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Sample records for adjoint flux

  1. Measurement of adjoint flux at the RB reactor

    The adjoint flux is of the great importance for determination of kinetic parameters of nuclear reactor (ρ, l and βeff) and for the interpretation of experiments with reactivity perturbations. In experimental reactor physics there are a few methods for the adjoint flux measurements. The method of reactivity perturbations with adequate samples is used for thermal reactors. According to the theory of reactivity perturbations the reactivity change due to sample of thermal neutrons absorbing material is proportional to product of flux and adjoint flux of thermal neutrons (Φ2(r)Φ=2(r)). The reactivity change due to fissionable nuclide is proportional to product of thermal neutron flux and adjoint flux of fast neutrons (Φ2(r)Φ=2(r)). The axial distribution of adjoint flux is determined by reactivity measurements and measurements of axial distribution of thermal neutron flux. Thi results of this measurement will be used for interpretation of other experiments with reactivity perturbations at the RB reactor

  2. An Analysis on the Calculation Efficiency of the Responses Caused by the Biased Adjoint Fluxes in Hybrid Monte Carlo Simulation

    Khuat, Quang Huy; Kim, Song Hyun; Kim, Do Hyun; Shin, Chang Ho [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    This technique is known as Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (CADIS) method and it is implemented in SCALE code system. In the CADIS method, adjoint transport equation has to be solved to determine deterministic importance functions. Using the CADIS method, a problem was noted that the biased adjoint flux estimated by deterministic methods can affect the calculation efficiency and error. The biases of adjoint function are caused by the methodology, calculation strategy, tolerance of result calculated by the deterministic method and inaccurate multi-group cross section libraries. In this paper, a study to analyze the influence of the biased adjoint functions into Monte Carlo computational efficiency is pursued. In this study, a method to estimate the calculation efficiency was proposed for applying the biased adjoint fluxes in the CADIS approach. For a benchmark problem, the responses and FOMs using SCALE code system were evaluated as applying the adjoint fluxes. The results show that the biased adjoint fluxes significantly affects the calculation efficiencies.

  3. Adjoint Monte Carlo calculation of charged plasma particle flux to wall

    Äkäslompolo, Simppa

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript describes an adjoint/reverse Monte Carlo method to calculate the flux of charged plasma particles to the wall of e.g. a tokamak. Two applications are described: a fusion product activation probe and a neutral beam injection prompt loss measurement with a fast ion loss diagnostic. In both cases, the collisions of the particles with the background plasma can be omitted.

  4. Adjoint-based Sensitivity Analysis for High-Energy Density Radiaitive Transfer using Flux-Limited Diffusion

    Humbird, Kelli D

    2016-01-01

    Uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analyses are a vital component for predictive modeling in the sciences and engineering. The adjoint approach to sensitivity analysis requires solving a primary system of equations and a mathematically related set of adjoint equations. The information contained in the equations can be combined to produce sensitivity information in a computationally efficient manner. In this work, sensitivity analyses are performed on systems described by flux-limited radiative diffusion using the adjoint approach. The sensitivities computed are shown to agree with standard perturbation theory, and can be obtained in significantly less computational time.

  5. An Evaluation of the Adjoint Flux Using the Collision Probability Method for the Hybrid Monte Carlo Radiation Shielding Analysis

    It is noted that the analog Monte Carlo method has low calculation efficiency at deep penetration problems such as radiation shielding analysis. In order to increase the calculation efficiency, variance reduction techniques have been introduced and applied for the shielding calculation. To optimize the variance reduction technique, the hybrid Monte Carlo method was introduced. For the determination of the parameters using the hybrid Monte Carlo method, the adjoint flux should be calculated by the deterministic methods. In this study, the collision probability method is applied to calculate adjoint flux. The solution of integration transport equation in the collision probability method is modified to calculate the adjoint flux approximately even for complex and arbitrary geometries. For the calculation, C++ program is developed. By using the calculated adjoint flux, importance parameters of each cell in shielding material are determined and used for variance reduction of transport calculation. In order to evaluate calculation efficiency with the proposed method, shielding calculations are performed with MCNPX 2.7. In this study, a method to calculate the adjoint flux in using the Monte Carlo variance reduction was proposed to improve Monte Carlo calculation efficiency of thick shielding problem. The importance parameter for each cell of shielding material is determined by calculating adjoint flux with the modified collision probability method. In order to calculate adjoint flux with the proposed method, C++ program is developed. The results show that the proposed method can efficiently increase the FOM of transport calculation. It is expected that the proposed method can be utilize for the calculation efficiency in thick shielding calculation

  6. Methods of Monte Carlo biasing using two-dimensional discrete ordinates adjoint flux

    Tang, J.S.; Stevens, P.N.; Hoffman, T.J.

    1976-06-01

    Methods of biasing three-dimensional deep penetration Monte Carlo calculations using importance functions obtained from a two-dimensional discrete ordinates adjoint calculation have been developed. The important distinction was made between the applications of the point value and the event value to alter the random walk in Monte Carlo analysis of radiation transport. The biasing techniques developed are the angular probability biasing which alters the collision kernel using the point value as the importance function and the path length biasing which alters the transport kernel using the event value as the importance function. Source location biasings using the step importance function and the scalar adjoint flux obtained from the two-dimensional discrete ordinates adjoint calculation were also investigated. The effects of the biasing techniques to Monte Carlo calculations have been investigated for neutron transport through a thick concrete shield with a penetrating duct. Source location biasing, angular probability biasing, and path length biasing were employed individually and in various combinations. Results of the biased Monte Carlo calculations were compared with the standard Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates calculations.

  7. An adjoint view on flux consistency and strong wall boundary conditions to the Navier-Stokes equations

    Stück, Arthur

    2015-11-01

    Inconsistent discrete expressions in the boundary treatment of Navier-Stokes solvers and in the definition of force objective functionals can lead to discrete-adjoint boundary treatments that are not a valid representation of the boundary conditions to the corresponding adjoint partial differential equations. The underlying problem is studied for an elementary 1D advection-diffusion problem first using a node-centred finite-volume discretisation. The defect of the boundary operators in the inconsistently defined discrete-adjoint problem leads to oscillations and becomes evident with the additional insight of the continuous-adjoint approach. A homogenisation of the discretisations for the primal boundary treatment and the force objective functional yields second-order functional accuracy and eliminates the defect in the discrete-adjoint boundary treatment. Subsequently, the issue is studied for aerodynamic Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes problems in conjunction with a standard finite-volume discretisation on median-dual grids and a strong implementation of noslip walls, found in many unstructured general-purpose flow solvers. Going out from a base-line discretisation of force objective functionals which is independent of the boundary treatment in the flow solver, two improved flux-consistent schemes are presented; based on either body wall-defined or farfield-defined control-volumes they resolve the dual inconsistency. The behaviour of the schemes is investigated on a sequence of grids in 2D and 3D.

  8. Globally Conservative, Hybrid Self-Adjoint Angular Flux and Least-Squares Method Compatible with Void

    Laboure, Vincent M; Wang, Yaqi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we derive a method for the second-order form of the transport equation that is both globally conservative and compatible with voids, using Continuous Finite Element Methods (CFEM). The main idea is to use the Least-Squares (LS) form of the transport equation in the void regions and the Self-Adjoint Angular Flux (SAAF) form elsewhere. While the SAAF formulation is globally conservative, the LS formulation need a correction in void. The price to pay for this fix is the loss of symmetry of the bilinear form. We first derive this Conservative LS (CLS) formulation in void. Second we combine the SAAF and CLS forms and end up with an hybrid SAAF-CLS method, having the desired properties. We show that extending the theory to near-void regions is a minor complication and can be done without affecting the global conservation of the scheme. Being angular discretization agnostic, this method can be applied to both discrete ordinates (SN) and spherical harmonics (PN) methods. However, since a globally conse...

  9. Nonlinear acceleration of a continuous finite element discretization of the self-adjoint angular flux form of the transport equation

    Nonlinear acceleration of a continuous finite element (CFE) discretization of the transport equation requires a modification of the transport solution in order to achieve local conservation, a condition used in nonlinear acceleration to define the stopping criterion. In this work we implement a coarse-mesh finite difference acceleration for a CFE discretization of the second-order self-adjoint angular flux (SAAF) form of the transport equation and use a postprocessing to enforce local conservation. Numerical results are given for one-group source calculations of one-dimensional slabs. We also give a novel formal derivation of the boundary conditions for the SAAF. (authors)

  10. Continuous-Energy Adjoint Flux and Perturbation Calculation using the Iterated Fission Probability Method in Monte Carlo Code TRIPOLI-4® and Underlying Applications

    Truchet, G.; Leconte, P.; Peneliau, Y.; Santamarina, A.; Malvagi, F.

    2014-06-01

    Pile-oscillation experiments are performed in the MINERVE reactor at the CEA Cadarache to improve nuclear data accuracy. In order to precisely calculate small reactivity variations (TRIPOLI-4® by using the eigenvalue difference method. This "direct" method has shown limitations in the evaluation of very small reactivity effects because it needs to reach a very small variance associated to the reactivity in both states. To answer this problem, it has been decided to implement the exact perturbation theory in TRIPOLI-4® and, consequently, to calculate a continuous-energy adjoint flux. The Iterated Fission Probability (IFP) method was chosen because it has shown great results in some other Monte Carlo codes. The IFP method uses a forward calculation to compute the adjoint flux, and consequently, it does not rely on complex code modifications but on the physical definition of the adjoint flux as a phase-space neutron importance. In the first part of this paper, the IFP method implemented in TRIPOLI-4® is described. To illustrate the effciency of the method, several adjoint fluxes are calculated and compared with their equivalent obtained by the deterministic code APOLLO-2. The new implementation can calculate angular adjoint flux. In the second part, a procedure to carry out an exact perturbation calculation is described. A single cell benchmark has been used to test the accuracy of the method, compared with the "direct" estimation of the perturbation. Once again the method based on the IFP shows good agreement for a calculation time far more inferior to the "direct" method. The main advantage of the method is that the relative accuracy of the reactivity variation does not depend on the magnitude of the variation itself, which allows us to calculate very small reactivity perturbations with high precision. Other applications of this perturbation method are presented and tested like the calculation of exact kinetic parameters (βeff, Λeff) or sensitivity parameters.

  11. Finite Element Solution of the Self-Adjoint Angular Flux Equation for Coupled Electron-Photon Transport

    A novel approach is proposed for charged particle transport calculations using a recently developed second-order, self-adjoint angular flux (SAAF) form of the Boltzmann transport equation with continuous slowing-down. A finite element discretization that is linear continuous in space and linear discontinuous (LD) in energy is described and implemented in a one-dimensional, planar geometry, multigroup, discrete ordinates code for charged particle transport. The cross-section generating code CEPXS is used to generate the electron and photon transport cross sections employed in this code. The discrete ordinates SAAF transport equation is solved using source iteration in conjunction with an inner iteration acceleration scheme and an outer iteration acceleration scheme. Outer iterations are required with the LD energy discretization scheme because the two angular flux unknowns within each group are coupled, which gives rise to effective upscattering. The inner iteration convergence is accelerated using diffusion synthetic acceleration, and the outer iteration convergence is accelerated using a diamond difference approximation to the LD energy discretization. Computational results are given that demonstrate the effectiveness of our convergence acceleration schemes and the accuracy of our discretized SAAF equation

  12. Metabolic Flux Analysis in Isotope Labeling Experiments using the Adjoint Approach

    Mottelet, Stéphane; Gaullier, Gil; Sadaka, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Comprehension of metabolic pathways is considerably enhanced by metabolic flux analysis (MFA-ILE) in isotope labeling experiments. The balance equations are given by hundreds of algebraic (stationary MFA) or ordinary differential equations (nonstationary MFA), and reducing the number of operations is therefore a crucial part of reducing the computation cost. The main bottleneck for deterministic algorithms is the computation of derivatives, particularly for nonstationary MFA. In this article ...

  13. System of adjoint P1 equations for neutron moderation

    In some applications of perturbation theory, it is necessary know the adjoint neutron flux, which is obtained by the solution of adjoint neutron diffusion equation. However, the multigroup constants used for this are weighted in only the direct neutron flux, from the solution of direct P1 equations. In this work, this procedure is questioned and the adjoint P1 equations are derived by the neutron transport equation, the reversion operators rules and analogies between direct and adjoint parameters. (author)

  14. Adjoint P1 equations solution for neutron slowing down

    In some applications of perturbation theory, it is necessary know the adjoint neutron flux, which is obtained by the solution of adjoint neutron diffusion equation. However, the multigroup constants used for this are weighted in only the direct neutron flux, from the solution of direct P1 equations. In this work, the adjoint P1 equations are derived by the neutron transport equation, the reversion operators rules and analogies between direct and adjoint parameters. The direct and adjoint neutron fluxes resulting from the solution of P1 equations were used to three different weighting processes, to obtain the macrogroup macroscopic cross sections. It was found out noticeable differences among them. (author)

  15. Adjoint of Pair Frames

    Fereydooni, Abolhassan; Safapour, Ahmad; Rahimi , Asghar

    2012-01-01

    The concept of (p,q)-pair frames is generalized to (l,l^*)-pair frames. Adjoint (conjugate) of a pair frames for dual space of a Banach space is introduced and some conditions for the existence of adjoint (conjugate) of pair frames are presented.

  16. System of adjoint P1 equations for neutron moderation; Sistema de equacoes P1 adjuntas para a moderacao de neutrons

    Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da; Cardoso, Carlos Eduardo Santos [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2000-07-01

    In some applications of perturbation theory, it is necessary know the adjoint neutron flux, which is obtained by the solution of adjoint neutron diffusion equation. However, the multigroup constants used for this are weighted in only the direct neutron flux, from the solution of direct P1 equations. In this work, this procedure is questioned and the adjoint P1 equations are derived by the neutron transport equation, the reversion operators rules and analogies between direct and adjoint parameters. (author)

  17. Adjoint functors in graph theory

    Foniok, Jan; Tardif, Claude

    2013-01-01

    We survey some uses of adjoint functors in graph theory pertaining to colourings, complexity reductions, multiplicativity, circular colourings and tree duality. The exposition of these applications through adjoint functors unifies the presentation to some extent, and also raises interesting questions.

  18. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    Urichuk, Andrew; Walton, Mark A.

    2016-06-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  19. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    Urichuk, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows, and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  20. Sensitivity analysis via reduced order adjoint method

    Notwithstanding the voluminous literature on adjoint sensitivity analysis, it has been generally dismissed by practitioners as cumbersome with limited value in realistic engineering models. This perception reflects two limitations about adjoint sensitivity analysis: a) its most effective application is limited to calculation of first-order variations; when higher order derivatives are required, it quickly becomes computationally inefficient; and b) the number of adjoint model evaluations depends on the number of responses, which renders it ineffective for multi-physics model where entire distributions, such as flux and power distribution, are often transferred between the various physics models. To overcome these challenges, this manuscript employs recent advances in reduced order modeling to re-cast the adjoint model equations into a form that renders its application to real reactor models practical. Past work applied reduced order modeling techniques to render reduction for general nonlinear high dimensional models by identifying mathematical subspaces, called active subspaces, that capture all dominant features of the model, including both linear and nonlinear variations. We demonstrate the application of these techniques to the calculation of first-order derivatives, or as commonly known sensitivity coefficients, for a fuel assembly model with many responses. We show that the computational cost becomes dependent on the physics model itself, via the so-called rank of the active subspace, rather than the number of responses or parameters. (author)

  1. Adjoint code generator

    CHENG Qiang; CAO JianWen; WANG Bin; ZHANG HaiBin

    2009-01-01

    The adjoint code generator (ADG) is developed to produce the adjoint codes, which are used to analytically calculate gradients and the Hessian-vector products with the costs independent of the number of the independent variables. Different from other automatic differentiation tools, the implementation of ADG has advantages of using the least program behavior decomposition method and several static dependence analysis techniques. In this paper we first address the concerned concepts and fundamentals, and then introduce the functionality and the features of ADG. In particular, we also discuss the design architecture of ADG and implementation details including the recomputation and storing strategy and several techniques for code optimization. Some experimental results in several applications are presented at the end.

  2. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    Urichuk, Andrew; Walton, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-pol...

  3. NON-SELF-ADJOINT GRAPHS

    Hussein, A.; Krejčiřík, David; Siegl, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 367, č. 4 (2015), s. 2921-2957. ISSN 0002-9947 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP203/11/0701 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Laplacians on metric graphs * non-self-adjoint boundary conditions * similarity transforms to self-adjoint operators * Riesz basis Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.122, year: 2014

  4. Implementation of Generalized Adjoint Equation Solver for DeCART

    In this paper, the generalized adjoint solver based on the generalized perturbation theory is implemented on DeCART and the verification calculations were carried out. As the results, the adjoint flux for the general response coincides with the reference solution and it is expected that the solver could produce the parameters for the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. Recently, MUSAD (Modules of Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis for DeCART) was developed for the uncertainty analysis of PMR200 core and the fundamental adjoint solver was implemented into DeCART. However, the application of the code was limited to the uncertainty to the multiplication factor, keff, because it was based on the classical perturbation theory. For the uncertainty analysis to the general response as like the power density, it is necessary to develop the analysis module based on the generalized perturbation theory and it needs the generalized adjoint solutions from DeCART. In this paper, the generalized adjoint solver is implemented on DeCART and the calculation results are compared with the results by TSUNAMI of SCALE 6.1

  5. Implementation of Generalized Adjoint Equation Solver for DeCART

    Han, Tae Young; Cho, Jin Young; Lee, Hyun Chul; Noh, Jae Man [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, the generalized adjoint solver based on the generalized perturbation theory is implemented on DeCART and the verification calculations were carried out. As the results, the adjoint flux for the general response coincides with the reference solution and it is expected that the solver could produce the parameters for the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. Recently, MUSAD (Modules of Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis for DeCART) was developed for the uncertainty analysis of PMR200 core and the fundamental adjoint solver was implemented into DeCART. However, the application of the code was limited to the uncertainty to the multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, because it was based on the classical perturbation theory. For the uncertainty analysis to the general response as like the power density, it is necessary to develop the analysis module based on the generalized perturbation theory and it needs the generalized adjoint solutions from DeCART. In this paper, the generalized adjoint solver is implemented on DeCART and the calculation results are compared with the results by TSUNAMI of SCALE 6.1.

  6. Adjoint-based Gradient Estimation Using the Space-time Solutions of Unknown Conservation Law Simulations

    Chen, Han

    2016-01-01

    Many control applications can be formulated as optimization constrained by conservation laws. Such optimization can be efficiently solved by gradient-based methods, where the gradient is obtained through the adjoint method. Traditionally, the adjoint method has not been able to be implemented in "gray-box" conservation law simulations. In gray-box simulations, the analytical and numerical form of the conservation law is unknown, but the space-time solution of relevant flow quantities is available. Without the adjoint gradient, optimization can be challenging for problems with many control variables. However, much information about the gray-box simulation is contained in its space-time solution, which motivates us to estimate the adjoint gradient by leveraging the space-time solution. This article considers a type of gray-box simulations where the flux function is partially unknown. A method is introduced to estimate the adjoint gradient at a cost independent of the number of control variables. The method firs...

  7. Estimation of Adjoint-Weighted Kinetics Parameters in Monte Carlo Wieland Calculations

    The effective delayed neutron fraction, βeff, and the prompt neutron generation time, Λ, in the point kinetics equation are weighted by the adjoint flux to improve the accuracy of the reactivity estimate. Recently the Monte Carlo (MC) kinetics parameter estimation methods by using the self-consistent adjoint flux calculated in the MC forward simulations have been developed and successfully applied for the research reactor analyses. However these adjoint estimation methods based on the cycle-by-cycle genealogical table require a huge memory size to store the pedigree hierarchy. In this paper, we present a new adjoint estimation in which the pedigree of a single history is utilized by applying the MC Wielandt method. The effectiveness of the new method is demonstrated in the kinetics parameter estimations for infinite homogeneous two-group problems and the Godiva critical facility

  8. Estimation of Adjoint-Weighted Kinetics Parameters in Monte Carlo Wieland Calculations

    Choi, Sung Hoon; Shim, Hyung Jin [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    The effective delayed neutron fraction, β{sub eff}, and the prompt neutron generation time, Λ, in the point kinetics equation are weighted by the adjoint flux to improve the accuracy of the reactivity estimate. Recently the Monte Carlo (MC) kinetics parameter estimation methods by using the self-consistent adjoint flux calculated in the MC forward simulations have been developed and successfully applied for the research reactor analyses. However these adjoint estimation methods based on the cycle-by-cycle genealogical table require a huge memory size to store the pedigree hierarchy. In this paper, we present a new adjoint estimation in which the pedigree of a single history is utilized by applying the MC Wielandt method. The effectiveness of the new method is demonstrated in the kinetics parameter estimations for infinite homogeneous two-group problems and the Godiva critical facility.

  9. Efficient estimation of adjoint-weighted kinetics parameters in the Monte Carlo Wielandt calculations

    The effective delayed neutron fraction, βeff, and the prompt neutron generation time, Λ, in the point kinetics equation are weighted by the adjoint flux to improve the accuracy of the reactivity estimate. Recently the Monte Carlo (MC) kinetics parameter estimation methods by using the adjoint flux calculated in the MC forward simulations have been developed and successfully applied for reactor analyses. However these adjoint estimation methods based on the cycle-by-cycle genealogical table require a huge memory size to store the pedigree hierarchy. In this paper, we present a new adjoint estimation method in which the pedigree of a single history is utilized by applying the MC Wielandt method. The algorithm of the new method is derived and its effectiveness is demonstrated in the kinetics parameter estimations for infinite homogeneous two-group problems and critical facilities. (author)

  10. Self-adjointness and polarization of the fermionic vacuum in the background of nontrivial topology

    Singular configuration of an external static magnetic field in the form of a string polarizes vacuum in the secondly quantized theory on a plane which is orthogonal to the string axis. We consider the most general boundary conditions at the punctured singular point, which are compatible with the self-adjointness of the two-dimensional Dirac Hamiltonian. The dependence of the induced vacuum quantum numbers on the self-adjoint extension parameter and the flux of the string is determined

  11. Adjoint Functors and Representation Dimensions

    Chang Chang XI

    2006-01-01

    We study the global dimensions of the coherent functors over two categories that are linked by a pair of adjoint functors. This idea is then exploited to compare the representation dimensions of two algebras. In particular, we show that if an Artin algebra is switched from the other, then they have the same representation dimension.

  12. Adjoint Weighted Kinetics Parameter Estimation in the Monte Carlo Wielandt Calculations

    Choi, Sung Hoon; Shim, Hyung Jin [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In order to eliminate this huge memory consumption in the current adjoint estimation method, we have developed a new method in which the pedigree of a single history is utilized by applying the MC Wielandt method. The Wielandt method allows the estimations of the adjoint flux and adjoint-weighted parameters within a single cycle neutron simulations. The effectiveness of the new method is demonstrated in the kinetics parameter estimations for an infinite homogeneous two-group problem and the Godiva facility. We have developed an efficient algorithm for the adjoint-weighted kinetics parameter estimation in the MC Wielandt calculations which can significantly reduce the memory usage. From the numerical applications, it is demonstrated that the new method can predict the kinetics parameters with great accuracy.

  13. Self-adjointness of deformed unbounded operators

    Much, Albert [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, México D.F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    We consider deformations of unbounded operators by using the novel construction tool of warped convolutions. By using the Kato-Rellich theorem, we show that unbounded self-adjoint deformed operators are self-adjoint if they satisfy a certain condition. This condition proves itself to be necessary for the oscillatory integral to be well-defined. Moreover, different proofs are given for self-adjointness of deformed unbounded operators in the context of quantum mechanics and quantum field theory.

  14. Self-Adjoint Extension of Symmetric Maps

    Friedel, H. N.

    2011-01-01

    A densely-defined symmetric linear map from/to a real Hilbert space extends to a self-adjoint map. Extension is expressed via Riesz representation. For a case including Friedrichs extension of a strongly monotone map, self-adjoint extension is unique, and equals closure of the given map.

  15. Recent advances in the spectral green's function method for monoenergetic slab-geometry fixed-source adjoint transport problems in S{sub N} formulation

    Curbelo, Jesus P.; Alves Filho, Hermes; Barros, Ricardo C., E-mail: jperez@iprj.uerj.br, E-mail: halves@iprj.uerj.br, E-mail: rcbarros@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Instituto Politecnico. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Modelagem Computacional; Hernandez, Carlos R.G., E-mail: cgh@instec.cu [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba)

    2015-07-01

    The spectral Green's function (SGF) method is a numerical method that is free of spatial truncation errors for slab-geometry fixed-source discrete ordinates (S{sub N}) adjoint problems. The method is based on the standard spatially discretized adjoint S{sub N} balance equations and a nonstandard adjoint auxiliary equation expressing the node-average adjoint angular flux, in each discretization node, as a weighted combination of the node-edge outgoing adjoint fluxes. The auxiliary equation contains parameters which act as Green's functions for the cell-average adjoint angular flux. These parameters are determined by means of a spectral analysis which yields the local general solution of the S{sub N} equations within each node of the discretization grid. In this work a number of advances in the SGF adjoint method are presented: the method is extended to adjoint S{sub N} problems considering linearly anisotropic scattering and non-zero prescribed boundary conditions for the forward source-detector problem. Numerical results to typical model problems are considered to illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of the o offered method. (author)

  16. Recent advances in the spectral green's function method for monoenergetic slab-geometry fixed-source adjoint transport problems in SN formulation

    The spectral Green's function (SGF) method is a numerical method that is free of spatial truncation errors for slab-geometry fixed-source discrete ordinates (SN) adjoint problems. The method is based on the standard spatially discretized adjoint SN balance equations and a nonstandard adjoint auxiliary equation expressing the node-average adjoint angular flux, in each discretization node, as a weighted combination of the node-edge outgoing adjoint fluxes. The auxiliary equation contains parameters which act as Green's functions for the cell-average adjoint angular flux. These parameters are determined by means of a spectral analysis which yields the local general solution of the SN equations within each node of the discretization grid. In this work a number of advances in the SGF adjoint method are presented: the method is extended to adjoint SN problems considering linearly anisotropic scattering and non-zero prescribed boundary conditions for the forward source-detector problem. Numerical results to typical model problems are considered to illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of the o offered method. (author)

  17. Southern California Adjoint Source Inversions

    Tromp, J.; Kim, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Southern California Centroid-Moment Tensor (CMT) solutions with 9 components (6 moment tensor elements, latitude, longitude, and depth) are sought to minimize a misfit function computed from waveform differences. The gradient of a misfit function is obtained based upon two numerical simulations for each earthquake: one forward calculation for the southern California model, and an adjoint calculation that uses time-reversed signals at the receivers. Conjugate gradient and square-root variable metric methods are used to iteratively improve the earthquake source model while reducing the misfit function. The square-root variable metric algorithm has the advantage of providing a direct approximation to the posterior covariance operator. We test the inversion procedure by perturbing each component of the CMT solution, and see how the algorithm converges. Finally, we demonstrate full inversion capabilities using data for real Southern California earthquakes.

  18. Experience with Monte Carlo variance reduction using adjoint solutions in HYPER neutronics analysis

    The variance reduction techniques using adjoint solutions are applied to the Monte Carlo calculation of the HYPER(HYbrid Power Extraction Reactor) core neutronics. The applied variance reduction techniques are the geometry splitting and the weight windows. The weight bounds and the cell importance needed for these techniques are generated from an adjoint discrete ordinate calculation by the two-dimensional TWODANT code. The flux distribution variances of the Monte Carlo calculations by these variance reduction techniques are compared with the results of the standard Monte Carlo calculations. It is shown that the variance reduction techniques using adjoint solutions to the HYPER core neutronics result in a decrease in the efficiency of the Monte Carlo calculation

  19. Generalized adjoint consistent treatment of wall boundary conditions for compressible flows

    Hartmann, Ralf; Leicht, Tobias

    2015-11-01

    In this article, we revisit the adjoint consistency analysis of Discontinuous Galerkin discretizations of the compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations with application to the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and k- ω turbulence equations. Here, particular emphasis is laid on the discretization of wall boundary conditions. While previously only one specific combination of discretizations of wall boundary conditions and of aerodynamic force coefficients has been shown to give an adjoint consistent discretization, in this article we generalize this analysis and provide a discretization of the force coefficients for any consistent discretization of wall boundary conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a related evaluation of the cp- and cf-distributions is required. The freedom gained in choosing the discretization of boundary conditions without loosing adjoint consistency is used to devise a new adjoint consistent discretization including numerical fluxes on the wall boundary which is more robust than the adjoint consistent discretization known up to now. While this work is presented in the framework of Discontinuous Galerkin discretizations, the insight gained is also applicable to (and thus valuable for) other discretization schemes. In particular, the discretization of integral quantities, like the drag, lift and moment coefficients, as well as the discretization of local quantities at the wall like surface pressure and skin friction should follow as closely as possible the discretization of the flow equations and boundary conditions at the wall boundary.

  20. Double-difference adjoint seismic tomography

    Yuan, Yanhua O.; Simons, Frederik J.; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-06-01

    We introduce a `double-difference' method for the inversion for seismic wavespeed structure based on adjoint tomography. Differences between seismic observations and model predictions at individual stations may arise from factors other than structural heterogeneity, such as errors in the assumed source-time function, inaccurate timings, and systematic uncertainties. To alleviate the corresponding nonuniqueness in the inverse problem, we construct differential measurements between stations, thereby reducing the influence of the source signature and systematic errors. We minimize the discrepancy between observations and simulations in terms of the differential measurements made on station pairs. We show how to implement the double-difference concept in adjoint tomography, both theoretically and in practice. We compare the sensitivities of absolute and differential measurements. The former provide absolute information on structure along the ray paths between stations and sources, whereas the latter explain relative (and thus higher-resolution) structural variations in areas close to the stations. Whereas in conventional tomography a measurement made on a single earthquake-station pair provides very limited structural information, in double-difference tomography one earthquake can actually resolve significant details of the structure. The double-difference methodology can be incorporated into the usual adjoint tomography workflow by simply pairing up all conventional measurements; the computational cost of the necessary adjoint simulations is largely unaffected. Rather than adding to the computational burden, the inversion of double-difference measurements merely modifies the construction of the adjoint sources for data assimilation.

  1. ADGEN: ADjoint GENerator for computer models

    This paper presents the development of a FORTRAN compiler and an associated supporting software library called ADGEN. ADGEN reads FORTRAN models as input and produces and enhanced version of the input model. The enhanced version reproduces the original model calculations but also has the capability to calculate derivatives of model results of interest with respect to any and all of the model data and input parameters. The method for calculating the derivatives and sensitivities is the adjoint method. Partial derivatives are calculated analytically using computer calculus and saved as elements of an adjoint matrix on direct assess storage. The total derivatives are calculated by solving an appropriate adjoint equation. ADGEN is applied to a major computer model of interest to the Low-Level Waste Community, the PRESTO-II model. PRESTO-II sample problem results reveal that ADGEN correctly calculates derivatives of response of interest with respect to 300 parameters. The execution time to create the adjoint matrix is a factor of 45 times the execution time of the reference sample problem. Once this matrix is determined, the derivatives with respect to 3000 parameters are calculated in a factor of 6.8 that of the reference model for each response of interest. For a single 3000 for determining these derivatives by parameter perturbations. The automation of the implementation of the adjoint technique for calculating derivatives and sensitivities eliminates the costly and manpower-intensive task of direct hand-implementation by reprogramming and thus makes the powerful adjoint technique more amenable for use in sensitivity analysis of existing models. 20 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  2. Application of adjoint operators to neural learning

    Barhen, J.; Toomarian, N.; Gulati, S.

    1990-01-01

    A technique for the efficient analytical computation of such parameters of the neural architecture as synaptic weights and neural gain is presented as a single solution of a set of adjoint equations. The learning model discussed concentrates on the adiabatic approximation only. A problem of interest is represented by a system of N coupled equations, and then adjoint operators are introduced. A neural network is formalized as an adaptive dynamical system whose temporal evolution is governed by a set of coupled nonlinear differential equations. An approach based on the minimization of a constrained neuromorphic energylike function is applied, and the complete learning dynamics are obtained as a result of the calculations.

  3. Adjoint-Based Uncertainty Quantification with MCNP

    Seifried, Jeffrey E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-09-01

    This work serves to quantify the instantaneous uncertainties in neutron transport simulations born from nuclear data and statistical counting uncertainties. Perturbation and adjoint theories are used to derive implicit sensitivity expressions. These expressions are transformed into forms that are convenient for construction with MCNP6, creating the ability to perform adjoint-based uncertainty quantification with MCNP6. These new tools are exercised on the depleted-uranium hybrid LIFE blanket, quantifying its sensitivities and uncertainties to important figures of merit. Overall, these uncertainty estimates are small (< 2%). Having quantified the sensitivities and uncertainties, physical understanding of the system is gained and some confidence in the simulation is acquired.

  4. Aerosols Processes in the CMAQ Adjoint

    Turner, M.; Henze, D.; Hakami, A.; Zhao, S.; Resler, Jaroslav; Carmichael, G.; Stanier, C.; Baek, J.; Saide, P.; Sandu, A.; Russel, A.; Jeong, G.; Nenes, A.; Capps, S.; Percell, P.; Pinder, R.; Napelenok, S.; Pye, H.; Bash, J.; Chai, T.; Byun, D

    Davis: Air Quality Research Center, 2011. [IAMA 2011. International Aerosol Modeling Algorithms Conference /3./. Davis, 30.11.2011-02.12.2011] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : air pollution * adjoint * aerosols Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology http://dl.dropbox.com/u/41967626/IAMApresent/TURNER.pdf

  5. Fine resolution modeling with CMAQ-adjoint

    Resler, Jaroslav; Eben, Kryštof; Juruš, Pavel

    Chapel Hill : CMAS, 2010. [Annual CMAS Conference /9./. 11.10.2010-13.10.2010, Chapel Hill] R&D Projects: GA MŽP SP/1A4/107/07 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : CMAQ * adjoint * MPI * parallel efficiency Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology http://www.cmascenter.org/conference/2010/agenda.cfm

  6. Dual of QCD with One Adjoint Fermion

    Mojaza, Matin; Nardecchia, Marco; Pica, Claudio;

    2011-01-01

    We construct the magnetic dual of QCD with one adjoint Weyl fermion. The dual is a consistent solution of the 't Hooft anomaly matching conditions, allows for flavor decoupling and remarkably constitutes the first nonsupersymmetric dual valid for any number of colors. The dual allows to bound the...

  7. Development of CO2 inversion system based on the adjoint of the global coupled transport model

    Belikov, Dmitry; Maksyutov, Shamil; Chevallier, Frederic; Kaminski, Thomas; Ganshin, Alexander; Blessing, Simon

    2014-05-01

    We present the development of an inverse modeling system employing an adjoint of the global coupled transport model consisting of the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) Eulerian transport model (TM) and the Lagrangian plume diffusion model (LPDM) FLEXPART. NIES TM is a three-dimensional atmospheric transport model, which solves the continuity equation for a number of atmospheric tracers on a grid spanning the entire globe. Spatial discretization is based on a reduced latitude-longitude grid and a hybrid sigma-isentropic coordinate in the vertical. NIES TM uses a horizontal resolution of 2.5°×2.5°. However, to resolve synoptic-scale tracer distributions and to have the ability to optimize fluxes at resolutions of 0.5° and higher we coupled NIES TM with the Lagrangian model FLEXPART. The Lagrangian component of the forward and adjoint models uses precalculated responses of the observed concentration to the surface fluxes and 3-D concentrations field simulated with the FLEXPART model. NIES TM and FLEXPART are driven by JRA-25/JCDAS reanalysis dataset. Construction of the adjoint of the Lagrangian part is less complicated, as LPDMs calculate the sensitivity of measurements to the surrounding emissions field by tracking a large number of "particles" backwards in time. Developing of the adjoint to Eulerian part was performed with automatic differentiation tool the Transformation of Algorithms in Fortran (TAF) software (http://www.FastOpt.com). This method leads to the discrete adjoint of NIES TM. The main advantage of the discrete adjoint is that the resulting gradients of the numerical cost function are exact, even for nonlinear algorithms. The overall advantages of our method are that: 1. No code modification of Lagrangian model is required, making it applicable to combination of global NIES TM and any Lagrangian model; 2. Once run, the Lagrangian output can be applied to any chemically neutral gas; 3. High-resolution results can be obtained over

  8. Fully automatic adjoints: a robust and efficient mechanism for generating adjoint ocean models

    Ham, D. A.; Farrell, P. E.; Funke, S. W.; Rognes, M. E.

    2012-04-01

    The problem of generating and maintaining adjoint models is sufficiently difficult that typically only the most advanced and well-resourced community ocean models achieve it. There are two current technologies which each suffer from their own limitations. Algorithmic differentiation, also called automatic differentiation, is employed by models such as the MITGCM [2] and the Alfred Wegener Institute model FESOM [3]. This technique is very difficult to apply to existing code, and requires a major initial investment to prepare the code for automatic adjoint generation. AD tools may also have difficulty with code employing modern software constructs such as derived data types. An alternative is to formulate the adjoint differential equation and to discretise this separately. This approach, known as the continuous adjoint and employed in ROMS [4], has the disadvantage that two different model code bases must be maintained and manually kept synchronised as the model develops. The discretisation of the continuous adjoint is not automatically consistent with that of the forward model, producing an additional source of error. The alternative presented here is to formulate the flow model in the high level language UFL (Unified Form Language) and to automatically generate the model using the software of the FEniCS project. In this approach it is the high level code specification which is differentiated, a task very similar to the formulation of the continuous adjoint [5]. However since the forward and adjoint models are generated automatically, the difficulty of maintaining them vanishes and the software engineering process is therefore robust. The scheduling and execution of the adjoint model, including the application of an appropriate checkpointing strategy is managed by libadjoint [1]. In contrast to the conventional algorithmic differentiation description of a model as a series of primitive mathematical operations, libadjoint employs a new abstraction of the simulation

  9. Double-difference adjoint seismic tomography

    Yuan, Yanhua O; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a `double-difference' method for the inversion for seismic wavespeed structure based on adjoint tomography. Differences between seismic observations and model predictions at individual stations may arise from factors other than structural heterogeneity, such as errors in the assumed source-time function, inaccurate timings, and systematic uncertainties. To alleviate the corresponding nonuniqueness in the inverse problem, we construct differential measurements between stations, thereby reducing the influence of the source signature and systematic errors. We minimize the discrepancy between observations and simulations in terms of the differential measurements made on station pairs. We show how to implement the double-difference concept in adjoint tomography, both theoretically and in practice. We compare the sensitivities of absolute and differential measurements. The former provide absolute information on structure along the ray paths between stations and sources, whereas the latter explain relat...

  10. Chiral transition of fundamental and adjoint quarks

    Capdevilla, R.M. [Instituto de Física Teórica, UNESP – Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rua Dr. Bento T. Ferraz, 271, Bloco II, 01140-070 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Doff, A., E-mail: agomes@utfpr.edu.br [Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná – UTFPR – DAFIS, Av. Monteiro Lobato Km 04, 84016-210 Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Natale, A.A., E-mail: natale@ift.unesp.br [Instituto de Física Teórica, UNESP – Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rua Dr. Bento T. Ferraz, 271, Bloco II, 01140-070 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-170 Santo André, SP (Brazil)

    2014-01-20

    The chiral symmetry breaking transition of quarks in the fundamental and adjoint representation is studied in a model where the gap equation contains two contributions, one containing a confining propagator and another corresponding to the exchange of one-dressed dynamically massive gluons. When quarks are in the fundamental representation the confinement effect dominates the chiral symmetry breaking while the gluon exchange is suppressed due to the dynamical gluon mass effect in the propagator and in the coupling constant. In this case the chiral and deconfinement transition temperatures are approximately the same. For quarks in the adjoint representation, due to the larger Casimir eigenvalue, the gluon exchange is operative and the chiral transition happens at a larger temperature than the deconfinement one.

  11. Chiral transition of fundamental and adjoint quarks

    The chiral symmetry breaking transition of quarks in the fundamental and adjoint representation is studied in a model where the gap equation contains two contributions, one containing a confining propagator and another corresponding to the exchange of one-dressed dynamically massive gluons. When quarks are in the fundamental representation the confinement effect dominates the chiral symmetry breaking while the gluon exchange is suppressed due to the dynamical gluon mass effect in the propagator and in the coupling constant. In this case the chiral and deconfinement transition temperatures are approximately the same. For quarks in the adjoint representation, due to the larger Casimir eigenvalue, the gluon exchange is operative and the chiral transition happens at a larger temperature than the deconfinement one

  12. Chiral transition of fundamental and adjoint quarks

    Capdevilla, R. M.; Doff, A.(Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná – UTFPR – DAFIS, Av. Monteiro Lobato Km 04, 84016-210 Ponta Grossa, PR, Brazil); Natale, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    The chiral symmetry breaking transition of quarks in the fundamental and adjoint representation is studied in a model where the gap equation contains two contributions, one containing a confining propagator and another corresponding to the exchange of one-dressed dynamically massive gluons. When quarks are in the fundamental representation the confinement effect dominates the chiral symmetry breaking while the gluon exchange is suppressed due to the dynamical gluon mass effect in the propagat...

  13. Effective freeness of adjoint line bundles

    Heier, Gordon

    2001-01-01

    In this note we establish a new Fujita-type effective bound for the base point freeness of adjoint line bundles on a compact complex projective manifold of complex dimension $n$. The bound we obtain (approximately) differs from the linear bound conjectured by Fujita only by a factor of the cube root of $n$. As an application, a new effective statement for pluricanonical embeddings is derived.

  14. Seismic imaging: From classical to adjoint tomography

    Liu, Q.; Gu, Y. J.

    2012-09-01

    Seismic tomography has been a vital tool in probing the Earth's internal structure and enhancing our knowledge of dynamical processes in the Earth's crust and mantle. While various tomographic techniques differ in data types utilized (e.g., body vs. surface waves), data sensitivity (ray vs. finite-frequency approximations), and choices of model parameterization and regularization, most global mantle tomographic models agree well at long wavelengths, owing to the presence and typical dimensions of cold subducted oceanic lithospheres and hot, ascending mantle plumes (e.g., in central Pacific and Africa). Structures at relatively small length scales remain controversial, though, as will be discussed in this paper, they are becoming increasingly resolvable with the fast expanding global and regional seismic networks and improved forward modeling and inversion techniques. This review paper aims to provide an overview of classical tomography methods, key debates pertaining to the resolution of mantle tomographic models, as well as to highlight recent theoretical and computational advances in forward-modeling methods that spearheaded the developments in accurate computation of sensitivity kernels and adjoint tomography. The first part of the paper is devoted to traditional traveltime and waveform tomography. While these approaches established a firm foundation for global and regional seismic tomography, data coverage and the use of approximate sensitivity kernels remained as key limiting factors in the resolution of the targeted structures. In comparison to classical tomography, adjoint tomography takes advantage of full 3D numerical simulations in forward modeling and, in many ways, revolutionizes the seismic imaging of heterogeneous structures with strong velocity contrasts. For this reason, this review provides details of the implementation, resolution and potential challenges of adjoint tomography. Further discussions of techniques that are presently popular in

  15. Fast Correlation Greeks by Adjoint Algorithmic Differentiation

    Luca Capriotti; Mike Giles

    2010-01-01

    We show how Adjoint Algorithmic Differentiation (AAD) allows an extremely efficient calculation of correlation Risk of option prices computed with Monte Carlo simulations. A key point in the construction is the use of binning to simultaneously achieve computational efficiency and accurate confidence intervals. We illustrate the method for a copula-based Monte Carlo computation of claims written on a basket of underlying assets, and we test it numerically for Portfolio Default Options. For any...

  16. Supersymmetric descendants of self-adjointly extended quantum mechanical Hamiltonians

    Al-Hashimi, M. H.; Salman, M.; Shalaby, A.; Wiese, U.-J.

    2013-10-01

    We consider the descendants of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians in supersymmetric quantum mechanics on a half-line, on an interval, and on a punctured line or interval. While there is a 4-parameter family of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians on a punctured line, only a 3-parameter sub-family has supersymmetric descendants that are themselves self-adjoint. We also address the self-adjointness of an operator related to the supercharge, and point out that only a sub-class of its most general self-adjoint extensions is physical. Besides a general characterization of self-adjoint extensions and their supersymmetric descendants, we explicitly consider concrete examples, including a particle in a box with general boundary conditions, with and without an additional point interaction. We also discuss bulk-boundary resonances and their manifestation in the supersymmetric descendant.

  17. Supersymmetric Descendants of Self-Adjointly Extended Quantum Mechanical Hamiltonians

    Al-Hashimi, M H; Shalaby, A; Wiese, U -J

    2013-01-01

    We consider the descendants of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians in supersymmetric quantum mechanics on a half-line, on an interval, and on a punctured line or interval. While there is a 4-parameter family of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians on a punctured line, only a 3-parameter sub-family has supersymmetric descendants that are themselves self-adjoint. We also address the self-adjointness of an operator related to the supercharge, and point out that only a sub-class of its most general self-adjoint extensions is physical. Besides a general characterization of self-adjoint extensions and their supersymmetric descendants, we explicitly consider concrete examples, including a particle in a box with general boundary conditions, with and without an additional point interaction. We also discuss bulk-boundary resonances and their manifestation in the supersymmetric descendant.

  18. Adjoint of the Global Eulerian–Lagrangian Coupled Atmospheric transport model (A-GELCA v1.0: development and validation

    D. A. Belikov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We present the development of the Adjoint of the Global Eulerian–Lagrangian Coupled Atmospheric (A-GELCA model that consists of the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES model as an Eulerian three-dimensional transport model (TM, and FLEXPART (FLEXible PARTicle dispersion model as the Lagrangian plume diffusion model (LPDM. The tangent and adjoint components of the Eulerian model were constructed directly from the original NIES TM code using an automatic differentiation tool known as TAF (Transformation of Algorithms in Fortran; http://www.FastOpt.com, with additional manual pre- and post-processing aimed at improving the performance of the computing, including MPI (Message Passing Interface. As results, the adjoint of Eulerian model is discrete. Construction of the adjoint of the Lagrangian component did not require any code modification, as LPDMs are able to track a significant number of particles back in time and thereby calculate the sensitivity of observations to the neighboring emissions areas. Eulerian and Lagrangian adjoint components were coupled at the time boundary in the global domain.The results are verified using a series of test experiments. The forward simulation shown the coupled model is effective in reproducing the seasonal cycle and short-term variability of CO2 even in the case of multiple limiting factors, such as high uncertainty of fluxes and the low resolution of the Eulerian model. The adjoint model demonstrates the high accuracy compared to direct forward sensitivity calculations and fast performance. The developed adjoint of the coupled model combines the flux conservation and stability of an Eulerian discrete adjoint formulation with the flexibility, accuracy, and high resolution of a Lagrangian backward trajectory formulation.

  19. Adjoint of the global Eulerian-Lagrangian coupled atmospheric transport model (A-GELCA v1.0): development and validation

    Belikov, Dmitry A.; Maksyutov, Shamil; Yaremchuk, Alexey; Ganshin, Alexander; Kaminski, Thomas; Blessing, Simon; Sasakawa, Motoki; Gomez-Pelaez, Angel J.; Starchenko, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    We present the development of the Adjoint of the Global Eulerian-Lagrangian Coupled Atmospheric (A-GELCA) model that consists of the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) model as an Eulerian three-dimensional transport model (TM), and FLEXPART (FLEXible PARTicle dispersion model) as the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM). The forward tangent linear and adjoint components of the Eulerian model were constructed directly from the original NIES TM code using an automatic differentiation tool known as TAF (Transformation of Algorithms in Fortran; http://www.FastOpt.com, with additional manual pre- and post-processing aimed at improving transparency and clarity of the code and optimizing the performance of the computing, including MPI (Message Passing Interface). The Lagrangian component did not require any code modification, as LPDMs are self-adjoint and track a significant number of particles backward in time in order to calculate the sensitivity of the observations to the neighboring emission areas. The constructed Eulerian adjoint was coupled with the Lagrangian component at a time boundary in the global domain. The simulations presented in this work were performed using the A-GELCA model in forward and adjoint modes. The forward simulation shows that the coupled model improves reproduction of the seasonal cycle and short-term variability of CO2. Mean bias and standard deviation for five of the six Siberian sites considered decrease roughly by 1 ppm when using the coupled model. The adjoint of the Eulerian model was shown, through several numerical tests, to be very accurate (within machine epsilon with mismatch around to ±6 e-14) compared to direct forward sensitivity calculations. The developed adjoint of the coupled model combines the flux conservation and stability of an Eulerian discrete adjoint formulation with the flexibility, accuracy, and high resolution of a Lagrangian backward trajectory formulation. A-GELCA will be incorporated

  20. On the essential self-adjointness of generalized Schroedinger operators

    We give a necessary and sufficient condition for the generalized Schroedinger operator to be essentially self-adjoint in L2(Ω; rhodx), under general assumptions on rho and for arbitrary domains Ω in Rsup(n). In particular, if rho is strictly positive and locally Lipschitz continuous on Ω = Rsup(n), then A is essentially self-adjoint. We also give examples of non-essential self-adjointness and a complete discussion of the one-dimensional case. These results have applications to the problem of the essential self-adjointness of quantum Hamiltonians and to the uniqueness problem of Markov processes. (orig./WL)

  1. The Schroedinger differential operator and intrinsic self adjointness

    An attempt is made to establish a hermitization procedure for rendering any linear differential operator to be intrinsically self adjoint, independently of any prescribed representation. This is accomplished by introducing an associate differential operator, which is simply a linear combination of all the individual ordinary differential operators belonging to the adjoint of the given linear differential operator, that satisfies the criterion of intrinsic self adjointness. It turns out that the associate differential operator is capable of generating an infinite set of hermitized versions of any arbitrary linear differential operator. Both momentum and kinetic energy differential operators that belong to the Schroedinger wave equation are rendered self adjoint. (author)

  2. Generalized uncertainty principle and self-adjoint operators

    Balasubramanian, Venkat, E-mail: vbalasu8@uwo.ca [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Das, Saurya, E-mail: saurya.das@uleth.ca [Theoretical Physics Group, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Lethbridge, 4401 University Drive, Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4 (Canada); Vagenas, Elias C., E-mail: elias.vagenas@ku.edu.kw [Theoretical Physics Group, Department of Physics, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 5969, Safat 13060 (Kuwait)

    2015-09-15

    In this work we explore the self-adjointness of the GUP-modified momentum and Hamiltonian operators over different domains. In particular, we utilize the theorem by von-Neumann for symmetric operators in order to determine whether the momentum and Hamiltonian operators are self-adjoint or not, or they have self-adjoint extensions over the given domain. In addition, a simple example of the Hamiltonian operator describing a particle in a box is given. The solutions of the boundary conditions that describe the self-adjoint extensions of the specific Hamiltonian operator are obtained.

  3. Local Volatility Calibration Using An Adjoint Proxy

    Gabriel TURINICI

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We document the calibration of the local volatility in a framework similar to Coleman, Li and Verma. The quality of a surface is assessed through a functional to be optimized; the specificity of the approach is to separate the optimization (performed with any suitable optimization algorithm from the computation of the functional where we use an adjoint (as in L. Jiang et. al. to obtain an approximation; moreover our main calibration variable is the implied volatility (the procedure can also accommodate the Greeks. The procedure performs well on benchmarks from the literature and on FOREX data.

  4. Symmetries of linearized gravity from adjoint operators

    Aksteiner, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Using a covariant formulation it is shown that the Teukolsky equation and the Teukolsky-Starobinsky identities for spin-1 and linearized gravity on a vacuum type D background are self-adjoint. This fact is used to construct symmetry operators for each of the four cases. We find both irreducible second order symmetry operators for spin-1, a known fourth order, and a new sixth order symmetry operator for linearized gravity. The results are connected to Hertz and Debye potentials and to the separability of the Teukolsky equation.

  5. Supersymmetric descendants of self-adjointly extended quantum mechanical Hamiltonians

    Al-Hashimi, M.H., E-mail: hashimi@itp.unibe.ch [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Bern University, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Salman, M., E-mail: msalman@qu.edu.qa [Department of Mathematics, Statistics, and Physics, Qatar University, Al Tarfa, Doha 2713 (Qatar); Shalaby, A., E-mail: amshalab@qu.edu.qa [Department of Mathematics, Statistics, and Physics, Qatar University, Al Tarfa, Doha 2713 (Qatar); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University (Egypt); Wiese, U.-J., E-mail: wiese@itp.unibe.ch [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Bern University, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-10-15

    We consider the descendants of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians in supersymmetric quantum mechanics on a half-line, on an interval, and on a punctured line or interval. While there is a 4-parameter family of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians on a punctured line, only a 3-parameter sub-family has supersymmetric descendants that are themselves self-adjoint. We also address the self-adjointness of an operator related to the supercharge, and point out that only a sub-class of its most general self-adjoint extensions is physical. Besides a general characterization of self-adjoint extensions and their supersymmetric descendants, we explicitly consider concrete examples, including a particle in a box with general boundary conditions, with and without an additional point interaction. We also discuss bulk-boundary resonances and their manifestation in the supersymmetric descendant. -- Highlights: •Self-adjoint extension theory and contact interactions. •Application of self-adjoint extensions to supersymmetry. •Contact interactions in finite volume with Robin boundary condition.

  6. Self-adjointness of the Gaffney Laplacian on Vector Bundles

    We study the Gaffney Laplacian on a vector bundle equipped with a compatible metric and connection over a Riemannian manifold that is possibly geodesically incomplete. Under the hypothesis that the Cauchy boundary is polar, we demonstrate the self-adjointness of this Laplacian. Furthermore, we show that negligible boundary is a necessary and sufficient condition for the self-adjointness of this operator

  7. A reduced adjoint approach to variational data assimilation

    Altaf, Muhammad

    2013-02-01

    The adjoint method has been used very often for variational data assimilation. The computational cost to run the adjoint model often exceeds several original model runs and the method needs significant programming efforts to implement the adjoint model code. The work proposed here is variational data assimilation based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) which avoids the implementation of the adjoint of the tangent linear approximation of the original nonlinear model. An ensemble of the forward model simulations is used to determine the approximation of the covariance matrix and only the dominant eigenvectors of this matrix are used to define a model subspace. The adjoint of the tangent linear model is replaced by the reduced adjoint based on this reduced space. Thus the adjoint model is run in reduced space with negligible computational cost. Once the gradient is obtained in reduced space it is projected back in full space and the minimization process is carried in full space. In the paper the reduced adjoint approach to variational data assimilation is introduced. The characteristics and performance of the method are illustrated with a number of data assimilation experiments in a ground water subsurface contaminant model. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  8. Supersymmetric descendants of self-adjointly extended quantum mechanical Hamiltonians

    We consider the descendants of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians in supersymmetric quantum mechanics on a half-line, on an interval, and on a punctured line or interval. While there is a 4-parameter family of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians on a punctured line, only a 3-parameter sub-family has supersymmetric descendants that are themselves self-adjoint. We also address the self-adjointness of an operator related to the supercharge, and point out that only a sub-class of its most general self-adjoint extensions is physical. Besides a general characterization of self-adjoint extensions and their supersymmetric descendants, we explicitly consider concrete examples, including a particle in a box with general boundary conditions, with and without an additional point interaction. We also discuss bulk-boundary resonances and their manifestation in the supersymmetric descendant. -- Highlights: •Self-adjoint extension theory and contact interactions. •Application of self-adjoint extensions to supersymmetry. •Contact interactions in finite volume with Robin boundary condition

  9. Self-adjointness of the Gaffney Laplacian on Vector Bundles

    Bandara, Lashi, E-mail: lashi.bandara@chalmers.se [Chalmers University of Technology and University of Gothenburg, Mathematical Sciences (Sweden); Milatovic, Ognjen, E-mail: omilatov@unf.edu [University of North Florida, Department of Mathematics and Statistics (United States)

    2015-12-15

    We study the Gaffney Laplacian on a vector bundle equipped with a compatible metric and connection over a Riemannian manifold that is possibly geodesically incomplete. Under the hypothesis that the Cauchy boundary is polar, we demonstrate the self-adjointness of this Laplacian. Furthermore, we show that negligible boundary is a necessary and sufficient condition for the self-adjointness of this operator.

  10. Radiation source reconstruction with known geometry and materials using the adjoint

    We present a method to estimate an unknown isotropic source distribution, in space and energy, using detector measurements when the geometry and material composition are known. The estimated source distribution minimizes the difference between the measured and computed responses of detectors located at a selected number of points within the domain. In typical methods, a forward flux calculation is performed for each source guess in an iterative process. In contrast, we use the adjoint flux to compute the responses. Potential applications of the proposed method include determining the distribution of radio-contaminants following a nuclear event, monitoring the flow of radioactive fluids in pipes to determine hold-up locations, and retroactive reconstruction of radiation fields using workers' detectors' readings. After presenting the method, we describe a numerical test problem to demonstrate the preliminary viability of the method. As expected, using the adjoint flux reduces the number of transport solves to be proportional to the number of detector measurements, in contrast to methods using the forward flux that require a typically larger number proportional to the number of spatial mesh cells. (author)

  11. Adjoint Monte Carlo simulation of fixed-energy secondary radiation

    Fixed energy secondary generation for adjoint Monte Carlo methods constitutes certain difficulties because of zero probability of reaching fixed value from continuous distribution. This paper proposes a possible approach to adjoint Monte Carlo simulation with fixed energy secondary radiation which does not contain any simplifying restriction. This approach uses the introduced before generalized particle concept developed for description of mixed-type radiation transport and allows adjoint Monte Carlo simulation of such processes. It treats particle type as additional discrete coordinate and always considers only one particle even for the interactions with many particles outgoing from the collision. The adjoint fixed energy secondary radiation simulation is performed as local energy estimator through the intermediate state with fixed energy. The proposed algorithm is tested on the example of coupled gamma/electron/positron transport with generation of annihilation radiation. Forward and adjoint simulation according to generalized particle concept show statistically similar results. (orig.)

  12. Adjoint-based error estimation and mesh adaptation for the correction procedure via reconstruction method

    Shi, Lei; Wang, Z. J.

    2015-08-01

    Adjoint-based mesh adaptive methods are capable of distributing computational resources to areas which are important for predicting an engineering output. In this paper, we develop an adjoint-based h-adaptation approach based on the high-order correction procedure via reconstruction formulation (CPR) to minimize the output or functional error. A dual-consistent CPR formulation of hyperbolic conservation laws is developed and its dual consistency is analyzed. Super-convergent functional and error estimate for the output with the CPR method are obtained. Factors affecting the dual consistency, such as the solution point distribution, correction functions, boundary conditions and the discretization approach for the non-linear flux divergence term, are studied. The presented method is then used to perform simulations for the 2D Euler and Navier-Stokes equations with mesh adaptation driven by the adjoint-based error estimate. Several numerical examples demonstrate the ability of the presented method to dramatically reduce the computational cost comparing with uniform grid refinement.

  13. Adjoint-based uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis for reactor depletion calculations

    Stripling, Hayes Franklin

    Depletion calculations for nuclear reactors model the dynamic coupling between the material composition and neutron flux and help predict reactor performance and safety characteristics. In order to be trusted as reliable predictive tools and inputs to licensing and operational decisions, the simulations must include an accurate and holistic quantification of errors and uncertainties in its outputs. Uncertainty quantification is a formidable challenge in large, realistic reactor models because of the large number of unknowns and myriad sources of uncertainty and error. We present a framework for performing efficient uncertainty quantification in depletion problems using an adjoint approach, with emphasis on high-fidelity calculations using advanced massively parallel computing architectures. This approach calls for a solution to two systems of equations: (a) the forward, engineering system that models the reactor, and (b) the adjoint system, which is mathematically related to but different from the forward system. We use the solutions of these systems to produce sensitivity and error estimates at a cost that does not grow rapidly with the number of uncertain inputs. We present the framework in a general fashion and apply it to both the source-driven and k-eigenvalue forms of the depletion equations. We describe the implementation and verification of solvers for the forward and ad- joint equations in the PDT code, and we test the algorithms on realistic reactor analysis problems. We demonstrate a new approach for reducing the memory and I/O demands on the host machine, which can be overwhelming for typical adjoint algorithms. Our conclusion is that adjoint depletion calculations using full transport solutions are not only computationally tractable, they are the most attractive option for performing uncertainty quantification on high-fidelity reactor analysis problems.

  14. Technical Note: Adjoint formulation of the TOMCAT atmospheric transport scheme in the Eulerian backtracking framework (RETRO-TOM

    P. E. Haines

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new methodology for the formulation of an adjoint to the transport component of the chemistry transport model TOMCAT is described and implemented in a new model RETRO-TOM. The Eulerian backtracking method is used, allowing the forward advection scheme (Prather's second-order moments, to be efficiently exploited in the backward adjoint calculations. Prather's scheme is shown to be time-symmetric suggesting the possibility of high accuracy. To attain this accuracy, however, it is necessary to make a careful treatment of the "density inconsistency" problem inherent to offline transport models. The results are verified using a series of test experiments. These demonstrate the high accuracy of RETRO-TOM when compared with direct forward sensitivity calculations, at least for problems in which flux-limiters in the advection scheme are not required. RETRO-TOM therefore combines the flexibility and stability of a "finite difference of adjoint" formulation with the accuracy of an "adjoint of finite difference" formulation.

  15. Gauge Mediation Models with Adjoint Messengers

    Gogoladze, Ilia; Shafi, Qaisar; Un, Cem Salih

    2016-01-01

    We present a class of models in the framework of gauge mediation supersymmetry breaking where the messenger fields transform in the adjoint representation of the Standard Model gauge symmetry. To avoid unacceptably light right-handed sleptons in the spectrum we introduce a non-zero U(1)_B-L D-term. This leads to an additional contribution to the soft supersymmetry breaking mass terms which makes the right-handed slepton masses compatible with the current experimental bounds. We show that in this framework the observed 125 GeV Higgs boson mass can be accommodated with the sleptons accessible at the LHC, while the squarks and gluinos lie in the multi-TeV range. We also discuss the issue of the fine-tuning and show that the desired relic dark matter abundance can also be accommodated.

  16. Adjoint tomography of the southern California crust.

    Tape, Carl; Liu, Qinya; Maggi, Alessia; Tromp, Jeroen

    2009-08-21

    Using an inversion strategy based on adjoint methods, we developed a three-dimensional seismological model of the southern California crust. The resulting model involved 16 tomographic iterations, which required 6800 wavefield simulations and a total of 0.8 million central processing unit hours. The new crustal model reveals strong heterogeneity, including local changes of +/-30% with respect to the initial three-dimensional model provided by the Southern California Earthquake Center. The model illuminates shallow features such as sedimentary basins and compositional contrasts across faults. It also reveals crustal features at depth that aid in the tectonic reconstruction of southern California, such as subduction-captured oceanic crustal fragments. The new model enables more realistic and accurate assessments of seismic hazard. PMID:19696349

  17. GPU-accelerated adjoint algorithmic differentiation

    Gremse, Felix; Höfter, Andreas; Razik, Lukas; Kiessling, Fabian; Naumann, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Many scientific problems such as classifier training or medical image reconstruction can be expressed as minimization of differentiable real-valued cost functions and solved with iterative gradient-based methods. Adjoint algorithmic differentiation (AAD) enables automated computation of gradients of such cost functions implemented as computer programs. To backpropagate adjoint derivatives, excessive memory is potentially required to store the intermediate partial derivatives on a dedicated data structure, referred to as the "tape". Parallelization is difficult because threads need to synchronize their accesses during taping and backpropagation. This situation is aggravated for many-core architectures, such as Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), because of the large number of light-weight threads and the limited memory size in general as well as per thread. We show how these limitations can be mediated if the cost function is expressed using GPU-accelerated vector and matrix operations which are recognized as intrinsic functions by our AAD software. We compare this approach with naive and vectorized implementations for CPUs. We use four increasingly complex cost functions to evaluate the performance with respect to memory consumption and gradient computation times. Using vectorization, CPU and GPU memory consumption could be substantially reduced compared to the naive reference implementation, in some cases even by an order of complexity. The vectorization allowed usage of optimized parallel libraries during forward and reverse passes which resulted in high speedups for the vectorized CPU version compared to the naive reference implementation. The GPU version achieved an additional speedup of 7.5 ± 4.4, showing that the processing power of GPUs can be utilized for AAD using this concept. Furthermore, we show how this software can be systematically extended for more complex problems such as nonlinear absorption reconstruction for fluorescence-mediated tomography.

  18. A PNJL Model for Adjoint Fermions with Periodic Boundary Conditions

    Nishimura, Hiromichi; Ogilvie, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    Recent work on QCD-like theories has shown that the addition of adjoint fermions obeying periodic boundary conditions to gauge theories on $R^{3}\\times S^{1}$ can lead to a restoration of center symmetry and confinement for sufficiently small circumference $L$ of $S^{1}$. At small $L$, perturbation theory may be used reliably to compute the effective potential for the Polyakov loop $P$ in the compact direction. Periodic adjoint fermions act in opposition to the gauge fields, which by themselv...

  19. Development of one-energy group, two-dimensional, frequency dependent detector adjoint function based on the nodal method

    One-energy group, two-dimensional computer code was developed to calculate the response of a detector to a vibrating absorber in a reactor core. A concept of local/global components, based on the frequency dependent detector adjoint function, and a nodalization technique were utilized. The frequency dependent detector adjoint functions presented by complex equations were expanded into real and imaginary parts. In the nodalization technique, the flux is expanded into polynomials about the center point of each node. The phase angle and the magnitude of the one-energy group detector adjoint function were calculated for a detector located in the center of a 200x200 cm reactor using a two-dimensional nodalization technique, the computer code EXTERMINATOR, and the analytical solution. The purpose of this research was to investigate the applicability of a polynomial nodal model technique to the calculations of the real and the imaginary parts of the detector adjoint function for one-energy group two-dimensional polynomial nodal model technique. From the results as discussed earlier, it is concluded that the nodal model technique can be used to calculate the detector adjoint function and the phase angle. Using the computer code developed for nodal model technique, the magnitude of one energy group frequency dependent detector adjoint function and the phase angle were calculated for the detector located in the center of a 200x200 cm homogenous reactor. The real part of the detector adjoint function was compared with the results obtained from the EXTERMINATOR computer code as well as the analytical solution based on a double sine series expansion using the classical Green's Function solution. The values were found to be less than 1% greater at 20 cm away from the source region and about 3% greater closer to the source compared to the values obtained from the analytical solution and the EXTERMINATOR code. The currents at the node interface matched within 1% of the average

  20. Utilisation de sources et d'adjoints dragon pour les calculs TRIPOLI

    Camand, Corentin

    usually non significant. The second method is to use of the adjoint neutron flux calculated by DRAGON as an importance function for Monte Carlo biaising in TRIPOLI. The objective is to improve the figure of merit of the detector response located far away of the neutron source. The neutron source initialisation of a TRIPOLI calculation required to develop the development of a module in DRAGON that generates a list of sources in the TRIPOLI syntaxe, including for each source, its intensity, its position and the energy domain it covers. We tested our method on a complete 17×17 PWR-UOX assembly and on a reduced 3×3 model. We first verified that the DRAGON and TRIPOLI models were consistent in order to ensure that TRIPOLI receives a coherent source distribution. Then we tested the use of DRAGON sources in TRIPOLI with neutron flux and the effective multiplying coefficient (keff). We observe slightly better standard deviations, of an order of 10 pcm, on keff for simulations using DRAGON sources distributions as compared to simulations with less precise initial sources. Flux convergence is also improved. However some incoherence were also observed in the results, some flux converging slower with DRAGON sources when fewer neutrons per batch are considered. In addition, a very large number of sources is too heavy to insert in TRIPOLI. It seems that our method is perfectible in order to improve implementation and convergence. Study of more complex geometries, with less regular sources distributions (for instance using MOX or irradiated fuel) may provide better performances using our method. For biaising TRIPOLI calculations using the DRAGON adjoint flux we created a module that produces importance maps readable by TRIPOLI. We tested our method on a source-detector shielding problem in one dimension. After checking the coherence of DRAGON and TRIPOLI models, we biaised TRIPOLI simulations using the DRAGON adjoint flux, and using INIPOND, the internal biaising option of TRIPOLI. We

  1. Deterministic adjoint transport applications for He-3 neutron detector design

    This work focuses on the determination of predicted neutron detector response accomplished using neutron importance derived from an adjoint discrete ordinates (SN) transport calculation. A hypothetical detector apparatus, intended to detect fast neutrons, was modeled using He-3 tubes with graphite moderation using the PENTRANTM 3-D multi-group discrete ordinates parallel transport code system. The detector geometry was modeled using z-axis symmetry and discretized into 30,280 3-D Cartesian cells. The material spatial mesh was generated using the PENMSHTM code in the PENTRAN system. The 47-group BUGLE-96 neutron cross section library was used for construction of macroscopic neutron cross sections. Results from an S8 angular quadrature using P3 anisotropy are presented. An adjoint transport source was established in the model using group dependent He-3 response cross sections. Each He-3 tube contained an adjoint source aliased to group He-3 absorption cross sections to permit assessment of detector performance. The spectrally dependent detector response from neutron capture in He-3 tubes from an arbitrary source can, therefore, be readily determined. This response comes from the complete integral of the actual source strength weighted by the adjoint function at the source location for any source distribution scenario. For selected neutron energies, an equivalent forward MCNP Monte Carlo model was used to demonstrate good agreement with the detector response determined from the adjoint calculation. The graphite used in this design has a large impact on detector performance due to the increasing sensitivity inherent in He-3 gas as neutrons thermalize. Computational adjoint results presented here predict a fast neutron detector design that yields efficiencies between 30 and 50% for neutron energies below 3 keV, and up to 30% efficiencies for neutron energies between 3 keV and 1 MeV. Overall, the methodology applied here highlights the elegant nature of an adjoint

  2. Flux tubes at Finite Temperature

    Bicudo, Pedro; Cardoso, Marco

    2016-01-01

    We show the flux tubes produced by static quark-antiquark, quark-quark and quark-gluon charges at finite temperature. The sources are placed in the lattice with fundamental and adjoint Polyakov loops. We compute the square densities of the chromomagnetic and chromoelectric fields above and below the phase transition. Our results are gauge invariant and produced in pure gauge SU(3). The codes are written in CUDA and the computations are performed with GPUs.

  3. Mesh-free adjoint methods for nonlinear filters

    Daum, Fred

    2005-09-01

    We apply a new industrial strength numerical approximation, called the "mesh-free adjoint method", to solve the nonlinear filtering problem. This algorithm exploits the smoothness of the problem, unlike particle filters, and hence we expect that mesh-free adjoints are superior to particle filters for many practical applications. The nonlinear filter problem is equivalent to solving the Fokker-Planck equation in real time. The key idea is to use a good adaptive non-uniform quantization of state space to approximate the solution of the Fokker-Planck equation. In particular, the adjoint method computes the location of the nodes in state space to minimize errors in the final answer. This use of an adjoint is analogous to optimal control algorithms, but it is more interesting. The adjoint method is also analogous to importance sampling in particle filters, but it is better for four reasons: (1) it exploits the smoothness of the problem; (2) it explicitly minimizes the errors in the relevant functional; (3) it explicitly models the dynamics in state space; and (4) it can be used to compute a corrected value for the desired functional using the residuals. We will attempt to make this paper accessible to normal engineers who do not have PDEs for breakfast.

  4. Adjoint-based Optimal Flow Control for Compressible DNS

    Otero, J Javier; Sandberg, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    A novel adjoint-based framework oriented to optimal flow control in compressible direct numerical simulations is presented. Also, a new formulation of the adjoint characteristic boundary conditions is introduced, which enhances the stability of the adjoint simulations. The flow configuration chosen as a case study consists of a two dimensional open cavity flow with aspect ratio $L/H=3$ and Reynolds number $Re=5000$. This flow configuration is of particular interest, as the turbulent and chaotic nature of separated flows pushes the adjoint approach to its limit. The target of the flow actuation, defined as cost, is the reduction of the pressure fluctuations at the sensor location. To exploit the advantages of the adjoint method, a large number of control parameters is used. The control consists of an actuating sub-domain where a two-dimensional body force is applied at every point within the sub-volume. This results in a total of $2.256 \\cdot 10^6$ control parameters. The final actuation achieved a successful ...

  5. Adjoint transport methods for radiation-effects testing

    Adjoint transport has been exploited for some time for neutral particle calculations. For charged particles, however, production adjoint capability was not available until Morel developed the ability to solve coupled-photon-electron transport problems with production discrete ordinates codes. This represents a significant advance for many problems of interest, such as predicting bremsstrahlung yield from flash X-ray machines, internal electromagnetic pulse (IEMP) for photons incident on printed circuit boards, shielding requirements for electron dosimetry, and dose enhancement from photon irradiation of printed circuit boards. The authors demonstrate here that adjoint photon-electron transport is at least an order of magnitude more efficient than forward transport for optimizing bremsstrahlung yield from flash X-ray machine converters. This problem is particularly interesting since adjoint transport provides a good approximation for a variable geometry in addition to a variable source, due to the highly forward-peaked nature of the electron scattering. Normally, neither forward nor adjoint transport is efficient for studying a variable-geometry problem

  6. An Adjoint-Based Analysis of the Sampling Footprints of Tall Tower, Aircraft and Potential Future Lidar Observations of CO2

    Andrews, Arlyn; Kawa, Randy; Zhu, Zhengxin; Burris, John; Abshire, Jim

    2004-01-01

    A detailed mechanistic understanding of the sources and sinks of CO2 will be required to reliably predict future CO2 levels and climate. A commonly used technique for deriving information about CO2 exchange with surface reservoirs is to solve an 'inverse problem', where CO2 observations are used with an atmospheric transport model to find the optimal distribution of sources and sinks. Synthesis inversion methods are powerful tools for addressing this question, but the results are disturbingly sensitive to the details of the calculation. Studies done using different atmospheric transport models and combinations of surface station data have produced substantially different distributions of surface fluxes. Adjoint methods are now being developed that will more effectively incorporate diverse datasets in estimates of surface fluxes of CO2. In an adjoint framework, it will be possible to combine CO2 concentration data from longterm surface and aircraft monitoring stations with data from intensive field campaigns and with proposed future satellite observations. We have recently developed an adjoint for the GSFC 3-D Parameterized Chemistry and Transport Model (PCTM). Here, we will present results from a PCTM Adjoint study comparing the sampling footprints of tall tower, aircraft and potential future lidar observations of CO2. The vertical resolution and extent of the profiles and the observation frequency will be considered for several sites in North America.

  7. Adjoint-consistent formulations of slip models for coupled electroosmotic flow systems

    Garg, Vikram V

    2014-09-27

    Background Models based on the Helmholtz `slip\\' approximation are often used for the simulation of electroosmotic flows. The objectives of this paper are to construct adjoint-consistent formulations of such models, and to develop adjoint-based numerical tools for adaptive mesh refinement and parameter sensitivity analysis. Methods We show that the direct formulation of the `slip\\' model is adjoint inconsistent, and leads to an ill-posed adjoint problem. We propose a modified formulation of the coupled `slip\\' model, which is shown to be well-posed, and therefore automatically adjoint-consistent. Results Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the computation and use of the adjoint solution in two-dimensional microfluidics problems. Conclusions An adjoint-consistent formulation for Helmholtz `slip\\' models of electroosmotic flows has been proposed. This formulation provides adjoint solutions that can be reliably used for mesh refinement and sensitivity analysis.

  8. SUPERSTABILITY OF ADJOINTABLE MAPPINGS ON HILBERT C*-MODULES

    Mohammad Sal Moslehian

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We define the notion of $varphi$-perturbation of a densely definedadjointable mapping and prove that any such mapping $f$ betweenHilbert ${mathcal A}$-modules over a fixed $C^*$-algebra ${mathcalA}$ with densely defined corresponding mapping $g$ is ${mathcalA}$-linear and adjointable in the classical sense with adjoint $g$.If both $f$ and $g$ are everywhere defined then they are bounded.Our work concerns with the concept of {sc Hyers--Ulam--Rassias} stability originated from the {sc Th.~M.~Rassias}' stability theorem that appeared in his paper [{it On the stability of the linear mapping in Banach spaces}, Proc. Amer. Math. Soc., {f 72} (1978, 297--300]. We also indicate complementary results in the case where the {sc Hilbert} $C^*$-modules admit non-adjointable $C^*$-linear appings

  9. A Posteriori Analysis for Hydrodynamic Simulations Using Adjoint Methodologies

    Woodward, C S; Estep, D; Sandelin, J; Wang, H

    2009-02-26

    This report contains results of analysis done during an FY08 feasibility study investigating the use of adjoint methodologies for a posteriori error estimation for hydrodynamics simulations. We developed an approach to adjoint analysis for these systems through use of modified equations and viscosity solutions. Targeting first the 1D Burgers equation, we include a verification of the adjoint operator for the modified equation for the Lax-Friedrichs scheme, then derivations of an a posteriori error analysis for a finite difference scheme and a discontinuous Galerkin scheme applied to this problem. We include some numerical results showing the use of the error estimate. Lastly, we develop a computable a posteriori error estimate for the MAC scheme applied to stationary Navier-Stokes.

  10. Automatic differentiation, tangent linear models, and (pseudo) adjoints

    Bischof, C.H.

    1993-12-31

    This paper provides a brief introduction to automatic differentiation and relates it to the tangent linear model and adjoint approaches commonly used in meteorology. After a brief review of the forward and reverse mode of automatic differentiation, the ADIFOR automatic differentiation tool is introduced, and initial results of a sensitivity-enhanced version of the MM5 PSU/NCAR mesoscale weather model are presented. We also present a novel approach to the computation of gradients that uses a reverse mode approach at the time loop level and a forward mode approach at every time step. The resulting ``pseudoadjoint`` shares the characteristic of an adjoint code that the ratio of gradient to function evaluation does not depend on the number of independent variables. In contrast to a true adjoint approach, however, the nonlinearity of the model plays no role in the complexity of the derivative code.

  11. Reconstruction of ocean circulation from sparse data using the adjoint method: LGM and the present

    Kurahashi-Nakamura, T.; Losch, M. J.; Paul, A.; Mulitza, S.; Schulz, M.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the behavior of the Earth's climate system under different conditions in the past is the basis for more robust projections of future climate. It is thought that the ocean circulation plays a very important role in the climate system, because it can greatly affect climate by dynamic-thermodynamic (as a medium of heat transport) and biogeochemical processes (by affecting the global carbon cycle). In this context, studying the period of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is particularly promising, as it represents a climate state that is very different from today. Furthermore the LGM, compared to other paleoperiods, is characterized by a relatively good paleo-data coverage. Unfortunately, the ocean circulation during the LGM is still uncertain, with a range of climate models estimating both a stronger and a weaker formation rate of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) as compared to the present rate. Here, we present a project aiming at reducing this uncertainty by combining proxy data with a numerical ocean model using variational techniques. Our approach, the so-called adjoint method, employs a quadratic cost function of model-data differences weighted by their prior error estimates. We seek an optimal state estimate at the global minimum of the cost function by varying the independent control variables such as initial conditions (e.g. temperature), boundary conditions (e.g. surface winds, heat flux), or internal parameters (e.g. vertical diffusivity). The adjoint or dual model computes the gradient of the cost function with respect to these control variables and thus provides the information required by gradient descent algorithms. The gradients themselves provide valuable information about the sensitivity of the system to perturbations in the control variables. We use the Massachusetts Institute of Technology ocean general circulation model (MITgcm) with a cubed-sphere grid system that avoids converging grid lines and pole singularities. This model code is

  12. Improving the Fit of a Land-Surface Model to Data Using its Adjoint

    Raoult, Nina; Jupp, Tim; Cox, Peter; Luke, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    Land-surface models (LSMs) are crucial components of the Earth System Models (ESMs) which are used to make coupled climate-carbon cycle projections for the 21st century. The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) is the land-surface model used in the climate and weather forecast models of the UK Met Office. In this study, JULES is automatically differentiated using commercial software from FastOpt, resulting in an analytical gradient, or adjoint, of the model. Using this adjoint, the adJULES parameter estimation system has been developed, to search for locally optimum parameter sets by calibrating against observations. We present an introduction to the adJULES system and demonstrate its ability to improve the model-data fit using eddy covariance measurements of gross primary production (GPP) and latent heat (LE) fluxes. adJULES also has the ability to calibrate over multiple sites simultaneously. This feature is used to define new optimised parameter values for the 5 Plant Functional Types (PFTS) in JULES. The optimised PFT-specific parameters improve the performance of JULES over 90% of the FLUXNET sites used in the study. These reductions in error are shown and compared to reductions found due to site-specific optimisations. Finally, we show that calculation of the 2nd derivative of JULES allows us to produce posterior probability density functions of the parameters and how knowledge of parameter values is constrained by observations.

  13. Normal and adjoint integral and integrodifferential neutron transport equations. Pt. 2

    Using the simplifying hypotheses of the integrodifferential Boltzmann equations of neutron transport, given in JEN 334 report, several integral equations, and theirs adjoint ones, are obtained. Relations between the different normal and adjoint eigenfunctions are established and, in particular, proceeding from the integrodifferential Boltzmann equation it's found out the relation between the solutions of the adjoint equation of its integral one, and the solutions of the integral equation of its adjoint one (author)

  14. Searching for Standard Model Adjoint Scalars with Diboson Resonance Signatures

    Carpenter, Linda M

    2015-01-01

    We explore the phenomenology of scalar fields in the adjoint representation of SM gauge groups. We write a general set of dimension 5 effective operators in which SM adjoint scalars couple to pairs of standard model bosons. Using these effective operators, we explore new possible decay channels of a scalar color octet into a gluon and a Z boson/ gluon and a photon. We recast several analyses from Run I of the LHC to find constraints on an a scalar octet decaying into these channels, and we project the discovery potential of color octets in our gluon+photon channel for the 14 TeV run of LHC.

  15. An eddy-permitting, dynamically consistent adjoint-based assimilation system for the tropical Pacific: Hindcast experiments in 2000

    Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2010-03-02

    An eddy-permitting adjoint-based assimilation system has been implemented to estimate the state of the tropical Pacific Ocean. The system uses the Massachusetts Institute of Technology\\'s general circulation model and its adjoint. The adjoint method is used to adjust the model to observations by controlling the initial temperature and salinity; temperature, salinity, and horizontal velocities at the open boundaries; and surface fluxes of momentum, heat, and freshwater. The model is constrained with most of the available data sets in the tropical Pacific, including Tropical Atmosphere and Ocean, ARGO, expendable bathythermograph, and satellite SST and sea surface height data, and climatologies. Results of hindcast experiments in 2000 suggest that the iterated adjoint-based descent is able to significantly improve the model consistency with the multivariate data sets, providing a dynamically consistent realization of the tropical Pacific circulation that generally matches the observations to within specified errors. The estimated model state is evaluated both by comparisons with observations and by checking the controls, the momentum balances, and the representation of small-scale features that were not well sampled by the observations used in the assimilation. As part of these checks, the estimated controls are smoothed and applied in independent model runs to check that small changes in the controls do not greatly change the model hindcast. This is a simple ensemble-based uncertainty analysis. In addition, the original and smoothed controls are applied to a version of the model with doubled horizontal resolution resulting in a broadly similar “downscaled” hindcast, showing that the adjustments are not tuned to a single configuration (meaning resolution, topography, and parameter settings). The time-evolving model state and the adjusted controls should be useful for analysis or to supply the forcing, initial, and boundary conditions for runs of other models.

  16. On self-adjointness of singular Floquet Hamiltonians

    Duclos, Pierre; Jensen, Arne

    2010-01-01

    Schrödinger equations with time-dependent interactions are studied. We investigate how to define the Floquet Hamiltonian as a self-adjoint operator, when the interaction is singular in time or space. Using these results we establish the existence of a bounded propagator, by applying a result given...

  17. Large-volume results in SU(2) with adjoint fermions

    Del Debbio, Luigi; Lucini, Biagio; Pica, Claudio; Patella, Agostino; Rago, Antonio; Roman, Sabin

    2013-01-01

    Taming finite-volume effects is a crucial ingredient in order to identify the existence of IR fixed points. We present the latest results from our numerical simulations of SU(2) gauge theory with 2 Dirac fermions in the adjoint representation on large volumes. We compare with previous results, and...

  18. The Adjoint of the CMAQ Aqueous Chemistry Module

    Baek, J.; Stanier, C.; Saide, P.; Carmichael, G.; Henze, D.; Turner, M.; Zhao, S.; Hakami, A.; Resler, Jaroslav; Sandu, A.; Russell, A. P.; Jeong, G.; Nenes, A.; Capps, S.; Percell, P.; Pinder, R.; Napelenok, S.; Bash, J.; Chai, T.; Byun, D

    Chapel Hill : CMAS, 2012. s. 91-92. [Annual CMAS Conference /11./. Chapel Hill, 15.10.2012-17.10.2012] Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : air pollution * adjoint * aqueous chemistry Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology http://www.cmascenter.org/conference/2012/agenda.cfm

  19. Adjoint electron-photon transport Monte Carlo calculations with ITS

    A general adjoint coupled electron-photon Monte Carlo code for solving the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equation has recently been created. It is a modified version of ITS 3.0, a coupled electronphoton Monte Carlo code that has world-wide distribution. The applicability of the new code to radiation-interaction problems of the type found in space environments is demonstrated

  20. Approximate nonlinear self-adjointness and approximate conservation laws

    In this paper, approximate nonlinear self-adjointness for perturbed PDEs is introduced and its properties are studied. Consequently, approximate conservation laws which cannot be obtained by the approximate Noether theorem are constructed by means of the method. As an application, a class of perturbed nonlinear wave equations is considered to illustrate the effectiveness. (paper)

  1. Assimilating Remote Ammonia Observations with a Refined Aerosol Thermodynamics Adjoint"

    Ammonia emissions parameters in North America can be refined in order to improve the evaluation of modeled concentrations against observations. Here, we seek to do so by developing and applying the GEOS-Chem adjoint nested over North America to conductassimilation of observations...

  2. Non-self-adjoint hamiltonians defined by Riesz bases

    Bagarello, F., E-mail: fabio.bagarello@unipa.it [Dipartimento di Energia, Ingegneria dell' Informazione e Modelli Matematici, Facoltà di Ingegneria, Università di Palermo, I-90128 Palermo, Italy and INFN, Università di Torino, Torino (Italy); Inoue, A., E-mail: a-inoue@fukuoka-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Mathematics, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Trapani, C., E-mail: camillo.trapani@unipa.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, Università di Palermo, I-90123 Palermo (Italy)

    2014-03-15

    We discuss some features of non-self-adjoint Hamiltonians with real discrete simple spectrum under the assumption that the eigenvectors form a Riesz basis of Hilbert space. Among other things, we give conditions under which these Hamiltonians can be factorized in terms of generalized lowering and raising operators.

  3. High Order Adjoint Derivatives using ESDIRK Methods for Oil Reservoir Production Optimization

    Capolei, Andrea; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2012-01-01

    continuous adjoints . The high order integration scheme allows larger time steps and therefore faster solution times. We compare gradient computation by the continuous adjoint method to the discrete adjoint method and the finite-difference method. The methods are implemented for a two phase flow reservoir...... simulator. Computational experiments demonstrate that the accuracy of the sensitivities obtained by the adjoint methods are comparable to the accuracy obtained by the finite difference method. The continuous adjoint method is able to use a different time grid than the forward integration. Therefore, it can...

  4. Adjoint Monte Carlo simulation of fusion product activation probe experiment in ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    The activation probe is a robust tool to measure flux of fusion products from a magnetically confined plasma. A carefully chosen solid sample is exposed to the flux, and the impinging ions transmute the material making it radioactive. Ultra-low level gamma-ray spectroscopy is used post mortem to measure the activity and, thus, the number of fusion products. This contribution presents the numerical analysis of the first measurement in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak, which was also the first experiment to measure a single discharge. The ASCOT suite of codes was used to perform adjoint/reverse Monte Carlo calculations of the fusion products. The analysis facilitates, for the first time, a comparison of numerical and experimental values for absolutely calibrated flux. The results agree to within a factor of about two, which can be considered a quite good result considering the fact that all features of the plasma cannot be accounted in the simulations.Also an alternative to the present probe orientation was studied. The results suggest that a better optimized orientation could measure the flux from a significantly larger part of the plasma. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: 1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics

  5. Adjoint Formulation for an Embedded-Boundary Cartesian Method

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Murman, Scott M.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2004-01-01

    Many problems in aerodynamic design can be characterized by smooth and convex objective functions. This motivates the use of gradient-based algorithms, particularly for problems with a large number of design variables, to efficiently determine optimal shapes and configurations that maximize aerodynamic performance. Accurate and efficient computation of the gradient, however, remains a challenging task. In optimization problems where the number of design variables dominates the number of objectives and flow- dependent constraints, the cost of gradient computations can be significantly reduced by the use of the adjoint method. The problem of aerodynamic optimization using the adjoint method has been analyzed and validated for both structured and unstructured grids. The method has been applied to design problems governed by the potential, Euler, and Navier-Stokes equations and can be subdivided into the continuous and discrete formulations. Giles and Pierce provide a detailed review of both approaches. Most implementations rely on grid-perturbation or mapping procedures during the gradient computation that explicitly couple changes in the surface shape to the volume grid. The solution of the adjoint equation is usually accomplished using the same scheme that solves the governing flow equations. Examples of such code reuse include multistage Runge-Kutta schemes coupled with multigrid, approximate-factorization, line-implicit Gauss-Seidel, and also preconditioned GMRES. The development of the adjoint method for aerodynamic optimization problems on Cartesian grids has been limited. In contrast to implementations on structured and unstructured grids, Cartesian grid methods decouple the surface discretization from the volume grid. This feature makes Cartesian methods well suited for the automated analysis of complex geometry problems, and consequently a promising approach to aerodynamic optimization. Melvin e t al. developed an adjoint formulation for the TRANAIR code

  6. Adjoint Monte Carlo Simulation of Fusion Product Activation Probe Experiment in ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    Äkäslompolo, Simppa; Tardini, Giovanni; Kurki-Suonio, Taina

    2015-01-01

    The activation probe is a robust tool to measure flux of fusion products from a magnetically confined plasma. A carefully chosen solid sample is exposed to the flux, and the impinging ions transmute the material makig it radioactive. Ultra-low level gamma-ray spectroscopy is used post mortem to measure the activity and, thus, the number of fusion products. This contribution presents the numerical analysis of the first measurement in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak, which was also the first experiment to measure a single discharge. The ASCOT suite of codes was used to perform adjoint/reverse Monte-Carlo calculations of the fusion products. The analysis facilitated, for the first time, a comparison of numerical and experimental values for absolutely calibrated flux. The results agree to within 40%, which can be considered remarkable considering the fact that all features of the plasma cannot be accounted in the simulations. Also an alternative probe orientation was studied. The results suggest that a better optimized...

  7. Adjoint-based sensitivity analysis for reactor accident codes

    This paper summarizes a recently completed study that identified and investigated the difficulties and limitations of applying first-order adjoint sensitivity methods to reactor accident codes. The work extends earlier adjoint sensitivity formulations and applications to consider problem/model discontinuities in a general fashion, provide for response (R) formulations required by reactor safety applications, and provide a scheme for accurately handling extremely time-sensitive reactor accident responses. The scheme involves partitioning (dividing) the model into submodels (with spearate defining equations and initial conditions) at the location of discontinuity. Successful partitioning moves the problem dependence on the discontinuity location from the whole model system equations to the initial conditions of the second submodel

  8. Examination of Observation Impacts derived from OSEs and Adjoint Models

    Gelaro, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    With the adjoint of a data assimilation system, the impact of any or all assimilated observations on measures of forecast skill can be estimated accurately and efficiently. The approach allows aggregation of results in terms of individual data types, channels or locations, all computed simultaneously. In this study, adjoint-based estimates of observation impact are compared with results from standard observing system experiments (OSEs) in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS-5) GEOS-5 system. The two approaches are shown to provide unique, but complimentary, information. Used together, they reveal both redundancies and dependencies between observing system impacts as observations are added or removed. Understanding these dependencies poses a major challenge for optimizing the use of the current observational network and defining requirements for future observing systems.

  9. Refined topological vertex, cylindric partitions and U(1) adjoint theory

    We study the partition function of the compactified 5D U(1) gauge theory (in the Ω-background) with a single adjoint hypermultiplet, calculated using the refined topological vertex. We show that this partition function is an example a periodic Schur process and is a refinement of the generating function of cylindric plane partitions. The size of the cylinder is given by the mass of adjoint hypermultiplet and the parameters of the Ω-background. We also show that this partition function can be written as a trace of operators which are generalizations of vertex operators studied by Carlsson and Okounkov. In the last part of the paper we describe a way to obtain (q,t) identities using the refined topological vertex.

  10. Adjoint equation of ADS sub-critical reactor

    Compared with the critical reactor, the distributions of source neutron and fission neutron are asymmetric inside ADS (accelerator driven sub-critical system) sub-critical reactor, as well as the importance function is different. The multigroup-diffusion approximation was used to simplify the steady-state transport equation into multigroup equation. Then an adjoint equation normalized by the power of reactor core and an importance function associated with the relative power were derived. The physical significance of neutron importance in the sub-critical reactor was also derived. Finally, two different expressions of multiplication factor for sub-critical reactor with external neutron source were derived based on steady-state adjoint equations. (authors)

  11. Accurate adjoint design sensitivities for nano metal optics.

    Hansen, Paul; Hesselink, Lambertus

    2015-09-01

    We present a method for obtaining accurate numerical design sensitivities for metal-optical nanostructures. Adjoint design sensitivity analysis, long used in fluid mechanics and mechanical engineering for both optimization and structural analysis, is beginning to be used for nano-optics design, but it fails for sharp-cornered metal structures because the numerical error in electromagnetic simulations of metal structures is highest at sharp corners. These locations feature strong field enhancement and contribute strongly to design sensitivities. By using high-accuracy FEM calculations and rounding sharp features to a finite radius of curvature we obtain highly-accurate design sensitivities for 3D metal devices. To provide a bridge to the existing literature on adjoint methods in other fields, we derive the sensitivity equations for Maxwell's equations in the PDE framework widely used in fluid mechanics. PMID:26368483

  12. Adjoint Fokker-Planck equation and runaway electron dynamics

    Liu, Chang; Brennan, Dylan P.; Bhattacharjee, Amitava [Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Boozer, Allen H. [Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The adjoint Fokker-Planck equation method is applied to study the runaway probability function and the expected slowing-down time for highly relativistic runaway electrons, including the loss of energy due to synchrotron radiation. In direct correspondence to Monte Carlo simulation methods, the runaway probability function has a smooth transition across the runaway separatrix, which can be attributed to effect of the pitch angle scattering term in the kinetic equation. However, for the same numerical accuracy, the adjoint method is more efficient than the Monte Carlo method. The expected slowing-down time gives a novel method to estimate the runaway current decay time in experiments. A new result from this work is that the decay rate of high energy electrons is very slow when E is close to the critical electric field. This effect contributes further to a hysteresis previously found in the runaway electron population.

  13. A comparison of adjoint and data-centric verification techniques.

    Wildey, Timothy Michael; Cyr, Eric Christopher; Shadid, John Nicolas; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Smith, Thomas Michael

    2013-03-01

    This document summarizes the results from a level 3 milestone study within the CASL VUQ effort. We compare the adjoint-based a posteriori error estimation approach with a recent variant of a data-centric verification technique. We provide a brief overview of each technique and then we discuss their relative advantages and disadvantages. We use Drekar::CFD to produce numerical results for steady-state Navier Stokes and SARANS approximations. 3

  14. Optimization of a neutron detector design using adjoint transport simulation

    Yi, C.; Manalo, K.; Huang, M.; Chin, M.; Edgar, C.; Applegate, S.; Sjoden, G. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Gilhouse Boggs Bldg., 770 State St, Atlanta, GA 30332-0745 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    A synthetic aperture approach has been developed and investigated for Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) detection in vehicles passing a checkpoint at highway speeds. SNM is postulated to be stored in a moving vehicle and detector assemblies are placed on the road-side or in chambers embedded below the road surface. Neutron and gamma spectral awareness is important for the detector assembly design besides high efficiencies, so that different SNMs can be detected and identified with various possible shielding settings. The detector assembly design is composed of a CsI gamma-ray detector block and five neutron detector blocks, with peak efficiencies targeting different energy ranges determined by adjoint simulations. In this study, formulations are derived using adjoint transport simulations to estimate detector efficiencies. The formulations is applied to investigate several neutron detector designs for Block IV, which has its peak efficiency in the thermal range, and Block V, designed to maximize the total neutron counts over the entire energy spectrum. Other Blocks detect different neutron energies. All five neutron detector blocks and the gamma-ray block are assembled in both MCNP and deterministic simulation models, with detector responses calculated to validate the fully assembled design using a 30-group library. The simulation results show that the 30-group library, collapsed from an 80-group library using an adjoint-weighting approach with the YGROUP code, significantly reduced the computational cost while maintaining accuracy. (authors)

  15. Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling using Space, Energy and Angle

    Peplow, Douglas E. [ORNL; Mosher, Scott W [ORNL; Evans, Thomas M [ORNL

    2012-08-01

    For challenging radiation transport problems, hybrid methods combine the accuracy of Monte Carlo methods with the global information present in deterministic methods. One of the most successful hybrid methods is CADIS Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling. This method uses a deterministic adjoint solution to construct a biased source distribution and consistent weight windows to optimize a specific tally in a Monte Carlo calculation. The method has been implemented into transport codes using just the spatial and energy information from the deterministic adjoint and has been used in many applications to compute tallies with much higher figures-of-merit than analog calculations. CADIS also outperforms user-supplied importance values, which usually take long periods of user time to develop. This work extends CADIS to develop weight windows that are a function of the position, energy, and direction of the Monte Carlo particle. Two types of consistent source biasing are presented: one method that biases the source in space and energy while preserving the original directional distribution and one method that biases the source in space, energy, and direction. Seven simple example problems are presented which compare the use of the standard space/energy CADIS with the new space/energy/angle treatments.

  16. Unsteady adjoint of pressure loss for a fundamental transonic turbine vane

    Talnikar, Chaitanya; Laskowski, Gregory M

    2015-01-01

    High fidelity simulations, e.g., large eddy simulation are often needed for accurately predicting pressure losses due to wake mixing in turbomachinery applications. An unsteady adjoint of such high fidelity simulations is useful for design optimization in these aerodynamic applications. In this paper we present unsteady adjoint solutions using a large eddy simulation model for a vane from VKI using aerothermal objectives. The unsteady adjoint method is effective in capturing the gradient for a short time interval aerothermal objective, whereas the method provides diverging gradients for long time-averaged thermal objectives. As the boundary layer on the suction side near the trailing edge of the vane is turbulent, it poses a challenge for the adjoint solver. The chaotic dynamics cause the adjoint solution to diverge exponentially from the trailing edge region when solved backwards in time. This results in the corruption of the sensitivities obtained from the adjoint solutions. An energy analysis of the unstea...

  17. Adjoint-Based Sensitivity Maps for the Nearshore

    Orzech, Mark; Veeramony, Jay; Ngodock, Hans

    2013-04-01

    The wave model SWAN (Booij et al., 1999) solves the spectral action balance equation to produce nearshore wave forecasts and climatologies. It is widely used by the coastal modeling community and is part of a variety of coupled ocean-wave-atmosphere model systems. A variational data assimilation system (Orzech et al., 2013) has recently been developed for SWAN and is presently being transitioned to operational use by the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office. This system is built around a numerical adjoint to the fully nonlinear, nonstationary SWAN code. When provided with measured or artificial "observed" spectral wave data at a location of interest on a given nearshore bathymetry, the adjoint can compute the degree to which spectral energy levels at other locations are correlated with - or "sensitive" to - variations in the observed spectrum. Adjoint output may be used to construct a sensitivity map for the entire domain, tracking correlations of spectral energy throughout the grid. When access is denied to the actual locations of interest, sensitivity maps can be used to determine optimal alternate locations for data collection by identifying regions of greatest sensitivity in the mapped domain. The present study investigates the properties of adjoint-generated sensitivity maps for nearshore wave spectra. The adjoint and forward SWAN models are first used in an idealized test case at Duck, NC, USA, to demonstrate the system's effectiveness at optimizing forecasts of shallow water wave spectra for an inaccessible surf-zone location. Then a series of simulations is conducted for a variety of different initializing conditions, to examine the effects of seasonal changes in wave climate, errors in bathymetry, and variations in size and shape of the inaccessible region of interest. Model skill is quantified using two methods: (1) a more traditional correlation of observed and modeled spectral statistics such as significant wave height, and (2) a recently developed RMS

  18. Inflow and initial conditions for direct numerical simulation based on adjoint data assimilation

    Gronskis, A; Heitz, D.; Mémin, E.

    2011-01-01

    A method for generating inflow conditions for direct numerical simulations (DNS) of spatially-developing flows is presented. The proposed method is based on variational data assimilation and adjoint-based optimization. The estimation is conducted through an iterative process involving a forward integration of a given dynamical model followed by a backward integration of an adjoint system defined by the adjoint of the discrete scheme associated to the dynamical system. The ap...

  19. Self-Adjoint Extensions of the Pauli Equation in the Presence of a Magnetic Monopole

    Karat, Edwin R.; Schulz, Michael B.

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the Hamiltonian for a nonrelativistic electron with spin in the presence of an abelian magnetic monopole and note that it is not self-adjoint in the lowest two angular momentum modes. We then use von Neumann's theory of self-adjoint extensions to construct a self-adjoint operator with the same functional form. In general, this operator will have eigenstates in which the lowest two angular momentum modes mix, thereby removing conservation of angular momentum. However, consistency wi...

  20. Integration of the adjoint gamma quantum transport equation by the Monte Carlo method

    Comparative description and analysis of the direct and adjoint algorithms of calculation of gamma-quantum transmission in shielding using the Monte Carlo method have been carried out. Adjoint estimations for a number of monoenergetic sources have been considered. A brief description of ''COMETA'' program for BESM-6 computer reazaling direct and adjoint algorithms is presented. The program is modular-constructed which allows to widen it the new module-units being joined. Results of solution by the adjoint branch of two analog problems as compared to the analytical data are presented. These results confirm high efficiency of ''COMETA'' program

  1. Adjoint optimization of natural convection problems: differentially heated cavity

    Saglietti, Clio; Schlatter, Philipp; Monokrousos, Antonios; Henningson, Dan S.

    2016-06-01

    Optimization of natural convection-driven flows may provide significant improvements to the performance of cooling devices, but a theoretical investigation of such flows has been rarely done. The present paper illustrates an efficient gradient-based optimization method for analyzing such systems. We consider numerically the natural convection-driven flow in a differentially heated cavity with three Prandtl numbers (Pr=0.15{-}7 ) at super-critical conditions. All results and implementations were done with the spectral element code Nek5000. The flow is analyzed using linear direct and adjoint computations about a nonlinear base flow, extracting in particular optimal initial conditions using power iteration and the solution of the full adjoint direct eigenproblem. The cost function for both temperature and velocity is based on the kinetic energy and the concept of entransy, which yields a quadratic functional. Results are presented as a function of Prandtl number, time horizons and weights between kinetic energy and entransy. In particular, it is shown that the maximum transient growth is achieved at time horizons on the order of 5 time units for all cases, whereas for larger time horizons the adjoint mode is recovered as optimal initial condition. For smaller time horizons, the influence of the weights leads either to a concentric temperature distribution or to an initial condition pattern that opposes the mean shear and grows according to the Orr mechanism. For specific cases, it could also been shown that the computation of optimal initial conditions leads to a degenerate problem, with a potential loss of symmetry. In these situations, it turns out that any initial condition lying in a specific span of the eigenfunctions will yield exactly the same transient amplification. As a consequence, the power iteration converges very slowly and fails to extract all possible optimal initial conditions. According to the authors' knowledge, this behavior is illustrated here

  2. Running coupling in SU(2) with two adjoint fermions

    Rantaharju, Jarno; Rummukainen, Kari; Tuominen, Kimmo

    2015-01-01

    We study SU(2) gauge theory with two Dirac fermions in the adjoint representation of the gauge group on the lattice. Using clover improved Wilson fermion action with hypercubic truncated stout smearing we perform simulations at larger coupling than earlier. We measure the evolution of the coupling constant using the Schr\\"odinger functional method. Extrapolating our lattice results to the continuum, we confirm the existence of a fixed point in the interval 2.2 $\\lesssim $ $g^{*2}$ $\\lesssim $ 3. We also measure the anomalous dimension and find its value at the fixed point is 0.18 $\\lesssim $ $\\gamma^*$ $\\lesssim $ 0.23.

  3. Self-adjoint dirac equation for a fuzzy potential representation

    In the present paper, the dependent-, as well as the independent-variables that belong to a self-adjointed relativistic scattering equation, are properly transformed, for a fuzzy potential representation of Woods and Saxon type, with the purpose of being amenable to analytic solutions. This has been accomplished, in terms of hypergeometric functions that can be analytically continued before-and after-the boundary separating the interior from the exterior. Studies of these analytic solutions about the singular points are performed and the corresponding asymptotic behavior is investigated. The corresponding scattering matrix is extracted, where the resonance energy Eigen-values can be identified

  4. Adjoint Monte Carlo techniques and codes for organ dose calculations

    Adjoint Monte Carlo simulations can be effectively used for the estimation of doses in small targets when the sources are extended in large volumes or surfaces. The main features of two computer codes for calculating doses at free points or in organs of an anthropomorphic phantom are described. In the first program (REBEL-3) natural gamma-emitting sources are contained in the walls of a dwelling room; in the second one (POKER-CAMP) the user can specify arbitrary gamma sources with different spatial distributions in the environment: in (or on the surface of) the ground and in the air. 3 figures

  5. Bimetric Gravity From Adjoint Frame Field In Four Dimensions

    Guo, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    We provide a novel model of gravity by using adjoint frame fields in four dimensions. It has a natural interpretation as a gravitational theory of a complex metric field, which describes interactions between two real metrics. The classical solutions establish three appealing features. The spherical symmetric black hole solution has an additional hair, which includes the Schwarzschild solution as a special case. The de Sitter solution is realized without introducing a cosmological constant. The constant flat background breaks the Lorentz invariance spontaneously, although the Lorentz breaking effect can be localized to the second metric while the first metric still respects the Lorentz invariance.

  6. Inverse Modeling of Emissions using the CMAQ Adjoint Model

    Resler, Jaroslav; Eben, Kryštof; Juruš, Pavel; Krč, Pavel

    Chapel Hill : CMAS, 2008, s. 1-5. [Annual CMAS Conference /7./. Chapel Hill (US), 06.10.2008-08.10.2008] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET400300414; GA MŽP SP/1A4/107/07 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : 4DVar * data assimilation * inverse modelling * emission * CMAQ adjoint * tropospheric column of NO2 * satellite instruments * GOME2 * OMI Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://www.cmascenter.org/conference/2008/agenda.cfm

  7. Large-N reduction with adjoint Wilson fermions

    Bringoltz, Barak; Sharpe, Stephen R

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the large-N behavior of SU(N) lattice gauge theories with adjoint fermions by studying volume-reduced models, as pioneered by Eguchi and Kawai. We perform simulations on a single-site lattice for Nf = 1 and Nf = 2 Wilson Dirac fermions with values of N up to 53. We show for both values of Nf that in the large-N limit there is a finite region, containing both light and heavy fermions, of unbroken center symmetry where the theory exhibits volume independence. Using large-N reduction we attempt to calculate physical quantities such as the string tension and meson masses.

  8. On the Norm Convergence of the Self-Adjoint Trotter–Kato Product Formula with Error Bound

    Takashi Ichinose; Hideo Tamura

    2002-02-01

    The norm convergence of the Trotter–Kato product formula with error bound is shown for the semigroup generated by that operator sum of two nonnegative self-adjoint operators and which is self-adjoint.

  9. On rational R-matrices with adjoint SU(n) symmetry

    Stronks, Laurens; Schuricht, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Using the representation theory of Yangians we construct the rational R-matrix which takes values in the adjoint representation of SU(n). From this we derive an integrable SU(n) spin chain with lattice spins transforming under the adjoint representation. However, the resulting Hamiltonian is found to be non-Hermitian.

  10. Adjoint design sensitivity analysis of reduced atomic systems using generalized Langevin equation for lattice structures

    An efficient adjoint design sensitivity analysis method is developed for reduced atomic systems. A reduced atomic system and the adjoint system are constructed in a locally confined region, utilizing generalized Langevin equation (GLE) for periodic lattice structures. Due to the translational symmetry of lattice structures, the size of time history kernel function that accounts for the boundary effects of the reduced atomic systems could be reduced to a single atom’s degrees of freedom. For the problems of highly nonlinear design variables, the finite difference method is impractical for its inefficiency and inaccuracy. However, the adjoint method is very efficient regardless of the number of design variables since one additional time integration is required for the adjoint GLE. Through numerical examples, the derived adjoint sensitivity turns out to be accurate and efficient through the comparison with finite difference sensitivity

  11. Singular Potentials in Quantum Mechanics and Ambiguity in the Self-Adjoint Hamiltonian

    Tamás Fülöp

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available For a class of singular potentials, including the Coulomb potential (in three and less dimensions and $V(x = g/x^2$ with the coefficient $g$ in a certain range ($x$ being a space coordinate in one or more dimensions, the corresponding Schrödinger operator is not automatically self-adjoint on its natural domain. Such operators admit more than one self-adjoint domain, and the spectrum and all physical consequences depend seriously on the self-adjoint version chosen. The article discusses how the self-adjoint domains can be identified in terms of a boundary condition for the asymptotic behaviour of the wave functions around the singularity, and what physical differences emerge for different self-adjoint versions of the Hamiltonian. The paper reviews and interprets known results, with the intention to provide a practical guide for all those interested in how to approach these ambiguous situations.

  12. Adjoint $SU(5)$ GUT model with $T_{7}$ flavor symmetry

    Arbeláez, Carolina; Kovalenko, Sergey; Schmidt, Iván

    2015-01-01

    We propose an adjoint $SU(5)$ GUT model with a $T_{7}$ family symmetry and an extra $Z_{2}\\otimes Z_{2}^{\\prime }\\otimes Z_{3}\\otimes Z_{4}\\otimes Z_{12}$ discrete group, that successfully describes the prevailing Standard Model (SM) fermion mass and mixing pattern. The observed hierarchy of the charged fermion masses and the quark mixing angles arises from the $Z_{3}\\otimes Z_{4}\\otimes Z_{12}$ symmetry breaking, which occurs near the GUT scale. The light active neutrino masses are generated by type I and type III seesaw mechanisms mediated by the fermionic $SU(5)$ singlet and the adjoint $\\mathbf{24}$-plet. The model predicts the effective Majorana neutrino mass parameter of neutrinoless double beta decay to be $m_{\\beta \\beta }=$ 4 and 50 meV for the normal and the inverted neutrino spectrum, respectively. We construct several benchmark scenarios, which lead to $SU(5)$ gauge coupling unification and are compatible with the known phenomenological constraints originating from the lightness of neutrinos, prot...

  13. Limitations of Adjoint-Based Optimization for Separated Flows

    Otero, J. Javier; Sharma, Ati; Sandberg, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Cabin noise is generated by the transmission of turbulent pressure fluctuations through a vibrating panel and can lead to fatigue. In the present study, we model this problem by using DNS to simulate the flow separating off a backward facing step and interacting with a plate downstream of the step. An adjoint formulation of the full compressible Navier-Stokes equations with varying viscosity is used to calculate the optimal control required to minimize the fluid-structure-acoustic interaction with the plate. To achieve noise reduction, a cost function in wavenumber space is chosen to minimize the excitation of the lower structural modes of the structure. To ensure the validity of time-averaged cost functions, it is essential that the time horizon is long enough to be a representative sample of the statistical behaviour of the flow field. The results from the current study show how this scenario is not always feasible for separated flows, because the chaotic behaviour of turbulence surpasses the ability of adjoint-based methods to compute time-dependent sensitivities of the flow.

  14. Solar wind reconstruction from magnetosheath data using an adjoint approach

    Nabert, C.; Othmer, C. [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Geophysik und extraterrestrische Physik; Glassmeier, K.H. [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Geophysik und extraterrestrische Physik; Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Goettingen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    We present a new method to reconstruct solar wind conditions from spacecraft data taken during magnetosheath passages, which can be used to support, e.g., magnetospheric models. The unknown parameters of the solar wind are used as boundary conditions of an MHD (magnetohydrodynamics) magnetosheath model. The boundary conditions are varied until the spacecraft data matches the model predictions. The matching process is performed using a gradient-based minimization of the misfit between data and model. To achieve this time-consuming procedure, we introduce the adjoint of the magnetosheath model, which allows efficient calculation of the gradients. An automatic differentiation tool is used to generate the adjoint source code of the model. The reconstruction method is applied to THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms) data to calculate the solar wind conditions during spacecraft magnetosheath transitions. The results are compared to actual solar wind data. This allows validation of our reconstruction method and indicates the limitations of the MHD magnetosheath model used.

  15. Solar wind reconstruction from magnetosheath data using an adjoint approach

    We present a new method to reconstruct solar wind conditions from spacecraft data taken during magnetosheath passages, which can be used to support, e.g., magnetospheric models. The unknown parameters of the solar wind are used as boundary conditions of an MHD (magnetohydrodynamics) magnetosheath model. The boundary conditions are varied until the spacecraft data matches the model predictions. The matching process is performed using a gradient-based minimization of the misfit between data and model. To achieve this time-consuming procedure, we introduce the adjoint of the magnetosheath model, which allows efficient calculation of the gradients. An automatic differentiation tool is used to generate the adjoint source code of the model. The reconstruction method is applied to THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms) data to calculate the solar wind conditions during spacecraft magnetosheath transitions. The results are compared to actual solar wind data. This allows validation of our reconstruction method and indicates the limitations of the MHD magnetosheath model used.

  16. On the Self-adjointness of the Product Operators of Two mth-Order Differential Operators on [0, +∞)

    Jian Ye AN; Jiong SUN

    2004-01-01

    In the present paper, the self-adjointness of the product of two mth-order differential operators on [0, +∞) is studied. By means of the construction theory of self-adjoint operators and matrix computation, we obtain a sufficient and necessary condition to ensure that the product operator is self-adjoint, which extends the results in the second order case.

  17. Adjoint optimization scheme for lower hybrid current rampup and profile control in Tokamak

    The purpose of this work is to take into account and study the effect of the electric field profiles on the Lower Hybrid (LH) current drive efficiency during transient phases such as rampup. As a complement to the full ray-tracing / Fokker Planck studies, and for the purpose of optimization studies, we developed a simplified 1-D model based on the adjoint Karney-Fisch numerical results. This approach allows us to estimate the LH power deposition profile which would be required for ramping the current with prescribed rate, total current density profile (q-profile) and surface loop voltage. For rampup optimization studies, we can therefore scan the whole parameter space and eliminate a posteriori those scenarios which correspond to unrealistic deposition profiles. We thus obtain the time evolution of the LH power, minor radius of the plasma, volt-second consumption and total energy dissipated. Optimization can thus be performed with respect to any of those criteria. This scheme is illustrated by some numerical simulations performed with TORE-SUPRA and NET/ITER parameters. We conclude with a derivation of a simple and general scaling law for the flux consumption during the rampup phase

  18. Infrared regime of SU(2) with one adjoint Dirac flavor

    Athenodorou, Andreas; Bennett, Ed; Bergner, Georg; Lucini, Biagio

    2015-06-01

    SU(2) gauge theory with one Dirac flavor in the adjoint representation is investigated on a lattice. Initial results for the gluonic and mesonic spectrum, static potential from Wilson and Polyakov loops, and the anomalous dimension of the fermionic condensate from the Dirac mode number are presented. The results found are not consistent with conventional confining behavior, pointing instead tentatively towards a theory lying within or very near the onset of the conformal window, with the anomalous dimension of the fermionic condensate in the range 0.9 ≲γ*≲0.95 . The implications of our work for building a viable theory of strongly interacting dynamics beyond the standard model are discussed.

  19. Conformal versus confining scenario in SU(2) with adjoint fermions

    The masses of the lowest-lying states in the meson and in the gluonic sector of an SU(2) gauge theory with two Dirac flavors in the adjoint representation are measured on the lattice at a fixed value of the lattice coupling β=4/g02=2.25 for values of the bare fermion mass m0 that span a range between the quenched regime and the massless limit, and for various lattice volumes. Even for light constituent fermions the lightest glueballs are found to be lighter than the lightest mesons. Moreover, the string tension between two static fundamental sources strongly depends on the mass of the dynamical fermions and becomes of the order of the inverse squared lattice linear size before the chiral limit is reached. The implications of these findings for the phase of the theory in the massless limit are discussed and a strategy for discriminating between the (near-)conformal and the confining scenario is outlined.

  20. Adjoint Fokker-Planck equation and runaway electron dynamics

    Liu, Chang; Boozer, Allen H; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2016-01-01

    A new method to obtain the runaway probability and the expected slowing-down time for runaway electrons is developed, by solving the adjoint Fokker-Planck equation in momentum space. The runaway probability function has a smooth transition at the runaway separatrix, which can be attributed to the effect of the pitch angle scattering term in the kinetic equation. The expected slowing-down time gives a new way to estimate the runaway current decay time in experiments. The result shows that the decay rate of high energy electron is very slow when E is close to the critical electric field, which helps elucidate the hysteresis effect seen in the runaway electron population. Given the same numerical accuracy, the new method is more efficient than the Monte Carlo simulation.

  1. An Adjoint-Based Adaptive Ensemble Kalman Filter

    Song, Hajoon

    2013-10-01

    A new hybrid ensemble Kalman filter/four-dimensional variational data assimilation (EnKF/4D-VAR) approach is introduced to mitigate background covariance limitations in the EnKF. The work is based on the adaptive EnKF (AEnKF) method, which bears a strong resemblance to the hybrid EnKF/three-dimensional variational data assimilation (3D-VAR) method. In the AEnKF, the representativeness of the EnKF ensemble is regularly enhanced with new members generated after back projection of the EnKF analysis residuals to state space using a 3D-VAR [or optimal interpolation (OI)] scheme with a preselected background covariance matrix. The idea here is to reformulate the transformation of the residuals as a 4D-VAR problem, constraining the new member with model dynamics and the previous observations. This should provide more information for the estimation of the new member and reduce dependence of the AEnKF on the assumed stationary background covariance matrix. This is done by integrating the analysis residuals backward in time with the adjoint model. Numerical experiments are performed with the Lorenz-96 model under different scenarios to test the new approach and to evaluate its performance with respect to the EnKF and the hybrid EnKF/3D-VAR. The new method leads to the least root-mean-square estimation errors as long as the linear assumption guaranteeing the stability of the adjoint model holds. It is also found to be less sensitive to choices of the assimilation system inputs and parameters.

  2. On the group classification and conservation laws of the self-adjoint first order evolution equations

    Freire, Igor Leite

    2010-01-01

    In this work we consider the problem on group classification and conservation laws of the general first order evolution equations. We obtain the subclasses of these general equations which are quasi-self-adjoint and self-adjoint. By using the recent Ibragimov's Theorem on conservation laws, we establish the conservation laws of the equations admiting self-adjoint equations. We illustrate our results applying them to the inviscid Burgers' equation. In particular an infinite number of new symmetries of these equations are found and their corresponding conservation laws are established.

  3. Quantum cosmology of scalar-tensor theories and self-adjointness

    Almeida, C R; Fabris, J C; Moniz, P V

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of the self-adjointness for the case of a quantum minisuperspace Hamiltonian retrieved from a Brans-Dicke (BD) action is investigated. Our matter content is presented in terms of a perfect fluid, onto which the Schutz's formalism will be applied. We use the von Neumann theorem and the similarity with the Laplacian operator in one of the variables to determine the cases where the Hamiltonian is self-adjoint and if it admits self-adjoint extensions. For the latter, we study which extension is physically more suitable.

  4. Use of adjoint methods in the probabilistic finite element approach to fracture mechanics

    Liu, Wing Kam; Besterfield, Glen; Lawrence, Mark; Belytschko, Ted

    1988-01-01

    The adjoint method approach to probabilistic finite element methods (PFEM) is presented. When the number of objective functions is small compared to the number of random variables, the adjoint method is far superior to the direct method in evaluating the objective function derivatives with respect to the random variables. The PFEM is extended to probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) using an element which has the near crack-tip singular strain field embedded. Since only two objective functions (i.e., mode I and II stress intensity factors) are needed for PFM, the adjoint method is well suited.

  5. Adjoint Assimilation in Marine Ecosystem Models and an Example of Application

    XU Qing; LIU Yuguang; L(U) Xianqing

    2005-01-01

    This paper aims at a review of the work carried out to date on the adjoint assimilation of data in marine ecosystem models since 1995. The structure and feature of the adjoint assimilation in marine ecosystem models are also introduced.To illustrate the application of the adjoint technique and its merits, a 4-variable ecosystem model coupled with a 3-D physical model is established for the Bohai Sea and the Yellow Sea. The chlorophyll concentration data derived from the SeaWiFS ocean colour data are assimilated in the model with the technique. Some results are briefly presented.

  6. Revisit boundary conditions for the self-adjoint angular flux formulation

    Wang, Yaqi [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gleicher, Frederick N. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    We revisit the boundary conditions for SAAF. We derived the equivalent parity variational form ready for coding up. The more rigorous approach of evaluating odd parity should be solving the odd parity equation coupled with the even parity. We proposed a symmetric reflecting boundary condition although neither positive definiteness nor even-odd decoupling is achieved. A simple numerical test verifies the validity of these boundary conditions.

  7. Variational characterizations for eigenfunctions of analytic self-adjoint operator functions

    Georgios Katsouleas; John Maroulas

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we consider Rellich's diagonalization theorem for analytic self-adjoint operator functions and investigate variational principles for their eigenfunctions and interlacing statements. As an application, we present a characterization for the eigenvalues of hyperbolic operator polynomials.

  8. A numerical adjoint parabolic equation (PE) method for tomography and geoacoustic inversion in shallow water

    Hermand, Jean-Pierre; Berrada, Mohamed; Meyer, Matthias; Asch, Mark

    2005-09-01

    Recently, an analytic adjoint-based method of optimal nonlocal boundary control has been proposed for inversion of a waveguide acoustic field using the wide-angle parabolic equation [Meyer and Hermand, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 117, 2937-2948 (2005)]. In this paper a numerical extension of this approach is presented that allows the direct inversion for the geoacoustic parameters which are embedded in a spectral integral representation of the nonlocal boundary condition. The adjoint model is generated numerically and the inversion is carried out jointly across multiple frequencies. The paper further discusses the application of the numerical adjoint PE method for ocean acoustic tomography. To show the effectiveness of the implemented numerical adjoint, preliminary inversion results of water sound-speed profile and bottom acoustic properties will be shown for the YELLOW SHARK '94 experimental conditions.

  9. Self-adjoint extensions of the Pauli equation in the presence of a magnetic monopole

    Karat, E R; Karat, Edwin R; Schulz, Michael B

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the Hamiltonian for a nonrelativistic electron with spin in the presence of a magnetic monopole and note that it is not self-adjoint in the lowest two angular momentum modes. We then use von Neumann's theory of self-adjoint extensions to construct a self-adjoint operator with the same functional form. In general, this operator will have eigenstates in which the lowest two angular momentum modes mix, thereby removing conservation of angular momentum. Because the same effect occurs for a spinless particle with a sufficiently attractive inverse square potential, we also study this system. We use this simpler Hamiltonian to compare the eigenfunctions corresponding to a particular self-adjoint extension with the eigenfunctions satisfying a boundary condition consistent with probability conservation.

  10. A SYSTEMATIC FORMULATION OF THE CONTINUOUS ADJOINT METHOD APPLIED TO VISCOUS AERODYNAMIC DESIGN

    C. Castro*, C. Lozano**, F. Palacios*** and E. Zuazua****

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A continuous adjoint approach to aerodynamic design for viscous compressible flows on unstructuredgrids is developed, and three important problems raised in the continuous adjoint literature are solved. First, using tools of shape deformation of boundary integrals a generic adjoint formulation is developed withindependence of the kind of mesh used. Then, a systematic way of reducing the 2nd order derivative terms which arise is presented which avoids the need of using higher order numerical solvers to obtain accurateapproximations of the 2nd order derivatives. And finally, the class of admissible optimization functionals isclarified. Several remarks are made concerning the longstanding discrete vs. continuous adjoint dichotomy, with the emphasis not on the advantages or disadvantages of each method, but rather on the well-posedness of the approaches. The accuracy of the sensitivity derivatives is assessed by comparison with finite-difference computations, and the validity of the overall methodology is illustrated with design examples under demanding subsonic conditions.

  11. Self-adjoint extensions of the Pauli equation in the presence of a magnetic monopole

    We discuss the Hamiltonian for a nonrelativistic electron with spin in the presence of an abelian magnetic monopole and note that it is not self-adjoint in the lowest two angular momentum modes. We then use von Neumann close-quote s theory of self-adjoint extensions to construct a self-adjoint operator with the same functional form. In general, this operator will have eigenstates in which the lowest two angular momentum modes mix, thereby removing conservation of angular momentum. However, consistency with the solutions of the Dirac equation limits the possibilities such that conservation of angular momentum is restored. Because the same effect occurs for a spinless particle with a sufficiently attractive inverse square potential, we also study this system. We use this simpler Hamiltonian to compare the eigenfunctions corresponding to a particular self-adjoint extension with the eigenfunctions satisfying a boundary condition consistent with probability conservation. copyright 1997 Academic Press, Inc

  12. Self-adjoint extensions of the Pauli equation in the presence of a magnetic monopole

    Karat, E.; Schulz, M. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Laboratory for Nuclear Science, and Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States)

    1997-02-01

    We discuss the Hamiltonian for a nonrelativistic electron with spin in the presence of an abelian magnetic monopole and note that it is not self-adjoint in the lowest two angular momentum modes. We then use von Neumann{close_quote}s theory of self-adjoint extensions to construct a self-adjoint operator with the same functional form. In general, this operator will have eigenstates in which the lowest two angular momentum modes mix, thereby removing conservation of angular momentum. However, consistency with the solutions of the Dirac equation limits the possibilities such that conservation of angular momentum is restored. Because the same effect occurs for a spinless particle with a sufficiently attractive inverse square potential, we also study this system. We use this simpler Hamiltonian to compare the eigenfunctions corresponding to a particular self-adjoint extension with the eigenfunctions satisfying a boundary condition consistent with probability conservation. {copyright} 1997 Academic Press, Inc.

  13. MS S4.03.002 - Adjoint-Based Design for Configuration Shaping

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation discusses a method of inverse design for low sonic boom using adjoint-based gradient computations. It outlines a method for shaping a configuration in order to match a prescribed near-field signature.

  14. Comparison of the adjoint and adjoint-free 4dVar assimilation of the hydrographic and velocity observations in the Adriatic Sea

    Yaremchuk, Max; Martin, Paul; Koch, Andrey; Beattie, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Performance of the adjoint and adjoint-free 4-dimensional variational (4dVar) data assimilation techniques is compared in application to the hydrographic surveys and velocity observations collected in the Adriatic Sea in 2006. Assimilating the data into the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) has shown that both methods deliver similar reduction of the cost function and demonstrate comparable forecast skill at approximately the same computational expense. The obtained optimal states were, however, significantly different in terms of distance from the background state: application of the adjoint method resulted in a 30-40% larger departure, mostly due to the excessive level of ageostrophic motions in the southern basin of the Sea that was not covered by observations.

  15. Adjoint Algorithm for CAD-Based Shape Optimization Using a Cartesian Method

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Adjoint solutions of the governing flow equations are becoming increasingly important for the development of efficient analysis and optimization algorithms. A well-known use of the adjoint method is gradient-based shape optimization. Given an objective function that defines some measure of performance, such as the lift and drag functionals, its gradient is computed at a cost that is essentially independent of the number of design variables (geometric parameters that control the shape). More recently, emerging adjoint applications focus on the analysis problem, where the adjoint solution is used to drive mesh adaptation, as well as to provide estimates of functional error bounds and corrections. The attractive feature of this approach is that the mesh-adaptation procedure targets a specific functional, thereby localizing the mesh refinement and reducing computational cost. Our focus is on the development of adjoint-based optimization techniques for a Cartesian method with embedded boundaries.12 In contrast t o implementations on structured and unstructured grids, Cartesian methods decouple the surface discretization from the volume mesh. This feature makes Cartesian methods well suited for the automated analysis of complex geometry problems, and consequently a promising approach to aerodynamic optimization. Melvin et developed an adjoint formulation for the TRANAIR code, which is based on the full-potential equation with viscous corrections. More recently, Dadone and Grossman presented an adjoint formulation for the Euler equations. In both approaches, a boundary condition is introduced to approximate the effects of the evolving surface shape that results in accurate gradient computation. Central to automated shape optimization algorithms is the issue of geometry modeling and control. The need to optimize complex, "real-life" geometry provides a strong incentive for the use of parametric-CAD systems within the optimization procedure. In previous work, we presented

  16. Weighted $L^p$ estimates for the area integral associated to self-adjoint operators

    Gong, Ruming; Yan, Lixin

    2011-01-01

    This article is concerned with some weighted norm inequalities for the so-called horizontal (i.e. involving time derivatives) area integrals associated to a non-negative self-adjoint operator satisfying a pointwise Gaussian estimate for its heat kernel, as well as the corresponding vertical (i.e. involving space derivatives) area integrals associated to a non-negative self-adjoint operator satisfying in addition a pointwise upper bounds for the gradient of the heat kernel. As applications, we...

  17. Self-adjoint Time Operator is the Rule for Discrete Semibounded Hamiltonians

    Galapon, E A

    2002-01-01

    We prove explicitly that to every discrete, semibounded Hamiltonian with constant degeneracy and with finite sum of the squares of the reciprocal of its eigenvalues and whose eigenvectors span the entire Hilbert space there exists a characteristic self-adjoint time operator which is canonically conjugate to the Hamiltonian in a dense subspace of the Hilbert space. Moreover, we show that each characteristic time operator generates an uncountable class of self- adjoint operators canonically conjugate with the same Hamiltonian.

  18. Efficient parameter estimation in 2D transport models based on an adjoint formalism

    An adjoint based optimization procedure is elaborated to estimate transport coefficients for plasma edge models based on a limited set of known profiles at different locations. It is shown that a set of adjoint equations can accurately determine all sensitivities towards transport coefficients at once. A proof of principle is provided on a simple geometry. The methodology is subsequently applied to assess whether a simple edge model can be tuned toward full B2-EIRENE profiles for a JET-configuration. (paper)

  19. Investigation of a continuous adjoint-based optimization procedure for aeroacoustic control of plane jets

    Highlights: ► Successful noise control of a 2D-planejet with DNS resolution and a 3D-planejet with LES-resolution using adjoint method. ► Validation of gradient-information obtained with the continuous-adjoint approach, by comparing gradient with finite differences. ► Extension of control-interval with the receding horizon algorithm. - Abstract: A control optimization technique using the continuous adjoint of the compressible Navier–Stokes equations is implemented for aeroacoustic optimization of plane jet flows. The purpose of the adjoint equations is to provide sensitivity information, which is afterwards used in a gradient-based minimization of a prescribed cost functional, designed to describe the far-field sound pressure level (SPL). The objective of the present paper is to demonstrate the ability to reduce the sound in the near far-field of plane jets. Furthermore, as the continuous adjoint approach can become inaccurate, due to inconsistencies between the continuous and the discretized system, the accuracy of the continuous adjoint approach is investigated. The considered cases exhibit a nozzle exit Reynolds number of Rejet = ρujetD/μ = 2000 and a Mach number of Mjet = 0.9, performed using two-dimensional direct numerical simulation and three-dimensional large-eddy simulation, respectively. A comparison of the obtained gradient via adjoint and finite differences is presented and it is shown, that in order to obtain reliable gradient directions, the length of the optimization time needs to be restricted. Furthermore, a receding horizon optimization for the two-dimensional plane jet simulation is used to obtain a sound reduction over much longer time intervals. The influence of different formulations of the viscosity in the adjoint equations is finally investigated.

  20. On the validity of tidal turbine array configurations obtained from steady-state adjoint optimisation

    Jacobs, Christian T.; Piggott, Matthew D.; Kramer, Stephan C; Funke, Simon W.

    2016-01-01

    Extracting the optimal amount of power from an array of tidal turbines requires an intricate understanding of tidal dynamics and the effects of turbine placement on the local and regional scale flow. Numerical models have contributed significantly towards this understanding, and more recently, adjoint-based modelling has been employed to optimise the positioning of the turbines in an array in an automated way and improve on simple, regular man-made configurations. Adjoint-based optimisation o...

  1. A self-adjoint arrival time operator inspired by measurement models

    Highlights: • Construction of a self-adjoint arrival time operator inspired by measurements. • Agreement with the strong measurement formula in the low momentum regime. • Review of self-adjoint and non-self-adjoint arrival time operators. • Discussion of the momentum operator on the half-line. • Discussion of the intuitive reasons obstructing self-adjointness. - Abstract: We introduce an arrival time operator which is self-adjoint and, unlike previously proposed arrival time operators, has a close link to simple measurement models. Its spectrum leads to an arrival time distribution which is a variant of the Kijowski distribution (a re-ordering of the current) in the large momentum regime but is proportional to the kinetic energy density in the small momentum regime, in agreement with measurement models. A brief derivation of the latter distribution is given. We make some simple observations about the physical reasons for self-adjointness, or its absence, in both arrival time operators and the momentum operator on the half-line and we also compare our operator with the dwell time operator

  2. Plumes, Hotspot & Slabs Imaged by Global Adjoint Tomography

    Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Lei, W.; Peter, D. B.; Smith, J. A.; Komatitsch, D.; Tromp, J.

    2015-12-01

    We present the "first generation" global adjoint tomography model based on 3D wave simulations, which is the result of 15 conjugate-gradient iterations with confined transverse isotropy to the upper mantle. Our starting model is the 3D mantle and crustal models S362ANI (Kustowski et al. 2008) and Crust2.0 (Bassin et al. 2000), respectively. We take into account the full nonlinearity of wave propagation in numerical simulations including attenuation (both in forward and adjoint simulations), topography/bathymetry, etc., using the GPU version of the SPECFEM3D_GLOBE package. We invert for crust and mantle together without crustal corrections to avoid any bias in mantle structure. We started with an initial selection of 253 global CMT events within the magnitude range 5.8 ≤ Mw ≤ 7.0 with numerical simulations having resolution down to 27 s combining 30-s body and 60-s surface waves. After the 12th iteration we increased the resolution to 17 s, including higher-frequency body waves as well as going down to 45 s in surface-wave measurements. We run 180-min seismograms and assimilate all minor- and major-arc body and surface waves. Our 15th iteration model update shows a tantalisingly enhanced image of the Tahiti plume as well as various other plumes and hotspots, such as Caroline, Galapagos, Yellowstone, Erebus, etc. Furthermore, we see clear improvements in slab resolution along the Hellenic and Japan Arcs, as well as subduction along the East of Scotia Plate, which does not exist in the initial model. Point-spread function tests (Fichtner & Trampert 2011) suggest that we are close to the resolution of continental-scale studies in our global inversions and able to confidently map features, for instance, at the scale of the Yellowstone hotspot. This is a clear consequence of our multi-scale smoothing strategy, in which we define our smoothing operator as a function of the approximate Hessian kernel and smooth our gradients less wherever we have good ray coverage

  3. State estimates and forecasts of the loop current in the Gulf of Mexico using the MITgcm and its adjoint

    Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh; Cornuelle, Bruce D.; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Rudnick, Daniel L.; Owens, W. Brechner

    2013-07-01

    An ocean state estimate has been developed for the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) using the MIT general circulation model and its adjoint. The estimate has been tested by forecasting loop current (LC) evolution and eddy shedding in the GoM. The adjoint (or four-dimensional variational) method was used to match the model evolution to observations by adjusting model temperature and salinity initial conditions, open boundary conditions, and atmospheric forcing fields. The model was fit to satellite-derived along-track sea surface height, separated into temporal mean and anomalies, and gridded sea surface temperature for 2 month periods. The optimized state at the end of the assimilation period was used to initialize the forecast for 2 months. Forecasts explore practical LC predictability and provide a cross-validation test of the state estimate by comparing it to independent future observations. The model forecast was tested for several LC eddy separation events, including Eddy Franklin in May 2010 during the deepwater horizon oil spill disaster in the GoM. The forecast used monthly climatological open boundary conditions, atmospheric forcing, and run-off fluxes. The model performance was evaluated by computing model-observation root-mean-square difference (rmsd) during both the hindcast and forecast periods. The rmsd metrics for the forecast generally outperformed persistence (keeping the initial state fixed) and reference (forecast initialized using assimilated Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model 1/12° global analysis) model simulations during LC eddy separation events for a period of 1˜2 months.

  4. Application of real, adjoint and bilinear weighting for collapsing group constants used in space neutron diffusion problems

    Conventional collapsing for group cross sections used in multigroup nuclear reactor calculations is usually performed using normal (real; direct) flux weighting. The application of more advanced collapsing procedures using in an appropriate manner real, adjoint and bilinear weighting was in the past restricted in general to fundamental mode problems. Although the principles have been published for more than ten years, there seems to exist little recent experience on the merits and possible difficulties of these improved procedures for multidimensional diffusion problems for practical purposes, e.g. in the nuclear design and analysis of large Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs). The present work indicates the nature of the problems which could possibly be encountered in applying these procedures by tracing them back to the known close correspondence between group collapsing and synthesis methods. It tries to explain certain somewhat unusual features of the collapsed group constants obtained by adjoint and bilinear weighting and describes the experience gained in representative 1-dim. and 2-dim. test cases. It could be shown for criticality and perturbation calculations that in general it is advantageous to apply these improved collapsing methods if the necessary precautions are taken. Compared to the conventional collapsing procedures these improved procedures are especially useful for multidimensional problems because their application is well suited for that purpose. In the present study it could be proven that they are favorable with respect to computer time and storage needed due to the fact that the necessary number of coarse groups can be kept fairly small without deteriorating too much the accuracy and reliability of the coarse group results compared to reference results of corresponding fine group calculations with uncollapsed group constants. (orig.)

  5. State estimates and forecasts of the loop current in the Gulf of Mexico using the MITgcm and its adjoint

    Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh

    2013-07-01

    An ocean state estimate has been developed for the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) using the MIT general circulation model and its adjoint. The estimate has been tested by forecasting loop current (LC) evolution and eddy shedding in the GoM. The adjoint (or four-dimensional variational) method was used to match the model evolution to observations by adjusting model temperature and salinity initial conditions, open boundary conditions, and atmospheric forcing fields. The model was fit to satellite-derived along-track sea surface height, separated into temporal mean and anomalies, and gridded sea surface temperature for 2 month periods. The optimized state at the end of the assimilation period was used to initialize the forecast for 2 months. Forecasts explore practical LC predictability and provide a cross-validation test of the state estimate by comparing it to independent future observations. The model forecast was tested for several LC eddy separation events, including Eddy Franklin in May 2010 during the deepwater horizon oil spill disaster in the GoM. The forecast used monthly climatological open boundary conditions, atmospheric forcing, and run-off fluxes. The model performance was evaluated by computing model-observation root-mean-square difference (rmsd) during both the hindcast and forecast periods. The rmsd metrics for the forecast generally outperformed persistence (keeping the initial state fixed) and reference (forecast initialized using assimilated Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model 1/12° global analysis) model simulations during LC eddy separation events for a period of 1̃2 months.

  6. A practical discrete-adjoint method for high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations

    Vishnampet, Ramanathan [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Bodony, Daniel J. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Freund, Jonathan B., E-mail: jbfreund@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Methods and computing hardware advances have enabled accurate predictions of complex compressible turbulence phenomena, such as the generation of jet noise that motivates the present effort. However, limited understanding of underlying physical mechanisms restricts the utility of such predictions since they do not, by themselves, indicate a route to design improvements. Gradient-based optimization using adjoints can circumvent the flow complexity to guide designs, though this is predicated on the availability of a sufficiently accurate solution of the forward and adjoint systems. These are challenging to obtain, since both the chaotic character of the turbulence and the typical use of discretizations near their resolution limits in order to efficiently represent its smaller scales will amplify any approximation errors made in the adjoint formulation. Formulating a practical exact adjoint that avoids such errors is especially challenging if it is to be compatible with state-of-the-art simulation methods used for the turbulent flow itself. Automatic differentiation (AD) can provide code to calculate a nominally exact adjoint, but existing general-purpose AD codes are inefficient to the point of being prohibitive for large-scale turbulence simulations. Here, we analyze the compressible flow equations as discretized using the same high-order workhorse methods used for many high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations, and formulate a practical space–time discrete-adjoint method without changing the basic discretization. A key step is the definition of a particular discrete analog of the continuous norm that defines our cost functional; our selection leads directly to an efficient Runge–Kutta-like scheme, though it would be just first-order accurate if used outside the adjoint formulation for time integration, with finite-difference spatial operators for the adjoint system. Its computational cost only modestly exceeds that of the flow equations. We confirm that

  7. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of hydrodynamic stability in cyclonic flows

    Guzman Inigo, Juan; Juniper, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Cyclonic separators are used in a variety of industries to efficiently separate mixtures of fluid and solid phases by means of centrifugal forces and gravity. In certain circumstances, the vortex core of cyclonic flows is known to precess due to the instability of the flow, which leads to performance reductions. We aim to characterize the unsteadiness using linear stability analysis of the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations in a global framework. The system of equations, including the turbulence model, is linearised to obtain an eigenvalue problem. Unstable modes corresponding to the dynamics of the large structures of the turbulent flow are extracted. The analysis shows that the most unstable mode is a helical motion which develops around the axis of the flow. This result is in good agreement with LES and experimental analysis, suggesting the validity of the approach. Finally, an adjoint-based sensitivity analysis is performed to determine the regions of the flow that, when altered, have most influence on the frequency and growth-rate of the unstable eigenvalues.

  8. Adjoint sources, disconnected loops and other fruit of lattice QCD

    Foster, M S

    1998-01-01

    eta' meson mass in full QCD. We introduce related source pairs to minimise the variance of the disconnected loop operators that are employed. We are able to obtain estimates of the mass from a very modest number of gauge configurations and purely local operators. We did not observe any evidence of unquenching from the measurements obtained, though statistical noise dominated the signal in the region where definitive effects would be seen. We undertake a comprehensive study of the gluelump mass spectrum, exploring the spin structure of the state. We use five lattice spacings from which we extract continuum values for the state splittings, with high statistics employed at beta = 6.0. We conduct a low statistics study of a related and previously unexamined lattice state, which we term the adjoint meson. We find that this state is fractionally more massive than the gluelump on the lattices considered, with indications that the splitting is greater than the pion mass at beta = 6.0. We investigate a sum rule approa...

  9. Use of adjoint transport solutions for inverse problems

    Inverse problems represent a third major class of transport problems (after criticality-type problems and shielding-type problems). For the purpose of discussion here, an inverse problem is defined to be one in which a medium of interest emits some particular type of radiation, either spontaneously or when exposed to some other type of radiation. From a knowledge of the emitted radiation characteristics, one wishes to infer something about the medium that emits the detected radiation. An important example of a practical inverse problem is the geophysical logging of geological formations to determine the presence of minerals or hydrocarbons in the vicinity of a borehole. Proposals have also been made to detect hidden explosives by these methods. For a complete understanding of the apparatus used to solve inverse problems, it is important to know the characteristic interrogation distance of the method. Phrased more precisely, What is the relative contribution to the detector signal due to radiation particles emitted by different elements of volume in the medium being interrogated? As shown in the paper, it is possible to address this question with a computational procedure that utilizes adjoint transport solutions

  10. U.S. Department Of Energy's nuclear engineering education research: highlights of recent and current research-III. 8. Adjoint Monte Carlo Methods for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a new technique for administering external beam radiation therapy. This technology modulates the intensity and shape of the treatment beam as a function of source position and patient anatomy. This process of conforming the source to the patient requires the optimization of the independent variables of the source field. In this study, adjoint Monte Carlo methods were used to compute the sensitivity field that corresponds to a prescribed dose distribution. Given these data, linear and nonlinear optimization models were constructed with a simplified geometry to compute an optimized set of beams to deliver a desired dose distribution. The dose delivered to voxel i by beam j (Dij) influence matrix may be obtained from solutions to the adjoint transport equation. These solutions provide the sensitivity of the prescribed dose at a single point in the patient to all possible points in the source field. For this investigation, the source field consisted of 36 possible positions along a circular gantry. Each position had 21 possible directions to aim at the patient. Beam weights could vary continuously, and beam energy spectra matched that of a hospital-based linear accelerator. The MCNP Monte Carlo code was used to transport adjoint particles from each patient voxel to the 36 possible source locations where they were binned by direction and energy. The patient voxels (1 cm3) were defined within the central slice of a block phantom (31 x 31 x 11 cm) of unit-density water. The adjoint source for each voxel was the flux-to-dose conversion factor for tissue. The bin structures for the tallies matched the direction and energy structure of the forward source. Figure 1 shows the dose volume histograms (DVHs) for the optimized dose distributions for a ring-shaped tumor surrounding a sensitive structure. The DVH reports the fraction of each tissue type that is raised to each dose level. The lower dose limit prescribed for TU was 2

  11. Adjoint-based airfoil shape optimization in transonic flow

    Gramanzini, Joe-Ray

    The primary focus of this work is efficient aerodynamic shape optimization in transonic flow. Adjoint-based optimization techniques are employed on airfoil sections and evaluated in terms of computational accuracy as well as efficiency. This study examines two test cases proposed by the AIAA Aerodynamic Design Optimization Discussion Group. The first is a two-dimensional, transonic, inviscid, non-lifting optimization of a Modified-NACA 0012 airfoil. The second is a two-dimensional, transonic, viscous optimization problem using a RAE 2822 airfoil. The FUN3D CFD code of NASA Langley Research Center is used as the ow solver for the gradient-based optimization cases. Two shape parameterization techniques are employed to study their effect and the number of design variables on the final optimized shape: Multidisciplinary Aerodynamic-Structural Shape Optimization Using Deformation (MASSOUD) and the BandAids free-form deformation technique. For the two airfoil cases, angle of attack is treated as a global design variable. The thickness and camber distributions are the local design variables for MASSOUD, and selected airfoil surface grid points are the local design variables for BandAids. Using the MASSOUD technique, a drag reduction of 72.14% is achieved for the NACA 0012 case, reducing the total number of drag counts from 473.91 to 130.59. Employing the BandAids technique yields a 78.67% drag reduction, from 473.91 to 99.98. The RAE 2822 case exhibited a drag reduction from 217.79 to 132.79 counts, a 39.05% decrease using BandAids.

  12. STUDY ON THE ADJOINT METHOD IN DATA ASSIMILATION AND THE RELATED PROBLEMS

    吕咸青; 吴自库; 谷艺; 田纪伟

    2004-01-01

    It is not reasonable that one can only use the adjoint of model in data assimilation.The simulated numerical experiment shows that for the tidal model,the result of the adjoint of equation is almost the same as that of the adjoint of model:the averaged absolute difference of the amplitude between observations and simulation is less than 5.0 cm and that of the phase-lag is less than 5.0°.The results are both in good agreement with the observed M2 tide in the Bohai Sea and the Yellow Sea.For comparison,the traditional methods also have been used to simulate M2 tide in the Bohai Sea and the Yellow Sea.The initial guess values of the boundary conditions are given first,and then are adjusted to acquire the simulated results that are as close as possible to the observations.As the boundary conditions contain 72 values,which should be adjusted and how to adjust them can only be partially solved by adjusting them many times.The satisfied results are hard to acquire even gigantic efforts are done.Here,the automation of the treatment of the open boundary conditions is realized.The method is unique and superior to the traditional methods.It is emphasized that if the adjoint of equation is used,tedious and complicated mathematical deduction can be avoided.Therefore the adjoint of equation should attract much attention.

  13. Assessing the Impact of Observations on Numerical Weather Forecasts Using the Adjoint Method

    Gelaro, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The adjoint of a data assimilation system provides a flexible and efficient tool for estimating observation impacts on short-range weather forecasts. The impacts of any or all observations can be estimated simultaneously based on a single execution of the adjoint system. The results can be easily aggregated according to data type, location, channel, etc., making this technique especially attractive for examining the impacts of new hyper-spectral satellite instruments and for conducting regular, even near-real time, monitoring of the entire observing system. This talk provides a general overview of the adjoint method, including the theoretical basis and practical implementation of the technique. Results are presented from the adjoint-based observation impact monitoring tool in NASA's GEOS-5 global atmospheric data assimilation and forecast system. When performed in conjunction with standard observing system experiments (OSEs), the adjoint results reveal both redundancies and dependencies between observing system impacts as observations are added or removed from the assimilation system. Understanding these dependencies may be important for optimizing the use of the current observational network and defining requirements for future observing systems

  14. Light Adjoint Quarks in the Instanton-Dyon Liquid Model IV

    Liu, Yizhuang; Zahed, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the instanton-dyon liquid model with $N_f$ Majorana quark flavors in the adjoint representation of color $SU_c(2)$ at finite temperature. We briefly recall the index theorem on $S^1\\times R^3$ for twisted adjoint fermions in a BPS dyon background of arbitrary holonomy, and use the ADHM construction to explicit the adjoint anti-periodic zero modes. We use these results to derive the partition function of an interacting instanton-dyon ensemble with $N_f$ light and anti-periodic adjoint quarks. We develop the model in details by mapping the theory on a 3-dimensional quantum effective theory with adjoint quarks with manifest $SU(N_f)\\times Z_{4N_f}$ symmetry. Using a mean-field analysis at weak coupling and strong screening, we show that center symmetry requires the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry, which is shown to only take place for $N_f=1$. For a sufficiently dense liquid, we find that the ground state is center symmetric and breaks spontaneously flavor symmetry through $SU(N_f)\\times Z_{4N...

  15. Computing adjoint-weighted kinetics parameters in TRIPOLI-4® by the Iterated Fission Probability method

    Highlights: • We present a Monte Carlo method for computing the adjoint-weighted kinetics parameters via the IFP algorithm. • Extensive verification tests are performed on simple models. • Several validation tests are performed on the measured values of effective delayed neutron fraction and Rossi alpha. - Abstract: The analysis of neutron kinetics relies on the knowledge of adjoint-weighted kinetics parameters, which are key to safety issues in the context of transient or accidental reactor behavior. The Iterated Fission Probability (IFP) method allows the adjoint-weighted mean generation time and delayed neutron fraction to be computed within a Monte Carlo power iteration calculation. In this work we describe the specific features of the implementation of the IFP algorithm in the reference Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-4® developed at CEA. Several verification and validation tests are discussed, and the impact of nuclear data libraries, IFP cycle length and inter-cycle correlations are analyzed in detail

  16. Automated derivation of the adjoint of high-level transient finite element programs

    Farrell, Patrick E; Funke, Simon F; Rognes, Marie E

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the capability of automatically deriving the discrete adjoint and tangent linear models from a forward model written in the high-level FEniCS finite element computing environment. In contrast to developing a model directly in Fortran or C++, high-level systems allow the developer to express the variational problems to be solved in near-mathematical notation. As such, these systems have a key advantage: since the mathematical structure of the problem is preserved, they are more amenable to automated analysis and manipulation. Our approach to automated adjoint derivation relies on run-time annotation of the temporal structure of the model, and employs the same finite element form compiler to automatically generate the low-level code for the derived models. The approach requires only trivial changes to a large class of forward models, including complicated time-dependent nonlinear models. The adjoint model automatically employs optimal checkpointing schemes to mitigate storage requir...

  17. An adjoint-based approach for finding invariant solutions of Navier-Stokes equations

    Farazmand, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    We consider the incompressible Navier--Stokes equations with periodic boundary conditions and time-independent forcing. For this type of flow, we derive adjoint equations whose trajectories converge asymptotically to the equilibrium and traveling wave solutions of the Navier--Stokes equations. Using the adjoint equations, arbitrary initial conditions evolve to the vicinity of a (relative) equilibrium at which point a few Newton-type iterations yield the desired (relative) equilibrium solution. We apply this adjoint-based method to a chaotic two-dimensional Kolmogorov flow. A convergence rate of 100% is observed, leading to the discovery of 21 new steady state and traveling wave solutions at Reynolds number Re=40. Some of the new invariant solutions have spatially localized structures that were previously believed to only exist on domains with large aspect ratios. We show that one of the newly found steady state solutions underpins the temporal intermittencies, i.e., high energy dissipation episodes of the flo...

  18. Adjoint Based A Posteriori Analysis of Multiscale Mortar Discretizations with Multinumerics

    Tavener, Simon

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we derive a posteriori error estimates for linear functionals of the solution to an elliptic problem discretized using a multiscale nonoverlapping domain decomposition method. The error estimates are based on the solution of an appropriately defined adjoint problem. We present a general framework that allows us to consider both primal and mixed formulations of the forward and adjoint problems within each subdomain. The primal subdomains are discretized using either an interior penalty discontinuous Galerkin method or a continuous Galerkin method with weakly imposed Dirichlet conditions. The mixed subdomains are discretized using Raviart- Thomas mixed finite elements. The a posteriori error estimate also accounts for the errors due to adjoint-inconsistent subdomain discretizations. The coupling between the subdomain discretizations is achieved via a mortar space. We show that the numerical discretization error can be broken down into subdomain and mortar components which may be used to drive adaptive refinement.Copyright © by SIAM.

  19. Tracking influential haze source areas in North China using an adjoint model, GRAPES-CUACE

    An, X. Q.; Zhai, S. X.; Jin, M.; Gong, S. L.; Wang, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Based upon the adjoint theory, the adjoint of the aerosol module in the atmospheric chemical modeling system GRAPES-CUACE (Global/Regional Assimilation and PrEdiction System coupled with the CMA Unified Atmospheric Chemistry Environment) was developed and tested for its correctness. Through statistic comparison, BC (black carbon aerosol) concentrations simulated by GRAPES-CUACE were generally consistent with observations from Nanjiao (one urban observation station) and Shangdianzi (one rural observation station) stations. To track the most influential emission-sources regions and the most influential time intervals for the high BC concentration during the simulation period, the adjoint model was adopted to simulate the sensitivity of average BC concentration over Beijing at the highest concentration time point (referred to as the Objective Function) with respect to BC emission amount over Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region. Four types of regions were selected based on administrative division and sensitivity coefficient distribution. The adjoint model was used to quantify the effects of emission-sources reduction in different time intervals over different regions by one independent simulation. Effects of different emission reduction strategies based on adjoint sensitivity information show that the more influential regions (regions with relatively larger sensitivity coefficients) do not necessarily correspond to the administrative regions, and the influence effectiveness of sensitivity-oriented regions was greater than the administrative divisions. The influence of emissions on the objective function decreases sharply approximately for the pollutants emitted 17-18 h ago in this episode. Therefore, controlling critical emission regions during critical time intervals on the basis of adjoint sensitivity analysis is much more efficient than controlling administrative specified regions during an experiential time period.

  20. Local-in-Time Adjoint-Based Method for Optimal Control/Design Optimization of Unsteady Compressible Flows

    Yamaleev, N. K.; Diskin, B.; Nielsen, E. J.

    2009-01-01

    .We study local-in-time adjoint-based methods for minimization of ow matching functionals subject to the 2-D unsteady compressible Euler equations. The key idea of the local-in-time method is to construct a very accurate approximation of the global-in-time adjoint equations and the corresponding sensitivity derivative by using only local information available on each time subinterval. In contrast to conventional time-dependent adjoint-based optimization methods which require backward-in-time integration of the adjoint equations over the entire time interval, the local-in-time method solves local adjoint equations sequentially over each time subinterval. Since each subinterval contains relatively few time steps, the storage cost of the local-in-time method is much lower than that of the global adjoint formulation, thus making the time-dependent optimization feasible for practical applications. The paper presents a detailed comparison of the local- and global-in-time adjoint-based methods for minimization of a tracking functional governed by the Euler equations describing the ow around a circular bump. Our numerical results show that the local-in-time method converges to the same optimal solution obtained with the global counterpart, while drastically reducing the memory cost as compared to the global-in-time adjoint formulation.

  1. Essential self-adjointness of translation-invariant quantum field models for arbitrary coupling constants

    The Hamiltonian of a system of quantum particles minimally coupled to a quantum field is considered for arbitrary coupling constants. The Hamiltonian has a translation invariant part. By means of functional integral representations the existence of an invariant domain under the action of the heat semigroup generated by a self-adjoint extension of the translation invariant part is shown. With a non-perturbative approach it is proved that the Hamiltonian is essentially self-adjoint on a domain. A typical example is the Pauli-Fierz model with spin 1/2 in nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics for arbitrary coupling constants. (orig.)

  2. Bounds on variation of spectral subspaces under J-self-adjoint perturbations

    Albeverio, S.; Motovilov, A. K.; Shkalikov, A. A.

    2008-01-01

    Let $A$ be a self-adjoint operator on a Hilbert space $\\fH$. Assume that the spectrum of $A$ consists of two disjoint components $\\sigma_0$ and $\\sigma_1$. Let $V$ be a bounded operator on $\\fH$, off-diagonal and $J$-self-adjoint with respect to the orthogonal decomposition $\\fH=\\fH_0\\oplus\\fH_1$ where $\\fH_0$ and $\\fH_1$ are the spectral subspaces of $A$ associated with the spectral sets $\\sigma_0$ and $\\sigma_1$, respectively. We find (optimal) conditions on $V$ guaranteeing that the pertur...

  3. Adjoint sensitivity studies of loop current and eddy shedding in the Gulf of Mexico

    Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh

    2013-07-01

    Adjoint model sensitivity analyses were applied for the loop current (LC) and its eddy shedding in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) using the MIT general circulation model (MITgcm). The circulation in the GoM is mainly driven by the energetic LC and subsequent LC eddy separation. In order to understand which ocean regions and features control the evolution of the LC, including anticyclonic warm-core eddy shedding in the GoM, forward and adjoint sensitivities with respect to previous model state and atmospheric forcing were computed using the MITgcm and its adjoint. Since the validity of the adjoint model sensitivities depends on the capability of the forward model to simulate the real LC system and the eddy shedding processes, a 5 year (2004–2008) forward model simulation was performed for the GoM using realistic atmospheric forcing, initial, and boundary conditions. This forward model simulation was compared to satellite measurements of sea-surface height (SSH) and sea-surface temperature (SST), and observed transport variability. Despite realistic mean state, standard deviations, and LC eddy shedding period, the simulated LC extension shows less variability and more regularity than the observations. However, the model is suitable for studying the LC system and can be utilized for examining the ocean influences leading to a simple, and hopefully generic LC eddy separation in the GoM. The adjoint sensitivities of the LC show influences from the Yucatan Channel (YC) flow and Loop Current Frontal Eddy (LCFE) on both LC extension and eddy separation, as suggested by earlier work. Some of the processes that control LC extension after eddy separation differ from those controlling eddy shedding, but include YC through-flow. The sensitivity remains stable for more than 30 days and moves generally upstream, entering the Caribbean Sea. The sensitivities of the LC for SST generally remain closer to the surface and move at speeds consistent with advection by the high-speed core of

  4. Adaptive mesh refinement and adjoint methods in geophysics simulations

    Burstedde, Carsten

    2013-04-01

    required by human intervention and analysis. Specifying an objective functional that quantifies the misfit between the simulation outcome and known constraints and then minimizing it through numerical optimization can serve as an automated technique for parameter identification. As suggested by the similarity in formulation, the numerical algorithm is closely related to the one used for goal-oriented error estimation. One common point is that the so-called adjoint equation needs to be solved numerically. We will outline the derivation and implementation of these methods and discuss some of their pros and cons, supported by numerical results.

  5. CHC program for calculation of the adjoint neutron cross sections on the basis of evaluated neutron data of the ENDF/B

    The features and the algorithm of the program to calculate adjoint neutron cross sections on the basis of the continuous energy neutron cross sections as well as energy and angular distributions are described. The calculated adjoint cross sections are intended for Monte Carlo investigation of the nonuniform adjoint Boltzmann equation. 16 refs

  6. A generalized adjoint framework for sensitivity and global error estimation in time-dependent nuclear reactor simulations

    Highlights: ► We develop an abstract framework for computing the adjoint to the neutron/nuclide burnup equations posed as a system of differential algebraic equations. ► We validate use of the adjoint for computing both sensitivity to uncertain inputs and for estimating global time discretization error. ► Flexibility of the framework is leveraged to add heat transfer physics and compute its adjoint without a reformulation of the adjoint system. ► Such flexibility is crucial for high performance computing applications. -- Abstract: We develop a general framework for computing the adjoint variable to nuclear engineering problems governed by a set of differential–algebraic equations (DAEs). The nuclear engineering community has a rich history of developing and applying adjoints for sensitivity calculations; many such formulations, however, are specific to a certain set of equations, variables, or solution techniques. Any change or addition to the physics model would require a reformulation of the adjoint problem and substantial difficulties in its software implementation. In this work we propose an abstract framework that allows for the modification and expansion of the governing equations, leverages the existing theory of adjoint formulation for DAEs, and results in adjoint equations that can be used to efficiently compute sensitivities for parametric uncertainty quantification. Moreover, as we justify theoretically and demonstrate numerically, the same framework can be used to estimate global time discretization error. We first motivate the framework and show that the coupled Bateman and transport equations, which govern the time-dependent neutronic behavior of a nuclear reactor, may be formulated as a DAE system with a power constraint. We then use a variational approach to develop the parameter-dependent adjoint framework and apply existing theory to give formulations for sensitivity and global time discretization error estimates using the adjoint

  7. Feynman's Operational Calculi: Spectral Theory for Noncommuting Self-adjoint Operators

    Jefferies, Brian [University of New South Wales, School of Mathematics (Australia)], E-mail: b.jefferies@unsw.edu.au; Johnson, Gerald W. [333 Avery Hall, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Department of Mathematics (United States)], E-mail: gjohnson@math.unl.edu; Nielsen, Lance [Creighton University, Department of Mathematics (United States)], E-mail: lnielsen@creighton.edu

    2007-02-15

    The spectral theorem for commuting self-adjoint operators along with the associated functional (or operational) calculus is among the most useful and beautiful results of analysis. It is well known that forming a functional calculus for noncommuting self-adjoint operators is far more problematic. The central result of this paper establishes a rich functional calculus for any finite number of noncommuting (i.e. not necessarily commuting) bounded, self-adjoint operators A{sub 1},..., A{sub n} and associated continuous Borel probability measures {mu}{sub 1}, ?, {mu}{sub n} on [0,1]. Fix A{sub 1},..., A{sub n}. Then each choice of an n-tuple ({mu}{sub 1},...,{mu}{sub n}) of measures determines one of Feynman's operational calculi acting on a certain Banach algebra of analytic functions even when A{sub 1}, ..., A{sub n} are just bounded linear operators on a Banach space. The Hilbert space setting along with self-adjointness allows us to extend the operational calculi well beyond the analytic functions. Using results and ideas drawn largely from the proof of our main theorem, we also establish a family of Trotter product type formulas suitable for Feynman's operational calculi.

  8. Application of non-self-adjoint operators for description of electronic excitations in metallic lithium

    Popov, A. V., E-mail: Popov.Barnaul@mail.ru [Polzunov Altai State Technical University (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    Metallic lithium is used to demonstrate the possibilities of applying non-self-adjoint operators for quantitative description of orbital excitations of electrons in crystals. It is shown that, the nonequilibrium distribution function can be calculated when solving the spectral problem; therefore, the kinetic properties of a material can also be described with the unified band theory.

  9. Möbius invariant BFKL equation for the adjoint representation in N=4 SUSY

    Fadin, V.S., E-mail: fadin@inp.nsk.su [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics of SD RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Fiore, R., E-mail: roberto.fiore@cs.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo collegato di Cosenza, Arcavacata di Rende, I-87036 Cosenza (Italy); Lipatov, L.N., E-mail: lipatov@thd.pnpi.spb.ru [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute and St. Petersburg State University, Gatchina, 188300 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Papa, A., E-mail: alessandro.papa@cs.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo collegato di Cosenza, Arcavacata di Rende, I-87036 Cosenza (Italy)

    2013-09-01

    It is shown that in the next-to-leading approximation of N=4 SUSY the BFKL equation for two-gluon composite states in the adjoint representation of the gauge group can be reduced to a form which is invariant under Möbius transformation in the momentum space. The corresponding similarity transformation of its integral kernel is constructed in an explicit way.

  10. On a class of non-self-adjoint periodic boundary value problems with discrete real spectrum

    Boulton, Lyonell; Levitin, Michael; Marletta, Marco

    2010-01-01

    In [arXiv:0801.0172] we examined a family of periodic Sturm-Liouville problems with boundary and interior singularities which are highly non-self-adjoint but have only real eigenvalues. We now establish Schatten class properties of the associated resolvent operator.

  11. Coupling of Monte Carlo adjoint leakages with three-dimensional discrete ordinates forward fluences

    A computer code, DRC3, has been developed for coupling Monte Carlo adjoint leakages with three-dimensional discrete ordinates forward fluences in order to solve a special category of geometrically-complex deep penetration shielding problems. The code extends the capabilities of earlier methods that coupled Monte Carlo adjoint leakages with two-dimensional discrete ordinates forward fluences. The problems involve the calculation of fluences and responses in a perturbation to an otherwise simple two- or three-dimensional radiation field. In general, the perturbation complicates the geometry such that it cannot be modeled exactly using any of the discrete ordinates geometry options and thus a direct discrete ordinates solution is not possible. Also, the calculation of radiation transport from the source to the perturbation involves deep penetration. One approach to solving such problems is to perform the calculations in three steps: (1) a forward discrete ordinates calculation, (2) a localized adjoint Monte Carlo calculation, and (3) a coupling of forward fluences from the first calculation with adjoint leakages from the second calculation to obtain the response of interest (fluence, dose, etc.). A description of this approach is presented along with results from test problems used to verify the method. The test problems that were selected could also be solved directly by the discrete ordinates method. The good agreement between the DRC3 results and the direct-solution results verify the correctness of DRC3

  12. Coupling of Monte Carlo adjoint leakages with three-dimensional discrete ordinates forward fluences

    Slater, C.O.; Lillie, R.A.; Johnson, J.O.; Simpson, D.B.

    1998-04-01

    A computer code, DRC3, has been developed for coupling Monte Carlo adjoint leakages with three-dimensional discrete ordinates forward fluences in order to solve a special category of geometrically-complex deep penetration shielding problems. The code extends the capabilities of earlier methods that coupled Monte Carlo adjoint leakages with two-dimensional discrete ordinates forward fluences. The problems involve the calculation of fluences and responses in a perturbation to an otherwise simple two- or three-dimensional radiation field. In general, the perturbation complicates the geometry such that it cannot be modeled exactly using any of the discrete ordinates geometry options and thus a direct discrete ordinates solution is not possible. Also, the calculation of radiation transport from the source to the perturbation involves deep penetration. One approach to solving such problems is to perform the calculations in three steps: (1) a forward discrete ordinates calculation, (2) a localized adjoint Monte Carlo calculation, and (3) a coupling of forward fluences from the first calculation with adjoint leakages from the second calculation to obtain the response of interest (fluence, dose, etc.). A description of this approach is presented along with results from test problems used to verify the method. The test problems that were selected could also be solved directly by the discrete ordinates method. The good agreement between the DRC3 results and the direct-solution results verify the correctness of DRC3.

  13. Theory of Loops and Strings with Matter in the Adjoint Representation

    Maharana, Jnanadeva; Singh, Lambodhar P.

    1994-01-01

    We have presented canonical and path integral formulations of a theory of loops and closed strings with the matter field quanta transforming in the adjoint representation of the SU(N) gauge group. The physical processes arising out of the interactions of loops and closed strings are discussed.

  14. Using adjoint-based optimization to study wing flexibility in flapping flight

    Wei, Mingjun; Xu, Min; Dong, Haibo

    2014-11-01

    In the study of flapping-wing flight of birds and insects, it is important to understand the impact of wing flexibility/deformation on aerodynamic performance. However, the large control space from the complexity of wing deformation and kinematics makes usual parametric study very difficult or sometimes impossible. Since the adjoint-based approach for sensitivity study and optimization strategy is a process with its cost independent of the number of input parameters, it becomes an attractive approach in our study. Traditionally, adjoint equation and sensitivity are derived in a fluid domain with fixed solid boundaries. Moving boundary is only allowed when its motion is not part of control effort. Otherwise, the derivation becomes either problematic or too complex to be feasible. Using non-cylindrical calculus to deal with boundary deformation solves this problem in a very simple and still mathematically rigorous manner. Thus, it allows to apply adjoint-based optimization in the study of flapping wing flexibility. We applied the ``improved'' adjoint-based method to study the flexibility of both two-dimensional and three-dimensional flapping wings, where the flapping trajectory and deformation are described by either model functions or real data from the flight of dragonflies. Supported by AFOSR.

  15. On the Finite Volume Element Method for Self-Adjoint Parabolic Integrodifferential Equations

    Mohamed Bahaj; Anas Rachid

    2013-01-01

    Finite volume element schemes for non-self-adjoint parabolic integrodifferential equations are derived and stated. For the spatially discrete scheme, optimal-order error estimates in , , and , norms for are obtained. In this paper, we also study the lumped mass modification. Based on the Crank-Nicolson method, a time discretization scheme is discussed and related error estimates are derived.

  16. Adjoint sensitivity in PDE constrained least squares problems as a multiphysics problem

    Lahaye, D.; Mulckhuyse, W.F.W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to provide a framework for the implementation of an adjoint sensitivity formulation for least-squares partial differential equations constrained optimization problems exploiting a multiphysics finite elements package. The estimation of the diffusion coefficient

  17. Brane Configurations for Nonsupersymmetric Meta-Stable Vacua in SQCD with Adjoint Matter

    Ahn, C

    2006-01-01

    We present the configurations of intersecting branes in type IIA string theory corresponding to the meta-stable supersymmetry breaking vacua(hep-th/0608063) in the four-dimensional N}=1 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory coupled massive flavors with adjoint matter where the superpotential has three deformed terms.

  18. Evaluating Observational Constraints on N2O Emissions via Information Content Analysis Using GEOS-Chem and its Adjoint

    Wells, K. C.; Millet, D. B.; Bousserez, N.; Henze, D. K.; Chaliyakunnel, S.; Griffis, T. J.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Prinn, R. G.; O'Doherty, S.; Weiss, R. F.; Dutton, G. S.; Elkins, J. W.; Krummel, P. B.; Langenfelds, R. L.; Steele, P.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a long-lived greenhouse gas with a global warming potential approximately 300 times that of CO2, and plays a key role in stratospheric ozone depletion. Human perturbation of the nitrogen cycle has led to a rise in atmospheric N2O, but large uncertainties exist in the spatial and temporal distribution of its emissions. Here we employ a 4D-Var inversion framework for N2O based on the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint to derive new constraints on the space-time distribution of global land and ocean N2O fluxes. Based on an ensemble of global surface measurements, we find that emissions are overestimated over Northern Hemisphere land areas and underestimated in the Southern Hemisphere. Assigning these biases to particular land or ocean regions is more difficult given the long lifetime of N2O. To quantitatively evaluate where the current N2O observing network provides local and regional emission constraints, we apply a new, efficient information content analysis technique involving radial basis functions. The technique yields optimal state vector dimensions for N2O source inversions, with model grid cells grouped in space and time according to the resolution that can actually be provided by the network of global observations. We then use these optimal state vectors in an analytical inversion to refine current top-down emission estimates.

  19. Solution of the advection-dispersion equation by a finite-volume eulerian-lagrangian local adjoint method

    Healy, R.W.; Russell, T.F.

    1992-01-01

    A finite-volume Eulerian-Lagrangian local adjoint method for solution of the advection-dispersion equation is developed and discussed. The method is mass conservative and can solve advection-dominated ground-water solute-transport problems accurately and efficiently. An integrated finite-difference approach is used in the method. A key component of the method is that the integral representing the mass-storage term is evaluated numerically at the current time level. Integration points, and the mass associated with these points, are then forward tracked up to the next time level. The number of integration points required to reach a specified level of accuracy is problem dependent and increases as the sharpness of the simulated solute front increases. Integration points are generally equally spaced within each grid cell. For problems involving variable coefficients it has been found to be advantageous to include additional integration points at strategic locations in each well. These locations are determined by backtracking. Forward tracking of boundary fluxes by the method alleviates problems that are encountered in the backtracking approaches of most characteristic methods. A test problem is used to illustrate that the new method offers substantial advantages over other numerical methods for a wide range of problems.

  20. The adjoint sensitivity method of global electromagnetic induction for CHAMP magnetic data

    Complete text of publication follows. Martinec and McCreadie (2004) developed a time-domain spectral-finite element approach for the forward modelling of electromagnetic induction vector data as measured by the CHAMP satellite. Here, we present a new method of computing the sensitivity of the CHAMP electromagnetic induction data on the Earth's mantle electrical conductivity, which we term the adjoint sensitivity method. The forward and adjoint initial boundary-value problems, both solved in the time domain, are identical, except for the specification of prescribed boundary conditions. The respective boundary-value data at the satellite's altitude are the X magnetic component measured by the CHAMP vector magnetometer along satellite tracks for the forward method and the difference between the measured and predicted Z magnetic component for the adjoint method. The squares of these differences summed up over all CHAMP tracks determine the misfit. The sensitivity of the CHAMP data, that is the partial derivatives of the misfit function with respect to mantle conductivity parameters, are then determined by the scalar product of the forward and adjoint solutions, multiplied by the gradient of the conductivity and integrated over all CHAMP tracks. Such exactly determined sensitivities are checked against numerical differentiation of the misfit, and very good agreement is obtained. The attractiveness of the adjoint method lies in the fact that the adjoint sensitivities are calculated for little cost, regardless of the number of conductivity parameters. However, since the adjoint solution proceeds backwards in time, the forward solution must be stored at each time step, leading to memory requirements that are linear with respect to the number of steps undertaken. Having determined the sensitivities, we apply the conjugate gradient method to infer 1-D and 2-D conductivity structures of the Earth based on the CHAMP residual time serie (after the subtraction of static field

  1. Diagnosis of Physical and Biological Control over Phytoplankton in the Gulf of Maine-Georges Bank Region Using an Adjoint Data Assimilation Approach

    WANG Caixia; Paola Malanotte-Rizzoli

    2014-01-01

    The linkage between physical and biological processes, particularly the effect of the circulation field on the distribution of phytoplankton, is studied by applying a two-dimensional model and an adjoint data assimilation approach to the Gulf of Maine-Georges Bank region. The model results, comparing well with observation data, reveal seasonal and geographic variations of phytoplankton concentration and verify that the seasonal cycles of phytoplankton are controlled by both biological sources and ad-vection processes which are functions of space and time and counterbalance each other. Although advective flux divergences have greater magnitudes on Georges Bank than in the coastal region of the western Gulf of Maine, advection control over phytoplankton concentration is more significant in the coastal region of the western Gulf of Maine. The model results also suggest that the two separated populations in the coastal regions of the western Gulf of Maine and on Georges Bank are self-sustaining.

  2. Construction of the adjoint MIT ocean general circulation model and application to Atlantic heat transport sensitivity

    Marotzke, Jochem; Giering, Ralf; Zhang, Kate Q.; Stammer, Detlef; Hill, Chris; Lee, Tong

    1999-12-01

    We first describe the principles and practical considerations behind the computer generation of the adjoint to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology ocean general circulation model (GCM) using R. Giering's software tool Tangent-Linear and Adjoint Model Compiler (TAMC). The TAMC's recipe for (FORTRAN-) line-by-line generation of adjoint code is explained by interpreting an adjoint model strictly as the operator that gives the sensitivity of the output of a model to its input. Then, the sensitivity of 1993 annual mean heat transport across 29°N in the Atlantic, to the hydrography on January 1, 1993, is calculated from a global solution of the GCM. The "kinematic sensitivity" to initial temperature variations is isolated, showing how the latter would influence heat transport if they did not affect the density and hence the flow. Over 1 year the heat transport at 29°N is influenced kinematically from regions up to 20° upstream in the western boundary current and up to 5° upstream in the interior. In contrast, the dynamical influences of initial temperature (and salinity) perturbations spread from as far as the rim of the Labrador Sea to the 29°N section along the western boundary. The sensitivities calculated with the adjoint compare excellently to those from a perturbation calculation with the dynamical model. Perturbations in initial interior salinity influence meridional overturning and heat transport when they have propagated to the western boundary and can thus influence the integrated east-west density difference. Our results support the notion that boundary monitoring of meridional mass and heat transports is feasible.

  3. Inversion of CO and NOx emissions using the adjoint of the IMAGES model

    J.-F. Müller

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We use ground-based observations of CO mixing ratios and vertical column abundances together with tropospheric NO2 columns from the GOME satellite instrument as constraints for improving the global annual emission estimates of CO and NOx for the year 1997. The agreement between concentrations calculated by the global 3-dimensional CTM IMAGES and the observations is optimized using the adjoint modelling technique, which allows to invert for CO and NOx fluxes simultaneously, taking their chemical interactions into account. Our analysis quantifies a total of 39 flux parameters, comprising anthropogenic and biomass burning sources over large continental regions, soil and lightning emissions of NOx, biogenic emissions of CO and non-methane hydrocarbons, as well as the deposition velocities of both CO and NOx. Comparison between observed, prior and optimized CO mixing ratios at NOAA/CMDL sites shows that the inversion performs well at the northern mid- and high latitudes, and that it is less efficient in the Southern Hemisphere, as expected due to the scarsity of measurements over this part of the globe. The inversion, moreover, brings the model much closer to the measured NO2 columns over all regions. Sensitivity tests show that anthropogenic sources exhibit weak sensitivity to changes of the a priori errors associated to the bottom-up inventory, whereas biomass burning sources are subject to a strong variability. Our best estimate for the 1997 global top-down CO source amounts to 2760 Tg CO. Anthropogenic emissions increase by 28%, in agreement with previous inverse modelling studies, suggesting that the present bottom-up inventories underestimate the anthropogenic CO emissions in the Northern Hemisphere. The magnitude of the optimized NOx global source decreases by 14% with respect to the prior, and amounts to 42.1 Tg N, out of which 22.8 Tg N are due to anthropogenic sources. The NOx emissions increase over Tropical regions, whereas they decrease

  4. Inversion of CO and NOx emissions using the adjoint of the IMAGES model

    T. Stavrakou

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available We use ground-based observations of CO mixing ratios and vertical column abundances together with tropospheric NO2 columns from the GOME satellite instrument as constraints for improving the global annual emission estimates of CO and NOx for the year 1997. The agreement between concentrations calculated by the global 3-dimensional CTM IMAGES and the observations is optimized using the adjoint modelling technique, which allows to invert for CO and NOx fluxes simultaneously, taking their chemical interactions into account. Our analysis quantifies a total of 39 flux parameters, comprising anthropogenic and biomass burning sources over large continental regions, soil and lightning emissions of NOx, biogenic emissions of CO and non-methane hydrocarbons, as well as the deposition velocities of both CO and NOx. Comparison between observed, prior and optimized CO mixing ratios at NOAA/CMDL sites shows that the inversion performs well at the northern mid- and high latitudes, and that it is less efficient in the Southern Hemisphere, as expected due to the scarsity of measurements over this part of the globe. The inversion, moreover, brings the model much closer to the measured NO2 columns over all regions. Sensitivity tests show that anthropogenic sources exhibit weak sensitivity to changes of the a priori errors associated to the bottom-up inventory, whereas biomass burning sources are subject to a strong variability. Our best estimate for the 1997 global top-down CO source amounts to 2760 Tg CO. Anthropogenic emissions increase by 28%, in agreement with previous inverse modelling studies, suggesting that the present bottom-up inventories underestimate the anthropogenic CO emissions in the Northern Hemisphere. The magnitude of the optimized NOx global source decreases by 14% with respect to the prior, and amounts to 42.1 Tg N, out of which 22.8 Tg N are due to anthropogenic sources. The NOx emissions increase over Tropical regions, whereas they

  5. Practical Aerodynamic Design Optimization Based on the Navier-Stokes Equations and a Discrete Adjoint Method

    Grossman, Bernard

    1999-01-01

    The technical details are summarized below: Compressible and incompressible versions of a three-dimensional unstructured mesh Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver have been differentiated and resulting derivatives have been verified by comparisons with finite differences and a complex-variable approach. In this implementation, the turbulence model is fully coupled with the flow equations in order to achieve this consistency. The accuracy demonstrated in the current work represents the first time that such an approach has been successfully implemented. The accuracy of a number of simplifying approximations to the linearizations of the residual have been examined. A first-order approximation to the dependent variables in both the adjoint and design equations has been investigated. The effects of a "frozen" eddy viscosity and the ramifications of neglecting some mesh sensitivity terms were also examined. It has been found that none of the approximations yielded derivatives of acceptable accuracy and were often of incorrect sign. However, numerical experiments indicate that an incomplete convergence of the adjoint system often yield sufficiently accurate derivatives, thereby significantly lowering the time required for computing sensitivity information. The convergence rate of the adjoint solver relative to the flow solver has been examined. Inviscid adjoint solutions typically require one to four times the cost of a flow solution, while for turbulent adjoint computations, this ratio can reach as high as eight to ten. Numerical experiments have shown that the adjoint solver can stall before converging the solution to machine accuracy, particularly for viscous cases. A possible remedy for this phenomenon would be to include the complete higher-order linearization in the preconditioning step, or to employ a simple form of mesh sequencing to obtain better approximations to the solution through the use of coarser meshes. . An efficient surface parameterization based

  6. Building the Tangent and Adjoint codes of the Ocean General Circulation Model OPA with the Automatic Differentiation tool TAPENADE

    Tber, Moulay Hicham; Vidard, Arthur; Dauvergne, Benjamin

    2007-01-01

    The ocean general circulation model OPA is developed by the LODYC team at Paris VI university. OPA has recently undergone a major rewriting, migrating to FORTRAN95, and its adjoint code needs to be rebuilt. For earlier versions, the adjoint of OPA was written by hand at a high development cost. We use the Automatic Differentiation tool TAPENADE to build mechanicaly the tangent and adjoint codes of OPA. We validate the differentiated codes by comparison with divided differences, and also with an identical twin experiment. We apply state-of-the-art methods to improve the performance of the adjoint code. In particular we implement the Griewank and Walther's binomial checkpointing algorithm which gives us an optimal trade-off between time and memory consumption. We apply a specific strategy to differentiate the iterative linear solver that comes from the implicit time stepping scheme

  7. Flux Creep and Flux Jumping

    Mints, R G

    1995-01-01

    We consider the flux jump instability of the Bean's critical state arising in the flux creep regime in type-II superconductors. We find the flux jump field, $B_j$, that determines the superconducting state stability criterion. We calculate the dependence of $B_j$ on the external magnetic field ramp rate, magnetization experiments the slope of the current-voltage curve in the flux creep regime determines the stability of the Bean's critical state, {\\it i.e.}, the value of $B_j$. We show that a flux jump can be preceded by the magneto-thermal oscillations and find the frequency of these oscillations as a function of $\\dot B_e$.

  8. Deconfinement and chiral symmetry restoration in an SU(3) gauge theory with adjoint fermions

    We analyze the finite temperature phase diagram of QCD with fermions in the adjoint representation. The simulations performed with four dynamical Majorana fermions show that the deconfinement and chiral phase transitions occur at two distinct temperatures. While the deconfinement transition is first-order at Td we find evidence for a continuous chiral transition at a higher temperature Tc ≅ 8 Td. We observe a rapid change of bulk thermodynamic observables at Td which reflects the increase in the number of degrees of freedom. However, these show little variation at Tc, where the fermion condensate vanishes. We also analyze the potential between static fundamental and adjoint charges in all three phases and extract the corresponding screening masses above Td

  9. Adjoint-based linear analysis in reduced-order thermo-acoustic models

    Magri, Luca

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the linear theory of adjoint equations as applied to thermo-acoustics. The purpose is to describe the mathematical foundations of adjoint equations for linear sensitivity analysis of thermo-acoustic systems, recently developed by Magri and Juniper (J. Fluid Mech. (2013), vol. 719, pp. 183--202). This method is applied pedagogically to a damped oscillator, for which analytical solutions are available, and then for an electrically heated Rijke tube with a mean-flow temperature discontinuity induced by the compact heat source. Passive devices that most affect the growth rate / frequency of the electrical Rijke-tube system are presented, including a discussion about the effect of modelling the mean-flow temperature discontinuity.

  10. Adjoint-Based a Posteriori Error Estimation for Coupled Time-Dependent Systems

    Asner, Liya

    2012-01-01

    We consider time-dependent parabolic problem s coupled across a common interface which we formulate using a Lagrange multiplier construction and solve by applying a monolithic solution technique. We derive an adjoint-based a posteriori error representation for a quantity of interest given by a linear functional of the solution. We establish the accuracy of our error representation formula through numerical experimentation and investigate the effect of error in the adjoint solution. Crucially, the error representation affords a distinction between temporal and spatial errors and can be used as a basis for a blockwise time-space refinement strategy. Numerical tests illustrate the efficacy of the refinement strategy by capturing the distinctive behavior of a localized traveling wave solution. The saddle point systems considered here are equivalent to those arising in the mortar finite element technique for parabolic problems. © 2012 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  11. Weyl theorems for the polluted set of self-adjoint operators in Galerkin approximations

    Boulton, Lyonell; Lewin, Mathieu

    2010-01-01

    Let A be a self-adjoint operator on a separable Hilbert space H and let (L_n) be a sequence of finite dimensional subspaces of the domain of A, approximating H in the large n limit. Denote by A_n the compression of A to L_n. In general the spectrum of A is only a subset of the limit of the spectra of A_n and the latter might differ from the former in a non-trivial "polluted set". In this paper we show that this polluted set is determined by the existence of particular Weyl sequences of singular type. This characterization allows us to identify verifiable conditions on self-adjoint perturbations B, ensuring that the polluted set of B is identical to that of A. The results reported are illustrated by means of several canonical examples and they reveal the many subtleties involved in the systematic study of spectral pollution.

  12. Self-adjoint elliptic operators with boundary conditions on not closed hypersurfaces

    Mantile, Andrea; Posilicano, Andrea; Sini, Mourad

    2016-07-01

    The theory of self-adjoint extensions of symmetric operators is used to construct self-adjoint realizations of a second-order elliptic differential operator on Rn with linear boundary conditions on (a relatively open part of) a compact hypersurface. Our approach allows to obtain Kreĭn-like resolvent formulae where the reference operator coincides with the "free" operator with domain H2 (Rn); this provides an useful tool for the scattering problem from a hypersurface. Concrete examples of this construction are developed in connection with the standard boundary conditions, Dirichlet, Neumann, Robin, δ and δ‧-type, assigned either on a (n - 1) dimensional compact boundary Γ = ∂ Ω or on a relatively open part Σ ⊂ Γ. Schatten-von Neumann estimates for the difference of the powers of resolvents of the free and the perturbed operators are also proven; these give existence and completeness of the wave operators of the associated scattering systems.

  13. Neutrino masses in SU(5) x U(1){sub F} with adjoint flavons

    Nardi, Enrico [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Frascati (Italy); IFT-UAM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Madrid (Spain); Restrepo, Diego; Velasquez, Mauricio [Universidad de Antioquia, Instituto de Fisica, Medellin (Colombia)

    2012-03-15

    We present a SU(5) x U(1){sub F} supersymmetric model for neutrino masses and mixings that implements the seesaw mechanism by means of the heavy SU(2) singlets and triplets states contained in three adjoints of SU(5). We discuss how Abelian U(1){sub F} symmetries can naturally yield non-hierarchical light neutrinos even when the heavy states are strongly hierarchical, and how it can also ensure that R-parity arises as an exact accidental symmetry. By assigning two flavons that break U(1){sub F} to the adjoint representation of SU(5) and assuming universality for all the fundamental couplings, the coefficients of the effective Yukawa and Majorana mass operators become calculable in terms of group theoretical quantities. There is a single free parameter in the model, however, at leading order the structure of the light neutrinos mass matrix is determined in a parameter independent way. (orig.)

  14. Method of tallying adjoint fluence and calculating kinetics parameters in Monte Carlo codes

    A method of using iterated fission probability to estimate the adjoint fluence during particles simulation, and using it as the weighting function to calculate kinetics parameters βeff and A in Monte Carlo codes, was introduced in this paper. Implements of this method in continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP and multi-group Monte Carlo code MCMG are both elaborated. Verification results show that, with regardless additional computing cost, using this method, the adjoint fluence accounted by MCMG matches well with the result computed by ANISN, and the kinetics parameters calculated by MCNP agree very well with benchmarks. This method is proved to be reliable, and the function of calculating kinetics parameters in Monte Carlo codes is carried out effectively, which could be the basement for Monte Carlo codes' utility in the analysis of nuclear reactors' transient behavior. (authors)

  15. Topology Optimization of Turbulent Fluid Flow with a Sensitive Porosity Adjoint Method (SPAM)

    Philippi, B

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive porosity adjoint method (SPAM) for optimizing the topology of fluid machines has been proposed. A sensitivity function with respect to the porosity has been developed. In the first step of the optimization process, porous media are introduced into the flow regime according to the sensitivity function. Then the optimized porous media are transformed to solid walls. The turbulent flow in porous media is accounted for by a modified eddy-viscosity based turbulence model. Its influence on the adjoint equations is nevertheless neglected, which refers to the so called frozen turbulence assumption. A test case of application in terms of the turbulent rough wall channel flow shows that a considerable reduction of the objective function can be obtained by this method. The transformation from porous media to solid walls may have important effect on the optimization results.

  16. Quantitative photoacoustic tomography using forward and adjoint Monte Carlo models of radiance

    Hochuli, Roman; Arridge, Simon; Cox, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Forward and adjoint Monte Carlo (MC) models of radiance are proposed for use in model-based quantitative photoacoustic tomography. A 2D radiance MC model using a harmonic angular basis is introduced and validated against analytic solutions for the radiance in heterogeneous media. A gradient-based optimisation scheme is then used to recover 2D absorption and scattering coefficients distributions from simulated photoacoustic measurements. It is shown that the functional gradients, which are a challenge to compute efficiently using MC models, can be calculated directly from the coefficients of the harmonic angular basis used in the forward and adjoint models. This work establishes a framework for transport-based quantitative photoacoustic tomography that can fully exploit emerging highly parallel computing architectures.

  17. Active adjoint modeling method in microwave induced thermoacoustic tomography for breast tumor.

    Zhu, Xiaozhang; Zhao, Zhiqin; Wang, Jinguo; Chen, Guoping; Liu, Qing Huo

    2014-07-01

    To improve the model-based inversion performance of microwave induced thermoacoustic tomography for breast tumor imaging, an active adjoint modeling (AAM) method is proposed. It aims to provide a more realistic breast acoustic model used for tumor inversion as the background by actively measuring and reconstructing the structural heterogeneity of human breast environment. It utilizes the reciprocity of acoustic sensors, and adapts the adjoint tomography method from seismic exploration. With the reconstructed acoustic model of breast environment, the performance of model-based inversion method such as time reversal mirror is improved significantly both in contrast and accuracy. To prove the advantage of AAM, a checkerboard pattern model and anatomical realistic breast models have been used in full wave numerical simulations. PMID:24956614

  18. Adjoint Airfoil Optimization of Darrieus-Type Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    Fuchs, Roman; Nordborg, Henrik

    2012-11-01

    We present the feasibility of using an adjoint solver to optimize the torque of a Darrieus-type vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT). We start with a 2D cross section of a symmetrical airfoil and restrict us to low solidity ratios to minimize blade vortex interactions. The adjoint solver of the ANSYS FLUENT software package computes the sensitivities of airfoil surface forces based on a steady flow field. Hence, we find the torque of a full revolution using a weighted average of the sensitivities at different wind speeds and angles of attack. The weights are computed analytically, and the range of angles of attack is given by the tip speed ratio. Then the airfoil geometry is evolved, and the proposed methodology is evaluated by transient simulations.

  19. Airfoil design using a coupled euler and integral boundary layer method with adjoint based sensitivities

    Edwards, S.; Reuther, J.; Chattot, J. J.

    The objective of this paper is to present a control theory approach for the design of airfoils in the presence of viscous compressible flows. A coupled system of the integral boundary layer and the Euler equations is solved to provide rapid flow simulations. An adjoint approach consistent with the complete coupled state equations is employed to obtain the sensitivities needed to drive a numerical optimization algorithm. Design to a target pressure distribution is demonstrated on an RAE 2822 airfoil at transonic speeds.

  20. Some results on the dynamics and transition probabilities for non self-adjoint hamiltonians

    We discuss systematically several possible inequivalent ways to describe the dynamics and the transition probabilities of a quantum system when its hamiltonian is not self-adjoint. In order to simplify the treatment, we mainly restrict our analysis to finite dimensional Hilbert spaces. In particular, we propose some experiments which could discriminate between the various possibilities considered in the paper. An example taken from the literature is discussed in detail

  1. The Adjoint Monte Carlo - a viable option for efficient radiotherapy treatment planning

    In cancer therapy using collimated beams of photons, the radiation oncologist must determine a set of beams that delivers the required dose to each point in the tumor and minimizes the risk of damage to the healthy tissue and vital organs. Currently, the oncologist determines these beams iteratively, by using a sequence of dose calculations using approximate numerical methods. In this paper, a more accurate and potentially faster approach, based on the Adjoint Monte Carlo method, is presented (authors)

  2. Adjoint gradient-based approach for aerodynamic optimization of transport aircraft

    Ilic, Caslav

    2013-01-01

    Aerodynamic design of transport aircraft has been steadily improved over past several decades, to the point where today highly-detailed shape control is needed to achieve further improvements. Aircraft manufacturers are therefore increasingly looking into formal optimization methods, driving high-fidelity CFD analysis of finely-parametrized candidate designs. We present an adjoint gradient-based approach for maximizing the aerodynamic performance index relevant to cruise-climb mission segment...

  3. Spectrum of SU(2) gauge theory with two fermions in the adjoint representation

    Hietanen, Ari; Rantaharju, Jarno; Rummukainen, Kari; Tuominen, Kimmo

    2008-01-01

    We present preliminary results of lattice simulations of SU(2) gauge theory with two Wilson fermions in the adjoint representation. This theory has recently attracted considerable attention because it might possess an infrared fixed point (or an almost-fixed-point), and hence be a candidate for a walking technicolor theory. In this work we study the particle spectrum of the theory, and compare it with more familiar spectrum of the theory with SU(2) gauge fields and two flavors of fundamental ...

  4. Serre's reduction of linear systems of partial differential equations with holonomic adjoints

    Cluzeau, Thomas; Quadrat, Alban

    2010-01-01

    Given a linear functional system (e.g., ordinary/partial di erential system, di erential time-delay system, di erence system), Serre's reduction aims at nding an equivalent linear functional system which contains fewer equations and fewer unknowns. The purpose of this paper is to study Serre's reduction of underdetermined linear systems of partial di erential equations with either polynomial, formal power series or analytic coe cients and with holonomic adjoints in the sense of algebraic anal...

  5. Coupling Unification and Dark Matter in a Standard Model Extension with Adjoint Majorana Fermions

    Aizawa, Tasuku; Ibe, Masahiro; Kaneta, Kunio

    2014-01-01

    We revisit an extension of the Standard Model with Majorana fermions in the adjoint representations. There, a precise coupling unification and the good candidate for dark matter (the $SU(2)_L$ triplet fermion) are achieved simultaneously. In particular, we show that the $SU(3)_c$ octet fermion which is required for successful unification can be a good non-thermal source of the triplet fermion dark matter. We also show that the scenario predicts a rather short lifetime of the proton compared w...

  6. Adjoint BFKL at finite coupling: a short-cut from the collinear limit

    Basso, Benjamin; Sever, Amit

    2014-01-01

    In the high energy Regge limit, the six gluons scattering amplitude is controlled by the adjoint BFKL eigenvalue and impact factor. In this paper we determine these two building blocks at any value of the 't Hooft coupling in planar $\\cal{N}$=4 SYM theory. This is achieved by means of analytic continuations from the collinear limit, where similar all loops expressions were recently established. We check our predictions against all available data at weak and strong coupling.

  7. Scattering and self-adjoint extensions of the Aharonov-Bohm Hamiltonian

    De Oliveira, Cesar R [Departamento de Matematica-UFSCar, Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo 13560-970 (Brazil); Pereira, Marciano, E-mail: marciano@uepg.b [Departamento de Matematica e EstatIstica-UEPG, Ponta Grossa, Parana 84030-900 (Brazil)

    2010-09-03

    We consider the Hamiltonian operator associated with planar sections of infinitely long cylindrical solenoids and with a homogeneous magnetic field in their interior. First, in the Sobolev space H{sup 2}, we characterize all generalized boundary conditions on the solenoid border compatible with quantum mechanics, i.e. the boundary conditions, so that the corresponding Hamiltonian operators are self-adjoint. Then we study and compare the scattering of the most usual boundary conditions, that is, Dirichlet, Neumann and Robin.

  8. Solving Large-Scale Inverse Magnetostatic Problems using the Adjoint Method

    Bruckner, Florian; Wautischer, Gregor; Huber, Christian; Vogler, Christoph; Hinze, Michael; Suess, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    An efficient algorithm for the reconstruction of the magnetization state within magnetic components is presented. The occurring inverse magnetostatic problem is solved by means of an adjoint approach, based on the Fredkin-Koehler method for the solution of the forward problem. Due to the use of hybrid FEM-BEM coupling combined with matrix compression techniques the resulting algorithm is well suited for large-scale problems. Furthermore the reconstruction of the magnetization state within a permanent magnet is demonstrated.

  9. Methane Flux

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Methane (CH4) flux is the net rate of methane exchange between an ecosystem and the atmosphere. Data of this variable were generated by the USGS LandCarbon project...

  10. First-arrival traveltime tomography for anisotropic media using the adjoint-state method

    Waheed, Umair bin

    2016-05-27

    Traveltime tomography using transmission data has been widely used for static corrections and for obtaining near-surface models for seismic depth imaging. More recently, it is also being used to build initial models for full-waveform inversion. The classic traveltime tomography approach based on ray tracing has difficulties in handling large data sets arising from current seismic acquisition surveys. Some of these difficulties can be addressed using the adjoint-state method, due to its low memory requirement and numerical efficiency. By coupling the gradient computation to nonlinear optimization, it avoids the need for explicit computation of the Fréchet derivative matrix. Furthermore, its cost is equivalent to twice the solution of the forward-modeling problem, irrespective of the size of the input data. The presence of anisotropy in the subsurface has been well established during the past few decades. The improved seismic images obtained by incorporating anisotropy into the seismic processing workflow justify the effort. However, previous literature on the adjoint-state method has only addressed the isotropic approximation of the subsurface. We have extended the adjoint-state technique for first-arrival traveltime tomography to vertical transversely isotropic (VTI) media. Because δ is weakly resolvable from surface seismic alone, we have developed the mathematical framework and procedure to invert for vNMO and η. Our numerical tests on the VTI SEAM model demonstrate the ability of the algorithm to invert for near-surface model parameters and reveal the accuracy achievable by the algorithm.

  11. An adjoint-based approach for finding invariant solutions of Navier–Stokes equations

    Farazmand, M.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the incompressible Navier--Stokes equations with periodic boundary conditions and time-independent forcing. For this type of flow, we derive adjoint equations whose trajectories converge asymptotically to the equilibrium and traveling wave solutions of the Navier--Stokes equations. Using the adjoint equations, arbitrary initial conditions evolve to the vicinity of a (relative) equilibrium at which point a few Newton-type iterations yield the desired (relative) equilibrium solution. We apply this adjoint-based method to a chaotic two-dimensional Kolmogorov flow. A convergence rate of 100% is observed, leading to the discovery of 21 new steady state and traveling wave solutions at Reynolds number Re=40. Some of the new invariant solutions have spatially localized structures that were previously believed to only exist on domains with large aspect ratios. We show that one of the newly found steady state solutions underpins the temporal intermittencies, i.e., high energy dissipation episodes of the flow. More precisely, it is shown that each intermittent episode of a generic turbulent trajectory corresponds to its close passage to this equilibrium solution.

  12. Source attribution of particulate matter pollution over North China with the adjoint method

    We quantify the source contributions to surface PM2.5 (fine particulate matter) pollution over North China from January 2013 to 2015 using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint with improved model horizontal resolution (1/4° × 5/16°) and aqueous-phase chemistry for sulfate production. The adjoint method attributes the PM2.5 pollution to emissions from different source sectors and chemical species at the model resolution. Wintertime surface PM2.5 over Beijing is contributed by emissions of organic carbon (27% of the total source contribution), anthropogenic fine dust (27%), and SO2 (14%), which are mainly from residential and industrial sources, followed by NH3 (13%) primarily from agricultural activities. About half of the Beijing pollution originates from sources outside of the city municipality. Adjoint analyses for other cities in North China all show significant regional pollution transport, supporting a joint regional control policy for effectively mitigating the PM2.5 air pollution. (letter)

  13. On the validity of tidal turbine array configurations obtained from steady-state adjoint optimisation

    Jacobs, Christian T; Kramer, Stephan C; Funke, Simon W

    2016-01-01

    Extracting the optimal amount of power from an array of tidal turbines requires an intricate understanding of tidal dynamics and the effects of turbine placement on the local and regional scale flow. Numerical models have contributed significantly towards this understanding, and more recently, adjoint-based modelling has been employed to optimise the positioning of the turbines in an array in an automated way and improve on simple, regular man-made configurations. Adjoint-based optimisation of high-resolution and ideally 3D transient models is generally a very computationally expensive problem. As a result, existing work on the adjoint optimisation of tidal turbine placement has been mostly limited to steady-state simulations in which very high, non-physical values of the background viscosity are required to ensure that a steady-state solution exists. However, such compromises may affect the reliability of the modelled turbines, their wakes and interactions, and thus bring into question the validity of the co...

  14. Adjoint-based deviational Monte Carlo methods for phonon transport calculations

    Péraud, Jean-Philippe M.; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas G.

    2015-06-01

    In the field of linear transport, adjoint formulations exploit linearity to derive powerful reciprocity relations between a variety of quantities of interest. In this paper, we develop an adjoint formulation of the linearized Boltzmann transport equation for phonon transport. We use this formulation for accelerating deviational Monte Carlo simulations of complex, multiscale problems. Benefits include significant computational savings via direct variance reduction, or by enabling formulations which allow more efficient use of computational resources, such as formulations which provide high resolution in a particular phase-space dimension (e.g., spectral). We show that the proposed adjoint-based methods are particularly well suited to problems involving a wide range of length scales (e.g., nanometers to hundreds of microns) and lead to computational methods that can calculate quantities of interest with a cost that is independent of the system characteristic length scale, thus removing the traditional stiffness of kinetic descriptions. Applications to problems of current interest, such as simulation of transient thermoreflectance experiments or spectrally resolved calculation of the effective thermal conductivity of nanostructured materials, are presented and discussed in detail.

  15. Source attribution of particulate matter pollution over North China with the adjoint method

    Zhang, Lin; Liu, Licheng; Zhao, Yuanhong; Gong, Sunling; Zhang, Xiaoye; Henze, Daven K.; Capps, Shannon L.; Fu, Tzung-May; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Yuxuan

    2015-08-01

    We quantify the source contributions to surface PM2.5 (fine particulate matter) pollution over North China from January 2013 to 2015 using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint with improved model horizontal resolution (1/4° × 5/16°) and aqueous-phase chemistry for sulfate production. The adjoint method attributes the PM2.5 pollution to emissions from different source sectors and chemical species at the model resolution. Wintertime surface PM2.5 over Beijing is contributed by emissions of organic carbon (27% of the total source contribution), anthropogenic fine dust (27%), and SO2 (14%), which are mainly from residential and industrial sources, followed by NH3 (13%) primarily from agricultural activities. About half of the Beijing pollution originates from sources outside of the city municipality. Adjoint analyses for other cities in North China all show significant regional pollution transport, supporting a joint regional control policy for effectively mitigating the PM2.5 air pollution.

  16. Neural Network Training by Integration of Adjoint Systems of Equations Forward in Time

    Toomarian, Nikzad (Inventor); Barhen, Jacob (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for supervised neural learning of time dependent trajectories exploits the concepts of adjoint operators to enable computation of the gradient of an objective functional with respect to the various parameters of the network architecture in a highly efficient manner. Specifically. it combines the advantage of dramatic reductions in computational complexity inherent in adjoint methods with the ability to solve two adjoint systems of equations together forward in time. Not only is a large amount of computation and storage saved. but the handling of real-time applications becomes also possible. The invention has been applied it to two examples of representative complexity which have recently been analyzed in the open literature and demonstrated that a circular trajectory can be learned in approximately 200 iterations compared to the 12000 reported in the literature. A figure eight trajectory was achieved in under 500 iterations compared to 20000 previously required. Tbc trajectories computed using our new method are much closer to the target trajectories than was reported in previous studies.

  17. Flux mapping system for AHWR critical facility

    A software for flux mapping system (FMS) for AHWR critical facility has been developed. The system consists of 25 LEU based pulse detectors and associated software. The objective of the FMS is to obtain the flux profiles over the central 5 x 5 lattice locations. For development of flux mapping system it is required to compute the higher harmonics of the diffusion equation. These harmonics (also called λ-modes) are the eigen functions of multi-group diffusion equation. The fundamental mode is found by power iteration method. Apart from the fundamental mode, other higher modes are evaluated by subtraction technique. In the present paper, fundamental eigenvalue and eigenfunction are evaluated by finite difference method. The bi-orthogonality relations between the direct and adjoint eigenvectors are used for this purpose. The reference core for AHWR has been simulated by computer code FINSQR. Two group lattice cell data have been generated using transport theory code WIMSD and its associated 69-group nuclear data library. The reactor core along with the surrounding radial and axial reflector was represented using 3243 mesh points. In total 5 λ-modes and corresponding eigenvalues have been estimated. The computer code FMS has been developed specifically for AHWR/PHWR critical facility. Flux construction at 5 x 5 lattice locations of the core has been achieved by using observed fluxes at 25 detector locations and linear combinations of pre calculated eigen functions. Combining coefficients have been computed by least square method. To validate the code, we have used computer code based on Monte Carlo method for estimation of thermal fluxes at a few discrete locations. The fluxes were estimated using ENDF/B-VI point nuclear data library. (author)

  18. Reentry-Vehicle Shape Optimization Using a Cartesian Adjoint Method and CAD Geometry

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    A DJOINT solutions of the governing flow equations are becoming increasingly important for the development of efficient analysis and optimization algorithms. A well-known use of the adjoint method is gradient-based shape. Given an objective function that defines some measure of performance, such as the lift and drag functionals, its gradient is computed at a cost that is essentially independent of the number of design variables (e.g., geometric parameters that control the shape). Classic aerodynamic applications of gradient-based optimization include the design of cruise configurations for transonic and supersonic flow, as well as the design of high-lift systems. are perhaps the most promising approach for addressing the issues of flow solution automation for aerodynamic design problems. In these methods, the discretization of the wetted surface is decoupled from that of the volume mesh. This not only enables fast and robust mesh generation for geometry of arbitrary complexity, but also facilitates access to geometry modeling and manipulation using parametric computer-aided design (CAD). In previous work on Cartesian adjoint solvers, Melvin et al. developed an adjoint formulation for the TRANAIR code, which is based on the full-potential equation with viscous corrections. More recently, Dadone and Grossman presented an adjoint formulation for the two-dimensional Euler equations using a ghost-cell method to enforce the wall boundary conditions. In Refs. 18 and 19, we presented an accurate and efficient algorithm for the solution of the adjoint Euler equations discretized on Cartesian meshes with embedded, cut-cell boundaries. Novel aspects of the algorithm were the computation of surface shape sensitivities for triangulations based on parametric-CAD models and the linearization of the coupling between the surface triangulation and the cut-cells. The accuracy of the gradient computation was verified using several three-dimensional test cases, which included design

  19. The topology and geometry of self-adjoint and elliptic boundary conditions for Dirac and Laplace operators

    Asorey, M.; Ibort, A.; Marmo, G.

    2015-06-01

    The theory of self-adjoint extensions of first- and second-order elliptic differential operators on manifolds with boundary is studied via its most representative instances: Dirac and Laplace operators. The theory is developed by exploiting the geometrical structures attached to them and, by using an adapted Cayley transform on each case, the space {M} of such extensions is shown to have a canonical group composition law structure. The obtained results are compared with von Neumann's theorem characterizing the self-adjoint extensions of densely defined symmetric operators on Hilbert spaces. The 1D case is thoroughly investigated. The geometry of the submanifold of elliptic self-adjoint extensions {M}ellip is studied and it is shown that it is a Lagrangian submanifold of the universal Grassmannian Gr. The topology of {M}ellip is also explored and it is shown that there is a canonical cycle whose dual is the Maslov class of the manifold. Such cycle, called the Cayley surface, plays a relevant role in the study of the phenomena of topology change. Self-adjoint extensions of Laplace operators are discussed in the path integral formalism, identifying a class of them for which both treatments leads to the same results. A theory of dissipative quantum systems is proposed based on this theory and a unitarization theorem for such class of dissipative systems is proved. The theory of self-adjoint extensions with symmetry of Dirac operators is also discussed and a reduction theorem for the self-adjoint elliptic Grassmannian is obtained. Finally, an interpretation of spontaneous symmetry breaking is offered from the point of view of the theory of self-adjoint extensions.

  20. Adjoint sensitivity of global cloud droplet number to aerosol and dynamical parameters

    V. A. Karydis

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We present the development of the adjoint of a comprehensive cloud droplet formation parameterization for use in aerosol-cloud-climate interaction studies. The adjoint efficiently and accurately calculates the sensitivity of cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC to all parameterization inputs (e.g., updraft velocity, water uptake coefficient, aerosol number and hygroscopicity with a single execution. The adjoint is then integrated within three dimensional (3-D aerosol modeling frameworks to quantify the sensitivity of CDNC formation globally to each parameter. Sensitivities are computed for year-long executions of the NASA Global Modeling Initiative (GMI Chemical Transport Model (CTM, using wind fields computed with the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS Global Circulation Model (GCM II', and the GEOS-Chem CTM, driven by meteorological input from the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS of the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO. We find that over polluted (pristine areas, CDNC is more sensitive to updraft velocity and uptake coefficient (aerosol number and hygroscopicity. Over the oceans of the Northern Hemisphere, addition of anthropogenic or biomass burning aerosol is predicted to increase CDNC in contrast to coarse-mode sea salt which tends to decrease CDNC. Over the Southern Oceans, CDNC is most sensitive to sea salt, which is the main aerosol component of the region. Globally, CDNC is predicted to be less sensitive to changes in the hygroscopicity of the aerosols than in their concentration with the exception of dust where CDNC is very sensitive to particle hydrophilicity over arid areas. Regionally, the sensitivities differ considerably between the two frameworks and quantitatively reveal why the models differ considerably in their indirect forcing estimates.

  1. The Adjoint Method Formulation for an Inverse Problem in the Generalized Black-Scholes Model

    PIERRE NGNEPIEBA

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A general framework is developed to treat optimal control problems for a generalized Black-Scholes model, which is used for option pricing. The volatility function is retrieved from a set of market observations. The optimal volatility function is found by minimizing the cost functional measuring the discrepancy between the model solution (pricing and the observed market price, via the unconstrained minimization algorithm of the quasi-Newton limited memory type. The gradient is computed via the adjoint method. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated on an European call option.

  2. Self-adjoint Extensions of Schrödinger Operators with ?-magnetic Fields on Riemannian Manifolds

    T. Mine

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the magnetic Schr¨odinger operator on a Riemannian manifold M. We assume the magnetic field is given by the sum of a regular field and the Dirac δ measures supported on a discrete set Γ in M. We give a complete characterization of the self-adjoint extensions of the minimal operator, in terms of the boundary conditions. The result is an extension of the former results by Dabrowski-Šťoviček and Exner-Šťoviček-Vytřas.

  3. On Maximal Abelian Self-adjoint Subalgebras of Factors of Type Ⅱ1

    Li Guang WANG

    2005-01-01

    In this note, we show that if (N) is a proper subfactor of a factor (M) of type Ⅱ1 with finite Jones index, then there is a maximal abelian self-adjoint subalgebra (masa) (A) of (N) that is not a masa in (M). Popa showed that there is a proper subfactor (R)O of the hyperfinite type Ⅱ1 factor (R) such that each masa in (R)O is also a masa in (R). We shall give a detailed proof of Popa's result.

  4. Self-adjointness and the Casimir effect with confined quantized spinor matter

    Sitenko, Yurii A

    2015-01-01

    A generalization of the MIT bag boundary condition for spinor matter is proposed basing on the requirement that the Dirac hamiltonian operator be self-adjoint. An influence of a background magnetic field on the vacuum of charged spinor matter confined between two parallel material plates is studied. Employing the most general set of boundary conditions at the plates in the case of the uniform magnetic field directed orthogonally to the plates, we find the pressure from the vacuum onto the plates. In physically plausible situations, the Casimir effect is shown to be repulsive, independently of a choice of boundary conditions and of a distance between the plates.

  5. Infrared fixed point in SU(2) gauge theory with adjoint fermions

    We apply Schroedinger-functional techniques to the SU(2) lattice gauge theory with Nf=2 flavors of fermions in the adjoint representation. Our use of hypercubic smearing enables us to work at stronger couplings than did previous studies, before encountering a critical point and a bulk phase boundary. Measurement of the running coupling constant gives evidence of an infrared fixed point g* where 1/g*2=0.20(4)(3). At the fixed point, we find a mass anomalous dimension γm(g*)=0.31(6).

  6. Infrared fixed point in SU(2) gauge theory with adjoint fermions

    DeGrand, Thomas; Shamir, Yigal; Svetitsky, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    We apply Schrodinger-functional techniques to the SU(2) lattice gauge theory with N_f=2 flavors of fermions in the adjoint representation. Our use of hypercubic smearing enables us to work at stronger couplings than did previous studies, before encountering a critical point and a bulk phase boundary. Measurement of the running coupling constant gives evidence of an infrared fixed point g* where 1/g*^2 = 0.20(4)(3). At the fixed point, we find a mass anomalous dimension gamma_m(g*) = 0.31(6).

  7. Development of an adjoint sensitivity method for site characterization, uncertainty analysis, and code calibration/validation

    Lu, A.H.

    1991-09-01

    The adjoint method is applied to groundwater flow-mass transport coupled equations in variably saturated media. The sensitivity coefficients derived by this method can be calculated by a single execution for each performance measure regardless of the number of parameters in question. The method provides an efficient and effective way to rank the importance of the parameters, so that data collection can be guided in support of site characterization programs. The developed code will facilitate the sensitivity/uncertainty analysis in both model prediction and model calibration/validation. 13 refs., 1 tab.

  8. Development of an adjoint sensitivity method for site characterization, uncertainty analysis, and code calibration/validation

    The adjoint method is applied to groundwater flow-mass transport coupled equations in variably saturated media. The sensitivity coefficients derived by this method can be calculated by a single execution for each performance measure regardless of the number of parameters in question. The method provides an efficient and effective way to rank the importance of the parameters, so that data collection can be guided in support of site characterization programs. The developed code will facilitate the sensitivity/uncertainty analysis in both model prediction and model calibration/validation. 13 refs., 1 tab

  9. Self-adjointness and the Casimir effect with confined quantized spinor matter

    Sitenko, Yurii A.

    2016-01-01

    A generalization of the MIT bag boundary condition for spinor matter is proposed basing on the requirement that the Dirac hamiltonian operator be self-adjoint. An influence of a background magnetic field on the vacuum of charged spinor matter confined between two parallel material plates is studied. Employing the most general set of boundary conditions at the plates in the case of the uniform magnetic field directed orthogonally to the plates, we find the pressure from the vacuum onto the plates. In physically plausible situations, the Casimir effect is shown to be repulsive, independently of a choice of boundary conditions and of a distance between the plates.

  10. The adjoint equation method for constructing first integrals of difference equations

    A new method for finding first integrals of discrete equations is presented. It can be used for discrete equations which do not possess a variational (Lagrangian or Hamiltonian) formulation. The method is based on a newly established identity which links symmetries of the underlying discrete equations, solutions of the discrete adjoint equations and first integrals. The method is applied to an invariant mapping and to discretizations of second order and third order ordinary differential equations. In examples the set of independent first integrals makes it possible to find the general solution of the discrete equations. (paper)

  11. Adjoint Sensitivity Computations for an Embedded-Boundary Cartesian Mesh Method and CAD Geometry

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis,Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Cartesian-mesh methods are perhaps the most promising approach for addressing the issues of flow solution automation for aerodynamic design problems. In these methods, the discretization of the wetted surface is decoupled from that of the volume mesh. This not only enables fast and robust mesh generation for geometry of arbitrary complexity, but also facilitates access to geometry modeling and manipulation using parametric Computer-Aided Design (CAD) tools. Our goal is to combine the automation capabilities of Cartesian methods with an eficient computation of design sensitivities. We address this issue using the adjoint method, where the computational cost of the design sensitivities, or objective function gradients, is esseutially indepeudent of the number of design variables. In previous work, we presented an accurate and efficient algorithm for the solution of the adjoint Euler equations discretized on Cartesian meshes with embedded, cut-cell boundaries. Novel aspects of the algorithm included the computation of surface shape sensitivities for triangulations based on parametric-CAD models and the linearization of the coupling between the surface triangulation and the cut-cells. The objective of the present work is to extend our adjoint formulation to problems involving general shape changes. Central to this development is the computation of volume-mesh sensitivities to obtain a reliable approximation of the objective finction gradient. Motivated by the success of mesh-perturbation schemes commonly used in body-fitted unstructured formulations, we propose an approach based on a local linearization of a mesh-perturbation scheme similar to the spring analogy. This approach circumvents most of the difficulties that arise due to non-smooth changes in the cut-cell layer as the boundary shape evolves and provides a consistent approximation tot he exact gradient of the discretized abjective function. A detailed gradient accurace study is presented to verify our approach

  12. On linear operators with s-nuclear adjoints: $0< s \\le 1$

    Reinov, O. I.

    2013-01-01

    If $ s\\in (0,1]$ and $ T$ is a linear operator with $ s$-nuclear adjoint from a Banach space $ X$ to a Banach space $ Y$ and if one of the spaces $ X^*$ or $ Y^{***}$ has the approximation property of order $s,$ $AP_s,$ then the operator $ T$ is nuclear. The result is in a sense exact. For example, it is shown that for each $r\\in (2/3, 1]$ there exist a Banach space $Z_0$ and a non-nuclear operator $ T: Z_0^{**}\\to Z_0$ so that $Z_0^{**}$ has a Schauder basis, $ Z_0^{***}$ has the $AP_s$ for ...

  13. Application of sensitivity analysis to a simplified coupled neutronic thermal-hydraulics transient in a fast reactor using Adjoint techniques

    In this paper a method to perform sensitivity analysis for a simplified multi-physics problem is presented. The method is based on the Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis Procedure which is used to apply first order perturbation theory to linear and nonlinear problems using adjoint techniques. The multi-physics problem considered includes a neutronic, a thermo-kinetics, and a thermal-hydraulics part and it is used to model the time dependent behavior of a sodium cooled fast reactor. The adjoint procedure is applied to calculate the sensitivity coefficients with respect to the kinetic parameters of the problem for two reference transients using two different model responses, the results obtained are then compared with the values given by a direct sampling of the forward nonlinear problem. Our first results show that, thanks to modern numerical techniques, the procedure is relatively easy to implement and provides good estimation for most perturbations, making the method appealing for more detailed problems. (author)

  14. U.S. Department Of Energy's nuclear engineering education research: highlights of recent and current research-I. 5. Optimization Treatment Planning for Interstitial Brachytherapy Using the Adjoint Transport Method

    Permanent radioactive seed implantation (interstitial brachytherapy) is becoming the preferred method of treating prostate cancers. The main goal of the treatment is to deliver a conformal dose to the tumor while simultaneously minimizing the dose to the normal tissue and sensitive tissue structures. The treatment plan determines the number of seeds, their embedded positions, and the dose delivered to the tissue by photons emitted from the seeds. This study adopts the adjoint method to calculate dose and mixed integer programming (MIP) to optimize the dose to regions of interest for the permanent implantation of 125I radioactive source seeds for prostate cancers. DANTSYS, a discrete ordinates transport code, is utilized to compute the adjoint flux at all fine meshes (voxels) within a geometric model of the prostate image taken by a Transrectal Ultrasound probe. A broad 3-group-photon cross-section library was generated from the lowest three energy groups of the FENDL-2 42-group cross-section library. The first group spans the energy range 20 to 30 keV in which the photons emitted by 125I lie. The second and third groups span the energy ranges 10 to 20 keV and 1 to 10 keV, respectively. The flux-to-dose rate conversion factors for the broad 3-group-photon library are computed using the methodology described in Ref. 2. These factors are used as the adjoint source for the adjoint calculations. The adjoint flux obtained is then used to compute the absorbed dose rate in the regions of interest. The MIP solver is used to optimize seed placements for the treatment plan. MIP is well suited for the optimization problem of brachytherapy because the binary integer variable can represent yes/no decisions as to the placement or non-placement of seeds. The prescribed dose Dp to the tumor in our study is 150 Gy.We set the lower dose constraint, lDtu, for the tumor and the upper dose constraints, uDur and uDno, for the urethra and the normal tissue. The objective function we

  15. Critical flux determination by flux-stepping

    Beier, Søren; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2010-01-01

    values are more or less useless in itself as critical flux predictors, and constant flux verification experiments have to be conducted to check if the determined critical fluxes call predict sustainable flux regimes. However, it is shown that using the step-by-step predicted critical fluxes as start...

  16. Hilbert-Schmidt Inner Product for an Adjoint Representation of the Quantum Algebra U⌣Q(SU2)

    Fakhri, Hossein; Nouraddini, Mojtaba

    2015-10-01

    The Jordan-Schwinger realization of quantum algebra U⌣q(su2) is used to construct the irreducible submodule Tl of the adjoint representation in two different bases. The two bases are known as types of irreducible tensor operators of rank l which are related to each other by the involution map. The bases of the submodules are equipped with q-analogues of the Hilbert-Schmidt inner product and it is also shown that the adjoint representation corresponding to one of those submodules is a *-representation.

  17. Calculation of the response of cylindrical targets to collimated beams of particles using one-dimensional adjoint transport techniques

    The use of adjoint techniques to determine the interaction of externally incident collimated beams of particles with cylindrical targets is a convenient means of examining a class of problems important in radiation transport studies. The theory relevant to such applications is derived, and a simple example involving a fissioning target is discussed. Results from both discrete ordinates and Monte Carlo transport-code calculations are presented, and comparisons are made with results obtained from forward calculations. The accuracy of the discrete ordinates adjoint results depends on the order of angular quadrature used in the calculation. Reasonable accuracy by using EQN quadratures can be expected from order S16 or higher

  18. Adjoint accuracy for the full-Stokes ice flow model: limits to the transmission of basal friction variability to the surface

    Martin, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    This work focuses on the numerical assessment of the accuracy of an adjoint-based gradient in the perspective of variational data assimilation and parameter identification in glaciology. Using noisy synthetic data, we quantify the ability to identify the friction coefficient for such methods with a non-linear friction law. The exact adjoint problem is solved, based on second order numerical schemes, and a comparison with the so called "self-adjoint" approximation, neglecting the viscosity dependency to the velocity (leading to an incorrect gradient), common in glaciology, is carried out. For data with a noise of $1\\%$, a lower bound of identifiable wavelengths of $10$ ice thicknesses in the friction coefficient is established, when using the exact adjoint method, while the "self-adjoint" method is limited, even for lower noise, to a minimum of $20$ ice thicknesses wavelengths. The second order exact gradient method therefore provides robustness and reliability for the parameter identification process. In othe...

  19. Sources and processes contributing to nitrogen deposition: an adjoint model analysis applied to biodiversity hotspots worldwide.

    Paulot, Fabien; Jacob, Daniel J; Henze, Daven K

    2013-04-01

    Anthropogenic enrichment of reactive nitrogen (Nr) deposition is an ecological concern. We use the adjoint of a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) to identify the sources and processes that control Nr deposition to an ensemble of biodiversity hotspots worldwide and two U.S. national parks (Cuyahoga and Rocky Mountain). We find that anthropogenic sources dominate deposition at all continental sites and are mainly regional (less than 1000 km) in origin. In Hawaii, Nr supply is controlled by oceanic emissions of ammonia (50%) and anthropogenic sources (50%), with important contributions from Asia and North America. Nr deposition is also sensitive in complicated ways to emissions of SO2, which affect Nr gas-aerosol partitioning, and of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which affect oxidant concentrations and produce organic nitrate reservoirs. For example, VOC emissions generally inhibit deposition of locally emitted NOx but significantly increase Nr deposition downwind. However, in polluted boreal regions, anthropogenic VOC emissions can promote Nr deposition in winter. Uncertainties in chemical rate constants for OH + NO2 and NO2 hydrolysis also complicate the determination of source-receptor relationships for polluted sites in winter. Application of our adjoint sensitivities to the representative concentration pathways (RCPs) scenarios for 2010-2050 indicates that future decreases in Nr deposition due to NOx emission controls will be offset by concurrent increases in ammonia emissions from agriculture. PMID:23458244

  20. Eguchi-Kawai reduction with one flavor of adjoint Möbius fermion

    Cunningham, William; Giedt, Joel

    2016-02-01

    We study the single site lattice gauge theory of S U (N ) coupled to one Dirac flavor of fermion in the adjoint representation. We utilize Möbius fermions for this study, and accelerate the calculation with graphics processing units. Our Monte Carlo simulations indicate that for sufficiently large inverse 't Hooft coupling b =1 /g2N , and for N ≤10 the distribution of traced Polyakov loops has "fingers" that extend from the origin. However, in the massless case the distribution of eigenvalues of the untraced Polyakov loop becomes uniform at large N , indicating preservation of center symmetry in the thermodynamic limit. By contrast, for a large mass and large b , the distribution is highly nonuniform in the same limit, indicating spontaneous center symmetry breaking. These conclusions are confirmed by comparing to the quenched case, as well as by examining another observable based on the average value of the modulus of the traced Polyakov loop. The result of this investigation is that with massless adjoint fermions center symmetry is stabilized and the Eguchi-Kawai reduction should be successful; this is in agreement with most other studies.

  1. Aerodynamic Optimization of the Nose Shape of a Train Using the Adjoint Method

    Jorge Munoz-Paniagua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The adjoint method is used in this paper for the aerodynamic optimization of the nose shape of a train. This method has been extensively applied in aircraft or ground vehicle aerodynamic optimization, but is still in progress in train aerodynamics. Here we consider this innovative optimization method and present its application to reduce the aerodynamic drag when the train is subjected to front wind. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method, highlighting the requirements, limitations and capabilities of it. Furthermore, a significant reduction of the aerodynamic drag in a short number of solver calls is aimed as well. The independence of the computational cost with respect to the number of design variables that define the optimal candidate is stressed as the most interesting characteristic of the adjoint method. This behavior permits a more complete modification of the shape of the train nose because the number of design variables is not a constraint anymore. The information obtained from the sensitivity field permits determining the regions of the geometry where a small modification of the nose shape might introduce a larger improvement of the train performance. A good agreement between this information and the successive geometry modifications is observed here.

  2. A generalized albedo option for forward and adjoint Monte Carlo calculations

    The advisability of using the albedo procedure for the Monte Carlo solution of deep-penetration shielding problems which have ducts and other penetrations is investigated. It is generally accepted that the use of albedo data can dramatically improve the computational efficiency of certain Monte Carlo calculations - however the accuracy of these results may be unacceptable because of lost information during the albedo event and serious errors in the available differential albedo data. This study was done to evaluate and appropriate modify the MORSE/BREESE package, to develop new methods for generating the required albedo data, and to extend the adjoint capability to the albedo-modified calculations. The major modifications include an option to save for further use information that would be lost at the albedo event, an option to displace the emergent point during an albedo event, and an option to read spatially-dependent albedo data for both forward and adjoint calculations - which includes the emergent point as a new random variable to be selected during an albedo reflection event. The theoretical basis for using TORT-generated forward albedo information to produce adjuncton albedos is derived

  3. The minimal adjoint-SU(5)xZ_4 GUT model

    Emmanuel-Costa, D; Tortola, M

    2013-01-01

    An extension of the adjoint SU(5) model with a flavour symmetry based on the Z_4 group is investigated. The Z_4 symmetry is introduced with the aim of leading the up- and down-quark mass matrices to the Nearest-Neighbour-Interaction form. As a consequence of the discrete symmetry embedded in the SU(5) gauge group, the charged lepton mass matrix also gets the same form. Within this model, light neutrinos get their masses through type-I, type-III and one-loop radiative seesaw mechanisms, implemented, respectively, via a singlet, a triplet and an octet from the adjoint fermionic 24 fields. It is demonstrated that the neutrino phenomenology forces the introduction of at least three 24 fermionic multiplets. The symmetry SU(5)xZ_4 allows only two viable zero textures for the effective neutrino mass matrix. It is showed that one texture is only compatible with normal hierarchy and the other with inverted hierarchy in the light neutrino mass spectrum. Finally, it is also demonstrated that Z_4 freezes out the possibil...

  4. Seeking Energy System Pathways to Reduce Ozone Damage to Ecosystems through Adjoint-based Sensitivity Analysis

    Capps, S. L.; Pinder, R. W.; Loughlin, D. H.; Bash, J. O.; Turner, M. D.; Henze, D. K.; Percell, P.; Zhao, S.; Russell, M. G.; Hakami, A.

    2014-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) affects the productivity of ecosystems in addition to degrading human health. Concentrations of this pollutant are significantly influenced by precursor gas emissions, many of which emanate from energy production and use processes. Energy system optimization models could inform policy decisions that are intended to reduce these harmful effects if the contribution of precursor gas emissions to human health and ecosystem degradation could be elucidated. Nevertheless, determining the degree to which precursor gas emissions harm ecosystems and human health is challenging because of the photochemical production of ozone and the distinct mechanisms by which ozone causes harm to different crops, tree species, and humans. Here, the adjoint of a regional chemical transport model is employed to efficiently calculate the relative influences of ozone precursor gas emissions on ecosystem and human health degradation, which informs an energy system optimization. Specifically, for the summer of 2007 the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model adjoint is used to calculate the location- and sector-specific influences of precursor gas emissions on potential productivity losses for the major crops and sensitive tree species as well as human mortality attributable to chronic ozone exposure in the continental U.S. The atmospheric concentrations are evaluated with 12-km horizontal resolution with crop production and timber biomass data gridded similarly. These location-specific factors inform the energy production and use technologies selected in the MARKet ALlocation (MARKAL) model.

  5. Two-dimensional QCD with matter in the adjoint representation: What does it teach us?

    We analyse the highly excited states in QCD2 (Nc→∞) with adjoint matter by using such general methods as dispersion relations, duality and unitarity. We find the Hagedorn-like spectrum ρ(m) ∝m-aexp (βH m) where the parameters βH and a can be expressed in terms of the asymptotics of the matrix elements fn{k} ∝ left angle 0 vertical stroke Tr(anti ΨΨ)k vertical stroke nk right angle. We argue that the asymptotical values fn{k} do not depend on k (after appropriate normalization). Thus, we obtain βH=(2/π)√(π/g2Nc) and a=-3/2 in the case of Majorana fermions in the adjoint representation. The Hagedorn temperature is the limiting temperature in this case. We also argue that the chiral condensate left angle 0 vertical stroke Tr(anti ΨΨ) vertical stroke 0 right angle is not zero in the model. Contrary to the 't Hooft model, this condensate does not break down any continuous symmetries and can not be considered as an order parameter. Thus, no Goldstone boson appears as a consequence of the condensation. We also discuss a few apparently different but actually tightly related problems: master field, condensate, wee partons and constituent quark model in the light-cone framework. (orig.)

  6. Ocean acoustic tomography from different receiver geometries using the adjoint method.

    Zhao, Xiaofeng; Wang, Dongxiao

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, an ocean acoustic tomography inversion using the adjoint method in a shallow water environment is presented. The propagation model used is an implicit Crank-Nicolson finite difference parabolic equation solver with a non-local boundary condition. Unlike previous matched-field processing works using the complex pressure fields as the observations, here, the observed signals are the transmission losses. Based on the code tests of the tangent linear model, the adjoint model, and the gradient, the optimization problem is solved by a gradient-based minimization algorithm. The inversions are performed in numerical simulations for two geometries: one in which hydrophones are sparsely distributed in the horizontal direction, and another in which the hydrophones are distributed vertically. The spacing in both cases is well beyond the half-wavelength threshold at which beamforming could be used. To deal with the ill-posedness of the inverse problem, a linear differential regularization operator of the sound-speed profile is used to smooth the inversion results. The L-curve criterion is adopted to select the regularization parameter, and the optimal value can be easily determined at the elbow of the logarithms of the residual norm of the measured-predicted fields and the norm of the penalty function. PMID:26723329

  7. Adjoint sensitivity theory for steady-state ground-water flow

    In this study, adjoint sensitivity theory is developed for equations of two-dimensional steady-state flow in a confined aquifer. Both the primary flow equation and the adjoint sensitivity equation are solved using the Galerkin finite element method. The developed computer code is used to investigate the regional flow parameters of the Leadville Formation of the Paradox Basin in Utah and the Wolcamp carbonate/sandstone aquifer of the Palo Duro Basin in the Texas Panhandle. Two performance measures are evaluated, local heads and velocity in the vicinity of potential high-level nuclear waste repositories. The results illustrate the sensitivity of calculated local heads to the boundary conditions. Local velocity-related performance measures are more sensitive to hydraulic conductivities. The uncertainty in the performance measure is a function of the parameter sensitivity, parameter variance and the correlation between parameters. Given a parameter covariance matrix, the uncertainty of the performance measure can be calculated. Although no results are presented here, the implications of uncertainty calculations for the two studies are discussed. 18 references, 25 figures

  8. Source attribution of PM2.5 pollution over North China using the adjoint method

    Zhang, L.; Liu, L.; Zhao, Y.; Gong, S.; Henze, D. K.

    2014-12-01

    Conventional methods for source attribution of air pollution are based on measurement statistics (such as Positive Matrix Factorization) or sensitivity simulations with a chemical transport model (CTM). These methods generally ignore the nonlinear chemistry associated with the pollution formation or require unaffordable computational time. Here we use the adjoint of GEOS-Chem CTM at 0.25x0.3125 degree resolution to examine the sources contributing to the PM2.5 pollution over North China in winter 2013. We improved the model sulfate simulation by implementing the aqueous-phase oxidation of S(IV) by nitrogen dioxide. The adjoint results provide detailed source information at the model underlying grid resolution including source types and sectors. We show that PM2.5 pollution over Beijing and Baoding (Hebei) in winter was largely contributed by the large-scale residential and industrial burnings, and ammonia (NH3) emissions from agriculture activities. Nearly half of pollution was transported from outside of the city domains, and accumulated over 2-3 days. We also show under the current emission conditions, the PM2.5 concentrations over North China are more sensitive to NH3 emissions than NOx and SO2 emissions.

  9. Efficient Adjoint Computation of Hybrid Systems of Differential Algebraic Equations with Applications in Power Systems

    Abhyankar, Shrirang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Anitescu, Mihai [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Constantinescu, Emil [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Zhang, Hong [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-03-31

    Sensitivity analysis is an important tool to describe power system dynamic behavior in response to parameter variations. It is a central component in preventive and corrective control applications. The existing approaches for sensitivity calculations, namely, finite-difference and forward sensitivity analysis, require a computational effort that increases linearly with the number of sensitivity parameters. In this work, we investigate, implement, and test a discrete adjoint sensitivity approach whose computational effort is effectively independent of the number of sensitivity parameters. The proposed approach is highly efficient for calculating trajectory sensitivities of larger systems and is consistent, within machine precision, with the function whose sensitivity we are seeking. This is an essential feature for use in optimization applications. Moreover, our approach includes a consistent treatment of systems with switching, such as DC exciters, by deriving and implementing the adjoint jump conditions that arise from state and time-dependent discontinuities. The accuracy and the computational efficiency of the proposed approach are demonstrated in comparison with the forward sensitivity analysis approach.

  10. Coupling of MASH-MORSE Adjoint Leakages with Space- and Time-Dependent Plume Radiation Sources

    Slater, C.O.

    2001-04-20

    In the past, forward-adjoint coupling procedures in air-over-ground geometry have typically involved forward fluences arising from a point source a great distance from a target or vehicle system. Various processing codes were used to create localized forward fluence files that could be used to couple with the MASH-MORSE adjoint leakages. In recent years, radiation plumes that result from reactor accidents or similar incidents have been modeled by others, and the source space and energy distributions as a function of time have been calculated. Additionally, with the point kernel method, they were able to calculate in relatively quick fashion free-field radiation doses for targets moving within the fluence field or for stationary targets within the field, the time dependence for the latter case coming from the changes in position, shape, source strength, and spectra of the plume with time. The work described herein applies the plume source to the MASH-MORSE coupling procedure. The plume source replaces the point source for generating the forward fluences that are folded with MASH-MORSE adjoint leakages. Two types of source calculations are described. The first is a ''rigorous'' calculation using the TORT code and a spatially large air-over-ground geometry. For each time step desired, directional fluences are calculated and are saved over a predetermined region that encompasses a structure within which it is desired to calculate dose rates. Processing codes then create the surface fluences (which may include contributions from radiation sources that deposit on the roof or plateout) that will be coupled with the MASH-MORSE adjoint leakages. Unlike the point kernel calculations of the free-field dose rates, the TORT calculations in practice include the effects of ground scatter on dose rates and directional fluences, although the effects may be underestimated or overestimated because of the use of necessarily coarse mesh and quadrature in order to

  11. Simulation of atmospheric N2O with GEOS-Chem and its adjoint: evaluation of observational constraints

    K. C. Wells

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new 4D-Var inversion framework for N2O based on the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint, and apply this framework in a series of observing system simulation experiments to assess how well N2O sources and sinks can be constrained by the current global observing network. The employed measurement ensemble includes approximately weekly and quasi-continuous N2O measurements (hourly averages used from several long-term monitoring networks, N2O measurements collected from discrete air samples aboard a commercial aircraft (CARIBIC, and quasi-continuous measurements from an airborne pole-to-pole sampling campaign (HIPPO. For a two-year inversion, we find that the surface and HIPPO observations can accurately resolve a uniform bias in emissions during the first year; CARIBIC data provide a somewhat weaker constraint. Variable emission errors are much more difficult to resolve given the long lifetime of N2O, and major parts of the world lack significant constraints on the seasonal cycle of fluxes. Current observations can largely correct a global bias in the stratospheric sink of N2O if emissions are known, but do not provide information on the temporal and spatial distribution of the sink. However, for the more realistic scenario where source and sink are both uncertain, we find that simultaneously optimizing both would require unrealistically small errors in model transport. Regardless, a bias in the magnitude of the N2O sink would not affect the a posteriori N2O emissions for the two-year timescale used here, given realistic initial conditions, due to the timescale required for stratosphere–troposphere exchange (STE. The same does not apply to model errors in the rate of STE itself, which we show exerts a larger influence on the tropospheric burden of N2O than does the chemical loss rate over short (2O emissions. There, averaging kernels are highly smeared spatially and extend even to the midlatitudes, so that tropical

  12. Adjoint problem in duct acoustics and its reciprocity to forward problem by the Time Domain Wave Packet method

    Kocaogul, Ibrahim; Hu, Fang; Li, Xiaodong

    2014-03-01

    Radiation of acoustic waves at all frequencies can be obtained by Time Domain Wave Packet (TDWP) method in a single time domain computation. Other benefit of the TDWP method is that it makes possible the separation of acoustic and instability wave in the shear flow. The TDWP method is also particularly useful for computations in the ducted or waveguide environments where incident wave modes can be imposed cleanly without a potentially long transient period. The adjoint equations for the linearized Euler equations are formulated for the Cartesian coordinates. Analytical solution for adjoint equations is derived by using Green's function in 2D and 3D. The derivation of reciprocal relations is presented for closed and open ducts. The adjoint equations are then solved numerically in reversed time by the TDWP method. Reciprocal relation between the duct mode amplitudes and far field point sources in the presence of the exhaust shear flow is computed and confirmed numerically. Applications of the adjoint problem to closed and open ducts are also presented.

  13. Numerical computation of the beta function of large N SU(N) gauge theory coupled to an adjoint Dirac fermion

    Hietanen, A.; Narayanan, R.

    2012-01-01

    We use a single site lattice in four dimensions to study the scaling of large N Yang-Mills field coupled to a single massless Dirac fermion in the adjoint representation. We use the location of the strong to the weak coupling transition defined through the eigenvalues of the folded Wilson loop...

  14. Hermitian separability and transition from singlet to adjoint BFKL equations in $\\mathcal{N}=4$ super Yang-Mills Theory

    Bondarenko, S

    2015-01-01

    We revisit the next-to-leading order~(NLO) correction to the eigenvalue of the BFKL equation in the adjoint representation and investigate its properties in analogy with the singlet BFKL in planar $\\mathcal{N}=4$ super Yang-Mills Theory~(SYM). We show that the adjoint NLO BFKL eigenvalue is needed to be slightly modified in order to have a property of hermitian separability present for the singlet BFKL. After this modification the adjoint NLO BFKL eigenvalue is expressed through holomorphic and antiholomophic parts of the leading order eigenvalue and their derivatives. The proposed choice of the modified NLO expression is supported by the fact that it is possible to obtain the same result in a relatively straightforward way directly from the singlet NLO BFKL eigenvalue replacing alternating series by series of constant sign. This transformation corresponds to changing cylindrical topology of the singlet BFKL to the planar topology of the adjoint BFKL. We believe that the original NLO calculation of Fadin and ...

  15. Self-adjoint Wheeler-DeWitt operators, the problem of time and the wave function of the universe

    Feinberg, J; Feinberg, Joshua; Peleg, Yoav

    1995-01-01

    We discuss minisuperspace aspects of various non empty Robertson-Walker cosmological models. The requirement that the Wheeler-DeWitt (WDW) operator be self adjoint is a key ingredient in constructing the physical Hilbert space of a given model and has non-trivial cosmological implications. We discuss a dust filled Universe and its Schr\\"odinger type WDW operator, as well as a Universe containing scalar field matter and its Klein-Gordon type WDW operator. In the latter case, the issue of self-adjointness is intimately related with the problem of time in quantum cosmology. Namely, if time is parametrized by matter fields we find two types of domains for the self adjoint WDW operator: a non trivial domain is comprised of zero current (Hartle-Hawking type) wave functions and is parametrized by two new parameters, whereas the domain of a self adjoint WDW operator acting on tunneling (Vilenkin type) wave functions is a {\\em single} ray. On the other hand, if time is parametrized by the scale factor both types of wa...

  16. Improved forward wave propagation and adjoint-based sensitivity kernel calculations using a numerically stable finite-element PML

    Xie, Zhinan; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Martin, Roland;

    2014-01-01

    auxiliary differential equation (ADE) form of CFS-UPML, which allows for extension to higher order time schemes and is easier to implement. Secondly, we rigorously derive the CFS-UPML formulation for time-domain adjoint elastic wave problems, which to our knowledge has never been done before. Thirdly, in...

  17. New optimality criteria methods - Forcing uniqueness of the adjoint strains by corner-rounding at constraint intersections

    Rozvany, G. I. N.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.

    1992-01-01

    In new, iterative continuum-based optimality criteria (COC) methods, the strain in the adjoint structure becomes non-unique if the number of active local constraints is greater than the number of design variables for an element. This brief note discusses the use of smooth envelope functions (SEFs) in overcoming economically computational problems caused by the above non-uniqueness.

  18. An investigation of the adjoint method for external beam radiation therapy treatment planning using Monte Carlo transport

    A relatively new technique for achieving the right dose to the right tissue, is intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). In this technique, a megavoltage x-ray beam is rotated around a patient, and the intensity and shape of the beam is modulated as a function of source position and patient anatomy. The relationship between beam-let intensity and patient dose can be expressed under a matrix form where the matrix Dij represents the dose delivered to voxel i by beam-let j per unit fluence. The Dij influence matrix is the key element that enables this approach. In this regard, sensitivity theory lends itself in a natural way to the process of computing beam weights for treatment planning. The solution of the adjoint form of the Boltzmann equation is an adjoint function that describes the importance of particles throughout the system in contributing to the detector response. In this case, adjoint methods can provide the sensitivity of the dose at a single point in the patient with respect to all points in the source field. The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using the adjoint method and Monte Carlo transport for radiation therapy treatment planning

  19. Surface Pressure Dependencies in the Geos-Chem-Adjoint System and the Impact of the GEOS-5 Surface Pressure on CO2 Model Forecast

    Lee, Meemong; Weidner, Richard

    2016-01-01

    In the GEOS-Chem Adjoint (GCA) system, the total (wet) surface pressure of the GEOS meteorology is employed as dry surface pressure, ignoring the presence of water vapor. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) research team has been evaluating the impact of the above discrepancy on the CO2 model forecast and the CO2 flux inversion. The JPL CMS research utilizes a multi-mission assimilation framework developed by the Multi-Mission Observation Operator (M2O2) research team at JPL extending the GCA system. The GCA-M2O2 framework facilitates mission-generic 3D and 4D-variational assimilations streamlining the interfaces to the satellite data products and prior emission inventories. The GCA-M2O2 framework currently integrates the GCA system version 35h and provides a dry surface pressure setup to allow the CO2 model forecast to be performed with the GEOS-5 surface pressure directly or after converting it to dry surface pressure.

  20. Slices to sums of adjoint orbits, the Atiyah-Hitchin manifold, and Hilbert schemes of points

    Bielawski, Roger

    2015-01-01

    We show that the regular Slodowy slice to the sum of two semisimple adjoint orbits of $GL(n,C)$ is isomorphic to the deformation of the $D_2$-singularity if $n=2$, the Dancer deformation of the double cover of the Atiyah-Hitchin manifold if $n=3$, and to the Atiyah-Hitchin manifold itself if $n=4$. For higher $n$, such slices to the sum of two orbits, each having only two distinct eigenvalues, are either empty or biholomorphic to open subsets of the Hilbert scheme of points on of one the above surfaces. In particular, these open subsets of Hilbert schemes of points carry complete hyperk\\"ahler metrics, which in the case of the Atiyah-Hitchin manifold turns out to be the natural $L^2$-metric on a hyperk\\"ahler submanifold of the monopole moduli space.

  1. F-theorem, duality and SUSY breaking in one-adjoint Chern-Simons-Matter theories

    Morita, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    We extend previous work on N=2 Chern-Simons theories coupled to a single adjoint chiral superfield using localization techniques and the F-maximization principle. We provide tests of a series of proposed 3D Seiberg dualities and a new class of tests of the conjectured F-theorem. In addition, a proposal is made for a modification of the F-maximization principle that takes into account the effects of decoupling fields. Finally, we formulate and provide evidence for a new general non-perturbative constraint on spontaneous supersymmetry breaking in three dimensions based on Q-deformed S^3 partition functions computed via localization. An explicit illustration based on the known analytic solution of the Chern-Simons matrix model is presented.

  2. Spectrum of SU(2) lattice gauge theory with two adjoint Dirac flavours

    An SU(2) gauge theory with two fermions transforming under the adjoint representation of the gauge group may appear conformal or almost conformal in the infrared. We use lattice simulations to study the spectrum of this theory and present results on the masses of several gauge singlet states as a function of the physical quark mass determined through the axial Ward identity and find indications of a change from chiral symmetry breaking to a phase consistent with conformal behaviour at βL ∼ 2. However, the measurement of the spectrum is not alone sufficient to decisively confirm the existence of conformal fixed point in this theory as we show by comparing to similar measurements with fundamental fermions. Based on the results we sketch a possible phase diagram of this lattice theory and discuss the applicability and importance of these results for the future measurement of the evolution of the coupling constant.

  3. Multi-objective optimization strategies using adjoint method and game theory in aerodynamics

    Zhili Tang

    2006-01-01

    There are currently three different game strategies originated in economics:(1) Cooperative games (Pareto front),(2)Competitive games (Nash game) and (3)Hierarchical games (Stackelberg game).Each game achieves different equilibria with different performance,and their players play different roles in the games.Here,we introduced game concept into aerodynamic design, and combined it with adjoint method to solve multicriteria aerodynamic optimization problems.The performance distinction of the equilibria of these three game strategies was investigated by numerical experiments.We computed Pareto front, Nash and Stackelberg equilibria of the same optimization problem with two conflicting and hierarchical targets under different parameterizations by using the deterministic optimization method.The numerical results show clearly that all the equilibria solutions are inferior to the Pareto front.Non-dominated Pareto front solutions are obtained,however the CPU cost to capture a set of solutions makes the Pareto front an expensive tool to the designer.

  4. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of dynamic reliability models based on Markov chains - I: Theory

    The development of the adjoint sensitivity analysis procedure (ASAP) for generic dynamic reliability models based on Markov chains is presented, together with applications of this procedure to the analysis of several systems of increasing complexity. The general theory is presented in Part I of this work and is accompanied by a paradigm application to the dynamic reliability analysis of a simple binary component, namely a pump functioning on an 'up/down' cycle until it fails irreparably. This paradigm example admits a closed form analytical solution, which permits a clear illustration of the main characteristics of the ASAP for Markov chains. In particular, it is shown that the ASAP for Markov chains presents outstanding computational advantages over other procedures currently in use for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of the dynamic reliability of large-scale systems. This conclusion is further underscored by the large-scale applications presented in Part II. (authors)

  5. Confining vs. conformal scenario for SU(2) with 2 adjoint fermions. Gluonic observables

    Del Debbio, Luigi; Lucini, Biagio; Patella, Agostino; Pica, Claudio; Rago, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Walking technicolor is a mechanism for electroweak symmetry breaking without Higgs field. The Higgs mechanism is provided by chiral symmetry breaking in the technicolor theory. An essential ingredient is the vicinity to an IR fixed point, which could reconcile technicolor with the electroweak...... signal for the existence of an IR fixed point in this theory can be obtained by comparing the mesonic and gluonic sectors. We review some technical details of our calculations. Possible systematic errors are discussed....... precision tests. SU(2) gauge theory with two Dirac adjoint fermions has been proposed as a candidate for walking technicolor. Understanding whether this theory is confining or IR-conformal is a challenging problem, which can be addressed by means of numerical simulations. We have pointed out that a clean...

  6. The 2-loop partition function of large N gauge theories with adjoint matter on S^3

    Mussel, Matan

    2009-01-01

    We compute the 2-loop thermal partition function of Yang-Mills theory on a small 3-sphere, in the large N limit with weak 't Hooft coupling. We include N_s scalars and N_f chiral fermions in the adjoint representation of the gauge group (S)U(N), with arbitrary Yukawa and quartic scalar couplings, assuming only commutator interactions. From this computation one can extract information on the perturbative corrections to the spectrum of the theory, and the correction to its Hagedorn temperature. Furthermore, the computation of the 2-loop partition function is a necessary step towards determining the order of the deconfinement phase transition at weak coupling, for which a 3-loop computation is needed.

  7. Phase diagram of SU(2) with 2 flavors of dynamical adjoint quarks

    Catterall, Simon; Sannino, Francesco; Schneible, Joe

    2008-01-01

    We report on numerical simulations of SU(2) lattice gauge theory with two flavors of light dynamical quarks in the adjoint of the gauge group. The dynamics of this theory is thought to be very different from QCD -- the theory exhibiting conformal or near conformal behavior in the infrared. We make a high resolution survey of the phase diagram of this model in the plane of the bare coupling and quark mass on lattices of size 8^3 \\times 16. Our simulations reveal a line of first order phase transitions extending from beta=0 to beta=beta_c \\sim 2.0. For beta > beta_c the line is no longer first order but continues as the locus of minimum meson mass. For beta > 2.0 we observe the critical pion and rho masses to be light, independent of bare coupling and approximately degenerate. We discuss possible interpretations of these observations and corresponding continuum limits.

  8. Phase diagram of SU(2) with 2 flavors of dynamical adjoint quarks

    We report on numerical simulations of SU(2) lattice gauge theory with two flavors of light dynamical quarks in the adjoint of the gauge group. The dynamics of this theory is thought to be very different from QCD-the theory exhibiting conformal or near conformal behavior in the infrared. We make a high resolution survey of the phase diagram of this model in the plane of the bare coupling and quark mass on lattices of size 83 x 16. Our simulations reveal a line of first order phase transitions extending from β = 0 to β = βc ∼ 2.0. For β > βc the phase boundary is no longer first order but continues as the locus of minimum meson mass. For β > βc we observe the pion and rho masses along the phase boundary to be light, independent of bare coupling and approximately degenerate. We discuss possible interpretations of these observations and corresponding continuum limits.

  9. On the product of self-adjoint Sturm-Liouville differential operators in direct sum spaces

    Sobhy El-Sayed Ibrahim

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the second-order symmetric Sturm-Liouville differential expressions $ \\tau_1,\\tau_2, \\ldots, \\tau_n $, with real coefficients on any finite number of intervals are studied in the setting of the direct sum of the $ L_w^2 $-spaces of functions defined on each of the separate intervals. It is shown that the characterization of singular self-adjoint boundary conditions involves the sesquilinear form associated with the product of Sturm-Liouville differential expressions and elements of the maximal domain of the product operators, it is an exact parallel of that in the regular case. This characterization is an extension of those obtained in [6], [7], [8], [9], [12], [14] and [15].

  10. Focus Point Gauge Mediation with Incomplete Adjoint Messengers and Gauge Coupling Unification

    Bhattacharyya, Gautam; Yokozaki, Norimi

    2015-01-01

    As the mass limits on supersymmetric particles are gradually pushed to higher values due to their continuing non-observation at the CERN LHC, looking for focus point regions in the supersymmetric parameter space, which shows considerably reduced fine-tuning, is increasingly more important than ever. We explore this in the context of gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking with messengers transforming in the adjoint representation of the gauge group, namely, octet of color SU(3) and triplet of weak SU(2). A distinctive feature of this scenario is that the focus point is achieved by fixing a single combination of parameters in the messenger sector, which is invariant under the renormalization group evolution. Because of this invariance, the focus point behavior is well under control once the relevant parameters are fixed by a more fundamental theory. The observed Higgs boson mass is explained with a relatively mild fine-tuning $\\Delta=$ 60-150. Interestingly, even in the presence of incomplete messenger multiplet...

  11. One-loop adjoint masses for non-supersymmetric intersecting branes

    Anastasopoulos, P. [Technische Univ., Vienna (Austria). 1. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Antoniadis, I. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Benakli, K. [CNRS, UPMC Univ. Paris (France). Lab. de Physique Theorique et Haute Energies; Goodsell, M.D. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Vichi, A. [Institute de Theorie des Phenomenes Physiques, EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-05-15

    We consider breaking of supersymmetry in intersecting D-brane configurations by slight deviation of the angles from their supersymmetric values. We compute the masses generated by radiative corrections for the adjoint scalars on the brane world-volumes. In the open string channel, the string two-point function receives contributions only from the infrared and the ultraviolet limits. The latter is due to tree-level closed string uncanceled NS-NS tadpoles, which we explicitly reproduce from the effective Born-Infeld action. On the other hand, the infrared region reproduces the one-loop mediation of supersymmetry breaking in the effective gauge theory, via messengers and their Kaluza-Klein excitations. In the toroidal set-up considered here, it receives contributions only from N {approx} 4 and N {approx} 2 supersymmetric configurations, and thus always leads at leading order to a tachyonic direction, in agreement with effective field theory expectations. (orig.)

  12. The method of rigged spaces in singular perturbation theory of self-adjoint operators

    Koshmanenko, Volodymyr; Koshmanenko, Nataliia

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents the newly developed method of rigged Hilbert spaces as a modern approach in singular perturbation theory. A key notion of this approach is the Lax-Berezansky triple of Hilbert spaces embedded one into another, which specifies the well-known Gelfand topological triple. All kinds of singular interactions described by potentials supported on small sets (like the Dirac δ-potentials, fractals, singular measures, high degree super-singular expressions) admit a rigorous treatment only in terms of the equipped spaces and their scales. The main idea of the method is to use singular perturbations to change inner products in the starting rigged space, and the construction of the perturbed operator by the Berezansky canonical isomorphism (which connects the positive and negative spaces from a new rigged triplet). The approach combines three powerful tools of functional analysis based on the Birman-Krein-Vishik theory of self-adjoint extensions of symmetric operators, the theory of singular quadra...

  13. Solution of the self-adjoint radiative transfer equation on hybrid computer systems

    Gasilov, V. A.; Kuchugov, P. A.; Olkhovskaya, O. G.; Chetverushkin, B. N.

    2016-06-01

    A new technique for simulating three-dimensional radiative energy transfer for the use in the software designed for the predictive simulation of plasma with high energy density on parallel computers is proposed. A highly scalable algorithm that takes into account the angular dependence of the radiation intensity and is free of the ray effect is developed based on the solution of a second-order equation with a self-adjoint operator. A distinctive feature of this algorithm is a preliminary transformation of rotation to eliminate mixed derivatives with respect to the spatial variables, simplify the structure of the difference operator, and accelerate the convergence of the iterative solution of the equation. It is shown that the proposed method correctly reproduces the limiting cases—isotropic radiation and the directed radiation with a δ-shaped angular distribution.

  14. Comparison of Evolutionary (Genetic) Algorithm and Adjoint Methods for Multi-Objective Viscous Airfoil Optimizations

    Pulliam, T. H.; Nemec, M.; Holst, T.; Zingg, D. W.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A comparison between an Evolutionary Algorithm (EA) and an Adjoint-Gradient (AG) Method applied to a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code for airfoil design is presented. Both approaches use a common function evaluation code, the steady-state explicit part of the code,ARC2D. The parameterization of the design space is a common B-spline approach for an airfoil surface, which together with a common griding approach, restricts the AG and EA to the same design space. Results are presented for a class of viscous transonic airfoils in which the optimization tradeoff between drag minimization as one objective and lift maximization as another, produces the multi-objective design space. Comparisons are made for efficiency, accuracy and design consistency.

  15. SO(N) Higgs problem with adjoint + vector representations and non-linear potentials

    Using the recently devised geometrical method, we analyze the quartic Higgs potential for SO(N) adjoint + vector representations. The minimum energy solutions are found to correspond to maxi-maximal little groups, but not all such groups are used. However, in the complete orbit space (including invariants not employed in the Higgs potential) we find that their strata have somewhat equal geometrical status of being low dimensional singular subspaces, i.e., cusps, edge curves, two-dimensional surfaces, etc. We also consider simple scalar potentials which are nonlinear with respect to orbit parameters and show that the directional extremum often, though not always, remains monotonic in orbit parameters within the orbit space and consequently the absolute extremum is likely to occur on the most protrudent portions of the orbit space boundary. Thus we clarify the range of validity of the Michel-Radicati conjecture and the Gell-Mann-Slansky conjecture. (orig.)

  16. Discrete Adjoint-Based Design for Unsteady Turbulent Flows On Dynamic Overset Unstructured Grids

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Diskin, Boris

    2012-01-01

    A discrete adjoint-based design methodology for unsteady turbulent flows on three-dimensional dynamic overset unstructured grids is formulated, implemented, and verified. The methodology supports both compressible and incompressible flows and is amenable to massively parallel computing environments. The approach provides a general framework for performing highly efficient and discretely consistent sensitivity analysis for problems involving arbitrary combinations of overset unstructured grids which may be static, undergoing rigid or deforming motions, or any combination thereof. General parent-child motions are also accommodated, and the accuracy of the implementation is established using an independent verification based on a complex-variable approach. The methodology is used to demonstrate aerodynamic optimizations of a wind turbine geometry, a biologically-inspired flapping wing, and a complex helicopter configuration subject to trimming constraints. The objective function for each problem is successfully reduced and all specified constraints are satisfied.

  17. The spectrum of a self-adjoint differential operator with rapidly oscillating coefficients on the axis

    The asymptotic behaviour of the spectrum of a self-adjoint second-order differential operator on the axis is investigated. The coefficients of this operator depend on rapid and slow variables and are periodic in the rapid variable. The period of oscillations in the rapid variable is a small parameter. The dependence of the coefficients on the rapid variable is localized, and they stop depending on it at infinity. Asymptotic expansions for the eigenvalues and the eigenfunctions of the operator in question are constructed. It is shown that, apart from eigenvalues convergent to eigenvalues of the homogenized operator as the small parameter converges to zero, the perturbed operator can also have an eigenvalue convergent to the boundary of the continuous spectrum. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of such an eigenvalue are obtained. Bibliography: 22 titles.

  18. Adjoint-based optimization of flapping plates hinged with a trailing-edge flap

    Min Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to understand the impact of wing-morphing on aerodynamic performance in the study of flapping-wing flight of birds and insects. We use a flapping plate hinged with a trailing-edge flap as a simplified model for flexible/morphing wings in hovering. The trailing-edge flapping motion is optimized by an adjoint-based approach. The optimized configuration suggests that the trailing-edge flap can substantially enhance the overall lift. Further analysis indicates that the lift enhancement by the trailing-edge flapping is from the change of circulation in two ways: the local circulation change by the rotational motion of the flap, and the modification of vortex shedding process by the relative location between the trailing-edge flap and leading-edge main plate.

  19. Adjoint Parameter Sensitivity Analysis for the Hydrodynamic Lattice Boltzmann Method with Applications to Design Optimization

    Pingen, Georg; Evgrafov, Anton; Maute, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    We present an adjoint parameter sensitivity analysis formulation and solution strategy for the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The focus is on design optimization applications, in particular topology optimization. The lattice Boltzmann method is briefly described with an in-depth discussion of...... generalized geometry optimization formulation and derive the corresponding sensitivity analysis for the single relaxation LBM for both topology and shape optimization applications. Using numerical examples, we verify the accuracy of the analytical sensitivity analysis through a comparison with finite...... differences. In addition, we show that for fluidic topology optimization a scaled volume constraint should be used to obtain the desired "0-1" optimal solutions. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  20. Eigenvalue problem meets Sierpinski triangle: computing the spectrum of a non-self-adjoint random operator

    Chandler-Wilde, Simon; Lindner, Marko

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to prove that the spectrum of the non-self-adjoint one-particle Hamiltonian proposed by J. Feinberg and A. Zee (Phys. Rev. E 59 (1999), 6433--6443) has interior points. We do this by first recalling that the spectrum of this random operator is the union of the set of $\\ell^\\infty$ eigenvalues of all infinite matrices with the same structure. We then construct an infinite matrix of this structure for which every point of the open unit disk is an $\\ell^\\infty$ eigenvalue, this following from the fact that the components of the eigenvector are polynomials in the spectral parameter whose non-zero coefficients are $\\pm 1$'s, forming the pattern of an infinite discrete Sierpinski triangle.

  1. Adjoint-tomography Inversion of the Small-scale Surface Sedimentary Structures: Key Methodological Aspects

    Kubina, Filip; Moczo, Peter; Kristek, Jozef; Michlik, Filip

    2016-04-01

    Adjoint tomography has proven an irreplaceable useful tool in exploring Earth's structure in the regional and global scales. It has not been widely applied for improving models of local surface sedimentary structures (LSSS) in numerical predictions of earthquake ground motion (EGM). Anomalous earthquake motions and corresponding damage in earthquakes are often due to site effects in local surface sedimentary basins. Because majority of world population is located atop surface sedimentary basins, it is important to predict EGM at these sites during future earthquakes. A major lesson learned from dedicated international tests focused on numerical prediction of EGM in LSSS is that it is hard to reach better agreement between data and synthetics without an improved structural model. If earthquake records are available for sites atop a LSSS it is natural to consider them for improving the structural model. Computationally efficient adjoint tomography might be a proper tool. A seismic wavefield in LSSS is relatively very complex due to diffractions, conversions, interference and often also resonant phenomena. In shallow basins, the first arrivals are not suitable for inversion due to almost vertical incidence and thus insufficient vertical resolution. Later wavefield consists mostly of local surface waves often without separated wave groups. Consequently, computed kernels are complicated and not suitable for inversion without pre-processing. The spatial complexity of a kernel can be dramatic in a typical situation with relatively low number of sources (local earthquakes) and surface receivers. This complexity can be simplified by directionally-dependent smoothing and spatially-dependent normalization that condition reasonable convergence. A multiscale approach seems necessary given the usual difference between the available and true models. Interestingly, only a successive inversion of μ and λ elastic moduli, and different scale sequences lead to good results.

  2. Towards adjoint-based inversion for rheological parameters in nonlinear viscous mantle flow

    Worthen, Jennifer; Stadler, Georg; Petra, Noemi; Gurnis, Michael; Ghattas, Omar

    2014-09-01

    We address the problem of inferring mantle rheological parameter fields from surface velocity observations and instantaneous nonlinear mantle flow models. We formulate this inverse problem as an infinite-dimensional nonlinear least squares optimization problem governed by nonlinear Stokes equations. We provide expressions for the gradient of the cost functional of this optimization problem with respect to two spatially-varying rheological parameter fields: the viscosity prefactor and the exponent of the second invariant of the strain rate tensor. Adjoint (linearized) Stokes equations, which are characterized by a 4th order anisotropic viscosity tensor, facilitates efficient computation of the gradient. A quasi-Newton method for the solution of this optimization problem is presented, which requires the repeated solution of both nonlinear forward Stokes and linearized adjoint Stokes equations. For the solution of the nonlinear Stokes equations, we find that Newton’s method is significantly more efficient than a Picard fixed point method. Spectral analysis of the inverse operator given by the Hessian of the optimization problem reveals that the numerical eigenvalues collapse rapidly to zero, suggesting a high degree of ill-posedness of the inverse problem. To overcome this ill-posedness, we employ Tikhonov regularization (favoring smooth parameter fields) or total variation (TV) regularization (favoring piecewise-smooth parameter fields). Solution of two- and three-dimensional finite element-based model inverse problems show that a constant parameter in the constitutive law can be recovered well from surface velocity observations. Inverting for a spatially-varying parameter field leads to its reasonable recovery, in particular close to the surface. When inferring two spatially varying parameter fields, only an effective viscosity field and the total viscous dissipation are recoverable. Finally, a model of a subducting plate shows that a localized weak zone at the

  3. Calculation of radiation effects in solids by direct numerical solution of the adjoint transport equation

    The 'adjoint transport equation in its integro-differential form' is derived for the radiation damage produced by atoms injected into solids. We reduce it to the one-dimensional form and prepare it for a numerical solution by: --discretizing the continuous variables energy, space and direction, --replacing the partial differential quotients by finite differences and --evaluating the collision integral by a double sum. By a proper manipulation of this double sum the adjoint transport equation turns into a (very large) set of linear equations with tridiagonal matrix which can be solved by a special (simple and fast) algorithm. The solution of this set of linear equations contains complete information on a specified damage type (e.g. the energy deposited in a volume V) in terms of the function D(i,E,c,x) which gives the damage produced by all particles generated in a cascade initiated by a particle of type i starting at x with energy E in direction c. It is essential to remark that one calculation gives the damage function D for the complete ranges of the variables {i,E,c and x} (for numerical reasons of course on grid-points in the {E,c,x}-space). This is most useful to applications where a general source-distribution S(i,E,c,x) of particles is given by the experimental setup (e.g. beam-window and and target in proton accelerator work. The beam-protons along their path through the window--or target material generate recoil atoms by elastic collisions or nuclear reactions. These recoil atoms form the particle source S). The total damage produced then is eventually given by: D = (Σ)i ∫ ∫ ∫ S(i, E, c, x)*D(i, E, c, x)*dE*dc*dx A Fortran-77 program running on a PC-486 was written for the overall procedure and applied to some problems

  4. The efficiency of geophysical adjoint codes generated by automatic differentiation tools

    Vlasenko, A. V.; Köhl, A.; Stammer, D.

    2016-02-01

    The accuracy of numerical models that describe complex physical or chemical processes depends on the choice of model parameters. Estimating an optimal set of parameters by optimization algorithms requires knowledge of the sensitivity of the process of interest to model parameters. Typically the sensitivity computation involves differentiation of the model, which can be performed by applying algorithmic differentiation (AD) tools to the underlying numerical code. However, existing AD tools differ substantially in design, legibility and computational efficiency. In this study we show that, for geophysical data assimilation problems of varying complexity, the performance of adjoint codes generated by the existing AD tools (i) Open_AD, (ii) Tapenade, (iii) NAGWare and (iv) Transformation of Algorithms in Fortran (TAF) can be vastly different. Based on simple test problems, we evaluate the efficiency of each AD tool with respect to computational speed, accuracy of the adjoint, the efficiency of memory usage, and the capability of each AD tool to handle modern FORTRAN 90-95 elements such as structures and pointers, which are new elements that either combine groups of variables or provide aliases to memory addresses, respectively. We show that, while operator overloading tools are the only ones suitable for modern codes written in object-oriented programming languages, their computational efficiency lags behind source transformation by orders of magnitude, rendering the application of these modern tools to practical assimilation problems prohibitive. In contrast, the application of source transformation tools appears to be the most efficient choice, allowing handling even large geophysical data assimilation problems. However, they can only be applied to numerical models written in earlier generations of programming languages. Our study indicates that applying existing AD tools to realistic geophysical problems faces limitations that urgently need to be solved to allow the

  5. On the formulation of sea-ice models. Part 2: Lessons from multi-year adjoint sea-ice export sensitivities through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago

    Heimbach, Patick; Menemenlis, Dimitris; Losch, Martin; Campin, Jean-Michel; Hill, Chris

    The adjoint of an ocean general circulation model is at the heart of the ocean state estimation system of the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) project. As part of an ongoing effort to extend ECCO to a coupled ocean/sea-ice estimation system, a dynamic and thermodynamic sea-ice model has been developed for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm). One key requirement is the ability to generate, by means of automatic differentiation (AD), tangent linear (TLM) and adjoint (ADM) model code for the coupled MITgcm ocean/sea-ice system. This second part of a two-part paper describes aspects of the adjoint model. The adjoint ocean and sea-ice model is used to calculate transient sensitivities of solid (ice and snow) freshwater export through Lancaster Sound in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA). The adjoint state provides a complementary view of the dynamics. In particular, the transient, multi-year sensitivity patterns reflect dominant pathways and propagation timescales through the CAA as resolved by the model, thus shedding light on causal relationships, in the model, across the Archipelago. The computational cost of inferring such causal relationships from forward model diagnostics alone would be prohibitive. The role of the exact model trajectory around which the adjoint is calculated (and therefore of the exactness of the adjoint) is exposed through calculations using free-slip vs no-slip lateral boundary conditions. Effective ice thickness, sea surface temperature, and precipitation sensitivities, are discussed in detail as examples of the coupled sea-ice/ocean and atmospheric forcing control space. To test the reliability of the adjoint, finite-difference perturbation experiments were performed for each of these elements and the cost perturbations were compared to those "predicted" by the adjoint. Overall, remarkable qualitative and quantitative agreement is found. In particular, the adjoint correctly

  6. A New Method for Computing Three-Dimensional Capture Fraction in Heterogeneous Regional Systems using the MODFLOW Adjoint Code

    Clemo, T. M.; Ramarao, B.; Kelly, V. A.; Lavenue, M.

    2011-12-01

    Capture is a measure of the impact of groundwater pumping upon groundwater and surface water systems. The computation of capture through analytical or numerical methods has been the subject of articles in the literature for several decades (Bredehoeft et al., 1982). Most recently Leake et al. (2010) described a systematic way to produce capture maps in three-dimensional systems using a numerical perturbation approach in which capture from streams was computed using unit rate pumping at many locations within a MODFLOW model. The Leake et al. (2010) method advances the current state of computing capture. A limitation stems from the computational demand required by the perturbation approach wherein days or weeks of computational time might be required to obtain a robust measure of capture. In this paper, we present an efficient method to compute capture in three-dimensional systems based upon adjoint states. The efficiency of the adjoint method will enable uncertainty analysis to be conducted on capture calculations. The USGS and INTERA have collaborated to extend the MODFLOW Adjoint code (Clemo, 2007) to include stream-aquifer interaction and have applied it to one of the examples used in Leake et al. (2010), the San Pedro Basin MODFLOW model. With five layers and 140,800 grid blocks per layer, the San Pedro Basin model, provided an ideal example data set to compare the capture computed from the perturbation and the adjoint methods. The capture fraction map produced from the perturbation method for the San Pedro Basin model required significant computational time to compute and therefore the locations for the pumping wells were limited to 1530 locations in layer 4. The 1530 direct simulations of capture require approximately 76 CPU hours. Had capture been simulated in each grid block in each layer, as is done in the adjoint method, the CPU time would have been on the order of 4 years. The MODFLOW-Adjoint produced the capture fraction map of the San Pedro Basin model

  7. A global inverse model for estimating surface CO2 fluxes at a 0.1x0.1 degree resolution

    Maksyutov, Shamil; Oda, Tomohiro; Janardanan, Rajesh; Yaremchuk, Alexey; Kaiser, Johannes W.; Ito, Akihiko; Belikov, Dmitry; Zhuravlev, Ruslan; Ganshin, Alexander; Valsala, Vinu

    2015-04-01

    We propose an iterative inversion method for estimating surface CO2 fluxes at a high spatial resolution (0.1 degree) using atmospheric CO2 data collected by the global in-situ network and GOSAT. The Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART was coupled to the Eulerian atmospheric tracer transport model (NIES-TM) and an adjoint of the coupled model was derived. The inverse model calculates weekly corrections to given prior fluxes at a spatial resolution of the surface flux footprints simulated by FLEXPART model (0.1 degrees). Prior fluxes are given at different spatial resolutions in low and high resolution mode implementations. The hourly terrestrial biosphere fluxes are simulated with VISIT model using CFSR reanalysis. Ocean fluxes are calculated using a 4D-Var assimilation system of the surface pCO2 observations. Fossil fuel (ODIAC) and biomass burning (GFASv1.1) emissions are given at original model resolutions (0.1 degree), while terrestrial biosphere and ocean fluxes are interpolated from a coarser resolution. Flux response functions (footprints) for observations are first simulated with FLEXPART. The precalculated flux response functions are then used in forward and adjoint runs of the coupled transport model. We apply Lanczos process to obtain the truncated singular value decomposition (SVD) of the scaled tracer transport operator A = R-1/2HB1/2, where H - tracer transport operator, R and B - error covariance matrices for observations and fluxes, respectively. The square root of covariance matrix B is constructed by directional splitting in latitude, longitude and time, with exponential decay scales of 500 km on land, 1000 km over oceans and 2 weeks in time. Once singular vectors of AAT are obtained, the prior and posterior flux uncertainties are evaluated. Numerical experiments of inverting surface CO2 fluxes showed that the high-resolution (Lagrangian) part of the flux responses dominates the solution so that spatial patterns from the coarser

  8. Development of an adjoint model of GRAPES-CUACE and its application in tracking influential haze source areas in north China

    An, Xing Qin; Xian Zhai, Shi; Jin, Min; Gong, Sunling; Wang, Yu

    2016-06-01

    The aerosol adjoint module of the atmospheric chemical modeling system GRAPES-CUACE (Global-Regional Assimilation and Prediction System coupled with the CMA Unified Atmospheric Chemistry Environment) is constructed based on the adjoint theory. This includes the development and validation of the tangent linear and the adjoint models of the three parts involved in the GRAPES-CUACE aerosol module: CAM (Canadian Aerosol Module), interface programs that connect GRAPES and CUACE, and the aerosol transport processes that are embedded in GRAPES. Meanwhile, strict mathematical validation schemes for the tangent linear and the adjoint models are implemented for all input variables. After each part of the module and the assembled tangent linear and adjoint models is verified, the adjoint model of the GRAPES-CUACE aerosol is developed and used in a black carbon (BC) receptor-source sensitivity analysis to track influential haze source areas in north China. The sensitivity of the average BC concentration over Beijing at the highest concentration time point (referred to as the Objective Function) is calculated with respect to the BC amount emitted over the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region. Four types of regions are selected based on the administrative division or the sensitivity coefficient distribution. The adjoint sensitivity results are then used to quantify the effect of reducing the emission sources at different time intervals over different regions. It is indicated that the more influential regions (with relatively larger sensitivity coefficients) do not necessarily correspond to the administrative regions. Instead, the influence per unit area of the sensitivity selected regions is greater. Therefore, controlling the most influential regions during critical time intervals based on the results of the adjoint sensitivity analysis is much more efficient than controlling administrative regions during an experimental time period.

  9. Adjoint-Based Design of Rotors Using the Navier-Stokes Equations in a Noninertial Reference Frame

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Jones, William T.

    2010-01-01

    Optimization of rotorcraft flowfields using an adjoint method generally requires a time-dependent implementation of the equations. The current study examines an intermediate approach in which a subset of rotor flowfields are cast as steady problems in a noninertial reference frame. This technique permits the use of an existing steady-state adjoint formulation with minor modifications to perform sensitivity analyses. The formulation is valid for isolated rigid rotors in hover or where the freestream velocity is aligned with the axis of rotation. Discrete consistency of the implementation is demonstrated by using comparisons with a complex-variable technique, and a number of single- and multipoint optimizations for the rotorcraft figure of merit function are shown for varying blade collective angles. Design trends are shown to remain consistent as the grid is refined.

  10. Adjoint free four-dimensional variational data assimilation for a storm surge model of the German North Sea

    Zheng, Xiangyang; Mayerle, Roberto; Xing, Qianguo; Fernández Jaramillo, José Manuel

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a data assimilation scheme based on the adjoint free Four-Dimensional Variational(4DVar) method is applied to an existing storm surge model of the German North Sea. To avoid the need of an adjoint model, an ensemble-like method to explicitly represent the linear tangent equation is adopted. Results of twin experiments have shown that the method is able to recover the contaminated low dimension model parameters to their true values. The data assimilation scheme was applied to a severe storm surge event which occurred in the North Sea in December 5, 2013. By adjusting wind drag coefficient, the predictive ability of the model increased significantly. Preliminary experiments have shown that an increase in the predictive ability is attained by narrowing the data assimilation time window.

  11. Adjoint systems and Green functionals for second-order linear integro-differential equations with nonlocal conditions

    Ali Sirma

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we generalize so called Green's functional concept in literature to second-order linear integro-differential equation with nonlocal conditions. According to this technique, a linear completely nonhomogeneous nonlocal problem for a second-order integro-differential equation is reduced to one and one integral equation to identify the Green's solution. The coefficients of the equation are assumed to be generally nonsmooth functions satisfying some general properties such as p-integrability and boundedness. We obtain new adjoint system and Green's functional for second-order linear integro-differential equation with nonlocal conditions. An application illustrate the adjoint system and the Green's functional. Another application shows when the Green's functional does not exist.

  12. Adjoint-based computation of U.S. nationwide ozone exposure isopleths

    Ashok, Akshay; Barrett, Steven R. H.

    2016-05-01

    Population exposure to daily maximum ozone is associated with an increased risk of premature mortality, and efforts to mitigate these impacts involve reducing emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). We quantify the dependence of U.S. national exposure to annually averaged daily maximum ozone on ambient VOC and NOx concentrations through ozone exposure isopleths, developed using emissions sensitivities from the adjoint of the GEOS-Chem air quality model for 2006. We develop exposure isopleths for all locations within the contiguous US and derive metrics based on the isopleths that quantify the impact of emissions on national ozone exposure. This work is the first to create ozone exposure isopleths using adjoint sensitivities and at a large scale. We find that across the US, 29% of locations experience VOC-limited conditions (where increased NOx emissions lower ozone) during 51% of the year on average. VOC-limited conditions are approximately evenly distributed diurnally and occur more frequently during the fall and winter months (67% of the time) than in the spring and summer (37% of the time). The VOC/NOx ratio of the ridge line on the isopleth diagram (denoting a local maximum in ozone exposure with respect to NOx concentrations) is 9.2 ppbC/ppb on average across grid cells that experience VOC-limited conditions and 7.9, 10.1 and 6.7 ppbC/ppb at the three most populous US cities of New York, Los Angeles and Chicago, respectively. Emissions that are ozone exposure-neutral during VOC-limited exposure conditions result in VOC/NOx concentration ratios of 0.63, 1.61 and 0.72 ppbC/ppb at each of the three US cities respectively, and between 0.01 and 1.91 ppbC/ppb at other locations. The sensitivity of national ozone exposure to NOx and VOC emissions is found to be highest near major cities in the US. Together, this information can be used to assess the effectiveness of NOx and VOC emission reductions on mitigating ozone exposure in the

  13. Development of the inverse model for estimation of the surface CO2 fluxes at grid scale and high resolution with GOSAT data

    Maksyutov, S. S.; Ito, A.; Oda, T.; Kaiser, J. W.; Belikov, D. A.; Janardanan Achari, R.; Yaremchuk, A.; Zhuravlev, R.; Ganshin, A.; Valsala, V.

    2014-12-01

    We develop an iterative inversion method to estimate surface CO2 fluxes at resolutions up to 0.1 degree using atmospheric CO2 data collected by the global in-situ network and GOSAT. The atmospheric transport model and its adjoint are made by coupling the Eulerian grid model (NIES-TM) to Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART. The inverse model calculates corrections to the prior fluxes at a weekly time step and spatial resolution of the FLEXPART model (1 or 0.1 degrees). The terrestrial biosphere fluxes are simulated with VISIT model at hourly time step using CFSR reanalysis. Ocean fluxes are calculated using a 4D-Var assimilation system of the surface pCO2 observations. In the high resolution mode, prior fluxes of fossil emissions (ODIAC) and biomass burning (GFASv1.1) are given at a model resolution, while ocean and terrestrial ecosystem fluxes are interpolated from a coarser resolution. The surface flux footprints for in-situ and GOSAT observations are simulated with Flexpart. Precalculated flux response functions are then used in forward and adjoint runs of the coupled transport model. We apply the truncated singular value decomposition (SVD) of the scaled tracer transport operator A=R-1/2HB1/2, where H - tracer transport operator, R and B - uncertainty matrices for observations and fluxes, respectively. The square root of covariance matrix B is constructed by directional splitting in latitude, longitude and time, with exponential decay scales of 500 km on land, 1000 km over oceans and 2 weeks in time. Once right and left singular vectors of ATA are obtained, the prior and posterior flux uncertainties are evaluated. Numerical experiments of inverting the surface CO2 fluxes showed that the high resolution (Lagrangian) part of the flux responses dominates the solution so that patterns from the coarser resolution NIES TM (10x10 degree) are not visible in flux singular vectors and the optimized flux. The reconstruction of the fluxes at highest resolution of

  14. Continuity of symplectically adjoint maps and the algebraic structure of Hadamard vacuum representations for quantum fields on curved spacetime

    Verch, R

    1996-01-01

    We derive for a pair of operators on a symplectic space which are adjoints of each other with respect to the symplectic form (that is, they are sympletically adjoint) that, if they are bounded for some scalar product on the symplectic space dominating the symplectic form, then they are bounded with respect to a one-parametric family of scalar products canonically associated with the initially given one, among them being its ``purification''. As a typical example we consider a scalar field on a globally hyperbolic spacetime governed by the Klein-Gordon equation; the classical system is described by a symplectic space and the temporal evolution by symplectomorphisms (which are symplectically adjoint to their inverses). A natural scalar product is that inducing the classical energy norm, and an application of the above result yields that its ``purification'' induces on the one-particle space of the quantized system a topology which coincides with that given by the two-point functions of quasifree Hadamard states...

  15. The adjoint sensitivity method. A contribution to the code uncertainty evaluation

    The application of the ASM (Adjoint Sensitivity Method) to thermohydraulic codes, is examined. The advantage of the method is to be very few CPU time consuming in comparison with usual approach requiring one complete code run per sensitivity determination. The mathematical aspects of the problem are first described, and the applicability of the method of the functional-type response of a thermalhydraulic model is demonstrated. On a simple example of non linear hyperbolic equation (Burgers equation) the problem has been analyzed. It is shown that the formalism used in the literature treating this subject is not appropriate. A new mathematical formalism circumventing the problem is proposed. For the discretized form of the problem, two methods are possible: the Continuous ASM and the Discrete ASM. The equivalence of both methods is demonstrated; nevertheless only the DASM constitutes a practical solution for thermalhydraulic codes. The application of the DASM to the thermalhydraulic safety code CATHARE is then presented for two examples. They demonstrate that ASM constitutes an efficient tool for the analysis of code sensitivity. (authors) 7 figs., 5 tabs., 8 refs

  16. The adjoint sensitivity method, a contribution to the code uncertainty evaluation

    The application of the ASM (Adjoint Sensitivity Method) to thermohydraulic codes, is examined. The advantage of the method is to be very few CPU time consuming in comparison with usual approach requiring one complete code run per sensitivity determination. The mathematical aspects of the problem are first described, and the applicability of the method of the functional-type response of a thermalhydraulic model is demonstrated. On a simple example of non linear hyperbolic equation (Burgers equation) the problem has been analyzed. It is shown that the formalism used in the literature treating this subject is not appropriate. A new mathematical formalism circumventing the problem is proposed. For the discretized form of the problem, two methods are possible: the Continuous ASM and the Discrete ASM. The equivalence of both methods is demonstrated; nevertheless only the DASM constitutes a practical solution for thermalhydraulic codes. The application of the DASM to the thermalhydraulic safety code CATHARE is then presented for two examples. They demonstrate that ASM constitutes an efficient tool for the analysis of code sensitivity. (authors) 7 figs., 5 tabs., 8 refs

  17. Multi-point Adjoint-Based Design of Tilt-Rotors in a Noninertial Reference Frame

    Jones, William T.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Acree, Cecil W.

    2014-01-01

    Optimization of tilt-rotor systems requires the consideration of performance at multiple design points. In the current study, an adjoint-based optimization of a tilt-rotor blade is considered. The optimization seeks to simultaneously maximize the rotorcraft figure of merit in hover and the propulsive efficiency in airplane-mode for a tilt-rotor system. The design is subject to minimum thrust constraints imposed at each design point. The rotor flowfields at each design point are cast as steady-state problems in a noninertial reference frame. Geometric design variables used in the study to control blade shape include: thickness, camber, twist, and taper represented by as many as 123 separate design variables. Performance weighting of each operational mode is considered in the formulation of the composite objective function, and a build up of increasing geometric degrees of freedom is used to isolate the impact of selected design variables. In all cases considered, the resulting designs successfully increase both the hover figure of merit and the airplane-mode propulsive efficiency for a rotor designed with classical techniques.

  18. Large-N reduction in QCD with two adjoint Dirac fermions

    Bringoltz, Barak; Sharpe, Stephen R

    2011-01-01

    We use lattice simulations to study the single-site version of SU(N) lattice gauge theory with two flavors of Wilson-Dirac fermions in the adjoint representation, a theory whose large volume correspondent is expected to be conformal or nearly conformal. Working with N as large as 53, we map out the phase diagram in the plane of bare `t Hooft coupling, g^2 N, and of the lattice quark mass, a*m, and look for the region where the Z_N^4 center symmetry of the theory is intact. In this region one expects the large-N equivalence of the single site and infinite volume theories to be valid. As for the N_f=1 case (see Phys. Rev. D80: 065031), we find that the center-symmetric region is large and includes both light fermion masses and masses at the cutoff scale. We study the N-dependence of the width of this region and, while we cannot rule out that it shrinks to zero at infinite N, the bulk of the evidence suggests that it remains of finite width. Simulating with couplings as small as g^2 N = 0.005, we find that the w...

  19. Large-N reduction in QCD-like theories with massive adjoint fermions

    Azeyanagi, Tatsuo; /Kyoto U.; Hanada, Masanori; /Weizmann Inst.; Unsal, Mithat; /Weizmann Inst. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Yacoby, Ran; /Weizmann Inst.

    2010-08-26

    Large-N QCD with heavy adjoint fermions emulates pure Yang-Mills theory at long distances. We study this theory on a four- and three-torus, and analytically argue the existence of a large-small volume equivalence. For any finite mass, center symmetry unbroken phase exists at sufficiently small volume and this phase can be used to study the large-volume limit through the Eguchi-Kawai equivalence. A finite temperature version of volume independence implies that thermodynamics on R3 x S1 can be studied via a unitary matrix quantum mechanics on S1, by varying the temperature. To confirm this non-perturbatively, we numerically study both zero- and one-dimensional theories by using Monte-Carlo simulation. Order of finite-N corrections turns out to be 1/N. We introduce various twisted versions of the reduced QCD which systematically suppress finite-N corrections. Using a twisted model, we observe the confinement/deconfinement transition on a 1{sup 3} x 2-lattice. The result agrees with large volume simulations of Yang-Mills theory. We also comment that the twisted model can serve as a non-perturbative formulation of the non-commutative Yang-Mills theory.

  20. Discrete SLn-connections and self-adjoint difference operators on 2-dimensional manifolds

    The programme of discretization of famous completely integrable systems and associated linear operators was launched in the 1990s. In particular, the properties of second-order difference operators on triangulated manifolds and equilateral triangular lattices have been studied by Novikov and Dynnikov since 1996. This study included Laplace transformations, new discretizations of complex analysis, and new discretizations of GLn-connections on triangulated n-dimensional manifolds. A general theory of discrete GLn-connections 'of rank one' has been developed (see the Introduction for definitions). The problem of distinguishing the subclass of SLn-connections (and unimodular SLn± -connections, which satisfy detA = ±1) has not been solved. In the present paper it is shown that these connections play an important role (which is similar to the role of magnetic fields in the continuous case) in the theory of self-adjoint Schrödinger difference operators on equilateral triangular lattices in ℝ2. In Appendix 1 a complete characterization is given of unimodular SLn± -connections of rank 1 for all n > 1, thus correcting a mistake (it was wrongly claimed that they reduce to a canonical connection for n > 2). With the help of a communication from Korepanov, a complete clarification is provided of how the classical theory of electrical circuits and star-triangle transformations is connected with the discrete Laplace transformations on triangular lattices. Bibliography: 29 titles

  1. One-loop Test of Free SU(N) Adjoint Model Holography

    Bae, Jin-Beom; Lal, Shailesh

    2016-01-01

    We consider the holographic duality where the CFT side is given by $SU(N)$ adjoint free scalar field theory. Compared to the vector models, the set of single trace operators is immensely extended so that the corresponding AdS theory also contains infinitely many massive higher spin fields on top of the massless ones. We compute the one-loop vacuum energy of these AdS fields to test this duality at the subleading order in large $N$ expansion. The determination of the bulk vacuum energy requires a proper scheme to sum up the infinitely many contributions. For that, we develop a new method and apply it first to calculate the vacuum energies for the first few `Regge trajectories' in AdS$_4$ and AdS$_5$. In considering the full vacuum energy of AdS theory dual to a matrix model CFT, we find that there exist more than one available prescriptions for the one-loop vacuum energy. Taking a particular prescription, we determine the full vacuum energy of the AdS$_5$ theory, whereas the AdS$_4$ calculation still remains t...

  2. Finite volume phases of large-N gauge theories with massive adjoint fermions

    The phase structure of QCD-like gauge theories with fermions in various representations is an interesting but generally analytically intractable problem. One way to ensure weak coupling is to define the theory in a small finite volume, in this case S3 x S1. Genuine phase transitions can then occur in the large N theory. Here, we use this technique to investigate SU(N) gauge theory with a number Nf of massive adjoint-valued Majorana fermions having non-thermal boundary conditions around S1. For Nf = 1 we find a line of transitions that separate the weak-coupling analogues of the confined and de-confined phases for which the density of eigenvalues of the Wilson line transform from the uniform distribution to a gapped distribution. However, the situation for Nf > 1 is much richer and a series of weak-coupling analogues of partially-confined phases appear which leave unbroken a Zp subgroup of the centre symmetry. In these Zp phases the eigenvalue density has p gaps and they are separated from the confining phase and from one-another by first order phase transitions. We show that for small enough mR (the mass of the fermions times the radius of the S3) only the confined phase exists. The large N phase diagram is consistent with the finite N result and with other approaches based on R3 x S1 calculations and lattice simulations.

  3. Anelastic sensitivity kernels with parsimonious storage for adjoint tomography and full waveform inversion

    Komatitsch, Dimitri; Bozdag, Ebru; de Andrade, Elliott Sales; Peter, Daniel B; Liu, Qinya; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a technique to compute exact anelastic sensitivity kernels in the time domain using parsimonious disk storage. The method is based on a reordering of the time loop of time-domain forward/adjoint wave propagation solvers combined with the use of a memory buffer. It avoids instabilities that occur when time-reversing dissipative wave propagation simulations. The total number of required time steps is unchanged compared to usual acoustic or elastic approaches. The cost is reduced by a factor of 4/3 compared to the case in which anelasticity is partially accounted for by accommodating the effects of physical dispersion. We validate our technique by performing a test in which we compare the $K_\\alpha$ sensitivity kernel to the exact kernel obtained by saving the entire forward calculation. This benchmark confirms that our approach is also exact. We illustrate the importance of including full attenuation in the calculation of sensitivity kernels by showing significant differences with physical-dispersi...

  4. Performance analysis for neutronics benchmark experiments with partial adjoint contribution estimated by forward Monte Carlo calculation

    Highlights: • Performance estimation of nuclear-data benchmark was investigated. • Point detector contribution played a benchmark role not only to the neutron producing the detector contribution but also equally to all the upstream transport neutrons. • New functions were defined to give how well the contribution could be interpreted for benchmarking. • Benchmark performance could be evaluated only by a forward Monte Carlo calculation. -- Abstract: The author's group has been investigating how the performance estimation of nuclear-data benchmark using experiment and its analysis by Monte Carlo code should be carried out especially at 14 MeV. We have recently found that a detector contribution played a benchmark role not only to the neutron producing the detector contribution but also equally to all the upstream neutrons during the neutron history. This result would propose that the benchmark performance could be evaluated only by a forward Monte Carlo calculation. In this study, we thus defined new functions to give how well the contribution could be utilized for benchmarking using the point detector, and described that it was deeply related to the newly introduced “partial adjoint contribution”. By preparing these functions before benchmark experiments, one could know beforehand how well and for which nuclear data the experiment results could do benchmarking in forward Monte Carlo calculations

  5. Simplification process of safety assessment model for engineered barrier system by using adjoint sensitivity analysis method

    Sensitivity analyses for mass transport model in porous media were performed by using adjoint method. The mass transport model employed is to evaluate the performance of engineered barrier of shallow land disposal, assuming that water flows through a cylinder packed with sand. In this model instantaneous sorption equilibrium between liquid and solid phases is assumed and two types of boundary conditions which represent the nuclide release from waste package, i.e. solubility-limited case and constant leaching case, are considered. From the sensitivity analysis, it was shown that the effect of longitudinal dispersion on performance measure is very small and calculated normalized sensitivity is in the order 10-4∼10-3 around the most probable value of longitudinal dispersion coefficient. This suggests that the term of longitudinal dispersion can be removed from the original model. In this case analytical solution is easily introduced for two boundary conditions respectively to evaluate the performance measure of the barrier system. These simplified models, in fact, gives larger estimate of the nuclide release from the engineered barrier system than that calculated from the model considering the longitudinal dispersion. They are acceptable from the standpoint of conservatism of safety assessment. (author)

  6. Comparison of Ensemble and Adjoint Approaches to Variational Optimization of Observational Arrays

    Nechaev, D.; Panteleev, G.; Yaremchuk, M.

    2015-12-01

    Comprehensive monitoring of the circulation in the Chukchi Sea and Bering Strait is one of the key prerequisites of the successful long-term forecast of the Arctic Ocean state. Since the number of continuously maintained observational platforms is restricted by logistical and political constraints, the configuration of such an observing system should be guided by an objective strategy that optimizes the observing system coverage, design, and the expenses of monitoring. The presented study addresses optimization of system consisting of a limited number of observational platforms with respect to reduction of the uncertainties in monitoring the volume/freshwater/heat transports through a set of key sections in the Chukchi Sea and Bering Strait. Variational algorithms for optimization of observational arrays are verified in the test bed of the set of 4Dvar optimized summer-fall circulations in the Pacific sector of the Arctic Ocean. The results of an optimization approach based on low-dimensional ensemble of model solutions is compared against a more conventional algorithm involving application of the tangent linear and adjoint models. Special attention is paid to the computational efficiency and portability of the optimization procedure.

  7. Stabilized FE simulation of prototype thermal-hydraulics problems with integrated adjoint-based capabilities

    Shadid, J. N.; Smith, T. M.; Cyr, E. C.; Wildey, T. M.; Pawlowski, R. P.

    2016-09-01

    A critical aspect of applying modern computational solution methods to complex multiphysics systems of relevance to nuclear reactor modeling, is the assessment of the predictive capability of specific proposed mathematical models. In this respect the understanding of numerical error, the sensitivity of the solution to parameters associated with input data, boundary condition uncertainty, and mathematical models is critical. Additionally, the ability to evaluate and or approximate the model efficiently, to allow development of a reasonable level of statistical diagnostics of the mathematical model and the physical system, is of central importance. In this study we report on initial efforts to apply integrated adjoint-based computational analysis and automatic differentiation tools to begin to address these issues. The study is carried out in the context of a Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes approximation to turbulent fluid flow and heat transfer using a particular spatial discretization based on implicit fully-coupled stabilized FE methods. Initial results are presented that show the promise of these computational techniques in the context of nuclear reactor relevant prototype thermal-hydraulics problems.

  8. Decomposition of the adjoint representation of the small quantum sl$_{2}$

    Ostrik, V

    1997-01-01

    Given a finite type root datum and a primitive root of unity q=\\sqrt[l]{1}, G.~Lusztig has defined in [Lu] a remarkable finite dimensional Hopf algebra \\fu over the cyclotomic field {\\Bbb Q}(\\sqrt[l]{1}). In this note we study the adjoint representation \\ad of \\fu in the simplest case of the root datum sl_2. The semisimple part of this representation is of big importance in the study of local systems of conformal blocks in WZW model for \\hat{sl}_2 at level l-2 in arbitrary genus. The problem of distinguishing the semisimple part is closely related to the problem of integral representation of conformal blocks (see [BFS]). We find all the indecomposable direct summands of \\ad with multiplicities. It appears that \\ad is isomorphic to a direct sum of simple and projective modules. It can be lifted to a module over the (infinite dimensional) quantum universal enveloping algebra with divided powers U_q(sl_2) which is also a direct sum of simples and projectives.

  9. Focus point gauge mediation with incomplete adjoint messengers and gauge coupling unification

    Bhattacharyya, Gautam; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.; Yokozaki, Norimi

    2015-10-01

    As the mass limits on supersymmetric particles are gradually pushed to higher values due to their continuing non-observation at the CERN LHC, looking for focus point regions in the supersymmetric parameter space, which shows considerably reduced fine-tuning, is increasingly more important than ever. We explore this in the context of gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking with messengers transforming in the adjoint representation of the gauge group, namely, octet of color SU(3) and triplet of weak SU(2). A distinctive feature of this scenario is that the focus point is achieved by fixing a single combination of parameters in the messenger sector, which is invariant under the renormalization group evolution. Because of this invariance, the focus point behavior is well under control once the relevant parameters are fixed by a more fundamental theory. The observed Higgs boson mass is explained with a relatively mild fine-tuning Δ = 60- 150. Interestingly, even in the presence of incomplete messenger multiplets of the SU(5) GUT group, the gauge couplings still unify perfectly, but at a scale which is one or two orders of magnitude above the conventional GUT scale. Because of this larger unification scale, the colored Higgs multiplets become too heavy to trigger proton decay at a rate larger than the experimentally allowed limit.

  10. Application to MISR Land Products of an RPV Model Inversion Package Using Adjoint and Hessian Codes

    Lavergne, T.; Kaminski, T.; Pinty, B.; Taberner, M.; Gobron, N.; Verstraete, M. M.; Vossbeck, M.; Widlowski, J.-L.; Giering, R.

    The capability of the non-linear Rahman-Pinty-Verstraete RPV model to 1 accurately fit a large variety of Bidirectional Reflectance Factor BRF fields and 2 return parameter values of interest for land surface applications motivate the development of a computer efficient inversion package The present paper describes such a package based on the 3 and 4 parameter versions of the RPV model This software environment implements the adjoint code generated using automatic differentiation techniques of the cost function This cost function itself balances two main contributions reflecting 1 the a priori knowledge on the model parameter values and 2 BRF uncertainties together with the requirement to minimize the mismatch between the measurements and the RPV simulations The individual weights of these contributions are specified notably via covariance matrices of the uncertainties in the a priori knowledge on the model parameters and the observations This package also reports on the probability density functions of the retrieved model parameter values that thus permit the user to evaluate the a posteriori uncertainties on these retrievals This is achieved by evaluating the Hessian of the cost function at its minimum Results from a variety of tests are shown in order to document and analyze software performance against complex synthetic BRF fields simulated by radiation transfer models as well as against actual MISR-derived surface BRF products

  11. Adjoint-based sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of lattice physics calculations with CASMO-4

    The topic of this paper is the development of sensitivity and uncertainty analysis capability to the reactor physics code CASMO-4 in the UAM (Uncertainty Analysis in Best-Estimate Modelling for Design, Operation and Safety Analysis of LWRs) benchmark. The developed calculation system enables the uncertainty analysis of homogenized multi-group cross-sections, diffusion coefficients and pin powers with respect to nuclear data. The uncertainty analysis methodology is deterministic, meaning that the sensitivity profiles of the responses are computed first, after which uncertainty is propagated by combining the sensitivity profiles with the covariance matrices of the uncertain nuclear data. The sensitivity analysis is based on perturbation theory which enables computing the sensitivity profiles efficiently by solving one generalized adjoint system for each response. The mathematical background of this work is reviewed and the main conclusions related to the implementation are summarized. Special emphasis is placed on the sensitivity analysis of two-group homogenized diffusion coefficients which require some modifications to the standard equations of generalized perturbation theory. Numerical results are presented and analyzed for a PWR fuel assembly with control rods out and inserted. The computational efficiency of the calculations is discussed. (author)

  12. The development of three-dimensional adjoint method for flow control with blowing in convergent-divergent nozzle flows

    Sikarwar, Nidhi

    multiple experiments or numerical simulations. Alternatively an inverse design method can be used. An adjoint optimization method can be used to achieve the optimum blowing rate. It is shown that the method works for both geometry optimization and active control of the flow in order to deflect the flow in desirable ways. An adjoint optimization method is described. It is used to determine the blowing distribution in the diverging section of a convergent-divergent nozzle that gives a desired pressure distribution in the nozzle. Both the direct and adjoint problems and their associated boundary conditions are developed. The adjoint method is used to determine the blowing distribution required to minimize the shock strength in the nozzle to achieve a known target pressure and to achieve close to an ideally expanded flow pressure. A multi-block structured solver is developed to calculate the flow solution and associated adjoint variables. Two and three-dimensional calculations are performed for internal and external of the nozzle domains. A two step MacCormack scheme based on predictor- corrector technique is was used for some calculations. The four and five stage Runge-Kutta schemes are also used to artificially march in time. A modified Runge-Kutta scheme is used to accelerate the convergence to a steady state. Second order artificial dissipation has been added to stabilize the calculations. The steepest decent method has been used for the optimization of the blowing velocity after the gradients of the cost function with respect to the blowing velocity are calculated using adjoint method. Several examples are given of the optimization of blowing using the adjoint method.

  13. Aerosol Health Impact Source Attribution Studies with the CMAQ Adjoint Air Quality Model

    Turner, M. D.

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is an air pollutant consisting of a mixture of solid and liquid particles suspended in the atmosphere. Knowledge of the sources and distributions of PM2.5 is important for many reasons, two of which are that PM2.5 has an adverse effect on human health and also an effect on climate change. Recent studies have suggested that health benefits resulting from a unit decrease in black carbon (BC) are four to nine times larger than benefits resulting from an equivalent change in PM2.5 mass. The goal of this thesis is to quantify the role of emissions from different sectors and different locations in governing the total health impacts, risk, and maximum individual risk of exposure to BC both nationally and regionally in the US. We develop and use the CMAQ adjoint model to quantify the role of emissions from all modeled sectors, times, and locations on premature deaths attributed to exposure to BC. From a national analysis, we find that damages resulting from anthropogenic emissions of BC are strongly correlated with population and premature death. However, we find little correlation between damages and emission magnitude, suggesting that controls on the largest emissions may not be the most efficient means of reducing damages resulting from BC emissions. Rather, the best proxy for locations with damaging BC emissions is locations where premature deaths occur. Onroad diesel and nonroad vehicle emissions are the largest contributors to premature deaths attributed to exposure to BC, while onroad gasoline emissions cause the highest deaths per amount emitted. Additionally, emissions in fall and winter contribute to more premature deaths (and more per amount emitted) than emissions in spring and summer. From a regional analysis, we find that emissions from outside each of six urban areas account for 7% to 27% of the premature deaths attributed to exposure to BC within the region. Within the region encompassing New York City and Philadelphia

  14. Flux-P: Automating Metabolic Flux Analysis

    Birgitta E. Ebert

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative knowledge of intracellular fluxes in metabolic networks is invaluable for inferring metabolic system behavior and the design principles of biological systems. However, intracellular reaction rates can not often be calculated directly but have to be estimated; for instance, via 13C-based metabolic flux analysis, a model-based interpretation of stable carbon isotope patterns in intermediates of metabolism. Existing software such as FiatFlux, OpenFLUX or 13CFLUX supports experts in this complex analysis, but requires several steps that have to be carried out manually, hence restricting the use of this software for data interpretation to a rather small number of experiments. In this paper, we present Flux-P as an approach to automate and standardize 13C-based metabolic flux analysis, using the Bio-jETI workflow framework. Exemplarily based on the FiatFlux software, it demonstrates how services can be created that carry out the different analysis steps autonomously and how these can subsequently be assembled into software workflows that perform automated, high-throughput intracellular flux analysis of high quality and reproducibility. Besides significant acceleration and standardization of the data analysis, the agile workflow-based realization supports flexible changes of the analysis workflows on the user level, making it easy to perform custom analyses.

  15. Forward and adjoint spectral-element simulations of seismic wave propagation using hardware accelerators

    Peter, Daniel; Videau, Brice; Pouget, Kevin; Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2015-04-01

    Improving the resolution of tomographic images is crucial to answer important questions on the nature of Earth's subsurface structure and internal processes. Seismic tomography is the most prominent approach where seismic signals from ground-motion records are used to infer physical properties of internal structures such as compressional- and shear-wave speeds, anisotropy and attenuation. Recent advances in regional- and global-scale seismic inversions move towards full-waveform inversions which require accurate simulations of seismic wave propagation in complex 3D media, providing access to the full 3D seismic wavefields. However, these numerical simulations are computationally very expensive and need high-performance computing (HPC) facilities for further improving the current state of knowledge. During recent years, many-core architectures such as graphics processing units (GPUs) have been added to available large HPC systems. Such GPU-accelerated computing together with advances in multi-core central processing units (CPUs) can greatly accelerate scientific applications. There are mainly two possible choices of language support for GPU cards, the CUDA programming environment and OpenCL language standard. CUDA software development targets NVIDIA graphic cards while OpenCL was adopted mainly by AMD graphic cards. In order to employ such hardware accelerators for seismic wave propagation simulations, we incorporated a code generation tool BOAST into an existing spectral-element code package SPECFEM3D_GLOBE. This allows us to use meta-programming of computational kernels and generate optimized source code for both CUDA and OpenCL languages, running simulations on either CUDA or OpenCL hardware accelerators. We show here applications of forward and adjoint seismic wave propagation on CUDA/OpenCL GPUs, validating results and comparing performances for different simulations and hardware usages.

  16. The adjoint method of data assimilation used operationally for shelf circulation

    Griffin, David A.; Thompson, Keith R.

    1996-02-01

    A real-time shelf circulation model with data assimilation has been successfully used, possibly for the first time, on the outer Nova Scotian Shelf. The adjoint method was used to infer the time histories of flows across the four open boundaries of a 60 km × 60 km shallow-water equation model of Western Bank. The aim was to hindcast and nowcast currents over the bank so that a patch of water (initially 15 km in diameter) could be resampled over a 3-week period as part of a study of the early life history of Atlantic cod. Observations available in near real time for assimilation were from 14 drifting buoys, 2 telemetering moored current meters, the ship's acoustic Doppler current profiler and the local wind. For the postcruise hindcasts presented here, data from two bottom pressure gauges and two more current meters are also available. The experiment was successful, and the patch was sampled over a 19-day period that included two intense storms. In this paper we (1) document the model and how the data are assimilated, (2) present and discuss the observations, (3) demonstrate that the interpolative skill of the model exceeds that of simpler schemes that use just the current velocity data, and (4) provide examples of how particle tracking with the model enables asynoptically acquired data to be displayed as synoptic maps, greatly facilitating both underway cruise planning and postcruise data analysis. An interesting feature of the circulation on the bank was a nearly stationary eddy atop the bank crest. Larvae within the eddy were retained on the bank in a favorable environment until the onset of the storms. The variable integrity of the eddy may contribute to fluctuations of year-class success.

  17. A user`s manual for MASH 1.0: A Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System

    Johnson, J.O. [ed.

    1992-03-01

    The Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System, MASH, calculates neutron and gamma-ray environments and radiation protection factors for armored military vehicles, structures, trenches, and other shielding configurations by coupling a forward discrete ordinates air-over-ground transport calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo treatment of the shielding geometry. Efficiency and optimum use of computer time are emphasized. The code system include the GRTUNCL and DORT codes for air-over-ground transport calculations, the MORSE code with the GIFT5 combinatorial geometry package for adjoint shielding calculations, and several peripheral codes that perform the required data preparations, transformations, and coupling functions. MASH is the successor to the Vehicle Code System (VCS) initially developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The discrete ordinates calculation determines the fluence on a coupling surface surrounding the shielding geometry due to an external neutron/gamma-ray source. The Monte Carlo calculation determines the effectiveness of the fluence at that surface in causing a response in a detector within the shielding geometry, i.e., the ``dose importance`` of the coupling surface fluence. A coupling code folds the fluence together with the dose importance, giving the desired dose response. The coupling code can determine the dose response a a function of the shielding geometry orientation relative to the source, distance from the source, and energy response of the detector. This user`s manual includes a short description of each code, the input required to execute the code along with some helpful input data notes, and a representative sample problem (input data and selected output edits) for each code.

  18. A user's manual for MASH 1. 0: A Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System

    Johnson, J.O. (ed.)

    1992-03-01

    The Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System, MASH, calculates neutron and gamma-ray environments and radiation protection factors for armored military vehicles, structures, trenches, and other shielding configurations by coupling a forward discrete ordinates air-over-ground transport calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo treatment of the shielding geometry. Efficiency and optimum use of computer time are emphasized. The code system include the GRTUNCL and DORT codes for air-over-ground transport calculations, the MORSE code with the GIFT5 combinatorial geometry package for adjoint shielding calculations, and several peripheral codes that perform the required data preparations, transformations, and coupling functions. MASH is the successor to the Vehicle Code System (VCS) initially developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The discrete ordinates calculation determines the fluence on a coupling surface surrounding the shielding geometry due to an external neutron/gamma-ray source. The Monte Carlo calculation determines the effectiveness of the fluence at that surface in causing a response in a detector within the shielding geometry, i.e., the dose importance'' of the coupling surface fluence. A coupling code folds the fluence together with the dose importance, giving the desired dose response. The coupling code can determine the dose response a a function of the shielding geometry orientation relative to the source, distance from the source, and energy response of the detector. This user's manual includes a short description of each code, the input required to execute the code along with some helpful input data notes, and a representative sample problem (input data and selected output edits) for each code.

  19. Adjoint methods for electromagnetic shape optimization of the low-loss cavity for the International Linear Collider

    We formulate the problem of designing the low-loss cavity for the International Linear Collider (ILC) as an electromagnetic shape optimization problem involving a Maxwell eigenvalue problem. The objective is to maximize the stored energy of a trapped mode in the end cell while maintaining a specified frequency corresponding to the accelerating mode. A continuous adjoint method is presented for computation of the design gradient of the objective and constraint. The gradients are used within a nonlinear optimization scheme to compute the optimal shape for a simplified model of the ILC in a small multiple of the cost of solving the Maxwell eigenvalue problem

  20. Simulation of atmospheric N[subscript 2]O with GEOS-Chem and its adjoint: evaluation of observational constraints

    K. C. Wells; Millet, D. B.; Bousserez, N.; D. K. Henze; Chaliyakunnel, S.; T. J. Griffis; Luan, Y.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; O'Doherty, S.; R. F. Weiss; G. S. Dutton; Elkins, J. W.; Krummel, P. B.; R. L. Langenfelds; Steele, L.P.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a new 4D-Var inversion framework for nitrous oxide (N[subscript 2]O) based on the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint, and apply it in a series of observing system simulation experiments to assess how well N[subscript 2]O sources and sinks can be constrained by the current global observing network. The employed measurement ensemble includes approximately weekly and quasi-continuous N[subscript 2]O measurements (hourly averages used) from several long-term monitoring...

  1. Adjoint methods for adjusting three-dimensional atmosphere and surface properties to fit multi-angle/multi-pixel polarimetric measurements

    This paper derives an efficient procedure for using the three-dimensional (3D) vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE) to adjust atmosphere and surface properties and improve their fit with multi-angle/multi-pixel radiometric and polarimetric measurements of scattered sunlight. The proposed adjoint method uses the 3D VRTE to compute the measurement misfit function and the adjoint 3D VRTE to compute its gradient with respect to all unknown parameters. In the remote sensing problems of interest, the scalar-valued misfit function quantifies agreement with data as a function of atmosphere and surface properties, and its gradient guides the search through this parameter space. Remote sensing of the atmosphere and surface in a three-dimensional region may require thousands of unknown parameters and millions of data points. Many approaches would require calls to the 3D VRTE solver in proportion to the number of unknown parameters or measurements. To avoid this issue of scale, we focus on computing the gradient of the misfit function as an alternative to the Jacobian of the measurement operator. The resulting adjoint method provides a way to adjust 3D atmosphere and surface properties with only two calls to the 3D VRTE solver for each spectral channel, regardless of the number of retrieval parameters, measurement view angles or pixels. This gives a procedure for adjusting atmosphere and surface parameters that will scale to the large problems of 3D remote sensing. For certain types of multi-angle/multi-pixel polarimetric measurements, this encourages the development of a new class of three-dimensional retrieval algorithms with more flexible parametrizations of spatial heterogeneity, less reliance on data screening procedures, and improved coverage in terms of the resolved physical processes in the Earth's atmosphere. - Highlights: • Blueprint for 3D remote sensing of the atmosphere and surface. • Procedure for adjusting thousands of parameters with millions of data

  2. On vector-valued tent spaces and Hardy spaces associated with non-negative self-adjoint operators

    Kemppainen, Mikko

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we study Hardy spaces associated with non-negative self-adjoint operators and develop their vector-valued theory. The complex interpolation scales of vector-valued tent spaces and Hardy spaces are extended to the endpoint p=1. The holomorphic functional calculus of L is also shown to be bounded on the associated Hardy space H^1_L(X). These results, along with the atomic decomposition for the aforementioned space, rely on boundedness of certain integral operators on the tent spac...

  3. Interpreting the atmospheric circulation trend during the last half of the 20th century: Application of an adjoint model

    S. Blessing; Greatbatch, Richard; K. Fraedrich; Lunkeit, F.

    2008-01-01

    A tangent linear adjoint for a low-resolution dynamical model of the atmosphere is used to derive the optimal forcing perturbations for all state variables such that after a specified lead time the model response has a given projection, in terms of an energy norm, on the pattern associated with the 51-yr trend in the Northern Hemisphere winter tropospheric circulation, 1948/49–1998/99. A feature of the derived forcing sensitivity is a Rossby wave–like feature that emanates from the western tr...

  4. Clustering of Emerging Flux

    Ruzmaikin, A.

    1997-01-01

    Observations show that newly emerging flux tends to appear on the Solar surface at sites where there is flux already. This results in clustering of solar activity. Standard dynamo theories do not predict this effect.

  5. Inversion of geothermal heat flux in a thermomechanically coupled nonlinear Stokes ice sheet model

    Zhu, Hongyu; Petra, Noemi; Stadler, Georg; Isaac, Tobin; Hughes, Thomas J. R.; Ghattas, Omar

    2016-07-01

    We address the inverse problem of inferring the basal geothermal heat flux from surface velocity observations using a steady-state thermomechanically coupled nonlinear Stokes ice flow model. This is a challenging inverse problem since the map from basal heat flux to surface velocity observables is indirect: the heat flux is a boundary condition for the thermal advection-diffusion equation, which couples to the nonlinear Stokes ice flow equations; together they determine the surface ice flow velocity. This multiphysics inverse problem is formulated as a nonlinear least-squares optimization problem with a cost functional that includes the data misfit between surface velocity observations and model predictions. A Tikhonov regularization term is added to render the problem well posed. We derive adjoint-based gradient and Hessian expressions for the resulting partial differential equation (PDE)-constrained optimization problem and propose an inexact Newton method for its solution. As a consequence of the Petrov-Galerkin discretization of the energy equation, we show that discretization and differentiation do not commute; that is, the order in which we discretize the cost functional and differentiate it affects the correctness of the gradient. Using two- and three-dimensional model problems, we study the prospects for and limitations of the inference of the geothermal heat flux field from surface velocity observations. The results show that the reconstruction improves as the noise level in the observations decreases and that short-wavelength variations in the geothermal heat flux are difficult to recover. We analyze the ill-posedness of the inverse problem as a function of the number of observations by examining the spectrum of the Hessian of the cost functional. Motivated by the popularity of operator-split or staggered solvers for forward multiphysics problems - i.e., those that drop two-way coupling terms to yield a one-way coupled forward Jacobian - we study the

  6. Global Modeling and Data Assimilation. Volume 11; Documentation of the Tangent Linear and Adjoint Models of the Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert Moisture Parameterization of the NASA GEOS-1 GCM; 5.2

    Suarez, Max J. (Editor); Yang, Wei-Yu; Todling, Ricardo; Navon, I. Michael

    1997-01-01

    A detailed description of the development of the tangent linear model (TLM) and its adjoint model of the Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert moisture parameterization package used in the NASA GEOS-1 C-Grid GCM (Version 5.2) is presented. The notational conventions used in the TLM and its adjoint codes are described in detail.

  7. CMT Source Inversions for Massive Data Assimilation in Global Adjoint Tomography

    Lei, W.; Ruan, Y.; Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Smith, J. A.; Modrak, R. T.; Komatitsch, D.; Song, X.; Liu, Q.; Tromp, J.; Peter, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) is a vital tool for probing the Earth's interior and enhancing our knowledge of the underlying dynamical processes [e.g., Liu et al., 2012]. Using the adjoint tomography method, we have successfully obtained a first-generation global FWI model named M15 [Bozdag et al., 2015]. To achieve higher resolution of the emerging new structural features and to accommodate azimuthal anisotropy and anelasticity in the next-generation model, we expanded our database from 256 to 4,224 earthquakes. Previous studies have shown that ray-theory-based Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) inversion algorithms can produce systematic biases in earthquake source parameters due to tradeoffs with 3D crustal and mantle heterogeneity [e.g., Hjorleifsdottir et al., 2010]. To reduce these well-known tradeoffs, we performed CMT inversions in our current 3D global model before resuming the structural inversion with the expanded database. Initial source parameters are selected from the global CMT database [Ekstrom et al., 2012], with moment magnitudes ranging from 5.5 to 7.0 and occurring between 1994 and 2015. Data from global and regional networks were retrieved from the IRIS DMC. Synthetic seismograms were generated based on the spectral-element-based seismic wave propagation solver (SPECFEM3D GLOBE) in model M15. We used a source inversion algorithm based on a waveform misfit function while allowing time shifts between data and synthetics to accommodate additional unmodeled 3D heterogeneity [Liu et al., 2004]. To accommodate the large number of earthquakes and time series (more than 10,000,000 records), we implemented a source inversion workflow based on the newly developed Adaptive Seismic Data Format (ASDF) [Krischer, Smith, et al., 2015] and ObsPy [Krischer et al., 2015]. In ASDF, each earthquake is associated with a single file, thereby eliminating I/O bottlenecks in the workflow and facilitating fast parallel processing. Our preliminary results indicate that errors

  8. Seismic structure of the European upper mantle based on adjoint tomography

    Zhu, Hejun; Bozdağ, Ebru; Tromp, Jeroen

    2015-04-01

    We use adjoint tomography to iteratively determine seismic models of the crust and upper mantle beneath the European continent and the North Atlantic Ocean. Three-component seismograms from 190 earthquakes recorded by 745 seismographic stations are employed in the inversion. Crustal model EPcrust combined with mantle model S362ANI comprise the 3-D starting model, EU00. Before the structural inversion, earthquake source parameters, for example, centroid moment tensors and locations, are reinverted based on global 3-D Green's functions and Fréchet derivatives. This study consists of three stages. In stage one, frequency-dependent phase differences between observed and simulated seismograms are used to constrain radially anisotropic wave speed variations. In stage two, frequency-dependent phase and amplitude measurements are combined to simultaneously constrain elastic wave speeds and anelastic attenuation. In these two stages, long-period surface waves and short-period body waves are combined to simultaneously constrain shallow and deep structures. In stage three, frequency-dependent phase and amplitude anomalies of three-component surface waves are used to simultaneously constrain radial and azimuthal anisotropy. After this three-stage inversion, we obtain a new seismic model of the European curst and upper mantle, named EU60. Improvements in misfits and histograms in both phase and amplitude help us to validate this three-stage inversion strategy. Long-wavelength elastic wave speed variations in model EU60 compare favourably with previous body- and surface wave tomographic models. Some hitherto unidentified features, such as the Adria microplate, naturally emerge from the smooth starting model. Subducting slabs, slab detachments, ancient suture zones, continental rifts and backarc basins are well resolved in model EU60. We find an anticorrelation between shear wave speed and anelastic attenuation at depths global attenuation studies. Furthermore, enhanced

  9. Parallelized Three-Dimensional Resistivity Inversion Using Finite Elements And Adjoint State Methods

    Schaa, Ralf; Gross, Lutz; Du Plessis, Jaco

    2015-04-01

    The resistivity method is one of the oldest geophysical exploration methods, which employs one pair of electrodes to inject current into the ground and one or more pairs of electrodes to measure the electrical potential difference. The potential difference is a non-linear function of the subsurface resistivity distribution described by an elliptic partial differential equation (PDE) of the Poisson type. Inversion of measured potentials solves for the subsurface resistivity represented by PDE coefficients. With increasing advances in multichannel resistivity acquisition systems (systems with more than 60 channels and full waveform recording are now emerging), inversion software require efficient storage and solver algorithms. We developed the finite element solver Escript, which provides a user-friendly programming environment in Python to solve large-scale PDE-based problems (see https://launchpad.net/escript-finley). Using finite elements, highly irregular shaped geology and topography can readily be taken into account. For the 3D resistivity problem, we have implemented the secondary potential approach, where the PDE is decomposed into a primary potential caused by the source current and the secondary potential caused by changes in subsurface resistivity. The primary potential is calculated analytically, and the boundary value problem for the secondary potential is solved using nodal finite elements. This approach removes the singularity caused by the source currents and provides more accurate 3D resistivity models. To solve the inversion problem we apply a 'first optimize then discretize' approach using the quasi-Newton scheme in form of the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (L-BFGS) method (see Gross & Kemp 2013). The evaluation of the cost function requires the solution of the secondary potential PDE for each source current and the solution of the corresponding adjoint-state PDE for the cost function gradients with respect to the subsurface

  10. Adjoint distributed catchment modelling for flood impact of rural land use and management change

    O'Donnell, G. M.; Ewen, J.; O'Connell, P. E.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the impact that changes in land use and management (LUM) can have on downstream flooding is a significant research challenge that requires a distributed physically-based modelling approach. A key issue in this regard is how to understand the role of the river channel network in propagating the effects of changes in runoff generation downstream to flood sites. The effects of LUM changes can be analysed as if they are perturbations in properties or rates that cause perturbations in flow to propagate through the network. A novel approach has been developed that computes the sensitivity of an impact (for example the impact on a flood level) to upstream perturbations. This is achieved using an adjoint hydraulic model of the channel network that computes sensitivities using algorithmic differentiation. The hydraulic model provides a detailed representation of the drainage network, based on field surveys of channel cross sections and channel roughness, and is linked to runoff generation elements (grid squares). Various sensitivities can be calculated, including sensitivities to perturbations in runoff generation parameters, thus providing some insight into the link between impact and the parameterisation used for runoff generation, and perturbation in the rate of lateral inflow to the network, as can be calculated using expert knowledge on the local effects of LUM on runoff from agricultural fields and hillslopes. The resulting sensitivities may be decomposed and presented as maps that show the relationship between perturbations and impacts, giving valuable insight into the link between cause and effects. Results are provided for the Hodder catchment, NW England (260 sq. km), which is undergoing large-scale changes in LUM. The application focuses on the role of hydrodynamic and geomorphologic dispersion in attenuating perturbations in network flow that result from perturbations to lateral inflows of the types expected if changes in LUM alter the timing or

  11. Estimating and understanding contemporary large-scale CO2 fluxes using 4D-Var for inverse transport modelling

    Wilson, Chris; Chipperfield, Martyn; Gloor, Emanuel

    2010-05-01

    Knowledge of fluxes from terrestrial carbon reservoirs is currently uncertain. While the atmospheric burden and oceanic uptake of carbon are well understood, evidence points to a large land sink, equivalent in size to the atmospheric sink. However, neither the nature nor the location of this land reservoir is well known. Atmospheric transport models, such as the CTM TOMCAT, predict the forward transport of carbon in the atmosphere by numerically solving tracer transport equations with respect to conditions based upon observed data. However, if an 'adjoint' to the CTM is created, it can be used to solve the inverse problem of investigating the nature of carbon sources and sinks using information about atmospheric carbon patterns i.e. inverse transport modelling. Due to recent and imminent improvements in remote sensing of atmospheric CO2, there will soon be thorough high-resolution data available which can be used in order to constrain the results from inverse transport modelling. In this work we describe the creation of the adjoint of the TOMCAT CTM and its application to the inverse modeling of carbon fluxes. The inverse model is created through methods involving matrix inversion and iterative minimisation of a cost function involving surface carbon fluxes.

  12. Including the adjoint model of the moist physics in the 4D-Var in NASA's GEOS-5 Global Circulation Model

    Holdaway, D. R.; Errico, R.

    2011-12-01

    Inherent in the minimization process in the 4D-Var data assimilation system is the need for the model's adjoint. It is straightforward to obtain the exact adjoint by linearizing the code in a line by line sense; however it only provides an accurate overall representation of the physical processes if the model behaviour is linear. Moist processes in the atmosphere, and thus the models that represent them, are intrinsically highly non-linear and can contain discrete switches. The adjoint that is required in the data assimilation system needs to provide an accurate representation of the physical behaviour for perturbation sizes of the order of the analysis error, so an exact adjoint of the moist physics model is likely to be inaccurate. Instead a non-exact adjoint model, which is accurate for large enough perturbations, must be developed. The constraint on the development is that the simplified adjoint be consistent with the actual trajectory of the model. Previous attempts to include the moist physics in the 4D-Var have emphasized the need for redevelopment of the actual moist scheme to a simpler version. These schemes are designed to be linear in the limit of realistic perturbation size but also capture the essence of the physical behaviour, making the adjoint version of the scheme suitable for use in the 4D-Var. A downside to this approach is that it can result in an over simplification of the physics and represent a larger departure from the true model trajectory than necessary. The adjoint is just the transpose of the tangent linear model, which is the differential of the model operator. This differential of the operator can be constructed from Jacobian matrices. Examining the structures of the Jacobians as perturbations of varying size are added to the state vector can help determine whether the adjoint model - be it of actual or simplified physics - will be suitable for use in the assimilation algorithm. If Jacobian structures change considerably when the

  13. Establishment of control equations and adjoint equations using block-pulse functions for optimal control of linear systems with time delays

    王兴涛

    2002-01-01

    Control equation and adjoint equation are established by using block-pulse functions, which trans-forms the linear time-varying systems with time delays into a system of algebraic equations and the optimal con-trol problems are transformed into an optimization problem of multivariate functions thereby achieving the opti-mal control of linear systems with time delays.

  14. A novel concept for scheduling and effect assessment of soft-kill against an antiship missile based on the adjoint method

    Weiss, M.; Vermeulen, A.; Bos, J.; Bucco, D.

    2011-01-01

    The Adjoint Method is a well establised tool for assessement of guidance loops in conceptual design studies. It allows one to perform quick assessments of the performance both in deterministic settings, to determine a nominal or average miss distance, and in stochastic settings, to determine the sta

  15. GRASP [GRound-Water Adjunct Sensitivity Program]: A computer code to perform post-SWENT [simulator for water, energy, and nuclide transport] adjoint sensitivity analysis of steady-state ground-water flow: Technical report

    GRASP (GRound-Water Adjunct Senstivity Program) computes measures of the behavior of a ground-water system and the system's performance for waste isolation, and estimates the sensitivities of these measures to system parameters. The computed measures are referred to as ''performance measures'' and include weighted squared deviations of computed and observed pressures or heads, local Darcy velocity components and magnitudes, boundary fluxes, and travel distance and time along travel paths. The sensitivities are computed by the adjoint method and are exact derivatives of the performance measures with respect to the parameters for the modeled system, taken about the assumed parameter values. GRASP presumes steady-state, saturated grondwater flow, and post-processes the results of a multidimensional (1-D, 2-D, 3-D) finite-difference flow code. This document describes the mathematical basis for the model, the algorithms and solution techniques used, and the computer code design. The implementation of GRASP is verified with simple one- and two-dimensional flow problems, for which analytical expressions of performance measures and sensitivities are derived. The linkage between GRASP and multidimensional finite-difference flow codes is described. This document also contains a detailed user's manual. The use of GRASP to evaluate nuclear waste disposal issues has been emphasized throughout the report. The performance measures and their sensitivities can be employed to assist in directing data collection programs, expedite model calibration, and objectively determine the sensitivity of projected system performance to parameters

  16. Top-Down Inversion of Aerosol Emissions through Adjoint Integration of Satellite Radiance and GEOS-Chem Chemical Transport Model

    Xu, X.; Wang, J.; Henze, D. K.; Qu, W.; Kopacz, M.

    2012-12-01

    The knowledge of aerosol emissions from both natural and anthropogenic sources are needed to study the impacts of tropospheric aerosol on atmospheric composition, climate, and human health, but large uncertainties persist in quantifying the aerosol sources with the current bottom-up methods. This study presents a new top-down approach that spatially constrains the amount of aerosol emissions from satellite (MODIS) observed reflectance with the adjoint of a chemistry transport model (GEOS-Chem). We apply this technique with a one-month case study (April 2008) over the East Asia. The bottom-up estimated sulfate-nitrate-ammonium precursors, such as sulfur dioxide (SO2), ammonia (NH3), and nitrogen oxides (NOx), all from INTEX-B 2006 inventory, emissions of black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC) from Bond-2007 inventory, and mineral dust simulated from DEAD dust mobilization scheme, are spatially optimized from the GEOS-Chem model and its adjoint constrained by the aerosol optical depth (AOD) that are derived from MODIS reflectance with the GEOS-Chem aerosol single scattering properties. The adjoint inverse modeling for the study period yields notable decreases in anthropogenic aerosol emissions over China: 436 Gg (33.5%) for SO2, 378 Gg (34.5%) for NH3, 319 (18.8%) for NOx, 10 Gg (9.1%) for BC, and 30 Gg (15.0%) for OC. The total amount of the mineral dust emission is reduced by 56.4% from the DEAD mobilization module which simulates dust production of 19020 Gg. Sub-regional adjustments are significant and directions of changes are spatially different. The model simulation with optimized aerosol emissions shows much better agreement with independent observations from sun-spectrophotometer observed AOD from AERONET, MISR (Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer) AOD, OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) NO2 and SO2 columns, and surface aerosol concentrations measured over both anthropogenic pollution and dust source regions. Assuming the used bottom-up anthropogenic

  17. Deciphering Jupiter's complex flow dynamics using the upcoming Juno gravity measurements and an adjoint based dynamical model

    Galanti, Eli; Kaspi, Yohai

    2015-11-01

    The nature of the large scale flow on Jupiter below the cloud level is still unknown. The observed surface wind might be confined to the upper layers, or be a manifestation of deep cylindrical flow. Moreover, it is possible that in the case where the observed wind is superficial, there exists deep flow that is completely separated from the surface. To date, all models linking the wind (via the induced density nomalies) to the gravity field to be measured by Juno, consider only wind flow related to the observed could level wind. Some assume full cylindrical flow while others allow for the wind to decay with depth.Here we explore the possibility of complex wind dynamics that include both the upper-layer wind, and a deep flow that is completely detached from the flow above it. The surface flow is based on the observed cloud level flow and is set to decay with depth. The deep flow is constructed synthetically to produce cylindrical structures with variable width and magnitude, thus allowing for a wide range of possible setups of the unknown deep flow. This flow is also set to decay when approaching the surface flow in coordination with the exponential decay rate. The combined 3D flow is then related to the density anomalies via a dynamical model, taking into account oblateness effects as well, and the resulting density field is then used to calculate the gravitational moments. An adjoint inverse model is constructed for the dynamical model, thus allowing backward integration of the dynamical model, from the expected observations of the gravity moments to the parameters controlling the setup of the deep and surface flows. We show that the model can be used for examination of various scenarios, including cases in which the deep flow is dominating over the surface wind. The novelty of our adjoint based inversion approach is in the ability to identify complex dynamics including deep cylindrical flows that have no manifestation in the observed cloud-level wind. Furthermore

  18. Video Meteor Fluxes

    Campbell-Brown, M. D.; Braid, D.

    2011-01-01

    The flux of meteoroids, or number of meteoroids per unit area per unit time, is critical for calibrating models of meteoroid stream formation and for estimating the hazard to spacecraft from shower and sporadic meteors. Although observations of meteors in the millimetre to centimetre size range are common, flux measurements (particularly for sporadic meteors, which make up the majority of meteoroid flux) are less so. It is necessary to know the collecting area and collection time for a given set of observations, and to correct for observing biases and the sensitivity of the system. Previous measurements of sporadic fluxes are summarized in Figure 1; the values are given as a total number of meteoroids striking the earth in one year to a given limiting mass. The Gr n et al. (1985) flux model is included in the figure for reference. Fluxes for sporadic meteoroids impacting the Earth have been calculated for objects in the centimeter size range using Super-Schmidt observations (Hawkins & Upton, 1958); this study used about 300 meteors, and used only the physical area of overlap of the cameras at 90 km to calculate the flux, corrected for angular speed of meteors, since a large angular speed reduces the maximum brightness of the meteor on the film, and radiant elevation, which takes into account the geometric reduction in flux when the meteors are not perpendicular to the horizontal. They bring up corrections for both partial trails (which tends to increase the collecting area) and incomplete overlap at heights other than 90 km (which tends to decrease it) as effects that will affect the flux, but estimated that the two effects cancelled one another. Halliday et al. (1984) calculated the flux of meteorite-dropping fireballs with fragment masses greater than 50 g, over the physical area of sky accessible to the MORP fireball cameras, counting only observations in clear weather. In the micron size range, LDEF measurements of small craters on spacecraft have been used to

  19. Nonlinear heat flux estimation in the JET divertor with the ITER like wall

    The present paper deals with a nonlinear unsteady heat flux calculation in the case when measurements are provided by only one thermocouple (TC) embedded in the material and the spatial shape of the unknown surface heat flux is given. This inverse problem is solved with the Conjugate Gradient Method (CGM) combined with the adjoint state, the direct problem being solved with the finite element method. This heat flux estimation technique is illustrated in the case of the plasma facing components located in the JET tokamak divertor that can be exposed to several MW m-2 during more than 10 s. In those tiles, few embedded thermocouples (TC) located 1 cm below the tile surface are used to measure the bulk temperatures of the Carbon Fiber Composite (CFC) composite tiles (which are coated with 14 mm of tungsten for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) like wall). A numerical study is first presented in order to validate the heat flux calculation and to study the accuracy of the method. Then experimental data from a recent shot with the ITER-like wall configuration are used in the heat flux calculation presented here. Results are compared with those obtained with the deconvolution technique in the linear case, on a simplified geometry of the tiles. (authors)

  20. Daily European CO2 fluxes inferred by inversion of atmospheric transport

    Bousquet, P.; Peylin, P.; Rayner, P.; Carouge, C.; Rivier, L.; Ciais, P.; Heinrich, P.; Hourdin, F.

    2002-12-01

    Continuous measurements of atmospheric CO2 over continental areas offer the potential to better understand the carbon fluxes between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere. Up to now, most atmospheric inversions have provided monthly fluxes averaged over large sub continental regions. Refining space and time resolution of European fluxes calculated by inversion of atmospheric transport requires i) continuous CO2 measurements over Europe, ii) a high resolution transport model that can reproduce the variability of CO2 over continents and provide continuous response functions at model resolution, and iii) an updated inverse procedure that can use the increased associated information. We use here continuous CO2 measurements obtained through AEROCARB EU project (part of CARBOEUROPE cluster) for year 1998 at 10 continental stations to retrieve daily fluxes over Europe at model resolution with LMDZ transport model. LMDZ model is a global transport model with zoom and back-transport capabilities. A zoom was defined over Europe, with 0.4° maximum resolution. Back transport is based on self-adjoint property of atmospheric transport that makes it possible to get model daily response functions at model resolution and at low computing cost. In this talk, we present the new features of the inverse procedure and we detail the LMDZ back transport. First results obtained for daily European fluxes of the two last months of 1998 are presented and analysed. The question of retrieving fossil emissions from continuous measurements is also developed.

  1. Convergence of a semi-discretization scheme for the Hamilton-Jacobi equation: A new approach with the adjoint method

    Cagnetti, Filippo

    2013-11-01

    We consider a numerical scheme for the one dimensional time dependent Hamilton-Jacobi equation in the periodic setting. This scheme consists in a semi-discretization using monotone approximations of the Hamiltonian in the spacial variable. From classical viscosity solution theory, these schemes are known to converge. In this paper we present a new approach to the study of the rate of convergence of the approximations based on the nonlinear adjoint method recently introduced by L.C. Evans. We estimate the rate of convergence for convex Hamiltonians and recover the O(h) convergence rate in terms of the L∞ norm and O(h) in terms of the L1 norm, where h is the size of the spacial grid. We discuss also possible generalizations to higher dimensional problems and present several other additional estimates. The special case of quadratic Hamiltonians is considered in detail in the end of the paper. © 2013 IMACS.

  2. Quantifying the loss of information in source attribution problems using the adjoint method in global models of atmospheric chemical transport

    Santillana, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    It is of crucial importance to be able to identify the location of atmospheric pollution sources in our planet. Global models of atmospheric transport in combination with diverse Earth observing systems are a natural choice to achieve this goal. It is shown that the ability to successfully reconstruct the location and magnitude of an instantaneous source in global chemical transport models (CTMs) decreases rapidly as a function of the time interval between the pollution release and the observation time. A simple way to quantitatively characterize this phenomenon is proposed based on the effective -undesired- numerical diffusion present in current Eulerian CTMs and verified using idealized numerical experiments. The approach presented consists of using the adjoint-based optimization method in a state-of-the-art CTM, GEOS-Chem, to reconstruct the location and magnitude of a realistic pollution plume for multiple time scales. The findings obtained from these numerical experiments suggest a time scale of 2 days a...

  3. Modularity and 4D-2D spectral equivalences for large-N gauge theories with adjoint matter

    Başar, Gökçe; Dienes, Keith R; McGady, David A

    2015-01-01

    In recent work, we demonstrated that the confined-phase spectrum of non-supersymmetric pure Yang-Mills theory coincides with the spectrum of the chiral sector of a two-dimensional conformal field theory in the large-$N$ limit. This was done within the tractable setting in which the gauge theory is compactified on a three-sphere whose radius is small compared to the strong length scale. In this paper, we generalize these observations by demonstrating that similar results continue to hold even when massless adjoint matter fields are introduced. These results hold for both thermal and $(-1)^F$-twisted partition functions, and collectively suggest that the spectra of large-$N$ confining gauge theories are organized by the symmetries of two-dimensional conformal field theories.

  4. Enhancing adaptive sparse grid approximations and improving refinement strategies using adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates

    In this paper we present an algorithm for adaptive sparse grid approximations of quantities of interest computed from discretized partial differential equations. We use adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates of the physical discretization error and the interpolation error in the sparse grid to enhance the sparse grid approximation and to drive adaptivity of the sparse grid. Utilizing these error estimates provides significantly more accurate functional values for random samples of the sparse grid approximation. We also demonstrate that alternative refinement strategies based upon a posteriori error estimates can lead to further increases in accuracy in the approximation over traditional hierarchical surplus based strategies. Throughout this paper we also provide and test a framework for balancing the physical discretization error with the stochastic interpolation error of the enhanced sparse grid approximation

  5. Nonlinear self-adjointness, conservation laws, and the construction of solutions of partial differential equations using conservation laws

    The method of nonlinear self-adjointness, which was recently developed by the first author, gives a generalization of Noether's theorem. This new method significantly extends approaches to constructing conservation laws associated with symmetries, since it does not require the existence of a Lagrangian. In particular, it can be applied to any linear equations and any nonlinear equations that possess at least one local conservation law. The present paper provides a brief survey of results on conservation laws which have been obtained by this method and published mostly in recent preprints of the authors, along with a method for constructing exact solutions of systems of partial differential equations with the use of conservation laws. In most cases the solutions obtained by the method of conservation laws cannot be found as invariant or partially invariant solutions. Bibliography: 23 titles

  6. A finite-volume Eulerian-Lagrangian localized adjoint method for solution of the advection-dispersion equation

    Healy, R.W.; Russell, T.F.

    1993-01-01

    Test results demonstrate that the finite-volume Eulerian-Lagrangian localized adjoint method (FVELLAM) outperforms standard finite-difference methods for solute transport problems that are dominated by advection. FVELLAM systematically conserves mass globally with all types of boundary conditions. Integrated finite differences, instead of finite elements, are used to approximate the governing equation. This approach, in conjunction with a forward tracking scheme, greatly facilitates mass conservation. The mass storage integral is numerically evaluated at the current time level, and quadrature points are then tracked forward in time to the next level. Forward tracking permits straightforward treatment of inflow boundaries, thus avoiding the inherent problem in backtracking of characteristic lines intersecting inflow boundaries. FVELLAM extends previous results by obtaining mass conservation locally on Lagrangian space-time elements. -from Authors

  7. A User's Manual for MASH V1.5 - A Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System

    C. O. Slater; J. M. Barnes; J. O. Johnson; J.D. Drischler

    1998-10-01

    The Monte Carlo ~djoint ~ielding Code System, MASH, calculates neutron and gamma- ray environments and radiation protection factors for armored military vehicles, structures, trenches, and other shielding configurations by coupling a forward discrete ordinates air- over-ground transport calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo treatment of the shielding geometry. Efficiency and optimum use of computer time are emphasized. The code system includes the GRTUNCL and DORT codes for air-over-ground transport calculations, the MORSE code with the GIFT5 combinatorial geometry package for adjoint shielding calculations, and several peripheral codes that perform the required data preparations, transformations, and coupling functions. The current version, MASH v 1.5, is the successor to the original MASH v 1.0 code system initially developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The discrete ordinates calculation determines the fluence on a coupling surface surrounding the shielding geometry due to an external neutron/gamma-ray source. The Monte Carlo calculation determines the effectiveness of the fluence at that surface in causing a response in a detector within the shielding geometry, i.e., the "dose importance" of the coupling surface fluence. A coupling code folds the fluence together with the dose importance, giving the desired dose response. The coupling code can determine the dose response as a function of the shielding geometry orientation relative to the source, distance from the source, and energy response of the detector. This user's manual includes a short description of each code, the input required to execute the code along with some helpful input data notes, and a representative sample problem.

  8. Directed flux motor

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A directed flux motor described utilizes the directed magnetic flux of at least one magnet through ferrous material to drive different planetary gear sets to achieve capabilities in six actuated shafts that are grouped three to a side of the motor. The flux motor also utilizes an interwoven magnet configuration which reduces the overall size of the motor. The motor allows for simple changes to modify the torque to speed ratio of the gearing contained within the motor as well as simple configurations for any number of output shafts up to six. The changes allow for improved manufacturability and reliability within the design.

  9. The calculation of fallout protection factors using the VCS adjoint Monte Carlo methodology

    The Vehicle Code System (VCS) was designed to compute initial radiation protection factors from distal sources for the shielding object such that radiation environments on a coupling boundary surface could be specified by a two-dimensional discrete ordinate (R,Z) calculation with the DOT code at a single range interval. The VCS procedure does not allow fixed sources of radiation internal to the coupling surface. This constraint on VCS is important for the analysis of fallout radiation protection factors. A new code, in a VCS framework, computes radiation protection factors from nuclear fallout for complex three-dimensional structures. Fallout radiation protection factor computations present at least two significant differences from the normal application of VCS to initial radiation: (1) there are radiation sources (on ground and roofs) local to the detector which cannot normally be excluded from the interior of a boundary surface and (2) the distal radiation environment is well-characterized by a one-dimensional discrete ordinates computation in plane geometry with the ANISN code. Thus, major features of this new code procedure include the addition of logic to score particles at potential source surfaces (e.g., roof and ground surfaces) within the Monte Carlo geometry, the addition of logic in the coupling procedure to treat these scores, and the addition of a capability to couple the ANISN plane geometry free-field fluxes instead of the two-dimensional DOT free-field fluxes

  10. Aeronet Solar Flux

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SolRad-Net (Solar Radiation Network) is an established network of ground-based sensors providing high-frequency solar flux measurements in quasi-realtime to the...

  11. Flux in Tallinn

    2004-01-01

    Rahvusvahelise elektroonilise kunsti sümpoosioni ISEA2004 klubiõhtu "Flux in Tallinn" klubis Bon Bon. Eestit esindasid Ropotator, Ars Intel Inc., Urmas Puhkan, Joel Tammik, Taavi Tulev (pseud. Wochtzchee). Klubiõhtu koordinaator Andres Lõo

  12. Nitrous Oxide Flux

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Nitrous Oxide (N20) flux is the net rate of nitrous oxide exchange between an ecosystem and the atmosphere. Data of this variable were generated by the USGS...

  13. Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux is defined as the year-over-year change in Total Ecosystem Carbon Stock, or the net rate of carbon exchange between an ecosystem and the...

  14. Flux Emergence (Theory)

    Cheung, Mark C. M.; Hiroaki Isobe

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic flux emergence from the solar convection zone into the overlying atmosphere is the driver of a diverse range of phenomena associated with solar activity. In this article, we introduce theoretical concepts central to the study of flux emergence and discuss how the inclusion of different physical effects (e.g., magnetic buoyancy, magnetoconvection, reconnection, magnetic twist, interaction with ambient field) in models impact the evolution of the emerging field and plasma.

  15. Flux Emergence (Theory

    Mark C. M. Cheung

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic flux emergence from the solar convection zone into the overlying atmosphere is the driver of a diverse range of phenomena associated with solar activity. In this article, we introduce theoretical concepts central to the study of flux emergence and discuss how the inclusion of different physical effects (e.g., magnetic buoyancy, magnetoconvection, reconnection, magnetic twist, interaction with ambient field in models impact the evolution of the emerging field and plasma.

  16. Estimation of surface heat flux for ablation and charring of thermal protection material

    Qian, Wei-qi; He, Kai-feng; Zhou, Yu

    2016-07-01

    Ablation of the thermal protection material of the reentry hypersonic flight vehicle is a complex physical and chemical process. To estimate the surface heat flux from internal temperature measurement is much more complex than the conventional inverse heat conduction problem case. In the paper, by utilizing a two-layer pyrogeneration-plane ablation model to model the ablation and charring of the material, modifying the finite control volume method to suit for the numerical simulation of the heat conduction equation with variable-geometry, the CGM along with the associated adjoint problem is developed to estimate the surface heat flux. This estimation method is verified with a numerical example at first, the results show that the estimation method is feasible and robust. The larger is the measurement noise, the greater is the deviation of the estimated result from the exact value, and the measurement noise of ablated surface position has a significant and more direct influence on the estimated result of surface heat flux. Furthermore, the estimation method is used to analyze the experimental data of ablation of blunt Carbon-phenolic material Narmco4028 in an arc-heater. It is shown that the estimated surface heat flux agrees with the heating power value of the arc-heater, and the estimation method is basically effective and potential to treat the engineering heat conduction problem with ablation.

  17. Numerical methods for 3D tokamak simulations using a flux-surface independent grid

    A numerical approach for 3D tokamak simulations using a flux surface independent grid is presented. The grid consists of few poloidal planes with a Cartesian Isotropic grid within each poloidal plane. Perpendicular operators can be discretised within a poloidal plane using standard second order finite difference methods. The discretisation of parallel operators is achieved with a field line following map and an interpolation. The application of the support operator method to the parallel diffusion operator conserves the self-adjointness of the operator on the discrete level and keeps the numerical decay rate at a low level. The developed numerical methods can be applied to geometries where an X-point is present.

  18. Use of large-scale transient stresses and a coupled adjoint-sensitivity/kriging approach to calibrate a groundwater-flow model at the Wipp site

    A coupled adjoint-sensitivity/kriging approach was used to calibrate a groundwater-flow model to 10 years of human-induced transient hydraulic stresses at the WIPP site in New Mexico, USA. Transmissivity data obtained from local-scale hydraulic tests were first kriged to define an initial transmissivity distribution. Steady-state model calibration was then performed employing adjoint-sensitivity techniques to identify regions where transmissivity changes would improve the model fit to the observed steady-state heads. Subsequent transient calibration to large-scale hydraulic stresses created by shaft construction and long-term pumping tests aided in identifying smaller scale features not detected during steady-state calibration. This transient calibration resulted in a much more reliable and defendable model for use in performance-assessment calculations. Computer codes used: GRASPII; SWIFTII. 7 refs., 7 figs

  19. Inverting Juno Gravity Field Measurements into the Atmospheric Dynamics of Jupiter - a Study Using a Dynamical Model and Its Adjoint Counterpart

    Galanti, E.; Kaspi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    In approximately two years Juno will perform close flybys of Jupiter, obtaining a high precision gravity spectrum for the planet. This data can potentially be used to estimate the depth of the observed flows on the Jupiter. Here, we propose a new methodology for the inversion of the gravity data into into the full three-dimensional flow on Jupiter. Using the adjoint method we construct an inverse model for a dynamical model in which the gravity field is calculated from the observed surface wind, thus allowing its backward integration, from the gravity field to the wind. Given a gravity field, the adjoint based model finds the atmospheric dynamics that can explain best the gravity field (minimum difference). The dynamical model is set up to allow either zonal flow only, or a full horizontal flow in both zonal and meridional directions based on the observed cloud-level wind. In addition, dynamical perturbations resulting from the the non-spherical shape of the planet are accounted for. The dynamical model, together with its adjoint counterpart, are used for examination of various scenarios, including cases in which the depth of the wind depend on latitudinal position.We show that given the expected sensitivities of Juno, it is possible to use the gravity measurements to derive the depth of the wind on Jupiter. This holds for a large range of zonal wind possible penetration depths, from 100km to 10,000km, and for winds depth that vary with latitude. This method proves to be useful also when incorporating the full horizontal flow, and thus taking into account gravity perturbations that vary with longitude. We show that our adjoint based inversion method allows not only to estimate the depth of the circulation, but allows via iterations with the spacecraft trajectory estimation model to improve the inferred gravity field.

  20. Simulation of atmospheric N2O with GEOS-Chem and its adjoint: evaluation of observational constraints

    K. C. Wells; Millet, D. B.; Bousserez, N.; D. K. Henze; Chaliyakunnel, S.; T. J. Griffis; Luan, Y.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; R. G. Prinn; S. O'Doherty; R. F. Weiss; G. S. Dutton; Elkins, J. W.; Krummel, P. B.; Langenfelds, R.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a new 4D-Var inversion framework for N2O based on the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint, and apply this framework in a series of observing system simulation experiments to assess how well N2O sources and sinks can be constrained by the current global observing network. The employed measurement ensemble includes approximately weekly and quasi-continuous N2O measurements (hourly averages used) from several long-term monitoring netw...

  1. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of the RELAPS/MOD3.2 two-fluid thermal-hydraulic code system

    This work presents the implementation of the Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis Procedure (ASAP) for the non-equilibrium, non-homogeneous two-fluid model, including boron concentration and non-condensable gases, of the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code. The end-product of this implementation is the Adjoint Sensitivity Model (ASM-REL/TF), which is derived for both the differential and discretized equations underlying the two-fluid model with non-condensable(s). The consistency requirements between these two representations are also highlighted. The validation of the ASM-REL/TF has been carried out by using sample problems involving: (i) liquid-phase only, (ii) gas-phase only, and (iii) two-phase mixture (of water and steam). Thus the 'Two-Loops with Pumps' sample problem supplied with RELAP5/MOD3.2 has been used to verify the accuracy and stability of the numerical solution of the ASM-REL/TF when only the liquid-phase is present. Furthermore, the 'Edwards Pipe' sample problem, also supplied with RELAP5/MOD3.2, has been used to verify the accuracy and stability of the numerical solution of the ASM-REL/TF when both (i.e., liquid and gas) phases are present. In addition, the accuracy and stability of the numerical solution of the ASM-REL/TF have been verified when only the gas-phase is present by using modified 'Two-Loops with Pumps' and the 'Edwards Pipe' sample problems in which the liquid and two-phase fluids, respectively, were replaced by pure steam. The results obtained for these sample problems depict typical sensitivities of junction velocities and volume-averaged pressures to perturbations in initial conditions, and indicate that the numerical solution of the ASM-REL/TF is as robust, stable, and accurate as the original RELAP5/MOD3.2 calculations. In addition, the solution of the ASM-REL/TF has been used to calculate sample sensitivities of volume-averaged pressures to variations in the pump head. (orig.)

  2. Efficient forward and adjoint calculations of normal mode spectra in laterally heterogeneous earth models using an iterative direct solution method

    Al-Attar, D.; Woodhouse, J. H.

    2011-12-01

    Normal mode spectra provide a valuable data set for global seismic tomography, and, notably, are amongst the few geophysical observables that are sensitive to lateral variations in density structure within the Earth. Nonetheless, the effects of lateral density variations on mode spectra are rather subtle. In order, therefore, to reliably determine density variations with in the earth, it is necessary to make use of sufficiently accurate methods for calculating synthetic mode spectra. In particular, recent work has highlighted the need to perform 'full-coupling calculations' that take into account the interaction of large numbers of spherical earth multiplets. However, present methods for performing such full-coupling calculations require diagonalization of large coupling matrices, and so become computationally inefficient as the number of coupled modes is increased. In order to perform full-coupling calculations more efficiently, we describe a new implementation of the direct solution method for calculating synthetic spectra in laterally heterogeneous earth models. This approach is based on the solution of the inhomogeneous mode coupling equations in the frequency domain, and does not require the diagonalization of large matrices. Early implementations of the direct solution method used LU-decomposition to solve the mode coupling equations. However, as the number of coupled modes is increased, this method becomes impractically slow. To circumvent this problem, we solve the mode coupling equations iteratively using the preconditioned biconjugate gradient algorithm. We present a number of numerical tests to display the accuracy and efficiency of this method for performing large full-coupling calculations. In addition, we describe a frequency-domain formulation of the adjoint method for the calculation of Frechet kernels that show the sensitivity of normal mode observations to variations in earth structure. The calculation of such Frechet kernels involves one solution

  3. Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes

    Filippov, Boris; Srivastava, Abhishek K; Uddin, Wahab

    2015-01-01

    The most probable initial magnetic configuration of a CME is a flux rope consisting of twisted field lines which fill the whole volume of a dark coronal cavity. The flux ropes can be in stable equilibrium in the coronal magnetic field for weeks and even months, but suddenly they loose their stability and erupt with high speed. Their transition to the unstable phase depends on the parameters of the flux rope (i.e., total electric current, twist, mass loading etc.), as well as on the properties of the ambient coronal magnetic field. One of the major governing factors is the vertical gradient of the coronal magnetic field which is estimated as decay index (n). Cold dense prominence material can be collected in the lower parts of the helical flux tubes. Filaments are therefore good tracers of the flux ropes in the corona, which become visible long before the beginning of the eruption. The perspectives of the filament eruptions and following CMEs can be estimated by the comparison of observed filament heights with...

  4. The Consistency of a Bounded, Self-Adjoint Time Operator Canonically Conjugate to a Hamiltonian with Non-empty Point Spectrum

    Galapon, E A

    1999-01-01

    Pauli's well known theorem (W. Pauli, Hanbuch der Physik vol. 5/1, ed. S. Flugge, (1926) p.60) asserts that the existence of a self-adjoint time operator canonically conjugate to a given Hamiltonian implies that the time operator and the Hamitlonian posses completely continuous spectra spanning the entire real line. Thus the conclusion that there exists no self-adjoint time operator conjugate to a Hamiltonian with a spectrum which is a proper subspace of the real line. But we challenge this conclusion. We show rigourously the consitency of assuming a bounded, self-adjoint time operator conjugate to a Hamiltonian with an unbounded, or semibounded, or finitely countable point spectrum. Pauli implicitly assumed unconditionally that the domain of the Hamiltonian is invariant under the action of $U_\\beta=\\exp(-i\\beta T)$, where $T$ is the time operator, for arbitrary real number $\\betaA$. But we show that the $\\beta$'s are at most the differences of the eigenvalues of the Hamiltonian. And this happens, under some ...

  5. Superradiance and flux conservation

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Ngampitipan, Tritos; Visser, Matt

    2014-09-01

    The theoretical foundations of the phenomenon known as superradiance still continue to attract considerable attention. Despite many valiant attempts at pedagogically clear presentations, the effect nevertheless still continues to generate some significant confusion. Part of the confusion arises from the fact that superradiance in a quantum field theory context is not the same as superradiance (superfluorescence) in some condensed matter contexts; part of the confusion arises from traditional but sometimes awkward normalization conventions, and part is due to sometimes unnecessary confusion between fluxes and probabilities. We shall argue that the key point underlying the effect is flux conservation (and, in the presence of dissipation, a controlled amount of flux nonconservation), and that attempting to phrase things in terms of reflection and transmission probabilities only works in the absence of superradiance. To help clarify the situation we present a simple exactly solvable toy model exhibiting both superradiance and damping.

  6. Magnetic flux tube tunneling

    We present numerical simulations of the collision and subsequent interaction of orthogonal magnetic flux tubes. The simulations were carried out using a parallelized spectral algorithm for compressible magnetohydrodynamics. It is found that, under a wide range of conditions, the flux tubes can open-quotes tunnelclose quotes through each other, a behavior not previously seen in studies of either vortex tube or magnetic flux tube interactions. Two conditions must be satisfied for tunneling to occur: the magnetic field must be highly twisted with a field line pitch >1, and the Lundquist number must be somewhat large, ≥2880. An examination of magnetic field lines suggests that tunneling is due to a double-reconnection mechanism. Initially orthogonal field lines reconnect at two specific locations, exchange interacting sections, and open-quotes passclose quotes through each other. The implications of these results for solar and space plasmas are discussed. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  7. Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes

    Boris Filippov; Olesya Martsenyuk; Abhishek K. Srivastava; Wahab Uddin

    2015-03-01

    In the early 1990s, it was found that the strongest disturbances of the space–weather were associated with huge ejections of plasma from the solar corona, which took the form of magnetic clouds when moved from the Sun. It is the collisions of the magnetic clouds with the Earth's magnetosphere that lead to strong, sometimes catastrophic changes in space–weather. The onset of a coronal mass ejection (CME) is sudden and no reliable forerunners of CMEs have been found till date. The CME prediction methodologies are less developed compared to the methods developed for the prediction of solar flares. The most probable initial magnetic configuration of a CME is a flux rope consisting of twisted field lines which fill the whole volume of a dark coronal cavity. The flux ropes can be in stable equilibrium in the coronal magnetic field for weeks and even months, but suddenly they lose their stability and erupt with high speed. Their transition to the unstable phase depends on the parameters of the flux rope (i.e., total electric current, twist, mass loading, etc.), as well as on the properties of the ambient coronal magnetic field. One of the major governing factors is the vertical gradient of the coronal magnetic field, which is estimated as decay index (). Cold dense prominence material can be collected in the lower parts of the helical flux tubes. Filaments are, therefore, good tracers of the flux ropes in the corona, which become visible long before the beginning of the eruption. The perspectives of the filament eruptions and following CMEs can be estimated by a comparison of observed filament heights with calculated decay index distributions. The present paper reviews the formation of magnetic flux ropes, their stable and unstable phases, eruption conditions, and also discusses their physical implications in the solar corona.

  8. Approximation of eigenvalues of some unbounded self-adjoint discrete Jacobi matrices by eigenvalues of finite submatrices

    Maria Malejki

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the problem of approximation of eigenvalues of some self-adjoint operator in the Hilbert space \\(l^2(\\mathbb{N}\\ by eigenvalues of suitably chosen principal finite submatrices of an infinite Jacobi matrix that defines the operator considered. We assume the Jacobi operator is bounded from below with compact resolvent. In our research we estimate the asymptotics (with \\(n\\to \\infty\\ of the joint error of approximation for the first \\(n\\ eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the operator by the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the finite submatrix of order \\(n \\times n\\. The method applied in our research is based on the Rayleigh-Ritz method and Volkmer's results included in [H. Volkmer, Error Estimates for Rayleigh-Ritz Approximations of Eigenvalues and Eigenfunctions of the Mathieu and Spheroidal Wave Equation, Constr. Approx. 20 (2004, 39-54]. We extend the method to cover a class of infinite symmetric Jacobi matrices with three diagonals satisfying some polynomial growth estimates.

  9. On the Spectra and Pseudospectra of a Class of Non-Self-Adjoint Random Matrices and Operators

    Chandler-Wilde, Simon N; Lindner, Marko

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we develop and apply methods for the spectral analysis of non-self-adjoint tridiagonal infinite and finite random matrices, and for the spectral analysis of analogous deterministic matrices which are pseudo-ergodic in the sense of E.B.Davies (Commun. Math. Phys. 216 (2001), 687-704). As a major application to illustrate our methods we focus on the "hopping sign model" introduced by J.Feinberg and A.Zee (Phys. Rev. E 59 (1999), 6433-6443), in which the main objects of study are random tridiagonal matrices which have zeros on the main diagonal and random $\\pm 1$'s as the other entries. We explore the relationship between spectral sets in the finite and infinite matrix cases, and between the semi-infinite and bi-infinite matrix cases, for example showing that the numerical range and $p$-norm $\\eps$-pseudospectra ($\\eps>0$, $p\\in [1,\\infty]$) of the random finite matrices converge almost surely to their infinite matrix counterparts, and that the finite matrix spectra are contained in the infinite ma...

  10. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of dynamic reliability models based on Markov chains - II: Application to IFMIF reliability assessment

    In Part II of this work, the adjoint sensitivity analysis procedure developed in Part I is applied to perform sensitivity analysis of several dynamic reliability models of systems of increasing complexity, culminating with the consideration of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) accelerator system. Section II presents the main steps of a procedure for the automated generation of Markov chains for reliability analysis, including the abstraction of the physical system, construction of the Markov chain, and the generation and solution of the ensuing set of differential equations; all of these steps have been implemented in a stand-alone computer code system called QUEFT/MARKOMAG-S/MCADJSEN. This code system has been applied to sensitivity analysis of dynamic reliability measures for a paradigm '2-out-of-3' system comprising five components and also to a comprehensive dynamic reliability analysis of the IFMIF accelerator system facilities for the average availability and, respectively, the system's availability at the final mission time. The QUEFT/MARKOMAG-S/MCADJSEN has been used to efficiently compute sensitivities to 186 failure and repair rates characterizing components and subsystems of the first-level fault tree of the IFMIF accelerator system. (authors)

  11. Sensitivity analysis of a time-delayed thermo-acoustic system via an adjoint-based approach

    Magri, Luca

    2013-01-01

    We apply adjoint-based sensitivity analysis to a time-delayed thermo-acoustic system: a Rijke tube containing a hot wire. We calculate how the growth rate and frequency of small oscillations about a base state are affected either by a generic passive control element in the system (the structural sensitivity analysis) or by a generic change to its base state (the base-state sensitivity analysis). We illustrate the structural sensitivity by calculating the effect of a second hot wire with a small heat release parameter. In a single calculation, this shows how the second hot wire changes the growth rate and frequency of the small oscillations, as a function of its position in the tube. We then examine the components of the structural sensitivity in order to determine the passive control mechanism that has the strongest influence on the growth rate. We find that a force applied to the acoustic momentum equation in the opposite direction to the instantaneous velocity is the most stabilizing feedback mechanism. We ...

  12. An adjoint based method for the inversion of the Juno and Cassini gravity measurements into wind fields

    Galanti, Eli

    2016-01-01

    During 2016-17 the Juno and Cassini spacecraft will both perform close eccentric orbits of Jupiter and Saturn, respectively, obtaining high-precision gravity measurements for these planets. This data will be used to estimate the depth of the observed surface flows on these planets. All models to date, relating the winds to the gravity field, have been in the forward direction, thus allowing only calculation of the gravity field from given wind models. However, there is a need to do the inverse problem since the new observations will be of the gravity field. Here, an inverse dynamical model, is developed to relate the expected measurable gravity field, to perturbations of the density and wind fields, and therefore to the observed cloud-level winds. In order to invert the gravity field into the 3D circulation, an adjoint model is constructed for the dynamical model, thus allowing backward integration. This tool is used for examination of various scenarios, simulating cases in which the depth of the wind depends...

  13. Sensitivity of temporal moments calculated by the adjoint-state method and joint inversing of head and tracer data

    Cirpka, Olaf A.; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    Including tracer data into geostatistically based methods of inverse modeling is computationally very costly when all concentration measurements are used and the sensitivities of many observations are calculated by the direct differentiation approach. Harvey and Gorelick (Water Resour Res 1995;31(7):1615-26) have suggested the use of the first temporal moment instead of the complete concentration record at a point. We derive a computationally efficient adjoint-state method for the sensitivities of the temporal moments that require the solution of the steady-state flow equation and two steady-state transport equations for the forward problem and the same number of equations for each first-moment measurement. The efficiency of the method makes it feasible to evaluate the sensitivity matrix many times in large domains. We incorporate our approach for the calculation of sensitivities in the quasi-linear geostatistical method of inversing ("iterative cokriging"). The application to an artificial example of a tracer introduced into an injection well shows good convergence behavior when both head and first-moment data are used for inversing, whereas inversing of arrival times alone is less stable.

  14. Efficient calculation of Jacobian and adjoint vector products in the wave propagational inverse problem using automatic differentiation

    Wave propagational inverse problems arise in several applications including medical imaging and geophysical exploration. In these problems, one is interested in obtaining the parameters describing the medium from its response to excitations. The problems are characterized by their large size, and by the hyperbolic equation which models the physical phenomena. The inverse problems are often posed as a nonlinear data-fitting where the unknown parameters are found by minimizing the misfit between the predicted data and the actual data. In order to solve the problem numerically using a gradient-type approach, one must calculate the action of the Jacobian and its adjoint on a given vector. In this paper, the authors explore the use of automatic differentiation (AD) to develop codes that perform these calculations. They show that by exploiting structure at 2 scales, they can arrive at a very efficient code whose main components are produced by AD. In the first scale they exploit the time-stepping nature of the hyperbolic solver by using the Extended Jacobian framework. In the second (finer) scale, they exploit the finite difference stencil in order to make explicit use of the sparsity in the dependence of the output variables to the input variables. The main ideas in this work are illustrated with a simpler, one-dimensional version of the problem. Numerical results are given for both one- and two-dimensional problems. They present computational templates that can be used in conjunction with optimization packages to solve the inverse problem

  15. Global estimates of CO sources with high resolution by adjoint inversion of multiple satellite datasets (MOPITT, AIRS, SCIAMACHY, TES

    M. Kopacz

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We combine CO column measurements from the MOPITT, AIRS, SCIAMACHY, and TES satellite instruments in a full-year (May 2004–April 2005 global inversion of CO sources at 4°×5° spatial resolution and monthly temporal resolution. The inversion uses the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model (CTM and its adjoint applied to MOPITT, AIRS, and SCIAMACHY. Observations from TES, surface sites (NOAA/GMD, and aircraft (MOZAIC are used for evaluation of the a posteriori solution. Using GEOS-Chem as a common intercomparison platform shows global consistency between the different satellite datasets and with the in situ data. Differences can be largely explained by different averaging kernels and a priori information. The global CO emission from combustion as constrained in the inversion is 1350 Tg a−1. This is much higher than current bottom-up emission inventories. A large fraction of the correction results from a seasonal underestimate of CO sources at northern mid-latitudes in winter and suggests a larger-than-expected CO source from vehicle cold starts and residential heating. Implementing this seasonal variation of emissions solves the long-standing problem of models underestimating CO in the northern extratropics in winter-spring. A posteriori emissions also indicate a general underestimation of biomass burning in the GFED2 inventory. However, the tropical biomass burning constraints are not quantitatively consistent across the different datasets.

  16. A three-dimensional finite-volume Eulerian-Lagrangian Localized Adjoint Method (ELLAM) for solute-transport modeling

    Heberton, C.I.; Russell, T.F.; Konikow, L.F.; Hornberger, G.Z.

    2000-01-01

    This report documents the U.S. Geological Survey Eulerian-Lagrangian Localized Adjoint Method (ELLAM) algorithm that solves an integral form of the solute-transport equation, incorporating an implicit-in-time difference approximation for the dispersive and sink terms. Like the algorithm in the original version of the U.S. Geological Survey MOC3D transport model, ELLAM uses a method of characteristics approach to solve the transport equation on the basis of the velocity field. The ELLAM algorithm, however, is based on an integral formulation of conservation of mass and uses appropriate numerical techniques to obtain global conservation of mass. The implicit procedure eliminates several stability criteria required for an explicit formulation. Consequently, ELLAM allows large transport time increments to be used. ELLAM can produce qualitatively good results using a small number of transport time steps. A description of the ELLAM numerical method, the data-input requirements and output options, and the results of simulator testing and evaluation are presented. The ELLAM algorithm was evaluated for the same set of problems used to test and evaluate Version 1 and Version 2 of MOC3D. These test results indicate that ELLAM offers a viable alternative to the explicit and implicit solvers in MOC3D. Its use is desirable when mass balance is imperative or a fast, qualitative model result is needed. Although accurate solutions can be generated using ELLAM, its efficiency relative to the two previously documented solution algorithms is problem dependent.

  17. The Adjoint Method for The Optimization of Brachytherapy and Radiotherapy Patient Treatment Planning Procedures Using Monte Carlo Calculations

    The goal of this project is to investigate the use of the adjoint method, commonly used in the reactor physics community, for the optimization of radiation therapy patient treatment plans. Two different types of radiation therapy are being examined, interstitial brachytherapy and radiotherapy. In brachytherapy radioactive sources are surgically implanted within the diseased organ such as the prostate to treat the cancerous tissue. With radiotherapy, the x-ray source is usually located at a distance of about 1-meter from the patient and focused on the treatment area. For brachytherapy the optimization phase of the treatment plan consists of determining the optimal placement of the radioactive sources, which delivers the prescribed dose to the disease tissue while simultaneously sparing (reducing) the dose to sensitive tissue and organs. For external beam radiation therapy the optimization phase of the treatment plan consists of determining the optimal direction and intensity of beam, which provides complete coverage of the tumor region with the prescribed dose while simultaneously avoiding sensitive tissue areas. For both therapy methods, the optimal treatment plan is one in which the diseased tissue has been treated with the prescribed dose and dose to the sensitive tissue and organs has been kept to a minimum

  18. Radiation flux measuring device

    A radiation flux measuring device is described which employs an attenuator circuit, the output of which is maintained constant, connected to a radiation detector. Means connected to the attenuator circuit produce an output representing the log of the a-c component of the radiation detector, thereby providing a true root mean square logarithmic output

  19. Radiation flux measuring device

    A radiation flux measuring device is described which employs a differential pair of transistors, the output of which is maintained constant, connected to a radiation detector. Means connected to the differential pair produce a signal representing the log of the a-c component of the radiation detector, thereby providing a signal representing the true root mean square logarithmic output. 3 claims, 2 figures

  20. Coupled superconducting flux qubits

    Plantenberg, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents results of theoretical and experimental work on superconducting persistent-current quantum bits. These qubits offer an attractive route towards scalable solid-state quantum computing. The focus of this work is on the gradiometer flux qubit which has a special geometric design, t

  1. Disconnecting Solar Magnetic Flux

    DeForest, C E; McComas, D J

    2011-01-01

    Disconnection of open magnetic flux by reconnection is required to balance the injection of open flux by CMEs and other eruptive events. Making use of recent advances in heliospheric background subtraction, we have imaged many abrupt disconnection events. These events produce dense plasma clouds whose distinctie shape can now be traced from the corona across the inner solar system via heliospheric imaging. The morphology of each initial event is characteristic of magnetic reconnection across a current sheet, and the newly-disconnected flux takes the form of a "U"-shaped loop that moves outward, accreting coronal and solar wind material. We analyzed one such event on 2008 December 18 as it formed and accelerated at 20 m/s^2 to 320 km/s, expanding self-similarly until it exited our field of view 1.2 AU from the Sun. From acceleration and photometric mass estimates we derive the coronal magnetic field strength to be 8uT, 6 Rs above the photosphere, and the entrained flux to be 1.6x10^11 Wb (1.6x10^19 Mx). We mod...

  2. Flux-induced Soft Terms on Type IIB/F-theory Matter Curves and Hypercharge Dependent Scalar Masses

    Camara, Pablo G; Valenzuela, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Closed string fluxes induce generically SUSY-breaking soft terms on supersymmetric type IIB orientifold compactifications with D3/D7 branes. This was studied in the past by inserting those fluxes on the DBI+CS actions for adjoint D3/D7 fields, where D7-branes had no magnetic fluxes. In the present work we generalise those computations to the phenomenologically more relevant case of chiral bi-fundamental fields laying at 7-brane intersections and F-theory local matter curves. We also include the effect of 7-brane magnetic flux as well as more general closed string backgrounds, including the effect of distant (anti-)D3-branes. We discuss several applications of our results. We find that squark/slepton masses become in general flux-dependent in F-theory GUT's. Hypercharge-dependent non-universal scalar masses with a characteristic sfermion hierarchy m_E^2 < m_L^2 < m_Q^2 < m_D^2 < m_U^2 are obtained. There are also flavor-violating soft terms both for matter fields living at intersecting 7-branes or ...

  3. Domain Walls and Flux Tubes in N=2 SQCD D-Brane Prototypes

    Shifman, M

    2003-01-01

    This paper could have been entitled "D branes and strings from flesh and blood." We study field theoretic prototypes of D branes/strings. To this end we consider (2+1)-dimensional domain walls in (3+1)-dimensional N=2 SQCD with SU(2) gauge group and two quark flavors in the fundamental representation. This theory is perturbed by a small mass term of the adjoint matter which, in the leading order in the mass parameter, does not break N=2 supersymmetry, and reduces to a (generalized) Fayet-Iliopoulos term in the effective low-energy N=2 SQED. We find 1/2 BPS-saturated domain wall solution interpolating between two quark vacua at weak coupling, and show that this domain wall localizes a U(1) gauge field. To make contact with the brane/string picture we consider the Abrikosov-Nielsen-Olesen magnetic flux tube in one of two quark vacua and demonstrate that it can end on the domain wall. We find an explicit 1/4 BPS-saturated solution for the wall/flux tube junction. We verify that the end point of the flux tube on ...

  4. Atmospheric lepton fluxes

    Gaisser Thomas K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This review of atmospheric muons and neutrinos emphasizes the high energy range relevant for backgrounds to high-energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin. After a brief historical introduction, the main distinguishing features of atmospheric νμ and νe are discussed, along with the implications of the muon charge ratio for the νµ / ν̅µ ratio. Methods to account for effects of the knee in the primary cosmic-ray spectrum and the energy-dependence of hadronic interactions on the neutrino fluxes are discussed and illustrated in the context of recent results from IceCube. A simple numerical/analytic method is proposed for systematic investigation of uncertainties in neutrino fluxes arising from uncertainties in the primary cosmic-ray spectrum/composition and hadronic interactions.

  5. The forward and adjoint sensitivity methods of glacial isostatic adjustment: Existence, uniqueness and time-differencing scheme

    Martinec, Zdenek; Sasgen, Ingo; Velimsky, Jakub

    2014-05-01

    In this study, two new methods for computing the sensitivity of the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) forward solution with respect to the Earth's mantle viscosity are presented: the forward sensitivity method (FSM) and the adjoint sensitivity method (ASM). These advanced formal methods are based on the time-domain,spectral-finite element method for modelling the GIA response of laterally heterogeneous earth models developed by Martinec (2000). There are many similarities between the forward method and the FSM and ASM for a general physical system. However, in the case of GIA, there are also important differences between the forward and sensitivity methods. The analysis carried out in this study results in the following findings. First, the forward method of GIA is unconditionally solvable, regardless of whether or not a combined ice and ocean-water load contains the first-degree spherical harmonics. This is also the case for the FSM, however, the ASM must in addition be supplemented by nine conditions on the misfit between the given GIA-related data and the forward model predictions to guarantee the existence of a solution. This constrains the definition of data least-squares misfit. Second, the forward method of GIA implements an ocean load as a free boundary-value function over an ocean area with a free geometry. That is, an ocean load and the shape of ocean, the so-called ocean function, are being sought, in addition to deformation and gravity-increment fields, by solving the forward method. The FSM and ASM also apply the adjoint ocean load as a free boundary-value function, but instead over an ocean area with the fixed geometry given by the ocean function determined by the forward method. In other words, a boundary-value problem for the forward method of GIA is free with respect to determining (i) the boundary-value data over an ocean area and (ii) the ocean function itself, while the boundary-value problems for the FSM and ASM are free only with respect to

  6. SUSY SU(5)× S 4 GUT flavor model for fermion masses and mixings with adjoint, large θ 13 PMNS

    Zhao, Ya; Zhang, Peng-Fei

    2016-06-01

    We propose an S 4 flavor model based on supersymmetric (SUSY) SU(5) GUT. The first and third generations of 10 dimensional representations in SU(5) are all assigned to be 11 of S 4. The second generation of 10 is to be 12 of S 4. Right-handed neutrinos of singlet 1 and three generations of overline{mathbf{5}} are all assigned to be 31 of S 4. The VEVs of two sets of flavon fields are allowed a moderate hierarchy, that is ˜ λ c . Tri-Bimaximal (TBM) mixing can be produced at both leading order (LO) and next to next to leading order (NNLO) in neutrino sector. All the masses of up-type quarks are obtained at LO. We also get the bottom-tau unification m τ = m b and the popular Georgi-Jarlskog relation m μ = 3 m s as well as a new mass relation {m}_e=8/27{m}_d in which the novel Clebsch-Gordan (CG) factor arises from the adjoint field H 24. The GUT relation leads to a sizable mixing angle θ 12 e ˜ θ c and the correct quark mixing matrix V CKM can also be realised in the model. The resulting CKM-like mixing matrix of charged leptons modifies the vanishing θ 13 ν in TBM mixing to a large {θ}_{13}^{PMNS}˜eq {θ}_c/√{2} , in excellent agreement with experimental results. A Dirac CP violation phase ϕ 12 ≃ ±π /2 is required to make the deviation from θ 12 ν small. We also present some phenomenological numerical results predicted by the model.

  7. An Adjoint-based Method for the Inversion of the Juno and Cassini Gravity Measurements into Wind Fields

    Galanti, Eli; Kaspi, Yohai

    2016-04-01

    During 2016-17, the Juno and Cassini spacecraft will both perform close eccentric orbits of Jupiter and Saturn, respectively, obtaining high-precision gravity measurements for these planets. These data will be used to estimate the depth of the observed surface flows on these planets. All models to date, relating the winds to the gravity field, have been in the forward direction, thus only allowing the calculation of the gravity field from given wind models. However, there is a need to do the inverse problem since the new observations will be of the gravity field. Here, an inverse dynamical model is developed to relate the expected measurable gravity field, to perturbations of the density and wind fields, and therefore to the observed cloud-level winds. In order to invert the gravity field into the 3D circulation, an adjoint model is constructed for the dynamical model, thus allowing backward integration. This tool is used for the examination of various scenarios, simulating cases in which the depth of the wind depends on latitude. We show that it is possible to use the gravity measurements to derive the depth of the winds, both on Jupiter and Saturn, also taking into account measurement errors. Calculating the solution uncertainties, we show that the wind depth can be determined more precisely in the low-to-mid-latitudes. In addition, the gravitational moments are found to be particularly sensitive to flows at the equatorial intermediate depths. Therefore, we expect that if deep winds exist on these planets they will have a measurable signature by Juno and Cassini.

  8. Multiparameter adjoint tomography of the crust and upper mantle beneath East Asia: 1. Model construction and comparisons

    Chen, Min; Niu, Fenglin; Liu, Qinya; Tromp, Jeroen; Zheng, Xiufen

    2015-03-01

    We present a 3-D radially anisotropic model of the crust and mantle beneath East Asia down to 900 km depth. Adjoint tomography based on a spectral element method is applied to a phenomenal data set comprising 1.7 million frequency-dependent traveltime measurements from waveforms of 227 earthquakes recorded by 1869 stations. Compressional wave speeds are independently constrained and simultaneously inverted along with shear wave speeds (VSH and VSV) using the same waveform data set with comparable resolution. After 20 iterations, the new model (named EARA2014) exhibits sharp and detailed wave speed anomalies with improved correlations with surface tectonic units compared to previous models. In the upper 100 km, high wave speed (high-V) anomalies correlate very well with the Junggar and Tarim Basins, the Ordos Block, and the Yangtze Platform, while strong low wave speed (low-V) anomalies coincide with the Qiangtang Block, the Songpan Ganzi Fold Belt, the Chuandian Block, the Altay-Sayan Mountain Range, and the back-arc basins along the Pacific and Philippine Sea Plate margins. At greater depths, narrow high-V anomalies correspond to major subduction zones and broad high-V anomalies to cratonic roots in the upper mantle and fragmented slabs in the mantle transition zone. In particular, EARA2014 reveals a strong high-V structure beneath Tibet, appearing below 100 km depth and extending to the bottom of the mantle transition zone, and laterally spanning across the Lhasa and Qiangtang Blocks. In this paper we emphasize technical aspects of the model construction and provide a general discussion through comparisons.

  9. Accounting for propagation outside of the model boundaries in regional full waveform inversion based on adjoint methods

    Masson, Y.; Pierre, C.; Romanowicz, B. A.; French, S. W.; Yuan, H.

    2014-12-01

    Yuan et al. (2013) developed a 3D radially anisotropic shear wave model of North America (NA) upper mantle based on full waveform tomography, combining teleseismic and regional distance data sampling the NA. In this model, synthetic seismograms associated with regional events (i.e. events located inside in the region imaged NA) were computed exactly using the Spectral Element method (Cupillard et al., 2012), while, synthetic seismograms associated with teleseismic events were performed approximately using non-linear asymptotic coupling theory (NACT, Li and Romanowicz, 1995). Both the regional and the teleseismic dataset have been inverted using approximate sensitivity kernels based upon normal mode theory. Our objective is to improve our current model and to build the next generation model of NA by introducing new methodological developments (Masson et al., 2014) that allow us to compute exact synthetic seismograms as well as adjoint sensitivity kernels associated with teleseismic events, using mostly regional computations of wave propagation. The principle of the method is to substitute a teleseismic source (i.e. an earthquake) by an "equivalent" set of seismic sources acting on the boundaries of the region to be imaged that is producing exactly the same wavefield. Computing the equivalent set of sources associated with each one of the teleseismic events requires a few global simulations of the seismic wavefield that can be done once for all, prior to the regional inversion. Then, the regional full waveform inversion can be preformed using regional simulations only. We present a 3D model of NA demonstrating the advantages of the proposed method.

  10. Quantifying the temporal and spatial sensitivity of forecast storm surge to initial and boundary forcing using the novel technique of adjoint modelling

    Wilson, C.; Horsburgh, K. J.; Williams, J. A.

    2012-04-01

    Adjoint modelling has only been adopted in atmospheric and large-scale ocean modelling within the last few years. For the first time this study applies it to tide-surge modelling in the coastal region to gain new insight into dynamics and predictability. In order to improve the skill of storm surge forecasts, one needs to understand how uncertainty propagates through the dynamical system from its boundary conditions, through physical parameterisations and how it is modified by the system dynamics. Uncertainty can come from many sources. Here, we aim to determine the sensitivity of forecast coastal sea level in a tide-surge model to infinitesimal perturbations of two such sources: wind stress and bottom drag. We aim to answer two key questions: 1. What are the relative roles of uncertainties in wind stress and bottom drag in causing changes in forecast coastal sea level? 2. For such changes, what are the temporal and spatial scales over which the sensitivities are largest? The existing approach to answer these questions is to use forward ensemble experiments to explore the propagation of uncertainty due to small perturbations of each of the parameters at several locations and at several times. However, to cover all parameters, spatial and temporal scales would require an ensemble with many thousands or millions of members in order to produce sensitivity maps and time-series and may still not capture all the sensitivity due to gaps in the choice of perturbation directions. We apply a new technique, adjoint modelling, which can produce sensitivity information with a single model integration. The adjoint of a tide-surge model based on MITgcm is used to examine coastal storm surge sensitivities to wind stress and bottom drag for an extreme event on the northwest European continental shelf on 9th November 2007. The forward model is first validated against the UK operational tide-surge model and observations, and then the adjoint is constructed using algorithmic automatic

  11. Simulation of atmospheric N2O with GEOS-Chem and its adjoint: evaluation of observational constraints

    K. C. Wells; Millet, D. B.; Bousserez, N.; D. K. Henze; Chaliyakunnel, S.; T. J. Griffis; Luan, Y.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; R. G. Prinn; S. O'Doherty; R. F. Weiss; G. S. Dutton; Elkins, J. W.; Krummel, P. B.; Langenfelds, R.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a new 4D-Var inversion framework for nitrous oxide (N2O) based on the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint, and apply it in a series of observing system simulation experiments to assess how well N2O sources and sinks can be constrained by the current global observing network. The employed measurement ensemble includes approximately weekly and quasi-continuous N2O measurements (hourly averages used) from several long-term monitoring networks, N2O mea...

  12. On Hermitian separability of the next-to-leading order BFKL kernel for the adjoint representation of the gauge group in the planar N=4 SYM

    Fadin, V. S.; Fiore, R.

    2016-05-01

    We analyze a modification of the BFKL kernel for the adjoint representation of the color group in the maximally supersymmetric (N=4) Yang-Mills theory in the limit of a large number of colors, related to the modification of the eigenvalues of the kernel suggested by Bondarenko and Prygarin in order to obtain Hermitian separability of the eigenvalues. We restore the modified kernel in the momentum space. It turns out that the modification is related only to the real part of the kernel and that the correction to the kernel cannot be presented by a single analytic function in the entire momentum region, which contradicts the known properties of the kernel.

  13. On the Similarity of Sturm-Liouville Operators with Non-Hermitian Boundary Conditions to Self-Adjoint and Normal Operators

    Krejčiřík, David; Siegl, Petr; Železný, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2014), s. 255-281. ISSN 1661-8254 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06002; GA MŠk LC527; GA ČR GAP203/11/0701 Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GD202/08/H072 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Sturm-Liouville operators * non-symmetric Robin boundary conditions * similarity to normal or self-adjoint operators * discrete spectral operator * complex symmetric operator * PT-symmetry * metric operator * C operator * Hilbert-Schmidt operators Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 0.545, year: 2014

  14. Necessary and Sufficient Condition for Adjoint Uniqueness of the Graph(Ui∈APi)U(Uj∈BUj)%图(∪i∈APi )∪(∪Uj∈BUj )伴随唯一的充要条件

    王建丰; 黄琼湘; 刘儒英; 冶成福

    2008-01-01

    For a graph G,let h(G;x)=h(G)and[G]h denote the adjoint polynomial and the adjoint equivalence class of G,respectively.In this paper,a new application of[G]h is given.Making use of[G]h,we give a necessary and suffcient condition for adjoint uniqueness of the graph H such that H≠G,where H=(Ui∈APi)U(Uj∈BUj),A(∈)A'={1,2,3,5}U{2n|n∈N,n≥3},B(∈)B'={7,2n|n∈N,n(>)5)and G=a p1UaoP2Ua1P3Ua2P5U(U(n i)=3aiP2i).

  15. Critical heat flux evaluation

    Critical heat flux (CHF) is of importance for nuclear safety and represents the major limiting factors for reactor cores. Critical heat flux is caused by a sharp reduction in the heat transfer coefficient located at the outer surface of fuel rods. Safety requires that this phenomenon also called the boiling crisis should be precluded under nominal or incidental conditions (Class I and II events). CHF evaluation in reactor cores is basically a two-step approach. Fuel assemblies are first tested in experimental loops in order to determine CHF limits under various flow conditions. Then, core thermal-hydraulic calculations are performed for safety evaluation. The paper will go into more details about the boiling crisis in order to pinpoint complexity and lack of fundamental understanding in many areas. Experimental test sections needed to collect data over wide thermal-hydraulic and geometric ranges are described CHF safety margin evaluation in reactors cores is discussed by presenting how uncertainties are mentioned. From basic considerations to current concerns, the following topics are discussed; knowledge of the boiling crisis, CHF predictors, and advances thermal-hydraulic codes. (authors). 15 refs., 4 figs

  16. Computing the Flux Footprint

    Wilson, J. D.

    2015-07-01

    We address the flux footprint for measurement heights in the atmospheric surface layer, comparing eddy diffusion solutions with those furnished by the first-order Lagrangian stochastic (or "generalized Langevin") paradigm. The footprint given by Langevin models differs distinctly from that given by the random displacement model (i.e. zeroth-order Lagrangian stochastic model) corresponding to its "diffusion limit," which implies that a well-founded theory of the flux footprint must incorporate the turbulent velocity autocovariance. But irrespective of the choice of the eddy diffusion or Langevin class of model as basis for the footprint, tuning relative to observations is ultimately necessary. Some earlier treatments assume Monin-Obukhov profiles for the mean wind and eddy diffusivity and that the effective Schmidt number (ratio of eddy viscosity to the tracer eddy diffusivity) in the neutral limit , while others calibrate the model to the Project Prairie Grass dispersion trials. Because there remains uncertainty as to the optimal specification of (or a related parameter in alternative theories, e.g. the Kolmogorov coefficient in Langevin models) it is recommended that footprint models should be explicit in this regard.

  17. Adjoint sensitivity analysis procedure of Markov chains with applications on reliability of IFMIF accelerator-system facilities

    This work presents the implementation of the Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis Procedure (ASAP) for the Continuous Time, Discrete Space Markov chains (CTMC), as an alternative to the other computational expensive methods. In order to develop this procedure as an end product in reliability studies, the reliability of the physical systems is analyzed using a coupled Fault-Tree - Markov chain technique, i.e. the abstraction of the physical system is performed using as the high level interface the Fault-Tree and afterwards this one is automatically converted into a Markov chain. The resulting differential equations based on the Markov chain model are solved in order to evaluate the system reliability. Further sensitivity analyses using ASAP applied to CTMC equations are performed to study the influence of uncertainties in input data to the reliability measures and to get the confidence in the final reliability results. The methods to generate the Markov chain and the ASAP for the Markov chain equations have been implemented into the new computer code system QUEFT/MARKOMAGS/MCADJSEN for reliability and sensitivity analysis of physical systems. The validation of this code system has been carried out by using simple problems for which analytical solutions can be obtained. Typical sensitivity results show that the numerical solution using ASAP is robust, stable and accurate. The method and the code system developed during this work can be used further as an efficient and flexible tool to evaluate the sensitivities of reliability measures for any physical system analyzed using the Markov chain. Reliability and sensitivity analyses using these methods have been performed during this work for the IFMIF Accelerator System Facilities. The reliability studies using Markov chain have been concentrated around the availability of the main subsystems of this complex physical system for a typical mission time. The sensitivity studies for two typical responses using ASAP have been

  18. Adjoint-based estimation of plate coupling in a non-linear mantle flow model: theory and examples

    Ratnaswamy, Vishagan; Stadler, Georg; Gurnis, Michael

    2015-08-01

    We develop and validate a systematic approach to infer plate boundary strength and rheological parameters in models of mantle flow from surface velocity observations. Based on a realistic rheological model that includes yielding and strain rate weakening from dislocation creep, we formulate the inverse problem in a Bayesian inference framework. To study the distribution of parameters that are consistent with the observations, we compute the maximum a posteriori (MAP) point, Gaussian approximations of the parameter distribution around that MAP point, and employ Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The computation of the MAP point and the Gaussian approximation require first and second derivatives of an objective function subject to non-linear Stokes equations; these derivatives are computed efficiently using adjoint Stokes equations. We set up 2-D numerical experiments with many of the elements expected in a global geophysical inversion. This setup incorporates three subduction zones with slab and weak zone (interplate fault) geometry consistent with average seismic characteristics. With these experiments, we demonstrate that when the temperature field is known, we can recover the strength of plate boundaries, the yield stress and strain rate exponent in the upper mantle. When the number of uncertain parameters increases, there are trade-offs between the inferred parameters. These trade-offs depend on how well the observational data represents the surface velocities, and on the weakness of plate boundaries. As the plate boundary coupling drops below a threshold, the uncertainty of the inferred parameters increases due to insensitivity of plate motion to plate coupling. Comparing the trade-offs between inferred rheological parameters found from the Gaussian approximation of the parameter distribution and from MCMC sampling, we conclude that the Gaussian approximation-which is significantly cheaper to compute-is often a good approximation, in particular

  19. The application of the gradient-based adjoint multi-point optimization of single and double shock control bumps for transonic airfoils

    Mazaheri, K.; Nejati, A.; Chaharlang Kiani, K.; Taheri, R.

    2015-08-01

    A shock control bump (SCB) is a flow control method which uses local small deformations in a flexible wing surface to considerably reduce the strength of shock waves and the resulting wave drag in transonic flows. Most of the reported research is devoted to optimization in a single flow condition. Here, we have used a multi-point adjoint optimization scheme to optimize shape and location of the SCB. Practically, this introduces transonic airfoils equipped with the SCB which are simultaneously optimized for different off-design transonic flight conditions. Here, we use this optimization algorithm to enhance and optimize the performance of SCBs in two benchmark airfoils, i.e., RAE-2822 and NACA-64A010, over a wide range of off-design Mach numbers. All results are compared with the usual single-point optimization. We use numerical simulation of the turbulent viscous flow and a gradient-based adjoint algorithm to find the optimum location and shape of the SCB. We show that the application of SCBs may increase the aerodynamic performance of an RAE-2822 airfoil by 21.9 and by 22.8 % for a NACA-64A010 airfoil compared to the no-bump design in a particular flight condition. We have also investigated the simultaneous usage of two bumps for the upper and the lower surfaces of the airfoil. This has resulted in a 26.1 % improvement for the RAE-2822 compared to the clean airfoil in one flight condition.

  20. Adjoint based optimal control of partially miscible two-phase flow in porous media with applications to CO2 sequestration in underground reservoirs

    Simon, Moritz

    2014-11-14

    © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media New York. With the target of optimizing CO2 sequestration in underground reservoirs, we investigate constrained optimal control problems with partially miscible two-phase flow in porous media. Our objective is to maximize the amount of trapped CO2 in an underground reservoir after a fixed period of CO2 injection, while time-dependent injection rates in multiple wells are used as control parameters. We describe the governing two-phase two-component Darcy flow PDE system, formulate the optimal control problem and derive the continuous adjoint equations. For the discretization we apply a variant of the so-called BOX method, a locally conservative control-volume FE method that we further stabilize by a periodic averaging feature to reduce oscillations. The timestep-wise Lagrange function of the control problem is implemented as a variational form in Sundance, a toolbox for rapid development of parallel FE simulations, which is part of the HPC software Trilinos. We discuss the BOX method and our implementation in Sundance. The MPI parallelized Sundance state and adjoint solvers are linked to the interior point optimization package IPOPT, using limited-memory BFGS updates for approximating second derivatives. Finally, we present and discuss different types of optimal control results.

  1. California's Future Carbon Flux

    Xu, L.; Pyles, R. D.; Paw U, K.; Gertz, M.

    2008-12-01

    The diversity of the climate and vegetation systems in the state of California provides a unique opportunity to study carton dioxide exchange between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere. In order to accurately calculate the carbon flux, this study couples the sophisticated analytical surface layer model ACASA (Advance Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm, developed in the University of California, Davis) with the newest version of mesoscale model WRF (the Weather Research & Forecasting Model, developed by NCAR and several other agencies). As a multilayer, steady state model, ACASA incorporates higher-order representations of vertical temperature variations, CO2 concentration, radiation, wind speed, turbulent statistics, and plant physiology. The WRF-ACASA coupling is designed to identify how multiple environmental factors, in particularly climate variability, population density, and vegetation distribution, impact on future carbon cycle prediction across a wide geographical range such as in California.

  2. Photospheric flux cancellation and associated flux rope formation and eruption

    Green, L M; Wallace, A J; 10.1051/0004-6361/201015146

    2010-01-01

    We study an evolving bipolar active region that exhibits flux cancellation at the internal polarity inversion line, the formation of a soft X-ray sigmoid along the inversion line and a coronal mass ejection. The evolution of the photospheric magnetic field is described and used to estimate how much flux is reconnected into the flux rope. About one third of the active region flux cancels at the internal polarity inversion line in the 2.5~days leading up to the eruption. In this period, the coronal structure evolves from a weakly to a highly sheared arcade and then to a sigmoid that crosses the inversion line in the inverse direction. These properties suggest that a flux rope has formed prior to the eruption. The amount of cancellation implies that up to 60% of the active region flux could be in the body of the flux rope. We point out that only part of the cancellation contributes to the flux in the rope if the arcade is only weakly sheared, as in the first part of the evolution. This reduces the estimated flux...

  3. Quantitative Flux Ecoregions for AmeriFlux Using MODIS

    Hoffman, F. M.; Hargrove, W. W.

    2004-12-01

    Multivariate Geographic Clustering was used with maps of climate, soils, and physiography and MODIS remotely sensed data products to statistically produce a series of the 90 most-different homogeneous flux-relevant ecoregions in the conterminous United States using a parallel supercomputer. Nine separate sets of flux ecoregions were produced; only two will be discussed here. Both the IB and IIIB maps were quantitatively constructed from subsets of the input data integrated during the local growing season (frost-free period) in every 1 km cell. Each map is shown two ways --- once with the 90 flux ecoregions colored randomly, and once using color combinations derived statistically from the first three Principal Component Axes. Although the underlying flux ecoregion polygons are the same in both cases, the statistically derived colors show the similarity of conditions within each flux ecoregion. Coloring the same map in this way shows the continuous gradient of changing flux environments across the US. The IB map, since it considers only abiotic environmental factors, represents flux-ecoregions based on potential vegetation. The IIIB map, since it contains remotely sensed MODIS information about existing vegetation, includes the effects of natural and anthropogenic disturbance, and represents actual or realized flux ecoregions. Thus, differences between the maps are attributable to human activity and natural disturbances. The addition of information on existing vegetation exerts a unifying effect on abiotic-only flux ecoregions. The Mississippi Valley and Corn Belt areas show large differences between the two maps. Map IIIB shows a mosaic of ``speckles'' in areas of intense human land use, ostensibly from disturbances like agriculture, irrigation, fertilization, and clearing. Such ``speckles'' are absent from areas devoid of intense human land use. Major cities are also evident in the IIIB map. We will use the quantitative similarity of the suite of flux

  4. Optimal fluxes and Reynolds stresses

    Jimenez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    It is remarked that fluxes in conservation laws, such as the Reynolds stresses in the momentum equation of turbulent shear flows, or the spectral energy flux in isotropic turbulence, are only defined up to an arbitrary solenoidal field. While this is not usually significant for long-time averages, it becomes important when fluxes are modelled locally in large-eddy simulations, or in the analysis of intermittency and cascades. As an example, a numerical procedure is introduced to compute fluxes in scalar conservation equations in such a way that their total integrated magnitude is minimised. The result is an irrotational vector field that derives from a potential, thus minimising sterile flux `circuits'. The algorithm is generalised to tensor fluxes and applied to the transfer of momentum in a turbulent channel. The resulting instantaneous Reynolds stresses are compared with their traditional expressions, and found to be substantially different.

  5. Vorticity flux from active dimples

    McKeon, Beverley; Sherwin, Spencer; Morrison, Jonathan

    2004-11-01

    The effect of surface depressions, or dimples, in reducing drag on golf balls is well-known. Here this concept is extended to using ``active" dimples to manipulate vorticity flux at the wall. Surface vorticity flux is governed by surface accelerations, pressure and shear stress gradients, and surface curvature. ``Active" (or vibrating) dimples may generate vorticity flux by each of these terms, making them an excellent candidate for a basic study of flux manipulation, by which flow control may be achieved. Flow over an active dimple in fully-developed laminar channel flow is simulated with velocity boundary conditions developed from a linearized perturbation method imposed at the wall. This simple model cannot capture flow separation, but gives insight into the most straightforward means of flux generation from the concave surface. Vorticity flux due to dimple geometry and motion is quantified, and enhancements of two to three orders of magnitude in peak vorticity over the static dimple case are observed.

  6. Heat Flux Apportionment to Heterogeneous Surfaces Using Flux Footprint Analysis

    2008-01-01

    Heat flux data collected from the Baiyangdian Heterogeneous Field Experiment were analyzed using the footprint method. High resolution (25 m) Landsat-5 satellite imaging was used to determine the land cover as one of four surface types: farmland, lake, wetland, or village. Data from two observation sites in September 2005 were used. One site (Wangjiazhai) was characterized by highly heterogeneous surfaces in the central area of the Baiyangdian: lake/wetland. The other site (Xiongxian) was on land with more uniform surface cover. An improved Eulerian analytical flux footprint model was used to determine "source areas" of the heat fluxes measured at towers located at each site from surrounding landscapes of mixed surface types.In relative terms results show that wetland and lake areas generally contributed most to the observed heat flux at Wangjiazhai, while farmland contributed most at Xiongxian. Given the areal distribution of surface type contributions, calculations were made to obtain the magnitudes of the heat flux from lake, wetland and farmland to the total observed flux and apportioned contributions of each surface type to the sensible and latent heat fluxes. Results show that on average the sensible heat flux from wetland and farmland were comparable over the diurnal cycle, while the latent heat flux from farmland was somewhat larger by about 30-50 W m-2 during daytime. The latent and sensible fluxes from the lake source in daytime were about 50 W m-2 and 100 W m-2 less, respectively, than from wetland and farmland. The results are judged reasonable and serve to demonstrate the potential for flux apportionment over heterogeneous surfaces.

  7. Adjoint Fermion Matrix Models

    Makeenko, Yu.; Zarembo, K.

    1993-01-01

    We study fermionic one-matrix, two-matrix and $D$-dimensional gauge invariant matrix models. In all cases we derive loop equations which unambiguously determine the large-$N$ solution. For the one-matrix case the solution is obtained for an arbitrary interaction potential and turns out to be equivalent to the one for the Hermitean one-matrix model with a logarithmic potential and, therefore, belongs to the same universality class. The explicit solutions for the fermionic two-matrix and $D$-di...

  8. Heat Flux Instrumentation Laboratory (HFIL)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The Heat Flux Instrumentation Laboratory is used to develop advanced, flexible, thin film gauge instrumentation for the Air Force Research Laboratory....

  9. Data Acquisition and Flux Calculations

    Rebmann, C.; Kolle, O; Heinesch, B;

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, the basic theory and the procedures used to obtain turbulent fluxes of energy, mass, and momentum with the eddy covariance technique will be detailed. This includes a description of data acquisition, pretreatment of high-frequency data and flux calculation.......In this chapter, the basic theory and the procedures used to obtain turbulent fluxes of energy, mass, and momentum with the eddy covariance technique will be detailed. This includes a description of data acquisition, pretreatment of high-frequency data and flux calculation....

  10. Methane flux from wetlands areas

    BAKER-BLOCKER, ANITA; Donahue, Thomas M.; MANCY, KHALIL H.

    2011-01-01

    Ebullient gases from Michigan wetlands have been collected and analyzed to deduce in situ methane fluxes. Methane flux has been found to be a function of mean air temperature. This relationship has been utilized to extrapolate observed methane fluxes to estimates of fluxes from the Pripet marshes, Sudd, Everglades, and Ugandan swamps. These four wetlands together provide a yearly source of 6.8 × 1013 g of methane to the atmosphere.DOI: 10.1111/j.2153-3490.1977.tb00731.x

  11. KoFlux: Korean Regional Flux Network in AsiaFlux

    Kim, J.

    2002-12-01

    AsiaFlux, the Asian arm of FLUXNET, held the Second International Workshop on Advanced Flux Network and Flux Evaluation in Jeju Island, Korea on 9-11 January 2002. In order to facilitate comprehensive Asia-wide studies of ecosystem fluxes, the meeting launched KoFlux, a new Korean regional network of long-term micrometeorological flux sites. For a successful assessment of carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere, an accurate measurement of surface fluxes of energy and water is one of the prerequisites. During the 7th Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Asian Monsoon Experiment (GAME) held in Nagoya, Japan on 1-2 October 2001, the Implementation Committee of the Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period (CEOP) was established. One of the immediate tasks of CEOP was and is to identify the reference sites to monitor energy and water fluxes over the Asian continent. Subsequently, to advance the regional and global network of these reference sites in the context of both FLUXNET and CEOP, the Korean flux community has re-organized the available resources to establish a new regional network, KoFlux. We have built up domestic network sites (equipped with wind profiler and radiosonde measurements) over deciduous and coniferous forests, urban and rural rice paddies and coastal farmland. As an outreach through collaborations with research groups in Japan, China and Thailand, we also proposed international flux sites at ecologically and climatologically important locations such as a prairie on the Tibetan plateau, tropical forest with mixed and rapid land use change in northern Thailand. Several sites in KoFlux already begun to accumulate interesting data and some highlights are presented at the meeting. The sciences generated by flux networks in other continents have proven the worthiness of a global array of micrometeorological flux towers. It is our intent that the launch of KoFlux would encourage other scientists to initiate and

  12. Interpreting Flux from Broadband Photometry

    Brown, Peter J; Roming, Peter W A; Siegel, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the transformation of observed photometry into flux for the creation of spectral energy distributions and the computation of bolometric luminosities. We do this in the context of supernova studies, particularly as observed with the Swift spacecraft, but the concepts and techniques should be applicable to many other types of sources and wavelength regimes. Traditional methods of converting observed magnitudes to flux densities are not very accurate when applied to UV photometry. Common methods for extinction and the integration of pseudo-bolometric fluxes can also lead to inaccurate results. The sources of inaccuracy, though, also apply to other wavelengths. Because of the complicated nature of translating broad-band photometry into monochromatic flux densities, comparison between observed photometry and a spectroscopic model is best done by comparing in the natural units of the observations. We recommend that integrated flux measurements be made using a spectrum or spectral energy distribution whic...

  13. Nonlocality, Self-Adjointness and Theta-Vacuum in Quantum Field Theory in Spaces with Nontrivial Topology

    Sitenko, Yu. A.

    1997-01-01

    We consider an analogue of the Aharonov-Bohm effect in quantum field theory: the fermionic vacuum attains nontrivial quantum numbers in the background of a magnetic vortex even in the case when the spatial region of nonvanishing external field strength is excluded. The dependence of the vacuum quantum numbers on the value of the vortex flux and the choice of the condition on the boundary of the excluded region is determined.

  14. A Schauder and Riesz basis criterion for non-self-adjoint Schrödinger operators with periodic and antiperiodic boundary conditions

    Gesztesy, Fritz; Tkachenko, Vadim

    Under the assumption that V∈L2([0,π];dx), we derive necessary and sufficient conditions in terms of spectral data for (non-self-adjoint) Schrödinger operators -d2/dx2+V in L2([0,π];dx) with periodic and antiperiodic boundary conditions to possess a Riesz basis of root vectors (i.e., eigenvectors and generalized eigenvectors spanning the range of the Riesz projection associated with the corresponding periodic and antiperiodic eigenvalues). We also discuss the case of a Schauder basis for periodic and antiperiodic Schrödinger operators -d2/dx2+V in Lp([0,π];dx), p∈(1,∞).

  15. BFKL equation for the adjoint representation of the gauge group in the next-to-leading approximation at N=4 SUSY

    Fadin, V.S. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Budker Nuclear Physics Institute, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Lipatov, L.N. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); St. Petersburg State Univ., Gatchina (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    We calculate the eigenvalues of the next-to-leading kernel for the BFKL equation in the adjoint representation of the gauge group SU(N{sub c}) in the N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills model. These eigenvalues are used to obtain the high energy behavior of the remainder function for the 6-point scattering amplitude with the maximal helicity violation in the kinematical regions containing the Mandelstam cut contribution. The leading and next-to-leading singularities of the corresponding collinear anomalous dimension are calculated in all orders of perturbation theory. We compare our result with the known collinear limit and with the recently suggested ansatz for the remainder function in three loops and obtain the full agreement providing that the numerical parameters in this anzatz are chosen in an appropriate way.

  16. On Hermitian separability of the next-to-leading order BFKL kernel for the adjoint representation of the gauge group in the planar N = 4 SYM

    Fadin, V S

    2015-01-01

    We analyze a modification of the BFKL kernel for the adjoint representation of the colour group in the maximally supersymmetric (N=4) Yang-Mills theory in the limit of a large number of colours, related to the modification of the eigenvalues of the kernel suggested by S. Bondarenko and A. Prygarin in order to reach the Hermitian separability of the eigenvalues. We restore the modified kernel in the momentum space. It turns out that the modification is related only to the real part of the kernel and that the correction to the kernel can not be presented by a single analytic function in the entire momentum region, which contradicts the known properties of the kernel.

  17. On a residual freedom of the next-to-leading BFKL eigenvalue in color adjoint representation in planar $\\mathcal{N} = 4$ SYM

    Bondarenko, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a residual freedom of the next-to-leading BFKL eigenvalue that originates from ambiguity in redistributing the next-to-leading~(NLO) corrections between the adjoint BFKL eigenvalue and eigenfunctions in planar $\\mathcal{N}=4$ super-Yang-Mills~(SYM) Theory. In terms of the remainder function of the Bern-Dixon-Smirnov~(BDS) amplitude this freedom is translated to reshuffling correction between the eigenvalue and the impact factors in the multi-Regge kinematics~(MRK) in the next-to-leading logarithm approximation~(NLA). We show that the modified NLO BFKL eigenvalue suggested by the authors can be introduced in the MRK expression for the remainder function by shifting the anomalous dimension in the impact factor in such a way that the two and three loop remainder function is left unchanged to the NLA accuracy.

  18. The Berry-Keating operator on L{sup 2}(R{sub >},dx) and on compact quantum graphs with general self-adjoint realizations

    Endres, Sebastian; Steiner, Frank, E-mail: sebastian.endres@uni-ulm.d, E-mail: frank.steiner@uni-ulm.d [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Ulm Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89081 Ulm (Germany)

    2010-03-05

    The Berry-Keating operator H{sub BK} := -i h-bar (x d/dx + 1/2) (Berry and Keating 1999 SIAM Rev. 41 236) governing the Schroedinger dynamics is discussed in the Hilbert space L{sup 2}(R{sub >},dx) and on compact quantum graphs. It has been proved that the spectrum of H{sub BK} defined on L{sup 2}(R{sub >},dx) is purely continuous and thus this quantization of H{sub BK} cannot yield the hypothetical Hilbert-Polya operator possessing as eigenvalues the nontrivial zeros of the Riemann zeta function. A complete classification of all self-adjoint extensions of H{sub BK} acting on compact quantum graphs is given together with the corresponding secular equation in form of a determinant whose zeros determine the discrete spectrum of H{sub BK}. In addition, an exact trace formula and the Weyl asymptotics of the eigenvalue counting function are derived. Furthermore, we introduce the 'squared' Berry-Keating operator H{sub BK}{sup 2} := -x{sup 2} d{sup 2}/dx{sup 2} -2x d/dx - 1/4 which is a special case of the Black-Scholes operator used in financial theory of option pricing. Again, all self-adjoint extensions, the corresponding secular equation, the trace formula and the Weyl asymptotics are derived for H{sup 2}{sub BK} on compact quantum graphs. While the spectra of both H{sub BK} and H{sup 2}{sub BK} on any compact quantum graph are discrete, their Weyl asymptotics demonstrate that neither H{sub BK} nor H{sup 2}{sub BK} can yield as eigenvalues the nontrivial Riemann zeros. Some simple examples are worked out in detail.

  19. The Berry-Keating operator on L^2({\\mathbb R}_\\gt,dx) and on compact quantum graphs with general self-adjoint realizations

    Endres, Sebastian; Steiner, Frank

    2010-03-01

    The Berry-Keating operator H_{BK}:= -i\\hbar \\big(x\\frac{d}{dx}+\\frac{1}{2}\\big) (Berry and Keating 1999 SIAM Rev. 41 236) governing the Schrödinger dynamics is discussed in the Hilbert space L^2({\\mathbb R}_\\gt,dx) and on compact quantum graphs. It has been proved that the spectrum of HBK defined on L^2({\\mathbb R}_\\gt,dx) is purely continuous and thus this quantization of HBK cannot yield the hypothetical Hilbert-Polya operator possessing as eigenvalues the nontrivial zeros of the Riemann zeta function. A complete classification of all self-adjoint extensions of HBK acting on compact quantum graphs is given together with the corresponding secular equation in form of a determinant whose zeros determine the discrete spectrum of HBK. In addition, an exact trace formula and the Weyl asymptotics of the eigenvalue counting function are derived. Furthermore, we introduce the 'squared' Berry-Keating operator H_{BK}^2:= -x^2\\frac{d^2}{dx^2}-2x\\frac{d}{dx}-\\frac{1}{4} which is a special case of the Black-Scholes operator used in financial theory of option pricing. Again, all self-adjoint extensions, the corresponding secular equation, the trace formula and the Weyl asymptotics are derived for H2BK on compact quantum graphs. While the spectra of both HBK and H2BK on any compact quantum graph are discrete, their Weyl asymptotics demonstrate that neither HBK nor H2BK can yield as eigenvalues the nontrivial Riemann zeros. Some simple examples are worked out in detail.

  20. The Berry-Keating operator on L2(R>,dx) and on compact quantum graphs with general self-adjoint realizations

    The Berry-Keating operator HBK := -i h-bar (x d/dx + 1/2) (Berry and Keating 1999 SIAM Rev. 41 236) governing the Schroedinger dynamics is discussed in the Hilbert space L2(R>,dx) and on compact quantum graphs. It has been proved that the spectrum of HBK defined on L2(R>,dx) is purely continuous and thus this quantization of HBK cannot yield the hypothetical Hilbert-Polya operator possessing as eigenvalues the nontrivial zeros of the Riemann zeta function. A complete classification of all self-adjoint extensions of HBK acting on compact quantum graphs is given together with the corresponding secular equation in form of a determinant whose zeros determine the discrete spectrum of HBK. In addition, an exact trace formula and the Weyl asymptotics of the eigenvalue counting function are derived. Furthermore, we introduce the 'squared' Berry-Keating operator HBK2 := -x2 d2/dx2 -2x d/dx - 1/4 which is a special case of the Black-Scholes operator used in financial theory of option pricing. Again, all self-adjoint extensions, the corresponding secular equation, the trace formula and the Weyl asymptotics are derived for H2BK on compact quantum graphs. While the spectra of both HBK and H2BK on any compact quantum graph are discrete, their Weyl asymptotics demonstrate that neither HBK nor H2BK can yield as eigenvalues the nontrivial Riemann zeros. Some simple examples are worked out in detail.

  1. An Application of the Adjoint Method to a Statistical-Dynamical Tropical-Cyclone Prediction Model (SD-90) Ⅱ: Real Tropical Cyclone Cases

    2006-01-01

    In the first paper in this series, a variational data assimilation of ideal tropical cyclone (TC) tracks was performed for the statistical-dynamical prediction model SD-90 by the adjoint method, and a prediction of TC tracks was made with good accuracy for tracks containing no sharp turns. In the present paper, the cases of real TC tracks are studied. Due to the complexity of TC motion, attention is paid to the diagnostic research of TC motion. First, five TC tracks are studied. Using the data of each entire TC track, by the adjoint method, five TC tracks are fitted well, and the forces acting on the TCs are retrieved. For a given TC, the distribution of the resultant of the retrieved force and Coriolis force well matches the corresponding TC track, i.e., when a TC turns, the resultant of the retrieved force and Coriolis force acts as a centripetal force, which means that the TC indeed moves like a particle; in particular, for TC 9911, the clockwise looping motion is also fitted well. And the distribution of the resultant appears to be periodic in some cases. Then, the present method is carried out for a portion of the track data for TC 9804, which indicates that when the amount of data for a TC track is sufficient, the algorithm is stable. And finally, the same algorithm is implemented for TCs with a double-eyewall structure, namely Bilis (2000) and Winnie (1997),and the results prove the applicability of the algorithm to TCs with complicated mesoscale structures if the TC track data are obtained every three hours.

  2. Inferring the depth of the atmospheric circulation on Jupiter and Saturn through gravity measurements by Juno and Cassini and an adjoint based dynamical model

    Galanti, Eli; Kaspi, Yohai

    2014-05-01

    In approximately three years Juno and Cassini will both perform close flybys of Jupiter and Saturn respectively, obtaining a high precision gravity spectrum for these planets. This data can be used to estimate the depth of the observed flows on these planets. Here we use a hierarchy of dynamical models in order to relate the three-dimensional flow to perturbations of the density field, and therefore to the gravity field. The models are set up to allow either zonal flow only, or a full horizontal flow in both zonal and meridional directions based on the observed cloud-level winds. In addition, dynamical perturbations resulting from the the non-spherical shape of the planets are accounted for.In order to invert the gravity field to be measured by Juno and Cassini into the 3D circulation, an adjoint model is constructed for the dynamical model, thus allowing backward integration of the dynamical model. This tool can be used for examination of various scenarios, including cases in which the depth of the winds depend on latitudinal position. We show that given the expected sensitivities of Juno and Cassini, it is possible to use the gravity measurements to derive the depth of the winds, both on Jupiter and Saturn. This hold for a large range of zonal wind possible penetration depths, from ~100km to ~10000km, and for winds depth that vary with latitude. This method proves to be useful also when Incorporating the full horizontal flow, and thus taking into account gravity perturbations that vary with longitude. We show that our adjoint based inversion method allows not only to estimate the depth of the circulation, but allows via iterations with the spacecraft trajectory estimation model to improve the inferred gravity field.

  3. Small helical flux compression amplifiers

    Small, explosively compressed, magnetic flux transducers with many closely spaced helical turns are investigated theoretically and experimentally. The analysis is limited to linear operation, but takes into account load influence, proximity effects, and switching delays. The latter are due to retarded breakdown in the wire insulation and to the finite decay time of the magnetic field in the wire. More than 150 experiments showed considerable data scatter. Shots which exhibited low clocking and high amplification were in good agreement with the theory. The main conclusion is that device performance is limited not only by flux loss, but by flux remaining in the generator after compression

  4. Generalised Geometry and Flux Vacua

    Larfors, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    This note discusses the connection between generalised geometry and flux compactifications of string theory. Firstly, we explain in a pedestrian manner how the supersymmetry constraints of type II ${\\mathcal{N}}=1$ flux compactifications can be restated as integrability constraints on certain generalised complex structures. This reformulation uses generalised complex geometry, a mathematical framework that geometrizes the B-field. Secondly, we discuss how exceptional generalised geometry may provide a similar geometrization of the RR fields. Thirdly, we examine the connection between generalised geometry and non-geometry, and finally we present recent developments where generalised geometry is used to construct explicit examples of flux compactifications to flat space.

  5. The Solar Wind Energy Flux

    Chat, G. Le; Issautier, K.; Meyer-Vernet, N.

    2012-01-01

    The solar-wind energy flux measured near the ecliptic is known to be independent of the solar-wind speed. Using plasma data from Helios, Ulysses, and Wind covering a large range of latitudes and time, we show that the solar-wind energy flux is independent of the solar-wind speed and latitude within 10%, and that this quantity varies weakly over the solar cycle. In other words the energy flux appears as a global solar constant. We also show that the very high speed solar-wind (VSW > 700 km/s) ...

  6. Carbon Monitoring System Flux Estimation and Attribution: Impact of ACOS-GOSAT X(CO2) Sampling on the Inference of Terrestrial Biospheric Sources and Sinks

    Liu, Junjie; Bowman, Kevin W.; Lee, Memong; Henze, David K.; Bousserez, Nicolas; Brix, Holger; Collatz, G. James; Menemenlis, Dimitris; Ott, Lesley; Pawson, Steven; Jones, Dylan; Nassar, Ray

    2014-01-01

    Using an Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE), we investigate the impact of JAXA Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite 'IBUKI' (GOSAT) sampling on the estimation of terrestrial biospheric flux with the NASA Carbon Monitoring System Flux (CMS-Flux) estimation and attribution strategy. The simulated observations in the OSSE use the actual column carbon dioxide (X(CO2)) b2.9 retrieval sensitivity and quality control for the year 2010 processed through the Atmospheric CO2 Observations from Space algorithm. CMS-Flux is a variational inversion system that uses the GEOS-Chem forward and adjoint model forced by a suite of observationally constrained fluxes from ocean, land and anthropogenic models. We investigate the impact of GOSAT sampling on flux estimation in two aspects: 1) random error uncertainty reduction and 2) the global and regional bias in posterior flux resulted from the spatiotemporally biased GOSAT sampling. Based on Monte Carlo calculations, we find that global average flux uncertainty reduction ranges from 25% in September to 60% in July. When aggregated to the 11 land regions designated by the phase 3 of the Atmospheric Tracer Transport Model Intercomparison Project, the annual mean uncertainty reduction ranges from 10% over North American boreal to 38% over South American temperate, which is driven by observational coverage and the magnitude of prior flux uncertainty. The uncertainty reduction over the South American tropical region is 30%, even with sparse observation coverage. We show that this reduction results from the large prior flux uncertainty and the impact of non-local observations. Given the assumed prior error statistics, the degree of freedom for signal is approx.1132 for 1-yr of the 74 055 GOSAT X(CO2) observations, which indicates that GOSAT provides approx.1132 independent pieces of information about surface fluxes. We quantify the impact of GOSAT's spatiotemporally sampling on the posterior flux, and find that a 0.7 gigatons of

  7. The Solar Wind Energy Flux

    Chat, G Le; Meyer-Vernet, N

    2012-01-01

    The solar-wind energy flux measured near the ecliptic is known to be independent of the solar-wind speed. Using plasma data from Helios, Ulysses, and Wind covering a large range of latitudes and time, we show that the solar-wind energy flux is independent of the solar-wind speed and latitude within 10%, and that this quantity varies weakly over the solar cycle. In other words the energy flux appears as a global solar constant. We also show that the very high speed solar-wind (VSW > 700 km/s) has the same mean energy flux as the slower wind (VSW < 700 km/s), but with a different histogram. We use this result to deduce a relation between the solar-wind speed and density, which formalizes the anti-correlation between these quantities.

  8. Specification of ROP flux shape

    Min, Byung Joo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Gray, A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    1997-06-01

    The CANDU 9 480/SEU core uses 0.9% SEU (Slightly Enriched Uranium) fuel. The use f SEU fuel enables the reactor to increase the radial power form factor from 0.865, which is typical in current natural uranium CANDU reactors, to 0.97 in the nominal CANDU 9 480/SEU core. The difference is a 12% increase in reactor power. An additional 5% increase can be achieved due to a reduced refuelling ripple. The channel power limits were also increased by 3% for a total reactor power increase of 20%. This report describes the calculation of neutron flux distributions in the CANDU 9 480/SEU core under conditions specified by the C and I engineers. The RFSP code was used to calculate of neutron flux shapes for ROP analysis. Detailed flux values at numerous potential detector sites were calculated for each flux shape. (author). 6 tabs., 70 figs., 4 refs.

  9. Measuring temperature and thermal flux

    A sensitive temperature measuring device is described for detecting small temperature differences and associated thermal fluxes. Highly-doped silicon diodes operated at constant current are used in conjunction with suitable circuitry. (U.K.)

  10. Physics of Magnetic Flux Ropes

    Priest, E R; Lee, L C

    1990-01-01

    The American Geophysical Union Chapman Conference on the Physics of Magnetic Flux Ropes was held at the Hamilton Princess Hotel, Hamilton, Bermuda on March 27–31, 1989. Topics discussed ranged from solar flux ropes, such as photospheric flux tubes, coronal loops and prominences, to flux ropes in the solar wind, in planetary ionospheres, at the Earth's magnetopause, in the geomagnetic tail and deep in the Earth's magnetosphere. Papers presented at that conference form the nucleus of this book, but the book is more than just a proceedings of the conference. We have solicited articles from all interested in this topic. Thus, there is some material in the book not discussed at the conference. Even in the case of papers presented at the conference, there is generally a much more detailed and rigorous presentation than was possible in the time allowed by the oral and poster presentations.

  11. Specification of ROP flux shape

    The CANDU 9 480/SEU core uses 0.9% SEU (Slightly Enriched Uranium) fuel. The use f SEU fuel enables the reactor to increase the radial power form factor from 0.865, which is typical in current natural uranium CANDU reactors, to 0.97 in the nominal CANDU 9 480/SEU core. The difference is a 12% increase in reactor power. An additional 5% increase can be achieved due to a reduced refuelling ripple. The channel power limits were also increased by 3% for a total reactor power increase of 20%. This report describes the calculation of neutron flux distributions in the CANDU 9 480/SEU core under conditions specified by the C and I engineers. The RFSP code was used to calculate of neutron flux shapes for ROP analysis. Detailed flux values at numerous potential detector sites were calculated for each flux shape. (author). 6 tabs., 70 figs., 4 refs

  12. High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The HFIR at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a light-water cooled and moderated reactor that is the United States’ highest flux reactor-based neutron source. HFIR...

  13. Periodicities in photospheric magnetic flux

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic field plays an important role in solar structure and activity. In principle, the determination of magnetic flux would provide the best general-purpose index of solar activity. Currently, the periodicity studies corresponding to photospheric magnetic flux (PMF) are very few possibly due to the absence of a uniform flux sequence. In this paper, by using 383 NSO/Kitt Peak magnetic synoptic charts we reconstruct a flux sequence from February 1975 to August 2003 and perform a relatively systemic periodicity analysis with two methods of the Scargle periodogram and the Morlet wavelet transform. As a result, four periods are found at around 1050, 500, 300 and 160 days. We analyze these periods' temporal variabilities in detail and discuss their respective origins briefly.

  14. Flux networks in metabolic graphs

    A metabolic model can be represented as a bipartite graph comprising linked reaction and metabolite nodes. Here it is shown how a network of conserved fluxes can be assigned to the edges of such a graph by combining the reaction fluxes with a conserved metabolite property such as molecular weight. A similar flux network can be constructed by combining the primal and dual solutions to the linear programming problem that typically arises in constraint-based modelling. Such constructions may help with the visualization of flux distributions in complex metabolic networks. The analysis also explains the strong correlation observed between metabolite shadow prices (the dual linear programming variables) and conserved metabolite properties. The methods were applied to recent metabolic models for Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Methanosarcina barkeri. Detailed results are reported for E. coli; similar results were found for other organisms

  15. Notes on neutron flux measurement

    The main purpose of this work is to get an useful guide to carry out topical neutron flux measurements. Although the foil activation technique is used in the majority of the cases, other techniques, such as those based on fission chambers and self-powered neutron detectors, are also shown. Special interest is given to the description and application of corrections on the measurement of relative and absolute induced activities by several types of detectors (scintillators, G-M and gas proportional counters). The thermal arid epithermal neutron fluxes, as determined in this work, are conventional or effective (West cots fluxes), which are extensively used by the reactor experimentalists; however, we also give some expressions where they are related to the integrated neutron fluxes, which are used in neutron calculations. (Author) 16 refs

  16. Flux emergence and coronal eruption

    Archontis, V; 10.1051/0004-6361/200913502

    2010-01-01

    Our aim is to study the photospheric flux distribution of a twisted flux tube that emerges from the solar interior. We also report on the eruption of a new flux rope when the emerging tube rises into a pre-existing magnetic field in the corona. To study the evolution, we use 3D numerical simulations by solving the time-dependent and resistive MHD equations. We qualitatively compare our numerical results with MDI magnetograms of emerging flux at the solar surface. We find that the photospheric magnetic flux distribution consists of two regions of opposite polarities and elongated magnetic tails on the two sides of the polarity inversion line (PIL), depending on the azimuthal nature of the emerging field lines and the initial field strength of the rising tube. Their shape is progressively deformed due to plasma motions towards the PIL. Our results are in qualitative agreement with observational studies of magnetic flux emergence in active regions (ARs). Moreover, if the initial twist of the emerging tube is sma...

  17. Flux flow and flux dynamics in high-Tc superconductors

    Bennett, L. H.; Turchinskaya, M.; Swartzendruber, L. J.; Roitburd, A.; Lundy, D.; Ritter, J.; Kaiser, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    Because high temperature superconductors, including BYCO and BSSCO, are type 2 superconductors with relatively low H(sub c 1) values and high H(sub c 2) values, they will be in a critical state for many of their applications. In the critical state, with the applied field between H(sub c 1) and H(sub c 2), flux lines have penetrated the material and can form a flux lattice and can be pinned by structural defects, chemical inhomogeneities, and impurities. A detailed knowledge of how flux penetrates the material and its behavior under the influence of applied fields and current flow, and the effect of material processing on these properties, is required in order to apply, and to improve the properties of these superconductors. When the applied field is changed rapidly, the time dependence of flux change can be divided into three regions, an initial region which occurs very rapidly, a second region in which the magnetization has a 1n(t) behavior, and a saturation region at very long times. A critical field is defined for depinning, H(sub c,p) as that field at which the hysteresis loop changes from irreversible to reversible. As a function of temperature, it is found that H(sub c,p) is well described by a power law with an exponent between 1.5 and 2.5. The behavior of H(sub c,p) for various materials and its relationship to flux flow and flux dynamics are discussed.

  18. Flux flow and flux dynamics in high-Tc superconductors

    Because high temperature superconductors, including BYCO and BSSCO, are type 2 superconductors with relatively low H(sub c 1) values and high H(sub c 2) values, they will be in a critical state for many of their applications. In the critical state, with the applied field between H(sub c 1) and H(sub c 2), flux lines have penetrated the material and can form a flux lattice and can be pinned by structural defects, chemical inhomogeneities, and impurities. A detailed knowledge of how flux penetrates the material and its behavior under the influence of applied fields and current flow, and the effect of material processing on these properties, is required in order to apply, and to improve the properties of these superconductors. When the applied field is changed rapidly, the time dependence of flux change can be divided into three regions, an initial region which occurs very rapidly, a second region in which the magnetization has a 1n(t) behavior, and a saturation region at very long times. A critical field is defined for depinning, H(sub c,p) as that field at which the hysteresis loop changes from irreversible to reversible. As a function of temperature, it is found that H(sub c,p) is well described by a power law with an exponent between 1.5 and 2.5. The behavior of H(sub c,p) for various materials and its relationship to flux flow and flux dynamics are discussed

  19. Importance weighting of local flux measurements to improve reactivity predictions in nuclear systems

    Dulla, Sandra; Hoh, Siew Sin; Nervo, Marta; Ravetto, Piero [Politecnico di Torino, Dipt. Energia (Italy)

    2015-07-15

    The reactivity monitoring is a key aspect for the safe operation of nuclear reactors, especially for subcritical source-driven systems. Various methods are available for both, off-line and on-line reactivity determination from direct measurements carried out on the reactor. Usually the methods are based on the inverse point kinetic model applied to signals from neutron detectors and results may be severely affected by space and spectral effects. Such effects need to be compensated and correction procedures have to be applied. In this work, a new approach is proposed, by using the full information from different local measurements to generate a global signal through a proper weighting of the signals provided by single neutron detectors. A weighting techique based on the use of the adjoint flux proves to be efficient in improving the prediction capability of inverse techniques. The idea is applied to the recently developed algorithm, named MAρTA, that can be used in both off-line and online modes.

  20. Physics of magnetic flux tubes

    Ryutova, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    This book is the first account of the physics of magnetic flux tubes from their fundamental properties to collective phenomena in an ensembles of flux tubes. The physics of magnetic flux tubes is absolutely vital for understanding fundamental physical processes in the solar atmosphere shaped and governed by magnetic fields. High-resolution and high cadence observations from recent space and  ground-based instruments taken simultaneously at different heights and temperatures not only show the ubiquity of filamentary structure formation but also allow to study how various events are interconnected by system of magnetic flux tubes. The book covers both theory and observations. Theoretical models presented in analytical and phenomenological forms are tailored for practical applications. These are welded with state-of-the-art observations from early decisive ones to the most recent data that open a new phase-space for exploring the Sun and sun-like stars. Concept of magnetic flux tubes is central to various magn...

  1. Thermality of the Hawking flux

    Visser, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Is the Hawking flux "thermal"? Unfortunately, the answer to this seemingly innocent question depends on a number of often unstated, but quite crucial, technical assumptions built into modern (mis-)interpretations of the word "thermal". The original 1850's notions of thermality --- based on classical thermodynamic reasoning applied to idealized "black bodies" or "lamp black surfaces" --- when supplemented by specific basic quantum ideas from the early 1900's, immediately led to the notion of the black-body spectrum, (the Planck-shaped spectrum), but "without" any specific assumptions or conclusions regarding correlations between the quanta. Many (not all) modern authors (often implicitly and unintentionally) add an extra, and quite unnecessary, assumption that there are no correlations in the black-body radiation; but such usage is profoundly ahistorical and dangerously misleading. Specifically, the Hawking flux from an evaporating black hole, (just like the radiation flux from a leaky furnace or a burning lum...

  2. Phase versus flux coupling between resonator and superconducting flux qubit

    Birenbaum, J. S.; O'Kelley, S. R.; Anton, S. M.; Nugroho, C. D.; Orlyanchik, V.; Dove, A. H.; Yoscovits, Z. R.; Olson, G. A.; van Harlingen, D. J.; Eckstein, J.; Braje, D. A.; Johnson, R. C.; Oliver, W. D.; Clarke, John

    2013-03-01

    The dispersive coupling of qubits to microwave resonators has become widely used for qubit readout. Recent advances in coupling qubits to 3D resonators have demonstrated the importance of the nature of the qubit-resonator coupling in determining the qubit relaxation and decoherence times, T1 and T2*. We study the effect of phase versus flux coupling on flux qubits coupled to planar resonators. Using an aluminum shadow evaporation technique we fabricate a low-loss planar resonator, consisting of a meandering inductor and interdigitated capacitor, and a flux qubit, all in a single processing step. Whereas the qubit and resonator are always flux coupled via a geometric mutual inductance, a phase coupling can be added by including a shared trace between the qubit and resonator. This technique allows us to control both the magnitude and nature of the qubit-resonator coupling without significantly affecting either the qubit or resonator design. We characterize the dependence of the qubit parameters T1, T2*, and spin echo time Techo on the resonator coupling parameters to gain insight into possible sources of decoherence and loss. This work was supported by ARO, IARPA, and the US Government

  3. Flux attenuation at NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace

    Bingham, Carl E.; Scholl, Kent L.; Lewandowski, Allan A.

    1994-10-01

    The High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has a faceted primary concentrator and a long focal-length-to-diameter ratio (due to its off-axis design). Each primary facet can be aimed individually to produce different flux distributions at the target plane. Two different types of attenuators are used depending on the flux distribution. A sliding-plate attenuator is used primarily when the facets are aimed at the same target point. The alternate attenuator resembles a venetian blind. Both attenuators are located between the concentrator and the focal point. The venetian-blind attenuator is primarily used to control the levels of sunlight failing on a target when the primary concentrators are not focused to a single point. This paper will demonstrate the problem of using the sliding-plate attenuator with a faceted concentrator when the facets are not aimed at the same target point. We will show that although the alternate attenuator necessarily blocks a certain amount of incoming sunlight, even when fully open, it provides a more even attenuation of the flux for alternate aiming strategies.

  4. The flux database concerted action

    This paper summarizes the background to the UIR action on the development of a flux database for radionuclide transfer in soil-plant systems. The action is discussed in terms of the objectives, the deliverables and the progress achieved so far by the flux database working group. The paper describes the background to the current initiative and outlines specific features of the database and supporting documentation. Particular emphasis is placed on the proforma used for data entry, on the database help file and on the approach adopted to indicate data quality. Refs. 3 (author)

  5. Flux stabilization in compact groups

    We consider the Born-Infeld action for symmetry-preserving, orientable D-branes in compact group manifolds. We find classical solutions that obey the flux quantization condition. They correspond to conformally invariant boundary conditions on the world sheet. We compute the spectrum of quadratic fluctuations and find agreement with the predictions of conformal field theory, up to a missing level-dependent truncation. Our results extend to D-branes with the geometry of twined conjugacy classes; they illustrate the mechanism of flux stabilization of D-branes. (author)

  6. Flux stabilization in compact groups

    Bordalo, P; Schweigert, C; Bordalo, Pedro; Ribault, Sylvain; Schweigert, Christoph

    2001-01-01

    We consider the Born-Infeld action for symmetry-preserving, orientable D-branes in compact group manifolds. We find classical solutions that obey the flux quantization condition. They correspond to conformally invariant boundary conditions on the world sheet. We compute the spectrum of quadratic fluctuations and find agreement with the predictions of conformal field theory, up to a missing level-dependent truncation. Our results extend to D-branes with the geometry of twined conjugacy classes; they illustrate the mechanism of flux stabilization of D-branes.

  7. An improved method for estimation of Jupiter's gravity field using the Juno expected measurements, a trajectory estimation model, and an adjoint based thermal wind model

    Galanti, E.; Finocchiaro, S.; Kaspi, Y.; Iess, L.

    2013-12-01

    The upcoming high precision measurements of the Juno flybys around Jupiter, have the potential of improving the estimation of Jupiter's gravity field. The analysis of the Juno Doppler data will provide a very accurate reconstruction of spacial gravity variations, but these measurements will be over a limited latitudinal and longitudinal range. In order to deduce the full gravity field of Jupiter, additional information needs to be incorporated into the analysis, especially with regards to the Jovian wind structure and its depth at high latitudes. In this work we propose a new iterative method for the estimation of the Jupiter gravity field, using the Juno expected measurements, a trajectory estimation model, and an adjoint based inverse thermal wind model. Beginning with an artificial gravitational field, the trajectory estimation model together with an optimization procedure is used to obtain an initial solution of the gravitational moments. As upper limit constraints, the model applies the gravity harmonics obtained from a thermal wind model in which the winds are assumed to penetrate barotropicaly along the direction of the spin axis. The solution from the trajectory model is then used as an initial guess for the thermal wind model, and together with an adjoint optimization method, the optimal penetration depth of the winds is computed. As a final step, the gravity harmonics solution from the thermal wind model is given back to the trajectory model, along with an uncertainties estimate, to be used as constraints for a new calculation of the gravity field. We test this method for several cases, some with zonal harmonics only, and some with the full gravity field including longitudinal variations that include the tesseral harmonics as well. The results show that using this method some of the gravitational moments are fitted better to the 'observed' ones, mainly due to the fact that the thermal wind model is taking into consideration the wind structure and depth

  8. Initiation of CMEs by Magnetic Flux Emergence

    Govind Dubey; Bart van der Holst; Stefaan Poedts

    2006-06-01

    The initiation of solar Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) is studied in the framework of numerical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The initial CME model includes a magnetic flux rope in spherical, axisymmetric geometry. The initial configuration consists of a magnetic flux rope embedded in a gravitationally stratified solar atmosphere with a background dipole magnetic field. The flux rope is in equilibrium due to an image current below the photosphere. An emerging flux triggering mechanism is used to make this equilibrium system unstable. When the magnetic flux emerges within the filament below the flux rope, this results in a catastrophic behavior similar to previous models. As a result, the flux rope rises and a current sheet forms below it. It is shown that the magnetic reconnection in the current sheet below the flux rope in combination with the outward curvature forces results in a fast ejection of the flux rope as observed for solar CMEs.We have done a parametric study of the emerging flux rate.

  9. FACTORS ON VISCOSITY STABILITY OF MOLD FLUXES

    C.Y.Zhu; C.J.Liu; M.F.Jiang; Z.D.Yang

    2004-01-01

    Viscosity stability indexes of mold flux at high temperature and low temperature have been introduced,and the effects of flux compositions on viscosity stability indexes have been studied.Two mold fluxes have been developed by analyzing the effects of flux viscosity stability on the process and the condition of continuous casting slab of medium carbon steel.The results show that the fluxes are suitable for the process.

  10. Flux-balance modelling of plant metabolism

    Lee James Sweetlove; R. George eRatcliffe

    2011-01-01

    Flux-balance modelling of plant metabolic networks provides an important complement to 13C-based metabolic flux analysis. Flux-balance modelling is a constraints-based approach in which steady-state fluxes in a metabolic network are predicted by using optimisation algorithms within an experimentally bounded solution space. In the last two years several flux-balance models of plant metabolism have been published including genome-scale models of Arabidopsis metabolism. In this review we conside...

  11. The Berry-Keating operator on $L^2(\\rz_>,\\ud x)$ and on compact quantum graphs with general self-adjoint realizations

    Endres, Sebastian

    2009-01-01

    The Berry-Keating operator $H_{\\mathrm{BK}}:= -\\ui\\hbar(x\\frac{\\ud\\phantom{x}}{\\ud x}+{1/2})$ [M. V. Berry and J. P. Keating, SIAM Rev. 41 (1999) 236] governing the Schr\\"odinger dynamics is discussed in the Hilbert space $L^2(\\rz_>,\\ud x)$ and on compact quantum graphs. It is proved that the spectrum of $H_{\\mathrm{BK}}$ defined on $L^2(\\rz_>,\\ud x)$ is purely continuous and thus this quantization of $H_{\\mathrm{BK}}$ cannot yield the hypothetical Hilbert-Polya operator possessing as eigenvalues the nontrivial zeros of the Riemann zeta function. A complete classification of all self-adjoint extensions of $H_{\\mathrm{BK}}$ acting on compact quantum graphs is given together with the corresponding secular equation in form of a determinant whose zeros determine the discrete spectrum of $H_{\\mathrm{BK}}$. In addition, an exact trace formula and the Weyl asymptotics of the eigenvalue counting function are derived. Furthermore, we introduce the ``squared'' Berry-Keating operator $H_{\\mathrm{BK}}^2:= -x^2\\frac{\\ud^2...

  12. NESTLE: Few-group neutron diffusion equation solver utilizing the nodal expansion method for eigenvalue, adjoint, fixed-source steady-state and transient problems

    NESTLE is a FORTRAN77 code that solves the few-group neutron diffusion equation utilizing the Nodal Expansion Method (NEM). NESTLE can solve the eigenvalue (criticality); eigenvalue adjoint; external fixed-source steady-state; or external fixed-source. or eigenvalue initiated transient problems. The code name NESTLE originates from the multi-problem solution capability, abbreviating Nodal Eigenvalue, Steady-state, Transient, Le core Evaluator. The eigenvalue problem allows criticality searches to be completed, and the external fixed-source steady-state problem can search to achieve a specified power level. Transient problems model delayed neutrons via precursor groups. Several core properties can be input as time dependent. Two or four energy groups can be utilized, with all energy groups being thermal groups (i.e. upscatter exits) if desired. Core geometries modelled include Cartesian and Hexagonal. Three, two and one dimensional models can be utilized with various symmetries. The non-linear iterative strategy associated with the NEM method is employed. An advantage of the non-linear iterative strategy is that NSTLE can be utilized to solve either the nodal or Finite Difference Method representation of the few-group neutron diffusion equation

  13. NESTLE: Few-group neutron diffusion equation solver utilizing the nodal expansion method for eigenvalue, adjoint, fixed-source steady-state and transient problems

    Turinsky, P.J.; Al-Chalabi, R.M.K.; Engrand, P.; Sarsour, H.N.; Faure, F.X.; Guo, W. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1994-06-01

    NESTLE is a FORTRAN77 code that solves the few-group neutron diffusion equation utilizing the Nodal Expansion Method (NEM). NESTLE can solve the eigenvalue (criticality); eigenvalue adjoint; external fixed-source steady-state; or external fixed-source. or eigenvalue initiated transient problems. The code name NESTLE originates from the multi-problem solution capability, abbreviating Nodal Eigenvalue, Steady-state, Transient, Le core Evaluator. The eigenvalue problem allows criticality searches to be completed, and the external fixed-source steady-state problem can search to achieve a specified power level. Transient problems model delayed neutrons via precursor groups. Several core properties can be input as time dependent. Two or four energy groups can be utilized, with all energy groups being thermal groups (i.e. upscatter exits) if desired. Core geometries modelled include Cartesian and Hexagonal. Three, two and one dimensional models can be utilized with various symmetries. The non-linear iterative strategy associated with the NEM method is employed. An advantage of the non-linear iterative strategy is that NSTLE can be utilized to solve either the nodal or Finite Difference Method representation of the few-group neutron diffusion equation.

  14. Solution of the advection-dispersion equation in two dimensions by a finite-volume Eulerian-Lagrangian localized adjoint method

    Healy, R.W.; Russell, T.F.

    1998-01-01

    We extend the finite-volume Eulerian-Lagrangian localized adjoint method (FVELLAM) for solution of the advection-dispersion equation to two dimensions. The method can conserve mass globally and is not limited by restrictions on the size of the grid Peclet or Courant number. Therefore, it is well suited for solution of advection-dominated ground-water solute transport problems. In test problem comparisons with standard finite differences, FVELLAM is able to attain accurate solutions on much coarser space and time grids. On fine grids, the accuracy of the two methods is comparable. A critical aspect of FVELLAM (and all other ELLAMs) is evaluation of the mass storage integral from the preceding time level. In FVELLAM this may be accomplished with either a forward or backtracking approach. The forward tracking approach conserves mass globally and is the preferred approach. The backtracking approach is less computationally intensive, but not globally mass conservative. Boundary terms are systematically represented as integrals in space and time which are evaluated by a common integration scheme in conjunction with forward tracking through time. Unlike the one-dimensional case, local mass conservation cannot be guaranteed, so slight oscillations in concentration can develop, particularly in the vicinity of inflow or outflow boundaries. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  15. Second-order adjoint sensitivity analysis methodology (2nd-ASAM) for computing exactly and efficiently first- and second-order sensitivities in large-scale linear systems: II. Illustrative application to a paradigm particle diffusion problem

    Cacuci, Dan G.

    2015-03-01

    This work presents an illustrative application of the second-order adjoint sensitivity analysis methodology (2nd-ASAM) to a paradigm neutron diffusion problem, which is sufficiently simple to admit an exact solution, thereby making transparent the underlying mathematical derivations. The general theory underlying 2nd-ASAM indicates that, for a physical system comprising Nα parameters, the computation of all of the first- and second-order response sensitivities requires (per response) at most (2Nα + 1) "large-scale" computations using the first-level and, respectively, second-level adjoint sensitivity systems (1st-LASS and 2nd-LASS). Very importantly, however, the illustrative application presented in this work shows that the actual number of adjoint computations needed for computing all of the first- and second-order response sensitivities may be significantly less than (2Nα + 1) per response. For this illustrative problem, four "large-scale" adjoint computations sufficed for the complete and exact computations of all 4 first- and 10 distinct second-order derivatives. Furthermore, the construction and solution of the 2nd-LASS requires very little additional effort beyond the construction of the adjoint sensitivity system needed for computing the first-order sensitivities. Very significantly, only the sources on the right-sides of the diffusion (differential) operator needed to be modified; the left-side of the differential equations (and hence the "solver" in large-scale practical applications) remained unchanged. All of the first-order relative response sensitivities to the model parameters have significantly large values, of order unity. Also importantly, most of the second-order relative sensitivities are just as large, and some even up to twice as large as the first-order sensitivities. In the illustrative example presented in this work, the second-order sensitivities contribute little to the response variances and covariances. However, they have the

  16. Flux

    Ravn, Ib

    Med udgangspunkt i kompleksistetsforskning og studiet af selvorganiserende systemer beskriver lb Ravn den fysiske og biologiske evolution og menneskets udvikling. Han fortolker begreber som kultur, sprog, frihed, værdier, mening, smerte og det ondes problem i lyset af en procesbaseret ontologi...

  17. CCD flux measurement system Prohermes

    Kroger-Vodde, A. [University of Almeria, Plataforma Solar de Almeria (Spain); Hollander, A. [German Aerospace Center, Plataforma de Almeria, Head of Engineering (Spain)

    1999-03-01

    At the Plataforma Solar de Almeria (PSA) a new, PC based, 14 bit CCD video flux measurement system, called PROHERMES, has been introduced to improve the precision of data acquisition and includes with Optimas a flexible, more user friendly, easy adaptable software environment. The hardware and software is described. Macros have been created to meet the special requirements of the tasks at the PSA. As an example for a macro, the program flow structure is given for the acquisition of the moving-bar sequence to measure the performance of receivers like in the REFOS project. The results are exported to Excel. The comparison with the former measurement system HERMES II concludes the new system as an important progress. Future efforts will focus on the further automation of flux measurements and heliostat controls. (authors)

  18. Constrained Allocation Flux Balance Analysis

    Mori, Matteo; Martin, Olivier C; De Martino, Andrea; Marinari, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    New experimental results on bacterial growth inspire a novel top-down approach to study cell metabolism, combining mass balance and proteomic constraints to extend and complement Flux Balance Analysis. We introduce here Constrained Allocation Flux Balance Analysis, CAFBA, in which the biosynthetic costs associated to growth are accounted for in an effective way through a single additional genome-wide constraint. Its roots lie in the experimentally observed pattern of proteome allocation for metabolic functions, allowing to bridge regulation and metabolism in a transparent way under the principle of growth-rate maximization. We provide a simple method to solve CAFBA efficiently and propose an "ensemble averaging" procedure to account for unknown protein costs. Applying this approach to modeling E. coli metabolism, we find that, as the growth rate increases, CAFBA solutions cross over from respiratory, growth-yield maximizing states (preferred at slow growth) to fermentative states with carbon overflow (preferr...

  19. Comments on Heterotic Flux Compactifications

    Kimura, T; Kimura, Tetsuji; Yi, Piljin

    2006-01-01

    In heterotic flux compactification with supersymmetry, three different connections with torsion appear naturally, all in the form $\\omega+a H$. Supersymmetry condition carries $a=-1$, the Dirac operator has $a=-1/3$, and higher order term in the effective action involves $a=1$. With a view toward the gauge sector, we explore the geometry with such torsions. After reviewing the supersymmetry constraints and finding a relation between the scalar curvature and the flux, we derive the squared form of the zero mode equations for gauge fermions. With $\\d H=0$, the operator has a positive potential term, and the mass of the unbroken gauge sector appears formally positive definite. However, this apparent contradiction is avoided by a no-go theorem that the compactification with $H\

  20. SQUID With Integral Flux Concentrator

    Peters, Palmer N.; Sisk, Robert C.

    1989-01-01

    In improved superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), change in size and shape of superconducting ring improves coupling to external signal coil and eases coil-positioning tolerances. More rugged and easier to manufacture than conventional SQUID's with comparable electrical characteristics. Thin-film superconducting flux concentrator utilizes Meissner effect to deflect magnetic field of signal coil into central hole of SQUID. Used in magnetometers, ammeters, analog-to-digital converters, and related electronic applications in which high signal-to-noise ratios required.

  1. Flux footprints in different ecosystems

    Macálková, Lenka; Havránková, Kateřina; Pavelka, Marian

    Brno : Global Change Research Centre, The Czech Academy of Sciences, v. v. i., 2015 - ( Urban , O.; Šprtová, M.; Klem, K.), s. 54-57 ISBN 978-80-87902-10-3. [Global Change: A Complex Challenge /4th/. Brno (CZ), 23.03.2015-24.03.2015] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010007 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : eddy covariance * flux footprints * ecosystems Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  2. Sparsity of the Hawking flux

    Visser, Matt; Schuster, Sebastian; Van-Brunt, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    It is (or should be) well-known that the Hawking flux that reaches spatial infinity is extremely sparse, and extremely thin, with the Hawking quanta, one-by-one, slowly dribbling out of the black hole. The typical time between quanta reaching infinity is much larger than the timescale set by the energy of the quanta. Among other things, this means that the Hawking evaporation of a black hole should be viewed as a sequential cascade of 2-body decays.

  3. Surface fluxes in heterogeneous landscape

    Bay Hasager, C.

    1997-01-01

    The surface fluxes in homogeneous landscapes are calculated by similarity scaling principles. The methodology is well establish. In heterogeneous landscapes with spatial changes in the micro scale range, i e from 100 m to 10 km, advective effects are significant. The present work focus on these effects in an agricultural countryside typical for the midlatitudes. Meteorological and satellite data from a highly heterogeneous landscape in the Rhine Valley, Germany was collected in the large-scale field experiment TRACT (Transport of pollutants over complex terrain) in 1992. Classified satellite images, Landsat TM and ERS SAR, are used as basis for roughness maps. The roughnesses were measured at meteorological masts in the various cover classes and assigned pixel by pixel to the images. The roughness maps are aggregated, i e spatially averaged, into so-called effective roughness lengths. This calculation is performed by a micro scale aggregation model. The model solves the linearized atmospheric flow equations by a numerical (Fast Fourier Transform) method. This model also calculate maps of friction velocity and momentum flux pixel wise in heterogeneous landscapes. It is indicated how the aggregation methodology can be used to calculate the heat fluxes based on the relevant satellite data i e temperature and soil moisture information. (au) 10 tabs., 49 ills., 223 refs.

  4. Center vortices as composites of monopole fluxes

    Deldar, Sedigheh

    2015-01-01

    We study the relation between the flux of a center vortex obtained from the center vortex model and the flux formed between monopoles obtained from the Abelian gauge fixing method. Motivated by the Monte Carlo simulations which have shown that almost all monopoles are sitting on the top of vortices, we construct the fluxes of center vortices for $SU(2)$ and $SU(3)$ gauge groups using fractional fluxes of monopoles. Then, we compute the potentials in the fundamental representation induced by center vortices and fractional fluxes of monopoles. We show that by combining the fractional fluxes of monopoles one can produce the center vortex fluxes for $SU(3)$ gauge group in a "center vortex model". Comparing the potentials, we conclude that the fractional fluxes of monopoles attract each other.

  5. Force sensor using changes in magnetic flux

    Pickens, Herman L. (Inventor); Richard, James A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A force sensor includes a magnetostrictive material and a magnetic field generator positioned in proximity thereto. A magnetic field is induced in and surrounding the magnetostrictive material such that lines of magnetic flux pass through the magnetostrictive material. A sensor positioned in the vicinity of the magnetostrictive material measures changes in one of flux angle and flux density when the magnetostrictive material experiences an applied force that is aligned with the lines of magnetic flux.

  6. Reluctance motor employing superconducting magnetic flux switches

    This paper reports that superconducting flux switches controlling the magnetic flux in the poles of a motor will enable the implementation of a reluctance motor using one central single phase winding. A superconducting flux switch consists of a ring of superconducting material surrounding a ferromagnetic pole of the motor. When in the superconducting state the switch will block all magnetic flux attempting to flow in the ferromagnetic core. When switched to the normal state the superconducting switch will allow the magnetic flux to flow freely in that pole. By using one high turns-count coil as a flux generator, and selectively channeling flux among the various poles using the superconducting flux switch, 3-phase operation can be emulated with a single-hase central AC source. The motor will also operate when the flux generating coil is driven by a DC current, provided the magnetic flux switches see a continuously varying magnetic flux. Rotor rotation provides this varying flux due to the change in stator pole inductance it produces

  7. Apparatus for measuring a flux of neutrons

    Stringer, James L.

    1977-01-01

    A flux of neutrons is measured by disposing a detector in the flux and applying electronic correlation techniques to discriminate between the electrical signals generated by the neutron detector and the unwanted interfering electrical signals generated by the incidence of a neutron flux upon the cables connecting the detector to the electronic measuring equipment at a remote location.

  8. Flux-limited diffusion with relativistic corrections

    A recently reported flux-limited diffusion theory is extended to include relativistic terms, correct to first order in the fluid velocity. We show that this diffusion theory is fully flux limited, and yields the correct result for the radiative flux in the classical diffusion limit, namely a Fick's law component plus a v/c convective term

  9. Advanced high temperature heat flux sensors

    Atkinson, W.; Hobart, H. F.; Strange, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    To fully characterize advanced high temperature heat flux sensors, calibration and testing is required at full engine temperature. This required the development of unique high temperature heat flux test facilities. These facilities were developed, are in place, and are being used for advanced heat flux sensor development.

  10. Full-3D waveform tomography of Southern California crustal structure by using earthquake recordings and ambient noise Green's functions based on adjoint and scattering-integral methods

    Lee, E.; Chen, P.; Jordan, T. H.; Maechling, P. J.; Denolle, M.; Beroza, G. C.

    2013-12-01

    We apply a unified methodology for seismic waveform analysis and inversions to Southern California. To automate the waveform selection processes, we developed a semi-automatic seismic waveform analysis algorithm for full-wave earthquake source parameters and tomographic inversions. The algorithm is based on continuous wavelet transforms, a topological watershed method, and a set of user-adjustable criteria to select usable waveform windows for full-wave inversions. The algorithm takes advantages of time-frequency representations of seismograms and is able to separate seismic phases in both time and frequency domains. The selected wave packet pairs between observed and synthetic waveforms are then used for extracting frequency-dependent phase and amplitude misfit measurements, which are used in our seismic source and structural inversions. Our full-wave waveform tomography uses the 3D SCEC Community Velocity Model Version 4.0 as initial model, a staggered-grid finite-difference code to simulate seismic wave propagations. The sensitivity (Fréchet) kernels are calculated based on the scattering integral and adjoint methods to iteratively improve the model. We use both earthquake recordings and ambient noise Green's functions, stacking of station-to-station correlations of ambient seismic noise, in our full-3D waveform tomographic inversions. To reduce errors of earthquake sources, the epicenters and source parameters of earthquakes used in our tomographic inversion are inverted by our full-wave CMT inversion method. Our current model shows many features that relate to the geological structures at shallow depth and contrasting velocity values across faults. The velocity perturbations could up to 45% with respect to the initial model in some regions and relate to some structures that do not exist in the initial model, such as southern Great Valley. The earthquake waveform misfits reduce over 70% and the ambient noise Green's function group velocity delay time variance

  11. Decision making by Berry's flux

    Sung, Benjamin O.; Lawler, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Order by disorder is a decision making process for frustrated systems but often leads to simple answers. We study order by disorder in the kagome Kondo model known for its complexity seeking rich decision making capabilities. At half filling and large Kondo coupling to hopping ratio $J_K/t$, the full manifold of 120$^o$ kagome ground states are degenerate at second order in $t/J_K$. We show this degeneracy lifts at sixth order when a fermion can hop around a hexagon and feel the Berry flux in...

  12. Complementary neutron flux monitoring system

    The present work is an example for that, how with modern technical instruments it is possible to compensate disadvantage and to increase technical resources of the old systems, without a change of given system totally with new one. The system detail design and implementation was possible mostly, due to the international conferences and courses organized by IAEA and technical information provided by the agency. The system acts as a complementary to the existing systems for the reactor core neutron flux monitoring AKNP. The new system extends the measurement range of the original AKNP system approximately by two decades. It allows neutron flux to be monitored during refuelling. The system is permitted for use by Bulgarian Nuclear Safety Authority - CUAEPP. The system also calculates the reactivity and thus allows the operator to monitor the criticality condition very precisely. The system calculates also the period of the reactor and has adjustable setpoints at two levels for alarm and pre-alarm, both for counting rate and period. The system sends the analog signals for the counting rate and for the period as well as digital signals for the alarm and pre-alarm to the refueling machine cabin for on-line control. It also produces sound and blinks (LEDs) if any setpoint is reached. It should be mentioned that the refueling machine panel do not need additional power supply and thus high reliability is achieved. The system automatically stores the data for neutron flux, period, reactivity, alarm and prealarm state and value, reactor kinetic parameters(β,λ and source) on hard disk. The stored data can be reviewed very easy and printed. Depending on the hard disk capacity the storage period can be longer than a year. The old system for neutron flux monitoring during refuelling, which operated with 3 removable neutron fission chambers KNT-54 located next to the reactor core is now obsolete and is decommissioned. This have the significant impact on personnel dose

  13. Methane Fluxes from Subtropical Wetlands

    DeLucia, N.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.; Bernacchi, C.

    2013-12-01

    It is well documented that green house gas concentrations have risen at unequivocal rates since the industrial revolution but the disparity between anthropogenic sources and natural sources is uncertain. Wetlands are one example of a natural ecosystem that can be a substantial source or sink for methane (CH4) depending on climate conditions. Due to strict anaerobic conditions required for CH4-generating microorganisms, natural wetlands are one of the main sources for biogenic CH4. Although wetlands occupy less than 5% of total land surface area, they contribute approximately 20% of total CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. The processes regulating CH4 emissions are sensitive to land use and management practices of areas surrounding wetlands. Variation in adjacent vegetation or grazing intensity by livestock can, for example, alter CH4 fluxes from wetland soils by altering nutrient balance, carbon inputs and hydrology. Therefore, understanding how these changes will affect wetland source strength is essential to understand the impact of wetland management practices on the global climate system. In this study we quantify wetland methane fluxes from subtropical wetlands on a working cattle ranch in central Florida near Okeechobee Lake (27o10'52.04'N, 81o21'8.56'W). To determine differences in CH4 fluxes associated with land use and management, a replicated (n = 4) full factorial experiment was designed for wetlands where the surrounding vegetation was (1) grazed or un-grazed and (2) composed of native vegetation or improved pasture. Net exchange of CH4 and CO2 between the land surface and the atmosphere were sampled with a LICOR Li-7700 open path CH4 analyzer and Li-7500A open path CO2/H20 analyzer mounted in a 1-m3 static gas-exchange chamber. Our results showed and verified that CH4 emissions from subtropical wetlands were larger when high soil moisture was coupled with high temperatures. The presence of cattle only amplified these results. These results help quantify

  14. Evaluation of flux synthesis algorithms

    The flux synthesis algorithm which is the best fit to the numerical solution of the multigroup diffusion equations, was determined. Three different types of synthesis were studied: 1) discontinuous synthesis 2) continuous synthesis 3) pseudo-continuous synthesis. A matrix and a differential formulation were developed for the first two types of synthesis. For pseudo-continuous synthesis only the matrix formulation was used. Some tests were performed and the results allowed us to establish the following order of efficiency for the algorithms: 1) continuous synthesis (matrix formulation) 2) continuous synthesis (differential formulation) 3) pseudo-continuous synthesis 4) discontinuous synthesis (matrix formulation) 5) discontinuous synthesis (differential formulation). (Author)

  15. Geometrical correction factors for heat flux meters

    Baumeister, K. J.; Papell, S. S.

    1974-01-01

    General formulas are derived for determining gage averaging errors of strip-type heat flux meters used in the measurement of one-dimensional heat flux distributions. The local averaging error e(x) is defined as the difference between the measured value of the heat flux and the local value which occurs at the center of the gage. In terms of e(x), a correction procedure is presented which allows a better estimate for the true value of the local heat flux. For many practical problems, it is possible to use relatively large gages to obtain acceptable heat flux measurements.

  16. Calculated Electron Fluxes at Airplane Altitudes

    Schaefer, R K; Stanev, T

    1993-01-01

    A precision measurement of atmospheric electron fluxes has been performed on a Japanese commercial airliner (Enomoto, {\\it et al.}, 1991). We have performed a monte carlo calculation of the cosmic ray secondary electron fluxes expected in this experiment. The monte carlo uses the hadronic portion of our neutrino flux cascade program combined with the electromagnetic cascade portion of the CERN library program GEANT. Our results give good agreement with the data, provided we boost the overall normalization of the primary cosmic ray flux by 12\\% over the normalization used in the neutrino flux calculation.

  17. Flux focusing eddy current probe

    Simpson, John W. (Inventor); Clendenin, C. Gerald (Inventor); Fulton, James P. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Todhunter, Ronald G. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Nath, Shridhar C. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A flux-focusing electromagnetic sensor which uses a ferromagnetic flux-focusing lens simplifies inspections and increases detectability of fatigue cracks and material loss in high conductivity material. The unique feature of the device is the ferrous shield isolating a high-turn pick-up coil from an excitation coil. The use of the magnetic shield is shown to produce a null voltage output across the receiving coil in the presence of an unflawed sample. A redistribution of the current flow in the sample caused by the presence of flaws, however, eliminates the shielding condition and a large output voltage is produced, yielding a clear unambiguous flaw signal. The maximum sensor output is obtained when positioned symmetrically above the crack. Hence, by obtaining the position of the maximum sensor output, it is possible to track the fault and locate the area surrounding its tip. The accuracy of tip location is enhanced by two unique features of the sensor; a very high signal-to-noise ratio of the probe's output which results in an extremely smooth signal peak across the fault, and a rapidly decaying sensor output outside a small area surrounding the crack tip which enables the region for searching to be clearly defined. Under low frequency operation, material thinning due to corrosion damage causes an incomplete shielding of the pick-up coil. The low frequency output voltage of the probe is therefore a direct indicator of the thickness of the test sample.

  18. SEP flux mapping with PHOEBUS

    Grimani, C [Universita di Urbino and INFN Florence, Urbino (Italy); Bagni, G [Universita di Urbino and INFN Florence, Urbino (Italy); Fabi, M [Universita di Urbino and INFN Florence, Urbino (Italy); Vicere, A [Universita di Urbino and INFN Florence, Urbino (Italy); Marconi, L [Universita di Pisa and INFN Florence, Pisa (Italy); Stanga, R [Universita and INFN, Florence (Italy); Bosi, L [Universita and INFN Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Vocca, H [Universita and INFN Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Araujo, H [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Shaul, D [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Sumner, T [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Wass, P [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Boatella, C [IEEC, Barcelona (Spain); Lobo, A [ICE/CSIC and IEEC, Barcelona (Spain); Chmeissani, M [IFAE, Barcelona (Spain); Martinez, I [IFAE, Barcelona (Spain)

    2006-03-02

    We report about PHOEBUS (PHysics Of Events BUrsted by the Sun): a proposal for solar physics and space weather investigation with LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna). Galactic and solar cosmic-ray particles with energies larger than 100 MeV(/n) penetrate and charge the LISA test masses. Spurious forces occur between the test masses and the surrounding electrodes mimicking gravitational wave signals. This process constitutes one of the major sources of acceleration noise for LISA. Silicon particle detectors will be placed on board the LISA-PF and LISA missions to monitor the overall energetic incident cosmic-ray fluxes. These telescopes can be also used to carry out a map of shock accelerated Solar Energetic Particle (SEPs) fluxes associated with evolving Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) at different steps in longitude. We discuss the role of protons, helium nuclei, galactic heavy nuclei and solar ions. We aim to contribute to the COST724 (European CO-operation in the field of Scientific and Technical Research) action inside WG1/WP13000 developing appropriate simulations of the dynamics of CMEs by using space-based data and theoretical models.

  19. Constrained Allocation Flux Balance Analysis

    Mori, Matteo; Hwa, Terence; Martin, Olivier C.

    2016-01-01

    New experimental results on bacterial growth inspire a novel top-down approach to study cell metabolism, combining mass balance and proteomic constraints to extend and complement Flux Balance Analysis. We introduce here Constrained Allocation Flux Balance Analysis, CAFBA, in which the biosynthetic costs associated to growth are accounted for in an effective way through a single additional genome-wide constraint. Its roots lie in the experimentally observed pattern of proteome allocation for metabolic functions, allowing to bridge regulation and metabolism in a transparent way under the principle of growth-rate maximization. We provide a simple method to solve CAFBA efficiently and propose an “ensemble averaging” procedure to account for unknown protein costs. Applying this approach to modeling E. coli metabolism, we find that, as the growth rate increases, CAFBA solutions cross over from respiratory, growth-yield maximizing states (preferred at slow growth) to fermentative states with carbon overflow (preferred at fast growth). In addition, CAFBA allows for quantitatively accurate predictions on the rate of acetate excretion and growth yield based on only 3 parameters determined by empirical growth laws. PMID:27355325

  20. Atmospheric discharges and particle fluxes

    Chilingarian, A.; Chilingaryan, S.; Reymers, A.

    2015-07-01

    Fluxes of the electrons, gamma rays, and neutrons observed by particle detectors located on the Earth's surface during thunderstorms originate so-called Thunderstorm Ground Enhancements (TGEs). The relativistic runaway electron avalanches giving rise to TGEs originate in the thundercloud's lower dipole between the main negatively charged region in the middle of the thundercloud and transient lower positively charged region. Acceleration of electrons in the upper dipole between main negative and main positive charge regions leads to initiation of the terrestrial gamma flashes (TGFs) intensive researched during the last two decades by orbiting gamma ray observatories. TGFs are exceptionally intense, submillisecond bursts of electromagnetic radiation directed to the open space from the thunderstorm atmosphere. Unlike visible lightning, TGF beams do not create a hot plasma channel and optical flash; hence, in the literature they got name "dark lightning." We investigate the TGEs development in 1 min and 1 s time series of particle detector count rates. Synchronized time series of the near-surface electric field and lightning occurrences allows interconnecting two atmospheric phenomena. Registration of the Extensive Air Showers allows approaching problems of relation of the lightning occurrences and particle fluxes.