WorldWideScience

Sample records for adjoint difference method

  1. Ocean acoustic tomography from different receiver geometries using the adjoint method.

    Zhao, Xiaofeng; Wang, Dongxiao

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, an ocean acoustic tomography inversion using the adjoint method in a shallow water environment is presented. The propagation model used is an implicit Crank-Nicolson finite difference parabolic equation solver with a non-local boundary condition. Unlike previous matched-field processing works using the complex pressure fields as the observations, here, the observed signals are the transmission losses. Based on the code tests of the tangent linear model, the adjoint model, and the gradient, the optimization problem is solved by a gradient-based minimization algorithm. The inversions are performed in numerical simulations for two geometries: one in which hydrophones are sparsely distributed in the horizontal direction, and another in which the hydrophones are distributed vertically. The spacing in both cases is well beyond the half-wavelength threshold at which beamforming could be used. To deal with the ill-posedness of the inverse problem, a linear differential regularization operator of the sound-speed profile is used to smooth the inversion results. The L-curve criterion is adopted to select the regularization parameter, and the optimal value can be easily determined at the elbow of the logarithms of the residual norm of the measured-predicted fields and the norm of the penalty function. PMID:26723329

  2. Double-difference adjoint seismic tomography

    Yuan, Yanhua O.; Simons, Frederik J.; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-06-01

    We introduce a `double-difference' method for the inversion for seismic wavespeed structure based on adjoint tomography. Differences between seismic observations and model predictions at individual stations may arise from factors other than structural heterogeneity, such as errors in the assumed source-time function, inaccurate timings, and systematic uncertainties. To alleviate the corresponding nonuniqueness in the inverse problem, we construct differential measurements between stations, thereby reducing the influence of the source signature and systematic errors. We minimize the discrepancy between observations and simulations in terms of the differential measurements made on station pairs. We show how to implement the double-difference concept in adjoint tomography, both theoretically and in practice. We compare the sensitivities of absolute and differential measurements. The former provide absolute information on structure along the ray paths between stations and sources, whereas the latter explain relative (and thus higher-resolution) structural variations in areas close to the stations. Whereas in conventional tomography a measurement made on a single earthquake-station pair provides very limited structural information, in double-difference tomography one earthquake can actually resolve significant details of the structure. The double-difference methodology can be incorporated into the usual adjoint tomography workflow by simply pairing up all conventional measurements; the computational cost of the necessary adjoint simulations is largely unaffected. Rather than adding to the computational burden, the inversion of double-difference measurements merely modifies the construction of the adjoint sources for data assimilation.

  3. The adjoint equation method for constructing first integrals of difference equations

    A new method for finding first integrals of discrete equations is presented. It can be used for discrete equations which do not possess a variational (Lagrangian or Hamiltonian) formulation. The method is based on a newly established identity which links symmetries of the underlying discrete equations, solutions of the discrete adjoint equations and first integrals. The method is applied to an invariant mapping and to discretizations of second order and third order ordinary differential equations. In examples the set of independent first integrals makes it possible to find the general solution of the discrete equations. (paper)

  4. Double-difference adjoint seismic tomography

    Yuan, Yanhua O; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a `double-difference' method for the inversion for seismic wavespeed structure based on adjoint tomography. Differences between seismic observations and model predictions at individual stations may arise from factors other than structural heterogeneity, such as errors in the assumed source-time function, inaccurate timings, and systematic uncertainties. To alleviate the corresponding nonuniqueness in the inverse problem, we construct differential measurements between stations, thereby reducing the influence of the source signature and systematic errors. We minimize the discrepancy between observations and simulations in terms of the differential measurements made on station pairs. We show how to implement the double-difference concept in adjoint tomography, both theoretically and in practice. We compare the sensitivities of absolute and differential measurements. The former provide absolute information on structure along the ray paths between stations and sources, whereas the latter explain relat...

  5. High Order Adjoint Derivatives using ESDIRK Methods for Oil Reservoir Production Optimization

    Capolei, Andrea; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2012-01-01

    continuous adjoints . The high order integration scheme allows larger time steps and therefore faster solution times. We compare gradient computation by the continuous adjoint method to the discrete adjoint method and the finite-difference method. The methods are implemented for a two phase flow reservoir...... simulator. Computational experiments demonstrate that the accuracy of the sensitivities obtained by the adjoint methods are comparable to the accuracy obtained by the finite difference method. The continuous adjoint method is able to use a different time grid than the forward integration. Therefore, it can...

  6. Sensitivity analysis via reduced order adjoint method

    Notwithstanding the voluminous literature on adjoint sensitivity analysis, it has been generally dismissed by practitioners as cumbersome with limited value in realistic engineering models. This perception reflects two limitations about adjoint sensitivity analysis: a) its most effective application is limited to calculation of first-order variations; when higher order derivatives are required, it quickly becomes computationally inefficient; and b) the number of adjoint model evaluations depends on the number of responses, which renders it ineffective for multi-physics model where entire distributions, such as flux and power distribution, are often transferred between the various physics models. To overcome these challenges, this manuscript employs recent advances in reduced order modeling to re-cast the adjoint model equations into a form that renders its application to real reactor models practical. Past work applied reduced order modeling techniques to render reduction for general nonlinear high dimensional models by identifying mathematical subspaces, called active subspaces, that capture all dominant features of the model, including both linear and nonlinear variations. We demonstrate the application of these techniques to the calculation of first-order derivatives, or as commonly known sensitivity coefficients, for a fuel assembly model with many responses. We show that the computational cost becomes dependent on the physics model itself, via the so-called rank of the active subspace, rather than the number of responses or parameters. (author)

  7. A SYSTEMATIC FORMULATION OF THE CONTINUOUS ADJOINT METHOD APPLIED TO VISCOUS AERODYNAMIC DESIGN

    C. Castro*, C. Lozano**, F. Palacios*** and E. Zuazua****

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A continuous adjoint approach to aerodynamic design for viscous compressible flows on unstructuredgrids is developed, and three important problems raised in the continuous adjoint literature are solved. First, using tools of shape deformation of boundary integrals a generic adjoint formulation is developed withindependence of the kind of mesh used. Then, a systematic way of reducing the 2nd order derivative terms which arise is presented which avoids the need of using higher order numerical solvers to obtain accurateapproximations of the 2nd order derivatives. And finally, the class of admissible optimization functionals isclarified. Several remarks are made concerning the longstanding discrete vs. continuous adjoint dichotomy, with the emphasis not on the advantages or disadvantages of each method, but rather on the well-posedness of the approaches. The accuracy of the sensitivity derivatives is assessed by comparison with finite-difference computations, and the validity of the overall methodology is illustrated with design examples under demanding subsonic conditions.

  8. Mesh-free adjoint methods for nonlinear filters

    Daum, Fred

    2005-09-01

    We apply a new industrial strength numerical approximation, called the "mesh-free adjoint method", to solve the nonlinear filtering problem. This algorithm exploits the smoothness of the problem, unlike particle filters, and hence we expect that mesh-free adjoints are superior to particle filters for many practical applications. The nonlinear filter problem is equivalent to solving the Fokker-Planck equation in real time. The key idea is to use a good adaptive non-uniform quantization of state space to approximate the solution of the Fokker-Planck equation. In particular, the adjoint method computes the location of the nodes in state space to minimize errors in the final answer. This use of an adjoint is analogous to optimal control algorithms, but it is more interesting. The adjoint method is also analogous to importance sampling in particle filters, but it is better for four reasons: (1) it exploits the smoothness of the problem; (2) it explicitly minimizes the errors in the relevant functional; (3) it explicitly models the dynamics in state space; and (4) it can be used to compute a corrected value for the desired functional using the residuals. We will attempt to make this paper accessible to normal engineers who do not have PDEs for breakfast.

  9. A practical discrete-adjoint method for high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations

    Vishnampet, Ramanathan [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Bodony, Daniel J. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Freund, Jonathan B., E-mail: jbfreund@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Methods and computing hardware advances have enabled accurate predictions of complex compressible turbulence phenomena, such as the generation of jet noise that motivates the present effort. However, limited understanding of underlying physical mechanisms restricts the utility of such predictions since they do not, by themselves, indicate a route to design improvements. Gradient-based optimization using adjoints can circumvent the flow complexity to guide designs, though this is predicated on the availability of a sufficiently accurate solution of the forward and adjoint systems. These are challenging to obtain, since both the chaotic character of the turbulence and the typical use of discretizations near their resolution limits in order to efficiently represent its smaller scales will amplify any approximation errors made in the adjoint formulation. Formulating a practical exact adjoint that avoids such errors is especially challenging if it is to be compatible with state-of-the-art simulation methods used for the turbulent flow itself. Automatic differentiation (AD) can provide code to calculate a nominally exact adjoint, but existing general-purpose AD codes are inefficient to the point of being prohibitive for large-scale turbulence simulations. Here, we analyze the compressible flow equations as discretized using the same high-order workhorse methods used for many high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations, and formulate a practical space–time discrete-adjoint method without changing the basic discretization. A key step is the definition of a particular discrete analog of the continuous norm that defines our cost functional; our selection leads directly to an efficient Runge–Kutta-like scheme, though it would be just first-order accurate if used outside the adjoint formulation for time integration, with finite-difference spatial operators for the adjoint system. Its computational cost only modestly exceeds that of the flow equations. We confirm that

  10. STUDY ON THE ADJOINT METHOD IN DATA ASSIMILATION AND THE RELATED PROBLEMS

    吕咸青; 吴自库; 谷艺; 田纪伟

    2004-01-01

    It is not reasonable that one can only use the adjoint of model in data assimilation.The simulated numerical experiment shows that for the tidal model,the result of the adjoint of equation is almost the same as that of the adjoint of model:the averaged absolute difference of the amplitude between observations and simulation is less than 5.0 cm and that of the phase-lag is less than 5.0°.The results are both in good agreement with the observed M2 tide in the Bohai Sea and the Yellow Sea.For comparison,the traditional methods also have been used to simulate M2 tide in the Bohai Sea and the Yellow Sea.The initial guess values of the boundary conditions are given first,and then are adjusted to acquire the simulated results that are as close as possible to the observations.As the boundary conditions contain 72 values,which should be adjusted and how to adjust them can only be partially solved by adjusting them many times.The satisfied results are hard to acquire even gigantic efforts are done.Here,the automation of the treatment of the open boundary conditions is realized.The method is unique and superior to the traditional methods.It is emphasized that if the adjoint of equation is used,tedious and complicated mathematical deduction can be avoided.Therefore the adjoint of equation should attract much attention.

  11. Adjoint Formulation for an Embedded-Boundary Cartesian Method

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Murman, Scott M.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2004-01-01

    Many problems in aerodynamic design can be characterized by smooth and convex objective functions. This motivates the use of gradient-based algorithms, particularly for problems with a large number of design variables, to efficiently determine optimal shapes and configurations that maximize aerodynamic performance. Accurate and efficient computation of the gradient, however, remains a challenging task. In optimization problems where the number of design variables dominates the number of objectives and flow- dependent constraints, the cost of gradient computations can be significantly reduced by the use of the adjoint method. The problem of aerodynamic optimization using the adjoint method has been analyzed and validated for both structured and unstructured grids. The method has been applied to design problems governed by the potential, Euler, and Navier-Stokes equations and can be subdivided into the continuous and discrete formulations. Giles and Pierce provide a detailed review of both approaches. Most implementations rely on grid-perturbation or mapping procedures during the gradient computation that explicitly couple changes in the surface shape to the volume grid. The solution of the adjoint equation is usually accomplished using the same scheme that solves the governing flow equations. Examples of such code reuse include multistage Runge-Kutta schemes coupled with multigrid, approximate-factorization, line-implicit Gauss-Seidel, and also preconditioned GMRES. The development of the adjoint method for aerodynamic optimization problems on Cartesian grids has been limited. In contrast to implementations on structured and unstructured grids, Cartesian grid methods decouple the surface discretization from the volume grid. This feature makes Cartesian methods well suited for the automated analysis of complex geometry problems, and consequently a promising approach to aerodynamic optimization. Melvin e t al. developed an adjoint formulation for the TRANAIR code

  12. The adjoint sensitivity method of global electromagnetic induction for CHAMP magnetic data

    Complete text of publication follows. Martinec and McCreadie (2004) developed a time-domain spectral-finite element approach for the forward modelling of electromagnetic induction vector data as measured by the CHAMP satellite. Here, we present a new method of computing the sensitivity of the CHAMP electromagnetic induction data on the Earth's mantle electrical conductivity, which we term the adjoint sensitivity method. The forward and adjoint initial boundary-value problems, both solved in the time domain, are identical, except for the specification of prescribed boundary conditions. The respective boundary-value data at the satellite's altitude are the X magnetic component measured by the CHAMP vector magnetometer along satellite tracks for the forward method and the difference between the measured and predicted Z magnetic component for the adjoint method. The squares of these differences summed up over all CHAMP tracks determine the misfit. The sensitivity of the CHAMP data, that is the partial derivatives of the misfit function with respect to mantle conductivity parameters, are then determined by the scalar product of the forward and adjoint solutions, multiplied by the gradient of the conductivity and integrated over all CHAMP tracks. Such exactly determined sensitivities are checked against numerical differentiation of the misfit, and very good agreement is obtained. The attractiveness of the adjoint method lies in the fact that the adjoint sensitivities are calculated for little cost, regardless of the number of conductivity parameters. However, since the adjoint solution proceeds backwards in time, the forward solution must be stored at each time step, leading to memory requirements that are linear with respect to the number of steps undertaken. Having determined the sensitivities, we apply the conjugate gradient method to infer 1-D and 2-D conductivity structures of the Earth based on the CHAMP residual time serie (after the subtraction of static field

  13. Integration of the adjoint gamma quantum transport equation by the Monte Carlo method

    Comparative description and analysis of the direct and adjoint algorithms of calculation of gamma-quantum transmission in shielding using the Monte Carlo method have been carried out. Adjoint estimations for a number of monoenergetic sources have been considered. A brief description of ''COMETA'' program for BESM-6 computer reazaling direct and adjoint algorithms is presented. The program is modular-constructed which allows to widen it the new module-units being joined. Results of solution by the adjoint branch of two analog problems as compared to the analytical data are presented. These results confirm high efficiency of ''COMETA'' program

  14. Use of adjoint methods in the probabilistic finite element approach to fracture mechanics

    Liu, Wing Kam; Besterfield, Glen; Lawrence, Mark; Belytschko, Ted

    1988-01-01

    The adjoint method approach to probabilistic finite element methods (PFEM) is presented. When the number of objective functions is small compared to the number of random variables, the adjoint method is far superior to the direct method in evaluating the objective function derivatives with respect to the random variables. The PFEM is extended to probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) using an element which has the near crack-tip singular strain field embedded. Since only two objective functions (i.e., mode I and II stress intensity factors) are needed for PFM, the adjoint method is well suited.

  15. Source attribution of particulate matter pollution over North China with the adjoint method

    We quantify the source contributions to surface PM2.5 (fine particulate matter) pollution over North China from January 2013 to 2015 using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint with improved model horizontal resolution (1/4° × 5/16°) and aqueous-phase chemistry for sulfate production. The adjoint method attributes the PM2.5 pollution to emissions from different source sectors and chemical species at the model resolution. Wintertime surface PM2.5 over Beijing is contributed by emissions of organic carbon (27% of the total source contribution), anthropogenic fine dust (27%), and SO2 (14%), which are mainly from residential and industrial sources, followed by NH3 (13%) primarily from agricultural activities. About half of the Beijing pollution originates from sources outside of the city municipality. Adjoint analyses for other cities in North China all show significant regional pollution transport, supporting a joint regional control policy for effectively mitigating the PM2.5 air pollution. (letter)

  16. Source attribution of particulate matter pollution over North China with the adjoint method

    Zhang, Lin; Liu, Licheng; Zhao, Yuanhong; Gong, Sunling; Zhang, Xiaoye; Henze, Daven K.; Capps, Shannon L.; Fu, Tzung-May; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Yuxuan

    2015-08-01

    We quantify the source contributions to surface PM2.5 (fine particulate matter) pollution over North China from January 2013 to 2015 using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint with improved model horizontal resolution (1/4° × 5/16°) and aqueous-phase chemistry for sulfate production. The adjoint method attributes the PM2.5 pollution to emissions from different source sectors and chemical species at the model resolution. Wintertime surface PM2.5 over Beijing is contributed by emissions of organic carbon (27% of the total source contribution), anthropogenic fine dust (27%), and SO2 (14%), which are mainly from residential and industrial sources, followed by NH3 (13%) primarily from agricultural activities. About half of the Beijing pollution originates from sources outside of the city municipality. Adjoint analyses for other cities in North China all show significant regional pollution transport, supporting a joint regional control policy for effectively mitigating the PM2.5 air pollution.

  17. Adjoint transport methods for radiation-effects testing

    Adjoint transport has been exploited for some time for neutral particle calculations. For charged particles, however, production adjoint capability was not available until Morel developed the ability to solve coupled-photon-electron transport problems with production discrete ordinates codes. This represents a significant advance for many problems of interest, such as predicting bremsstrahlung yield from flash X-ray machines, internal electromagnetic pulse (IEMP) for photons incident on printed circuit boards, shielding requirements for electron dosimetry, and dose enhancement from photon irradiation of printed circuit boards. The authors demonstrate here that adjoint photon-electron transport is at least an order of magnitude more efficient than forward transport for optimizing bremsstrahlung yield from flash X-ray machine converters. This problem is particularly interesting since adjoint transport provides a good approximation for a variable geometry in addition to a variable source, due to the highly forward-peaked nature of the electron scattering. Normally, neither forward nor adjoint transport is efficient for studying a variable-geometry problem

  18. A numerical adjoint parabolic equation (PE) method for tomography and geoacoustic inversion in shallow water

    Hermand, Jean-Pierre; Berrada, Mohamed; Meyer, Matthias; Asch, Mark

    2005-09-01

    Recently, an analytic adjoint-based method of optimal nonlocal boundary control has been proposed for inversion of a waveguide acoustic field using the wide-angle parabolic equation [Meyer and Hermand, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 117, 2937-2948 (2005)]. In this paper a numerical extension of this approach is presented that allows the direct inversion for the geoacoustic parameters which are embedded in a spectral integral representation of the nonlocal boundary condition. The adjoint model is generated numerically and the inversion is carried out jointly across multiple frequencies. The paper further discusses the application of the numerical adjoint PE method for ocean acoustic tomography. To show the effectiveness of the implemented numerical adjoint, preliminary inversion results of water sound-speed profile and bottom acoustic properties will be shown for the YELLOW SHARK '94 experimental conditions.

  19. Adjoint Algorithm for CAD-Based Shape Optimization Using a Cartesian Method

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Adjoint solutions of the governing flow equations are becoming increasingly important for the development of efficient analysis and optimization algorithms. A well-known use of the adjoint method is gradient-based shape optimization. Given an objective function that defines some measure of performance, such as the lift and drag functionals, its gradient is computed at a cost that is essentially independent of the number of design variables (geometric parameters that control the shape). More recently, emerging adjoint applications focus on the analysis problem, where the adjoint solution is used to drive mesh adaptation, as well as to provide estimates of functional error bounds and corrections. The attractive feature of this approach is that the mesh-adaptation procedure targets a specific functional, thereby localizing the mesh refinement and reducing computational cost. Our focus is on the development of adjoint-based optimization techniques for a Cartesian method with embedded boundaries.12 In contrast t o implementations on structured and unstructured grids, Cartesian methods decouple the surface discretization from the volume mesh. This feature makes Cartesian methods well suited for the automated analysis of complex geometry problems, and consequently a promising approach to aerodynamic optimization. Melvin et developed an adjoint formulation for the TRANAIR code, which is based on the full-potential equation with viscous corrections. More recently, Dadone and Grossman presented an adjoint formulation for the Euler equations. In both approaches, a boundary condition is introduced to approximate the effects of the evolving surface shape that results in accurate gradient computation. Central to automated shape optimization algorithms is the issue of geometry modeling and control. The need to optimize complex, "real-life" geometry provides a strong incentive for the use of parametric-CAD systems within the optimization procedure. In previous work, we presented

  20. Comparison of three different methods of perturbing the potential vorticity field in mesoscale forecasts of Mediterranean heavy precipitation events: PV-gradient, PV-adjoint and PV-satellite

    Vich, M.; Romero, R.; Richard, E.; Arbogast, P.; Maynard, K.

    2010-09-01

    Heavy precipitation events occur regularly in the western Mediterranean region. These events often have a high impact on the society due to economic and personal losses. The improvement of the mesoscale numerical forecasts of these events can be used to prevent or minimize their impact on the society. In previous studies, two ensemble prediction systems (EPSs) based on perturbing the model initial and boundary conditions were developed and tested for a collection of high-impact MEDEX cyclonic episodes. These EPSs perturb the initial and boundary potential vorticity (PV) field through a PV inversion algorithm. This technique ensures modifications of all the meteorological fields without compromising the mass-wind balance. One EPS introduces the perturbations along the zones of the three-dimensional PV structure presenting the local most intense values and gradients of the field (a semi-objective choice, PV-gradient), while the other perturbs the PV field over the MM5 adjoint model calculated sensitivity zones (an objective method, PV-adjoint). The PV perturbations are set from a PV error climatology (PVEC) that characterizes typical PV errors in the ECMWF forecasts, both in intensity and displacement. This intensity and displacement perturbation of the PV field is chosen randomly, while its location is given by the perturbation zones defined in each ensemble generation method. Encouraged by the good results obtained by these two EPSs that perturb the PV field, a new approach based on a manual perturbation of the PV field has been tested and compared with the previous results. This technique uses the satellite water vapor (WV) observations to guide the correction of initial PV structures. The correction of the PV field intents to improve the match between the PV distribution and the WV image, taking advantage of the relation between dark and bright features of WV images and PV anomalies, under some assumptions. Afterwards, the PV inversion algorithm is applied to run

  1. Reconstruction of ocean circulation from sparse data using the adjoint method: LGM and the present

    Kurahashi-Nakamura, T.; Losch, M. J.; Paul, A.; Mulitza, S.; Schulz, M.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the behavior of the Earth's climate system under different conditions in the past is the basis for more robust projections of future climate. It is thought that the ocean circulation plays a very important role in the climate system, because it can greatly affect climate by dynamic-thermodynamic (as a medium of heat transport) and biogeochemical processes (by affecting the global carbon cycle). In this context, studying the period of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is particularly promising, as it represents a climate state that is very different from today. Furthermore the LGM, compared to other paleoperiods, is characterized by a relatively good paleo-data coverage. Unfortunately, the ocean circulation during the LGM is still uncertain, with a range of climate models estimating both a stronger and a weaker formation rate of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) as compared to the present rate. Here, we present a project aiming at reducing this uncertainty by combining proxy data with a numerical ocean model using variational techniques. Our approach, the so-called adjoint method, employs a quadratic cost function of model-data differences weighted by their prior error estimates. We seek an optimal state estimate at the global minimum of the cost function by varying the independent control variables such as initial conditions (e.g. temperature), boundary conditions (e.g. surface winds, heat flux), or internal parameters (e.g. vertical diffusivity). The adjoint or dual model computes the gradient of the cost function with respect to these control variables and thus provides the information required by gradient descent algorithms. The gradients themselves provide valuable information about the sensitivity of the system to perturbations in the control variables. We use the Massachusetts Institute of Technology ocean general circulation model (MITgcm) with a cubed-sphere grid system that avoids converging grid lines and pole singularities. This model code is

  2. Multi-objective optimization strategies using adjoint method and game theory in aerodynamics

    Zhili Tang

    2006-01-01

    There are currently three different game strategies originated in economics:(1) Cooperative games (Pareto front),(2)Competitive games (Nash game) and (3)Hierarchical games (Stackelberg game).Each game achieves different equilibria with different performance,and their players play different roles in the games.Here,we introduced game concept into aerodynamic design, and combined it with adjoint method to solve multicriteria aerodynamic optimization problems.The performance distinction of the equilibria of these three game strategies was investigated by numerical experiments.We computed Pareto front, Nash and Stackelberg equilibria of the same optimization problem with two conflicting and hierarchical targets under different parameterizations by using the deterministic optimization method.The numerical results show clearly that all the equilibria solutions are inferior to the Pareto front.Non-dominated Pareto front solutions are obtained,however the CPU cost to capture a set of solutions makes the Pareto front an expensive tool to the designer.

  3. Adaptive mesh refinement and adjoint methods in geophysics simulations

    Burstedde, Carsten

    2013-04-01

    required by human intervention and analysis. Specifying an objective functional that quantifies the misfit between the simulation outcome and known constraints and then minimizing it through numerical optimization can serve as an automated technique for parameter identification. As suggested by the similarity in formulation, the numerical algorithm is closely related to the one used for goal-oriented error estimation. One common point is that the so-called adjoint equation needs to be solved numerically. We will outline the derivation and implementation of these methods and discuss some of their pros and cons, supported by numerical results.

  4. Computing adjoint-weighted kinetics parameters in TRIPOLI-4® by the Iterated Fission Probability method

    Highlights: • We present a Monte Carlo method for computing the adjoint-weighted kinetics parameters via the IFP algorithm. • Extensive verification tests are performed on simple models. • Several validation tests are performed on the measured values of effective delayed neutron fraction and Rossi alpha. - Abstract: The analysis of neutron kinetics relies on the knowledge of adjoint-weighted kinetics parameters, which are key to safety issues in the context of transient or accidental reactor behavior. The Iterated Fission Probability (IFP) method allows the adjoint-weighted mean generation time and delayed neutron fraction to be computed within a Monte Carlo power iteration calculation. In this work we describe the specific features of the implementation of the IFP algorithm in the reference Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-4® developed at CEA. Several verification and validation tests are discussed, and the impact of nuclear data libraries, IFP cycle length and inter-cycle correlations are analyzed in detail

  5. Assessing the Impact of Observations on Numerical Weather Forecasts Using the Adjoint Method

    Gelaro, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The adjoint of a data assimilation system provides a flexible and efficient tool for estimating observation impacts on short-range weather forecasts. The impacts of any or all observations can be estimated simultaneously based on a single execution of the adjoint system. The results can be easily aggregated according to data type, location, channel, etc., making this technique especially attractive for examining the impacts of new hyper-spectral satellite instruments and for conducting regular, even near-real time, monitoring of the entire observing system. This talk provides a general overview of the adjoint method, including the theoretical basis and practical implementation of the technique. Results are presented from the adjoint-based observation impact monitoring tool in NASA's GEOS-5 global atmospheric data assimilation and forecast system. When performed in conjunction with standard observing system experiments (OSEs), the adjoint results reveal both redundancies and dependencies between observing system impacts as observations are added or removed from the assimilation system. Understanding these dependencies may be important for optimizing the use of the current observational network and defining requirements for future observing systems

  6. Adjoint Parameter Sensitivity Analysis for the Hydrodynamic Lattice Boltzmann Method with Applications to Design Optimization

    Pingen, Georg; Evgrafov, Anton; Maute, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    We present an adjoint parameter sensitivity analysis formulation and solution strategy for the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The focus is on design optimization applications, in particular topology optimization. The lattice Boltzmann method is briefly described with an in-depth discussion of...... generalized geometry optimization formulation and derive the corresponding sensitivity analysis for the single relaxation LBM for both topology and shape optimization applications. Using numerical examples, we verify the accuracy of the analytical sensitivity analysis through a comparison with finite...... differences. In addition, we show that for fluidic topology optimization a scaled volume constraint should be used to obtain the desired "0-1" optimal solutions. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  7. Local-in-Time Adjoint-Based Method for Optimal Control/Design Optimization of Unsteady Compressible Flows

    Yamaleev, N. K.; Diskin, B.; Nielsen, E. J.

    2009-01-01

    .We study local-in-time adjoint-based methods for minimization of ow matching functionals subject to the 2-D unsteady compressible Euler equations. The key idea of the local-in-time method is to construct a very accurate approximation of the global-in-time adjoint equations and the corresponding sensitivity derivative by using only local information available on each time subinterval. In contrast to conventional time-dependent adjoint-based optimization methods which require backward-in-time integration of the adjoint equations over the entire time interval, the local-in-time method solves local adjoint equations sequentially over each time subinterval. Since each subinterval contains relatively few time steps, the storage cost of the local-in-time method is much lower than that of the global adjoint formulation, thus making the time-dependent optimization feasible for practical applications. The paper presents a detailed comparison of the local- and global-in-time adjoint-based methods for minimization of a tracking functional governed by the Euler equations describing the ow around a circular bump. Our numerical results show that the local-in-time method converges to the same optimal solution obtained with the global counterpart, while drastically reducing the memory cost as compared to the global-in-time adjoint formulation.

  8. On the Finite Volume Element Method for Self-Adjoint Parabolic Integrodifferential Equations

    Mohamed Bahaj; Anas Rachid

    2013-01-01

    Finite volume element schemes for non-self-adjoint parabolic integrodifferential equations are derived and stated. For the spatially discrete scheme, optimal-order error estimates in , , and , norms for are obtained. In this paper, we also study the lumped mass modification. Based on the Crank-Nicolson method, a time discretization scheme is discussed and related error estimates are derived.

  9. Method of tallying adjoint fluence and calculating kinetics parameters in Monte Carlo codes

    A method of using iterated fission probability to estimate the adjoint fluence during particles simulation, and using it as the weighting function to calculate kinetics parameters βeff and A in Monte Carlo codes, was introduced in this paper. Implements of this method in continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP and multi-group Monte Carlo code MCMG are both elaborated. Verification results show that, with regardless additional computing cost, using this method, the adjoint fluence accounted by MCMG matches well with the result computed by ANISN, and the kinetics parameters calculated by MCNP agree very well with benchmarks. This method is proved to be reliable, and the function of calculating kinetics parameters in Monte Carlo codes is carried out effectively, which could be the basement for Monte Carlo codes' utility in the analysis of nuclear reactors' transient behavior. (authors)

  10. Active adjoint modeling method in microwave induced thermoacoustic tomography for breast tumor.

    Zhu, Xiaozhang; Zhao, Zhiqin; Wang, Jinguo; Chen, Guoping; Liu, Qing Huo

    2014-07-01

    To improve the model-based inversion performance of microwave induced thermoacoustic tomography for breast tumor imaging, an active adjoint modeling (AAM) method is proposed. It aims to provide a more realistic breast acoustic model used for tumor inversion as the background by actively measuring and reconstructing the structural heterogeneity of human breast environment. It utilizes the reciprocity of acoustic sensors, and adapts the adjoint tomography method from seismic exploration. With the reconstructed acoustic model of breast environment, the performance of model-based inversion method such as time reversal mirror is improved significantly both in contrast and accuracy. To prove the advantage of AAM, a checkerboard pattern model and anatomical realistic breast models have been used in full wave numerical simulations. PMID:24956614

  11. Topology Optimization of Turbulent Fluid Flow with a Sensitive Porosity Adjoint Method (SPAM)

    Philippi, B

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive porosity adjoint method (SPAM) for optimizing the topology of fluid machines has been proposed. A sensitivity function with respect to the porosity has been developed. In the first step of the optimization process, porous media are introduced into the flow regime according to the sensitivity function. Then the optimized porous media are transformed to solid walls. The turbulent flow in porous media is accounted for by a modified eddy-viscosity based turbulence model. Its influence on the adjoint equations is nevertheless neglected, which refers to the so called frozen turbulence assumption. A test case of application in terms of the turbulent rough wall channel flow shows that a considerable reduction of the objective function can be obtained by this method. The transformation from porous media to solid walls may have important effect on the optimization results.

  12. Adjoint-based error estimation and mesh adaptation for the correction procedure via reconstruction method

    Shi, Lei; Wang, Z. J.

    2015-08-01

    Adjoint-based mesh adaptive methods are capable of distributing computational resources to areas which are important for predicting an engineering output. In this paper, we develop an adjoint-based h-adaptation approach based on the high-order correction procedure via reconstruction formulation (CPR) to minimize the output or functional error. A dual-consistent CPR formulation of hyperbolic conservation laws is developed and its dual consistency is analyzed. Super-convergent functional and error estimate for the output with the CPR method are obtained. Factors affecting the dual consistency, such as the solution point distribution, correction functions, boundary conditions and the discretization approach for the non-linear flux divergence term, are studied. The presented method is then used to perform simulations for the 2D Euler and Navier-Stokes equations with mesh adaptation driven by the adjoint-based error estimate. Several numerical examples demonstrate the ability of the presented method to dramatically reduce the computational cost comparing with uniform grid refinement.

  13. Solving Large-Scale Inverse Magnetostatic Problems using the Adjoint Method

    Bruckner, Florian; Wautischer, Gregor; Huber, Christian; Vogler, Christoph; Hinze, Michael; Suess, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    An efficient algorithm for the reconstruction of the magnetization state within magnetic components is presented. The occurring inverse magnetostatic problem is solved by means of an adjoint approach, based on the Fredkin-Koehler method for the solution of the forward problem. Due to the use of hybrid FEM-BEM coupling combined with matrix compression techniques the resulting algorithm is well suited for large-scale problems. Furthermore the reconstruction of the magnetization state within a permanent magnet is demonstrated.

  14. Practical Aerodynamic Design Optimization Based on the Navier-Stokes Equations and a Discrete Adjoint Method

    Grossman, Bernard

    1999-01-01

    The technical details are summarized below: Compressible and incompressible versions of a three-dimensional unstructured mesh Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver have been differentiated and resulting derivatives have been verified by comparisons with finite differences and a complex-variable approach. In this implementation, the turbulence model is fully coupled with the flow equations in order to achieve this consistency. The accuracy demonstrated in the current work represents the first time that such an approach has been successfully implemented. The accuracy of a number of simplifying approximations to the linearizations of the residual have been examined. A first-order approximation to the dependent variables in both the adjoint and design equations has been investigated. The effects of a "frozen" eddy viscosity and the ramifications of neglecting some mesh sensitivity terms were also examined. It has been found that none of the approximations yielded derivatives of acceptable accuracy and were often of incorrect sign. However, numerical experiments indicate that an incomplete convergence of the adjoint system often yield sufficiently accurate derivatives, thereby significantly lowering the time required for computing sensitivity information. The convergence rate of the adjoint solver relative to the flow solver has been examined. Inviscid adjoint solutions typically require one to four times the cost of a flow solution, while for turbulent adjoint computations, this ratio can reach as high as eight to ten. Numerical experiments have shown that the adjoint solver can stall before converging the solution to machine accuracy, particularly for viscous cases. A possible remedy for this phenomenon would be to include the complete higher-order linearization in the preconditioning step, or to employ a simple form of mesh sequencing to obtain better approximations to the solution through the use of coarser meshes. . An efficient surface parameterization based

  15. First-arrival traveltime tomography for anisotropic media using the adjoint-state method

    Waheed, Umair bin

    2016-05-27

    Traveltime tomography using transmission data has been widely used for static corrections and for obtaining near-surface models for seismic depth imaging. More recently, it is also being used to build initial models for full-waveform inversion. The classic traveltime tomography approach based on ray tracing has difficulties in handling large data sets arising from current seismic acquisition surveys. Some of these difficulties can be addressed using the adjoint-state method, due to its low memory requirement and numerical efficiency. By coupling the gradient computation to nonlinear optimization, it avoids the need for explicit computation of the Fréchet derivative matrix. Furthermore, its cost is equivalent to twice the solution of the forward-modeling problem, irrespective of the size of the input data. The presence of anisotropy in the subsurface has been well established during the past few decades. The improved seismic images obtained by incorporating anisotropy into the seismic processing workflow justify the effort. However, previous literature on the adjoint-state method has only addressed the isotropic approximation of the subsurface. We have extended the adjoint-state technique for first-arrival traveltime tomography to vertical transversely isotropic (VTI) media. Because δ is weakly resolvable from surface seismic alone, we have developed the mathematical framework and procedure to invert for vNMO and η. Our numerical tests on the VTI SEAM model demonstrate the ability of the algorithm to invert for near-surface model parameters and reveal the accuracy achievable by the algorithm.

  16. Adjoint-based deviational Monte Carlo methods for phonon transport calculations

    Péraud, Jean-Philippe M.; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas G.

    2015-06-01

    In the field of linear transport, adjoint formulations exploit linearity to derive powerful reciprocity relations between a variety of quantities of interest. In this paper, we develop an adjoint formulation of the linearized Boltzmann transport equation for phonon transport. We use this formulation for accelerating deviational Monte Carlo simulations of complex, multiscale problems. Benefits include significant computational savings via direct variance reduction, or by enabling formulations which allow more efficient use of computational resources, such as formulations which provide high resolution in a particular phase-space dimension (e.g., spectral). We show that the proposed adjoint-based methods are particularly well suited to problems involving a wide range of length scales (e.g., nanometers to hundreds of microns) and lead to computational methods that can calculate quantities of interest with a cost that is independent of the system characteristic length scale, thus removing the traditional stiffness of kinetic descriptions. Applications to problems of current interest, such as simulation of transient thermoreflectance experiments or spectrally resolved calculation of the effective thermal conductivity of nanostructured materials, are presented and discussed in detail.

  17. Methods of Monte Carlo biasing using two-dimensional discrete ordinates adjoint flux

    Tang, J.S.; Stevens, P.N.; Hoffman, T.J.

    1976-06-01

    Methods of biasing three-dimensional deep penetration Monte Carlo calculations using importance functions obtained from a two-dimensional discrete ordinates adjoint calculation have been developed. The important distinction was made between the applications of the point value and the event value to alter the random walk in Monte Carlo analysis of radiation transport. The biasing techniques developed are the angular probability biasing which alters the collision kernel using the point value as the importance function and the path length biasing which alters the transport kernel using the event value as the importance function. Source location biasings using the step importance function and the scalar adjoint flux obtained from the two-dimensional discrete ordinates adjoint calculation were also investigated. The effects of the biasing techniques to Monte Carlo calculations have been investigated for neutron transport through a thick concrete shield with a penetrating duct. Source location biasing, angular probability biasing, and path length biasing were employed individually and in various combinations. Results of the biased Monte Carlo calculations were compared with the standard Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates calculations.

  18. Continuous-Energy Adjoint Flux and Perturbation Calculation using the Iterated Fission Probability Method in Monte Carlo Code TRIPOLI-4® and Underlying Applications

    Truchet, G.; Leconte, P.; Peneliau, Y.; Santamarina, A.; Malvagi, F.

    2014-06-01

    Pile-oscillation experiments are performed in the MINERVE reactor at the CEA Cadarache to improve nuclear data accuracy. In order to precisely calculate small reactivity variations (TRIPOLI-4® by using the eigenvalue difference method. This "direct" method has shown limitations in the evaluation of very small reactivity effects because it needs to reach a very small variance associated to the reactivity in both states. To answer this problem, it has been decided to implement the exact perturbation theory in TRIPOLI-4® and, consequently, to calculate a continuous-energy adjoint flux. The Iterated Fission Probability (IFP) method was chosen because it has shown great results in some other Monte Carlo codes. The IFP method uses a forward calculation to compute the adjoint flux, and consequently, it does not rely on complex code modifications but on the physical definition of the adjoint flux as a phase-space neutron importance. In the first part of this paper, the IFP method implemented in TRIPOLI-4® is described. To illustrate the effciency of the method, several adjoint fluxes are calculated and compared with their equivalent obtained by the deterministic code APOLLO-2. The new implementation can calculate angular adjoint flux. In the second part, a procedure to carry out an exact perturbation calculation is described. A single cell benchmark has been used to test the accuracy of the method, compared with the "direct" estimation of the perturbation. Once again the method based on the IFP shows good agreement for a calculation time far more inferior to the "direct" method. The main advantage of the method is that the relative accuracy of the reactivity variation does not depend on the magnitude of the variation itself, which allows us to calculate very small reactivity perturbations with high precision. Other applications of this perturbation method are presented and tested like the calculation of exact kinetic parameters (βeff, Λeff) or sensitivity parameters.

  19. An Evaluation of the Adjoint Flux Using the Collision Probability Method for the Hybrid Monte Carlo Radiation Shielding Analysis

    It is noted that the analog Monte Carlo method has low calculation efficiency at deep penetration problems such as radiation shielding analysis. In order to increase the calculation efficiency, variance reduction techniques have been introduced and applied for the shielding calculation. To optimize the variance reduction technique, the hybrid Monte Carlo method was introduced. For the determination of the parameters using the hybrid Monte Carlo method, the adjoint flux should be calculated by the deterministic methods. In this study, the collision probability method is applied to calculate adjoint flux. The solution of integration transport equation in the collision probability method is modified to calculate the adjoint flux approximately even for complex and arbitrary geometries. For the calculation, C++ program is developed. By using the calculated adjoint flux, importance parameters of each cell in shielding material are determined and used for variance reduction of transport calculation. In order to evaluate calculation efficiency with the proposed method, shielding calculations are performed with MCNPX 2.7. In this study, a method to calculate the adjoint flux in using the Monte Carlo variance reduction was proposed to improve Monte Carlo calculation efficiency of thick shielding problem. The importance parameter for each cell of shielding material is determined by calculating adjoint flux with the modified collision probability method. In order to calculate adjoint flux with the proposed method, C++ program is developed. The results show that the proposed method can efficiently increase the FOM of transport calculation. It is expected that the proposed method can be utilize for the calculation efficiency in thick shielding calculation

  20. Reentry-Vehicle Shape Optimization Using a Cartesian Adjoint Method and CAD Geometry

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    A DJOINT solutions of the governing flow equations are becoming increasingly important for the development of efficient analysis and optimization algorithms. A well-known use of the adjoint method is gradient-based shape. Given an objective function that defines some measure of performance, such as the lift and drag functionals, its gradient is computed at a cost that is essentially independent of the number of design variables (e.g., geometric parameters that control the shape). Classic aerodynamic applications of gradient-based optimization include the design of cruise configurations for transonic and supersonic flow, as well as the design of high-lift systems. are perhaps the most promising approach for addressing the issues of flow solution automation for aerodynamic design problems. In these methods, the discretization of the wetted surface is decoupled from that of the volume mesh. This not only enables fast and robust mesh generation for geometry of arbitrary complexity, but also facilitates access to geometry modeling and manipulation using parametric computer-aided design (CAD). In previous work on Cartesian adjoint solvers, Melvin et al. developed an adjoint formulation for the TRANAIR code, which is based on the full-potential equation with viscous corrections. More recently, Dadone and Grossman presented an adjoint formulation for the two-dimensional Euler equations using a ghost-cell method to enforce the wall boundary conditions. In Refs. 18 and 19, we presented an accurate and efficient algorithm for the solution of the adjoint Euler equations discretized on Cartesian meshes with embedded, cut-cell boundaries. Novel aspects of the algorithm were the computation of surface shape sensitivities for triangulations based on parametric-CAD models and the linearization of the coupling between the surface triangulation and the cut-cells. The accuracy of the gradient computation was verified using several three-dimensional test cases, which included design

  1. Development of an adjoint sensitivity method for site characterization, uncertainty analysis, and code calibration/validation

    Lu, A.H.

    1991-09-01

    The adjoint method is applied to groundwater flow-mass transport coupled equations in variably saturated media. The sensitivity coefficients derived by this method can be calculated by a single execution for each performance measure regardless of the number of parameters in question. The method provides an efficient and effective way to rank the importance of the parameters, so that data collection can be guided in support of site characterization programs. The developed code will facilitate the sensitivity/uncertainty analysis in both model prediction and model calibration/validation. 13 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Development of an adjoint sensitivity method for site characterization, uncertainty analysis, and code calibration/validation

    The adjoint method is applied to groundwater flow-mass transport coupled equations in variably saturated media. The sensitivity coefficients derived by this method can be calculated by a single execution for each performance measure regardless of the number of parameters in question. The method provides an efficient and effective way to rank the importance of the parameters, so that data collection can be guided in support of site characterization programs. The developed code will facilitate the sensitivity/uncertainty analysis in both model prediction and model calibration/validation. 13 refs., 1 tab

  3. Adjoint code generator

    CHENG Qiang; CAO JianWen; WANG Bin; ZHANG HaiBin

    2009-01-01

    The adjoint code generator (ADG) is developed to produce the adjoint codes, which are used to analytically calculate gradients and the Hessian-vector products with the costs independent of the number of the independent variables. Different from other automatic differentiation tools, the implementation of ADG has advantages of using the least program behavior decomposition method and several static dependence analysis techniques. In this paper we first address the concerned concepts and fundamentals, and then introduce the functionality and the features of ADG. In particular, we also discuss the design architecture of ADG and implementation details including the recomputation and storing strategy and several techniques for code optimization. Some experimental results in several applications are presented at the end.

  4. The Adjoint Method Formulation for an Inverse Problem in the Generalized Black-Scholes Model

    PIERRE NGNEPIEBA

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A general framework is developed to treat optimal control problems for a generalized Black-Scholes model, which is used for option pricing. The volatility function is retrieved from a set of market observations. The optimal volatility function is found by minimizing the cost functional measuring the discrepancy between the model solution (pricing and the observed market price, via the unconstrained minimization algorithm of the quasi-Newton limited memory type. The gradient is computed via the adjoint method. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated on an European call option.

  5. Adjoint Sensitivity Computations for an Embedded-Boundary Cartesian Mesh Method and CAD Geometry

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis,Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Cartesian-mesh methods are perhaps the most promising approach for addressing the issues of flow solution automation for aerodynamic design problems. In these methods, the discretization of the wetted surface is decoupled from that of the volume mesh. This not only enables fast and robust mesh generation for geometry of arbitrary complexity, but also facilitates access to geometry modeling and manipulation using parametric Computer-Aided Design (CAD) tools. Our goal is to combine the automation capabilities of Cartesian methods with an eficient computation of design sensitivities. We address this issue using the adjoint method, where the computational cost of the design sensitivities, or objective function gradients, is esseutially indepeudent of the number of design variables. In previous work, we presented an accurate and efficient algorithm for the solution of the adjoint Euler equations discretized on Cartesian meshes with embedded, cut-cell boundaries. Novel aspects of the algorithm included the computation of surface shape sensitivities for triangulations based on parametric-CAD models and the linearization of the coupling between the surface triangulation and the cut-cells. The objective of the present work is to extend our adjoint formulation to problems involving general shape changes. Central to this development is the computation of volume-mesh sensitivities to obtain a reliable approximation of the objective finction gradient. Motivated by the success of mesh-perturbation schemes commonly used in body-fitted unstructured formulations, we propose an approach based on a local linearization of a mesh-perturbation scheme similar to the spring analogy. This approach circumvents most of the difficulties that arise due to non-smooth changes in the cut-cell layer as the boundary shape evolves and provides a consistent approximation tot he exact gradient of the discretized abjective function. A detailed gradient accurace study is presented to verify our approach

  6. Aerodynamic Optimization of the Nose Shape of a Train Using the Adjoint Method

    Jorge Munoz-Paniagua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The adjoint method is used in this paper for the aerodynamic optimization of the nose shape of a train. This method has been extensively applied in aircraft or ground vehicle aerodynamic optimization, but is still in progress in train aerodynamics. Here we consider this innovative optimization method and present its application to reduce the aerodynamic drag when the train is subjected to front wind. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method, highlighting the requirements, limitations and capabilities of it. Furthermore, a significant reduction of the aerodynamic drag in a short number of solver calls is aimed as well. The independence of the computational cost with respect to the number of design variables that define the optimal candidate is stressed as the most interesting characteristic of the adjoint method. This behavior permits a more complete modification of the shape of the train nose because the number of design variables is not a constraint anymore. The information obtained from the sensitivity field permits determining the regions of the geometry where a small modification of the nose shape might introduce a larger improvement of the train performance. A good agreement between this information and the successive geometry modifications is observed here.

  7. Parallelized Three-Dimensional Resistivity Inversion Using Finite Elements And Adjoint State Methods

    Schaa, Ralf; Gross, Lutz; Du Plessis, Jaco

    2015-04-01

    The resistivity method is one of the oldest geophysical exploration methods, which employs one pair of electrodes to inject current into the ground and one or more pairs of electrodes to measure the electrical potential difference. The potential difference is a non-linear function of the subsurface resistivity distribution described by an elliptic partial differential equation (PDE) of the Poisson type. Inversion of measured potentials solves for the subsurface resistivity represented by PDE coefficients. With increasing advances in multichannel resistivity acquisition systems (systems with more than 60 channels and full waveform recording are now emerging), inversion software require efficient storage and solver algorithms. We developed the finite element solver Escript, which provides a user-friendly programming environment in Python to solve large-scale PDE-based problems (see https://launchpad.net/escript-finley). Using finite elements, highly irregular shaped geology and topography can readily be taken into account. For the 3D resistivity problem, we have implemented the secondary potential approach, where the PDE is decomposed into a primary potential caused by the source current and the secondary potential caused by changes in subsurface resistivity. The primary potential is calculated analytically, and the boundary value problem for the secondary potential is solved using nodal finite elements. This approach removes the singularity caused by the source currents and provides more accurate 3D resistivity models. To solve the inversion problem we apply a 'first optimize then discretize' approach using the quasi-Newton scheme in form of the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (L-BFGS) method (see Gross & Kemp 2013). The evaluation of the cost function requires the solution of the secondary potential PDE for each source current and the solution of the corresponding adjoint-state PDE for the cost function gradients with respect to the subsurface

  8. A finite-volume Eulerian-Lagrangian localized adjoint method for solution of the advection-dispersion equation

    Healy, R.W.; Russell, T.F.

    1993-01-01

    Test results demonstrate that the finite-volume Eulerian-Lagrangian localized adjoint method (FVELLAM) outperforms standard finite-difference methods for solute transport problems that are dominated by advection. FVELLAM systematically conserves mass globally with all types of boundary conditions. Integrated finite differences, instead of finite elements, are used to approximate the governing equation. This approach, in conjunction with a forward tracking scheme, greatly facilitates mass conservation. The mass storage integral is numerically evaluated at the current time level, and quadrature points are then tracked forward in time to the next level. Forward tracking permits straightforward treatment of inflow boundaries, thus avoiding the inherent problem in backtracking of characteristic lines intersecting inflow boundaries. FVELLAM extends previous results by obtaining mass conservation locally on Lagrangian space-time elements. -from Authors

  9. Source attribution of PM2.5 pollution over North China using the adjoint method

    Zhang, L.; Liu, L.; Zhao, Y.; Gong, S.; Henze, D. K.

    2014-12-01

    Conventional methods for source attribution of air pollution are based on measurement statistics (such as Positive Matrix Factorization) or sensitivity simulations with a chemical transport model (CTM). These methods generally ignore the nonlinear chemistry associated with the pollution formation or require unaffordable computational time. Here we use the adjoint of GEOS-Chem CTM at 0.25x0.3125 degree resolution to examine the sources contributing to the PM2.5 pollution over North China in winter 2013. We improved the model sulfate simulation by implementing the aqueous-phase oxidation of S(IV) by nitrogen dioxide. The adjoint results provide detailed source information at the model underlying grid resolution including source types and sectors. We show that PM2.5 pollution over Beijing and Baoding (Hebei) in winter was largely contributed by the large-scale residential and industrial burnings, and ammonia (NH3) emissions from agriculture activities. Nearly half of pollution was transported from outside of the city domains, and accumulated over 2-3 days. We also show under the current emission conditions, the PM2.5 concentrations over North China are more sensitive to NH3 emissions than NOx and SO2 emissions.

  10. The method of rigged spaces in singular perturbation theory of self-adjoint operators

    Koshmanenko, Volodymyr; Koshmanenko, Nataliia

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents the newly developed method of rigged Hilbert spaces as a modern approach in singular perturbation theory. A key notion of this approach is the Lax-Berezansky triple of Hilbert spaces embedded one into another, which specifies the well-known Gelfand topological triple. All kinds of singular interactions described by potentials supported on small sets (like the Dirac δ-potentials, fractals, singular measures, high degree super-singular expressions) admit a rigorous treatment only in terms of the equipped spaces and their scales. The main idea of the method is to use singular perturbations to change inner products in the starting rigged space, and the construction of the perturbed operator by the Berezansky canonical isomorphism (which connects the positive and negative spaces from a new rigged triplet). The approach combines three powerful tools of functional analysis based on the Birman-Krein-Vishik theory of self-adjoint extensions of symmetric operators, the theory of singular quadra...

  11. Discrete SLn-connections and self-adjoint difference operators on 2-dimensional manifolds

    The programme of discretization of famous completely integrable systems and associated linear operators was launched in the 1990s. In particular, the properties of second-order difference operators on triangulated manifolds and equilateral triangular lattices have been studied by Novikov and Dynnikov since 1996. This study included Laplace transformations, new discretizations of complex analysis, and new discretizations of GLn-connections on triangulated n-dimensional manifolds. A general theory of discrete GLn-connections 'of rank one' has been developed (see the Introduction for definitions). The problem of distinguishing the subclass of SLn-connections (and unimodular SLn± -connections, which satisfy detA = ±1) has not been solved. In the present paper it is shown that these connections play an important role (which is similar to the role of magnetic fields in the continuous case) in the theory of self-adjoint Schrödinger difference operators on equilateral triangular lattices in ℝ2. In Appendix 1 a complete characterization is given of unimodular SLn± -connections of rank 1 for all n > 1, thus correcting a mistake (it was wrongly claimed that they reduce to a canonical connection for n > 2). With the help of a communication from Korepanov, a complete clarification is provided of how the classical theory of electrical circuits and star-triangle transformations is connected with the discrete Laplace transformations on triangular lattices. Bibliography: 29 titles

  12. Recent advances in the spectral green's function method for monoenergetic slab-geometry fixed-source adjoint transport problems in S{sub N} formulation

    Curbelo, Jesus P.; Alves Filho, Hermes; Barros, Ricardo C., E-mail: jperez@iprj.uerj.br, E-mail: halves@iprj.uerj.br, E-mail: rcbarros@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Instituto Politecnico. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Modelagem Computacional; Hernandez, Carlos R.G., E-mail: cgh@instec.cu [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba)

    2015-07-01

    The spectral Green's function (SGF) method is a numerical method that is free of spatial truncation errors for slab-geometry fixed-source discrete ordinates (S{sub N}) adjoint problems. The method is based on the standard spatially discretized adjoint S{sub N} balance equations and a nonstandard adjoint auxiliary equation expressing the node-average adjoint angular flux, in each discretization node, as a weighted combination of the node-edge outgoing adjoint fluxes. The auxiliary equation contains parameters which act as Green's functions for the cell-average adjoint angular flux. These parameters are determined by means of a spectral analysis which yields the local general solution of the S{sub N} equations within each node of the discretization grid. In this work a number of advances in the SGF adjoint method are presented: the method is extended to adjoint S{sub N} problems considering linearly anisotropic scattering and non-zero prescribed boundary conditions for the forward source-detector problem. Numerical results to typical model problems are considered to illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of the o offered method. (author)

  13. Recent advances in the spectral green's function method for monoenergetic slab-geometry fixed-source adjoint transport problems in SN formulation

    The spectral Green's function (SGF) method is a numerical method that is free of spatial truncation errors for slab-geometry fixed-source discrete ordinates (SN) adjoint problems. The method is based on the standard spatially discretized adjoint SN balance equations and a nonstandard adjoint auxiliary equation expressing the node-average adjoint angular flux, in each discretization node, as a weighted combination of the node-edge outgoing adjoint fluxes. The auxiliary equation contains parameters which act as Green's functions for the cell-average adjoint angular flux. These parameters are determined by means of a spectral analysis which yields the local general solution of the SN equations within each node of the discretization grid. In this work a number of advances in the SGF adjoint method are presented: the method is extended to adjoint SN problems considering linearly anisotropic scattering and non-zero prescribed boundary conditions for the forward source-detector problem. Numerical results to typical model problems are considered to illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of the o offered method. (author)

  14. Comparison of Evolutionary (Genetic) Algorithm and Adjoint Methods for Multi-Objective Viscous Airfoil Optimizations

    Pulliam, T. H.; Nemec, M.; Holst, T.; Zingg, D. W.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A comparison between an Evolutionary Algorithm (EA) and an Adjoint-Gradient (AG) Method applied to a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code for airfoil design is presented. Both approaches use a common function evaluation code, the steady-state explicit part of the code,ARC2D. The parameterization of the design space is a common B-spline approach for an airfoil surface, which together with a common griding approach, restricts the AG and EA to the same design space. Results are presented for a class of viscous transonic airfoils in which the optimization tradeoff between drag minimization as one objective and lift maximization as another, produces the multi-objective design space. Comparisons are made for efficiency, accuracy and design consistency.

  15. Adjoint problem in duct acoustics and its reciprocity to forward problem by the Time Domain Wave Packet method

    Kocaogul, Ibrahim; Hu, Fang; Li, Xiaodong

    2014-03-01

    Radiation of acoustic waves at all frequencies can be obtained by Time Domain Wave Packet (TDWP) method in a single time domain computation. Other benefit of the TDWP method is that it makes possible the separation of acoustic and instability wave in the shear flow. The TDWP method is also particularly useful for computations in the ducted or waveguide environments where incident wave modes can be imposed cleanly without a potentially long transient period. The adjoint equations for the linearized Euler equations are formulated for the Cartesian coordinates. Analytical solution for adjoint equations is derived by using Green's function in 2D and 3D. The derivation of reciprocal relations is presented for closed and open ducts. The adjoint equations are then solved numerically in reversed time by the TDWP method. Reciprocal relation between the duct mode amplitudes and far field point sources in the presence of the exhaust shear flow is computed and confirmed numerically. Applications of the adjoint problem to closed and open ducts are also presented.

  16. New optimality criteria methods - Forcing uniqueness of the adjoint strains by corner-rounding at constraint intersections

    Rozvany, G. I. N.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.

    1992-01-01

    In new, iterative continuum-based optimality criteria (COC) methods, the strain in the adjoint structure becomes non-unique if the number of active local constraints is greater than the number of design variables for an element. This brief note discusses the use of smooth envelope functions (SEFs) in overcoming economically computational problems caused by the above non-uniqueness.

  17. An investigation of the adjoint method for external beam radiation therapy treatment planning using Monte Carlo transport

    A relatively new technique for achieving the right dose to the right tissue, is intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). In this technique, a megavoltage x-ray beam is rotated around a patient, and the intensity and shape of the beam is modulated as a function of source position and patient anatomy. The relationship between beam-let intensity and patient dose can be expressed under a matrix form where the matrix Dij represents the dose delivered to voxel i by beam-let j per unit fluence. The Dij influence matrix is the key element that enables this approach. In this regard, sensitivity theory lends itself in a natural way to the process of computing beam weights for treatment planning. The solution of the adjoint form of the Boltzmann equation is an adjoint function that describes the importance of particles throughout the system in contributing to the detector response. In this case, adjoint methods can provide the sensitivity of the dose at a single point in the patient with respect to all points in the source field. The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using the adjoint method and Monte Carlo transport for radiation therapy treatment planning

  18. Solution of the advection-dispersion equation by a finite-volume eulerian-lagrangian local adjoint method

    Healy, R.W.; Russell, T.F.

    1992-01-01

    A finite-volume Eulerian-Lagrangian local adjoint method for solution of the advection-dispersion equation is developed and discussed. The method is mass conservative and can solve advection-dominated ground-water solute-transport problems accurately and efficiently. An integrated finite-difference approach is used in the method. A key component of the method is that the integral representing the mass-storage term is evaluated numerically at the current time level. Integration points, and the mass associated with these points, are then forward tracked up to the next time level. The number of integration points required to reach a specified level of accuracy is problem dependent and increases as the sharpness of the simulated solute front increases. Integration points are generally equally spaced within each grid cell. For problems involving variable coefficients it has been found to be advantageous to include additional integration points at strategic locations in each well. These locations are determined by backtracking. Forward tracking of boundary fluxes by the method alleviates problems that are encountered in the backtracking approaches of most characteristic methods. A test problem is used to illustrate that the new method offers substantial advantages over other numerical methods for a wide range of problems.

  19. A New Method for Computing Three-Dimensional Capture Fraction in Heterogeneous Regional Systems using the MODFLOW Adjoint Code

    Clemo, T. M.; Ramarao, B.; Kelly, V. A.; Lavenue, M.

    2011-12-01

    Capture is a measure of the impact of groundwater pumping upon groundwater and surface water systems. The computation of capture through analytical or numerical methods has been the subject of articles in the literature for several decades (Bredehoeft et al., 1982). Most recently Leake et al. (2010) described a systematic way to produce capture maps in three-dimensional systems using a numerical perturbation approach in which capture from streams was computed using unit rate pumping at many locations within a MODFLOW model. The Leake et al. (2010) method advances the current state of computing capture. A limitation stems from the computational demand required by the perturbation approach wherein days or weeks of computational time might be required to obtain a robust measure of capture. In this paper, we present an efficient method to compute capture in three-dimensional systems based upon adjoint states. The efficiency of the adjoint method will enable uncertainty analysis to be conducted on capture calculations. The USGS and INTERA have collaborated to extend the MODFLOW Adjoint code (Clemo, 2007) to include stream-aquifer interaction and have applied it to one of the examples used in Leake et al. (2010), the San Pedro Basin MODFLOW model. With five layers and 140,800 grid blocks per layer, the San Pedro Basin model, provided an ideal example data set to compare the capture computed from the perturbation and the adjoint methods. The capture fraction map produced from the perturbation method for the San Pedro Basin model required significant computational time to compute and therefore the locations for the pumping wells were limited to 1530 locations in layer 4. The 1530 direct simulations of capture require approximately 76 CPU hours. Had capture been simulated in each grid block in each layer, as is done in the adjoint method, the CPU time would have been on the order of 4 years. The MODFLOW-Adjoint produced the capture fraction map of the San Pedro Basin model

  20. Globally Conservative, Hybrid Self-Adjoint Angular Flux and Least-Squares Method Compatible with Void

    Laboure, Vincent M; Wang, Yaqi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we derive a method for the second-order form of the transport equation that is both globally conservative and compatible with voids, using Continuous Finite Element Methods (CFEM). The main idea is to use the Least-Squares (LS) form of the transport equation in the void regions and the Self-Adjoint Angular Flux (SAAF) form elsewhere. While the SAAF formulation is globally conservative, the LS formulation need a correction in void. The price to pay for this fix is the loss of symmetry of the bilinear form. We first derive this Conservative LS (CLS) formulation in void. Second we combine the SAAF and CLS forms and end up with an hybrid SAAF-CLS method, having the desired properties. We show that extending the theory to near-void regions is a minor complication and can be done without affecting the global conservation of the scheme. Being angular discretization agnostic, this method can be applied to both discrete ordinates (SN) and spherical harmonics (PN) methods. However, since a globally conse...

  1. The adjoint sensitivity method. A contribution to the code uncertainty evaluation

    The application of the ASM (Adjoint Sensitivity Method) to thermohydraulic codes, is examined. The advantage of the method is to be very few CPU time consuming in comparison with usual approach requiring one complete code run per sensitivity determination. The mathematical aspects of the problem are first described, and the applicability of the method of the functional-type response of a thermalhydraulic model is demonstrated. On a simple example of non linear hyperbolic equation (Burgers equation) the problem has been analyzed. It is shown that the formalism used in the literature treating this subject is not appropriate. A new mathematical formalism circumventing the problem is proposed. For the discretized form of the problem, two methods are possible: the Continuous ASM and the Discrete ASM. The equivalence of both methods is demonstrated; nevertheless only the DASM constitutes a practical solution for thermalhydraulic codes. The application of the DASM to the thermalhydraulic safety code CATHARE is then presented for two examples. They demonstrate that ASM constitutes an efficient tool for the analysis of code sensitivity. (authors) 7 figs., 5 tabs., 8 refs

  2. The adjoint sensitivity method, a contribution to the code uncertainty evaluation

    The application of the ASM (Adjoint Sensitivity Method) to thermohydraulic codes, is examined. The advantage of the method is to be very few CPU time consuming in comparison with usual approach requiring one complete code run per sensitivity determination. The mathematical aspects of the problem are first described, and the applicability of the method of the functional-type response of a thermalhydraulic model is demonstrated. On a simple example of non linear hyperbolic equation (Burgers equation) the problem has been analyzed. It is shown that the formalism used in the literature treating this subject is not appropriate. A new mathematical formalism circumventing the problem is proposed. For the discretized form of the problem, two methods are possible: the Continuous ASM and the Discrete ASM. The equivalence of both methods is demonstrated; nevertheless only the DASM constitutes a practical solution for thermalhydraulic codes. The application of the DASM to the thermalhydraulic safety code CATHARE is then presented for two examples. They demonstrate that ASM constitutes an efficient tool for the analysis of code sensitivity. (authors) 7 figs., 5 tabs., 8 refs

  3. Simplification process of safety assessment model for engineered barrier system by using adjoint sensitivity analysis method

    Sensitivity analyses for mass transport model in porous media were performed by using adjoint method. The mass transport model employed is to evaluate the performance of engineered barrier of shallow land disposal, assuming that water flows through a cylinder packed with sand. In this model instantaneous sorption equilibrium between liquid and solid phases is assumed and two types of boundary conditions which represent the nuclide release from waste package, i.e. solubility-limited case and constant leaching case, are considered. From the sensitivity analysis, it was shown that the effect of longitudinal dispersion on performance measure is very small and calculated normalized sensitivity is in the order 10-4∼10-3 around the most probable value of longitudinal dispersion coefficient. This suggests that the term of longitudinal dispersion can be removed from the original model. In this case analytical solution is easily introduced for two boundary conditions respectively to evaluate the performance measure of the barrier system. These simplified models, in fact, gives larger estimate of the nuclide release from the engineered barrier system than that calculated from the model considering the longitudinal dispersion. They are acceptable from the standpoint of conservatism of safety assessment. (author)

  4. A three-dimensional finite-volume Eulerian-Lagrangian Localized Adjoint Method (ELLAM) for solute-transport modeling

    Heberton, C.I.; Russell, T.F.; Konikow, L.F.; Hornberger, G.Z.

    2000-01-01

    This report documents the U.S. Geological Survey Eulerian-Lagrangian Localized Adjoint Method (ELLAM) algorithm that solves an integral form of the solute-transport equation, incorporating an implicit-in-time difference approximation for the dispersive and sink terms. Like the algorithm in the original version of the U.S. Geological Survey MOC3D transport model, ELLAM uses a method of characteristics approach to solve the transport equation on the basis of the velocity field. The ELLAM algorithm, however, is based on an integral formulation of conservation of mass and uses appropriate numerical techniques to obtain global conservation of mass. The implicit procedure eliminates several stability criteria required for an explicit formulation. Consequently, ELLAM allows large transport time increments to be used. ELLAM can produce qualitatively good results using a small number of transport time steps. A description of the ELLAM numerical method, the data-input requirements and output options, and the results of simulator testing and evaluation are presented. The ELLAM algorithm was evaluated for the same set of problems used to test and evaluate Version 1 and Version 2 of MOC3D. These test results indicate that ELLAM offers a viable alternative to the explicit and implicit solvers in MOC3D. Its use is desirable when mass balance is imperative or a fast, qualitative model result is needed. Although accurate solutions can be generated using ELLAM, its efficiency relative to the two previously documented solution algorithms is problem dependent.

  5. The development of three-dimensional adjoint method for flow control with blowing in convergent-divergent nozzle flows

    Sikarwar, Nidhi

    multiple experiments or numerical simulations. Alternatively an inverse design method can be used. An adjoint optimization method can be used to achieve the optimum blowing rate. It is shown that the method works for both geometry optimization and active control of the flow in order to deflect the flow in desirable ways. An adjoint optimization method is described. It is used to determine the blowing distribution in the diverging section of a convergent-divergent nozzle that gives a desired pressure distribution in the nozzle. Both the direct and adjoint problems and their associated boundary conditions are developed. The adjoint method is used to determine the blowing distribution required to minimize the shock strength in the nozzle to achieve a known target pressure and to achieve close to an ideally expanded flow pressure. A multi-block structured solver is developed to calculate the flow solution and associated adjoint variables. Two and three-dimensional calculations are performed for internal and external of the nozzle domains. A two step MacCormack scheme based on predictor- corrector technique is was used for some calculations. The four and five stage Runge-Kutta schemes are also used to artificially march in time. A modified Runge-Kutta scheme is used to accelerate the convergence to a steady state. Second order artificial dissipation has been added to stabilize the calculations. The steepest decent method has been used for the optimization of the blowing velocity after the gradients of the cost function with respect to the blowing velocity are calculated using adjoint method. Several examples are given of the optimization of blowing using the adjoint method.

  6. The Adjoint Method for The Optimization of Brachytherapy and Radiotherapy Patient Treatment Planning Procedures Using Monte Carlo Calculations

    The goal of this project is to investigate the use of the adjoint method, commonly used in the reactor physics community, for the optimization of radiation therapy patient treatment plans. Two different types of radiation therapy are being examined, interstitial brachytherapy and radiotherapy. In brachytherapy radioactive sources are surgically implanted within the diseased organ such as the prostate to treat the cancerous tissue. With radiotherapy, the x-ray source is usually located at a distance of about 1-meter from the patient and focused on the treatment area. For brachytherapy the optimization phase of the treatment plan consists of determining the optimal placement of the radioactive sources, which delivers the prescribed dose to the disease tissue while simultaneously sparing (reducing) the dose to sensitive tissue and organs. For external beam radiation therapy the optimization phase of the treatment plan consists of determining the optimal direction and intensity of beam, which provides complete coverage of the tumor region with the prescribed dose while simultaneously avoiding sensitive tissue areas. For both therapy methods, the optimal treatment plan is one in which the diseased tissue has been treated with the prescribed dose and dose to the sensitive tissue and organs has been kept to a minimum

  7. The adjoint method of data assimilation used operationally for shelf circulation

    Griffin, David A.; Thompson, Keith R.

    1996-02-01

    A real-time shelf circulation model with data assimilation has been successfully used, possibly for the first time, on the outer Nova Scotian Shelf. The adjoint method was used to infer the time histories of flows across the four open boundaries of a 60 km × 60 km shallow-water equation model of Western Bank. The aim was to hindcast and nowcast currents over the bank so that a patch of water (initially 15 km in diameter) could be resampled over a 3-week period as part of a study of the early life history of Atlantic cod. Observations available in near real time for assimilation were from 14 drifting buoys, 2 telemetering moored current meters, the ship's acoustic Doppler current profiler and the local wind. For the postcruise hindcasts presented here, data from two bottom pressure gauges and two more current meters are also available. The experiment was successful, and the patch was sampled over a 19-day period that included two intense storms. In this paper we (1) document the model and how the data are assimilated, (2) present and discuss the observations, (3) demonstrate that the interpolative skill of the model exceeds that of simpler schemes that use just the current velocity data, and (4) provide examples of how particle tracking with the model enables asynoptically acquired data to be displayed as synoptic maps, greatly facilitating both underway cruise planning and postcruise data analysis. An interesting feature of the circulation on the bank was a nearly stationary eddy atop the bank crest. Larvae within the eddy were retained on the bank in a favorable environment until the onset of the storms. The variable integrity of the eddy may contribute to fluctuations of year-class success.

  8. The forward and adjoint sensitivity methods of glacial isostatic adjustment: Existence, uniqueness and time-differencing scheme

    Martinec, Zdenek; Sasgen, Ingo; Velimsky, Jakub

    2014-05-01

    In this study, two new methods for computing the sensitivity of the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) forward solution with respect to the Earth's mantle viscosity are presented: the forward sensitivity method (FSM) and the adjoint sensitivity method (ASM). These advanced formal methods are based on the time-domain,spectral-finite element method for modelling the GIA response of laterally heterogeneous earth models developed by Martinec (2000). There are many similarities between the forward method and the FSM and ASM for a general physical system. However, in the case of GIA, there are also important differences between the forward and sensitivity methods. The analysis carried out in this study results in the following findings. First, the forward method of GIA is unconditionally solvable, regardless of whether or not a combined ice and ocean-water load contains the first-degree spherical harmonics. This is also the case for the FSM, however, the ASM must in addition be supplemented by nine conditions on the misfit between the given GIA-related data and the forward model predictions to guarantee the existence of a solution. This constrains the definition of data least-squares misfit. Second, the forward method of GIA implements an ocean load as a free boundary-value function over an ocean area with a free geometry. That is, an ocean load and the shape of ocean, the so-called ocean function, are being sought, in addition to deformation and gravity-increment fields, by solving the forward method. The FSM and ASM also apply the adjoint ocean load as a free boundary-value function, but instead over an ocean area with the fixed geometry given by the ocean function determined by the forward method. In other words, a boundary-value problem for the forward method of GIA is free with respect to determining (i) the boundary-value data over an ocean area and (ii) the ocean function itself, while the boundary-value problems for the FSM and ASM are free only with respect to

  9. Airfoil design using a coupled euler and integral boundary layer method with adjoint based sensitivities

    Edwards, S.; Reuther, J.; Chattot, J. J.

    The objective of this paper is to present a control theory approach for the design of airfoils in the presence of viscous compressible flows. A coupled system of the integral boundary layer and the Euler equations is solved to provide rapid flow simulations. An adjoint approach consistent with the complete coupled state equations is employed to obtain the sensitivities needed to drive a numerical optimization algorithm. Design to a target pressure distribution is demonstrated on an RAE 2822 airfoil at transonic speeds.

  10. U.S. Department Of Energy's nuclear engineering education research: highlights of recent and current research-III. 8. Adjoint Monte Carlo Methods for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    .5 Gy; the upper limits for sensitive structure (SS) and normal tissue (NT) were 1.4 and 1.8 Gy, respectively. The linear programming (LP) model may have advantages over the nonlinear programming (NLP) case. The LP model raises 100% of TU to the prescribed dose, raises a smaller percentage of SS to its tolerance dose, and does not overdose NT. However, the LP plan creates a significant 'hot spot' within TU by raising 40% of TU above the prescribed dose. In choosing between the plans, one would have to weigh the clinical consequences of tumor hot spots with the clinical implications that come with the different sparing characteristics of the two plans. This investigation demonstrated that for a simple geometric model, adjoint Monte Carlo methods can be used as the basis for inverse radiation therapy treatment planning. By using flux-to-dose conversion factors as adjoint sources, it is possible to develop an influence matrix that provides the sensitivity of the dose at a single point in the patient to all points in the treatment source field. These data may be used to determine an optimized set of treatment beams

  11. Adjoint methods for electromagnetic shape optimization of the low-loss cavity for the International Linear Collider

    We formulate the problem of designing the low-loss cavity for the International Linear Collider (ILC) as an electromagnetic shape optimization problem involving a Maxwell eigenvalue problem. The objective is to maximize the stored energy of a trapped mode in the end cell while maintaining a specified frequency corresponding to the accelerating mode. A continuous adjoint method is presented for computation of the design gradient of the objective and constraint. The gradients are used within a nonlinear optimization scheme to compute the optimal shape for a simplified model of the ILC in a small multiple of the cost of solving the Maxwell eigenvalue problem

  12. Adjoint methods for adjusting three-dimensional atmosphere and surface properties to fit multi-angle/multi-pixel polarimetric measurements

    This paper derives an efficient procedure for using the three-dimensional (3D) vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE) to adjust atmosphere and surface properties and improve their fit with multi-angle/multi-pixel radiometric and polarimetric measurements of scattered sunlight. The proposed adjoint method uses the 3D VRTE to compute the measurement misfit function and the adjoint 3D VRTE to compute its gradient with respect to all unknown parameters. In the remote sensing problems of interest, the scalar-valued misfit function quantifies agreement with data as a function of atmosphere and surface properties, and its gradient guides the search through this parameter space. Remote sensing of the atmosphere and surface in a three-dimensional region may require thousands of unknown parameters and millions of data points. Many approaches would require calls to the 3D VRTE solver in proportion to the number of unknown parameters or measurements. To avoid this issue of scale, we focus on computing the gradient of the misfit function as an alternative to the Jacobian of the measurement operator. The resulting adjoint method provides a way to adjust 3D atmosphere and surface properties with only two calls to the 3D VRTE solver for each spectral channel, regardless of the number of retrieval parameters, measurement view angles or pixels. This gives a procedure for adjusting atmosphere and surface parameters that will scale to the large problems of 3D remote sensing. For certain types of multi-angle/multi-pixel polarimetric measurements, this encourages the development of a new class of three-dimensional retrieval algorithms with more flexible parametrizations of spatial heterogeneity, less reliance on data screening procedures, and improved coverage in terms of the resolved physical processes in the Earth's atmosphere. - Highlights: • Blueprint for 3D remote sensing of the atmosphere and surface. • Procedure for adjusting thousands of parameters with millions of data

  13. Adjoint design sensitivity analysis of reduced atomic systems using generalized Langevin equation for lattice structures

    An efficient adjoint design sensitivity analysis method is developed for reduced atomic systems. A reduced atomic system and the adjoint system are constructed in a locally confined region, utilizing generalized Langevin equation (GLE) for periodic lattice structures. Due to the translational symmetry of lattice structures, the size of time history kernel function that accounts for the boundary effects of the reduced atomic systems could be reduced to a single atom’s degrees of freedom. For the problems of highly nonlinear design variables, the finite difference method is impractical for its inefficiency and inaccuracy. However, the adjoint method is very efficient regardless of the number of design variables since one additional time integration is required for the adjoint GLE. Through numerical examples, the derived adjoint sensitivity turns out to be accurate and efficient through the comparison with finite difference sensitivity

  14. Mimetic finite difference method

    Lipnikov, Konstantin; Manzini, Gianmarco; Shashkov, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    The mimetic finite difference (MFD) method mimics fundamental properties of mathematical and physical systems including conservation laws, symmetry and positivity of solutions, duality and self-adjointness of differential operators, and exact mathematical identities of the vector and tensor calculus. This article is the first comprehensive review of the 50-year long history of the mimetic methodology and describes in a systematic way the major mimetic ideas and their relevance to academic and real-life problems. The supporting applications include diffusion, electromagnetics, fluid flow, and Lagrangian hydrodynamics problems. The article provides enough details to build various discrete operators on unstructured polygonal and polyhedral meshes and summarizes the major convergence results for the mimetic approximations. Most of these theoretical results, which are presented here as lemmas, propositions and theorems, are either original or an extension of existing results to a more general formulation using polyhedral meshes. Finally, flexibility and extensibility of the mimetic methodology are shown by deriving higher-order approximations, enforcing discrete maximum principles for diffusion problems, and ensuring the numerical stability for saddle-point systems.

  15. Self-adjointness of deformed unbounded operators

    Much, Albert [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, México D.F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    We consider deformations of unbounded operators by using the novel construction tool of warped convolutions. By using the Kato-Rellich theorem, we show that unbounded self-adjoint deformed operators are self-adjoint if they satisfy a certain condition. This condition proves itself to be necessary for the oscillatory integral to be well-defined. Moreover, different proofs are given for self-adjointness of deformed unbounded operators in the context of quantum mechanics and quantum field theory.

  16. Convergence of a semi-discretization scheme for the Hamilton-Jacobi equation: A new approach with the adjoint method

    Cagnetti, Filippo

    2013-11-01

    We consider a numerical scheme for the one dimensional time dependent Hamilton-Jacobi equation in the periodic setting. This scheme consists in a semi-discretization using monotone approximations of the Hamiltonian in the spacial variable. From classical viscosity solution theory, these schemes are known to converge. In this paper we present a new approach to the study of the rate of convergence of the approximations based on the nonlinear adjoint method recently introduced by L.C. Evans. We estimate the rate of convergence for convex Hamiltonians and recover the O(h) convergence rate in terms of the L∞ norm and O(h) in terms of the L1 norm, where h is the size of the spacial grid. We discuss also possible generalizations to higher dimensional problems and present several other additional estimates. The special case of quadratic Hamiltonians is considered in detail in the end of the paper. © 2013 IMACS.

  17. Quantifying the loss of information in source attribution problems using the adjoint method in global models of atmospheric chemical transport

    Santillana, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    It is of crucial importance to be able to identify the location of atmospheric pollution sources in our planet. Global models of atmospheric transport in combination with diverse Earth observing systems are a natural choice to achieve this goal. It is shown that the ability to successfully reconstruct the location and magnitude of an instantaneous source in global chemical transport models (CTMs) decreases rapidly as a function of the time interval between the pollution release and the observation time. A simple way to quantitatively characterize this phenomenon is proposed based on the effective -undesired- numerical diffusion present in current Eulerian CTMs and verified using idealized numerical experiments. The approach presented consists of using the adjoint-based optimization method in a state-of-the-art CTM, GEOS-Chem, to reconstruct the location and magnitude of a realistic pollution plume for multiple time scales. The findings obtained from these numerical experiments suggest a time scale of 2 days a...

  18. A novel concept for scheduling and effect assessment of soft-kill against an antiship missile based on the adjoint method

    Weiss, M.; Vermeulen, A.; Bos, J.; Bucco, D.

    2011-01-01

    The Adjoint Method is a well establised tool for assessement of guidance loops in conceptual design studies. It allows one to perform quick assessments of the performance both in deterministic settings, to determine a nominal or average miss distance, and in stochastic settings, to determine the sta

  19. Efficient forward and adjoint calculations of normal mode spectra in laterally heterogeneous earth models using an iterative direct solution method

    Al-Attar, D.; Woodhouse, J. H.

    2011-12-01

    Normal mode spectra provide a valuable data set for global seismic tomography, and, notably, are amongst the few geophysical observables that are sensitive to lateral variations in density structure within the Earth. Nonetheless, the effects of lateral density variations on mode spectra are rather subtle. In order, therefore, to reliably determine density variations with in the earth, it is necessary to make use of sufficiently accurate methods for calculating synthetic mode spectra. In particular, recent work has highlighted the need to perform 'full-coupling calculations' that take into account the interaction of large numbers of spherical earth multiplets. However, present methods for performing such full-coupling calculations require diagonalization of large coupling matrices, and so become computationally inefficient as the number of coupled modes is increased. In order to perform full-coupling calculations more efficiently, we describe a new implementation of the direct solution method for calculating synthetic spectra in laterally heterogeneous earth models. This approach is based on the solution of the inhomogeneous mode coupling equations in the frequency domain, and does not require the diagonalization of large matrices. Early implementations of the direct solution method used LU-decomposition to solve the mode coupling equations. However, as the number of coupled modes is increased, this method becomes impractically slow. To circumvent this problem, we solve the mode coupling equations iteratively using the preconditioned biconjugate gradient algorithm. We present a number of numerical tests to display the accuracy and efficiency of this method for performing large full-coupling calculations. In addition, we describe a frequency-domain formulation of the adjoint method for the calculation of Frechet kernels that show the sensitivity of normal mode observations to variations in earth structure. The calculation of such Frechet kernels involves one solution

  20. Sensitivity of temporal moments calculated by the adjoint-state method and joint inversing of head and tracer data

    Cirpka, Olaf A.; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    Including tracer data into geostatistically based methods of inverse modeling is computationally very costly when all concentration measurements are used and the sensitivities of many observations are calculated by the direct differentiation approach. Harvey and Gorelick (Water Resour Res 1995;31(7):1615-26) have suggested the use of the first temporal moment instead of the complete concentration record at a point. We derive a computationally efficient adjoint-state method for the sensitivities of the temporal moments that require the solution of the steady-state flow equation and two steady-state transport equations for the forward problem and the same number of equations for each first-moment measurement. The efficiency of the method makes it feasible to evaluate the sensitivity matrix many times in large domains. We incorporate our approach for the calculation of sensitivities in the quasi-linear geostatistical method of inversing ("iterative cokriging"). The application to an artificial example of a tracer introduced into an injection well shows good convergence behavior when both head and first-moment data are used for inversing, whereas inversing of arrival times alone is less stable.

  1. Seismic imaging: From classical to adjoint tomography

    Liu, Q.; Gu, Y. J.

    2012-09-01

    Seismic tomography has been a vital tool in probing the Earth's internal structure and enhancing our knowledge of dynamical processes in the Earth's crust and mantle. While various tomographic techniques differ in data types utilized (e.g., body vs. surface waves), data sensitivity (ray vs. finite-frequency approximations), and choices of model parameterization and regularization, most global mantle tomographic models agree well at long wavelengths, owing to the presence and typical dimensions of cold subducted oceanic lithospheres and hot, ascending mantle plumes (e.g., in central Pacific and Africa). Structures at relatively small length scales remain controversial, though, as will be discussed in this paper, they are becoming increasingly resolvable with the fast expanding global and regional seismic networks and improved forward modeling and inversion techniques. This review paper aims to provide an overview of classical tomography methods, key debates pertaining to the resolution of mantle tomographic models, as well as to highlight recent theoretical and computational advances in forward-modeling methods that spearheaded the developments in accurate computation of sensitivity kernels and adjoint tomography. The first part of the paper is devoted to traditional traveltime and waveform tomography. While these approaches established a firm foundation for global and regional seismic tomography, data coverage and the use of approximate sensitivity kernels remained as key limiting factors in the resolution of the targeted structures. In comparison to classical tomography, adjoint tomography takes advantage of full 3D numerical simulations in forward modeling and, in many ways, revolutionizes the seismic imaging of heterogeneous structures with strong velocity contrasts. For this reason, this review provides details of the implementation, resolution and potential challenges of adjoint tomography. Further discussions of techniques that are presently popular in

  2. Southern California Adjoint Source Inversions

    Tromp, J.; Kim, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Southern California Centroid-Moment Tensor (CMT) solutions with 9 components (6 moment tensor elements, latitude, longitude, and depth) are sought to minimize a misfit function computed from waveform differences. The gradient of a misfit function is obtained based upon two numerical simulations for each earthquake: one forward calculation for the southern California model, and an adjoint calculation that uses time-reversed signals at the receivers. Conjugate gradient and square-root variable metric methods are used to iteratively improve the earthquake source model while reducing the misfit function. The square-root variable metric algorithm has the advantage of providing a direct approximation to the posterior covariance operator. We test the inversion procedure by perturbing each component of the CMT solution, and see how the algorithm converges. Finally, we demonstrate full inversion capabilities using data for real Southern California earthquakes.

  3. EULERIAN-LAGRANGIAN LOCALIZED ADJOINT METHOD FOR THE ADVECTION-DIFFUSION EQUATION

    Many numerical methods use characteristic analysis to accommodate the advective component of transport. uch characteristic methods include Eulerian-Lagrangian methods (ELM), modified method of characteristics (MMOC), and operator splitting methods. eneralization of characteristic...

  4. AN EULERIAN-LAGRANGIAN LOCALIZED ADJOINT METHOD FOR THE ADVECTION-DIFFUSION EQUATION

    Many numerical methods use characteristic analysis to accommodate the advective component of transport. Such characteristic methods include Eulerian-Lagrangian methods (ELM), modified method of characteristics (MMOC), and operator splitting methods. A generalization of characteri...

  5. Adjoint P1 equations solution for neutron slowing down

    In some applications of perturbation theory, it is necessary know the adjoint neutron flux, which is obtained by the solution of adjoint neutron diffusion equation. However, the multigroup constants used for this are weighted in only the direct neutron flux, from the solution of direct P1 equations. In this work, the adjoint P1 equations are derived by the neutron transport equation, the reversion operators rules and analogies between direct and adjoint parameters. The direct and adjoint neutron fluxes resulting from the solution of P1 equations were used to three different weighting processes, to obtain the macrogroup macroscopic cross sections. It was found out noticeable differences among them. (author)

  6. Solution of the advection-dispersion equation in two dimensions by a finite-volume Eulerian-Lagrangian localized adjoint method

    Healy, R.W.; Russell, T.F.

    1998-01-01

    We extend the finite-volume Eulerian-Lagrangian localized adjoint method (FVELLAM) for solution of the advection-dispersion equation to two dimensions. The method can conserve mass globally and is not limited by restrictions on the size of the grid Peclet or Courant number. Therefore, it is well suited for solution of advection-dominated ground-water solute transport problems. In test problem comparisons with standard finite differences, FVELLAM is able to attain accurate solutions on much coarser space and time grids. On fine grids, the accuracy of the two methods is comparable. A critical aspect of FVELLAM (and all other ELLAMs) is evaluation of the mass storage integral from the preceding time level. In FVELLAM this may be accomplished with either a forward or backtracking approach. The forward tracking approach conserves mass globally and is the preferred approach. The backtracking approach is less computationally intensive, but not globally mass conservative. Boundary terms are systematically represented as integrals in space and time which are evaluated by a common integration scheme in conjunction with forward tracking through time. Unlike the one-dimensional case, local mass conservation cannot be guaranteed, so slight oscillations in concentration can develop, particularly in the vicinity of inflow or outflow boundaries. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  7. NESTLE: Few-group neutron diffusion equation solver utilizing the nodal expansion method for eigenvalue, adjoint, fixed-source steady-state and transient problems

    NESTLE is a FORTRAN77 code that solves the few-group neutron diffusion equation utilizing the Nodal Expansion Method (NEM). NESTLE can solve the eigenvalue (criticality); eigenvalue adjoint; external fixed-source steady-state; or external fixed-source. or eigenvalue initiated transient problems. The code name NESTLE originates from the multi-problem solution capability, abbreviating Nodal Eigenvalue, Steady-state, Transient, Le core Evaluator. The eigenvalue problem allows criticality searches to be completed, and the external fixed-source steady-state problem can search to achieve a specified power level. Transient problems model delayed neutrons via precursor groups. Several core properties can be input as time dependent. Two or four energy groups can be utilized, with all energy groups being thermal groups (i.e. upscatter exits) if desired. Core geometries modelled include Cartesian and Hexagonal. Three, two and one dimensional models can be utilized with various symmetries. The non-linear iterative strategy associated with the NEM method is employed. An advantage of the non-linear iterative strategy is that NSTLE can be utilized to solve either the nodal or Finite Difference Method representation of the few-group neutron diffusion equation

  8. NESTLE: Few-group neutron diffusion equation solver utilizing the nodal expansion method for eigenvalue, adjoint, fixed-source steady-state and transient problems

    Turinsky, P.J.; Al-Chalabi, R.M.K.; Engrand, P.; Sarsour, H.N.; Faure, F.X.; Guo, W. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1994-06-01

    NESTLE is a FORTRAN77 code that solves the few-group neutron diffusion equation utilizing the Nodal Expansion Method (NEM). NESTLE can solve the eigenvalue (criticality); eigenvalue adjoint; external fixed-source steady-state; or external fixed-source. or eigenvalue initiated transient problems. The code name NESTLE originates from the multi-problem solution capability, abbreviating Nodal Eigenvalue, Steady-state, Transient, Le core Evaluator. The eigenvalue problem allows criticality searches to be completed, and the external fixed-source steady-state problem can search to achieve a specified power level. Transient problems model delayed neutrons via precursor groups. Several core properties can be input as time dependent. Two or four energy groups can be utilized, with all energy groups being thermal groups (i.e. upscatter exits) if desired. Core geometries modelled include Cartesian and Hexagonal. Three, two and one dimensional models can be utilized with various symmetries. The non-linear iterative strategy associated with the NEM method is employed. An advantage of the non-linear iterative strategy is that NSTLE can be utilized to solve either the nodal or Finite Difference Method representation of the few-group neutron diffusion equation.

  9. Accounting for propagation outside of the model boundaries in regional full waveform inversion based on adjoint methods

    Masson, Y.; Pierre, C.; Romanowicz, B. A.; French, S. W.; Yuan, H.

    2014-12-01

    Yuan et al. (2013) developed a 3D radially anisotropic shear wave model of North America (NA) upper mantle based on full waveform tomography, combining teleseismic and regional distance data sampling the NA. In this model, synthetic seismograms associated with regional events (i.e. events located inside in the region imaged NA) were computed exactly using the Spectral Element method (Cupillard et al., 2012), while, synthetic seismograms associated with teleseismic events were performed approximately using non-linear asymptotic coupling theory (NACT, Li and Romanowicz, 1995). Both the regional and the teleseismic dataset have been inverted using approximate sensitivity kernels based upon normal mode theory. Our objective is to improve our current model and to build the next generation model of NA by introducing new methodological developments (Masson et al., 2014) that allow us to compute exact synthetic seismograms as well as adjoint sensitivity kernels associated with teleseismic events, using mostly regional computations of wave propagation. The principle of the method is to substitute a teleseismic source (i.e. an earthquake) by an "equivalent" set of seismic sources acting on the boundaries of the region to be imaged that is producing exactly the same wavefield. Computing the equivalent set of sources associated with each one of the teleseismic events requires a few global simulations of the seismic wavefield that can be done once for all, prior to the regional inversion. Then, the regional full waveform inversion can be preformed using regional simulations only. We present a 3D model of NA demonstrating the advantages of the proposed method.

  10. Adjoint of Pair Frames

    Fereydooni, Abolhassan; Safapour, Ahmad; Rahimi , Asghar

    2012-01-01

    The concept of (p,q)-pair frames is generalized to (l,l^*)-pair frames. Adjoint (conjugate) of a pair frames for dual space of a Banach space is introduced and some conditions for the existence of adjoint (conjugate) of pair frames are presented.

  11. Development of one-energy group, two-dimensional, frequency dependent detector adjoint function based on the nodal method

    One-energy group, two-dimensional computer code was developed to calculate the response of a detector to a vibrating absorber in a reactor core. A concept of local/global components, based on the frequency dependent detector adjoint function, and a nodalization technique were utilized. The frequency dependent detector adjoint functions presented by complex equations were expanded into real and imaginary parts. In the nodalization technique, the flux is expanded into polynomials about the center point of each node. The phase angle and the magnitude of the one-energy group detector adjoint function were calculated for a detector located in the center of a 200x200 cm reactor using a two-dimensional nodalization technique, the computer code EXTERMINATOR, and the analytical solution. The purpose of this research was to investigate the applicability of a polynomial nodal model technique to the calculations of the real and the imaginary parts of the detector adjoint function for one-energy group two-dimensional polynomial nodal model technique. From the results as discussed earlier, it is concluded that the nodal model technique can be used to calculate the detector adjoint function and the phase angle. Using the computer code developed for nodal model technique, the magnitude of one energy group frequency dependent detector adjoint function and the phase angle were calculated for the detector located in the center of a 200x200 cm homogenous reactor. The real part of the detector adjoint function was compared with the results obtained from the EXTERMINATOR computer code as well as the analytical solution based on a double sine series expansion using the classical Green's Function solution. The values were found to be less than 1% greater at 20 cm away from the source region and about 3% greater closer to the source compared to the values obtained from the analytical solution and the EXTERMINATOR code. The currents at the node interface matched within 1% of the average

  12. Investigation of the adjoint-state method for ultrasound computed tomography: a numerical and experimental study

    Anis, Fatima; Lou, Yang; Conjusteau, André; Su, Richard; Oruganti, Tanmayi; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we investigate a novel reconstruction method for laser-induced ultrasound computed tomography (USCT) breast imaging that circumvents limitations of existing methods that rely on ray-tracing. There is currently great interest in developing hybrid imaging systems that combine optoacoustic tomography (OAT) and USCT. There are two primary motivations for this: (1) the speed-of-sound (SOS) distribution reconstructed by USCT can provide complementary diagnostic information; and (2) the reconstructed SOS distribution can be incorporated in the OAT reconstruction algorithm to improve OAT image quality. However, image reconstruction in USCT remains challenging. The majority of existing approaches for USCT breast imaging involve ray-tracing to establish the imaging operator. This process is cumbersome and can lead to inaccuracies in the reconstructed SOS images in the presence of multiple ray-paths and/or shadow zones. To circumvent these problems, we implemented a partial differential equation-based Eulerian approach to USCT that was proposed in the mathematics literature but never investigated for medical imaging applications. This method operates by directly inverting the Eikonal equation without ray-tracing. A numerical implementation of this method was developed and compared to existing reconstruction methods for USCT breast imaging. We demonstrated the ability of the new method to reconstruct SOS maps from TOF data obtained by a hybrid OAT/USCT imager built by our team.

  13. High Order Adjoint Derivatives using ESDIRK Methods for Oil Reservoir Production Optimization

    Capolei, Andrea; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2012-01-01

    In production optimization, computation of the gradients is the computationally expensive step. We improve the computational efficiency of such algorithms by improving the gradient computation using high-order ESDIRK (Explicit Singly Diagonally Implicit Runge-Kutta) temporal integration methods and...

  14. Investigation of a continuous adjoint-based optimization procedure for aeroacoustic control of plane jets

    Highlights: ► Successful noise control of a 2D-planejet with DNS resolution and a 3D-planejet with LES-resolution using adjoint method. ► Validation of gradient-information obtained with the continuous-adjoint approach, by comparing gradient with finite differences. ► Extension of control-interval with the receding horizon algorithm. - Abstract: A control optimization technique using the continuous adjoint of the compressible Navier–Stokes equations is implemented for aeroacoustic optimization of plane jet flows. The purpose of the adjoint equations is to provide sensitivity information, which is afterwards used in a gradient-based minimization of a prescribed cost functional, designed to describe the far-field sound pressure level (SPL). The objective of the present paper is to demonstrate the ability to reduce the sound in the near far-field of plane jets. Furthermore, as the continuous adjoint approach can become inaccurate, due to inconsistencies between the continuous and the discretized system, the accuracy of the continuous adjoint approach is investigated. The considered cases exhibit a nozzle exit Reynolds number of Rejet = ρujetD/μ = 2000 and a Mach number of Mjet = 0.9, performed using two-dimensional direct numerical simulation and three-dimensional large-eddy simulation, respectively. A comparison of the obtained gradient via adjoint and finite differences is presented and it is shown, that in order to obtain reliable gradient directions, the length of the optimization time needs to be restricted. Furthermore, a receding horizon optimization for the two-dimensional plane jet simulation is used to obtain a sound reduction over much longer time intervals. The influence of different formulations of the viscosity in the adjoint equations is finally investigated.

  15. Full-3D waveform tomography of Southern California crustal structure by using earthquake recordings and ambient noise Green's functions based on adjoint and scattering-integral methods

    Lee, E.; Chen, P.; Jordan, T. H.; Maechling, P. J.; Denolle, M.; Beroza, G. C.

    2013-12-01

    We apply a unified methodology for seismic waveform analysis and inversions to Southern California. To automate the waveform selection processes, we developed a semi-automatic seismic waveform analysis algorithm for full-wave earthquake source parameters and tomographic inversions. The algorithm is based on continuous wavelet transforms, a topological watershed method, and a set of user-adjustable criteria to select usable waveform windows for full-wave inversions. The algorithm takes advantages of time-frequency representations of seismograms and is able to separate seismic phases in both time and frequency domains. The selected wave packet pairs between observed and synthetic waveforms are then used for extracting frequency-dependent phase and amplitude misfit measurements, which are used in our seismic source and structural inversions. Our full-wave waveform tomography uses the 3D SCEC Community Velocity Model Version 4.0 as initial model, a staggered-grid finite-difference code to simulate seismic wave propagations. The sensitivity (Fréchet) kernels are calculated based on the scattering integral and adjoint methods to iteratively improve the model. We use both earthquake recordings and ambient noise Green's functions, stacking of station-to-station correlations of ambient seismic noise, in our full-3D waveform tomographic inversions. To reduce errors of earthquake sources, the epicenters and source parameters of earthquakes used in our tomographic inversion are inverted by our full-wave CMT inversion method. Our current model shows many features that relate to the geological structures at shallow depth and contrasting velocity values across faults. The velocity perturbations could up to 45% with respect to the initial model in some regions and relate to some structures that do not exist in the initial model, such as southern Great Valley. The earthquake waveform misfits reduce over 70% and the ambient noise Green's function group velocity delay time variance

  16. Comparison of the adjoint and adjoint-free 4dVar assimilation of the hydrographic and velocity observations in the Adriatic Sea

    Yaremchuk, Max; Martin, Paul; Koch, Andrey; Beattie, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Performance of the adjoint and adjoint-free 4-dimensional variational (4dVar) data assimilation techniques is compared in application to the hydrographic surveys and velocity observations collected in the Adriatic Sea in 2006. Assimilating the data into the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) has shown that both methods deliver similar reduction of the cost function and demonstrate comparable forecast skill at approximately the same computational expense. The obtained optimal states were, however, significantly different in terms of distance from the background state: application of the adjoint method resulted in a 30-40% larger departure, mostly due to the excessive level of ageostrophic motions in the southern basin of the Sea that was not covered by observations.

  17. Generalized uncertainty principle and self-adjoint operators

    Balasubramanian, Venkat, E-mail: vbalasu8@uwo.ca [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Das, Saurya, E-mail: saurya.das@uleth.ca [Theoretical Physics Group, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Lethbridge, 4401 University Drive, Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4 (Canada); Vagenas, Elias C., E-mail: elias.vagenas@ku.edu.kw [Theoretical Physics Group, Department of Physics, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 5969, Safat 13060 (Kuwait)

    2015-09-15

    In this work we explore the self-adjointness of the GUP-modified momentum and Hamiltonian operators over different domains. In particular, we utilize the theorem by von-Neumann for symmetric operators in order to determine whether the momentum and Hamiltonian operators are self-adjoint or not, or they have self-adjoint extensions over the given domain. In addition, a simple example of the Hamiltonian operator describing a particle in a box is given. The solutions of the boundary conditions that describe the self-adjoint extensions of the specific Hamiltonian operator are obtained.

  18. Adjoint functors in graph theory

    Foniok, Jan; Tardif, Claude

    2013-01-01

    We survey some uses of adjoint functors in graph theory pertaining to colourings, complexity reductions, multiplicativity, circular colourings and tree duality. The exposition of these applications through adjoint functors unifies the presentation to some extent, and also raises interesting questions.

  19. U.S. Department Of Energy's nuclear engineering education research: highlights of recent and current research-I. 5. Optimization Treatment Planning for Interstitial Brachytherapy Using the Adjoint Transport Method

    Permanent radioactive seed implantation (interstitial brachytherapy) is becoming the preferred method of treating prostate cancers. The main goal of the treatment is to deliver a conformal dose to the tumor while simultaneously minimizing the dose to the normal tissue and sensitive tissue structures. The treatment plan determines the number of seeds, their embedded positions, and the dose delivered to the tissue by photons emitted from the seeds. This study adopts the adjoint method to calculate dose and mixed integer programming (MIP) to optimize the dose to regions of interest for the permanent implantation of 125I radioactive source seeds for prostate cancers. DANTSYS, a discrete ordinates transport code, is utilized to compute the adjoint flux at all fine meshes (voxels) within a geometric model of the prostate image taken by a Transrectal Ultrasound probe. A broad 3-group-photon cross-section library was generated from the lowest three energy groups of the FENDL-2 42-group cross-section library. The first group spans the energy range 20 to 30 keV in which the photons emitted by 125I lie. The second and third groups span the energy ranges 10 to 20 keV and 1 to 10 keV, respectively. The flux-to-dose rate conversion factors for the broad 3-group-photon library are computed using the methodology described in Ref. 2. These factors are used as the adjoint source for the adjoint calculations. The adjoint flux obtained is then used to compute the absorbed dose rate in the regions of interest. The MIP solver is used to optimize seed placements for the treatment plan. MIP is well suited for the optimization problem of brachytherapy because the binary integer variable can represent yes/no decisions as to the placement or non-placement of seeds. The prescribed dose Dp to the tumor in our study is 150 Gy.We set the lower dose constraint, lDtu, for the tumor and the upper dose constraints, uDur and uDno, for the urethra and the normal tissue. The objective function we

  20. Building the Tangent and Adjoint codes of the Ocean General Circulation Model OPA with the Automatic Differentiation tool TAPENADE

    Tber, Moulay Hicham; Vidard, Arthur; Dauvergne, Benjamin

    2007-01-01

    The ocean general circulation model OPA is developed by the LODYC team at Paris VI university. OPA has recently undergone a major rewriting, migrating to FORTRAN95, and its adjoint code needs to be rebuilt. For earlier versions, the adjoint of OPA was written by hand at a high development cost. We use the Automatic Differentiation tool TAPENADE to build mechanicaly the tangent and adjoint codes of OPA. We validate the differentiated codes by comparison with divided differences, and also with an identical twin experiment. We apply state-of-the-art methods to improve the performance of the adjoint code. In particular we implement the Griewank and Walther's binomial checkpointing algorithm which gives us an optimal trade-off between time and memory consumption. We apply a specific strategy to differentiate the iterative linear solver that comes from the implicit time stepping scheme

  1. An Application of the Adjoint Method to a Statistical-Dynamical Tropical-Cyclone Prediction Model (SD-90) Ⅱ: Real Tropical Cyclone Cases

    2006-01-01

    In the first paper in this series, a variational data assimilation of ideal tropical cyclone (TC) tracks was performed for the statistical-dynamical prediction model SD-90 by the adjoint method, and a prediction of TC tracks was made with good accuracy for tracks containing no sharp turns. In the present paper, the cases of real TC tracks are studied. Due to the complexity of TC motion, attention is paid to the diagnostic research of TC motion. First, five TC tracks are studied. Using the data of each entire TC track, by the adjoint method, five TC tracks are fitted well, and the forces acting on the TCs are retrieved. For a given TC, the distribution of the resultant of the retrieved force and Coriolis force well matches the corresponding TC track, i.e., when a TC turns, the resultant of the retrieved force and Coriolis force acts as a centripetal force, which means that the TC indeed moves like a particle; in particular, for TC 9911, the clockwise looping motion is also fitted well. And the distribution of the resultant appears to be periodic in some cases. Then, the present method is carried out for a portion of the track data for TC 9804, which indicates that when the amount of data for a TC track is sufficient, the algorithm is stable. And finally, the same algorithm is implemented for TCs with a double-eyewall structure, namely Bilis (2000) and Winnie (1997),and the results prove the applicability of the algorithm to TCs with complicated mesoscale structures if the TC track data are obtained every three hours.

  2. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    Urichuk, Andrew; Walton, Mark A.

    2016-06-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  3. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    Urichuk, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows, and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  4. A reduced adjoint approach to variational data assimilation

    Altaf, Muhammad

    2013-02-01

    The adjoint method has been used very often for variational data assimilation. The computational cost to run the adjoint model often exceeds several original model runs and the method needs significant programming efforts to implement the adjoint model code. The work proposed here is variational data assimilation based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) which avoids the implementation of the adjoint of the tangent linear approximation of the original nonlinear model. An ensemble of the forward model simulations is used to determine the approximation of the covariance matrix and only the dominant eigenvectors of this matrix are used to define a model subspace. The adjoint of the tangent linear model is replaced by the reduced adjoint based on this reduced space. Thus the adjoint model is run in reduced space with negligible computational cost. Once the gradient is obtained in reduced space it is projected back in full space and the minimization process is carried in full space. In the paper the reduced adjoint approach to variational data assimilation is introduced. The characteristics and performance of the method are illustrated with a number of data assimilation experiments in a ground water subsurface contaminant model. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Normal and adjoint integral and integrodifferential neutron transport equations. Pt. 2

    Using the simplifying hypotheses of the integrodifferential Boltzmann equations of neutron transport, given in JEN 334 report, several integral equations, and theirs adjoint ones, are obtained. Relations between the different normal and adjoint eigenfunctions are established and, in particular, proceeding from the integrodifferential Boltzmann equation it's found out the relation between the solutions of the adjoint equation of its integral one, and the solutions of the integral equation of its adjoint one (author)

  6. Adjoint-consistent formulations of slip models for coupled electroosmotic flow systems

    Garg, Vikram V

    2014-09-27

    Background Models based on the Helmholtz `slip\\' approximation are often used for the simulation of electroosmotic flows. The objectives of this paper are to construct adjoint-consistent formulations of such models, and to develop adjoint-based numerical tools for adaptive mesh refinement and parameter sensitivity analysis. Methods We show that the direct formulation of the `slip\\' model is adjoint inconsistent, and leads to an ill-posed adjoint problem. We propose a modified formulation of the coupled `slip\\' model, which is shown to be well-posed, and therefore automatically adjoint-consistent. Results Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the computation and use of the adjoint solution in two-dimensional microfluidics problems. Conclusions An adjoint-consistent formulation for Helmholtz `slip\\' models of electroosmotic flows has been proposed. This formulation provides adjoint solutions that can be reliably used for mesh refinement and sensitivity analysis.

  7. An adjoint based method for the inversion of the Juno and Cassini gravity measurements into wind fields

    Galanti, Eli

    2016-01-01

    During 2016-17 the Juno and Cassini spacecraft will both perform close eccentric orbits of Jupiter and Saturn, respectively, obtaining high-precision gravity measurements for these planets. This data will be used to estimate the depth of the observed surface flows on these planets. All models to date, relating the winds to the gravity field, have been in the forward direction, thus allowing only calculation of the gravity field from given wind models. However, there is a need to do the inverse problem since the new observations will be of the gravity field. Here, an inverse dynamical model, is developed to relate the expected measurable gravity field, to perturbations of the density and wind fields, and therefore to the observed cloud-level winds. In order to invert the gravity field into the 3D circulation, an adjoint model is constructed for the dynamical model, thus allowing backward integration. This tool is used for examination of various scenarios, simulating cases in which the depth of the wind depends...

  8. Measurement of adjoint flux at the RB reactor

    The adjoint flux is of the great importance for determination of kinetic parameters of nuclear reactor (ρ, l and βeff) and for the interpretation of experiments with reactivity perturbations. In experimental reactor physics there are a few methods for the adjoint flux measurements. The method of reactivity perturbations with adequate samples is used for thermal reactors. According to the theory of reactivity perturbations the reactivity change due to sample of thermal neutrons absorbing material is proportional to product of flux and adjoint flux of thermal neutrons (Φ2(r)Φ=2(r)). The reactivity change due to fissionable nuclide is proportional to product of thermal neutron flux and adjoint flux of fast neutrons (Φ2(r)Φ=2(r)). The axial distribution of adjoint flux is determined by reactivity measurements and measurements of axial distribution of thermal neutron flux. Thi results of this measurement will be used for interpretation of other experiments with reactivity perturbations at the RB reactor

  9. ADGEN: ADjoint GENerator for computer models

    This paper presents the development of a FORTRAN compiler and an associated supporting software library called ADGEN. ADGEN reads FORTRAN models as input and produces and enhanced version of the input model. The enhanced version reproduces the original model calculations but also has the capability to calculate derivatives of model results of interest with respect to any and all of the model data and input parameters. The method for calculating the derivatives and sensitivities is the adjoint method. Partial derivatives are calculated analytically using computer calculus and saved as elements of an adjoint matrix on direct assess storage. The total derivatives are calculated by solving an appropriate adjoint equation. ADGEN is applied to a major computer model of interest to the Low-Level Waste Community, the PRESTO-II model. PRESTO-II sample problem results reveal that ADGEN correctly calculates derivatives of response of interest with respect to 300 parameters. The execution time to create the adjoint matrix is a factor of 45 times the execution time of the reference sample problem. Once this matrix is determined, the derivatives with respect to 3000 parameters are calculated in a factor of 6.8 that of the reference model for each response of interest. For a single 3000 for determining these derivatives by parameter perturbations. The automation of the implementation of the adjoint technique for calculating derivatives and sensitivities eliminates the costly and manpower-intensive task of direct hand-implementation by reprogramming and thus makes the powerful adjoint technique more amenable for use in sensitivity analysis of existing models. 20 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  10. Adjoint Monte Carlo simulation of fixed-energy secondary radiation

    Fixed energy secondary generation for adjoint Monte Carlo methods constitutes certain difficulties because of zero probability of reaching fixed value from continuous distribution. This paper proposes a possible approach to adjoint Monte Carlo simulation with fixed energy secondary radiation which does not contain any simplifying restriction. This approach uses the introduced before generalized particle concept developed for description of mixed-type radiation transport and allows adjoint Monte Carlo simulation of such processes. It treats particle type as additional discrete coordinate and always considers only one particle even for the interactions with many particles outgoing from the collision. The adjoint fixed energy secondary radiation simulation is performed as local energy estimator through the intermediate state with fixed energy. The proposed algorithm is tested on the example of coupled gamma/electron/positron transport with generation of annihilation radiation. Forward and adjoint simulation according to generalized particle concept show statistically similar results. (orig.)

  11. An Adjoint-based Method for the Inversion of the Juno and Cassini Gravity Measurements into Wind Fields

    Galanti, Eli; Kaspi, Yohai

    2016-04-01

    During 2016-17, the Juno and Cassini spacecraft will both perform close eccentric orbits of Jupiter and Saturn, respectively, obtaining high-precision gravity measurements for these planets. These data will be used to estimate the depth of the observed surface flows on these planets. All models to date, relating the winds to the gravity field, have been in the forward direction, thus only allowing the calculation of the gravity field from given wind models. However, there is a need to do the inverse problem since the new observations will be of the gravity field. Here, an inverse dynamical model is developed to relate the expected measurable gravity field, to perturbations of the density and wind fields, and therefore to the observed cloud-level winds. In order to invert the gravity field into the 3D circulation, an adjoint model is constructed for the dynamical model, thus allowing backward integration. This tool is used for the examination of various scenarios, simulating cases in which the depth of the wind depends on latitude. We show that it is possible to use the gravity measurements to derive the depth of the winds, both on Jupiter and Saturn, also taking into account measurement errors. Calculating the solution uncertainties, we show that the wind depth can be determined more precisely in the low-to-mid-latitudes. In addition, the gravitational moments are found to be particularly sensitive to flows at the equatorial intermediate depths. Therefore, we expect that if deep winds exist on these planets they will have a measurable signature by Juno and Cassini.

  12. Fully automatic adjoints: a robust and efficient mechanism for generating adjoint ocean models

    Ham, D. A.; Farrell, P. E.; Funke, S. W.; Rognes, M. E.

    2012-04-01

    The problem of generating and maintaining adjoint models is sufficiently difficult that typically only the most advanced and well-resourced community ocean models achieve it. There are two current technologies which each suffer from their own limitations. Algorithmic differentiation, also called automatic differentiation, is employed by models such as the MITGCM [2] and the Alfred Wegener Institute model FESOM [3]. This technique is very difficult to apply to existing code, and requires a major initial investment to prepare the code for automatic adjoint generation. AD tools may also have difficulty with code employing modern software constructs such as derived data types. An alternative is to formulate the adjoint differential equation and to discretise this separately. This approach, known as the continuous adjoint and employed in ROMS [4], has the disadvantage that two different model code bases must be maintained and manually kept synchronised as the model develops. The discretisation of the continuous adjoint is not automatically consistent with that of the forward model, producing an additional source of error. The alternative presented here is to formulate the flow model in the high level language UFL (Unified Form Language) and to automatically generate the model using the software of the FEniCS project. In this approach it is the high level code specification which is differentiated, a task very similar to the formulation of the continuous adjoint [5]. However since the forward and adjoint models are generated automatically, the difficulty of maintaining them vanishes and the software engineering process is therefore robust. The scheduling and execution of the adjoint model, including the application of an appropriate checkpointing strategy is managed by libadjoint [1]. In contrast to the conventional algorithmic differentiation description of a model as a series of primitive mathematical operations, libadjoint employs a new abstraction of the simulation

  13. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    Urichuk, Andrew; Walton, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-pol...

  14. An improved method for estimation of Jupiter's gravity field using the Juno expected measurements, a trajectory estimation model, and an adjoint based thermal wind model

    Galanti, E.; Finocchiaro, S.; Kaspi, Y.; Iess, L.

    2013-12-01

    The upcoming high precision measurements of the Juno flybys around Jupiter, have the potential of improving the estimation of Jupiter's gravity field. The analysis of the Juno Doppler data will provide a very accurate reconstruction of spacial gravity variations, but these measurements will be over a limited latitudinal and longitudinal range. In order to deduce the full gravity field of Jupiter, additional information needs to be incorporated into the analysis, especially with regards to the Jovian wind structure and its depth at high latitudes. In this work we propose a new iterative method for the estimation of the Jupiter gravity field, using the Juno expected measurements, a trajectory estimation model, and an adjoint based inverse thermal wind model. Beginning with an artificial gravitational field, the trajectory estimation model together with an optimization procedure is used to obtain an initial solution of the gravitational moments. As upper limit constraints, the model applies the gravity harmonics obtained from a thermal wind model in which the winds are assumed to penetrate barotropicaly along the direction of the spin axis. The solution from the trajectory model is then used as an initial guess for the thermal wind model, and together with an adjoint optimization method, the optimal penetration depth of the winds is computed. As a final step, the gravity harmonics solution from the thermal wind model is given back to the trajectory model, along with an uncertainties estimate, to be used as constraints for a new calculation of the gravity field. We test this method for several cases, some with zonal harmonics only, and some with the full gravity field including longitudinal variations that include the tesseral harmonics as well. The results show that using this method some of the gravitational moments are fitted better to the 'observed' ones, mainly due to the fact that the thermal wind model is taking into consideration the wind structure and depth

  15. An Analysis on the Calculation Efficiency of the Responses Caused by the Biased Adjoint Fluxes in Hybrid Monte Carlo Simulation

    Khuat, Quang Huy; Kim, Song Hyun; Kim, Do Hyun; Shin, Chang Ho [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    This technique is known as Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (CADIS) method and it is implemented in SCALE code system. In the CADIS method, adjoint transport equation has to be solved to determine deterministic importance functions. Using the CADIS method, a problem was noted that the biased adjoint flux estimated by deterministic methods can affect the calculation efficiency and error. The biases of adjoint function are caused by the methodology, calculation strategy, tolerance of result calculated by the deterministic method and inaccurate multi-group cross section libraries. In this paper, a study to analyze the influence of the biased adjoint functions into Monte Carlo computational efficiency is pursued. In this study, a method to estimate the calculation efficiency was proposed for applying the biased adjoint fluxes in the CADIS approach. For a benchmark problem, the responses and FOMs using SCALE code system were evaluated as applying the adjoint fluxes. The results show that the biased adjoint fluxes significantly affects the calculation efficiencies.

  16. Adjoint-Based Sensitivity Maps for the Nearshore

    Orzech, Mark; Veeramony, Jay; Ngodock, Hans

    2013-04-01

    The wave model SWAN (Booij et al., 1999) solves the spectral action balance equation to produce nearshore wave forecasts and climatologies. It is widely used by the coastal modeling community and is part of a variety of coupled ocean-wave-atmosphere model systems. A variational data assimilation system (Orzech et al., 2013) has recently been developed for SWAN and is presently being transitioned to operational use by the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office. This system is built around a numerical adjoint to the fully nonlinear, nonstationary SWAN code. When provided with measured or artificial "observed" spectral wave data at a location of interest on a given nearshore bathymetry, the adjoint can compute the degree to which spectral energy levels at other locations are correlated with - or "sensitive" to - variations in the observed spectrum. Adjoint output may be used to construct a sensitivity map for the entire domain, tracking correlations of spectral energy throughout the grid. When access is denied to the actual locations of interest, sensitivity maps can be used to determine optimal alternate locations for data collection by identifying regions of greatest sensitivity in the mapped domain. The present study investigates the properties of adjoint-generated sensitivity maps for nearshore wave spectra. The adjoint and forward SWAN models are first used in an idealized test case at Duck, NC, USA, to demonstrate the system's effectiveness at optimizing forecasts of shallow water wave spectra for an inaccessible surf-zone location. Then a series of simulations is conducted for a variety of different initializing conditions, to examine the effects of seasonal changes in wave climate, errors in bathymetry, and variations in size and shape of the inaccessible region of interest. Model skill is quantified using two methods: (1) a more traditional correlation of observed and modeled spectral statistics such as significant wave height, and (2) a recently developed RMS

  17. NON-SELF-ADJOINT GRAPHS

    Hussein, A.; Krejčiřík, David; Siegl, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 367, č. 4 (2015), s. 2921-2957. ISSN 0002-9947 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP203/11/0701 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Laplacians on metric graphs * non-self-adjoint boundary conditions * similarity transforms to self-adjoint operators * Riesz basis Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.122, year: 2014

  18. Application of sensitivity analysis to a simplified coupled neutronic thermal-hydraulics transient in a fast reactor using Adjoint techniques

    In this paper a method to perform sensitivity analysis for a simplified multi-physics problem is presented. The method is based on the Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis Procedure which is used to apply first order perturbation theory to linear and nonlinear problems using adjoint techniques. The multi-physics problem considered includes a neutronic, a thermo-kinetics, and a thermal-hydraulics part and it is used to model the time dependent behavior of a sodium cooled fast reactor. The adjoint procedure is applied to calculate the sensitivity coefficients with respect to the kinetic parameters of the problem for two reference transients using two different model responses, the results obtained are then compared with the values given by a direct sampling of the forward nonlinear problem. Our first results show that, thanks to modern numerical techniques, the procedure is relatively easy to implement and provides good estimation for most perturbations, making the method appealing for more detailed problems. (author)

  19. Fast Correlation Greeks by Adjoint Algorithmic Differentiation

    Luca Capriotti; Mike Giles

    2010-01-01

    We show how Adjoint Algorithmic Differentiation (AAD) allows an extremely efficient calculation of correlation Risk of option prices computed with Monte Carlo simulations. A key point in the construction is the use of binning to simultaneously achieve computational efficiency and accurate confidence intervals. We illustrate the method for a copula-based Monte Carlo computation of claims written on a basket of underlying assets, and we test it numerically for Portfolio Default Options. For any...

  20. Effective freeness of adjoint line bundles

    Heier, Gordon

    2001-01-01

    In this note we establish a new Fujita-type effective bound for the base point freeness of adjoint line bundles on a compact complex projective manifold of complex dimension $n$. The bound we obtain (approximately) differs from the linear bound conjectured by Fujita only by a factor of the cube root of $n$. As an application, a new effective statement for pluricanonical embeddings is derived.

  1. Inflow and initial conditions for direct numerical simulation based on adjoint data assimilation

    Gronskis, A; Heitz, D.; Mémin, E.

    2011-01-01

    A method for generating inflow conditions for direct numerical simulations (DNS) of spatially-developing flows is presented. The proposed method is based on variational data assimilation and adjoint-based optimization. The estimation is conducted through an iterative process involving a forward integration of a given dynamical model followed by a backward integration of an adjoint system defined by the adjoint of the discrete scheme associated to the dynamical system. The ap...

  2. Unsteady adjoint of pressure loss for a fundamental transonic turbine vane

    Talnikar, Chaitanya; Laskowski, Gregory M

    2015-01-01

    High fidelity simulations, e.g., large eddy simulation are often needed for accurately predicting pressure losses due to wake mixing in turbomachinery applications. An unsteady adjoint of such high fidelity simulations is useful for design optimization in these aerodynamic applications. In this paper we present unsteady adjoint solutions using a large eddy simulation model for a vane from VKI using aerothermal objectives. The unsteady adjoint method is effective in capturing the gradient for a short time interval aerothermal objective, whereas the method provides diverging gradients for long time-averaged thermal objectives. As the boundary layer on the suction side near the trailing edge of the vane is turbulent, it poses a challenge for the adjoint solver. The chaotic dynamics cause the adjoint solution to diverge exponentially from the trailing edge region when solved backwards in time. This results in the corruption of the sensitivities obtained from the adjoint solutions. An energy analysis of the unstea...

  3. On the preconditioning conjugate gradient method for the solution of 9-point elliptic difference equations

    Mazhar, Zeka; Daoud, D.S; Subaşı, Deniz

    1994-01-01

    The Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG) method is implemented to solve the system with 9 diagonal entries generated from a 9-point finite difference approximation of the self-adjoint elliptic partial differential equation using an incomplete matrix decomposition. A simpler matrix decomposition for such a linear system is also proposed with a main advantage that it preserves the symmetry of the original matrix, and is easy to implement. Results of the numerical experiments and comparison w...

  4. Adjoint-based Gradient Estimation Using the Space-time Solutions of Unknown Conservation Law Simulations

    Chen, Han

    2016-01-01

    Many control applications can be formulated as optimization constrained by conservation laws. Such optimization can be efficiently solved by gradient-based methods, where the gradient is obtained through the adjoint method. Traditionally, the adjoint method has not been able to be implemented in "gray-box" conservation law simulations. In gray-box simulations, the analytical and numerical form of the conservation law is unknown, but the space-time solution of relevant flow quantities is available. Without the adjoint gradient, optimization can be challenging for problems with many control variables. However, much information about the gray-box simulation is contained in its space-time solution, which motivates us to estimate the adjoint gradient by leveraging the space-time solution. This article considers a type of gray-box simulations where the flux function is partially unknown. A method is introduced to estimate the adjoint gradient at a cost independent of the number of control variables. The method firs...

  5. Adjoint Functors and Representation Dimensions

    Chang Chang XI

    2006-01-01

    We study the global dimensions of the coherent functors over two categories that are linked by a pair of adjoint functors. This idea is then exploited to compare the representation dimensions of two algebras. In particular, we show that if an Artin algebra is switched from the other, then they have the same representation dimension.

  6. Adjoint-based Optimal Flow Control for Compressible DNS

    Otero, J Javier; Sandberg, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    A novel adjoint-based framework oriented to optimal flow control in compressible direct numerical simulations is presented. Also, a new formulation of the adjoint characteristic boundary conditions is introduced, which enhances the stability of the adjoint simulations. The flow configuration chosen as a case study consists of a two dimensional open cavity flow with aspect ratio $L/H=3$ and Reynolds number $Re=5000$. This flow configuration is of particular interest, as the turbulent and chaotic nature of separated flows pushes the adjoint approach to its limit. The target of the flow actuation, defined as cost, is the reduction of the pressure fluctuations at the sensor location. To exploit the advantages of the adjoint method, a large number of control parameters is used. The control consists of an actuating sub-domain where a two-dimensional body force is applied at every point within the sub-volume. This results in a total of $2.256 \\cdot 10^6$ control parameters. The final actuation achieved a successful ...

  7. Technical Note: Adjoint formulation of the TOMCAT atmospheric transport scheme in the Eulerian backtracking framework (RETRO-TOM

    P. E. Haines

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new methodology for the formulation of an adjoint to the transport component of the chemistry transport model TOMCAT is described and implemented in a new model RETRO-TOM. The Eulerian backtracking method is used, allowing the forward advection scheme (Prather's second-order moments, to be efficiently exploited in the backward adjoint calculations. Prather's scheme is shown to be time-symmetric suggesting the possibility of high accuracy. To attain this accuracy, however, it is necessary to make a careful treatment of the "density inconsistency" problem inherent to offline transport models. The results are verified using a series of test experiments. These demonstrate the high accuracy of RETRO-TOM when compared with direct forward sensitivity calculations, at least for problems in which flux-limiters in the advection scheme are not required. RETRO-TOM therefore combines the flexibility and stability of a "finite difference of adjoint" formulation with the accuracy of an "adjoint of finite difference" formulation.

  8. A Posteriori Analysis for Hydrodynamic Simulations Using Adjoint Methodologies

    Woodward, C S; Estep, D; Sandelin, J; Wang, H

    2009-02-26

    This report contains results of analysis done during an FY08 feasibility study investigating the use of adjoint methodologies for a posteriori error estimation for hydrodynamics simulations. We developed an approach to adjoint analysis for these systems through use of modified equations and viscosity solutions. Targeting first the 1D Burgers equation, we include a verification of the adjoint operator for the modified equation for the Lax-Friedrichs scheme, then derivations of an a posteriori error analysis for a finite difference scheme and a discontinuous Galerkin scheme applied to this problem. We include some numerical results showing the use of the error estimate. Lastly, we develop a computable a posteriori error estimate for the MAC scheme applied to stationary Navier-Stokes.

  9. Singular Potentials in Quantum Mechanics and Ambiguity in the Self-Adjoint Hamiltonian

    Tamás Fülöp

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available For a class of singular potentials, including the Coulomb potential (in three and less dimensions and $V(x = g/x^2$ with the coefficient $g$ in a certain range ($x$ being a space coordinate in one or more dimensions, the corresponding Schrödinger operator is not automatically self-adjoint on its natural domain. Such operators admit more than one self-adjoint domain, and the spectrum and all physical consequences depend seriously on the self-adjoint version chosen. The article discusses how the self-adjoint domains can be identified in terms of a boundary condition for the asymptotic behaviour of the wave functions around the singularity, and what physical differences emerge for different self-adjoint versions of the Hamiltonian. The paper reviews and interprets known results, with the intention to provide a practical guide for all those interested in how to approach these ambiguous situations.

  10. An Adjoint-Based Adaptive Ensemble Kalman Filter

    Song, Hajoon

    2013-10-01

    A new hybrid ensemble Kalman filter/four-dimensional variational data assimilation (EnKF/4D-VAR) approach is introduced to mitigate background covariance limitations in the EnKF. The work is based on the adaptive EnKF (AEnKF) method, which bears a strong resemblance to the hybrid EnKF/three-dimensional variational data assimilation (3D-VAR) method. In the AEnKF, the representativeness of the EnKF ensemble is regularly enhanced with new members generated after back projection of the EnKF analysis residuals to state space using a 3D-VAR [or optimal interpolation (OI)] scheme with a preselected background covariance matrix. The idea here is to reformulate the transformation of the residuals as a 4D-VAR problem, constraining the new member with model dynamics and the previous observations. This should provide more information for the estimation of the new member and reduce dependence of the AEnKF on the assumed stationary background covariance matrix. This is done by integrating the analysis residuals backward in time with the adjoint model. Numerical experiments are performed with the Lorenz-96 model under different scenarios to test the new approach and to evaluate its performance with respect to the EnKF and the hybrid EnKF/3D-VAR. The new method leads to the least root-mean-square estimation errors as long as the linear assumption guaranteeing the stability of the adjoint model holds. It is also found to be less sensitive to choices of the assimilation system inputs and parameters.

  11. Approximate nonlinear self-adjointness and approximate conservation laws

    In this paper, approximate nonlinear self-adjointness for perturbed PDEs is introduced and its properties are studied. Consequently, approximate conservation laws which cannot be obtained by the approximate Noether theorem are constructed by means of the method. As an application, a class of perturbed nonlinear wave equations is considered to illustrate the effectiveness. (paper)

  12. MS S4.03.002 - Adjoint-Based Design for Configuration Shaping

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation discusses a method of inverse design for low sonic boom using adjoint-based gradient computations. It outlines a method for shaping a configuration in order to match a prescribed near-field signature.

  13. Adjoint Weighted Kinetics Parameter Estimation in the Monte Carlo Wielandt Calculations

    Choi, Sung Hoon; Shim, Hyung Jin [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In order to eliminate this huge memory consumption in the current adjoint estimation method, we have developed a new method in which the pedigree of a single history is utilized by applying the MC Wielandt method. The Wielandt method allows the estimations of the adjoint flux and adjoint-weighted parameters within a single cycle neutron simulations. The effectiveness of the new method is demonstrated in the kinetics parameter estimations for an infinite homogeneous two-group problem and the Godiva facility. We have developed an efficient algorithm for the adjoint-weighted kinetics parameter estimation in the MC Wielandt calculations which can significantly reduce the memory usage. From the numerical applications, it is demonstrated that the new method can predict the kinetics parameters with great accuracy.

  14. Efficient estimation of adjoint-weighted kinetics parameters in the Monte Carlo Wielandt calculations

    The effective delayed neutron fraction, βeff, and the prompt neutron generation time, Λ, in the point kinetics equation are weighted by the adjoint flux to improve the accuracy of the reactivity estimate. Recently the Monte Carlo (MC) kinetics parameter estimation methods by using the adjoint flux calculated in the MC forward simulations have been developed and successfully applied for reactor analyses. However these adjoint estimation methods based on the cycle-by-cycle genealogical table require a huge memory size to store the pedigree hierarchy. In this paper, we present a new adjoint estimation method in which the pedigree of a single history is utilized by applying the MC Wielandt method. The algorithm of the new method is derived and its effectiveness is demonstrated in the kinetics parameter estimations for infinite homogeneous two-group problems and critical facilities. (author)

  15. Self-Adjoint Extension of Symmetric Maps

    Friedel, H. N.

    2011-01-01

    A densely-defined symmetric linear map from/to a real Hilbert space extends to a self-adjoint map. Extension is expressed via Riesz representation. For a case including Friedrichs extension of a strongly monotone map, self-adjoint extension is unique, and equals closure of the given map.

  16. Estimation of Adjoint-Weighted Kinetics Parameters in Monte Carlo Wieland Calculations

    Choi, Sung Hoon; Shim, Hyung Jin [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    The effective delayed neutron fraction, β{sub eff}, and the prompt neutron generation time, Λ, in the point kinetics equation are weighted by the adjoint flux to improve the accuracy of the reactivity estimate. Recently the Monte Carlo (MC) kinetics parameter estimation methods by using the self-consistent adjoint flux calculated in the MC forward simulations have been developed and successfully applied for the research reactor analyses. However these adjoint estimation methods based on the cycle-by-cycle genealogical table require a huge memory size to store the pedigree hierarchy. In this paper, we present a new adjoint estimation in which the pedigree of a single history is utilized by applying the MC Wielandt method. The effectiveness of the new method is demonstrated in the kinetics parameter estimations for infinite homogeneous two-group problems and the Godiva critical facility.

  17. Estimation of Adjoint-Weighted Kinetics Parameters in Monte Carlo Wieland Calculations

    The effective delayed neutron fraction, βeff, and the prompt neutron generation time, Λ, in the point kinetics equation are weighted by the adjoint flux to improve the accuracy of the reactivity estimate. Recently the Monte Carlo (MC) kinetics parameter estimation methods by using the self-consistent adjoint flux calculated in the MC forward simulations have been developed and successfully applied for the research reactor analyses. However these adjoint estimation methods based on the cycle-by-cycle genealogical table require a huge memory size to store the pedigree hierarchy. In this paper, we present a new adjoint estimation in which the pedigree of a single history is utilized by applying the MC Wielandt method. The effectiveness of the new method is demonstrated in the kinetics parameter estimations for infinite homogeneous two-group problems and the Godiva critical facility

  18. Adjoint tomography of the southern California crust.

    Tape, Carl; Liu, Qinya; Maggi, Alessia; Tromp, Jeroen

    2009-08-21

    Using an inversion strategy based on adjoint methods, we developed a three-dimensional seismological model of the southern California crust. The resulting model involved 16 tomographic iterations, which required 6800 wavefield simulations and a total of 0.8 million central processing unit hours. The new crustal model reveals strong heterogeneity, including local changes of +/-30% with respect to the initial three-dimensional model provided by the Southern California Earthquake Center. The model illuminates shallow features such as sedimentary basins and compositional contrasts across faults. It also reveals crustal features at depth that aid in the tectonic reconstruction of southern California, such as subduction-captured oceanic crustal fragments. The new model enables more realistic and accurate assessments of seismic hazard. PMID:19696349

  19. Adjoint Fokker-Planck equation and runaway electron dynamics

    Liu, Chang; Brennan, Dylan P.; Bhattacharjee, Amitava [Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Boozer, Allen H. [Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The adjoint Fokker-Planck equation method is applied to study the runaway probability function and the expected slowing-down time for highly relativistic runaway electrons, including the loss of energy due to synchrotron radiation. In direct correspondence to Monte Carlo simulation methods, the runaway probability function has a smooth transition across the runaway separatrix, which can be attributed to effect of the pitch angle scattering term in the kinetic equation. However, for the same numerical accuracy, the adjoint method is more efficient than the Monte Carlo method. The expected slowing-down time gives a novel method to estimate the runaway current decay time in experiments. A new result from this work is that the decay rate of high energy electrons is very slow when E is close to the critical electric field. This effect contributes further to a hysteresis previously found in the runaway electron population.

  20. An Adjoint-Based Analysis of the Sampling Footprints of Tall Tower, Aircraft and Potential Future Lidar Observations of CO2

    Andrews, Arlyn; Kawa, Randy; Zhu, Zhengxin; Burris, John; Abshire, Jim

    2004-01-01

    A detailed mechanistic understanding of the sources and sinks of CO2 will be required to reliably predict future CO2 levels and climate. A commonly used technique for deriving information about CO2 exchange with surface reservoirs is to solve an 'inverse problem', where CO2 observations are used with an atmospheric transport model to find the optimal distribution of sources and sinks. Synthesis inversion methods are powerful tools for addressing this question, but the results are disturbingly sensitive to the details of the calculation. Studies done using different atmospheric transport models and combinations of surface station data have produced substantially different distributions of surface fluxes. Adjoint methods are now being developed that will more effectively incorporate diverse datasets in estimates of surface fluxes of CO2. In an adjoint framework, it will be possible to combine CO2 concentration data from longterm surface and aircraft monitoring stations with data from intensive field campaigns and with proposed future satellite observations. We have recently developed an adjoint for the GSFC 3-D Parameterized Chemistry and Transport Model (PCTM). Here, we will present results from a PCTM Adjoint study comparing the sampling footprints of tall tower, aircraft and potential future lidar observations of CO2. The vertical resolution and extent of the profiles and the observation frequency will be considered for several sites in North America.

  1. Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling using Space, Energy and Angle

    Peplow, Douglas E. [ORNL; Mosher, Scott W [ORNL; Evans, Thomas M [ORNL

    2012-08-01

    For challenging radiation transport problems, hybrid methods combine the accuracy of Monte Carlo methods with the global information present in deterministic methods. One of the most successful hybrid methods is CADIS Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling. This method uses a deterministic adjoint solution to construct a biased source distribution and consistent weight windows to optimize a specific tally in a Monte Carlo calculation. The method has been implemented into transport codes using just the spatial and energy information from the deterministic adjoint and has been used in many applications to compute tallies with much higher figures-of-merit than analog calculations. CADIS also outperforms user-supplied importance values, which usually take long periods of user time to develop. This work extends CADIS to develop weight windows that are a function of the position, energy, and direction of the Monte Carlo particle. Two types of consistent source biasing are presented: one method that biases the source in space and energy while preserving the original directional distribution and one method that biases the source in space, energy, and direction. Seven simple example problems are presented which compare the use of the standard space/energy CADIS with the new space/energy/angle treatments.

  2. GPU-accelerated adjoint algorithmic differentiation

    Gremse, Felix; Höfter, Andreas; Razik, Lukas; Kiessling, Fabian; Naumann, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Many scientific problems such as classifier training or medical image reconstruction can be expressed as minimization of differentiable real-valued cost functions and solved with iterative gradient-based methods. Adjoint algorithmic differentiation (AAD) enables automated computation of gradients of such cost functions implemented as computer programs. To backpropagate adjoint derivatives, excessive memory is potentially required to store the intermediate partial derivatives on a dedicated data structure, referred to as the "tape". Parallelization is difficult because threads need to synchronize their accesses during taping and backpropagation. This situation is aggravated for many-core architectures, such as Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), because of the large number of light-weight threads and the limited memory size in general as well as per thread. We show how these limitations can be mediated if the cost function is expressed using GPU-accelerated vector and matrix operations which are recognized as intrinsic functions by our AAD software. We compare this approach with naive and vectorized implementations for CPUs. We use four increasingly complex cost functions to evaluate the performance with respect to memory consumption and gradient computation times. Using vectorization, CPU and GPU memory consumption could be substantially reduced compared to the naive reference implementation, in some cases even by an order of complexity. The vectorization allowed usage of optimized parallel libraries during forward and reverse passes which resulted in high speedups for the vectorized CPU version compared to the naive reference implementation. The GPU version achieved an additional speedup of 7.5 ± 4.4, showing that the processing power of GPUs can be utilized for AAD using this concept. Furthermore, we show how this software can be systematically extended for more complex problems such as nonlinear absorption reconstruction for fluorescence-mediated tomography.

  3. Efficient parameter estimation in 2D transport models based on an adjoint formalism

    An adjoint based optimization procedure is elaborated to estimate transport coefficients for plasma edge models based on a limited set of known profiles at different locations. It is shown that a set of adjoint equations can accurately determine all sensitivities towards transport coefficients at once. A proof of principle is provided on a simple geometry. The methodology is subsequently applied to assess whether a simple edge model can be tuned toward full B2-EIRENE profiles for a JET-configuration. (paper)

  4. Radiation source reconstruction with known geometry and materials using the adjoint

    We present a method to estimate an unknown isotropic source distribution, in space and energy, using detector measurements when the geometry and material composition are known. The estimated source distribution minimizes the difference between the measured and computed responses of detectors located at a selected number of points within the domain. In typical methods, a forward flux calculation is performed for each source guess in an iterative process. In contrast, we use the adjoint flux to compute the responses. Potential applications of the proposed method include determining the distribution of radio-contaminants following a nuclear event, monitoring the flow of radioactive fluids in pipes to determine hold-up locations, and retroactive reconstruction of radiation fields using workers' detectors' readings. After presenting the method, we describe a numerical test problem to demonstrate the preliminary viability of the method. As expected, using the adjoint flux reduces the number of transport solves to be proportional to the number of detector measurements, in contrast to methods using the forward flux that require a typically larger number proportional to the number of spatial mesh cells. (author)

  5. Accurate adjoint design sensitivities for nano metal optics.

    Hansen, Paul; Hesselink, Lambertus

    2015-09-01

    We present a method for obtaining accurate numerical design sensitivities for metal-optical nanostructures. Adjoint design sensitivity analysis, long used in fluid mechanics and mechanical engineering for both optimization and structural analysis, is beginning to be used for nano-optics design, but it fails for sharp-cornered metal structures because the numerical error in electromagnetic simulations of metal structures is highest at sharp corners. These locations feature strong field enhancement and contribute strongly to design sensitivities. By using high-accuracy FEM calculations and rounding sharp features to a finite radius of curvature we obtain highly-accurate design sensitivities for 3D metal devices. To provide a bridge to the existing literature on adjoint methods in other fields, we derive the sensitivity equations for Maxwell's equations in the PDE framework widely used in fluid mechanics. PMID:26368483

  6. Adjoint equation of ADS sub-critical reactor

    Compared with the critical reactor, the distributions of source neutron and fission neutron are asymmetric inside ADS (accelerator driven sub-critical system) sub-critical reactor, as well as the importance function is different. The multigroup-diffusion approximation was used to simplify the steady-state transport equation into multigroup equation. Then an adjoint equation normalized by the power of reactor core and an importance function associated with the relative power were derived. The physical significance of neutron importance in the sub-critical reactor was also derived. Finally, two different expressions of multiplication factor for sub-critical reactor with external neutron source were derived based on steady-state adjoint equations. (authors)

  7. Optimization of a neutron detector design using adjoint transport simulation

    Yi, C.; Manalo, K.; Huang, M.; Chin, M.; Edgar, C.; Applegate, S.; Sjoden, G. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Gilhouse Boggs Bldg., 770 State St, Atlanta, GA 30332-0745 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    A synthetic aperture approach has been developed and investigated for Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) detection in vehicles passing a checkpoint at highway speeds. SNM is postulated to be stored in a moving vehicle and detector assemblies are placed on the road-side or in chambers embedded below the road surface. Neutron and gamma spectral awareness is important for the detector assembly design besides high efficiencies, so that different SNMs can be detected and identified with various possible shielding settings. The detector assembly design is composed of a CsI gamma-ray detector block and five neutron detector blocks, with peak efficiencies targeting different energy ranges determined by adjoint simulations. In this study, formulations are derived using adjoint transport simulations to estimate detector efficiencies. The formulations is applied to investigate several neutron detector designs for Block IV, which has its peak efficiency in the thermal range, and Block V, designed to maximize the total neutron counts over the entire energy spectrum. Other Blocks detect different neutron energies. All five neutron detector blocks and the gamma-ray block are assembled in both MCNP and deterministic simulation models, with detector responses calculated to validate the fully assembled design using a 30-group library. The simulation results show that the 30-group library, collapsed from an 80-group library using an adjoint-weighting approach with the YGROUP code, significantly reduced the computational cost while maintaining accuracy. (authors)

  8. Adjoint-based sensitivity analysis for reactor accident codes

    This paper summarizes a recently completed study that identified and investigated the difficulties and limitations of applying first-order adjoint sensitivity methods to reactor accident codes. The work extends earlier adjoint sensitivity formulations and applications to consider problem/model discontinuities in a general fashion, provide for response (R) formulations required by reactor safety applications, and provide a scheme for accurately handling extremely time-sensitive reactor accident responses. The scheme involves partitioning (dividing) the model into submodels (with spearate defining equations and initial conditions) at the location of discontinuity. Successful partitioning moves the problem dependence on the discontinuity location from the whole model system equations to the initial conditions of the second submodel

  9. Use of adjoint transport solutions for inverse problems

    Inverse problems represent a third major class of transport problems (after criticality-type problems and shielding-type problems). For the purpose of discussion here, an inverse problem is defined to be one in which a medium of interest emits some particular type of radiation, either spontaneously or when exposed to some other type of radiation. From a knowledge of the emitted radiation characteristics, one wishes to infer something about the medium that emits the detected radiation. An important example of a practical inverse problem is the geophysical logging of geological formations to determine the presence of minerals or hydrocarbons in the vicinity of a borehole. Proposals have also been made to detect hidden explosives by these methods. For a complete understanding of the apparatus used to solve inverse problems, it is important to know the characteristic interrogation distance of the method. Phrased more precisely, What is the relative contribution to the detector signal due to radiation particles emitted by different elements of volume in the medium being interrogated? As shown in the paper, it is possible to address this question with a computational procedure that utilizes adjoint transport solutions

  10. Coupling of MASH-MORSE Adjoint Leakages with Space- and Time-Dependent Plume Radiation Sources

    Slater, C.O.

    2001-04-20

    reduce computational times. The second source calculation uses a point kernel like method to calculate directional fluences at points surrounding user-specified detector and structure locations and folds those fluences with MASH-MORSE adjoint leakages to calculate free-field and shielded fluences and dose rates and the indicated protection factors. Both source calculation methods were tested for determining dose rates at specified locations within a two-story concrete building. For two early time steps, results from the second method are 50 to 60% higher than those from the first method, but the protection factors differ by only a few percent. This indicates that the free-field and shielded fluence spectra are similar and differ mainly in magnitude. Other comparisons were made, and from the comparisons there was a perceived underprediction by TORT. That underprediction can be attributed to the coarse mesh and quadrature used in the calculations. The second method, while not rigorously correct, requires much less computer time for a reasonably good estimate of the shielded dose rates within a structure.

  11. System of adjoint P1 equations for neutron moderation

    In some applications of perturbation theory, it is necessary know the adjoint neutron flux, which is obtained by the solution of adjoint neutron diffusion equation. However, the multigroup constants used for this are weighted in only the direct neutron flux, from the solution of direct P1 equations. In this work, this procedure is questioned and the adjoint P1 equations are derived by the neutron transport equation, the reversion operators rules and analogies between direct and adjoint parameters. (author)

  12. Application of adjoint operators to neural learning

    Barhen, J.; Toomarian, N.; Gulati, S.

    1990-01-01

    A technique for the efficient analytical computation of such parameters of the neural architecture as synaptic weights and neural gain is presented as a single solution of a set of adjoint equations. The learning model discussed concentrates on the adiabatic approximation only. A problem of interest is represented by a system of N coupled equations, and then adjoint operators are introduced. A neural network is formalized as an adaptive dynamical system whose temporal evolution is governed by a set of coupled nonlinear differential equations. An approach based on the minimization of a constrained neuromorphic energylike function is applied, and the complete learning dynamics are obtained as a result of the calculations.

  13. Adjoint-Based Uncertainty Quantification with MCNP

    Seifried, Jeffrey E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-09-01

    This work serves to quantify the instantaneous uncertainties in neutron transport simulations born from nuclear data and statistical counting uncertainties. Perturbation and adjoint theories are used to derive implicit sensitivity expressions. These expressions are transformed into forms that are convenient for construction with MCNP6, creating the ability to perform adjoint-based uncertainty quantification with MCNP6. These new tools are exercised on the depleted-uranium hybrid LIFE blanket, quantifying its sensitivities and uncertainties to important figures of merit. Overall, these uncertainty estimates are small (< 2%). Having quantified the sensitivities and uncertainties, physical understanding of the system is gained and some confidence in the simulation is acquired.

  14. Two-dimensional QCD with matter in the adjoint representation: What does it teach us?

    We analyse the highly excited states in QCD2 (Nc→∞) with adjoint matter by using such general methods as dispersion relations, duality and unitarity. We find the Hagedorn-like spectrum ρ(m) ∝m-aexp (βH m) where the parameters βH and a can be expressed in terms of the asymptotics of the matrix elements fn{k} ∝ left angle 0 vertical stroke Tr(anti ΨΨ)k vertical stroke nk right angle. We argue that the asymptotical values fn{k} do not depend on k (after appropriate normalization). Thus, we obtain βH=(2/π)√(π/g2Nc) and a=-3/2 in the case of Majorana fermions in the adjoint representation. The Hagedorn temperature is the limiting temperature in this case. We also argue that the chiral condensate left angle 0 vertical stroke Tr(anti ΨΨ) vertical stroke 0 right angle is not zero in the model. Contrary to the 't Hooft model, this condensate does not break down any continuous symmetries and can not be considered as an order parameter. Thus, no Goldstone boson appears as a consequence of the condensation. We also discuss a few apparently different but actually tightly related problems: master field, condensate, wee partons and constituent quark model in the light-cone framework. (orig.)

  15. Adjoint Based A Posteriori Analysis of Multiscale Mortar Discretizations with Multinumerics

    Tavener, Simon

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we derive a posteriori error estimates for linear functionals of the solution to an elliptic problem discretized using a multiscale nonoverlapping domain decomposition method. The error estimates are based on the solution of an appropriately defined adjoint problem. We present a general framework that allows us to consider both primal and mixed formulations of the forward and adjoint problems within each subdomain. The primal subdomains are discretized using either an interior penalty discontinuous Galerkin method or a continuous Galerkin method with weakly imposed Dirichlet conditions. The mixed subdomains are discretized using Raviart- Thomas mixed finite elements. The a posteriori error estimate also accounts for the errors due to adjoint-inconsistent subdomain discretizations. The coupling between the subdomain discretizations is achieved via a mortar space. We show that the numerical discretization error can be broken down into subdomain and mortar components which may be used to drive adaptive refinement.Copyright © by SIAM.

  16. Dual of QCD with One Adjoint Fermion

    Mojaza, Matin; Nardecchia, Marco; Pica, Claudio;

    2011-01-01

    We construct the magnetic dual of QCD with one adjoint Weyl fermion. The dual is a consistent solution of the 't Hooft anomaly matching conditions, allows for flavor decoupling and remarkably constitutes the first nonsupersymmetric dual valid for any number of colors. The dual allows to bound the...

  17. Aerosols Processes in the CMAQ Adjoint

    Turner, M.; Henze, D.; Hakami, A.; Zhao, S.; Resler, Jaroslav; Carmichael, G.; Stanier, C.; Baek, J.; Saide, P.; Sandu, A.; Russel, A.; Jeong, G.; Nenes, A.; Capps, S.; Percell, P.; Pinder, R.; Napelenok, S.; Pye, H.; Bash, J.; Chai, T.; Byun, D

    Davis: Air Quality Research Center, 2011. [IAMA 2011. International Aerosol Modeling Algorithms Conference /3./. Davis, 30.11.2011-02.12.2011] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : air pollution * adjoint * aerosols Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology http://dl.dropbox.com/u/41967626/IAMApresent/TURNER.pdf

  18. Fine resolution modeling with CMAQ-adjoint

    Resler, Jaroslav; Eben, Kryštof; Juruš, Pavel

    Chapel Hill : CMAS, 2010. [Annual CMAS Conference /9./. 11.10.2010-13.10.2010, Chapel Hill] R&D Projects: GA MŽP SP/1A4/107/07 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : CMAQ * adjoint * MPI * parallel efficiency Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology http://www.cmascenter.org/conference/2010/agenda.cfm

  19. Adjoint accuracy for the full-Stokes ice flow model: limits to the transmission of basal friction variability to the surface

    Martin, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    This work focuses on the numerical assessment of the accuracy of an adjoint-based gradient in the perspective of variational data assimilation and parameter identification in glaciology. Using noisy synthetic data, we quantify the ability to identify the friction coefficient for such methods with a non-linear friction law. The exact adjoint problem is solved, based on second order numerical schemes, and a comparison with the so called "self-adjoint" approximation, neglecting the viscosity dependency to the velocity (leading to an incorrect gradient), common in glaciology, is carried out. For data with a noise of $1\\%$, a lower bound of identifiable wavelengths of $10$ ice thicknesses in the friction coefficient is established, when using the exact adjoint method, while the "self-adjoint" method is limited, even for lower noise, to a minimum of $20$ ice thicknesses wavelengths. The second order exact gradient method therefore provides robustness and reliability for the parameter identification process. In othe...

  20. Study on Anti-inflammatory Effect and Adjoint Toxical and Side Effects of Different Extract from Fructus Bruceae%鸦胆子不同组分抗炎与伴随毒副作用研究

    杨倩; 吕莉莉; 张丽美; 孙蓉

    2011-01-01

    Objective To offer experimental basement for the elucidation of dependablity between "toxicity-efficacy" by researching the adjoint toxical and side effects of anti-inflammatory effect of water and alcohol extract from Fructus Bruceae. Methods The model of ear swelling by croton oil and granuloma by agar were made and model mice were administrated with water and alcohol extract from Fructus Bruceae of high, middle and low dosage 3/7 days continually. The activities of serum ALT, AST and contents of Cr, BUN were detected while the ratio of liver and kidney to body was measured. Results Both ear swelling by croton oil and granuloma by agar can be inhibited by multiple intragastric administration of water and alcohol extract from Fructus Bruceae. The swelling depressive rate of water extract was higher than that of alcohol extract and showed a well "dose-effect" relationship. The activities of serum ALT, AST and ratio of liver to body showed little change, but both the contents of Cr and BUN and ratio of kidney to body increased significantly with doses and time. Conclusion Both water and alcohol extract from Fructus Bruceae at effective dosage could efficiently inhibit acute and chronic inflammation. At the same time some toxical and side effects can be caused to kidney, however, the occurrence mechanism of its toxical and side effects still need further study.%目的 对鸦胆子水提、醇提组分发挥抗炎药效剂量下出现的伴随毒副作用进行观察与研究,为阐明其"毒性-功效"相关性提供实验依据.方法 建立小鼠巴豆油耳肿胀模型和琼脂肉芽肿模型,并分别给小鼠灌胃高、中、低不同剂量的鸦胆子水提、醇提组分连续3天和7天,末次给药后取血检测血清丙氨酸氨基转移酶(ALT)、天门冬氨酸氨基转移酶(AST)活性及肌Of(Cr)、尿素氮(BUN)含量变化并取肝、肾称重计算脏体比值.结果 连续多次给小鼠灌胃药效剂量的鸦胆子水提和醇提组分均可明

  1. Running coupling in SU(2) with two adjoint fermions

    Rantaharju, Jarno; Rummukainen, Kari; Tuominen, Kimmo

    2015-01-01

    We study SU(2) gauge theory with two Dirac fermions in the adjoint representation of the gauge group on the lattice. Using clover improved Wilson fermion action with hypercubic truncated stout smearing we perform simulations at larger coupling than earlier. We measure the evolution of the coupling constant using the Schr\\"odinger functional method. Extrapolating our lattice results to the continuum, we confirm the existence of a fixed point in the interval 2.2 $\\lesssim $ $g^{*2}$ $\\lesssim $ 3. We also measure the anomalous dimension and find its value at the fixed point is 0.18 $\\lesssim $ $\\gamma^*$ $\\lesssim $ 0.23.

  2. Adjoint Monte Carlo techniques and codes for organ dose calculations

    Adjoint Monte Carlo simulations can be effectively used for the estimation of doses in small targets when the sources are extended in large volumes or surfaces. The main features of two computer codes for calculating doses at free points or in organs of an anthropomorphic phantom are described. In the first program (REBEL-3) natural gamma-emitting sources are contained in the walls of a dwelling room; in the second one (POKER-CAMP) the user can specify arbitrary gamma sources with different spatial distributions in the environment: in (or on the surface of) the ground and in the air. 3 figures

  3. Utilisation de sources et d'adjoints dragon pour les calculs TRIPOLI

    Camand, Corentin

    Numerical simulation is an essential part of reactor physics in order to understand the behaviour of neutrons inside and outside nuclear reactors. The objective is to solve the neutron transport equation in order to know the neutron flux and the interactions between neutrons and materials. We use neutronic simulation codes in order to solve this equation for criticallity problem, where we have a neutron multiplying environment, and shielding problems. There are two different types of numerical simulation techniques. Deterministic methods solve directly the transport equation using some approximations. The energy domain is divided in regions called groups, we use a spatial mesh for the geometry treatment, transport operator may also be simplified. Those approximations invole an inherent error. However these methods provide high computation time performances. Monte Carlo or stochastic methods follow explicitly a large number of neutrons as they travel through materials minimizing approximations. Continuous-energy and multigroup treatment are both available. Quantities calculated are random variables to which are associated statistical error called standard deviations. We have to simulate a very large number of neutrons if we want the calculation to converge and the results to be precise enough. As a matter of fact, computation time of these methods can be excessively large and represent their main weakness. The objective of this study is to set up a chaining method from a deterministic code to a Monte Carlo code, in order to improve the convergence of Monte Carlo calculations performed by the code TRIPOLI. We want to use datas calculated by the deterministic code DRAGON and use them in TRIPOLI. We will develop two methods. The first one will calculate source distribution in DRAGON and implement them in TRIPOLI as initial sources of a criticallity calculation. The objective is to accelerate the convergence of the neutrons sources, and save the first batches that are

  4. Inverting Juno Gravity Field Measurements into the Atmospheric Dynamics of Jupiter - a Study Using a Dynamical Model and Its Adjoint Counterpart

    Galanti, E.; Kaspi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    In approximately two years Juno will perform close flybys of Jupiter, obtaining a high precision gravity spectrum for the planet. This data can potentially be used to estimate the depth of the observed flows on the Jupiter. Here, we propose a new methodology for the inversion of the gravity data into into the full three-dimensional flow on Jupiter. Using the adjoint method we construct an inverse model for a dynamical model in which the gravity field is calculated from the observed surface wind, thus allowing its backward integration, from the gravity field to the wind. Given a gravity field, the adjoint based model finds the atmospheric dynamics that can explain best the gravity field (minimum difference). The dynamical model is set up to allow either zonal flow only, or a full horizontal flow in both zonal and meridional directions based on the observed cloud-level wind. In addition, dynamical perturbations resulting from the the non-spherical shape of the planet are accounted for. The dynamical model, together with its adjoint counterpart, are used for examination of various scenarios, including cases in which the depth of the wind depend on latitudinal position.We show that given the expected sensitivities of Juno, it is possible to use the gravity measurements to derive the depth of the wind on Jupiter. This holds for a large range of zonal wind possible penetration depths, from 100km to 10,000km, and for winds depth that vary with latitude. This method proves to be useful also when incorporating the full horizontal flow, and thus taking into account gravity perturbations that vary with longitude. We show that our adjoint based inversion method allows not only to estimate the depth of the circulation, but allows via iterations with the spacecraft trajectory estimation model to improve the inferred gravity field.

  5. An adjoint-based approach for finding invariant solutions of Navier-Stokes equations

    Farazmand, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    We consider the incompressible Navier--Stokes equations with periodic boundary conditions and time-independent forcing. For this type of flow, we derive adjoint equations whose trajectories converge asymptotically to the equilibrium and traveling wave solutions of the Navier--Stokes equations. Using the adjoint equations, arbitrary initial conditions evolve to the vicinity of a (relative) equilibrium at which point a few Newton-type iterations yield the desired (relative) equilibrium solution. We apply this adjoint-based method to a chaotic two-dimensional Kolmogorov flow. A convergence rate of 100% is observed, leading to the discovery of 21 new steady state and traveling wave solutions at Reynolds number Re=40. Some of the new invariant solutions have spatially localized structures that were previously believed to only exist on domains with large aspect ratios. We show that one of the newly found steady state solutions underpins the temporal intermittencies, i.e., high energy dissipation episodes of the flo...

  6. Adjoint optimization of natural convection problems: differentially heated cavity

    Saglietti, Clio; Schlatter, Philipp; Monokrousos, Antonios; Henningson, Dan S.

    2016-06-01

    Optimization of natural convection-driven flows may provide significant improvements to the performance of cooling devices, but a theoretical investigation of such flows has been rarely done. The present paper illustrates an efficient gradient-based optimization method for analyzing such systems. We consider numerically the natural convection-driven flow in a differentially heated cavity with three Prandtl numbers (Pr=0.15{-}7 ) at super-critical conditions. All results and implementations were done with the spectral element code Nek5000. The flow is analyzed using linear direct and adjoint computations about a nonlinear base flow, extracting in particular optimal initial conditions using power iteration and the solution of the full adjoint direct eigenproblem. The cost function for both temperature and velocity is based on the kinetic energy and the concept of entransy, which yields a quadratic functional. Results are presented as a function of Prandtl number, time horizons and weights between kinetic energy and entransy. In particular, it is shown that the maximum transient growth is achieved at time horizons on the order of 5 time units for all cases, whereas for larger time horizons the adjoint mode is recovered as optimal initial condition. For smaller time horizons, the influence of the weights leads either to a concentric temperature distribution or to an initial condition pattern that opposes the mean shear and grows according to the Orr mechanism. For specific cases, it could also been shown that the computation of optimal initial conditions leads to a degenerate problem, with a potential loss of symmetry. In these situations, it turns out that any initial condition lying in a specific span of the eigenfunctions will yield exactly the same transient amplification. As a consequence, the power iteration converges very slowly and fails to extract all possible optimal initial conditions. According to the authors' knowledge, this behavior is illustrated here

  7. Tracking influential haze source areas in North China using an adjoint model, GRAPES-CUACE

    An, X. Q.; Zhai, S. X.; Jin, M.; Gong, S. L.; Wang, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Based upon the adjoint theory, the adjoint of the aerosol module in the atmospheric chemical modeling system GRAPES-CUACE (Global/Regional Assimilation and PrEdiction System coupled with the CMA Unified Atmospheric Chemistry Environment) was developed and tested for its correctness. Through statistic comparison, BC (black carbon aerosol) concentrations simulated by GRAPES-CUACE were generally consistent with observations from Nanjiao (one urban observation station) and Shangdianzi (one rural observation station) stations. To track the most influential emission-sources regions and the most influential time intervals for the high BC concentration during the simulation period, the adjoint model was adopted to simulate the sensitivity of average BC concentration over Beijing at the highest concentration time point (referred to as the Objective Function) with respect to BC emission amount over Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region. Four types of regions were selected based on administrative division and sensitivity coefficient distribution. The adjoint model was used to quantify the effects of emission-sources reduction in different time intervals over different regions by one independent simulation. Effects of different emission reduction strategies based on adjoint sensitivity information show that the more influential regions (regions with relatively larger sensitivity coefficients) do not necessarily correspond to the administrative regions, and the influence effectiveness of sensitivity-oriented regions was greater than the administrative divisions. The influence of emissions on the objective function decreases sharply approximately for the pollutants emitted 17-18 h ago in this episode. Therefore, controlling critical emission regions during critical time intervals on the basis of adjoint sensitivity analysis is much more efficient than controlling administrative specified regions during an experiential time period.

  8. Solar wind reconstruction from magnetosheath data using an adjoint approach

    Nabert, C.; Othmer, C. [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Geophysik und extraterrestrische Physik; Glassmeier, K.H. [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Geophysik und extraterrestrische Physik; Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Goettingen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    We present a new method to reconstruct solar wind conditions from spacecraft data taken during magnetosheath passages, which can be used to support, e.g., magnetospheric models. The unknown parameters of the solar wind are used as boundary conditions of an MHD (magnetohydrodynamics) magnetosheath model. The boundary conditions are varied until the spacecraft data matches the model predictions. The matching process is performed using a gradient-based minimization of the misfit between data and model. To achieve this time-consuming procedure, we introduce the adjoint of the magnetosheath model, which allows efficient calculation of the gradients. An automatic differentiation tool is used to generate the adjoint source code of the model. The reconstruction method is applied to THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms) data to calculate the solar wind conditions during spacecraft magnetosheath transitions. The results are compared to actual solar wind data. This allows validation of our reconstruction method and indicates the limitations of the MHD magnetosheath model used.

  9. Solar wind reconstruction from magnetosheath data using an adjoint approach

    We present a new method to reconstruct solar wind conditions from spacecraft data taken during magnetosheath passages, which can be used to support, e.g., magnetospheric models. The unknown parameters of the solar wind are used as boundary conditions of an MHD (magnetohydrodynamics) magnetosheath model. The boundary conditions are varied until the spacecraft data matches the model predictions. The matching process is performed using a gradient-based minimization of the misfit between data and model. To achieve this time-consuming procedure, we introduce the adjoint of the magnetosheath model, which allows efficient calculation of the gradients. An automatic differentiation tool is used to generate the adjoint source code of the model. The reconstruction method is applied to THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms) data to calculate the solar wind conditions during spacecraft magnetosheath transitions. The results are compared to actual solar wind data. This allows validation of our reconstruction method and indicates the limitations of the MHD magnetosheath model used.

  10. Firm Analysis by Different Methods

    Píbilová, Kateřina

    2012-01-01

    This Diploma Thesis deals with an analysis of the company made by selected methods. External environment of the company is analysed using PESTLE analysis and Porter’s five-factor model. The internal environment is analysed by means of Kralicek Quick test and Fundamental analysis. SWOT analysis represents opportunities and threats of the external environment with the strengths and weaknesses of the company. The proposal of betterment of the company’s economic management is designed on the basi...

  11. Chiral transition of fundamental and adjoint quarks

    Capdevilla, R.M. [Instituto de Física Teórica, UNESP – Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rua Dr. Bento T. Ferraz, 271, Bloco II, 01140-070 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Doff, A., E-mail: agomes@utfpr.edu.br [Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná – UTFPR – DAFIS, Av. Monteiro Lobato Km 04, 84016-210 Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Natale, A.A., E-mail: natale@ift.unesp.br [Instituto de Física Teórica, UNESP – Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rua Dr. Bento T. Ferraz, 271, Bloco II, 01140-070 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-170 Santo André, SP (Brazil)

    2014-01-20

    The chiral symmetry breaking transition of quarks in the fundamental and adjoint representation is studied in a model where the gap equation contains two contributions, one containing a confining propagator and another corresponding to the exchange of one-dressed dynamically massive gluons. When quarks are in the fundamental representation the confinement effect dominates the chiral symmetry breaking while the gluon exchange is suppressed due to the dynamical gluon mass effect in the propagator and in the coupling constant. In this case the chiral and deconfinement transition temperatures are approximately the same. For quarks in the adjoint representation, due to the larger Casimir eigenvalue, the gluon exchange is operative and the chiral transition happens at a larger temperature than the deconfinement one.

  12. Chiral transition of fundamental and adjoint quarks

    The chiral symmetry breaking transition of quarks in the fundamental and adjoint representation is studied in a model where the gap equation contains two contributions, one containing a confining propagator and another corresponding to the exchange of one-dressed dynamically massive gluons. When quarks are in the fundamental representation the confinement effect dominates the chiral symmetry breaking while the gluon exchange is suppressed due to the dynamical gluon mass effect in the propagator and in the coupling constant. In this case the chiral and deconfinement transition temperatures are approximately the same. For quarks in the adjoint representation, due to the larger Casimir eigenvalue, the gluon exchange is operative and the chiral transition happens at a larger temperature than the deconfinement one

  13. Solution of the self-adjoint radiative transfer equation on hybrid computer systems

    Gasilov, V. A.; Kuchugov, P. A.; Olkhovskaya, O. G.; Chetverushkin, B. N.

    2016-06-01

    A new technique for simulating three-dimensional radiative energy transfer for the use in the software designed for the predictive simulation of plasma with high energy density on parallel computers is proposed. A highly scalable algorithm that takes into account the angular dependence of the radiation intensity and is free of the ray effect is developed based on the solution of a second-order equation with a self-adjoint operator. A distinctive feature of this algorithm is a preliminary transformation of rotation to eliminate mixed derivatives with respect to the spatial variables, simplify the structure of the difference operator, and accelerate the convergence of the iterative solution of the equation. It is shown that the proposed method correctly reproduces the limiting cases—isotropic radiation and the directed radiation with a δ-shaped angular distribution.

  14. Chiral transition of fundamental and adjoint quarks

    Capdevilla, R. M.; Doff, A.(Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná – UTFPR – DAFIS, Av. Monteiro Lobato Km 04, 84016-210 Ponta Grossa, PR, Brazil); Natale, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    The chiral symmetry breaking transition of quarks in the fundamental and adjoint representation is studied in a model where the gap equation contains two contributions, one containing a confining propagator and another corresponding to the exchange of one-dressed dynamically massive gluons. When quarks are in the fundamental representation the confinement effect dominates the chiral symmetry breaking while the gluon exchange is suppressed due to the dynamical gluon mass effect in the propagat...

  15. SPECTRAL RELATIVE ABSORPTION DIFFERENCE METHOD

    Salaymeh, S.

    2010-06-17

    When analyzing field data, the uncertainty in the background continuum emission produces the majority of error in the final gamma-source analysis. The background emission typically dominates an observed spectrum in terms of counts and is highly variable spatially and temporally. The majority of the spectral shape of the background continuum is produced by combinations of cosmic rays, {sup 40}K, {sup 235}U, and {sup 220}Rn, and the continuum is similar in shape to the 15%-20% level for most field observations. However, the goal of spectroscopy analysis is to pick up subtle peaks (<%5) upon this large background. Because the continuum is falling off as energy increases, peak detection algorithms must first define the background surrounding the peak. This definition is difficult when the range of background shapes is considered. The full spectral template matching algorithms are heavily weighted to solving for the background continuum as it produces significant counts over much of the energy range. The most appropriate background mitigation technique is to take a separate background observation without the source of interest. But, it is frequently not possible to record a background observation in the exact location before (or after) a source has been detected. Thus, one uses approximate backgrounds that rely on spatially nearby locations or similar environments. Since the error in many field observations is dominated by the background, a technique that is less sensitive to the background would be quite beneficial. We report the result of an initial investigation into a novel observation scheme for gamma-emission detection in high background environments. Employing low resolution, NaI, detectors, we examine the different between the direct emission and the 'spectral-shadow' that the gamma emission produces when passed through a thin absorber. For this detection scheme to be competitive, it is required to count and analyze individual gamma-events. We describe

  16. Supersymmetric descendants of self-adjointly extended quantum mechanical Hamiltonians

    Al-Hashimi, M. H.; Salman, M.; Shalaby, A.; Wiese, U.-J.

    2013-10-01

    We consider the descendants of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians in supersymmetric quantum mechanics on a half-line, on an interval, and on a punctured line or interval. While there is a 4-parameter family of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians on a punctured line, only a 3-parameter sub-family has supersymmetric descendants that are themselves self-adjoint. We also address the self-adjointness of an operator related to the supercharge, and point out that only a sub-class of its most general self-adjoint extensions is physical. Besides a general characterization of self-adjoint extensions and their supersymmetric descendants, we explicitly consider concrete examples, including a particle in a box with general boundary conditions, with and without an additional point interaction. We also discuss bulk-boundary resonances and their manifestation in the supersymmetric descendant.

  17. Supersymmetric Descendants of Self-Adjointly Extended Quantum Mechanical Hamiltonians

    Al-Hashimi, M H; Shalaby, A; Wiese, U -J

    2013-01-01

    We consider the descendants of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians in supersymmetric quantum mechanics on a half-line, on an interval, and on a punctured line or interval. While there is a 4-parameter family of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians on a punctured line, only a 3-parameter sub-family has supersymmetric descendants that are themselves self-adjoint. We also address the self-adjointness of an operator related to the supercharge, and point out that only a sub-class of its most general self-adjoint extensions is physical. Besides a general characterization of self-adjoint extensions and their supersymmetric descendants, we explicitly consider concrete examples, including a particle in a box with general boundary conditions, with and without an additional point interaction. We also discuss bulk-boundary resonances and their manifestation in the supersymmetric descendant.

  18. Limitations of Adjoint-Based Optimization for Separated Flows

    Otero, J. Javier; Sharma, Ati; Sandberg, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Cabin noise is generated by the transmission of turbulent pressure fluctuations through a vibrating panel and can lead to fatigue. In the present study, we model this problem by using DNS to simulate the flow separating off a backward facing step and interacting with a plate downstream of the step. An adjoint formulation of the full compressible Navier-Stokes equations with varying viscosity is used to calculate the optimal control required to minimize the fluid-structure-acoustic interaction with the plate. To achieve noise reduction, a cost function in wavenumber space is chosen to minimize the excitation of the lower structural modes of the structure. To ensure the validity of time-averaged cost functions, it is essential that the time horizon is long enough to be a representative sample of the statistical behaviour of the flow field. The results from the current study show how this scenario is not always feasible for separated flows, because the chaotic behaviour of turbulence surpasses the ability of adjoint-based methods to compute time-dependent sensitivities of the flow.

  19. Adjoint sensitivity studies of loop current and eddy shedding in the Gulf of Mexico

    Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh

    2013-07-01

    Adjoint model sensitivity analyses were applied for the loop current (LC) and its eddy shedding in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) using the MIT general circulation model (MITgcm). The circulation in the GoM is mainly driven by the energetic LC and subsequent LC eddy separation. In order to understand which ocean regions and features control the evolution of the LC, including anticyclonic warm-core eddy shedding in the GoM, forward and adjoint sensitivities with respect to previous model state and atmospheric forcing were computed using the MITgcm and its adjoint. Since the validity of the adjoint model sensitivities depends on the capability of the forward model to simulate the real LC system and the eddy shedding processes, a 5 year (2004–2008) forward model simulation was performed for the GoM using realistic atmospheric forcing, initial, and boundary conditions. This forward model simulation was compared to satellite measurements of sea-surface height (SSH) and sea-surface temperature (SST), and observed transport variability. Despite realistic mean state, standard deviations, and LC eddy shedding period, the simulated LC extension shows less variability and more regularity than the observations. However, the model is suitable for studying the LC system and can be utilized for examining the ocean influences leading to a simple, and hopefully generic LC eddy separation in the GoM. The adjoint sensitivities of the LC show influences from the Yucatan Channel (YC) flow and Loop Current Frontal Eddy (LCFE) on both LC extension and eddy separation, as suggested by earlier work. Some of the processes that control LC extension after eddy separation differ from those controlling eddy shedding, but include YC through-flow. The sensitivity remains stable for more than 30 days and moves generally upstream, entering the Caribbean Sea. The sensitivities of the LC for SST generally remain closer to the surface and move at speeds consistent with advection by the high-speed core of

  20. On the essential self-adjointness of generalized Schroedinger operators

    We give a necessary and sufficient condition for the generalized Schroedinger operator to be essentially self-adjoint in L2(Ω; rhodx), under general assumptions on rho and for arbitrary domains Ω in Rsup(n). In particular, if rho is strictly positive and locally Lipschitz continuous on Ω = Rsup(n), then A is essentially self-adjoint. We also give examples of non-essential self-adjointness and a complete discussion of the one-dimensional case. These results have applications to the problem of the essential self-adjointness of quantum Hamiltonians and to the uniqueness problem of Markov processes. (orig./WL)

  1. The Schroedinger differential operator and intrinsic self adjointness

    An attempt is made to establish a hermitization procedure for rendering any linear differential operator to be intrinsically self adjoint, independently of any prescribed representation. This is accomplished by introducing an associate differential operator, which is simply a linear combination of all the individual ordinary differential operators belonging to the adjoint of the given linear differential operator, that satisfies the criterion of intrinsic self adjointness. It turns out that the associate differential operator is capable of generating an infinite set of hermitized versions of any arbitrary linear differential operator. Both momentum and kinetic energy differential operators that belong to the Schroedinger wave equation are rendered self adjoint. (author)

  2. Coupling of Monte Carlo adjoint leakages with three-dimensional discrete ordinates forward fluences

    A computer code, DRC3, has been developed for coupling Monte Carlo adjoint leakages with three-dimensional discrete ordinates forward fluences in order to solve a special category of geometrically-complex deep penetration shielding problems. The code extends the capabilities of earlier methods that coupled Monte Carlo adjoint leakages with two-dimensional discrete ordinates forward fluences. The problems involve the calculation of fluences and responses in a perturbation to an otherwise simple two- or three-dimensional radiation field. In general, the perturbation complicates the geometry such that it cannot be modeled exactly using any of the discrete ordinates geometry options and thus a direct discrete ordinates solution is not possible. Also, the calculation of radiation transport from the source to the perturbation involves deep penetration. One approach to solving such problems is to perform the calculations in three steps: (1) a forward discrete ordinates calculation, (2) a localized adjoint Monte Carlo calculation, and (3) a coupling of forward fluences from the first calculation with adjoint leakages from the second calculation to obtain the response of interest (fluence, dose, etc.). A description of this approach is presented along with results from test problems used to verify the method. The test problems that were selected could also be solved directly by the discrete ordinates method. The good agreement between the DRC3 results and the direct-solution results verify the correctness of DRC3

  3. Coupling of Monte Carlo adjoint leakages with three-dimensional discrete ordinates forward fluences

    Slater, C.O.; Lillie, R.A.; Johnson, J.O.; Simpson, D.B.

    1998-04-01

    A computer code, DRC3, has been developed for coupling Monte Carlo adjoint leakages with three-dimensional discrete ordinates forward fluences in order to solve a special category of geometrically-complex deep penetration shielding problems. The code extends the capabilities of earlier methods that coupled Monte Carlo adjoint leakages with two-dimensional discrete ordinates forward fluences. The problems involve the calculation of fluences and responses in a perturbation to an otherwise simple two- or three-dimensional radiation field. In general, the perturbation complicates the geometry such that it cannot be modeled exactly using any of the discrete ordinates geometry options and thus a direct discrete ordinates solution is not possible. Also, the calculation of radiation transport from the source to the perturbation involves deep penetration. One approach to solving such problems is to perform the calculations in three steps: (1) a forward discrete ordinates calculation, (2) a localized adjoint Monte Carlo calculation, and (3) a coupling of forward fluences from the first calculation with adjoint leakages from the second calculation to obtain the response of interest (fluence, dose, etc.). A description of this approach is presented along with results from test problems used to verify the method. The test problems that were selected could also be solved directly by the discrete ordinates method. The good agreement between the DRC3 results and the direct-solution results verify the correctness of DRC3.

  4. Convergence analysis of combinations of different methods

    Kang, Y. [Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    This paper provides a convergence analysis for combinations of different numerical methods for solving systems of differential equations. The author proves that combinations of two convergent linear multistep methods or Runge-Kutta methods produce a new convergent method of which the order is equal to the smaller order of the two original methods.

  5. ELEMENT FUNCTIONS OF DISCRETE OPERATOR DIFFERENCE METHOD

    田中旭; 唐立民; 刘正兴

    2002-01-01

    The discrete scheme called discrete operator difference for differential equations was given. Several difference elements for plate bending problems and plane problems were given. By investigating these elements, the ability of the discrete forms expressing to the element functions was talked about. In discrete operator difference method, the displacements of the elements can be reproduced exactly in the discrete forms whether the displacements are conforming or not. According to this point, discrete operator difference method is a method with good performance.

  6. Symmetries of linearized gravity from adjoint operators

    Aksteiner, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Using a covariant formulation it is shown that the Teukolsky equation and the Teukolsky-Starobinsky identities for spin-1 and linearized gravity on a vacuum type D background are self-adjoint. This fact is used to construct symmetry operators for each of the four cases. We find both irreducible second order symmetry operators for spin-1, a known fourth order, and a new sixth order symmetry operator for linearized gravity. The results are connected to Hertz and Debye potentials and to the separability of the Teukolsky equation.

  7. Local Volatility Calibration Using An Adjoint Proxy

    Gabriel TURINICI

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We document the calibration of the local volatility in a framework similar to Coleman, Li and Verma. The quality of a surface is assessed through a functional to be optimized; the specificity of the approach is to separate the optimization (performed with any suitable optimization algorithm from the computation of the functional where we use an adjoint (as in L. Jiang et. al. to obtain an approximation; moreover our main calibration variable is the implied volatility (the procedure can also accommodate the Greeks. The procedure performs well on benchmarks from the literature and on FOREX data.

  8. Development of CO2 inversion system based on the adjoint of the global coupled transport model

    Belikov, Dmitry; Maksyutov, Shamil; Chevallier, Frederic; Kaminski, Thomas; Ganshin, Alexander; Blessing, Simon

    2014-05-01

    We present the development of an inverse modeling system employing an adjoint of the global coupled transport model consisting of the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) Eulerian transport model (TM) and the Lagrangian plume diffusion model (LPDM) FLEXPART. NIES TM is a three-dimensional atmospheric transport model, which solves the continuity equation for a number of atmospheric tracers on a grid spanning the entire globe. Spatial discretization is based on a reduced latitude-longitude grid and a hybrid sigma-isentropic coordinate in the vertical. NIES TM uses a horizontal resolution of 2.5°×2.5°. However, to resolve synoptic-scale tracer distributions and to have the ability to optimize fluxes at resolutions of 0.5° and higher we coupled NIES TM with the Lagrangian model FLEXPART. The Lagrangian component of the forward and adjoint models uses precalculated responses of the observed concentration to the surface fluxes and 3-D concentrations field simulated with the FLEXPART model. NIES TM and FLEXPART are driven by JRA-25/JCDAS reanalysis dataset. Construction of the adjoint of the Lagrangian part is less complicated, as LPDMs calculate the sensitivity of measurements to the surrounding emissions field by tracking a large number of "particles" backwards in time. Developing of the adjoint to Eulerian part was performed with automatic differentiation tool the Transformation of Algorithms in Fortran (TAF) software (http://www.FastOpt.com). This method leads to the discrete adjoint of NIES TM. The main advantage of the discrete adjoint is that the resulting gradients of the numerical cost function are exact, even for nonlinear algorithms. The overall advantages of our method are that: 1. No code modification of Lagrangian model is required, making it applicable to combination of global NIES TM and any Lagrangian model; 2. Once run, the Lagrangian output can be applied to any chemically neutral gas; 3. High-resolution results can be obtained over

  9. Adjoint Fokker-Planck equation and runaway electron dynamics

    Liu, Chang; Boozer, Allen H; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2016-01-01

    A new method to obtain the runaway probability and the expected slowing-down time for runaway electrons is developed, by solving the adjoint Fokker-Planck equation in momentum space. The runaway probability function has a smooth transition at the runaway separatrix, which can be attributed to the effect of the pitch angle scattering term in the kinetic equation. The expected slowing-down time gives a new way to estimate the runaway current decay time in experiments. The result shows that the decay rate of high energy electron is very slow when E is close to the critical electric field, which helps elucidate the hysteresis effect seen in the runaway electron population. Given the same numerical accuracy, the new method is more efficient than the Monte Carlo simulation.

  10. Using adjoint-based optimization to study wing flexibility in flapping flight

    Wei, Mingjun; Xu, Min; Dong, Haibo

    2014-11-01

    In the study of flapping-wing flight of birds and insects, it is important to understand the impact of wing flexibility/deformation on aerodynamic performance. However, the large control space from the complexity of wing deformation and kinematics makes usual parametric study very difficult or sometimes impossible. Since the adjoint-based approach for sensitivity study and optimization strategy is a process with its cost independent of the number of input parameters, it becomes an attractive approach in our study. Traditionally, adjoint equation and sensitivity are derived in a fluid domain with fixed solid boundaries. Moving boundary is only allowed when its motion is not part of control effort. Otherwise, the derivation becomes either problematic or too complex to be feasible. Using non-cylindrical calculus to deal with boundary deformation solves this problem in a very simple and still mathematically rigorous manner. Thus, it allows to apply adjoint-based optimization in the study of flapping wing flexibility. We applied the ``improved'' adjoint-based method to study the flexibility of both two-dimensional and three-dimensional flapping wings, where the flapping trajectory and deformation are described by either model functions or real data from the flight of dragonflies. Supported by AFOSR.

  11. Supersymmetric descendants of self-adjointly extended quantum mechanical Hamiltonians

    We consider the descendants of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians in supersymmetric quantum mechanics on a half-line, on an interval, and on a punctured line or interval. While there is a 4-parameter family of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians on a punctured line, only a 3-parameter sub-family has supersymmetric descendants that are themselves self-adjoint. We also address the self-adjointness of an operator related to the supercharge, and point out that only a sub-class of its most general self-adjoint extensions is physical. Besides a general characterization of self-adjoint extensions and their supersymmetric descendants, we explicitly consider concrete examples, including a particle in a box with general boundary conditions, with and without an additional point interaction. We also discuss bulk-boundary resonances and their manifestation in the supersymmetric descendant. -- Highlights: •Self-adjoint extension theory and contact interactions. •Application of self-adjoint extensions to supersymmetry. •Contact interactions in finite volume with Robin boundary condition

  12. Supersymmetric descendants of self-adjointly extended quantum mechanical Hamiltonians

    Al-Hashimi, M.H., E-mail: hashimi@itp.unibe.ch [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Bern University, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Salman, M., E-mail: msalman@qu.edu.qa [Department of Mathematics, Statistics, and Physics, Qatar University, Al Tarfa, Doha 2713 (Qatar); Shalaby, A., E-mail: amshalab@qu.edu.qa [Department of Mathematics, Statistics, and Physics, Qatar University, Al Tarfa, Doha 2713 (Qatar); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University (Egypt); Wiese, U.-J., E-mail: wiese@itp.unibe.ch [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Bern University, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-10-15

    We consider the descendants of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians in supersymmetric quantum mechanics on a half-line, on an interval, and on a punctured line or interval. While there is a 4-parameter family of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians on a punctured line, only a 3-parameter sub-family has supersymmetric descendants that are themselves self-adjoint. We also address the self-adjointness of an operator related to the supercharge, and point out that only a sub-class of its most general self-adjoint extensions is physical. Besides a general characterization of self-adjoint extensions and their supersymmetric descendants, we explicitly consider concrete examples, including a particle in a box with general boundary conditions, with and without an additional point interaction. We also discuss bulk-boundary resonances and their manifestation in the supersymmetric descendant. -- Highlights: •Self-adjoint extension theory and contact interactions. •Application of self-adjoint extensions to supersymmetry. •Contact interactions in finite volume with Robin boundary condition.

  13. Self-adjointness of the Gaffney Laplacian on Vector Bundles

    We study the Gaffney Laplacian on a vector bundle equipped with a compatible metric and connection over a Riemannian manifold that is possibly geodesically incomplete. Under the hypothesis that the Cauchy boundary is polar, we demonstrate the self-adjointness of this Laplacian. Furthermore, we show that negligible boundary is a necessary and sufficient condition for the self-adjointness of this operator

  14. Self-adjointness of the Gaffney Laplacian on Vector Bundles

    Bandara, Lashi, E-mail: lashi.bandara@chalmers.se [Chalmers University of Technology and University of Gothenburg, Mathematical Sciences (Sweden); Milatovic, Ognjen, E-mail: omilatov@unf.edu [University of North Florida, Department of Mathematics and Statistics (United States)

    2015-12-15

    We study the Gaffney Laplacian on a vector bundle equipped with a compatible metric and connection over a Riemannian manifold that is possibly geodesically incomplete. Under the hypothesis that the Cauchy boundary is polar, we demonstrate the self-adjointness of this Laplacian. Furthermore, we show that negligible boundary is a necessary and sufficient condition for the self-adjointness of this operator.

  15. Construction of the adjoint MIT ocean general circulation model and application to Atlantic heat transport sensitivity

    Marotzke, Jochem; Giering, Ralf; Zhang, Kate Q.; Stammer, Detlef; Hill, Chris; Lee, Tong

    1999-12-01

    We first describe the principles and practical considerations behind the computer generation of the adjoint to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology ocean general circulation model (GCM) using R. Giering's software tool Tangent-Linear and Adjoint Model Compiler (TAMC). The TAMC's recipe for (FORTRAN-) line-by-line generation of adjoint code is explained by interpreting an adjoint model strictly as the operator that gives the sensitivity of the output of a model to its input. Then, the sensitivity of 1993 annual mean heat transport across 29°N in the Atlantic, to the hydrography on January 1, 1993, is calculated from a global solution of the GCM. The "kinematic sensitivity" to initial temperature variations is isolated, showing how the latter would influence heat transport if they did not affect the density and hence the flow. Over 1 year the heat transport at 29°N is influenced kinematically from regions up to 20° upstream in the western boundary current and up to 5° upstream in the interior. In contrast, the dynamical influences of initial temperature (and salinity) perturbations spread from as far as the rim of the Labrador Sea to the 29°N section along the western boundary. The sensitivities calculated with the adjoint compare excellently to those from a perturbation calculation with the dynamical model. Perturbations in initial interior salinity influence meridional overturning and heat transport when they have propagated to the western boundary and can thus influence the integrated east-west density difference. Our results support the notion that boundary monitoring of meridional mass and heat transports is feasible.

  16. On Cultural Differences and Translation Methods

    Hongmei Sun

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays translation is regarded essentially as a cross-cultural communication, and cultural differences pose major barriers in translating. After a brief overview of cultural differences in translation, this paper mainly explores foreignizing and domesticating methods in dealing with cultural differences and those possible factors affecting the choice of them.

  17. Accurate Finite Difference Methods for Option Pricing

    Persson, Jonas

    2006-01-01

    Stock options are priced numerically using space- and time-adaptive finite difference methods. European options on one and several underlying assets are considered. These are priced with adaptive numerical algorithms including a second order method and a more accurate method. For American options we use the adaptive technique to price options on one stock with and without stochastic volatility. In all these methods emphasis is put on the control of errors to fulfill predefined tolerance level...

  18. On the wavelet optimized finite difference method

    Jameson, Leland

    1994-01-01

    When one considers the effect in the physical space, Daubechies-based wavelet methods are equivalent to finite difference methods with grid refinement in regions of the domain where small scale structure exists. Adding a wavelet basis function at a given scale and location where one has a correspondingly large wavelet coefficient is, essentially, equivalent to adding a grid point, or two, at the same location and at a grid density which corresponds to the wavelet scale. This paper introduces a wavelet optimized finite difference method which is equivalent to a wavelet method in its multiresolution approach but which does not suffer from difficulties with nonlinear terms and boundary conditions, since all calculations are done in the physical space. With this method one can obtain an arbitrarily good approximation to a conservative difference method for solving nonlinear conservation laws.

  19. The Adjoint Monte Carlo - a viable option for efficient radiotherapy treatment planning

    In cancer therapy using collimated beams of photons, the radiation oncologist must determine a set of beams that delivers the required dose to each point in the tumor and minimizes the risk of damage to the healthy tissue and vital organs. Currently, the oncologist determines these beams iteratively, by using a sequence of dose calculations using approximate numerical methods. In this paper, a more accurate and potentially faster approach, based on the Adjoint Monte Carlo method, is presented (authors)

  20. Gauge Mediation Models with Adjoint Messengers

    Gogoladze, Ilia; Shafi, Qaisar; Un, Cem Salih

    2016-01-01

    We present a class of models in the framework of gauge mediation supersymmetry breaking where the messenger fields transform in the adjoint representation of the Standard Model gauge symmetry. To avoid unacceptably light right-handed sleptons in the spectrum we introduce a non-zero U(1)_B-L D-term. This leads to an additional contribution to the soft supersymmetry breaking mass terms which makes the right-handed slepton masses compatible with the current experimental bounds. We show that in this framework the observed 125 GeV Higgs boson mass can be accommodated with the sleptons accessible at the LHC, while the squarks and gluinos lie in the multi-TeV range. We also discuss the issue of the fine-tuning and show that the desired relic dark matter abundance can also be accommodated.

  1. On the formulation of sea-ice models. Part 2: Lessons from multi-year adjoint sea-ice export sensitivities through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago

    Heimbach, Patick; Menemenlis, Dimitris; Losch, Martin; Campin, Jean-Michel; Hill, Chris

    The adjoint of an ocean general circulation model is at the heart of the ocean state estimation system of the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) project. As part of an ongoing effort to extend ECCO to a coupled ocean/sea-ice estimation system, a dynamic and thermodynamic sea-ice model has been developed for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm). One key requirement is the ability to generate, by means of automatic differentiation (AD), tangent linear (TLM) and adjoint (ADM) model code for the coupled MITgcm ocean/sea-ice system. This second part of a two-part paper describes aspects of the adjoint model. The adjoint ocean and sea-ice model is used to calculate transient sensitivities of solid (ice and snow) freshwater export through Lancaster Sound in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA). The adjoint state provides a complementary view of the dynamics. In particular, the transient, multi-year sensitivity patterns reflect dominant pathways and propagation timescales through the CAA as resolved by the model, thus shedding light on causal relationships, in the model, across the Archipelago. The computational cost of inferring such causal relationships from forward model diagnostics alone would be prohibitive. The role of the exact model trajectory around which the adjoint is calculated (and therefore of the exactness of the adjoint) is exposed through calculations using free-slip vs no-slip lateral boundary conditions. Effective ice thickness, sea surface temperature, and precipitation sensitivities, are discussed in detail as examples of the coupled sea-ice/ocean and atmospheric forcing control space. To test the reliability of the adjoint, finite-difference perturbation experiments were performed for each of these elements and the cost perturbations were compared to those "predicted" by the adjoint. Overall, remarkable qualitative and quantitative agreement is found. In particular, the adjoint correctly

  2. Difference equations by differential equation methods

    Hydon, Peter E

    2014-01-01

    Most well-known solution techniques for differential equations exploit symmetry in some form. Systematic methods have been developed for finding and using symmetries, first integrals and conservation laws of a given differential equation. Here the author explains how to extend these powerful methods to difference equations, greatly increasing the range of solvable problems. Beginning with an introduction to elementary solution methods, the book gives readers a clear explanation of exact techniques for ordinary and partial difference equations. The informal presentation is suitable for anyone who is familiar with standard differential equation methods. No prior knowledge of difference equations or symmetry is assumed. The author uses worked examples to help readers grasp new concepts easily. There are 120 exercises of varying difficulty and suggestions for further reading. The book goes to the cutting edge of research; its many new ideas and methods make it a valuable reference for researchers in the field.

  3. Time-dependent problems and difference methods

    Gustafsson, Bertil; Oliger, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Praise for the First Edition "". . . fills a considerable gap in the numerical analysis literature by providing a self-contained treatment . . . this is an important work written in a clear style . . . warmly recommended to any graduate student or researcher in the field of the numerical solution of partial differential equations."" -SIAM Review Time-Dependent Problems and Difference Methods, Second Edition continues to provide guidance for the analysis of difference methods for computing approximate solutions to partial differential equations for time-de

  4. Adjoint gradient-based approach for aerodynamic optimization of transport aircraft

    Ilic, Caslav

    2013-01-01

    Aerodynamic design of transport aircraft has been steadily improved over past several decades, to the point where today highly-detailed shape control is needed to achieve further improvements. Aircraft manufacturers are therefore increasingly looking into formal optimization methods, driving high-fidelity CFD analysis of finely-parametrized candidate designs. We present an adjoint gradient-based approach for maximizing the aerodynamic performance index relevant to cruise-climb mission segment...

  5. Adjoint Monte Carlo calculation of charged plasma particle flux to wall

    Äkäslompolo, Simppa

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript describes an adjoint/reverse Monte Carlo method to calculate the flux of charged plasma particles to the wall of e.g. a tokamak. Two applications are described: a fusion product activation probe and a neutral beam injection prompt loss measurement with a fast ion loss diagnostic. In both cases, the collisions of the particles with the background plasma can be omitted.

  6. Hilbert-Schmidt Inner Product for an Adjoint Representation of the Quantum Algebra U⌣Q(SU2)

    Fakhri, Hossein; Nouraddini, Mojtaba

    2015-10-01

    The Jordan-Schwinger realization of quantum algebra U⌣q(su2) is used to construct the irreducible submodule Tl of the adjoint representation in two different bases. The two bases are known as types of irreducible tensor operators of rank l which are related to each other by the involution map. The bases of the submodules are equipped with q-analogues of the Hilbert-Schmidt inner product and it is also shown that the adjoint representation corresponding to one of those submodules is a *-representation.

  7. A PNJL Model for Adjoint Fermions with Periodic Boundary Conditions

    Nishimura, Hiromichi; Ogilvie, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    Recent work on QCD-like theories has shown that the addition of adjoint fermions obeying periodic boundary conditions to gauge theories on $R^{3}\\times S^{1}$ can lead to a restoration of center symmetry and confinement for sufficiently small circumference $L$ of $S^{1}$. At small $L$, perturbation theory may be used reliably to compute the effective potential for the Polyakov loop $P$ in the compact direction. Periodic adjoint fermions act in opposition to the gauge fields, which by themselv...

  8. Development of an adjoint model of GRAPES-CUACE and its application in tracking influential haze source areas in north China

    An, Xing Qin; Xian Zhai, Shi; Jin, Min; Gong, Sunling; Wang, Yu

    2016-06-01

    The aerosol adjoint module of the atmospheric chemical modeling system GRAPES-CUACE (Global-Regional Assimilation and Prediction System coupled with the CMA Unified Atmospheric Chemistry Environment) is constructed based on the adjoint theory. This includes the development and validation of the tangent linear and the adjoint models of the three parts involved in the GRAPES-CUACE aerosol module: CAM (Canadian Aerosol Module), interface programs that connect GRAPES and CUACE, and the aerosol transport processes that are embedded in GRAPES. Meanwhile, strict mathematical validation schemes for the tangent linear and the adjoint models are implemented for all input variables. After each part of the module and the assembled tangent linear and adjoint models is verified, the adjoint model of the GRAPES-CUACE aerosol is developed and used in a black carbon (BC) receptor-source sensitivity analysis to track influential haze source areas in north China. The sensitivity of the average BC concentration over Beijing at the highest concentration time point (referred to as the Objective Function) is calculated with respect to the BC amount emitted over the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region. Four types of regions are selected based on the administrative division or the sensitivity coefficient distribution. The adjoint sensitivity results are then used to quantify the effect of reducing the emission sources at different time intervals over different regions. It is indicated that the more influential regions (with relatively larger sensitivity coefficients) do not necessarily correspond to the administrative regions. Instead, the influence per unit area of the sensitivity selected regions is greater. Therefore, controlling the most influential regions during critical time intervals based on the results of the adjoint sensitivity analysis is much more efficient than controlling administrative regions during an experimental time period.

  9. Neural Network Training by Integration of Adjoint Systems of Equations Forward in Time

    Toomarian, Nikzad (Inventor); Barhen, Jacob (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for supervised neural learning of time dependent trajectories exploits the concepts of adjoint operators to enable computation of the gradient of an objective functional with respect to the various parameters of the network architecture in a highly efficient manner. Specifically. it combines the advantage of dramatic reductions in computational complexity inherent in adjoint methods with the ability to solve two adjoint systems of equations together forward in time. Not only is a large amount of computation and storage saved. but the handling of real-time applications becomes also possible. The invention has been applied it to two examples of representative complexity which have recently been analyzed in the open literature and demonstrated that a circular trajectory can be learned in approximately 200 iterations compared to the 12000 reported in the literature. A figure eight trajectory was achieved in under 500 iterations compared to 20000 previously required. Tbc trajectories computed using our new method are much closer to the target trajectories than was reported in previous studies.

  10. Adjoint-based linear analysis in reduced-order thermo-acoustic models

    Magri, Luca

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the linear theory of adjoint equations as applied to thermo-acoustics. The purpose is to describe the mathematical foundations of adjoint equations for linear sensitivity analysis of thermo-acoustic systems, recently developed by Magri and Juniper (J. Fluid Mech. (2013), vol. 719, pp. 183--202). This method is applied pedagogically to a damped oscillator, for which analytical solutions are available, and then for an electrically heated Rijke tube with a mean-flow temperature discontinuity induced by the compact heat source. Passive devices that most affect the growth rate / frequency of the electrical Rijke-tube system are presented, including a discussion about the effect of modelling the mean-flow temperature discontinuity.

  11. Self-adjoint elliptic operators with boundary conditions on not closed hypersurfaces

    Mantile, Andrea; Posilicano, Andrea; Sini, Mourad

    2016-07-01

    The theory of self-adjoint extensions of symmetric operators is used to construct self-adjoint realizations of a second-order elliptic differential operator on Rn with linear boundary conditions on (a relatively open part of) a compact hypersurface. Our approach allows to obtain Kreĭn-like resolvent formulae where the reference operator coincides with the "free" operator with domain H2 (Rn); this provides an useful tool for the scattering problem from a hypersurface. Concrete examples of this construction are developed in connection with the standard boundary conditions, Dirichlet, Neumann, Robin, δ and δ‧-type, assigned either on a (n - 1) dimensional compact boundary Γ = ∂ Ω or on a relatively open part Σ ⊂ Γ. Schatten-von Neumann estimates for the difference of the powers of resolvents of the free and the perturbed operators are also proven; these give existence and completeness of the wave operators of the associated scattering systems.

  12. Weyl theorems for the polluted set of self-adjoint operators in Galerkin approximations

    Boulton, Lyonell; Lewin, Mathieu

    2010-01-01

    Let A be a self-adjoint operator on a separable Hilbert space H and let (L_n) be a sequence of finite dimensional subspaces of the domain of A, approximating H in the large n limit. Denote by A_n the compression of A to L_n. In general the spectrum of A is only a subset of the limit of the spectra of A_n and the latter might differ from the former in a non-trivial "polluted set". In this paper we show that this polluted set is determined by the existence of particular Weyl sequences of singular type. This characterization allows us to identify verifiable conditions on self-adjoint perturbations B, ensuring that the polluted set of B is identical to that of A. The results reported are illustrated by means of several canonical examples and they reveal the many subtleties involved in the systematic study of spectral pollution.

  13. Adjoint Airfoil Optimization of Darrieus-Type Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    Fuchs, Roman; Nordborg, Henrik

    2012-11-01

    We present the feasibility of using an adjoint solver to optimize the torque of a Darrieus-type vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT). We start with a 2D cross section of a symmetrical airfoil and restrict us to low solidity ratios to minimize blade vortex interactions. The adjoint solver of the ANSYS FLUENT software package computes the sensitivities of airfoil surface forces based on a steady flow field. Hence, we find the torque of a full revolution using a weighted average of the sensitivities at different wind speeds and angles of attack. The weights are computed analytically, and the range of angles of attack is given by the tip speed ratio. Then the airfoil geometry is evolved, and the proposed methodology is evaluated by transient simulations.

  14. Maintenance Approaches for Different Production Methods

    Mungani, Dzivhuluwani Simon

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Various production methods are used in industry to manufacture or produce a variety of products needed by industry and consumers. The nature of a product determines which production method is most suitable or cost-effective. A continuous process is typically used to produce large volumes of liquids or gases. Batch processing is often used for small volumes, such as pharmaceutical products. This paper discusses a research project to determine the relationship between maintenance approaches and production methods. A survey was done to determine to what extent three maintenance approaches reliability-centred maintenance (RCM, total productive maintenance (TPM, and business-centred maintenance (BCM are used for three different processing methods (continuous process, batch process, and a production line method.

  15. Different partial volume correction methods lead to different conclusions

    Greve, Douglas N; Salat, David H; Bowen, Spencer L;

    2016-01-01

    A cross-sectional group study of the effects of aging on brain metabolism as measured with (18)F-FDG-PET was performed using several different partial volume correction (PVC) methods: no correction (NoPVC), Meltzer (MZ), Müller-Gärtner (MG), and the symmetric geometric transfer matrix (SGTM) using...... 99 subjects aged 65-87years from the Harvard Aging Brain study. Sensitivity to parameter selection was tested for MZ and MG. The various methods and parameter settings resulted in an extremely wide range of conclusions as to the effects of age on metabolism, from almost no changes to virtually all...... correlated with age. MG and SGTM were found to be similar; however, MG was sensitive to a thresholding parameter that can result in data loss. CSF uptake was surprisingly high at about 15% of that in gray matter. The exclusion of CSF from SGTM and MG models, which is almost universally done, caused...

  16. Fuzzy logic controller using different inference methods

    In this paper the design of fuzzy controllers by using different inference methods is introduced. Configuration of the fuzzy controllers includes a general rule-base which is a collection of fuzzy PI or PD rules, the triangular fuzzy data model and a centre of gravity defuzzification algorithm. The generalized modus ponens (GMP) is used with the minimum operator of the triangular norm. Under the sup-min inference rule, six fuzzy implication operators are employed to calculate the fuzzy look-up tables for each rule base. The performance is tested in simulated systems with MATLAB/SIMULINK. Results show the effects of using the fuzzy controllers with different inference methods and applied to different test processes

  17. Adjoint based optimal control of partially miscible two-phase flow in porous media with applications to CO2 sequestration in underground reservoirs

    Simon, Moritz

    2014-11-14

    © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media New York. With the target of optimizing CO2 sequestration in underground reservoirs, we investigate constrained optimal control problems with partially miscible two-phase flow in porous media. Our objective is to maximize the amount of trapped CO2 in an underground reservoir after a fixed period of CO2 injection, while time-dependent injection rates in multiple wells are used as control parameters. We describe the governing two-phase two-component Darcy flow PDE system, formulate the optimal control problem and derive the continuous adjoint equations. For the discretization we apply a variant of the so-called BOX method, a locally conservative control-volume FE method that we further stabilize by a periodic averaging feature to reduce oscillations. The timestep-wise Lagrange function of the control problem is implemented as a variational form in Sundance, a toolbox for rapid development of parallel FE simulations, which is part of the HPC software Trilinos. We discuss the BOX method and our implementation in Sundance. The MPI parallelized Sundance state and adjoint solvers are linked to the interior point optimization package IPOPT, using limited-memory BFGS updates for approximating second derivatives. Finally, we present and discuss different types of optimal control results.

  18. Deterministic adjoint transport applications for He-3 neutron detector design

    This work focuses on the determination of predicted neutron detector response accomplished using neutron importance derived from an adjoint discrete ordinates (SN) transport calculation. A hypothetical detector apparatus, intended to detect fast neutrons, was modeled using He-3 tubes with graphite moderation using the PENTRANTM 3-D multi-group discrete ordinates parallel transport code system. The detector geometry was modeled using z-axis symmetry and discretized into 30,280 3-D Cartesian cells. The material spatial mesh was generated using the PENMSHTM code in the PENTRAN system. The 47-group BUGLE-96 neutron cross section library was used for construction of macroscopic neutron cross sections. Results from an S8 angular quadrature using P3 anisotropy are presented. An adjoint transport source was established in the model using group dependent He-3 response cross sections. Each He-3 tube contained an adjoint source aliased to group He-3 absorption cross sections to permit assessment of detector performance. The spectrally dependent detector response from neutron capture in He-3 tubes from an arbitrary source can, therefore, be readily determined. This response comes from the complete integral of the actual source strength weighted by the adjoint function at the source location for any source distribution scenario. For selected neutron energies, an equivalent forward MCNP Monte Carlo model was used to demonstrate good agreement with the detector response determined from the adjoint calculation. The graphite used in this design has a large impact on detector performance due to the increasing sensitivity inherent in He-3 gas as neutrons thermalize. Computational adjoint results presented here predict a fast neutron detector design that yields efficiencies between 30 and 50% for neutron energies below 3 keV, and up to 30% efficiencies for neutron energies between 3 keV and 1 MeV. Overall, the methodology applied here highlights the elegant nature of an adjoint

  19. Adjoint-based uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis for reactor depletion calculations

    Stripling, Hayes Franklin

    Depletion calculations for nuclear reactors model the dynamic coupling between the material composition and neutron flux and help predict reactor performance and safety characteristics. In order to be trusted as reliable predictive tools and inputs to licensing and operational decisions, the simulations must include an accurate and holistic quantification of errors and uncertainties in its outputs. Uncertainty quantification is a formidable challenge in large, realistic reactor models because of the large number of unknowns and myriad sources of uncertainty and error. We present a framework for performing efficient uncertainty quantification in depletion problems using an adjoint approach, with emphasis on high-fidelity calculations using advanced massively parallel computing architectures. This approach calls for a solution to two systems of equations: (a) the forward, engineering system that models the reactor, and (b) the adjoint system, which is mathematically related to but different from the forward system. We use the solutions of these systems to produce sensitivity and error estimates at a cost that does not grow rapidly with the number of uncertain inputs. We present the framework in a general fashion and apply it to both the source-driven and k-eigenvalue forms of the depletion equations. We describe the implementation and verification of solvers for the forward and ad- joint equations in the PDT code, and we test the algorithms on realistic reactor analysis problems. We demonstrate a new approach for reducing the memory and I/O demands on the host machine, which can be overwhelming for typical adjoint algorithms. Our conclusion is that adjoint depletion calculations using full transport solutions are not only computationally tractable, they are the most attractive option for performing uncertainty quantification on high-fidelity reactor analysis problems.

  20. An adjoint-based approach for finding invariant solutions of Navier–Stokes equations

    Farazmand, M.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the incompressible Navier--Stokes equations with periodic boundary conditions and time-independent forcing. For this type of flow, we derive adjoint equations whose trajectories converge asymptotically to the equilibrium and traveling wave solutions of the Navier--Stokes equations. Using the adjoint equations, arbitrary initial conditions evolve to the vicinity of a (relative) equilibrium at which point a few Newton-type iterations yield the desired (relative) equilibrium solution. We apply this adjoint-based method to a chaotic two-dimensional Kolmogorov flow. A convergence rate of 100% is observed, leading to the discovery of 21 new steady state and traveling wave solutions at Reynolds number Re=40. Some of the new invariant solutions have spatially localized structures that were previously believed to only exist on domains with large aspect ratios. We show that one of the newly found steady state solutions underpins the temporal intermittencies, i.e., high energy dissipation episodes of the flow. More precisely, it is shown that each intermittent episode of a generic turbulent trajectory corresponds to its close passage to this equilibrium solution.

  1. Top-Down Inversion of Aerosol Emissions through Adjoint Integration of Satellite Radiance and GEOS-Chem Chemical Transport Model

    Xu, X.; Wang, J.; Henze, D. K.; Qu, W.; Kopacz, M.

    2012-12-01

    The knowledge of aerosol emissions from both natural and anthropogenic sources are needed to study the impacts of tropospheric aerosol on atmospheric composition, climate, and human health, but large uncertainties persist in quantifying the aerosol sources with the current bottom-up methods. This study presents a new top-down approach that spatially constrains the amount of aerosol emissions from satellite (MODIS) observed reflectance with the adjoint of a chemistry transport model (GEOS-Chem). We apply this technique with a one-month case study (April 2008) over the East Asia. The bottom-up estimated sulfate-nitrate-ammonium precursors, such as sulfur dioxide (SO2), ammonia (NH3), and nitrogen oxides (NOx), all from INTEX-B 2006 inventory, emissions of black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC) from Bond-2007 inventory, and mineral dust simulated from DEAD dust mobilization scheme, are spatially optimized from the GEOS-Chem model and its adjoint constrained by the aerosol optical depth (AOD) that are derived from MODIS reflectance with the GEOS-Chem aerosol single scattering properties. The adjoint inverse modeling for the study period yields notable decreases in anthropogenic aerosol emissions over China: 436 Gg (33.5%) for SO2, 378 Gg (34.5%) for NH3, 319 (18.8%) for NOx, 10 Gg (9.1%) for BC, and 30 Gg (15.0%) for OC. The total amount of the mineral dust emission is reduced by 56.4% from the DEAD mobilization module which simulates dust production of 19020 Gg. Sub-regional adjustments are significant and directions of changes are spatially different. The model simulation with optimized aerosol emissions shows much better agreement with independent observations from sun-spectrophotometer observed AOD from AERONET, MISR (Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer) AOD, OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) NO2 and SO2 columns, and surface aerosol concentrations measured over both anthropogenic pollution and dust source regions. Assuming the used bottom-up anthropogenic

  2. Perception Differences in Punishment Methods against Child

    Kaya, Ahsen; Aktas, Ekin O.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Potentially, all children have the risk of encountering with the ill-treatment of adults. In Turkey, discipline oriented punishment behaviors are social problems because of their traditional acceptability. In this study, the comparison of punishment methods both physical and emotional, which parents and teachers state to apply on their children/students and which the children states, assessment of perception differences were presented.  By using randomized cluster sampling, it was ch...

  3. The Complex-Step-Finite-Difference method

    Abreu, Rafael; Stich, Daniel; Morales, Jose

    2015-07-01

    We introduce the Complex-Step-Finite-Difference method (CSFDM) as a generalization of the well-known Finite-Difference method (FDM) for solving the acoustic and elastic wave equations. We have found a direct relationship between modelling the second-order wave equation by the FDM and the first-order wave equation by the CSFDM in 1-D, 2-D and 3-D acoustic media. We present the numerical methodology in order to apply the introduced CSFDM and show an example for wave propagation in simple homogeneous and heterogeneous models. The CSFDM may be implemented as an extension into pre-existing numerical techniques in order to obtain fourth- or sixth-order accurate results with compact three time-level stencils. We compare advantages of imposing various types of initial motion conditions of the CSFDM and demonstrate its higher-order accuracy under the same computational cost and dispersion-dissipation properties. The introduced method can be naturally extended to solve different partial differential equations arising in other fields of science and engineering.

  4. Measurements and Terminology of Different Measure Methods

    FANG Fang; ZHANG Wei-yuan; ZHANG Wen-bin

    2005-01-01

    Body measuring is very important for garment sizing and pattern making. In this paper, we study the difference of the landmarks between the traditional method and 3D scanner and we also select the 19 circumference measurements,29 height and length measurements, 18 breadth and depth measurements and 3 other measurements, which are quite important in fashion body measuring, to compare the terminology of them in these two measuring method. 3D scanners seem better than the traditional method on these aspects, which are the number of measurements, speed,privacy and data accuracy, but they are limited on measuring posture. And there is no uniform standard for the scanners and the definitions of the measurements in the scanners are diversified.

  5. Implementation of Generalized Adjoint Equation Solver for DeCART

    In this paper, the generalized adjoint solver based on the generalized perturbation theory is implemented on DeCART and the verification calculations were carried out. As the results, the adjoint flux for the general response coincides with the reference solution and it is expected that the solver could produce the parameters for the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. Recently, MUSAD (Modules of Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis for DeCART) was developed for the uncertainty analysis of PMR200 core and the fundamental adjoint solver was implemented into DeCART. However, the application of the code was limited to the uncertainty to the multiplication factor, keff, because it was based on the classical perturbation theory. For the uncertainty analysis to the general response as like the power density, it is necessary to develop the analysis module based on the generalized perturbation theory and it needs the generalized adjoint solutions from DeCART. In this paper, the generalized adjoint solver is implemented on DeCART and the calculation results are compared with the results by TSUNAMI of SCALE 6.1

  6. Implementation of Generalized Adjoint Equation Solver for DeCART

    Han, Tae Young; Cho, Jin Young; Lee, Hyun Chul; Noh, Jae Man [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, the generalized adjoint solver based on the generalized perturbation theory is implemented on DeCART and the verification calculations were carried out. As the results, the adjoint flux for the general response coincides with the reference solution and it is expected that the solver could produce the parameters for the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. Recently, MUSAD (Modules of Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis for DeCART) was developed for the uncertainty analysis of PMR200 core and the fundamental adjoint solver was implemented into DeCART. However, the application of the code was limited to the uncertainty to the multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, because it was based on the classical perturbation theory. For the uncertainty analysis to the general response as like the power density, it is necessary to develop the analysis module based on the generalized perturbation theory and it needs the generalized adjoint solutions from DeCART. In this paper, the generalized adjoint solver is implemented on DeCART and the calculation results are compared with the results by TSUNAMI of SCALE 6.1.

  7. Anelastic sensitivity kernels with parsimonious storage for adjoint tomography and full waveform inversion

    Komatitsch, Dimitri; Bozdag, Ebru; de Andrade, Elliott Sales; Peter, Daniel B; Liu, Qinya; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a technique to compute exact anelastic sensitivity kernels in the time domain using parsimonious disk storage. The method is based on a reordering of the time loop of time-domain forward/adjoint wave propagation solvers combined with the use of a memory buffer. It avoids instabilities that occur when time-reversing dissipative wave propagation simulations. The total number of required time steps is unchanged compared to usual acoustic or elastic approaches. The cost is reduced by a factor of 4/3 compared to the case in which anelasticity is partially accounted for by accommodating the effects of physical dispersion. We validate our technique by performing a test in which we compare the $K_\\alpha$ sensitivity kernel to the exact kernel obtained by saving the entire forward calculation. This benchmark confirms that our approach is also exact. We illustrate the importance of including full attenuation in the calculation of sensitivity kernels by showing significant differences with physical-dispersi...

  8. Evaluation of toothbrush disinfection via different methods

    Adil BASMAN

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of using a dishwasher or different chemical agents, including 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate, 2% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl, a mouthrinse containing essential oils and alcohol, and 50% white vinegar, for toothbrush disinfection. Sixty volunteers were divided into five experimental groups and one control group (n = 10. Participants brushed their teeth using toothbrushes with standard bristles, and they disinfected the toothbrushes according to instructed methods. Bacterial contamination of the toothbrushes was compared between the experimental groups and the control group. Data were analyzed by Kruskal–Wallis and Duncan's multiple range tests, with 95% confidence intervals for multiple comparisons. Bacterial contamination of toothbrushes from individuals in the experimental groups differed from those in the control group (p < 0.05. The most effective method for elimination of all tested bacterial species was 50% white vinegar, followed in order by 2% NaOCl, mouthrinse containing essential oils and alcohol, 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate, dishwasher use, and tap water (control. The results of this study show that the most effective method for disinfecting toothbrushes was submersion in 50% white vinegar, which is cost-effective, easy to access, and appropriate for household use.

  9. Learning phacoemulsification. Results of different teaching methods.

    Hennig Albrecht

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the learning curves of three eye surgeons converting from sutureless extracapsular cataract extraction to phacoemulsification using different teaching methods. Posterior capsule rupture (PCR as a per-operative complication and visual outcome of the first 100 operations were analysed. The PCR rate was 4% and 15% in supervised and unsupervised surgery respectively. Likewise, an uncorrected visual acuity of > or = 6/18 on the first postoperative day was seen in 62 (62% of patients and in 22 (22% in supervised and unsupervised surgery respectively.

  10. State estimates and forecasts of the loop current in the Gulf of Mexico using the MITgcm and its adjoint

    Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh; Cornuelle, Bruce D.; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Rudnick, Daniel L.; Owens, W. Brechner

    2013-07-01

    An ocean state estimate has been developed for the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) using the MIT general circulation model and its adjoint. The estimate has been tested by forecasting loop current (LC) evolution and eddy shedding in the GoM. The adjoint (or four-dimensional variational) method was used to match the model evolution to observations by adjusting model temperature and salinity initial conditions, open boundary conditions, and atmospheric forcing fields. The model was fit to satellite-derived along-track sea surface height, separated into temporal mean and anomalies, and gridded sea surface temperature for 2 month periods. The optimized state at the end of the assimilation period was used to initialize the forecast for 2 months. Forecasts explore practical LC predictability and provide a cross-validation test of the state estimate by comparing it to independent future observations. The model forecast was tested for several LC eddy separation events, including Eddy Franklin in May 2010 during the deepwater horizon oil spill disaster in the GoM. The forecast used monthly climatological open boundary conditions, atmospheric forcing, and run-off fluxes. The model performance was evaluated by computing model-observation root-mean-square difference (rmsd) during both the hindcast and forecast periods. The rmsd metrics for the forecast generally outperformed persistence (keeping the initial state fixed) and reference (forecast initialized using assimilated Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model 1/12° global analysis) model simulations during LC eddy separation events for a period of 1˜2 months.

  11. State estimates and forecasts of the loop current in the Gulf of Mexico using the MITgcm and its adjoint

    Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh

    2013-07-01

    An ocean state estimate has been developed for the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) using the MIT general circulation model and its adjoint. The estimate has been tested by forecasting loop current (LC) evolution and eddy shedding in the GoM. The adjoint (or four-dimensional variational) method was used to match the model evolution to observations by adjusting model temperature and salinity initial conditions, open boundary conditions, and atmospheric forcing fields. The model was fit to satellite-derived along-track sea surface height, separated into temporal mean and anomalies, and gridded sea surface temperature for 2 month periods. The optimized state at the end of the assimilation period was used to initialize the forecast for 2 months. Forecasts explore practical LC predictability and provide a cross-validation test of the state estimate by comparing it to independent future observations. The model forecast was tested for several LC eddy separation events, including Eddy Franklin in May 2010 during the deepwater horizon oil spill disaster in the GoM. The forecast used monthly climatological open boundary conditions, atmospheric forcing, and run-off fluxes. The model performance was evaluated by computing model-observation root-mean-square difference (rmsd) during both the hindcast and forecast periods. The rmsd metrics for the forecast generally outperformed persistence (keeping the initial state fixed) and reference (forecast initialized using assimilated Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model 1/12° global analysis) model simulations during LC eddy separation events for a period of 1̃2 months.

  12. SUPERSTABILITY OF ADJOINTABLE MAPPINGS ON HILBERT C*-MODULES

    Mohammad Sal Moslehian

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We define the notion of $varphi$-perturbation of a densely definedadjointable mapping and prove that any such mapping $f$ betweenHilbert ${mathcal A}$-modules over a fixed $C^*$-algebra ${mathcalA}$ with densely defined corresponding mapping $g$ is ${mathcalA}$-linear and adjointable in the classical sense with adjoint $g$.If both $f$ and $g$ are everywhere defined then they are bounded.Our work concerns with the concept of {sc Hyers--Ulam--Rassias} stability originated from the {sc Th.~M.~Rassias}' stability theorem that appeared in his paper [{it On the stability of the linear mapping in Banach spaces}, Proc. Amer. Math. Soc., {f 72} (1978, 297--300]. We also indicate complementary results in the case where the {sc Hilbert} $C^*$-modules admit non-adjointable $C^*$-linear appings

  13. Automatic differentiation, tangent linear models, and (pseudo) adjoints

    Bischof, C.H.

    1993-12-31

    This paper provides a brief introduction to automatic differentiation and relates it to the tangent linear model and adjoint approaches commonly used in meteorology. After a brief review of the forward and reverse mode of automatic differentiation, the ADIFOR automatic differentiation tool is introduced, and initial results of a sensitivity-enhanced version of the MM5 PSU/NCAR mesoscale weather model are presented. We also present a novel approach to the computation of gradients that uses a reverse mode approach at the time loop level and a forward mode approach at every time step. The resulting ``pseudoadjoint`` shares the characteristic of an adjoint code that the ratio of gradient to function evaluation does not depend on the number of independent variables. In contrast to a true adjoint approach, however, the nonlinearity of the model plays no role in the complexity of the derivative code.

  14. Evaluating different methods of microarray data normalization

    Ferreira Carlos

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the development of DNA hybridization microarray technologies, nowadays it is possible to simultaneously assess the expression levels of thousands to tens of thousands of genes. Quantitative comparison of microarrays uncovers distinct patterns of gene expression, which define different cellular phenotypes or cellular responses to drugs. Due to technical biases, normalization of the intensity levels is a pre-requisite to performing further statistical analyses. Therefore, choosing a suitable approach for normalization can be critical, deserving judicious consideration. Results Here, we considered three commonly used normalization approaches, namely: Loess, Splines and Wavelets, and two non-parametric regression methods, which have yet to be used for normalization, namely, the Kernel smoothing and Support Vector Regression. The results obtained were compared using artificial microarray data and benchmark studies. The results indicate that the Support Vector Regression is the most robust to outliers and that Kernel is the worst normalization technique, while no practical differences were observed between Loess, Splines and Wavelets. Conclusion In face of our results, the Support Vector Regression is favored for microarray normalization due to its superiority when compared to the other methods for its robustness in estimating the normalization curve.

  15. Difference methods for stiff delay differential equations

    Delay differential equations of the form y'(t) = f(y(t), z(t)), where z(t) = [y1(α1(y(t))),..., y/sub n/(α/sub n/(y(t)))]/sup T/ and α/sub i/(y(t)) less than or equal to t, arise in many scientific and engineering fields when transport lags and propagation times are physically significant in a dynamic process. Difference methods for approximating the solution of stiff delay systems require special stability properties that are generalizations of those employed for stiff ordinary differential equations. By use of the model equation y'(t) = py(t) + qy(t-1), with complex p and q, the definitions of A-stability, A( )-stability, and stiff stability have been generalize to delay equations. For linear multistep difference formulas, these properties extend directly from ordinary to delay equations. This straight forward extension is not true for implicit Runge-Kutta methods, as illustrated by the midpoint formula, which is A-stable for ordinary equations, but not for delay equations. A computer code for stiff delay equations was developed using the BDF. 24 figures, 5 tables

  16. Efficient discretization in finite difference method

    Rozos, Evangelos; Koussis, Antonis; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2015-04-01

    Finite difference method (FDM) is a plausible and simple method for solving partial differential equations. The standard practice is to use an orthogonal discretization to form algebraic approximate formulations of the derivatives of the unknown function and a grid, much like raster maps, to represent the properties of the function domain. For example, for the solution of the groundwater flow equation, a raster map is required for the characterization of the discretization cells (flow cell, no-flow cell, boundary cell, etc.), and two raster maps are required for the hydraulic conductivity and the storage coefficient. Unfortunately, this simple approach to describe the topology comes along with the known disadvantages of the FDM (rough representation of the geometry of the boundaries, wasted computational resources in the unavoidable expansion of the grid refinement in all cells of the same column and row, etc.). To overcome these disadvantages, Hunt has suggested an alternative approach to describe the topology, the use of an array of neighbours. This limits the need for discretization nodes only for the representation of the boundary conditions and the flow domain. Furthermore, the geometry of the boundaries is described more accurately using a vector representation. Most importantly, graded meshes can be employed, which are capable of restricting grid refinement only in the areas of interest (e.g. regions where hydraulic head varies rapidly, locations of pumping wells, etc.). In this study, we test the Hunt approach against MODFLOW, a well established finite difference model, and the Finite Volume Method with Simplified Integration (FVMSI). The results of this comparison are examined and critically discussed.

  17. Searching for Standard Model Adjoint Scalars with Diboson Resonance Signatures

    Carpenter, Linda M

    2015-01-01

    We explore the phenomenology of scalar fields in the adjoint representation of SM gauge groups. We write a general set of dimension 5 effective operators in which SM adjoint scalars couple to pairs of standard model bosons. Using these effective operators, we explore new possible decay channels of a scalar color octet into a gluon and a Z boson/ gluon and a photon. We recast several analyses from Run I of the LHC to find constraints on an a scalar octet decaying into these channels, and we project the discovery potential of color octets in our gluon+photon channel for the 14 TeV run of LHC.

  18. The application of the gradient-based adjoint multi-point optimization of single and double shock control bumps for transonic airfoils

    Mazaheri, K.; Nejati, A.; Chaharlang Kiani, K.; Taheri, R.

    2015-08-01

    A shock control bump (SCB) is a flow control method which uses local small deformations in a flexible wing surface to considerably reduce the strength of shock waves and the resulting wave drag in transonic flows. Most of the reported research is devoted to optimization in a single flow condition. Here, we have used a multi-point adjoint optimization scheme to optimize shape and location of the SCB. Practically, this introduces transonic airfoils equipped with the SCB which are simultaneously optimized for different off-design transonic flight conditions. Here, we use this optimization algorithm to enhance and optimize the performance of SCBs in two benchmark airfoils, i.e., RAE-2822 and NACA-64A010, over a wide range of off-design Mach numbers. All results are compared with the usual single-point optimization. We use numerical simulation of the turbulent viscous flow and a gradient-based adjoint algorithm to find the optimum location and shape of the SCB. We show that the application of SCBs may increase the aerodynamic performance of an RAE-2822 airfoil by 21.9 and by 22.8 % for a NACA-64A010 airfoil compared to the no-bump design in a particular flight condition. We have also investigated the simultaneous usage of two bumps for the upper and the lower surfaces of the airfoil. This has resulted in a 26.1 % improvement for the RAE-2822 compared to the clean airfoil in one flight condition.

  19. Fundamental differences between SPH and grid methods

    Agertz, O; Stadel, J; Potter, D; Miniati, F; Read, J; Mayer, L; Gawryszczak, A; Kravtsov, A; Monaghan, J; Nordlund, A; Pearce, F; Quilis, V; Rudd, D; Springel, V; Stone, J; Tasker, E; Teyssier, R; Wadsley, J; Walder, R; Agertz, Oscar; Moore, Ben; Stadel, Joachim; Potter, Doug; Miniati, Francesco; Read, Justin; Mayer, Lucio; Gawryszczak, Artur; Kravtsov, Andrey; Monaghan, Joe; Nordlund, Ake; Pearce, Frazer; Quilis, Vincent; Rudd, Douglas; Springel, Volker; Stone, James; Tasker, Elizabeth; Teyssier, Romain; Wadsley, James; Walder, Rolf

    2006-01-01

    We have carried out a hydrodynamical code comparison study of interacting multiphase fluids. The two commonly used techniques of grid and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) show striking differences in their ability to model processes that are fundamentally important across many areas of astrophysics. Whilst Eulerian grid based methods are able to resolve and treat important dynamical instabilities, such as Kelvin-Helmholtz or Rayleigh-Taylor, these processes are poorly or not at all resolved by existing SPH techniques. We show that the reason for this is that SPH, at least in its standard implementation, introduces spurious pressure forces on particles in regions where there are steep density gradients. This results in a boundary gap of the size of the SPH smoothing kernel over which information is not transferred.

  20. Large-volume results in SU(2) with adjoint fermions

    Del Debbio, Luigi; Lucini, Biagio; Pica, Claudio; Patella, Agostino; Rago, Antonio; Roman, Sabin

    2013-01-01

    Taming finite-volume effects is a crucial ingredient in order to identify the existence of IR fixed points. We present the latest results from our numerical simulations of SU(2) gauge theory with 2 Dirac fermions in the adjoint representation on large volumes. We compare with previous results, and...

  1. Assimilating Remote Ammonia Observations with a Refined Aerosol Thermodynamics Adjoint"

    Ammonia emissions parameters in North America can be refined in order to improve the evaluation of modeled concentrations against observations. Here, we seek to do so by developing and applying the GEOS-Chem adjoint nested over North America to conductassimilation of observations...

  2. On self-adjointness of singular Floquet Hamiltonians

    Duclos, Pierre; Jensen, Arne

    2010-01-01

    Schrödinger equations with time-dependent interactions are studied. We investigate how to define the Floquet Hamiltonian as a self-adjoint operator, when the interaction is singular in time or space. Using these results we establish the existence of a bounded propagator, by applying a result given...

  3. Adjoint electron-photon transport Monte Carlo calculations with ITS

    A general adjoint coupled electron-photon Monte Carlo code for solving the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equation has recently been created. It is a modified version of ITS 3.0, a coupled electronphoton Monte Carlo code that has world-wide distribution. The applicability of the new code to radiation-interaction problems of the type found in space environments is demonstrated

  4. The Adjoint of the CMAQ Aqueous Chemistry Module

    Baek, J.; Stanier, C.; Saide, P.; Carmichael, G.; Henze, D.; Turner, M.; Zhao, S.; Hakami, A.; Resler, Jaroslav; Sandu, A.; Russell, A. P.; Jeong, G.; Nenes, A.; Capps, S.; Percell, P.; Pinder, R.; Napelenok, S.; Bash, J.; Chai, T.; Byun, D

    Chapel Hill : CMAS, 2012. s. 91-92. [Annual CMAS Conference /11./. Chapel Hill, 15.10.2012-17.10.2012] Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : air pollution * adjoint * aqueous chemistry Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology http://www.cmascenter.org/conference/2012/agenda.cfm

  5. Non-self-adjoint hamiltonians defined by Riesz bases

    Bagarello, F., E-mail: fabio.bagarello@unipa.it [Dipartimento di Energia, Ingegneria dell' Informazione e Modelli Matematici, Facoltà di Ingegneria, Università di Palermo, I-90128 Palermo, Italy and INFN, Università di Torino, Torino (Italy); Inoue, A., E-mail: a-inoue@fukuoka-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Mathematics, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Trapani, C., E-mail: camillo.trapani@unipa.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, Università di Palermo, I-90123 Palermo (Italy)

    2014-03-15

    We discuss some features of non-self-adjoint Hamiltonians with real discrete simple spectrum under the assumption that the eigenvectors form a Riesz basis of Hilbert space. Among other things, we give conditions under which these Hamiltonians can be factorized in terms of generalized lowering and raising operators.

  6. Beryllium Wipe Sampling (differing methods - differing exposure potentials)

    Kerr, Kent

    2005-03-09

    This research compared three wipe sampling techniques currently used to test for beryllium contamination on room and equipment surfaces in Department of Energy facilities. Efficiencies of removal of beryllium contamination from typical painted surfaces were tested by wipe sampling without a wetting agent, with water-moistened wipe materials, and by methanol-moistened wipes. Analysis indicated that methanol-moistened wipe sampling removed about twice as much beryllium/oil-film surface contamination as water-moistened wipes, which removed about twice as much residue as dry wipes. Criteria at 10 CFR 850.30 and .31 were established on unspecified wipe sampling method(s). The results of this study reveal a need to identify criteria-setting method and equivalency factors. As facilities change wipe sampling methods among the three compared in this study, these results may be useful for approximate correlations. Accurate decontamination decision-making depends on the selection of appropriate wetting agents for the types of residues and surfaces. Evidence for beryllium sensitization via skin exposure argues in favor of wipe sampling with wetting agents that provide enhanced removal efficiency such as methanol when surface contamination includes oil mist residue.

  7. Adjoint free four-dimensional variational data assimilation for a storm surge model of the German North Sea

    Zheng, Xiangyang; Mayerle, Roberto; Xing, Qianguo; Fernández Jaramillo, José Manuel

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a data assimilation scheme based on the adjoint free Four-Dimensional Variational(4DVar) method is applied to an existing storm surge model of the German North Sea. To avoid the need of an adjoint model, an ensemble-like method to explicitly represent the linear tangent equation is adopted. Results of twin experiments have shown that the method is able to recover the contaminated low dimension model parameters to their true values. The data assimilation scheme was applied to a severe storm surge event which occurred in the North Sea in December 5, 2013. By adjusting wind drag coefficient, the predictive ability of the model increased significantly. Preliminary experiments have shown that an increase in the predictive ability is attained by narrowing the data assimilation time window.

  8. Adjoint sensitivity of global cloud droplet number to aerosol and dynamical parameters

    V. A. Karydis

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We present the development of the adjoint of a comprehensive cloud droplet formation parameterization for use in aerosol-cloud-climate interaction studies. The adjoint efficiently and accurately calculates the sensitivity of cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC to all parameterization inputs (e.g., updraft velocity, water uptake coefficient, aerosol number and hygroscopicity with a single execution. The adjoint is then integrated within three dimensional (3-D aerosol modeling frameworks to quantify the sensitivity of CDNC formation globally to each parameter. Sensitivities are computed for year-long executions of the NASA Global Modeling Initiative (GMI Chemical Transport Model (CTM, using wind fields computed with the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS Global Circulation Model (GCM II', and the GEOS-Chem CTM, driven by meteorological input from the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS of the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO. We find that over polluted (pristine areas, CDNC is more sensitive to updraft velocity and uptake coefficient (aerosol number and hygroscopicity. Over the oceans of the Northern Hemisphere, addition of anthropogenic or biomass burning aerosol is predicted to increase CDNC in contrast to coarse-mode sea salt which tends to decrease CDNC. Over the Southern Oceans, CDNC is most sensitive to sea salt, which is the main aerosol component of the region. Globally, CDNC is predicted to be less sensitive to changes in the hygroscopicity of the aerosols than in their concentration with the exception of dust where CDNC is very sensitive to particle hydrophilicity over arid areas. Regionally, the sensitivities differ considerably between the two frameworks and quantitatively reveal why the models differ considerably in their indirect forcing estimates.

  9. A comparison between different segmentation methods

    Ni, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Upland heather moors are of vital importance in terms of economic and aesthetic values. A satisfying segmentation method is required to help the following classification thus helping land managers to make decisions about their management. This project focuses on object-based segmentation and four approaches: multiresolution segmentation of eCognition Professional 4.0, along with edge-based segmentation, marker controlled segmentation and efficient graph-based segmentation of python. They were...

  10. Refined topological vertex, cylindric partitions and U(1) adjoint theory

    We study the partition function of the compactified 5D U(1) gauge theory (in the Ω-background) with a single adjoint hypermultiplet, calculated using the refined topological vertex. We show that this partition function is an example a periodic Schur process and is a refinement of the generating function of cylindric plane partitions. The size of the cylinder is given by the mass of adjoint hypermultiplet and the parameters of the Ω-background. We also show that this partition function can be written as a trace of operators which are generalizations of vertex operators studied by Carlsson and Okounkov. In the last part of the paper we describe a way to obtain (q,t) identities using the refined topological vertex.