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Sample records for adjacent fire disturbed

  1. Ecohydrology of adjacent sagebrush and lodgepole pine ecosystems: the consequences of climate change and disturbance

    Bradford, John B.; Schlaepfer, Daniel R.; Lauenroth, William K.

    2014-01-01

    Sagebrush steppe and lodgepole pine forests are two of the most widespread vegetation types in the western United States and they play crucial roles in the hydrologic cycle of these water-limited regions. We used a process-based ecosystem water model to characterize the potential impact of climate change and disturbance (wildfire and beetle mortality) on water cycling in adjacent sagebrush and lodgepole pine ecosystems. Despite similar climatic and topographic conditions between these ecosystems at the sites examined, lodgepole pine, and sagebrush exhibited consistent differences in water balance, notably more evaporation and drier summer soils in the sagebrush and greater transpiration and less water yield in lodgepole pine. Canopy disturbances (either fire or beetle) have dramatic impacts on water balance and availability: reducing transpiration while increasing evaporation and water yield. Results suggest that climate change may reduce snowpack, increase evaporation and transpiration, and lengthen the duration of dry soil conditions in the summer, but may have uncertain effects on drainage. Changes in the distribution of sagebrush and lodgepole pine ecosystems as a consequence of climate change and/or altered disturbance regimes will likely alter ecosystem water balance.

  2. Repeated Habitat Disturbances by Fire Decrease Local Effective Population Size.

    Schrey, Aaron W; Ragsdale, Alexandria K; McCoy, Earl D; Mushinsky, Henry R

    2016-07-01

    Effective population size is a fundamental parameter in population genetics, and factors that alter effective population size will shape the genetic characteristics of populations. Habitat disturbance may have a large effect on genetic characteristics of populations by influencing immigration and gene flow, particularly in fragmented habitats. We used the Florida Sand Skink (Plestiodon reynoldsi) to investigate the effect of fire-based habitat disturbances on the effective population size in the highly threatened, severely fragmented, and fire dependent Florida scrub habitat. We screened 7 microsatellite loci in 604 individuals collected from 12 locations at Archbold Biological Station. Archbold Biological Station has an active fire management plan and detailed records of fires dating to 1967. Our objective was to determine how the timing, number, and intervals between fires affect effective population size, focusing on multiple fires in the same location. Effective population size was higher in areas that had not been burned for more than 10 years and decreased with number of fires and shorter time between fires. A similar pattern was observed in abundance: increasing abundance with time-since-fire and decreasing abundance with number of fires. The ratio of effective population size to census size was higher at sites with more recent fires and tended to decrease with time-since-last-fire. These results suggest that habitat disturbances, such as fire, may have a large effect in the genetic characteristics of local populations and that Florida Sand Skinks are well adapted to the natural fire dynamics required to maintain Florida scrub. PMID:26976940

  3. Effects of fire disturbance on forest hydrology

    YAOShu-ren

    2003-01-01

    Fire is quite a common natural phenomenon closely related to forest hydrology in forest ecosystem. The influence of fire on water is indirectly manifested in that the post fire changes of vegetation, ground cover, soil and environment affect water cycle, water quality and aquatic lives. The effect varies depending upon fire severity and frequency. Light wildland fires or prescribed burnings do not affect hydrology regime significantly but frequent burnings or intense fires can cause changes in hydrology regime similar to that caused clear cutting.

  4. Thermal buckling of metal oil tanks subject to an adjacent fire

    Liu, Ying(College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, 100875, Beijing, China)

    2011-01-01

    Fire is one of the main hazards associated with storage tanks containing flammable liquids. These tanks are usually closely spaced and in large groups, so where a petroleum fire occurs, adjacent tanks are susceptible to damage leading to further development of the fire. The structural behaviour such as thermal stability and failure modes of the tanks under such fire scenario are very important to the safety design and assessment of oil depots. However, no previous studies on th...

  5. Microclimate and Modeled Fire Behavior Differ Between Adjacent Forest Types in Northern Portugal

    2014-01-01

    Fire severity varies with forest composition and structure, reflecting micrometeorology and the fuel complex, but their respective influences are difficult to untangle from observation alone. We quantify the differences in fire weather between different forest types and the resulting differences in modeled fire behavior. Collection of in-stand weather data proceeded during two summer periods in three adjacent stands in northern Portugal, respectively Pinus pinaster (PP), Betula alba (BA), and...

  6. Fire characterization and object thermal response for a large flat plate adjacent to a large JP-4 fuel fire

    Gritzo, L.A.; Moya, J.L. [Sandia National Labs, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Murray, D. [Naval Air Warefare Center, China Lake, CA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A series of three 18.9 m diameter JP-4 pool fire experiments with a large (2.1 m X 4.6 m), flat plate calorimeter adjacent to the fuel pool were recently performed. The objectives of these experiments were to: (1) gain a better understanding of fire phenomenology, (2) provide empirical input parameter estimates for simplified, deterministic Risk Assessment Compatible Fire Models (RACFMs), (3) assist in continuing fire field model code validation and development, and (4) enhance the data base of fire temperature and heat flux to object distributions. Due to different wind conditions during each experiment, data were obtained for conditions where the plate was not engulfed, fully-engulfed and partially engulfed by the continuous flame zone. Results include the heat flux distribution to the plate and flame thermocouple temperatures in the vicinity of the plate and at two cross sections within the lower region of the continuous flame zone. The results emphasize the importance of radiative coupling (i.e. the cooling of the flames by a thermally massive object) and convective coupling (including object-induced turbulence and object/wind/flame interactions) in determining the heat flux from a fire to an object. The formation of a secondary flame zone on an object adjacent to a fire via convective coupling (which increases the heat flux by a factor of two) is shown to be possible when the object is located within a distance equal to the object width from the fire.

  7. Post-disturbance plant community dynamics following a rare natural-origin fire in a Tsuga canadensis forest.

    Bryan D Murray

    Full Text Available Opportunities to directly study infrequent forest disturbance events often lead to valuable information about vegetation dynamics. In mesic temperate forests of North America, stand-replacing crown fire occurs infrequently, with a return interval of 2000-3000 years. Rare chance events, however, may have profound impacts on the developmental trajectories of forest ecosystems. For example, it has been postulated that stand-replacing fire may have been an important factor in the establishment of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis stands in the northern Great Lakes region. Nevertheless, experimental evidence linking hemlock regeneration to non-anthropogenic fire is limited. To clarify this potential relationship, we monitored vegetation dynamics following a rare lightning-origin crown fire in a Wisconsin hemlock-hardwood forest. We also studied vegetation in bulldozer-created fire breaks and adjacent undisturbed forest. Our results indicate that hemlock establishment was rare in the burned area but moderately common in the scarified bulldozer lines compared to the reference area. Early-successional, non-arboreal species including Rubus spp., Vaccinium angustifolium, sedges (Carex spp., grasses, Epilobium ciliatum, and Pteridium aquilinium were the most abundant post-fire species. Collectively, our results suggest that competing vegetation and moisture stress resulting from drought may reduce the efficacy of scarification treatments as well as the usefulness of fire for preparing a suitable seedbed for hemlock. The increasing prevalence of growing-season drought suggests that silvicultural strategies based on historic disturbance regimes may need to be reevaluated for mesic species.

  8. Post-disturbance plant community dynamics following a rare natural-origin fire in a Tsuga canadensis forest.

    Murray, Bryan D; Holmes, Stacie A; Webster, Christopher R; Witt, Jill C

    2012-01-01

    Opportunities to directly study infrequent forest disturbance events often lead to valuable information about vegetation dynamics. In mesic temperate forests of North America, stand-replacing crown fire occurs infrequently, with a return interval of 2000-3000 years. Rare chance events, however, may have profound impacts on the developmental trajectories of forest ecosystems. For example, it has been postulated that stand-replacing fire may have been an important factor in the establishment of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) stands in the northern Great Lakes region. Nevertheless, experimental evidence linking hemlock regeneration to non-anthropogenic fire is limited. To clarify this potential relationship, we monitored vegetation dynamics following a rare lightning-origin crown fire in a Wisconsin hemlock-hardwood forest. We also studied vegetation in bulldozer-created fire breaks and adjacent undisturbed forest. Our results indicate that hemlock establishment was rare in the burned area but moderately common in the scarified bulldozer lines compared to the reference area. Early-successional, non-arboreal species including Rubus spp., Vaccinium angustifolium, sedges (Carex spp.), grasses, Epilobium ciliatum, and Pteridium aquilinium were the most abundant post-fire species. Collectively, our results suggest that competing vegetation and moisture stress resulting from drought may reduce the efficacy of scarification treatments as well as the usefulness of fire for preparing a suitable seedbed for hemlock. The increasing prevalence of growing-season drought suggests that silvicultural strategies based on historic disturbance regimes may need to be reevaluated for mesic species. PMID:22928044

  9. Microclimate and Modeled Fire Behavior Differ Between Adjacent Forest Types in Northern Portugal

    Anita Pinto

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Fire severity varies with forest composition and structure, reflecting micrometeorology and the fuel complex, but their respective influences are difficult to untangle from observation alone. We quantify the differences in fire weather between different forest types and the resulting differences in modeled fire behavior. Collection of in-stand weather data proceeded during two summer periods in three adjacent stands in northern Portugal, respectively Pinus pinaster (PP, Betula alba (BA, and Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (CL. Air temperature, relative humidity and wind speed varied respectively as CL < PP < BA, PP < CL < BA, and CL < BA < PP. Differences between PP and the other types were greatest during the warmest and driest hours of the day in a sequence of 10 days with high fire danger. Estimates of daytime moisture content of fine dead fuels and fire behavior characteristics for this period, respectively, from Behave and BehavePlus, indicate a CL < BA < PP gradient in fire potential. High stand density in CL and BA ensured lower wind speed and higher fuel moisture content than in PP, limiting the likelihood of an extreme fire environment. However, regression tree analysis revealed that the fire behavior distinction between the three forest types was primarily a function of the surface fuel complex, and more so during extreme fire weather conditions.

  10. Investigation of Threshold Voltage Disturbance Caused by Programmed Adjacent Cell in Virtual Source/Drain NAND Flash Memory

    Kim, Wandong; Kwon, Dae Woong; Ji, Jung Hwan; Lee, Jung Hoon; Lee, Jong-Ho; Shin, Hyungcheol; Park, Byung-Gook

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the threshold voltage disturbance caused by programmed adjacent cells in virtual source/drain (VSD) NAND flash memory device. The fringing field induced by charge in an adjacent memory node inhibits the inversion of virtual source/drain region. So, it increases the threshold voltage of the read cell. This is a drawback for the multi-level cell (MLC) operation. The device simulation and measurement data of fabricated devices show that the disturbance increases as the cell gate length and VSD length decreases. It can be minimized by the electric field concentration induced by the arch shape structure.

  11. Multiple disturbance interactions and drought influence fire severity in Rocky Mountain subalpine forests

    C. Bigler; D. Kulakowski; T. T. Veblen

    2005-01-01

    Disturbances such as fire, insect outbreaks, and blowdown are important in shaping subalpine forests in the Rocky Mountains, but quantitative studies of their interactions are rare. We investigated the combined effects of past disturbances, current vegetation, and topography on spatial variability of the severity of a fire that burned approximately 4500 ha of subalpine forest during the extreme drought of 2002 in northwestern Colorado. Ordinal logistic regression was used to spatially model f...

  12. Repeated experimental fires and window of disturbance in relation to runoff in a Mediterranean shrubland

    E. Gimeno-García

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study is focused on exploring the effect of repeated experimental fires on post-fire runoff generation through a sixteen years monitoring runoff yield from erosion plots (eight years after the first fire and other eight years after the second one in a Mediterranean shrubland area (La Concordia Experimental Station, considering the fire severity and the post-fire erosive rainfall events. The conceptual framework of the window of disturbance is used to analyze how long the runoff yield in burned plots shows clear differences respect to the unburned ones, as well as, the recovery-rate model for multiple fire events. Results show that the effect of repeated fires on runoff yield is related to a combination of fire severity, climatic conditions (mainly rainfall intensity, I30, soil hydrological properties (infiltration capacity, steady state infiltration and soil water retention capacity, and rate of vegetation recovery. Eight years after the first fire, even though soil hydrological properties are recovered as well as vegetation cover did, rainfall events with I30 ≥20 mm h-1 still promoted differences between burned and control plots. The second post-fire disturbance period was associated with the low vegetation recovery, and also with rainfall events with I30 ≥20 mm h-1 even seven years after the repeated fires.

  13. The fire ant Solenopsis saevissima and habitat disturbance alter ant communities

    Dejean, A; Cereghino, R.; Leponce, M.; Rossi, V; Roux, Olivier; Compin, A.; Delabie, J. H. C.; Corbara, B.

    2015-01-01

    The fire ant Solenopsis saevissima is a major pest frequent in human-disturbed areas of its native range where it forms 'supercolonies'. We determined that its natural habitat in French Guiana is likely the sporadically flooded riparian forest and aimed to evaluate this ant's impact on the abundance and diversity of other ants by comparing different habitats at two sites. We noted a significant decrease in ant species richness between the rainforest and human-disturbed habitats (but not betwe...

  14. Estimating Fire-Caused Boreal Forest Disturbances Using Remote Sensing Data

    Sukhinin, A. I.; Slinkina, O. A.; Soja, A. J.; Buryak, L. V.; Conard, S. G.; McRae, D.; Yurikova, E. Y.; Cahoon, D. R.

    2008-12-01

    Russia accounts for about half of the world's forests, most of which are in Siberia. Numerous forest fires, mostly human-caused, and extensive forest harvesting, including illegal logging, have resulted in considerable ecological damage and economic loss. At present, forest inventory agencies assess the effects of fire based on the known forest area burned. Due to potential cost and difficulty of access types and severity of fire effects are normally not assessed. The lack of reliable estimates of ecological and economic impacts of forest fires prevents development of effective approaches for forest management and forest fire protection. Remote sensing and GIS-based technologies provide for the development of fundamental new methods to assess and monitor forest condition and wildfire behavior and effects. Wildfire and insect and disease outbreaks are the main natural factors responsible for partial or complete mortality of forest stands in Siberia. Negative human influences include forest harvesting, mining, industrial pollution, and human-caused fires. Estimating the scale, rate, and severity of disturbance is of key importance for appraising the resulting ecological and economical damage. In this study, we developed a GIS- and satellite-based methodology to appraise forest damage by taking advantage of unique spectral signature of the underlying forest types. Our focus was on an area of intensive forest harvest in the Angara river basin, which includes the southern and central taiga zones. We have assessed the type, extent, and severity of disturbances in vegetation cover and mapped the current condition of disturbed forest sites.

  15. Simulating the effects of fire disturbance and vegetation recovery on boreal ecosystem carbon fluxes

    Yi, Y.; Kimball, J. S.; Jones, L. A.; Zhao, M.

    2011-12-01

    Fire related disturbance and subsequent vegetation recovery has a major influence on carbon storage and land-atmosphere CO2 fluxes in boreal ecosystems. We applied a synthetic approach combining tower eddy covariance flux measurements, satellite remote sensing and model reanalysis surface meteorology within a terrestrial carbon model framework to estimate fire disturbance and recovery effects on boreal ecosystem carbon fluxes including gross primary production (GPP), ecosystem respiration and net CO2 exchange (NEE). A disturbance index based on MODIS land surface temperature and NDVI was found to coincide with vegetation recovery status inferred from tower chronosequence sites. An empirical algorithm was developed to track ecosystem recovery status based on the disturbance index and used to nudge modeled net primary production (NPP) and surface soil organic carbon stocks from baseline steady-state conditions. The simulations were conducted using a satellite based terrestrial carbon flux model driven by MODIS NDVI and MERRA reanalysis daily surface meteorology inputs. The MODIS (MCD45) burned area product was then applied for mapping recent (post 2000) regional disturbance history, and used with the disturbance index to define vegetation disturbance and recovery status. The model was then applied to estimate regional patterns and temporal changes in terrestrial carbon fluxes across the entire northern boreal forest and tundra domain. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to assess the relative importance of fire disturbance and recovery on regional carbon fluxes relative to assumed steady-state conditions. The explicit representation of disturbance and recovery effects produces more accurate NEE predictions than the baseline steady-state simulations and reduces uncertainty regarding the purported missing carbon sink in the high latitudes.

  16. Reconstructing Fire Disturbances in Coastal Temperate Rainforests on the Central Coast of British Columbia, Canada

    Hoffman, Kira; Smith, Dan; Lertzman, Ken; Starzomski, Brian

    2015-04-01

    The coastal temperate rainforests of British Columbia's Central Coast are comprised of old growth, mixed-age stands and a mosaic of non-forested bogs. This region receives approximately 4000 mm of annual rainfall, and fire disturbances caused by lightning are thought to be very rare. Because of the late successional characteristics of these forests and the presumed lack of visible fire evidence, fires have been estimated to occur at up to 6000-year return intervals. We attempt to distinguish the roles of natural and cultural (First Nations) fires using multiple lines of evidence from tree ring records, fire-scarred trees, soil charcoal and archaeological evidence from First Nations settlement areas. To reconstruct the Holocene fire history of the study area located on Hecate Island (N 51 38 W -128 05), thirty 400m2 forest mensuration plots were systematically established in a 287-hectare area burned in 1893. Analyses focused on the relationship between fire events and climate recorded in tree rings and instrumental records, as well as nutrient concentrations and pH of soils and plant community characteristics. Four fire events (1893, 1776, 1525, 1372) were recorded in forty-five living, fire-scarred western redcedar (Thuja plicata), yellow cedar (Xanthocyparis nootkatensis) and shore pine (Pinus contorta var. contorta) trees. Five additional fire events (1785 Cal BP, 2760 Cal BP, 3355 Cal BP, 4735 Cal BP, 7740 Cal BP) were dated with accelerated mass spectrometry radiocarbon dating of in situ macro charcoal (> 5mm) buried in stratigraphy in both organic and mineral soils. The short intervals between fire events, coupled with the long history of First Nations settlement and land use in the study area, suggest purposeful and repeated low-intensity ground fires. Our research demonstrates that fires are more widespread and common than previously recorded on the very wet Central Coast of British Columbia. It is important to incorporate cultural fires into fire history

  17. Snowpack, fire, and forest disturbance: interactions affect montane invasions by non-native shrubs.

    Stevens, Jens T; Latimer, Andrew M

    2015-06-01

    Montane regions worldwide have experienced relatively low plant invasion rates, a trend attributed to increased climatic severity, low rates of disturbance, and reduced propagule pressure relative to lowlands. Manipulative experiments at elevations above the invasive range of non-native species can clarify the relative contributions of these mechanisms to montane invasion resistance, yet such experiments are rare. Furthermore, global climate change and land use changes are expected to cause decreases in snowpack and increases in disturbance by fire and forest thinning in montane forests. We examined the importance of these factors in limiting montane invasions using a field transplant experiment above the invasive range of two non-native lowland shrubs, Scotch broom (Cytisus scoparius) and Spanish broom (Spartium junceum), in the rain-snow transition zone of the Sierra Nevada of California. We tested the effects of canopy closure, prescribed fire, and winter snow depth on demographic transitions of each species. Establishment of both species was most likely at intermediate levels of canopy disturbance, but at this intermediate canopy level, snow depth had negative effects on winter survival of seedlings. We used matrix population models to show that an 86% reduction in winter snowfall would cause a 2.8-fold increase in population growth rates in Scotch broom and a 3.5-fold increase in Spanish broom. Fall prescribed fire increased germination rates, but decreased overall population growth rates by reducing plant survival. However, at longer fire return intervals, population recovery between fires is likely to keep growth rates high, especially under low snowpack conditions. Many treatment combinations had positive growth rates despite being above the current invasive range, indicating that propagule pressure, disturbance, and climate can all strongly affect plant invasions in montane regions. We conclude that projected reductions in winter snowpack and increases in

  18. Effects of fire disturbance on the forest structure and succession in the natural broad-leaved/Korean pine forest

    LIULi-juan; GEJian-ping

    2003-01-01

    Investigations on charcoal in the soil, fire-scarred trees, stand composition, forest structure as well as regeneration status were carried out in the natural broad-leaved/Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis) forest after fire disturbance at Liangshui Nature Reserve on the mid-north of Xiaoxing'an Mountains from 1990 to 1992, and the ecological effects of fire disturbance on the formation and succession of this kind of forest were analyzed according to the survey results. The average depth of charcoal in the soil was related to the timing of the fire. According to the characteristic of fire-scarred trees, the dynamic map of the fire behavior was drawn onto the topographic map. It showed that the dimension and extent of the fire disturbance was closely related with site conditions. Fire disturbance only led to a significant difference in stand composition and diameter class structurefor the stands at different locations, rather than completely destroying the forest. After fire disturbance, the horizontal community structure was a mosaic of different patches, which were made up of different deciduous species or different sizes of Korean pines, and the succession trend of each patch was also different. In the sites with the heavy fire disturbance, the intolerant hardwood species were dominant, and there were a large number of regenerative Korean pine saplings under the canopy. In the moderate -disturbed sites, the tolerant hardwood species were dominant, and a small number of large size Korean pines still survived. In the light-disturbed sites, large size Korean pines were dominant.

  19. The wind and fire disturbance in Central European mountain spruce forests: the regeneration after four years

    Monika Budzáková

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A strong windstorm in November 2004 resulted in a huge blown-down spruce forest area in the southern part of the Tatra National Park in the Western Carpathians in Slovakia, Central Europe. The aim of this work is to study the vegetation composition of spruce forest at differently managed sites four years after this disturbance. Four study areas were selected for this purpose: (i an area where the fallen trees were extracted and new seedlings were planted; (ii an area, which was hit by a forest fire after the extraction; (iii an area where no active management was applied; (iv a reference forest unaffected by such disturbance. A total of 100 plots were selected, 25 of each area type. The result of DCA and CCA analyses consistently indicated that after this short period the non-extracted and extracted areas are currently most similar to the reference forest area, while the fire affected area differed. A one-way ANOVA comparing species cover for the different plot sizes indicated some significant differences between the extracted and non-extracted plots. The abundance of certain species commonly occurring in spruce forests, such as Dyopteris carthusiana agg., Vaccinium myrtillus and Avenella flexuosa, correlated weli with the non-extracted plots, compared to the extracted plots. Coverage of these species was lowest on burned plots. The lowest Shannon-Wiener’s diversity values were recorded in burned plots. This was most likely a consequence of mono-dominant competitive species spread, (mainly Chamerion angustifolium which profited from the altered ecological conditions following the fire. Although some differences were also registered in the Shannon-Wiener diversity index between the remaining research plots, however these were not statistically significant. The most important results of our investigations include the extensive influence of fire disturbance on vegetation. Study revealed that the wind-disturbed area is able to regenerate

  20. Simulating effects of fire disturbance and climate change on boreal forest productivity and evapotranspiration

    We used a terrestrial ecosystem process model, BIOME-BGC, to investigate historical climate change and fire disturbance effects on regional carbon and water budgets within a 357,500 km2 portion of the Canadian boreal forest. Historical patterns of increasing atmospheric CO2, climate change, and regional fire activity were used as model drivers to evaluate the relative effects of these impacts to spatial patterns and temporal trends in forest net primary production (NPP) and evapotranspiration (ET). Historical trends of increasing atmospheric CO2 resulted in overall 13% and 5% increases in annual NPP and ET from 1994 to 1996, respectively. NPP was found to be relatively sensitive to changes in air temperature (Ta), while ET was more sensitive to precipitation (P) change within the ranges of observed climate variability (e.g., +/-2 oC for Ta and +/-20% for P). In addition, the potential effect of climate change related warming on NPP is exacerbated or offset depending on whether these changes are accompanied by respective decreases or increases in precipitation. Historical fire activity generally resulted in reductions of both NPP and ET, which consumed an average of approximately 6% of annual NPP from 1959 to 1996. Areas currently occupied by dry conifer forests were found to be subject to more frequent fire activity, which consumed approximately 8% of annual NPP. The results of this study show that the North American boreal ecosystem is sensitive to historical patterns of increasing atmospheric CO2, climate change and regional fire activity. The relative impacts of these disturbances on NPP and ET interact in complex ways and are spatially variable depending on regional land cover and climate gradients. (author)

  1. Interactions between soil thermal and hydrological dynamics in the response of Alaska ecosystems to fire disturbance

    Yi, Shuhua; McGuire, Anthony; Harden, Jennifer; Kasischke, Eric; Manies, Kristen L.; Hinzman, Larry; Liljedahl, Anna K.; Randerson, J.; Liu, Heping; Romanovsky, V.adimir E; Marchenko, Sergey S.; Kim, Yongwon

    2009-01-01

    Soil temperature and moisture are important factors that control many ecosystem processes. However, interactions between soil thermal and hydrological processes are not adequately understood in cold regions, where the frozen soil, fire disturbance, and soil drainage play important roles in controlling interactions among these processes. These interactions were investigated with a new ecosystem model framework, the dynamic organic soil version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model, that incorporates an efficient and stable numerical scheme for simulating soil thermal and hydrological dynamics within soil profiles that contain a live moss horizon, fibrous and amorphous organic horizons, and mineral soil horizons. The performance of the model was evaluated for a tundra burn site that had both preburn and postburn measurements, two black spruce fire chronosequences (representing space-for-time substitutions in well and intermediately drained conditions), and a poorly drained black spruce site. Although space-for-time substitutions present challenges in model-data comparison, the model demonstrates substantial ability in simulating the dynamics of evapotranspiration, soil temperature, active layer depth, soil moisture, and water table depth in response to both climate variability and fire disturbance. Several differences between model simulations and field measurements identified key challenges for evaluating/improving model performance that include (1) proper representation of discrepancies between air temperature and ground surface temperature; (2) minimization of precipitation biases in the driving data sets; (3) improvement of the measurement accuracy of soil moisture in surface organic horizons; and (4) proper specification of organic horizon depth/properties, and soil thermal conductivity.

  2. Modeling the effects of environmental disturbance on wildlife communities: avian responses to prescribed fire.

    Russell, Robin E; Royle, J Andrew; Saab, Victoria A; Lehmkuhl, John F; Block, William M; Sauer, John R

    2009-07-01

    Prescribed fire is a management tool used to reduce fuel loads on public lands in forested areas in the western United States. Identifying the impacts of prescribed fire on bird communities in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests is necessary for providing land management agencies with information regarding the effects of fuel reduction on sensitive, threatened, and migratory bird species. Recent developments in occupancy modeling have established a framework for quantifying the impacts of management practices on wildlife community dynamics. We describe a Bayesian hierarchical model of multi-species occupancy accounting for detection probability, and we demonstrate the model's usefulness for identifying effects of habitat disturbances on wildlife communities. Advantages to using the model include the ability to estimate the effects of environmental impacts on rare or elusive species, the intuitive nature of the modeling, the incorporation of detection probability, the estimation of parameter uncertainty, the flexibility of the model to suit a variety of experimental designs, and the composite estimate of the response that applies to the collection of observed species as opposed to merely a small subset of common species. Our modeling of the impacts of prescribed fire on avian communities in a ponderosa pine forest in Washington indicate that prescribed fire treatments result in increased occupancy rates for several bark-insectivore, cavity-nesting species including a management species of interest, Black-backed Woodpeckers (Picoides arcticus). Three aerial insectivore species, and the ground insectivore, American Robin (Turdus migratorius), also responded positively to prescribed fire, whereas three foliage insectivores and two seed specialists, Clark's Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana) and the Pine Siskin (Carduelis pinus), declined following treatments. Land management agencies interested in determining the effects of habitat manipulations on wildlife

  3. Modeling the effects of environmental disturbance on wildlife communities: Avian responses to prescribed fire

    Russell, R.E.; Royle, J. Andrew; Saab, V.A.; Lehmkuhl, J.F.; Block, W.M.; Sauer, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    Prescribed fire is a management tool used to reduce fuel loads on public lands in forested areas in the western United States. Identifying the impacts of prescribed fire on bird communities in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests is necessary for providing land management agencies with information regarding the effects of fuel reduction on sensitive, threatened, and migratory bird species. Recent developments in occupancy modeling have established a framework for quantifying the impacts of management practices on wildlife community dynamics. We describe a Bayesian hierarchical model of multi-species occupancy accounting for detection probability, and we demonstrate the model's usefulness for identifying effects of habitat disturbances on wildlife communities. Advantages to using the model include the ability to estimate the effects of environmental impacts on rare or elusive species, the intuitive nature of the modeling, the incorporation of detection probability, the estimation of parameter uncertainty, the flexibility of the model to suit a variety of experimental designs, and the composite estimate of the response that applies to the collection of observed species as opposed to merely a small subset of common species. Our modeling of the impacts of prescribed fire on avian communities in a ponderosa pine forest in Washington indicate that prescribed fire treatments result in increased occupancy rates for several bark-insectivore, cavity-nesting species including a management species of interest, Black-backed Woodpeckers (Picoides arcticus). Three aerial insectivore species, and the ground insectivore, American Robin (Turdus migratorius), also responded positively to prescribed fire, whereas three foliage insectivores and two seed specialists, Clark's Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana) and the Pine Siskin (Carduelis pinus), declined following treatments. Land management agencies interested in determining the effects of habitat manipulations on wildlife

  4. Tropical Forest Reorganization after Cyclone and Fire Disturbance in Samoa: Remnant Trees as Biological Legacies

    Åsa Fritioff

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In disturbed rain forests, large, living remnant trees may be of significant importance for postdisturbance reorganization either directly, by producing large quantities of seeds, or indirectly, by attracting vertebrate seed dispersers. In addition, remnant trees may also be important in providing a favorable microhabitat for seedlings of late-successional species. This study focused on the role of large remnant trees (> 40 cm dbh in patterns of regeneration after cyclone and fire damage in the Tafua and Falealupo Rain Forest Preserves, Savaií, Samoa. At Tafua, 10 large trees at each of two sites (one site burned in 1990 were investigated with regard to numbers of species and densities of plants from three different size classes at different distances from remnant trees. At the burned site, both species richness and the densities of plants < 1cm dbh were significantly higher inside the canopies of remnant trees than outside of them. At the unburned site, no or only marginally significant differences were observed. At Falealupo, two burned sites (burned in 1993 and 1998 were investigated using seed traps. At both sites, the seed rain from vertebrate dispersers was disproportionally higher under the canopies of remnant trees than in outside areas. No differences in soil characteristics were found when comparing samples taken from inside and outside canopies. Our results are congruent with the prediction that large remnant trees surviving in severely disturbed rain-forest areas represent biological legacies and serve as nuclei for reorganization. Based on this study and our previous work, we suggest that three factors represent essential components of the spatial resilience of tropical forest ecosystems and should be targeted for active management in tropical forests exposed to large-scale disturbances, particularly fire: remnant trees, refugia, and vertebrate dispersers.

  5. Effects of climate change on fire and spruce budworm disturbance regimes and consequences on forest biomass production in eastern Canada

    The dynamics of spruce budworm (SBW) outbreaks and wildfires are expected to change as climatic change progresses. The effects of an altered, combined interaction between SBW and fire may be of greater importance than the individual effect of either on forest biomass production. The objectives of this study are to define current fire and SBW regimes in eastern Canada and relate the characteristics of each regime based upon climate model outputs for 2050 and 2100. The study also attempts to evaluate the impact of predicted changes in SBW and fire disturbance regimes on forest dynamics. The methodology used in the study included data from the Canadian Large Fire Database and historical records of SBW outbreaks. Spatial and environmental variables were presented along with climate models. The analysis was conducted using constrained ordination techniques, and canonical correspondence and redundancy analysis. Projected disturbance regimes were presented for both fire and SBW. The effects of the regimes on biomass productivity were also examined, using a Landscape Disturbance Simulator (LAD). It was concluded that this model will help evaluate the consequences of changes imposed by climatic change on both disturbances individually, as well as their interaction. 10 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  6. Post-Disturbance Plant Community Dynamics following a Rare Natural-Origin Fire in a Tsuga canadensis Forest

    Bryan D Murray; Holmes, Stacie A.; Webster, Christopher R.; Witt, Jill C.

    2012-01-01

    Opportunities to directly study infrequent forest disturbance events often lead to valuable information about vegetation dynamics. In mesic temperate forests of North America, stand-replacing crown fire occurs infrequently, with a return interval of 2000-3000 years. Rare chance events, however, may have profound impacts on the developmental trajectories of forest ecosystems. For example, it has been postulated that stand-replacing fire may have been an important factor in the establishment of...

  7. Post-Disturbance Plant Community Dynamics following a Rare Natural-Origin Fire in a Tsuga canadensis Forest

    Murray, Bryan D.; Holmes, Stacie A.; Webster, Christopher R.; Witt, Jill C.

    2012-01-01

    Opportunities to directly study infrequent forest disturbance events often lead to valuable information about vegetation dynamics. In mesic temperate forests of North America, stand-replacing crown fire occurs infrequently, with a return interval of 2000–3000 years. Rare chance events, however, may have profound impacts on the developmental trajectories of forest ecosystems. For example, it has been postulated that stand-replacing fire may have been an important factor in the establishment of...

  8. Do fire disturbances account for missing C in snow dominated headwater catchments in NM?

    Perdrial, J. N.; Brooks, P. D.; Swetnam, T.; Lohse, K. A.; Rasmussen, C.; Harpold, A. A.; Litvak, M. E.; Broxton, P. D.; Mitra, B.; Condon, K.; Huckle, D. M.; Vazquez, A.; Lybrand, R. A.; Holleran, M.; Orem, C. A.; Meixner, T.; Chorover, J.

    2013-12-01

    How do fires affect the potential for long term carbon (C) sequestration in the forests of western North America? We quantified current C fluxes (net ecosystem exchange [NEE] and dissolved & particulate stream and ground water fluxes) and pools (above and below ground biomass, [AGB, BGB], soil C) in three catchments of the Jemez River Basin Critical Zone Observatory. Our estimates revealed that study systems are dominated by gaseous fluxes (ranging from 3,200 to 3,900 kg ha-1 yr-1over three years) with only small losses to streams as dissolved or particulate C (5 to 30 kg ha-1 yr-1) or to GW (1-6 kg ha-1 yr-1) rendering these systems substantial sinks for atmospheric C. Our estimates for biomass (20,000 - 240,000 kg ha-1) and soil C (80.000 and 160.000 kg ha-1) are comparable to stocks of similar soil and vegetation types (Lal 2005; North et al. 2009) and at current uptake rates only ~ 50-100 years are necessary for accumulation. Since old soil C accumulated over a longer period of time, current uptake rates are either higher than past ones and/or disturbances reduced the stocks in the past. Logging is documented in these systems but cannot explain the bulk of unaccounted C. Wildfires in contrast have occurred repeatedly in the past and impacted the C budget by reducing stocks (e.g. ~ 8% of AGB, ) during each fire. Additionally, uptake rates after fire are reduced until vegetation regrowth, with microbial respiration and thus carbon loss dominating in the interim. Post-fire debris flows (estimate 800 - 1140 kg C ha-1 after a recent fire in NM) present an additional sink. Together, our results are used to test the hypothesis that recurring wildfires strongly impact the C-balance of seasonally snow-covered forests in the SW US leading to oscillation between sources and sinks for C. Lal R (2005). Forest Ecol Manag 220 (1-3):242-258. North M, Hurteau M, Innes J (2009). Ecol Appl 19 (6):1385-1396.

  9. Hoof, teeth and fire: the effects of different simulated forms of disturbance on wind erosion in a desert scrub grassland

    Disturbance to and removal of vegetation is a major cause of increased aeolian erodibility for many natural surfaces. This study in the extreme northern Chihuahuan Desert used a portable wind tunnel to examine the impact of grazing, trampling and fire on dust emission from grassland in the Sevilleta...

  10. Climate Change Effects on Multiple Disturbance Interactions: Wildland Fire, Mountain Pine Beetles, and Blister Rust Simulations on a Yellowstone National Park Landscape

    Keane, R. E.; Loehman, R.; Smithwick, E. A.

    2011-12-01

    Complex interactions between disturbance, climate, and vegetation will dramatically alter spatial patterns and ecosystem processes in the future, but the interactions between multiple disturbances may ultimately determine vegetation response and landscape dynamics. The frequency and extent of wildland fire, mountain pine beetles, and blister rust are predicted to increase with global warming, but the interactions and reciprocal feedbacks between these three disturbances could also alter landscape trajectories. We used the mechanistic, spatially explicit, landscape FireBGCv2 model parameterized for Yellowstone National Park to determine the extent to which climate altered ecosystem carbon storage, landscape composition and structure, and interacting disturbance regimes that include wildland fire, mountain pine beetles, and white pine blister rust for lodgepole and whitebark pine forests. Under two simulated future climate scenarios (B2 and A2) and three disturbance scenarios (fire only, fire and beetles/rust, beetles/rust only), it appears fire and bark beetle disturbance events interacted to moderate burn area and decrease insect/disease mortality. Landscape composition and structure was roughly the same across disturbance scenarios except whitebark pine disappears when rust is present in the simulation. Overall, we conclude that disturbance interactions are important to landscape dynamics under future climates and these interactions may overwhelm the direct effects of climate or single disturbances.

  11. Relative effects of disturbance on red imported fire ants and native ant species in a longleaf pine ecosystem

    Stuble, Katharine L.; Kirkman, L. Katherine; Carroll, C. Ronald;

    2011-01-01

    the abundance of native ants and fire ants in four experimental plots. We then observed the reassembly and reestablishment of the ants in these plots for 1 year after treatment. The abundance of fire ants in treated plots did not differ from abundance in control plots 1 year after treatment. Likewise......, the abundance of native ants increased to levels comparable to those in control plots after 1 year. Our findings suggest that factors other than large reductions in ant abundance and species density (number of species per unit area) may affect the establishment of fire ants and that the response of...... cases in which non-native species become established in intact (lacking extensive anthropogenic soil disturbance) communities and subsequently diminish the abundance and richness of native species is challenging on the basis of observation alone. The red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta), an...

  12. Post-fire Gully Rejuvenation - Evidence of Process Thresholds Controlled by Vegetation Disturbance

    Hyde, K.; Woods, S.

    2011-12-01

    High intensity rainfall may trigger gully rejuvenation on hillslopes recently disturbed by wildfire, leading to debris-laden flows which generally contribute the majority of sediment transported in post-fire erosion events. We investigated the extent to which the occurrence of gully rejuvenation can be predicted based upon burn severity, rainfall data and basin morphometric variables. Field surveys were conducted at six Northern Rockies sites to identify occurrence of gully rejuvenation in first order catchments and to map and characterize the location of gully heads. NEXRAD and rain gage data analysis coupled with field observations characterized rainfall intensity and extent. Building on previous work we quantified burn severity using the Vegetation Disturbance Index (VDI), a continuous metric based upon Burned Area Reflectance Classification (BARC) maps derived from satellite imagery using the dNBR algorithm. GIS analysis combined the VDI with morphometric factors expected to influence hillslope stability. Gully heads marked abrupt transition in channel form. Above gully heads, channels were shallow and U-shaped with gentle transition to the hillslope and fine root hairs intact. Angular edges marked deep gully head incisions which down-cut channel floors from 0.2-0.3 to 1.0 meter or more. Any remaining roots were coarse and the hillslope transition was sharp. Gully heads were located at variable distances below the master rill head of the catchment hollow. Distances were obviously greater where live canopy remained upslope. Gully head morphology strongly suggests flow force transition and exceedance of an erosion process threshold. The variable distance of the gully head below the hollow suggest upslope controls influencing initiation point, possibly degree and spatial pattern of burn severity. Binary logistic regression revealed stronger correlation between gully rejuvenation and VDI than morphometric variables. The statistical strength using the continuous

  13. Long term repeated fire disturbance alters soil bacterial diversity but not the abundance in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest

    Shen, Ju-Pei; Chen, C. R.; Lewis, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Effects of fire on biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystem are widely acknowledged, while few studies have focused on the bacterial community under the disturbance of long-term frequent prescribed fire. In this study, three treatments (burning every two years (B2), burning every four years (B4) and no burning (B0)) were applied for 38 years in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest. Results showed that bacterial alpha diversity (i.e. bacterial OTU) in the top soil (0–10 cm) was signific...

  14. Response of soil carbon dioxide efflux to fire disturbance in a long-term grassland global change experiment

    Strong, A. L.; Chiariello, N.; Tobeck, T.; Field, C. B.

    2012-12-01

    How terrestrial biosphere-atmosphere carbon dioxide exchange responds to global change is an important component to understanding global feedbacks of the carbon cycle. Soils represent a global store of organic carbon on the order of 3000 Pg C. Increased carbon dioxide release from increased respiration of soil C in response to climate warming and other direct and indirect anthropogenic factors could create a positive carbon cycle feedback to climate change. Numerous studies have demonstrated that soil respiration increases under experimental warming and elevated CO2, although the long-term, multi-year dynamics of this feedback remain poorly constrained. Punctuated disturbances, such as fire, are also likely to affect soil C responses, and understanding how fire and other global change factors interact in their influence on soil respiration is important in order to fully characterize climate-carbon cycle feedbacks. Previous studies have found that fire disturbance in semi-arid grasslands reduces soil CO2. The Jasper Ridge Global Change Experiment is a thirteen-year continuous full-factorial global change manipulation (elevated carbon dioxide, temperature, precipitation, and nitrogen deposition) located in a clay-loam soil grassland in central coastal California. In summer 2011, an additional treatment condition -- a controlled burn -- was applied to half the experimental plots to provide a fire treatment, and in the following growing season, soil carbon dioxide effluxes were measured at peak aboveground plant biomass (April 2012) and after summer senescence (June 2012) using a LiCOR-6400 soil respiration chamber and infrared gas analyzer. Across all plots and other treatments, CO2 fluxes were greater in burned grassland soils than in non-burned grassland soils (p fertilized with N, than in plots with either single treatment alone. CO2 enrichment had a marginal positive effect on soil CO2 efflux (p 0.10). Neither soil temperature, nor soil moisture appeared to be

  15. Long term repeated fire disturbance alters soil bacterial diversity but not the abundance in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest

    Shen, Ju-Pei; Chen, C. R.; Lewis, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Effects of fire on biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystem are widely acknowledged, while few studies have focused on the bacterial community under the disturbance of long-term frequent prescribed fire. In this study, three treatments (burning every two years (B2), burning every four years (B4) and no burning (B0)) were applied for 38 years in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest. Results showed that bacterial alpha diversity (i.e. bacterial OTU) in the top soil (0-10 cm) was significantly higher in the B2 treatment compared with the B0 and B4 treatments. Non-metric multidimensional analysis (NMDS) of bacterial community showed clear separation of the soil bacterial community structure among different fire frequency regimes and between the depths. Different frequency fire did not have a substantial effect on bacterial composition at phylum level or bacterial 16S rRNA gene abundance. Soil pH and C:N ratio were the major drivers for bacterial community structure in the most frequent fire treatment (B2), while other factors (EC, DOC, DON, MBC, NH4+, TC and TN) were significant in the less frequent burning and no burning treatments (B4 and B0). This study suggested that burning had a dramatic impact on bacterial diversity but not abundance with more frequent fire.

  16. Long term repeated fire disturbance alters soil bacterial diversity but not the abundance in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest.

    Shen, Ju-pei; Chen, C R; Lewis, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Effects of fire on biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystem are widely acknowledged, while few studies have focused on the bacterial community under the disturbance of long-term frequent prescribed fire. In this study, three treatments (burning every two years (B2), burning every four years (B4) and no burning (B0)) were applied for 38 years in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest. Results showed that bacterial alpha diversity (i.e. bacterial OTU) in the top soil (0-10 cm) was significantly higher in the B2 treatment compared with the B0 and B4 treatments. Non-metric multidimensional analysis (NMDS) of bacterial community showed clear separation of the soil bacterial community structure among different fire frequency regimes and between the depths. Different frequency fire did not have a substantial effect on bacterial composition at phylum level or bacterial 16S rRNA gene abundance. Soil pH and C:N ratio were the major drivers for bacterial community structure in the most frequent fire treatment (B2), while other factors (EC, DOC, DON, MBC, NH4(+), TC and TN) were significant in the less frequent burning and no burning treatments (B4 and B0). This study suggested that burning had a dramatic impact on bacterial diversity but not abundance with more frequent fire. PMID:26787458

  17. The results of cytogenetic studies of persons from the settlements adjacent to Semipalatinsk firing ground (during the period of activity of joint commission in 1989)

    Within the frames of activity of joint commission the cytogenetic studied of 98 persons from different areas of Semipalatinsk region have been carried out in 1989. The studies revealed the higher level of chromosome aberrations in the settlements adjacent to firing ground. The possible connection of discovered cytogenetic lesions to the influence of radiation aftermath of ground and air nuclear weapon test is discussed. 10 refs., 1 tab

  18. Pollen, wind and fire: how to investigate genetic effects of disturbance-induced change in forest trees.

    Bacles, Cecile F E

    2014-01-01

    ) take advantage of the distinctive features of the fire-adapted wind-pollinated Aleppo pine Pinus halepensis (Fig. 1) to provide an elegant example of best practice. Thanks to long-term monitoring of the study site, a natural stand in Israel, Shohami and Nathan witnessed the direct impact of habitat disturbance, here taking the shape of fire, on conspecific and forest densities and compared pre- and postdisturbance mating patterns estimated from cones of different ages sampled on the same surviving maternal individuals (Fig. 2). This excellent study design is all the more strong that Shohami and Nathan took further analytical steps to account for confounding variables, such as historical population genetic structure and possible interannual variation in wind conditions, thus giving high credibility to their findings of unequivocal fire-induced alteration of mating patterns in P. halepensis. Most notably, the authors found, at the pollen pool level, a disruption of local genetic structure which, furthermore, they were able to attribute explicitly to enhanced pollen-mediated gene immigration into the low-density fire-disturbed stand. This cleverly designed research provides a model approach to be followed if we are to advance our understanding of disturbance-induced dispersal and genetic change in forest trees. PMID:24372751

  19. How have past fire disturbances contributed to the current carbon balance of boreal ecosystems?

    Yue, C.; Ciais, P.; Zhu, D.; Wang, T.; Peng, S. S.; Piao, S. L.

    2016-02-01

    Boreal fires have immediate effects on regional carbon budgets by emitting CO2 into the atmosphere at the time of burning, but they also have legacy effects by initiating a long-term carbon sink during post-fire vegetation recovery. Quantifying these different effects on the current-day pan-boreal (44-84° N) carbon balance and quantifying relative contributions of legacy sinks by past fires is important for understanding and predicting the carbon dynamics in this region. Here we used the global dynamic vegetation model ORCHIDEE-SPITFIRE (Organising Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic Ecosystems - SPread and InTensity of FIRE) to attribute the contributions by fires in different decades between 1850 and 2009 to the carbon balance of 2000-2009, taking into account the atmospheric CO2 change and climate change since 1850. The fire module of ORCHIDEE-SPITFIRE was turned off for each decade in turn and was also turned off before and after the decade in question in order to model the legacy carbon trajectory by fires in each past decade. We found that, unsurprisingly, fires that occurred in 2000-2009 are a carbon source (-0.17 Pg C yr-1) for the carbon balance of 2000-2009, whereas fires in all decades before 2000 contribute carbon sinks with a collective contribution of 0.23 Pg C yr-1. This leaves a net fire sink effect of 0.06 Pg C yr-1, or 6.3 % of the simulated regional carbon sink (0.95 Pg C yr-1). Further, fires with an age of 10-40 years (i.e., those that occurred during 1960-1999) contribute more than half of the total sink effect of fires. The small net sink effect of fires indicates that current-day fire emissions are roughly balanced out by legacy sinks. The future role of fires in the regional carbon balance remains uncertain and will depend on whether changes in fires and associated carbon emissions will exceed the enhanced sink effects of previous fires, both being strongly affected by global change.

  20. A minimal model of fire-vegetation feedbacks and disturbance stochasticity generates alternative stable states in grassland–shrubland–woodland systems

    Altered disturbance regimes in the context of global change are likely to have profound consequences for ecosystems. Interactions between fire and vegetation are of particular interest, as fire is a major driver of vegetation change, and vegetation properties (e.g., amount, flammability) alter fire regimes. Mediterranean-type ecosystems (MTEs) constitute a paradigmatic example of temperate fire-prone vegetation. Although these ecosystems may be heavily impacted by global change, disturbance regime shifts and the implications of fire-vegetation feedbacks in the dynamics of such biomes are still poorly characterized. We developed a minimal modeling framework incorporating key aspects of fire ecology and successional processes to evaluate the relative influence of extrinsic and intrinsic factors on disturbance and vegetation dynamics in systems composed of grassland, shrubland, and woodland mosaics, which characterize many MTEs. In this theoretical investigation, we performed extensive simulations representing different background rates of vegetation succession and disturbance regime (fire frequency and severity) processes that reflect a broad range of MTE environmental conditions. Varying fire-vegetation feedbacks can lead to different critical points in underlying processes of disturbance and sudden shifts in the vegetation state of grassland–shrubland–woodland systems, despite gradual changes in ecosystem drivers as defined by the environment. Vegetation flammability and disturbance stochasticity effectively modify system behavior, determining its heterogeneity and the existence of alternative stable states in MTEs. Small variations in system flammability and fire recurrence induced by climate or vegetation changes may trigger sudden shifts in the state of such ecosystems. The existence of threshold dynamics, alternative stable states, and contrasting system responses to environmental change has broad implications for MTE management. (letter)

  1. Simulating boreal forest carbon dynamics after stand-replacing fire disturbance: insights from a global process-based vegetation model

    Yue, C.; Ciais, P.; Luyssaert, S.; Cadule, P.; Harden, J.; Randerson, J.; Bellassen, V.; Wang, T.; Piao, S.L.; Poulter, B.; Viovy, N.

    2013-01-01

    results demonstrate that a global vegetation model such as ORCHIDEE is able to capture the essential ecosystem processes in fire-disturbed boreal forests and produces satisfactory results in terms of both carbon fluxes and carbon-stock evolution after fire. This makes the model suitable for regional simulations in boreal regions where fire regimes play a key role in the ecosystem carbon balance.

  2. Growth and Nutrient Status of Foliage as Affected by Tree Species and Fertilization in a Fire-Disturbed Urban Forest

    Choonsig Kim; Jaeyeob Jeong; Jae-Hyun Park; Ho-Seop Ma

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the growth and macronutrient (C, N, P, K) status in the foliage of four tree species (LT: Liriodendron tulipifera L.; PY: Prunus yedoensis Matsumura; QA: Quercus acutissima Carruth; PT: Pinus thunbergii Parl.) in response to fertilization with different nutrient ratios in a fire-disturbed urban forest located in BongDaesan (Mt.), Korea. Two fertilizers (N3P8K1 = 113:300:37 kg·ha−1·year−1; N6P4K1 = 226:150:37 ha−1·year−1) in four planting sites we...

  3. Disturbance and the carbon balance of US forests: A quantitative review of impacts from harvests, fires, insects, and droughts

    Williams, Christopher A.; Gu, Huan; MacLean, Richard; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Collatz, G. James

    2016-08-01

    Disturbances are a major determinant of forest carbon stocks and uptake. They generally reduce land carbon stocks but also initiate a regrowth legacy that contributes substantially to the contemporary rate of carbon stock increase in US forestlands. As managers and policy makers increasingly look to forests for climate protection and mitigation, and because of increasing concern about changes in disturbance intensity and frequency, there is a need for synthesis and integration of current understanding about the role of disturbances and other processes in governing forest carbon cycle dynamics, and the likely future of this and other sinks for atmospheric carbon. This paper aims to address that need by providing a quantitative review of the distribution, extent and carbon impacts of the major disturbances active in the US. We also review recent trends in disturbances, climate, and other global environmental changes and consider their individual and collective contributions to the US carbon budget now and in the likely future. Lastly, we identify some key challenges and opportunities for future research needed to improve current understanding, advance predictive capabilities, and inform forest management in the face of these pressures. Harvest is found to be the most extensive disturbance both in terms of area and carbon impacts, followed by fire, windthrow and bark beetles, and lastly droughts. Collectively these lead to the gross loss of about 200 Tg C y- 1 in live biomass annually across the conterminous US. At the same time, the net change in forest carbon stocks is positive (190 Tg C y- 1), indicating not only forest resilience but also an apparently large response to growth enhancements such as fertilization by CO2 and nitrogen. Uncertainty about disturbance legacies, disturbance interactions, likely trends, and global change factors make the future of the US forest carbon sink unclear. While there is scope for management to enhance carbon sinks in US forests

  4. Assessing the length of the post-disturbance recovery period for woodland caribou habitat after fire and logging in west-central Manitoba

    Juha M. Metsaranta

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the habitat characteristics of areas used by woodland caribou and areas disturbed by fire or logging in the Naosap caribou range in west-central Manitoba. The population inhabiting this area is currently considered to be of high conservation concern. The purpose was to determine how long after disturbance forests again resembled caribou habitat and whether there were differences in the recovery period between fire disturbed and logged areas. Sample transects were located in areas used by caribou and areas disturbed by fire or logging. Previously, it was shown that variables positively associated with habitat suitability in this region were species composition (presence of black spruce, an index of arboreal lichen abundance and tree size, while variables negatively associated with habitat suitability were deadfall abundance and species composition (presence of trembling aspen. It was hypothesized that if disturbed sites had become suitable caribou habitat, then they should be statistically indistinguishable from sites used by caribou based on these variables. Using cluster analysis, it was found that 2 statistical clusters showed the highest level of agreement with sampling clusters, with 88% of plots used by caribou classified into one cluster, and 74% of disturbed plots classified into the other. Although a small proportion (12% of disturbed plots resembled used plots, 30 years (the age of the oldest disturbed plot was not enough time, in general, for forest to return to conditions resembling caribou habitat in this region.

  5. Growth and Nutrient Status of Foliage as Affected by Tree Species and Fertilization in a Fire-Disturbed Urban Forest

    Choonsig Kim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the growth and macronutrient (C, N, P, K status in the foliage of four tree species (LT: Liriodendron tulipifera L.; PY: Prunus yedoensis Matsumura; QA: Quercus acutissima Carruth; PT: Pinus thunbergii Parl. in response to fertilization with different nutrient ratios in a fire-disturbed urban forest located in BongDaesan (Mt., Korea. Two fertilizers (N3P8K1 = 113:300:37 kg·ha−1·year−1; N6P4K1 = 226:150:37 ha−1·year−1 in four planting sites were applied in April 2013 and March 2014. The growth and nutrient responses of the foliage were monitored six times for two years. Foliar growth and nutrient concentrations were not significantly different (p > 0.05 in response to different doses of N or P fertilizer, but the foliage showed increased N and P concentrations and content after fertilization compared with the control (N0P0K0. Foliar C and K concentrations were little affected by fertilization. Foliar nutrient concentrations and contents were significantly higher in PY and LT than in PT. The results suggest that the foliar N and P concentration could be used as a parameter to assess the nutrient environments of tree species restored in a fire-disturbed urban forest.

  6. The role of historical fire disturbance in the carbon dynamics of the pan-boreal region: A process-based analysis

    Balshi, M. S.; McGuire, A.D.; Zhuang, Q.; Melillo, J.; Kicklighter, D.W.; Kasischke, E.; Wirth, C.; Flannigan, M.; Harden, J.; Clein, J.S.; Burnside, T.J.; McAllister, J.; Kurz, W.A.; Apps, M.; Shvidenko, A.

    2007-01-01

    Wildfire is a common occurrence in ecosystems of northern high latitudes, and changes in the fire regime of this region have consequences for carbon feedbacks to the climate system. To improve our understanding of how wildfire influences carbon dynamics of this region, we used the process-based Terrestrial Ecosystem Model to simulate fire emissions and changes in carbon storage north of 45??N from the start of spatially explicit historically recorded fire records in the twentieth century through 2002, and evaluated the role of fire in the carbon dynamics of the region within the context of ecosystem responses to changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration and climate. Our analysis indicates that fire plays an important role in interannual and decadal scale variation of source/sink relationships of northern terrestrial ecosystems and also suggests that atmospheric CO2 may be important to consider in addition to changes in climate and fire disturbance. There are substantial uncertainties in the effects of fire on carbon storage in our simulations. These uncertainties are associated with sparse fire data for northern Eurasia, uncertainty in estimating carbon consumption, and difficulty in verifying assumptions about the representation of fires that occurred prior to the start of the historical fire record. To improve the ability to better predict how fire will influence carbon storage of this region in the future, new analyses of the retrospective role of fire in the carbon dynamics of northern high latitudes should address these uncertainties. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Disturbances (fire and grazing by reindeer) and soil methane fluxes -- case studies from the subarctic boreal forest of Finish Lapland.

    Köster, Kajar; Köster, Egle; Berninger, Frank; Pumpanen, Jukka

    2016-04-01

    In aerobic, well-drained environments such as boreal upland forest soils, methane (CH4) is oxidized by microbes, resulting into the soils acting as a sink of atmospheric CH4. The emission of CH4 is controlled primarily by soil moisture and temperature, but also by the availability of organic carbon. Forest fires are one of the predominant natural disturbances in subarctic boreal forests that strongly influence soil moisture and soil temperature values and carbon dynamics of the soils. At the same time also the effect of reindeer (Rangifer tarandus L.) grazing on soil moisture and temperature regimes in the lichen-dominated Arctic ecosystems has been found to be considerable. By removing the lichen carpet and damaging the secondary vegetation mat, reindeer make patches of bare soil common, and these factors in combination with trampling allow for soil to warm up faster, reach higher temperatures, and reduce the soil moisture content. We studied the effect of reindeer grazing and forest fire on fluxes of CH4 in northern boreal subarctic Scots pine forest stands. The study areas are in eastern Lapland, Värriö Strict Nature Reserve, Finland (67° 46' N, 29° 35' E). The sites are situated north of the Arctic Circle, near to the northern timberline at an average of 300 m altitude. For studing the effect of fire we have established sample areas (with three replicate plots in each) in a chronosequence of 4 age classes (2 to 152 years since the last fire). The fire chronosequence consisted of four types of areas with different time since the last forest fire: i) 5 years, ii) 45 years, iii) 70 years and iv) 155 years after fire. For studing the effect of reindeer grazing (comparison of grazed and non-grazed areas) we have established the study areas (10 sample plots in total established in year 2013) along the borderline between Finland and Russia. The ungrazed area was excluded from the reindeer grazing already in 1918, to prevent the Finnish reindeer from going to the

  8. Disturbing forest disturbances

    Volney, W.J.A.; Hirsch, K.G. [Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Northern Forestry Centre, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2005-10-01

    This paper described the role that disturbances play in maintaining the ecological integrity of Canadian boreal forests. Potential adaptation options to address the challenges that these disturbances present were also examined. Many forest ecosystems need fire for regeneration, while other forests rely on a cool, wet disintegration process driven by insects and commensal fungi feeding on trees to effect renewal. While there are characteristic natural, temporal and spatial patterns to these disturbances, recent work has demonstrated that the disturbances are being perturbed by climatic change that has been compounded by anthropogenic disturbances in forests. Fire influences species composition and age structure, regulates forest insects and diseases, affects nutrient cycling and energy fluxes, and maintains the productivity of different habitats. Longer fire seasons as a result of climatic change will lead to higher intensity fires that may more easily evade initial attacks and become problematic. Fire regimes elevated beyond the range of natural variation will have a dramatic effect on the regional distribution and functioning of forest ecosystems and pose a threat to the safety and prosperity of people. While it was acknowledged that if insect outbreaks were to be controlled on the entire forest estate, the productivity represented by dead wood would be lost, it was suggested that insects such as the forest tent caterpillar and the spruce bud worm may also pose a greater threat as the climate gets warmer and drier. Together with fungal associates, saproxylic arthropods are active in nutrient cycling and ultimately determine the fertility of forest sites. It was suggested that the production of an age class structure and forest mosaic would render the forest landscape less vulnerable to the more negative aspects of climate change on vegetation response. It was concluded that novel management design paradigms are needed to successfully reduce the risk from threats

  9. Vegetation characteristics of forest stands used by woodland caribou and those disturbed by fire or logging in Manitoba

    Juha M. Metsaranta

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examined woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou in an area known as the Kississing-Naosap caribou range in west central Manitoba. The vegetation characteristics of areas used by caribou and areas disturbed by fire or logging were measured in order to develop a model to estimate habitat quality from parameters collected during stan¬dard resource inventories. There was evidence that habitat index values calculated using a visual score-sheet index could be used as the basis to relate parameters commonly collected during resource inventories to habitat suitability. Use of this model to select long and short-term leave areas during forest management planning could potentially mitigate some of the negative impacts of forest harvesting. Abundance of arboreal lichen and wind-fallen trees were important predictor variables in the suitability model, but their inclusion did not explain more variance in habitat suitability than models that did not include them. Extreme post-fire deadfall abundance may play a role in predator-prey dynamics by creating habitat that is equally unsuitable for all ungulates, and thus keeping both moose and caribou densities low.

  10. Interaction among climate change, fire disturbance and ecosystem carbon cycle%气候变化、火干扰与生态系统碳循环

    胡海清; 魏书精; 孙龙; 王明玉

    2013-01-01

    随着全球变暖的日益显著,气候变化及其影响越来越受到广泛关注.火干扰作为森林生态系统碳循环的一个重要组成部分,其干扰过程是对碳的再分配过程,因而对区域乃至全球的碳循环产生重要影响.气候变化、火干扰与生态系统碳循环三者之间存在因果循环关系,正确认识气候变化与火干扰的复杂关系及双向反馈作用,以及火干扰在生态系统碳循环中的作用,这对制定科学合理的火干扰管理策略,提高生态系统管理水平,减少碳排放,促进碳增汇,减缓全球变化速率均有重要意义.从两个方面阐述了气候变化、火干扰与生态系统碳循环之间的交互作用关系:气候变化与火干扰相互影响关系及双向反馈作用,分别从气候变化对火干扰的影响及火干扰对气候变化的影响两个方面阐述了两者之间的相互影响关系;火干扰与森林生态系统碳循环的交互作用,分别从火干扰对森林生态系统碳循环的影响及模型方法在模拟火干扰对森林生态系统碳循环影响中的应用两个方面论述火干扰对森林生态系统碳循环的影响及其定量评价模型方法.目前火干扰直接碳排放的模型方法比较完善,而间接影响碳循环的模型方法并不成熟,许多方法局限于定性描述,因此,应进一步探讨集成实地测量、遥感观测和模型模拟的跨尺度火干扰对碳循环的影响研究,注重尺度的转换问题.最后,提出了气候变暖背景下火干扰管理的路径选择,以及对今后的研究方向进行了展望.%Climate change have been drawn wide attention by the government, academic field and the public. Meanwhile , those issues have a significant effect on fire disturbance and forest ecosystem carbon cycle. Climate wanning is one key issue of global change and plays an important role on carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Carbon storage of forest ecosystem is a basic

  11. On the characterization of vegetation recovery after fire disturbance using Fisher-Shannon analysis and SPOT/VEGETATION Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) time series

    Lasaponara, Rosa; Lanorte, Antonio; Lovallo, Michele; Telesca, Luciano

    2015-04-01

    Time series can fruitfully support fire monitoring and management from statistical analysis of fire occurrence (Tuia et al. 2008) to danger estimation (lasaponara 2005), damage evaluation (Lanorte et al 2014) and post fire recovery (Lanorte et al. 2014). In this paper, the time dynamics of SPOT-VEGETATION Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) time series are analyzed by using the statistical approach of the Fisher-Shannon (FS) information plane to assess and monitor vegetation recovery after fire disturbance. Fisher-Shannon information plane analysis allows us to gain insight into the complex structure of a time series to quantify its degree of organization and order. The analysis was carried out using 10-day Maximum Value Composites of NDVI (MVC-NDVI) with a 1 km × 1 km spatial resolution. The investigation was performed on two test sites located in Galizia (North Spain) and Peloponnese (South Greece), selected for the vast fires which occurred during the summer of 2006 and 2007 and for their different vegetation covers made up mainly of low shrubland in Galizia test site and evergreen forest in Peloponnese. Time series of MVC-NDVI have been analyzed before and after the occurrence of the fire events. Results obtained for both the investigated areas clearly pointed out that the dynamics of the pixel time series before the occurrence of the fire is characterized by a larger degree of disorder and uncertainty; while the pixel time series after the occurrence of the fire are featured by a higher degree of organization and order. In particular, regarding the Peloponneso fire, such discrimination is more evident than in the Galizia fire. This suggests a clear possibility to discriminate the different post-fire behaviors and dynamics exhibited by the different vegetation covers. Reference Lanorte A, R Lasaponara, M Lovallo, L Telesca 2014 Fisher-Shannon information plane analysis of SPOT/VEGETATION Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) time series to

  12. Fires

    Whether a fire happens in your home or in the wild, it can be very dangerous. Fire spreads quickly. There is no time to gather ... a phone call. In just two minutes, a fire can become life-threatening. In five minutes, a ...

  13. The effect of fire disturbance on short-term soil respiration in typical forest of Greater Xing’an Range, China

    Long Sun; Tongxin Hu; Ji Hong Kim; Futao Guo; Hong Song; Xinshuang Lv; Haiqing Hu

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of fire disturbance on short-term soil respiration in birch (Betula platyphylla Suk.) and larch (Larix gmelinii Rupr.) forests in Greater Xing’an range, northeastern China for further understanding of its effect on the carbon cycle in ecosystems. Our study show that post-fire soil respiration rates in B. platyphylla and L. gmelinii forests were reduced by 14%and 10%, respectively. In contrast, the soil heterotrophic respiration rates in the two types of forest were similar in post-fire and control plots. After fire, the contribution of root respiration to total soil respiration was dramatically reduced. Variation in soil respiration rates was explained by soil moisture (W) and soil tem-perature (T) at a depth of 5 cm. Exponential regression fitted T and W models explained Rs rates in B. platyphylla control and post-fire plots (83.1% and 86.2%) and L. gmelinii control and post-fire plots (83.7%and 88.7%). In addition, the short-term temperature coefficients in B.

  14. Stability, Bistability, and Critical Thresholds in Fire-prone Forested Landscapes: How Frequency and Intensity of Disturbance Interact and Influence Forest Cover

    Miller, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Many aspects of disturbance processes can have large impacts on the composition of plant communities, and associated changes in land cover type in turn have biogeochemical feedbacks to climate. In particular, changes to disturbance regimes can potentially change the number and stability of equilibrial states, and plant community states can differ dramatically in their carbon (C) dynamics, energy balance, and hydrology. Using the Klamath region of northern California as a model system, we present a theoretical analysis of how changes to climate and associated fire dynamics can disrupt high-carbon, long-lived conifer forests and replace them with shrub-chaparral communities that have much lower biomass and are more pyrogenic. Specifically, we develop a tractable model of plant community dynamics, structured by size class, life-history traits, lottery-type competition, and species-specific responses to disturbance. We assess the stability of different states in terms of disturbance frequency and intensity, and quantitatively partition long-term low-density population growth rates into mechanisms that influence critical transitions from stable to bistable behavior. Our findings show how different aspects of disturbance act and interact to control competitive outcomes and stable states, hence ecosystem-atmosphere C exchange. Forests tend to dominate in low frequency and intensity regimes, while shrubs dominate at high fire frequency and intensity. In other regimes, the system is bistable, and the fate of the system depends both on initial conditions and random chance. Importantly, the system can cross a critical threshold where hysteresis prevents easy return to the prior forested state. We conclude that changes in disturbance-recovery dynamics driven by projected climate change can shift this system away from forest dominated in the direction of shrub-dominated landscape. This will result in a large net C release from the landscape, and alter biophysical ecosystem

  15. Fire and Ecological Disturbance

    Dentzau, Michael; Sampson, Victor

    2011-01-01

    Misconceptions are not simply factual errors or a lack of understanding, but rather explanations that are constructed based on past experiences (Hewson and Hewson 1988). If students' misconceptions are not directly engaged in the learning process, they may persist--even when faced with instruction to the contrary (Bransford, Brown, and Cocking…

  16. Multiple Site Evaluation of a Dynamic Organic Soil Model for Analyzing Carbon Responses of Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change and Fire Disturbance in Interior Alaska

    Yuan, F.; Yi, S.; McGuire, D.; Johnson, K. D.; Liang, J.; Kasischke, E.; Harden, J. W.

    2009-12-01

    Regional scale analysis of ecosystem carbon (C) dynamics requires extensive evaluation of ecosystem models to reliably predict C responses to climate change and disturbance. This study presents a multiple site evaluation of the dynamic organic soil version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (DOS-TEM) for the linkages among plant growth and organic soil C dynamics in taiga of four terrestrial vegetation types (black spruce, white spruce, broad-leaved deciduous forest, and upland tundra) in the Interior Alaska. We assembled vegetation biomass and soil C data from the literature and from forest inventory and soil surveys in the study region. Vegetation types in both well-drained and poorly-drained landscape positions were considered separately because of their contrasting growth and soil C storage characteristics. These data were first used to calibrate the model, and then the model dynamics were evaluated using available forest inventory and soil survey data (e.g. organic horizon data) to assess the ability of the model to capture the effects of climate variability and fire disturbance on C dynamics across the region. Our model development and integrative evaluation of simulated C dynamics provides a sound foundation for the application of DOS-TEM to analyze the response of C in the region to projected changes in climate and fire disturbance.

  17. The study of soils and vegetation transformation due fire disturbances in remote areas through scenario modelling of observed hydrological response to fire impact

    Nesterova, Natalia; Semenova, Olga; Lebedeva, Luidmila

    2015-04-01

    Large territories of Siberia and Russian Far East are the subject to frequent forest fires. Often there is no information available about fire impact except its timing, areal distribution and qualitative characteristics of fire severity. Observed changes of hydrological response in burnt watersheds can be considered as indirect evidence of soil and vegetation transformation due to fire impact. In our study we used MODIS Fire products to detect spatial distribution of fires in Transbaikal and Far East regions of Russia in 2000 - 2012 period. Small and middle-size watersheds (with area up to 10000 km2) affected by extensive (burn area not less than 20 %) fires were chosen. We analyzed available hydrological data (measured discharges in watersheds outlets) for chosen basins. In several cases apparent hydrological response to fire was detected. To investigate main factors causing the change of hydrologic regime after fire several scenarios of soil and vegetation transformation were developed for each watershed under consideration. Corresponding sets of hydrological model parameters describing those transformations were elaborated based on data analysis and post-fire landscape changes as derived from a literature review. We implied different factors such as removal of organic layer, albedo changes, intensification of soil thaw (in presence of permafrost and seasonal soil freezing), reduction of infiltration rate and evapotranspiration, increase of upper subsurface flow fraction in summer flood events following the fire and others. We applied Hydrograph model (Russia) to conduct simulation experiments aiming to reveal which landscape changes scenarios were more plausible. The advantages of chosen hydrological model for this study are 1) that it takes into consideration thermal processes in soils which in case of permafrost and seasonal soil freezing presence can play leading role in runoff formation and 2) that observable vegetation and soil properties are used as its

  18. Fire disturbance, forest structure, and stand dynamics in montane forests of the southern Cascades, Thousand Lakes Wilderness, California, USA

    Bekker, Matthew F.; Alan H Taylor

    2010-01-01

    We examined tree diameter, age structure, and successional trends in 100 montane forest plots to identify the effects of variation in the return interval, severity, and extent of fires on forest structure and dynamics in the southern Cascade Range, California. We classified 100 forest plots into 8 groups based on stand structural characteristics. Median point fire return intervals were shortest in lower montane mixed conifer and Jeffrey pine–white fir stands (13-25 y) and upper montane red fi...

  19. 火干扰对森林水文的影响%Effects of fire disturbance on forest hydrology

    姚树仁

    2003-01-01

    Fire is quite a common natural phenomenon closely related to forest hydrology in forest ecosystem. The influence of fire on water is indirectly manifested in that the post fire changes of vegetation, ground cover, soil and environment affect water cycle, water quality and aquatic lives. The effect varies depending upon fire severity and frequency. Light wildland fires or prescribed burnings do not affect hydrology regime significantly but frequent burnings or intense fires can cause changes in hydrology regime similar to that caused clear cutting.%火是森林生态系统中与森林水文密切相关的常见自然现象.火对水分的影响间接地表现在火后植被,地被物、土壤和环境的变化会影响水分循环、水质和水生生物.这种影响程度取决于火灾严重程度和火发生频率.低强度的野火对森林水文没有明显的影响,但频频火烧或高强度火可以造成类似皆伐的水文变化.本文综述了火干扰对水分循环、流体和沉积、下游水质及水生物的影响.参37.

  20. The influence of fire disturbance on the biotype structure and seasonal dynamics of ground-dwelling spider on Cangshan Mountain, Yunnan Province

    Yanyan Ma

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to demonstrate the influence of fire disturbance on the function, structure and seasonal dynamics of ground-dwelling spider assemblages, we chose a burned site and an unburned control site. Both study sites were in broadleaf-conifer mixed forest on Cangshan Mountain, Yunnan Province. The results showed that (1 Zelotes zhui (relative dominance value (DV' =33.03, Pardosa chionophila (DV'=22.53 and Sibianor sp. 1 (DV'=8.75 were obviously dominant at the burned site and that Draconarius sp. 2 (DV'=63.50 was absolutely dominant at the control site; (2 At the burned site, the relative abundance of web-builders was significantly lower than that of hunters (P<0.001, whereas the relative abundance of web-builders was significantly higher than that of hunters at the control site; and (3 As season changed, the dominant group fluctuated significantly at the burned, with the lowest abundance during the part of the summer with the maximum rainfall and during the coldest winter; the spider assemblages were stable at the control site, with agelenids consistently the dominant group. These results indicated that fire disturbance changes the community function and structure of ground-dwelling spiders in mixed broadleaf-conifer forest in Cangshan Mountain, increases the relative abundance of hunters and reduces the stability of ground-dwelling spider assemblages.

  1. Evaluating an Automated Approach for Monitoring Forest Disturbances in the Pacific Northwest from Logging, Fire and Insect Outbreaks with Landsat Time Series Data

    Christopher S. R. Neigh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Forests are the largest aboveground sink for atmospheric carbon (C, and understanding how they change through time is critical to reduce our C-cycle uncertainties. We investigated a strong decline in Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI from 1982 to 1991 in Pacific Northwest forests, observed with the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA series of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRRs. To understand the causal factors of this decline, we evaluated an automated classification method developed for Landsat time series stacks (LTSS to map forest change. This method included: (1 multiple disturbance index thresholds; and (2 a spectral trajectory-based image analysis with multiple confidence thresholds. We produced 48 maps and verified their accuracy with air photos, monitoring trends in burn severity data and insect aerial detection survey data. Area-based accuracy estimates for change in forest cover resulted in producer’s and user’s accuracies of 0.21 ± 0.06 to 0.38 ± 0.05 for insect disturbance, 0.23 ± 0.07 to 1 ± 0 for burned area and 0.74 ± 0.03 to 0.76 ± 0.03 for logging. We believe that accuracy was low for insect disturbance because air photo reference data were temporally sparse, hence missing some outbreaks, and the annual anniversary time step is not dense enough to track defoliation and progressive stand mortality. Producer’s and user’s accuracy for burned area was low due to the temporally abrupt nature of fire and harvest with a similar response of spectral indices between the disturbance index and normalized burn ratio. We conclude that the spectral trajectory approach also captures multi-year stress that could be caused by climate, acid deposition, pathogens, partial harvest, thinning, etc. Our study focused on understanding the transferability of previously successful methods to new ecosystems and found that this automated method does not perform with the same accuracy in Pacific

  2. Evaluating an Automated Approach for Monitoring Forest Disturbances in the Pacific Northwest from Logging, Fire and Insect Outbreaks with Landsat Time Series Data

    R.Neigh, Christopher S.; Bolton, Douglas K.; Williams, Jennifer J.; Diabate, Mouhamad

    2014-01-01

    Forests are the largest aboveground sink for atmospheric carbon (C), and understanding how they change through time is critical to reduce our C-cycle uncertainties. We investigated a strong decline in Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) from 1982 to 1991 in Pacific Northwest forests, observed with the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) series of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRRs). To understand the causal factors of this decline, we evaluated an automated classification method developed for Landsat time series stacks (LTSS) to map forest change. This method included: (1) multiple disturbance index thresholds; and (2) a spectral trajectory-based image analysis with multiple confidence thresholds. We produced 48 maps and verified their accuracy with air photos, monitoring trends in burn severity data and insect aerial detection survey data. Area-based accuracy estimates for change in forest cover resulted in producer's and user's accuracies of 0.21 +/- 0.06 to 0.38 +/- 0.05 for insect disturbance, 0.23 +/- 0.07 to 1 +/- 0 for burned area and 0.74 +/- 0.03 to 0.76 +/- 0.03 for logging. We believe that accuracy was low for insect disturbance because air photo reference data were temporally sparse, hence missing some outbreaks, and the annual anniversary time step is not dense enough to track defoliation and progressive stand mortality. Producer's and user's accuracy for burned area was low due to the temporally abrupt nature of fire and harvest with a similar response of spectral indices between the disturbance index and normalized burn ratio. We conclude that the spectral trajectory approach also captures multi-year stress that could be caused by climate, acid deposition, pathogens, partial harvest, thinning, etc. Our study focused on understanding the transferability of previously successful methods to new ecosystems and found that this automated method does not perform with the same accuracy in Pacific Northwest forests

  3. Exploring the sensitivity of soil carbon dynamics to climate change, fire disturbance and permafrost thaw in a black spruce ecosystem

    O'Donnell, J. A.; Harden, J.W.; McGuire, A.D.; Romanovsky, V.E.

    2011-01-01

    In the boreal region, soil organic carbon (OC) dynamics are strongly governed by the interaction between wildfire and permafrost. Using a combination of field measurements, numerical modeling of soil thermal dynamics, and mass-balance modeling of OC dynamics, we tested the sensitivity of soil OC storage to a suite of individual climate factors (air temperature, soil moisture, and snow depth) and fire severity. We also conducted sensitivity analyses to explore the combined effects of fire-soil moisture interactions and snow seasonality on OC storage. OC losses were calculated as the difference in OC stocks after three fire cycles (???500 yr) following a prescribed step-change in climate and/or fire. Across single-factor scenarios, our findings indicate that warmer air temperatures resulted in the largest relative soil OC losses (???5.3 kg C mg-2), whereas dry soil conditions alone (in the absence of wildfire) resulted in the smallest carbon losses (???0.1 kg C mg-2). Increased fire severity resulted in carbon loss of ???3.3 kg C mg-2, whereas changes in snow depth resulted in smaller OC losses (2.1-2.2 kg C mg-2). Across multiple climate factors, we observed larger OC losses than for single-factor scenarios. For instance, high fire severity regime associated with warmer and drier conditions resulted in OC losses of ???6.1 kg C mg-2, whereas a low fire severity regime associated with warmer and wetter conditions resulted in OC losses of ???5.6 kg C mg-2. A longer snow-free season associated with future warming resulted in OC losses of ???5.4 kg C mg-2. Soil climate was the dominant control on soil OC loss, governing the sensitivity of microbial decomposers to fluctuations in temperature and soil moisture; this control, in turn, is governed by interannual changes in active layer depth. Transitional responses of the active layer depth to fire regimes also contributed to OC losses, primarily by determining the proportion of OC into frozen and unfrozen soil layers

  4. Proceedings of the workshop on effects of climate change on major forest disturbances (fire, insects) and their impact on biomass production in Canada : synthesis of the current state of knowledge

    Canada's forest dynamics are shaped by natural disturbances such as fire and insect outbreaks. The central focus of this workshop was climate change, which is likely to influence these disturbance agents and have an impact on biomass productivity. Forest biomass is Canada's second largest source of renewable energy and a major carbon pool in the global carbon budge. The presentations highlighted current research efforts on the effects of climate change, with particular focus on landscape-level disturbances and issues concerning biomass dynamics, such as the carbon cycle, managed forests and boreal forest vulnerability. Some of the major forest disturbances include insects, fires and root diseases. The workshop featured 9 presentations, of which 7 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  5. Disturbances on a wooded raised bog - How windthrow, bark beetle and fire affect vegetation and soil water quality?

    Kučerová, Andrea; Rektoris, L.; Štechová, T.; Bastl, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 1 (2008), s. 49-67. ISSN 1211-9520 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK6005114 Grant ostatní: GA MŽP(CZ) SE/610/10/00 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : Czech Republic * Groundwater chemistry * Post- fire succession Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.964, year: 2008

  6. Understanding the role of wildland fire, insects, and disease in predicting climate change effects on whitebark pine: Simulating vegetation, disturbance, and climate dynamics in a northern Rocky Mountain landscape

    Keane, R. E.; Loehman, R.

    2010-12-01

    Climate changes are projected to profoundly influence vegetation patterns and community compositions, either directly through increased species mortality and shifts in species distributions, or indirectly through disturbance dynamics such as increased wildfire activity and extent, shifting fire regimes, and pathogenesis. High-elevation landscapes have been shown to be particularly sensitive to climatic change, and are likely to experience significant impacts under predicted future climate change conditions. Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis), a high-elevation five-needle pine species that is important for snowpack retention, resource provision, and other ecosystem services in alpine environments in the northern Rocky Mountains, is particularly sensitive to an interacting complex of disturbances - climatic change, altered fire regimes, white-pine blister rust, and mountain pine beetles - that have already caused major changes in species distribution and density. Further changes in abiotic and biotic conditions will likely pose additional threats to the success of this keystone alpine tree species. We used the mechanistic simulation model Fire-BGCv2 to assess potential interacting effects of climate changes, pathogens, and wildfire on the distribution and density of whitebark pine in a high-elevation watershed in Glacier National Park, Montana, USA. The FireBGCv2 modeling platform is uniquely structured to address questions of future species distribution in response to interacting disturbance agents; further, we integrated a range of potential future climate conditions derived from downscaled Global Circulation Models to examine multiple potential future climatic contexts. Our results show that the distribution of whitebark pine is severely reduced under potential future climates, and that increased fire frequency and severity resulting from warmer, drier conditions further reduces the presence of the species on the simulation landscape. Simulation model results

  7. Satellite Remote Sensing of Landscape Freeze/Thaw State Dynamics for Complex Topography and Fire Disturbance Areas Using Multi-Sensor Radar and SRTM Digital Elevation Models

    Podest, E.; McDonald, K.; Kimball, J.; Randerson, J. T.

    2003-12-01

    The annual freeze/thaw cycle drives the length of the growing season in the boreal forest, and is a major factor determining annual productivity and associated exchange of CO2 with the atmosphere. Variations in freeze/thaw processes are spatially and temporally complex in boreal environments, particularly in areas of complex topography and in fire disturbance regimes. We investigate the spatial and temporal characteristics of seasonal freeze/thaw dynamics in complex boreal landscapes, as derived from radar backscatter measured with ERS (C-band, VV polarization, 200m resolution) and JERS-1 (L-band, HH polarization, 100m resolution) Synthetic Aperture Radars (SARs), and with the SeaWinds scatterometer (Ku-band, 25km resolution). C- and L-band backscatter are applied to characterize freeze/thaw transitions for a chronosequence of recovering burn sites near Delta Junction, Alaska, and for a region of complex topography on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska. We characterize differences in radar-derived freeze/thaw state, examining transitions over complex terrain and landscape disturbance regimes. In areas of complex terrain, we explore freeze/thaw dynamics related to elevation, slope aspect and varying landcover. In the burned regions, we explore the timing of seasonal freeze/thaw transition as related to the recovering landscape, relative to that of a nearby control site. We apply in situ biophysical measurements, including flux tower measurements to validate and interpret the remotely sensed parameters. A multi-scale analysis is performed relating high-resolution SAR backscatter and moderate resolution scatterometer measurements to assess trade-offs in spatial and temporal resolution in the remotely sensed fields. A temporal change discriminator is applied to classify time series radar imagery to classify the landscape freeze-thaw state. We apply a 30m-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) derived from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data to orthorectify the time

  8. 林火干扰对土壤理化性质的影响%Effect of Forest Fire Disturbance on Soil Physical and Chemical Properties

    韩钊龙; 胡慧蓉; 黄铄淇

    2014-01-01

    With field researching and laboratory determinating,analyzing the effect of forest fire disturbance on Soil physical and chemical properties of Pinus armandii and Cupressus plantation,in Yunnan Forest Nature Center on the outskrits of Kunming.After forest fire,soil density of Pinus armandii has increased by 11.48%,while soil non-capillary porosity,saturation moisture capacity,capillary water holding capacity,total soil porosity,and capillary porosity in soil have decreased by 32.38%,16.21%,18.71%,9.94%,22.44%,respectively.In Cupressus plantation,after forest fire,soil density has increased by 10.38%,while soil non-capillary porosity,saturation moisture capacity,capillary water holding capacity,total soil porosity,and capillary porosity in soil have decreased by 23.55%,10.77%,23.22%, 5.38%,12.91%,respectively.Moreover,compared to control,soil pH and available P in Pinus armandii have increased by 5.81%,130.25%,respectively,while soil organic materials,total N,total P,total K,hydrolysable N and rapidly available K have reduced by 53.30%,28.30%,22.60%,39.74%,25.32%,respectively.After forest fire,soil pH and available P have increased by 12.33%,176.34%,respectively.And the soil organic materials,total N,total P, total K,hydrolysable N and rapidly available K have reduced by 31.28%,31.25%,67.09%,40.66%,51.21%, respectively.Forest fire would result in soil hardening,decrease soil nutrient content,reduce improve soil fertility.%通过实地调查与实验室测定,分析林火干扰对昆明近郊云南省森林自然中心华山松和柏木人工林林地土壤理化性质的影响。结果表明,火烧后,华山松林下土壤密度比未过火区增加11.48%,土壤自然含水量、饱和持水量、毛管持水量、总孔隙度以及毛管孔隙度分别下降32.38%、16.21%、18.71%、9.94%、22.44%;柏木林地土壤密度比未过火区增加10.38%,自然含水量、饱和持水量、毛管持水量、总孔隙度以

  9. Effect of Forest Fire Disturbance on Soil Physical and Chemical Properties%林火干扰对土壤理化性质的影响

    韩钊龙; 胡慧蓉; 黄铄淇

    2014-01-01

    With field researching and laboratory determinating,analyzing the effect of forest fire disturbance on Soil physical and chemical properties of Pinus armandii and Cupressus plantation,in Yunnan Forest Nature Center on the outskrits of Kunming.After forest fire,soil density of Pinus armandii has increased by 11.48%,while soil non-capillary porosity,saturation moisture capacity,capillary water holding capacity,total soil porosity,and capillary porosity in soil have decreased by 32.38%,16.21%,18.71%,9.94%,22.44%,respectively.In Cupressus plantation,after forest fire,soil density has increased by 10.38%,while soil non-capillary porosity,saturation moisture capacity,capillary water holding capacity,total soil porosity,and capillary porosity in soil have decreased by 23.55%,10.77%,23.22%, 5.38%,12.91%,respectively.Moreover,compared to control,soil pH and available P in Pinus armandii have increased by 5.81%,130.25%,respectively,while soil organic materials,total N,total P,total K,hydrolysable N and rapidly available K have reduced by 53.30%,28.30%,22.60%,39.74%,25.32%,respectively.After forest fire,soil pH and available P have increased by 12.33%,176.34%,respectively.And the soil organic materials,total N,total P, total K,hydrolysable N and rapidly available K have reduced by 31.28%,31.25%,67.09%,40.66%,51.21%, respectively.Forest fire would result in soil hardening,decrease soil nutrient content,reduce improve soil fertility.%通过实地调查与实验室测定,分析林火干扰对昆明近郊云南省森林自然中心华山松和柏木人工林林地土壤理化性质的影响。结果表明,火烧后,华山松林下土壤密度比未过火区增加11.48%,土壤自然含水量、饱和持水量、毛管持水量、总孔隙度以及毛管孔隙度分别下降32.38%、16.21%、18.71%、9.94%、22.44%;柏木林地土壤密度比未过火区增加10.38%,自然含水量、饱和持水量、毛管持水量、总孔隙度以

  10. Disturbance Rejection

    2005-01-01

    This interactive tutorial reviews the disturbance rejection capabilities of different feedback control schemes. The interactions in this tutorial involve students analyzing 4 cases of step-like disturbance rejection. ME2801 Introduction to Engineering System Dynamics

  11. 宝天曼自然保护区林火干扰下不同恢复阶段栎林群落幼苗库动态特征%The Dynamic Characteristics of the Seedling Bank of Quercus Community at Different Restoration Stages under the Disturbance of Forest Fire in Baotianman Nature Reserve

    朱学灵; 崔向慧; 刘晓静

    2011-01-01

    recovery of the vegetation in the burned area, the amount of the wood species seedling increased and the shrub species seedling de-creased, but the Quercus spp. seedling always maintained prevalence at different stages; the density of the seedling bank under the forest became smaller as the restoration time prolonged, the density of the Quercus spp. seedling showed a high-low-high fluctuation. The density reached the highest amount of (9. 34 ±4. 71) plant/10 m2 1 year after fire; there were a significant differences between the seedling bank under the forest 1 year after fire and 10 years after fire, and between 15 years and the primeval forest, but no significant difference was found between 1 year after fire and 5 years after fire, and between 10 years after fire and the primeval forest. The density change of the Quercus spp. seedling showed a 2-stages process and there were a significant differences between 1 year after fire and 5 years after fire, and between 10 years and 15 years, but no significant difference was found between the seed-ling bank of Quercus spp. community at different restoration stages and the primeval forest; the Shannon-Wiener in-dex of the seedling bank showed a great difference at different restoration stages. The adjacent recovery stages shared more seedling species and the similarity index was higher. Comparing every 2 Quercus spp. communities at different restoration stages, they shared 4 to 17 species. With the succession time prolonged, the percentage of the wood seedlings increased gradually while the percentage of the root sprout seedling declined; 5 years after the restoration of the vegetation, no root sprout seedlings existed under the Quercus spp. forest, while the shrub seedlings under forest also disappeared in the community of 10 years after the recovery. It showed that the disturbance of forest fire had a significant influence on the distribution of the height of seedlings of Quercus spp. Ⅰ , Ⅱ and Ⅲ and the trans

  12. Adjacent segment disease.

    Virk, Sohrab S; Niedermeier, Steven; Yu, Elizabeth; Khan, Safdar N

    2014-08-01

    EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Understand the forces that predispose adjacent cervical segments to degeneration. 2. Understand the challenges of radiographic evaluation in the diagnosis of cervical and lumbar adjacent segment disease. 3. Describe the changes in biomechanical forces applied to adjacent segments of lumbar vertebrae with fusion. 4. Know the risk factors for adjacent segment disease in spinal fusion. Adjacent segment disease (ASD) is a broad term encompassing many complications of spinal fusion, including listhesis, instability, herniated nucleus pulposus, stenosis, hypertrophic facet arthritis, scoliosis, and vertebral compression fracture. The area of the cervical spine where most fusions occur (C3-C7) is adjacent to a highly mobile upper cervical region, and this contributes to the biomechanical stress put on the adjacent cervical segments postfusion. Studies have shown that after fusion surgery, there is increased load on adjacent segments. Definitive treatment of ASD is a topic of continuing research, but in general, treatment choices are dictated by patient age and degree of debilitation. Investigators have also studied the risk factors associated with spinal fusion that may predispose certain patients to ASD postfusion, and these data are invaluable for properly counseling patients considering spinal fusion surgery. Biomechanical studies have confirmed the added stress on adjacent segments in the cervical and lumbar spine. The diagnosis of cervical ASD is complicated given the imprecise correlation of radiographic and clinical findings. Although radiological and clinical diagnoses do not always correlate, radiographs and clinical examination dictate how a patient with prolonged pain is treated. Options for both cervical and lumbar spine ASD include fusion and/or decompression. Current studies are encouraging regarding the adoption of arthroplasty in spinal surgery, but more long

  13. Vegetation and climate change, fire-regime shifts and volcanic disturbance in Chiloé Continental (43°S) during the last 10,000 years

    Henríquez, W. I.; Moreno, P. I.; Alloway, B. V.; Villarosa, G.

    2015-09-01

    Disentangling the roles of paleofires and explosive volcanism from climatic drivers of past vegetation change is a subject insufficiently addressed in the paleoecological literature. The coastal region of the Chiloé Continental sector of northwestern Patagonia is ideal in this regard considering its proximity to active eruptive centers and the possibility of establishing comparisons with more distal, upwind sites where volcanic influence is minimal. Here we present a fine-resolution pollen and macroscopic charcoal record from Lago Teo with the aim of documenting the local vegetation and climate history, and assessing the role of disturbance regimes as drivers of vegetation change during the last ˜10,000 years. The Lago Teo record shows a conspicuous warm/dry interval between ˜7500 and 10,000 cal yrs BP followed by a cooling trend and increase in precipitation that has persisted until the present, in agreement with previous studies in the region and interpretations of past southern westerly wind activity at multi-millennial scales. The presence of 26 tephras throughout the record allows examination of the relationship between explosive volcanism and vegetation change under contrasting climatic states of the Holocene. We found consistent statistically significant increases in Tepualia stipularis after tephra deposition over the last 10,000 years, in Eucryphia/Caldcluvia between 7500 and 10,000 cal yrs BP and in Hydrangea over the last 7500 years. Our results indicate a primary role of climate change as driver of long-term vegetation change and as a modulator of vegetation responses to volcanic disturbance at multidecadal and centennial timescales.

  14. Fire and ventilation

    In order to restrict the consequences of the spread of a fire on adjacent premises and on the environment, the fire must not damage the ventilation system. This is why every endeavour must be made to confine the fire from the intake to the outlet of this system. The study of the confinement measures will cover in succession each component part of the system, namely: air intake, blower filter, premises, ducting and extraction filters. The spread of the fire and the effects on ventilation are then examined

  15. Dispersal by rodent caching increases seed survival in multiple ways in canopy-fire ecosystems.

    Peterson, N B; Parker, V T

    2016-07-01

    Seed-caching rodents have long been seen as important actors in dispersal ecology. Here, we focus on the interactions with plants in a fire-disturbance community, specifically Arctostaphylos species (Ericaceae) in California chaparral. Although mutualistic relationships between caching rodents and plants are well studied, little is known how this type of relationship functions in a disturbance-driven system, and more specifically to systems shaped by fire disturbance. By burying seeds in the soil, rodents inadvertently improve the probability of seed surviving high temperatures produced by fire. We test two aspects of vertical dispersal, depth of seed and multiple seeds in caches as two important dimensions of rodent-caching behavior. We used a laboratory experimental approach to test seed survival under different heating conditions and seed bank structures. Creating a synthetic soil seed bank and synthetic fire/heating in the laboratory allowed us to have control over surface heating, depth of seed in the soil, and seed cache size. We compared the viability of Arctostaphylos viscida seeds from different treatment groups determined by these factors and found that, as expected, seeds slightly deeper in the soil had substantial increased chances of survival during a heating event. A key result was that some seeds within a cache in shallow soil could survive fire even at a depth with a killing heat pulse compared to isolated seeds; temperature measurements indicated lower temperatures immediately below caches compared to the same depth in adjacent soil. These results suggest seed caching by rodents increases seed survival during fire events in two ways, that caches disrupt heat flow or that caches are buried below the heat pulse kill zone. The context of natural disturbance drives the significance of this mutualism and further expands theory regarding mutualisms into the domain of disturbance-driven systems. PMID:27386076

  16. Gordian adjacency for torus knots

    Feller, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A knot K is called Gordian adjacent to a knot L if there exists an unknotting sequence for L containing K. We provide a sufficient condition for Gordian adjacency of torus knots via the study of knots in the thickened torus. We also completely describe Gordian adjacency for torus knots of index 2 and 3 using Levine-Tristram signatures as obstructions to Gordian adjacency. Finally, Gordian adjacency for torus knots is compared to the notion of adjacency for plane curve singularities.

  17. Dynamics of greenhouse gases emission and its impact factors by fire disturbance from Alnus sibirica forested wetland in Xiaoxing'an Mountains, Northeast China%火干扰对小兴安岭毛赤杨沼泽温室气体排放动态影响及其影响因素

    顾韩; 牟长城; 张博文

    2012-01-01

    Wetlands are important sources and sinks of greenhouse gases. Fire disturbance plays an important role in wetland ecosystems, it commonly is a important carbon sink of the land ecosystems, the Lesser xing'an Mountains of China' s northeast is the frequent area of the fire disturbance as well as a major distribution area of China's wetlands. Fire-related disturbance in forests are more frequent in mid-to high latitudes than elsewhere. In the present study, Alnus sibirica wetland, were studied to reveal the emission variation of CH4, CO2, and N2O under fire disturbance during the growing season. The study area is located in the Lesser Xing' an Mountains. We used a static opaque chamber and gas chromatography methods, and we monitored related environmental factors. The results were as follows; disturbance by fire increased air and soil temperature by 2. 5-5.0℃ , and lowered the water table by an average of 0. 24-6. 36 cm. Burning increased CH4 emissions from Alnus sibirica wetlands by 485. 2. Burning decreased the CO2 and N2O emissions by 45. 5% and 24.8% respectively from Alnus sibirica wetland. Burning also changed the Alnus sibirica wetland CO2 and N2O flux patterns in the growing season, but no marked variations were detected in the Alnus sibirica wetland CH4. Burning changed the Alnus sibirica wetland green-house gas flux patterns in the growing season. The CH4 emissions and the seasonal change pattern were affected by fire disturbance. Before and after the fire disturbance, CH4 emission flux remained unchanged during the growing season. The CH4 was absorbed weakly by the wetland soil( M0,M1) in spring and emitted in summer and autumn. The CH4 emission flux in summer was less than that in autumn, the CO2 and N2O emission fluxes had changed. At the unburned site, the CO2 flux had a seasonal variation where summer flux > spring > autumn; under fire disturbance, the CO2 flux in summer > autumn> spring. The N2O flux varied in the order of spring > autumn > summer

  18. Short-term effects of fire disturbance on greanhouse gases emission from Betula platyphylla-forested wetland in Xiaoxing' an Mountains,Northeast China%火干扰对小兴安岭白桦沼泽温室气体排放的短期影响

    牟长城; 张博文; 韩丽冬; 于丽丽; 顾韩

    2011-01-01

    By the methods of static chamber and gas chromatography, this paper studied the effects of fire disturbance on the seasonal dynamics and source/sink functions of CH4, CO2 and N2O emissions from Betula platyphylla-forested wetland as well as their relations with environmental factors in Xiaoxing' an Mountains of China. In growth season, slight fire disturbance on the wetland induced an increase of air temperature and ground surface temperature by 1.8- 3.9 ℃ and a decrease of water table by 6.3 cm; while heavy fire disturbance led to an increase of air temperature and 0-40 cm soil temperature by 1.4-3.8 ℃ and a decrease of water table by 33.9 cm. Under slight or no fire disturbance, the CH4 was absorbed by the wetland soil in spring but emitted in summcr and autumn; under heavy fire disturbance, the CH4 was absorbed in spring and summer but emitted in autumn. The CO2 flux had a seasonal variation of summer > spring= autumn under no fire disturbance, but of summer > autumn > spring under fire disturbance; and the N2O flux varied in the order of spring > summer > autumn under no fire disturbance, but of autumn > spring > summcr under slight fire disturbance, and of summer > spring= autumn under heavy fire disturbance.At unburned site, the CO2 flux was significantly positively correlated with air temperature and ground surface temperature; at slightly burned site, the CO2 flux had significant positive correlations with air temperature, 5-10 cm soil temperature, and water table; at heavily burned sites, there was a significant positive correlation between CO2 flux and 5-40 cm soil temperature. Fire disturbance made the CH4 emission increased by 169.5% at lightly burned site or turned into weak CH4 sink at heavily burned site, and made the CO2 and N2O emissions and the global warming potential (GWP) at burned sites decreased by 21.2% -34.7% , 65.6% -95.8% , and 22.9% -36.6% respectively, compared with those at unburned site. Therefore

  19. Compounding disturbance interactions in a Southern Rocky Mountain subalpine forest

    Caldwell, M. K.; Wessman, C. A.; Buma, B.; Poore, R.

    2014-12-01

    Landscape disturbances are important shaping agents to ecosystem processes, services and structure. When multiple disturbances occur, they create novel ecosystem trajectories. It is unknown what happens to ecosystem resiliency and services, such as carbon storage, when multiple disturbances occur in a short time period. Routt National Forest, Colorado is a subalpine forest which experienced multiple disturbances including a blowdown (1997), logging (1999-2001), fire (2002) and insects (spruce and pine beetle, multiple years). The objective of this study is to determine recovery patterns post- disturbance as they pertain to resilience and carbon storage. Recovery from a single landscape disturbance for individual species typically have a predictable response. In order to study recovery from multiple disturbances, we measured plots in 2010-2013 across the multiple disturbances. Further, we simulated plots to the year 2113 using the Forest Vegetation Simulator to quantify carbon storage. Our sampling design captured disturbance interactions, where we considered 1. fire, 2. blowdown + fire, with a gradient across blowdown severity, 3. blowdown + logging + fire, 4. beetle-kill, 5. logged + beetle kill, 6. blowdown + beetle kill, 7. logged + blowdown, and 8. control. We counted species, diameter and height of each tree within the 162 (15x15m) square plots. Results between fire and other disturbances varied by individual species. Lodgepole pine regeneration was strongly driven by other disturbances along a severity gradient. Logging prior to fire seems to create varying abiotic conditions, increasing lodgepole seedling density post-fire. Engelmann spruce regeneration was linked to the presence of aspen post-fire + other disturbances, a function of shade provided by aspen. In turn, soil moisture drives aspen regeneration. Incoming aspen seedlings aid carbon storage, recovering to pre-fire between 60-80 years, post disturbance. Upon preliminary analysis, those plots absent

  20. Fire propagation equation for the explicit identification of fire scenarios in a fire PSA

    When performing fire PSA in a nuclear power plant, an event mapping method, using an internal event PSA model, is widely used to reduce the resources used by fire PSA model development. Feasible initiating events and component failure events due to fire are identified to transform the fault tree (FT) for an internal event PSA into one for a fire PSA using the event mapping method. A surrogate event or damage term method is used to condition the FT of the internal PSA. The surrogate event or the damage term plays the role of flagging whether the system/component in a fire compartment is damaged or not, depending on the fire being initiated from a specified compartment. These methods usually require explicit states of all compartments to be modeled in a fire area. Fire event scenarios, when using explicit identification, such as surrogate or damage terms, have two problems: there is no consideration of multiple fire propagation beyond a single propagation to an adjacent compartment, and there is no consideration of simultaneous fire propagations in which an initiating fire event is propagated to multiple paths simultaneously. The present paper suggests a fire propagation equation to identify all possible fire event scenarios for an explicitly treated fire event scenario in the fire PSA. Also, a method for separating fire events was developed to make all fire events a set of mutually exclusive events, which can facilitate arithmetic summation in fire risk quantification. A simple example is given to confirm the applicability of the present method for a 2x3 rectangular fire area. Also, a feasible asymptotic approach is discussed to reduce the computational burden for fire risk quantification

  1. FIRE ANT, BIOLOGY, ECOLOGY, AND BIOCONTROL

    The red fire ant Solenopsis invicta was accidentally introduced into the United States from South America sometime in the 1930s. These ants do best in open, disturbed habitats associated with human activities. Fire ants construct large earthen mounds which function as solar collecting devises. Fire...

  2. Fire Perimeters

    California Department of Resources — The Fire Perimeters data consists of CDF fires 300 acres and greater in size and USFS fires 10 acres and greater throughout California from 1950 to 2003. Some fires...

  3. Fire History

    California Department of Resources — The Fire Perimeters data consists of CDF fires 300 acres and greater in size and USFS fires 10 acres and greater throughout California from 1950 to 2002. Some fires...

  4. Fire risk in the liquid effluent treatment station (STE3) at La Hague

    The challenge faced by the designers of the new liquid effluent treatment station (STE3) at La Hague is the non-negligible risk of fire during the lifetime of the workshop, allied to the potentially considerable consequences for personnel and the environment. In the 'bituminization' section of this workshop, the radioactive sludges generated by the decontamination of liquid effluents from the La Hague plants are dried and hot coated in bitumen. The bitumen waste product (BWP) is then poured into drums and stored after cooling. The only identified cause of a fire is an exothermic reaction during the production and cooling of the BWPs, therefore the two drum filling units were of main concern. Attention was then focused on identifying the parameters which increase the risk and on implementing the appropriate means of control. Independent of these steps, reliable detection and powerful fire fighting resources were installed. The drum filling units comprise several types of detector and temperature and pressure measurement instruments. The fire fighting resources in the drum filling units use halon and water. The latter has proved effective in fighting BWP fires which have broken out in various places around the world. The effectiveness of halon has been demonstrated in a specialized laboratory. Finally, to maintain a pressure in the drum filling units that is lower than that in the adjacent rooms, an extraction system was installed which included the washing and filtering of gases and fumes. This also permits extraction of the contaminant while fighting the fire, using the means already described. Various cases of disturbance were also envisaged (loss of electric power and individual equipment failure). A fire detection and fighting system was installed, even though the risk of fire is considered negligible in storage halls. Because of the research that has been conducted into the origins of a fire and the extremely powerful fire fighting resources made available, one

  5. Wetland succession in a permafrost collapse: interactions between fire and thermokarst

    I. H. Myers-Smith

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available To determine the influence of fire and thermokarst in a boreal landscape, we investigated ~600 years of vegetation succession from peat cores within and adjacent to a permafrost collapse feature on the Tanana River Floodplain of Interior Alaska. Radioisotope dating, diatom assemblages, plant macrofossils, charcoal fragments, and carbon and nitrogen content of the peat profile indicate that succession proceeded from a terrestrial forest to a sedge-dominated wetland over 100 years ago and to a Sphagnum-dominated bog in approximately 1970. The shift from sedge to Sphagnum, and a decrease in the detrended tree-ring width index of black spruce trees adjacent to the collapse coincided with an increase in the growing season temperature record from Fairbanks. The concurrent wetland succession and reduced growth of black spruce trees indicates a non-linear ecosystem-level response to a change in regional climate. In 2001, fire was observed coincident with permafrost collapse and resulted in lateral expansion of the bog. These observations and the peat profile suggest that future warming and/or increased fire disturbance could promote permafrost degradation and bog expansion, and increase carbon storage in the collapse; however, the development of drought conditions could reduce the success of black spruce and Sphagnum, decreasing long-term ecosystem carbon storage in the adjacent landscape.

  6. Holocene fire dynamics in Fennoscandia

    Clear, Jennifer; Seppa, Heikki; Kuosmanen, Niina; Molinari, Chiara; Lehsten, Veiko; Allen, Katherine; Bradshaw, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Prescribed burning is advocated in Fennoscandia to promote regeneration and to encourage biodiversity. This method of forest management is based on the perception that fire was much more frequent in the recent past and over a century of active fire suppression has created a boreal forest ecosystem almost free of natural fire. The absence of fire is thought to have contributed to the widespread dominance of Picea abies (Norway spruce) with the successive spruce dominated forest further reducing fire ignition potential. However, humans have altered the natural fire dynamics of Fennoscandia since the early- to mid-Holocene and disentangling the anthropogenic driven fire dynamics from the natural fire dynamics is challenging. Through palaeoecology and sedimentary charcoal deposits we are able to explore the Holocene spatial and temporal variability and changing drivers of fire and vegetation dynamics in Fennoscandia. At the local-scale, two forest hollow environments (low fire frequency observed throughout Fennoscandia. Mid-Holocene declines in the abundance of deciduous species and concomitant loss of floristic diversity were driven by an increased use of fire during localised anthropogenic disturbance recorded 1500 years apart at two local-scale sites (located deciduous species and floristic diversity, but only if the fire frequency remains low.

  7. Fire, carbon, and climate change

    One million hectares of forest are harvested in Canada annually, with 1 to 8 million hectares destroyed by fire and a further 10 to 25 million hectares consumed by insects. Enhanced disturbances have meant that Canadian forests are becoming carbon sources instead of carbon sinks. Canadian fire statistics from the year 1920 were provided along with a map of large fires between 1980 and 1999. A cycle of combustion losses, decomposition and regeneration of forests was presented, along with a stylized concept of forest carbon life cycles with fire. Direct emissions from forests fires were evaluated. An annual net ecosystem production in Canadian boreal forests and stand age was presented. Projections of areas burned were presented based on weather and fire danger relationships, with statistics suggesting that a 75 to 120 per cent increase is likely to occur by the end of this century. Trend observations show that areas burned are correlated with increasing temperature caused by anthropogenic effects. Prevention, detection, suppression and fuels management were presented as areas that needed improvement in fire management. However, management strategies may only postpone an increase in forest fires. Changes in disturbances such as fire and insects will be a significant early impact of climate change on forests. tabs., figs

  8. Risk assessment of main control board fire using fire dynamics simulator

    Kang, Dae Il, E-mail: dikang@kaeri.re.kr [KAERI, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kilyoo; Jang, Seung-Cheol [KAERI, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Seong Yeon [Chungnam National University, 79, Daehagro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • A decision tree for evaluating the risk of a main control board (MCB) fire was proposed to systematically determine the MCB fire scenarios. • Fire simulations using fire dynamics simulator (FDS) were performed to estimate the time to MCR abandonment. • Non-propagating and propagating fire scenarios were considered for fire simulations. • The current study indicates that the quantification of the MCB fire risk should address the propagating fire and non-propagating fire scenarios if the MCB has no internal barriers between the panels. - Abstract: This paper presents the process and results of a risk assessment for a main control board (MCB) fire using fire dynamics simulator (FDS). A decision tree for evaluating the risk of a MCB fire was proposed to systematically determine the MCB fire scenarios, and fire simulations using FDS were performed to estimate the time to MCR abandonment. As a reference NPP for this study, Hanul unit 3 in Korea was selected and its core damage frequency (CDF) owing to the MCB fire was quantified. Two types of fire scenarios were considered for fire simulations: non-propagating fire scenarios occurring within a single MCB panel and propagating fire scenarios spreading from one control panel to the adjacent panels. Further, the fire scenarios were classified into fires with and without a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system (HVACS). The fire simulation results showed that the major factor causing the MCR evacuation was the optical density irrelevant to the availability of the HVACS. The risk assessment results showed that the abandonment fire scenario risk was less than the non-abandonment fire scenario risk and the propagating fire scenario risk was greater than the non-propagating fire scenario risk.

  9. Risk assessment of main control board fire using fire dynamics simulator

    Highlights: • A decision tree for evaluating the risk of a main control board (MCB) fire was proposed to systematically determine the MCB fire scenarios. • Fire simulations using fire dynamics simulator (FDS) were performed to estimate the time to MCR abandonment. • Non-propagating and propagating fire scenarios were considered for fire simulations. • The current study indicates that the quantification of the MCB fire risk should address the propagating fire and non-propagating fire scenarios if the MCB has no internal barriers between the panels. - Abstract: This paper presents the process and results of a risk assessment for a main control board (MCB) fire using fire dynamics simulator (FDS). A decision tree for evaluating the risk of a MCB fire was proposed to systematically determine the MCB fire scenarios, and fire simulations using FDS were performed to estimate the time to MCR abandonment. As a reference NPP for this study, Hanul unit 3 in Korea was selected and its core damage frequency (CDF) owing to the MCB fire was quantified. Two types of fire scenarios were considered for fire simulations: non-propagating fire scenarios occurring within a single MCB panel and propagating fire scenarios spreading from one control panel to the adjacent panels. Further, the fire scenarios were classified into fires with and without a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system (HVACS). The fire simulation results showed that the major factor causing the MCR evacuation was the optical density irrelevant to the availability of the HVACS. The risk assessment results showed that the abandonment fire scenario risk was less than the non-abandonment fire scenario risk and the propagating fire scenario risk was greater than the non-propagating fire scenario risk

  10. Forest soil disturbance intervals inferred from soil charcoal radiocarbon dates

    Forest soil disturbance intervals are usually too long to measure using plot-based studies, and thus they are poorly understood. The mean soil disturbance interval (MSDI) in an old-growth forest on the west coast of Vancouver Island was estimated from radiocarbon dates of charcoal from organic and mineral soil horizons. Two assumptions are required to estimate the MSDI: charcoal from forest fires is deposited within the organic horizon and eventually mixed into deeper mineral horizons by soil disturbances, and the probability of soil disturbance is spatially homogeneous and affected only by the time since the last fire or the last soil disturbance. The MSDI is then estimated by the rate at which the proportion of undisturbed sample sites (determined by the proportion of sites with charcoal from the most recent fire in the organic horizon) decreases with increasing time since the last fire. Soil charcoal evidence of time since fire was determined at 83 sites using 141 radiocarbon dates. The estimated MSDI was greater on slopes (ca. 2010 years) than on terraces (ca. 920 years). The long periods between soil disturbances, especially on slopes, are consistent with other evidence from the study area that suggests infrequent tree uprooting is the predominant mode of soil disturbance. (author)

  11. Responses of wind erosion to disturbance in a desert scrub grassland: grass vs. bush cover, and a snapshot into recovery

    Baddock, M.; Zobeck, T. M.; D'Odorico, P.; van Pelt, S.; Ravi, S.; Over, T. M.; Bhattachan, A.

    2010-12-01

    The mixture of grass and bush vegetation that typifies many desert scrublands is a distinctive feature of the northern Chihuahuan Desert, where it represents a change in land cover driven by shrub encroachment. In such environments, the redistribution of nutrients by aeolian transport has been recognized as an important biophysical process, with a role in sustaining shrub presence. Investigation of disturbances in these landscapes (e.g. fire and grazing) will enable better understanding of their dust emission behavior with changing climate, perturbance regime and management scenarios. Here we use a portable wind tunnel to investigate the impact of fire and animals on soil erodibilty and dust emissions from different vegetation types in the Sevilleta Wildlife Refuge, central New Mexico. Plots were selected that were a) predominantly creosote bush or b) predominantly grass covered. Dust emission was measured for these surfaces both before and after a prescribed burn was conducted. The grass plots were also clipped and artificially trampled to simulate grazing. PM10 concentrations and emission rates from the test surfaces are shown for initial blow-off experiments as the wind tunnel flow accelerates to a target velocity, plus the steady state emission flux produced under constant wind flow with an added abrader sand. An adjacent area burned 8 months previously also allowed investigation of the change in erodibility of the soil for a known time after fire. Our preliminary results indicate the extent that dust emission is changed by the introduced disturbances, and their differing effect on creosote bush and grass dominated covers.

  12. 林火干扰区全极化SAR影像的散射特性分析%Analysis of fire disturbed forests scattering characteristics using polarimetric SAR image

    祁帅; 张永红; 汪慧琴

    2016-01-01

    So far forest fire monitoring is only confined to single channel polarimetric amplitude data before and after fire or the utilization of the amplitude of the fully polarimetric SAR after fire, and less research have been conducted from the viewpoint of applying change of the scattering mechanism by forest fire to monitoring forest fire by using fully polarimetric SAR. In this paper, the authors analyzed a forest fire that occurred in 2009 in Alaska, used Radarsat-2 fully polarimetric SAR data obtained before and after the fire and, from the aspect of forest fires changing backscatter intensity and changing forest scattering mechanisms, quantitatively analyzed the intensity of each polarization channel, the dominant scattering mechanism and depolarization parameters and gave reasons for each change. The results obtained by the authors show that, for boreal forests after fire, the backscatter intensity increased by 20% in co-pol channels, and cross-pol channel increased slightly, that forest dominant scattering mechanism changed from volume scattering accounting for 59% before the fire to surface scattering accounting for 53% after the fire, and that depolarization of forests was reduced by 45% in comparison with things before fire. These conclusions have reference values for applying multitemporal polarimetric SAR data to mapping forest fire scar or monitoring burn severity.%目前,利用合成孔径雷达( synthetic aperture Radar,SAR)影像进行林火监测主要限于从林火前后时相的单极化通道振幅数据或者火后全极化影像振幅数据开展,而从林火对森林散射机制改变角度开展多时相全极化SAR林火监测的研究还较少。以2009年阿拉斯加地区发生的林火为例,以林火发生前后获取的Radarsat-2全极化影像为实验数据,从林火所改变的森林后向散射强度和散射机制角度,对林火发生前后各个极化通道后向散射强度、主导散射机制和去极化作用参数进行了

  13. Plutonium fires

    The author reports an information survey on accidents which occurred when handling plutonium. He first addresses accidents reported in documents. He indicates the circumstances and consequences of these accidents (explosion in glove boxes, fires of plutonium chips, plutonium fire followed by filter destruction, explosion during plutonium chip dissolution followed by chip fire). He describes hazards associated with plutonium fires: atmosphere and surface contamination, criticality. The author gives some advices to avoid plutonium fires. These advices concern electric installations, the use of flammable solvents, general cautions associated with plutonium handling, venting and filtration. He finally describes how to fight plutonium fires, and measures to be taken after the fire (staff contamination control, atmosphere control)

  14. ESA Fire CCI product assessment

    Heil, Angelika; Yue, Chao; Mouillot, Florent; Storm, Thomas; Chuvieco, Emilio; Kaiser, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Vegetation fires are a major disturbance in the Earth System. Fires change the biophysical properties and dynamics of ecosystems and alter terrestrial carbon pools. By altering the atmosphere's composition, fire emissions exert a significant climate forcing. To realistically model past and future changes of the Earth System, fire disturbances must be taken into account. Related modelling efforts require consistent global burned area observations covering at least 10 to 20 years. Guided by the specific requirements of a wide range of end users, the ESA fire_cci project is currently computing a new global burned area dataset. It applies a newly developed spectral change detection algorithm upon the full ENVISAT-MERIS archive (2002 to 2012). The algorithm relies on MODIS active fire information as "seed". A first, formally validated version has been released for the period 2006 to 2008. It comprises a pixel burned area product (spatial resolution of 333 m) with date detection information and a biweekly grid product at 0.5 degree spatial resolution. We compare fire_cci burned area with other global burned area products (MCD64, GFED4(s), GEOLAND) and a set of active fires data (hotspots from MODIS, TRMM, AATSR and fire radiative power from GFAS). Output from the ongoing processing of the full MERIS timeseries will be incorporated into the study, as far as available. The analysis of patterns of agreement and disagreement between fire_cci and other products provides a better understanding of product characteristics and uncertainties. The intercomparison of the 2006-2008 fire_cci time series shows a close agreement with GFED4 data in terms of global burned area and the general spatial and temporal patterns. Pronounced differences, however, emerge for specific regions or fire events. Burned area mapped by fire_cci tends to be notably higher in regions where small agricultural fires predominate. The improved detection of small agricultural fires by fire_cci can be related to

  15. Anatomical Features of the Scots Pine Stem Phloem After Forest FireAnatomical Features of the Scots Pine Stem Phloem After Forest Fire

    V. V. Stasova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study changes in anatomical structure of phloem tissue in pine (Pinus sylvestris L. stems influenced by creeping forest fires of various rates. The experiments were carried out in the Lower Angara river region of the Angara provenance, Krasnoyarsk Krai, Central Siberia. The trees with green crowns and different fire damaged butts were chosen as models. Control (undamaged trees were taken from stands adjacent to experimental plots. The changes of inner bark thickness, number of phloem annual layers between cambium and periderm and number of cells in conductive phloem were found in the stem side opposite to fire scars. The structure fluctuations of phloem tissue were detected: disturbances of sieve cell arrangement, phloem ray enlargements, resin canal overgrowth and formation of great resin ducts. The lignin accumulation was observed in inner bark and a large amount of callusing was detected between conductive and nonconductive phloem. Over the course of time, repairing of tissues occurred and the normal inner bark structure and chemistry (without lignin were restored. The creeping fire of low intensity caused the maximal changes of phloem quantitative characteristics in trees with bark charring and these tendencies were stored after eight years. After creeping fire of high intensity the tendency for phloem thickening in trees with one fire scar and to thinning in strongly damaged trees were revealed. Also tendencies to decrease of the number of phloem annual layers, number of sieve cells in conductive phloem and ray frequency with increasing of stem injury degree were observed, besides axial parenchyma percentage trended to increase. Eight years after fire these tendencies were often not visible.

  16. Wetland succession in a permafrost collapse: interactions between fire and thermokarst

    I. H. Myers-Smith

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available To determine the influence of fire and thermokarst in a boreal landscape, we investigated peat cores within and adjacent to a permafrost collapse feature on the Tanana River Floodplain of Interior Alaska. Radioisotope dating, diatom assemblages, plant macrofossils, charcoal fragments, and carbon and nitrogen content of the peat profile indicate ~600 years of vegetation succession with a transition from a terrestrial forest to a sedge-dominated wetland over 100 years ago, and to a Sphagnum-dominated peatland in approximately 1970. The shift from sedge to Sphagnum, and a decrease in the detrended tree-ring width index of black spruce trees adjacent to the collapse coincided with an increase in the growing season temperature record from Fairbanks. This concurrent wetland succession and reduced growth of black spruce trees indicates a step-wise ecosystem-level response to a change in regional climate. In 2001, fire was observed coincident with permafrost collapse and resulted in lateral expansion of the peatland. These observations and the peat profile suggest that future warming and/or increased fire disturbance could promote permafrost degradation, peatland expansion, and increase carbon storage across this landscape; however, the development of drought conditions could reduce the success of both black spruce and Sphagnum, and potentially decrease the long-term ecosystem carbon storage.

  17. Wetland succession in a permafrost collapse: Interactions between fire and thermokarst

    Myers-Smith, I. H.; Harden, J.W.; Wilmking, M.; Fuller, C.C.; McGuire, A.D.; Chapin, F. S., III

    2008-01-01

    To determine the influence of fire and thermokarst in a boreal landscape, we investigated peat cores within and adjacent to a permafrost collapse feature on the Tanana River Floodplain of Interior Alaska. Radioisotope dating, diatom assemblages, plant macrofossils, charcoal fragments, and carbon and nitrogen content of the peat profile indicate ???600 years of vegetation succession with a transition from a terrestrial forest to a sedge-dominated wetland over 100 years ago, and to a Sphagnum-dominated peatland in approximately 1970. The shift from sedge to Sphagnum, and a decrease in the detrended tree-ring width index of black spruce trees adjacent to the collapse coincided with an increase in the growing season temperature record from Fairbanks. This concurrent wetland succession and reduced growth of black spruce trees indicates a step-wise ecosystem-level response to a change in regional climate. In 2001, fire was observed coincident with permafrost collapse and resulted in lateral expansion of the peatland. These observations and the peat profile suggest that future warming and/or increased fire disturbance could promote permafrost degradation, peatland expansion, and increase carbon storage across this landscape; however, the development of drought conditions could reduce the success of both black spruce and Sphagnum, and potentially decrease the long-term ecosystem carbon storage.

  18. Plant layout and fire protection in nuclear power plants

    Fire protection programme for the plants start right from the layout stage. Provision of proper fire barriers around buildings, easy accessibility to the various plant buildings as well as fire station for the fire-fighting equipment/personnel, good house-keeping around the plant inside as well as adjacent to the plant outside, due consideration for fire influence as well as containment approach in the layout of safety systems/equipment help in minimising the damaging effect of fire and prevent its spread. Proper layout goes a long way in ensuring a fire-incident-free plant

  19. Land cover fire proneness in Europe

    Mario Gonzalez Pereira; Jose Aranha; Malik Amraoui

    2014-01-01

    Aim of study: This study aims to identify and characterize the spatial and temporal evolution of the types of vegetation that are most affected by forest fires in Europe. The characterization of the fuels is an important issue of the fire regime in each specific ecosystem while, on the other hand, fire is an important disturbance for global vegetation dynamics.Area of study: Southern European countries: Portugal, Spain, France, Italy and Greece.Material and Methods: Corine Land Cover maps for...

  20. Post-fire effects and short-term regeneration dynamics following high-severity crown fires in a Mediterranean forest

    Garbarino M; Lingua E; Marzano R

    2012-01-01

    Resilience against fire disturbance of Mediterranean vegetation has been frequently described. However, due to climatic change and abandonment of local land use practices, the fire regime is changing, probably leading to higher intensities and frequencies of disturbance events. The forthcoming scenario calls for a full understanding of post-disturbance tree recruitment processes, structural resilience and possible consequences on the overall forest biodiversity. In particular, knowledge on se...

  1. Cajander larch (Larix cajanderi) biomass distribution, fire regime and post-fire recovery in northeastern Siberia

    L. T. Berner; P. S. A. Beck; M. M. Loranty; H. D. Alexander; M. C. Mack; Goetz, S.J.

    2012-01-01

    Climate change and land-use activities are increasing fire activity across much of the Siberian boreal forest, yet the climate feedbacks from forest disturbances remain difficult to quantify due to limited information on forest biomass distribution, disturbance regimes and post-disturbance ecosystem recovery. Our primary objective here was to analyse post-fire accumulation of Cajander larch (Larix cajanderi Mayr.) aboveground biomass for a 100 000 km2 area of open forest in ...

  2. Interactions among wildland fires in a long-established Sierra Nevada natural fire area

    Collins, B.M.; Miller, J.D.; Thode, A.E.; Kelly, M.; van Wagtendonk, J.W.; Stephens, S.L.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate interactions between successive naturally occurring fires, and assess to what extent the environments in which fires burn influence these interactions. Using mapped fire perimeters and satellite-based estimates of post-fire effects (referred to hereafter as fire severity) for 19 fires burning relatively freely over a 31-year period, we demonstrate that fire as a landscape process can exhibit self-limiting characteristics in an upper elevation Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forest. We use the term 'self-limiting' to refer to recurring fire as a process over time (that is, fire regime) consuming fuel and ultimately constraining the spatial extent and lessening fire-induced effects of subsequent fires. When the amount of time between successive adjacent fires is under 9 years, and when fire weather is not extreme (burning index fire burning into the previous fire area is extremely low. Analysis of fire severity data by 10-year periods revealed a fair degree of stability in the proportion of area burned among fire severity classes (unchanged, low, moderate, high). This is in contrast to a recent study demonstrating increasing high-severity burning throughout the Sierra Nevada from 1984 to 2006, which suggests freely burning fires over time in upper elevation Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forests can regulate fire-induced effects across the landscape. This information can help managers better anticipate short- and long-term effects of allowing naturally ignited fires to burn, and ultimately, improve their ability to implement Wildland Fire Use programs in similar forest types. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  3. US Fire Administration Fire Statistics

    Department of Homeland Security — The U.S. Fire Administration collects data from a variety of sources to provide information and analyses on the status and scope of the fire problem in the United...

  4. Structural Parameters Dynamics Optimization of Muzzle Disturbance in a Wheeled Self-propelled Anti-aircraft Gun during Long Burst Fire%某轮式自行高炮长连发射击炮口扰动结构参数动力学优化

    曹广群; 王建中; 朵英贤; 杨东

    2014-01-01

    To reduce the muzzle disturbance of a wheeled self-propelled anti-aircraft gun during long burst fire,the structural parameters dynamics optimization was designed based on co-simulation method of AD-AMS and MATLAB by use of improved adaptive genetic algorithm.A virtual prototype of the wheeled self-propelled anti-aircraft gun was established based on its physical prototype,and the virtual prototype was examined and verified through comparing the results of live firing test with numerical simulation.The best matched structural parameters to improve firing accuracy were obtained.The method was proved to be valid by use of comparing the results before and after optimization.Optimization results can provide the theoretical basis for the overall design and structural improvement.%针对减小某轮式自行高炮长连发射击时的炮口扰动问题,采用 ADAMS 与 MATLAB 联合仿真的方法,基于改进的自适应遗传算法进行结构参数动力学优化设计。基于物理样机,构建了虚拟样机,并通过连发射击动态响应数值仿真结果与实弹射击试验结果的对比验证虚拟样机。通过动力学优化设计,找出了减小炮口扰动的系统最佳参数匹配,优化前后结果证明优化效果显著。计算结果为总体设计及结构改进提供了理论依据。

  5. Species richness, equitability, and abundance of ants in disturbed landscapes

    Graham, J.H.; Krzysik, A.J.; Kovacic, D.A.; Duda, J.J.; Freeman, D.C.; Emlen, J.M.; Zak, J.C.; Long, W.R.; Wallace, M.P.; Chamberlin-Graham, C.; Nutter, J.P.; Balbach, H.E.

    2009-01-01

    Ants are used as indicators of environmental change in disturbed landscapes, often without adequate understanding of their response to disturbance. Ant communities in the southeastern United States displayed a hump-backed species richness curve against an index of landscape disturbance. Forty sites at Fort Benning, in west-central Georgia, covered a spectrum of habitat disturbance (military training and fire) in upland forest. Sites disturbed by military training had fewer trees, less canopy cover, more bare ground, and warmer, more compact soils with shallower A-horizons. We sampled ground-dwelling ants with pitfall traps, and measured 15 habitat variables related to vegetation and soil. Ant species richness was greatest with a relative disturbance of 43%, but equitability was greatest with no disturbance. Ant abundance was greatest with a relative disturbance of 85%. High species richness at intermediate disturbance was associated with greater within-site spatial heterogeneity. Species richness was also associated with intermediate values of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), a correlate of net primary productivity (NPP). Available NPP (the product of NDVI and the fraction of days that soil temperature exceeded 25 ??C), however, was positively correlated with species richness, though not with ant abundance. Species richness was unrelated to soil texture, total ground cover, and fire frequency. Ant species richness and equitability are potential state indicators of the soil arthropod community. Moreover, equitability can be used to monitor ecosystem change. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Forest fires

    This book examines the many complex and sensitive issues relating to wildland fires. Beginning with an overview of the fires of 1980s, the book discusses the implications of continued drought and considers the behavior of wildland fires, from ignition and spread to spotting and firestorms. Topics include the effects of weather, forest fuels, fire ecology, and the effects of fire on plants and animals. In addition, the book examines firefighting methods and equipment, including new minimum impact techniques and compressed air foam; prescribed burning; and steps that can be taken to protect individuals and human structures. A history of forest fire policies in the U.S. and a discussion of solutions to fire problems around the world completes the coverage. With one percent of the earth's surface burning every year in the last decade, this is a penetrating book on a subject of undeniable importance

  7. Responses of radial growth to fire disturbance in alpine pine (Pinus densata) of different age classes in Nang County, Xizang, China%西藏朗县地区不同龄级高山松林木径向生长对火干扰的响应

    李宝; 程雪寒; 吕利新

    2016-01-01

    Aims Forest fire plays a complex and important role in affecting forest regeneration, tree growth, and stand development. Despite the importance of forest fire in modulating forest dynamics, researches on the response patterns of trees of different age-classes to fire disturbances are scarce. This study was conducted to determine the growth patterns of surviving trees of different age-classes in an alpine pine (Pinus densata) forest in the southeastern Xizang Plateau, where a moderate surface fire occurred in 2005. Methods We collected tree-ring samples of P. densata in the Gong-Zi-Nong valley in Nang County, Xizang Autonomous Region, in western China. Based on the diameter at breast height (DBH), the sampling trees were divided into saplings (DBH Important findings Before the fire event, the radial growth of saplings showed a significantly negative response to the monthly mean minimum temperature of the preceding November, whereas the radial growth of mature trees showed a significantly positive response to monthly mean minimum temperature and monthly mean temperature of current September;following the fire event, radial growth of both the saplings and the mature trees showed a significantly negative response to monthly mean temperature and monthly mean maximum temperature of Janu-ary of the tree-ring formation year. Based on the ratios of mean tree-ring widths of 5 post-fire years to those of 5 pre-fire years, the mature trees were significantly more fire resistant than the saplings. Moreover, the mature trees also showed greater ability in post-fire recoveries than the burnt saplings. Our results demonstrated that moderate surface fire stimulated the radial growth of both saplings and mature trees, and that the mature trees better recov-ered from the fire event than the saplings. The changes in growth-climate relationships following the fire event may attribute to changes in understory vegetation and microenvironments.%林火影响着林木的更新、生长发

  8. Fire-driven alien invasion in a fire-adapted ecosystem

    Keeley, Jon E.; Brennan, Teresa J.

    2012-01-01

    Disturbance plays a key role in many alien plant invasions. However, often the main driver of invasion is not disturbance per se but alterations in the disturbance regime. In some fire-adapted shrublands, the community is highly resilient to infrequent, high-intensity fires, but changes in the fire regime that result in shorter fire intervals may make these communities more susceptible to alien plant invasions. This study examines several wildfire events that resulted in short fire intervals in California chaparral shrublands. In one study, we compared postfire recovery patterns in sites with different prefire stand ages (3 and 24 years), and in another study we compared sites that had burned once in four years with sites that had burned twice in this period. The population size of the dominant native shrub Adenostoma fasciculatum was drastically reduced following fire in the 3-year sites relative to the 24-year sites. The 3-year sites had much greater alien plant cover and significantly lower plant diversity than the 24-year sites. In a separate study, repeat fires four years apart on the same sites showed that annual species increased significantly after the second fire, and alien annuals far outnumbered native annuals. Aliens included both annual grasses and annual forbs and were negatively correlated with woody plant cover. Native woody species regenerated well after the first fire but declined after the second fire, and one obligate seeding shrub was extirpated from two sites by the repeat fires. It is concluded that some fire-adapted shrublands are vulnerable to changes in fire regime, and this can lead to a loss of native diversity and put the community on a trajectory towards type conversion from a woody to an herbaceous system. Such changes result in alterations in the proportion of natives to non-natives, changes in functional types from deeply rooted shrubs to shallow rooted grasses and forbs, increased fire frequency due to the increase in fine fuels

  9. 不同强度林火干扰对红花尔基樟子松天然林更新的影响%Effects of Fire Disturbance with Different Intensities on Regeneration of Natural Forest of Pinus sylvestris var.mongolica in Honghuaerj i Region

    张立志; 孙亚娟; 宋银平; 许忠海; 葛玉祥

    2015-01-01

    在依据火烧迹地林木烧伤程度确定林火强度基础上,对内蒙古红花尔基樟子松林国家级自然保护区不同林火强度下的幼苗更新状况进行调查和分析,以期探明自然条件下林火干扰对樟子松天然林更新的影响,为今后开展林火促进更新方面提供科学依据。结果表明:不同火烧强度下更新树种均为樟子松;樟子松天然更新株数介于2500~6500株?hm-2,平均值为4542株?hm-2;樟子松天然更新频度介于50%~100%,平均值为89%;表明林火能够促进樟子松天然更新。随着火烧程度增加,樟子松天然更新株数和频度显著降低,轻度和中度火烧更有利于促进樟子松天然更新,而重度和极重度火烧下樟子松仍能天然更新。%Fire intensity were determined by the degree of burned forest in the burned area.In order to ascertain the effects of fire disturbance on regeneration of natural forest for Pinus sylvestris var.mongolica and provide a scientif-ic basis for the future,the regeneration of young seedlings under different fire intensities in Honghuaerji National Nature Reserve of Inner Mongolia were analyzed.Research shows that the regeneration species are all Pinus sylves-tris var.mongolica under different fire intensities;the regenerated numbers of Pinus sylvestris var.mongolica are among 2 500-6 500 trees ?hm-2 ,the average value being 4 542 trees ?hm-2;the frequency of natural regeneration for Pinus sylvestris var.mongolica among 50%-100%,with an average being 89%,which shows forest fire can pro-mote natural regeneration of Pinussylvestris var.mongolica.With the increase of the degree of fire,the number and frequency of natural regeneration for Pinus sylvestris var.mongolica significantly reduced;the frequency of mild and moderate burn are more conducive to the promotion of natural regeneration for Pinus sylvestris var.mongolica;Pi-nus sylvestris var.mongolica can still regenerated under severe & very severe fire.

  10. Adjacent Lumbar Disc Herniation after Lumbar Short Spinal Fusion

    Koshi Ninomiya; Koichi Iwatsuki; Yu-ichiro Ohnishi; Toshika Ohkawa; Toshiki Yoshimine

    2014-01-01

    A 70-year-old outpatient presented with a chief complaint of sudden left leg motor weakness and sensory disturbance. He had undergone L4/5 posterior interbody fusion with L3–5 posterior fusions for spondylolisthesis 3 years prior, and the screws were removed 1 year later. He has been followed up for 3 years, and there had been no adjacent segment problems before this presentation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a large L2/3 disc hernia descending to the L3/4 level. Compared to...

  11. Range expansion of invasive shrubs: implication for crown fire risk in forestlands of the southern USA.

    Wang, Hsiao-Hsuan; Wonkka, Carissa L; Grant, William E; Rogers, William E

    2016-01-01

    Non-native plant invasions and changing management activities have dramatically altered the structure and composition of forests worldwide. Invasive shrubs and fire suppression have led to increased densification and biomass accumulation in forest ecosystems of the southeastern USA. Notably, Chinese and European privets are rapid growing, shade-tolerant shrubs which number among the most aggressive invasive species in these forests. Privet encroachment has caused losses of native diversity, alteration of ecosystem processes and changes in community structure. The latter has become manifest through decreases in fine herbaceous fuels concurrent with increases in coarse woody fuels in forest understoreys. These alterations in fuel structure will potentially lead to less frequent, but more severe forest fires, which threaten important forest resources during extreme weather conditions. Drawing on extensive data sets compiled by the US Forest Service, we integrated statistical forecasting and analytical techniques within a spatially explicit, agent-based, simulation framework to predict potential range expansion of Chinese and European privet (Ligustrum sinenseandL. vulgare) and the associated increase in crown fire risk over the next two decades in forestlands of Mississippi and Alabama. Our results indicate that probability of invasion is positively associated with elevation, adjacency (within 300 m) to water bodies, mean daily maximum temperature, site productivity and private land ownership, and is negatively associated with slope, stand age, artificial regeneration, distance to the nearest road and fire disturbance. Our projections suggest the total area invaded will increase from 1.36 to ≈31.39% of all forestlands in Mississippi and Alabama (≈7 million hectares) and the annual frequency of crown fires in these forestlands will approximately double within the next two decades. Such time series projections of annual range expansions and crown fire frequency

  12. Combining satellite-based fire observations and ground-based lightning detections to identify lightning fires across the conterminous USA

    Bar-Massada, A.; Hawbaker, T.J.; Stewart, S.I.; Radeloff, V.C.

    2012-01-01

    Lightning fires are a common natural disturbance in North America, and account for the largest proportion of the area burned by wildfires each year. Yet, the spatiotemporal patterns of lightning fires in the conterminous US are not well understood due to limitations of existing fire databases. Our goal here was to develop and test an algorithm that combined MODIS fire detections with lightning detections from the National Lightning Detection Network to identify lightning fires across the conterminous US from 2000 to 2008. The algorithm searches for spatiotemporal conjunctions of MODIS fire clusters and NLDN detected lightning strikes, given a spatiotemporal lag between lightning strike and fire ignition. The algorithm revealed distinctive spatial patterns of lightning fires in the conterminous US While a sensitivity analysis revealed that the algorithm is highly sensitive to the two thresholds that are used to determine conjunction, the density of fires it detected was moderately correlated with ground based fire records. When only fires larger than 0.4 km2 were considered, correlations were higher and the root-mean-square error between datasets was less than five fires per 625 km2 for the entire study period. Our algorithm is thus suitable for detecting broad scale spatial patterns of lightning fire occurrence, and especially lightning fire hotspots, but has limited detection capability of smaller fires because these cannot be consistently detected by MODIS. These results may enhance our understanding of large scale patterns of lightning fire activity, and can be used to identify the broad scale factors controlling fire occurrence.

  13. Fire Power

    Denker, Deb; West, Lee

    2009-01-01

    For education administrators, campus fires are not only a distressing loss, but also a stark reminder that a campus faces risks that require special vigilance. In many ways, campuses resemble small communities, with areas for living, working and relaxing. A residence hall fire may raise the specter of careless youth, often with the complication of…

  14. Returning Fire

    Gould, Jon B.

    2007-01-01

    Last December saw another predictable report from the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE), a self-described watchdog group, highlighting how higher education is supposedly under siege from a politically correct plague of so-called hate-speech codes. In that report, FIRE declared that as many as 96 percent of top-ranked colleges…

  15. On fire

    Hansen, Helle Rabøl

    The title of this paper: “On fire”, refers to two (maybe three) aspects: firstly as a metaphor of having engagement in a community of practice according to Lave & Wenger (1991), and secondly it refers to the concrete element “fire” in the work of the fire fighters – and thirdly fire as a signifier...

  16. 46 CFR 28.315 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses... After September 15, 1991, and That Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.315 Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses. (a) Each vessel 36 feet (11.8 meters) or more in length...

  17. 46 CFR 28.820 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses... REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.820 Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses. (a) Each vessel must be equipped with a self-priming, power driven...

  18. Depression Disturbs Germany

    2011-01-01

    The suicide of Robert Enke,the goalkeeper of the Germany national football team who had battled depression for years,stunned the country and cast depression into the national spotlight as a disturbing disease.

  19. Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances (SID)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sudden ionospheric disturbances (SID) are caused by solar flare enhanced X-rays in the 1 to 10 angstrom range. Solar flares can produce large increases of...

  20. Tubular composite columns in a non-symmetrical fire

    Markku Heinisuo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A considerable number of studies have been conducted worldwide on fires that act on all four sides of a column (symmetrical fire. These cases are used for the validation of the analysis models developed in this study. In real buildings the columns are often embedded. If the fire does not act similarly on all surfaces of the column (non-symmetrical fire, it is extremely difficult to predict how the column will behave. The key research questions are: Is resistance stronger in non-symmetrical than in symmetrical fires? What is the final buckling mode, towards the fire or in the opposite direction? Results of numerical analyses for reinforced concrete filled square steel tube columns in nonsymmetrical fires are presented for a total of 150 cases. An ISO 834 fire acts constant along the column on one, two adjacent or three sides. Three embedding systems are considered for the remaining sides: adiabatic, concrete wall and sandwich panel. The material models are done using the Eurocodes and an initial bow imperfection is considered. The reference cases are symmetrical cases. When fire acted on one, two adjacent or three sides, the fire resistance times were on average about 3.4, 2 and 1.3 times longer than in a symmetrical fire. A concrete wall is a good thermal sink for columns. Slender columns typically buckle towards the fire. The final failure mode and corresponding resistance time depend on the direction of the initial bow imperfection. Experimental tests are needed to verify the results.

  1. Fire resistant PV shingle assembly

    Lenox, Carl J.

    2012-10-02

    A fire resistant PV shingle assembly includes a PV assembly, including PV body, a fire shield and a connection member connecting the fire shield below the PV body, and a support and inter-engagement assembly. The support and inter-engagement assembly is mounted to the PV assembly and comprises a vertical support element, supporting the PV assembly above a support surface, an upper interlock element, positioned towards the upper PV edge, and a lower interlock element, positioned towards the lower PV edge. The upper interlock element of one PV shingle assembly is inter-engageable with the lower interlock element of an adjacent PV shingle assembly. In some embodiments the PV shingle assembly may comprise a ventilation path below the PV body. The PV body may be slidably mounted to the connection member to facilitate removal of the PV body.

  2. Fire safety

    According to experience and probabilistic risk assessments, fires present a significant hazard in a nuclear power plant. Fires may be initial events for accidents or affect safety systems planned to prevent accidents and to mitigate their consequences. The project consists of theoretical work, experiments and simulations aiming to increase the fire safety at nuclear power plants. The project has four target areas: (1) to produce validated models for numerical simulation programmes, (2) to produce new information on the behavior of equipment in case of fire, (3) to study applicability of new active fire protecting systems in nuclear power plants, and (4) to obtain quantitative knowledge of ignitions induced by important electric devices in nuclear power plants. These topics have been solved mainly experimentally, but modelling at different level is used to interpret experimental data, and to allow easy generalisation and engineering use of the obtained data. Numerical fire simulation has concentrated in comparison of CFD modelling of room fires, and fire spreading on cables on experimental data. So far the success has been good to fair. A simple analytical and numerical model has been developed for fire effluents spreading beyond the room of origin in mechanically strongly ventilated compartments. For behaviour of equipment in fire several full scale and scaled down calorimetric experiments were carried out on electronic cabinets, as well as on horizontal and vertical cable trays. These were carried out to supply material for CFD numerical simulation code validation. Several analytical models were developed and validated against obtained experimental results to allow quick calculations for PSA estimates as well as inter- and extrapolations to slightly different objects. Response times of different commercial fire detectors were determined for different types of smoke, especially emanating from smoldering and flaming cables to facilitate selection of proper detector

  3. Recent Forest Disturbance History in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem Reconstructed using Remote Sensing and Management Record

    Zhao, F.; Huang, C.; Zhu, Z.

    2014-12-01

    The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE), located in Central Rocky Mountains of United States, is of complex ecological and land management histories along with different land ownerships. What are effects of the different land management practices (such as those by national parks vs. national forests) on ecosystem disturbances and carbon balance? We present here the methods and results of a study on forest disturbance history over the GYE from 1984 to 2010 reconstructed from Landsat time series stacks and local management records. Annual forest fire, harvest and other disturbances were tracked and separated by integrating a model called Vegetation Change Tracker and the Support Vector Machine algorithm. Local management records were separated into training and validation data for the disturbance maps. Area statistics and rates of disturbances were quantified and compared across GYE land ownership over the multi-decade period and interpreted for implications of these changes for forest management and carbon analysis. Our results indicate that during the study interval (1984 - 2010), GYE National Parks (NPs) and Wilderness Area (WA) had higher percentages of area of forests disturbed compared to GYE National Forests (NF). Within the GYE NPs, over 45% of the forest lands were disturbed at least once during the study period, the majority (37%) was by wildfire. For GYE wilderness area, the total disturbance was 30% of forest with 19.4% by wildfire and 10.6% by other disturbances. In Bridger-Teton NF, 14.7% of forest was disturbed and 3.6%, 0.5% and 10.6% of forest were disturbed by fire, harvest and other disturbances, respectively. For Caribou-Targhee NF, 25% of total forest was disturbed during this time interval and 1.5%, 6.4% and 17.1% of forest were disturbed by fire, harvest and other disturbances, respectively.

  4. Fire effects in Pinus uncinata Ram plantations

    Adrián Cardil Forradellas

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: Understanding fire ecology of main forest species is essential for a sound, scientifically based on managing of wildlands and also to assess likely implications due to changes in fire regime under a global change scenario. Few references can be found about fire ecology of Pinus uncinata Ram. (PU. PU species grows in the Central Pyrenees where large, severe wildland fires did not occur frequently in the past. However, several fires with extreme fire behavior have affected PU stands in last years and they might disturb other PU forest in the future.Area of study: Cabdella fire (February 2012, in Lleida province, is one of the several wildland fires occurred in 2012 (winter season in the Central Pyrenees. Fire affected a large PU plantation (102 ha located at 1.800-2,100 meters above the sea.Material and methods: We have analyzed first order fire effects in three fireline intensity thresholds along three years in terms of mortality ratio, scorched height, percentage of scorched crown volume and bark char height.Main results: PU seems to be a very tolerant species to low and medium fire line intensity but fire effects were very significant when fire line intensity was high. In medium fireline intensity sites, probability of mortality ranged from 15 to 30% and the dead trees had the highest values on scorched height and percentage of scorched crown volume.Research highlights: Results from this work supports that prescribed burning might be used to efficiently decrease fuel load and fuel vertical continuity while avoiding considerable PU mortality. It also displayed that when fuel management has been implemented, PU mortality might be limited even under extreme fire behavior.Abbreviations used: PU: Pinus uncinata Ram.

  5. Ecosystem Disturbance Effects on Land Surface Temperature, Forest Carbon Stocks, and Primary Productivity in the Western United States

    Cooper, L. A.; Ballantyne, A.; Holden, Z. A.; Landguth, E.

    2015-12-01

    Disturbance plays an important role in the structure, composition, and nutrient cycling of forest ecosystems. Climate change is resulting in an increase in disturbance frequency and intensity, making it critical that we quantify the physical and chemical impacts of disturbances on forests. The impacts of disturbance are thought to vary widely depending on disturbance type, location, and climate. More specifically, fires, insect infestations, and other types of disturbances differ in their timing, extent, and intensity making it difficult to assess the true impact of disturbances on local energy budgets and carbon cycling. Here, we provide a regional analysis of the impacts of fire, insect attack, and other disturbances on land surface temperature (LST), carbon stocks, and gross primary productivity (GPP). Using disturbances detected with MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) time series between 2002 and 2012, we find that the impacts of disturbance on LST, carbon stocks, and GPP vary widely according to local climate, vegetation, and disturbance type and intensity. Fires resulted in the most distinct impacts on all response variables. Forest responses to insect epidemics were more varied in their magnitude and timing. The results of this study provide an important estimation of the variability of climate and ecosystem responses to disturbance across a large and heterogeneous landscape. With disturbance projected to increase in both frequency and intensity around the globe in the coming years, this information is vitally important to effectively manage forests into the future.

  6. Spatially explicit fire-climate history of the boreal forest-tundra (Eastern Canada) over the last 2000 years

    Payette, Serge; Filion, Louise; Delwaide, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Across the boreal forest, fire is the main disturbance factor and driver of ecosystem changes. In this study, we reconstructed a long-term, spatially explicit fire history of a forest-tundra region in northeastern Canada. We hypothesized that current occupation of similar topographic and edaphic sites by tundra and forest was the consequence of cumulative regression with time of forest cover due to compounding fire and climate disturbances. All fires were mapped and dated per 100 year interva...

  7. Post-fire effects and short-term regeneration dynamics following high-severity crown fires in a Mediterranean forest

    Garbarino M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Resilience against fire disturbance of Mediterranean vegetation has been frequently described. However, due to climatic change and abandonment of local land use practices, the fire regime is changing, probably leading to higher intensities and frequencies of disturbance events. The forthcoming scenario calls for a full understanding of post-disturbance tree recruitment processes, structural resilience and possible consequences on the overall forest biodiversity. In particular, knowledge on severe crown fires’ effects on forest stand structural attributes needs to be further explored. In this work, we describe and quantify fire impact and short-term response of a Mediterranean forest affected by high severity crown fires, focusing on the compositional and structural diversity of living and dead trees, spatial pattern of fire-induced mortality, recovery dynamics of tree species. The analysis, based on a synchronic approach, was carried out within four burned and two not burned fully stem-mapped research plots located in NW Italy, belonging to two forest categories differing for their main tree restoration strategies. Distance-dependent and distance-independent indices were applied to assess structural diversity dynamics over time since fire occurrence. Within the analyzed forests fire was found to affect mostly forest structure rather than its composition. Number of snags largely increases immediately after the fire, but it levels off due to their fall dynamics. Regeneration strategies and fire severity influenced species abundance and consequently diversity patterns. Stem diameter and height diversity were modified as well, with a strong increase in the first post-fire year and a sharp reduction six years after the disturbance. Fire determined also a higher heterogeneity in crown cover and vertical structure. Spatial patterns of surviving trees and snags were greatly affected by fire, producing an increase in aggregation and segregation

  8. Disturbance recording system

    A computerized system for disturbance monitoring, recording and display has been developed for use in nuclear power plants and is versatile enough to be used where ever a large number of parameters need to be recorded, e.g. conventional power plants, chemical industry etc. The Disturbance Recording System (DRS) has been designed to continuously monitor a process plant and record crucial parameters. The DRS provides a centralized facility to monitor and continuously record 64 process parameters scanned every 1 sec for 5 days. The system also provides facility for storage of 64 parameters scanned every 200 msec during 2 minutes prior to and 3 minutes after a disturbance. In addition the system can initiate, on demand, the recording of 8 parameters at a fast rate of every 5 msec for a period of 5 sec. and thus act as a visicorder. All this data is recorded in non-volatile memory and can be displayed, printed/plotted and used for subsequent analysis. Since data can be stored densely on floppy disks, the volume of space required for archival storage is also low. As a disturbance recorder, the DRS allows the operator to view the state of the plant prior to occurrence of the disturbance and helps in identifying the root cause. (author). 10 refs., 7 figs

  9. United States Forest Disturbance Trends Observed Using Landsat Time Series

    Masek, Jeffrey G.; Goward, Samuel N.; Kennedy, Robert E.; Cohen, Warren B.; Moisen, Gretchen G.; Schleeweis, Karen; Huang, Chengquan

    2013-01-01

    Disturbance events strongly affect the composition, structure, and function of forest ecosystems; however, existing U.S. land management inventories were not designed to monitor disturbance. To begin addressing this gap, the North American Forest Dynamics (NAFD) project has examined a geographic sample of 50 Landsat satellite image time series to assess trends in forest disturbance across the conterminous United States for 1985-2005. The geographic sample design used a probability-based scheme to encompass major forest types and maximize geographic dispersion. For each sample location disturbance was identified in the Landsat series using the Vegetation Change Tracker (VCT) algorithm. The NAFD analysis indicates that, on average, 2.77 Mha/yr of forests were disturbed annually, representing 1.09%/yr of US forestland. These satellite-based national disturbance rates estimates tend to be lower than those derived from land management inventories, reflecting both methodological and definitional differences. In particular the VCT approach used with a biennial time step has limited sensitivity to low-intensity disturbances. Unlike prior satellite studies, our biennial forest disturbance rates vary by nearly a factor of two between high and low years. High western US disturbance rates were associated with active fire years and insect activity, while variability in the east is more strongly related to harvest rates in managed forests. We note that generating a geographic sample based on representing forest type and variability may be problematic since the spatial pattern of disturbance does not necessarily correlate with forest type. We also find that the prevalence of diffuse, non-stand clearing disturbance in US forests makes the application of a biennial geographic sample problematic. Future satellite-based studies of disturbance at regional and national scales should focus on wall-to-wall analyses with annual time step for improved accuracy.

  10. Ectomycorrhizal Fungal Communities of Red Pine (Pinus densiflora) Seedlings in Disturbed Sites and Undisturbed Old Forest Sites

    Lee, Eun-Hwa; Eom, Ahn-Heum

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate differences in ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal communities between disturbed sites and undisturbed old forest sites. ECM root tips of Pinus densiflora were collected from 4 sites disturbed by human activities and 3 undisturbed old forest sites adjacent to the disturbed sites. Results in this study showed that the number of ECM root tips, species diversity, and number of species were significantly higher in the disturbed sites than in the undisturbed sites, suggest...

  11. Phenology-based, remote sensing of post-burn disturbance windows in rangelands

    Sankeya, Joel B.; Wallace, Cynthia S.A.; Ravi, Sujith

    2013-01-01

    Wildland fire activity has increased in many parts of the world in recent decades. Ecological disturbance by fire can accelerate ecosystem degradation processes such as erosion due to combustion of vegetation that otherwise provides protective cover to the soil surface. This study employed a novel ecological indicator based on remote sensing of vegetation greenness dynamics (phenology) to estimate variability in the window of time between fire and the reemergence of green vegetation. The indicator was applied as a proxy for short-term, post-fire disturbance windows in rangelands; where a disturbance window is defined as the time required for an ecological or geomorphic process that is altered to return to pre-disturbance levels. We examined variability in the indicator determined for time series of MODIS and AVHRR NDVI remote sensing data for a database of ∼100 historical wildland fires, with associated post-fire reseeding treatments, that burned 1990–2003 in cold desert shrub steppe of the Great Basin and Columbia Plateau of the western USA. The indicator-based estimates of disturbance window length were examined relative to the day of the year that fires burned and seeding treatments to consider effects of contemporary variability in fire regime and management activities in this environment. A key finding was that contemporary changes of increased length of the annual fire season could have indirect effects on ecosystem degradation, as early season fires appeared to result in longer time that soils remained relatively bare of the protective cover of vegetation after fires. Also important was that reemergence of vegetation did not occur more quickly after fire in sites treated with post-fire seeding, which is a strategy commonly employed to accelerate post-fire vegetation recovery and stabilize soil. Future work with the indicator could examine other ecological factors that are dynamic in space and time following disturbance – such as nutrient cycling

  12. Natural disturbance impacts on Canada's forest carbon budget

    Wildfire and insect outbreaks are major determinants of forest dynamics in Canada, transferring carbon within the ecosystem, releasing carbon into the atmosphere and influencing post-disturbance carbon dynamics. This paper discusses the impacts of global climate change on natural disturbances. Higher temperatures and drier conditions are likely to increase burned areas in Canada and will also increase the impacts of insects, allowing for an expanded range and stressing their host species. Long-term changes in disturbance regimes have already affected Canada's forest age-class structure. Statistics of lower disturbance periods and carbon production were compared with periods of higher disturbance. Scenario analyses were conducted for the period of 1996 to 2032, assuming that annual insect and fire disturbance rates in timber-productive forests were 20 per cent higher and carbon production 20 per cent lower than base scenarios using average disturbance rates. It was concluded that these conditions could cause carbon stocks in Canada's forests to decline. The future carbon balance of Canada's forests will be affected by the rate of natural and human-induced disturbances. 4 refs

  13. Land cover fire proneness in Europe

    Mario Gonzalez Pereira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: This study aims to identify and characterize the spatial and temporal evolution of the types of vegetation that are most affected by forest fires in Europe. The characterization of the fuels is an important issue of the fire regime in each specific ecosystem while, on the other hand, fire is an important disturbance for global vegetation dynamics.Area of study: Southern European countries: Portugal, Spain, France, Italy and Greece.Material and Methods: Corine Land Cover maps for 2000 and 2006 (CLC2000, CLC2006 and burned area (BA perimeters, from 2000 to 2013 in Europe are combined to access the spatial and temporal evolution of the types of vegetation that are most affected by wild fires using descriptive statistics and Geographical Information System (GIS techniques.Main results: The spatial and temporal distribution of BA perimeters, vegetation and burnt vegetation by wild fires was performed and different statistics were obtained for Mediterranean and entire Europe, confirming the usefulness of the proposed land cover system. A fire proneness index is proposed to assess the fire selectivity of land cover classes. The index allowed to quantify and to compare the propensity of vegetation classes and countries to fire.Research highlights: The usefulness and efficiency of the land cover classification scheme and fire proneness index. The differences between northern Europe and southern Europe and among the Mediterranean region in what concerns to vegetation cover, fire incidence, area burnt in land cover classes and fire proneness between classes for the different countries.Keywords: Fire proneness; Mixed forests; Land cover/land use; Fire regime; Europe; GIS; Corine land cover. 

  14. Fires on trees

    Bertoin, Jean

    2010-01-01

    We consider random dynamics on the edges of a uniform Cayley tree with $n$ vertices, in which edges are either inflammable, fireproof, or burt. Every inflammable edge is replaced by a fireproof edge at unit rate, while fires start at smaller rate $n^{-\\alpha}$ on each inflammable edge, then propagate through the neighboring inflammable edges and are only stopped at fireproof edges. A vertex is called fireproof when all its adjacent edges are fireproof. We show that as $n\\to \\infty$, the density of fireproof vertices converges to 1 when $\\alpha>1/2$, to 0 when $\\alpha<1/2$, and to some non-degenerate random variable when $\\alpha=1/2$. We further study the connectivity of the fireproof forest, in particular the existence of a giant component.

  15. Fire in Fennoscandia: A palaeo-perspective of spatial and temporal variability in fire frequency and vegetation dynamics

    Clear, Jennifer; Bradshaw, Richard; Seppä, Heikki

    2014-05-01

    Active fire suppression in Fennoscandia has created a boreal forest ecosystem that is almost free of fire. Absence of fire is thought to have contributed to the widespread dominance of Picea abies (Norway spruce), though the character and structure of spruce forests operates as a positive feedback retarding fire frequency. This lack of fire and dominance by Picea abies may have assisted declines in deciduous tree species, with a concomitant loss of floristic diversity. Forest fires are driven by a complex interplay between natural (climate, vegetation and topography) and anthropogenic disturbance and through palaeoecology we are able to explore spatio-temporal variability in the drivers of fire, changing fire dynamics and the subsequent consequences for forest succession, development and floristic diversity over long timescales. High resolution analysis of palaeoenvironmental proxies (pollen and macroscopic charcoal) allows Holocene vegetation and fire dynamics to be reconstructed at the local forest-stand scale. Comparisons of fire histories with pollen-derived quantitative reconstruction of vegetation at local- and regional-scales identify large-scale ecosystem responses and local-scale disturbance. Spatio-temporal heterogeneity and variability in biomass burning is explored to identify the drivers of fire and palaeovegetation reconstructions are compared to process-based, climate-driven dynamic vegetation model output to test the significance of fire frequency as a driver of vegetation composition and dynamics. Fire was not always so infrequent in the northern European forest with early-Holocene fire regimes driven by natural climate variations and fuel availability. The establishment and spread of Picea abies was probably driven by an increase in continentality of climate, but local natural and anthropogenic ecosystem disturbance may have aided this spread. Picea expansion led to a step-wise reduction in regional biomass burning and here we show the now

  16. Active Fire Mapping Program

    Active Fire Mapping Program Current Large Incidents (Home) New Large Incidents Fire Detection Maps MODIS Satellite Imagery VIIRS Satellite Imagery Fire Detection GIS Data Fire Data in Google Earth ...

  17. Fire Research Enclosure

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Simulates submarine fires, enclosed aircraft fires, and fires in enclosures at shore facilities . DESCRIPTION: FIRE I is a pressurizable, 324 cu m(11,400...

  18. Influence of disturbance on carbon exchange in a permafrost collapse and adjacent burned forest

    Myers-Smith, I. H.; McGuire, A.D.; Harden, J.W.; Chapin, F. S., III

    2007-01-01

    We measured CO2 and CH4 exchange from the center of a Sphagnum-dominated permafrost collapse, through an aquatic most, and into a recently burned black spruce forest on the Tanana River floodplain in interior Alaska. In the anomalously dry growing season of 2004, both the collapse and the surrounding burned area were net sink, s for CO2, with a mean daytime net ecosystem exchange of -1.4 ??mol CO2 m-2 s-1, while the moat was a CH4 source with a mean flux of 0.013 ??mol CH4 m-2 s-1. Regression analyses identified temperature as the dominant factor affecting intragrowing season variation in CO2 exchange and soil moisture as the primary control influencing CH4 emissions. CH4 emissions during the wettest portion of the growing season were four times higher than during the driest periods. If temperatures continue to warm, peatlahd vegetation will likely expand with permafrost degradation, resulting in greater carbon accumulation and methane emissions for the landscape as a whole. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Short-Term Effects of Fire Disturbance on Carbon Storage of Larix gmelinii-Carex schmidtii Forested Wetlands Ecosystem in Daxing'an Mountain%火干扰对大兴安岭兴安落叶松瘤囊苔草湿地生态系统碳储量的短期影响

    牟长城; 包旭; 卢慧翠; 王彪; 崔巍

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated vegetation carbon storage, litter carbon storage and soil carbon storage of Larix gmelinii-Carex schmidtii forested wetlands ecosystem under the unburned site, lightly burned site and heavily burned site in Daxing'an Mountain, in order to reveal the short-term effects of fire disturbance on carbon storage of forested wetlands ecosystem. Results showed that the vegetation carbon storage of heavily burned site (0.26 kg·m-2 ) significantly (P 0. 05 ) . The litter carbon storage of the lightly burned site (0. 23kg·m-2 ) and heavily burned site (0. 15 kg·m-2) decreased respectively by 32.4% and 55. 9% than that of the unburned site (0. 34kg·m-2) , but only the latter existed significant difference with unburned site ( P < 0. 05). The soil carbon storage of the lightly burned site (15. 46 kg·m-2) and heavily burned site (16.33 kg·m-2) was both significantly lower than that of the unburned site (23. 07 kg·m-2) ( decreased by 33. 0% and 29. 2% , P < 0. 05). The ecosystem carbon storage of the lightly burned site (22. 04kg·m-2) and heavily burned site (16. 74 kg·m-2) decreased by 27. 8% and 45. 2% (8.49 or 13. 79 kg·m-2) than that of the unburned site (30. 53 kg·m-2) , but only the latter existed significant difference with the unburned site (P<0. 05) , and there were decreased trends with the fire disturbance intensity increased. Therefore, the heavily fire disturbance should be prevented in order to maintain or increase the carbon sink of the forested wetlands ecosystem.%对比分析大兴安岭未火烧、轻度火烧与重度火烧兴安落叶松瘤囊苔草湿地的植被碳储量、凋落物碳储量及土壤碳储量,揭示火烧干扰对寒温带森林湿地生态系统碳储量的短期影响规律.结果表明:兴安落叶松瘤囊苔草湿地轻度与重度火烧样地的植被碳储量(6.35和0.26 kg·m-2)较未火烧样地(7.12 kg·m-2)降低了10.8%和96.3%,重度火烧使其显著降低(P<0.05);轻度与重

  20. Fire, humans and landscape. Is there a connection?

    Valese, Eva; Ascoli, Davide; Conedera, Marco; Held, Alex

    2013-04-01

    Fire evolved on the earth under the direct influence of climate and the accumulation of burnable biomass at various times and spatial scales. As a result, fire regimes depend not only on climatic and biological factors, but also greatly reflect the cultural background of how people do manage ecosystems and fire. A new awareness among scientists and managers has been rising about the ecological role of fire and the necessity to understand its past natural and cultural dynamics in different ecosystems, in order to preserve present ecosystem functionality and minimize management costs and negative impacts. As a consequence we assisted in the last decades to a general shift from the fire control to the fire management approach, where fire prevention, fire danger rating, fire ecology, fire pre-suppression and suppression strategies are fully integrated in the landscape management. Nowadays, a large number of authors recognize that a total suppression strategy, as the one adopted during last decades, leads to a fire paradox: the more we fight for putting out all fires, the more extreme events occur and cause long term damages. The aim of this review is to provide a state of art about the connection between fire, humans and landscape, along time and space. Negative and positive impacts on ecosystem services and values are put in evidence, as well as their incidence on human aptitude to fire use as to fire suppression. In order to capture a consistent fragment of fire history, palaeofires and related palynological studies are considered. They enable a valuable, even if partial, look at the millenary fire regime. Actual strategies and future directions are described in order to show what are the alternatives for living with fire, since removing completely this disturbance from earth is not a option, nor feasible neither advisable. Examples from the world, in particular from the Alps and the Mediterranean basin, are shown for better illustrating the signature of

  1. Adjacent Lumbar Disc Herniation after Lumbar Short Spinal Fusion

    Koshi Ninomiya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old outpatient presented with a chief complaint of sudden left leg motor weakness and sensory disturbance. He had undergone L4/5 posterior interbody fusion with L3–5 posterior fusions for spondylolisthesis 3 years prior, and the screws were removed 1 year later. He has been followed up for 3 years, and there had been no adjacent segment problems before this presentation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed a large L2/3 disc hernia descending to the L3/4 level. Compared to the initial MRI, this hernia occurred in an “intact” disc among multilevel severely degenerated discs. Right leg paresis and bladder dysfunction appeared a few days after admission. Microscopic lumbar disc herniotomy was performed. The right leg motor weakness improved just after the operation, but the moderate left leg motor weakness and difficulty in urination persisted.

  2. Fire Models and Design Fires

    Poulsen, Annemarie

    The aim of this project is to perform an experimental study on the influence of the thermal feedback on the burning behavior of well ventilated pre-flashover fires. For the purpose an experimental method has been developed. Here the same identical objects are tested under free burn conditions and...... experiments carried out by Carleton University and NRC-IRC performed on seven different types of fire loads representing commercial premises, comprise the tests used for the study. The results show that for some of the room test the heat release rate increased due to thermal feedback compared to free burn for...... a pre-flashover fire. Two phenomena were observed, that relate well to theory was found. In an incipient phase the heat release rate rose with the temperature of the smoke layer/enclosure boundaries. This increase was also found to depend on the flammability properties of the burning object. The...

  3. Fire Brigade

    2004-01-01

    With effect from 15 April 2004, the Fire Brigade will no longer issue master keys on loan. Contractors' personnel requiring access to locked premises in order to carry out work must apply to the CERN staff member responsible for the contract concerned.

  4. The relative importance of disturbance and exotic-plant abundance in California coastal sage scrub

    Fleming, G.M.; Diffendorfer, J.E.; Zedler, P.H.

    2009-01-01

    Many ecosystems of conservation concern require some level of disturbance to sustain their species composition and ecological function. However, inappropriate disturbance regimes could favor invasion or expansion of exotic species. In southern California coastal sage scrub (CSS) fire is a natural disturbance, but because of human influence, frequencies may now be unnaturally high. Other anthropogenic disturbances such as grazing also occur in reserve areas. Managers charged with imposing or tolerating fire or other disturbance within their reserves are concerned that habitat quality may be degraded by an increasing abundance of exotic plants. We used vegetation monitoring data from Camp Pendleton, California, USA, to assess the correlation between past disturbances (frequent fire, agriculture, or grazing and mechanical disturbances) and current exotic species abundance in CSS. We found that disturbance history was only modestly related to exotic abundance overall, but fire frequency showed the strongest association. We also examined whether cover and richness of various native plant life forms (woody species, perennial herbs, and annual herbs) were more strongly influenced by disturbance history or by exotic-plant abundance. Native plant responses varied among life forms, but woody species and annual herbs were generally more strongly and negatively associated with exotic abundance than with disturbance. Effective CSS conservation will require developing means to curb the negative impacts of exotic plants, which may abound with or without severe or recent disturbance. Additionally, more focus should be given to understory herbs showing sensitivity to invasion. Though understudied, native herbs comprise the greatest portion of plant diversity in CSS and are critical to preservation of the community as a whole. ?? 2009 by the Ecological Society of America.

  5. Homogenizing the dose for adjacent fields

    Difficulties are found in radiotherapy in the determination of the gap which should be left among adjacent fields on the skin. In order to homogenize the dose at a given depth, measurements are done with a wood phantom using films, thermoluminescent dosemeters and ionization chambers. Field match is checked according to tables related in the literature and experimental data. Two tables of field separation are built at various depths, one for simultaneous adjacent fields and the other for non-simultaneous adjacent fields. Tables must be checked and the additional distances corrected for each field

  6. An assessment of fire occurrence regime and performance of Canadian fire weather index in south central Siberian boreal region

    T. Chu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Wildfire is the dominant natural disturbance in Eurasian boreal region, which acts as a major driver of the global carbon cycle. An effectiveness of wildfire management requires suitable tools for fire prevention and fire risk assessment. This study aims to investigate fire occurrence patterns in relation to fire weather conditions in the remote south central Siberia region. The Canadian Fire Weather Index derived from large-scale meteorological reanalysis data was evaluated with respects to fire regimes during 14 consecutive fire seasons in south central Siberian environment. All the fire weather codes and indices, including the Fine Fuel Moisture Code (FFMC, the Duff Moisture Code (DMC, the Drought Code (DC, the Buildup Index (BUI, the Initial Spread Index (ISI, and the Fire Weather Index (FWI, were highly reflected inter-annual variation of fire activity in south central Siberia. Even though human-caused fires were major events in Russian boreal forest including south central Siberia, extreme fire years were strongly correlated with ambient weather conditions (e.g. Arctic Oscillation, air temperature, relative humidity and wind, showing by in-phase (or positive linear relationship and significant wavelet coherence between fire activity and DMC, ISI, BUI, and FWI. Time series observation of 14 fire seasons showed that there was an average of about 3 months lags between the peaks of fire weather conditions and fire activity, which should take into account when using coarse scale fire weather indices in the assessment of fire danger in the study area. The results are expected to contribute to a better reconstruction and prediction of fire activity using large-scale reanalysis data in remote regions in which station data are very few.

  7. Postoperative circadian disturbances

    Gögenur, Ismail

    2010-01-01

    reduced the first night after minimally invasive surgery. The core body temperature rhythm was disturbed after both major and minor surgery. There was a change in the sleep wake cycle with a significantly increased duration of REM-sleep in the day and evening time after major surgery compared with...... after major surgery was increased on the fourth day after surgery and the total excretion of AMT6s in urine was correlated to sleep efficiency and wake time after sleep onset, but was not correlated to the occurrence of postoperative cognitive dysfunction. We could only prove an effect of melatonin...... substitution in patients with lower than median pain levels for a three days period after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In the series of studies included in this thesis we have systematically shown that circadian disturbances are found in the secretion of hormones, the sleep-wake cycle, core body temperature...

  8. Evaluation of vegetation post-fire resilience in the Alpine region using descriptors derived from MODIS spectral index time series

    Di Mauro, Biagio; Fava, Francesco; Busetto, Lorenzo; Crosta, Giovanni Franco; Colombo, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    In this study a method based on the analysis of MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) time series is proposed to estimate the post-fire resilience of mountain vegetation (broadleaf forest and prairies) in the Italian Alps. Resilience is defined herewith as the ability of a dynamical system to counteract disturbances. It can be quantified by the amount of time the disturbed system takes to resume, in statistical terms, an ecological functionality comparable with its undisturbed behavior. Satellite images of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and of the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) with spatial resolution of 250m and temporal resolution of 16 days in the 2000-2012 time period were used. Wildfire affected areas in the Lombardy region between the years 2000 and 2010 were analysed. Only large fires (affected area >40ha) were selected. For each burned area, an undisturbed adjacent control site was located. Data pre-processing consisted in the smoothing of MODIS time series for noise removal and then a double logistic function was fitted. Land surface phenology descriptors (proxies for growing season start/end/length and green biomass) were extracted in order to characterize the time evolution of the vegetation. Descriptors from a burned area were compared to those extracted from the respective control site by means of the one-way analysis of variance. According to the number of subsequent years which exhibit statistically meaningful difference between burned and control site, five classes of resilience were identified and a set of thematic maps was created for each descriptor. The same method was applied to all 84 aggregated events and to events aggregated by main land cover. EVI index results more sensitive to fire impact than NDVI index. Analysis shows that fire causes both a reduction of the biomass and a variation in the phenology of the Alpine vegetation. Results suggest an average ecosystem resilience of 6-7 years. Moreover

  9. Detect Adjacent Well by Analyzing Geomagnetic Anomalies

    Su Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study describes a method of determining the position of adjacent well by analyzing geomagnetic anomalies in the drilling. In the experiment, put a casing in the geomagnetic field respectively to simulate 3 conditions, which are vertical well, deviated well and horizontal well. Study the interference of regional geomagnetic caused by casing, summary the law of the regional geomagnetic field anomalies caused by the adjacent casing. Experimental results show that: magnetic intensity distortion caused by deviated well is similar to that caused by horizontal well, but the distortion is different from vertical well. The scope and amplitude of N and E component magnetic intensity distortion will increase with the increase of casing inclination, meanwhile the scope and amplitude of V component distortion will decrease and the distortion value changes from negative to positive to the southwest of adjacent well. Through the analysis of geomagnetic anomalies, the position of the adjacent wells could be determined.

  10. Atmospheric Disturbance Environment Definition

    Tank, William G.

    1994-01-01

    Traditionally, the application of atmospheric disturbance data to airplane design problems has been the domain of the structures engineer. The primary concern in this case is the design of structural components sufficient to handle transient loads induced by the most severe atmospheric "gusts" that might be encountered. The concern has resulted in a considerable body of high altitude gust acceleration data obtained with VGH recorders (airplane velocity, V, vertical acceleration, G, altitude, H) on high-flying airplanes like the U-2 (Ehernberger and Love, 1975). However, the propulsion system designer is less concerned with the accelerations of the airplane than he is with the airflow entering the system's inlet. When the airplane encounters atmospheric turbulence it responds with transient fluctuations in pitch, yaw, and roll angles. These transients, together with fluctuations in the free-stream temperature and pressure will disrupt the total pressure, temperature, Mach number and angularity of the inlet flow. For the mixed compression inlet, the result is a disturbed throat Mach number and/or shock position, and in extreme cases an inlet unstart can occur (cf. Section 2.1). Interest in the effects of inlet unstart on the vehicle dynamics of large, supersonic airplanes is not new. Results published by NASA in 1962 of wind tunnel studies of the problem were used in support of the United States Supersonic Transport program (SST) (White, at aI, 1963). Such studies continued into the late 1970's. However, in spite of such interest, there never was developed an atmospheric disturbance database for inlet unstart analysis to compare with that available for the structures load analysis. Missing were data for the free-stream temperature and pressure disturbances that also contribute to the unStart problem.

  11. Adjacency Algebra of Unitary Cayley Graph

    A. Satyanarayana Reddy

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A few properties of unitary Cayley graphs are explored using their eigenvalues. It is shown that the adjacency algebra of a unitary Cayley graph is a coherent algebra. Finally, a class of unitary Cayley graphs that are distance regular are also obtained.Key Words: Adjacency Algebra, Circulant Graph, Coherent Algebra, Distance Regular Graph,Ramanujan's sum .AMS(2010: 05C25, 05C50

  12. Surface radiative forcing of forest disturbances over northeastern China

    Forests provide important climate forcing through biogeochemical and biogeophysical processes. In this study, we investigated the climatic effects of forest disturbances due to changes in forest biomass and surface albedo in terms of radiative forcing over northeastern China. Four types of forest disturbances were considered: fires, insect damage, logging, and afforestation and reforestation. The mechanisms of the influence of forest disturbances on climate were different. ‘Instantaneous’ net radiative forcings caused by fires, insect damage, logging, and afforestation and reforestation were estimated at 0.53 ± 0.08 W m−2, 1.09 ± 0.14 W m−2, 2.23 ± 0.27 W m−2, and 0.14 ± 0.04 W m−2, respectively. Trajectories of CO2-driven radiative forcing, albedo-driven radiative forcing, and net forcing were different with time for each type of disturbance. Over a decade, the estimated net forcings were 2.24 ± 0.11 W m−2, 0.20 ± 0.31 W m−2, 1.06 ± 0.41 W m−2, and −0.47 ± 0.07 W m−2, respectively. These estimated radiative forcings from satellite observations provided evidence for the mechanisms of the influences of forest disturbances on climate. (paper)

  13. Age structure and disturbance legacy of North American forests

    Y. Pan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Most forests of the world are recovering from a past disturbance. It is well known that forest disturbances profoundly affect carbon stocks and fluxes in forest ecosystems, yet it has been a great challenge to assess disturbance impacts in estimates of forest carbon budgets. Net sequestration or loss of CO2 by forests after disturbance follows a predictable pattern with forest recovery. Forest age, which is related to time since disturbance, is a useful surrogate variable for analyses of the impact of disturbance on forest carbon. In this study, we compiled the first continental forest age map of North America by combining forest inventory data, historical fire data, optical satellite data and the dataset from NASA's Landsat Ecosystem Disturbance Adaptive Processing System (LEDAPS project. A companion map of the standard deviations for age estimates was developed for quantifying uncertainty. We discuss the significance of the disturbance legacy from the past, as represented by current forest age structure in different regions of the US and Canada, by analyzing the causes of disturbances from land management and nature over centuries and at various scales. We also show how such information can be used with inventory data for analyzing carbon management opportunities. By combining geographic information about forest age with estimated C dynamics by forest type, it is possible to conduct a simple but powerful analysis of the net CO2 uptake by forests, and the potential for increasing (or decreasing this rate as a result of direct human intervention in the disturbance/age status. Finally, we describe how the forest age data can be used in large-scale carbon modeling, both for land-based biogeochemistry models and atmosphere-based inversion models, in order to improve the spatial accuracy of carbon cycle simulations.

  14. Effect of bracing systems on the fire-induced progressive collapse of steel structures

    Jiang, Jian; Li, Guo-qiang; Usmani, Asif

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of various bracing systems on the fire-induced progressive collapse resistance of steel-framed structures using OpenSees. Two types of bracing systems (vertical and hat bracing) and various fire scenarios (single and multi-compartment fires) are considered. Four collapse mechanisms of steel frames in fire are found through parametric studies. General collapse is characterized by the collapse of the heated bay followed by lateral drift of adjacent cool bays. ...

  15. Challenges in Modeling Disturbance Regimes and Their Impacts in Arctic and Boreal Ecosystems (Invited)

    McGuire, A. D.; Rupp, T. S.; Kurz, W.

    2013-12-01

    Disturbances in arctic and boreal terrestrial ecosystems influence services provided by these ecosystems to society. In particular, changes in disturbance regimes in northern latitudes have uncertain consequences for the climate system. A major challenge for the scientific community is to develop the capability to predict how the frequency, severity and resultant impacts of disturbance regimes will change in response to future changes in climate projected for northern high latitudes. Here we compare what is known about drivers and impacts of wildfire, phytophagous insect pests, and thermokarst disturbance to illustrate the complexities in predicting future changes in disturbance regimes and their impacts in arctic and boreal regions. Much of the research on predicting fire has relied on the use of drivers related to fire weather. However, changes in vegetation, such as increases in broadleaf species, associated with intensified fire regimes have the potential to influence future fire regimes through negative feedbacks associated with reduced flammability. Phytophagous insect outbreaks have affected substantial portions of the boreal region in the past, but frequently the range of the tree host is larger than the range of the insect. There is evidence that a number of insect species are expanding their range in response to climate change. Major challenges to predicting outbreaks of phytophagous insects include modeling the effects of climate change on insect growth and maturation, winter mortality, plant host health, the synchrony of insect life stages and plant host phenology, and changes in the ranges of insect pests. Moreover, Earth System Models often simplify the representation of vegetation characteristics, e.g. the use of plant functional types, providing insufficient detail to link to insect population models. Thermokarst disturbance occurs when the thawing of ice-rich permafrost results in substantial ground subsidence. In the boreal forest, thermokarst can

  16. Fire Symfonier

    Nielsen, Svend Hvidtfelt

    2009-01-01

    sidste fire symfonier. Den er måske snarere at opfatte som et præludium til disse. At påstå, at symfonierne fra Holmboes side er planlagt til at være beslægtede, ville være at gå for vidt. Alene de 26 år, der skiller den 10. fra den 13., gør påstanden - i bedste fald - dubiøs. Når deres udformning...... udkrystallisering som i de sidste små 30 år af hans virke har afkastet disse fire variationer over en grundlæggende central holmboesk fornemmelse for form, melodi, klang og rytme. Denne oplevelse har fået mig til at udforske symfonierne, for at finde til bunds i dette holmboeske fællestræk, som jeg mener her står...

  17. Comparing modern and presettlement forest dynamics of a subboreal wilderness: Does spruce budworm enhance fire risk?

    Sturtevant, Brian R.; Miranda, Brian R.; Shinneman, Douglas J.; Gustafson, Eric J.; Wolter, Peter T.

    2012-01-01

    Insect disturbance is often thought to increase fire risk through enhanced fuel loadings, particularly in coniferous forest ecosystems. Yet insect disturbances also affect successional pathways and landscape structure that interact with fire disturbances (and vice-versa) over longer time scales. We applied a landscape succession and disturbance model (LANDIS-II) to evaluate the relative strength of interactions between spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) outbreaks and fire disturbances in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area (BWCA) in northern Minnesota (USA). Disturbance interactions were evaluated for two different scenarios: presettlement forests and fire regimes vs. contemporary forests and fire regimes. Forest composition under the contemporary scenario trended toward mixtures of deciduous species (primarily Betula papyrifera and Populus spp.) and shade-tolerant conifers (Picea mariana, Abies balsamea, Thuja occidentalis), with disturbances dominated by a combination of budworm defoliation and high-severity fires. The presettlement scenario retained comparatively more “big pines” (i.e., Pinus strobus, P. resinosa) and tamarack (L. laricina), and experienced less budworm disturbance and a comparatively less-severe fire regime. Spruce budworm disturbance decreased area burned and fire severity under both scenarios when averaged across the entire 300-year simulations. Contrary to past research, area burned and fire severity during outbreak decades were each similar to that observed in non-outbreak decades. Our analyses suggest budworm disturbances within forests of the BWCA have a comparatively weak effect on long-term forest composition due to a combination of characteristics. These include strict host specificity, fine-scaled patchiness created by defoliation damage, and advance regeneration of its primary host, balsam fir (A. balsamea) that allows its host to persist despite repeated disturbances. Understanding the nature of the three-way interaction

  18. Circumpolar Arctic greening: Relationships to summer sea-ice concentrations, land temperatures and disturbance regimes

    Walker, D. A.; Bhatt, U. S.; Epstein, H. E.; Raynolds, M. K.; Frost, G. V.; Leibman, M. O.; Khomutov, A.; Jia, G.; Comiso, J. C.; Pinzon, J. E.; Tucker, C. J.; Webber, P. J.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2009-12-01

    The global distribution of Arctic tundra vegetation is closely tied to the presence of summer sea ice. Models predict that the reduction of sea ice will cause large changes to summer land-surface temperatures. Warming combined with increased natural and anthropogenic disturbance are expected to greatly increase arctic tundra productivity. To examine where tundra productivity is changing most rapidly, we studied 1982-2008 trends of sea-ice concentrations, summer warmth index (SWI) and the annual Maximum Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (MaxNDVI). We summarize the results according to the tundra adjacent to 14 Arctic seas. Sea-ice concentrations have declined and summer land temperatures have increased in all parts of the Arctic coast. The overall percentage increase in Arctic MaxNDVI was +7%. The trend was much greater in North America (+11%) than in Eurasia (+4%). Large percentage increases of MaxNDVI occurred inland from Davis Straight (+20%), Baffin Bay (+18%), Canadian Archipelago (+14%), Beaufort Sea (+12%), and Laptev Sea (+8%). Declines occurred in the W. Chukchi (-6%) and E. Bering (-5%) seas. The changes in NDVI are strongly correlated to changes in summer ground temperatures. Two examples from a 900-km north-south Arctic transect in Russia and long-term observations at a High Arctic site in Canada provide insights to where the changes in productivity are occurring most rapidly. At tree line near Kharp in northwest Siberia, alder shrubs are expanding vigorously in fire-disturbed areas; seedling establishment is occurring primarily in areas with disturbed mineral soils, particularly nonsorted circles. In the Low Arctic tundra areas of the central Yamal Peninsula greening is concentrated in riparian areas and upland landslides associated with degrading massive ground ice, where low-willow shrublands replace the zonal sedge, dwarf-shrub tundra growing on nutrient-poor sands. In polar desert landscapes near the Barnes Ice Cap, Baffin Island, Canada

  19. Disturbing Behavior Checklists" Technical Manual

    Algozzine, Bob

    2012-01-01

    Ecological theorists have suggested that "disturbance" may result from an interaction between a child's behavior and reactions to that behavior within ecosystems such as schools. In this context, behavior is viewed as "disturbing" rather than "disturbed" and equal emphasis is given to the child and to individuals with whom the child interacts when…

  20. Development of a New Daily-Scale Forest Fire Danger Forecasting System Using Remote Sensing Data

    Chowdhury, Ehsan H.; Quazi K. Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Forest fires are a critical natural disturbance in most of the forested ecosystems around the globe, including the Canadian boreal forest where fires are recurrent. Here, our goal was to develop a new daily-scale forest fire danger forecasting system (FFDFS) using remote sensing data and implement it over the northern part of Canadian province of Alberta during 2009–2011 fire seasons. The daily-scale FFDFS was comprised of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-derived four-inp...

  1. Broad-Scale Environmental Conditions Responsible for Post-Fire Vegetation Dynamics

    Marsh, Stuart E.; Casady, Grant M.

    2010-01-01

    Ecosystem response to disturbance is influenced by environmental conditions at a number of scales. Changes in climate have altered fire regimes across the western United States, and have also likely altered spatio-temporal patterns of post-fire vegetation regeneration. Fire occurrence data and a vegetation index (NDVI) derived from the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) were used to monitor post-fire vegetation from 1989 to 2007. We first investigated differences in post-fi...

  2. Post-fire regeneration of Quercus sp. ecosystems in Alto Alentejo after 2003 wildfires

    Pereira, Marízia; Guiomar, Nuno; Martins, Mónica

    2011-01-01

    Fire is an ecological constant in the Mediterranean ecosystems and plays an important role in ecosystems dynamics. In Portugal we can distinguish different fire regimes, and thus it’s important to study these different areas independently. However it’s difficult to establish the regeneration patterns because they are influenced by local biophysical characteristics, land use, fire behaviour and other disturbance factors. In other hand there was lack of information about post-fire in southern P...

  3. Current fire regimes, impacts and the likely changes – IV: tropical Southeast Asia

    Page, Susan; Rieley, Jack; Hoscilo, Agata; Spessa, Allan; Weber, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    The Southeast Asian region is experiencing some of the world’s highest rates of deforestation and forest degradation, the principle drivers of which are agricultural expansion and wood extraction in combination with an increased incidence of fire. Recent changes in fire regimes in Southeast Asia are indicative of increased human-causd forest disturbance, but El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events also play a role in exacerbating fire occurrence and severity. Fires are now occurring on a m...

  4. Vulnerability of semi-enclosed marine systems to environmental disturbances

    MacCracken, M.; Escobar-Briones, E.; Gilbert, D.; Korotaev, G.; Naqvi, S.W.A; Perillo, G.M.E.; Rixen, T.; Stanev, E.; Sundby, B.; Thomas, H.; Unger, D.; Urban, E.R.

    Semi-Enclosed Marine Systems to Environmental Disturbances Michael MacCracken t Elva Escobar-Briones t Denis Gilbert, Gennady Korotaev, Wajih Naqvi, Gerardo M.E. Perillo, Tim Rixen, Emil Stanev, Bj0rn Sundby, Helmuth Thomas t Daniela Unger, and Edward R. Urban, Jr... to adjacent land areas and the open ocean, precludcs a simple, generalized description oftheirvulnerability. This chaptcr presents an overview 9 ...

  5. Vehicle Disturbance Test

    Clapp, Brian

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of the VDT is to measure and characterize uncompensated environmental disturbances acting upon the HST during normal operation. The VDT is a passive test {not a forced-response test} used to obtain signatures for both externally induced {e.g. SCM, SA-3, SSM thermal gradients} and internally induced {e.g. HGA, RWA, COS and WFC3 mechanisms} disturbances affecting HST LOS pointing. The disturbances observed will be used as the nominal on-orbit disturbances in pointing control simulations until the next VDT is run.The test occurs after release, and most of the VDT can be run during the BEA period. The ?V1 sunpoint portion of the VDT usually occurs after the BEA period is complete. The VDT shall consist of two separate tests that need not occur consecutively. The overall duration of the VDT is at least 13 orbits of spacecraft time including {1} at least 8 orbits at +V3 sunpoint after achieving thermal equilibrium {at least 36-hours at +V3 sunpoint} and three out of 8-orbits have RWA Friction Compensation turned Off, and {2} at least 5 orbits at ?V1 sunpoint {all or part of this segment have RWA Friction Compensation turned Off}. At the beginning of each test, the attitude control law gains are switched to maneuver gains, and the gyros are commanded to low mode. The nominal attitude control law configuration will be restored at the end of each test.Each test is initiated via SMS execution of stored program macros in the HST flight computer to switch the attitude control law gains to low-bandwidth maneuver gains, command the gyros into low mode, terminate Velocity aberration and parallax {VAP} processing, and manage the status of on-board RWA Friction Compensation. The nominal attitude control law configuration will be restored at the end of each test via SMS execution of stored program macros. The stored program command macros are developed specifically for the VDT by the Flight Software and Pointing Control System groups.

  6. Effects of habitat conditions and disturbance on lichen diversity

    Johansson, Per

    2006-01-01

    This thesis includes five papers from four studies on lichen diversity in its broad sense. The overall objectives were to examine species richness, composition, distribution, and abundance of lichens at tree and stand-level, after forest fire, and after prescribed burning. Based on these studies I develop two themes in the thesis: 1) The epiphytic lichen metacommunity – how tree-level lichen diversity depends on local and regional processes, whose importance may vary over time. 2) How disturb...

  7. Relative impact of previous disturbance history on the likelihood of additional disturbance in the Northern United States Forest Service USFS Region

    Hernandez, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Landsat archive is increasingly being used to detect trends in the occurrence of forest disturbance. Beyond information about the amount of area affected, forest managers need to know if and how disturbance regimes change. The National Forest System (NFS) has developed a comprehensive plan for carbon monitoring that requires a detailed temporal mapping of forest disturbances across 75 million hectares. A long-term annual time series that shows the timing, extent, and type of disturbance beginning in 1990 and ending in 2011 has been prepared for several USFS Regions, including the Northern Region. Our mapping starts with an automated detection of annual disturbances using a time series of historical Landsat imagery. Automated detections are meticulously inspected, corrected and labeled using various USFS ancillary datasets. The resulting maps of verified disturbance show the timing and types are fires, harvests, insect activity, disease, and abiotic (wind, drought, avalanche) damage. Also, the magnitude of each change event is modeled in terms of the proportion of canopy cover lost. The sequence of disturbances for every pixel since 1990 has been consistently mapped and is available across the entirety of NFS. Our datasets contain sufficient information to describe the frequency of stand replacement, as well as how often disturbance results in only a partial loss of canopy. This information provides empirical insight into how an initial disturbance may predispose a stand to further disturbance, and it also show a climatic signal in the occurrence of processes such as fire and insect epidemics. Thus, we have the information to model the likelihood of occurrence of certain disturbances after a given event (i.e. if we have a fire in the past what does that do to the likelihood of occurrence of insects in the future). Here, we explore if previous disturbance history is a reliable predictor of additional disturbance in the future and we present results of applying

  8. On the complexity of adjacent resource scheduling

    Duin, C.W.; Sluis, van, P.

    2004-01-01

    We study the problem of scheduling resource(s) for jobs in an adjacent manner (ARS). The problem relates to fixed interval scheduling on the one hand, and to the problem of two-dimensional strip packing on the other hand. Further, there is a close relation with multiprocessor scheduling. A distinguishing characteristic is the constraint of resource-adjacency. As an application of ARS, consider an airport where passengers check in for their flight, joining lines before one or more desks; at th...

  9. Adjacent Instability after Instrumented Lumbar Fusion.

    Wen-Jer Chen

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available The invention of pedicle screw instrumentation has greatly improved outcomes ofspinal fusion, which has become the treatment of choice for lumbar spondylolisthesis. Asresearchers accumulate experience, both theoretical and clinical advances are continuallybeing reported. A review of the literature and the experience of the authors show that thedevelopment of adjacent instability, as in the breakdown of a neighboring unfixed motionsegment, is a common consequence of an instrumented lumbar spine. This article reviewsthe risk factors and surgical treatment of adjacent instability. The authors believe that properpreoperative planning and complete surgical procedures are imperative to prevent adjacentinstability. For those who need revision surgery, meticulous surgical techniques can achievesatisfactory results.

  10. Variability in Fire Frequency and Forest Composition in Canada's Southeastern Boreal Forest: A Challenge for Sustainable Forest Management

    Mike Flannigan; Sylvie Gauthier; Christopher Carcaillet; Yves Bergeron; Pierre J.H. Richard; Prairie, Yves T.

    1998-01-01

    Because some consequences of fire resemble the effects of industrial forest harvesting, forest management is often considered as a disturbance having effects similar to those of natural disturbances. Although the analogy between forest management and fire disturbance in boreal ecosystems has some merit, it is important to recognize that it has limitations. First, normal forest rotations truncate the natural forest stand age distribution and eliminate over-mature forests from the landscape. Se...

  11. Fire safety at home

    ... over the smoke alarm as needed. Using a fire extinguisher can put out a small fire to keep it from getting out of control. Tips for use include: Keep fire extinguishers in handy locations, at least one on ...

  12. Fire Ant Bites

    ... Favorite Name: Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Fire Ant Bites Share | Fire ants are aggressive, venomous insects that have pinching ... across the United States, even into Puerto Rico. Fire ant stings usually occur on the feet or ...

  13. Crown Fire Potential

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Crown fire potential was modeled using FlamMap, an interagency fire behavior mapping and analysis program that computes potential fire behavior characteristics. The...

  14. Fire safety at home

    ... over the smoke alarm as needed. Using a fire extinguisher can put out a small fire to keep it from getting out of control. Tips for use include: Keep fire extinguishers in handy locations -- at least one on ...

  15. Multiple disturbances accelerate clonal growth in a potentially monodominant bamboo.

    Gagnon, Paul R; Platt, William J

    2008-03-01

    Organisms capable of rapid clonal growth sometimes monopolize newly freed space and resources. We hypothesize that sequential disturbances might change short-term clonal demography of these organisms in ways that promote formation of monotypic stands. We examined this hypothesis by studying the clonal response of Arundinaria gigantea (giant cane, a bamboo) to windstorm and fire. We studied giant cane growing in both a large tornado-blowdown gap and under forest canopy, in burned and unburned plots, using a split-block design. We measured density of giant cane ramets (culms) and calculated finite rates of increase (lamda) for populations of ramets over three years. Ramet density nearly doubled in stands subjected to both windstorm and fire; the high ramet densities that resulted could inhibit growth in other plants. In comparison, ramet density increased more slowly after windstorm alone, decreased after fire alone, and remained in stasis in controls. We predict that small, sparse stands of giant cane could spread and amalgamate to form dense, monotypic stands (called "canebrakes") that might influence fire return intervals and act as an alternative state to bottomland forest. Other clonal species may similarly form monotypic stands following successive disturbances via rapid clonal growth. PMID:18459325

  16. Simulation of landscape disturbances and the effect of climatic change

    Baker, W.L.

    1993-04-01

    Altering the natural disturbance regime of a landscape produces changes in the structure of that landscape as the landscape adjusts to the new disturbance regime. A computer simulation model was designed to enable analyses of the longterm changes to be expected in landscapes as their disturbance regime changes. The model, DISPATCH, is the first dynamic spatial simulation model built around a geographical information system (GIS). The model also includes a new set of programs, the r.le programs, that is the first set of programs designed for calculating landscape structure measures within a GIS. The DISPATCH model was used, to analyze the effects of human alterations of disturbance regimes and global change on landscape structure. Landscapes do not adjust quickly to these alterations based on available data. Landscapes subjected to warming or to longterm fire suppression experience a decline in patch richness, Shannon diversity, the amount of edge and contrast, but an increase in distance between patches, angular second moment (texture measure) and patch size. In contrast, landscapes subjected to cooling, the short-term effects of fire suppression, fragmentation, or traditional prescribed burning tend to respond with increasing richness, Shannon diversity, edge, and contrast, but declining distance, angular second moment, and size. The pattern of response is different at different scales, with important implications for species.

  17. Postoperative circadian disturbances

    Gögenur, Ismail

    2010-01-01

    postoperative recovery parameters, and if pharmacological administration of chronobiotics could improve postoperative recovery. Circadian rhythm disturbances were found in all the examined endogenous rhythms. A delay was found in the endogenous rhythm of plasma melatonin and excretion of the metabolite of...... after major surgery was increased on the fourth day after surgery and the total excretion of AMT6s in urine was correlated to sleep efficiency and wake time after sleep onset, but was not correlated to the occurrence of postoperative cognitive dysfunction. We could only prove an effect of melatonin...... rhythm, autonomic nervous system tone, myocardial ischaemia and activity rhythm after surgery. Correlation exists between circadian rhythm parameters and measures of postoperative sleep quality and recovery. However, oral melatonin treatment in the first three nights after surgery, cannot yet be...

  18. Adjacent stimulation and measurement patterns considered harmful

    We characterize the ability of electrical impedance tomography (EIT) to distinguish changes in internal conductivity distributions, and analyze it as a function of stimulation and measurement patterns. A distinguishability measure, z, is proposed which is related to the signal-to-noise ratio of a medium and to the probability of detection of conductivity changes in a region of interest. z is a function of the number of electrodes, the EIT stimulation and measurement protocol, the stimulation amplitude, the measurement noise, and the size and location of the contrasts. Using this measure we analyze various choices of stimulation and measurement patterns under the constraint of medical electrical safety limits (maximum current into the body). Analysis is performed for a planar placement of 16 electrodes for simulated 3D tank and chest shapes, and measurements in a saline tank. Results show that the traditional (and still most common) adjacent stimulation and measurement patterns have by far the poorest performance (by 6.9 ×). Good results are obtained for trigonometric patterns and for pair drive and measurement patterns separated by over 90°. Since the possible improvement over adjacent patterns is so large, we present this result as a call to action: adjacent patterns are harmful, and should be abandoned. We recommend using pair drive and measurement patterns separated by one electrode less than 180°. We describe an approach to modify an adjacent pattern EIT system by adjusting electrode placement

  19. Temporal Patterns of Fire in West Kalimantan, Indonesia

    Murphy, K. J.

    2004-12-01

    Fire is an essential landscape management tool extensively employed in West Kalimantan Indonesia to clear land and prepare agricultural areas. Under typically wet climatic conditions fires are easily controlled and seldom spread into adjacent land cover. However, during droughts induced by strong El Nino events, land management fires threaten vast areas of the landscape threatening endangered species habitat and releasing large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. This study investigates temporal and spatial variations of fires detected by Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Along Track Scanning Radiometer between 2000 and 2004 against the MODIS Vegetation Continuous Fields and cultural features manually digitized from Landsat ETM+ scenes. Patterns of fire during phases of the El Niño-La Niña cycle are described and the impacts of fires on orangutan habitat are investigated.

  20. Changes in forest structure and composition after fire in tropical montane cloud forests near the Andean treeline

    Oliveras Menor, I.; Malhi, Y.; Salinas, N.; Huaman, V.; Urquiaga-Flores, E.; Kala-Mamani, J.; Quintano-Loaiza, J.A.; Cuba-Torres, I.; Lizarraga-Morales, N.; Roman-Cuesta, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In tropical montane cloud forests (TMCFs) fires can be a frequent source of disturbance near the treeline. Aims: To identify how forest structure and tree species composition change in response to fire and to identify fire-tolerant species, and determine which traits or characteristics a

  1. Travel Guide (Travelling Fires)

    Stern-Gottfried, Jamie; Rein, Guillermo; Torero, Jose L

    2009-01-01

    Close inspection of real fires in large, open compartments reveals that they do not burn simultaneously throughout the whole compartment. Instead, these fires tend to move as flames spread, partitions or false ceilings break, and ventilation changes through glazing failure. These fires have been labelled ‘travelling fires’ and represent a new understanding of fire behaviour in modern building layouts. Despite these observations, fire scenarios currently used for the structural fire design of ...

  2. Site assessment and cleanup of the Youngs Road small arms firing range at Moosehorn NWR

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A former small arms firing range was located adjacent to Youngs Road in an upland portion of the Baring Division of Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge, Washington...

  3. Broad-Scale Environmental Conditions Responsible for Post-Fire Vegetation Dynamics

    Stuart E. Marsh

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Ecosystem response to disturbance is influenced by environmental conditions at a number of scales. Changes in climate have altered fire regimes across the western United States, and have also likely altered spatio-temporal patterns of post-fire vegetation regeneration. Fire occurrence data and a vegetation index (NDVI derived from the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR were used to monitor post-fire vegetation from 1989 to 2007. We first investigated differences in post-fire rates of vegetation regeneration between ecoregions. We then related precipitation, temperature, and elevation records at four temporal scales to rates of post-fire vegetation regeneration to ascertain the influence of climate on post-fire vegetation dynamics. We found that broad-scale climate factors are an important influence on post-fire vegetation regeneration. Most notably, higher rates of post-fire regeneration occurred with warmer minimum temperatures. Increases in precipitation also resulted in higher rates of post-fire vegetation growth. While explanatory power was slight, multiple statistical approaches provided evidence for real ecological drivers of post-fire regeneration that should be investigated further at finer scales. The sensitivity of post-disturbance vegetation dynamics to climatic drivers has important ramifications for the management of ecosystems under changing climatic conditions. Shifts in temperature and precipitation regimes are likely to result in changes in post-disturbance dynamics, which could represent important feedbacks into the global climate system.

  4. Microbiological assessment of technogenicaly disturbed forest ecosystems in Central Siberia

    A. V. Bogorodskaya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The state of soil microbial complexes of forest ecosystems of Central Siberia, disturbed by cutting, fires, emissions of pollutants and mining was investigated. The most appropriate indicators for early diagnosis of the condition and sustainability assessment of soils were the contents of microbial biomass, the intensity of the basal respiration and microbial metabolic quotient. Recorded time quantitative and structural-taxonomic restructuring of ecological trophic groups of microorganisms exhibited orientation of the elementary soil-biological processes and allowed detail to assess the state of soils of disturbed forest ecosystems. Successions of soil microorganisms reflected stages of plant succession after cutting. Structural and functional changes in the microbial soil complexes marked by only one-two years after cutting of coniferous forests. For the grassy stage in deciduous young stands, there was an increase in soil microbial activity that accompanied the development of the sod process. Microbiological processes were balanced and comparable to the control at the stage of closed 30-year-old stands. Post-fire recovery of the microbial soil complexes was determined by fire severity and by the properties of soils and vegetation succession. Functional activity of microbial soil complexes were recovered in one or two years after a low-intensity fires, whereas after high-intensity fires – was not recovered in eight years. Indicative responses of soil microorganisms in the sustainable impact of aggressive pollutants tundra zone of the Norilsk industrial region were registered at the functional and at the structural level. In areas of moderate and weak disturbances of vegetation, there were quantitative changes, whereas strong disturbances and constant exposure to pollutants marked structural and taxonomic adjustment of microbial soil complexes, disturbed dynamic processes of synthesis-mineralization and reduced adaptive capacity saprophytic

  5. Sleep Disturbances in Mood Disorders.

    Rumble, Meredith E; White, Kaitlin Hanley; Benca, Ruth M

    2015-12-01

    The article provides an overview of common and differentiating self-reported and objective sleep disturbances seen in mood-disordered populations. The importance of considering sleep disturbances in the context of mood disorders is emphasized, because a large body of evidence supports the notion that sleep disturbances are a risk factor for onset, exacerbation, and relapse of mood disorders. In addition, potential mechanisms for sleep disturbance in depression, other primary sleep disorders that often occur with mood disorders, effects of antidepressant and mood-stabilizing drugs on sleep, and the adjunctive effect of treating sleep in patients with mood disorders are discussed. PMID:26600106

  6. Fire PSA for MAPS

    Full text: Fire hazard has been identified as one of the major contributors to a plant's operational risk. As a result of several fire incidences at nuclear power plants, internal fire is included in level 1 probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) studies of nuclear power plants (NPPs). This activity is termed as fire risk analysis or fire PSA. In this context, fire PSA studies were initiated for Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS). Fire PSA extends the consequence analysis of a fire event towards core damage, in case of nuclear power plants. The paper summarises and gives an overview of the fire PSA procedure performed for MAPS. It highlights the issues associated with the collection of data and information needed for fire modelling. An estimate of the contribution of fire to core damage frequency (CDF) has been obtained

  7. The Effects of Disturbance History on Ground-Layer Plant Community Composition in British Columbia

    Michael Ton

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant communities are sensitive to perturbations and may display alternative recovery pathways depending on disturbance history. In sub-boreal lodgepole pine forests of central interior British Columbia, Canada, fire and logging are two widespread landscape disturbances that overlap in many regions. We asked whether cumulative, short-interval disturbance from logging and fire resulted in different ground-layer plant communities than resulted from fire alone. Using field-collected data, we compared the taxonomic composition and functional traits of 3-year old plant communities that were either harvested 6-to-13 years prior, or not harvested prior to being burned in a large stand-replacing fire. The taxonomic composition diverged between the two treatments, driven primarily by differences in a few key indicator species such as Petasites frigidus and Vaccinium membranaceum. Analysis of individual species’ morphological traits indicated that only a few species vary in size in relation to disturbance history. Our data suggest that a history of forest harvest leaves a subtle footprint on post-fire ground-layer plant communities at early stages of succession.

  8. Mapping Disturbance Dynamics in Wet Sclerophyll Forests Using Time Series Landsat

    Haywood, A.; Verbesselt, J.; Baker, P. J.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we characterised the temporal-spectral patterns associated with identifying acute-severity disturbances and low-severity disturbances between 1985 and 2011 with the objective to test whether different disturbance agents within these categories can be identified with annual Landsat time series data. We analysed a representative State forest within the Central Highlands which has been exposed to a range of disturbances over the last 30 years, including timber harvesting (clearfell, selective and thinning) and fire (wildfire and prescribed burning). We fitted spectral time series models to annual normal burn ratio (NBR) and Tasseled Cap Indices (TCI), from which we extracted a range of disturbance and recovery metrics. With these metrics, three hierarchical random forest models were trained to 1) distinguish acute-severity disturbances from low-severity disturbances; 2a) attribute the disturbance agents most likely within the acute-severity class; 2b) and attribute the disturbance agents most likely within the low-severity class. Disturbance types (acute severity and low-severity) were successfully mapped with an overall accuracy of 72.9 %, and the individual disturbance types were successfully attributed with overall accuracies ranging from 53.2 % to 64.3 %. Low-severity disturbance agents were successfully mapped with an overall accuracy of 80.2 %, and individual agents were successfully attributed with overall accuracies ranging from 25.5 % to 95.1. Acute-severity disturbance agents were successfully mapped with an overall accuracy of 95.4 %, and individual agents were successfully attributed with overall accuracies ranging from 94.2 % to 95.2 %. Spectral metrics describing the disturbance magnitude were more important for distinguishing the disturbance agents than the post-disturbance response slope. Spectral changes associated with planned burning disturbances had generally lower magnitudes than selective harvesting. This study demonstrates the

  9. Carbon Cycling, Climate Regulation, and Disturbances in Canadian Forests: Scientific Principles for Management

    Jean-Sébastien Landry; Navin Ramankutty

    2015-01-01

    Canadian forests are often perceived as pristine and among the last remaining wilderness, but the majority of them are officially managed and undergo direct land use, mostly for wood harvest. This land use has modified their functions and properties, often inadvertently (e.g., age structure) but sometimes purposefully (e.g., fire suppression). Based on a review of the literature pertaining to carbon cycling, climate regulation, and disturbances from logging, fire, and insect outbreaks, we pro...

  10. Modeling disturbance-based native invasive species control and its implications for management

    Shackelford, Nancy; Renton, Michael; Perring, Michael; Hobbs, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Shifts in disturbance regime have often been linked to invasion in systems by native and nonnative species. This process can have negative effects on biodiversity and ecosystem function. Degradation may be ameliorated by the reinstatement of the disturbance regimes, such as the reintroduction of fire in pyrogenic systems. Modeling is one method through which potential outcomes of different regimes can be investigated. We created a population model to examine the control of a native invasive t...

  11. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion.

    Lee, Jae Chul; Choi, Sung-Woo

    2015-10-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  12. Nonequilibrium phenomena in adjacent electrically isolated nanostructures

    Khrapai, V. S.; Ludwig, S.; Kotthaus, J. P.; Tranitz, H. P.; Wegscheider, W.

    2008-01-01

    We report on nonequilibrium interaction phenomena between adjacent but electrostatically separated nanostructures in GaAs. A current flowing in one externally biased nanostructure causes an excitation of electrons in a circuit of a second nanostructure. As a result we observe a dc current generated in the unbiased second nanostructure. The results can be qualitatively explained in terms of acoustic phonon based energy transfer between the two mutually isolated circuits.

  13. Normalized algorithm for mapping and dating forest disturbances and regrowth for the United States

    He, Liming; Chen, Jing M.; Zhang, Shaoliang; Gomez, Gustavo; Pan, Yude; McCullough, Kevin; Birdsey, Richard; Masek, Jeffrey G.

    2011-04-01

    Forest disturbances such as harvesting, wildfire and insect infestation are critical ecosystem processes affecting the carbon cycle. Because carbon dynamics are related to time since disturbance, forest stand age that can be used as a surrogate for major clear-cut/fire disturbance information has recently been recognized as an important input to forest carbon cycle models for improving prediction accuracy. In this study, forest disturbances in the USA for the period of ˜1990-2000 were mapped using 400+ pairs of re-sampled Landsat TM/ETM scenes in 500m resolution, which were provided by the Landsat Ecosystem Disturbance Adaptive Processing System project. The detected disturbances were then separated into two five-year age groups, facilitated by Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) data, which was used to calculate the area of forest regeneration for each county in the USA. In this study, a disturbance index (DI) was defined as the ratio of the short wave-infrared (SWIR, band 5) to near-infrared (NIR, band 4) reflectance. Forest disturbances were identified through the Normalized Difference of Disturbance Index (NDDI) between circa 2000 and 1990, where a positive NDDI means disturbance and a negative NDDI means regrowth. Axis rotation was performed on the plot between DIs of the two matched Landsat scenes in order to reduce any difference of DIs caused by non-disturbance factors. The threshold of NDDI for each TM/ETM pair was determined by analysis of FIA data. Minor disturbances affecting small areas may be omitted due to the coarse resolution of the aggregated Landsat data, but the major stand-clearing disturbances (clear-cut harvest, fire) are captured. The spatial distribution of the detected disturbed areas was validated by Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity fire data in four States of the western USA (Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and California). Results indicate omission errors of 66.9%. An important application of this remote sensing-based disturbance map is

  14. Post-fire vegetation phenology in Siberian burn scars

    BALZTER, Heiko; Cuevas-Gonzalez, Maria; Gerard, France; Riano, David

    2008-01-01

    Boreal forests comprise one third of global forested area and are the largest terrestrial carbon store. Forest fires are the regions most dynamic disturbance factor, occurring mainly in Siberia, Russian Far East, Canada and Alaska, and these fires represent a globally important release of terrestrial carbon to the atmosphere, via the burning of vegetation and organic soils. Currently the boreal region is believed to be a net carbon sink,but climate change predictions indicate significant b...

  15. Fire Safety Technician

    Moore, Pam

    2007-01-01

    Fire protection is one of the most important considerations in the construction and operation of industrial plants and commercial buildings. Fire insurance rates are determined by fire probability factors, such as the type of construction, ease of transporting personnel, and the quality and quantity of fire protection equipment available. Because…

  16. Responses of aboveground and belowground forest carbon stocks to disturbances in boreal forests of Northeastern China

    Huang, Chao; He, Hong S.; Hawbaker, Todd J.; Liang, Yu; Gong, Peng; Wu, Wuzhiwei; Zhu, Zhiliang

    2016-04-01

    Boreal forests represents about 1/3 of forest area and 1/3 of forest carbon on earth. Carbon dynamics of boreal forests are sensitive to climate change, natural (e.g., fire) and anthropogenic (e.g., harvest) disturbances. Field-based studies suggest that disturbances alter species composition, stand structure, and litter decomposition, and have significant effects on boreal forest carbon dynamics. Most of these studies, however, covered a relatively short period of time (e.g., few decades), which is limited in revealing such long-term effects of disturbances. Models are therefore developed as important tools in exploring the long-term (e.g., hundreds of years) effects of disturbances on forest carbon dynamics. In this study, we applied a framework of coupling forest ecosystem and landscape model to evaluating the effect of fire, harvest and their interactions on carbon stocks in a boreal forest landscape of Northeastern China. We compared the simulation results under fire, harvest and fire-harvest interaction scenarios with the simulated value of succession scenario at 26 landtypes over 150 years at a 10-year time step. Our results suggest that aboveground and belowground carbon are significantly reduced by fire and harvest over 150years. Fire reduced aboveground carbon by 2.3±0.6 ton/ha, harvest by 6.0±1.4 ton/ha, and fire and harvest interaction by 8.0±1.9 tons/ha. Fire reduced belowground carbon by 4.6±3.4 ton/ha, harvest by 5.0±3.5 ton/ha, and fire-harvest interaction by 5.7±3.7 tons/ha. The divergent response of carbon stocks among landtypes and between disturbance scenarios was due to the spatial interactions between fire, harvest, and species composition. Our results indicated that boreal forests carbon stocks prediction needs to consider the effects of fire and harvest for improving the estimation accuracy.

  17. Fundamentals of Fire Phenomena

    Quintiere, James

    discipline. It covers thermo chemistry including mixtures and chemical reactions; Introduces combustion to the fire protection student; Discusses premixed flames and spontaneous ignition; Presents conservation laws for control volumes, including the effects of fire; Describes the theoretical bases for......Understanding fire dynamics and combustion is essential in fire safety engineering and in fire science curricula. Engineers and students involved in fire protection, safety and investigation need to know and predict how fire behaves to be able to implement adequate safety measures and hazard...... analyses. Fire phenomena encompass everything about the scientific principles behind fire behaviour. Combining the principles of chemistry, physics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid dynamics necessary to understand the fundamentals of fire phenomena, this book integrates the subject into a clear...

  18. Simulation of landscape disturbances and the effect of climatic change

    Baker, W.L.

    1993-01-29

    The purpose of this research is to understand how changes in climate may affect the structure of landscapes that are subject to periodic disturbances. A general model useful for examining the linkage between climatic change and landscape change has been developed. The model makes use of synoptic climatic data, a geographical information system (GRASS), field data on the location of disturbance patches, simulation code written in the SIMSCRIPT language, and a set of landscape structure analysis programs written specifically for this research project. A simplified version of the model, lacking the climatic driver, has been used to analyze how changes in disturbance regimes (in this case settlement and fire suppression) affect landscape change. Landscape change lagged in its response to changes in the disturbance regime, but the lags differed depending upon the character of the change and the particular measure considered. The model will now be modified for use in a specific setting to analyze the effects of changes in climate on the structure of flood-disturbed patches along the Animas River, Colorado.

  19. Simulation of landscape disturbances and the effect of climatic change

    The purpose of this research is to understand how changes in climate may affect the structure of landscapes that are subject to periodic disturbances. A general model useful for examining the linkage between climatic change and landscape change has been developed. The model makes use of synoptic climatic data, a geographical information system (GRASS), field data on the location of disturbance patches, simulation code written in the SIMSCRIPT language, and a set of landscape structure analysis programs written specifically for this research project. A simplified version of the model, lacking the climatic driver, has been used to analyze how changes in disturbance regimes (in this case settlement and fire suppression) affect landscape change. Landscape change lagged in its response to changes in the disturbance regime, but the lags differed depending upon the character of the change and the particular measure considered. The model will now be modified for use in a specific setting to analyze the effects of changes in climate on the structure of flood-disturbed patches along the Animas River, Colorado

  20. Climate change, fire and the carbon balance

    On average, forest fires have burned 2 to 3 million hectares annually in Canada over the last twenty years. Over the last 40 years, this amounts to 20 per cent of the amount of carbon released through fossil fuel emissions in Canada. This paper analyses the extent to which climate change may contribute to a disturbance in the carbon balance due to increased fire activity. In addition, data from FLUXNET-Canada was examined, indicating that carbon fluxes from younger forests show dramatic changes in diurnal carbon flux patterns, caused by reduced photosynthetic uptake during the day and less root respiration at night. Increases in fire are expected throughout much of the boreal forest towards the end of this century, with a lengthening of the fire season and increases in severity and intensity. It was concluded that there is the possibility of a positive feedback, where climate change could cause more fires, resulting in a greater release of carbon and thereby increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. Evidence that smoke promoted positive lightning strikes while reducing precipitation was also presented. It was suggested that certain self-limiting factors may prevent a run-away scenario. Changes to human and lightning ignition patterns, for example, may have an impact. It was also suggested that research efforts should focus on refining climate change estimates that account for landscape change and other aspects that control fire in Canada. 9 refs., 2 figs

  1. Can Logging in Equatorial Africa Affect Adjacent Parks?

    Jeremy W. Lichstein

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Tropical deforestation can cause fundamental regional-scale shifts in vegetation structure and diversity. This is particularly true in Africa. Although national parks are being established to protect areas from deforestation and to conserve biodiversity, these parks are not immune to disturbances outside their boundaries. We used regional-scale atmospheric simulation experiments to investigate how deforestation in timber concessions might affect precipitation inside adjacent, undisturbed national parks in the equatorial African countries of Gabon and the Republic of Congo. The experiments revealed a complex response. Some parks showed rainfall reduced as much as 15%, while others showed slight increases. Rainfall inside parks was particularly sensitive to upwind deforestation along the path of airborne moisture traveling inland from the ocean. A variety of shortcomings in the current modeling procedures limit the ability to extrapolate from experiments such as ours to provide spatially explicit, long-term forecasts of climate. We describe what advances in modeling are needed to produce regional-scale predictions that are robust enough to be useful to managers and policy makers.

  2. Western Disturbances: A review

    Dimri, A. P.; Niyogi, D.; Barros, A. P.; Ridley, J.; Mohanty, U. C.; Yasunari, T.; Sikka, D. R.

    2015-06-01

    Cyclonic storms associated with the midlatitude Subtropical Westerly Jet (SWJ), referred to as Western Disturbances (WDs), play a critical role in the meteorology of the Indian subcontinent. WDs embedded in the southward propagating SWJ produce extreme precipitation over northern India and are further enhanced over the Himalayas due to orographic land-atmosphere interactions. During December, January, and February, WD snowfall is the dominant precipitation input to establish and sustain regional snowpack, replenishing regional water resources. Spring melt is the major source of runoff to northern Indian rivers and can be linked to important hydrologic processes from aquifer recharge to flashfloods. Understanding the dynamical structure, evolution-decay, and interaction of WDs with the Himalayas is therefore necessary to improve knowledge which has wide ranging socioeconomic implications beyond short-term disaster response including cold season agricultural activities, management of water resources, and development of vulnerability-adaptive measures. In addition, WD wintertime precipitation provides critical mass input to existing glaciers and modulates the albedo characteristics of the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau, affecting large-scale circulation and the onset of the succeeding Indian Summer Monsoon. Assessing the impacts of climate variability and change on the Indian subcontinent requires fundamental understanding of the dynamics of WDs. In particular, projected changes in the structure of the SWJ will influence evolution-decay processes of the WDs and impact Himalayan regional water availability. This review synthesizes past research on WDs with a perspective to provide a comprehensive assessment of the state of knowledge to assist both researchers and policymakers, and context for future research.

  3. Resilience Through Disturbance: Effects of Wildfire on Vegetation and Water Balance in the Sierra Nevadas

    Boisrame, G. F. S.; Thompson, S. E.; Stephens, S.; Collins, B.; Tague, N.

    2015-12-01

    A century of fire suppression in the Western United States has drastically altered the historically fire-adapated ecology in California's Sierra Nevada Mountains. Fire suppression is understood to have increased the forest cover, as well as the stem density, canopy cover and water demand of montane forests, reducing resilience of the forests to drought, and increasing the risk of catastrophic fire by drying the landscape and increasing fuel loads. The potential to reverse these trends by re-introducing fire into the Sierra Nevada is highly promising, but the likely effects on vegetation structure and water balance are poorly quantified. The Illilouette Creek Basin in Yosemite National Park represents a unique experiment in the Sierra Nevada, in which managers have moved from fire suppression to allowing a near-natural fire regime to prevail since 1972. Changes in vegetation structure in the Illilouette since the restoration of natural burning provides a unique opportunity to examine how frequent, mixed severity fires can reshape the Sierra Nevada landscape. We characterize these changes from 1969 to the present using a combination of Landsat products and high-resolution aerial imagery. We describe how the landscape structure has changed in terms of vegetation composition and its spatial organization, and explore the drivers of different post-fire vegetation type transitions (e.g. forest to shrubland vs. forest to meadow). By upscaling field data using vegetation maps and Landsat wetness indices, we explore how these vegetation transitions have impacted the water balance of the Illilouette Creek Basin, potentially increasing its resilience in the face of drought, climate change, and catastrophic fire. In a region that is adapted to frequent disturbance from fire, this work helps us understand how allowing such natural disturbances to take place can increase the sustainability of diverse landscapes in the long term.

  4. Fire PSA methodology

    The fire PSA methodology, which NUPEC has introduced from one of US IPEEE fire PSA methodologies, was applied to a Japanese typical 1,100 Mwe class four loop PWR to confirm the applicability. Through this application, some consideration is given on some key parameters, such as fire frequencies and severity factor, in the fire PSA methodology to develop the fire PSA models specific to Japanese plants. (author)

  5. Fire-Walking

    Willey, David

    2010-01-01

    This article gives a brief history of fire-walking and then deals with the physics behind fire-walking. The author has performed approximately 50 fire-walks, took the data for the world's hottest fire-walk and was, at one time, a world record holder for the longest fire-walk (www.dwilley.com/HDATLTW/Record_Making_Firewalks.html). He currently…

  6. FIRE EXTINGUISHER TRAINING

    Jyoti Sanjay Yadav

    2013-01-01

    Afire extinguisher, flame extinguisher, or simply an extinguisher, is an active fire protection device used to extinguish or control small fires, often in emergency situations. It is not intended for use on an out-of-control fire, such as one which has reached the ceiling, endangers the user (i.e., no escape route, smoke, explosion hazard, etc.), or otherwise requires the expertise of a fire department. Typically, a fire extinguisher consists of a hand-held cylindrical pressure vessel contain...

  7. EVALUATION OF EFFECTS OF FOREST-FIRE SMOKE/HAZE ON BASIN-WIDE STREAM TEMPERATURES

    The effects of forest fires on ecological resources in the area experiencing the burn are well documented in the literature. What is not well known is the effect of smoke and haze generated from forest fires on ecological resources adjacent to or at great distances from the burn ...

  8. Fire impacts on European Boreal soils: A review

    Pereira, Paulo; Oliva, Marc; Cerda, Artemi

    2016-04-01

    Fire is an important natural disturbance in boreal ecosystems, fundamental to understand plant distribution (Ryan, 2002; Wallenius et al., 2004; Granstrom, 2001). Nevertheless, nowadays the intense and successful, fire suppression measures are changing their ecological role (Pereira et al., 2013a,b). This is consequence of the lack of understanding of stakeholders and decision makers about the role of the fire in the ecosystems (Mierasukas and Pereira, 2013; Pereira et al., 2016). This fire suppression measures are increasing the amount of fuel accumulation and the risk of severe wildfires, which can increase of frequency and severity in a context of climate change. Fire is a good tool for landscape management and restoration of degraded ecosystems (Toivanen and Kotiaho, 2007). Fire is considered a soil forming factor (Certini, 2014) and in boreal environments it has been observed that low fire severities, do not change importantly soil properties, mean fire severities induce positive impacts on soil, since add an important amounts of nutrients into soil profile and high severity fires had negative impacts due to the high consumption of organic matter (Vanha-Majamaa et al., 2007; Pereira et al., 2014). References Certini, G., 2014. Fire as a soil-forming factor. Ambio, 43, 191-195 Granstrom A. 2001. Fire management for biodiversity in the European Boreal forest. Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research 3: 62-69. Mierauskas, P., Pereira, P. (2013) Stakeholders perception about prescribed fire use in Lithuania. First results, Flamma, 4(3), 157-161. Pereira, P., Cerdà, A., Jordán, A., Bolutiene, V., Úbeda, X., Pranskevicius, M., Mataix-Solera, J. (2013) Spatio-temporal vegetation recuperation after a grassland fire in Lithuania, Procedia Environmental Sciences, 19:856-864 Pereira, P., Mierauskas, P., Ubeda, X., Mataix-Solera, J.,Cerda, A. (2012) Fire in protected areas - the effect of the protection and importance of fire management, Environmental Research

  9. Long-term Effects of Fire Hazard Reduction Treatments in the Southern Cascades and Northern Sierra Nevada, California

    Chiono, Lindsay Aney

    2012-01-01

    Historic fire regimes in the dry conifer forests of the southern Cascade and northern Sierra Nevada regions of California were characterized by relatively frequent fires of low and mixed severity. Human management practices since the mid-19th century have altered the disturbance role of fire in these dry yellow pine and mixed conifer forest ecosystems. Fire suppression, high-grade timber harvesting, and livestock grazing have reduced the frequency of burning and caused a shift in the structur...

  10. Fire Regime and Stability of the West African Tropical Forest

    Dwomoh, F. K.; Wimberly, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    Ecological discussions concerning alternative stable states theory suggest that tropical forest ecosystems could shift to qualitatively different alternative states upon catastrophic disturbances which exceed forest resilience. In this regard, it is expected that changes in the fire regime facilitated by climate and land use alterations could lead to rapid forest cover loss, creating conditions likely to push tropical forests to tipping points, beyond which forest resilience is lost. However, there is a dearth of empirical examples of fire-driven alternative stable states involving tropical forests. Key among the constraints for this scarcity are the requirements for large scale disturbances and long-term data, both of which are scarce. However, in the West African tropical forest (referred to as the Upper Guinean forest, UGF) a number of protected areas were impacted by large fire events during the 1980s El Niño-driven droughts, providing an opportunity for testing hypotheses concerning alternative stable states in tropical forest ecosystems. This paper aims to demonstrate fire-driven alternative stable states in the deciduous forest zone of the UGF by analyzing fire activity and forest recovery in fire-impacted forest reserves. We analyzed historical Landsat and MODIS imagery to map and quantify vegetation cover change, fire frequency and fire severity patterns. Our analyses suggest that the historic fires in the 1980s were catastrophic enough to remove forest canopy, thereby triggering a landscape-scale alternative stable states. Forest cover declined substantially becoming replaced by a novel ecosystem with low tree density. Our results also indicate the establishment of a positive fire-vegetation feedback effect, such that the new vegetation which displaced severely burned forests is more pyrogenic and maintained through frequent burns. This study expands our knowledge on the vulnerability of tropical forest ecosystems to state transitions in response to fire

  11. Medium-long term soil resilience against different disturbances: wildfires, silvicultural treatments and climate change

    Hedo de Santiago, Javier; Borja, Manuel Esteban Lucas; de las Heras, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    Soils of semiarid Mediterranean forest ecosystems are very fragile and sensitive to changes due to different anthropogenic and natural disturbances. The increasing vulnerability of semiarid lands within this world framework has generated growing awareness in the field of research, with highly intensified study into soils properties. One of the main problems of Mediterranean forests is wildfire disturbance. Fire should be considered more an ecological factor but, in contrast to the role of fire, it is now a closely related factor to human action. On the other hand, to improve the recovery of forest communities after fire, silvicultural treatments are needed and, for that matter, another disturbance is added to the ecosystem. By last, climate change is also affecting the fire regime increasing fire frequency and burned area, enhancing the destructiveness to Mediterranean ecosystems. After all of these three disturbances, changes in vegetation dynamics and soil properties are expected to occur due to the plant-soil feedback. Soil plays an essential role in the forest ecosystem's fertility and stability and specifically soil microorganisms, which accomplish reactions to release soil nutrients for vegetation development, for that is essential to enlarge knowledge about soil properties resilience in semiarid forest ecosystems. Physico-chemical and microbiological soil properties, and enzyme activities have been studied in two Aleppo pine forest stands that have suffered three disturbances: 1) a wildfire event, 2) silvicultural treatments (thinning) and 3) an artificial drought (simulating climate change) and results showed that soil recovered after 15 years. Final results showed that soils have been recovered from the three disturbances at the medium-long term.

  12. Natural disturbance impacts on ecosystem services and biodiversity in temperate and boreal forests.

    Thom, Dominik; Seidl, Rupert

    2016-08-01

    In many parts of the world forest disturbance regimes have intensified recently, and future climatic changes are expected to amplify this development further in the coming decades. These changes are increasingly challenging the main objectives of forest ecosystem management, which are to provide ecosystem services sustainably to society and maintain the biological diversity of forests. Yet a comprehensive understanding of how disturbances affect these primary goals of ecosystem management is still lacking. We conducted a global literature review on the impact of three of the most important disturbance agents (fire, wind, and bark beetles) on 13 different ecosystem services and three indicators of biodiversity in forests of the boreal, cool- and warm-temperate biomes. Our objectives were to (i) synthesize the effect of natural disturbances on a wide range of possible objectives of forest management, and (ii) investigate standardized effect sizes of disturbance for selected indicators via a quantitative meta-analysis. We screened a total of 1958 disturbance studies published between 1981 and 2013, and reviewed 478 in detail. We first investigated the overall effect of disturbances on individual ecosystem services and indicators of biodiversity by means of independence tests, and subsequently examined the effect size of disturbances on indicators of carbon storage and biodiversity by means of regression analysis. Additionally, we investigated the effect of commonly used approaches of disturbance management, i.e. salvage logging and prescribed burning. We found that disturbance impacts on ecosystem services are generally negative, an effect that was supported for all categories of ecosystem services, i.e. supporting, provisioning, regulating, and cultural services (P paradox', documenting that disturbances can put ecosystem services at risk while simultaneously facilitating biodiversity. A detailed investigation of disturbance effect sizes on carbon storage and

  13. Kauffman's adjacent possible in word order evolution

    Ferrer-i-Cancho, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Word order evolution has been hypothesized to be constrained by a word order permutation ring: transitions involving orders that are closer in the permutation ring are more likely. The hypothesis can be seen as a particular case of Kauffman's adjacent possible in word order evolution. Here we consider the problem of the association of the six possible orders of S, V and O to yield a couple of primary alternating orders as a window to word order evolution. We evaluate the suitability of various competing hypotheses to predict one member of the couple from the other with the help of information theoretic model selection. Our ensemble of models includes a six-way model that is based on the word order permutation ring (Kauffman's adjacent possible) and another model based on the dual two-way of standard typology, that reduces word order to basic orders preferences (e.g., a preference for SV over VS and another for SO over OS). Our analysis indicates that the permutation ring yields the best model when favoring pa...

  14. Invasive fire ants reduce reproductive success and alter the reproductive strategies of a native vertebrate insectivore.

    Russell A Ligon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Introduced organisms can alter ecosystems by disrupting natural ecological relationships. For example, red imported fire ants (Solenopsis invicta have disrupted native arthropod communities throughout much of their introduced range. By competing for many of the same food resources as insectivorous vertebrates, fire ants also have the potential to disrupt vertebrate communities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To explore the effects of fire ants on a native insectivorous vertebrate, we compared the reproductive success and strategies of eastern bluebirds (Sialia sialis inhabiting territories with different abundances of fire ants. We also created experimental dyads of adjacent territories comprised of one territory with artificially reduced fire ant abundance (treated and one territory that was unmanipulated (control. We found that more bluebird young fledged from treated territories than from adjacent control territories. Fire ant abundance also explained significant variation in two measures of reproductive success across the study population: number of fledglings and hatching success of second clutches. Furthermore, the likelihood of bluebird parents re-nesting in the same territory was negatively influenced by the abundance of foraging fire ants, and parents nesting in territories with experimentally reduced abundances of fire ants produced male-biased broods relative to pairs in adjacent control territories. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Introduced fire ants altered both the reproductive success (number of fledglings, hatching success and strategies (decision to renest, offspring sex-ratio of eastern bluebirds. These results illustrate the negative effects that invasive species can have on native biota, including species from taxonomically distant groups.

  15. Drivers of tall shrub proliferation adjacent to the Dempster Highway, Northwest Territories, Canada

    Cameron, Emily A.; Lantz, Trevor C.

    2016-04-01

    Arctic ecosystems are undergoing rapid changes as a result of climate warming and more frequent disturbances. Disturbances can have particularly large effects on high-latitude ecosystems when ecosystem structure and function is controlled by strong feedbacks between soil conditions, vegetation, and ground thermal regime. In this study we investigated the impact of road construction and maintenance on vegetation structure and biomass along the Dempster Highway where it crosses the Peel Plateau in the Northwest Territories. To explore drivers of tall shrub proliferation and to quantify shrub proliferation in this region of continuous permafrost, greyscale air photos (1975) and Quickbird satellite imagery (2008) were used to map landcover change within two 0.6 km2 belts next to the road and two 0.6 km2 belts 500 m away from the road. Maps showing areas where: 1) tall shrubs expanded, and 2) dwarf shrub tundra resisted invasion were then used to select field sites where a suite of biophysical variables were measured. Rapid tall shrub proliferation and greater biomass adjacent to the road indicate that disturbance can facilitate vegetation change in tundra environments. Our field data also suggests that increased shrub proliferation adjacent to the road was caused by greater soil moisture. Tall shrub proliferation adjacent to the road occurred at lower elevation sites characterized by wetter soils with thicker organic layers. Areas that resisted tall shrub encroachment were located at higher elevations and had drier soils with thin organic layers. Our observations also support previous work illustrating that tall shrub expansion next to the highway promotes strong positive feedbacks to ongoing shrub growth and proliferation.

  16. Sleep Disturbances in Bipolar Disorder

    Cátia Alves Moreira; Pedro Afonso

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bipolar disorder, characterized by episodes of mania, hypomania and depression is associated with sleep disturbances and circadian rhythm disruption. These changes have significant impact on quality of life and in the disease prognosis. Aims: Review of the main sleep disturbances observed in the bipolar disorder, their clinical impact and the hypothetical pathophysiological mechanisms involved. Methods: We conducted a non-systematic review of the literature in English through rese...

  17. Succession Stages of Tundra Plant Communities Following Wildfire Disturbance in Arctic Alaska

    Breen, A. L.; Hollingsworth, T. N.; Mack, M. C.; Jones, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid climate change is affecting climate-sensitive disturbance regimes throughout the world. In particular, the impacts of climate change on Arctic disturbance regimes are poorly understood because landscape-scale disturbances are infrequent or occur in remote localities. Wildfire in Arctic Alaska is presently limited by ignition source and favorable burn weather. With rapid climate change, a lengthening growing season, and subsequent increase in plant biomass and productivity, wildfire frequency and annual area burned in tundra ecosystems is expected to increase over the next century. Yet, post-fire tundra vegetation succession is inadequately characterized except at a few point locations. We identify succession stages of tussock tundra communities following wildfire using a chronosequence of 65 relevés in 10 tundra fire scars (1971-2011) and nearby unburned tundra from sites on the Seward Peninsula and northern foothills of the Brooks Range. We used the Braun-Blanquét approach to classify plant communities, and applied nonmetric multidimentional scaling (NMDS) to identify ecological gradients underlying community differentiation. The ordination revealed a clear differentiation between unburned and burned tundra communities. Ecological gradients, reflected by ordination axes, correspond to fire history (e.g., time since last fire, number of times burned, burn severity) and a complex productivity gradient. Post-fire species richness is less than unburned tundra; primarily reflected as a decrease in lichen species and turnover of bryophyte species immediately post-fire. Species richness of grasses increases post-fire and is greatest in communities that burned more than once in the past 30 years. Shrub cover and total aboveground biomass are greatest in repeat burn sites. We review and discuss our results focusing on the implications of a changing tundra fire regime, its effect on vegetation succession trajectories, and subsequent rates of carbon sequestration and

  18. Climate change and the future of natural disturbances in the central hardwood region

    Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Hughes, M. Joseph [University of Tennessee (UT); Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    The spatial patterns and ecological processes of the southeastern upland hardwood forests have evolved to reflect past climatic conditions and natural disturbance regimes. Changes in climate can lead to disturbances that exceed their natural range of variation, and the impacts of these changes will depend on the vulnerability or resiliency of these ecosystems. Global Circulation Models generally project annual increases in temperature across the southeastern United States over the coming decades, but changes in precipitation are less consistent. Even more unclear is how climate change might affect future trends in the severity and frequency of natural disturbances, such as severe storms, fires, droughts, floods, and insect outbreaks. Here, we use a time-series satellite data record to map the spatial pattern and severity of broad classes of natural disturbances the southeast region. The data derived from this map allow analysis of regional-scale trends in natural and anthropogenic disturbances in the region over the last three decades. Throughout the region, between 5% and 25% of forest land is affected by some sort of disturbance each year since 1985. The time series reveals periodic droughts that themselves are widespread and of low severity but are associated with more localized, high-severity disturbances such as fire and insect outbreaks. The map also reveals extensive anthropogenic disturbance across the region in the form of forest conversion related to resource extraction and urban and residential development. We discuss how changes in climate and disturbance regimes might affect southeastern forests in the future via altering the exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity of these ecosystems. Changes in climate are highly likely to expose southeastern forests to more frequent and severe disturbances, but ultimately how vulnerable or resilient southeastern forests are to these changes will depend on their sensitivity and capacity to adapt to these novel

  19. Estimating Reliability of Disturbances in Satellite Time Series Data Based on Statistical Analysis

    Zhou, Z.-G.; Tang, P.; Zhou, M.

    2016-06-01

    Normally, the status of land cover is inherently dynamic and changing continuously on temporal scale. However, disturbances or abnormal changes of land cover — caused by such as forest fire, flood, deforestation, and plant diseases — occur worldwide at unknown times and locations. Timely detection and characterization of these disturbances is of importance for land cover monitoring. Recently, many time-series-analysis methods have been developed for near real-time or online disturbance detection, using satellite image time series. However, the detection results were only labelled with "Change/ No change" by most of the present methods, while few methods focus on estimating reliability (or confidence level) of the detected disturbances in image time series. To this end, this paper propose a statistical analysis method for estimating reliability of disturbances in new available remote sensing image time series, through analysis of full temporal information laid in time series data. The method consists of three main steps. (1) Segmenting and modelling of historical time series data based on Breaks for Additive Seasonal and Trend (BFAST). (2) Forecasting and detecting disturbances in new time series data. (3) Estimating reliability of each detected disturbance using statistical analysis based on Confidence Interval (CI) and Confidence Levels (CL). The method was validated by estimating reliability of disturbance regions caused by a recent severe flooding occurred around the border of Russia and China. Results demonstrated that the method can estimate reliability of disturbances detected in satellite image with estimation error less than 5% and overall accuracy up to 90%.

  20. Integrating theory into disturbance interaction experiments to better inform ecosystem management.

    Foster, Claire N; Sato, Chloe F; Lindenmayer, David B; Barton, Philip S

    2016-04-01

    Managing multiple, interacting disturbances is a key challenge to biodiversity conservation, and one that will only increase as global change drivers continue to alter disturbance regimes. Theoretical studies have highlighted the importance of a mechanistic understanding of stressor interactions for improving the prediction and management of interactive effects. However, many conservation studies are not designed or interpreted in the context of theory and instead focus on case-specific management questions. This is a problem as it means that few studies test the relationships highlighted in theoretical models as being important for ecological management. We explore the extent of this problem among studies of interacting disturbances by reviewing recent experimental studies of the interaction between fire and grazing in terrestrial ecosystems. Interactions between fire and grazing can occur via a number of pathways; one disturbance can modify the other's likelihood, intensity or spatial distribution, or one disturbance can alter the other's impacts on individual organisms. The strength of such interactions will vary depending on disturbance attributes (e.g. size or intensity), and this variation is likely to be nonlinear. We show that few experiments testing fire-grazing interactions are able to identify the mechanistic pathway driving an observed interaction, and most are unable to detect nonlinear effects. We demonstrate how these limitations compromise the ability of experimental studies to effectively inform ecological management. We propose a series of adjustments to the design of disturbance interaction experiments that would enable tests of key theoretical pathways and provide the deeper ecological understanding necessary for effective management. Such considerations are relevant to studies of a broad range of ecological interactions and are critical to informing the management of disturbance regimes in the context of accelerating global change. PMID

  1. Factory waste influence on Elbrus adjacent area

    Complete text of publication follows. Two major burials of waste from concentrating mill of The Tyrnauz Tungsten-Molybdic Plant are situated at the recreation area of Elbrus adjacent territory. But it is significant that the strong winds periods are available here at the river Baksan valley constantly, which are transfers the particles of burials along that valley. The waste pollutes pastures and agricultural lands. The sampling of the buried material on the surface and of the soil of adjacent territory was fulfilled here in order to check up that assumption. The chemical analyses of the buried waste were performed at the X-ray spectrometer Philips PW2400. The results received showed the high quantity of some environmental threat elements. The soil sample analyses on 20 elements (including Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, P, S, Cr, V, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Zr, Ba, Pb, As, Mo, W, Sn) showed the excess of maximum permissible concentrations (according to Russian Federation hygienic regulations 2.1.7.2041-06) of some investigated elements in the all researched samples. Some results of the investigations are shown below in the table 1. The excesses of maximum permissible concentrations were observed for phosphorus from 5.3 to 11.3 times as much; for sulphur from 3 to 8.75 times as much; for cobalt from 2.6 to 4.6 times as much; for nickel from 8.25 to 15.25 times as much; for copper from 9.3 to 22 times as much; for arsenic up to 10 and at one sample - to 28 times as much. At the MPC level was the lead contents and also at single instances - the manganese and vanadium contents. The excess of background contents were observed for molybdenum up to 8, tungsten - up to 38 and tin - up to 7 times as much. Presented data confirmed the supposition that buried waste pollutes pastures and agricultural lands of Elbrus adjacent area and that means the necessity of either more careful burial of these waste products, or their full recycling.

  2. Fire Stations - 2007

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Fire Station Locations in Kansas Any location where fire fighters are stationed at or based out of, or where equipment that such personnel use in carrying out their...

  3. Fire Stations - 2009

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Fire Stations in Kansas Any location where fire fighters are stationed or based out of, or where equipment that such personnel use in carrying out their jobs is...

  4. Wildland Fire Safety

    Wildland Fire Safety Every year, wildfires burn across the U.S., and more and more people are living where wildfires ... including garages and sheds. If it can catch fire, don’t let it touch your house, deck ...

  5. Buildings exposed to fire

    The 24 lectures presented to the colloquium cover the following subject fields: (1) Behaviour of structural components exposed to fire; (2) Behaviour of building materials exposed to fire; (3) Thermal processes; (4) Safety related, theoretical studies. (PW)

  6. Filosofiens historiografi: Fire genrer

    Rorty, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Oversættelse af Richard Rortys artikel "Filosofiens historiografi: Fire genrer" Udgivelsesdato: 26 Oktober......Oversættelse af Richard Rortys artikel "Filosofiens historiografi: Fire genrer" Udgivelsesdato: 26 Oktober...

  7. Tunnel fire dynamics

    Ingason, Haukur; Lönnermark, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This book covers a wide range of issues in fire safety engineering in tunnels, describes the phenomena related to tunnel fire dynamics, presents state-of-the-art research, and gives detailed solutions to these major issues. Examples for calculations are provided. The aim is to significantly improve the understanding of fire safety engineering in tunnels. Chapters on fuel and ventilation control, combustion products, gas temperatures, heat fluxes, smoke stratification, visibility, tenability, design fire curves, heat release, fire suppression and detection, CFD modeling, and scaling techniques all equip readers to create their own fire safety plans for tunnels. This book should be purchased by any engineer or public official with responsibility for tunnels. It would also be of interest to many fire protection engineers as an application of evolving technical principles of fire safety.

  8. Seismicity in Azerbaijan and Adjacent Caspian Sea

    So far no general view on the geodynamic evolution of the Black Sea to the Caspian Sea region is elaborated. This is associated with the geological and structural complexities of the region revealed by geophysical, geochemical, petrologic, structural, and other studies. A clash of opinions on geodynamic conditions of the Caucasus region, sometimes mutually exclusive, can be explained by a simplified interpretation of the seismic data. In this paper I analyze available data on earthquake occurrences in Azerbaijan and the adjacent Caspian Sea region. The results of the analysis of macroseismic and instrumental data, seismic regime, and earthquake reoccurrence indicate that a level of seismicity in the region is moderate, and seismic event are concentrated in the shallow part of the lithosphere. Seismicity is mostly intra-plate, and spatial distribution of earthquake epicenters does not correlate with the plate boundaries

  9. Detecting Adjacent Relativity of Engineering Drawing Entities with Container Window

    林福严; 邱友申; 秦吉胜

    2001-01-01

    Automatic recognition and interpretation of engineering drawing plays an important role in computer aided engineering. Detecting the positional relation between entities is an important topic in this research field. In this paper the concepts of adjacent relativity and container window of drawing entities were proposed. By means of container window, the adjacent irrelative entities can be detected quickly and effectively, which speeds up the process of adjacent relativity detection. Meanwhile, the algorithm of adjacent relativity detection was discussed.

  10. Fire Size in Tunnels

    Carvel, Ricky O

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, a number of high profile accidental fires have occurred in several road and rail tunnels throughout the world. Many of these fires grew rapidly to catastrophic size and claimed many lives. The processes involved in the rapid growth and extremely severe of these fires are not adequately understood as yet. The introduction to this thesis reviews a number of these accidental fires and describes much of the previous experimental research which has brought about the...

  11. Urban Fire Risk Clustering Method Based on Fire Statistics

    WU Lizhi; REN Aizhu

    2008-01-01

    Fire statistics and fire analysis have become important ways for us to understand the law of fire,prevent the occurrence of fire, and improve the ability to control fire. According to existing fire statistics, the weighted fire risk calculating method characterized by the number of fire occurrence, direct economic losses,and fire casualties was put forward. On the basis of this method, meanwhile having improved K-mean clus-tering arithmetic, this paper established fire dsk K-mean clustering model, which could better resolve the automatic classifying problems towards fire risk. Fire risk cluster should be classified by the absolute dis-tance of the target instead of the relative distance in the traditional cluster arithmetic. Finally, for applying the established model, this paper carded out fire risk clustering on fire statistics from January 2000 to December 2004 of Shenyang in China. This research would provide technical support for urban fire management.

  12. Age structure and disturbance legacy of North American forests

    Y. Pan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Most forests of the world are recovering from a past disturbance. It is well known that forest disturbances profoundly affect carbon stock and fluxes in forest ecosystems, yet it has been a great challenge to assess disturbance impacts in estimates of forest carbon budgets. Net sequestration or loss of CO2 by forests after disturbance follows a predictable pattern with forest recovery. Forest age, which is related to time since disturbance, is the most available surrogate variable for various forest carbon analyses that concern the impact of disturbance. In this study, we compiled the first continental forest age map of North America by combining forest inventory data, historical fire data, optical satellite data and the dataset from NASA's LEDAPS project. Mexico and interior Alaska are excluded from this initial map due to unavailability of all required data sets, but work is underway to develop some different methodology for these areas. We discuss the significance of disturbance legacy from the past, as represented by current forest age structure in different regions of the US and Canada, tracking back disturbances caused by human and nature over centuries and at various scales. We also show how such information can be used with inventory data for analyzing carbon management opportunities, and other modeling applications. By combining geographic information about forest age with estimated C dynamics by forest type, it is possible to conduct a simple but powerful analysis of the net CO2 uptake by forests, and the potential for increasing (or decreasing this rate as a result of direct human intervention in the disturbance/age status. The forest age map may also help address the recent concern that the terrestrial C sink from forest regrowth in North America may saturate in the next few decades. Finally, we describe how the forest age data can be used in large-scale carbon modeling, both for land-based biogeochemistry

  13. Recurrent habitat disturbance and species diversity in a multiple-competitive species system.

    Ohsawa, Kyoko; Kawasaki, Kohkichi; Takasu, Fugo; Shigesada, Nanako

    2002-05-21

    To address how species interactions, dispersal and environmental disturbances interplay to affect the spatial distribution and diversity of species, we present a compartment model in which multiple species undergo competitive interaction of Lotka-Volterra type in a patchy environment arranged in a square lattice. Dispersal of species occurs between adjacent patches. Disturbances are periodically imposed on a central part of the environment in a belt-like block or an island-like block of various sizes where each species is killed for a certain time interval and then allowed to recover for the rest of a disturbance cycle. We deal with a case in which the local population dynamics within each patch is analytically determinable and has multiple locally stable equilibrium states in the absence of environmental disturbance. We further assume a trade-off between the reproductive rate of species and its dispersal ability. With these settings, we numerically examine how the spatio-temporal distributions of species are affected by changes in the pattern, size and duration of disturbances. The results demonstrate that: (1) in the undisturbed area, environmental disturbances could generate spatially segregated distributions of species; (2) in the disturbed area, species with higher dispersal abilities quickly invade and preferentially recover their population during the post-disturbance period, being temporarily relieved of competition from other species. These mechanisms collectively lead to increased species diversity in the whole habitat, functioning best when both the size and duration of disturbances are intermediate. In particular, the belt-like disturbance is more effective than the island-like disturbance in sustaining spatial heterogeneity for a wider range of duration of disturbance. PMID:12079366

  14. Fire Safety (For Parents)

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Fire Safety KidsHealth > For Parents > Fire Safety Print A A A Text Size What's in ... kids? Take the time now to review fire safety facts and tips so your family will be ...

  15. Fire as Technology

    Rudolph, Robert N.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project that deals with fire production as an aspect of technology. The project challenges students to be survivors in a five-day classroom activity. Students research various materials and methods to produce fire without the use of matches or other modern combustion devices, then must create "fire" to keep…

  16. Fire Department Emergency Response

    In 1995 the SRS Fire Department published the initial Operations Basis Document (OBD). This document was one of the first of its kind in the DOE complex and was widely distributed and reviewed. This plan described a multi-mission Fire Department which provided fire, emergency medical, hazardous material spill, and technical rescue services

  17. Courage under fire: Seagrass persistence adjacent to a highly urbanisedcity–state

    Yaakub, S.M.; McKenzie, L.J.; Erftemeijer, P.L.A.; Bouma, T.; Todd, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Due to increasing development Southeast Asia’s coastlines are undergoing massive changes, but the associated impacts on marine habitats are poorly known. Singapore, a densely populated island city–state, is a quintessential example of coastal modification that has resulted in the (hitherto undocumen

  18. Courage under fire: Seagrass persistence adjacent to a highly urbanisedcity–state

    Yaakub, S.M.; McKenzie, L.J.; P. L. A. Erftemeijer; Bouma, T.; Todd, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Due to increasing development Southeast Asia’s coastlines are undergoing massive changes, but the associated impacts on marine habitats are poorly known. Singapore, a densely populated island city–state, is a quintessential example of coastal modification that has resulted in the (hitherto undocumented) loss of seagrass. We reconstructed the historic extent and diversity of local seagrass meadows through herbarium records and backwards extrapolation from contemporary seagrass locations. We al...

  19. Forest response and recovery following disturbance (Invited)

    Schafer, K. V.; Clark, K. L.; Renninger, H. J.; Carlo, N.; Medvigy, D.

    2013-12-01

    Forest management and global climate change may modulate forest responses to disturbances such as drought, insect infestation or windthrow. Forest responses to drought and gypsy moth defoliation measured from 2005 to present in an oak/pine ecosystem in the Atlantic Coastal Plain (New Jersey Pinelands) show a relative conservatism of water use but longer lasting effects on carbon balance. While post-defoliation transpiration and evapotranspiration were similar to pre-defoliation levels, post-defoliation carbon fluxes have not returned to pre-disturbance levels even after five years of recovery due to a 25% reduction in basal area following tree mortality. Defoliation frequency also affects recovery with modeled carbon fluxes under various defoliation scenarios, showing pronounced reduction in productivity under frequent defoliation, but no effect if defoliation occurs at a rate of less than 15 years. Despite a relatively consistent seasonal water use through various disturbances, defoliation and drought affect water use differently. For example, canopy transpiration (EC) after defoliation and subsequent re-sprouting, was reduced by 25% compared to pre-defoliation levels, even though only half of the leaf area was replaced. However under severe drought conditions in 2006 and 2010, EC was only reduced by 8% and 18% respectively. Therefore, prolonged drought had a lesser effect on EC than reduced foliage or episodic defoliation, suggesting these trees have access to deeper soil moisture. These data also suggest that defoliation may make trees more sensitive to drought as evidenced by the higher reduction of Ec in 2010 compared to 2006 (pre-defoliation). Differential physiological responses of the various oak species as well as pitch pine may also create a species shift in an ecosystem that is also prone to fire. In this ecosystem, Quercus prinus showed consistently lower stomatal conductance, photosynthesis and maximum carboxylation rate compared to Quercus velutina

  20. Salt movement in disturbed soils

    A literature review is presented of information on salt movement in disturbed soils, particularly in soils that have been disturbed by pipeline construction. The review has two main objectives: to assess climatic and soil conditions under which salts will move out of the root zone in a disturbed soil and to determine the rate at which salts will move in disturbed soils. A literature base was established using computer database and library searches, and a number of studies were reviewed. Many studies, dealing specifically with salt movement over time in disturbed soils under climatic and salt conditions similar to those found in Alberta, are summarized in tabular form. Data found in the literature tend to be sparse and incomplete, making firm conclusions about rates of salt movement difficult. In the brown soil zone, 5 years may be sufficient time for sodium absorption ratio and electrical conductivity levels, elevated during construction, to return to pre-construction conditions in coarse to moderately coarse textured soils. In medium to moderately fine textured soils, 10-26 years may be required. In the dark brown soil zone, 5 years is marginal for return to pre-construction conditions. Data in the black soil zone are limited and results inconsistent. 37 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  1. An overview of observations and assessment of forest carbon dynamics following disturbance in North America

    Goetz, S. J.; Bond-Lamberty, B. P.

    2012-12-01

    Disturbance processes of various types substantially modify ecosystem carbon dynamics both temporally and spatially, and constitute a fundamental part of larger landscape-level dynamics. Forests typically lose carbon for several years to several decades following severe disturbance, but our understanding of the duration and dynamics of post-disturbance forest carbon fluxes remains limited. We capitalize on a recent North American Carbon Program disturbance synthesis to discuss techniques and future work needed to better understand carbon dynamics after forest disturbance. Specifically, we address three topics: (1) the history, spatial distribution, and characteristics of different types of disturbance (in particular fire, insects, and harvest) in North America; (2) the integrated measurements and experimental designs required to quantify forest carbon dynamics in the years and decades after disturbance, as presented in a series of case studies; and (3) a synthesis of the greatest uncertainties spanning these studies, as well as the utility of multiple types of observations in understanding their dynamics. The case studies - in the southeast U.S., central boreal Canada, U.S. Rocky Mountains, and Pacific Northwest - explore how different measurements can be used to constrain and understand carbon dynamics in regrowing forests, with the most important measurements summarized for each disturbance type. We identify disturbance severity and history as key but highly uncertain factors driving post-disturbance carbon source-sink dynamics across all disturbance types. We suggest integrative analyses using multiple lines of evidence, increased measurement capabilities, shared models and online data sets, and innovative numerical algorithms hold promise for improved understanding and prediction of carbon dynamics in disturbance-prone forests.

  2. Coal-fired diesel generator

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    The objective of the proposed project is to test the technical, environmental, and economic viability of a coal-fired diesel generator for producing electric power in small power generating markets. Coal for the diesel generator would be provided from existing supplies transported for use in the University`s power plant. A cleanup system would be installed for limiting gaseous and particulate emissions. Electricity and steam produced by the diesel generator would be used to supply the needs of the University. The proposed diesel generator and supporting facilities would occupy approximately 2 acres of land adjacent to existing coal- and oil-fired power plant and research laboratory buildings at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. The environmental analysis identified that the most notable changes to result from the proposed project would occur in the following areas: power plant configuration at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks; air emissions, water use and discharge, and the quantity of solid waste for disposal; noise levels at the power plant site; and transportation of coal to the power plant. No substantive adverse impacts or environmental concerns were identified in analyzing the effects of these changes.

  3. Human-Induced Disturbance Alters Pollinator Communities in Tropical Mountain Forests

    Matthias Schleuning

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Mountain forest ecosystems in the Andes are threatened by deforestation. Increasing fire frequencies lead to fire-degraded habitats that are often characterized by a persistent fern-dominated vegetation. Little is known about the consequences of these drastic changes in habitat conditions for pollinator communities. In a rapid diversity assessment, we collected individuals of two major groups of insect pollinators (bees and butterflies/moths with pan traps and compared pollinator diversities in a spatial block design between forest interior, forest edge and adjacent fire-degraded habitats at eight sites in the Bolivian Andes. We found that bee species richness and abundance were significantly higher in fire-degraded habitats than in forest habitats, whereas species richness and abundance of butterflies/moths increased towards the forests interior. Species turnover between forest and fire-degraded habitats was very high for both pollinator groups and was reflected by an increase in the body size of bee species and a decrease in the body size of butterfly/moth species in fire-degraded habitats. We conclude that deforestation by frequent fires has profound impacts on the diversity and composition of pollinator communities. Our tentative findings suggest shifts towards bee-dominated pollinator communities in fire-degraded habitats that may have important feedbacks on the regenerating communities of insect-pollinated plant species.

  4. A Review of Fire Interactions and Mass Fires

    Finney, Mark A.; McAllister, Sara S.

    2011-01-01

    The character of a wildland fire can change dramatically in the presence of another nearby fire. Understanding and predicting the changes in behavior due to fire-fire interactions cannot only be life-saving to those on the ground, but also be used to better control a prescribed fire to meet objectives. In discontinuous fuel types, such interactions may elicit fire spread where none otherwise existed. Fire-fire interactions occur naturally when spot fires start ahead of the main fire and when...

  5. Disturbed Sleep and Postpartum Depression.

    Okun, Michele L

    2016-07-01

    The perinatal period introduces a myriad of changes. One important but often overlooked change is an increased reporting of sleep disturbance. Although casually regarded as a consequence of pregnancy or postpartum, there is emerging evidence implicating significant sleep disturbance, characterized by insomnia symptoms and/or poor sleep quality, with adverse outcomes, such as an increase in depressive symptomatology or the development postpartum depression (PPD). Significant consequences may arise as a result including issues with maternal-infant bonding, effective care for the infant, and behavioral or emotional difficulties in the infant. This review discusses the relevant literature as to how disturbed sleep during pregnancy as well as in the postpartum may increase the risk for PPD. PMID:27222140

  6. Managing Sleep Disturbances in Cirrhosis

    Xun Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disturbances, particularly daytime sleepiness and insomnia, are common problems reported by patients suffering from liver cirrhosis. Poor sleep negatively impacts patients’ quality of life and cognitive functions and increases mortality. Although sleep disturbances can be an early sign of hepatic encephalopathy (HE, many patients without HE still complain of poor quality sleep. The pathophysiology of these disturbances is not fully understood but is believed to be linked to impaired hepatic melatonin metabolism. This paper provides an overview for the clinician of common comorbidities contributing to poor sleep in patients with liver disease, mainly restless leg syndrome and obstructive sleep apnea. It discusses nondrug and pharmacologic treatment options in these patients, such as the use of light therapy and histamine (H1 blockers.

  7. Fire Severity Controlled Susceptibility to a 1940s Spruce Beetle Outbreak in Colorado, USA

    Kulakowski, Dominik; Veblen, Thomas T.; Bebi, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The frequency, magnitude, and size of forest disturbances are increasing globally. Much recent research has focused on how the occurrence of one disturbance may affect susceptibility to subsequent disturbances. While much has been learned about such linked disturbances, the strength of the interactions is likely to be contingent on the severity of disturbances as well as climatic conditions, both of which can affect disturbance intensity and tree resistance to disturbances. Subalpine forests in western Colorado were affected by extensive and severe wildfires in the late 19th century and an extensive and severe outbreak of spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis) in the 1940s. Previous research found that most, but not all, of the stands that burned and established following the late 19th century fires were not susceptible to the 1940s outbreak as beetles preferentially attack larger trees and stands in advanced stages of development. However, previous research also left open the possibility that some stands that burned and established following the 19th century fires may have been attacked during the 1940s outbreak. Understanding how strongly stand structure, as shaped by disturbances of varying severity, affected susceptibility to past outbreaks is important to provide a baseline for assessing the degree to which recent climate change may be relaxing the preferences of beetles for larger trees and for stands in latter stages of structural development and thereby changing the nature of linked disturbances. Here, dendroecological methods were used to study disturbance history and tree age of stands in the White River National Forest in Western Colorado that were identified in historical documents or remotely-sensed images as having burned in the 19th century and having been attacked by spruce beetle in the 1940s. Dendroecological reconstructions indicate that in young post-fire stands only old remnant trees that survived the otherwise stand-replacing fires were

  8. Fighting Forest Fires

    1993-01-01

    Firefly is an airborne system for imaging forest fires. It uses satellite-based navigation for greater positioning accuracy and offers timeliness in fire location data delivery with on board data processing and a direct aircraft-to-fire camp communications link. Developed by Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the USFS, it has an infrared line scanner to identify fire boundaries and an infrared sensor system that can penetrate smoke to image the ground. Firefly is an outgrowth of a previous collaboration that produced FLAME, an airborne fire mapping instrument. Further refinements are anticipated by NASA and the United States Forest Service (USFS).

  9. Fire Protection Program Manual

    Sharry, J A

    2012-05-18

    This manual documents the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Fire Protection Program. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 420.1B, Facility Safety, requires LLNL to have a comprehensive and effective fire protection program that protects LLNL personnel and property, the public and the environment. The manual provides LLNL and its facilities with general information and guidance for meeting DOE 420.1B requirements. The recommended readers for this manual are: fire protection officers, fire protection engineers, fire fighters, facility managers, directorage assurance managers, facility coordinators, and ES and H team members.

  10. Factors controlling vegetation fires in protected and non-protected areas of myanmar.

    Sumalika Biswas

    Full Text Available Fire is an important disturbance agent in Myanmar impacting several ecosystems. In this study, we quantify the factors impacting vegetation fires in protected and non-protected areas of Myanmar. Satellite datasets in conjunction with biophysical and anthropogenic factors were used in a spatial framework to map the causative factors of fires. Specifically, we used the frequency ratio method to assess the contribution of each causative factor to overall fire susceptibility at a 1km scale. Results suggested the mean fire density in non-protected areas was two times higher than the protected areas. Fire-land cover partition analysis suggested dominant fire occurrences in the savannas (protected areas and woody savannas (non-protected areas. The five major fire causative factors in protected areas in descending order include population density, land cover, tree cover percent, travel time from nearest city and temperature. In contrast, the causative factors in non-protected areas were population density, tree cover percent, travel time from nearest city, temperature and elevation. The fire susceptibility analysis showed distinct spatial patterns with central Myanmar as a hot spot of vegetation fires. Results from propensity score matching suggested that forests within protected areas have 11% less fires than non-protected areas. Overall, our results identify important causative factors of fire useful to address broad scale fire risk concerns at a landscape scale in Myanmar.