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Sample records for adiabatic resonance crossing

  1. Radioanalytical prediction of radiative capture in 99Mo production via transmutation adiabatic resonance crossing by cyclotron

    Khorshidi, Abdollah; Pazirandeh, Ali; Tenreiro, Claudio; Kadi, Yacine

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the transmutation adiabatic resonance crossing (TARC) concept was estimated in Mo-99 radioisotope production via radiative capture reaction in two designs. The TARC method was composed of moderating neutrons in lead or a composition of lead and water. Additionally, the target was surrounded by a moderator assembly and a graphite reflector district. Produced neutrons were investigated by (p,xn) interactions with 30 MeV and 300 mu A proton beam on tungsten, beryllium, and tantalum targets. The Mo-99 production yield was related to the moderator property, cross section, and sample positioning inside the distinct region of neutron storage as must be proper to achieve gains. Gathered thermal flux of neutrons can contribute to molybdenum isotope production. Moreover, the sample positioning to gain higher production yield was dependent on a greater flux in the length of thermal neutrons and region materials inside the moderator or reflector. When the sample radial distance from Be was 38 cm inside the...

  2. The TARC experiment (PS211): neutron-driven nuclear transmutation by adiabatic resonance crossing

    The main purpose of the TARC experiment is to demonstrate the possibility of using Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (ARC) to destroy efficiently Long-Lived Fission Fragments (LLFFs) in accelerator-driven systems and to validate a new simulation developed in the framework of the Energy Amplifier programme. An experimental set-up was installed in a CERN PS beam line to study how neutrons produced by spallation at relatively high energy (En≥1 MeV) slow down quasi adiabatically with almost flat isolethargic energy distribution and reach the capture resonance energy of an element to be transmuted where they will have a high probability of being captured. Precision measurements of energy and space distributions of spallation neutrons (using 2.5 GeV/c and 3.5 GeV/c protons) slowing down in a 3.3 m x 3.3 m x 3 m lead volume and of neutron capture rates of LLFFs 99Tc, 129I, and several other elements were performed. An appropriate formalism and appropriate computational tools necessary for the analysis and understanding of the data were developed and validated in detail. Our direct experimental observation of ARC demonstrates the possibility to destroy, in a parasitic mode, outside the Energy Amplifier core, large amounts of 99Tc or 129I at a rate exceeding the production rate, thereby making it practical to reduce correspondingly the existing stockpile of LLFFs. In addition, TARC opens up new possibilities for radioactive isotope production as an alternative to nuclear reactors, in particular for medical applications, as well as new possibilities for neutron research and industrial applications. (orig.)

  3. Epithermal neutron formation for boron neutron capture therapy by adiabatic resonance crossing concept

    Low-energy protons from the cyclotron in the range of 15–30 MeV and low current have been simulated on beryllium (Be) target with a lead moderator around the target. This research was accomplished to design an epithermal neutron beam for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) using the moderated neutron on the average produced from 9Be target via (p, xn) reaction in Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (ARC) concept. Generation of neutron to proton ratio, energy distribution, flux and dose components in head phantom have been simulated by MCNP5 code. The reflector and collimator were designed in prevention and collimation of derivation neutrons from proton bombarding. The scalp-skull-brain phantom consisting of bone and brain equivalent material has been simulated in order to evaluate the dosimetric effect on the brain. Results of this analysis demonstrated while the proton energy decreased, the dose factor altered according to filters thickness. The maximum epithermal flux revealed using fluental, Fe and bismuth (Bi) filters with thicknesses of 9.4, 3 and 2 cm, respectively and also the epithermal to thermal neutron flux ratio was 103.85. The potential of the ARC method to replace or complement the current reactor-based supply sources of BNCT purposes. (author)

  4. Radioanalytical prediction of radiative capture in 99Mo production via transmutation adiabatic resonance crossing by cyclotron

    In this study, the transmutation adiabatic resonance crossing (TARC) concept was estimated in 99Mo radioisotope production via radiative capture reaction in two designs. The TARC method was composed of moderating neutrons in lead or a composition of lead and water. Additionally, the target was surrounded by a moderator assembly and a graphite reflector district. Produced neutrons were investigated by (p,xn) interactions with 30 MeV and 300 μA proton beam on tungsten, beryllium, and tantalum targets. The 99Mo production yield was related to the moderator property, cross section, and sample positioning inside the distinct region of neutron storage as must be proper to achieve gains. Gathered thermal flux of neutrons can contribute to molybdenum isotope production. Moreover, the sample positioning to gain higher production yield was dependent on a greater flux in the length of thermal neutrons and region materials inside the moderator or reflector. When the sample radial distance from Be was 38 cm inside the graphite region using a lead moderator design, the production yield had the greatest value of activity, compared with the other regions, equal to 608.72 MBq/g. Comparison of the two designs using a Be target revealed that the maximum yield occurred inside the graphite region for the first design at 38 cm and inside the lead region for the second design at 10 cm. The results and modeling of the new neutron activator were very encouraging and seem to confirm that the TARC concept can be used for 99Mo production in nuclear medicine. (author)

  5. Experimental verification of neutron phenomenology in lead and of transmutation by adiabatic resonance crossing in accelerator driven systems A summary of the TARC Project at CERN

    The Transmutation by Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (TARC) experiment was carried out as PS211 at the CERN PS from 1996 to 1999. Energy and space distributions of spallation neutrons (produced by 2.5 and 3.57 GeV/c CERN proton beams) slowing down in a 3.3x3.3x3 m3 lead volume and neutron capture rates on long-lived fission fragments 99Tc and 129I demonstrate that Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (ARC) can be used to eliminate efficiently such nuclear waste and validate innovative simulation

  6. Experimental verification of neutron phenomenology in lead and of transmutation by adiabatic resonance crossing in accelerator driven systems A summary of the TARC Project at CERN

    Abanades, A.; Aleixandre, J.; Andriamonje, S.; Angelopoulos, A.; Apostolakis, A.; Arnould, H.; Belle, E.; Bompas, C.A.; Brozzi, D.; Bueno, J.; Buono, S.; Carminati, F.; Casagrande, F.; Cennini, P.; Collar, J.I.; Cerro, E.; Moral, R.D.R.Del; Diez, S.; Dumps, L.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid, M.; Fernandez, R.; Galvez, J.; Garcia, J.; Geles, C.; Giorni, A.; Gonzalez, E.; Gonzalez, O.; Goulas, I.; Heuer, D.; Hussonnois, M.; Kadi, Y.; Karaiskos, P.; Kitis, G.; Klapisch, R.; Kokkas, P.; Lacoste, V.; Le Naour, C.; Lopez, C.; Loiseaux, J.M.; Martinez-Val, J.M.; Meplan, O.; Nifenecker, H.; Oropesa, J.; Papadopoulos, I.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perez-Enciso, E.; Perez-Navarro, A.; Perlado, M.; Placci, A.; Poza, M.; Revol, J.-P. E-mail: Jean-Pierre.Revol@cern.ch; Rubbia, C.; Rubio, J.A.; Sakelliou, L.; Saldana, F.; Savvidis, E.; Schussler, F.; Sirvent, C.; Tamarit, J.; Trubert, D.; Tzima, A.; Viano, J.B.; Vieira, S.; Vlachoudis, V.; Zioutas, K

    2001-05-11

    The Transmutation by Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (TARC) experiment was carried out as PS211 at the CERN PS from 1996 to 1999. Energy and space distributions of spallation neutrons (produced by 2.5 and 3.57 GeV/c CERN proton beams) slowing down in a 3.3x3.3x3 m{sup 3} lead volume and neutron capture rates on long-lived fission fragments {sup 99}Tc and {sup 129}I demonstrate that Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (ARC) can be used to eliminate efficiently such nuclear waste and validate innovative simulation.

  7. Results from the TARC experiment: spallation neutron phenomenology in lead and neutron-driven nuclear transmutation by adiabatic resonance crossing

    Abanades, A.; Aleixandre, J.; Andriamonje, S.; Angelopoulos, A.; Apostolakis, A.; Arnould, H.; Belle, E.; Bompas, C.A.; Brozzi, D.; Bueno, J.; Buono, S.; Carminati, F.; Casagrande, F.; Cennini, P.; Collar, J.I.; Cerro, E.; Moral, R. Del; Diez, S.; Dumps, L.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid, M.; Fernandez, R.; Galvez, J.; Garcia, J.; Geles, C.; Giorni, A.; Gonzalez, E.; Gonzalez, O.; Goulas, I.; Heuer, D.; Hussonnois, M.; Kadi, Y.; Karaiskos, P.; Kitis, G.; Klapisch, R.; Kokkas, P.; Lacoste, V.; Naour, C. Le; Lopez, C.; Loiseaux, J.M.; Martinez-Val, J.M.; Meplan, O.; Nifenecker, H.; Oropesa, J.; Papadopoulos, I.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perez-Enciso, E.; Perez-Navarro, A.; Perlado, M.; Placci, A.; Poza, M.; Revol, J.-P. E-mail: jean-pierre.revol@cern.ch; Rubbia, C.; Rubio, J.A.; Sakelliou, L.; Saldana, F.; Savvidis, E.; Schussler, F.; Sirvent, C.; Tamarit, J.; Trubert, D.; Tzima, A.; Viano, J.B.; Vieira, S.; Vlachoudis, V.; Zioutas, K

    2002-02-11

    We summarize here the results of the TARC experiment whose main purpose is to demonstrate the possibility of using Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (ARC) to destroy efficiently Long-Lived Fission Fragments (LLFFs) in accelerator-driven systems and to validate a new simulation developed in the framework of the Energy Amplifier programme. An experimental set-up was installed in a CERN PS proton beam line to study how neutrons produced by spallation at relatively high energy (E{sub n}{>=}1 MeV) slow down quasi-adiabatically with almost flat isolethargic energy distribution and reach the capture resonance energy of an element to be transmuted where they will have a high probability of being captured. Precision measurements of energy and space distributions of spallation neutrons (using 2.5 and 3.5 GeV/c protons) slowing down in a 3.3 mx3.3 mx3 m lead volume and of neutron capture rates on LLFFs {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, and several other elements were performed. An appropriate formalism and appropriate computational tools necessary for the analysis and understanding of the data were developed and validated in detail. Our direct experimental observation of ARC demonstrates the possibility to destroy, in a parasitic mode, outside the Energy Amplifier core, large amounts of {sup 99}Tc or {sup 129}I at a rate exceeding the production rate, thereby making it practical to reduce correspondingly the existing stockpile of LLFFs. In addition, TARC opens up new possibilities for radioactive isotope production as an alternative to nuclear reactors, in particular for medical applications, as well as new possibilities for neutron research and industrial applications.

  8. New Approach to Resonance Crossing

    Franchetti, G.; Zimmermann, F.

    2012-01-01

    Time varying nonlinear oscillatory systems produce phenomena of resonance crossing and trapping of particles in resonance islands. Traditionally such processes have been analyzed in terms of adiabatic conditions. Considering, as an example, a simplified 1-dimensional (1-D) model describing the “electron cloud pinch” during a bunch passage in a particle accelerator, here we present an approach to resonance trapping which does not require any adiabatic condition. Instead we introduce the concep...

  9. New Approach to Resonance Crossing

    Franchetti, G

    2012-01-01

    Time varying nonlinear oscillatory systems produce phenomena of resonance crossing and trapping of particles in resonance islands. Traditionally such processes have been analyzed in terms of adiabatic conditions. Considering, as an example, a simplified 1-dimensional (1-D) model describing the “electron cloud pinch” during a bunch passage in a particle accelerator, here we present an approach to resonance trapping which does not require any adiabatic condition. Instead we introduce the concept of attraction point and investigate invariance and scaling properties of motion close to the attraction point, considering a single resonance crossing.

  10. Adiabatic transition probability for a tangential crossing

    Watanabe, Takuya

    2006-01-01

    We consider a time-dependent Schrödinger equation whose Hamiltonian is a $2\\times 2$ real symmetric matrix. We study, using an exact WKB method, the adiabatic limit of the transition probability in the case where several complex eigenvalue crossing points accumulate to one real point.

  11. Resonances and adiabatic invariance in classical and quantum scattering theory

    Jain, S R

    2004-01-01

    We discover that the energy-integral of time-delay is an adiabatic invariant in quantum scattering theory and corresponds classically to the phase space volume. The integral thus found provides a quantization condition for resonances, explaining a series of results recently found in non-relativistic and relativistic regimes. Further, a connection between statistical quantities like quantal resonance-width and classical friction has been established with a classically deterministic quantity, the stability exponent of an adiabatically perturbed periodic orbit. This relation can be employed to estimate the rate of energy dissipation in finite quantum systems.

  12. Single-parameter adiabatic charge pumping in carbon nanotube resonators

    Perroni, C. A.; Nocera, A.; Cataudella, V.

    2013-01-01

    Single-parameter adiabatic charge pumping, induced by a nearby radio-frequency antenna, is achieved in suspended carbon nanotubes close to the mechanical resonance. The charge pumping is due to an important dynamic adjustment of the oscillating motion to the antenna signal and it is different from the mechanism active in the two-parameter pumping. Finally, the second harmonic oscillator response shows an interesting relationship with the first harmonic that should be experimentally observed.

  13. Crossing simple resonances

    A simple criterion governs the beam distortion and/or loss of protons on a fast resonance crossing. Results from numerical integrations are illustrated for simple sextupole, octupole, and 10-pole resonances

  14. Monte Carlo analysis of the long-lived fission product neutron capture rates at the Transmutation by Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (TARC) experiment

    Abanades, A., E-mail: abanades@etsii.upm.es [Grupo de Modelizacion de Sistemas Termoenergeticos, ETSII, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, c/Ramiro de Maeztu, 7, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.M. [Centro de Investigaciones Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Avda. Complutense, 40, Ed. 17, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ismailov, K. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Lafuente, A. [Grupo de Modelizacion de Sistemas Termoenergeticos, ETSII, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, c/Ramiro de Maeztu, 7, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Nishihara, K. [Transmutation Section, J-PARC Center, JAEA, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Saito, M. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Stanculescu, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna (Austria); Sugawara, T. [Transmutation Section, J-PARC Center, JAEA, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TARC experiment benchmark capture rates results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Utilization of updated databases, included ADSLib. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Self-shielding effect in reactor design for transmutation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of Lead nuclear data. - Abstract: The design of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) requires the development of simulation tools that are able to describe in a realistic way their nuclear performance and transmutation rate capability. In this publication, we present an evaluation of state of the art Monte Carlo design tools to assess their performance concerning transmutation of long-lived fission products. This work, performed under the umbrella of the International Atomic Energy Agency, analyses two important aspects for transmutation systems: moderation on Lead and neutron captures of {sup 99}Tc, {sup 127}I and {sup 129}I. The analysis of the results shows how shielding effects due to the resonances at epithermal energies of these nuclides affects strongly their transmutation rate. The results suggest that some research effort should be undertaken to improve the quality of Iodine nuclear data at epithermal and fast neutron energy to obtain a reliable transmutation estimation.

  15. Optimization of adiabatic microring resonators with few-mode and high-Q resonances.

    Li, Ruifei; Zhou, Linjie; Xie, Jingya; Xie, Anbang; Chen, Jianping

    2015-12-01

    We present the theoretical analysis and experimental demonstration of adiabatic microring resonators. The resonators are halfway between microdisk and microring preserving the good properties of both the microdisk (high Q-factor) and the microring (internal mode rejection). Device modeling based on the coupled-mode theory suggests that both the internal and external decay rates should be low in order to obtain high-Q and high extinction ratio resonances. The internal decay is modal-order-dependent and significantly affected by the adiabatic tapering rate of the ring waveguide. The external delay is determined by the modal effective index difference between the bus and ring waveguides at the coupling point under a fixed gap. Upon optimization of the resonator system, two resonance modes in the measured device are measured with one possessing a high Q-factor. PMID:26836679

  16. Quantum Dynamics of the Oscillating Cantilever-Driven Adiabatic Reversals in Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    Berman, G P; Tsifrinovich, V I

    2004-01-01

    We simulated the quantum dynamics for magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) in the oscillating cantilever-driven adiabatic reversals (OSCAR) technique. We estimated the frequency shift of the cantilever vibrations and demonstrated that this shift causes the formation of a Schrodinger cat state which has some similarities and differences from the conventional MRFM technique which uses cyclic adiabatic reversals of spins. The interaction of the cantilever with the environment is shown to quickly destroy the coherence between the two possible cantilever trajectories. We have shown that using partial adiabatic reversals, one can produce a significant increase in the OSCAR signal.

  17. Adiabatic Coherence Transfer in Magnetic Resonance of Homonuclear Scalar-Coupled Systems

    Kurur, N. D.; Bodenhausen, G.

    By analogy to heteronuclear systems, it is shown that coherence can be transferred adiabatically in the rotating frame between two selected spins I and S belonging to a homonuclear network of scalar-coupled spins. In contrast to cross polarization with constant radiofrequency field amplitudes, the transfer function obtained with adiabatic methods depends in a monotonic, nonoscillatory manner on the duration of the transfer interval. The efficiency of the transfer does not depend on the magnitude of the scalar coupling constant JIS, although it can be affected by relaxation and by couplings JIR and JSR to further spins R. Three methods are investigated: (i) adiabatic demagnetization of spin I in the rotating frame followed by observation of the resulting J-ordered state, (ii) adiabatic demagnetization of spin I in the rotating frame followed by adiabatic remagnetization of spin S, and (iii) adiabatic transfer where spins I and S are subjected simultaneously to time-dependent spin-locking fields. In all three cases, the optimum shape of the time dependence of the radiofrequency field amplitudes is discussed, with the help of a geometric interpretation of cross polarization.

  18. Stationary cantilever vibrations in the oscillating cantilever-driven adiabatic reversals -- magnetic resonance force microscopy technique

    Berman, G P; Tsifrinovich, V I

    2002-01-01

    We consider theoretically the novel technique in magnetic resonance force microscopy which is called ``oscillating cantilever-driven adiabatic reversals''. We present analytical and numerical analysis for the stationary cantilever vibrations in this technique. For reasonable values of parameters we estimate the resonant frequency shift as 6Hz per the Bohr magneton. We analyze also the regime of small oscillations of the paramagnetic moment near the transversal plane and the frequency shift of the damped cantilever vibrations.

  19. Stationary cantilever vibrations in oscillating-cantilever-driven adiabatic reversals: Magnetic-resonance-force-microscopy technique

    We consider theoretically the novel technique in magnetic-resonance-force microscopy that is called ''oscillating-cantilever-driven adiabatic reversals.'' We present an analytical and numerical analysis for the stationary cantilever vibrations in this technique. For reasonable values of parameters, we estimate the resonant frequency shift as 6 Hz per the Bohr magneton. We analyze also the regime of small oscillations of the paramagnetic moment near the transversal plane and the frequency shift of the damped cantilever vibrations

  20. Penetration of a resonant magnetic perturbation in an adiabatically rippled plasma slab

    Dewar, Robert L; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Yoshida, Zensho

    2016-01-01

    The adiabatic limit of a recently proposed dynamical extension of Taylor relaxation, \\emph{multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics} (MRxMHD) is summarized, with special attention to the appropriate definition of relative magnetic helicity. The formalism is illustrated using a simple two-region, sheared-magnetic-field model similar to the Hahm--Kulsrud--Taylor (HKT) rippled-boundary slab model. In MRxMHD a linear Grad--Shafranov equation applies, even at finite ripple amplitude. The adiabatic switching on of boundary ripple excites a shielding current sheet opposing reconnection at a resonant surface. The perturbed magnetic field as a function of ripple amplitude is calculated by invoking conservation of magnetic helicity in the two regions separated by the current sheet. At low ripple amplitude "half islands" appear on each side of the current sheet, locking the rotational transform at the resonant value. Beyond a critical amplitude these islands disappear and the rotational transform develops a discontinui...

  1. Adiabatic Chemical Freeze-out and Wide Resonance Modification in a Thermal Medium

    Bugaev, K A; Nikonov, E G; Sorin, A S; Zinovjev, G M

    2012-01-01

    Here we develop a model equation of state which successfully parameterizes the thermodynamic functions of hadron resonance gas model at chemical freeze-out and which allows us to naturally explain the adiabatic chemical freeze-out criterion. The present model enables us to clearly demonstrate that at chemical freeze-out the resulting hadronic mass spectrum used in the hadron resonance gas model is not an exponential-like, but a power-like. We argue that such a property of hadronic mass spectrum at chemical freeze-out can be explained by the two new effects found here for wide resonances existing in a thermal environment: the near threshold thermal resonance enhancement and the near threshold resonance sharpening. The effect of resonance sharpening is studied for a sigma meson and our analysis shows that for the temperatures well below 92 MeV the effective width of sigma meson is about 50 to 70 MeV. Thus, the effect of resonance sharpening justifies the usage of the sigma-like field-theoretical models for the ...

  2. Hamiltonian Dynamics and Adiabatic Invariants for Time-Dependent Superconducting Qubit-Oscillators and Resonators in Quantum Computing Systems

    Jeong Ryeol Choi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An adiabatic invariant, which is a conserved quantity, is useful for studying quantum and classical properties of dynamical systems. Adiabatic invariants for time-dependent superconducting qubit-oscillator systems and resonators are investigated using the Liouville-von Neumann equation. At first, we derive an invariant for a simple superconducting qubit-oscillator through the introduction of its reduced Hamiltonian. Afterwards, an adiabatic invariant for a nanomechanical resonator linearly interfaced with a superconducting circuit, via a coupling with a time-dependent strength, is evaluated using the technique of unitary transformation. The accuracy of conservation for such invariant quantities is represented in detail. Based on the results of our developments in this paper, perturbation theory is applicable to the research of quantum characteristics of more complicated qubit systems that are described by a time-dependent Hamiltonian involving nonlinear terms.

  3. Application of magnetic resonance force microscopy cyclic adiabatic inversion for a single-spin measurement

    Berman, G P; Chapline, G; Gurvitz, S A; Hammel, P C; Pelekhov, D V; Suter, A; Tsifrinovich, V I

    2003-01-01

    We consider the process of a single-spin measurement using magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) with a cyclic adiabatic inversion (CAI). This technique is also important for different applications, including a measurement of a qubit state in quantum computation. The measurement takes place through the interaction of a single spin with a cantilever modelled by a quantum oscillator in a coherent state in a quasi-classical range of parameters. The entire system is treated rigorously within the framework of the Schroedinger equation. For a many-spin system our equations accurately describe conventional MRFM experiments involving CAI of the spin system. Our computer simulations of the quantum spin-cantilever dynamics show that the probability distribution for the cantilever position develops two asymmetric peaks with the total relative probabilities mainly dependent on the initial angle between the directions of the average spin and the effective magnetic field, in the rotating frame. We show that each of th...

  4. Application of magnetic resonance force microscopy cyclic adiabatic inversion for a single-spin measurement

    We consider the process of a single-spin measurement using magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) with a cyclic adiabatic inversion (CAI). This technique is also important for different applications, including a measurement of a qubit state in quantum computation. The measurement takes place through the interaction of a single spin with a cantilever modelled by a quantum oscillator in a coherent state in a quasi-classical range of parameters. The entire system is treated rigorously within the framework of the Schroedinger equation. For a many-spin system our equations accurately describe conventional MRFM experiments involving CAI of the spin system. Our computer simulations of the quantum spin-cantilever dynamics show that the probability distribution for the cantilever position develops two asymmetric peaks with the total relative probabilities mainly dependent on the initial angle between the directions of the average spin and the effective magnetic field, in the rotating frame. We show that each of the peaks is correlated with the direction of the average spin (being along or opposite to the direction of the effective magnetic field). This generates two possible outcomes of a single-spin measurement, similar to the Stern-Gerlach effect. We demonstrate that the generation of the second peak can be significantly suppressed by turning on adiabatically the amplitude of the rf magnetic field. We also show that MRFM CAI can be used both for detecting a signal from a single spin, and for measuring the single-spin state by measuring the phase of the cantilever driving oscillations

  5. Nuclear transmission coefficients for calculation of the absorption cross section in the adiabatic coupled-channel approximation method

    Formulas which are needed to calculate transmission coefficients for the adiabatic coupled-channel approximation method are described. In terms of these coefficients, nuclear absorption cross sections may be obtained. First, derivations are given of various cross sections for a system of coupled inelastic channels in terms of the S matrix. The adiabatic approximation method is discussed for a rotational band, and the dynamical nuclear S matrix is obtained from the S matrix for scattering from a static rotor. The formulas are valid for a spheroidal rotor, with or without an extra-core particle, which does not interact with the projectile but does provide angular momentum to the target

  6. Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage and dark resonances in an open three-level Λ-system

    The evolution of populations and fluorescence of atoms or molecules interacting with two fields whose frequencies are close to the transition frequencies between the ground and excited states and excited and metastable ones (Lambda-system) is investigated. The system is assumed to be open. The spontaneous decay from the upper state to the other states of the system is taken into account too. The expressions for dependence of fluorescence and the population of the dark state on two-photon detuning are derived by the perturbation theory. The small parameter of the theory is the non-adiabaticity of the atom-field interaction. The cases of constant and pulse fields are discussed. It is shown that the frequency fluctuation can substantially reduce the population of the dark state and the deepness of the dark resonance but does not affect the width of the two-photon lineshape which is inversely proportional to the square root of the interaction time. The analytical results are confirmed by the numerical simulation

  7. Emittance growths in resonance crossing at FFAGs

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab; Pang, X.; Wang, F.; Wang, X.; Lee, S.Y.; /Indiana U.

    2007-10-01

    Scaling laws of the emittance growth for a beam crossing the 6th-order systematic space-charge resonances and the random-octupole driven 4th-order resonance are obtained by numerical multi-particle simulations. These laws can be important in setting the minimum acceleration rate and maximum tolerable resonance strength for the design of non-scaling fixed-field alternating gradient accelerators.

  8. Adiabatic fast passage application in solid state NMR study of cross relaxation and molecular dynamics in heteronuclear systems

    Baranowski, M.; Woźniak-Braszak, A.; Jurga, K.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the benefits of using fast adiabatic passage for the study of molecular dynamics in the solid state heteronuclear systems in the laboratory frame. A homemade pulse spectrometer operating at the frequency of 30.2 MHz and 28.411 MHz for protons and fluorines, respectively, has been enhanced with microcontroller direct digital synthesizer DDS controller [1-4]. This work briefly describes how to construct a low-cost and easy-to-assemble adiabatic extension set for homemade and commercial spectrometers based on recently very popular Arduino shields. The described set was designed for fast adiabatic generation. Timing and synchronization problems are discussed. The cross-relaxation experiments with different initial states of the two spin systems have been performed. Contrary to our previous work [5] where the steady-state NOE experiments were conducted now proton spins 1H are polarized in the magnetic field B0 while fluorine spins 19F are perturbed by selective saturation for a short time and then the system is allowed to evolve for a period in the absence of a saturating field. The adiabatic passage application leads to a reversal of magnetization of fluorine spins and increases the amplitude of the signal.

  9. Improved adiabatic calculation of muonic-hydrogen-atom cross sections. II. Hyperfine transitions and elastic scattering in symmetric collisions

    The improved adiabatic representation is used in calculations of elastic and hyperfine-transition cross sections for symmetric collisions of pμ, dμ, and tμ with bare p, d, and t nuclei and with H, D, and T atoms, respectively. The cross sections for dμ+d and tμ+t are in excellent agreement with other recent determinations, while those for pμ+p are about 30% larger at low energies. The electronic screening is calculated nonperturbatively and found to be about 30% smaller in magnitude than the previously calculated value at large internuclear distances, and to deviate considerably from the asymptotic form in the molecular region. The resulting screened elastic cross sections are up to 60% smaller than those obtained using the old screening potential. The reactance matrices, needed for calculations of molecular-target effects, are given in tables

  10. Topology of the Adiabatic Potential Energy Surfaces for theResonance States of the Water Anion

    Haxton, Daniel J.; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William

    2005-04-15

    The potential energy surfaces corresponding to the long-lived fixed-nuclei electron scattering resonances of H{sub 2}O relevant to the dissociative electron attachment process are examined using a combination of ab initio scattering and bound-state calculations. These surfaces have a rich topology, characterized by three main features: a conical intersection between the {sup 2}A{sub 1} and {sup 2}B{sub 2} Feshbach resonance states; charge-transfer behavior in the OH ({sup 2}{Pi}) + H{sup -} asymptote of the {sup 2}B{sub 1} and {sup 2}A{sub 1} resonances; and an inherent double-valuedness of the surface for the {sup 2}B{sub 2} state the C{sub 2v} geometry, arising from a branch-point degeneracy with a {sup 2}B{sub 2} shape resonance. In total, eight individual seams of degeneracy among these resonances are located.

  11. Use of non-adiabatic geometric phase for quantum computing by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Das, R; Kumar, A; Das, Ranabir; Kumar, Anil

    2005-01-01

    Geometric phases have stimulated researchers for its potential applications in many areas of science. One of them is fault-tolerant quantum computation. A preliminary requisite of quantum computation is the implementation of controlled logic gates by controlled dynamics of qubits. In controlled dynamics, one qubit undergoes coherent evolution and acquires appropriate phase, depending on the state of other qubits. If the evolution is geometric, then the phase acquired depend only on the geometry of the path executed, and is robust against certain types of errors. This phenomenon leads to an inherently fault-tolerant quantum computation. Here we suggest a technique of using non-adiabatic geometric phase for quantum computation, using selective excitation. In a two-qubit system, we selectively evolve a suitable subsystem where the control qubit is in state |1>, through a closed circuit. By this evolution, the target qubit gains a phase controlled by the state of the control qubit. Using these geometric phase gat...

  12. Resonance Averaged Photoionization Cross Sections for Astrophysical Models

    Bautista, M A; Pradhan, A K

    1997-01-01

    We present ground state photoionization cross sections of atoms and ions averaged over resonance structures for photoionization modeling of astrophysical sources. The detailed cross sections calculated in the close-coupling approximation using the R-matrix method, with resonances delineated at thousands of energies, are taken from the Opacity Project database TOPbase and the Iron Project, including new data for the low ionization stages of iron Fe I--V. The resonance-averaged cross sections are obtained by convolving the detailed cross sections with a Gaussian distribution over the autoionizing resonances. This procedure is expected to minimize errors in the derived ionization rates that could result from small uncertainties in computed positions of resonances, while preserving the overall resonant contribution to the cross sections in the important near threshold regions. The detailed photoionization cross sections at low photon energies are complemented by new relativistic distorted-wave calculations for Z1...

  13. Resonance capture cross section of 207Pb

    Domingo-Pardo, C; Aerts, G; Alvarez-Pol, H; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Andrzejewski, J; Andriamonje, Samuel A; Assimakopoulos, P A; Audouin, L; Badurek, G; Baumann, P; Becvar, F; Berthoumieux, E; Bisterzo, S; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; Carrapico, C; Chepel, V; Cennini, P; Chiaveri, Enrico; Colonna, N; Cortés, G; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dahlfors, M; David, S; Dillman, I; Dolfini, R; Dridi, W; Durán, I; Eleftheriadis, C; Embid-Segura, M; Ferrant, L; Ferrari, A; Ferreira-Marques, R; Fitzpatrick, L; Frais-Kölbl, H; Fujii, K; Furman, W; Gallino, R; Gonçalves, I; González-Romero, E M; Goverdovski, A; Gramegna, F; Griesmayer, E; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martínez, A; Igashira, M; Isaev, S; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Käppeler, F K; Karamanis, D; Karadimos, D; Kerveno, M; Ketlerov, V; Köhler, P; Konovalov, V; Kossionides, E; Krticka, M; Lamboudis, C; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marrone, S; Mastinu, P; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Moreau, C; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, Heinz; Oshima, M; O'Brien, S; Pancin, J; Papachristodoulou, C; Papadopoulos, C; Paradela, C; Patronis, N; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Perrot, L; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Pretel, C; Quesada, J; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Rosetti, M; Rubbia, Carlo; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Sarchiapone, L; Savvidis, I; Stéphan, C; Tagliente, G; Taín, J L; Tassan-Got, L; Tavora, L; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Villamarín, D; Vincente6, M C; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Voss, F; Walter, S; Wendler, H; Wiescher, M; Wisshak, K

    2006-01-01

    The radiative neutron capture cross section of 207Pb has been measured at the CERN neutron time of flight installation n_TOF using the pulse height weighting technique in the resolved energy region. The measurement has been performed with an optimized setup of two C6D6 scintillation detectors, which allowed us to reduce scattered neutron backgrounds down to a negligible level. Resonance parameters and radiative kernels have been determined for 16 resonances by means of an R-matrix analysis in the neutron energy range from 3 keV to 320 keV. Good agreement with previous measurements was found at low neutron energies, whereas substantial discrepancies appear beyond 45 keV. With the present results, we obtain an s-process contribution of 77(8)% to the solar abundance of 207Pb. This corresponds to an r-process component of 23(8)%, which is important for deriving the U/Th ages of metal poor halo stars.

  14. Single-level resonance parameters fit nuclear cross-sections

    Drawbaugh, D. W.; Gibson, G.; Miller, M.; Page, S. L.

    1970-01-01

    Least squares analyses of experimental differential cross-section data for the U-235 nucleus have yielded single level Breit-Wigner resonance parameters that fit, simultaneously, three nuclear cross sections of capture, fission, and total.

  15. Rovibrational cross sections from reactance matrices calculated in adiabatic nuclei approximation

    Body frame reactance matrices obtained from elastic scattering calculations at fixed internuclear separations are transformed into laboratory frame matrices to compute differential and integral cross sections for simultaneous rotational and vibrational excitation of a molecule. Transformation for vibrational excitation is obtained by integrating the real and imaginary parts of the body-frame t-matrices over internuclear separation. Vibrational wave functions are assumed to be given. The rotational transformation involves an eight-fold sum over angular momenta. The summands involve Asub(lambda)-coefficients and Legendre polynomials, which are each evaluated by separate subprograms. Differential, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections are computed from the transformed t-matrices. (Auth.)

  16. ADAPE program for calculation of the cross sections of neutron inelastic scattering on deformed nuclei in the adiabatic approximation by the coupled channel method

    The program for calculation of the cross sections of neutron interaction with deformed nuclei by the strongly coupled channel method in the adiabatic approximation is described. The results of test calculations of cross sections of elastic and inelastic neutron scattering with initial energy of 0.1; 0.6; 2.0; 2.5 MeV on the sup(238)U nucleus are presented

  17. Unified approach to the multilevel parametrization of resonance cross sections

    A combined method of parametrization in the resolved resonance region and an approach to modelling the resonance structure in the unresolved region are suggested. The most typical case for the resonances of the non fissile nuclei with one neutron channel (s-wave resonances or resonances of an arbitrary l and a zero spin of the target nucleus) are considered. It is shown that for such systems the total cross section as well as the absorption cross section can be expressed as ratios of sums of pole terms with respect to energy. The modeling of the resonance structure in the unresolved region is needed for the examination of the resonance self-shielding effects in reactor physics. In this region the analysis of the experimental data (average cross sections and average transmissions) permits the determination of only the average resonance parameters - the strength functions Sn, Sγ. And it is necessary to model the resonance cross sections structure and such models should give the correct average cross section and also conserve the information for the cross sections minima to which the values of the transmissions data are very sensitive

  18. Theory of neutron resonance cross sections for safety applications

    Neutron resonances exert a strong influence on the behaviour of nuclear reactors, especially on their response to the temperature changes accompanying power excursions, and also on the efficiency of shielding materials. The relevant theory of neutron resonance cross sections including the practically important approximations is reviewed, both for the resolved and the unresolved resonance region. Numerical techniques for Doppler broadening of resonances are presented, and the construction of group constants and especially of self-shielding factors for neutronics calculations is outlined. (orig.)

  19. Resonant Response in Mechanically Tunable Metasurface based on Crossed Metallic Gratings with Controllable Crossing Angle

    Yachin, Vladimir V; Polevoy, Sergey Y; Tarapov, Sergey I

    2016-01-01

    We report on a resonant response in transmission spectra of a linearly polarized wave passing through the system of crossed gratings. Each grating consists of an array of parallel metallic strips located on the top of a dielectric substrate. It is revealed that the resonant position appears to be dependent on the angle of gratings crossing. It is found out that the resonant shift on the frequency scale appears as a result of increasing in the length of the resonating portion of the parallelogram periodic cell formed by the crossed metallic strips with decreasing crossing angle and the proposed design can be used in new types of planar metamaterials and filters.

  20. Elastic scattering, muon transfer, bound states and resonances in the three-body mesic molecular systems in the reduced adiabatic hyperspherical approach

    The uniform method of numerical investigation of bound states and scattering processes 2→ 2 (including resonance states) in the Coulomb three-body (CTB) systems is developed. It is based on the adiabatic hyperspherical approach (AHSA) and includes the numerical realization and applications to the three-body mesic atomic systems. The results of calculations of bound states of these systems (including the local characteristics of the wave functions) and the scattering processes 2→ 2 (including the characteristics of the resonance states) are presented

  1. Excitation of Orbital Eccentricities by Repeated Resonance Crossings Requirements

    Chiang, E I

    2003-01-01

    Divergent migration of planets within a viscous circumstellar disk can engender resonance crossings and dramatic excitation of orbital eccentricities. We provide quantitative criteria for the viability of this mechanism. For the orbits of two bodies to diverge, a ring of viscous material must be shepherded between them. As the ring diffuses in radius by virtue of its intrinsic viscosity, the two planets are wedged further apart. The ring mass must be smaller than the planetary masses so that the crossing of an individual resonance lasts longer than the resonant libration period. At the same time, the crossing cannot be of such long duration that the disk's direct influence on the bodies' eccentricities interferes with the resonant interaction between the two planets. This last criterion is robustly satisfied because resonant widths are typically tiny fractions of the orbital radius. We evaluate our criteria not only for giant planets within gaseous protoplanetary disks, but also for shepherd moons that bracke...

  2. Wireless adiabatic power transfer

    Research highlights: → Efficient and robust mid-range wireless energy transfer between two coils. → The adiabatic energy transfer is analogous to adiabatic passage in quantum optics. → Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to any resonant constraints. → Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to noise in the neighborhood of the coils. - Abstract: We propose a technique for efficient mid-range wireless power transfer between two coils, by adapting the process of adiabatic passage for a coherently driven two-state quantum system to the realm of wireless energy transfer. The proposed technique is shown to be robust to noise, resonant constraints, and other interferences that exist in the neighborhood of the coils.

  3. The Hadronic Cross-Section in the Resonance Energy Region

    Portoles, J.; Ruiz-Femenia, P. D.

    2003-01-01

    We study the hadronic vacuum polarization in the resonance energy region, using the framework given by the Resonance Effective Theory of QCD. We consider the incorporation of vector-pseudoscalar meson loops that give, inclusively, three and four pseudoscalar meson cuts. After resummation we achieve a QCD-based inclusive parameterization of the correlator, hence of the hadronic cross-section in the energy region populated by resonances.

  4. Adiabatic Hyperspherical Approach to the Problems of Muon Catalyzed Fusion

    The adiabatic hyperspherical approach (AHSA) is applied for the numerical investigation of the scattering processes and resonances in Coulomb three-body mesic atomic systems. The results of the calculations of elastic and inelastic cross sections in low-energy collisions aμ + b (a, b = p, d, t), energies, lifetimes and local characteristics of resonant states of mesic molecular ions nHeaμ+ (n = 3, 4) are presented.

  5. Wireless adiabatic power transfer

    Rangelov, A. A.; Suchowski, H.; Silberberg, Y.; Vitanov, N. V.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a technique for efficient mid-range wireless power transfer between two coils, by adapting the process of adiabatic passage for a coherently driven two-state quantum system to the realm of wireless energy transfer. The proposed technique is shown to be robust to noise, resonant constraints, and other interferences that exist in the neighborhood of the coils.

  6. Photon-photon cross sections in the resonance region

    Possible contributions to the photon-photon cross section in the region where the vector dominated thresholds are closed are evaluated. All two body processes diagonal and off diagonal are summed explicitly and the multibody processes are calculated by a method introduced previously. It is found that, excluding s-channel resonances, the cross section is very small for all channels, and purely real except for resonances. It is concluded that the possibility of studying s-channel resonances in electron colliding machines is probably far better than it was believed. These possibilities are discussed in a separate paper. (author)

  7. Neutron cross section covariances in the resolved resonance region.

    Herman,M.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Oblozinsky, P.; Pigni, M.T.; Rochman, D.

    2008-04-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the impact of resonance parameter uncertainties on covariances for neutron capture and fission cross sections in the resolved resonance region. Our analysis uses the uncertainties available in the recently published Atlas of Neutron Resonances employing the Multi-Level Breit-Wigner formalism. We consider uncertainties on resonance energies along with those on neutron-, radiative-, and fission-widths and examine their impact on cross section uncertainties and correlations. We also study the effect of the resonance parameter correlations deduced from capture and fission kernels and illustrate our approach on several practical examples. We show that uncertainties of neutron-, radiative- and fission-widths are important, while the uncertainties of resonance energies can be effectively neglected. We conclude that the correlations between neutron and radiative (fission) widths should be taken into account. The multi-group cross section uncertainties can be properly generated from both the resonance parameter covariance format MF32 and the cross section covariance format MF33, though the use of MF32 is more straightforward and hence preferable.

  8. Evaluation of Neutron Resonance Cross Section Data at GELINA

    Schillebeeckx, P.; Becker, B.; Capote, R.; Emiliani, F.; Guber, K.; Heyse, J.; Kauwenberghs, K.; Kopecky, S.; Lampoudis, C.; Massimi, C.; Mondelaers, W.; Moxon, M.; Noguere, G.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Pronyaev, V.; Siegler, P.; Sirakov, I.; Trkov, A.; Volev, K.; Zerovnik, G.

    2014-05-01

    Over the last decade, the EC-JRC-IRMM, in collaboration with other institutes such as INRNE Sofia (BG), INFN Bologna (IT), ORNL (USA), CEA Cadarache (FR) and CEA Saclay (FR), has made an intense effort to improve the quality of neutron-induced cross section data in the resonance region. These improvements relate to both the infrastructure of the facility and the measurement setup, and the data reduction and analysis procedures. As a result total and reaction cross section data in the resonance region with uncertainties better than 0.5 % and 2 %, respectively, can be produced together with evaluated data files for both the resolved and unresolved resonance region. The methodology to produce full ENDF compatible files, including covariances, is illustrated by the production of resolved resonance parameter files for 241Am, Cd and W and an evaluation for 197Au in the unresolved resonance region.

  9. Resonance interaction effects in photonucleon reaction cross sections

    The fine structure of a giant dipole resonance in the photonuclear reaction cross section is investigated. Developed is a diagram of parametrization of cross sections, angular distribution and polarization for two resonances, one of which is directly excited by gamma-quantum, the second - due to internal and external mixing with the first state. It is shown, that for several reaction channels the interaction effects significantly the energy dependence of the cross sections and results in qualitative effects in the photonuclear angular distributions and polarization of photonucleons

  10. Phase-space picture of resonance creation and avoided crossings

    Complex coordinate scaling (CCS) is used to calculate resonance eigenvalues and eigenstates for a system consisting of an inverted Gaussian potential and a monochromatic driving field. Floquet eigenvalues and Husimi distributions of resonance eigenfunctions are calculated using two different versions of CCS. The number of resonance states in this system increases as the strength of the driving field is increased, indicating that this system might have increased stability against ionization when the field strength is very high. We find that the newly created resonance states are scarred on unstable periodic orbits of the classical motion. The behavior of these periodic orbits as the field strength is increased may explain why there are more resonance states at high field strengths than at low field strengths. Close examination of an avoided crossing between resonance states shows that the two states exchange their structure, as in bound systems. This phenomenon might lead to interesting effects at certain field strengths

  11. Neutron Cross Section Uncertainties in the Thermal and Resonance Regions

    Mughabghab,S.F.; Oblozinsky, P.

    2008-06-24

    In the 'Atlas of Neutron Resonances', special care was expended to ensure that the resonance parameter information reproduces the various measured thermal cross sections, as well as the infinite dilute resonance integrals for Z = 1-100. In contrast, the uncertainties of the recommended quantities do not match those generated from the uncertainties of the resonance parameters. To address this problem, the present study was initiated to achieve consistency for 15 actinides and 21 structural and coolant moderator materials. This is realized by assigning uncertainties to the parameters of the negative-energy resonances and changing, if necessary, significantly the uncertainties of the low-lying positive-energy resonances. The influence of correlations between parameters on the derived uncertainties is examined and discussed.

  12. Electrical cross-talk in two-port resonators the resonant silicon beam force sensor

    Mullem, van, F.; Tilmans, H. A. C.; Mouthaan, A.J.; Fluitman, J.H.J.

    1992-01-01

    An important design consideration in the development of two-port resonant sensors is the electrical cross-talk between the input port and the output port. The overall transfer function (j) of the two-port sensor is equal to the vectorial sum of a transfer function representing the mechanical behavior and a transfer function representing the electrical cross-talk. The resonant silicon beam force sensor with a piezoelectric driver and a piezoelectric detector is analyzed. Two solutions to reduc...

  13. Analysis and approximations for crossing two nearby spin resonances

    Solutions to the T-BMT spin equation have to date been confined to the single resonance crossing. However, in reality most cases of interest concern the overlapping of several resonances. To date there has been several serious studies of this problem; however, a good analytical solution or even approximation has eluded the community. We show that the T-BMT equation can be transformed into a Hill's like equation. In this representation it can be shown that, while the single resonance crossing represents the solution to the Parabolic Cylinder equation, the overlapping case becomes a parametric type of resonance. We present possible approximations for both the non-accelerating case and accelerating case.

  14. Amplification of weak signals via the non-adiabatic regime of stochastic resonance in a bistable dynamical system with time delay

    The non-adiabatic regime of stochastic resonance (SR) in a bistable system with time delay, an additive white noise and a periodic signal was investigated. The signal power amplification η was employed to characterize the SR of the system. The simulation results indicate that (i) in the case of intermediate frequency Ω of the periodic signal, the typical behavior of SR is lowered monotonically by increasing the delay time τ; in the case of large Ω, τ weakens the SR behavior and then enhances it, with a non-monotonic behavior as a function of time delay; (ii) time delay induces SR when A is above the threshold, whereas no such resonance exists in the absence of time delay; (iii) time delay induces a transition from bimodal to unimodal configuration of η; (iv) varying the particular form of time delay results in different phenomena.

  15. Multigroup cross sections of resonant nuclei considering moderator mass differences

    The multigroup constants library MGCL in the nuclear criticality safety evaluation code system JACS has been produced by the Bondarenko method to treat self-shielding effects. For estimating errors of this treatment, the multigroup cross sections of MGCL are compared with those obtained by precise treatment, i.e. with the weighted cross sections by ultra-fine spectra of neutron. The precise calculations are made for homogeneous mixtures of a resonant nucleus (235U, 238U, 239Pu, 240Pu, 242Pu or 56Fe) and a fictitious moderator nucleus with mass number 1, 12 or 200. The ultra-fine spectrum is calculated by the RABBLE code. Distinct differences are found in the self-shielding factors by comparisons between both treatments. Moreover, as the mass number increases, depressions of the self-shielding factor at the resonance peaks and its enhancements at the window of resonances are observed. (author)

  16. Evaluation of neutron resonance cross section data at GELINA

    BECKER BJÖRN; Capote, R; EMILIANI FEDERICA; Guber, K. H.; HEYSE JAN; KAUWENBERGHS KIM JOSEPHA; Kopecky, Stefan; LAMPOUDIS CHRISTOS; Massimi, C.; MONDELAERS Willy; Moxon, M.; Noguere, G.; Plompen, Arjan; PRONAYEV V.; SIEGLER Peter

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, the EC–JRC–IRMM, in collaboration with other institutes such as INRNE Sofia (BG), INFN Bologna (IT), ORNL (USA), CEA Cadarache (FR) and CEA Saclay (FR), has made an intense effort to improve the quality of neutron-induced cross section data in the resonance region. These improvements relate to both the infrastructure of the facility and the measurement setup, and the data reduction and analysis procedures. As a result total and reaction cross section data in the resonanc...

  17. Resonance averaged channel radiative neutron capture cross sections

    In order to apply Lane amd Lynn's channel capture model in calculations with a realistic optical model potential, we have derived an approximate wave function for the entrance channel in the neutron-nucleus reaction, based on the intermediate interaction model. It is valid in the exterior region as well as the region near the nuclear surface, ans is expressed in terms of the wave function and reactance matrix of the optical model and of the near-resonance parameters. With this formalism the averaged channel radiative neutron capture cross section in the resonance region is written as the sum of three terms. The first two terms correspond to contribution of the optical model real and imaginary parts respectively, and together can be regarded as the radiative capture of the shape elastic wave. The third term is a fluctuation term, corresponding to the radiative capture of the compound elastic wave in the exterior region. On applying this theory in the resonance region, we obtain an expression for the average valence radiative width similar to that of Lane and Mughabghab. We have investigated the magnitude and energy dependence of the three terms as a function of the neutron incident energy. Calculated results for 98Mo and 55Mn show that the averaged channel radiative capture cross section in the giant resonance region of the neutron strength function may account for a considerable fraction of the total (n, γ) cross section; at lower neutron energies a large part of this channel capture arises from the fluctuation term. We have also calculated the partial capture cross section in 98Mo and 55Mn at 2.4 keV and 24 keV, respectively, and compared the 98Mo results with the experimental data. (orig.)

  18. Astrophysical S-factor for 16O+16O within the adiabatic molecular picture

    The astrophysical S-factor for 16O+16O is investigated within the adiabatic molecular picture. It very well explains the available experimental data. The collective radial mass causes a pronounced resonant structure in the S-factor excitation function, providing a motivation for measuring the 16O+16O fusion cross section at deep sub-barrier energies. (author)

  19. Nonresonance adiabatic photon trap

    Popov, S S; Burdakov, A V; Ushkova, M Yu

    2016-01-01

    Concept of high efficiency photon storage based on adiabatic confinement between concave mirrors is presented and experimentally investigated. The approach is insensitive to typical for Fabri-Perot cells requirements on quality of accumulated radiation, tolerance of resonator elements and their stability. Experiments have been carried out with the trap, which consists from opposed concave cylindrical mirrors and conjugated with them spherical mirrors. In result, high efficiency for accumulation of radiation with large angular spread and spectrum width has been confirmed. As radiation source a commercial fiber laser has been used.

  20. The thermal neutron absorption cross-sections, resonance integrals and resonance parameters of silicon and its stable isotopes

    The data available up to the end of November 1968 on the thermal neutron absorption cross-sections, resonance absorption integrals, and resonance parameters of silicon and its stable isotopes are collected and discussed. Estimates are given of the mean spacing of the energy levels of the compound nuclei near the neutron binding energy. It is concluded that the thermal neutron absorption cross-section and resonance absorption integral of natural silicon are not well established. The data on these two parameters are somewhat correlated, and three different assessments of the resonance integral are presented which differ over-all by a factor of 230. Many resonances have been detected by charged particle reactions which have not yet been observed in neutron cross-section measurements. One of these resonances of Si28, at En = 4 ± 5 keV might account for the large resonance integral which is derived, very uncertainly, from integral data. The principal source of the measured resonance integral of Si30 has not yet been located. The thermal neutron absorption cross-section of Si28 appears to result mainly from a negative energy resonance, possibly the resonance at En = - 59 ± 5 keV detected by the Si28 (d,p) reaction. (author)

  1. The total cross section and the fission cross section of 241Am in the resonance region. Resonance parameters

    The 241Am total and fission cross sections have been measured in the resonance region, using the 60MeV Saclay linac as a pulsed neutron source. The resonance parameters obtained by a single level shape analysis of the transmission data are given for 189 levels up to 150eV neutron energy. The mean level spacing, corrected for 18% of missed resonances in the 0 to 50eV energy range, is (0.55+-0.05)eV. The s-wave neutron strength function value, in the 0 to 150eV energy range, is equal to (0.94+-0.09)10-4. The average radiation width obtained from 43 resonances is (43.77+-0.72)MeV. Only preliminary results of the fission experiment are available now; 38 fission widths are given up to 32eV neutron energy, with the average value GAMMA(f) approximately equal to 0.23MeV; the statistical distribution of these fission widths corresponds to a X2 law with 4 degrees of freedom. An area analysis of the Los Alamos fission data has also been done, from which we obtain 36 GAMMA(f) values in the 20eV to 50eV energy range; the corresponding average value is: GAMMA(f) approximately equal to 0.52MeV; the statistical distribution obeys to a X2 law with 15 degrees of freedom, in desagreement with the Saclay results

  2. On the unresolved resonance region representation of neutron induced cross sections

    The accurate representation of neutron cross sections in the unresolved resonance region is of interest for the calculation of the Doppler coefficient of reactivity and self-shielded group cross -section sets for fast reactors. Customarily, the cross sections in the unresolved resonance region are described on the basis of the statistical theory of nuclear reactions, by specifying average values and distribution functions for the resonance parameters. Resonance self-shielding factors can then be calculated by the appropriate statistical techniques. In this work we review the unresolved resonance region formalism in the light of the availability of new high-energy resolution measurements. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  3. The adiabatic energy change of plasma electrons and the frame dependence of the cross-shock potential at collisionless magnetosonic shock waves

    Goodrich, C. C.; Scudder, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    The adiabatic energy gain of electrons in the stationary electric and magnetic field structure of collisionless shock waves was examined analytically in reference to conditions of the earth's bow shock. The study was performed to characterize the behavior of electrons interacting with the cross-shock potential. A normal incidence frame (NIF) was adopted in order to calculate the reversible energy change across a time stationary shock, and comparisons were made with predictions made by the de Hoffman-Teller (HT) model (1950). The electron energy gain, about 20-50 eV, is demonstrated to be consistent with a 200-500 eV potential jump in the bow shock quasi-perpendicular geometry. The electrons lose energy working against the solar wind motional electric field. The reversible energy process is close to that modeled by HT, which predicts that the motional electric field vanishes and the electron energy gain from the electric potential is equated to the ion energy loss to the potential.

  4. Adiabatic theory for anisotropic cold molecule collisions

    We developed an adiabatic theory for cold anisotropic collisions between slow atoms and cold molecules. It enables us to investigate the importance of the couplings between the projection states of the rotational motion of the atom about the molecular axis of the diatom. We tested our theory using the recent results from the Penning ionization reaction experiment 4He(1s2s 3S) + HD(1s2) → 4He(1s2) + HD+(1s) + e− [Lavert-Ofir et al., Nat. Chem. 6, 332 (2014)] and demonstrated that the couplings have strong effect on positions of shape resonances. The theory we derived provides cross sections which are in a very good agreement with the experimental findings

  5. Adiabatic theory for anisotropic cold molecule collisions.

    Pawlak, Mariusz; Shagam, Yuval; Narevicius, Edvardas; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2015-08-21

    We developed an adiabatic theory for cold anisotropic collisions between slow atoms and cold molecules. It enables us to investigate the importance of the couplings between the projection states of the rotational motion of the atom about the molecular axis of the diatom. We tested our theory using the recent results from the Penning ionization reaction experiment (4)He(1s2s (3)S) + HD(1s(2)) → (4)He(1s(2)) + HD(+)(1s) + e(-) [Lavert-Ofir et al., Nat. Chem. 6, 332 (2014)] and demonstrated that the couplings have strong effect on positions of shape resonances. The theory we derived provides cross sections which are in a very good agreement with the experimental findings. PMID:26298122

  6. Adiabatic theory for anisotropic cold molecule collisions

    Pawlak, Mariusz [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, Gagarina 7, 87-100 Toruń (Poland); Shagam, Yuval; Narevicius, Edvardas [Department of Chemical Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Moiseyev, Nimrod [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Faculty of Physics, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2015-08-21

    We developed an adiabatic theory for cold anisotropic collisions between slow atoms and cold molecules. It enables us to investigate the importance of the couplings between the projection states of the rotational motion of the atom about the molecular axis of the diatom. We tested our theory using the recent results from the Penning ionization reaction experiment {sup 4}He(1s2s {sup 3}S) + HD(1s{sup 2}) → {sup 4}He(1s{sup 2}) + HD{sup +}(1s) + e{sup −} [Lavert-Ofir et al., Nat. Chem. 6, 332 (2014)] and demonstrated that the couplings have strong effect on positions of shape resonances. The theory we derived provides cross sections which are in a very good agreement with the experimental findings.

  7. Calculation of neutron cross-sections in the unresolved resonance region by the Monte Carlo method

    The Monte-Carlo method is used to produce neutron cross-sections and functions of the cross-section probabilities in the unresolved energy region and a corresponding Fortran programme (ONERS) is described. Using average resonance parameters, the code generates statistical distribution of level widths and spacing between resonance for S and P waves. Some neutron cross-sections for U238 and U235 are shown as examples

  8. Correction of multigroup cross sections for resolved resonance interference in mixed absorbers

    The effect that interference between resolved resonances has on averaging multigroup cross sections is examined for thermal reactor-type problems. A simple and efficient numerical scheme is presented to correct a preprocessed multigroup library for interference effects. The procedure is implemented in a design oriented lattice physics computer code and compared with rigorous numerical calculations. The approximate method for computing resonance interference correction factors is applied to obtaining fine-group cross sections for a homogeneous uranium-plutonium mixture and a uranium oxide lattice. It was found that some fine group cross sections are changed by more than 40% due to resonance interference. The change in resonance interference correction factors due to burnup of a PWR fuel pin is examined and found to be small. The effect of resolved resonance interference on collapsed broad-group cross sections for thermal reactor calculations is discussed

  9. Representation of the neutron cross sections of several fertile and fissile nuclei in the resonance regions

    Some problems associated with the measurement and representation of the neutron cross sections of the fertile and fissile nuclei in the resolved and unresolved resonance regions are briefly discussed. Attention is restricted to the heavy nuclei most important for nuclear reactor applications: the resonance structure of the light- and medium-weight nuclei (moderators and structural materials) has different characteristics and requires a different approach. Some of the experimental problems in neutron cross-section measurements and some of the ambiguities in the resonance analysis resulting from the use of different resonance formalisms and different treatments of the effect of far-away levels are discussed

  10. Determination of Pb total photonuclear absorption cross section in the Δ resonance range by measurement of photoneutrons cross sections

    The photonuclear absorption cross section of Pb, σ(TOT:Esub(γ), is studied in the 145-440 MeV Δ resonance range using a quasi-monochromatic photon beam obtained by monoenergetic positon in-flight annihilation. This study is deduced of the cross section measurement for at least j neutron emission σsup(j))Esub(γ). The cross sections of reactions with 1 or 0 neutron are evaluated as the same values as the experimental errors. The variation of the photonuclear absorption cross section for a nuclear σ(TOT:Esub(γ)/A is mass independent for A<=4-6. It seems that the damping between σ(TOT:Esub(γ)/A and the cross section of the free nucleon is caused by the Fermi movement of the nucleons. In conclusion: it seems that the excitation of the nucleus in the Δ resonance region is produced on free nucleons and there are no collective states

  11. Group cross-sections and resonance self-shielding factors for 239Pu in the unresolved resonance region

    The authors analyse experimental data on the transmission and fission self-indication functions for 239Pu in the unresolved resonance region. Use is made of the method of generating a cross-section structure based on the multi-level R-matrix formalism (stochastic K-matrix method). Evaluations of the average resonance parameters and group constants for 239Pu are made. (author)

  12. Computation of Resonance-Screened Cross Section by the Dorix-Speng System

    The report describes a scheme for computation of group cross sections for fast reactors in energy regions where the resonance structure of the cross sections may be dense. A combination of the programmes Dorix and Speng is then used. Dorix calculates group cross sections for each resonance absorber separately. The interaction between resolved resonances in the same isotope is treated using a method described in a separate report. The interaction between correlated and non-correlated resonances in the unresolved region is also considered. By a Dorix calculation we obtain effective microscopic cross sections which are then read in on a library tape. This library contains both point-by-point data and group cross sections and is used in the Speng programme for computation of spectrum and/or macroscopic cross sections. The resonance interaction between different isotopes is computed in Speng by the same method as was used in the Dorix programme for non-correlated unresolved resonances. Consideration is also given to the width of the resonances compared to the energy loss by a neutron colliding with some of the scattering elements

  13. Resonance analysis and evaluation of the 235U neutron induced cross sections

    Neutron cross sections of fissile nuclei are of considerable interest for the understanding of parameters such as resonance absorption, resonance escape probability, resonance self-shielding,and the dependence of the reactivity on temperature. In the present study, new techniques for the evaluation of the 235U neutron cross sections are described. The Reich-Moore formalism of the Bayesian computer code SAMMY was used to perform consistent R-matrix multilevel analyses of the selected neutron cross-section data. The Δ3-statistics of Dyson and Mehta, along with high-resolution data and the spin-separated fission cross-section data, have provided the possibility of developing a new methodology for the analysis and evaluation of neutron-nucleus cross sections. The results of the analysis consists of a set of resonance parameters which describe the 235U neutron cross sections up to 500 eV. The set of resonance parameters obtained through a R-matrix analysis are expected to satisfy statistical properties which lead to information on the nuclear structure. The resonance parameters were tested and showed good agreement with the theory. It is expected that the parametrization of the 235U neutron cross sections obtained in this dissertation represents the current state of art in data as well as in theory and, therefore, can be of direct use in reactor calculations. 44 refs., 21 figs., 8 tabs

  14. A new resonance-region evaluation of neutron cross sections for 235U

    This paper describes a new evaluation of the resolved resonance range for the neutron cross sections of 235U. Up to 110 eV the evaluation is based on an R-matrix analysis of several fission, capture and transmission measurements. Above 110 eV levels are not resolved anymore so that many resonances are missed; from 110 to 500 eV most of the important resonances can be identified and analyzed so that the cross section and transmission data are well represented by the proposed parameters. From 500 to 2,250 eV fictitious parameters are provided which describe fairly well the results of thick sample transmission measurements and recent fission cross-section data. We believe that such a parameterization is likely to yield a better approximation of resonance self-shielding than the current ENDF/B-V unresolved resonance treatment

  15. Search for Optimum Subgroup Levels for Minimizing Errors in Resonance Shielded Cross Sections

    The subgroup method is one of the most employed methods for resonance treatment in the lattice transport or the direct whole core transport codes such as HELIOS and DeCART. It requires the subgroup parameters which consist of subgroup levels and subgroup weights. Subgroup weights are produced from the given subgroup levels by solving an error minimization problem for the resonance shielded effective cross sections. The subgroup parameters have a significant impact on the accuracy of the effective cross section which is estimated by the subgroup method. The available subgroup levels for each resonance group of the existing libraries were not been thoroughly optimized. The purpose of this work is to devise a way to determine proper subgroup levels which can further reduce the error in the effective cross section errors. Needless to say, more correct resonance effective cross sections would improve the accuracy of the lattice transport or the direct whole transport calculation.

  16. Search for Optimum Subgroup Levels for Minimizing Errors in Resonance Shielded Cross Sections

    Lee, Kyong Seop; Kim, Gwan Young; Joo, Han Gyu [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    The subgroup method is one of the most employed methods for resonance treatment in the lattice transport or the direct whole core transport codes such as HELIOS and DeCART. It requires the subgroup parameters which consist of subgroup levels and subgroup weights. Subgroup weights are produced from the given subgroup levels by solving an error minimization problem for the resonance shielded effective cross sections. The subgroup parameters have a significant impact on the accuracy of the effective cross section which is estimated by the subgroup method. The available subgroup levels for each resonance group of the existing libraries were not been thoroughly optimized. The purpose of this work is to devise a way to determine proper subgroup levels which can further reduce the error in the effective cross section errors. Needless to say, more correct resonance effective cross sections would improve the accuracy of the lattice transport or the direct whole transport calculation.

  17. Level-crossing and modal structure in microdroplet resonators

    Attar, Sarah T; Deych, Lev; Martin, Leopoldo L; Carmon, Tal

    2016-01-01

    We fabricate a liquid-core liquid-clad microcavity that is coupled to a standard tapered fiber, and then experimentally map the whispering-gallery modes of this droplet resonator. The shape of our resonator is similar to a thin prolate spheroid, which makes space for many high-order transverse modes, suggesting that some of them will share the same resonance frequency. Indeed, we experimentally observe that more than half of the droplet's modes have a sibling having the same frequency (to within linewidth) and therefore exhibiting a standing interference-pattern.

  18. Resonant tunneling quantum waveguides of variable cross-section, asymptotics, numerics, and applications

    Baskin, Lev; Plamenevskii, Boris; Sarafanov, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    This volume studies electron resonant tunneling in two- and three-dimensional quantum waveguides of variable cross-sections in the time-independent approach. Mathematical models are suggested for the resonant tunneling and develop asymptotic and numerical approaches for investigating the models. Also, schemes are presented for several electronics devices based on the phenomenon of resonant tunneling.   Devices based on the phenomenon of electron resonant tunneling are widely used in electronics. Efforts are directed towards refining properties of resonance structures. There are prospects for building new nanosize electronics elements based on quantum dot systems.   However, the role of resonance structure can also be given to a quantum wire of variable cross-section. Instead of an "electrode - quantum dot - electrode" system, one can use a quantum wire with two narrows. A waveguide narrow is an effective potential barrier for longitudinal electron motion along a waveguide. The part of the waveguide between ...

  19. Evaluation of Cm-247 neutron cross sections in the resonance region

    The neutron cross sections of Cm-247 are evaluated in the resonance (resolved and unresolved) region up to 10 keV. Average resonance parameters (i.e. spacing D, fission and radiative widths, neutron strength functions) are determined for unresolved region calculations. Moreover for a better comparison with the experimental data, fission cross section is calculated up to 10 MeV. In addition, the average number of neutrons emitted per fission as a function of energy is estimated

  20. Experimental determination of resonance absorption cross sections for Zircaloy-2 and zirconium

    The integral absorption cross section for the neutron spectrum and the thermal absorption cross section for zircaloy-2 have been determined using the pile oscillator technique. Using both values and a measured ratio of the epithermal to the thermal flux, the effective resonance integrals were obtained. After subtraction of the contributions for alloy and impurity elements, the effective resonance integrals for zirconium were evaluated. An extrapolated value of 0.91±0.10 was obtained for the dilute integral. (author)

  1. Quantum adiabatic machine learning

    Pudenz, Kristen L.; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    We develop an approach to machine learning and anomaly detection via quantum adiabatic evolution. In the training phase we identify an optimal set of weak classifiers, to form a single strong classifier. In the testing phase we adiabatically evolve one or more strong classifiers on a superposition of inputs in order to find certain anomalous elements in the classification space. Both the training and testing phases are executed via quantum adiabatic evolution. We apply and illustrate this app...

  2. Electron-impact resonant vibration excitation cross sections and rate coefficients for carbon monoxide

    Laporta, V.; Cassidy, C. M.; Tennyson, J.; Celiberto, R.

    2012-01-01

    Resonant vibrational and rotation-vibration excitation cross sections for electron-CO scattering are calculated in the 0-10 eV energy range for all 81 vibrational states of CO, assuming that the excitation occur via the 2{\\Pi} shape resonance. Static exchange plus polarization calculations performed using the R-matrix method are used to estimate resonance positions and widths as functions of internuclear separation. The effects of nuclear motion are considered using a local complex potential ...

  3. Estimation of neutron energy for first resonance from absorption cross section for thermal neutrons

    Bogart, Donald

    1951-01-01

    Examination of published data for some 52 isotopes indicates that the neutron energy for which the first resonance occurs is related to the magnitude of the thermal absorption cross section. The empirical relation obtained is in qualitative agreement with the results of a simplified version of the resonance theory of the nucleus of Breit-Wigner.

  4. A novel soft switching crossing current resonant converter (XCRC)

    Poon, FNK; Pong, MH

    1994-01-01

    Unlike other resonate or soft-switching converter, this novel topology employs only two switches and a very simply control method. The inherent constant power protection feature is another merit. No special resonate chip is needed to control the circuit. By adding two diode parallel with the dividing capacitors and selecting the capacitors for a small value that will fully charge and discharge in one cycle, one can obtain the zero voltage switching characteristic and control the output voltag...

  5. PAPIN, Cross Section, Self-Shielding Factors for Fertile Isotopes in Unresolved Resonance Region

    1 - Description of problem or function: PAPIN calculates cross section probability tables, Bondarenko self-shielding factors and average self-indication ratios for non-fissile isotopes, below the inelastic threshold, on the basis of the ENDF/B prescriptions for the unresolved resonance region. 2 - Method of solution: Monte-Carlo methods are utilized to generate ladders of resonance parameters in the unresolved resonance region, from average parameters and their appropriate distribution functions. The neutron cross-sections are calculated by the single-level Breit-Wigner formalism, with s-, p-, and d-wave contributions. The cross section probability tables are constructed by sampling the Doppler-broadened cross sections. The various self-shielded factors are computed numerically as Lebesgue integrals over the cross section probability tables

  6. POLIDENT: A Module for Generating Continuous-Energy Cross Sections from ENDF Resonance Data

    POLIDENT (Point Libraries of Data from ENDF/B Tapes) is an AMPX module that accesses the resonance parameters from File 2 of an ENDF/B library and constructs the continuous-energy cross sections in the resonance energy region. The cross sections in the resonance range are subsequently combined with the File 3 background data to construct the cross-section representation over the complete energy range. POLIDENT has the capability to process all resonance reactions that are identified in File 2 of the ENDF/B library. In addition, the code has the capability to process the single- and multi-level Breit-Wigner, Reich-Moore and Adler-Adler resonance formalisms that are identified in File 2. POLIDENT uses a robust energy-mesh-generation scheme that determines the minimum, maximum and points of inflection in the cross-section function in the resolved-resonance region. Furthermore, POLIDENT processes all continuous-energy cross-section reactions that are identified in File 3 of the ENDF/B library and outputs all reactions in an ENDF/B TAB1 format that can be accessed by other AMPX modules

  7. POLIDENT: A Module for Generating Continuous-Energy Cross Sections from ENDF Resonance Data

    Dunn, M.E.; Greene, N.M.

    2000-12-01

    POLIDENT (Point Libraries of Data from ENDF/B Tapes) is an AMPX module that accesses the resonance parameters from File 2 of an ENDF/B library and constructs the continuous-energy cross sections in the resonance energy region. The cross sections in the resonance range are subsequently combined with the File 3 background data to construct the cross-section representation over the complete energy range. POLIDENT has the capability to process all resonance reactions that are identified in File 2 of the ENDF/B library. In addition, the code has the capability to process the single- and multi-level Breit-Wigner, Reich-Moore and Adler-Adler resonance formalisms that are identified in File 2. POLIDENT uses a robust energy-mesh-generation scheme that determines the minimum, maximum and points of inflection in the cross-section function in the resolved-resonance region. Furthermore, POLIDENT processes all continuous-energy cross-section reactions that are identified in File 3 of the ENDF/B library and outputs all reactions in an ENDF/B TAB1 format that can be accessed by other AMPX modules.

  8. POLIDENT: A Module for Generating Continuous-Energy Cross Sections from ENDF Resonance Data

    Dunn, M.E.

    2000-10-20

    POLIDENT (POint LIbraries of Data from ENDF/B Tapes) is an AMPX module that accesses the resonance parameters from File 2 of an ENDF/B library and constructs the continuous-energy cross sections in the resonance energy region. The cross sections in the resonance range are subsequently combined with the File 3 background data to construct the cross-section representation over the complete energy range. POLIDENT has the capability to process all resonance reactions that are identified in File 2 of the ENDF/B library. In addition, the code has the capability to process the single- and multi-level Breit-Wigner, Reich-Moore and Adler-Adler resonance formalisms that are identified in File 2. POLIDENT uses a robust energy-mesh-generation scheme that determines the minimum, maximum and points of inflection in the cross-section function in the resolved-resonance region. Furthermore, POLIDENT processes all continuous-energy cross-section reactions that are identified in File 3 of the ENDF/B library and outputs all reactions in an ENDF/B TAB1 format that can be accessed by other AMPX modules.

  9. Self Shielded Cross-Section Evaluation through Sub Group Method with Improved Resonance Interference Treatment

    Sohail, Muhammad; Kim, Myunghyun [Kyung Hee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    It has the applicability for the cases of arbitrary geometry or direct whole-core transport calculation. Conventionally in subgroup method the subgroup data is generated without considering resonance interference and is therefore included at the use of subgroup data. A modification in subgroup method to consider resonance interference explicitly in more consistent way has been proposed in this study. Owing to the fact that these self-shielded cross-sections in interference term is also lethargy dependent, it can be converted to subgroup level dependent self-shielded cross-sections. The proposed method is implemented in 3-D whole core transport lattice code nTRACER. More consistent method of resonance interference interaction has shown relatively negligible error in self shielded cross-section. This new interference treatment method is investigated at various temperatures and has shown better results regardless of temperature changes of mixture of resonance isotopes mixture.

  10. Updated multi-group cross sections of minor actinides with improved resonance treatment

    The study of minor actinide in transmutation reactors and other future applications makes resonance self-shielding treatment a significant issue for criticality and isotope depletion. Resonance treatment for minor actinides has been carried out by subgroup method with improved interference effect through interference correction. Subgroup data was generated using RMET21 and GENP codes along with multi-group cross section data by NJOY nuclear data processing system. Updated multi-group cross section data library for a neutron transport code nTRACER was compared with solutions from MCNPX. The resonance interaction of uranium with minor actinides has been included by modified interference treatment of interference correction in subgroup methodology. The comparison of cross sections and multiplication factor in pin and assembly problems showed significant improvement from systematic resonance treatment especially for 237Np and 243Am. (author)

  11. Status of 239Pu cross-section evaluation in the resonance region at Cadarache

    Some aspects of the evaluations of 239 Pu cross-sections in the resonance region have been presented in this report. A set of resonance parameters assembling the results of a multilevel analysis in the energy range thermal to 200 eV and the result of a single analysis in the energy range 200 eV - 660eV is proposed for the calculation of the cross-sections in the energy range thermal-600eV. These parameters provide a quite good representation of the most recent measured fission cross-sections

  12. Resonance self-shielding corrections for activation cross section measurements

    The Pade approximations of the Doppler broadening function ψ(θ, x) have been used for the calculations of resonance self-shielding factors used in activation measurements. It is shown that this method of the calculations is effective from the point of view of fastness and accuracy. (author)

  13. Terrestrial Planet Formation During the Migration and Resonance Crossings of the Giant Planets

    Lykawka, Patryk Sofia; Ito, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The newly formed giant planets may have migrated and crossed a number of mutual mean motion resonances (MMRs) when smaller objects (embryos) were accreting to form the terrestrial planets. We investigated the effects of the planetesimal-driven migration of Jupiter and Saturn, and the influence of their mutual 1:2 MMR crossing on terrestrial planet formation for the first time, by performing N-body simulations. These simulations considered distinct timescales of MMR crossing and planet migrati...

  14. Electron nuclear double resonance near an energy level crossing

    It is shown that double electron-nuclear resonance (DENR) spectra near the intersection of spin-electron levels differ notably from spectra recorded under normal conditions. In particular, hyperfine and quadrupole splittings are notably increased while the nuclear Zeeman interaction is supressed. A giant line splitting (exceeding the line splitting in a standard situation by orders) occurs in a DENR spectrum in the presence of external electric field

  15. Quantum adiabatic machine learning

    Pudenz, Kristen L

    2011-01-01

    We develop an approach to machine learning and anomaly detection via quantum adiabatic evolution. In the training phase we identify an optimal set of weak classifiers, to form a single strong classifier. In the testing phase we adiabatically evolve one or more strong classifiers on a superposition of inputs in order to find certain anomalous elements in the classification space. Both the training and testing phases are executed via quantum adiabatic evolution. We apply and illustrate this approach in detail to the problem of software verification and validation.

  16. Representation of the neutron cross sections of several fertile and fissile nuclei in the resonance regions

    Several problems related to the measurement, analysis and evaluation of the neutron cross sections of the main fertile and fissile nuclides in the resonance region are reviewed. In particular, the ENDF/B-V representation of these cross sections are discussed. In recent years little progress has been made in improving knowledge of the resolved resonance parameters of the fertile nuclei. It is suggested that this absence of progress is due to a lack of adequate methodologies to deal with the systematic errors arising from uncertainties in the analysis of the measurements. The ENDF/B treatment of the unresolved resonance region is discussed, and the validation of the unresolved resonance range evaluations with appropriate transmission and selfindication measurements is recommended. 105 references

  17. Representation of the neutron cross sections of several fertile and fissile nuclei in the resonance regions

    Several problems related to the measurement, analysis and evaluation of the neutron cross sections of the main fertile and fissile nuclides in the resonance region are reviewed. In particular the ENDF/B-V representation of these cross sections is discussed. In recent years little progress has been made in improving our knowledge of the resolved resonance parameters of the fertile nuclei. It is suggested that this absence of progress is due to a lack of adequate methodologies to deal with the systematic errors arising from uncertainties in the analysis of the measurements. The ENDF/B treatment of the unresolved resonance region is commented on and the authors recommend the validation of the unresolved resonance range evaluations with appropriate transmission and self-indication measurements. (author)

  18. Compensations of beam-beam resonances using crabbing schemes at large Piwinski crossing angles

    We study combined effects of the crab crossing and of the crab waist lattice options on the luminosity performance of a collider where the crossing angle collisions are used. We have found that for collisions at large Piwinski angle a proper combination of the crab crossing and of the crab waist lattice insertions results in exact cancellation of all synchro-betatron as well as of all betatron coupling beam-beam resonances of odd orders. The beam-beam limitations on the luminosity for such a collider with the crossing angle collisions will be the same like that for a collider with head-on collisions of short bunches.

  19. Resonance parameters for measured keV neutron capture cross sections

    All available neutron capture cross sections in the keV region (∼ to 100 keV) have been fitted with resonance parameters. Capture cross sections for nuclides with reasonably well known average s-wave parameters, but no measured cross section, have been calculated and tabulated using p-and d- wave strength functions interpolated between fitted values. Several of these nuclides are of interest in the theory of slow nucleosynthesis of heavy elements in stars, and the product of cosmic abundance (due to the s-process) and capture cross section at 30 keV has been plotted versus mass number. (author)

  20. Adiabatic Markovian Dynamics

    Oreshkov, Ognyan

    2010-01-01

    We propose a theory of adiabaticity in quantum Markovian dynamics based on a structural decomposition of the Hilbert space induced by the asymptotic behavior of the Lindblad semigroup. A central idea of our approach is that the natural generalization of the concept of eigenspace of the Hamiltonian in the case of Markovian dynamics is a noiseless subsystem with a minimal noisy cofactor. Unlike previous attempts to define adiabaticity for open systems, our approach deals exclusively with physical entities and provides a simple, intuitive picture at the underlying Hilbert-space level, linking the notion of adiabaticity to the theory of noiseless subsystems. As an application of our theory, we propose a framework for decoherence-assisted computation in noiseless codes under general Markovian noise. We also formulate a dissipation-driven approach to holonomic computation based on adiabatic dragging of subsystems that is generally not achievable by non-dissipative means.

  1. Current plutonium cross-section evaluations in the resolved resonance region

    The representation of the fissile nuclei cross section in the resonance region in the evaluated data files is far from being satisfactory. Most evaluations need updating. For example, the ENDF/B-V evaluation for 239Pu was taken from an evaluation done in 1973 for ENDF/B-III and still uses the single level and multilevel Breit-Wigner formalisms to represent the cross sections. The strong level-level interference effects in the fission channels cannot be represented in the formalism and a so-called smooth File 3 is needed to obtain agreement with measured cross sections. This File 3 creates complications in the calculation of Doppler broadened cross sections. Large improvements can now be obtained by taking advantage of: new measurements, mainly from ORNL, with higher accuracy or much better resolution than previously available data, new resonance analysis codes, particularly SAMMY5 which uses sophisticated R-matrix formalisms for an accurate representation of the cross sections for all reaction channels, and Bayesian methods for a consistent analysis of several sets of experimental data; improvement of the processing codes for group cross-section calculations, allowing the cross sections to be calculated with the same R-matrix formulations than those used in the resonance analysis codes. 19 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Analysis of the 235U neutron cross sections in the resolved resonance range

    Using recent high-resolution measurements of the neutron transmission of 235U and the spin-separated fission cross-section data of Moore et al., a multilevel analysis of the 235U neutron cross sections was performed up to 300 eV. The Dyson Metha Δ3 statistics were used to help locate small levels above 100 eV where resonances are not clearly resolved even in the best resolution measurements available. The statistical properties of the resonance parameters are discussed

  3. Analysis of the 235U neutron cross sections in the resolved resonance range

    Using recent high-resolution measurements of the neutron transmission of 235U and the spin-separated fission cross-section data of Moore et al., a multilevel analysis of the 235U neutron cross sections was performed up to 300 eV. The Dyson Metha Δ3 statistics were used to help locate small levels above 100 eV where resonances are not clearly resolved even in the best resolution measurements available. The statistical properties of the resonance parameters are discussed. 13 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  4. Terrestrial Planet Formation During the Migration and Resonance Crossings of the Giant Planets

    Lykawka, Patryk Sofia

    2013-01-01

    The newly formed giant planets may have migrated and crossed a number of mutual mean motion resonances (MMRs) when smaller objects (embryos) were accreting to form the terrestrial planets. We investigated the effects of the planetesimal-driven migration of Jupiter and Saturn, and the influence of their mutual 1:2 MMR crossing on terrestrial planet formation for the first time, by performing N-body simulations. These simulations considered distinct timescales of MMR crossing and planet migration. In total, 68 high-resolution simulation runs using 2000 disk planetesimals were performed, which was a significant improvement on previously published results. Even when the effects of the 1:2 MMR crossing and planet migration were included in the system, Venus and Earth analogs (considering both orbits and masses) successfully formed in several runs. In addition, we found that the orbits of planetesimals beyond a ~1.5-2 AU were dynamically depleted by the strengthened sweeping secular resonances associated with Jupit...

  5. Double-hump resonance structure of the cross sections for electron impact ionization of Ar5+

    2006-01-01

    Configuration-average distorted-wave calculations are carried out for electron-impact ionization of Ar5+. Both direct ionization and the indirect excitation autoionization processes are included in our calculations. Our theoretical values are in quite reasonable agreement with the experimental data. The indirect processes contribute up to 50% to the total ionization cross sections. The possible origin of double-hump resonance structure of the cross sections is demonstrated and the contributions of metastable states are also taken into account.

  6. The derivation and evaluation of resonance cross sections applicable to light-water reactors

    A rigorous approach to resonance cross section theory is adopted. The R-matrix theory of Wigner and Eisenbud is reviewed and presented in a form applicable to nuclear reactor technology. The single-level Breit-Wigner, multi-level Breit-Wigner, Vogt, and Reich-Moore cross section formulas are derived. The application of these formulas in the construction of nuclear data libraries is discussed

  7. Nonadiabatic exchange dynamics during adiabatic frequency sweeps

    Barbara, Thomas M.

    2016-04-01

    A Bloch equation analysis that includes relaxation and exchange effects during an adiabatic frequency swept pulse is presented. For a large class of sweeps, relaxation can be incorporated using simple first order perturbation theory. For anisochronous exchange, new expressions are derived for exchange augmented rotating frame relaxation. For isochronous exchange between sites with distinct relaxation rate constants outside the extreme narrowing limit, simple criteria for adiabatic exchange are derived and demonstrate that frequency sweeps commonly in use may not be adiabatic with regard to exchange unless the exchange rates are much larger than the relaxation rates. Otherwise, accurate assessment of the sensitivity to exchange dynamics will require numerical integration of the rate equations. Examples of this situation are given for experimentally relevant parameters believed to hold for in-vivo tissue. These results are of significance in the study of exchange induced contrast in magnetic resonance imaging.

  8. On the treatment of resonance cross sections in thermal reactor lattices using the WIMSD/4 transport lattice code

    This paper discusses the mathematical models and methods used for calculating resonance cross sections in the resonance region of the neutron energy spectrum. Particular attention has been paid to the treatment outlined in the WIMSD/4 version of the WIMS lattice transport code. The significance of the resonance integral evaluation needed for computing the effective group resonance cross sections is also presented. The resonance treatment was applied to the Ghana Research Reactor-1 fuel lattice to compute the resonance escape probability, Dancoff factors, flux depression factors corrected for resonance absorption to the removal cross sections and the evaluated correction factors in the 13 resonance energy groups of the WIMSD/4 lattice code. The application shows that the resonances for the ν* fission (or Nu* Fission) cross sections are higher than for absorption cross-sections with the resonance energy spectrum for resonance absorbers U235 and Pu239. The Dancoff factor increased by a nominal 0.9% across the resonance energy range. (au)

  9. 238U(n,γ) cross section above the resonance region

    A number of measurements of the 238U(n,γ) cross section above the resonance region have been completed in the past few years. In the keV range, these measurements suggest a considerable amount of intermediate structure. Comparisons are made of pre-1970 and more recent evaluations with ENDF/B-IV results. Discrepancies and uncertainties are discussed

  10. Electron-impact resonant vibration excitation cross sections and rate coefficients for carbon monoxide

    Resonant vibrational and rotation–vibration excitation cross sections for electron–CO scattering are calculated in the 0–10 eV energy range for all 81 vibrational states of CO, assuming that the excitation occurs via the 2Π shape resonance. Static exchange plus polarization calculations performed using the R-matrix method are used to estimate resonance positions and widths as functions of internuclear separation. The effects of nuclear motion are considered using a local-complex-potential model. Good agreement is obtained with available experimental data on excitation from the vibrational ground state. Excitation rates and cross sections are provided as a function of the initial CO vibrational state for all ground state vibrational levels. (paper)

  11. Electron--impact resonant vibration excitation cross sections and rate coefficients for carbon monoxide

    Laporta, V; Tennyson, J; Celiberto, R; 10.1088/0963-0252/21/4/045005

    2012-01-01

    Resonant vibrational and rotation-vibration excitation cross sections for electron-CO scattering are calculated in the 0-10 eV energy range for all 81 vibrational states of CO, assuming that the excitation occur via the 2{\\Pi} shape resonance. Static exchange plus polarization calculations performed using the R-matrix method are used to estimate resonance positions and widths as functions of internuclear separation. The effects of nuclear motion are considered using a local complex potential model. Good agreement is obtained with available experimental data on excitation from the vibrational ground state. Excitation rates and cross sections are provided as a functions of the initial CO vibrational state for all ground state vibrational levels.

  12. Neutron capture cross section measurements for 238U in the resonance region at GELINA

    Kim, H. I.; Paradela, C.; Sirakov, I.; Becker, B.; Capote, R.; Gunsing, F.; Kim, G. N.; Kopecky, S.; Lampoudis, C.; Lee, Y.-O.; Massarczyk, R.; Moens, A.; Moxon, M.; Pronyaev, V. G.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Wynants, R.

    2016-06-01

    Measurements were performed at the time-of-flight facility GELINA to determine the 238U(n, γ) cross section in the resonance region. Experiments were carried out at a 12.5 and 60m measurement station. The total energy detection principle in combination with the pulse height weighting technique was applied using C6D6 liquid scintillators as prompt γ-ray detectors. The energy dependence of the neutron flux was measured with ionisation chambers based on the 10B(n, α) reaction. The data were normalised to the isolated and saturated 238U resonance at 6.67 eV. Special procedures were applied to reduce bias effects due to the weighting function, normalization, dead time and background corrections, and corrections related to the sample properties. The total uncertainty due to the weighting function, normalization, neutron flux and sample characteristics is about 1.5%. Resonance parameters were derived from a simultaneous resonance shape analysis of the GELINA capture data and transmission data obtained previously at a 42m and 150m station of ORELA. The parameters of resonances below 500 eV are in good agreement with those resulting from an evaluation that was adopted in the main data libraries. Between 500 eV and 1200 eV a systematic difference in the neutron width is observed. Average capture cross section data were derived from the experimental capture yield in the energy region between 3.5 keV and 90 keV. The results are in good agreement with an evaluated cross section resulting from a least squares fit to experimental data available in the literature prior to this work. The average cross section data derived in this work were parameterised in terms of average resonance parameters and included in a least squares analysis together with other experimental data reported in the literature.

  13. Neutron Capture and Total Cross Section Measurements and Resonance Parameters of Gadolinium

    Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-of-flight technique at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) linac facility using metallic and liquid Gd samples. The liquid samples were isotopically-enriched in either 155Gd or 157Gd. The capture measurements were made at the 25-m flight station with a multiplicity-type capture detector, and the transmission measurements were performed at 15- and 25-m flight stations with 6Li glass scintillation detectors. The multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY was used to extract resonance parameters. Among the significant findings are the following. The neutron width of the largest resonance in Gd, at 0.032 eV in 157Gd, has been measured to be (9 ± 1)% smaller than that given in ENDF/B-VI updated through release 8. The thermal (2200 m/s) capture cross section of 157Gd has been measured to be 11% smaller than that calculated from ENDF. The other major thermal resonance, at 0.025 eV in 155Gd, did not display a significant deviation from the thermal capture cross section given by ENDF. In the epithermal region, the analysis provided here represents the most extensive to date. Twenty eight new resonances are proposed and other resonances previously identified in the literature have been revisited. The assignment of resonances within regions of complicated structure incorporated the observations of other researchers, particularly on the six occasions where ENDF resonances are recommended to be removed. The poor match of the ENDF parameters to the current data is significant, and substantial improvement to the understanding of gadolinium cross sections is presented, particularly above 180 eV where the ENDF resolved region for 155Gd ends

  14. Evaluation of thermal neutron cross-sections and resonance integrals of protactinium, americium, curium, and berkelium isotopes

    Data on the thermal neutron fission and capture cross-sections as well as their corresponding resonance integrals are reviewed and analysed. The data are classified according to the form of neutron spectra under investigation. The weighted mean values of the cross-sections and resonance integrals for every type of neutron spectra were adopted as evaluated data. (author). 87 refs, 2 tabs

  15. Resonance threshold singularities in reaction cross sections and the full experiment problem

    The full experiment problem near the resonance threshold is considered. The following conclusions are made. In case of spinless particles the measurement of the differential cross section energy dependence in all open channels i, r (where i is an input reaction channel, r is a nonthreshold reaction channel, including r=i) near the (i, q) reaction threshold (where q is a threshold reaction channel) permits to perform a full phase analysis in the channels i, r in the near-threshold region and determine the (i, q) reaction cross section. The analysis of threshold anomalies in the integral cross sections permits to determine the resonance matrix elements. The results obtained can be used for the a+X → b+Y → b+c+d type reaction with two-step decay via an intermediate nucleus Y

  16. Covariances for 239Pu induced cross section in the resonance range using the CONRAD code

    This paper will present the evaluation of neutron induced cross sections covariances for the 239Pu in the resonance range. The methodology used is based on marginalization and retroactive technique to allow the treatment of experimental systematic uncertainties such as normalization. In addition, as sensitivity studies performed on iso-thermal temperature moderator analysis have demonstrated the need for improving the description of the 239Pu neutron cross sections in the sub-thermal energy range and knowing the poor accuracy of the EXFOR data below the thermal energy range, integral trends have to be taken into account in this evaluation work. The focus of the presentation is to show results obtained on the 239Pu capture and fission neutron cross sections in the resonance range with an exhaustive integral validation. (authors)

  17. ZZ DLC-13B, Resonance Cross-Section Group Constant Library for Tungsten and Depleted Pu

    Nature of physical problem solved: Format: GAM-II; Number of groups: 32-energy-group split (0.4 to 1234 eV). Nuclides: tungsten (W,) and depleted uranium (U,) slabs. Multigroup capture and scatter cross sections in the resolved resonance region were calculated for tungsten and depleted uranium slabs for use in shielding calculations of neutron transport and capture distributions. Slabs of thickness of 1 to 8 centimeters surrounded by hydrogen or lithium hydride were considered. GAROL was used to generate the cross sections, a method previously observed to preserve the total capture rate in a detailed multigroup neutron transport calculation for a thick resonance absorber. Average cross sections were calculated for a 32-energy-group split (0.4 to 1234 eV) compatible with that used by GAM-2. Group fluxes are also presented permitting further group collapsing either by hand calculations or with an included computer program

  18. Reich-Moore and Adler-Adler representations of the 235U cross sections in the resolved resonance region

    In the first part of this paper, a reevaluation of the low-energy neutron cross sections of 235U is described. This reevaluation was motivated by the discrepancy between the measured and computed temperature coefficients of reactivity and is based on recent measurements of the fission cross section and of η in the thermal and subthermal neutron energy regions. In the second part of the paper, we discuss the conversion of the Reich-Moore resonance parameters, describing the neutron cross sections of 235U in the resolved resonance region, into equivalent Adler-Adler resonance parameters and into equivalent momentum space multipole resonance parameters

  19. Reich-Moore and Adler-Adler representations of the 235U cross sections in the resolved resonance region

    In the first part of this paper, a reevaluation of the low-energy neutron cross sections of 235U is described. This reevaluation was motivated by the discrepancy between the measured and computed temperature coefficients of reactivity and is based on recent measurements of the fission cross section and of η in the thermal and subthermal neutron energy regions. In the second part of the paper, we discuss the conversion of the Reich-Moore resonance parameters, describing the neutron cross sections of 235U in the resolved resonance region, into equivalent Adler-Adler resonance parameters and into equivalent momentum space multipole resonance parameters. 25 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  20. Evaluation of neutron induced reaction cross sections in the resolved and unresolved resonance region at EC - JRC - IRMM

    Recent efforts made at the EC-JRC-IRMM to produce evaluated cross section data files for neutron induced reactions are described as well as the methodology applied in both the resolved and unresolved resonance. For the resolved resonance region the paper focuses on a recent evaluation of isotopes present in natural cadmium. For the unresolved resonance region results for gold are presented. (authors)

  1. Effects of projectile resonances on the total, Coulomb, and nuclear breakup cross sections in the 6Li+152Sm reaction

    Mukeru, B.; Lekala, M. L.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we analyze the effects of the projectile resonances on the total, Coulomb, and nuclear breakup cross sections as well as on the Coulomb-nuclear interferences at different arbitrary incident energies. It is found that these resonances have non-negligible effects on the total, Coulomb, and nuclear breakup cross sections. Qualitatively, they have no effects on the constructiveness or destructiveness of the Coulomb-nuclear interferences. Quantitatively, we obtained that these resonances increase by 7.38%, 7.58%, and 20.30% the integrated total, Coulomb, and nuclear breakup cross sections, respectively at Elab=35 MeV . This shows that the nuclear breakup cross sections are more affected by the effects of the projectile resonances than their total and Coulomb breakup counterparts. We also obtain that the effects of the resonances on the total, Coulomb, and nuclear breakup cross sections decrease as the incident energy increases.

  2. Contribution to the study of the unresolved resonance range of the neutrons cross sections

    This document presents the statistical description of neutron cross sections in the unresolved resonance range. The modeling of the total cross section and of the 'shape - elastic' cross section is based on the 'average R-Matrix' formalism. The partial cross sections describing the radiative capture, elastic scattering, inelastic scattering and fission process are calculated using the Hauser-Feshbach formalism with width fluctuation corrections. In the unresolved resonance range, these models depend on the average resonance parameters (neutron strength function Sc, mean level spacing Dc, average partial reaction widths Γc, channel radius ac, effective radius R' and distant level parameter R-barc∞). The codes (NJOY, CALENDF...) dedicated to the processing of nuclear data libraries (JEFF, ENDF/B, JENDL, CENDL, BROND... ) use the average parameters to take into account the self-shielding phenomenon for the simulation of the neutron transport in Monte-Carlo (MCNP, TRIPOLI... ) and deterministic (APOLLO, ERANOS...) codes. The evaluation work consists in establishing a consistent set of average parameters as a function of the total angular momentum J of the system and of the orbital moment of the incident neutron l. The work presented in this paper aims to describe the links between the S-Matrix and the 'average R-Matrix' formalism for the calculation of Sc, R-barc∞, ac and R'. (author)

  3. A Comparison between Effective Cross Section Calculations using the Intermediate Resonance Approximation and More Exact Methods

    In order to investigate some aspects of the 'Intermediate Resonance Approximation' developed by Goldstein and Cohen, comparative calculations have been made using this method together with more accurate methods. The latter are as follows: a) For homogeneous materials the slowing down equation is solved in the fundamental mode approximation with the computer programme SPENG. All cross sections are given point by point. Because the spectrum can be calculated for at most 2000 energy points, the energy regions where the resonances are accurately described are limited. Isolated resonances in the region 100 to 240 eV are studied for 238U/Fe and 238U/Fe/Na mixtures. In the regions 161 to 251 eV and 701 to 1000 eV, mixtures of 238U and Na are investigated. 239Pu/Na and 239Pu/238U/Na mixtures are studied in the region 161 to 251 eV. b) For heterogeneous compositions in slab geometry the integral transport equation is solved using the FLIS programme in 22 energy groups. Thus, only one resonance can be considered in each calculation. Two resonances are considered, namely those belonging to 238U at 190 and 937 eV. The compositions are lattices of 238U and Fe plates. The computer programme DORIX is used for the calculations using the Intermediate Resonance Approximation. Calculations of reaction rates and effective cross sections are made at 0, 300 and 1100 deg K for homogeneous media and at 300 deg K for heterogeneous media. The results are compared to those obtained by using the programmes SPENG and FLIS and using the narrow resonance approximation

  4. Adiabatically implementing quantum gates

    We show that, through the approach of quantum adiabatic evolution, all of the usual quantum gates can be implemented efficiently, yielding running time of order O(1). This may be considered as a useful alternative to the standard quantum computing approach, which involves quantum gates transforming quantum states during the computing process

  5. Unresolved resonance range cross section, probability tables and self shielding factor

    The performance and methodology of 4 processing codes have been compared in the unresolved resonance range of a selected set of isotopes. Those isotopes have been chosen to encompass most cases encountered in the unresolved energy range contained in major libraries like Endf/B-7 or Jeff-3.1.1. The code results comparison is accompanied by data format and formalism examinations and processing code fine-interpretation study. After some improvements, the results showed generally good agreement, although not perfect with infinite dilute cross-sections. However, much larger differences occur when shelf-shielded effective cross-sections are compared. The infinitely dilute cross-section are often plot checked but it is the probability table derived and shelf-shielded cross sections that are used and interpreted in criticality and transport calculations. This suggests that the current evaluation data format and formalism, in the unresolved resonance range should be tightened up, ambiguities removed. In addition production of the shelf shielded cross-sections should be converged to a much greater accuracy. (author)

  6. Method of calculating cross section functionals in the range of unresolved resonances

    A calculational scheme is proposed to evaluate expected values of complicated cross section functionals in the range of unresolved resonances. The scheme is based on the introduction of intermediate values - cross section momenta, which are calculated using optimization of parameters of the low-order gaussian quadrature formulae. Orientation of the parameters with respect to specific functionals allows to lessen significantly the number of integration modes, and, therefore, the calculational time. In addition, the scheme allows to evaluate the error bars of the calculations

  7. Atlas of giant dipole resonances. Parameters and graphs of photonuclear reaction cross sections

    Parameters of giant dipole resonances (GDR) observed in photonuclear reaction cross sections using various beams of incident photons are presented. Data, given for 200 stable isotopes from 2H to 243Am including their natural compositions, were collected from papers published over the years 1951-1996. GDR parameters, such as energy positions, amplitudes and widths, are included into the table and organized by element, isotope and reaction. Graphs of the majority of the photonuclear reaction cross sections, included in the international nuclear data library EXFOR by the end of 1998, are presented. The graphs are provided for 182 stable isotopes and natural compositions. (author)

  8. Measurement of resonance self-shielding factors of neutron capture cross section by 238U

    Resonance self-shielding factors fsub(c) of neutron capture cross section by 238U in the 20-100 keV energy range are measured. The method for determining the fsub(c) factor consists in measuring partial transmission and transmission in the total cross section at different 238U filter thickness. The fsub(c) factor values in the 46.5-100 and 21.5-46.5 keV energy ranges are equal to 0.89+-0.03 and 0.81+-0.04, respectively

  9. 41K(n, γ)42K thermal and resonance integral cross section measurements

    We measured the 41K thermal neutron absorption and resonance integral cross sections after the irradiation of KNO3 samples near the core of the IEA-R1 IPEN pool-type research reactor. Bare and cadmium-covered targets were irradiated in pairs with Au-Al alloy flux-monitors. The residual activities were measured by gamma-ray spectroscopy with a HPGe detector, with special care to avoid the 42K decay β- emission effects on the spectra. The gamma-ray self-absorption was corrected with the help of MCNP simulations. We applied the Westcott formalism in the average neutron flux determination and calculated the depression coefficients for thermal and epithermal neutrons due to the sample thickness with analytical approximations. We obtained 1.57(4) b and 1.02(4) b, for thermal and resonance integral cross sections, respectively, with correlation coefficient equal to 0.39.

  10. Application of Gauss quadratures to calculate resolved resonance contribution in multigroup cross sections

    A program (RESQ) based on quadratures that evaluates, from ENDF/B data, the resolved resonance contribution in group-averaged cross sections (capture, fission and scattering) was developed. Single and Multilevel Breit-Wigner parameters are accepted. Constant weighting function and zero degree kelvin were considered. To assure convergence, different quadrature orders may be analysed. Results are compared with other codes' reconstruction and integration methods. (author)

  11. Integer spin resonance crossing at VEPP-4M with conservation of beam polarization

    Barladyan, A K; Glukhov, S A; Glukhovchenko, Yu M; Karnaev, S E; Levichev, E B; Nikitin, S A; Nikolaev, I B; Okunev, I N; Piminov, P A; Shamov, A G; Zhuravlev, A N

    2015-01-01

    A recently proposed method to preserve the electron beam polarization at the VEPP-4M collider during acceleration with crossing the integer spin resonance energy E=1763 MeV has been successfully applied. It is based on full decompensation of $ 0.6\\times3.3$ Tesla$\\times$meter integral of the KEDR detector longitudinal magnetic field due to s 'switched-off' state of the anti-solenoids.

  12. Thermal neutron capture and resonance integral cross sections of 45Sc

    Van Do, Nguyen; Duc Khue, Pham; Tien Thanh, Kim; Thi Hien, Nguyen; Kim, Guinyun; Kim, Kwangsoo; Shin, Sung-Gyun; Cho, Moo-Hyun; Lee, Manwoo

    2015-11-01

    The thermal neutron cross section (σ0) and resonance integral (I0) of the 45Sc(n,γ)46Sc reaction have been measured relative to that of the 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction by means of the activation method. High-purity natural scandium and gold foils without and with a cadmium cover of 0.5 mm thickness were irradiated with moderated pulsed neutrons produced from the Pohang Neutron Facility (PNF). The induced activities in the activated foils were measured with a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector. In order to improve the accuracy of the experimental results the counting losses caused by the thermal (Gth) and resonance (Gepi) neutron self-shielding, the γ-ray attenuation (Fg) and the true γ-ray coincidence summing effects were made. In addition, the effect of non-ideal epithermal spectrum was also taken into account by determining the neutron spectrum shape factor (α). The thermal neutron cross-section and resonance integral of the 45Sc(n,γ)46Sc reaction have been determined relative to the reference values of the 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction, with σo,Au = 98.65 ± 0.09 barn and Io,Au = 1550 ± 28 barn. The present thermal neutron cross section has been determined to be σo,Sc = 27.5 ± 0.8 barn. According to the definition of cadmium cut-off energy at 0.55 eV, the present resonance integral cross section has been determined to be Io,Sc = 12.4 ± 0.7 barn. The present results are compared with literature values and discussed.

  13. Canonical-ensemble state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) strategy for problems with more diabatic than adiabatic states: Charge-bond resonance in monomethine cyanines

    This paper reviews basic results from a theory of the a priori classical probabilities (weights) in state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) models. It addresses how the classical probabilities limit the invariance of the self-consistency condition to transformations of the complete active space configuration interaction (CAS-CI) problem. Such transformations are of interest for choosing representations of the SA-CASSCF solution that are diabatic with respect to some interaction. I achieve the known result that a SA-CASSCF can be self-consistently transformed only within degenerate subspaces of the CAS-CI ensemble density matrix. For uniformly distributed (“microcanonical”) SA-CASSCF ensembles, self-consistency is invariant to any unitary CAS-CI transformation that acts locally on the ensemble support. Most SA-CASSCF applications in current literature are microcanonical. A problem with microcanonical SA-CASSCF models for problems with “more diabatic than adiabatic” states is described. The problem is that not all diabatic energies and couplings are self-consistently resolvable. A canonical-ensemble SA-CASSCF strategy is proposed to solve the problem. For canonical-ensemble SA-CASSCF, the equilibrated ensemble is a Boltzmann density matrix parametrized by its own CAS-CI Hamiltonian and a Lagrange multiplier acting as an inverse “temperature,” unrelated to the physical temperature. Like the convergence criterion for microcanonical-ensemble SA-CASSCF, the equilibration condition for canonical-ensemble SA-CASSCF is invariant to transformations that act locally on the ensemble CAS-CI density matrix. The advantage of a canonical-ensemble description is that more adiabatic states can be included in the support of the ensemble without running into convergence problems. The constraint on the dimensionality of the problem is relieved by the introduction of an energy constraint. The method is illustrated with a complete active space

  14. Extension of the Application of the generalized pole representation to the treatment of resonance cross sections.

    Hwang, R. N.; Jammes, C.

    1999-03-12

    One reliable and convenient way of processing the cross sections in the resolved energy region is by use of the generalized pole representation, whereby the Doppler-broadening calculation can be carried out rigorously using the analytical approach. So far, its applications have been limited to cases with resonance parameters specified by the Reich-Moore formalism. Although such an approach, in principle, can be extended to all three remaining representations of resolved resonance parameters specified by the ENDF data format, there is no computational tool for handling such a task at present. Given that Breit-Wigner formalisms are probably the most widely used by any evaluated nuclear data library to represent cross sections, a special effort has to be made to convert the single level and multilevel Breit-Wigner resonance parameters to pole parameters. A FORTRAN computer code BW2PR has been developed for this purpose. Extensive calculations have been performed to demonstrate that the proposed method ensures the conservation of the information contained originally in Breit-Wigner resonance parameters. This will make it possible to apply the exact Doppler-broadening method to a larger collection of nuclides.

  15. Dependence of adiabatic population transfer on pulse profile

    S Dasgupta; T kushwaha; D Goswami

    2006-06-01

    Control of population transfer by rapid adiabatic passage has been an established technique wherein the exact amplitude profile of the shaped pulse is considered to be insignificant. We study the effect of ultrafast shaped pulses for two-level systems, by density-matrix approach. However, we find that adiabaticity depends simultaneously on pulse profile as well as the frequency modulation under non-resonant conditions.

  16. Adiabatic chaos in the spin orbit problem

    Benettin, Giancarlo; Guzzo, Massimiliano; Marini, Valerio

    2008-05-01

    We provide evidences that the angular momentum of a symmetric rigid body in a spin orbit resonance can perform large scale chaotic motions on time scales which increase polynomially with the inverse of the oblateness of the body. This kind of irregular precession appears as soon as the orbit of the center of mass is non-circular and the angular momentum of the body is far from the principal directions with minimum (maximum) moment of inertia. We also provide a quantitative explanation of these facts by using the theory of adiabatic invariants, and we provide numerical applications to the cases of the 1:1 and 1:2 spin orbit resonances.

  17. Semi adiabatic theory of seasonal Markov processes

    Talkner, P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The dynamics of many natural and technical systems are essentially influenced by a periodic forcing. Analytic solutions of the equations of motion for periodically driven systems are generally not known. Simulations, numerical solutions or in some limiting cases approximate analytic solutions represent the known approaches to study the dynamics of such systems. Besides the regime of weak periodic forces where linear response theory works, the limit of a slow driving force can often be treated analytically using an adiabatic approximation. For this approximation to hold all intrinsic processes must be fast on the time-scale of a period of the external driving force. We developed a perturbation theory for periodically driven Markovian systems that covers the adiabatic regime but also works if the system has a single slow mode that may even be slower than the driving force. We call it the semi adiabatic approximation. Some results of this approximation for a system exhibiting stochastic resonance which usually takes place within the semi adiabatic regime are indicated. (author) 1 fig., 8 refs.

  18. Plasma adiabatic lapse rate

    Amendt, Peter; Bellei, Claudio; Wilks, Scott

    2012-01-01

    The plasma analog of an adiabatic lapse rate (or temperature variation with height) in atmospheric physics is obtained. A new source of plasma temperature gradient in a binary ion species mixture is found that is proportional to the concentration gradient and difference in average ionization states . Application to inertial-confinement-fusion implosions indicates a potentially strong effect in plastic (CH) ablators that is not modeled with mainline (single-fluid) simulations. An associated pl...

  19. Neutron capture on (94)Zr: Resonance parameters and Maxwellian-averaged cross sections

    Tagliente, G; Fujii, K; Abbondanno, U; Aerts, G; Alvarez, H; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Andriamonje, S; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Badurek, G; Baumann, P; Becvar, F; Belloni, F; Berthoumieux, E; Bisterzo, S; Calvino, F; Calviani, M; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; Carrapico, C; Cennini, P; Chepel, V; Chiaveri, E; Colonna, N; Cortes, G; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dahlfors, M; David, S; Dillmann, I; Domingo-Pardo, C; Dridi, W; Duran, I; Eleftheriadis, C; Embid-Segura, M; Ferrari, A; Ferreira-Marques, R; Furman, W; Gallino, R; Goncalves, I; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Gramegna, F; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martinez, A; Jericha, E; Kappeler, F; Kadi, Y; Karadimos, D; Karamanis, D; Kerveno, M; Kossionides, E; Krticka, M; Lamboudis, C; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marrone, S; Martinez, T; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P; Mengoni, A; Moreau, C; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, H; O'Brien, S; Pancin, J; Papachristodoulou, C; Papadopoulos, C; Paradela, C; Patronis, N; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Perrot, L; Pigni, M.T; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Praena, J; Pretel, C; Quesada, J; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Rosetti, M; Rubbia, C; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Santos, C; Sarchiapone, L; Savvidis, I; Stephan, C; Tain, J.L; Tassan-Got, L; Tavora, L; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Villamarin, D; Vincente, M.C; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Voss, F; Walter, S; Wiescher, M; Wisshak, K

    2011-01-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of the Zr isotopes play an important role in nucleosynthesis studies. The s-process reaction flow between the Fe seed and the heavier isotopes passes through the neutron magic nucleus (90)Zr and through (91,92,93,94)Zr, but only part of the flow extends to (96)Zr because of the branching point at (95)Zr. Apart from their effect on the s-process flow, the comparably small isotopic (n, gamma) cross sections make Zr also an interesting structural material for nuclear reactors. The (94)Zr (n, gamma) cross section has been measured with high resolution at the spallation neutron source n_TOF at CERN and resonance parameters are reported up to 60 keV neutron energy.

  20. Thermal neutron capture cross sections resonance integrals and g-factors

    The thermal radiative capture cross sections and resonance integrals of elements and isotopes with atomic numbers from 1 to 83 (as well as 232Th and 238U) have been re-evaluated by taking into consideration all known pertinent data published since 1979. This work has been undertaken as part of an IAEA co-ordinated research project on 'Prompt capture gamma-ray activation analysis'. Westcott g-factors for radiative capture cross sections at a temperature of 300K were computed by utilizing the INTER code and ENDF-B/VI (Release 8) library files. The temperature dependence of the Westcott g-factor is illustrated for 113Cd, 124Xe and 157Gd at temperatures of 150, 294 and 400K. Comparisons have also been made of the newly evaluated capture cross sections of 6Li, 7Li, 12C and 207Pb with those determined by the k0 method. (author)

  1. TERRESTRIAL PLANET FORMATION DURING THE MIGRATION AND RESONANCE CROSSINGS OF THE GIANT PLANETS

    Lykawka, Patryk Sofia [Astronomy Group, Faculty of Social and Natural Sciences, Kinki University, Shinkamikosaka 228-3, Higashiosaka-shi, Osaka 577-0813 (Japan); Ito, Takashi, E-mail: patryksan@gmail.com [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa 2-21-1, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2013-08-10

    The newly formed giant planets may have migrated and crossed a number of mutual mean motion resonances (MMRs) when smaller objects (embryos) were accreting to form the terrestrial planets in the planetesimal disk. We investigated the effects of the planetesimal-driven migration of Jupiter and Saturn, and the influence of their mutual 1:2 MMR crossing on terrestrial planet formation for the first time, by performing N-body simulations. These simulations considered distinct timescales of MMR crossing and planet migration. In total, 68 high-resolution simulation runs using 2000 disk planetesimals were performed, which was a significant improvement on previously published results. Even when the effects of the 1:2 MMR crossing and planet migration were included in the system, Venus and Earth analogs (considering both orbits and masses) successfully formed in several runs. In addition, we found that the orbits of planetesimals beyond a {approx} 1.5-2 AU were dynamically depleted by the strengthened sweeping secular resonances associated with Jupiter's and Saturn's more eccentric orbits (relative to the present day) during planet migration. However, this depletion did not prevent the formation of massive Mars analogs (planets with more than 1.5 times Mars's mass). Although late MMR crossings (at t > 30 Myr) could remove such planets, Mars-like small mass planets survived on overly excited orbits (high e and/or i), or were completely lost in these systems. We conclude that the orbital migration and crossing of the mutual 1:2 MMR of Jupiter and Saturn are unlikely to provide suitable orbital conditions for the formation of solar system terrestrial planets. This suggests that to explain Mars's small mass and the absence of other planets between Mars and Jupiter, the outer asteroid belt must have suffered a severe depletion due to interactions with Jupiter/Saturn, or by an alternative mechanism (e.g., rogue super-Earths)

  2. Neutron Thermal Cross Sections, Westcott Factors, Resonance Integrals, Maxwellian Averaged Cross Sections and Astrophysical Reaction Rates Calculated from Major Evaluated Data Libraries

    Pritychenko, B.; Mughabghab, S.F.

    2012-01-01

    We present calculations of neutron thermal cross sections, Westcott factors, resonance integrals, Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates for 843 ENDF materials using data from the major evaluated nuclear libraries and European activation file. Extensive analysis of newly-evaluated neutron reaction cross sections, neutron covariances, and improvements in data processing techniques motivated us to calculate nuclear industry and neutron physics quantities, produce s-...

  3. Non-adiabatic dynamics of reactions of O(1D) with Xe, CO, NO2, and CO2 from crossed atomic and molecular beam experiments

    Boering, Kristie

    2015-03-01

    Reactions of the first excited state of atomic oxygen, O(1D), with small molecules such as CO, NO2, and CO2 continue to be of interest in aeronomy and atmospheric chemistry, thus providing additional motivation to understand the dynamics of these reactions and how well they are predicted by theory. In collaboration with Prof. Jim Lin of the Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taiwan, we have studied the dynamics of quenching and non-quenching reactions between O(1D) and various small molecules using a universal crossed atomic and molecular beam apparatus. New experimental results for the dynamics of quenching of O(1D) by Xe and CO will be presented and compared with previous results for NO2 (K.A. Mar, A.L. Van Wyngarden, C.-W. Liang, Y.T. Lee, J.J. Lin, K.A. Boering, J. Chem. Phys., 137, 044302, doi: 10.1063/1.4736567, 2012) and CO2 (M.J. Perri, A.L. Van Wyngarden, K.A. Boering, J.J. Lin, and Y.T. Lee, J. Chem. Phys., 119(16), 8213-8216, 2003; M.J. Perri, A.L. Van Wyngarden, J.J. Lin, Y.T. Lee, and K.A. Boering, J. Phys. Chem. A, 108(39), 7995-8001, doi: 10.1021/jp0485845, 2004). Among the most intriguing of the new results are for quenching of O(1D) by Xe, for which marked oscillations in the differential cross sections were observed for the O(3P) and Xe products. The shape and relative phase of the oscillatory structure depended strongly on collision energy. This behavior is likely due to the quantum nature of the collision dynamics, caused by interferences among multiple curve crossing pathways accessible during electronic quenching, known as Stueckelberg oscillations.

  4. Quantification of resonance interference effect for multi-group effective cross-section in lattice physics calculation

    This paper presents the quantification of resonance interference effect for multi-group effective cross-section in lattice physics calculation. In the resonance self-shielding method based on the equivalence theory, the resonance interference effect among multiple nuclides cannot be treated directly to the multi-group effective cross-section. The continuous energy or the ultra-fine-group treatment can directly consider the effect, but the application to the fuel assembly geometry is not realistic with practical computation time. In the present study, the resonance interference effect to the multi-group effective cross-section is simply quantified by the resonance interference factor (RIF) in order to confirm the benefit for considering the effect. The RIF is generated for the typical pin-cell geometry of water moderated system. The multi-group effective cross-sections with and without RIFs are compared with the continuous energy Monte-Carlo result. As a result, the significant impact for considering the resonance interference effect is confirmed to the limited nuclide, reaction type and energy group. Fortunately, these have small effect on k-infinity because the resonance interference effect is mainly induced by the wide resonances of 238U to the other minor nuclides (e.g., 235U, 239Pu) in the limited resonance energy ranges. The results also show that the effect is small to the absorption cross-section of 238U, which is the dominant resonance nuclide in the fuel. The quantification results in the present study indicate a useful material to investigate the more advanced resonance treatment for the next generation lattice physics code. (author)

  5. Neutron Cross Section Processing Methods for Improved Integral Benchmarking of Unresolved Resonance Region Evaluations

    Walsh, Jonathan A.; Forget, Benoit; Smith, Kord S.; Brown, Forrest B.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we describe the development and application of computational methods for processing neutron cross section data in the unresolved resonance region (URR). These methods are integrated with a continuous-energy Monte Carlo neutron transport code, thereby enabling their use in high-fidelity analyses. Enhanced understanding of the effects of URR evaluation representations on calculated results is then obtained through utilization of the methods in Monte Carlo integral benchmark simulations of fast spectrum critical assemblies. First, we present a so-called on-the-fly (OTF) method for calculating and Doppler broadening URR cross sections. This method proceeds directly from ENDF-6 average unresolved resonance parameters and, thus, eliminates any need for a probability table generation pre-processing step in which tables are constructed at several energies for all desired temperatures. Significant memory reduction may be realized with the OTF method relative to a probability table treatment if many temperatures are needed. Next, we examine the effects of using a multi-level resonance formalism for resonance reconstruction in the URR. A comparison of results obtained by using the same stochastically-generated realization of resonance parameters in both the single-level Breit-Wigner (SLBW) and multi-level Breit-Wigner (MLBW) formalisms allows for the quantification of level-level interference effects on integrated tallies such as keff and energy group reaction rates. Though, as is well-known, cross section values at any given incident energy may differ significantly between single-level and multi-level formulations, the observed effects on integral results are minimal in this investigation. Finally, we demonstrate the calculation of true expected values, and the statistical spread of those values, through independent Monte Carlo simulations, each using an independent realization of URR cross section structure throughout. It is observed that both probability table

  6. Neutron Cross Section Processing Methods for Improved Integral Benchmarking of Unresolved Resonance Region Evaluations

    Walsh Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we describe the development and application of computational methods for processing neutron cross section data in the unresolved resonance region (URR. These methods are integrated with a continuous-energy Monte Carlo neutron transport code, thereby enabling their use in high-fidelity analyses. Enhanced understanding of the effects of URR evaluation representations on calculated results is then obtained through utilization of the methods in Monte Carlo integral benchmark simulations of fast spectrum critical assemblies. First, we present a so-called on-the-fly (OTF method for calculating and Doppler broadening URR cross sections. This method proceeds directly from ENDF-6 average unresolved resonance parameters and, thus, eliminates any need for a probability table generation pre-processing step in which tables are constructed at several energies for all desired temperatures. Significant memory reduction may be realized with the OTF method relative to a probability table treatment if many temperatures are needed. Next, we examine the effects of using a multi-level resonance formalism for resonance reconstruction in the URR. A comparison of results obtained by using the same stochastically-generated realization of resonance parameters in both the single-level Breit-Wigner (SLBW and multi-level Breit-Wigner (MLBW formalisms allows for the quantification of level-level interference effects on integrated tallies such as keff and energy group reaction rates. Though, as is well-known, cross section values at any given incident energy may differ significantly between single-level and multi-level formulations, the observed effects on integral results are minimal in this investigation. Finally, we demonstrate the calculation of true expected values, and the statistical spread of those values, through independent Monte Carlo simulations, each using an independent realization of URR cross section structure throughout. It is observed that both

  7. Investigation of the sup 9 sup 3 Nb neutron cross-sections in resonance energy range

    Grigoriev, Y V; Faikov-Stanchik, H; Ilchev, G; Kim, G N; Kitaev, V Ya; Mezentseva, Z V; Panteleev, T; Sinitsa, V V; Zhuravlev, B V

    2001-01-01

    The results of gamma-ray multiplicity spectra and transmission measurements for sup 9 sup 3 Nb in energy range 21.5 eV-100 keV are presented. Gamma spectra from 1 to 7 multiplicity were measured on the 501 m and 121 m flight paths of the IBR-30 using a 16-section scintillation detector with a NaI(Tl) crystals of a total volume of 36 l and a 16-section liquid scintillation detector of a total volume of 80 l for metallic samples of 50, 80 mm in diameter and 1, 1.5 mm thickness with 100% sup 9 sup 3 Nb. Besides, the total and scattering cross-section of sup 9 sup 3 Nb were measured by means batteries of B-10 and He-3 counters on the 124 m, 504 m and 1006 m flight paths of the IBR-30. Spectra of multiplicity distribution were obtained for resolved resonances in the energy region E=30-6000 eV and for energy groups in the energy region E=21.5 eV- 100 keV. They were used for determination of the average multiplicity, resonance parameters and capture cross-section in energy groups and for low-laying resonances of sup...

  8. In-resonator variation of waveguide cross-sections for dispersion control of aluminum nitride micro-rings

    Jung, Hojoong; Tang, Hong X

    2015-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a dispersion control technique by combination of different waveguide cross sections in an aluminum nitride micro-ring resonator. Narrow and wide waveguides with normal and anomalous dispersion, respectively, are linked with tapering waveguides and enclosed in a ring resonator to produce a total dispersion near zero. The mode-coupling in multimoded waveguides is also effectively suppressed. This technique provides new degrees of freedom and enhanced flexibility in engineering the dispersion of microcomb resonators.

  9. Acoustic scattering by elastic cylinders of elliptical cross-section and splitting up of resonances

    The scattering of a plane acoustic wave by an infinite elastic cylinder of elliptical cross section is studied from a modal formalism by emphasizing the role of the symmetries. More precisely, as the symmetry is broken in the transition from the infinite circular cylinder to the elliptical one, the splitting up of resonances is observed both theoretically and experimentally. This phenomenon can be interpreted using group theory. The main difficulty stands in the application of this theory within the framework of the vectorial formalism in elastodynamics. This method significantly simplifies the numerical treatment of the problem, provides a full classification of the resonances, and gives a physical interpretation of the splitting up in terms of symmetry breaking. An experimental part based on ultrasonic spectroscopy complements the theoretical study. A series of tank experiments is carried out in the case of aluminium elliptical cylinders immersed in water, in the frequency range 0 ≤ kr ≤ 50, where kr is the reduced wave number in the fluid. The symmetry is broken by selecting various cylinders of increasing eccentricity. More precisely, the greater the eccentricity, the higher the splitting up of resonances is accentuated. The experimental results provide a very good agreement with the theoretical ones, the splitting up is observed on experimental form functions, and the split resonant modes are identified on angular diagrams

  10. $^{197}$Au($n,\\gamma$) cross section in the unresolved resonance region

    Lederer, C.; Domingo-Pardo, C; Gunsing, F; Kappeler, F; Massimi, C.; Mengoni, A.; Wallner, A.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Alvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Barbagallo, M.; Baumann, P.; Becvar, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calviani, M.; Calvino, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapico, C.; Carrillo de Albornoz, A.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Dolfini, R.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Isaev, S.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Ketlerov, V.; Koehler, P.; Konovalov, V.; Kossionides, E.; Krticka, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Losito, R.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marques, L.; Marrone, S.; Martinez, T.; Mastinu, P.; Mendoza, E.; Milazzo, P.M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Oshima, M.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M.T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Sarmento, R.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J.L.; Tarrio, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2011-01-01

    The cross section of the reaction (197)Au(n,gamma) was measured with the time-of-flight technique at the n_TOF (neutron time-of-flight) facility in the unresolved resonance region between 5 and 400 keV using a pair of C(6)D(6) (where D denotes (2)H) liquid scintillators for the detection of prompt capture gamma rays. The results with a total uncertainty of 3.9%-6.7% for a resolution of 20 bins per energy decade show fair agreement with the Evaluated Nuclear Data File Version B-VII.0 (ENDF B-VII.0), which contains the standard evaluation. The Maxwellian-averaged cross section (MACS) at 30 keV is in excellent agreement with the one according to the ENDF/B-VII.0 evaluation and 4.7% higher than the MACS measured independently by activation technique. Structures in the cross section, which had also been reported earlier, have been interpreted as being due to clusters of resonances.

  11. Adjustable low frequency and broadband metamaterial absorber based on magnetic rubber plate and cross resonator

    Cheng, Yongzhi; Nie, Yan; Wang, Xian; Gong, Rongzhou

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, the magnetic rubber plate absorber (MRPA) and metamaterial absorber (MA) based on MRP substrate were proposed and studied numerically and experimentally. Based on the characteristic of L-C resonances, experimental results show that the MA composed of cross resonator (CR) embedded single layer MRP could be adjustable easily by changing the wire length and width of CR structure and MRP thickness. Finally, experimental results show that the MA composed of CR-embedded two layers MRP with the total thickness of 2.42 mm exhibit a -10 dB absorption bandwidth from 1.65 GHz to 3.7 GHz, which is 1.86 times wider than the same thickness MRPA.

  12. Optical modulation using anti-crossing between paired amplitude and phase resonators.

    Green, William M J; Rooks, Michael J; Sekaric, Lidija; Vlasov, Yurii A

    2007-12-10

    An optical modulator design based upon anti-crossing between coupled silicon microrings with independent amplitude and phase functionality is presented. The device exhibits over 25x improvement in sensitivity to an input drive signal when compared with previously studied microring modulators based on control of waveguide-resonator coupling. The new design also demonstrates an ON-OFF contrast of 14 dB, and has an ultra-compact footprint of 0.003 mm(2). The observed sensitivity enhancement suggests that this modulator may be driven directly by digital CMOS electrical signals with less than 1 V amplitude. PMID:19551020

  13. Measurement of the thermal neutron capture cross section and the resonance integral of radioactive Hf182

    Vockenhuber, C.; Bichler, M.; Wallner, A.; Kutschera, W.; Dillmann, I.; Käppeler, F.

    2008-04-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of the radioactive isotope Hf182 (t1/2=8.9×106 yr) in the thermal and epithermal energy regions have been measured by activation at the TRIGA Mark-II reactor of the Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities in Vienna, Austria, and subsequent γ-ray spectroscopy of Hf183. High values for the thermal (kT=25 meV) cross section σ0=133±10 b and for the resonance integral I0=5850±660 b were found. Additionally, the absolute intensities of the main γ-ray transitions in the decay of Hf182 have been considerably improved.

  14. Adiabatic quantum simulators

    J. D. Biamonte

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In his famous 1981 talk, Feynman proposed that unlike classical computers, which would presumably experience an exponential slowdown when simulating quantum phenomena, a universal quantum simulator would not. An ideal quantum simulator would be controllable, and built using existing technology. In some cases, moving away from gate-model-based implementations of quantum computing may offer a more feasible solution for particular experimental implementations. Here we consider an adiabatic quantum simulator which simulates the ground state properties of sparse Hamiltonians consisting of one- and two-local interaction terms, using sparse Hamiltonians with at most three-local interactions. Properties of such Hamiltonians can be well approximated with Hamiltonians containing only two-local terms. The register holding the simulated ground state is brought adiabatically into interaction with a probe qubit, followed by a single diabatic gate operation on the probe which then undergoes free evolution until measured. This allows one to recover e.g. the ground state energy of the Hamiltonian being simulated. Given a ground state, this scheme can be used to verify the QMA-complete problem LOCAL HAMILTONIAN, and is therefore likely more powerful than classical computing.

  15. Performance evaluation of quantitative adiabatic (13)C NMR pulse sequences for site-specific isotopic measurements.

    Thibaudeau, Christophe; Remaud, Gérald; Silvestre, Virginie; Akoka, Serge

    2010-07-01

    (2)H/(1)H and (13)C/(12)C site-specific isotope ratios determined by NMR spectroscopy may be used to discriminate pharmaceutically active ingredients based on the synthetic process used in production. Extending the Site-specific Natural Isotope Fractionation NMR (SNIF-NMR) method to (13)C is highly beneficial for complex organic molecules when measurements of (2)H/(1)H ratios lead to poorly defined molecular fingerprints. The current NMR methodology to determine (13)C/(12)C site-specific isotope ratios suffers from poor sensitivity and long experimental times. In this work, several NMR pulse sequences based on polarization transfer were evaluated and optimized to measure precise quantitative (13)C NMR spectra within a short time. Adiabatic 180 degrees (1)H and (13)C pulses were incorporated into distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer (DEPT) and refocused insensitive nuclei enhanced by polarization transfer (INEPT) to minimize the influence of 180 degrees pulse imperfections and of off-resonance effects on the precision of the measured (13)C peak areas. The adiabatic DEPT sequence was applied to draw up a precise site-specific (13)C isotope profile of ibuprofen. A modified heteronuclear cross-polarization (HCP) experiment featuring (1)H and (13)C spin-locks with adiabatic 180 degrees pulses is also introduced. This sequence enables efficient magnetization transfer across a wide (13)C frequency range although not enough for an application in quantitative (13)C isotopic analysis. PMID:20527737

  16. Is the sech/tanh Adiabatic Pulse Really Adiabatic?

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Zur, Yuval

    1998-05-01

    Adiabatic pulses are most conveniently studied in the frequency frame which is a frame of reference rotating at the instantaneous frequency of the pulse. In this frame the adiabatic condition ‖γBeff‖ ≫ |θ≳| sets an upper limit on the sweep rate θ≳ of the Beffvector. This, in turn, places a lower bound on the pulse duration. Adiabatic behavior is studied at the threshold duration and two pulses are examined: (i) a pulse with a constant sweep rate (CAPpulse) and (ii) a conventional sech/tanh adiabatic pulse. It is shown that the sech/tanh pulse performs robust magnetization inversion although it seems to violate the adiabatic condition. This puzzling phenomenon is solved by switching into a second-order rotating frame of reference (SORF) where it is shown that the adiabatic condition is fulfilled. This frame coincides with the frequency frame at the beginning of the pulse. Assuming an RF field along thex-axis of the frequency frame, the SORF then rotates about the commony-axis during the pulse with thez-axis of the new frame aligned with the Beffvector. It is shown that adiabatic motion may be performed in the SORF, in which the sweep rate is increased indefinitely; the adiabatic condition is violated by this motion in the frequency frame but is fulfilled in the SORF. The lower bound on the sweep rate in the frequency frame is thereby lifted.

  17. Neutron Resonance Parameters of 55Mn from Reich-Moore Analysis of Recent Experimental Neutron Transmission and Capture Cross Sections

    Derrien, Herve [ORNL; Leal, Luiz C [ORNL; Larson, Nancy M [ORNL; Guber, Klaus H [ORNL; Wiarda, Dorothea [ORNL; Arbanas, Goran [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution neutron capture cross section measurements of 55Mn were recently performed at GELINA by Schillebeeckx et al. (2005) and at ORELA by Guber et al. (2007). The analysis of the experimental data was performed with the computer code SAMMY using the Bayesian approach in the resonance parameters representation of the cross sections. The neutron transmission data taken in 1988 by Harvey et al. (2007) and not analyzed before were added to the SAMMY experimental data base. More than 95% of the s-wave resonances and more than 85% of the p-wave resonances were identified in the energy range up to 125 keV, leading to the neutron strength functions S0 = (3.90 0.78) x 10-4 and S1 = (0.45 0.08) x 10-4. About 25% of the d-wave resonances were identified with a possible strength function of S2 = 1.0 x 10-4. The capture cross section calculated at 0.0253 eV is 13.27 b, and the capture resonance integral is 13.52 0.30 b. In the energy range 15 to 120 keV, the average capture cross section is 12% lower than Lerigoleur value and 25% smaller than Macklin value. GELINA and ORELA experimental capture cross sections show a background cross section not described by the Reich-Moore resonance parameters. Part of this background could be due to a direct capture component and/or to the missing d-wave resonances. The uncertainty of 10% on the average capture cross section above 20 keV is mainly due to the inaccuracy in the calculation of the background components.

  18. Adiabatic and non-adiabatic processes in strong Coulomb fields

    Adiabatic and non-adiabatic behaviour of relativistic electrons in external Coulomb fields of time-dependent strength is studied within the framework of a model for the description of a shell electron's behaviour during a heavy-ion collision. A classification scheme for types of non-adiabatic behaviour is suggested; its relevance for the analysis of pair production processes in strong Coulomb fields is discussed (K-Shell Ionization). An ansatz for the vacuum polarization potential is introduced and employed to demonstrate the special role of vacuum polarization for adiabatic and non-adiabatic behaviour in very strong Coulomb fields (Zα > 1). The implications of the underlaying specific features of the vacuum polarization charge density in very strong fields for pair production mechanisms are considered. (orig.)

  19. Cross sections for electron-induced resonant vibrational excitations in polyatomic molecules

    We continue our review of experimental data for electron-polyatomic molecule collisions in connection with fusion and processing plasmas, as well as with the associated environmental issues. In this case we focus on vibrational excitation processes, in particular what vibrational modes can be identified in electron energy loss experiments and which of these modes are resonantly enhanced due to the temporary capture of the incident electron by the species in question. In this latter respect we report indicative excitation function data, all of which were originally measured at Sophia University and for which the differential cross section, for excitation of the relevant mode, are studied as a function of the incident electron energy at a fixed scattered electron angle. Unlike our previous compilation (NIFS-DATA-101) for elastic scattering, which was conducted over a broad range of energies (1-100 eV), vibrational excitation cross sections usually only become significant when the resonance enhancement process occurs. As a consequence, this survey encompasses incident electron energies between 1-30 eV. Consistent with our first report, no detailed comparison is made here with any other data that might be available in the literature. This course of action was once again adopted in order to keep this report to a sensible length. (author)

  20. A method for extracting the resonance parameters from experimental cross-sections

    Within the proposed method, a set of experimental data points are fitted using a multi-channel S-matrix. Then the resonance parameters are located as its poles on an appropriate sheet of the Riemann surface of the energy. The main advantage of the method is that the S-matrix is constructed in such a way that it has proper analytic structure, i.e. for any number of two-body channels, the branching at all the channel thresholds is represented via exact analytic expressions in terms of the channel momenta. The way the S-matrix is constructed makes it possible not only to locate multi-channel resonances but also to extract their partial widths as well as to obtain the scattering cross-section in the channels for which no data are available. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated by two model examples of a single-channel and a two-channel problems, where known resonance parameters are rather accurately reproduced by fitting the pseudo-data artificially generated using the corresponding potentials. (author)

  1. Geometry of the Adiabatic Theorem

    Lobo, Augusto Cesar; Ribeiro, Rafael Antunes; Ribeiro, Clyffe de Assis; Dieguez, Pedro Ruas

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and pedagogical derivation of the quantum adiabatic theorem for two-level systems (a single qubit) based on geometrical structures of quantum mechanics developed by Anandan and Aharonov, among others. We have chosen to use only the minimum geometric structure needed for the understanding of the adiabatic theorem for this case.…

  2. A model for calculating multigroup self-shielded cross sections for a mixture of resonance absorbers in heterogeneous media

    A computational method for calculating multigroup self-shielded cross sections in heterogeneous media containing arbitrary mixtures of resonant isotopes is presented. The method accounts for resonance interference between immixed resonant nuclei as well as for spatial resonance interference between resonant isotopes in different geometrical locations. A general correction is used to generate an intermediary reaction-rate library for resonant isotopic mixtures from a single-isotope, standard preprocessed library. Reaction rates for the heterogeneous fine-structure equation are computed from the intermediary library by invoking an equivalence theorem either on a group basis or using Bell's factors defined on macrogroups. Results are presented for a homogeneous mixture of Uranium oxide as well as for a recycled-fuel PWR cell. A study of the radial dependence of self-shielding for a recycled mixture of Uranium-Plutonium oxide in a PWR cell and in a submoderated cell is also included

  3. On the generation of resonance cross sections in the resonance region of the neutron energy spectrum for the Ghana Research Reactor-1 fuel lattice unit cell using the WIMS lattice code

    The different physical and mathematical models and methods for calculating the resonance group constants or cross sections from resonance integrals in the resonance region of the neutron energy spectrum has been reviewed. The methods as outlined in the WIMS lattice program were used to calculate effective resonance cross sections for unit cell calculations of the five-region fuel lattice of the Ghana Research Reactor-1, using WIMSPC, the PC version of the versatile WIMSD/4 lattice code. The Ludwig Boltzmann multigroup neutron transport equation was solved for this exercise using the discrete ordinate spatial model (DSN) which provides solution to the differential form of the transport equation by the Carlson-Sn approach for the 13 different resonance energy groups defined in the WIMS code. The resonance escape probability, flux depression factors corrected for resonance absorption and evaluated correction factors to the resonance cross sections due to the depression of the neutron flux for the 13 resonance energy groups were also calculated

  4. Cross-linkable liposomes stabilize a magnetic resonance contrast-enhancing polymeric fastener.

    Smith, Cartney E; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2014-04-01

    Liposomes are commonly used to deliver drugs and contrast agents to their target site in a controlled manner. One of the greatest obstacles in the performance of such delivery vehicles is their stability in the presence of serum. Here, we demonstrate a method to stabilize a class of liposomes that load gadolinium, a magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent, as a model cargo on their surfaces. We hypothesized that the sequential adsorption of a gadolinium-binding chitosan fastener on the liposome surface followed by covalent cross-linking of the lipid bilayer would provide enhanced stability and improved MR signal in the presence of human serum. To investigate this hypothesis, liposomes composed of diyne-containing lipids were assembled and functionalized via chitosan conjugated with a hydrophobic anchor and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). This postadsorption cross-linking strategy served to stabilize the thermodynamically favorable association between liposome and polymeric fastener. Furthermore, the chitosan-coated, cross-linked liposomes proved more effective as delivery vehicles of gadolinium than uncross-linked liposomes due to the reduced liposome degradation and chitosan desorption. Overall, this study demonstrates a useful method to stabilize a broad class of particles used for systemic delivery of various molecular payloads. PMID:24635565

  5. Photoionization of Xe inside C60: Atom-fullerene hybridization, giant cross-section enhancement, and correlation confinement resonances

    A theoretical study of the subshell photoionization of the Xe atom endohedrally confined in C60 is presented. Powerful hybridization of the Xe 5s state with the bottom edge of C60 π band is found that induces strong structures in the 5s ionization, causing the cross section to differ significantly from earlier results that omit this hybridization. The hybridization also affects the angular distribution asymmetry parameter of Xe 5p ionization near the Cooper minimum. The 5p cross section, on the other hand, is greatly enhanced by borrowing considerable oscillator strength from the C60 giant plasmon resonance via the atom-fullerene dynamical interchannel coupling. Beyond the C60 plasmon energy range the atomic subshell cross sections display confinement-induced oscillations in which, over the large 4d shape resonance region, the dominant 4d oscillations induce their ''clones'' in all degenerate weaker channels known as correlation confinement resonances.

  6. Adiabatic heavy-ion fusion potentials for fusion at deep sub-barrier energies

    S V S Sastry; S Kailas; A K Mohanty; A Saxena

    2005-01-01

    The recently reported unusual behaviour of fusion cross-sections at extreme sub-barrier energies has been examined. The adiabatic limit of fusion barriers has been determined from experimental data using the barrier penetration model. These adiabatic barriers are consistent with the adiabatic fusion barriers derived from the modified Wilzynska–Wilzynski prescription. The fusion barrier systematics has been obtained for a wide range of heavy-ion systems.

  7. Neutron total cross-sections and resonance parameters of Mo and Ta

    A K M Moinul Haque Meaze; K Devan; Y S Lee; Y D Oh; G N Kim; D Son

    2007-02-01

    Experimental results of transmissions for the samples of natural molybdenum with thickness 0.0192 atoms/barn and for the four samples of natural tantalum with thickness 0.0222, 0.0111, 0.0055 and 0.0025 atoms/barn are presented in this work. Measurements were carried out at the Pohang Neutron Facility which consists of a 100 MeV Linac, water-cooled tantalum target, and 12 m flight path length. Effective total cross-sections were extracted from the transmission data, and resonance parameters were obtained by using the code SAMMY. The present measurements were compared with other measurements and with the evaluated nuclear data file ENDF/B-VI.8.

  8. FOURACES, MultiGroup Cross-Sections, Resonance Calculation from ENDF/B, KEDAK, UKNDL

    1 - Description of problem or function: FOURACES produces spectrum weighted, group averaged nuclear cross sections and related parameters for nuclear reactor calculations. ENDF/B-IV, ENDF/B-V, KEDAK or UKNDL libraries may be used as basic input data. The weighting function and energy group structure are arbitrary, and are specified by the user. The code can deal with single or multi-level Breit-Wigner Adler- Adler and Reich-Moore resonance formalisms, and includes a Doppler broadening option. 4. Method of solution: If the weighting function is simple enough group averaged quantities are computed from the point data and interpolation rule read from the evaluated data library using analytic formulae. Otherwise the integrations are performed using the trapezium rule. Resonance data are converted into point data using subroutines written primarily for the program CRESO (abstract NEA 0719), then Doppler broadened, and finally group averaged. 5. Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: A maximum of 256 energy groups can be dealt with

  9. Contributions of an adiabatic initial inversion pulse and K-space Re-ordered by inversion-time at each slice position (KRISP) to control of CSF artifacts and visualization of the brain in FLAIR magnetic resonance imaging

    AIM: The aim of this study was to compare the performance of three fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) pulse sequences for control of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood flow artifacts in imaging of the brain. The first of these sequences had an initial sinc inversion pulse which was followed by conventional k-space mapping. The second had an initial sinc inversion pulse followed by k-space re-ordered by inversion time at each slice position (KRISP) and the third had an adiabatic initial inversion pulse followed by KRISP. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten patients with established disease were studied with all three pulse sequences. Seven were also studied with the adiabatic KRISP sequence after contrast enhancement. Their images were evaluated for patient motion artifact, CSF and blood flow artifact as well as conspicuity of the cortex, meninges, ventricular system, brainstem and cerebellum. The conspicuity of lesions and the degree of enhancement were also evaluated. RESULTS: Both the sinc and adiabatic KRISP FLAIR sequences showed better control of CSF and blood flow artifacts than the conventional FLAIR sequence. In addition the adiabatic KRISP FLAIR sequence showed better control of CSF artifact at the inferior aspect of the posterior fossa. The lesion conspicuity was similar for each of the FLAIR sequences as was the degree of contrast enhancement to that shown with a T1weighted spin echo sequence. CONCLUSION: The KRISP FLAIR sequence controls high signal artifacts from CSF flow and blood flow and the adiabatic pulse controls high signal artifacts due to inadequate inversion of the CSF magnetization at the periphery of the head transmitter coil. The KRISP FLAIR sequence also improves cortical and meningeal definition as a result of an edge enhancement effect. The effects are synergistic and can be usefully combined in a single pulse sequence. Curati, W.L. et al. (2001)

  10. Measurement of neutron capture and fission cross sections of 233U in the resonance region

    Tsekhanovich I.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of studies concerning new fuel cycles and nuclear wastes incineration experimental data of the α ratio between capture and fission cross sections of 233U reactions play an important role in the Th/U cycle. The safety evaluation and the detailed performance assessment for the generation IV nuclear-energy system based on 232Th cycle strongly depend on this ratio. Since the current data are scarce and sometimes contradictory, new experimental studies are required. The measurement will take place at the neutron time-of-flight facility GELINA at Geel, designed to perform neutron cross section measurements with high incident neutron-energy resolution. A dedicated high efficiency fission ionization chamber (IC as fission fragment detector and six C6D6 liquid scintilators sensitive to γ-rays and neutrons will be used. The method, based on the IC energy response study, allowing to distinguish between gammas originating from fission and capture, in the resonance region, will be presented.

  11. Non-adiabatic primordial fluctuations

    Noller, J

    2009-01-01

    We consider general non-adiabatic single fluid cosmological perturbations. We derive the second-order action and its curvature variables assuming only the (linearized) Einstein equations for a perfect fluid stress-energy tensor. The derivation is therefore carried out at the same level of generality that has been achieved before for adiabatic modes. We also allow for arbitrary "speed of sound" profiles in our derivation. As a result we find a new conserved super-horizon quantity and relate it to the adiabatically conserved curvature perturbation. We then use the formalism to investigate a family of non-adiabatic hydrodynamical primordial matter models and the power spectra they produce. This yields a new scale-invariant solution that can resolve the horizon problem if implemented in a contracting phase.

  12. Quantum Adiabatic Pumping by Modulating Tunnel Phase in Quantum Dots

    Taguchi, Masahiko; Nakajima, Satoshi; Kubo, Toshihiro; Tokura, Yasuhiro

    2016-08-01

    In a mesoscopic system, under zero bias voltage, a finite charge is transferred by quantum adiabatic pumping by adiabatically and periodically changing two or more control parameters. We obtained expressions for the pumped charge for a ring of three quantum dots (QDs) by choosing the magnetic flux penetrating the ring as one of the control parameters. We found that the pumped charge shows a steplike behavior with respect to the variance of the flux. The value of the step heights is not universal but depends on the trajectory of the control parameters. We discuss the physical origin of this behavior on the basis of the Fano resonant condition of the ring.

  13. Validation of the XLACS code related to contribution of resolved and unresolved resonances and background cross sections

    The procedures for calculating contributions of resolved and unresolved resonances and background cross sections, in XLACS code, were revised. Constant weighting function and zero Kelvin temperature were considered. Discrepancies found were corrected and now the validated XLACS code generates results that are correct and in accordance with its originally established procedures. (author)

  14. URR [Unresolved Resonance Region] computer code: A code to calculate resonance neutron cross-section probability tables, Bondarenko self-shielding factors, and self-indication ratios for fissile and fertile nuclides

    The URR computer code has been developed to calculate cross-section probability tables, Bondarenko self-shielding factors, and self-indication ratios for fertile and fissile isotopes in the unresolved resonance region. Monte Carlo methods are utilized to select appropriate resonance parameters and to compute the cross sections at the desired reference energy. The neutron cross sections are calculated by the single-level Breit-Wigner formalism with s-, p-, and d-wave contributions. The cross-section probability tables are constructed by sampling by Doppler broadened cross-sections. The various self-shielding factors are computer numerically as Lebesgue integrals over the cross-section probability tables

  15. Mid-range adiabatic wireless energy transfer via a mediator coil

    Rangelov, Andon A.; Vitanov, Nikolay V.

    2012-01-01

    A technique for efficient mid-range wireless energy transfer between two coils via a mediator coil is proposed. By varying the coil frequencies three resonances are created: emitter-mediator (EM), mediator-receiver (MR) and emitter-receiver (ER). If the frequency sweeps are adiabatic and such that the ER resonance precedes the MR resonance, the energy flows sequentially along the chain emitter-mediator-receiver. If the MR resonance precedes the ER resonance, then the energy flows directly fro...

  16. The effect of self-shielding of resonance cross sections on the performance of some promising fusion blanket designs

    The effect of self-shielding of resonance cross sections on the tritium breeding ratio was investigated for three promising fusion blanket designs with liquid lithium, lithium oxide and lithium-lead breeders. Calculations were performed using ANISN and MCNP transport codes with the ENDF/B-V based nuclear data libraries. It is found that the self-shielding effect cannot be neglected in the blanket design if the blanket is neutron leaky in the case when the blanket is thin or with lower Li-6 enrichment in Li. This may result in an underestimate of the tritium breeding ratio if the cross sections are infinitely diluted. This is due to the resonances in the structure materials in which the absorption cross sections are enhanced in the infinitely diluted case. Thus the effect of self-shielding of resonance cross sections should be considered in neutronics calculations of fusion reactors. It is shown that the MCNP results are better reproduced by those from the transport code with the infinitely diluted library. This is probably due to the weight function used to generate the library and to the number of groups considered. Thus for fusion applications it is recommanded to collapse broad group cross sections with the spectrum obtained from an accurate calculation based on many fine groups. (author)

  17. Theoretical Prediction of Differential Cross Sections for Reaction pp → pK+Λ in a Resonance Model

    LIU Bo-Chao; ZOU Bing-Song

    2006-01-01

    The reaction of pp → pK+Λ is a very good channel to study N* resonances through their KΛ decay mode, because there is no mixing of isospin Ⅰ = 1/2 and Ⅰ = 3/2 due to isospin conservation. In this work, we extend a resonance model, which can reproduce the total cross section very well, to offer differential cross section information about this reaction. It can serve as a reference to build the scheduled hadron detector at Lanzhou Cooler Storage Ring (CSR). Experiment measurement of these differential cross sections in the future will supply us more constraints on the model and help us understanding the strangeness production dynamics better.

  18. Interplay between electric and magnetic effect in adiabatic polaritonic systems

    Alabastri, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    We report on the possibility of realizing adiabatic compression of polaritonic wave on a metallic conical nano-structure through an oscillating electric potential (quasi dynamic regime). By comparing this result with an electromagnetic wave excitation, we were able to relate the classical lighting-rod effect to adiabatic compression. Furthermore, we show that while the magnetic contribution plays a marginal role in the formation of adiabatic compression, it provides a blue shift in the spectral region. In particular, magnetic permeability can be used as a free parameter for tuning the polaritonic resonances. The peculiar form of adiabatic compression is instead dictated by both the source and the metal permittivity. The analysis is performed by starting from a simple electrostatic system to end with the complete electromagnetic one through intermediate situations such as the quasi-electrostatic and quasi-dynamic regimes. Each configuration is defined by a particular set of equations which allows to clearly determine the individual role played by the electric and magnetic contribution in the generation of adiabatic compression. We notice that these findings can be applied for the realization of a THz nano-metric generator. © 2013 Optical Society of America.

  19. Collision Cross Sections for 20 Protonated Amino Acids: Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance and Ion Mobility Results.

    Anupriya; Jones, Chad A; Dearden, David V

    2016-08-01

    We report relative dephasing cross sections for the 20 biogenic protonated amino acids measured using the cross sectional areas by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (CRAFTI) technique at 1.9 keV in the laboratory reference frame, as well as momentum transfer cross sections for the same ions computed from Boltzmann-weighted structures determined using molecular mechanics. Cross sections generally increase with increasing molecular weight. Cross sections for aliphatic and aromatic protonated amino acids are larger than the average trend, suggesting these side chains do not fold efficiently. Sulfur-containing protonated amino acids have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting the mass of the S atom. Protonated amino acids that can internally hydrogen-bond have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting more extensive folding. The CRAFTI measurements correlate well with results from drift ion mobility (IMS) and traveling wave ion mobility (TWIMS) spectrometric measurements; CRAFTI results correlate with IMS values approximately as well as IMS and TWIMS values from independent measurements correlate with each other. Both CRAFTI and IMS results correlate well with the computed momentum transfer cross sections, suggesting both techniques provide accurate molecular structural information. Absolute values obtained using the various methods differ significantly; in the case of CRAFTI, this may be due to errors in measurements of collision gas pressure, measurement of excitation voltage, and/or dependence of cross sections on kinetic energy. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27220844

  20. Collision Cross Sections for 20 Protonated Amino Acids: Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance and Ion Mobility Results

    Anupriya; Jones, Chad A.; Dearden, David V.

    2016-08-01

    We report relative dephasing cross sections for the 20 biogenic protonated amino acids measured using the cross sectional areas by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (CRAFTI) technique at 1.9 keV in the laboratory reference frame, as well as momentum transfer cross sections for the same ions computed from Boltzmann-weighted structures determined using molecular mechanics. Cross sections generally increase with increasing molecular weight. Cross sections for aliphatic and aromatic protonated amino acids are larger than the average trend, suggesting these side chains do not fold efficiently. Sulfur-containing protonated amino acids have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting the mass of the S atom. Protonated amino acids that can internally hydrogen-bond have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting more extensive folding. The CRAFTI measurements correlate well with results from drift ion mobility (IMS) and traveling wave ion mobility (TWIMS) spectrometric measurements; CRAFTI results correlate with IMS values approximately as well as IMS and TWIMS values from independent measurements correlate with each other. Both CRAFTI and IMS results correlate well with the computed momentum transfer cross sections, suggesting both techniques provide accurate molecular structural information. Absolute values obtained using the various methods differ significantly; in the case of CRAFTI, this may be due to errors in measurements of collision gas pressure, measurement of excitation voltage, and/or dependence of cross sections on kinetic energy.

  1. Cross-section scanning tunneling spectroscopy on a resonant-tunneling diode structure

    Teichmann, Karen; Wenderoth, Martin; Burbach, Sergej; Ulbrich, Rainer G. [IV. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August Universitaet Goettingen (Germany); Pierz, Klaus; Schumacher, Hans W. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    We investigated a resonant-tunneling diode structure by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy. The diode structure was grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on a n{sup +}-doped GaAs (100) substrate and consists of self-assembled InAs quantum dots embedded in AlAs barriers (both 4 nm) each followed by undoped GaAs prelayers (15 nm). We use a low temperature STM working under UHV conditions at 5 K. The samples are cleaved in UHV to obtain a clean and atomically flat surface perpendicular to the diode-structure. Atomically resolved constant current topography images taken simultaneously at different bias voltages, (both positive and negative voltage) show the high quality of the heterostructure. Local I(V)-spectroscopy resolves the band edge alignment across the heterostructure. On negative bias voltage several peaks in the differential conductivity are observed. The voltage position of these peaks varies with distance from the interface. We attribute the origin of the enhanced differential conductivity peak to an interaction between the potential induced by the tip and the quantum dot layer.

  2. Resonant vibrational-excitation cross sections and rate constants for low-energy electron scattering by molecular oxygen

    Laporta, V; Tennyson, J

    2016-01-01

    Resonant vibrational-excitation cross sections and rate constants for electron scattering by molecular oxygen are presented. Transitions between all 42 vibrational levels of O$_2(\\textrm{X}\\ ^3\\Sigma_g^- $) are considered. Molecular rotations are parameterized by the rotational quantum number $J$ which is considered in the range 1 to 151. The lowest four resonant states of O$_2^-$, $^2\\Pi_g$, $^2\\Pi_u$, $^4\\Sigma_u^-$ and $^2\\Sigma_u^-$, are taken into account. The calculations are performed using the fixed-nuclei R-matrix approach to determine the resonance positions and widths, and the boomerang model to characterize the nuclei motion. Two energy regions below and above 4~eV are investigated: the first one is characterized by sharp structures in the cross section, and the second by a broad resonance peaked at 10~eV. The computed cross sections are compared with theoretical and experimental results available in literature for both the energy regions, and are made available for use by modelers. The effect of ...

  3. Improved algorithms for the calculation of resolved resonance cross sections with applications to the structural Doppler effect in fast reactors

    Motivated by a need for an economical yet rigorous tool which can address the computation of the structural material Doppler effect, an extremely efficient improved RABANL capability has been developed utilizing the fact that the Doppler broadened line shape functions become essentially identical to the natural line shape functions or Lorentzian limits beyond about 100 Doppler widths from the resonance energy, or when the natural width exceeds about 200 Doppler widths. The computational efficiency has been further enhanced by preprocessing or screening a significant number of selected resonances during library preparation into composition and temperature independent smooth background cross sections. The resonances which are suitable for such pre-processing are those which are either very broad or those which are very weak. The former contribute very little to the Doppler effect and their self-shielding effect can readily be averaged into slowly varying background cross section data, while the latter contribute very little to either the Doppler or to self-shielding effects. To illustrate the accuracy and efficiency of the improved RABANL algorithms and resonance screening techniques, calculations have been performed for two systems, the first with a composition typical of the STF converter region and the second typical of an LMFBR core composition. Excellent agreement has been found for RABANL compared to the reference Monte Carlo solution obtained using the code VIM, and improved results have also been obtained for the narrow resonance approximation in the ultra-fine-group option of MC2-2

  4. On criterion of modal adiabaticity

    WANG; Ning(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Pierce, A. D., Extension of the method of normal modes to sound propagation in an almost-stratified medium, J. Acoust.Soc. Am., 1965, 37: 19-27.[2]Wang, D. Z. , Shang, E. C., Underwater Acoustics (in Chinese), Beijing: Science Press, 1981.[3]Zhang Renhe, Li Fenghua, Beam-displacement rya-mode theory of sound propagation in shallow water, Science in China, Ser.A, 1999, 42(7): 739-749.[4]Zhou Jixun, Zhang Xuezhen, Rogers P., Resonance interaction of sound waves with internal solitons in coastal zone, J.Acoust. Soc. Am., 1991, 90: 2042-2054.[5]Shang, E. C., Wang, Y. Y., The impact of mesoscale oceanic structure on global-scale acoustic propagation, in Theoretical and Computational Acoustics (ed. Ding Lee et al. ), Singapore: World Scientific Publishing Co. , 1996, 409-431.[6]Milder, D. M., Ray and wave invariants for SOFAR channel propagation, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 1969, 46: 1259-1263.[7]Nag l, A., Milder, D. M., Adiabatic mode theory of underwater sound propagation in a range-dependent environment, J.Acoust. Soc. Am., 1978, 63: 739-749.[8]Brekhovskikh, L. M., Waves in Layered Media, 2nd ed., New York: Academic Press Inc., 1973.[9]Brekhovskikh, L. M., Lysanov, Yu., Fundamental of Ocean Acoustics, Ch. 7, Sec. 7.2, Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 1982.[10]Evans, R. B., A coupled mode solution for acoustic propagation in a wave-guide with stepwise depth variations of a penerable bottom, J. Acoust. Soc. A.m., 1983, 74: 188-195.[11]Jensen, F. B., Kuperman, W. A., Porter, M. B. et al., Computational Ocean Acoustics, New York: Springer-Verlag,1992.[12]Wang Ning, Inverse scattering problem for the coupled second order ODE, Journal of The Physical Society of Japan, 1995, 64(12): 4907-4915.

  5. Non-adiabatic Chaplygin gas

    The split of a generalised Chaplygin gas with an equation of state p=−A/ρα into an interacting mixture of pressureless matter and a dark-energy component with equation of state pΛ=−ρΛ implies the existence of non-adiabatic pressure perturbations. We demonstrate that the square of the effective (non-adiabatic) sound speed cs of the medium is proportional to the ratio of the perturbations of the dark energy to those of the dark matter. Since, as demonstrated explicitly for the particular case α=−1/2, dark-energy perturbations are negligible compared with dark-matter perturbations on scales that are relevant for structure formation, we find |cs2|≪1. Consequently, there are no oscillations or instabilities which have plagued previous adiabatic Chaplygin-gas models

  6. Muonated cyclohexadienyl radicals observed by level crossing resonance in dilute solutions of benzene in hexane subjected to muon-irradiation

    Benzene is used here as a scavenger of muonium to produce the muonated cyclohexadienyl radical in dilute solutions in n-hexane. The radical was identified by level crossing resonance spectroscopy (LFR) by observing the proton resonance of the -CHMu group occurring at 2.059T. Its yield is found to equal the sum of the muonium atom yield and the ''missing'' muon yield in hexane (total 35% of the incident muons). Consequently, the complete dispersement of muons in different chemical associations is now accounted for in a saturated hydrocarbon liquid, and is seen to be similar to that in water. (author)

  7. Muonated cyclohexadienyl radicals observed by level crossing resonance in dilute solutions of benzene in hexane subjected to muon-irradiation

    Benzene is used here as a scavenger of muonium to produce the muonated cyclohexadienyl radical in dilute solutions in n-hexane. The radical was identified by level crossing resonance spectroscopy (LCR) by observing the proton resonance of the -CHMu group occurring at 2.059T. Its yield is found to equal the sum of the muonium atom yield and the 'missing' muon yield in hexane (total 35% of the incident muons). Consequently, the complete dispersement of muons in different chemical associations is now accounted for in a saturated hydrocarbon liquid, and is seen to be similar to that in water

  8. Optimizing adiabaticity in quantum mechanics

    MacKenzie, R; Renaud-Desjardins, L

    2011-01-01

    A condition on the Hamiltonian of a time-dependent quantum mechanical system is derived which, if satisfied, implies optimal adiabaticity (defined below). The condition is expressed in terms of the Hamiltonian and in terms of the evolution operator related to it. Since the latter depends in a complicated way on the Hamiltonian, it is not yet clear how the condition can be used to extract useful information about the optimal Hamiltonian. The condition is tested on an exactly-soluble time-dependent problem (a spin in a magnetic field), where perfectly adiabatic evolution can be easily identified.

  9. ENDF/B-IV representation of the 238U total neutron cross section in the resolved resonance energy region

    The ENDF/B-IV prescription fails to represent correctly the 238U total (and scattering) cross section between the levels of the resolved range. It is shown how this representation can be improved by properly accounting for the contribution of levels outside the resolved region to the cross section at energies inside the resolved region, and by substituting the more precise multilevel Breit-Wigner formula for the presently used single-level formula. The importance of computing accurately the minima in the total cross section is illustrated by comparing values of the self-shielded capture resonance integral computed with ENDF/B-IV and with a more accurate cross section model

  10. Research progress of functional magnetic resonance imaging in cross-modal activation of visual cortex during tactile perception

    An increasing amount of neuroimaging studies recently demonstrated activation of visual cortex in both blind and sighted participants when performing a variety of tactile tasks such as Braille reading and tactile object recognition, which indicates that visual cortex not only receives visual information, but may participate in tactile perception. To address these cross-modal changes of visual cortex and the neurophysiological mechanisms, many researchers conducted explosive studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and have made some achievements. This review focuses on cross-modal activation of visual cortex and the underlying mechanisms during tactile perception in both blind and sighted individuals. (authors)

  11. Heteronuclear cross-polarization in multinuclear multidimensional NMR: Prospects for triple-resonance CP

    Majumdar, A.; Zuiderweg, E.R.P. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Heteronuclear multiple-pulse-based Cross Polarization (HECP) between scalar coupled spins is gaining an important role in high-resolution multidimensional NMR of isotopically labeled biomolecules, especially in experiments involving net magnetization transfer. It has generally been observed that in these situations, the performance of HECP is superior to that of INEPT-based sequences. In particular, HECP-based three-dimensional HCCH spectroscopy is more efficient than the INEPT version of the same experiment. Differences in sensitivity have been intuitively attributed to relaxation effects and technical factors such as radiofrequency (rf) inhomogeneity We present theoretical analyses and computer simulations to probe the effects of these factors. Relaxation effects were treated phenomenologically; we found that relaxation differences are relatively small (up to 25%) between pulsed-free-precession (INEPT) and HECP-although always in favor of HECP. We explored the rf effects by employing a Gaussian distribution of rf amplitude over sample volume. We found that inhomogeneity effects significantly favor HECP over INEPT, especially under conditions of {open_quotes}matched {close_quotes} inhomogeneity in the two rf coils. The differences in favor of HECP indicate that an extension of HECP to triple resonance experiments (TRCP) in I -> S -> Q net transfers might yield better results relative to analogous INEPT-based net transfers. We theoretically analyze the possibilities of TRCP and find that transfer functions are critically dependent on the ratio J{sub IS}/J{sub SQ}. When J{sub IS} equals J{sub SQ}, we find that 100% transfer is possible for truly simultaneous TRCP and this transfer is obtained in a time 1.41 /J. The TRCP time requirement compares favorably with optimally concatenated INEPT-transfers, where net transfer I -> S -> Q is complete at 1.5 /J.

  12. Optimization of Adiabatic Selective Pulses

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Panfil, Shimon L.; Zur, Yuval

    1997-06-01

    Adiabatic RF pulses play an important role in spin inversion due to their robust behavior in presence of inhomogeneous RF fields. These pulses are characterized by the trajectory swept by the tip of theBeffvector and the rate of motion upon it. In this paper, a method is described for optimizing adiabatic inversion pulses to achieve a frequency-selective magnetization inversion over a given bandwidth in a shorter time and to improve slice profile. An efficient adiabatic pulse is used as an initial condition. This pulse allows for flexibility in choosing its parameters; in particular, the transition sharpness may be traded off against the inverted bandwidth. The considerations for selecting the parameters of the pulse according to the requirements of the design are discussed. The optimization process then improves the slice profile by optimizing the rate of motion along the trajectory of the pulse while preserving the trajectory itself. The adiabatic behavior of the optimized pulses is fully preserved over a twofold range of variation in the RF amplitude which is sufficient for imaging applications in commercial high-field MRI machines. Design examples demonstrate the superiority of the optimized pulses over the conventional sech/tanh pulse.

  13. A Many Particle Adiabatic Invariant

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    For a system of N charged particles moving in a homogeneous, sufficiently strong magnetic field, a many-particle adiabatic invariant constrains the collisional exchange of energy between the degrees of freedom perpendicular to and parallel to the magnetic field. A description of the phenomenon in...

  14. PAPIN: A Fortran-IV program to calculate cross section probability tables, Bondarenko and transmission self-shielding factors for fertile isotopes in the unresolved resonance region

    The Fortran IV code PAPIN has been developed to calculate cross section probability tables, Bondarenko self-shielding factors and average self-indication ratios for non-fissile isotopes, below the inelastic threshold, on the basis of the ENDF/B prescriptions for the unresolved resonance region. Monte-Carlo methods are utilized to generate ladders of resonance parameters in the unresolved resonance region, from average resonance parameters and their appropriate distribution functions. The neutron cross-sections are calculated by the single level Breit-Wigner (SLBW) formalism, with s, p and d-wave contributions. The cross section probability tables are constructed by sampling the Doppler-broadened cross sections. The various self-shielded factors are computed numerically as Lebesgue integrals over the cross section probability tables. The program PAPIN has been validated through extensive comparisons with several deterministic codes

  15. PAPIN: A FORTRAN-4 program to calculate cross section probability tables, Bondarenko and transmission self-shielding factors for fertile isotopes in the unresolved resonance region

    Munoz-Cobos, J. G.

    1981-08-01

    A FORTRAN 4 code was developed to calculate cross section probability tables, Bondarenko self-shielding factors, and average self-indication ratios for non-fissile isotopes, below the inelastic threshold, on the basis of prescriptions for the unresolved resonance region. Monte-Carlo methods are utilized to generate ladders of resonance parameters in he unresolved resonance region, from average resonance parameters and their appropriate distribution functions. The neutron cross sections are calculated by the single level Breit-Wigner formalism, with s, p and d-wave contributions. The cross section probability tables are constructed by sampling the Doppler-broadened cross sections. The various self-shielded factors are computed numerically as Lebesgue integrals over the cross section probability tables. The program was validated through extensive comparisons with several deterministic codes.

  16. Capture cross section measurements of 186,187,188Os at n-TOF: the resolved resonance region

    The neutron capture cross sections of 186,187,188Os have been measured at the CERN neutron time-of-flight facility, n-TOF, in the neutron energy range from 1 eV up to 1 MeV. In this contribution, we report the results of the analysis of the resolved resonance region (RRR). Resonance parameters have been extracted from a full R-matrix fit of the capture yields with the SAMMY code. A statistical analysis has been performed and the related average resonance parameters are derived. This information is crucial for a complete understanding and modeling in terms of the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model of the capture and inelastic reaction channels, required for the evaluation of the stellar reaction rates of these isotopes. Maxwellian average cross sections for the range of temperatures relevant for s-process nucleosynthesis have been derived from the combined information of the experimental data in the resolved and unresolved resonance regions. A brief account of the implications of this analysis in the estimation of the s-process component of the 187Os abundance and the related impact on the estimates of the time-duration of the galactic nucleosynthesis through the Re/Os clock is given. (authors)

  17. Capture cross section measurements of {sup 186,187,188}Os at n-TOF: the resolved resonance region

    Fujii, K.; Mosconi, M.; Milazzo, P.M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Kappeler, F.; Mengoni, A.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Alvarez, H.; A lvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Becvar, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calvino, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapic, C.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Gramegna, F.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Koehler, P.; Kossionides, E.; Krticka, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, H.; Marganiec, J.; Marrone, S.; Martinez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Moreau, C.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O' Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M.T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J.L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M.C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K

    2008-07-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of {sup 186,187,188}Os have been measured at the CERN neutron time-of-flight facility, n-TOF, in the neutron energy range from 1 eV up to 1 MeV. In this contribution, we report the results of the analysis of the resolved resonance region (RRR). Resonance parameters have been extracted from a full R-matrix fit of the capture yields with the SAMMY code. A statistical analysis has been performed and the related average resonance parameters are derived. This information is crucial for a complete understanding and modeling in terms of the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model of the capture and inelastic reaction channels, required for the evaluation of the stellar reaction rates of these isotopes. Maxwellian average cross sections for the range of temperatures relevant for s-process nucleosynthesis have been derived from the combined information of the experimental data in the resolved and unresolved resonance regions. A brief account of the implications of this analysis in the estimation of the s-process component of the {sup 187}Os abundance and the related impact on the estimates of the time-duration of the galactic nucleosynthesis through the Re/Os clock is given. (authors)

  18. Resonances

    an impetus or drive to that account: change, innovation, rupture, or discontinuity. Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change explores the historiographical question of the modes of interrelation between these motifs in historical narratives. The essays in the collection attempt to...... realize theoretical consciousness through historical narrative ‘in practice’, by discussing selected historical topics from Western cultural history, within the disciplines of history, literature, visual arts, musicology, archaeology, philosophy, and theology. The title Resonances indicates the overall...

  19. Studies in Chaotic adiabatic dynamics

    Chaotic adiabatic dynamics refers to the study of systems exhibiting chaotic evolution under slowly time-dependent equations of motion. In this dissertation the author restricts his attention to Hamiltonian chaotic adiabatic systems. The results presented are organized around a central theme, namely, that the energies of such systems evolve diffusively. He begins with a general analysis, in which he motivates and derives a Fokker-Planck equation governing this process of energy diffusion. He applies this equation to study the open-quotes goodnessclose quotes of an adiabatic invariant associated with chaotic motion. This formalism is then applied to two specific examples. The first is that of a gas of noninteracting point particles inside a hard container that deforms slowly with time. Both the two- and three-dimensional cases are considered. The results are discussed in the context of the Wall Formula for one-body dissipation in nuclear physics, and it is shown that such a gas approaches, asymptotically with time, an exponential velocity distribution. The second example involves the Fermi mechanism for the acceleration of cosmic rays. Explicit evolution equations are obtained for the distribution of cosmic ray energies within this model, and the steady-state energy distribution that arises when this equation is modified to account for the injection and removal of cosmic rays is discussed. Finally, the author re-examines the multiple-time-scale approach as applied to the study of phase space evolution under a chaotic adiabatic Hamiltonian. This leads to a more rigorous derivation of the above-mentioned Fokker-Planck equation, and also to a new term which has relevance to the problem of chaotic adiabatic reaction forces (the forces acting on slow, heavy degrees of freedom due to their coupling to light, fast chaotic degrees)

  20. Digital Waveguide Adiabatic Passage Part 1: Theory

    Vaitkus, Jesse A; Greentree, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Spatial adiabatic passage represents a new way to design integrated photonic devices. In conventional adiabatic passage designs require smoothly varying waveguide separations. Here we show modelling of adiabatic passage devices where the waveguide separation is varied digitally. Despite digitisation, our designs show robustness against variations in the input wavelength and refractive index contrast of the waveguides relative to the cladding. This approach to spatial adiabatic passage opens new design strategies and hence the potential for new photonics devices.

  1. Mid-range adiabatic wireless energy transfer via a mediator coil

    Rangelov, Andon A

    2012-01-01

    A technique for efficient mid-range wireless energy transfer between two coils via a mediator coil is proposed. By varying the coil frequencies three resonances are created: emitter-mediator (EM), mediator-receiver (MR) and emitter-receiver (ER). If the frequency sweeps are adiabatic and such that the ER resonance precedes the MR resonance, the energy flows sequentially along the chain emitter-mediator-receiver. If the MR resonance precedes the ER resonance, then the energy flows directly from the emitter to the receiver via the ER resonance; then the losses from the mediator are suppressed. This technique is robust to noise, resonant constraints and external interferences.

  2. Representation of the neutron cross sections in the unresolved resonance region

    Some limitations of the statistical approach to the representation of cross sections in the unresolved region are discussed and it is suggested that the actual Doppler-broadened cross sections should be used instead. 5 figures

  3. Design of Selective Adiabatic Inversion Pulses Using the Adiabatic Condition

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Panfil, Shimon L.; Zur, Yuval

    1997-12-01

    Adiabatic RF pulses play an important role in spin inversion due to their robust behavior in the presence of inhomogeneous RF fields. These pulses are characterized by the trajectory swept by the tip of theBeffvector and the rate of motion along it. In this paper, we describe a method by which optimized modulation functions can be constructed to render insensitivity toB1inhomogeneity over a predeterminedB1range and over a wide band of frequencies. This is accomplished by requiring that the optimized pulse fulfill the adiabatic condition over this range ofB1inhomogeneity and over the desired frequency band for the complete duration of the pulse. A trajectory similar to the well-known sech/tanh adiabatic pulse, i.e., a half-ellipse, is used. The optimization process improves the slice profile by optimizing the rate of motion along this trajectory. The optimized pulse can be tailored to the specific design requirements; in particular, the transition sharpness may be traded off against the inverted bandwidth. Two design examples, including experimental results, demonstrate the superiority of the optimized pulses over the conventional sech/tanh pulse: in the first example, a large frequency band is to be inverted using a weak RF amplitude in a short time. In the second example, a pulse with a very sharp transition is required.

  4. Development of 239Pu total cross section multilevel parameters determination technique by analysing experiments on neutron transmission in resolved resonance region

    The aim of this work is development of S-matrix multilevel resonance parameters determination technique with neutron transmission data used in resolved resonance region. Experimental transmission data values were obtained for the Pu-239 thickness range 0.00217-0.1234 nucl/barns on the time-of-flight spectrometer with 70 ns/m resolution. S-matrix Adler's formalism with least square method fit were used for experimental data description. The method developed enables to justify the resonance-resonance interference parameters H. Its possibilities are demonstrated by determination of these parameters for four resonances of the Pu-239 total cross section

  5. Thermal neutron cross section and resonance integral of the 159Tb(n,γ)160Tb reaction

    The thermal neutron cross section and resonance integral of the reaction 159Tb(n,γ)160Tb in the thermal and 1/E regions, respectively, of a thermal reactor neutron spectrum have been experimentally determined. Literature data on the resonance integral of the reaction show a large scatter ranging from 313 to 780 b . On the basis of such data it becomes extremely difficult to produce a best value for application. In this work we performed a careful experiment in an effort to produce a precise and accurate measured value, which will be a valuable addition to the literature. The 159Tb(n,γ)160Tb reaction is studied by irradiating spectrographically pure Tb 4 O 7 powder samples with thermal and epithermal neutrons in the Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) at PINSTECH. Thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rates were determined with Au and Co activation detectors. The α parameter, which accounts for the deviation of the neutron spectrum shape from the 1/E law in the epithermal neutron region, was obtained with good accuracy by using Au, Co, Mn, and Zn activation detectors and adopting the regression and iterative analysis procedures. The induced activities in the target samples and the activation detectors were measured with a high purity germanium detector system. The cadmium ratio method was used to yield the thermal neutron cross section and resonance integral. The measured thermal neutron cross section at 0.0253 eV and resonance integral are 23.6±0.4 b and 443±21 b , respectively. The results are discussed and compared with the literature

  6. Production Cross-Section Estimates for Strongly-Interacting Electroweak-Symmetry Breaking Sector Resonances at Particle Colliders

    Dobado, Antonio; Guo, Feng-Kun; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.

    2015-12-01

    We are exploring a generic strongly-interacting Electroweak Symmetry Breaking Sector (EWSBS) with the low-energy effective field theory for the four experimentally known particles (W±L, ZL, h) and its dispersion-relation based unitary extension. In this contribution we provide simple estimates for the production cross-section of pairs of the EWSBS bosons and their resonances at proton-proton colliders as well as in a future e-e+ (or potentially a μ-μ+) collider with a typical few-TeV energy. We examine the simplest production mechanisms, tree-level production through a W (dominant when quantum numbers allow) and the simple effective boson approximation (in which the electroweak bosons are considered as collinear partons of the colliding fermions). We exemplify with custodial isovector and isotensor resonances at 2 TeV, the energy currently being discussed because of a slight excess in the ATLAS 2-jet data. We find it hard, though not unthinkable, to ascribe this excess to one of these WLWL rescattering resonances. An isovector resonance could be produced at a rate smaller than, but close to earlier CMS exclusion bounds, depending on the parameters of the effective theory. The ZZ excess is then problematic and requires additional physics (such as an additional scalar resonance). The isotensor one (that would describe all charge combinations) has smaller cross-section. Supported by the Spanish Excellence Network on Hadronic Physics FIS2014-57026-REDT, by Spanish Grants Universidad Complutense UCM:910309 and Ministerio de Economia y Competitividad MINECO:FPA2011-27853-C02-01, MINECO:FPA2014-53375-C2-1-P, by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and National Natural Science Foundation of China through Funds Provided to the Sino-German CRC 110 “Symmetries and the Emergence of Structure in QCD” (NSFC Grant No. 11261130311) and by NSFC (Grant No. 11165005)

  7. Thermal neutron capture cross section and resonance integral of the {sup 139}La(n,γ){sup 140}La reaction

    Van Do, Nguyen; Khue, Pham Duc; Thanh, Kim Tien; Hien, Nguyen Thi [Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology,10 Dao Tan, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Kim, Guinyun, E-mail: gnkim@knu.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Sungchul [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Nuclear Data Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Young-Sik; Song, Tae-Yung; Lee, Young-Ouk [Nuclear Data Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sung Gyun; Cho, Moo-Hyun [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Man Woo [Research Center, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan 619-953 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    The thermal neutron capture cross section (σ{sub 0}) and resonance integral cross section (I{sub 0}) of the {sup 139}La(n,γ){sup 140}La reaction have been measured relative to that of the {sup 197}Au(n,γ){sup 198}Au reaction by means of the activation method. High-purity natural lanthanum and gold foils were exposed to pulsed neutrons at the Pohang neutron facility. One set of foils was irradiated directly and a second set of foils was shielded with a cadmium cover of 0.5 mm thickness. The induced activities in the activated foils were measured by a γ-ray spectrometer based on a calibrated high purity germanium (HPGe) detector. In order to improve the accuracy of the experimental results the epithermal neutron spectrum shape factor (α) was determined, and the corrections for the thermal neutron self-shielding (G{sub th}), the resonance neutron self-shielding (G{sub epi}), the γ-ray attenuation (F{sub g}) and the γ-ray coincidence summing effects were made. The thermal neutron cross-section for the {sup 139}La(n,γ){sup 140}La reaction has been determined to be 9.16 ± 0.36 barn, relative to the reference value of 98.65 ± 0.09 barn for the {sup 197}Au(n,γ){sup 198}Au reaction. By assuming the cadmium cut-off energy of 0.55 eV, the resonance integral cross section for the {sup 139}La(n,γ){sup 140}La reaction is 11.64 ± 0.69 barn, which is determined relative to the reference value of 1550 ± 28 barn for the {sup 197}Au(n,γ){sup 198}Au reaction. The measured results are compared with literature values and discussed.

  8. On uncertainties and fluctuations of averaged neutron cross sections in unresolved resonance energy region for 235U, 238U, 239Pu

    This paper analyses the reasons for the differences which exist between group-averaged evaluated cross-section data from different evaluated data files for U235, U238 and Pu239 in the unresolved resonance energy region. (author)

  9. Adiabatic pumping through quantum dots

    A finite charge can be pumped through a mesoscopic system in the absence of an applied bias voltage by changing periodically in time some parameters of the system. If these parameters change slowly with respect to all internal time scales of the system, pumping is adiabatic. The scope of this work is to investigate adiabatic pumping through a quantum dot, in particular the influence of Coulomb interaction between electrons in the dot on the pumped charge. On one hand we develop a formalism based on Green's functions, in order to calculate the pumped charge from the weak-tunnel-coupling regime down to the Kondo regime. We extend our calculations to a system with a superconducting contact. On the other hand we use a systematic perturbation expansion for the calculation of the pumped charge, giving us the possibility to analyze processes which contribute to charge pumping and to highlight the important role of interaction-induced level renormalization. (orig.)

  10. Adiabatic theory for the bipolaron

    A translation-invariant adiabatic theory is constructed for the bipolaron. It is shown that motions in the bipolaron are divided: the relative electron coordinates describe fast electron oscillations in the induced polarization well and the center of mass coordinates represent slow electron movement followed by polarization. Nonlinear differential bipolaron equations are derived which are asymptotically exact in the adiabatic limit. Particlelike solutions of these equations correspond to the bipolaron bound state. The exact solution yields the value of the ion critical parameter η=0.31 for which the bipolaron state is stable, where η=ε∞/ε0 and ε∞,ε0 are high-frequency and static dielectric permittivities. The energy, the total energy, the effective mass, the radius, and the critical values of the electron-phonon coupling constants are calculated for the bipolaron. The results obtained are generalized to the case of two-dimensional bipolarons

  11. Limits on orbit crossing planetesimals in the resonant multiple planet system, KOI-730

    Moore, Alexander; Hasan, Imran; Quillen, Alice

    2012-01-01

    A fraction of multiple planet candidate systems discovered from transits by the Kepler mission contain pairs of planet candidates that are in orbital resonance or are spaced slightly too far apart to be in resonance. We focus here on the four planet system, KOI 730, that has planet periods satisfying the ratios 8:6:4:3. By numerically integrating four planets initially in this resonant configuration in proximity to an initially exterior cold planetesimal disk, we find that of the order of a M...

  12. Evaluated 182,183,184,186W Neutron Cross Sections and Covariances in the Resolved Resonance Region

    Pigni, Marco T [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Leal, Luiz C [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has recently completed the resonance parameter evaluation of four tungsten isotopes, i.e., 182,183,184,186W, in the neutron energy range of thermal up to several keV. This nuclear data work was performed with support from the US Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) in an effort to provide improved tungsten cross section and covariance data for criticality safety analyses. The evaluation methodology uses the Reich-Moore approximation of the R-matrix formalism of the code SAMMY to fit high-resolution measurements performed in 2010 and 2012 at the Geel linear accelerator facility (GELINA), as well as other experimental data sets on natural tungsten available in the EXFOR library. In the analyzed energy range, this work nearly doubles the resolved resonance region (RRR) present in the latest US nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII.1. In view of the interest in tungsten for distinct types of nuclear applications and the relatively homogeneous distribution of the isotopic tungsten—namely, 182W(26.5%), 183W(14.31%), 184W(30.64%), and 186W(28.43%) - the completion of these four evaluations represents a significant contribution to the improvement of the ENDF library. This paper presents an overview of the evaluated resonance parameters and related covariances for total and capture cross sections on the four tungsten isotopes.

  13. Evaluated 182,183,184,186W Neutron Cross Sections and Covariances in the Resolved Resonance Region

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has recently completed the resonance parameter evaluation of four tungsten isotopes, i.e., 182,183,184,186W, in the neutron energy range of thermal up to several keV. This nuclear data work was performed with support from the US Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) in an effort to provide improved tungsten cross section and covariance data for criticality safety analyses. The evaluation methodology uses the Reich-Moore approximation of the R-matrix formalism of the code SAMMY to fit high-resolution measurements performed in 2010 and 2012 at the Geel linear accelerator facility (GELINA), as well as other experimental data sets on natural tungsten available in the EXFOR library. In the analyzed energy range, this work nearly doubles the resolved resonance region (RRR) present in the latest US nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII.1. In view of the interest in tungsten for distinct types of nuclear applications and the relatively homogeneous distribution of the isotopic tungsten - namely, 182W(26.5%), 183W(14.31%), 184W(30.64%), and 186W(28.43%) - the completion of these four evaluations represents a significant contribution to the improvement of the ENDF library. This paper presents an overview of the evaluated resonance parameters and related covariances for total and capture cross sections on the four tungsten isotopes.

  14. Vortices and stabilization of resonance states in crossed magnetic and electric fields

    We analyze a two-dimensional model of electrons moving under the influence of an attractive zero-range potential as well as external magnetic and electric fields. In order to determine the complex energies of the electron's resonance states we use the Green's-function method. It is found by numerical calculations that there are resonances that have a peculiar dependence on the electric-field intensity, i.e., although the electric field increases, the lifetime of these resonance states grows up. We show that this phenomenon, called stabilization, can be attributed to quantum-mechanical vortices induced by the magnetic field and controlled by the electric-field strength. In order to get more information about these vortices the phase of the wave functions as well as the probability currents for these stable resonances are investigated. We also demonstrate the existence of the so-called stabilization path

  15. Fano resonances in high energy electron transport in nanowires of variable cross-section

    Baskin, L. M.; Kabardov, M. M.; Sharkova, N. M.

    2015-09-01

    Electron ballistic transport in 2D quantum waveguide with two narrowings is considered. For longitudinal electron motion such narrowings play the role of effective potential barriers and conditions for resonant tunneling arise. If the electron energy is sufficiently high the electron wave can scatter into different quantum states (transverse channels of the leads) which results in complicated E-dependence of the scattering amplitudes. Numerical simulations have shown that the scattering amplitudes resonances are of Fano type. The form of the transmission probability curve is conditioned by interference of the quantum states into which the electron wave is scattered by the narrowings. The suggested interference model makes possible to find the resonance parameters with high precision and to link them to the closed resonator eigenvalues.

  16. Integral Cross-Sections of the Photonuclear Reactions in the Region of Giant Dipole Resonance

    Belov, A G; Gudima, K K; Zuzaan, P

    2000-01-01

    The cross-sections of the photonuclear reactions (gamma, n) were measured for the 12 nuclei in the region between {45}Sc and {208}Pb. The measurements were performed by the activation method on the bremsstrahlung of the microtron with the boundary energy of 25 MeV. The integral cross-sections were calculated using the modificated model of the preequilibrium decay. The satisfactory agreament of the experimental and calculated cross-section was observed.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of athlete's heart: myocardial mass, left ventricular function, and cross-sectional area of the coronary arteries

    To evaluate left ventricular myocardial mass and function as well as ostial coronary artery cross-sectional area in endurance athletes, an athlete group of 12 highly trained rowers and a control group of 12 sedentary healthy subjects underwent MR examination. An ECG-gated breath-hold cine gradient-echo sequence was used to calculate myocardial mass, end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes, stroke volume, and cardiac output, all related to body surface area, as well as ejection fraction. A 3D fat-saturated ECG- and respiratory-triggered navigator echo sequence was used to evaluate coronary arteries: left main (LM), left anterior descending (LAD), left circumflex (LCx), and right coronary artery (RCA). Cross-sectional area was calculated and divided for body surface area. Myocardial mass was found significantly larger in athlete group than in control group (p = 0.0078), the same being for end-diastolic volume (p = 0.0078), stroke volume (p = 0.0055), LM (p = 0.0066) and LAD (p = 0.0129). No significant difference was found for all the remaining parameters. Significant correlation with myocardial mass was found for LM (p < 0.001) and LAD (p = 0.0340), not for LCx and RCA. Magnetic resonance imaging is a useful tool in evaluating the myocardial hypertrophy and function of athlete's heart. Magnetic resonance angiography is a valuable noninvasive method to visualize the correlated cross-sectional area increase of the left coronary artery system. (orig.)

  18. Investigation of resonance structure and Doppler-effect of cross sections for 232 Th, 235 U and 239 Pu

    The results of measuring the neutron transmissions for 232 Th, 235 U and 239 Pu metal samples carried out at the 60 m, 123 m and 1006 m flight paths of the Dubna IBR-30 booster in the neutron energy range of 2 eV - 200 keV are given and discussed. The measurements were made at the room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. The batteries of 3 boron and 26 helium counters were used as detectors. The results of the calculations of analogous transmissions realized on the base of the evaluated data libraries BROND-2, ENDF/B-6 and JENDL-3 by means of the GRUCON computer program package are also given. It is concluded that the 235 U Doppler coefficients and effective total cross sections taken from measured transmissions are in a good agreement with calculation results based on the ENDF/B-6 library at energies of 2.15 eV - 200 keV. The BROND-2 and JENDL-3 parameters give the Doppler coefficients and effective cross sections which are 10-30% higher than the experimental and ENDF/B-6 ones at the resonance energies of 46.5 - 465 eV. For 239 Pu there is agreement of the experimental and calculational results within the experimental error limits. For 232 Th experimental values for the Doppler coefficients and effective cross sections are 10-15% higher than the calculated ones with all libraries in resonance energy region. 9 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  19. Elucidation of hydrogen cross leak mechanism in PEFC by magnetic resonance imaging and in-line direct gas mass spectroscopy

    Hydrogen (H2) permeability of polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) is of great importance since cross-leak H2 has an effect on degradation of membranes and/or catalyst layers in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). In this study, H2 cross-leak measurement by direct gas mass spectroscopy (DGMS) and water content measurement using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique were carried out to investigate H2 cross-leak mechanism in a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM). High H2 permeability was detected at elevated temperature, higher humidity and large H2 partial pressure in the anode. H2 permeability through the membrane was strongly affected by the volume fraction of the hydrophilic ion-cluster domain as MRI revealed the membrane was hydrated at higher humidity. Increase of cell temperature possibly accelerates H2 diffusion through the ion-cluster domain and the hydrophobic domain. Observed H2 permeability depending on H2 partial pressure in the anode shows H2 cross-leak process was closely related to both dissolution and diffusion of hydrogen in the membrane. Based on the experimental results, a comprehensive H2 cross-leak mechanism in PEFC was proposed. (author)

  20. Highly stripped ions on hydrogen atoms: the adiabatic approach

    The simple Lorentzian form for the adiabatic radial matrix elements which dominate low-energy charge transfer in highly stripped systems is exploited to derive the S matrix for the Asub(Z)sup(Z+) + H(1s) → Asub(Z)sup(Z-1)+ + H+ scattering process. The approximations used are discussed and the results of the theory are compared with measured He2+ + H(1s) → He+ + H+ cross sections. Agreement is satisfactory for low velocities. (author)

  1. Measurement of the partial cross sections and asymmetry parameters in the 4p-4d giant resonance region of Sr

    Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using monochromatized synchrotron radiation has been applied to measure relative partial photoionization cross sections σ and photoelectron asymmetry parameters β for Sr+ 5s 2S1/2, 5p 2P1/2 and 5p 2P3/2 in the Sr 4p-4d giant resonance region. At the Sr 4p-15s24d 1P1 resonance photoionization, the phase difference between the s and d outgoing waves which leave Sr+ in the 5p 2P3/2 level is evaluated using the present measurement of β and the previous fluorescence measurement of the alignment tensor A20 for Sr+ 5p 2P3/2. (author)

  2. Bending light via adiabatic optical transition in longitudinally modulated photonic lattices

    Han, Bin; Xu, Lei; Dou, Yiling; Xu, Jingjun; Zhang, Guoquan

    2015-10-01

    Bending light in a controllable way is desired in various applications such as beam steering, navigating and cloaking. Different from the conventional way to bend light by refractive index gradient, transformation optics or special beams through wavefront design such as Airy beams and surface plasmons, we proposed a mechanism to bend light via resonant adiabatic optical transition between Floquet-Bloch (FB) modes from different FB bands in longitudinally modulated photonic lattices. The band structure of longitudinally modulated photonic lattices was calculated by employing the concept of quasi-energy based on the Floquet-Bloch theory, showing the existence of band discontinuities at specific resonant points which cannot be revealed by the coupled-mode theory. Interestingly, different FB bands can be seamlessly connected at these resonant points in longitudinally modulated photonic lattices driven by adiabatically varying the longitudinal modulation period along the propagation direction, which stimulates the adiabatic FB mode transition between different FB bands.

  3. URR [Unresolved Resonance Region] computer code: A code to calculate resonance neutron cross-section probability tables, Bondarenko self-shielding factors, and self-indication ratios for fissile and fertile nuclides

    The URR computer code has been developed to calculate cross-section probability tables, Bondarenko self-shielding factors, and self- indication ratios for fertile and fissile isotopes in the unresolved resonance region. Monte Carlo methods are utilized to select appropriate resonance parameters and to compute the cross sections at the desired reference energy. The neutron cross sections are calculated by the single-level Breit-Wigner formalism with s-, p-, and d-wave contributions. The cross-section probability tables are constructed by sampling the Doppler broadened cross-section. The various shelf-shielded factors are computed numerically as Lebesgue integrals over the cross-section probability tables. 6 refs

  4. BARC-35: A 35 group cross-section library with P3-anisotropic scattering matrices and resonance self-shielding factors

    A 35 group cross-section set with P3-anisotropic scattering matrices and resonance self-shielding factors has been generated from the basic ENDF/B-IV cross-section Library for 57 reactor elements. This library, called BARC35, is considered to be well suited for the neutronics and safety analysis of fission, fusion and hybrid systems. (author)

  5. Computer simulation of satellite resonances caused by the beam-beam interaction at a crossing angle in the SSC [Superconducting Super Collider

    The beam-beam interaction at horizontal and vertical crossing angles in the SSC is simulated. It is shown that with the present SSC parameters several satellite resonances can be excited. The dependence on the working point, the crossing angle, the space charge parameter and the synchrotron frequency is investigated. 2 refs., 9 figs

  6. Enhancement of level-crossing resonances in rubidium atoms by frequency control of the exciting radiation field

    Auzinsh, Marcis; Ferber, Ruvin; Gahbauer, Florian; Kalvans, Linards; Mozers, Arturs; Spiss, Agris

    2013-01-01

    We studied magneto-optical resonances caused by excited-state level crossings in a nonzero magnetic field. Experimental measurements were performed on the transitions of the $D_2$ line of rubidium. These measured signals were described by a theoretical model that takes into account all neighboring hyperfine transitions, the mixing of magnetic sublevels in an external magnetic field, the coherence properties of the exciting laser radiation, and the Doppler effect. Good agreement between the experimental measurements and the theoretical model could be achieved over a wide range of laser power densities. We further showed that the contrasts of the level-crossing peaks can be sensitive to changes in the frequency of the exciting laser radiation as small as several tens of megahertz when the hyperfine splitting of the exciting state is larger than the Doppler broadening.

  7. Adiabatic processes in monatomic gases

    A kinetic model is used to predict the temperature evolution of a monatomic ideal gas undergoing an adiabatic expansion or compression at a constant finite rate, and it is then generalized to treat real gases. The effects of interatomic forces are considered, using as examples the gas with the square-well potential and the van der Waals gas. The model is integrated into a Carnot cycle operating at a finite rate to compare the efficiency's rate-dependent behavior with the reversible result. Limitations of the model, rate penalties, and their importance are discussed

  8. Additional adiabatic heating of plasma

    A theoretical possibility of a plasma additional adiabatic heating up to temperatures needed for the begin of D-T thermonuclear fusion reaction, has been found on the base of the polyenergetic conjugation expression, developed in the Thermodynamics of Accumulation Processes. TAP is a branch of the non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The thermodynamics of irreversible processes is another branch of the entire non-equilibrium thermodynamics. TAP deals with the phenomena associated with the introduction, conversion and accumulation of mass or energy or both in the affected, open or closed systems. (author) 2 refs

  9. A Preliminary Study on a Method for Generating Self-shielded Multi-group Cross Sections in an Unresolved Resonance Region

    Kim, Jong Woon; Kim, Sang Ji; Gil, Choong-Sup; Lee, Young-Ouk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The unresolved resonance region (URR) begins at an energy where it is difficult to measure individual resonances and extends to an energy where the effects of fluctuations in the resonance cross sections become unimportant for practical calculations. In ENDF-format evaluations, this 'unresolved range' is handled by giving average values for the resonance spacing and the various partial widths, together with their probability distributions. These unresolved resonance parameters are used two ways in view of transport solver. For a deterministic method, the self-shielded multi-group cross sections are generated by UNRESR and GROUPR modules of NJOY code which use Bondarenko method. For a Monte Carlo method, so-called Bondarenko method is not very useful for continuous-energy Monte Carlo codes like MCNP. The natural approach for treating unresolved-resonance self-shielding for Monte Carlo codes is the 'Probability Table' method. The PURR module produces probability tables that can be used in versions of MCNP from 4B on to treat unresolved-resonance self-shielding. We present a method to generate self-shielded multi-group cross sections in URR for easy numerical integration and tested on the total cross section of {sup 239}Pu. This is the first phase of study and the effects of statistical resonances in URR are identified by comparing generated multi-group cross sections. Test will be performed on several other nuclides and this method might be used as a one of items for developing multi-group cross section generation code for fast reactor analysis.

  10. A Preliminary Study on a Method for Generating Self-shielded Multi-group Cross Sections in an Unresolved Resonance Region

    The unresolved resonance region (URR) begins at an energy where it is difficult to measure individual resonances and extends to an energy where the effects of fluctuations in the resonance cross sections become unimportant for practical calculations. In ENDF-format evaluations, this 'unresolved range' is handled by giving average values for the resonance spacing and the various partial widths, together with their probability distributions. These unresolved resonance parameters are used two ways in view of transport solver. For a deterministic method, the self-shielded multi-group cross sections are generated by UNRESR and GROUPR modules of NJOY code which use Bondarenko method. For a Monte Carlo method, so-called Bondarenko method is not very useful for continuous-energy Monte Carlo codes like MCNP. The natural approach for treating unresolved-resonance self-shielding for Monte Carlo codes is the 'Probability Table' method. The PURR module produces probability tables that can be used in versions of MCNP from 4B on to treat unresolved-resonance self-shielding. We present a method to generate self-shielded multi-group cross sections in URR for easy numerical integration and tested on the total cross section of 239Pu. This is the first phase of study and the effects of statistical resonances in URR are identified by comparing generated multi-group cross sections. Test will be performed on several other nuclides and this method might be used as a one of items for developing multi-group cross section generation code for fast reactor analysis

  11. Cross sections for 14-eV e-H2 resonant collisions: Isotope effect in dissociative electron attachment

    The process of dissociative attachment of electrons to molecular hydrogen and its isotopes in the energy range at approximately 14 eV is investigated. The dissociative electron attachment cross sections for all six hydrogen isotopes are calculated over an extended range of electron energies using the local complex potential model with the excited Rydberg 2Σg+ electronic state of H2- acting as the intermediate resonant state. A significant isotope effect in theoretical electron attachment cross sections is observed, in agreement with previous predictions and experimental observations. A two-parameter analytic expression for the cross section is derived from the theory that fits accurately the numerically calculated cross sections for all isotopes. Similarly, an analytic mass-scaling relation is derived from the theory that accurately reproduces the numerically calculated rate coefficients for all isotopes in the 0.1-1000 eV temperature range by using the rate coefficient for the H2 isotope only. The latter is represented by an analytic fit expression with two parameters only.

  12. Neutron resonance parameters of {sup 55}Mn from Reich-Moore analysis of recent experimental neutron transmission and capture cross sections

    Derrien, H.; Leal, L.C.; Larson, N.M.; Guber, K.; Wiarda, D.; Arbanas, G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Tennessee 37831-6170 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    High-resolution neutron capture cross section measurements of {sup 55}Mn were recently performed at GELINA by Schillebeeckx et al. (2005) and at ORELA by Guber et al. (2007). The analysis of the experimental data was performed with the computer code SAMMY using the Bayesian approach in the resonance parameters representation of the cross sections. The neutron transmission data taken in 1988 by Harvey et al. (2007) and not analyzed before were added to the SAMMY experimental data base. More than 95% of the s-wave resonances and more than 85% of the p-wave resonances were identified in the energy range up to 125 keV, leading to the neutron strength functions S{sub 0} = (3.90 +- 0.78) x 10{sup -4} and S{sub 1} = (0.45 +- 0.08) x 10{sup -4}. About 25% of the d-wave resonances were identified with a possible strength function of S{sub 2} 1.0 x 10{sup -4}. The capture cross section calculated at 0.0253 eV is 13.27 b, and the capture resonance integral is 13.52 +- 0.30 b. In the energy range 15 to 120 keV, the average capture cross section is 12% lower than Lerigoleur value and 25% smaller than Macklin value. GELINA and ORELA experimental capture cross sections show a background cross section not described by the Reich-Moore resonance parameters. Part of this background could be due to a direct capture component and/or to the missing d-wave resonances. The uncertainty of 10% on the average capture cross section above 20 keV is mainly due to the inaccuracy in the calculation of the background components. (authors)

  13. Tunneling of Bose-Einstein condensates and nonlinear models with separatrix crossings

    Itin, A. P.

    2004-01-01

    This paper has been withdrawn by the author. Instead, more comprehensive and accurate works are placed in: 1) cond-mat/0610767: Universality in nonadiabatic behaviour of classical actions in nonlinear models with separatrix crossings, to appear in Phys.Rev.E; and 2) nlin/0611007: Change in the adiabatic invariant in a nonlinear two-mode model of Feshbach resonance passage, to appear in Physica D

  14. An Algebraic Approach to the Evolution of Emittances upon Crossing the Linear Coupling Difference Resonance

    Gardner,C.

    2008-09-01

    One of the hallmarks of linear coupling is the resonant exchange of oscillation amplitude between the horizontal and vertical planes when the difference between the unperturbed tunes is close to an integer. The standard derivation of this phenomenon (known as the difference resonance) can be found, for example, in the classic papers of Guignard [1, 2]. One starts with an uncoupled lattice and adds a linear perturbation that couples the two planes. The equations of motion are expressed in hamiltonian form. As the difference between the unperturbed tunes approaches an integer, one finds that the perturbing terms in the hamiltonian can be divided into terms that oscillate slowly and ones that oscillate rapidly. The rapidly oscillating terms are discarded or transformed to higher order with an appropriate canonical transformation. The resulting approximate hamiltonian gives equations of motion that clearly exhibit the exchange of oscillation amplitude between the two planes. If, instead of the hamiltonian, one is given the four-by-four matrix for one turn around a synchrotron, then one has the complete solution for the turn-by-turn (TBT) motion. However, the conditions for the phenomenon of amplitude exchange are not obvious from a casual inspection of the matrix. These conditions and those that give rise to the related sum resonance are identified in this report. The identification is made using the well known formalism of Edwards and Teng [3, 4, 5] and, in particular, the normalized coupling matrix of Sagan and Rubin [6]. The formulae obtained are general in that no particular hamiltonian or coupling elements are assumed. The only assumptions are that the one-turn matrix is symplectic and that it has distinct eigenvalues on the unit circle in the complex plane. Having identified the conditions of the one-turn matrix that give rise to the resonances, we focus on the difference resonance and apply the formulae to the evolution of the horizontal and vertical emittances

  15. An Algebraic Approach to the Evolution of Emittances upon Crossing the Linear Coupling Difference Resonance

    One of the hallmarks of linear coupling is the resonant exchange of oscillation amplitude between the horizontal and vertical planes when the difference between the unperturbed tunes is close to an integer. The standard derivation of this phenomenon (known as the difference resonance) can be found, for example, in the classic papers of Guignard [1, 2]. One starts with an uncoupled lattice and adds a linear perturbation that couples the two planes. The equations of motion are expressed in hamiltonian form. As the difference between the unperturbed tunes approaches an integer, one finds that the perturbing terms in the hamiltonian can be divided into terms that oscillate slowly and ones that oscillate rapidly. The rapidly oscillating terms are discarded or transformed to higher order with an appropriate canonical transformation. The resulting approximate hamiltonian gives equations of motion that clearly exhibit the exchange of oscillation amplitude between the two planes. If, instead of the hamiltonian, one is given the four-by-four matrix for one turn around a synchrotron, then one has the complete solution for the turn-by-turn (TBT) motion. However, the conditions for the phenomenon of amplitude exchange are not obvious from a casual inspection of the matrix. These conditions and those that give rise to the related sum resonance are identified in this report. The identification is made using the well known formalism of Edwards and Teng [3, 4, 5] and, in particular, the normalized coupling matrix of Sagan and Rubin [6]. The formulae obtained are general in that no particular hamiltonian or coupling elements are assumed. The only assumptions are that the one-turn matrix is symplectic and that it has distinct eigenvalues on the unit circle in the complex plane. Having identified the conditions of the one-turn matrix that give rise to the resonances, we focus on the difference resonance and apply the formulae to the evolution of the horizontal and vertical emittances

  16. A New Approach to the Quantum Adiabatic Condition

    The quantum adiabatic theorem is the basis of adiabatic quantum computation. However, the exact necessary and sufficient conditions for adiabatic evolution are still under debate. We discuss the adiabatic condition of a system undergoing a special evolution route, and obtain an explicit formula that is necessary and sufficient for the adiabatic evolution in this route. Based on this formula, we find that the traditional adiabatic condition is neither sufficient nor necessary. Finally, we show that no adiabatic process can occur even the evolution speed goes to 0 in some examples, which is surprising since the adiabatic theorem states that if the evolution of a system is slow enough, the adiabatic process could occur

  17. 3He(γ,pd) cross sections with tagged photons below the Δ resonance

    The reaction cross section for 3He(γ,pd) has been measured using the Saskatchewan-Alberta Large Acceptance Detector (SALAD) with tagged photons in the energy range from 166 to 213 MeV. The energy and angle of the proton and the deuteron were measured with SALAD while the tagger determined the photon energy. Differential cross sections have been determined for 40 degree p*<150 degree. The results are in agreement with the Bonn and Saclay photodisintegration measurements. The most recent photodisintegration measurement performed at Bates is higher by a factor of 1.3, which is just within the combined errors of the experiments. The proton capture results differ by a factor of 1.7 from the present experiment. Comparisons are made with microscopic calculations of the cross sections

  18. Pediatric ureteropelvic junction obstruction: can magnetic resonance urography identify crossing vessels?

    MR Urography (MRU) is an increasingly used imaging modality for the evaluation of pediatric genitourinary obstruction. To determine whether pediatric MR urography (MRU) reliably detects crossing vessels in the setting of suspected ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction. The clinical significance of these vessels was also evaluated. We identified pediatric patients diagnosed with UPJ obstruction by MRU between May 2009 and June 2014. MRU studies were evaluated by two pediatric radiologists for the presence or absence of crossing vessels. Ancillary imaging findings such as laterality, parenchymal thinning/scarring, trapped fluid in the proximal ureter, and presence of renal parenchymal edema were also evaluated. Imaging findings were compared to surgical findings. We used the Mann-Whitney U test to compare continuous data and the Fisher exact test to compare proportions. Twenty-four of 25 (96%) UPJ obstructions identified by MRU were surgically confirmed. MRU identified crossing vessels in 10 of these cases, with 9 cases confirmed intraoperatively (κ = 0.92 [95% CI: 0.75, 1.0]). Crossing vessels were determined to be the primary cause of UPJ obstruction in 7/9 children intraoperatively, while in two children the vessels were deemed incidental and noncontributory to the urinary tract obstruction. There was no significant difference in age or the proportions of ancillary findings when comparing children without and with obstructing vessels. MRU allows detection of crossing vessels in pediatric UPJ obstruction. Although these vessels are the primary cause of obstruction in some children, they are incidental and non-contributory in others. Our study failed to convincingly identify any significant predictors (e.g., age or presence of renal parenchymal edema) that indicate when a crossing vessel is the primary cause of obstruction. (orig.)

  19. Pediatric ureteropelvic junction obstruction: can magnetic resonance urography identify crossing vessels?

    Parikh, Kushal R.; Kraft, Kate H.; Ivancic, Vesna; Smith, Ethan A.; Dillman, Jonathan R. [Section of Pediatric Radiology, Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hammer, Matthew R. [University of Texas Southwestern, Department of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-11-15

    MR Urography (MRU) is an increasingly used imaging modality for the evaluation of pediatric genitourinary obstruction. To determine whether pediatric MR urography (MRU) reliably detects crossing vessels in the setting of suspected ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction. The clinical significance of these vessels was also evaluated. We identified pediatric patients diagnosed with UPJ obstruction by MRU between May 2009 and June 2014. MRU studies were evaluated by two pediatric radiologists for the presence or absence of crossing vessels. Ancillary imaging findings such as laterality, parenchymal thinning/scarring, trapped fluid in the proximal ureter, and presence of renal parenchymal edema were also evaluated. Imaging findings were compared to surgical findings. We used the Mann-Whitney U test to compare continuous data and the Fisher exact test to compare proportions. Twenty-four of 25 (96%) UPJ obstructions identified by MRU were surgically confirmed. MRU identified crossing vessels in 10 of these cases, with 9 cases confirmed intraoperatively (κ = 0.92 [95% CI: 0.75, 1.0]). Crossing vessels were determined to be the primary cause of UPJ obstruction in 7/9 children intraoperatively, while in two children the vessels were deemed incidental and noncontributory to the urinary tract obstruction. There was no significant difference in age or the proportions of ancillary findings when comparing children without and with obstructing vessels. MRU allows detection of crossing vessels in pediatric UPJ obstruction. Although these vessels are the primary cause of obstruction in some children, they are incidental and non-contributory in others. Our study failed to convincingly identify any significant predictors (e.g., age or presence of renal parenchymal edema) that indicate when a crossing vessel is the primary cause of obstruction. (orig.)

  20. The Decent Care Movement: Subsidiarity, Pragmatic Solidarity, and Cross-Cultural Resonance.

    Niforatos, Joshua D

    2016-02-01

    Decent Care is the World Health Organization and The Ford Foundation's joint effort to articulate a healthcare paradigm that makes a patient's voice equal to the voice of the healthcare provider. In this article, the six tenants of Decent Care are outlined with particular emphasis on subsidiarity. Liberation theology's preferential option for the poor maxim is presented and compared with other major world religions to demonstrate the cross-cultural focus of "decency." The power of this paradigm is in its emphasis and proclamation of human flourishing in a healthcare setting, generally speaking, and more specifically, human flourishing in the presence of affliction from chronic disease or dying cross-culturally. PMID:25893474

  1. Threshold-energy region in the electron-excitation cross sections of the sodium resonant transition

    Ying, C. H.; Perales, F.; Vušković, L.; Bederson, B.

    1993-08-01

    We present measurements of absolute excitation differential cross sections for electron scattering by ground-state sodium in the 3P manifold at 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.0, 3.3, and 3.7 eV in the angular range 1° to 60°. No calibration or normalization procedures are involved. Comparisons with computational results of the close-coupling approximation and experimentally obtained ΔMs- and ΔML-changing cross sections are made.

  2. Mid-range adiabatic wireless energy transfer via a mediator coil

    A technique for efficient mid-range wireless energy transfer between two coils via a mediator coil is proposed. By varying the coil frequencies, three resonances are created: emitter–mediator (EM), mediator–receiver (MR) and emitter–receiver (ER). If the frequency sweeps are adiabatic and such that the EM resonance precedes the MR resonance, the energy flows sequentially along the chain emitter–mediator–receiver. If the MR resonance precedes the EM resonance, then the energy flows directly from the emitter to the receiver via the ER resonance; then the losses from the mediator are suppressed. This technique is robust against noise, resonant constraints and external interferences. - Highlights: ► Efficient and robust mid-range wireless energy transfer via a mediator coil. ► The adiabatic energy transfer is analogous to adiabatic passage in quantum optics. ► Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to any resonant constraints. ► Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to noise in the neighborhood of the coils.

  3. Calculation of vibrational excitation cross-sections in resonant electron-molecule scattering using the time-dependent wave packet (TDWP) approach with application to the 2 CO- shape resonance

    Raman Kumar Singh; Manabendra Sarma; Ankit Jain; Satrajit Adhikari; Manoj K Mishra

    2007-09-01

    Results from application of a new implementation of the time-dependent wave packet (TDWP) approach to the calculation of vibrational excitation cross-sections in resonant e-CO scattering are presented to examine its applicability in the treatment of e-molecule resonances. The results show that the SCF level local complex potential (LCP) in conjunction with the TDWP approach can reproduce experimental features quite satisfactorily.

  4. Complete Adiabatic Quantum Search in Unsorted Databases

    Xu, Nanyang; Peng, Xinhua; Shi, Mingjun; Du, Jiangfeng

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new adiabatic algorithm for the unsorted database search problem. This algorithm saves two thirds of qubits than Grover's algorithm in realizations. Meanwhile, we analyze the time complexity of the algorithm by both perturbative method and numerical simulation. The results show it provides a better speedup than the previous adiabatic search algorithm.

  5. Shortcut to adiabatic gate teleportation

    Santos, Alan C.; Silva, Raphael D.; Sarandy, Marcelo S.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a shortcut to the adiabatic gate teleportation model of quantum computation. More specifically, we determine fast local counterdiabatic Hamiltonians able to implement teleportation as a universal computational primitive. In this scenario, we provide the counterdiabatic driving for arbitrary n -qubit gates, which allows to achieve universality through a variety of gate sets. Remarkably, our approach maps the superadiabatic Hamiltonian HSA for an arbitrary n -qubit gate teleportation into the implementation of a rotated superadiabatic dynamics of an n -qubit state teleportation. This result is rather general, with the speed of the evolution only dictated by the quantum speed limit. In particular, we analyze the energetic cost for different Hamiltonian interpolations in the context of the energy-time complementarity.

  6. Quantum gates with controlled adiabatic evolutions

    Hen, Itay

    2015-02-01

    We introduce a class of quantum adiabatic evolutions that we claim may be interpreted as the equivalents of the unitary gates of the quantum gate model. We argue that these gates form a universal set and may therefore be used as building blocks in the construction of arbitrary "adiabatic circuits," analogously to the manner in which gates are used in the circuit model. One implication of the above construction is that arbitrary classical boolean circuits as well as gate model circuits may be directly translated to adiabatic algorithms with no additional resources or complexities. We show that while these adiabatic algorithms fail to exhibit certain aspects of the inherent fault tolerance of traditional quantum adiabatic algorithms, they may have certain other experimental advantages acting as quantum gates.

  7. 3He(γ,pp)n cross sections with tagged photons below the Δ resonance energy

    Cross sections have been measured for the 3He(γ,pp)n reaction with tagged photons in the range Eγ =161 endash 208 MeV using the Saskatchewan-Alberta Large Acceptance Detector (SALAD). The protons were detected over a range of polar angles of 40 degree endash 140 degree and azimuthal angles of 0 degree endash 360 degree with an energy threshold of 40 MeV. Comparisons are made with a microscopic calculation which includes one-, two-, and three-nucleon absorption mechanisms. One- and two-nucleon processes, including final-state interactions, are unable to account for the measured cross sections. The addition of three-nucleon absorption diagrams gives roughly the right strength, but the distribution in phase space is in disagreement with the data. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  8. A Systematic Search for New Coupling Schemes of Cross-Coupled Resonator Bandpass Filters

    A. Lamecki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a systematic approach to an extensive search for topologies of cross-coupled filters with generalized Chebyshev response is presented. The technique applies graph theory to find unique, nonisomorphic filter configurations, and tests whether a specific frequency response can be realized in a given set of topologies. The results of the search are then stored in a database of possible filter configurations.

  9. A data acquisition system for measuring ionization cross section in laser multi-step resonant ionization experiment

    A CAMAC data acquisition system for measuring ionization cross section in laser multi-step resonant ionization experiment is described. The number of scalers in the front-end CAMAC can be adjusted by changing the data read-out table files. Both continuous and manual acquisition models are available, and there is a wide adjustable range from 1 ms to 800 s with the acquisition time unit. The long-term stability, Δt/t, for the data acquisition system with an acquisition time unit of 100 s was measured to be better than ±0.01%, thus validating its reliability in long-term online experimental data acquisition. The time response curves for three electrothermal power-meters were also measured by this DAQ system. (authors)

  10. Ratios of 15N/12C and 4He/12C inclusive electroproduction cross sections in the nucleon resonance region

    Bosted, P E; Amarian, M; Anefalos, S; Anghinolfi, M; Asryan, G; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Baillie, N; Ball, J P; Baltzell, N A; Barrow, S; Batourine, V; Battaglieri, M; Beard, K; Bedlinskiy, I; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Biselli, A S; Bonner, B E; Bouchigny, S; Boiarinov, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Brooks, W K; Bültmann, S; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Careccia, S L; Carman, D S; Carnahan, B; Cazes, A; Chen, S; Cole, P L; Collins, P; Coltharp, P; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Crannell, H; Credé, V; Cummings, J P; De Masi, R; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Donnelly, J; Doughty, D; Dragovitsch, P; Dugger, M; Dharmawardane, K V; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fatemi, R; Fedotov, G; Feuerbach, R J; Forest, T A; Fradi, A; Funsten, H; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, R S; Hardie, J; Heddle, D; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hleiqawi, I; Holtrop, M; Huertas, M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Jüngst, H G; Kalantarians, N; Keith, C; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, K Y; Kim, K; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Kramer, L H; Kubarovski, V; Kühn, J; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Ji Li; Lima, A C S; Livingston, K; Lü, H; Lukashin, K; MacCormick, M; Markov, N; McAleer, S; McKinnon, B; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mibe, T; Mikhailov, K; Minehart, R; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Morand, L; Morrow, S A; Moteabbed, M; Müller, J; Mutchler, G S; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niroula, M R; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; O'Rielly, G V; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Paterson, C; Philips, S A; Pierce, J; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Polli, E; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P D; Sabati, F; Salgado, C; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Sharabyan, Yu G; Shaw, J; Shvedunov, N V; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Stavinsky, A; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stokes, B E; Stoler, P; Strauch, S; Suleiman, R; Taiuti, M; Taylor, S; Tedeschi, D J; Thoma, U; Tkabladze, A; Tkachenko, S; Todor, L; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Williams, M; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z

    2007-01-01

    The ratio of inclusive electron scattering cross sections for 15N/12C was determined in the kinematic range 0.8resonance structure, as predicted by a phenomenological model, and also by quark-hadron duality. Within the super-scaling quasi-elastic model, slight evidence is found for a 1 MeV lower effective nucleon binding energy in 15N than in 12C. Ratios of 4He/12C using 1.6 to 2.5 GeV electrons are in good agreement with the phenomenological model.

  11. On the statistical mechanics of an adiabatic ensemble

    S.N.Andreev

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Different descriptions of an adiabatic process based on statistical thermodynamics and statistical mechanics are discussed. Equality of the so-called adiabatic and isolated susceptibilities and its generalization as well as adiabatic invariants are essentially used to describe adiabatic processes in the framework of quantum and classical statistical mechanics. It is shown that distribution function in adiabatic ensemble differs from a quasi-equilibrium canonical form provided the heat capacity of the system is not constant in adiabatic process.

  12. Fission Cross-Section Measurements on Pu239, Pu241 , U232, and a Search for Fission Components in Pu238 Resonances

    Fission cross-section measurements on Pu239 and Pu241 have been carried out from sub-thermal-neutron energy to the keV region; resonance parameters are given and errors in the average values of the cross-section are discussed. The discovery of large fission components in the U232 neutron resonances stimulated a search for fission components in Pu238. The results of these experiments are given. All the measurements were performed on the Harwell time-of-flight spectrometer. (author)

  13. Correlation of Resonance Charge Exchange Cross-Section Data in the Low-Energy Range

    Sheldon, John W.

    1962-01-01

    During the course of a literature survey concerning resonance charge exchange, an unusual degree of agreement was noted between an extrapolation of the data reported by Kushnir, Palyukh, and Sena and the data reported by Ziegler. The data of Kushnir et al. are for ion-atom relative energies from 10 to 1000 ev, while the data of Ziegler are for a relative energy of about 1 ev. Extrapolation of the data of Kushnir et al. was made in accordance with Holstein's theory, 3 which is a combination of time-dependent perturbation methods and classical orbit theory. The results of this theory may be discussed in terms of a critical impact parameter b(sub c).

  14. Competition between benzene and styrene in forming radicals under different solvent conditions observed by muon level crossing resonance

    The muon level-crossing-resonance technique has been used to resolve major discrepancies that exist in muon-spin-resonance studies (both free-radical formation and muonium decay rates) in the competition between benzene and styrene. The results, obtained for ∼30 mM solutions in ethanol and for 2.5 mM aqueous micelles solutions, show that muonium atoms (Mu) react 8 (±2) times faster with styrene than with benzene. In the above cases thermalized Mu is unquestionably the reactive species, which is known to show nucleophilic intra-molecular selectivity in the case of styrene. But a similar value, 9 (±2), was also obtained for undiluted mixtures of liquid benzene and styrene (neat mixture) - where the precursor might have been 'hot Mu' (which should display weaker selectivity than Mu) or cations derived from μ+ (which should show higher selectivity). These results support the view that thermalized Mu is the predominant reactive species in liquid benzene and styrene. (orig.)

  15. Rapid adiabatic passage in quantum dots: Influence of scattering and dephasing

    Schuh, K.; Jahnke, F.; Lorke, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical investigations for the realization of population inversion of semiconductor quantum dot ground-state transitions by means of adiabatic passage with chirped optical pulses are presented. While the inversion due to Rabi oscillations depends sensitively on the resonance condition, the...

  16. Accurate non-relativistic photoionization cross section for He at non-resonant photon energies

    The total single-photon ionization cross section was calculated for helium atoms in their ground state. Using a full configuration-interaction approach the photoionization cross section was extracted from the complex-scaled resolvent. Our results agree with an earlier B-spline-based calculation in which the continuum is box discretized within a relative deviation of less than 0.06% in the energy range from 28 to 59 eV. On the other hand, above the He++ threshold our results agree very well to a recent Floquet calculation. Thus, our calculation confirms the previously reported deviations from the experimental reference data outside the claimed error estimate. In order to extend the calculated spectrum to very high energies, an analytical hydrogenic-type model tail is introduced that should become asymptotically exact for infinite photon energies. Its universality is investigated considering also H-, Li+ and HeH+. With the aid of the tail corrections to the dipole approximation are estimated.

  17. Partial evolution based local adiabatic quantum search

    Recently, Zhang and Lu provided a quantum search algorithm based on partial adiabatic evolution, which beats the time bound of local adiabatic search when the number of marked items in the unsorted database is larger than one. Later, they found that the above two adiabatic search algorithms had the same time complexity when there is only one marked item in the database. In the present paper, following the idea of Roland and Cerf [Roland J and Cerf N J 2002 Phys. Rev. A 65 042308], if within the small symmetric evolution interval defined by Zhang et al., a local adiabatic evolution is performed instead of the original “global” one, this “new” algorithm exhibits slightly better performance, although they are progressively equivalent with M increasing. In addition, the proof of the optimality for this partial evolution based local adiabatic search when M = 1 is also presented. Two other special cases of the adiabatic algorithm obtained by appropriately tuning the evolution interval of partial adiabatic evolution based quantum search, which are found to have the same phenomenon above, are also discussed. (general)

  18. Back pain was less explained than leg pain: a cross-sectional study using magnetic resonance imaging in low back pain patients with and without radiculopathy

    Jensen, Ole Kudsk; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Sørensen, Joan Solgaard; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Background Cross-sectional studies have shown associations between lumbar degenerative manifestations on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and low back pain (LBP). Disc herniations and other degenerative manifestations, however, frequently occur in asymptomatic individuals. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to analyze for associations between pain intensity and degenerative manifestations and other pain variables in patients for whom prognostic factors have been published previousl...

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging depiction of acquired Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome with crossed cerebro-cerebellar diaschisis: Report of two cases

    Ranjana Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome, also known as hemispheric atrophy, is characterized by loss of volume of one cerebral hemisphere from an insult in early life. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis refers to dysfunction/atrophy of cerebellar hemisphere which is secondary to contralateral supratentorial insult. We describe magnetic resonance imaging findings in two cases of acquired Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome with crossed cerebro-cerebellar diaschisis.

  20. Stochastic resonance induced by a multiplicative periodic signal in a bistable system with cross-correlated noises and time delay

    The stochastic resonance (SR) phenomenon induced by a multiplicative periodic signal in a bistable system with cross-correlated noises and time delay is studied. Two cases have been considered: the case of a system with no delay and the case of a system with time-delayed feedback. The expressions for the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are derived, for both cases. The effects of the cross-correlated noise intensity (λ) and the delay time (τ) on the SNR are discussed. It is found that the existence of a maximum in the SNR is the identifying characteristic of the SR phenomenon. In contrast with the case for the SR induced by an additive signal, here both λ and τ have critical values in SR when the SNR as a function of the noise intensities, i.e., λ (or τ), suppresses the SR for λ (or τ) below the critical value while it enhances the SR for λ (or τ) above the critical value. τ suppresses the SR in the SNR as a function of λ while it enhances the SR in the SNR as a function of the noise intensities. The SNR is not only dependent on λ, τ and the noise intensities, but also on the initial condition of the system

  1. X-ray spectra from magnetar candidates. II Resonant cross sections for electron-photon scattering in the relativistic regime

    Nobili, L; Zane, S

    2008-01-01

    Recent models of spectral formation in magnetars called renewed attention on electron-photon scattering in the presence of ultra-strong magnetic fields. Investigations presented so far mainly focussed on mildly relativistic particles and magnetic scattering was treated in the non-relativistic (Thomson) limit. This allows for consistent spectral calculations up to a few tens of keVs, but becomes inadequate in modelling the hard tails (<200 keV) detected by INTEGRAL from magnetar sources. In this paper, the second in a series devoted to model the X-/soft gamma-ray persistent spectrum of magnetar candidates, we present explicit, relatively simple expressions for the magnetic Compton cross-section at resonance which account for Landau-Raman scattering up to the second Landau level. No assumption is made on the magnetic field strength. We find that sensible departures from the Thomson regime can bealready present at B ~5E12 G. The form of the magnetic cross section we derived can be easily implemented in Monte ...

  2. Cross-calibrating interferon-γ detection by using eletrochemical impedance spectroscopy and paraboloidal mirror enabled surface plasmon resonance interferometer

    Liu, Meng-Wei; Chang, Hao-Jung; Lee, Shu-sheng; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis is a highly contagious disease such that global latent patient can be as high as one third of the world population. Currently, latent tuberculosis was diagnosed by stimulating the T cells to produce the biomarker of tuberculosis, i.e., interferon-γ. In this paper, we developed a paraboloidal mirror enabled surface plasmon resonance (SPR) interferometer that has the potential to also integrate ellipsometry to analyze the antibody and antigen reactions. To examine the feasibility of developing a platform for cross calibrating the performance and detection limit of various bio-detection techniques, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) method was also implemented onto a biochip that can be incorporated into this newly developed platform. The microfluidic channel of the biochip was functionalized by coating the interferon-γ antibody so as to enhance the detection specificity. To facilitate the processing steps needed for using the biochip to detect various antigen of vastly different concentrations, a kinetic mount was also developed to guarantee the biochip re-positioning accuracy whenever the biochip was removed and placed back for another round of detection. With EIS being utilized, SPR was also adopted to observe the real-time signals on the computer in order to analyze the success of each biochip processing steps such as functionalization, wash, etc. Finally, the EIS results and the optical signals obtained from the newly developed optical detection platform was cross-calibrated. Preliminary experimental results demonstrate the accuracy and performance of SPR and EIS measurement done at the newly integrated platform.

  3. Theory of relativistic CRM with synchronous adiabatic electromagnetic wave deceleration of electron beam

    An approximation of nonlinear theory of relativistic gyrotrons with variable magnetic fields is formulated. It is assumed that, for a single electron being decelerated by a high-frequency field, the condition of cyclotron resonance is satisfied identically over the entire interaction space. Other electrons captured by the wave, which undergo small oscillations, are decelerated with the resonant electron. Using the method of adiabatic invariants, a longitudinal amplitude distribution is determined for the high-frequency field that prevents escape of any electrons

  4. Applied neutron resonance theory

    Utilisation of resonance theory in basic and applications-oriented neutron cross section work is reviewed. The technically important resonance formalisms, principal concepts and methods as well as representative computer programs for resonance parameter extraction from measured data, evaluation of resonance data, calculation of Doppler-broadened cross sections and estimation of level-statistical quantities from resonance parameters are described. (orig.)

  5. Digital Waveguide Adiabatic Passage Part 2: Experiment

    Ng, Vincent; Chaboyer, Zachary J; Nguyen, Thach; Dawes, Judith M; Withford, Michael J; Greentree, Andrew D; Steel, M J

    2016-01-01

    Using a femtosecond laser writing technique, we fabricate and characterise three-waveguide digital adiabatic passage devices, with the central waveguide digitised into five discrete waveguidelets. Strongly asymmetric behaviour was observed, devices operated with high fidelity in the counter-intuitive scheme while strongly suppressing transmission in the intuitive. The low differential loss of the digital adiabatic passage designs potentially offers additional functionality for adiabatic passage based devices. These devices operate with a high contrast ($>\\!90\\%$) over a 60~nm bandwidth, centered at $\\sim 823$~nm.

  6. Adiabatic Compression of Oxygen: Real Fluid Temperatures

    Barragan, Michelle; Wilson, D. Bruce; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2000-01-01

    The adiabatic compression of oxygen has been identified as an ignition source for systems operating in enriched oxygen atmospheres. Current practice is to evaluate the temperature rise on compression by treating oxygen as an ideal gas with constant heat capacity. This paper establishes the appropriate thermodynamic analysis for the common occurrence of adiabatic compression of oxygen and in the process defines a satisfactory equation of state (EOS) for oxygen. It uses that EOS to model adiabatic compression as isentropic compression and calculates final temperatures for this system using current approaches for comparison.

  7. Coherent photon scattering cross sections for helium near the delta resonance

    Delli Carpini, D.; Booth, E. C.; Miller, J. P.; Igarashi, R.; Bergstrom, J.; Caplan, H.; Doss, M.; Hallin, E.; Rangacharyulu, C.; Skopik, D.; Lucas, M. A.; Nathan, A. M.; Wells, D. P.

    1991-04-01

    The angular distributions for coherent photon scattering from 4He were measured at average laboratory bremsstrahlung energies of 187, 235, and 280 MeV. The experiment was performed at the Saskatchewan Accelerator Laboratory using the new high duty factor electron beam. The scattered photons were observed with a high-resolution NaI(Tl) total absorption scintillation detector. These measurements are intended to investigate modification of the Δ properties inside the nuclear medium and the treatment of nonresonant contributions to the scattering cross sections. The results are compared to theoretical calculations in the isobar-hole model. Clear deviations from the theory are evident at all energies, especially at 187 MeV.

  8. Coherent photon scattering cross sections for helium near the delta resonance

    The angular distributions for coherent photon scattering from 4He were measured at average laboratory bremsstrahlung energies of 187, 235, and 280 MeV. The experiment was performed at the Saskatchewan Accelerator Laboratory using the new high duty factor electron beam. The scattered photons were observed with a high-resolution NaI(Tl) total absorption scintillation detector. These measurements are intended to investigate modification of the Δ properties inside the nuclear medium and the treatment of nonresonant contributions to the scattering cross sections. The results are compared to theoretical calculations in the isobar-hole model. Clear deviations from the theory are evident at all energies, especially at 187 MeV

  9. Cross-field flow of plasma produced by laser resonance photoionization

    A slow(v≅700m/s) neodymium plasma was produced by laser resonance photoionization in a transverse magnetic field of up to 2240G. The plasma density was in the range of 7.5 x 107 - 1.7 x 109cm-3. The high-density plasma in the low magnetic field flowed straight and was detected by a planar collector set 60mm downstream from the position of plasma production. On the contrary, the low-density plasma did not flow straight across the high magnetic field. The ion numbers detected by the collector decreased and arrival time to the collector delayed. It was found that the ratio of the ions detected by the collector to those produced by laser beams and the arrival times were functions of the plasma relative dielectric constant εr in the wide ranges of plasma density and magnetic field. When εr >1000, the plasma flowed straight across the magnetic field. Therefore it was concluded that the lowest value of εr for the very slow plasma flow in the transverse magnetic field is also consistent with the theoretical prediction εr >(M/m)1/2 =513 for neodymium plasma, where M/m is the mass ratio of the ion to the electron. (author)

  10. Measurement and analysis of the nitrogen total and differential scattering cross sections in the resonance region

    High-resolution neutron transmission and differential elastic scattering measurements have been made on samples of nitrogen from 0.5 eV to 10 MeV at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). For the transmission measurement several different detectors were used at various flight path lengths, with high-purity nitrogen gas samples. The data have been corrected for the dead time of the time digitizer and for several small backgrounds. For the scattering measurements six detectors were placed at various angles inside an evacuated scattering chamber at 200 meters from the neutron producing target. The sample was silicon nitride held in a thin graphite container. Scattering from carbon and silicon samples was also measured to correct for these materials and calibrate the relative efficiencies of the scattering detectors. The data have been corrected for dead time and for a constant background. A preliminary analysis has been completed to obtain parameters of the resonances up to 4.8 MeV

  11. Determination of the neutron resonance parameters for 206Pb and of the thermal neutron capture cross section for 206Pb and 209Bi

    Chapter 1 describes the motivation of the measurements (accelerator driven systems, stellar nucleosynthesis, neutron induced reactions on 206Pb), the present status of the neutron capture data for 206Pb and 209Bi and the structure of this work. In Chapter 2 the basic reaction theory underlying this work is described. The neutron induced reaction mechanism and formalism are explained. The parameterisation of the cross section in terms of R-matrix theory is discussed and we put particular emphasis on the statistical behaviour of the resonance parameters and the impact of the angular distribution of gamma rays following neutron capture. The relation between experimental observables and the resonance parameters is discussed together with general comments related to resonance shape analysis. Chapter 3 is focused on the determination of resonance parameters for 206Pb. We performed high-resolution transmission and capture measurements at the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) facility GELINA of the IRMM at Geel (B) and determined the resonance parameters. For nuclei like 206Pb, where the total width is dominated by Γn, the capture area allows to determine G. Transmission measurements were carried out to determine Γn, and the statistical factor g of resonances. Before performing a Resonance Shape Analysis (RSA) on the transmission and capture data, we verified the neutron flux and resolution at GELINA. We also compared the characteristics of GELINA with those of the n-TOF facility at CERN. A special emphasis is placed on the total energy detection technique using C6D6 detectors. This technique was applied for the determination of the capture cross section. To reduce systematic bias effects on the capture cross section, the response of the detectors was determined by Monte Carlo simulations, which has been validated by experiments. Using these response functions the partial capture cross sections for individual resonances of 206Pb have been deduced, by unfolding the response of the C6D

  12. Thermoelectric Effects under Adiabatic Conditions

    George Levy

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates not fully explained voltage offsets observed by several researchers during the measurement of the Seebeck coefficient of high Z materials. These offsets, traditionally attributed to faulty laboratory procedures, have proven to have an irreducible component that cannot be fully eliminated in spite of careful laboratory procedures. In fact, these offsets are commonly observed and routinely subtracted out of commercially available Seebeck measurement systems. This paper offers a possible explanation based on the spontaneous formation of an adiabatic temperature gradient in the presence of a force field. The diffusion-diffusion heat transport mechanism is formulated and applied to predict two new thermoelectric effects. The first is the existence of a temperature gradient across a potential barrier in a semiconductor and the second is the Onsager reciprocal of the first, that is, the presence of a measureable voltage that arises across a junction when the temperature gradient is forced to zero by a thermal clamp. Suggested future research includes strategies for utilizing the new thermoelectric effects.

  13. Adiabatic Floquet model for the optical response in femtosecond filaments

    Hofmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The standard model of femtosecond filamentation is based on phenomenological assumptions which suggest that the ionization-induced carriers can be treated as free according to the Drude model, while the nonlinear response of the bound carriers follows the all-optical Kerr effect. Here, we demonstrate that the additional plasma generated at a multiphoton resonance dominates the saturation of the nonlinear refractive index. Since resonances are not captured by the standard model, we propose a modification of the latter in which ionization enhancements can be accounted for by an ionization rate obtained from non-Hermitian Floquet theory. In the adiabatic regime of long pulse envelopes, this augmented standard model is in excellent agreement with direct quantum mechanical simulations. Since our proposal maintains the structure of the standard model, it can be easily incorporated into existing codes of filament simulation.

  14. Adiabatic regularisation of power spectra in nonminimally coupled chaotic inflation

    Alinea, Allan L

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effect of adiabatic regularisation on both the tensor- and scalar-perturbation power spectra in \\textit{nonminimally} coupled chaotic inflation. Similar to that of the \\textit{minimally} coupled general single-field inflation, we find that the subtraction term is suppressed by an exponentially decaying factor involving the number of $ e $-folds. By following the subtraction term long enough beyond horizon crossing, the regularised power spectrum tends to the "bare" power spectrum. This study justifies the use of the unregularised ("bare") power spectrum in standard calculations.

  15. Adiabatic Invariance of Oscillons/I-balls

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Takeda, Naoyuki

    2015-01-01

    Real scalar fields are known to fragment into spatially localized and long-lived solitons called oscillons or $I$-balls. We prove the adiabatic invariance of the oscillons/$I$-balls for a potential that allows periodic motion even in the presence of non-negligible spatial gradient energy. We show that such potential is uniquely determined to be the quadratic one with a logarithmic correction, for which the oscillons/$I$-balls are absolutely stable. For slightly different forms of the scalar potential dominated by the quadratic one, the oscillons/$I$-balls are only quasi-stable, because the adiabatic charge is only approximately conserved. We check the conservation of the adiabatic charge of the $I$-balls in numerical simulation by slowly varying the coefficient of logarithmic corrections. This unambiguously shows that the longevity of oscillons/$I$-balls is due to the adiabatic invariance.

  16. Adiabatic hydrodynamics: The eightfold way to dissipation

    Haehl, Felix M; Rangamani, Mukund

    2015-01-01

    We provide a complete solution to hydrodynamic transport at all orders in the gradient expansion compatible with the second law constraint. The key new ingredient we introduce is the notion of adiabaticity, which allows us to take hydrodynamics off-shell. Adiabatic fluids are such that off-shell dynamics of the fluid compensates for entropy production. The space of adiabatic fluids is quite rich, and admits a decomposition into seven distinct classes. Together with the dissipative class this establishes the eightfold way of hydrodynamic transport. Furthermore, recent results guarantee that dissipative terms beyond leading order in the gradient expansion are agnostic of the second law. While this completes a transport taxonomy, we go on to argue for a new symmetry principle, an Abelian gauge invariance that guarantees adiabaticity in hydrodynamics. We suggest that this symmetry is the macroscopic manifestation of the microscopic KMS invariance. We demonstrate its utility by explicitly constructing effective ac...

  17. Adiabatic Connection for Strictly-Correlated Electrons

    Liu, Zhenfei; Burke, Kieron

    2009-01-01

    Modern density functional theory (DFT) calculations employ the Kohn-Sham (KS) system of non-interacting electrons as a reference, with all complications buried in the exchange-correlation energy (Exc). The adiabatic connection formula gives an exact expression for Exc. We consider DFT calculations that instead employ a reference of strictly-correlated electrons. We define a "decorrelation energy" that relates this reference to the real system, and derive the corresponding adiabatic connection...

  18. Adiabatic Approximation, Semiclassical Scattering, and Unidirectional Invisibility

    Mostafazadeh, Ali

    2014-01-01

    arXiv:1401.4315v3 [quant-ph] 27 Feb 2014 Adiabatic Approximation, Semiclassical Scattering, and Unidirectional Invisibility Ali Mostafazadeh∗ Department of Mathematics, Ko¸c University, 34450 Sarıyer, Istanbul, Turkey Abstract The transfer matrix of a possibly complex and energy-dependent scattering potential can be identified with the S-matrix of a two-level time-dependent non-Hermitian Hamiltonian H( ). We show that the application of the adiabatic approximation ...

  19. On adiabatic invariant in generalized Galileon theories

    Ema, Yohei; Jinno, Ryusuke; Mukaida, Kyohei; Nakayama, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    We consider background dynamics of generalized Galileon theories in the context of inflation, where gravity and inflaton are non-minimally coupled to each other. In the inflaton oscillation regime, the Hubble parameter and energy density oscillate violently in many cases, in contrast to the Einstein gravity with minimally coupled inflaton. However, we find that there is an adiabatic invariant in the inflaton oscillation regime in any generalized Galileon theory. This adiabatic invariant is us...

  20. Quantum and classical dynamics in adiabatic computation

    Crowley, P. J. D.; Duric, T.; Vinci, W.; Warburton, P. A.; Green, A. G.

    2014-01-01

    Adiabatic transport provides a powerful way to manipulate quantum states. By preparing a system in a readily initialized state and then slowly changing its Hamiltonian, one may achieve quantum states that would otherwise be inaccessible. Moreover, a judicious choice of final Hamiltonian whose ground state encodes the solution to a problem allows adiabatic transport to be used for universal quantum computation. However, the dephasing effects of the environment limit the quantum correlations th...

  1. Quasielastic pion scattering near the (3,3) resonance. [255 MeV, differential cross section ratio

    Varghese, P.

    1978-12-01

    The quasielastic pion scattering process (..pi..,..pi..p), in which an energetic pion scatters off a target nucleus, knocking-out a bound proton, was studied to determine the role of recoil nucleon charge exchange in the mechanism of the process near the (3,3) free particle pion-nucleon resonance. Calculations, which incorporate the hypothesis of final state charge exchange of the outgoing nucleon, were performed to predict expectations for observing the process. Experimental measurements were made on /sup 27/Al and /sup 208/Pb, using 255-MeV ..pi../sup +/ and ..pi../sup -/ beams. The outgoing protons were observed in a counter telescope in singles and coincidence modes. Singles spectra were measured at proton angles theta/sub rho/ = 45, 55, 64, and 90/sup 0/ and cross sections were calculated as a function of the energy of the detected proton, for each of the targets. Values of the ratio of ..pi../sup +/ to ..pi../sup -/ cross sections were calculated for each of the angles of observation. The results obtained indicate that the singles spectra contain events from processes other than quasielastic scattering and that the quasielastic events cannot be easily disentangled from the large background due to such events. The study has thus established the inadequacy of observing quasielastic pion scattering in a single arm measurement. Coincidence measurements were made by observing the recoil protons in coincidence with the scattered pions, which were detected in a scintillator counter telescope. The ratio of ..pi../sup +/ to ..pi../sup -/ cross sections were obtained for each target for the angular settings (theta/sub rho/, theta/sub ..pi../) = (55, 50/sup 0/) and (64, 37.5/sup 0/). The measured values of 7.0 +- 0.7 for /sup 27/Al and 4.5 +- 0.5 for /sup 208/Pb are substantially below the impulse approximation no-charge-exchange limit of 9. The observed A dependence of this cross section ratio is in agreement with the predictions of the semiclassical charge exchange

  2. Multiple series of shape resonances and near-zero-energy cross section enhancements in photoionization of hydrogen-like ions with screened coulomb interaction

    The recently discovered multiple series of shape resonances and near-zero-energy enhancements in photoionization cross section of hydrogen-like atomic systems with screened Coulomb (Yukawa type) interaction [Phys. Rev. A 80, 063404 (2009)] are studied in detail, in particular their evolution with the variation of the screening strength of the potential. The conditions for appearance of these multiple series of cross section features are identified and related to certain critical screening strengths of the potential. A relation between the appearance of Cooper minima and shape resonances in the photoionization cross section has been established. It is also shown that the s-channel of np photoionization for a fixed photoelectron energy exhibits Ramsauer-Townsend minima in the screening length variable. (authors)

  3. An Integrated Programming and Development Environment for Adiabatic Quantum Optimization

    Humble, Travis S.; McCaskey, Alex J.; Bennink, Ryan S.; Billings, Jay J.; D'Azevedo, Ed F.; Sullivan, Blair D.; Klymko, Christine F.; Seddiqi, Hadayat

    2013-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computing is a promising route to the computational power afforded by quantum information processing. The recent availability of adiabatic hardware has raised challenging questions about how to evaluate adiabatic quantum optimization programs. Processor behavior depends on multiple steps to synthesize an adiabatic quantum program, which are each highly tunable. We present an integrated programming and development environment for adiabatic quantum optimization called JADE tha...

  4. Adiabatic mixed-field orientation of ground-state-selected carbonyl sulfide molecules

    Kienitz, Jens S; Mullins, Terry; Długołęcki, Karol; González-Férez, Rosario; Küpper, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrated strong adiabatic mixed-field orientation of carbonyl sulfide molecules (OCS) in their absolute ground state of $\\text{N}_{\\text{up}}/\\text{N}_{\\text{tot}}=0.882$. OCS was oriented in combined non-resonant laser and static electric fields inside a two-plate velocity map imaging spectrometer. The transition from non-adiabatic to adiabatic orientation for the rotational ground state was studied by varying the applied laser and static electric field. Above static electric field strengths of 10~kV/cm and laser intensities of $10^{11} \\text{W/cm}^2$ the observed degree of orientation reached a plateau. These results are in good agreement with computational solutions of the time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation.

  5. Using resonance Raman cross-section data to estimate the spin state populations of Cytochromes P450.

    Mak, Piotr J; Zhu, Qianhong; Kincaid, James R

    2013-12-01

    The cytochromes P450 (CYPs) are heme proteins responsible for the oxidation of xenobiotics and pharmaceuticals and the biosynthesis of essential steroid products. In all cases, substrate binding initiates the enzymatic cycle, converting ferric low spin (LS) to high-spin (HS), with the efficiency of the conversion varying widely for different substrates, so documentation of this conversion for a given substrate is an important objective. Resonance Raman (rR) spectroscopy can effectively yield distinctive frequencies for the ν3 "spin state marker" bands. Here, employing a reference cytochrome P450 (CYP101), the intensities of the ν3 modes (ILS) and (IHS) relative to an internal standard (sodium sulfate) yield relative populations for the two spin states; i.e., a value of 1.24 was determined for the ratio of the relative cross sections for the ν3 modes. Use of this value was then shown to permit a reliable calculation of relative populations of the two spin states from rR spectra of several other Cytochromes P450. The importance of this work is that, using this information, it is now possible to conveniently document by rR the spin state population without conducting separate experiments requiring different analytical methods, instrumentation and additional sample. PMID:24443630

  6. First Cross-Correlation Analysis of Interferometric and Resonant-Bar Gravitational-Wave Data for Stochastic Backgrounds

    Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Agresti, J; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arain, M; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Aston, S; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Ballmer, S; Bantilan, H; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Belczynski, K; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bogenstahl, J; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brooks, A; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burgamy, M; Burmeister, O; Busby, D; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cantley, C A; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Casey, M M; Castaldi, G; Cepeda, C; Chalkey, E; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chiadini, F; Chin, D; Chin, E; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Clark, J; Cochrane, P; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coward, D; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Croce, R P; Crooks, D R M; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Dalrymple, J; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; De Bra, D; Degallaix, J; Degree, M; Demma, T; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Díaz, M; Dickson, J; Di Credico, A; Diederichs, G; Dietz, A; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Dumas, J C; Dupuis, R J; Dwyer, J G; Ehrens, P; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Fiumara, V; Fotopoulos, N; Franzen, A; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Galdi, V; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L; González, G; Gossler, S; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, J; Gretarsson, A M; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hamilton, W O; Hammer, D; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G; Harstad, E; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Howell, E; Hoyland, D; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D; Innerhofer, E; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jackrel, D; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, Peter Ignaz Paul; Kalogera, V; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalili, F Ya; Kim, C; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R K; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lee, B; Lei, M; Leiner, J; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Lockerbie, N A; Longo, M; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Marano, S; Marka, S; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Martin, I; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matone, L; Matta, V; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McKenzie, K; McNabb, J W C; McWilliams, S; Meier, T; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Mikhailov, E; Miller, P; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Mohanty, S; Moody, V; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mow Lowry, C; Moylan, A; Mudge, D; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Muller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Nettles, D; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Numata, K; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Paik, H J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pierro, V; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H; Plissi, M V; Postiglione, F; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Rabeling, D; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ribichini, L; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rodríguez, A; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Route, R; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Samidi, M; Sancho de la Jordana, L; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Schediwy, S; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Sidles, J A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Somiya, K; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Takahashi, H; Tanner, D B; Tarallo, M; Taylor, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thüring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Ungarelli, C; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vallisneri, M; Van Den Broeck, C; Varvella, M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P; Villar, A; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Waldman, S J; Wallace, L; Ward, H; Ward, R; Watts, K; Weaver, J; Webber, D; Weber, A; Weidner, A; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Wen, S; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitbeck, D M; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, L; Willke, B; Wilmut, I; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Woods, D; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Wu, W; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yan, Z; Yoshida, S; Yunes, N; Zanolin, M; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhang, P; Zhao, C; Zotov, N; Zucker, M; zur Muhlen, H; Zweizig, J; al, et

    2007-01-01

    Data from the LIGO Livingston interferometer and the ALLEGRO resonant bar detector, taken during LIGO's fourth science run, were examined for cross-correlations indicative of a stochastic gravitational-wave background in the frequency range 850-950 Hz, with most of the sensitivity arising between 905 Hz and 925 Hz. ALLEGRO was operated in three different orientations during the experiment to modulate the relative sign of gravitational-wave and environmental correlations. No statistically significant correlations were seen in any of the orientations, and the results were used to set a Bayesian 90% confidence level upper limit of Omega_gw(f) <= 1.02, which corresponds to a gravitational wave strain at 915 Hz of 1.5e-23/rHz. In the traditional units of h_100^2 Omega_gw(f), this is a limit of 0.53, two orders of magnitude better than the previous direct limit at these frequencies. The method was also validated with successful extraction of simulated signals injected in hardware and software.

  7. Adiabatically switched-on electrical bias and the Landauer-Buttiker formula

    Cornean, Horia; Duclos, P.; Nenciu, G.;

    2008-01-01

    Consider a three dimensional system which looks like a cross connected pipe system, i.e., a small sample coupled to a finite number of leads. We investigate the current running through this system, in the linear response regime, when we adiabatically turn on an electrical bias between leads. The ...... formula....

  8. Theoretical vibrational-excitation cross sections and rate coefficients for electron-impact resonant collisions involving rovibrationally excited N2 and NO molecules

    Laporta, V; Wadehra, J M

    2012-01-01

    Electron-impact vi->vf vibrational excitations cross sections, involving rovibrationally excited N_{2}(v_{i}, J) and NO(v_{i}, J) molecules (fixed J), are calculated for collisions occurring through the nitrogen resonant electronic state N_{2}^{-} (X ^{2}\\Pi_{g}), and the three resonant states of nitric oxide NO^{-}(^{3}\\Sigma^{-},^{1} \\Delta,^{1} \\Sigma^{+}). Complete sets of cross sections have been obtained for all possible transitions involving 68 vibrational levels of N2(X ^{1}\\Sigma^{+}_{g}) and 55 levels of NO(X ^{2}\\Pi), for the incident electron energy between 0.1 and 10 eV. In order to study the rotational motion in the resonant processes, cross sections have been also computed for rotationally elastic transitions characterized by the rotational quantum number J running from 0 through 150. The calculations are performed within the framework of the local complex potential model, by using potentials energies and widths optimized in order to reproduce the experimental cross sections available in litera...

  9. Resonances in rotationally inelastic scattering of NH{sub 3} and ND{sub 3} with H{sub 2}

    Ma, Qianli; Dagdigian, Paul J., E-mail: pjdagdigian@jhu.edu [Department of Chemistry, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218-2685 (United States); Avoird, Ad van der, E-mail: A.vanderAvoird@theochem.ru.nl; Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T. van de [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Loreau, Jérôme [Service de Chimie Quantique et Photophysique C. P. 160/09, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), 50 Ave. F. D. Roosevelt, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Alexander, Millard H., E-mail: mha@umd.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-2021 (United States)

    2015-07-28

    We present theoretical studies on the scattering resonances in rotationally inelastic collisions of NH{sub 3} and ND{sub 3} molecules with H{sub 2} molecules. We use the quantum close-coupling method to compute state-to-state integral and differential cross sections for the NH{sub 3}/ND{sub 3}–H{sub 2} system for collision energies between 5 and 70 cm{sup −1}, using a previously reported potential energy surface [Maret et al., Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 399, 425 (2009)]. We identify the resonances as shape or Feshbach resonances. To analyze these, we use an adiabatic bender model, as well as examination at the scattering wave functions and lifetimes. The strength and width of the resonance peaks suggest that they could be observed in a crossed molecular beam experiment involving a Stark-decelerated NH{sub 3} beam.

  10. Exploring adiabatic quantum trajectories via optimal control

    Adiabatic quantum computation employs a slow change of a time-dependent control function (or functions) to interpolate between an initial and final Hamiltonian, which helps to keep the system in the instantaneous ground state. When the evolution time is finite, the degree of adiabaticity (quantified in this work as the average ground-state population during evolution) depends on the particulars of a dynamic trajectory associated with a given set of control functions. We use quantum optimal control theory with a composite objective functional to numerically search for controls that achieve the target final state with a high fidelity while simultaneously maximizing the degree of adiabaticity. Exploring the properties of optimal adiabatic trajectories in model systems elucidates the dynamic mechanisms that suppress unwanted excitations from the ground state. Specifically, we discover that the use of multiple control functions makes it possible to access a rich set of dynamic trajectories, some of which attain a significantly improved performance (in terms of both fidelity and adiabaticity) through the increase of the energy gap during most of the evolution time. (paper)

  11. Adiabatic cooling of a single trapped ion

    Poulsen, Gregers

    2012-01-01

    We present experimental results on adiabatic cooling of a single 40Ca+ ion in a linear radiofrequency trap. After a period of laser cooling, the secular frequency along the rf-field-free axis is adiabatically lowered by nearly a factor of eight from 583 kHz to 75 kHz. For an ion originally Doppler laser cooled to a temperature of 0.65 +/- 0.03 mK, a temperature of 87 +/- 7 \\mu K is measured after the adiabatic expansion. Applying the same adiabatic cooling procedure to a single sideband cooled ion in the ground state (P0 = 0.978 +/- 0.002) resulted in a final ground state occupation of 0.947 +/- 0.005. Both results are in excellent agreement with an essentially fully adiabatic behavior. The results have a wide range of perspectives within such diverse fields as ion based quantum information science, high resolution molecular ion spectroscopy and ion chemistry at ultra-low temperatures.

  12. Symmetry-Protected Quantum Adiabatic Transistors

    Williamson, Dominic J.; Bartlett, Stephen D.

    2014-03-01

    An essential development in the history of computing was the invention of the transistor as it allowed logic circuits to be implemented in a robust and modular way. The physical characteristics of semiconductor materials were the key to building these devices. We aim to present an analogous development for quantum computing by showing that quantum adiabatic transistors (as defined by Flammia et al.) are built upon the essential qualities of symmetry-protected (SP) quantum ordered phases in one dimension. Flammia et al. and Renes et al. have demonstrated schemes for universal adiabatic quantum computation using quantum adiabatic transistors described by interacting spin chain models with specifically chosen Hamiltonian terms. We show that these models can be understood as specific examples of the generic situation in which all SP phases lead to quantum computation on encoded edge degrees of freedom by adiabatically traversing a symmetric phase transition into a trivial symmetric phase. This point of view is advantageous as it allows us to readily see that the computational properties of a quantum adiabatic transistor arise from a phase of matter rather than due to carefully tuned interactions.

  13. Accurate adiabatic correction in the hydrogen molecule

    Pachucki, Krzysztof, E-mail: krp@fuw.edu.pl [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 5, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Komasa, Jacek, E-mail: komasa@man.poznan.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89b, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2014-12-14

    A new formalism for the accurate treatment of adiabatic effects in the hydrogen molecule is presented, in which the electronic wave function is expanded in the James-Coolidge basis functions. Systematic increase in the size of the basis set permits estimation of the accuracy. Numerical results for the adiabatic correction to the Born-Oppenheimer interaction energy reveal a relative precision of 10{sup −12} at an arbitrary internuclear distance. Such calculations have been performed for 88 internuclear distances in the range of 0 < R ⩽ 12 bohrs to construct the adiabatic correction potential and to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Finally, the adiabatic correction to the dissociation energies of all rovibrational levels in H{sub 2}, HD, HT, D{sub 2}, DT, and T{sub 2} has been determined. For the ground state of H{sub 2} the estimated precision is 3 × 10{sup −7} cm{sup −1}, which is almost three orders of magnitude higher than that of the best previous result. The achieved accuracy removes the adiabatic contribution from the overall error budget of the present day theoretical predictions for the rovibrational levels.

  14. Adiabatic process reversibility: microscopic and macroscopic views

    The reversibility of adiabatic processes was recently addressed by two publications. In the first (Miranda 2008 Eur. J. Phys. 29 937-43), an equation was derived relating the initial and final volumes and temperatures for adiabatic expansions of an ideal gas, using a microscopic approach. In that relation the parameter r accounts for the process reversibility, ranging between 0 and 1, which corresponds to the free and reversible expansion, respectively. In the second (Anacleto and Pereira 2009 Eur. J. Phys. 30 177-83), the authors have shown that thermodynamics can effectively and efficiently be used to obtain the general law for adiabatic processes carried out by an ideal gas, including compressions, for which r≥1. The present work integrates and extends the aforementioned studies, providing thus further insights into the analysis of the adiabatic process. It is shown that Miranda's work is wholly valid for compressions. In addition, it is demonstrated that the adiabatic reversibility coefficient given in terms of the piston velocity and the root mean square velocity of the gas particles is equivalent to the macroscopic description, given just by the quotient between surroundings and system pressure values. (letters and comments)

  15. Adiabatic change of state of photon gas

    The authors introduced and justified the k problem as a thermodynamical contradiction of photon gas. In thermodynamics of photon gas the main contradiction is called the k problem: the piezotropic-autobarotropic equation of state P = u/3 is adiabatic if k = 1 exclusively, while the adiabatic connection PV4/3 = const (or rather the Poisson equation Pρ-4/3 = const, ρ = u/c2) requires that k = 4/3. The present paper shows that the equations of state PV4/3 = const, TV1/3 = const, T-4/3P1/3 = const and P = u/3 cannot be valid for the adiabatic change of state of photon gas, simultaneously. Furthermore, the Planck's distribution -- and so the Wien's law and the Rayleigh-Jeans connection as well -- cannot be invariant in case of adiabatic change of state of photon gas. Namely, in case of adiabatic change of state of photon gas, a new type of ultraviolet catastrophe appears. These results possess a fundamental important in case of arbitrary deformation of electromagnetic radiation fields or quantum plasmas

  16. Energy efficiency of adiabatic superconductor logic

    Adiabatic superconductor logic (ASL), including adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron (AQFP) logic, exhibits high energy efficiency because its bit energy can be decreased below the thermal energy through adiabatic switching operations. In the present paper, we present the general scaling laws of ASL and compare the energy efficiency of ASL with those of other energy-efficient logics. Also, we discuss the minimum energy-delay product (EDP) of ASL at finite temperature. Our study shows that there is a maximum temperature at which the EDP can reach the quantum limit given by ħ/2, which is dependent on the superconductor material and the Josephson junction quality, and that it is reasonable to operate ASL at cryogenic temperatures in order to achieve an EDP that approaches ħ/2. (paper)

  17. Experimental study on the adiabatic shear bands

    Four martensitic steels (Z50CDV5 steel, 28CND8 steel, 35NCDV16 steel and 4340 steel) with different hardness between 190 and 600 Hsub(B) (Brinell hardness), have been studied by means of dynamic compressive tests on split Hopkinson pressure bar. Microscopic observations show that the fracture are associated to the development of adiabatic shear bands (except 4340 steel with 190 Hsub(B) hardness). By means of tests for which the deformation is stopped at predetermined levels, the measurement of shear and hardness inside the band and the matrix indicates the chronology of this phenomenon: first the localization of shear, followed by the formation of adiabatic shear band and ultimatly crack initiation and propagation. These results correlated with few simulations by finite elements have permitted to suggest two mecanisms of deformation leading to the formation of adiabatic shear bands in this specific test

  18. Cross-section and asymmetry-parameter calculations for the outer- and inner-valence photoionization of ethane

    We have computed cross sections and asymmetry parameters for the outer- and inner-valence photoionization of ethane using the Schwinger variational method with Pade corrections. The calculated total cross section is found to be in rather good agreement with the available electron-impact and photoabsorption measurements. One-electron resonant processes in the (1eg)-1 (3a1g)-1, and (2a1g)-1 ionization channels were examined comparing resonant states predicted from the virtual orbitals of a minimum basis set self-consistent-field (MBS-SCF) calculations with scattering resonances found using a local model potential for the electron-molecule interaction. The analysis of the interaction potential in terms of adiabatic radial components provides a description of the mechanism of the resonant trapping

  19. Angle-integrated measurements of the {sup 26}Al(d, n){sup 27}Si reaction cross section: a probe of spectroscopic factors and astrophysical resonance strengths

    Kankainen, A.; Woods, P.J.; Doherty, D.T.; Estrade, A.; Lotay, G. [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Nunes, F.; Schatz, H.; Brown, B.A.; Browne, J.; Meisel, Z.; Zegers, R. [Michigan State University, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Michigan State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Lansing, MI (United States); Michigan State University, JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements, East Lansing, MI (United States); Langer, C.; Montes, F.; Pereira, J.; Stevens, J. [Michigan State University, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Michigan State University, JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements, East Lansing, MI (United States); Bader, V.; Gade, A.; Stroberg, R.; Scott, M. [Michigan State University, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Michigan State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Lansing, MI (United States); Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Kontos, A.; Noji, S.; Recchia, F.; Weisshaar, D. [Michigan State University, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Perdikakis, G. [Michigan State University, JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements, East Lansing, MI (United States); Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI (United States); Redpath, T.; Wimmer, K. [Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI (United States); Seweryniak, D. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Measurements of angle-integrated cross sections to discrete states in {sup 27}Si have been performed studying the {sup 26}Al(d, n) reaction in inverse kinematics by tagging states by their characteristic γ-decays using the GRETINA array. Transfer reaction theory has been applied to derive spectroscopic factors for strong single-particle states below the proton threshold, and astrophysical resonances in the {sup 26}Al(p, γ){sup 27}Si reaction. Comparisons are made between predictions of the shell model and known characteristics of the resonances. Overall very good agreement is obtained, indicating this method can be used to make estimates of resonance strengths for key reactions currently largely unconstrained by experiment. (orig.)

  20. Angle-integrated measurements of the 26Al(d, n)27Si reaction cross section: a probe of spectroscopic factors and astrophysical resonance strengths

    Measurements of angle-integrated cross sections to discrete states in 27Si have been performed studying the 26Al(d, n) reaction in inverse kinematics by tagging states by their characteristic γ-decays using the GRETINA array. Transfer reaction theory has been applied to derive spectroscopic factors for strong single-particle states below the proton threshold, and astrophysical resonances in the 26Al(p, γ)27Si reaction. Comparisons are made between predictions of the shell model and known characteristics of the resonances. Overall very good agreement is obtained, indicating this method can be used to make estimates of resonance strengths for key reactions currently largely unconstrained by experiment. (orig.)

  1. Single-sided Nuclear Magnetic Resonance for condition monitoring of cross-linked polyethylene exposed to aggressive media

    Adams, A., E-mail: Alina.Adams@itmc.rwth-aachen.de [Institut für Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie, RWTH Aachen University, Templergraben 55, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Piechatzek, A.; Schmitt, G. [Institut für Instandhaltung und Korrosionsschutztechnik gGmbH, Kalkofen 4, 58638 Iserlohn (Germany); Siegmund, G. [ExxonMobil Production Germany, Riethorst 12, 30659 Hannover (Germany)

    2015-08-05

    The potential of single-sided Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to monitor truly non-invasive changes in polymer materials during aging under aggressive media is for the first time evaluated. For this, the NMR method is used in combination with other condition monitoring methods including mechanical measurements, mass uptake, and differential scanning calorimetry. It is validated by studying for the first time the aging kinetics of silane cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) exposed to media used in oil and gas production and transportation, including aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, sulphur solvents, and corrosion inhibitors in combination with CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S. All investigated parameters changed, with the strongest effects detected for the NMR chain mobility and in the presence of hydrocarbons. Furthermore, a universal linear correlation curve could be established between the depression of the tensile strength and the chain mobility. This result represents a fundamental step towards establishing single-sided NMR as a new analytical tool for in situ condition monitoring of polyethylene working under sour conditions. The proposed approach can be easily extended to other polymer materials. - Highlights: • The changes in PEX exposed to sour media were quantified for the first time. • The strongest morphological changes in PEX were detected under exposure to hydrocarbon media. • The chain mobility measured truly non-destructively by single-sided NMR showed the highest sensitivity to the aging process. • A universal linear correlation curve was found between the chain mobility and the tensile strength. • Single-sided NMR was validated as a condition monitoring tool.

  2. Single-sided Nuclear Magnetic Resonance for condition monitoring of cross-linked polyethylene exposed to aggressive media

    The potential of single-sided Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to monitor truly non-invasive changes in polymer materials during aging under aggressive media is for the first time evaluated. For this, the NMR method is used in combination with other condition monitoring methods including mechanical measurements, mass uptake, and differential scanning calorimetry. It is validated by studying for the first time the aging kinetics of silane cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) exposed to media used in oil and gas production and transportation, including aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, sulphur solvents, and corrosion inhibitors in combination with CO2 and H2S. All investigated parameters changed, with the strongest effects detected for the NMR chain mobility and in the presence of hydrocarbons. Furthermore, a universal linear correlation curve could be established between the depression of the tensile strength and the chain mobility. This result represents a fundamental step towards establishing single-sided NMR as a new analytical tool for in situ condition monitoring of polyethylene working under sour conditions. The proposed approach can be easily extended to other polymer materials. - Highlights: • The changes in PEX exposed to sour media were quantified for the first time. • The strongest morphological changes in PEX were detected under exposure to hydrocarbon media. • The chain mobility measured truly non-destructively by single-sided NMR showed the highest sensitivity to the aging process. • A universal linear correlation curve was found between the chain mobility and the tensile strength. • Single-sided NMR was validated as a condition monitoring tool

  3. Staying adiabatic with unknown energy gap

    Nehrkorn, J; Ekert, A; Smerzi, A; Fazio, R; Calarco, T

    2011-01-01

    We introduce an algorithm to perform an optimal adiabatic evolution that operates without an apriori knowledge of the system spectrum. By probing the system gap locally, the algorithm maximizes the evolution speed, thus minimizing the total evolution time. We test the algorithm on the Landau-Zener transition and then apply it on the quantum adiabatic computation of 3-SAT: The result is compatible with an exponential speed-up for up to twenty qubits with respect to classical algorithms. We finally study a possible algorithm improvement by combining it with the quantum Zeno effect.

  4. Ramsey numbers and adiabatic quantum computing

    Gaitan, Frank; Clark, Lane

    2011-01-01

    The graph-theoretic Ramsey numbers are notoriously difficult to calculate. In fact, for the two-color Ramsey numbers $R(m,n)$ with $m,n\\geq 3$, only nine are currently known. We present a quantum algorithm for the computation of the Ramsey numbers $R(m,n)$. We show how the computation of $R(m,n)$ can be mapped to a combinatorial optimization problem whose solution can be found using adiabatic quantum evolution. We numerically simulate this adiabatic quantum algorithm and show that it correctl...

  5. Superconducting system for adiabatic quantum computing

    We study the Hamiltonian of a system of inductively coupled flux qubits, which has been theoretically proposed for adiabatic quantum computation to handle NP problems. We study the evolution of a basic structure consisting of three coupled rf-SQUIDs upon tuning the external flux bias, and we show that the adiabatic nature of the evolution is guaranteed by the presence of the single-SQUID gap. We further propose a scheme and the first realization of an experimental device suitable for verifying the theoretical results

  6. On black hole spectroscopy via adiabatic invariance

    Jiang Qingquan, E-mail: qqjiangphys@yeah.net [College of Physics and Electronic Information, China West Normal University, Nanchong, Sichuan 637002 (China); Han Yan [College of Mathematic and Information, China West Normal University, Nanchong, Sichuan 637002 (China)

    2012-12-05

    In this Letter, we obtain the black hole spectroscopy by combining the black hole property of adiabaticity and the oscillating velocity of the black hole horizon. This velocity is obtained in the tunneling framework. In particular, we declare, if requiring canonical invariance, the adiabatic invariant quantity should be of the covariant form I{sub adia}= Contour-Integral p{sub i}dq{sub i}. Using it, the horizon area of a Schwarzschild black hole is quantized independently of the choice of coordinates, with an equally spaced spectroscopy always given by {Delta}A=8{pi}l{sub p}{sup 2} in the Schwarzschild and Painleve coordinates.

  7. Complexity of the Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm

    Hen, Itay

    2013-01-01

    The Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm (QAA) has been proposed as a mechanism for efficiently solving optimization problems on a quantum computer. Since adiabatic computation is analog in nature and does not require the design and use of quantum gates, it can be thought of as a simpler and perhaps more profound method for performing quantum computations that might also be easier to implement experimentally. While these features have generated substantial research in QAA, to date there is still a lack of solid evidence that the algorithm can outperform classical optimization algorithms.

  8. Adiabatic Flame Temperature for Combustion of Methane

    Rebeca Pupo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This project calculated the adiabatic flame temperature of a combustion reaction of pure methane and oxygen, assuming that all of the heat liberated by the combustion reaction goes into heating the resulting mixture. Mole fractions of methane to oxygen were computed from 0.05 to 0.95, in increments of 0.05, and then an integral was computed was computed with respect to temperature using the moles of product produced or leftover moles of reactants from the starting mole fraction times the specific heat of each respective gas. The highest adiabatic flame temperature evaluated, occurred at a mole fraction of 0.35.

  9. An adiabatic apparatus to establish the spontaneous combustion propensity of coal

    Gouws, M.J.; Gibbon, G.J.; Wade, L.; Phillips, H.R. (University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa))

    1991-12-01

    An adiabatic calorimeter has been designed to enable the spontaneous combustion propensity of coal to be established. The experiment was designed to run unattended, with a personal computer being used for measurement and control functions. All measurements are stored on a data diskette while the experiment is in progress. The calorimeter was designed to be run in both a rising temperature mode and an incubation mode. Various indicators of self-heating potential, such as total temperature rise, initial rate of heating, minimum self-heating temperature, and kinetic constants can be investigated. Results obtained from the adiabatic tests will be compared with the results of crossing-point temperature determinations and differential thermal analysis (DTA) tests for the same coals, with a view to formulating a mathematically consistent spontaneous combustion liability index. This paper describes the major components of the adiabatic calorimeter. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Charge exchange transition probability for collisions between unlike ions and atoms within the adiabatic approximation

    Xu, Y. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, John W.

    1989-01-01

    A simple formula for the transition probability for electron exchange between unlike ions and atoms is established within the adiabatic approximation by employing the Linear Combination of Atomic Orbitals (LCAO) method. The formula also involves an adiabatic parameter, introduced by Massey, and thus the difficulties arising from the internal energy defect and the adiabatic approximation are avoided. Specific reactions Li(+++) + H to Li(++) + H(+) and Be(4+) + H to Be(3+) + H(+) are considered as examples. The calculated capture cross section results of the present work are compared with the experimental data and with the calculation of other authors over the velocity range of 10(7) cm/sec to 10(8) cm/sec.

  11. Non-adiabatic dynamics in 10Be with the microscopic alpha+alpha+n+n model

    Ito, M

    2006-01-01

    The alpha+6He low-energy reactions and the structural changes of 10Be in the microscopic alpha+alpha+n+n model are studied by the generalized two-center cluster model with the Kohn-Hulthen-Kato variation method. It is found that, in the inelastic scattering to the alpha+6He(2+) channel, characteristic enhancements are expected as the results of the parity-dependent non-adiabatic dynamics. In the positive parity state, the enhancement originates from the no-adiabatic eigenstate generated by the radial excitation of the relative motion between two alpha-cores. On the other hand, the enhancement in the negative parity state is induced by the Landau-Zener level-crossing. These non-adiabatic processes are discussed in connection to the formation of the inversion doublet in the compound system of 10Be.

  12. Selective excitation in a three-state system using a hybrid adiabatic-nonadiabatic interaction

    Song, Yunheung; Jo, Hanlae; Ahn, Jaewook

    2016-01-01

    The chirped-pulse interaction in the adiabatic coupling regime induces cyclic permutations of the energy states of a three-level system in the $V$-type configuration, which process is known as the three-level chirped rapid adiabatic passage. Here we show that a spectral hole in a chirped pulse can turn on and off one of the two adiabatic crossing points of this process, reducing the system to an effective two-level system. The given hybrid adiabatic-nonadiabatic transition results in selective excitation of the three-level system, controlled by the laser intensity and spectral position of the hole as well as the sign of the chirp parameter. Experiments are performed with shaped femtosecond laser pulses and the three lowest energy-levels (5S$_{1/2}$, 5P$_{1/2}$, and 5P$_{3/2}$) of atomic rubidium ($^{85}$Rb), of which the result shows good agreement with the theoretically analyzed dynamics. The result indicates that our method, being combined with the ordinary chirped-RAP, implements an adiabatic transitions b...

  13. Controlled Rapid Adiabatic Passage in a V-Type System

    Song, Yunheung; Lee, Han-Gyeol; Jo, Hanlae; Ahn, Jaewook

    2016-05-01

    In chirped rapid adiabatic passage (RAP), chirp sign determines the final state to which the complete population transfer (CPT) occurs in a three-level V-type system. In this study, we show that laser intensity can be alternatively used as a control means in RAP, when the laser pulse is chirped and of a spectral hole resonant to one of the excited states. We verified such excitation selectivity in the experiment performed as-shaped femtosecond laser pulses interacting with the lowest three levels (5S, 5 P1/2, and 5 P3/2) of atomic rubidium. The successful demonstration implies that this intensity-dependent RAP in conjunction with laser beam profile programming may allow excitation selectivity for atoms or ions arranged in space.

  14. On the double adiabatic continuous spectrum

    In earlier work it has been found that the Alfven and cusp (or slow) continuous spectra can become unstable in toroidal geometry, as judged from the linearized double adiabatic equations. In this paper the validity of fluid approaches to the present problem is investigated. The physical implications of the stability conditions are discussed. (Author)

  15. Pulsed adiabatic structure and complete population transfer

    Population can be transferred between atomic or molecular energy states in a variety of ways. The basic idea of adiabatic transfer, discussed in many textbooks, is as follows. One begins with an atom that is in some single energy state (an eigenstate of an initial Hamiltonian). This energy state is one of many possible states, known variously as the unperturbed states or basis states or diabatic states. Next one begins to change the Hamiltonian very slowly. The changes may occur in either the diagonal elements (the basis state energies) or in the off-diagonal elements (interactions between basis states). If there are off-diagonal elements then the Hamiltonian will no longer commute with the original one. Because the Hamiltonian is no longer the one that was used to define the original basis states, it will cause these states to become mixed. However, if the change is sufficiently slow, the system can remain in a single eigenstate of the changing Hamiltonian -- an adiabatic state, composed of a combination of basis states. Finally, at some later time, one examines the system once again in the original basis. One finds that the population has undergone a change, and now resides in a different unperturbed state. One has produced population transfer. There are many illustrative examples of adiabatic passage, both theory and experiment. The author mentions briefly two common examples, inelastic collisions between atoms, and the static Stark effect in Rydberg atoms, before continuing with the main objective, a discussion of adiabatic passage induced by laser pulses

  16. Adiabatic reversible compression: a molecular view

    The adiabatic compression (or expansion) of an ideal gas has been analysed. Using the kinetic theory of gases the usual relation between temperature and volume is obtained, while textbooks follow a thermodynamic approach. In this way we show, once again, the agreement between a macroscopic view (thermodynamics) and a microscopic one (kinetic theory). (author)

  17. Recent adiabaticity results from orbit calculations

    There has been much activity recently in an attempt to find a straightforward method of predicting the limits of adiabatic behavior in high-beta magnetic-mirror configurations. The particle-orbit code TIBRO was used to obtain numerical results on nonadiabatic behavior with which the predictions of theoretical expressions can be compared. These results are summarized. (MOW)

  18. Adiabatic Excitation of Longitudinal Bunch Shape Oscillations

    By modulating the rf voltage at near twice the synchrotrons frequency we are able to modulate the longitudinal bunch shape. We show experimentally that this can be done while preserving the longitudinal emittance when the rf voltage modulation is turned on adiabatically. Experimental measurements will be presented along with theoretical predictions

  19. Communication: Adiabatic and non-adiabatic electron-nuclear motion: Quantum and classical dynamics

    Albert, Julian; Kaiser, Dustin; Engel, Volker

    2016-05-01

    Using a model for coupled electronic-nuclear motion we investigate the range from negligible to strong non-adiabatic coupling. In the adiabatic case, the quantum dynamics proceeds in a single electronic state, whereas for strong coupling a complete transition between two adiabatic electronic states takes place. It is shown that in all coupling regimes the short-time wave-packet dynamics can be described using ensembles of classical trajectories in the phase space spanned by electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom. We thus provide an example which documents that the quantum concept of non-adiabatic transitions is not necessarily needed if electronic and nuclear motion is treated on the same footing.

  20. The dynamic instability of adiabatic blast waves

    Ryu, Dongsu; Vishniac, Ethan T.

    1991-01-01

    Adiabatic blastwaves, which have a total energy injected from the center E varies as t(sup q) and propagate through a preshock medium with a density rho(sub E) varies as r(sup -omega) are described by a family of similarity solutions. Previous work has shown that adiabatic blastwaves with increasing or constant postshock entropy behind the shock front are susceptible to an oscillatory instability, caused by the difference between the nature of the forces on the two sides of the dense shell behind the shock front. This instability sets in if the dense postshock layer is sufficiently thin. The stability of adiabatic blastwaves with a decreasing postshock entropy is considered. Such blastwaves, if they are decelerating, always have a region behind the shock front which is subject to convection. Some accelerating blastwaves also have such region, depending on the values of q, omega, and gamma where gamma is the adiabatic index. However, since the shock interface stabilizes dynamically induced perturbations, blastwaves become convectively unstable only if the convective zone is localized around the origin or a contact discontinuity far from the shock front. On the other hand, the contact discontinuity of accelerating blastwaves is subject to a strong Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The frequency spectra of the nonradial, normal modes of adiabatic blastwaves have been calculated. The results have been applied to the shocks propagating through supernovae envelopes. It is shown that the metal/He and He/H interfaces are strongly unstable against the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. This instability will induce mixing in supernovae envelopes. In addition the implications of this work for the evolution of planetary nebulae is discussed.

  1. Inverse engineering rigorous adiabatic Hamiltonian for non-Hermitian system

    Wu, Qi-Cheng; Chen, Ye-Hong; Huang, Bi-Hua; Xia, Yan; Song, Jie

    2016-01-01

    We generalize the quantum adiabatic theorem to the non-Hermitian system and build a rigorous adiabaticity condition with respect to the adiabatic phase. The non-Hermitian Hamiltonian inverse engineering method is proposed for the purpose to adiabatically drive a artificial quantum state. For the sake of clearness, we take a concrete two-level system as an example to show the usefulness of the inverse engineering method. The numerical simulation result shows that our scheme can work well even ...

  2. Perturbation to Mei symmetry and adiabatic invariants for Hamilton systems

    Ding Ning; Fang Jian-Hui

    2008-01-01

    Based on the concept of adiabatic invariant,this paper studies the perturbation to Mei symmetry and adiabatic invariants for Hamilton systems.The exact invaxiants of Mei symmetry for the system without perturbation are given.The perturbation to Mei symmetry is discussed and the adiabatic invariants induced from the perturbation to Mei symmetry of the system are obtained.

  3. X-ray absorption and resonant Auger spectroscopy of O2 in the vicinity of the O 1s→σ* resonance: Experiment and theory

    We report on an experimental and theoretical investigation of x-ray absorption and resonant Auger electron spectra of gas phase O2 recorded in the vicinity of the O 1s→σ* excitation region. Our investigation shows that core excitation takes place in a region with multiple crossings of potential energy curves of the excited states. We find a complete breakdown of the diabatic picture for this part of the x-ray absorption spectrum, which allows us to assign an hitherto unexplained fine structure in this spectral region. The experimental Auger data reveal an extended vibrational progression, for the outermost singly ionized X 2Πg final state, which exhibits strong changes in spectral shape within a short range of photon energy detuning (0 eV>Ω>-0.7 eV). To explain the experimental resonant Auger electron spectra, we use a mixed adiabatic/diabatic picture selecting crossing points according to the strength of the electronic coupling. Reasonable agreement is found between experiment and theory even though the nonadiabatic couplings are neglected. The resonant Auger electron scattering, which is essentially due to decay from dissociative core-excited states, is accompanied by strong lifetime-vibrational and intermediate electronic state interferences as well as an interference with the direct photoionization channel. The overall agreement between the experimental Auger spectra and the calculated spectra supports the mixed diabatic/adiabatic picture

  4. Multilevel analysis of the 233U and 235U capture and fission cross-sections and statistical properties of the Kapur-Peierls-type resonance parameters for the S-wave cross-sections of the fissile isotopes

    At the 1966 Conference on Nuclear Data for Reactors, simultaneous measurements of the capture and fission cross-sections of 233U and 235U were presented. Those measurements have now been analysed with the multilevel formalism developed by Adler and Adler. To obtain consistent sets of resonance parameters the capture and fission data were least-square fitted simultaneously. This analysis was carried out to 60 eV for 233U and to 100 eV for 235U. The main purpose of this analysis was to provide a simple and precise analytical description of the very complex structure of the fission and capture cross-sections of 233U and 235U at low energy. Such an analytical description should be useful to calculate reaction rates in nuclear reactors and to compare experimental data taken with different energy resolutions or at different sample temperatures. For the low-energy resonances of 233U and 235U, the neutron width is always smaller, by at least two orders of magnitude, than the total width. Thus, the total cross-section, for those isotopes, can be approximated as the sum of the absorption cross-section and the potential scattering cross-section. Hence it is possible to compute the total cross-section from the resonance parameters obtained by fitting the fission and capture cross-sections. The total cross-section of 235U computed by this method is compared to the data from a transmission measurement done at Saclay, with the sample at 77 deg. K. The computed total cross-section of 233U is compared with transmission data obtained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and at the Material Testing Reactor. Such comparisons between data obtained by different experimental techniques illustrate the internal consistency of the low-energy cross-sections of the two main uranium fissile isotopes. The physical interpretation of the resonance parameters is somewhat ambiguous, because such multilevel fits are by no means unique. This is particularly true for 233U since, for this nucleus, the

  5. Population transfer of a NaH molecule via stimulated Raman adiabatic passage

    Zai, Jing-Bo; Zhan, Wei-Shen; Wang, Shuo; Dang, Hai-Ping; Han, Xiao

    2016-09-01

    The population transfer of a NaH molecule from the ground state {{X}1}{Σ+} to the target state {{A}1}{Σ+} via stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) is investigated. The results show that the intensity, delay time and detuning have a significant effect on population transfer. A large population transfer is observed with increased pump and Stokes intensity, especially when the pump and Stokes intensity match. Population transfer also depends on the delay time between the pump laser pulse and the Stokes laser pulse. The detuning of the two pulses influences the population transfer. Efficient population transfer can be realized under the resonant or two-photon resonant condition.

  6. On the power of coherently controlled quantum adiabatic evolutions

    We provide a new approach to adiabatic state preparation that uses coherent control and measurement to average different adiabatic evolutions in ways that cause their diabatic errors to cancel, allowing highly accurate state preparations using less time than conventional approaches. We show that this new model for adiabatic state preparation is polynomially equivalent to conventional adiabatic quantum computation by providing upper bounds on the cost of simulating such evolutions on a circuit-based quantum computer. Finally, we show that this approach is robust to small errors in the quantum control register and that the system remains protected against noise on the adiabatic register by the spectral gap. (paper)

  7. The role of adiabaticity in alkali atom-fine structure mixing

    Eshel, Ben; Weeks, David E.; Perram, Glen P.

    2014-02-01

    Fine-structure mixing cross-sections for the alkalis in collisions with the rare gases are reviewed. Included in the review are all the rare gases in collisions with all of the first excited state of the alkalis, the second excited state for K, Rb and Cs and the third excited state for Rb and Cs. The cross-sections are converted to probabilities for energy transfer using a quantum-defect calculated cross-section and are then presented as a function of adiabaticity. The data shows a clear decreasing trend with adiabaticity but secondary factors prevent the probabilities from decreasing as quickly as expected. Polarizability is introduced as a proxy for the secondary influences on the data as it increases with both rare gas partner and alkali excited state. The polarizability is shown to cause the probability of fine structure transition to be higher than expected. An empirical model is introduced and fit to the data. Future work will develop a model using time-independent perturbation theory in order to further develop a physical rational for the dependence of fine structure cross sections on adiabaticity and to further understand the secondary influences on the probability for fine structure transition.

  8. Weinberg Soft Theorems from Weinberg Adiabatic Modes

    Mirbabayi, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    Soft theorems for the scattering of low energy photons and gravitons and cosmological consistency conditions on the squeezed-limit correlation functions are both understood to be consequences of invariance under large gauge transformations. We apply the same method used in cosmology -- based on the identification of an infinite set of "adiabatic modes" and the corresponding conserved currents -- to derive flat space soft theorems for electrodynamics and gravity. We discuss how the recent derivations based on the asymptotic symmetry groups (BMS) can be continued to a finite size sphere surrounding the scattering event, when the soft photon or graviton has a finite momentum. We give a finite distance derivation of the antipodal matching condition previously imposed between future and past null infinities, and explain why all but one radiative degrees of freedom decouple in the soft limit. In contrast to earlier works on BMS, we work with adiabatic modes which correspond to large gauge transformations that are $...

  9. Quantum adiabatic evolution with energy degeneracy levels

    Zhang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    A classical-kind phase-space formalism is developed to address the tiny intrinsic dynamical deviation from what is predicted by Wilczek-Zee theorem during quantum adiabatic evolution on degeneracy levels. In this formalism, the Hilbert space and the aggregate of degenerate eigenstates become the classical-kind phase space and a high-dimensional subspace in the phase space, respectively. Compared with the previous analogous study by a different method, the current result is qualitatively different in that the first-order deviation derived here is always perpendicular to the degeneracy subspace. A tripod-scheme Hamiltonian with two degenerate dark states is employed to illustrate the adiabatic deviation with degeneracy levels.

  10. Adiabatic Quantum Optimization for Associative Memory Recall

    Hadayat eSeddiqi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO. Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are stored in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.

  11. Adiabatic Quantum Simulation of Quantum Chemistry

    Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-10-01

    We show how to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm directly to the quantum computation of molecular properties. We describe a procedure to map electronic structure Hamiltonians to 2-body qubit Hamiltonians with a small set of physically realizable couplings. By combining the Bravyi-Kitaev construction to map fermions to qubits with perturbative gadgets to reduce the Hamiltonian to 2-body, we obtain precision requirements on the coupling strengths and a number of ancilla qubits that scale polynomially in the problem size. Hence our mapping is efficient. The required set of controllable interactions includes only two types of interaction beyond the Ising interactions required to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm to combinatorial optimization problems. Our mapping may also be of interest to chemists directly as it defines a dictionary from electronic structure to spin Hamiltonians with physical interactions.

  12. Robust Classification with Adiabatic Quantum Optimization

    Denchev, Vasil S.; Ding, Nan; Vishwanathan, S. V. N.; Neven, Hartmut

    2012-01-01

    We propose a non-convex training objective for robust binary classification of data sets in which label noise is present. The design is guided by the intention of solving the resulting problem by adiabatic quantum optimization. Two requirements are imposed by the engineering constraints of existing quantum hardware: training problems are formulated as quadratic unconstrained binary optimization; and model parameters are represented as binary expansions of low bit-depth. In the present work we...

  13. Adiabatic graph-state quantum computation

    Measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC) and holonomic quantum computation (HQC) are two very different computational methods. The computation in MBQC is driven by adaptive measurements executed in a particular order on a large entangled state. In contrast in HQC the system starts in the ground subspace of a Hamiltonian which is slowly changed such that a transformation occurs within the subspace. Following the approach of Bacon and Flammia, we show that any MBQC on a graph state with generalized flow (gflow) can be converted into an adiabatically driven holonomic computation, which we call adiabatic graph-state quantum computation (AGQC). We then investigate how properties of AGQC relate to the properties of MBQC, such as computational depth. We identify a trade-off that can be made between the number of adiabatic steps in AGQC and the norm of H-dot as well as the degree of H, in analogy to the trade-off between the number of measurements and classical post-processing seen in MBQC. Finally the effects of performing AGQC with orderings that differ from standard MBQC are investigated. (paper)

  14. Effect of 0.3eV resonance cross section for plutonium on coolant void reactivity in heavy water lattice

    Plutonium fuel could be utilized in the entire core of heavy water moderated, boiling light water cooled pressure-tube-type reactor (HWR). The void reactivity, however, depends on the various parameters of the lattice. It is especially significant to clarify the influence of plutonium nuclides on the void reactivity. The void reactivities in the infinite HWR lattices have been parametrically analyzed to clarify the influences of changes in the lattice parameters on the void reactivity using the WIMS-D4 code with the JENDL-3.1 nuclear data. In this lattice calculation, it has been known that the behavior of the void reactivity can be made clear by separating the components for fuel nuclides, neutron cross sections, energy group and regions in lattice cell from the void reactivity using the important reaction rates. If the macroscopic 2200m/s neutron absorption cross section of fuel is identical each other, it has been shown that the void reactivity of the HWR lattice shifts further to the negative side in the narrower pitch lattice, and in the plutonium lattice than in the uranium lattice. The effect reducing the void reactivity to the negative by plutonium is caused mainly by the presence of the resonance cross section at around 0.3eV of 239Pu. Because the higher the content of 239Pu is, the less the recovery effect of neutron density within the resonance energy due to decrease in the thermal neutron scattering of hydrogen is with increase in coolant void fraction, so that the decreased resonance fission rate for 239Pu contributes to the more negative side for the void reactivity. (author)

  15. The added value of longitudinal black-blood cardiovascular magnetic resonance angiography in the cross sectional identification of carotid atherosclerotic ulceration

    Hippe Daniel S

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carotid atherosclerotic ulceration is a significant source of stroke. This study evaluates the efficacy of adding longitudinal black-blood (BB cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR angiography to cross-sectional CMR images in the identification of carotid atherosclerotic ulceration. Methods Thirty-two subjects (30 males and two females with ages between 48 and 83 years scheduled for carotid endarterectomy were imaged on a 1.5T GE Signa scanner using multisequence [3D time-of-flight, T1, proton density, T2, contrast enhanced T1], cross-sectional CMR images and longitudinal BB CMR angiography (0.625 × 0.625 mm/pixel. Two rounds of review (round 1: cross-sectional CMR images alone and round 2: cross-sectional CMR images plus longitudinal BB CMR angiography were conducted for the presence and volume measurements of ulceration. Ulceration was defined as a distinct depression into the plaque containing blood flow signal on cross-sectional CMR and longitudinal BB CMR angiography. Results Of the 32 plaques examined by histology, 17 contained 21 ulcers. Using the longitudinal BB CMR angiography sequence in addition to the cross-sectional CMR images in round 2, the sensitivity improved to 80% for ulcers of at least 6 mm3 in volume by histology and 52.4% for all ulcers, compared to 30% and 23.8% in round 1, respectively. There was a slight decline in specificity from 88.2% to 82.3%, though both the positive and negative predictive values increased modestly from 71.4% to 78.6% and from 48.4% to 58.3%, respectively. Conclusion The addition of longitudinal BB CMR angiography to multisequence cross-sectional CMR images increases accuracy in the identification of carotid atherosclerotic ulceration.

  16. Calculation of self-shielding factors for cross-sections in the unresolved resonance region using the GRUCON applied program package

    The author gives a scheme for the calculation of the self-shielding factors in the unresolved resonance region using the GRUCON applied program package. This package is especially created to be used in the conversion of evaluated neutron cross-section data, as available in existing data libraries, into multigroup microscopic constants. A detailed description of the formulae and algorithms used in the programs is given. Some typical examples of calculation are considered and the results are compared with those of other authors. The calculation accuracy is better than 2%

  17. An optimized C sub 6 D sub 6 detector for studies of resonance-dominated (n,gamma) cross-sections

    Plag, R; Kaeppeler, F; Pavlopoulos, P; Reifarth, R; Wisshak, K

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogen-free scintillators are indispensable for determining the small, resonance-dominated neutron capture cross-sections of light and neutron magic nuclei, data which are needed for advanced reactor concepts, for transmutation of radioactive wastes as well as for astrophysical scenarios of neutron capture nucleosynthesis. A critical comparison of the existing detector concepts by means of detailed GEANT simulations revealed large differences in neutron sensitivity. Based on these simulations, an optimized detector was developed and successfully tested. Compared to a commercial detector, the neutron sensitivity of this solution is more than an order of magnitude lower, thus allowing even extremely small capture/scattering ratios to be measured reliably.

  18. Extracting the cross section angular distributions for 15C high-energy resonance excited via the (18O,16O two-neutron transfer reaction

    Carbone D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The 13C(18O,16O15C reaction has been studied at 84 MeV incident energy. The ejectiles have been momentum analized by the MAGNEX spectrometer and 15C excitation energy spectra have been obtained up to about 20 MeV. In the region above the two-neutron separation energy, a bump has been observed at 13.7 MeV. The extracted cross section angular distribution for this structure, obtained by using different models for background, displays a clear oscillating pattern, typical of resonant state of the residual nucleus.

  19. Non-adiabatic transition probability with a moving $\\delta$ potential coupling

    Diwaker; Chakraborty, Aniruddha

    2013-01-01

    The present work focuses on the calculation of a non-adiabatic transition probability between two states which may or may not cross with each other and are coupled to each other by a moving $\\delta$ function potential. Here, the time dependent Schrodinger equation is converted to time independent one by using a scaling factor which is function of time. This time independent Schrodinger equation is then considered for two potentials coupled by a moving $\\delta$ potential and an expression for ...

  20. Adiabatic pumping in a double-dot Cooper-pair beam splitter

    Hiltscher B.; Governale M.; Splettstoesser J.; Konig J.

    2011-01-01

    We study adiabatic pumping through a double quantum dot coupled to normal and superconducting leads. For this purpose a perturbation expansion in the tunnel coupling between the dots and the normal leads is performed and processes underlying the pumping current are discussed. Features of crossed Andreev reflection are investigated in the average pumped charge and related to local Andreev reflection in a single quantum dot. In order to distinguish Cooper pair splitting from quasi-particle pump...

  1. Measurement of the cross-sectional area of the dural tube in the lumbar spine on magnetic resonance imaging. Comparison between normal, pre- and post-discectomy conditions

    Matsubayashi, Yasutomo [Juntendo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1997-07-01

    This study evaluated the usefulness of pre- and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of lumbar disc hernia with special attention to measurement of the cross-sectional area of the dural tube. Twenty-five patients (20 men and 5 women; 25 discs) who underwent posterior lumbar discectomy and 73 normal individuals (44 men and 29 women; 219 discs) of a similar age distribution were studied. Axial MRI was mainly used for the measurement of the dural tube. In the patient group, MRI examination was performed 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Assessment of the clinical symptoms was also included and used for comparison with the MRI evaluation. The cross-sectional area was significantly reduced to about 50% of the normal preoperatively. One month postoperatively, there was no significant increase in the size of the area, but after three months, the area increased significantly and progressed to the normal size within a year. One-month postoperatively, MRI examination was not considered useful because of postoperative hematoma and/or edema at the surgical site. The increase in the size of the cross-sectional area of the dural tube correlated well with the improvement in clinical symptoms. Three-months postoperatively, MRI evaluation of the lumbar disc seemed useful and measurement of the cross-sectional area of the dural tube appeared to serve as an indicator of the effectiveness of the surgery. (author)

  2. Measurement of the cross-sectional area of the dural tube in the lumbar spine on magnetic resonance imaging. Comparison between normal, pre- and post-discectomy conditions

    This study evaluated the usefulness of pre- and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of lumbar disc hernia with special attention to measurement of the cross-sectional area of the dural tube. Twenty-five patients (20 men and 5 women; 25 discs) who underwent posterior lumbar discectomy and 73 normal individuals (44 men and 29 women; 219 discs) of a similar age distribution were studied. Axial MRI was mainly used for the measurement of the dural tube. In the patient group, MRI examination was performed 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Assessment of the clinical symptoms was also included and used for comparison with the MRI evaluation. The cross-sectional area was significantly reduced to about 50% of the normal preoperatively. One month postoperatively, there was no significant increase in the size of the area, but after three months, the area increased significantly and progressed to the normal size within a year. One-month postoperatively, MRI examination was not considered useful because of postoperative hematoma and/or edema at the surgical site. The increase in the size of the cross-sectional area of the dural tube correlated well with the improvement in clinical symptoms. Three-months postoperatively, MRI evaluation of the lumbar disc seemed useful and measurement of the cross-sectional area of the dural tube appeared to serve as an indicator of the effectiveness of the surgery. (author)

  3. Critical analysis for nuclear data of thermal neutron capture cross section and the resonance integral from library based on neutron activation measurements

    For research reactor applications of neutron activation analysis, the evaluated neutron reaction cross sections and resonance integrals in some different libraries available were analyzed comparatively. In order to check these data, the thermal neutron capture cross section (σ0) and the resonance integral (I0) of 23Na(n, γ )24Na, 58Fe(n, γ) 59Fe, 59Co(n, γ )60Co, 27Al(n, γ )28Al, 109Ag(n, γ) 110mAg, 197Au(n, γ)198Au and 238U(n, γ )239U reactions from different libraries were used for comparative analysis with experimental measurements based on fundamental neutron activation equation. The targets were irradiated with neutrons in a research nuclear reactor 100 kW power, Triga Mark I. A high purity Ge detector was used for the gamma ray measurements of the irradiated samples. The evaluated results have been in general agreement with the current data according to different library sources. (author)

  4. Post-mortem changes in porcine M. longissimus studied by solid-state 13C cross-polarization magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Bertram, Hanne Christine; Jakobsen, Hans Jørgen; Andersen, Henrik Jørgen; Karlsson, Anders Hans; Engelsen, Søren Balling

    2003-03-26

    Solid-state (13)C cross-polarization (CP) magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments are carried out for the first time on rapidly frozen muscle biopsies taken in M. longissimus in vivo and at 1 min, 45 min, and 24 h post-mortem from three pigs. Two of the pigs were CO(2)-stunned (control animals), and one was pre-slaughter-stressed (treadmill exercise) followed by electrical stunning to induce difference in metabolism post-mortem. (13)C resonance signals from saturated and unsaturated carbons in fatty acids, carboxylic carbons, and carbons in lactate and glycogen are identified in the solid-state NMR spectra. The (13)C CP MAS spectra obtained for post-mortem samples of the stressed, electrically stunned pig differ significantly from the post-mortem control samples, as the intensity of a resonance line appearing at 30 ppm, assigned to carbons of the methylene chains, is reduced for the stressed pig. This spectral difference is probably due to changes in lipid mobility and indicates altered membrane properties in the muscle of the stressed/electrically stunned animal when compared with the control animals already 1 min post-mortem. In addition, the post-mortem period changes in glycogen carbons can be estimated from the (13)C CP MAS spectra, yielding a correlation of r = 0.74 to subsequent biochemical determination of the glycogen content. PMID:12643674

  5. Spin-label CW microwave power saturation and rapid passage with triangular non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) and adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) EPR spectroscopy

    Kittell, Aaron W.; Hyde, James S.

    2015-06-01

    Non-adiabatic rapid passage (NARS) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was introduced by Kittell et al. (2011) as a general purpose technique to collect the pure absorption response. The technique has been used to improve sensitivity relative to sinusoidal magnetic field modulation, increase the range of inter-spin distances that can be measured under near physiological conditions (Kittell et al., 2012), and enhance spectral resolution in copper (II) spectra (Hyde et al., 2013). In the present work, the method is extended to CW microwave power saturation of spin-labeled T4 Lysozyme (T4L). As in the cited papers, rapid triangular sweep of the polarizing magnetic field was superimposed on slow sweep across the spectrum. Adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) effects were encountered in samples undergoing very slow rotational diffusion as the triangular magnetic field sweep rate was increased. The paper reports results of variation of experimental parameters at the interface of adiabatic and non-adiabatic rapid sweep conditions. Comparison of the forward (up) and reverse (down) triangular sweeps is shown to be a good indicator of the presence of rapid passage effects. Spectral turning points can be distinguished from spectral regions between turning points in two ways: differential microwave power saturation and differential passage effects. Oxygen accessibility data are shown under NARS conditions that appear similar to conventional field modulation data. However, the sensitivity is much higher, permitting, in principle, experiments at substantially lower protein concentrations. Spectral displays were obtained that appear sensitive to rotational diffusion in the range of rotational correlation times of 10-3 to 10-7 s in a manner that is analogous to saturation transfer spectroscopy.

  6. Adiabatic principles in atom-diatom collisional energy transfer

    This work describes the application of numerical methods to the solution of the time dependent Schroedinger equation for non-reactive atom-diatom collisions in which only one of the degrees of freedom has been removed. The basic method involves expanding the wave function in a basis set in two of the diatomic coordinates in a body-fixed frame (with respect to the triatomic complex) and defining the coefficients in that expansion as functions on a grid in the collision coordinate. The wave function is then propagated in time using a split operator method. The bulk of this work is devoted to the application of this formalism to the study of internal rotational predissociation in NeHF, in which quasibound states of the triatom predissociate through the transfer of energy from rotation of the diatom into translational energy in the atom-diatom separation coordinate. The author analyzes the computed time dependent wave functions to calculate the lifetimes for several quasibound states; these are in agreement with time independent quantum calculations using the same potential. Moreover, the time dependent behavior of the wave functions themselves sheds light on the dynamics of the predissociation processes. Finally, the partial cross sections of the products in those processes is determined with multiple exit channels. These show strong selectivity in the orbital angular momentum of the outgoing fragments, which the author explains with an adiabatic channel interpretation of the wave function's dynamics. The author also suggests that the same formalism might profitably be used to investigate the quantum dynamics of open-quotes quasiresonant vibration-rotation transferclose quotes, in which remarkably strong propensity rules in certain inelastic atom-diatom collision arise from classical adiabatic invariance theory

  7. Frequency offset dependence of adiabatic rotating frame relaxation rate constants: relevance to MRS investigations of metabolite dynamics in vivo.

    Mangia, Silvia; Liimatainen, Timo; Garwood, Michael; Tkac, Ivan; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Deelchand, Dinesh; Michaeli, Shalom

    2011-08-01

    In this work, we investigated the frequency-offset dependence of the rotating frame longitudinal (R(1ρ)) and transverse (R(2ρ)) relaxation rate constants when using hyperbolic-secant adiabatic full passage pulses or continuous-wave spin-lock irradiation. Phantom and in vivo measurements were performed to validate theoretical predictions of the dominant relaxation mechanisms existing during adiabatic full passage pulses when using different settings of the frequency offset relative to the carrier. In addition, adiabatic R(1ρ) and R(2ρ) values of total creatine and N-acetylaspartate were measured in vivo from the human brain at 4 T. When the continuous-wave pulse power was limited to safe specific absorption rates for humans, simulations revealed a strong dependence of R(1ρ) and R(2ρ) values on the frequency offset for both dipolar interactions and anisochronous exchange mechanisms. By contrast, theoretical and experimental results showed adiabatic R(1ρ) and R(2ρ) values to be practically invariant within the large subregion of the bandwidth of the hyperbolic-secant pulse where complete inversion was achieved. However, adiabatic R(1ρ) and R(2ρ) values of the methyl protons of total creatine (at 3.03 ppm) were almost doubled when compared with those of the methyl protons of N-acetylaspartate (at 2.01 ppm) in spite of the fact that these resonances were in the flat region of the inversion band of the adiabatic full passage pulses. We conclude that differences in adiabatic R(1ρ) and R(2ρ) values of human brain metabolites are not a result of their chemical shifts, but instead reflect differences in dynamics. PMID:21264976

  8. Bond selective chemistry beyond the adiabatic approximation

    Butler, L.J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    One of the most important challenges in chemistry is to develop predictive ability for the branching between energetically allowed chemical reaction pathways. Such predictive capability, coupled with a fundamental understanding of the important molecular interactions, is essential to the development and utilization of new fuels and the design of efficient combustion processes. Existing transition state and exact quantum theories successfully predict the branching between available product channels for systems in which each reaction coordinate can be adequately described by different paths along a single adiabatic potential energy surface. In particular, unimolecular dissociation following thermal, infrared multiphoton, or overtone excitation in the ground state yields a branching between energetically allowed product channels which can be successfully predicted by the application of statistical theories, i.e. the weakest bond breaks. (The predictions are particularly good for competing reactions in which when there is no saddle point along the reaction coordinates, as in simple bond fission reactions.) The predicted lack of bond selectivity results from the assumption of rapid internal vibrational energy redistribution and the implicit use of a single adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface for the reaction. However, the adiabatic approximation is not valid for the reaction of a wide variety of energetic materials and organic fuels; coupling between the electronic states of the reacting species play a a key role in determining the selectivity of the chemical reactions induced. The work described below investigated the central role played by coupling between electronic states in polyatomic molecules in determining the selective branching between energetically allowed fragmentation pathways in two key systems.

  9. Utilization of Methyl Proton Resonances in Cross-Saturation Measurement for Determining the Interfaces of Large Protein-Protein Complexes

    Cross-saturation experiments allow the identification of the contact residues of large protein complexes (MW>50 K) more rigorously than conventional NMR approaches which involve chemical shift perturbations and hydrogen-deuterium exchange experiments [Takahashi et al. (2000) Nat. Struct. Biol., 7, 220-223]. In the amide proton-based cross-saturation experiment, the combined use of high deuteration levels for non-exchangeable protons of the ligand protein and a solvent with a low concentration of 1H2Ogreatly enhanced the selectivity of the intermolecular cross-saturation phenomenon. Unfortunately, experimental limitations caused losses in sensitivity. Furthermore, since main chain amide protons are not generally exposed to solvent, the efficiency of the saturation transfer directed to the main chain amide protons is not very high. Here we propose an alternative cross-saturation experiment which utilizes the methyl protons of the side chains of the ligand protein. Owing to the fast internal rotation along the methyl axis, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrated the enhanced efficiency of this approach. The methyl-utilizing cross-saturation experiment has clear advantages in sensitivity and saturation transfer efficiency over the amide proton-based approach

  10. Accuracy vs run time in adiabatic quantum search

    Rezakhani, A T; Lidar, D A

    2010-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum algorithms are characterized by their run time and accuracy. The relation between the two is essential for quantifying adiabatic algorithmic performance, yet is often poorly understood. We study the dynamics of a continuous time, adiabatic quantum search algorithm, and find rigorous results relating the accuracy and the run time. Proceeding with estimates, we show that under fairly general circumstances the adiabatic algorithmic error exhibits a behavior with two discernible regimes: the error decreases exponentially for short times, then decreases polynomially for longer times. We show that the well known quadratic speedup over classical search is associated only with the exponential error regime. We illustrate the results through examples of evolution paths derived by minimization of the adiabatic error. We also discuss specific strategies for controlling the adiabatic error and run time.

  11. Effect of cross-redistribution on the resonance scattering polarization of O I line at 1302 Å

    Oxygen is the most abundant element on the Sun after hydrogen and helium. The intensity spectrum of resonance lines of neutral oxygen, namely, O I (1302, 1305, and 1306 Å), has been studied in the literature for chromospheric diagnostics. In this paper, we study the resonance scattering polarization in the O I line at 1302 Å using two-dimensional (2D) radiative transfer in a composite atmosphere constructed using a 2D magneto-hydrodynamical snapshot in the photosphere and columns of the one-dimensional FALC atmosphere in the chromosphere. The methods developed by us recently in a series of papers to solve multi-dimensional polarized radiative transfer have been incorporated in our new code POLY2D, which we use for our analysis. We find that multi-dimensional radiative transfer including XRD effects is important in reproducing the amplitude and shape of scattering polarization signals of the O I line at 1302 Å.

  12. Hypergraph Ramsey Numbers and Adiabatic Quantum Algorithm

    Qu, Ri; Bao, Yan-ru

    2012-01-01

    Gaitan and Clark [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 010501 (2012)] have recently presented a quantum algorithm for the computation of the Ramsey numbers R(m, n) using adiabatic quantum evolution. We consider that the two-color Ramsey numbers R(m, n; r) for r-uniform hypergraphs can be computed by using the similar ways in [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 010501 (2012)]. In this comment, we show how the computation of R(m, n; r) can be mapped to a combinatorial optimization problem whose solution be found using adi...

  13. Adiabatic quantum algorithm for search engine ranking

    Garnerone, Silvano; Lidar, Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm to evaluate the PageRank vector, the most widely used tool in ranking the relative importance of internet pages. We present extensive numerical simulations which provide evidence that this quantum algorithm outputs any component of the PageRank vector-and thus the ranking of the corresponding webpage-in a time which scales polylogarithmically in the number of webpages. This would constitute an exponential speed-up with respect to all known classical algorithms designed to evaluate the PageRank.

  14. Adiabatic fission barriers in superheavy nuclei

    Jachimowicz, P.; Kowal, M; Skalski, J.

    2016-01-01

    Using the microscopic-macroscopic model based on the deformed Woods-Saxon single-particle potential and the Yukawa-plus-exponential macroscopic energy we calculated static fission barriers $B_{f}$ for 1305 heavy and superheavy nuclei $98\\leq Z \\leq 126$, including even - even, odd - even, even - odd and odd - odd systems. For odd and odd-odd nuclei, adiabatic potential energy surfaces were calculated by a minimization over configurations with one blocked neutron or/and proton on a level from ...

  15. Brane World Dynamics and Adiabatic Matter creation

    Gopakumar, P

    2006-01-01

    We have treated the adiabatic matter creation process in various three-brane models by applying thermodynamics of open systems. The matter creation rate is found to affect the evolution of scale factor and energy density of the universe. We find modification at early stages of cosmic dynamics. In GB and RS brane worlds, by chosing appropriate parameters we obtain standard scenario, while the warped DGP model has different Friedmann equations. During later stages, since the matter creation is negligible the evolution reduces to FRW expansion, in RS and GB models.

  16. Myosin cross-bridge orientation in rigor and in the presence of nucleotide studied by electron spin resonance.

    Ajtai, K; French, A R; Burghardt, T P

    1989-01-01

    The tilt series electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrum from muscle fibers decorated with spin labeled myosin subfragment 1 (S1) was measured from fibers in rigor and in the presence of MgADP. ESR spectra were measured at low amplitude modulation of the static magnetic field to insure that a minimum of spectral lineshape distortion occurs. Ten tilt series ESR data sets were fitted simultaneously by the model-independent methodology described in the accompanying paper (Burghardt, T. P., and A. ...

  17. Applications of pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance to chemistry: multiple-pulse NMR, cross polarization, magic-angle spinning annd instrumental design

    Murphy, P.D.

    1979-07-01

    Pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has been applied to: (1) Measurements of the prinicpal components of the proton shielding tensors of the hydrides of zirconium chloride and zirconium bromide. Multiple-Pulse techniques have been used to remove static homonuclear dipolar coupling. The anisotropies and isotropic shifts of these tensors have been used to infer the possible locations of the hydrogen within the sandwich-like layers of these unusual compounds. (2) Studies of the oscillatory transfer of magnetic polarization between /sup 1/H and /sup 29/Si in substituted silanes. The technique of J Cross Polarization has been used to enhance sensitivity. The /sup 29/Si NMR shifts of -Si-O- model compounds have been investigated as a possible probe for future studies of the environment of bound oxygen in coal-derived liquids. (3) Measurements of the aromatic fraction of /sup 13/C in whole coals. The techniques of /sup 1/H-/sup 13/C Cross Polarization and Magic-Angle Spinning have been used to enhance sensitivity and remove shift anisotropy. Additional topics described are: (4) Calculation and properties of the broadened lineshape of the shileding Powder Pattern. (5) Calculation of the oscillatory transfer of magnetic polarization for an I-S system. (6) Numerical convolution and its uses. (7) The technique of digital filtering applied in the frequency domain. (8) The designs and properties of four NMR probe-circuits. (9) The design of a single-coil double-resonance probe for combined Magic-Angle Spinning and Cross Polarization. (10) The designs of low Q and high Q rf power amplifiers with emphasis on the rf matching circuitry.

  18. Dark Energy and Dark Matter from an additional adiabatic fluid

    Dunsby, Peter K. S.; Luongo, Orlando; Reverberi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    The Dark Sector is described by an additional barotropic fluid which evolves adiabatically during the universe's history and whose adiabatic exponent $\\gamma$ is derived from the standard definitions of specific heats. Although in general $\\gamma$ is a function of the redshift, the Hubble parameter and its derivatives, we find that our assumptions lead necessarily to solutions with $\\gamma = $ constant in a FLRW universe. The adiabatic fluid acts effectively as the sum of two distinct compone...

  19. Adiabatic Flame Temperature and Specific Heat of Combustion Gases

    Torii, Shuichi; Yano, Toshiaki; Tsunoda, Yukio; トリイ, シュウイチ; ヤノ, トシアキ; ツノダ, ユキオ; 鳥居, 修一; 矢野, 利明; 角田, 幸男

    1992-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to examine adiabatic flame temperature and the specific heat of combustion gases for both hydrocarbon-air and alcohol-air mixtures by means of a method of chemical equilibrium calculation. Emphasis is placed on the elucidation of simplified correlation equations capable of predicting (i) adiabatic flame temperature at any equivalence ratio and (ii) the specific heat of combustion gases when the adiabatic flame temperature, the gas temperature and the equivalence...

  20. Adiabatic renormalization in theories with modified dispersion relations

    Nacir, D. Lopez; Mazzitelli, F. D.; Simeone, C.

    2007-01-01

    We generalize the adiabatic renormalization to theories with dispersion relations modified at energies higher than a new scale $M_C$. We obtain explicit expressions for the mean value of the stress tensor in the adiabatic vacuum, up to the second adiabatic order. We show that for any dispersion relation the divergences can be absorbed into the bare gravitational constants of the theory. We also point out that, depending on the renormalization prescription, the renormalized stress tensor may c...

  1. Measurement of total cross sections for π0 photoproduction on nuclei in the Δ-resonance region

    Total cross sections for π0 photoproduction on Be, C, Al, Cu, Sn and Pb have been measured in the photon energy range k=220-450 MeV using the tagged photon beam of the Bonn 500 MeV synchrotron. The data show a broad maximum around k=350 MeV. The A-dependence can be described by sigmasub(A)proportionalAsup(0.7). The results are compared to charged pion production and to total hadronic cross sections. (orig.)

  2. A novel electron paramagnetic resonance spin label and its application to study the cross-bridge cycle.

    Raucher, D; Fajer, E A; Sár, C; Hideg, K; Zhao, Y.; Kawai, M; Fajer, P G

    1995-01-01

    We have used a novel alpha-iodoketone spin-label (IKSL) to study myosin head orientation and cross-bridge dynamics in the putative pre-powerstroke state. Possible perturbation of the cross-bridge cycle by the label was assayed by the sinusoidal analysis method (Kawai and Brandt, 1980; Kawai and Zhao, 1993), which determines the rate constants of the elementary steps in the cycle. A comparison of the rates obtained from unlabeled and IKSL fibers revealed small (10-20%) changes in the ATP hydro...

  3. Symmetry of the adiabatic condition in the piston problem

    This study addresses a controversial issue in the adiabatic piston problem, namely that of the piston being adiabatic when it is fixed but no longer so when it can move freely. It is shown that this apparent contradiction arises from the usual definition of adiabatic condition. The issue is addressed here by requiring the adiabatic condition to be compatible with the invariance of total entropy under a system-surroundings interchange. This paper also strengthens some recently published ideas concerning the concepts of heat and dissipative work, and is primarily intended for teachers and graduate students, as well as for all who are interested in this fascinating problem.

  4. Magnesium Diboride Superconducting Coils for Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADR's) Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADRs) in space applications, it is desirable to have very light weight, small diameter, high current density...

  5. A quantum search algorithm based on partial adiabatic evolution

    Zhang Ying-Yu; Hu He-Ping; Lu Song-Feng

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents and implements a specified partial adiabatic search algorithm on a quantum circuit. It studies the minimum energy gap between the first excited state and the ground state of the system Hamiltonian and it finds that, in the case of M=1, the algorithm has the same performance as the local adiabatic algorithm. However, the algorithm evolves globally only within a small interval, which implies that it keeps the advantages of global adiabatic algorithms without losing the speedup of the local adiabatic search algorithm.

  6. A quantum search algorithm based on partial adiabatic evolution

    This paper presents and implements a specified partial adiabatic search algorithm on a quantum circuit. It studies the minimum energy gap between the first excited state and the ground state of the system Hamiltonian and it finds that, in the case of M = 1, the algorithm has the same performance as the local adiabatic algorithm. However, the algorithm evolves globally only within a small interval, which implies that it keeps the advantages of global adiabatic algorithms without losing the speedup of the local adiabatic search algorithm. (general)

  7. Combined action of time-delay and colored cross-associated multiplicative and additive noises on stability and stochastic resonance for a stochastic metapopulation system

    Wang, Kang-Kang; Zong, De-Cai; Wang, Ya-Jun; Li, Sheng-Hong

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the transition between the stable state of a big density and the extinction state and stochastic resonance (SR) for a time-delayed metapopulation system disturbed by colored cross-correlated noises are investigated. By applying the fast descent method, the small time-delay approximation and McNamara and Wiesenfeld's SR theory, we investigate the impacts of time-delay, the multiplicative, additive noises and colored cross-correlated noise on the SNR and the shift between the two states of the system. Numerical results show that the multiplicative, additive noises and time-delay can all speed up the transition from the stable state to the extinction state, while the correlation noise and its correlation time can slow down the extinction process of the population system. With respect to SNR, the multiplicative noise always weakens the SR effect, while noise correlation time plays a dual role in motivating the SR phenomenon. Meanwhile, time-delay mainly plays a negative role in stimulating the SR phenomenon. Conversely, it could motivate the SR effect to increase the strength of the cross-correlation noise in the SNR-β plot, while the increase of additive noise intensity will firstly excite SR, and then suppress the SR effect.

  8. Adiabatic collapse of rotating gas clouds

    The gravitational, axisymmetric and adiabatic collapse of rotating gas clouds with various initial conditions has been calculated numerically by means of Fluid-In-Cell method. We have assumed that the gas is ideal and its change is adiabatic except for heat production by shock waves and that, initially, a cloud has no motion in a meridional plane and has spherical and polytropic distributions of mass and temperature. The results of calculations show that a cloud which has initially larger rotational energy bounced more easily, i.e., bounces at lower central density. The bounce occurs first in the direction of the rotation axis and next in direction perpendicular to it. A shock wave generated by the bounce is strong especially in the vicinity of the rotation axis. At first the shock front is nearly parallel to the equatorial plane but it becomes gradually spherical as it propagates outwards. Calculations have been performed until the mass enclosed inside the shock front becomes as large as 95 percent of the total mass. At this final stage either a rotating spheroidal core or a rotating ring is left in the central region; a ring is formed if initially a cloud is rotating more rapidly, less centrally condensed and at lower temperature. (auth.)

  9. Adiabatic cooling of solar wind electrons

    Sandbaek, Ornulf; Leer, Egil

    1992-01-01

    In thermally driven winds emanating from regions in the solar corona with base electron densities of n0 not less than 10 exp 8/cu cm, a substantial fraction of the heat conductive flux from the base is transfered into flow energy by the pressure gradient force. The adiabatic cooling of the electrons causes the electron temperature profile to fall off more rapidly than in heat conduction dominated flows. Alfven waves of solar origin, accelerating the basically thermally driven solar wind, lead to an increased mass flux and enhanced adiabatic cooling. The reduction in electron temperature may be significant also in the subsonic region of the flow and lead to a moderate increase of solar wind mass flux with increasing Alfven wave amplitude. In the solar wind model presented here the Alfven wave energy flux per unit mass is larger than that in models where the temperature in the subsonic flow is not reduced by the wave, and consequently the asymptotic flow speed is higher.

  10. Adiabatic Mass Loss Model in Binary Stars

    Ge, H. W.

    2012-07-01

    Rapid mass transfer process in the interacting binary systems is very complicated. It relates to two basic problems in the binary star evolution, i.e., the dynamically unstable Roche-lobe overflow and the common envelope evolution. Both of the problems are very important and difficult to be modeled. In this PhD thesis, we focus on the rapid mass loss process of the donor in interacting binary systems. The application to the criterion of dynamically unstable mass transfer and the common envelope evolution are also included. Our results based on the adiabatic mass loss model could be used to improve the binary evolution theory, the binary population synthetic method, and other related aspects. We build up the adiabatic mass loss model. In this model, two approximations are included. The first one is that the energy generation and heat flow through the stellar interior can be neglected, hence the restructuring is adiabatic. The second one is that he stellar interior remains in hydrostatic equilibrium. We model this response by constructing model sequences, beginning with a donor star filling its Roche lobe at an arbitrary point in its evolution, holding its specific entropy and composition profiles fixed. These approximations are validated by the comparison with the time-dependent binary mass transfer calculations and the polytropic model for low mass zero-age main-sequence stars. In the dynamical time scale mass transfer, the adiabatic response of the donor star drives it to expand beyond its Roche lobe, leading to runaway mass transfer and the formation of a common envelope with its companion star. For donor stars with surface convection zones of any significant depth, this runaway condition is encountered early in mass transfer, if at all; but for main sequence stars with radiative envelopes, it may be encountered after a prolonged phase of thermal time scale mass transfer, so-called delayed dynamical instability. We identify the critical binary mass ratio for the

  11. TSAR: a program for automatic resonance assignment using 2D cross-sections of high dimensionality, high-resolution spectra.

    Zawadzka-Kazimierczuk, Anna; Koźmiński, Wiktor; Billeter, Martin

    2012-09-01

    While NMR studies of proteins typically aim at structure, dynamics or interactions, resonance assignments represent in almost all cases the initial step of the analysis. With increasing complexity of the NMR spectra, for example due to decreasing extent of ordered structure, this task often becomes both difficult and time-consuming, and the recording of high-dimensional data with high-resolution may be essential. Random sampling of the evolution time space, combined with sparse multidimensional Fourier transform (SMFT), allows for efficient recording of very high dimensional spectra (≥4 dimensions) while maintaining high resolution. However, the nature of this data demands for automation of the assignment process. Here we present the program TSAR (Tool for SMFT-based Assignment of Resonances), which exploits all advantages of SMFT input. Moreover, its flexibility allows to process data from any type of experiments that provide sequential connectivities. The algorithm was tested on several protein samples, including a disordered 81-residue fragment of the δ subunit of RNA polymerase from Bacillus subtilis containing various repetitive sequences. For our test examples, TSAR achieves a high percentage of assigned residues without any erroneous assignments. PMID:22806130

  12. TSAR: a program for automatic resonance assignment using 2D cross-sections of high dimensionality, high-resolution spectra

    Zawadzka-Kazimierczuk, Anna; Kozminski, Wiktor [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry (Poland); Billeter, Martin, E-mail: martin.billeter@chem.gu.se [University of Gothenburg, Biophysics Group, Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology (Sweden)

    2012-09-15

    While NMR studies of proteins typically aim at structure, dynamics or interactions, resonance assignments represent in almost all cases the initial step of the analysis. With increasing complexity of the NMR spectra, for example due to decreasing extent of ordered structure, this task often becomes both difficult and time-consuming, and the recording of high-dimensional data with high-resolution may be essential. Random sampling of the evolution time space, combined with sparse multidimensional Fourier transform (SMFT), allows for efficient recording of very high dimensional spectra ({>=}4 dimensions) while maintaining high resolution. However, the nature of this data demands for automation of the assignment process. Here we present the program TSAR (Tool for SMFT-based Assignment of Resonances), which exploits all advantages of SMFT input. Moreover, its flexibility allows to process data from any type of experiments that provide sequential connectivities. The algorithm was tested on several protein samples, including a disordered 81-residue fragment of the {delta} subunit of RNA polymerase from Bacillus subtilis containing various repetitive sequences. For our test examples, TSAR achieves a high percentage of assigned residues without any erroneous assignments.

  13. Rotational excitation of H2O by para-H2 from an adiabatically reduced dimensional potential

    Scribano, Yohann; Faure, Alexandre; Lauvergnat, David

    2012-03-01

    Cross sections and rate coefficients for low lying rotational transitions in H2O colliding with para-hydrogen pH2 are computed using an adiabatic approximation which reduces the dimensional dynamics from a 5D to a 3D problem. Calculations have been performed at the close-coupling level using the recent potential of Valiron et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 134306 (2008), 10.1063/1.2988314]. A good agreement is found between the reduced adiabatic calculations and the 5D exact calculations, with an impressive time saving and memory gain. This adiabatic reduction of dimensionality seems very promising for scattering studies involving the excitation of a heavy target molecule by a light molecular projectile.

  14. The exact forces on classical nuclei in non-adiabatic charge transfer

    Agostini, Federica; Suzuki, Yasumitsu; Min, Seung Kyu; Maitra, Neepa T; Gross, E K U

    2014-01-01

    The decomposition of electronic and nuclear motion presented in [A. Abedi, N. T. Maitra, and E. K. U. Gross, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 123002 (2010)] yields a time dependent potential that drives the nuclear motion and fully accounts for the coupling to the electronic subsystem. Here we show that propagation of an ensemble of independent classical nuclear trajectories on this exact potential yields dynamics that are essentially indistinguishable from the exact quantum dynamics for a model non-adiabatic charge transfer problem. Further, we investigate the properties of the exact potential that enable the correct splitting of the quasiclassical nuclear wave packet in space: after the nuclear wave packet passes through an avoided crossing between two Born-Oppenheimer surfaces, the potential becomes piecewise parallel to one or the other adiabatic surface and, in the intermediate region, it develops steps or bumps. A detailed analysis of the shape of the potential and its connection to standard mixed quantum-classica...

  15. Plasmas in particle accelerators: adiabatic theories for bunched beams

    Three different formalisms for discussing Vlasov's equation for bunched beam problems with anharmonic space charge forces are outlined. These correspond to the use of a drift kinetic equation averaged over random betatron motions; a fluidkinetic adiabatic regime analogous to the theory of Chew, Goldberger, and Low; and an adiabatic hydrodynamic theory

  16. Teleportation of an Unknown Atomic State via Adiabatic Passage

    2007-01-01

    We propose a scheme for teleporting an unknown atomic state via adiabatic passage. Taking advantage of adiabatic passage, the atom has no probability of being excited and thus the atomic spontaneous emission is suppressed.We also show that the fidelity can reach 1 under certain condition.

  17. Examination of the adiabatic approximation in open systems

    We examine the notion of the adiabatic approximation in open systems by applying it to closed systems. Our results shows that the notion is equivalent to the standard adiabatic approximation if the systems are initially in eigenstates, and it leads to a more general expression if the systems are in mixed states

  18. Adiabat-shaping in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion

    Adiabat-shaping techniques were investigated in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility as a means to improve implosion stability, while still maintaining a low adiabat in the fuel. Adiabat-shaping was accomplished in these indirect drive experiments by altering the ratio of the picket and trough energies in the laser pulse shape, thus driving a decaying first shock in the ablator. This decaying first shock is designed to place the ablation front on a high adiabat while keeping the fuel on a low adiabat. These experiments were conducted using the keyhole experimental platform for both three and four shock laser pulses. This platform enabled direct measurement of the shock velocities driven in the glow-discharge polymer capsule and in the liquid deuterium, the surrogate fuel for a DT ignition target. The measured shock velocities and radiation drive histories are compared to previous three and four shock laser pulses. This comparison indicates that in the case of adiabat shaping the ablation front initially drives a high shock velocity, and therefore, a high shock pressure and adiabat. The shock then decays as it travels through the ablator to pressures similar to the original low-adiabat pulses when it reaches the fuel. This approach takes advantage of initial high ablation velocity, which favors stability, and high-compression, which favors high stagnation pressures

  19. High Fidelity Adiabatic Quantum Computation via Dynamical Decoupling

    Quiroz, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    We introduce high-order dynamical decoupling strategies for open system adiabatic quantum computation. Our numerical results demonstrate that a judicious choice of high-order dynamical decoupling method, in conjunction with an encoding which allows computation to proceed alongside decoupling, can dramatically enhance the fidelity of adiabatic quantum computation in spite of decoherence.

  20. Quantum adiabatic algorithm for factorization and its experimental implementation.

    Peng, Xinhua; Liao, Zeyang; Xu, Nanyang; Qin, Gan; Zhou, Xianyi; Suter, Dieter; Du, Jiangfeng

    2008-11-28

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm capable of factorizing numbers, using fewer qubits than Shor's algorithm. We implement the algorithm in a NMR quantum information processor and experimentally factorize the number 21. In the range that our classical computer could simulate, the quantum adiabatic algorithm works well, providing evidence that the running time of this algorithm scales polynomially with the problem size. PMID:19113467

  1. Dependence of the Ratio between the Resonance Integral and Thermal Neutron Cross Section on the Deviation of the Epithermal Neutron Spectrum from the 1/E Law

    In k0- Neutron Activation Analysis (k0-NAA), the conversion from the tabulated Q0 (ratio of the resonance integral to thermal neutron cross-section)to Q0(α) (α is the shape factor of the epithermal neutron flux, indicating the deviation of the epithermal neutron spectrum from the ideal 1/E shape) are calculated using a FORTRAN program. The calculations are done for most elements that can be detected by neutron activation using different values of the parameter (α) ranging from -0.1≤α≤+0.1. The obtained data are used to study the dependence of the values (α) on the irradiation position factor in (k0-NAA)equation for some selected isotopes differ in their resonance energy and its Q0 values. The results show that, the irradiation factor is affective mainly for low thermal tro epithermal flux ratio f especially for Q0 value greater than 50. so consequently determining the irradiation parameters α value is not needed for irradiation positions that rich with thermal neutron. But for high f values the irradiation position factor should be taken into account. On the other hand the constructed FORTRAN program can be used to calculate the value Q0 (α) directly for different value of α

  2. Robust Classification with Adiabatic Quantum Optimization

    Denchev, Vasil S; Vishwanathan, S V N; Neven, Hartmut

    2012-01-01

    We propose a non-convex training objective for robust binary classification of data sets in which label noise is present. The design is guided by the intention of solving the resulting problem by adiabatic quantum optimization. Two requirements are imposed by the engineering constraints of existing quantum hardware: training problems are formulated as quadratic unconstrained binary optimization; and model parameters are represented as binary expansions of low bit-depth. In the present work we validate this approach by using a heuristic classical solver as a stand-in for quantum hardware. Testing on several popular data sets and comparing with a number of existing losses we find substantial advantages in robustness as measured by test error under increasing label noise. Robustness is enabled by the non-convexity of our hardware-compatible loss function, which we name q-loss.

  3. Number Partitioning via Quantum Adiabatic Computation

    Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Toussaint, Udo; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We study both analytically and numerically the complexity of the adiabatic quantum evolution algorithm applied to random instances of combinatorial optimization problems. We use as an example the NP-complete set partition problem and obtain an asymptotic expression for the minimal gap separating the ground and exited states of a system during the execution of the algorithm. We show that for computationally hard problem instances the size of the minimal gap scales exponentially with the problem size. This result is in qualitative agreement with the direct numerical simulation of the algorithm for small instances of the set partition problem. We describe the statistical properties of the optimization problem that are responsible for the exponential behavior of the algorithm.

  4. Entropy in adiabatic regions of convection simulations

    Tanner, Joel D; Demarque, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    One of the largest sources of uncertainty in stellar models is caused by the treatment of convection in stellar envelopes. One dimensional stellar models often make use of the mixing length or equivalent approximations to describe convection, all of which depend on various free parameters. There have been attempts to rectify this by using 3D radiative-hydrodynamic simulations of stellar convection, and in trying to extract an equivalent mixing length from the simulations. In this paper we show that the entropy of the deeper, adiabatic layers in these simulations can be expressed as a simple function of og g and log T_{eff} which holds potential for calibrating stellar models in a simple and more general manner.

  5. Adiabatic Liquid Piston Compressed Air Energy Storage

    Petersen, Tage; Elmegaard, Brian; Pedersen, Allan Schrøder

    This project investigates the potential of a Compressed Air Energy Storage system (CAES system). CAES systems are used to store mechanical energy in the form of compressed air. The systems use electricity to drive the compressor at times of low electricity demand with the purpose of converting the...... compensates the added investment. •When comparing ALP-CAES to an adiabatic CAES system, where compression heat is stored in thermal oil, the ALP-CAES system is found only to be competitive under a very specific set of operating/design conditions, including very high operation pressure and the use of very...... primarily due to the investment in turbine/generator, heat exchangers, and a large quantity of thermal oil. To improve the economy, it would be relevant to investigate the possibility of replacing the thermal oil by water, for example by injecting the water directly into the air flow between the different...

  6. Adiabatic approximation, semiclassical scattering, and unidirectional invisibility

    The transfer matrix of a possibly complex and energy-dependent scattering potential can be identified with the S-matrix of a two-level time-dependent non-Hermitian Hamiltonian H(τ). We show that the application of the adiabatic approximation to H(τ) corresponds to the semiclassical description of the original scattering problem. In particular, the geometric part of the phase of the evolving eigenvectors of H(τ) gives the pre-exponential factor of the WKB wave functions. We use these observations to give an explicit semiclassical expression for the transfer matrix. This allows for a detailed study of the semiclassical unidirectional reflectionlessness and invisibility. We examine concrete realizations of the latter in the realm of optics. (paper)

  7. Parametric Erosion Investigation: Propellant Adiabatic Flame Temperature

    P. J. Conroy

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of quasi-independent parameters and their potential influence on erosion in guns have been investigated. Specifically, the effects of flame temperature and the effect of assuming that the Lewis number (ratio of mass-to-heat transport to the surface, Le = 1, has been examined. The adiabatic flame temperature for a propellant was reduced by the addition of a diluent from a high temperature of 3843 K (similar to that of M9 down to 3004 K, which is near the value for M30A1 propellant. Mass fractions of critical species at the surface with and without the assumption of Le = 1 are presented, demonstrating that certain species preferentially reach the surface providing varied conditions for the surface reactions. The results for gun tube bore surface regression qualitatively agree with previous studies and with current experimental data.

  8. Index Theory and Adiabatic Limit in QFT

    Wawrzycki, Jaroslaw

    2011-01-01

    The paper has the form of a proposal concerned with the relationship between the three mathematically rigorous approaches to quantum field theory: 1) local algebraic formulation of Haag, 2) Wightman formulation and 3) the perturbative formulation based on the microlocal renormalization method. In this project we investigate the relationship between 1) and 3) and utilize the known relationships between 1) and 2). The main goal of the proposal lies in obtaining obstructions for the existence of the adiabatic limit (confinement problem in the phenomenological standard model approach). We extend the method of deformation of D\\"utsch and Fredenhagen (in the Bordeman-Waldmann sense) and apply Fedosov construction of the formal index -- an analog of the index for deformed symplectic manifolds, generalizing the Atiyah-Singer index. We present some first steps in realization of the proposal.

  9. Index Theory and Adiabatic Limit in QFT

    Wawrzycki, Jarosław

    2013-08-01

    The paper has the form of a proposal concerned with the relationship between the three mathematically rigorous approaches to quantum field theory: (1) local algebraic formulation of Haag, (2) Wightman formulation and (3) the perturbative formulation based on the microlocal renormalization method. In this project we investigate the relationship between (1) and (3) and utilize the known relationships between (1) and (2). The main goal of the proposal lies in obtaining obstructions for the existence of the adiabatic limit ( confinement problem in the phenomenological standard model approach). We extend the method of deformation of Dütsch and Fredenhagen (in the Bordeman-Waldmann sense) and apply Fedosov construction of the formal index—an analog of the index for deformed symplectic manifolds, generalizing the Atiyah-Singer index. We present some first steps in realization of the proposal.

  10. The adiabatic approximation in multichannel scattering

    Using two-dimensional models, an attempt has been made to get an impression of the conditions of validity of the adiabatic approximation. For a nucleon bound to a rotating nucleus the Coriolis coupling is neglected and the relation between this nuclear Coriolis coupling and the classical Coriolis force has been examined. The approximation for particle scattering from an axially symmetric rotating nucleus based on a short duration of the collision, has been combined with an approximation based on the limitation of angular momentum transfer between particle and nucleus. Numerical calculations demonstrate the validity of the new combined method. The concept of time duration for quantum mechanical collisions has also been studied, as has the collective description of permanently deformed nuclei. (C.F.)

  11. Entropy in Adiabatic Regions of Convection Simulations

    Tanner, Joel D.; Basu, Sarbani; Demarque, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    One of the largest sources of uncertainty in stellar models is caused by the treatment of convection in stellar envelopes. One-dimensional stellar models often make use of the mixing length or equivalent approximations to describe convection, all of which depend on various free parameters. There have been attempts to rectify this by using 3D radiative-hydrodynamic simulations of stellar convection, and in trying to extract an equivalent mixing length from the simulations. In this Letter, we show that the entropy of the deeper, adiabatic layers in these simulations can be expressed as a simple function of {log}g and {log}{T}{{eff}}, which holds potential for calibrating stellar models in a simple and more general manner.

  12. Geometric phase and angle for noncyclic adiabatic change, revivals and measures of quantal instability

    Within the adiabatic theorem we must explicitly add to the instantaneous adiabatic vectors, parametrized by an external parameter following an open curve, a dynamical as well as a geometrical phase contribution to be able to predict the quantum observables. We give an alternative to Berry's proof for cyclic paths without use of Stokes's theorem that is then generalized to open paths. Recent analyses that argued, for an adiabatic open path case, that there is only dynamical phase change or that the situation is undefined are shown to be incorrect. The noncyclic geometric phase correction is discussed in detail for the spin in a magnetic field, an Aharonov-Bohm experiment and a resonator. Properties of the geometric phase contribution for open paths are studied. First, it is shown that degeneracies play an important role. Second, it is shown to be semiclassically related to a geometric angle shift on the final torus. The revival structure of wavepackets is shown to be affected by the noncyclic geometric phases of the, contributing instantaneous vectors that make the revived wavepacket to be shifted on the final torus by the classical geometric angle. We also propose two measures of quantum sensitivity to initial conditions. The first one is valid for quantum and classical Liouville states and it is given by the different distances of two close states to a third fixed state. The second measure is given by the divergence of the flow lines of suitable quantum phase space representations and reduces to the classical Lyapunov exponent. (author)

  13. Inclusive π±, K± and(p,bar p) differential cross-sections at the Z resonance

    Buskulic, D.; Casper, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Ariztizabal, F.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, L. I.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Palla, F.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Marinelli, N.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Bonvicini, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Engelhardt, A.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Ganis, G.; Gay, C.; Girone, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Maggi, M.; Markou, C.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Perrodo, P.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Veenhof, R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Johnson, S. D.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Passalacqua, L.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Delfino, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Salomone, S.; Colrain, P.; Ten Have, I.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Konstantinidis, N.; Moneta, L.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; San Martin, G.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Walther, S. M.; Wanke, R.; Wolf, B.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Thulasidas, M.; Nicod, D.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Gotzhein, C.; Halley, A. W.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; St. Denis, R.; Wolf, G.; Alemany, R.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Courault, F.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacquet, M.; Panot, P.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Musolino, G.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Abbaneo, D.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foa, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Johnson, D. L.; Medcalf, T.; Mir, Ll. M.; Strong, J. A.; Bertin, V.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Edwards, M.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Beddall, A.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Dawson, I.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Rankin, C.; Reeves, P.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Feigl, E.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Schäfer, U.; Smolik, L.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Pitis, L.; Ragusa, F.; Kim, H.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Conway, J. S.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Gonzáles, S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I. J.; Sharma, V.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Wildish, T.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.

    1995-09-01

    Inclusive π±, K± and(p,bar p) differential cross-sections in hadronic decays of the Z have been measured as a function of z= P hadron/ P beam, the scaled momentum. The results are based on approximately 520 000 events measured by the ALEPH detector at LEP during 1992. Charged particles are identified by their rate of ionization energy loss in the ALEPH Time Projection Chamber. The position, ξ*, of the peak in the ln(1/ z) distribution is determined, and the evolution of the peak position with centre-of-mass energy is compared with the prediction of QCD.

  14. Adiabatic Rearrangement of Hollow PV Towers

    Eric A Hendricks

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabatic heating from deep moist convection in the hurricane eyewall produces a towering annular structure of elevated potential vorticity (PV. This structure has been referred to as a hollow PV tower. The sign reversal of the radial gradient of PV satisfies the Charney-Stern necessary condition for combined barotropic-baroclinic instability. For thin enough annular structures, small perturbations grow exponentially, extract energy from the mean flow, and lead to hollow tower breakdown, with significant vortex structural and intensity change. The three-dimensional adiabatic rearrangements of two prototypical hurricane-like hollow PV towers (one thick and one thin are examined in an idealized framework. For both hollow towers, dynamic instability causes air parcels with high PV to be mixed into the eye preferentially at lower levels, where unstable PV wave growth rates are the largest. Little or no mixing is found to occur at upper levels. The mixing at lower and middle levels is most rapid for the breakdown of the thin hollow tower, consistent with previous barotropic results. For both hollow towers, this advective rearrangement of PV affects the tropical cyclone structure and intensity in a number of ways. First, the minimum central pressure and maximum azimuthal mean velocity simultaneously decrease, consistent with previous barotropic results. Secondly, isosurfaces of absolute angular momentum preferentially shift inward at low levels, implying an adiabatic mechanism by which hurricane eyewall tilt can form. Thirdly, a PV bridge, similar to that previously found in full-physics hurricane simulations, develops as a result of mixing at the isentropic levels where unstable PV waves grow most rapidly. Finally, the balanced mass field resulting from the PV rearrangement is warmer in the eye between 900 and 700 hPa. The location of this warming is consistent with observed warm anomalies in the eye, indicating that in certain instances the hurricane

  15. Adiabatic interaction representation and Floquet Theory: quantum state dynamics under periodic Hamiltonians with different energy scales

    Kampermann, Hermann; Bruss, Dagmar [Institut fuer theoretische Physik III, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Bain, Alex; Dumont, Randall [Department of Chemistry, McMaster University, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    We consider a quantum system which evolves under a time-dependent periodic Hamiltonian. We focus on the situation that the Hamiltonian contains terms which have large energy splittings in comparison to the periodic frequency of the Hamiltonian. An adiabatic interaction basis in Floquet space is used which allows to calculate accurate frequency spectra for an observable of a given quantum state. We exemplify the power of this framework by calculating the magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of a spin-(1)/(2) nucleus dipolar coupled to spin-1 or spin-(3)/(2) nuclei.

  16. Implementation of one-qubit holonomic rotation gate by adiabatic passage

    R Nader-Ali

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose a robust scheme, using tripod stimulated Raman adiabatic passage, to generate one-qubit rotation gate. In this scheme, a four-level atom interacts with three resonant laser pulses and time evolution of the corresponding coherent system is designed such that the rotation gate is implemented at the end of process. Rotation angle in this gate is holonomic and has a geometrical basis in the parameter space. We also explore the effect of spontaneous emission on the population transfer with numerical solution of Schrödinger and Liouville equations.

  17. Thin film NMR T1 measurement by MRFM using cyclic adiabatic inversion

    Kwon, Sungmin; Saun, Seung-Bo; Lee, Soonchil; Won, Soonho

    2014-03-01

    We obtained the NMR spectrum and the spin lattice relaxation time (T1) for thin film samples using Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM). The samples were Alq3, which is widely used as an organic light emitting diode (OLED), thin films of 150 nm thick and a bulk crystal. T1 was measured by using the cyclic adiabatic inversion method at a fixed frequency of 297 MHz and at 12 K. To confirm the reliability of our measurement technique we compared the result with that obtained by conventional NMR method. T1 of thin film samples was measured and compared with that of the bulk sample. thin film, MRFM.

  18. Adiabatic and Isocurvature Perturbation Projections in Multi-Field Inflation

    Gordon, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Current data are in good agreement with the predictions of single field inflation. However, the hemispherical asymmetry seen in the cosmic microwave background data, may hint at a potential problem. Generalizing to multi-field models may provide one possible explanation. A useful way of modeling perturbations in multi-field inflation is to investigate the projection of the perturbation along and perpendicular to the background fields' trajectory. These correspond to the adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations. However, it is important to note that in general there are no corresponding adiabatic and isocurvature fields. The purpose of this article is to highlight the distinction between a field redefinition and a perturbation projection. We provide a detailed derivation of the evolution of the adiabatic perturbation to show that no assumption of an adiabatic or isocurvature field is needed. We also show how this evolution equation is consistent with the field covariant evolution equations for the adiabatic pe...

  19. Adiabatic logic future trend and system level perspective

    Teichmann, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Adiabatic logic is a potential successor for static CMOS circuit design when it comes to ultra-low-power energy consumption. Future development like the evolutionary shrinking of the minimum feature size as well as revolutionary novel transistor concepts will change the gate level savings gained by adiabatic logic. In addition, the impact of worsening degradation effects has to be considered in the design of adiabatic circuits. The impact of the technology trends on the figures of merit of adiabatic logic, energy saving potential and optimum operating frequency, are investigated, as well as degradation related issues. Adiabatic logic benefits from future devices, is not susceptible to Hot Carrier Injection, and shows less impact of Bias Temperature Instability than static CMOS circuits. Major interest also lies on the efficient generation of the applied power-clock signal. This oscillating power supply can be used to save energy in short idle times by disconnecting circuits. An efficient way to generate the p...

  20. How detrimental is decoherence in adiabatic quantum computation?

    Albash, Tameem

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments with increasingly larger numbers of qubits have sparked renewed interest in adiabatic quantum computation, and in particular quantum annealing. A central question that is repeatedly asked is whether quantum features of the evolution can survive over the long time-scales used for quantum annealing relative to standard measures of the decoherence time. We reconsider the role of decoherence in adiabatic quantum computation and quantum annealing using the adiabatic quantum master equation formalism. We restrict ourselves to the weak-coupling and singular-coupling limits, which correspond to decoherence in the energy eigenbasis and in the computational basis, respectively. We demonstrate that decoherence in the instantaneous energy eigenbasis does not necessarily detrimentally affect adiabatic quantum computation, and in particular that a short single-qubit $T_2$ time need not imply adverse consequences for the success of the quantum adiabatic algorithm. We further demonstrate that boundary canc...

  1. Power spectra in the eikonal approximation with adiabatic and non-adiabatic modes

    Bernardeau, Francis; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    We use the so-called eikonal approximation, recently introduced in the context of cosmological perturbation theory, to compute power spectra for multi-component fluids. We demonstrate that, at any given order in standard perturbation theory, multi-point power spectra do not depend on the large-scale adiabatic modes. Moreover, we employ perturbation theories to decipher how non-adiabatic modes, such as a relative velocity between two different components, damp the small-scale matter power spectrum, a mechanism recently described in the literature. In particular, we do an explicit calculation at 1-loop order of this effect. While the 1-loop result eventually breaks down, we show how the damping effect can be fully captured by the help of the eikonal approximation. A relative velocity not only induces mode damping but also creates large-scale anisotropic modulations of the matter power spectrum amplitude. We illustrate this for the Local Group environment.

  2. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics with complex quantum trajectories. II. The adiabatic representation

    Zamstein, Noa; Tannor, David J. [Department of Chemical Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2012-12-14

    We present a complex quantum trajectory method for treating non-adiabatic dynamics. Each trajectory evolves classically on a single electronic surface but with complex position and momentum. The equations of motion are derived directly from the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, and the population exchange arises naturally from amplitude-transfer terms. In this paper the equations of motion are derived in the adiabatic representation to complement our work in the diabatic representation [N. Zamstein and D. J. Tannor, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A517 (2012)]. We apply our method to two benchmark models introduced by John Tully [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 1061 (1990)], and get very good agreement with converged quantum-mechanical calculations. Specifically, we show that decoherence (spatial separation of wavepackets on different surfaces) is already contained in the equations of motion and does not require ad hoc augmentation.

  3. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics with complex quantum trajectories. II. The adiabatic representation

    We present a complex quantum trajectory method for treating non-adiabatic dynamics. Each trajectory evolves classically on a single electronic surface but with complex position and momentum. The equations of motion are derived directly from the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, and the population exchange arises naturally from amplitude-transfer terms. In this paper the equations of motion are derived in the adiabatic representation to complement our work in the diabatic representation [N. Zamstein and D. J. Tannor, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A517 (2012)]. We apply our method to two benchmark models introduced by John Tully [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 1061 (1990)], and get very good agreement with converged quantum-mechanical calculations. Specifically, we show that decoherence (spatial separation of wavepackets on different surfaces) is already contained in the equations of motion and does not require ad hoc augmentation.

  4. Computational study of elastic and electronically inelastic scattering of Br by ground state I atoms: Role of potential curve crossing

    Two-state, close-coupled quantal computations of the elastic and inelastic scattering of ground-state I atoms by ground-state Br and spin--orbit excited Br* atoms have been carried out over a range of total energies E from 0.01 to 0.94 eV. The possibility of translational--electronic energy transfer arises from the 3Pi0+ potential curve crossing at E=0.25 eV, responsible for the well-known IBr predissociation. The Y, B, and V12(R) diabatic potentials have been obtained by judicious extension (and manipulation) of the spectroscopically derived B and B' adiabats. At energies below the threshold for Br* formation (E/sub th/=0.457 eV) collisions of I+Br are necessarily elastic, exhibiting both shape and compound-state resonances. These produce interesting interference patterns in the differential cross sections, but no significant inverse-predissociation resonance (which might have been anticipated for E> or =0.25 eV). The main features of the elastic scattering can be fairly well approximated considering only the lower adiabat, even at post threshold energies where the inelastic process becomes important. An oscillatory pattern found in the total elastic cross section has been identified with a barrier effect associated with the maximum in this B adiabat. Total inelastic cross sections are well reproduced by the closed-form Landau--Zener--Stueckelberg (LZS) approximation. The Boltzmann-averaged LZS rate constant for the collisional deactivation I+Br*→I+Br is calculated to be 1.8x10-11 cm3 sec-1 at 300 K (with only a slight temperature dependence over the range 300--1000 K). This large rate is due to the inverse predissociation mechanism, common

  5. Resonance shielding-factor cross-section processing technique validation based on tungsten decay heat experimental data

    This study presents a method to obtain corrected self-shielded radiative capture cross-sections for tungsten isotopes to be used for activation calculations. The approach used is based on the application of the Bondarenko shielding factor method to the 175-group AMPX master library by means of the Bonami-Nitawl scale-4.3 sequence calculation. The ANITA-4M activation code calculates the tungsten radioisotopes production and the decay heat using the self-shielded cross-sections from ENDF/B-VI, JEF-2.2 and JENDL-3.2 data files. Two irradiation scenarios (5 min and 7 h) in the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER)-like neutron flux spectrum defined by the fusion neutron source experiments are analyzed. The unshielded calculations result in discrepancy with experiment up to 70%, while the self-shielding treatment reduces drastically that discrepancy to less than few percents. In comparison to the experimental integral decay heat values provides a validation of the method used to deal with the self-shielding treatment

  6. Resonance shielding-factor cross-section processing technique validation based on tungsten decay heat experimental data

    Cepraga, D G; Frisoni, M

    2000-01-01

    This study presents a method to obtain corrected self-shielded radiative capture cross-sections for tungsten isotopes to be used for activation calculations. The approach used is based on the application of the Bondarenko shielding factor method to the 175-group AMPX master library by means of the Bonami-Nitawl scale-4.3 sequence calculation. The ANITA-4M activation code calculates the tungsten radioisotopes production and the decay heat using the self-shielded cross-sections from ENDF/B-VI, JEF-2.2 and JENDL-3.2 data files. Two irradiation scenarios (5 min and 7 h) in the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER)-like neutron flux spectrum defined by the fusion neutron source experiments are analyzed. The unshielded calculations result in discrepancy with experiment up to 70%, while the self-shielding treatment reduces drastically that discrepancy to less than few percents. In comparison to the experimental integral decay heat values provides a validation of the method used to deal with the sel...

  7. Measurements of Cross Sections and Forward-Backward Asymmetries at the Z Resonance and Determination of Electroweak Parameters

    Acciarri, M; Adriani, O; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Balandras, A; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brochu, F; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; Cozzoni, B; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Cucciarelli, S; Dai, T S; van Dalen, J A; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Dufournaud, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hidas, P; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Holzner, G; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Iashvili, I; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Khan, R A; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Koffeman, E; Kopp, A; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Krüger, A; Kuijten, H; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lassila-Perini, K M; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Likhoded, S A; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Lu, W; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Lugnier, L; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Marchesini, P A; Marian, G; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Merk, M; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Musy, M; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Organtini, G; Oulianov, A; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paoloni, A; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Pothier, J; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Raspereza, A V; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Seganti, A; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Sztaricskai, T; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, M; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, A; Zilizi, G; Zöller, M

    2000-01-01

    We report on measurements of hadronic and leptonic cross sections and leptonic forward-backward asymmetries performed with the L3 detector in the years $1993-95$.A total luminosity of 103 pb$^{-1}$ was collected at centre-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s} \\approx m_\\mathrm{Z}$ and $\\sqrt{s} \\approx m_\\mathrm{Z} \\pm 1.8$ GeVwhich corresponds to 2.5 million hadronic and 245 thousand leptonic events selected.These data lead to a significantly improved determination of Z parameters.From the total cross sections, combined with our measurements in $1990-92$,we obtain the final results:%%%\\begin{eqnarr ay*} m_\\mathrm{Z} = 91189.8 \\pm 3.1\\ \\mathrm{MeV} \\, , & & \\Gamma_\\mathrm{Z} = 2502.4 \\pm 4.2\\ \\mathrm{MeV} \\, , \\\\ \\Gamma_\\mathrm{had} = 1741.1 \\pm 3.8\\ \\mathrm{MeV} \\, , & & \\Gamma_\\ell = 84.14 \\pm 0.17\\ \\mathrm{MeV} \\,. \\label{eq:Zpara_abstract}\\end{eqnarray*}%%%An invisible width of $\\Gamma_\\mathrm{inv} = 499.1 \\pm 2.9$ MeV is derived which in the Standard Model yields for the numberof light neutrino spec...

  8. Bayesian Extraction of Deep UV Resonance Raman Signature of Fibrillar Cross-β Sheet Core based on H-D Exchange Data

    Shashilov, V. A.; Lednev, I. K.

    2007-11-01

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with many neurodegenerative diseases. The application of conventional biophysical techniques including solution NMR and X-ray crystallography for structural characterization of fibrils is limited because they are neither crystalline nor soluble. The Bayesian approach was utilized for extracting the deep UV resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectrum of the lysozyme fibrillar β-sheet based on the hydrogen-deuterium exchange spectral data. The problem was shown to be unsolvable when using blind source separation or conventional chemometrics methods because of the 100% correlation of the concentration profiles of the species under study. Information about the mixing process was incorporated by forcing the columns of the concentration matrix to be proportional to the expected concentration profiles. The ill-conditioning of the matrix was removed by concatenating it to the diagonal matrix with entries corresponding to the known pure spectra (sources). Prior information about the spectral features and characteristic bands of the spectra was taken into account using the Bayesian signal dictionary approach. The extracted DUVRR spectrum of the cross-β sheet core exhibited sharp bands indicating the highly ordered structure. Well resolved sub-bands in Amide I and Amide III regions enabled us to assign the fibril core structure to anti-parallel β-sheet and estimate the amide group facial angle Ψ in the cross-β structure. The elaborated Bayesian approach was demonstrated to be applicable for studying correlated biochemical processes.

  9. Quantal Description of Atomic Diamagnetism: the Quasi-Landau Resonances

    Wang, Qiaoling

    We describe atomic hydrogen diamagnetism within the framework of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. Our theoretical studies have used three descriptions: an adiabatic description, a multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT) description using an ab initio R-matrix approach, and a model description. The analysis has conclusively demonstrated that the diamagnetic spectrum can be viewed as a perturbed Rydberg spectrum. The adiabatic analysis provides a crude but useful picture to see the overall channel structure and the nature of the perturbing configurations, where the quasi-Landau resonances are the lowest states in each Landau channel which will perturb high Rydberg states in lower Landau channels once the nonadiabatic coupling is turned on. The ab initio calculation of the photoionization spectrum in the field range 10^3 -10^4 Tesla shows that the quasi -Landau resonances are broad interlopers which perturb high Rydberg states converging to the Landau thresholds, forming complex resonances. Also in these calculations, a new partial cross section analysis has been performed to predict the relative electron populations in different Landau channels. The population is found to depend on the azimuthal quantum number and the parity of final states. For photoionization from the hydrogen ground state of final states with m = 1, the electron is predicted to escape predominantly in the higher Landau channels. In contrast, for the final states with m = 0, it escapes in the lower channels. This property is reflected in the shape of autoionizing resonances, which are more like peaks for m = 1, but are more like dips (window resonances) for m = 0. In studying the features of the complex resonances, formed by the quasi-Landau resonances perturbing the high Rydberg states, we developed an analytical description using a model based on three interacting Rydberg channels, identifying the key dynamical quantities which control the appearance of a complex resonance and its evolution

  10. Oscillating adiabatic temperature change of 2D diamagnetic materials

    Studies on magnetocaloric effect generally concern ferromagnetic materials, due to their high magnetocaloric potential near phase transitions. Recently, this effect on diamagnetic materials was explored and oscillations on the entropy change observed as a consequence of the crossing of the Landau levels through the Fermi energy. The present paper explores the adiabatic temperature change in graphenes and thin films of non-relativistic diamagnetic materials and then compares the results with those from 3D diamagnets. Applying 10 T of magnetic field, the temperature change of a gold thin film reaches 1 K, while for bulk gold the temperature change is smaller than 6 mK. For graphenes, the temperature change reaches 4 K with a field of ∼1 T. - Highlights: • We studied magnetocaloric properties of 2D diamagnetic materials. • Temperature change of low-dimensional materials exhibits an oscillating behavior. • The effect of scattering from impurity in graphene strongly reduces the temperature change. • We propose an application involving field sensors

  11. Partial photoionization cross-sections of rare earths metals in the region of the 4d resonance

    The partial photoionization cross-sections of the 4d-, 5p-, 4f-shells and the valence band of Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu and Gd are measured in the region of the 4d → 4f excitation. The sum is compared with the corresponding absorption spectrum in order to estimate the importance of different decay channels of the excited 4d94fsup(N+1) configurations. For the heavy rare earth metals, which show a large 4f multiplet splitting, we demonstrate that the coupling of the 4f ionization to the 4d → 4f excitations strongly depends on the particular (4fsup(N-1)) sup(2S+1)Lsub(J) - multiplet lines. This effect is also discussed for the 5p multiplet lines in Eu which arise from the coupling of the 5p hole with the 4f electrons. (orig.)

  12. Neutron Resonance Parameters of 238U and the Calculated Cross Sections from the Reich-Moore Analysis of Experimental Data in the Neutron Energy Range from 0 keV to 20 keV

    Derrien, H

    2005-12-05

    The neutron resonance parameters of {sup 238}U were obtained from a SAMMY analysis of high-resolution neutron transmission measurements and high-resolution capture cross section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) in the years 1970-1990, and from more recent transmission and capture cross section measurements performed at the Geel Linear Accelerator (GELINA). Compared with previous evaluations, the energy range for this resonance analysis was extended from 10 to 20 keV, taking advantage of the high resolution of the most recent ORELA transmission measurements. The experimental database and the method of analysis are described in this report. The neutron transmissions and the capture cross sections calculated with the resonance parameters are compared with the experimental data. A description is given of the statistical properties of the resonance parameters and of the recommended values of the average parameters. The new evaluation results in a slight decrease of the effective capture resonance integral and improves the prediction of integral thermal benchmarks by 70 pcm to 200 pcm.

  13. A Crossed Pack-to-Cell Equalizer Based on Quasi-Resonant LC Converter with Adaptive Fuzzy Logic Equalization Control for Series-connected Lithium-Ion Battery Strings

    Shang, Yunlong; Zhang, Chenghui; Cui, Naxin;

    2015-01-01

    The equalization speed, efficiency, and control are the key issues of battery equalization. This paper proposes a crossed pack-to-cell equalizer based on quasi-resonant LC converter (QRLCC). The battery string is divided into M modules, and each module consists of N series-connected cells. The en...

  14. Kinetically constrained ring-polymer molecular dynamics for non-adiabatic chemical reactions

    We extend ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) to allow for the direct simulation of general, electronically non-adiabatic chemical processes. The kinetically constrained (KC) RPMD method uses the imaginary-time path-integral representation in the set of nuclear coordinates and electronic states to provide continuous equations of motion that describe the quantized, electronically non-adiabatic dynamics of the system. KC-RPMD preserves the favorable properties of the usual RPMD formulation in the position representation, including rigorous detailed balance, time-reversal symmetry, and invariance of reaction rate calculations to the choice of dividing surface. However, the new method overcomes significant shortcomings of position-representation RPMD by enabling the description of non-adiabatic transitions between states associated with general, many-electron wavefunctions and by accurately describing deep-tunneling processes across asymmetric barriers. We demonstrate that KC-RPMD yields excellent numerical results for a range of model systems, including a simple avoided-crossing reaction and condensed-phase electron-transfer reactions across multiple regimes for the electronic coupling and thermodynamic driving force

  15. Kinetically constrained ring-polymer molecular dynamics for non-adiabatic chemical reactions

    Menzeleev, Artur R.; Bell, Franziska; Miller, Thomas F., E-mail: tfm@caltech.edu [Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2014-02-14

    We extend ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) to allow for the direct simulation of general, electronically non-adiabatic chemical processes. The kinetically constrained (KC) RPMD method uses the imaginary-time path-integral representation in the set of nuclear coordinates and electronic states to provide continuous equations of motion that describe the quantized, electronically non-adiabatic dynamics of the system. KC-RPMD preserves the favorable properties of the usual RPMD formulation in the position representation, including rigorous detailed balance, time-reversal symmetry, and invariance of reaction rate calculations to the choice of dividing surface. However, the new method overcomes significant shortcomings of position-representation RPMD by enabling the description of non-adiabatic transitions between states associated with general, many-electron wavefunctions and by accurately describing deep-tunneling processes across asymmetric barriers. We demonstrate that KC-RPMD yields excellent numerical results for a range of model systems, including a simple avoided-crossing reaction and condensed-phase electron-transfer reactions across multiple regimes for the electronic coupling and thermodynamic driving force.

  16. Investigation of resonance structure of neutron cross-sections and α-value of 235U for different temperatures

    The time-of-flight spectra for γ-ray multiplicities from 1 to 15 were measured on the 122 m flight path of the IBR-30 pulsed neutron booster using the 16-section liquid scintillation detector with the 80 l total volume for thin metallic 235U radiator-sample (0.25 mm) with and without 0.5 mm thickness 235U filter-sample at two temperatures (100 deg. and 293 deg.). Multiplicity spectra and alpha values α=σγ/σf were obtained from time-of-flight spectra after subtracting background components for the energy groups over the range of 2.15-2150 eV with and without filter samples of 235U. The self-indication functions in capture and fission cross-sections for these two temperatures and the Doppler-coefficient for the alpha values were determined from the time-of-flight spectra of 3-rd and sum of the 6 to 9-th multiplicities. (author)

  17. Are the reactions of quinones on graphite adiabatic?

    Outer sphere electron transfer reactions on pure metal electrodes are often adiabatic and hence independent of the electrode material. Since it is not clear, whether adiabatic electron transfer can also occur on a semi-metal like graphite, we have re-investigated experimental data presented in a recent communication by Nissim et al. [Chemical Communications 48 (2012) 3294] on the reactions of quinones on graphite. We have supplemented their work by DFT calculations and conclude, that these reactions are indeed adiabatic. This contradicts the assertion of Nissim et al. that the rates are proportional to the density of states at the Fermi level

  18. Approximability of optimization problems through adiabatic quantum computation

    Cruz-Santos, William

    2014-01-01

    The adiabatic quantum computation (AQC) is based on the adiabatic theorem to approximate solutions of the Schrödinger equation. The design of an AQC algorithm involves the construction of a Hamiltonian that describes the behavior of the quantum system. This Hamiltonian is expressed as a linear interpolation of an initial Hamiltonian whose ground state is easy to compute, and a final Hamiltonian whose ground state corresponds to the solution of a given combinatorial optimization problem. The adiabatic theorem asserts that if the time evolution of a quantum system described by a Hamiltonian is l

  19. A note on the geometric phase in adiabatic approximation

    Tong, D M; Kwek, L C; Oh, C H

    2004-01-01

    It is widely held that the Berry phase of a quantum system is the geometric phase in adiabatic approximation. However, Pati and Rajagopal recently claimed that the Berry phase vanishes under strict adiabatic evolution. In this note, we reexamine and address this issue. In particular, we show that the use of the adiabatic theorem does not lead to this inconsistency. We also examine the difference between the Berry phase and the exact geometric phase. Here we find that the Berry phase may differ appreciably from the exact geometric phase if the evolution time is large enough.

  20. On the persistence of adiabatic shear bands

    Bassim M.N.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available It is generally agreed that the initiation and development of adiabatic shear bands (ASBs are manifestations of damage in metallic materials subjected to high strain rates and large strains as those due to impact in a Hopkinson Bar system. Models for evolution of these bands have been described in the literature. One question that has not received attention is how persistent these bands are and whether their presence and effect can be reversed or eliminated by using a process of thermal (heat treatment or thermo-mechanical treatment that would relieve the material from the high strain associated with ASBs and their role as precursors to crack initiation and subsequent failure. Since ASBs are more prevalent and more defined in BCC metals including steels, a study was conducted to investigate the best conditions of generating ASBs in a heat treatable steel, followed by determining the best conditions for heat treatment of specimens already damaged by the presence of ASBs in order to relieve the strains due to ASBs and restore the material to an apparent microstructure without the “scars” due to the previous presence of ASBs. It was found that heat treatment achieves the curing from ASBs. This presentation documents the process undertaken to achieve this objective.

  1. Graph isomorphism and adiabatic quantum computing

    Gaitan, Frank; Clark, Lane

    2014-03-01

    In the Graph Isomorphism (GI) problem two N-vertex graphs G and G' are given and the task is to determine whether there exists a permutation of the vertices of G that preserves adjacency and maps G --> G'. If yes (no), then G and G' are said to be isomorphic (non-isomorphic). The GI problem is an important problem in computer science and is thought to be of comparable difficulty to integer factorization. We present a quantum algorithm that solves arbitrary instances of GI, and which provides a novel approach to determining all automorphisms of a graph. The algorithm converts a GI instance to a combinatorial optimization problem that can be solved using adiabatic quantum evolution. Numerical simulation of the algorithm's quantum dynamics shows that it correctly distinguishes non-isomorphic graphs; recognizes isomorphic graphs; and finds the automorphism group of a graph. We also discuss the algorithm's experimental implementation and show how it can be leveraged to solve arbitrary instances of the NP-Complete Sub-Graph Isomorphism problem.

  2. Adiabatic fission barriers in superheavy nuclei

    Jachimowicz, P; Skalski, J

    2016-01-01

    Using the microscopic-macroscopic model based on the deformed Woods-Saxon single-particle potential and the Yukawa-plus-exponential macroscopic energy we calculated static fission barriers $B_{f}$ for 1305 heavy and superheavy nuclei $98\\leq Z \\leq 126$, including even - even, odd - even, even - odd and odd - odd systems. For odd and odd-odd nuclei, adiabatic potential energy surfaces were calculated by a minimization over configurations with one blocked neutron or/and proton on a level from the 10-th below to the 10-th above the Fermi level. The parameters of the model that have been fixed previously by a fit to masses of even-even heavy nuclei were kept unchanged. A search for saddle points has been performed by the "Imaginary Water Flow" method on a basic five-dimensional deformation grid, including triaxiality. Two auxiliary grids were used for checking the effects of the mass asymmetry and hexadecapole non-axiallity. The ground states were found by energy minimization over configurations and deformations...

  3. Dynamically encircling exceptional points in a waveguide: asymmetric mode switching from the breakdown of adiabaticity

    Doppler, Jörg; Böhm, Julian; Kuhl, Ulrich; Girschik, Adrian; Libisch, Florian; Milburn, Thomas J; Rabl, Peter; Moiseyev, Nimrod; Rotter, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Physical systems with loss or gain feature resonant modes that are decaying or growing exponentially with time. Whenever two such modes coalesce both in their resonant frequency and their rate of decay or growth, a so-called "exceptional point" occurs, around which many fascinating phenomena have recently been reported to arise. Particularly intriguing behavior is predicted to appear when encircling an exceptional point sufficiently slowly, like a state-flip or the accumulation of a geometric phase. Experiments dedicated to this issue could already successfully explore the topological structure of exceptional points, but a full dynamical encircling and the breakdown of adiabaticity inevitably associated with it remained out of reach of any measurement so far. Here we demonstrate that a dynamical encircling of an exceptional point can be mapped onto the problem of scattering through a two-mode waveguide, which allows us for the first time to access the elusive effects occurring in this context. Specifically, w...

  4. Adiabatic model of (d, p) reactions with explicitly energy-dependent nonlocal potentials

    Johnson, RC; Timofeyuk, NK

    2014-01-01

    We have developed an approximate way of dealing with explicit energy-dependence of non-local nucleon optical potentials as used to predict the $(d,p)$ cross sections within the adiabatic theory. Within this approximation, the non-local optical potentials have to be evaluated at an energy shifted from half the incident deuteron energy by the $n-p$ kinetic energy averaged over the range of the $n-p$ interaction and then treated as an energy-independent non-local potential. Thus the evaluation o...

  5. Adiabatically switched-on electrical bias in continuous systems, and the Landauer-Büttiker formula

    Cornean, Horia; Duclos, Pierre; Nenciu, Gheorghe;

    Consider a three dimensional system which looks like a cross-connected pipe system, i.e. a small sample coupled to a finite number of leads. We investigate the current running through this system, in the linear response regime, when we adiabatically turn on an electrical bias between leads....... The main technical tool is the use of a finite volume regularization, which allows us to define the current coming out of a lead as the time derivative of its charge. We finally prove that in virtually all physically interesting situations, the conductivity tensor is given by a Landauer-Büttiker type...

  6. General dynamical description of quasi-adiabatically encircling exceptional points

    Milburn, Thomas J; Holmes, Catherine A; Portolan, Stefano; Rotter, Stefan; Rabl, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The appearance of so-called exceptional points in the complex spectra of non-Hermitian systems is often associated with phenomena that contradict our physical intuition. One example of particular interest is the state-exchange process predicted for an adiabatic encircling of an exceptional point. In this work we analyze this process for the generic system of two coupled oscillator modes with loss or gain. We identify a characteristic system evolution consisting of periods of quasi-stationarity interrupted by abrupt non-adiabatic transitions. Our findings explain the breakdown of the adiabatic theorem as well as the chiral behavior noticed previously in this context, and we provide a unified framework to describe quasi-adiabatic dynamical effects in non-Hermitian systems in a qualitative and quantitative way.

  7. Adiabatic and isocurvature perturbation projections in multi-field inflation

    Current data are in good agreement with the predictions of single field inflation. However, the hemispherical asymmetry, seen in the cosmic microwave background data, may hint at a potential problem. Generalizing to multi-field models may provide one possible explanation. A useful way of modeling perturbations in multi-field inflation is to investigate the projection of the perturbation along and perpendicular to the background fields' trajectory. These correspond to the adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations. However, it is important to note that in general there are no corresponding adiabatic and isocurvature fields. The purpose of this article is to highlight the distinction between a field redefinition and a perturbation projection. We provide a detailed derivation of the evolution of the isocurvature perturbation to show that no assumption of an adiabatic or isocurvature field is needed. We also show how this evolution equation is consistent with the field covariant evolution equations for the adiabatic perturbation in the flat field space limit

  8. AN ADIABATIC APPROACH FOR LOW POWER FULL ADDER DESIGN

    Prof. Dinesh Chandra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, several adiabatic logic styles have been reported. This paper deals with the design of a 1-bit full adder using several adiabatic logic styles, which are derived from static CMOS logic, without a large change. The full adders are designed using 180nm technology parameters provided by predictive technology and simulated using HSPICE. The full adders designed are compared in terms of average power consumption with different values of load capacitance, temperature and input frequency. The different designs of full adder are also compared on the basis of propagation delay exhibit by them. It is found that, full adders designed with adiabatic logic styles tends to consume very low power in comparison to full adder designed with static CMOS logic. Under certain operating conditions, one of adiabatic designs of full adder achieves upto 74% power saving in comparison to the full adder designedwith static CMOS logic.

  9. Magnesium Diboride Superconducting Coils for Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADR's) Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators(ADR's) for space it is desirable to have very light weight, small diameter, high current density superconducting wires...

  10. Application of adiabatic calorimetry to metal systems. Final report

    Research on the application of adiabatic calorimetry to metal systems is described. Investigations into formation of pearlite in steels, ferromagnetic effects, cold working and annealing, solid solution alloys, pure solid metals, and pure liquid metals, are briefly described

  11. Case Study of Indirect Adiabatic Cooling System in Historical Building

    Brahmanis, A; Lešinskis, A; Krūmiņš, A

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to investigate the efficiency of indirect adiabatic chiller-based cooling system efficiency dependence of outdoor air humidity. The system is located in historical building, in temperate climate of Latvia.

  12. Adiabatic instability in coupled dark energy-dark matter models

    Bean, Rachel; Flanagan, Eanna E.; Trodden, Mark

    2007-01-01

    We consider theories in which there exists a nontrivial coupling between the dark matter sector and the sector responsible for the acceleration of the universe. Such theories can possess an adiabatic regime in which the quintessence field always sits at the minimum of its effective potential, which is set by the local dark matter density. We show that if the coupling strength is much larger than gravitational, then the adiabatic regime is always subject to an instability. The instability, whi...

  13. Hybrid adiabatic potentials in the QCD string model

    Kalashnikova, Yu S; Kalashnikova, Yu.S.

    2003-01-01

    The short- and intermediate-distance behaviour of the hybrid adiabatic potentials is calculated in the framework of the QCD string model. The calculations are performed with the inclusion of Coulomb force. Spin-dependent force and the so-called string correction term are treated as perturbation at the leading potential-type regime. Reasonably good agreement with lattice measurements takes place for adiabatic curves excited with magnetic components of field strength correlators.

  14. Adiabatic frequency conversion of quantum optical information in atomic vapor

    Vewinger, Frank; Appel, Juergen; Figueroa, Eden; Lvovsky, A. I.

    2006-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a quantum communication protocol that enables frequency conversion and routing of quantum optical information in an adiabatic and thus robust way. The protocol is based on electromagnetically-induced transparency in systems with multiple excited levels: transfer and/or distribution of optical states between different signal modes is implemented by adiabatically changing the control fields. The proof-of-principle experiment is performed using the hyperfine levels ...

  15. Adiabatic CMB perturbations in pre-big bang string cosmology

    Enqvist, Kari; Enqvist, Kari; Sloth, Martin S.

    2002-01-01

    We consider the pre-big bang scenario with a massive axion field which starts to dominate energy density when oscillating in an instanton-induced potential and subsequently reheats the universe as it decays into photons, thus creating adiabatic CMB perturbations. We find that the fluctuations in the axion field can give rise to a nearly flat spectrum of adiabatic perturbations with a spectral tilt $\\Delta n$ in the range $-0.1 \\lesssim \\Delta n \\lesssim 0.3$.

  16. Realization of adiabatic Aharonov-Bohm scattering with neutrons

    Sjöqvist, Erik; Almquist, Martin; Mattsson, Ken; Gürkan, Zeynep Nilhan; Hessmo, Björn

    2015-11-01

    The adiabatic Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect is a manifestation of the Berry phase acquired when some slow variables take a planar spin around a loop. While the effect has been observed in molecular spectroscopy, direct measurement of the topological phase shift in a scattering experiment has been elusive in the past. Here, we demonstrate an adiabatic AB effect by explicit simulation of the dynamics of unpolarized very slow neutrons that scatter on a long straight current-carrying wire.

  17. Adiabatic Invariant Treatment of a Collapsing Sphere of Quantized Dust

    Roberto CasadioDipartimento di Fisica, Universita' di Bologna and INFN, Bologna; Fabio Finelli(Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita' di Bologna and INFN, Bologna); Giovanni Venturi(Department of Physics, University of Bologna, and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bologna, Italy)

    2015-01-01

    The semiclassical collapse of a sphere of quantized dust is studied. A Born-Oppenheimer decomposition is performed for the wave function of the system and the semiclassical limit is considered for the gravitational part. The method of adiabatic invariants for time dependent Hamiltonians is then employed to find (approximate) solutions to the quantum dust equations of motions. This allows us to obtain corrections to the adiabatic approximation of the dust states associated with the time evolut...

  18. Time Development of Exponentially Small Non-Adiabatic Transitions

    Hagedorn, George A.; Joye, Alain

    2003-01-01

    Optimal truncations of asymptotic expansions are known to yield approximations to adiabatic quantum evolutions that are accurate up to exponentially small errors. In this paper, we rigorously determine the leading order non--adiabatic corrections to these approximations for a particular family of two--level analytic Hamiltonian functions. Our results capture the time development of the exponentially small transition that takes place between optimal states by means of a particular switching fu...

  19. Adiabatic Quantum Programming: Minor Embedding With Hard Faults

    Klymko, Christine; Sullivan, Blair D.; Humble, Travis S.

    2012-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum programming defines the time-dependent mapping of a quantum algorithm into an underlying hardware or logical fabric. An essential step is embedding problem-specific information into the quantum logical fabric. We present algorithms for embedding arbitrary instances of the adiabatic quantum optimization algorithm into a square lattice of specialized unit cells. These methods extend with fabric growth while scaling linearly in time and quadratically in footprint. We also provi...

  20. Vacuum vessel eddy current modeling for TFTR adiabatic compression experiments

    DeLucia, J.; Bell, M.; Wong, K.L.

    1985-07-01

    A relatively simple current filament model of the TFTR vacuum vessel is described. It is used to estimate the three-dimensional structure of magnetic field perturbations in the vicinity of the plasma that arise from vacuum vessel eddy currents induced during adiabatic compression. Eddy currents are calculated self-consistently with the plasma motion. The Shafranov formula and adiabatic scaling laws are used to model the plasma. Although the specific application is to TFTR, the present model is of generation applicability.

  1. Vacuum vessel eddy current modeling for TFTR adiabatic compression experiments

    A relatively simple current filament model of the TFTR vacuum vessel is described. It is used to estimate the three-dimensional structure of magnetic field perturbations in the vicinity of the plasma that arise from vacuum vessel eddy currents induced during adiabatic compression. Eddy currents are calculated self-consistently with the plasma motion. The Shafranov formula and adiabatic scaling laws are used to model the plasma. Although the specific application is to TFTR, the present model is of generation applicability

  2. Non Adiabatic Centrifugal Compressor Gas Dynamic Performance Definition

    Soldatova, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Most centrifugal compressors operate in conditions with negligible heat transfer (adiabatic compression). Their plant tests conditions are similar or close to adiabatic conditions. Test regulations establish measures to diminish influence of a heat transfer “compressor body – atmospheric air” to an exit temperature. Therefore a temperature rise in a compressor is used to calculate a work input coefficient and efficiency. Unlike it high pressure centrifugal compressors of gas turbines and supe...

  3. Adiabatic boiling of two-phase coolant in upward flow

    A mathematical model of the process of adiabatic boiling (self-condensation) of a two-phase coolant in upward (downward) flow is developed. The model takes account of changes in phase properties with static pressure decrease. The process is investigated numerically. Approximate analytical formulas for design calculations are obtained. It is shown that effects of adiabatic boiling (self-condensation) should be taken into account when calculating two-phase coolant flow in stretched vertical channels

  4. Age and gender specific normal values of left ventricular mass, volume and function for gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging: a cross sectional study

    Allansdotter-Johnsson Ase

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge about age-specific normal values for left ventricular mass (LVM, end-diastolic volume (EDV, end-systolic volume (ESV, stroke volume (SV and ejection fraction (EF by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR is of importance to differentiate between health and disease and to assess the severity of disease. The aims of the study were to determine age and gender specific normal reference values and to explore the normal physiological variation of these parameters from adolescence to late adulthood, in a cross sectional study. Methods Gradient echo CMR was performed at 1.5 T in 96 healthy volunteers (11–81 years, 50 male. Gender-specific analysis of parameters was undertaken in both absolute values and adjusted for body surface area (BSA. Results Age and gender specific normal ranges for LV volumes, mass and function are presented from the second through the eighth decade of life. LVM, ESV and EDV rose during adolescence and declined in adulthood. SV and EF decreased with age. Compared to adult females, adult males had higher BSA-adjusted values of EDV (p = 0.006 and ESV (p Conclusion LV volumes, mass and function vary over a broad age range in healthy individuals. LV volumes and mass both rise in adolescence and decline with age. EF showed a rapid decline in adolescence compared to changes throughout adulthood. These findings demonstrate the need for age and gender specific normal ranges for clinical use.

  5. Assessment of pulmonary venous stenosis after radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation by magnetic resonance angiography: a comparison of linear and cross-sectional area measurements

    Tintera, Jaroslav; Porod, Vaclav; Rolencova, Eva; Fendrych, Pavel [Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Department of Radiology, Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Cihak, Robert; Mlcochova, Hanka; Kautzner, Josef [Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Prague 4 (Czech Republic)

    2006-12-15

    One of the recognised complications of catheter ablation is pulmonary venous stenosis. The aim of this study was to compare two methods of evaluation of pulmonary venous diameter for follow-up assessment of the above complication: (1) a linear approach evaluating two main diameters of the vein, (2) semiautomatically measured cross-sectional area (CSA). The study population consists of 29 patients. All subjects underwent contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CeMRA) of the pulmonary veins (PVs) before and after the ablation; 14 patients were also scanned 3 months later. PV diameter was evaluated from two-dimensional multiplanar reconstructions by measuring either the linear diameter or CSA. A comparison between pulmonary venous CSA and linear measurements revealed a systematic difference in absolute values. This difference was not significant when comparing the relative change CSA and quadratic approximation using linear extents (linear approach). However, a trend towards over-estimation of calibre reduction was documented for the linear approach. Using CSA assessment, significant PV stenosis was found in ten PVs (8%) shortly after ablation. Less significant PV stenosis, ranging from 20 to 50% was documented in other 18 PVs (15%). CeMRA with CSA assessment of the PVs is suitable method for evaluation of PV diameters. (orig.)

  6. Measurement of thermal neutron cross section and resonance integral of the reaction {sup 135}Cs(n,{gamma}){sup 136}Cs

    Katoh, Toshio; Nakamura, Shoji; Harada, Hideo [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Hatsukawa, Yuichi; Shinohara, Nobuo; Hata, Kentaro; Kobayashi, Katsutoshi; Motoishi, Shoji; Tanase, Masakazu

    1997-03-01

    The thermal neutron(2,200 m/s neutron) capture cross section({sigma}{sub 0}) and the resonance integral(I{sub 0}) of the reaction {sup 135}Cs(n,{gamma}){sup 136}Cs were measured by an activation method. Targets of radioactive cesium, which include {sup 135}Cs, {sup 137}Cs and stable {sup 133}Cs, were irradiated with reactor neutrons within or without a Cd shield case. The ratio of the number of nuclei of {sup 135}Cs to that of {sup 137}Cs was measured with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. This ratio and the ratio of activity of {sup 136}Cs to that of {sup 137}Cs were used for deduction of the {sigma}{sub 0} and the I{sub 0} of {sup 135}Cs. The {sigma}{sub 0} and the I{sub 0} of the reaction {sup 135}Cs(n,{sigma}){sup 136}Cs were 8.3 {+-} 0.3 barn and 38.1 {+-} 2.6 barn, respectively. (author)

  7. Adiabatic and non-adiabatic charge pumping in a single-level molecular motor

    We propose a design for realizing quantum charge pump based on a recent proposal for a molecular motor (Seldenthuis J S et al 2010 ACS Nano 4 6681). Our design is based on the presence of a moiety with a permanent dipole moment which can rotate, thereby modulating the couplings to metallic contacts at both ends of the molecule. Using the non-equilibrium Keldysh Green’s function formalism (NEGF), we show that our design indeed generates a pump current. In the non-interacting pump, the variation of frequency from adiabatic to non-adiabatic regime, can be used to control the direction as well as the amplitude of the average current. The effect of Coulomb interaction is considered within the first- and the second- order perturbation. The numerical implementation of the scheme is quite demanding, and we develop an analytical approximation to obtain a speed-up giving results within a reasonable time. We find that the amplitude of the average pumped current can be controlled by both the driving frequency and the Coulomb interaction. The direction of of pumped current is shown to be determined by the phase difference between left and right anchoring groups. (paper)

  8. Nonlinear resonance: Performance report, August 1, 1989--November 30, 1991

    Kevorkian, J.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses research concentrated on slowly varying nonlinear oscillatory systems. Some of the topics discussed are; adiabatic invariants and transient resonance in very slowly varying hamiltonians systems; sustained resonance in very slowly varying hamiltonian systems; free-electron lasers with very slow wiggler taper; and bursting oscillators. (LSP)

  9. Nonlinear resonance: Performance report, August 1, 1989--November 30, 1991

    Kevorkian, J.

    1991-12-31

    This report discusses research concentrated on slowly varying nonlinear oscillatory systems. Some of the topics discussed are; adiabatic invariants and transient resonance in very slowly varying hamiltonians systems; sustained resonance in very slowly varying hamiltonian systems; free-electron lasers with very slow wiggler taper; and bursting oscillators. (LSP)

  10. Quantitative dosing by nuclear magnetic resonance

    The measurement of the absolute concentration of a heavy water reference containing approximately 99.8 per cent of D2O has been performed, by an original magnetic resonance method ('Adiabatic fast passage method') with a precision of 5.10-5 on the D2O concentration. (author)

  11. Nonadiabatic Geometric Angle in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Connection

    Cherbal, Omar; Maamache, Mustapha; Drir, Mahrez

    2005-01-01

    By using the Grassmannian invariant-angle coherents states approach, the classical analogue of the Aharonov-Anandan nonadiabatic geometrical phase is found for a spin one-half in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). In the adiabatic limit, the semi-classical relation between the adiabatic Berry’s phase and Hannay’s angle gives exactly the experimental result observed by Suter et al[12].

  12. Random matrix approach to quantum adiabatic evolution algorithms

    We analyze the power of the quantum adiabatic evolution algorithm (QAA) for solving random computationally hard optimization problems within a theoretical framework based on random matrix theory (RMT). We present two types of driven RMT models. In the first model, the driving Hamiltonian is represented by Brownian motion in the matrix space. We use the Brownian motion model to obtain a description of multiple avoided crossing phenomena. We show that nonadiabatic corrections in the QAA are due to the interaction of the ground state with the 'cloud' formed by most of the excited states, confirming that in driven RMT models, the Landau-Zener scenario of pairwise level repulsions is not relevant for the description of nonadiabatic corrections. We show that the QAA has a finite probability of success in a certain range of parameters, implying a polynomial complexity of the algorithm. The second model corresponds to the standard QAA with the problem Hamiltonian taken from the RMT Gaussian unitary ensemble (GUE). We show that the level dynamics in this model can be mapped onto the dynamics in the Brownian motion model. For this reason, the driven GUE model can also lead to polynomial complexity of the QAA. The main contribution to the failure probability of the QAA comes from the nonadiabatic corrections to the eigenstates, which only depend on the absolute values of the transition amplitudes. Due to the mapping between the two models, these absolute values are the same in both cases. Our results indicate that this 'phase irrelevance' is the leading effect that can make both the Markovian- and GUE-type QAAs successful

  13. Dynamical fluctuations in classical adiabatic processes: General description and their implications

    Zhang, Qi; Gong, Jiangbin; Oh, C. H.

    2010-01-01

    Dynamical fluctuations in classical adiabatic processes are not considered by the conventional classical adiabatic theorem. In this work a general result is derived to describe the intrinsic dynamical fluctuations in classical adiabatic processes. Interesting implications of our general result are discussed via two subtopics, namely, an intriguing adiabatic geometric phase in a dynamical model with an adiabatically moving fixed-point solution, and the possible "pollution" to Hannay's angle or...

  14. Fermi liquid theory of resonant spin pumping

    Moca, C. P.; Alex, A.; Shnirman, A.; Zarand, G.

    2013-01-01

    We study resonant all-electric adiabatic spin pumping through a quantum dot with two nearby levels by using a Fermi liquid approach in the strongly interacting regime, combined with a projective numerical renormalization group (NRG) theory. Due to spin-orbit coupling, a strong spin pumping resonance emerges at every charging transition, which allows for the transfer of a spin $~ \\hbar/2$ through the device in a single pumping cycle. Depending on the precise geometry of the device, controlled ...

  15. Semiclassical quantization via adiabatic switching. I. Choice of tori and initial conditions for two-dimensional systems

    Zakrzewski, J.; Saini, S.; Taylor, H.S.

    1988-10-15

    A general theoretical base and a general strategy for implementing semiclassical quantization using the adiabatic-switching method are presented for two-dimensional systems. The method proposed does not depend on specialized coordinates, trajectory, or surfaces-of-section studies and is generalizable to multidimensional systems. The choice of the initial tori for the switching procedure is accomplished by simple diagonalizations of small-dimensional matrix representations of invariant operators obtained from perturbation theory. The method gives quantum energies at a useful level of accuracy for the vast majority of states in many of the well-known nonresonant and resonant Hamiltonian cases. Many eigenvalues previously thought unobtainable when the adiabatic-switching method is used are obtained in a quite simple manner.

  16. Phenomenon of transformed adiabatic shear band surrounded by deformed adiabatic shear band of ductile metal

    WANG Xue-bin

    2008-01-01

    The coexistent phenomenon of deformed and transformed adiabatic shear bands(ASBs) of ductile metal was analyzed using the JOHNSON-COOK model and gradient-dependent plasticity(GDP). The effects of melting point, density, heat capacity and work to heat conversion factor were investigated. Higher work to heat conversion factor, lower density, lower heat capacity and higher melting point lead to wider transformed ASB and higher local plastic shear deformation between deformed and transformed ASBs. Higher work to heat conversion factor, lower density, lower heat capacity and lower melting point cause higher local plastic shear deformation in the deformed ASB. Three reasons for the scatter in experimental data on the ASB width were pointed out and the advantages of the work were discussed. If the transformed ASB width is used to back-calculate the internal length parameter in the GDP, undoubtedly, the parameter will be extremely underestimated.

  17. Neutron Thermal Cross Sections, Westcott Factors, Resonance Integrals, Maxwellian Averaged Cross Sections and Astrophysical Reaction Rates Calculated from the ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, JENDL-4.0, ROSFOND-2010, CENDL-3.1 and EAF-2010 Evaluated Data Libraries

    Pritychenko, B.; Mughabghab, S. F.

    2012-12-01

    We present calculations of neutron thermal cross sections, Westcott factors, resonance integrals, Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates for 843 ENDF materials using data from the major evaluated nuclear libraries and European activation file. Extensive analysis of newly-evaluated neutron reaction cross sections, neutron covariances, and improvements in data processing techniques motivated us to calculate nuclear industry and neutron physics quantities, produce s-process Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates, systematically calculate uncertainties, and provide additional insights on currently available neutron-induced reaction data. Nuclear reaction calculations are discussed and new results are presented. Due to space limitations, the present paper contains only calculated Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and their uncertainties. The complete data sets for all results are published in the Brookhaven National Laboratory report.

  18. Assessment of the Unresolved Resonance Treatment for Cross-section and Covariance Representation. A report by the Working Party on International Evaluation Co-operation of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee

    This report summarises the work performed under WPEC Subgroup 32 (SG32) on issues pertinent to the methodology used in the unresolved resonance region (URR). The main purpose of SG32 was to verify the validity of the Single-level Breit-Wigner (SLBW) cross-section representation in the URR for self-shielding calculations. While SG32 work was under way, several other developments related to the URR on this subject came into play that had a direct impact on the results of calculations. The work described in this report focuses on: - testing of the SLBW formalism in the URR for fissile and fertile isotopes; - URR covariance representation; - interpolation issue with a URR resonance parameter for the infinitely dilute cross-section calculations; - ENDF URR parameter representation based on the LSSF = 0 or LSSF = 1 option

  19. Irreversible adiabatic decoherence of dipole-interacting nuclear-spin pairs coupled with a phonon bath

    Domínguez, F. D.; González, C. E.; Segnorile, H. H.; Zamar, R. C.

    2016-02-01

    We study the quantum adiabatic decoherence of a multispin array, coupled with an environment of harmonic phonons, in the framework of the theory of open quantum systems. We follow the basic formal guidelines of the well-known spin-boson model, since in this framework it is possible to derive the time dependence of the reduced density matrix in the adiabatic time scale, without resorting to coarse-graining procedures. However, instead of considering a set of uncoupled spins interacting individually with the boson field, the observed system in our model is a network of weakly interacting spin pairs; the bath corresponds to lattice phonons, and the system-environment interaction is generated by the variation of the dipole-dipole energy due to correlated shifts of the spin positions, produced by the phonons. We discuss the conditions that the model must meet in order to fit within the adiabatic regime. By identifying the coupling of the dipole-dipole spin interaction with the low-frequency acoustic modes as the source of decoherence, we calculate the decoherence function of the reduced spin density matrix in closed way, and estimate the decoherence rate of a typical element of the reduced density matrix in one- and three-dimensional models of the spin array. Using realistic values for the various parameters of the model we conclude that the dipole-phonon mechanism can be particularly efficient to degrade multispin coherences, when the number of active spins involved in a given coherence is high. The model provides insight into the microscopic irreversible spin dynamics involved in the buildup of quasiequilibrium states and in the coherence leakage during refocusing experiments in nuclear magnetic resonance of crystalline solids.

  20. Age and gender specific normal values of left ventricular mass, volume and function for gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging: a cross sectional study

    Knowledge about age-specific normal values for left ventricular mass (LVM), end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), stroke volume (SV) and ejection fraction (EF) by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is of importance to differentiate between health and disease and to assess the severity of disease. The aims of the study were to determine age and gender specific normal reference values and to explore the normal physiological variation of these parameters from adolescence to late adulthood, in a cross sectional study. Gradient echo CMR was performed at 1.5 T in 96 healthy volunteers (11–81 years, 50 male). Gender-specific analysis of parameters was undertaken in both absolute values and adjusted for body surface area (BSA). Age and gender specific normal ranges for LV volumes, mass and function are presented from the second through the eighth decade of life. LVM, ESV and EDV rose during adolescence and declined in adulthood. SV and EF decreased with age. Compared to adult females, adult males had higher BSA-adjusted values of EDV (p = 0.006) and ESV (p < 0.001), similar SV (p = 0.51) and lower EF (p = 0.014). No gender differences were seen in the youngest, 11–15 year, age range. LV volumes, mass and function vary over a broad age range in healthy individuals. LV volumes and mass both rise in adolescence and decline with age. EF showed a rapid decline in adolescence compared to changes throughout adulthood. These findings demonstrate the need for age and gender specific normal ranges for clinical use

  1. Physics on the adiabatically changed Finslerian manifold and cosmology

    Lipovka, Anton A

    2016-01-01

    In present paper we confirm our previous result [4] that Planck constant is adiabatic invariant of electromagnetic field propagating on the adiabatically changed Finslerian manifold. Direct calculation from cosmological parameters gives value h=6x10(-27) (erg s). We also confirm that Planck constant (and hence other fundamental constants which depend on h) is varied on time due to changing of geometry. As an example the variation of the fine structure constant is calculated. Its relative variation ((da/dt)/a) consist 1.0x10(-18) (1/s). We show that on the Finsler manifold characterized by adiabatically changed geometry, classical free electromagnetic field is quantized geometrically, from the properties of the manifold in such manner that adiabatic invariant of field is ET=6x10(-27)=h. Electrodynamic equations on the Finslerian manifold are suggested. It is stressed that quantization naturally appears from these equations and is provoked by adiabatically changed geometry of manifold. We consider in details tw...

  2. Adiabatic condition and the quantum hitting time of Markov chains

    We present an adiabatic quantum algorithm for the abstract problem of searching marked vertices in a graph, or spatial search. Given a random walk (or Markov chain) P on a graph with a set of unknown marked vertices, one can define a related absorbing walk P' where outgoing transitions from marked vertices are replaced by self-loops. We build a Hamiltonian H(s) from the interpolated Markov chain P(s)=(1-s)P+sP' and use it in an adiabatic quantum algorithm to drive an initial superposition over all vertices to a superposition over marked vertices. The adiabatic condition implies that, for any reversible Markov chain and any set of marked vertices, the running time of the adiabatic algorithm is given by the square root of the classical hitting time. This algorithm therefore demonstrates a novel connection between the adiabatic condition and the classical notion of hitting time of a random walk. It also significantly extends the scope of previous quantum algorithms for this problem, which could only obtain a full quadratic speedup for state-transitive reversible Markov chains with a unique marked vertex.

  3. Global adiabaticity and non-Gaussianity consistency condition

    Romano, Antonio Enea; Sasaki, Misao

    2016-01-01

    In the context of single-field inflation, the conservation of the curvature perturbation on comoving slices, $R_c$, on super-horizon scales is one of the assumptions necessary to derive the consistency condition between the squeezed limit of the bispectrum and the spectrum of the primordial curvature perturbation. However, the conservation of $R_c$ holds only after the perturbation has reached the adiabatic limit where the constant mode of $R_c$ dominates over the other (usually decaying) mode. In this case, the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation defined in the thermodynamic sense, $\\delta P_{nad}\\equiv\\delta P-c_w^2\\delta\\rho$ where $c_w^2=\\dot P/\\dot\\rho$, usually becomes also negligible on superhorizon scales. Therefore one might think that the adiabatic limit is the same as thermodynamic adiabaticity. This is in fact not true. In other words, thermodynamic adiabaticity is not a sufficient condition for the conservation of $R_c$ on super-horizon scales. In this paper, we consider models that satisfies $\\d...

  4. A two-dimensional space-time kinetics model using the adiabatic approach

    A two-dimensional space-time kinetics code, based on the adiabatic method is described. In this approach, the space, energy and time dependent flux is factorized into an amplitude factor and a shape function, the latter being assumed to be slowly varying in time as compared to the former. Further, one does not distinguish between the shapes of delayed and prompt neutron sources. The shape function is calculated at selected times by solving numerically a multigroup static eigen-value diffusion equation by the finite difference method. Between two consecutive time-steps, the point kinetics equations are solved by Cohen's method. Feedback is introduced through changes in cross-sections. With the changed cross-sections, the static calculation is repeated. The cycle is repeated till convergence is achieved in reactivity and temperatures. The code was tested against a typical fast reactor benchmark. The results agree well with those obtained elsewhere. (auth.)

  5. On the determination of adiabatic compressibility, isoentropy coefficient and other properties of two-phase media

    Presented are calculated dependences for adiabatic compressibility, isoentropy coefficient and thermodynamic sound velocity of a two-phase media with homogeneous disperse structure being in a state of equilibrium. The character of the change of the values mentioned for vapor water media at the change of vapor mass composition in the mixture from zero to 1 is shown. Comparison of the calculated data as to dependences obtained with the experimental ones for critical regimes of vapor-water flow outflow through short and long cylindrical channels with sharp entrance rims. The calculation error does not exceed approximately 12%. Analysis of the results obtained showed that at outflow through short channels of metastable vapor liquid flow the main characteristics, like at outflow through long channels, are determined by the pressure in the exit cross section, mass vapor content and specific volume of the mixture, which are calculated with account for real overheating of the liquid to the exit cross section. At critical regime of outflow through the very long channels, when one can not neglect hydraulic resistance in the channel and the process is not isoentropic, the pressure and mass vapor content in the exit cross section also unambiguously determine the value of adiabatic compressibility of two-phase media, sound velocity and isoentropy coefficient in the cross section. Conclusion is made that the dependences obtained can be used with sufficient for practical purposes accuracy when solving different engineering problems, as well as for the calculations of the mixture consumption at flow of the reactor contours NAI with WWR

  6. Development of an adiabatic field rotation system to measure spin polarization of unstable nuclei

    Highlights: • An adabatic field rotation system has been developed for efficient β-NMR experiments. • The system enables to measure spin polarization separately from β-NMR measurements. • A magnetic field of 300 mT produced with Nd can be adiabatically inverted in 150 ms. • The system performance was investigated with spin-polarized 20F. -- Abstract: A system for the spin-polarization measurement of unstable nuclei has been developed, in which the alternation of nuclear spins takes place by adiabatically rotating a holding magnetic field for the preservation of spin polarization, without applying a resonant oscillating magnetic field for NMR. The performance of the system was studied with spin-polarized 20F (Iπ = 2+,T1/2 = 11.163 s) produced in the 19F(d→,p)20→F reaction at E/A = 7 MeV at the RIKEN RIBF facility. In the measurement, the magnitude of 20F spin polarization |P(20F)|=1.6(2)% was successfully observed with the new system

  7. Spectroscopic imaging with improved gradient modulated constant adiabaticity pulses on high-field clinical scanners

    Andronesi, Ovidiu C.; Ramadan, Saadallah; Ratai, Eva-Maria; Jennings, Dominique; Mountford, Carolyn E.; Sorensen, A. Gregory

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to design and implement constant adiabaticity gradient modulated pulses that have improved slice profiles and reduced artifacts for spectroscopic imaging on 3 T clinical scanners equipped with standard hardware. The newly proposed pulses were designed using the gradient offset independent adiabaticity (GOIA, Tannus and Garwood [13]) method using WURST modulation for RF and gradient waveforms. The GOIA-WURST pulses were compared with GOIA-HS n (GOIA based on nth-order hyperbolic secant) and FOCI (frequency offset corrected inversion) pulses of the same bandwidth and duration. Numerical simulations and experimental measurements in phantoms and healthy volunteers are presented. GOIA-WURST pulses provide improved slice profile that have less slice smearing for off-resonance frequencies compared to GOIA-HS n pulses. The peak RF amplitude of GOIA-WURST is much lower (40% less) than FOCI but slightly higher (14.9% more) to GOIA-HS n. The quality of spectra as shown by the analysis of lineshapes, eddy currents artifacts, subcutaneous lipid contamination and SNR is improved for GOIA-WURST. GOIA-WURST pulse tested in this work shows that reliable spectroscopic imaging could be obtained in routine clinical setup and might facilitate the use of clinical spectroscopy.

  8. Adiabaticity and gravity theory independent conservation laws for cosmological perturbations

    Romano, Antonio Enea; Sasaki, Misao

    2015-01-01

    We carefully study the implications of adiabaticity for the behavior of cosmological perturbations. There are essentially three similar but different definitions of non-adiabaticity: one is appropriate for a thermodynamic fluid $\\delta P_{nad}$, another is for a general matter field $\\delta P_{c,nad}$, and the last one is valid only on superhorizon scales. The first two definitions coincide if $c_s^2=c_w^2$ where $c_s$ is the propagation speed of the perturbation, while $c_w^2=\\dot P/\\dot\\rho$. Assuming the adiabaticity in the general sense, $\\delta P_{c,nad}=0$, we derive a relation between the lapse function in the comoving slicing $A_c$ and $\\delta P_{nad}$ valid for arbitrary matter field in any theory of gravity, by using only momentum conservation. The relation implies that as long as $c_s\

  9. Integrated polarization rotator/converter by stimulated Raman adiabatic passage.

    Xiong, Xiao; Zou, Chang-Ling; Ren, Xi-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2013-07-15

    We proposed a polarization rotator inspired by stimulated Raman adiabatic passage model from quantum optics, which is composed of a signal waveguide and an ancillary waveguide. The two orthogonal modes in signal waveguide and the oblique mode in ancillary waveguide form a Λ-type three-level system. By controlling the width of signal waveguide and the gap between two waveguides, adiabatic conversion between two orthogonal modes can be realized in the signal waveguide. With such adiabatic passage, polarization conversion is completed within 150 μm length, with the efficiencies over 99% for both conversions between horizontal polarization and vertical polarization. In addition, such a polarization rotator is quite robust against fabrication error, allowing a wide range of tolerances for the rotator geometric parameters. Our work is not only significative to photonic simulations of coherent quantum phenomena with engineered photonic waveguides, but also enlightens the practical applications of these phenomena in optical device designs. PMID:23938558

  10. Adiabatic fluctuations from cosmic strings in a contracting universe

    We show that adiabatic, super-Hubble, and almost scale invariant density fluctuations are produced by cosmic strings in a contracting universe. An essential point is that isocurvature perturbations produced by topological defects such as cosmic strings on super-Hubble scales lead to a source term which seeds the growth of curvature fluctuations on these scales. Once the symmetry has been restored at high temperatures, the isocurvature seeds disappear, and the fluctuations evolve as adiabatic ones in the expanding phase. Thus, cosmic strings may be resurrected as a mechanism for generating the primordial density fluctuations observed today

  11. Non-adiabatic pumping through interacting quantum dots

    Cavaliere, Fabio; Governale, Michele; König, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    We study non-adiabatic two-parameter charge and spin pumping through a single-level quantum dot with Coulomb interaction. For the limit of weak tunnel coupling and in the regime of pumping frequencies up to the tunneling rates, $\\Omega \\lesssim \\Gamma/\\hbar$, we perform an exact resummation of contributions of all orders in the pumping frequency. As striking non-adiabatic signatures, we find frequency-dependent phase shifts in the charge and spin currents, which allow for an effective single-...

  12. Adiabatic theory of ionization of atoms by intense laser pulses

    As a first step towards the adiabatic theory of ionization of atoms by intense laser pulses, here we consider the simplest one-dimensional zero-range potential model. The asymptotic solution to the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in the adiabatic regime is obtained and the photoelectron spectrum is calculated. The factorization formula for the photoelectron spectrum in the back-rescattering region, first suggested by Morishita et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 013903 (2008)] on the basis of ab initio calculations, is derived analytically.

  13. Classical nuclear motion coupled to electronic non-adiabatic transitions

    Agostini, Federica; Gross, E K U

    2014-01-01

    We present a detailed derivation and numerical tests of a new mixed quantum-classical scheme to deal with non-adiabatic processes. The method is presented as the zero-th order approximation to the exact coupled dynamics of electrons and nuclei offered by the factorization of the electron-nuclear wave function [A. Abedi, N. T. Maitra and E. K. U. Gross, Phys. Rev. Lett., 105 (2010)]. Numerical results are presented for a model system for non-adiabatic charge transfer in order to test the performance of the method and to validate the underlying approximations.

  14. Classical nuclear motion coupled to electronic non-adiabatic transitions

    Agostini, Federica; Abedi, Ali; Gross, E. K. U.

    2014-12-01

    Based on the exact factorization of the electron-nuclear wave function, we have recently proposed a mixed quantum-classical scheme [A. Abedi, F. Agostini, and E. K. U. Gross, Europhys. Lett. 106, 33001 (2014)] to deal with non-adiabatic processes. Here we present a comprehensive description of the formalism, including the full derivation of the equations of motion. Numerical results are presented for a model system for non-adiabatic charge transfer in order to test the performance of the method and to validate the underlying approximations.

  15. Classical nuclear motion coupled to electronic non-adiabatic transitions

    Agostini, Federica; Abedi, Ali; Gross, E. K. U. [Max-Planck Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Germany)

    2014-12-07

    Based on the exact factorization of the electron-nuclear wave function, we have recently proposed a mixed quantum-classical scheme [A. Abedi, F. Agostini, and E. K. U. Gross, Europhys. Lett. 106, 33001 (2014)] to deal with non-adiabatic processes. Here we present a comprehensive description of the formalism, including the full derivation of the equations of motion. Numerical results are presented for a model system for non-adiabatic charge transfer in order to test the performance of the method and to validate the underlying approximations.

  16. Classical nuclear motion coupled to electronic non-adiabatic transitions

    Based on the exact factorization of the electron-nuclear wave function, we have recently proposed a mixed quantum-classical scheme [A. Abedi, F. Agostini, and E. K. U. Gross, Europhys. Lett. 106, 33001 (2014)] to deal with non-adiabatic processes. Here we present a comprehensive description of the formalism, including the full derivation of the equations of motion. Numerical results are presented for a model system for non-adiabatic charge transfer in order to test the performance of the method and to validate the underlying approximations

  17. Nanoscale resolution for fluorescence microscopy via adiabatic passage

    Rubio, Juan Luis; Ahufinger, Verònica; Mompart, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    We propose the use of the subwavelength localization via adiabatic passage technique for fluorescence microscopy with nanoscale resolution in the far field. This technique uses a {\\Lambda}-type medium coherently coupled to two laser pulses: the pump, with a node in its spatial profile, and the Stokes. The population of the {\\Lambda} system is adiabatically transferred from one ground state to the other except at the node position, yielding a narrow population peak. This coherent localization allows fluorescence imaging with nanometer lateral resolution. We derive an analytical expression to asses the resolution and perform a comparison with the coherent population trapping and the stimulated-emission-depletion techniques.

  18. Adiabatic and isothermal compressibility in the liquid state

    The paper reviews the work carried out on the adiabatic and isothermal compressibility of liquid alkali metals. Saturated liquid states are discussed, including thermodynamic relations, adiabatic compressibility and isothermal compressibility. Results for the compressibility, and other related quantities, for the saturated liquids: lithium, potassium, rubidium, caesium and sodium, over the temperature range approx.= 300 - 18000 K, are presented. Subcooled liquid states are also examined with respect to its thermodynamic relations, and compressibility results (and other related quantities) for the same elements are given. An assessment of errors and data reliability is briefly discussed. (U.K.)

  19. High beta lasing in micropillar cavities with adiabatic layer design

    Lermer, M.; Gregersen, Niels; Lorke, M.;

    2013-01-01

    We report on lasing in optically pumped adiabatic micropillar cavities, based on the AlAs/GaAs material system. A detailed study of the threshold pump power and the spontaneous emission β factor in the lasing regime for different diameters dc is presented. We demonstrate a reduction of the thresh...... threshold pump power by over 2 orders of magnitude from dc = 2.25 μm down to 0.95 μm. Lasing with β factors exceeding 0.5 shows that adiabatic micropillars are operating deeply in the cavity quantum electrodynamics regime....

  20. Quantum pumping in graphene nanoribbons at resonant transmission

    Grichuk, E.; Manykin, E.

    2010-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum charge pumping in graphene nanoribbon double barrier structures with armchair and zigzag edges in the resonant transmission regime is analyzed. Using recursive Green's function method we numerically calculate the pumped charge for pumping contours encircling a resonance. We find that for armchair ribbons the whole resonance line contributes to the pumping of a single electron (ignoring double spin degeneracy) per cycle through the device. The case of zigzag ribbons is more i...

  1. Efficient isotropic magnetic resonators

    Martin, O. J. F.; Gay-Balmaz, P.

    2002-01-01

    We study experimentally and numerically a novel three-dimensional magnetic resonator structure with high isotropy. It is formed by crossed split-ring resonators and has a response independent of the illumination direction in a specific plane. The utilization of such elements to build a finite left-handed medium is discussed. (C) 2002 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Excitation cross sections for the ns 2S yields np 2P resonance transitions in Mg(+) (n = 3) and Zn(+) (n = 4) using electron-energy-loss and merged-beams methods

    Smith, Steven J.; Chutjian, A.; Mitroy, J.; Tayal, S. S.; Henry, Ronald J. W.; Man, K.-F.; Mawhorter, R. J.; Williams, I. D.

    1993-01-01

    Electron-excitation cross sections are reported for the 3s 2S yields 3p 2P(h, k) resonance transition in Mg(+) at energies from threshold (4.43 eV) to approximately 9 times threshold (40.0 eV). The electron-energy-loss merged-beams technique used in these measurements is described in detail. In addition, the method of separating contributions of the elastically scattered (Coulomb) and the inelastically scattered electrons in the present Mg(+) case and previously reported Zn(+) results is described. Comparisons in the experimental energy range are made for Mg(+) with the two five-state close-coupling theoretical calculations carried out herein, and with other published close-coupling, distorted-wave, and semiempirical calculations. The present Mg(+) cross sections and Zn(+) cross sections from earlier measurements are tabulated.

  3. Exploiting adiabatically switched RF-field for manipulating spin hyperpolarization induced by parahydrogen

    A method for precise manipulation of non-thermal nuclear spin polarization by switching a RF-field is presented. The method harnesses adiabatic correlation of spin states in the rotating frame. A detailed theory behind the technique is outlined; examples of two-spin and three-spin systems prepared in a non-equilibrium state by Para-Hydrogen Induced Polarization (PHIP) are considered. We demonstrate that the method is suitable for converting the initial multiplet polarization of spins into net polarization: compensation of positive and negative lines in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, which is detrimental when the spectral resolution is low, is avoided. Such a conversion is performed for real two-spin and three-spin systems polarized by means of PHIP. Potential applications of the presented technique are discussed for manipulating PHIP and its recent modification termed signal amplification by reversible exchange as well as for preparing and observing long-lived spin states

  4. Adiabatic and non-adiabatic electron transfer in solutions: A self-consistent approach beyond the Condon approximation

    Calculational schemes enabling to go beyond crude Condon approximation in non-adiabatic electron transfer reactions are discussed with the use of continuum approximation for the solvent polarization. An algorithm for the self-consistent introduction of an effective reaction coordinate in the adiabatic transition is suggested. Effects due to deviations from the Born-Oppenheimer approximation in bridge-assisted electron transfer reactions are discussed. Interpolation formulae covering limits of coherent and sequential electron transfer in bridge-assisted processes are presented. Simple equations determining a parametric dependence of the transition probability on the reaction free energy in crude Condon approximation are included. (author)

  5. High Sensitivity Refractometer Based on TiO₂-Coated Adiabatic Tapered Optical Fiber via ALD Technology.

    Zhu, Shan; Pang, Fufei; Huang, Sujuan; Zou, Fang; Guo, Qiang; Wen, Jianxiang; Wang, Tingyun

    2016-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) technology is introduced to fabricate a high sensitivity refractometer based on an adiabatic tapered optical fiber. Different thicknesses of titanium dioxide (TiO₂) nanofilm were coated around the tapered fiber precisely and uniformly under different deposition cycles. Attributed to the higher refractive index of the TiO₂ nanofilm compared to that of silica, an asymmetric Fabry-Perot (F-P) resonator could be constructed along the fiber taper. The central wavelength of the F-P resonator could be controlled by adjusting the thickness of the TiO₂ nanofilm. Such a F-P resonator is sensitive to changes in the surrounding refractive index (SRI), which is utilized to realize a high sensitivity refractometer. The refractometer developed by depositing 50.9-nm-thickness TiO₂ on the tapered fiber shows SRI sensitivity as high as 7096 nm/RIU in the SRI range of 1.3373-1.3500. Due to TiO₂'s advantages of high refractive index, lack of toxicity, and good biocompatibility, this refractometer is expected to have wide applications in the biochemical sensing field. PMID:27537885

  6. On Models of Nonlinear Evolution Paths in Adiabatic Quantum Algorithms

    In this paper, we study two different nonlinear interpolating paths in adiabatic evolution algorithms for solving a particular class of quantum search problems where both the initial and final Hamiltonian are one-dimensional projector Hamiltonians on the corresponding ground state. If the overlap between the initial state and final state of the quantum system is not equal to zero, both of these models can provide a constant time speedup over the usual adiabatic algorithms by increasing some another corresponding “complexity. But when the initial state has a zero overlap with the solution state in the problem, the second model leads to an infinite time complexity of the algorithm for whatever interpolating functions being applied while the first one can still provide a constant running time. However, inspired by a related reference, a variant of the first model can be constructed which also fails for the problem when the overlap is exactly equal to zero if we want to make up the 'intrinsic' fault of the second model — an increase in energy. Two concrete theorems are given to serve as explanations why neither of these two models can improve the usual adiabatic evolution algorithms for the phenomenon above. These just tell us what should be noted when using certain nonlinear evolution paths in adiabatic quantum algorithms for some special kind of problems. (general)

  7. Scalings for a traveling mirror adiabatic magnetic compressor

    Bellan, P. M.

    1982-01-01

    Detailed practical scaling relations for a traveling mirror adiabatic magnetic compressor are derived, and an example is given of how this technique could be used to translate, compress, and heat the Los Alamos FRX-C reversed field theta pinch plasma.

  8. Adiabatic waves along interfacial layers near the critical point

    Gouin, Henri

    2008-01-01

    Near the critical point, isothermal interfacial zones are investigated starting from a non-local density of energy. From the equations of motion of thermocapillary fluids, we point out a new kind of adiabatic waves propagating along the interfacial layers. The waves are associated with the second derivatives of densities and propagate with a celerity depending on the proximity of the critical point.

  9. When an Adiabatic Irreversible Expansion or Compression Becomes Reversible

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Ferreira, J. M.; Soares, A. A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to a better understanding of the concepts of a "reversible process" and "entropy". For this purpose, an adiabatic irreversible expansion or compression is analysed, by considering that an ideal gas is expanded (compressed), from an initial pressure P[subscript i] to a final pressure P[subscript f], by being placed in…

  10. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit.

    Barends, R; Shabani, A; Lamata, L; Kelly, J; Mezzacapo, A; Las Heras, U; Babbush, R; Fowler, A G; Campbell, B; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z; Chiaro, B; Dunsworth, A; Jeffrey, E; Lucero, E; Megrant, A; Mutus, J Y; Neeley, M; Neill, C; O'Malley, P J J; Quintana, C; Roushan, P; Sank, D; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; White, T C; Solano, E; Neven, H; Martinis, John M

    2016-06-01

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable. PMID:27279216

  11. Evolutions of Yang Phase Under Cyclic Condition and Adiabatic Condition

    QIAN Shang-Wu; GU Zhi-Yu

    2005-01-01

    There are three non-integrable phases in literatures: Berry phase, Aharonov-Anandan phase, and Yang phase. This article discusses the evolutions of Yang phase under the cyclic condition and the adiabatic condition for the generaltime-dependent harmonic oscillator, thus reveals the intimate relations between these three non-integrable phases.

  12. Adiabatic CMB perturbations in pre-big bang string cosmology

    Enqvist, Kari; Sloth, Martin Snoager

    2001-01-01

    We consider the pre-big bang scenario with a massive axion field which starts to dominate energy density when oscillating in an instanton-induced potential and subsequently reheats the universe as it decays into photons, thus creating adiabatic CMB perturbations. We find that the fluctuations in...

  13. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit

    Barends, R.; Shabani, A.; Lamata, L.; Kelly, J.; Mezzacapo, A.; Heras, U. Las; Babbush, R.; Fowler, A. G.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Lucero, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J. Y.; Neeley, M.; Neill, C.; O’Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Solano, E.; Neven, H.; Martinis, John M.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable.

  14. Evolutions of Yang Phase Under Cyclic Condition and Adiabatic Condition

    There are three non-integrable phases in literatures: Berry phase, Aharonov-Anandan phase, and Yang phase. This article discusses the evolutions of Yang phase under the cyclic condition and the adiabatic condition for the general time-dependent harmonic oscillator, thus reveals the intimate relations between these three non-integrable phases.

  15. Adiabatic single scan two-dimensional NMR spectrocopy.

    Pelupessy, Philippe

    2003-10-01

    New excitation schemes, based on the use adiabatic pulses, for single scan two-dimensional NMR experiments (Frydman et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 2002, 99, 15 858-15 862) are introduced. The advantages are discussed. Applications in homo- and heteronuclear experiments are presented. PMID:14519020

  16. A Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm for Factorization and Its Experimental Implementation

    Peng, Xinhua; Liao, Zeyang; Xu, Nanyang; Qin, Gan; Zhou, Xianyi; Suter, Dieter; Du, Jiangfeng

    2008-01-01

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm capable of factorizing numbers, using fewer qubits than Shor's algorithm. We implement the algorithm in an NMR quantum information processor and experimentally factorize the number 21. Numerical simulations indicate that the running time grows only quadratically with the number of qubits.

  17. Adiabatic and diabatic aerosol transport to the Jungfraujoch

    Lugauer, M.; Baltensperger, U.; Furger, M.; Jost, D.T.; Schwikowski, M.; Gaeggeler, H.W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Synoptic scale vertical motion, here detected by the geopotential height of the 500 hPa surface, mainly accounts for the aerosol transport to the Jungfraujoch in winter. In summer, diabatic convection provides the dominant vertical transport mechanism. Nevertheless, synoptic scale adiabatic motion still determines whether diabatic convection can develop. (author) 2 figs., 2 refs.

  18. Dark Energy and Dark Matter from an additional adiabatic fluid

    Dunsby, Peter K S; Reverberi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    The Dark Sector is described by an additional barotropic fluid which evolves adiabatically during the universe's history and whose adiabatic exponent $\\gamma$ is derived from the standard definitions of specific heats. Although in general $\\gamma$ is a function of the redshift, the Hubble parameter and its derivatives, we find that our assumptions lead necessarily to solutions with $\\gamma = $ constant in a FLRW universe. The adiabatic fluid acts effectively as the sum of two distinct components, one evolving like non-relativistic matter and the other depending on the value of the adiabatic index. This makes the model particularly interesting as a way of simultaneously explaining the nature of both Dark Energy and Dark Matter, at least at the level of the background cosmology. The $\\Lambda$CDM model is included in this family of theories when $\\gamma = 0$. We fit our model to SNIa, $H(z)$ and BAO data, discussing the model selection criteria. The implications for the early-universe and the growth of small per...

  19. On the hydrogen-air adiabatic isochoric complete combustion pressure

    A simple and fast method for calculating the AICC state (adiabatic Isochoric Complete Combustion) for the hydrogen-air reaction is presented. By comparison with more detailed algorithms it is shown that the proposed method produces satisfactory results, and is thus a viable alternative in situations where the use of detailed algorithms or of tables is too time-consuming. (orig.)

  20. Neutron total and capture cross section measurements and resonance parameter analysis of tungsten from 0.01 eV to 200 eV

    Werner, C.J.; Block, R.C.; Slovacek, R.E.; Overberg, M.E.; Moretti, B.E. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Environmental and Energy Engineering Dept.; Burke, J.A.; Leinweber, G.; Drindak, N.J. [Lockheed Martin Corp., Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1998-06-15

    Natural tungsten metal was measured using neutron time-of-flight spectroscopy at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) Gaerttner Laboratory linear accelerator to determine the tungsten resonance parameters. Three separate measurements were performed: transmission, capture, and self-indication. Previous measurements did not employ all three experiment types and used less sophisticated methods. The current work improves on the published tungsten data base and reduces resonance parameter uncertainties.