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Sample records for adhesively bonded shell

  1. Interface Fracture in Adhesively Bonded Shell Structures

    Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    2007-01-01

    Two methods for the prediction of crack propagation through the interface of adhesively bonded shells are discussed. One is based on a fracture mechanics approach; the other is based on a cohesive zone approach. Attention is focussed on predicting the shape of the crack front and the critical...

  2. Computational Chemistry of Adhesive Bonds

    Phillips, Donald H.

    1999-01-01

    This investigation is intended to determine the electrical mechanical, and chemical properties of adhesive bonds at the molecular level. The initial determinations will be followed by investigations of the effects of environmental effects on the chemistry and properties of the bond layer.

  3. Adhesives for orthodontic bracket bonding

    Déborah Daniella Diniz Fonseca

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The advent of acid etching, introduced by Buonocore in 1955, brought the possibility of bonding between the bracket base and enamel, contributing to more esthetic and conservative orthodontics. This direct bracket bonding technique has brought benefits such as reduced cost and time in performing the treatment, as well as making it easier to perform oral hygiene. The aim of this study was to conduct a survey of published studies on orthodontic bracket bonding to dental enamel. It was verified that resin composites and glass ionomer are the most studied and researched materials for this purpose. Resin-modified glass ionomer, with its biocompatibility, capacity of releasing fluoride and no need for acid etching on the tooth structure, has become increasingly popular among dentists. However, due to the esthetic and mechanical properties of light polymerizable resin composite, it continues to be one of the adhesives of choice in the bracket bonding technique and its use is widely disseminated.

  4. Mechanical strength of adhesive-bonding

    In order to meet the prospective application of a GFRP dewar for energy storage system using a large superconducting magnet, the dewar with a complex structure together with a large size are desired to be made. It is difficult to manufacture such a type of the dewars in one united body. These dewars can be manufactured by the adhesive-bonding method. In the present study, the mechanical strength of adhesive-bonding is studied from this point of view. The mechanical strength of the adhesive-bonding has been investigated by the static tensile method and the impact loading method using small test samples. From the static tensile tests, the following results have been obtained. For the sample adhesive-bonded with insertion structure, the mechanical strength of the adhesive-bonding is found to depend on the adhesives used and on the difference of the thermal contraction between the materials which are adhesive-bonded each other. Using a soft adhesive as Araldite 106, the mechanical strength of the adhesive-bonding is small at room temperature, but it remarkably increases at cryogenic temperatures. For a hard adhesive as Araldite 103 and Stycast 2850 FT, it is large at room temperature, and it further increases at cryogenic temperatures. The dewar has to be strong enough not only at cryogenic temperatures but also at room temperature. A soft adhesive is not suitable for constructing the dewar. For the sample adhesive-bonded with screwing structure, the mechanical strength of the adhesive-bonding depends on the shear strength of GFRP itself. The mechanical strength of the adhesive-bonded part increases with the decreasing temperature. Therefore, this screwing method is advantageous for the construction of the dewar. According to the impact loading tests, it is found that the adhesive-bonding of screwing structure is not brittle at cryogenic temperature. This is due to inherent property of GFRP. (J.P.N.)

  5. Characterization of adhesively bonded joints using bulk adhesive properties

    Kon, Haruhiko

    1991-01-01

    Though using bulk adhesive properties to predict adhesively bonded joint response has yet to be proven infallible, based upon the success of previous works, this effort attempts to shed some light on the stresses present in a typical automotive bonded joint. Adhesive material properties obtained in previous works were used in a finite element analysis of a simulated automotive joint to predict the stresses in that joint. The automotive joint analyzed was a simplified repr...

  6. Effect of adhesive thickness on adhesively bonded T-joint

    The aim of this work is to analyze the effect of adhesive thickness on tensile strength of adhesively bonded stainless steel T-joint. Specimens were made from SUS 304 Stainless Steel plate and SUS 304 Stainless Steel perforated plate. Four T-joint specimens with different adhesive thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm) were made. Experiment result shows T-joint specimen with adhesive thickness of 1.0 mm yield highest maximum load. Identical T-joint specimen jointed by spot welding was also tested. Tensile test shows welded T-Joint had eight times higher tensile load than adhesively bonded T-joint. However, in low pressure application such as urea granulator chamber, high tensile strength is not mandatory. This work is useful for designer in fertilizer industry and others who are searching for alternative to spot welding

  7. Dynamic analysis of two adhesively bonded rods

    Kenneth L. Kuttler

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This work presents two models for the dynamic analysis of two rods that are adhesively bonded. The first model assumes that the adhesive is an elasto-plastic material and that complete debonding occurs when the stress reaches the yield limit. In the second model the degradation of the adhesive is described by the introduction of material damage. Failure occurs when the material is completely damaged, or the damage reaches a critical floor value. Both models are analyzed and the existence of a weak solution is established for the model with damage. In the quasistatic case, a new condition for adhesion is found as the limit of the adhesive thickness tends to zero.

  8. Ultrasonic Nondestructive Characterization of Adhesive Bonds

    Qu, Jianmin

    1999-01-01

    Adhesives and adhesive joints are widely used in various industrial applications to reduce weight and costs, and to increase reliability. For example, advances in aerospace technology have been made possible, in part, through the use of lightweight materials and weight-saving structural designs. Joints, in particular, have been and continue to be areas in which weight can be trimmed from an airframe through the use of novel attachment techniques. In order to save weight over traditional riveted designs, to avoid the introduction of stress concentrations associated with rivet holes, and to take full advantage of advanced composite materials, engineers and designers have been specifying an ever-increasing number of adhesively bonded joints for use on airframes. Nondestructive characterization for quality control and remaining life prediction has been a key enabling technology for the effective use of adhesive joints. Conventional linear ultrasonic techniques generally can only detect flaws (delamination, cracks, voids, etc) in the joint assembly. However, more important to structural reliability is the bond strength. Although strength, in principle, cannot be measured nondestructively, a slight change in material nonlinearity may indicate the onset of failure. Furthermore, microstructural variations due to aging or under-curing may also cause changes in the third order elastic constants, which are related to the ultrasonic nonlinear parameter of the polymer adhesive. It is therefore reasonable to anticipate a correlation between changes in the ultrasonic nonlinear acoustic parameter and the remaining bond strength. It has been observed that higher harmonics of the fundamental frequency are generated when an ultrasonic wave passes through a nonlinear material. It seems that such nonlinearity can be effectively used to characterize bond strength. Several theories have been developed to model this nonlinear effect. Based on a microscopic description of the nonlinear

  9. Dynamic strength of molecular adhesion bonds.

    Evans, E; Ritchie, K

    1997-01-01

    In biology, molecular linkages at, within, and beneath cell interfaces arise mainly from weak noncovalent interactions. These bonds will fail under any level of pulling force if held for sufficient time. Thus, when tested with ultrasensitive force probes, we expect cohesive material strength and strength of adhesion at interfaces to be time- and loading rate-dependent properties. To examine what can be learned from measurements of bond strength, we have extended Kramers' theory for reaction k...

  10. Advances in modeling and design of adhesively bonded systems

    Kumar, S

    2013-01-01

    The book comprehensively charts a way for industry to employ adhesively bonded joints to make systems more efficient and cost-effective Adhesively bonded systems have found applications in a wide spectrum of industries (e.g., aerospace, electronics, construction, ship building, biomedical, etc.) for a variety of purposes. Emerging adhesive materials with improved mechanical properties have allowed adhesion strength approaching that of the bonded materials themselves. Due to advances in adhesive materials and the many potential merits that adhesive bonding offers, adhesive bonding has replac

  11. Improved stress prediction in adhesive bonded optical components

    Vreugd, J. de; Voert, M.J.A. te; Nijenhuis, J.R.; Pijnenburg, J.A.C.M.; Tabak, E.

    2012-01-01

    Adhesives are widely used in optomechanical structures for bonding optical components to their mounts. The main advantage of using adhesives is the excellent strength to weight ratio. Adhesive bonding is seen as a desirable joining technique as it allows for greater flexibility in design. A disadvantage of adhesives however is the limited dimensional stability and loadability. To design stable optical mounts, accurate prediction of stresses and deformation is therefore needed. Adhesives show ...

  12. A comparison of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with four different orthodontic adhesives

    Sharma, Sudhir; Tandon, Pradeep; Nagar, Amit; Singh, Gyan P; Singh, Alka; Chugh, Vinay K

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study is to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of stainless steel (SS) orthodontic brackets bonded with four different orthodontic adhesives. Materials and Methods: Eighty newly extracted premolars were bonded to 0.022 SS brackets (Ormco, Scafati, Italy) and equally divided into four groups based on adhesive used: (1) Rely-a-Bond (self-cure adhesive, Reliance Orthodontic Product, Inc., Illinois, USA), (2) Transbond XT (light-cure adhesive, 3M Unitek, CA, U...

  13. Bond Assembly FOD Zones - A Procedure for Assuring Acceptable Adhesion

    Evans, Kurt; Wurth, Laura; Mitchell, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Rocket motor components are primarily assembled by adhesion. a) For example, the RSRM (Reusable Solid Rocket Motor - part of the Space Shuttle Boosters) system contains 10,000 sq ft of bondline area. b) Rocket motors contain a variety of adhesive/substrate bond systems c) Bond system performance requirements also vary. To assemble reliable components, ATK Space Systems and customers invest substantial resources to the study of bond assembly processes. a) Surface and adhesion science; b) Adhesive chemistry; c) Process parameters; d) Contamination effects.

  14. Application of Bonded Joints for Quantitative Analysis of Adhesion

    Jarmila Trpčevská

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of hot-dip coated steel sheets is associated with properties of the zinc coatings on steel substrate. For the characterization of the adhesion behaviour of zinc coating on steel various tests were employed. The study was focused on quantification assessment of galvanized coating adhesion to substrates. Methods for evaluation of the bonding strength of zinc coating by the shear strength and the T-peel tests applying four special types of adhesives were used. The experimental tests of bonded joints show that the adhesion of the zinc coating to the substrate was higher than that of the applied adhesive with the highest strength.

  15. Microleakage under orthodontic brackets bonded with different adhesive systems

    Alkis, Huseyin; Turkkahraman, Hakan; Adanir, Necdet

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This in vitro study aimed to compare the microleakage of orthodontic brackets between enamel-adhesive and adhesive-bracket interfaces at the occlusal and gingival margins bonded with different adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: A total of 144 human maxillary premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons was randomly divided into four groups. Each group was then further divided into three sub-groups. Three total-etching bonding systems (Transbond XT, Greengloo and Kurasper ...

  16. Immediate Dentin Bond Strength of Self-etch Dentine Adhesives

    David Lafuente

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate bond strength of two sixth generation and two seventh generation dentin bonding agents to superficial dentin. Specimens were prepared to exposed superficial dentin and either Clearfil SE, Clearfil S3, Adper Prompt-l-pop of G-bond was applied over the dentin surface and light cured. Then composite resin was applied to the treated surface and light-cured in two increments. Specimens were tested 15 minutes after they were made for shear bond strength at 0.01 cm/min. Clearfil SE had statistically higher bond strength than the other three adhesives evaluated (42.9 MPa. There was no statistical difference among Clearfil S3, Adper Prompt-l-pop and G-Bond. The dentin adhesive with an application of an acidic primer before the application of the adhesive showed better immediate bond strength.

  17. Neutron imaging inspections of composite honeycomb adhesive bonds

    Numerous commercial and military aircraft, including the Canadian Forces CF188 Hornet, use composite honeycomb structures in the design of their flight control surfaces (FCS). These structures provide excellent strength to weight ratios, but are often susceptible to degradation from moisture ingress. Once inside the honeycomb structure moisture causes the structural adhesive bonds to weaken, which can lead to complete failure of the FCS in flight. There are two critical structural adhesive bonds: the node bond and the filet bond. The node bond is integral to the honeycomb portion of the composite core and is located between the honeycomb cells. The filet bond is the adhesive bond located between the skin and the core. In order to asses overall structural degradation and develop repair procedures, it is important to determine the degree of degradation in each type of bond. Neutron radiography and tomography of the adhesive bonds was conducted at the Royal Military College (RMC) and FRM-II. Honeycomb samples were manufactured from FCS with in-service water ingress. The radiographs and tomograms provided important information about the degree of degradation in the core as well as about which adhesive bonds are more susceptible. The information obtained from this study will help to develop repair techniques and assess the flight worthiness of FCS.

  18. Microleakage under orthodontic brackets bonded with different adhesive systems

    Alkis, Huseyin; Turkkahraman, Hakan; Adanir, Necdet

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This in vitro study aimed to compare the microleakage of orthodontic brackets between enamel-adhesive and adhesive-bracket interfaces at the occlusal and gingival margins bonded with different adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: A total of 144 human maxillary premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons was randomly divided into four groups. Each group was then further divided into three sub-groups. Three total-etching bonding systems (Transbond XT, Greengloo and Kurasper F), three one-step self-etching bonding systems (Transbond Plus SEP, Bond Force and Clearfil S3), three two-step self-etching bonding systems (Clearfil SE Bond, Clearfil Protectbond and Clearfil Liner Bond), and three self-adhesive resin cements (Maxcem Elite, Relyx U 100 and Clearfil SA Cement) were used to bond the brackets to the teeth. After bonding, all teeth were sealed with nail varnish and stained with 0.5% basic fuchsine for 24 h. All samples were sectioned and examined under a stereomicroscope to score for microleakage at the adhesive–enamel and adhesive–bracket interfaces from both occlusal and gingival margins. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analyses were performed with Kruskal–Wallis and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Results: The results indicate no statistically significant differences between the microleakage scores of the adhesives; microleakage was detected in all groups. Comparison of the average values of the microleakage scores in the enamel–adhesive and adhesive–bracket interfaces indicated statistically significant differences (P < 0.05). The amount of the microleakage was higher at the enamel–adhesive interface than at the bracket-adhesive interface. Conclusions: All of the brackets exhibited some amount of microleakage. This result means that microleakage does not depend on the type of adhesive used. PMID:25713494

  19. Shear bond strength of different retainer wires and bonding adhesives in consideration of the pretreatment process

    Reicheneder, C. (Claudia); Hofrichter, B. (Bernd); Faltermeier, A. (Andreas); P. Proff; Lippold, C. (Carsten); Kirschneck, C.J. (Christian)

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We aimed to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of three different retainer wires and three different bonding adhesives in consideration of the pretreatment process of enamel surface sandblasting. Methods: 400 extracted bovine incisors were divided into 10 groups of 20 paired specimens each. 10 specimens of each group were pretreated by enamel sandblasting. The retainer wires Bond-A-Braid™, GAC-Wildcat®-Twistflex and everStick®ORTHO were bonded to the teeth with the adhesives ...

  20. Experimental and numerical investigations on adhesively bonded joints

    Negru, R.; Marsavina, L.; Hluscu, M.

    2016-04-01

    Two types of adhesively bonded joints were experimental and numerical investigated. Firstly, the adhesives were characterized through a set of tests and the main elastic and mechanical properties were obtained. After that, the stress distributions at interface and middle of adhesive layer were determined using a linear elastic FEA. The numerical data were fitted by a power law in order to determine the critical values of intensity of stress singularity.

  1. Application of Bonded Joints for Quantitative Analysis of Adhesion

    Jarmila Trpčevská; Mária Kollárová; Eva Zdravecká; Jana Tkáčová

    2016-01-01

    The performance of hot-dip coated steel sheets is associated with properties of the zinc coatings on steel substrate. For the characterization of the adhesion behaviour of zinc coating on steel various tests were employed. The study was focused on quantification assessment of galvanized coating adhesion to substrates. Methods for evaluation of the bonding strength of zinc coating by the shear strength and the T-peel tests applying four special types of adhesives were used. The experimental te...

  2. Polymer Composition and Substrate Influences on the Adhesive Bonding of a Biomimetic, Cross-Linking Polymer

    Matos-Pérez, Cristina R.; White, James D.; Wilker, Jonathan J.

    2012-01-01

    Hierarchical biological materials such as bone, sea shells, and marine bioadhesives are providing inspiration for the assembly of synthetic molecules into complex structures. The adhesive system of marine mussels has been the focus of much attention in recent years. Several catechol-containing polymers are being developed to mimic the cross-linking of proteins containing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) used by shellfish for sticking to rocks. Many of these biomimetic polymer systems have been shown to form surface coatings or hydrogels, however bulk adhesion is demonstrated less often. Developing adhesives requires addressing design issues including finding a good balance between cohesive and adhesive bonding interactions. Despite the growing number of mussel mimicking polymers, there has been little effort to generate structure-property relations and gain insights on what chemical traits give rise to the best glues. In this report, we examined the simplest of these biomimetic polymers, poly[(3,4-dihydroxystyrene)-co-styrene]. Pendant catechol groups (i.e., 3,4-dihydroxystyrene) were distributed throughout a polystyrene backbone. Several polymer derivatives were prepared, each with a different 3,4-dihyroxystyrene content. Bulk adhesion testing showed where the optimal middle ground of cohesive and adhesive bonding resides. Adhesive performance was benchmarked against commercial glues as well as the genuine material produced by live mussels. In the best case, bonding was similar to cyanoacrylate “Krazy” or “Super” glue. Performance was also examined using low (e.g., plastics) and high (e.g., metals, wood) energy surfaces. Adhesive bonding of poly[(3,4-dihydroxystyrene)-co-styrene] may be the strongest of reported mussel protein mimics. These insights should help us to design future biomimetic systems, thereby bringing us closer to development of bone cements, dental composites, and surgical glues. PMID:22582754

  3. Polymer composition and substrate influences on the adhesive bonding of a biomimetic, cross-linking polymer.

    Matos-Pérez, Cristina R; White, James D; Wilker, Jonathan J

    2012-06-01

    Hierarchical biological materials such as bone, sea shells, and marine bioadhesives are providing inspiration for the assembly of synthetic molecules into complex structures. The adhesive system of marine mussels has been the focus of much attention in recent years. Several catechol-containing polymers are being developed to mimic the cross-linking of proteins containing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) used by shellfish for sticking to rocks. Many of these biomimetic polymer systems have been shown to form surface coatings or hydrogels; however, bulk adhesion is demonstrated less often. Developing adhesives requires addressing design issues including finding a good balance between cohesive and adhesive bonding interactions. Despite the growing number of mussel-mimicking polymers, there has been little effort to generate structure-property relations and gain insights on what chemical traits give rise to the best glues. In this report, we examine the simplest of these biomimetic polymers, poly[(3,4-dihydroxystyrene)-co-styrene]. Pendant catechol groups (i.e., 3,4-dihydroxystyrene) are distributed throughout a polystyrene backbone. Several polymer derivatives were prepared, each with a different 3,4-dihyroxystyrene content. Bulk adhesion testing showed where the optimal middle ground of cohesive and adhesive bonding resides. Adhesive performance was benchmarked against commercial glues as well as the genuine material produced by live mussels. In the best case, bonding was similar to that obtained with cyanoacrylate "Krazy Glue". Performance was also examined using low- (e.g., plastics) and high-energy (e.g., metals, wood) surfaces. The adhesive bonding of poly[(3,4-dihydroxystyrene)-co-styrene] may be the strongest of reported mussel protein mimics. These insights should help us to design future biomimetic systems, thereby bringing us closer to development of bone cements, dental composites, and surgical glues. PMID:22582754

  4. Adhesive Bonding of Aluminium Alloy A5754 by Epoxy Resins

    Ivan Michalec

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Joining thin sheets of aluminium and its alloys is a promising area in the field of joining materials. Nowadays, joining methods that do not melt the material itself are increasingly being utilised. This paper deals with adhesive bonding of aluminium alloy A5754 by two-component epoxy resins. Theresults show that joints bonded by Hysol 9466 have appropriate mechanical properties, but that joints bonded by Hysol 9492 have better thermal stability.

  5. Adhesive Bonding of Aluminium Alloy A5754 by Epoxy Resins

    Ivan Michalec; Milan Marônek

    2013-01-01

    Joining thin sheets of aluminium and its alloys is a promising area in the field of joining materials. Nowadays, joining methods that do not melt the material itself are increasingly being utilised. This paper deals with adhesive bonding of aluminium alloy A5754 by two-component epoxy resins. Theresults show that joints bonded by Hysol 9466 have appropriate mechanical properties, but that joints bonded by Hysol 9492 have better thermal stability.

  6. Adhesion between silica surfaces due to hydrogen bonding

    Bowen, James; Rossetto, Hebert L.; Kendall, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    The adhesion between surfaces can be enhanced significantly by the presence of hydrogen bonding. Confined water at the nanoscale can display behaviour remarkably different to bulk water due to the formation of hydrogen bonds between two surfaces. In this work we investigate the role of confined water on the interaction between hydrophilic surfaces, specifically the effect of organic contaminants in the aqueous phase, by measuring the peak adhesive force and the work of adhesion. Atomic force microscope cantilevers presenting hemispherical silica tips were interacted with planar single crystals of silica in the presence of dimethylformamide, ethanol, and formamide; solution compositions in the range 0–100 mol% water were investigated for each molecule. Each molecule was chosen for its ability to hydrogen bond with water molecules, with increasing concentrations likely to disrupt the structure of surface-bound water layers. With the exception of aqueous solutions containing low concentrations of ethanol, all molecules decreased the ability of confined water to enhance the adhesion between the silica surfaces in excess of the predicted theoretical adhesion due to van der Waals forces. The conclusion was that adhesion depends strongly on the formation of a hydrogen-bonding network within the water layers confined between the silica surfaces.

  7. Computed tomography analysis of wood-adhesive bonds

    Modzel, Gunter Georg Rolf

    The importance of wood bonding increased in the last decades due to the increased usage of wood composites whose performance depends to a large extent on the adhesive penetration and subsequent bonding of the adherends. The presented research used XMT (x-ray microtomography) to perform a non-destructive, three-dimensional analysis of the adhesive bondline and wood-structure of Southern yellow pine, Douglas-fir and yellow-poplar samples. A phenol-formaldehyde adhesive was used. The sodium hydroxide catalyst was replaced with rubidium hydroxide during resin formulation. This was done to improve the image contrast. The reconstructions of the wood structure of Southern yellow pine showed tracheids, rays, fusiform rays, resin canals and pits. On the Douglas-fir sample tracheids, pits and rays were displayed clearly. The yellow-poplar images showed vessels, fibers, bordered pits, scalariform sieve plates and rays. The renderings of the adhesive-bondline of Southern yellow pine proved the dominant role of tracheids for the adhesive flow and showed rays as a secondary pathway of adhesive flow. The results revealed no adhesive flow occured through bordered pits, while simple pits permitted some adhesive flow through ray parenchyma. The results for Douglas-fir showed a similar result; the tracheids were the predominant path of adhesive penetration, while rays played a secondary role and no adhesive flow through the pit aperture was visible. The adhesive flow through the microstructure of yellow-poplar wood occured mainly through vessels and also through rays, but no adhesive flow through the pits was directly observed. The segmentation of the images in three phases: void space, cell wall substance and adhesive, enabled the calculation of the effective bondline thickness based on the adhesive, as well as the volumetric measurement of all three elements and their share on the sample volume. Subsequent experiments showed that the exposure of the Southern yellow pine and yellow

  8. Fatigue de-bond growth in adhesively bonded single lap joints

    P K Sahoo; B Dattaguru; C M Manjunatha; C R L Murthy

    2012-02-01

    The fatigue de-bond growth studies have been conducted on adhesively bonded lap joint specimens between aluminium and aluminium with Redux-319A adhesive with a pre-defined crack of 3 mm at the bond end. The correlations between fracture parameters and the de-bond growth data are established using both numerical and experimental techniques. In the numerical method, geometrically non-linear finite element analyses were carried out on adhesively bonded joint specimen for various de-bond lengths measured from the lap end along the mid-bond line of the adhesive. The finite element results were post processed to estimate the SERR components $G_I$ and $G_{II}$ using the Modified Virtual Crack Closure Integral (MVCCI) procedure. In experimental work, specimens were fabricated and fatigue de-bond growth tests were conducted at a stress ratio $R = −1$. The results obtained from both numerical analyses and testing have been used to generate de-bond growth curve and establish de-bond growth law in the Paris regime for such joints. The de-bond growth rate is primarily function of mode-I SERR component $G_I$ since the rate of growth in shear mode is relatively small. The value of Paris exponent is found to be 6.55. The high value of de-bond growth exponent in Paris regime is expected, since the adhesive is less ductile than conventional metallic materials. This study is important for estimating the life of adhesively bonded joints under both constant and variable amplitude fatigue loads.

  9. Thermoplastic polymeric adhesive for structural bonding applications for orthopaedic devices

    The orthopaedics industry has witnessed tremendous growth in recent years primarily due to the introduction of high performance, porous coated implants. These devices have eliminated the need for the use of bone cement for in vivo implant fixation, replacing it with the ingrowth of bone into the porous surfaces. The metallurgical bonding processes used for attaching the porous to the implant body introduce some undesirable effect i.e., the reduction of the fatigue strength of the implant due to the ''notches'' created and also due to the high temperature exposure during the sintering operations. This paper describes the development of a thermoplastic polymeric adhesive based structural bonding technique. The high performance polymeric adhesive is fully characterized with respect to its intended application. The design of the porous layer is optimized to achieve a reliable bond to the implant. A thermal heating/cooling process was developed to control the final polymer morphology. Static and fatigue tests were conducted to fully characterize the adhesive bond strength. A ring shear test method was developed to determine the shear strength of the bond interface. Besides the characterization of the adhesive bond, the joints will be analyzed using finite element models. The correlation between the analytical models and the

  10. Adhesive Bonding Characterization of Composite Joints for Cryogenic Usage

    Graf, Neil A.; Schieleit, Gregory F.; Biggs, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The development of polymer composite cryogenic tanks is a critical step in creating the next generation of launch vehicles. Future reusable launch vehicles need to minimize the gross liftoff weight (GLOW). This weight reduction is possible due to the large reduction in weight that composite materials can provide over current aluminum technology. In addition to composite technology, adhesively bonded joints potentially have several benefits over mechanically fastened joints, such as weight savings and cryogenic fluid containment. Adhesively bonded joints may be used in several areas of these cryogenic tanks, such as in lobe-to-lobe joints (in a multi-lobe concept), skirt-to-tank joint, strut-to-tank joint, and for attaching stringers and ring frames. The bonds, and the tanks themselves, must be able to withstand liquid cryogenic fuel temperatures that they contain. However, the use of adhesively bonded composite joints at liquid oxygen and hydrogen temperatures is largely unknown and must be characterized. Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Michoud Operations performed coupon-level tests to determine effects of material selection, cure process parameters, substrate surface preparation, and other factors on the strength of these composite joints at cryogenic temperatures. This led to the selection of a material and process that would be suitable for a cryogenic tank. KEY WORDS: Composites, Adhesive Bonding, Cryogenics

  11. Durability properties for adhesively bonded structural aerospace applications

    This paper reports on the importance of good bond durability of adhesively joined aerospace components which has been recognized for many years. Military and civilian aircraft are exposed to harsh environments in addition to severe thermal and stress cycles during their service lives. Moisture is responsible for the majority of bond failures in the field. The presence of surface contaminants (e.g., fluoride, silicones) and the non-neutral pH of poor rinse water are common causes of adhesion problems in production environments. Honeycomb panels, stringer skins, doubler plates and core cowl assemblies are bonded joint structures that are subject to environmental- or contaminant-induced debonding. The identification and characterization of the causes of such bond failures leads to improved production quality, yield and cost reduction

  12. Reliability Analysis of Adhesive Bonded Scarf Joints

    Kimiaeifar, Amin; Toft, Henrik Stensgaard; Lund, Erik;

    2012-01-01

    element analysis (FEA). For the reliability analysis a design equation is considered which is related to a deterministic code-based design equation where reliability is secured by partial safety factors together with characteristic values for the material properties and loads. The failure criteria are...... the FEA model, and a sensitivity analysis on the influence of various geometrical parameters and material properties on the maximum stress is conducted. Because the yield behavior of many polymeric structural adhesives is dependent on both deviatoric and hydrostatic stress components, different ratios...

  13. Robust Adhesive Precision Bonding in Automated Assembly Cells

    Müller, Tobias; Haag, Sebastian; Bastuck, Thomas; Gisler, Thomas; Moser, Hansruedi; Uusimaa, Petteri; Axt, Christoph; Brecher, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The assembly of optical components goes along with highest requirements regarding assembly precision. Laser products have become an integral part of many industrial, medical, and consumer applications and their relevance will increase significantly in the years to come. Still economic challenges remain. Assembly costs are driven by the demanding requirements regarding alignment and adhesive bonding. Especially challenging in precision bonding are the interdependencies between alignment and bo...

  14. The Influences of Overlap Length, Bond Line Thickness and Pretreatmant on the Mechanical Properties of Adhesives: Focussing on Bonding Glass

    Vervloed, J.; Kwakernaak, A.; Poulis, H.

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on the influences of overlap length, bond line thickness and pretreatment on the mechanical properties of adhesive bonds. In order to determine the bond strength, lap shear tests were performed. The researched adhesives are a 2 component epoxy and MS polymer. The smallest overlap length of the epoxy adhesive results in the highest maximum bond stress. However, there is nosignificant difference in maximum bond stresses due to different overlap lengths of the MS polymer. When...

  15. Direct observation of catch bonds involving cell-adhesion molecules

    Marshall, Bryan T.; Long, Mian; Piper, James W.; Yago, Tadayuki; McEver, Rodger P.; Zhu, Cheng

    2003-05-01

    Bonds between adhesion molecules are often mechanically stressed. A striking example is the tensile force applied to selectin-ligand bonds, which mediate the tethering and rolling of flowing leukocytes on vascular surfaces. It has been suggested that force could either shorten bond lifetimes, because work done by the force could lower the energy barrier between the bound and free states (`slip'), or prolong bond lifetimes by deforming the molecules such that they lock more tightly (`catch'). Whereas slip bonds have been widely observed, catch bonds have not been demonstrated experimentally. Here, using atomic force microscopy and flow-chamber experiments, we show that increasing force first prolonged and then shortened the lifetimes of P-selectin complexes with P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1, revealing both catch and slip bond behaviour. Transitions between catch and slip bonds might explain why leukocyte rolling on selectins first increases and then decreases as wall shear stress increases. This dual response to force provides a mechanism for regulating cell adhesion under conditions of variable mechanical stress.

  16. Nanoindentation mapping of a wood-adhesive bond

    Konnerth, J.; Valla, A.; Gindl, W.

    2007-08-01

    A mapping experiment of a wood phenol-resorcinol-formaldehyde adhesive bond was performed by means of grid nanoindentation. The variability of the modulus of elasticity and the hardness was evaluated for an area of 17 μm by 90 μm. Overall, the modulus of elasticity of the adhesive was clearly lower than the modulus of wood cell walls, whereas the hardness of the adhesive was slightly higher compared to cell walls. A very slight trend of decreasing modulus of elasticity was found with increasing distance from the immediate bond line. However, the trend was superimposed by a high variability of the modulus of elasticity in dependence on the position in the wood cell wall. The unexpectedly high variation of the modulus between 12 and 24 GPa may be explained by the interaction between the helical orientation of the cellulose microfibrils in the S2 layer of the wood cell wall and the geometry of the three-sided Berkovich type indenter pyramid used. Corresponding to the very slight decrease in modulus with increasing distance from the bond line, a similar but clearer trend was found for hardness. Both trends of changing mechanical properties of wood cell walls with varying distance from the bond line are attributed to effects of adhesive penetration into the wood cell wall.

  17. Failure strength prediction for adhesively bonded single lap joints

    Rahman, Niat Mahmud

    For adhesively bonded joint, failure strength depends on many factors such as material properties (both adhesive and adherend), specimen geometries, test environments, surface preparation procedures, etc. Failure occurs inside constitutive materials or along joint interfaces. Based on location, adhesively bonded failure mode can be classified as adhesive failure mode, cohesive failure mode and adherend failure mode. Failure mode directly affects the failure strength of joint. For last eight decades, researchers have developed analytical, empirical or semi-empirical methods capable of predicting failure strength for adhesively bonded joints generating either cohesive failure or adherend failure. Applicability of most of the methods is limited to particular cases. In this research, different failure modes for single lap joints (SLJs) were generated experimentally using epoxy based paste adhesive. Based on experimental data and analytical study, simplified failure prediction methods were developed for each failure mode. For adhesive failure mode, it is observed that peel stress distributions concur along interface near crack initiation points. All SLJs for this test endured consistent surface treatments. Geometric parameters of the joints were varied to study their effect on failure strength. Peel stress distributions were calculated using finite analysis (FEA). Based on peel stress distribution near crack initiation point, a failure model is proposed. Numerous analytical, empirical and semi-empirical models are available for predicting failure strengths of SLJs generating cohesive failures. However, most of the methods in the literature failed to capture failure behavior of SLJs having thickness of adhesive layer as variable. Cohesive failure mode was generated experimentally using aluminum as adherend and epoxy adhesive considering thickness of adhesive layers as variable within SLJs. Comparative study was performed among various methods. It was observed that

  18. A comparison of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with four different orthodontic adhesives

    Sharma, Sudhir; Tandon, Pradeep; Nagar, Amit; Singh, Gyan P; Singh, Alka; Chugh, Vinay K

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study is to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of stainless steel (SS) orthodontic brackets bonded with four different orthodontic adhesives. Materials and Methods: Eighty newly extracted premolars were bonded to 0.022 SS brackets (Ormco, Scafati, Italy) and equally divided into four groups based on adhesive used: (1) Rely-a-Bond (self-cure adhesive, Reliance Orthodontic Product, Inc., Illinois, USA), (2) Transbond XT (light-cure adhesive, 3M Unitek, CA, USA), (3) Transbond Plus (sixth generation self-etch primer, 3M Unitek, CA, USA) with Transbond XT (4) Xeno V (seventh generation self-etch primer, Dentsply, Konstanz, Germany) with Xeno Ortho (light-cure adhesive, Dentsply, Konstanz, Germany) adhesive. Brackets were debonded with a universal testing machine (Model No. 3382 Instron Corp., Canton, Mass, USA). The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was recordedIn addition, the conditioned enamel surfaces were observed under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results: Transbond XT (15.49 MPa) attained the highest bond strength. Self-etching adhesives (Xeno V, 13.51 MPa; Transbond Plus, 11.57 MPa) showed clinically acceptable SBS values and almost clean enamel surface after debonding. The analysis of variance (F = 11.85, P < 0.0001) and Chi-square (χ2 = 18.16, P < 0.05) tests revealed significant differences among groups. The ARI score of 3 (i.e., All adhesives left on the tooth) to be the most prevalent in Transbond XT (40%), followed by Rely-a-Bond (30%), Transbond Plus with Transbond XT (15%), and Xeno V with Xeno Ortho (10%). Under SEM, enamel surfaces after debonding of the brackets appeared porous when an acid-etching process was performed on the surfaces of Rely-a-Bond and Transbond XT, whereas with self-etching primers enamel presented smooth and almost clean surfaces (Transbond Plus and Xeno V group). Conclusion: All adhesives yielded SBS values higher than the recommended bond strength (5.9-7–8 MPa), Seventh generation

  19. Evaluation of bond strength of different adhesive systems: Shear and Microtensile Bond Strength Test

    GALLUSI, G.; GALEANO, P.; LIBONATI, A.; GIUCA, M.R.; CAMPANELLA, V.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives. Aim of this work is the in vitro bond strength evaluation of three bonding agents comparing the results of two kinds of test, Microtensile Bond Strength Test and a Shear Bond Strength Test. Bond strength tests have been used to test both direct and indirect restorative techniques to investigate if methods could give different results. Methods 72 human third molars have been collected and stored in physiological solution. Three kinds of test were conducted: 1- SB, 2- “Slice” preparation μTBS1, 3- “Stick” preparation μTBS2. We tested three different adhesive systems (Groups 1-2-3 n=24), two restorative techniques (subgroup A–B n=12). The tested adhesives were: Optibond FL (OFL) (Group 1), Optibond Solo Plus (OSP) (Group 2), Optibond Solo Plus Self-Etch (OSSE) (Group 3). For all tests was used a universal load machine Instron Machine. Results. Best values were found for Optibond FL with mean values of 45–50 MPa. Optibond Solo Plus resulted in values very similar and in some cases almost identical to FL. Optibond Solo Self Etch showed poorer adhesion in both direct and indirect restorative techniques. The parametric and non parametric statistical variance analysis pointed out the absence of significant differences between OFL and OSP, and demonstrated a significant difference for OSSE adhesive. Significance. The results confirm that a total etch two-step adhesive is the best compromise between easiness and effectiveness. PMID:23285371

  20. Failure in a composite resin-dentin adhesive bond

    Composites are drawing more and more attention as preferred materials for teeth restoration. The success of teeth restoration has been generally limited by the Composite Resin-Dentin bond strength. A testing device has been developped to allow a satisfactory testing method for evaluating bonding strength in tension and shear, which led to reproducible results. A comparaison between different bond systems has shown no significant difference in the tensile and the shear strength as well as in the fracture behavior. Moreover, results showed difference between tensile and shear strength, when considering one same bond system. Failure mode examination turned out to be, either cohesive (composite rupture), or adhesive (interface rupture) or both (mixed rupture). (orig.)

  1. Adhesive Characterization and Progressive Damage Analysis of Bonded Composite Joints

    Girolamo, Donato; Davila, Carlos G.; Leone, Frank A.; Lin, Shih-Yung

    2014-01-01

    The results of an experimental/numerical campaign aimed to develop progressive damage analysis (PDA) tools for predicting the strength of a composite bonded joint under tensile loads are presented. The PDA is based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM) to account for intralaminar damage, and cohesive laws to account for interlaminar and adhesive damage. The adhesive response is characterized using standard fracture specimens and digital image correlation (DIC). The displacement fields measured by DIC are used to calculate the J-integrals, from which the associated cohesive laws of the structural adhesive can be derived. A finite element model of a sandwich conventional splice joint (CSJ) under tensile loads was developed. The simulations indicate that the model is capable of predicting the interactions of damage modes that lead to the failure of the joint.

  2. Adhesive bone bonding prospects for lithium disilicate ceramic implants

    Vennila Thirugnanam, Sakthi Kumar

    Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) implants articulating mandible with temporal bone in humans have a very high failure rate. Metallic TMJ implants available in the medical market are not osseointegrated, but bond only by mechanical interlocking using screws which may fail, mandating a second surgery for removal. Stress concentration around fixture screws leads to aseptic loosening or fracture of the bone. It has been proposed that this problem can be overcome by using an all-ceramic TMJ implant bonded to bone with dental adhesives. Structural ceramics are promising materials with an excellent track record in the field of dentis.

  3. Propagation of Iamb waves in adhesively bonded multilayered media

    ZHANG Haiyan; XIE Yuanxia; LIU Zhenqing

    2003-01-01

    The effect of introducing attenuation on Lamb wave dispersion curves is studied in this paper. Attenuation is introduced to a three-layered composite plate by an adhesive bond layer with viscous behavior. No changes are required to the transfer matrix formulation for the propagation of elastic waves. By introduction of a complex wavenumber, the model can be used to the propagation of attenuative Lamb waves. Numerical examples for a three-layered aluminium-epoxy-aluminium plate show that attenuation values of each mode in plates are related not only to attenuation, but also to the thickness of the bonded layer, which is in agreement with practical situations.

  4. Statistical failure analysis of adhesive resin cement bonded dental ceramics

    Wang, Yaou; Katsube, Noriko; Seghi, Robert R.; Rokhlin, Stanislav I.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this work is to quantitatively examine the effect of adhesive resin cement on the probability of crack initiation from the internal surface of ceramic dental restorations. The possible crack bridging mechanism and residual stress effect of the resin cement on the ceramic surface are examined. Based on the fracture-mechanics-based failure probability model, we predict the failure probability of glass-ceramic disks bonded to simulated dentin subjected to indentation loads. The theor...

  5. Structural Health Monitoring of Adhesively Bonded Composite Joints

    Habib, Fady

    In recent years, many aerospace organizations have researched and implemented composite materials to achieve better fuel efficiency as well as reduced maintenance cost. In addition to the use of composites, manufacturers are investigating the use of adhesive bonded joints and composite patch bonded repairs to extend the life of their in-service aircraft. Adhesive joints are superior to traditional mechanical fasteners as they reduce stress concentration zones and overall part count. However, the integrity of an adhesive joint is difficult to inspect. Inspection of adhesive joints may be carried out using interrogation technology such as Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). This thesis focuses on the evaluation of Acoustic-Ultrasonic (AU) SHM technique for the detection of crack and disbond growth. In addition to AU, Capacitance Disbond Detection Technique (CDDT) and the Surface Mountable Crack Detection System (SMCDS) were evaluated for the detection disbonds. Results of the AU system demonstrated that AU technology may be used to detect and quantify crack and disbond growth. It was also found that SMCDS and CDDT both complement each other, as SMCDS identified the location of disbond while CDDT quantify disbond.

  6. Deformation and fracture of particulate epoxy in adhesive bonds

    Chai, H. [Tel-Aviv Univ. (Israel). Dept. of Mechanics

    1994-12-31

    The effect of bond thickness, t, on the fracture behavior of two epoxy adhesives toughened by a wide range of particle size, distribution and hardness was evaluated using DCB type test specimens. Video recording and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the damage evolution and the post-fracture morphology in the bond. The stress-strain behavior in shear was determined for a limited number of bond thicknesses using the napkin ring test specimen. Similarly to previous findings on homogeneous polymeric adhesives, G{sub IIC} and G{sub IIIC} coincided irrespective of t. Moreover, the opening and the shearing fracture energies converged to a common value when t was decreased to the micrometer range. New trends were found, however, when t approached the reinforcement size. A predominant feature of the crack propagation in this case was coalescence of voids that originated from particles ahead of the crack tip. The relief of hydrostatic stress caused by this damage is believed to be responsible for the alteration of the mode I fracture behavior as compared to homogeneous adhesives. The stiffness of the reinforcement particles played an important rule on the fracture in shear.

  7. Deformation and fracture of particulate epoxy in adhesive bonds

    Chai, H. (Tel-Aviv Univ. (Israel). Dept. of Mechanics, Materials and Structures)

    1995-01-01

    The effect of bond thickness, t, on the mode I, mode II and mode III fracture energies of two epoxy adhesives toughened by a wide range of particle size, distribution and hardness was evaluated using DCB type test specimens. A high-magnification video recording and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the damage evolution and the post-fracture morphology in the bond. The stress-strain behavior in shear was determined for a limited number of bond thicknesses using the napkin ring test specimen. Similarly to previous findings on homogeneous polymeric adhesives, G[sub IIC] and G[sub IIIC] coincided irrespective of t. Moreover, all three fracture energies converged to a single value when t was decreased to the micrometer range. New trends were found, however, when t approached the size of the reinforcement. A predominant feature of the crack propagation in this case was coalescence of voids that originated from particles ahead of the crack tip. The relief of hydrostatic stress caused by this damage is believed to be responsible for the alteration of the mode I fracture behavior as compared to homogeneous adhesives. The stiffness of the reinforcement particles played an important role in the fracture in shear.

  8. Evaluation of Adhesive Bonding Quality by Acoustic Emission

    Prediction of fatigue life and monitoring of fracture process for adhesively bonded CFRP composites joint have been investigated by analysis of acoustic emission signals during the fatigue and tension tests. During fatigue test, generated acoustic emission is related to stored elastic strain energy. By results of monitoring of AE event rate, fatigue process could be divided into two regions, and boundaries of two regions, fatigue cycles of the initiation of fast crack growth, were 70-80% of fatigue life even though the fatigue life were highly scattered from specimen to specimen. The result shows the possibility of predicting catastrophic failure by acoustic emission monitoring

  9. Methods for Using Durable Adhesively Bonded Joints for Sandwich Structures

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III (Inventor); Lundgren, Eric C. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Systems, methods, and apparatus for increasing durability of adhesively bonded joints in a sandwich structure. Such systems, methods, and apparatus includes an first face sheet and an second face sheet as well as an insert structure, the insert structure having a first insert face sheet, a second insert face sheet, and an insert core material. In addition, sandwich core material is arranged between the first face sheet and the second face sheet. A primary bondline may be coupled to the face sheet(s) and the splice. Further, systems, methods, and apparatus of the present disclosure advantageously reduce the load, provide a redundant path, reduce structural fatigue, and/or increase fatigue life.

  10. Torsional Stiffness Verification of an Adhesively Bonded Joint

    Annicchiarico, A.; Caputo, F.; De Angelis, G.; Frascà, F.; Lamanna, G.

    2010-06-01

    In the present work numerical-experimental analysis for the characterization of a structural adhesive has been performed. The numerical analysis has been carried out through the finite element method by using, for the phases pre / post processing were used commercial programs while for the phase of numerical solution the Abaqus code was used. The experimental analyses were carried out at laboratories of C.R.F. S.C.p.A. by using of a standard quasi static testing machine. Later numerical analysis was performed comparing the torsional stiffness of a vehicle in which the welded connection between the pavilion and the flank has been substituted by bonded one. This comparison has allowed to demonstrate the ability of the bonded joint discussed to provide mechanical performances comparable with those of a welded joint widely used in the automotive industry.

  11. Characterization and Development of General Material Models for use in Modeling Structures Bonded with Ductile Adhesives

    Cassino, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    Structural adhesives are materials that are capable of bearing significant loads in shear, and sometimes tension, over a range of strains and strain rates. Adhesively bonded structures can dissipate large amounts of mechanical energy and can be lighter and more efficient than many bolted or vibration welded parts. The largest barrier to using structural adhesives in more applications is the many challenges engineers are presented with when designing and analyzing adhesively bonded structures....

  12. Microtensile bond strength of different adhesive systems in dentin irradiated with Er:YAG laser

    The objective this study was to evaluate in vitro the bond strength of two etch-and-rise and one self-etching adhesive system after dentin irradiation with Er:YAG (erbium: yttrium aluminum garnet) laser using microtensile test. The results revealed that the groups treated with laser Er:YAG presented less tensile bond strength, independently to the adhesive system used. The prompt L-pop adhesive presented less microtensile bond strength compared to the other adhesives evaluated. There was no difference between single bond and excite groups. The adhesive failures were predominant in all the experimental groups. The Er:YAG laser influenced negatively bond strength values of adhesive systems tested in dental substrate

  13. Bonding of adhesives to Er:YAG laser-treated dentin

    Koliniotou-Koumpia, Eugenia; Kouros, Pantelis; Zafiriadis, Lazaros; Koumpia, Effimia; Dionysopoulos, Pavlos; Karagiannis, Vassilis

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The shear bond strength of adhesives applied to dentin was investigated after irradiation with an erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser. Methods: Superficial and deep dentin specimens from human molars were treated either with carbide bur or an Er:YAG laser. Two etch and rinse adhesives (Single Bond and XP Bond) and two self-etch adhesives (Prompt L-Pop and Xeno III) were employed to bond the composite. Shear bond strength (SBS) was determined after storage in water f...

  14. Efficacy of microtensile versus microshear bond testing for evaluation of bond strength of dental adhesive systems to enamel

    A.A. El Zohairy; M.H. Saber; A.I. Abdalla; A.J. Feilzer

    2010-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of the microtensile bond test (μTBS) and the microshear bond test (μSBS) in ranking four dental adhesives according to bond strength to enamel and identify the modes of failure involved. Materials and methods Forty-four caries-free human mo

  15. Bond strength of different adhesives to normal and caries-affected dentins

    XUAN Wei; HOU Ben-xiang; L(U) Yalin

    2010-01-01

    Background Currently, several systems of dentin substrate-reacting adhesives are available for use in the restorative treatment against caries. However, the bond effectiveness and property of different adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin are not fully understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of different adhesives to both normal dentin (ND) and caries-affected dentin (CAD) and to analyze the dentin/adhesive interracial characteristics.Methods Twenty eight extracted human molars with coronal medium carious lesions were randomly assigned to four groups according to adhesives used. ND and CAD were bonded with etch-and-rinse adhesive Adper~(TM) Single Bond 2 (SB2) or self-etching adhesives Clearfil SE Bond (CSE), Clearfil S~3 Bond (CS3), iBond GI (IB). Rectangular sticks of resin-dentin bonded interfaces 0.9 mm~2 were obtained. The specimens were subjected to microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Mean μTBS was statistically analyzed with analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student-Newman-Keuls tests. Interfacial morphologies were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM).Results Etch-and-rinse adhesive Adper~(TM) Single Bond 2 yielded high bond strength when applied to both normal and caries-affected dentin. The two-step self-etching adhesive Clearfil SE Bond generated the highest bond strength to ND among all adhesives tested but a significantly reduced strength when applied to CAD. For the one-step self-etching adhesives, Clearfil S~3 Bond and iBond GI, the bond strength was relatively low regardless of the dentin type. SEM interfacial analysis revealed that hybrid layers were thicker with poorer resin tag formation and less resin-filled lateral branches in the CAD than in the ND for all the adhesives tested.Conclusion The etch-and-rinse adhesive performed more effectively to caries-affected dentin than the self-etching adhesives.

  16. Acoustic wave interaction with a laminated transversely isotropic spherical shell with imperfect bonding

    Hasheminejad, Seyyed M.; Maleki, M. [Iran University of Science and Technology, Acoustics Research Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Narmak, Tehran (Iran)

    2009-02-15

    An exact analysis is carried out to study interaction of a time-harmonic plane-progressive sound field with a multi-layered elastic hollow sphere made of spherically isotropic materials with interlaminar bonding imperfections. A modal state equation with variable coefficients is set up in terms of appropriate displacement and stress functions and their spherical harmonics, ultimately leading to calculation of a global transfer matrix. A linear spring model is adopted to describe the interlaminar adhesive bonding whose effects are incorporated into the global transfer matrix by introduction of proper interfacial transfer matrices. The solution is first used to correlate the perturbation in the material elastic constants of an evacuated and water submerged steel (isotropic) spherical shell to the sensitivity of resonances appearing in the backscattered amplitude spectrum. The backscattering form function, in addition to the acoustic radiation force acting on selected transversely isotropic spherical shells with distinct degrees of material anisotropy, is subsequently calculated and discussed. An illustrative numerical example is given for a multi-layered hollow sphere with two distinct interlaminar interface conditions (i.e., perfectly and imperfectly bonded layers). Limiting cases are considered and fair agreements with solutions available in the literature are established. (orig.)

  17. Polymerization contraction stress in dentin adhesives bonded to dentin and enamel

    M. Hashimoto; A.J. de Gee; A.J. Feilzer

    2008-01-01

    Objective In a previous study on of polymerization contraction stress determinations of adhesives bonded to dentin a continuous decline of stress was observed after the adhesives had been light-cured. The decline was ascribed to stress relief caused by diffusion into the adhesive layer of water and/

  18. Post-bleaching application of an antioxidant on dentin bond strength of three dental adhesives

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: The findings suggest that bond strength of resin to bleached dentin may be affected with the adhesive system. Reduced SBS to bleached dentin can be amended by the use of SA as an antioxidizing agent. However, the amount of reversed bond strength subsequent to applying antioxidant might be related to the kind of dental adhesive.

  19. Shear bond strength of metallic and ceramic brackets using color change adhesives

    Aisha de Souza Gomes Stumpf

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets using color change adhesives that are supposed to aid in removing excess of bonding material and compare them to a traditional adhesive. METHODS: Ninety metallic and ninety ceramic brackets were bonded to bovine incisors using two color change adhesives and a regular one. A tensile stress was applied by a universal testing machine. The teeth were observed in a microscope after debonding in order to determine the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI. RESULTS: The statistical analysis (ANOVA, Tukey, and Kruskall-Wallis tests demonstrated that the mean bond strength presented no difference when metallic and ceramic brackets were compared but the bond resistance values were significantly different for the three adhesives used. The most common ARI outcome was the entire adhesive remaining on the enamel. CONCLUSIONS: The bond strength was similar for metallic and ceramic brackets when the same adhesive system was used. ARI scores demonstrated that bonding with these adhesives is safe even when ceramic brackets were used. On the other hand, bond strength was too low for orthodontic purposes when Ortho Lite Cure was used.

  20. Factors affecting the bond strength of self-etch adhesives: A meta-analysis of literature

    P Pranau Vanajasan

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: Our analysis has showed that two-step self-etch adhesive system showed a superior in vitro performance in comparison to one-step self-etch system. Nevertheless, certain factors such as dentin origin, site and area of bonding affect the bond strength of adhesives.

  1. Bonding of self-adhesive resin cements to enamel using different surface treatments: bond strength and etching pattern evaluations.

    Lin, Jie; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2010-08-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strengths and etching patterns of seven self-adhesive resin cements to human enamel specimens which were subjected to one of the following surface treatments: (1) Polishing with #600 polishing paper; (2) Phosphoric acid; (3) G-Bond one-step adhesive; or (4) Phosphoric acid and G-Bond. After surface treatment, the human incisor specimens were bonded to a resin composite using a self-adhesive resin cement [Maxcem (MA), RelyX Unicem (UN), Breeze (BR), BisCem (BI), seT (SE), Clearfil SA Luting (CL)] or a conventional resin cement [ResiCem (RE)]. Representative morphology formed with self-adhesive resin cements showed areas of etched enamel intermingled with areas of featureless enamel. In conclusion, etching efficacy influenced the bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive resin cements to unground enamel, and that a combined use of phosphoric acid and G-Bond for pretreatment of human enamel surfaces improved the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements. PMID:20668359

  2. Effect of hot-humid exposure on static strength of adhesive-bonded aluminum alloys

    Rui Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of hot-humid exposure (i.e., 40 °C and 98% R.H. on the quasi-static strength of the adhesive-bonded aluminum alloys was studied. Test results show that the hot-humid exposure leads to the significant decrease in the joint strength and the change of the failure mode from a mixed cohesive and adhesive failure with cohesive failure being dominant to adhesive failure being dominant. Careful analyses of the results reveal that the physical bond is likely responsible for the bond adhesion between L adhesive and aluminum substrates. The reduction in joint strength and the change of the failure mode resulted from the degradation in bond adhesion, which was primarily attributed to the corrosion of aluminum substrate. In addition, the elevated temperature exposure significantly accelerated the corrosion reaction of aluminum, which accelerated the degradation in joint strength.

  3. Characterization of mode 1 and mixed-mode failure of adhesive bonds between composite adherends

    Mall, S.; Johnson, W. S.

    1985-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical investigation of an adhesively bonded composite joint was conducted to characterize both the static and fatigue beyond growth mechanism under mode 1 and mixed-mode 1 and 2 loadings. Two bonded systems were studied: graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with EC 3445 and FM-300 adhesives. For each bonded system, two specimen types were tested: a double-cantilever-beam specimen for mode 1 loading and a cracked-lapshear specimen for mixed-mode 1 and 2 loading. In all specimens tested, failure occurred in the form of debond growth. Debonding always occurred in a cohesive manner with EC 3445 adhesive. The FM-300 adhesive debonded in a cohesive manner under mixed-mode 1 and 2 loading, but in a cohesive, adhesive, or combined cohesive and adhesive manner under mode 1 loading. Total strain-energy release rate appeared to be the driving parameter for debond growth under static and fatigue loadings.

  4. Characterization of mode I and mixed-mode failure of adhesive bonds between composite adherends

    Mall, S.; Johnson, W. S.

    1986-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical investigation of an adhesively bonded composite joint was conducted to characterize both the static and fatigue beyond growth mechanism under mode 1 and mixed-mode 1 and 2 loadings. Two bonded systems were studied: graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with EC 3445 and FM-300 adhesives. For each bonded system, two specimen types were tested: a double-cantilever-beam specimen for mode 1 loading and a cracked-lapshear specimen for mixed-mode 1 and 2 loading. In all specimens tested, failure occurred in the form of debond growth. Debonding always occurred in a cohesive manner with EC 3445 adhesive. The FM-300 adhesive debonded in a cohesive manner under mixed-mode 1 and 2 loading, but in a cohesive, adhesive, or combined cohesive and adhesive manner under mode 1 loading. Total strain-energy release rate appeared to be the driving parameter for debond growth under static and fatigue loadings.

  5. On structural health monitoring of aircraft adhesively bonded repairs

    Pavlopoulou, Sofia

    The recent interest in life extension of ageing aircraft and the need to address the repair challenges in the new age composite ones, led to the investigation of new repair methodologies such as adhesively bonded repair patches. The present thesis focuses on structural health monitoring aspects of the repairs, evaluating their performance with guided ultrasonic waves aiming to develop a monitoring strategy which would eliminate unscheduled maintenance and unnecessary inspection costs. To address the complex nature of the wave propagation phenomena, a finite element based model identified the existing challenges by exploring the interaction of the excitation waves with different levels of damage. The damage sensitivity of the first anti-symmetric mode was numerically investigated. An external bonded patch and a scarf repair, were further tested in static and dynamic loadings, and their performance was monitored with Lamb waves, excited by surface-bonded piezoelectric transducers.. The response was processed by means of advanced pattern recognition and data dimension reduction techniques such as novelty detection and principal component analysis. An optimisation of these tools enabled an accurate damage detection under complex conditions. The phenomena of mode isolation and precise arrival time determination under a noisy environment and the problem of inadequate training data were investigated and solved through appropriate transducer arrangements and advanced signal processing respectively. The applicability of the established techniques was demonstrated on an aluminium repaired helicopter tail stabilizer. Each case study utilised alternative non-destructive techniques for validation such as 3D digital image correlation, X-ray radiography and thermography. Finally a feature selection strategy was developed through the analysis of the instantaneous properties of guided waves for damage detection purposes..

  6. Acoustic resonance scattering from a multilayered cylindrical shell with imperfect bonding.

    Rajabi, M; Hasheminejad, Seyyed M

    2009-12-01

    The method of wave function expansion is adopted to study the three dimensional scattering of a time-harmonic plane progressive sound field obliquely incident upon a multi-layered hollow cylinder with interlaminar bonding imperfection. For the generality of solution, each layer is assumed to be cylindrically orthotropic. An approximate laminate model in the context of the modal state equations with variable coefficients along with the classical T-matrix solution technique is set up for each layer to solve for the unknown modal scattering and transmission coefficients. A linear spring model is used to describe the interlaminar adhesive bonding whose effects are incorporated into the global transfer matrix by introduction of proper interfacial transfer matrices. Following the classic acoustic resonance scattering theory (RST), the scattered field and response to surface waves are determined by constructing the partial waves and obtaining the non-resonance (backgrounds) and resonance components. The solution is first used to investigate the effect of interlayer imperfection of an air-filled and water submerged bilaminate aluminium cylindrical shell on the resonances associated with various modes of wave propagation (i.e., symmetric/asymmetric Lamb waves, fluid-borne A-type waves, Rayleigh and Whispering Gallery waves) appearing in the backscattered spectrum, according to their polarization and state of stress. An illustrative numerical example is also given for a multi-layered (five-layered) cylindrical shell for which the stiffness of the adhesive interlayers is artificially varied. The sensitivity of resonance frequencies associated with higher mode numbers to the stiffness coefficients is demonstrated to be a good measure of the bonding strength. Limiting cases are considered and fair agreements with solutions available in the literature are established. PMID:19586650

  7. Development of improved polypropylene adhesive bonding by abrasion and atmospheric plasma surface modifications

    Encinas, N.; Abenojar, J.; Martínez, M A

    2012-01-01

    The present work deals with the problematic adhesive bonding of substrates with low surface energy. Different approaches have been explored with the aim of creating adequate adhesive joints based on polyolefinic substrate and polyurethane adhesive. The selected material under study was polypropylene (PP) as adherend, and a commercial Sikaflex®-252 polyurethane one component based structural adhesive (PU) as joint fluid. Among the diverse pre-treatments typically used to prepare surfaces prior...

  8. Application of radio frequency heating to wood bonding with aqueous vinyl polymer solution-isocyanate adhesives: Bond quality of four API adhesives

    The application of four aqueous vinyl polymer solution-isocyanate (API-resin) adhesives (Koyo Sangyo Co.) to wood bonding with radio frequency (RF) heating was examined. Two different types of cure systems, that is, room-temperature-cure type (Resins A and B) and heat-cure type (Resins C and D) were used. However, all of these adhesives can be used with both cure systems. Two-ply lumber (red meranti, Shorea spp.) was bonded with either RF-through heating or room-temperature curing. The bond quality of these laminates was evaluated with the compression-shear test specified in the Japan Agricultural Standard for laminated lumber

  9. Effectiveness of immediate bonding of etch-and-rinse adhesives to simplified ethanol-saturated dentin

    Leandro Afonso Guimarães

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the immediate bond strength of etch-and-rinse adhesives to demineralized dentin saturated with either water or absolute ethanol. The research hypothesis was that there would be no difference in bond strength to dentin between water or ethanol wet-bonding techniques. The medium dentin of 20 third molars was exposed (n = 5. The dentin surface was then acid-etched, left moist and randomly assigned to be saturated via either water wet-bonding (WBT or absolute ethanol wet-bonding (EBT. The specimens were then treated with one of the following etch-and-rinse adhesive systems: a 3-step, water-based system (Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose, or SBMP or a 2-step, ethanol/water-based system (Adper Single Bond 2, or SB. Resin composite build-ups were then incrementally constructed. After water storage for 24 h at 37°C, the tensile strength of the specimens was tested in a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (a = 5%. The failure modes were verified using a stereomicroscope (40'. For both adhesives, no significant difference in bond strength was observed between WBT and EBT (p > 0.05. The highest bond strength was observed for SB, regardless of the bonding technique (p < 0.05. No significant interaction between adhesives and bonding techniques was noticed (p = 0.597. There was a predominance of adhesive failures for all tested groups. The EBT and WBT displayed similar immediate bond strength means for both adhesives. The SB adhesive exhibited higher means for all conditions tested. Further investigations are needed to evaluate long-term bonding to dentin mediated by commercial etch-and-rinse adhesives using the EBT approach.

  10. Effect of tetracycline on the bond performance of etch-and-rinse adhesives to dentin

    Rodrigo Stanislawczuk; Jully Anna da Costa; Luceli Grabicoski Polli; Alessandra Reis; Alessandro Dourado Loguercio

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of modified tetracycline on the resin-dentin bond strength (µTBS), silver nitrate uptake (SNU) and solution homogeneity (SH) of two adhesives. Dentin surfaces were treated with phosphoric acid, rinsed off and either rewetted with water (control group - CO), 2% minocycline (MI), 2% doxycyline (DO) or 2% chlorhexidine (CH). Adhesive systems (Adper Single Bond 2 and Prime Bond NT) and composite were applied and light-polymerized. Specimens were sectioned to obtain...

  11. Shear Bond Strengths and Morphological Evaluation of Filled and Unfilled Adhesive Interfaces to Enamel and Dentine

    Vajihesadat Mortazavi; Mohammadhosein Fathi; Ebrahim Ataei; Niloufar Khodaeian; Navid Askari

    2012-01-01

    In this laboratory study shear bond strengths of three filled and one unfilled adhesive systems to enamel and dentine were compared. Forty-eight extracted intact noncarious human mandibular molars were randomly assigned to two groups of 24 one for bonding to enamel and the other for bonding to dentine. Buccal and lingual surfaces of each tooth were randomly assigned for application of each one of filled (Prime & Bond NT (PBNT), Optibond Solo Plus (OBSP), and Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB)) and unfil...

  12. Oxide film microstructure: the link between surface preparation processes and strength/durability of adhesively bonded aluminum. Final report

    Hsia, K. Jimmy; Pearlstein, Arne J.; Scheeline, Alexander; Shang, Jian Ku

    2000-11-30

    Strength and durability of adhesive bonding of aluminum alloys structures are intrinsically determined by the surface microstructures and interfacial failure micromechanisms. The current project presents a multidisciplinary approach to addressing critical issues controlling the strength and durability of adhesive bonds of aluminum alloys. Three main thrust areas have been pursued: surface treatment technology development to achieve desirable surface microstructures; relationship between surface structure and properties of adhesive bonds; and failure mechanisms of adhesively bonded components.

  13. Microtensile bond strength of restorative composite bonded with self-adhesive resin cements to enamel and dentin

    Mohammed Al-Saleh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine the microtensile bond strength (µTBS of composite restorations when bonded with self-adhesive resin-cements. METHODS: Thirty caries-free extracted molars were sterilized, and divided into 5 equal groups according to adhesive used: SBMP (Scotch-Bond-Multipurpose, total-etch 3-step adhesive, 3M/ESPE, PAN (PanaviaF-2.0, resin-cement with self-etch primer, Kuraray, RXU (RelyX-Unicem, self-adhesive resin-cement, 3M/ESPE, BRZ (Breeze, self-adhesive resin-cement, Pentron and MON (Monocem, self-adhesive resin-cement, Shofu. Each group was divided into 2 subgroups (dentin or enamel. Bonding agents, used according to manufacturers’ directions, or a thin layer of resin cement was applied onto teeth flat surfaces. Six mm-thick Filtek-Z250 (3M/ESPE composite build up was made in three increments. Teeth were sectioned to obtain rectangular specimens which were subjected to tensile force until failure. Specimens were subjected to 1,000 thermo-cycles between 5oC-55°C. Means and standard deviation (SD were calculated and statistically-analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey’s t-test. Specimens’ failure modes were reported. RESULTS: SBMP showed the highest µTBS results with enamel (24.6(6.1 MPa, PAN showed high µTBS with enamel (12.1(3.9MPa and dentin (11.6(4.7MPa compared to the other self-adhesive cements. Failure modes were adhesive and mixed for self-adhesive resin-cements. MON subgroups and BRZ enamel subgroup underwent premature failure. CONCLUSION: self-adhesive resin-cements showed low µTBS compared to SBMP.

  14. Eroded dentin does not jeopardize the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials

    Janaina Barros Cruz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study evaluated the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials to sound and eroded dentin. Thirty-six bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated in 2 groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva and eroded dentin (pH cycling model - 3× / cola drink for 7 days. Specimens were then reassigned according to restorative material: glass ionomer cement (KetacTM Molar Easy Mix, resin-modified glass ionomer cement (VitremerTM or adhesive system with resin composite (Adper Single Bond 2 + Filtek Z250. Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over the dentin and filled with the material. The microshear bond test was performed after 24 h of water storage at 37ºC. The failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×. Bond strength data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05. Eroded dentin showed bond strength values similar to those for sound dentin for all materials. The adhesive system showed the highest bond strength values, regardless of the substrate (p < 0.0001. For all groups, the adhesive/mixed failure prevailed. In conclusion, adhesive materials may be used in eroded dentin without jeopardizing the bonding quality. It is preferable to use an etch-and-rinse adhesive system because it shows the highest bond strength values compared with the glass ionomer cements tested.

  15. An Ultrasonic Technique to Determine the Residual Strength of Adhesive Bonds

    Achenbach, J. D.; Tang, Z.

    1999-01-01

    In this work, ultrasonic techniques to nondestructively evaluate adhesive bond degradation have been studied. The key to the present approach is the introduction of an external factor which pulls the adhesive bond in the nonlinear range, simultaneously with the application of an ultrasonic technique. With the aid of an external static tensile loading, a superimposed longitudinal wave has.been used to obtain the slopes of the stress-strain curve of an adhesive bond at a series of load levels. The critical load, at which a reduction of the slope is detected by the superimposed longitudinal wave, is an indication of the onset of nonlinear behavior of the adhesive bond, and therefore of bond degradation. This approach has been applied to the detection of adhesive bond degradation induced by cyclic fatigue loading. Analogously to the longitudinal wave case, a superimposed shear wave has been used to obtain the effective shear modulus of adhesive layers at different shear load levels. The onset of the nonlinear behavior of an adhesive bond under shear loading has been detected by the use of a superimposed shear wave. Experiments show that a longitudinal wave can also detect the nonlinear behavior when an adhesive bond is subjected to shear loading. An optimal combination of ultrasonic testing and mechanical loading methods for the detection of degradation related nonlinear behavior of adhesive bonds has been discussed. For the purpose of a practical application, an ultrasonic technique that uses a temperature increase as an alternative to static loading has also been investigated. A general strain-temperature correspondence principle that relates a mechanical strain to a temperature has been presented. Explicit strain-temperature correspondence relations for both the tension and shear cases have been derived. An important parameter which quantifies the relation between the wave velocity and temperature has been defined. This parameter, which is indicative of adhesive

  16. Comparative study to evaluate shear bond strength of RMGIC to composite resin using different adhesive systems

    Manoj G Chandak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study is to compare and evaluate the role of new dental adhesives to bond composite to the resinmodified glass inomer cement (RMGIC. Materials and Methods: Thirty specimens were prepared on acrylic blocks, with wells prepared in it by drilling holes, to retain the RMGIC. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups of ten specimens each. In Group a thin layer of selfetch adhesive (3M ESPE was applied between the RMGIC and the composite resin FILTEK P60 (3M SPE. In Group II, total etch adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2, 3M ESPE was applied, and in Group III, there was no application of any adhesive between RMGIC and the composite resin. After curing all the specimens, the shear bond strength was measured using an Instron universal testing machine. Results: The results were drawn and tabulated using ANOVA-fishers and Dunnet D statistical tests.The maximum shear bond strength values were recorded in Group I specimens with self-etch adhesive showing a mean value of 2.74 when compared to the Group II adhesive (Total etch showing a mean shear strength of value 1.89, where no adhesive was used, showed a minimum mean shear bond strength of 1.42. There was a great and significant difference between Group I and Group II (P value 0.05 whereas, both Group I and Group II showed a vast and significant difference from Group III (P value = 0-001. Conclusion: Hence, this present study concludes that application of self-etch adhesive (3M ESPE, U.S.A in between RMGIC and composite resin increases the shear bond strength between RMGIC and the resin composites, as compared to the total-etch type adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2,3M ESPE, U.S.A as well as without application of the adhesive agent.

  17. Development of nanosilica bonded monetite cement from egg shells

    This work represents further effort from our group in developing monetite based calcium phosphate cements (CPC). These cements start with a calcium phosphate powder (MW-CPC) that is manufactured using microwave irradiation. Due to the robustness of the cement production process, we report that the starting materials can be derived from egg shells, a waste product from the poultry industry. The CPC were prepared with MW-CPC and aqueous setting solution. Results showed that the CPC hardened after mixing powdered cement with water for about 12.5 ± 1 min. The compressive strength after 24 h of incubation was approximately 8.45 ± 1.29 MPa. In addition, adding colloidal nanosilica to CPC can accelerate the cement hardening (10 ± 1 min) process by about 2.5 min and improve compressive strength (20.16 ± 4.39 MPa), which is more than double the original strength. The interaction between nanosilica and CPC was monitored using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). While hardening, nanosilica can bond to the CPC crystal network for stabilization. The physical and biological studies performed on both cements suggest that they can potentially be used in orthopedics. - Highlights: • Cement raw powder is derived from egg shells. • A microwave assisted system is used for preparing monetite bone cement. • Colloidal silica is used to reinforce cement

  18. Development of nanosilica bonded monetite cement from egg shells

    Zhou, Huan, E-mail: huanzhou@cczu.edu.cn [Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Health Sciences, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu (China); Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Luchini, Timothy J.F.; Boroujeni, Nariman Mansouri [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Agarwal, Anand K.; Goel, Vijay K. [Department of Bioengineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Bhaduri, Sarit B. [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Division of Dentistry, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This work represents further effort from our group in developing monetite based calcium phosphate cements (CPC). These cements start with a calcium phosphate powder (MW-CPC) that is manufactured using microwave irradiation. Due to the robustness of the cement production process, we report that the starting materials can be derived from egg shells, a waste product from the poultry industry. The CPC were prepared with MW-CPC and aqueous setting solution. Results showed that the CPC hardened after mixing powdered cement with water for about 12.5 ± 1 min. The compressive strength after 24 h of incubation was approximately 8.45 ± 1.29 MPa. In addition, adding colloidal nanosilica to CPC can accelerate the cement hardening (10 ± 1 min) process by about 2.5 min and improve compressive strength (20.16 ± 4.39 MPa), which is more than double the original strength. The interaction between nanosilica and CPC was monitored using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). While hardening, nanosilica can bond to the CPC crystal network for stabilization. The physical and biological studies performed on both cements suggest that they can potentially be used in orthopedics. - Highlights: • Cement raw powder is derived from egg shells. • A microwave assisted system is used for preparing monetite bone cement. • Colloidal silica is used to reinforce cement.

  19. Interaction morphology and bond strength of nanofilled simplified-step adhesives to acid etched dentin

    Vinicius DI HIPÓLITO; Reis, André Figueiredo; Mitra, Sumita B.; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of nanofillers incorporated into adhesives on the microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) and interfacial micromorphology to dentin. Methods: The occlusal enamel of 5 human molars was removed and each tooth sectioned into four quarters. The exposed dentin was treated with one of the following adhesives: Adper Single Bond (SB-unfilled), OptiBond Solo Plus (OS-barium aluminoborosilicate, 400nm Ø), Prime & Bond NT (NT-colloidal silica, 7–40 nm Ø) and Adper Single Bon...

  20. Biomaterial based novel polyurethane adhesives for wood to wood and metal to metal bonding

    Mitesh Ramanlal Patel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyurethane adhesives made from synthetic chemicals are non-biodegradable, costly and difficult to find raw materials from local market. To avoid solid pollution problem, cost effectiveness and easy availability of raw materials, biomaterials based polyurethane adhesives are used in current industrial interest. Direct use of castor oil in polyurethane adhesive gives limited hardness. Modification on active sites of castor oil to utilize double bond of unsaturated fatty acid and carboxyl group yields new modified or activated polyols, which can be utilized for polyurethane adhesive formulation. In view of this, we have synthesized polyurethane adhesives from polyester polyols, castor oil based polyols and epoxy based polyols with Isocyanate adducts based on castor oil and trimethylolpropane. To study the effects of polyurethane adhesive strength (i.e. lap shear strength on wood-to-wood and metal-to-metal bonding through various types of polyols, cross-linking density, isocyanate adducts and also to compare adhesive strength between wood to wood and metal to metal surface. These polyols and polyurethanes were characterized through GPC, NMR and IR-spectroscopy, gel and surface drying time. Thermal stability of PU adhesives was determined under the effect of cross-linking density (NCO/OH ratio. The NCO/OH ratio (1.5 was optimized for adhesives as the higher NCO/OH ratio (2.0 increasing cross-linking density and decreases adhesion. Lower NCO/OH ratio (1.0 provideslow cross-linking density and low strength of adhesives.

  1. Nondestructive strength evaluation of adhesive-bonded single-lap joints by signal processing method

    Application of bonding by adhesives can be found in many industries, particularly in advanced technological domains such as the aeronautical and space industries, automobile manufacture, and electronics. Periodic inspection with conventional ultrasonic NDE techniques is capable of indicating the presence and possible location of crack. Continuous ultrasonic attenuation monitoring has potential to supply information. This study used adhesive-bonded single-lap joints specimen to evaluate such possibility by ultrasonic signal processing method

  2. Lamb Wave Interaction with Adhesively Bonded Stiffeners and Disbonds Using 3D Vibrometry

    Ryan Marks; Alastair Clarke; Carol Featherston; Christophe Paget; Rhys Pullin

    2016-01-01

    There are many advantages to adhesively bonding stiffeners onto aircraft structures rather than using traditional mechanical fastening methods. However there is a lack of confidence of the structural integrity of adhesively bonded joints over time. Acousto-ultrasonic Lamb waves have shown great potential in structural health monitoring applications in both metallic and composite structures. This paper presents an experimental investigation of the use of acousto-ultrasonic Lamb waves for the m...

  3. Post-bleaching application of an antioxidant on dentin bond strength of three dental adhesives

    Maryam Khoroushi; Tahereh Saneie

    2012-01-01

    Background: Antioxidizing agents have recently been suggested to compensate decreased bond strength of resin materials to bleached tooth tissues. This study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) of three different adhesives on bleached dentin immediately after bleaching, bleached/delayed for 1 week, and bleached/applied antioxidizing agent. Materials and Methods: The dentinal surfaces of 132 intact extracted molars were prepared and divided into 12 groups. The following adhesives were in...

  4. Influence of fluoride-containing adhesives and bleaching agents on enamel bond strength

    Vanessa Cavalli; Priscila Cristiane Suzy Liporoni; Marcos Augusto do Rego; Sandrine Bittencourt Berger; Marcelo Giannini

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of fluoride-containing carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agents and adhesive systems on bonded enamel interfaces that are part of the dynamic pH cycling and thermal cycling models. The buccal surfaces of 60 bovine incisors were restored with a composite resin and bonded with three- and two-step, etch-and-rinse, fluoride-containing adhesives, Optibond FL (FL) and Optibond Solo Plus (SP), respectively. Restored teeth were subjected to thermal cycling to age th...

  5. Tensile Bond Strengths of Two Adhesives on Irradiated and Nonirradiated Human Dentin

    Cécile Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the effect of radiotherapy on bond efficiency of two different adhesive systems using tensile bond strength test. Twenty extracted teeth after radiotherapy and twenty nonirradiated extracted teeth were used. The irradiation was applied in vivo to a minimal dose of 50 Gy. The specimens of each group were randomly assigned to two subgroups to test two different adhesive systems. A three-step/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL and a two-steps/self-etch adhesive system (Optibond XTR were used. Composite buildups were performed with a nanohybrid composite (Herculite XTR. All specimens were submitted to thermocycling ageing (10000 cycles. The specimens were sectioned in 1 mm2 sticks. Microtensile bond strength tests were measured. Nonparametric statistical analyses were performed due to nonnormality of data. Optibond XTR on irradiated and nonirradiated teeth did not show any significant differences. However, Optibond FL bond strength was more effective on nonirradiated teeth than on irradiated teeth. Within the limitations of an in vitro study, it can be concluded that radiotherapy had a significant detrimental effect on bond strength to human dentin. However, it seems that adhesive choice could be adapted to the substrata. According to the present study, the two-steps/self-etch (Optibond XTR adhesive system tested could be more effective on irradiated dentin compared to three-steps/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL.

  6. BONDING OF MINIATURE PARTS WITH ADHESIVES AND VISION BASED PROCEDURE INSPECTION

    Wang Xiaodong; Jürgen Hesselbach

    2004-01-01

    Bonding with adhesives is an important technique for building up hybrid microsystems.Some adhesives are tested with capillary dispensing system for microassembly,and volume of droplets less than 10 nl with good repeatability can be acquired.1-part UV curing adhesive hardens rapidly and is suitable for bonding of transparent microparts.Light-activated adhesive starts the curing process in an adjustable short period of time after the radiation of visible light,and thus suits bonding of non-transparent microparts.A method is proposed for bonding the guides of a miniature linear motor being developed by collaborate research center 516 (SFB516) in Germany.With the method high assembly accuracy in the vertical direction can be guaranteed.By making small grooves on the stator for containing adhesive,the deterioration of the accuracy due to the thickness of adhesive layer can be avoided.The criteria on deciding the size of the groove are given and analyzed.Vision based inspection method is introduced for automatic assembly of the guides.The dispensing volume and position of dispensed adhesive droplets can be detected for ensuring the bonding quality.

  7. Tensile Bond Strengths of Two Adhesives on Irradiated and Nonirradiated Human Dentin.

    Bernard, Cécile; Villat, Cyril; Abouelleil, Hazem; Gustin, Marie-Paule; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of radiotherapy on bond efficiency of two different adhesive systems using tensile bond strength test. Twenty extracted teeth after radiotherapy and twenty nonirradiated extracted teeth were used. The irradiation was applied in vivo to a minimal dose of 50 Gy. The specimens of each group were randomly assigned to two subgroups to test two different adhesive systems. A three-step/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL) and a two-steps/self-etch adhesive system (Optibond XTR) were used. Composite buildups were performed with a nanohybrid composite (Herculite XTR). All specimens were submitted to thermocycling ageing (10000 cycles). The specimens were sectioned in 1 mm(2) sticks. Microtensile bond strength tests were measured. Nonparametric statistical analyses were performed due to nonnormality of data. Optibond XTR on irradiated and nonirradiated teeth did not show any significant differences. However, Optibond FL bond strength was more effective on nonirradiated teeth than on irradiated teeth. Within the limitations of an in vitro study, it can be concluded that radiotherapy had a significant detrimental effect on bond strength to human dentin. However, it seems that adhesive choice could be adapted to the substrata. According to the present study, the two-steps/self-etch (Optibond XTR) adhesive system tested could be more effective on irradiated dentin compared to three-steps/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL). PMID:26783528

  8. Bond strength evaluation in adhesive joints using NDE and DIC methods

    Poudel, Anish

    Adhesive bonding of graphite epoxy composite laminates to itself or traditional metal alloys in modern aerospace and aircraft structural applications offers an excellent opportunity to use the most efficient and intelligent combination of materials available thus providing an attractive package for efficient structural designs. However, one of the major issues of adhesive bonding is the occasional formation of interfacial defects such as kissing or weak bonds in the bondline interface. Also, there are shortcomings of existing non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods to non-destructively detect/characterize these interfacial defects and reliably predicting the bond shear strength. As a result, adhesive bonding technology is still not solely implemented in primary structures of an aircraft. Therefore, there is a greater demand for a novel NDE tool that can meet the existing aerospace requirement for adhesive bondline characterization. This research implemented a novel Acoustography ultrasonic imaging and digital image correlation (DIC) technique to detect and characterize interfacial defects in the bondline and determine bond shear strength in adhesively bonded composite-metal joints. Adhesively bonded Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) laminate and 2024-T3 Aluminum single lap shear panels subjected to various implanted kissing/weak bond defects were the primary focus of this study. Kissing/weak bonds were prepared by controlled surface contamination in the composite bonding surface and also by improperly mixing the adhesive constituent. SEM analyses were also conducted to understand the surface morphology of substrates and their interaction with the contaminants. Morphological changes were observed in the microscopic scale and the chemical analysis confirmed the stability of the contaminant at or very close to the interface. In addition, it was also demonstrated that contaminants migrated during the curing of the adhesive from CFRP substrate which caused a

  9. Effect of glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate on shear bond strength of adhesives to primary dentin

    Prabhakar A

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of alternative pulpotomy agents such as glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate on the shear bond strength of self-etch adhesive systems to dentin of primary teeth. Materials and Methods: Eighty human primary molar teeth were sectioned in a mesiodistal direction and divided into experimental and control groups. Lingual dentin specimens in experimental groups were treated with glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate. Buccal surfaces soaked in water served as control group. Each group was then divided into two groups based on the adhesive system used: Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Prompt L-Pop. A teflon mold was used to build the composite (Filtek Z-250 cylinders on the dentinal surface of all the specimens. Shear bond strength was tested for all the specimens with an Instron Universal Testing Machine. The failure mode analysis was performed with a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. Results: The results revealed that glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate significantly reduced the shear bond strength of the tested adhesive systems to primary dentin. Clearfil SE Bond showed much higher shear bond strength than Adper Prompt L Pop to primary dentin. SEM analysis revealed a predominant cohesive failure mode for both adhesive systems. Conclusion: This study revealed that the pulpotomy medicaments glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate adversely affected the bonding of self-etch adhesive systems to primary dentin.

  10. Bond strength comparison of color-change adhesives for orthodontic bonding using a self-etching primer

    Frey GN; Bussa HI; Powers JM; Ontiveros JC; English JD; Ekhlassi S; Colville CD; Ellis RK

    2011-01-01

    Sara Ekhlassi, Jeryl D English, Joe C Ontiveros, John M Powers, Harry I Bussa, Gary N Frey, Clark D Colville, Randy K EllisHouston Department of Orthodontics, The University of Texas Dental Branch, Houston, TX, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strengths of two color-change adhesives with a commonly used conventional light-cure adhesive while using a self-etching primer, and to compare any changes in shear bond strengths over time.Methods: One hundred and ...

  11. Hybridization quality and bond strength of adhesive systems according to interaction with dentin

    Salvio, Luciana Andrea; Hipólito, Vinicius Di; Martins, Adriano Luis; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the hybridization quality and bond strength of adhesives to dentin. Materials and Methods: Ten human molars were ground to expose the dentin and then sectioned in four tooth-quarters. They were randomly divided into 5 groups according to the adhesive used: Two single-step self-etch adhesives – Adper Prompt (ADP) and Xeno III (XE), two two-step self-etching primer systems – Clearfil SE Bond (SE) and Adhe SE (ADSE), and one one-step etch-and-rinse system – Adper Single Bo...

  12. Evaluation method for adhesion test results of bonded wet concrete to epoxies

    Aguiar, J. L. Barroso de

    1999-01-01

    The use of epoxies is today current in repair and bonding works of concrete structures. The raison of that is the good adhesion they present in bonding hardened concrete-hardened concrete, hardened concrete-fresh concrete and hardened concrete-metallic materials. However, the adhesion decreases when the substrate concrete is wet. The incorporation of a filler in the epoxy makes possible a good adhesion even when the concrete is wet. We did tension tests to study the influence of the type, the...

  13. Tensile Bond Strengths of Two Adhesives on Irradiated and Nonirradiated Human Dentin

    Cécile Bernard; Cyril Villat; Hazem Abouelleil; Marie-Paule Gustin; Brigitte Grosgogeat

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of radiotherapy on bond efficiency of two different adhesive systems using tensile bond strength test. Twenty extracted teeth after radiotherapy and twenty nonirradiated extracted teeth were used. The irradiation was applied in vivo to a minimal dose of 50 Gy. The specimens of each group were randomly assigned to two subgroups to test two different adhesive systems. A three-step/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL) and a two-steps/self-et...

  14. Effect of pre-etching enamel on fatigue of self-etch adhesive bonds

    R.L. Erickson; A.J. de Gee; A.J. Feilzer

    2008-01-01

    Objective. A previous study found that the shear bond strength (SBS) to bovine enamel for the self-etching adhesive Adper Prompt-L-Pop (PLP) was 75% of that found with the etch-and-rinse material SingleBond, while the comparative value for the shear fatigue limit (SFL) was only 58% at 10(5) load cyc

  15. Ideal, catch, and slip bonds in cadherin adhesion

    Rakshit, Sabyasachi; Zhang, Yunxiang; Manibog, Kristine; Shafraz, Omer; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi

    2012-01-01

    Classical cadherin cell-cell adhesion proteins play key morphogenetic roles during development and are essential for maintaining tissue integrity in multicellular organisms. Classical cadherins bind in two distinct conformations, X-dimer and strand-swap dimer; during cellular rearrangements, these adhesive states are exposed to mechanical stress. However, the molecular mechanisms by which cadherins resist tensile force and the pathway by which they convert between different conformations are ...

  16. System integration and demonstration of adhesive bonded high temperature aluminum alloys for aerospace structure, phase 2

    Falcone, Anthony; Laakso, John H.

    1993-01-01

    Adhesive bonding materials and processes were evaluated for assembly of future high-temperature aluminum alloy structural components such as may be used in high-speed civil transport aircraft and space launch vehicles. A number of candidate high-temperature adhesives were selected and screening tests were conducted using single lap shear specimens. The selected adhesives were then used to bond sandwich (titanium core) test specimens, adhesive toughness test specimens, and isothermally aged lap shear specimens. Moderate-to-high lap shear strengths were obtained from bonded high-temperature aluminum and silicon carbide particulate-reinforced (SiC(sub p)) aluminum specimens. Shear strengths typically exceeded 3500 to 4000 lb/in(sup 2) and flatwise tensile strengths exceeded 750 lb/in(sup 2) even at elevated temperatures (300 F) using a bismaleimide adhesive. All faceskin-to-core bonds displayed excellent tear strength. The existing production phosphoric acid anodize surface preparation process developed at Boeing was used, and gave good performance with all of the aluminum and silicon carbide particulate-reinforced aluminum alloys investigated. The results of this program support using bonded assemblies of high-temperature aluminum components in applications where bonding is often used (e.g., secondary structures and tear stoppers).

  17. Void-free wafer-level adhesive bonding utilizing modified poly (diallyl phthalate)

    Zhong, Fang; Dong, Tao; Yong, He; Yan, Su; Wang, Kaiying

    2013-12-01

    A new thermosetting polymer, modified poly (diallyl phthalate) (PDAP), is used as intermediate layer to realize a void-free wafer-level transfer bonding, in which the bonding interface contains patterned metal. Through glass-silicon bonding experiments, bonding defects are easily recognized with light microscopy. Three typical defect types are identified as: uneven flow defect, particle defect and bubble defect. The processing parameters, such as bonding pressure, pre-baking temperature, polymer thickness and coating conditions, have been optimized based on analysis of the defect formation. The optimized conditions have yielded a void-free wafer-level adhesive bonding. Then, the die shearing test indicates a good bonding strength. Additionally, the transfer bonding process is applied in SOI-silicon bonding as a practical example of MEMS fabrication.

  18. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to tooth structure

    Susan Hattar; Hatamleh, Muhanad M.; Faleh Sawair; Mohammad Al-Rabab’ah

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the strength of the bond between newly introduced self-adhesive resin cements and tooth structures (i.e., enamel and dentin). Methods: Three self-adhesive cements (SmartCem2, RelyX Unicem, seT SDI) were tested. Cylindrical-shaped cement specimens (diameter, 3 mm; height, 3 mm) were bonded to enamel and dentin. Test specimens were incubated at 37 °C for 24 h. The shear bond strength (SBS) was tested in a Zwick Roll testing machine. Results w...

  19. The Effect of Epigallocatechin Gallate on the Dentin Bond Durability of Two Self-etch Adhesives

    Zahra Khamverdi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Self-etch adhesives can activate matrix metalloprotein-ase (MMP which hydrolyzes organic matrix of demineralized dentin. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG, especially found in green tea, could inhibit the activation of MMP. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of adding Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG into two types of adhesives on dentin bond strength. Materials and Method: In this experimental study, 64 extracted third molars were randomly divided into 16 groups. Clearfil SE Bond and Filtek Silorane System with 0 µM, 25µM, 50µM, and 100µM concentration of 95% EGCG were used for bond-ing. Following the bonding and fabrication of beams (1±0.1 mm2 and storage in distilled water, the specimens were subjected to thermal cycles. Microtensile bond strengths of 8 groups were examined after 24 hours and others were tested after 6 months. The fracture modes of specimens were evaluated by stereomicroscope and SEM. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and t-test (α = 0.05. Results: The results of the three- way ANOVA test showed that types of bonding, storage time and interactive effect of EGCG concentration and bonding influenced the bond strength of specimens significantly (p<0.05. The results of the t-test indi-cated that storage time only had significant effect on bond strength of Clearfil SE Bond with no EGCG (p= 0.017. The most common failure modes in Filtek Silorane System groups and Clearfil SE Bond groups were adhesive and mixed/cohesive, respectively. The results of SEM at different magnifications showed that most fractures have occurred in the hybrid layer. Conclusion: Although adding 100 µM volume of EGCG to Clearfil SE Bond can preserve the dentin bond, incorporation of EGCG in the silorane system, especially in high concentrations, decreases the bond strength after 6 months.

  20. A randomized clinical trial evaluating the success rate of ethanol wet bonding technique and two adhesives

    Vajihesadat Mortazavi; Pouran Samimi; Mojgan Rafizadeh; Shantia Kazemi

    2012-01-01

    Background : Composite resin restorations may have a short lifespan due to the degradation of resin-dentin interface. Ethanol wet bonding technique may extend the longevity of resin-dentin bond. The purpose of this one year randomized clinical trial was to compare clinical performance of two adhesives with ethanol wet bonding technique. Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial was performed on 36 non-carious cervical lesions in 12 patients restored with composite resin using ...

  1. Bond strength comparison of color-change adhesives for orthodontic bonding using a self-etching primer

    Frey GN

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Sara Ekhlassi, Jeryl D English, Joe C Ontiveros, John M Powers, Harry I Bussa, Gary N Frey, Clark D Colville, Randy K EllisHouston Department of Orthodontics, The University of Texas Dental Branch, Houston, TX, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strengths of two color-change adhesives with a commonly used conventional light-cure adhesive while using a self-etching primer, and to compare any changes in shear bond strengths over time.Methods: One hundred and eighty extracted bovine incisors were randomly divided into nine groups of 20 teeth each. The teeth were prepared with a self-etching primer (Transbond™ Plus Metal lower incisor brackets were bonded directly to each tooth with two different color-change adhesives (TransbondPlus and Grengloo™ and a control (Transbond XT. The teeth were debonded at three different time points (15 minutes, 24 hours, 1 week using an Instron at 1.0 mm/min. The teeth that were to be debonded at 24 hours and 1 week were stored in distilled water at 37°C to simulate the oral environment. The data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance and with Fisher's protected least-significant difference multiple comparisons test at the P < 0.05 level of significance. Adhesive remnant index (ARI scores were calculated for each debonded tooth.Results: Transbond Plus at 1 week had the highest mean shear bond strength (14.7 mPa. Grengloo tested at 24 hours had the lowest mean shear bond strength (11.3 mPa. The mean shear bond strengths for the remaining seven groups had a range of 12–14.5 mPa. Grengloo had >80% samples presenting with an ARI score of 1 at all times. Interestingly, both Transbond groups had ARI scores of 3 in more than 50% of their samples.Conclusion: Time had no significant effect on the mean shear bond strength of Transbond XT, Grengloo, or Transbond Plus adhesive.Keywords: bond strength, color-change adhesives, self-etching primer, orthodontic bonding 

  2. Microtensile and tensile bond strength of single-bottle adhesives: a new test method.

    Abdalla, A I

    2004-04-01

    To evaluate the tensile and microtensile bond strength of five single-bottle adhesives to dentine, extracted human molar teeth were used. For each tooth dentine was exposed on the occlusal surface by cutting with an isomet saw and the remaining part was mounted in a plastic ring using dental stone. The tested adhesive materials were: Scotchbond 1, Syntac SC, One-Step, Prime & Bond 2.1 and Clearfil SE Bond. The adhesive was applied to either 1 mm(2) of dentine or a circular area with a diameter of 3.9 mm. Composite resin Clearfil AP-X was placed to the adhesives using a Teflon split mould 3.9 mm in diameter and 2.5 mm in height. Tensile and microtensile bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm min(-1). Under tensile mode, the bond strengths were 16.7 +/- 3.5, 15.2 +/- 2.5, 11.5 +/- 3.2, 13.7 +/- 2.6, 20.9 +/- 4.2 MPa for each material. Under microtensile mode, the bond strengths were 52.5 +/- 9.5, 55.3 +/- 8.3, 40.5 +/- 5.2, 37.5 +/- 8.7, 60 +/- 6.21 MPa. Fracture pattern of bonded specimens showed 66% cohesive dentine failure in samples tested for tensile bond strength. For the microtensile test, failures were mainly adhesive at the interface between adhesive and dentine (94%). PMID:15089946

  3. Test method to assess interface adhesion in composite bonding

    Teixeira de Freitas, S.; Sinke, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a new type of peel tests dedicated to composite bonding: Composite Peel Tests. This test is inspired on the standard floating roller peel test widely used for metal bonding. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of the Composite Peel Test to assess interface ad

  4. Influence of Ortho Primer Morelli adhesion booster on orthodontic brackets shear bond strength

    Sabrina de Mendonça Invernici

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This work aimed at assessing the bond strength (AS, the site of the flaw and the relation between them and Ortho Primer Morelli® (OPM adhesion optimizer. METHODS: Sixty test specimens, made out of bovine permanent lower incisors, were divided into three groups: TXT Primer (control, in which a conventional adhesive system was applied (primer and paste; OPM, in which TXT primer was replaced by OPM; and TXT without Primer, in which only TXT paste was used. A shear force was applied at a speed of 0,5 mm/min. Failure site was assessed by the Remaining Adhesion Index (RAI. RESULTS: Kruskal-Wallis demonstrated that OPM (8.54 ± 1.86 MPa presented a statistically higher AS (p 0.05 between TXT with or without Primer (6.42 ± 2.12 MPa. Regarding the RAI, the K test demonstrated that TXT Primer and OPM (prevailing scores 2 and 3 showed higher values (p 0.05. CONCLUSION: OPM increases AS and presents the same bond failure location if compared to a conventional adhesive system; the use of the TXT adhesive system paste only was shown to have the same AS if compared to conventional systems, except it does not allow to predict the adhesive failure site; there is no correlation between AS and bond failure location, regardless of the use of any adhesion optimizer.

  5. Influence of chlorhexidine concentration on microtensile bond strength of contemporary adhesive systems

    Edson Alves de Campos

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of chlorhexidine (CHX concentration on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS of contemporary adhesive systems. Eighty bovine central incisors were used in this study. The facial enamel surface of the crowns was abraded with 600-grit silicon carbide paper to expose flat, mid-coronal dentin surfaces. The tested materials were Scotchbond Multipurpose (SMP, Single-Bond (SB, Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB and Clearfil Tri S Bond (CTSB. All the materials were applied according to manufacturer's instructions and followed by composite application (Z250. The teeth were randomly divided into 16 groups: for the etch-and-rinse adhesives (SMP and SB, 0.12% or 2% CHX was applied prior to or after the acid etching procedure. For the self-etch adhesives (CSEB and CTSB 0.12% or 2% CHX was applied prior to the primer. Control groups for each one of the adhesive systems were also set up. The specimens were immediately submitted to μTBS testing and the data were analyzed using Analysis of Variance and the Tukey post hoc test (alpha = .01. The failure patterns of the specimens were observed using scanning electron microscopy. The effects of 2% CHX were statistically significant (p < 0.01 for the self-etch adhesives but were not significant for the etch-and-rinse adhesive systems. Analysis of the data demonstrated no statistical difference between the etch-and-rinse adhesive systems. CHX-based cavity disinfectants in concentrations higher than 0.12% should be avoided prior to the self-etch adhesive systems evaluated in this study to diminish the possibilities of reduction in bond strength.

  6. Surface Modification of Titanium and Polyimide Sheet for Adhesive Bonding

    Akram, M.

    2015-01-01

    Major industrial sectors like automotive, aerospace and others are increasingly using polymer composites in their structural parts. Polyimide sheet and adhesives, are high performance polymers. They are widely used in various engineering applications due to their excellent thermal, mechanical and ch

  7. Loss effects on adhesively-bonded multilayer ultrasonic transducers by self-heating.

    Wu, Zhengbin; Cochran, Sandy

    2010-04-01

    Multilayer ultrasonic transducers are widely being used for high power applications. In these applications, typical Langevin/Tonpilz structures without any adhesive bondings however have the disadvantage of limited bandwidth. Therefore adhesively-bonded structures are still a potential solution for this issue. In this paper, two-layer piezoelectric ceramic ultrasonic transducers with two different adhesive bondlines were investigated comparing to a single-layer transducer in terms of loss effects during operation with excitation signals sufficient to cause self-heating. The theoretical functions fitted to the measured time-temperature dependency data are compared with experimental results of different piezoelectric transducers. Theoretical analysis of loss characteristics at various surface displacements and the relationship with increasing temperature are reported. The effects of self-heating on the practical performance of multilayer ultrasonic transducers with adhesive bondlines are discussed. PMID:19942247

  8. Embedded proteins and sacrificial bonds provide the strong adhesive properties of gastroliths.

    Thormann, Esben; Mizuno, Hiroyasu; Jansson, Kjell; Hedin, Niklas; Fernández, M Soledad; Arias, José Luis; Rutland, Mark W; Pai, Ranjith Krishna; Bergström, Lennart

    2012-07-01

    The adhesive properties of gastroliths from a freshwater crayfish (Cherax quadricarinatus) were quantified by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) between heavily demineralized gastrolith microparticles and gastrolith substrates of different composition. Combined AFM and transmission electron microscopy studies demonstrated that the sequential detachment and large adhesion energies that characterise the adhesive behaviour of a native gastrolith substrate are dominated by sacrificial bonds between chitin fibres and between chitin fibres and CaCO(3). The sacrificial bonds were shown to be strongly related to the gastrolith proteins and when the majority of these proteins were removed by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), the sequential detachment disappeared and the adhesive energy was reduced by more than two orders of magnitude. PMID:22653376

  9. Dry chemical pretreatment of titanium and polymers for adhesive bonding. Trockenchemische Vorbehandlung von Titan und Kunststoffen fuer das Kleben

    Krueger, G.; Hennemann, O.D. (Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Angewandte Materialforschung, Bremen (Germany))

    1993-01-01

    Titan alloys have to be pretreated to increase the adhesive bonding strength. Because of environmental reasons dry chemical pretreatment methods are preferred compared to wet chemical techniques. One successful method is a silicatisation referring to the Saco-technique. Layers generated by this method on titanium or polymer substrates lead to highly water-resistant adhesive bondings. Also adhesive joints of Ti with polymer show high bond strength when polymer and Ti are Saco treated. With a suitable optimization of the technological parameters it is possible to adhesively bond polymers also with anaerobic acrylic esters. (orig.).

  10. Lamb Wave Interaction with Adhesively Bonded Stiffeners and Disbonds Using 3D Vibrometry

    Ryan Marks

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many advantages to adhesively bonding stiffeners onto aircraft structures rather than using traditional mechanical fastening methods. However there is a lack of confidence of the structural integrity of adhesively bonded joints over time. Acousto-ultrasonic Lamb waves have shown great potential in structural health monitoring applications in both metallic and composite structures. This paper presents an experimental investigation of the use of acousto-ultrasonic Lamb waves for the monitoring of adhesively bonded joints in metallic structures using 3D scanning laser vibrometry. Two stiffened panels were manufactured, one with an intentional disbonded region. Lamb wave interaction with the healthy and disbonded stiffeners was investigated at three excitation frequencies. A windowed root-mean-squared technique was applied to quantify where Lamb wave energy was reflected, attenuated and transmitted across the structure enabling the size and shape of the defect to be visualised which was verified by traditional ultrasonic inspection techniques.

  11. Development of a rubber toughened epoxy adhesive loaded with carbon nanotubes, for aluminium – polymer bonds

    Salinas-Ruiz , Maria del Mar

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes the formulation of a ternary thermosetting adhesive which consists of a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) epoxy resin cured with 3,3’-diamino diphenyl sulphone (3,3’-DDS) hardener and modified through the addition of carboxyl- terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile (CTBN) rubber and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Processing implications of the novel adhesive in the film form are considered in order to manufacture bonded specimens for characteris...

  12. Effects of Different Hardeners on the Working Properties and Bonding Strength of Urea-formaldehyde Adhesives

    2003-01-01

    The addition of a hardener is necessary for the curing of urea-formaldehyde (UF) adhesives in the production of MDF and particleboard. The most commonly used hardener, ammonium chloride, however, is suspected to cause the formation of poisonous dioxin when waste boards are combusted and hence considered as a potential source of pollution. To assess the feasibility of substituting ammonium sulphate for ammonium chloride, working properties and bonding strength were measured for UF adhesives with the two ...

  13. Effect of Adhesive Cementation Strategies on the Bonding of Y-TZP to Human Dentin.

    Alves, Mll; Campos, F; Bergoli, C D; Bottino, M A; Özcan, M; Souza, Roa

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of different adhesive strategies on the adhesion of zirconia to dentin using conventional and self-adhesive cements and their corresponding adhesive resins. The occlusal parts of human molars (N=80) were sectioned, exposing the dentin. The teeth and zirconia cylinders (N=80) (diameter=3.4 mm; height=4 mm) were randomly divided into eight groups according to the factors "surface conditioning" and "cement type" (n=10 per group). One conventional cement (CC: RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE) and one self-adhesive cement (SA: RelyX U200, 3M ESPE) and their corresponding adhesive resin (for CC, Adper Single Bond Plus; for SA, Scotchbond Universal Adhesive-SU) were applied on dentin. Zirconia specimens were conditioned either using chairside (CJ: CoJet, 30 μm, 2.5 bar, four seconds), laboratory silica coating (RC: Rocatec, 110 μm, 2.5 bar, four seconds), or universal primer (Single Bond Universal-UP). Nonconditioned groups for both cements acted as the control (C). Specimens were stored in water (37°C, 30 days) and subjected to shear bond strength (SBS) testing (1 mm/min). Data (MPa) were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and a Tukey test (α=0.05). While surface conditioning significantly affected the SBS values (p=0.0001) (Cadhesive. Air-abrasion and the use of the universal primer improved the bond strength of zirconia to dentin compared to the control group, regardless of the type of resin cement used. PMID:26509232

  14. Additional Interface Corner Toughness Data for an Adhesively-Bonded Butt Joint

    Guess, T.R.; Reedy, E.D.

    1999-04-14

    Over a period of 15 months, five sets of adhesively-bonded butt joints were fabricated and tested. This previously unreported data is used to assess the variability of measured interface corner toughness values, K{sub ac}, as well as the dependence of K{sub ac} on surface preparation. A correlation between K{sub ac} and the size of the adhesive failure zone is also noted.

  15. Micro-tensile bond strength of adhesives to pulp chamber dentin after irrigation with Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid

    Ç Barutcigil; Arslan, H; Özcan, E; O T Harorli

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different concentrations of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) solution on adhesion, that is, the bond strength of the different adhesive systems, to the pulp chamber dentin. Materials and Methods: Recently extracted, sound, human, third molars were cut horizontally to expose the pulp horn. The roof of the pulp chamber and pulp tissue was removed. The teeth were then divided into five main groups. The teeth in each group were tre...

  16. Influence of saliva contamination on the shear bond strength of adhesives on enamel

    Tatiana Feres Assad-Loss

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate shear bond strength of 3 adhesive systems (Single Bond, TransbondTM MIP and TransbondTM XT applied on bovine enamel under saliva contamination condition. METHOD: One hundred and twenty enamel surfaces of bovine incisors were divided into 6 groups (n = 20 according to the adhesive system used (TransbondTM XT, TransbondTM MIP and Single Bond with or without saliva contamination. For each adhesive system, there were two groups defined as no contamination group (NC: 37% H3PO4 conditioning for 30 seconds and two layers of adhesive systems; saliva contamination group (SC: After the first adhesive layer application, the examined areas were contaminated with saliva. Samples were mounted appropriately for testing and stored in deionized water at 37 ºC for 7 days. Samples were then submitted to shear bond strength trials at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI was evaluated under stereomicroscopy. Two-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test were used to compare mean values (α = 0.05. RESULTS: Groups XT (NC = 26.29 ± 7.23; MIP (NC = 24.47 ± 7.52 and SB (NC = 32.36 ± 4.14 XT (SC = 19.59 ± 6.76; MIP (SC = 18.08 ± 6.39 and SB (SC = 18.18 ± 7.03 MPa. ARI 0 and 1 were the most prevalent scores in all study groups examined. CONCLUSION: Saliva contamination significantly decreased bond strength of the three adhesive systems examined (p <0.05. However, the comparison of groups with and without saliva contamination did not reveal any significant differences, and, therefore, the three systems may be considered equivalent.

  17. Molecular weight effects upon the adhesive bonding of a mussel mimetic polymer.

    Jenkins, Courtney L; Meredith, Heather J; Wilker, Jonathan J

    2013-06-12

    Characterization of marine biological adhesives are teaching us how nature makes materials and providing new ideas for synthetic systems. One of the most widely studied adhering animals is the marine mussel. This mollusk bonds to wet rocks by producing an adhesive from cross-linked proteins. Several laboratories are now making synthetic mimics of mussel adhesive proteins, with 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) or similar molecules pendant from polymer chains. In select cases, appreciable bulk bonding results, with strengths as high as commercial glues. Polymer molecular weight is amongst several parameters that need to be examined in order to both understand biomimetic adhesion as well as to maximize performance. Experiments presented here explore how the bulk adhesion of a mussel mimetic polymer varies as a function of molecular weight. Systematic structure-function studies were carried out both with and without the presence of an oxidative cross-linker. Without cross-linking, higher molecular weights generally afforded higher adhesion. When a [N(C4H9)4](IO4) cross-linker was added, adhesion peaked at molecular weights of ~50,000-65,000 g/mol. These data help to illustrate how changes to the balance of cohesion versus adhesion influence bulk bonding. Mussel adhesive plaques achieve this balance by incorporating several proteins with molecular weights ranging from 6000 to 110,000 g/mol. To mimic these varied proteins we made a blend of polymers containing a range of molecular weights. Interestingly, this blend adhered more strongly than any of the individual polymers when cross-linked with [N(C4H9)4](IO4). These results are helping us to both understand the origins of biological materials as well as design high performance polymers. PMID:23668520

  18. Multitechnique monitoring of fatigue damage in adhesively bonded composite lap-joints

    Karpenko, Oleksii; Koricho, Ermias; Khomenko, Anton; Dib, Gerges; Haq, Mahmoodul; Udpa, Lalita

    2015-03-01

    The requirement for reduced structural weight has driven the development of adhesively bonded joints. However, a major issue preventing their full acceptance is the initiation of premature failure in the form of a disbond between adherends, mainly due to fatigue, manufacturing flaws or impact damage. This work presents the integrated approach for in-situ monitoring of degradation of the adhesive bond in the GFRP composite lap-joint using ultrasonic guided waves and dynamic measurements from strategically embedded FBG sensors. Guided waves are actuated with surface mounted piezoelectric elements and mode tuning is used to provide high sensitivity to the degradation of the adhesive layer parameters. Composite lap-joints are subjected to fatigue loading, and data from piezoceramic transducers are collected at regular intervals to evaluate the progression of damage. Results demonstrate that quasi-static loading affects guided wave measurements considerably, but FBG sensors can be used to monitor the applied load levels and residual strains in the adhesive bond. The proposed technique shows promise for determining the post-damage stiffness of adhesively bonded joints.

  19. Low-frequency features of the ultrasound echo from an adhesively bonded layer-substrate structure

    WANG Xiaomin; LI Mingxuan; MAO Jie; LIAN Guoxuan

    2005-01-01

    The low-frequency features of the ultrasound reflection spectra from the structure of a single layer on a substrate bonded by a thin adhesive layer are theoretically studied; the low-frequency here means the frequency of the interrogating ultrasonic wave is less than the quart-wavelength resonance frequency of the adhesive layer. The possibility of the inversion of the thickness and the evaluation of the cohesion strength of the adhesive layer from the resonance frequency shifts of the layered system is indicated. An analytic solution to the nonlinear equation satisfied by the resonance frequency is presented by Taylor expansion method showing satisfactory agreement with the numerical results by Newton iterative method. The results indicate larger range for application than the traditional spring model for the thin adhesive layer. In a much lower frequency range the thin adhesive layer may be regarded to be a spring.

  20. Effect of cleaning methods on bond strength of self-etching adhesive to dentin

    Juliana Delatorre Bronzato

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of cleaning methods to remove zinc oxide-eugenol-based root canal sealer (Endomethasone on the bond strength of the self-etching adhesive to dentin. Materials and Methods: Twenty crowns of bovine incisors were cut to expose the pulp chamber. A zinc oxide- and eugenol-based sealer was placed for 10 min in contact with the pulp chamber dentin. Specimens were divided into four groups according to the cleaning method of dentin used: G1, no root canal sealer (control; G2, 0.9% sodium chlorite (NaCl; G3, ethanol; and G4, followed by diamond drill. After cleaning, the teeth were restored with composite resin and Clearfil SE Bond. All specimens were sectioned to produce rectangular sticks and dentin/resin interface was submitted to microtensile bond testing. The mean bond strengths were analyzed using ANOVA/Tukey (α = 0.05. Results: G3 and G4 showed bond strengths similar to the G1 (P > 0.05. A significant decrease in the bond strength in the G2 was observed (P < 0.05. G1, G3, and G4, the predominant failure mode was the mixed type. The prevalence of adhesive failure mode was verified in the G2. Conclusion: The cleaning methods affected the bond strength of the self-etching adhesive to dentin differently.

  1. Study on the structural evolution of modified phenol-formaldehyde resin adhesive for the high-temperature bonding of graphite

    A novel adhesive for carbon materials composed of phenol-formaldehyde resin, boron carbide and fumed silica, was prepared. The adhesive property of graphite joints bonded by the above adhesive treated at high-temperatures was tested. Results showed that the adhesive was found to have outstanding high-temperature bonding properties for graphite. The adhesive structure was dense and uniform even after the graphite joints were heat-treated at 1500 deg. C. Bonding strength was 17.1 MPa. The evolution of adhesive structure was investigated. The results indicated that the addition of the secondary additive, fumed silica, improved the bonding performance greatly. Borosilicate phase with better stability was formed during the heat-treatment process, and the volume shrinkage was restrained effectively, which was responsible for the satisfactory high-temperature bonding performance of graphite

  2. Effects of endodontic tri-antibiotic paste on bond strengths of dentin adhesives to coronal dentin

    Mirzakoucheki, Parvin; Walter, Ricardo; Khalighinejad, Navid; Jahromi, Maryam Zare; Mirsattari, Sanaz; Akbarzadeh, Navid

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of tri-antibiotic paste (TAP) on microtensile bond strengths (MTBS) of dental adhesives to dentin. Materials and Methods Sixty extracted molars had their occlusal surfaces flattened to expose dentin. They were divided into two groups, i.e., control group with no dentin treatment and experimental group with dentin treatment with TAP. After 10 days, specimens were bonded using self-etch (Filtek P90 adhesive) or etch-and-rinse (Adper S...

  3. Laser Surface Preparation for Adhesive Bonding of Ti-6Al-4V

    Belcher, Marcus A.; List, Martina S.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Ghose, Sayata; Watson, Kent A.; Hopkins, John W.; Connell, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesively bonded structures are potentially lighter in weight than mechanically fastened ones, but existing surface treatments are often considered unreliable. Two main problems in achieving reproducible and durable adhesive bonds are surface contamination and variability in standard surface preparation techniques. In this work three surface pretreatments were compared: laser etching with and without grit blasting and conventional Pasa-Jell treatment. Ti-6Al-4V surfaces were characterized by contact angle goniometry, optical microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Laser -etching was found to produce clean surfaces with precisely controlled surface topographies and PETI-5 lap shear strengths and durabilities were equivalent to those produced with Pasa-Jell.

  4. Effect of Self-etching Adhesives on the Bond Strength of Glass-Ionomer Cements.

    Zahra Jaberi Ansari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Adequate bond strength between glass ionomer cements and composite resin is necessary for the success of the sandwich technique.This study assessed the micro-shear bond strength of composite resin to glass-ionomer cements (GIC using self-etch adhesives with different pH values.One hundred specimens (6×4×2 mm were made using Fuji II and Fuji II LC GICs and treated with different adhesives as follows: Group 1:Fuji II+ Adper Prompt L-Pop, Group-2: Fuji II+SE bond, Group-3: Fuji II + AdheSE, Group-4:Fuji II+ Protect bond, Group-5: Fuji II + Single bond, Group-6:Fuji II LC+ Adper Prompt LPop, Group-7: Fuji II LC+SE bond, Group-8:Fuji II LC+ AdheSE, Group-9: Fuji II LC+ Protect bond, and Group-10: Fuji II LC+ Single bond. Each group consisted of 10 specimens. A cylinder of Z100 composite resin was placed on each sample and light cured. After 24 hours of water storage (37°C, the specimens were subjected to micro-shear bond strength tests (0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test.The mean micro-shear bond strength of groups 1-10 was 11.66±1.79, 16.50±1.85, 18.47±1.77, 13.95±1.77, 15.27±1.49, 15.14±0.90, 20.03±1.19, 17.48±3.00, 16.24±1.98 and 16.03±1.49 MPa, respectively. There were significant differences between groups 1 and 7 (P0.05. Fuji II LC showed higher bond strength than Fuji II (P<0.05.Type of self-etch adhesive had no significant effect on micro-shear bond strength of glass-ionomer to composite resin. Resin modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC exhibited higher bond strength than the conventional GIC.

  5. Post-bleaching application of an antioxidant on dentin bond strength of three dental adhesives

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Saneie, Tahereh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Antioxidizing agents have recently been suggested to compensate decreased bond strength of resin materials to bleached tooth tissues. This study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) of three different adhesives on bleached dentin immediately after bleaching, bleached/delayed for 1 week, and bleached/applied antioxidizing agent. Materials and Methods: The dentinal surfaces of 132 intact extracted molars were prepared and divided into 12 groups. The following adhesives were investigated: Optibond FL (OFL) (three-step etch-and-rinse), Optibond Solo Plus (two-step etch-and-rinse), and Optibond all-in-one (OA) (one-step self-etch) (Kerr, Orange, USA). Unbleached dentin groups (groups 1-3) were prepared as negative controls (NC). The remainder surfaces (groups 4-12) were bleached with 20% Opalescent PF (Ultradent, USA). Specimens were bonded immediately after bleaching (groups 4-6), after 1 week (groups 7-9), or after using 10% sodium ascorbate (SA) gel (groups 10-12). Subsequent to bonding of composite resin, the samples were tested for SBS and analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α=0.05). Results: Regarding control groups, OA showed the highest SBS among the studied adhesives (P0.05) except the of delay bonding with OA. Conclusions: The findings suggest that bond strength of resin to bleached dentin may be affected with the adhesive system. Reduced SBS to bleached dentin can be amended by the use of SA as an antioxidizing agent. However, the amount of reversed bond strength subsequent to applying antioxidant might be related to the kind of dental adhesive. PMID:22363363

  6. Effect of thermal cycling on the bond strength of self-adhesive cements to fiber posts.

    Mazzitelli, Claudia; Monticelli, Francesca; Toledano, Manuel; Ferrari, Marco; Osorio, Raquel

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the push-out bond strengths of self-adhesive resin cements to epoxy resin-based fiber posts after challenging by thermocycling. Thirty-six single-rooted premolars were endodontically treated, and the post-spaces were drilled to receive RelyX Fiber posts #1. Three self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, and Breeze) were used for luting fiber posts. The bonded specimens were either stored for 1 month in a moist field (37°C) or submitted to thermocycling (5,000 times) prior to push-out test. The maximum force required to dislodge the post via an apical-coronal direction was recorded (megapascal). The data were statistically analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (p Breeze were higher than those of G-Cem. After thermocycling, the bond strength of G-Cem increased and no differences were found between groups. RelyX Unicem and Breeze bond strengths were not affected by the thermal challenge. Thermal cycling and cement type differently influence the bond strengths of self-adhesive resin cements. Self-adhesive cements can represent an option for luting fiber posts into root canal. PMID:21670983

  7. Effects of Type I Collagen Degradation on the Durability of Three Adhesive Systems in the Early Phase of Dentin Bonding

    Hu, Lin; Xiao, Yu-hong; Fang, Ming; Gao, Yu; Huang, Li; Jia, An-qi; Chen, Ji-hua

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study was designed to evaluate the effects of type I collagen degradation on the durability of three adhesive systems in the early phase of dentin bonding. Methods Bonded dentin specimens were prepared using three different types of adhesive systems. Micro-tensile bond strength and degradation of collagen were tested before, and after 1 month or 4 months of aging in artificial saliva. The relationship between micro-tensile bond strength and collagen degradation was analyzed by ...

  8. Nondestructive Characterization of Adhesive Bonds from Guided Wave Data

    Mal, A.; Lih, S-S.; Bar-Cohen, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The critical role played by interface zones in the fracture and failure of composites and other bonded materials is well known. The existing nondestructive evaluation methods are generally not capable of yielding useful quantitative information of the strength of an interface.

  9. Shear bond strength between alumina substrate and prosthodontic resin composites with various adhesive resin systems

    AlJehani, Yousef A.; Baskaradoss, Jagan K; Geevarghese, Amrita; AlShehry, Marey A; Pekka K. Vallittu

    2015-01-01

    Background With the increase in demand for cosmetics and esthetics, resin composite restorations and all-ceramic restorations have become an important treatment alternative. Taking into consideration the large number of prosthodontic and adhesive resins currently available, the strength and durability of these materials needs to be evaluated. This laboratory study presents the shear bond strengths of a range of veneering resin composites bonded to all-ceramic core material using different adh...

  10. Shear bond strength of amalgam to dentin using different dentin adhesive systems

    Farimah Sardari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the shear bond strength of amalgam to dentin using four dentin adhesive systems.Materials and Methods: One hundred human molars were selected. After enamel removal, a dentin cylinder with 3 mm thickness was prepared. Eighty specimens were resorted with amalgam and four dentin adhesive systems as follows (n=20: group 1, Scotch Bond Multi-Purpose; group 2, One Coat Bond; group 3, PQ1; and group 4, Panavia-F. In group 5, 20 specimens were resorted with amalgam and varnish as control group. The specimens were incubated at 37°C for 24 h. The shear bond strengths were then measured by using push out method. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and post hoc Duncan's tests.Results: Mean values for bond strengths of test groups were as follows: group 1=21.03±8.9, group 2=23.47±9, group 3=13.16±8.8, group 4=20.07±8.9 and group 5=14.15±8.7 MPa±SD. One-way ANOVA showed the statistically significant difference between the bond strengths of five groups (P=0.001. Post hoc Duncan's test showed significant difference between groups 1and 3 (P=0.008, groups 1 and 5 (P=0.019, groups 2 and 5 (P=0.0008, groups 4 and 5 (P=0.042, and groups 3 and 4 (P=0.018.Conclusion: Results of this study showed that the bond strength of amalgam to dentin using One Coat Bond as dentin adhesive system was higher than that observed in other dentin adhesive systems.

  11. Adhesively bonded composite reinforcements for steel structures: durability of the stress transfer

    CHATAIGNER, Sylvain; GAGNON, Arnaud; Quiertant, Marc; BENZARTI, Karim; Aubagnac, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, externally bonded composites are currently used for reinforced concrete structures repair or reinforcement. Such a technique allows increasing the service life of concrete bridges. In the case of steel bridges, applications of this technique are not significant. This may be due to the similarity of both materials rigidity, but also to the lack of confidence of structure owners in using structural adhesive bonding as assembly technique. In the scope of a research work led by the IFST...

  12. A simple surface treatment and characterization of AA 6061 aluminum alloy surface for adhesive bonding applications

    Highlights: ► A very simple surface treatment method to achieve excellent and durable aluminum adhesive bonding. ► Our method involves simple immersion of aluminum in very dilute NaOH solution at room temperature with no involvement of strong acids or multiple procedures. ► Surface analysis via various surface characterization techniques showed morphological and chemical modifications favorable for obtaining highly durable bond strengths on the treated surface. ► Safe, economical, reproducible and simple method, easily applicable in industries. - Abstract: Structural adhesive bonding of aluminum is widely used in aircraft and automotive industries. It has been widely noted that surface preparation of aluminum surfaces prior to adhesive bonding plays a significant role in improving the strength of the adhesive bond. Surface cleanliness, surface roughness, surface wettability and surface chemistry are controlled primarily by proper surface treatment methods. In this study, we have employed a very simple technique influencing all these criteria by simply immersing aluminum substrates in a very dilute solution of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and we have studied the effect of varying the treatment period on the adhesive bonding characteristics. A bi-component epoxy adhesive was used to join the treated surfaces and the bond strengths were evaluated via single lap shear (SLS) tests in pristine as well as degraded conditions. Surface morphology, chemistry, crystalline nature and wettability of the NaOH treated surfaces were characterized using various surface analytical tools such as scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX), optical profilometry, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and contact angle goniometry. Excellent adhesion characteristics with complete cohesive failure of the adhesive were encountered on the NaOH treated surfaces that are comparable to the benchmark

  13. Effect of digluconate chlorhexidine on bond strength between dental adhesive systems and dentin: A systematic review

    Dimitrios Dionysopoulos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to systematically review the literature for the effect of digluconate chlorhexidine (CHX on bond strength between dental adhesive systems and dentin of composite restorations. Materials and Methods: The electronic databases that were searched to identify manuscripts for inclusion were Medline via PubMed and Google search engine. The search strategies were computer search of the database and review of reference lists of the related articles. Search words/terms were as follows: (digluconate chlorhexidineFNx01 AND (dentinFNx01 OR adhesive systemFNx01 OR bond strengthFNx01. Results: Bond strength reduction after CHX treatments varied among the studies, ranging 0-84.9%. In most of the studies, pretreatment CHX exhibited lower bond strength reduction than the control experimental groups. Researchers who previously investigated the effect of CHX on the bond strength of dental adhesive systems on dentin have reported contrary results, which may be attributed to different experimental methods, different designs of the experiments, and different materials investigated. Conclusions: Further investigations, in particular clinical studies, would be necessary to clarify the effect of CHX on the longevity of dentin bonds.

  14. The analysis of adhesively bonded advanced composite joints using joint finite elements

    Stapleton, Scott E.

    The design and sizing of adhesively bonded joints has always been a major bottleneck in the design of composite vehicles. Dense finite element (FE) meshes are required to capture the full behavior of a joint numerically, but these dense meshes are impractical in vehicle-scale models where a course mesh is more desirable to make quick assessments and comparisons of different joint geometries. Analytical models are often helpful in sizing, but difficulties arise in coupling these models with full-vehicle FE models. Therefore, a joint FE was created which can be used within structural FE models to make quick assessments of bonded composite joints. The shape functions of the joint FE were found by solving the governing equations for a structural model for a joint. By analytically determining the shape functions of the joint FE, the complex joint behavior can be captured with very few elements. This joint FE was modified and used to consider adhesives with functionally graded material properties to reduce the peel stress concentrations located near adherend discontinuities. Several practical concerns impede the actual use of such adhesives. These include increased manufacturing complications, alterations to the grading due to adhesive flow during manufacturing, and whether changing the loading conditions significantly impact the effectiveness of the grading. An analytical study is conducted to address these three concerns. Furthermore, proof-of-concept testing is conducted to show the potential advantages of functionally graded adhesives. In this study, grading is achieved by strategically placing glass beads within the adhesive layer at different densities along the joint. Furthermore, the capability to model non-linear adhesive constitutive behavior with large rotations was developed, and progressive failure of the adhesive was modeled by re-meshing the joint as the adhesive fails. Results predicted using the joint FE was compared with experimental results for various

  15. The Analysis of Adhesively Bonded Advanced Composite Joints Using Joint Finite Elements

    Stapleton, Scott E.; Waas, Anthony M.

    2012-01-01

    The design and sizing of adhesively bonded joints has always been a major bottleneck in the design of composite vehicles. Dense finite element (FE) meshes are required to capture the full behavior of a joint numerically, but these dense meshes are impractical in vehicle-scale models where a course mesh is more desirable to make quick assessments and comparisons of different joint geometries. Analytical models are often helpful in sizing, but difficulties arise in coupling these models with full-vehicle FE models. Therefore, a joint FE was created which can be used within structural FE models to make quick assessments of bonded composite joints. The shape functions of the joint FE were found by solving the governing equations for a structural model for a joint. By analytically determining the shape functions of the joint FE, the complex joint behavior can be captured with very few elements. This joint FE was modified and used to consider adhesives with functionally graded material properties to reduce the peel stress concentrations located near adherend discontinuities. Several practical concerns impede the actual use of such adhesives. These include increased manufacturing complications, alterations to the grading due to adhesive flow during manufacturing, and whether changing the loading conditions significantly impact the effectiveness of the grading. An analytical study is conducted to address these three concerns. Furthermore, proof-of-concept testing is conducted to show the potential advantages of functionally graded adhesives. In this study, grading is achieved by strategically placing glass beads within the adhesive layer at different densities along the joint. Furthermore, the capability to model non-linear adhesive constitutive behavior with large rotations was developed, and progressive failure of the adhesive was modeled by re-meshing the joint as the adhesive fails. Results predicted using the joint FE was compared with experimental results for various

  16. Failure criterion for adhesively bonded joints using Arcan´s experimental method

    Demetrio Jackson dos Santos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of polymeric materials mechanical behavior requires some previous knowledge about their structure, which allows the choice of more appropriated models and methods. Polymeric materials, below their glass transition temperature (Tg, may be handled as perfect elastic solids, allowing the use of classic mechanics to characterize their behavior. Polymers above their Tg present a viscous contribution to mechanical behavior, which has to be taken into consideration by modeling it. Adhesively bonded joint, joining of different materials using a polymer as adhesive, adds to the mentioned requirements more parameters, such as surface roughness, adhesive thickness and different types of contributions to adhesively bonded joint strength. This work has the purpose of presenting a mechanical behavior characterization of adhesive bonded joints, concerning their average stress at rupture. A modified Arcan´s device was used to obtain the average stress at rupture under different angles or loading conditions, such as pure shear 0°, pure tensile strength 90° and combined conditions. The experimental results were applied to a theoretical model, which takes into consideration the hydrostatic contribution to the mechanical behavior, called Drucker-Prager Model, which was initially developed to characterize soils.

  17. Does the 4f-shell contribute to bonding in tetravalent lanthanide halides?

    Lanthanide tetrahalide molecules LnX4 (Ln = Ce, Pr, Tb; X = F, Cl, Br, I) have been investigated by density functional theory at the levels of the relativistic Zero Order Regular Approximation and the relativistic energy-consistent pseudopotentials, using frozen small- and medium-cores. The calculated bond lengths and vibrational frequencies are close to the experimental data. Our calculations indicate 4f shell contributions to bonding in LnX4, in particular for the early lanthanides, which show significant overlap between the Ln 4f-shell and the halogen np-shells. The 4f shells contribute to Ln-X bonding in LnX4 about one third more than in LnX3

  18. Atmospheric pressure plasma surface modification of titanium for high temperature adhesive bonding

    Akram, M.; Jansen, K.M.B.; Ernst, L.J.; Bhowmik, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this investigation surface treatment of titanium is carried out by plasma ion implantation under atmospheric pressure plasma in order to increase the adhesive bond strength. Prior to the plasma treatment, titanium surfaces were mechanically treated by sand blasting. It is observed that the contac

  19. Hydrogen Bonding in Liquid Water and in the Hydration Shell of Salts.

    Dagade, Dilip H; Barge, Seema S

    2016-03-16

    A near-IR spectral study on pure water and aqueous salt solutions is used to investigate stoichiometric concentrations of different types of hydrogen-bonded water species in liquid water and in water comprising the hydration shell of salts. Analysis of the thermodynamics of hydrogen-bond formation signifies that hydrogen-bond making and breaking processes are dominated by enthalpy with non-negligible heat capacity effects, as revealed by the temperature dependence of standard molar enthalpies of hydrogen-bond formation and from analysis of the linear enthalpy-entropy compensation effects. A generalized method is proposed for the simultaneous calculation of the spectrum of water in the hydration shell and hydration number of solutes. Resolved spectra of water in the hydration shell of different salts clearly differentiate hydrogen bonding of water in the hydration shell around cations and anions. A comparison of resolved liquid water spectra and resolved hydration-shell spectra of ions highlights that the ordering of absorption frequencies of different kinds of hydrogen-bonded water species is also preserved in the bound state with significant changes in band position, band width, and band intensity because of the polarization of water molecules in the vicinity of ions. PMID:26749515

  20. Adhesive bond failure monitoring with triboluminescent optical fiber sensor

    Shohag, Md Abu S.; Hammel, Emily C.; Olawale, David O.; Okoli, Okenwa O.

    2016-04-01

    One of the most severe damage modes in modern wind turbines is the failure of the adhesive joints in the trailing edge of the large composite blades. The geometrical shape of the blade and current manufacturing techniques make the trailing edge of the wind turbine blade more sensitive to damage. Failure to timely detect this damage type may result in catastrophic failures, expensive system downtime, and high repair costs. A novel sensing system called the In-situ Triboluminescent Optical Fiber (ITOF) sensor has been proposed for monitoring the initiation and propagation of disbonds in composite adhesive joints. The ITOF sensor combines the triboluminescent property of ZnS:Mn with the many desirable features of optical fiber to provide in-situ and distributed damage sensing in large composite structures like the wind blades. Unlike other sensor systems, the ITOF sensor does not require a power source at the sensing location or for transmitting damage-induced signals to the hub of the wind turbine. Composite parts will be fabricated and the ITOF integrated within the bondline to provide in-situ and real time damage sensing. Samples of the fabricated composite parts with integrated ITOF will be subjected to tensile and flexural loads, and the response from the integrated sensors will be monitored and analyzed to characterize the performance of the ITOF sensor as a debonding damage monitoring system. In addition, C-scan and optical microscopy will be employed to gain greater insights into the damage propagation behavior and the signals received from the ITOF sensors.

  1. COMPOSITE RESIN BOND STRENGTH TO ETCHED DENTINWITH ONE SELF PRIMING ADHESIVE

    P SAMIMI

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The purpose of this study was to compare shear bond strength of composite resins to etched dentin in both dry and wet dentin surface with active and inactive application of a single-bottle adhesive resin (Single Bond, 3M Dental products. Methods. Fourthy four intact human extracted molars and premolars teeth were selected. The facial surfaces of the teeth were grounded with diamond bur to expose dentin. Then specimens were divided into four groups of 11 numbers (9 Molars and 2 Premolars. All the samples were etched with Phosphoric Acid Gel 35% and then rinsed for 10 seconds. The following stages were carried out for each group: Group I (Active-Dry: After rinsing, air drying of dentin surface for 15 seconds, active priming of adhesive resin for 15 seconds, air drying for 5 seconds, the adhesive resin layer was light cured for 10 seconds. Group III (Inactive-Dry:After rinsing, air drying of dentin surface for 15 seconds, adhesive resin was applied and air dryied for 5 seconds, the adhesive layer was light cured for 10 seconds. Group III (Active-Wet:After rinsing, removal of excess water of dentin surface with a cotton roll, active priming of adhesive resin for 15 seconds and air drying for 5 seconds, the adhesive layer was light cured for 10 seconds. Group IV (Inactive-Wet:After rinsing, removal of excess water of dentin surface with a cotton roll, the adhesive resin was applied and air dryied for 5 seconds and then cured for 10 seconds. After adhesive resin application, composite resin (Z250, 3M Dental products was applied on prepared surface with cylindrical molds (with internal diameter of 2.8mm, & height of 5mm and light-cured for 100 seconds (5x20s. The samples were then thermocycled. They were located in 6±3c water .temperature for 10 seconds and then 15 seconds in inviromental temperature, 10s in 55±3c water temperature and then were located at room temperature for 15s. This test was repeated for 100s. All of the specimens

  2. The influence of an adhesive system on shear bond strength of repaired high-copper amalgams.

    Hadavi, F; Hey, J H; Ambrose, E R; elBadrawy, H E

    1991-01-01

    The shear bond strengths of intact high-copper spherical and admixed amalgams were compared with repaired high-copper spherical and admixed amalgam specimens with and without the use of an adhesive system (Amalgambond). In the spherical group the shear bond strength of the repaired specimens was found to be 55 and 53.2% of the intact specimens without and with the use of the adhesive system. After thermocycling those percentages were 48.5 and 43. In the admixed groups those percentages were 39, 36.5, 34.5, and 35.2 respectively. It was found that the application of Amalgambond did not significantly increase the strength of the repaired amalgam. Thermocycling only had a significantly adverse effect on the repair strength in the admixed group repaired without an adhesive system. PMID:1813872

  3. Effect of new adhesion promoter and mechanical interlocking on bonding strength in metal-polymer composites

    Schuberth, A.; Göring, M.; Lindner, T.; Töberling, G.; Puschmann, M.; Riedel, F.; Scharf, I.; Schreiter, K.; Spange, S.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    There are various opportunities to improve the adhesion between polymer and metal in metal-plastic composites. The addition of a bonding agent which reacts with both joining components at the interfaces of the composite can enhance the bonding strength. An alternative method for the adjustment of interfaces in metal-plastic composites is the specific surface structuring of the joining partners in order to exploit the mechanical interlock effect. In this study the potential of using an adhesion promoter based on twin polymerization for metal-plastic composites in combination with different methods of mechanical surface treatment is evaluated by using the tensile shear test. It is shown that the new adhesion promoter has a major effect when applied on smooth metal surfaces. A combination of both mechanical and chemical surface treatment of the metal part is mostly just as effective as the application of only one of these surface treatment methods.

  4. Optimisation of industrial production of low-force sensors - adhesive bonding of force-centring ball

    Maeder, T.; Jacq, C.; Blot, M.; Ryser, P.

    2016-01-01

    This work addresses the issue of attaching the force-centring part (a round ball) to the load cell of a force sensor, a piezoresistive thick-film Wheatstone bridge deposited onto a ceramic cantilever. As the current soldering process requires expensive metallisation steps for both the ball and the cantilever, and subjects the solder pads used for mounting the cantilever to an additional reflow cycle, an alternative adhesive bonding process was developed, allowing both simpler production and the use of other ball materials such as ceramic and glass. The selfcentring action of solder capillary forces was ensured by structuring the adhesive so as to form a mechanical cuvette allowing centring of the ball by gravity. The selected adhesive materials exhibited good printability and bonding, as well as surviving the subsequent soldering and cleaning process steps.

  5. Effect of Repeated Container Lid Opening on Dentin Shear Bond Strength of Two Dentin Adhesive Systems

    H. Hassanzadeh

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Comparing the effect of repeated opening of the container lid of two dentin adhesive systems, Prime&Bond NT (P&B NT and iBond (iB, on shear bond strength.Materials and Methods: Intact bovine lower incisors (n=60, fixed in acrylic were ran-domly divided into six groups (n=10. Groups I and II were set as control groups. P&B NT and iB were applied on the samples after five days a week, three times a day for two weeks of use in groups III and VI; and after four weeks of use in groups V and VI. The samples were evaluated by a universal testing-machine (Instron, cross-head speed 1mm/min and stereomicroscope.Results: There was no significant difference between the bond strengths in any of the three P&B NT. The mean amount of the shear bond strength for iB after 60 times of use (15.31 MPa was significantly lowerthan that at the baseline (23.51 MPa. There was no significant difference between iB at the baseline and after 30 times of use (19.26 Mpa, and also between iB after 30 times of use and after 60 times of use. All P&B NT groups showed significantly highershear bond strengths when compared with their similar iB groups in iB.Conclusion: Repeated use (60 times of the all-in-one adhesive container seems to reduce dentin shear bond strength. Therefore, containers with a lower content of the same adhe-sive or a single-dose of the adhesive are preferred.

  6. Effects of long-term repeated topical fluoride applications and adhesion promoter on shear bond strengths of orthodontic brackets

    Endo, Toshiya; Ishida, Rieko; Komatsuzaki, Akira; Sanpei, Shinya; Tanaka, Satoshi; Sekimoto, Tsuneo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of long-term repeated topical application of fluoride before bonding and an adhesion promoter on the bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: A total of 76 bovine incisors were collected and divided equally into four groups. In group 1, the brackets were bonded without topical fluoride application or adhesion promoter. In group 2, before bonding, the adhesion promoter was applied to nonfluoridated enamel. In group 3, the brackets were bonded without the application of the adhesion promoter to enamel, which had undergone long-term repeated topical fluoride treatments. Teeth in group 4 received the long-term repeated topical applications of fluoride, and the brackets were bonded using the adhesion promoter. All the brackets were bonded using BeautyOrtho Bond self-etching adhesive. The shear bond strength was measured and the bond failure modes were evaluated with the use of the adhesive remnant index (ARI) after debonding. Results: The mean shear bond strength was significantly lower in group 3 than in groups 1, 2, and 4, and there were no significant differences between the groups except for group 3. There were significant differences in the distribution of ARI scores between groups 2 and 3, and between groups 3 and 4. Conclusions: The adhesion promoter can recover the bond strength reduced by the long-term repeated topical applications of fluoride to the prefluoridation level and had a significantly great amount of adhesives left on either fluoridated or nonfluoridated enamel. PMID:25512720

  7. Bonding to sound vs caries-affected dentin using photo- and dual-cure adhesives.

    Say, Esra Can; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Senawongse, Pisol; Soyman, Mübin; Ozer, Füsun; Tagami, Junji

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of photo- and dual-cure adhesives to sound and caries-affected dentin using total- and self-etch techniques. Human third molars with occlusal caries were prepared as previously described by Nakajima and others (1995). Dentin surfaces were bonded with Optibond Solo Plus (Kerr; photo-cure adhesive) or Optibond Solo Plus + Dual-cure activator (Kerr; dual-cure adhesive) with total- and self-etch technique. Clearfil AP-X (Kuraray) was used for composite buildups. Following storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours, the teeth were sectioned into 0.7-mm thick slices to obtain sound and caries-affected dentin slabs, then trimmed to form hour glass shapes with a 1 mm2 cross-sectional area. The specimens were subjected to microtensile testing using EZ-test (Shimadzu) at 1 mm/minute. Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Student's t-Test (p<0.05). Bond strengths to sound dentin with photo- and dual-cure adhesives using total- and self-etch techniques were significantly higher than those to caries-affected dentin. Dual-cure adhesive significantly decreased bond strengths both to sound and caries-affected dentin. The total-etch technique showed no beneficial effect on caries-affected dentin compared with the self-etch technique. Scanning electron microscopic observation of the resin-dentin interfaces revealed that hybrid layers in caries-affected dentin were thicker than those observed in sound dentin with photo- and dual-cure adhesives. Resin infiltration into dentinal tubules of caries-affected dentin was hampered by the presence of mineral deposits. PMID:15765963

  8. Comparative Shear-Bond Strength of Six Dental Self-Adhesive Resin Cements to Zirconia

    Si-Eun Lee; Ji-Hyeon Bae; Jae-Won Choi; Yong-Chan Jeon; Chang-Mo Jeong; Mi-Jung Yoon; Jung-Bo Huh

    2015-01-01

    This study compared shear bond strength (SBS) of six self-adhesive resin cements (SARC) and one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) to zirconia before and after thermocycling. The cylinder shape (Φ 2.35 mm × 3 mm) of six SARCs (G-CEM LinkAce (GLA), Maxcem Elite (MAX), Clearfil SA Luting (CSL), PermaCem 2.0 (PM2), Rely-X U200 (RXU), Smartcem 2 (SC2)) were bonded to the top surface of the zirconia specimens with light-curing. RMGIC (Fujicem (FJC)) was bonded to the specimens with self-c...

  9. Effect of water storage on microshear bond strength of four dental adhesive systems to dentin

    Montenegro, Robinson Viegas; Carlo, Hugo Lemes; Batista, André Ulisses Dantas; Montenegro, Sheyla Christinne Lira; Farias, Ohana Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the microshear bond strength of 4 dental adhesive systems after 1 year-water storage. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The sample consisted of 120 cylinders of composite, obtained from 24 bovine incisors, which were divided into four experimental groups: G1-Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, G2-Single Bond 2, G3-Clearfil SE Bond, G4-Adper Easy One and two storage times in distilled water: T0 - 24h and T1 - 1 year. A bivariate analysis was performed using the ANOVA and Tukey test (α=0.05). Result...

  10. Three-dimensional Material and Geometrical Nonlinear Analysis of Adhesively Bonded Single Lap Joint

    S. Narasimhan

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents 3-D viscoplastic analysis of adhesively bonded single lap joint considering material and geometric nonlinearity. Total Lagrangian formulation is used to develop a 3-D finite element for geometric nonlinear analysis. The overall geometry of the single lap joint, the loading, and the boundary conditions has been considered, both according to the ASTM testing standards and from those adopted in earlier investigations. The constitutive relations for the adhesive are developed using a pressure-dependant (modified von Mises yield function and Ramberg-Osgood idealisation for the experimental stress-strain curve. The adherends and adhesive layers are both modelled using 20-noded solid elements. However, observations have been made, in particular, on peel and shear stresses in the adhesive layer, which provide useful insight into the 3-D nature of the problem.

  11. Effect of Nanofiller Addition to an Experimental Dentin Adhesive on Microtensile Bond Strength to Human Dentin

    SH. Kasraei

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the influence of adding nanofiller particles to a dentin bonding agent on resin-dentin bond strength.Materials and Methods: Fifty-four human intact premolar teeth were divided in to 6 groups of nine. The teeth were ground on occlusal surfaces and polished with 320 and then 600 grit silicon carbide papers. An experimental bonding system based on acetone/alcoholsolvent was provided with filler contents of 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0, and 10.0 weight percent fumed silica nanofiller. After dentin surface etching, rinsing and blot drying, the experimentalbonding agents were applied to dentin surface. A composite resin was, then,bonded to the dentin on the bonding agent. The specimens were thermocycled for 500 cycles and sectioned in stick form. After two week of storage in distilled water, resin-dentin microtensile bond strength of the specimens was measured. Data were analyzed by one way ANOVA and DunnettT3 tests.Results: Bond strength to dentin was significantly affected by the filler level. Minimum and maximum resin-microtensile bond strength was in the experimental bonding agent with no filler (5.88 MPa and with filler level of 1.0 weight percent (15.15 MPa, respectively,and decreased with the increase of filler content down to 8.95 MPa for the filler level of 10.0 weight percent.Conclusion: Filler content seems to be one of the important factors influencing the bond strength of dental adhesives. Maximum dentin bond strength was obtained with 1% silanized nanofiller silica added to experimental adhesive system.

  12. On the adhesion between hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene fuel-binder and ammonium perchlorate. Performance of bonding agents

    Hori, K.; Iwama, A.; Fukuda, T.

    1985-12-01

    A simple method to evaluate the adhesive force between solid oxidizer and polymeric fuel-binder is presented. As an illustration, hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) sticks including several different bonding agents are bonded on ammonium perchlorate (AP) single crystals, and stress-strain history unitl rupture occurs is obtained by applying uniaxial tensile stress perpendicularly to the adhesion surface. Further, whether each bonding agent reacts with AP or not was analysed with pursuing infrared absorption spectra. The hypothesis that the interfacial adhesive force arises from hydrogen bonding force is proposed.

  13. Long-term bond strength of adhesive systems applied to etched and deproteinized dentin

    Ninoshka Uceda-Gómez

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the early and 12-month bond strength of two adhesive systems (Single Bond-SB and One Step-OS applied to demineralized dentin (WH and demineralized/NaOCl-treated dentin (H. Twenty flat dentin surfaces were exposed, etched, rinsed and slightly dried. For the H groups, a solution of 10% NaOCl was applied for 60 s, rinsed (15 s and slightly dried. The adhesives were applied according to the manufacturer's instructions and composite resin crowns were incrementally constructed. After 24 h (water-37ºC, the specimens was sectioned in order to obtain resin-dentin sticks (0.8 mm². The specimens were tested in microtensile (0.5 mm/min immediately (IM or after 12 months of water storage (12M. The data (MPa were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's test (a=0.05. Only the main factors adhesive and time were significant (p=0.004 and p=0.003, respectively. SB (42.3±9.1 showed higher bond strengths than OS (33.6±11.6. The mean bond strength for IM-group (42.5±8.7 was statistically superior to 12M (33.3±11.8. The use of 10% NaOCl, after acid etching, did not improve the immediate and the long-term resin-dentin bond strength.

  14. Influence of fluoride-containing adhesives and bleaching agents on enamel bond strength

    Vanessa Cavalli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of fluoride-containing carbamide peroxide (CP bleaching agents and adhesive systems on bonded enamel interfaces that are part of the dynamic pH cycling and thermal cycling models. The buccal surfaces of 60 bovine incisors were restored with a composite resin and bonded with three- and two-step, etch-and-rinse, fluoride-containing adhesives, Optibond FL (FL and Optibond Solo Plus (SP, respectively. Restored teeth were subjected to thermal cycling to age the interface. Both SP and FL adhesive-restored teeth were bleached (n = 10 with 10% CP (CP and 10% CP + fluoride (CPF or were left unbleached (control. Bleaching was performed for 14 days simultaneously with pH cycling, which comprised of 14 h of remineralization, 2 h of demineralization and 8 h of bleaching. The control groups (FL and SP were stored in remineralizing solution during their bleaching periods and were also subjected to carious lesion formation. Parallelepiped-shaped samples were obtained from the bonded interface for microtensile bond strength (∝TBS testing. The enamel ∝TBS of the FL and SP groups (control, not bleached were higher (p FL + CPF = FL + CP and SP > SP + CPF = SP + CP. The groups subjected to treatment with the fluoride-containing bleaching agents exhibited similar ∝TBS compared to regular bleaching agents. Bleaching agents, regardless of whether they contained fluoride, decreased enamel bond strength.

  15. Influence of fluoride-containing adhesives and bleaching agents on enamel bond strength.

    Cavalli, Vanessa; Liporoni, Priscila Cristiane Suzy; Rego, Marcos Augusto do; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Giannini, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of fluoride-containing carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agents and adhesive systems on bonded enamel interfaces that are part of the dynamic pH cycling and thermal cycling models. The buccal surfaces of 60 bovine incisors were restored with a composite resin and bonded with three- and two-step, etch-and-rinse, fluoride-containing adhesives, Optibond FL (FL) and Optibond Solo Plus (SP), respectively. Restored teeth were subjected to thermal cycling to age the interface. Both SP and FL adhesive-restored teeth were bleached (n = 10) with 10% CP (CP) and 10% CP + fluoride (CPF) or were left unbleached (control). Bleaching was performed for 14 days simultaneously with pH cycling, which comprised of 14 h of remineralization, 2 h of demineralization and 8 h of bleaching. The control groups (FL and SP) were stored in remineralizing solution during their bleaching periods and were also subjected to carious lesion formation. Parallelepiped-shaped samples were obtained from the bonded interface for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. The enamel μTBS of the FL and SP groups (control, not bleached) were higher (p FL > FL + CPF = FL + CP and SP > SP + CPF = SP + CP). The groups subjected to treatment with the fluoride-containing bleaching agents exhibited similar μTBS compared to regular bleaching agents. Bleaching agents, regardless of whether they contained fluoride, decreased enamel bond strength. PMID:23184165

  16. Comparative Shear-Bond Strength of Six Dental Self-Adhesive Resin Cements to Zirconia

    Si-Eun Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study compared shear bond strength (SBS of six self-adhesive resin cements (SARC and one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC to zirconia before and after thermocycling. The cylinder shape (Φ 2.35 mm × 3 mm of six SARCs (G-CEM LinkAce (GLA, Maxcem Elite (MAX, Clearfil SA Luting (CSL, PermaCem 2.0 (PM2, Rely-X U200 (RXU, Smartcem 2 (SC2 were bonded to the top surface of the zirconia specimens with light-curing. RMGIC (Fujicem (FJC was bonded to the specimens with self-curing. The shear bond strength of all cemented specimens was measured with universal testing machine. Half of the specimens were thermocycled 5000 times before shear bonding strength testing. Fractured surfaces were examined with a field-emission SEM (10,000× and analyzed by energy dispersive x-ray analysis. MAX, PM2, SC2 group without thermocycling and GLA, MAX, PM2 group with thermocycling showed adhesive failure, but GLA, CSL, RXU, FJC group without thermocycling and SLC, RXU, SC2, FJC group with thermocycling indicated cohesive failure. Within the limitation of this study, All of SARCs except MAX demonstrated higher bond strength than that of RMGIC regardless of thermocycling. Also, SARC containing MDP monomers (CSL retained better bonds than other cements.

  17. Composite shear bond strength to dry and wet enamel with three self-etch adhesives

    Shafiee F

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The bonding mechanisms of self etching primers, based upon the simultaneous etching and priming of dentin, simplifies the bonding technique, but the efficiency of these systems is still controversial. This study compared the shear bond strength of three self etch adhesive systems in dry and wet conditions. Materials and Method: In this experimental study, 77 intact bovine lower incisors with flat 600 grit sanded enamel surface were fixed in acrylic molds and divided into 7 groups, of 11 teeth. The enamel surfaces were treated according to a special procedure as follows: Group 1: Prompt L-Pop (PLP in dry condition, Group 2: Prompt L-Pop in wet condition, Group 3: Clearfield SE Bond (CSEB in dry condition, Group 4: Clearfield SE Bond in wet condition, Group 5: iBond (iB in dry condition, Group 6: iBond in wet condition, Group 7: Margin Bond (Control in dry condition. Surfaces were air dried for ten seconds, or blot dried in wet condition. Composite resin was bonded on the enamel and built up by applying a cylindric teflon split mold (4 mm height 2mm diameter. After 24 hours storage in dionized water at room temperature, all specimens were thermocycled and shear bond test was employed by a universal testing machine (Instron with a cross-head speed of 1mm/min. The shear bond strength was recorded in MPa and data were analyzed with ANOVA and Scheffe statistical tests. P<0.05 was considered as statistically significant. The mode of failure was examined under a stereomicroscope. Results: 1- Shear bond strength of CSEB in dry condition (21.5 ± 4.8 MPa was significantly higher than PLP and iB groups (p<0.0001. 2- Shear bond strength of iB and PLP groups in dry condition (9.60 ± 2.2, 9.49 ± 3 MPa were significantly lower than CSEB and control (2.99 ± 5.1 MPa (P<0.0001. 3- There was no significant difference between PLP and iB groups in dry condition (P=1. 4- Shear bond strength of CSEB in wet condition (21.8 ± 3 MPa was

  18. Influence of dentin contamination by temporary cements on the bond strength of adhesive systems

    Josimeri Hebling

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of adhesive systems to dentin contaminated by temporary cements with or without eugenol. Method: Flat dentin surfaces were obtained from twenty-four human third molars. With exception of the control group (n=8, the surfaces were covered with Interim Restorative Material (Caulk Dentsplay, Milford, DE, USA or Cavit (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA and kept in an oven at 37oC for seven days. After removing the cements, the adhesive systems Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA or Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan were applied in accordance with the manufacturers’ recommendations, and then the crowns were constructed in of resin composite. The teeth were sectioned into specimens with a cross-sectional bond area of 0.81mm2, which were sub mitted to microtensile testing in a mechanical test machine at an actuator speed of 0.5mm/min. The data were analyzed by t- and ANOVA tests, complemented by Tukey tests (α=0.05. Results: For Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA, bond strength did not differ statistically (p>0.05 for all the experimental conditions. For Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan, only the Interim Restorative Material (Caulk Dentsplay, Milford, DE, USA Group showed significantly lower bond strength (30.1±13.8 MPa in comparison with the other groups; control (38.9±13.5 MPa and Cavit (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA (42.1±11.0 MPa, which showed no significant difference between them.Conclusion: It was concluded that the previous covering of dentin with temporary cement containing eugenol had a deleterious effect on the adhesive performance of the self-etching system only.

  19. Effect of caries infiltrant application on shear bond strength of different adhesive systems to sound and demineralized enamel

    Jia, Liuhe; Stawarczyk, Bogna; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Attin, Thomas; Wiegand, Annette

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of caries infiltrant application on the shear bond strength of different adhesives on sound and demineralized enamel. Materials and Methods: Sound and artificially demineralized (14 days, acidic buffer, pH 5.0) bovine enamel specimens were treated with a caries infiltrant (Icon, DMG), three different commercial adhesives (unfilled etchand- rinse adhesive: Heliobond, Ivoclar Vivadent; filled etch-and-rinse adhesive: Optibond FL, Kerr; or self-etching adhes...

  20. Locally measuring the adhesion of InP directly bonded on sub-100 nm patterned Si

    Pantzas, K.; Le Bourhis, E.; Patriarche, G.; Troadec, D.; Beaudoin, G.; Itawi, A.; Sagnes, I.; Talneau, A.

    2016-03-01

    A nano-scale analogue to the double cantilever experiment that combines instrumented nano-indentation and atomic force microscopy is used to precisely and locally measure the adhesion of InP bonded on sub-100 nm patterned Si using oxide-free or oxide-mediated bonding. Surface-bonding energies of 0.548 and 0.628 J m-2, respectively, are reported. These energies correspond in turn to 51% and 57% of the surface bonding energy measured in unpatterned regions on the same samples, i.e. the proportion of unetched Si surface in the patterned areas. The results show that bonding on patterned surfaces can be as robust as on unpatterned surfaces, provided care is taken with the post-patterning surface preparation process and, therefore, open the path towards innovative designs that include patterns embedded in the Si guiding layer of hybrid III-V/Si photonic integrated circuits.

  1. Effects of type I collagen degradation on the durability of three adhesive systems in the early phase of dentin bonding.

    Lin Hu

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the effects of type I collagen degradation on the durability of three adhesive systems in the early phase of dentin bonding.Bonded dentin specimens were prepared using three different types of adhesive systems. Micro-tensile bond strength and degradation of collagen were tested before, and after 1 month or 4 months of aging in artificial saliva. The relationship between micro-tensile bond strength and collagen degradation was analyzed by calculating their Pearson's correlation coefficient.Aging induced time-dependent reduction in micro-tensile bond strengths for all the tested adhesive systems, although such reduction for the single-step self-etching adhesive G-Bond (GB was not statistically significant. The bond strength of the two-step self-etching primer adhesive system Clearfil SE Bond (SEB was similar to that of the two-step etch-and-rinse self-priming adhesive system Single Bond 2 (SB, and they were both significantly reduced after one or four months of aging. A negative correlation was found between the degree of collagen degradation and magnitude of micro-tensile bond strength (r = -0.65, p = 0.003. The Pearson's correlation coefficient was 0.426, indicating that 42.6% of the aging-induced reduction in bond strength can be explained by the degradation of collagen.In the early phase of dentin bonding, there was a negative correlation between the degree of collagen degradation and the magnitude of micro-tensile bond strength. The reduction of bond strength was accompanied by the degradation of collagen. These results provide evidence for the causative relationship between the degradation of collagen and the deterioration of dentin-adhesive interface.

  2. Effect of delayed insertion of composite resin on the bond strength of etch-and-rinse adhesive systems

    Edson Alves de CAMPOS; SAAD, José Roberto Cury; Sizenando Toledo PORTO NETO; Campos, Lucas Arrais; de Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Etch-and-rinse adhesive systems are characterized bythe dental acid etching previously to the monomer application. Thesematerials can be classified as 3-step (when primer and bond are applied separately) or 2-step (when the primer and bond functions are carried out by a single component). Objective: To determine the influence of immediate or delayed insertion of restorative material on the values of bond strength of 2-step and 3-step etch-and-rinse adhesive systems using the mic...

  3. Influence of laser etching on enamel and dentin bond strength of Silorane System Adhesive.

    Ustunkol, Ildem; Yazici, A Ruya; Gorucu, Jale; Dayangac, Berrin

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of Silorane System Adhesive to enamel and dentin surfaces that had been etched with different procedures. Ninety freshly extracted human third molars were used for the study. After the teeth were embedded with buccal surfaces facing up, they were randomly divided into two groups. In group I, specimens were polished with a 600-grit silicon carbide (SiC) paper to obtain flat exposed enamel. In group II, the overlying enamel layer was removed and exposed dentin surfaces were polished with a 600-grit SiC paper. Then, the teeth in each group were randomly divided into three subgroups according to etching procedures: etched with erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet laser (a), etched with 35% phosphoric acid (b), and non-etched (c, control). Silorane System Adhesive was used to bond silorane restorative to both enamel and dentin. After 24-h storage in distilled water at room temperature, a SBS test was performed using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Bonferroni tests (p  0.05). The SBS of self-etch adhesive to dentin was not statistically different from enamel (p > 0.05). Phosphoric acid treatment seems the most promising surface treatment for increasing the enamel and dentin bond strength of Silorane System Adhesive. PMID:23912781

  4. Use of high and low frequency dielectric measurements in the NDE of adhesively bonded composite joints

    Pethrick, R. A.; Hayward, D.; McConnell, B. K.; Crane, R. L.

    2005-05-01

    Dielectric spectroscopy has been developed as a non-destructive technique for assessment of moisture content and structural integrity of adhesively bonded joints. Knowledge of these parameters is particularly crucial for the aerospace industry, since environmental degradation of adhesive joints presents a major limit on their utilization. High and low frequency measurements have been carried out on joints assembled from CFRP adherend, and a commercially available adhesive (AF 163-2K). The samples have been aged in deionised water at 75oC to chart the effect water ingress has on bond durability. In addition, some joints have been exposed to cryogenic temperatures to mimic the conditions joints experience whilst an aircraft is in flight. In this way it has been possible to determine the extent of degradation caused by freezing of water within the joint structure. Dielectric behaviour of the joints was studied in both the frequency and in the time domain. Frequency domain analysis allows the amount and effects of moisture ingress in the bondline to be assessed, whereas the time domain highlights the onset of joint defects with increasing exposure time. Mechanical testing of the joints has been carried out to enable correlation between changes in strength and failure mechanism due to moisture ingress, with changes in the dielectric data. In addition, dielectric studies of the neat adhesive have been undertaken, as have gravimetric and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis. These have helped reveal the effects of ageing upon the adhesive layer itself.

  5. Enhancing structural integrity of adhesive bonds through pulsed laser surface micro-machining

    Diaz, Edwin Hernandez

    2015-06-01

    Enhancing the effective peel resistance of plastically deforming adhesive joints through laser-based surface micro-machining Edwin Hernandez Diaz Inspired by adhesion examples commonly found in nature, we reached out to examine the effect of different kinds of heterogeneous surface properties that may replicate this behavior and the mechanisms at work. In order to do this, we used pulsed laser ablation on copper substrates (CuZn40) aiming to increase adhesion for bonding. A Yb-fiber laser was used for surface preparation of the substrates, which were probed with a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Heterogeneous surface properties were devised through the use of simplified laser micromachined patterns which may induce sequential events of crack arrest propagation, thereby having a leveraging effect on dissipation. The me- chanical performance of copper/epoxy joints with homogeneous and heterogeneous laser micromachined interfaces was then analyzed using the T-peel test. Fractured surfaces were analyzed using SEM to resolve the mechanism of failure and adhesive penetration within induced surface asperities from the treatment. Results confirm positive modifications of the surface morphology and chemistry from laser ablation that enable mechanical interlocking and cohesive failure within the adhesive layer. Remarkable improvements of apparent peel energy, bond toughness, and effective peel force were appreciated with respect to sanded substrates as control samples.

  6. Investigation of the impact of cleaning on the adhesive bond and the process implications

    EMERSON,JOHN A.; GUESS,TOMMY R.; ADKINS,CAROL L. JONES; CURRO,JOHN G.; REEDY JR.,EARL DAVID; LOPEZ,EDWIN P.; LEMKE,PAUL A.

    2000-05-01

    While surface cleaning is the most common process step in DOE manufacturing operations, the link between a successful adhesive bond and the surface clean performed before adhesion is not well understood. An innovative approach that combines computer modeling expertise, fracture mechanics understanding, and cleaning experience to address how to achieve a good adhesive bond is discussed here to develop a capability that would result in reduced cleaning development time and testing, improved bonds, improved manufacturability, and even an understanding that leads to improved aging. A simulation modeling technique, polymer reference interaction site model applied near wall (Wall PRISM), provided the capability to include contaminants on the surface. Calculations determined an approximately 8% reduction in the work of adhesion for 1% by weight of ethanol contamination on the structure of a silicone adhesive near a surface. The demonstration of repeatable coatings and quantitative analysis of the surface for deposition of controlled amounts of contamination (hexadecane and mineral oil) was based on three deposition methods. The effect of the cleaning process used on interfacial toughness was determined. The measured interfacial toughness of samples with a Brulin cleaned sandblasted aluminum surface was found to be {approximately} 15% greater than that with a TCE cleaned aluminum surface. The sensitivity of measured fracture toughness to various test conditions determined that both interfacial toughness and interface corner toughness depended strongly on surface roughness. The work of adhesion value for silicone/silicone interface was determined by a contact mechanics technique known as the JKR method. Correlation with fracture data has allowed a better understanding between interfacial fracture parameters and surface energy.

  7. Effect of service environments on adhesively bonded joints in composite structures

    Singhal, S. N.; Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.

    1992-01-01

    The models employed in the present computational methods for evaluating severe service-environment effects on adhesively bonded joints in composites are based on composite analyses and structural mechanics, encompassing nonlinear environmental degradation. The methods are demonstrated for the case of a butt joint with a single doubler, subjected to the environmental effects as well as static and cyclic loads. The highest joint strength is noted to be required in the case of cyclic loads and hygrothermal service environments; margins of safety for adhesive material stresses decline rapidly in such cases.

  8. Moisture distribution measurements in adhesive-bonded composites using the D (3He,p)4 He reaction

    Adhesive bonding of composite materials for many aircraft components offers a distinct advantage in weight and cost reduction compared to similar structures that have been joined by riveting. However, the long term performance of adhesive-bonded components depends on the degree and rate of moisture absorption by the adhesive in the service environment. To investigate the rate and the mechanism of water transport in adhesive-bonded composite materials, a nuclear reaction analysis method based on the D(3He,p)4He reaction is used to measure the moisture distributions. Samples of graphite/epoxy composite materials were bonded with an epoxy adhesive and isothermally conditioned in a controlled D2O environment at 70% relative humidity and 770C for various exposure times. The moisture profiles were measured along the adhesive (adhesive scan) as well as through the thickness of the bonded joint (transverse scan). The dimensions of the probing beam were 125 μm x 125 μm for the adhesive scan and 25 μ x 200 μm for the transverse scan. Absolute deuterium concentrations were determined by comparison of the proton yield from the composite/adhesive to that from reference standards. Calculations from diffusion models of water transport based on parameters determined from bulk measurement techniques are compared to the measured profile and the agreement indicates that classical Fickian diffusion describes the transport of moisture in these materials

  9. Effect of EDTA Conditioning and Carbodiimide Pretreatment on the Bonding Performance of All-in-One Self-Etch Adhesives

    Shipra Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study evaluated the effect of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA conditioning and carbodiimide (EDC pretreatment on the shear bond strength of two all-in-one self-etch adhesives to dentin. Methods. Flat coronal dentin surfaces were prepared on one hundred and sixty extracted human molars. Teeth were randomly divided into eight groups according to two different self-etch adhesives used [G-Bond and OptiBond-All-In-One] and four different surface pretreatments: (a adhesive applied following manufacturer’s instructions; (b dentin conditioning with 24% EDTA gel prior to application of adhesive; (c EDC pretreatment followed by application of adhesive; (d application of EDC on EDTA conditioned dentin surface followed by application of adhesive. Composite restorations were placed in all the samples. Ten samples from each group were subjected to immediate and delayed (6-month storage in artificial saliva shear bond strength evaluation. Data collected was subjected to statistical analysis using three-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey’s test at a significance level of p<0.05.  Results and Conclusion. EDTA preconditioning as well as EDC pretreatment alone had no significant effect on the immediate and delayed bond strengths of either of the adhesives. However, EDC pretreatment on EDTA conditioned dentin surface resulted in preservation of resin-dentin bond strength of both adhesives with no significant fall over six months.

  10. Effect of Multiple Coatings of One-step Self-etching Adhesive on Microtensile Bond Strength to Primary Dentin

    Lin Ma; Jian-feng Zhou; Jian-guo Tan; Quan Jing; Ji-zhi Zhao; Kuo Wan

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of multiple coatings of the one-step self-etching adhesive on immediate microtensile bond strength to primary dentin.Methods Twelve caries-free human primary molars were randomly divided into 2 groups with 6 teeth each. In group 1,each tooth was hemisected into two halves. One half was assigned to control subgroup 1,which was bonded with a single-step self-etching adhesive according to the manufacturer's instructions; the other half was assigned to experimental subgroup 1 in which the adhesive was applied three times before light curing. In group 2, the teeth were also hemisected into two halves. One half was assigned to control subgroup 2, which was bonded with the single-step self-etching adhesive according to the manufacturer's instructions; the other half was assigned to experimental subgroup 2 in which three layers of adhesive were applied with light curing each successive layer. Microtensile bond strength was immediately tested after specimen preparation.Results When the adhesive was applied three times before light curing, the bond strength of the experimental subgroup 1 (n=33, 57.49±11.61 MPa) was higher than that of the control subgroup 1 (n=31,49.71±11.43 MPa, P0.05).Conclusion multiple coatings of one-step self-etching adhesive can increase the immediate bond strength to primary dentin when using the technique of light-curing after applying three layers of adhesive.

  11. Analysis of an adhesively bonded single lap joint subjected to eccentric loading

    Anyfantis, Konstantinos; Tsouvalis, N. G.

    2013-01-01

    A new experimental test is proposed, which allows the contribution of Mode I, II and III fracture modes to the failure of the adhesive layer of bonded joints aiming at achieving the realistic conditions often occurring during loading of practical joints. The main objective of this test is...... benchmarking of computational tools. The test is based on a Single Lap Joint subjected to Eccentric Loading (SLJ-EL). The basic concept that lies behind this configuration is that the applied in-plane tensile load leads the adhesive layer to develop normal stresses, in-plane and out-of-plane shear stresses......, which correspond to Mode I, II and III loading and fracture. These tests were designed so that the metal substrates do not enter plasticity and the adhesive achieves a mode mixity ratio between Mode II and Mode III not lower than 0.5. The experiments were simulated in a 3-dimensional finite element...

  12. Influence of chlorhexidine application on longitudinal adhesive bond strength in deciduous teeth

    Vicente Castelo Branco Leitune

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of applying 2% chlorhexidine for 30 seconds after phosphoric acid conditioning of dentin on the immediate and long-term bond strengths in deciduous teeth. The occlusal enamel was removed from 40 human sound deciduous molars, which were exfoliated by natural means, and the dentin was conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds and washed with running water. The specimens were divided into two groups of 20 teeth. The test group received an application of 2% chlorhexidine for 30 seconds prior to a three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system, whereas the control group received only the adhesive system. Three cylindrical restorations were made with a composite resin for each tooth. Ten teeth in each group were submitted to a microshear bond strength test after 24 hours, while the remaining teeth were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 6 months before testing the microshear bond strength. The test group had a higher bond strength than did the control group after 6 months of storage. No statistical differences were found when groups with the same dentin treatment were compared at different times. Short applications of chlorhexidine at low concentrations prevent hybrid layer degradation and positively affect bond strength over time.

  13. Reliability Analysis for Adhesive Bonded Composite Stepped Lap Joints Loaded in Fatigue

    Kimiaeifar, Amin; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Lund, Erik;

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a probabilistic approach to calculate the reliability of adhesive bonded composite stepped lap joints loaded in fatigue using three- dimensional finite element analysis (FEA). A method for progressive damage modelling is used to assess fatigue damage accumulation and residual...... strength under fully reversed cyclic loading based on stiffness/strength degradation. The FEA simulations are conducted using the commercial FEA code ANSYS 12.1. A design equation for fatigue failure of wind turbine blades is chosen based on recommendations given in the wind turbine standard IEC 61400...... by the wind turbine standard IEC 61400-1. Finally, an approach for the assessment of the reliability of adhesive bonded composite stepped lap joints loaded in fatigue is presented. The introduced methodology can be applied in the same way to calculate the reliability level of wind turbine blade...

  14. Characterization of debond growth mechanism in adhesively bonded composites under mode II static and fatigue loadings

    Mall, S.; Kochhar, N. K.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental investigation of adhesively bonded composite joint was conducted to characterize the debond growth mechanism under mode II static and fatigue loadings. For this purpose, end-notched flexure specimens of graphite/epoxy (T300/5208) adherends bonded with EC 3445 adhesive were tested. In all specimen tested, the fatigue failure occurred in the form of cyclic debonding. The present study confirmed the result of previous studies that total strain-energy-release rate is the driving parameter for cyclic debonding. Further, the debond growth resistance under cyclic loading with full shear reversal (i.e., stress ratio, R = -1) is drastically reduced in comparison to the case when subjected to cyclic shear loading with no shear reversal (i.e., R = 0.1).

  15. Influence of adhesive layer properties on laser-generated ultrasonic waves in thin bonded plates

    Sun Hong-Xiang; Xu Bai-Qiang; Zhang Hua; Gao Qian; Zhang Shu-Yi

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies quantitatively the generation of Lamb waves in thin bonded plates subjected to laser illumination, after considering the viscoelasticity of the adhesive layer. The displacements of such plates have been calculated in the frequency domain by using the finite element method, and the time domain response has been reconstructed by applying an inverse fast Fourier transform. Numerical results are presented showing the normal surface displacement for several configurations: a single aluminum plate, a three-layer bonded plate, and a two-layer plate. The characteristics of the laser-generated Lamb waves for each particular case have been investigated. In addition, the sensitivity of the transient responses to variations of material properties (elastic modulus, viscoelastic modulus, and thickness) of the adhesive layer has been studied in detail.

  16. Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Shear Bond Strength of Adhesives to Primary Teeth Enamel

    Farokh Gisovar, Elham; Hedayati, Nassim; Shadman, Niloofar; Shafiee, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Background: CPP-ACP (Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate) has an important role in caries prevention in pediatric patients. This study was done, because of the great use of CPP-ACP and the need for restoration for teeth treated with CPP-ACP as well as the importance of shear bond strength of adhesives in the success of restorations. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on shear bond strength of dental adhesiv...

  17. Effect of blood contamination with 1-step self-etching adhesives on microtensile bond strength to dentin.

    Yoo, H M; Pereira, P N R

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of blood contamination and decontamination methods on the microtensile bond strength of 1-step self-etching adhesive systems to dentin contaminated after adhesive application and light curing. Three commercially available "all-in-one" adhesives (One Up Bond F, Xeno III and Adper Prompt L-Pop) and 1 resin composite (Clearfil AP-X) were used. Third molars that had been stored in distilled water with 0.5% thymol at 4 degrees C were ground with #600 SiC paper under running water to produce a standardized smear layer. The specimens were randomly divided into groups according to the 3 adhesive systems. The adhesive systems were used under 3 conditions: no contamination, which was the control (C); contamination of the light-cured adhesive surface with blood and reapplication of adhesive (Contamination 1) and contamination of the light-cured adhesive surface with blood, then washing, drying and reapplication of the adhesive (Contamination 2). Following light curing of the adhesive, the resin composite was placed in 3 increments up to a 5-mm-thick layer on the bonded surface. All specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. The microtensile bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine (EZ test), and data were analyzed by 1-way ANOVA followed by the Duncan test to make comparisons among the groups (p=0.05). After debonding, 5 specimens were selected from each group and examined in a scanning electron microscope to evaluate the modes of fracture. For all adhesives, contamination groups showed lower bond strength than the control (p0.05). For Xeno III and Adper Prompt L-Pop, contamination group #2 showed the lowest bond strength among the groups (p0.05). PMID:17153973

  18. Effect of digluconate chlorhexidine on bond strength between dental adhesive systems and dentin: A systematic review

    Dimitrios Dionysopoulos

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to systematically review the literature for the effect of digluconate chlorhexidine (CHX) on bond strength between dental adhesive systems and dentin of composite restorations. Materials and Methods: The electronic databases that were searched to identify manuscripts for inclusion were Medline via PubMed and Google search engine. The search strategies were computer search of the database and review of reference lists of the related articles. Search words/terms were a...

  19. Three dimensional geometrical and material nonlinear finite element analysis of adhesively bonded joints for marine structures

    Sampathkumar, Narasimhan

    2005-01-01

    The use of adhesive bonding as a structural joining method has been gaining recognition in marine industry in recent years, though it has been widely adopted in other fields such as aerospace, automobiles, trains and in civil constructions. The type of materials used and design practices followed in marine structures are different from what is applied in other disciplines. Therefore new research approaches are required and recent novel ideas are ex- plored in the context of app...

  20. Effect of bromelain enzyme for dentin deproteinization on bond strength of adhesive system

    Kirti Chauhan; Revaplar Siddaveerappa Basavanna; Vasundhara Shivanna

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To assess the deproteinizing effect of bromelain enzyme and compare it with 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) on shear bond strength before application of the adhesive system. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 extracted human premolars were divided into three groups, each one consisted of 10 teeth. The occlusal surface was wet ground to expose superficial dentin. In Group 1, teeth were etched; in Group 2, teeth were etched and deproteinized with bromelain enzyme; in Group 3, teeth w...

  1. Analytical modeling of mixed-Mode bending behavior of asymmetric adhesively bonded pultruded GFRP joints

    Ševčík, Martin; Shahverdi, M.; Hutař, Pavel; Vassilopoulos, Anastasios P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 147, OCT (2015), s. 228-242. ISSN 0013-7944 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0063 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Mixed-Mode delamination * Asymmetric joint * Adhesively bonded joint * Failure criterion * Analytical prediction * GFRP Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.767, year: 2014

  2. Effect of Curing Mode on Shear Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Cement to Composite Blocks

    Jin-Young Kim; Ga-Young Cho; Byoung-Duck Roh; Yooseok Shin

    2016-01-01

    To overcome the disadvantages of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) processed indirect restorations using glass-ceramics and other ceramics, resin nano ceramic, which has high strength and wear resistance with improved polish retention and optical properties, was introduced. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength and fracture pattern of indirect CAD/CAM composite blocks cemented with two self-etch adhesive cements with different curing mode...

  3. Adhesion of Two Bonding Systems to Air-Abraded or Bur-Abraded Human Enamel Surfaces

    Sengun, Abdulkadir; Orucoglu, Hasan; Ipekdal, Ilknur; Ozer, Fusun

    2008-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate whether mechanical alteration of the enamel surfaces with air abrasion and bur abrasion techniques could enhance the bonding performance of a three step and a self etching adhesive resin systems to enamel. Methods 126 extracted lower human incisor teeth were used. The teeth were divided into three groups including 40 teeth each. First group; teeth were used as control and no preparation was made on enamel surfaces, 2nd group; outer...

  4. A New Material Model for 2D FE Analysis of Adhesively Bonded Composite Joints

    Zhao, Libin; Wang, Yana; TianLiang QIN; Zhang, Jianyu

    2014-01-01

    Effective and convenient stress analysis techniques play important roles in the analysis and design of adhesively bonded composite joints. A new material model is presented at the level of composite ply according to the orthotropic elastic mechanics theory and plane strain assumption. The model proposed has the potential to reserve nature properties of laminates with ply-to-ply modeling. The equivalent engineering constants in the model are obtained only by the material properties of unidirec...

  5. Characterization of Mixed-Mode Fracture Testing of Adhesively Bonded Wood Specimens

    Nicoli, Edoardo

    2010-01-01

    The primary focus of this thesis was to investigate the critical strain energy release rates (G) for mixed-mode (I/II) fracture of wood adhesive joints. The aims of the study were: (1) quantifying the fracture properties of two material systems, (2) analyzing the aspects that influence the fracture properties of bonded wood, (3) refining test procedures that particularly address layered orthotropic systems in which the layers are not parallel to the laminate faces, of which wood is often a p...

  6. Microtensile Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Luting Cements to Ceramics

    Tomoko Abo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper was to compare the bond strengths of the self-adhesive luting cements between ceramics and resin cores and examine their relation to the cement thickness. Three self-adhesive luting cements (Smartcem, Maxcem, and G-CEM and a resin cement (Panavia F 2.0 for control were used in the paper. The thickness of the cements was controlled in approximately 25, 50, 100, or 200 μm. Each 10 specimens were made according to the manufacturers’ instructions and stored in water at 37°C. After 24 hours, microtensile bond strength (μTBS was measured. There were significant differences in cements. Three self-adhesive cements showed significantly lower μTBSs than control that required both etching and priming before cementation (Tukey, <0.05. The cement thickness of 50 or 100 μm tended to induce the highest μTBSs for each self-adhesive luting cements though no difference was found.

  7. A New Material Model for 2D FE Analysis of Adhesively Bonded Composite Joints

    Libin ZHAO

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Effective and convenient stress analysis techniques play important roles in the analysis and design of adhesively bonded composite joints. A new material model is presented at the level of composite ply according to the orthotropic elastic mechanics theory and plane strain assumption. The model proposed has the potential to reserve nature properties of laminates with ply-to-ply modeling. The equivalent engineering constants in the model are obtained only by the material properties of unidirectional composites. Based on commercial FE software ABAQUS, a 2D FE model of a single-lap adhesively bonded joint was established conveniently by using the new model without complex modeling process and much professional knowledge. Stress distributions in adhesive were compared with the numerical results by Tsai and Morton and interlaminar stresses between adhesive and adherents were compared with the results from a detailed 3D FE analysis. Good agreements in both cases verify the validity of the proposed model. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.4.5960

  8. Sacrificial adhesive bonding: a powerful method for fabrication of glass microchips

    Lima, Renato S.; Leão, Paulo A. G. C.; Piazzetta, Maria H. O.; Monteiro, Alessandra M.; Shiroma, Leandro Y.; Gobbi, Angelo L.; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2015-08-01

    A new protocol for fabrication of glass microchips is addressed in this research paper. Initially, the method involves the use of an uncured SU-8 intermediate to seal two glass slides irreversibly as in conventional adhesive bonding-based approaches. Subsequently, an additional step removes the adhesive layer from the channels. This step relies on a selective development to remove the SU-8 only inside the microchannel, generating glass-like surface properties as demonstrated by specific tests. Named sacrificial adhesive layer (SAB), the protocol meets the requirements of an ideal microfabrication technique such as throughput, relatively low cost, feasibility for ultra large-scale integration (ULSI), and high adhesion strength, supporting pressures on the order of 5 MPa. Furthermore, SAB eliminates the use of high temperature, pressure, or potential, enabling the deposition of thin films for electrical or electrochemical experiments. Finally, the SAB protocol is an improvement on SU-8-based bondings described in the literature. Aspects such as substrate/resist adherence, formation of bubbles, and thermal stress were effectively solved by using simple and inexpensive alternatives.

  9. The effect of antimicrobial agents on bond strength of orthodontic adhesives: a meta-analysis of in vitro studies.

    Altmann, A S P; Collares, F M; Leitune, V C B; Samuel, S M W

    2016-02-01

    Antimicrobial orthodontic adhesives aim to reduce white spot lesions' incidence in orthodontic patients, but they should not jeopardizing its properties. Systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to answer the question whether the association of antimicrobial agents with orthodontic adhesives compromises its mechanical properties and whether there is a superior antimicrobial agent. PubMed and Scopus databases. In vitro studies comparing shear bond strength of conventional photo-activated orthodontic adhesives to antimicrobial photo-activated orthodontic adhesives were considered eligible. Search terms included the following: orthodontics, orthodontic, antimicrobial, antibacterial, bactericidal, adhesive, resin, resin composite, bonding agent, bonding system, and bond strength. The searches yielded 494 citations, which turned into 467 after duplicates were discarded. Titles and abstracts were read and 13 publications were selected for full-text reading. Twelve studies were included in the meta-analysis. The global analysis showed no statistically significant difference between control and experimental groups. In the subgroup analysis, only the chlorhexidine subgroup showed a statistically significant difference, where the control groups had higher bond strength than the experimental groups. Many studies on in vitro orthodontic bond strength fail to report test conditions that could affect their outcomes. The pooled in vitro data suggest that adding an antimicrobial agent to an orthodontic adhesive system does not influence bond strength to enamel. It is not possible to state which antimicrobial agent is better to be associated. PMID:26257400

  10. Laser Ablation Surface Preparation of Ti-6A1-4V for Adhesive Bonding

    Palmieri, Frank L.; Watson, Kent A.; Morales, Guillermo; Williams, Thomas; Hicks, Robert; Wohl, Christopher J.; Hopkins, John W.; Connell, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive bonding offers many advantages over mechanical fastening, but requires certification before it can be incorporated in primary structures for commercial aviation without disbond-arrestment features or redundant load paths. Surface preparation is widely recognized as the key step to producing robust and predictable bonds. Laser ablation imparts both topographical and chemical changes to a surface which can lead to increased bond durability. A laser based process provides an alternative to chemical-dip, manual abrasion and grit blast treatments which are expensive, hazardous, polluting, and less precise. This report documents preliminary testing of a surface preparation technique using laser ablation as a replacement for the chemical etch and abrasive processes currently applied to Ti-6Al-4V alloy adherends. Failure mode, surface roughness, and chemical makeup were analyzed using fluorescence enhanced visualization, microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Single lap shear tests were conducted on bonded and aged specimens to observe bond strength retention and failure mode. Some promising results showed increasing strength and durability of lap shear specimens as laser ablation coverage area and beam intensity increased. Chemical analyses showed trends for surface chemical species which correlated with improved bond strength and durability. Combined, these results suggest that laser ablation is a viable process for inclusion with or/and replacement of one or more currently used titanium surface treatments. On-going work will focus on additional mechanical tests to further demonstrate improved bond durability.

  11. Microleakage of bonded amalgam restorations using different adhesive agents with dye under vacuum: An in vitro study

    Abhishek Parolia; Kundabala, M; Vaibhav Gupta; Mudita Verma; Chandni Batra; Ramya Shenoy; Srikant, N

    2011-01-01

    Aim: In an effort to minimize tooth preparation, yet provide additional retention to compromised tooth structure, bonded amalgam restorations were introduced. Various resin-based adhesives have been tried earlier under bonded amalgam restorations. Still there are controversies regarding the outcome of bonded amalgam restorations regarding their adaptability to the tooth structure and microleakage. Therefore, this study was undertaken to compare the microleakage of bonded amalgam restorations ...

  12. Multiple Coatings can Improve the Bond Durability of One-step Self-etching Adhesive to Primary Dentin

    Lin Ma; Jian-feng Zhou; Quan Jing; Ji-zhi Zhao; Kuo Wan

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether multiple coatings can improve the bond durability of one-step self-etching adhesive to primary dentin.Methods Twelve caries-free human primary molars were randomly divided into 2 groups.In group 1,each tooth was hemisected into 2 halves.One half was assigned to the control subgroup 1,which was bonded with a commercially available one-step self-etching adhesive according to the manufacturer's instructions; the other half was assigned to experimental subgroup 1,in which the adhesive was applied three times before light curing.In group 2,one split half tooth was bonded with a commercially available one-step self-etching adhesive according to the manufacturer's instructions; for the other half,three layers of adhesive were applied with each successive layer of light curing.Specimens were stored in 0.9% NaCl containing 0.02% sodium azide at 37℃ for 18 months and then were subjected to microtensile bond strength test and the fracture mode analysis.Results When the adhesive was applied three times before light curing,the bond strength of the experimental subgroup 1 was significandy higher than that of the control subgroup 1 (47.46±13.91 vs.38.12±11.21 MPa,P<0.05).When using the technique of applying multiple layers of adhesive with each successive layer of light curing,no difference was observed in bond strength between the control subgroup and the experimental subgroup (39.40±8.87 vs.40.87±9.33 MPa,P>0.05).Conclusion Multiple coatings can improve the bond durability of one-step self-etching adhesive to primary dentin when using the technique of light-curing after applying 3 layers of adhesive.

  13. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF LAMINATED VENEER LUMBERS BONDED WITH VARIOUS ADHESIVES AND IMPREGNATED WITH VARIOUS CHEMICALS

    Burhanettin Uysal

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Desmodur VTKA and Urea formaldehyde on wooden materials (Scotch pine and oriental beech cut tangentially and radially impregnated with Tanalith-C, creosote, and sodium silicate in layer (3, 4, 5 of laminated veneer lumber (LVLs on thermal conductivity. The lowest thermal conductivity of 0.103 Kcal/mh°C was obtained in Scotch pine, cut tangentially, impregnated with creosote, bonded with urea formaldehyde, and 3 layer LVL. The highest thermal conductivity of 0.185 Kcal/mh°C was obtained in oriental beech, cut radially, impregnated with Tanalith-C, bonded with PVAc, and 5 layers LVL. Consequently, oriental beech wood cut radially and impregnated with Tanalith-C, bonded with PVAc adhesive and 5 layers in LVL can be used as a material in construction where the thermal conductivity is required. Scotch pine wood cut tangentially and impregnated with creosote, bonded with urea formaldehyde adhesive and 3 layers in LVL can be used as a material in construction where the insulation is required.

  14. Mode-I Fracture in Bonded Wood: Studies of Adhesive Thermal Stability, and of the Effects of Wood Surface Deactivation

    Gao, Tian

    2010-01-01

    This work included two separate studies; the common theme in each was the use of mode-I fracture testing to evaluate wood adhesion. In the first study, mode-I fracture testing was used to compare the thermal stability of polyurethane (PUR) and resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) wood adhesives. Bonded specimens for both adhesives were subjected to prolonged thermal exposure, and fracture testing was subsequently conducted after re-equilibration to standard test conditions. It was found that both ...

  15. Influence of previous acid etching on interface morphology and bond strength of self-etching adhesive to cavosurface enamel

    Lima, Adriano Fonseca; da Silva, Vinícius Brito; Soares, Giulliana Panfiglio; Marchi, Giselle Maria; Baggio Aguiar, Flávio Henrique; Lovadino, José Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the (1) bond strength of a etch-and-rinse and self-etching adhesive systems to cavosurface enamel, (2) influence of the previous acid etching with phosphoric acid 35% to the self-etching adhesive application on bond strength values, and (3) analysis of the cavosurface enamel morphology submitted to different types of conditioning, with the use of a scanning electronic microscope (SEM). Methods: Twenty four human third molars were sectioned on ...

  16. Effect of delayed insertion of composite resin on the bond strength of etch-and-rinse adhesive systems

    Edson Alves CAMPOS

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Etch-and-rinse adhesive systems are characterized bythe dental acid etching previously to the monomer application. Thesematerials can be classified as 3-step (when primer and bond are applied separately or 2-step (when the primer and bond functions are carried out by a single component. Objective: To determine the influence of immediate or delayed insertion of restorative material on the values of bond strength of 2-step and 3-step etch-and-rinse adhesive systems using the microtensile test. Material and methods: Bovine incisors were used, which had its vestibular surface abraded to obtain a flat dentin surface. 3-step (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose – SMP; Optibond FL – OFL; Bond-It – BIT and 2-step (Single-Bond – SB; Optibond Solo Plus – OSP; Bond-1 – B1 etch-and-rinse adhesive systems were used, and composite resin (Z-350 was adhered to this substrate at two different times: immediately and later (after 24 hours. Procedures were performed with simulated physiological pulpal pressure. Results were submitted to statistical analysis through Anova and Tukey’s test (p < 0.05. Results: When the composite resin was immediately inserted all the adhesive systems showed similar results. 3-step adhesive systems did not show reduction in bond strength values related to delayed insertion of composite. On the other hand, 2-step adhesive systems showed significant reduction in the values of bond strength. Reduction was around 30.24% to SB, 27.19% to OSP and 28.21% to B1. Conclusion: 2-step etch-and-rinse adhesive systems should be used very carefully. It is advisable to insert and polymerize the composite resin immediately after the conclusion of adhesive procedure.

  17. CARIOSTATIC EFFECT AND FLUORIDE RELEASE FROM A VISIBLE LIGHT-CURING ADHESIVE FOR BONDING OF ORTHODONTIC BRACKETS

    OGAARD, B; REZKLEGA, F; RUBEN, J; ARENDS, J

    1992-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the cariostatic potential in vivo of a visible light-curing adhesive for the bonding of orthodontic brackets. The fluoride release of the adhesive in water and saliva was also measured. Ten orthodontic patients with premolars to be extracted participated. One b

  18. Adhesive bonding and brazing of nanocrystalline diamond foil onto different substrate materials

    Lodes, Matthias A.; Sailer, Stefan; Rosiwal, Stefan M.; Singer, Robert F.

    2013-10-01

    Diamond coatings are used in heavily stressed industrial applications to reduce friction and wear. Hot-filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) is the favourable coating method, as it allows a coating of large surface areas with high homogeneity. Due to the high temperatures occurring in this CVD-process, the selection of substrate materials is limited. With the desire to coat light materials, steels and polymers a new approach has been developed. First, by using temperature-stable templates in the HFCVD and stripping off the diamond layer afterwards, a flexible, up to 150 μm thick and free standing nanocrystalline diamond foil (NCDF) can be produced. Afterwards, these NCDF can be applied on technical components through bonding and brazing, allowing any material as substrate. This two-step process offers the possibility to join a diamond layer on any desired surface. With a modified scratch test and Rockwell indentation testing the adhesion strength of NCDF on aluminium and steel is analysed. The results show that sufficient adhesion strength is reached both on steel and aluminium. The thermal stress in the substrates is very low and if failure occurs, cracks grow undercritically. Adhesion strength is even higher for the brazed samples, but here crack growth is critical, delaminating the diamond layer to some extent. In comparison to a sample directly coated with diamond, using a high-temperature CVD interlayer, the brazed as well as the adhesively bonded samples show very good performance, proving their competitiveness. A high support of the bonding layer could be identified as crucial, though in some cases a lower stiffness of the latter might be acceptable considering the possibility to completely avoid thermal stresses which occur during joining at higher temperatures.

  19. Bonding Analysis of Amino Resin Wood Adhesive with Pesticide Using Response Surface Method

    Bono, Awang; Rajin, Mariani; Siambun, Nancy Julius

    Wood base industries are among the dominant players in Malaysia economic activities. In this research, by using Response Surface Method (RSM), studies of bonding between Disodium Tetraborate Decahydrate (DTD) pesticide and various formulation of wood adhesive i.e., Melamine-Urea-Formaldehyde (MUF) resin is carried out. The RSM formulated twenty-five MUF formulations, consisting combination of different amount of formaldehyde, melamine, urea added in stage-1 and stage-2 of resin synthesis and DTD pesticide. The liquid products of resin are then hardened and tested using Fourier Transformation Infra-Red (FTIR) and visible spectrophotometer (VIS), to analyse the bonding of the resin and pesticide. The data from the FTIR and VIS analysis were then compiled and analysed using Response Surface Method. The results show that, different amount of the formaldehyde, melamine, urea and DTD pesticide, gives specific impact to the strength of MUF resin-pesticide bonding.

  20. Mechanical switching and coupling between two dissociation pathways in a P-selectin adhesion bond

    Evans, Evan; Leung, Andrew; Heinrich, Volkmar; Zhu, Cheng

    2004-08-01

    Many biomolecular bonds exhibit a mechanical strength that increases in proportion to the logarithm of the rate of force application. Consistent with exponential decrease in bond lifetime under rising force, this kinetically limited failure reflects dissociation along a single thermodynamic pathway impeded by a sharp free energy barrier. Using a sensitive force probe to test the leukocyte adhesion bond P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL-1)-P-selectin, we observed a linear increase of bond strength with each 10-fold increase in the rate of force application from 300 to 30,000 pN/sec, implying a single pathway for failure. However, the strength and lifetime of PSGL-1-P-selectin bonds dropped anomalously when loaded below 300 pN/sec, demonstrating unexpectedly faster dissociation and a possible second pathway for failure. Remarkably, if first loaded by a "jump" in force to 20-30 pN, the bonds became strong when subjected to a force ramp as slow as 30 pN/sec and exhibited the same single-pathway kinetics under all force rates. Applied in this way, a new "jump/ramp" mode of force spectroscopy was used to show that the PSGL-1-P-selectin bond behaves as a mechanochemical switch where force history selects between two dissociation pathways with markedly different properties. Furthermore, replacing PSGL-1 by variants of its 19-aa N terminus and by the crucial tetrasaccharide sialyl LewisX produces dramatic changes in the failure kinetics, suggesting a structural basis for the two pathways. The two-pathway switch seems to provide a mechanism for the "catch bond" response observed recently with PSGL-1-P-selectin bonds subjected to small-constant forces.

  1. In vitro evaluation of the bonding durability of self-adhesive resin cement to titanium using highly accelerated life test.

    Lin, Jie; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bonding durability of three self-adhesive resin cements to titanium using the Highly Accelerated Life Test (HALT). The following self-adhesive resin cements were used to bond pairs of titanium blocks together according to manufacturers' instructions: RelyX Unicem, Breeze, and Clearfil SA Luting. After storage in water at 37°C for 24 h, bonded specimens (n=15) immersed in 37°C water were subjected to cyclic shear load testing regimes of 20, 30, or 40 kg using a fatigue testing machine. Cyclic loading continued until failure occurred, and the number of cycles taken to reach failure was recorded. The bonding durability of a self-adhesive resin cement to titanium was largely influenced by the weight of impact load. HALT showed that Clearfil SA Luting, which contained MDP monomer, yielded the highest median bonding lifetime to titanium. PMID:22123007

  2. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    Cafer Türkmen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group: direct composite resin restoration (Alert with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive, Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia luted with a resin cement (Cement-It combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond, Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. RESULTS: The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7 showed better results compared to the other groups (p0.05. The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. CONCLUSION: The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces.

  3. Depletion of water molecules during ethanol wet-bonding with etch and rinse dental adhesives

    The treatment of demineralized dentin with ethanol has been proposed as a way to improve hydrophobic monomer penetration into otherwise water saturated collagen fibrils. The ethanol rinse is expected to preserve the fibrils from collapsing while optimizing resin constituent infiltration for better long term adhesion. The physico-chemical investigations of demineralized dentin confirmed objectively these working hypotheses. Namely, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) measurements of the melting point of water molecules pointed to the presence of free and bound water states. Unfreezable water was the main type of water remaining following a rinsing step with absolute ethanol. Two different liquid water phases were also observed by Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) solid state Nuclear magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Infrared spectra of ethanol treated specimens illustrated differences with the fully hydrated specimens concerning the polar carbonyl vibrations. Optical microscopy observations as well as scanning electron microscopy showed an improved dentin-adhesive interface with ethanol wet bonding. The results indicate that water can be confined to strongly bound structural molecules when excess water is removed with ethanol prior to adhesive application. This should preserve collagen from hydrolysis upon aging of the hybrid layer. - Highlights: ► Non-freezable water exists in demineralized dentine. ► Free water can be removed by ethanol rinse of the demineralized collagen. ► Ethanol wet bonding leads to a homogeneous hybrid layer free of defects.

  4. Depletion of water molecules during ethanol wet-bonding with etch and rinse dental adhesives

    Gregoire, Genevieve, E-mail: gregoire@cict.fr [Department of Biomaterials, Faculty of Odontology, University Toulouse III, 31062, Toulouse (France); Sharrock, Patrick [Medical and Spatial Imaging Laboratory, University Toulouse III, Ave. Pompidou, 81104, Castres (France); Delannee, Mathieu [Department of Biomaterials, Faculty of Odontology, University Toulouse III, 31062, Toulouse (France); Delisle, Marie-Bernadette [Faculty of Medicine, University Toulouse III, 31062, Toulouse (France)

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of demineralized dentin with ethanol has been proposed as a way to improve hydrophobic monomer penetration into otherwise water saturated collagen fibrils. The ethanol rinse is expected to preserve the fibrils from collapsing while optimizing resin constituent infiltration for better long term adhesion. The physico-chemical investigations of demineralized dentin confirmed objectively these working hypotheses. Namely, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) measurements of the melting point of water molecules pointed to the presence of free and bound water states. Unfreezable water was the main type of water remaining following a rinsing step with absolute ethanol. Two different liquid water phases were also observed by Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) solid state Nuclear magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Infrared spectra of ethanol treated specimens illustrated differences with the fully hydrated specimens concerning the polar carbonyl vibrations. Optical microscopy observations as well as scanning electron microscopy showed an improved dentin-adhesive interface with ethanol wet bonding. The results indicate that water can be confined to strongly bound structural molecules when excess water is removed with ethanol prior to adhesive application. This should preserve collagen from hydrolysis upon aging of the hybrid layer. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-freezable water exists in demineralized dentine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Free water can be removed by ethanol rinse of the demineralized collagen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ethanol wet bonding leads to a homogeneous hybrid layer free of defects.

  5. Effect of EDTA and Phosphoric Acid Pretreatment on the Bonding Effectiveness of Self-Etch Adhesives to Ground Enamel

    Ibrahim, Ihab M.; Elkassas, Dina W.; Yousry, Mai M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This in vitro study determined the effect of enamel pretreatment with phosphoric acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on the bond strength of strong, intermediary strong, and mild self-etching adhesive systems. Methods: Ninety sound human premolars were used. Resin composite cylinders were bonded to flat ground enamel surfaces using three self-etching adhesive systems: strong Adper Prompt L-Pop (pH=0.9–1.0), intermediary strong AdheSE (pH=1.6–1.7), and mild Frog (pH=2)....

  6. Nanoleakage of dentin adhesive systems bonded to Carisolv-treated dentin.

    Kubo, Shisei; Li, Heping; Burrow, Michael F; Tyas, Martin J

    2002-01-01

    The hybrid layer created in caries-affected dentin has not been fully elucidated and may influence bond durability. This study investigated the nanoleakage patterns of caries-affected dentin after excavation with Carisolv or conventional instruments treated with one of three adhesive systems. Flat occlusal dentin surfaces, including carious lesions, were prepared from extracted human molars and finished with wet 600-grit silicon carbide paper. Carious dentin was removed with Carisolv or round steel burs in conjunction with Caries Detector. PermaQuik, Single Bond or One-Up Bond F was bonded to the excavated dentin surfaces and adjacent flat occlusal surfaces and it was covered with Silux Plus resin-based composite. After 24-hour storage in 37 degrees C water, the bonded interfaces were polished to remove flash, and the surrounding tooth surfaces were coated with nail varnish. Specimens were immersed in 50% (w/v) silver nitrate solution for 24 hours, exposed to photo developing solution for eight hours, then sectioned longitudinally through the bonded, excavated dentin or "normal" dentin surfaces. The sectioned surfaces were polished, carbon coated and observed in a Field Emission-SEM using back scattered electrons. Silver deposition occurred along the base of the hybrid layer for all specimens. However, Single Bond showed a greater density of silver deposition in the caries-affected dentin compared with normal dentin. PermaQuik had a thicker hybrid layer in caries-affected dentin than normal dentin. One-Up Bond F exhibited a thin hybrid layer in normal dentin, but the hybrid layer was often difficult to detect in caries-affected dentin. PMID:12120777

  7. Assessment of the Shear Bond Strength between Nanofilled Composite Bonded to Glass-ionomer Cement Using Self-etch Adhesive with Different pHs and Total-Etch Adhesive

    Farahnaz Sharafeddin; Mohammad Mehdi Choobineh

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: In the sandwich technique, the undesirable bond between the composite resin and glass-ionomer cement (GIc) is one of the most important factors which lead to the failure of restoration. Total-etch and self-etch adhesives may improve the bond strength based on their pH. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength between the nanofilled composite resin and GIc using different adhesives. Materials and Method: In this experimental stu...

  8. Effect of delayed insertion of composite resin on the bond strength of self-etching adhesive systems

    Osmir Batista OLIVEIRA JÚNIOR

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Technological advances in adhesive systems haveresulted in materials with simplified techniques, which require lessclinical steps. Objective: To determine the influence of immediate ordelayed insertion of restorative material on the values of bond strength self-etching adhesives by using the micro tensile test. Material and methods: Bovine incisors were used, which had its vestibular surface abraded to obtain a flat dentin surface. Self-etching adhesive systems were used: Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB, Clearfil Tri S Bond (CTSB,AdheSE (ADS and AdheSE One (ADO. The composite resin Z350 was adhered to this substrate at two different times: immediately and later (after 24 hours. Procedures were performed with simulated physiological pulpal pressure. Results were submitted to statistical analysis through Anova and Tukey’s test. Results: Except ADS, all materials tested showed reduction of the values of bond strength when composite resin was applied delayed, and only for single-step systems(CTSB and ADO this reduction was statistically significant.Conclusion: Special care shall be taken when using single-step self-etching adhesive systems. It is recommended the application of an additional layer of hydrophobic material in order to reduce permeation of adhesive layer, and the insertion of composite resin should be initiated immediately after the photopolymerization of adhesive system.

  9. Asymptotic Sampling for Reliability Analysis of Adhesive Bonded Stepped Lap Composite Joints

    Kimiaeifar, Amin; Lund, Erik; Thomsen, Ole Thybo;

    2013-01-01

    is a promising and time efficient tool to calculate the probability of failure, is utilized, and a probabilistic model for the reliability analysis of adhesive bonded stepped lap composite joints, representative for the main laminate in a wind turbine blade subjected to static flapwise bending load......Reliability analysis coupled with finite element analysis (FEA) of composite structures is computationally very demanding and requires a large number of simulations to achieve an accurate prediction of the probability of failure with a small standard error. In this paper Asymptotic Sampling, which...... used to predict failure in the composite and adhesive layers, respectively, and the results are compared with the target reliability level implicitly used in the wind turbine standard IEC 61400-1. The accuracy and efficiency of Asymptotic Sampling is investigated by comparing the results with...

  10. SHEAR STRENGTH OF HEAT-TREATED TALI (ERYTHROPHLEUM IVORENSE AND IROKO (CHLOROPHORA EXCELSA WOODS, BONDED WITH VARIOUS ADHESIVES

    Hamiyet Sahin Kol

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of heat treatment on the shear strength of tali (Erythrophleum ivorense and iroko (Chlorophora excelsa woods, bonded with some structural adhesives. Shear strength of untreated and heat-treated woods bonded with phenol-formaldehyde (PF, melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF, melamine-formaldehyde (MF, and polyurethane (PUR adhesives was studied. An industrial heat treatment method (ThermoWood was used. The timbers were thermally modified for 2 hours at 180 ºC. Laminated samples having two sample sets were prepared from untreated and heat-treated wood for the shear strength test. The results of the tests showed that the heat treatment affected shear strength of laminated wood negatively. Although there was a considerable difference in adhesive bond shear strength between untreated and treated wood, both wood species bonded with the adhesives fulfilled the required value for shear strength of the adhesive bonds. PF, MUF, MF, and PUR adhesives performed in a rather similar way for both wood species.

  11. Supersonic Retropulsion Surface Preparation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites for Adhesive Bonding

    Palmieri, Frank L.; Belcher, Marcus A.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Blohowiak, Kay Y.; Connell, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Surface preparation is widely recognized as a key step to producing robust and predictable bonds in a precise and reproducible manner. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, can lack precision and reproducibility, which can lead to variation in surface properties and subsequent bonding performance. The use of a laser to ablate composite surface resin can provide an efficient, precise, and reproducible means of preparing composite surfaces for adhesive bonding. Advantages include elimination of physical waste (i.e., grit media and sacrificial peel ply layers that ultimately require disposal), reduction in process variability due to increased precision (e.g. increased reproducibility), and automation of surface preparation, all of which improve reliability and process control. This paper describes a Nd:YAG laser surface preparation technique for composite substrates and the mechanical performance and failure modes of bonded laminates thus prepared. Additionally, bonded specimens were aged in a hot, wet environment for approximately one year and subsequently mechanically tested. The results of a one year hygrothermal aging study will be presented.

  12. Assessment of the Shear Bond Strength between Nanofilled Composite Bonded to Glass-ionomer Cement Using Self-etch Adhesive with Different pHs and Total-Etch Adhesive

    Farahnaz Sharafeddin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: In the sandwich technique, the undesirable bond between the composite resin and glass-ionomer cement (GIc is one of the most important factors which lead to the failure of restoration. Total-etch and self-etch adhesives may improve the bond strength based on their pH. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength between the nanofilled composite resin and GIc using different adhesives. Materials and Method: In this experimental study, 40 specimens (6×6mm in 4 groups (n=10 were prepared in acrylic mold. Each specimen contained conventional GI ChemFil Superior with a height of 3mm, bonded to Z350 composite resin with a height measured 3mm. In order to bond the composite to the GI, the following adhesives were used, respectively: A: mild Clearfil SE Bond self-etch (pH=2, B: intermediate OptiBond self-etch (pH=1.4, C: strong Adper Prompt L-Pop (pH=1, and D: Adper Single Bond 2 total-etch (pH=7.2. The shear bond strength was measured by using universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test were used to analyze the data (p< 0.05. Results: The shear bond strength in group A was significantly higher than group B (p= 0.002, C (p< 0.001, and D (p< 0.001. Moreover, the shear bond strength of groups A and B (self-etch was significantly different from group D (total-etch (p< 0.001; and C (self-etch with D (p= 0.024. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that applying the mild self-etch adhesive between the composite and the GIc results in stronger shear bond strength compared to intermediate and strong self-etch adhesives. Moreover, the self-etch adhesive increased the shear bond strength between composite resin and GIc more significantly than total-etch adhesive.

  13. Dentin Bond Strength of Two One-Bottle Adhesives after Delayed Activation of Light-Cured Resin Composites

    F. Shafiei

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Adverse surface interactions between one-bottle adhesives and chemical-cured composites may occur with delayed light activation of light-cured composites. The purpose of this study was to assess the Effects of delayed activation of light-cured compositeson shear bond strength of two one-bottle adhesives with different acidity to bovine dentin.Materials and Methods: Flat dentin surface was prepared on sixty-six bovine incisors using 600 grit carbide papers. Prime&Bond NT, and One-Step adhesives and resin composite were applied in six groups: 1 immediate curing of the composite, 2 the composite was left 2.5 minutes over the cured adhesive before light activation, 3 prior to delayed activation of the composite, the cured adhesive was covered with a layer of nonacidic hydrophobic porcelain bonding resin (Choice 2 and cured immediately. After thermocycling,shear bond strength (SBS test was performed using a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. Data were analyzed with Friedmans two-way Non-parametric ANOVA.Results: The SBS of delayed activation of Prime&Bond was significantly lower than immediate activated (P<0.05. Decrease in the SBS of One-Step was not statistically significant after delayed activation. The SBS of delayed activation of Prime&Bond and One-Step with an additional resin layer was significantly higher than delayed activation (P<0.001.Conclusion: The bond strength of Prime&Bond might be compromised by the higher acidity of this adhesive during the 2.5 minutes delayed activation of light-cured composite.Addition of a layer of hydrophobic resin compensated the effect of delayed activation andimproved the bond strength.

  14. Shear Bond Strengths of Methacrylate- and Silorane-based Composite Resins to Feldspathic Porcelain using Different Adhesive Systems.

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Shakur Shahabi, Maryam; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pournagi Azar, Fatemeh; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Use of porcelain as inlays, laminates and metal-ceramic and all-ceramic crowns is common in modern dentistry. The high cost of ceramic restorations, time limitations and difficulty of removing these restorations result in delays in replacing fractured restorations; therefore, their repair is indicated. The aim of the present study was to compare the shear bond strengths of two types of composite resins (methacrylate-based and silorane-based) to porcelain, using three adhesive types. Materials and methods. A total of 156 samples of feldspathic porcelain surfaces were prepared with air-abrasion and randomly divided into 6 groups (n=26). In groups 1-3, Z250 composite resin was used to repair porcelain samples with Ad-per Single Bond 2 (ASB), Clearfil SE Bond (CSB) and Silorane Adhesive (SA) as the bonding systems, afterapplication of silane, respectively. In groups 4-6, the same adhesives were used in the same manner with Filtek Silorane composite resin. Finally, the shear bond strengths of the samples were measured. Two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests were used to compare bond strengths between the groups with different adhesives at P<0.05. Results. There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values in terms of the adhesive type (P<0.001). In addition, the interactive effect of the adhesive type and composite resin type had no significant effect on bond strength (P=0.602). Conclusion. The results of the present study showed the highest repair bond strength values to porcelain with both composite resin types with the application of SA and ASB. PMID:26697151

  15. Shear Bond Strengths of Methacrylate- and Silorane-based Composite Resins to Feldspathic Porcelain using Different Adhesive Systems

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Shakur Shahabi, Maryam; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pournagi Azar, Fatemeh; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Use of porcelain as inlays, laminates and metal-ceramic and all-ceramic crowns is common in modern dentistry. The high cost of ceramic restorations, time limitations and difficulty of removing these restorations result in delays in replacing fractured restorations; therefore, their repair is indicated. The aim of the present study was to compare the shear bond strengths of two types of composite resins (methacrylate-based and silorane-based) to porcelain, using three adhesive types. Materials and methods. A total of 156 samples of feldspathic porcelain surfaces were prepared with air-abrasion and randomly divided into 6 groups (n=26). In groups 1-3, Z250 composite resin was used to repair porcelain samples with Ad-per Single Bond 2 (ASB), Clearfil SE Bond (CSB) and Silorane Adhesive (SA) as the bonding systems, afterapplication of silane, respectively. In groups 4-6, the same adhesives were used in the same manner with Filtek Silorane composite resin. Finally, the shear bond strengths of the samples were measured. Two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests were used to compare bond strengths between the groups with different adhesives at P<0.05. Results. There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values in terms of the adhesive type (P<0.001). In addition, the interactive effect of the adhesive type and composite resin type had no significant effect on bond strength (P=0.602). Conclusion. The results of the present study showed the highest repair bond strength values to porcelain with both composite resin types with the application of SA and ASB. PMID:26697151

  16. Adhesives in Building--Lamination of Structural Timber Beams, Bonding of Cementitious Materials, Bonding of Gypsum Drywall Construction. Proceedings of a Conference of the Building Research Institute, Division of Engineering and Industrial Research (Spring 1960).

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

    The role of adhesives in building design is discussed. Three major areas are as follows--(1) lamination of structural timber beams, (2) bonding of cementitious materials, and (3) bonding of gypsum drywall construction. Topical coverage includes--(1) structural lamination today, (2) adhesives in use today, (3) new adhesives needed, (4) production…

  17. Laser treatment of carbon fibre reinforced thermoplastic matrix for adhesive bonding

    Genna, S.; Leone, C.; Ucciardello, N.; Giuliani, M.

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, laser surface treatment of CFRP made of PPS thermoplastic matrix by means of a 30 W Q-Switched Yb:YAG fiber laser, is investigated with the aim to improve adhesive bonding. The process parameters pulse power, scanning speed, hatch distance and scanning strategy, were varied to the aim to study the influence of the process condition on the first top resin layer removal and fibre damage. The operating window was experimentally determined. The effectiveness of laser treatment was verified by single lap shear test.

  18. Effect of different adhesive strategies on microtensile bond strength of computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing blocks bonded to dentin

    Roperto, Renato; Akkus, Anna; Akkus, Ozan; Lang, Lisa; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damiao; Teich, Sorin; Porto, Thiago Soares

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of ceramic and composite computer aided design-computer aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) blocks bonded to dentin using different adhesive strategies. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 30 crowns of sound freshly extracted human molars were sectioned horizontally 3 mm above the cementoenamel junction to produce flat dentin surfaces. Ceramic and composite CAD/CAM blocks, size 14, were sectioned into slices of 3 mm thick. Before bonding, CAD/CAM block surfaces were treated according to the manufacturer's instructions. Groups were created based on the adhesive strategy used: Group 1 (GI) - conventional resin cement + total-etch adhesive system, Group 2 (GII) - conventional resin cement + self-etch adhesive system, and Group 3 (GIII) - self-adhesive resin cement with no adhesive. Bonded specimens were stored in 100% humidity for 24h at 37΀C, and then sectioned with a slow-speed diamond saw to obtain 1 mm × 1 mm × 6 mm microsticks. Microtensile testing was then conducted using a microtensile tester. μTBS values were expressed in MPa and analyzed by one-way ANOVA with post hoc (Tukey) test at the 5% significance level. Results: Mean values and standard deviations of μTBS (MPa) were 17.68 (±2.71) for GI/ceramic; 17.62 (±3.99) for GI/composite; 13.61 (±6.92) for GII/composite; 12.22 (±4.24) for GII/ceramic; 7.47 (±2.29) for GIII/composite; and 6.48 (±3.10) for GIII/ceramic; ANOVA indicated significant differences among the adhesive modality and block interaction (P CAD/CAM restorations, either composite or ceramic, can be significantly affected by different adhesive strategies used. PMID:27076825

  19. Evaluation of microtensile bond strength of total-etch, self-etch, and glass ionomer adhesive to human dentin: An in vitro study

    Neelima Lakshmi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength of Single Bond, AdheSE, and Fuji Bond LC to human dentin. Fifteen non-carious third molars were selected for the study. The teeth were randomly divided into three groups of five teeth each. Each group was given a different bonding treatment. Group I was treated with Single Bond (3M, ESPE, group II with AdheSE (Ivoclar, Vivadent, and group III was treated with Fuji Bond LC (GC America. A T-band metal matrix was placed and composite resin bonded on to the tooth surface using appropriate bonding agents. The composite resin was packed in increments and light cured. Each tooth was sectioned to obtain 1 mm x 1 mm beams of dentin-resin samples. Tensile bond testing was done using a universal testing machine (Instron at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Results: The mean bond strength of Single Bond (35.5 MPa was significantly higher than that of AdheSE (32.8 MPa and Fuji Bond LC (32.6 MPa. The difference between the microtensile bond strength values of AdheSE and Fuji Bond LC was statistically insignificant. Inference: Though the bond strength of AdheSE and Fuji Bond LC was above 30 MPa, it was less than that of Single Bond as evaluated by testing of microtensile bond strength.

  20. Resin-dentin bond strength of 10 contemporary etch-and-rinse adhesive systems after one year of water storage.

    Fontes, Silvia Terra; Cubas, Gloria Beatriz de Azevedo; Flores, Josiane Barcelos; Montemezzo, Murieli Leonor; Pinto, Marcia Bueno; Piva, Evandro

    2010-01-01

    To compare the resin-dentin bond degradation of 10 contemporary etch-and-rinse adhesive systems after one year of water storage, 100 bovine incisors were randomly separated into 10 groups and their superficial coronal dentin was exposed. According to manufacturers' instructions, dentin surfaces were bonded with one of seven two-step etch-and-rinse adhesives or one of three three-step etch-and-rinse adhesives. Composite buildups were constructed incrementally. Restored teeth were sectioned to obtain sticks (0.5 mm²). The specimens were subjected to a microtensile bond strength test after storage in distilled water (at 37°C) for one year. Data (MPa) were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Tukey's tests at α = 0.05. Of the adhesives tested, One Step, All Bond 2, and Optibond FL attained the highest bond strength to dentin after one year in water storage, while Magic Bond DE and Master Bond presented a high number of premature debonded flaws. PMID:21062710

  1. Effect of collagen fibrils removal on shear bond strength of total etch and self etch adhesive systems

    Pishevar L.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Sodium hypochlorite can remove the organic phase of the demineralized dentin and it produces direct resin bonding with hydroxyapatite crystals. Therefore, the hydrolytic degradation of collagen fibrils which might affect the bonding durability is removed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of collagen fibrils removal by 10% NaOCl on dentin shear bond strength of two total etch and self etch adhesive systems."nMaterials and Methods: Sixty extracted human premolar teeth were used in this study. Buccal surface of teeth were grounded until dentin was exposed. Then teeth were divided into four groups. According to dentin surface treatment, experimental groups were as follows: Group I: Single Bond (3M according to manufacture instruction, Group II: 10% NaOCl+Single bond (3M, Group III: Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray according to manufacture instruction, and Group IV: Clearfil SE Bond primer. After that, the specimens were immersed in 50% acetone solution for removing extra monomer. Then the specimens were rinsed and dried. 10% NaOCl was applied and finally adhesive was used. Then composite was bonded to the treated surfaces using a 4 2 mm cylindrical plastic mold. Specimens were thermocycled for 500 cycles (5-55ºC. A shear load was employed by a universal testing machine with a cross head speed of 1mm/min. The data were analyzed for statistical significance with One-way ANOVA, Two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD post-hoc tests."nResults: The mean shear bond strengths of groups were as follows: Single Bond=16.8±4.2, Clearfil SE Bond=23.7±4.07, Single Bond+NaOCl=10.5±4.34, Clearfil SE Bond+NaOCl=23.3±3.65 MPa. Statistical analysis revealed that using 10% NaOCl significantly decreased the shear bond strength in Single Bond group (P=0.00, but caused no significant difference in the shear bond strength in Clearfil SE Bond group (P=0.99."nConclusion: Based on the results of this study, NaOCl treatment did not improve the bond

  2. Can previous acid etching increase the bond strength of a self-etching primer adhesive to enamel?

    Ana Paula Morales Cobra Carvalho

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Because a greater research effort has been directed to analyzing the adhesive effectiveness of self etch primers to dentin, the aim of this study was to evaluate, by microtensile testing, the bond strength to enamel of a composite resin combined with a conventional adhesive system or with a self-etching primer adhesive, used according to its original prescription or used with previous acid etching. Thirty bovine teeth were divided into 3 groups with 10 teeth each (n= 10. In one of the groups, a self-etching primer (Clearfil SE Bond - Kuraray was applied in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions and, in the other, it was applied after previous acid etching. In the third group, a conventional adhesive system (Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus - 3M-ESPE was applied in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. The results obtained by analysis of variance revealed significant differences between the adhesive systems (F = 22.31. The self-etching primer (Clearfil SE Bond presented lower enamel bond strength values than the conventional adhesive system (Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus (m = 39.70 ± 7.07 MPa both when used according to the original prescription (m = 27.81 ± 2.64 MPa and with previous acid etching (m = 25.08 ± 4.92 MPa.

  3. The reduction of formaldehyde and VOCs emission from wood-based flooring by green adhesive using cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL).

    Kim, Sumin

    2010-10-15

    To discuss the reduction of formaldehyde and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from engineered flooring, cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL)-formaldehyde (CF) resin and CF/PVAc resin were applied for the maple face of the veneer bonding on plywood. The CF resin was used to replace urea-formaldehyde (UF) resin in the formaldehyde-based resin system in order to reduce formaldehyde and VOC emissions from the adhesives used between the plywoods and fancy veneers. For the CF/PVAc resins, 5, 10, 20 or 30% of PVAc was added to the CF resin. The CF/PVAc resins showed better bonding than the commercial natural tannin adhesive with a higher level of wood penetration. The standard formaldehyde emission test and a VOC analyzer were used to determine the formaldehyde and VOC emissions, respectively, from the engineered floorings. The CF resin and CF/PVAc resin systems with UV coating satisfied the E(1) and E(0) grades of the Korean Standard. TVOC emission was slightly increased by the PVAc addition. PMID:20362392

  4. Bond strength of an adhesive system irradiated with Nd:YAG laser in dentin treated with Er:YAG laser

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to verify through micro tensile bond test the bond strength of an adhesive system irradiated with Nd:YAG laser in dentine previously treated with Er:YAG laser. Twenty caries free extracted human third molars were used. The teeth were divided in four experimental groups (n = 5): (G1) control group; (G2) irradiation of the adhesive system with the Nd:YAG laser; (G3) dentin treatment with Er:YAG laser; (G4) dentin treatment with Er:YAG laser followed by the irradiation of the adhesive system with Nd:YAG laser. The Er:YAG laser fluency parameter for the dentin treatment was of 60 J/cm2. The adhesive system was irradiated with the Nd:YAG laser with fluency of 100 J/cm2. Dental restorations were performed with Adper Single Bond 2/Z250. One tooth from each group was prepared for the evaluation of the adhesive interface under SEM and bond failure tests were also performed and evaluated. The statistical analysis showed statistical significant difference between the groups G1 and G3, G1 and G4, G2 and G3, and G2 and G4; and similarity between the groups G1 and G2, and G3 and G4. The adhesive failures were predominant in all the experimental groups. The SEM analysis showed an adhesive interface with features confirming the results of the mechanical tests. The Nd:YAG laser on the adhesive system did not influence the bond strength in dentin treated or not with the Er:YAG laser

  5. Epoxy Enhanced by Recycled Milled Carbon Fibres in Adhesively-Bonded CFRP for Structural Strengthening

    Chao Wu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the mechanical performance and electrical resistivity of a structural adhesive epoxy enhanced using milled carbon fibre (MCF as well as the bond performance of carbon fibre reinforced polymers (CFRP and steel adhesively bonded joints using the enhanced epoxy. The epoxy was enhanced using such MCFs with different weight ratios of 1.5%, 3% and 5%. Tensile experiments were performed on the original and enhanced epoxy specimens according to ASTM D638. More ductile process failure was found for the epoxy after modification and significant improvements of E-modulus and tensile strength were evidenced when the MCF weight ratio was larger than 1.5%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM revealed that the failure mechanism of short MCFs pulled out from the epoxy matrix contributed to the enhancement of the mechanical performance of the epoxy. The electrical resistivity of the epoxy with MCF weight ratio of 5% was reduced by at least four orders of magnitude compared to the original epoxy, due to the conductive network formed by MCFs. Steel/CFRP double strap joints (with either CFRP sheets or CFRP laminates were prepared using the enhanced epoxy and then tested in tension, however no obvious increase in joint stiffness or strength was observed.

  6. Air-coupled ultrasonic testing of metal adhesively bonded joints using cellular polypropylene transducers

    Gaal, Mate; Bartusch, Jürgen; Dohse, Elmar; Kreutzbruck, Marc; Amos, Jay

    2014-02-01

    Adhesively bonded aluminum components have been widely used in the aerospace industry for weight-efficient and damage-tolerant structures. Automated squirter jet immersion ultrasonic testing is a common inspection technique to assure the bond integrity of large, contoured assemblies. However, squirter jet inspection presents several limitations in scanning speed, related to water splash noise over protruding stiffeners and splash interference crosstalk in multi-channel inspection systems. Air-coupled ultrasonic testing has been evaluated as an alternative, possibly offering the benefits of increased throughput by enabling higher speeds, and eliminating the contamination concerns and maintenance issues of water couplant systems. Adhesive joints of multi-layer aluminum plates with artificial disbonds were inspected with novel air-coupled ultrasonic probes based on cellular polypropylene. Disbonds of various sizes were engineered in several multi-layer configurations and at various depths. Results were compared with squirter jet immersion and conventional piezoelectric transducer designs in terms of scan contrast, resolution and inspection time.

  7. Mechanical joining and adhesive bonding - basics, technology, applications; Fuegen durch Umformen und Kleben - Grundlagen, Technologie, Anwendungen

    Meschut, G. [Volkswagen AG, Konzern-Forschung, Wolfsburg (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    This contribution uses material combinations current in the automotive industry to demonstrate the mutual dependence of joining processes and their implications for the geometric shaping of fasteners in the combined shaping and adhesive bonding joining process. The mechanical properties of joints made using combined and elementary methods are compared taking into consideration quasi static, oscillating and impact-type loads, and ageing characteristics. The results demonstrate that the combination of mechanical and adhesive bonding methods produces joints of technologically high quality which can be implemented in optimised light-weight construction. General information is provided on the use of low-heat hybrid joining technology for project planning of this type of connections in industrial practice. (orig.) [German] Der Beitrag verdeutlicht anhand von aktuellen Werkstoffkombinationen aus dem Fahrzeugbau die gegenseitige Beeinflussung der Fuegeprozesse und die Folgen fuer die Fuegeelementausbildung bei der Verfahrenskombination Fuegen durch Umformen und Kleben. Die mechanischen Eigenschaften von kombiniert gefuegten und elementar gefuegten Verbindungen unter quasistatischer, schwingender und stossartiger Belastung sowie das Alterungsverhalten werden gegenuebergestellt. Die Ergebnisse zeigen, dass mittels der Kombination mechanischer Fuegeverfahren mit dem Kleben technologisch hochwertige Verbindungen fuer den eigenschaftsoptimierten Leichtbau realisierbar sind. Fuer die Projektierung derartiger Verbindungen in der industriellen Praxis werden allgemeingueltige Hinweise zum Einsatz der waermearmen Hybridfuegetechnik gegeben. (orig.)

  8. A completely transparent, adhesively bonded soda-lime glass block masonry system

    F. Oikonomopoulou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A pioneering, all transparent, self-supporting glass block facade is presented in this paper. Previously realized examples utilize embedded metal components in order to obtain the desired structural performance despite the fact that these elements greatly affect the facade’s overall transparency level. Undeniably, the oxymoron ‘transparency and strength’ remains the prime concern in such applications. In this paper, a new, innovative structural system for glass block facades is described, which demonstrably meets both criteria. The structure is exclusively constructed by monolithic glass blocks, bonded with a colourless, UV-curing adhesive, obtaining thus a maximum transparency. In addition, the desired structural performance is achieved solely through the masonry system, without any opaque substructure. Differing from previous realized projects, solid soda-lime glass blocks are used rather than borosilicate ones. This article provides an overview of the integrated architectural and structural design and discusses the choice of materials. The structural verification of the system is demonstrated. The results show that the adhesively bonded glass block structure has the required self-structural behaviour, but only if strict tolerances are met in the geometry of the glass blocks.

  9. A completely transparent, adhesively bonded soda-lime glass block masonry system

    Faidra Oikonomopoulou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A pioneering, all transparent, self-supporting glass block facade is presented in this paper. Previously realized examples utilize embedded metal components in order to obtain the desired structural performance despite the fact that these elements greatly affect the facade’s overall transparency level. Undeniably, the oxymoron ‘transparency and strength’ remains the prime concern in such applications. In this paper, a new, innovative structural system for glass block facades is described, which demonstrably meets both criteria. The structure is exclusively constructed by monolithic glass blocks, bonded with a colourless, UV-curing adhesive, obtaining thus a maximum transparency. In addition, the desired structural performance is achieved solely through the masonry system, without any opaque substructure. Differing from previous realized projects, solid soda-lime glass blocks are used rather than borosilicate ones. This article provides an overview of the integrated architectural and structural design and discusses the choice of materials. The structural verification of the system is demonstrated. The results show that the adhesively bonded glass block structure has the required self-structural behaviour, but only if strict tolerances are met in the geometry of the glass blocks.  

  10. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Fixed with Remineralizing Adhesive Systems after Simulating One Year of Orthodontic Treatment

    Bezerra, Gisele Lima; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Firoozmand, Leily Macedo

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess, in vitro, the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets fixed with remineralizing adhesive systems submitted to thermomechanical cycling, simulating one year of orthodontic treatment. Sixty-four bovine incisor teeth were randomly divided into 4 experimental groups (n = 16): XT: Transbond XT, QC: Quick Cure, OL: Ortholite Color, and SEP: Transbond Plus Self-Etching Primer. The samples were submitted to thermomechanical cycling simulating one year of orthodontic treatment. Shear bond strength tests were carried out using a universal testing machine with a load cell of 50 KgF at 0.5 mm/minute. The samples were examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in order to analyze enamel surface and Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney (with Bonferroni correction) tests showed a significant difference between the studied groups (p < 0.05). Groups XT, QC, and SEP presented the highest values of adhesive resistance and no statistical differences were found between them. The highest frequency of failures between enamel and adhesive was observed in groups XT, QC, and OL. Quick Cure (QC) remineralizing adhesive system presented average adhesive resistance values similar to conventional (XT) and self-etching (SEP) adhesives, while remineralizing system (OL) provided the lowest values of adhesive resistance. PMID:26380371

  11. Bonding Effectiveness of Universal Adhesive to Intracoronal Bleached Dentin Treated with Sodium Ascorbate.

    Trindade, Thaís Fantinato; Moura, Luana Kelle Batista; Raucci, Walter; Messias, Danielle Cristine Furtado; Colucci, Vivian

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of restorative protocol with sodium ascorbate on the shear bond strength (SBS) of a universal adhesive to intracoronal bleached dentin. One hundred-and-twenty bovine dentin fragments were randomly divided into 12 groups (n=10), according to the bleaching procedure (unbleached and bleached) and restorative protocol (no treatment, 10% sodium ascorbate -10SA, 35% sodium ascorbate -35SA and two-step etch-and-rinse -ER or one-step self-etch -SE Scotchbond universal adhesive approaches). Four whitening sessions were performed using 35% hydrogen peroxide. The samples from control groups were kept in relative humidity at 37 °C. Immediately after bleaching procedures, the assigned antioxidant solution was applied on dentin and restorative procedures were performed following either the ER or the SE approach. After 24 h, the specimens were subjected to SBS test. Data (MPa) were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (?=0.05). Lower SBS values were found for bleached specimens (8.54 MPa) compared with those unbleached (12.13 MPa) (pbond strength of the sodium ascorbate-treated groups was higher than those untreated, regardless of the strategy employed (pbond strength values for both ER (8.32 MPa) and SE (8.28 MPa) adhesive strategies. The group treated with 10SA submitted to ER approach (10.14 MPa) was similar to untreated groups (p>0.05). It may be concluded that bond strength of composite resin to intracoronal dentin was affected by restorative protocol and reduced by bleaching. PMID:27224564

  12. Analysis on Adhesively-Bonded Joints of FRP-steel Composite Bridge under Combined Loading: Arcan Test Study and Numerical Modeling

    Xu Jiang; Xuhong Qiang; Henk Kolstein; Frans Bijlaard

    2016-01-01

    The research presented in this paper is an experimental study and numerical analysis on mechanical behavior of the adhesively-bonded joint between FRP sandwich bridge deck and steel girder. Generally, there are three typical stress states in the adhesively-bonded joint: shear stress, tensile stress, and combination of both. To realize these stress states in the adhesively-bonded joint during tests, a specific loading device is developed with the capacity of providing six different loading ang...

  13. Bond strength durability of self-etching adhesives and resin cements to dentin

    Carolina de Andrade Lima Chaves

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS of one- (Xeno III, Dentsply and two-step (Tyrian-One Step Plus, Bisco self-etching adhesive systems bonded to dentin and cemented to chemically cured (C&B Metabond or light-cured paste of a dual-cure resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar within a short (24 h and long period of evaluation (90 days. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty recently extracted human molars had their roots removed and their occlusal dentin exposed and ground wet with 600-grit SiC paper. After application of one of the adhesives, the resin cement was applied to the bonded surface and a composite resin block was incrementally built up to a height of 5 mm (n=10. The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 7 days. The teeth were then cut along two axes (x and y, producing beam-shaped specimens with 0.8 mm² cross-sectional area, which were subjected to µTBS testing at a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min and stressed to failure after 24 h or 90 days of storage in water. The µTBS data in MPa were subjected to three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α= 0.05. RESULTS: The interaction effect for all three factors was statistically significant (three-way ANOVA, p<0.001. All eight experimental means (MPa were compared by the Tukey's test (p<0.05 and the following results were obtained: Tyrian-One Step Plus /C&B/24 h (22.4±7.3; Tyrian-One Step Plus /Variolink II/24 h (39.4±11.6; Xeno III/C&B/24 h (40.3±12.9; Xeno III/Variolink II/24 h (25.8±10.5; Tyrian-One Step Plus /C&B/90 d (22.1±12.8 Tyrian-One Step Plus/VariolinkII/90 d (24.2±14.2; Xeno III/C&B/90 d (27.0±13.5; Xeno III/Variolink II/90 d (33.0±8.9. CONCLUSIONS: Xeno III/Variolink II was the luting agent/adhesive combination that provided the most promising bond strength after 90 days of storage in water.

  14. Damage prognosis of adhesively-bonded joints in laminated composite structural components of unmanned aerial vehicles

    Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gobbato, Maurizio [UCSD; Conte, Joel [UCSD; Kosmatke, John [UCSD; Oliver, Joseph A [UCSD

    2009-01-01

    The extensive use of lightweight advanced composite materials in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) drastically increases the sensitivity to both fatigue- and impact-induced damage of their critical structural components (e.g., wings and tail stabilizers) during service life. The spar-to-skin adhesive joints are considered one of the most fatigue sensitive subcomponents of a lightweight UAV composite wing with damage progressively evolving from the wing root. This paper presents a comprehensive probabilistic methodology for predicting the remaining service life of adhesively-bonded joints in laminated composite structural components of UAVs. Non-destructive evaluation techniques and Bayesian inference are used to (i) assess the current state of damage of the system and, (ii) update the probability distribution of the damage extent at various locations. A probabilistic model for future loads and a mechanics-based damage model are then used to stochastically propagate damage through the joint. Combined local (e.g., exceedance of a critical damage size) and global (e.g.. flutter instability) failure criteria are finally used to compute the probability of component failure at future times. The applicability and the partial validation of the proposed methodology are then briefly discussed by analyzing the debonding propagation, along a pre-defined adhesive interface, in a simply supported laminated composite beam with solid rectangular cross section, subjected to a concentrated load applied at mid-span. A specially developed Eliler-Bernoulli beam finite element with interlaminar slip along the damageable interface is used in combination with a cohesive zone model to study the fatigue-induced degradation in the adhesive material. The preliminary numerical results presented are promising for the future validation of the methodology.

  15. Dentin bonding performance using Weibull statistics and evaluation of acid-base resistant zone formation of recently introduced adhesives.

    Guan, Rui; Takagaki, Tomohiro; Matsui, Naoko; Sato, Takaaki; Burrow, Michael F; Palamara, Joseph; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji

    2016-07-30

    Dentin bonding durability of recently introduced dental adhesives: Clearfil SE Bond 2 (SE2), Optibond XTR (XTR), and Scotchbond Universal (SBU) was investigated using Weibull analysis as well as analysis of the micromorphological features of the acid-base resistant zone (ABRZ) created for the adhesives. The bonding procedures of SBU were divided into three subgroups: self-etch (SBS), phosphoric acid (PA) etching on moist (SBM) or dry dentin (SBD). All groups were thermocycled for 0, 5,000 and 10,000 cycles followed by microtensile bond strength testing. Acid-base challenge was undertaken before SEM and TEM observations of the adhesive interface. The etch-and-rinse method with SBU (SBM and SBD) created inferior interfaces on the dentin surface which resulted in reduced bond durability. ABRZ formation was detected with the self-etch adhesive systems; SE2, XTR and SBS. In the PA etching protocols of SBM and SBD, a thick hybrid layer but no ABRZ was detected, which might affect dentin bond durability. PMID:27335136

  16. Effect of saliva contamination on the shear bond strength of a new self-etch adhesive system to dentin

    Swapna Munaga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To evaluate the effect of saliva contamination on the shear bond strength of a new two-step self-etch adhesive (P90 system adhesive to dentin and to determine the effect of contaminant removing treatments on the recovery of bond strengths. Materials and Methods: The buccal surfaces of 40 human premolars were ground to expose dentin. The specimens were randomly divided into four groups. Group 1 is uncontaminated and serves as the control group. Further groups were divided based on the step in the bonding sequence when the contamination had occurred as follows: Group 2 (primer, saliva contamination, rinse and dry, group 3 (after procedure of group 2, reapplication of primer, and group 4 (after procedure like in control group, saliva contamination, rinse and dry. Filtek P90 composite resin cylinders of 3 mm diameter and 3 mm length were fabricated on the surfaces. Shear bond strength testing was done in an Instron Universal Testing Machine and the data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Student′s t-test. Results: With P90 system adhesive, group 2 and group 4 showed lower shear bond strength than group 1 (control and group 3 (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Saliva contamination significantly decreased the shear bond strength of the adhesive to dentin.

  17. Effects of adhesive thickness on the Lamb wave pitch-catch signal using bonded piezoelectric wafer transducers

    Islam, M. M.; Huang, H.

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the effects of adhesive layer on Lamb wave ultrasound pitch-catch signals that are excited and sensed by piezoelectric wafer transducers bonded on a slender structure. Analytical models were established to simulate the longitudinal and flexural vibrations of the structures separately and parametric studies of the bonding layer properties, i.e. the shear transfer parameter, adhesive thickness, and shear modulus, were performed. The parametric studies indicate that there exists an optimal adhesive layer thickness that generates maximum ultrasound pitch-catch signal for both wave modes. This prediction was subsequently validated by measurements. In addition, an improved match between the measured and simulated pitch-catch signals was achieved by adjusting the adhesive layer parameters.

  18. Effect of dental bleaching after bracket bonding and debonding using three different adhesive systems

    Lucianna de Oliveira Gomes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of bonding and debonding of orthodontic brackets on dental in-home bleaching, taking into account three different adhesive systems. METHODS: Forty-four bovine incisors were divided into four groups according to the primer system used for orthodontic bracket bonding. Following the debonding of orthodontic brackets, the teeth were stored in staining solution for 96 hours. Then, teeth were whitened using 10% carbamide peroxide for two weeks at a 6-hour-a-day regime. Standardized digital photographs were taken at the following intervals: T0 (initial; T1 (after debonding; T2 (after pigmentation; T3, T4 and T5 representing 1, 7, and 14 days of bleaching. Repeatability and stability tests were carried out to check the method accuracy. Images were analyzed using Adobe Photoshop 7.0 software considering (L*a*b*color coordinate values and a modified color difference total (Δ;E'. RESULTS: The results of this study (ANOVA and Tukey; p < 0.01 demonstrated that after 7 days of bleaching, experimental groups showed significantly less teeth whitening compared to the control group. However, there were no significant color differences between the groups after 14 days, according to values of lightness (L*. CONCLUSIONS: Regardless of the adhesive primer system applied, bonding and debonding of orthodontic brackets alters the outcome of tooth whitening in the first 7 days of bleaching, however it has no influence on the whitening of the dental structure after 14 days of in-home dental bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide.

  19. Environment-friendly adhesives for surface bonding of wood-based flooring using natural tannin to reduce formaldehyde and TVOC emission.

    Kim, Sumin

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop environment-friendly adhesives for face fancy veneer bonding of engineered flooring using the natural tannin form bark in the wood. The natural wattle tannin adhesive were used to replace UF resin in the formaldehyde-based resin system in order to reduce formaldehyde and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from the adhesives used between plywoods and fancy veneers. PVAc was added to the natural tannin adhesive to increase viscosity of tannin adhesive for surface bonding. For tannin/PVAc hybrid adhesives, 5%, 10%, 20% and 30% of PVAc to the natural tannin adhesives were added. tannin/PVAc hybrid adhesives showed better bonding than the commercial natural tannin adhesive with a higher level of wood penetration. The initial adhesion strength was sufficient to be maintained within the optimum initial tack range. The standard formaldehyde emission test (desiccator method), field and laboratory emission cell (FLEC) and VOC analyzer were used to determine the formaldehyde and VOC emissions from engineered flooring bonded with commercial the natural tannin adhesive and tannin/PVAc hybrid adhesives. By desiccator method and FLEC, the formaldehyde emission level of each adhesive showed the similar tendency. All adhesives satisfied the E(1) grade (below 1.5 mg/L) and E(0) grade (below 0.5 mg/L) with UV coating. VOC emission results by FLEC and VOC analyzer were different with the formaldehyde emission results. TVOC emission was slightly increased as adding PVAc. PMID:18710801

  20. Effect of saliva contamination on the microshear bond strength of one-step self-etching adhesive systems to dentin.

    Yoo, H M; Oh, T S; Pereira, P N R

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of saliva contamination and decontamination methods on the dentin bond strength of one-step self-etching adhesive systems. Three commercially available "all-in-one" adhesives (One Up Bond F, Xeno III and Adper Prompt) and one resin composite (Filtek Z-250) were used. Third molars stored in distilled water with 0.5% thymol at 4 degrees C were ground with #600 SiC paper under running water to produce a standardized smear layer. The specimens were randomly divided into groups according to contamination methods: no contamination, which was the control (C); contamination of the adhesive surface with fresh saliva before light curing (A) and contamination of the adhesive surface with fresh saliva after light curing (B). Each contamination group was further subdivided into three subgroups according to the decontamination method: A1-Saliva was removed by a gentle air blast and the adhesive was light-cured; A2-Saliva was rinsed for 10 seconds, gently air-dried and the was adhesive light-cured; A3-Saliva was rinsed and dried as in A2, then the adhesive was re-applied to the dentin surface and light-cured; B1-Saliva was removed with a gentle air blast; B2-Saliva was rinsed and dried; B3-Saliva was rinsed, dried and the adhesive was re-applied and light cured. Tygon tubes filled with resin composite were placed on each surface and light cured. All specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. Microshear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine (EZ test), and data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA followed by the Duncan test to make comparisons among the groups (p0.05). Bond strengths of all B groups were significantly lower compared to the controls (p0.05). PMID:16536204

  1. Shear Bond Strength of Saliva Contaminated and Re-etched All-in-One Adhesive to Enamel

    M. Khoroushi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of phosphoric acid re-etching of an enamel surface treated via a one-bottle adhesive system on shear bond strength between resin composite and the enamelsurface in different stages of adhesive application.Materials and Methods: Extracted intact premolars (n=84 were divided into sevengroups (n=12. In the control group 1, the adhesive i-Bond was used according to the manufacturer's instructions, with nocontamination. In groups 2 to 4, the conditioned and saliva, contaminated enamel was blot dried only, rinsed,and blot dried, rinsed blot dried and re-etched, respectively. In groups 5, 6and 7 cured adhesive was contaminated with saliva and then rinsed and blot-dried, blot dried only and rinsed, blot-dried and re-etched respectively. In groups 3, 4, 6 and 7 the adhesive was reapplied. Afterward, Z100 compos-ite cylinders were bonded to the enamel surfaces. The samples were thermocycled (5°C and 55°C, 30 s, dwelling time: 10 s, 500 cycles. Finally, the samples were sheared using Dartec testing machine and shear bond strength data were subjected to one-way ANOVA analysis and Tukey's HSD test.Results: There were statistically significant differences among groups 1 and 5-7. The samples in groups 1 and 4 demonstrated higher bond strengths than those in the other groups.Conclusion: Using phosphoric acid etching may be effective, only where contamination occurs prior to curing of the adhesive. After curing of the adhesive, none of the methods in this study would be preferred.

  2. In-vitro evaluation of an experimental method for bonding of orthodontic brackets with self-adhesive resin cements

    Barat Ali Ramazanzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-adhesive resin cements do not require the surface treatment of teeth and are said to release fluoride, which makes them suitable candidates for bonding of orthodontic brackets. The objectives of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS of self-adhesive resin cements on etched on non-etched surfaces in vitro and to assess their fluoride release features. Materials and Methods: Four fluoride-releasing dual-cure self-adhesive resin cements were investigated. For SBS experiment, 135 freshly extracted human maxillary premolars were used and divided into nine groups of 15 teeth. In the control group, brackets were cemented by Transbond XT (3M Unitek, USA, in four groups self-adhesive resin cements were used without acid-etching and in four groups self-adhesive cements were applied on acid-etched surfaces and the brackets were then deboned in shear with a testing machine. Adhesive remnant index (ARI scores were also calculated. For fluoride release investigation, 6 discs were prepared for each self-adhesive cement. Transbond XT and Fuji Ortho LC (GC, Japan served as negative and positive control groups, respectively. The fluoride release of each disc into 5 ml of de-ionized water was measured at days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 28, and 56 using a fluoride ion-selective electrode connected to an ion analyzer. To prevent cumulative measurements, the storage solutions were changed daily. Results: The SBS of brackets cemented with Transbond XT were significantly higher compared to self-adhesives applied on non-etched surfaces (P<0.001. However, when the self-adhesive resin cements were used with enamel etching, no significant differences was found in the SBS compared to Transbond XT, except for Breeze. The comparisons of the ARI scores indicated that bracket failure modes were significantly different between the etched and non-etched groups. All self-adhesive cements released clinically sufficient amounts of fluoride for an extended

  3. Influence of 10-MDP Adhesive System on Shear Bond Strength of Zirconia-Composite Interfaces

    Philipp Cornelius Pott

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This in-vitro study investigated the initial 24h bond strength between different composites and zirconia after application of four different adhesive systems. Methods: A total of 120 specimens of zirconia (InCoris, Sirona, Germany, Bernsheim were ground with a 165 µm grit rotating diamond disc. Thirty specimens were each additionally treated with Cimara Zircon “CZ” (VOCO GmbH, Germany, Cuxhaven, Futurabond U “FBU” (VOCO GmbH, Futurabond M+ “FBM” (VOCO GmbH or Futurabond M+ in combination with the DCA activator “FBMD” (VOCO GmbH. One of three different types of composites – BifixSE (“BS”, BifixQM (“BQ” or GrandioSO (“G” (VOCO GmbH – was bonded to ten specimens each in every group. Shear bond strength (SBS was determined in a universal testing machine. Statistical analysis was performed with ANOVA and the Tukey test. Results: FBM and FBMD gave higher SBS than CZ and FBU in combination with all tested composites. In comparison to FBU, FBM gave statistically significant increases in SBS with BifixSE (19.4±5.7 MPa (P

  4. Influence of oxygen inhibition on the surface free-energy and dentin bond strength of self-etch adhesives.

    Koga, Kensaku; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Ishii, Ryo; Iino, Masayoshi; Kotaku, Mayumi; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Tsubota, Keishi; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2011-10-01

    We compared the surface free-energies and dentin bond strengths of single-step self-etch adhesives with and without an oxygen-inhibited layer. The labial dentin surfaces of bovine mandibular incisors were wet ground with #600-grit silicon carbide paper. The adhesives were applied to the ground dentin, light-irradiated, and the oxygen-inhibited layer was either retained or removed with ethanol. The surface free-energies were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids placed on the cured adhesives. The dentin bond strengths of specimens with and without the oxygen-inhibited layer were measured. For all surfaces, the value of the estimated surface tension component was relatively constant at 35.5-39.8 mJ m(-2) . The value of the , Lewis acid component increased slightly when the oxygen-inhibited layer was removed, whereas that of the , Lewis base component decreased significantly. The bond strengths of the self-etch adhesives were significantly lower in specimens without an oxygen-inhibited layer (13.2-13.6 MPa) than in those with an oxygen-inhibited layer (17.5-18.4 MPa). These results indicate that the presence of an oxygen-inhibited layer in single-step self-etch adhesives with advanced photoinitiators promotes higher dentin bond strength. PMID:21896057

  5. Comparative study of the bond strength of self-etch adhesive systems with different pHs applied to enamel and dentine

    Rubens Côrte Real de Carvalho

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate whether the pH of the primer is capable of influencing the bond strength of three self-etching adhesive systems to enamel and dentin. Methods: Forty enamel surfaces and 40 dentin surfaces were used, divided into eight groups (n=10 according to the adhesive system (Single Bond, ClearfilSE, AdheSE, Adper Prompt L-Pop. A 3 mm matrix was used to delimit the area restored with composite resin Z250. The test specimens were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 24 hours and submitted to mechanical shear testing.Results: The ANOVA and Tukey statistical tests showed that there was no statistical difference among the groups in which the adhesivesystems Single Bond (control and Clearfil SE Bond were used and among the groups in which the AdheSE and Adper Prompt L-Pop systemswere used, both with statistical difference when compared with the Single Bond and Clearfil SE Bond groups. There was no statisticallysignificant difference between the bond strength values obtained, when the same adhesive systems were compared with regard to thesubstrates (enamel and dentin. The increased acidity of the self-etch adhesive systems was not capable of increasing the bond strengthvalues. Conclusion: The increasing of self-etch acidity of adhesive systems was not capable to increase the band strenght values. In the comparison between the same adhesive system in enamel or dentin, all adhesive presented similar performance, irrespective of the substrate used.

  6. The Influence of No-Primer Adhesives and Anchor Pylons Bracket Bases on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets

    Andrea Scribante

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS and adhesive remnant index (ARI scores of no-primer adhesives tested with two different bracket bases. Materials and Methods. 120 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were divided into 6 groups of 20 specimens. Two brackets (ODP with different bracket bases (anchor pylons and 80-gauge mesh were bonded to the teeth using a conventional adhesive (Transbond XT and two different no-primer adhesive (Ortho Cem; Heliosit systems. Groups were tested using an instron universal testing machine. SBS values were recorded. ARI scores were measured. SEM microphotographs were taken to evaluate the pattern of bracket bases. Statistical analysis was performed. ANOVA and Tukey tests were carried out for SBS values, whereas a chi-squared test was applied for ARI scores. Results. Highest bond strength values were reported with Transbond XT (with both pad designs, Ortho Cem bonded on anchor pylons and Heliosit on 80-gauge mesh. A higher frequency of ARI score of “3” was reported for Transbond XT groups. Other groups showed a higher frequency of ARI score “2” and “1.” Conclusion. Transbond XT showed the highest shear bond strength values with both pad designs.

  7. Effect of desensitizing agents on the microtensile bond strength of two-step etch-and-rinse adhesives to dentin.

    Cortiano, Fernanda M; Rached, Rodrigo N; Mazur, Rui F; Vieira, Sergio; Freire, Andrea; de Souza, Evelise M

    2016-06-01

    Desensitizers can be used to control postoperative sensitivity in adhesive restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of desensitizing agents on the bond strength of two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive systems to dentin. Forty-two human molars were sectioned to obtain 3-mm-thick dentin discs. The discs were divided into three groups (n = 14 in each) - no-treatment control group (CT), and oxalic acid [BisBlock (BB)] and calcium phosphate [Desensibilize Nano-P (NP)] desensitizers - before the application of two adhesive systems [Adper Single Bond Plus (SB) and One-Step Plus (OSP)]. A nanoparticle composite resin was used to create a 3-mm-thick build-up. The specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 h before a microtensile bond-strength test was performed. The failure modes were determined using a stereomicroscope at 100 × magnification. Specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the interface for scanning electron microscopy analyses. The CT-SB group exhibited the highest bond strength, differing significantly from BB-SB and BB-OSP groups. Mixed failures were prevalent for all groups. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a continuous hybrid layer and resin tags in all groups. Dentin bond strength of etch-and-rinse adhesive systems was reduced by an oxalic acid desensitizer but was not affected by a calcium phosphate-containing desensitizer. PMID:27038226

  8. Analytical model of asymmetrical Mixed-Mode Bending test of adhesively bonded GFRP joint

    M. Ševčík

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents new analytical model of asymmetric mixed-mode bending (MMB specimen of adhesively bonded pultruded GFRP joints. An easily applicable relationship for the calculation of the strain energy release rate of the asymmetric MMB specimens is proposed based on the beam theory. The model is capable to analyze stacking sequence as well as various crack propagation paths. In the paper the effect of the various fiber bridging length and different crack propagation paths is analyzed analytically and supported by experimental results. The methodology and results presented in this paper could be utilized for the design of both joint geometry and lay-up of the laminates constituting the joint or for the prediction of the fracture behavior of such structures.

  9. Thermographic testing of adhesive bonded joints in car body construction; Thermografische Pruefung von Fuegeverbindungen im Karosseriebau

    Siemer, Ulrike [Volkswagen AG, Wolfsburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    In the automotive industry, non-destructive testing (NDT) has a great capability to improve the part quality and to make production processes more efficient. Non-destructive testing techniques that are suitable for the inline quality control of conventional joining techniques (e.g. spot or laser welding) in body-in-white structures are presented. The ultrasound excited thermography has proved its general feasibility for the evaluation of adhesive bonded joints. This application is currently under investigation at Volkswagen. Current results of ongoing tests with scopes and constraints of the technique are shown. Furthermore, an outlook to new applications developed for future body structure concepts will be given. Challenges for testing new materials and joining technologies will be discussed. Another important aspect of this paper is the need to qualify non-destructive testing procedures for the implementation in automotive production processes. An approach how to prove their feasibility is presented. (orig.)

  10. Effect of Bioactive Glass air Abrasion on Shear Bond Strength of Two Adhesive Resins to Decalcified Enamel.

    Alireza Eshghi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive glass air abrasion is a conservative technique to remove initial decalcified tissue and caries. This study examined the shear bond strength of composite resin to sound and decalcified enamel air-abraded by bioactive glass (BAG or alumina using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives.Forty-eight permanent molars were root-amputated and sectioned mesiodistally. The obtained 96 specimens were mounted in acrylic resin; the buccal and lingual surfaces remained exposed. A demineralizing solution was used to decalcify half the specimens. Both sound and decalcified specimens were divided into two groups of alumina and bioactive glass air abrasion. In each group, the specimens were subdivided into two subgroups of Clearfil SE Bond or OptiBond FL adhesives (n=12. Composite resin cylinders were bonded on enamel surfaces cured and underwent thermocycling. The specimens were tested for shear bond strength. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 and three-way ANOVA (α=0.05. Similar to the experimental groups, the enamel surface of one specimen underwent SEM evaluation.No significant differences were observed in composite resin bond strength subsequent to alumina or bioactive glass air abrasion preparation techniques (P=0.987. There were no statistically significant differences between the bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive groups (P=1. Also, decalcified or intact enamel groups had no significant difference (P=0.918. However, SEM analysis showed much less enamel irregularities with BAG air abrasion compared to alumina air abrasion.Under the limitations of this study, preparation of both intact and decalcified enamel surfaces with bioactive glass air abrasion results in similar bond strength of composite resin in comparison with alumina air abrasion using etch-&-rinse or self-etch adhesives.