WorldWideScience

Sample records for adhesive sliding wear-friction

  1. Sliding Adhesion Dynamics of Isolated Gecko Setal Arrays

    Sponberg, Simon; Autumn, Kellar

    2003-03-01

    The tokay gecko (Gekko gecko) can adhere to nearly any surface through van der Waals interactions of the specialized setae (b-keratin "hairs") of its toe pads. Our recent research has suggested that a gecko is substantially overbuilt for static adhesion requiring as little as 0.03of its theoretical adhesive capacity. We performed the first sliding adhesion experiments on this novel biological adhesive to determine its response to dynamic loading. We isolated arrays of setae and constructed a precision controlled Robo-toe to study sliding effects. Our results indicate that, unlike many typical adhesives, gecko setal arrays exhibit an increased frictional force upon sliding (mk > ms) which further increases with velocity, suggesting that perturbation rejection may be an evolutionary design principle underlying the evolution of the gecko adhesive. We compare these dynamic properties with those of other adhesives and explore the impacts of these results on the design of artificial adhesives.

  2. Wear, friction, and temperature characteristics of an aircraft tire undergoing braking and cornering

    Mccarty, J. L.; Yager, T. J.; Riccitiello, S. R.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation to evaluate the wear, friction, and temperature characteristics of aircraft tire treads fabricated from different elastomers is presented. The braking and cornering tests performed on aircraft tires retreaded with currently employed and experimental elastomers are described. The tread wear rate is discussed in relation to the slip ratio during braking and yaw angle during cornering. The extent of wear in either operational mode is examined in relation to the runway surface.

  3. Alcohol-based quorum sensing plays a role in adhesion and sliding motility of the yeast Debaryomyces hansenii

    Gori, Klaus; Knudsen, Peter Boldsen; Nielsen, Kristian Fog;

    2011-01-01

    varied with growth conditions such as the availability of aromatic amino acids, ammonium sulphate, NaCl, pH and temperature. Tryptophol was only produced in the presence of tryptophane, whereas farnesol in general was not detectable. Especially, the type strain of D. hansenii (CBS767) had good adhesion...... and sliding motility abilities, which seemed to be related to a higher hydrophobicity of the cell surface of D. hansenii (CBS767) rather than the ability to form pseudomycelium. Addition of phenylethanol, tyrosol, tryptophol and farnesol was found to influence both adhesion and sliding motility of D...

  4. Biomechanics of shear-sensitive adhesion in climbing animals: peeling, pre-tension and sliding-induced changes in interface strength.

    Labonte, David; Federle, Walter

    2016-09-01

    Many arthropods and small vertebrates use adhesive pads for climbing. These biological adhesives have to meet conflicting demands: attachment must be strong and reliable, yet detachment should be fast and effortless. Climbing animals can rapidly and reversibly control their pads' adhesive strength by shear forces, but the mechanisms underlying this coupling have remained unclear. Here, we show that adhesive forces of stick insect pads closely followed the predictions from tape peeling models when shear forces were small, but strongly exceeded them when shear forces were large, resulting in an approximately linear increase of adhesion with friction. Adhesion sharply increased at peel angles less than ca 30°, allowing a rapid switch between attachment and detachment. The departure from classic peeling theory coincided with the appearance of pad sliding, which dramatically increased the peel force via a combination of two mechanisms. First, partial sliding pre-stretched the pads, so that they were effectively stiffer upon detachment and peeled increasingly like inextensible tape. Second, pad sliding reduces the thickness of the fluid layer in the contact zone, thereby increasing the stress levels required for peeling. In combination, these effects can explain the coupling between adhesion and friction that is fundamental to adhesion control across all climbing animals. Our results highlight that control of adhesion is not solely achieved by direction-dependence and morphological anisotropy, suggesting promising new routes for the development of controllable bio-inspired adhesives. PMID:27605165

  5. Atomic Scale Interface Manipulation, Structural Engineering, and Their Impact on Ultrathin Carbon Films in Controlling Wear, Friction, and Corrosion.

    Dwivedi, Neeraj; Yeo, Reuben J; Yak, Leonard J K; Satyanarayana, Nalam; Dhand, Chetna; Bhat, Thirumaleshwara N; Zhang, Zheng; Tripathy, Sudhiranjan; Bhatia, Charanjit S

    2016-07-13

    Reducing friction, wear, and corrosion of diverse materials/devices using systems. Here, we present a novel approach based on atomic scale interface manipulation to engineer and control the friction, wear, corrosion, and structural characteristics of 0.7-1.7 nm carbon-based films on CoCrPt:oxide-based magnetic media. We demonstrate that when an atomically thin (∼0.5 nm) chromium nitride (CrNx) layer is sandwiched between the magnetic media and an ultrathin carbon overlayer (1.2 nm), it modifies the film-substrate interface, creates various types of interfacial bonding, increases the interfacial adhesion, and tunes the structure of carbon in terms of its sp(3) bonding. These contribute to its remarkable functional properties, such as stable and lowest coefficient of friction (∼0.15-0.2), highest wear resistance and better corrosion resistance despite being only ∼1.7 nm thick, surpassing those of ∼2.7 nm thick current commercial carbon overcoat (COC) and other overcoats in this work. While this approach has direct implications for advancing current magnetic storage technology with its ultralow thickness, it can also be applied to advance the protective and barrier capabilities of other ultrathin materials for associated technologies. PMID:27267790

  6. Slide Rule For Calculating Curing Schedules

    Heater, Don

    1995-01-01

    Special-purpose slide rule devised for calculating schedules for storing and curing adhesives, sealants, and other materials characterized by known curing times and shelf lives. Prevents mistakes commonly made in determining storage and curing schedules.

  7. Sliding wear behavior of carbide coatings

    The wear rates of sliding surfaces under starved lubrication conditions are frequently controlled by the onset of scuffing or adhesive transfer resulting in scratching or galling damage mechanisms. Thermally sprayed coatings containing a high volume fraction of hard phases, such as carbides, generally exhibit good abrasion resistance. However, during sliding contact with ferrous materials, the onset of adhesive transfer can occur at relatively low combinations of temperature, sliding speed and contact pressure. Improvements may be obtained when appropriate additions of solid lubricating phases are distributed within the coating. These additions are usually accompanied by an increase in the coating porosity which may itself alter the sliding wear behavior by modifying the distribution of lubricating oil. This paper describes an investigation of the influence of coating porosity on the sliding wear behavior of two conventional carbide coatings

  8. Abdominal Adhesions

    ... adhesions? Abdominal adhesions can cause intestinal obstruction and female infertility—the inability to become pregnant after a year of trying. Abdominal adhesions can lead to female infertility by preventing fertilized eggs from reaching the uterus, ...

  9. 3-AMINOPROPYLTRIETHOXYSILANE TREATED SLIDES

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Author: University of Nottingham Medical School Division of Histopathy ### METHOD: 1. Wash glass slides in detergent for 30 minutes. - Wash glass slides in running tap water for 30 minutes. - Wash glass slides in distilled water 2x5 minutes. - Wash glass slides in 95% alcohol 2x5 minutes. - Air dry for 10 minutes. - Immerse slides in a freshly prepared 2% solution for 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane in dry acetone for 5 seconds. - Wash briefly in distilled water twi...

  10. Tribological Behaviour of W-DLC against an Aluminium Alloy Subjected to Lubricated Sliding

    S. Bhowmick; A. Banerji; A.T. Alpas

    2015-01-01

    Diamond like carbon (DLC) coatings mitigate aluminium adhesion and reduce friction under the ambient conditions but their tribological behaviour under lubricated sliding need to be further investigated. In this study, tribological tests were performed to evaluate the friction and wear characteristics of W-DLC and H-DLC coatings sliding against an aluminium alloy (319 Al) under unlubricated (40 % RH) and lubricated sliding conditions. For unlubricated sliding, coefficient of friction (COF) val...

  11. Adhesive Categories

    Lack, Stephen; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2003-01-01

    We introduce adhesive categories, which are categories with structure ensuring that pushouts along monomorphisms are well-behaved. Many types of graphical structures used in computer science are shown to be examples of adhesive categories. Double-pushout graph rewriting generalises well to...... rewriting on arbitrary adhesive categories....

  12. Adhesive Categories

    Lack, Stephen; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2004-01-01

    We introduce adhesive categories, which are categories with structure ensuring that pushouts along monomorphisms are well-behaved. Many types of graphical structures used in computer science are shown to be examples of adhesive categories. Double-pushout graph rewriting generalises well to...... rewriting on arbitrary adhesive categories....

  13. Resistance to Sliding on Atomic Scales

    Dominik, C.; Tielens, A.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The structure and stability of agglomerates of micron-sized particles is determined by the mechanical properties of the individual contacts between the constituent particles. In this paper we study the possibility of aggregate rearrangements by sliding. Since the contacts between (sub)micron particles are only a few hundred atoms in diameter, processes on atomic levels will play the dominating roll. We study a theoretical model of sliding friction for surfaces that are either flat or contain steps in their grids. The results show that sliding over flat surfaces may produce a large range of friction coefficients, including zero if the adhesive forces are small compared to the binding forces inside a body. However, both grid alignment and steps in the surface will lead to high values for friction. These processes combined virtually eliminate the possibility of sliding in a collision of two (sub)micron sized particles at velocities low enough for sticking to occur. On the other hand we show that in collisions between aggregates sliding may be an important factor for energy dissipation and compaction.

  14. UNDERSTANDING THE SLIDE RULE.

    JOHNSON, RONALD E.; AND OTHERS

    A BOOKLET DESIGNED FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS TO BE USED INDEPENDENTLY FROM AND IN ADDITION TO THE REGULAR CLASSROOM CURRICULUM IN MATHEMATICS IS GIVEN. THE FIFTH- OR SIXTH-GRADE STUDENT IS PRESENTED WITH A DISCUSSION OF THE APPLICATIONS OF THE SLIDE RULE AND WITH A BACKGROUND REVIEW OF NECESSARY CONCEPTS. THE CONCEPTS OF THE SLIDE RULE ARE…

  15. Surgical adhesives

    I. A. THOMAZINI-SANTOS

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors have performed a literature review of surgical adhesives, such as cyanoacrylate, collagen gelatin, and fibrin glue. They have included different types of commercial and non-commercial fibrin sealants and have reported on the different components in these adhesives, such as fibrinogen, cryoprecipitate, bovine thrombin, and thrombin-like fraction of snake venom.

  16. Sliding mode control and observation

    Shtessel, Yuri; Fridman, Leonid; Levant, Arie

    2014-01-01

    The sliding mode control methodology has proven effective in dealing with complex dynamical systems affected by disturbances, uncertainties and unmodeled dynamics. Robust control technology based on this methodology has been applied to many real-world problems, especially in the areas of aerospace control, electric power systems, electromechanical systems, and robotics. Sliding Mode Control and Observation represents the first textbook that starts with classical sliding mode control techniques and progresses toward newly developed higher-order sliding mode control and observation algorithms and their applications. The present volume addresses a range of sliding mode control issues, including: *Conventional sliding mode controller and observer design *Second-order sliding mode controllers and differentiators *Frequency domain analysis of conventional and second-order sliding mode controllers *Higher-order sliding mode controllers and differentiators *Higher-order sliding mode observers *Sliding mode disturbanc...

  17. Mechanics of slide dams

    Studies which promote the use of nuclear energy for peaceful projects in engineering are sponsored by the Atomic Energy Commission under the Plowshare program. Specific projects being considered include the construction of harbors, canals, and dams. Of these projects, perhaps the most difficult to accomplish will be the latter. This paper which is in two parts considers the problems which are associated with the construction of slide dams with nuclear explosives. It examines first the characteristics of conventional earth and rock-fill dams which are based upon proven techniques developed after many years of experience. The characteristics of natural landslide dams are also briefly considered to identify potential problems that must be overcome by slide dam construction techniques. Second, the mechanics of slide dams as determined from small-scale laboratory studies are presented. It is concluded that slide dams can be constructed and that small-scale field tests and additional laboratory studies are justified. (author)

  18. Water-slide alopecia.

    Adams, B B

    2001-05-01

    A 29-year-old male presented with large, symmetric, alopecic patches on the posterolateral aspects of both calves. A detailed history revealed that the individual had recently attended a water-slide amusement park. Repeated frictional trauma between the legs and the slide resulted in these alopecic patches. Friction, especially when encountered during sports-related and recreational activities, should be included in the differential diagnosis of well-defined alopecic patches. PMID:11381856

  19. Sliding tethered ligands add topological interactions to the toolbox of ligand-receptor design

    Bauer, Martin; Kékicheff, Patrick; Iss, Jean; Fajolles, Christophe; Charitat, Thierry; Daillant, Jean; Marques, Carlos M.

    2015-09-01

    Adhesion in the biological realm is mediated by specific lock-and-key interactions between ligand-receptor pairs. These complementary moieties are ubiquitously anchored to substrates by tethers that control the interaction range and the mobility of the ligands and receptors, thus tuning the kinetics and strength of the binding events. Here we add sliding anchoring to the toolbox of ligand-receptor design by developing a family of tethered ligands for which the spacer can slide at the anchoring point. Our results show that this additional sliding degree of freedom changes the nature of the adhesive contact by extending the spatial range over which binding may sustain a significant force. By introducing sliding tethered ligands with self-regulating length, this work paves the way for the development of versatile and reusable bio-adhesive substrates with potential applications for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  20. Nucleation and growth of cadherin adhesions

    Cell-cell contact formation relies on the recruitment of cadherin molecules and their anchoring to actin. However, the precise chronology of events from initial cadherin trans-interactions to adhesion strengthening is unclear, in part due to the lack of access to the distribution of cadherins within adhesion zones. Using N-cadherin expressing cells interacting with N-cadherin coated surfaces, we characterized the formation of cadherin adhesions at the ventral cell surface. TIRF and RIC microscopies revealed streak-like accumulations of cadherin along actin fibers. FRAP analysis indicated that engaged cadherins display a slow turnover at equilibrium, compatible with a continuous addition and removal of cadherin molecules within the adhesive contact. Association of cadherin cytoplasmic tail to actin as well as actin cables and myosin II activity are required for the formation and maintenance of cadherin adhesions. Using time lapse microscopy we deciphered how cadherin adhesions form and grow. As lamellipodia protrude, cadherin foci stochastically formed a few microns away from the cell margin. Neo-formed foci coalesced aligned and coalesced with preformed foci either by rearward sliding or gap filling to form cadherin adhesions. Foci experienced collapse at the rear of cadherin adhesions. Based on these results, we present a model for the nucleation, directional growth and shrinkage of cadherin adhesions

  1. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    parameters, which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to...... tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion is...... the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental...

  2. Slowing the Summer Slide

    Smith, Lorna

    2012-01-01

    Research shows that summer slide--the loss of learning over the summer break--is a huge contributor to the achievement gap between low-income students and their higher-income peers. In fact, some researchers have concluded that two-thirds of the 9th-grade reading achievement gap can be explained by unequal access to summer learning opportunities…

  3. Sliding Wear Analysis of Ultra High Strength Steel Using Full Factorial Design Approach

    Sharma Varun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes multi-factor-based experiments that were applied to investigate the sliding wear behaviour of quenched and tempered wear resistant steel. This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of input parameters (such as applied load, sliding velocity and sliding time on wear rate. Full factorial design through design of experiments approach was used for investigation by establishing an empirical relationship between wear loss and input parameters and determining the optimal combination of testing parameters for minimum and maximum wear losses. Sliding wear tests were carried out using pin-on-disc type apparatus at room temperature under dry sliding wear conditions. Detailed investigation revealed that applied load was the most significant factor affecting the wear performance followed by sliding velocity and sliding time. The maximum weight loss due to wear was found to be 33.48 mg when experimentation was conducted at maximum levels of input variables and minimum wear loss of 3.12 mg was obtained at the minimum levels of load, sliding velocity and sliding time. The scanning electron microscopy of the worn pin surfaces shows that adhesion and plastic deformation were the dominating mechanisms involved during experimentation that resulted in maximum wear of the pins, and on the other hand no such mechanism persisted when the pins were worn under minimum sliding wear conditions.

  4. Drying induced upright sliding and reorganization of carbon nanotube arrays

    Li Qingwen [Materials Physics and Applications Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); De Paula, Raymond [Materials Physics and Applications Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Zhang Xiefei [Materials Physics and Applications Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Zheng Lianxi [Materials Physics and Applications Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Arendt, Paul N [Materials Physics and Applications Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Mueller, Fred M [Materials Physics and Applications Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Zhu, Y T [Materials Physics and Applications Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Tu Yi [CVD-First Nano, 1860 Smithtown Avenue, Ronkonkoma, NY 11779 (United States)

    2006-09-28

    Driven by capillary force, wet carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays have been found to reorganize into cellular structures upon drying. During the reorganization process, individual CNTs are firmly attached to the substrate and have to lie down on the substrate at cell bottoms, forming closed cells. Here we demonstrate that by modifying catalyst structures, the adhesion of CNTs to the substrate can be weakened. Upon drying such CNT arrays, CNTs may slide away from their original sites on the surface and self-assemble into cellular patterns with bottoms open. It is also found that the sliding distance of CNTs increases with array height, and drying millimetre tall arrays leads to the sliding of CNTs over a few hundred micrometres and the eventual self-assembly into discrete islands. By introducing regular vacancies in CNT arrays, CNTs may be manipulated into different patterns.

  5. Drying induced upright sliding and reorganization of carbon nanotube arrays

    Driven by capillary force, wet carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays have been found to reorganize into cellular structures upon drying. During the reorganization process, individual CNTs are firmly attached to the substrate and have to lie down on the substrate at cell bottoms, forming closed cells. Here we demonstrate that by modifying catalyst structures, the adhesion of CNTs to the substrate can be weakened. Upon drying such CNT arrays, CNTs may slide away from their original sites on the surface and self-assemble into cellular patterns with bottoms open. It is also found that the sliding distance of CNTs increases with array height, and drying millimetre tall arrays leads to the sliding of CNTs over a few hundred micrometres and the eventual self-assembly into discrete islands. By introducing regular vacancies in CNT arrays, CNTs may be manipulated into different patterns

  6. Tribological studies on sliding pairs of ZrO{sub 2}, POM and steel for applications as water-lubricated micro-mechanical components; Tribologische Untersuchungen an Gleitpaarungen aus ZrO{sub 2}, POM und Stahl fuer den Einsatz als wassergeschmierte mikromechanische Bauteile

    Herz, J.; Schneider, J.; Zum Gahr, K.H. [Institut fuer Werkstoffkunde II, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Micro-tribological tests were carried out on varying mated sliding pairs of TZP-ZrO{sub 2}, polyoxymethylene (POM) and steel 17-4PH in air and distilled water using a laboratory tribometer (system: flattened ball-on-disc) under unidirectional sliding. The effects of relative humidity in air or water lubrication, respectively, the surface pressure and the sliding speed were studied with the self-mated zirconia. The results show that zirconia can be a favourable material for tribologically high-loaded micro-mechanical components at water lubrication, particularly, in comparision with already used polymeric materials. Self-mated zirconia resulted also during unlubricated sliding in air in lower friction and wear than the steel/steel, POM/steel or POM/ZrO{sub 2} pairs, respectively.Keywords: precision engineering, micromechanical components, sliding wear, friction, water lubrication, zirconia, polyoxymethylene, steel 17-4 PH. (Abstract Copyright[2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] In einem Labor-Mikrotribometer wurden im System abgeplattete Kugel/Scheibe tribologische Untersuchungen unter einsinniger Gleitbeanspruchung an Selbst- und Fremdpaarungen der Werkstoffe TZP-ZrO{sub 2}, Polyacetal (POM) und Stahl 17-4PH an Luft und unter Wasserschmierung durchgefuehrt. Neben den verschiedenen Werkstoffpaarungen wurden insbesondere an der ZrO{sub 2}-Selbstpaarung der Einfluss der relativen Luftfeuchte bzw. von Wasserschmierung, der Flaechenpressung und der Gleitgeschwindigkeit untersucht. Die Ergebnisse zeigen, dass ZrO{sub 2}-Keramik im Hinblick auf die tribologischen Eigenschaften eine vorteilhafte Alternative fuer hochbeanspruchte mikromechanische Bauteile besonders unter Wasserschmierung im Vergleich zu heute vielfach eingesetzten Polymerwerkstoffen darstellt. Auch ungeschmiert an Luft wies die ZrO{sub 2}-Selbstpaarung geringere Werte der Reibung und des Verschleisses als Stahl/Stahl-, POM/Stahl- oder POM/ZrO{sub 2}-Paarungen auf.Schlagworte: Feinwerktechnik

  7. Presentation = Speech + Slides

    Derik Badman

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Back in October, Aaron Schmidt posted “HOWTO give a good presentation” to his blog walking paper. His second bullet point of “thoughts” on good presentations is: Please don’t fill your slides with words. Find some relevant and pretty pictures to support what you’re saying. You can use the pictures to remind yourself what you’re going [...

  8. Adhesion and Cohesion

    J. Anthony von Fraunhofer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomena of adhesion and cohesion are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to dentistry. This review considers the forces involved in cohesion and adhesion together with the mechanisms of adhesion and the underlying molecular processes involved in bonding of dissimilar materials. The forces involved in surface tension, surface wetting, chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, diffusive adhesion, and mechanical adhesion are reviewed in detail and examples relevant to adhesive dentistry and bonding are given. Substrate surface chemistry and its influence on adhesion, together with the properties of adhesive materials, are evaluated. The underlying mechanisms involved in adhesion failure are covered. The relevance of the adhesion zone and its importance with regard to adhesive dentistry and bonding to enamel and dentin is discussed.

  9. Saltatory formation, sliding and dissolution of ER–PM junctions in migrating cancer cells

    Dingsdale, Hayley; Okeke, Emmanuel; Awais, Muhammad; Haynes, Lee; Criddle, David N.; Sutton, Robert; Tepikin, Alexei V.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrated three novel forms of dynamic behaviour of junctions between the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) and the PM (plasma membrane) in migrating cancer cells: saltatory formation, long-distance sliding and dissolution. The individual ER–PM junctions formed near the leading edge of migrating cells (usually within 0.5 μm of polymerized actin and close to focal adhesions) and appeared suddenly without sliding from the interior of the cell. The long distance sliding and dissolution of ER–PM j...

  10. Prediction Study on Anti-Slide Control of Railway Vehicle Based on RBF Neural Networks

    Yang, Lijun; Zhang, Jimin

    While railway vehicle braking, Anti-slide control system will detect operating status of each wheel-sets e.g. speed difference and deceleration etc. Once the detected value on some wheel-set is over pre-defined threshold, brake effort on such wheel-set will be adjusted automatically to avoid blocking. Such method takes effect on guarantee safety operation of vehicle and avoid wheel-set flatness, however it cannot adapt itself to the rail adhesion variation. While wheel-sets slide, the operating status is chaotic time series with certain law, and can be predicted with the law and experiment data in certain time. The predicted values can be used as the input reference signals of vehicle anti-slide control system, to judge and control the slide status of wheel-sets. In this article, the RBF neural networks is taken to predict wheel-set slide status in multi-step with weight vector adjusted based on online self-adaptive algorithm, and the center & normalizing parameters of active function of the hidden unit of RBF neural networks' hidden layer computed with K-means clustering algorithm. With multi-step prediction simulation, the predicted signal with appropriate precision can be used by anti-slide system to trace actively and adjust wheel-set slide tendency, so as to adapt to wheel-rail adhesion variation and reduce the risk of wheel-set blocking.

  11. Tile adhesive production by Inorganic materials

    Fasil Alemayehu Hayilu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In modern construction, ceramic tile and mosaic which are used for finishing and decoration are attached to the surface by using tile adhesives. It was a long way for tiling technology to arrive at the current cement based modified adhesive. The development in additives and modifier are the paramount factor to improve workability, higher flexibility, and better adhesion. In this document tile adhesive has been produced for economical and high performance formulation. These products have been produced by considering the effect of aggregate. These two products with different size of aggregate have been compared and tested. The test made was slip, bending, and compression test. Economical formulation consists of components like cement, quartz sand, cellulose ether and tartaric acid. But high performance consists of limestone and cellulose fiber in addition to these components. The modifier added has enhanced the final product resistance to sliding, bending and compression strength. In terms of compression strength test about 17.27% high performance is stronger than economical formulation. And in addition high performance is stronger than economical formulation by about 16.89% in terms of bending strength. The other thing is the effect of grain size, the component that has low grain size have shown great strength and resistant to slide.

  12. Shearing Nanometer-Thick Confined Hydrocarbon Films: Friction and Adhesion

    Sivebæk, I. M.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2016-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics (MD) friction and adhesion calculations for nanometer-thick confined hydrocarbon films with molecular lengths 20, 100 and 1400 carbon atoms. We study the dependency of the frictional shear stress on the confining pressure and sliding speed. We present results for the...

  13. Consecutive sliding window systems

    This paper proposes a new model that generalizes the linear multi-state sliding window system to the case of m consecutive overlapping windows. In this model the system consists of n linearly ordered multi-state elements. Each element can have different states: from complete failure up to perfect functioning. A performance rate is associated with each state. The system fails if in each of at least m consecutive overlapping groups of r consecutive elements (windows) the sum of the performance rates of elements belonging to the group is lower than a minimum allowable level. An algorithm for system reliability evaluation is suggested which is based on an extended universal moment generating function. Examples of evaluating system reliability and elements' reliability importance indices are presented. - Highlights: → A new model generalizing the linear multi-state sliding window system is proposed. → An algorithm for evaluating the system reliability is developed. → Computational complexity reduction measures are suggested for the algorithm. → Experimental study is performed.

  14. Advanced adhesives in electronics

    Bailey, C

    2011-01-01

    Adhesives are widely used in the manufacture of electronic devices to act as passive and active components. Recently there has been considerable interest in the use of conductive adhesives. This book reviews key types of conductive adhesives, processing methods, properties and the way they can be modelled as well as potential applications.$bAdhesives for electronic applications serve important functional and structural purposes in electronic components and packaging, and have developed significantly over the last few decades. Advanced adhesives in electronics reviews recent developments in adhesive joining technology, processing and properties. The book opens with an introduction to adhesive joining technology for electronics. Part one goes on to cover different types of adhesive used in electronic systems, including thermally conductive adhesives, isotropic and anisotropic conductive adhesives and underfill adhesives for flip-chip applications. Part two focuses on the properties and processing of electronic ...

  15. Reversible low adhesive to high adhesive superhydrophobicity transition on ZnO nanoparticle surfaces

    Li, Jian, E-mail: jianli83@126.com; Jing, Zhijiao; Yang, Yaoxia; Zha, Fei; Yan, Long; Lei, Ziqiang, E-mail: leizq@nwnu.edu.cn

    2014-01-15

    Superhydrophobic ZnO surfaces with water contact angle of 162° and sliding angle of 2° were fabricated successfully by spraying hydrophobic ZnO nanoparticle suspensions without limitations the shape and size of substrates. The as-prepared superhydrophobic ZnO surfaces are low adhesive and a water droplet easily rolls off with the surface slightly tilted. However, after being irradiated by UV light through a photomask, it becomes highly adhesive, on which a water droplet is firmly pinned without any movement. Further annealing the irradiated film, water droplets can roll off the surface again. Reversible transition between the low adhesive rolling state and high adhesive pinning state can be realized simply by UV illumination and heat treatment alternately. At the same time, the maximum adhesive force between the superhydrophobic ZnO surfaces and the water droplet changes from extreme low (∼5.1 μN) to very high (∼136.1 μN). When irradiated without a photomask, the surface became hydrophilic. Additionally, a water droplet can be transfered from the low adhesive superhydrophobic ZnO surfaces to the hydrophilic ZnO surfaces using the high adhesive superhydrophobic ZnO surfaces as a mechanical hand.

  16. Solar-Cell Slide Rule

    Yamakawa, K. A.

    1983-01-01

    Slide rule relates efficiency, impurity types, impurity concentrations, and process types. Solar cell slide rule calculations are determination of allowable impurity concentration for nonredistributive process, determination of impurity buildup factor for redistributive process and determination of allowable impurity concentration for redistributive process.

  17. Operational Semantics for SPARQL Update (slides)

    Horne, Ross

    2011-01-01

    These are the slides presented at JIST 2011. The slides contain examples of updates. The examples are based on Chinese history local to Hangzhou, where the conference was held. The slides also feature the crocodile served at the conference banquet.

  18. Shear adhesion strength of aligned electrospun nanofibers.

    Najem, Johnny F; Wong, Shing-Chung; Ji, Guang

    2014-09-01

    Inspiration from nature such as insects' foot hairs motivates scientists to fabricate nanoscale cylindrical solids that allow tens of millions of contact points per unit area with material substrates. In this paper, we present a simple yet robust method for fabricating directionally sensitive shear adhesive laminates. By using aligned electrospun nylon-6, we create dry adhesives, as a succession of our previous work on measuring adhesion energies between two single free-standing electrospun polymer fibers in cross-cylinder geometry, randomly oriented membranes and substrate, and peel forces between aligned fibers and substrate. The synthetic aligned cylindrical solids in this study are electrically insulating and show a maximal Mode II shear adhesion strength of 27 N/cm(2) on a glass slide. This measured value, for the purpose of comparison, is 270% of that reported from gecko feet. The Mode II shear adhesion strength, based on a commonly known "dead-weight" test, is 97-fold greater than the Mode I (normal) adhesion strength of the same. The data indicate a strong shear binding on and easy normal lifting off. Anisotropic adhesion (Mode II/Mode I) is pronounced. The size and surface boundary effects, crystallinity, and bending stiffness of fibers are used to understand these electrospun nanofibers, which vastly differ from otherwise known adhesive technologies. The anisotropic strength distribution is attributed to a decreasing fiber diameter and an optimized laminate thickness, which, in turn, influences the bending stiffness and solid-state "wettability" of points of contact between nanofibers and surface asperities. PMID:25105533

  19. Adhesion in microelectronics

    Mittal, K L

    2014-01-01

    This comprehensive book will provide both fundamental and applied aspects of adhesion pertaining to microelectronics in a single and easily accessible source. Among the topics to be covered include; Various theories or mechanisms of adhesionSurface (physical or chemical) characterization of materials as it pertains to adhesionSurface cleaning as it pertains to adhesionWays to improve adhesionUnraveling of interfacial interactions using an array of pertinent techniquesCharacterization of interfaces / interphasesPolymer-polymer adhesionMetal-polymer adhesion  (metallized polymers)Polymer adhesi

  20. T-Slide Linear Actuators

    Vranish, John

    2009-01-01

    T-slide linear actuators use gear bearing differential epicyclical transmissions (GBDETs) to directly drive a linear rack, which, in turn, performs the actuation. Conventional systems use a rotary power source in conjunction with a nut and screw to provide linear motion. Non-back-drive properties of GBDETs make the new actuator more direct and simpler. Versions of this approach will serve as a long-stroke, ultra-precision, position actuator for NASA science instruments, and as a rugged, linear actuator for NASA deployment duties. The T slide can operate effectively in the presence of side forces and torques. Versions of the actuator can perform ultra-precision positioning. A basic T-slide actuator is a long-stroke, rack-and-pinion linear actuator that, typically, consists of a T-slide, several idlers, a transmission to drive the slide (powered by an electric motor) and a housing that holds the entire assembly. The actuator is driven by gear action on its top surface, and is guided and constrained by gear-bearing idlers on its other two parallel surfaces. The geometry, implemented with gear-bearing technology, is particularly effective. An electronic motor operating through a GBDET can directly drive the T slide against large loads, as a rack and pinion linear actuator, with no break and no danger of back driving. The actuator drives the slide into position and stops. The slide holes position with power off and no brake, regardless of load. With the T slide configuration, this GBDET has an entire T-gear surface on which to operate. The GB idlers coupling the other two T slide parallel surfaces to their housing counterpart surfaces provide constraints in five degrees-of-freedom and rolling friction in the direction of actuation. Multiple GB idlers provide roller bearing strength sufficient to support efficient, rolling friction movement, even in the presence of large, resisting forces. T-slide actuators can be controlled using the combination of an off

  1. Thermal Characterization of Adhesive

    Spomer, Ken A.

    1999-01-01

    The current Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle adhesive bond system is being replaced due to obsolescence. Down-selection and performance testing of the structural adhesives resulted in the selection of two candidate replacement adhesives, Resin Technology Group's Tiga 321 and 3M's EC2615XLW. This paper describes rocket motor testing of these two adhesives. Four forty-pound charge motors were fabricated in configurations that would allow side by side comparison testing of the candidate replacement adhesives and the current RSRM adhesives. The motors provided an environment where the thermal performance of adhesives in flame surface bondlines was compared. Results of the FPC testing show that: 1) The phenolic char depths on radial bond lines is approximately the same and vary depending on the position in the blast tube regardless of which adhesive was used; 2) The adhesive char depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the char depth of the current adhesives; 3) The heat-affected depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the heat-affected depth of the current adhesives; and 4) The ablation rates for both replacement adhesives are slower than that of the current adhesives.

  2. Adhesion and size dependent friction anisotropy in boron nitride nanotubes

    The frictional properties of individual multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes (BN-NTs) synthesized by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and deposited on a silicon substrate are investigated using an atomic force microscope tip sliding along (longitudinal sliding) and across (transverse sliding) the tube’s principal axis. Because of the tube’s transverse deformations during the tip sliding, a larger friction coefficient is found for the transverse sliding as compared to the longitudinal sliding. Here, we show that the friction anisotropy in BN-NTs, defined as the ratio between transverse and longitudinal friction forces per unit area, increases with the nanotube–substrate contact area, estimated to be proportional to (LNTRNT)1/2, where LNT and RNT are the length and the radius of the nanotube, respectively. Larger contact area denotes stronger surface adhesion, resulting in a longitudinal friction coefficient closer to the value expected in the absence of transverse deformations. Compared to carbon nanotubes (C-NTs), BN-NTs display a friction coefficient in each sliding direction with intermediate values between CVD and arc discharge C-NTs. CVD BN-NTs with improved tribological properties and higher oxidation temperature might be a better candidate than CVD C-NTs for applications in extreme environments. (paper)

  3. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    H. G. Silverman; F. F. Roberto

    2007-12-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.

  4. Understanding marine mussel adhesion.

    Silverman, Heather G; Roberto, Francisco F

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  5. An Airship Slide Rule

    Weaver, E R; Pickering, S F

    1924-01-01

    This report prepared for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, describes an airship slide rule developed by the Gas-Chemistry Section of the Bureau of Standards, at the request of the Bureau of Engineering of the Navy Department. It is intended primarily to give rapid solutions of a few problems of frequent occurrence in airship navigation, but it can be used to advantage in solving a great variety of problems, involving volumes, lifting powers, temperatures, pressures, altitudes and the purity of the balloon gas. The rule is graduated to read directly in the units actually used in making observations, constants and conversion factors being taken care of by the length and location of the scales. It is thought that with this rule practically any problem likely to arise in this class of work can be readily solved after the user has become familiar with the operation of the rule; and that the solution will, in most cases, be as accurate as the data warrant.

  6. SLIDE INVENTORY IN DUBRACINA RIVER BASIN

    Aleksandar Toševski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available he slide inventory in Dubračina river basin consists of 39 slides. They have been detected by field geomorphological mapping and visual analysis of 1 meter digital elevation model. The slides detected using elevation model are validated by the field checking as well. The outline of all slides is generated using digital elevation model. The total area affected by sliding is 81873 m2 which is 0,44% of researched area. The area, volume, total lenght, width of displaced mass, dip angle of slope on the slide location and dip direction of sliding have been defined for each slide. Slides areas are ranging from 150 to 12956 m2. Minimal total slide lenght from the crown to the tip is 20 m and maximal is 226 m. Angles of slope dip on slide locations are ranging from 10,1° to 28,6° focusing that 76,7% total area affected by sliding has slope dip angle on slide location up to 20°. According to weighting factor calculations lithological unit flysch (E2,3 is marked as the most significant lithological factor of the sliding. All slides are located in the flysch weathering zone where zone crop out. It has been shown that terrain tendency for excessive erosion is very limitative factor in using digital elevation model for the remote slide mapping (the paper is published in Croatian.

  7. Friction and adhesion mediated by supramolecular host-guest complexes.

    Guerra, Roberto; Benassi, Andrea; Vanossi, Andrea; Ma, Ming; Urbakh, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The adhesive and frictional response of an AFM tip connected to a substrate through supramolecular host-guest complexes is investigated by dynamic Monte Carlo simulations. Here, the variation of the pull-off force with the unloading rate recently observed in experiments is unraveled by evidencing simultaneous (progressive) breaking of the bonds at fast (slow) rates. The model reveals the origin of the observed plateaus in the retraction force as a function of the tip-surface distance, showing that they result from the tip geometrical features. In lateral sliding, the model exhibits a wide range of dynamic behaviors ranging from smooth sliding to stick-slip at different velocities, with the average friction force determined by the characteristic formation/rupture rates of the complexes. In particular, it is shown that for some molecular complexes friction can become almost constant over a wide range of velocities. Also, we show the possibility of exploiting the ageing effect through slide-hold-slide experiments, in order to infer the characteristic formation rate. Finally, our model predicts a novel "anti-ageing" effect which is characterized by a decrease of the static friction force with the hold time. Such an effect is explained in terms of enhancement of adhesion during sliding, especially observed at high driving velocities. PMID:26975343

  8. Friction and adhesion mediated by supramolecular host-guest complexes

    Guerra, Roberto; Benassi, Andrea; Vanossi, Andrea; Ma, Ming; Urbakh, Michael

    The adhesive and frictional response of an AFM tip connected to a substrate through supramolecular host-guest complexes is investigated by dynamic Monte Carlo simulations. The variation of the pull-off force with the unloading rate recently observed in experiments is here unraveled by evidencing a simultaneous (progressive) break of the bonds at fast (slow) rates. The model reveals the origin of the observed plateaus in the retraction force as a function of tip-surface distance, showing that they ensue from the tip geometrical features. In lateral sliding, the model exhibits a wide range of dynamic behaviors ranging from smooth sliding to stick-slip at different velocities, with the average friction force determined by the characteristic formation/rupture rates of the complexes. In particular, it is shown that for some molecular complexes friction can become almost constant over a wide range of velocities. Also, we show the possibility to exploit ageing effect through slide-hold-slide experiments, in order to infer the characteristic formation rate. Finally, our model predicts a novel "anti-ageing" effect which is characterized by a decrease of static friction force with the hold time. Such effect is explained in terms of enhancement of adhesion during sliding, especially observed at high driving velocities.

  9. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  10. Mapping stain distribution in pathology slides using whole slide imaging

    Fang-Cheng Yeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Whole slide imaging (WSI offers a novel approach to digitize and review pathology slides, but the voluminous data generated by this technology demand new computational methods for image analysis. Materials and Methods: In this study, we report a method that recognizes stains in WSI data and uses kernel density estimator to calculate the stain density across the digitized pathology slides. The validation study was conducted using a rat model of acute cardiac allograft rejection and another rat model of heart ischemia/reperfusion injury. Immunohistochemistry (IHC was conducted to label ED1 + macrophages in the tissue sections and the stained slides were digitized by a whole slide scanner. The whole slide images were tessellated to enable parallel processing. Pixel-wise stain classification was conducted to classify the IHC stains from those of the background and the density distribution of the identified IHC stains was then calculated by the kernel density estimator. Results: The regression analysis showed a correlation coefficient of 0.8961 between the number of IHC stains counted by our stain recognition algorithm and that by the manual counting, suggesting that our stain recognition algorithm was in good agreement with the manual counting. The density distribution of the IHC stains showed a consistent pattern with those of the cellular magnetic resonance (MR images that detected macrophages labeled by ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron-oxide or micron-sized iron-oxide particles. Conclusions: Our method provides a new imaging modality to facilitate clinical diagnosis. It also provides a way to validate/correlate cellular MRI data used for tracking immune-cell infiltration in cardiac transplant rejection and cardiac ischemic injury.

  11. Particle adhesion and removal

    Mittal, K L

    2015-01-01

    The book provides a comprehensive and easily accessible reference source covering all important aspects of particle adhesion and removal.  The core objective is to cover both fundamental and applied aspects of particle adhesion and removal with emphasis on recent developments.  Among the topics to be covered include: 1. Fundamentals of surface forces in particle adhesion and removal.2. Mechanisms of particle adhesion and removal.3. Experimental methods (e.g. AFM, SFA,SFM,IFM, etc.) to understand  particle-particle and particle-substrate interactions.4. Mechanics of adhesion of micro- and  n

  12. Slides and sliding in the water reservoirs banks

    Spanilá, Tamara; Horský, O.; Banach, M.

    Lisse : A.A.Balkema, 2002 - (Rybář, J.; Stemberk, J.; Novosad, S.), s. 315-319 ISBN 90-5809-393-x. [Evropská konference o sesuvech /1./. Praha (CZ), 24.06.2002-26.06.2002] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3046908 Keywords : abrasion * slides influence of water levels * weathering Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  13. In vitro inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa adhesion by Xylitol

    Letícia Pinheiro de Sousa; Annelisa Farah da Silva; Natalia Oliveira Calil; Murilo Gomes Oliveira; Silvio Silvério da Silva; Nádia Rezende Barbosa Raposo

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated, in vitro, the antimicrobial activity and the anti-adherent property of xylitol (0.5, 2.5 and 5.0%, w/v) on two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains (ATCC 9027 and clinical). The assay of antimicrobial activity was performed to determine a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the adhesion test was performed, by which the parameters regarding, growth in the culture medium, number of colony forming units (CFUs) released and slide evaluation by scanning electron microscopy (...

  14. Comprehensive Smokefree Indoor Air PDF Slides

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Download the comprehensive smokefree indoor air slides. These slides are available in PDF and PowerPoint formats. The PowerPoint version can be found at:...

  15. Sliding Window Orthonormal PAST Algorithm

    Badeau, Roland; Abed-Meraim, Karim; Richard, Gaël; David, Bertrand

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces an orthonormal version of the sliding-window Projection Approximation Subspace Tracker (PAST). The new algorithm guarantees the orthonormality of the signal subspace basis at each iteration. Moreover, it has the same complexity as the original PAST algorithm, and like the more computationally demanding natural power (NP) method, it satisfies a global convergence property, and reaches an excellent tracking performance.

  16. Heavy duty complete extension slides

    Bueno, José Ignacio; Vázquez, Javier

    2001-09-01

    The selection from available commercial market of a set of slides to be used in an habitable pressurised module in space, to draw a 660 mm box out of a rack, up to a completely extracted position in a safely supported configuration, seems in principle not to be a complicated task. That was the first approach taken in the design process of the telescopic guides of the Crew Work Bench (CWB) included in the Fluid Science Laboratory (FSL), part of "ESA Microgravity Facilities for Columbus" within the Columbus Orbital Facility (COF) of the International Space Station (ISS). Nevertheless, common space compatible requirements such as materials, specific environmental loads, available envelope, total weight, etc., can make the selection of telescopic slides from commercial market unfeasible. A specific development to design space compatible telescopic slides for the CWB was undertaken. A set of heavy duty space compatible telescopic slides were designed, manufactured and tested. They should be operative in both, 1-g environment and in orbit, and additionally should withstand an inadvertent astronaut kick or bump of 556 N in any direction.

  17. Radiation-curable adhesives

    Radiation-curable adhesives may be classified into two broad categories. In the first category, adhesive bonding occurs as a direct result of irradiation. The second category includes pressure-sensitive and hot-melt adhesives, which are composed of linear or lightly cross-linked polymers prepared by a radiation-induced polymerization reaction. This chapter is mainly concerned with radiation-curable adhesives of the first category. The various adhesive types are discussed and adhesive performance is examined, particularly in relation to the chemistry and chemical technology which underlies the individual materials. A description of a limited number of representative applications is included as is an outline of recent developments of curing and dispensing equipment. 268 refs., 14 figs., 13 tabs

  18. Tribological Behaviour of W-DLC against an Aluminium Alloy Subjected to Lubricated Sliding

    S. Bhowmick

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Diamond like carbon (DLC coatings mitigate aluminium adhesion and reduce friction under the ambient conditions but their tribological behaviour under lubricated sliding need to be further investigated. In this study, tribological tests were performed to evaluate the friction and wear characteristics of W-DLC and H-DLC coatings sliding against an aluminium alloy (319 Al under unlubricated (40 % RH and lubricated sliding conditions. For unlubricated sliding, coefficient of friction (COF values of H-DLC and W-DLC were 0.15 and 0.20. A lower COF value of 0.11 was observed when W-DLC was tested using lubricant oil incorporating sulphur while the H-DLC’s COF remained almost unchanged. The mechanisms responsible for the low friction of W-DLC observed during lubricated sliding were revealed by studying the compositions of the coating surfaces and the transfer layers formed on 319 Al. Micro-Raman spectroscopy indicated that the transfer layers formed during lubricated sliding of W-DLC incorporated tungsten disulphide (WS2.

  19. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach that....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will...

  20. Penetration of urea-formaldehyde adhesives in wood tissue, part I: Radial penetration of UF adhesives into beech

    Gavrilović-Grmuša Ivana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Adhesive penetration plays an important role in wood adhesion, since wood is a porous material. The degree of penetration mostly depends on the wood factors, resin type and formulation and processing parameters. Tangentially cut 5 mm thick beech wood (Fagus moesiaca plies, 100 mm long (parallel to grain and 30 mm wide, were prepared for this study. The urea-formaldehyde (UF adhesive was applied to the surface of one ply. Two plies were assembled into sample so that the grains of two plies were parallel. Samples were pressed in a hydraulic press at 120°C and 0,7 MPa for 15 min. Microtome test-specimens were cut of each sample. 20 μm thick microtomes were cut by sliding microtome apparatus, exposing a bondline with a cross-sectional surface. The lack of more exhausting research on the penetration of urea-formaldehyde adhesives in wood is evident. Since ureaformaldehyde (UF glue resins were the most important type of adhesives in the wood industry in the last 60 years (Dunky, 2000, the objective of this research was microscopic detection of UF adhesive penetration in wood tissue. Four types of UF resins with different levels of polycondensation were used in this research. Safranin was added in resins, since epi-fluorescence microscope was used in this research for measuring the adhesive penetration.

  1. Diseases of Landscape Ornamentals. Slide Script.

    Powell, Charles C.; Sydnor, T. Davis

    This slide script, part of a series of slide scripts designed for use in vocational agriculture classes, deals with recognizing and controlling diseases found on ornamental landscape plants. Included in the script are narrations for use with a total of 80 slides illustrating various foliar diseases (anthracnose, black spot, hawthorn leaf blight,…

  2. Study on distribution rule of sliding pushing force and remnant resistant sliding force acting on anti-sliding pile

    Qingyang YU; Lei NIE

    2006-01-01

    Anti-slide pile is one of the important methods to administer landslide geological disaster because of its advantages. It plays important role in administering landslide. It is a premise of reasonable economy and technological advance to know the distribution rule and feature of the force between anti-sliding pile and surrounding rock. To determine the sliding force and remnant resistant sliding force, according to need of study, this paper sets up the geological model and mechanics model in term of a typical landslide, and analyzes the effect rule of sliding body distortion, strength and gravity to the pushing force and remnant resistant sliding force by use of the numerical model. The distribution rule of pushing force and remnant resistant sliding force of the type of landslide is given.

  3. Automated single-slide staining device

    Wilkins, J. R.; Mills, S. M. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A simple apparatus and method is disclosed for making individual single Gram stains on bacteria inoculated slides to assist in classifying bacteria in the laboratory as Gram-positive or Gram-negative. The apparatus involves positioning a single inoculated slide in a stationary position and thereafter automatically and sequentially flooding the slide with increments of a primary stain, a mordant, a decolorizer, a counterstain and a wash solution in a sequential manner without the individual lab technician touching the slide and with minimum danger of contamination thereof from other slides.

  4. EXPERIMENTALLY-STATISTICAL MODEL OF CLADDING LAYER FORMATION PROCESS ON SLIDE-WAYS

    N. N. Maksimchenko

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The developed experimentally-statistical model of the cladding composite layer formation process on slide-ways allows to operate technological modes of cladding by flexible instrument (CFI in order to obtain the set properties of a coating (thickness, continuity, adhesion strength.The established optimum technological modes of CFI process providing formation of continuous, strongly adhered to a basis composite coatings of the required thickness have been used for applying coatings on working surfaces of slide-ways of metal-cutting machine tool beds that has allowed to lower friction factor in coupling on the average by 1.3–1.7-fold and to improve uniformity of slow moving of machine tool units by 1.74-fold in comparison with slide-ways without a coating. 

  5. Wear mechanism of Mo−W doped carbon-based coating during boundary lubricated sliding

    Mandal, Paranjayee; Ehiasarian, Arutiun; Hovsepian, Papken

    2015-01-01

    The high temperature tribological applications of state-of-the-art diamond-like-carbon (DLC) coatings in automotive industry are often compromised due to their poor adhesion strength and low thermal stability. A molybdenum and tungsten doped carbon-based coating (Mo−W−C) is developed in order to overcome these limitations and to enhance tribological performance during boundary lubricated sliding at ambient and elevated temperature. The coating was deposited utilising HIPIMS technology. Mo−W−C...

  6. Bacterial adhesion to glass and metal-oxide surfaces.

    Li, Baikun; Logan, Bruce E

    2004-07-15

    Metal oxides can increase the adhesion of negatively-charged bacteria to surfaces primarily due to their positive charge. However, the hydrophobicity of a metal-oxide surface can also increase adhesion of bacteria. In order to understand the relative contribution of charge and hydrophobicity to bacterial adhesion, we measured the adhesion of 8 strains of bacteria, under conditions of low and high-ionic strength (1 and 100 mM, respectively) to 11 different surfaces and examined adhesion as a function of charge, hydrophobicity (water contact angle) and surface energy. Inorganic surfaces included three uncoated glass surfaces and eight metal-oxide thin films prepared on the upper (non-tin-exposed) side of float glass by chemical vapor deposition. The Gram-negative bacteria differed in lengths of lipopolysaccharides on their outer surface (three Escherichia coli strains), the amounts of exopolysaccharides (two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains), and their known relative adhesion to sand grains (two Burkholderia cepacia strains). One Gram positive bacterium was also used that had a lower adhesion to glass than these other bacteria (Bacillus subtilis). For all eight bacteria, there was a consistent increase in adhesion between with the type of inorganic surface in the order: float glass exposed to tin (coded here as Si-Sn), glass microscope slide (Si-m), uncoated air-side float glass surface (Si-a), followed by thin films of (Co(1-y-z)Fe(y)Cr(z))3O4, Ti/Fe/O, TiO2, SnO2, SnO2:F, SnO2:Sb, A1(2)O3, and Fe2O3 (the colon indicates metal doping, a slash indicates that the metal is a major component, while the dash is used to distinguish surfaces). Increasing the ionic strength from 1 to 100 mM increased adhesion by a factor of 2.0 +/- 0.6 (73% of the sample results were within the 95% CI) showing electrostatic charge was important in adhesion. However, adhesion was not significantly correlated with bacterial charge and contact angle. Adhesion (A) of the eight strains was

  7. Sliding wear of cemented carbides

    Cemented carbides are known to be very hard and wear resistant and are therefor often used in applications involving surface damage and wear. The wear rate of cemented carbides is often measured in abrasion. In such tests it has been shown that the wear rate is inversely dependent on the material hardness. The sliding wear is even more of a surface phenomenon than a abrasion, making it difficult to predict friction and wear from bulk properties. This paper concentrates on the sliding wear of cemented carbides and elucidates some wear mechanisms. It is especially shown that a fragmenting wear mechanism of WC is very important for the description of wear of cemented carbides. (author)

  8. Tissue adhesives in otorhinolaryngology

    Schneider, Gerlind

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of medical tissue adhesives has a long history without finding an all-purpose tissue adhesive for clinical daily routine. This is caused by the specific demands which are made on a tissue adhesive, and the different areas of application. In otorhinolaryngology, on the one hand, this is the mucosal environment as well as the application on bones, cartilage and periphery nerves. On the other hand, there are stressed regions (skin, oral cavity, pharynx, oesophagus, trachea and unstressed regions (middle ear, nose and paranasal sinuses, cranial bones. But due to the facts that adhesives can have considerable advantages in assuring surgery results, prevention of complications and so reduction of medical costs/treatment expenses, the search for new adhesives for use in otorhinolaryngology will be continued intensively. In parallel, appropriate application systems have to be developed for microscopic and endoscopic use.

  9. Experimental Investigation of Adhesion and Friction Phenomena of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond (UNCD) and Aluminum Oxide in MEMS

    Buja, F.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis aims to provide the latest progresses on the experimental investigation of friction and adhesion phenomena, occurring at the nanoscale in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). I have studied and characterized the interaction between MEMS sidewalls in contact and sliding one onto another

  10. An innovative wheel–rail contact model for railway vehicles under degraded adhesion conditions

    Meli, E., E-mail: enrico.meli@unifi.it; Ridolfi, A., E-mail: a.ridolfi@unifi.it [University of Florence, Department of Industrial Engineering (Italy)

    2015-03-15

    The accurate modelling of the wheel–rail contact plays a fundamental role in the railway field since the contact forces heavily affect the vehicle dynamics, the wear of the contact surfaces and the vehicle safety. Concerning the wheel–rail contact, an important open problem is represented by the degraded adhesion. A realistic adhesion model is quite difficult to obtain because of the complex and highly non-linear behaviour of the adhesion coefficient and the presence of external unknown contaminants (the third body); this is especially true when degraded adhesion and large sliding between the wheel and rail contact surfaces occur.In this work the authors present an adhesion model particularly developed to describe degraded adhesion conditions. The new approach will have to be suitable to be employed within the wheel–rail contact models typical of the multibody applications. In other words, the contact model, comprising the new adhesion model, will have to guarantee a good accuracy and, at the same time, a high numerical efficiency to be implemented directly online inside the general multibody model of the vehicles (e.g. in Matlab-Simulink or Simpack environments) ( www.mathworks.com http://www.mathworks.com , 2012; www.simpack.com http://www.simpack.com , 2012).The model analysed in the paper is based on some of the main phenomena characterising the degraded adhesion, such as large sliding at the contact interface, high energy dissipation, the consequent cleaning effect on the contact surfaces and the final adhesion recovery due to the removal of external unknown contaminants.The adhesion model has been validated because of the experimental data provided by Trenitalia S.p.A. coming from on-track tests performed in Velim (Czech Republic). The tests have been carried out on a straight railway track under degraded adhesion conditions with the railway vehicle UIC-Z1 equipped with a fully-working Wheel Slide Protection (WSP) system.The validation highlighted the

  11. An innovative wheel–rail contact model for railway vehicles under degraded adhesion conditions

    The accurate modelling of the wheel–rail contact plays a fundamental role in the railway field since the contact forces heavily affect the vehicle dynamics, the wear of the contact surfaces and the vehicle safety. Concerning the wheel–rail contact, an important open problem is represented by the degraded adhesion. A realistic adhesion model is quite difficult to obtain because of the complex and highly non-linear behaviour of the adhesion coefficient and the presence of external unknown contaminants (the third body); this is especially true when degraded adhesion and large sliding between the wheel and rail contact surfaces occur.In this work the authors present an adhesion model particularly developed to describe degraded adhesion conditions. The new approach will have to be suitable to be employed within the wheel–rail contact models typical of the multibody applications. In other words, the contact model, comprising the new adhesion model, will have to guarantee a good accuracy and, at the same time, a high numerical efficiency to be implemented directly online inside the general multibody model of the vehicles (e.g. in Matlab-Simulink or Simpack environments) ( www.mathworks.com http://www.mathworks.com , 2012; www.simpack.com http://www.simpack.com , 2012).The model analysed in the paper is based on some of the main phenomena characterising the degraded adhesion, such as large sliding at the contact interface, high energy dissipation, the consequent cleaning effect on the contact surfaces and the final adhesion recovery due to the removal of external unknown contaminants.The adhesion model has been validated because of the experimental data provided by Trenitalia S.p.A. coming from on-track tests performed in Velim (Czech Republic). The tests have been carried out on a straight railway track under degraded adhesion conditions with the railway vehicle UIC-Z1 equipped with a fully-working Wheel Slide Protection (WSP) system.The validation highlighted the

  12. Handbook of adhesion

    Packham, D E

    2006-01-01

    This second edition of the successful Handbook of Adhesion provides concise and authoritative articles covering many aspects of the science and technology associated with adhesion and adhesives. It is intended to fill a gap between the necessarily simplified treatment of the student textbook and the full and thorough treatment of the research monograph and review article. The articles are structured in such a way, with internal cross-referencing and external literature references, that the reader can build up a broader and deeper understanding, as their needs require.This second edition includ

  13. Lactobacillus Adhesion to Mucus

    Maxwell L. Van Tassell

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Mucus provides protective functions in the gastrointestinal tract and plays an important role in the adhesion of microorganisms to host surfaces. Mucin glycoproteins polymerize, forming a framework to which certain microbial populations can adhere, including probiotic Lactobacillus species. Numerous mechanisms for adhesion to mucus have been discovered in lactobacilli, including partially characterized mucus binding proteins. These mechanisms vary in importance with the in vitro models studied, which could significantly affect the perceived probiotic potential of the organisms. Understanding the nature of mucus-microbe interactions could be the key to elucidating the mechanisms of probiotic adhesion within the host.

  14. Controlling the Adhesion of Superhydrophobic Surfaces Using Electrolyte Jet Machining Techniques

    Yang, Xiaolong; Liu, Xin; Lu, Yao; Zhou, Shining; Gao, Mingqian; Song, Jinlong; Xu, Wenji

    2016-04-01

    Patterns with controllable adhesion on superhydrophobic areas have various biomedical and chemical applications. Electrolyte jet machining technique (EJM), an electrochemical machining method, was firstly exploited in constructing dimples with various profiles on the superhydrophobic Al alloy surface using different processing parameters. Sliding angles of water droplets on those dimples firstly increased and then stabilized at a certain value with the increase of the processing time or the applied voltages of the EJM, indicating that surfaces with different adhesion force could be obtained by regulating the processing parameters. The contact angle hysteresis and the adhesion force that restricts the droplet from sliding off were investigated through experiments. The results show that the adhesion force could be well described using the classical Furmidge equation. On account of this controllable adhesion force, water droplets could either be firmly pinned to the surface, forming various patterns or slide off at designed tilting angles at specified positions on a superhydrophobic surface. Such dimples on superhydrophopbic surfaces can be applied in water harvesting, biochemical analysis and lab-on-chip devices.

  15. Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (LAD)

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (LAD) LAD is an immune deficiency in ... are slow to heal also may have LAD. Treatment and Research Doctors prescribe antibiotics to prevent and ...

  16. Adhesion of Lunar Dust

    Walton, Otis R.

    2007-04-01

    This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e., from rover wheels, astronaut boots and rocket engine blast) and static electric effects (from UV photo-ionization and/or tribo-electric charging) are likely to be the major contributors to the transport of dust particles. If fine regolith particles are deposited on a surface, then surface energy-related (e.g., van der Walls) adhesion forces and static-electric-image forces are likely to be the strongest contributors to adhesion. Some measurement techniques are offered to quantify the strength of adhesion forces. And finally some dust removal techniques are discussed.

  17. Management of adhesive capsulitis

    Neviaser, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Kristen L Stupay,1 Andrew S Neviaser2 1Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2George Washington University Medical Faculty Associates, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder is a condition of capsular contracture that reduces both active and passive glenohumeral motion. The cause of adhesive capsulitis is not known but it is strongly associated with endocrine abnormalities such as diabetes. Diverse terminology and the absence of definitive cri...

  18. "Slide less pathology": Fairy tale or reality?

    Indu, M; Rathy, R; Binu, M P

    2016-01-01

    Pathology practice is significantly advanced in various frontiers. Therefore, "slide less digital" pathology will not be a mere imagination in near future. Digitalization of histopathological slides (whole slide imaging [WSI]) is possible with the help of whole slide scanner. The WSI has a positive impact not only in routine practice but also in research field, medical education and bioindustry. Even if digital pathology has definitive advantages, its widespread use is not yet possible. As it is an upcoming technology in our field, this article is aimed to discussessential aspects of WSI. PMID:27601824

  19. Sliding mode control for mobile welding robot

    Lü Xueqin; Zhang Ke; Wu Yixiong

    2006-01-01

    The sliding mode controller of mobile welding robot is established in this paper through applying the method of variable structure control with sliding mode into the control of the mobile welding robot.The traditional switching function smooth method is improved by combining the smoothed switching function with the time-varying control gain.It is shown that the proposed sliding mode controller is robust to bounded external disturbances.Experimental results demonstrate that sliding mode controller algorithm can be used into seam tracking and the tracking system is stable with bounded uncertain disturbance.In the seam tracking process, the robot moves steadily without any obvious chattering.

  20. Interfacial sliding in carbon nanotube/diamond matrix composites

    Carbon matrix-carbon nanotube (CNT) composites have a broad range of applications because of the exceptional mechanical properties of both matrix and fibers. Since interfacial sliding plays a key role in determining the strength and toughness of ceramic composites, here interface behavior during nanotube pull-out is studied using molecular dynamics models. The degree of interfacial coupling/adhesion between a diamond matrix and a carbon nanotube is captured through interstitial carbon atoms located in the interface, which can form bonds with both the matrix and CNT atoms. Bonding is accurately captured using the modified REBO potential of Pastewka et al. that introduces an environmental screening coefficient to better capture covalent bond breaking and reforming. Pull-out tests reveal that, after an initial transient, the pull-out force becomes constant, mimicking frictional sliding. The pull-out force is directly proportional to the number of interstitial atoms per unit area in the interface, showing that 'friction' is generated by the energy dissipated during breaking and reforming of bonds involving the interstitial atoms. The effective friction stresses are quite high (several GPa) for interstitial areal densities of 0.72-2.18 nm-2 and the energy dissipated during pull-out can thus be substantial. No differences were found in the pull-out of single wall nanotubes and double wall nanotubes having interwall sp3 bonding. These results demonstrate that 'friction-like' behavior can emerge from non-smooth interfaces and that chemical control of interfacial bonding in CNT can yield substantial sliding resistance and high potential toughening in nanoceramic composites.

  1. Adhesion and friction characteristics of carbon nanotube arrays

    There has been a great deal of interest in understanding, design and fabrication of bio-mimetic and bio-inspired adhesives in recent years. In this paper we present theoretical investigations on adhesion, friction behaviors and characteristics of fibrillar arrays composed of noninteracting carbon nanotubes for bio-inspired dry adhesives. Contact, compression, subsequent pulling off and dry sliding friction simulations were performed. It is demonstrated that there are two different adhesion forces during pull off. Static friction force values are in between 40 and 60 N cm−2 at different loads and they are significantly larger than the normal adhesion forces. Dynamic friction force and load are anisotropic and they depend on the direction of the motion. It is also found that friction force values and friction coefficients decrease although contact length and contact area increase when the loads are high. This is due to the arms of the nanotubes which bend significantly and act as stiffer springs at high loads. (paper)

  2. Linear-induction-motor slide drive

    Barkman, W. E.

    1977-10-11

    A linear-induction-motor drive system to position machine tool slides has been developed on a test bed that utilizes an air-bearing slide, laser interferometer feedback, and a microprocessor-based servo system. Static and dynamic positioning accuracies of +-16 nm (+-0.6 ..mu..in) have been demonstrated.

  3. Sliding-window dynamic frameproof codes

    Paterson, Maura

    2007-01-01

    A sliding-window dynamic frameproof code is a scheme for discouraging the piracy of digital broadcasts through the use of digital finger printing. In this paper we formally define sliding-window dynamic frame proof codes and provide optimal constructions for a certain class of these schemes. We also discuss bounds on the number of users such schemes can support.

  4. Sliding-window dynamic frameproof codes

    Paterson, Maura B.

    2007-01-01

    A sliding-window dynamic frameproof code is a scheme for discouraging the piracy of digital broadcasts through the use of digital fingerprinting. In this paper, we formally define sliding-window dynamic frameproof codes and provide optimal constructions for a certain class of these schemes. We also discuss bounds on the number of users such schemes can support.

  5. The Cancer Digital Slide Archive - TCGA

    Dr. David Gutman and Dr. Lee Cooper developed The Cancer Digital Slide Archive (CDSA), a web platform for accessing pathology slide images of TCGA samples. Find out how they did it and how to use the CDSA website in this Case Study.

  6. Roots of crosscap slides and crosscap transpositions

    Parlak, Anna; Stukow, Michał

    2016-01-01

    Let $N_{g}$ denote a closed nonorientable surface of genus $g$. For $g \\geq 2$ the mapping class group $\\mathcal{M}(N_{g})$ is generated by Dehn twists and one crosscap slide ($Y$-homeomorphism) or by Dehn twists and a crosscap transposition. Margalit and Schleimer observed that Dehn twists have nontrivial roots. We construct roots of crosscap slides and crosscap transpositions.

  7. Peeling, sliding, pulling and bending

    Lister, John; Peng, Gunnar

    2015-11-01

    The peeling of an elastic sheet away from thin layer of viscous fluid is a simply-stated and generic problem, that involves complex interactions between the flow and elastic deformation on a range of length scales. Consider an analogue of capillary spreading, where a blister of injected viscous fluid spreads due to tension in the overlying elastic sheet. Here the tension is coupled to the deformation of the sheet, and thus varies in time and space. A key question is whether or not viscous shear stresses ahead of the blister are sufficient to prevent the sheet sliding inwards and relieving the tension. Our asymptotic analysis reveals a dichotomy between fast and slow spreading, and between two-dimensional and axisymmetric spreading. In combination with bending stresses and gravity, which may dominate parts of the flow but not others, there is a plethora of dynamical regimes.

  8. Eurosafe-2011 - Papers and slides

    This document gathers some slides, papers and posters that were presented at the 2011 annual EUROSAFE forum. This forum focuses in its plenary part on 'Nuclear safety: new challenges, gained experience and public expectations' in the light of the Fukushima nuclear power station (NPS) accident. The topic will be considered from the point of view of Japanese safety authorities, of a regulator, of an international organisation, of a utility and of a Technical Safety Organisation (TSO). The first part of the second day will be devoted to presentations of the Fukushima NPS accident. The second part of this day will present the latest work carried out by ETSON (European Technical Safety Organizations Network) and EUROSAFE members and their partners worldwide through three seminars (nuclear safety research and safety assessment, radiation protection and environment, nuclear material and nuclear facilities security) and a workshop on operating experience feedback on nuclear fuel cycle facilities

  9. Electrically Conductive Epoxy Adhesives

    Lan Bai

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Conductive adhesives are widely used in electronic packaging applications such as die attachment and solderless interconnections, component repair, display interconnections, and heat dissipation. The effects of film thickness as functions of filler volume fraction, conductive filler size, shape, as well as uncured adhesive matrix viscosity on the electrical conduction behavior of epoxy-based adhesives are presented in this work. For this purpose, epoxy-based adhesives were prepared using conductive fillers of different size, shape, and types, including Ni powder, flakes, and filaments, Ag powder, and Cu powder. The filaments were 20 μm in diameter, and 160 or 260 μm in length. HCl and H3PO4 acid solutions were used to etch and remove the surface oxide layers from the fillers. The plane resistance of filled adhesive films was measured using the four-point method. In all cases of conductive filler addition, the planar resistivity levels for the composite adhesive films increased when the film thickness was reduced. The shape of resistivity-thickness curves was negative exponential decaying type and was modeled using a mathematical relation. The relationships between the conductive film resistivities and the filler volume fractions were also derived mathematically based on the experimental data. Thus, the effects of surface treatment of filler particles, the type, size, shape of fillers, and the uncured epoxy viscosity could be included empirically by using these mathematical relations based on the experimental data. By utilizing the relations we proposed to model thickness-dependent and volume fraction-dependent conduction behaviors separately, we were able to describe the combined and coupled volume fraction-film thickness relationship mathematically based on our experimental data.

  10. Penetration of urea formaldehyde adhesives in wood tissue, Part II: Radial penetration of UF adhesives into silver fir

    Gavrilović-Grmuša Ivana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Penetration is the ability of the adhesive to move into the voids on the substrate surface or into the substrate itself. Wood's cellular nature allows significant penetration of the adhesive into the substrate. Objective of this work was the evaluation of the penetration and hence the distribution of urea-formaldehyde (UF resins by means of microscopic detection of the penetration of such UF adhesives into the wood tissue. Tangentially cut 5 mm thick silver fir (Abies alba Mill. plies, 100 mm long (parallel to the grain and 30 mm width, were prepared for this study. Four types of UF resins with different degree of condensation were investigated in this research. Safranin was added to the resins and epi-fluorescence microscope was used for measuring the adhesive penetration. The UF adhesive mixes, consisting of the various resins, extender and hardener were applied to the surface of one ply. Two plies, one with applied adhesive mix and one without adhesive mix, were assembled with parallel grain direction. Samples were pressed in a hydraulic press at 120°C and 1.0 MPa for 15 minutes. Test-specimens of 20 μm thickness were cut of each sample using a sliding microtome apparatus, exposing a bondline on a cross-sectional surface. The results show a significant correlation between the penetration behaviour and the degree of condensation (molecular sizes, viscosity of the resins. The higher the degree of condensation, the lower the possibility for penetration, expresses as average penetration (AP and as portion of filled tracheids on the whole cross section of interphase (filled interphase region FIR.

  11. Surface adhesion between hexagonal boron nitride nanotubes and silicon based on lateral force microscopy

    This study presents the surface adhesion between hexagonal boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) and silicon based on lateral manipulation in an atomic force microscope (AFM). The BNNT was mechanically manipulated by the lateral force of an AFM pyramidal silicon probe using the scan mechanism in the imaging mode. With a controlled normal force of the AFM probe and the lateral motion, the lateral force applied to the BNNT could overcome the surface adhesion between BNNT and silicon surface. The individual BNNT is forced to slide and rotate on the silicon surface. Based on the recorded force curve, the calculated shear stress due to surface adhesion is 0.5 GPa. And the specific sliding energy loss is 0.2 J/m2. Comparing BNNTs and carbon nanotube (CNT), the shear stress and specific sliding energy loss of BNNT are an order of magnitude larger than that of CNT. Therefore, the results show that the surface adhesion between BNNT and silicon surface is higher than that of CNT.

  12. Enhancement of sliding life of MoS2 films deposited by combining sputtering and high-energy ion implantation

    Solid lubricant films of MoS2 with improved adhesion to a stainless-steel substrate have been deposited by a combination of rf sputtering and ion implantation with inert gas ions in the 100-keV region. When the sputter film had obtained a thickness of 500 A, it was subjected to the ionic bombardment prior to completion of the sputter deposition. Dependent on the ion dose an adhesion improvement and a sliding life enhancement of approximately a factor of 2 were obtained for the solid lubricant film

  13. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives.

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-11-01

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm(2) provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects. PMID:26457864

  14. An updated nuclear criticality slide rule

    This Volume 2 contains the functional version of the updated nuclear criticality slide rule (more accurately, sliding graphs) that is referenced in An Updated Nuclear Criticality Slide Rule: Technical Basis, NUREG/CR-6504, Vol. 1 (ORNL/TM-13322/V1). This functional slide rule provides a readily usable open-quotes in-handclose quotes method for estimating pertinent nuclear criticality accident information from sliding graphs, thereby permitting (1) the rapid estimation of pertinent criticality accident information without laborious or sophisticated calculations in a nuclear criticality emergency situation, (2) the appraisal of potential fission yields and external personnel radiation exposures for facility safety analyses, and (3) a technical basis for emergency preparedness and training programs at nonreactor nuclear facilities. The slide rule permits the estimation of neutron and gamma dose rates and integrated doses based upon estimated fission yields, distance from the fission source, and time-after criticality accidents for five different critical systems. Another sliding graph permits the estimation of critical solution fission yields based upon fissile material concentration, critical vessel geometry, and solution addition rate. Another graph provides neutron and gamma dose-reduction factors for water, steel, and concrete. Graphs from historic documents are provided as references for estimating critical parameters of various fissile material systems. Conversion factors for various English and metric units are provided for quick reference

  15. Whole slide imaging for educational purposes

    Liron Pantanowitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Digitized slides produced by whole slide image scanners can be easily shared over a network or by transferring image files to optical or other data storage devices. Navigation of digitized slides is interactive and intended to simulate viewing glass slides with a microscope (virtual microscopy. Image viewing software permits users to edit, annotate, analyze, and easily share whole slide images (WSI. As a result, WSI have begun to replace the traditional light microscope, offering a myriad of opportunities for education. This article focuses on current applications of WSI in education and proficiency testing. WSI has been successfully explored for graduate education (medical, dental, and veterinary schools, training of pathology residents, as an educational tool in allied pathology schools (e.g., cytotechnology, for virtual tracking and tutoring, tele-education (tele-conferencing, e-learning, virtual workshops, at tumor boards, with interactive publications, and on examinations. WSI supports flexible and cost-effective distant learning and augments problem-oriented teaching, competency evaluation, and proficiency testing. WSI viewed on touchscreen displays and with tablet technology are especially beneficial for education. Further investigation is necessary to develop superior WSI applications that better support education and to design viewing stations with ergonomic tools that improve the WSI-human interface and navigation of virtual slides. Studies to determine the impact of training pathologists without exposure to actual glass slides are also needed.

  16. Wood Composite Adhesives

    Gomez-Bueso, Jose; Haupt, Robert

    The global environment, in which phenolic resins are being used for wood composite manufacture, has changed significantly during the last decade. This chapter reviews trends that are driving the use and consumption of phenolic resins around the world. The review begins with recent data on volume usage and regional trends, followed by an analysis of factors affecting global markets. In a section on environmental factors, the impact of recent formaldehyde emission regulations is discussed. The section on economics introduces wood composite production as it relates to the available adhesive systems, with special emphasis on the technical requirement to improve phenolic reactivity. Advances in composite process technology are introduced, especially in regard to the increased demands the improvements place upon adhesive system performance. The specific requirements for the various wood composite families are considered in the context of adhesive performance needs. The results of research into current chemistries are discussed, with a review of recent findings regarding the mechanisms of phenolic condensation and acceleration. Also, the work regarding alternate natural materials, such as carbohydrates, lignins, tannins, and proteinaceous materials, is presented. Finally, new developments in alternative adhesive technologies are reported.

  17. Fault Reconstruction Using Sliding Mode Observers

    K. Hakiki

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a nonlinear sliding observer is proposed to explicitly reconstruct fault signals. The novelty lies in the application of the equivalent output injection concept. Previous work in the area of fault detection has used disruption of the sliding motion to detect faults. The aim of the present study was to design a robust observer that slides in the presence of faults based on the response of the estimated outputs of the system. A numerical example of the application to an inverted pendulum mounted on a cart is provided to demonstrate the approach

  18. Sliding mode control for synchronous electric drives

    Ryvkin, Sergey E

    2011-01-01

    This volume presents the theory of control systems with sliding mode applied to electrical motors and power converters. It demonstrates the methodology of control design and the original algorithms of control and observation. Practically all semiconductor devices are used in power converters, that feed electrical motors, as power switches. A switching mode offers myriad attractive, inherent properties from a control viewpoint, especially a sliding mode. Sliding mode control supplies high dynamics to systems, invariability of systems to changes of their parameters and of exterior loads in combi

  19. Sliding wear resistance of iron aluminides

    Garima Sharma; M Sundararaman; N Prabhu; G L Goswami

    2003-04-01

    Room temperature dry sliding wear behaviour of iron aluminides containing 28% aluminium and various amounts of chromium has been investigated using pin on disk wear tester. The aluminides were heat treated to have ordered 3 structure. It was found that wear rate of the aluminides increased with the increase of applied normal load and sliding speed. Wear resistance of the aluminides increased with increase in chromium content. SEM observation of the worn surface showed that the microcutting and microploughing were the dominant sliding wear mechanisms.

  20. SLIDING MODE CONTROL FOR ACTIVE AUTOMOBILE SUSPENSIONS

    1998-01-01

    Nonlinear control methods are presented based on theory of sliding mode control (SMC) or variable structure control (VSC) for application to active automobile suspensions. Requirements of reducing manufacturing cost and energy consumption of the active suspension system may be satisfiedby reasonable design of the sliding surface and hydraulic servo system. Emphasis is placed on the study of the discrete sliding mode control method (DSMC) applicable for a new sort of speed on-off solenoid valves of anti-dust capability and low price. Robustness and effectiveness of the feedback linearized controller in typical road conditions are demonstrated by numerical results fora quarter-car suspension model.

  1. Ergometer rowing with and without slides

    Larsen, Anders Holsgaard; Jensen, K

    2010-01-01

    A rowing ergometer can be placed on a slide to imitate 'on-water' rowing. The present study examines I) possible differences in biomechanical and physiological variables of ergometer rowing with and without slides and II) potential consequences on training load during exercise. 7 elite oars......-women rowed in a randomized order in a slide or stationary ergometer at 3 predefined submaximal and at maximal intensity. Oxygen uptake was measured and biomechanical variables of the rowing were calculated based upon handle force (force transducer) and velocity/length (potentiometer) of the stroke. Stroke...

  2. Friction and wear of rare earths modified carbon fibers filled PTFE composite under dry sliding condition

    Carbon fibers (CF) were surface treated with air-oxidation and rare earths (RE), respectively. The friction and wear properties of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) composites filled with differently surface treated carbon fibers, sliding against GCr15 steel under dry sliding condition, were investigated on a block-on-ring M-2000 tribometer. Experimental results revealed that RE treatment largely reduced the friction and wear of CF reinforced PTFE (CF/PTFE) composites. The RE treated composite exhibited the lowest friction and wear under dry sliding. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigation of worn surfaces and transfer films of CF/PTFE composites showed that RE treated CF/PTFE composites had the smoothest worn surface under given load and sliding speed, and a continuous and uniform transfer film formed on the counterface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study of carbon fiber surface showed that the oxygen concentration was obviously increased after RE treatment, and more carboxyl groups were introduced onto CF surfaces after RE treatment. The increase in the amount of oxygen-containing groups increased the interfacial adhesion between CF and PTFE matrix, and accordingly increased the tribological properties of the composite

  3. Nanoscale sliding friction phenomena at the interface of diamond-like carbon and tungsten

    Macroscopic tribometry is linked to classical atomistic simulations in order to improve understanding of the nanoscale interfacial processes during sliding of hydrogenated DLC (a-C:H) against a metal (W) in dry and lubricated conditions. Experimentally, using an online tribometer, wear and roughness measurements are performed after each sliding cycle, which are then correlated with the frictional resistance. Ex situ analysis is also performed on the worn surfaces (i.e. plates and counterfaces) using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy imaging of the near-surface region. Then, in order to elucidate the atomistic level processes that contribute to the observed microstructural evolution in the experiments, classical molecular dynamics are performed, employing a bond order potential for the tungsten–carbon–hydrogen system. Macroscopic tribometry shows that dry sliding of a-C:H against W results in higher frictional resistance and significantly more material transfer compared with lubricated conditions. Similarly, the molecular dynamic simulations exhibit higher average shear stresses and clear material transfer for dry conditions compared with simulations with hexadecane as a lubricant. In the lubricated simulations, the lower shear stress and the absence of a material transfer are attributed to hexadecane monolayers that are partially tethered to the a-C:H surface and significantly reduce adhesion and mechanical mixing between the sliding partners

  4. New Approach to Ceramic/Metal-Polymer Multilayered Coatings for High Performance Dry Sliding Applications

    Rempp, A.; Killinger, A.; Gadow, R.

    2012-06-01

    The combination of thermally sprayed hard coatings with a polymer based top coat leads to multilayered coating systems with tailored functionalities concerning wear resistance, friction, adhesion, wettability or specific electrical properties. The basic concept is to combine the mechanical properties of the hard base coating with the tribological or chemical abilities of the polymer top coat suitable for the respective application. This paper gives an overview of different types of recently developed multilayer coatings and their application in power transmission under dry sliding conditions. State of the art coatings for dry sliding applications in power transmission are mostly based on thin film coatings like diamond-like carbon or solid lubricants, e.g. MoS2. A new approach is the combination of thin film coatings with combined multilayer coatings. To evaluate the capability of these tribological systems, a multi-stage investigation has been carried out. In the first stage the performance of the sliding lacquers and surface topography of the steel substrate has been evaluated. In the following stage thermally sprayed hard coatings were tested in combination with different sliding lacquers. Wear resistance and friction coefficients of combined coatings were determined using a twin disc test-bed.

  5. The Influence of Normal Load and Sliding Speed on Frictional Properties of Skin

    Wei Tang; Shi-rong Ge; Hua Zhu; Xi-chuan Cao; Ning Li

    2008-01-01

    The study of frictional properties of human skin is important for medical research, skin care products and textile exploitation. In order to investigate the influence of normal load and sliding speed on the frictional properties of skin and its possible mechanism, tests were carried out on a multi-specimen friction tester. When the normal load increases from 0.1 N to 0.9 N,normal displacement and the friction coefficient of skin increase. The friction coefficient is dependent on the load, indicating that both adhesion and deformation contribute to the friction behaviour. The deformation friction was interpreted using the plough model of fiiction. When sliding speed increases from 0.5 mm·s-1 to 4 mm·s-1,the friction coefficient increases and "stick-slip" phenomena increase, indicating that hysteretic friction contributes to the friction. The hysteretic friction was interpreted using schematic of energy translation during the rigid spherical probe sliding on the soft skin surface, which provides an explanation for the influence of the sliding speed on the frictional characteristics of the skin.

  6. Sliding wear studies of sprayed chromium carbide-nichrome coatings for gas-cooled reactor applications

    Chromium carbide-nichrome coatings being considered for wear protection of some critical components in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR's) were investigated. The coatings were deposited either by the detonation gun or the plasma-arc process. Sliding wear tests were conducted on specimens in a button-on-plate arrangement with sliding velocities of 7.1 x 10-3 and 7.9 mm/s at 8160C in a helium environment simulates HTGR primary coolant chemistry. The coatings containing 75 or 80 wt % chromium carbide exhibited excellent wear resistance. As the chromium carbide content decreased from either 80 or 75 to 55 wt %, with a concurrent decrease in coating hardness, wear-resistance deteriorated. The friction and wear behavior of the soft coating was similar to that of the bare metal--showing severe galling and significant amounts of wear debris. The friction characteristics of the hard coating exhibited a strong velocity dependence with high friction coefficients in low sliding velocity tests ad vice versa. Both the soft coating and bare metal showed no dependence on sliding velocity. The wear behavior observed in this study is of adhesive type, and the wear damage is believed to be controlled primarily by the delamination process

  7. Nanoscale friction and adhesion of tree frog toe pads.

    Kappl, Michael; Kaveh, Farzaneh; Barnes, W Jon P

    2016-01-01

    Tree frogs have become an object of interest in biomimetics due to their ability to cling to wet and slippery surfaces. In this study, we have investigated the adhesion and friction behavior of toe pads of White's tree frog (Litoria caerulea) using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in an aqueous medium. Facilitating special types of AFM probes with radii of ∼400 nm and ∼13 μm, we were able to sense the frictional response without damaging the delicate nanopillar structures of the epithelial cells. While we observed no significant adhesion between both types of probes and toe pads in wet conditions, frictional forces under such conditions were very pronounced and friction coefficients amounted between 0.3 and 1.1 for the sliding friction between probes and the epithelial cell surfaces. PMID:27165465

  8. Coating Reduces Ice Adhesion

    Smith, Trent; Prince, Michael; DwWeese, Charles; Curtis, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    The Shuttle Ice Liberation Coating (SILC) has been developed to reduce the adhesion of ice to surfaces on the space shuttle. SILC, when coated on a surface (foam, metal, epoxy primer, polymer surfaces), will reduce the adhesion of ice by as much as 90 percent as compared to the corresponding uncoated surface. This innovation is a durable coating that can withstand several cycles of ice growth and removal without loss of anti-adhesion properties. SILC is made of a binder composed of varying weight percents of siloxane(s), ethyl alcohol, ethyl sulfate, isopropyl alcohol, and of fine-particle polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The combination of these components produces a coating with significantly improved weathering characteristics over the siloxane system alone. In some cases, the coating will delay ice formation and can reduce the amount of ice formed. SILC is not an ice prevention coating, but the very high water contact angle (greater than 140 ) causes water to readily run off the surface. This coating was designed for use at temperatures near -170 F (-112 C). Ice adhesion tests performed at temperatures from -170 to 20 F (-112 to -7 C) show that SILC is a very effective ice release coating. SILC can be left as applied (opaque) or buffed off until the surface appears clear. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data show that the coating is still present after buffing to transparency. This means SILC can be used to prevent ice adhesion even when coating windows or other objects, or items that require transmission of optical light. Car windshields are kept cleaner and SILC effectively mitigates rain and snow under driving conditions.

  9. Slides with no attached paper

    This document brings together the different presentations (slides) given at the workshop but with no attached paper. These slides refer to the following presentations: - Presentation of ITN (Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear); - Minor Actinide Partitioning (Dominique Warin); - Transmutation (Janne Wallenius); - Radioactive Waste Management, IGD-TP (Gerald Ouzounian); - Present status of the Swedish nuclear waste management programme (Peter Wikberg); - The U.S. Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program - Separations Research and Development (Terry Todd); - Strategies and national programs of closed fuel cycles - Russian Expert Vision (Mikhael Kormilitsyn) - Extraction Studies Of Potential Solvent Formulations For The GANEX Process (Fiona MacLachlan); - Investigations of The Fundamental Chemistry of the TALSPEAK Process (Ken Nash); - Extraction Separation of Trivalent Minor Actinides and Lanthanides by Hexa-dentate Nitrogen-donor Extractant, TPEN, and its Analogs (Kenji Takeshita); - Fluorinated Diluents for HLW Processing - technological point of view (Vasiliy Babain); - Extraction properties of some new pyridine molecules and search for better diluents (Irena Spendlikova); - Kinetics of extraction of Eu3+ ion by TODGA and CyMe4-BTBP studied using the RMC technique (Trong Hung Vu); - Redox Chemistry of Neptunium in Solutions of Nitric Acid (Alena Paulenova); - NMR applied to actinide ions and their complexes. In search of covalency effects (Geoffrey Vidick); - Towards 'Stability Rules' for Radiolysis of bis-DGA compounds (Ana Nunez); - Pyroprocess Research Activities at IGCAR, Kalpakkam, India (K. Nagarajan); - Critical issues of nuclear energy systems employing molten salt fluorides: from ISTC No. 1606 to No. 3749 (1. year of project activity) and MARS/EVOL cooperation (Victor Ignatiev); - Conversion processes: Internal Gelation and the Sphere-pac concept (Manuel Pouchon); - A Combined Nuclear Technology and Nuclear Chemistry Master. A Unique Initiative

  10. Pathogenesis of postoperative adhesion formation

    Hellebrekers, B.W.J.; Kooistra, T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Current views on the pathogenesis of adhesion formation are based on the "classical concept of adhesion formation", namely that a reduction in peritoneal fibrinolytic activity following peritoneal trauma is of key importance in adhesion development. Methods: A non-systematic literature s

  11. Dry sliding wear system response of ferritic and tempered martensitic ductile iron

    Jha, V. K.; Mozumder, Y. H.; Shama, S.; Behera, R. K.; Pattaniak, A.; P, Sindhoora L.; Mishra, S. C.; Sen, S.

    2015-02-01

    Spheroidal graphite cast iron (SG iron) is the most preferable member of cast iron family due to its strength and toughness along with good tribological properties. SG iron specimens with annealed and martensitic matrix were subjected to dry sliding wear condition and the system response was correlated to matrix microstructure. Respective microstructure was obtained by annealing and quench and tempering heat treatment process for an austenitizing temperature of 1000°C. Specimens were subjected to Ball on plate wear tester under 40N, 50N, 60N load for a sliding distance of 7.54m. Except for quench and tempered specimen at 50N, weight loss was observed in every condition. The wear surface under optical microscope reveals adhesive mechanism for as-cast and annealed specimen whereas delaminated wear track feature was observed for quench and tempered specimen.

  12. Color standardization in whole slide imaging using a color calibration slide

    Pinky A Bautista

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Color consistency in histology images is still an issue in digital pathology. Different imaging systems reproduced the colors of a histological slide differently. Materials and Methods: Color correction was implemented using the color information of the nine color patches of a color calibration slide. The inherent spectral colors of these patches along with their scanned colors were used to derive a color correction matrix whose coefficients were used to convert the pixels′ colors to their target colors. Results: There was a significant reduction in the CIELAB color difference, between images of the same H & E histological slide produced by two different whole slide scanners by 3.42 units, P < 0.001 at 95% confidence level. Conclusion: Color variations in histological images brought about by whole slide scanning can be effectively normalized with the use of the color calibration slide.

  13. On the Effect of Counterface Materials on Tribo-Behavior of Steel Wire Sliding Under Dry Contact Condition

    Chee, Su Be; Al Shalabi, Ammar; Yousif, B. F.

    Steel wires are implemented in numerous systems and undergo frequent faults due to tribological loading conditions. Therefore, this paper presents a study on the tribological performance of steel wire sliding against different counterfaces, namely, aluminum alloy, stainless steel, and mild steel using a block-on-ring tribo-tester. According to common mechanisms, the tests were performed under 5 N applied load and 0.15 m/s sliding velocity under dry contact condition. Additionally, scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the damaged features on the worn surfaces of the steel wire. Weight loss and friction coefficient results were presented versus sliding distances (0-1.6 km). In general, the results showed that friction coefficient did not reach the steady state due to the transformation of the wear mechanism from adhesive to abrasive mode. Nevertheless, the average of friction coefficient was found to be about 0.7 ± 0.1 for stainless steel and 0.2 ± 0.1 for mild steel. Weight loss gradually increased with the increase of sliding distance. The micrographs of worn surfaces revealed that the contact mechanism was transformed from adhesive to abrasive wear mode as implied by the scars and grooves on the wire surface.

  14. A Sliding Mode-Multimodel Control with Sliding Mode Observer for a Sensorless Pumping System

    Rhif, Ahmed; Kardous, Zohra; Braiek, Naceur Ben Hadj

    2013-01-01

    This work deals with the design of a sliding mode observer with a multi-surfaces sliding mode multimodel control (SM-MMC) for a mechanical sensorless pumping system. The observer is designed to estimate the speed and the mechanical position of the DC motor operating in the process. Robustness tests validated by simulation show the effectiveness of the sliding mode observer associated with this control approach (SM-MMC).

  15. An Electric Method for Qualifying Cytogenetic Slides

    Saeed Khamnei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetics is a branch of genetics that involves critical applications in medical decisions. The procedures involved take cells with chromosomes and rupture them on the slide to release their chromosomes in metaphase spreadings. Usually the slide contains few metaphase spreadings and plenty of intact cells, so finding and analyzing metaphase spreadings are difficult. It is for this reason that many investigations search for innovations that optimize chromosome spreading and facilitate cytogenetic studies. To aid rupturing cells in cytogenetic slide preparation, Pulsed Electric Fields (PEFs could be used. PEFs are a kind of electric fields, which affect the cell membrane in a way that can lead to cell lysis. These effects are currently the basis of applications such as nonthermal pasteurization. Therefore, applying PEFs to cell suspension of the cytogenetic experiments would probably lyse all the cells, yielding a clear slide with many metaphase spreadings.

  16. Automated single-slide staining system

    Mills, S. M.; Wilkins, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Apparatus developed to Gram-stain single slides automatically is flexible enough to accommodate other types of staining procedures. Method frees operator and eliminates necessity for subjective evaluations as to length of staining or decolorizing time.

  17. WTP Pretreatment Facility Potential Design Deficiencies--Sliding Bed and Sliding Bed Erosion Assessment

    This assessment is based on readily available literature and discusses both Newtonian and non-Newtonian slurries with respect to sliding beds and erosion due to sliding beds. This report does not quantify the size of the sliding beds or erosion rates due to sliding beds, but only assesses if they could be present. This assessment addresses process pipelines in the Pretreatment (PT) facility and the high level waste (HLW) transfer lines leaving the PT facility to the HLW vitrification facility concentrate receipt vessel.

  18. WTP Pretreatment Facility Potential Design Deficiencies--Sliding Bed and Sliding Bed Erosion Assessment

    Hansen, E. K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-05-06

    This assessment is based on readily available literature and discusses both Newtonian and non-Newtonian slurries with respect to sliding beds and erosion due to sliding beds. This report does not quantify the size of the sliding beds or erosion rates due to sliding beds, but only assesses if they could be present. This assessment addresses process pipelines in the Pretreatment (PT) facility and the high level waste (HLW) transfer lines leaving the PT facility to the HLW vitrification facility concentrate receipt vessel.

  19. Compact, Automated Centrifugal Slide-Staining System

    Feeback, Daniel L.; Clarke, Mark S. F.

    2004-01-01

    The Directional Acceleration Vector-Driven Displacement of Fluids (DAVD-DOF) system, under development at the time of reporting the information for this article, would be a relatively compact, automated, centrifugally actuated system for staining blood smears and other microbiological samples on glass microscope slides in either a microgravitational or a normal Earth gravitational environment. The DAVD-DOF concept is a successor to the centrifuge-operated slide stainer (COSS) concept, which was reported in Slide-Staining System for Microgravity or Gravity (MSC-22949), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 1 (January, 2001), page 64. The COSS includes reservoirs and a staining chamber that contains a microscope slide to which a biological sample is affixed. The staining chamber is sequentially filled with and drained of staining and related liquids from the reservoirs by use of a weighted plunger to force liquid from one reservoir to another at a constant level of hypergravity maintained in a standard swing-bucket centrifuge. In the DAVD-DOF system, a staining chamber containing a sample would also be sequentially filled and emptied, but with important differences. Instead of a simple microscope slide, one would use a special microscope slide on which would be fabricated a network of very small reservoirs and narrow channels connected to a staining chamber (see figure). Unlike in the COSS, displacement of liquid would be effected by use of the weight of the liquid itself, rather than the weight of a plunger.

  20. Management of adhesive capsulitis

    Stupay KL

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kristen L Stupay,1 Andrew S Neviaser2 1Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2George Washington University Medical Faculty Associates, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder is a condition of capsular contracture that reduces both active and passive glenohumeral motion. The cause of adhesive capsulitis is not known but it is strongly associated with endocrine abnormalities such as diabetes. Diverse terminology and the absence of definitive criteria for diagnosis make evaluating treatment modalities difficult. Many treatment methods have been reported, most with some success, but few have been proved to alter the natural course of this disease. Most afflicted patients will achieve acceptable shoulder function without surgery. Those who remain debilitated after 8–12 months are reasonable candidates for invasive treatments. Here, the various treatment methods and the data to support their use are reviewed. Keywords: frozen shoulder, stiff shoulder, periarthritis, painful shoulder 

  1. Syndecans and cell adhesion

    Couchman, J R; Chen, L; Woods, A

    2001-01-01

    Now that transmembrane signaling through primary cell-matrix receptors, integrins, is being elucidated, attention is turning to how integrin-ligand interactions can be modulated. Syndecans are transmembrane proteoglycans implicated as coreceptors in a variety of physiological processes, including...... cell adhesion, migration, response to growth factors, development, and tumorigenesis. This review will describe this family of proteoglycans in terms of their structures and functions and their signaling in conjunction with integrins, and indicate areas for future research....

  2. Ceramic microstructure and adhesion

    Buckley, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with a ceramic, a polymer, or a metal, strong bond forces can develop between the materials. The bonding forces will depend upon the state of the surfaces, cleanliness and the fundamental properties of the two solids, both surface and bulk. Adhesion between a ceramic and another solid are discussed from a theoretical consideration of the nature of the surfaces and experimentally by relating bond forces to interface resulting from solid state contact. Surface properties of ceramics correlated with adhesion include, orientation, reconstruction and diffusion as well as the chemistry of the surface specie. Where a ceramic is in contact with a metal their interactive chemistry and bond strength is considered. Bulk properties examined include elastic and plastic behavior in the surficial regions, cohesive binding energies, crystal structures and crystallographic orientation. Materials examined with respect to interfacial adhesive interactions include silicon carbide, nickel zinc ferrite, manganese zinc ferrite, and aluminum oxide. The surfaces of the contacting solids are studied both in the atomic or molecularly clean state and in the presence of selected surface contaminants.

  3. Elastic–plastic adhesive impacts of tungsten dust with metal surfaces in plasma environments

    Dust-surface collisions impose size selectivity on the ability of dust grains to migrate in scrape-off layer and divertor plasmas and to adhere to plasma-facing components. Here, we report first experimental evidence of dust impact phenomena in plasma environments concerning low-speed collisions of tungsten dust with tungsten surfaces: re-bouncing, adhesion, sliding and rolling. The results comply with the predictions of the model of elastic-perfectly plastic adhesive spheres employed in the dust dynamics code MIGRAINe for sub- to several meters per second impacts of micrometer-range metal dust

  4. Elastic–plastic adhesive impacts of tungsten dust with metal surfaces in plasma environments

    Ratynskaia, S., E-mail: svetlana.ratynskaia@ee.kth.se [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Association EUROfusion-VR, Stockholm (Sweden); Tolias, P. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Association EUROfusion-VR, Stockholm (Sweden); Shalpegin, A. [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Vignitchouk, L. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Association EUROfusion-VR, Stockholm (Sweden); De Angeli, M. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Bykov, I. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Association EUROfusion-VR, Stockholm (Sweden); Bystrov, K.; Bardin, S. [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute For Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439MN Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Brochard, F. [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Ripamonti, D. [Istituto per l’Energetica e le Interfasi – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Harder, N. den; De Temmerman, G. [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute For Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439MN Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    Dust-surface collisions impose size selectivity on the ability of dust grains to migrate in scrape-off layer and divertor plasmas and to adhere to plasma-facing components. Here, we report first experimental evidence of dust impact phenomena in plasma environments concerning low-speed collisions of tungsten dust with tungsten surfaces: re-bouncing, adhesion, sliding and rolling. The results comply with the predictions of the model of elastic-perfectly plastic adhesive spheres employed in the dust dynamics code MIGRAINe for sub- to several meters per second impacts of micrometer-range metal dust.

  5. [The expression level of adhesion molecules on neutrophils depending at segmentation of their nuclei].

    Kashutin, S L; Danilov, S I; Vereshchagina, E N; Kluchareva, S V

    2013-11-01

    The article deals with results of detection of expression level of adhesion molecules on neutrophils and segmentation of their nuclei. It is established that in conditions of absence of antigen stimulation neutrophils of circulating pool express molecules of L-selectin in 53.34%, LFA-1 molecules in 65.64%, ICAM-1 in 40.51%, LE4-3 in 58.72% and PECAM-1 in 59.74%. The full readiness to realization of phase of sliding, strong adhesion and immediately transmigration itselfis detected in neutrophils with five segments in nucleus. PMID:24640111

  6. Frictional sliding tests on combined coal-rock samples

    Tao Wang; Yaodong Jiang; Shaojian Zhan; Chen Wang

    2014-01-01

    A test system was developed to understand the sliding mechanism of coal-rock structure. The test system was composed by a double-shear testing model and an acousto-optic monitoring system in association with a digital camera and an acoustic emission (AE) instrument. The tests can simulate the movement of activated faults and the sliding in coal-rock structure. In this regard, instable sliding conditions of coal-rock samples, sliding types under different conditions, displacement evolution law, and AE character-istics during sliding process were investigated. Several sliding types were monitored in the tests, including unstable continuous sliding, unstable discontinuous sliding, and stable sliding. The sliding types have close relation with the axial loads and loading rates. Larger axial load and smaller loading rate mean that unstable sliding is less likely to occur. The peak shear stress was positively correlated with the axial load when sliding occurred, whereas the displacement induced by unstable sliding was uncorre-lated with the axial load. A large number of AE events occurred before sliding, and the AE rate decreased after stable sliding. The results show that the tests can well simulate the process of structural instability in a coal bump, and are helpful in the understanding of fault activation and the physical processes during squeezing process of roof and floor.

  7. Adhesive Wear Performance of CFRP Multilayered Polyester Composites Under Dry/wet Contact Conditions

    Danaelan, D.; Yousif, B. F.

    The tribo-performance of a new engineering composite material based on coconut fibers was investigated. In this work, coconut fibers reinforced polyester (CFRP) composites were developed. The tribo-experiments were conducted by using pin-on-disc machine under dry and wet sliding contact condition against smooth stainless steel counterface. Worn surfaces were observed using optical microscope. Friction coefficient and specific wear rate were presented as a function of sliding distance (0-0.6 km) at different sliding velocities (0.1-0.28 m/s). The effect of applied load and sliding velocity was evaluated. The results showed that all test parameters have significant influence on friction and wear characteristics of the composites. Moreover, friction coefficient increased as the normal load and speed increased, the values were about 0.7-0.9 under dry contact condition. Meanwhile, under wet contact condition, there was a great reduction in the friction coefficient, i.e. the values were about 0.1-0.2. Furthermore, the specific wear rates were found to be around 2-4 (10-3) mm3/Nm under dry contact condition and highly reduced under wet condition. In other words, the presence of water as cleaner and polisher assisted to enhance the adhesive wear performance of CFRP by about 10%. The images from optical microscope showed evidence of adhesive wear mode with transition to abrasive wear mode at higher sliding velocities due to third body abrasion. On the other hand, optical images for wet condition showed less adhesive wear and smooth surfaces.

  8. Scuffing of aluminum/steel contacts under dry sliding conditions

    Sheiretov, Todor Konstantinov

    Some typical applications where scuffing may occur are gear teeth, piston rings and cylinder pairs, cams and followers, splines, sleeve bearings, and parts of swash and wobble plate compressors. Unlike other tribology-related failures, scuffing occurs very fast, without any warning, and usually leads to the complete destruction of the sliding pair. Practical experience with steel has helped to outline safe ranges of operation for some components. Very little, however, is known about aluminum, which is the second most commonly used engineering metal. The aim of this study is to obtain a better understanding scuffing and seizure of aluminum/steel contacts. The research includes an experimental study of scuffing of aluminum/steel contacts under dry sliding conditions, a study of the physics of the scuffing process, evaluation of various hypotheses for scuffing, and modeling of scuffing. The experiments are conducted in a custom-designed tribometer, which provides accurate control of the environmental conditions. Special instrumentation, experimental procedures and software are developed as a part of the experimental program. These provide a reliable reproduction and identification of scuffing under laboratory conditions. The scuffing characteristics of five materials are obtained in air and refrigerant (R134a) environments. The effects of load, sliding velocity, mechanical strength, environmental temperature, specimen geometry, time, loading history, and type of environment are evaluated. The mechanisms leading to scuffing are studied by examination of surfaces, subsurfaces and wear debris of specimens in the process of scuffing. Quantitative measurements of subsurface plastic strain are also obtained. The theoretical part of the study includes the development of a finite element model for the contact of runned-in rough surfaces and several other models for subsurface stresses, temperatures, and strains. These models provide information about the local conditions in

  9. In vitro inhibition of adhesion of Escherichia coli strains by Xylitol

    Annelisa Farah da Silva; Érika Yoko Suzuki; Aline Siqueira Ferreira; Murilo Gomes Oliveira; Sílvio Silvério da Silva; Nádia Rezende Barbosa Raposo

    2011-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate xylitol's antimicrobial and anti-adherence activities on Escherichia coli (ATCC 8739) and on another clinical strain enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC). In vitro minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) test and adhesion assays were performed using 0.5, 2.5 and 5.0% xylitol. It was found that xylitol did not have antimicrobial properties on these strains. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) demonstrated that the slides treated with xylitol had a significant r...

  10. Controlling the Adhesion of Superhydrophobic Surfaces Using Electrolyte Jet Machining Techniques

    Xiaolong Yang; Xin Liu; Yao Lu; Shining Zhou; Mingqian Gao; Jinlong Song; Wenji Xu

    2016-01-01

    Patterns with controllable adhesion on superhydrophobic areas have various biomedical and chemical applications. Electrolyte jet machining technique (EJM), an electrochemical machining method, was firstly exploited in constructing dimples with various profiles on the superhydrophobic Al alloy surface using different processing parameters. Sliding angles of water droplets on those dimples firstly increased and then stabilized at a certain value with the increase of the processing time or the a...

  11. Characterization of adhesively bonded joints using bulk adhesive properties

    Kon, Haruhiko

    1991-01-01

    Though using bulk adhesive properties to predict adhesively bonded joint response has yet to be proven infallible, based upon the success of previous works, this effort attempts to shed some light on the stresses present in a typical automotive bonded joint. Adhesive material properties obtained in previous works were used in a finite element analysis of a simulated automotive joint to predict the stresses in that joint. The automotive joint analyzed was a simplified repr...

  12. Long-term subglacial sliding patterns based on a sliding law with cavitation

    Ugelvig, Sofie Vej; Egholm, D.L.

    In ice-sheet models and glacial landscape evolution models, subglacial sliding rates are often related to basal shear stress by a power-law. However, the power-law relationship implies that the subglacial bed can provide unlimited levels of basal drag as sliding rates increases, which is recognized...... hydrology. The sliding law includes an upper bound to the basal drag and depends on the effects of longitudinal and transverse stress components for obtaining force balance along the glacier bed. Computational experiments indicate that high annually averaged sliding rates concentrate along valley sides when...... as an inadequate assumption, particularly when the effects of subglacial cavities are considered (Schoof 2005). We have implemented a glacial sliding law suggested by Schoof (2005) in a depth-integrated higher-order ice-sheet model (Egholm et al. 2011) and coupled this to a model for glacial...

  13. Friction and adhesion of gecko-inspired PDMS flaps on rough surfaces.

    Yu, Jing; Chary, Sathya; Das, Saurabh; Tamelier, John; Turner, Kimberly L; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2012-08-01

    Geckos have developed a unique hierarchical structure to maintain climbing ability on surfaces with different roughness, one of the extremely important parameters that affect the friction and adhesion forces between two surfaces. Although much attention has been paid on fabricating various structures that mimic the hierarchical structure of a gecko foot, yet no systematic effort, in experiment or theory, has been made to quantify the effect of surface roughness on the performance of the fabricated structures that mimic the hierarchical structure of geckos. Using a modified surface forces apparatus (SFA), we measured the adhesion and friction forces between microfabricated tilted PDMS flaps and optically smooth SiO(2) and rough SiO(2) surfaces created by plasma etching. Anisotropic adhesion and friction forces were measured when sliding the top glass surface along (+y) and against (-y) the tilted direction of the flaps. Increasing the surface roughness first increased the adhesion and friction forces measured between the flaps and the rough surface due to topological matching of the two surfaces but then led to a rapid decrease in both of these forces. Our results demonstrate that the surface roughness significantly affects the performance of gecko mimetic adhesives and that different surface textures can either increase or decrease the adhesion and friction forces of the fabricated adhesives. PMID:22779923

  14. Mechanisms of self-cleaning in fluid-based smooth adhesive pads of insects

    Pressure-sensitive adhesives such as tapes become easily contaminated by dust particles. By contrast, animal adhesive pads are able to self-clean and can be reused millions of times over a lifetime with little reduction in adhesion. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying this ability are still unclear. Here we test in adhesive pads of stick insects (Carausius morosus) (1) whether self-cleaning is enhanced by the liquid pad secretion, and (2) whether alternating push–pull movements aid the removal of particles. We measured attachment forces of insect pads on glass after contamination with 10 µm polystyrene beads. While the amount of fluid present on the pad showed no effect on the pads' susceptibility to contamination, the recovery of adhesive forces after contamination was faster when higher fluid levels were present. However, this effect does not appear to be based on a faster rate of self-cleaning since the number of spheres deposited with each step did not increase with fluid level. Instead, the fluid may aid the recovery of adhesive forces by filling in the gaps between contaminating particles, similar to the fluid's function on rough surfaces. Further, we found no evidence that an alternation of pushing and pulling movements, as found in natural steps, leads to a more efficient recovery of adhesion than repeated pulling slides. (paper)

  15. Remote Controlling and Monitoring of Microscopic Slides

    Remotely controlled microscopic slide was designed using especial Graphical User Interface (GUI) which interfaces the user at remote location with the real microscope using site and the user can easily view and control the slide present on the microscope's stage. Precise motors have been used to allow the movement in all the three dimensions required by a pathologist. The pathologist can easily access these slides from any remote location and so the physical presence of the pathologist is now made easy. This invention would increase the health care efficiency by reducing the time and cost of diagnosis, making it very easy to get the expert's opinion and supporting the pathologist to relocate himself for his work. The microscope is controlled with computer with an attractive Graphical User Interface (GUI), through which a pathologist can easily monitor, control and record the image of the slide. The pathologist can now do his work regardless of his location, time, cost and physically presence of lab equipment. The technology will help the specialist in viewing the patients slide from any location in the world. He would be able to monitor and control the stage. This will also help the pathological laboratories in getting opinion from senior pathologist who are present at any far location in the world. This system also reduces the life risks of the patients. (author)

  16. Adhesive tape exfoliation

    Bohr, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Single-crystal graphite can be cleaved by the use of an adhesive tape. This was also the initial route for obtaining graphene, a one-layer thick graphite slab. In this letter a few simple and fun considerations are presented in an attempt to shed some light on why this procedure is successful. In...... particular on the nature of the surprisingly small number of repetitive steps that are needed in order to obtain a single-layer slab. Two frameworks for exfoliation are investigated: parallel exfoliation involving repetitive simultaneous cleaving, the other, serial exfoliation, which involves the repetitive...

  17. Polyurethane adhesive ingestion.

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Bronstein, Alvin C

    2013-02-01

    Polyurethane adhesives are found in a large number of household products in the United States and are used for a variety of purposes. Several brands of these expanding wood glues (those containing diphenylmethane diisocyanate [MDI]) have the potential to form gastrointestinal (GI) foreign bodies if ingested. The ingested adhesive forms an expanding ball of glue in the esophagus and gastric lumen. This expansion is caused by a polymerization reaction using the heat, water, and gastric acids of the stomach. A firm mass is created that can be 4-8 times its original volume. As little as 2 oz of glue have been reported to develop gastric foreign bodies. The obstructive mass is reported to form within minutes of ingestion of the adhesive. The foreign body can lead to esophageal impaction and obstruction, airway obstruction, gastric outflow obstruction, mucosal hemorrhage, ulceration, laceration, perforation of the esophageal and gastric linings, and death. Clinical signs following ingestion include anorexia, lethargy, vomiting, tachypnea, and abdominal distention and pain, and typically develop within 12 hours. Clinical signs may depend upon the size of the mass. If left untreated, perforation and rupture of the esophagus or stomach can occur. The glue mass does not stick to the GI mucosa and is not always detectable on abdominal palpation. Radiographs are recommended to confirm the presence of the "glue-ball" foreign body, and radiographic evidence of the obstruction may be seen as early as 4-6 hours following ingestion. Emesis is contraindicated owing to the risk of aspiration of the glue into the respiratory tree or the subsequent lodging of the expanding glue mass in the esophagus. Likewise, efforts to dilute the glue and prevent the formation of the foreign body through administration of liquids, activated charcoal, or bulk-forming products to push the foreign body through the GI tract have proven ineffective. Even endoscopy performed to remove the foreign body has

  18. Syndecan proteoglycans and cell adhesion

    Woods, A; Oh, E S; Couchman, J R

    1998-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that a family of transmembrane proteoglycans, the syndecans, have important roles in cell adhesion. They participate through binding of matrix ligand to their glycosaminoglycan chains, clustering, and the induction of signaling cascades to modify the internal microfilament...... organization. Syndecans can modulate the type of adhesive responses induced by other matrix ligand-receptor interactions, such as those involving the integrins, and so contribute to the control of cell morphology, adhesion and migration....

  19. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...... between two identical fragments of the NCAM. Also during the past year, a link between homophilic cell adhesion and several signal transduction pathways has been proposed, connecting the event of cell surface adhesion to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth. Finally, the stimulation of neurite...

  20. Develop and Manufacture an airlock sliding tray

    Lawton, Cindy M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-02-26

    Objective: The goal of this project is to continue to develop an airlock sliding tray and then partner with an industrial manufacturing company for production. The sliding tray will be easily installed into and removed from most glovebox airlocks in a few minutes. Technical Approach: A prototype of a sliding tray has been developed and tested in the LANL cold lab and 35 trays are presently being built for the plutonium facility (PF-4). The current, recently approved design works for a 14-inch diameter round airlock and has a tray length of approximately 20 inches. The grant will take the already tested and approved round technology and design for the square airlock. These two designs will be suitable for the majority of the existing airlocks in the multitude of DOE facilities. Partnering with an external manufacturer will allow for production of the airlock trays at a much lower cost and increase the availability of the product for all DOE sites. Project duration is estimated to be 12-13 months. Benefits: The purpose of the airlock sliding trays is fourfold: 1) Mitigate risk of rotator cuff injuries, 2) Improve ALARA, 3) Reduce risk of glovebox glove breaches and glove punctures, and 4) Improve worker comfort. I have had the opportunity to visit many other DOE facilities including Savannah, Y-12, ORNL, Sandia, and Livermore for assistance with ergonomic problems and/or injuries. All of these sites would benefit from the airlock sliding tray and I can assume all other DOE facilities with gloveboxes built prior to 1985 could also use the sliding trays.

  1. Experimental Investigation on Caisson Breakwater Sliding

    Ruol, Piero; Martin, Paolo; Andersen, Thomas Lykke;

    2014-01-01

    This note presents wave flume experiments, carried out at Aalborg University, measuring the horizontal sliding distance of a vertical breakwater in 1:40 scale. Horizontal and uplift wave induced pressures were accurately measured simultaneously with the caisson movements. Caissons of different...... weight and same geometries are tested under regular and irregular waves. It is found that, under breaking conditions, the expected inaccuracy of the prediction of the force, inherent on the variability of the breaking process, induce unacceptable errors in the prediction of the sliding. This observation...

  2. Asymmetric frictional sliding between incommensurate surfaces

    Santoro, Giuseppe E.; Vanossi, Andrea; Manini, Nicola; Divitini, Giorgio; Tosatti, Erio

    2006-01-01

    We study the frictional sliding of two ideally incommensurate surfaces with a third incommensurate sheet - a sort of extended lubricant - in between. When the mutual ratios of the three periodicities in this sandwich geometry are chosen to be the golden mean \\phi=(1+\\sqrt 5)/2, this system is believed to be statically pinned for any choice of system parameters. In the present study we overcome this pinning and force the two "substrates" to slide with a mutual velocity V_ext, analyzing the res...

  3. Stretchable, Adhesion-Tunable Dry Adhesive by Surface Wrinkling

    Jeong, Hoon Eui

    2010-02-16

    We introduce a simple yet robust method of fabricating a stretchable, adhesion-tunable dry adhesive by combining replica molding and surface wrinkling. By utilizing a thin, wrinkled polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) sheet with a thickness of 1 mm with built-in micropillars, active, dynamic control of normal and shear adhesion was achieved. Relatively strong normal (∼10.8 N/cm2) and shear adhesion (∼14.7 N/cm2) forces could be obtained for a fully extended (strained) PDMS sheet (prestrain of∼3%), whereas the forces could be rapidly reduced to nearly zero once the prestrain was released (prestrain of ∼0.5%). Moreover, durability tests demonstrated that the adhesion strength in both the normal and shear directions was maintained over more than 100 cycles of attachment and detachment. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  4. Improved Adhesion and Compliancy of Hierarchical Fibrillar Adhesives.

    Li, Yasong; Gates, Byron D; Menon, Carlo

    2015-08-01

    The gecko relies on van der Waals forces to cling onto surfaces with a variety of topography and composition. The hierarchical fibrillar structures on their climbing feet, ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale, are hypothesized to be key elements for the animal to conquer both smooth and rough surfaces. An epoxy-based artificial hierarchical fibrillar adhesive was prepared to study the influence of the hierarchical structures on the properties of a dry adhesive. The presented experiments highlight the advantages of a hierarchical structure despite a reduction of overall density and aspect ratio of nanofibrils. In contrast to an adhesive containing only nanometer-size fibrils, the hierarchical fibrillar adhesives exhibited a higher adhesion force and better compliancy when tested on an identical substrate. PMID:26167951

  5. Effect of adhesive thickness on adhesively bonded T-joint

    The aim of this work is to analyze the effect of adhesive thickness on tensile strength of adhesively bonded stainless steel T-joint. Specimens were made from SUS 304 Stainless Steel plate and SUS 304 Stainless Steel perforated plate. Four T-joint specimens with different adhesive thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm) were made. Experiment result shows T-joint specimen with adhesive thickness of 1.0 mm yield highest maximum load. Identical T-joint specimen jointed by spot welding was also tested. Tensile test shows welded T-Joint had eight times higher tensile load than adhesively bonded T-joint. However, in low pressure application such as urea granulator chamber, high tensile strength is not mandatory. This work is useful for designer in fertilizer industry and others who are searching for alternative to spot welding

  6. Wear mechanism for spray deposited Al-Si/SiCp composites under dry sliding condition

    滕杰; 李华培; 陈刚

    2015-01-01

    Al-Si/15%SiCp (volume fraction) composites with different silicon contents were fabricated by spray deposition technique, and typical microstructures of these composites were studied by optical microscopy (OM). Dry sliding wear tests were carried out using a block-on-ring wear machine to investigate the effect of applied load range of 10−220 N on the wear and friction behavior of these composites sliding against SAE 52100 grade bearing steel. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDAX) were utilized to examine the morphologies of the worn surfaces in order to observe the wear characteristics and investigate the wear mechanism. The results show that the wear behavior of these composites is dependent on the silicon content in the matrix alloy and the applied load. Al-Si/15%SiCp composites with higher silicon content exhibit better wear resistance in the applied load range. Under lower loads, the major wear mechanisms are oxidation wear and abrasive wear for all tested composites. Under higher loads, severe adhesive wear becomes the main wear mechanisms for Al-7Si/15%SiCp and Al-13Si/15%SiCp composites, while Al-20Si/15%SiCp presents a compound wear mechanism, consisting of oxidation, abrasive wear and adhesion wear.

  7. Sliding mode control of wind-induced vibrations using fuzzy sliding surface and gain adaptation

    Thenozhi, Suresh; Yu, Wen

    2016-04-01

    Although fuzzy/adaptive sliding mode control can reduce the chattering problem in structural vibration control applications, they require the equivalent control and the upper bounds of the system uncertainties. In this paper, we used fuzzy logic to approximate the standard sliding surface and designed a dead-zone adaptive law for tuning the switching gain of the sliding mode control. The stability of the proposed controller is established using Lyapunov stability theory. A six-storey building prototype equipped with an active mass damper has been used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller towards the wind-induced vibrations.

  8. Syndecans, signaling, and cell adhesion

    Couchman, J R; Woods, A

    1996-01-01

    structures within the heparan sulfate chains, leaving the roles of chondroitin sulfate chains and extracellular portion of the core proteins to be elucidated. Evidence that syndecans are a class of receptor involved in cell adhesion is mounting, and their small cytoplasmic domains may link with the...... transmembrane signaling from matrix to cytoskeleton, as proposed for other classes of adhesion receptors....

  9. Interventional microadhesiolysis: A new nonsurgical release technique for adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder

    Lim Tae-Kyun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A nonsurgical intervention, interventional microadhesiolysis, was developed to release adhesions in joints and soft tissues. This paper introduces the procedure and evaluates the efficacy of the intervention for adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder. Methods Ten patients (five men and five women with primary adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder were treated at a chronic pain management center in Korea. Three specially made needles are used in interventional microadhesiolysis: the Round, Flexed Round, and Ahn's needles. A Round Needle is inserted on the skin over middle of supraspinatus and advanced under the acromion and acromioclavicular joint (subacromial release. A Flexed Round Needle is inserted two-fingers caudal to the inferior border of the scapular spine and advanced over the capsule sliding on the surface of infraspinatus muscle-tendon fascia. The capsule is released while an assistant simultaneously passively abducts the shoulder to full abduction (posteroinferior capsule release. An Ahn's Needle is inserted on the skin over the lesser tubercle and advanced under the coracoid process sliding on the surface of the subscapularis muscle (subcoracoid release. Results After the patients underwent interventional microadhesiolysis, the self-rated pain score or severity declined significantly (p p Conclusion Our findings suggest that interventional microadhesiolysis is effective for managing adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder.

  10. Mechanical Properties and Adhesion of a Micro Structured Polymer Blend

    Brunero Cappella

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A 50:50 blend of polystyrene (PS and poly(n-butyl methacrylate (PnBMA has been characterized with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM in Tapping Mode and with force-distance curves. The polymer solution has been spin-coated on a glass slide. PnBMA builds a uniform film on the glass substrate with a thickness of @200 nm. On top of it, the PS builds an approximately 100 nm thick film. The PS-film undergoes dewetting, leading to the formation of holes surrounded by about 2 µm large rims. In those regions of the sample, where the distance between the holes is larger than about 4 µm, light depressions in the PS film can be observed. Topography, dissipated energy, adhesion, stiffness and elastic modulus have been measured on these three regions (PnBMA, PS in the rims and PS in the depressions. The two polymers can be distinguished in all images, since PnBMA has a higher adhesion and a smaller stiffness than PS, and hence a higher dissipated energy. Moreover, the polystyrene in the depressions shows a very high adhesion (approximately as high as PnBMA and its stiffness is intermediate between that of PnBMA and that of PS in the rims. This is attributed to higher mobility of the PS chains in the depressions, which are precursors of new holes.

  11. Investigation of adhesion during operation of MEMS cantilevers

    Ali, Shaikh M.; Phinney, Leslie M.

    2004-01-01

    Reliability of MEMS is a major concern for the commercialization of laboratory prototypes. Surface adhesion or stiction strongly affects the reliability of MEMS devices which have sliding or rubbing contacts. Determination of adhesion energies, adhesion forces, and pull-off forces are important for predicting stiction in MEMS. We present an experimental technique to estimate the pull-off forces for MEMS surfaces. Polysilicon microcantilevers were electrostatically actuated using gradually varying voltages. A hysteresis was observed in the voltage at which the tip of the cantilevers made and broke contact with the substrate. Pull-off forces were estimated from the hysteresis in the voltage values using a strain energy formulation. The pull-off forces for microcantilevers dried out of isopropyl alcohol and repaired using laser irradiation were estimated to be in the range of 45-121 nN. The role of adhered length, variable external loading, and actuating signal on in-use stiction is also investigated. From our experimental results, we demonstrate an empirical approach to predict in-use stiction of microcantilevers.

  12. Hyaluronan-mediated cellular adhesion

    Curtis, Jennifer

    2005-03-01

    Many cells surround themselves with a cushioning halo of polysaccharides that is further strengthened and organized by proteins. In fibroblasts and chrondrocytes, the primary component of this pericellular matrix is hyaluronan, a large linear polyanion. Hyaluronan production is linked to a variety of disease, developmental, and physiological processes. Cells manipulate the concentration of hyaluronan and hyaluronan receptors for numerous activities including modulation of cell adhesion, cell motility, and differentiation. Recent investigations by identify hyaluronan's role in mediating early-stage cell adhesion. An open question is how the cell removes the 0.5-10 micron thick pericellular matrix to allow for further mature adhesion events requiring nanometer scale separations. In this investigation, holographic optical tweezers are used to study the adhesion and viscoelastic properties of chondrocytes' pericellular matrix. Ultimately, we aim to shed further light on the spatial and temporal details of the dramatic transition from micron to nanometer gaps between the cell and its adhesive substrate.

  13. Current Cigarette Use Among Adults (BRFSS) PDF Slides

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Download the current cigarette use among adults slides. These slides are available in PDF and PowerPoint formats. The PowerPoint version can be found at:...

  14. Current Cigarette Use Among Youth (YRBSS) PDF Slides

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Download the current cigarette use among youth slides. These slides are available in PDF and PowerPoint formats. The PowerPoint version can be found at:...

  15. Excise Tax Rates On Packs Of Cigarettes PDF Slides

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Download the current excise tax rates on packs of cigarettes slides. These slides are available in PDF and PowerPoint formats. The PowerPoint version can be found...

  16. [Retention of adhesive bridges].

    Raes, F; De Boever, J

    1994-04-01

    Since the development of adhesive bridges in the early seventies, the retention and therefore the durability of these bridges has been tremendously improved. Conditioning of the non-precious metal by silanisation, careful acid etching of the enamel and the use of the appropriate composite resin are of prime importance. Furthermore, the meticulous preparation with enough interproximal embrace, occlusal rests, interocclusal clearance and cingulum stops is equally important. Including more teeth in the design does not necessarily lead to an improved retention. Besides the material and technical aspects, the whole clinical procedure needs much attention. The retention does not depend on one single factor, but on the precision of all the necessary clinical steps and on a well-defined selection of the material. In this way a five-year survival rate of close to 80% can be obtained. PMID:11830965

  17. Effect of fibril shape on adhesive properties

    Soto, Daniel; Hill, Ginel; Parness, Aaron; Esparza, Noé; Cutkosky, Mark; Kenny, Tom

    2010-08-01

    Research into the gecko's adhesive system revealed a unique architecture for adhesives using tiny hairs. By using a stiff material (β-keratin) to create a highly structured adhesive, the gecko's system demonstrates properties not seen in traditional pressure-sensitive adhesives which use a soft, unstructured planar layer. In contrast to pressure sensitive adhesives, the gecko adhesive displays frictional adhesion, in which increased shear force allows it to withstand higher normal loads. Synthetic fibrillar adhesives have been fabricated but not all demonstrate this frictional adhesion property. Here we report the dual-axis force testing of single silicone rubber pillars from synthetic adhesive arrays. We find that the shape of the adhesive pillar dictates whether frictional adhesion or pressure-sensitive behavior is observed. This work suggests that both types of behavior can be achieved with structures much larger than gecko terminal structures. It also indicates that subtle differences in the shape of these pillars can significantly influence their properties.

  18. Enhancing Creative Thinking through Designing Electronic Slides

    Mokaram, Al-Ali Khaled; Al-Shabatat, Ahmad Mohammad; Fong, Fook Soon; Abdallah, Andaleeb Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    During the shifting of teaching and learning methods using computer technologies, much emphasis was paid on the knowledge content more than the thinking skills. Thus, this study investigated the effects of a computer application, namely, designing electronic slides on the development of creative thinking skills of a sample of undergraduate…

  19. Adaptive Sliding Mode Control for Hydraulic Drives

    Schmidt, Lasse; Andersen, Torben Ole; Pedersen, Henrik C.;

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new adaptive sliding mode controller generally applicable for position tracking control of electro-hydraulic valve-cylinder drives (VCD’s). The proposed control scheme requires limited knowledge on system parameters, and employs only piston- and valve spool position feedback...

  20. WWNPQFT-2010 - Slides of the presentations

    This document is made up of the slides of the presentations. The object of this workshop is to consolidate and publicize new efforts in non-perturbative field theories. The main topics are quantum chromodynamics, Yang-Mills theory, effective locality, the Gribov-Zwanziger Lagrangian, and renormalization. A presentation is dedicated to the initial stages of high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

  1. A thermodynamic model of sliding friction

    Lasse Makkonen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A first principles thermodynamic model of sliding friction is derived. The model predictions are in agreement with the observed friction laws both in macro- and nanoscale. When applied to calculating the friction coefficient the model provides a quantitative agreement with recent atomic force microscopy measurements on a number of materials.

  2. Variable structure system with fuzzy sliding surface

    Fuzzy logic controller has succeeded in many control problems such that the conventional control theory has difficulties to deal with. However the design procedure for fuzzy logic controller depends large amounts on the expert's knowledge or trial and error. Moreover, due to the linguistic expression of fuzzy controller, it is very difficult to guarantee the stability and robustness of the system. In this paper we propose a design scheme for the fuzzy controller using the variable structure control (VSC) theory. Instead of fuzzifying the error and error rate, we fuzzify the sliding surface, that is, we construct a variable structure controller with the fuzzy sliding surface. The proposed controller can eliminate the chattering problem of the conventional VSC. We show this property is due to the facts that the fuzzy sliding surface acts as a boundary layer and the control law in this boundary layer is the continuous approximation between the extreme control values. It is also shown that introducing the dynamics on the fuzzy sliding surface reduces error. As a result, we can guarantee the stability and robustness of fuzzy logic controller by the help of VSC theory. (Author)

  3. [Development of an obstetrical pocket slide rule].

    Krüger, G

    1986-01-01

    We present a slide rule to value old obstetric and ultrasound findings in prenatal care day by day. We have developed the scale. Manufacturer is VEB Mantissa Dresden, sales department is Staatliches Versorgungskontor für Pharmazie und Medizintechnik. PMID:3727852

  4. Transistor h parameter conversion slide rule

    Brantner, R. E.

    1967-01-01

    Slide rule enables the ready conversion of transistor h parameters from one form to another and reduces calculation time by a factor of 5 to 10. The scales are selected to cover all ranges of each parameter that will normally exist for any transistor, and answers are given in the correct order of magnitude, making powers-of-ten calculations unnecessary.

  5. Coupling of cytoplasm and adhesion dynamics determines cell polarization and locomotion

    Bock, Martin; Möhl, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Observations of single epidermal cells on flat adhesive substrates have revealed two distinct morphological and functional states, namely a non-migrating symmetric unpolarized state and a migrating asymmetric polarized state. These states are characterized by different spatial distributions and dynamics of important biochemical cell components: F-actin and myosin-II form the contractile part of the cytoskeleton, and integrin receptors in the plasma membrane connect F-actin filaments to the substratum. In this way, focal adhesion complexes are assembled, which determine cytoskeletal force transduction and subsequent cell locomotion. So far, physical models have reduced this phenomenon either to gradients in regulatory control molecules or to different mechanics of the actin filament system in different regions of the cell. Here we offer an alternative and self-organizational model incorporating polymerization, pushing and sliding of filaments, as well as formation of adhesion sites and their force dependent ki...

  6. Grain boundary sliding in beta phase zircaloy-2

    Grain boundary sliding in zircaloy-2 was investigated in torsion using bamboo-structured wire coiled into helical springs. The rate of sliding is shown to vary with stress raised to a power slightly greater than unity with an activation energy close to that for lattice diffusion. Results are interpreted in terms of sliding controlled by diffusion between undulations in the boundary geometry. The geometry required to satisfy the observed rates of sliding is estimated

  7. Impact of oils and coatings on adhesion of structural adhesives

    Hagström, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    This is a master thesis project conducted for Scania CV AB in collaboration with Swerea Kimab. The purpose is to examine how oils and coatings on the surface affect the adhesion of adhesives. Earlier work done by Scania indicate that the amount of oil applied may have an impact on the adhesion. Substrates tested are hot dipped galvanised steel, electro galvanised. AlSi and ZnMg. Oils used are Anticorit RP 3802 that is an anti-corrosive oil and Renoform 3802 that is a drawing oil. The two adhes...

  8. Slides and the Foreign Language Teacher: A Bibliography.

    Galt, Alan

    This bibliography lists 275 items relating to the use of visual and audiovisual aids in the foreign language classroom. The items are entered under the following major headings: (1) Audiovisual Aids; (2) Photography; (3) Picture Composition; (4) Slides and Photographs for Teaching; and (5) Slides and Slide Shows: Production and Presentation.…

  9. Wet adhesion and adhesive locomotion of snails on anti-adhesive non-wetting surfaces.

    Neil J Shirtcliffe

    Full Text Available Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted, texture (smooth, rough or granular or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces.

  10. Wet Adhesion and Adhesive Locomotion of Snails on Anti-Adhesive Non-Wetting Surfaces

    Shirtcliffe, Neil J.; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted), texture (smooth, rough or granular) or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces. PMID:22693563

  11. Marine Bioinspired Underwater Contact Adhesion.

    Clancy, Sean K; Sodano, Antonio; Cunningham, Dylan J; Huang, Sharon S; Zalicki, Piotr J; Shin, Seunghan; Ahn, B Kollbe

    2016-05-01

    Marine mussels and barnacles are sessile biofouling organisms that adhere to a number of surfaces in wet environments and maintain remarkably strong bonds. Previous synthetic approaches to mimic biological wet adhesive properties have focused mainly on the catechol moiety, present in mussel foot proteins (mfps), and especially rich in the interfacial mfps, for example, mfp-3 and -5, found at the interface between the mussel plaque and substrate. Barnacles, however, do not use Dopa for their wet adhesion, but are instead rich in noncatecholic aromatic residues. Due to this anomaly, we were intrigued to study the initial contact adhesion properties of copolymerized acrylate films containing the key functionalities of barnacle cement proteins and interfacial mfps, for example, aromatic (catecholic or noncatecholic), cationic, anionic, and nonpolar residues. The initial wet contact adhesion of the copolymers was measured using a probe tack testing apparatus with a flat-punch contact geometry. The wet contact adhesion of an optimized, bioinspired copolymer film was ∼15.0 N/cm(2) in deionized water and ∼9.0 N/cm(2) in artificial seawater, up to 150 times greater than commercial pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) tapes (∼0.1 N/cm(2)). Furthermore, maximum wet contact adhesion was obtained at ∼pH 7, suggesting viability for biomedical applications. PMID:27046671

  12. Adhesion and multi-materials

    Adhesion is a multidisciplinary science relevant to many practical fields. The main application of adhesion is bonding by adhesives. This technique is widely used in the industrial world and more specifically in the advanced technical domains. Adhesion is also involved in multi-component materials such as coatings, multilayer materials, polymer blends, composite materials... The multidisciplinary aspect of adhesion is well demonstrated by considering the wide variety of concepts, models and theories proposed for its description. An example of the adhesion between a fiber and a matrix in a composite material will lead to a general model relating the molecular properties of the interface to its capacity of stress transfer and hence to the macroscopic mechanical properties of the composite. This relationship is valid whatever the fiber (glass, carbon, polymeric) or the polymer matrix (thermoplastics, thermosetting). Any deviation from this model can be attributed to the existence of an interfacial zone or interphase exhibiting properties, mainly mechanical properties, different from the bulk matrix. Two examples are examined: the first one deals with the creation of a trans crystalline interphase in a semi-crystalline thermoplastic matrix and the second one is concerned with the formation of a pseudo glassy interphase in an elastomer matrix. These examples stress the need for complementary approaches in the understanding of adhesion phenomena at different levels of knowledge, from molecular to macroscopic. They also show how important it is to understand the mechanisms of formation of inter phases in order to be able to master the performance of multicomponent materials. (Author)

  13. Focal Adhesion Kinases in Adhesion Structures and Disease

    Pierre P. Eleniste

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases.

  14. Focal adhesion kinases in adhesion structures and disease.

    Eleniste, Pierre P; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases. PMID:22888421

  15. Adhesives from modified soy protein

    Sun, Susan; Wang, Donghai; Zhong, Zhikai; Yang, Guang

    2008-08-26

    The, present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF and PPF resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

  16. Photovoltaic module with adhesion promoter

    Xavier, Grace

    2013-10-08

    Photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters and methods for fabricating photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters are described. A photovoltaic module includes a solar cell including a first surface and a second surface, the second surface including a plurality of interspaced back-side contacts. A first glass layer is coupled to the first surface by a first encapsulating layer. A second glass layer is coupled to the second surface by a second encapsulating layer. At least a portion of the second encapsulating layer is bonded directly to the plurality of interspaced back-side contacts by an adhesion promoter.

  17. Focal Adhesion Kinases in Adhesion Structures and Disease

    Pierre P. Eleniste; Angela Bruzzaniti

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organiza...

  18. Fault detection and fault-tolerant control using sliding modes

    Alwi, Halim; Tan, Chee Pin

    2011-01-01

    ""Fault Detection and Fault-tolerant Control Using Sliding Modes"" is the first text dedicated to showing the latest developments in the use of sliding-mode concepts for fault detection and isolation (FDI) and fault-tolerant control in dynamical engineering systems. It begins with an introduction to the basic concepts of sliding modes to provide a background to the field. This is followed by chapters that describe the use and design of sliding-mode observers for FDI using robust fault reconstruction. The development of a class of sliding-mode observers is described from first principles throug

  19. Seismic behavior with sliding of overhead travelling crane

    In this study, the seismic behavior of an overhead travelling crane with the sliding between travelling wheels and rails is examined. First, the dynamic characteristic test of the actual crane installed in a reactor building and the sliding test of the rigid-element model to observe the basic sliding characteristic were performed. Next, to examine the dynamic response with sliding, shaking tests using the scaled model of an actual crane were conducted. From these results, useful design information about seismic behavior of an overhead travelling crane was obtained. It was also observed that numerical predictions considering sliding behavior have good agreement with the experimental results and are applicable to seismic design. (author)

  20. Accelerating solitons for sliding-frequency filter systems

    Parker, D. F.; Radha, Ch.; Facão, Margarida

    2002-06-01

    The sliding-frequency filter equation is shown to have similarity solutions which travel with steady profile but with constant acceleration. Over a wide range of the gain, filter strength and sliding-rate parameters, the pulse envelope is very well approximated by a sech profile. However, when the sliding rate is large, the chirp differs greatly from the usually assumed linear variation of frequency through the pulse. The amplitude and chirp are found for small and moderate sliding rate by a perturbation analysis and, for larger sliding rates, by solving a nonlinear eigenvalue problem for a nonautonomous differential equation.

  1. An Efficient Method for Distributing Animated Slides of Web Presentations

    Yusuke Niwa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Attention control of audience is required for suc-cessful presentations, therefore giving a presentation with im-mediate reaction, called reactive presentation, to unexpected changes in the context given by the audience is important. Examples of functions for the reactive presentation are shape animation effects on slides and slide transition effects. Understanding the functions that realize the reactive pre-sentation on the Web can be useful. In this work, we present an effective method for synchronizing shape animation effects on the Web, such as moving the objects and changing the size and color of the shape objects. The main idea is to make a video of animated slides, called Web Slide Media, including the page information of slides as movie chapter information for synchronization. Moreover, we explain a method to reduce the file size of the Web slide media by removing all shape animation effects and slide transition effects from a Web slide media item, called Sparse Web Slide Media. We demonstrate that the performance of the system is enough for practical use and the file size of the Sparse Web Slide Media is smaller than the file size of the Web Slide Media.

  2. An updated nuclear criticality slide rule. Technical basis

    In January 1974, a limited distribution report, entitled open-quotes A Slide Rule for Estimating Nuclear Criticality Information,close quotes was written by C. M. Hopper for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant as a tool for emergency response to nuclear criticality accidents. Because of several shortcomings of the original slide rule, work began recently to update the slide rule using modern computational tools. Volume 1 of this report describes the analyses performed in support of this updated slide-rule tool and includes a sample, nonfunctioning version of the new slide rule. Volume 2 contains the functional version of the slide rule. The new slide-rule tool provides capabilities for the continued updating of accident information during the evolution of emergency response, including victim exposure information; potential exposures to emergency reentry personnel; estimates of future radiation fields; and fission-yield estimates

  3. Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of a Novel 6351 Al-Al4SiC4 Composite

    Mondal, Manas Kumar; Biswas, Koushik; Saha, Atanu; Maity, Joydeep

    2015-02-01

    In this research work the dry sliding wear behavior of 6351 Al alloy and 6351 Al based composites possessing varying amount of (2-7 vol.%) in situ Al4SiC4 reinforcement was investigated at low sliding speed (1 m/s) against a hardened EN 31 disk at different loads. In general, the wear mechanism involved adhesion and microcutting abrasion. Under selected loads (9.8 and 24.5 N), the overall wear resistance increased with increasing content of Al4SiC4 particles since particles stood tall against the process of wear. Besides, strain hardening of the matrix played an additional role to provide wear resistance. Therefore, the newly developed 6351Al-Al4SiC4 composite can be used as light weight wear resistance component in industry.

  4. Denture Adhesives - A Literature Review

    Sudhanshu Shekhar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Successful complete denture treatment combines exemplary technique, effective patient rapport and education and familiarity with all possible management options to provide the highest degree of patient satisfaction. Dentists need to know about denture adhesives to be able to identify those patients who actually need them and to be able to educate them about the advantages, disadvantages and correct use of these products. Denture adhesives are commercially available nontoxic, soluble materials that when applied to the tissue surface of dentures enhance their retention, stability and performance. They were introduced in dentistry in the late 18th century. The first patent related to adhesives was issued in 1913, followed in the 1920’s and 1930’s. The purpose of the use of denture adhesives can be described as to subjectively benefit denture-wearers with improved stability, retention and comfort of their dentures, and with improved incisal force, masticatory ability, and confidence.

  5. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    Akihiko Murata; Shin-Ichi Hayashi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of...

  6. Laser surface modification and adhesion

    Mittal, K L

    2014-01-01

    The book provides a unique overview on laser techniques and applications for the purpose of improving adhesion by altering surface chemistry and topography/morphology of the substrate. It details laser surface modification techniques for a wide range of industrially relevant materials (plastics, metals, ceramics, composites) with the aim to improve and enhance their adhesion to other materials. The joining of different materials is of critical importance in the fabrication of many and varied products.

  7. Adhesive capsulitis: a case report

    Kazemi, Mohsen

    2000-01-01

    Adhesive capsulitis or frozen shoulder is an uncommon entity in athletes. However, it is a common cause of shoulder pain and disability in the general population. Although it is a self limiting ailment, its rather long, restrictive and painful course forces the affected person to seek treatment. Conservative management remains the mainstay treatment of adhesive capsulitis. This includes chiropractic manipulation of the shoulder, therapeutic modalities, mobilization, exercise, soft tissue ther...

  8. The Tribology of Sliding Elastic Media

    Cule, D.; Hwa, T.

    1996-01-01

    The tribology of a sliding elastic continuum in contact with a disordered substrate is investigated analytically and numerically via a bead-spring model. The deterministic dynamics of this system exhibits a depinning transition at a finite driving force, with complex spatial-temporal dynamics including stick-slip events of all sizes. These behaviors can be understood completely by mapping the system to the well-known problem of a directed-path in {\\em higher-dimensional } random media.

  9. Laser autofocusing: a sliding mode approach

    Golubovic, Edin; Khalil, Islam S. M.; Kamadan, Abdullah; ŞABANOVIÇ, Asif; Sabanovic, Asif

    2010-01-01

    Quality of the laser processing depends on many factors, such as overall configuration of the laser workstation, control methods used and quality of the laser beam. Although lasers used in material processing are typically high energy lasers, light beam still needs to be focused in order to achieve higher energy density and smaller final spot size. This paper presents an application of sliding mode to the laser autofocusing system. Autofocusing system consists of photodiode as the measurem...

  10. In vitro inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa adhesion by Xylitol

    Letícia Pinheiro de Sousa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated, in vitro, the antimicrobial activity and the anti-adherent property of xylitol (0.5, 2.5 and 5.0%, w/v on two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains (ATCC 9027 and clinical. The assay of antimicrobial activity was performed to determine a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and the adhesion test was performed, by which the parameters regarding, growth in the culture medium, number of colony forming units (CFUs released and slide evaluation by scanning electron microscopy (SEM were analyzed. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS was employed for statistical analysis. Results showed that xylitol had no antimicrobial activity on these strains; however, the inhibition of bacterial adherence was observed in microphotographs obtained by SEM. These results indicated that xylitol could be a future alternative to combat bacterial colonization.

  11. Magnetorheological Elastomer Films with Tunable Wetting and Adhesion Properties.

    Lee, Sanghee; Yim, Changyong; Kim, Wuseok; Jeon, Sangmin

    2015-09-01

    We fabricated magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) films consisting of polydimethylsiloxane and various concentrations of fluorinated carbonyl iron particles. The application of a magnetic field to the MRE film induced changes in the surface morphology due to the alignment of the iron particles along the magnetic field lines. At low concentrations of iron particles and low magnetic field intensities, needle-like microstructures predominated. These structures formed more mountain-like microstructures as the concentration of iron particles or the magnetic field intensity increased. The surface roughness increased the water contact angle from 100° to 160° and decreased the sliding angle from 180° to 10°. The wettability and adhesion properties changed substantially within a few seconds simply upon application of a magnetic field. Cyclical measurements revealed that the transition was completely reversible. PMID:26301942

  12. Virtual slides: application in pulmonary pathology consultations.

    Michał Wojciechowski

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The Virtual Slide (VS is an interactive microscope emulator that presents a complete digitized tissue section via the Internet. A successful implementation of VS has been observed for educational, research venues and quality control. VS acquisition for consultative pathology is not so common. The purpose of this study was to explore the efficacy and usability of VS in the consultative pulmonary telepathology. 20 lung tumors entered the study. The performance was programmed for 2 medical centers specialized in pulmonary pathology (beginner and advancer in telepathology. A high-quality VSs were prepared by Coolscope (Nikon, Eclipsnet VSL, Japan, and were evaluated via the Internet. The cases were reviewed for the second time with conventional light microscope. VS diagnostic accuracy and the interobserver variability were evaluated. Also the time taken by examiners to render the diagnoses and time needed to scan the microscopic slide were analyzed. Percentage concordance between original glass-slides diagnosis and diagnosis for VSs was very high. Pathologists found the download speed of VSs adequate; experience in telepathology reduced the time of VS diagnosis. VS implementation suggests advantages for teleconsulation and education but also indicate some technical limitations. This is the first Polish trial of VS implementation in telepathology consultative service.

  13. Adhesion and friction of transition metals in contact with non-metallic hard materials

    An investigation was conducted to examine the adhesion and friction behavior of transition metals in contact with various non-metallic hard materials and the nature of the metal transfer to the hard materials. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with the metals yttrium, titanium, tantalum, zirconium, vanadium, neodymium, iron, cobalt, nickel, tungsten, platinum, rhenium, ruthenium and rhodium in sliding contact with single-crystal diamond, silicon carbide, pyrolytic boron nitride and ferrite. All experiments were conducted under the following conditions: loads, 0.05-0.3 N; sliding velocities, 3 x 10-3 and 0.7 x 10-3 m min-1; in a vacuum of 10-8 Pa; at room temperature. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis was conducted with the metals and non-metals to determine the surface chemistry and the degree of surface cleanness. The results of the investigation indicate the adhesion and friction of the transition metals in contact with diamond, silicon carbide, boron nitride and ferrite are related to the relative chemical activity of the metals. The more chemically active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction and the greater the amount of transfer to the non-metals. (Auth.)

  14. Slide-specific models for segmentation of differently stained digital histopathology whole slide images

    Brieu, Nicolas; Pauly, Olivier; Zimmermann, Johannes; Binnig, Gerd; Schmidt, Günter

    2016-03-01

    The automatic analysis of whole slide images (WSIs) of stained histopathology tissue sections plays a crucial role in the discovery of predictive biomarkers in the field on immuno-oncology by enabling the quantification of the phenotypic information contained in the tissue sections. The automatic detection of cells and nuclei, while being one of the major steps of such analysis, remains a difficult problem because of the low visual differentiation of high pleomorphic and densely cluttered objects and of the diversity of tissue appearance between slides. The key idea of this work is to take advantage of well-differentiated objects in each slide to learn about the appearance of the tissue and in particular about the appearance of low-differentiated objects. We detect well-differentiated objects on a automatically selected set of representative regions, learn slide-specific visual context models, and finally use the resulting posterior maps to perform the final detection steps on the whole slide. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated against manual annotations on a set of differently stained images.

  15. Plasma polymerization for cell adhesive/anti-adhesive implant coating

    Meichsner, Juergen; Testrich, Holger; Rebl, Henrike; Nebe, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Plasma polymerization of ethylenediamine (C2H8N2, EDA) and perfluoropropane (C3F8, PFP) with admixture of argon and hydrogen, respectively, was studied using an asymmetric 13.56 MHz CCP. The analysis of the plasma chemical gas phase processes for stable molecules revealed consecutive reactions: C2H8N2 consumption, intermediate product NH3, and main final product HCN. In C3F8- H2 plasma the precursor molecule C3F8 and molecular hydrogen are consumed and HF as well as CF4 and C2F6 are found as main gaseous reaction products. The deposited plasma polymer films on the powered electrode are strongly cross-linked due to ion bombardment. The stable plasma polymerized films from EDA are characterized by high content of nitrogen with N/C ratio of about 0.35. The plasma polymerized fluorocarbon film exhibit a reduced F/C ratio of about 1.2. Adhesion tests with human osteoblast cell line MG-63 on coated Ti6Al4V samples (polished) compared with uncoated reference sample yielded both, the enhanced cell adhesion for plasma polymerized EDA and significantly reduced cell adhesion for fluorocarbon coating, respectively. Aging of the plasma polymerized EDA film, in particular due to the reactions with oxygen from air, showed no significant change in the cell adhesion. The fluorocarbon coating with low cell adhesion is of interest for temporary implants. Funded by the Campus PlasmaMed.

  16. Two dimensional nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts of textured surfaces

    Tong, Ruiting; Liu, Geng; Liu, Tianxiang

    2016-05-01

    Detailed behaviors of nanoscale textured surfaces during the reciprocating sliding contacts are still unknown although they are widely used in mechanical components to improve tribological characteristics. The current research of sliding contacts of textured surfaces mainly focuses on the experimental studies, while the cost is too high. Molecular dynamics(MD) simulation is widely used in the studies of nanoscale single-pass sliding contacts, but the CPU cost of MD simulation is also too high to simulate the reciprocating sliding contacts. In this paper, employing multiscale method which couples molecular dynamics simulation and finite element method, two dimensional nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts of textured surfaces are investigated. Four textured surfaces with different texture shapes are designed, and a rigid cylindrical tip is used to slide on these textured surfaces. For different textured surfaces, average potential energies and average friction forces of the corresponding sliding processes are analyzed. The analyzing results show that "running-in" stages are different for each texture, and steady friction processes are discovered for textured surfaces II, III and IV. Texture shape and sliding direction play important roles in reciprocating sliding contacts, which influence average friction forces greatly. This research can help to design textured surfaces to improve tribological behaviors in nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts.

  17. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    Bryan, Tom; Macleod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry; Williams, Scott; McCoy, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA gripper pad surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and

  18. Aggregation of amphiphilic polymers in the presence of adhesive small colloidal particles

    Baulin, Vladimir A.; Johner, Albert; Avalos, Josep Bonet

    2010-11-01

    The interaction of amphiphilic polymers with small colloids, capable to reversibly stick onto the chains, is studied. Adhesive small colloids in solution are able to dynamically bind two polymer segments. This association leads to topological changes in the polymer network configurations, such as looping and cross-linking, although the reversible adhesion permits the colloid to slide along the chain backbone. Previous analyses only consider static topologies in the chain network. We show that the sliding degree of freedom ensures the dominance of small loops, over other structures, giving rise to a new perspective in the analysis of the problem. The results are applied to the analysis of the equilibrium between colloidal particles and star polymers, as well as to block copolymer micelles. The results are relevant for the reversible adsorption of silica particles onto hydrophilic polymers, used in the process of formation of mesoporous materials of the type SBA or MCM, cross-linked cyclodextrin molecules threading on the polymers and forming the structures known as polyrotaxanes. Adhesion of colloids on the corona of the latter induce micellization and growth of larger micelles as the number of colloids increase, in agreement with experimental data.

  19. Lubricating layer formed on porous anodic alumina template due to pore effect at water lubricated sliding and its properties

    A porous anodic alumina (PAA) template was manufactured to investigate the pore effect on the formation of lubricating layers. A PAA template with 260 nm pores was manufactured by two-step anodization using phosphoric acid. A sliding wear test was carried out using a ball-on-disk tester. Due to the pore effect, an aluminum hydroxide film; i.e., the lubricating layer, was formed at a specific condition. The PAA template has a low friction regime because of the aluminum hydroxide film. The adhesion and friction forces of the aluminum hydroxide film were measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the adhesion and friction forces of the lubricating layer were lower than that of a typical oxide layer. Using AFM analysis, the existence of a lubricating layer can be verified.

  20. Elastocapilllarity in insect adhesion: the case of beetle adhesive hair

    Gernay, Sophie; Gilet, Tristan; Lambert, Pierre; Federle, Walter

    2014-11-01

    The feet of many insects are covered with dense arrays of hair-like structures called setae. Liquid capillary bridges at the tip of these micrometric structures are responsible for the controlled adhesion of the insect on a large variety of substrates. The resulting adhesion force can exceed several times the body weight of the insect. The high aspect-ratio of setae suggests that flexibility is a key ingredient in this capillary-based adhesion mechanism. There is indeed a strong coupling between their elastic deformation and the shape of the liquid meniscus. In this experimental work, we observe and quantify the local deflection of dock beetle seta tips under perpendicular loading using interference microscopy. Our results are then interpreted in the light of an analytic model of elastocapillarity. This research has been funded by the FRIA/FNRS and the Interuniversity Attraction Poles Programme (IAP 7/38 MicroMAST) initiated by the Belgian Science Policy Office.

  1. Pre-Stressed Rope Reinforced Anti-Sliding Pile

    XU Jun; WANG Chenghua

    2006-01-01

    Pre-stressed rope reinforced anti-sliding pile is a composite anti-sliding structure. It is made up of pre-stressed rope and general anti-sliding pile. It can bring traditional anti-sliding pile's retaining performance into full play, and to treat with landslide fast and economically. The difference between them is that the pre-stressed rope will transfix the whole anti-sliding pile through a prearranged pipe in this structure. The working mechanics, the design method and economic benefit are studied. The results show that the pre-stressed rope reinforced anti-sliding pile can treat with the small and middle landslides or high slopes well and possess the notable advantage of technology and economic.

  2. Sliding wear and friction behaviour of zircaloy-4 in water

    Sharma, Garima; Limaye, P. K.; Jadhav, D. T.

    2009-11-01

    In water cooled nuclear reactors, the sliding of fuel bundles in fuel channel handling system can lead to severe wear and it is an important topic to study. In the present study, sliding wear behaviour of zircaloy-4 was investigated in water (pH ˜ 10.5) using ball-on-plate sliding wear tester. Sliding wear resistance zircaloy-4 against SS 316 was examined at room temperature. Sliding wear tests were carried out at different load and sliding frequencies. The coefficient of friction of zircaloy-4 was also measured during each tests and it was found to decrease slightly with the increase in applied load. The micro-mechanisms responsible for wear in zircaloy-4 were identified to be microcutting, micropitting and microcracking of deformed subsurface zones in water.

  3. Adhesion and friction of transition metals in contact with nonmetallic hard materials

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with the metals yttrium, titanium, tantalum, zirconium, vanadium, neodymium, iron, cobalt, nickel, tungsten, platinum, rhenium, ruthenium, and rhodium in sliding contact with single crystal diamond, silicon carbide, pyrolytic boron nitride, and ferrite. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis was conducted with the metals and nonmetals to determine the surface chemistry and the degree of surface cleanliness. The results of the investigation indicate the adhesion and friction of the transition metals in contact with diamond, silicon carbide, boron nitride, and ferrite are related to the relative chemical activity of the metals. The more chemically active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction and the greater amount of transfer to the nonmetals.

  4. Adhesion and friction of transition metals in contact with nonmetallic hard materials

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with the metals yttrium, titanium, tantalum, zirconium, vanadium, neodymium, iron, cobalt, nickel, tungsten, platinum, rhenium, ruthenium, and rhodium in sliding contact with single crystal diamond, silicon carbide, pyrolytic boron nitride, and ferrite. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis was conducted with the metals and nonmetals to determine the surface chemistry and the degree of surface cleanliness. The results of the investigation indicate the adhesion and friction of the transition metals in contact with diamond, silicon carbide, boron nitride, and ferrite are related to the relative chemical activity of the metals. The more chemically active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction and the greater amount of transfer to the nonmetals

  5. A critical appraisal of positive cooperativity in oral streptococcal adhesion: Scatchard analyses of adhesion data versus analyses of the spatial arrangement of adhering bacteria.

    Van der Mei, H C; Cox, S D; Geertsema-Doornbusch, G I; Doyle, R J; Busscher, H J

    1993-05-01

    Positive cooperativity is a mechanism proposed to account for the adhesion of bacteria to surfaces. In this paper, two methods that both claim to assess experimentally cooperative phenomena, viz. Scatchard analysis of adhesion data (using adhesion to vials) and analysis of the spatial arrangement of adhering cells (using a flow chamber), were compared and critically evaluated. Three oral strains were used and the substrata involved were glass (hydrophilic) and silicone-coated glass (hydrophobic) employed with or without a salivary coating. Scatchard analysis and near-neighbour analysis of adhering cells yield similar conclusions with regard to the mechanism of adhesion of the cells, provided that adhering cells are sufficiently immobilized under the experimental conditions. In the case of incomplete immobilization, near-neighbour collection results from sliding of adhering cells rather than from cooperative phenomena. Also, the agreement between the conclusions from both methods seems to be better, the more reversibly the cells adhere. Positive cooperativity can be absent or present on saliva-coated substrata with a distinct effect of the substratum hydrophobicity, despite the presence of an adsorbed film. This suggests that a different pellicle develops on a hydrophobic substratum than on a hydrophilic substratum. This is confirmed by our observation that the amino acid composition of salivary films is different on both types of substratum. PMID:8336110

  6. A sliding cell technique for diffusion measurements in liquid metals

    Yongliang Geng; Chunao Zhu; Bo Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The long capillary and shear cell techniques are the usual methods for diffusion measurements in liquid metals. Here we present a new “sliding cell technique” to measure interdiffusion in liquid alloys, which combines the merits of these two methods. Instead of a number of shear cells, as used in the shear cell method, only one sliding cell is designed to separate and join the liquid diffusion samples. Using the sliding cell technique, the influence of the heating process (which affects liqui...

  7. Thermal imaging on simulated faults during frictional sliding

    Mair, Karen; Renard, François; Gundersen, Olav

    2008-01-01

    Heating during frictional sliding is a major component of the energy budget of earthquakes and represents a potential weakening mechanism. It is therefore important to investigate how heat dissipates during sliding on simulated faults. We present results from laboratory friction experiments where a halite (NaCl) slider held under constant load is dragged across a coarse substrate. Surface evolution and frictional resistance are recorded. Heat emission at the sliding surface is monitored using...

  8. Sliding Mode Speed Control for DC Drive Systems

    Guldemir, H.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the Sliding Mode Control theory of the Variable Structure System has been applied to the speed control of a de motor. The dynamic performance of the sliding mode speed control system has been studied against system parameter variations and external load disturbance and the simulation results are given. The application of the sliding mode control theory to controller design for DC drive control system shows a robust system performance.

  9. Power System Stabilizer Based on Global Fuzzy Sliding Mode Control

    Nechadi, E.; Harmas, M. N.

    2013-01-01

    —Power systems stability is enhanced through a novel stabiliser developed around a fuzzy sliding mode approach. First, sliding mode control is applied to selected operating point based models of a power system separately then fuzzy logic is used to form a global model encompassing the separate subsystems, thus leading to a fuzzy sliding mode power system control. Stability is insured through Lyapunov synthesis. Severe operating conditions are used in a simulation study to test the validity of...

  10. Dynamical bond cooperativity enables very fast and strong binding between sliding surfaces

    Trømborg, Jørgen Kjoshagen

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative binding affects many processes in biology, but it is commonly addressed only in equilibrium. In this work we explore dynamical cooperativity in driven systems, where the cooperation occurs because some of the bonds change the dynamical response of the system to a regime where the other bonds become active. To investigate such cooperativity we study the frictional binding between two flow driven surfaces that interact through a large population of activated bonds. In particular, we study systems where each bond can have two different modes: one mode corresponds to a fast forming yet weak bond, and the other is a strong yet slow forming bond. We find considerable cooperativity between both types of bonds. Under some conditions the system behaves as if there were only one binding mode, corresponding to a strong and fast forming bond. Our results may have important implications on the friction and adhesion between sliding surfaces containing complementary binding motifs, such as in the case of cells b...

  11. Lignin-Furfural Based Adhesives

    Prajakta Dongre

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lignin recovered from the hot-water extract of sugar maple (Acer saccharum is used in this study to synthesize adhesive blends to replace phenol-formaldehyde (PF resin. Untreated lignin is characterized by lignin content and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR analysis. The molecular weight distribution of the lignin and the blends are characterized by size exclusion chromatography (SEC. The effect of pH (0.3, 0.65 and 1, ex situ furfural, and curing conditions on the tensile properties of adhesive reinforced glass fibers is determined and compared to the reinforcement level of commercially available PF resin. The adhesive blend prepared at pH = 0.65 with no added furfural exhibits the highest tensile properties and meets 90% of the PF tensile strength.

  12. The histological slides and drawings of Cajal

    Pablo Garcia-Lopez

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Ramon y Cajal´s studies in the world of neuroscience provoked a radical change in the course of its history. For this reason he is considered as the father of modern neuroscience. Some of his items are housed at the Cajal Museum (Cajal Institute, CSIC, Madrid, Spain. In this article, we will present an analysis of Cajal’s effects used in his research that could help to understand his enormous scientific production, and that offers some curious insights into his work and his legacy. Furthermore, we present some images relating Cajal’s scientific drawings with his histological slides.

  13. IWM2011, Slides of the presentations

    The aim of the International Workshops on Multifragmentation and related topics (IWM) is to bring together a wide international community from heavy-ion physics in order to debate open questions in the domain of nuclear dynamics and thermodynamics. There will be dedicated sessions on the following topics: -) thermodynamics of finite nuclei and nuclear matter, -) isospin and symmetry energy: from the laboratory to compact stars, -) physics with low-energy radioactive beams, -) dynamics of heavy-ion collisions, -) correlations, dynamics and structure, and -) instrumentation and new detection techniques. This document gathers only the slides of the presentations

  14. Meetings on Particle Physics - Abstracts and Slides

    RPP (Meetings on Particle Physics) annual meetings are aimed at gathering the theoretical particle physicists' community, providing the participants with the opportunity not only to present their research topics, but also to make contact with the latest developments in adjacent fields. RPP-2012 will have a few review talks on topics such as flavors, Higgs bosons, astro-particle physics and cosmology, heavy ions, physics beyond the standard model, and quantum chromodynamics. This document gathers the slides of the presentations, a few presentations are accompanied by an abstract.

  15. Handle slides for delta-matroids

    Moffatt, Iain; MPHAKO-BANDA, EUNICE

    2015-01-01

    A classic exercise in the topology of surfaces is to show that, using handle slides, every disc-band surface, or 1-vertex ribbon graph, can be put in a canonical form consisting of the connected sum of orientable loops, and either non-orientable loops or pairs of interlaced orientable loops. Motivated by the principle that ribbon graph theory informs delta-matroid theory, we find the delta-matroid analogue of this surface classification. We show that, using a delta-matroid analogue of handle-...

  16. Simulations of atomic-scale sliding friction

    Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Stoltze, Per

    1996-01-01

    Simulation studies of atomic-scale sliding friction have been performed for a number of tip-surface and surface-surface contacts consisting of copper atoms. Both geometrically very simple tip-surface structures and more realistic interface necks formed by simulated annealing have been studied...... pinning of atoms near the boundary of the interface and is therefore more easily observed for smaller contacts. Depending on crystal orientation and load, frictional wear can also be seen in the simulations. In particular, for the annealed interface-necks which model contacts created by scanning tunneling...

  17. A Sliding Mode Multimodel Control for a Sensorless Photovoltaic System

    Rhif, Ahmed; Kardous, Zohra; Braiek, Naceur BenHadj

    2013-01-01

    In this work we will talk about a new control test using the sliding mode control with a nonlinear sliding mode observer, which are very solicited in tracking problems, for a sensorless photovoltaic panel. In this case, the panel system will has as a set point the sun position at every second during the day for a period of five years; then the tracker, using sliding mode multimodel controller and a sliding mode observer, will track these positions to make the sunrays orthogonal to the photovo...

  18. Was the Scanner Calibration Slide used for its intended purpose?

    Zong Yaping

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the article, Scanner calibration revisited, BMC Bioinformatics 2010, 11:361, Dr. Pozhitkov used the Scanner Calibration Slide, a key product of Full Moon BioSystems to generate data in his study of microarray scanner PMT response and proposed a mathematic model for PMT response 1. In the end, the author concluded that "Full Moon BioSystems calibration slides are inadequate for performing calibration," and recommended "against using these slides." We found these conclusions are seriously flawed and misleading, and his recommendation against using the Scanner Calibration Slide was not properly supported.

  19. Second order sliding mode control for a quadrotor UAV.

    Zheng, En-Hui; Xiong, Jing-Jing; Luo, Ji-Liang

    2014-07-01

    A method based on second order sliding mode control (2-SMC) is proposed to design controllers for a small quadrotor UAV. For the switching sliding manifold design, the selection of the coefficients of the switching sliding manifold is in general a sophisticated issue because the coefficients are nonlinear. In this work, in order to perform the position and attitude tracking control of the quadrotor perfectly, the dynamical model of the quadrotor is divided into two subsystems, i.e., a fully actuated subsystem and an underactuated subsystem. For the former, a sliding manifold is defined by combining the position and velocity tracking errors of one state variable, i.e., the sliding manifold has two coefficients. For the latter, a sliding manifold is constructed via a linear combination of position and velocity tracking errors of two state variables, i.e., the sliding manifold has four coefficients. In order to further obtain the nonlinear coefficients of the sliding manifold, Hurwitz stability analysis is used to the solving process. In addition, the flight controllers are derived by using Lyapunov theory, which guarantees that all system state trajectories reach and stay on the sliding surfaces. Extensive simulation results are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control method. PMID:24751475

  20. Slide less pathology”: Fairy tale or reality?

    Indu, M; Rathy, R; Binu, MP

    2016-01-01

    Pathology practice is significantly advanced in various frontiers. Therefore, “slide less digital” pathology will not be a mere imagination in near future. Digitalization of histopathological slides (whole slide imaging [WSI]) is possible with the help of whole slide scanner. The WSI has a positive impact not only in routine practice but also in research field, medical education and bioindustry. Even if digital pathology has definitive advantages, its widespread use is not yet possible. As it is an upcoming technology in our field, this article is aimed to discussessential aspects of WSI.

  1. Sliding Mode Robustness Control Strategy for Shearer Height Adjusting System

    Xiuping Su

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper firstly established mathematical model of height adjusting hydro cylinder of the shearer, as well as the state space equation of the shearer height adjusting system. Secondly we designed a shearer automatic height adjusting controller adopting the sliding mode robustness control strategy. The height adjusting controller includes the sliding mode surface switching function based on Ackermann formula, as well as sliding mode control function with the improved butterworth filter. Then simulation of the height adjustment controller shows that the sliding mode robustness control solves buffeting of typical controller, and achieves automatic control for the rolling drum of the shearer.

  2. Tribological Properties of MoSi2 Against AISI10045 Steel Under Sliding Friction

    CHEN Ping; ZHANG Hou-an; CHEN Hua-hui

    2006-01-01

    MoSi2 samples were prepared by a self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) and a hot-press technique. The sliding friction and wear properties of intermetallic MoSi2 against AISI10045 steel under dry friction and oil lubrication conditions were investigated with a MRH-5A type ring-on-block friction and wear tester. The elemental composition, microstructure and worn surface morphology of the MoSi2 material were observed and analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The synthetic parameter pv value reflecting friction work, was used to discuss the tribological properties of MoSi2 material. The results show that 1) oil lubrication can obviously improve the tribological properties of MoSi2, 2) the bigger the pv value, the greater the antifriction and the abrasive resistance of MoSi2 under oil lubrication, 3) with an increase in the pv value, the wear mechanism of MoSi2 material under dry sliding friction is the fatigue fracture and adhesive wear and 4) under oil lubrication the wear mechanism is mainly fatigue pitting.

  3. Adhesive Wear and Frictional Behavior of Multilayered Polyester Composite Based on Betelnut Fiber Mats Under Wet Contact Conditions

    Yousif, B. F.; Devadas, Alvin; Yusaf, Talal F.

    In the current study, a multilayered polyester composite based on betelnut fiber mats is fabricated. The adhesive wear and frictional performance of the composite was studied against a smooth stainless steel at different sliding distances (0-6.72 km) and applied loads (20-200 N) at 2.8 m/s sliding velocity. Variations in specific wear rate and friction coefficient were evaluated at two different orientations of fiber mat; namely parallel (P-O) and normal (N-O). Results obtained were presented against sliding distance. The worn surfaces of the composite were studied using an optical microscope. The effect of the composite sliding on the stainless steel counterface roughness was investigated. The results revealed that the wear performance of betelnut fiber reinforced polyester (BFRP) composite under wet contact condition was highly dependent on test parameters and fiber mat orientation. The specific wear rate performance for each orientation showed an inverse relationship to sliding distance. BFRP composite in N-O exhibited better wear performance compared with P-O. However, the friction coefficient in N-O was higher than that in P-O at lower range of applied load. The predominant wear mechanism was debonding of fiber with no pullout or ploughing. Moreover, at higher applied loads, micro- and macrocracking and fracture were observed in the resinous region.

  4. Influence of normal loads and sliding velocities on friction properties of engineering plastics sliding against rough counterfaces

    Nuruzzaman, D. M.; Chowdhury, M. A.; Rahaman, M. L.; Oumer, A. N.

    2016-02-01

    Friction properties of plastic materials are very important under dry sliding contact conditions for bearing applications. In the present research, friction properties of engineering plastics such as polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and nylon are investigated under dry sliding contact conditions. In the experiments, PTFE and nylon slide against different rough counterfaces such as mild steel and stainless steel 316 (SS 316). Frictional tests are carried out at low loads 5, 7.5 and 10 N, low sliding velocities 0.5, 0.75 and 1 m/s and relative humidity 70%. The obtained results reveal that friction coefficient of PTFE increases with the increase in normal loads and sliding velocities within the observed range. On the other hand, frictional values of nylon decrease with the increase in normal loads and sliding velocities. It is observed that in general, these polymers show higher frictional values when sliding against SS 316 rather than mild steel. During running-in process, friction coefficient of PTFE and nylon steadily increases with the increase in rubbing time and after certain duration of rubbing, it remains at steady level. At identical operating conditions, the frictional values are significantly different depending on normal load, sliding velocity and material pair. It is also observed that in general, the influence of normal load on the friction properties of PTFE and nylon is greater than that of sliding velocity.

  5. Computational Chemistry of Adhesive Bonds

    Phillips, Donald H.

    1999-01-01

    This investigation is intended to determine the electrical mechanical, and chemical properties of adhesive bonds at the molecular level. The initial determinations will be followed by investigations of the effects of environmental effects on the chemistry and properties of the bond layer.

  6. Adhesion of biocompatible and biodegradable micropatterned surfaces

    Kaiser, J.S.; Kamperman, M.M.G.; Souza, E.J.; Schick, B.; Arzt, E.

    2011-01-01

    We studied the effects of pillar dimensions and stiffness of biocompatible and biodegradable micropatterned surfaces on adhesion on different compliant substrates. The micropatterned adhesives were based on biocompatible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PL

  7. In vitro inhibition of adhesion of Escherichia coli strains by Xylitol

    Annelisa Farah da Silva

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to evaluate xylitol's antimicrobial and anti-adherence activities on Escherichia coli (ATCC 8739 and on another clinical strain enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC. In vitro minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC test and adhesion assays were performed using 0.5, 2.5 and 5.0% xylitol. It was found that xylitol did not have antimicrobial properties on these strains. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM demonstrated that the slides treated with xylitol had a significant reduction in the number of bacilli and the inhibition of microbial adhesion was probably the xylitol's mechanism of action. Xylitol could be a possible alternative on the control of E. coli infections.

  8. Verifying a sliding window protocol in mCRL

    Fokkink, Wan; Groote, Jan Friso; J. Pang; Badban, Bahareh; Pol

    2003-01-01

    We prove the correctness of a sliding window protocol with an arbitrary finite window size n and sequence numbers modulo 2n. The correctness consists of showing that the sliding window protocol is branching bisimilar to a queue of capacity 2n. The proof is given entirely on the basis of an axiomatic theory.

  9. Optimizing Student Learning: Examining the Use of Presentation Slides

    Strauss, Judy; Corrigan, Hope; Hofacker, Charles F.

    2011-01-01

    Sensory overload and split attention result in reduced learning when instructors read slides with bullet points and complex graphs during a lecture. Conversely, slides containing relevant visual elements, when accompanied by instructor narration, use both the visual and verbal channels of a student's working memory, thus improving the chances of…

  10. Computer Slide Shows: A Trap for Bad Teaching

    Klemm, W. R.

    2007-01-01

    Slide shows presented with software such as PowerPoint or WordPerfect Presentations can trap instructors into bad teaching practices. Research on memory suggests that slide-show instruction can actually be less effective than traditional lecturing when the teacher uses a blackboard or overhead projector. The author proposes a model of classroom…

  11. Film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells

    A R M Yusoff; M N Syahrul; K Henkel

    2007-08-01

    A major issue encountered during fabrication of triple junction -Si solar cells on polyimide substrates is the adhesion of the solar cell thin films to the substrates. Here, we present our study of film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells made on different polyimide substrates (Kapton VN, Upilex-S and Gouldflex), and the effect of tie coats on film adhesion.

  12. Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces polyurethane adhesive

    Roseland, L. M.

    1967-01-01

    Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces the adhesive properties of a polyurethane adhesive that fastens hardware to exterior surfaces of aluminum tanks. The mat is embedded in the uncured adhesive. It ensures good control of the bond line and increases the peel strength.

  13. Sliding behaviors of elastic cylindrical tanks under seismic loading

    There is a paper that reports on the occurrence of sliding in several oil tanks on Alaskan earthquake of 1964. This incident appears to be in need of further investigation for the following reasons: First, in usual seismic designing of cylindrical tanks ('tanks'), sliding is considered to occur when the lateral inertial force exceeds the static friction force. When the tank in question can be taken as a rigid body, this rule is known to hold true. If the tank is capable of undergoing a considerable amount of elastic deformation, however, its applicability has not been proved. Second, although several studies have been done on the critical conditions for static sliding the present author is unaware of like ones made on the dynamic sliding, except for the pioneering work of Sogabe, in which they have empirically indicated possibility of sliding to occur under the force of sloshing. Third, this author has shown earlier on that tanks, if not anchored properly, will start rocking, inducing uplifting of the base plate, even at a relatively small seismic acceleration of 10 gal or so. The present study has been conducted with these observations for the background. Namely, based on a notion that elastic deformation given rise to by rocking oscillation should be incorporated as an important factor in any set of critical conditions for the onset of sliding, a series of shaking table experiments were performed for rigid steel block to represent the rigid tanks ('rigid model') and a model tank having a same sort of plate thickness-to-diameter ratio as industrial tanks to represent the elastic cylindrical tanks ('elastic model'). Following observations have been obtained for the critical condition of the onset of sliding: (1) sliding of rigid tanks will occur when the lateral force given rise to by oscillation exceeds the static, or the Coulombic, friction force. (2) if vertical oscillation is imposed on the lateral oscillation, the lateral force needed to induce sliding of a

  14. Sliding mode control the delta-sigma modulation approach

    Sira-Ramírez, Hebertt

    2015-01-01

    This monograph presents a novel method of sliding mode control for switch-regulated nonlinear systems. The Delta Sigma modulation approach allows one to implement a continuous control scheme using one or multiple, independent switches, thus effectively merging the available linear and nonlinear controller design techniques with sliding mode control.   Sliding Mode Control: The Delta-Sigma Modulation Approach, combines rigorous mathematical derivation of the unique features of Sliding Mode Control and Delta-Sigma modulation with numerous illustrative examples from diverse areas of engineering. In addition, engineering case studies demonstrate the applicability of the technique and the ease with which one can implement the exposed results. This book will appeal to researchers in control engineering and can be used as graduate-level textbook for a first course on sliding mode control.

  15. Advances in sliding mode control concept, theory and implementation

    Janardhanan, S; Spurgeon, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    The sliding mode control paradigm has become a mature technique for the design of robust controllers for a wide class of systems including nonlinear, uncertain and time-delayed systems. This book is a collection of plenary and invited talks delivered at the 12th IEEE International Workshop on Variable Structure System held at the Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai, India in January 2012. After the workshop, these researchers were invited to develop book chapters for this edited collection in order to reflect the latest results and open research questions in the area. The contributed chapters have been organized by the editors to reflect the various themes of sliding mode control which are the current areas of theoretical research and applications focus; namely articulation of the fundamental underpinning theory of the sliding mode design paradigm, sliding modes for decentralized system representations, control of time-delay systems, the higher order sliding mode concept, results applicable to nonlinear an...

  16. Accurate Sliding-Mode Control System Modeling for Buck Converters

    Høyerby, Mikkel Christian Wendelboe; Andersen, Michael Andreas E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper shows that classical sliding mode theory fails to correctly predict the output impedance of the highly useful sliding mode PID compensated buck converter. The reason for this is identified as the assumption of the sliding variable being held at zero during sliding mode, effectively...... modeling the hysteretic comparator as an infinite gain. Correct prediction of output impedance is shown to be enabled by the use of a more elaborate, finite-gain model of the hysteretic comparator, which takes the effects of time delay and finite switching frequency into account. The demonstrated modeling...... approach also predicts the self-oscillating switching action of the sliding-mode control system correctly. Analytical findings are verified by simulation as well as experimentally in a 10-30V/3A buck converter....

  17. Sliding mode controller for signal input multiple state submarine system

    Sliding mode control design has become a popular choice for controlling non-linear dynamical systems. This paper, explores the dynamics of a submarine and represents the same in state space form. It also investigates the potential of sliding mode controller for a single input multiple state system of a submarine. Mathematical derivation of the controller is presented and it is proved that the sliding mode controllers is robust to changes in operating conditions. The problem of chattering in sliding mode controller design is discussed and remedy of this problem is suggested. Simulation studies are carried out which demonstrate that the sliding mode controller can efficiency be used as a heading controller for the submarine under investigation. (author)

  18. 23. Blois meeting 2011- Slides and abstracts

    This conference on 'Particle Physics and Cosmology' will emphasize the increasing interplay between high energy accelerator based physics and cosmology. The meeting will be articulated around the results and their impact on current theories from the 3 major new experimental and observational facilities which are coming on line or have recently been commissioned: the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the Planck satellite, and the Herschel satellite. The topics will include: -) the Standard Model in particle physics, in new data and analyses, -) the search for the Higgs boson, -) theories of and searches for physics beyond the Standard Model, -) heavy flavour physics, -) neutrino physics (astrophysical and laboratory), -) dark matter, dark energy and recent advances in cosmology. This document gathers the program, the slides and some abstracts of the presentations

  19. Robust Sliding Mode Control for Tokamaks

    I. Garrido

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear fusion has arisen as an alternative energy to avoid carbon dioxide emissions, being the tokamak a promising nuclear fusion reactor that uses a magnetic field to confine plasma in the shape of a torus. However, different kinds of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities may affect tokamak plasma equilibrium, causing severe reduction of particle confinement and leading to plasma disruptions. In this sense, numerous efforts and resources have been devoted to seeking solutions for the different plasma control problems so as to avoid energy confinement time decrements in these devices. In particular, since the growth rate of the vertical instability increases with the internal inductance, lowering the internal inductance is a fundamental issue to address for the elongated plasmas employed within the advanced tokamaks currently under development. In this sense, this paper introduces a lumped parameter numerical model of the tokamak in order to design a novel robust sliding mode controller for the internal inductance using the transformer primary coil as actuator.

  20. Frictional sliding with geometrically broken reflection symmetry

    Aldam, Michael; Svetlizky, Ilya; Brener, Efim A; Fineberg, Jay; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of frictional interfaces play an important role in many physical systems spanning a broad range of scales. It is well-known that frictional interfaces separating two dissimilar materials couple interfacial slip and normal stress variations, a coupling that has major implications on their stability, failure mechanism and rupture directionality. In contrast, interfaces separating identical materials are traditionally assumed not to feature such a coupling due to symmetry considerations. We show, combining theory and experiments, that interfaces which separate bodies made of identical materials, but lack geometric reflection symmetry, generically feature such a coupling. We discuss two applications of this novel feature. First, we show that it accounts for a distinct and previously unexplained weakening effect in frictional cracks observed experimentally. Second, we demonstrate that it can destabilize frictional sliding which is otherwise stable. The emerging framework is expected to find applicatio...

  1. Sliding Trellis-Based Frame Synchronization

    Ali, Usman; Kieffer, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Frame Synchronization (FS) is required in several communication standards in order to recover the individual frames that have been aggregated in a burst. This paper proposes a low-delay and reducedcomplexity Sliding Trellis (ST)-based FS technique, compared to our previously proposed trellis-based FS method. Each burst is divided into overlapping windows in which FS is performed. Useful information is propagated from one window to the next. The proposed method makes use of soft information provided by the channel, but also of all sources of redundancy present in the protocol stack. An illustration of our STbased approach for the WiMAX Media Access Control (MAC) layer is provided. When FS is performed on bursts transmitted over Rayleigh fading channel, the ST-based approach reduces the FS latency and complexity at the cost of a very small performance degradation compared to our full complexity trellis-based FS and outperforms state-of-the-art FS techniques.

  2. Sliding Adjustment for 3D Video Representation

    Galpin Franck

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with video coding of static scenes viewed by a moving camera. We propose an automatic way to encode such video sequences using several 3D models. Contrary to prior art in model-based coding where 3D models have to be known, the 3D models are automatically computed from the original video sequence. We show that several independent 3D models provide the same functionalities as one single 3D model, and avoid some drawbacks of the previous approaches. To achieve this goal we propose a novel algorithm of sliding adjustment, which ensures consistency of successive 3D models. The paper presents a method to automatically extract the set of 3D models and associate camera positions. The obtained representation can be used for reconstructing the original sequence, or virtual ones. It also enables 3D functionalities such as synthetic object insertion, lightning modification, or stereoscopic visualization. Results on real video sequences are presented.

  3. Sliding Mode Control of Steerable Needles.

    Rucker, D Caleb; Das, Jadav; Gilbert, Hunter B; Swaney, Philip J; Miga, Michael I; Sarkar, Nilanjan; Webster, Robert J

    2013-10-01

    Steerable needles can potentially increase the accuracy of needle-based diagnosis and therapy delivery, provided they can be adequately controlled based on medical image information. We propose a novel sliding mode control law that can be used to deliver the tip of a flexible asymmetric-tipped needle to a desired point, or to track a desired trajectory within tissue. The proposed control strategy requires no a priori knowledge of model parameters, has bounded input speeds, and requires little computational resources. We show that if the standard nonholonomic model for tip-steered needles holds, then the control law will converge to desired targets in a reachable workspace, within a tolerance that can be defined by the control parameters. Experimental results validate the control law for target points and trajectory following in phantom tissue and ex vivo liver. Experiments with targets that move during insertion illustrate robustness to disturbances caused by tissue deformation. PMID:25400527

  4. Mechanical strength of adhesive-bonding

    In order to meet the prospective application of a GFRP dewar for energy storage system using a large superconducting magnet, the dewar with a complex structure together with a large size are desired to be made. It is difficult to manufacture such a type of the dewars in one united body. These dewars can be manufactured by the adhesive-bonding method. In the present study, the mechanical strength of adhesive-bonding is studied from this point of view. The mechanical strength of the adhesive-bonding has been investigated by the static tensile method and the impact loading method using small test samples. From the static tensile tests, the following results have been obtained. For the sample adhesive-bonded with insertion structure, the mechanical strength of the adhesive-bonding is found to depend on the adhesives used and on the difference of the thermal contraction between the materials which are adhesive-bonded each other. Using a soft adhesive as Araldite 106, the mechanical strength of the adhesive-bonding is small at room temperature, but it remarkably increases at cryogenic temperatures. For a hard adhesive as Araldite 103 and Stycast 2850 FT, it is large at room temperature, and it further increases at cryogenic temperatures. The dewar has to be strong enough not only at cryogenic temperatures but also at room temperature. A soft adhesive is not suitable for constructing the dewar. For the sample adhesive-bonded with screwing structure, the mechanical strength of the adhesive-bonding depends on the shear strength of GFRP itself. The mechanical strength of the adhesive-bonded part increases with the decreasing temperature. Therefore, this screwing method is advantageous for the construction of the dewar. According to the impact loading tests, it is found that the adhesive-bonding of screwing structure is not brittle at cryogenic temperature. This is due to inherent property of GFRP. (J.P.N.)

  5. Waves in stratified geomaterials with sliding layers

    Pasternak, Elena; Dyskin, Arcady

    2016-04-01

    Wave propagation in stratified geomaterials with sliding layers is strongly anisotropic. The simplest representation of this behaviour is an elastic transverse-isotropic (orthotropic in 2D) continuum. Such a model is however only applicable when loading that is sufficiently uniform or when the wavelength is much larger than the layer thickness. In this case the stress non-uniformity over the layer thickness and the associated layer bending can be neglected. In an intermediate case when the wavelength is still higher than the layer thickness but not as high to neglect the stress non-uniformity at least bending moments and layer bending need to be taken into account. This is equivalent to retaining only the linear term of the normal stress variation over the layer thickness. The layer bending creates additional, rotational degrees of freedom. In 2D only one rotational degree of freedom exists, which considerably simplifies the modelling. The corresponding rotation is represented by the average gradient of layer deflection. The presence of rotations makes the stress tensor non-symmetrical. On top of that the rotation gradient creates moment stresses, which represent bending moments over the unit area in the layer cross-section. This requires the use of a 2D orthotropic Cosserat continuum to model the dynamics of such a stratified geomaterial. We show that in the stratified geomaterial shear-bending waves propagate. We determine the wave velocities and demonstrate that as the resistance to sliding reduces, the waves tend to localise over a line normal to the layering.

  6. Sacrificial adhesive bonding: a powerful method for fabrication of glass microchips

    Lima, Renato S.; Leão, Paulo A. G. C.; Piazzetta, Maria H. O.; Monteiro, Alessandra M.; Shiroma, Leandro Y.; Gobbi, Angelo L.; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2015-08-01

    A new protocol for fabrication of glass microchips is addressed in this research paper. Initially, the method involves the use of an uncured SU-8 intermediate to seal two glass slides irreversibly as in conventional adhesive bonding-based approaches. Subsequently, an additional step removes the adhesive layer from the channels. This step relies on a selective development to remove the SU-8 only inside the microchannel, generating glass-like surface properties as demonstrated by specific tests. Named sacrificial adhesive layer (SAB), the protocol meets the requirements of an ideal microfabrication technique such as throughput, relatively low cost, feasibility for ultra large-scale integration (ULSI), and high adhesion strength, supporting pressures on the order of 5 MPa. Furthermore, SAB eliminates the use of high temperature, pressure, or potential, enabling the deposition of thin films for electrical or electrochemical experiments. Finally, the SAB protocol is an improvement on SU-8-based bondings described in the literature. Aspects such as substrate/resist adherence, formation of bubbles, and thermal stress were effectively solved by using simple and inexpensive alternatives.

  7. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    Pesika, Noshir S [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Zeng Hongbo [Chemical and Materials Engineering Department, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2V4 (Canada); Kristiansen, Kai; Israelachvili, Jacob [Chemical Engineering Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Zhao, Boxin [Chemical Engineering Department and Waterloo Institute of Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Tian Yu [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Department of Precision Instruments, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Autumn, Kellar, E-mail: npesika@tulane.ed [Department of Biology, Lewis and Clark College, Portland, OR 97219 (United States)

    2009-11-18

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  8. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    Pesika, Noshir S.; Zeng, Hongbo; Kristiansen, Kai; Zhao, Boxin; Tian, Yu; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2009-11-01

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  9. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  10. Host Selection of Microbiota via Differential Adhesion.

    McLoughlin, Kirstie; Schluter, Jonas; Rakoff-Nahoum, Seth; Smith, Adrian L; Foster, Kevin R

    2016-04-13

    The host epithelium is the critical interface with microbial communities, but the mechanisms by which the host regulates these communities are poorly understood. Here we develop the hypothesis that hosts use differential adhesion to select for and against particular members of their microbiota. We use an established computational, individual-based model to study the impact of host factors that regulate adhesion at the epithelial surface. Our simulations predict that host-mediated adhesion can increase the competitive advantage of microbes and create ecological refugia for slow-growing species. We show how positive selection via adhesion can be transformed into negative selection if the host secretes large quantities of a matrix such as mucus. Our work predicts that adhesion is a powerful mechanism for both positive and negative selection within the microbiota. We discuss molecules-mucus glycans and IgA-that affect microbe adhesion and identify testable predictions of the adhesion-as-selection model. PMID:27053168