WorldWideScience

Sample records for adhesive sliding wear-friction

  1. Sliding Adhesion Dynamics of Isolated Gecko Setal Arrays

    Sponberg, Simon; Autumn, Kellar

    2003-03-01

    The tokay gecko (Gekko gecko) can adhere to nearly any surface through van der Waals interactions of the specialized setae (b-keratin "hairs") of its toe pads. Our recent research has suggested that a gecko is substantially overbuilt for static adhesion requiring as little as 0.03of its theoretical adhesive capacity. We performed the first sliding adhesion experiments on this novel biological adhesive to determine its response to dynamic loading. We isolated arrays of setae and constructed a precision controlled Robo-toe to study sliding effects. Our results indicate that, unlike many typical adhesives, gecko setal arrays exhibit an increased frictional force upon sliding (mk > ms) which further increases with velocity, suggesting that perturbation rejection may be an evolutionary design principle underlying the evolution of the gecko adhesive. We compare these dynamic properties with those of other adhesives and explore the impacts of these results on the design of artificial adhesives.

  2. Wear, friction, and temperature characteristics of an aircraft tire undergoing braking and cornering

    Mccarty, J. L.; Yager, T. J.; Riccitiello, S. R.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation to evaluate the wear, friction, and temperature characteristics of aircraft tire treads fabricated from different elastomers is presented. The braking and cornering tests performed on aircraft tires retreaded with currently employed and experimental elastomers are described. The tread wear rate is discussed in relation to the slip ratio during braking and yaw angle during cornering. The extent of wear in either operational mode is examined in relation to the runway surface.

  3. Alcohol-based quorum sensing plays a role in adhesion and sliding motility of the yeast Debaryomyces hansenii

    Gori, Klaus; Knudsen, Peter Boldsen; Nielsen, Kristian Fog;

    2011-01-01

    varied with growth conditions such as the availability of aromatic amino acids, ammonium sulphate, NaCl, pH and temperature. Tryptophol was only produced in the presence of tryptophane, whereas farnesol in general was not detectable. Especially, the type strain of D. hansenii (CBS767) had good adhesion...... and sliding motility abilities, which seemed to be related to a higher hydrophobicity of the cell surface of D. hansenii (CBS767) rather than the ability to form pseudomycelium. Addition of phenylethanol, tyrosol, tryptophol and farnesol was found to influence both adhesion and sliding motility of D...

  4. Biomechanics of shear-sensitive adhesion in climbing animals: peeling, pre-tension and sliding-induced changes in interface strength.

    Labonte, David; Federle, Walter

    2016-09-01

    Many arthropods and small vertebrates use adhesive pads for climbing. These biological adhesives have to meet conflicting demands: attachment must be strong and reliable, yet detachment should be fast and effortless. Climbing animals can rapidly and reversibly control their pads' adhesive strength by shear forces, but the mechanisms underlying this coupling have remained unclear. Here, we show that adhesive forces of stick insect pads closely followed the predictions from tape peeling models when shear forces were small, but strongly exceeded them when shear forces were large, resulting in an approximately linear increase of adhesion with friction. Adhesion sharply increased at peel angles less than ca 30°, allowing a rapid switch between attachment and detachment. The departure from classic peeling theory coincided with the appearance of pad sliding, which dramatically increased the peel force via a combination of two mechanisms. First, partial sliding pre-stretched the pads, so that they were effectively stiffer upon detachment and peeled increasingly like inextensible tape. Second, pad sliding reduces the thickness of the fluid layer in the contact zone, thereby increasing the stress levels required for peeling. In combination, these effects can explain the coupling between adhesion and friction that is fundamental to adhesion control across all climbing animals. Our results highlight that control of adhesion is not solely achieved by direction-dependence and morphological anisotropy, suggesting promising new routes for the development of controllable bio-inspired adhesives. PMID:27605165

  5. Atomic Scale Interface Manipulation, Structural Engineering, and Their Impact on Ultrathin Carbon Films in Controlling Wear, Friction, and Corrosion.

    Dwivedi, Neeraj; Yeo, Reuben J; Yak, Leonard J K; Satyanarayana, Nalam; Dhand, Chetna; Bhat, Thirumaleshwara N; Zhang, Zheng; Tripathy, Sudhiranjan; Bhatia, Charanjit S

    2016-07-13

    Reducing friction, wear, and corrosion of diverse materials/devices using systems. Here, we present a novel approach based on atomic scale interface manipulation to engineer and control the friction, wear, corrosion, and structural characteristics of 0.7-1.7 nm carbon-based films on CoCrPt:oxide-based magnetic media. We demonstrate that when an atomically thin (∼0.5 nm) chromium nitride (CrNx) layer is sandwiched between the magnetic media and an ultrathin carbon overlayer (1.2 nm), it modifies the film-substrate interface, creates various types of interfacial bonding, increases the interfacial adhesion, and tunes the structure of carbon in terms of its sp(3) bonding. These contribute to its remarkable functional properties, such as stable and lowest coefficient of friction (∼0.15-0.2), highest wear resistance and better corrosion resistance despite being only ∼1.7 nm thick, surpassing those of ∼2.7 nm thick current commercial carbon overcoat (COC) and other overcoats in this work. While this approach has direct implications for advancing current magnetic storage technology with its ultralow thickness, it can also be applied to advance the protective and barrier capabilities of other ultrathin materials for associated technologies. PMID:27267790

  6. Slide Rule For Calculating Curing Schedules

    Heater, Don

    1995-01-01

    Special-purpose slide rule devised for calculating schedules for storing and curing adhesives, sealants, and other materials characterized by known curing times and shelf lives. Prevents mistakes commonly made in determining storage and curing schedules.

  7. Sliding wear behavior of carbide coatings

    The wear rates of sliding surfaces under starved lubrication conditions are frequently controlled by the onset of scuffing or adhesive transfer resulting in scratching or galling damage mechanisms. Thermally sprayed coatings containing a high volume fraction of hard phases, such as carbides, generally exhibit good abrasion resistance. However, during sliding contact with ferrous materials, the onset of adhesive transfer can occur at relatively low combinations of temperature, sliding speed and contact pressure. Improvements may be obtained when appropriate additions of solid lubricating phases are distributed within the coating. These additions are usually accompanied by an increase in the coating porosity which may itself alter the sliding wear behavior by modifying the distribution of lubricating oil. This paper describes an investigation of the influence of coating porosity on the sliding wear behavior of two conventional carbide coatings

  8. 3-AMINOPROPYLTRIETHOXYSILANE TREATED SLIDES

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Author: University of Nottingham Medical School Division of Histopathy ### METHOD: 1. Wash glass slides in detergent for 30 minutes. - Wash glass slides in running tap water for 30 minutes. - Wash glass slides in distilled water 2x5 minutes. - Wash glass slides in 95% alcohol 2x5 minutes. - Air dry for 10 minutes. - Immerse slides in a freshly prepared 2% solution for 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane in dry acetone for 5 seconds. - Wash briefly in distilled water twi...

  9. Abdominal Adhesions

    ... adhesions? Abdominal adhesions can cause intestinal obstruction and female infertility—the inability to become pregnant after a year of trying. Abdominal adhesions can lead to female infertility by preventing fertilized eggs from reaching the uterus, ...

  10. Tribological Behaviour of W-DLC against an Aluminium Alloy Subjected to Lubricated Sliding

    S. Bhowmick; A. Banerji; A.T. Alpas

    2015-01-01

    Diamond like carbon (DLC) coatings mitigate aluminium adhesion and reduce friction under the ambient conditions but their tribological behaviour under lubricated sliding need to be further investigated. In this study, tribological tests were performed to evaluate the friction and wear characteristics of W-DLC and H-DLC coatings sliding against an aluminium alloy (319 Al) under unlubricated (40 % RH) and lubricated sliding conditions. For unlubricated sliding, coefficient of friction (COF) val...

  11. Adhesive Categories

    Lack, Stephen; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2003-01-01

    We introduce adhesive categories, which are categories with structure ensuring that pushouts along monomorphisms are well-behaved. Many types of graphical structures used in computer science are shown to be examples of adhesive categories. Double-pushout graph rewriting generalises well to...... rewriting on arbitrary adhesive categories....

  12. Adhesive Categories

    Lack, Stephen; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2004-01-01

    We introduce adhesive categories, which are categories with structure ensuring that pushouts along monomorphisms are well-behaved. Many types of graphical structures used in computer science are shown to be examples of adhesive categories. Double-pushout graph rewriting generalises well to...... rewriting on arbitrary adhesive categories....

  13. Resistance to Sliding on Atomic Scales

    Dominik, C.; Tielens, A.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The structure and stability of agglomerates of micron-sized particles is determined by the mechanical properties of the individual contacts between the constituent particles. In this paper we study the possibility of aggregate rearrangements by sliding. Since the contacts between (sub)micron particles are only a few hundred atoms in diameter, processes on atomic levels will play the dominating roll. We study a theoretical model of sliding friction for surfaces that are either flat or contain steps in their grids. The results show that sliding over flat surfaces may produce a large range of friction coefficients, including zero if the adhesive forces are small compared to the binding forces inside a body. However, both grid alignment and steps in the surface will lead to high values for friction. These processes combined virtually eliminate the possibility of sliding in a collision of two (sub)micron sized particles at velocities low enough for sticking to occur. On the other hand we show that in collisions between aggregates sliding may be an important factor for energy dissipation and compaction.

  14. UNDERSTANDING THE SLIDE RULE.

    JOHNSON, RONALD E.; AND OTHERS

    A BOOKLET DESIGNED FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS TO BE USED INDEPENDENTLY FROM AND IN ADDITION TO THE REGULAR CLASSROOM CURRICULUM IN MATHEMATICS IS GIVEN. THE FIFTH- OR SIXTH-GRADE STUDENT IS PRESENTED WITH A DISCUSSION OF THE APPLICATIONS OF THE SLIDE RULE AND WITH A BACKGROUND REVIEW OF NECESSARY CONCEPTS. THE CONCEPTS OF THE SLIDE RULE ARE…

  15. Sliding mode control and observation

    Shtessel, Yuri; Fridman, Leonid; Levant, Arie

    2014-01-01

    The sliding mode control methodology has proven effective in dealing with complex dynamical systems affected by disturbances, uncertainties and unmodeled dynamics. Robust control technology based on this methodology has been applied to many real-world problems, especially in the areas of aerospace control, electric power systems, electromechanical systems, and robotics. Sliding Mode Control and Observation represents the first textbook that starts with classical sliding mode control techniques and progresses toward newly developed higher-order sliding mode control and observation algorithms and their applications. The present volume addresses a range of sliding mode control issues, including: *Conventional sliding mode controller and observer design *Second-order sliding mode controllers and differentiators *Frequency domain analysis of conventional and second-order sliding mode controllers *Higher-order sliding mode controllers and differentiators *Higher-order sliding mode observers *Sliding mode disturbanc...

  16. Surgical adhesives

    I. A. THOMAZINI-SANTOS

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors have performed a literature review of surgical adhesives, such as cyanoacrylate, collagen gelatin, and fibrin glue. They have included different types of commercial and non-commercial fibrin sealants and have reported on the different components in these adhesives, such as fibrinogen, cryoprecipitate, bovine thrombin, and thrombin-like fraction of snake venom.

  17. Mechanics of slide dams

    Studies which promote the use of nuclear energy for peaceful projects in engineering are sponsored by the Atomic Energy Commission under the Plowshare program. Specific projects being considered include the construction of harbors, canals, and dams. Of these projects, perhaps the most difficult to accomplish will be the latter. This paper which is in two parts considers the problems which are associated with the construction of slide dams with nuclear explosives. It examines first the characteristics of conventional earth and rock-fill dams which are based upon proven techniques developed after many years of experience. The characteristics of natural landslide dams are also briefly considered to identify potential problems that must be overcome by slide dam construction techniques. Second, the mechanics of slide dams as determined from small-scale laboratory studies are presented. It is concluded that slide dams can be constructed and that small-scale field tests and additional laboratory studies are justified. (author)

  18. Water-slide alopecia.

    Adams, B B

    2001-05-01

    A 29-year-old male presented with large, symmetric, alopecic patches on the posterolateral aspects of both calves. A detailed history revealed that the individual had recently attended a water-slide amusement park. Repeated frictional trauma between the legs and the slide resulted in these alopecic patches. Friction, especially when encountered during sports-related and recreational activities, should be included in the differential diagnosis of well-defined alopecic patches. PMID:11381856

  19. Sliding tethered ligands add topological interactions to the toolbox of ligand-receptor design

    Bauer, Martin; Kékicheff, Patrick; Iss, Jean; Fajolles, Christophe; Charitat, Thierry; Daillant, Jean; Marques, Carlos M.

    2015-09-01

    Adhesion in the biological realm is mediated by specific lock-and-key interactions between ligand-receptor pairs. These complementary moieties are ubiquitously anchored to substrates by tethers that control the interaction range and the mobility of the ligands and receptors, thus tuning the kinetics and strength of the binding events. Here we add sliding anchoring to the toolbox of ligand-receptor design by developing a family of tethered ligands for which the spacer can slide at the anchoring point. Our results show that this additional sliding degree of freedom changes the nature of the adhesive contact by extending the spatial range over which binding may sustain a significant force. By introducing sliding tethered ligands with self-regulating length, this work paves the way for the development of versatile and reusable bio-adhesive substrates with potential applications for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  20. Nucleation and growth of cadherin adhesions

    Cell-cell contact formation relies on the recruitment of cadherin molecules and their anchoring to actin. However, the precise chronology of events from initial cadherin trans-interactions to adhesion strengthening is unclear, in part due to the lack of access to the distribution of cadherins within adhesion zones. Using N-cadherin expressing cells interacting with N-cadherin coated surfaces, we characterized the formation of cadherin adhesions at the ventral cell surface. TIRF and RIC microscopies revealed streak-like accumulations of cadherin along actin fibers. FRAP analysis indicated that engaged cadherins display a slow turnover at equilibrium, compatible with a continuous addition and removal of cadherin molecules within the adhesive contact. Association of cadherin cytoplasmic tail to actin as well as actin cables and myosin II activity are required for the formation and maintenance of cadherin adhesions. Using time lapse microscopy we deciphered how cadherin adhesions form and grow. As lamellipodia protrude, cadherin foci stochastically formed a few microns away from the cell margin. Neo-formed foci coalesced aligned and coalesced with preformed foci either by rearward sliding or gap filling to form cadherin adhesions. Foci experienced collapse at the rear of cadherin adhesions. Based on these results, we present a model for the nucleation, directional growth and shrinkage of cadherin adhesions

  1. Slowing the Summer Slide

    Smith, Lorna

    2012-01-01

    Research shows that summer slide--the loss of learning over the summer break--is a huge contributor to the achievement gap between low-income students and their higher-income peers. In fact, some researchers have concluded that two-thirds of the 9th-grade reading achievement gap can be explained by unequal access to summer learning opportunities…

  2. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    parameters, which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to...... tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion is...... the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental...

  3. Sliding Wear Analysis of Ultra High Strength Steel Using Full Factorial Design Approach

    Sharma Varun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes multi-factor-based experiments that were applied to investigate the sliding wear behaviour of quenched and tempered wear resistant steel. This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of input parameters (such as applied load, sliding velocity and sliding time on wear rate. Full factorial design through design of experiments approach was used for investigation by establishing an empirical relationship between wear loss and input parameters and determining the optimal combination of testing parameters for minimum and maximum wear losses. Sliding wear tests were carried out using pin-on-disc type apparatus at room temperature under dry sliding wear conditions. Detailed investigation revealed that applied load was the most significant factor affecting the wear performance followed by sliding velocity and sliding time. The maximum weight loss due to wear was found to be 33.48 mg when experimentation was conducted at maximum levels of input variables and minimum wear loss of 3.12 mg was obtained at the minimum levels of load, sliding velocity and sliding time. The scanning electron microscopy of the worn pin surfaces shows that adhesion and plastic deformation were the dominating mechanisms involved during experimentation that resulted in maximum wear of the pins, and on the other hand no such mechanism persisted when the pins were worn under minimum sliding wear conditions.

  4. Presentation = Speech + Slides

    Derik Badman

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Back in October, Aaron Schmidt posted “HOWTO give a good presentation” to his blog walking paper. His second bullet point of “thoughts” on good presentations is: Please don’t fill your slides with words. Find some relevant and pretty pictures to support what you’re saying. You can use the pictures to remind yourself what you’re going [...

  5. Drying induced upright sliding and reorganization of carbon nanotube arrays

    Li Qingwen [Materials Physics and Applications Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); De Paula, Raymond [Materials Physics and Applications Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Zhang Xiefei [Materials Physics and Applications Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Zheng Lianxi [Materials Physics and Applications Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Arendt, Paul N [Materials Physics and Applications Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Mueller, Fred M [Materials Physics and Applications Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Zhu, Y T [Materials Physics and Applications Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Tu Yi [CVD-First Nano, 1860 Smithtown Avenue, Ronkonkoma, NY 11779 (United States)

    2006-09-28

    Driven by capillary force, wet carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays have been found to reorganize into cellular structures upon drying. During the reorganization process, individual CNTs are firmly attached to the substrate and have to lie down on the substrate at cell bottoms, forming closed cells. Here we demonstrate that by modifying catalyst structures, the adhesion of CNTs to the substrate can be weakened. Upon drying such CNT arrays, CNTs may slide away from their original sites on the surface and self-assemble into cellular patterns with bottoms open. It is also found that the sliding distance of CNTs increases with array height, and drying millimetre tall arrays leads to the sliding of CNTs over a few hundred micrometres and the eventual self-assembly into discrete islands. By introducing regular vacancies in CNT arrays, CNTs may be manipulated into different patterns.

  6. Drying induced upright sliding and reorganization of carbon nanotube arrays

    Driven by capillary force, wet carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays have been found to reorganize into cellular structures upon drying. During the reorganization process, individual CNTs are firmly attached to the substrate and have to lie down on the substrate at cell bottoms, forming closed cells. Here we demonstrate that by modifying catalyst structures, the adhesion of CNTs to the substrate can be weakened. Upon drying such CNT arrays, CNTs may slide away from their original sites on the surface and self-assemble into cellular patterns with bottoms open. It is also found that the sliding distance of CNTs increases with array height, and drying millimetre tall arrays leads to the sliding of CNTs over a few hundred micrometres and the eventual self-assembly into discrete islands. By introducing regular vacancies in CNT arrays, CNTs may be manipulated into different patterns

  7. Tribological studies on sliding pairs of ZrO{sub 2}, POM and steel for applications as water-lubricated micro-mechanical components; Tribologische Untersuchungen an Gleitpaarungen aus ZrO{sub 2}, POM und Stahl fuer den Einsatz als wassergeschmierte mikromechanische Bauteile

    Herz, J.; Schneider, J.; Zum Gahr, K.H. [Institut fuer Werkstoffkunde II, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Micro-tribological tests were carried out on varying mated sliding pairs of TZP-ZrO{sub 2}, polyoxymethylene (POM) and steel 17-4PH in air and distilled water using a laboratory tribometer (system: flattened ball-on-disc) under unidirectional sliding. The effects of relative humidity in air or water lubrication, respectively, the surface pressure and the sliding speed were studied with the self-mated zirconia. The results show that zirconia can be a favourable material for tribologically high-loaded micro-mechanical components at water lubrication, particularly, in comparision with already used polymeric materials. Self-mated zirconia resulted also during unlubricated sliding in air in lower friction and wear than the steel/steel, POM/steel or POM/ZrO{sub 2} pairs, respectively.Keywords: precision engineering, micromechanical components, sliding wear, friction, water lubrication, zirconia, polyoxymethylene, steel 17-4 PH. (Abstract Copyright[2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] In einem Labor-Mikrotribometer wurden im System abgeplattete Kugel/Scheibe tribologische Untersuchungen unter einsinniger Gleitbeanspruchung an Selbst- und Fremdpaarungen der Werkstoffe TZP-ZrO{sub 2}, Polyacetal (POM) und Stahl 17-4PH an Luft und unter Wasserschmierung durchgefuehrt. Neben den verschiedenen Werkstoffpaarungen wurden insbesondere an der ZrO{sub 2}-Selbstpaarung der Einfluss der relativen Luftfeuchte bzw. von Wasserschmierung, der Flaechenpressung und der Gleitgeschwindigkeit untersucht. Die Ergebnisse zeigen, dass ZrO{sub 2}-Keramik im Hinblick auf die tribologischen Eigenschaften eine vorteilhafte Alternative fuer hochbeanspruchte mikromechanische Bauteile besonders unter Wasserschmierung im Vergleich zu heute vielfach eingesetzten Polymerwerkstoffen darstellt. Auch ungeschmiert an Luft wies die ZrO{sub 2}-Selbstpaarung geringere Werte der Reibung und des Verschleisses als Stahl/Stahl-, POM/Stahl- oder POM/ZrO{sub 2}-Paarungen auf.Schlagworte: Feinwerktechnik

  8. Saltatory formation, sliding and dissolution of ER–PM junctions in migrating cancer cells

    Dingsdale, Hayley; Okeke, Emmanuel; Awais, Muhammad; Haynes, Lee; Criddle, David N.; Sutton, Robert; Tepikin, Alexei V.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrated three novel forms of dynamic behaviour of junctions between the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) and the PM (plasma membrane) in migrating cancer cells: saltatory formation, long-distance sliding and dissolution. The individual ER–PM junctions formed near the leading edge of migrating cells (usually within 0.5 μm of polymerized actin and close to focal adhesions) and appeared suddenly without sliding from the interior of the cell. The long distance sliding and dissolution of ER–PM j...

  9. Prediction Study on Anti-Slide Control of Railway Vehicle Based on RBF Neural Networks

    Yang, Lijun; Zhang, Jimin

    While railway vehicle braking, Anti-slide control system will detect operating status of each wheel-sets e.g. speed difference and deceleration etc. Once the detected value on some wheel-set is over pre-defined threshold, brake effort on such wheel-set will be adjusted automatically to avoid blocking. Such method takes effect on guarantee safety operation of vehicle and avoid wheel-set flatness, however it cannot adapt itself to the rail adhesion variation. While wheel-sets slide, the operating status is chaotic time series with certain law, and can be predicted with the law and experiment data in certain time. The predicted values can be used as the input reference signals of vehicle anti-slide control system, to judge and control the slide status of wheel-sets. In this article, the RBF neural networks is taken to predict wheel-set slide status in multi-step with weight vector adjusted based on online self-adaptive algorithm, and the center & normalizing parameters of active function of the hidden unit of RBF neural networks' hidden layer computed with K-means clustering algorithm. With multi-step prediction simulation, the predicted signal with appropriate precision can be used by anti-slide system to trace actively and adjust wheel-set slide tendency, so as to adapt to wheel-rail adhesion variation and reduce the risk of wheel-set blocking.

  10. Consecutive sliding window systems

    This paper proposes a new model that generalizes the linear multi-state sliding window system to the case of m consecutive overlapping windows. In this model the system consists of n linearly ordered multi-state elements. Each element can have different states: from complete failure up to perfect functioning. A performance rate is associated with each state. The system fails if in each of at least m consecutive overlapping groups of r consecutive elements (windows) the sum of the performance rates of elements belonging to the group is lower than a minimum allowable level. An algorithm for system reliability evaluation is suggested which is based on an extended universal moment generating function. Examples of evaluating system reliability and elements' reliability importance indices are presented. - Highlights: → A new model generalizing the linear multi-state sliding window system is proposed. → An algorithm for evaluating the system reliability is developed. → Computational complexity reduction measures are suggested for the algorithm. → Experimental study is performed.

  11. Adhesion and Cohesion

    J. Anthony von Fraunhofer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomena of adhesion and cohesion are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to dentistry. This review considers the forces involved in cohesion and adhesion together with the mechanisms of adhesion and the underlying molecular processes involved in bonding of dissimilar materials. The forces involved in surface tension, surface wetting, chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, diffusive adhesion, and mechanical adhesion are reviewed in detail and examples relevant to adhesive dentistry and bonding are given. Substrate surface chemistry and its influence on adhesion, together with the properties of adhesive materials, are evaluated. The underlying mechanisms involved in adhesion failure are covered. The relevance of the adhesion zone and its importance with regard to adhesive dentistry and bonding to enamel and dentin is discussed.

  12. Solar-Cell Slide Rule

    Yamakawa, K. A.

    1983-01-01

    Slide rule relates efficiency, impurity types, impurity concentrations, and process types. Solar cell slide rule calculations are determination of allowable impurity concentration for nonredistributive process, determination of impurity buildup factor for redistributive process and determination of allowable impurity concentration for redistributive process.

  13. Tile adhesive production by Inorganic materials

    Fasil Alemayehu Hayilu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In modern construction, ceramic tile and mosaic which are used for finishing and decoration are attached to the surface by using tile adhesives. It was a long way for tiling technology to arrive at the current cement based modified adhesive. The development in additives and modifier are the paramount factor to improve workability, higher flexibility, and better adhesion. In this document tile adhesive has been produced for economical and high performance formulation. These products have been produced by considering the effect of aggregate. These two products with different size of aggregate have been compared and tested. The test made was slip, bending, and compression test. Economical formulation consists of components like cement, quartz sand, cellulose ether and tartaric acid. But high performance consists of limestone and cellulose fiber in addition to these components. The modifier added has enhanced the final product resistance to sliding, bending and compression strength. In terms of compression strength test about 17.27% high performance is stronger than economical formulation. And in addition high performance is stronger than economical formulation by about 16.89% in terms of bending strength. The other thing is the effect of grain size, the component that has low grain size have shown great strength and resistant to slide.

  14. Operational Semantics for SPARQL Update (slides)

    Horne, Ross

    2011-01-01

    These are the slides presented at JIST 2011. The slides contain examples of updates. The examples are based on Chinese history local to Hangzhou, where the conference was held. The slides also feature the crocodile served at the conference banquet.

  15. Shearing Nanometer-Thick Confined Hydrocarbon Films: Friction and Adhesion

    Sivebæk, I. M.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2016-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics (MD) friction and adhesion calculations for nanometer-thick confined hydrocarbon films with molecular lengths 20, 100 and 1400 carbon atoms. We study the dependency of the frictional shear stress on the confining pressure and sliding speed. We present results for the...

  16. T-Slide Linear Actuators

    Vranish, John

    2009-01-01

    T-slide linear actuators use gear bearing differential epicyclical transmissions (GBDETs) to directly drive a linear rack, which, in turn, performs the actuation. Conventional systems use a rotary power source in conjunction with a nut and screw to provide linear motion. Non-back-drive properties of GBDETs make the new actuator more direct and simpler. Versions of this approach will serve as a long-stroke, ultra-precision, position actuator for NASA science instruments, and as a rugged, linear actuator for NASA deployment duties. The T slide can operate effectively in the presence of side forces and torques. Versions of the actuator can perform ultra-precision positioning. A basic T-slide actuator is a long-stroke, rack-and-pinion linear actuator that, typically, consists of a T-slide, several idlers, a transmission to drive the slide (powered by an electric motor) and a housing that holds the entire assembly. The actuator is driven by gear action on its top surface, and is guided and constrained by gear-bearing idlers on its other two parallel surfaces. The geometry, implemented with gear-bearing technology, is particularly effective. An electronic motor operating through a GBDET can directly drive the T slide against large loads, as a rack and pinion linear actuator, with no break and no danger of back driving. The actuator drives the slide into position and stops. The slide holes position with power off and no brake, regardless of load. With the T slide configuration, this GBDET has an entire T-gear surface on which to operate. The GB idlers coupling the other two T slide parallel surfaces to their housing counterpart surfaces provide constraints in five degrees-of-freedom and rolling friction in the direction of actuation. Multiple GB idlers provide roller bearing strength sufficient to support efficient, rolling friction movement, even in the presence of large, resisting forces. T-slide actuators can be controlled using the combination of an off

  17. Advanced adhesives in electronics

    Bailey, C

    2011-01-01

    Adhesives are widely used in the manufacture of electronic devices to act as passive and active components. Recently there has been considerable interest in the use of conductive adhesives. This book reviews key types of conductive adhesives, processing methods, properties and the way they can be modelled as well as potential applications.$bAdhesives for electronic applications serve important functional and structural purposes in electronic components and packaging, and have developed significantly over the last few decades. Advanced adhesives in electronics reviews recent developments in adhesive joining technology, processing and properties. The book opens with an introduction to adhesive joining technology for electronics. Part one goes on to cover different types of adhesive used in electronic systems, including thermally conductive adhesives, isotropic and anisotropic conductive adhesives and underfill adhesives for flip-chip applications. Part two focuses on the properties and processing of electronic ...

  18. Reversible low adhesive to high adhesive superhydrophobicity transition on ZnO nanoparticle surfaces

    Li, Jian, E-mail: jianli83@126.com; Jing, Zhijiao; Yang, Yaoxia; Zha, Fei; Yan, Long; Lei, Ziqiang, E-mail: leizq@nwnu.edu.cn

    2014-01-15

    Superhydrophobic ZnO surfaces with water contact angle of 162° and sliding angle of 2° were fabricated successfully by spraying hydrophobic ZnO nanoparticle suspensions without limitations the shape and size of substrates. The as-prepared superhydrophobic ZnO surfaces are low adhesive and a water droplet easily rolls off with the surface slightly tilted. However, after being irradiated by UV light through a photomask, it becomes highly adhesive, on which a water droplet is firmly pinned without any movement. Further annealing the irradiated film, water droplets can roll off the surface again. Reversible transition between the low adhesive rolling state and high adhesive pinning state can be realized simply by UV illumination and heat treatment alternately. At the same time, the maximum adhesive force between the superhydrophobic ZnO surfaces and the water droplet changes from extreme low (∼5.1 μN) to very high (∼136.1 μN). When irradiated without a photomask, the surface became hydrophilic. Additionally, a water droplet can be transfered from the low adhesive superhydrophobic ZnO surfaces to the hydrophilic ZnO surfaces using the high adhesive superhydrophobic ZnO surfaces as a mechanical hand.

  19. An Airship Slide Rule

    Weaver, E R; Pickering, S F

    1924-01-01

    This report prepared for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, describes an airship slide rule developed by the Gas-Chemistry Section of the Bureau of Standards, at the request of the Bureau of Engineering of the Navy Department. It is intended primarily to give rapid solutions of a few problems of frequent occurrence in airship navigation, but it can be used to advantage in solving a great variety of problems, involving volumes, lifting powers, temperatures, pressures, altitudes and the purity of the balloon gas. The rule is graduated to read directly in the units actually used in making observations, constants and conversion factors being taken care of by the length and location of the scales. It is thought that with this rule practically any problem likely to arise in this class of work can be readily solved after the user has become familiar with the operation of the rule; and that the solution will, in most cases, be as accurate as the data warrant.

  20. Shear adhesion strength of aligned electrospun nanofibers.

    Najem, Johnny F; Wong, Shing-Chung; Ji, Guang

    2014-09-01

    Inspiration from nature such as insects' foot hairs motivates scientists to fabricate nanoscale cylindrical solids that allow tens of millions of contact points per unit area with material substrates. In this paper, we present a simple yet robust method for fabricating directionally sensitive shear adhesive laminates. By using aligned electrospun nylon-6, we create dry adhesives, as a succession of our previous work on measuring adhesion energies between two single free-standing electrospun polymer fibers in cross-cylinder geometry, randomly oriented membranes and substrate, and peel forces between aligned fibers and substrate. The synthetic aligned cylindrical solids in this study are electrically insulating and show a maximal Mode II shear adhesion strength of 27 N/cm(2) on a glass slide. This measured value, for the purpose of comparison, is 270% of that reported from gecko feet. The Mode II shear adhesion strength, based on a commonly known "dead-weight" test, is 97-fold greater than the Mode I (normal) adhesion strength of the same. The data indicate a strong shear binding on and easy normal lifting off. Anisotropic adhesion (Mode II/Mode I) is pronounced. The size and surface boundary effects, crystallinity, and bending stiffness of fibers are used to understand these electrospun nanofibers, which vastly differ from otherwise known adhesive technologies. The anisotropic strength distribution is attributed to a decreasing fiber diameter and an optimized laminate thickness, which, in turn, influences the bending stiffness and solid-state "wettability" of points of contact between nanofibers and surface asperities. PMID:25105533

  1. Adhesion in microelectronics

    Mittal, K L

    2014-01-01

    This comprehensive book will provide both fundamental and applied aspects of adhesion pertaining to microelectronics in a single and easily accessible source. Among the topics to be covered include; Various theories or mechanisms of adhesionSurface (physical or chemical) characterization of materials as it pertains to adhesionSurface cleaning as it pertains to adhesionWays to improve adhesionUnraveling of interfacial interactions using an array of pertinent techniquesCharacterization of interfaces / interphasesPolymer-polymer adhesionMetal-polymer adhesion  (metallized polymers)Polymer adhesi

  2. SLIDE INVENTORY IN DUBRACINA RIVER BASIN

    Aleksandar Toševski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available he slide inventory in Dubračina river basin consists of 39 slides. They have been detected by field geomorphological mapping and visual analysis of 1 meter digital elevation model. The slides detected using elevation model are validated by the field checking as well. The outline of all slides is generated using digital elevation model. The total area affected by sliding is 81873 m2 which is 0,44% of researched area. The area, volume, total lenght, width of displaced mass, dip angle of slope on the slide location and dip direction of sliding have been defined for each slide. Slides areas are ranging from 150 to 12956 m2. Minimal total slide lenght from the crown to the tip is 20 m and maximal is 226 m. Angles of slope dip on slide locations are ranging from 10,1° to 28,6° focusing that 76,7% total area affected by sliding has slope dip angle on slide location up to 20°. According to weighting factor calculations lithological unit flysch (E2,3 is marked as the most significant lithological factor of the sliding. All slides are located in the flysch weathering zone where zone crop out. It has been shown that terrain tendency for excessive erosion is very limitative factor in using digital elevation model for the remote slide mapping (the paper is published in Croatian.

  3. Thermal Characterization of Adhesive

    Spomer, Ken A.

    1999-01-01

    The current Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle adhesive bond system is being replaced due to obsolescence. Down-selection and performance testing of the structural adhesives resulted in the selection of two candidate replacement adhesives, Resin Technology Group's Tiga 321 and 3M's EC2615XLW. This paper describes rocket motor testing of these two adhesives. Four forty-pound charge motors were fabricated in configurations that would allow side by side comparison testing of the candidate replacement adhesives and the current RSRM adhesives. The motors provided an environment where the thermal performance of adhesives in flame surface bondlines was compared. Results of the FPC testing show that: 1) The phenolic char depths on radial bond lines is approximately the same and vary depending on the position in the blast tube regardless of which adhesive was used; 2) The adhesive char depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the char depth of the current adhesives; 3) The heat-affected depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the heat-affected depth of the current adhesives; and 4) The ablation rates for both replacement adhesives are slower than that of the current adhesives.

  4. Adhesion and size dependent friction anisotropy in boron nitride nanotubes

    The frictional properties of individual multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes (BN-NTs) synthesized by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and deposited on a silicon substrate are investigated using an atomic force microscope tip sliding along (longitudinal sliding) and across (transverse sliding) the tube’s principal axis. Because of the tube’s transverse deformations during the tip sliding, a larger friction coefficient is found for the transverse sliding as compared to the longitudinal sliding. Here, we show that the friction anisotropy in BN-NTs, defined as the ratio between transverse and longitudinal friction forces per unit area, increases with the nanotube–substrate contact area, estimated to be proportional to (LNTRNT)1/2, where LNT and RNT are the length and the radius of the nanotube, respectively. Larger contact area denotes stronger surface adhesion, resulting in a longitudinal friction coefficient closer to the value expected in the absence of transverse deformations. Compared to carbon nanotubes (C-NTs), BN-NTs display a friction coefficient in each sliding direction with intermediate values between CVD and arc discharge C-NTs. CVD BN-NTs with improved tribological properties and higher oxidation temperature might be a better candidate than CVD C-NTs for applications in extreme environments. (paper)

  5. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    H. G. Silverman; F. F. Roberto

    2007-12-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.

  6. Understanding marine mussel adhesion.

    Silverman, Heather G; Roberto, Francisco F

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  7. Friction and adhesion mediated by supramolecular host-guest complexes

    Guerra, Roberto; Benassi, Andrea; Vanossi, Andrea; Ma, Ming; Urbakh, Michael

    The adhesive and frictional response of an AFM tip connected to a substrate through supramolecular host-guest complexes is investigated by dynamic Monte Carlo simulations. The variation of the pull-off force with the unloading rate recently observed in experiments is here unraveled by evidencing a simultaneous (progressive) break of the bonds at fast (slow) rates. The model reveals the origin of the observed plateaus in the retraction force as a function of tip-surface distance, showing that they ensue from the tip geometrical features. In lateral sliding, the model exhibits a wide range of dynamic behaviors ranging from smooth sliding to stick-slip at different velocities, with the average friction force determined by the characteristic formation/rupture rates of the complexes. In particular, it is shown that for some molecular complexes friction can become almost constant over a wide range of velocities. Also, we show the possibility to exploit ageing effect through slide-hold-slide experiments, in order to infer the characteristic formation rate. Finally, our model predicts a novel "anti-ageing" effect which is characterized by a decrease of static friction force with the hold time. Such effect is explained in terms of enhancement of adhesion during sliding, especially observed at high driving velocities.

  8. Friction and adhesion mediated by supramolecular host-guest complexes.

    Guerra, Roberto; Benassi, Andrea; Vanossi, Andrea; Ma, Ming; Urbakh, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The adhesive and frictional response of an AFM tip connected to a substrate through supramolecular host-guest complexes is investigated by dynamic Monte Carlo simulations. Here, the variation of the pull-off force with the unloading rate recently observed in experiments is unraveled by evidencing simultaneous (progressive) breaking of the bonds at fast (slow) rates. The model reveals the origin of the observed plateaus in the retraction force as a function of the tip-surface distance, showing that they result from the tip geometrical features. In lateral sliding, the model exhibits a wide range of dynamic behaviors ranging from smooth sliding to stick-slip at different velocities, with the average friction force determined by the characteristic formation/rupture rates of the complexes. In particular, it is shown that for some molecular complexes friction can become almost constant over a wide range of velocities. Also, we show the possibility of exploiting the ageing effect through slide-hold-slide experiments, in order to infer the characteristic formation rate. Finally, our model predicts a novel "anti-ageing" effect which is characterized by a decrease of the static friction force with the hold time. Such an effect is explained in terms of enhancement of adhesion during sliding, especially observed at high driving velocities. PMID:26975343

  9. Mapping stain distribution in pathology slides using whole slide imaging

    Fang-Cheng Yeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Whole slide imaging (WSI offers a novel approach to digitize and review pathology slides, but the voluminous data generated by this technology demand new computational methods for image analysis. Materials and Methods: In this study, we report a method that recognizes stains in WSI data and uses kernel density estimator to calculate the stain density across the digitized pathology slides. The validation study was conducted using a rat model of acute cardiac allograft rejection and another rat model of heart ischemia/reperfusion injury. Immunohistochemistry (IHC was conducted to label ED1 + macrophages in the tissue sections and the stained slides were digitized by a whole slide scanner. The whole slide images were tessellated to enable parallel processing. Pixel-wise stain classification was conducted to classify the IHC stains from those of the background and the density distribution of the identified IHC stains was then calculated by the kernel density estimator. Results: The regression analysis showed a correlation coefficient of 0.8961 between the number of IHC stains counted by our stain recognition algorithm and that by the manual counting, suggesting that our stain recognition algorithm was in good agreement with the manual counting. The density distribution of the IHC stains showed a consistent pattern with those of the cellular magnetic resonance (MR images that detected macrophages labeled by ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron-oxide or micron-sized iron-oxide particles. Conclusions: Our method provides a new imaging modality to facilitate clinical diagnosis. It also provides a way to validate/correlate cellular MRI data used for tracking immune-cell infiltration in cardiac transplant rejection and cardiac ischemic injury.

  10. Slides and sliding in the water reservoirs banks

    Spanilá, Tamara; Horský, O.; Banach, M.

    Lisse : A.A.Balkema, 2002 - (Rybář, J.; Stemberk, J.; Novosad, S.), s. 315-319 ISBN 90-5809-393-x. [Evropská konference o sesuvech /1./. Praha (CZ), 24.06.2002-26.06.2002] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3046908 Keywords : abrasion * slides influence of water levels * weathering Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  11. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  12. Heavy duty complete extension slides

    Bueno, José Ignacio; Vázquez, Javier

    2001-09-01

    The selection from available commercial market of a set of slides to be used in an habitable pressurised module in space, to draw a 660 mm box out of a rack, up to a completely extracted position in a safely supported configuration, seems in principle not to be a complicated task. That was the first approach taken in the design process of the telescopic guides of the Crew Work Bench (CWB) included in the Fluid Science Laboratory (FSL), part of "ESA Microgravity Facilities for Columbus" within the Columbus Orbital Facility (COF) of the International Space Station (ISS). Nevertheless, common space compatible requirements such as materials, specific environmental loads, available envelope, total weight, etc., can make the selection of telescopic slides from commercial market unfeasible. A specific development to design space compatible telescopic slides for the CWB was undertaken. A set of heavy duty space compatible telescopic slides were designed, manufactured and tested. They should be operative in both, 1-g environment and in orbit, and additionally should withstand an inadvertent astronaut kick or bump of 556 N in any direction.

  13. Sliding Window Orthonormal PAST Algorithm

    Badeau, Roland; Abed-Meraim, Karim; Richard, Gaël; David, Bertrand

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces an orthonormal version of the sliding-window Projection Approximation Subspace Tracker (PAST). The new algorithm guarantees the orthonormality of the signal subspace basis at each iteration. Moreover, it has the same complexity as the original PAST algorithm, and like the more computationally demanding natural power (NP) method, it satisfies a global convergence property, and reaches an excellent tracking performance.

  14. Comprehensive Smokefree Indoor Air PDF Slides

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Download the comprehensive smokefree indoor air slides. These slides are available in PDF and PowerPoint formats. The PowerPoint version can be found at:...

  15. Particle adhesion and removal

    Mittal, K L

    2015-01-01

    The book provides a comprehensive and easily accessible reference source covering all important aspects of particle adhesion and removal.  The core objective is to cover both fundamental and applied aspects of particle adhesion and removal with emphasis on recent developments.  Among the topics to be covered include: 1. Fundamentals of surface forces in particle adhesion and removal.2. Mechanisms of particle adhesion and removal.3. Experimental methods (e.g. AFM, SFA,SFM,IFM, etc.) to understand  particle-particle and particle-substrate interactions.4. Mechanics of adhesion of micro- and  n

  16. Diseases of Landscape Ornamentals. Slide Script.

    Powell, Charles C.; Sydnor, T. Davis

    This slide script, part of a series of slide scripts designed for use in vocational agriculture classes, deals with recognizing and controlling diseases found on ornamental landscape plants. Included in the script are narrations for use with a total of 80 slides illustrating various foliar diseases (anthracnose, black spot, hawthorn leaf blight,…

  17. Tribological Behaviour of W-DLC against an Aluminium Alloy Subjected to Lubricated Sliding

    S. Bhowmick

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Diamond like carbon (DLC coatings mitigate aluminium adhesion and reduce friction under the ambient conditions but their tribological behaviour under lubricated sliding need to be further investigated. In this study, tribological tests were performed to evaluate the friction and wear characteristics of W-DLC and H-DLC coatings sliding against an aluminium alloy (319 Al under unlubricated (40 % RH and lubricated sliding conditions. For unlubricated sliding, coefficient of friction (COF values of H-DLC and W-DLC were 0.15 and 0.20. A lower COF value of 0.11 was observed when W-DLC was tested using lubricant oil incorporating sulphur while the H-DLC’s COF remained almost unchanged. The mechanisms responsible for the low friction of W-DLC observed during lubricated sliding were revealed by studying the compositions of the coating surfaces and the transfer layers formed on 319 Al. Micro-Raman spectroscopy indicated that the transfer layers formed during lubricated sliding of W-DLC incorporated tungsten disulphide (WS2.

  18. Study on distribution rule of sliding pushing force and remnant resistant sliding force acting on anti-sliding pile

    Qingyang YU; Lei NIE

    2006-01-01

    Anti-slide pile is one of the important methods to administer landslide geological disaster because of its advantages. It plays important role in administering landslide. It is a premise of reasonable economy and technological advance to know the distribution rule and feature of the force between anti-sliding pile and surrounding rock. To determine the sliding force and remnant resistant sliding force, according to need of study, this paper sets up the geological model and mechanics model in term of a typical landslide, and analyzes the effect rule of sliding body distortion, strength and gravity to the pushing force and remnant resistant sliding force by use of the numerical model. The distribution rule of pushing force and remnant resistant sliding force of the type of landslide is given.

  19. In vitro inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa adhesion by Xylitol

    Letícia Pinheiro de Sousa; Annelisa Farah da Silva; Natalia Oliveira Calil; Murilo Gomes Oliveira; Silvio Silvério da Silva; Nádia Rezende Barbosa Raposo

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated, in vitro, the antimicrobial activity and the anti-adherent property of xylitol (0.5, 2.5 and 5.0%, w/v) on two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains (ATCC 9027 and clinical). The assay of antimicrobial activity was performed to determine a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the adhesion test was performed, by which the parameters regarding, growth in the culture medium, number of colony forming units (CFUs) released and slide evaluation by scanning electron microscopy (...

  20. Automated single-slide staining device

    Wilkins, J. R.; Mills, S. M. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A simple apparatus and method is disclosed for making individual single Gram stains on bacteria inoculated slides to assist in classifying bacteria in the laboratory as Gram-positive or Gram-negative. The apparatus involves positioning a single inoculated slide in a stationary position and thereafter automatically and sequentially flooding the slide with increments of a primary stain, a mordant, a decolorizer, a counterstain and a wash solution in a sequential manner without the individual lab technician touching the slide and with minimum danger of contamination thereof from other slides.

  1. Sliding wear of cemented carbides

    Cemented carbides are known to be very hard and wear resistant and are therefor often used in applications involving surface damage and wear. The wear rate of cemented carbides is often measured in abrasion. In such tests it has been shown that the wear rate is inversely dependent on the material hardness. The sliding wear is even more of a surface phenomenon than a abrasion, making it difficult to predict friction and wear from bulk properties. This paper concentrates on the sliding wear of cemented carbides and elucidates some wear mechanisms. It is especially shown that a fragmenting wear mechanism of WC is very important for the description of wear of cemented carbides. (author)

  2. Radiation-curable adhesives

    Radiation-curable adhesives may be classified into two broad categories. In the first category, adhesive bonding occurs as a direct result of irradiation. The second category includes pressure-sensitive and hot-melt adhesives, which are composed of linear or lightly cross-linked polymers prepared by a radiation-induced polymerization reaction. This chapter is mainly concerned with radiation-curable adhesives of the first category. The various adhesive types are discussed and adhesive performance is examined, particularly in relation to the chemistry and chemical technology which underlies the individual materials. A description of a limited number of representative applications is included as is an outline of recent developments of curing and dispensing equipment. 268 refs., 14 figs., 13 tabs

  3. EXPERIMENTALLY-STATISTICAL MODEL OF CLADDING LAYER FORMATION PROCESS ON SLIDE-WAYS

    N. N. Maksimchenko

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The developed experimentally-statistical model of the cladding composite layer formation process on slide-ways allows to operate technological modes of cladding by flexible instrument (CFI in order to obtain the set properties of a coating (thickness, continuity, adhesion strength.The established optimum technological modes of CFI process providing formation of continuous, strongly adhered to a basis composite coatings of the required thickness have been used for applying coatings on working surfaces of slide-ways of metal-cutting machine tool beds that has allowed to lower friction factor in coupling on the average by 1.3–1.7-fold and to improve uniformity of slow moving of machine tool units by 1.74-fold in comparison with slide-ways without a coating. 

  4. Penetration of urea-formaldehyde adhesives in wood tissue, part I: Radial penetration of UF adhesives into beech

    Gavrilović-Grmuša Ivana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Adhesive penetration plays an important role in wood adhesion, since wood is a porous material. The degree of penetration mostly depends on the wood factors, resin type and formulation and processing parameters. Tangentially cut 5 mm thick beech wood (Fagus moesiaca plies, 100 mm long (parallel to grain and 30 mm wide, were prepared for this study. The urea-formaldehyde (UF adhesive was applied to the surface of one ply. Two plies were assembled into sample so that the grains of two plies were parallel. Samples were pressed in a hydraulic press at 120°C and 0,7 MPa for 15 min. Microtome test-specimens were cut of each sample. 20 μm thick microtomes were cut by sliding microtome apparatus, exposing a bondline with a cross-sectional surface. The lack of more exhausting research on the penetration of urea-formaldehyde adhesives in wood is evident. Since ureaformaldehyde (UF glue resins were the most important type of adhesives in the wood industry in the last 60 years (Dunky, 2000, the objective of this research was microscopic detection of UF adhesive penetration in wood tissue. Four types of UF resins with different levels of polycondensation were used in this research. Safranin was added in resins, since epi-fluorescence microscope was used in this research for measuring the adhesive penetration.

  5. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach that....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will...

  6. Wear mechanism of Mo−W doped carbon-based coating during boundary lubricated sliding

    Mandal, Paranjayee; Ehiasarian, Arutiun; Hovsepian, Papken

    2015-01-01

    The high temperature tribological applications of state-of-the-art diamond-like-carbon (DLC) coatings in automotive industry are often compromised due to their poor adhesion strength and low thermal stability. A molybdenum and tungsten doped carbon-based coating (Mo−W−C) is developed in order to overcome these limitations and to enhance tribological performance during boundary lubricated sliding at ambient and elevated temperature. The coating was deposited utilising HIPIMS technology. Mo−W−C...

  7. Bacterial adhesion to glass and metal-oxide surfaces.

    Li, Baikun; Logan, Bruce E

    2004-07-15

    Metal oxides can increase the adhesion of negatively-charged bacteria to surfaces primarily due to their positive charge. However, the hydrophobicity of a metal-oxide surface can also increase adhesion of bacteria. In order to understand the relative contribution of charge and hydrophobicity to bacterial adhesion, we measured the adhesion of 8 strains of bacteria, under conditions of low and high-ionic strength (1 and 100 mM, respectively) to 11 different surfaces and examined adhesion as a function of charge, hydrophobicity (water contact angle) and surface energy. Inorganic surfaces included three uncoated glass surfaces and eight metal-oxide thin films prepared on the upper (non-tin-exposed) side of float glass by chemical vapor deposition. The Gram-negative bacteria differed in lengths of lipopolysaccharides on their outer surface (three Escherichia coli strains), the amounts of exopolysaccharides (two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains), and their known relative adhesion to sand grains (two Burkholderia cepacia strains). One Gram positive bacterium was also used that had a lower adhesion to glass than these other bacteria (Bacillus subtilis). For all eight bacteria, there was a consistent increase in adhesion between with the type of inorganic surface in the order: float glass exposed to tin (coded here as Si-Sn), glass microscope slide (Si-m), uncoated air-side float glass surface (Si-a), followed by thin films of (Co(1-y-z)Fe(y)Cr(z))3O4, Ti/Fe/O, TiO2, SnO2, SnO2:F, SnO2:Sb, A1(2)O3, and Fe2O3 (the colon indicates metal doping, a slash indicates that the metal is a major component, while the dash is used to distinguish surfaces). Increasing the ionic strength from 1 to 100 mM increased adhesion by a factor of 2.0 +/- 0.6 (73% of the sample results were within the 95% CI) showing electrostatic charge was important in adhesion. However, adhesion was not significantly correlated with bacterial charge and contact angle. Adhesion (A) of the eight strains was

  8. Tissue adhesives in otorhinolaryngology

    Schneider, Gerlind

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of medical tissue adhesives has a long history without finding an all-purpose tissue adhesive for clinical daily routine. This is caused by the specific demands which are made on a tissue adhesive, and the different areas of application. In otorhinolaryngology, on the one hand, this is the mucosal environment as well as the application on bones, cartilage and periphery nerves. On the other hand, there are stressed regions (skin, oral cavity, pharynx, oesophagus, trachea and unstressed regions (middle ear, nose and paranasal sinuses, cranial bones. But due to the facts that adhesives can have considerable advantages in assuring surgery results, prevention of complications and so reduction of medical costs/treatment expenses, the search for new adhesives for use in otorhinolaryngology will be continued intensively. In parallel, appropriate application systems have to be developed for microscopic and endoscopic use.

  9. Experimental Investigation of Adhesion and Friction Phenomena of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond (UNCD) and Aluminum Oxide in MEMS

    Buja, F.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis aims to provide the latest progresses on the experimental investigation of friction and adhesion phenomena, occurring at the nanoscale in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). I have studied and characterized the interaction between MEMS sidewalls in contact and sliding one onto another

  10. "Slide less pathology": Fairy tale or reality?

    Indu, M; Rathy, R; Binu, M P

    2016-01-01

    Pathology practice is significantly advanced in various frontiers. Therefore, "slide less digital" pathology will not be a mere imagination in near future. Digitalization of histopathological slides (whole slide imaging [WSI]) is possible with the help of whole slide scanner. The WSI has a positive impact not only in routine practice but also in research field, medical education and bioindustry. Even if digital pathology has definitive advantages, its widespread use is not yet possible. As it is an upcoming technology in our field, this article is aimed to discussessential aspects of WSI. PMID:27601824

  11. Sliding mode control for mobile welding robot

    Lü Xueqin; Zhang Ke; Wu Yixiong

    2006-01-01

    The sliding mode controller of mobile welding robot is established in this paper through applying the method of variable structure control with sliding mode into the control of the mobile welding robot.The traditional switching function smooth method is improved by combining the smoothed switching function with the time-varying control gain.It is shown that the proposed sliding mode controller is robust to bounded external disturbances.Experimental results demonstrate that sliding mode controller algorithm can be used into seam tracking and the tracking system is stable with bounded uncertain disturbance.In the seam tracking process, the robot moves steadily without any obvious chattering.

  12. An innovative wheel–rail contact model for railway vehicles under degraded adhesion conditions

    Meli, E., E-mail: enrico.meli@unifi.it; Ridolfi, A., E-mail: a.ridolfi@unifi.it [University of Florence, Department of Industrial Engineering (Italy)

    2015-03-15

    The accurate modelling of the wheel–rail contact plays a fundamental role in the railway field since the contact forces heavily affect the vehicle dynamics, the wear of the contact surfaces and the vehicle safety. Concerning the wheel–rail contact, an important open problem is represented by the degraded adhesion. A realistic adhesion model is quite difficult to obtain because of the complex and highly non-linear behaviour of the adhesion coefficient and the presence of external unknown contaminants (the third body); this is especially true when degraded adhesion and large sliding between the wheel and rail contact surfaces occur.In this work the authors present an adhesion model particularly developed to describe degraded adhesion conditions. The new approach will have to be suitable to be employed within the wheel–rail contact models typical of the multibody applications. In other words, the contact model, comprising the new adhesion model, will have to guarantee a good accuracy and, at the same time, a high numerical efficiency to be implemented directly online inside the general multibody model of the vehicles (e.g. in Matlab-Simulink or Simpack environments) ( www.mathworks.com http://www.mathworks.com , 2012; www.simpack.com http://www.simpack.com , 2012).The model analysed in the paper is based on some of the main phenomena characterising the degraded adhesion, such as large sliding at the contact interface, high energy dissipation, the consequent cleaning effect on the contact surfaces and the final adhesion recovery due to the removal of external unknown contaminants.The adhesion model has been validated because of the experimental data provided by Trenitalia S.p.A. coming from on-track tests performed in Velim (Czech Republic). The tests have been carried out on a straight railway track under degraded adhesion conditions with the railway vehicle UIC-Z1 equipped with a fully-working Wheel Slide Protection (WSP) system.The validation highlighted the

  13. An innovative wheel–rail contact model for railway vehicles under degraded adhesion conditions

    The accurate modelling of the wheel–rail contact plays a fundamental role in the railway field since the contact forces heavily affect the vehicle dynamics, the wear of the contact surfaces and the vehicle safety. Concerning the wheel–rail contact, an important open problem is represented by the degraded adhesion. A realistic adhesion model is quite difficult to obtain because of the complex and highly non-linear behaviour of the adhesion coefficient and the presence of external unknown contaminants (the third body); this is especially true when degraded adhesion and large sliding between the wheel and rail contact surfaces occur.In this work the authors present an adhesion model particularly developed to describe degraded adhesion conditions. The new approach will have to be suitable to be employed within the wheel–rail contact models typical of the multibody applications. In other words, the contact model, comprising the new adhesion model, will have to guarantee a good accuracy and, at the same time, a high numerical efficiency to be implemented directly online inside the general multibody model of the vehicles (e.g. in Matlab-Simulink or Simpack environments) ( www.mathworks.com http://www.mathworks.com , 2012; www.simpack.com http://www.simpack.com , 2012).The model analysed in the paper is based on some of the main phenomena characterising the degraded adhesion, such as large sliding at the contact interface, high energy dissipation, the consequent cleaning effect on the contact surfaces and the final adhesion recovery due to the removal of external unknown contaminants.The adhesion model has been validated because of the experimental data provided by Trenitalia S.p.A. coming from on-track tests performed in Velim (Czech Republic). The tests have been carried out on a straight railway track under degraded adhesion conditions with the railway vehicle UIC-Z1 equipped with a fully-working Wheel Slide Protection (WSP) system.The validation highlighted the

  14. Handbook of adhesion

    Packham, D E

    2006-01-01

    This second edition of the successful Handbook of Adhesion provides concise and authoritative articles covering many aspects of the science and technology associated with adhesion and adhesives. It is intended to fill a gap between the necessarily simplified treatment of the student textbook and the full and thorough treatment of the research monograph and review article. The articles are structured in such a way, with internal cross-referencing and external literature references, that the reader can build up a broader and deeper understanding, as their needs require.This second edition includ

  15. Lactobacillus Adhesion to Mucus

    Maxwell L. Van Tassell

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Mucus provides protective functions in the gastrointestinal tract and plays an important role in the adhesion of microorganisms to host surfaces. Mucin glycoproteins polymerize, forming a framework to which certain microbial populations can adhere, including probiotic Lactobacillus species. Numerous mechanisms for adhesion to mucus have been discovered in lactobacilli, including partially characterized mucus binding proteins. These mechanisms vary in importance with the in vitro models studied, which could significantly affect the perceived probiotic potential of the organisms. Understanding the nature of mucus-microbe interactions could be the key to elucidating the mechanisms of probiotic adhesion within the host.

  16. Interfacial sliding in carbon nanotube/diamond matrix composites

    Carbon matrix-carbon nanotube (CNT) composites have a broad range of applications because of the exceptional mechanical properties of both matrix and fibers. Since interfacial sliding plays a key role in determining the strength and toughness of ceramic composites, here interface behavior during nanotube pull-out is studied using molecular dynamics models. The degree of interfacial coupling/adhesion between a diamond matrix and a carbon nanotube is captured through interstitial carbon atoms located in the interface, which can form bonds with both the matrix and CNT atoms. Bonding is accurately captured using the modified REBO potential of Pastewka et al. that introduces an environmental screening coefficient to better capture covalent bond breaking and reforming. Pull-out tests reveal that, after an initial transient, the pull-out force becomes constant, mimicking frictional sliding. The pull-out force is directly proportional to the number of interstitial atoms per unit area in the interface, showing that 'friction' is generated by the energy dissipated during breaking and reforming of bonds involving the interstitial atoms. The effective friction stresses are quite high (several GPa) for interstitial areal densities of 0.72-2.18 nm-2 and the energy dissipated during pull-out can thus be substantial. No differences were found in the pull-out of single wall nanotubes and double wall nanotubes having interwall sp3 bonding. These results demonstrate that 'friction-like' behavior can emerge from non-smooth interfaces and that chemical control of interfacial bonding in CNT can yield substantial sliding resistance and high potential toughening in nanoceramic composites.

  17. Controlling the Adhesion of Superhydrophobic Surfaces Using Electrolyte Jet Machining Techniques

    Yang, Xiaolong; Liu, Xin; Lu, Yao; Zhou, Shining; Gao, Mingqian; Song, Jinlong; Xu, Wenji

    2016-04-01

    Patterns with controllable adhesion on superhydrophobic areas have various biomedical and chemical applications. Electrolyte jet machining technique (EJM), an electrochemical machining method, was firstly exploited in constructing dimples with various profiles on the superhydrophobic Al alloy surface using different processing parameters. Sliding angles of water droplets on those dimples firstly increased and then stabilized at a certain value with the increase of the processing time or the applied voltages of the EJM, indicating that surfaces with different adhesion force could be obtained by regulating the processing parameters. The contact angle hysteresis and the adhesion force that restricts the droplet from sliding off were investigated through experiments. The results show that the adhesion force could be well described using the classical Furmidge equation. On account of this controllable adhesion force, water droplets could either be firmly pinned to the surface, forming various patterns or slide off at designed tilting angles at specified positions on a superhydrophobic surface. Such dimples on superhydrophopbic surfaces can be applied in water harvesting, biochemical analysis and lab-on-chip devices.

  18. Adhesion of Lunar Dust

    Walton, Otis R.

    2007-04-01

    This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e., from rover wheels, astronaut boots and rocket engine blast) and static electric effects (from UV photo-ionization and/or tribo-electric charging) are likely to be the major contributors to the transport of dust particles. If fine regolith particles are deposited on a surface, then surface energy-related (e.g., van der Walls) adhesion forces and static-electric-image forces are likely to be the strongest contributors to adhesion. Some measurement techniques are offered to quantify the strength of adhesion forces. And finally some dust removal techniques are discussed.

  19. Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (LAD)

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (LAD) LAD is an immune deficiency in ... are slow to heal also may have LAD. Treatment and Research Doctors prescribe antibiotics to prevent and ...

  20. Roots of crosscap slides and crosscap transpositions

    Parlak, Anna; Stukow, Michał

    2016-01-01

    Let $N_{g}$ denote a closed nonorientable surface of genus $g$. For $g \\geq 2$ the mapping class group $\\mathcal{M}(N_{g})$ is generated by Dehn twists and one crosscap slide ($Y$-homeomorphism) or by Dehn twists and a crosscap transposition. Margalit and Schleimer observed that Dehn twists have nontrivial roots. We construct roots of crosscap slides and crosscap transpositions.

  1. Linear-induction-motor slide drive

    Barkman, W. E.

    1977-10-11

    A linear-induction-motor drive system to position machine tool slides has been developed on a test bed that utilizes an air-bearing slide, laser interferometer feedback, and a microprocessor-based servo system. Static and dynamic positioning accuracies of +-16 nm (+-0.6 ..mu..in) have been demonstrated.

  2. Sliding-window dynamic frameproof codes

    Paterson, Maura

    2007-01-01

    A sliding-window dynamic frameproof code is a scheme for discouraging the piracy of digital broadcasts through the use of digital finger printing. In this paper we formally define sliding-window dynamic frame proof codes and provide optimal constructions for a certain class of these schemes. We also discuss bounds on the number of users such schemes can support.

  3. Sliding-window dynamic frameproof codes

    Paterson, Maura B.

    2007-01-01

    A sliding-window dynamic frameproof code is a scheme for discouraging the piracy of digital broadcasts through the use of digital fingerprinting. In this paper, we formally define sliding-window dynamic frameproof codes and provide optimal constructions for a certain class of these schemes. We also discuss bounds on the number of users such schemes can support.

  4. The Cancer Digital Slide Archive - TCGA

    Dr. David Gutman and Dr. Lee Cooper developed The Cancer Digital Slide Archive (CDSA), a web platform for accessing pathology slide images of TCGA samples. Find out how they did it and how to use the CDSA website in this Case Study.

  5. Management of adhesive capsulitis

    Neviaser, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Kristen L Stupay,1 Andrew S Neviaser2 1Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2George Washington University Medical Faculty Associates, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder is a condition of capsular contracture that reduces both active and passive glenohumeral motion. The cause of adhesive capsulitis is not known but it is strongly associated with endocrine abnormalities such as diabetes. Diverse terminology and the absence of definitive cri...

  6. Peeling, sliding, pulling and bending

    Lister, John; Peng, Gunnar

    2015-11-01

    The peeling of an elastic sheet away from thin layer of viscous fluid is a simply-stated and generic problem, that involves complex interactions between the flow and elastic deformation on a range of length scales. Consider an analogue of capillary spreading, where a blister of injected viscous fluid spreads due to tension in the overlying elastic sheet. Here the tension is coupled to the deformation of the sheet, and thus varies in time and space. A key question is whether or not viscous shear stresses ahead of the blister are sufficient to prevent the sheet sliding inwards and relieving the tension. Our asymptotic analysis reveals a dichotomy between fast and slow spreading, and between two-dimensional and axisymmetric spreading. In combination with bending stresses and gravity, which may dominate parts of the flow but not others, there is a plethora of dynamical regimes.

  7. Eurosafe-2011 - Papers and slides

    This document gathers some slides, papers and posters that were presented at the 2011 annual EUROSAFE forum. This forum focuses in its plenary part on 'Nuclear safety: new challenges, gained experience and public expectations' in the light of the Fukushima nuclear power station (NPS) accident. The topic will be considered from the point of view of Japanese safety authorities, of a regulator, of an international organisation, of a utility and of a Technical Safety Organisation (TSO). The first part of the second day will be devoted to presentations of the Fukushima NPS accident. The second part of this day will present the latest work carried out by ETSON (European Technical Safety Organizations Network) and EUROSAFE members and their partners worldwide through three seminars (nuclear safety research and safety assessment, radiation protection and environment, nuclear material and nuclear facilities security) and a workshop on operating experience feedback on nuclear fuel cycle facilities

  8. Adhesion and friction characteristics of carbon nanotube arrays

    There has been a great deal of interest in understanding, design and fabrication of bio-mimetic and bio-inspired adhesives in recent years. In this paper we present theoretical investigations on adhesion, friction behaviors and characteristics of fibrillar arrays composed of noninteracting carbon nanotubes for bio-inspired dry adhesives. Contact, compression, subsequent pulling off and dry sliding friction simulations were performed. It is demonstrated that there are two different adhesion forces during pull off. Static friction force values are in between 40 and 60 N cm−2 at different loads and they are significantly larger than the normal adhesion forces. Dynamic friction force and load are anisotropic and they depend on the direction of the motion. It is also found that friction force values and friction coefficients decrease although contact length and contact area increase when the loads are high. This is due to the arms of the nanotubes which bend significantly and act as stiffer springs at high loads. (paper)

  9. Whole slide imaging for educational purposes

    Liron Pantanowitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Digitized slides produced by whole slide image scanners can be easily shared over a network or by transferring image files to optical or other data storage devices. Navigation of digitized slides is interactive and intended to simulate viewing glass slides with a microscope (virtual microscopy. Image viewing software permits users to edit, annotate, analyze, and easily share whole slide images (WSI. As a result, WSI have begun to replace the traditional light microscope, offering a myriad of opportunities for education. This article focuses on current applications of WSI in education and proficiency testing. WSI has been successfully explored for graduate education (medical, dental, and veterinary schools, training of pathology residents, as an educational tool in allied pathology schools (e.g., cytotechnology, for virtual tracking and tutoring, tele-education (tele-conferencing, e-learning, virtual workshops, at tumor boards, with interactive publications, and on examinations. WSI supports flexible and cost-effective distant learning and augments problem-oriented teaching, competency evaluation, and proficiency testing. WSI viewed on touchscreen displays and with tablet technology are especially beneficial for education. Further investigation is necessary to develop superior WSI applications that better support education and to design viewing stations with ergonomic tools that improve the WSI-human interface and navigation of virtual slides. Studies to determine the impact of training pathologists without exposure to actual glass slides are also needed.

  10. An updated nuclear criticality slide rule

    This Volume 2 contains the functional version of the updated nuclear criticality slide rule (more accurately, sliding graphs) that is referenced in An Updated Nuclear Criticality Slide Rule: Technical Basis, NUREG/CR-6504, Vol. 1 (ORNL/TM-13322/V1). This functional slide rule provides a readily usable open-quotes in-handclose quotes method for estimating pertinent nuclear criticality accident information from sliding graphs, thereby permitting (1) the rapid estimation of pertinent criticality accident information without laborious or sophisticated calculations in a nuclear criticality emergency situation, (2) the appraisal of potential fission yields and external personnel radiation exposures for facility safety analyses, and (3) a technical basis for emergency preparedness and training programs at nonreactor nuclear facilities. The slide rule permits the estimation of neutron and gamma dose rates and integrated doses based upon estimated fission yields, distance from the fission source, and time-after criticality accidents for five different critical systems. Another sliding graph permits the estimation of critical solution fission yields based upon fissile material concentration, critical vessel geometry, and solution addition rate. Another graph provides neutron and gamma dose-reduction factors for water, steel, and concrete. Graphs from historic documents are provided as references for estimating critical parameters of various fissile material systems. Conversion factors for various English and metric units are provided for quick reference

  11. Slides with no attached paper

    This document brings together the different presentations (slides) given at the workshop but with no attached paper. These slides refer to the following presentations: - Presentation of ITN (Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear); - Minor Actinide Partitioning (Dominique Warin); - Transmutation (Janne Wallenius); - Radioactive Waste Management, IGD-TP (Gerald Ouzounian); - Present status of the Swedish nuclear waste management programme (Peter Wikberg); - The U.S. Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program - Separations Research and Development (Terry Todd); - Strategies and national programs of closed fuel cycles - Russian Expert Vision (Mikhael Kormilitsyn) - Extraction Studies Of Potential Solvent Formulations For The GANEX Process (Fiona MacLachlan); - Investigations of The Fundamental Chemistry of the TALSPEAK Process (Ken Nash); - Extraction Separation of Trivalent Minor Actinides and Lanthanides by Hexa-dentate Nitrogen-donor Extractant, TPEN, and its Analogs (Kenji Takeshita); - Fluorinated Diluents for HLW Processing - technological point of view (Vasiliy Babain); - Extraction properties of some new pyridine molecules and search for better diluents (Irena Spendlikova); - Kinetics of extraction of Eu3+ ion by TODGA and CyMe4-BTBP studied using the RMC technique (Trong Hung Vu); - Redox Chemistry of Neptunium in Solutions of Nitric Acid (Alena Paulenova); - NMR applied to actinide ions and their complexes. In search of covalency effects (Geoffrey Vidick); - Towards 'Stability Rules' for Radiolysis of bis-DGA compounds (Ana Nunez); - Pyroprocess Research Activities at IGCAR, Kalpakkam, India (K. Nagarajan); - Critical issues of nuclear energy systems employing molten salt fluorides: from ISTC No. 1606 to No. 3749 (1. year of project activity) and MARS/EVOL cooperation (Victor Ignatiev); - Conversion processes: Internal Gelation and the Sphere-pac concept (Manuel Pouchon); - A Combined Nuclear Technology and Nuclear Chemistry Master. A Unique Initiative

  12. Sliding wear resistance of iron aluminides

    Garima Sharma; M Sundararaman; N Prabhu; G L Goswami

    2003-04-01

    Room temperature dry sliding wear behaviour of iron aluminides containing 28% aluminium and various amounts of chromium has been investigated using pin on disk wear tester. The aluminides were heat treated to have ordered 3 structure. It was found that wear rate of the aluminides increased with the increase of applied normal load and sliding speed. Wear resistance of the aluminides increased with increase in chromium content. SEM observation of the worn surface showed that the microcutting and microploughing were the dominant sliding wear mechanisms.

  13. SLIDING MODE CONTROL FOR ACTIVE AUTOMOBILE SUSPENSIONS

    1998-01-01

    Nonlinear control methods are presented based on theory of sliding mode control (SMC) or variable structure control (VSC) for application to active automobile suspensions. Requirements of reducing manufacturing cost and energy consumption of the active suspension system may be satisfiedby reasonable design of the sliding surface and hydraulic servo system. Emphasis is placed on the study of the discrete sliding mode control method (DSMC) applicable for a new sort of speed on-off solenoid valves of anti-dust capability and low price. Robustness and effectiveness of the feedback linearized controller in typical road conditions are demonstrated by numerical results fora quarter-car suspension model.

  14. Fault Reconstruction Using Sliding Mode Observers

    K. Hakiki

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a nonlinear sliding observer is proposed to explicitly reconstruct fault signals. The novelty lies in the application of the equivalent output injection concept. Previous work in the area of fault detection has used disruption of the sliding motion to detect faults. The aim of the present study was to design a robust observer that slides in the presence of faults based on the response of the estimated outputs of the system. A numerical example of the application to an inverted pendulum mounted on a cart is provided to demonstrate the approach

  15. Sliding mode control for synchronous electric drives

    Ryvkin, Sergey E

    2011-01-01

    This volume presents the theory of control systems with sliding mode applied to electrical motors and power converters. It demonstrates the methodology of control design and the original algorithms of control and observation. Practically all semiconductor devices are used in power converters, that feed electrical motors, as power switches. A switching mode offers myriad attractive, inherent properties from a control viewpoint, especially a sliding mode. Sliding mode control supplies high dynamics to systems, invariability of systems to changes of their parameters and of exterior loads in combi

  16. Ergometer rowing with and without slides

    Larsen, Anders Holsgaard; Jensen, K

    2010-01-01

    A rowing ergometer can be placed on a slide to imitate 'on-water' rowing. The present study examines I) possible differences in biomechanical and physiological variables of ergometer rowing with and without slides and II) potential consequences on training load during exercise. 7 elite oars......-women rowed in a randomized order in a slide or stationary ergometer at 3 predefined submaximal and at maximal intensity. Oxygen uptake was measured and biomechanical variables of the rowing were calculated based upon handle force (force transducer) and velocity/length (potentiometer) of the stroke. Stroke...

  17. Enhancement of sliding life of MoS2 films deposited by combining sputtering and high-energy ion implantation

    Solid lubricant films of MoS2 with improved adhesion to a stainless-steel substrate have been deposited by a combination of rf sputtering and ion implantation with inert gas ions in the 100-keV region. When the sputter film had obtained a thickness of 500 A, it was subjected to the ionic bombardment prior to completion of the sputter deposition. Dependent on the ion dose an adhesion improvement and a sliding life enhancement of approximately a factor of 2 were obtained for the solid lubricant film

  18. Electrically Conductive Epoxy Adhesives

    Lan Bai

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Conductive adhesives are widely used in electronic packaging applications such as die attachment and solderless interconnections, component repair, display interconnections, and heat dissipation. The effects of film thickness as functions of filler volume fraction, conductive filler size, shape, as well as uncured adhesive matrix viscosity on the electrical conduction behavior of epoxy-based adhesives are presented in this work. For this purpose, epoxy-based adhesives were prepared using conductive fillers of different size, shape, and types, including Ni powder, flakes, and filaments, Ag powder, and Cu powder. The filaments were 20 μm in diameter, and 160 or 260 μm in length. HCl and H3PO4 acid solutions were used to etch and remove the surface oxide layers from the fillers. The plane resistance of filled adhesive films was measured using the four-point method. In all cases of conductive filler addition, the planar resistivity levels for the composite adhesive films increased when the film thickness was reduced. The shape of resistivity-thickness curves was negative exponential decaying type and was modeled using a mathematical relation. The relationships between the conductive film resistivities and the filler volume fractions were also derived mathematically based on the experimental data. Thus, the effects of surface treatment of filler particles, the type, size, shape of fillers, and the uncured epoxy viscosity could be included empirically by using these mathematical relations based on the experimental data. By utilizing the relations we proposed to model thickness-dependent and volume fraction-dependent conduction behaviors separately, we were able to describe the combined and coupled volume fraction-film thickness relationship mathematically based on our experimental data.

  19. Nanoscale sliding friction phenomena at the interface of diamond-like carbon and tungsten

    Macroscopic tribometry is linked to classical atomistic simulations in order to improve understanding of the nanoscale interfacial processes during sliding of hydrogenated DLC (a-C:H) against a metal (W) in dry and lubricated conditions. Experimentally, using an online tribometer, wear and roughness measurements are performed after each sliding cycle, which are then correlated with the frictional resistance. Ex situ analysis is also performed on the worn surfaces (i.e. plates and counterfaces) using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy imaging of the near-surface region. Then, in order to elucidate the atomistic level processes that contribute to the observed microstructural evolution in the experiments, classical molecular dynamics are performed, employing a bond order potential for the tungsten–carbon–hydrogen system. Macroscopic tribometry shows that dry sliding of a-C:H against W results in higher frictional resistance and significantly more material transfer compared with lubricated conditions. Similarly, the molecular dynamic simulations exhibit higher average shear stresses and clear material transfer for dry conditions compared with simulations with hexadecane as a lubricant. In the lubricated simulations, the lower shear stress and the absence of a material transfer are attributed to hexadecane monolayers that are partially tethered to the a-C:H surface and significantly reduce adhesion and mechanical mixing between the sliding partners

  20. New Approach to Ceramic/Metal-Polymer Multilayered Coatings for High Performance Dry Sliding Applications

    Rempp, A.; Killinger, A.; Gadow, R.

    2012-06-01

    The combination of thermally sprayed hard coatings with a polymer based top coat leads to multilayered coating systems with tailored functionalities concerning wear resistance, friction, adhesion, wettability or specific electrical properties. The basic concept is to combine the mechanical properties of the hard base coating with the tribological or chemical abilities of the polymer top coat suitable for the respective application. This paper gives an overview of different types of recently developed multilayer coatings and their application in power transmission under dry sliding conditions. State of the art coatings for dry sliding applications in power transmission are mostly based on thin film coatings like diamond-like carbon or solid lubricants, e.g. MoS2. A new approach is the combination of thin film coatings with combined multilayer coatings. To evaluate the capability of these tribological systems, a multi-stage investigation has been carried out. In the first stage the performance of the sliding lacquers and surface topography of the steel substrate has been evaluated. In the following stage thermally sprayed hard coatings were tested in combination with different sliding lacquers. Wear resistance and friction coefficients of combined coatings were determined using a twin disc test-bed.

  1. The Influence of Normal Load and Sliding Speed on Frictional Properties of Skin

    Wei Tang; Shi-rong Ge; Hua Zhu; Xi-chuan Cao; Ning Li

    2008-01-01

    The study of frictional properties of human skin is important for medical research, skin care products and textile exploitation. In order to investigate the influence of normal load and sliding speed on the frictional properties of skin and its possible mechanism, tests were carried out on a multi-specimen friction tester. When the normal load increases from 0.1 N to 0.9 N,normal displacement and the friction coefficient of skin increase. The friction coefficient is dependent on the load, indicating that both adhesion and deformation contribute to the friction behaviour. The deformation friction was interpreted using the plough model of fiiction. When sliding speed increases from 0.5 mm·s-1 to 4 mm·s-1,the friction coefficient increases and "stick-slip" phenomena increase, indicating that hysteretic friction contributes to the friction. The hysteretic friction was interpreted using schematic of energy translation during the rigid spherical probe sliding on the soft skin surface, which provides an explanation for the influence of the sliding speed on the frictional characteristics of the skin.

  2. Friction and wear of rare earths modified carbon fibers filled PTFE composite under dry sliding condition

    Carbon fibers (CF) were surface treated with air-oxidation and rare earths (RE), respectively. The friction and wear properties of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) composites filled with differently surface treated carbon fibers, sliding against GCr15 steel under dry sliding condition, were investigated on a block-on-ring M-2000 tribometer. Experimental results revealed that RE treatment largely reduced the friction and wear of CF reinforced PTFE (CF/PTFE) composites. The RE treated composite exhibited the lowest friction and wear under dry sliding. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigation of worn surfaces and transfer films of CF/PTFE composites showed that RE treated CF/PTFE composites had the smoothest worn surface under given load and sliding speed, and a continuous and uniform transfer film formed on the counterface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study of carbon fiber surface showed that the oxygen concentration was obviously increased after RE treatment, and more carboxyl groups were introduced onto CF surfaces after RE treatment. The increase in the amount of oxygen-containing groups increased the interfacial adhesion between CF and PTFE matrix, and accordingly increased the tribological properties of the composite

  3. Sliding wear studies of sprayed chromium carbide-nichrome coatings for gas-cooled reactor applications

    Chromium carbide-nichrome coatings being considered for wear protection of some critical components in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR's) were investigated. The coatings were deposited either by the detonation gun or the plasma-arc process. Sliding wear tests were conducted on specimens in a button-on-plate arrangement with sliding velocities of 7.1 x 10-3 and 7.9 mm/s at 8160C in a helium environment simulates HTGR primary coolant chemistry. The coatings containing 75 or 80 wt % chromium carbide exhibited excellent wear resistance. As the chromium carbide content decreased from either 80 or 75 to 55 wt %, with a concurrent decrease in coating hardness, wear-resistance deteriorated. The friction and wear behavior of the soft coating was similar to that of the bare metal--showing severe galling and significant amounts of wear debris. The friction characteristics of the hard coating exhibited a strong velocity dependence with high friction coefficients in low sliding velocity tests ad vice versa. Both the soft coating and bare metal showed no dependence on sliding velocity. The wear behavior observed in this study is of adhesive type, and the wear damage is believed to be controlled primarily by the delamination process

  4. Color standardization in whole slide imaging using a color calibration slide

    Pinky A Bautista

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Color consistency in histology images is still an issue in digital pathology. Different imaging systems reproduced the colors of a histological slide differently. Materials and Methods: Color correction was implemented using the color information of the nine color patches of a color calibration slide. The inherent spectral colors of these patches along with their scanned colors were used to derive a color correction matrix whose coefficients were used to convert the pixels′ colors to their target colors. Results: There was a significant reduction in the CIELAB color difference, between images of the same H & E histological slide produced by two different whole slide scanners by 3.42 units, P < 0.001 at 95% confidence level. Conclusion: Color variations in histological images brought about by whole slide scanning can be effectively normalized with the use of the color calibration slide.

  5. A Sliding Mode-Multimodel Control with Sliding Mode Observer for a Sensorless Pumping System

    Rhif, Ahmed; Kardous, Zohra; Braiek, Naceur Ben Hadj

    2013-01-01

    This work deals with the design of a sliding mode observer with a multi-surfaces sliding mode multimodel control (SM-MMC) for a mechanical sensorless pumping system. The observer is designed to estimate the speed and the mechanical position of the DC motor operating in the process. Robustness tests validated by simulation show the effectiveness of the sliding mode observer associated with this control approach (SM-MMC).

  6. An Electric Method for Qualifying Cytogenetic Slides

    Saeed Khamnei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetics is a branch of genetics that involves critical applications in medical decisions. The procedures involved take cells with chromosomes and rupture them on the slide to release their chromosomes in metaphase spreadings. Usually the slide contains few metaphase spreadings and plenty of intact cells, so finding and analyzing metaphase spreadings are difficult. It is for this reason that many investigations search for innovations that optimize chromosome spreading and facilitate cytogenetic studies. To aid rupturing cells in cytogenetic slide preparation, Pulsed Electric Fields (PEFs could be used. PEFs are a kind of electric fields, which affect the cell membrane in a way that can lead to cell lysis. These effects are currently the basis of applications such as nonthermal pasteurization. Therefore, applying PEFs to cell suspension of the cytogenetic experiments would probably lyse all the cells, yielding a clear slide with many metaphase spreadings.

  7. Automated single-slide staining system

    Mills, S. M.; Wilkins, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Apparatus developed to Gram-stain single slides automatically is flexible enough to accommodate other types of staining procedures. Method frees operator and eliminates necessity for subjective evaluations as to length of staining or decolorizing time.

  8. Surface adhesion between hexagonal boron nitride nanotubes and silicon based on lateral force microscopy

    This study presents the surface adhesion between hexagonal boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) and silicon based on lateral manipulation in an atomic force microscope (AFM). The BNNT was mechanically manipulated by the lateral force of an AFM pyramidal silicon probe using the scan mechanism in the imaging mode. With a controlled normal force of the AFM probe and the lateral motion, the lateral force applied to the BNNT could overcome the surface adhesion between BNNT and silicon surface. The individual BNNT is forced to slide and rotate on the silicon surface. Based on the recorded force curve, the calculated shear stress due to surface adhesion is 0.5 GPa. And the specific sliding energy loss is 0.2 J/m2. Comparing BNNTs and carbon nanotube (CNT), the shear stress and specific sliding energy loss of BNNT are an order of magnitude larger than that of CNT. Therefore, the results show that the surface adhesion between BNNT and silicon surface is higher than that of CNT.

  9. Penetration of urea formaldehyde adhesives in wood tissue, Part II: Radial penetration of UF adhesives into silver fir

    Gavrilović-Grmuša Ivana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Penetration is the ability of the adhesive to move into the voids on the substrate surface or into the substrate itself. Wood's cellular nature allows significant penetration of the adhesive into the substrate. Objective of this work was the evaluation of the penetration and hence the distribution of urea-formaldehyde (UF resins by means of microscopic detection of the penetration of such UF adhesives into the wood tissue. Tangentially cut 5 mm thick silver fir (Abies alba Mill. plies, 100 mm long (parallel to the grain and 30 mm width, were prepared for this study. Four types of UF resins with different degree of condensation were investigated in this research. Safranin was added to the resins and epi-fluorescence microscope was used for measuring the adhesive penetration. The UF adhesive mixes, consisting of the various resins, extender and hardener were applied to the surface of one ply. Two plies, one with applied adhesive mix and one without adhesive mix, were assembled with parallel grain direction. Samples were pressed in a hydraulic press at 120°C and 1.0 MPa for 15 minutes. Test-specimens of 20 μm thickness were cut of each sample using a sliding microtome apparatus, exposing a bondline on a cross-sectional surface. The results show a significant correlation between the penetration behaviour and the degree of condensation (molecular sizes, viscosity of the resins. The higher the degree of condensation, the lower the possibility for penetration, expresses as average penetration (AP and as portion of filled tracheids on the whole cross section of interphase (filled interphase region FIR.

  10. Dry sliding wear system response of ferritic and tempered martensitic ductile iron

    Jha, V. K.; Mozumder, Y. H.; Shama, S.; Behera, R. K.; Pattaniak, A.; P, Sindhoora L.; Mishra, S. C.; Sen, S.

    2015-02-01

    Spheroidal graphite cast iron (SG iron) is the most preferable member of cast iron family due to its strength and toughness along with good tribological properties. SG iron specimens with annealed and martensitic matrix were subjected to dry sliding wear condition and the system response was correlated to matrix microstructure. Respective microstructure was obtained by annealing and quench and tempering heat treatment process for an austenitizing temperature of 1000°C. Specimens were subjected to Ball on plate wear tester under 40N, 50N, 60N load for a sliding distance of 7.54m. Except for quench and tempered specimen at 50N, weight loss was observed in every condition. The wear surface under optical microscope reveals adhesive mechanism for as-cast and annealed specimen whereas delaminated wear track feature was observed for quench and tempered specimen.

  11. WTP Pretreatment Facility Potential Design Deficiencies--Sliding Bed and Sliding Bed Erosion Assessment

    Hansen, E. K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-05-06

    This assessment is based on readily available literature and discusses both Newtonian and non-Newtonian slurries with respect to sliding beds and erosion due to sliding beds. This report does not quantify the size of the sliding beds or erosion rates due to sliding beds, but only assesses if they could be present. This assessment addresses process pipelines in the Pretreatment (PT) facility and the high level waste (HLW) transfer lines leaving the PT facility to the HLW vitrification facility concentrate receipt vessel.

  12. WTP Pretreatment Facility Potential Design Deficiencies--Sliding Bed and Sliding Bed Erosion Assessment

    This assessment is based on readily available literature and discusses both Newtonian and non-Newtonian slurries with respect to sliding beds and erosion due to sliding beds. This report does not quantify the size of the sliding beds or erosion rates due to sliding beds, but only assesses if they could be present. This assessment addresses process pipelines in the Pretreatment (PT) facility and the high level waste (HLW) transfer lines leaving the PT facility to the HLW vitrification facility concentrate receipt vessel.

  13. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives.

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-11-01

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm(2) provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects. PMID:26457864

  14. Compact, Automated Centrifugal Slide-Staining System

    Feeback, Daniel L.; Clarke, Mark S. F.

    2004-01-01

    The Directional Acceleration Vector-Driven Displacement of Fluids (DAVD-DOF) system, under development at the time of reporting the information for this article, would be a relatively compact, automated, centrifugally actuated system for staining blood smears and other microbiological samples on glass microscope slides in either a microgravitational or a normal Earth gravitational environment. The DAVD-DOF concept is a successor to the centrifuge-operated slide stainer (COSS) concept, which was reported in Slide-Staining System for Microgravity or Gravity (MSC-22949), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 1 (January, 2001), page 64. The COSS includes reservoirs and a staining chamber that contains a microscope slide to which a biological sample is affixed. The staining chamber is sequentially filled with and drained of staining and related liquids from the reservoirs by use of a weighted plunger to force liquid from one reservoir to another at a constant level of hypergravity maintained in a standard swing-bucket centrifuge. In the DAVD-DOF system, a staining chamber containing a sample would also be sequentially filled and emptied, but with important differences. Instead of a simple microscope slide, one would use a special microscope slide on which would be fabricated a network of very small reservoirs and narrow channels connected to a staining chamber (see figure). Unlike in the COSS, displacement of liquid would be effected by use of the weight of the liquid itself, rather than the weight of a plunger.

  15. On the Effect of Counterface Materials on Tribo-Behavior of Steel Wire Sliding Under Dry Contact Condition

    Chee, Su Be; Al Shalabi, Ammar; Yousif, B. F.

    Steel wires are implemented in numerous systems and undergo frequent faults due to tribological loading conditions. Therefore, this paper presents a study on the tribological performance of steel wire sliding against different counterfaces, namely, aluminum alloy, stainless steel, and mild steel using a block-on-ring tribo-tester. According to common mechanisms, the tests were performed under 5 N applied load and 0.15 m/s sliding velocity under dry contact condition. Additionally, scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the damaged features on the worn surfaces of the steel wire. Weight loss and friction coefficient results were presented versus sliding distances (0-1.6 km). In general, the results showed that friction coefficient did not reach the steady state due to the transformation of the wear mechanism from adhesive to abrasive mode. Nevertheless, the average of friction coefficient was found to be about 0.7 ± 0.1 for stainless steel and 0.2 ± 0.1 for mild steel. Weight loss gradually increased with the increase of sliding distance. The micrographs of worn surfaces revealed that the contact mechanism was transformed from adhesive to abrasive wear mode as implied by the scars and grooves on the wire surface.

  16. Wood Composite Adhesives

    Gomez-Bueso, Jose; Haupt, Robert

    The global environment, in which phenolic resins are being used for wood composite manufacture, has changed significantly during the last decade. This chapter reviews trends that are driving the use and consumption of phenolic resins around the world. The review begins with recent data on volume usage and regional trends, followed by an analysis of factors affecting global markets. In a section on environmental factors, the impact of recent formaldehyde emission regulations is discussed. The section on economics introduces wood composite production as it relates to the available adhesive systems, with special emphasis on the technical requirement to improve phenolic reactivity. Advances in composite process technology are introduced, especially in regard to the increased demands the improvements place upon adhesive system performance. The specific requirements for the various wood composite families are considered in the context of adhesive performance needs. The results of research into current chemistries are discussed, with a review of recent findings regarding the mechanisms of phenolic condensation and acceleration. Also, the work regarding alternate natural materials, such as carbohydrates, lignins, tannins, and proteinaceous materials, is presented. Finally, new developments in alternative adhesive technologies are reported.

  17. Nanoscale friction and adhesion of tree frog toe pads.

    Kappl, Michael; Kaveh, Farzaneh; Barnes, W Jon P

    2016-01-01

    Tree frogs have become an object of interest in biomimetics due to their ability to cling to wet and slippery surfaces. In this study, we have investigated the adhesion and friction behavior of toe pads of White's tree frog (Litoria caerulea) using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in an aqueous medium. Facilitating special types of AFM probes with radii of ∼400 nm and ∼13 μm, we were able to sense the frictional response without damaging the delicate nanopillar structures of the epithelial cells. While we observed no significant adhesion between both types of probes and toe pads in wet conditions, frictional forces under such conditions were very pronounced and friction coefficients amounted between 0.3 and 1.1 for the sliding friction between probes and the epithelial cell surfaces. PMID:27165465

  18. Coating Reduces Ice Adhesion

    Smith, Trent; Prince, Michael; DwWeese, Charles; Curtis, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    The Shuttle Ice Liberation Coating (SILC) has been developed to reduce the adhesion of ice to surfaces on the space shuttle. SILC, when coated on a surface (foam, metal, epoxy primer, polymer surfaces), will reduce the adhesion of ice by as much as 90 percent as compared to the corresponding uncoated surface. This innovation is a durable coating that can withstand several cycles of ice growth and removal without loss of anti-adhesion properties. SILC is made of a binder composed of varying weight percents of siloxane(s), ethyl alcohol, ethyl sulfate, isopropyl alcohol, and of fine-particle polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The combination of these components produces a coating with significantly improved weathering characteristics over the siloxane system alone. In some cases, the coating will delay ice formation and can reduce the amount of ice formed. SILC is not an ice prevention coating, but the very high water contact angle (greater than 140 ) causes water to readily run off the surface. This coating was designed for use at temperatures near -170 F (-112 C). Ice adhesion tests performed at temperatures from -170 to 20 F (-112 to -7 C) show that SILC is a very effective ice release coating. SILC can be left as applied (opaque) or buffed off until the surface appears clear. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data show that the coating is still present after buffing to transparency. This means SILC can be used to prevent ice adhesion even when coating windows or other objects, or items that require transmission of optical light. Car windshields are kept cleaner and SILC effectively mitigates rain and snow under driving conditions.

  19. Pathogenesis of postoperative adhesion formation

    Hellebrekers, B.W.J.; Kooistra, T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Current views on the pathogenesis of adhesion formation are based on the "classical concept of adhesion formation", namely that a reduction in peritoneal fibrinolytic activity following peritoneal trauma is of key importance in adhesion development. Methods: A non-systematic literature s

  20. Frictional sliding tests on combined coal-rock samples

    Tao Wang; Yaodong Jiang; Shaojian Zhan; Chen Wang

    2014-01-01

    A test system was developed to understand the sliding mechanism of coal-rock structure. The test system was composed by a double-shear testing model and an acousto-optic monitoring system in association with a digital camera and an acoustic emission (AE) instrument. The tests can simulate the movement of activated faults and the sliding in coal-rock structure. In this regard, instable sliding conditions of coal-rock samples, sliding types under different conditions, displacement evolution law, and AE character-istics during sliding process were investigated. Several sliding types were monitored in the tests, including unstable continuous sliding, unstable discontinuous sliding, and stable sliding. The sliding types have close relation with the axial loads and loading rates. Larger axial load and smaller loading rate mean that unstable sliding is less likely to occur. The peak shear stress was positively correlated with the axial load when sliding occurred, whereas the displacement induced by unstable sliding was uncorre-lated with the axial load. A large number of AE events occurred before sliding, and the AE rate decreased after stable sliding. The results show that the tests can well simulate the process of structural instability in a coal bump, and are helpful in the understanding of fault activation and the physical processes during squeezing process of roof and floor.

  1. Scuffing of aluminum/steel contacts under dry sliding conditions

    Sheiretov, Todor Konstantinov

    Some typical applications where scuffing may occur are gear teeth, piston rings and cylinder pairs, cams and followers, splines, sleeve bearings, and parts of swash and wobble plate compressors. Unlike other tribology-related failures, scuffing occurs very fast, without any warning, and usually leads to the complete destruction of the sliding pair. Practical experience with steel has helped to outline safe ranges of operation for some components. Very little, however, is known about aluminum, which is the second most commonly used engineering metal. The aim of this study is to obtain a better understanding scuffing and seizure of aluminum/steel contacts. The research includes an experimental study of scuffing of aluminum/steel contacts under dry sliding conditions, a study of the physics of the scuffing process, evaluation of various hypotheses for scuffing, and modeling of scuffing. The experiments are conducted in a custom-designed tribometer, which provides accurate control of the environmental conditions. Special instrumentation, experimental procedures and software are developed as a part of the experimental program. These provide a reliable reproduction and identification of scuffing under laboratory conditions. The scuffing characteristics of five materials are obtained in air and refrigerant (R134a) environments. The effects of load, sliding velocity, mechanical strength, environmental temperature, specimen geometry, time, loading history, and type of environment are evaluated. The mechanisms leading to scuffing are studied by examination of surfaces, subsurfaces and wear debris of specimens in the process of scuffing. Quantitative measurements of subsurface plastic strain are also obtained. The theoretical part of the study includes the development of a finite element model for the contact of runned-in rough surfaces and several other models for subsurface stresses, temperatures, and strains. These models provide information about the local conditions in

  2. Long-term subglacial sliding patterns based on a sliding law with cavitation

    Ugelvig, Sofie Vej; Egholm, D.L.

    In ice-sheet models and glacial landscape evolution models, subglacial sliding rates are often related to basal shear stress by a power-law. However, the power-law relationship implies that the subglacial bed can provide unlimited levels of basal drag as sliding rates increases, which is recognized...... hydrology. The sliding law includes an upper bound to the basal drag and depends on the effects of longitudinal and transverse stress components for obtaining force balance along the glacier bed. Computational experiments indicate that high annually averaged sliding rates concentrate along valley sides when...... as an inadequate assumption, particularly when the effects of subglacial cavities are considered (Schoof 2005). We have implemented a glacial sliding law suggested by Schoof (2005) in a depth-integrated higher-order ice-sheet model (Egholm et al. 2011) and coupled this to a model for glacial...

  3. Management of adhesive capsulitis

    Stupay KL

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kristen L Stupay,1 Andrew S Neviaser2 1Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2George Washington University Medical Faculty Associates, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder is a condition of capsular contracture that reduces both active and passive glenohumeral motion. The cause of adhesive capsulitis is not known but it is strongly associated with endocrine abnormalities such as diabetes. Diverse terminology and the absence of definitive criteria for diagnosis make evaluating treatment modalities difficult. Many treatment methods have been reported, most with some success, but few have been proved to alter the natural course of this disease. Most afflicted patients will achieve acceptable shoulder function without surgery. Those who remain debilitated after 8–12 months are reasonable candidates for invasive treatments. Here, the various treatment methods and the data to support their use are reviewed. Keywords: frozen shoulder, stiff shoulder, periarthritis, painful shoulder 

  4. Remote Controlling and Monitoring of Microscopic Slides

    Remotely controlled microscopic slide was designed using especial Graphical User Interface (GUI) which interfaces the user at remote location with the real microscope using site and the user can easily view and control the slide present on the microscope's stage. Precise motors have been used to allow the movement in all the three dimensions required by a pathologist. The pathologist can easily access these slides from any remote location and so the physical presence of the pathologist is now made easy. This invention would increase the health care efficiency by reducing the time and cost of diagnosis, making it very easy to get the expert's opinion and supporting the pathologist to relocate himself for his work. The microscope is controlled with computer with an attractive Graphical User Interface (GUI), through which a pathologist can easily monitor, control and record the image of the slide. The pathologist can now do his work regardless of his location, time, cost and physically presence of lab equipment. The technology will help the specialist in viewing the patients slide from any location in the world. He would be able to monitor and control the stage. This will also help the pathological laboratories in getting opinion from senior pathologist who are present at any far location in the world. This system also reduces the life risks of the patients. (author)

  5. Syndecans and cell adhesion

    Couchman, J R; Chen, L; Woods, A

    2001-01-01

    Now that transmembrane signaling through primary cell-matrix receptors, integrins, is being elucidated, attention is turning to how integrin-ligand interactions can be modulated. Syndecans are transmembrane proteoglycans implicated as coreceptors in a variety of physiological processes, including...... cell adhesion, migration, response to growth factors, development, and tumorigenesis. This review will describe this family of proteoglycans in terms of their structures and functions and their signaling in conjunction with integrins, and indicate areas for future research....

  6. Elastic–plastic adhesive impacts of tungsten dust with metal surfaces in plasma environments

    Ratynskaia, S., E-mail: svetlana.ratynskaia@ee.kth.se [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Association EUROfusion-VR, Stockholm (Sweden); Tolias, P. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Association EUROfusion-VR, Stockholm (Sweden); Shalpegin, A. [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Vignitchouk, L. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Association EUROfusion-VR, Stockholm (Sweden); De Angeli, M. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Bykov, I. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Association EUROfusion-VR, Stockholm (Sweden); Bystrov, K.; Bardin, S. [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute For Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439MN Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Brochard, F. [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Ripamonti, D. [Istituto per l’Energetica e le Interfasi – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Harder, N. den; De Temmerman, G. [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute For Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439MN Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    Dust-surface collisions impose size selectivity on the ability of dust grains to migrate in scrape-off layer and divertor plasmas and to adhere to plasma-facing components. Here, we report first experimental evidence of dust impact phenomena in plasma environments concerning low-speed collisions of tungsten dust with tungsten surfaces: re-bouncing, adhesion, sliding and rolling. The results comply with the predictions of the model of elastic-perfectly plastic adhesive spheres employed in the dust dynamics code MIGRAINe for sub- to several meters per second impacts of micrometer-range metal dust.

  7. [The expression level of adhesion molecules on neutrophils depending at segmentation of their nuclei].

    Kashutin, S L; Danilov, S I; Vereshchagina, E N; Kluchareva, S V

    2013-11-01

    The article deals with results of detection of expression level of adhesion molecules on neutrophils and segmentation of their nuclei. It is established that in conditions of absence of antigen stimulation neutrophils of circulating pool express molecules of L-selectin in 53.34%, LFA-1 molecules in 65.64%, ICAM-1 in 40.51%, LE4-3 in 58.72% and PECAM-1 in 59.74%. The full readiness to realization of phase of sliding, strong adhesion and immediately transmigration itselfis detected in neutrophils with five segments in nucleus. PMID:24640111

  8. Elastic–plastic adhesive impacts of tungsten dust with metal surfaces in plasma environments

    Dust-surface collisions impose size selectivity on the ability of dust grains to migrate in scrape-off layer and divertor plasmas and to adhere to plasma-facing components. Here, we report first experimental evidence of dust impact phenomena in plasma environments concerning low-speed collisions of tungsten dust with tungsten surfaces: re-bouncing, adhesion, sliding and rolling. The results comply with the predictions of the model of elastic-perfectly plastic adhesive spheres employed in the dust dynamics code MIGRAINe for sub- to several meters per second impacts of micrometer-range metal dust

  9. Ceramic microstructure and adhesion

    Buckley, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with a ceramic, a polymer, or a metal, strong bond forces can develop between the materials. The bonding forces will depend upon the state of the surfaces, cleanliness and the fundamental properties of the two solids, both surface and bulk. Adhesion between a ceramic and another solid are discussed from a theoretical consideration of the nature of the surfaces and experimentally by relating bond forces to interface resulting from solid state contact. Surface properties of ceramics correlated with adhesion include, orientation, reconstruction and diffusion as well as the chemistry of the surface specie. Where a ceramic is in contact with a metal their interactive chemistry and bond strength is considered. Bulk properties examined include elastic and plastic behavior in the surficial regions, cohesive binding energies, crystal structures and crystallographic orientation. Materials examined with respect to interfacial adhesive interactions include silicon carbide, nickel zinc ferrite, manganese zinc ferrite, and aluminum oxide. The surfaces of the contacting solids are studied both in the atomic or molecularly clean state and in the presence of selected surface contaminants.

  10. Adhesive Wear Performance of CFRP Multilayered Polyester Composites Under Dry/wet Contact Conditions

    Danaelan, D.; Yousif, B. F.

    The tribo-performance of a new engineering composite material based on coconut fibers was investigated. In this work, coconut fibers reinforced polyester (CFRP) composites were developed. The tribo-experiments were conducted by using pin-on-disc machine under dry and wet sliding contact condition against smooth stainless steel counterface. Worn surfaces were observed using optical microscope. Friction coefficient and specific wear rate were presented as a function of sliding distance (0-0.6 km) at different sliding velocities (0.1-0.28 m/s). The effect of applied load and sliding velocity was evaluated. The results showed that all test parameters have significant influence on friction and wear characteristics of the composites. Moreover, friction coefficient increased as the normal load and speed increased, the values were about 0.7-0.9 under dry contact condition. Meanwhile, under wet contact condition, there was a great reduction in the friction coefficient, i.e. the values were about 0.1-0.2. Furthermore, the specific wear rates were found to be around 2-4 (10-3) mm3/Nm under dry contact condition and highly reduced under wet condition. In other words, the presence of water as cleaner and polisher assisted to enhance the adhesive wear performance of CFRP by about 10%. The images from optical microscope showed evidence of adhesive wear mode with transition to abrasive wear mode at higher sliding velocities due to third body abrasion. On the other hand, optical images for wet condition showed less adhesive wear and smooth surfaces.

  11. Develop and Manufacture an airlock sliding tray

    Lawton, Cindy M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-02-26

    Objective: The goal of this project is to continue to develop an airlock sliding tray and then partner with an industrial manufacturing company for production. The sliding tray will be easily installed into and removed from most glovebox airlocks in a few minutes. Technical Approach: A prototype of a sliding tray has been developed and tested in the LANL cold lab and 35 trays are presently being built for the plutonium facility (PF-4). The current, recently approved design works for a 14-inch diameter round airlock and has a tray length of approximately 20 inches. The grant will take the already tested and approved round technology and design for the square airlock. These two designs will be suitable for the majority of the existing airlocks in the multitude of DOE facilities. Partnering with an external manufacturer will allow for production of the airlock trays at a much lower cost and increase the availability of the product for all DOE sites. Project duration is estimated to be 12-13 months. Benefits: The purpose of the airlock sliding trays is fourfold: 1) Mitigate risk of rotator cuff injuries, 2) Improve ALARA, 3) Reduce risk of glovebox glove breaches and glove punctures, and 4) Improve worker comfort. I have had the opportunity to visit many other DOE facilities including Savannah, Y-12, ORNL, Sandia, and Livermore for assistance with ergonomic problems and/or injuries. All of these sites would benefit from the airlock sliding tray and I can assume all other DOE facilities with gloveboxes built prior to 1985 could also use the sliding trays.

  12. Experimental Investigation on Caisson Breakwater Sliding

    Ruol, Piero; Martin, Paolo; Andersen, Thomas Lykke;

    2014-01-01

    This note presents wave flume experiments, carried out at Aalborg University, measuring the horizontal sliding distance of a vertical breakwater in 1:40 scale. Horizontal and uplift wave induced pressures were accurately measured simultaneously with the caisson movements. Caissons of different...... weight and same geometries are tested under regular and irregular waves. It is found that, under breaking conditions, the expected inaccuracy of the prediction of the force, inherent on the variability of the breaking process, induce unacceptable errors in the prediction of the sliding. This observation...

  13. Asymmetric frictional sliding between incommensurate surfaces

    Santoro, Giuseppe E.; Vanossi, Andrea; Manini, Nicola; Divitini, Giorgio; Tosatti, Erio

    2006-01-01

    We study the frictional sliding of two ideally incommensurate surfaces with a third incommensurate sheet - a sort of extended lubricant - in between. When the mutual ratios of the three periodicities in this sandwich geometry are chosen to be the golden mean \\phi=(1+\\sqrt 5)/2, this system is believed to be statically pinned for any choice of system parameters. In the present study we overcome this pinning and force the two "substrates" to slide with a mutual velocity V_ext, analyzing the res...

  14. Controlling the Adhesion of Superhydrophobic Surfaces Using Electrolyte Jet Machining Techniques

    Xiaolong Yang; Xin Liu; Yao Lu; Shining Zhou; Mingqian Gao; Jinlong Song; Wenji Xu

    2016-01-01

    Patterns with controllable adhesion on superhydrophobic areas have various biomedical and chemical applications. Electrolyte jet machining technique (EJM), an electrochemical machining method, was firstly exploited in constructing dimples with various profiles on the superhydrophobic Al alloy surface using different processing parameters. Sliding angles of water droplets on those dimples firstly increased and then stabilized at a certain value with the increase of the processing time or the a...

  15. In vitro inhibition of adhesion of Escherichia coli strains by Xylitol

    Annelisa Farah da Silva; Érika Yoko Suzuki; Aline Siqueira Ferreira; Murilo Gomes Oliveira; Sílvio Silvério da Silva; Nádia Rezende Barbosa Raposo

    2011-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate xylitol's antimicrobial and anti-adherence activities on Escherichia coli (ATCC 8739) and on another clinical strain enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC). In vitro minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) test and adhesion assays were performed using 0.5, 2.5 and 5.0% xylitol. It was found that xylitol did not have antimicrobial properties on these strains. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) demonstrated that the slides treated with xylitol had a significant r...

  16. Characterization of adhesively bonded joints using bulk adhesive properties

    Kon, Haruhiko

    1991-01-01

    Though using bulk adhesive properties to predict adhesively bonded joint response has yet to be proven infallible, based upon the success of previous works, this effort attempts to shed some light on the stresses present in a typical automotive bonded joint. Adhesive material properties obtained in previous works were used in a finite element analysis of a simulated automotive joint to predict the stresses in that joint. The automotive joint analyzed was a simplified repr...

  17. Mechanisms of self-cleaning in fluid-based smooth adhesive pads of insects

    Pressure-sensitive adhesives such as tapes become easily contaminated by dust particles. By contrast, animal adhesive pads are able to self-clean and can be reused millions of times over a lifetime with little reduction in adhesion. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying this ability are still unclear. Here we test in adhesive pads of stick insects (Carausius morosus) (1) whether self-cleaning is enhanced by the liquid pad secretion, and (2) whether alternating push–pull movements aid the removal of particles. We measured attachment forces of insect pads on glass after contamination with 10 µm polystyrene beads. While the amount of fluid present on the pad showed no effect on the pads' susceptibility to contamination, the recovery of adhesive forces after contamination was faster when higher fluid levels were present. However, this effect does not appear to be based on a faster rate of self-cleaning since the number of spheres deposited with each step did not increase with fluid level. Instead, the fluid may aid the recovery of adhesive forces by filling in the gaps between contaminating particles, similar to the fluid's function on rough surfaces. Further, we found no evidence that an alternation of pushing and pulling movements, as found in natural steps, leads to a more efficient recovery of adhesion than repeated pulling slides. (paper)

  18. Friction and adhesion of gecko-inspired PDMS flaps on rough surfaces.

    Yu, Jing; Chary, Sathya; Das, Saurabh; Tamelier, John; Turner, Kimberly L; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2012-08-01

    Geckos have developed a unique hierarchical structure to maintain climbing ability on surfaces with different roughness, one of the extremely important parameters that affect the friction and adhesion forces between two surfaces. Although much attention has been paid on fabricating various structures that mimic the hierarchical structure of a gecko foot, yet no systematic effort, in experiment or theory, has been made to quantify the effect of surface roughness on the performance of the fabricated structures that mimic the hierarchical structure of geckos. Using a modified surface forces apparatus (SFA), we measured the adhesion and friction forces between microfabricated tilted PDMS flaps and optically smooth SiO(2) and rough SiO(2) surfaces created by plasma etching. Anisotropic adhesion and friction forces were measured when sliding the top glass surface along (+y) and against (-y) the tilted direction of the flaps. Increasing the surface roughness first increased the adhesion and friction forces measured between the flaps and the rough surface due to topological matching of the two surfaces but then led to a rapid decrease in both of these forces. Our results demonstrate that the surface roughness significantly affects the performance of gecko mimetic adhesives and that different surface textures can either increase or decrease the adhesion and friction forces of the fabricated adhesives. PMID:22779923

  19. Sliding mode control of wind-induced vibrations using fuzzy sliding surface and gain adaptation

    Thenozhi, Suresh; Yu, Wen

    2016-04-01

    Although fuzzy/adaptive sliding mode control can reduce the chattering problem in structural vibration control applications, they require the equivalent control and the upper bounds of the system uncertainties. In this paper, we used fuzzy logic to approximate the standard sliding surface and designed a dead-zone adaptive law for tuning the switching gain of the sliding mode control. The stability of the proposed controller is established using Lyapunov stability theory. A six-storey building prototype equipped with an active mass damper has been used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller towards the wind-induced vibrations.

  20. Wear mechanism for spray deposited Al-Si/SiCp composites under dry sliding condition

    滕杰; 李华培; 陈刚

    2015-01-01

    Al-Si/15%SiCp (volume fraction) composites with different silicon contents were fabricated by spray deposition technique, and typical microstructures of these composites were studied by optical microscopy (OM). Dry sliding wear tests were carried out using a block-on-ring wear machine to investigate the effect of applied load range of 10−220 N on the wear and friction behavior of these composites sliding against SAE 52100 grade bearing steel. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDAX) were utilized to examine the morphologies of the worn surfaces in order to observe the wear characteristics and investigate the wear mechanism. The results show that the wear behavior of these composites is dependent on the silicon content in the matrix alloy and the applied load. Al-Si/15%SiCp composites with higher silicon content exhibit better wear resistance in the applied load range. Under lower loads, the major wear mechanisms are oxidation wear and abrasive wear for all tested composites. Under higher loads, severe adhesive wear becomes the main wear mechanisms for Al-7Si/15%SiCp and Al-13Si/15%SiCp composites, while Al-20Si/15%SiCp presents a compound wear mechanism, consisting of oxidation, abrasive wear and adhesion wear.

  1. Adhesive tape exfoliation

    Bohr, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Single-crystal graphite can be cleaved by the use of an adhesive tape. This was also the initial route for obtaining graphene, a one-layer thick graphite slab. In this letter a few simple and fun considerations are presented in an attempt to shed some light on why this procedure is successful. In...... particular on the nature of the surprisingly small number of repetitive steps that are needed in order to obtain a single-layer slab. Two frameworks for exfoliation are investigated: parallel exfoliation involving repetitive simultaneous cleaving, the other, serial exfoliation, which involves the repetitive...

  2. Polyurethane adhesive ingestion.

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Bronstein, Alvin C

    2013-02-01

    Polyurethane adhesives are found in a large number of household products in the United States and are used for a variety of purposes. Several brands of these expanding wood glues (those containing diphenylmethane diisocyanate [MDI]) have the potential to form gastrointestinal (GI) foreign bodies if ingested. The ingested adhesive forms an expanding ball of glue in the esophagus and gastric lumen. This expansion is caused by a polymerization reaction using the heat, water, and gastric acids of the stomach. A firm mass is created that can be 4-8 times its original volume. As little as 2 oz of glue have been reported to develop gastric foreign bodies. The obstructive mass is reported to form within minutes of ingestion of the adhesive. The foreign body can lead to esophageal impaction and obstruction, airway obstruction, gastric outflow obstruction, mucosal hemorrhage, ulceration, laceration, perforation of the esophageal and gastric linings, and death. Clinical signs following ingestion include anorexia, lethargy, vomiting, tachypnea, and abdominal distention and pain, and typically develop within 12 hours. Clinical signs may depend upon the size of the mass. If left untreated, perforation and rupture of the esophagus or stomach can occur. The glue mass does not stick to the GI mucosa and is not always detectable on abdominal palpation. Radiographs are recommended to confirm the presence of the "glue-ball" foreign body, and radiographic evidence of the obstruction may be seen as early as 4-6 hours following ingestion. Emesis is contraindicated owing to the risk of aspiration of the glue into the respiratory tree or the subsequent lodging of the expanding glue mass in the esophagus. Likewise, efforts to dilute the glue and prevent the formation of the foreign body through administration of liquids, activated charcoal, or bulk-forming products to push the foreign body through the GI tract have proven ineffective. Even endoscopy performed to remove the foreign body has

  3. Syndecan proteoglycans and cell adhesion

    Woods, A; Oh, E S; Couchman, J R

    1998-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that a family of transmembrane proteoglycans, the syndecans, have important roles in cell adhesion. They participate through binding of matrix ligand to their glycosaminoglycan chains, clustering, and the induction of signaling cascades to modify the internal microfilament...... organization. Syndecans can modulate the type of adhesive responses induced by other matrix ligand-receptor interactions, such as those involving the integrins, and so contribute to the control of cell morphology, adhesion and migration....

  4. A thermodynamic model of sliding friction

    Lasse Makkonen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A first principles thermodynamic model of sliding friction is derived. The model predictions are in agreement with the observed friction laws both in macro- and nanoscale. When applied to calculating the friction coefficient the model provides a quantitative agreement with recent atomic force microscopy measurements on a number of materials.

  5. Enhancing Creative Thinking through Designing Electronic Slides

    Mokaram, Al-Ali Khaled; Al-Shabatat, Ahmad Mohammad; Fong, Fook Soon; Abdallah, Andaleeb Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    During the shifting of teaching and learning methods using computer technologies, much emphasis was paid on the knowledge content more than the thinking skills. Thus, this study investigated the effects of a computer application, namely, designing electronic slides on the development of creative thinking skills of a sample of undergraduate…

  6. Adaptive Sliding Mode Control for Hydraulic Drives

    Schmidt, Lasse; Andersen, Torben Ole; Pedersen, Henrik C.;

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new adaptive sliding mode controller generally applicable for position tracking control of electro-hydraulic valve-cylinder drives (VCD’s). The proposed control scheme requires limited knowledge on system parameters, and employs only piston- and valve spool position feedback...

  7. WWNPQFT-2010 - Slides of the presentations

    This document is made up of the slides of the presentations. The object of this workshop is to consolidate and publicize new efforts in non-perturbative field theories. The main topics are quantum chromodynamics, Yang-Mills theory, effective locality, the Gribov-Zwanziger Lagrangian, and renormalization. A presentation is dedicated to the initial stages of high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

  8. Variable structure system with fuzzy sliding surface

    Fuzzy logic controller has succeeded in many control problems such that the conventional control theory has difficulties to deal with. However the design procedure for fuzzy logic controller depends large amounts on the expert's knowledge or trial and error. Moreover, due to the linguistic expression of fuzzy controller, it is very difficult to guarantee the stability and robustness of the system. In this paper we propose a design scheme for the fuzzy controller using the variable structure control (VSC) theory. Instead of fuzzifying the error and error rate, we fuzzify the sliding surface, that is, we construct a variable structure controller with the fuzzy sliding surface. The proposed controller can eliminate the chattering problem of the conventional VSC. We show this property is due to the facts that the fuzzy sliding surface acts as a boundary layer and the control law in this boundary layer is the continuous approximation between the extreme control values. It is also shown that introducing the dynamics on the fuzzy sliding surface reduces error. As a result, we can guarantee the stability and robustness of fuzzy logic controller by the help of VSC theory. (Author)

  9. [Development of an obstetrical pocket slide rule].

    Krüger, G

    1986-01-01

    We present a slide rule to value old obstetric and ultrasound findings in prenatal care day by day. We have developed the scale. Manufacturer is VEB Mantissa Dresden, sales department is Staatliches Versorgungskontor für Pharmazie und Medizintechnik. PMID:3727852

  10. Transistor h parameter conversion slide rule

    Brantner, R. E.

    1967-01-01

    Slide rule enables the ready conversion of transistor h parameters from one form to another and reduces calculation time by a factor of 5 to 10. The scales are selected to cover all ranges of each parameter that will normally exist for any transistor, and answers are given in the correct order of magnitude, making powers-of-ten calculations unnecessary.

  11. Current Cigarette Use Among Adults (BRFSS) PDF Slides

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Download the current cigarette use among adults slides. These slides are available in PDF and PowerPoint formats. The PowerPoint version can be found at:...

  12. Current Cigarette Use Among Youth (YRBSS) PDF Slides

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Download the current cigarette use among youth slides. These slides are available in PDF and PowerPoint formats. The PowerPoint version can be found at:...

  13. Excise Tax Rates On Packs Of Cigarettes PDF Slides

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Download the current excise tax rates on packs of cigarettes slides. These slides are available in PDF and PowerPoint formats. The PowerPoint version can be found...

  14. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...... between two identical fragments of the NCAM. Also during the past year, a link between homophilic cell adhesion and several signal transduction pathways has been proposed, connecting the event of cell surface adhesion to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth. Finally, the stimulation of neurite...

  15. Grain boundary sliding in beta phase zircaloy-2

    Grain boundary sliding in zircaloy-2 was investigated in torsion using bamboo-structured wire coiled into helical springs. The rate of sliding is shown to vary with stress raised to a power slightly greater than unity with an activation energy close to that for lattice diffusion. Results are interpreted in terms of sliding controlled by diffusion between undulations in the boundary geometry. The geometry required to satisfy the observed rates of sliding is estimated

  16. Slides and the Foreign Language Teacher: A Bibliography.

    Galt, Alan

    This bibliography lists 275 items relating to the use of visual and audiovisual aids in the foreign language classroom. The items are entered under the following major headings: (1) Audiovisual Aids; (2) Photography; (3) Picture Composition; (4) Slides and Photographs for Teaching; and (5) Slides and Slide Shows: Production and Presentation.…

  17. Stretchable, Adhesion-Tunable Dry Adhesive by Surface Wrinkling

    Jeong, Hoon Eui

    2010-02-16

    We introduce a simple yet robust method of fabricating a stretchable, adhesion-tunable dry adhesive by combining replica molding and surface wrinkling. By utilizing a thin, wrinkled polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) sheet with a thickness of 1 mm with built-in micropillars, active, dynamic control of normal and shear adhesion was achieved. Relatively strong normal (∼10.8 N/cm2) and shear adhesion (∼14.7 N/cm2) forces could be obtained for a fully extended (strained) PDMS sheet (prestrain of∼3%), whereas the forces could be rapidly reduced to nearly zero once the prestrain was released (prestrain of ∼0.5%). Moreover, durability tests demonstrated that the adhesion strength in both the normal and shear directions was maintained over more than 100 cycles of attachment and detachment. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  18. Improved Adhesion and Compliancy of Hierarchical Fibrillar Adhesives.

    Li, Yasong; Gates, Byron D; Menon, Carlo

    2015-08-01

    The gecko relies on van der Waals forces to cling onto surfaces with a variety of topography and composition. The hierarchical fibrillar structures on their climbing feet, ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale, are hypothesized to be key elements for the animal to conquer both smooth and rough surfaces. An epoxy-based artificial hierarchical fibrillar adhesive was prepared to study the influence of the hierarchical structures on the properties of a dry adhesive. The presented experiments highlight the advantages of a hierarchical structure despite a reduction of overall density and aspect ratio of nanofibrils. In contrast to an adhesive containing only nanometer-size fibrils, the hierarchical fibrillar adhesives exhibited a higher adhesion force and better compliancy when tested on an identical substrate. PMID:26167951

  19. Effect of adhesive thickness on adhesively bonded T-joint

    The aim of this work is to analyze the effect of adhesive thickness on tensile strength of adhesively bonded stainless steel T-joint. Specimens were made from SUS 304 Stainless Steel plate and SUS 304 Stainless Steel perforated plate. Four T-joint specimens with different adhesive thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm) were made. Experiment result shows T-joint specimen with adhesive thickness of 1.0 mm yield highest maximum load. Identical T-joint specimen jointed by spot welding was also tested. Tensile test shows welded T-Joint had eight times higher tensile load than adhesively bonded T-joint. However, in low pressure application such as urea granulator chamber, high tensile strength is not mandatory. This work is useful for designer in fertilizer industry and others who are searching for alternative to spot welding

  20. Interventional microadhesiolysis: A new nonsurgical release technique for adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder

    Lim Tae-Kyun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A nonsurgical intervention, interventional microadhesiolysis, was developed to release adhesions in joints and soft tissues. This paper introduces the procedure and evaluates the efficacy of the intervention for adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder. Methods Ten patients (five men and five women with primary adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder were treated at a chronic pain management center in Korea. Three specially made needles are used in interventional microadhesiolysis: the Round, Flexed Round, and Ahn's needles. A Round Needle is inserted on the skin over middle of supraspinatus and advanced under the acromion and acromioclavicular joint (subacromial release. A Flexed Round Needle is inserted two-fingers caudal to the inferior border of the scapular spine and advanced over the capsule sliding on the surface of infraspinatus muscle-tendon fascia. The capsule is released while an assistant simultaneously passively abducts the shoulder to full abduction (posteroinferior capsule release. An Ahn's Needle is inserted on the skin over the lesser tubercle and advanced under the coracoid process sliding on the surface of the subscapularis muscle (subcoracoid release. Results After the patients underwent interventional microadhesiolysis, the self-rated pain score or severity declined significantly (p p Conclusion Our findings suggest that interventional microadhesiolysis is effective for managing adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder.

  1. Investigation of adhesion during operation of MEMS cantilevers

    Ali, Shaikh M.; Phinney, Leslie M.

    2004-01-01

    Reliability of MEMS is a major concern for the commercialization of laboratory prototypes. Surface adhesion or stiction strongly affects the reliability of MEMS devices which have sliding or rubbing contacts. Determination of adhesion energies, adhesion forces, and pull-off forces are important for predicting stiction in MEMS. We present an experimental technique to estimate the pull-off forces for MEMS surfaces. Polysilicon microcantilevers were electrostatically actuated using gradually varying voltages. A hysteresis was observed in the voltage at which the tip of the cantilevers made and broke contact with the substrate. Pull-off forces were estimated from the hysteresis in the voltage values using a strain energy formulation. The pull-off forces for microcantilevers dried out of isopropyl alcohol and repaired using laser irradiation were estimated to be in the range of 45-121 nN. The role of adhered length, variable external loading, and actuating signal on in-use stiction is also investigated. From our experimental results, we demonstrate an empirical approach to predict in-use stiction of microcantilevers.

  2. Mechanical Properties and Adhesion of a Micro Structured Polymer Blend

    Brunero Cappella

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A 50:50 blend of polystyrene (PS and poly(n-butyl methacrylate (PnBMA has been characterized with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM in Tapping Mode and with force-distance curves. The polymer solution has been spin-coated on a glass slide. PnBMA builds a uniform film on the glass substrate with a thickness of @200 nm. On top of it, the PS builds an approximately 100 nm thick film. The PS-film undergoes dewetting, leading to the formation of holes surrounded by about 2 µm large rims. In those regions of the sample, where the distance between the holes is larger than about 4 µm, light depressions in the PS film can be observed. Topography, dissipated energy, adhesion, stiffness and elastic modulus have been measured on these three regions (PnBMA, PS in the rims and PS in the depressions. The two polymers can be distinguished in all images, since PnBMA has a higher adhesion and a smaller stiffness than PS, and hence a higher dissipated energy. Moreover, the polystyrene in the depressions shows a very high adhesion (approximately as high as PnBMA and its stiffness is intermediate between that of PnBMA and that of PS in the rims. This is attributed to higher mobility of the PS chains in the depressions, which are precursors of new holes.

  3. Syndecans, signaling, and cell adhesion

    Couchman, J R; Woods, A

    1996-01-01

    structures within the heparan sulfate chains, leaving the roles of chondroitin sulfate chains and extracellular portion of the core proteins to be elucidated. Evidence that syndecans are a class of receptor involved in cell adhesion is mounting, and their small cytoplasmic domains may link with the...... transmembrane signaling from matrix to cytoskeleton, as proposed for other classes of adhesion receptors....

  4. Hyaluronan-mediated cellular adhesion

    Curtis, Jennifer

    2005-03-01

    Many cells surround themselves with a cushioning halo of polysaccharides that is further strengthened and organized by proteins. In fibroblasts and chrondrocytes, the primary component of this pericellular matrix is hyaluronan, a large linear polyanion. Hyaluronan production is linked to a variety of disease, developmental, and physiological processes. Cells manipulate the concentration of hyaluronan and hyaluronan receptors for numerous activities including modulation of cell adhesion, cell motility, and differentiation. Recent investigations by identify hyaluronan's role in mediating early-stage cell adhesion. An open question is how the cell removes the 0.5-10 micron thick pericellular matrix to allow for further mature adhesion events requiring nanometer scale separations. In this investigation, holographic optical tweezers are used to study the adhesion and viscoelastic properties of chondrocytes' pericellular matrix. Ultimately, we aim to shed further light on the spatial and temporal details of the dramatic transition from micron to nanometer gaps between the cell and its adhesive substrate.

  5. [Retention of adhesive bridges].

    Raes, F; De Boever, J

    1994-04-01

    Since the development of adhesive bridges in the early seventies, the retention and therefore the durability of these bridges has been tremendously improved. Conditioning of the non-precious metal by silanisation, careful acid etching of the enamel and the use of the appropriate composite resin are of prime importance. Furthermore, the meticulous preparation with enough interproximal embrace, occlusal rests, interocclusal clearance and cingulum stops is equally important. Including more teeth in the design does not necessarily lead to an improved retention. Besides the material and technical aspects, the whole clinical procedure needs much attention. The retention does not depend on one single factor, but on the precision of all the necessary clinical steps and on a well-defined selection of the material. In this way a five-year survival rate of close to 80% can be obtained. PMID:11830965

  6. Effect of fibril shape on adhesive properties

    Soto, Daniel; Hill, Ginel; Parness, Aaron; Esparza, Noé; Cutkosky, Mark; Kenny, Tom

    2010-08-01

    Research into the gecko's adhesive system revealed a unique architecture for adhesives using tiny hairs. By using a stiff material (β-keratin) to create a highly structured adhesive, the gecko's system demonstrates properties not seen in traditional pressure-sensitive adhesives which use a soft, unstructured planar layer. In contrast to pressure sensitive adhesives, the gecko adhesive displays frictional adhesion, in which increased shear force allows it to withstand higher normal loads. Synthetic fibrillar adhesives have been fabricated but not all demonstrate this frictional adhesion property. Here we report the dual-axis force testing of single silicone rubber pillars from synthetic adhesive arrays. We find that the shape of the adhesive pillar dictates whether frictional adhesion or pressure-sensitive behavior is observed. This work suggests that both types of behavior can be achieved with structures much larger than gecko terminal structures. It also indicates that subtle differences in the shape of these pillars can significantly influence their properties.

  7. Seismic behavior with sliding of overhead travelling crane

    In this study, the seismic behavior of an overhead travelling crane with the sliding between travelling wheels and rails is examined. First, the dynamic characteristic test of the actual crane installed in a reactor building and the sliding test of the rigid-element model to observe the basic sliding characteristic were performed. Next, to examine the dynamic response with sliding, shaking tests using the scaled model of an actual crane were conducted. From these results, useful design information about seismic behavior of an overhead travelling crane was obtained. It was also observed that numerical predictions considering sliding behavior have good agreement with the experimental results and are applicable to seismic design. (author)

  8. Fault detection and fault-tolerant control using sliding modes

    Alwi, Halim; Tan, Chee Pin

    2011-01-01

    ""Fault Detection and Fault-tolerant Control Using Sliding Modes"" is the first text dedicated to showing the latest developments in the use of sliding-mode concepts for fault detection and isolation (FDI) and fault-tolerant control in dynamical engineering systems. It begins with an introduction to the basic concepts of sliding modes to provide a background to the field. This is followed by chapters that describe the use and design of sliding-mode observers for FDI using robust fault reconstruction. The development of a class of sliding-mode observers is described from first principles throug

  9. Accelerating solitons for sliding-frequency filter systems

    Parker, D. F.; Radha, Ch.; Facão, Margarida

    2002-06-01

    The sliding-frequency filter equation is shown to have similarity solutions which travel with steady profile but with constant acceleration. Over a wide range of the gain, filter strength and sliding-rate parameters, the pulse envelope is very well approximated by a sech profile. However, when the sliding rate is large, the chirp differs greatly from the usually assumed linear variation of frequency through the pulse. The amplitude and chirp are found for small and moderate sliding rate by a perturbation analysis and, for larger sliding rates, by solving a nonlinear eigenvalue problem for a nonautonomous differential equation.

  10. Coupling of cytoplasm and adhesion dynamics determines cell polarization and locomotion

    Bock, Martin; Möhl, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Observations of single epidermal cells on flat adhesive substrates have revealed two distinct morphological and functional states, namely a non-migrating symmetric unpolarized state and a migrating asymmetric polarized state. These states are characterized by different spatial distributions and dynamics of important biochemical cell components: F-actin and myosin-II form the contractile part of the cytoskeleton, and integrin receptors in the plasma membrane connect F-actin filaments to the substratum. In this way, focal adhesion complexes are assembled, which determine cytoskeletal force transduction and subsequent cell locomotion. So far, physical models have reduced this phenomenon either to gradients in regulatory control molecules or to different mechanics of the actin filament system in different regions of the cell. Here we offer an alternative and self-organizational model incorporating polymerization, pushing and sliding of filaments, as well as formation of adhesion sites and their force dependent ki...

  11. An Efficient Method for Distributing Animated Slides of Web Presentations

    Yusuke Niwa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Attention control of audience is required for suc-cessful presentations, therefore giving a presentation with im-mediate reaction, called reactive presentation, to unexpected changes in the context given by the audience is important. Examples of functions for the reactive presentation are shape animation effects on slides and slide transition effects. Understanding the functions that realize the reactive pre-sentation on the Web can be useful. In this work, we present an effective method for synchronizing shape animation effects on the Web, such as moving the objects and changing the size and color of the shape objects. The main idea is to make a video of animated slides, called Web Slide Media, including the page information of slides as movie chapter information for synchronization. Moreover, we explain a method to reduce the file size of the Web slide media by removing all shape animation effects and slide transition effects from a Web slide media item, called Sparse Web Slide Media. We demonstrate that the performance of the system is enough for practical use and the file size of the Sparse Web Slide Media is smaller than the file size of the Web Slide Media.

  12. An updated nuclear criticality slide rule. Technical basis

    In January 1974, a limited distribution report, entitled open-quotes A Slide Rule for Estimating Nuclear Criticality Information,close quotes was written by C. M. Hopper for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant as a tool for emergency response to nuclear criticality accidents. Because of several shortcomings of the original slide rule, work began recently to update the slide rule using modern computational tools. Volume 1 of this report describes the analyses performed in support of this updated slide-rule tool and includes a sample, nonfunctioning version of the new slide rule. Volume 2 contains the functional version of the slide rule. The new slide-rule tool provides capabilities for the continued updating of accident information during the evolution of emergency response, including victim exposure information; potential exposures to emergency reentry personnel; estimates of future radiation fields; and fission-yield estimates

  13. Laser autofocusing: a sliding mode approach

    Golubovic, Edin; Khalil, Islam S. M.; Kamadan, Abdullah; ŞABANOVIÇ, Asif; Sabanovic, Asif

    2010-01-01

    Quality of the laser processing depends on many factors, such as overall configuration of the laser workstation, control methods used and quality of the laser beam. Although lasers used in material processing are typically high energy lasers, light beam still needs to be focused in order to achieve higher energy density and smaller final spot size. This paper presents an application of sliding mode to the laser autofocusing system. Autofocusing system consists of photodiode as the measurem...

  14. The Tribology of Sliding Elastic Media

    Cule, D.; Hwa, T.

    1996-01-01

    The tribology of a sliding elastic continuum in contact with a disordered substrate is investigated analytically and numerically via a bead-spring model. The deterministic dynamics of this system exhibits a depinning transition at a finite driving force, with complex spatial-temporal dynamics including stick-slip events of all sizes. These behaviors can be understood completely by mapping the system to the well-known problem of a directed-path in {\\em higher-dimensional } random media.

  15. Impact of oils and coatings on adhesion of structural adhesives

    Hagström, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    This is a master thesis project conducted for Scania CV AB in collaboration with Swerea Kimab. The purpose is to examine how oils and coatings on the surface affect the adhesion of adhesives. Earlier work done by Scania indicate that the amount of oil applied may have an impact on the adhesion. Substrates tested are hot dipped galvanised steel, electro galvanised. AlSi and ZnMg. Oils used are Anticorit RP 3802 that is an anti-corrosive oil and Renoform 3802 that is a drawing oil. The two adhes...

  16. Virtual slides: application in pulmonary pathology consultations.

    Michał Wojciechowski

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The Virtual Slide (VS is an interactive microscope emulator that presents a complete digitized tissue section via the Internet. A successful implementation of VS has been observed for educational, research venues and quality control. VS acquisition for consultative pathology is not so common. The purpose of this study was to explore the efficacy and usability of VS in the consultative pulmonary telepathology. 20 lung tumors entered the study. The performance was programmed for 2 medical centers specialized in pulmonary pathology (beginner and advancer in telepathology. A high-quality VSs were prepared by Coolscope (Nikon, Eclipsnet VSL, Japan, and were evaluated via the Internet. The cases were reviewed for the second time with conventional light microscope. VS diagnostic accuracy and the interobserver variability were evaluated. Also the time taken by examiners to render the diagnoses and time needed to scan the microscopic slide were analyzed. Percentage concordance between original glass-slides diagnosis and diagnosis for VSs was very high. Pathologists found the download speed of VSs adequate; experience in telepathology reduced the time of VS diagnosis. VS implementation suggests advantages for teleconsulation and education but also indicate some technical limitations. This is the first Polish trial of VS implementation in telepathology consultative service.

  17. Wet adhesion and adhesive locomotion of snails on anti-adhesive non-wetting surfaces.

    Neil J Shirtcliffe

    Full Text Available Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted, texture (smooth, rough or granular or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces.

  18. Wet Adhesion and Adhesive Locomotion of Snails on Anti-Adhesive Non-Wetting Surfaces

    Shirtcliffe, Neil J.; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted), texture (smooth, rough or granular) or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces. PMID:22693563

  19. Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of a Novel 6351 Al-Al4SiC4 Composite

    Mondal, Manas Kumar; Biswas, Koushik; Saha, Atanu; Maity, Joydeep

    2015-02-01

    In this research work the dry sliding wear behavior of 6351 Al alloy and 6351 Al based composites possessing varying amount of (2-7 vol.%) in situ Al4SiC4 reinforcement was investigated at low sliding speed (1 m/s) against a hardened EN 31 disk at different loads. In general, the wear mechanism involved adhesion and microcutting abrasion. Under selected loads (9.8 and 24.5 N), the overall wear resistance increased with increasing content of Al4SiC4 particles since particles stood tall against the process of wear. Besides, strain hardening of the matrix played an additional role to provide wear resistance. Therefore, the newly developed 6351Al-Al4SiC4 composite can be used as light weight wear resistance component in industry.

  20. Slide-specific models for segmentation of differently stained digital histopathology whole slide images

    Brieu, Nicolas; Pauly, Olivier; Zimmermann, Johannes; Binnig, Gerd; Schmidt, Günter

    2016-03-01

    The automatic analysis of whole slide images (WSIs) of stained histopathology tissue sections plays a crucial role in the discovery of predictive biomarkers in the field on immuno-oncology by enabling the quantification of the phenotypic information contained in the tissue sections. The automatic detection of cells and nuclei, while being one of the major steps of such analysis, remains a difficult problem because of the low visual differentiation of high pleomorphic and densely cluttered objects and of the diversity of tissue appearance between slides. The key idea of this work is to take advantage of well-differentiated objects in each slide to learn about the appearance of the tissue and in particular about the appearance of low-differentiated objects. We detect well-differentiated objects on a automatically selected set of representative regions, learn slide-specific visual context models, and finally use the resulting posterior maps to perform the final detection steps on the whole slide. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated against manual annotations on a set of differently stained images.

  1. Marine Bioinspired Underwater Contact Adhesion.

    Clancy, Sean K; Sodano, Antonio; Cunningham, Dylan J; Huang, Sharon S; Zalicki, Piotr J; Shin, Seunghan; Ahn, B Kollbe

    2016-05-01

    Marine mussels and barnacles are sessile biofouling organisms that adhere to a number of surfaces in wet environments and maintain remarkably strong bonds. Previous synthetic approaches to mimic biological wet adhesive properties have focused mainly on the catechol moiety, present in mussel foot proteins (mfps), and especially rich in the interfacial mfps, for example, mfp-3 and -5, found at the interface between the mussel plaque and substrate. Barnacles, however, do not use Dopa for their wet adhesion, but are instead rich in noncatecholic aromatic residues. Due to this anomaly, we were intrigued to study the initial contact adhesion properties of copolymerized acrylate films containing the key functionalities of barnacle cement proteins and interfacial mfps, for example, aromatic (catecholic or noncatecholic), cationic, anionic, and nonpolar residues. The initial wet contact adhesion of the copolymers was measured using a probe tack testing apparatus with a flat-punch contact geometry. The wet contact adhesion of an optimized, bioinspired copolymer film was ∼15.0 N/cm(2) in deionized water and ∼9.0 N/cm(2) in artificial seawater, up to 150 times greater than commercial pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) tapes (∼0.1 N/cm(2)). Furthermore, maximum wet contact adhesion was obtained at ∼pH 7, suggesting viability for biomedical applications. PMID:27046671

  2. Adhesion and multi-materials

    Adhesion is a multidisciplinary science relevant to many practical fields. The main application of adhesion is bonding by adhesives. This technique is widely used in the industrial world and more specifically in the advanced technical domains. Adhesion is also involved in multi-component materials such as coatings, multilayer materials, polymer blends, composite materials... The multidisciplinary aspect of adhesion is well demonstrated by considering the wide variety of concepts, models and theories proposed for its description. An example of the adhesion between a fiber and a matrix in a composite material will lead to a general model relating the molecular properties of the interface to its capacity of stress transfer and hence to the macroscopic mechanical properties of the composite. This relationship is valid whatever the fiber (glass, carbon, polymeric) or the polymer matrix (thermoplastics, thermosetting). Any deviation from this model can be attributed to the existence of an interfacial zone or interphase exhibiting properties, mainly mechanical properties, different from the bulk matrix. Two examples are examined: the first one deals with the creation of a trans crystalline interphase in a semi-crystalline thermoplastic matrix and the second one is concerned with the formation of a pseudo glassy interphase in an elastomer matrix. These examples stress the need for complementary approaches in the understanding of adhesion phenomena at different levels of knowledge, from molecular to macroscopic. They also show how important it is to understand the mechanisms of formation of inter phases in order to be able to master the performance of multicomponent materials. (Author)

  3. Focal Adhesion Kinases in Adhesion Structures and Disease

    Pierre P. Eleniste

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases.

  4. Focal adhesion kinases in adhesion structures and disease.

    Eleniste, Pierre P; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases. PMID:22888421

  5. Photovoltaic module with adhesion promoter

    Xavier, Grace

    2013-10-08

    Photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters and methods for fabricating photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters are described. A photovoltaic module includes a solar cell including a first surface and a second surface, the second surface including a plurality of interspaced back-side contacts. A first glass layer is coupled to the first surface by a first encapsulating layer. A second glass layer is coupled to the second surface by a second encapsulating layer. At least a portion of the second encapsulating layer is bonded directly to the plurality of interspaced back-side contacts by an adhesion promoter.

  6. Adhesives from modified soy protein

    Sun, Susan; Wang, Donghai; Zhong, Zhikai; Yang, Guang

    2008-08-26

    The, present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF and PPF resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

  7. Focal Adhesion Kinases in Adhesion Structures and Disease

    Pierre P. Eleniste; Angela Bruzzaniti

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organiza...

  8. Two dimensional nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts of textured surfaces

    Tong, Ruiting; Liu, Geng; Liu, Tianxiang

    2016-05-01

    Detailed behaviors of nanoscale textured surfaces during the reciprocating sliding contacts are still unknown although they are widely used in mechanical components to improve tribological characteristics. The current research of sliding contacts of textured surfaces mainly focuses on the experimental studies, while the cost is too high. Molecular dynamics(MD) simulation is widely used in the studies of nanoscale single-pass sliding contacts, but the CPU cost of MD simulation is also too high to simulate the reciprocating sliding contacts. In this paper, employing multiscale method which couples molecular dynamics simulation and finite element method, two dimensional nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts of textured surfaces are investigated. Four textured surfaces with different texture shapes are designed, and a rigid cylindrical tip is used to slide on these textured surfaces. For different textured surfaces, average potential energies and average friction forces of the corresponding sliding processes are analyzed. The analyzing results show that "running-in" stages are different for each texture, and steady friction processes are discovered for textured surfaces II, III and IV. Texture shape and sliding direction play important roles in reciprocating sliding contacts, which influence average friction forces greatly. This research can help to design textured surfaces to improve tribological behaviors in nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts.

  9. Denture Adhesives - A Literature Review

    Sudhanshu Shekhar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Successful complete denture treatment combines exemplary technique, effective patient rapport and education and familiarity with all possible management options to provide the highest degree of patient satisfaction. Dentists need to know about denture adhesives to be able to identify those patients who actually need them and to be able to educate them about the advantages, disadvantages and correct use of these products. Denture adhesives are commercially available nontoxic, soluble materials that when applied to the tissue surface of dentures enhance their retention, stability and performance. They were introduced in dentistry in the late 18th century. The first patent related to adhesives was issued in 1913, followed in the 1920’s and 1930’s. The purpose of the use of denture adhesives can be described as to subjectively benefit denture-wearers with improved stability, retention and comfort of their dentures, and with improved incisal force, masticatory ability, and confidence.

  10. In vitro inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa adhesion by Xylitol

    Letícia Pinheiro de Sousa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated, in vitro, the antimicrobial activity and the anti-adherent property of xylitol (0.5, 2.5 and 5.0%, w/v on two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains (ATCC 9027 and clinical. The assay of antimicrobial activity was performed to determine a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and the adhesion test was performed, by which the parameters regarding, growth in the culture medium, number of colony forming units (CFUs released and slide evaluation by scanning electron microscopy (SEM were analyzed. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS was employed for statistical analysis. Results showed that xylitol had no antimicrobial activity on these strains; however, the inhibition of bacterial adherence was observed in microphotographs obtained by SEM. These results indicated that xylitol could be a future alternative to combat bacterial colonization.

  11. Magnetorheological Elastomer Films with Tunable Wetting and Adhesion Properties.

    Lee, Sanghee; Yim, Changyong; Kim, Wuseok; Jeon, Sangmin

    2015-09-01

    We fabricated magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) films consisting of polydimethylsiloxane and various concentrations of fluorinated carbonyl iron particles. The application of a magnetic field to the MRE film induced changes in the surface morphology due to the alignment of the iron particles along the magnetic field lines. At low concentrations of iron particles and low magnetic field intensities, needle-like microstructures predominated. These structures formed more mountain-like microstructures as the concentration of iron particles or the magnetic field intensity increased. The surface roughness increased the water contact angle from 100° to 160° and decreased the sliding angle from 180° to 10°. The wettability and adhesion properties changed substantially within a few seconds simply upon application of a magnetic field. Cyclical measurements revealed that the transition was completely reversible. PMID:26301942

  12. Laser surface modification and adhesion

    Mittal, K L

    2014-01-01

    The book provides a unique overview on laser techniques and applications for the purpose of improving adhesion by altering surface chemistry and topography/morphology of the substrate. It details laser surface modification techniques for a wide range of industrially relevant materials (plastics, metals, ceramics, composites) with the aim to improve and enhance their adhesion to other materials. The joining of different materials is of critical importance in the fabrication of many and varied products.

  13. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    Akihiko Murata; Shin-Ichi Hayashi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of...

  14. Adhesive capsulitis: a case report

    Kazemi, Mohsen

    2000-01-01

    Adhesive capsulitis or frozen shoulder is an uncommon entity in athletes. However, it is a common cause of shoulder pain and disability in the general population. Although it is a self limiting ailment, its rather long, restrictive and painful course forces the affected person to seek treatment. Conservative management remains the mainstay treatment of adhesive capsulitis. This includes chiropractic manipulation of the shoulder, therapeutic modalities, mobilization, exercise, soft tissue ther...

  15. Adhesion and friction of transition metals in contact with non-metallic hard materials

    An investigation was conducted to examine the adhesion and friction behavior of transition metals in contact with various non-metallic hard materials and the nature of the metal transfer to the hard materials. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with the metals yttrium, titanium, tantalum, zirconium, vanadium, neodymium, iron, cobalt, nickel, tungsten, platinum, rhenium, ruthenium and rhodium in sliding contact with single-crystal diamond, silicon carbide, pyrolytic boron nitride and ferrite. All experiments were conducted under the following conditions: loads, 0.05-0.3 N; sliding velocities, 3 x 10-3 and 0.7 x 10-3 m min-1; in a vacuum of 10-8 Pa; at room temperature. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis was conducted with the metals and non-metals to determine the surface chemistry and the degree of surface cleanness. The results of the investigation indicate the adhesion and friction of the transition metals in contact with diamond, silicon carbide, boron nitride and ferrite are related to the relative chemical activity of the metals. The more chemically active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction and the greater the amount of transfer to the non-metals. (Auth.)

  16. Lubricating layer formed on porous anodic alumina template due to pore effect at water lubricated sliding and its properties

    A porous anodic alumina (PAA) template was manufactured to investigate the pore effect on the formation of lubricating layers. A PAA template with 260 nm pores was manufactured by two-step anodization using phosphoric acid. A sliding wear test was carried out using a ball-on-disk tester. Due to the pore effect, an aluminum hydroxide film; i.e., the lubricating layer, was formed at a specific condition. The PAA template has a low friction regime because of the aluminum hydroxide film. The adhesion and friction forces of the aluminum hydroxide film were measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the adhesion and friction forces of the lubricating layer were lower than that of a typical oxide layer. Using AFM analysis, the existence of a lubricating layer can be verified.

  17. Pre-Stressed Rope Reinforced Anti-Sliding Pile

    XU Jun; WANG Chenghua

    2006-01-01

    Pre-stressed rope reinforced anti-sliding pile is a composite anti-sliding structure. It is made up of pre-stressed rope and general anti-sliding pile. It can bring traditional anti-sliding pile's retaining performance into full play, and to treat with landslide fast and economically. The difference between them is that the pre-stressed rope will transfix the whole anti-sliding pile through a prearranged pipe in this structure. The working mechanics, the design method and economic benefit are studied. The results show that the pre-stressed rope reinforced anti-sliding pile can treat with the small and middle landslides or high slopes well and possess the notable advantage of technology and economic.

  18. Sliding wear and friction behaviour of zircaloy-4 in water

    Sharma, Garima; Limaye, P. K.; Jadhav, D. T.

    2009-11-01

    In water cooled nuclear reactors, the sliding of fuel bundles in fuel channel handling system can lead to severe wear and it is an important topic to study. In the present study, sliding wear behaviour of zircaloy-4 was investigated in water (pH ˜ 10.5) using ball-on-plate sliding wear tester. Sliding wear resistance zircaloy-4 against SS 316 was examined at room temperature. Sliding wear tests were carried out at different load and sliding frequencies. The coefficient of friction of zircaloy-4 was also measured during each tests and it was found to decrease slightly with the increase in applied load. The micro-mechanisms responsible for wear in zircaloy-4 were identified to be microcutting, micropitting and microcracking of deformed subsurface zones in water.

  19. IWM2011, Slides of the presentations

    The aim of the International Workshops on Multifragmentation and related topics (IWM) is to bring together a wide international community from heavy-ion physics in order to debate open questions in the domain of nuclear dynamics and thermodynamics. There will be dedicated sessions on the following topics: -) thermodynamics of finite nuclei and nuclear matter, -) isospin and symmetry energy: from the laboratory to compact stars, -) physics with low-energy radioactive beams, -) dynamics of heavy-ion collisions, -) correlations, dynamics and structure, and -) instrumentation and new detection techniques. This document gathers only the slides of the presentations

  20. The histological slides and drawings of Cajal

    Pablo Garcia-Lopez

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Ramon y Cajal´s studies in the world of neuroscience provoked a radical change in the course of its history. For this reason he is considered as the father of modern neuroscience. Some of his items are housed at the Cajal Museum (Cajal Institute, CSIC, Madrid, Spain. In this article, we will present an analysis of Cajal’s effects used in his research that could help to understand his enormous scientific production, and that offers some curious insights into his work and his legacy. Furthermore, we present some images relating Cajal’s scientific drawings with his histological slides.

  1. Handle slides for delta-matroids

    Moffatt, Iain; MPHAKO-BANDA, EUNICE

    2015-01-01

    A classic exercise in the topology of surfaces is to show that, using handle slides, every disc-band surface, or 1-vertex ribbon graph, can be put in a canonical form consisting of the connected sum of orientable loops, and either non-orientable loops or pairs of interlaced orientable loops. Motivated by the principle that ribbon graph theory informs delta-matroid theory, we find the delta-matroid analogue of this surface classification. We show that, using a delta-matroid analogue of handle-...

  2. Simulations of atomic-scale sliding friction

    Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Stoltze, Per

    1996-01-01

    Simulation studies of atomic-scale sliding friction have been performed for a number of tip-surface and surface-surface contacts consisting of copper atoms. Both geometrically very simple tip-surface structures and more realistic interface necks formed by simulated annealing have been studied...... pinning of atoms near the boundary of the interface and is therefore more easily observed for smaller contacts. Depending on crystal orientation and load, frictional wear can also be seen in the simulations. In particular, for the annealed interface-necks which model contacts created by scanning tunneling...

  3. Meetings on Particle Physics - Abstracts and Slides

    RPP (Meetings on Particle Physics) annual meetings are aimed at gathering the theoretical particle physicists' community, providing the participants with the opportunity not only to present their research topics, but also to make contact with the latest developments in adjacent fields. RPP-2012 will have a few review talks on topics such as flavors, Higgs bosons, astro-particle physics and cosmology, heavy ions, physics beyond the standard model, and quantum chromodynamics. This document gathers the slides of the presentations, a few presentations are accompanied by an abstract.

  4. A sliding cell technique for diffusion measurements in liquid metals

    Yongliang Geng; Chunao Zhu; Bo Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The long capillary and shear cell techniques are the usual methods for diffusion measurements in liquid metals. Here we present a new “sliding cell technique” to measure interdiffusion in liquid alloys, which combines the merits of these two methods. Instead of a number of shear cells, as used in the shear cell method, only one sliding cell is designed to separate and join the liquid diffusion samples. Using the sliding cell technique, the influence of the heating process (which affects liqui...

  5. Thermal imaging on simulated faults during frictional sliding

    Mair, Karen; Renard, François; Gundersen, Olav

    2008-01-01

    Heating during frictional sliding is a major component of the energy budget of earthquakes and represents a potential weakening mechanism. It is therefore important to investigate how heat dissipates during sliding on simulated faults. We present results from laboratory friction experiments where a halite (NaCl) slider held under constant load is dragged across a coarse substrate. Surface evolution and frictional resistance are recorded. Heat emission at the sliding surface is monitored using...

  6. Sliding Mode Speed Control for DC Drive Systems

    Guldemir, H.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the Sliding Mode Control theory of the Variable Structure System has been applied to the speed control of a de motor. The dynamic performance of the sliding mode speed control system has been studied against system parameter variations and external load disturbance and the simulation results are given. The application of the sliding mode control theory to controller design for DC drive control system shows a robust system performance.

  7. Power System Stabilizer Based on Global Fuzzy Sliding Mode Control

    Nechadi, E.; Harmas, M. N.

    2013-01-01

    —Power systems stability is enhanced through a novel stabiliser developed around a fuzzy sliding mode approach. First, sliding mode control is applied to selected operating point based models of a power system separately then fuzzy logic is used to form a global model encompassing the separate subsystems, thus leading to a fuzzy sliding mode power system control. Stability is insured through Lyapunov synthesis. Severe operating conditions are used in a simulation study to test the validity of...

  8. Was the Scanner Calibration Slide used for its intended purpose?

    Zong Yaping

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the article, Scanner calibration revisited, BMC Bioinformatics 2010, 11:361, Dr. Pozhitkov used the Scanner Calibration Slide, a key product of Full Moon BioSystems to generate data in his study of microarray scanner PMT response and proposed a mathematic model for PMT response 1. In the end, the author concluded that "Full Moon BioSystems calibration slides are inadequate for performing calibration," and recommended "against using these slides." We found these conclusions are seriously flawed and misleading, and his recommendation against using the Scanner Calibration Slide was not properly supported.

  9. Slide less pathology”: Fairy tale or reality?

    Indu, M; Rathy, R; Binu, MP

    2016-01-01

    Pathology practice is significantly advanced in various frontiers. Therefore, “slide less digital” pathology will not be a mere imagination in near future. Digitalization of histopathological slides (whole slide imaging [WSI]) is possible with the help of whole slide scanner. The WSI has a positive impact not only in routine practice but also in research field, medical education and bioindustry. Even if digital pathology has definitive advantages, its widespread use is not yet possible. As it is an upcoming technology in our field, this article is aimed to discussessential aspects of WSI.

  10. A Sliding Mode Multimodel Control for a Sensorless Photovoltaic System

    Rhif, Ahmed; Kardous, Zohra; Braiek, Naceur BenHadj

    2013-01-01

    In this work we will talk about a new control test using the sliding mode control with a nonlinear sliding mode observer, which are very solicited in tracking problems, for a sensorless photovoltaic panel. In this case, the panel system will has as a set point the sun position at every second during the day for a period of five years; then the tracker, using sliding mode multimodel controller and a sliding mode observer, will track these positions to make the sunrays orthogonal to the photovo...

  11. Second order sliding mode control for a quadrotor UAV.

    Zheng, En-Hui; Xiong, Jing-Jing; Luo, Ji-Liang

    2014-07-01

    A method based on second order sliding mode control (2-SMC) is proposed to design controllers for a small quadrotor UAV. For the switching sliding manifold design, the selection of the coefficients of the switching sliding manifold is in general a sophisticated issue because the coefficients are nonlinear. In this work, in order to perform the position and attitude tracking control of the quadrotor perfectly, the dynamical model of the quadrotor is divided into two subsystems, i.e., a fully actuated subsystem and an underactuated subsystem. For the former, a sliding manifold is defined by combining the position and velocity tracking errors of one state variable, i.e., the sliding manifold has two coefficients. For the latter, a sliding manifold is constructed via a linear combination of position and velocity tracking errors of two state variables, i.e., the sliding manifold has four coefficients. In order to further obtain the nonlinear coefficients of the sliding manifold, Hurwitz stability analysis is used to the solving process. In addition, the flight controllers are derived by using Lyapunov theory, which guarantees that all system state trajectories reach and stay on the sliding surfaces. Extensive simulation results are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control method. PMID:24751475

  12. Sliding Mode Robustness Control Strategy for Shearer Height Adjusting System

    Xiuping Su

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper firstly established mathematical model of height adjusting hydro cylinder of the shearer, as well as the state space equation of the shearer height adjusting system. Secondly we designed a shearer automatic height adjusting controller adopting the sliding mode robustness control strategy. The height adjusting controller includes the sliding mode surface switching function based on Ackermann formula, as well as sliding mode control function with the improved butterworth filter. Then simulation of the height adjustment controller shows that the sliding mode robustness control solves buffeting of typical controller, and achieves automatic control for the rolling drum of the shearer.

  13. Plasma polymerization for cell adhesive/anti-adhesive implant coating

    Meichsner, Juergen; Testrich, Holger; Rebl, Henrike; Nebe, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Plasma polymerization of ethylenediamine (C2H8N2, EDA) and perfluoropropane (C3F8, PFP) with admixture of argon and hydrogen, respectively, was studied using an asymmetric 13.56 MHz CCP. The analysis of the plasma chemical gas phase processes for stable molecules revealed consecutive reactions: C2H8N2 consumption, intermediate product NH3, and main final product HCN. In C3F8- H2 plasma the precursor molecule C3F8 and molecular hydrogen are consumed and HF as well as CF4 and C2F6 are found as main gaseous reaction products. The deposited plasma polymer films on the powered electrode are strongly cross-linked due to ion bombardment. The stable plasma polymerized films from EDA are characterized by high content of nitrogen with N/C ratio of about 0.35. The plasma polymerized fluorocarbon film exhibit a reduced F/C ratio of about 1.2. Adhesion tests with human osteoblast cell line MG-63 on coated Ti6Al4V samples (polished) compared with uncoated reference sample yielded both, the enhanced cell adhesion for plasma polymerized EDA and significantly reduced cell adhesion for fluorocarbon coating, respectively. Aging of the plasma polymerized EDA film, in particular due to the reactions with oxygen from air, showed no significant change in the cell adhesion. The fluorocarbon coating with low cell adhesion is of interest for temporary implants. Funded by the Campus PlasmaMed.

  14. Dynamical bond cooperativity enables very fast and strong binding between sliding surfaces

    Trømborg, Jørgen Kjoshagen

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative binding affects many processes in biology, but it is commonly addressed only in equilibrium. In this work we explore dynamical cooperativity in driven systems, where the cooperation occurs because some of the bonds change the dynamical response of the system to a regime where the other bonds become active. To investigate such cooperativity we study the frictional binding between two flow driven surfaces that interact through a large population of activated bonds. In particular, we study systems where each bond can have two different modes: one mode corresponds to a fast forming yet weak bond, and the other is a strong yet slow forming bond. We find considerable cooperativity between both types of bonds. Under some conditions the system behaves as if there were only one binding mode, corresponding to a strong and fast forming bond. Our results may have important implications on the friction and adhesion between sliding surfaces containing complementary binding motifs, such as in the case of cells b...

  15. Aggregation of amphiphilic polymers in the presence of adhesive small colloidal particles

    Baulin, Vladimir A.; Johner, Albert; Avalos, Josep Bonet

    2010-11-01

    The interaction of amphiphilic polymers with small colloids, capable to reversibly stick onto the chains, is studied. Adhesive small colloids in solution are able to dynamically bind two polymer segments. This association leads to topological changes in the polymer network configurations, such as looping and cross-linking, although the reversible adhesion permits the colloid to slide along the chain backbone. Previous analyses only consider static topologies in the chain network. We show that the sliding degree of freedom ensures the dominance of small loops, over other structures, giving rise to a new perspective in the analysis of the problem. The results are applied to the analysis of the equilibrium between colloidal particles and star polymers, as well as to block copolymer micelles. The results are relevant for the reversible adsorption of silica particles onto hydrophilic polymers, used in the process of formation of mesoporous materials of the type SBA or MCM, cross-linked cyclodextrin molecules threading on the polymers and forming the structures known as polyrotaxanes. Adhesion of colloids on the corona of the latter induce micellization and growth of larger micelles as the number of colloids increase, in agreement with experimental data.

  16. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    Bryan, Tom; Macleod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry; Williams, Scott; McCoy, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA gripper pad surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and

  17. Elastocapilllarity in insect adhesion: the case of beetle adhesive hair

    Gernay, Sophie; Gilet, Tristan; Lambert, Pierre; Federle, Walter

    2014-11-01

    The feet of many insects are covered with dense arrays of hair-like structures called setae. Liquid capillary bridges at the tip of these micrometric structures are responsible for the controlled adhesion of the insect on a large variety of substrates. The resulting adhesion force can exceed several times the body weight of the insect. The high aspect-ratio of setae suggests that flexibility is a key ingredient in this capillary-based adhesion mechanism. There is indeed a strong coupling between their elastic deformation and the shape of the liquid meniscus. In this experimental work, we observe and quantify the local deflection of dock beetle seta tips under perpendicular loading using interference microscopy. Our results are then interpreted in the light of an analytic model of elastocapillarity. This research has been funded by the FRIA/FNRS and the Interuniversity Attraction Poles Programme (IAP 7/38 MicroMAST) initiated by the Belgian Science Policy Office.

  18. Influence of normal loads and sliding velocities on friction properties of engineering plastics sliding against rough counterfaces

    Nuruzzaman, D. M.; Chowdhury, M. A.; Rahaman, M. L.; Oumer, A. N.

    2016-02-01

    Friction properties of plastic materials are very important under dry sliding contact conditions for bearing applications. In the present research, friction properties of engineering plastics such as polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and nylon are investigated under dry sliding contact conditions. In the experiments, PTFE and nylon slide against different rough counterfaces such as mild steel and stainless steel 316 (SS 316). Frictional tests are carried out at low loads 5, 7.5 and 10 N, low sliding velocities 0.5, 0.75 and 1 m/s and relative humidity 70%. The obtained results reveal that friction coefficient of PTFE increases with the increase in normal loads and sliding velocities within the observed range. On the other hand, frictional values of nylon decrease with the increase in normal loads and sliding velocities. It is observed that in general, these polymers show higher frictional values when sliding against SS 316 rather than mild steel. During running-in process, friction coefficient of PTFE and nylon steadily increases with the increase in rubbing time and after certain duration of rubbing, it remains at steady level. At identical operating conditions, the frictional values are significantly different depending on normal load, sliding velocity and material pair. It is also observed that in general, the influence of normal load on the friction properties of PTFE and nylon is greater than that of sliding velocity.

  19. Tribological Properties of MoSi2 Against AISI10045 Steel Under Sliding Friction

    CHEN Ping; ZHANG Hou-an; CHEN Hua-hui

    2006-01-01

    MoSi2 samples were prepared by a self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) and a hot-press technique. The sliding friction and wear properties of intermetallic MoSi2 against AISI10045 steel under dry friction and oil lubrication conditions were investigated with a MRH-5A type ring-on-block friction and wear tester. The elemental composition, microstructure and worn surface morphology of the MoSi2 material were observed and analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The synthetic parameter pv value reflecting friction work, was used to discuss the tribological properties of MoSi2 material. The results show that 1) oil lubrication can obviously improve the tribological properties of MoSi2, 2) the bigger the pv value, the greater the antifriction and the abrasive resistance of MoSi2 under oil lubrication, 3) with an increase in the pv value, the wear mechanism of MoSi2 material under dry sliding friction is the fatigue fracture and adhesive wear and 4) under oil lubrication the wear mechanism is mainly fatigue pitting.

  20. Adhesion and friction of transition metals in contact with nonmetallic hard materials

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with the metals yttrium, titanium, tantalum, zirconium, vanadium, neodymium, iron, cobalt, nickel, tungsten, platinum, rhenium, ruthenium, and rhodium in sliding contact with single crystal diamond, silicon carbide, pyrolytic boron nitride, and ferrite. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis was conducted with the metals and nonmetals to determine the surface chemistry and the degree of surface cleanliness. The results of the investigation indicate the adhesion and friction of the transition metals in contact with diamond, silicon carbide, boron nitride, and ferrite are related to the relative chemical activity of the metals. The more chemically active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction and the greater amount of transfer to the nonmetals

  1. Adhesion and friction of transition metals in contact with nonmetallic hard materials

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with the metals yttrium, titanium, tantalum, zirconium, vanadium, neodymium, iron, cobalt, nickel, tungsten, platinum, rhenium, ruthenium, and rhodium in sliding contact with single crystal diamond, silicon carbide, pyrolytic boron nitride, and ferrite. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis was conducted with the metals and nonmetals to determine the surface chemistry and the degree of surface cleanliness. The results of the investigation indicate the adhesion and friction of the transition metals in contact with diamond, silicon carbide, boron nitride, and ferrite are related to the relative chemical activity of the metals. The more chemically active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction and the greater amount of transfer to the nonmetals.

  2. A critical appraisal of positive cooperativity in oral streptococcal adhesion: Scatchard analyses of adhesion data versus analyses of the spatial arrangement of adhering bacteria.

    Van der Mei, H C; Cox, S D; Geertsema-Doornbusch, G I; Doyle, R J; Busscher, H J

    1993-05-01

    Positive cooperativity is a mechanism proposed to account for the adhesion of bacteria to surfaces. In this paper, two methods that both claim to assess experimentally cooperative phenomena, viz. Scatchard analysis of adhesion data (using adhesion to vials) and analysis of the spatial arrangement of adhering cells (using a flow chamber), were compared and critically evaluated. Three oral strains were used and the substrata involved were glass (hydrophilic) and silicone-coated glass (hydrophobic) employed with or without a salivary coating. Scatchard analysis and near-neighbour analysis of adhering cells yield similar conclusions with regard to the mechanism of adhesion of the cells, provided that adhering cells are sufficiently immobilized under the experimental conditions. In the case of incomplete immobilization, near-neighbour collection results from sliding of adhering cells rather than from cooperative phenomena. Also, the agreement between the conclusions from both methods seems to be better, the more reversibly the cells adhere. Positive cooperativity can be absent or present on saliva-coated substrata with a distinct effect of the substratum hydrophobicity, despite the presence of an adsorbed film. This suggests that a different pellicle develops on a hydrophobic substratum than on a hydrophilic substratum. This is confirmed by our observation that the amino acid composition of salivary films is different on both types of substratum. PMID:8336110

  3. Lignin-Furfural Based Adhesives

    Prajakta Dongre

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lignin recovered from the hot-water extract of sugar maple (Acer saccharum is used in this study to synthesize adhesive blends to replace phenol-formaldehyde (PF resin. Untreated lignin is characterized by lignin content and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR analysis. The molecular weight distribution of the lignin and the blends are characterized by size exclusion chromatography (SEC. The effect of pH (0.3, 0.65 and 1, ex situ furfural, and curing conditions on the tensile properties of adhesive reinforced glass fibers is determined and compared to the reinforcement level of commercially available PF resin. The adhesive blend prepared at pH = 0.65 with no added furfural exhibits the highest tensile properties and meets 90% of the PF tensile strength.

  4. Optimizing Student Learning: Examining the Use of Presentation Slides

    Strauss, Judy; Corrigan, Hope; Hofacker, Charles F.

    2011-01-01

    Sensory overload and split attention result in reduced learning when instructors read slides with bullet points and complex graphs during a lecture. Conversely, slides containing relevant visual elements, when accompanied by instructor narration, use both the visual and verbal channels of a student's working memory, thus improving the chances of…

  5. Verifying a sliding window protocol in mCRL

    Fokkink, Wan; Groote, Jan Friso; J. Pang; Badban, Bahareh; Pol

    2003-01-01

    We prove the correctness of a sliding window protocol with an arbitrary finite window size n and sequence numbers modulo 2n. The correctness consists of showing that the sliding window protocol is branching bisimilar to a queue of capacity 2n. The proof is given entirely on the basis of an axiomatic theory.

  6. Computer Slide Shows: A Trap for Bad Teaching

    Klemm, W. R.

    2007-01-01

    Slide shows presented with software such as PowerPoint or WordPerfect Presentations can trap instructors into bad teaching practices. Research on memory suggests that slide-show instruction can actually be less effective than traditional lecturing when the teacher uses a blackboard or overhead projector. The author proposes a model of classroom…

  7. Sliding behaviors of elastic cylindrical tanks under seismic loading

    There is a paper that reports on the occurrence of sliding in several oil tanks on Alaskan earthquake of 1964. This incident appears to be in need of further investigation for the following reasons: First, in usual seismic designing of cylindrical tanks ('tanks'), sliding is considered to occur when the lateral inertial force exceeds the static friction force. When the tank in question can be taken as a rigid body, this rule is known to hold true. If the tank is capable of undergoing a considerable amount of elastic deformation, however, its applicability has not been proved. Second, although several studies have been done on the critical conditions for static sliding the present author is unaware of like ones made on the dynamic sliding, except for the pioneering work of Sogabe, in which they have empirically indicated possibility of sliding to occur under the force of sloshing. Third, this author has shown earlier on that tanks, if not anchored properly, will start rocking, inducing uplifting of the base plate, even at a relatively small seismic acceleration of 10 gal or so. The present study has been conducted with these observations for the background. Namely, based on a notion that elastic deformation given rise to by rocking oscillation should be incorporated as an important factor in any set of critical conditions for the onset of sliding, a series of shaking table experiments were performed for rigid steel block to represent the rigid tanks ('rigid model') and a model tank having a same sort of plate thickness-to-diameter ratio as industrial tanks to represent the elastic cylindrical tanks ('elastic model'). Following observations have been obtained for the critical condition of the onset of sliding: (1) sliding of rigid tanks will occur when the lateral force given rise to by oscillation exceeds the static, or the Coulombic, friction force. (2) if vertical oscillation is imposed on the lateral oscillation, the lateral force needed to induce sliding of a

  8. Accurate Sliding-Mode Control System Modeling for Buck Converters

    Høyerby, Mikkel Christian Wendelboe; Andersen, Michael Andreas E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper shows that classical sliding mode theory fails to correctly predict the output impedance of the highly useful sliding mode PID compensated buck converter. The reason for this is identified as the assumption of the sliding variable being held at zero during sliding mode, effectively...... modeling the hysteretic comparator as an infinite gain. Correct prediction of output impedance is shown to be enabled by the use of a more elaborate, finite-gain model of the hysteretic comparator, which takes the effects of time delay and finite switching frequency into account. The demonstrated modeling...... approach also predicts the self-oscillating switching action of the sliding-mode control system correctly. Analytical findings are verified by simulation as well as experimentally in a 10-30V/3A buck converter....

  9. Sliding mode control the delta-sigma modulation approach

    Sira-Ramírez, Hebertt

    2015-01-01

    This monograph presents a novel method of sliding mode control for switch-regulated nonlinear systems. The Delta Sigma modulation approach allows one to implement a continuous control scheme using one or multiple, independent switches, thus effectively merging the available linear and nonlinear controller design techniques with sliding mode control.   Sliding Mode Control: The Delta-Sigma Modulation Approach, combines rigorous mathematical derivation of the unique features of Sliding Mode Control and Delta-Sigma modulation with numerous illustrative examples from diverse areas of engineering. In addition, engineering case studies demonstrate the applicability of the technique and the ease with which one can implement the exposed results. This book will appeal to researchers in control engineering and can be used as graduate-level textbook for a first course on sliding mode control.

  10. Advances in sliding mode control concept, theory and implementation

    Janardhanan, S; Spurgeon, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    The sliding mode control paradigm has become a mature technique for the design of robust controllers for a wide class of systems including nonlinear, uncertain and time-delayed systems. This book is a collection of plenary and invited talks delivered at the 12th IEEE International Workshop on Variable Structure System held at the Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai, India in January 2012. After the workshop, these researchers were invited to develop book chapters for this edited collection in order to reflect the latest results and open research questions in the area. The contributed chapters have been organized by the editors to reflect the various themes of sliding mode control which are the current areas of theoretical research and applications focus; namely articulation of the fundamental underpinning theory of the sliding mode design paradigm, sliding modes for decentralized system representations, control of time-delay systems, the higher order sliding mode concept, results applicable to nonlinear an...

  11. Sliding mode controller for signal input multiple state submarine system

    Sliding mode control design has become a popular choice for controlling non-linear dynamical systems. This paper, explores the dynamics of a submarine and represents the same in state space form. It also investigates the potential of sliding mode controller for a single input multiple state system of a submarine. Mathematical derivation of the controller is presented and it is proved that the sliding mode controllers is robust to changes in operating conditions. The problem of chattering in sliding mode controller design is discussed and remedy of this problem is suggested. Simulation studies are carried out which demonstrate that the sliding mode controller can efficiency be used as a heading controller for the submarine under investigation. (author)

  12. Frictional sliding with geometrically broken reflection symmetry

    Aldam, Michael; Svetlizky, Ilya; Brener, Efim A; Fineberg, Jay; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of frictional interfaces play an important role in many physical systems spanning a broad range of scales. It is well-known that frictional interfaces separating two dissimilar materials couple interfacial slip and normal stress variations, a coupling that has major implications on their stability, failure mechanism and rupture directionality. In contrast, interfaces separating identical materials are traditionally assumed not to feature such a coupling due to symmetry considerations. We show, combining theory and experiments, that interfaces which separate bodies made of identical materials, but lack geometric reflection symmetry, generically feature such a coupling. We discuss two applications of this novel feature. First, we show that it accounts for a distinct and previously unexplained weakening effect in frictional cracks observed experimentally. Second, we demonstrate that it can destabilize frictional sliding which is otherwise stable. The emerging framework is expected to find applicatio...

  13. Sliding Trellis-Based Frame Synchronization

    Ali, Usman; Kieffer, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Frame Synchronization (FS) is required in several communication standards in order to recover the individual frames that have been aggregated in a burst. This paper proposes a low-delay and reducedcomplexity Sliding Trellis (ST)-based FS technique, compared to our previously proposed trellis-based FS method. Each burst is divided into overlapping windows in which FS is performed. Useful information is propagated from one window to the next. The proposed method makes use of soft information provided by the channel, but also of all sources of redundancy present in the protocol stack. An illustration of our STbased approach for the WiMAX Media Access Control (MAC) layer is provided. When FS is performed on bursts transmitted over Rayleigh fading channel, the ST-based approach reduces the FS latency and complexity at the cost of a very small performance degradation compared to our full complexity trellis-based FS and outperforms state-of-the-art FS techniques.

  14. 23. Blois meeting 2011- Slides and abstracts

    This conference on 'Particle Physics and Cosmology' will emphasize the increasing interplay between high energy accelerator based physics and cosmology. The meeting will be articulated around the results and their impact on current theories from the 3 major new experimental and observational facilities which are coming on line or have recently been commissioned: the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the Planck satellite, and the Herschel satellite. The topics will include: -) the Standard Model in particle physics, in new data and analyses, -) the search for the Higgs boson, -) theories of and searches for physics beyond the Standard Model, -) heavy flavour physics, -) neutrino physics (astrophysical and laboratory), -) dark matter, dark energy and recent advances in cosmology. This document gathers the program, the slides and some abstracts of the presentations

  15. Robust Sliding Mode Control for Tokamaks

    I. Garrido

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear fusion has arisen as an alternative energy to avoid carbon dioxide emissions, being the tokamak a promising nuclear fusion reactor that uses a magnetic field to confine plasma in the shape of a torus. However, different kinds of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities may affect tokamak plasma equilibrium, causing severe reduction of particle confinement and leading to plasma disruptions. In this sense, numerous efforts and resources have been devoted to seeking solutions for the different plasma control problems so as to avoid energy confinement time decrements in these devices. In particular, since the growth rate of the vertical instability increases with the internal inductance, lowering the internal inductance is a fundamental issue to address for the elongated plasmas employed within the advanced tokamaks currently under development. In this sense, this paper introduces a lumped parameter numerical model of the tokamak in order to design a novel robust sliding mode controller for the internal inductance using the transformer primary coil as actuator.

  16. Sliding Mode Control of Steerable Needles.

    Rucker, D Caleb; Das, Jadav; Gilbert, Hunter B; Swaney, Philip J; Miga, Michael I; Sarkar, Nilanjan; Webster, Robert J

    2013-10-01

    Steerable needles can potentially increase the accuracy of needle-based diagnosis and therapy delivery, provided they can be adequately controlled based on medical image information. We propose a novel sliding mode control law that can be used to deliver the tip of a flexible asymmetric-tipped needle to a desired point, or to track a desired trajectory within tissue. The proposed control strategy requires no a priori knowledge of model parameters, has bounded input speeds, and requires little computational resources. We show that if the standard nonholonomic model for tip-steered needles holds, then the control law will converge to desired targets in a reachable workspace, within a tolerance that can be defined by the control parameters. Experimental results validate the control law for target points and trajectory following in phantom tissue and ex vivo liver. Experiments with targets that move during insertion illustrate robustness to disturbances caused by tissue deformation. PMID:25400527

  17. Sliding Adjustment for 3D Video Representation

    Galpin Franck

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with video coding of static scenes viewed by a moving camera. We propose an automatic way to encode such video sequences using several 3D models. Contrary to prior art in model-based coding where 3D models have to be known, the 3D models are automatically computed from the original video sequence. We show that several independent 3D models provide the same functionalities as one single 3D model, and avoid some drawbacks of the previous approaches. To achieve this goal we propose a novel algorithm of sliding adjustment, which ensures consistency of successive 3D models. The paper presents a method to automatically extract the set of 3D models and associate camera positions. The obtained representation can be used for reconstructing the original sequence, or virtual ones. It also enables 3D functionalities such as synthetic object insertion, lightning modification, or stereoscopic visualization. Results on real video sequences are presented.

  18. Adhesive Wear and Frictional Behavior of Multilayered Polyester Composite Based on Betelnut Fiber Mats Under Wet Contact Conditions

    Yousif, B. F.; Devadas, Alvin; Yusaf, Talal F.

    In the current study, a multilayered polyester composite based on betelnut fiber mats is fabricated. The adhesive wear and frictional performance of the composite was studied against a smooth stainless steel at different sliding distances (0-6.72 km) and applied loads (20-200 N) at 2.8 m/s sliding velocity. Variations in specific wear rate and friction coefficient were evaluated at two different orientations of fiber mat; namely parallel (P-O) and normal (N-O). Results obtained were presented against sliding distance. The worn surfaces of the composite were studied using an optical microscope. The effect of the composite sliding on the stainless steel counterface roughness was investigated. The results revealed that the wear performance of betelnut fiber reinforced polyester (BFRP) composite under wet contact condition was highly dependent on test parameters and fiber mat orientation. The specific wear rate performance for each orientation showed an inverse relationship to sliding distance. BFRP composite in N-O exhibited better wear performance compared with P-O. However, the friction coefficient in N-O was higher than that in P-O at lower range of applied load. The predominant wear mechanism was debonding of fiber with no pullout or ploughing. Moreover, at higher applied loads, micro- and macrocracking and fracture were observed in the resinous region.

  19. Waves in stratified geomaterials with sliding layers

    Pasternak, Elena; Dyskin, Arcady

    2016-04-01

    Wave propagation in stratified geomaterials with sliding layers is strongly anisotropic. The simplest representation of this behaviour is an elastic transverse-isotropic (orthotropic in 2D) continuum. Such a model is however only applicable when loading that is sufficiently uniform or when the wavelength is much larger than the layer thickness. In this case the stress non-uniformity over the layer thickness and the associated layer bending can be neglected. In an intermediate case when the wavelength is still higher than the layer thickness but not as high to neglect the stress non-uniformity at least bending moments and layer bending need to be taken into account. This is equivalent to retaining only the linear term of the normal stress variation over the layer thickness. The layer bending creates additional, rotational degrees of freedom. In 2D only one rotational degree of freedom exists, which considerably simplifies the modelling. The corresponding rotation is represented by the average gradient of layer deflection. The presence of rotations makes the stress tensor non-symmetrical. On top of that the rotation gradient creates moment stresses, which represent bending moments over the unit area in the layer cross-section. This requires the use of a 2D orthotropic Cosserat continuum to model the dynamics of such a stratified geomaterial. We show that in the stratified geomaterial shear-bending waves propagate. We determine the wave velocities and demonstrate that as the resistance to sliding reduces, the waves tend to localise over a line normal to the layering.

  20. Computational Chemistry of Adhesive Bonds

    Phillips, Donald H.

    1999-01-01

    This investigation is intended to determine the electrical mechanical, and chemical properties of adhesive bonds at the molecular level. The initial determinations will be followed by investigations of the effects of environmental effects on the chemistry and properties of the bond layer.

  1. Adhesion of biocompatible and biodegradable micropatterned surfaces

    Kaiser, J.S.; Kamperman, M.M.G.; Souza, E.J.; Schick, B.; Arzt, E.

    2011-01-01

    We studied the effects of pillar dimensions and stiffness of biocompatible and biodegradable micropatterned surfaces on adhesion on different compliant substrates. The micropatterned adhesives were based on biocompatible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PL

  2. In vitro inhibition of adhesion of Escherichia coli strains by Xylitol

    Annelisa Farah da Silva

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to evaluate xylitol's antimicrobial and anti-adherence activities on Escherichia coli (ATCC 8739 and on another clinical strain enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC. In vitro minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC test and adhesion assays were performed using 0.5, 2.5 and 5.0% xylitol. It was found that xylitol did not have antimicrobial properties on these strains. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM demonstrated that the slides treated with xylitol had a significant reduction in the number of bacilli and the inhibition of microbial adhesion was probably the xylitol's mechanism of action. Xylitol could be a possible alternative on the control of E. coli infections.

  3. Film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells

    A R M Yusoff; M N Syahrul; K Henkel

    2007-08-01

    A major issue encountered during fabrication of triple junction -Si solar cells on polyimide substrates is the adhesion of the solar cell thin films to the substrates. Here, we present our study of film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells made on different polyimide substrates (Kapton VN, Upilex-S and Gouldflex), and the effect of tie coats on film adhesion.

  4. Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces polyurethane adhesive

    Roseland, L. M.

    1967-01-01

    Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces the adhesive properties of a polyurethane adhesive that fastens hardware to exterior surfaces of aluminum tanks. The mat is embedded in the uncured adhesive. It ensures good control of the bond line and increases the peel strength.

  5. Introducing Slide Sets for the Introductory Astronomy Instructor

    Meinke, Bonnie K.; Schneider, Nicholas; Brain, David; Schultz, Gregory; Buxner, Sanlyn; Smith, Denise

    2014-11-01

    The NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Science Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) community and Forums work together to bring the cutting-edge discoveries of NASA Astrophysics and Planetary Science missions to the introductory astronomy college classroom. These mission- and grant-based E/PO programs are uniquely poised to foster collaboration between scientists with content expertise and educators with pedagogy expertise. We present two new opportunities for college instructors to bring the latest NASA discoveries in Space Science into their classrooms.In an effort to keep the astronomy classroom apprised of the fast moving field of planetary science, the Division of Planetary Sciences (DPS) has developed “DPS Discoveries”, which are short, topical presentations that can be incorporated into college lectures. The slide sets are targeted at the Introductory Astronomy undergraduate level. Each slide set consists of three slides that cover a description of the discovery, a discussion of the underlying science, and a presentation of the big picture implications of the discovery, with a fourth slide that includes links to associated press releases, images, and primary sources. Topics span all subdisciplines of planetary science, and sets are available in Farsi and Spanish. The NASA SMD Planetary Science Forum has recently partnered with the DPS to continue producing the Discovery slides and connect them to NASA mission science. http://dps.aas.org/education/dpsdisc Similarly, the NASA SMD Astrophysics Forum is coordinating the development of a series of slide sets to help Astronomy 101 instructors incorporate new discoveries in their classrooms. The “Astro 101 slide sets” are presentations 5-7 slides in length on a new development or discovery from a NASA Astrophysics mission relevant to topics in introductory astronomy courses. We intend for these slide sets to help Astronomy 101 instructors include new developments (not yet in their textbooks) into the

  6. SurfaceSlide: a multitouch digital pathology platform.

    Yinhai Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Digital pathology provides a digital environment for the management and interpretation of pathological images and associated data. It is becoming increasing popular to use modern computer based tools and applications in pathological education, tissue based research and clinical diagnosis. Uptake of this new technology is stymied by its single user orientation and its prerequisite and cumbersome combination of mouse and keyboard for navigation and annotation. METHODOLOGY: In this study we developed SurfaceSlide, a dedicated viewing platform which enables the navigation and annotation of gigapixel digitised pathological images using fingertip touch. SurfaceSlide was developed using the Microsoft Surface, a 30 inch multitouch tabletop computing platform. SurfaceSlide users can perform direct panning and zooming operations on digitised slide images. These images are downloaded onto the Microsoft Surface platform from a remote server on-demand. Users can also draw annotations and key in texts using an on-screen virtual keyboard. We also developed a smart caching protocol which caches the surrounding regions of a field of view in multi-resolutions thus providing a smooth and vivid user experience and reducing the delay for image downloading from the internet. We compared the usability of SurfaceSlide against Aperio ImageScope and PathXL online viewer. CONCLUSION: SurfaceSlide is intuitive, fast and easy to use. SurfaceSlide represents the most direct, effective and intimate human-digital slide interaction experience. It is expected that SurfaceSlide will significantly enhance digital pathology tools and applications in education and clinical practice.

  7. Coarse Graining and Localized Plasticity between Sliding Nanocrystalline Metals

    Romero, Pedro A.; Järvi, Tommi T.; Beckmann, Nils; Mrovec, Matous; Moseler, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Tribological shearing of polycrystalline metals typically leads to grain refinement at the sliding interface. This study, however, shows that nanocrystalline metals exhibit qualitatively different behavior. Using large-scale atomistic simulations, we demonstrate that during sliding, contact interface nanocrystalline grains self-organize through extensive grain coarsening and lattice rotation until the optimal plastic slip orientation is established. Subsequently, plastic deformation is frequently confined to localized nanoshear bands aligned with the shearing direction and emanating from voids and other defects in the vicinity of the sliding interface.

  8. Robust sliding mode control applied to double Inverted pendulum system

    A three hierarchical sliding mode control is presented for a class of an underactuated system which can overcome the mismatched perturbations. The considered underactuated system is a double inverted pendulum (DIP), can be modeled by three subsystems. Such structure allows the construction of several designs of hierarchies for the controller. For all hierarchical designs, the asymptotic stability of every layer sliding mode surface and the sliding mode surface of subsystems are proved theoretically by Barbalat's lemma. Simulation results show the validity of these methods.

  9. Sliding mode control of switching power converters techniques and implementation

    Tan, Siew-Chong; Tse, Chi-Kong

    2011-01-01

    Sliding Mode Control of Switching Power Converters: Techniques and Implementation is perhaps the first in-depth account of how sliding mode controllers can be practically engineered to optimize control of power converters. A complete understanding of this process is timely and necessary, as the electronics industry moves toward the use of renewable energy sources and widely varying loads that can be adequately supported only by power converters using nonlinear controllers.Of the various advanced control methods used to handle the complex requirements of power conversion systems, sliding mode c

  10. Mechanical strength of adhesive-bonding

    In order to meet the prospective application of a GFRP dewar for energy storage system using a large superconducting magnet, the dewar with a complex structure together with a large size are desired to be made. It is difficult to manufacture such a type of the dewars in one united body. These dewars can be manufactured by the adhesive-bonding method. In the present study, the mechanical strength of adhesive-bonding is studied from this point of view. The mechanical strength of the adhesive-bonding has been investigated by the static tensile method and the impact loading method using small test samples. From the static tensile tests, the following results have been obtained. For the sample adhesive-bonded with insertion structure, the mechanical strength of the adhesive-bonding is found to depend on the adhesives used and on the difference of the thermal contraction between the materials which are adhesive-bonded each other. Using a soft adhesive as Araldite 106, the mechanical strength of the adhesive-bonding is small at room temperature, but it remarkably increases at cryogenic temperatures. For a hard adhesive as Araldite 103 and Stycast 2850 FT, it is large at room temperature, and it further increases at cryogenic temperatures. The dewar has to be strong enough not only at cryogenic temperatures but also at room temperature. A soft adhesive is not suitable for constructing the dewar. For the sample adhesive-bonded with screwing structure, the mechanical strength of the adhesive-bonding depends on the shear strength of GFRP itself. The mechanical strength of the adhesive-bonded part increases with the decreasing temperature. Therefore, this screwing method is advantageous for the construction of the dewar. According to the impact loading tests, it is found that the adhesive-bonding of screwing structure is not brittle at cryogenic temperature. This is due to inherent property of GFRP. (J.P.N.)

  11. Sacrificial adhesive bonding: a powerful method for fabrication of glass microchips

    Lima, Renato S.; Leão, Paulo A. G. C.; Piazzetta, Maria H. O.; Monteiro, Alessandra M.; Shiroma, Leandro Y.; Gobbi, Angelo L.; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2015-08-01

    A new protocol for fabrication of glass microchips is addressed in this research paper. Initially, the method involves the use of an uncured SU-8 intermediate to seal two glass slides irreversibly as in conventional adhesive bonding-based approaches. Subsequently, an additional step removes the adhesive layer from the channels. This step relies on a selective development to remove the SU-8 only inside the microchannel, generating glass-like surface properties as demonstrated by specific tests. Named sacrificial adhesive layer (SAB), the protocol meets the requirements of an ideal microfabrication technique such as throughput, relatively low cost, feasibility for ultra large-scale integration (ULSI), and high adhesion strength, supporting pressures on the order of 5 MPa. Furthermore, SAB eliminates the use of high temperature, pressure, or potential, enabling the deposition of thin films for electrical or electrochemical experiments. Finally, the SAB protocol is an improvement on SU-8-based bondings described in the literature. Aspects such as substrate/resist adherence, formation of bubbles, and thermal stress were effectively solved by using simple and inexpensive alternatives.

  12. Edit Distance to Monotonicity in Sliding Windows

    Chan, Ho-Leung; Lam, Tak-Wah; Lee, Lap Kei;

    2011-01-01

    algorithm which can return an estimate within a factor of (4 + ε) using O(21log2(w)) space. We also extend the study in two directions. First, we consider a stream where each item is associated with a value from a partial ordered set. We give a randomized (4 + ε)-approximate algorithm using O(21log2wlogw......Given a stream of items each associated with a numerical value, its edit distance to monotonicity is the minimum number of items to remove so that the remaining items are non-decreasing with respect to the numerical value. The space complexity of estimating the edit distance to monotonicity...... of a data stream is becoming well-understood over the past few years. Motivated by applications on network quality monitoring, we extend the study to estimating the edit distance to monotonicity of a sliding window covering the w most recent items in the stream for any w ≥ 1. We give a deterministic...

  13. Sliding Vacua in Dense Skyrmion Matter

    Lee, H J; Rho, M; Vento, V; Lee, Hee-Jung; Park, Byung-Yoon; Rho, Mannque; Vento, Vicente

    2003-01-01

    In continuation of our systematic effort to understand hadronic matter at high density, we study dense skyrmion matter and its chiral phase structure in an effective field theory implemented with the trace anomaly of QCD applicable in the large $N_c$ limit. By incorporating a dilaton field $\\chi$ associated with broken conformal symmetry of QCD into the simplest form of skyrmion Lagrangian, we simulate the effect of "sliding vacua" influenced by the presence of matter and obtain what could correspond to the ``intrinsic dependence" on the background of the system, i.e., matter density or temperature, that results when a generic chiral effective field theory of strong interactions is matched to QCD at a matching scale near the chiral scale $\\Lambda_\\chi \\sim 4\\pi f_\\pi\\sim 1$ GeV. The properties of the Goldstone pions and the dilaton scalar near the chiral phase transition are studied by looking at the pertinent excitations of given quantum numbers on top of a skyrmion matter and their behavior in the vicinity ...

  14. Loading dynamics of a sliding DNA clamp.

    Cho, Won-Ki

    2014-05-22

    Sliding DNA clamps are loaded at a ss/dsDNA junction by a clamp loader that depends on ATP binding for clamp opening. Sequential ATP hydrolysis results in closure of the clamp so that it completely encircles and diffuses on dsDNA. We followed events during loading of an E. coli β clamp in real time by using single-molecule FRET (smFRET). Three successive FRET states were retained for 0.3 s, 0.7 s, and 9 min: Hydrolysis of the first ATP molecule by the γ clamp loader resulted in closure of the clamp in 0.3 s, and after 0.7 s in the closed conformation, the clamp was released to diffuse on the dsDNA for at least 9 min. An additional single-molecule polarization study revealed that the interfacial domain of the clamp rotated in plane by approximately 8° during clamp closure. The single-molecule polarization and FRET studies thus revealed the real-time dynamics of the ATP-hydrolysis-dependent 3D conformational change of the β clamp during loading at a ss/dsDNA junction.

  15. Low radiation doses - Book of presentations (slides)

    This document brings together all the available presentations (slides) of the conference on low radiation doses organised by the 'research and health' department of the French society of radiation protection (SFRP). Ten presentations are available and deal with he following topics: 1 - Cyto-toxicity, geno-toxicity: comparative approach between ionizing radiations and other geno-toxic agents (F. Nesslany, Institut Pasteur, Lille); Succession of events occurring after a radio-induced DNA damage (D. Averbeck, IRSN/CEA); Importance of stem cells in the response to ionizing radiations (J. Lebeau, CEA); Relation between energy deposition at the sub-cell scale and early biological effects (C. Villagrasa, IRSN); Natural history of breast cancer: predisposition, susceptibility with respect to irradiation (S. Rivera, IGR); Pediatrics scanner study and the EPI-CT project (M.O Bernier, IRSN); What future for an irradiated cell: survival or apoptosis? (E. Sage, Institut Curie); Differential effect of a 137Cs chronic contamination on the different steps of the atheromatous pathology (T. Ebrahimian, IRSN); Variability of the individual radiosensitivity (S. Chevillard, CEA); What definitions for individual sensitivity? (A. Schmidt, CEA); Low doses: some philosophical remarks (A. Grinbaum, CEA)

  16. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    Pesika, Noshir S.; Zeng, Hongbo; Kristiansen, Kai; Zhao, Boxin; Tian, Yu; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2009-11-01

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  17. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  18. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    Pesika, Noshir S [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Zeng Hongbo [Chemical and Materials Engineering Department, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2V4 (Canada); Kristiansen, Kai; Israelachvili, Jacob [Chemical Engineering Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Zhao, Boxin [Chemical Engineering Department and Waterloo Institute of Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Tian Yu [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Department of Precision Instruments, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Autumn, Kellar, E-mail: npesika@tulane.ed [Department of Biology, Lewis and Clark College, Portland, OR 97219 (United States)

    2009-11-18

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  19. Adhesive mechanisms in cephalopods: a review.

    von Byern, Janek; Klepal, Waltraud

    2006-01-01

    Several genera of cephalopods (Nautilus, Sepia, Euprymna and Idiosepius) produce adhesive secretions, which are used for attachment to the substratum, for mating and to capture prey. These adhesive structures are located in different parts of the body, viz. in the digital tentacles (Nautilus), in the ventral surface of the mantle and fourth arm pair (Sepia), in the dorsal epidermis (Euprymna), or in the dorsal mantle side and partly on the fins (Idiosepius). Adhesion in Sepia is induced by suction of dermal structures on the mantle, while for Nautilus, Euprymna and Idiosepius adhesion is probably achieved by chemical substances. Histochemical studies indicate that in Nautilus and Idiosepius secretory cells that appear to be involved in adhesion stain for carbohydrates and protein, whilst in Euprymna only carbohydrates are detectable. De-adhesion is either achieved by muscle contraction of the tentacles and mantle (Nautilus and Sepia) or by secretion of substances (Euprymna). The de-adhesive mechanism used by Idiosepius remains unknown. PMID:17110356

  20. Bacterial adhesion and biofilms on surfaces

    Trevor Roger Garrett; Manmohan Bhakoo; Zhibing Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion has become a significant problem in industry and in the domicile,and much research has been done for deeper understanding of the processes involved.A generic biological model of bacterial adhesion and population growth called the bacterial biofilm growth cycle,has been described and modified many times.The biofilm growth cycle encompasses bacterial adhesion at all levels,starting with the initial physical attraction of bacteria to a substrate,and ending with the eventual liberation of cell dusters from the biofilm matrix.When describing bacterial adhesion one is simply describing one or more stages of biofilm development,neglecting the fact that the population may not reach maturity.This article provides an overview of bacterial adhesion.cites examples of how bac-terial adhesion affects industry and summarises methods and instrumentation used to improve our understanding of the adhesive prop-erties of bacteria.

  1. Host Selection of Microbiota via Differential Adhesion.

    McLoughlin, Kirstie; Schluter, Jonas; Rakoff-Nahoum, Seth; Smith, Adrian L; Foster, Kevin R

    2016-04-13

    The host epithelium is the critical interface with microbial communities, but the mechanisms by which the host regulates these communities are poorly understood. Here we develop the hypothesis that hosts use differential adhesion to select for and against particular members of their microbiota. We use an established computational, individual-based model to study the impact of host factors that regulate adhesion at the epithelial surface. Our simulations predict that host-mediated adhesion can increase the competitive advantage of microbes and create ecological refugia for slow-growing species. We show how positive selection via adhesion can be transformed into negative selection if the host secretes large quantities of a matrix such as mucus. Our work predicts that adhesion is a powerful mechanism for both positive and negative selection within the microbiota. We discuss molecules-mucus glycans and IgA-that affect microbe adhesion and identify testable predictions of the adhesion-as-selection model. PMID:27053168

  2. Electrochemical Corrosion of Adhesive Joints

    Vondrák, Jiří

    Vol. 2. Brno: Akademické nakladatelství CERM, 2000 - (Vondrák, J.; Sedlaříková, M.), s. 10.1-10.2 ISBN 80-214-1615-7. [Advanced Batteries and Accumulators /1./. Brno (CZ), 28.08.2000-01.09.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : adhesive * joints * corrosion Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  3. Underwater adhesion: The barnacle way

    Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.

    surrounded by calcium carbonate (calcite). It has been suggested that the anionic groups on the matric proteins may serve as sites for nucleation during calcification [47]. The disruption in such interactions can thus bring about hindrance during... of bones, nerves and blood vessels in an aqueous environment and dental filling without the need for drilling [83]. It has been suggested that with the advances in biomimetics, future dentin adhesive monomers may contain domains derived from...

  4. Sliding mode control on electro-mechanical systems

    Utkin Vadim I.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The first sliding mode control application may be found in the papers back in the 1930s in Russia. With its versatile yet simple design procedure the methodology is proven to be one of the most powerful solutions for many practical control designs. For the sake of demonstration this paper is oriented towards application aspects of sliding mode control methodology. First the design approach based on the regularization is generalized for mechanical systems. It is shown that stability of zero dynamics should be taken into account when the regular form consists of blocks of second-order equations. Majority of applications in the paper are related to control and estimation methods of automotive industry. New theoretical methods are developed in the context of these studies: sliding made nonlinear observers, observers with binary measurements, parameter estimation in systems with sliding mode control.

  5. No further risk of underwater slides?; Skredfaren over?

    Haarvik, Linda; Kvalstad, Tore

    2002-07-01

    The Ormen Lange oil field of the Norwegian Sea is situated in the middle of the enormous Storegga submarine slide that occurred about 8000 years ago. The danger is probably over, but it is unclear what caused the slide. The Norwegian Geotechnical Institute has begun a comprehensive research project in order to increase the knowledge of how oil- and gas exploitation at great depths can be safeguarded against geological hazards like slides, earthquakes, flood waves and clay volcanos. This is motivated by the fact that oil exploration has moved to greater depths, where the conditions for development are very different from those at shallower depths. Future developers will have to consider the discovery of traces of old slides along the Norwegian continental shelf all the way to Spitsbergen.

  6. Thermal imaging on simulated faults during frictional sliding

    Mair, Karen; Gundersen, Olav

    2008-01-01

    Heating during frictional sliding is a major component of the energy budget of earthquakes and represents a potential weakening mechanism. It is therefore important to investigate how heat dissipates during sliding on simulated faults. We present results from laboratory friction experiments where a halite (NaCl) slider held under constant load is dragged across a coarse substrate. Surface evolution and frictional resistance are recorded. Heat emission at the sliding surface is monitored using an infra-red camera. We demonstrate a link between plastic deformations of halite and enhanced heating characterized by transient localized heat spots. When sand 'gouge' is added to the interface, heating is more diffuse. Importantly, when strong asperities concentrate deformation, significantly more heat is produced locally. In natural faults such regions could be nucleation patches for melt production and hence potentially initiate weakening during earthquakes at much smaller sliding velocities or shear stress than pre...

  7. Fuzzy Backstepping Sliding Mode Control for Mismatched Uncertain System

    H. Q. Hou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Sliding mode controllers have succeeded in many control problems that the conventional control theories have difficulties to deal with; however it is practically impossible to achieve high-speed switching control. Therefore, in this paper an adaptive fuzzy backstepping sliding mode control scheme is derived for mismatched uncertain systems. Firstly fuzzy sliding mode controller is designed using backstepping method based on the Lyapunov function approach, which is capable of handling mismatched problem. Then fuzzy sliding mode controller is designed using T-S fuzzy model method, it can improve the performance of the control systems and their robustness. Finally this method of control is applied to nonlinear system as a case study; simulation results are also provided the performance of the proposed controller.

  8. Culinary Medicine-Jalebi Adhesions.

    Kapoor, Vinay K

    2016-02-01

    Culinary terms have been used to describe anatomy (bean-shaped kidneys), pathology (strawberry gall bladder), clinical signs (café-au-lait spots), radiological images (sausage-shaped pancreas), etc. While Indian cuisine is popular all over the world, no Indian dish finds mention in medical terminology. In intra-abdominal adhesions, sometimes, the intestinal loops are so densely adherent that it is difficult to make out proximal from distal and it is impossible to separate them without injuring the bowel resulting in spill of contents-resection is the only option (Fig. 1). Jalebi, an Indian dessert, has a single long tubular strip of fried batter filled with sugary syrup so intertwined that it is impossible to discern its ends; if broken, the syrup spills out-the best way to relish it is to chew the whole piece (Fig. 2). Because of these similarities between them, I propose to name dense intra-abdominal adhesions as 'jalebi adhesions.' PMID:27186047

  9. [Adhesion to the antiretroviral treatment].

    Carballo, M

    2004-12-01

    The objective of the therapy antiretroviral is to improve the quality of life and the survival of the persons affected by the VIH through the suppression of the viral replication. Nevertheless one of the present problems is the resistant apparition of stumps to the new medicines caused by an incorrect management of the therapeutic plan; by an incorrect adhesion of the personal processing. Since the therapeutic success will depend, among others factors, and of important form of the degree of implication and commitment of the person affected, is a matter of identifying prematurely the possible situations concomitants (personal factors and of addiction, psycho-social, related to the processing and its possible secondary effects, associated factors to the own illness or even to the relation professional-patient) that can interfere in a correct adhesion. For it is necessary of the interaction multidisciplinary of the welfare team, and fundamental the work of nursing at the moment of to detect the possible determinant factors and the intervention definition of strategies arrived at by consensus with the own person, that they promote it or it improve. The quantification of the degree of adhesion (measure in %) values through various direct and indirect methods and should keep in mind in it takes of therapeutic decisions being able to come to be advised the suspension of the processing until obtaining to conscience to the person affected of the importance of a correct therapeutic compliance. PMID:15672996

  10. A novel higher order sliding mode control scheme

    Defoort, Michael; Floquet, Thierry; Kökösy, Annemarie; Perruquetti, Wilfrid

    2009-01-01

    A higher order sliding mode control algorithm is proposed for a class of uncertain multi-input multi-output nonlinear systems. This problem can be viewed as the finite time stabilization of a higher order input-output dynamic system with bounded uncertainties. The developed control scheme is based on geometric homogeneity and sliding mode control. The proposed procedure provides explicit conditions on the controller parameters and guarantees robustness against uncertainties. An illustrative e...

  11. Adaptive sliding mode control for a class of chaotic systems

    Farid, R.; Ibrahim, A.; Zalam, B., E-mail: ramy5475@yahoo.com [Menofia University, Faculty of Electronic Engineering, Department of Industrial Electronics and Control, Menuf, Menofia (Egypt)

    2015-03-30

    Chaos control here means to design a controller that is able to mitigating or eliminating the chaos behavior of nonlinear systems that experiencing such phenomenon. In this paper, an Adaptive Sliding Mode Controller (ASMC) is presented based on Lyapunov stability theory. The well known Chua's circuit is chosen to be our case study in this paper. The study shows the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive sliding mode controller.

  12. Applications and challenges of digital pathology and whole slide imaging.

    Higgins, C

    2015-07-01

    Virtual microscopy is a method for digitizing images of tissue on glass slides and using a computer to view, navigate, change magnification, focus and mark areas of interest. Virtual microscope systems (also called digital pathology or whole slide imaging systems) offer several advantages for biological scientists who use slides as part of their general, pharmaceutical, biotechnology or clinical research. The systems usually are based on one of two methodologies: area scanning or line scanning. Virtual microscope systems enable automatic sample detection, virtual-Z acquisition and creation of focal maps. Virtual slides are layered with multiple resolutions at each location, including the highest resolution needed to allow more detailed review of specific regions of interest. Scans may be acquired at 2, 10, 20, 40, 60 and 100 × or a combination of magnifications to highlight important detail. Digital microscopy starts when a slide collection is put into an automated or manual scanning system. The original slides are archived, then a server allows users to review multilayer digital images of the captured slides either by a closed network or by the internet. One challenge for adopting the technology is the lack of a universally accepted file format for virtual slides. Additional challenges include maintaining focus in an uneven sample, detecting specimens accurately, maximizing color fidelity with optimal brightness and contrast, optimizing resolution and keeping the images artifact-free. There are several manufacturers in the field and each has not only its own approach to these issues, but also its own image analysis software, which provides many options for users to enhance the speed, quality and accuracy of their process through virtual microscopy. Virtual microscope systems are widely used and are trusted to provide high quality solutions for teleconsultation, education, quality control, archiving, veterinary medicine, research and other fields. PMID:25978139

  13. Passage retrieval for question answering using sliding windows

    Khalid, M.A.; Verberne, S.

    2008-01-01

    The information retrieval (IR) community has investigated many different techniques to retrieve passages from large collections of documents for question answering (QA). In this paper, we specifically examine and quantitatively compare the impact of passage retrieval for QA using sliding windows and disjoint windows. We consider two different data sets, the TREC 2002-2003 QA data set, and 93 whyquestions against INEX Wikipedia. We discovered that, compared to disjoint windows, using sliding w...

  14. Sliding mode observers and observability singularity in chaotic synchronization

    L. Boutat-Baddas; J. P. Barbot; Boutat, D.; R. Tauleigne

    2004-01-01

    We present a new secured data transmission based on a chaotic synchronization and observability singularity. For this, we adopt an approach based on an inclusion of the message in the system structure and we use a sliding mode observer for system with unknown input in order to recover the information. We end the paper with an example of chaotic system with an observability bifurcation. Moreover, this example highlights some benefits of the so-called step-by-step sliding mode observer.

  15. Adaptive sliding mode control for a class of chaotic systems

    Chaos control here means to design a controller that is able to mitigating or eliminating the chaos behavior of nonlinear systems that experiencing such phenomenon. In this paper, an Adaptive Sliding Mode Controller (ASMC) is presented based on Lyapunov stability theory. The well known Chua's circuit is chosen to be our case study in this paper. The study shows the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive sliding mode controller

  16. Soliton dynamics in a solid lubricant during sliding friction

    Vigentini, Anna; Van Hattem, Barbara; Diato, Elena; Ponzellini, Paolo; Meledina, Tommaso; Vanossi, Andrea; Santoro, Giuseppe; Tosatti, Erio; Manini, Nicola

    2014-03-01

    Recent highly idealized model studies of lubricated nanofriction for two crystalline sliding surfaces with an interposed thin solid crystalline lubricant layer showed that the overall relative velocity of the lubricant vlub/vslider depends only on the ratio of the lattice spacings, and retains a strictly constant value even when system parameters are varied within a wide range. This peculiar "quantized" dynamical locking was understood as due to the sliding-induced motion of misfit dislocations, or soliton structures. So far the practical relevance of this concept to realistic sliding three-dimensional crystals has not been demonstrated. In this work, by means of classical molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical considerations, we realize a realistic three-dimensional crystal-lubricant-crystal geometry. Results show that the flux of lubricant particles associated with the advancing soliton lines gives rise here too to a quantized-velocity ratio. Moreover, depending on the interface lattice spacing mismatch, both forward and backward quantized motion of the lubricant is predicted. The persistence under realistic conditions of the dynamically pinned state and quantized sliding is further investigated by varying sliding speed, temperature, load, and lubricant film thickness. The possibilities of experimental observation of quantized sliding are also discussed.

  17. Wet Adhesion and Adhesive Locomotion of Snails on Anti-Adhesive Non-Wetting Surfaces

    Shirtcliffe, Neil; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted), texture (smooth, rough or granular) or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and th...

  18. A Neuro-fuzzy-sliding Mode Controller Using Nonlinear Sliding Surface Applied to the Coupled Tanks System

    Ahcene Boubakir; Fares Boudjema; Salim Labiod

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop a neuro-fuzzy-sliding mode controller (NFSMC) with a nonlinear sliding surface for a coupled tank system.The main purpose is to eliminate the chattering phenomenon and to overcome the problem of the equivalent control computation.A first-order nonlinear sliding surface is presented,on which the developed sliding mode controller (SMC) is based.Mathematical proof for the stability and convergence of the system is presented.In order to reduce the chattering in SMC,a fixed boundary layer around the switch surface is used.Within the boundary layer,where the fuzzy logic control is applied,the chattering phenomenon,which is inherent in a sliding mode control,is avoided by smoothing the switch signal.Outside the boundary,the sliding mode control is applied to drive the system states into the boundary layer.Moreover,to compute the equivalent controller,a feed-forward neural network (NN) is used.The weights of the net are updated such that the corrective control term of the NFSMC goes to zero.Then,this NN also alleviates the chattering phenomenon because a big gain in the corrective control term produces a more serious chattering than a small gain.Experimental studies carried out on a coupled tank system indicate that the proposed approach is good for control applications.

  19. Modification of fluorous substrates with oligo(ethylene glycol) via "click" chemistry for long-term resistance of cell adhesion.

    Contreras-Caceres, Rafael; Santos, Catherine M; Li, Siheng; Kumar, Amit; Zhu, Zhiling; Kolar, Satya S; Casado-Rodriguez, Miguel A; Huang, Yongkai; McDermott, Alison; Lopez-Romero, Juan Manuel; Cai, Chengzhi

    2015-11-15

    In this work perfluorinated substrates fabricated from SiO2 glass slides are modified with oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) units for long-term resistance of cell adhesion purposes, based on fluorous interactions and click chemistry. Specifically, fluorous substrates, prepared by treatment of glass slides with 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorodecyltrimethoxysilane (FAS17), were coated with ethynyl-OEG-C8F17, followed by covalent attachment of an azido-OEG via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) "click" reaction. We demonstrate that the resultant surface avoid fibrinogen adsorption and resisted cell adhesion for over 14days. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) analysis and contact angle goniometry measurements confirm the presence of the OEG molecules on the fluorous substrates. Bright field optical images show total absence of 3T3 fibroblast cells on the OEG modified fluorinated substrate for 1 and 5days, and a remarkably decrease of cell adhesion at 14days. PMID:26210101

  20. Experimental Investigation of Optimal Adhesion of Mushroomlike Elastomer Microfibrillar Adhesives.

    Marvi, Hamidreza; Song, Sukho; Sitti, Metin

    2015-09-22

    Optimal fiber designs for the maximal pull-off force have been indispensable for increasing the attachment performance of recently introduced gecko-inspired reversible micro/nanofibrillar adhesives. There are several theoretical studies on such optimal designs; however, due to the lack of three-dimensional (3D) fabrication techniques that can fabricate such optimal designs in 3D, there have not been many experimental investigations on this challenge. In this study, we benefitted from recent advances in two-photon lithography techniques to fabricate mushroomlike polyurethane elastomer fibers with different aspect ratios of tip to stalk diameter (β) and tip wedge angles (θ) to investigate the effect of these two parameters on the pull-off force. We found similar trends to those predicted theoretically. We found that β has an impact on the slope of the force-displacement curve while both β and θ play a role in the stress distribution and crack propagation. We found that these effects are coupled and the optimal set of parameters also depends on the fiber material. This is the first experimental verification of such optimal designs proposed for mushroomlike microfibers. This experimental approach could be used to evaluate a wide range of complex microstructured adhesive designs suggested in the literature and optimize them. PMID:26322396

  1. Effect of wettability and surface roughness on ice-adhesion strength of hydrophilic, hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces

    Highlights: • Anti-icing property is related to wettability and surface roughness. • Silicone based hydrophobic coating showed excellent ice-adhesion strength. • Superhydrophobic surfaces displayed poor anti-icing property. - Abstract: The anti-icing properties of hydrophilic, hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces/coatings were evaluated using a custom-built apparatus based on zero-degree cone test method. The ice-adhesion reduction factor (ARF) of these coatings has been evaluated using bare aluminium alloy as a reference. The wettability of the surfaces was evaluated by measuring water contact angle (WCA) and sliding angle. It was found that the ice-adhesion strength (τ) on silicone based hydrophobic surfaces was ∼ 43 times lower than compared to bare polished aluminium alloy indicating excellent anti-icing property of these coatings. Superhydrophobic coatings displayed poor anti-icing property in spite of their high water repellence. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope reveal that Silicone based hydrophobic coatings exhibited smooth surface whereas the superhydrophobic coatings had a rough surface consisting of microscale bumps and protrusions superimposed with nanospheres. Both surface roughness and surface energy play a major role on the ice-adhesion strength of the coatings. The 3D surface roughness profiles of the coatings also indicated the same trend of roughness. An attempt is made to correlate the observed ice-adhesion strength of different surfaces with their wettability and surface roughness

  2. Effect of wettability and surface roughness on ice-adhesion strength of hydrophilic, hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces

    Bharathidasan, T. [Surface Engineering Division, CSIR- National Aerospace Laboratories, Bangalore 560017 (India); Kumar, S. Vijay; Bobji, M.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560003 (India); Chakradhar, R.P.S. [Surface Engineering Division, CSIR- National Aerospace Laboratories, Bangalore 560017 (India); Basu, Bharathibai J., E-mail: bharathijbasu@gmail.com [Surface Engineering Division, CSIR- National Aerospace Laboratories, Bangalore 560017 (India)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Anti-icing property is related to wettability and surface roughness. • Silicone based hydrophobic coating showed excellent ice-adhesion strength. • Superhydrophobic surfaces displayed poor anti-icing property. - Abstract: The anti-icing properties of hydrophilic, hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces/coatings were evaluated using a custom-built apparatus based on zero-degree cone test method. The ice-adhesion reduction factor (ARF) of these coatings has been evaluated using bare aluminium alloy as a reference. The wettability of the surfaces was evaluated by measuring water contact angle (WCA) and sliding angle. It was found that the ice-adhesion strength (τ) on silicone based hydrophobic surfaces was ∼ 43 times lower than compared to bare polished aluminium alloy indicating excellent anti-icing property of these coatings. Superhydrophobic coatings displayed poor anti-icing property in spite of their high water repellence. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope reveal that Silicone based hydrophobic coatings exhibited smooth surface whereas the superhydrophobic coatings had a rough surface consisting of microscale bumps and protrusions superimposed with nanospheres. Both surface roughness and surface energy play a major role on the ice-adhesion strength of the coatings. The 3D surface roughness profiles of the coatings also indicated the same trend of roughness. An attempt is made to correlate the observed ice-adhesion strength of different surfaces with their wettability and surface roughness.

  3. Synaptic Cell Adhesion Molecules in Alzheimer's Disease

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative brain disorder associated with the loss of synapses between neurons in the brain. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules are cell surface glycoproteins which are expressed at the synaptic plasma membranes of neurons. These proteins play key roles in formation and maintenance of synapses and regulation of synaptic plasticity. Genetic studies and biochemical analysis of the human brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, and sera from AD patients indicate that levels and function of synaptic cell adhesion molecules are affected in AD. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules interact with Aβ, a peptide accumulating in AD brains, which affects their expression and synaptic localization. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules also regulate the production of Aβ via interaction with the key enzymes involved in Aβ formation. Aβ-dependent changes in synaptic adhesion affect the function and integrity of synapses suggesting that alterations in synaptic adhesion play key roles in the disruption of neuronal networks in AD. PMID:27242933

  4. The Rheological Property of Potato Starch Adhesives

    Junjun Liu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this study was to use potato starch in the production of environmentally sound adhesives. ‘Three-formaldehyde glue’ pollutes the environment and harms to human health strongly, which widely used for wood-based panels preparation. Environment-friendly potato starch adhesives were prepared using method of oxidation-gelatinization, insteading of the three formaldehyde glue. The effects of the quality ratio of starch and water, temperature and shear rate on the apparent viscosity of the adhesive were studied. The rheological eigenvalue of apparent viscosity was studied through nonlinear regression. The results showed that the apparent viscosity of potato starch adhesives decreased with the increasing of temperature; the apparent viscosity decreased slowly with the increasing of rotor speed; the phenomenon of shear thinning appeared within potato starch adhesives which was pseudo-plastic fluids. Potato starch adhesives with characteristics of non-toxic, no smell and pollution could be applied in interior and upscale packaging.

  5. Optimal sliding guidance algorithm for Mars powered descent phase

    Wibben, Daniel R.; Furfaro, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    Landing on large planetary bodies (e.g. Mars) with pinpoint accuracy presents a set of new challenges that must be addressed. One such challenge is the development of new guidance algorithms that exhibit a higher degree of robustness and flexibility. In this paper, the Zero-Effort-Miss/Zero-Effort-Velocity (ZEM/ZEV) optimal sliding guidance (OSG) scheme is applied to the Mars powered descent phase. This guidance algorithm has been specifically designed to combine techniques from both optimal and sliding control theories to generate an acceleration command based purely on the current estimated spacecraft state and desired final target state. Consequently, OSG yields closed-loop trajectories that do not need a reference trajectory. The guidance algorithm has its roots in the generalized ZEM/ZEV feedback guidance and its mathematical equations are naturally derived by defining a non-linear sliding surface as a function of the terms Zero-Effort-Miss and Zero-Effort-Velocity. With the addition of the sliding mode and using Lyapunov theory for non-autonomous systems, one can formally prove that the developed OSG law is globally finite-time stable to unknown but bounded perturbations. Here, the focus is on comparing the generalized ZEM/ZEV feedback guidance with the OSG law to explicitly demonstrate the benefits of the sliding mode augmentation. Results show that the sliding guidance provides a more robust solution in off-nominal scenarios while providing similar fuel consumption when compared to the non-sliding guidance command. Further, a Monte Carlo analysis is performed to examine the performance of the OSG law under perturbed conditions.

  6. Lignin-Furfural Based Adhesives

    Prajakta Dongre; Mark Driscoll; Thomas Amidon; Biljana Bujanovic

    2015-01-01

    Lignin recovered from the hot-water extract of sugar maple (Acer saccharum) is used in this study to synthesize adhesive blends to replace phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resin. Untreated lignin is characterized by lignin content and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. The molecular weight distribution of the lignin and the blends are characterized by size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The effect of pH (0.3, 0.65 and 1), ex situ furfural, and curing conditions on the tensile properties of a...

  7. Lignin-Furfural Based Adhesives

    Prajakta Dongre; Mark Driscoll; Thomas Amidon; Biljana Bujanovic

    2015-01-01

    Lignin recovered from the hot-water extract of sugar maple ( Acer saccharum ) is used in this study to synthesize adhesive blends to replace phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resin. Untreated lignin is characterized by lignin content and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. The molecular weight distribution of the lignin and the blends are characterized by size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The effect of pH (0.3, 0.65 and 1), ex situ furfural, and curing conditions on the tensile properties of...

  8. Syndecan-4 and focal adhesion function

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    2001-01-01

    Two groups have now reported the viability of mice that lack syndecan-4. These mice have wound healing/angiogenesis problems, and fibroblasts from these animals differ in adhesion and migration from normal. This is consistent with recent in vitro data indicating a need for signaling via syndecan-4...... for focal adhesion formation, and reports that overexpression of proteins that bind syndecan-4 can modify cell adhesion and migration....

  9. Tuning the kinetics of cadherin adhesion

    Sivasankar, Sanjeevi

    2013-01-01

    Cadherins are Ca2+ dependent cell-cell adhesion proteins that maintain the structural integrity of the epidermis; their principle function is to resist mechanical force. This review summarizes the biophysical mechanisms by which classical cadherins tune adhesion and withstand mechanical stress. We first relate the structure of classical cadherins to their equilibrium binding properties. We then review the role of mechanical perturbations in tuning the kinetics of cadherin adhesion. In particu...

  10. Factors influencing bacterial adhesion to contact lenses

    Dutta, Debarun; Cole, Nerida; Willcox, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The process of any contact lens related keratitis generally starts with the adhesion of opportunistic pathogens to contact lens surface. This article focuses on identifying the factors which have been reported to affect bacterial adhesion to contact lenses. Adhesion to lenses differs between various genera/species/strains of bacteria. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is the predominant causative organism, adheres in the highest numbers to both hydrogel and silicone hydrogel lenses in vitro. The ...

  11. Improving controllable adhesion on both rough and smooth surfaces with a hybrid electrostatic/gecko-like adhesive

    Ruffatto, Donald; Parness, Aaron; Spenko, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a novel, controllable adhesive that combines the benefits of electrostatic adhesives with gecko-like directional dry adhesives. When working in combination, the two technologies create a positive feedback cycle whose adhesion, depending on the surface type, is often greater than the sum of its parts. The directional dry adhesive brings the electrostatic adhesive closer to the surface, increasing its effect. Similarly, the electrostatic adhesion helps engage more of the di...

  12. Receding dynamics of contact lines and size-dependent adhesion on microstructured hydrophobic surfaces.

    Li, Dandan; Xue, Yahui; Lv, Pengyu; Huang, Shenglin; Lin, Hao; Duan, Huiling

    2016-05-14

    The microstructure size on textured surfaces of a given solid fraction exhibits an important effect on their properties. To understand the size effect on surface adhesion, we study the receding dynamics of the microscopic three-phase contact lines, the adhesive properties, and the relation between them on microstructured surfaces. Two types of surfaces are used, which are micropillar and micropore, respectively. First, the receding process of the contact line is directly observed by laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), which shows distinct characteristics on the two types of surfaces. The micro contact line experiences pinnning, sliding, and rupture on micropillar-patterned surfaces while no rupture occurs on micropore-patterned surfaces. The three-dimensional morphology of the micromeniscus on the micropillared surfaces and the two-dimensional scanning of the cross-sections of the micromeniscus along the diagonal direction are imaged. Based on the images, the local contact angles around the micropillar at the receding front, and the curvatures of the micro-meniscus are obtained. Then, the adhesive force on these surfaces is measured, which surprisingly shows an increasing trend with the size of the microstructure for micropillared surfaces but no obvious size dependence for micropored surfaces. Wetting hysteresis is also measured to testify the similar trend with the size for the two types of surfaces. Further investigation shows that the monotonic increase of the adhesive force with the increasing size of micropillars is due to the growing difficulty of the detachment of the contact lines. The underlying mechanism responsible for the size dependence of the adhesive force is the enhancement of the local reduced pressure exerted on the top of the micropillar with increasing size, resulting from the concave profile of the outer micromeniscus. PMID:27072295

  13. Performance of a malaria microscopy image analysis slide reading device

    Prescott William R

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viewing Plasmodium in Romanovsky-stained blood has long been considered the gold standard for diagnosis and a cornerstone in management of the disease. This method however, requires a subjective evaluation by trained, experienced diagnosticians and establishing proficiency of diagnosis is fraught with many challenges. Reported here is an evaluation of a diagnostic system (a “device” consisting of a microscope, a scanner, and a computer algorithm that evaluates scanned images of standard Giemsa-stained slides and reports species and parasitaemia. Methods The device was challenged with two independent tests: a 55 slide, expert slide reading test the composition of which has been published by the World Health Organization (“WHO55” test, and a second test in which slides were made from a sample of consenting subjects participating in a malaria incidence survey conducted in Equatorial Guinea (EGMIS test. These subjects’ blood was tested by malaria RDT as well as having the blood smear diagnosis unequivocally determined by a worldwide panel of a minimum of six reference microscopists. Only slides with unequivocal microscopic diagnoses were used for the device challenge, n = 119. Results On the WHO55 test, the device scored a “Level 4” using the WHO published grading scheme. Broken down by more traditional analysis parameters this result was translated to 89% and 70% sensitivity and specificity, respectively. Species were correctly identified in 61% of the slides and the quantification of parasites fell within acceptable range of the validated parasitaemia in 10% of the cases. On the EGMIS test it scored 100% and 94% sensitivity/specificity, with 64% of the species correct and 45% of the parasitaemia within an acceptable range. A pooled analysis of the 174 slides used for both tests resulted in an overall 92% sensitivity and 90% specificity with 61% species and 19% quantifications correct. Conclusions In its

  14. Standardization of whole slide image morphologic assessment with definition of a new application: Digital slide dynamic morphometry

    Giacomo Puppa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In histopathology, the quantitative assessment of various morphologic features is based on methods originally conceived on specific areas observed through the microscope used. Failure to reproduce the same reference field of view using a different microscope will change the score assessed. Visualization of a digital slide on a screen through a dedicated viewer allows selection of the magnification. However, the field of view is rectangular, unlike the circular field of optical microscopy. In addition, the size of the selected area is not evident, and must be calculated. Materials and Methods: A digital slide morphometric system was conceived to reproduce the various methods published for assessing tumor budding in colorectal cancer. Eighteen international experts in colorectal cancer were invited to participate in a web-based study by assessing tumor budding with five different methods in 100 digital slides. Results: The specific areas to be tested by each method were marked by colored circles. The areas were grouped in a target-like pattern and then saved as an .xml file. When a digital slide was opened, the .xml file was imported in order to perform the measurements. Since the morphometric tool is composed of layers that can be freely moved on top of the digital slide, the technique was named digital slide dynamic morphometry. Twelve investigators completed the task, the majority of them performing the multiple evaluations of each of the cases in less than 12 minutes. Conclusions: Digital slide dynamic morphometry has various potential applications and might be a useful tool for the assessment of histologic parameters originally conceived for optical microscopy that need to be quantified.

  15. Bioerosion by chemosynthetic biological communities on Holocene submarine slide scars

    Paull, C. K.; Ussler, W.; Greene, H. G.; Barry, J.; Keaten, R.

    2005-02-01

    Geomorphic, stratigraphic, and faunal observations of submarine slide scars that occur along the flanks of Monterey Canyon in 2.0 2.5 km water depths were made to identify the processes that continue to alter the surface of a submarine landslide scar after the initial slope failure. Deep-sea chemosynthetic biological communities and small caves are common on the sediment-free surfaces of the slide scars, especially along the headwall. The chemosynthetic organisms observed on slide scars in Monterey Canyon undergo a faunal succession based in part on their ability to maintain their access to the redox boundaries in the sediment on which they depend on as an energy source. By burrowing into the seafloor, these organisms are able to follow the retreating redox boundaries as geochemical re-equilibration occurs on the sole of the slide. As these organisms dig into the seafloor on the footwall, they often generate small caves and weaken the remaining seafloor. While chemosynthetic biological communities are typically used as indicators of fluid flow, these communities may be supported by methane and hydrogen sulfide that are diffusing out of the fresh seafloor exposed at the sole of the slide by the slope failure event. If so, these chemosynthetic biological communities may simply mark sites of recent seafloor exhumation, and are not reliable fluid seepage indicators.

  16. Rock Slide Risk Assessment: A Semi-Quantitative Approach

    Duzgun, H. S. B.

    2009-04-01

    Rock slides can be better managed by systematic risk assessments. Any risk assessment methodology for rock slides involves identification of rock slide risk components, which are hazard, elements at risk and vulnerability. For a quantitative/semi-quantitative risk assessment for rock slides, a mathematical value the risk has to be computed and evaluated. The quantitative evaluation of risk for rock slides enables comparison of the computed risk with the risk of other natural and/or human-made hazards and providing better decision support and easier communication for the decision makers. A quantitative/semi-quantitative risk assessment procedure involves: Danger Identification, Hazard Assessment, Elements at Risk Identification, Vulnerability Assessment, Risk computation, Risk Evaluation. On the other hand, the steps of this procedure require adaptation of existing or development of new implementation methods depending on the type of landslide, data availability, investigation scale and nature of consequences. In study, a generic semi-quantitative risk assessment (SQRA) procedure for rock slides is proposed. The procedure has five consecutive stages: Data collection and analyses, hazard assessment, analyses of elements at risk and vulnerability and risk assessment. The implementation of the procedure for a single rock slide case is illustrated for a rock slope in Norway. Rock slides from mountain Ramnefjell to lake Loen are considered to be one of the major geohazards in Norway. Lake Loen is located in the inner part of Nordfjord in Western Norway. Ramnefjell Mountain is heavily jointed leading to formation of vertical rock slices with height between 400-450 m and width between 7-10 m. These slices threaten the settlements around Loen Valley and tourists visiting the fjord during summer season, as the released slides have potential of creating tsunami. In the past, several rock slides had been recorded from the Mountain Ramnefjell between 1905 and 1950. Among them

  17. Robust observer-based adaptive fuzzy sliding mode controller

    Oveisi, Atta; Nestorović, Tamara

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a new observer-based adaptive fuzzy integral sliding mode controller is proposed based on the Lyapunov stability theorem. The plant is subjected to a square-integrable disturbance and is assumed to have mismatch uncertainties both in state- and input-matrices. Based on the classical sliding mode controller, the equivalent control effort is obtained to satisfy the sufficient requirement of sliding mode controller and then the control law is modified to guarantee the reachability of the system trajectory to the sliding manifold. In order to relax the norm-bounded constrains on the control law and solve the chattering problem of sliding mode controller, a fuzzy logic inference mechanism is combined with the controller. An adaptive law is then introduced to tune the parameters of the fuzzy system on-line. Finally, for evaluating the controller and the robust performance of the closed-loop system, the proposed regulator is implemented on a real-time mechanical vibrating system.

  18. Sequence-dependent sliding kinetics of p53

    Leith, Jason; Tafvizi, Anahita; Huang, Fang; Uspal, William; Doyle, Patrick; Fersht, Alan; Mirny, Leonid; van Oijen, Antoine

    2012-02-01

    Theoretical work has long proposed that one-dimensional sliding along DNA while simultaneously reading its sequence can accelerate transcription factors' (TFs) search for their target sites. More recently, functional sliding has been shown to require TFs to possess at least two DNA-binding modes. The tumor suppressor p53 has been directly observed to slide on DNA, and structural and single-molecule studies have provided evidence for a two-mode model for the protein. If the model is in fact applicable to p53, then the requirement that TFs read while they slide implies that p53's mobility on DNA should be affected by non-cognate sites and thus that its diffusivity should be generally sequence-dependent. Here we confirm this prediction with single-molecule microscopy measurements of p53's local diffusivity on non-cognate DNA. We show how a two-mode model accurately predicts the variation in local diffusivity while a single-mode model does not. Our work provides evidence that p53's sliding is indeed functional and suggests that the timing and efficiency of its activating and repressing transcription can depend on its non-cognate binding properties and its ability to change between multiple modes of binding, in addition to the much better-studied effects of cognate-site binding.

  19. Mechanistic Origin of the Ultrastrong Adhesion between Graphene and a-SiO2: Beyond van der Waals.

    Kumar, Sandeep; Parks, David; Kamrin, Ken

    2016-07-26

    The origin of the ultrastrong adhesion between graphene and a-SiO2 has remained a mystery. This adhesion is believed to be predominantly van der Waals (vdW) in nature. By rigorously analyzing recently reported blistering and nanoindentation experiments, we show that the ultrastrong adhesion between graphene and a-SiO2 cannot be attributed to vdW forces alone. Our analyses show that the fracture toughness of the graphene/a-SiO2 interface, when the interfacial adhesion is modeled with vdW forces alone, is anomalously weak compared to the measured values. The anomaly is related to an ultrasmall fracture process zone (FPZ): owing to the lack of a third dimension in graphene, the FPZ for the graphene/a-SiO2 interface is extremely small, and the combination of predominantly tensile vdW forces, distributed over such a small area, is bound to result in a correspondingly small interfacial fracture toughness. Through multiscale modeling, combining the results of finite element analysis and molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the adhesion between graphene and a-SiO2 involves two different kinds of interactions: one, a weak, long-range interaction arising from vdW adhesion and, second, discrete, short-range interactions originating from graphene clinging to the undercoordinated Si (≡Si·) and the nonbridging O (≡Si-O·) defects on a-SiO2. A strong resistance to relative opening and sliding provided by the latter mechanism is identified as the operative mechanism responsible for the ultrastrong adhesion between graphene and a-SiO2. PMID:27347793

  20. Design and fabrication of polymer based dry adhesives inspired by the gecko adhesive system

    Jin, Kejia

    There has been significant interest in developing dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which offers several advantages compared to conventional pressure sensitive adhesives. Specifically, gecko adhesive pads have anisotropic adhesion properties: the adhesive pads (spatulae) stick strongly when sheared in one direction but are non-adherent when sheared in the opposite direction. This anisotropy property is attributed to the complex topography of the array of fine tilted and curved columnar structures (setae) that bear the spatulae. In this thesis, easy, scalable methods, relying on conventional and unconventional techniques are presented to incorporate tilt in the fabrication of synthetic polymer-based dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which provide anisotropic adhesion properties. In the first part of the study, the anisotropic adhesion and friction properties of samples with various tilt angles to test the validity of a nanoscale tape-peeling model of spatular function are measured. Consistent with the Peel Zone model, samples with lower tilt angles yielded larger adhesion forces. Contact mechanics of the synthetic array were highly anisotropic, consistent with the frictional adhesion model and gecko-like. Based on the original design, a new design of gecko-like dry adhesives was developed which showed superior tribological properties and furthermore showed anisotropic adhesive properties without the need for tilt in the structures. These adhesives can be used to reversibly suspend weights from vertical surfaces (e.g., walls) and, for the first time to our knowledge, horizontal surfaces (e.g., ceilings) by simultaneously and judiciously activating anisotropic friction and adhesion forces. Furthermore, adhesion properties between artificial gecko-inspired dry adhesives and rough substrates with varying roughness are studied. The results suggest that both adhesion and friction forces on a rough substrate depends significantly on the

  1. Sliding Mode Attitude Control for Magnetic Actuated Satellite

    Wisniewski, Rafal

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic torquing is attractive as a control principle on small satellites. The actuation principle is to use the interaction between the earth's magnetic field and magnetic field generated by a coil set in the satellite. This control principle is inherently nonlinear, and difficult to use because...... control torques can only be generated perpendicular to the local geomagnetic field vector. This has been a serious obstacle for using magnetorquer based control for three-axis attitude control. This paper deals with three-axis stabilization of a low earth orbit satellite. The problem of controlling the...... spacecraft attitude using only magnetic torquing is realized in the form of the sliding mode control. A three dimensional sliding manifold is proposed, and it is shown that the satellite motion on the sliding manifold is asymptotically stable...

  2. Prediction of alpine glacier sliding instabilities: a new hope

    Faillettaz, Jerome; Sornette, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical and sliding instabilities are the two processes which may lead to breaking off events of large ice masses. Mechanical instabilities mainly affect unbalanced cold hanging glaciers. For the latter case, a prediction could be achieved based on data of surface velocities and seismic activity. The case of sliding instabilities is more problematic. This phenomenon occurs on temperate glacier tongues. Such instabilities are strongly affected by the subglacial hydrology: melt water may cause (i) a lubrication of the bed and (ii) a decrease of the effective pressure and consequently a decrease of basal friction. Available data from Allalingletscher (Valais) indicate that the glacier tongue experienced an active phase during 2-3 weeks with enhanced basal motion in late summer in most years. In order to scrutinize in more detail the processes governing the sliding instabilities, a numerical model developed to investigate gravitational instabilities in heterogeneous media was applied to Allalingletscher. This ...

  3. Hydrophobins as aqueous lubricant additive for a soft sliding contact

    Lee, Seunghwan; Røn, Troels; Pakkanen, Kirsi I.;

    2015-01-01

    Two type II fungal hydrophobins, HFBI and FpHYD5, have been studied as aqueous lubricant additive at a nonpolar, compliant sliding contact (self-mated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) contact) at two different concentrations, 0.1 mg/mL and 1.0 mg/mL. The two hydrophobins are featured as non......-PDMS sliding interface was effectively lubricated by the hydrophobin solutions, and showed a reduction in the coefficient of friction by as much as ca. two orders of magnitude. Higher concentration solution (1.0 mg/mL) provided a superior lubrication, particularly in low-speed regime, where boundary...... lubrication characteristic is dominant via ‘self-healing’ mechanism. FpHYD5 revealed a better lubrication than HFBI presumably due to the presence of glycans and improved hydration of the sliding interface. Two type II hydrophobins function more favorably compared to a synthetic amphiphilic copolymer, PEO...

  4. Friction Coefficient of UHMWPE During Dry Reciprocating Sliding

    F. Zivic

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the friction coefficient behaviour during dry reciprocating sliding of UHMWPE in contact with alumina (Al2O3, within a range of velocities typical for hip implants. Five values of normal force (100 - 1000 mN and three values of sliding speed (4 - 12 mm/s have been observed. Real time diagrams of the friction coefficient as a function of the sliding cycles were recorded for each test. Dynamic friction coefficient curves exhibited rather uniform behavior for all test conditions. Somewhat larger values of friction coefficient could be observed during the running-in period in case of low loads (100 - 250 mN and the lowest velocity (4 mm/s. In case of high loads and speeds, friction coefficient reached steady state values shortly after the beginning of the test.

  5. High current density, cryogenically cooled sliding electrical joint development

    In the past two years, conceptual designs for fusion energy research devices have focussed on compact, high magnetic field configurations. The concept of sliding electrical joints in the large magnets allows a number of technical advantages including enhanced mechanical integrity, remote maintainability, and reduced project cost. The rationale for sliding electrical joints is presented. The conceptual configuration for this generation of experimental devices is highlghted by an ∼ 20 T toroidal field magnet with a flat top conductor current of ∼ 300 kA and a sliding electrical joint with a gross current density of ∼ 0.6 kA/cm2. A numerical model was used to map the conductor current distribution as a function of time and position in the conductor. A series of electrical joint arrangements were produced against the system code envelope constraints for a specific version of the Ignition Studies Project (ISP) which is designated as 1025

  6. Design and Evaluation of Android Slide Kyeboard for Myanmar Language

    Nandar Pwint Oo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Because of the large character set nature of Myanmar character, currently used Myanmar language soft keyboard look like QWERTY layout on Android devices’s performance is degraded when using on small screens. The users are needed to switch keyboard layout frequently to get their desired characters. To reduce the user keyboard layout switching time, this paper proposed the slide keyboard to set the entire Myanmar character on one screen layout. User study was made by comparing slide keyboard with currently used Myanmar language soft keyboard that look like QWERTY layout (iTextMM. The user preferences and empirical evaluation is also analyzed. According to the evaluation, the parpicipants can take minimum learning time with slide keyboard and can type at a rate of 17 Character per Minutes (CPM and have got average 0.65 error rates.

  7. Robust antisynchronization of chaos using sliding mode control strategy

    Amit Mondal; Mitul Islam; Nurul Islam

    2015-01-01

    The paper proposes a sliding mode control strategy-based scheme for achieving anti-synchronization between two coupled non-linear chaotic systems. The method works irrespective of whether the systems under consideration possess or lack inverse symmetry. Using a linear sliding surface, a sliding mode control input and a non-linear coupling function are designed that synchronizes the systems antiphase. Finite-time convergence of the method is established. The controller is also robust to all forms of bounded perturbations and this robustness can be easily achieved by tuning of a single controller parameter and introduction of a control vector. The controller is also made chattering-free by producing a continuous analogue of the discontinuous control input. The effectiveness of the method is established by implementing it to antisynchronize chaotic Sprott systems and Rossler systems. The results are also verified through numerical simulation work.

  8. Sliding mode tracking control for miniature unmanned helicopters

    Xian Bin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A sliding mode control design for a miniature unmanned helicopter is presented. The control objective is to let the helicopter track some predefined velocity and yaw trajectories. A new sliding mode control design method is developed based on a linearized dynamic model. In order to facilitate the control design, the helicopter’s dynamic model is divided into two subsystems, such as the longitudinal-lateral and the heading-heave subsystem. The proposed controller employs sliding mode control technique to compensate for the immeasurable flapping angles’ dynamic effects and external disturbances. The global asymptotic stability (GAS of the closed-loop system is proved by the Lyapunov based stability analysis. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the proposed controller can achieve superior tracking performance compared with the proportional-integral-derivative (PID and linear-quadratic regulator (LQR cascaded controller in the presence of wind gust disturbances.

  9. Sliding Friction of Al-Cu-Fe-B Quasicrystals

    Xiying ZHOU; Peiyao LI; Junming LUO; Shiqiang QIAN; Jianhua TONG

    2004-01-01

    Dry sliding friction between the Al59Cu25.5Fe12.5B3 quasicrystals (QCs)/coating of the diamond-like carbon (DLC) was carried out by self-made tribometer under different conditions. The influences of four parameters (temperature, sliding velocity, applied load, atmosphere) on friction and wear of quasicrystal surface were studied. Microstructure of quasicrystal, morphology of worn surface, and wear debris were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).The results showed that for QCs, the friction coefficient and roughness of worn surface were influenced by the parameters, especially greatly by the temperature. With rise of the applied load and sliding velocity, the friction coefficient decreased. The dominant wear mechanism at 350℃ was delamination for QCs. The cracks formed on the worn surface during the friction. Moreover, phase transformation was not observed on worn surface of QCs at 350℃. All the results are discussed and explained.

  10. On Sliding Friction of PEEK Based Composite Coatings

    H. Liao; G. Zhang; C. Mateus; H. Li; C. Coddet

    2004-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) based composite materials become of great interest to applications as bearing and slider materials due to their excellent tribological performance. In present work, graphite and MoS2 (7%, wt) filled PEEK coatings were prepared using serigraph technique. Employing a uniform design experiment, the friction behavior of the composite coatings was systematically investigated under dry sliding conditions on a ball-on-disc arrangement. The evolution mechanism of coating friction coefficient was discussed. Correlation of coatings friction coefficient with sliding velocity and applied load was accomplished usingstepwise regression method. The results indicate that friction coefficients of PEEK + MoS2 and PEEK + graphite coating decrease while increasing applied load. Moreover, friction coefficient of PEEK + MoS2 coating increases with increasing sliding velocity.

  11. Optimal Sliding Mode Controllers for Attitude Stabilization of Flexible Spacecraft

    Chutiphon Pukdeboon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The robust optimal attitude control problem for a flexible spacecraft is considered. Two optimal sliding mode control laws that ensure the exponential convergence of the attitude control system are developed. Integral sliding mode control (ISMC is applied to combine the first-order sliding mode with optimal control and is used to control quaternion-based spacecraft attitude manoeuvres with external disturbances and an uncertainty inertia matrix. For the optimal control part the state-dependent Riccati equation (SDRE and optimal Lyapunov techniques are employed to solve the infinite-time nonlinear optimal control problem. The second method of Lyapunov is used to guarantee the stability of the attitude control system under the action of the proposed control laws. An example of multiaxial attitude manoeuvres is presented and simulation results are included to verify the usefulness of the developed controllers.

  12. A history of slide rules for blackbody radiation computations

    Johnson, R. Barry; Stewart, Sean M.

    2012-10-01

    During the Second World War the importance of utilizing detection devices capable of operating in the infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum was firmly established. Up until that time, laboriously constructed tables for blackbody radiation needed to be used in calculations involving the amount of radiation radiated within a given spectral region or for other related radiometric quantities. To rapidly achieve reasonably accurate calculations of such radiometric quantities, a blackbody radiation calculator was devised in slide rule form first in Germany in 1944 and soon after in England and the United States. In the immediate decades after its introduction, the radiation slide rule was widely adopted and recognized as a useful and important tool for engineers and scientists working in the infrared field. It reached its pinnacle in the United States in 1970 in a rule introduced by Electro Optical Industries, Inc. With the onset in the latter half of the 1970s of affordable, hand-held electronic calculators, the impending demise of the radiation slide rule was evident. No longer the calculational device of choice, the radiation slide rule all but disappeared within a few short years. Although today blackbody radiation calculations can be readily accomplished using anything from a programmable pocket calculator upwards, with each device making use of a wide variety of numerical approximations to the integral of Planck's function, radiation slide rules were in the early decades of infrared technology the definitive "workhorse" for those involved in infrared systems design and engineering. This paper presents a historical development of radiation slide rules with many versions being discussed.

  13. 3D DEM analyses of the 1963 Vajont rock slide

    Boon, Chia Weng; Houlsby, Guy; Utili, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    The 1963 Vajont rock slide has been modelled using the distinct element method (DEM). The open-source DEM code, YADE (Kozicki & Donzé, 2008), was used together with the contact detection algorithm proposed by Boon et al. (2012). The critical sliding friction angle at the slide surface was sought using a strength reduction approach. A shear-softening contact model was used to model the shear resistance of the clayey layer at the slide surface. The results suggest that the critical sliding friction angle can be conservative if stability analyses are calculated based on the peak friction angles. The water table was assumed to be horizontal and the pore pressure at the clay layer was assumed to be hydrostatic. The influence of reservoir filling was marginal, increasing the sliding friction angle by only 1.6˚. The results of the DEM calculations were found to be sensitive to the orientations of the bedding planes and cross-joints. Finally, the failure mechanism was investigated and arching was found to be present at the bend of the chair-shaped slope. References Boon C.W., Houlsby G.T., Utili S. (2012). A new algorithm for contact detection between convex polygonal and polyhedral particles in the discrete element method. Computers and Geotechnics, vol 44, 73-82, doi.org/10.1016/j.compgeo.2012.03.012. Kozicki, J., & Donzé, F. V. (2008). A new open-source software developed for numerical simulations using discrete modeling methods. Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, 197(49-50), 4429-4443.

  14. Transitions in Wear and Friction of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Copper Matrix Composite Sliding Against AISI-1045 Steel

    2007-01-01

    The friction and wear properties of carbon fiber reinforced copper matrix composite in dry sliding against AISI-1045 steel was evaluated by a block-on-ring test machine. It was shown that the low frictional factor and wear rate of the composite block could be maintained when pressure or velocity was below a certain value. But when the pressure or velocity exceeded the critical value, the friction factor and wear rate tended to increase rapidly with pressure and sliding velocity. The morphologies, elemental compositions, and surface profile of worn composite surfaces at different wear stages were analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry, and profile-meter. It was found that low values of friction and wear were due to a thin solid film forming on the surface of the composite block which includes carbon and copper at a mild wear stage. The film could impede adhesion and provide some degree of self-lubrication. When the film included more metal elements and were damaged, severe wear happened, and the wear rate increased sharply. As a result, a transition diagram in friction and wear was constructed, which provided pressure and velocity conditions of change from mild wear and low friction to severe wear and high friction for the wear-resisting design.

  15. Focal adhesions and cell-matrix interactions

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1988-01-01

    Focal adhesions are areas of cell surfaces where specializations of cytoskeletal, membrane and extracellular components combine to produce stable cell-matrix interactions. The morphology of these adhesions and the components identified in them are discussed together with possible mechanisms of...

  16. Synthesis of melamine-glucose resin adhesive

    CHEN; Shuanhu; ZHANG; Lei

    2005-01-01

    The synthesis of a novel melamine-glucose adhesive that is similar to urea-formaldehyde adhesive is reported in this paper. The conditions of synthesis, such as the initial pH, the quantity of catalyst, the temperature of reaction, the percentage of each reactant and the time of reaction, were optimized by using the orthogonal experimental method.

  17. Adhesion force studies of nanofibers and nanoparticles.

    Xing, Malcolm; Zhong, Wen; Xu, Xiuling; Thomson, Douglas

    2010-07-20

    Surface adhesion between nanofibers and nanoparticles has attracted attention for potential biomedical applications, but the measurement has not been reported. Adhesion forces were measured using a polystyrene (PS) nanoparticle attached to an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip/probe. Electrospun PS nanofibers of different diameters were tapped with the probe to study the effect of fiber diameters on adhesion force. Both AFM experiments and numerical models suggest that the adhesion force increases with increased fiber diameters. Numerical models further demonstrated that local deformation of the fiber surface, including the flattening of surface asperities and the nanofiber wrapping around the particle during contact, may have a significant impact on the adhesion force. The adhesion forces are in the order of 100 nN, much smaller than the adhesion forces of the gecko foot hair, but much larger than that of the receptor-ligand pair, antibody-antigen pair, and single-stranded DNA from a substrate. Adhesion forces of nanofibers with roughness were predicted by numerical analysis. This study is expected to provide approaches and information useful in the design of nanomedicine and scaffold based on nanofibers for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:20552953

  18. Adhesion Between Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Layers

    Yu, Liyun; Daugaard, Anders Egede; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    Different adhesion methods of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) layers were studied with respect to adhesional force and the resulting rheology of the two-layered PDMS films were investigated. The role of adhesion between PDMS layers on the performances of two-layer structures was studied with peel...

  19. Mechanisms of temporary adhesion in benthic animals

    Dodou, D.; Breedveld, P.; Winter, J.C.F.; Dankelman, J.; Leeuwen, van J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Adhesive systems are ubiquitous in benthic animals and play a key role in diverse functions such as locomotion, food capture, mating, burrow building, and defence. For benthic animals that release adhesives, surface and material properties and external morphology have received little attention compa

  20. Evaluation of progestogens for postoperative adhesion prevention.

    Beauchamp, P J; Quigley, M M; Held, B

    1984-10-01

    Progesterone (P) has been shown to have potent antiinflammatory and immunosuppressive properties. Previous reports have suggested that the use of P decreases postoperative adhesion formation. To further evaluate the role of pharmacologic doses of progestogens in adhesion prevention, 42 mature New Zealand White rabbits underwent standardized injuries to the uterine horns, fimbriae, and pelvic peritoneum and received one of six treatments. Group S had intraperitoneal placement of normal saline (0.9%); group H received intraperitoneal placement of 32% dextran 70; group IM-P received intramuscular P-in-oil 10 days before and after laparotomy in addition to intraperitoneal saline; group IP-P had intraperitoneal placement of an aqueous P suspension; group DP received medroxyprogesterone acetate intraperitoneally; and group C received no intramuscular or intraperitoneal adhesion-prevention agents. The animals were sacrificed 6 weeks after laparotomy, and the adhesions were scored. Intraperitoneal saline (group S) significantly reduced the amount of adhesions when compared with the control group (C) (P less than 0.05). No significant difference was observed when group S was compared with group H. Intramuscular P added to saline (group IM-P) did not cause further reduction in adhesions when compared with group S. Both group IP-P and group DP had more adhesions than did group S (P less than 0.01). These data fail to support previous claims regarding adhesion prevention by the use of locally or parenterally administered progestogens. PMID:6237937

  1. Recurrent spinal adhesive arachnoiditis: a case report

    James Pitágoras de Mattos

    1988-03-01

    Full Text Available Spinal adhesive arachnoiditis is not an uncommon disease, usually having a monophasic course. We studied an atypical patient with recurrent spinal adhesive arachnoiditis nine years after intrathecal anesthesia and the first attack of the disease. Also noteworthy was the favorable evolution after surgery.

  2. Syndecans: synergistic activators of cell adhesion

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1998-01-01

    Cell-surface proteoglycans participate in cell adhesion, growth-factor signalling, lipase activity and anticoagulation. Until recently, only the roles of the glycosaminoglycan chains were investigated. Now, with molecular characterization of several core proteins, the roles of each individual...... molecules modulating integrin-based adhesion....

  3. Adhesion mechanism of a gecko-inspired oblique structure with an adhesive tip for asymmetric detachment

    Sekiguchi, Yu; Takahashi, Kunio; Sato, Chiaki

    2015-12-01

    An adhesion model of an oblique structure with an adhesive tip is proposed by considering a limiting stress for adhesion to describe the detachment mechanism of gecko foot hairs. When a force is applied to the root of the oblique structure, normal and shear stresses are generated at contact and the adhesive tip is detached from the surface when reaching the limiting stress. An adhesion criterion that considers both the normal and shear stresses is introduced, and the asymmetric detachment of the oblique structure is theoretically investigated. In addition, oblique beam array structures are manufactured, and an inclination effect of the structure on the asymmetric detachment is experimentally verified.

  4. Artificial neural network based inverse design method for circular sliding slopes

    丁德馨; 张志军

    2004-01-01

    Current design method for circular sliding slopes is not so reasonable that it often results in slope sliding. As a result, artificial neural network (ANN) is used to establish an artificial neural network based inverse design method for circular sliding slopes. A sample set containing 21 successful circular sliding slopes excavated in the past is used to train the network. A test sample of 3 successful circular sliding slopes excavated in the past is used to test the trained network. The test results show that the ANN based inverse design method is valid and can be applied to the design of circular sliding slopes.

  5. Creep curve measurement to support wear and adhesion modelling, using a continuously variable creep twin disc machine

    Fletcher, D. I.; Lewis, S.

    2013-01-01

    Predictive modelling of wear and adhesion at rolling-sliding contacts such as a railway rail and wheel depends on understanding the relationship between slip and shear force at the contact surface, i.e. the creep verses force curve. This paper describes a new approach to creep curve measurement using a twin disc machine running with a continuous programmed variation of creep, enabling an entire creep curve to be defined in a single experiment. The work focuses on very low levels of creep, ran...

  6. A sliding wafer-OMVPE scheme for fabricating subnanometer superlattices

    Minagawa, S.; Satoh, S.; Nakatsuka, S.; Kakibayashi, H.

    1988-03-01

    A sliding wafer-OMVPE (Organometallic Vapor Phase Epitaxy) reactor suitable for growing superlattices is developed. The reactor is a two-channel horizontal reactor with a susceptor placed across the two channels. A slider is used to transport the substrate by sliding it along the susceptor surface from one channel to the other. This scheme makes it possible to set the temperature of the susceptor in each channel independently by utilizing the skin effect of radio wave in graphite. The performance of this scheme is demonstrated by growing a superlattice of ten periods of GaAs(3.5 Å)/AlAs(7 Å).

  7. Development of a teledermatopathology consultation system using virtual slides

    Nakayama Ikunori

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An online consultation system using virtual slides (whole slide images; WSI has been developed for pathological diagnosis, and could help compensate for the shortage of pathologists, especially in the field of dermatopathology and in other fields dealing with difficult cases. This study focused on the performance and future potential of the system. Method In our system, histological specimens on slide glasses are digitalized by a virtual slide instrument, converted into web data, and up-loaded to an open server. Using our own purpose-built online system, we then input patient details such as age, gender, affected region, clinical data, past history and other related items. We next select up to ten consultants. Finally we send an e-mail to all consultants simultaneously through a single command. The consultant receives an e-mail containing an ID and password which is used to access the open server and inspect the images and other data associated with the case. The consultant makes a diagnosis, which is sent to us along with comments. Because this was a pilot study, we also conducted several questionnaires with consultants concerning the quality of images, operability, usability, and other issues. Results We solicited consultations for 36 cases, including cases of tumor, and involving one to eight consultants in the field of dermatopathology. No problems were noted concerning the images or the functioning of the system on the sender or receiver sides. The quickest diagnosis was received only 18 minutes after sending our data. This is much faster than in conventional consultation using glass slides. There were no major problems relating to the diagnosis, although there were some minor differences of opinion between consultants. The results of questionnaires answered by many consultants confirmed the usability of this system for pathological consultation. (16 out of 23 consultants. Conclusion We have developed a novel

  8. Sliding Control with Chattering Elimination for Hydraulic Drives

    Schmidt, Lasse; Andersen, Torben Ole; Pedersen, Henrik C.;

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a sliding mode control scheme with chattering elimination, generally applicable for position tracking control of electro-hydraulic valve-cylinder drives. The proposed control scheme requires only common data sheet information, no knowledge on load characteri......This paper presents the development of a sliding mode control scheme with chattering elimination, generally applicable for position tracking control of electro-hydraulic valve-cylinder drives. The proposed control scheme requires only common data sheet information, no knowledge on load...

  9. Surface charging, discharging and chemical modification at a sliding contact

    Singh, Shailendra Vikram; Kusano, Yukihiro; Morgen, Per;

    2012-01-01

    Electrostatic charging, discharging, and consequent surface modification induced by sliding dissimilar surfaces have been studied. The surface-charge related phenomena were monitored by using a home-built capacitive, non-contact electrical probe, and the surface chemistry was studied by X...... are also able to comment on the behavior and the charge decay time in the ambient air-like condition, once the sliding contact is discontinued. XPS analysis showed a marginal deoxidation effect on the polyester disks due to the charging and discharging of the surfaces. Moreover, these XPS results...

  10. Power generation from conductive droplet sliding on electret film

    Yang, Zhaochu; Halvorsen, Einar; Dong, Tao

    2012-05-01

    Generating electrical power from low frequency vibration to power portable devices is a challenge that potentially can be met by nonresonant electrostatic energy harvesters. We propose a generator employing a conductive droplet sliding on a microfabricated electret film which is sputtered onto an interdigital electrode and charged already during deposition. Droplet motion causes a capacitance variation that is used to generate electric power. A prototype of the fluidic energy harvester demonstrated a peak output power at 0.18 µW with a single droplet having a diameter of 1.2 mm and sliding on a 2 -µm thick electret film.

  11. Induction Motor Flux Estimation using Nonlinear Sliding Observers

    Hakiki Khalid

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A nonlinear sliding flux was proposed for an induction motor. Its dynamic observation errors converge asymptotically to zero, independently from the inputs. The aim of this work was to study the robustness of this observer with respect to the variation of the rotor resistance known to be a crucial parameter for the control. The dynamic performance of this sliding observer was compared to that of Verghese observer via a simulation of an IM driven by U/F control in open loop.

  12. Moist Potential Vorticity and Up-Sliding Slantwise Vorticity Development

    GUI Xiao-Peng; GAO Shou-Ting; WU Guo-Xiong

    2003-01-01

    By using the moist potential vorticity equation derived from complete atmospheric equations including the effect of mass forcing, the theory of up-sliding slantwise vorticity development (USVD) is proposed based on the theory of slantwise vorticity development. When an air parcel slides up along a slantwise isentropic surface, its vertical component of relative vorticity is developed. Based on the theory of USVD, a complete vertical vorticity equation is expected with mass forcing, which explicitly includes the effect of both internal forcings and external forcings.

  13. Estimation of drug dosage regimens with a pharmacokinetic slide rule.

    Straughn, A B; Cruze, C A; Meyer, M C

    1977-02-01

    A pharmacokinetic slide rule to facilitate the computations based on relatively simple pharmacokinetic principles involved in the development of individualized drug dosage regimens is described. The calculations are based on the assumption that the body can be conceived as a one-compartment open model with drug elimination proceeding by apparent first-order kinetics. Examples are presented (1) to illustrate the clinical application of a slide rule to compute the time-course of drug in the body, (2) to calculate steady-state maximum and minimum levels, and accumulation during multiple dosage and (3) to estimate appropriate maintenance doses and intravenous infusion rates. PMID:842548

  14. Atomic-Scale Sliding Friction on Graphene in Water.

    Vilhena, J G; Pimentel, Carlos; Pedraz, Patricia; Luo, Feng; Serena, Pedro A; Pina, Carlos M; Gnecco, Enrico; Pérez, Rubén

    2016-04-26

    The sliding of a sharp nanotip on graphene completely immersed in water is investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) and atomic force microscopy. MD simulations predict that the atomic-scale stick-slip is almost identical to that found in ultrahigh vacuum. Furthermore, they show that water plays a purely stochastic role in sliding (solid-to-solid) friction. These observations are substantiated by friction measurements on graphene grown on Cu and Ni, where, oppositely of the operation in air, lattice resolution is readily achieved. Our results promote friction force microscopy in water as a robust alternative to ultra-high-vacuum measurements. PMID:26982997

  15. The simplex method for nonlinear sliding mode control

    Bartolini G.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available General nonlinear control systems described by ordinary differential equations with a prescribed sliding manifold are considered. A method of designing a feedback control law such that the state variable fulfills the sliding condition in finite time is based on the construction of a suitable simplex of vectors in the tangent space of the manifold. The convergence of the method is proved under an obtuse angle condition and a way to build the required simplex is indicated. An example of engineering interest is presented.

  16. Cascade Control of Magnetic Levitation with Sliding Modes

    Eroğlu Yakup

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness and applicability of magnetic levitation systems need precise feedback control designs. A cascade control approach consisting of sliding mode control plus sliding mode control (SMC plus SMC is designed to solve position control problem and to provide a high control performance and robustness to the magnetic levitation plant. It is shown that the SMC plus SMC cascade controller is able to eliminate the effects of the inductance related uncertainties of the electromagnetic coil of the plant and achieve a robust and precise position control. Experimental and numerical results are provided to validate the effectiveness and feasibility of the method.

  17. Sliding mode observers and observability singularity in chaotic synchronization

    Boutat-Baddas L.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new secured data transmission based on a chaotic synchronization and observability singularity. For this, we adopt an approach based on an inclusion of the message in the system structure and we use a sliding mode observer for system with unknown input in order to recover the information. We end the paper with an example of chaotic system with an observability bifurcation. Moreover, this example highlights some benefits of the so-called step-by-step sliding mode observer.

  18. Critical length scale controls adhesive wear mechanisms

    Aghababaei, Ramin; Warner, Derek H.; Molinari, Jean-Francois

    2016-06-01

    The adhesive wear process remains one of the least understood areas of mechanics. While it has long been established that adhesive wear is a direct result of contacting surface asperities, an agreed upon understanding of how contacting asperities lead to wear debris particle has remained elusive. This has restricted adhesive wear prediction to empirical models with limited transferability. Here we show that discrepant observations and predictions of two distinct adhesive wear mechanisms can be reconciled into a unified framework. Using atomistic simulations with model interatomic potentials, we reveal a transition in the asperity wear mechanism when contact junctions fall below a critical length scale. A simple analytic model is formulated to predict the transition in both the simulation results and experiments. This new understanding may help expand use of computer modelling to explore adhesive wear processes and to advance physics-based wear laws without empirical coefficients.

  19. Coating to enhance metal-polymer adhesion

    Parthasarathi, A.; Mahulikar, D. [Olin Metals Research Laboratories, New Haven, CT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    An ultra-thin electroplated coating has been developed to enhance adhesion of metals to polymers. The coating was developed for microelectronic packaging applications where it greatly improves adhesion of metal leadframes to plastic molding compounds. Recent tests show that the coating enhances adhesion of different metals to other types of adhesives as well and may thus have wider applicability. Results of adhesion tests with this coating, as well as its other characteristics such as corrosion resistance, are discussed. The coating is a very thin transparent electroplated coating containing zinc and chromium. It has been found to be effective on a variety of metal surfaces including copper alloys, Fe-Ni alloys, Al alloys, stainless steel, silver, nickel, Pd/Ni and Ni-Sn. Contact resistance measurements show that the coating has little or no effect on electrical resistivity.

  20. Dynamic analysis of two adhesively bonded rods

    Kenneth L. Kuttler

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This work presents two models for the dynamic analysis of two rods that are adhesively bonded. The first model assumes that the adhesive is an elasto-plastic material and that complete debonding occurs when the stress reaches the yield limit. In the second model the degradation of the adhesive is described by the introduction of material damage. Failure occurs when the material is completely damaged, or the damage reaches a critical floor value. Both models are analyzed and the existence of a weak solution is established for the model with damage. In the quasistatic case, a new condition for adhesion is found as the limit of the adhesive thickness tends to zero.

  1. Adhesives for orthodontic bracket bonding

    Déborah Daniella Diniz Fonseca

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The advent of acid etching, introduced by Buonocore in 1955, brought the possibility of bonding between the bracket base and enamel, contributing to more esthetic and conservative orthodontics. This direct bracket bonding technique has brought benefits such as reduced cost and time in performing the treatment, as well as making it easier to perform oral hygiene. The aim of this study was to conduct a survey of published studies on orthodontic bracket bonding to dental enamel. It was verified that resin composites and glass ionomer are the most studied and researched materials for this purpose. Resin-modified glass ionomer, with its biocompatibility, capacity of releasing fluoride and no need for acid etching on the tooth structure, has become increasingly popular among dentists. However, due to the esthetic and mechanical properties of light polymerizable resin composite, it continues to be one of the adhesives of choice in the bracket bonding technique and its use is widely disseminated.

  2. Multibody simulation of adhesion pili

    Zakrisson, Johan; Servin, Martin; Axner, Ove; Lacoursiere, Claude; Andersson, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    We present a coarse grained rigid multibody model of a subunit assembled helix-like polymer, e.g., adhesion pili expressed by bacteria, that is capable of describing the polymers force-extension response. With building blocks representing individual subunits the model appropriately describes the complex behavior of pili expressed by the gram-negative uropathogenic Escherichia coli bacteria under the action of an external force. Numerical simulations show that the dynamics of the model, which include both the effects of unwinding and rewinding, are in good quantitative agreement with the characteristic force-extension response as observed experimentally for type 1 and P pili. By tuning the model, it is also possible to reproduce the force-extension response in the presence of anti-shaft antibodies, which dramatically changes the mechanical properties. Thus, the model and the results in this work give enhanced understanding of how a pilus unwinds under action of external forces and provide new perspective of th...

  3. Surface tension driven shaping of adhesive microfluidic channel walls

    Janting, Jakob; Storm, Elisabeth K.; Geschke, Oliver

    2005-01-01

    The feasibility of making microfluidic channels with different wall geometries using adjacent lines of dispensed adhesive between substrates has been studied. Important parameters for the geometry have been identified to be: surface tension (adhesive / substrates), adhesive viscosity / thixotropy...

  4. A Multidirectional Tribo-System: Wear of UHMWPE under Sliding, Rolling, and Rotation

    Patten, Elias Wolfgang

    perpendicular to the primary sliding directions. These are consistent with abrasive wear, plastic flow and adhesive wear, and fatigue wear mechanisms reported in other in vitro and in vivo wear studies. The orientations of the lamellae at the wear surfaces were not discernibly different from the lamellae of an unworn section of the disk surface. Similarly, the near-surface regions of the disk cross-section were not discernibly different from the subsurface regions. Previous studies have demonstrated orientation of the microstructure during wear using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray scattering, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques, and such methods may be necessary for texture characterization. These results demonstrate that knee kinematics have a significant effect on the cross-shear and wear of UHMWPE and should not be neglected when designing TKR. A better theoretical understanding of how kinematics contribute to wear can lead to better UHMWPE formulations, improved computer simulations of wear, and optimized TKR designs with longer life-spans.

  5. Experimental Study of the Rolling-Sliding Contact Conditions in a PA66/STEEL Gear Using Twin-Disc Test Rig: Friction and Wear Analysis

    Mbarek, Meftah; Rhaiem, Sadok; Kharrat, Mohamed; Dammak, Maher

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the effects of sliding ratio on the tribological response of the contact between the teeth of a metal/polymer gear in the regions close to the pitch point. For this purpose, a new twin-disc test rig was developed on the basis of two discs of different diameters rotating one above the other at the same angular speed. Two different materials were used: non-alloyed structural steel (C45) and polyamide (PA66). The effect of the slip ratio (4%, 12%, 20% and 28%) was studied at a constant pressure of 34 MPa and a constant angular speed of 300 rpm. In addition, the contact conditions were controlled with measurements of the two discs surface temperatures. The results indicate that the wear and the friction are closely related to the contact temperature generated by the sliding phenomenon. At low slip ratio (4% and 12%), the coefficient of friction and the temperature are characterized by a quasi-linear increase with time, and the wear increases slowly. At higher slip ratio (20% and 28%), the coefficient of friction and the temperature presents a steady state, and the wear increases dramatically. During the test, a film of transferred PA66 is formed on the steel surface causing the development of adhesive interactions between the contacting discs which increase the friction coefficient and the contact temperature. The high thermal conductivity of steel as compared to that of the polymer can reduce enormously the contact temperature generated by the sliding process.

  6. Extended VVER-440 reactor operation with sliding secondary loop pressure

    A specific feature of water-moderated reactors is the need for periodic unit shutdown for scheduled preventative maintenance (SPM) of equipment and fuel assembly reloading. These shutdowns are highly undesirable during the autumn-winter peak for power system electrical load. In such cases, it becomes necessary to search for methods to extend the reactor operating period. For a water-moderated reactor, this problem is solved by using the power and temperature reactivity effects. The algorithm for VVER-440 reactor operation in the extended operating period regime with sliding primary and secondary loop parameters is presented. Implementing this regime in Unit 3 of the Kol'sk nuclear plant enabled it to operate an additional 67.5 effective days (79 calendar days). It is shown that reactor operation with sliding parameters requires careful preparation of equipment operating specifications and choosing of new setpoints for protection and interlock systems operation. During preparation for operation with sliding parameters, it is shown that in this regime the criteria for safe operation are met. Inasmuch as using the operating regime with sliding parameters is economically efficient, equipment development engineers must perform work proving equipment operability and making the corresponding revisions to the operating documentation

  7. Sliding joint concept for toroidal field coils of a tokamak

    A low-cost, compact, copper-coil ignition tokamak is the focus of design studies in FY85. For a minimum-cost machine, the toroidal field (TF) coils must be as compact as practical. On the other hand, smaller TF coils inhibit the assembly and maintenance of the components entrapped by the TF coils, such as the plasma vacuum vessel, limiter, poloidal field coils, etc. If the compact TF coil has at least two demountable electrical joints, removal of the outer part of the TF coil would permit servicing of the entrapped components. The vertical straight leg of a TF coil has the smallest cross-sectional area, but it experiences the largest tensile and compressive forces. The tensile load on the vertical leg can be eliminated if the demountable joints can slide. A possible sliding joint design concept is described in this paper. This sliding joint transfers only current. No forces are transferred from the outer curved leg to the straight leg of the TF coils. The outer curved leg can be separated at the sliding joint to gain access to the components inside the TF coil bore

  8. Three Monotheistic Religions: Judaism, Christianity, Islam. Slide Exercise.

    Michalak, Laurence

    This slide exercise is intended to communicate information about the three major monotheistic religions of the Middle East: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The exercise focuses on beliefs, events, symbols, institutions, and practices important to the three religions, but the main purpose is to impress upon students the many things that these…

  9. Efficient sliding spotlight SAR raw signal simulation of extended scenes

    Huang Pingping

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sliding spotlight mode is a novel synthetic aperture radar (SAR imaging scheme with an achieved azimuth resolution better than stripmap mode and ground coverage larger than spotlight configuration. However, its raw signal simulation of extended scenes may not be efficiently implemented in the two-dimensional (2D Fourier transformed domain. This article presents a novel sliding spotlight raw signal simulation approach from the wide-beam SAR imaging modes. This approach can generate sliding spotlight raw signal not only from raw data evaluated by the simulators, but also from real data in the stripmap/spotlight mode. In order to obtain the desired raw data from conventional stripmap/spotlight mode, the azimuth time-varying filtering, which is implemented by de-rotation and low-pass filtering, is adopted. As raw signal of extended scenes in the stripmap/spotlight mode can efficiently be evaluated in the 2D Fourier domain, the proposed approach provides an efficient sliding spotlight SAR simulator of extended scenes. Simulation results validate this efficient simulator.

  10. Sliding-Mode Control of PEM Fuel Cells

    Kunusch, Cristian; Mayosky, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in catalysis technologies and new materials make fuel cells an economically appealing and clean energy source with massive market potential in portable devices, home power generation and the automotive industry. Among the more promising fuel-cell technologies are proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Sliding-Mode Control of PEM Fuel Cells demonstrates the application of higher-order sliding-mode control to PEMFC dynamics. Fuel-cell dynamics are often highly nonlinear and the text shows the advantages of sliding modes in terms of robustness to external disturbance, modelling error and system-parametric disturbance using higher-order control to reduce chattering. Divided into two parts, the book first introduces the theory of fuel cells and sliding-mode control. It begins by contextualising PEMFCs both in terms of their development and within the hydrogen economy and today’s energy production situation as a whole. The reader is then guided through a discussion of fuel-cell operation pr...

  11. Characteristics of sliding discharge in a multi-rod reactor

    This paper is aimed at investigating the characteristics of a sliding discharge (SD) including the onset voltage (Vo), spark voltage (VS), and current-voltage (I-V) relationship in a multi-rod reactor stressed by sinusoidal AC or pulse voltage. The effects of various parameters (the voltage amplitude, frequency, gas flow rate, and voltage type) on the characteristics of the reactor sliding discharge (Vo, VS and I-V relationship) have been studied experimentally. It has been found that the DC onset and spark voltages increase with the increase of the gas flow rate, while the effect of the frequency on them is not pronounced. The onset and spark voltages of the stressed reactor for sinusoidal AC voltage are lower than those obtained under a pulse voltage of the same peak value. Subsequently, the sliding current increases with the increase of the sinusoidal AC high voltage, the frequency, and the negative DC voltage, while, it decreases with the increase of the flow rate. It is observed that stressing the reactor with sinusoidal AC voltage gives higher values of sliding current than those obtained using a pulse at the same peak voltage. Stressing the reactor with sinusoidal AC voltage gives higher values of the NO removal efficiency than those obtained using pulse voltage.

  12. Use of Slides and Self-Study Examples.

    Brainard, Alan J.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses methods used in teaching thermodynamics to students at the University of Pittsburgh. Methods include use of 35mm slides and companion activity book, self-study materials, and instructional objectives. Several examples of student reaction to the methods are provided. (JN)

  13. Toxic waste treatment with sliding centrifugal plasma reactor

    The aim is to develop technology for hazardous waste treatment, including the building and putting into operation of a prototype based on a sliding centrifugal plasma technology to demonstrate its ability to degradation taking in account the existing environmental standards. (Author)

  14. Sliding mode control based guidance law with impact angle constraint

    Zhao Yao; Sheng Yongzhi; Liu Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    The terminal guidance problem for an unpowered lifting reentry vehicle against a sta-tionary target is considered. In addition to attacking the target with high accuracy, the vehicle is also expected to achieve a desired impact angle. In this paper, a sliding mode control (SMC)-based guidance law is developed to satisfy the terminal angle constraint. Firstly, a specific sliding mode function is designed, and the terminal requirements can be achieved by enforcing both the sliding mode function and its derivative to zero at the end of the flight. Then, a backstepping approach is used to ensure the finite-time reaching phase of the sliding mode and the analytic expression of the control effort can be obtained. The trajectories generated by this method only depend on the initial and terminal conditions of the terminal phase and the instantaneous states of the vehicle. In order to test the performance of the proposed guidance law in practical application, numerical simulations are carried out by taking all the aerodynamic parameters into consideration. The effec-tiveness of the proposed guidance law is verified by the simulation results in various scenarios.

  15. Discrete-Time Sliding Mode Control with a Disturbance Estimator

    Monsees, G.; Scherpen, J.M.A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a novel output-based, discrete-time, sliding mode controller design methodology. Output based controllers with and without disturbance estimation are presented. First several existing discrete-time reaching conditions are analyzed and compared. From these methods the linear reach

  16. Avalanche Statistics of Driven Granular Slides in a Miniature Mound

    Juanico, D E; Batac, R; Monterola, C

    2008-01-01

    We examine avalanche statistics of rain- and vibration-driven granular slides in miniature soil mounds using experimental and numerical approaches. A crossover from power-law to non power-law avalanche-size statistics is demonstrated as a generic driving rate $\

  17. Optoelectronic hit/miss transform for screening cervical smear slides

    Narayanswamy, R.; Turner, R. M.; McKnight, D. J.; Johnson, K. M.; Sharpe, J. P.

    1995-06-01

    An optoelectronic morphological processor for detecting regions of interest (abnormal cells) on a cervical smear slide using the hit/miss transform is presented. Computer simulation of the algorithm tested on 184 Pap-smear images provided 95% detection and 5% false alarm. An optoelectronic implementation of the hit/miss transform is presented, along with preliminary experimental results.

  18. Digital Sliding Mode Control of Anti-Lock Braking System

    MITIC, D. B.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The control of anti-lock braking system is a great challenge, because of the nonlinear and complex characteristics of braking dynamics, unknown parameters of vehicle environment and system parameter variations. Using some of robust control methods, such as sliding mode control, can be a right solution for these problems. In this paper, we introduce a novel approach to design of ABS controllers, which is based on digital sliding mode control with only input/output measurements. The relay term of the proposed digital sliding mode control is filtered through digital integrator, reducing the chattering phenomenon in that way, and the additional signal of estimated modelling error is introduced into control algorithm to enhance the system steady-state accuracy. The given solution was verified in real experimental framework and the obtained results were compared with the results of implementation of two other digital sliding mode control algorithms. It is shown that it gives better system response, higher steady-state accuracy and smaller chattering.

  19. Current Status of Whole-Slide Imaging in Education.

    Saco, Adela; Bombi, Jose Antoni; Garcia, Adriana; Ramírez, Jose; Ordi, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    Conventional light microscopy (CLM) has classically been the basic tool to teach histology and pathology. In recent years, whole-slide imaging (WSI), which consists of generating a high-magnification digital image of an entire histological glass slide, has emerged as a useful alternative to CLM offering a myriad of opportunities for education. Navigation through the digitized slides closely simulates viewing glass slides with a microscope and is also referred to as virtual microscopy. WSI has many advantages for education. Students feel more comfortable with its use, and it can be used in any classroom as it only requires a computer with Internet access and it allows remote access from anywhere and from any device. WSI can be used simultaneously by a large number of people, stimulating cooperation between students and improving the interaction with the teachers. It allows making marks and annotations on specific fields, which enable specific directed questions to the teacher. Finally, WSI supports are cost-effective compared with CLM. Consequently, WSI has begun to replace CLM in many institutions. WSI has shown to be an extremely useful tool for undergraduate education (medical, dental and veterinary schools), for the training of residents of pathology, tele-education and in tumor boards. PMID:27101397

  20. Programmed Instruction with Microfiche: Intoduction to the Slide Rule.

    Wachtel, L. W.

    The use of microfiche as a means of programed self-instruction was examined in this study. Lessons adapted from a one-hour lecture on the slide rule were typed in large print in order to allow easy reading at distances normally used with microfiche readers. The 58 pages of the course were reproduced on microfilm, strips of which were then inserted…

  1. Modelling study of sliding interface contact in pipe coupling

    The Finite Element Method (FEM) results are dependent on simulation of geometry and boundary conditions. The difficulties are faced while modelling the complex structures with number of interface contact where small relative movement can not be ruled out. The paper describes the 3-D interface sliding contact modelling study for pipe coupling. (author). 3 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Slide rule-type color chart predicts reproduced photo tones

    Griffin, J. D.

    1966-01-01

    Slide rule-type color chart determines the final reproduced gray tones in the production of briefing charts that are photographed in black and white. The chart shows both the color by drafting paint manufacturers name and mixture number, and the gray tone resulting from black and white photographic reproduction.

  3. Limitations of the Nash Logoscope or diagnostic slide rule.

    Pain, R W

    1975-11-01

    The diagnostic efficacy of a commercially available diagnostic slide-rule (the Logoscope) was evaluated on 50 cases detailed in the leterature. In only 13 cases (26%) was the Logoscope of any practical assistance in diagnosis and even then it did not always indicate the entire final clinical diagnosis. Some major deficiencies of the Logoscope system are outlined. PMID:1207559

  4. Simplified atmospheric diffusion calculations with slide-rule gage points

    Gage points are given with the help of which the most commonly required atmospheric diffusion calculations can be carried out rapidly using a simple slide-rule setting; e.g. maximum ground concentration, its distance, and the corresponding effective stack height as functions of the prevailing type of meteorological condition. (author)

  5. Nonlinear hysteretic behavior of a confined sliding layer

    A nonlinear model representing the tribological problem of a thin solid lubricant layer between two sliding periodic surfaces is used to analyze the phenomenon of hysteresis at pinning/depinning around a moving state rather than around a statically pinned state. The cycling of an external driving force Fext is used as a simple means to destroy and then to recover the dynamically pinned state previously discovered for the lubricant center-of-mass velocity. Depinning to a quasi-freely sliding state occurs either directly, with a single jump, or through a sequence of discontinuous transitions. The intermediate sliding steps are reminiscent of phase-locked states and stick-slip motion in static friction, and can be interpreted in terms of the appearance of traveling density defects in an otherwise regular arrangement of kinks. Repinning occurs more smoothly, through the successive disappearance of different traveling defects. The resulting bistability and multistability regions may also be explored by varying mechanical parameters other than Fext, e.g. the sliding velocity or the corrugation amplitude of the sliders

  6. An Evaluation of a Biological Slide-Tutorial Program.

    Chan, Gordon L.

    Described is an auto-tutorial slide program for zoology students. A self-paced system was devised for observing the subject matter covered in the twelve study units of a zoology course. The post-testing evaluation revealed that students with lower grade point averages achieved scores comparable with students of higher grade point averages.…

  7. Excise Tax Rates On Packs Of Cigarettes PowerPoint Slides

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Download the current cigarette excise tax rates on packs of cigarettes slides. These slides are available in PDF and PowerPoint formats. The PDF version can be...

  8. Design and Implementation of a Magnetic Levitation System Controller using Global Sliding Mode Control

    Rudi Uswarman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents global sliding mode control and conventional sliding mode control for stabilization position of a levitation object. Sliding mode control will be robusting when in sliding mode condition. However, it is not necessarily robust at attaining phase. In the global sliding mode control, the attaining motion phase was eliminated, so that the robustness of the controller can be improved. However, the value of the parameter uncertainties needs to be limited. Besides that, the common problem in sliding mode control is high chattering phenomenon. If the chattering is too large, it can make the system unstable due the limited ability of electronics component. The strategy to overcome the chattering phenomenon is needed. Based on simulation and experimental results, the global sliding mode control has better performance than conventional sliding mode control.  

  9. Regolith slide recurrence history indicated by radiocarbon ages in the hills around Sendai, Northeastern Japan

    Observation of actual rain-induced regolith slides in the hills around Sendai confirmed that slides were concentrated on particular geomorphic positions and that deposits of slide itself and induced debris flow overlay the humic topsoil on some hillslopes or bottomlands. Then radiocarbon dating was systematically applied to buried humic topsoil horizons overlain by former slide deposits or debris flow deposits on bottomlands and head hollows in order to reconstract the history of regolith slide occurrence in a watershed. It was concluded that regolith slides have repeated at an interval of 300 to 400 years during at least recent 1,000 years on relatively slide-prone segments of a watershed, while the interval is about 2,500 years on relatively stable segment. The knowledge will contribute to the consideration of hillslope development rate controlled chiefly by regolith slides under temperate monsoon climate which has been prevailing since the early Holocene in Northeastern Japan. (author)

  10. Adhesion in ceramics and magnetic media

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1989-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with a metal or a polymeric material such as a magnetic medium, strong bonds form between the materials. For ceramic-to-metal contacts, adhesion and friction are strongly dependent on the ductility of the metals. Hardness of metals plays a much more important role in adhesion and friction than does the surface energy of metals. Adhesion, friction, surface energy, and hardness of a metal are all related to its Young's modulus and shear modulus, which have a marked dependence on the electron configuration of the metal. An increase in shear modulus results in a decrease in area of contact that is greater than the corresponding increase in surface energy (the fond energy) with shear modulus. Consequently, the adhesion and friction decrease with increasing shear modulus. For ceramics in contact with polymeric magnetic tapes, environment is extremely important. For example, a nitrogen environment reduces adhesion and friction when ferrite contacts polymeric tape, whereas a vacuum environment strengthens the ferrite-to-tape adhesion and increases friction. Adhesion and friction are strongly dependent on the particle loading of the tape. An increase in magnetic particle concentration increases the complex modulus of the tape, and a lower real area of contact and lower friction result.

  11. Dangling chain elastomers as repeatable fibrillar adhesives.

    Sitti, Metin; Cusick, Brian; Aksak, Burak; Nese, Alper; Lee, Hyung-il; Dong, Hongchen; Kowalewski, Tomasz; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2009-10-01

    This work reports on repeatable adhesive materials prepared by controlled grafting of dangling hetero chains from polymer elastomers. The dangling chain elastomer system was prepared by grafting poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PBA) chains from prefunctionalized polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer networks using atom transfer radical polymerization. To study the effects of chain growth and network strain as they relate to network adhesion mechanics, various lengths of PBA chains with degree of polymerizations (DP) of 65, 281, 508, and 1200 were incorporated into the PDMS matrix. PBA chains with a DP value of 281 grafted from a flat PDMS substrate showed the highest (approximately 3.5-fold) enhancement of nano- and macroscale adhesion relative to a flat raw (ungrafted and not prefunctionalized) PDMS substrate. Moreover, to study the effect of PBA dangling chains on adhesion in fibrillar elastomer structures inspired by gecko foot hairs, a dip-transfer fabrication method was used to graft PBA chains with a DP value of 296 from the tip endings of mushroom-shaped PDMS micropillars. A PBA chain covered micropillar array showed macroscale adhesion enhancement up to approximately 7 times relative to the flat ungrafted prefunctionalized PDMS control substrate, showing additional nonoptimized approximately 2-fold adhesion enhancement due to fibrillar structuring and mushroom-shaped tip ending. These dangling hetero chains on elastomer micro-/nanofibrillar structures may provide a novel fabrication platform for multilength scale, repeatable, and high-strength fibrillar adhesives inspired by gecko foot hairs. PMID:20355863

  12. Adhesion property of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR-based adhesives containing calcium carbonate

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The adhesion property (i.e. viscosity, loop tack and peel strength of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR 25 and ENR 50 grade-based pressure-sensitive adhesive was studied in the presence of calcium carbonate. The range of calcium carbonate loaded was from 10 to 50 parts per hundred parts of rubber (phr. Coumarone-indene resin was used as the tackifier and its concentration was fixed at 80 phr. Toluene was chosen as the solvent throughout the investigation. The substrates (PET film/paper were coated with the adhesive using a SHEEN hand coater at a coating thickness of 60 µm. Viscosity of the adhesive was measured by a HAAKE Rotary Viscometer whereas loop tack and peel strength were determined by a Llyod Adhesion Tester operating at 30 cm/min. Results show that viscosity of ENR-based adhesives increases gradually with increase in calcium carbonate loading due to the concentration effect of the filler. However, for loop tack and peel strength, it passes through a maximum at 30 phr calcium carbonate, an observation which is attributed to the optimum wettability of adhesive on the substrate at this adhesive composition. ENR 25-based adhesive consistently exhibits higher adhesion property than ENR 50 for all calcium carbonate loadings studied.

  13. Adhesion of Dental Materials to Tooth Structure

    Mitra, Sumita B.

    2000-03-01

    The understanding and proper application of the principles of adhesion has brought forth a new paradigm in the realm of esthetic dentistry. Modern restorative tooth procedures can now conserve the remaining tooth-structure and also provide for the strengthening of the tooth. Adhesive restorative techniques call for the application and curing of the dental adhesive at the interface between the tooth tissue and the filling material. Hence the success of the restoration depends largely on the integrity of this interface. The mechanism of adhesion of the bonding materials to the dental hard tissue will be discussed in this paper. There are four main steps that occur during the application of the dental adhesive to the oral hard tissues: 1) The first step is the creation of a microstructure in the tooth enamel or dentin by means of an acidic material. This can be through the application of a separate etchant or can be accomplished in situ by the adhesive/primer. This agent has to be effective in removing or modifying the proteinaceous “smear” layer, which would otherwise act as a weak boundary layer on the surface to be bonded. 2) The primer/adhesive must then be able to wet and penetrate the microstructure created in the tooth. Since the surface energies of etched enamel and that of etched dentin are different finding one material to prime both types of dental tissues can be quite challenging. 3) The ionomer types of materials, particularly those that are carboxylate ion-containing, can chemically bond with the calcium ions of the hydroxyapatite mineral. 4) Polymerization in situ allows for micromechanical interlocking of the adhesive. The importance of having the right mechanical properties of the cured adhesive layer and its role in absorbing and dissipating stresses encountered by a restored tooth will also be discussed.

  14. Adhesion of actinomyces isolates to experimental pellicles.

    Steinberg, D; Kopec, L K; Bowen, W H

    1993-06-01

    The ability of oral bacteria to adhere to surfaces is associated with their pathogenicity. Actinomyces can adhere to pellicle and cells through extracellular fimbriae. Research on adhesion of actinomyces has been conducted with use of hydroxyapatite (HA) coated with mammalian-derived salivary constituents, whereas the bacterial-derived components of the acquired pellicle have been largely ignored. The influence of the cell-free bacterial enzyme, glucosyltransferase (GTF), on adhesion of human and rodent isolates of Actinomyces viscosus was examined. Cell-free GTF was adsorbed onto parotid saliva-coated hydroxyapatite (sHA). Next, A. viscosus was exposed to the pellicle following the synthesis of glucan formed in situ by GTF. Glucans formed on the pellicle served as binding sites for adhesion of a rodent strain of A. viscosus. Conversely, the presence of in situ glucans on sHA reduced the adhesion of human isolates of A. viscosus compared with their adhesion to sHA. Adhesion of the rodent strains may be facilitated through a dextran-binding protein, since the rodent strains aggregated in the presence of dextrans and mutan. The human isolates were not aggregated by dextran or mutan. Pellicle harboring A. viscosus rodent strains interfered with the subsequent adhesion of Streptococcus mutans to the bacterial-coated pellicle. In contrast, the adhesion of S. mutans to pellicle was not decreased when the pellicle was pre-exposed to a human isolate of A. viscosus. The experimental data suggest that human and the rodent isolates of A. viscosus have distinct glucan adhesion properties.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8496474

  15. Improving controllable adhesion on both rough and smooth surfaces with a hybrid electrostatic/gecko-like adhesive.

    Ruffatto, Donald; Parness, Aaron; Spenko, Matthew

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes a novel, controllable adhesive that combines the benefits of electrostatic adhesives with gecko-like directional dry adhesives. When working in combination, the two technologies create a positive feedback cycle whose adhesion, depending on the surface type, is often greater than the sum of its parts. The directional dry adhesive brings the electrostatic adhesive closer to the surface, increasing its effect. Similarly, the electrostatic adhesion helps engage more of the directional dry adhesive fibrillar structures, particularly on rough surfaces. This paper presents the new hybrid adhesive's manufacturing process and compares its performance to three other adhesive technologies manufactured using a similar process: reinforced PDMS, electrostatic and directional dry adhesion. Tests were performed on a set of ceramic tiles with varying roughness to quantify its effect on shear adhesive force. The relative effectiveness of the hybrid adhesive increases as the surface roughness is increased. Experimental data are also presented for different substrate materials to demonstrate the enhanced performance achieved with the hybrid adhesive. Results show that the hybrid adhesive provides up to 5.1× greater adhesion than the electrostatic adhesive or directional dry adhesive technologies alone. PMID:24451392

  16. Whole slide imaging of unstained tissue using lensfree microscopy

    Morel, Sophie Nhu An; Hervé, Lionel; Bordy, Thomas; Cioni, Olivier; Delon, Antoine; Fromentin, Catherine; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Allier, Cédric

    2016-04-01

    Pathologist examination of tissue slides provides insightful information about a patient's disease. Traditional analysis of tissue slides is performed under a binocular microscope, which requires staining of the sample and delays the examination. We present a simple cost-effective lensfree imaging method to record 2-4μm resolution wide-field (10 mm2 to 6 cm2) images of unstained tissue slides. The sample processing time is reduced as there is no need for staining. A wide field of view (10 mm2) lensfree hologram is recorded in a single shot and the image is reconstructed in 2s providing a very fast acquisition chain. The acquisition is multispectral, i.e. multiple holograms are recorded simultaneously at three different wavelengths, and a dedicated holographic reconstruction algorithm is used to retrieve both amplitude and phase. Whole tissue slides imaging is obtained by recording 130 holograms with X-Y translation stages and by computing the mosaic of a 25 x 25 mm2 reconstructed image. The reconstructed phase provides a phase-contrast-like image of the unstained specimen, revealing structures of healthy and diseased tissue. Slides from various organs can be reconstructed, e.g. lung, colon, ganglion, etc. To our knowledge, our method is the first technique that enables fast wide-field lensfree imaging of such unlabeled dense samples. This technique is much cheaper and compact than a conventional phase contrast microscope and could be made portable. In sum, we present a new methodology that could quickly provide useful information when a rapid diagnosis is needed, such as tumor margin identification on frozen section biopsies during surgery.

  17. Stable Fuzzy PD Control with Parallel Sliding Mode Compensation with Application to Rigid Manipulator

    Farzin Piltan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Both fuzzy logic and sliding mode can compensate the steady-state error of proportional-derivative (PD control. This paper presents parallel sliding mode compensations for fuzzy PD controllers. The asymptotic stability of fuzzy PD control with first-order sliding mode compensation in the parallel structure is proven. For the parallel structure, the finite time convergence with a super-twisting second-order sliding-mode is guaranteed.

  18. Application of High Resolution Multispectral Imagery for Levee Slide Detection and Monitoring

    Hossain, A. K. M. Azad; Easson, Greg

    2007-01-01

    The objective is to develop methods to detect and monitor levee slides using commercially available high resolution multispectral imagery. High resolution multispectral imagery like IKONOS and QuickBird are suitable for detecting and monitoring levee slides. IKONOS is suitable for visual inspection, image classification and Tasseled Cap transform based slide detection. Tasseled Cap based model was found to be the best method for slide detection. QuickBird was suitable for visual inspection and image classification.

  19. Adaptive Tracking and Obstacle Avoidance Control for Mobile Robots With Unknown Sliding

    Mingyue Cui; Dihua Sun; Weining Liu; Min Zhao; Xiaoyong Liao

    2012-01-01

    An adaptive control approach is proposed for trajectory tracking and obstacle avoidance for mobile robots with consideration given to unknown sliding. A kinematic model of mobile robots is established in this paper, in which both longitudinal and lateral sliding are considered and processed as three time‐varying parameters. A sliding model observer is introduced to estimate the sliding parameters online. A stable tracking control law for this nonholonomic system is proposed to compensate the ...

  20. 24 CFR 3280.403 - Standard for windows and sliding glass doors used in manufactured homes.

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Standard for windows and sliding... AND SAFETY STANDARDS Testing § 3280.403 Standard for windows and sliding glass doors used in manufactured homes. (a) Scope. This section sets the requirements for prime windows and sliding glass...

  1. Tribological properties of AlN-CeO{sub 2}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} cutting materials in unlubricated sliding against tool steel and cast iron

    Gomes, J.R. [Universidade do Minho, Guimaraes (Portugal). Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica; Miranda, A.S. [Universidade do Minho, Guimaraes (Portugal). Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica; Silva, R.F. [Departamento de Engenharia Ceramica e do Vidro, Universidade de Aveiro, 3800 Aveiro (Portugal); Vieira, J.M. [Departamento de Engenharia Ceramica e do Vidro, Universidade de Aveiro, 3800 Aveiro (Portugal)

    1996-05-01

    Ceramic pins of the AlN-CeO{sub 2}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} system were tested in a pin-on-disc tribometer against discs of tool steel and grey cast iron, at room temperature, without lubrication, in different conditions of humidity and sliding speed. Ceramic samples were selected on the basis of their mechanical properties (hardness and fracture toughness), and microstructural characteristics, namely porosity, volume of intergranular phase and nitrogen content of the glass phase. Water vapour increased the weight loss of the nitride by promoting the tribo-oxidation wear mode and by weakening the adhesion of debris to the ceramic surfaces. In dry air, the adhering wear debris provided protection to the sliding surfaces and the wear coefficients of the ceramic converged to similar values for tests with both iron alloys. For the ceramic/tool steel tribopairs, the ceramic surfaces become more protected as the amount of the intergranular glassy layer of the nitride is increased, as the glassy phase gives enhanced debris adhesion. Microcracking of the ceramic surface was the dominant wear mode and the volumic wear rate was found to be dependent on the inverse of hardness and fracture toughness. In humid environments, the effect of roughness of the grey cast iron worn surface surmounted the dependence of the wear rate on microstructural and mechanical properties of the nitride, which was found in the ceramic/steel tribopairs. The sliding speed has a strong effect on the wear behaviour. (orig.)

  2. High temperature tribological behaviour of carbon based (B{sub 4}C and DLC) coatings in sliding contact with aluminum

    Gharam, A. Abou, E-mail: abougha@uwindsor.c [Mechanical Automotive and Materials Engineering Department, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, N9B3P4 (Canada); Lukitsch, M.J.; Balogh, M.P. [Chemical Sciences and Materials Systems Laboratory, General Motors R and D Center, 30500 Mound Road, Warren, MI 48090-9055 (United States); Alpas, A.T. [Mechanical Automotive and Materials Engineering Department, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, N9B3P4 (Canada)

    2010-12-30

    Carbon based coatings, particularly diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are known to resist aluminum adhesion and reduce friction at room temperature. This attractive tribological behaviour is useful for applications such as tool coatings used for aluminum forming and machining. However, for those operations that are performed at elevated temperatures (e.g. hot forming) or that generate frictional heat during contact (e.g. dry machining) the suitable coatings are required to maintain their tribological properties at high temperatures. Candidates for these demanding applications include boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) and DLC coatings. An understanding of the mechanisms of friction, wear and adhesion of carbon based coatings against aluminum alloys at high temperatures will help in designing coatings with improved high temperature tribological properties. With this goal in mind, this study focused on B{sub 4}C and a hydrogenated DLC coatings sliding against a 319 grade cast aluminum alloy by performing pin-on-disk experiments at temperatures up to 400 {sup o}C. Experimental results have shown that the 319 Al/B{sub 4}C tribosystem generated coefficient of friction (COF) values ranging between 0.42 and 0.65, in this temperature range. However, increased amounts of aluminum adhesion were detected in the B{sub 4}C wear tracks at elevated temperatures. Focused ion beam (FIB) milled cross sections of the wear tracks revealed that the coating failed due to shearing along the columnar grain boundaries of the coating. The 319 Al/DLC tribosystem maintained a low COF (0.15-0.06) from room temperature up to 200 {sup o}C. This was followed by an abrupt increase to 0.6 at 400 {sup o}C. The deterioration of friction behaviour at T > 200 {sup o}C was attributed to the exhaustion of hydrogen and hydroxyl passivants on the carbon transfer layer formed on the Al pin.

  3. High temperature tribological behaviour of carbon based (B4C and DLC) coatings in sliding contact with aluminum

    Carbon based coatings, particularly diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are known to resist aluminum adhesion and reduce friction at room temperature. This attractive tribological behaviour is useful for applications such as tool coatings used for aluminum forming and machining. However, for those operations that are performed at elevated temperatures (e.g. hot forming) or that generate frictional heat during contact (e.g. dry machining) the suitable coatings are required to maintain their tribological properties at high temperatures. Candidates for these demanding applications include boron carbide (B4C) and DLC coatings. An understanding of the mechanisms of friction, wear and adhesion of carbon based coatings against aluminum alloys at high temperatures will help in designing coatings with improved high temperature tribological properties. With this goal in mind, this study focused on B4C and a hydrogenated DLC coatings sliding against a 319 grade cast aluminum alloy by performing pin-on-disk experiments at temperatures up to 400 oC. Experimental results have shown that the 319 Al/B4C tribosystem generated coefficient of friction (COF) values ranging between 0.42 and 0.65, in this temperature range. However, increased amounts of aluminum adhesion were detected in the B4C wear tracks at elevated temperatures. Focused ion beam (FIB) milled cross sections of the wear tracks revealed that the coating failed due to shearing along the columnar grain boundaries of the coating. The 319 Al/DLC tribosystem maintained a low COF (0.15-0.06) from room temperature up to 200 oC. This was followed by an abrupt increase to 0.6 at 400 oC. The deterioration of friction behaviour at T > 200 oC was attributed to the exhaustion of hydrogen and hydroxyl passivants on the carbon transfer layer formed on the Al pin.

  4. Controllable and switchable capillary adhesion mechanism for bio-adhesive pads: Effect of micro patterns

    ZHANG XiangJun; LIU Yuan; LIU YongHe; AHMED S.I.-U.

    2009-01-01

    Some insects and animals, such as bugs, grasshoppers and tree frogs, realize their efficient adhesion mechanism to glass surface, wall and ceiling by injecting a wetting liquid thin film into the pad-substrate contact area. Their ability to control adhesion (attaching or detaching from a surface) is in many cases connected to the contact geometry and surface patterns of their attachment pads. This paper focuses on the dependence of the capillary adhesion (wet adhesion) on the micro patterns of the bio-adhesive pads. The objective is to reveal the possible mechanism for a bio-adhesive pad to control capillary force through adjusting its micro-scale surface pattern and topography. A capillary adhesion force model is built up taking account of the combined role of micro-dimple geometry as well as the wetting behavior of the confined liquid thin film. Calculated results of the apparent contact angle on the regularly micro-dimpled surfaces are compared with and in good agreement with the experimental measurements. Simulation of the capillary adhesion force reveals that it is controllable in a large mag-nitude by adjusting a dimensionless surface pattern parameter k defined as a/(a+b), where a is the dia-meter of micro dimple, and (a+b) is the side length of one pattern cell. When adjusting the parameter k more than 0.75, the capillary adhesion force could be switchable from attractive to repulsive. This effect of micro patterns on the interfacial capillary force is proved to be dominant when the pad-substrate clearance decreases to the nano/micrometer scale. These results indicate that a controllable and switchable capillary adhesive mechanism might be utilized by a living insect or animal to realize its stable adhesion and quick releasing movement through adjusting the micro-pattern topography of its bio-adhesive pad.

  5. A randomized control clinical trial of fissure sealant retention: Self etch adhesive versus total etch adhesive

    Nadia Aman; Farhan Raza Khan; Aisha Salim; Huma Farid

    2015-01-01

    Context: There are limited studies on comparison of Total etch (TE) and Self etch (SE) adhesive for placement of sealants. Aims: The aim of the study was to compare the retention of fissure sealants placed using TE adhesive to those sealants placed using SE (seventh generation) adhesive. Settings and Design: The study was conducted in the dental section, Aga Khan University Hospital. This study was a randomized single blinded trial with a split mouth design. Materials and Methods:...

  6. Embedded adhesive connection for laminated glass plates

    Hansen, Jens Zangenberg; Poulsen, S.H.; Bagger, A.; Stang, Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes

    2012-01-01

    The structural behavior of a new connection design, the embedded adhesive connection, used for laminated glass plates is investigated. The connection consists of an aluminum plate encapsulated in-between two adjacent triple layered laminated glass plates. Fastening between glass and aluminum is...... ensured using a structural adhesive. At first, the elastic and viscoelastic material properties of the adhesive are identified where the influence of load-rate and failure properties are also examined. Through an inverse analysis using the finite element method, the experimental observations are...... replicated to identify a material model of the adhesive. The material model consists of an elastic and linear viscoelastic formulation suitable for a numerical implementation of the material. Based on two relevant load cases, out-of-plane bending and in-plane shear, the connection performance is investigated...

  7. ENHANCING ADHESION OF TETRAHEDRAL AMORPHOUS CARBON FILMS

    Zhao Yuqing; Lin Yi; Wang Xiaoyan; Wang Yanwu; Wei Xinyu

    2005-01-01

    Objective The high energy ion bombardment technique is applied to enhancing the adhesion of the tetrahedral amorphous carbon (TAC) films deposited by the filtered cathode vacuum arc (FCVA). Methods The abrasion method, scratch method, heating and shaking method as well as boiling salt solution method is used to test the adhesion of the TAC films on various material substrates. Results The test results show that the adhesion is increased as the ion bombardment energy increases. However, if the bombardment energy were over the corresponding optimum value, the adhesion would be enhanced very slowly for the harder material substrates and drops quickly, for the softer ones. Conclusion The optimum values of the ion bombardment energy are larger for the harder materials than that for the softer ones.

  8. Micropatterning cell adhesion on polyacrylamide hydrogels.

    Zhang, Jian; Guo, Wei-Hui; Rape, Andrew; Wang, Yu-Li

    2013-01-01

    Cell shape and substrate rigidity play critical roles in regulating cell behaviors and fate. Controlling cell shape on elastic adhesive materials holds great promise for creating a physiologically relevant culture environment for basic and translational research and clinical applications. However, it has been technically challenging to create high-quality adhesive patterns on compliant substrates. We have developed an efficient and economical method to create precise micron-scaled adhesive patterns on the surface of a hydrogel (Rape et al., Biomaterials 32:2043-2051, 2011). This method will facilitate the research on traction force generation, cellular mechanotransduction, and tissue engineering, where precise controls of both materials rigidity and adhesive patterns are important. PMID:23955741

  9. Recent advances in nanostructured biomimetic dry adhesives

    CarloMenon

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The relatively large size of the gecko and its ability to climb a multitude of structures with ease has often been cited as the inspiration upon which the field of dry adhesives is based. Since 2010, there have been many advances in the field of dry adhesives with much of the new research focusing on developing nanoscale and hierarchical features in a concentrated effort to develop synthetic gecko-like dry adhesives which are strong, durable and self-cleaning. A brief overview of the geckos and the hairs which it uses to adhere to many different surfaces is provided before delving into the current methods and materials used to fabricate synthetic gecko hairs. A summary of the recently published literature on bio-inspired, nanostructured dry adhesives is presented with an emphasis being placed on fabrication techniques.

  10. Wear resistant PTFE thin film enabled by a polydopamine adhesive layer

    The influence of a polydopamine (PDA) adhesive layer on the friction and wear resistance of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) thin films coated on stainless steel was investigated. The friction and wear tests were carried out using a ball on flat configuration under a normal load of 50 g, sliding speed of 2.5 mm/s, and stroke length of 15 mm. It is found that the PDA/PTFE film is able to withstand approximately 500 times more rubbing cycles than the PTFE film alone. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results show that a tenacious layer of PTFE remains adhered to the PDA layer, which enables the durability of the PDA/PTFE film. Because of the relatively low thickness of the film, PDA/PTFE shows great potential for use in applications where durable, thin films are desirable

  11. Adhesion between Polydimethylsiloxane Layers by Crosslinking

    Yu, Liyun; Daugaard, Anders Egede; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2013-01-01

    Adhesion between two surfaces may be strongly improved by chemical crosslinking of the interfaces. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a widely used polymer that has received considerable attention due to its unique properties, such as relatively low price, biocompatibility, flexibility, high thermal...... investigated by rheology and microscopy. The objective of this work was to create adhesion of two layers without destroying the original viscoelastic properties of the PDMS films....

  12. Hierarchical Nanopatterns for Cell Adhesion Studies

    Schwieder, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Hierarchical nanopatterned interfaces are an intriguing tool to study clustering processes of proteins like for example integrins that mediate cell adhesion. The aim of this work is the development of innovative methods for the fabrication of hierarchical micro-nanopatterned surfaces and the use of such systems as platforms to study cell adhesion. In the first part of this work different approaches are presented which are suitable for preparing micro-nanopatterned interfaces at a large scale ...

  13. Effectiveness of cyanoacrylate adhesive in rabbit aortorrhaphy

    Marcus Vinicius Henriques de Carvalho; Evaldo Marchi; Mario Pantaroto

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Even when properly performed, arterial sutures are not always absolutely hemostatic. Tissue sealants and adhesives have become available that can be used to complete sutures, preventing hemorrhage problems.OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of cyanoacrylate adhesive for sealing aortotomies in rabbits in a coagulopathic state, by analyzing survival of the animals and the time taken to achieve hemostasis.METHODS: Ten-mm long aortotomies were performed on the infrarenal aortas...

  14. Phosphoproteomic analysis of adhesion receptor signalling

    Robertson, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The binding of integrin adhesion receptors to their extracellular matrix (ECM) ligands activates intracellular signalling pathways that control diverse and fundamental aspects of cell behaviour. While it is clear that protein kinases and phosphatases play an integral role in such adhesion-mediated signalling, current knowledge of the phosphorylation events regulated downstream of integrin ligation is limited and prohibits a systems-level understanding of the molecular mechanisms through which...

  15. Relationships between water wettability and ice adhesion.

    Meuler, Adam J; Smith, J David; Varanasi, Kripa K; Mabry, Joseph M; McKinley, Gareth H; Cohen, Robert E

    2010-11-01

    Ice formation and accretion may hinder the operation of many systems critical to national infrastructure, including airplanes, power lines, windmills, ships, and telecommunications equipment. Yet despite the pervasiveness of the icing problem, the fundamentals of ice adhesion have received relatively little attention in the scientific literature and it is not widely understood which attributes must be tuned to systematically design "icephobic" surfaces that are resistant to icing. Here we probe the relationships between advancing/receding water contact angles and the strength of ice adhesion to bare steel and twenty-one different test coatings (∼200-300 nm thick) applied to the nominally smooth steel discs. Contact angles are measured using a commercially available goniometer, whereas the average strengths of ice adhesion are evaluated with a custom-built laboratory-scale adhesion apparatus. The coatings investigated comprise commercially available polymers and fluorinated polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (fluorodecyl POSS), a low-surface-energy additive known to enhance liquid repellency. Ice adhesion strength correlates strongly with the practical work of adhesion required to remove a liquid water drop from each test surface (i.e., with the quantity [1 + cos θ(rec)]), and the average strength of ice adhesion was reduced by as much as a factor of 4.2 when bare steel discs were coated with fluorodecyl POSS-containing materials. We argue that any further appreciable reduction in ice adhesion strength will require textured surfaces, as no known materials exhibit receding water contact angles on smooth/flat surfaces that are significantly above those reported here (i.e., the values of [1 + cos θ(rec)] reported here have essentially reached a minimum for known materials). PMID:20949900

  16. The adhesive revolution of restorative dentistry

    Barnes, IE; Newsome, PRH

    1996-01-01

    In many countries, the incidence of dental decay in the young is decreasing, and Hong Kong is no exception. However, there remains in the region, a number of restorative dental problems of some significance. These are tooth discolouration, fracture, and root surface decay. This article discusses these problems and the way in which their treatment is increasingly being undertaken by means of minimalԸ?intervention adhesive techniques. The formulation of dental adhesive systems that are effectiv...

  17. Particle diameter influences adhesion under flow.

    Shinde Patil, V R; Campbell, C. J.; Yun, Y.H.; Slack, S M; Goetz, D J

    2001-01-01

    The diameter of circulating cells that may adhere to the vascular endothelium spans an order of magnitude from approximately 2 microm (e.g., platelets) to approximately 20 microm (e.g., a metastatic cell). Although mathematical models indicate that the adhesion exhibited by a cell will be a function of cell diameter, there have been few experimental investigations into the role of cell diameter in adhesion. Thus, in this study, we coated 5-, 10-, 15-, and 20-microm-diameter microspheres with ...

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Mussel Adhesive Peptides

    Deshmukh Manjeet Vinayakrao

    2005-01-01

    Mussels, marine organisms, attach to underwater surfaces by making a byssus, which is an extra-corporeal bundle of tiny tendons attached distally to a foreign surface and proximally by insertion of the root into the byssal retractor muscles. The interaction exterior of byssus and marine surface is an adhesive plaque that contains different proportion of five mytilus edulis adhesive proteins (mefp-1 to 5). Relatively high contains ...

  19. Evolutions of friction properties and acoustic emission source parameters associated with large sliding

    Yabe, Y.; Tsuda, H.; Iida, T.

    2015-12-01

    It was demonstrated by Yabe (2002) that friction properties and AE (acoustic emission) activities evolve with accumulation of sliding. However, large sliding distances of ~65 mm in his experiments were achieved by recurring ~10 mm sliding on the same fault. The evolution of friction coefficient was discontinuous, when rock samples were reset. Further, normal stress was not kept constant. To overcome these problems and to reexamine the evolutions of friction properties and AE activities with continuous large sliding under a constant normal stress, we developed a rotary shear apparatus. The evolutions of friction and AE up to ~80 mm sliding under a normal stress of 5 MPa were investigated. Rate dependence of friction was the velocity strengthening (a-b>0 in rate and state friction law) at the beginning. The value of a-b gradually decreased with sliding to negative (velocity weakening). Then, it took a constant negative value, when the sliding reached a critical distance. The m-value of Ishimoto-Iida's relation of AE activity increased with sliding at the beginning and converged to a constant value at the critical sliding distance. The m-value showed a negative rate dependence at the beginning, but became neutral after sliding of the critical distance. The sliding distances required to converge the a-b value, the m-value and the rate dependence of the m-value are almost identical to one another. These results are the same as those by Yabe (2002), suggesting the intermission of sliding little affected the evolutions. We, then, examined evolutions of AE source parameters such as source radii and stress drops. The average source radius was constant over the whole sliding distance, while the average stress drop decreased at the beginning of sliding, and converged to a constant value. The sliding distance required to the conversion was the same as that for the above mentioned evolutions of friction property or AE activity.

  20. Elimination of the reactivation process in the adhesion of chlorinated SBS rubber with polychloroprene adhesives

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Chlorination treatment of a thermoplastic styrene-butadiene-styrene rubber (SBS with a 3 wt% solution of trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCI in methyl ethyl ketone (MEK introduces chlorinated and oxidized moieties on the rubber surface which increase its surface energy and produces surface microroughness. Consequently adhesion properties, evaluated by T-peel strength measurements in chlorinated SBS/solvent based-polyurethane adhesive/leather joints, are enhanced. In this study, two solvent-based polychloroprene adhesives (PCP0 and PCP30R have been considered as an alternative to the commonly used solvent-based polyurethane adhesive (PU. A thermoreactive phenolic resin was added to one of the polychloroprene adhesive formulations (PCP30R. This tackifier resin favors chlorination of the adhesive and reinforces the interface between the chlorinated adhesive and the chlorinated rubber surface. Besides, PCP30R adhesive does not need adhesive reactivation and considerable high T-peel strength value (5.7±0.3 kN/m was obtained. Elimination of the reactivation process implies a considerable improvement of the manufacturing process in the footwear industry.

  1. Virtual slides in peer reviewed, open access medical publication

    Kayser Klaus

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Application of virtual slides (VS, the digitalization of complete glass slides, is in its infancy to be implemented in routine diagnostic surgical pathology and to issues that are related to tissue-based diagnosis, such as education and scientific publication. Approach Electronic publication in Pathology offers new features of scientific communication in pathology that cannot be obtained by conventional paper based journals. Most of these features are based upon completely open or partly directed interaction between the reader and the system that distributes the article. One of these interactions can be applied to microscopic images allowing the reader to navigate and magnify the presented images. VS and interactive Virtual Microscopy (VM are a tool to increase the scientific value of microscopic images. Technology and Performance The open access journal Diagnostic Pathology http://www.diagnosticpathology.org has existed for about five years. It is a peer reviewed journal that publishes all types of scientific contributions, including original scientific work, case reports and review articles. In addition to digitized still images the authors of appropriate articles are requested to submit the underlying glass slides to an institution (DiagnomX.eu, and Leica.com for digitalization and documentation. The images are stored in a separate image data bank which is adequately linked to the article. The normal review process is not involved. Both processes (peer review and VS acquisition are performed contemporaneously in order to minimize a potential publication delay. VS are not provided with a DOI index (digital object identifier. The first articles that include VS were published in March 2011. Results and Perspectives Several logistic constraints had to be overcome until the first articles including VS could be published. Step by step an automated acquisition and distribution system had to be implemented to the corresponding

  2. 21 CFR 878.3750 - External prosthesis adhesive.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External prosthesis adhesive. 878.3750 Section 878...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3750 External prosthesis adhesive. (a) Identification. An external prosthesis adhesive is a silicone-type adhesive intended to...

  3. Controlled Adhesion of Silicone Elastomer Surfaces

    Owen, Michael

    2000-03-01

    Opportunities exist for controllably enhancing the adhesion of silicone surfaces, ranging from modest enhancement of release force levels of pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) release liners by incorporation of adhesion promoters known as high release additives (HRA), to permanent bonding of silicone elastomers using surface modification techniques such as plasma or corona treatment. Although only a part of the complex interaction of factors contributing to adhesion, surface properties such as wettability are a critical component in the understanding and control of release and adhesion phenomena. Surface characterization studies of low-surface-energy silicones before and after various adhesion modification strategies are reviewed. The silicones include polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and fluorosiloxane elastomers and coatings. Techniques used include contact angle, the Johnson, Kendall and Roberts (JKR) contact mechanics approach, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Topics addressed are: use of HRA in PDMS release liners, the interaction of PDMS PSAs with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), and the effect of plasma treatment on PDMS and fluorosiloxane surfaces.

  4. Preparation and Properties of Cornstarch Adhesives

    Li Yang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this study was to use cornstarch in the production of environmentally sound adhesives. ‘Three-formaldehyde glue’ pollutes the environment and harms to human health strongly, which widely used for wood-based panels preparation. Environment-friendly cornstarch adhesives were prepared using method of oxidation-gelatinization, insteading of the three formaldehyde glue. The effects of the quality ratio of starch and water, temperature and shear rate on the apparent viscosity of the adhesive were studied. The rheological eigenvalue of apparent viscosity was studied through nonlinear regression. The results showed that the apparent viscosity of cornstarch adhesives increased and then decreased with the increasing of temperature and the maximum value was obtained at 10oC; the apparent viscosity decreased slowly with the increasing of rotor speed; the phenomenon of shear thinning appeared wither cornstarch adhesives which was pseudo-plastic fluids. Cornstarch adhesives with characteristics of non-toxic, no smell and pollution could be applied in interior and upscale packaging.

  5. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF WOOD ADHESIVE JOINTS

    Thomas GEREKE

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Engineered wood products such as glulam or cross-laminated timber are widely established in the construction industry. Their structural behaviour and reliability clearly bases on the adhesive bonding. In order to understand and improve the performance of glued wood members a finite element modelling of standard single lap shear samples was carried out. A three-dimensional model of a longitudinal tensile-shear specimen with quasi-centric load application was developed. The main influences of wood and adhesive parameters on structural performance were identified. Therefore, variations of the elasticity, the annual ring angle, fibre angle, and the interface zone and their effect on the occurring stresses in the adhesive bond line were investigated numerically. The adhesive bond line is most significantly sensitive to the Young´s modulus of the adhesive itself. A variation of the fibre angle of the glued members in the standard test is an essential criterion and to be considered when preparing lap shear specimens. A model with representation of early- and latewood gives a more detailed insight into wooden adhesive joints.

  6. Sliding without slipping under Coulomb friction: opening waves and inversion of frictional force

    Yastrebov, Vladislav A

    2015-01-01

    An elastic layer slides on a rigid flat governed by Coulomb's friction law. We demonstrate that if the coefficient of friction is high enough, the sliding localizes within stick-slip pulses, which transform into opening waves propagating at intersonic speed in the direction of sliding or, for high Poisson's ratios, at supersonic speed in the opposite one. This sliding mode, characterized by small frictional dissipation, rapidly relaxes the shear elastic energy via stress waves and enables the contact surface slide ahead of the top one, resulting in inversion of the frictional force direction.

  7. Enhanced adhesion of diamond coatings

    Zheng, Zhido

    potential layers identified: TiN and TiC. Crystalline diamond coatings are subsequently deposited on these layers by hot filament CVD. A large grained TiC coating with a relatively rough surface was found to provide the best adhesion to the diamond layer. As judged qualitatively by the extent of spallation adjacent to hardness indentation, this intermediate layer performs better than similar TiC layers reported in the literature. The residual stresses in the diamond coatings are analysed using Raman microprobe spectroscopy, and compared with the predictions of the analytical model. The adhesion of the diamond coatings on various substrates with and without an intermediate layer of TiC is quantitatively evaluated by measuring the length of the delamination crack surrounding through-thickness holes in the coating and comparing with the relationship derived between crack length and strain energy release rate. The measured adherence on WC-Co substrates, as characterised by the critical strain energy release rate for growth of the delamination crack, was found to be significantly higher in the presence of the TiC intermediate layer developed during the course of this work.

  8. Atomistic simulations to micro-mechanisms of adhesion in automotive applications

    Sen, Fatih Gurcag

    This study aimed at depicting atomistic and microstructural aspects of adhesion and friction that appear in different automotive applications and manufacturing processes using atomistic simulations coupled with tribological tests and surface characterization experiments. Thin films that form at the contact interfaces due to chemical reactions and coatings that are developed to mitigate or enhance adhesion were studied in detail. The adhesion and friction experiments conducted on diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings against Al indicated that F incorporation into DLC decreased the coefficient of friction (COF) by 30% -with respect to H-DLC that is known to have low COF and anti-adhesion properties against Al- to 0.14 owing to formation of repulsive F-F interactions at the sliding interface as shown by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. F atoms transferred to the Al surface with an increase in the contact pressure, and this F transfer led to the formation of a stable AlF3 compound at the Al surface as confirmed by XPS and cross-sectional FIB-TEM. The incorporation of Si and O in a F-containing DLC resulted in humidity independent low COF of 0.08 due to the hydration effect of the Si-O-Si chains in the carbonaceous tribolayers that resulted in repulsive OH-OH interactions at the contact interface. At high temperatures, adhesion of Al was found to be enhanced as a result of superplastic oxide fibers on the Al surface. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of tensile deformation of Al nanowires in oxygen carried out with ReaxFF showed that native oxide of Al has an oxygen deficient, low density structure and in O2, the oxygen diffusion in amorphous oxide healed the broken Al-O bonds during applied strain and resulted in the superplasticity. The oxide shell also provided nucleation sites for dislocations in Al crystal. In fuel cell applications, where low Pt/carbon adhesion is causing durability problems, spin-polarized DFT showed that metals with unfilled d

  9. Advances in modeling and design of adhesively bonded systems

    Kumar, S

    2013-01-01

    The book comprehensively charts a way for industry to employ adhesively bonded joints to make systems more efficient and cost-effective Adhesively bonded systems have found applications in a wide spectrum of industries (e.g., aerospace, electronics, construction, ship building, biomedical, etc.) for a variety of purposes. Emerging adhesive materials with improved mechanical properties have allowed adhesion strength approaching that of the bonded materials themselves. Due to advances in adhesive materials and the many potential merits that adhesive bonding offers, adhesive bonding has replac

  10. Application of the Blister Test in Study of Epoxy Adhesive

    Fei Xiong; Ingegerd Annergren

    2000-01-01

    Shaft-loaded blister test technique is used as an effective quantitative tool to measure adhesion strength. Investigation on conductive adhesive was done by modified blister test. It is found that shaftloaded blister test can be a good solution for the debonding of thin film adhesion. The intrinsic stable interface debonding process has been proved an attractive alternative to the conventional adhesion measurement techniques. In our study, epoxy matrix adhesive was studied using blister test technique in comparison with the traditional test-lap shear test. Adhesion strength was studied as a function of surface treatment and the metallization of substrate. It was found that surface conditions of substrate have significant impact on adhesion behaviour. The oxidation of surface is responsible for the poor adhesion. Activating chemical treatment and Plasma cleaning on substrate surface has been found to be a way of dreamatically improving adhesion strength of electronic conductive adhesive.

  11. L1 cell adhesion molecule overexpression in hepatocellular carcinoma associates with advanced tumor progression and poor patient survival

    Guo Xiaodong

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM, as a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, has recently been observed in a variety of human malignancies. However, no data of L1CAM are available for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of L1CAM in HCC and determine its correlation with tumor progression and prognosis. Methods One-hundred and thirty HCC patients who had undergone curative liver resection were selected and immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR were performed to analyze L1CAM expression in the respective tumors. Results Immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and Q-PCR consistently confirmed the overexpression of L1CAM in HCC tissues compared with their adjacent nonneoplastic tissues at both protein and gene level (both P Conclusion Our data suggest for the first time that L1CAM expression in HCC was significantly correlated with the advanced tumor progression and was an independent poor prognostic factor for both overall survival and disease-free survival in patients with HCC. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1970024872761542

  12. Reciprocating sliding wear characteristics of copper-carbon fiber composites

    Kuniya, Keiichi; Arakawa, Hideo; Namekawa, Takashi

    1988-01-01

    The effect of fiber orientation and alloy composition on the reciprocating sliding wear behavior of Cu-C fiber composite was studied. The wear volume was smaller than that of Cu alloys. The wear volume increased with increasing sliding load and volume fraction of C fibers above 30 volume percent. The effectiveness of fiber orientation in decreasing the wear volume was the highest for random orientation, medium in the direction perpendicular to the fiber direction, and lowest in the fiber direction. The wear volume was decreased by the addition of Sn and Zr. However, the additions did not achieve isotropic wear characteristics of the composite. Isotropic wear was obtained by the addition of C powder. Isotropic and decreased composite wear were attained by adding Zr and C powder together.

  13. Advances and applications in sliding mode control systems

    Zhu, Quanmin

    2015-01-01

    This book describes the advances and applications in Sliding mode control (SMC) which is widely used as a powerful method to tackle uncertain nonlinear systems. The book is organized into 21 chapters which have been organised by the editors to reflect the various themes of sliding mode control. The book provides the reader with a broad range of material from first principles up to the current state of the art in the area of SMC and observation presented in a clear, matter-of-fact style. As such it is appropriate for graduate students with a basic knowledge of classical control theory and some knowledge of state-space methods and nonlinear systems. The resulting design procedures are emphasized using Matlab/Simulink software.    

  14. Evidence of Self-Organized Criticality in Dry Sliding Friction

    Zypman, Fredy R.; Ferrante, John; Jansen, Mark; Scanlon, Kathleen; Abel, Phillip

    2003-01-01

    This letter presents experimental results on unlubricated friction, which suggests that stick-slip is described by self-organized criticality (SOC). The data, obtained with a pin-on-disc tribometer examines the variation of the friction force as a function of time-or sliding distance. This is the first time that standard tribological equipment has been used to examine the possibility of SOC. The materials were matching pins and discs of aluminium loaded with 250, 500 and 1000 g masses, and matching M50 steel couples loaded with a 1000 g mass. An analysis of the data shows that the probability distribution of slip sizes follows a power law. We perform a careful analysis of all the properties, beyond the two just mentioned, which are required to imply the presence of SOC. Our data strongly support the existence of SOC for stick-slip in dry sliding friction.

  15. Maximum Power Point Tracking Based on Sliding Mode Control

    Nimrod Vázquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar panels, which have become a good choice, are used to generate and supply electricity in commercial and residential applications. This generated power starts with the solar cells, which have a complex relationship between solar irradiation, temperature, and output power. For this reason a tracking of the maximum power point is required. Traditionally, this has been made by considering just current and voltage conditions at the photovoltaic panel; however, temperature also influences the process. In this paper the voltage, current, and temperature in the PV system are considered to be a part of a sliding surface for the proposed maximum power point tracking; this means a sliding mode controller is applied. Obtained results gave a good dynamic response, as a difference from traditional schemes, which are only based on computational algorithms. A traditional algorithm based on MPPT was added in order to assure a low steady state error.

  16. SIMULATING THE 'SLIDING DOORS' EFFECT THROUGH MAGNETIC FLUX EMERGENCE

    Recent Hinode photospheric vector magnetogram observations have shown that the opposite polarities of a long arcade structure move apart and then come together. In addition to this 'sliding doors' effect, orientations of horizontal magnetic fields along the polarity inversion line on the photosphere evolve from a normal-polarity configuration to an inverse one. To explain this behavior, a simple model by Okamoto et al. suggested that it is the result of the emergence of a twisted flux rope. Here, we model this scenario using a three-dimensional megnatohydrodynamic simulation of a twisted flux rope emerging into a pre-existing overlying arcade. We construct magnetograms from the simulation and compare them with the observations. The model produces the two signatures mentioned above. However, the cause of the 'sliding doors' effect differs from the previous model.

  17. Morphological Transitions of Sliding Drops -- Dynamics and Bifurcations

    Engelnkemper, Sebastian; Gurevich, Svetlana V; Thiele, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    We study fully three-dimensional droplets that slide down an incline employing a thin-film equation that accounts for capillarity, wettability and a lateral driving force in small-gradient (or long-wave) approximation. In particular, we focus on qualitative changes in the morphology and behavior of stationary sliding drops. We employ the inclination angle of the substrate as control parameter and use continuation techniques to analyze for several fixed droplet sizes the bifurcation diagram of stationary droplets, their linear stability and relevant eigenmodes. The obtained predictions on existence ranges and instabilities are tested via direct numerical simulations that are also used to investigate a branch of time-periodic behavior (corresponding to pearling-coalescence cycles) which emerges at a global instability, the related hysteresis in behavior and a period-doubling cascade. The non-trivial oscillatory behavior close to a Hopf bifurcation of drops with a finite-length tail is also studied. Finally, it ...

  18. Sliding window approach based Text Binarisation from Complex Textual images

    Gopalan, Chitrakala

    2010-01-01

    Text binarisation process classifies individual pixels as text or background in the textual images. Binarization is necessary to bridge the gap between localization and recognition by OCR. This paper presents Sliding window method to binarise text from textual images with textured background. Suitable preprocessing techniques are applied first to increase the contrast of the image and blur the background noises due to textured background. Then Edges are detected by iterative thresholding. Subsequently formed edge boxes are analyzed to remove unwanted edges due to complex background and binarised by sliding window approach based character size uniformity check algorithm. The proposed method has been applied on localized region from heterogeneous textual images and compared with Otsu, Niblack methods and shown encouraging performance of the proposed method.

  19. Sliding window approach based Text Binarisation from Complex Textual images

    Chitrakala Gopalan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Text binarisation process classifies individual pixels as text or background in the textual images. Binarization is necessary to bridge the gap between localization and recognition by OCR. This paper presents Sliding window method to binarise text from textual images with textured background. Suitable preprocessing techniques are applied first to increase the contrast of the image and blur the background noises due to textured background. Then Edges are detected by iterative thresholding. Subsequently formed edge boxes are analyzed to remove unwanted edges due to complex background and binarised by sliding window approach based character size uniformity check algorithm. The proposed method has been applied on localizedregion from heterogeneous textual images and compared with Otsu, Niblack methods and shown encouraging performance of the proposed method.

  20. Universal Aging Mechanism for Static and Sliding Friction of Metallic Nanoparticles

    Feldmann, Michael; Dietzel, Dirk; Tekiel, Antoni; Topple, Jessica; Grütter, Peter; Schirmeisen, André

    2016-07-01

    The term "contact aging" refers to the temporal evolution of the interface between a slider and a substrate usually resulting in increasing friction with time. Current phenomenological models for multiasperity contacts anticipate that such aging is not only the driving force behind the transition from static to sliding friction, but at the same time influences the general dynamics of the sliding friction process. To correlate static and sliding friction on the nanoscale, we show experimental evidence of stick-slip friction for nanoparticles sliding on graphite over a wide dynamic range. We can assign defined periods of aging to the stick phases of the particles, which agree with simulations explicitly including contact aging. Additional slide-hold-slide experiments for the same system allow linking the sliding friction results to static friction measurements, where both friction mechanisms can be universally described by a common aging formalism.

  1. Sliding rule-homogram for calculation of a shield from extended radioisotope gamma sources

    Arrangement of sliding rule-nomogram, intended for calculation of side protection in radial direction from γ-radiation of extended radioisotopic sources (60Co and 137Cs) is described. The sliding rule-nomogram comprises rule itself (body) with monograms plotted on it, first slide independently moving along the body of the rule, and second slide with sighting line independently sliding along the first slide perpendicular to its movement. The principle of operation of the slide rule-nomogram is considered in detail. Calculation examples of protective device by means of the rule-nomogram are presented. The rule is suitable and simple in operation. Any of the radiation parameters (protection thickness, protection material, activity, source energy, air gap) can be operatively determined by means of this rule

  2. Pressure-sensitive adhesives for transdermal drug delivery systems.

    Tan; Pfister

    1999-02-01

    Adhesives are a critical component in transdermal drug delivery (TDD) devices. In addition to the usual requirements of functional adhesive properties, adhesives for TDD applications must have good biocompatibility with the skin, chemical compatibility with the drug, various components of the formulation, and provide consistent, effective delivery of the drug. This review discusses the three most commonly used adhesives (polyisobutylenes, polyacrylates and silicones) in TDD devices, and provides an update on recently introduced TDD products and recent developments of new adhesives. PMID:10234208

  3. Characteristics of the adhesive determinants of Lactobacillus fermentum 104.

    Henriksson, A; Szewzyk, R; Conway, P L

    1991-01-01

    The adhesion of Lactobacillus fermentum 104-R and the variant strain 104-S to porcine gastric squamous epithelium was investigated. An epithelium-specific adhesion was detected for strain 104-S; however, strain 104-R expressed enhanced adhesion capacity to the control surfaces of polystyrene and bovine serum albumin. To characterize the adhesive determinants, the bacterial cells were exposed to various treatments. The adhesion pattern of bacterial cells in buffers of pH values ranging from 2 ...

  4. Improved stress prediction in adhesive bonded optical components

    Vreugd, J. de; Voert, M.J.A. te; Nijenhuis, J.R.; Pijnenburg, J.A.C.M.; Tabak, E.

    2012-01-01

    Adhesives are widely used in optomechanical structures for bonding optical components to their mounts. The main advantage of using adhesives is the excellent strength to weight ratio. Adhesive bonding is seen as a desirable joining technique as it allows for greater flexibility in design. A disadvantage of adhesives however is the limited dimensional stability and loadability. To design stable optical mounts, accurate prediction of stresses and deformation is therefore needed. Adhesives show ...

  5. Sliding functor and polarization functor for multigraded modules

    Yanagawa, Kohji

    2010-01-01

    We define "sliding functors", which are exact endofunctors of the category of multi-graded modules over a polynomial ring. They preserve several invariants of modules, especially the (usual) depth and Stanley depth. In a similar way, we can also define the "polarization functor". While this idea has appeared in papers of Bruns-Herzog and Sbarra, we give slightly different approach. Keeping these functors in mind, we treat simplicial spheres of Bier-Murai type.

  6. Recent advances in sliding modes from control to intelligent mechatronics

    Efe, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    This volume is dedicated to Professor Okyay Kaynak to commemorate his life time impactful research and scholarly achievements and outstanding services to profession. The 21 invited chapters have been written by leading researchers who, in the past, have had association with Professor Kaynak as either his students and associates or colleagues and collaborators. The focal theme of the volume is the Sliding Modes covering a broad scope of topics from theoretical investigations to their significant applications from Control to Intelligent Mechatronics.  

  7. Gif 2011 school: neutrinos. Slides of the presentations

    This document gathers the slides of the lectures given at the GIF 2011 school. These lectures were pedagogical reviews of both theoretical and experimental physics around neutrino issues. There were 9 lectures: 1) the origin of the neutrino mass, 2) theory of neutrino oscillations, 3) measuring the neutrino mass, 4) measuring the neutrino oscillation parameters, 5) astronomy with neutrinos, 6) the story of the neutrino, 7) neutrinos beyond the standard model, 8) neutrinos in cosmology, and 9) future experiments. (A.C.)

  8. Peeling of multilayer graphene generates complex interlayer sliding patterns

    Korhonen, Topi; Koskinen, Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Peeling, shearing, and sliding are important mechanical phenomena in van der Waals solids. However, theoretically they have been studied mostly using minimal periodic cells and in the context of accurate quantum simulations. Here, we investigate the peeling of large-scale multilayer graphene stacks with varying thicknesses, stackings, and peeling directions by using classical molecular dynamics simulations with a registry-dependent interlayer potential. Simulations show that, while at large s...

  9. Stability notions and Lyapunov functions for sliding mode control systems

    Polyakov, Andrey; Fridman, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    The paper surveys mathematical tools required for stability and convergence analysis of modern sliding mode control systems. Elements of Filippov theory of differential equations with discontinuous right-hand sides and its recent extensions are discussed. Stability notions (from Lyapunov stability (1982) to fixed-time stability (2012)) are observed. Concepts of generalized derivatives and non-smooth Lyapunov functions are considered. The generalized Lyapunov theorems for stability analysis an...

  10. Study of the Flow Induced by a Sliding Discharge

    Sosa, Roberto; Arnaud, Elise; Memin, Etienne; Artana, Guillermo

    2009-01-01

    International audience In this work, we report on electrical and fluid-dynamics studies concerning the flow induced by a sliding discharge (SD). This kind of discharge was created with a three electrode system configuration: one excited with ac and the others with a dc negative voltage. The SD was activated on a quiescent fluid at atmospheric pressure. The flow field induced by the SD was analysed by measurements undertaken with Pitot probes and Schlieren Image Velocimetry. Under the condi...

  11. Quantum Hall Smectics, Sliding Symmetry and the Renormalization Group

    Lawler, Michael J; Fradkin, Eduardo

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the implication of the existence of a sliding symmetry, equivalent to the absence of a shear modulus, on the low-energy theory of the quantum hall smectic (QHS) state. We show, through renormalization group calculations, that such a symmetry causes the naive continuum approximation in the direction perpendicular to the stripes to break down through infrared divergent contributions originating from naively irrelevant operators. In particular, we show that the correct f...

  12. Thresholds in the sliding resistance of simulated basal ice

    Emerson, L. F.; Rempel, A. W.

    2007-01-01

    We report on laboratory determinations of the shear resistance to sliding melting ice with entrained particles over a hard, impermeable surface. With higher particle concentrations and larger particle sizes, Coulomb friction at particle-bed contacts dominates and the shear stress increases linearly with normal load. We term this the sandy regime. When either particle concentration or particle size is reduced below a threshold, the dependence of shear resistance on normal lo...

  13. A high performance switching audio amplifier using sliding mode control

    Pillonnet, Gael; Cellier, Rémy; Abouchi, Nacer; Chiollaz, Monique

    2008-01-01

    International audience The switching audio amplifiers are widely used in various portable and consumer electronics due to their high efficiency, but suffers from low audio performances due to inherent nonlinearity. This paper presents an integrated class D audio amplifier with low consumption and high audio performances. It includes a power stage and an efficient control based on sliding mode technique. This monolithic class D amplifier is capable of delivering up to 1W into 8Ω load at les...

  14. Development of a standardized testing system for orthodontic sliding mechanics

    Fathimani, Maryam; Melenka, Garrett W; Romanyk, Dan L; Toogood, Roger W; Heo, Giseon; Carey, Jason P.; Major, Paul W

    2015-01-01

    Background The primary objective of this study was to develop a computer-controlled three-dimensional friction measuring system, the orthodontic friction simulator (OFS). A clinically-based in vitro experiment considering wet and dry friction for conventionally and self-ligated brackets is presented to elucidate debate surrounding sliding mechanics and illustrate capabilities of the OFS. Methods The OFS was designed and manufactured using sound engineering principles and with the primary conc...

  15. Silicone Brushes: Omniphobic Surfaces with Low Sliding Angles.

    Wooh, Sanghyuk; Vollmer, Doris

    2016-06-01

    Losing contact: Omniphobic surfaces can be readily produced by acid-catalyzed graft polycondensation of dimethyldimethoxysilane (PDMS). Droplets show a very small contact angle hysteresis as well as a low sliding angle of only a few degrees. The nm-thick PDMS layer is neither easily washed away nor depleted. This method offers a novel approach towards the preparation of super-liquid-repelling surfaces. PMID:27159802

  16. SIMULATION OF BLDC MOTOR CONTROL USING SLIDING MODE CONTROL TECHNIQUE

    Namita P. Galphade; Subhash S. Sankeshwari

    2015-01-01

    Mostly, Brushless DC motors have been used in various industrial and domestic applications because of its advantages like simple structure, large torque, long use time, good speed regulation. Generally the BLDCM systems have uncertain and nonlinear characteristics which degrade performance of controllers. Based on these reasons, Sliding Mode Control (SMC) is one of the popular control strategies to deal with the nonlinear uncertain system. In This work implemented a SMC scheme for effective s...

  17. The use of virtual slides in the EUROPALS examination

    Bosman Fred T; van den Tweel Jan G

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The only realistic way to improve harmonisation of European pathology training is to define the generally accepted competencies and to test them periodically during the training programme (progress test). The European Association of Pathology Chairs and Program Directors therefore decided to implement an annual on-line test using virtual slides in addition to static jpeg images and theoretical MCQ’s. The EU supported this endeavour as EUROPALS (EUROpean Pathology Assesseme...

  18. STUDIES REGARDING THE CALCULATION OF SLIDING FIT DIMENSION CHAIN

    Constanța Rădulescu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a case study regarding the determination of a dimension chain consisting in the case of a sliding fit of a guide column and a bushing guide of a die. It also presents the distribution of the chain elements tolerances values, their standard deviation and output probabilities values for the studied values. Data processing was made with a PQRS statistic program

  19. Base-sequence-dependent sliding of proteins on DNA

    Barbi, M; Place, C.; Popkov, V.; Salerno, M.

    2004-01-01

    The possibility that the sliding motion of proteins on DNA is influenced by the base sequence through a base pair reading interaction, is considered. Referring to the case of the T7 RNA-polymerase, we show that the protein should follow a noise-influenced sequence-dependent motion which deviate from the standard random walk usually assumed. The general validity and the implications of the results are discussed.

  20. Robust Control of a Brushless Servo Motor Using Sliding Mode

    Radita Arindya

    2012-01-01

    The application of sliding mode techniques the position control of a brushless servo motor is discussed. Such control laws are well suited for electric power inverter. However, high frequency commutations are avoided due to the mechanical systems. Various recent schemes are studied and operated to derive control solutions which are technically feasible. In spite of straightforward applications the resulting systems show robust performances to parametric variations and disturbances. Robustness...

  1. Suitable Friction Sliding Materials for Base Isolation of Masonry Buildings

    Radhikesh P. Nanda; Pankaj Agarwal; Manish Shrikhande

    2012-01-01

    A feasibility study of friction base isolation system for seismic protection has been performed. Four different sliding interfaces, namely, green marble/High Density Poly Ethylene (HDPE), green marble/green marble, green marble/geosynthetic, and green marble/ rubber layers have been studied through experimental and analytical investigations. The experimental investigations show that the coefficient of friction values of these interfaces lies in the desirable range for seismic protection, i.e....

  2. Sliding mode control of a magnetic levitation system

    N. F. Al-Muthairi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Sliding mode control schemes of the static and dynamic types are proposed for the control of a magnetic levitation system. The proposed controllers guarantee the asymptotic regulation of the statesof the system to their desired values. Simulation results of the proposed controllers are given to illustrate the effectiveness of them. Robustness of the control schemes to changes in the parameters of the system is also investigated.

  3. Neuron anatomy structure reconstruction based on a sliding filter

    Luo, Gongning; Sui, Dong; Wang, Kuanquan; Chae, Jinseok

    2015-01-01

    Background Reconstruction of neuron anatomy structure is a challenging and important task in neuroscience. However, few algorithms can automatically reconstruct the full structure well without manual assistance, making it essential to develop new methods for this task. Methods This paper introduces a new pipeline for reconstructing neuron anatomy structure from 3-D microscopy image stacks. This pipeline is initialized with a set of seeds that were detected by our proposed Sliding Volume Filte...

  4. Whole slide imaging for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 immunohistochemistry interpretation: Accuracy, Precision, and reproducibility studies for digital manual and paired glass slide manual interpretation

    David C Wilbur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of digital whole slide imaging for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 immunohistochemistry (IHC could create improvements in workflow and performance, allowing for central archiving of specimens, distributed and remote interpretation, and the potential for additional computerized automation. Procedures: The accuracy, precision, and reproducibility of manual digital interpretation for HER2 IHC were determined by comparison to manual glass slide interpretation. Inter- and intra-pathologist reproducibility and precision between the glass slide and digital interpretations of HER2 IHC were determined in 5 studies using DAKO HercepTest-stained breast cancer slides with the Philips Digital Pathology System. In 2 inter-method studies, 3 pathologists interpreted glass and digital slides in sequence or in random order with a minimum of 7 days as a washout period. These studies also measured inter-observer reproducibility and precision. Another two studies measured intra-pathologist reproducibility on cases read 10 times by glass and digital methods. One additional study evaluated the effects of adding IHC control slides with each run, using 1 pathologist interpreting glass and digital slides randomized from the sets above along with appropriate controls for each slide in the set. Results: The overall results show that there is no statistical difference between the variance of performance when comparing glass and digital HER2 interpretations; and there were no effects noted when control tissues were evaluated in conjunction with the test slides. Conclusions: The results show that there is an equivalence of result when interpreting HER2 IHC slides in breast cancer by either glass slides or digital images. Digital interpretation can therefore be safely and effectively used for this purpose.

  5. Analytical investigation on tsunamis generated by submarine slides

    E. Bortolucci

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Tsunamis induced by landslides are a topic on which growing attention is being paid especially under the pressure of recent events in which movement of underwater masses have been recognised to be the certain or likely cause of the observed tsunami. Here analytical methods and idealised cases are used to investigate tsunami generation by submarine slides that undergo negligible deformation during their motion, such as slumps. The general solution of the 1D Cauchy linear problem for long water waves is specialised to deal with rigid bodies and is used systematically to explore the main characteristics of the generated waves. Relationships between body motion, that is prescribed in terms of the slide Froude number, and wave pattern, wave amplitude and wave energy are studied in dimensionless space. Wave generation in various flow conditions (from subcritical to supercritical is handled, though most attention is given to analysing tsunamis induced by submarine slides at subcritical speed which are by far the most common cases. From numerical experiments it is found that good estimates of the tsunami wave amplitude can be calculated by means of simple expressions based on the maximum value and on the average value of the Froude number during the main generation phase.

  6. A sliding cell technique for diffusion measurements in liquid metals

    Yongliang Geng

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The long capillary and shear cell techniques are the usual methods for diffusion measurements in liquid metals. Here we present a new “sliding cell technique” to measure interdiffusion in liquid alloys, which combines the merits of these two methods. Instead of a number of shear cells, as used in the shear cell method, only one sliding cell is designed to separate and join the liquid diffusion samples. Using the sliding cell technique, the influence of the heating process (which affects liquid diffusion measurements in the conventional long capillary method can be eliminated. Time-dependent diffusion measurements at the same isothermal temperature were carried out in Al-Cu liquids. Compared with the previous results measured by in-situ X-ray radiography, the obtained liquid diffusion coefficient in this work is believed to be influenced by convective flow. The present work further supports the idea that to obtain accurate diffusion constants in liquid metals, the measurement conditions must be well controlled, and there should be no temperature gradients or other disturbances.

  7. Experimental Measurements of Prestressed Masonry with using Sliding Joint

    Stara Marie

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Contribution deals with experimental measurements of deformations in the place exposed to local load caused by additional pre-stressing. The measurements are made at the masonry corner built in the laboratory equipment. The laboratory equipment was designed at Faculty of Civil Engineering VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava for measurement tri-axial stress-strain conditions in masonry. In this masonry corner two pre-stressing bars are placed. These bars are in different height and are anchored to the anchor plates, which transfer pre-stressing forces to the masonry. The specimen for laboratory testing is performed in the proportion to the reality of 1:1. In the bottom part masonry is inserted asphalt strip. It operates in the masonry like a sliding joint and reduces the shear stress at interface between concrete and masonry structures. The results are compared with the results of masonry without the use of sliding joints, including comment on the effect of sliding joints on the pre-stressing masonry structures.

  8. A slide-rule for assessment of venous admixture.

    Zetterström, H

    1989-04-01

    Determination of venous admixture (physiological shunt, Qva/Qt) requires analysis of both arterial and mixed venous blood. When a pulmonary arterial catheter is not in use, the pulmonary oxygenating capacity may be assessed from arterial blood gas data, the fraction of inspired oxygen (FIO2) and an assumed value of the arterial-mixed venous oxygen content difference. To facilitate this process, a slide-rule based on the "virtual shunt" concept is presented. It permits rapid assessment of Qva/Qt from known values of arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) or saturation (SaO2) and FIO2 and may promote the choice of appropriate FIO2. The limitations of the slide-rule were studied theoretically and its validity was tested by comparing 100 determinations of virtual shunt with the corresponding Qva/Qt values. The slide-rule was found to estimate Qva/Qt more accurately than commonly used oxygenation indices such as the PaO2/FIO2 ratio. PMID:2499154

  9. Fatigue resistant carbon coatings for rolling/sliding contacts

    Singh, Harpal; Ramirez, Giovanni; Eryilmaz, Osman; Greco, Aaron; Doll, Gary; Erdemir, Ali

    2016-06-01

    The growing demands for renewable energy production have recently resulted in a significant increase in wind plant installation. Field data from these plants show that wind turbines suffer from costly repair, maintenance and high failure rates. Often times the reliability issues are linked with tribological components used in wind turbine drivetrains. The primary failure modes in bearings and gears are associated with micropitting, wear, brinelling, scuffing, smearing and macropitting all of which occur at or near the surface. Accordingly, a variety of surface engineering approaches are currently being considered to alter the near surface properties of such bearings and gears to prevent these tribological failures. In the present work, we have evaluated the tribological performance of compliant highly hydrogenated diamond like carbon coating developed at Argonne National Laboratory, under mixed rolling/sliding contact conditions for wind turbine drivetrain components. The coating was deposited on AISI 52100 steel specimens using a magnetron sputter deposition system. The experiments were performed on a PCS Micro-Pitting-Rig (MPR) with four material pairs at 1.79 GPa contact stress, 40% slide to roll ratio and in polyalphaolefin (PAO4) basestock oil (to ensure extreme boundary conditions). The post-test analysis was performed using optical microscopy, surface profilometry, and Raman spectroscopy. The results obtained show a potential for these coatings in sliding/rolling contact applications as no failures were observed with coated specimens even after 100 million cycles compared to uncoated pair in which they failed after 32 million cycles, under the given test conditions.

  10. Surface Modifications in Adhesion and Wetting

    Longley, Jonathan

    Advances in surface modification are changing the world. Changing surface properties of bulk materials with nanometer scale coatings enables inventions ranging from the familiar non-stick frying pan to advanced composite aircraft. Nanometer or monolayer coatings used to modify a surface affect the macro-scale properties of a system; for example, composite adhesive joints between the fuselage and internal frame of Boeing's 787 Dreamliner play a vital role in the structural stability of the aircraft. This dissertation focuses on a collection of surface modification techniques that are used in the areas of adhesion and wetting. Adhesive joints are rapidly replacing the familiar bolt and rivet assemblies used by the aerospace and automotive industries. This transition is fueled by the incorporation of composite materials into aircraft and high performance road vehicles. Adhesive joints have several advantages over the traditional rivet, including, significant weight reduction and efficient stress transfer between bonded materials. As fuel costs continue to rise, the weight reduction is accelerating this transition. Traditional surface pretreatments designed to improve the adhesion of polymeric materials to metallic surfaces are extremely toxic. Replacement adhesive technologies must be compatible with the environment without sacrificing adhesive performance. Silane-coupling agents have emerged as ideal surface modifications for improving composite joint strength. As these coatings are generally applied as very thin layers (method to surface vibration for moving drops in microfluidic devices. The final surface modification considered is the application of a thin layer of rubber to a rigid surface. While this technique has many practical uses, such as easy release coatings in marine environments, it is applied herein to enable spontaneous healing between a rubber surface and a glass cover slip. Study of the diffusion controlled healing of a blister can be made by

  11. Nanorough titanium surfaces reduce adhesion of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus via nano adhesion points.

    Lüdecke, Claudia; Roth, Martin; Yu, Wenqi; Horn, Uwe; Bossert, Jörg; Jandt, Klaus D

    2016-09-01

    Microbial adhesion to natural and synthetic materials surfaces is a key issue e.g. in food industry, sewage treatment and most importantly in the biomedical field. The current development and progress in nanoscale structuring of materials surfaces to control microbial adhesion requires an advanced understanding of the microbe-material-interaction. This study aimed to investigate the nanostructure of the microbe-material-interface and link it to microbial adhesion kinetics as function of titanium surface nanoroughness to gain new insight into controlling microbial adhesion via materials' surface nanoroughness. Adhesion of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus was statistically significantly reduced (p≤0.05) by 55.6 % and 40.5 %, respectively, on physical vapor deposited titanium thin films with a nanoroughness of 6nm and the lowest surface peak density compared to 2nm with the highest surface peak density. Cross-sectioning of the microbial cells with a focused ion beam (FIB) and SEM imaging provided for the first time direct insight into the titanium-microbe-interface. High resolution SEM micrographs gave evidence that the surface peaks are the loci of initial contact between the microbial cells and the material's surface. In a qualitative model we propose that the initial microbial adhesion on nanorough surfaces is controlled by the titanium surface peak density via nano adhesion points. This new understanding will help towards the design of materials surfaces for controlling microbial adhesion. PMID:27288816

  12. Improved method using a bubble-free adhesion technique for the preparation of semi-serial undecalcified histologic sections containing dental implants.

    Kihara, A; Morimoto, K; Suetsugu, T

    1989-01-01

    The preparation technique, with the minimum of artifacts for the semi-serial undecalcified histologic sections containing dental implants, is presented in this study. The sections enabled finer light-microscopic observations to be made. A formalin-fixed tissue block containing a dental implant was dehydrated in ethanol and acetone, and then embedded in polyester resin under 76 cm Hg reduced pressure. The embedded block was trimmed by a cutter and ground by abrasive paper. In a 1.5 Kg f/cm2 pressurized chamber, its polished surface was bonded to a methacrylate slide by means of ethylcyanoacrylate used in an adhesion loading device. This meant that no bubbles could arise in the interface between the slide and the block. The slide-block was then attached to an adsorptive specimen-holder of a hard-tissue cutting machine and cut to a thickness of approximately 50 microns, with use of a diamond blade. The slide-section was ground to 15-40 microns with wet-type abrasive paper and film on a polishing table. Etching with weak acid and surface staining with toluidine blue and methylene blue/basic fuchsin/light green were performed on the section. PMID:2701107

  13. Dynamic instabilities of frictional sliding at a bimaterial interface

    Brener, Efim A.; Weikamp, Marc; Spatschek, Robert; Bar-Sinai, Yohai; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the dynamic stability of bodies in frictional contact steadily sliding one over the other is of basic interest in various disciplines such as physics, solid mechanics, materials science and geophysics. Here we report on a two-dimensional linear stability analysis of a deformable solid of a finite height H, steadily sliding on top of a rigid solid within a generic rate-and-state friction type constitutive framework, fully accounting for elastodynamic effects. We derive the linear stability spectrum, quantifying the interplay between stabilization related to the frictional constitutive law and destabilization related both to the elastodynamic bi-material coupling between normal stress variations and interfacial slip, and to finite size effects. The stabilizing effects related to the frictional constitutive law include velocity-strengthening friction (i.e. an increase in frictional resistance with increasing slip velocity, both instantaneous and under steady-state conditions) and a regularized response to normal stress variations. We first consider the small wave-number k limit and demonstrate that homogeneous sliding in this case is universally unstable, independent of the details of the friction law. This universal instability is mediated by propagating waveguide-like modes, whose fastest growing mode is characterized by a wave-number satisfying kH ∼ O(1) and by a growth rate that scales with H-1. We then consider the limit kH → ∞ and derive the stability phase diagram in this case. We show that the dominant instability mode travels at nearly the dilatational wave-speed in the opposite direction to the sliding direction. In a certain parameter range this instability is manifested through unstable modes at all wave-numbers, yet the frictional response is shown to be mathematically well-posed. Instability modes which travel at nearly the shear wave-speed in the sliding direction also exist in some range of physical parameters. Previous results

  14. Ultrasonic Nondestructive Characterization of Adhesive Bonds

    Qu, Jianmin

    1999-01-01

    Adhesives and adhesive joints are widely used in various industrial applications to reduce weight and costs, and to increase reliability. For example, advances in aerospace technology have been made possible, in part, through the use of lightweight materials and weight-saving structural designs. Joints, in particular, have been and continue to be areas in which weight can be trimmed from an airframe through the use of novel attachment techniques. In order to save weight over traditional riveted designs, to avoid the introduction of stress concentrations associated with rivet holes, and to take full advantage of advanced composite materials, engineers and designers have been specifying an ever-increasing number of adhesively bonded joints for use on airframes. Nondestructive characterization for quality control and remaining life prediction has been a key enabling technology for the effective use of adhesive joints. Conventional linear ultrasonic techniques generally can only detect flaws (delamination, cracks, voids, etc) in the joint assembly. However, more important to structural reliability is the bond strength. Although strength, in principle, cannot be measured nondestructively, a slight change in material nonlinearity may indicate the onset of failure. Furthermore, microstructural variations due to aging or under-curing may also cause changes in the third order elastic constants, which are related to the ultrasonic nonlinear parameter of the polymer adhesive. It is therefore reasonable to anticipate a correlation between changes in the ultrasonic nonlinear acoustic parameter and the remaining bond strength. It has been observed that higher harmonics of the fundamental frequency are generated when an ultrasonic wave passes through a nonlinear material. It seems that such nonlinearity can be effectively used to characterize bond strength. Several theories have been developed to model this nonlinear effect. Based on a microscopic description of the nonlinear

  15. Development and evaluation of an off-the-slide genotyping technique for identifying Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts directly from US EPA Method 1623 slides

    ABSTRACT Aims This study developed and systematically evaluated performance and limit of detection of an off-the-slide genotyping procedure for both Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts. Methods and Results Slide standards containing flow sorted (oo)cysts were used to e...

  16. Fabrication of anti-adhesion surfaces on aluminium substrates of rubber plastic moulds using electrolysis plasma treatment

    An anti-adhesion surface with a water contact angle of 167° was fabricated on aluminium samples of rubber plastic moulds by electrolysis plasma treatment using mixed electrolytes of C6H5O7(NH4)3 and Na2SO4, followed by fluorination. To optimise the fabrication conditions, several important processing parameters such as the discharge voltage, discharge time, concentrations of supporting electrolyte and stearic acid ethanol solution were examined systematically. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to analyse surfaces morphology, micrometer scale pits, and protrusions were found on the surface, with numerous nanometer mastoids contained in the protrusions. These binary micro/nano-scale structures, which are similar to the micro-structures of soil-burrowing animals, play a critical role in achieving low adhesion properties. Otherwise, the anti-adhesion behaviours of the resulting samples were analysed by the atomic force microscope (AFM), Fourier-transform infrared spectrophotometer (FTIR), electrons probe micro-analyzer (EPMA), optical contact angle meter, digital Vickers microhardness (Hv) tester, and electronic universal testing. The results show that the electrolysis plasma treatment does not require complex processing parameters, using a simple device, and is an environment-friendly and effective method. Under the optimised conditions, the contact angle (CA) for the modified anti-adhesion surface is up to 167°, the sliding angle (SA) is less than 2°, roughness of the sample surface is only 0.409μm. Moreover, the adhesion force and Hv are 0. 9KN and 385, respectively

  17. Fabrication of anti-adhesion surfaces on aluminium substrates of rubber plastic moulds using electrolysis plasma treatment

    Meng, Jianbing, E-mail: jianbingmeng@126.com; Dong, Xiaojuan; Wei, Xiuting; Yin, Zhanmin [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo, 255049 (China)

    2015-04-15

    An anti-adhesion surface with a water contact angle of 167° was fabricated on aluminium samples of rubber plastic moulds by electrolysis plasma treatment using mixed electrolytes of C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O{sub 7}(NH{sub 4}){sub 3} and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, followed by fluorination. To optimise the fabrication conditions, several important processing parameters such as the discharge voltage, discharge time, concentrations of supporting electrolyte and stearic acid ethanol solution were examined systematically. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to analyse surfaces morphology, micrometer scale pits, and protrusions were found on the surface, with numerous nanometer mastoids contained in the protrusions. These binary micro/nano-scale structures, which are similar to the micro-structures of soil-burrowing animals, play a critical role in achieving low adhesion properties. Otherwise, the anti-adhesion behaviours of the resulting samples were analysed by the atomic force microscope (AFM), Fourier-transform infrared spectrophotometer (FTIR), electrons probe micro-analyzer (EPMA), optical contact angle meter, digital Vickers microhardness (Hv) tester, and electronic universal testing. The results show that the electrolysis plasma treatment does not require complex processing parameters, using a simple device, and is an environment-friendly and effective method. Under the optimised conditions, the contact angle (CA) for the modified anti-adhesion surface is up to 167°, the sliding angle (SA) is less than 2°, roughness of the sample surface is only 0.409μm. Moreover, the adhesion force and H{sub v} are 0. 9KN and 385, respectively.

  18. Thermal Characterization of Epoxy Adhesive by Hotfire Testing

    Spomer, Ken A.; Haddock, M. Reed; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes subscale solid-rocket motor hot-fire testing of epoxy adhesives in flame surface bondlines to evaluate heat-affected depth, char depth and ablation rate. Hot-fire testing is part of an adhesive down-selection program on the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle to provide additional confidence in the down-selected adhesives. The current nozzle structural adhesive bond system is being replaced due to obsolescence. Prior to hot-fire testing, adhesives were tested for chemical, physical and mechanical properties, which resulted in the selection of two potential replacement adhesives, Resin Technology Group's TIGA 321 and 3M's EC2615XLW. Hot-fire testing consisted of four forty-pound charge (FPC) motors fabricated in configurations that would allow side-by-side comparison testing of the candidate replacement adhesives with the current RSRM adhesives. Results of the FPC motor testing show that: 1) the phenolic char depths on radial bondlines is approximately the same and vary depending on the position in the blast tube regardless of which adhesive was used, 2) the replacement candidate adhesive char depths are equivalent to the char depths of the current adhesives, 3) the heat-affected depths of the candidate and current adhesives are equivalent, and 4) the ablation rates for both replacement adhesives were equivalent to the current adhesives.

  19. Comparing approaches for numerical modelling of tsunami generation by deformable submarine slides

    Smith, Rebecca C.; Hill, Jon; Collins, Gareth S.; Piggott, Matthew D.; Kramer, Stephan C.; Parkinson, Samuel D.; Wilson, Cian

    2016-04-01

    Tsunami generated by submarine slides are arguably an under-considered risk in comparison to earthquake-generated tsunami. Numerical simulations of submarine slide-generated waves can be used to identify the important factors in determining wave characteristics. Here we use Fluidity, an open source finite element code, to simulate waves generated by deformable submarine slides. Fluidity uses flexible unstructured meshes combined with adaptivity which alters the mesh topology and resolution based on the simulation state, focussing or reducing resolution, when and where it is required. Fluidity also allows a number of different numerical approaches to be taken to simulate submarine slide deformation, free-surface representation, and wave generation within the same numerical framework. In this work we use a multi-material approach, considering either two materials (slide and water with a free surface) or three materials (slide, water and air), as well as a sediment model (sediment, water and free surface) approach. In all cases the slide is treated as a viscous fluid. Our results are shown to be consistent with laboratory experiments using a deformable submarine slide, and demonstrate good agreement when compared with other numerical models. The three different approaches for simulating submarine slide dynamics and tsunami wave generation produce similar waveforms and slide deformation geometries. However, each has its own merits depending on the application. Mesh adaptivity is shown to be able to reduce the computational cost without compromising the accuracy of results.

  20. Adhesion-dependent negative friction coefficient on chemically modified graphite at the nanoscale

    Deng, Zhao; Smolyanitsky, Alex; Li, Qunyang; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Cannara, Rachel J.

    2012-12-01

    From the early tribological studies of Leonardo da Vinci to Amontons’ law, friction has been shown to increase with increasing normal load. This trend continues to hold at the nanoscale, where friction can vary nonlinearly with normal load. Here we present nanoscale friction force microscopy (FFM) experiments for a nanoscale probe tip sliding on a chemically modified graphite surface in an atomic force microscope (AFM). Our results demonstrate that, when adhesion between the AFM tip and surface is enhanced relative to the exfoliation energy of graphite, friction can increase as the load decreases under tip retraction. This leads to the emergence of an effectively negative coefficient of friction in the low-load regime. We show that the magnitude of this coefficient depends on the ratio of tip-sample adhesion to the exfoliation energy of graphite. Through both atomistic- and continuum-based simulations, we attribute this unusual phenomenon to a reversible partial delamination of the topmost atomic layers, which then mimic few- to single-layer graphene. Lifting of these layers with the AFM tip leads to greater deformability of the surface with decreasing applied load. This discovery suggests that the lamellar nature of graphite yields nanoscale tribological properties outside the predictive capacity of existing continuum mechanical models.

  1. Stick-slip at soft adhesive interfaces mediated by slow frictional waves.

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan K; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2016-06-28

    Stick-slip is a friction instability that governs diverse phenomena from squealing automobile brakes to earthquakes. At soft adhesive interfaces, this instability has long been attributed to Schallamach waves, which are a type of slow frictional wave. We use a contact configuration capable of isolating single wave events, coupled with high speed in situ imaging, to demonstrate the existence of two new stick-slip modes. It is shown that these modes also correspond to the passage of slow waves-separation pulse and slip pulse-with distinct nucleation and propagation characteristics. The slip pulse, characterized by a sharp stress front, propagates in the same direction as the Schallamach wave. In contrast, the separation pulse, involving local interface detachment and resembling a tensile neck, travels in exactly the opposite direction. A change in the stick-slip mode from the separation to the slip pulse is effected simply by increasing the normal force. Taken together, the three waves constitute all possible stick-slip modes in low-velocity sliding. The detailed observations enable us to present a phase diagram delineating the domains of occurrence of these waves. We suggest a direct analogy between the observed slow frictional waves and well known muscular locomotory waves in soft bodied organisms. Our work answers basic questions about adhesive mechanisms of frictional instabilities in natural and engineered systems, with broader implications for slow surface wave phenomena. PMID:27118236

  2. Tunable surface wettability and water adhesion of Sb2S3 micro-/nanorod films

    Antimony sulfide (Sb2S3) films were successfully prepared by spin coating Sb2S3 micro-/nanorods with different sizes on glass slides, which was synthesized via a facile and rapid microwave irradiation method. The prepared Sb2S3 micro-/nanorods and films were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle (CA). The as-prepared Sb2S3 films exhibited different surface wettabilities ranging from superhydrophilicity to superhydrophobicity, which was strongly dependent on the diameter of Sb2S3 micro-/nanorod. Sb2S3 film made by nanorods possessed superhydrophobic surface and high water adhesive property. After surface modification with stearic acid, the superhydrophobic surface exhibited an excellent self-cleaning property owing to its low adhesive force. The clarification of three possible states including Wenzel's state, “Gecko” state and Cassie's state for Sb2S3 film surfaces was also proposed to provide a better understanding of interesting surface phenomena on Sb2S3 films.

  3. The hunt for sliding planes in a phyllitic rock slide in Western Norway using airborne electromagnetic mapping

    Aspmo Pfaffhuber, Andreas; Grimstad, Eystein; Domaas, Ulrik; Auken, Esben; Halkjær, Max

    2010-05-01

    The inner Aurland fjord and the adjacent Flåm valley (Western Norway) are subject to a potential rock slide comprised of creeping rock- and debris masses. From repeated GPS measurements we understand that rock and debris movements are constrained by precipitation and snow melt. Based on this assumption the local municipality and regional hydroelectricity company are evaluating the option to drain the unstable area with a more than 10 km long drainage tunnel to a nearby hydropower reservoir. We conducted an airborne electromagnetic (AEM) mapping survey to find indications for the sliding planes and to assess the tunnel corridor for potential tunneling hazard areas. Unstable rock areas some 1.000 meters above seawater have been mapped as massive phyllite intercepted by numerous tension cracks opening up to several meters. Field observations also point out that significant amounts of surface water in streams on the mountain plateau disappear in some of these cracks and surface again several hundred meters down the slope. Potentially sliding planes provide the water pathways and the changes in water pressure can cause instability. As the phyllite will weather to fine grained clay the water saturated sliding planes should be an ideal target for AEM as they are very conductive (1-10 Ohm*m) in comparison to the resistive undisturbed phyllite or nearby gneiss (> 1.000 Ohm*m). From our first AEM data interpretation we find widespread areas with high conductivity, which are most likely caused by either water saturated, fine grained sliding planes or fault zones at the phyllite / gneiss interface. At this point, financing for drilling is pending to transform the geophysical maps to a firm geological model. Based on the AEM results, we are formulating a joint research program involving detailed hydrological investigations, monitoring of formation water pressure, movements, meteorology, more detailed structural mapping and geophysical ground follow up of the airborne data. We

  4. Apparatus for Removing Remaining Adhesives of Filter

    A Large amount of ventilation filter was used at radiation areas not only in nuclear power plants but also in nuclear facilities. These spent ventilation filters are generated as radioactive waste and composed of a steel frame, glass fiber media and aluminum separator. When treated, the spent filter is separated into filter media for air purification and frame. After separation, while the filter media is collected using steel drum for reducing internal exposure, the filter frame is treated further to remove adhesives for recycling the frame as many as possible in order to reduce waste and cost and improve working conditions. Usually, the adhesives are separated from the filter frame manually. As a result, a lot of time and labor is required. So, the objective of this study is to develop a motor-driven apparatus for removing adhesives efficiently

  5. Biologically Inspired Mushroom-Shaped Adhesive Microstructures

    Heepe, Lars; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2014-07-01

    Adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon with great importance in technology, in our everyday life, and in nature. In this article, we review physical interactions that resist the separation of two solids in contact. By using examples of biological attachment systems, we summarize and categorize various principles that contribute to the so-called gecko effect. Emphasis is placed on the contact geometry and in particular on the mushroom-shaped geometry, which is observed in long-term biological adhesive systems. Furthermore, we report on artificial model systems with this bio-inspired geometry and demonstrate that surface microstructures with this geometry are promising candidates for technical applications, in which repeatable, reversible, and residue-free adhesion under different environmental conditions—such as air, fluid, and vacuum—is required. Various applications in robotic systems and in industrial pick-and-place processes are discussed.

  6. Laparoscopic Management of Adhesive Small Bowel Obstruction

    Konjic, Ferid; Idrizovic, Enes; Hasukic, Ismar; Jahic, Alen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adhesions are the reason for bowel obstruction in 80% of the cases. In well selected patients the adhesive ileus laparoscopic treatment has multiple advantages which include the shorter hospitalization period, earlier food taking, and less postoperative morbidity rate. Case report: Here we have a patient in the age of 35 hospitalized at the clinic due to occlusive symptoms. Two years before an opened appendectomy had been performed on him. He underwent the treatment of exploration laparoscopy and laparoscopic adhesiolysis. Dilated small bowel loops connected with the anterior abdominal wall in the ileocecal region by adhesions were found intraoperatively and then resected harmonically with scalpel. One strangulation around which a small bowel loop was wrapped around was found and dissected. Postoperative course was normal. PMID:27041815

  7. High-Temperature Adhesive Strain Gage Developed

    Pereira, J. Michael; Roberts, Gary D.

    1997-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center have developed a unique strain gage and adhesive system for measuring the mechanical properties of polymers and polymer composites at elevated temperatures. This system overcomes some of the problems encountered in using commercial strain gages and adhesives. For example, typical commercial strain gage adhesives require a postcure at temperatures substantially higher than the maximum test temperature. The exposure of the specimen to this temperature may affect subsequent results, and in some cases may be higher than the glass-transition temperature of the polymer. In addition, although typical commercial strain gages can be used for short times at temperatures up to 370 C, their long-term use is limited to 230 C. This precludes their use for testing some high-temperature polyimides near their maximum temperature capability. Lewis' strain gage and adhesive system consists of a nonencapsulated, unbacked gage grid that is bonded directly to the polymer after the specimen has been cured but prior to the normal postcure cycle. The gage is applied with an adhesive specially formulated to cure under the specimen postcure conditions. Special handling, mounting, and electrical connection procedures were developed, and a fixture was designed to calibrate each strain gage after it was applied to a specimen. A variety of tests was conducted to determine the performance characteristics of the gages at elevated temperatures on PMR-15 neat resin and titanium specimens. For these tests, which included static tension, thermal exposure, and creep tests, the gage and adhesive system performed within normal strain gage specifications at 315 C. An example of the performance characteristics of the gage can be seen in the figure, which compares the strain gage measurement on a polyimide specimen at 315 C with an extensometer measurement.

  8. Mechanical Behaviour of Adhesive Joints in Cartonboard for Packaging

    Korin, Christer

    2009-01-01

    A cartonboard package is often sealed and closed with an adhesive – either a hot-melt adhesive (adhesives that are applied in a molten state on the cartonboard) or a dispersion adhesive (adhesives that are applied as water-based dispersions). This thesis focuses on the process of hot-melt gluing, and how material properties and process conditions affect the performance of the adhesive joint. Requirements vary depending on how the package is to be used. A package that is only supposed to prote...

  9. Is the lag screw sliding effective in the intramedullary nailing in A1 and A2 AO-OTA intertrochanteric fractures? A prospective study of Sliding and None-sliding lag screw in Gamma-III nail

    Zhu Yi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Object To compare the Sliding with Non-sliding lag screw of a gamma nail in the treatment of A1 and A2 AO-OTA intertrochanteric fractures. Materials and methods 80 patients were prospectively collected. In each group, AO/OTA 31-A were classified into group A. AO/OTA 31-A2.1 was classified as group B. We classified the A2.2 and A2.3 as group C. According to the set-screw locking formation of Gamma-III, the cases were randomly allocated to Sliding subgroup and Non-sliding subgroup in A, B and C groups. Follow-ups were performed 1, 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Results In the Sliding group, the bone healing rate 3, 6, 12 months postoperatively reached 85.00%, 97.50%, 100% in group A, B and C. Meanwhile, in Non-sliding group, postoperatively, bone healing rate were 90.00%, 95.00% and 97.50% in group A, B and C, respectively. Both differences were not significant. Lower limb discrepancy between Sliding and Non-sliding pattern was significantly different in group C which represent fracture types of AO/OTA 31-A2.2 and A2.3 (0.573 ± 0.019 mm in Non-sliding group, 0.955 mm ± 0.024 mm in Sliding group, P Conclusions As a result, we can conclude that the sliding distance is minimal in Gamma nails and it is related to the comminuted extent of the intertrochanteric area in A1 and A2 AO-OTA intertrochanteric fractures. For treating these kinds of fractures, the sliding of the lag screw of an Gamma nail does not improve any clinical results and in certain cases, such as highly comminuted A1 and A2 fractures, can therefore even benefit from a locked lag screw by tightening the set-screw.

  10. Surgical Adhesives in Facial Plastic Surgery.

    Toriumi, Dean M; Chung, Victor K; Cappelle, Quintin M

    2016-06-01

    In facial plastic surgery, attaining hemostasis may require adjuncts to traditional surgical techniques. Fibrin tissue adhesives have broad applications in surgery and are particularly useful when addressing the soft tissue encountered in facial plastic surgery. Beyond hemostasis, tissue adhesion and enhanced wound healing are reported benefits associated with a decrease in operating time, necessity for drains and pressure dressings, and incidence of wound healing complications. These products are clinically accessible to most physicians who perform facial plastic surgery, including skin grafts, flaps, rhytidectomy, and endoscopic forehead lift. PMID:27267012

  11. EFFECTIVENESS OF ADHESIVES IN SOYBEAN SEED INOCULATION

    Zlata Milaković

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Effectiveness of soybean seed inoculation can be improved by application of substances increasing adhesion of inoculant to the seed. Higher initial inoculum in the soil is ensured in this way, which increases formation of higher number and mass of nodules and consequently produces higher yield. In this research effects of different adhesives on nodulation capacity and components of soybean yield has been investigated. The best result of the investigated parameters was obtained by sugar and honey application, while carboximethyl cellulose did not show similar influence

  12. Coatings against corrosion and microbial adhesion

    Telegdi, J.; Szabo, T.; Al-Taher, F.; Pfeifer, E.; Kuzmann, E.; Vertes, A. [Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 1025 Budapest, Pusztaszeri ut 59/67 (Hungary)

    2010-12-15

    A systematic study on anti-corrosion and anti-fouling effect of hydrophobic Langmuir-Blodgett and self-assembled molecular layers deposited on metal surfaces, as well as anti-microbial adhesion properties of coatings with biocide is presented. Both types of efficiencies produced by LB films are enhanced by Fe{sup 3+} ions built in the molecular film. The quaternary ammonium type biocide embedded into the cross-linked gelatin decreased significantly the microbial adhesion, the biofilm formation. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Adhesion of PBO Fiber in Epoxy Composites

    2007-01-01

    The high mechanical and thermal performance of poly p-phenylene- 2, 6-benzobisoxazole ( PBO ) fiber provides great potential applications as reinforcement fibers for composites. A composite of PBO fiber and epoxy resin has excellent electrical insulation properties, therefore, it is considered to be the best choice for the reinforcement in high magnetic field coils for pulsed magnetic fields up to 100 T.However, poor adhesion between PBO fiber and matrix is found because of the chemically inactive and/or relatively smooth surface of the reinforcement fiber preventing efficient chemical bonding in the interface, which is a challenging issue to improve mechanical properties. Here, we report the surface modification of PBO fibers by ultraviolet (UV)irradiation, O2 and NH3 plasma, as well as acidic treatments. The interfacial adhesion strength values of all the treatments show the similar level as determined for aramid fibers by pull-out tests, a significant impact on fibermatrix-adhesion was not achieved. The surface free energy and roughness are increased for both sized and extracted fibers after plasma treatments together with maleic anhydride grafting. The sized fiber shows marginal improvement in adhesion strength and no change in fiber tensile strength because of the barrier effect of the finish.For the extracted fiber, different surface treatments either show no apparent effect or cause reduction in adhesion strength. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) topography analysis of the fracture surfaces proved adhesive failure at the fiber surface. The fiber surface roughness is increased and more surface flaws are induced, which could result in coarse interface structures when the treated fiber surface has no adequate wetting and functional groups. The adhesion failure is further confirmed by similar adhesion strength and compression shear strength values when the fiber was embedded in various epoxy resins with different temperature behavior. The tensile strength of fiber

  14. Beetle adhesive hairs differ in stiffness and stickiness: in vivo adhesion measurements on individual setae

    Bullock, James M. R.; Federle, Walter

    2011-05-01

    Leaf beetles are able to climb on smooth and rough surfaces using arrays of micron-sized adhesive hairs (setae) of varying morphology. We report the first in vivo adhesive force measurements of individual setae in the beetle Gastrophysa viridula, using a smooth polystyrene substrate attached to a glass capillary micro-cantilever. The beetles possess three distinct adhesive pads on each leg which differ in function and setal morphology. Visualisation of pull-offs allowed forces to be measured for each tarsal hair type. Male discoidal hairs adhered with the highest forces (919 ± 104 nN, mean ± SE), followed by spatulate (582 ± 59 nN) and pointed (127 ± 19 nN) hairs. Discoidal hairs were stiffer in the normal direction (0.693 ± 0.111 N m-1) than spatulate (0.364 ± 0.039 N m-1) or pointed (0.192 ± 0.044 N m-1) hairs. The greater adhesion on smooth surfaces and the higher stability of discoidal hairs help male beetles to achieve strong adhesion on the elytra of females during copulation. A comparison of pull-off forces measured for single setae and whole pads (arrays) revealed comparable levels of adhesive stress. This suggests that beetles are able to achieve equal load sharing across their adhesive pads so that detachment through peeling is prevented.

  15. A randomized control clinical trial of fissure sealant retention: Self etch adhesive versus total etch adhesive

    Nadia Aman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: There are limited studies on comparison of Total etch (TE and Self etch (SE adhesive for placement of sealants. Aims: The aim of the study was to compare the retention of fissure sealants placed using TE adhesive to those sealants placed using SE (seventh generation adhesive. Settings and Design: The study was conducted in the dental section, Aga Khan University Hospital. This study was a randomized single blinded trial with a split mouth design. Materials and Methods: The study included 37 patients, 101 teeth were included in both study groups. The intervention arm was treated with SE Adhesive (Adper Easy One, 3M ESPE, US. Control arm received TE adhesive (Adper Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE, US before sealant application. The patients were followed after 6 months for assessment of sealant retention. Statistical analysis used: Interexaminer agreement for outcome assessment was assessed by Kappa Statistics and outcome in intervention group was assessed by McNemar′s test. Results: Ninety-one pairs of molar (90% were reevaluated for sealant retention. Complete retention was 56% in TE arm and 28% in SE arm with an odds ratio (OR of 3.7. Conclusions: Sealants applied with TE adhesives show higher rate of complete sealant retention than SE adhesive.

  16. Robust fuzzy control for stochastic Markovian jumping systems via sliding mode method

    Chen, Bei; Jia, Tinggang; Niu, Yugang

    2016-07-01

    This paper considers the problem of sliding mode control for stochastic Markovian jumping systems by means of fuzzy method. The Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy stochastic model subject to state-dependent noise is presented. A key feature in this work is to remove the restricted condition that each local system model had to share the same input channel, which is usually assumed in some existing results. The integral sliding surface is constructed for every mode and the connections among various sliding surfaces are established via a set of coupled matrices. Moreover, the present sliding mode controller including the transition rates of modes can cope with the effect of Markovian switching. It is shown that both the reachability of sliding surfaces and the stability of sliding mode dynamics can be ensured. Finally, numerical simulation results are given.

  17. OpenSlide: A vendor-neutral software foundation for digital pathology

    Adam Goode

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although widely touted as a replacement for glass slides and microscopes in pathology, digital slides present major challenges in data storage, transmission, processing and interoperability. Since no universal data format is in widespread use for these images today, each vendor defines its own proprietary data formats, analysis tools, viewers and software libraries. This creates issues not only for pathologists, but also for interoperability. In this paper, we present the design and implementation of OpenSlide, a vendor-neutral C library for reading and manipulating digital slides of diverse vendor formats. The library is extensible and easily interfaced to various programming languages. An application written to the OpenSlide interface can transparently handle multiple vendor formats. OpenSlide is in use today by many academic and industrial organizations world-wide, including many research sites in the United States that are funded by the National Institutes of Health.

  18. Stability analysis of concrete gravity dam on complicated foundation with multiple slide planes

    Xu-hua REN

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A key problem in gravity dam design is providing enough stability to prevent slide, and the difficulty increases if there are several weak structural planes in the dam foundation. Overload and material weakening were taken into account, and a finite difference strength reserve method with partial safety factors based on the reliability method was developed and used to study the anti-slide stability of a concrete gravity dam on a complicated foundation with multiple slide planes. Possible slide paths were obtained, and the stability of the foundation with possible failure planes was evaluated through analysis of the stress distribution characteristics. The results reveal the mechanism and process of sliding due to weak structural planes and their deformations, and provide a reference for anti-slide stability analysis of gravity dams in complicated geological conditions.

  19. Stability analysis of concrete gravity dam on complicated foundation with multiple slide planes

    Ren Xuhua; Shu Jiaqing; Ben Nenghui; Ren Hongyun

    2008-01-01

    A key problem in gravity dam design is providing enough stability to prevent slide, and the difficulty increases if there are several weak structural planes in the dam foundation. Overload and material weakening were taken into account, and a finite difference strength reserve method with partial safety factors based on the reliability method was developed and used to study the anti-slide stability of a concrete gravity dam on a complicated foundation with multiple slide planes. Possible slide paths were obtained, and the stability of the foundation with possible failure planes was evaluated through analysis of the stress distribution characteristics. The results reveal the mechanism and process of sliding due to weak structural planes and their deformations, and provide a reference for anti-slide stability analysis of gravity dams in complicated geological conditions.

  20. Adaptive Global Sliding Mode Control for MEMS Gyroscope Using RBF Neural Network

    Yundi Chu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An adaptive global sliding mode control (AGSMC using RBF neural network (RBFNN is proposed for the system identification and tracking control of micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS gyroscope. Firstly, a new kind of adaptive identification method based on the global sliding mode controller is designed to update and estimate angular velocity and other system parameters of MEMS gyroscope online. Moreover, the output of adaptive neural network control is used to adjust the switch gain of sliding mode control dynamically to approach the upper bound of unknown disturbances. In this way, the switch item of sliding mode control can be converted to the output of continuous neural network which can weaken the chattering in the sliding mode control in contrast to the conventional fixed gain sliding mode control. Simulation results show that the designed control system can get satisfactory tracking performance and effective estimation of unknown parameters of MEMS gyroscope.

  1. Automated grading of renal cell carcinoma using whole slide imaging

    Fang-Cheng Yeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recent technology developments have demonstrated the benefit of using whole slide imaging (WSI in computer-aided diagnosis. In this paper, we explore the feasibility of using automatic WSI analysis to assist grading of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC, which is a manual task traditionally performed by pathologists. Materials and Methods: Automatic WSI analysis was applied to 39 hematoxylin and eosin-stained digitized slides of clear cell RCC with varying grades. Kernel regression was used to estimate the spatial distribution of nuclear size across the entire slides. The analysis results were correlated with Fuhrman nuclear grades determined by pathologists. Results: The spatial distribution of nuclear size provided a panoramic view of the tissue sections. The distribution images facilitated locating regions of interest, such as high-grade regions and areas with necrosis. The statistical analysis showed that the maximum nuclear size was significantly different (P < 0.001 between low-grade (Grades I and II and high-grade tumors (Grades III and IV. The receiver operating characteristics analysis showed that the maximum nuclear size distinguished high-grade and low-grade tumors with a false positive rate of 0.2 and a true positive rate of 1.0. The area under the curve is 0.97. Conclusion: The automatic WSI analysis allows pathologists to see the spatial distribution of nuclei size inside the tumors. The maximum nuclear size can also be used to differentiate low-grade and high-grade clear cell RCC with good sensitivity and specificity. These data suggest that automatic WSI analysis may facilitate pathologic grading of renal tumors and reduce variability encountered with manual grading.

  2. Aluminum and steel adhesion with polyurethanes from castor oil adhesives submitted to gamma irradiation

    Polyurethanes adhesive from castor oil is used to join aluminum and steel pieces. The effect of gamma radiation on the resistance to tension tests is investigated. The aluminum and steel pieces after being glued with the adhesive were submitted to gamma irradiation in doses of 1 kGy, 25 kGy and 100 kGy. The rupture strength of the joints after irradiation have a slightly increase or remains practically unchanged indicating that the adhesive properties is not affected by the gamma radiation. (author)

  3. Adhesive thickness effects of a ductile adhesive by optical measurement techniques

    Campilho, Raul; Moura, D.C.; Banea, Mariana D.; Silva, L. F. M. da

    2015-01-01

    Adhesive bonding is an excellent alternative to traditional joining techniques such as welding, mechanical fastening or riveting. However, there are many factors that have to be accounted for during joint design to accurately predict the joint strength. One of these is the adhesive layer thickness (tA). Most of the results are for epoxy structural adhesives, tailored to perform best with small values of tA, and these show that the lap joint strength decreases with increase of tA (the optimum ...

  4. An Axial Sliding Test for machine elements surfaces

    Godi, Alessandro; Grønbæk, J.; Mohaghegh, Kamran;

    2012-01-01

    , a housing and a stripwound container. The rod and the sleeve are the two surfaces in relative sliding motion; the stripwound container maintains a constant, but adjustable normal pressure and the housing serves as interface between the sleeve and the container. For carrying out the test, two...... machineries are necessary: a press to provide the normal pressure and a tensile machine to perform the axial movements. The test is calibrated so that the correspondence between the normal pressure and the container advancement is found. Finally, preliminary tests are carried out involving a multifunctional...

  5. Experimental Study of Sliding Friction for PET Track Membranes

    Filippova, E. O.; Filippov, A. V.; Shulepov, I. A.

    2016-04-01

    The article is presented results of a study of the process for a dry friction metal-polymer couple on scheme disc-finger. Track membrane from polyethylene terephthalate was a research material. Membrane had pores with 0.4 and 0.8 μm diameters. The effect of the sliding velocity for membranes with pores of 0.8 microns was determined. Research was shown that increasing pore’s diameter caused a reduction of the friction coefficient and downturn its magnitude vibrations. The study showed that track membrane have adequate resistance to wear and can be successfully used in surgical procedures in the layers of the cornea.

  6. Adaptive Fractional Fuzzy Sliding Mode Control for Multivariable Nonlinear Systems

    Junhai Luo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a robust adaptive fuzzy sliding mode control method for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems. The fractional order calculus is employed in the parameter updating stage. The underlying stability analysis as well as parameter update law design is carried out by Lyapunov based technique. In the simulation, two examples including a comparison with the traditional integer order counterpart are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed method. The main contribution of this paper consists in the control performance is better for the fractional order updating law than that of traditional integer order.

  7. SPIRAL2 Week 2012 - Slides of the presentations

    The main goal of the 5. edition of the SPIRAL2 Week is to present and discuss the current status of the SPIRAL2 project in front of a large community of scientists and engineers. The program of the meeting will include presentations on scientific and technical developments related to the baseline project, experiments and theory. The main topics to be discussed at the conference are: -) physics and detectors at SPIRAL2, -) driver accelerators, -) production of radioactive ion beams (RIB), -) safety, -) buildings and infrastructure, -) RIB facilities worldwide, and -) SPIRAL2 preparatory phase. This document is made up of the slides of the presentations

  8. SPIRAL2 Week 2011 - Slides of the presentations

    The main goal of the meeting is to present and discuss the current status of the SPIRAL2 project at GANIL in front of a large community of scientists and engineers. The program of the meeting will include presentations on scientific and technical developments related to the baseline project, experiments and theory. The main topics to be discussed at the conference have been: -) Driver Accelerators, -) Production of radioactive ion beams (RIB), -) Safety, -) RIB Facilities Worldwide (FAIR, Riken Nishina Center, SPES project, FRIB project) -) FP7 SPIRAL2 Preparatory Phase, -) Experiments with RIB and Theory. This document is made up of the slides of the presentations

  9. Linear stability analysis reveals exclusion zone for sliding bed transport

    Talmon Arnold M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A bend or any another pipe component disturbs solids transport in pipes. Longitudinal pressure profiles downstream of such a component may show a stationary transient harmonic wave, as revealed by a recent settling slurry laboratory experiment. Therefore the fundamental transient response of the two-layer model for fully stratified flow is investigated as a first approach. A linear stability analysis of the sliding bed configuration is conducted. No stationary transient harmonic waves are found in this analysis, but adaptation lengths for exponential recovery are quantified. An example calculation is given for a 0.1 m diameter pipeline.

  10. Cell structure and percent viability by a slide centrifuge technique.

    Fitzgerald, M G; Hosking, C S

    1982-01-01

    It was found that a slide centrifuge (Cytospin) preparation of a cell suspension allowed a reliable assessment of not only cell structure but also the percentage of non-viable cells. The non-viable cells appeared as "smear" cells and paralleled in number the cells taking up trypan blue. Direct experiment showed the unstained viable cells in a trypan blue cell suspension remained intact in a Cytospin preparation while the cells taking up trypan blue were the "smear" cells. The non-viability of...

  11. Geant4 2005 10. user conference and collaboration workshop. Slides

    Maire, M.; Amako, K.; Agapov, I.; Allison, J.; Amako, K.; Anah, J.; Apostolakis, J.; Asai, M.; Aso, T.; Barrand, G.; Becheva, E.; Berthoumieux, E.; Bongrand, M.; Boudard, A.; Canchel, G.; Capra, R.; Carlier, Th.; Chambon, P.; Chipaux, R.; Cognet, M.A.; Cornelius, I.; Cosmo, G.; Beenhouwer, J. de; Derreumaux, S.; Desbree, A.; Descourt, P.; Dridi, W.; Ersmark, T.; Faddegon, B.; Ferrer, L.; Flacco, A.; Folger, G.; Francis, S.; Giovinazzo, J.; Glinec, Y.; Godart, J.; Goncalves, P.; Gottschlag, H.; Grichine, V.; Guatelli, S.; Gudowska, I.; Guemnie Tafo, A.; Gueye, P.; Gumplinger, P.; Gurriaran, R.; Hannachi, F.; Heikkinen, A.; Hill, D.; Honore, P.F.; Howard, A.; Hrivnacova, I.; Hubert, X.; Incerti, S.; Ivanchenko, V.; Jacquemier, J.; Jones, F.; Kerhoas-Cavata, S.; Klem, J.; Koi, T.; Kosov, M.; Labalme, M.; Lang, N.; Lemercier, M.; Lemiere, Y.; Leroy, P.; Link, O.; Liu, B.; Lydon, J.; Maire, M.; Marchand, D.; Marquet, Ch.; Mascialino, B.; Matea, I.; Mccormick, J.; Mclaren, I.; Merchant, M.; Miceli, A.; Mine, Ph.; Moretto, Ph.; Mount, R.; Murakami, K.; Nachab, H.; Nehmeh, S.; Nieminen, P.; Paganetti, H.; Pallon, J.; Pandola, L.; Perl, J.; Perrot, F.; Pia Maria, G.; Piqueras, I.; Pouthier, Th.; Pshenichnov, I.; Raaijmakers, A.; Raaymakers, B.; Reuillon, R.; Ribon, A.; Rodrigues, P.; Rogel, G.; Salehzahi, F.; Santin, G.; Sasaki, T.; Schubert, M.; Seznec, H.; Shipley, D.; Skaza, F.; Thiam Cheick, O.; Tome, B.; Traneus, E.; Trindade, A.; Truscott, P.; Vacanti, G.; Verderi, M.; Watase, Y.; Wright, D.; Yarba, J.; Yoshida, H.; Zacharatou-Jarlskog, Ch.; Zhang, Q

    2005-07-01

    Originally developed for the simulation of large scale particle physics experiments, the field of applications of the conferences Geant4 is growing fast worldwide especially at the physics medicine biology frontier. In this framework the 2005 Geant4 conference was dedicated to simulations with a strong interest at the physics medicine biology frontier. In particular the following topics were discussed: review of simulation applications for medicine, validation of Geant4 models for medical physics, simulation of radiotherapy and irradiation setups, treatment planning in radiotherapy, dosimetry, parallelization, imaging techniques, data handling, related GRID developments and applications and the Geant4 DNA project with related Monte Carlo tools. Slides are provided. (A.L.B.)

  12. Limitations of the time slide method of background estimation

    Time shifting the output of gravitational wave detectors operating in coincidence is a convenient way of estimating the background in a search for short-duration signals. In this paper, we show how non-stationary data affect the background estimation precision. We present a method of measuring the fluctuations of the data and computing its effects on a coincident search. In particular, we show that for fluctuations of moderate amplitude, time slides larger than the fluctuation time scales can be used. We also recall how the false alarm variance saturates with the number of time shifts.

  13. Limitations of the time slide method of background estimation

    Was, Michal; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Brisson, Violette; Cavalier, Fabien; Davier, Michel; Hello, Patrice; Leroy, Nicolas; Robinet, Florent; Vavoulidis, Miltiadis, E-mail: mwas@lal.in2p3.f [LAL, Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (France)

    2010-10-07

    Time shifting the output of gravitational wave detectors operating in coincidence is a convenient way of estimating the background in a search for short-duration signals. In this paper, we show how non-stationary data affect the background estimation precision. We present a method of measuring the fluctuations of the data and computing its effects on a coincident search. In particular, we show that for fluctuations of moderate amplitude, time slides larger than the fluctuation time scales can be used. We also recall how the false alarm variance saturates with the number of time shifts.

  14. Thermal hydraulic behavior of SCWR sliding pressure startup

    The modification to ATHLET-SC code is introduced in this paper, which realizes the simulation of trans-critical transients using two-phase model. With the modified code, the thermal-hydraulic dynamic behavior of the mixed SCWR core during the startup process is simulated. The startup process is similar to the design of SCLWR-H sliding pressure startup. The results show that maximum temperature of cladding-surface does not exceed 650℃ in the whole startup process, and the sudden change of water properties in the trans-critical transients will not cause harmful influence to the heat transfer of the fuel cladding. (authors)

  15. Permanent Magnet DC Motor Sliding Mode Control System

    Vaez-Zadeh, S.; Zamanian, M.

    2000-09-01

    In this paper a sliding mode controller (SMC) is designed for a permanent magnet, direct current (PMDC) motor to enhance the motor performance in the presence of unwanted uncertainties. Both the electrical and mechanical signals are used as the inputs to the SMC. The complete motor control system is simulated on a personal computer with different design parameters and desirable system performance is obtained. The experimental implementation of the motor control system is also presented. The test results confirm the simulation results and validate the proposed control system.

  16. Observer Based Sliding Mode Attitude Control: Theoretical and Experimental Results

    U. Jørgensen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the design of a sliding mode controller for attitude control of spacecraft actuated by three orthogonal reaction wheels. The equilibrium of the closed loop system is proved to be asymptotically stable in the sense of Lyapunov. Due to cases where spacecraft do not have angular velocity measurements, an estimator for the generalized velocity is derived and asymptotic stability is proven for the observer. The approach is tested on an experimental platform with a sphere shaped Autonomous Underwater Vehicle SATellite: AUVSAT, developed at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

  17. Risk Analysis for Unintentional Slide Deployment During Airline Operations.

    Ayra, Eduardo S; Insua, David Ríos; Castellanos, María Eugenia; Larbi, Lydia

    2015-09-01

    We present a risk analysis undertaken to mitigate problems in relation to the unintended deployment of slides under normal operations within a commercial airline. This type of incident entails relevant costs for the airline industry. After assessing the likelihood and severity of its consequences, we conclude that such risks need to be managed. We then evaluate the effectiveness of various countermeasures, describing and justifying the chosen ones. We also discuss several issues faced when implementing and communicating the proposed measures, thus fully illustrating the risk analysis process. PMID:26061899

  18. Rolling motion: experiments and simulations focusing on sliding friction forces

    Onorato, Pasquale; Malgieri, Massimiliano; De Ambrosis, Anna

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents an activity sequence aimed at elucidating the role of sliding friction forces in determining/shaping the rolling motion. The sequence is based on experiments and computer simulations and it is devoted both to high school and undergraduate students. Measurements are carried out by using the open source Tracker Video Analysis software, while interactive simulations are realized by means of Algodoo, a freeware 2D-simulation software. Data collected from questionnaires before and after the activities, and from final reports, show the effectiveness of combining simulations and Video Based Analysis experiments in improving students' understanding of rolling motion.

  19. A sliding mode observer for hemodynamic characterization under modeling uncertainties

    Zayane, Chadia

    2014-06-01

    This paper addresses the case of physiological states reconstruction in a small region of the brain under modeling uncertainties. The misunderstood coupling between the cerebral blood volume and the oxygen extraction fraction has lead to a partial knowledge of the so-called balloon model describing the hemodynamic behavior of the brain. To overcome this difficulty, a High Order Sliding Mode observer is applied to the balloon system, where the unknown coupling is considered as an internal perturbation. The effectiveness of the proposed method is illustrated through a set of synthetic data that mimic fMRI experiments.

  20. Geant4 2005 10. user conference and collaboration workshop. Slides

    Originally developed for the simulation of large scale particle physics experiments, the field of applications of the conferences Geant4 is growing fast worldwide especially at the physics medicine biology frontier. In this framework the 2005 Geant4 conference was dedicated to simulations with a strong interest at the physics medicine biology frontier. In particular the following topics were discussed: review of simulation applications for medicine, validation of Geant4 models for medical physics, simulation of radiotherapy and irradiation setups, treatment planning in radiotherapy, dosimetry, parallelization, imaging techniques, data handling, related GRID developments and applications and the Geant4 DNA project with related Monte Carlo tools. Slides are provided. (A.L.B.)