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Sample records for adhesion modification protein

  1. Surface modification of polydimethylsiloxane with photo-grafted poly(ethylene glycol) for micropatterned protein adsorption and cell adhesion.

    Sugiura, Shinji; Edahiro, Jun-ichi; Sumaru, Kimio; Kanamori, Toshiyuki

    2008-06-01

    In this study, we applied photo-induced graft polymerization to micropatterned surface modification of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with poly(ethylene glycol). Two types of monomers, polyethylene glycol monoacrylate (PEGMA) and polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA), were tested for surface modification of PDMS. Changes in the surface hydrophilicity and surface element composition were characterized by contact angle measurement and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. The PEGMA-grafted PDMS surfaces gradually lost their hydrophilicity within two weeks. In contrast, the PEGDA-grafted PDMS surface maintained stable hydrophilic characteristics for more than two months. Micropatterned protein adsorption and micropatterned cell adhesion were successfully demonstrated using PEGDA-micropatterned PDMS surfaces, which were prepared by photo-induced graft polymerization using photomasks. The PEGDA-grafted PDMS exhibited useful characteristics for microfluidic devices (e.g. hydrophilicity, low protein adsorption, and low cell attachment). The technique presented in this study will be useful for surface modification of various research tools and devices. PMID:18242961

  2. In vivo modification of tyrosine residues in recombinant mussel adhesive protein by tyrosinase co-expression in Escherichia coli

    Choi Yoo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In nature, mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs show remarkable adhesive properties, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Thus, they have been considered promising adhesive biomaterials for various biomedical and industrial applications. However, limited production of natural MAPs has hampered their practical applications. Recombinant production in bacterial cells could be one alternative to obtain useable amounts of MAPs, although additional post-translational modification of tyrosine residues into 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-alanine (Dopa and Dopaquinone is required. The superior properties of MAPs are mainly attributed to the introduction of quinone-derived intermolecular cross-links. To solve this problem, we utilized a co-expression strategy of recombinant MAP and tyrosinase in Escherichia coli to successfully modify tyrosine residues in vivo. Results A recombinant hybrid MAP, fp-151, was used as a target for in vivo modification, and a dual vector system of pET and pACYC-Duet provided co-expression of fp-151 and tyrosinase. As a result, fp-151 was over-expressed and mainly obtained from the soluble fraction in the co-expression system. Without tyrosinase co-expression, fp-151 was over-expressed in an insoluble form in inclusion bodies. The modification of tyrosine residues in the soluble-expressed fp-151 was clearly observed from nitroblue tetrazolium staining and liquid-chromatography-mass/mass spectrometry analyses. The purified, in vivo modified, fp-151 from the co-expression system showed approximately 4-fold higher bulk-scale adhesive strength compared to in vitro tyrosinase-treated fp-151. Conclusion Here, we reported a co-expression system to obtain in vivo modified MAP; additional in vitro tyrosinase modification was not needed to obtain adhesive properties and the in vivo modified MAP showed superior adhesive strength compared to in vitro modified protein. It is expected that this co-expression strategy will accelerate

  3. Laser surface modification and adhesion

    Mittal, K L

    2014-01-01

    The book provides a unique overview on laser techniques and applications for the purpose of improving adhesion by altering surface chemistry and topography/morphology of the substrate. It details laser surface modification techniques for a wide range of industrially relevant materials (plastics, metals, ceramics, composites) with the aim to improve and enhance their adhesion to other materials. The joining of different materials is of critical importance in the fabrication of many and varied products.

  4. Photorhabdus adhesion modification protein (Pam) binds extracellular polysaccharide and alters bacterial attachment

    Jones, Robert T

    2010-05-12

    Abstract Background Photorhabdus are Gram-negative nematode-symbiotic and insect-pathogenic bacteria. The species Photorhabdus asymbiotica is able to infect humans as well as insects. We investigated the secreted proteome of a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at different temperatures in order to identify proteins relevant to the infection of the two different hosts. Results A comparison of the proteins secreted by a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at simulated insect (28°C) and human (37°C) temperatures led to the identification of a small and highly abundant protein, designated Pam, that is only secreted at the lower temperature. The pam gene is present in all Photorhabdus strains tested and shows a high level of conservation across the whole genus, suggesting it is both ancestral to the genus and probably important to the biology of the bacterium. The Pam protein shows limited sequence similarity to the 13.6 kDa component of a binary toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis. Nevertheless, injection or feeding of heterologously produced Pam showed no insecticidal activity to either Galleria mellonella or Manduca sexta larvae. In bacterial colonies, Pam is associated with an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS)-like matrix, and modifies the ability of wild-type cells to attach to an artificial surface. Interestingly, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) binding studies revealed that the Pam protein itself has adhesive properties. Although Pam is produced throughout insect infection, genetic knockout does not affect either insect virulence or the ability of P. luminescens to form a symbiotic association with its host nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. Conclusions We studied a highly abundant protein, Pam, which is secreted in a temperature-dependent manner in P. asymbiotica. Our findings indicate that Pam plays an important role in enhancing surface attachment in insect blood. Its association with exopolysaccharide suggests it may exert its effect through mediation of

  5. Photorhabdus adhesion modification protein (Pam binds extracellular polysaccharide and alters bacterial attachment

    Joyce Susan A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photorhabdus are Gram-negative nematode-symbiotic and insect-pathogenic bacteria. The species Photorhabdus asymbiotica is able to infect humans as well as insects. We investigated the secreted proteome of a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at different temperatures in order to identify proteins relevant to the infection of the two different hosts. Results A comparison of the proteins secreted by a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at simulated insect (28°C and human (37°C temperatures led to the identification of a small and highly abundant protein, designated Pam, that is only secreted at the lower temperature. The pam gene is present in all Photorhabdus strains tested and shows a high level of conservation across the whole genus, suggesting it is both ancestral to the genus and probably important to the biology of the bacterium. The Pam protein shows limited sequence similarity to the 13.6 kDa component of a binary toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis. Nevertheless, injection or feeding of heterologously produced Pam showed no insecticidal activity to either Galleria mellonella or Manduca sexta larvae. In bacterial colonies, Pam is associated with an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS-like matrix, and modifies the ability of wild-type cells to attach to an artificial surface. Interestingly, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR binding studies revealed that the Pam protein itself has adhesive properties. Although Pam is produced throughout insect infection, genetic knockout does not affect either insect virulence or the ability of P. luminescens to form a symbiotic association with its host nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. Conclusions We studied a highly abundant protein, Pam, which is secreted in a temperature-dependent manner in P. asymbiotica. Our findings indicate that Pam plays an important role in enhancing surface attachment in insect blood. Its association with exopolysaccharide suggests it may exert its effect

  6. Protein adsorption and cell adhesion on three-dimensional polycaprolactone scaffolds with respect to plasma modification by etching and deposition techniques

    Myung, Sung Woon; Ko, Yeong Mu; Kim, Byung Hoon

    2014-11-01

    In this work, protein adsorption and cell adhesion on three-dimensional (3D) polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds treated by plasma etching and deposition were performed. The 3D PCL scaffold used as a substrate of a bone tissue was fabricated by recent rapid prototype techniques. To increase surface properties, such as hydrophilicity, roughness, and surface chemistry, through good protein adhesion on scaffolds, oxygen (O2) plasma etching and acrylic acid or allyamine plasma deposition were performed on the 3D PCL scaffolds. The O2 plasma etching induced the formation of random nanoporous structures on the roughened surfaces of the 3D PCL scaffolds. The plasma deposition with acrylic acid and allyamine induced the chemical modification for introducing a functional group. The protein adsorption increased on the O2 plasma-etched surface compared with an untreated 3D PCL scaffold. MC3T3-E1 cells adhered bioactively on the etched and deposited surface compared with the untreated surface. The present plasma modification might be sought as an effective technique for enhancing protein adsorption and cell adhesion.

  7. Modification on epoxy-based adhesive

    ZhengXiaoxia; QianChunxiang

    2003-01-01

    This research adopted four methods to toughen epoxy adhesives. They were liquid hydroxyl group terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) rubber modification, silicon rubber modification, polyacrylate multiplicity elastomer particulates emulsion modification and chemical grafting modification. After modification, the shearing strength and the rapture elongation were tested. The interface and the chemical reaction between the modifiers and the epoxy were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and infrared optical spectrum. The results show that the elastomer particulates modification and the chemical grafting modification can reach the better toughening effects.

  8. Cell adhesion and growth enabled by biomimetic oligopeptide modification of a polydopamine-poly(ethylene oxide) protein repulsive surface

    Musílková, Jana; Kotelnikov, Ilya; Novotná, Katarína; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Rypáček, František; Bačáková, Lucie; Proks, Vladimír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 11 (2015), s. 253. ISSN 0957-4530 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1857; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/1168; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0029; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : protein repulsive surface * cell adhesion * RGD * endothelial cells Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics; CD - Macromolecular Chemistry (UMCH-V) Impact factor: 2.587, year: 2014

  9. Surface Modifications in Adhesion and Wetting

    Longley, Jonathan

    Advances in surface modification are changing the world. Changing surface properties of bulk materials with nanometer scale coatings enables inventions ranging from the familiar non-stick frying pan to advanced composite aircraft. Nanometer or monolayer coatings used to modify a surface affect the macro-scale properties of a system; for example, composite adhesive joints between the fuselage and internal frame of Boeing's 787 Dreamliner play a vital role in the structural stability of the aircraft. This dissertation focuses on a collection of surface modification techniques that are used in the areas of adhesion and wetting. Adhesive joints are rapidly replacing the familiar bolt and rivet assemblies used by the aerospace and automotive industries. This transition is fueled by the incorporation of composite materials into aircraft and high performance road vehicles. Adhesive joints have several advantages over the traditional rivet, including, significant weight reduction and efficient stress transfer between bonded materials. As fuel costs continue to rise, the weight reduction is accelerating this transition. Traditional surface pretreatments designed to improve the adhesion of polymeric materials to metallic surfaces are extremely toxic. Replacement adhesive technologies must be compatible with the environment without sacrificing adhesive performance. Silane-coupling agents have emerged as ideal surface modifications for improving composite joint strength. As these coatings are generally applied as very thin layers (method to surface vibration for moving drops in microfluidic devices. The final surface modification considered is the application of a thin layer of rubber to a rigid surface. While this technique has many practical uses, such as easy release coatings in marine environments, it is applied herein to enable spontaneous healing between a rubber surface and a glass cover slip. Study of the diffusion controlled healing of a blister can be made by

  10. Adhesives from modified soy protein

    Sun, Susan; Wang, Donghai; Zhong, Zhikai; Yang, Guang

    2008-08-26

    The, present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF and PPF resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

  11. Rabbit cationic protein enhances leukocyte adhesiveness.

    Oseas, R S; Allen, J; Yang, H. H.; Baehner, R. L.; Boxer, L A

    1981-01-01

    Cationic protein purified from rabbit peritoneal polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) was demonstrated to incite autoaggregation of the rabbit PMN and promote adhesiveness of human PMN to endothelial cells. PMN aggregation induced by supernatants derived from secretory PMN was blocked by a specific anticationic protein antibody. These studies reveal that a positively charged protein derived from the PMN can alter surface properties of the PMN itself and imply a role for this protein in PMN immo...

  12. Chemical Modification of Food Proteins

    Allaoua Achouri; Wang Zhang; Xu Shiying

    1999-01-01

    Acylation has been shown to be an effective tool for improving surface functional properties of plant proteins.Soy bean protein has been extensively modified through chemical and enzymatic treatments. Their effectiveness lies in their high nutritional value and low cost, which promote their use as ingredients for the formulation of food products.This paper reports a complete review of chemical modification of various proteins from plant and animal sources. The nutritive and toxicological aspects through in vitro and in vivo tests are also described.

  13. Strategies to improve the adhesion of rubbers to adhesives by means of plasma surface modification

    Martín-Martínez, J. M.; Romero-Sánchez, M. D.

    2006-05-01

    The surface modifications produced by treatment of a synthetic sulfur vulcanized styrene-butadiene rubber with oxidizing (oxygen, air, carbon dioxide) and non oxidizing (nitrogen, argon) RF low pressure plasmas, and by treatment with atmospheric plasma torch have been assessed by ATR-IR and XPS spectroscopy, SEM, and contact angle measurements. The effectiveness of the low pressure plasma treatment depended on the gas atmosphere used to generate the plasma. A lack of relationship between surface polarity and wettability, and peel strength values was obtained, likely due to the cohesive failure in the rubber obtained in the adhesive joints. In general, acceptable adhesion values of plasma treated rubber were obtained for all plasmas, except for nitrogen plasma treatment during 15 minutes due to the creation of low molecular weight moieties on the outermost rubber layer. A toluene wiping of the N{2 } plasma treated rubber surface for 15 min removed those moieties and increased adhesion was obtained. On the other hand, the treatment of the rubber with atmospheric pressure by means of a plasma torch was proposed. The wettability of the rubber was improved by decreasing the rubber-plasma torch distance and by increasing the duration because a partial removal of paraffin wax from the rubber surface was produced. The rubber surface was oxidized by the plasma torch treatment, and the longer the duration of the plasma torch treatment, the higher the degree of surface oxidation (mainly creation of C O moieties). However, although the rubber surface was effectively modified by the plasma torch treatment, the adhesion was not greatly improved, due to the migration of paraffin wax to the treated rubber-polyurethane adhesive interface once the adhesive joint was produced. On the other hand, the extended treatment with plasma torch facilitated the migration of zinc stearate to the rubber-adhesive interface, also contributing to deteriorate the adhesion in greater extent. Finally

  14. Soy protein modification: A review

    Barać Miroljub B.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Soy protein products such as flour, concentrates and isolates are used in food formulation because of their functionality, nutritional value and low cost. To obtain their optimal nutritive and functional properties as well as desirable flavor different treatments are used. Soybean proteins can be modified by physical, chemical and enzymatic treatments. Different thermal treatments are most commonly used, while the most appropriate way of modifying soy proteins from the standpoint of safety is their limited proteolysis. These treatments cause physical and chemical changes that affect their functional properties. This review discusses three principal methods used for modification of soy protein products, their effects on dominant soy protein properties and some biologically active compounds.

  15. Modifications of therapeutic proteins: challenges and prospects

    Jenkins, Nigel

    2007-01-01

    The production of therapeutic proteins is one of the fastest growing sectors of the pharmaceutical industry. However, most proteins used in drug therapy require complex post-translational modifications for efficient secretion, drug efficacy and stability. Common protein modifications include variable glycosylation, misfolding and aggregation, oxidation of methionine, deamidation of asparagine and glutamine, and proteolysis. These modifications not only pose challenges for accurate and consist...

  16. Chromatin proteins and modifications as drug targets

    Helin, Kristian; Dhanak, Dashyant

    2013-01-01

    A plethora of groundbreaking studies have demonstrated the importance of chromatin-associated proteins and post-translational modifications of histones, proteins and DNA (so-called epigenetic modifications) for transcriptional control and normal development. Disruption of epigenetic control is a ...

  17. Experimental strategies for the identification and characterization of adhesive proteins in animals: a review.

    Hennebert, Elise; Maldonado, Barbara; Ladurner, Peter; Flammang, Patrick; Santos, Romana

    2015-02-01

    Adhesive secretions occur in both aquatic and terrestrial animals, in which they perform diverse functions. Biological adhesives can therefore be remarkably complex and involve a large range of components with different functions and interactions. However, being mainly protein based, biological adhesives can be characterized by classical molecular methods. This review compiles experimental strategies that were successfully used to identify, characterize and obtain the full-length sequence of adhesive proteins from nine biological models: echinoderms, barnacles, tubeworms, mussels, sticklebacks, slugs, velvet worms, spiders and ticks. A brief description and practical examples are given for a variety of tools used to study adhesive molecules at different levels from genes to secreted proteins. In most studies, proteins, extracted from secreted materials or from adhesive organs, are analysed for the presence of post-translational modifications and submitted to peptide sequencing. The peptide sequences are then used directly for a BLAST search in genomic or transcriptomic databases, or to design degenerate primers to perform RT-PCR, both allowing the recovery of the sequence of the cDNA coding for the investigated protein. These sequences can then be used for functional validation and recombinant production. In recent years, the dual proteomic and transcriptomic approach has emerged as the best way leading to the identification of novel adhesive proteins and retrieval of their complete sequences. PMID:25657842

  18. Protein Recovery from Secondary Paper Sludge and Its Potential Use as Wood Adhesive

    Pervaiz, Muhammad

    Secondary sludge is an essential part of biosolids produced through the waste treatment plant of paper mills. Globally paper mills generate around 3.0 million ton of biosolids and in the absence of beneficial applications, the handling and disposal of this residual biomass poses a serious environmental and economic proposition. Secondary paper sludges were investigated in this work for recovery of proteins and their use as wood adhesive. After identifying extracellular polymeric substances as adhesion pre-cursors through analytical techniques, studies were carried out to optimize protein recovery from SS and its comprehensive characterization. A modified physicochemical protocol was developed to recover protein from secondary sludge in substantial quantities. The combined effect of French press and sonication techniques followed by alkali treatment resulted in significant improvement of 44% in the yield of solubilized protein compared to chemical methods. The characterization studies confirmed the presence of common amino acids in recovered sludge protein in significant quantities and heavy metal concentration was reduced after recovery process. The sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis revealed the presence of both low and high molecular weight protein fractions in recovered sludge protein. After establishing the proof-of-concept in the use of recovered sludge protein as wood adhesive, the bonding mechanism of protein adhesives with cellulose substrate was further elucidated in a complementary protein-modification study involving soy protein isolate and its glycinin fractions. The results of this study validated the prevailing bonding theories by proving that surface wetting, protein structure, and type of wood play important role in determining final adhesive strength. Recovered sludge protein was also investigated for its compatibility to formulate hybrid adhesive blends with formaldehyde and bio-based polymers. Apart from chemical

  19. Studies on polyurethane adhesives and surface modification of hydrophobic substrates

    Krishnamoorthy, Jayaraman

    This thesis work deals with (a) Curing of reactive, hot-melt polyurethane adhesives and (b) Adsorption studies using different interactions. Research on polyurethanes involves characterization of polyurethane prepolymers and a novel mechanism to cure isocyanate-terminated polyurethane prepolymer by a "trigger" mechanism. Curing of isocyanate-terminated polyurethane prepolymers has been shown to be influenced by morphology and environmental conditions such as temperature and relative humidity. Although the initial composition, final morphology and curing kinetics are known, information regarding the intermediate prepolymer mixture is yet to be established. Polyurethane prepolymers prepared by the reaction of diisocyanates with the primary hydroxyls of polyester diol (PHMA) and secondary hydroxyls of polyether diol (PPG) were characterized. The morphology and crystallization kinetics of a polyurethane prepolymer was compared with a blend of PPG prepolymer (the product obtained by the reaction of PPG with diisocyanate) and a PHMA prepolymer (the product obtained by the reaction of PHMA with diisocyanate) to study the effect of copolymer formed in the polyurethane prepolymer on the above-mentioned properties. Although the morphology of the polyurethane prepolymer is determined in the first few minutes of application, the chemical curing of isocyanate-terminated prepolymer occurs over hours to days. In the literature, different techniques are described to follow the curing kinetics. But there is no established technique to control the curing of polyurethane prepolymer. To make the curing process independent of environmental factors, a novel approach using a trigger mechanism was designed and implemented by using ammonium salts as curing agents. Ammonium salts that are stable at room temperature but decompose on heating to yield active hydrogen-containing compounds, NH3 and H2O, were used as 'Trojan horses' to cure the prepolymer chemically. Research on adsorption

  20. Surface modification of an epoxy resin with polyamines and polydopamine: Adhesion toward electroless deposited copper

    Schaubroeck, David; Mader, Lothar; Dubruel, Peter; Vanfleteren, Jan

    2015-10-01

    In this paper the influence of the epoxy roughness, surface modifications and ELD (electroless copper deposition) temperatures on the adhesive strength of the copper is studied. Good adhesion at low roughness values is targeted due to their applicability in high density electronic circuits. Roughened epoxy surfaces are modified with adsorbed polyamines, polydopamine and polyamines grafted to polydopamine. Next the, adhesive strength of ELD copper is determined with peel strength measurements and the interphases are examined with SEM (scanning electron microscopy). Polydopamine and polyamines grafted to polydopamine can lead to increased adhesive strength at lower roughness values compared to the non-modified samples at specific plating temperatures.

  1. Laser processing of natural mussel adhesive protein thin films

    Doraiswamy, A. [Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7575 (United States); Narayan, R.J. [Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7575 (United States)]. E-mail: roger_narayan@unc.edu; Cristescu, R. [Plasma and Radiation Physics, National Institute for Lasers, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Mihailescu, I.N. [Plasma and Radiation Physics, National Institute for Lasers, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Chrisey, D.B. [United States Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States)

    2007-04-15

    A novel laser processing technique is presented for depositing mussel adhesive protein thin films. Synthetic adhesives (e.g., acrylics, cyanoacrylates, epoxies, phenolics, polyurethanes, and silicones) have largely displaced natural adhesives in the automotive, aerospace, biomedical, electronic, and marine equipment industries over the past century. However, rising concerns over the environmental and health effects of solvents, monomers, and additives used in synthetic adhesives have led the adhesives community to seek natural alternatives. Marine mussel adhesive protein is a formaldehyde-free natural adhesive that demonstrates excellent adhesion to several classes of materials, including pure metals, metal oxides, polymers, and glasses. We have demonstrated the deposition of Mytilus edulis foot protein-1 thin films using matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). The Fourier transform infrared spectrum data suggest that the matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation process does not cause significant damage to the chemical structure of M. edulis foot protein-1. In addition, matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation appears to provide a better control over film thickness and film roughness than conventional solvent-based thin film processing techniques. MAPLE-deposited mussel adhesive protein thin films have numerous potential electronic, medical, and marine applications.

  2. Laser processing of natural mussel adhesive protein thin films

    A novel laser processing technique is presented for depositing mussel adhesive protein thin films. Synthetic adhesives (e.g., acrylics, cyanoacrylates, epoxies, phenolics, polyurethanes, and silicones) have largely displaced natural adhesives in the automotive, aerospace, biomedical, electronic, and marine equipment industries over the past century. However, rising concerns over the environmental and health effects of solvents, monomers, and additives used in synthetic adhesives have led the adhesives community to seek natural alternatives. Marine mussel adhesive protein is a formaldehyde-free natural adhesive that demonstrates excellent adhesion to several classes of materials, including pure metals, metal oxides, polymers, and glasses. We have demonstrated the deposition of Mytilus edulis foot protein-1 thin films using matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). The Fourier transform infrared spectrum data suggest that the matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation process does not cause significant damage to the chemical structure of M. edulis foot protein-1. In addition, matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation appears to provide a better control over film thickness and film roughness than conventional solvent-based thin film processing techniques. MAPLE-deposited mussel adhesive protein thin films have numerous potential electronic, medical, and marine applications

  3. Surface Modification of Titanium and Polyimide Sheet for Adhesive Bonding

    Akram, M.

    2015-01-01

    Major industrial sectors like automotive, aerospace and others are increasingly using polymer composites in their structural parts. Polyimide sheet and adhesives, are high performance polymers. They are widely used in various engineering applications due to their excellent thermal, mechanical and ch

  4. Adhesion of MRC-5 and A549 cells on poly(dimethylsiloxane) surface modified by proteins.

    Zuchowska, Agnieszka; Kwiatkowski, Piotr; Jastrzebska, Elzbieta; Chudy, Michal; Dybko, Artur; Brzozka, Zbigniew

    2016-02-01

    PDMS is a very popular material used for fabrication of Lab-on-a-Chip systems for biological applications. Although PDMS has numerous advantages, it is a highly hydrophobic material, which inhibits adhesion and proliferation of the cells. PDMS surface modifications are used to enrich growth of the cells. However, due to the fact that each cell type has specific adhesion, it is necessary to optimize the parameters of these modifications. In this paper, we present an investigation of normal (MRC-5) and carcinoma (A549) human lung cell adhesion and proliferation on modified PDMS surfaces. We have chosen these cell types because often they are used as models for basic cancer research. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first presentation of this type of investigation. The combination of a gas-phase processing (oxygen plasma or ultraviolet irradiation) and wet chemical methods based on proteins' adsorption was used in our experiments. Different proteins such as poly-l-lysine, fibronectin, laminin, gelatin, and collagen were incubated with the activated PDMS samples. To compare with other works, here, we also examined how ratio of prepolymer to curing agent (5:1, 10:1, and 20:1) influences PDMS hydrophilicity during further modifications. The highest adhesion of the tested cells was observed for the usage of collagen, regardless of PDMS ratio. However, the MRC-5 cell line demonstrated better adhesion than A549 cells. This is probably due to the difference in their morphology and type (normal/cancer). PMID:26311334

  5. Optimized Baxter model of protein solutions: electrostatics versus adhesion

    Prinsen, P.; Odijk, T.

    2004-01-01

    A theory is set up of spherical proteins interacting by screened electrostatics and constant adhesion, in which the effective adhesion parameter is optimized by a variational principle for the free energy. An analytical approach to the second virial coefficient is first outlined by balancing the repulsive electrostatics against part of the bare adhesion. A theory similar in spirit is developed at nonzero concentrations by assuming an appropriate Baxter model as the reference state. The first-...

  6. Soy protein isolate molecular level contributions to bulk adhesive properties

    Shera, Jeanne Norton

    Increasing environmental awareness and the recognized health hazards of formaldehyde-based resins has prompted a strong demand for environmentally-responsible adhesives for wood composites. Soy protein-based adhesives have been shown to be commercially viable with 90-day shelf stability and composite physical properties comparable to those of commercial formaldehyde-based particleboards. The main research focus is to isolate and characterize the molecular level features in soy protein isolate responsible for providing mechanical properties, storage stability, and water resistance during adhesive formulation, processing, and wood composite fabrication. Commercial composite board will be reviewed to enhance our understanding of the individual components and processes required for particleboard production. The levels of protein structure will be defined and an overview of current bio-based technology will be presented. In the process, the logic for utilizing soy protein as a sole binder in the adhesive will be reinforced. Variables such as adhesive components, pH, divalent ions, blend aging, protein molecular weight, formulation solids content, and soy protein functionalization will relate the bulk properties of soy protein adhesives to the molecular configuration of the soybean protein. This work has demonstrated that when intermolecular beta-sheet interactions and protein long-range order is disrupted, viscosity and mechanical properties decrease. Storage stability can be maintained through the stabilization of intermolecular beta-sheet interactions. When molecular weight is reduced through enzymatic digestion, long-range order is disrupted and viscosity and mechanical properties decrease accordingly. Processibility and physical properties must be balanced to increase solids while maintaining low viscosity, desirable mechanical properties, and adequate storage stability. The structure of the soybean protein must be related to the particleboard bulk mechanical

  7. Covalent and stable CuAAC modification of silicon surfaces for control of cell adhesion

    Vutti, Surendra; Buch-Månson, Nina; Schoffelen, Sanne; Bovet, Nicolas Emile; Martinez, Karen Laurence; Meldal, Morten Peter

    2015-01-01

    the vapor or liquid phase. In this work, we compared these two methods for oxidized silicon surfaces and thoroughly characterized the functionalization steps by tagging and fluorescence imaging. We demonstrate that the vapor-phase functionalization only provided transient surface modification that was......-transfer reaction. Subsequently, D-amino acid adhesion peptides could be immobilized on the surface by use of Cu(I)-catalyzed click chemistry. This enabled the study of cell adhesion to the metal surface. In contrast to unmodified surfaces, the peptide-modified surfaces were able to maintain cell adhesion during...

  8. Optimized Baxter model of protein solutions: electrostatics versus adhesion

    Prinsen, P.; Odijk, T.

    2004-01-01

    A theory is set up of spherical proteins interacting by screened electrostatics and constant adhesion, in which the effective adhesion parameter is optimized by a variational principle for the free energy. An analytical approach to the second virial coefficient is first outlined by balancing the rep

  9. High-adhesion Cu patterns fabricated by nanosecond laser modification and electroless copper plating

    Lv, Ming; Liu, Jianguo; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Du, Qifeng; Ai, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Adhesion strength is a crucial factor for the performance and reliability of metallic patterns on insulator substrates. In this study, we present an efficient technique for selective metallization of alumina ceramic with high adhesion strength by using nanosecond laser modification and electroless copper plating. Specifically, a 355 nm Nd:YVO4 ultraviolet (UV) laser was employed not only to decompose palladium chloride film locally for catalyzing the electroless reaction, but also to modify the ceramic surface directly using its high fluence. An orthogonal experiment was undertaken to study the effects of processing parameters including laser fluence, scanning speed and scanning line interval on adhesion strength. The adhesion strength was measured by pulling a metallic wire soldered into the copper coating perpendicular to the substrate using a pull tester. The results have shown that a strong adhesion between the copper coating and the alumina ceramic, higher than the tensile strength of tin-lead solder was obtained. Surface and interface characteristics were investigated to understand that, whose results have shown that the high-aspect-ratio microstructures formed by the laser modification is the major reason for the improvement of adhesion.

  10. Mussel-mimetic protein-based adhesive hydrogel.

    Kim, Bum Jin; Oh, Dongyeop X; Kim, Sangsik; Seo, Jeong Hyun; Hwang, Dong Soo; Masic, Admir; Han, Dong Keun; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2014-05-12

    Hydrogel systems based on cross-linked polymeric materials which could provide both adhesion and cohesion in wet environment have been considered as a promising formulation of tissue adhesives. Inspired by marine mussel adhesion, many researchers have tried to exploit the 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) molecule as a cross-linking mediator of synthetic polymer-based hydrogels which is known to be able to achieve cohesive hardening as well as adhesive bonding with diverse surfaces. Beside DOPA residue, composition of other amino acid residues and structure of mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs) have also been considered important elements for mussel adhesion. Herein, we represent a novel protein-based hydrogel system using DOPA-containing recombinant MAP. Gelation can be achieved using both oxdiation-induced DOPA quinone-mediated covalent and Fe(3+)-mediated coordinative noncovalent cross-linking. Fe(3+)-mediated hydrogels show deformable and self-healing viscoelastic behavior in rheological analysis, which is also well-reflected in bulk adhesion strength measurement. Quinone-mediated hydrogel has higher cohesive strength and can provide sufficient gelation time for easier handling. Collectively, our newly developed MAP hydrogel can potentially be used as tissue adhesive and sealant for future applications. PMID:24650082

  11. Polymer adhesion at surfaces: biological adhesive proteins and their synthetic mimics

    Messersmith, Phillip

    2008-03-01

    Mussels are famous for their ability to permanently adhere to a wide variety of wet surfaces, such as rocks, metal and polymer ship hulls, and wood structures. They accomplish this through specialized proteins collectively referred to as mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs). The biophysical aspects of MAP adhesion is being revealed through the use of single molecule force measurements. The results provide insight into the adhesive roles of key amino acids found in these proteins, including the magnitude of adhesive forces, cooperative effects, and their self-healing properties. This molecular-level information is being incorporated into designs of biomimetic polymer coatings for a variety of applications. Our biomimetic approach to polymer design will be illustrated by a few examples where adhesive constituents found in MAPs are exploited to make wet-adhesive polymer coatings. In addition, small molecule analogs of MAPs can be used to apply thin functional films onto virtually any material surface using a facile approach. These coatings have a variety of potential uses in microelectronics, water treatment, prevention of environmental biofouling, and for control of biointerfacial phenomena at the surfaces of medical/diagnostic devices.

  12. Radiation induced modification of polyetherurethane films and tubes: platelet adhesion and in vivo experiments

    The measurement of platelet adhesion to polyetherurethane films grafted (via the preswelling technique) with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and acrylamide (AAm), performed by means of the stagnation point flow experiment (SPFE-test) as well as with the aid of the bioluminescence assay, is described. Platelet adhesion is found to decrease if the interfacial free energy γ /sub sw/ of the polymer surfaces decreases. Adhesion to protein-coated, grafted polyetherurethane films (coated with albumin, γ-globulin, fibrinogen, fibronectin or a protein mixture) depends on the nature of the protein used: precoating of the films with albumin or γ-globulin leads to a decrease, precoating with fibrinogen or fibronectin to an increase in platelet adhesion. Also we report about early experiences with HEMA-grafted polyetherurethane tubes in implantation experiments

  13. Radiation induced modification of polyetherurethane films and tubes: platelet adhesion and in vivo experiments

    The measurement of platelet adhesion to polyetherurethane films grafted (via the preswelling technique) with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and acrylamide, performed by means of the stagnation point flow experiment as well as with the aid of the bioluminescence assay, is described. Platelet adhesion is found to decrease if the interfacial free energy γsub(SW) of the polymer surfaces decreases. Adhesion to protein-coated, grafted polyetherurethane films depends on the nature of the protein used: precoating of the films with albumin or γ-globulin leads to a decrease, pre-coating with fibrinogen or fibronectin to an increase in platelet adhesion. Also we report about early experiences with HEMA-grafted polyetherurethane tubes in implantation experiments. (author)

  14. Enhancing adhesion of yeast brewery strains to chamotte carriers through aminosilane surface modification.

    Berlowska, Joanna; Kregiel, Dorota; Ambroziak, Wojciech

    2013-07-01

    The adhesion of cells to solid supports is described as surface-dependent, being largely determined by the properties of the surface. In this study, ceramic surfaces modified using different organosilanes were tested for proadhesive properties using industrial brewery yeast strains in different physiological states. Eight brewing strains were tested: bottom-fermenting Saccharomyces pastorianus and top-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To determine adhesion efficiency light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and the fluorymetric method were used. Modification of chamotte carriers by 3-(3-anino-2-hydroxy-1-propoxy) propyldimethoxysilane and 3-(N, N-dimethyl-N-2-hydroxyethyl) ammonium propyldimethoxysilane groups increased their biomass load significantly. PMID:23420113

  15. Intrinsic Surface-Drying Properties of Bio-adhesive Proteins

    Akdogan, Yasar; Wei, Wei; Huang, Kuo-Ying; Kageyama, Yoshiyuki; Danner, Eric W.; Miller, Dusty R.; Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R.; Herbert Waite, J.; Han, Songi

    2014-01-01

    Sessile marine mussels must “dry” underwater surfaces before adhering to them. Synthetic adhesives have yet to overcome this fundamental challenge. Previous studies of bio-inspired adhesion have largely been performed under applied compressive forces but these are poor predictors of an adhesive’s ability to spontaneously penetrate surface hydration layers. In a force-free approach to measuring molecular-level interaction via the surface water diffusivity, different mussel foot proteins were f...

  16. Cell Adhesion Selectivity of Stent Material to improve Bio-functionality by Ion Beam Modification

    In this study, ion implantation into collagen coated Co-Cr alloy, which is a cheaper material of the artificial stent product comparing with Ti alloy, has been studied to develop small diameter artificial stent by the cell adhesion control. The size of stent was 1.6mm of the diameter and 18mm of the length. The life-time of artificial stent depends on adhesion property of endothelial-cells. We successfully controlled cell adhesion selectivity between endothelial cell and muscle cell by using collagen coated and He+ ion beam irradiated Co-Cr-alloy to apply to artificial stent. But, we did not achieve the inhibition of platelet adhesion, yet by using collagen coating and He+ ion beam irradiation. Based on this study, we have plan to research about separation between collagen coating effect and ion beam effect. Also, we will have more detail analysis of the mechanism of cell attachment. In recent years, ion implantation has been applied to the surface modification of prosthesis to improve blood compatibility and tissue compatibility in field of biomedical application. As well known, bio compatibility was concerned with the cell adhesion selectivity for bio-functionality. The biomedical application of ion beam technology would be used more widely in the future such as catheter and artificial graft

  17. Cell Adhesion Selectivity of Stent Material to improve Bio-functionality by Ion Beam Modification

    Lee, Jaesang; Park, JUngchan; Jung, Myunghwan; Kim, Yongki [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Junkyu [Bio alpha., Co. Ltd., Gimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In this study, ion implantation into collagen coated Co-Cr alloy, which is a cheaper material of the artificial stent product comparing with Ti alloy, has been studied to develop small diameter artificial stent by the cell adhesion control. The size of stent was 1.6mm of the diameter and 18mm of the length. The life-time of artificial stent depends on adhesion property of endothelial-cells. We successfully controlled cell adhesion selectivity between endothelial cell and muscle cell by using collagen coated and He{sup +} ion beam irradiated Co-Cr-alloy to apply to artificial stent. But, we did not achieve the inhibition of platelet adhesion, yet by using collagen coating and He{sup +} ion beam irradiation. Based on this study, we have plan to research about separation between collagen coating effect and ion beam effect. Also, we will have more detail analysis of the mechanism of cell attachment. In recent years, ion implantation has been applied to the surface modification of prosthesis to improve blood compatibility and tissue compatibility in field of biomedical application. As well known, bio compatibility was concerned with the cell adhesion selectivity for bio-functionality. The biomedical application of ion beam technology would be used more widely in the future such as catheter and artificial graft.

  18. Protein kinase C involvement in focal adhesion formation

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1992-01-01

    still to be elucidated. We show here that the kinase inhibitors H7 and HA1004 reduce focal adhesion and stress fiber formation in response to fibronectin in a dose-dependent manner, and that activators of protein kinase C can promote their formation under conditions where they do not normally form...... then treated with kinase inhibitors H7 and HA1004 for 2h, IRM indicated a reduction in focal adhesion formation at concentrations where protein kinase C (PKC) should be inhibited. In contrast, focal adhesions formed normally at concentrations of these inhibitors where cyclic AMP- or cyclic GMP......-dependent kinases should be inactivated. Inhibition of PKC, but not that of cyclic AMP- or cyclic GMP-dependent kinases, also prevented the formation of stress fibers and induced a dispersal of talin and vinculin, but not integrin beta 1 subunits, from small condensations present at 1h. Consistent with the...

  19. Targeting Protein Kinase C Downstream of Growth Factor and Adhesion Signalling

    Dowling, Catríona M., E-mail: Catriona.Dowling@ul.ie; Kiely, Patrick A., E-mail: Catriona.Dowling@ul.ie [Department of Life Sciences, Materials and Surface Science Institute and Stokes Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick 78666 (Ireland); Health Research Institute (HRI), University of Limerick, Limerick 78666 (Ireland)

    2015-07-15

    The signaling outputs of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases, G-protein coupled receptors and integrins converge to mediate key cell process such as cell adhesion, cell migration, cell invasion and cell proliferation. Once activated by their ligands, these cell surface proteins recruit and direct a diverse range of proteins to disseminate the appropriate response downstream of the specific environmental cues. One of the key groups of proteins required to regulate these activities is the family of serine/threonine intracellular kinases called Protein Kinase Cs. The activity and subcellular location of PKCs are mediated by a series of tightly regulated events and is dependent on several posttranslational modifications and the availability of second messengers. Protein Kinase Cs exhibit both pro- and anti-tumorigenic effects making them an interesting target for anti-cancer treatment.

  20. Biosynthesis of the D2-cell adhesion molecule: post-translational modifications, intracellular transport, and developmental changes

    Lyles, J M; Linnemann, D; Bock, E

    1984-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications and intracellular transport of the D2-cell adhesion molecule (D2-CAM) were examined in cultured fetal rat neuronal cells. Developmental changes in biosynthesis were studied in rat forebrain explant cultures. Two D2-CAM polypeptides with Mr of 187,000-210,000 (A) and...... antibody. The two polypeptides were sulfated in the trans-Golgi compartment and phosphorylated at the plasma membrane. D2-CAM underwent rapid intracellular transport, appearing at the cell surface within 35 min of synthesis. A and B were shown to be integral membrane proteins as seen by radioiodination by...... photoactivation employing a hydrophobic labeling reagent. In rat forebrain explant cultures, D2-CAM was synthesized as four polypeptides: A (195,000 Mr), B (137,000 Mr), C (115,000 Mr), and a group of polypeptides in the high molecular weight region (HMr) between 250,000 and 350,000. Peptide maps of the four...

  1. Silk Fibroin Aqueous-Based Adhesives Inspired by Mussel Adhesive Proteins.

    Burke, Kelly A; Roberts, Dane C; Kaplan, David L

    2016-01-11

    Silk fibroin from the domesticated silkworm Bombyx mori is a naturally occurring biopolymer with charged hydrophilic terminal regions that end-cap a hydrophobic core consisting of repeating sequences of glycine, alanine, and serine residues. Taking inspiration from mussels that produce proteins rich in L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) to adhere to a variety of organic and inorganic surfaces, the silk fibroin was functionalized with catechol groups. Silk fibroin was selected for its high molecular weight, tunable mechanical and degradation properties, aqueous processability, and wide availability. The synthesis of catechol-functionalized silk fibroin polymers containing varying amounts of hydrophilic polyethylene glycol (PEG, 5000 g/mol) side chains was carried out to balance silk hydrophobicity with PEG hydrophilicity. The efficiency of the catechol functionalization reaction did not vary with PEG conjugation over the range studied, although tuning the amount of PEG conjugated was essential for aqueous solubility. Adhesive bonding and cell compatibility of the resulting materials were investigated, where it was found that incorporating as little as 6 wt % PEG prior to catechol functionalization resulted in complete aqueous solubility of the catechol conjugates and increased adhesive strength compared with silk lacking catechol functionalization. Furthermore, PEG-silk fibroin conjugates maintained their ability to form β-sheet secondary structures, which can be exploited to reduce swelling. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) proliferated on the silks, regardless of PEG and catechol conjugation. These materials represent a protein-based approach to catechol-based adhesives, which we envision may find applicability as biodegradable adhesives and sealants. PMID:26674175

  2. The Mussel Adhesive Protein (Mefp-1) : A GREEN Corrosion Inhibitor

    Zhang, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion of metallic materials is a natural process, and our study shows that even in an alkaline environment severe corrosion may occur on a carbon steel surface. While corrosion cannot be stopped it can be retarded. Many of the traditional anti-corrosion approaches such as the chromate process are effective but hazardous to the environment and human health. Mefp-1, a protein derived from blue mussel byssus, is well known for its extraordinary adhesion and film forming properties. Moreover,...

  3. UV-assisted surface modification of PET fiber for adhesion improvement

    Highlights: ► A facile and highly efficient approach for surface modification of PET fiber was introduced. ► FTIR spectrum analysis proves that MDI is fixed on the PET surface. ► The chemical bonding at the interface between the fiber and matrix based on the reaction of -NCO + HO-R → NH-COO-R. ► The PET fiber modified with -NCO groups have a potential usage for composite fabrication. - Abstract: A facile and highly efficient method for adhesion improvement of PET/TPU laminates was introduced. A considerable improvement in adhesion was achieved by treating PET fabric with isocyanate (MDI) in toluene solution. Compared with unmodified ones, the maximal peel strength reaches to 2.27 kN/m (up to three times). The fabrics were also treated with NaOH and CDT (corona discharge treatment) and the results were compared respectively. It is considered that the improvement mainly depends on the strengthening of chemical bonding and mechanical interlocking between the fiber and the adhesive matrix. As the difference directly affects the effective transference of the stress (tension force) from matrix to fiber. The failure surface of PET fiber was severely destroyed which could be examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  4. Dynamics of allosteric action in multisite protein modification

    Milotti, E; Fabbro, A D; Pellegrina, C D; Chignola, Roberto; Fabbro, Alessio Del; Milotti, Edoardo; Pellegrina, Chiara Dalla

    2006-01-01

    Protein functions in cells may be activated or modified by the attachment of several kinds of chemical groups. While protein phosphorylation, i.e. the attachment of a phosphoryl (PO$_3^-$) group, is the most studied form of protein modification, and is known to regulate the functions of many proteins, protein behavior can also be modified by nitrosylation, acetylation, methylation, etc. A protein can have multiple modification sites, and display some form of transition only when enough sites are modified. In a previous paper we have modeled the generic equilibrium properties of multisite protein modification (R.Chignola, C. Dalla Pellegrina, A. Del Fabbro, E.Milotti, Physica A {\\bf 371}, 463 (2006)) and we have shown that it can account both for sharp, robust thresholds and for information transfer between processes with widely separated timescales. Here we use the same concepts to expand that analysis and describe multisite modification dynamics with a nonlinear differential system. We utilize the differenti...

  5. Modification of resolution in capillary electrophoresis for protein profiling in identification of genetic modification in foods

    Latoszek, A.; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    The capillary electrophoresis with UV detection was employed for protein profiling in extracts from maize and soybeans. Modifications of back-ground electrolyte and coating the capillary wall with polybrene was employed in order to decrease the protein adsorption on the capillary walls. The obtained protein profiles were compared for transgenic and non-transgenic variants, showing in some cases significant changes that might be employed for identification of genetic modifications ...

  6. Chemical modification of polyvinyl chloride and silicone elastomer in inhibiting adhesion of Aeromonas hydrophila.

    Kregiel, Dorota; Berlowska, Joanna; Mizerska, Urszula; Fortuniak, Witold; Chojnowski, Julian; Ambroziak, Wojciech

    2013-07-01

    Disease-causing bacteria of the genus Aeromonas are able to adhere to pipe materials, colonizing the surfaces and forming biofilms in water distribution systems. The aim of our research was to study how the modification of materials used commonly in the water industry can reduce bacterial cell attachment. Polyvinyl chloride and silicone elastomer surfaces were activated and modified with reactive organo-silanes by coupling or co-crosslinking silanes with the native material. Both the native and modified surfaces were tested using the bacterial strain Aeromonas hydrophila, which was isolated from the Polish water distribution system. The surface tension of both the native and modified surfaces was measured. To determine cell viability and bacterial adhesion two methods were used, namely plate count and luminometry. Results were expressed in colony-forming units (c.f.u.) and in relative light units (RLU) per cm(2). Almost all the chemically modified surfaces exhibited higher anti-adhesive and anti-microbial properties in comparison to the native surfaces. Among the modifying agents examined, poly[dimethylsiloxane-co-(N,N-dimethyl-N-n-octylammoniopropyl chloride) methylsiloxane)] terminated with hydroxydimethylsilyl groups (20 %) in silicone elastomer gave the most desirable results. The surface tension of this modifier, was comparable to the non-polar native surface. However, almost half of this value was due to the result of polar forces. In this case, in an adhesion analysis, only 1 RLU cm(-2) and less than 1 c.f.u. cm(-2) were noted. For the native gumosil, the results were 9,375 RLU cm(-2) and 2.5 × 10(8) c.f.u. cm(-2), respectively. The antibacterial activity of active organo-silanes was associated only with the carrier surface because no antibacterial compounds were detected in liquid culture media, in concentrations that were able to inhibit cell growth. PMID:23397109

  7. Influence of silane surface modification of veneer on interfacial adhesion of wood-plastic plywood

    Fang, Lu; Chang, Liang; Guo, Wen-jing; Chen, Yongping; Wang, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    In this study, wood-plastic plywood was fabricated with high density polyethylene (HDPE) film and poplar veneer by hot-pressing. To improve the interfacial adhesion between the wood veneer and HDPE film, silane A-171 (vinyltrimethoxysilane) was used to treat the surface of poplar veneer by spraying. The effects of silane agent on the veneer surface properties as well as the physical-mechanical performance of wood-plastic plywood were evaluated. The adsorption of several prehydrolyzed alkoxysilanes onto the veneer surface and the existence of a covalent bonding between the wood veneer and silane agent were confirmed using FTIR, XPS and contact angle. Silane surface treatment resulted in enhancement of shear strength and water resistance. When one layer HDPE film was used as adhesive, it caused 293.2% increase in shear strength, 34.6% and 40.8% reduction in water absorption and thickness swelling, respectively. In addition, the wood failure also increased from 5% to 100% due to the silane modification. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) results showed that treated plywood have higher storage modulus, lower tan δ peak value and lagged temperature for tan δ peak value with respect to untreated plywood. Experimental results of interfacial morphology by SEM further revealed better interaction between silane A-171 treated veneer and HDPE film.

  8. Posttranslational Modifications of Chloroplast Proteins: An Emerging Field.

    Lehtimäki, Nina; Koskela, Minna M; Mulo, Paula

    2015-07-01

    Posttranslational modifications of proteins are key effectors of enzyme activity, protein interactions, targeting, and turnover rate, but despite their importance, they are still poorly understood in plants. Although numerous reports have revealed the regulatory role of protein phosphorylation in photosynthesis, various other protein modifications have been identified in chloroplasts only recently. It is known that posttranslational N(α)-acetylation occurs in both nuclear- and plastid-encoded chloroplast proteins, but the physiological significance of this acetylation is not yet understood. Lysine acetylation affects the localization and activity of key metabolic enzymes, and it may work antagonistically or cooperatively with lysine methylation, which also occurs in chloroplasts. In addition, tyrosine nitration may help regulate the repair cycle of photosystem II, while N-glycosylation determines enzyme activity of chloroplastic carbonic anhydrase. This review summarizes the progress in the research field of posttranslational modifications of chloroplast proteins and points out the importance of these modifications in the regulation of chloroplast metabolism. PMID:25911530

  9. Unraveling oxidation-induced modifications in proteins by proteomics.

    Panis, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress-driven modifications can occur in lipids, proteins, and DNA and form the basis of several chronic pathologies. The metabolites generated during oxidative responses consist of very reactive substances that result in oxidative damage and modulation of redox signaling as the main outcomes. Oxidative modifications occurring in proteins are poorly understood; among the several methods employed to study such modifications, the most promising strategies are based on proteomics approaches. Proteomics has emerged as one of the most powerful and sensitive analytical tools for mapping the oxidative changes present in proteins in a wide range of sample types and disease models. This chapter addresses the main aspects of redox processes, including an overview of oxidative stress and its biological consequences on proteins. Moreover, major proteomic strategies that can be employed as powerful tools for understanding protein oxidative modifications detected in chronic pathologies are discussed, highlighting cancer research as a model. PMID:24629184

  10. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIV. Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors

    Hamann, Jörg; Aust, Gabriela; Araç, Demet;

    2015-01-01

    The Adhesion family forms a large branch of the pharmacologically important superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). As Adhesion GPCRs increasingly receive attention from a wide spectrum of biomedical fields, the Adhesion GPCR Consortium, together with the International Union of Basic ...

  11. Short-term adhesion and long-term biofouling testing of polydopamine and poly(ethylene glycol) surface modifications of membranes and feed spacers for biofouling control

    Miller, Daniel J.

    2012-08-01

    Ultrafiltration, nanofiltration membranes and feed spacers were hydrophilized with polydopamine and polydopamine- g-poly(ethylene glycol) surface coatings. The fouling propensity of modified and unmodified membranes was evaluated by short-term batch protein and bacterial adhesion tests. The fouling propensity of modified and unmodified membranes and spacers was evaluated by continuous biofouling experiments in a membrane fouling simulator. The goals of the study were: 1) to determine the effectiveness of polydopamine and polydopamine- g-poly(ethylene glycol) membrane coatings for biofouling control and 2) to compare techniques commonly used in assessment of membrane biofouling propensity with biofouling experiments under practical conditions. Short-term adhesion tests were carried out under static, no-flow conditions for 1 h using bovine serum albumin, a common model globular protein, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common model Gram-negative bacterium. Biofouling tests were performed in a membrane fouling simulator (MFS) for several days under flow conditions similar to those encountered in industrial modules with the autochthonous drinking water population and acetate dosage as organic substrate. Polydopamine- and polydopamine- g-poly(ethylene glycol)-modified membranes showed significantly reduced adhesion of bovine serum albumin and P. aeruginosa in the short-term adhesion tests, but no reduction of biofouling was observed during longer biofouling experiments with modified membranes and spacers. These results demonstrate that short-term batch adhesion experiments using model proteins or bacteria under static conditions are not indicative of biofouling, while continuous biofouling experiments showed that membrane surface modification by polydopamine and polydopamine- g-poly(ethylene glycol) is not effective for biofouling control. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Principles of protein group SUMO modification substantiated in DNA repair

    Psakhye, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of proteins by covalent attachment of functional groups (like phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, glycosylation, etc.) are of key importance for the cell as they regulate various aspects of protein behavior after its synthesis, e.g., dictate protein interaction properties, change catalytic activity of enzymes, induce conformational changes, guide subcellular localization and determine protein stability. A special class of protein PTMs is the conju...

  13. Enhanced cell adhesion to silicone implant material through plasma surface modification.

    Hauser, J; Zietlow, J; Köller, M; Esenwein, S A; Halfmann, H; Awakowicz, P; Steinau, H U

    2009-12-01

    Silicone implant material is widely used in the field of plastic surgery. Despite its benefits the lack of biocompatibility this material still represents a major problem. Due to the surface characteristics of silicone, protein adsorption and cell adhesion on this polymeric material is rather low. The aim of this study was to create a stable collagen I surface coating on silicone implants via glow-discharge plasma treatment in order to enhance cell affinity and biocompatibility of the material. Non-plasma treated, collagen coated and conventional silicone samples (non-plasma treated, non-coated) served as controls. After plasma treatment the change of surface free energy was evaluated by drop-shape analysis. The quality of the collagen coating was analysed by electron microscopy and Time-Of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. For biocompatibility tests mouse fibroblasts 3T3 were cultivated on the different silicone surfaces and stained with calcein-AM and propidium iodine to evaluate cell viability and adherence. Analysis of the different surfaces revealed a significant increase in surface free energy after plasma pre-treatment. As a consequence, collagen coating could only be achieved on the plasma activated silicone samples. The in vitro tests showed that the collagen coating led to a significant increase in cell adhesion and cell viability. PMID:19641852

  14. Protein modification by acrolein: Formation and stability of cysteine adducts

    Cai, Jian; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Pierce, William M.

    2009-01-01

    The toxicity of the ubiquitous pollutant and endogenous metabolite, acrolein, is due in part to covalent protein modifications. Acrolein reacts readily with protein nucleophiles via Michael addition and Schiff base formation. Potential acrolein targets in protein include the nucleophilic side chains of cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues as well as the free amino terminus of proteins. Although cysteine is the most acrolein-reactive residue, cysteine-acrolein adducts are difficult to iden...

  15. Development of improved polypropylene adhesive bonding by abrasion and atmospheric plasma surface modifications

    Encinas, N.; Abenojar, J.; Martínez, M A

    2012-01-01

    The present work deals with the problematic adhesive bonding of substrates with low surface energy. Different approaches have been explored with the aim of creating adequate adhesive joints based on polyolefinic substrate and polyurethane adhesive. The selected material under study was polypropylene (PP) as adherend, and a commercial Sikaflex®-252 polyurethane one component based structural adhesive (PU) as joint fluid. Among the diverse pre-treatments typically used to prepare surfaces prior...

  16. Dissecting signaling and functions of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors

    Araç, Demet; Aust, Gabriela; Calebiro, Davide;

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise an expanded superfamily of receptors in the human genome. Adhesion class G protein-coupled receptors (adhesion-GPCRs) form the second largest class of GPCRs. Despite the abundance, size, molecular structure, and functions in facilitating cell and matri...

  17. Research progress in protein post-translational modification

    2006-01-01

    Protein post-translational modification plays an important role in organism. It makes the protein obtain more complicated structures, perfect functions, more accurate regulations and more specific operations. The most common protein post- translational modifications include ubiquitylation, phosphorylation, glycosylation, lipodation, methylation, and acetylation and so on. Ubiquitylation plays an essential role in cellular functions such as cellular differentiation, apoptosis, DNA repair, antigen processing, and stress response. Phosphorylation is related to physiological and pathological processes including cellular signal conduction, nervous activity, muscle contraction and proliferation, development and differentiation of cells. Protein glycosylation is of great importance for many cell processes like immunoprotection, virus replication, cell growth, and occurrence of inflammation and so on. Lipodation is vital to signal conduction. Histone methylation and acetylation are responsible for transcription regulation. In vivo, different post-translational modifications do not occur isolatedly, but influence each other's function and cooperate with each other. Understanding what influences the post-translational modifications will help to uncover cellular processes and protein network in molecular level and finally direct more precise drug design targeting molecules. Post-translational modification mimics are set to dominate the next wave of protein therapeutics and become powerful medicinal tools in the 21st century.

  18. Protein modification: Standing out from the crowd

    Huang, Yichao; Liu, Lei

    2016-02-01

    The discovery of a tetrapeptide containing a reactive cysteine provides a method to site-selectively modify peptides and proteins, even if other cysteine residues are present in the polypeptide chain.

  19. Solid-binding Proteins for Modification of Inorganic Substrates

    Coyle, Brandon Laurence

    Robust and simple strategies to directly functionalize graphene- and diamond-based nanostructures with proteins are of considerable interest for biologically driven manufacturing, biosensing and bioimaging. In this work, we identify a new set of carbon binding peptides that vary in overall hydrophobicity and charge, and engineer two of these sequences (Car9 and Car15) within the framework of various proteins to exploit their binding ability. In addition, we conducted a detailed analysis of the mechanisms that underpin the interaction of the fusion proteins with carbon and silicon surfaces. Through these insights, we were able to develop proteins suitable for dispersing graphene flakes and carbon nanotubes in aqueous solutions, while retaining protein activity. Additionally, our investigation into the mechanisms of adhesion for our carbon binding peptides inspired a cheap, disposable protein purification system that is more than 10x cheaper than commonly used His-tag protein purification. Our results emphasize the importance of understanding both bulk and molecular recognition events when exploiting the adhesive properties of solid-binding peptides and proteins in technological applications.

  20. Role of Carbonyl Modifications on Aging-Associated Protein Aggregation

    Tanase, Maya; Urbanska, Aleksandra M.; Zolla, Valerio; Clement, Cristina C.; Huang, Liling; Morozova, Kateryna; Follo, Carlo; Goldberg, Michael; Roda, Barbara; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Santambrogio, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a common biological phenomenon, observed in different physiological and pathological conditions. Decreased protein solubility and a tendency to aggregate is also observed during physiological aging but the causes are currently unknown. Herein we performed a biophysical separation of aging-related high molecular weight aggregates, isolated from the bone marrow and splenic cells of aging mice and followed by biochemical and mass spectrometric analysis. The analysis indicated that compared to younger mice an increase in protein post-translational carbonylation was observed. The causative role of these modifications in inducing protein misfolding and aggregation was determined by inducing carbonyl stress in young mice, which recapitulated the increased protein aggregation observed in old mice. Altogether our analysis indicates that oxidative stress-related post-translational modifications accumulate in the aging proteome and are responsible for increased protein aggregation and altered cell proteostasis.

  1. Accelerated differentiation of osteoblast cells on polycaprolactone scaffolds driven by a combined effect of protein coating and plasma modification

    A combined effect of protein coating and plasma modification on the quality of the osteoblast-scaffold interaction was investigated. Three-dimensional polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds were manufactured by the precision extrusion deposition (PED) system. The structural, physical, chemical and biological cues were introduced to the surface through providing 3D structure, coating with adhesive protein fibronectin and modifying the surface with oxygen-based plasma. The changes in the surface properties of PCL after those modifications were examined by contact angle goniometry, surface energy calculation, surface chemistry analysis (XPS) and surface topography measurements (AFM). The effects of modification techniques on osteoblast short-term and long-term functions were examined by cell adhesion, proliferation assays and differentiation markers, namely alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) and osteocalcin secretion. The results suggested that the physical and chemical cues introduced by plasma modification might be sufficient for improved cell adhesion, but for accelerated osteoblast differentiation the synergetic effects of structural, physical, chemical and biological cues should be introduced to the PCL surface.

  2. Accelerated differentiation of osteoblast cells on polycaprolactone scaffolds driven by a combined effect of protein coating and plasma modification

    Yildirim, Eda D; Gueceri, Selcuk; Sun, Wei [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Besunder, Robyn; Allen, Fred [Drexel University, School of Biomedical Engineering Science and Health System, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Pappas, Daphne, E-mail: edy22@drexel.ed [Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    A combined effect of protein coating and plasma modification on the quality of the osteoblast-scaffold interaction was investigated. Three-dimensional polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds were manufactured by the precision extrusion deposition (PED) system. The structural, physical, chemical and biological cues were introduced to the surface through providing 3D structure, coating with adhesive protein fibronectin and modifying the surface with oxygen-based plasma. The changes in the surface properties of PCL after those modifications were examined by contact angle goniometry, surface energy calculation, surface chemistry analysis (XPS) and surface topography measurements (AFM). The effects of modification techniques on osteoblast short-term and long-term functions were examined by cell adhesion, proliferation assays and differentiation markers, namely alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) and osteocalcin secretion. The results suggested that the physical and chemical cues introduced by plasma modification might be sufficient for improved cell adhesion, but for accelerated osteoblast differentiation the synergetic effects of structural, physical, chemical and biological cues should be introduced to the PCL surface.

  3. Analysis of posttranslational modifications of proteins by tandem mass spectrometry

    Larsen, Martin Røssel; Trelle, Morten B; Thingholm, Tine E;

    2006-01-01

    -temporal distribution in cells and tissues. Most PTMs can be detected by protein and peptide analysis by mass spectrometry (MS), either as a mass increment or a mass deficit relative to the nascent unmodified protein. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) provides a series of analytical features that are highly useful for......Protein activity and turnover is tightly and dynamically regulated in living cells. Whereas the three-dimensional protein structure is predominantly determined by the amino acid sequence, posttranslational modification (PTM) of proteins modulates their molecular function and the spatial...

  4. 环氧树脂胶粘剂的改性%Modification on epoxy-based adhesive

    郑孝霞; 钱春香

    2003-01-01

    采用了4种方法增韧环氧树脂胶粘剂,分别是端羟基聚丁二烯液体橡胶改性、硅橡胶改性、聚丙烯酸酯复合弹性体微粒乳液改性及化学接枝共聚改性.研究过程中测试了剪切强度和断裂伸长率,并分别运用了扫描电镜图和红外光谱图分析了界面特性及改性剂与环氧树脂间的化学反应.研究结果表明,复合弹性体微粒改性和化学接枝改性能够取得更好的效果.%This research adopted four methods to toughen epoxy adhesives. They were liquid hydroxyl group terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) rubber modification, silicon rubber modification, polyacrylate multiplicity elastomer particulates emulsion modification and chemical grafting modification. After modification, the shearing strength and the rupture elongation were tested. The interface and the chemical reaction between the modifiers and the epoxy were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and infrared optical spectrum. The results show that the elastomer particulates modification and the chemical grafting modification can reach the better toughening effects.

  5. Biomimetic soy protein nanocomposites with calcium carbonate crystalline arrays for use as wood adhesive.

    Liu, Dagang; Chen, Huihuang; Chang, Peter R; Wu, Qinglin; Li, Kaifu; Guan, Litao

    2010-08-01

    Despite the biodegradability, non-toxicity, and renewability, commercially available soy protein-based adhesives still have not been widely adopted by industry, partially due to their disappointing performances, i.e., low glue strength in the dry state and no glue strength in the wet state. In this study, biomimetic soy protein/CaCO(3) hybrid wood glue was devised and an attempt made to improve the adhesion strength. The structure and morphology of the adhesive and its fracture bonding interface and adhesion strength were investigated. Results showed that the compact rivets or interlocking links, and ion crosslinking of calcium, carbonate, hydroxyl ions in the adhesive greatly improving the water-resistance and bonding strength of soy protein adhesives. Glue strength of soy protein hybrid adhesive was higher than 6 MPa even after three water-immersion cycles. This green and sustainable proteinous hybrid adhesive, with high glue strength and good water-resistance, is a good substitute for formaldehyde wood glues. PMID:20307978

  6. Flavonoids inhibit cytokine-induced endothelial cell adhesion protein gene expression.

    Gerritsen, M. E.; Carley, W. W.; Ranges, G. E.; Shen, C. P.; Phan, S. A.; Ligon, G. F.; Perry, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    Treatment of human endothelial cells with cytokines such as interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or interferon-gamma induces the expression of specific leukocyte adhesion molecules on the endothelial cell surface. Interfering with either leukocyte adhesion or adhesion protein upregulation is an important therapeutic target as evidenced by the potent anti-inflammatory actions of neutralizing antibodies to these ligands in various animal models and in patients. In the present ...

  7. Experimental strategies for the identification and characterization of adhesive proteins in animals: a review

    Hennebert, Elise; Maldonado, Barbara; Ladurner, Peter; Flammang, Patrick; Santos, Romana

    2015-01-01

    Adhesive secretions occur in both aquatic and terrestrial animals, in which they perform diverse functions. Biological adhesives can therefore be remarkably complex and involve a large range of components with different functions and interactions. However, being mainly protein based, biological adhesives can be characterized by classical molecular methods. This review compiles experimental strategies that were successfully used to identify, characterize and obtain the full-length sequence of ...

  8. Wet-chemical approach for the cell-adhesive modification of polytetrafluoroethylene

    Gabriel, Matthias; Dahm, Manfred; Vahl, Christian-F, E-mail: mgabriel@uni-mainz.de [Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Johannes Gutenberg-University School of Medicine, Mainz (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), a frequently utilized polymer for the fabrication of synthetic vascular grafts, was surface-modified by means of a wet-chemical process. The inherently non-cell-adhesive polymer does not support cellular attachment, a prerequisite for the endothelialization of luminal surface grafts in small diameter applications. To impart the material with cell-adhesive properties a treatment with sodium-naphthalene provided a basis for the subsequent immobilization of the adhesion promoting RGD-peptide using a hydroxy- and amine-reactive crosslinker. Successful conjugation was shown with cell culture experiments which demonstrated excellent endothelial cell growth on the modified surfaces.

  9. PROTEIN EXTRACTION FROM SECONDARY SLUDGE OF PAPER MILL WASTEWATER AND ITS UTILIZATION AS A WOOD ADHESIVE

    Muhammad Pervaiz

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, secondary sludge (SS from a kraft paper mill was used as a source of biomass to recover protein and investigate its potential use as a wood adhesive. The process of protein recovery involved disruption of the floc structure in alkaline medium to disintegrate and release intercellular contents into the aqueous phase followed by separation of soluble protein. Finally, the soluble protein was subjected to low pH precipitation and the pelletized sludge protein, referred to as recovered sludge protein (RSP was tested for crude protein, moisture, and other contents. A significant process yield of 90% in terms of precipitation of soluble protein from disintegrated sludge was estimated through calorimetric studies, whereas an overall material balance confirmed a RSP yield of up to 23% based on total suspended solids of raw sludge. The RSP containing 30% crude protein was used as a wood adhesive and its adhesion performance was compared with soy protein isolate (SPI and phenol formaldehyde (PF resin. The testing of plywood lap joints has shown up to 41% shear strength level of RSP adhesive compared to PF. This work demonstrates the technical feasibility and potential of SS as a biomass resource to develop eco-friendly adhesives for wood composite applications.

  10. Cloning and expression of recombinant adhesive protein MEFP-2 of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis

    Silverman, Heather G.; Roberto, Francisco F.

    2006-02-07

    The present invention includes a Mytilus edulis cDNA having a nucleotide sequence that encodes for the Mytilus edulis foot protein-2 (Mefp-2), an example of a mollusk foot protein. Mefp-2 is an integral component of the blue mussels' adhesive protein complex, which allows the mussel to attach to objects underwater. The isolation, purification and sequencing of the Mefp-2 gene will allow researchers to produce Mefp-2 protein using genetic engineering techniques. The discovery of Mefp-2 gene sequences will also allow scientists to better understand how the blue mussel creates its waterproof adhesive protein complex.

  11. Cloning and expression of recombinant adhesive protein Mefp-1 of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis

    Silverman, Heather G.; Roberto, Francisco F.

    2006-01-17

    The present invention comprises a Mytilus edulis cDNA sequenc having a nucleotide sequence that encodes for the Mytilus edulis foot protein-1 (Mefp-1), an example of a mollusk foot protein. Mefp-1 is an integral component of the blue mussels' adhesive protein complex, which allows the mussel to attach to objects underwater. The isolation, purification and sequencing of the Mefp-1 gene will allow researchers to produce Mefp-1 protein using genetic engineering techniques. The discovery of Mefp-1 gene sequence will also allow scientists to better understand how the blue mussel creates its waterproof adhesive protein complex.

  12. Recent approaches in physical modification of protein functionality.

    Mirmoghtadaie, Leila; Shojaee Aliabadi, Saeedeh; Hosseini, Seyede Marzieh

    2016-05-15

    Today, there is a growing demand for novel technologies, such as high hydrostatic pressure, irradiation, ultrasound, filtration, supercritical carbon dioxide, plasma technology, and electrical methods, which are not based on chemicals or heat treatment for modifying ingredient functionality and extending product shelf life. Proteins are essential components in many food processes, and provide various functions in food quality and stability. They can create interfacial films that stabilize emulsions and foams as well as interact to make networks that play key roles in gel and edible film production. These properties of protein are referred to as 'protein functionality', because they can be modified by different processing. The common protein modification (chemical, enzymatic and physical) methods have strong effects on the structure and functionality of food proteins. Furthermore, novel technologies can modify protein structure and functional properties that will be reviewed in this study. PMID:26776016

  13. Surface adhesion of fusion proteins containing the hydrophobins HFBI and HFBII from Trichoderma reesei

    Linder, Markus; Szilvay, Geza R.; Nakari-Setälä, Tiina; Söderlund, Hans; Penttilä, Merja

    2002-01-01

    Hydrophobins are surface-active proteins produced by filamentous fungi, where they seem to be ubiquitous. They have a variety of roles in fungal physiology related to surface phenomena, such as adhesion, formation of surface layers, and lowering of surface tension. Hydrophobins can be divided into two classes based on the hydropathy profile of their primary sequence. We have studied the adhesion behavior of two Trichoderma reesei class II hydrophobins, HFBI and HFBII, as isolated proteins and...

  14. Cell surface molecules and fibronectin-mediated cell adhesion: effect of proteolytic digestion of membrane proteins

    1982-01-01

    Proteases have been used as a tool to investigate the role of surface molecules in fibronectin-mediated cell adhesion. Proteolytic digestion of membrane-proteins by pronase (1 mg/ml for 20 min at 37 degrees C) completely inhibited adhesion of baby hamster kidney (BHK) fibroblasts on fibronectin-coated plastic dishes. Various degrees of inhibition were also obtained after treatment with proteinase K, chymotrypsin, papain, subtilopeptidase A, and thermolysin. Protein synthesis was required to r...

  15. Study of green film-forming corrosion inhibitor based on mussel adhesive protein

    Holmér, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    Today there are numerous methods to slow down a corrosion process of metallic materials. However, due to environmental effects and health risk issues, several traditional corrosion inhibitors have to be phased out. Hence, it is of great importance to develop new corrosion inhibitors that are “green”, safe, smart and multifunctional. In this essay, the focus is on mussel adhesive protein (MAP) and its possibility to reduce the rate of the corrosion process. The protein exhibit great adhesive s...

  16. Artificial Metalloenzymes through Chemical Modification of Engineered Host Proteins

    Zernickel, Anna

    2014-10-01

    With a few exceptions, all organisms are restricted to the 20 canonical amino acids for ribosomal protein biosynthesis. Addition of new amino acids to the genetic code can introduce novel functionalities to proteins, broadening the diversity of biochemical as well as chemical reactions and providing new tools to study protein structure, reactivity, dynamics and protein-protein-interactions. The site directed in vivo incorporation developed by P. G. SCHULTZ and coworkers, using an archeal orthogonal tRNA/aaRS (aminoacyl-tRNA synthase) pair, allows site-specifically insertion of a synthetic unnatural amino acid (UAA) by reprogramming the amber TAG stop codon. A variety of over 80 different UAAs can be introduced by this technique. However by now a very limited number can form kinetically stable bonds to late transition metals. This thesis aims to develop new catalytically active unnatural amino acids or strategies for a posttranslational modification of site-specific amino acids in order to achieve highly enantioselective metallorganic enzyme hybrids (MOEH). As a requirement a stable protein host has to be established, surviving the conditions for incorporation, posttranslational modification and the final catalytic reactions. mTFP* a fluorescent protein was genetically modified by excluding any exposed Cys, His and Met forming a variant mTFP*, which fulfills the required specifications. Posttranslational chemical modification of mTFP* allow the introduction of single site metal chelating moieties. For modification on exposed cysteines different maleiimid containing ligand structures were synthesized. In order to perform copper catalyzed click reactions, suitable unnatural amino acids (para-azido-(L)-phenylalanine, para-ethynyl-(L)-phenylalanine) were synthesized and a non-cytotoxic protocol was established. The triazole ring formed during this reaction may contribute as a moderate σ-donor/π-acceptor ligand to the metal binding site. Since the cell limits the

  17. PROTEIN EXTRACTION FROM SECONDARY SLUDGE OF PAPER MILL WASTEWATER AND ITS UTILIZATION AS A WOOD ADHESIVE

    Muhammad Pervaiz; Mohini Sain

    2011-01-01

    In this study, secondary sludge (SS) from a kraft paper mill was used as a source of biomass to recover protein and investigate its potential use as a wood adhesive. The process of protein recovery involved disruption of the floc structure in alkaline medium to disintegrate and release intercellular contents into the aqueous phase followed by separation of soluble protein. Finally, the soluble protein was subjected to low pH precipitation and the pelletized sludge protein, referred to as reco...

  18. UV-assisted surface modification of PET fiber for adhesion improvement

    Liu, Xiang-Dong; Sheng, De-Kun; Gao, Xiu-Mei; Li, Tong-Bing; Yang, Yu-Ming

    2013-01-01

    A facile and highly efficient method for adhesion improvement of PET/TPU laminates was introduced. A considerable improvement in adhesion was achieved by treating PET fabric with isocyanate (MDI) in toluene solution. Compared with unmodified ones, the maximal peel strength reaches to 2.27 kN/m (up to three times). The fabrics were also treated with NaOH and CDT (corona discharge treatment) and the results were compared respectively. It is considered that the improvement mainly depends on the strengthening of chemical bonding and mechanical interlocking between the fiber and the adhesive matrix. As the difference directly affects the effective transference of the stress (tension force) from matrix to fiber. The failure surface of PET fiber was severely destroyed which could be examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  19. Surface modification of polyethylene terephthalate substrates by high frequency air discharge plasma. Structure, morphology, adhesion performance

    Effect of high frequency air discharge plasma on the surface and adhesion performance of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates of different thickness was investigated. Based upon X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, contact angle measurements and ATF FTIR was shown that chemical composition of thin surface layer changes even after first 5 minutes of plasma treatment in spite of mild conditions of etching. Structure changes were estimated by AFM and TEM. It was shown that plasma treatment reveals phase structure organization of PET, but total surface relief changes insignificantly. Dramatic change in surface energy after treatment was revealed by contact angle measurements. At the same time, it was shown that surface energy relaxation occurs during storage of substrate in room conditions. These results are in good agreement with adhesion performance of PET substrate to model silicon scotch estimated by 180º Peel Test. Key words: surface energy, adhesion properties, plasma etching of PET surface

  20. Effect of adhesion proteins and surface chemistry on the procoagulant state of adherent platelets

    Grunkemeier, John Mark

    Poor hemocompatibility of a blood contacting device can lead to blood clotting, reduced blood flow, and depletion of platelets from the blood. Improved understanding of the processes by which blood-material contact leads to these responses could result in more hemocompatible materials. Platelets accelerate blood clotting by adhesion, aggregation, secretion of proteins and agonists and acceleration of thrombin generation. Platelets are said to be "procoagulant" after phosphatidylserine residues flip from the cytosolic to the extracellular face of the lipid bilayer. This then allows for the assembly of the prothrombinase complex (Xa, Va and calcium) on the platelet membrane, which can rapidly convert prothrombin to thrombin. In this study, three different methods confirmed that adhesion causes platelets to become procoagulant: shortening of clotting times of recalcified plasma, binding of FITC-annexin V, and generation of thrombin in the presence of Va, Xa and prothrombin by adherent platelets. Adherent platelets were 10--23 times more activated than bulk phase unactivated platelets and 10--24 times less activated than bulk phase platelets activated by calcium ionophore. The role of adsorbed fibrinogen, vWF, mixtures of fibrinogen and vWF, fibronectin, whole and dilute plasma, and plasma deficient in adhesion proteins in stimulating platelet procoagulant activity was investigated. The results of these experiments suggested that adhesion proteins affect procoagulant activation to varying degrees and that surfaces preadsorbed with mixtures of adhesion proteins are more activating that surfaces preadsorbed with single adhesion proteins. The hypothesis that materials that affect tightness of binding of adsorbed adhesion proteins affect platelet procoagulant activity was investigated. These studies showed that increasing fluorine content of RFGD polymerized films caused reduced platelet adhesion, but increased procoagulant activity, possibly due to their ability to adsorb

  1. Proteomic Analysis of Protein Posttranslational Modifications by Mass Spectrometry.

    Swaney, Danielle L; Villén, Judit

    2016-01-01

    The addition of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) to proteins is an influential mechanism to temporally control protein function and ultimately regulate entire cellular processes. Most PTMs are present at low stoichiometry and abundance, which limits their detection when analyzing whole cell lysates. PTM purification methods are thus required to comprehensively characterize the presence and dynamics of PTMs using mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches. Here we describe several of the most influential PTMs and discuss the fundamentals of proteomics experiments and PTM purification methods. PMID:26933252

  2. Atmospheric pressure plasma surface modification of titanium for high temperature adhesive bonding

    Akram, M.; Jansen, K.M.B.; Ernst, L.J.; Bhowmik, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this investigation surface treatment of titanium is carried out by plasma ion implantation under atmospheric pressure plasma in order to increase the adhesive bond strength. Prior to the plasma treatment, titanium surfaces were mechanically treated by sand blasting. It is observed that the contac

  3. Lysine Glutarylation Is a Protein Posttranslational Modification Regulated by SIRT5

    Tan, Minjia; Peng, Chao; Anderson, Kristin A.;

    2014-01-01

    We report the identification and characterization of a five-carbon protein posttranslational modification (PTM) called lysine glutarylation (Kglu). This protein modification was detected by immunoblot and mass spectrometry (MS), and then comprehensively validated by chemical and biochemical metho...

  4. Surface Modification of PMMA to Improve Adhesion to Corneal Substitutes in a Synthetic Core-Skirt Keratoprosthesis.

    Riau, Andri K; Mondal, Debasish; Yam, Gary H F; Setiawan, Melina; Liedberg, Bo; Venkatraman, Subbu S; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2015-10-01

    Patients with advanced corneal disease do poorly with conventional corneal transplantation and require a keratoprosthesis (KPro) for visual rehabilitation. The most widely used KPro is constructed using poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) in the central optical core and a donor cornea as skirt material. In many cases, poor adherence between the PMMA and the soft corneal tissue is responsible for device "extrusion" and bacterial infiltration. The interfacial adhesion between the tissue and the PMMA was therefore critical to successful implantation and device longevity. In our approach, we modified the PMMA surface using oxygen plasma (plasma group); plasma followed by calcium phosphate (CaP) coating (p-CaP); dopamine followed by CaP coating (d-CaP); or plasma followed by coating with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (3-APTES). To create a synthetic KPro model, we constructed and attached 500 μm thick collagen type I hydrogel on the modified PMMA surfaces. Surface modifications produced significantly improved interfacial adhesion strength compared to untreated PMMA (p strength was observed in p-CaP group over time (p human corneal stromal fibroblasts, except for the 3-APTES group, which showed no live cells at 72 h of culture. In contrast, cells on d-CaP surface showed good anchorage, evidenced by the expression of focal adhesion complex (paxillin and vinculin), and prominent filopodia protrusions. In conclusion, d-CaP can not only enhance and provide stability to the adhesion of collagen hydrogel on the PMMA surface but also promote biointegration. PMID:26389670

  5. Embedded proteins and sacrificial bonds provide the strong adhesive properties of gastroliths.

    Thormann, Esben; Mizuno, Hiroyasu; Jansson, Kjell; Hedin, Niklas; Fernández, M Soledad; Arias, José Luis; Rutland, Mark W; Pai, Ranjith Krishna; Bergström, Lennart

    2012-07-01

    The adhesive properties of gastroliths from a freshwater crayfish (Cherax quadricarinatus) were quantified by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) between heavily demineralized gastrolith microparticles and gastrolith substrates of different composition. Combined AFM and transmission electron microscopy studies demonstrated that the sequential detachment and large adhesion energies that characterise the adhesive behaviour of a native gastrolith substrate are dominated by sacrificial bonds between chitin fibres and between chitin fibres and CaCO(3). The sacrificial bonds were shown to be strongly related to the gastrolith proteins and when the majority of these proteins were removed by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), the sequential detachment disappeared and the adhesive energy was reduced by more than two orders of magnitude. PMID:22653376

  6. Investigating the BSA protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion of Al-alloy surfaces after creating a hierarchical (micro/nano) superhydrophobic structure.

    Moazzam, Parisa; Razmjou, Amir; Golabi, Mohsen; Shokri, Dariush; Landarani-Isfahani, Amir

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation on metals such as aluminum (Al) alloys lead to serious issues in biomedical and industrial fields from both an economical and health perspective. Here, we showed that a careful manipulation of Al surface characteristics via a facile two-steps superhydrophobic modification can provide not only biocompatibility and an ability to control protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion, but also address the issue of apparent long-term toxicity of Al-alloys. To find out the roles of surface characteristics, surface modification and protein adsorption on microbial adhesion and biofilm formation, the surfaces were systematically characterized by SEM, EDX, XPS, AFM, FTIR, water contact angle (WCA) goniometry, surface free energy (SFE) measurement, MTT, Bradford, Lowry and microtiter plate assays and also flow-cytometry and potentiostat analyses. Results showed that WCA and SFE changed from 70° to 163° and 36.3 to 0.13 mN m(-1) , respectively. The stable and durable modification led to a substantial reduction in static/dynamic BSA adsorption. The effect of such a treatment on the biofilm formation was analyzed by using three different bacteria of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Staphylococcus aureus. The microtiter plate assay and flow cytometry analysis showed that the modification not only could substantially reduce the bacterial adhesion but this biofouling resistance is independent of bacterium type. An excellent cell viability after exposure of HeLa cells to waters incubated with the modified samples was observed. Finally, the corrosion rate reduced sharply from 856.6 to 0.119 MPY after superhydrophobic modifications, which is an excellent stable corrosion inhibition property. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2220-2233, 2016. PMID:27104583

  7. Identification, characterization, and expression levels of putative adhesive proteins from the tube-dwelling polychaete Sabellaria alveolata.

    Becker, Pierre T; Lambert, Aurélie; Lejeune, Annabelle; Lanterbecq, Déborah; Flammang, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    The shelter of the tube-dwelling polychaete Sabellaria alveolata is composed of mineral particles assembled with spots of a proteinaceous cement. The adhesive proteins constituting the cement were identified on the basis of their sequence similarity with proteins of a phylogenetically related species, Phragmatopoma californica. Two positively charged proteins, Sa-1 and Sa-2, share common features: they both have a mass of 22 kDa; are rich in glycine, tyrosine and basic residues; and show repeated peptide motifs. The consensus repeat of Sa-1 is KGAYGAKGLGYGNKAGYGAYG (occurring 6-8 times), while Sa-2 displays the consensus heptapeptide VHKAAWG (5 times) and undecapeptide VHKAAGYGGYG (8 times). Two variants of a serine-rich protein, Sa-3A (22 kDa) and Sa-3B (21 kDa), were also identified. Their serine residues account for 75 mol% and are probably phosphorylated, meaning that Sa-3 is very acidic and negatively charged. Moreover, tyrosine residues of all adhesive proteins are presumably modified into DOPA. Although protein sequences are not well-conserved between S. alveolata and P. californica, their main characteristics (including amino acid composition, post-translational modifications, repeated patterns, isoelectric point, and mass) are shared by both species. This suggests that these features are more important for their function than the primary structure of the proteins. The mRNA abundance for each protein was estimated by quantitative real-time PCR, revealing relative expression levels of about 5, 11, 1.5, and 1 for Sa-1, -2, -3A, and -3B, respectively. These levels could be indicative of charge neutralization phenomena or could reflect their function (interface vs. bulk) in the cement. PMID:23111133

  8. 改性水性聚氨酯胶黏剂研究进展%Progress of modification of waterborne polyurethane adhesive

    邓威; 黄洪; 傅和青

    2011-01-01

    The classification and preparation of waterborne polyurethane adhesive are introduced. The modification methods of waterborne polyurethane, such as acrylate modification, epoxy resin modification, organic fluorine modification, silicone, nanomaterials modification, multi-modification and hyperbranched prepolymer modification are summarized. The advantages and disadvantages of these modification methods are compared, and the application of the modified waterborne polyurethane adhesive is proposed. The development of waterborne polyurethane adhesive is discussed.%介绍了水性聚氨酯胶黏剂的分类和合成方法.综述了水性聚氨酯的改性方法,包括丙烯酸酯改性、环氧树脂改性、有机氟改性、有机硅改性、纳米材料改性、复合改性和超支化预聚体改性.比较了各种改性方法的优势和缺陷,提出了每种方法改性的胶黏剂的适用领域,指出了水性聚氨酯胶黏剂的发展趋势.

  9. Protein Phosphorylation and Redox Modification in Stomatal Guard Cells.

    Balmant, Kelly M; Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modification (PTM) is recognized as a major process accounting for protein structural variation, functional diversity, and the dynamics and complexity of the proteome. Since PTMs can change the structure and function of proteins, they are essential to coordinate signaling networks and to regulate important physiological processes in eukaryotes. Plants are constantly challenged by both biotic and abiotic stresses that reduce productivity, causing economic losses in crops. The plant responses involve complex physiological, cellular, and molecular processes, with stomatal movement as one of the earliest responses. In order to activate such a rapid response, stomatal guard cells employ cellular PTMs of key protein players in the signaling pathways to regulate the opening and closure of the stomatal pores. Here we discuss two major types of PTMs, protein phosphorylation and redox modification that play essential roles in stomatal movement under stress conditions. We present an overview of PTMs that occur in stomatal guard cells, especially the methods and technologies, and their applications in PTM identification and quantification. Our focus is on PTMs that modify molecular components in guard cell signaling at the stages of signal perception, second messenger production, as well as downstream signaling events and output. Improved understanding of guard cell signaling will enable generation of crops with enhanced stress tolerance, and increased yield and bioenergy through biotechnology and molecular breeding. PMID:26903877

  10. Biomolecular modification of carbon nanotubes for studies of cell adhesion and migration

    Luo, Wei; Yousaf, Muhammad N.

    2011-12-01

    We report a strategy for tailoring and patterning carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for biospecific cell studies. We synthesized a new electroactive hydroquinone terminated pyrene molecule to tailor CNTs. These modified CNTs can be oxidized and chemoselectively reacted with oxyamine tethered ligands to generate various ligand tethered CNTs. A cell adhesive Arg-Gly-Asp peptide (RGD) is immobilized to the CNTs and a new microfluidic patterning method is employed to generate multiplex patterned surfaces for biospecific cell adhesion and migration studies. This work demonstrates the integration of a new functionalization strategy to immobilize a variety of ligands to CNTs for a range of potential drug delivery, tissue imaging and cellular behavior studies and a microfluidic patterning strategy for generating complex high-throughput surfaces for biotechnological and cell based assay applications.

  11. Transience of plasma surface modification as an adhesion promoter for polychlorotrifluorethylene

    Subramanian, S; Love, B J; Romand, M; Charbonnier, M

    2002-01-01

    Poly(chlorotrifluoroethylene) (PCTFE) and other fluoropolymers are increasingly used as inner layer dielectrics. However, these polymers have low surface energies and correspondingly poor adhesive properties. Results are presented on the use of a low-pressure ammonia plasma to enhance the surface bondability of PCTFE. The plasma modified PCTFE film surfaces were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. Surface modified films exhibited improved adhesion to electroless copper deposits (180 deg. peel test) compared to coated PCTFE controls and that underwent no plasma exposure. Annealing studies were conducted between 30 and 100 deg. C to examine the stability of the plasma-modified surfaces. For samples annealed below T sub g , contact angle measurements indicated that the plasma-introduced groups remained bound on the surface for four weeks. For specimens annealed above T sub g , the surface functionalities were absorbed within the bulk and surface rearrangement occurre...

  12. Diamond film growth with modification properties of adhesion between substrate and diamond film

    Setasuwon P.

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Diamond film growth was studied using chemical vapor deposition (CVD. A special equipment was build in-house, employing a welding torch, and substrate holder with a water-cooling system. Acetylene and oxygen were used as combustion gases and the substrate was tungsten carbide cobalt. It was found that surface treatments, such as diamond powder scratching or acid etching, increase the adhesion and prevent the film peel-off. Diamond powder scratching and combined diamond powder scratching with acid etching gave the similar diamond film structure with small grain and slightly rough surface. The diamond film obtained with both treatments has high adhesion and can withstand internal stress better than ones obtained by untreated surface or acid etching alone. It was also found that higher substrate temperature produced smoother surface and more uniform diamond grain.

  13. Effect of Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-1 on the Intraperitoneal Adhesion Formation

    2000-01-01

    In order to study the role of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) in the intra-peritoneal adhesion formation, 23 infertile patients undergoing laparoscopic operation were divided into two groups: experimental group including 12 patients with intra-peritoneal adhesion and control group including 11 patients without intra-peritoneal adhesion. Peritoneal fluid (PF) and peritoneum were collected from these patients during laparoscopic examination. The expression levels of MCP-l protein and MCP-1 mRNA were detected by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and dot blot analysis method respectively. It was found that the levels of MCP-1 protein in PF of the patients with peritoneal adhesion were significantly higher than in the control group (0. 44±0.11 ng/ml vs 0. 19+0. 09 ng/ml respectively, P<0. 01 ). The level of MCP-1 mRNA in the peritoneum of the patients with peritoneal adhesion was significantly higher than in the control group (48.61±3.72 vs 19. 87±2.54 respectively, P<0. 01). It was suggested that MCP-1 might play a role in the adhesion formation, and chemotactic cytokines expressing in the peritoneal mesothelial cells might be take part in the process.

  14. Cell Adhesion Modification of Streptococcus viridians in the Presence of Xylitol

    Esmacher, Jason; Vidakovich, Blair; Giangrande, Michael; Hoffmann, Peter

    2012-10-01

    There is scientific documentation that those who chew gum sweetened by the sugar alcohol xylitol report a dramatically lower incident of both dental caries and otitis media compared to those who chew conventional gum sweetened by sucrose. An explanation contends that xylitol interferes with the ability of Streptococcus viridian (SV) to form biofilms which is a necessary precursor to the bacteria's ability to damage human tissues. We have used atomic force microscopy to study the cell wall/fimbria properties at the nanonewton level in both the presence and absence of xylitol. The first set of measurements used varying concentrations of xylitol incorporated within the incubation medium. The second used non-xylitol grown bacteria, the xylitol was added externally at various concentrations. Our study suggests that growing SV with xylitol reduces their ability to adhere together. Additionally, externally added xylitol showed grouping of cell adhesion to a relatively narrow nanonewton spread that is concentration dependent. Measurement of the adhesion properties of the bacterial cell wall have found that there is a dramatic increase in the cell wall's firmness which simultaneously accompanied a decrease in its ability to support adhesion, even at very low concentrations of xylitol.

  15. Adhesion modification of neural stem cells induced by nanoscale ripple patterns

    Pedraz, P.; Casado, S.; Rodriguez, V.; Giordano, M. C.; Buatier de Mongeot, F.; Ayuso-Sacido, A.; Gnecco, E.

    2016-03-01

    We have studied the influence of anisotropic nanopatterns (ripples) on the adhesion and morphology of mouse neural stem cells (C17.2) on glass substrates using cell viability assay, optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The ripples were produced by defocused ion beam sputtering with inert Ar ions, which physically remove atoms from the surface at the energy of 800 eV. The ripple periodicity (∼200 nm) is comparable to the thickness of the cytoplasmatic microspikes (filopodia) which link the stem cells to the substrate. All methods show that the cell adhesion is significantly lowered compared to the same type of cells on flat glass surfaces. Furthermore, the AFM analysis reveals that the filopodia tend to be trapped parallel or perpendicular to the ripples, which limits the spreading of the stem cell on the rippled substrate. This opens the perspective of controlling the micro-adhesion of stem cells and the orientation of their filopodia by tuning the anisotropic substrate morphology without chemical reactions occurring at the surface.

  16. Chemical modifications of therapeutic proteins induced by residual ethylene oxide.

    Chen, Louise; Sloey, Christopher; Zhang, Zhongqi; Bondarenko, Pavel V; Kim, Hyojin; Ren, Da; Kanapuram, Sekhar

    2015-02-01

    Ethylene oxide (EtO) is widely used in sterilization of drug product primary containers and medical devices. The impact of residual EtO on protein therapeutics is of significant interest in the biopharmaceutical industry. The potential for EtO to modify individual amino acids in proteins has been previously reported. However, specific identification of EtO adducts in proteins and the effect of residual EtO on the stability of therapeutic proteins has not been reported to date. This paper describes studies of residual EtO with two therapeutic proteins, a PEGylated form of the recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (Peg-GCSF) and recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) formulated with human serum albumin (HSA). Peg-GCSF was filled in an EtO sterilized delivery device and incubated at accelerated stress conditions. Glu-C peptide mapping and LC-MS analyses revealed residual EtO reacted with Peg-GCSF and resulted in EtO modifications at two methionine residues (Met-127 and Met-138). In addition, tryptic peptide mapping and LC-MS analyses revealed residual EtO in plastic vials reacted with HSA in EPO formulation at Met-328 and Cys-34. This paper details the work conducted to understand the effects of residual EtO on the chemical stability of protein therapeutics. PMID:25407640

  17. Overexpression of Catalase Diminishes Oxidative Cysteine Modifications of Cardiac Proteins.

    Chunxiang Yao

    Full Text Available Reactive protein cysteine thiolates are instrumental in redox regulation. Oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, react with thiolates to form oxidative post-translational modifications, enabling physiological redox signaling. Cardiac disease and aging are associated with oxidative stress which can impair redox signaling by altering essential cysteine thiolates. We previously found that cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase (Cat, an enzyme that detoxifies excess H2O2, protected from oxidative stress and delayed cardiac aging in mice. Using redox proteomics and systems biology, we sought to identify the cysteines that could play a key role in cardiac disease and aging. With a 'Tandem Mass Tag' (TMT labeling strategy and mass spectrometry, we investigated differential reversible cysteine oxidation in the cardiac proteome of wild type and Cat transgenic (Tg mice. Reversible cysteine oxidation was measured as thiol occupancy, the ratio of total available versus reversibly oxidized cysteine thiols. Catalase overexpression globally decreased thiol occupancy by ≥1.3 fold in 82 proteins, including numerous mitochondrial and contractile proteins. Systems biology analysis assigned the majority of proteins with differentially modified thiols in Cat Tg mice to pathways of aging and cardiac disease, including cellular stress response, proteostasis, and apoptosis. In addition, Cat Tg mice exhibited diminished protein glutathione adducts and decreased H2O2 production from mitochondrial complex I and II, suggesting improved function of cardiac mitochondria. In conclusion, our data suggest that catalase may alleviate cardiac disease and aging by moderating global protein cysteine thiol oxidation.

  18. Effects of protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors on cytokine-induced adhesion molecule expression by human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    May, M. J.; Wheeler-Jones, C. P.; Pearson, J. D.

    1996-01-01

    1. Endothelial cells can be stimulated by the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1 alpha and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) alpha to express the leukocyte adhesion molecules E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 but the intracellular signalling mechanisms leading to this expression are incompletely understood. We have investigated the role of protein tyrosine kinases (PTK) in adhesion molecule expression by cytokine-activated ...

  19. Site-selective protein immobilization by covalent modification of GST fusion proteins.

    Zhou, Yiqing; Guo, Tianlin; Tang, Guanghui; Wu, Hui; Wong, Nai-Kei; Pan, Zhengying

    2014-11-19

    The immobilization of functional proteins onto solid supports using affinity tags is an attractive approach in recent development of protein microarray technologies. Among the commonly used fusion protein tags, glutathione S-transferase (GST) proteins have been indispensable tools for protein-protein interaction studies and have extensive applications in recombinant protein purification and reversible protein immobilization. Here, by utilizing pyrimidine-based small-molecule probes with a sulfonyl fluoride reactive group, we report a novel and general approach for site-selective immobilization of Schistosoma japonicum GST (sjGST) fusion proteins through irreversible and specific covalent modification of the tyrosine-111 residue of the sjGST tag. As demonstrated by sjGST-tagged eGFP and sjGST-tagged kinase activity assays, this immobilization approach offers the advantages of high immobilization efficiency and excellent retention of protein structure and activity. PMID:25340706

  20. Cardiovascular Proteomics: Assessment of Protein Post-translational Modifications

    Šťastná, Miroslava; Zhang, P.; Murphy, A.; Van Eyk, J.E.

    First edition. London : Academic Press, 2012 - (Hill, J.; Olson, E.), s. 261-271 ISBN 978-0-12-415890-0. - (Volume 1) Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : cardiac cell subproteomes * post-translational modifications * cardiovascular proteomics * protein separation * mass spectrometry Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation http://aleph.nkp.cz/F/XBEQK7PM32M6AY2U7E1H3G67CQLULGBBAPPVB7XTIE3CDJ73HI-74473?func=full-set-set&set_number=019920&set_entry=000002&format=999

  1. Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion to nanohydroxyapatite in the presence of model proteins

    Bacterial infections can have adverse effects on the efficacy, lifetime, and safety of an implanted device. The aim of this study was to investigate the initial adhesion of several strains, namely S. aureus and S. epidermidis, on two distinct types of nanohydroxyapatite (nanoHA), sintered at 725 °C and 1000 °C. A comparison was also made with nanohydroxyapatite having adsorbed fetal bovine serum (FBS), human fibronectin (FN) and human serum albumin (HSA). Adhered bacterial cells were examined by scanning electron microscopy and quantified as colony forming units after being released by sonication. The wettability of the sample surface with and without adsorbed protein was assessed by contact-angle measurements. NanoHA sintered at 1000 °C showed lower bacterial adhesion than this heat-treated at 725 °C. Adsorption of FBS onto the nanoHA surface caused a decrease in the adhesion of all strains on both materials. The bacterial adhesion patterns in the presence of FN were different for both nanoHA substrates; the adherence of the bacterial strains, except for the clinical strain of S. epidermidis, was significantly higher on nanoHA 1000 in comparison to nanoHA 1000 without protein and the bacterial adhesion on the FN-coated nanoHA 725 was lower in comparison to the bare nanoHA 725. The effect of HSA on bacterial adhesion was concentration and bacterial strain dependent. (paper)

  2. Adhesion of Mussel Foot Protein Mefp-5 to Mica: An Underwater Superglue†

    Danner, Eric W.; Kan, Yajing; Hammer, Malte U.; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2012-01-01

    Mussels have a remarkable ability to attach their holdfast, or byssus, opportunistically to a variety of substrata that are wet, saline, corroded, and/or fouled by biofilms. Mytilus edulis foot protein-5 (Mefp-5) is one of several proteins in the byssal adhesive plaque of the mussel M. edulis. The high content of 3,4 dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa) (~30 mol%) and its localization near the plaque-substrate interface have often prompted speculation that Mefp-5 plays a key role in adhesion. Using ...

  3. Polyimide surface modification by using microwave plasma for adhesion enhancement of Cu electroless plating.

    Cho, Sang-Jin; Nguyen, Trieu; Boo, Jin-Hyo

    2011-06-01

    Microwave (MW) plasma was applied to the surface of polyimide (PI) films as a treatment to enhance the adhesion between copper deposition layer and PI surface for electroless plating. The influences of nitrogen MW plasma treatment on chemical composition of the PI surface were investigated by using X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The wettability was also investigated by water contact angle measurement. The surface morphologies of PI films before and after treatment were characterized with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The contact angle results show that was dramatically decreased to 16.1 degrees at the optimal treatment condition from 72.1 degrees (untreated PI). However, the root mean square (RMS) roughness of treated PI film was almost unchanged. The AFM roughness was stayed from 1.0 to 1.2 with/without plasma treatment. XPS data show a nitrogen increase when PI films exposed to N2 MW plasma. Electroless copper depositions were carried out with the free-formaldehyde method using glyoxylic acid as the reducing reagent and mixture palladium chloride, tin chloride as activation solution. Adhesion property between polyimide surface and copper layer was investigated by tape test. PMID:21770184

  4. Tyrosine Sulfation as a Protein Post-Translational Modification

    Yuh-Shyong Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Integration of inorganic sulfate into biological molecules plays an important role in biological systems and is directly involved in the instigation of diseases. Protein tyrosine sulfation (PTS is a common post-translational modification that was first reported in the literature fifty years ago. However, the significance of PTS under physiological conditions and its link to diseases have just begun to be appreciated in recent years. PTS is catalyzed by tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase (TPST through transfer of an activated sulfate from 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate to tyrosine in a variety of proteins and peptides. Currently, only a small fraction of sulfated proteins is known and the understanding of the biological sulfation mechanisms is still in progress. In this review, we give an introductory and selective brief review of PTS and then summarize the basic biochemical information including the activity and the preparation of TPST, methods for the determination of PTS, and kinetics and reaction mechanism of TPST. This information is fundamental for the further exploration of the function of PTS that induces protein-protein interactions and the subsequent biochemical and physiological reactions.

  5. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase attenuates hepatocellular carcinoma cell adhesion stimulated by adipokine resistin

    Resistin, adipocyte-secreting adipokine, may play critical role in modulating cancer pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resistin on HCC adhesion to the endothelium, and the mechanism underlying these resistin effects. Human SK-Hep1 cells were used to study the effect of resistin on intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expressions as well as NF-κB activation, and hence cell adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR), an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator, was used to determine the regulatory role of AMPK on HCC adhesion to the endothelium in regard to the resistin effects. Treatment with resistin increased the adhesion of SK-Hep1 cells to HUVECs and concomitantly induced NF-κB activation, as well as ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expressions in SK-Hep1 cells. Using specific blocking antibodies and siRNAs, we found that resistin-induced SK-Hep1 cell adhesion to HUVECs was through NF-κB-regulated ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expressions. Moreover, treatment with AICAR demonstrated that AMPK activation in SK-Hep1 cells significantly attenuates the resistin effect on SK-Hep1 cell adhesion to HUVECs. These results clarify the role of resistin in inducing HCC adhesion to the endothelium and demonstrate the inhibitory effect of AMPK activation under the resistin stimulation. Our findings provide a notion that resistin play an important role to promote HCC metastasis and implicate AMPK may be a therapeutic target to against HCC metastasis

  6. Chemical modification of polyvinyl chloride and silicone elastomer in inhibiting adhesion of Aeromonas hydrophila

    Kregiel, Dorota; Berlowska, Joanna; Mizerska, Urszula; Fortuniak, Witold; Chojnowski, Julian; Ambroziak, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    Disease-causing bacteria of the genus Aeromonas are able to adhere to pipe materials, colonizing the surfaces and forming biofilms in water distribution systems. The aim of our research was to study how the modification of materials used commonly in the water industry can reduce bacterial cell attachment. Polyvinyl chloride and silicone elastomer surfaces were activated and modified with reactive organo-silanes by coupling or co-crosslinking silanes with the native material. Both the native a...

  7. Corneal cell adhesion to contact lens hydrogel materials enhanced via tear film protein deposition.

    Claire M Elkins

    Full Text Available Tear film protein deposition on contact lens hydrogels has been well characterized from the perspective of bacterial adhesion and viability. However, the effect of protein deposition on lens interactions with the corneal epithelium remains largely unexplored. The current study employs a live cell rheometer to quantify human corneal epithelial cell adhesion to soft contact lenses fouled with the tear film protein lysozyme. PureVision balafilcon A and AirOptix lotrafilcon B lenses were soaked for five days in either phosphate buffered saline (PBS, borate buffered saline (BBS, or Sensitive Eyes Plus Saline Solution (Sensitive Eyes, either pure or in the presence of lysozyme. Treated contact lenses were then contacted to a live monolayer of corneal epithelial cells for two hours, after which the contact lens was sheared laterally. The apparent cell monolayer relaxation modulus was then used to quantify the extent of cell adhesion to the contact lens surface. For both lens types, lysozyme increased corneal cell adhesion to the contact lens, with the apparent cell monolayer relaxation modulus increasing up to an order of magnitude in the presence of protein. The magnitude of this increase depended on the identity of the soaking solution: lenses soaked in borate-buffered solutions (BBS, Sensitive Eyes exhibited a much greater increase in cell attachment upon protein addition than those soaked in PBS. Significantly, all measurements were conducted while subjecting the cells to moderate surface pressures and shear rates, similar to those experienced by corneal cells in vivo.

  8. Tailored Poly(2-oxazoline) Polymer Brushes to Control Protein Adsorption and Cell Adhesion

    Zhang, Ning

    2012-05-18

    POx bottle-brush brushes (BBBs) are synthesized by SIPGP of 2-isopropenyl-2-oxazoline and consecutive LCROP of 2-oxazolines on 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane-modified silicon substrates. The side chain hydrophilicity and polarity are varied. The impact of the chemical composition and architecture of the BBB upon protein (fibronectin) adsorption and endothelial cell adhesion are investigated and prove extremely low protein adsorption and cell adhesion on BBBs with hydrophilic side chains such as poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline) and poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline). The influence of the POx side chain terminal function upon adsorption and adhesion is minor but the side chain length has a significant effect on bioadsorption. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Alteration and modulation of protein activity by varying post-translational modification

    Thompson, David N.; Reed, David W.; Thompson, Vicki S.; Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Apel, William A.

    2016-07-12

    Embodiments of the invention include methods of altering the enzymatic activity or solubility of an extremophilic enzyme or post-translationally modifying a protein of interest via using isolated or partially purified glycosyltransferases and/or post-translational modification proteins, extracts of cells comprising glycosyltransferases and/or post-translational modification proteins, and/or in cells comprising one or more glycosyltransferases and/or post-translational modification proteins.

  10. Functional Characteristics of Milk Protein Concentrates and Their Modification.

    Uluko, Hankie; Liu, Lu; Lv, Jia-Ping; Zhang, Shu-Wen

    2016-05-18

    A major deterrent to the usage of milk protein concentrate (MPC), a high-protein milk product with increasing demand as a food and sports drink ingredient, has been its poor functional characteristics when compared with other milk protein products such as whey protein concentrate and sodium caseinates. This review discusses the recent research on functional properties of MPC, focusing on factors that may contribute to the poor functional characteristics before, during, and after production. Current research, methods employed, and new understanding on the causes of poor solubility of MPC at mild temperatures (about 20°C) has been presented, including loss of solubility during storage as these areas have received unprecedented attention over the past decade, and also affects other useful functional properties of MPC, such as emulsifying properties, gelation, and foaming. Processing methods, which include heat treatment, high-pressure application, microwave heating, ultrasound application, and enzyme and salts modification, have been used or have potential to modify or improve the functional properties of MPCs. Future research on the effects of these processing methods on the functional properties, including effects of enzyme hydrolysis on bitterness and bioactivity, has also been discussed. PMID:26048645

  11. Cell adhesion and growth on ultrananocrystalline diamond and diamond-like carbon films after different surface modifications

    Miksovsky, J. [Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics, Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology, University of Kassel (Germany); Institute of Physics ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Kladno (Czech Republic); Voss, A. [Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics, Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology, University of Kassel (Germany); Kozarova, R. [Institute of Molecular Biology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria); Kocourek, T.; Pisarik, P. [Institute of Physics ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Kladno (Czech Republic); Ceccone, G. [Unit Nanobiosciences, European Commission Joint Research Centre, Ispra (Italy); Kulisch, W. [Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics, Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology, University of Kassel (Germany); Jelinek, M. [Institute of Physics ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Kladno (Czech Republic); Apostolova, M.D. [Institute of Molecular Biology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria); Reithmaier, J.P. [Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics, Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology, University of Kassel (Germany); Popov, C., E-mail: popov@ina.uni-kassel.de [Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics, Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology, University of Kassel (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • UNCD and DLC films were modified by UV/O{sub 3} treatments, O{sub 2} or NH{sub 3}-containing plasmas. • Surface composition, wettability and surface energy change upon modifications. • Higher efficiency of UNCD modifications was observed. • Cell attachment and growth were influenced by the surface termination and roughness. - Abstract: Diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC) films possess a set of excellent physical and chemical properties which together with a high biocompatibility make them attractive candidates for a number of medical and biotechnological applications. In the current work thin ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) and DLC films were comparatively investigated with respect to cell attachment and proliferation after different surface modifications. The UNCD films were prepared by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, the DLC films by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The films were comprehensively characterized with respect to their basic properties, e.g. crystallinity, morphology, chemical bonding nature, etc. Afterwards the UNCD and DLC films were modified applying O{sub 2} or NH{sub 3}/N{sub 2} plasmas and UV/O{sub 3} treatments to alter their surface termination. The surface composition of as-grown and modified samples was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Furthermore the films were characterized by contact angle measurements with water, formamide, 1-decanol and diiodomethane; from the results obtained the surface energy with its dispersive and polar components was calculated. The adhesion and proliferation of MG63 osteosarcoma cells on the different UNCD and DLC samples were assessed by measurement of the cell attachment efficiency and MTT assays. The determined cell densities were compared and correlated with the surface properties of as-deposited and modified UNCD and DLC films.

  12. New functions and signaling mechanisms for the class of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors

    Liebscher, Ines; Ackley, Brian; Araç, Demet;

    2014-01-01

    The class of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs), with 33 human homologs, is the second largest family of GPCRs. In addition to a seven-transmembrane α-helix-a structural feature of all GPCRs-the class of aGPCRs is characterized by the presence of a large N-terminal extracellular region...

  13. Low-Cost Soybean Protein Products as Extenders in Plywood Adhesives

    Soybean flour and meal were evaluated as alternate protein extenders in plywood adhesives. This research is part of our laboratory’s efforts to develop new uses for the proteinaceous co-products from soybean and cereal processing. Ground soybean meal was tested as replacement for wheat flour in gl...

  14. Role of Cbl-associated protein/ponsin in receptor tyrosine kinase signaling and cell adhesion

    Ritva Tikkanen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The Cbl-associated protein/ponsin (CAP is an adaptor protein that contains a so-called Sorbin homology (SoHo domain and three Src homology 3 (SH3 domains which are engaged in diverse protein-protein interactions. CAP has been shown to function in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and cell adhesion and to be involved in the differentiation of muscle cells and adipocytes. In addition, it participates in signaling pathways through several receptor tyrosine kinases such as insulin and neurotrophin receptors. In the last couple of years, several studies have shed light on the details of these processes and identified novel interaction partners of CAP. In this review, we summarize these recent findings and provide an overview on the function of CAP especially in cell adhesion and membrane receptor signaling.

  15. STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL CHARACTERISATION OF MUCUS ADHESION PROTEINS OF LACTOBACILLUS REUTERI

    Etzold, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    Mucus is the first point of contact between the gut microbiota and the host. Mucus adhesins are thought to be key mediators in the mucus adhesion of commensal Lactobacillus species. However, knowledge on the structural or functional basis of adhesin interaction with mucin glycoproteins, the main component of mucus, is limited. This work describes the biochemical and structural properties of two cell-surface proteins from Lactobacillus reuteri, the mucus-binding protein (MUB) and the Lar0958 p...

  16. Protein N-myristoylation in Escherichia coli: Reconstitution of a eukaryotic protein modification in bacteria

    Protein N-myristoylation refers to the covalent attachment of a myristoyl group (C14:0), via amide linkage, to the NH2-terminal glycine residue of certain cellular and viral proteins. Myristoyl-CoA:protein N-myristoyltransferase (NMT) catalyzes this cotranslational modification. The authors have developed a system for studying the substrate requirements and biological effects of protein N-myristoylation as well as NMT structure-activity relationships. Expression of the yeast NMT1 gene in Escherichia coli, a bacterium that has no endogenous NMT activity, results in production of the intact 53-kDa NMT polypeptide as well as a truncated polypeptide derived from proteolytic removal of its NH2-terminal 39 amino acids. By using a dual plasmid system, N-myristoylation of a mammalian protein was reconstituted in E. coli by simultaneous expression of the yeast NMT1 gene and a murine cDNA encoding the catalytic (C) subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PK-A). A major advantage of the bacterial system over eukaryotic systems is the absence of endogenous NMT and substrates, providing a more straightforward way of preparing myristoylated, analog-substituted, and nonmyristoylated forms of a given protein for comparison of their structural and functional properties. The experimental system may prove useful for recapitulating other eukaryotic protein modifications in E. coli so that structure-activity relationships of modifying enzymes and their substrates can be more readily assessed

  17. Mechanical and water soaking properties of medium density fiberboard with wood fiber and soybean protein adhesive.

    Li, Xin; Li, Yonghui; Zhong, Zhikai; Wang, Donghai; Ratto, Jo A; Sheng, Kuichuan; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2009-07-01

    Soybean protein is a renewable and abundant material that offers an alternative to formaldehyde-based resins. In this study, soybean protein was modified with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as an adhesive for wood fiber medium density fiberboard (MDF) preparation. Second-order response surface regression models were used to study the effects and interactions of initial moisture content (IMC) of coated wood fiber, press time (PT) and temperature on mechanical and water soaking properties of MDF. Results showed that IMC of coated fiber was the dominant influencing factor. Mechanical and soaking properties improved as IMC increased and reached their highest point at an IMC of 35%. Press time and temperature also had a significant effect on mechanical and water soaking properties of MDF. Second-order regression results showed that there were strong relationships between mechanical and soaking properties of MDF and processing parameters. Properties of MDF made using soybean protein adhesive are similar to those of commercial board. PMID:19329303

  18. Pulsed laser cleaning of aluminium-magnesium alloys: effect of surface modifications on adhesion

    Autric, Michel; Oltra, Roland

    2008-05-01

    Surface cleaning is a key step in many industrial processes and especially in laser surface treatments. During laser cleaning of metallic alloys using pulsed lasers, surface modification can be induced due to transient thermal effect. In ambient atmospheric conditions, an oxidation of the cleaned surface can be detected. The aim of this work was to characterize this transient oxidation that can occur below the laser energy domain leading to any phase change (melting, ablation) of the cleaned substrate. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (1.06 μm) with 10 ns pulse duration was used for this study. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy were used for surface analysis of irradiated samples. Thermal oxidation took place on the aluminium-magnesium alloy (5000 series) during the irradiation in air (fluence range 0.6-1.4 Jcm-2). It has been demonstrated that this 10 ns laser thermal oxidation and the steady state thermal oxidation have the same mechanism. When the laser fluence reached 1 J cm -2 , the oxide formed by the thermal oxidation became in a large extent crystalline and its outer part was entirely covered by a continuous magnesium oxide layer.

  19. The role of cytoskeleton and adhesion proteins in the resistance to photodynamic therapy. Possible therapeutic interventions.

    Di Venosa, Gabriela; Perotti, Christian; Batlle, Alcira; Casas, Adriana

    2015-08-01

    It is known that Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) induces changes in the cytoskeleton, the cell shape, and the adhesion properties of tumour cells. In addition, these targets have also been demonstrated to be involved in the development of PDT resistance. The reversal of PDT resistance by manipulating the cell adhesion process to substrata has been out of reach. Even though the existence of cell adhesion-mediated PDT resistance has not been reported so far, it cannot be ruled out. In addition to its impact on the apoptotic response to photodamage, the cytoskeleton alterations are thought to be associated with the processes of metastasis and invasion after PDT. In this review, we will address the impact of photodamage on the microfilament and microtubule cytoskeleton components and its regulators on PDT-treated cells as well as on cell adhesion. We will also summarise the impact of PDT on the surviving and resistant cells and their metastatic potential. Possible strategies aimed at taking advantage of the changes induced by PDT on actin, tubulin and cell adhesion proteins by targeting these molecules will also be discussed. PMID:25832889

  20. Fumonisin mycotoxicosis in broilers: plasma proteins and coagulation modifications.

    Espada, Y; Ruiz de Gopegui, R; Cuadradas, C; Cabañes, F J

    1997-01-01

    The effects of fumonisin B1 (FB1) intoxication in chickens were evaluated in three experiments. Two-day-old broiler chicks were fed a diet containing 10 mg pure FB1/kg feed for 6 days; some chicks were necropsied at this time, and others were allowed to recover for 5 wk before necropsy. In two other experiments, 2-day-old chicks were fed a broiler starter ration prepared with Fusarium moniliforme culture material containing FB1; one group received 30 mg/kg for 2 wk, and another received 300 mg FB1/kg for 8 days. Compared with controls, intoxicated chicks exhibited decreased prothrombin time, increased plasma fibrinogen (not included for the group receiving 30 mg/kg of culture material), and increased antithrombin III activity. Simultaneously decreased serum albumin concentration and increased serum globulins could be observed in groups intoxicated with F. moniliforme culture material containing FB1. The group allowed to recover for 5 wk did not exhibit modifications in hemostasis or serum proteins compared with controls. The results indicate that low doses of pure FB1 (10 mg/kg) and FB1 from F. moniliforme culture material (30 mg/kg) may alter hemostasis and serum proteins in young chicks. PMID:9087322

  1. Barnacle settlement and the adhesion of protein and diatom microfouling to xerogel films with varying surface energy and water wettability.

    Finlay, John A; Bennett, Stephanie M; Brewer, Lenora H; Sokolova, Anastasiya; Clay, Gemma; Gunari, Nikhil; Meyer, Anne E; Walker, Gilbert C; Wendt, Dean E; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A; Detty, Michael R

    2010-08-01

    Previous work has shown that organosilica-based xerogels have the potential to control biofouling. In this study, modifications of chemistry were investigated with respect to their resistance to marine slimes and to settlement of barnacle cyprids. Adhesion force measurements of bovine serum albumin (BSA)-coated atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips to xerogel surfaces prepared from aminopropylsilyl-, fluorocarbonsilyl-, and hydrocarbonsilyl-containing precursors, indicated that adhesion was significantly less on the xerogel surfaces in comparison to a poly(dimethylsiloxane) elastomer (PDMSE) standard. The strength of adhesion of BSA on the xerogels was highest on surfaces with the highest and the lowest critical surface tensions, gamma(C) and surface energies, gamma(S), and duplicated the 'Baier curve'. The attachment to and removal of cells of the diatom Navicula perminuta from a similar series of xerogel surfaces were examined. Initial attachment of cells was comparable on all of the xerogel surfaces, but the percentage removal of attached cells by hydrodynamic shear stress increased with gamma(C) and increased wettability as measured by the static water contact angle, theta(Ws), of the xerogel surfaces. The percentage removal of cells of Navicula was linearly correlated with both properties (R(2) = 0.74 for percentage removal as a function of theta(Ws) and R(2) = 0.69 for percentage removal as a function of gamma(C)). Several of the aminopropylsilyl-containing xerogels showed significantly greater removal of Navicula compared to a PDMSE standard. Cypris larvae of the barnacle B. amphitrite showed preferred settlement on hydrophilic/higher energy surfaces. Settlement was linearly correlated with theta(Ws) (R(2) = 0.84) and gamma(C) (R(2) = 0.84). Hydrophilic xerogels should prove useful as coatings for boats in regions where fouling is dominated by microfouling (protein and diatom slimes). PMID:20645195

  2. Ubiquitous distribution of salts and proteins in spider glue enhances spider silk adhesion

    Amarpuri, Gaurav; Chaurasia, Vishal; Jain, Dharamdeep; Blackledge, Todd A.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-03-01

    Modern orb-weaving spiders use micron-sized glue droplets on their viscid silk to retain prey in webs. A combination of low molecular weight salts and proteins makes the glue viscoelastic and humidity responsive in a way not easily achieved by synthetic adhesives. Optically, the glue droplet shows a heterogeneous structure, but the spatial arrangement of its chemical components is poorly understood. Here, we use optical and confocal Raman microscopy to show that salts and proteins are present ubiquitously throughout the droplet. The distribution of adhesive proteins in the peripheral region explains the superior prey capture performance of orb webs as it enables the entire surface area of the glue droplet to act as a site for prey capture. The presence of salts throughout the droplet explains the recent Solid-State NMR results that show salts directly facilitate protein mobility. Understanding the function of individual glue components and the role of the droplet's macro-structure can help in designing better synthetic adhesives for humid environments.

  3. Characterization of the in vitro binding and inhibition kinetics of primary amine oxidase/vascular adhesion protein-1 by glucosamine.

    Olivieri, Aldo

    2012-04-01

    Primary-amine oxidase (PrAO) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of endogenous and exogenous primary amines and also functions, in some tissues, as an inflammation-inducible endothelial factor, known as vascular adhesion protein-1. VAP-1 mediates the slow rolling and adhesion of lymphocytes to endothelial cells in a number of inflammatory conditions, including inflammation of the synovium.

  4. Comprehensive Analysis of Protein Modifications by Top-down Mass Spectrometry

    Zhang, Han; Ge, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics is playing an increasingly important role in cardiovascular research. Proteomics includes not only identification and quantification of proteins, but also the characterization of protein modifications such as post-translational modifications and sequence variants. The conventional bottom-up approach, involving proteolytic digestion of proteins into small peptides prior to MS analysis, is routinely used for protein identification and quantification with ...

  5. Antiadhesive Properties of Arabinogalactan Protein from Ribes nigrum Seeds against Bacterial Adhesion of Helicobacter pylori

    Jutta Messing; Michael Niehues; Anna Shevtsova; Thomas Borén; Andreas Hensel

    2014-01-01

    Fruit extracts from black currants (Ribes nigrum L.) are traditionally used for treatment of gastritis based on seed polysaccharides that inhibit the adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to stomach cells. For detailed investigations an arabinogalactan protein (F2) was isolated from seeds and characterized concerning molecular weight, carbohydrate, amino acid composition, linkage, configuration and reaction with beta-glucosyl Yariv. Functional testing of F2 was performed by semiquantitative in situ...

  6. Cell adhesion-dependent inactivation of a soluble protein kinase during fertilization in Chlamydomonas.

    Zhang, Y.; Luo, Y.; Emmett, K; Snell, W J

    1996-01-01

    Within seconds after the flagella of mt+ and mt- Chlamydomonas gametes adhere during fertilization, their flagellar adenylyl cyclase is activated several fold and preparation for cell fusion is initiated. Our previous studies indicated that early events in this pathway, including control of adenylyl cyclase, are regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we describe a soluble, flagellar protein kinase activity that is regulated by flagellar adhesion. A 48-kDa, soluble flagellar...

  7. Posttranslational Modifications of Proteins in the Pathobiology of Medically Relevant Fungi

    Leach, M. D.; A. J. P. Brown

    2012-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications of proteins drive a wide variety of cellular processes in eukaryotes, regulating cell growth and division as well as adaptive and developmental processes. With regard to the fungal kingdom, most information about posttranslational modifications has been generated through studies of the model yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, where, for example, the roles of protein phosphorylation, glycosylation, acetylation, ubiquitination, sumoyla...

  8. Hsp90 protein interacts with phosphorothioate oligonucleotides containing hydrophobic 2'-modifications and enhances antisense activity.

    Liang, Xue-Hai; Shen, Wen; Sun, Hong; Kinberger, Garth A; Prakash, Thazha P; Nichols, Joshua G; Crooke, Stanley T

    2016-05-01

    RNase H1-dependent antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are chemically modified to enhance pharmacological properties. Major modifications include phosphorothioate (PS) backbone and different 2'-modifications in 2-5 nucleotides at each end (wing) of an ASO. Chemical modifications can affect protein binding and understanding ASO-protein interactions is important for better drug design. Recently we identified many intracellular ASO-binding proteins and found that protein binding could affect ASO potency. Here, we analyzed the structure-activity-relationships of ASO-protein interactions and found 2'-modifications significantly affected protein binding, including La, P54nrb and NPM. PS-ASOs containing more hydrophobic 2'-modifications exhibit higher affinity for proteins in general, although certain proteins, e.g. Ku70/Ku80 and TCP1, are less affected by 2'-modifications. We found that Hsp90 protein binds PS-ASOs containing locked-nucleic-acid (LNA) or constrained-ethyl-bicyclic-nucleic-acid ((S)-cEt) modifications much more avidly than 2'-O-methoxyethyl (MOE). ASOs bind the mid-domain of Hsp90 protein. Hsp90 interacts with more hydrophobic 2' modifications, e.g. (S)-cEt or LNA, in the 5'-wing of the ASO. Reduction of Hsp90 protein decreased activity of PS-ASOs with 5'-LNA or 5'-cEt wings, but not with 5'-MOE wing. Together, our results indicate Hsp90 protein enhances the activity of PS/LNA or PS/(S)-cEt ASOs, and imply that altering protein binding of ASOs using different chemical modifications can improve therapeutic performance of PS-ASOs. PMID:26945041

  9. The adhesion G protein-coupled receptor G2 (ADGRG2/GPR64) constitutively activates SRE and NFκB and is involved in cell adhesion and migration

    Cornelia Peeters, Miriam; Fokkelman, Michiel; Boogaard, Bob;

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (ADGRs) are believed to be activated by auto-proteolytic cleavage of their very large extracellular N-terminal domains normally acting as a negative regulator of the intrinsically constitutively active seven transmembrane domain. ADGRG2 (or GPR64) which origin...... the adhesion GPCR ADGRG2 is critically involved in the adhesion and migration of certain breast cancer cells through mechanisms including a non-canonical NFkB pathway and that ADGRG2 could be a target for treatment of certain types of cancer.......Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (ADGRs) are believed to be activated by auto-proteolytic cleavage of their very large extracellular N-terminal domains normally acting as a negative regulator of the intrinsically constitutively active seven transmembrane domain. ADGRG2 (or GPR64) which...... activity through the adhesion- and migration-related transcription factors serum response element (SRE) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) presumably via coupling to Gα12/13 and Gαq. However, activation of these two pathways appears to occur through distinct molecular...

  10. Phosphorylation of the beta-subunit of CD11/CD18 integrins by protein kinase C correlates with leukocyte adhesion.

    Valmu, L; Autero, M; Siljander, P; Patarroyo, M; Gahmberg, C G

    1991-11-01

    Adhesion of activated leukocytes to cells is of critical functional importance. The adhesion is known to be mediated mainly by the CD11/CD18 integrins, also known as leukocytic cell adhesion molecules, or Leu-CAM. We have now studied the phosphorylation of Leu-CAM by protein kinase C and the correlation of phosphorylation with the generation of the adhesive phenotype among human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes during cell activation. We here show that a good correlation exists between the phosphorylation of the beta subunit of Leu-CAM (CD18), and the extent of cell-to-cell adhesion. The phosphorylated CD18 subunit was associated with both CD11a and CD11b. Purified protein kinase C was able to phosphorylate the beta subunit of isolated Leu-CAM in vitro. The phosphorylation occurred mainly on serine residues. PMID:1682156

  11. Spatial and Temporal Effects in Protein Post-translational Modification Distributions in the Developing Mouse Brain

    Edwards, Alistair V G; Edwards, Gregory J; Schwämmle, Veit;

    2014-01-01

    Protein post-translational modification (PTM) is a powerful way to modify the behavior of cellular proteins and thereby cellular behavior. Multiple recent studies of evolutionary trends have shown that certain pairs of protein post-translational modifications tend to occur closer to each other than...... observations of increasingly frequent and diverse protein modification in cell biology. In this study, we use mass spectrometry and proteomic strategies to present biological data showing spatiotemporal PTM co-localization across multiple PTM categories, which display changes over development of the brain...

  12. Identification of Posttranslational Modification-Dependent Protein Interactions Using Yeast Surface Displayed Human Proteome Libraries

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The identification of proteins that interact specifically with posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation is often necessary to understand cellular signaling pathways. Numerous methods for identifying proteins that interact with posttranslational modifications have been utilized, including affinity-based purification and analysis, protein microarrays, phage display, and tethered catalysis. Although these techniques have been used successfully, each has limitations. Recently, yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries have been utilized to identify protein fragments with affinity for various target molecules, including phosphorylated peptides. When coupled with fluorescently activated cell sorting and high throughput methods for the analysis of selection outputs, yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries can rapidly and efficiently identify protein fragments with affinity for any soluble ligand that can be fluorescently detected, including posttranslational modifications. In this review we compare the use of yeast surface display libraries to other methods for the identification of interactions between proteins and posttranslational modifications and discuss future applications of the technology. PMID:26060076

  13. The functional properties, modification and utilization of whey proteins

    B. G. Venter; A. E. J. McGill

    1986-01-01

    Whey protein has an excellent nutritional value and exhibits a functional potential. In comparison with certain other food proteins, the whey protein content of essential amino acids is extremely favourable for human consumption. Depending on the heat-treatment history thereof, soluble whey proteins with utilizable functional properties, apart from high biological value, true digestibility, protein efficiency ratio and nett protein utilization, can be recovered. Various technological and chem...

  14. The functional properties, modification and utilization of whey proteins

    B. G. Venter

    1986-03-01

    Full Text Available Whey protein has an excellent nutritional value and exhibits a functional potential. In comparison with certain other food proteins, the whey protein content of essential amino acids is extremely favourable for human consumption. Depending on the heat-treatment history thereof, soluble whey proteins with utilizable functional properties, apart from high biological value, true digestibility, protein efficiency ratio and nett protein utilization, can be recovered. Various technological and chemical recovery processes have been designed. Chemically and enzymatically modified whey protein is manufactured to obtain technological and functional advantages. The important functional properties of whey proteins, namely hydration, gelation, emulsifying and foaming properties, are reviewed.

  15. Down regulation of NO signaling in Trypanosoma cruzi upon parasite-extracellular matrix interaction: changes in protein modification by nitrosylation and nitration.

    Milton Pereira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion of the Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes, the causative agent of Chagas' disease in humans, to components of the extracellular matrix (ECM is an important step in host cell invasion. The signaling events triggered in the parasite upon binding to ECM are less explored and, to our knowledge, there is no data available regarding •NO signaling.Trypomastigotes were incubated with ECM for different periods of time. Nitrated and S-nitrosylated proteins were analyzed by Western blotting using anti-nitrotyrosine and S-nitrosyl cysteine antibodies. At 2 h incubation time, a decrease in NO synthase activity, •NO, citrulline, arginine and cGMP concentrations, as well as the protein modifications levels have been observed in the parasite. The modified proteins were enriched by immunoprecipitation with anti-nitrotyrosine antibodies (nitrated proteins or by the biotin switch method (S-nitrosylated proteins and identified by MS/MS. The presence of both modifications was confirmed in proteins of interest by immunoblotting or immunoprecipitation.For the first time it was shown that T. cruzi proteins are amenable to modifications by S-nitrosylation and nitration. When T. cruzi trypomastigotes are incubated with the extracellular matrix there is a general down regulation of these reactions, including a decrease in both NOS activity and cGMP concentration. Notwithstanding, some specific proteins, such as enolase or histones had, at least, their nitration levels increased. This suggests that post-translational modifications of T. cruzi proteins are not only a reflex of NOS activity, implying other mechanisms that circumvent a relatively low synthesis of •NO. In conclusion, the extracellular matrix, a cell surrounding layer of macromolecules that have to be trespassed by the parasite in order to be internalized into host cells, contributes to the modification of •NO signaling in the parasite, probably an essential move for the ensuing invasion step.

  16. XPS study on the weakest zone in the adhesion structure between resin containing 4-META and precious metal alloys treated with different surface modification methods.

    Ohno, H; Endo, K; Yamane, Y; Kawashima, I

    2001-03-01

    Three precious metal alloys, Type IV gold alloy, 14 K gold alloy, and silver-based alloy, were treated with different surface modifications including a metal primer (VBATDT) application, a SiOx coating method, high-temperature oxidation, modification method with a liquid Ga-Sn alloy, and tin electroplating. Then thin PMMA films were bonded with a resin containing 4-META. Water durability at the adhesion interface was evaluated after water immersion, followed by thermal cycling used liquid nitrogen. The weakest zone at the interface was investigated using XPS only for the Ag-Pd alloy specimens that had been surface-treated with as-polishing, adhesive primer, and the SiOx coating method, since peeling of the PMMA film on the surface of specimens surface-treated by other methods was not observed. Metal elements were detected from the resin side at the adhesion interface. The chemical states of Cu in the resin before argon ion etching were characterized as metal oxides and/or states of chemical interaction with 4-META, VBATDT, or SiOx. PMID:11441491

  17. Protein-protein binding before and after photo-modification of albumin

    Rozinek, Sarah C.; Glickman, Randolph D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2016-03-01

    Bioeffects of directed-optical-energy encompass a wide range of applications. One aspect of photochemical interactions involves irradiating a photosensitizer with visible light in order to induce protein unfolding and consequent changes in function. In the past, irradiation of several dye-protein combinations has revealed effects on protein structure. Beta lactoglobulin, human serum albumin (HSA) and tubulin have all been photo-modified with meso-tetrakis(4- sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (TSPP) bound, but only in the case of tubulin has binding caused a verified loss of biological function (loss of ability to form microtubules) as a result of this light-induced structural change. The current work questions if the photo-induced structural changes that occur to HSA, are sufficient to disable its biological function of binding to osteonectin. The albumin-binding protein, osteonectin, is about half the molecular weight of HSA, so the two proteins and their bound product can be separated and quantified by size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography. TSPP was first bound to HSA and irradiated, photo-modifying the structure of HSA. Then native HSA or photo-modified HSA (both with TSPP bound) were compared, to assess loss in HSA's innate binding ability as a result of light-induced structure modification.

  18. Antiadhesive Properties of Arabinogalactan Protein from Ribes nigrum Seeds against Bacterial Adhesion of Helicobacter pylori

    Jutta Messing

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Fruit extracts from black currants (Ribes nigrum L. are traditionally used for treatment of gastritis based on seed polysaccharides that inhibit the adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to stomach cells. For detailed investigations an arabinogalactan protein (F2 was isolated from seeds and characterized concerning molecular weight, carbohydrate, amino acid composition, linkage, configuration and reaction with β-glucosyl Yariv. Functional testing of F2 was performed by semiquantitative in situ adhesion assay on sections of human gastric mucosa and by quantitative in vitro adhesion assay with FITC-labled H. pylori strain J99 and human stomach AGS cells. Bacterial adhesins affected were identified by overlay assay with immobilized ligands. 125I-radiolabeled F2 served for binding studies to H. pylori and interaction experiments with BabA and SabA. F2 had no cytotoxic effects against H. pylori and AGS cells; but inhibited bacterial binding to human gastric cells. F2 inhibited the binding of BabA and fibronectin-binding adhesin to its specific ligands. Radiolabeled F2 bound non-specifically to different strains of H. pylori; and to BabA deficient mutant. F2 did not lead to subsequent feedback regulation or increased expression of adhesins or virulence factors. From these data the non-specific interactions between F2 and the H. pylori lead to moderate antiadhesive effects.

  19. Antiadhesive properties of arabinogalactan protein from ribes nigrum seeds against bacterial adhesion of Helicobacter pylori.

    Messing, Jutta; Niehues, Michael; Shevtsova, Anna; Borén, Thomas; Hensel, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Fruit extracts from black currants (Ribes nigrum L.) are traditionally used for treatment of gastritis based on seed polysaccharides that inhibit the adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to stomach cells. For detailed investigations an arabinogalactan protein (F2) was isolated from seeds and characterized concerning molecular weight, carbohydrate, amino acid composition, linkage, configuration and reaction with β-glucosyl Yariv. Functional testing of F2 was performed by semiquantitative in situ adhesion assay on sections of human gastric mucosa and by quantitative in vitro adhesion assay with FITC-labled H. pylori strain J99 and human stomach AGS cells. Bacterial adhesins affected were identified by overlay assay with immobilized ligands. ¹²⁵I-radiolabeled F2 served for binding studies to H. pylori and interaction experiments with BabA and SabA. F2 had no cytotoxic effects against H. pylori and AGS cells; but inhibited bacterial binding to human gastric cells. F2 inhibited the binding of BabA and fibronectin-binding adhesin to its specific ligands. Radiolabeled F2 bound non-specifically to different strains of H. pylori; and to BabA deficient mutant. F2 did not lead to subsequent feedback regulation or increased expression of adhesins or virulence factors. From these data the non-specific interactions between F2 and the H. pylori lead to moderate antiadhesive effects. PMID:24662083

  20. Proteins Play Important Role in Intercellular Adhesion Affecting on Fruit Textural Quality

    Bahadur Adhikari, Khem; Shomer, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    Fruit textural quality is becoming a major quality parameter for export, postharvest preservation, handling and processing. The main determinant of textural quality is intercellular adhesion (ICA) as attributed by the cell wall (CW) and its components. The importance of CW protein in ICA strength......Fruit textural quality is becoming a major quality parameter for export, postharvest preservation, handling and processing. The main determinant of textural quality is intercellular adhesion (ICA) as attributed by the cell wall (CW) and its components. The importance of CW protein in ICA...... strengthening was exempli ed in Medjoul date (Phoenix dactylifera L.) fruit, as a model. Fruit mesocarp sensitively responded to culture environment which was assayed in vitro at pH 3.5(< pKa) and pH 6.5(> pKa) in presence of organic acid molecules. The max penetration force, as a measure of ICA strength, of p......H 3.5 (< pKa) incubated mesocarp (~10.5 N) was signi cantly higher than that of pH 6.5 (> pKa) incubated fruits (~2 N). The protein bands at ~29 kDa, ~75 kDa, ~32 kDa and 87 kDa were exclusively or prominently found in ICA strengthened fruits (pH 3.5< pKa) compared to texturally injured fruits (pH 6...

  1. Micro patterning of cell and protein non-adhesive plasma polymerized coatings for biochip applications

    Bouaidat, Salim; Berendsen, C.; Thomsen, P.;

    2004-01-01

    Micro scale patterning of bioactive surfaces is desirable for numerous biochip applications. Polyethyleneoxide-like (PEO-like) coating with non-fouling functionality has been deposited using low frequency AC plasma polymerization. The non-fouling properties of the coating were tested with human...... cells ( HeLa) and fluorescence labeled proteins (isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin, i.e. FITC-BSA). The PEO-like coatings were fabricated by plasma polymerization of 12-crown-4 (ppCrown) with plasma polymerized hexene (ppHexene) as adhesion layer. The coatings were micro patterned using...

  2. Protein micro patterned lattices to probe a fundamental lengthscale involved in cell adhesion

    Guillou, Herve; Chaussy, Jacques; Block, Marc R

    2009-01-01

    Cell adhesion, a fundamental process of cell biology is involved in the embryo development and in numerous pathologies especially those related to cancers. We constrained cells to adhere on extracellular matrix proteins patterned in a micro lattices. The actin cytoskeleton is particularly sensitive to this constraint and reproducibly self organizes in simple geometrical patterns. Such highly organized cells are functional and proliferate. We performed statistical analysis of spread cells morphologies and discuss the existence of a fundamental lengthscale associated with active processes required for spreading.

  3. Glycoproteomic Analysis of Seven Major Allergenic Proteins Reveals Novel Post-translational Modifications*

    Halim, Adnan; Carlsson, Michael C.; Madsen, Caroline Benedicte; Brand, Stephanie; Møller, Svenning Rune; Olsen, Carl Erik; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y.; Brimnes, Jens; Wurtzen, Peter Adler; Ipsen, Henrik; Petersen, Bent L.; Wandall, Hans H.

    2014-01-01

    Allergenic proteins such as grass pollen and house dust mite (HDM) proteins are known to trigger hypersensitivity reactions of the immune system, leading to what is commonly known as allergy. Key allergenic proteins including sequence variants have been identified but characterization of their post-translational modifications (PTMs) is still limited.

  4. Oxidative modification of protein in the ats' liver by the action of X-ray

    We studied the 30 days long influence fractioned X-ray in total doses 0,3, 0,6, 0,9 and 1,2 Gr on the oxidative modification of protein in the rats liver. X-ray caused the increase of protein oxidative modification as well as neutral, so the main character after the completion of X-ray at all doses on the first and the tenth days; by this fact the level of aldegido- end keto- derivatives of main character was higher. After 20 and 30 days the level of oxidative modification of protein verge to control (data verification). The higher level of protein oxidative modification has been saved till 30 days long after the completion of X-ray

  5. Molecular architecture of a complex between an adhesion protein from the malaria parasite and intracellular adhesion molecule 1

    Brown, Alan; Turner, Louise; Christoffersen, Stig;

    2013-01-01

    The adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to human tissues or endothelium is central to the pathology caused by the parasite during malaria. It contributes to the avoidance of parasite clearance by the spleen and to the specific pathologies of cerebral and placental malaria. The...

  6. A comprehensive resource for integrating and displaying protein post-translational modifications

    Wang Ting-Yuan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein Post-Translational Modification (PTM plays an essential role in cellular control mechanisms that adjust protein physical and chemical properties, folding, conformation, stability and activity, thus also altering protein function. Findings dbPTM (version 1.0, which was developed previously, aimed on a comprehensive collection of protein post-translational modifications. In this update version (dbPTM2.0, we developed a PTM database towards an expert system of protein post-translational modifications. The database comprehensively collects experimental and predictive protein PTM sites. In addition, dbPTM2.0 was extended to a knowledge base comprising the modified sites, solvent accessibility of substrate, protein secondary and tertiary structures, protein domains, protein intrinsic disorder region, and protein variations. Moreover, this work compiles a benchmark to construct evaluation datasets for computational study to identifying PTM sites, such as phosphorylated sites, glycosylated sites, acetylated sites and methylated sites. Conclusion The current release not only provides the sequence-based information, but also annotates the structure-based information for protein post-translational modification. The interface is also designed to facilitate the access to the resource. This effective database is now freely accessible at http://dbPTM.mbc.nctu.edu.tw/.

  7. Focal adhesion kinase regulates expression of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) in cancer cells.

    Ho, Baotran; Huang, Grace; Golubovskaya, Vita M

    2014-01-01

    Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) plays an important role in cancer cell survival. Previous microarray gene profiling study detected inverse regulation between expression of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) and FAK, where down-regulation of FAK by siRNA in MCF-7 cells caused up-regulation of TXNIP mRNA level, and in contrast up-regulation of doxycyclin- induced FAK caused repression of TXNIP. In the present report, we show that overexpression of FAK in MCF-7 cells repressed TXNIP promoter activity. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with 1alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) down-regulated endogenous FAK and up-regulated TXNIP protein level, and treatment with 5-FU decreased FAK protein expression and up-regulated TXNIP protein expression in 293 cells. Moreover, silencing of FAK with siRNA increased TXNIP protein expression, while overexpression of FAK inhibited TXNIP protein expression in 293 cells. In addition, treatment of DBTRG glioblastoma cells with FAK inhibitor Y15 increased TXNIP mRNA, decreased cancer cell viability and increased apoptosis. These results for the first time demonstrate FAK-regulated TXNIP expression which is important for apoptotic, survival and oxidative stress signaling pathways in cancer cells. PMID:23387972

  8. Improving bacterial cellulose for blood vessel replacement: functionalization with a chimeric protein containing a cellulose-binding module and an adhesion peptide

    Andrade, Fábia K.; Costa, Raquel; Domingues, Lucília; Soares, Raquel; Gama, F. M.

    2010-01-01

    Chimeric proteins containing a cellulose-binding module (CBM) and an adhesion peptide (RGD or GRGDY) were produced and used to improve the adhesion of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC) to bacterial cellulose (BC). The effect of these proteins on the HMEC–BC interaction was studied. The results obtained demonstrated that recombinant proteins containing adhesion sequences were able to significantly increase the attachment of HMEC to BC surfaces, especially the RGD sequenc...

  9. Protein modification and replicative senescence of WI-38 human embryonic fibroblasts

    Ahmed, Emad K; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Roepstorff, Peter;

    2010-01-01

    Summary Oxidized proteins as well as proteins modified by the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) and by glycation (AGE) have been shown to accumulate with aging in vivo and during replicative senescence in vitro. To better understand the mechanisms by which these damaged proteins...... build up and potentially affect cellular function during replicative senescence of WI-38 fibroblasts, proteins targeted by these modifications have been identified using a bidimensional gel electrophoresis-based proteomic approach coupled with immunodetection of HNE-, AGE-modified and carbonylated...... proteins. 37 proteins targeted for either one of these modifications were identified by mass spectrometry and are involved in different cellular functions such as protein quality control, energy metabolism and cytoskeleton. Almost half of the identified proteins were found to be mitochondrial, which...

  10. Nanospherical arabinogalactan proteins are a key component of the high-strength adhesive secreted by English ivy

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Tan, Li; Sun, Leming; Petrosino, Jennifer; Cui, Mei-Zhen; Hao, Feng; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-06-01

    Over 130 y have passed since Charles Darwin first discovered that the adventitious roots of English ivy (Hedera helix) exude a yellowish mucilage that promotes the capacity of this plant to climb vertical surfaces. Unfortunately, little progress has been made in elucidating the adhesion mechanisms underlying this high-strength adhesive. In the previous studies, spherical nanoparticles were observed in the viscous exudate. Here we show that these nanoparticles are predominantly composed of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), a superfamily of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins present in the extracellular spaces of plant cells. The spheroidal shape of the AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles results in a low viscosity of the ivy adhesive, and thus a favorable wetting behavior on the surface of substrates. Meanwhile, calcium-driven electrostatic interactions among carboxyl groups of the AGPs and the pectic acids give rise to the cross-linking of the exuded adhesive substances, favor subsequent curing (hardening) via formation of an adhesive film, and eventually promote the generation of mechanical interlocking between the adventitious roots of English ivy and the surface of substrates. Inspired by these molecular events, a reconstructed ivy-mimetic adhesive composite was developed by integrating purified AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles with pectic polysaccharides and calcium ions. Information gained from the subsequent tensile tests, in turn, substantiated the proposed adhesion mechanisms underlying the ivy-derived adhesive. Given that AGPs and pectic polysaccharides are also observed in bioadhesives exuded by other climbing plants, the adhesion mechanisms revealed by English ivy may forward the progress toward understanding the general principles underlying diverse botanic adhesives.

  11. Nanospherical arabinogalactan proteins are a key component of the high-strength adhesive secreted by English ivy.

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Tan, Li; Sun, Leming; Petrosino, Jennifer; Cui, Mei-Zhen; Hao, Feng; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-06-01

    Over 130 y have passed since Charles Darwin first discovered that the adventitious roots of English ivy (Hedera helix) exude a yellowish mucilage that promotes the capacity of this plant to climb vertical surfaces. Unfortunately, little progress has been made in elucidating the adhesion mechanisms underlying this high-strength adhesive. In the previous studies, spherical nanoparticles were observed in the viscous exudate. Here we show that these nanoparticles are predominantly composed of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), a superfamily of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins present in the extracellular spaces of plant cells. The spheroidal shape of the AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles results in a low viscosity of the ivy adhesive, and thus a favorable wetting behavior on the surface of substrates. Meanwhile, calcium-driven electrostatic interactions among carboxyl groups of the AGPs and the pectic acids give rise to the cross-linking of the exuded adhesive substances, favor subsequent curing (hardening) via formation of an adhesive film, and eventually promote the generation of mechanical interlocking between the adventitious roots of English ivy and the surface of substrates. Inspired by these molecular events, a reconstructed ivy-mimetic adhesive composite was developed by integrating purified AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles with pectic polysaccharides and calcium ions. Information gained from the subsequent tensile tests, in turn, substantiated the proposed adhesion mechanisms underlying the ivy-derived adhesive. Given that AGPs and pectic polysaccharides are also observed in bioadhesives exuded by other climbing plants, the adhesion mechanisms revealed by English ivy may forward the progress toward understanding the general principles underlying diverse botanic adhesives. PMID:27217558

  12. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    H. G. Silverman; F. F. Roberto

    2007-12-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.

  13. Understanding marine mussel adhesion.

    Silverman, Heather G; Roberto, Francisco F

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  14. Protein-mediated adhesion of the dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Shewanella alga BrY to hydrous ferric oxide

    Caccavo, F. Jr.

    1999-11-01

    The rate and extent of bacterial Fe(III) mineral reduction are governed by molecular-scale interactions between the bacterial cell surface and the mineral surface. These interactions are poorly understood. This study examined the role of surface proteins in the adhesion of Shewanella alga BrY to hydrous ferric oxide (HFO). Enzymatic degradation of cell surface polysaccharides had no effect on cell adhesion to HFO. The proteolytic enzymes Streptomyces griseus protease and chymotrypsin inhibited the adhesion of S. alga BrY cells to HFO through catalytic degradation of surface proteins. Trypsin inhibited S. alga BrY adhesion solely through surface-coating effects. Protease and chymotrypsin also mediated desorption of adhered S. alga BrY cells from HFO while trypsin did not mediate cell desorption. Protease removed a single peptide band that represented a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 50 kDa. Chymotrypsin removed two peptide bands that represented proteins with apparent molecular masses of 60 and 31 kDa. These proteins represent putative HGO adhesion molecules. A. alga BrY adhesion was inhibited by up to 46% when cells were cultured at sub-MICs of chloramphenicol, suggesting that protein synthesis is necessary for adhesion. Proteins extracted from the surface of S. alga BrY cells inhibited adhesion to HFO by up to 41%. A number of these proteins bound specifically to HFO, suggesting that a complex system of surface proteins mediates S. alga BrY adhesion to HFO.

  15. Recombinant mussel adhesive protein fp-5 (MAP fp-5) as a bulk bioadhesive and surface coating material.

    Choi, Yoo Seong; Kang, Dong Gyun; Lim, Seonghye; Yang, Yun Jung; Kim, Chang Sup; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2011-08-01

    Mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs) attach to all types of inorganic and organic surfaces, even in wet environments. MAP of type 5 (fp-5), in particular, has been considered as a key adhesive material. However, the low availability of fp-5 has hampered its biochemical characterization and practical applications. Here, soluble recombinant fp-5 is mass-produced in Escherichia coli. Tyrosinase-modified recombinant fp-5 showed ∼1.11 MPa adhesive shear strength, which is the first report of a bulk-scale adhesive force measurement for purified recombinant of natural MAP type. Surface coatings were also performed through simple dip-coating of various objects. In addition, complex coacervate using recombinant fp-5 and hyaluronic acid was prepared as an efficient adhesive formulation, which greatly improved the bulk adhesive strength. Collectively, it is expected that this work will enhance basic understanding of mussel adhesion and that recombinant fp-5 can be successfully used as a realistic bulk-scale bioadhesive and an efficient surface coating material. PMID:21770718

  16. Protein Modifications after Foxtail Millet Extrusion: Solubility and Molecular Weight

    Xuewei Zhao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of illustrating the effects of extrusion cooking on the solubility of proteins in foxtail millet and their molecular basis, foxtail millet was extruded at five barrel temperature profiles and feed moisture contents. The proteins of raw and extrudate samples were extracted with six solutions sequentially. Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate-Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE of total protein and Starch Granule-Associate Protein (SGAP was performed. Extrusion caused a significant decrease in globulin, setarin and glutelin fractions with a corresponding increase in SDS- and SDS+2-ME-soluble and residual fractions. Increasing extrusion temperature or moisture content all led to SDS-soluble fraction decrease, while SDS+2-ME-soluble fraction increase. SDS-PAGE demonstrated that disulfide bond cross-linking occurred among glutelin and with setarin subunits. Extrusion had a less pronounced impact on the 60 kDa SGAP than the other middle-high molecular weight subunits. It is the protein-protein interaction shift from electrostatic force to hydrophobic and/or hydrogen forces and covalent disulfide cross-links that contributed to the decreased solubility of protein in foxtail millet extrudates.

  17. 2'-Phosphoadenylylation of eukaryotic proteins: a type of covalent modification.

    Hilz, H; Fanick, W; Klapproth, K

    1986-01-01

    An enzymatic system in rat liver microsomal preparations has been detected that catalyzes the transfer of the 2'-phospho-AMP moiety from NADP to endogenous polypeptides; the major acceptor is a polypeptide of about 40 kDa (p40). Modification of the acceptor by 2'-phospho-AMP residues was deduced from the simultaneous transfer of 2'-[33P]phosphate and [3H]adenine residues from double-labeled NADP, while no incorporation of radioactivity into p40 was seen with NADP species labeled in the NMN mo...

  18. Protein-RNA linkage and posttranslational modifications of feline calicivirus and murine norovirus VPg proteins

    Olspert, Allan; Hosmillo, Myra; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Peil, Lauri; Truve, Erkki

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Caliciviridae family of positive sense RNA viruses cause a wide range of diseases in both humans and animals. The detailed characterization of the calicivirus life cycle had been hampered due to the lack of robust cell culture systems and experimental tools for many of the members of the family. However, a number of caliciviruses replicate efficiently in cell culture and have robust reverse genetics systems available, most notably feline calicivirus (FCV) and murine norovirus (MNV). These are therefore widely used as representative members with which to examine the mechanistic details of calicivirus genome translation and replication. The replication of the calicivirus RNA genome occurs via a double-stranded RNA intermediate that is then used as a template for the production of new positive sense viral RNA, which is covalently linked to the virus-encoded protein VPg. The covalent linkage to VPg occurs during genome replication via the nucleotidylylation activity of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Using FCV and MNV, we used mass spectrometry-based approach to identify the specific amino acid linked to the 5′ end of the viral nucleic acid. We observed that both VPg proteins are covalently linked to guanosine diphosphate (GDP) moieties via tyrosine positions 24 and 26 for FCV and MNV respectively. These data fit with previous observations indicating that mutations introduced into these specific amino acids are deleterious for viral replication and fail to produce infectious virus. In addition, we also detected serine phosphorylation sites within the FCV VPg protein with positions 80 and 107 found consistently phosphorylated on VPg-linked viral RNA isolated from infected cells. This work provides the first direct experimental characterization of the linkage of infectious calicivirus viral RNA to the VPg protein and highlights that post-translational modifications of VPg may also occur during the viral life cycle. PMID:27375966

  19. Protein Modification by Dicarbonyl Molecular Species in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Wesley M. Williams

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegeneration results from abnormalities in cerebral metabolism and energy balance within neurons, astrocytes, microglia, or microvascular endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier. In Alzheimer's disease, -amyloid is considered the primary contributor to neuropathology and neurodegeneration. It now is believed that certain systemic diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, can contribute to neurodegeneration through the effects of chronic hyperglycemia/insulin resistance resulting in protein glycation, oxidative stress and inflammation within susceptible brain regions. Here, we present an overview of research focusing on the role of protein glycation, oxidative stress, and inflammation in the neurodegenerative process. Of special interest in this paper is the effect of methylglyoxal (MGO, a cytotoxic byproduct of glucose metabolism, elevated in neurodegenerative disease, and diabetes mellitus, on cerebral protein function and oxidative stress. How MGO interacts with amino acid residues within -amyloid, and small peptides within the brain, is also discussed in terms of the affect on protein function.

  20. Biotinylated probes for the analysis of protein modification by electrophiles.

    Codreanu, Simona G; Kim, Hye-Young H; Porter, Ned A; Liebler, Daniel C

    2012-01-01

    Formation of covalent protein adducts by lipid electrophiles contributes to diseases and toxicities linked to oxidative stress, but analysis of the adducts presents a challenging analytical problem. We describe selective adduct capture using biotin affinity probes to enrich protein and peptide adducts for analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). One approach employs biotinamidohexanoic acid hydrazide to covalently label residual carbonyl groups on adducts. The other employs alkynyl analogs of lipid electrophiles, which form adducts that can be postlabeled with azidobiotin tags by Cu(+)-catalyzed cycloaddition (Click chemistry). To enhance the selectivity of adduct capture, we use an azidobiotin reagent with a photocleavable linker, which allows recovery of adducted proteins and peptides under mild conditions. This approach allows both the identification of protein targets of lipid electrophiles and sequence mapping of the adducts. PMID:22065220

  1. Modification of tooth development by heat shock protein 60

    Papp Tamás; Polyák Angéla; Papp Krisztina; Mészár Zoltán (1977-) (állatorvos); Zákány Róza (1963-) (anatómus-, kötőszövetbiológus); Mészár-Katona Éva (1986-) (Ph.D hallgató); Terdik Tünde (1969-) (analitikus); Chang, Hwa Ham; Felszeghy Szabolcs Béla (1972-) (fogorvos, anatómus, kötőszövetbiológus)

    2016-01-01

    Although several heat shock proteins have been investigated in relation to tooth development, no available information is available about the spatial and temporal expression pattern of heat shock protein 60 (Hsp 60). To characterize Hsp 60 expression in the structures of the developing tooth germ, we used Western blotting, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Hsp 60 was present in high amounts in the inner and outer enamel epithelia, enamel knot (EK) and stratum intermedium (SI). H...

  2. High-throughput mass spectrometric discovery of protein post-translational modifications.

    Wilkins, M R; Gasteiger, E; Gooley, A A; Herbert, B R; Molloy, M P; Binz, P A; Ou, K; Sanchez, J C; Bairoch, A; Williams, K L; Hochstrasser, D F

    1999-06-11

    The availability of genome sequences, affordable mass spectrometers and high-resolution two-dimensional gels has made possible the identification of hundreds of proteins from many organisms by peptide mass fingerprinting. However, little attention has been paid to how information generated by these means can be utilised for detailed protein characterisation. Here we present an approach for the systematic characterisation of proteins using mass spectrometry and a software tool FindMod. This tool, available on the internet at http://www.expasy.ch/sprot/findmod.html , examines peptide mass fingerprinting data for mass differences between empirical and theoretical peptides. Where mass differences correspond to a post-translational modification, intelligent rules are applied to predict the amino acids in the peptide, if any, that might carry the modification. FindMod rules were constructed by examining 5153 incidences of post-translational modifications documented in the SWISS-PROT database, and for the 22 post-translational modifications currently considered (acetylation, amidation, biotinylation, C-mannosylation, deamidation, flavinylation, farnesylation, formylation, geranyl-geranylation, gamma-carboxyglutamic acids, hydroxylation, lipoylation, methylation, myristoylation, N -acyl diglyceride (tripalmitate), O-GlcNAc, palmitoylation, phosphorylation, pyridoxal phosphate, phospho-pantetheine, pyrrolidone carboxylic acid, sulphation) a total of 29 different rules were made. These consider which amino acids can carry a modification, whether the modification occurs on N-terminal, C-terminal or internal amino acids, and the type of organisms on which the modification can be found. We illustrate the utility of the approach with proteins from 2-D gels of Escherichia coli and sheep wool, where post-translational modifications predicted by FindMod were confirmed by MALDI post-source decay peptide fragmentation. As the approach is amenable to automation, it presents a

  3. Direct covalent coupling of proteins to nanostructured plasma polymers: a route to tunable cell adhesion

    Highlights: • Flat and nanostructured interfaces were overcoated by hydrocarbon plasma polymer. • Linker-free covalent attachment of proteins to resultant surfaces was validated. • Ultra-thin hydrocarbon overcoat (<2 nm) secured prolonged effective binding. • Pre-adsorbed tropoelastin promoted proliferation of osteoblast-like MG-63 cells. • Nanostructured films were multi-affine and impeded cell adhesion. - Abstract: Flat and nanostructured thin films were fabricated by deposition of ultra-thin (<2 nm) layer of hydrocarbon plasma polymer over polished silicon and over a pattern of 8 nm-thick poly(ethylene) islands on silicon. Linker-free radical-based covalent binding of bovine serum albumin and tropoelastin was confirmed for both types of films. The binding capability of albumin was found to be stable over many days of ambient air storage time. Tropoelastin-mediated flat plasma polymers favored adhesion and proliferation of osteoblast-like MG-63 cells. Nanostructured plasma polymers were multi-affine and their hierarchical surface represented an additional barrier for cell attachment

  4. Overexpression of vascular adhesion protein-1 is associated with poor prognosis of astrocytomas.

    Kostoro, Joanna; Chang, Shu-Jyuan; Clark Lai, Yen-Chang; Wu, Chun-Chieh; Chai, Chee-Yin; Kwan, Aij-Lie

    2016-06-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is one of the endothelial adhesion molecules that is believed to play a role in tumor progression and metastasis, supporting cancer cell extravasation. Very few studies have been performed on analyzing the contribution of VAP-1 in brain tumor. Astrocytomas are the most common type of brain tumors, which are classified by World Health Organization (WHO) into four grades according to the degree of malignancy. This study was designed to investigate VAP-1 expression level in different astrocytoma grades and its correlation with clinicopathological features as well as prognosis of astrocytoma patients. Eighty-seven patients with different grades of astrocytoma (WHO Grade I-Grade IV) were enrolled in this study. The expression of VAP-1 was assayed by immunohistochemistry. The correlation between VAP-1 expression and clinicopathological features was evaluated by Chi-square test, and overall survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier method. Cox regression analysis was applied to analyze the independent influence of each parameter on overall survival. The expression level of VAP-1 was significantly higher in diffuse astrocytoma than those of pilocytic astrocytoma (p astrocytoma and VAP-1(low) tumors in pilocytic astrocytoma (p astrocytoma. PMID:26935340

  5. Direct covalent coupling of proteins to nanostructured plasma polymers: a route to tunable cell adhesion

    Melnichuk, Iurii, E-mail: iurii.melnichuk@gmail.com [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Macromolecular Physics, Prague 18000 (Czech Republic); Choukourov, Andrei, E-mail: choukourov@kmf.troja.mff.cuni.cz [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Macromolecular Physics, Prague 18000 (Czech Republic); Bilek, Marcela, E-mail: m.bilek@physics.usyd.edu.au [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Macromolecular Physics, Prague 18000 (Czech Republic); School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Weiss, Anthony, E-mail: tony.weiss@sydney.edu.au [School of Molecular Bioscience, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Vandrovcová, Marta, E-mail: Marta.Vandrovcova@fgu.cas.cz [Institute of Physiology of Czech Academy of Science, Prague 14220 (Czech Republic); Bačáková, Lucie, E-mail: Lucie.Bacakova@fgu.cas.cz [Institute of Physiology of Czech Academy of Science, Prague 14220 (Czech Republic); Hanuš, Jan, E-mail: jan.hanus@gmail.com [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Macromolecular Physics, Prague 18000 (Czech Republic); Kousal, Jaroslav, E-mail: jarda@kmf.troja.mff.cuni.cz [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Macromolecular Physics, Prague 18000 (Czech Republic); Shelemin, Artem, E-mail: artem.shelemin@gmail.com [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Macromolecular Physics, Prague 18000 (Czech Republic); Solař, Pavel, E-mail: pawell.solar@seznam.cz [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Macromolecular Physics, Prague 18000 (Czech Republic); and others

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Flat and nanostructured interfaces were overcoated by hydrocarbon plasma polymer. • Linker-free covalent attachment of proteins to resultant surfaces was validated. • Ultra-thin hydrocarbon overcoat (<2 nm) secured prolonged effective binding. • Pre-adsorbed tropoelastin promoted proliferation of osteoblast-like MG-63 cells. • Nanostructured films were multi-affine and impeded cell adhesion. - Abstract: Flat and nanostructured thin films were fabricated by deposition of ultra-thin (<2 nm) layer of hydrocarbon plasma polymer over polished silicon and over a pattern of 8 nm-thick poly(ethylene) islands on silicon. Linker-free radical-based covalent binding of bovine serum albumin and tropoelastin was confirmed for both types of films. The binding capability of albumin was found to be stable over many days of ambient air storage time. Tropoelastin-mediated flat plasma polymers favored adhesion and proliferation of osteoblast-like MG-63 cells. Nanostructured plasma polymers were multi-affine and their hierarchical surface represented an additional barrier for cell attachment.

  6. Proteins isolated from regenerating sciatic nerves of rats form aggregates following posttranslational amino acid modification

    Soluble proteins of regenerating sciatic nerves of rats can be posttranslationally, covalently modified by a variety of radioactive amino acids. The present study shows that once modified by a mixture of 15 amino acids, many of those proteins form aggregates that are unable to pass through a 0.45-micron filter and pellet following 20,000g centrifugation (suggesting a size of greater than 2 x 10(6) Da). Aggregation of proteins also occurs following modification by Arg or Lys alone, but does not occur following protein modification in nonregenerating nerves or in brain. Aggregates are not disrupted by treatment with 100 mM beta mercaptoethanol or by exposure to 1.0 M NaCl, but aggregates are solubilized by treatment with urea and by boiling in 1.5% SDS. Amino acid analysis of proteins modified by a mixture of [3H]amino acids shows a similar proportion of posttranslationally incorporated Ser, Pro, Val, Ala, Leu, Phe, Lys, and Arg in the soluble and pelletable fractions. Two-dimensional PAGE profiles of soluble and pelletable modified proteins show that the modified proteins in both fractions are in similar pI and molecular weight ranges, except that the soluble modified proteins include a high-molecular-weight component that is absent in the pelleted modified proteins. Kinetic studies show that while half-maximal levels of protein modification occur within 30 seconds of incubation, the appearance of the pelletable modified protein fraction is delayed significantly. These results indicate that amino acid modification of soluble proteins in regenerating sciatic nerves of rats results in physical changes in those proteins so that they form high-molecular-weight aggregates

  7. Characterization of the protein fraction of the temporary adhesive secreted by the tube feet of the sea star Asterias rubens.

    Hennebert, Elise; Wattiez, Ruddy; Waite, J Herbert; Flammang, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Sea stars are able to make firm but temporary attachments to various substrata by secretions released by their tube feet. After tube foot detachment, the adhesive secretions remain on the substratum as a footprint. Proteins presumably play a key role in sea star adhesion, as evidenced by the removal of footprints from surfaces after a treatment with trypsin. However, until now, characterisation was hampered by their high insolubility. In this study, a non-hydrolytic method was used to render most of the proteins constituting the adhesive footprints soluble. After analysis by SDS-PAGE, the proteins separated into about 25 bands, which ranged from 25 to 450 kDa in apparent molecular weight. Using mass spectrometry and a homology-database search, it was shown that several of the proteins are known intracellular proteins, presumably resulting from contamination of footprint material with tube foot epidermal cells. However, 11 protein bands, comprising the most abundant proteins, were not identified and might correspond to novel adhesive proteins. They were named 'Sea star footprint proteins' (Sfps). Tandem mass spectrometry analysis of the protein bands yielded 43 de novo-generated peptide sequences. Most of them were shared by several, if not all, Sfps. Polyclonal antibodies were raised against one of the peptides (HEASGEYYR from Sfp-115) and were used in immunoblotting. They specifically labelled Sfp-115 and other bands with lower apparent molecular weights. The different results suggest that all Sfps might belong to a single family of related proteins sharing similar motifs or, alternatively, they are the products of polymerization and/or degradation processes. PMID:22439774

  8. Altering protein surface charge with chemical modification modulates protein–gold nanoparticle aggregation

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) can interact with a wide range of molecules including proteins. Whereas significant attention has focused on modifying the nanoparticle surface to regulate protein–AuNP assembly or influence the formation of the protein “corona,” modification of the protein surface as a mechanism to modulate protein–AuNP interaction has been less explored. Here, we examine this possibility utilizing three small globular proteins—lysozyme with high isoelectric point (pI) and established interactions with AuNP; α-lactalbumin with similar tertiary fold to lysozyme but low pI; and myoglobin with a different globular fold and an intermediate pI. We first chemically modified these proteins to alter their charged surface functionalities, and thereby shift protein pI, and then applied multiple methods to assess protein–AuNP assembly. At pH values lower than the anticipated pI of the modified protein, AuNP exposure elicits changes in the optical absorbance of the protein–NP solutions and other properties due to aggregate formation. Above the expected pI, however, protein–AuNP interaction is minimal, and both components remain isolated, presumably because both species are negatively charged. These data demonstrate that protein modification provides a powerful tool for modulating whether nanoparticle–protein interactions result in material aggregation. The results also underscore that naturally occurring protein modifications found in vivo may be critical in defining nanoparticle–protein corona compositions.

  9. Physical, Chemical and Biochemical Modifications of Protein-Based Films and Coatings: An Extensive Review.

    Zink, Joël; Wyrobnik, Tom; Prinz, Tobias; Schmid, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Protein-based films and coatings are an interesting alternative to traditional petroleum-based materials. However, their mechanical and barrier properties need to be enhanced in order to match those of the latter. Physical, chemical, and biochemical methods can be used for this purpose. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the effects of various treatments on whey, soy, and wheat gluten protein-based films and coatings. These three protein sources have been chosen since they are among the most abundantly used and are well described in the literature. Similar behavior might be expected for other protein sources. Most of the modifications are still not fully understood at a fundamental level, but all the methods discussed change the properties of the proteins and resulting products. Mastering these modifications is an important step towards the industrial implementation of protein-based films. PMID:27563881

  10. Site-selective protein-modification chemistry for basic biology and drug development

    Krall, Nikolaus; da Cruz, Filipa P.; Boutureira, Omar; Bernardes, Gonçalo J. L.

    2016-02-01

    Nature has produced intricate machinery to covalently diversify the structure of proteins after their synthesis in the ribosome. In an attempt to mimic nature, chemists have developed a large set of reactions that enable post-expression modification of proteins at pre-determined sites. These reactions are now used to selectively install particular modifications on proteins for many biological and therapeutic applications. For example, they provide an opportunity to install post-translational modifications on proteins to determine their exact biological roles. Labelling of proteins in live cells with fluorescent dyes allows protein uptake and intracellular trafficking to be tracked and also enables physiological parameters to be measured optically. Through the conjugation of potent cytotoxicants to antibodies, novel anti-cancer drugs with improved efficacy and reduced side effects may be obtained. In this Perspective, we highlight the most exciting current and future applications of chemical site-selective protein modification and consider which hurdles still need to be overcome for more widespread use.

  11. Multienzyme Modification of Hemp Protein for Functional Peptides Synthesis

    Ranjana Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional foods and nutraceuticals are of special importance, particularly for their impact on human health and prevention of certain chronic diseases. Consequently, the production and properties of bioactive peptides have received an increasing scientific interest over past few years. Present work intends to compare the competence of metalloendopeptidases (“Protease N” and “Protease A” with papain for getting functional peptides from hemp seed meal, which is an obligatory waste of hemp fiber production industry. As a measure of the functional potential hemp protein hydrolysates were analyzed for their antiradical properties in DPPH system. “Protease N” modified protein hydrolysate exhibited comparatively superior radical scavenging activity in DPPH system. Overall findings represent the importance of “Protease N,” as endopeptidase in getting peptides of good antiradical properties from various protein sources.

  12. Exploring the diversity of protein modifications: special bacterial phosphorylation systems

    Mijakovic, Ivan; Grangeasse, Christophe; Turgay, Kürşad

    2016-01-01

    physiology, and regulatory networks. Investigating these unusual bacterial kinase and phosphatases is not only important to understand their role in bacterial physiology but will help to generally understand the full potential and evolution of protein phosphorylation for signal transduction, protein...... has been most thoroughly investigated. Unlike in eukarya, a large diversity of enzyme families has been shown to phosphorylate and dephosphorylate proteins on various amino acids with different chemical properties in bacteria. In this review, after a brief overview of the known bacterial...... phosphorylation systems, we focus on more recently discovered and less widely known kinases and phosphatases. Namely, we describe in detail tyrosine- and arginine-phosphorylation together with some examples of unusual serine-phosphorylation systems and discuss their potential role and function in bacterial...

  13. Adsorption and adhesion of blood proteins and fibroblasts on multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    2009-01-01

    This article concerns the investigation of blood protein adsorption on carbon paper and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Mouse fibroblast cell adhesion and growth on MWCNTs was also studied. The results showed that fibrinogen adsorption on carbon paper was much lower than that on MWCNTs, which means that platelets readily aggregate on the surface of MWCNTs. Mouse fibroblast cells implanted on MWCNTs tended to grow more prolifically than those implanted on carbon paper. The cell concentration observed on MWCNTs increased from 1.2×105/mL for a single day culture to 2×105/mL for a 7-day culture. No toxicity reaction was observed during the culturing period. These results indicated that MWCNTs possessed excellent tissue compatibility.

  14. Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors in nervous system development and disease.

    Langenhan, Tobias; Piao, Xianhua; Monk, Kelly R

    2016-09-01

    Members of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor (aGPCR) class have emerged as crucial regulators of nervous system development, with important implications for human health and disease. In this Review, we discuss the current understanding of aGPCR functions during key steps in neural development, including cortical patterning, dendrite and synapse formation, and myelination. We focus on aGPCR modulation of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions and signalling to control these varied aspects of neural development, and we discuss how impaired aGPCR function leads to neurological disease. We further highlight the emerging hypothesis that aGPCRs can be mechanically activated and the implications of this property in the nervous system. PMID:27466150

  15. Facile immobilization of heparin on bioabsorbable iron via mussel adhesive protein (MAPs

    Xuchen Xu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by adhesive proteins in mussels, strategies using dopamine to modified surface have become particularly attractive. In the present work, we developed a novel and convenient method to modify the biodegradable Fe plates with heparin. Iron was first treated by a facile one-step pH-induced polymerization of dopamine, and then a high density heparin was successfully grafted onto the surface via coupling with polydopamine (PDA active layer. Heparin immobilization contributed much longer blood clotting coagulation time than the pure Fe sample, and hence reduced the risk of thrombosis. Cell viability tests suggested that the heparin modified Fe plates were more favorable to the proliferation of ECV304 cells. In summary, the heparin modified Fe plates with good anti-thrombus properties and inhibiting the proliferation of VSMC cells provide great prospects for biodegradable iron.

  16. Facile immobilization of heparin on bioabsorbable iron via mussel adhesive protein (MAPs)

    Xuchen Xu; Ming Li; Qian Liu; Zhaojun Jia; Yuying Shi; Yan Cheng; Yufeng Zheng; L.Q. Ruan

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by adhesive proteins in mussels, strategies using dopamine to modified surface have become particularly attractive. In the present work, we developed a novel and convenient method to modify the biodegradable Fe plates with heparin. Iron was first treated by a facile one-step pH-induced polymerization of dopamine, and then a high density heparin was successfully grafted onto the surface via coupling with polydopamine (PDA) active layer. Heparin immobilization contributed much longer blood clotting coagulation time than the pure Fe sample, and hence reduced the risk of thrombosis. Cell viability tests suggested that the heparin modified Fe plates were more favorable to the proliferation of ECV304 cells. In summary, the heparin modified Fe plates with good anti-thrombus properties and inhibiting the proliferation of VSMC cells provide great prospects for biodegradable iron.

  17. Modification of viral structural proteins of herpesvirus sylvilagus by glycosylation and phosphorylation.

    Rouhandeh, H.; Cohrs, R

    1984-01-01

    The structural proteins of herpesvirus sylvilagus, a lymphotropic gamma herpesvirus, were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoreses. Modification of the proteins by glycosylation and phosphorylation was shown by the incorporation of [14C]glucosamine or 32Pi into material which comigrated with [35S]methionine-labeled proteins. One-dimensional gel electrophoresis resolved four major glycoproteins and four major phosphoproteins. By two-dimensional ...

  18. Protein redox chemistry: post-translational cysteine modifications that regulate signal transduction and drug pharmacology

    Wani, Revati; Nagata, Asako; Murray, Brion W.

    2014-01-01

    The perception of reactive oxygen species has evolved over the past decade from agents of cellular damage to secondary messengers which modify signaling proteins in physiology and the disease state (e.g., cancer). New protein targets of specific oxidation are rapidly being identified. One emerging class of redox modification occurs to the thiol side chain of cysteine residues which can produce multiple chemically distinct alterations to the protein (e.g., sulfenic/sulfinic/sulfonic acid, disu...

  19. The Study of the Adhesive Activity and Modification Possibilities of Melamine-Urea-Formaldehyde (MUF), Urea-Formaldehyde (UF) Resins

    Kajaks, J; Kolbins, A

    2014-01-01

    Two types of thermosetting resins MUF and UF have been used as glues for birch wood veneer. As resins modifiers polyvinylacetate emulsion (PVA), polyvinylbutiral (PVB) (powder and solution), rubber latex, adipic (Ad) and sebacic (Seb) acids have been utilized. For glued system shear strength and deformation, bending properties and impact strength have been tested. The best properties: adhesive activity and elasticity have been shown by resins modified with PVB powder, rubber latex, adipic and...

  20. Surface modification of carbon fibers by a polyether sulfone emulsion sizing for increased interfacial adhesion with polyether sulfone

    Yuan, Haojie [National Engineering Laboratory for Carbon Fiber Technology, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan 030001 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Shouchun, E-mail: zschun@sxicc.ac.cn [National Engineering Laboratory for Carbon Fiber Technology, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Lu, Chunxiang [National Engineering Laboratory for Carbon Fiber Technology, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan 030001 (China)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • A polyether sulfone emulsion (PES) sizing was prepared for the first time. • The sizing enhanced the surface activity and wettability of carbon fibers. • Compared to the original sizing, the PES emulsion sizing resulted in an 18.4% increase in the interlaminar shear strength of carbon fiber/PES composites. • Important influences of emulsifier on the fiber surface and composite interface were demonstrated. • The reinforcing mechanisms are the improved fiber surface wettability and interfacial compatibility in composites. - Abstract: Interests on carbon fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites are growing rapidly, but the challenges with poor interfacial adhesion have slowed their adoption. In this work, a polyether sulfone (PES) emulsion sizing was prepared successfully for increased interfacial adhesion of carbon fiber/PES composites. To obtain a high-quality PES emulsion sizing, the key factor, emulsifier concentration, was studied by dynamic light scattering technique. The results demonstrated that the suitable weight ratio of PES to emulsifier was 8:3, and the resulting PES emulsion sizing had an average particle diameter of 117 nm and Zeta potential of −52.6 mV. After sizing, the surface oxygen-containing functional groups, free energy and wettability of carbon fibers increased significantly, which were advantageous to promote molecular-level contact between carbon fiber and PES. Finally, short beam shear tests were performed to evaluate the interfacial adhesion of carbon fiber/PES composites. The results indicated that PES emulsion sizing played a critical role for the enhanced interfacial adhesion in carbon fiber/PES composites, and a 26% increase of interlaminar shear strength was achieved, because of the improved fiber surface wettability and interfacial compatibility between carbon fiber and PES.

  1. Surface modification of carbon fibers by a polyether sulfone emulsion sizing for increased interfacial adhesion with polyether sulfone

    Highlights: • A polyether sulfone emulsion (PES) sizing was prepared for the first time. • The sizing enhanced the surface activity and wettability of carbon fibers. • Compared to the original sizing, the PES emulsion sizing resulted in an 18.4% increase in the interlaminar shear strength of carbon fiber/PES composites. • Important influences of emulsifier on the fiber surface and composite interface were demonstrated. • The reinforcing mechanisms are the improved fiber surface wettability and interfacial compatibility in composites. - Abstract: Interests on carbon fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites are growing rapidly, but the challenges with poor interfacial adhesion have slowed their adoption. In this work, a polyether sulfone (PES) emulsion sizing was prepared successfully for increased interfacial adhesion of carbon fiber/PES composites. To obtain a high-quality PES emulsion sizing, the key factor, emulsifier concentration, was studied by dynamic light scattering technique. The results demonstrated that the suitable weight ratio of PES to emulsifier was 8:3, and the resulting PES emulsion sizing had an average particle diameter of 117 nm and Zeta potential of −52.6 mV. After sizing, the surface oxygen-containing functional groups, free energy and wettability of carbon fibers increased significantly, which were advantageous to promote molecular-level contact between carbon fiber and PES. Finally, short beam shear tests were performed to evaluate the interfacial adhesion of carbon fiber/PES composites. The results indicated that PES emulsion sizing played a critical role for the enhanced interfacial adhesion in carbon fiber/PES composites, and a 26% increase of interlaminar shear strength was achieved, because of the improved fiber surface wettability and interfacial compatibility between carbon fiber and PES

  2. Effect of dispersion method and CNT loading on the quality and performance of nanocomposite soy protein/CNTs adhesive for wood application

    Afolabi, Ayo Samuel; Oluwafolakemi Sadare, Olawumi; Olawale Daramola, Michael

    2016-09-01

    In this article the effect of dispersion method and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) loading on the quality and performance of a nanocomposite adhesive is reported. The nanocomposite soy protein isolate adhesive was successfully developed by incorporating CNTs into the soy protein isolate (SPI) for enhanced bond strength and water resistance. Dispersion methods, namely mechanical (shear) mixing and mechanical/sonication were employed to aid good dispersion and interfacial interaction between soy protein matrix and the carbon nanofillers during the preparation of the adhesive. The concentration of the CNT was varied from 0.1–0.7 wt% in the nanocomposite adhesive. The morphology and the surface chemistry of the adhesives were checked with SEM and FTIR, respectively. The shear strength of the developed adhesives was investigated according to European standard (EN-204) for interior wood application on a tensile testing machine. The morphological structure of the nanocomposite adhesive obtained from SEM images showed homogeneous dispersion of CNTs in SPI using the two dispersion methods; shear mixing and sonication/shear mixing. Fourier transform infrared spectra showed chemical functionalities and successful interaction between CNTs and SPI adhesive. Thermogravimetric profile of the adhesive samples showed that the newly developed nanocomposite adhesive was thermally stable at a temperature up to about 600 °C at a higher percentage loading of 0.5 wt% CNTs. The result showed that sonication method of dispersion of CNTs into the SPI adhesive had a higher shear strength compared to the mechanical method of dispersion both at dry and wet state.

  3. Diamagnetic levitation causes changes in the morphology, cytoskeleton, and focal adhesion proteins expression in osteocytes.

    Qian, A R; Wang, L; Gao, X; Zhang, W; Hu, L F; Han, J; Li, J B; Di, S M; Shang, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Diamagnetic levitation technology is a novel simulated weightless technique and has recently been applied in life-science research. We have developed a superconducting magnet platform with large gradient high magnetic field (LG-HMF), which can provide three apparent gravity levels, namely, μg (diamagnetic levitation), 1g, and 2g for diamagnetic materials. In this study, the effects of LG-HMF on the activity, morphology, and cytoskeleton (actin filament, microtubules, and vimentin intermediate filaments) in osteocyte - like cell line MLO-Y4 were detected by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) methods, hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining, and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), respectively. The changes induced by LG-HMF in distribution and expression of focal adhesion (FA) proteins, including vinculin, paxillin, and talin in MLO-Y4 were determined by LSCM and Western blotting. The results showed that LG-HMF produced by superconducting magnet had no lethal effects on MLO-Y4. Compared to control, diamagnetic levitation (μg) affected MLO-Y4 morphology, nucleus size, cytoskeleton architecture, and FA proteins distribution and expression. The study indicates that osteocytes are sensitive to altered gravity and FA proteins (vinculin, paxillin, and talin) may be involved in osteocyte mechanosensation. The diamagnetic levitation may be a novel ground-based space-gravity simulator and can be used for biological experiment at cellular level. PMID:21216704

  4. Modification of fluorous substrates with oligo(ethylene glycol) via "click" chemistry for long-term resistance of cell adhesion.

    Contreras-Caceres, Rafael; Santos, Catherine M; Li, Siheng; Kumar, Amit; Zhu, Zhiling; Kolar, Satya S; Casado-Rodriguez, Miguel A; Huang, Yongkai; McDermott, Alison; Lopez-Romero, Juan Manuel; Cai, Chengzhi

    2015-11-15

    In this work perfluorinated substrates fabricated from SiO2 glass slides are modified with oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) units for long-term resistance of cell adhesion purposes, based on fluorous interactions and click chemistry. Specifically, fluorous substrates, prepared by treatment of glass slides with 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorodecyltrimethoxysilane (FAS17), were coated with ethynyl-OEG-C8F17, followed by covalent attachment of an azido-OEG via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) "click" reaction. We demonstrate that the resultant surface avoid fibrinogen adsorption and resisted cell adhesion for over 14days. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) analysis and contact angle goniometry measurements confirm the presence of the OEG molecules on the fluorous substrates. Bright field optical images show total absence of 3T3 fibroblast cells on the OEG modified fluorinated substrate for 1 and 5days, and a remarkably decrease of cell adhesion at 14days. PMID:26210101

  5. The recognition of adsorbed and denatured proteins of different topographies by β2 integrins and effects on leukocyte adhesion and activation

    Brevig, T.; Holst, B.; Ademovic, Z.;

    2005-01-01

    Leukocyte beta(2) integrins Mac-1 and p150,95 are promiscuous cell-surface receptors that recognise and mediate cell adhesion to a variety of adsorbed and denatured proteins. We used albumin as a model protein to study whether leukocyte adhesion and activation depended on the nm-scale topography ...

  6. Modifications of proteins by polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation products

    Refsgaard, Hanne; Tsai, Lin; Stadtman, Earl

    2000-01-01

    -dependent generation of carbonyl groups and loss of lysine residues increased in the order methyl linoleate < methyl linolenate < methyl arachidonate. The amounts of alkyl hydroperoxides, malondialdehyde, and a number of other aldehydes that accumulated when polyunsaturated fatty acids were oxidized in the presence of......The ability of unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters to modify amino acid residues in bovine serum albumin (BSA), glutamine synthetase, and insulin in the presence of a metal-catalyzed oxidation system [ascorbate/Fe(lll)/O-2] depends on the degree of unsaturation of the fatty acid. The fatty acid...... in the formation of protein carbonyls, These results are consistent with the proposition that metal-catalyzed oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids can contribute to the generation of protein carbonyls by direct interaction of lipid oxidation products (alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes) with lysine...

  7. Influence of levofloxacin on soluble selection, interleukin, adhesion molecule and pulmonary surfactant protein of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis

    Qing-Zhou He; Qian-Shu Hu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To observe the influence of levofloxacin on soluble selection, interleukin, adhesion molecule and pulmonary surfactant protein of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods:A total of 50 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis who had been treated in our hospital from March 2014 to April 2015 were randomly divided into the control group (conventional treatment) and the observation group (conventional treatment plus levofloxacin). Each group had 25 cases. Then, the soluble selection,interleukin,adhesion molecule and pulmonary surfactant protein levels of the two groups at the second, fourth and sixth months before and after treatment were compared. Results:Before treatment, the differencess of the levels of the soluble selection, interleukin, adhesion molecule and pulmonary surfactant protein of the two groups were significant (P>0.05), while the detection levels of all the aspects of the observation group at the second, fourth and sixth months after treatment were all significantly lower than those of the control group (P<0.05). The detection results of the two groups at the second, fourth and sixth months after treatment showed significant differences. Conclusions:Lvofloxacin has significant effect on the soluble selection, interleukin, adhesion molecule and pulmonary surfactant protein of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis.

  8. Integrin-mediated adhesion of human mesenchymal stem cells to extracellular matrix proteins adsorbed to polymer surfaces

    In vitro, degradable aliphatic polyesters are widely used as cell carriers for bone tissue engineering, despite their lack of biological cues. Their biological active surface is rather determined by an adsorbed layer of proteins from the surrounding media. Initial cell fate, including adhesion and proliferation, which are key properties for efficient cell carriers, is determined by the adsorbed layer of proteins. Herein we have investigated the ability of human bone marrow derived stem cells (hBMSC) to adhere to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, including fibronectin and vitronectin which are present in plasma and serum. hBMSC expressed integrins for collagens, laminins, fibronectin and vitronectin. Accordingly, hBMSC strongly adhered to these purified ECM proteins by using the corresponding integrins. Although purified fibronectin and vitronectin adsorbed to aliphatic polyesters to a lower extent than to cell culture polystyrene, these low levels were sufficient to mediate adhesion of hBMSC. It was found that plasma- and serum-coated polystyrene adsorbed significant levels of both fibronectin and vitronectin, and fibronectin was identified as the major adhesive component of plasma for hBMSC; however, aliphatic polyesters adsorbed minimal levels of fibronectin under similar conditions resulting in impaired cell adhesion. Altogether, the results suggest that the efficiency of aliphatic polyesters cell carriers could be improved by increasing their ability to adsorb fibronectin. (paper)

  9. In vitro adhesion and invasion inhibition of Shigella dysenteriae, Shigella flexneri and Shigella sonnei clinical strains by human milk proteins

    Giugliano Loreny

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shigella is the etiological agent of shigellosis, a disease responsible for more than 500,000 deaths of children per year, in developing countries. These pathogens colonize the intestinal colon, invade, spreading to the other enterocytes. Breastfeeding plays a very important role in protecting infants from intestinal infections. Amongst milk compounds, glycosylated proteins prevent the adhesion of many enteropathogens in vitro. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of human milk proteins on the colonization potential of Shigella dysenteriae, S. flexneri and S. sonnei. To fulfill this purpose, pooled milk samples from five donors, were fractionated by gel filtration and affinity chromatography. Using tissue culture, the milk fractions obtained were tested in Shigella adhesion and invasion assays. Results Our revealed showed that both adhesion and invasion of Shigella species were inhibited by low concentration of secretory immunoglobulin A, lactoferrin and free secretory component. This work also showed that, these proteins bind to superficial and whole-cell Shigella proteins. Conclusions Our findings suggest that human milk may act inhibiting adhesion and, consequently, invasion of Shigella, thereafter preventing shigellosis in infants.

  10. Surface-modified nanoparticles as a new, versatile, and mechanically robust nonadhesive coating : Suppression of protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion

    Holmes, P. F.; Currie, E. P. K.; Thies, J. C.; van der Mei, H. C.; Busscher, H. J.; Norde, W.

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis of surface-modified silica nanoparticles, chemically grafted with acrylate and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) groups, and the ability of the resulting crosslinked coatings to inhibit protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion are explored. Water contact angles, nanoindentation, and atomic

  11. Plasma treatment induces internal surface modifications of electrospun poly(L-lactic) acid scaffold to enhance protein coating

    Advanced biomaterials should also be bioactive with regard to desirable cellular responses, such as selective protein adsorption and cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation. To enhance cell-material interactions, surface modifications have commonly been performed. Among the various surface modification approaches, atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma has been used to change a hydrophobic polymer surface to a hydrophilic surface. Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA)-derived scaffolds lack cell recognition signals and the hydrophobic nature of PLLA hinders cell seeding. To make PLLA surfaces more conducive to cell attachment and spreading, surface modifications may be used to create cell-biomaterial interfaces that elicit controlled cell adhesion and maintain differentiated phenotypes. In this study, (He) gaseous atmospheric plasma glow discharge was used to change the characteristics of a 3D-type polymeric scaffold from hydrophobic to hydrophilic on both the outer and inner surfaces of the scaffold and the penetration efficiency with fibronectin was investigated. Field-emission scanning electron microscope images showed that some grooves were formed on the PLLA fibers after plasma treatment. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data also showed chemical changes in the PLLA structure. After plasma treatment, -CN (285.76 eV) was increased in C1s and -NH2 (399.70 eV) was increased significantly and –N=CH (400.80 eV) and –NH3+ (402.05 eV) were newly appeared in N1s. These changes allowed fibronectin to penetrate into the PLLA scaffold; this could be observed by confocal microscopy. In conclusion, helium atmospheric pressure plasma treatment was effective in modifying the polymeric scaffold, making it hydrophilic, and this treatment can also be used in tissue engineering research as needed to make polymers hydrophilic

  12. Plasma treatment induces internal surface modifications of electrospun poly(L-lactic) acid scaffold to enhance protein coating

    Jin Seo, Hyok; Hee Lee, Mi; Kwon, Byeong-Ju; Kim, Hye-Lee; Jin Lee, Seung; Kim, Bong-Jin; Wang, Kang-Kyun; Kim, Yong-Rok; Park, Jong-Chul

    2013-08-01

    Advanced biomaterials should also be bioactive with regard to desirable cellular responses, such as selective protein adsorption and cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation. To enhance cell-material interactions, surface modifications have commonly been performed. Among the various surface modification approaches, atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma has been used to change a hydrophobic polymer surface to a hydrophilic surface. Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA)-derived scaffolds lack cell recognition signals and the hydrophobic nature of PLLA hinders cell seeding. To make PLLA surfaces more conducive to cell attachment and spreading, surface modifications may be used to create cell-biomaterial interfaces that elicit controlled cell adhesion and maintain differentiated phenotypes. In this study, (He) gaseous atmospheric plasma glow discharge was used to change the characteristics of a 3D-type polymeric scaffold from hydrophobic to hydrophilic on both the outer and inner surfaces of the scaffold and the penetration efficiency with fibronectin was investigated. Field-emission scanning electron microscope images showed that some grooves were formed on the PLLA fibers after plasma treatment. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data also showed chemical changes in the PLLA structure. After plasma treatment, -CN (285.76 eV) was increased in C1s and -NH2 (399.70 eV) was increased significantly and -N=CH (400.80 eV) and -NH3+ (402.05 eV) were newly appeared in N1s. These changes allowed fibronectin to penetrate into the PLLA scaffold; this could be observed by confocal microscopy. In conclusion, helium atmospheric pressure plasma treatment was effective in modifying the polymeric scaffold, making it hydrophilic, and this treatment can also be used in tissue engineering research as needed to make polymers hydrophilic.

  13. Signal regulatory protein alpha negatively regulates beta2 integrin-mediated monocyte adhesion, transendothelial migration and phagocytosis.

    Dan-Qing Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Signal regulate protein alpha (SIRPalpha is involved in many functional aspects of monocytes. Here we investigate the role of SIRPalpha in regulating beta(2 integrin-mediated monocyte adhesion, transendothelial migration (TEM and phagocytosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: THP-1 monocytes/macropahges treated with advanced glycation end products (AGEs resulted in a decrease of SIRPalpha expression but an increase of beta(2 integrin cell surface expression and beta(2 integrin-mediated adhesion to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha-stimulated human microvascular endothelial cell (HMEC-1 monolayers. In contrast, SIRPalpha overexpression in THP-1 cells showed a significant less monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1-triggered cell surface expression of beta(2 integrins, in particular CD11b/CD18. SIRPalpha overexpression reduced beta(2 integrin-mediated firm adhesion of THP-1 cells to either TNFalpha-stimulated HMEC-1 monolayers or to immobilized intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1. SIRPalpha overexpression also reduced MCP-1-initiated migration of THP-1 cells across TNFalpha-stimulated HMEC-1 monolayers. Furthermore, beta(2 integrin-mediated THP-1 cell spreading and actin polymerization in response to MCP-1, and phagocytosis of bacteria were both inhibited by SIRPalpha overexpression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: SIRPalpha negatively regulates beta(2 integrin-mediated monocyte adhesion, transendothelial migration and phagocytosis, thus may serve as a critical molecule in preventing excessive activation and accumulation of monocytes in the arterial wall during early stage of atherosclerosis.

  14. Dysbiosis may trigger autoimmune diseases via inappropriate posttranslational modification of host proteins

    Aaron eLerner

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The gut ecosystem with myriads of microorganisms and the high concentration of immune system cells can be considered as a separate organ on its own. The balanced interaction between the host and microbial cells has been shaped during the long co-evolutionary process. In dysbiotic conditions, however, this balance is compromised and results in abnormal interaction between the host and microbiota. It is hypothesize here that the changed spectrum of microbial enzymes involved in posttranslational modification of proteins may contribute to the aberrant modification of host proteins thus generating autoimmune responses by the host, resulting in autoimmune diseases.

  15. Modification-specific proteomics of plasma membrane proteins

    Elortza, Felix; Mohammed, Shabaz; Bunkenborg, Jakob;

    2006-01-01

    that phospholipase D (PLD) treatment of human and plant plasma membrane fractions leads to the release of GPI-anchored proteins that were identified and characterized by capillary liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. In contrast to phospholipase C, the PLD enzyme is not affected by structural......-recognized as they are candidate cell surface biomarker molecules with potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications in molecular medicine. GPI-APs have also attracted interest in plant biotechnology because of their role in root development and cell remodeling. Using a shave-and-conquer concept, we demonstrate...

  16. Functional relevance of naturally occurring mutations in adhesion G protein-coupled receptor ADGRD1 (GPR133)

    Fischer, Liane; Wilde, Caroline; Schöneberg, Torsten; Liebscher, Ines

    2016-01-01

    Background: A large number of human inherited and acquired diseases and phenotypes are caused by mutations in G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have shown that variations in the ADGRD1 (GPR133) locus are linked with differences in metabolism, human height and heart frequency. ADGRD1 is a Gs protein-coupled receptor belonging to the class of adhesion GPCRs. Results: Analysis of more than 1000 sequenced human genomes revealed approximately 9000 single nu...

  17. Allicin Induces Thiol Stress in Bacteria through S-Allylmercapto Modification of Protein Cysteines*

    Müller, Alexandra; Eller, Jakob; Albrecht, Frank; Prochnow, Pascal; Kuhlmann, Katja; Bandow, Julia Elisabeth; Slusarenko, Alan John

    2016-01-01

    Allicin (diallyl thiosulfinate) from garlic is a highly potent natural antimicrobial substance. It inhibits growth of a variety of microorganisms, among them antibiotic-resistant strains. However, the precise mode of action of allicin is unknown. Here, we show that growth inhibition of Escherichia coli during allicin exposure coincides with a depletion of the glutathione pool and S-allylmercapto modification of proteins, resulting in overall decreased total sulfhydryl levels. This is accompanied by the induction of the oxidative and heat stress response. We identified and quantified the allicin-induced modification S-allylmercaptocysteine for a set of cytoplasmic proteins by using a combination of label-free mass spectrometry and differential isotope-coded affinity tag labeling of reduced and oxidized thiol residues. Activity of isocitrate lyase AceA, an S-allylmercapto-modified candidate protein, is largely inhibited by allicin treatment in vivo. Allicin-induced protein modifications trigger protein aggregation, which largely stabilizes RpoH and thereby induces the heat stress response. At sublethal concentrations, the heat stress response is crucial to overcome allicin stress. Our results indicate that the mode of action of allicin is a combination of a decrease of glutathione levels, unfolding stress, and inactivation of crucial metabolic enzymes through S-allylmercapto modification of cysteines. PMID:27008862

  18. The Effect of Gas-Discharge Plasma Radiation on Erythrocyte Protein Modification

    Trofimova S.V.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was to estimate the effect of spark plasma radiation on oxidative protein modification in solutions and erythrocytes in experiments and in vitro. Materials and Methods. Pulse spark discharge generating low-temperature plasma radiation was formed using an experimental device PILIMIN series IR-10 (Russia. The characteristics of a discharge were the following: capacity of pulse capacitor — 3.3 nF, ballast resistance — 10 MΩ, power supply voltage — 11 kV, pulse recurrence frequency — 10 Hz. Tryptophan, albumin, hemoglobin solutions, and erythrocyte suspensions of intact animals and animals with experimental sarcoma were used as research subjects. 4 ml samples were treated in sterile Petri plates. Structural state of tryptophan, albumin and hemoglobin molecules was assessed by UV absorption spectra. Oxidative protein damage degree in solutions and cells was estimated by bityrosine and tryptophan fluorescence. Results. The increase of oxidative protein modification in solutions after spark discharge plasma radiation is due to the presence of complexes of tryptophan, albumin and hemoglobin molecules with nitro compounds, nitric radicals, hydroperoxyl radicals formed under discharge generation. Erythrocyte protein structures of animals with experimental sarcoma are characterized by more intense oxidative modification compared to erythrocytes of intact animals. Oxidative modification of erythrocyte proteins under plasma radiation to greater degree is due to the accumulation of bityrosine cross-links.

  19. Modification of tooth development by heat shock protein 60.

    Papp, Tamas; Polyak, Angela; Papp, Krisztina; Meszar, Zoltan; Zakany, Roza; Meszar-Katona, Eva; Tünde, Palne Terdik; Ham, Chang Hwa; Felszeghy, Szabolcs

    2016-01-01

    Although several heat shock proteins have been investigated in relation to tooth development, no available information is available about the spatial and temporal expression pattern of heat shock protein 60 (Hsp 60). To characterize Hsp 60 expression in the structures of the developing tooth germ, we used Western blotting, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Hsp 60 was present in high amounts in the inner and outer enamel epithelia, enamel knot (EK) and stratum intermedium (SI). Hsp 60 also appeared in odontoblasts beginning in the bell stage. To obtain data on the possible effect of Hsp 60 on isolated lower incisors from mice, we performed in vitro culturing. To investigate the effect of exogenous Hsp 60 on the cell cycle during culturing, we used the 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation test on dental cells. Exogenously administered Hsp 60 caused bluntness at the apical part of the 16.5-day-old tooth germs, but it did not influence the proliferation rate of dental cells. We identified the expression of Hsp 60 in the developing tooth germ, which was present in high concentrations in the inner and outer enamel epithelia, EK, SI and odontoblasts. High concentration of exogenous Hsp 60 can cause abnormal morphology of the tooth germ, but it did not influence the proliferation rate of the dental cells. Our results suggest that increased levels of Hsp 60 may cause abnormalities in the morphological development of the tooth germ and support the data on the significance of Hsp during the developmental processes. PMID:27025262

  20. Proteinaceous determinants of surface colonization in bacteria: Bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation from a protein secretion perspective

    MickaelDesvaux

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial colonization of biotic or abiotic surfaces results from two quite distinct physiological processes, namely bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. Broadly speaking, a biofilm is defined as the sessile development of microbial cells. Biofilm formation arises following bacterial adhesion but not all single bacterial cells adhering reversibly or irreversibly engage inexorably into a sessile mode of growth. Among molecular determinants promoting bacterial colonization, surface proteins are the most functionally diverse active components. To be present on the bacterial cell surface, though, a protein must be secreted in the first place. Considering the close association of secreted proteins with their cognate secretion systems, the secretome (which refers both to the secretion systems and their protein substrates is a key concept to apprehend the protein secretion and related physiological functions. The protein secretion systems are here considered in light of the differences in the cell-envelope architecture between diderm-LPS (archetypal Gram-negative, monoderm (archetypal Gram-positive and diderm-mycolate (archetypal acid-fast bacteria. Besides, their cognate secreted proteins engaged in the bacterial colonization process are regarded from single protein to supramolecular protein structure as well as the non-classical protein secretion. This state-of-the-art on the complement of the secretome (the secretion systems and their cognate effectors involved in the surface colonization process in diderm-LPS and monoderm bacteria paves the way for future research directions in the field.

  1. An occludin-focal adhesion kinase protein complex at the blood-testis barrier: a study using the cadmium model.

    Siu, Erica R; Wong, Elissa W P; Mruk, Dolores D; Sze, K L; Porto, Catarina S; Cheng, C Yan

    2009-07-01

    Several integral membrane proteins that constitute the blood-testis barrier (BTB) in mammalian testes, in particular rodents, are known to date. These include tight junction (TJ) proteins (e.g. occludin, junctional adhesion molecule-A, claudins), basal ectoplasmic specialization proteins (e.g. N-cadherin), and gap junction proteins (e.g. connexin43). However, the regulators (e.g. protein kinases and phosphatases) that affect these proteins, such as their interaction with the cytoskeletal actin, which in turn confer cell adhesion at the TJ, remain largely unknown. We report herein that focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a putative interacting partner of occludin, but not claudin-11 or junctional adhesion molecule-A. Immunohistochemistry and fluorescence microscopy studies illustrated that the expression of FAK in the seminiferous epithelium of adult rat testes was stage specific. FAK colocalized with occludin at the BTB in virtually all stages of the seminiferous epithelial cycle but considerably diminished in stages VIII-IX, at the time of BTB restructuring to facilitate the transit of primary leptotene spermatocytes. Using Sertoli cells cultured in vitro with established TJ-permeability barrier and ultrastructures of TJ, basal ectoplasmic specialization and desmosome-like junction that mimicked the BTB in vivo, FAK was shown to colocalize with occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) at the Sertoli-Sertoli cell interface. When these Sertoli cell cultures were treated with CdCl(2) to perturb the TJ-barrier function, occludin underwent endocytic-mediated internalization in parallel with FAK and ZO-1. Thus, these findings demonstrate that FAK is an integrated regulatory component of the occludin-ZO-1 protein complex, suggesting that functional studies can be performed to study the role of FAK in BTB dynamics. PMID:19213829

  2. Actions of translocator protein ligands on neutrophil adhesion and motility induced by G-protein coupled receptor signaling.

    de Lima, Camila Bento; Tamura, Eduardo K; Montero-Melendez, Trindad; Palermo-Neto, João; Perretti, Mauro; Markus, Regina P; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli

    2012-01-13

    The 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) also known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), mediates the transportation of cholesterol and anions from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane in different cells types. Although recent evidences indicate a potential role for TSPO in the development of inflammatory processes, the mechanisms involved have not been elucidated. The present study investigated the ability of the specific TSPO ligands, the isoquinoline carboxamide PK11195 and benzodiazepine Ro5-4864, on neutrophil recruitment promoted by the N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine peptide (fMLP), an agonist of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR). Pre-treatment with Ro5-4864 abrograted fMLP-induced leukocyte-endothelial interactions in mesenteric postcapillary venules in vivo. Moreover, in vitro Ro5-4864 treatment prevented fMLP-induced: (i) L-selectin shedding and overexpression of PECAM-1 on the neutrophil cell surface; (ii) neutrophil chemotaxis and (iii) enhancement of intracellular calcium cations (iCa(+2)). Intriguingly, the two latter effects were augmented by cell treatment with PK11195. An allosteric agonist/antagonist relation may be suggested, as the effects of Ro5-4864 on fMLP-stimulated neutrophils were reverted by simultaneous treatment with PK11195. Taken together, these data highlight TSPO as a modulator of pathways of neutrophil adhesion and locomotion induced by GPCR, connecting TSPO actions and the onset of an innate inflammatory response. PMID:22209795

  3. Post-Translational Modifications of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Sulfate Reduction Pathway Proteins

    Gaucher, S.P.; Redding, A.M.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Keasling, J.D.; Singh, A.K.

    2008-03-01

    Recent developments in shotgun proteomics have enabled high-throughput studies of a variety of microorganisms at a proteome level and provide experimental validation for predicted open reading frames in the corresponding genome. More importantly, advances in mass spectrometric data analysis now allow mining of large proteomics data sets for the presence of post-translational modifications(PTMs). Although PTMs are a critical aspectof cellular activity, such information eludes cell-wide studies conducted at the transcript level. Here, we analyze several mass spectrometric data sets acquired using two-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, 2D-LC/MS/MS, for the sulfate reducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. Our searches of the raw spectra led us to discover several post-translationally modified peptides in D. vulgaris. Of these, several peptides containing a lysine with a +42 Da modification were found reproducibly across all data sets. Both acetylation and trimethylation have the same nominal +42 Da mass, and are therefore candidates for this modification. Several spectra were identified having markers for trimethylation, while one is consistent with an acetylation. Surprisingly, these modified peptides predominantly mapped to proteins involved in sulfate respiration. Other highly expressed proteins in D. vulgaris, such as enzymes involved in electron transport and other central metabolic processes, did not contain this modification. Decoy database searches were used to control for random spectrum/sequence matches. Additional validation for these modifications was provided by alternate workflows, for example, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry analysis of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gamma-subunit(DsrC) protein. MS data for DsrC in this alternate workflow also contained the +42 Da modification at the same loci. Furthermore, the DsrC homologue in another sulfate reducing bacterium

  4. Composites containing albumin protein or cyanoacrylate adhesives and biodegradable scaffolds: II. In vivo wound closure study in a rat model

    McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.; Heintzelman, Douglas L.; Duffy, Mark T.; Bloom, Jeffrey N.; Soller, Eric C.; Gilmour, Travis M.; Hoffman, Grant T.; Edward, Deepak

    2004-07-01

    Our Scaffold-Enhanced Biological Adhesive (SEBA) system was investigated as an alternative to sutures or adhesives alone for repair of wounds. Two scaffold materials were investigated: (i) a synthetic biodegradable material fabricated from poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid); and (ii) a biologic material, small intestinal submucosa, manufactured by Cook BioTech. Two adhesive materials were also investigated: (i) a biologic adhesive composed of 50%(w/v) bovine serum albumin solder and 0.5mg/ml indocyanine green dye mixed in deionized water, and activated with an 808-nm diode laser; and (ii) Ethicon"s Dermabond, a 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate. The tensile strength and time-to-failure of skin incisions repaired in vivo in a rat model were measured at seven days postoperative. Incisions closed by protein solder alone, by Dermabond alone, or by suture, were also tested for comparison. The tensile strength of repairs formed using the SEBA system were 50% to 65% stronger than repairs formed by suture or either adhesive alone, with significantly less variations within each experimental group (average standard deviations of 15% for SEBA versus 38% for suture and 28% for adhesive alone). In addition, the time-to-failure curves showed a longevity not previously seen with the suture or adhesive alone techniques. The SEBA system acts to keep the dermis in tight apposition during the critical early phase of wound healing when tissue gaps are bridged by scar and granulation tissue. It has the property of being more flexible than either of the adhesives alone and may allow the apposed edges to move in conjunction with each other as a unit for a longer period of time and over a greater range of stresses than adhesives alone. This permits more rapid healing and establishment of integrity since the microgaps between the dermis edges are significantly reduced. By the time the scaffolds are sloughed from the wound site, there is greater strength and healing than that produced by adhesive alone or

  5. ProteomeScout: a repository and analysis resource for post-translational modifications and proteins

    Matlock, Matthew K.; Holehouse, Alex S.; Kristen M Naegle

    2014-01-01

    ProteomeScout (https://proteomescout.wustl.edu) is a resource for the study of proteins and their post-translational modifications (PTMs) consisting of a database of PTMs, a repository for experimental data, an analysis suite for PTM experiments, and a tool for visualizing the relationships between complex protein annotations. The PTM database is a compendium of public PTM data, coupled with user-uploaded experimental data. ProteomeScout provides analysis tools for experimental datasets, incl...

  6. Constrained Selected Reaction Monitoring: Quantification of selected post-translational modifications and protein isoforms

    Liu, Xiaoqian; Jin, Zhicheng; O’Brien, Richard; Bathon, Joan; Dietz, Harry C.; Grote, Eric; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.

    2013-01-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) is a mass spectrometry method that can target signature peptides to provide for the detection and quantitation of specific proteins in complex biological samples. When quantifying a protein, peptides are generated using a specific protease such as trypsin, allowing the choice of signature peptides with robust signals. In contrast, signature peptide selection can be constrained when the goal is to monitor a specific post-translational modification (PTM) or pr...

  7. In Silico Analysis of Correlations between Protein Disorder and Post-Translational Modifications in Algae

    Atsushi Kurotani; Tetsuya Sakurai

    2015-01-01

    Recent proteome analyses have reported that intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) of proteins play important roles in biological processes. In higher plants whose genomes have been sequenced, the correlation between IDRs and post-translational modifications (PTMs) has been reported. The genomes of various eukaryotic algae as common ancestors of plants have also been sequenced. However, no analysis of the relationship to protein properties such as structure and PTMs in algae has been reporte...

  8. Aptamers as a Sensitive Tool to Detect Subtle Modifications in Therapeutic Proteins

    Zichel, Ran; Chearwae, Wanida; Pandey, Gouri Shankar; Golding, Basil; Sauna, Zuben E.

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic proteins are derived from complex expression/production systems, which can result in minor conformational changes due to preferential codon usage in different organisms, post-translational modifications, etc. Subtle conformational differences are often undetectable by bioanalytical methods but can sometimes profoundly impact the safety, efficacy and stability of products. Numerous bioanalytical methods exist to characterize the primary structure of proteins, post translational mod...

  9. Impact of anesthesia and storage on posttranslational modifications of cardiac myofilament proteins

    Utter, Megan S.; Warren, Chad M.; Solaro, R. John

    2015-01-01

    Although high fidelity measurements of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of cardiac myofilament proteins exist, important issues remain regarding basic techniques of sample acquisition and storage. We investigated the effects of anesthetic regimen and sample storage conditions on PTMs of major ventricular sarcomeric proteins. Mice were anesthetized with pentobarbital (Nembutal), ketamine/xylazine mixture (Ket/Xyl), or tribromoethanol (Avertin), and the ventricular tissue was prepared and...

  10. Glutathione depletion and acute exercise increase O-GlcNAc protein modification in rat skeletal muscle.

    Peternelj, Tina Tinkara; Marsh, Susan A; Strobel, Natalie A; Matsumoto, Aya; Briskey, David; Dalbo, Vincent J; Tucker, Patrick S; Coombes, Jeff S

    2015-02-01

    Post-translational modification of intracellular proteins with O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) profoundly affects protein structure, function, and metabolism. Although many skeletal muscle proteins are O-GlcNAcylated, the modification has not been extensively studied in this tissue, especially in the context of exercise. This study investigated the effects of glutathione depletion and acute exercise on O-GlcNAc protein modification in rat skeletal muscle. Diethyl maleate (DEM) was used to deplete intracellular glutathione and rats were subjected to a treadmill run. White gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were analyzed for glutathione status, O-GlcNAc and O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) protein levels, and mRNA expression of OGT, O-GlcNAcase and glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase. DEM and exercise both reduced intracellular glutathione and increased O-GlcNAc. DEM upregulated OGT protein expression. The effects of the interventions were significant 4 h after exercise (P exercise. PMID:25416863

  11. Trm9-Catalyzed tRNA Modifications Regulate Global Protein Expression by Codon-Biased Translation.

    Wenjun Deng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Post-transcriptional modifications of transfer RNAs (tRNAs have long been recognized to play crucial roles in regulating the rate and fidelity of translation. However, the extent to which they determine global protein production remains poorly understood. Here we use quantitative proteomics to show a direct link between wobble uridine 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl (mcm5 and 5-methoxy-carbonyl-methyl-2-thio (mcm5s2 modifications catalyzed by tRNA methyltransferase 9 (Trm9 in tRNAArg(UCU and tRNAGlu(UUC and selective translation of proteins from genes enriched with their cognate codons. Controlling for bias in protein expression and alternations in mRNA expression, we find that loss of Trm9 selectively impairs expression of proteins from genes enriched with AGA and GAA codons under both normal and stress conditions. Moreover, we show that AGA and GAA codons occur with high frequency in clusters along the transcripts, which may play a role in modulating translation. Consistent with these results, proteins subject to enhanced ribosome pausing in yeast lacking mcm5U and mcm5s2U are more likely to be down-regulated and contain a larger number of AGA/GAA clusters. Together, these results suggest that Trm9-catalyzed tRNA modifications play a significant role in regulating protein expression within the cell.

  12. Protein redox chemistry: post-translational cysteine modifications that regulate signal transduction and drug pharmacology

    Revati eWani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The perception of reactive oxygen species (ROS has evolved over the past decade from agents of cellular damage to secondary messengers which modify signaling proteins in physiology and the disease state (e.g. cancer. New protein targets of specific oxidation are rapidly being identified. One emerging class of redox modification occurs to the thiol side chain of cysteine residues which can produce multiple chemically-distinct alterations to the protein (e.g. sulfenic/sulfinic/sulfonic acid, disulfides. These post-translational modifications (PTM are shown to affect the protein structure and function. Because redox-sensitive proteins can traffic between subcellular compartments that have different redox environments, cysteine oxidation enables a spatio-temporal control to signaling. Understanding ramifications of these oxidative modifications to the functions of signaling proteins is crucial for understanding cellular regulation as well as for informed-drug discovery process. The effects of EGFR oxidation of Cys797 on inhibitor pharmacology are presented to illustrate the principle. Taken together, cysteine redox PTM can impact both cell biology and drug pharmacology.

  13. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase attenuates hepatocellular carcinoma cell adhesion stimulated by adipokine resistin

    Yang, Chen-Chieh; Chang, Shun-Fu; Chao, Jian-Kang; Lai, Yi-Liang; Chang, Wei-En; Hsu, Wen-Hsiu; Kuo, Wu-Hsien

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistin, adipocyte-secreting adipokine, may play critical role in modulating cancer pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resistin on HCC adhesion to the endothelium, and the mechanism underlying these resistin effects. Methods Human SK-Hep1 cells were used to study the effect of resistin on intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expressions as well as NF-κB activation, and hence cell adhesion to hu...

  14. Cell adhesion and growth on ultrananocrystalline diamond and diamond-like carbon films after different surface modifications

    Mikšovský, Jan; Voss, A.; Kozarova, R.; Kocourek, Tomáš; Písařík, Petr; Ceccone, G.; Kulisch, W.; Jelínek, Miroslav; Apostolova, M.D.; Reithmaier, J.P.; Popov, C.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 297, APR (2014), s. 95-102. ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD12069 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ultrananocrystalline diamond films * diamond-like carbon films * surface modification * direct contact cell tests Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.711, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169433214001251

  15. Surface modification of argon/oxygen plasma treated vulcanized ethylene propylene diene polymethylene surfaces for improved adhesion with natural rubber

    Vulcanized ethylene propylene diene polymethylene (EPDM) rubber surface was treated in a radio frequency capacitatively coupled low pressure argon/oxygen plasma to improve adhesion with compounded natural rubber (NR) during co-vulcanization. The plasma modified surfaces were analyzed by means of contact angle measurement, surface energy, attenuated total reflection-infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray sulfur mapping and atomic force microscopy. Several experimental variables such as plasma power, length of exposure time and composition of the argon-oxygen gas mixture were considered. It was delineated that plasma treatment changed both surface composition and roughness, and consequently increased peel strength. The change in surface composition was mainly ascribed to the formation of C-O and -C=O functional groups on the vulcanized surfaces. A maximum of 98% improvement in peel strength was observed after plasma treatment.

  16. Surface modification of cotton fabrics by gas plasmas for color strength and adhesion by inkjet ink printing

    Pransilp, Porntapin; Pruettiphap, Meshaya; Bhanthumnavin, Worawan; Paosawatyanyong, Boonchoat; Kiatkamjornwong, Suda

    2016-02-01

    Surface properties of cotton fabric were modified by three types of gas plasma pretreatment, namely, oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), to improve ink absorption of water-based pigmented inkjet inks and color reproduction of the treated surfaces. Effects of gas plasma exposure parameters of power, exposure time and gas pressure on surface physical and chemical properties of the treated fabrics were investigated. XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) was used to identify changes in functional groups on the fabric surface while AFM (atomic force microscopy) and SEM (scanning electron microscopy) were used to reveal surface topography of the fabric. Color spectroscopic technique was used to investigate changes in color strength caused by different absorptions of the printed fabrics. The O2 plasma treatments produced new functional groups, sbnd Osbnd Csbnd O/Cdbnd O and Osbnd Cdbnd O while N2 plasma treatments produced additionally new functional groups, Csbnd N and Odbnd Csbnd NH, onto the fabric surface which increased hydrophilic properties and surface energy of the fabric. For cotton fabric treated with SF6 plasma, the fluorine functionalization was additionally found on the surface. Color strength values (K/S) increased when compared with those of the untreated fabrics. SF6 plasma-treated fabrics were hydrophobic and caused less ink absorption. Fabric surface roughness caused by plasma etching increased fabric surface areas, captured more ink, and enhanced a larger ink color gamut and ink adhesion. Cotton fabrics exhibited higher ink adhesion and wider color gamut after the O2 plasma treatment comparing with those after N2 plasma treatment.

  17. Applications of post-translational modifications of FoxO family proteins in biological functions

    Ying Zhao; Yachen Wang; Wei-Guo Zhu

    2011-01-01

    The functions of the FoxO family proteins, in particular their transcriptional activities, are modulated by post-translational modifications (PTMs), including phosphorylation, acetylation, ubiquitination, methylation and glycosylation. These PTMs occur in response to different cellular stresses, which in turn regulate the subcellular localization of FoxO family proteins, as well as their half-life, DNA binding, transcriptional activity and ability to interact with other cellular proteins. In this review, we summarize the role of PTMs of FoxO family proteins in linking their biological and functional relevance with various diseases.%The functions of the FoxO family proteins,in particular their transcriptional activities,are modulated by post-translational modifications (PTMs),including phosphorylation,acetylation,ubiquitination,methylation and glycosylation.These PTMs occur in response to different cellular stresses,which in turn regulate the subceilular localization of FoxO family proteins,as well as their half-life,DNA binding,transcriptional activity and ability to interact with other cellular proteins.In this review,we summarize the role of PTMs of FoxO family proteins in linking their biological and functional relevance with various diseases.

  18. Circulating renalase, catecholamines, and vascular adhesion protein 1 in hypertensive patients.

    Maciorkowska, Dominika; Zbroch, Edyta; Malyszko, Jolanta

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate and correlate circulating levels of renalase, vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1), catecholamines in patients with primary hypertension. The renalase, VAP-1, and catecholamines concentration was estimated in 121 hypertensive patients. The correlation between renalase, VAP-1 levels and catecholamine concentration in blood, blood pressure control, pharmacological therapy, and medical history were taken in to consideration. The median office blood pressure was 145.5/86 mm Hg and was significantly higher than the median home blood pressure measurement value, which was 135/80 mm Hg, P hypertension comparing to healthy individuals (3.83 μg/mL and 248.37 ng/mL, P blood was observed (r = 0.549; P Hypertensive patients with diabetes mellitus had almost statistically significant higher VAP-1 concentration compared with hypertensive patients without diabetes mellitus (Me = 403.22 ng/mL vs. Me = 326,68 ng/mL, P = .064). In multiple regression analysis, renalase was predicted by plasma dopamine and norepinephrine as also diastolic office blood pressure and left ventricle ejection fraction. Circulating renalase and VAP-1 levels are elevated in patients with poor blood pressure control. Its correlation with noradrenalin concentration need further studies to find out the role of renalase as also VAP-1 in pathogenesis and treatment of hypertension. PMID:26403854

  19. Plasmodium vivax thrombospondin related adhesion protein: immunogenicity and protective efficacy in rodents and Aotus monkeys

    Angélica Castellanos

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The thrombospondin related adhesion protein (TRAP is a malaria pre-erythrocytic antigen currently pursued as malaria vaccine candidate to Plasmodium falciparum. In this study, a long synthetic peptide (LSP representing a P. vivax TRAP fragment involved in hepatocyte invasion was formulated in both Freund and Montanide ISA 720 adjutants and administered by IM and subcutaneous routes to BALB/c mice and Aotus monkeys. We measured specific humoral immune responses in both animal species and performed a sporozoite challenge in Aotus monkeys to assess the protective efficacy of the vaccine. After immunization both mice and Aotus seroconverted as shown by ELISA, and the specific anti-peptide antibodies cross reacted with the parasite in IFAT assays. Only two out of six immunized animals became infected after P. vivax sporozoite challenge as compared with four out of six animals from the control group. These results suggest that this TRAP fragment has protective potential against P. vivax malaria and deserves further studies as vaccine candidate.

  20. The surface modification of stainless steel and the correlation between the surface properties and protein adsorption.

    Kang, Chan-Koo; Lee, Yoon-Sik

    2007-07-01

    Protein adsorption on a biomaterial surface is of great importance as it usually induces unfavorable biological cascades, with the result that much surface modification research has had to be performed in an effort to prevent this. In this study, we developed surface modification methods for stainless steel, which is a representative metal for biomedical device. The stainless steels were first smoothened to different extents by electropolishing, in order to obtain a rough or smooth surface. On these two kinds of substrates, we introduced epoxide groups to the metal surface by silanization with 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTS). Then, various polymers such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), poly(tetrahydrofuran glycol) (PTG), poly(propylene glycol) (PPG) and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) were grafted on the silanized stainless steels. Each surface modification step was confirmed by various analytical methods. Contact angle measurement revealed that the surface hydrophilicity was controllable by polymer grafting. Root-mean-square (RMS) data of atomic force microscopy showed that surface roughness was dramatically changed by electropolishing. Based on these results, the correlation between surface properties and protein adsorption was investigated. In the protein adsorption study, we observed that all of the polymer-grafted stainless steels exhibited lower protein adsorption, when compared with bare stainless steel. Moreover, a hydrophilic and smooth surface was found to be the best of choice for decreasing the protein adsorption. PMID:17277988

  1. Impact of Enzymatic and Microbial Bioprocessing on Protein Modification and Nutritional Properties of Wheat Bran.

    Arte, Elisa; Rizzello, Carlo G; Verni, Michela; Nordlund, Emilia; Katina, Kati; Coda, Rossana

    2015-10-01

    Besides providing dietary fiber, wheat bran is a recognized source of protein and is considered a very valuable substitute for other protein-rich sources in the food and feed industry. Nonetheless, several factors affect protein bioavailability, including bran's layered structure. This study showed the influence on the release and protein modification of wheat bran of different bioprocessing methods involving the activation of endogenous enzymes of bran, the addition of an enzyme mixture having carbohydrase activity, and microbial fermentation. Bioprocessing in acidic conditions significantly enhanced the solubilization of protein from wheat bran, reaching the highest value in the treatment where the sole endogenous protease activity was activated. Bioprocessing through controlled fermentation allowed a more intense proteolysis and strongly impacted the in vitro digestibility of proteins. The combined use of starter cultures and cell-wall-degrading enzymes was characterized by the highest increase of phytase activity and total phenols. PMID:26365885

  2. Glycoproteomic analysis of seven major allergenic proteins reveals novel post-translational modifications

    Halim, Adnan; Carlsson, Michael C; Mathiesen, Caroline Benedicte K;

    2015-01-01

    Allergenic proteins such as grass pollen and house dust mite (HDM) proteins are known to trigger hypersensitivity reactions of the immune system, leading to what is commonly known as allergy. Key allergenic proteins including sequence variants have been identified but characterization of their post......-translational modifications (PTMs) is still limited. Here, we present a detailed PTM(1) characterization of a series of the main and clinically relevant allergens used in allergy tests and vaccines. We employ Orbitrap-based mass spectrometry with complementary fragmentation techniques (HCD/ETD) for site-specific PTM...

  3. Hydrophobic recovery of UV/ozone treated poly(dimethylsiloxane): adhesion studies by contact mechanics and mechanism of surface modification

    Silicone elastomers (Sylgard 184 and 170), based on poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), were surface treated by a combined exposure to UV and ozone. The effects of the treatments were analyzed as a function of time elapsed after stopping the treatments using different standard surface characterization techniques, such as water contact angle measurements, XPS and atomic force microscopy (AFM). However, the primary focus of this study was to apply the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) contact mechanics approach to investigate PDMS samples prior to and following UV/ozone surface treatment. A gradual formation of a hydrophilic, silica-like surface layer with increasing modulus was observed with increasing UV/ozone exposure. A subsequent hydrophobic recovery after UV/ozone exposure was observed, as indicated by increasing contact angles. This supports the hypothesis that the hydrophobic recovery is mainly caused by the gradual coverage of a permanent silica-like structure with free siloxanes and/or reorientation of polar groups. PDMS containing a homogenously dispersed filler (Sylgard 184), exhibited a decreasing surface roughness (by AFM) when the oxidized surface region 'collapsed' into a smooth SiOx layer (final surface roughness <2 nm). PDMS containing heterogeneously distributed, aggregated filler particles (Sylgard 170), exhibited an increasing surface roughness with treatment dose, which was attributed to the 'collapse' of the oxidized surface region thus exposing the contours of the underlying filler aggregates (final surface roughness ∼140 nm). A dedicated device was designed and built to study the contact mechanics behavior of PDMS prior to, and following surface treatment. The value of the combined elastic modulus obtained for PDMS lens and semi-infinite flat surface system showed an increase in full agreement with the formation of a silica-like layer exhibiting a high elastic modulus (compared with untreated PDMS). The work of adhesion observed in JKR experiments

  4. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON THE MODIFICATIONS PRODUCED AT THE INTERFACE BETWEEN THE PERIODONTAL ADHESIVE SPLINTS AND THE DENTAL SURFACE

    Bogdan VÂSCU

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available As the market offer for bioadhesive materials is constantly increasing, while the dental surfaces on which they are applied show specific features, different from those commonly resulting from the preparation of carious processes, knowledge on their behavioral characteristics is absolutely necessary for their utilization under optimum conditions, through methods assuming prolongued clinical performances, assured by dimensional and colouristic stability and by a reduced cure contraction, for diminishing as much as possible the space of marginal percolation and fracture of the free enamel-free margins, as well as for delamination of immobilization from the afferent dental structure. Selection of the type of material for periodonthic teeth immobilization and of the technique to be applied is decided on the basis of a systematic, clinical and radiological analysis meant at establishing: the number of affected teeth, the type of occlusion and the possible parafunctions, oral hygiene, the aesthetic requirements of the patient, his/her age and motivation for a periodical monitorization. Numerous modern materials employed in the immobilization of periodonthic teeth are closely related not only to their physical properties and long-term stability, but also to the oral environment in which they are functioning. Modern adhesive materials are well-suited for dental recovery of the remaining healthy structures, due to their capacity of chemically and micromechanically adhering onto them.

  5. Improved protein sequence coverage by on resin deglycosylation and cysteine modification for biomarker discovery.

    Kamada, Haruhiko; Fugmann, Tim; Neri, Dario; Roesli, Christoph

    2009-02-01

    Membrane proteins and secreted factors (soluble proteins or extracellular matrix components) are the targets of most monoclonal antibodies, which are currently in clinical development. These proteins are frequently post-translationally modified, e.g. by the formation of disulfide bonds or by glycosylation, which complicates their identification using proteomics technologies. Here, we describe a novel methodology for the on resin deglycosylation and cysteine modification of proteins after in vitro, in vivo or ex vivo biotinylation. Biotinylated proteins are captured on streptavidin resin and all subsequent modifications, as well as the proteolytic digestion, which yields peptides for MS analysis, are performed on resin. Using biotinylated bovine fetuin-A as a test protein, an improvement in sequence coverage from 7.9 to 58.7% could be shown, including the identification of all three glycosylation sites. Furthermore, a complex mixture derived from the ex vivo biotinylation of vascular structures in human kidney with cancer obtained by perfusion after surgical resection revealed almost a doubling of sequence coverage for all checked proteins when analyzed by LC-MALDI TOF/TOF. PMID:19137555

  6. The effect of temperature on adhesion forces between surfaces and model foods containing whey protein and sugar

    Goode, K. R.; Bowen, J.; Akhtar, N; Robbins, P. T.; Fryer, P. J.

    2013-01-01

    The formation of fouling deposit from foods and food components is a severe problem in food processing and leads to frequent cleaning. The design of surfaces that resist fouling may decrease the need for cleaning and thus increase efficiency. Atomic force microscopy has been used to measure adhesion forces between stainless steel (SS) and fluoro-coated glass (FCG) microparticles and the model food deposits (i) whey protein (WPC), (ii) sweetened condensed milk, and (iii) caramel. Measurements ...

  7. Role of Streptococcus gordonii Amylase-Binding Protein A in Adhesion to Hydroxyapatite, Starch Metabolism, and Biofilm Formation

    Rogers, Jeffrey D.; Palmer, Robert J.; Kolenbrander, Paul E; Scannapieco, Frank A.

    2001-01-01

    Interactions between bacteria and salivary components are thought to be important in the establishment and ecology of the oral microflora. α-Amylase, the predominant salivary enzyme in humans, binds to Streptococcus gordonii, a primary colonizer of the tooth. Previous studies have implicated this interaction in adhesion of the bacteria to salivary pellicles, catabolism of dietary starches, and biofilm formation. Amylase binding is mediated at least in part by the amylase-binding protein A (Ab...

  8. Resistance to protein adsorption and adhesion of fibroblasts on nanocrystalline diamond films: the role of topography and boron doping

    Alcaide, M.; Papaioannou, S.; Taylor, Andrew; Fekete, Ladislav; Gurevich, L.; Zachar, V.; Pennisi, C.P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 5 (2016), s. 90. ISSN 0957-4530 Grant ostatní: FUNBIO(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/21568; FUNBIO(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/21568 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : protein adsorption * fibroblasts adhesion * nanocrystalline diamond * boron doping * topography Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.587, year: 2014

  9. In vitro adhesion and invasion inhibition of Shigella dysenteriae, Shigella flexneri and Shigella sonnei clinical strains by human milk proteins

    Giugliano Loreny; Lima Renato de; Willer Emerson

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Shigella is the etiological agent of shigellosis, a disease responsible for more than 500,000 deaths of children per year, in developing countries. These pathogens colonize the intestinal colon, invade, spreading to the other enterocytes. Breastfeeding plays a very important role in protecting infants from intestinal infections. Amongst milk compounds, glycosylated proteins prevent the adhesion of many enteropathogens in vitro. The aim of this work was to determine the eff...

  10. Mass spectrometric identification of proteins and characterization of their post-translational modifications in proteome analysis

    Roepstorff, P; Larsen, Martin Røssel

    2001-01-01

    more than 425.000 protein sequences. However, the cellular functions are determined by the set of proteins expressed in the cell--the proteome. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics have become important tools in correlating the proteome with the genome. The current...... dominant strategies for identification of proteins from gels based on peptide mass spectrometric fingerprinting and partial sequencing by mass spectrometry are described. After identification of the proteins the next challenge in proteome analysis is characterization of their post-translational...... modifications. The general problems associated with characterization of these directly from gel separated proteins are described and the current state of art for the determination of phosphorylation, glycosylation and proteolytic processing is illustrated....

  11. Negative staining and immunoelectron microscopy of adhesion-deficient mutants of Streptococcus salivarius reveal that the adhesive protein antigens are separate classes of cell surface fibril.

    Weerkamp, A H; Handley, P S; Baars, A; Slot, J W

    1986-01-01

    The subcellular distribution of the cell wall-associated protein antigens of Streptococcus salivarius HB, which are involved in specific adhesive properties of the cells, was studied. Mutants which had lost the adhesive properties and lacked the antigens at the cell surface were compared with the parent strain. Immunoelectron microscopy of cryosections of cells labeled with affinity-purified, specific antisera and colloidal gold-protein A complexes was used to locate the antigens. Antigen C (AgC), a glycoprotein involved in attachment to host surfaces, was mainly located in the fibrillar layer outside the cell wall. A smaller amount of label was also found throughout the cytoplasmic area in the form of small clusters of gold particles, which suggests a macromolecular association. Mutant HB-7, which lacks the wall-associated AgC, accumulated AgC reactivity intracellularly. Intracellular AgC was often found associated with isolated areas of increased electron density, but sometimes seemed to fill the entire interior of the cell. Antigen B (AgB), a protein responsible for interbacterial coaggregation, was also located in the fibrillar layer, although its distribution differed from that of the wall-associated AgC since AgB was found predominantly in the peripheral areas. A very small amount of label was also found in the cytoplasmic area as discrete gold particles. Mutant HB-V5, which lacks wall-associated AgB, was not labeled in the fibrillar coat, but showed the same weak intracellular label as the parent strain. Immunolabeling with serum against AgD, another wall-associated protein but of unknown function, demonstrated its presence in the fibrillar layer of strain HB. Negatively stained preparations of whole cells of wild-type S. salivarius and mutants that had lost wall-associated AgB or AgC revealed that two classes of short fibrils are carried on the cell surface at the same time. AgB and AgC are probably located on separate classes of short, protease

  12. Emulsifying and Foaming Properties of Soy Protein Isolates with Covalent Modification by (--Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate

    M. Zheng

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Soy Protein Isolates (SPI with covalent modification by (--Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate (EGCG were prepared under the alkaline condition. The effects of covalent modification on the emulsifying and foaming properties of SPI were evaluated. The Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE profiles of the modified SPI revealed that EGCG treatment caused cross-linking of subunits. Emulsifying activity of modified SPI significantly increased when compared with that of control (p<0.05 at the concentration of 35 mg/mL. Modification of SPI by EGCG caused a decrease in the foam volume initially. In the range of 15 to 35 mg/mL, the foaming activities of modified SPI were found to be less than those of the control (p<0.05. The foaming stabilities of modified SPI were significantly higher when compared to those of control (p<0.05. The results obtained in this study indicated the modification by EGCG resulted in the enhancement of emulsifying activity and foaming stability of SPI. This modification may serve as a promising approach for improving functional properties of SPI.

  13. Adhesion and degranulation promoting adapter protein (ADAP is a central hub for phosphotyrosine-mediated interactions in T cells.

    Marc Sylvester

    Full Text Available TCR stimulation leads to an increase in cellular adhesion among other outcomes. The adhesion and degranulation promoting adapter protein (ADAP is known to be rapidly phosphorylated after T cell stimulation and relays the TCR signal to adhesion molecules of the integrin family. While three tyrosine phosphorylation sites have been characterized biochemically, the binding capabilities and associated functions of several other potential phosphotyrosine motifs remain unclear. Here, we utilize in vitro phosphorylation and mass spectrometry to map novel phosphotyrosine sites in the C-terminal part of human ADAP (486-783. Individual tyrosines were then mutated to phenylalanine and their relevance for cellular adhesion and migration was tested experimentally. Functionally important tyrosine residues include two sites within the folded hSH3 domains of ADAP and two at the C-terminus. Furthermore, using a peptide pulldown approach in combination with stable isotope labeling in cell culture (SILAC we identified SLP-76, PLCgamma, PIK3R1, Nck, CRK, Gads, and RasGAP as phospho-dependent binding partners of a central YDDV motif of ADAP. The phosphorylation-dependent interaction between ADAP and Nck was confirmed by yeast two-hybrid analysis, immunoprecipitation and binary pulldown experiments, indicating that ADAP directly links integrins to modulators of the cytoskeleton independent of SLP-76.

  14. Effects of ovarian cancer G protein coupled receptor 1 on the proliferation, migration, and adhesion of human ovarian cancer cells

    REN Juan; ZHANG Long

    2011-01-01

    Background OGR1 was found as a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and proton sensor. Our previous studies have found that OGR1 has inhibitory effect on the metastasis of prostate cancer. In order to investigate the roles of OGR1 gene in the biological activities of ovarian cancer, we studied the OGR1 effects on ovarian cancer cells, HEY cells.Methods OGR1 gene was transfected into HEY cell, in which endogenous expression is low. OGR1-overxepressed cells and vector-transfected cells were compared in different assays. Western blotting was employed to confirm the high expression level of OGR1. Cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay and cell doubling time assay. Cell migration assay (transwell assay) and cell adhesion assay were performed to determine the migration and adhesion potential of cells. Student's t test was employed for statistical analysis.Results Proliferation of OGR1-overexpressed cells was significantly reduced (P <0.01); cell migration was significantly inhibited in the OGR1-transfected cells (P <0.01); cell adhesion to extracellular matrix including fibronectin, vitronectin,collagen Ⅰ/Ⅳ was significantly increased (P <0.01).Conclusions OGR1 expression in human ovarian cancer cells significantly inhibited the cell proliferation and migration,but significantly enhanced cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. It indicated that OGR1 may be a tumor suppressor gene for ovarian cancer.

  15. Proteins implicated in the increase of adhesivity induced by suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid in leukemic cells

    Grebeňová, D.; Roeselová, M.; Pluskalová, M.; Halada, Petr; Roesel, D.; Suttnar, J.; Brodská, B.; Otevřelová, P.; Kuželová, K.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 77, DEC 2012 (2012), s. 406-422. ISSN 1874-3919 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : SAHA * Adhesion * Cofilin Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.088, year: 2012

  16. Protein kinase C, focal adhesions and the regulation of cell migration

    Fogh, Betina S; Multhaupt, Hinke A B; Couchman, John Robert

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix is a complex process involving protrusive activity driven by the actin cytoskeleton, engagement of specific receptors, followed by signaling and cytoskeletal organization. Thereafter, contractile and endocytic/recycling activities may facilitate migration and...

  17. Prediction of protein post-translational modifications: main trends and methods

    The review summarizes main trends in the development of methods for the prediction of protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) by considering the three most common types of PTMs — phosphorylation, acetylation and glycosylation. Considerable attention is given to general characteristics of regulatory interactions associated with PTMs. Different approaches to the prediction of PTMs are analyzed. Most of the methods are based only on the analysis of the neighbouring environment of modification sites. The related software is characterized by relatively low accuracy of PTM predictions, which may be due both to the incompleteness of training data and the features of PTM regulation. Advantages and limitations of the phylogenetic approach are considered. The prediction of PTMs using data on regulatory interactions, including the modular organization of interacting proteins, is a promising field, provided that a more carefully selected training data will be used. The bibliography includes 145 references

  18. The Cell Adhesion-associated Protein Git2 Regulates Morphogenetic Movements during Zebrafish Embryonic Development

    Yu, Jianxin A.; Foley, Fiona C.; Amack, Jeffrey D.; Christopher E Turner

    2010-01-01

    Signaling through cell adhesion complexes plays a critical role in coordinating cytoskeletal remodeling necessary for efficient cell migration. During embryonic development, normal morphogenesis depends on a series of concerted cell movements; but the roles of cell adhesion signaling during these movements are poorly understood. The transparent zebrafish embryo provides an excellent system to study cell migration during development. Here, we have identified zebrafish git2a and git2b, two new ...

  19. Modulation of cell adhesion and migration by the histone methyltransferase subunit mDpy-30 and its interacting proteins.

    Bin Xia

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that a subset of mDpy-30, an accessory subunit of the nuclear histone H3 lysine 4 methyltransferase (H3K4MT complex, also localizes at the trans-Golgi network (TGN, where its recruitment is mediated by the TGN-localized ARF guanine nucleotide exchange factor (ArfGEF BIG1. Depletion of mDpy-30 inhibits the endosome-to-TGN transport of internalized CIMPR receptors and concurrently promotes their accumulation at the cell protrusion. These observations suggest mDpy-30 may play a novel role at the crossroads of endosomal trafficking, nuclear transcription and adhesion/migration. Here we provide novel mechanistic and functional insight into this association. First, we demonstrate a direct interaction between mDpy-30 and BIG1 and locate the binding region in the N-terminus of BIG1. Second, we provide evidence that the depletion or overexpression of mDpy-30 enhances or inhibits cellular adhesion/migration of glioma cells in vitro, respectively. A similar increase in cell adhesion/migration is observed in cells with reduced levels of BIG1 or other H3K4MT subunits. Third, knockdown of mDpy-30, BIG1, or the RbBP5 H3K4MT subunit increases the targeting of beta1 integrin to cell protrusions, and suppression of H3K4MT activity by depleting mDpy-30 or RbBP5 leads to increased protein and mRNA levels of beta1 integrin. Moreover, stimulation of cell adhesion/migration via mDpy-30 knockdown is abolished after treating cells with a function-blocking antibody to beta1 integrin. Taken together, these data indicate that mDpy-30 and its interacting proteins function as a novel class of cellular adhesion/migration modulators partially by affecting the subcellular distribution of endosomal compartments as well as the expression of key adhesion/migration proteins such as beta1 integrin.

  20. Dissection of the DNA Mimicry of the Bacteriophage T7 Ocr Protein using Chemical Modification

    Stephanou, Augoustinos S.; Roberts, Gareth A.; Cooper, Laurie P.; Clarke, David J.; Thomson, Andrew R.; Mackay, C. Logan; Nutley, Margaret; Cooper, Alan; Dryden, David T. F.

    2009-01-01

    The homodimeric Ocr (overcome classical restriction) protein of bacteriophage T7 is a molecular mimic of double-stranded DNA and a highly effective competitive inhibitor of the bacterial type I restriction/modification system. The surface of Ocr is replete with acidic residues that mimic the phosphate backbone of DNA. In addition, Ocr also mimics the overall dimensions of a bent 24-bp DNA molecule. In this study, we attempted to delineate these two mechanisms of DNA mimicry by chemically modi...

  1. The adhesion modulation protein, AmpA localizes to an endocytic compartment and influences substrate adhesion, actin polymerization and endocytosis in vegetative Dictyostelium cells

    Noratel Elizabeth F

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background AmpA is a secreted 24Kd protein that has pleiotropic effects on Dictyostelium development. Null mutants delay development at the mound stage with cells adhering too tightly to the substrate. Prestalk cells initially specify as prespore cells and are delayed in their migration to the mound apex. Extracellular AmpA can rescue these defects, but AmpA is also necessary in a cell autonomous manner for anterior like cells (ALCs to migrate to the upper cup. The ALCs are only 10% of the developing cell population making it difficult to study the cell autonomous effect of AmpA on the migration of these cells. AmpA is also expressed in growing cells, but, while it contains a hydrophobic leader sequence that is cleaved, it is not secreted from growing cells. This makes growing cells an attractive system for studying the cell autonomous function of AmpA. Results In growing cells AmpA plays an environment dependent role in cell migration. Excess AmpA facilitates migration on soft, adhesive surfaces but hinders migration on less adhesive surfaces. AmpA also effects the level of actin polymerization. Knockout cells polymerize less actin while over expressing cells polymerize more actin than wild type. Overexpression of AmpA also causes an increase in endocytosis that is traced to repeated formation of multiple endocytic cups at the same site on the membrane. Immunofluorescence analysis shows that AmpA is found in the Golgi and colocalizes with calnexin and the slow endosomal recycling compartment marker, p25, in a perinuclear compartment. AmpA is found on the cell periphery and is endocytically recycled to the perinuclear compartment. Conclusion AmpA is processed through the secretory pathway and traffics to the cell periphery where it is endocytosed and localizes to what has been defined as a slow endosomal recycling compartment. AmpA plays a role in actin polymerization and cell substrate adhesion. Additionally AmpA influences cell

  2. Comprehensive Analysis of Maillard Protein Modifications in Human Lenses: Effect of Age and Cataract

    Smuda, Mareen; Henning, Christian; Raghavan, Cibin T.; Johar, Kaid; Vasavada, Abhay R.; Nagaraj, Ram H.; Glomb, Marcus A.

    2015-01-01

    In human lens proteins, advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) originate from the reaction of glycating agents, e.g., vitamin C and glucose. AGEs have been considered to play a significant role in lens aging and cataract formation. Although several AGEs have been detected in the human lens, the contribution of individual glycating agents to their formation remains unclear. A highly sensitive liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry multimethod was developed that allowed us to quantitate 21 protein modifications in normal and cataractous lenses, respectively. N6-Carboxymethyl lysine, N6-carboxyethyl lysine, N7-carboxyethyl arginine, methylglyoxal hydroimidazolone 1, and N6-lactoyl lysine were found to be the major Maillard protein modifications among these AGEs. The novel vitamin C specific amide AGEs, N6-xylonyl and N6-lyxonyl lysine, but also AGEs from glyoxal were detected, albeit in minor quantities. Among the 21 modifications, AGEs from the Amadori product (derived from the reaction of glucose and lysine) and methylglyoxal were dominant. PMID:25849437

  3. Role of Lactobacillus reuteri cell and mucus-binding protein A (CmbA) in adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells and mucus in vitro.

    Jensen, Hanne; Roos, Stefan; Jonsson, Hans; Rud, Ida; Grimmer, Stine; van Pijkeren, Jan-Peter; Britton, Robert A; Axelsson, Lars

    2014-04-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri, a symbiotic inhabitant of the gastrointestinal tract in humans and animals, is marketed as a probiotic. The ability to adhere to intestinal epithelial cells and mucus is an interesting property with regard to probiotic features such as colonization of the gastrointestinal tract and interaction with the host. Here, we present a study performed to elucidate the role of sortase (SrtA), four putative sortase-dependent proteins (SDPs), and one C-terminal membrane-anchored cell surface protein of Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 in adhesion to Caco-2 cells and mucus in vitro. This included mutagenesis of the genes encoding these proteins and complementation of mutants. A null mutation in hmpref0536_10255 encoding srtA resulted in significantly reduced adhesion to Caco-2 cells and mucus, indicating involvement of SDPs in adhesion. Evaluation of the bacterial adhesion revealed that of the five putative surface protein mutants tested, only a null mutation in the hmpref0536_10633 gene, encoding a putative SDP with an LPxTG motif, resulted in a significant loss of adhesion to both Caco-2 cells and mucus. Complementation with the functional gene on a plasmid restored adhesion to Caco-2 cells. However, complete restoration of adhesion to mucus was not achieved. Overexpression of hmpref0536_10633 in strain ATCC PTA 6475 resulted in an increased adhesion to Caco-2 cells and mucus compared with the WT strain. We conclude from these results that, among the putative surface proteins tested, the protein encoded by hmpref0536_10633 plays a critical role in binding of Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 to Caco-2 cells and mucus. Based on this, we propose that this LPxTG motif containing protein should be referred to as cell and mucus binding protein A (CmbA). PMID:24473252

  4. Modification effects of physical activity and protein intake on heritability of body size and composition

    Silventoinen, Karri; Hasselbalch, Ann Louise; Lallukka, Tea;

    2009-01-01

    Mx statistical package (Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA). RESULTS: High physical activity was associated with lower mean values, and a high proportion of protein in the diet was associated with higher mean BMI, waist...... circumference, and percentage body fat and a reduction in genetic and environmental variances. Genetic modification by physical activity was statistically significant for BMI (-0.18; 95% CI: -0.31, -0.05) and waist circumference (-0.14; 95% CI: -0.22, -0.05) in the merged data. A high proportion of protein in...

  5. Epidermal growth factor suppresses induction by progestin of the adhesion protein desmoplakin in T47D breast cancer cells

    Although the effects of progesterone on cell cycle progression are well known, its role in spreading and adhesion of breast cancer cells has not attracted much attention until recently. Indeed, by controlling cell adhesion proteins, progesterone may play a direct role in breast cancer invasion and metastasis. Progesterone has also been shown to modulate epidermal growth factor (EGF) effects in neoplasia, although EGF effects on progesterone pathways and targets are less well understood. In the present study we identify an effect of EGF on a progesterone target, namely desmoplakin. Initially flow cytometry was used to establish the growing conditions and demonstrate that the T47D breast cancer cell line was responding to progesterone and EGF in a classical manner. Differential display RT-PCR was employed to identify differentially expressed genes affected by progesterone and EGF. Western and Northern blotting were used to verify interactions between EGF and progesterone in three breast cancer cell lines: T47D, MCF-7, and ZR-75. We found the cell adhesion protein desmoplakin to be upregulated by progesterone – a process that was suppressed by EGF. This appears to be a general but not universal effect in breast cancer cell lines. Our findings suggest that progesterone and EGF may play opposing roles in metastasis. They also suggest that desmoplakin may be a useful biomarker for mechanistic studies designed to analyze the crosstalk between EGF and progesterone dependent events. Our work may help to bridge the fields of metastasis and differentiation, and the mechanisms of steroid action

  6. Modification of an apparatus for tumor-suppressor protein crystal growth in the International Space Station

    de Morais Mendonca Teles, Antonio

    Some human diseases as tumors are being studied continuously for the development of vaccines against them. And a way of doing that is by means of proteins research. There are some kinds of proteins, like the p53 and p73 proteins, which are tumor suppressors. There are other diseases such as A.I.D.S., hansenosis, the Parkinson's and Chagas' diseases which are protein-related. The determination of how proteins geometrically order themselves, during its biological functions is very necessary to understand how a protein's structure affects its function, to design vaccines that intercede in tumor-protein activities and in other proteins related to those other diseases. The protein crystal growth in microgravity environment produces purer crystallization than on the ground, and it is a powerful tool to produce better vaccines. Several data have already been acquired using ground-based research and in spaceflight experiments aboard the Spacelab and Space Shuttle missions, and in the MIR and in the International Space Station (ISS). Here in this paper, I propose to be performed in the ISS Biological Research Facility (which is being developed), multiple crystal growth of proteins related to cancer (as tumors suppressors and oncoproteins), A.I.D.S., hansenosis, the Parkinson's and Chagas' diseases, for the future obtaining of possible vaccines against them. I also propose a simple and practical equipment, a modification of the crystallization plates (which use a vapor diffusion technique) inside each cylinder of the Protein Crystallization Apparatus in Microgravity (PCAM), with multiple chambers with different sizes. Instead of using some chambers with the same size it is better to use several chambers with different sizes. Why is that? The answer is: the energy associated with the surface tension of the liquid in the chamber is directly related to the circle area of it. So, to minimize the total energy of the surface tension of a proteins liquid -making it more stable

  7. Barley lipid transfer protein, LTP1, contains a new type of lipid-like post-translational modification

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Lerche, Mathilde H.; Poulsen, Flemming Martin;

    2001-01-01

    In plants a group of proteins termed nonspecific lipid transfer proteins are found. These proteins bind and catalyze transfer of lipids in vitro, but their in vivo function is unknown. They have been suggested to be involved in different aspects of plant physiology and cell biology, including the...... formation of cutin and involvement in stress and pathogen responses, but there is yet no direct demonstration of an in vivo function. We have found and characterized a novel post-translational modification of the barley nonspecific lipid transfer protein, LTP1. The protein-modification bond is of a new type...... found to be lipid-like in nature. The modification does not resemble any standard lipid post-translational modification but is similar to a compound with known antimicrobial activity....

  8. Protein Modifications and Lipid Composition Changes in Rat Lenses in Postnatal Development

    Knyazev D.I.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to study age dynamics of posttranslational protein modification level and the changes of rat lens membranes, and the consideration of possible mechanisms of membrane effect on the composition and intensity of protein modifications in lens. Materials and Methods. The experiments were carried out on Wistar rats of three age groups: 1, 12 and 24 months. Protein level, sulfhydryl (SH group concentration, and protein carbonyl derivatives level were measured spectrophotometrically. The content of tryptophan, bityrosine and advanced glycation end-products (AGEs were assessed by fluorescence intensity. Phospholipids and neutral lipids were fractionated by thin-layer chromatography. Densitometric analysis and quantitative processing of chromatograms were performed using NIH Image J software. Results. Protein content in lens homogenate was found to increase with age, indicating the accumulation of slightly soluble protein aggregates. There was uniform decrease of SH-group concentration and protein carbonyl derivatives in homogenate. On the other hand, there was observed the accumulation of AGEs, bityrosine and tryptophan in water-soluble fraction. The main age changes of lens membrane lipid composition were the increasing ratio of sphingomyelin and neutral lipids. The changes could be caused by the growth of the proportion of mature fibers forming the nucleus of lens compared to poorly- and medium-moderately fibers and cells of epithelium. The principal component of neutral lipids was cholesterol and cholesterol esters. Conclusion. Lens membrane enrichment by lipids characterized by relatively high “ordering” inhibits the formation of protein carbonyl derivatives, but at the same time, can disbalance intercellular communication resulting in proteolysis (and tryptophan exposure and AGEs accumulation.

  9. Neural cell adhesion molecule-stimulated neurite outgrowth depends on activation of protein kinase C and the Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway

    Kolkova, K; Novitskaya, V; Pedersen, N;

    2000-01-01

    ), protein kinase C (PKC), and the Ras-mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway. This was done using a coculture system consisting of PC12-E2 cells grown on fibroblasts, with or without NCAM expression, allowing NCAM-NCAM interactions resulting in neurite outgrowth. PC12-E2 cells were transiently......The signal transduction pathways associated with neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM)-induced neuritogenesis are only partially characterized. We here demonstrate that NCAM-induced neurite outgrowth depends on activation of p59(fyn), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), phospholipase Cgamma (PLCgamma...... transfected with expression plasmids encoding constitutively active forms of Ras, Raf, MAP kinase kinases MEK1 and 2, dominant negative forms of Ras and Raf, and the FAK-related nonkinase. Alternatively, PC12-E2 cells were submitted to treatment with antibodies to the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor...

  10. Supporting data for characterization of non-coding RNAs associated with the Neuronal growth regulator 1 (NEGR1) adhesion protein.

    Kaur, Prameet; Tan, Jun Rong; Karolina, Dwi Setyowati; Sepramaniam, Sugunavathi; Armugam, Arunmozhiarasi; Peter Wong, Tsun-Hon; Jeyaseelan, Kandiah

    2016-06-01

    Long non-coding RNAs and microRNAs control gene expression to determine central nervous system development and function. Neuronal growth regulator 1 (NEGR1) is a cell adhesion molecule that plays an important role in neurite outgrowth during neuronal development and its precise expression is crucial for correct brain development. The data described here is related to the research article titled "A long non-coding RNA, BC048612 and a microRNA, miR-203 coordinate the gene expression of Neuronal growth regulator 1 (NEGR1) adhesion protein" [1]. This data article contains detailed bioinformatics analysis of genetic signatures at the Negr1 gene locus retrieved from the UCSC genome browser. This approach could be adopted to identify putative regulatory non-coding RNAs in other tissues and diseases. PMID:26977442

  11. Adhesive bonding of resin composite to various titanium surfaces using different metal conditioners and a surface modification system

    Hercules Jorge ALMILHATTI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated the effect of three metal conditioners on the shear bond strength (SBS of a prosthetic composite material to cpTi grade I having three surface treatments. Material and Methods: One hundred sixty eight rivet-shaped specimens (8.0x2.0 mm were cast and subjected to polishing (P or sandblasting with either 50 mm (50SB or 250 mm (250SB Al2O3. The metal conditioners Metal Photo Primer (MPP, Cesead II Opaque Primer (OP, Targis Link (TL, and one surface modification system Siloc (S, were applied to the specimen surfaces, which were covered with four 1-mm thick layers of resin composite. The resin layers were exposed to curing light for 90 s separately. Seven specimens from each experimental group were stored in water at 37ºC for 24 h while the other 7 specimens were subjected to 5,000 thermal cycles consisting of water baths at 4ºC and 60ºC (n=7. All specimens were subjected to SBS test (0.5 mm/min until failure occurred, and further 28 specimens were analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM and X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS. Data were analyzed by 3-way ANOVA followed by post-hoc Tukey's test (α=0.05. Results: On 50SB surfaces, OP groups showed higher SBS means than MPP (P<0.05, while no significant difference was found among OP, S, and TL groups. On 250SB surfaces, OP and TL groups exhibited higher SBS than MPP and S (P<0.05. No significant difference in SBS was found between OP and TL groups nor between MPP and S groups. The use of conditioners on 250SB surfaces resulted in higher SBS means than the use of the same products on 50SB surfaces (P<0.05. Conclusion: Sandblasting associated with the use of metal conditioners improves SBS of resin composites to cpTi.

  12. Structural analysis of DNA–protein complexes regulating the restriction–modification system Esp1396I

    Comparison of bound and unbound DNA in protein–DNA co-crystal complexes reveals insights into controller-protein binding and DNA distortion in transcriptional regulation. The controller protein of the type II restriction–modification (RM) system Esp1396I binds to three distinct DNA operator sequences upstream of the methyltransferase and endonuclease genes in order to regulate their expression. Previous biophysical and crystallographic studies have shown molecular details of how the controller protein binds to the operator sites with very different affinities. Here, two protein–DNA co-crystal structures containing portions of unbound DNA from native operator sites are reported. The DNA in both complexes shows significant distortion in the region between the conserved symmetric sequences, similar to that of a DNA duplex when bound by the controller protein (C-protein), indicating that the naked DNA has an intrinsic tendency to bend when not bound to the C-protein. Moreover, the width of the major groove of the DNA adjacent to a bound C-protein dimer is observed to be significantly increased, supporting the idea that this DNA distortion contributes to the substantial cooperativity found when a second C-protein dimer binds to the operator to form the tetrameric repression complex

  13. A Halotyrosine Antibody that Detects Increased Protein Modifications in Asthma Patients

    Jin, Hongjun; Hallstrand, Teal S.; Daly, Don S.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Nair, Parameswaran; Bigelow, Diana J.; Pounds, Joel G.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2014-01-31

    Background-Airway inflammation plays an important pathophysiological role in asthma. Eosinophils produce hypobromite and bromotyrosine while neutrophils produce hypochlorite and chlorotyrosine. Objective-To evaluate halotyrosine modifications of individual airway proteins as a marker of inflammation in asthma using an antibody-based assay. Methods-We developed a novel monoclonal antibody (BTK-94C) that binds halogenated tyrosine residues, and used this antibody in a custom enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarray platform to examine halotyrosine levels in 23 proteins in three independent sets of sputum samples (52 samples total). Results-In 15 subjects with either no asthma, or with asthma characterized by high or low sputum eosinophil counts, we found associations between increased halotyrosine levels of at least three proteins and severity of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Treatment with mepolizumab in 17 patients with sputum eosinophilia markedly reduced the sputum eosinophilia and significantly reduced halotyrosine levels in one sputum protein. Further analysis of 10 subjects with neutrophilic asthma and 10 health controls demonstrated a broad increase in halotyrosine in the patients with airway neutrophilia. Conclusions-Significantly higher levels of halotyrosine are associated with asthma in the asthma phenotypes we examined. The halotyrosine levels correlated with indirect AHR in the form of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Clinical Implication-An antibody-based assay for tyrosine halogenation in specific proteins may prove useful for assessing airway inflammation in asthma. Capsule Summary-An antibody to measure protein monobrominated tyrosine and other halotyrosine modifications was developed and used to evaluate halogenation in specific proteins in the airways for the first time. Associations were found between levels of halotyrosine and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, and eosinophil and neutrophil inflammation in sputum from

  14. Myeloperoxidase-dependent lipid peroxidation promotes the oxidative modification of cytosolic proteins in phagocytic neutrophils.

    Wilkie-Grantham, Rachel P; Magon, Nicholas J; Harwood, D Tim; Kettle, Anthony J; Vissers, Margreet C; Winterbourn, Christine C; Hampton, Mark B

    2015-04-10

    Phagocytic neutrophils generate reactive oxygen species to kill microbes. Oxidant generation occurs within an intracellular phagosome, but diffusible species can react with the neutrophil and surrounding tissue. To investigate the extent of oxidative modification, we assessed the carbonylation of cytosolic proteins in phagocytic neutrophils. A 4-fold increase in protein carbonylation was measured within 15 min of initiating phagocytosis. Carbonylation was dependent on NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase activity and was inhibited by butylated hydroxytoluene and Trolox, indicating a role for myeloperoxidase-dependent lipid peroxidation. Proteomic analysis of target proteins revealed significant carbonylation of the S100A9 subunit of calprotectin, a truncated form of Hsp70, actin, and hemoglobin from contaminating erythrocytes. The addition of the reactive aldehyde 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) caused carbonylation, and HNE-glutathione adducts were detected in the cytosol of phagocytic neutrophils. The post-translational modification of neutrophil proteins will influence the functioning and fate of these immune cells in the period following phagocytic activation, and provides a marker of neutrophil activation during infection and inflammation. PMID:25697357

  15. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    parameters, which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to...... tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion is...... the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental...

  16. A quantitative strategy to detect changes in accessibility of protein regions to chemical modification on heterodimerization

    Dreger, Mathias; Leung, Bo Wah; Brownlee, George G; Deng, Tao

    2009-01-01

    We describe a method for studying quantitative changes in accessibility of surface lysine residues of the PB1 subunit of the influenza RNA polymerase as a result of association with the PA subunit to form a PB1-PA heterodimer. Our method combines two established methods: (i) the chemical modification of surface lysine residues of native proteins by N-hydroxysuccinimidobiotin (NHS-biotin) and (ii) the stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) followed by tryptic digestion and mass spectrometry. By linking the chemical modification with the SILAC methodology for the first time, we obtain quantitative data on chemical modification allowing subtle changes in accessibility to be described. Five regions in the PB1 monomer showed altered reactivity to NHS-biotin when compared with the [PB1-PA] heterodimer. Mutational analysis of residues in two such regions—at K265 and K481 of PB1, which were about three- and twofold, respectively, less accessible to biotinylation in the PB1-PA heterodimer compared with the PB1 monomer, demonstrated that both K265 and K481 were crucial for polymerase function. This novel assay of quantitative profiling of biotinylation patterns (Q-POP assay) highlights likely conformational changes at important functional sites, as observed here for PB1, and may provide information on protein–protein interaction interfaces. The Q-POP assay should be a generally applicable approach and may detect novel functional sites suitable for targeting by drugs. PMID:19517532

  17. Orthogonal dual-modification of proteins for the engineering of multivalent protein scaffolds

    Michaela Mühlberg

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available To add new tools to the repertoire of protein-based multivalent scaffold design, we have developed a novel dual-labeling strategy for proteins that combines residue-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids with chemical oxidative aldehyde formation at the N-terminus of a protein. Our approach relies on the selective introduction of two different functional moieties in a protein by mutually orthogonal copper-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC and oxime ligation. This method was applied to the conjugation of biotin and β-linked galactose residues to yield an enzymatically active thermophilic lipase, which revealed specific binding to Erythrina cristagalli lectin by SPR binding studies.

  18. The adhesive protein of Choromytilus chorus (Molina, 1782) and Aulacomya ater (Molina, 1782): a proline-rich and a glycine-rich polyphenolic protein.

    Burzio, L A; Saéz, C; Pardo, J; Waite, J H; Burzio, L O

    2000-06-15

    The adhesive polyphenolic proteins from Aulacomya ater and Choromytilus chorus with apparent molecular masses of 135000 and 105000, respectively, were digested with trypsin and the peptides produced resolved by reversed phase liquid chromatography. About 5 and 12 major peptides were obtained from the protein of A. ater and C. chorus, respectively. The major peptides were purified by reverse-phase chromatography and the amino acid sequence indicates that both polyphenolic proteins consisted of repeated sequence motifs in their primary structure. The major peptides of A. ater contain seven amino acids corresponding to the consensus sequence AGYGGXK, whereas the tyrosine was always found as 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa), the X residue in position 6 was either valine, leucine or isoleucine, and the carboxy terminal was either lysine or hydroxylysine. On the other hand, the major peptides of C. chorus ranged in size from 6 to 21 amino acids and the majority correspond to the consensus sequence AKPSKYPTGYKPPVK. Both proteins differ markedly in the sequence of their tryptic peptides, but they share the common characteristics of other adhesive proteins in having a tandem sequence repeat in their primary structure. PMID:11004549

  19. A role for the retinoblastoma protein as a regulator of mouse osteoblast cell adhesion: implications for osteogenesis and osteosarcoma formation.

    Bernadette Sosa-García

    Full Text Available The retinoblastoma protein (pRb is a cell cycle regulator inactivated in most human cancers. Loss of pRb function results from mutations in the gene coding for pRb or for any of its upstream regulators. Although pRb is predominantly known as a cell cycle repressor, our data point to additional pRb functions in cell adhesion. Our data show that pRb regulates the expression of a wide repertoire of cell adhesion genes and regulates the assembly of the adherens junctions required for cell adhesion. We conducted our studies in osteoblasts, which depend on both pRb and on cell-to-cell contacts for their differentiation and function. We generated knockout mice in which the RB gene was excised specifically in osteoblasts using the cre-lox P system and found that osteoblasts from pRb knockout mice did not assemble adherens junction at their membranes. pRb depletion in wild type osteoblasts using RNAi also disrupted adherens junctions. Microarrays comparing pRb-expressing and pRb-deficient osteoblasts showed that pRb controls the expression of a number of cell adhesion genes, including cadherins. Furthermore, pRb knockout mice showed bone abnormalities consistent with osteoblast adhesion defects. We also found that pRb controls the function of merlin, a well-known regulator of adherens junction assembly, by repressing Rac1 and its effector Pak1. Using qRT-PCR, immunoblots, co-immunoprecipitation assays, and immunofluorescent labeling, we observed that pRb loss resulted in Rac1 and Pak1 overexpression concomitant with merlin inactivation by Pak1, merlin detachment from the membrane, and adherens junction loss. Our data support a pRb function in cell adhesion while elucidating the mechanism for this function. Our work suggests that in some tumor types pRb inactivation results in both a loss of cell cycle control that promotes initial tumor growth as well as in a loss of cell-to-cell contacts, which contributes to later stages of metastasis.

  20. Protein O-Glucosyltransferase 1 (POGLUT1 Promotes Mouse Gastrulation through Modification of the Apical Polarity Protein CRUMBS2.

    Nitya Ramkumar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Crumbs family proteins are apical transmembrane proteins with ancient roles in cell polarity. Mouse Crumbs2 mutants arrest at midgestation with abnormal neural plate morphology and a deficit of mesoderm caused by defects in gastrulation. We identified an ENU-induced mutation, wsnp, that phenocopies the Crumbs2 null phenotype. We show that wsnp is a null allele of Protein O-glucosyltransferase 1 (Poglut1, which encodes an enzyme previously shown to add O-glucose to EGF repeats in the extracellular domain of Drosophila and mammalian Notch, but the role of POGLUT1 in mammalian gastrulation has not been investigated. As predicted, we find that POGLUT1 is essential for Notch signaling in the early mouse embryo. However, the loss of mouse POGLUT1 causes an earlier and more dramatic phenotype than does the loss of activity of the Notch pathway, indicating that POGLUT1 has additional biologically relevant substrates. Using mass spectrometry, we show that POGLUT1 modifies EGF repeats in the extracellular domain of full-length mouse CRUMBS2. CRUMBS2 that lacks the O-glucose modification fails to be enriched on the apical plasma membrane and instead accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum. The data demonstrate that CRUMBS2 is the target of POGLUT1 for the gastrulation epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitions (EMT and that all activity of CRUMBS2 depends on modification by POGLUT1. Mutations in human POGLUT1 cause Dowling-Degos Disease, POGLUT1 is overexpressed in a variety of tumor cells, and mutations in the EGF repeats of human CRUMBS proteins are associated with human congenital nephrosis, retinitis pigmentosa and retinal degeneration, suggesting that O-glucosylation of CRUMBS proteins has broad roles in human health.

  1. Protein O-Glucosyltransferase 1 (POGLUT1) Promotes Mouse Gastrulation through Modification of the Apical Polarity Protein CRUMBS2.

    Ramkumar, Nitya; Harvey, Beth M; Lee, Jeffrey D; Alcorn, Heather L; Silva-Gagliardi, Nancy F; McGlade, C Jane; Bestor, Timothy H; Wijnholds, Jan; Haltiwanger, Robert S; Anderson, Kathryn V

    2015-10-01

    Crumbs family proteins are apical transmembrane proteins with ancient roles in cell polarity. Mouse Crumbs2 mutants arrest at midgestation with abnormal neural plate morphology and a deficit of mesoderm caused by defects in gastrulation. We identified an ENU-induced mutation, wsnp, that phenocopies the Crumbs2 null phenotype. We show that wsnp is a null allele of Protein O-glucosyltransferase 1 (Poglut1), which encodes an enzyme previously shown to add O-glucose to EGF repeats in the extracellular domain of Drosophila and mammalian Notch, but the role of POGLUT1 in mammalian gastrulation has not been investigated. As predicted, we find that POGLUT1 is essential for Notch signaling in the early mouse embryo. However, the loss of mouse POGLUT1 causes an earlier and more dramatic phenotype than does the loss of activity of the Notch pathway, indicating that POGLUT1 has additional biologically relevant substrates. Using mass spectrometry, we show that POGLUT1 modifies EGF repeats in the extracellular domain of full-length mouse CRUMBS2. CRUMBS2 that lacks the O-glucose modification fails to be enriched on the apical plasma membrane and instead accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum. The data demonstrate that CRUMBS2 is the target of POGLUT1 for the gastrulation epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitions (EMT) and that all activity of CRUMBS2 depends on modification by POGLUT1. Mutations in human POGLUT1 cause Dowling-Degos Disease, POGLUT1 is overexpressed in a variety of tumor cells, and mutations in the EGF repeats of human CRUMBS proteins are associated with human congenital nephrosis, retinitis pigmentosa and retinal degeneration, suggesting that O-glucosylation of CRUMBS proteins has broad roles in human health. PMID:26496195

  2. Analytical reduction of combinatorial complexity arising from multiple protein modification sites.

    Birtwistle, Marc R

    2015-02-01

    Combinatorial complexity is a major obstacle to ordinary differential equation (ODE) modelling of biochemical networks. For example, a protein with 10 sites that can each be unphosphorylated, phosphorylated or bound to adaptor protein requires 3(10) ODEs. This problem is often dealt with by making ad hoc assumptions which have unclear validity and disallow modelling of site-specific dynamics. Such site-specific dynamics, however, are important in many biological systems. We show here that for a common biological situation where adaptors bind modified sites, binding is slow relative to modification/demodification, and binding to one modified site hinders binding to other sites, for a protein with n modification sites and m adaptor proteins the number of ODEs needed to simulate the site-specific dynamics of biologically relevant, lumped bound adaptor states is independent of the number of modification sites and equal to m + 1, giving a significant reduction in system size. These considerations can be relaxed considerably while retaining reasonably accurate descriptions of the true system dynamics. We apply the theory to model, using only 11 ODEs, the dynamics of ligand-induced phosphorylation of nine tyrosines on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and primary recruitment of six signalling proteins (Grb2, PI3K, PLCγ1, SHP2, RasA1 and Shc1). The model quantitatively accounts for experimentally determined site-specific phosphorylation and dephosphorylation rates, differential affinities of binding proteins for the phosphorylated sites and binding protein expression levels. Analysis suggests that local concentration of site-specific phosphatases such as SHP2 in membrane subdomains by a factor of approximately 10(7) is critical for effective site-specific regulation. We further show how our framework can be extended with minimal effort to consider binding cooperativity between Grb2 and c-Cbl, which is important for receptor trafficking. Our theory has potentially

  3. Extracellular Protein Interactions Mediated by the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule, NCAM: Heterophilic Interactions Between NCAM and Cell Adhesion Molecules, Extracellular Matrix Proteins, and Viruses

    Nielsen, Janne; Kulahin, Nikolaj; Walmod, Peter

    2008-01-01

    interactions, thereby modulating a range of biological processes. This review summarizes interactions between NCAM and other CAMs and ECM proteins. Additionally, the role of NCAM as a receptor for rabies virus, and its implications in rabies infections is briefly described. Interactions between NCAM and its...

  4. Outer Membrane Proteins of Fibrobacter succinogenes with Potential Roles in Adhesion to Cellulose and in Cellulose Digestion▿

    Jun, Hyun-Sik; Qi, Meng; Gong, Joshua; Egbosimba, Emmanuel E.; Forsberg, Cecil W.

    2007-01-01

    Comparative analysis of binding of intact glucose-grown Fibrobacter succinogenes strain S85 cells and adhesion-defective mutants AD1 and AD4 to crystalline and acid-swollen (amorphous) cellulose showed that strain S85 bound efficiently to both forms of cellulose while mutant Ad1 bound to acid-swollen cellulose, but not to crystalline cellulose, and mutant Ad4 did not bind to either. One- and two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) of outer membrane cellulose binding proteins and of outer membr...

  5. Cdc42 Effector Protein 2 (XCEP2 is required for normal gastrulation and contributes to cellular adhesion in Xenopus laevis

    Nelson Richard W

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rho GTPases and their downstream effector proteins regulate a diverse array of cellular processes during embryonic development, including reorganization of cytoskeletal architecture, cell adhesion, and transcription. Changes in the activation state of Rho GTPases are converted into changes in cellular behavior by a diversity of effector proteins, which are activated in response to changes in the GTP binding state of Rho GTPases. In this study we characterize the expression and function of one such effector, XCEP2, that is present during gastrulation stages in Xenopus laevis. Results In a search for genes whose expression is regulated during early stages of embryonic development in Xenopus laevis, a gene encoding a Rho GTPase effector protein (Xenopus Cdc42 effector protein 2, or XCEP2 was isolated, and found to be highly homologous, but not identical, to a Xenopus sequence previously submitted to the Genbank database. These two gene sequences are likely pseudoalleles. XCEP2 mRNA is expressed at constant levels until mid- to late- gastrula stages, and then strongly down-regulated at late gastrula/early neurula stages. Injection of antisense morpholino oligonucleotides directed at one or both pseudoalleles resulted in a significant delay in blastopore closure and interfered with normal embryonic elongation, suggesting a role for XCEP2 in regulating gastrulation movements. The morpholino antisense effect could be rescued by co-injection with a morpholino-insensitive version of the XCEP2 mRNA. Antisense morpholino oligonucleotides were found to have no effect on mesodermal induction, suggesting that the observed effects were due to changes in the behavior of involuting cells, rather than alterations in their identity. XCEP2 antisense morpholino oligonucleotides were also observed to cause complete disaggregation of cells composing animal cap explants, suggesting a specific role of XCEP2 in maintenance or regulation of cell

  6. Posttranslational Protein Modification in the Salivary Glands of Sjögren’s Syndrome Patients

    Rafael Herrera-Esparza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated posttranslational reactions in the salivary glands of patients with Sjögren’s syndrome. We analysed the biopsies of primary Sjögren’s patients using immunohistochemistry and a tag-purified anticyclic citrullinated protein (CCP antibody to detect citrullinated peptides, and the presence of peptidylarginine deiminase 2 (PAD2 was assessed simultaneously. The present work demonstrated the weak presence of the PAD2 enzyme in some normal salivary glands, although PAD2 expression was increased considerably in Sjögren’s patients. The presence of citrullinated proteins was also detected in the salivary tissues of Sjögren’s patients, which strongly supports the in situ posttranslational modification of proteins in this setting. Furthermore, the mutual expression of CCP and PAD2 suggests that this posttranslational modification is enzyme dependent. In conclusion, patients with Sjögren’s syndrome expressed the catalytic machinery to produce posttranslational reactions that may result in autoantigen triggering.

  7. Modification of the protein corona-nanoparticle complex by physiological factors.

    Braun, Nicholas J; DeBrosse, Madeleine C; Hussain, Saber M; Comfort, Kristen K

    2016-07-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) effects in a biological system are driven through the formation and structure of the protein corona-NP complex, which is dynamic by nature and dependent upon factors from both the local environment and NP physicochemical parameters. To date, considerable data has been gathered regarding the structure and behavior of the protein corona in blood, plasma, and traditional cell culture medium. However, there exists a knowledge gap pertaining to the protein corona in additional biological fluids and following incubation in a dynamic environment. Using 13nm gold NPs (AuNPs), functionalized with either polyethylene glycol or tannic acid, we demonstrated that both particle characteristics and the associated protein corona were altered when exposed to artificial physiological fluids and under dynamic flow. Furthermore, the magnitude of observed behavioral shifts were dependent upon AuNP surface chemistry. Lastly, we revealed that exposure to interstitial fluid produced protein corona modifications, reshaping of the nano-cellular interface, modified AuNP dosimetry, and induction of previously unseen cytotoxicity. This study highlights the need to elucidate both NP and protein corona behavior in biologically representative environments in an effort to increase accurate interpretation of data and transfer of this knowledge to efficacy, behavior, and safety of nano-based applications. PMID:27127026

  8. In Silico Analysis of Correlations between Protein Disorder and Post-Translational Modifications in Algae

    Atsushi Kurotani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent proteome analyses have reported that intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs of proteins play important roles in biological processes. In higher plants whose genomes have been sequenced, the correlation between IDRs and post-translational modifications (PTMs has been reported. The genomes of various eukaryotic algae as common ancestors of plants have also been sequenced. However, no analysis of the relationship to protein properties such as structure and PTMs in algae has been reported. Here, we describe correlations between IDR content and the number of PTM sites for phosphorylation, glycosylation, and ubiquitination, and between IDR content and regions rich in proline, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine (PEST and transmembrane helices in the sequences of 20 algae proteomes. Phosphorylation, O-glycosylation, ubiquitination, and PEST preferentially occurred in disordered regions. In contrast, transmembrane helices were favored in ordered regions. N-glycosylation tended to occur in ordered regions in most of the studied algae; however, it correlated positively with disordered protein content in diatoms. Additionally, we observed that disordered protein content and the number of PTM sites were significantly increased in the species-specific protein clusters compared to common protein clusters among the algae. Moreover, there were specific relationships between IDRs and PTMs among the algae from different groups.

  9. Enzymatic Modification of Polyethersulfone Membranes

    Karin Schroën

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic modification of polyethersulfone (PES membranes has been found not only feasible, but also an environmentally attractive way to vary surface properties systematically. In this paper, we summarize the effect of modification layers on protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion on PES membranes and surfaces. The enzyme laccase was used to covalently bind (polyphenolic acids to the membrane, and compared to other membrane modification methods, this method is very mild and did not influence the mechanical strength negatively. Depending on the conditions used during modification, the modification layers were capable of influencing interactions with typical fouling species, such as protein, and to influence attachment of microorganisms. We also show that the modification method can be successfully applied to hollow fiber membranes; and depending on the pore size of the base membrane, proteins were partially rejected by the membrane. In conclusion, we have shown that enzymatic membrane modification is a versatile and economically attractive method that can be used to influence various interactions that normally lead to surface contamination, pore blocking, and considerable flux loss in membranes.

  10. Anomalous Behaviour of a Protein During Sds/Page Corrected by Chemical Modification of Carboxylic Groups

    Matagne, André; Joris, Bernard; Frère, Jean-Marie

    1991-01-01

    The 29,000-Mr Actinomadura R39 beta-lactamase exhibited a remarkably low electrophoretic mobility on SDS/PAGE, yielding an Mr value almost twice that computed from the corresponding gene sequence. We showed that chemical modification of the carboxylic groups of glutamic acid and aspartic acid residues restored a normal electrophoretic mobility and that the anomalous behaviour of that protein on SDS/PAGE was due to its very large negative charge at neutral pH. We also compared the behaviour of...

  11. SUMO Modification Stabilizes Dengue Virus Nonstructural Protein 5 To Support Virus Replication

    Su, Chan-I; Tseng, Chung-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) participates in a reversible posttranslational modification process (SUMOylation) that regulates a wide variety of cellular processes and plays important roles for numerous viruses during infection. However, the roles of viral protein SUMOylation in dengue virus (DENV) infection have not been elucidated. In this study, we found that the SUMOylation pathway was involved in the DENV life cycle, since DENV replication was reduced by silencing the cellular gene Ubc9, which encodes the sole E2-conjugating enzyme required for SUMOylation. By in vivo and in vitro SUMOylation assays, the DENV NS5 protein was identified as an authentic SUMO-targeted protein. By expressing various NS5 mutants, we found that the SUMO acceptor sites are located in the N-terminal domain of NS5 and that a putative SUMO-interacting motif (SIM) of this domain is crucial for its SUMOylation. A DENV replicon harboring the SUMOylation-defective SIM mutant showed a severe defect in viral RNA replication, supporting the notion that NS5 SUMOylation is required for DENV replication. SUMOylation-defective mutants also failed to suppress the induction of STAT2-mediated host antiviral interferon signaling. Furthermore, the SUMOylation of NS5 significantly increased the stability of NS5 protein, which could account for most of the biological functions of SUMOylated NS5. Collectively, these findings suggest that the SUMOylation of DENV NS5 is one of the mechanisms regulating DENV replication. IMPORTANCE SUMOylation is a common posttranslational modification that regulates cellular protein functions but has not been reported in the proteins of dengue virus. Here, we found that the replicase of DENV, nonstructural protein 5 (NS5), can be SUMOylated. It is well known that providing RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity and antagonizing host antiviral IFN signaling are a “double indemnity” of NS5 to support DENV replication. Without SUMOylation, NS5 fails to

  12. OPTIMIZATION OF THE CONDITIONS REQUIRED FOR CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL MODIFICATION OF THE YEAST WASTE FROM BEER MANUFACTURING TO PRODUCE ADHESIVE COMPOSITIONS

    Davud Kadimaliev,; Vladimir Telyatnik,; Victor Revin,; Alexander Parshin,; Surhay Allahverdi,; Gokhan Gunduz; Elena Kezina,; Nejla Asık

    2012-01-01

    During the production of beer large amounts of yeast waste are generated. This paper considers the possible making of environmentally friendly adhesive compositions from such wastes. Chemical treatment of yeast wastes increases their adhesive characteristics. Chemical cross-linking with glutaric aldehyde and biological cross-linking by enzyme transglutaminase improves the moisture resistance of the adhesive compositions. In terms of their physical and mechanical parameters they are not inferi...

  13. Direct binding of syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain to the catalytic domain of protein kinase C alpha (PKC alpha) increases focal adhesion localization of PKC alpha

    Lim, Ssang-Taek; Longley, Robert L; Couchman, John R; Woods, Anne

    2003-01-01

    Syndecan-4 is a transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan that acts as a coreceptor with integrins in focal adhesion formation. The central region of syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain (4V; LGKKPIYKK) binds phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, and together they regulate protein kinase C alpha (PKC......, overexpression of syndecan-4 in rat embryo fibroblast cells, but not expression of the YF mutant, increased PKC alpha localization to focal adhesions. The data support a mechanism where syndecan-4 binds PKC alpha and localizes it to focal adhesions, whose assembly may be regulated by the kinase....

  14. Lysine pyrrolation is a naturally-occurring covalent modification involved in the production of DNA mimic proteins

    Miyashita, Hiroaki; Chikazawa, Miho; Otaki, Natsuki; Hioki, Yusuke; Shimozu, Yuki; Nakashima, Fumie; Shibata, Takahiro; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Maruyama, Shoichi; Matsumi, Noriyoshi; Uchida, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Covalent modification of proteins exerts significant effects on their chemical properties and has important functional and regulatory consequences. We now report the identification and verification of an electrically-active form of modified proteins recognized by a group of small molecules commonly used to interact with DNA. This previously unreported property of proteins was initially discovered when the γ-ketoaldehydes were identified as a source of the proteins stained by the DNA intercala...

  15. Evaluation of C-Reactive Protein, Endothelin-1, Adhesion Molecule(s), and Lipids as Inflammatory Markers in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    2007-01-01

    This study compared lipids, the product of lipid peroxidation malondialdehyde (MDA), the acute phase reactant high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), endothelin-1 (ET-1), P-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) between healthy controls, subjects with ischemic heart disease (IHD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) subjects who did not perform coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery as well as type 2 DM subjects who performed ...

  16. Single step surface modification of highly stable magnetic nanoparticles for purification of His-tag proteins

    Sahu, Sumanta Kumar [Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Department of Chemistry (India); Chakrabarty, Arindam [Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Department of Biotechnology (India); Bhattacharya, Dipsikha [Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Department of Chemistry (India); Ghosh, Sudip K. [Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Department of Biotechnology (India); Pramanik, Panchanan, E-mail: chandrasourov@gmail.com [Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Department of Chemistry (India)

    2011-06-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a simple, cheap, and rapid method for purification of His-tag recombinant proteins with high yields. The new immobilized metal ion affinity adsorbent containing superparamagnetic nanoparticles and hydrophilic resins are proposed here to improve the purification of His-tagged recombinant proteins. In this report, we have described the preparation of nanosized superparamagnetic nanoparticles (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) which were prepared by chemical precipitation method followed by surface modification using phosphonomethyl iminodiacetic acid. The stable surface functionalized nanoparticles were further linked with Ni{sup 2+} for purification of 6 Multiplication-Sign His-tagged proteins. The phosphonate group of the N-phosphonomethyl iminodiacetic acid ligand acts as a surface anchoring agent on magnetite nanoparticles and the remaining free -COOH groups outside for binding with Ni{sup 2+} ions. The nanoparticles were approximately 6-8 nm in size and were stable and had negligible non-specific binding for protein. The proteins were purified within 1 h and observed on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis gel.

  17. Advances in identification and validation of protein targets of natural products without chemical modification.

    Chang, J; Kim, Y; Kwon, H J

    2016-05-01

    Covering: up to February 2016Identification of the target proteins of natural products is pivotal to understanding the mechanisms of action to develop natural products for use as molecular probes and potential therapeutic drugs. Affinity chromatography of immobilized natural products has been conventionally used to identify target proteins, and has yielded good results. However, this method has limitations, in that labeling or tagging for immobilization and affinity purification often result in reduced or altered activity of the natural product. New strategies have recently been developed and applied to identify the target proteins of natural products and synthetic small molecules without chemical modification of the natural product. These direct and indirect methods for target identification of label-free natural products include drug affinity responsive target stability (DARTS), stability of proteins from rates of oxidation (SPROX), cellular thermal shift assay (CETSA), thermal proteome profiling (TPP), and bioinformatics-based analysis of connectivity. This review focuses on and reports case studies of the latest advances in target protein identification methods for label-free natural products. The integration of newly developed technologies will provide new insights and highlight the value of natural products for use as biological probes and new drug candidates. PMID:26964663

  18. CHEMICAL MODIFICATION OF CHITOSAN AND FORMULATION OF ITS NANOPARTICLES FOR PROTEIN DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Swastika Karwani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The most common route of administration of proteins has been parenterals using invasive ways of administration but this route has many side effects like lack of patient compliance, cost, high drug levels etc. The development of an oral dosage form that improves the absorption of protein drugs is the most desirable formulation but one of the greatest challenges in the pharmaceutical field. The major barriers in developing oral formulations for peptides and proteins include poor intrinsic permeability, luminal and cellular enzymatic degradation and chemical and conformational stability. A number of innovative oral drug delivery approaches have been recently developed, including the drug entrapment within polymer nanoparticles. The various advantages of oral delivery of proteins are like ease of administration, can be used as cure in primary stages of disease eg. Thrombosis, no internal bleeding, patient compliance and economical Our formulation development approach is to develop the formulations targeted to bypass the stomach with an aim to release the drug in the intestine; with extended residence time in the GIT and for this polymer like Chitosan is used. To improve the lipophillic property of chitosan, to modify biodegradation pattern of polymer and for oral delivery of proteins (Insulin and serratiopeptidase, modification is done using lactic-acid and polyethyleneglycol by copolymerization.

  19. Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) plays a key role in ovarian cancer cell adhesion and motility

    Highlights: ► We generated stable transduced HE4 overexpression and knockdown cells. ► HE4 was associated with EOC cell adhesion and motility. ► HE4 might have some effects on activation of EGFR-MAPK signaling pathway. ► HE4 play an important role in EOC tumorigenicity. -- Abstract: Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) is a novel and specific biomarker for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). We previously demonstrated that serum HE4 levels were significantly elevated in the majority of EOC patients but not in subjects with benign disease or healthy controls. However, the precise mechanism of HE4 protein function is unknown. In this study, we generated HE4-overexpressing SKOV3 cells and found that stably transduced cells promoted cell adhesion and migration. Knockdown of HE4 expression was achieved by stable transfection of SKOV3 cells with a construct encoding a short hairpin DNA directed against the HE4 gene. Correspondingly, the proliferation and spreading ability of HE4-expressed cells were inhibited by HE4 suppression. Mechanistically, impaired EGFR and Erk1/2 phosphorylation were observed in cells with HE4 knockdown. The phosphorylation was restored when the knockdown cells were cultured in conditioned medium containing HE4. Moreover, in vivo tumorigenicity showed that HE4 suppression markedly inhibited the growth of tumors. This suggests that expression of HE4 is associated with cancer cell adhesion, migration and tumor growth, which can be related to its effects on the EGFR-MAPK signaling pathway. Our results provide evidence of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that may underlie the motility-promoting role of HE4 in EOC progression. The role of HE4 as a target for gene-based therapy might be considered in future studies.

  20. Marine biofouling of surfaces: morphology, and nanomechanics of Barnacle Cyprid adhesion proteins by AFM

    Phang, In Yee

    2008-01-01

    The understanding of biointerfaces in contact with seawater is crucially important in tackling the problems of marine biofouling. Such biointerfaces involve the bioadhesives used by marine organisms to attach temporary or permanently to the surfaces immersed in water. The aim of this Thesis is to address a particular problem, i.e. barnacle adhesion, to the biointerface and the corresponding fouling process. We try to understand the first steps of the fouling process of this species, and help ...

  1. Influence of preadsorbed milk proteins on adhesion of Listeria monocytogenes to hydrophobic and hydrophilic silica surfaces.

    al-Makhlafi, H; McGuire, J.; Daeschel, M

    1994-01-01

    The adsorption of beta-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin, alpha-lactalbumin, and beta-casein for 8 h and beta-lactoglobulin and bovine serum albumin for 1 h at silanized silica surfaces of low and high hydrophobicity, followed by incubation in buffer and contact with Listeria monocytogenes, resulted in different numbers of cells adhered per unit of surface area. Adhesion to both surfaces was greatest when beta-lactoglobulin was present and was lowest when bovine serum albumin was present. P...

  2. Effect of Milk Proteins on Adhesion of Bacteria to Stainless Steel Surfaces

    Barnes, L. M.; Lo, M. F.; Adams, M. R.; Chamberlain, A. H. L.

    1999-01-01

    Stainless steel coupons were treated with skim milk and subsequently challenged with individual bacterial suspensions of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas fragi, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and Serratia marcescens. The numbers of attached bacteria were determined by direct epifluorescence microscopy and compared with the attachment levels on clean stainless steel with two different surface finishes. Skim milk was found to reduce adhesion of S. aureus, L. monocytogenes, and S. m...

  3. Do post-translational beta cell protein modifications trigger type 1 diabetes?

    Størling, Joachim; Overgaard, Anne Julie; Brorsson, Caroline Anna;

    2013-01-01

    forms capable of specifically triggering beta cell destruction. In other immune-mediated diseases, autoantigens targeted by the immune system have undergone post-translational modification (PTM), thereby creating tissue-specific neo-epitopes. In a similar manner, PTM of beta cell proteins might create......Type 1 diabetes is considered an autoimmune disease characterised by specific T cell-mediated destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells. Yet, except for insulin, no beta cell-specific antigens have been discovered. This may imply that the autoantigens in type 1 diabetes exist in modified...... beta cell-specific neo-epitopes. We suggest that the current paradigm of type 1 diabetes as a classical autoimmune disease should be reconsidered since the immune response may not be directed against native beta cell proteins. A modified model for the pathogenetic events taking place in islets leading...

  4. Plekhh2, a novel podocyte protein downregulated in human focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, is involved in matrix adhesion and actin dynamics.

    Perisic, Ljubica; Lal, Mark; Hulkko, Jenny; Hultenby, Kjell; Önfelt, Björn; Sun, Ying; Dunér, Fredrik; Patrakka, Jaakko; Betsholtz, Christer; Uhlen, Mathias; Brismar, Hjalmar; Tryggvason, Karl; Wernerson, Annika; Pikkarainen, Timo

    2012-11-01

    Pleckstrin homology domain-containing, family H (with MyTH4 domain), member 2 (Plekhh2) is a 1491-residue intracellular protein highly enriched in renal glomerular podocytes for which no function has been ascribed. Analysis of renal biopsies from patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis revealed a significant reduction in total podocyte Plekhh2 expression compared to controls. Sequence analysis indicated a putative α-helical coiled-coil segment as the only recognizable domain within the N-terminal half of the polypeptide, while the C-terminal half contains two PH, a MyTH4, and a FERM domain. We identified a phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate consensus-binding site in the PH1 domain required for Plekhh2 localization to peripheral regions of cell lamellipodia. The N-terminal half of Plekkh2 is not necessary for lamellipodial targeting but mediates self-association. Yeast two-hybrid screening showed that Plekhh2 directly interacts through its FERM domain with the focal adhesion protein Hic-5 and actin. Plekhh2 and Hic-5 coprecipitated and colocalized at the soles of podocyte foot processes in situ and Hic-5 partially relocated from focal adhesions to lamellipodia in Plekhh2-expressing podocytes. In addition, Plekhh2 stabilizes the cortical actin cytoskeleton by attenuating actin depolymerization. Our findings suggest a structural and functional role for Plekhh2 in the podocyte foot processes. PMID:22832517

  5. Getting from A to B-exploring the activation motifs of the class B adhesion G protein-coupled receptor subfamily G member 4/GPR112

    Peeters, Miriam C; Mos, Iris; Lenselink, Eelke B;

    2016-01-01

    The adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (ADGRs/class B2 G protein-coupled receptors) constitute an ancient family of G protein-coupled receptors that have recently been demonstrated to play important roles in cellular and developmental processes. Here, we describe a first insight into the struct......The adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (ADGRs/class B2 G protein-coupled receptors) constitute an ancient family of G protein-coupled receptors that have recently been demonstrated to play important roles in cellular and developmental processes. Here, we describe a first insight...... identified several potential equivalent motifs and subjected those to mutational analysis. The importance of the mutated residues was evaluated by examining their effect on the high constitutive activity of the N-terminally truncated ADGRG4/GPR112 in a 1-receptor-1-G protein Saccharomyces cerevisiae...

  6. Post-translational disulfide modifications in cell signaling--role of inter-protein, intra-protein, S-glutathionyl, and S-cysteaminyl disulfide modifications in signal transmission.

    O'Brian, Catherine A; Chu, Feng

    2005-05-01

    Cell signaling entails a host of post-translational modifications of effector-proteins. These modifications control signal transmission by regulating the activity, localization or half-life of the effector-protein. Prominent oxidative modifications induced by cell-signaling reactive oxygen species (ROS) are cysteinyl modifications such as S-nitrosylation, sulfenic acid and disulfide formation. Disulfides protect protein sulfhydryls against oxidative destruction and simultaneously influence cell signaling by engaging redox-regulatory sulfhydryls in effector-proteins. The types of disulfides implicated in signaling span (1) protein S-glutathionylation, e.g. as a novel mode of Ras activation through S-glutathionylation at Cys-118 in response to a hydrogen-peroxide burst, (2) intra-protein disulfides, e.g. in the regulation of the stability of the protein phosphatase Cdc25C by hydrogen-peroxide, (3) inter-protein disulfides, e.g. in the hydrogen peroxide-mediated inactivation of receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPalpha) by dimerization and (4) protein S-cysteaminylation by cystamine. Cystamine is a byproduct of pantetheinase-catalyzed pantothenic acid recycling from pantetheine for biosynthesis of Coenzyme A (CoA), a ubiquitous and metabolically indispensable cofactor. Cystamine inactivates protein kinase C-epsilon (PKCepsilon), gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase and tissue transglutaminase by S-cysteaminylation-triggered mechanisms. The importance of protein S-cysteaminylation in signal transmission in vivo is evident from the ability of cystamine administration to rescue the intestinal inflammatory-response deficit of pantetheinase knockout mice. These mice lack the predominant epithelial pantetheinase isoform and have sharply reduced levels of cystamine/cysteamine in epithelial tissues. In addition, intraperitoneal administration of cystamine significantly delays neurodegenerative pathogenesis in a Huntington's disease mouse model. Thus, cystamine may

  7. Endogenous 3, 4- Dihydroxyphenylalanine and Dopaquinone Modifications on Protein Tyrosine: links to mitochondrially derived oxidative stress via hydroxyl radical

    Zhang, Xu; Monroe, Matthew E.; Chen, Baowei; Chin, Mark H.; Heibeck, Tyler H.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Yang, Feng; Petritis, Brianne O.; Camp, David G.; Pounds, Joel G.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Desmond J.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

    2010-06-02

    Oxidative modifications of protein tyrosines have been implicated in multiple human diseases. Among these modifications, elevations in levels of 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), a major product of hydroxyl radical addition to tyrosine, has been observed in a number of pathologies. Here we report the first global proteome survey of endogenous site-specific modifications, i.e, DOPA and its further oxidation product dopaquinone (DQ) in mouse brain and heart tissues. Results from LC-MS/MS analyses included 203 and 71 DOPA-modified tyrosine sites identified from brain and heart, respectively, with a false discovery rate of ~1%; while only a few nitrotyrosine containing peptides, a more commonly studied marker of oxidative stress, were detectable, suggesting the much higher abundance for DOPA modification as compared with tyrosine nitration. Moreover, 57 and 29 DQ modified peptides were observed from brain and heart, respectively; nearly half of these peptides were also observed with DOPA modification on the same sites. For both tissues, these modifications are preferentially found in mitochondrial proteins with metal-binding properties, consistent with metal catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation from mitochondrial superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. These modifications also link to a number of mitochondria-associated and other signaling pathways. Furthermore, many of the modification sites were common sites of previously reported tyrosine phosphorylation suggesting potential disruption of signaling pathways. Structural aspects of DOPA-modified tyrosine sequences are distinct from those of nitrotyrosines suggesting that each type of modifications provides a marker for different in vivo reactive chemistries and can be used to predict sensitive protein targets. Collectively, the results suggest that these modifications are linked with mitochondrially-derived oxidative stress, and may serve as sensitive markers for disease pathologies.

  8. Protein associated with L-lactate transport in rabbit erythrocytes: chemical modification, labeling, and purification

    The object of the present investigation was to identify, characterize, and isolate the protein responsible for mediating specific monocarboxylate transport across the rabbit erythrocyte membrane. Chemical modification of the transport protein indicates that transporter function probably involves lysine, cysteine, and arginyl resides at or near the active site. Amino-reactive modifiers, including 4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2'-dihydrostilbene disulfonate (H2DIDS), isobutylcarbonyllactyl anhydride (iBCLA), reductive methylation, and a variety of sulfo-succinimidyl active esters were used in direct and indirect labeling experiments designed to identify the transport protein. Tritiated H2DIDS and active esters label a 40-55 kDalton (B and R) polypeptide under conditions where lactate transport is selectively inhibited in a concentration dependent manner. Also, iBCLA prevents the labeling of B and R by (3H)H2DIDS; sulfosuccinimidyl active esters prevent (3H)H2DIDS and other active esters from labeling the protein. These findings suggest that B and R is associated with lactate transport

  9. A role for the WH-30 protein in sperm-sperm adhesion during rouleaux formation in the guinea pig.

    Flaherty, S P; Swann, N J; Primakoff, P; Myles, D G

    1993-03-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa participate in specific cell adhesion phenomena during their development and functional lifespan; this includes interaction with Sertoli cells, the zona pellucida, and the oolemma. In some species such as the guinea pig, an additional sperm-sperm adhesion occurs during epididymal maturation which results in the formation of rouleaux in which the sperm heads are stacked one upon the other and the periacrosomal plasma membranes of adjacent sperm are linked by periodic cross-bridges. In this study, we have used a monoclonal antibody to investigate the role of the WH-30 protein on the sperm surface in the formation of the junctional zones between adjacent guinea pig sperm in rouleaux. WH-30 monoclonal antibodies caused a dose- and time-dependent dissociation of rouleaux and an increase in the percentage of single, acrosome-intact sperm; there were no effects on sperm motility (maintained at 80-90%) or ultrastructure during the 120-min incubations. The maximal effect of about 80% single sperm was obtained with a 1:4 dilution of the WH-30 hybridoma supernatant or 5-50 micrograms/ml of purified WH-30 IgG. In contrast, incubation of sperm in AH-20 IgG, myeloma cell supernatants, or purified, nonspecific mouse IgG1 had no effect on rouleaux. Treatment of sperm with a WH-30 Fab fragment resulted in almost complete dissociation of rouleaux without any observed effect on sperm motility or acrosomal status. Surface labeling of sperm followed by immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE revealed that the WH-30 antibody recognizes a single polypeptide of 43-45 kDa. Using immunofluorescence, the WH-30 protein was localized over the entire surface of the sperm head (whole-head pattern), and immunogold labeling showed that WH-30 is localized in the glycocalyx on both the dorsal and ventral surfaces of the periacrosomal and postacrosomal plasma membranes. These results indicate that the WH-30 protein on the sperm surface is a cell adhesion protein which is involved in

  10. Protein oxidative modifications during electrospray ionization: solution phase electrochemistry or corona discharge-induced radical attack?

    Boys, Brian L; Kuprowski, Mark C; Noël, James J; Konermann, Lars

    2009-05-15

    The exposure of solution-phase proteins to reactive oxygen species (ROS) causes oxidative modifications, giving rise to the formation of covalent +16 Da adducts. Electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) is the most widely used method for monitoring the extent of these modifications. Unfortunately, protein oxidation can also take place as an experimental artifact during ESI, such that it may be difficult to assess the actual level of oxidation in bulk solution. Previous work has demonstrated that ESI-induced oxidation is highly prevalent when operating at strongly elevated capillary voltage V(0) (e.g., +8 kV) and with oxygen nebulizer gas in the presence of a clearly visible corona discharge. Protein oxidation under these conditions is commonly attributed to OH radicals generated in the plasma of the discharge. On the other hand, charge balancing oxidation reactions are known to take place at the metal/liquid interface of the emitter. Previous studies have not systematically explored whether such electrochemical processes could be responsible for the formation of oxidative +16 Da adducts instead of (or in combination with) plasma-generated ROS. Using hemoglobin as a model system, this work illustrates the occurrence of extensive protein oxidation even under typical operating conditions (e.g., V(0) = 3.5 kV, N(2) nebulizer gas). Surprisingly, measurements of the current flowing in the ESI circuit demonstrate that a weak corona discharge persists for these relatively gentle settings. On the basis of comparative experiments with nebulizer gases of different dielectric strength, it is concluded that ROS generated under discharge conditions are solely responsible for ESI-induced protein oxidation. This result is corroborated through off-line electrolysis experiments designed to mimic the electrochemical processes taking place during ESI. Our findings highlight the necessity of using easily oxidizable internal standards in biophysical or biomedical ESI

  11. Bioactivity of immobilized hyaluronic acid derivatives regarding protein adsorption and cell adhesion

    Köwitsch, Alexander; Yang, Yuan; Ma, Ning;

    2011-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) was chemically modified either by oxidation to obtain aldehyde-HA (aHA) or 3,3'-dithiobis(propanoic hydrazide) to obtain thiol-HA (tHA) that was covalently immobilized on model substrata such as amino-terminated surfaces or gold. Knowledge about the effect of modification with...

  12. OPTIMIZATION OF THE CONDITIONS REQUIRED FOR CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL MODIFICATION OF THE YEAST WASTE FROM BEER MANUFACTURING TO PRODUCE ADHESIVE COMPOSITIONS

    Davud Kadimaliev,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available During the production of beer large amounts of yeast waste are generated. This paper considers the possible making of environmentally friendly adhesive compositions from such wastes. Chemical treatment of yeast wastes increases their adhesive characteristics. Chemical cross-linking with glutaric aldehyde and biological cross-linking by enzyme transglutaminase improves the moisture resistance of the adhesive compositions. In terms of their physical and mechanical parameters they are not inferior to glues of natural origin and can be used for bonding paper, cardboard, and wood. The bonding strength of paper was 421.8 N / m, and that of wood was 27.8 MPa.

  13. ELMO1 increases expression of extracellular matrix proteins and inhibits cell adhesion to ECMs.

    Shimazaki, A; Tanaka, Y; Shinosaki, T; Ikeda, M; Watada, H; Hirose, T; Kawamori, R; Maeda, S

    2006-11-01

    We have previously identified the engulfment and cell motility 1 (ELMO1) as a susceptibility gene for diabetic nephropathy. To elucidate the role of ELMO1 in the pathogenesis of chronic renal injury, we examined the expression of Elmo1 in the kidney of a rat model for chronic glomerulonephritis (uninephrectomy plus anti-Thy1.1 antibody [E30] injection). We found that the expression of the Elmo1 was significantly increased in the renal cortex and glomeruli of uninephrectomized rats injected with E30 compared to controls. By in situ hybridization, the expression of Elmo1 was shown to be elevated in the diseased kidney, especially in glomerular epithelial cells. In COS cells, the overexpression of ELMO1 resulted in a substantial increase in fibronectin expression, whereas the depletion of the ELMO1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting ELMO1 significantly suppressed the fibronectin expression in ELMO1 overexpressing and control cells. We also found that the expression of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) was significantly increased in ELMO1 overexpressing cells, and the ELMO1-induced increase in fibronectin was partially, but significantly, inhibited by siRNA targeting ILK. Furthermore, we identified that the cell adhesion to ECMs was considerably inhibited in cells overexpressing ELMO1. These results suggest that the ELMO1 contributes to the development and progression of chronic glomerular injury through the dysregulation of ECM metabolism and the reduction in cell adhesive properties to ECMs. PMID:17021600

  14. Enhanced CLIP uncovers IMP protein-RNA targets in human pluripotent stem cells important for cell adhesion and survival

    Conway, Anne E.; Van Nostrand, Eric L.; Pratt, Gabriel A.; Aigner, Stefan; Wilbert, Melissa L.; Sundararaman, Balaji; Freese, Peter; Lambert, Nicole J.; Sathe, Shashank; Liang, Tiffany Y.; Essex, Anthony; Landais, Severine; Burge, Christopher B.; Jones, D. Leanne; Yeo, Gene W.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) require precise control of post-transcriptional RNA networks to maintain proliferation and survival. Using enhanced UV crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (eCLIP), we identify RNA targets of the IMP/IGF2BP family of RNA-binding proteins in hPSCs. At the broad region- and binding site-level IMP1 and IMP2 show reproducible binding to a large and overlapping set of 3′UTR-enriched targets. RNA Bind-N-Seq applied to recombinant full-length IMP1 and IMP2 reveals CA-rich motifs that are enriched in eCLIP-defined binding sites. We observe that IMP1 loss in hPSCs recapitulates IMP1 phenotypes, including a reduction in cell adhesion and an increase in cell death. For cell adhesion, in hPSCs we find IMP1 maintains levels of integrin mRNA, specifically regulating RNA stability of ITGB5. Additionally, we show IMP1 can be linked to hPSC survival via direct target BCL2. Thus, transcriptome-wide binding profiles identify hPSC targets modulating well-characterized IMP1 roles. PMID:27068461

  15. Polyester Modification of the Mammalian TRPM8 Channel Protein: Implications for Structure and Function

    Chike Cao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The TRPM8 ion channel is expressed in sensory neurons and is responsible for sensing environmental cues, such as cold temperatures and chemical compounds, including menthol and icilin. The channel functional activity is regulated by various physical and chemical factors and is likely to be preconditioned by its molecular composition. Our studies indicate that the TRPM8 channel forms a structural-functional complex with the polyester poly-(R-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB. We identified by mass spectrometry a number of PHB-modified peptides in the N terminus of the TRPM8 protein and in its extracellular S3-S4 linker. Removal of PHB by enzymatic hydrolysis and site-directed mutagenesis of both the serine residues that serve as covalent anchors for PHB and adjacent hydrophobic residues that interact with the methyl groups of the polymer resulted in significant inhibition of TRPM8 channel activity. We conclude that the TRPM8 channel undergoes posttranslational modification by PHB and that this modification is required for its normal function.

  16. FLEXITau: Quantifying Post-translational Modifications of Tau Protein in Vitro and in Human Disease.

    Mair, Waltraud; Muntel, Jan; Tepper, Katharina; Tang, Shaojun; Biernat, Jacek; Seeley, William W; Kosik, Kenneth S; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Steen, Hanno; Steen, Judith A

    2016-04-01

    Tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), are associated with the aggregation of modified microtubule associated protein tau. This pathological state of tau is often referred to as "hyperphosphorylated". Due to limitations in technology, an accurate quantitative description of this state is lacking. Here, a mass spectrometry-based assay, FLEXITau, is presented to measure phosphorylation stoichiometry and provide an unbiased quantitative view of the tau post-translational modification (PTM) landscape. The power of this assay is demonstrated by measuring the state of hyperphosphorylation from tau in a cellular model for AD pathology, mapping, and calculating site occupancies for over 20 phosphorylations. We further employ FLEXITau to define the tau PTM landscape present in AD post-mortem brain. As shown in this study, the application of this assay provides mechanistic understanding of tau pathology that could lead to novel therapeutics, and we envision its further use in prognostic and diagnostic approaches for tauopathies. PMID:26877193

  17. Quantitation of protein post-translational modifications using isobaric tandem mass tags.

    Liang, Hui-Chung; Lahert, Emma; Pike, Ian; Ward, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins are known to modulate many cellular processes and their qualitative and quantitative evaluation is fundamental for understanding the mechanisms of biological events. Over the past decade, improvements in sample preparation techniques and enrichment strategies, the development of quantitative labeling strategies, the launch of a new generation of mass spectrometers and the creation of bioinformatics tools for the interrogation of ever larger datasets has established MS-based quantitative proteomics as a powerful workflow for global proteomics, PTM analysis and the elucidation of key biological mechanisms. With the advantage of their multiplexing capacity and the flexibility of an ever-growing family of different peptide-reactive groups, isobaric tandem mass tags facilitate quantitative proteomics and PTM experiments and enable higher sample throughput. In this review, we focus on the technical concept and utility of the isobaric tandem mass tag labeling approach to PTM analysis, including phosphorylation, glycosylation and S-nitrosylation. PMID:25697195

  18. [The role of oxidative protein modification and the gluthatione system in modulation of the redox status of breast epithelial cells].

    Stepovaya, E A; Shakhristova, E V; Ryazantseva, N V; Nosareva, O L; Yakushina, V D; Nosova, A I; Gulaya, V S; Stepanova, E A; Chil'chigashev, R I; Novitsky, V V

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the SH-group blocker N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) and thiol group protector 1,4-dithioerythritol (DTE) on the redox status of cells HBL-100 cells, oxidative modification of their proteins and the state of glutathione and thioredoxin systems have been investigated. Breast epithelial cells cultivated in the presence of NEM were characterized by decreased redox status, increased glutathione reductase activity, and increased concentrations of products of irreversible oxidative modification of protein and amino acids. Cultivation of HBL-100 cells in the presence of DTE resulted in a shift of the redox status towards reduction processes and increased reversible protein modification by glutathionylation. The proposed model of intracellular redox modulation may be used in the development of new therapeutic approaches to treat diseases accompanied by impaired redox homeostasis (e.g. oncologic, inflammatory, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disease). PMID:26973189

  19. Abdominal Adhesions

    ... adhesions? Abdominal adhesions can cause intestinal obstruction and female infertility—the inability to become pregnant after a year of trying. Abdominal adhesions can lead to female infertility by preventing fertilized eggs from reaching the uterus, ...

  20. Nitric oxide-based protein modification: formation and site-specificity of protein S-nitrosylation: Could protein S-nitrosylation be the unifying oxidative modification to explain the cellular signaling activity of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide?

    Clement, Marie-Veronique

    2014-10-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) function as signaling molecules in physiological settings by acting as second messengers in response to external stimuli such as growth factors, cytokines and hormones. The nature of the ROS involved in cell signaling as well as the underlying mechanisms by which ROS modify protein function to influence cellular processes have been unfolding over the past decade. ROS and RNS influence various cellular processes by altering the function of critical proteins via reversible oxidation of "reactive cysteine" residues. Protein S-nitrosylation is a mechanism of nitric oxide-based signaling, however, while the presence of NO is sufficient and may be a prerequisite for the formation of cysteine-SNO, we reasoned that if protein-SNO formation is a critical cystein modification for redox driven signal transduction, an increase in intracellular ROS such as H2O2 and O2(-), shown to be independently involved in cell signaling, might both promote the formation of protein-SNO. In this respect, the present study shows that an increase in protein-SNO was detected not only upon an increase in the intracellular level of nitric oxide (NO), but also following exposure to low concentration of exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or upon inhibition of the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase that results in increased intracellular O2(-). PMID:26461291

  1. Surface-tethered polymers to influence protein adsorption and microbial adhesion

    Norde, Willem

    2007-01-01

    In various applications it is desired that biological cells or protein molecules are immobilized at surfaces. Examples are enzymes or cells in bioreactors and biosensors, immuno-proteins in solid-state diagnostics and proteinaceous farmacons in drug delivery systems. In order to retain biological ac

  2. Heat treatment of peach fruit: modifications in the extracellular compartment and identification of novel extracellular proteins.

    Bustamante, Claudia A; Budde, Claudio O; Borsani, Julia; Lombardo, Verónica A; Lauxmann, Martin A; Andreo, Carlos S; Lara, María V; Drincovich, María F

    2012-11-01

    Ripening of peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) fruit is accompanied by dramatic cell wall changes that lead to softening. Post-harvest heat treatment is effective in delaying softening and preventing some chilling injury symptoms that this fruit exhibits after storage at low temperatures. In the present work, the levels of twelve transcripts encoding proteins involved in cell wall metabolism, as well as the differential extracellular proteome, were examined after a post-harvest heat treatment (HT; 39 °C for 3 days) of "Dixiland" peach fruit. A typical softening behaviour, in correlation with an increase in 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase-1 (PpACO1), was observed for peach maintained at 20 °C for 3 days (R3). Six transcripts encoding proteins involved in cell wall metabolism significantly increased in R3 with respect to peach at harvest, while six showed no modification or even decreased. In contrast, after HT, fruit maintained their firmness, exhibiting low PpACO1 level and significant lower levels of the twelve cell wall-modifying genes than in R3. Differential proteomic analysis of apoplastic proteins during softening and after HT revealed a significant decrease of DUF642 proteins after HT; as well as an increase of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPC) after softening. The presence of GAPC in the peach extracellular matrix was further confirmed by in situ immunolocalization and transient expression in tomato fruit. Though further studies are required to establish the function of DUF642 and GAPC in the apoplast, this study contributes to a deeper understanding of the events during peach softening and after HT with a focus on this key compartment. PMID:22902552

  3. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels.

    Smith, M Ryan; Vayalil, Praveen K; Zhou, Fen; Benavides, Gloria A; Beggs, Reena R; Golzarian, Hafez; Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Oliver, Patsy G; Smith, Robin A J; Murphy, Michael P; Velu, Sadanandan E; Landar, Aimee

    2016-08-01

    Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP), decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231) breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR) in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10µM) of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC) protein levels, although other protein levels were unaffected. This study

  4. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels

    M. Ryan Smith

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP, decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231 breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24 h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10 µM of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC protein levels, although other protein levels were

  5. Molecular cloning and characterization of a surface-localized adhesion protein in Mycoplasma bovis Hubei-1 strain.

    Xiaohui Zou

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis is an important pathogen that causes various bovine diseases, such as mastitis in cows and pneumonia in calves. The surface proteins are generally thought to play a central role in the pathogenesis of this organism. We screened the entire genome of M. bovis Hubei-1 and discovered a gene named vpmaX that encodes the 25 kDa variable surface lipoprotein A (VpmaX. Sequence analysis revealed that VpmaX contains several repetitive units and a typical bacterial lipoprotein signal sequence. The vpmaX gene was cloned and expressed in E. coli to obtain recombinant VpmaX (rVpmaX. Western blot analysis using a rabbit antibody against rVpmaX demonstrated that VpmaX is a membrane protein. Immunostaining visualized via confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that rVpmaX was able to adhere to embryonic bovine lung cells (EBL, and this was also confirmed by a sandwich ELISA. In summary, a surface-localized adhesion protein was identified in M. bovis Hubei-1.

  6. The adhesion protein IgSF9b is coupled to neuroligin 2 via S-SCAM to promote inhibitory synapse development.

    Woo, Jooyeon; Kwon, Seok-Kyu; Nam, Jungyong; Choi, Seungwon; Takahashi, Hideto; Krueger, Dilja; Park, Joohyun; Lee, Yeunkum; Bae, Jin Young; Lee, Dongmin; Ko, Jaewon; Kim, Hyun; Kim, Myoung-Hwan; Bae, Yong Chul; Chang, Sunghoe; Craig, Ann Marie; Kim, Eunjoon

    2013-06-10

    Synaptic adhesion molecules regulate diverse aspects of synapse formation and maintenance. Many known synaptic adhesion molecules localize at excitatory synapses, whereas relatively little is known about inhibitory synaptic adhesion molecules. Here we report that IgSF9b is a novel, brain-specific, homophilic adhesion molecule that is strongly expressed in GABAergic interneurons. IgSF9b was preferentially localized at inhibitory synapses in cultured rat hippocampal and cortical interneurons and was required for the development of inhibitory synapses onto interneurons. IgSF9b formed a subsynaptic domain distinct from the GABAA receptor- and gephyrin-containing domain, as indicated by super-resolution imaging. IgSF9b was linked to neuroligin 2, an inhibitory synaptic adhesion molecule coupled to gephyrin, via the multi-PDZ protein S-SCAM. IgSF9b and neuroligin 2 could reciprocally cluster each other. These results suggest a novel mode of inhibitory synaptic organization in which two subsynaptic domains, one containing IgSF9b for synaptic adhesion and the other containing gephyrin and GABAA receptors for synaptic transmission, are interconnected through S-SCAM and neuroligin 2. PMID:23751499

  7. Prediction of protein modification sites of pyrrolidone carboxylic acid using mRMR feature selection and analysis.

    Lu-Lu Zheng

    Full Text Available Pyrrolidone carboxylic acid (PCA is formed during a common post-translational modification (PTM of extracellular and multi-pass membrane proteins. In this study, we developed a new predictor to predict the modification sites of PCA based on maximum relevance minimum redundancy (mRMR and incremental feature selection (IFS. We incorporated 727 features that belonged to 7 kinds of protein properties to predict the modification sites, including sequence conservation, residual disorder, amino acid factor, secondary structure and solvent accessibility, gain/loss of amino acid during evolution, propensity of amino acid to be conserved at protein-protein interface and protein surface, and deviation of side chain carbon atom number. Among these 727 features, 244 features were selected by mRMR and IFS as the optimized features for the prediction, with which the prediction model achieved a maximum of MCC of 0.7812. Feature analysis showed that all feature types contributed to the modification process. Further site-specific feature analysis showed that the features derived from PCA's surrounding sites contributed more to the determination of PCA sites than other sites. The detailed feature analysis in this paper might provide important clues for understanding the mechanism of the PCA formation and guide relevant experimental validations.

  8. An Enzyme Cascade for Selective Modification of Tyrosine Residues in Structurally Diverse Peptides and Proteins.

    Struck, Anna-Winona; Bennett, Matthew R; Shepherd, Sarah A; Law, Brian J C; Zhuo, Ying; Wong, Lu Shin; Micklefield, Jason

    2016-03-01

    Bioorthogonal chemistry enables a specific moiety in a complex biomolecule to be selectively modified in the presence of many reactive functional groups and other cellular entities. Such selectivity has become indispensable in biology, enabling biomolecules to be derivatized, conjugated, labeled, or immobilized for imaging, biochemical assays, or therapeutic applications. Methyltransferase enzymes (MTase) that accept analogues of the cofactor S-adenosyl methionine have been widely deployed for alkyl-diversification and bioorthogonal labeling. However, MTases typically possess tight substrate specificity. Here we introduce a more flexible methodology for selective derivatization of phenolic moieties in complex biomolecules. Our approach relies on the tandem enzymatic reaction of a fungal tyrosinase and the mammalian catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), which can effect the sequential hydroxylation of the phenolic group to give an intermediate catechol moiety that is subsequently O-alkylated. When used in this combination, the alkoxylation is highly selective for tyrosine residues in peptides and proteins, yet remarkably tolerant to changes in the peptide sequence. Tyrosinase-COMT are shown to provide highly versatile and regioselective modification of a diverse range of substrates including peptide antitumor agents, hormones, cyclic peptide antibiotics, and model proteins. PMID:26867114

  9. Structure and post-translational modifications of the web silk protein spidroin-1 from Nephila spiders.

    dos Santos-Pinto, José Roberto Aparecido; Lamprecht, Günther; Chen, Wei-Qiang; Heo, Seok; Hardy, John George; Priewalder, Helga; Scheibel, Thomas Rainer; Palma, Mario Sergio; Lubec, Gert

    2014-06-13

    Spidroin-1 is one of the major ampullate silk proteins produced by spiders for use in the construction of the frame and radii of orb webs, and as a dragline to escape from predators. Only partial sequences of spidroin-1 produced by Nephila clavipes have been reported up to now, and there is no information on post-translational modifications (PTMs). A gel-based mass spectrometry strategy with ETD and CID fragmentation methods were used to sequence and determine the presence/location of any PTMs on the spidroin-1. Sequence coverage of 98.06%, 95.05%, and 98.37% were obtained for N. clavipes, Nephila edulis and for Nephila madagascariensis, respectively. Phosphorylation was the major PTM observed with 8 phosphorylation sites considered reliable on spidroin-1 produced by N. clavipes, 4 in N. madagascariensis and 2 for N. edulis. Dityrosine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (formed by oxidation of the spidroin-1) were observed, although the mechanism by which they are formed (i.e. exposure to UV radiation or to peroxidases in the major ampullate silk gland) is uncertain. Herein we present structural information on the spidroin-1 produced by three different Nephila species; these findings may be valuable for understanding the physicochemical properties of the silk proteins and moreover, future designs of recombinantly produced spider silk proteins. Biotechnological significance The present investigation shows for the first time spidroin structure and post-translational modifications observed on the major ampullate silk spidroin-1. The many site specific phosphorylations (localized within the structural motifs) along with the probably photoinduction of hydroxylations may be relevant for scientists in material science, biology, biochemistry and environmental scientists. Up to now all the mechanical properties of the spidroin have been characterized without any consideration about the existence of PTMs in the sequence of spidroins. Thus, these findings for major ampullate silk

  10. Guanine Nucleotide-Binding Proteins of the G(12) Family Shape Immune Functions by Controlling CD4(+) T Cell Adhesiveness and Motility

    S. Herroeder; P. Reichardt; A. Sassmann; B. Zimmermann; D. Jaeneke; J. Hoeckner; M.W. Hollmann; K.D. Fischer; S. Vogt; R. Grosse; N. Hogg; M. Gunzer; S. Offermanns; N. Wettschureck

    2009-01-01

    Integrin-mediated adhesion plays a central role in T cell trafficking and activation. Genetic inactivation of the guanine nucleotide-binding (G) protein alpha-subunits G alpha(12) and G alpha(13) resulted in an increased activity of integrin leukocyte-function-antigen-1 in murine CD4(+) T cells. The

  11. RACK1 Targets the Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase/Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway To Link Integrin Engagement with Focal Adhesion Disassembly and Cell Motility

    Vomastek, Tomáš; Iwanicki, M. P.; Schaeffer, J.; J.; Tarcsafalvi, A.; Parsons, J. T.; Weber, M. J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 23 (2007), s. 8296-8305. ISSN 0270-7306 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500200716 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : protein kinase * adhesion * cell Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 6.420, year: 2007

  12. WHEY PROTEIN-BASED WATER RESISTANT AND ENVIRONMENTALLY SAFE ADHESIVES FOR PLYWOOD

    Zongyan Zhao; Wenbo Wang; Zhenhua Gao; Mingruo Guo

    2011-01-01

    Whey protein is a renewable and environmentally safe biomaterial, a by-product of cheese production. It can be utilized for non-food applications for value-added products. The substances glyoxal (GO), glutaraldehyde (GA), polymeric methylene biphenyl diisocyanate (p-MDI), urea-formaldehyde (UF) resin, and phenol-formaldehyde oligomer (PFO) that contain reactive groups were applied together with whey protein as modifier in order to increase crosslinking density and molecular weight for improvi...

  13. 淀粉基木材胶黏剂的耐水性改性及表征%Water resistance modification and characterization of starch based wood adhesive

    谭海彦; 左迎峰; 张彦华; 翁向丽; 顾继友

    2012-01-01

    本文通过用酒石酸对玉米淀粉进行酯化处理制备酯化淀粉胶黏剂,然后用异氰酸酯对淀粉胶黏剂进行改性.讨论了反应温度和PVA用量对淀粉胶黏剂合成过程的影响,以及固含量和异氰酸酯对淀粉胶黏剂胶接强度和耐水性的影响.结果表明,反应温度为50~55℃,10%的PVA用量为淀粉量的15%时,胶液性能最佳;固含量为50%,加入少量异氰酸酯后,淀粉胶黏剂的胶接强度和耐水性有显著提高,达到杨木GB/T9846-2004Ⅱ类胶合板指标.采用差示扫描量热法(DSC)和热重分析仪(TGA)对异氰酸酯改性淀粉胶黏剂进行了表征,结果表明,异氰酸酯可以加快淀粉胶黏剂的固化速率,提高其热稳定性.%The esterified starch adhesive was prepared treated by esterification processing with tartaric acid on corn starch, and then the isocyanate was used to niodifiy the starch adhesive. The influences of reaction temperature and PVA content on starch adhesive synthesis process were studied, as well as the effects of the solid content and isocyanates on the bonding strength and water resistance of starch adhesive were discussed. The results show that when the reaction temperature 50 ~ 55 'C , PVA (10% ) amount to be 15% , the adhesive properties was the best; the starch adhesive bonding strength and water resistance were improved significantly when the solid content to be 50%, adding a small amount of isocyanate, the treatment increased obviously bonding strength and water resistance, the products could meet the requirement of poplar wood GB/T9846-2004 II plywood. By adopting differential scanning calorimetry ( DSC ) and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), the esterified starch adhesive with isocyanate were characterized. The findings show that isocyanates could accelerate the curing rate and improve the thermal stability of starch adhesive.

  14. Absolute quantification of protein and post-translational modification abundance with stable isotope–labeled synthetic peptides

    Kettenbach, Arminja N.; Rush, John; Gerber, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    In the analysis of biological systems, it is of interest to identify the components of the system and to monitor their changes in abundance under different conditions. The AQUA (for ‘absolute quantification’) method allows sensitive and specific targeted quantification of protein and post-translational modifications in complex protein mixtures using stable isotope–labeled peptides as internal standards. Each AQUA experiment is composed of two stages: method development and application to a bi...

  15. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels

    M. Ryan Smith; Vayalil, Praveen K.; Fen Zhou; Benavides, Gloria A; Beggs, Reena R.; Hafez Golzarian; Bhavitavya Nijampatnam; Oliver, Patsy G.; Smith, Robin A.J.; Murphy, Michael P.; Velu, Sadanandan E.; Aimee Landar

    2016-01-01

    Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compo...

  16. Amine-functionalized polypyrrole: Inherently cell adhesive conducting polymer.

    Lee, Jae Y; Schmidt, Christine E

    2015-06-01

    Electrically conducting polymers (CPs) have been recognized as novel biomaterials that can electrically communicate with biological systems. For their tissue engineering applications, CPs have been modified to promote cell adhesion for improved interactions between biomaterials and cells/tissues. Conventional approaches to improve cell adhesion involve the surface modification of CPs with biomolecules, such as physical adsorption of cell adhesive proteins and polycationic polymers, or their chemical immobilization; however, these approaches require additional multiple modification steps with expensive biomolecules. In this study, as a simple and effective alternative to such additional biomolecule treatment, we synthesized amine-functionalized polypyrrole (APPy) that inherently presents cell adhesion-supporting positive charges under physiological conditions. The synthesized APPy provides electrical activity in a moderate range and a hydrophilic surface compared to regular polypyrrole (PPy) homopolymers. Under both serum and serum-free conditions, APPy exhibited superior attachment of human dermal fibroblasts and Schwann cells compared to PPy homopolymer controls. Moreover, Schwann cell adhesion onto the APPy copolymer was at least similar to that on poly-l-lysine treated PPy controls. Our results indicate that amine-functionalized CP substrates will be useful to achieve good cell adhesion and potentially electrically stimulate various cells. In addition, amine functionality present on CPs can further serve as a novel and flexible platform to chemically tether various bioactive molecules, such as growth factors, antibodies, and chemical drugs. PMID:25294089

  17. Role of post-translational modifications on structure, function and pharmacology of class C G protein-coupled receptors

    Nørskov-Lauritsen, Lenea; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2015-01-01

    taste receptors (T1R1-3), one calcium-sensing (CaS) receptor, one GPCR, class C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6) receptor, and seven orphan receptors. G protein-coupled receptors undergo a number of post-translational modifications, which regulate their structure, function and/or pharmacology. Here, we...

  18. AND-34, a novel p130Cas-binding thymic stromal cell protein regulated by adhesion and inflammatory cytokines.

    Cai, D; Clayton, L K; Smolyar, A; Lerner, A

    1999-08-15

    We have characterized a novel cDNA whose steady state mRNA levels rise in the thymus 2 to 6 h following the induction of CD4+CD8+ thymocyte apoptosis by in vivo cross-linking of CD3 epsilon. This cDNA, AND-34-1, contains an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a protein with an amino-terminal Src homology 2 (SH2) domain and a carboxyl-terminal domain homologous to GDP-exchange factors (GEFs). Northern analysis demonstrates widespread expression of the AND-34 gene. Anti-CD3 epsilon treatment induces up-regulation of the AND-34 mRNA levels in total thymic RNA but not in RNA from purified thymocytes, suggesting that this transcript is derived from a thymic stromal cell population. IL-1 and TNF increase AND-34 transcript levels in thymic cortical reticular, thymic nurse, and fibroblast cell lines. In the thymic cortical reticular cell line, IL-1 and TNF induce a protein of the predicted 93-kDa size reactive with anti-AND-34 peptide antisera. Fifteen minutes of serum stimulation of vanadate-pretreated AND-34-1-transfected NIH3T3 fibroblasts induces tyrosine phosphorylation of AND-34 as well as coprecipitating 95-, 125-, and 130-kDa proteins. One of these tyrosine phosphorylated proteins is identified as p130Cas (Crk-associated substrate), a signaling molecule previously known to bind to a GDP-exchange factor (C3G) and inducibly associate with the focal adhesion complex. Consistent with such an association, AND-34 tyrosine phosphorylation is induced following adherence of trypsinized fibroblasts to fibronectin or poly-L -lysine-coated surfaces. PMID:10438950

  19. ADHESION-INDUCE PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHORY-LATION IS ASSOCIATED WITH INVASIVE AND METASTATIC POTENTIALS IN B16-BL6 MELANOMA CELLS

    Yan Chunhong; Han Rui

    1998-01-01

    Objective: The interaction of cancer cell with extracellular matrix (ECM) happens as an earlier and specific event in the invasive and metastatic cascade. To explore the key element(s) in cancer metastasis and observe the cell-ECM interaction and its role. Methods:To interrupt the cell-ECM interaction by suppression of adhesion-induced protein tyrosine phosphorylation with protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein in B16-B16mouse melanoma cells. Results: When B16-BL6 cells attached to Matrigel, a solubilized basement membrane preparation from EHS sarcoma, a 125 kDa protein increased its phosphotyrosine content dramatically. In contrast, when the cells were pretreated with 20μM or 30μM genistein for 3 days, it was revealed a less increase in the phosphotyrosine content of this 125 kDa protein inresponse to cell attachment to ECM was revealed with immunoblot analysis. Accompanied by the lower level of adhesion-induced protein tyrosine phosphorylation the genistein-treated cells exhibited a decrease in their capabilities of adhesion to Matrigel and invasion through reconstituted basement membrane. The potentials of and forming lung metastatic nodules were also shown to be decreased dramatically in these genistein-treated cells.Conclusion: It was suggested that protein tyrosine phosphorylation in cell-ECM interaction might be associated with invasive and metastatic potentials in cancer cells.

  20. A Tethered Agonist within the Ectodomain Activates the Adhesion G Protein-Coupled Receptors GPR126 and GPR133

    Ines Liebscher

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs comprise the second largest yet least studied class of the GPCR superfamily. aGPCRs are involved in many developmental processes and immune and synaptic functions, but the mode of their signal transduction is unclear. Here, we show that a short peptide sequence (termed the Stachel sequence within the ectodomain of two aGPCRs (GPR126 and GPR133 functions as a tethered agonist. Upon structural changes within the receptor ectodomain, this intramolecular agonist is exposed to the seven-transmembrane helix domain, which triggers G protein activation. Our studies show high specificity of a given Stachel sequence for its receptor. Finally, the function of Gpr126 is abrogated in zebrafish with a mutated Stachel sequence, and signaling is restored in hypomorphic gpr126 zebrafish mutants upon exogenous Stachel peptide application. These findings illuminate a mode of aGPCR activation and may prompt the development of specific ligands for this currently untargeted GPCR family.

  1. Cyclic di-GMP contributes to adaption and virulence of Bacillus thuringiensis through a riboswitch-regulated collagen adhesion protein.

    Tang, Qing; Yin, Kang; Qian, Hongliang; Zhao, Youwen; Wang, Wen; Chou, Shan-Ho; Fu, Yang; He, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP is a ubiquitous second messenger that regulates diverse cellular processes in bacteria by binding to various protein or riboswitch effectors. In Bacillus thuringiensis BMB171, a c-di-GMP riboswitch termed Bc2 RNA resides in the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of an mRNA that encodes a collagen adhesion protein (Cap). The expression of cap was strongly repressed in parent strain BMB171 because of the presence of Bc2 RNA but was significantly promoted in the Bc2 RNA markerless deletion mutant. Bc2 RNA acts as a genetic "on" switch, which forms an anti-terminator structure to promote cap read-through transcription upon c-di-GMP binding. As a result, cap transcription was de-repressed under high c-di-GMP levels. Therefore, Bc2 RNA regulates cap expression using a repression/de-repression model. Bc2 RNA-regulated Cap was also found to be tightly associated with motility, aggregation, exopolysaccharide secretion, biofilm formation, and virulence of B. thuringiensis BMB171 against its host insect Helicoverpa armigera. PMID:27381437

  2. Study of Polyacrylate Emulsion Composite Modification of Water-based Polyurethane Adhesive%聚丙烯酸酯乳液复合改性水性聚氨酯胶粘剂的研究

    赖少媚; 朱炳华; 林华玉; 潘滴云; 叶家灿

    2011-01-01

    研究了一种聚丙烯酸酯乳液复合改性水性聚氨酯胶粘剂的方法,以及聚丙烯酸酯的玻璃化温度Tg、功能单体等改变对改性后的PUA复合乳液的粘接性能的影响。结果表明:聚丙烯酸酯乳液的分子结构不同对复合乳液的粘接性能影响很大,通过改变聚丙烯酸酯乳液的用量、Tg、羟基含量、羧基含量等可以得到综合性能更优的复合乳液。%The method of a polyacrylate emulsion composite modification of waterborne polyurethane adhesive was studied,as well as polyacrylate glass transition temperature Tg,and functional monomer on the modified PUA composite emulsion adhesive properties.The results showed that polyacrylate emulsion with different molecular structures had great influence on the adhesive properties of composite emulsion,and by changing the polyacrylate emulsion dosage,Tg,content hydroxyl and,carboxyl of can obtained better comprehensive properties of composite emulsion.

  3. INCREASE OF ADHESION OF PAINT-AND-LACQUER MATERIALS TO WOOD THROUGH THE MODIFICATION OF ITS SURFACE BY BORON-NITROGEN COMPOUNDS

    Koteneva Irina Vasil'evna

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The authors demonstrate that the efficiency of protection of wooden structures, covered with paints and lacquer materials, from the influence of the environment, depends on the adhesion size. It is common knowledge that improvement of adhesion of capillary-porous materials to the wood, and, hence, the increase of the service life of the sheeting requires the reduction in the dimensions of the wood surface, as the reduction of diameters of capillaries leads to the growth of forces of capillary condensation and to the increase in the depth of penetration of paints into the material. Adhesion of a water-soluble acrylic paint and organic-soluble enamels to the surface of the wood modified by boron-nitrogen compounds and to unmodified wood is the subject of the research. It is identified that the increase in the adhesive durability of paint and varnish coverings if glued to the surface of the wood modified by boron-nitrogen compounds, is driven by the growth of the polarity of a substrate and the reduction of dimensions of the wood surface.

  4. Biologically engineered protein-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels: A cell-adhesive and plasmin-degradable biosynthetic material for tissue repair

    Halstenberg, Sven

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the research presented in this dissertation was to create a biomimetic artificial material that exhibits functions of extracellular matrix relevant for improved nerve regeneration. Neural adhesion peptides were photoimmobilized on highly crosslinked poly(ethylene glycol)-based substrates that were otherwise non-adhesive. Neurons adhered in two-dimensional patterns for eleven hours, but no neurites extended. To enable neurite extension and nerve regeneration in three dimensions, and to address the need for specifically cell adhesive and cell degradable materials for clinical applications in tissue repair in general, an artificial protein was recombinantly expressed and purified that consisted of a repeating amino acid sequence based on fibrinogen and anti-thrombin III. The recombinant protein contained integrin-binding RGD sites, plasmin degradation sites, heparin binding sites, and six thiol-containing cysteine residues as grafting sites for poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate via Michael-type conjugate addition. The resulting protein-graft-poly(ethylene glycol)acrylates were crosslinked by photopolymerization to form hydrogels. Although three-dimensional, RGD mediated and serine protease-dependent ingrowth of human fibroblasts into protein-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels occurred, only surface neurite outgrowth was observed from chick dorsal root ganglia. Axonal outgrowth depended on the concentration of matrix-bound heparin, suggesting that improved mechanical strength of the hydrogels and possible immobilization of neuroactive factors due to the presence of heparin promoted neurite outgrowth. Together, the above results show that specific biological functions can be harnessed by protein-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels to serve as matrices for tissue repair and regeneration. In particular, the two design objectives, specific cell adhesion and degradability by cell-associated proteases, were fulfilled by the material. In the future, this and

  5. Cellular prion protein is required for neuritogenesis: fine-tuning of multiple signaling pathways involved in focal adhesions and actin cytoskeleton dynamics

    Alleaume-Butaux A

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aurélie Alleaume-Butaux,1,2 Caroline Dakowski,1,2 Mathéa Pietri,1,2 Sophie Mouillet-Richard,1,2 Jean-Marie Launay,3,4 Odile Kellermann,1,2 Benoit Schneider1,2 1INSERM, UMR-S 747, 2Paris Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR-S 747, 3Public Hospital of Paris, Department of Biochemistry, INSERM UMR-S 942, Lariboisière Hospital, Paris, France; 4Pharma Research Department, Hoffmann La Roche Ltd, Basel, Switzerland Abstract: Neuritogenesis is a dynamic phenomenon associated with neuronal differentiation that allows a rather spherical neuronal stem cell to develop dendrites and axon, a prerequisite for the integration and transmission of signals. The acquisition of neuronal polarity occurs in three steps: (1 neurite sprouting, which consists of the formation of buds emerging from the postmitotic neuronal soma; (2 neurite outgrowth, which represents the conversion of buds into neurites, their elongation and evolution into axon or dendrites; and (3 the stability and plasticity of neuronal polarity. In neuronal stem cells, remodeling and activation of focal adhesions (FAs associated with deep modifications of the actin cytoskeleton is a prerequisite for neurite sprouting and subsequent neurite outgrowth. A multiple set of growth factors and interactors located in the extracellular matrix and the plasma membrane orchestrate neuritogenesis by acting on intracellular signaling effectors, notably small G proteins such as RhoA, Rac, and Cdc42, which are involved in actin turnover and the dynamics of FAs. The cellular prion protein (PrPC, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchored membrane protein mainly known for its role in a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases, has emerged as a central player in neuritogenesis. Here, we review the contribution of PrPC to neuronal polarization and detail the current knowledge on the signaling pathways fine-tuned by PrPC to promote neurite sprouting, outgrowth, and maintenance. We emphasize that Pr

  6. The role of heparan sulfate on adhesion of 47 and 51 kDa outer membrane proteins of Helicobacter pylori to gastric cancer cells.

    López-Bolaños, Claudia C; Guzmán-Murillo, Maria A; Ruiz-Bustos, Eduardo; Ascencio, Felipe

    2009-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a common gastrointestinal pathogenic bacterium in humans and the usual preference for the stomach's outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are antigens involved in the adhesion process. Through SDS-PAGE and blotting analyses, using horseradish peroxidase-labeled heparan sulfate (HRP-HS) as a probe, we identified H. pylori OMPs with affinity for heparan sulfate (OMP-HS). Biotin-streptavidin bacterial-adhesion assay was used to evaluate participation of OMP-HS in the adhesion of H. pylori to semi-confluent HeLa S3 and Kato III cell monolayers. The results provide evidence that induction of antibodies against 2 OMP-HSs (HSBP-47 and HSBP-51) could reduce binding of H. pylori to both cell lines and induce detachment of cell-bound bacteria from infected cultured cells. PMID:19396245

  7. Peptidomics of Peptic Digest of Selected Potato Tuber Proteins: Post-Translational Modifications and Limited Cleavage Specificity.

    C K Rajendran, Subin R; Mason, Beth; Udenigwe, Chibuike C

    2016-03-23

    Bioinformatic tools are useful in predicting bioactive peptides from food proteins. This study was focused on using bioinformatics and peptidomics to evaluate the specificity of peptide release and post-translational modifications (PTMs) in a peptic digest of potato protein isolate. Peptides in the protein hydrolysate were identified by LC-MS/MS and subsequently aligned to their parent potato tuber proteins. Five major proteins were selected for further analysis, namely, lipoxygenase, α-1,4-glucan phosphorylase, annexin, patatin, and polyubiquitin, based on protein coverage, abundance, confidence levels, and function. Comparison of the in silico peptide profile generated with ExPASy PeptideCutter and experimental peptidomics data revealed several differences. The experimental peptic cleavage sites were found to vary in number and specificity from PeptideCutter predictions. Average peptide chain length was also found to be higher than predicted with hexapeptides as the smallest detected peptides. Moreover, PTMs, particularly Met oxidation and Glu/Asp deamidation, were observed in some peptides, and these were unaccounted for during in silico analysis. PTMs can be formed during aging of potato tubers, or as a result of processing conditions during protein isolation and hydrolysis. The findings provide insights on the limitations of current bioinformatics tools for predicting bioactive peptide release from proteins, and on the existence of structural modifications that can alter the peptide bioactivity and functionality. PMID:26947758

  8. Computational Identification of Post Translational Modification Regulated RNA Binding Protein Motifs.

    Andrew S Brown

    Full Text Available RNA and its associated RNA binding proteins (RBPs mitigate a diverse array of cellular functions and phenotypes. The interactions between RNA and RBPs are implicated in many roles of biochemical processing by the cell such as localization, protein translation, and RNA stability. Recent discoveries of novel mechanisms that are of significant evolutionary advantage between RBPs and RNA include the interaction of the RBP with the 3' and 5' untranslated region (UTR of target mRNA. These mechanisms are shown to function through interaction of a trans-factor (RBP and a cis-regulatory element (3' or 5' UTR by the binding of a RBP to a regulatory-consensus nucleic acid motif region that is conserved throughout evolution. Through signal transduction, regulatory RBPs are able to temporarily dissociate from their target sites on mRNAs and induce translation, typically through a post-translational modification (PTM. These small, regulatory motifs located in the UTR of mRNAs are subject to a loss-of-function due to single polymorphisms or other mutations that disrupt the motif and inhibit the ability to associate into the complex with RBPs. The identification of a consensus motif for a given RBP is difficult, time consuming, and requires a significant degree of experimentation to identify each motif-containing gene on a genomic scale. We have developed a computational algorithm to analyze high-throughput genomic arrays that contain differential binding induced by a PTM for a RBP of interest-RBP-PTM Target Scan (RPTS. We demonstrate the ability of this application to accurately predict a PTM-specific binding motif to an RBP that has no antibody capable of distinguishing the PTM of interest, negating the use of in-vitro exonuclease digestion techniques.

  9. Reversible Conformational Change in the Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Protein Masks Its Adhesion Domains

    Herrera, Raul; Anderson, Charles; Kumar, Krishan; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Nguyen, Vu; Burkhardt, Martin; Reiter, Karine; Shimp, Richard; Howard, Randall F.; Srinivasan, Prakash; Nold, Michael J.; Ragheb, Daniel; Shi, Lirong; DeCotiis, Mark; Aebig, Joan

    2015-01-01

    The extended rod-like Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP) is comprised of three primary domains: a charged N terminus that binds heparan sulfate proteoglycans, a central NANP repeat domain, and a C terminus containing a thrombospondin-like type I repeat (TSR) domain. Only the last two domains are incorporated in RTS,S, the leading malaria vaccine in phase 3 trials that, to date, protects about 50% of vaccinated children against clinical disease. A seroepidemiological study in...

  10. Unbinding and unfolding of adhesion protein complexes through stretching: Interplay between shear and tensile mechanical clamps

    Rozycki, Bartosz; Mioduszewski, Lukasz; Cieplak, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, we analyze mechanically induced dissociation and unfolding of the protein complex CD48-2B4. This heterodimer is an indispensable component of the immunological system: 2B4 is a receptor on natural killer cells whereas CD48 is expressed on surfaces of various immune cells. So far, its mechanostability has not been assessed either experimentally or theoretically. We find that the dissociation processes strongly depend on the direction of pull...

  11. Plasma Surface Modification for Immobilization of Bone Morphogenic Protein-2 on Polycaprolactone Scaffolds

    Kim, Byung Hoon; Myung, Sung Woon; Jung, Sang Chul; Ko, Yeong Mu

    2013-11-01

    The immobilization of recombinant human bone formation protein-2 (rhBMP-2) on polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds was performed by plasma polymerization. RhBMP-2, which induces osteoblast differentiation in various cell types, is a growth factor that plays an important role in bone formation and repair. The surface of the PCL scaffold was functionalized with the carboxyl groups of plasma-polymerized acrylic acid (PPAA) thin films. Plasma polymerization was carried out at a discharge power of 60 W at an acrylic acid flow rate of 7 sccm for 5 min. The PPAA thin film exhibited moderate hydrophilic properties and possessed a high density of carboxyl groups. Carboxyl groups and rhBMP-2 on the PCL scaffolds surface were identified by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The alkaline phosphatase activity assay showed that the rhBMP-2 immobilized PCL scaffold increased the level of MG-63 cell differentiation. Plasma surface modification for the preparation of biomaterials, such as biofunctionalized polymer scaffolds, can be used for the binding of bioactive molecules in tissue engineering.

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the yeast tRNA-thiouridine modification protein 1 (Tum1p)

    Yeast tRNA-thiouridine modification protein 1 was overpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. The crystals belonged to space group I41 and diffracted to a resolution of 1.9 Å. Yeast tRNA-thiouridine modification protein 1 (Tum1p), a crucial component of the Urm1 system, is believed to play important roles in protein urmylation and tRNA-thiouridine modification. Previous studies have demonstrated that the conserved residue Cys259 in the C-terminal rhodanese-like domain of Tum1p is essential for these sulfur-transfer activities. Here, recombinant Tum1p protein has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). After purification, crystals of Tum1p were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 1.9 Å resolution. The preliminary X-ray data showed that the tetragonal Tum1p crystal belonged to space group I41, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 120.94, c = 48.35 Å. The asymmetric unit of the crystal was assumed to contain one protein molecule, giving a Matthews coefficient of 2.41 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 49.0%

  13. Cell adhesion and growth enabled by biomimetic oligopeptide modification of a polydopamine-poly(ethylene oxide) protein repulsive surface

    Kotelnikov, Ilya; Musílková, Jana; Novotná, Katarína; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Rypáček, František; Bačáková, Lucie; Proks, Vladimír

    Prague : Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry AS CR, 2015. s. 79. ISBN 978-80-85009-82-8. [Functional Polymers at Bio-Material Interfaces - 79th Prague Meeting on Macromolecules. 28.06.2015-02.07.2015, Prague] Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:67985823 Keywords : polymer * surface characterization Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  14. Endothelial Cell Lining of PET Vascular Prostheses: Modification with Degradable Polyester-based Copolymers and Adhesive Protein Multi-layers

    Chlupáč, Jaroslav; Filová, Elena; Riedel, Tomáš; Brynda, Eduard; Pamula, E.; Bačáková, Lucie

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 2 (2014), s. 1000139. ISSN 2157-7552 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/10/1106; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1857; GA MZd(CZ) NT11270; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0029 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : blood vessel prosthesis * polyethylene terephthalate * poly (L-lactide-co-glycolide) * endothelial cells Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics; CD - Macromolecular Chemistry (UMCH-V)

  15. A fucan from the brown seaweed Spatoglossum schröederi inhibits Chinese hamster ovary cell adhesion to several extracellular matrix proteins

    Rocha H.A.O.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Fucans, a family of sulfated polysaccharides present in brown seaweed, have several biological activities. Their use as drugs would offer the advantage of no potential risk of contamination with viruses or particles such as prions. A fucan prepared from Spatoglossum schröederi was tested as a possible inhibitor of cell-matrix interactions using wild-type Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1 and the mutant type deficient in xylosyltransferase (CHO-745. The effect of this polymer on adhesion properties with specific extracellular matrix components was studied using several matrix proteins as substrates for cell attachment. Treatment with the polymer inhibited the adhesion of fibronectin to both CHO-K1 (2 x 10(5(and CHO-745 (2 x 10(5 and 5 x 10(5 cells. No effect was detected with laminin, using the two cell types. On the other hand, adhesion to vitronectin was inhibited in CHO-K1 cells and adhesion to type I collagen was inhibited in CHO-745 cells. In spite of this inhibition, the fucan did not affect either cell proliferation or cell cycle. These results demonstrate that this polymer is a new anti-adhesive compound with potential pharmacological applications.

  16. The Ras suppressor Rsu-1 binds to the LIM 5 domain of the adaptor protein PINCH1 and participates in adhesion-related functions

    Rsu-1 is a highly conserved leucine rich repeat (LRR) protein that is expressed ubiquitously in mammalian cells. Rsu-1 was identified based on its ability to inhibit transformation by Ras, and previous studies demonstrated that ectopic expression of Rsu-1 inhibited anchorage-independent growth of Ras-transformed cells and human tumor cell lines. Using GAL4-based yeast two-hybrid screening, the LIM domain protein, PINCH1, was identified as the binding partner of Rsu-1. PINCH1 is an adaptor protein that localizes to focal adhesions and it has been implicated in the regulation of adhesion functions. Subdomain mapping in yeast revealed that Rsu-1 binds to the LIM 5 domain of PINCH1, a region not previously identified as a specific binding domain for any other protein. Additional testing demonstrated that PINCH2, which is highly homologous to PINCH1, except in the LIM 5 domain, does not interact with Rsu-1. Glutathione transferase fusion protein binding studies determined that the LRR region of Rsu-1 interacts with PINCH1. Transient expression studies using epitope-tagged Rsu-1 and PINCH1 revealed that Rsu-1 co-immunoprecipitated with PINCH1 and colocalized with vinculin at sites of focal adhesions in mammalian cells. In addition, endogenous P33 Rsu-1 from 293T cells co-immunoprecipitated with transiently expressed myc-tagged PINCH1. Furthermore, RNAi-induced reduction in Rsu-1 RNA and protein inhibited cell attachment, and while previous studies demonstrated that ectopic expression of Rsu-1 inhibited Jun kinase activation, the depletion of Rsu-1 resulted in activation of Jun and p38 stress kinases. These studies demonstrate that Rsu-1 interacts with PINCH1 in mammalian cells and functions, in part, by altering cell adhesion

  17. Chemical modification of PDMS surface without impacting the viscoelasticity: Model systems for a better understanding of elastomer/elastomer adhesion and friction

    DIRANY, Mohammed; DIES, Laëtitia; Restagno, Frédéric; Léger, Liliane; Poulard, Christophe; MIQUELARD-GARNIER, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    The influence of both viscoelastic and interfacial parameters on the surface properties of elastomers is difficult to study. Here, we describe a simple route to achieve surface modification of PDMS without impacting the viscoelastic properties of the bulk. PEG modified PDMS surfaces were synthesized by two step surface modification based on hydrosilylation. The covalent grafting of PEG on the surface has been evidenced by AFM and ATR-FTIR, and its effect on the hydrophilicity characterized by...

  18. Stainless steel modified with poly(ethylene glycol) can prevent protein adsorption but not bacterial adhesion

    Wei, Jiang; Bagge, Dorthe; Gram, Lone;

    2003-01-01

    . The chemical composition and uniformity of the surfaces were determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight static secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SSIMS) in the imaging mode. The effects of PEI concentration and different substrate pre-cleaning methods on the structure....... The surface density of PEI was shown to increase with increasing PEI concentration (up to 30 mg/ml), as determined from XPS measurements, and subsequently produced the PEG layer with the highest density of attached chains. In model experiments using beta-lactoglobulin no protein adsorption was detected...

  19. Post-translational modifications of chicken myelin basic protein charge components.

    Kim, Jeongkwon; Zhang, Rui; Strittmatter, Eric F; Smith, Richard D; Zand, Robert

    2009-02-01

    Purified myelin basic protein (MBP) from various species contains several post-translationally modified forms termed charge components or charge isomers. Chicken MBP contains four charge components denoted as C1, C2, C3 and C8. (The C8 isomer is a complex mixture and was not investigated in this study.) These findings are in contrast to those found for human, bovine and other mammalian MBP's. Mammalian MBP's, each of which contain seven or eight charge components depending on the analysis of the CM-52 chromatographic curves and the PAGE gels obtained under basic pH conditions. Chicken MBP components C1, C2 and C3 were treated with trypsin and endoproteinase Glu-C. The resulting digests were analyzed by capillary liquid chromatography combined with either an ion trap tandem mass spectrometer or with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. This instrumentation permitted establishing the amino acid composition and the determination of the post-translational modifications for each of the three charge components C1-C3. With the exception of N-terminal acetylation, the post-translational modifications were partial. The C1 component lacks any phosphorylated sites, a finding in agreement with the analysis of other MBP species. It also had a single methylation at R105 as did the components C2 and C3. The C2 component contains ten phosphorylated sites (S7, S18, S33, S64, S73, T96, S113, S141, S164, and S168), and modified arginine to citrulline residues at R24, and R165. Component C3 contains eight phosphorylated sites (S7, S33, S64, T96, S113, S141, S164, and S168), and citrulline residues at Arginine 41, R24 and R165. Partial deamidation of glutamine residues Q71, Q101 and Q146 were present in addition to asparagine N90 that was found in all three charge components. The glutamine at residue 3 is partially deamidated in isomers C1 and C2, whereas glutamine 74 and asparagine 83 were found not to be deamidated. Comparison of the PTM's of MBP's isolated

  20. Unbinding and unfolding of adhesion protein complexes through stretching: interplay between shear and tensile mechanical clamps.

    Różycki, Bartosz; Mioduszewski, Łukasz; Cieplak, Marek

    2014-11-01

    Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, we analyze mechanically induced dissociation and unfolding of the protein complex CD48-2B4. This heterodimer is an indispensable component of the immunological system: 2B4 is a receptor on natural killer cells whereas CD48 is expressed on surfaces of various immune cells. So far, its mechanostability has not been assessed either experimentally or theoretically. We find that the dissociation processes strongly depend on the direction of pulling and may take place in several pathways. Interestingly, the CD48-2B4 interface can be divided into three distinct patches that act as units when resisting the pulling forces. At experimentally accessible pulling speeds, the characteristic mechanostability forces are in the range between 100 and 200 pN, depending on the pulling direction. These characteristic forces need not be associated with tensile forces involved in the act of separation of the complex because prior shear-involving unraveling within individual proteins may give rise to a higher force peak. PMID:25142868

  1. Adrm1, a putative cell adhesion regulating protein, is a novel proteasome-associated factor

    Jørgensen, Jakob Ploug; Lauridsen, Anne-Marie; Kristensen, Poul; Dissing, Karen; Johnsen, Anders H; Hendil, Klavs B; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2006-01-01

    We have identified Adrm1 as a novel component of the regulatory ATPase complex of the 26 S proteasome: Adrm1 was precipitated with an antibody to proteasomes and vice versa. Adrm1 co-migrated with proteasomes on gel-filtration chromatography and non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis....... Adrm1 has been described as an interferon-gamma-inducible, heavily glycosylated membrane protein of 110 kDa. However, we found Adrm1 in mouse tissues only as a 42 kDa peptide, corresponding to the mass of the non-glycosylated peptide chain, and it could not be induced in HeLa cells with interferon......-existing 26 S proteasomes in cell extracts. Adrm1 may be distantly related to the yeast proteasome subunit Rpn13, mutants of which are reported to display no obvious phenotype. Accordingly, knock-down of Adrm1 in HeLa cells had no effect on the amount of proteasomes, or on degradation of bulk cell protein, or...

  2. Ion induced modification of polymers at energies between 100 keV and 1 GeV applied for optical waveguides and improved metal adhesion

    Polymers are a class of materials widely used for a broad field of applications. Ion irradiation ranging from several eV to GeV is a quite efficient tool to modify the properties of polymers like wettability, optical properties, adhesion between metal and polymer surfaces. In this paper ion induced chemical changes of polymers will be discussed in relation to the modified macroscopic properties. In the field of optical telecommunication, polymers are discussed as a new class of materials for the fabrication of passive optical devices. Ion irradiation is a promising method to generate structures with a modified index of refraction, which is necessary for the guidance of light with different wavelengths in optical devices. Modified optical properties of different polymers under ion irradiation will be discussed. Analytical investigations like infrared measurements and measurement of the outgassing reaction products during irradiation will be discussed to interpret the chemical changes of the polymers. Metallization of polymers is of interest in several fields of application like for multilayer systems in microtechnology or casings for radiation shielding for example. Ion beam mixing at low energies is a promising method to improve the metal/polymer adhesion. Also ion irradiation at high energies applied to a metal/polymer multilayer can improve the adhesion of a metal layer to a polymer surface, if not sufficient. Different metal/polymer systems will be presented as well as specific applications

  3. Controllable degradation of medical magnesium by electrodeposited composite films of mussel adhesive protein (Mefp-1) and chitosan.

    Jiang, Ping-Li; Hou, Rui-Qing; Chen, Cheng-Dong; Sun, Lan; Dong, Shi-Gang; Pan, Jin-Shan; Lin, Chang-Jian

    2016-09-15

    To control the degradation rate of medical magnesium in body fluid environment, biocompatible films composed of Mussel Adhesive Protein (Mefp-1) and chitosan were electrodeposited on magnesium surface in cathodic constant current mode. The compositions and structures of the films were characterized by atomic force microscope (AFM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS). And the corrosion protection performance was investigated using electrochemical measurements and immersion tests in simulated body fluid (Hanks' solution). The results revealed that Mefp-1 and chitosan successfully adhered on the magnesium surface and formed a protective film. Compared with either single Mefp-1 or single chitosan film, the composite film of chitosan/Mefp-1/chitosan (CPC (chitosan/Mefp-1/chitosan)) exhibited lower corrosion current density, higher polarization resistance and more homogenous corrosion morphology and thus was able to effectively control the degradation rate of magnesium in simulated body environment. In addition, the active attachment and spreading of MC3T3-E1 cells on the CPC film coated magnesium indicated that the CPC film was significantly able to improve the biocompatibility of the medical magnesium. PMID:27309944

  4. Heat shock protein 90β stabilizes focal adhesion kinase and enhances cell migration and invasion in breast cancer cells

    Xiong, Xiangyang [Center for Experimental Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, 17 Yongwai Street, Donghu District, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330047 (China); Wang, Yao [Center for Experimental Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, 17 Yongwai Street, Donghu District, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Liu, Chengmei [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330047 (China); Lu, Quqin [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Liu, Tao [Center for Experimental Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, 17 Yongwai Street, Donghu District, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Chen, Guoan [Department of Hematology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Rao, Hai [Department of Molecular Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Luo, Shiwen, E-mail: shiwenluo@ncu.edu.cn [Center for Experimental Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, 17 Yongwai Street, Donghu District, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China)

    2014-08-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) acts as a regulator of cellular signaling and may promote cell spreading, motility, invasion and survival in malignancy. Elevated expression and activity of FAK frequently correlate with tumor cell metastasis and poor prognosis in breast cancer. However, the mechanisms by which the turnover of FAK is regulated remain elusive. Here we report that heat shock protein 90β (HSP90β) interacts with FAK and the middle domain (amino acids 233–620) of HSP90β is mainly responsible for this interaction. Furthermore, we found that HSP90β regulates FAK stability since HSP90β inhibitor 17-AAG triggers FAK ubiquitylation and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation. Moreover, disrupted FAK-HSP90β interaction induced by 17-AAG contributes to attenuation of tumor cell growth, migration, and invasion. Together, our results reveal how HSP90β regulates FAK stability and identifies a potential therapeutic strategy to breast cancer. - Highlights: • HSP90β protects FAK from degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. • Inhibition of HSP90β or FAK attenuates tumorigenesis of breast cancer cells. • Genetic repression of HSP90β or FAK inhibits tumor cell migration and proliferation. • Inhibition of HSP90β or FAK interferes cell invasion and cytoskeleton.

  5. Extracellular matrix protein ITGBL1 promotes ovarian cancer cell migration and adhesion through Wnt/PCP signaling and FAK/SRC pathway.

    Sun, Li; Wang, Defeng; Li, Xiaotian; Zhang, Lingling; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Yingjie

    2016-07-01

    Despite the advances in cancer treatment and the progresses in tumor biological, ovarian cancer remains a bad situation. In current study, we found a novel extracellular matrix protein, ITGBL1, which is highly expressed in ovarian cancer tissues by immunohistochemistry examination. The expression pattern of ITGBL1 in malignant tissues inspired us to investigate its role in ovarian cancer progression. Both loss- and gain-function assays revealed that ITGBL1 could promote ovarian cancer cell migration and adhesion. As it's a secreted protein, we further used recombinant ITGBL1 protein treated cancer cells and found that ITGBL1 promotes cell migration and adhesion in a concentration dependent manner. Furthermore, we found that ITGBL1 not only influences the activity of Wnt/PCP signaling but also affects FAK/src pathway in vitro. Taken together, our results suggest that highly expressed ITGBL1 could promotes cancer cell migration and adhesion in ovarian cancer and as a secreted protein, ITGBL1 might be a novel biomarker for ovarian cancer diagnosis. PMID:27261588

  6. Recruitment of focal adhesion kinase and paxillin to β1 integrin promotes cancer cell migration via mitogen activated protein kinase activation

    Integrin-extracellular matrix interactions activate signaling cascades such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK). Integrin binding to extracellular matrix increases tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Inhibition of FAK activity by expression of its carboxyl terminus decreases cell motility, and cells from FAK deficient mice also show reduced migration. Paxillin is a focal adhesion protein which is also phosphorylated on tyrosine. FAK recruitment of paxillin to the cell membrane correlates with Shc phosphorylation and activation of MAPK. Decreased FAK expression inhibits papilloma formation in a mouse skin carcinogenesis model. We previously demonstrated that MAPK activation was required for growth factor induced in vitro migration and invasion by human squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) lines. Adapter protein recruitment to integrin subunits was examined by co-immunoprecipitation in SCC cells attached to type IV collagen or plastic. Stable clones overexpressing FAK or paxillin were created using the lipofection technique. Modified Boyden chambers were used for invasion assays. In the present study, we showed that FAK and paxillin but not Shc are recruited to the β1 integrin cytoplasmic domain following attachment of SCC cells to type IV collagen. Overexpression of either FAK or paxillin stimulated cancer cell migration on type IV collagen and invasion through reconstituted basement membrane which was dependent on MAPK activity. We concluded that recruitment of focal adhesion kinase and paxillin to β1 integrin promoted cancer cell migration via the mitogen activated protein kinase pathway

  7. Recruitment of focal adhesion kinase and paxillin to β1 integrin promotes cancer cell migration via mitogen activated protein kinase activation

    Ohannessian Arthur

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integrin-extracellular matrix interactions activate signaling cascades such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK. Integrin binding to extracellular matrix increases tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK. Inhibition of FAK activity by expression of its carboxyl terminus decreases cell motility, and cells from FAK deficient mice also show reduced migration. Paxillin is a focal adhesion protein which is also phosphorylated on tyrosine. FAK recruitment of paxillin to the cell membrane correlates with Shc phosphorylation and activation of MAPK. Decreased FAK expression inhibits papilloma formation in a mouse skin carcinogenesis model. We previously demonstrated that MAPK activation was required for growth factor induced in vitro migration and invasion by human squamous cell carcinoma (SCC lines. Methods Adapter protein recruitment to integrin subunits was examined by co-immunoprecipitation in SCC cells attached to type IV collagen or plastic. Stable clones overexpressing FAK or paxillin were created using the lipofection technique. Modified Boyden chambers were used for invasion assays. Results In the present study, we showed that FAK and paxillin but not Shc are recruited to the β1 integrin cytoplasmic domain following attachment of SCC cells to type IV collagen. Overexpression of either FAK or paxillin stimulated cancer cell migration on type IV collagen and invasion through reconstituted basement membrane which was dependent on MAPK activity. Conclusions We concluded that recruitment of focal adhesion kinase and paxillin to β1 integrin promoted cancer cell migration via the mitogen activated protein kinase pathway.

  8. Posttranslational modification of Birch and Ragweed allergen proteins by common gas phase pollutants, NO2 and O3

    Mahmood, M. A.; Pope, F.; Bloss, W.

    2015-12-01

    The global incidence of hay fever has been rising for decades, however, the underlying reasons behind this rise remain unclear. It is hypothesized that exposure of pollen to common gas phase pollutants, such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3), increases the allergenicity of the pollen and thus increases hay fever incidence. Since atmospheric pollutants tend to have greater concentrations within urban areas (in particular NO2) the hypothesis suggests that greater allergenicity should occur in urban areas. Indeed, several studies do suggest higher hay fever incidence within urban areas compared to rural areas. Previous published work suggests a link between increased allergies with changes in the chemical composition of the pollen protein via posttranslational modification of the protein. This study investigates the posttranslational modification of two highly allergenic pollen species (Birch and Ragweed) that are common in Europe. Within the laboratory, we expose pollen grains to atmospherically relevant exposures of gas phase NO2, O3 and other common gas phase oxidants under a range of environmentally relevant conditions. The effects of the environmentally relevant exposures on the biochemistry of the pollen grains were probed using a proteomic approach (liquid chromatography coupled ultra-high resolution spectrometer). Our findings indicate the interaction between gas phase pollutants and pollen cause protein specific modifications; in particular, nitration occurs upon tyrosine residues and nitrosylation on cysteine residues. Possibly, these modifications may affect the immune response of the pollen protein, which may suggest a possible reason for increased allergies in reaction to such biologically altered protein. The laboratory-derived results will be supported with a time series analysis of asthma incidence rates for the London area, which take into account the pollen count, and pollutant concentrations. The implications of the results will be discussed

  9. N-Glycosylation at the SynCAM (Synaptic Cell Adhesion Molecule) Immunoglobulin Interface Modulates Synaptic Adhesion

    A Fogel; Y Li; Q Wang; T Lam; Y Modis; T Biederer

    2011-12-31

    Select adhesion molecules connect pre- and postsynaptic membranes and organize developing synapses. The regulation of these trans-synaptic interactions is an important neurobiological question. We have previously shown that the synaptic cell adhesion molecules (SynCAMs) 1 and 2 engage in homo- and heterophilic interactions and bridge the synaptic cleft to induce presynaptic terminals. Here, we demonstrate that site-specific N-glycosylation impacts the structure and function of adhesive SynCAM interactions. Through crystallographic analysis of SynCAM 2, we identified within the adhesive interface of its Ig1 domain an N-glycan on residue Asn(60). Structural modeling of the corresponding SynCAM 1 Ig1 domain indicates that its glycosylation sites Asn(70)/Asn(104) flank the binding interface of this domain. Mass spectrometric and mutational studies confirm and characterize the modification of these three sites. These site-specific N-glycans affect SynCAM adhesion yet act in a differential manner. Although glycosylation of SynCAM 2 at Asn(60) reduces adhesion, N-glycans at Asn(70)/Asn(104) of SynCAM 1 increase its interactions. The modification of SynCAM 1 with sialic acids contributes to the glycan-dependent strengthening of its binding. Functionally, N-glycosylation promotes the trans-synaptic interactions of SynCAM 1 and is required for synapse induction. These results demonstrate that N-glycosylation of SynCAM proteins differentially affects their binding interface and implicate post-translational modification as a mechanism to regulate trans-synaptic adhesion.

  10. Composites containing albumin protein or cyanoacrylate adhesives and biodegradable scaffolds: I. Acute wound closure study in a rat model

    Hoffman, Grant T.; Soller, Eric C.; Heintzelman, Douglas L.; Duffy, Mark T.; Bloom, Jeffrey N.; Gilmour, Travis M.; Gonnerman, Krista N.; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.

    2004-07-01

    Composite adhesives composed of biodegradable scaffolds impregnated with a biological or synthetic adhesive were investigated for use in wound closure as an alternative to using either one of the adhesives alone. Two different scaffold materials were investigated: (i) a synthetic biodegradable material fabricated from poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid); and (ii) a biological material, small intestinal sub mucosa, manufactured by Cook BioTech. The biological adhesive was composed of 50%(w/v) bovine serum albumin solder and 0.5mg/ml indocyanine green dye mixed in deionized water, and activated with an 808-nm diode laser. The synthetic adhesive was Ethicon's Dermabond, a 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate. The tensile strength of skin incisions repaired ex vivo in a rat model, by adhesive alone or in combination with a scaffold, as well as the time-to-failure, were measured and compared. The tensile strength of repairs formed using the scaffold-enhanced biological adhesives were on average, 80% stronger than their non-enhanced counterparts, with an accompanying increase in the time-to-failure of the repairs. These results support the theory that a scaffold material with an irregular surface that bridges the wound provides a stronger, more durable and consistent adhesion, due to the distribution of the tensile stress forces over the many micro-adhesions provided by the irregular surface, rather than the one large continuous adhesive contact. This theory is also supported by several previous ex vivo experiments demonstrating enhanced tensile strength of irregular versus smooth scaffold surfaces in identical tissue repairs performed on bovine thoracic aorta, liver, spleen, small intestine and lung tissue.

  11. Strain-specific diversity of mucus-binding proteins in the adhesion and aggregation properties of Lactobacillus reuteri.

    Mackenzie, Donald A; Jeffers, Faye; Parker, Mary L; Vibert-Vallet, Amandine; Bongaerts, Roy J; Roos, Stefan; Walter, Jens; Juge, Nathalie

    2010-11-01

    Mucus-binding proteins (MUBs) have been revealed as one of the effector molecules involved in mechanisms of the adherence of lactobacilli to the host; mub, or mub-like, genes are found in all of the six genomes of Lactobacillus reuteri that are available. We recently reported the crystal structure of a Mub repeat from L. reuteri ATCC 53608 (also designated strain 1063), revealing an unexpected recognition of immunoglobulins. In the current study, we explored the diversity of the ATCC 53608 mub gene, and MUB expression levels in a large collection of L. reuteri strains isolated from a range of vertebrate hosts. This analysis revealed that the MUB was only detectable on the cell surface of two highly related isolates when using antibodies that were raised against the protein. There was considerable variation in quantitative mucus adhesion in vitro among L. reuteri strains, and mucus binding showed excellent correlation with the presence of cell-surface ATCC 53608 MUB. ATCC 53608 MUB presence was further highly associated with the autoaggregation of L. reuteri strains in washed cell suspensions, suggesting a novel role of this surface protein in cell aggregation. We also characterized MUB expression in representative L. reuteri strains. This analysis revealed that one derivative of strain 1063 was a spontaneous mutant that expressed a C-terminally truncated version of MUB. This frameshift mutation was caused by the insertion of a duplicated 13 nt sequence at position 4867 nt in the mub gene, producing a truncated MUB also lacking the C-terminal LPxTG region, and thus unable to anchor to the cell wall. This mutant, designated 1063N (mub-4867(i)), displayed low mucus-binding and aggregation capacities, further providing evidence for the contribution of cell-wall-anchored MUB to such phenotypes. In conclusion, this study provided novel information on the functional attributes of MUB in L. reuteri, and further demonstrated that MUB and MUB-like proteins

  12. Crystal structure of linoleate 13R-manganese lipoxygenase in complex with an adhesion protein.

    Chen, Yang; Wennman, Anneli; Karkehabadi, Saeid; Engström, Åke; Oliw, Ernst H

    2016-08-01

    The crystal structure of 13R-manganese lipoxygenase (MnLOX) of Gaeumannomyces graminis (Gg) in complex with zonadhesin of Pichia pastoris was solved by molecular replacement. Zonadhesin contains β-strands in two subdomains. A comparison of Gg-MnLOX with the 9S-MnLOX of Magnaporthe oryzae (Mo) shows that the protein fold and the geometry of the metal ligands are conserved. The U-shaped active sites differ mainly due to hydrophobic residues of the substrate channel. The volumes and two hydrophobic side pockets near the catalytic base may sanction oxygenation at C-13 and C-9, respectively. Gly-332 of Gg-MnLOX is positioned in the substrate channel between the entrance and the metal center. Replacements with larger residues could restrict oxygen and substrate to reach the active site. C18 fatty acids are likely positioned with C-11 between Mn(2+)OH2 and Leu-336 for hydrogen abstraction and with one side of the 12Z double bond shielded by Phe-337 to prevent antarafacial oxygenation at C-13 and C-11. Phe-347 is positioned at the end of the substrate channel and replacement with smaller residues can position C18 fatty acids for oxygenation at C-9. Gg-MnLOX does not catalyze the sequential lipoxygenation of n-3 fatty acids in contrast to Mo-MnLOX, which illustrates the different configurations of their substrate channels. PMID:27313058

  13. Reversible Conformational Change in the Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Protein Masks Its Adhesion Domains.

    Herrera, Raul; Anderson, Charles; Kumar, Krishan; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Nguyen, Vu; Burkhardt, Martin; Reiter, Karine; Shimp, Richard; Howard, Randall F; Srinivasan, Prakash; Nold, Michael J; Ragheb, Daniel; Shi, Lirong; DeCotiis, Mark; Aebig, Joan; Lambert, Lynn; Rausch, Kelly M; Muratova, Olga; Jin, Albert; Reed, Steven G; Sinnis, Photini; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Duffy, Patrick E; MacDonald, Nicholas J; Narum, David L

    2015-10-01

    The extended rod-like Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP) is comprised of three primary domains: a charged N terminus that binds heparan sulfate proteoglycans, a central NANP repeat domain, and a C terminus containing a thrombospondin-like type I repeat (TSR) domain. Only the last two domains are incorporated in RTS,S, the leading malaria vaccine in phase 3 trials that, to date, protects about 50% of vaccinated children against clinical disease. A seroepidemiological study indicated that the N-terminal domain might improve the efficacy of a new CSP vaccine. Using a panel of CSP-specific monoclonal antibodies, well-characterized recombinant CSPs, label-free quantitative proteomics, and in vitro inhibition of sporozoite invasion, we show that native CSP is N-terminally processed in the mosquito host and undergoes a reversible conformational change to mask some epitopes in the N- and C-terminal domains until the sporozoite interacts with the liver hepatocyte. Our findings show the importance of understanding processing and the biophysical change in conformation, possibly due to a mechanical or molecular signal, and may aid in the development of a new CSP vaccine. PMID:26169272

  14. Reversible Conformational Change in the Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Protein Masks Its Adhesion Domains

    Herrera, Raul; Anderson, Charles; Kumar, Krishan; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Nguyen, Vu; Burkhardt, Martin; Reiter, Karine; Shimp, Richard; Howard, Randall F.; Srinivasan, Prakash; Nold, Michael J.; Ragheb, Daniel; Shi, Lirong; DeCotiis, Mark; Aebig, Joan; Lambert, Lynn; Rausch, Kelly M.; Muratova, Olga; Jin, Albert; Reed, Steven G.; Sinnis, Photini; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Duffy, Patrick E.; MacDonald, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    The extended rod-like Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP) is comprised of three primary domains: a charged N terminus that binds heparan sulfate proteoglycans, a central NANP repeat domain, and a C terminus containing a thrombospondin-like type I repeat (TSR) domain. Only the last two domains are incorporated in RTS,S, the leading malaria vaccine in phase 3 trials that, to date, protects about 50% of vaccinated children against clinical disease. A seroepidemiological study indicated that the N-terminal domain might improve the efficacy of a new CSP vaccine. Using a panel of CSP-specific monoclonal antibodies, well-characterized recombinant CSPs, label-free quantitative proteomics, and in vitro inhibition of sporozoite invasion, we show that native CSP is N-terminally processed in the mosquito host and undergoes a reversible conformational change to mask some epitopes in the N- and C-terminal domains until the sporozoite interacts with the liver hepatocyte. Our findings show the importance of understanding processing and the biophysical change in conformation, possibly due to a mechanical or molecular signal, and may aid in the development of a new CSP vaccine. PMID:26169272

  15. Biomimetic protein-repulsive modification of material substrates: aspects of polydopamine and "click & seed" approach

    Proks, Vladimír; Jaroš, J.; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Kučka, Jan; Popelka, Štěpán; Hampl, A.; Rypáček, František

    Strasbourg: European Materials Research Society, 2013. R.VIII-4. [E- MRS 2013 Spring Meeting. 27.05.2013-31.05.2013, Strasbourg] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/11/1857; GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0029 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : polydopamine * poly(ethylene oxide) * cell adhesion Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  16. EFFECTS OF SYSTEMIC FLUCONAZOLE THERAPY ON IN VITRO ADHESION OF CANDIDA ALBICANS TO BUCCAL EPITHELIAL CELLS AND CHANGES OF THE CELL SURFACE PROTEINS OF THE EPITHELIAL CELLS

    吴绍熙; 郭宁如; 侯幼红

    1996-01-01

    This paper presented the effects of systemic fluconazole therapy via intravenous (IV) and oral (PO) administrations on the adhesion of Candida albicans (C. albicans) to the huccal epithelial ceils (BEC) from five treated patients with three candidosis, one mucornlycosis and one sporotrichosis and at the same time,an analysis of the cell surface proteins involving candidal adherent receptor in the BEC of the patients in the course of 7 days were exposed to 3H-leucine radiolabaled C. atbicans for in vitro eandidal adherent assay,and the BEC from first intake day and the last intake day of the patients were extracted by dithiothreitol(DTT)-iodoacetamide treatment for SDS-PAGE. These results indicate that the systemic iluconazole therapy resuks in the inhibitory effect of candldal adhesion to BEC of treated patients to prevent them from oral candidosis for a prolonged time, which is based on the absent surface protein (35KDa) of the BEC.

  17. Adhesive Categories

    Lack, Stephen; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2003-01-01

    We introduce adhesive categories, which are categories with structure ensuring that pushouts along monomorphisms are well-behaved. Many types of graphical structures used in computer science are shown to be examples of adhesive categories. Double-pushout graph rewriting generalises well to...... rewriting on arbitrary adhesive categories....

  18. Adhesive Categories

    Lack, Stephen; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2004-01-01

    We introduce adhesive categories, which are categories with structure ensuring that pushouts along monomorphisms are well-behaved. Many types of graphical structures used in computer science are shown to be examples of adhesive categories. Double-pushout graph rewriting generalises well to...... rewriting on arbitrary adhesive categories....

  19. Site-specific labeling of proteins for single-molecule FRET by combining chemical and enzymatic modification

    Jager, M; Nir, E; Weiss, S

    2006-01-01

    An often limiting factor for studying protein folding by single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is the ability to site-specifically introduce a photostable organic FRET donor (D) and a complementary acceptor (A) into a polypeptide chain. Using alternating-laser excitation and chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 as a model, we show that chemical labeling of a unique cysteine, followed by enzymatic modification of a reactive glutamine in an N-terminally appended substrate sequence r...

  20. topPTM: a new module of dbPTM for identifying functional post-translational modifications in transmembrane proteins.

    Su, Min-Gang; Huang, Kai-Yao; Lu, Cheng-Tsung; Kao, Hui-Ju; Chang, Ya-Han; Lee, Tzong-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Transmembrane (TM) proteins have crucial roles in various cellular processes. The location of post-translational modifications (PTMs) on TM proteins is associated with their functional roles in various cellular processes. Given the importance of PTMs in the functioning of TM proteins, this study developed topPTM (available online at http://topPTM.cse.yzu.edu.tw), a new dbPTM module that provides a public resource for identifying the functional PTM sites on TM proteins with structural topology. Experimentally verified TM topology data were integrated from TMPad, TOPDB, PDBTM and OPM. In addition to the PTMs obtained from dbPTM, experimentally verified PTM sites were manually extracted from research articles by text mining. In an attempt to provide a full investigation of PTM sites on TM proteins, all UniProtKB protein entries containing annotations related to membrane localization and TM topology were considered potential TM proteins. Two effective tools were then used to annotate the structural topology of the potential TM proteins. The TM topology of TM proteins is represented by graphical visualization, as well as by the PTM sites. To delineate the structural correlation between the PTM sites and TM topologies, the tertiary structure of PTM sites on TM proteins was visualized by Jmol program. Given the support of research articles by manual curation and the investigation of domain-domain interactions in Protein Data Bank, 1347 PTM substrate sites are associated with protein-protein interactions for 773 TM proteins. The database content is regularly updated on publication of new data by continuous surveys of research articles and available resources. PMID:24302577

  1. Lactobacillus Adhesion to Mucus

    Maxwell L. Van Tassell

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Mucus provides protective functions in the gastrointestinal tract and plays an important role in the adhesion of microorganisms to host surfaces. Mucin glycoproteins polymerize, forming a framework to which certain microbial populations can adhere, including probiotic Lactobacillus species. Numerous mechanisms for adhesion to mucus have been discovered in lactobacilli, including partially characterized mucus binding proteins. These mechanisms vary in importance with the in vitro models studied, which could significantly affect the perceived probiotic potential of the organisms. Understanding the nature of mucus-microbe interactions could be the key to elucidating the mechanisms of probiotic adhesion within the host.

  2. Multiple γ-glutamylation: A novel type of post-translational modification in a diapausing Artemia cyst protein

    A highly hydrophilic, glutamate-rich protein was identified in the aqueous phenol extract from the cytosolic fraction of brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) diapausing cysts and termed Artemia phenol soluble protein (PSP). Mass spectrometric analysis revealed the presence of many protein peaks around m/z 11,000, separated by 129 atomic mass units; this value corresponds to that of glutamate, which is strongly suggestive of heterogeneous polyglutamylation. Polyglutamylation has long been known as the functionally important post-translational modification of tubulins, which carry poly(L-glutamic acid) chains of heterogeneous length branching off from the main chain at the γ-carboxy groups of a few specific glutamate residues. In Artemia PSP, however, Edman degradation of enzymatic peptides revealed that at least 13, and presumably 16, glutamate residues were modified by the attachment of a single L-glutamate, representing a hitherto undescribed type of post-translational modification: namely, multiple γ-glutamylation or the addition of a large number of glutamate residues along the polypeptide chain. Although biological significance of PSP and its modification is yet to be established, suppression of in vitro thermal aggregation of lactate dehydrogenase by glutamylated PSP was observed.

  3. Multiple {gamma}-glutamylation: A novel type of post-translational modification in a diapausing Artemia cyst protein

    Hasegawa, Mai [Bioscience Course, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, 2-8050 Ikarashi, Nishi-Ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Ikeda, Yuka [Institute of High Polymer Research, Faculty of Textile Science and Technology, Shinshu University, 3-15-1, Tokida, Ueda 386-8567 (Japan); Kanzawa, Hideaki [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Niigata University, 2-8050 Ikarashi, Nishi-Ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Sakamoto, Mika [Bioscience Course, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, 2-8050 Ikarashi, Nishi-Ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Goto, Mina [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Niigata University, 2-8050 Ikarashi, Nishi-Ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Tsunasawa, Susumu [Analytical and Measuring Instruments Division, Shimadzu Corporation, Nishinokyo Kuwabaracho 1, Nakagyo-Ku, Kyoto 604-8511 (Japan); Uchiumi, Toshio, E-mail: uchiumi@bio.sc.niigata-u.ac.jp [Bioscience Course, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, 2-8050 Ikarashi, Nishi-Ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Niigata University, 2-8050 Ikarashi, Nishi-Ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Odani, Shoji [Bioscience Course, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, 2-8050 Ikarashi, Nishi-Ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Niigata University, 2-8050 Ikarashi, Nishi-Ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)

    2010-03-26

    A highly hydrophilic, glutamate-rich protein was identified in the aqueous phenol extract from the cytosolic fraction of brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) diapausing cysts and termed Artemia phenol soluble protein (PSP). Mass spectrometric analysis revealed the presence of many protein peaks around m/z 11,000, separated by 129 atomic mass units; this value corresponds to that of glutamate, which is strongly suggestive of heterogeneous polyglutamylation. Polyglutamylation has long been known as the functionally important post-translational modification of tubulins, which carry poly(L-glutamic acid) chains of heterogeneous length branching off from the main chain at the {gamma}-carboxy groups of a few specific glutamate residues. In Artemia PSP, however, Edman degradation of enzymatic peptides revealed that at least 13, and presumably 16, glutamate residues were modified by the attachment of a single L-glutamate, representing a hitherto undescribed type of post-translational modification: namely, multiple {gamma}-glutamylation or the addition of a large number of glutamate residues along the polypeptide chain. Although biological significance of PSP and its modification is yet to be established, suppression of in vitro thermal aggregation of lactate dehydrogenase by glutamylated PSP was observed.

  4. First study on gene expression of cement proteins and potential adhesion-related genes of a membranous-based barnacle as revealed from Next-Generation Sequencing technology

    Lin, Hsiu Chin

    2013-12-12

    This is the first study applying Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology to survey the kinds, expression location, and pattern of adhesion-related genes in a membranous-based barnacle. A total of 77,528,326 and 59,244,468 raw sequence reads of total RNA were generated from the prosoma and the basis of Tetraclita japonica formosana, respectively. In addition, 55,441 and 67,774 genes were further assembled and analyzed. The combined sequence data from both body parts generates a total of 79,833 genes of which 47.7% were shared. Homologues of barnacle cement proteins - CP-19K, -52K, and -100K - were found and all were dominantly expressed at the basis where the cement gland complex is located. This is the main area where transcripts of cement proteins and other potential adhesion-related genes were detected. The absence of another common barnacle cement protein, CP-20K, in the adult transcriptome suggested a possible life-stage restricted gene function and/or a different mechanism in adhesion between membranous-based and calcareous-based barnacles. © 2013 © 2013 Taylor & Francis.

  5. O-GlcNAc modification blocks the aggregation and toxicity of the protein α-synuclein associated with Parkinson's disease

    Marotta, Nicholas P.; Lin, Yu Hsuan; Lewis, Yuka E.; Ambroso, Mark R.; Zaro, Balyn W.; Roth, Maxwell T.; Arnold, Don B.; Langen, Ralf; Pratt, Matthew R.

    2015-11-01

    Several aggregation-prone proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases can be modified by O-linked N-acetyl-glucosamine (O-GlcNAc) in vivo. One of these proteins, α-synuclein, is a toxic aggregating protein associated with synucleinopathies, including Parkinson's disease. However, the effect of O-GlcNAcylation on α-synuclein is not clear. Here, we use synthetic protein chemistry to generate both unmodified α-synuclein and α-synuclein bearing a site-specific O-GlcNAc modification at the physiologically relevant threonine residue 72. We show that this single modification has a notable and substoichiometric inhibitory effect on α-synuclein aggregation, while not affecting the membrane binding or bending properties of α-synuclein. O-GlcNAcylation is also shown to affect the phosphorylation of α-synuclein in vitro and block the toxicity of α-synuclein that was exogenously added to cells in culture. These results suggest that increasing O-GlcNAcylation may slow the progression of synucleinopathies and further support a general function for O-GlcNAc in preventing protein aggregation.

  6. Global Identification of Protein Post-translational Modifications in a Single-Pass Database Search

    Shortreed, Michael R.; Wenger, Craig D.; Frey, Brian L.; Sheynkman, Gloria M.; Scalf, Mark; Keller, Mark P.; Attie, Alan D; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2015-01-01

    Bottom-up proteomics database search algorithms used for peptide identification cannot comprehensively identify post-translational modifications (PTMs) in a single-pass because of high false discovery rates (FDRs). A new approach to database searching enables global PTM (G-PTM) identification by exclusively looking for curated PTMs, thereby avoiding the FDR penalty experienced during conventional variable modification searches. We identified over 2200 unique, high-confidence modified peptides...

  7. Y-box-binding protein-1 (YB-1) promotes cell proliferation, adhesion and drug resistance in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Miao, Xiaobing; Wu, Yaxun; Wang, Yuchan; Zhu, Xinghua; Yin, Haibing; He, Yunhua; Li, Chunsun; Liu, Yushan; Lu, Xiaoyun; Chen, Yali; Shen, Rong; Xu, Xiaohong; He, Song

    2016-08-15

    YB-1 is a multifunctional protein, which has been shown to correlate with resistance to treatment of various tumor types. This study investigated the expression and biologic function of YB-1 in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the expression statuses of YB-1 and pYB-1(S102) were reversely correlated with the clinical outcomes of DLBCL patients. In addition, we found that YB-1 could promote the proliferation of DLBCL cells by accelerating the G1/S transition. Ectopic expression of YB-1 could markedly increase the expression of cell cycle regulators cyclin D1 and cyclin E. Furthermore, we found that adhesion of DLBCL cells to fibronectin (FN) could increase YB-1 phosphorylation at Ser102 and pYB-1(S102) nuclear translocation. In addition, overexpression of YB-1 could increase the adhesion of DLBCL cells to FN. Intriguingly, we found that YB-1 overexpression could confer drug resistance through cell-adhesion dependent and independent mechanisms in DLBCL. Silencing of YB-1 could sensitize DLBCL cells to mitoxantrone and overcome cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) phenotype in an AKT-dependent manner. PMID:27397581

  8. Contributions of adhesive proteins to the cellular and bacterial response to surfaces treated with bioactive polymers: case of poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) grafted titanium surfaces.

    Felgueiras, Helena P; Aissa, Ines Ben; Evans, Margaret D M; Migonney, Véronique

    2015-11-01

    The research developed on functionalized model or prosthetic surfaces with bioactive polymers has raised the possibility to modulate and/or control the biological in vitro and in vivo responses to synthetic biomaterials. The mechanisms underlying the bioactivity exhibited by sulfonated groups on surfaces involves both selective adsorption and conformational changes of adsorbed proteins. Indeed, surfaces functionalized by grafting poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) [poly(NaSS)] modulate the cellular and bacterial response by inducing specific interactions with fibronectin (Fn). Once implanted, a biomaterial surface is exposed to a milieu of many proteins that compete for the surface which dictates the subsequent biological response. Once understood, this can be controlled by dictating exposure of active binding sites. In this in vitro study, we report the influence of binary mixtures of proteins [albumin (BSA), Fn and collagen type I (Col I)] adsorbed on poly(NaSS) grafted Ti6Al4V on the adhesion and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells and the adhesion and proliferation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Outcomes showed that poly(NaSS) stimulated cell spreading, attachment strength, differentiation and mineralization, whatever the nature of protein provided at the interface compared with ungrafted Ti6Al4V (control). While in competition, Fn and Col I were capable of prevailing over BSA. Fn played an important role in the early interactions of the cells with the surface, while Col I was responsible for increased alkaline phosphatase, calcium and phosphate productions associated with differentiation. Poly(NaSS) grafted surfaces decreased the adhesion of S. aureus and the presence of Fn on these chemically altered surfaces increased bacterial resistance ≈70% compared to the ungrafted Ti6Al4V. Overall, our study showed that poly(NaSS) grafted Ti6Al4V selectively adsorbed proteins (particularly Fn) promoting the adhesion and differentiation of osteoblast

  9. Improving biocompatibility by controlling protein adsorption: Modification and design of biomaterials using poly(ethylene glycol) microgels and microspheres

    Scott, Evan Alexander

    2009-12-01

    Guided by the clinical needs of patients and developments in biology and materials science, the primary focus of the biomaterials field remains at the solid/liquid interface between biomaterial surfaces and biological fluids. For blood-contacting devices, biological responses are initially elicited and directed by proteins that adsorb from this multicomponent solution to form thin films on their surfaces. The identity, conformation, and quantity of adsorbed proteins are related to the properties of a material's surface. For example, hydrophobic surfaces tend to be thrombotic via interactions between platelets and adsorbed fibrinogen, while surface-activation of specific enzymes initiates the coagulation cascade on hydrophilic surfaces. The objective of this thesis is to improve the design of biomaterials through the analysis and control of adsorbing protein layers. This goal is approached through three separate strategies. First, a proteomics-based methodology is presented for the assessment of protein conformation at the residue level after adsorption to biomaterial surfaces. A quantitative mass spectrometric technique is additionally suggested for the identification and quantification of proteins within adsorbed protein layers. Second, a method is described for the covalent attachment of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogel coatings onto biomaterials surfaces for the minimization of protein adsorption. The coatings are applied using partially crosslinked PEG solutions containing polymer and protein oligomers and microgels that can be designed to control cell adhesion. Finally, a modular strategy is proposed for the assembly of bioactive PEG-based hydrogel scaffolds. This was accomplished using novel PEG microspheres with diverse characteristics that individually contribute to the ability of the scaffold to direct cellular infiltration. The methodologies proposed by this thesis contribute to the recent shift in biomaterials and tissue engineering strategies

  10. Surface modification of tantalum pentoxide coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering and correlation with cell adhesion and proliferation in in vitro tests

    Zykova, A.; Safonov, V.; Goltsev, A.; Dubrava, T.; Rossokha, I.; Donkov, N.; Yakovin, S.; Kolesnikov, D.; Goncharov, I.; Georgieva, V.

    2016-03-01

    The effect was analyzed of surface treatment by argon ions on the surface properties of tantalum pentoxide coatings deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering. The structural parameters of the as-deposited coatings were investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction profiles and X-ray photoelectron spectra were also acquired. The total surface free energy (SFE), the polar, dispersion parts and fractional polarities, were estimated by the Owens-Wendt-Rabel-Kaeble method. The adhesive and proliferative potentials of bone marrow cells were evaluated for both Ta2O5 coatings and Ta2O5 coatings deposited by simultaneous bombardment by argon ions in in vitro tests.

  11. α2-macroglobulin can crosslink multiple Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) molecules and may facilitate adhesion of parasitized erythrocytes

    Stevenson, Liz; Laursen, Erik; Cowan, Graeme J;

    2015-01-01

    Rosetting, the adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to uninfected erythrocytes, involves clonal variants of the parasite protein P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) and soluble serum factors. While rosetting is a well-known phenotypic marker of parasites......-macroglobulin (α2M), which is both required and sufficient for rosetting mediated by the PfEMP1 protein HB3VAR06 and some other rosette-mediating PfEMP1 proteins. We map the α2M binding site to the C terminal end of HB3VAR06, and demonstrate that α2M can bind at least four HB3VAR06 proteins, plausibly....... Together, our results are evidence that P. falciparum parasites exploit α2M (and IgM) to expand the repertoire of host receptors available for PfEMP1-mediated IE adhesion, such as the erythrocyte carbohydrate moieties that lead to formation of rosettes. It is likely that this mechanism also affects IE...

  12. POTAMOS mass spectrometry calculator: computer aided mass spectrometry to the post-translational modifications of proteins. A focus on histones.

    Vlachopanos, A; Soupsana, E; Politou, A S; Papamokos, G V

    2014-12-01

    Mass spectrometry is a widely used technique for protein identification and it has also become the method of choice in order to detect and characterize the post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins. Many software tools have been developed to deal with this complication. In this paper we introduce a new, free and user friendly online software tool, named POTAMOS Mass Spectrometry Calculator, which was developed in the open source application framework Ruby on Rails. It can provide calculated mass spectrometry data in a time saving manner, independently of instrumentation. In this web application we have focused on a well known protein family of histones whose PTMs are believed to play a crucial role in gene regulation, as suggested by the so called "histone code" hypothesis. The PTMs implemented in this software are: methylations of arginines and lysines, acetylations of lysines and phosphorylations of serines and threonines. The application is able to calculate the kind, the number and the combinations of the possible PTMs corresponding to a given peptide sequence and a given mass along with the full set of the unique primary structures produced by the possible distributions along the amino acid sequence. It can also calculate the masses and charges of a fragmented histone variant, which carries predefined modifications already implemented. Additional functionality is provided by the calculation of the masses of fragments produced upon protein cleavage by the proteolytic enzymes that are most widely used in proteomics studies. PMID:25450216

  13. Sinorhizobium meliloti Controls Nitric Oxide-Mediated Post-Translational Modification of a Medicago truncatula Nodule Protein.

    Blanquet, Pauline; Silva, Liliana; Catrice, Olivier; Bruand, Claude; Carvalho, Helena; Meilhoc, Eliane

    2015-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in various plant-microbe interactions. In the symbiosis between soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti and model legume Medicago truncatula, NO is required for an optimal establishment of the interaction but is also a signal for nodule senescence. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms responsible for NO effects in the legume-rhizobium interaction. Here, we investigate the contribution of the bacterial NO response to the modulation of a plant protein post-translational modification in nitrogen-fixing nodules. We made use of different bacterial mutants to finely modulate NO levels inside M. truncatula root nodules and to examine the consequence on tyrosine nitration of the plant glutamine synthetase, a protein responsible for assimilation of the ammonia released by nitrogen fixation. Our results reveal that S. meliloti possesses several proteins that limit inactivation of plant enzyme activity via NO-mediated post-translational modifications. This is the first demonstration that rhizobia can impact the course of nitrogen fixation by modulating the activity of a plant protein. PMID:26422404

  14. A SAP domain-containing protein shuttles between the nucleus and cell membranes and plays a role in adhesion and migration in D. discoideum

    Jessica S. Kelsey

    2013-02-01

    The AmpA protein reduces cell adhesion, thereby influencing cell migration in Dictyostelium. To understand how ampA influences cell migration, second site suppressors of an AmpA overexpressing cell line were created by REMI mutagenesis. Mutant candidates were identified by their ability to suppress the large plaques that the AmpA overexpressing cells form on bacterial lawns as a result of their increased rate of migration. One suppressor gene, sma, encodes an uncharacterized protein, which contains a SAP DNA-binding domain and a PTEN-like domain. Using sma gene knockouts and Sma-mRFP expressing cell lines, a role for sma in influencing cell migration was uncovered. Knockouts of the sma gene in a wild-type background enhanced chemotaxis. An additional role for Sma in influencing cell–cell adhesion was also demonstrated. Sma protein transitions between cytosolic and nuclear localizations as a function of cell density. In growing cells migrating to folic acid it is localized to regions of actin polymerization and absent from the nucleus. A role for Sma in influencing ampA mRNA levels is also demonstrated. Sma additionally appears to be involved in ampA pathways regulating cell size, actin polymerization, and cell substrate adhesion. We present insights to the SAP domain-containing group of proteins in Dictyostelium and provide evidence of a role for a SAP domain-containing protein shuttling from the nucleus to sites of actin polymerization during chemotaxis to folic acid and influencing the efficiency of migration.

  15. Upregulation of adhesion complex proteins and fibronectin by human keratinocytes treated with an aqueous extract from the leaves of Chromolaena odorata (Eupolin).

    Phan, T T; Allen, J; Hughes, M A; Cherry, G; Wojnarowska, F

    2000-01-01

    The fresh leaves and extract of the plant Chromolaena odorata are a traditional herbal treatment in developing countries for burns, soft tissue wounds and skin infections. We have previously shown that the extract had an effect on the growth and proliferation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in culture. This study has demonstrated that Eupolin extract increased expression of several components of the adhesion complex and fibronectin by human keratinocytes. Using indirect immunofluorescence we found increased expression (dose-dependent) of laminin 5, laminin 1, collagen IV, and fibronectin. The expression of the b1 and b4 integrins was upregulated by the extract at low concentrations (0.1 and 1 microg/ml), but the expression was decreased at higher doses of Eupolin (10 microg-150 microg/ml). A number of clinical studies carried out by Vietnamese and international medical investigators have demonstrated the efficacy of this extract on the wound healing process. In this study we have shown that Eupolin stimulated the expression of many proteins of the adhesion complex and fibronectin by human keratinocytes. The adhesion complex proteins are essential to stabilise epithelium and this effect could contribute to the clinical efficacy of Eupolin in healing. PMID:11056422

  16. DDB2 (damaged-DNA binding 2) protein: a new modulator of nanomechanical properties and cell adhesion of breast cancer cells

    Barbieux, Claire; Bacharouche, Jalal; Soussen, Charles; Hupont, Sébastien; Razafitianamaharavo, Angélina; Klotz, Rémi; Pannequin, Rémi; Brie, David; Bécuwe, Philippe; Francius, Grégory; Grandemange, Stéphanie

    2016-02-01

    DDB2, known for its role in DNA repair, was recently shown to reduce mammary tumor invasiveness by inducing the transcription of IκBα, an inhibitor of NF-κB activity. Since cellular adhesion is a key event during the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) leading to the invasive capacities of breast tumor cells, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of DDB2 in this process. Thus, using low and high DDB2-expressing MDA-MB231 and MCF7 cells, respectively, in which DDB2 expression was modulated experimentally, we showed that DDB2 overexpression was associated with a decrease of adhesion abilities on glass and plastic areas of breast cancer cells. Then, we investigated cell nanomechanical properties by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results revealed significant changes in the Young's Modulus value and the adhesion force in MDA-MB231 and MCF7 cells, whether DDB2 was expressed or not. The cell stiffness decrease observed in MDA-MB231 and MCF7 expressing DDB2 was correlated with a loss of the cortical actin-cytoskeleton staining. To understand how DDB2 regulates these processes, an adhesion-related gene PCR-Array was performed. Several adhesion-related genes were differentially expressed according to DDB2 expression, indicating that important changes are occurring at the molecular level. Thus, this work demonstrates that AFM technology is an important tool to follow cellular changes during tumorigenesis. Moreover, our data revealed that DDB2 is involved in early events occurring during metastatic progression of breast cancer cells and will contribute to define this protein as a new marker of metastatic progression in this type of cancer.

  17. Studies on cell adhesion and recognition. II. The kinetics of cell adhesion and cell spreading on surfaces coated with carbohydrate- reactive proteins (glycosidases and lectins) and fibronectin

    1981-01-01

    The kinetics of cell attachment and cell spreading on the coated surfaces of two classes of carbohydrate-reactive proteins, enzymes and lectins, have been compared with those on fibronectin-coated surfaces with the following results: (a) A remarkable similarity between the kinetics of cell attachment to fibronectin-coated and glycosidase- coated surfaces was found. In contrast, cell attachment kinetics induced by lectin- and galactose oxidase-coated surfaces, in general, were strikingly diffe...

  18. Controlled spatial and conformational display of immobilised bone morphogenetic protein-2 and osteopontin signalling motifs regulates osteoblast adhesion and differentiation in vitro

    McCaskie Andrew W

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interfacial molecular mechanisms that regulate mammalian cell growth and differentiation have important implications for biotechnology (production of cells and cell products and medicine (tissue engineering, prosthetic implants, cancer and developmental biology. We demonstrate here that engineered protein motifs can be robustly displayed to mammalian cells in vitro in a highly controlled manner using a soluble protein scaffold designed to self assemble on a gold surface. Results A protein was engineered to contain a C-terminal cysteine that would allow chemisorption to gold, followed by 12 amino acids that form a water soluble coil that could switch to a hydrophobic helix in the presence of alkane thiols. Bioactive motifs from either bone morphogenetic protein-2 or osteopontin were added to this scaffold protein and when assembled on a gold surface assessed for their ability to influence cell function. Data demonstrate that osteoblast adhesion and short-term responsiveness to bone morphogenetic protein-2 is dependent on the surface density of a cell adhesive motif derived from osteopontin. Furthermore an immobilised cell interaction motif from bone morphogenetic protein supported bone formation in vitro over 28 days (in the complete absence of other osteogenic supplements. In addition, two-dimensional patterning of this ligand using a soft lithography approach resulted in the spatial control of osteogenesis. Conclusion These data describe an approach that allows the influence of immobilised protein ligands on cell behaviour to be dissected at the molecular level. This approach presents a durable surface that allows both short (hours or days and long term (weeks effects on cell activity to be assessed. This widely applicable approach can provide mechanistic insight into the contribution of immobilised ligands in the control of cell activity.

  19. The Src homology 2 protein Shb promotes cell cycle progression in murine hematopoietic stem cells by regulation of focal adhesion kinase activity

    Gustafsson, Karin [Department of Medical Cell Biology, Uppsala University, Uppsala 751 23 (Sweden); Heffner, Garrett; Wenzel, Pamela L.; Curran, Matthew [HHMI, Children' s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, 02115 MA (United States); Grawé, Jan [Department of Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala 75185 (Sweden); McKinney-Freeman, Shannon L. [Department of Hematology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN 38105 (United States); Daley, George Q. [HHMI, Children' s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, 02115 MA (United States); Welsh, Michael, E-mail: michael.welsh@mcb.uu.se [Department of Medical Cell Biology, Uppsala University, Uppsala 751 23 (Sweden)

    2013-07-15

    The widely expressed adaptor protein Shb has previously been reported to contribute to T cell function due to its association with the T cell receptor and furthermore, several of Shb's known interaction partners are established regulators of blood cell development and function. In addition, Shb deficient embryonic stem cells displayed reduced blood cell colony formation upon differentiation in vitro. The aim of the current study was therefore to explore hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function in the Shb knockout mouse. Shb deficient bone marrow contained reduced relative numbers of long-term hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSCs) that exhibited lower proliferation rates. Despite this, Shb knockout LT-HSCs responded promptly by entering the cell cycle in response to genotoxic stress by 5-fluorouracil treatment. In competitive LT-HSC transplantations, Shb null cells initially engrafted as well as the wild-type cells but provided less myeloid expansion over time. Moreover, Shb knockout bone marrow cells exhibited elevated basal activities of focal adhesion kinase/Rac1/p21-activated kinase signaling and reduced responsiveness to Stem Cell Factor stimulation. Consequently, treatment with a focal adhesion kinase inhibitor increased Shb knockout LT-HSC proliferation. The altered signaling characteristics thus provide a plausible mechanistic explanation for the changes in LT-HSC proliferation since these signaling intermediates have all been shown to participate in LT-HSC cell cycle control. In summary, the loss of Shb dependent signaling in bone marrow cells, resulting in elevated focal adhesion kinase activity and reduced proliferative responses in LT-HSCs under steady state hematopoiesis, confers a disadvantage to the maintenance of LT-HSCs over time. -- Highlights: • Shb is an adaptor protein operating downstream of tyrosine kinase receptors. • Shb deficiency reduces hematopoietic stem cell proliferation. • The proliferative effect of Shb occurs via

  20. The Src homology 2 protein Shb promotes cell cycle progression in murine hematopoietic stem cells by regulation of focal adhesion kinase activity

    The widely expressed adaptor protein Shb has previously been reported to contribute to T cell function due to its association with the T cell receptor and furthermore, several of Shb's known interaction partners are established regulators of blood cell development and function. In addition, Shb deficient embryonic stem cells displayed reduced blood cell colony formation upon differentiation in vitro. The aim of the current study was therefore to explore hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function in the Shb knockout mouse. Shb deficient bone marrow contained reduced relative numbers of long-term hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSCs) that exhibited lower proliferation rates. Despite this, Shb knockout LT-HSCs responded promptly by entering the cell cycle in response to genotoxic stress by 5-fluorouracil treatment. In competitive LT-HSC transplantations, Shb null cells initially engrafted as well as the wild-type cells but provided less myeloid expansion over time. Moreover, Shb knockout bone marrow cells exhibited elevated basal activities of focal adhesion kinase/Rac1/p21-activated kinase signaling and reduced responsiveness to Stem Cell Factor stimulation. Consequently, treatment with a focal adhesion kinase inhibitor increased Shb knockout LT-HSC proliferation. The altered signaling characteristics thus provide a plausible mechanistic explanation for the changes in LT-HSC proliferation since these signaling intermediates have all been shown to participate in LT-HSC cell cycle control. In summary, the loss of Shb dependent signaling in bone marrow cells, resulting in elevated focal adhesion kinase activity and reduced proliferative responses in LT-HSCs under steady state hematopoiesis, confers a disadvantage to the maintenance of LT-HSCs over time. -- Highlights: • Shb is an adaptor protein operating downstream of tyrosine kinase receptors. • Shb deficiency reduces hematopoietic stem cell proliferation. • The proliferative effect of Shb occurs via increased

  1. SSPaQ: A Subtractive Segmentation Approach for the Exhaustive Parallel Quantification of the Extent of Protein Modification at Every Possible Site

    Gabant, Guillaume; Boyer, Alain; Cadene, Martine

    2016-05-01

    Protein modifications, whether chemically induced or post-translational (PTMs), play an essential role for the biological activity of proteins. Understanding biological processes and alterations thereof will rely on the quantification of these modifications on individual residues. Here we present SSPaQ, a subtractive method for the parallel quantification of the extent of modification at each possible site of a protein. The method combines uniform isotopic labeling and proteolysis with MS, followed by a segmentation approach, a powerful tool to refine the quantification of the degree of modification of a peptide to a segment containing a single modifiable amino acid. The strength of this strategy resides in: (1) quantification of all modifiable sites in a protein without prior knowledge of the type(s) of modified residues; (2) insensitivity to changes in the solubility and ionization efficiency of peptides upon modification; and (3) detection of missed cleavages caused by the modification for mitigation. The SSPaQ method was applied to quantify modifications resulting from the interaction of human phosphatidyl ethanolamine binding protein 1 (hPEBP1), a metastasis suppressor gene product, with locostatin, a covalent ligand and antimigratory compound with demonstrated activity towards hPEBP1. Locostatin is shown to react with several residues of the protein. SSPaQ can more generally be applied to induced modification in the context of drugs that covalently bind their target protein. With an alternate front-end protocol, it could also be applied to the quantification of protein PTMs, provided a removal tool is available for that PTM.

  2. SSPaQ: A Subtractive Segmentation Approach for the Exhaustive Parallel Quantification of the Extent of Protein Modification at Every Possible Site

    Gabant, Guillaume; Boyer, Alain; Cadene, Martine

    2016-08-01

    Protein modifications, whether chemically induced or post-translational (PTMs), play an essential role for the biological activity of proteins. Understanding biological processes and alterations thereof will rely on the quantification of these modifications on individual residues. Here we present SSPaQ, a subtractive method for the parallel quantification of the extent of modification at each possible site of a protein. The method combines uniform isotopic labeling and proteolysis with MS, followed by a segmentation approach, a powerful tool to refine the quantification of the degree of modification of a peptide to a segment containing a single modifiable amino acid. The strength of this strategy resides in: (1) quantification of all modifiable sites in a protein without prior knowledge of the type(s) of modified residues; (2) insensitivity to changes in the solubility and ionization efficiency of peptides upon modification; and (3) detection of missed cleavages caused by the modification for mitigation. The SSPaQ method was applied to quantify modifications resulting from the interaction of human phosphatidyl ethanolamine binding protein 1 (hPEBP1), a metastasis suppressor gene product, with locostatin, a covalent ligand and antimigratory compound with demonstrated activity towards hPEBP1. Locostatin is shown to react with several residues of the protein. SSPaQ can more generally be applied to induced modification in the context of drugs that covalently bind their target protein. With an alternate front-end protocol, it could also be applied to the quantification of protein PTMs, provided a removal tool is available for that PTM.

  3. Protein Modification: Bacterial Effectors Rewrite the Rules of Ubiquitylation.

    Berk, Jason M; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2016-07-11

    A family of virulence factors from the bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila has been discovered to modify human Rab GTPases with ubiquitin. Surprisingly, this modification occurs via a non-canonical mechanism that uses nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide as a cofactor. PMID:27404243

  4. Study of Osteoclast Adhesion to Cortical Bone Surfaces: A Correlative Microscopy Approach for Concomitant Imaging of Cellular Dynamics and Surface Modifications.

    Shemesh, Michal; Addadi, Sefi; Milstein, Yonat; Geiger, Benjamin; Addadi, Lia

    2016-06-22

    Bone remodeling relies on the coordinated functioning of osteoblasts, bone-forming cells, and osteoclasts, bone-resorbing cells. The effects of specific chemical and physical bone features on the osteoclast adhesive apparatus, the sealing zone ring, and their relation to resorption functionality are still not well-understood. We designed and implemented a correlative imaging method that enables monitoring of the same area of bone surface by time-lapse light microscopy, electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy before, during, and after exposure to osteoclasts. We show that sealing zone rings preferentially develop around surface protrusions, with lateral dimensions of several micrometers, and ∼1 μm height. Direct overlay of sealing zone rings onto resorption pits on the bone surface shows that the rings adapt to pit morphology. The correlative procedure presented here is noninvasive and performed under ambient conditions, without the need for sample labeling. It can potentially be applied to study various aspects of cell-matrix interactions. PMID:26682493

  5. Robust and Superhydrophobic Surface Modification by a "Paint + Adhesive" Method: Applications in Self-Cleaning after Oil Contamination and Oil-Water Separation.

    Chen, Baiyi; Qiu, Jianhui; Sakai, Eiichi; Kanazawa, Nobuhiro; Liang, Ruilu; Feng, Huixia

    2016-07-13

    Conventional superhydrophobic surfaces have always depended on expensive, sophisticated, and fragile roughness structures. Therefore, poor robustness has turned into the bottleneck for large-scale industrial applications of the superhydrophobic surfaces. To handle this problem, a superhydrophobic surface with firm robustness urgently needs to be developed. In this work, we created a versatile strategy to fabricate robust, self-cleaning, and superhydrophobic surfaces for both soft and hard substrates. We created an ethanol based suspension of perfluorooctyltriethoxysilane-mdodified calcium carbonate nanoparticles which can be sprayed onto both hard and soft substrates to form superhydrophobic surfaces. For all kinds of substrates, spray adhesive was directly coated onto abluent substrate surfaces to promote the robustness. These superhydrophobic surfaces showed remarkable robustness against knife scratch and sandpaper abrasion, while retaining its superhydrophobicity even after 30 abrasion cycles with sandpaper. What is more, the superhydrophobic surfaces have shown promising potential applications in self-cleaning and oil-water separation. The surfaces retained their self-cleaning property even immersed in oil. In addition to oil-water separation, the water contents in oil after separation of various mixtures were all below 150 ppm, and for toluene even as low as 55 ppm. Furthermore, the as-prepared device for oil-water separation could be cycled 6 times and still retained excellent oil-water separation efficiency. PMID:27286474

  6. The Role of Protein Modifications of T-Bet in Cytokine Production and Differentiation of T Helper Cells

    Sera Oh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available T-Bet (T-box protein expressed in T cells, also called as TBX21 was originally cloned as a key transcription factor involved in the commitment of T helper (Th cells to the Th1 lineage. T-Bet directly activates IFN-γ gene transcription and enhances development of Th1 cells. T-Bet simultaneously modulates IL-2 and Th2 cytokines in an IFN-γ-independent manner, resulting in an attenuation of Th2 cell development. Numerous studies have demonstrated that T-bet plays multiple roles in many subtypes of immune cells, including B cell, dendritic cells, natural killer (NK cells, NK T cells, and innate lymphoid cells. Therefore, T-bet is crucial for the development and coordination of both innate and adaptive immune responses. To fulfill these multiple roles, T-bet undergoes several posttranslational protein modifications, such as phosphorylation at tyrosine, serine, and threonine residues, and ubiquitination at lysine residues, which affect lineage commitment during Th cell differentiation. This review presents a current overview of the progress made in understanding the roles of various types of T-bet protein modifications in the regulation of cytokine production during Th cell differentiation.

  7. Serum Vascular Adhesion Protein-1 Predicts End-Stage Renal Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Hung-Yuan Li

    Full Text Available Diabetes is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD worldwide. Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1 participates in inflammation and catalyzes the deamination of primary amines into aldehydes, hydrogen peroxide, and ammonia, both of which are involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. We have shown that serum VAP-1 is higher in patients with diabetes and in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD, and can predict cardiovascular mortality in subjects with diabetes. In this study, we investigated if serum VAP-1 can predict ESRD in diabetic subjects.In this prospective cohort study, a total of 604 type 2 diabetic subjects were enrolled between 1996 to 2003 at National Taiwan University Hospital, Taiwan, and were followed for a median of 12.36 years. The development of ESRD was ascertained by linking our database with the nationally comprehensive Taiwan Society Nephrology registry. Serum VAP-1 concentrations at enrollment were measured by time-resolved immunofluorometric assay.Subjects with serum VAP-1 in the highest tertile had the highest incidence of ESRD (p<0.001. Every 1-SD increase in serum VAP-1 was associated with a hazard ratio of 1.55 (95%CI 1.12-2.14, p<0.01 for the risk of ESRD, adjusted for smoking, history of cardiovascular disease, body mass index, hypertension, HbA1c, duration of diabetes, total cholesterol, use of statins, ankle-brachial index, estimated GFR, and proteinuria. We developed a risk score comprising serum VAP-1, HbA1c, estimated GFR, and proteinuria, which could predict ESRD with good performance (area under the ROC curve = 0.9406, 95%CI 0.8871-0.9941, sensitivity = 77.3%, and specificity = 92.8%. We also developed an algorithm based on the stage of CKD and a risk score including serum VAP-1, which can stratify these subjects into 3 categories with an ESRD risk of 0.101%/year, 0.131%/year, and 2.427%/year, respectively.In conclusion, serum VAP-1 can predict ESRD and is a useful biomarker to

  8. Protein O-Glucosyltransferase 1 (POGLUT1) Promotes Mouse Gastrulation through Modification of the Apical Polarity Protein CRUMBS2

    Ramkumar, Nitya; Harvey, Beth M.; Lee, Jeffrey D.; Alcorn, Heather L.; Silva-Gagliardi, Nancy F.; McGlade, C Jane; Bestor, Timothy H.; Wijnholds, J.; Haltiwanger, Robert S.; Anderson, Kathryn V

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Crumbs family proteins are apical transmembrane proteins with ancient roles in cell polarity. Mouse Crumbs2 mutants arrest at midgestation with abnormal neural plate morphology and a deficit of mesoderm caused by defects in gastrulation. We identified an ENU-induced mutation, wsnp, that phenocopies the Crumbs2 null phenotype. We show that wsnp is a null allele of Protein O-glucosyltransferase 1 (Poglut1), which encodes an enzyme previously shown to add O-glucose to EGF repeats in the...

  9. Isolation of surface (S) layer protein carrying Lactobacillus species from porcine intestine and faeces and characterization of their adhesion properties to different host tissues.

    Jakava-Viljanen, Miia; Palva, Airi

    2007-10-01

    Surface-layer proteins (Slps) of lactobacilli have been shown to confer tissue adherence. This study aimed to isolate and identify Slps carrying Lactobacillus species from the porcine intestine and faeces and to characterize these S-layer-expressing strains for their ability to adhere to the pig and human intestinal cells and to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. In total 99 strains, putatively belonging to the genus Lactobacillus, were isolated as pure cultures. SDS-PAGE and a gene probe specific for the Lactobacillus brevis ATCC 8287 S-layer protein gene (slpA) were used to screen the presence of strains possessing putative Slps. Eight of the 99 pure cultures exhibited Slps according to the SDS-PAGE analyses. In these strains the presence of genes encoding Slps was confirmed by PCR and partial sequencing. Only one isolate of the 99 strains gave a positive hybridisation signal with the L. brevis slpA probe but did not appear to produce S-layer protein. Their taxonomic identification, based on phenotyping and the 16S rRNA sequences, revealed that the eight S-layer protein-producing strains were closely related to Lactobacillus amylovorus, Lactobacillus sobrius and Lactobacillus crispatus. The strain with the slpA positive hybridisation result was identified as Lactobacillus mucosae. The SDS-extractable protein profile, the size of the putative S-layer protein and binding capability of the strains varied greatly, even among the isolates belonging to the same Lactobacillus cluster. Removal of the intact Slps from the bacterial surface by extraction with guanidine hydrochloride reduced the adhesion of some strains to fibronectin and laminin, whereas, the adhesiveness to laminin increased with some strains. PMID:17544232

  10. Integration of plasma-assisted surface chemical modification, soft lithography, and protein surface activation for single-cell patterning

    Cheng, Q.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2010-07-01

    Surface patterning for single-cell culture was accomplished by combining plasma-assisted surface chemical modification, soft lithography, and protein-induced surface activation. Hydrophilic patterns were produced on Parylene C films deposited on glass substrates by oxygen plasma treatment through the windows of polydimethylsiloxane shadow masks. After incubation first with Pluronic F108 solution and then serum medium overnight, surface seeding with mesenchymal stem cells in serum medium resulted in single-cell patterning. The present method provides a means of surface patterning with direct implications in single-cell culture.

  11. Surgical adhesives

    I. A. THOMAZINI-SANTOS

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors have performed a literature review of surgical adhesives, such as cyanoacrylate, collagen gelatin, and fibrin glue. They have included different types of commercial and non-commercial fibrin sealants and have reported on the different components in these adhesives, such as fibrinogen, cryoprecipitate, bovine thrombin, and thrombin-like fraction of snake venom.

  12. The simultaneous determination of different posttranslational modifications of proteins – A comparison of approaches

    Dyčka, Filip; Čmelík, Richard; Bobálová, Janette

    2011. s. 144-145. ISBN 978-88-89884-19-5. [IMMS. Informal Meeting on Mass Spectrometry /29./. 15.05.2011-19.05.2011, Fiera di Primiero] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0570; GA AV ČR IAA600040701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : posttranslational modifications * IMAC * titanium dioxide Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  13. CHEMICAL MODIFICATION OF CHITOSAN AND FORMULATION OF ITS NANOPARTICLES FOR PROTEIN DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Swastika Karwani; Rabindra Nanda; Jyoti Nirmal

    2013-01-01

    The most common route of administration of proteins has been parenterals using invasive ways of administration but this route has many side effects like lack of patient compliance, cost, high drug levels etc. The development of an oral dosage form that improves the absorption of protein drugs is the most desirable formulation but one of the greatest challenges in the pharmaceutical field. The major barriers in developing oral formulations for peptides and proteins include poor intrinsic perme...

  14. Mining Large Scale Tandem Mass Spectrometry Data for Protein Modifications Using Spectral Libraries.

    Horlacher, Oliver; Lisacek, Frederique; Müller, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Experimental improvements in post-translational modification (PTM) detection by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has allowed the identification of vast numbers of PTMs. Open modification searches (OMSs) of MS/MS data, which do not require prior knowledge of the modifications present in the sample, further increased the diversity of detected PTMs. Despite much effort, there is still a lack of functional annotation of PTMs. One possibility to narrow the annotation gap is to mine MS/MS data deposited in public repositories and to correlate the PTM presence with biological meta-information attached to the data. Since the data volume can be quite substantial and contain tens of millions of MS/MS spectra, the data mining tools must be able to cope with big data. Here, we present two tools, Liberator and MzMod, which are built using the MzJava class library and the Apache Spark large scale computing framework. Liberator builds large MS/MS spectrum libraries, and MzMod searches them in an OMS mode. We applied these tools to a recently published set of 25 million spectra from 30 human tissues and present tissue specific PTMs. We also compared the results to the ones obtained with the OMS tool MODa and the search engine X!Tandem. PMID:26653734

  15. Structural modification of serum vitamin D3-binding protein and immunosuppression in AIDS patients.

    Yamamoto, N; Naraparaju, V R; Srinivasula, S M

    1995-11-01

    A serum glycoprotein, vitamin D3-binding protein (Gc protein), can be converted by beta-galactosidase of stimulated B lymphocytes and sialidase of T lymphocytes to a potent macrophage-activating factor (MAF), a protein with N-acetylgalactosamine as the remaining sugar moiety. Thus, Gc protein is a precursor for MAF. Treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generates an extremely high-titered MAF (GcMAF). When peripheral blood monocytes/macrophages of 46 HIV-infected patients were treated with GcMAF (100 pg/ml), the monocytes/macrophages of all patients were efficiently activated. However, the MAF precursor activity of plasma Gc protein was low in 16 (35%) of of these patients. Loss of the MAF precursor activity appeared to be due to deglycosylation of plasma Gc protein by alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase found in the patient blood stream. Levels of plasma alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity in individual patients had an inverse correlation with the MAF precursor activity of their plasma Gc protein. Thus, precursor activity of Gc protein and alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity in patient blood can serve as diagnostic and prognostic indices. PMID:8573395

  16. Modifications in structure and interaction of nanoparticle-protein-surfactant complexes in electrolyte solution

    Mehan, Sumit; Kumar, S.; Aswal, V. K.; Schweins, R.

    2016-05-01

    SANS experiments of three-component system of anionic silica nanoparticles, anionic BSA protein and anionic SDS surfactants have been carried out without and with electrolyte in aqueous solution. In both the cases, the interaction of surfactant with protein results in formation of bead-necklace structure of protein-surfactant complexes in solution. These protein-surfactant complexes interact very differently with nanoparticles in absence and presence of electrolyte. In absence of electrolyte, nanoparticles remain in dispersed phase in solution, whereas with the addition of electrolyte the nanoparticles fractal aggregates are formed. SANS describes the phase behavior to be governed by competition of electrostatic and depletion interactions among the components solution.

  17. Mapping the laminin-binding and adhesive domain of the cell surface-associated Hlp/LBP protein from Mycobacterium leprae.

    Soares de Lima, Cristiana; Zulianello, Laurence; Marques, Maria Angela de Melo; Kim, Heejin; Portugal, Michelle Iespa; Antunes, Sérgio Luiz; Menozzi, Franco Dante; Ottenhoff, Tom Henricus Maria; Brennan, Patrick Joseph; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal

    2005-07-01

    Binding of Mycobacterium leprae to and invasion of Schwann cells (SC) represent a crucial step that initiates nerve damage in leprosy. We and others have described that M. leprae colonization of the peripheral nerve system may be mediated in part by a surface-exposed histone-like protein (Hlp), characterized as a laminin-binding protein (LBP). Hlp/LBP has also been shown to play a role in the binding of mycobacteria to alveolar epithelial cells and macrophages. In the present study we report that M. leprae expresses Hlp/LBP protein during the course of human infection. Additionally, we analyzed the interaction of Hlp/LBP with the extracellular matrix and host cell surface. We show that Hlp/LBP, besides laminin, also binds heparin and heparan sulfate. Testing truncated recombinant Hlp molecules corresponding to the N-terminal (rHlp-N) and the C-terminal (rHlp-C) domains of the protein, we established that interaction of Hlp/LBP with laminin-2 and heparin is mainly mediated by the C-terminal domain of the protein. Moreover, the same domain was found to be involved in Hlp/LBP-mediating bacterial binding to human SC. Finally, evidence is shown suggesting that M. leprae produces a post-translationally modified Hlp/LBP containing methyllysine residues. Methylation of the lysine residues, however, seems not to affect the adhesive properties of Hlp/LBP. Taken together, our observations reinforce the involvement of Hlp/LBP as an adhesin in mycobacterial infections and define its highly positive C-terminal region as the major adhesive domain of this protein. PMID:15919224

  18. Proteomic assessment of sulfur mustard-induced protein adducts and other protein modifications in human epidermal keratinocytes

    Although some toxicological mechanisms of sulfur mustard (HD) have been uncovered, new knowledge will allow for advanced insight in the pathways that lead towards epidermal-dermal separation in skin. In the present investigation, we aimed to survey events that occur at the protein level in human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK) during 24 h after exposure to HD. By using radiolabeled 14C-HD, it was found that proteins in cultured HEK are significant targets for alkylation by HD. HD-adducted proteins were visualized by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and analyzed by mass spectrometry. Several type I and II cytokeratins, actin, stratifin (14-3-3σ) and galectin-7 were identified. These proteins are involved in the maintenance of the cellular cytoskeleton. Their alkylation may cause changes in the cellular architecture and, in direct line with that, be determinative for the onset of vesication. Furthermore, differential proteomic analysis was applied to search for novel features of the cellular response to HD. Partial breakdown of type I cytokeratins K14, K16 and K17 as well as the emergence of new charge variants of the proteins heat shock protein 27 and ribosomal protein P0 were observed. Studies with caspase inhibitors showed that caspase-6 is probably responsible for the breakdown of type I cytokeratins in HEK. The significance of the results is discussed in terms of toxicological relevance and possible clues for therapeutic intervention

  19. β-Lactoglobulin as nanotransporter--Part II: Characterization of the covalent protein modification by allicin and diallyl disulfide.

    Wilde, Sandra Catharina; Treitz, Christian; Keppler, Julia Katharina; Koudelka, Tomas; Palani, Kalpana; Tholey, Andreas; Rawel, Harshadrai M; Schwarz, Karin

    2016-04-15

    The whey protein β-lactoglobulin has been proposed as a transporter for covalent bound bioactive compounds in order to enhance their stability and reduce their sensory perception. The garlic derived compounds allicin and diallyl disulfide were bound covalently to the native and heat denatured protein. The binding site and the influence of the modification on the digestibility were determined by mass spectrometric analysis of the modified β-lactoglobulin. Further, the conformation of the modified protein was assessed by circular dichroism and dynamic light scattering. The free thiol group of Cys(121) turned out to be the major binding site. After proteolysis with trypsin at pH 7 but not with pepsin at pH 2, a limited transfer to other cysteinyl residues was observed. The covalently bound ligands did not mask any proteolytic cleavage sites of pepsin, trypsin or chymotrypsin. The modified β-lactoglobulin showed a native like conformation, besides a moderate loosening of protein folding. The covalent binding of organosulfur compounds to β-lactoglobulin provides a bioactive ingredient without impairing the digestibility and functional properties of the protein. PMID:26617049

  20. Site-specific modification of genome with cell-permeable Cre fusion protein in preimplantation mouse embryo

    Kim, Kyoungmi; Kim, Hwain; Lee, Daekee, E-mail: daekee@ewha.ac.kr

    2009-10-09

    Site-specific recombination (SSR) by Cre recombinase and its target sequence, loxP, is a valuable tool in genetic analysis of gene function. Recently, several studies reported successful application of Cre fusion protein containing protein transduction peptide for inducing gene modification in various mammalian cells including ES cell as well as in the whole animal. In this study, we show that a short incubation of preimplantation mouse embryos with purified cell-permeable Cre fusion protein results in efficient SSR. X-Gal staining of preimplantation embryos, heterozygous for Gtrosa26{sup tm1Sor}, revealed that treatment of 1-cell or 2-cell embryos with 3 {mu}M of Cre fusion protein for 2 h leads to Cre-mediated excision in 70-85% of embryos. We have examined the effect of the concentration of the Cre fusion protein and the duration of the treatment on embryonic development, established a condition for full term development and survival to adulthood, and demonstrated the germ line transmission of excised Gtrosa26 allele. Potential applications and advantages of the highly efficient technique described here are discussed.

  1. Site-specific modification of genome with cell-permeable Cre fusion protein in preimplantation mouse embryo

    Site-specific recombination (SSR) by Cre recombinase and its target sequence, loxP, is a valuable tool in genetic analysis of gene function. Recently, several studies reported successful application of Cre fusion protein containing protein transduction peptide for inducing gene modification in various mammalian cells including ES cell as well as in the whole animal. In this study, we show that a short incubation of preimplantation mouse embryos with purified cell-permeable Cre fusion protein results in efficient SSR. X-Gal staining of preimplantation embryos, heterozygous for Gtrosa26tm1Sor, revealed that treatment of 1-cell or 2-cell embryos with 3 μM of Cre fusion protein for 2 h leads to Cre-mediated excision in 70-85% of embryos. We have examined the effect of the concentration of the Cre fusion protein and the duration of the treatment on embryonic development, established a condition for full term development and survival to adulthood, and demonstrated the germ line transmission of excised Gtrosa26 allele. Potential applications and advantages of the highly efficient technique described here are discussed.

  2. Canavanine Alters ROS/RNS Level and Leads to Post-translational Modification of Proteins in Roots of Tomato Seedlings.

    Krasuska, Urszula; Andrzejczak, Olga; Staszek, Paweł; Bogatek, Renata; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Canavanine (CAN), a structural analog of arginine (Arg), is used as a selective inhibitor of inducible NOS in mammals. CAN is incorporated into proteins' structure in the place of Arg, leading to the formation of aberrant compounds. This non-protein amino acid is found in legumes, e.g., Canavalia ensiformis (L.) DC. or Sutherlandia frutescens (L.) R.Br. and acts as a strong toxin against herbivores or plants. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seedlings were treated for 24-72 h with CAN (10 or 50 μM) inhibiting root growth by 50 or 100%, without lethal effect. We determined ROS level/production in root extracts, fluorescence of DAF-FM and APF derivatives corresponding to RNS level in roots of tomato seedlings and linked CAN-induced restriction of root growth to the post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins: carbonylation and nitration. Both PTMs are stable markers of nitro-oxidative stress, regarded as the plant's secondary response to phytotoxins. CAN enhanced H2O2 content and superoxide radicals generation in extracts of tomato roots and stimulated formation of protein carbonyl groups. An elevated level of carbonylated proteins was characteristic for the plants after 72 h of the culture, mainly for the roots exposed to 10 μM CAN. The proteolytic activity was stimulated by tested non-protein amino acid. CAN treatment led to decline of fluorescence of DAF-FM derivatives, and transiently stimulated fluorescence of APF derivatives. Short-term exposure of tomato seedlings to CAN lowered the protein nitration level. Activity of peroxidase, polyamine oxidase and NADPH oxidase, enzymes acting as modulators of H2O2 concentration and governing root architecture and growth were determined. Activities of all enzymes were stimulated by CAN, but no strict CAN concentration dependence was observed. We conclude, that although CAN treatment led to a decline in the nitric oxide level, PTMs observed in roots of plants exposed to CAN are linked rather to the formation of

  3. Aplysia cell adhesion molecule and a novel protein kinase C activity in the postsynaptic neuron are required for presynaptic growth and initial formation of specific synapses

    Hu, Jiang-Yuan; Chen, Yang; Bougie, Joanna K; Sossin, Wayne S.; Schacher, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    To explore the role of both Aplysia cell adhesion molecule (ApCAM) and activity of specific protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms in the initial formation of sensory neuron synapses with specific postsynaptic targets (L7 but not L11), we examined presynaptic growth, initial synapse formation, and the expression of the presynaptic neuropeptide sensorin following cell-specific reduction of ApCAM or of a novel PKC activity. Synapse formation between sensory neurons and L7 begins by 3 h after plating a...

  4. Syndecans, signaling, and cell adhesion

    Couchman, J R; Woods, A

    1996-01-01

    structures within the heparan sulfate chains, leaving the roles of chondroitin sulfate chains and extracellular portion of the core proteins to be elucidated. Evidence that syndecans are a class of receptor involved in cell adhesion is mounting, and their small cytoplasmic domains may link with the...... transmembrane signaling from matrix to cytoskeleton, as proposed for other classes of adhesion receptors....

  5. Effects of Industrial Heating Processes of Milk-Based Enteral Formulas on Site-Specific Protein Modifications and Their Relationship to in Vitro and in Vivo Protein Digestibility.

    Wada, Yasuaki; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2015-08-01

    Heat treatments are applied to milk and dairy products to ensure their microbiological safety and shelf lives. Types of heating processes may have different effects on protein modifications, leading to different protein digestibility. In this study, milk-based liquid nutritional formulas (simulating enteral formulas) were subjected to steam injection ultra-high-temperature treatment or in-can sterilization, and the formulas were investigated by proteomic methods and in vitro and in vivo digestion assays. Proteomic analyses revealed that in-can sterilization resulted in higher signals for N(ε)-carboxymethyllysine and dephosphorylation of Ser residues in major milk proteins than in steam-injected formula, reflecting the more severe thermal process of in-can sterilization. In vitro and in vivo digestion assays indicated that steam injection improved protein digestibility, supposedly by denaturation, while the improvement seemed to be overwhelmed by formation of aggregates that showed resistance to digestion in in-can sterilized formula. Adverse effects of heat treatment on protein digestibility are more likely to be manifested in milk-based formulas than in cow's milk. Although the differences might be of limited significance in terms of amino acid bioavailability, these results emphasize the importance of protein quality of raw materials and selection of heating processes. PMID:26161498

  6. Effects of the knockdown of death-associated protein 3 expression on cell adhesion, growth and migration in breast cancer cells.

    Wazir, Umar; Sanders, Andrew J; Wazir, Ahmad M A; Ye, Lin; Jiang, Wen G; Ster, Irina C; Sharma, Anup K; Mokbel, Kefah

    2015-05-01

    The death-associated protein 3 (DAP3) is a highly conserved phosphoprotein involved in the regulation of autophagy. A previous clinical study by our group suggested an association between low DAP3 expression and clinicopathological parameters of human breast cancer. In the present study, we intended to determine the role of DAP3 in cancer cell behaviour in the context of human breast cancer. We developed knockdown sub-lines of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231, and performed growth, adhesion, invasion assays and electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) studies of post-wound migration of the cells. In addition, we studied the mRNA expression of caspase 8 and 9, death ligand signal enhancer (DELE), IFN-β promoter stimulator 1 (IPS1), cyclin D1 and p21 in the control and knockdown sub-lines. The knockdown sub-lines of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 had significantly increased adhesion and decreased growth when compared to the controls. Furthermore, invasion and migration were significantly increased in the MDA-MB-231DAP3kd cells vs. the controls. The expression of caspase 9 and IPS1, known components of the apoptosis pathway, were significantly reduced in the MCF7DAP3kd cells (p=0.05 and p=0.003, respectively). We conclude that DAP3 silencing contributes to breast carcinogenesis by increasing cell adhesion, migration and invasion. It is possible that this may be due to the activity of focal adhesion kinase further downstream of the anoikis pathway. Further research in this direction would be beneficial in increasing our understanding of the mechanisms underlying human breast cancer. PMID:25738636

  7. Surface modification by using of immobilized electrostatic self-assembly of bacteriorhodopsin as protein memory

    Ashkan Zare Karizak

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriorhodopsin (BR is the light harvesting and photoactive proton pump found in the membrane of a salt marsh bacteria. This protein has significant potential to use in optical computing and memory devices due to unique intrinsic physical properties of photo and bioelectric. All these features make BR one of the most promising protein candidates in protein memories. Protein memory is a kind of optical memory with a large storage capacity and high speed processing features. BR protein was used with the polymer film in order to create better stability. In order to investigate immobilization of electrostatic self-assembly of BR on glass and polycarbonate as protein memories was used. Polycarbonate is a layer of compact disc (CD structure which considered dye immobilized on its surface and have reading and writing abilities of information via 0,1 bites. In this study, surfaces of polycarbonate modified by the mixture of 5% sulfuric acid and 20% acetic acid; furthermore, by using of PEI as cationic resin the surface of polycarbonate was charged and BR immobilized on it electrostatically. The modified surfaces were characterized by AFM technique. Also, light activity for reading data is retained. This is an appropriate method for optimal stability and activity assay of the protein and also is suitable for preparation of protein memories.

  8. Structure modification of montmorillonite nanoclay by surface coating with soy protein.

    Jin, Minfeng; Zhong, Qixin

    2012-12-01

    To achieve exfoliated and/or intercalated structures, montmorillonite (MMT) was surface-coated by soy protein at 60 °C, at MMT/soy protein powder mass ratios of 49:1, 9:1, 4:1, and 2:1 and pH 2.0-10.0. The protein-coated MMT was triple-washed and lyophilized for characterization. Protein coating was observed at all pH conditions, based on data from X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, zeta potential, and quantification of protein remaining in the continuous phase and present in the triple-washed MMT. At a mass ratio of 4:1, >90% protein bound with MMT, with the largest d-spacing at pH 9.0. When the mass ratio was increased to 2:1, protein-coated MMT at pH 9.0 demonstrated the highest degree of intercalation/exfoliation, corresponding to disappearance of the diffraction peak characteristic of pristine MMT. This study thus demonstrated that intercalation/exfoliation of MMT can be easily achieved by coating with low-cost soy protein for manufacturing nanocomposite materials. PMID:23163488

  9. Strawberry Fruit Protein With a Novel Post-Translational Indole-acyl Modification

    Fruit of the diploid strawberry, Fragaria vesca, L. ‘Yellow Wonder’ contain indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) covalently attached to specific strawberry proteins. Protein-conjugated IAA accounts for between 0.4 and 4 ng of IAA per gram fresh weight of tissue in achenes, and in receptacle tissue. Immunob...

  10. Mitochondrial dysfunction and tissue injury by alcohol, high fat, nonalcoholic substances and pathological conditions through post-translational protein modifications

    Byoung-Joon Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are critically important in providing cellular energy ATP as well as their involvement in anti-oxidant defense, fat oxidation, intermediary metabolism and cell death processes. It is well-established that mitochondrial functions are suppressed when living cells or organisms are exposed to potentially toxic agents including alcohol, high fat diets, smoking and certain drugs or in many pathophysiological states through increased levels of oxidative/nitrative stress. Under elevated nitroxidative stress, cellular macromolecules proteins, DNA, and lipids can undergo different oxidative modifications, leading to disruption of their normal, sometimes critical, physiological functions. Recent reports also indicated that many mitochondrial proteins are modified via various post-translation modifications (PTMs and primarily inactivated. Because of the recently-emerging information, in this review, we specifically focus on the mechanisms and roles of five major PTMs (namely oxidation, nitration, phosphorylation, acetylation, and adduct formation with lipid-peroxides, reactive metabolites, or advanced glycation end products in experimental models of alcoholic and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease as well as acute hepatic injury caused by toxic compounds. We also highlight the role of the ethanol-inducible cytochrome P450-2E1 (CYP2E1 in some of these PTM changes. Finally, we discuss translational research opportunities with natural and/or synthetic anti-oxidants, which can prevent or delay the onset of mitochondrial dysfunction, fat accumulation and tissue injury.

  11. An integrated top-down and bottom-up strategy for characterization protein isoforms and modifications

    Wu, Si; Tolic, Nikola; Tian, Zhixin; Robinson, Errol W.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2011-04-15

    Bottom-up and top-down strategies are two commonly used methods for mass spectrometry (MS) based protein identification; each method has its own advantages and disadvantages. In this chapter, we describe an integrated top-down and bottom-up approach facilitated by concurrent liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis and fraction collection for comprehensive high-throughput intact protein profiling. The approach employs a high resolution reversed phase (RP) LC separation coupled with LC eluent fraction collection and concurrent on-line MS with a high field (12 Tesla) Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. Protein elusion profiles and tentative modified protein identification are made using detected intact protein mass in conjunction with bottom-up protein identifications from the enzymatic digestion and analysis of corresponding LC fractions. Specific proteins of biological interest are incorporated into a target ion list for subsequent off-line gas-phase fragmentation that uses an aliquot of the original collected LC fraction, an aliquot of which was also used for bottom-up analysis.

  12. dbPTM 2016: 10-year anniversary of a resource for post-translational modification of proteins.

    Huang, Kai-Yao; Su, Min-Gang; Kao, Hui-Ju; Hsieh, Yun-Chung; Jhong, Jhih-Hua; Cheng, Kuang-Hao; Huang, Hsien-Da; Lee, Tzong-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the importance of the post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins in regulating biological processes, the dbPTM (http://dbPTM.mbc.nctu.edu.tw/) was developed as a comprehensive database of experimentally verified PTMs from several databases with annotations of potential PTMs for all UniProtKB protein entries. For this 10th anniversary of dbPTM, the updated resource provides not only a comprehensive dataset of experimentally verified PTMs, supported by the literature, but also an integrative interface for accessing all available databases and tools that are associated with PTM analysis. As well as collecting experimental PTM data from 14 public databases, this update manually curates over 12 000 modified peptides, including the emerging S-nitrosylation, S-glutathionylation and succinylation, from approximately 500 research articles, which were retrieved by text mining. As the number of available PTM prediction methods increases, this work compiles a non-homologous benchmark dataset to evaluate the predictive power of online PTM prediction tools. An increasing interest in the structural investigation of PTM substrate sites motivated the mapping of all experimental PTM peptides to protein entries of Protein Data Bank (PDB) based on database identifier and sequence identity, which enables users to examine spatially neighboring amino acids, solvent-accessible surface area and side-chain orientations for PTM substrate sites on tertiary structures. Since drug binding in PDB is annotated, this update identified over 1100 PTM sites that are associated with drug binding. The update also integrates metabolic pathways and protein-protein interactions to support the PTM network analysis for a group of proteins. Finally, the web interface is redesigned and enhanced to facilitate access to this resource. PMID:26578568

  13. Canavanine Alters ROS/RNS Level and Leads to Post-translational Modification of Proteins in Roots of Tomato Seedlings

    Krasuska, Urszula; Andrzejczak, Olga; Staszek, Paweł; Bogatek, Renata; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Canavanine (CAN), a structural analog of arginine (Arg), is used as a selective inhibitor of inducible NOS in mammals. CAN is incorporated into proteins’ structure in the place of Arg, leading to the formation of aberrant compounds. This non-protein amino acid is found in legumes, e.g., Canavalia ensiformis (L.) DC. or Sutherlandia frutescens (L.) R.Br. and acts as a strong toxin against herbivores or plants. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seedlings were treated for 24–72 h with CAN (10 or 50 μM) inhibiting root growth by 50 or 100%, without lethal effect. We determined ROS level/production in root extracts, fluorescence of DAF-FM and APF derivatives corresponding to RNS level in roots of tomato seedlings and linked CAN-induced restriction of root growth to the post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins: carbonylation and nitration. Both PTMs are stable markers of nitro-oxidative stress, regarded as the plant’s secondary response to phytotoxins. CAN enhanced H2O2 content and superoxide radicals generation in extracts of tomato roots and stimulated formation of protein carbonyl groups. An elevated level of carbonylated proteins was characteristic for the plants after 72 h of the culture, mainly for the roots exposed to 10 μM CAN. The proteolytic activity was stimulated by tested non-protein amino acid. CAN treatment led to decline of fluorescence of DAF-FM derivatives, and transiently stimulated fluorescence of APF derivatives. Short-term exposure of tomato seedlings to CAN lowered the protein nitration level. Activity of peroxidase, polyamine oxidase and NADPH oxidase, enzymes acting as modulators of H2O2 concentration and governing root architecture and growth were determined. Activities of all enzymes were stimulated by CAN, but no strict CAN concentration dependence was observed. We conclude, that although CAN treatment led to a decline in the nitric oxide level, PTMs observed in roots of plants exposed to CAN are linked rather to the

  14. Surface modification of diamond-like carbon films with protein via polydopamine inspired coatings

    In this paper, we report a facile two-step approach to immobilize proteins onto DLC surfaces. The first step was a simple immersion of DLC in a solution of dopamine. Polydopamine was deposited on DLC as a stable anchor to present protein molecules. Then the protein ad-layer was deposited on it. The chemical components of the modified DLC surfaces were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The biocompatibility of it was evaluated in vitro by the tetrazolium salt method. And it was indicated that the BSA modified surface had good haemocompatibility properties, and was cytocompatible to PC-12 cells.

  15. Surface modification of diamond-like carbon films with protein via polydopamine inspired coatings

    Tao Caihong [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Tianshui Middle Road 18th, Lanzhou 730000 (China); China and Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Yang Shengrong [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Tianshui Middle Road 18th, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang Junyan, E-mail: zhangjunyan@lzb.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Tianshui Middle Road 18th, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang Jinqing [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Tianshui Middle Road 18th, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2009-10-15

    In this paper, we report a facile two-step approach to immobilize proteins onto DLC surfaces. The first step was a simple immersion of DLC in a solution of dopamine. Polydopamine was deposited on DLC as a stable anchor to present protein molecules. Then the protein ad-layer was deposited on it. The chemical components of the modified DLC surfaces were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The biocompatibility of it was evaluated in vitro by the tetrazolium salt method. And it was indicated that the BSA modified surface had good haemocompatibility properties, and was cytocompatible to PC-12 cells.

  16. Normal histone modifications on the inactive X chromosome in ICF and Rett syndrome cells: implications for methyl-CpG binding proteins

    Canfield Theresa K

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In mammals, there is evidence suggesting that methyl-CpG binding proteins may play a significant role in histone modification through their association with modification complexes that can deacetylate and/or methylate nucleosomes in the proximity of methylated DNA. We examined this idea for the X chromosome by studying histone modifications on the X chromosome in normal cells and in cells from patients with ICF syndrome (Immune deficiency, Centromeric region instability, and Facial anomalies syndrome. In normal cells the inactive X has characteristic silencing type histone modification patterns and the CpG islands of genes subject to X inactivation are hypermethylated. In ICF cells, however, genes subject to X inactivation are hypomethylated on the inactive X due to mutations in the DNA methyltransferase (DNMT3B genes. Therefore, if DNA methylation is upstream of histone modification, the histones on the inactive X in ICF cells should not be modified to a silent form. In addition, we determined whether a specific methyl-CpG binding protein, MeCP2, is necessary for the inactive X histone modification pattern by studying Rett syndrome cells which are deficient in MeCP2 function. Results We show here that the inactive X in ICF cells, which appears to be hypomethylated at all CpG islands, exhibits normal histone modification patterns. In addition, in Rett cells with no functional MeCP2 methyl-CpG binding protein, the inactive X also exhibits normal histone modification patterns. Conclusions These data suggest that DNA methylation and the associated methyl-DNA binding proteins may not play a critical role in determining histone modification patterns on the mammalian inactive X chromosome at the sites analyzed.

  17. Identification of protein complexes that bind to histone H3 combinatorial modifications using super-SILAC and weighted correlation network analysis

    Kunowska, Natalia; Rotival, Maxime; Yu, Lu; Choudhary, Jyoti; Dillon, Niall

    2015-01-01

    The large number of chemical modifications that are found on the histone proteins of eukaryotic cells form multiple complex combinations, which can act as recognition signals for reader proteins. We have used peptide capture in conjunction with super-SILAC quantification to carry out an unbiased high-throughput analysis of the composition of protein complexes that bind to histone H3K9/S10 and H3K27/S28 methyl-phospho modifications. The accurate quantification allowed us to perform Weighted co...

  18. Identification and modification of dynamical regions in proteins for alteration of enzyme catalytic effect

    Agarwal, Pratul K.

    2013-04-09

    A method for analysis, control, and manipulation for improvement of the chemical reaction rate of a protein-mediated reaction is provided. Enzymes, which typically comprise protein molecules, are very efficient catalysts that enhance chemical reaction rates by many orders of magnitude. Enzymes are widely used for a number of functions in chemical, biochemical, pharmaceutical, and other purposes. The method identifies key protein vibration modes that control the chemical reaction rate of the protein-mediated reaction, providing identification of the factors that enable the enzymes to achieve the high rate of reaction enhancement. By controlling these factors, the function of enzymes may be modulated, i.e., the activity can either be increased for faster enzyme reaction or it can be decreased when a slower enzyme is desired. This method provides an inexpensive and efficient solution by utilizing computer simulations, in combination with available experimental data, to build suitable models and investigate the enzyme activity.

  19. Identification and modification of dynamical regions in proteins for alteration of enzyme catalytic effect

    Agarwal, Pratul K.

    2015-11-24

    A method for analysis, control, and manipulation for improvement of the chemical reaction rate of a protein-mediated reaction is provided. Enzymes, which typically comprise protein molecules, are very efficient catalysts that enhance chemical reaction rates by many orders of magnitude. Enzymes are widely used for a number of functions in chemical, biochemical, pharmaceutical, and other purposes. The method identifies key protein vibration modes that control the chemical reaction rate of the protein-mediated reaction, providing identification of the factors that enable the enzymes to achieve the high rate of reaction enhancement. By controlling these factors, the function of enzymes may be modulated, i.e., the activity can either be increased for faster enzyme reaction or it can be decreased when a slower enzyme is desired. This method provides an inexpensive and efficient solution by utilizing computer simulations, in combination with available experimental data, to build suitable models and investigate the enzyme activity.

  20. Altered starch structure is associated with endosperm modification in Quality Protein Maize

    Gibbon, Bryan C.; Wang, Xuelu; Larkins, Brian A

    2003-01-01

    The biochemical basis of modified kernel texture in Quality Protein Maize (QPM) is poorly understood. Proteomic analysis of several QPM lines indicated increased levels of granule-bound starch synthase I in the soluble nonzein protein fraction of these genotypes. Increased extraction of this enzyme reflected a change in starch structure, which was manifested as shorter amylopectin branches and increased starch-granule swelling. In mature kernels, these alterations in starch structure were ass...

  1. Structure of chromatin, protein transitions, and post-translational histone modifications in several sperm models

    Kurtz, Katryn Lucille

    2008-01-01

    [eng] The study of chromatin structure in several simple sperm models of increasing complexity was performed. Species demonstrating different types of sperm nuclear protein transitions and structural changes in spermatic chromatin during spermiogenesis were selected as models for comparison: "H" (non-histone proteins are removed), "H->P" (protamine displaces histones), and "H->Pp->P" (precursor protamine displaces histones, and subsequently is converted into the mature protamine). This study ...

  2. Prediction and Analysis of Post-Translational Pyruvoyl Residue Modification Sites from Internal Serines in Proteins

    Jiang, Yang; Li, Bi-Qing; Zhang, Yuchao; Feng, Yuan-Ming; Gao, Yu-Fei; Zhang, Ning; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Most of pyruvoyl-dependent proteins observed in prokaryotes and eukaryotes are critical regulatory enzymes, which are primary targets of inhibitors for anti-cancer and anti-parasitic therapy. These proteins undergo an autocatalytic, intramolecular self-cleavage reaction in which a covalently bound pyruvoyl group is generated on a conserved serine residue. Traditional detections of the modified serine sites are performed by experimental approaches, which are often labor-intensive and time-cons...

  3. Computational Identification of Post Translational Modification Regulated RNA Binding Protein Motifs

    Andrew S. Brown; Mohanty, Bidyut K.; Howe, Philip H.

    2015-01-01

    RNA and its associated RNA binding proteins (RBPs) mitigate a diverse array of cellular functions and phenotypes. The interactions between RNA and RBPs are implicated in many roles of biochemical processing by the cell such as localization, protein translation, and RNA stability. Recent discoveries of novel mechanisms that are of significant evolutionary advantage between RBPs and RNA include the interaction of the RBP with the 3’ and 5’ untranslated region (UTR) of target mRNA. These mechani...

  4. Histone modifications and lamin A regulate chromatin protein dynamics in early embryonic stem cell differentiation

    Melcer, Shai; Hezroni, Hadas; Rand, Eyal; Nissim-Rafinia, Malka; Skoultchi, Arthur; Stewart, Colin L.; Bustin, Michael; Meshorer, Eran

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells are characterized by unique epigenetic features including decondensed chromatin and hyperdynamic association of chromatin proteins with chromatin. Here we investigate the potential mechanisms that regulate chromatin plasticity in embryonic stem cells. Using epigenetic drugs and mutant embryonic stem cells lacking various chromatin proteins, we find that histone acetylation, G9a-mediated histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) methylation and lamin A expression, all affect chromatin pr...

  5. Thermodynamic analysis of protein folding and stability using a tryptophan modification protocol.

    Xu, Yingrong; Strickland, Erin C; Fitzgerald, Michael C

    2014-07-15

    Described here is the development of a mass spectrometry-based covalent labeling protocol that utilizes the reaction of dimethyl(2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzyl)sulfonium bromide (HNSB) with tryptophan (Trp) residues to measure protein folding free energies (ΔG(f) values). In the protocol, the chemical denaturant dependence of the rate at which globally protected Trp residues in a protein react with HNSB is evaluated using either a matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight analysis of the intact protein or a quantitative, bottom-up proteomics analysis using isobaric mass tags. In the proof-of-principle studies performed here, the protocol yielded accurate ΔG(f) values for the two-state folding proteins, lysozyme and cytochrome c. The protocol also yielded an accurate measure of the dissociation constant (K(d) value) for the binding of N,N',N″-triacetylchitotriose to lysozyme, and it successfully detected the binding of brinzolamide to BCA II, a non-two-state folding protein. The HNSB protocol can be used in combination with SPROX (stability of proteins from rates of oxidation), a previously reported technique that exploits the hydrogen peroxide oxidation of methionine (Met) residues in proteins to make ΔG(f) value measurements. Incorporating the HNSB protocol into SPROX increased the peptide and protein coverage in proteome-wide SPROX experiments by 50% and 25%, respectively. As part of this work, the precision of proteome-wide ΔG(f) value measurements using the combined HNSB and SPROX protocol is also evaluated. PMID:24896224

  6. The conserved dual phosphorylation sites of the Candida albicans Hog1 protein are crucial for white-opaque switching, mating, and pheromone-stimulated cell adhesion.

    Chang, Wen-Han; Liang, Shen-Huan; Deng, Fu-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Hsuan

    2016-08-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic human pathogen capable of causing life-threatening infections in immunocompromised patients. C. albicans has a unique morphological transition between white and opaque phases. These two cells differ in virulence, mating capability, biofilm formation, and host-cell interaction. Previous studies revealed that deletion of the SSK2, PBS2, or HOG1 gene resulted in 100% opaque cell formation and suppressed the mating response. Thr-174 and Tyr-176 of the Hog1 protein are important phosphoacceptors and can be activated in response to stimuli. In this study, we first demonstrated the importance of two conserved phosphorylation sites in white-opaque switching, mating, and pheromone-stimulated cell adhesion. Six Hog1 point-mutated strains were generated, including nonphosphorylated strains (Hog1(T174A), Hog1(Y176F), and Hog1(T174A,Y176F)) and negatively charged phosphorylated strains (Hog1(T174D), Hog1(Y176D), and Hog1(T174D,Y176D)). Point mutation on Thr-174, Tyr-176 or in combination with the Hog1 protein in C. albicans MTL homozygous strains stimulated opaque cell formation at a frequency of 100%. Furthermore, mating projections of point-mutated strains were significantly shorter and their mating efficiencies and pheromone-stimulated cell adhesive numbers were lower than those of the wild-type. By investigating the effects of Hog1 phosphorylation in ssk1Δ and sln1Δ, we also demonstrate that the phosphorylation intensity of Hog1p is directly involved in the white-opaque switching. Taken together, the results of our study demonstrate that dual phosphorylation sites of C. albicans are crucial for white-opaque transition, sexual mating, and pheromone-induced cell adhesion. PMID:27118797

  7. 改性豆基蛋白胶粘剂的制备及应用%Preparation and application of modified soy-based protein adhesive

    邱盈盈; 张越; 李城; 张世锋; 李建章

    2012-01-01

    以改性异氰酸酯作为交联剂,制备改性豆基蛋白胶粘剂.探讨了交联剂、乳化剂和热压工艺条件等因素对该胶粘剂耐水胶接强度的影响.结果表明:当w(交联剂)=6%、w(乳化剂)=1.5%、热压时间为60s/mm、热压压力为1.0Mpa和热压温度为120℃时,胶合板的耐水胶接强度为1.21Mpa,完全满足GB/T9846.3-2004标准中Ⅱ类胶合板的使用要求,并且改性豆基蛋白胶粘剂的适用期超过60h.%With modified isocyanate as cross linker, a modified soy-based protein adhesive was prepared. The influences of cross linker, emulsifier, hot-pressing process conditions and other factors were discussed on the water—resistance bonding strength of the adhesive. The results showed that the water—resistance bonding strength of plywood(1.21 Mpa) could fully meet application requirements of II-type plywood in GB/T 9846.3—2004 standard, and the working life of the modified soy-based protein adhesive was more than 60 h when mass fractions of cross linker and emulsifier were 6% and 1.5% respectively, hot-pressing time, hot-pressing pressure and hot-pressing temperature were 60 s/mm,1.0 Mpa and 120 ℃ respectively.

  8. De novo design of protein-protein interactions through modification of inter-molecular helix-helix interface residues.

    Yagi, Sota; Akanuma, Satoshi; Yamagishi, Manami; Uchida, Tatsuya; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2016-05-01

    For de novo design of protein-protein interactions (PPIs), information on the shape and chemical complementarity of their interfaces is generally required. Recent advances in computational PPI design have allowed for de novo design of protein complexes, and several successful examples have been reported. In addition, a simple and easy-to-use approach has also been reported that arranges leucines on a solvent-accessible region of an α-helix and places charged residues around the leucine patch to induce interactions between the two helical peptides. For this study, we adopted this approach to de novo design a new PPI between the helical bundle proteins sulerythrin and LARFH. A non-polar patch was created on an α-helix of LARFH around which arginine residues were introduced to retain its solubility. The strongest interaction found was for the LARFH variant cysLARFH-IV-3L3R and the sulerythrin mutant 6L6D (KD=0.16 μM). This artificial protein complex is maintained by hydrophobic and ionic interactions formed by the inter-molecular helical bundle structure. Therefore, by the simple and easy-to-use approach to create de novo interfaces on the α-helices, we successfully generated an artificial PPI. We also created a second LARFH variant with the non-polar patch surrounded by positively charged residues at each end. Upon mixing this LARFH variant with 6L6D, mesh-like fibrous nanostructures were observed by atomic force microscopy. Our method may, therefore, also be applicable to the de novo design of protein nanostructures. PMID:26867971

  9. The Src Homology 3 Domain Is Required for Junctional Adhesion Molecule Binding to the Third PDZ Domain of the Scaffolding Protein ZO-1

    Nomme, Julian; Fanning, Alan S.; Caffrey, Michael; Lye, Ming F.; Anderson, James M.; Lavie, Arnon (NIH); (UNC); (UIC)

    2012-01-20

    Tight junctions are cell-cell contacts that regulate the paracellular flux of solutes and prevent pathogen entry across cell layers. The assembly and permeability of this barrier are dependent on the zonula occludens (ZO) membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) proteins ZO-1, -2, and -3. MAGUK proteins are characterized by a core motif of protein-binding domains that include a PDZ domain, a Src homology 3 (SH3) domain, and a region of homology to guanylate kinase (GUK); the structure of this core motif has never been determined for any MAGUK. To better understand how ZO proteins organize the assembly of protein complexes we have crystallized the entire PDZ3-SH3-GUK core motif of ZO-1. We have also crystallized this core motif in complex with the cytoplasmic tail of the ZO-1 PDZ3 ligand, junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A) to determine how the activity of different domains is coordinated. Our study shows a new feature for PDZ class II ligand binding that implicates the two highly conserved Phe{sup -2} and Ser{sup -3} residues of JAM. Our x-ray structures and NMR experiments also show for the first time a role for adjacent domains in the binding of ligands to PDZ domains in the MAGUK proteins family.

  10. Age-induced protein modifications and increased proteolysis in potato seed-tubers

    Kumar, G.N.M.; Knowles, N.R. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science; Houtz, R.L. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture

    1999-01-01

    Long-term aging of potato (Solanum tuberosum) seed-tubers resulted in a loss of patatin and a cysteine-proteinase inhibitor, potato multicystatin (PMC), as well as in increase in the activities of 84-, 95-, and 125-kD proteinases. Highly active, additional proteinases appeared in the oldest tubers. Over 90% of the total proteolytic activity in aged tubers was sensitive to trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido (4-guanidino) butane or leupeptin, whereas pepstatin was the most effective inhibitor of proteinases in young tubers. Proteinases in aged tubers were also inhibited by crude extracts or purified PMC from young tubers, suggesting that the loss of PMC was responsible for the age-induced increase in proteinase activity. Nonenzymatic oxidation, glycation, and deamidation of proteins were enhanced by aging. Aged tubers developed daughter tubers that contained 3-fold more protein than mother tubers, with a polypeptide profile consistent with that of young tubers. Although PMC and patatin were absent from the older mother tubers, both proteins were expressed in the daughter tubers, indicating that aging did not compromise the efficacy of genes encoding PMC and patatin. Unlike the mother tubers, proteinase activity in daughter tubers was undetectable. Their results indicate that tuber aging nonenzymatically modifies proteins, which enhances their susceptibility to breakdown; the authors also identify a role for PMC in regulating protein turnover in potato tubers.

  11. Modification of gene duplicability during the evolution of protein interaction network.

    Matteo D'Antonio

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Duplications of genes encoding highly connected and essential proteins are selected against in several species but not in human, where duplicated genes encode highly connected proteins. To understand when and how gene duplicability changed in evolution, we compare gene and network properties in four species (Escherichia coli, yeast, fly, and human that are representative of the increase in evolutionary complexity, defined as progressive growth in the number of genes, cells, and cell types. We find that the origin and conservation of a gene significantly correlates with the properties of the encoded protein in the protein-protein interaction network. All four species preserve a core of singleton and central hubs that originated early in evolution, are highly conserved, and accomplish basic biological functions. Another group of hubs appeared in metazoans and duplicated in vertebrates, mostly through vertebrate-specific whole genome duplication. Such recent and duplicated hubs are frequently targets of microRNAs and show tissue-selective expression, suggesting that these are alternative mechanisms to control their dosage. Our study shows how networks modified during evolution and contributes to explaining the occurrence of somatic genetic diseases, such as cancer, in terms of network perturbations.

  12. Posttranslational modifications, localization, and protein interactions of optineurin, the product of a glaucoma gene.

    Hongyu Ying

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glaucoma is a major blinding disease. The most common form of this disease, primary open angle glaucoma (POAG, is genetically heterogeneous. One of the candidate genes, optineurin, is linked principally to normal tension glaucoma, a subtype of POAG. The present study was undertaken to illustrate the basic characteristics of optineurin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Lysates from rat retinal ganglion RGC5 cells were subjected to N- or O-deglycosylation or membrane protein extraction. The phosphorylation status was evaluated after immunoprecipitation. It was found that while phosphorylated, optineurin was neither N- nor O-glycosylated, and was by itself not a membrane protein. RGC5 and human retinal pigment epithelial cells were double stained with anti-optineurin and anti-GM130. The endogenous optineurin exhibited a diffuse, cytoplasmic distribution, but a population of the protein was associated with the Golgi apparatus. Turnover experiments showed that the endogenous optineurin was relatively short-lived, with a half-life of approximately 8 hours. Native blue gel electrophoresis revealed that the endogenous optineurin formed homohexamers. Optineurin also interacted with molecules including Rab8, myosin VI, and transferrin receptor to assemble into supermolecular complexes. When overexpressed, optineurin-green fluorescence protein (GFP fusion protein formed punctate structures termed "foci" in the perinuclear region. Treatment of nocadazole resulted in dispersion of the optineurin foci. In addition, tetracycline-regulated optineurin-GFPs expressing RGC5 stable cell lines were established for the first time. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study provides new information regarding basic characteristics of optineurin that are important for future efforts in defining precisely how optineurin functions normally and how mutations may result in pathology. The inducible optineurin-GFP-expressing cell lines are also anticipated to

  13. Targeted modification of storage protein content resulting in improved amino acid composition of barley grain

    Sikdar, Md. Shafiqul Islam; Bowra, S; Schmidt, Daiana;

    2016-01-01

    C-hordein in barley and ω-gliadins in wheat are members of the prolamins protein families. Prolamins are the major component of cereal storage proteins and composed of non-essential amino acids (AA) such as proline and glutamine therefore have low nutritional value. Using double stranded RNAi...... family members. Analysis of the AA composition of the transgenic lines showed that the level of essential amino acids increased with a concomitant reduction in proline and glutamine. Both the barley C-hordein and wheat ω-gliadin genes proved successful for RNAi-gene mediated suppression of barley C...

  14. Prediction and Analysis of Post-Translational Pyruvoyl Residue Modification Sites from Internal Serines in Proteins.

    Yang Jiang

    Full Text Available Most of pyruvoyl-dependent proteins observed in prokaryotes and eukaryotes are critical regulatory enzymes, which are primary targets of inhibitors for anti-cancer and anti-parasitic therapy. These proteins undergo an autocatalytic, intramolecular self-cleavage reaction in which a covalently bound pyruvoyl group is generated on a conserved serine residue. Traditional detections of the modified serine sites are performed by experimental approaches, which are often labor-intensive and time-consuming. In this study, we initiated in an attempt for the computational predictions of such serine sites with Feature Selection based on a Random Forest. Since only a small number of experimentally verified pyruvoyl-modified proteins are collected in the protein database at its current version, we only used a small dataset in this study. After removing proteins with sequence identities >60%, a non-redundant dataset was generated and was used, which contained only 46 proteins, with one pyruvoyl serine site for each protein. Several types of features were considered in our method including PSSM conservation scores, disorders, secondary structures, solvent accessibilities, amino acid factors and amino acid occurrence frequencies. As a result, a pretty good performance was achieved in our dataset. The best 100.00% accuracy and 1.0000 MCC value were obtained from the training dataset, and 93.75% accuracy and 0.8441 MCC value from the testing dataset. The optimal feature set contained 9 features. Analysis of the optimal feature set indicated the important roles of some specific features in determining the pyruvoyl-group-serine sites, which were consistent with several results of earlier experimental studies. These selected features may shed some light on the in-depth understanding of the mechanism of the post-translational self-maturation process, providing guidelines for experimental validation. Future work should be made as more pyruvoyl-modified proteins are

  15. Post-transcriptional protein modification of Gata4%Gata4转录后蛋白共价修饰

    俞立玮

    2012-01-01

    Gata4是心脏发育重要的转录因子,其转录活性和DNA亲和力受转录后蛋白共价修饰的调节,并影响下游目的基因和相关转录因子表达,胚胎干细胞分化,心肌细胞生长和心脏发育.该文总结Gata4转录后蛋白共价修饰对其转录活性的影响,寻找其与心脏发育和先天性心脏病( congenital heart disease,CHD)的关系.结果发现乙酰化、磷酸化、SUMO化使其转录活性和DNA亲和力升高,下游基因表达上升,促进胚胎干细胞分化等呈正性调节;去乙酰化和甲基化下调Gata4转录活性,呈负性调节.因此,Gata4蛋白共价修饰对研究先天性心脏病及其他一些心脏疾病有重要的临床意义.%Gata4 is an important transcription factor in heart development. Gata4 post-transcriptional protein modification regulates transcriptional activity and DNA binding, which in turn affects expression of downstream genes and transcription factors, differentiation of embryonic stem cells and cardiogenesis. This article summarizes the effect of post-transcriptional protein modification on transcriptional activity of Gata4 and the relationship between this effect and congenital heart disease. It was shown that acetylation, phosphorylation and SUMOylation upregulate transcriptiona) activity, DNA binding, downstream gene expression and embryonic stem cell differentiation. On the other hand, methylation and deacetylation downregulate Gata4 transcriptional activity. Post-transcriptional protein modification of Gata4 is very important in clinical research on congenital and other heart diseases.

  16. Plasma treated polyethylene grafted with adhesive molecules for enhanced adhesion and growth of fibroblasts

    The cell–material interface plays a crucial role in the interaction of cells with synthetic materials for biomedical use. The application of plasma for tailoring polymer surfaces is of abiding interest and holds a great promise in biomedicine. In this paper, we describe polyethylene (PE) surface tuning by Ar plasma irradiating and subsequent grafting of the chemically active PE surface with adhesive proteins or motives to support cell attachment. These simple modifications resulted in changed polymer surface hydrophilicity, roughness and morphology, which we thoroughly characterized. The effect of our modifications on adhesion and growth was tested in vitro using mouse embryonic fibroblasts (NIH 3T3 cell line). We demonstrate that the plasma treatment of PE had a positive effect on the adhesion, spreading, homogeneity of distribution and moderately on proliferation activity of NIH 3T3 cells. This effect was even more pronounced on PE coated with biomolecules. - Graphical abstract: High density polyethylene scaffolds (PE) were modified by deposition to Ar plasma. These surface reactive PE were further grafted with biomolecules to enhance cell attachment and proliferation. The changes in surface physico-chemical properties (hydrophilicity, morphology, roughness) of PE were measured. The effects of used substrates on the adhesion and growth of mouse embryonic fibroblasts were determined by a five-day cell culture study. The method for significant biocompatibility improvement was presented. Highlights: ► Argon plasma treatment altered polyethylene surface morphology and roughness ► Plasma treatment reduced contact angle of polyethylene ► Grafting of polyethylene with biomolecules further reduced contact angle ► Plasma treatment and peptide grafting increased polyethylene biocompatibility

  17. Exploiting the MDM2-CK1α protein-protein interface to develop novel biologics that induce UBL-kinase-modification and inhibit cell growth.

    Anne-Sophie Huart

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions forming dominant signalling events are providing ever-growing platforms for the development of novel Biologic tools for controlling cell growth. Casein Kinase 1 α (CK1α forms a genetic and physical interaction with the murine double minute chromosome 2 (MDM2 oncoprotein resulting in degradation of the p53 tumour suppressor. Pharmacological inhibition of CK1 increases p53 protein level and induces cell death, whilst small interfering RNA-mediated depletion of CK1α stabilizes p53 and induces growth arrest. We mapped the dominant protein-protein interface that stabilizes the MDM2 and CK1α complex in order to determine whether a peptide derived from the core CK1α-MDM2 interface form novel Biologics that can be used to probe the contribution of the CK1-MDM2 protein-protein interaction to p53 activation and cell viability. Overlapping peptides derived from CK1α were screened for dominant MDM2 binding sites using (i ELISA with recombinant MDM2; (ii cell lysate pull-down towards endogenous MDM2; (iii MDM2-CK1α complex-based competition ELISA; and (iv MDM2-mediated ubiquitination. One dominant peptide, peptide 35 was bioactive in all four assays and its transfection induced cell death/growth arrest in a p53-independent manner. Ectopic expression of flag-tagged peptide 35 induced a novel ubiquitin and NEDD8 modification of CK1α, providing one of the first examples whereby NEDDylation of a protein kinase can be induced. These data identify an MDM2 binding motif in CK1α which when isolated as a small peptide can (i function as a dominant negative inhibitor of the CK1α-MDM2 interface, (ii be used as a tool to study NEDDylation of CK1α, and (iii reduce cell growth. Further, this approach provides a technological blueprint, complementing siRNA and chemical biology approaches, by exploiting protein-protein interactions in order to develop Biologics to manipulate novel types of signalling pathways such as cross

  18. Sorghum Proteins: The Concentration, Isolation, Modification and Food Applications of Kafirins

    Celiac disease is a serious condition affecting millions of individuals. Those afflicted with these illnesses are resigned to a lifelong avoidance of products containing gluten, the storage protein found in cereal grains wheat, rye and barley. Since many food products contain gluten, these individ...

  19. The effect of polymer surface modification on polymer-protein interaction via interfacial polymerization

    Membrane separation is an important processing technology used for separating food ingredients and fractionating value-added components from food processing by-products. Long-term performance of polymeric membranes in food protein processing is impeded by formation of fouled layers on the membrane ...

  20. One-step polymer surface modification for minimizing drug, protein, and DNA adsorption in microanalytical systems

    Larsen, Esben Kjær Unmack; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2013-01-01

    including hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs (0.23 proteins (insulin, albumin, IgG), and DNA. The coating is shown to limit the adsorption of even highly hydrophobic drugs (ClogP > 8) in their pharmaceutically relevant concentration range ≤100 nM. The low adsorption is mediated...

  1. CPNA-1, a copine domain protein, is located at integrin adhesion sites and is required for myofilament stability in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Warner, Adam; Xiong, Ge; Qadota, Hiroshi; Rogalski, Teresa; Vogl, A Wayne; Moerman, Donald G; Benian, Guy M

    2013-03-01

    We identify cpna-1 (F31D5.3) as a novel essential muscle gene in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Antibodies specific to copine domain protein atypical-1 (CPNA-1), as well as a yellow fluorescent protein translational fusion, are localized to integrin attachment sites (M-lines and dense bodies) in the body-wall muscle of C. elegans. CPNA-1 contains an N-terminal predicted transmembrane domain and a C-terminal copine domain and binds to the M-line/dense body protein PAT-6 (actopaxin) and the M-line proteins UNC-89 (obscurin), LIM-9 (FHL), SCPL-1 (SCP), and UNC-96. Proper CPNA-1 localization is dependent upon PAT-6 in embryonic and adult muscle. Nematodes lacking cpna-1 arrest elongation at the twofold stage of embryogenesis and display disruption of the myofilament lattice. The thick-filament component myosin heavy chain MYO-3 and the M-line component UNC-89 are initially localized properly in cpna-1-null embryos. However, in these embryos, when contraction begins, MYO-3 and UNC-89 become mislocalized into large foci and animals die. We propose that CPNA-1 acts as a linker between an integrin-associated protein, PAT-6, and membrane-distal components of integrin adhesion complexes in the muscle of C. elegans. PMID:23283987

  2. Post-translational modifications of plant cell wall proteins and peptides: A survey from a proteomics point of view.

    Canut, Hervé; Albenne, Cécile; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2016-08-01

    Plant cell wall proteins (CWPs) and peptides are important players in cell walls contributing to their assembly and their remodeling during development and in response to environmental constraints. Since the rise of proteomics technologies at the beginning of the 2000's, the knowledge of CWPs has greatly increased leading to the discovery of new CWP families and to the description of the cell wall proteomes of different organs of many plants. Conversely, cell wall peptidomics data are still lacking. In addition to the identification of CWPs and peptides by mass spectrometry (MS) and bioinformatics, proteomics has allowed to describe their post-translational modifications (PTMs). At present, the best known PTMs consist in proteolytic cleavage, N-glycosylation, hydroxylation of P residues into hydroxyproline residues (O), O-glycosylation and glypiation. In this review, the methods allowing the capture of the modified proteins based on the specific properties of their PTMs as well as the MS technologies used for their characterization are briefly described. A focus is done on proteolytic cleavage leading to protein maturation or release of signaling peptides and on O-glycosylation. Some new technologies, like top-down proteomics and terminomics, are described. They aim at a finer description of proteoforms resulting from PTMs or degradation mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics- a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock. PMID:26945515

  3. Vitamin D-mediated modifications in protein-DNA interactions at two promoter elements of the osterocalcin gene

    By the combined use of DNase I footprinting, electrophoretic mobility-shift assay, and methylation interference analysis, the authors have identified a series of sequence-specific protein-DNA interactions in the 5' flanking region of the rat osteocalcin gene. Stimulation of osteocalcin gene expression by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, a physiologic mediator of this bone-specific gene in vitro and in vivo, is associated with modifications in the binding of ROS 17/2.8 cell nuclear factors to two promoter segments that up-regulate transcription. One segment located between -462 and -437 exhibits a vitamin D-dependent increase in sequence-specific binding of nuclear factors. This element (CTGGGTGAATGAGGACATTACT-GACC), identified at single nucleotide resolution, contains a region of hyphenated dyad symmetry and shares sequence homology with consensus steroid-responsive elements and with the sequence that has been identified as the vitamin D receptor binding site in the human osteocalcin gene. They have also observed that vitamin D stimulation of osteocalcin gene expression results in a 5-fold increase in protein binding to the region of the osteocalcin box, a 24-nucleotide segment in the proximal promoter with a CCAAT motif as the central core. The results demonstrate protein-DNA interactions in a vitamin D-responsive element and in a second sequence, the osteocalcin box, both of which are involved in the physiologic regulation of the osteocalcin gene in response to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3

  4. Protein Modification with Amphiphilic Block Copoly(2-oxazoline)s as a New Platform for Enhanced Cellular Delivery

    Tong, Jing

    2010-08-02

    Several homopolymers, random copolymers and block copolymers based on poly(2-oxazoline)s (POx) were synthesized and conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) using biodegradable and nonbiodegradable linkers. These conjugates were characterized by amino group titration, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), isoelectric focusing, enzymatic activity assay and conformation analysis. The conjugates contained on average from about one to two polymer chains per enzyme. From 70% to 90% of enzymatic activity was retained in most cases. Circular dichroism (CD) analysis revealed that HRP modification affected the secondary structure of the apoprotein but did not affect the tertiary structure and heme environment. Enhanced cellular uptake was found in the conjugates of two block copolymers using both MDCK cells and Caco-2 cells, but not in the conjugates of random copolymer and homopolymer. Conjugation with a block copolymer of 2-methyl-2-oxazoline and 2-butyl-2-oxazoline led to the highest cellular uptake as compared to other conjugates. Our data indicates that modification with amphiphilic POx has the potential to modulate and enhance cellular delivery of proteins.

  5. Complete characterization of posttranslational modification sites in the bovine milk protein PP3 by tandem mass spectrometry with electron capture dissociation as the last stage

    Kjeldsen, Frank; Haselmann, Kim F; Budnik, Bogdan A;

    2003-01-01

    the PTM site. Chromatographic peak analysis continues until full sequence coverage is obtained, after which the molecular mass is reconstructed and compared with the measured value. An agreement indicates that the PTM characterization was complete. This procedure applied to the bovine milk PP3 protein......A comprehensive approach to protein identification and determination of sites of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) in heavily modified proteins was tested. In this approach, termed "reconstructed molecular mass analysis" (REMMA), the molecular mass distribution of the intact protein is......-sensitivity PTM characterization of biological important proteins, which should speed up the proteomics research....

  6. Oxidative modifications, mitochondrial dysfunction, and impaired protein degradation in Parkinson's disease: how neurons are lost in the Bermuda triangle

    Malkus Kristen A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract While numerous hypotheses have been proposed to explain the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, the theory of oxidative stress has received considerable support. Although many correlations have been established and encouraging evidence has been obtained, conclusive proof of causation for the oxidative stress hypothesis is lacking and potential cures have not emerged. Therefore it is likely that other factors, possibly in coordination with oxidative stress, contribute to neuron death. Using Parkinson's disease (PD as the paradigm, this review explores the hypothesis that oxidative modifications, mitochondrial functional disruption, and impairment of protein degradation constitute three interrelated molecular pathways that execute neuron death. These intertwined events are the consequence of environmental exposure, genetic factors, and endogenous risks and constitute a "Bermuda triangle" that may be considered the underlying cause of neurodegenerative pathogenesis.

  7. Protein Adsorption to Surface Chemistry and Crystal Structure Modification of Titanium Surfaces

    Ryo Jimbo; Mikael Ivarsson; Anita Koskela; Young-Taeg Sul; Johansson, Carina B.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To observe the early adsorption of extracellular matrix and blood plasma proteins to magnesium-incorporated titanium oxide surfaces, which has shown superior bone response in animal models. Material and Methods Commercially pure titanium discs were blasted with titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles (control), and for the test group, TiO2 blasted discs were further processed with a micro-arc oxidation method (test). Surface morphology was investigated by scanning electron micro...

  8. Posttranslational Modifications, Localization, and Protein Interactions of Optineurin, the Product of a Glaucoma Gene

    Hongyu Ying; Xiang Shen; BumChan Park; Beatrice Y J T Yue

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Glaucoma is a major blinding disease. The most common form of this disease, primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), is genetically heterogeneous. One of the candidate genes, optineurin, is linked principally to normal tension glaucoma, a subtype of POAG. The present study was undertaken to illustrate the basic characteristics of optineurin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Lysates from rat retinal ganglion RGC5 cells were subjected to N- or O-deglycosylation or membrane protein extract...

  9. Vinylsulfonamide and Acrylamide Modification of DNA for Cross-linking with Proteins

    Daďová, Jitka; Orság, Petr; Pohl, Radek; Brázdová, Marie; Fojta, Miroslav; Hocek, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 40 (2013), s. 10515-10518. ISSN 1433-7851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0317; GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/2076 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68081707 Keywords : bioorthogonal chemistry * DNA * DNA polymerase * Michael additions * proteins Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 11.336, year: 2013

  10. Development of site specific labeling strategies for protein modification and synthesis of Rab probes

    Long, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Die Entwicklung von Methoden für die chemische Ligation von synthetischen kleinen Molekülen oder Peptiden, Proteinen ist eine aktuelle Grenze in der chemischen Biologie. Exprimierte Protein-Ligation (EPL) war äußerst nützlich für die Synthese von verschiedenen Proteinen in der Vergangenheit. Insbesondere das Konzept der EPL elegant zeigt den Nutzen der Kombination der Felder der synthetischen organischen Chemie und Molekularbiologie, um komplexe physiologische und biochemische ...

  11. In planta modification of potato starch granule biogenesis by different granule-bound fusion proteins

    Nazarian, F.

    2007-01-01

    Starch is composed of amylose and amylopectin and it is deposited in amyloplasts/choloroplasts as semi-crystalline granules. Many biosynthetic enzymes are involved in starch degradation and biosynthesis. Some microbial starch degrading enzymes have a Starch Binding Domain (SBD) which has affinity for the starch granules on its own. In our laboratory, expression of SBD alone or fused to other effector proteins has been demonstrated. In industry, starch is modified after harvesting by chemical,...

  12. Will Posttranslational Modifications of Brain Proteins Provide Novel Serological Markers for Dementias?

    Y. Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug development for dementias is significantly hampered by the lack of easily accessible biomarkers. Fluid biomarkers of dementias provide indications of disease stage, but have little prognostic value, cannot detect early pathological changes, and can only be measured in CSF (cerebrospinal fluid which significantly limits their applicability. In contrast, imaging based biomarkers can provide indications of probability of disease progression, yet are limited in applicability due to cost, radiation and radio-tracers. These aspects highlight the need for other approaches to the development of biomarkers of dementia, which should focus on not only providing information about pathological changes, but also on being measured easily and reproducibly. For other diseases, focus on development of assays monitoring highly specific protease-generated cleavage fragments of proteins has provided assays, which in serum or plasma have the ability to predict early pathological changes. Proteolytic processing of brain proteins, such as tau, APP, and α-synuclein, is a key pathological event in dementias. Here, we speculate that aiming biomarker development for dementias at detecting small brain protein degradation fragments of generated by brain-derived proteases specifically in blood samples could lead to the development of novel markers of disease progression, stage and importantly of treatment efficacy.

  13. Protein Adsorption to Surface Chemistry and Crystal Structure Modification of Titanium Surfaces

    Ryo Jimbo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To observe the early adsorption of extracellular matrix and blood plasma proteins to magnesium-incorporated titanium oxide surfaces, which has shown superior bone response in animal models.Material and Methods: Commercially pure titanium discs were blasted with titanium dioxide (TiO2 particles (control, and for the test group, TiO2 blasted discs were further processed with a micro-arc oxidation method (test. Surface morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy, surface topography by optic interferometry, characterization by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and by X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis. The adsorption of 3 different proteins (fibronectin, albumin, and collagen type I was investigated by an immunoblotting technique.Results: The test surface showed a porous structure, whereas the control surface showed a typical TiO2 blasted structure. XPS data revealed magnesium-incorporation to the anodic oxide film of the surface. There was no difference in surface roughness between the control and test surfaces. For the protein adsorption test, the amount of albumin was significantly higher on the control surface whereas the amount of fibronectin was significantly higher on the test surface. Although there was no significant difference, the test surface had a tendency to adsorb more collagen type I.Conclusions: The magnesium-incorporated anodized surface showed significantly higher fibronectin adsorption and lower albumin adsorption than the blasted surface. These results may be one of the reasons for the excellent bone response previously observed in animal studies.

  14. Identification of protein complexes that bind to histone H3 combinatorial modifications using super-SILAC and weighted correlation network analysis.

    Kunowska, Natalia; Rotival, Maxime; Yu, Lu; Choudhary, Jyoti; Dillon, Niall

    2015-02-18

    The large number of chemical modifications that are found on the histone proteins of eukaryotic cells form multiple complex combinations, which can act as recognition signals for reader proteins. We have used peptide capture in conjunction with super-SILAC quantification to carry out an unbiased high-throughput analysis of the composition of protein complexes that bind to histone H3K9/S10 and H3K27/S28 methyl-phospho modifications. The accurate quantification allowed us to perform Weighted correlation network analysis (WGCNA) to obtain a systems-level view of the histone H3 histone tail interactome. The analysis reveals the underlying modularity of the histone reader network with members of nuclear complexes exhibiting very similar binding signatures, which suggests that many proteins bind to histones as part of pre-organized complexes. Our results identify a novel complex that binds to the double H3K9me3/S10ph modification, which includes Atrx, Daxx and members of the FACT complex. The super-SILAC approach allows comparison of binding to multiple peptides with different combinations of modifications and the resolution of the WGCNA analysis is enhanced by maximizing the number of combinations that are compared. This makes it a useful approach for assessing the effects of changes in histone modification combinations on the composition and function of bound complexes. PMID:25605797

  15. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and soluble adhesion molecules as possible prognostic markers of the efficacy of antiviral treatment in chronic hepatitis C

    Anatol Panasiuk; Danuta Prokopowicz; Bozena Panasiuk

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explain the role of Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and soluble adhesion molecules in chronic hepatitis C during the treatment of interferon alpha (IFNα) 2 b and ribavirin (RBV).METHODS: Concentrations of MCP-1, soluble adhesion molecules intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), sPselectin, interleukin (IL) 6, and IL10 in serum were estimated in the group of 40 patients with chronic hepatitis C treated with IFNalpha2 b and RBV in 0, 16, 32, 48 wk of the therapy.RESULTS: In chronic hepatitis C, before and during the treatment, the serum levels of MCP-1 and sP-selectin in responders were similar to those of healthy subjects. In nonresponders (NR), MCP-1 increased in the course of IFNα+RBV treatment, differences were statistically significant as compared to responders. MCP-1 correlated statistically with the activity of pedportal inflammation (r = 0.35, P<0.05) but not with staging of liver fibrosis. sICAM-1 positively correlated with inflammatory activity and fibrosis in NR. sP-selectin did not correlate with histological findings in the liver. The MCP-1 correlated with the soluble form of sP-selectin concentrations (r = 6, P<0.001) and with IL-10 level in NR (r = 0.4, P<0.05). There was no correlation observed between the concentration of MCP-1 and sICAM-1, IL-6 during the treatment.CONCLUSION: MCP-1 concentration may be a prognostic marker of the efficacy of IFN+RBV therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

  16. Effect of the knockdown of death-associated protein 1 expression on cell adhesion, growth and migration in breast cancer cells.

    Wazir, Umar; Sanders, Andrew J; Wazir, Ali; Baig, Ruqia Mehmood; Jiang, Wen G; Ster, Irina C; Sharma, Anup K; Mokbel, Kefah

    2015-03-01

    Death-associated protein 1 (DAP1) is a highly conserved phosphoprotein involved in the regulation of autophagy. A previous clinical study by our group suggested an association between low DAP1 expression and clinicopathological parameters of human breast cancer. In the present study, we aimed to determine the role of DAP1 in cancer cell behaviour in the context of human breast cancer. We developed knockdown sublines of MCF7 and MDA-MB‑231, and performed growth, adhesion and invasion assays and electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) studies of the post-wound migration of cells. In addition, we studied the mRNA expression of caspase 8 and 9, DELE, IPS1, cyclin D1 and p21 in the control and knockdown sublines. Knockdown was associated with increased adhesion and migration, significantly so in the MDA-MB-231DAP1kd cell subline (p=0.029 and p=0.001, respectively). Growth in MCF7 cells showed a significant suppression on day 3 (p=0.029), followed by an increase in growth matching the controls on day 5. While no change in the apoptotic response to serum starvation could be attributed to DAP1 knockdown, the expression of known components of the apoptosis pathway (caspase 8) and cell cycle (p21) was significantly reduced in the MCF7DAP1kd cell subline (p≤0.05), while in MDA-MB-231DAP1kd the expression of a pro-apoptotic molecule, IPS1, was suppressed (p≤0.05). DAP1 may have an important role in cell adhesion, migration and growth in the context of breast cancer and has significant associations with the apoptosis pathway. Furthermore, we believe that delayed increase in growth observed in the MCF7DAP1kd cell subline may indicate activation of a strongly pro-oncogenic pathway downstream of DAP1. PMID:25530065

  17. Characterizing the Range of Extracellular Protein Post-Translational Modifications in a Cellulose-Degrading Bacteria Using a Multiple Proteolyic Digestion/Peptide Fragmentation Approach

    Dykstra, Andrew B [ORNL; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel [ORNL; Raman, Babu [Dow Chemical Company, The; Cook, Kelsey [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) are known to play a significant role in many biological functions. The focus of this study is to characterize the post-translational modifications of the cellulosome protein complex used by the bacterium Clostridium thermocellum to better understand how this protein machine is tuned for enzymatic cellulose solubilization. To enhance comprehensive characterization, the extracellular cellulosome proteins were analyzed using multiple proteolytic digests (trypsin, Lys-C, Glu-C) and multiple fragmentation techniques (collisionally-activated dissociation, electron transfer dissociation, decision tree). As expected, peptide and protein identifications were increased by utilizing alternate proteases and fragmentation methods, in addition to the increase in protein sequence coverage. The complementarity of these experiments also allowed for a global exploration of PTMs associated with the cellulosome based upon a set of defined PTMs that included methylation, oxidation, acetylation, phosphorylation, and signal peptide cleavage. In these experiments, 85 modified peptides corresponding to 28 cellulosome proteins were identified. Many of these modifications were located in active cellulolytic or structural domains of the cellulosome proteins, suggesting a level of possible regulatory control of protein function in various cellulotyic conditions. The use of multiple enzymes and fragmentation technologies allowed for independent verification of PTMs in different experiments, thus leading to increased confidence in PTM identifications.

  18. Modification of a PAMPA model to predict passive gastrointestinal absorption and plasma protein binding.

    Bujard, Alban; Voirol, Hervé; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Schappler, Julie

    2015-09-18

    The Parallel Artificial Membrane Permeability Assay (PAMPA) is a well-known high throughput screening (HTS) technique for predicting in vivo passive absorption. In this technique, two compartments are separated by an artificial membrane that mimics passive permeability through biological membranes such as the dermal layer, the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), and the blood brain barrier (BBB). In the present study, a hexadecane artificial membrane (HDM)-PAMPA was used to predict the binding of compounds towards the human plasma using a mixture of human serum albumin (HSA) and alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP). The ratio of HSA and AGP was equivalent to that found in the human plasma for both proteins (∼20:1). A pH gradient (5.0-7.4) was performed to increase the screening capacity and overcome the issue of passive permeability for acidic and amphoteric compounds. With this assay, the prediction of passive GIT absorption was maintained and the compounds were discriminated according to their permeability (on a no-to-high scale). The plasma protein binding (PPB) was estimated via the correlation of the differences between the amount of compound crossing the artificial membrane in assays conducted with and without protein using only a two end-point measurement. The use of a mixture of HSA and AGP to modulate drug permeation was compared to the use of the same concentrations of HSA and AGP used separately. The addition of HSA alone in the acceptor compartment was sufficient for estimating PPB, while it was demonstrated that AGP alone could enable the estimation of AGP binding. PMID:26118348

  19. Rapid modification of proteins using a rapamycin-inducible tobacco etch virus protease system.

    Damian J Williams

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ability to disrupt the function of a specific protein on a rapid time scale provides a powerful tool for biomedical research. Specific proteases provide a potential method to selectively cleave a chosen protein, but rapid control of protease activity is difficult. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A heterologous expression system for rapid target-directed proteolysis in mammalian cells was developed. The system consists of an inducible NIa protease from the tobacco etch virus (TEVp and a chosen protein into which a TEVp substrate recognition sequence (TRS has been inserted. Inducible activity was conferred to the TEVp using rapamycin-controlled TEVp fragment complementation. TEVp activity was assayed using a FRET-based reporter construct. TEVp expression was well tolerated by mammalian cells and complete cleavage of the substrate was possible. Cleavage at 37 degrees C proceeded exponentially with a time constant of approximately 150 minutes. Attempts to improve cleavage efficiency were hampered by substantial background activity, which was attributed to inherent affinity between the TEVp fragments. A second TEVp assay, based on changes in inactivation of a modified K(V3.4 channel, showed that functional properties of a channel can be using altered using an inducible TEVp system. Similar levels of background activity and variability were observed in both electrophysiological and FRET assays. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggested that an optimum level of TEVp expression leading to sufficient inducible activity (with minimal background activity exists but the variability in expression levels between cells makes the present system rather impractical for single cell experiments. The system is likely to be more suitable for experiments in which the cell-to-cell variability is less of an issue; for example, in experiments involving large populations of cells.

  20. Regulation of post-translational modifications of muskelin by protein kinase C.

    Prag, Soren; De Arcangelis, Adèle; Georges-Labouesse, Elisabeth; Adams, Josephine C

    2007-01-01

    Muskelin is a member of the kelch-repeat superfamily of proteins, identified as an intracellular protein involved in cell spreading responses to thombospondin-1. Muskelin is expressed by many adult tissues and has an evolutionarily conserved, multidomain architecture consisting of an amino-terminal discoidin-like domain, a central alpha-helical region and six kelch-repeats that are predicted to form a beta-propeller structure. We previous demonstrated that muskelin molecules undergo head-to-tail association, however the physiological, post-translational regulation of muskelin is not well understood. Here, we have examined the expression of muskelin during mouse embryonic development and report widespread expression that includes muscle tissues, multiple epithelia and the brain. In cultured skeletal myoblasts and vascular smooth muscle cells, muskelin exists as a complex set of isoelectric variants. Five potential sites for phosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC), are conserved between vertebrate and Drosophila muskelins, therefore we examined the hypothesis that muskelin is regulated post-translationally by PKC activity. We demonstrate that PKC activation or inhibition regulates the profile of endogenous muskelin isoelectric variants and that muskelin is a substrate for PKCalphain vitro. Wild-type GFP-muskelin and a panel of alanine point mutations were used to test the sensitivity of self-association to PKC activation. Mutation of two of the sites, S324 and T515, partially inhibited the ability of muskelin to self-associate in cells and inhibited responsiveness to activated PKC. Interestingly, both sites are predicted to lie in surface-exposed loops on the same side of the beta-propeller, implicating a common binding interface. PMID:17049906

  1. MUC16/CA125 in the Context of Modular Proteins with an Annotated Role in Adhesion-Related Processes: In Silico Analysis

    Ninoslav Mitic

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Mucin 16 (MUC16 is a type I transmembrane protein, the extracellular portion of which is shed after proteolytic degradation and is denoted as CA125 antigen, a well known tumor marker for ovarian cancer. Regarding its polypeptide and glycan structures, as yet there is no detailed insight into their heterogeneity and ligand properties, which may greatly influence its function and biomarker potential. This study was aimed at obtaining further insight into the biological capacity of MUC16/CA125, using in silico analysis of corresponding mucin sequences, including similarity searches as well as GO (gene ontology-based function prediction. The results obtained pointed to the similarities within extracellular serine/threonine rich regions of MUC16 to sequences of proteins expressed in evolutionary distant taxa, all having in common an annotated role in adhesion-related processes. Specifically, a homology to conserved domains from the family of herpesvirus major outer envelope protein (BLLF1 was found. In addition, the possible involvement of MUC16/CA125 in carbohydrate-binding interactions or cellular transport of protein/ion was suggested.

  2. Haloarchaeal myovirus φCh1 harbours a phase variation system for the production of protein variants with distinct cell surface adhesion specificities.

    Klein, R; Rössler, N; Iro, M; Scholz, H; Witte, A

    2012-01-01

    The φCh1 myovirus, which infects the haloalkaliphilic archaeon Natrialba magadii, contains an invertible region that comprises the convergent open reading frames (ORFs) 34 and 36, which code for the putative tail fibre proteins gp34 and gp36 respectively. The inversion leads to an exchange of the C-termini of these proteins, thereby creating different types of tail fibres. Gene expression experiments revealed that only ORF34 is transcribed, indicating that φCh1 produces tail fibre proteins exclusively from this particular ORF. Only one of the two types of tail fibres encoded by ORF34 is able to bind to Nab. magadii in vitro. This is reflected by the observation that during the early phases of the infection cycle, the lysogenic strain L11 carries its invertible region exclusively in the orientation that produces that specific type of tail fibre. Obviously, Nab. magadii can only be infected by viruses carrying this particular type of tail fibre. By mutational analysis, the binding domain of gp34 was localized to the C-terminal part of the protein, particularly to a galactose-binding domain. The involvement of galactose residues in cell adhesion was supported by the observation that the addition of α-D-galactose to purified gp34 or whole virions prevented their attachment to Nab. magadii. PMID:22111759

  3. Modification of DNA radiolysis by DNA-binding proteins: Structural aspects

    Davídková, Marie; Štísová, Viktorie; Goffinont, S.; Gillard, N.; Castaing, B.; Maurizot, M. S.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 122, 1-4 (2007), s. 100-105. ISSN 0144-8420. [Symposium on Microdosimetry /14./. Venezia, 13.11.2005-18.11.2005] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1P05OC085 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CS1) Barrande 2005-6-018-1 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : specific DNA-protein complexes * radiolysis * ionizing radiation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 0.528, year: 2007

  4. Modification of certain functional properties of protein preparations depending on the introduced technological treatment

    The paper shows the results of the work on the possibilities for the application of certain methods used for the improvement of quality of casein preparations. The presence of proteolytic and lipolytic enzymes of bacterial origin caused the undesirable changes of functional properties of high-protein products. Several technological treatments were applied, i.e. thermization of raw milk, thermization of casein grain, gamma-irradiation of casein and extrusion of casein. The microbiological quality of the product and the changes in viscosity of casein solutions during the storage, were evaluated. The high effectiveness of thermization and extruzion processes, was stated

  5. Estrogen and pure antiestrogen fulvestrant (ICI 182 780) augment cell–matrigel adhesion of MCF-7 breast cancer cells through a novel G protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPR30)-to-calpain signaling axis

    Fulvestrant (ICI 182 780, ICI) has been used in treating patients with hormone-sensitive breast cancer, yet initial or acquired resistance to endocrine therapies frequently arises and, in particular, cancer recurs as metastasis. We demonstrate here that both 17-beta-estradiol (E2) and ICI enhance cell adhesion to matrigel in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, with increased autolysis of calpain 1 (large subunit) and proteolysis of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), indicating calpain activation. Additionally, either E2 or ICI induced down-regulation of estrogen receptor α without affecting G protein coupled estrogen receptor 30 (GPR30) expression. Interestingly, GPR30 agonist G1 triggered calpain 1 autolysis but not calpain 2, whereas ER agonist diethylstilbestrol caused no apparent calpain autolysis. Furthermore, the actions of E2 and ICI on calpain and cell adhesion were tremendously suppressed by G15, or knockdown of GPR30. E2 and ICI also induced phosphorylation of extracellular regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), and suppression of ERK1/2 phosphorylation by U0126 profoundly impeded calpain activation triggered by estrogenic and antiestrogenic stimulations indicating implication of ERK1/2 in the GPR30-mediated action. Lastly, the E2- or ICI-induced cell adhesion was dramatically impaired by calpain-specific inhibitors, ALLN or calpeptin, suggesting requirement of calpain in the GPR30-associated action. These data show that enhanced cell adhesion by E2 and ICI occurs via a novel GPR30-ERK1/2-calpain pathway. Our results indicate that targeting the GPR30 signaling may be a potential strategy to reduce metastasis and improve the efficacy of antiestrogens in treatment of advanced breast cancer. - Highlights: • Estrogen and ICI augment adhesion to matrigel with calpain activation in MCF-7 cells. • GPR30 mediates cell–matrigel adhesion and calpain activation via ERK1/2. • Calpain is required in the cell–matrigel adhesion induced by E2 and ICI

  6. Estrogen and pure antiestrogen fulvestrant (ICI 182 780) augment cell–matrigel adhesion of MCF-7 breast cancer cells through a novel G protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPR30)-to-calpain signaling axis

    Chen, Yan; Li, Zheng; He, Yan; Shang, Dandan; Pan, Jigang; Wang, Hongmei; Chen, Huamei; Zhu, Zhuxia [Department of Physiology/Cancer Research Group, Guiyang Medical University School of Basic Medicine, 9 Beijing Road, Guiyang 550004, Guizhou (China); Wan, Lei [Department of Pharmacology, Guiyang Medical University School of Basic Medicine, 9 Beijing Road, Guiyang 550004, Guizhou (China); Wang, Xudong, E-mail: xdwang@gmc.edu.cn [Department of Physiology/Cancer Research Group, Guiyang Medical University School of Basic Medicine, 9 Beijing Road, Guiyang 550004, Guizhou (China)

    2014-03-01

    Fulvestrant (ICI 182 780, ICI) has been used in treating patients with hormone-sensitive breast cancer, yet initial or acquired resistance to endocrine therapies frequently arises and, in particular, cancer recurs as metastasis. We demonstrate here that both 17-beta-estradiol (E2) and ICI enhance cell adhesion to matrigel in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, with increased autolysis of calpain 1 (large subunit) and proteolysis of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), indicating calpain activation. Additionally, either E2 or ICI induced down-regulation of estrogen receptor α without affecting G protein coupled estrogen receptor 30 (GPR30) expression. Interestingly, GPR30 agonist G1 triggered calpain 1 autolysis but not calpain 2, whereas ER agonist diethylstilbestrol caused no apparent calpain autolysis. Furthermore, the actions of E2 and ICI on calpain and cell adhesion were tremendously suppressed by G15, or knockdown of GPR30. E2 and ICI also induced phosphorylation of extracellular regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), and suppression of ERK1/2 phosphorylation by U0126 profoundly impeded calpain activation triggered by estrogenic and antiestrogenic stimulations indicating implication of ERK1/2 in the GPR30-mediated action. Lastly, the E2- or ICI-induced cell adhesion was dramatically impaired by calpain-specific inhibitors, ALLN or calpeptin, suggesting requirement of calpain in the GPR30-associated action. These data show that enhanced cell adhesion by E2 and ICI occurs via a novel GPR30-ERK1/2-calpain pathway. Our results indicate that targeting the GPR30 signaling may be a potential strategy to reduce metastasis and improve the efficacy of antiestrogens in treatment of advanced breast cancer. - Highlights: • Estrogen and ICI augment adhesion to matrigel with calpain activation in MCF-7 cells. • GPR30 mediates cell–matrigel adhesion and calpain activation via ERK1/2. • Calpain is required in the cell–matrigel adhesion induced by E2 and ICI.

  7. Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Elastomers with Tethered Peptide Ligands for Cell Adhesion Studies

    Wu, Yuanzi; Coyer, Sean R.; Ma, Hongwei; Andrés J. García

    2010-01-01

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) is the choice of material for a wide range of bio- and non-biological applications because of its chemical inertness, non-toxicity, ease of handling, and commercial availability. However, PDMS exhibits uncontrolled protein adsorption and cell adhesion, and it has proven difficult to functionalize to present bioactive ligands. We present a facile strategy for functional surface modification of PDMS using commercial reagents to engineer polymer brushes of oligo(eth...

  8. Comparative LC-MS/MS profiling of free and protein-bound early and advanced glycation-induced lysine modifications in dairy products.

    Hegele, Jörg; Buetler, Timo; Delatour, Thierry

    2008-06-01

    Free and protein-bound forms of early and advanced glycation-induced lysine (Lys) modifications were quantified in dairy products by LC-MS/MS using a stable isotope dilution assay. The glycation profiles for N(epsilon)-fructoselysine (FL), N(epsilon)-carboxymethyllysine (CML) and pyrraline (Pyr) were monitored in raw and processed cow milk to investigate whether free glycation products could serve as fast and simple markers to assess the extent of protein glycation in dairy products. In all milk samples, the fraction of free glycation adducts was predominantly composed of advanced modifications, e.g. 8.34+/-3.81 nmol CML per micromol of free Lys (Lys(free)) and 81.5+/-87.8 nmol Pyr micromol(-1) Lys(free)(-1) vs. 3.72+/-1.29 nmol FL micromol(-1) Lys(free)(-1). In contrast, the protein-bound early glycation product FL considerably outweighed the content of CML and Pyr in milk proteins of raw and processed cow milk, whereas severely heat treated milk products, e.g. condensed milk, contained a higher amount of protein-bound advanced glycation adducts. Typical values recorded for milk samples processed under mild conditions were 0.47+/-0.08 nmol FL micromol(-1) of protein-bound Lys (Lys(p-b)), 0.04+/-0.03 nmol CML micromol(-1) Lys(p-b)(-1) and 0.06+/-0.02 nmol Pyr micromol(-1)Lys(p-b)(-1). It was particularly noticeable, however, that mild heat treatment of raw milk, i.e. pasteurization and UHT treatment, did not significantly increase the amount of both free and protein-bound Lys modifications. In conclusion, the profiles of free and protein-bound glycation-induced Lys modifications were found to be different and a screening of free glycation adducts does, therefore, not allow for a conclusion about the protein glycation status of dairy products. PMID:18486644

  9. Deletion of GSTA4-4 results in increased mitochondrial post-translational modification of proteins by reactive aldehydes following chronic ethanol consumption in mice.

    Shearn, Colin T; Fritz, Kristofer S; Shearn, Alisabeth H; Saba, Laura M; Mercer, Kelly E; Engi, Bridgette; Galligan, James J; Zimniak, Piotr; Orlicky, David J; Ronis, Martin J; Petersen, Dennis R

    2016-04-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption induces hepatic oxidative stress resulting in production of highly reactive electrophilic α/β-unsaturated aldehydes that have the potential to modify proteins. A primary mechanism of reactive aldehyde detoxification by hepatocytes is through GSTA4-driven enzymatic conjugation with GSH. Given reports that oxidative stress initiates GSTA4 translocation to the mitochondria, we hypothesized that increased hepatocellular damage in ethanol (EtOH)-fed GSTA4(-/-) mice is due to enhanced mitochondrial protein modification by reactive aldehydes. Chronic ingestion of EtOH increased hepatic protein carbonylation in GSTA4(-/-) mice as evidenced by increased 4-HNE and MDA immunostaining in the hepatic periportal region. Using mass spectrometric analysis of biotin hydrazide conjugated carbonylated proteins, a total of 829 proteins were identified in microsomal, cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions. Of these, 417 were novel to EtOH models. Focusing on mitochondrial fractions, 1.61-fold more carbonylated proteins were identified in EtOH-fed GSTA4(-)(/-) mice compared to their respective WT mice ingesting EtOH. Bioinformatic KEGG pathway analysis of carbonylated proteins from the mitochondrial fractions revealed an increased propensity for modification of proteins regulating oxidative phosphorylation, glucose, fatty acid, glutathione and amino acid metabolic processes in GSTA4(-/-) mice. Additional analysis revealed sites of reactive aldehyde protein modification on 26 novel peptides/proteins isolated from either SV/GSTA4(-/-) PF or EtOH fed mice. Among the peptides/proteins identified, ACSL, ACOX2, MTP, and THIKB contribute to regulation of fatty acid metabolism and ARG1, ARLY, and OAT, which regulate nitrogen and ammonia metabolism having direct relevance to ethanol-induced liver injury. These data define a role for GSTA4-4 in buffering hepatic oxidative stress associated with chronic alcohol consumption and that this GST isoform plays an important

  10. Deletion of GSTA4-4 results in increased mitochondrial post-translational modification of proteins by reactive aldehydes following chronic ethanol consumption in mice

    Colin T. Shearn

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic alcohol consumption induces hepatic oxidative stress resulting in production of highly reactive electrophilic α/β-unsaturated aldehydes that have the potential to modify proteins. A primary mechanism of reactive aldehyde detoxification by hepatocytes is through GSTA4-driven enzymatic conjugation with GSH. Given reports that oxidative stress initiates GSTA4 translocation to the mitochondria, we hypothesized that increased hepatocellular damage in ethanol (EtOH-fed GSTA4−/− mice is due to enhanced mitochondrial protein modification by reactive aldehydes. Chronic ingestion of EtOH increased hepatic protein carbonylation in GSTA4−/− mice as evidenced by increased 4-HNE and MDA immunostaining in the hepatic periportal region. Using mass spectrometric analysis of biotin hydrazide conjugated carbonylated proteins, a total of 829 proteins were identified in microsomal, cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions. Of these, 417 were novel to EtOH models. Focusing on mitochondrial fractions, 1.61-fold more carbonylated proteins were identified in EtOH-fed GSTA4−/− mice compared to their respective WT mice ingesting EtOH. Bioinformatic KEGG pathway analysis of carbonylated proteins from the mitochondrial fractions revealed an increased propensity for modification of proteins regulating oxidative phosphorylation, glucose, fatty acid, glutathione and amino acid metabolic processes in GSTA4−/− mice. Additional analysis revealed sites of reactive aldehyde protein modification on 26 novel peptides/proteins isolated from either SV/GSTA4−/− PF or EtOH fed mice. Among the peptides/proteins identified, ACSL, ACOX2, MTP, and THIKB contribute to regulation of fatty acid metabolism and ARG1, ARLY, and OAT, which regulate nitrogen and ammonia metabolism having direct relevance to ethanol-induced liver injury. These data define a role for GSTA4-4 in buffering hepatic oxidative stress associated with chronic alcohol consumption and that this GST

  11. Hyaluronan-mediated cellular adhesion

    Curtis, Jennifer

    2005-03-01

    Many cells surround themselves with a cushioning halo of polysaccharides that is further strengthened and organized by proteins. In fibroblasts and chrondrocytes, the primary component of this pericellular matrix is hyaluronan, a large linear polyanion. Hyaluronan production is linked to a variety of disease, developmental, and physiological processes. Cells manipulate the concentration of hyaluronan and hyaluronan receptors for numerous activities including modulation of cell adhesion, cell motility, and differentiation. Recent investigations by identify hyaluronan's role in mediating early-stage cell adhesion. An open question is how the cell removes the 0.5-10 micron thick pericellular matrix to allow for further mature adhesion events requiring nanometer scale separations. In this investigation, holographic optical tweezers are used to study the adhesion and viscoelastic properties of chondrocytes' pericellular matrix. Ultimately, we aim to shed further light on the spatial and temporal details of the dramatic transition from micron to nanometer gaps between the cell and its adhesive substrate.

  12. Differential role of eDNA, proteins, and polysaccharides in cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesion by three Staphylococcus species

    Meyer, Rikke Louise; Okshevsky, Mira Ursula; Zeng, Guanghong

    and S. aureus to glass surfaces, while it also weakened cell-cell interactions and hampered aggregation in all species. Dispersin was most effective against S. epidermidis and S. xylosus, whereas subtilisin was most effective against S. aureus. eDNA and polysaccharides appeared to work in concert to......The diversity in mechanisms for bacterial attachment and biofilm formation is the overarching challenge for development of strategies to combat biofilms. Understanding the quantitative contribution of different types of cell surface adhesins during the initiation of biofilm formation is therefore...... valuable for designing new approaches to biofilm prevention. In this study, we combine microfluidic flow-cell studies with single-cell analyses to understand how polysaccharides, extracellular DNA (eDNA), and proteins contribute individually and in concert to mediate bacterial adhesion and aggregation on...

  13. Amino acid sequences mediating vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 binding to integrin alpha 4: homologous DSP sequence found for JC polyoma VP1 coat protein

    Michael Andrew Meyer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The JC polyoma viral coat protein VP1 was analyzed for amino acid sequences homologies to the IDSP sequence which mediates binding of VLA-4 (integrin alpha 4 to vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. Although the full sequence was not found, a DSP sequence was located near the critical arginine residue linked to infectivity of the virus and binding to sialic acid containing molecules such as integrins (3. For the JC polyoma virus, a DSP sequence was found at residues 70, 71 and 72 with homology also noted for the mouse polyoma virus and SV40 virus. Three dimensional modeling of the VP1 molecule suggests that the DSP loop has an accessible site for interaction from the external side of the assembled viral capsid pentamer.

  14. Electrochemical, atomic force microscopy and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy studies of pre-formed mussel adhesive protein films on carbon steel for corrosion protection

    Zhang, Fan, E-mail: fanzhang@kth.se [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Div. of Surface and Corrosion Science, Drottning Kristinas vaeg.51, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Pan, Jinshan [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Div. of Surface and Corrosion Science, Drottning Kristinas vaeg.51, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Claesson, Per Martin [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Div. of Surface and Corrosion Science, Drottning Kristinas vaeg.51, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Institute for Surface Chemistry, P.O. Box 5607, SE-114 86 Stockholm (Sweden); Brinck, Tore [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Department of Physical Chemistry, Division of Physical Chemistry, Teknikringen 36, SE-10044 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-10-01

    Electrochemical measurements, in situ and ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) analysis were performed to investigate the formation and stability as well as corrosion protection properties of mussel adhesive protein (Mefp-1) films on carbon steel, and the influence of cross-linking by NaIO{sub 4} oxidation. The in situ AFM measurements show flake-like adsorbed protein aggregates in the film formed at pH 9. The ex situ AFM images indicate multilayer-like films and that the film becomes more compact and stable in NaCl solution after the cross-linking. The IRAS results reveal the absorption bands of Mefp-1 on carbon steel before and after NaIO{sub 4} induced oxidation of the pre-adsorbed protein. Within a short exposure time, a certain corrosion protection effect was noted for the pre-formed Mefp-1 film in 0.1 M NaCl solution. Cross-linking the pre-adsorbed film by NaIO{sub 4} oxidation significantly enhanced the protection efficiency by up to 80%. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mussel protein was tested as 'green' corrosion protection strategy for steel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At pH 9, the protein adsorbs on carbon steel and forms a multilayer-like film. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NaIO{sub 4} leads to structural changes and cross-linking of the protein film. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cross-linking results in a dense and compact film with increased stability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cross-linking of preformed film significantly enhances the corrosion protection.

  15. Electrochemical, atomic force microscopy and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy studies of pre-formed mussel adhesive protein films on carbon steel for corrosion protection

    Electrochemical measurements, in situ and ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) analysis were performed to investigate the formation and stability as well as corrosion protection properties of mussel adhesive protein (Mefp-1) films on carbon steel, and the influence of cross-linking by NaIO4 oxidation. The in situ AFM measurements show flake-like adsorbed protein aggregates in the film formed at pH 9. The ex situ AFM images indicate multilayer-like films and that the film becomes more compact and stable in NaCl solution after the cross-linking. The IRAS results reveal the absorption bands of Mefp-1 on carbon steel before and after NaIO4 induced oxidation of the pre-adsorbed protein. Within a short exposure time, a certain corrosion protection effect was noted for the pre-formed Mefp-1 film in 0.1 M NaCl solution. Cross-linking the pre-adsorbed film by NaIO4 oxidation significantly enhanced the protection efficiency by up to 80%. - Highlights: ► Mussel protein was tested as “green” corrosion protection strategy for steel. ► At pH 9, the protein adsorbs on carbon steel and forms a multilayer-like film. ► NaIO4 leads to structural changes and cross-linking of the protein film. ► Cross-linking results in a dense and compact film with increased stability. ► Cross-linking of preformed film significantly enhances the corrosion protection.

  16. Investigation of the Adhesion Promoter Distribution in Porous Ceramic Precursors

    Steier, Volker; Koplin, Christof; Kailer, Andreas; Reinecke, Holger

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to improve the mechanical properties of polymer infiltrated ceramics (PICs) by the enhancement of the adhesion between both components. To improve the interface adhesion, an adhesion promoter (silane) was used. The silane distribution in the precursors was studied using Raman and IR spectroscopy. Inhomogeneous silane distribution was found after applying a common surface modification method. In this paper, different silane modification methods were developed. The ...

  17. The adhesion protein IgSF9b is coupled to neuroligin 2 via S-SCAM to promote inhibitory synapse development

    Woo, Jooyeon; Kwon, Seok-Kyu; Nam, Jungyong; Choi, Seungwon; Takahashi, Hideto; Krueger, Dilja; Park, Joohyun; Lee, Yeunkum; Bae, Jin Young; Lee, Dongmin; Ko, Jaewon; Kim, Hyun; Kim, Myoung-Hwan; Bae, Yong Chul; Chang, Sunghoe

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic adhesion molecules regulate diverse aspects of synapse formation and maintenance. Many known synaptic adhesion molecules localize at excitatory synapses, whereas relatively little is known about inhibitory synaptic adhesion molecules. Here we report that IgSF9b is a novel, brain-specific, homophilic adhesion molecule that is strongly expressed in GABAergic interneurons. IgSF9b was preferentially localized at inhibitory synapses in cultured rat hippocampal and cortical interneurons an...

  18. A Novel Method of Determining the Functional Effects of a Minor Genetic Modification of a Protein

    Janhavi eNagwekar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Contraction of muscles results from the ATP-coupled cyclic interactions of the myosin cross-bridges with actin filaments. Macroscopic parameters of contraction, such as maximum tension, speed of shortening or ATPase activity, are unlikely to reveal differences between the Wild Type and mutated proteins when the level of transgenic protein expression is low. This is because macroscopic measurements are made on whole organs containing trillions of actin and myosin molecules. An average of the information collected from such a large assembly is bound to conceal any differences imposed by a small fraction of mutated molecules. To circumvent the averaging problem, the measurements were done on isolated ventricular myofibril in which thin filaments were sparsely labeled with a fluorescent dye. We isolated a single myofibril from a ventricle, oriented it vertically (to be able measure the orientation, and labeled 1 in 100,000 actin monomers with a fluorescent dye. We observed the fluorescence from a small confocal volume containing ~3 actin molecules. During the contraction of a ventricle actin constantly changes orientation (i.e. the transition moment of rigidly attached fluorophore fluctuates in time because it is repetitively being kicked by myosin cross-bridges. An autocorrelation functions of these fluctuations are remarkably sensitive to the mutation of myosin. We examined the effects of Alanine to Threonine (A13T mutation in the myosin regulatory light chain shown by population studies to cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. This is an appropriate example, because mutation is expressed at only 10% in the ventricles of transgenic mice. Autocorrelation functions were either Standard (decaying monotonically in time or Non-standard (decaying irregularly. The sparse labeling of actin also allowed the measurement of the spatial distribution of actin molecules. Such distribution reflects the interaction of actin with myosin cross-bridges and is also

  19. Gene duplication confers enhanced expression of 27-kDa γ-zein for endosperm modification in quality protein maize.

    Liu, Hongjun; Shi, Junpeng; Sun, Chuanlong; Gong, Hao; Fan, Xingming; Qiu, Fazhan; Huang, Xuehui; Feng, Qi; Zheng, Xixi; Yuan, Ningning; Li, Changsheng; Zhang, Zhiyong; Deng, Yiting; Wang, Jiechen; Pan, Guangtang; Han, Bin; Lai, Jinsheng; Wu, Yongrui

    2016-05-01

    The maize opaque2 (o2) mutant has a high nutritional value but it develops a chalky endosperm that limits its practical use. Genetic selection for o2 modifiers can convert the normally chalky endosperm of the mutant into a hard, vitreous phenotype, yielding what is known as quality protein maize (QPM). Previous studies have shown that enhanced expression of 27-kDa γ-zein in QPM is essential for endosperm modification. Taking advantage of genome-wide association study analysis of a natural population, linkage mapping analysis of a recombinant inbred line population, and map-based cloning, we identified a quantitative trait locus (qγ27) affecting expression of 27-kDa γ-zein. qγ27 was mapped to the same region as the major o2 modifier (o2 modifier1) on chromosome 7 near the 27-kDa γ-zein locus. qγ27 resulted from a 15.26-kb duplication at the 27-kDa γ-zein locus, which increases the level of gene expression. This duplication occurred before maize domestication; however, the gene structure of qγ27 appears to be unstable and the DNA rearrangement frequently occurs at this locus. Because enhanced expression of 27-kDa γ-zein is critical for endosperm modification in QPM, qγ27 is expected to be under artificial selection. This discovery provides a useful molecular marker that can be used to accelerate QPM breeding. PMID:27092004

  20. Near infrared light induces post-translational modifications of human red blood cell proteins.

    Walski, Tomasz; Dyrda, Agnieszka; Dzik, Małgorzata; Chludzińska, Ludmiła; Tomków, Tomasz; Mehl, Joanna; Detyna, Jerzy; Gałecka, Katarzyna; Witkiewicz, Wojciech; Komorowska, Małgorzata

    2015-11-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that near infrared (NIR) light exerts beneficial effects on cells. Its usefulness in the treatment of cancer, acute brain injuries, strokes and neurodegenerative disorders has been proposed. The mechanism of the NIR action is probably of photochemical nature, however it is not fully understood. Here, using a relatively simple biological model, human red blood cells (RBCs), and a polychromatic non-polarized light source, we investigate the impact of NIR radiation on the oxygen carrier, hemoglobin (Hb), and anion exchanger (AE1, Band 3). The exposure of intact RBCs to NIR light causes quaternary transitions in Hb, dehydration of proteins and decreases the amount of physiologically inactive methemoglobin, as detected by Raman spectroscopy. These effects are accompanied by a lowering of the intracellular pH (pHi) and changes in the cell membrane topography, as documented by atomic force microscopy (AFM). All those changes are in line with our previous studies where alterations of the membrane fluidity and membrane potential were attributed to NIR action on RBCs. The rate of the above listed changes depends strictly on the dose of NIR light that the cells receive, nonetheless it should not be considered as a thermal effect. PMID:26329012

  1. Altered plasma apolipoprotein modifications in patients with pancreatic cancer: protein characterization and multi-institutional validation.

    Kazufumi Honda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Among the more common human malignancies, invasive ductal carcinoma of the pancreas has the worst prognosis. The poor outcome seems to be attributable to difficulty in early detection. METHODS: We compared the plasma protein profiles of 112 pancreatic cancer patients with those of 103 sex- and age-matched healthy controls (Cohort 1 using a newly developed matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (oMALDI QqTOF (quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS system. RESULTS: We found that hemi-truncated apolipoprotein AII dimer (ApoAII-2; 17252 m/z, unglycosylated apolipoprotein CIII (ApoCIII-0; 8766 m/z, and their summed value were significantly decreased in the pancreatic cancer patients [P = 1.36×10(-21, P = 4.35×10(-14, and P = 1.83×10(-24 (Mann-Whitney U-test; area-under-curve values of 0.877, 0.798, and 0.903, respectively]. The significance was further validated in a total of 1099 plasma/serum samples, consisting of 2 retrospective cohorts [Cohort 2 (n = 103 and Cohort 3 (n = 163] and a prospective cohort [Cohort 4 (n = 833] collected from 8 medical institutions in Japan and Germany. CONCLUSIONS: We have constructed a robust quantitative MS profiling system and used it to validate alterations of modified apolipoproteins in multiple cohorts of patients with pancreatic cancer.

  2. SURFACE MODIFICATION OF TITANIUM FILMS WITH SODIUM ION IMPLANTATION: SURFACE PROPERTIES AND PROTEIN ADSORPTION

    K. Y. Cai

    2007-01-01

    Sodium implanted titanium films with different ion doses were characterized to correlate their ion implantation parameters. Native titanium films and ion implanted titanium films were characterized with combined techniques of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and light microscopy (LM). The surface presented increased sodium concentration on treated titanium films with ion dose increasing, except for the group with the highest ion dose of 4× 1017 ions/cm2. XPS depth profiling displayed that sodium entered titanium film around 25-50 nm depth depending on its implantation ion dose. AFM characterization showed that sodium ion implantation treatment changed the surface morphology from a relatively smooth titanium film to rough surfaces corresponding to different implantation doses.After sodium implantation, implanted titanium films presented big particles with island structure morphology. The surface morphology and particle growth displayed the corresponding trend.Fibrinogen adsorption on these titanium films was performed to correlate with the surface properties of treated titanium films. The results show that protein adsorption on ion-implanted samples with dose of 2 × 1017 and 4 × 1017 are statistically higher (p < 0. 01) than samples treated with dose of 5×1016 and 1 ×1017, as well as the control samples.

  3. Standardization and quality control in quantifying non-enzymatic oxidative protein modifications in relation to ageing and disease: Why is it important and why is it hard?

    Nedić, Olgica; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Rattan, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTM) of proteins determine the activity, stability, specificity, transportability and lifespan of a protein. Some PTM are highly specific and regulated involving various enzymatic pathways, but there are other non-enzymatic PTM (nePTM), which occur stochastically......PTM, including requirements for the assay performance, standardization and quality control, and points to the difficulties, uncertainties and un-resolved issues....

  4. Focal Adhesion Kinases in Adhesion Structures and Disease

    Pierre P. Eleniste; Angela Bruzzaniti

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organiza...

  5. Preparation of some (1 goes to 6)-linked disaccharides, and their derivatives suitable for protein modification.

    Lee, R T; Lee, Y C

    1982-02-16

    Synthetic methods for the preparation of per-O-acetylated, (1 goes to 6)-linked disaccharides containing either a D-galactose or a D-glucose residue at the reducing end are described. In these methods, 1,2,3,4-tetra-O-acetyl-6-O-trityl-beta-D-glucopyranose was first converted into 1,2,3,4-tetra-O-acetyl-beta-D-glucopyranose (1) by rapid treatment with 90% trifluoroacetic acid, followed by rapid isolation designed to minimize O-acyl migration. Disaccharides acid, followed by rapid isolation designed to minimize )-acyl migration. Disaccharides were formed by glycosylation of 1 or 1,2:3,4-di-O-isopropylidene-D-galactopyranose with per-O-acetylglycosyl halides. Isopropylidene groups in the resulting disaccharide, if present were removed, and the disaccharide was per-O-acetylated. Per-O-acetylated beta-Gal-(1 goes to 6)-Glc and beta-GlcNAc-(1 goes to 6)-Gal, and a mixture of per-O-acetylated alpha-Gal-(1 goes to 6)-Gal and beta-Gal-(1 goes to 6)-Gal (in the ratio of 3:7) were thus obtained. The per-O-acetylated Gal-(1 goes to 6)-Gal disaccharides were converted, by a reaction sequence previously reported, into (2,2-dimethoxyethyl)aminocarbonylmethyl 1-thio-beta-D-glycosides, which could then be coupled to proteins via reductive alkylation. For the anomeric mixture of per-O-acetylated Gal-(1 goes to 6(-Gal, conversion into the corresponding 1-thioglycoside permitted resolution of the isomers by chromatography on silica gel. When disaccharides, as borate complexes, were chromatographed on a column of a strong, anion-exchange resin, all of the (1 goes to 6)-linked disaccharides of neutral sugars tested (including melibiose) were eluted later than analogous disaccharides having other linkages, and also later than any neutral monosaccharides. PMID:7060054

  6. Proteomic investigation of protein profile changes and amino acid residue-level modification in cooked lamb longissimus thoracis et lumborum: The effect of roasting.

    Yu, Tzer-Yang; Morton, James D; Clerens, Stefan; Dyer, Jolon M

    2016-09-01

    Protein modifications of meat cooked by typical dry-heat methods (e.g., roasting) are currently not well understood. The present study utilised a shotgun proteomic approach to examine the molecular-level effect of roasting on thin lamb longissimus thoracis et lumborum patties, in terms of changes to both the protein profile and amino acid residue side-chain modifications. Cooking caused aggregation of actin, myosin heavy chains and sarcoplasmic proteins. Longer roasting time resulted in significantly reduced protein extractability as well as protein truncation involving particularly a number of myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic proteins, e.g., 6-phosphofructokinase, beta-enolase, l-lactate dehydrogenase A chain, alpha-actinin-3, actin and possibly myosin heavy chains. Modifications that have potential influence on nutritional properties, including carboxyethyllysine and a potentially glucose-derived N-terminal Amadori compound, were observed in actin and myoglobin after roasting. This study provided new insights into molecular changes resulting from the dry-heat treatment of meat, such as commonly used in food preparation. PMID:27150797

  7. Marine Bioinspired Underwater Contact Adhesion.

    Clancy, Sean K; Sodano, Antonio; Cunningham, Dylan J; Huang, Sharon S; Zalicki, Piotr J; Shin, Seunghan; Ahn, B Kollbe

    2016-05-01

    Marine mussels and barnacles are sessile biofouling organisms that adhere to a number of surfaces in wet environments and maintain remarkably strong bonds. Previous synthetic approaches to mimic biological wet adhesive properties have focused mainly on the catechol moiety, present in mussel foot proteins (mfps), and especially rich in the interfacial mfps, for example, mfp-3 and -5, found at the interface between the mussel plaque and substrate. Barnacles, however, do not use Dopa for their wet adhesion, but are instead rich in noncatecholic aromatic residues. Due to this anomaly, we were intrigued to study the initial contact adhesion properties of copolymerized acrylate films containing the key functionalities of barnacle cement proteins and interfacial mfps, for example, aromatic (catecholic or noncatecholic), cationic, anionic, and nonpolar residues. The initial wet contact adhesion of the copolymers was measured using a probe tack testing apparatus with a flat-punch contact geometry. The wet contact adhesion of an optimized, bioinspired copolymer film was ∼15.0 N/cm(2) in deionized water and ∼9.0 N/cm(2) in artificial seawater, up to 150 times greater than commercial pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) tapes (∼0.1 N/cm(2)). Furthermore, maximum wet contact adhesion was obtained at ∼pH 7, suggesting viability for biomedical applications. PMID:27046671

  8. Properties of Nano SiO2 Modified PVF Adhesive

    CHEN He-sheng; SUN Zhen-ya; XUE Li-hui

    2004-01-01

    Some properties of nano SiO2 modified PVF adhesive were studied. The experimental results show that nano SiO2 can improve the properties of PVF adhesive very well. Meanwhile the modification mechanism of nano SiO2 to PVF adhesive and the applications of this adhesive in paper-plastic composite, concrete and fireproof paint were discussed by using IR and XRD determination.

  9. Post-translational protein modifications in type 1 diabetes: a role for the repair enzyme protein-L-isoaspartate (D-aspartate) O-methyltransferase?

    Wägner, A M; Cloos, P; Bergholdt, R;

    2007-01-01

    15.8+/-2.7 mmol; p<0.01 for high- and low-dose groups vs control group) and residual beta cells were more frequently identified (43% vs 71% vs 86%; p<0.05 for high-dose vs control group) in the treated animals. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: The results support a role for post-translational......AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Post-translational modifications, such as isomerisation of native proteins, may create new antigenic epitopes and play a role in the development of the autoimmune response. Protein-L-isoaspartate (D-aspartate) O-methyltransferase (PIMT), encoded by the gene PCMT1, is an enzyme that...... expression of Pcmt1, was tested on MIN6 and INS1 cells, to assess its effect on Pcmt1 mRNA and PIMT levels (RT-PCR and western blot) and apoptosis. Forty-five diabetes-prone BioBreeding (BB) Ottawa Karlsburg (OK) rats were randomised to receive 0, 14 or 500 microg/kg (denoted as the control, low-dose and...

  10. A Novel Domain Cassette Identifies Plasmodium falciparum PfEMP1 Proteins Binding ICAM-1 and Is a Target of Cross-Reactive, Adhesion-Inhibitory Antibodies

    Bengtsson, Anja; Jørgensen, Louise; Rask, Thomas Salhøj;

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral Plasmodium falciparum malaria is characterized by adhesion of infected erythrocytes (IEs) to the cerebral microvasculature. This has been linked to parasites expressing the structurally related group A subset of the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family of IE adhes...

  11. Exploring natural silk protein sericin for regenerative medicine: an injectable, photoluminescent, cell-adhesive 3D hydrogel

    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Yeshun; Zhang, Jinxiang; Huang, Lei; Liu, Jia; Li, Yongkui; Zhang, Guozheng; Kundu, Subhas C.; Wang, Lin

    2014-11-01

    Sericin, a major component of silk, has a long history of being discarded as a waste during silk processing. The value of sericin for tissue engineering is underestimated and its potential application in regenerative medicine has just begun to be explored. Here we report the successful fabrication and characterization of a covalently-crosslinked 3D pure sericin hydrogel for delivery of cells and drugs. This hydrogel is injectable, permitting its implantation through minimally invasive approaches. Notably, this hydrogel is found to exhibit photoluminescence, enabling bioimaging and in vivo tracking. Moreover, this hydrogel system possesses excellent cell-adhesive capability, effectively promoting cell attachment, proliferation and long-term survival of various types of cells. Further, the sericin hydrogel releases bioactive reagents in a sustained manner. Additionally, this hydrogel demonstrates good elasticity, high porosity, and pH-dependent degradation dynamics, which are advantageous for this sericin hydrogel to serve as a delivery vehicle for cells and therapeutic drugs. With all these unique features, it is expected that this sericin hydrogel will have wide utility in the areas of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  12. Anti-tumor activity and immunological modification of ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) from Momordica charantia by covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol

    Mengen Li; Yiwen Chen; Zhongyu Liu; Fubing Shen; Xiaoxiao Bian; Yanfa Meng

    2009-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are a family of enzymes that depurinate rRNA and inhibit protein biosynthesis. Here we report the purification, apoptosis-inducing activity, and polyethylene glycol (PEG) modification of RIP from the bitter melon seeds. The protein has a homogenous N-terminal sequence of N-Asp-Val-Ser-Phe-Arg. Moreover, the RIP displayed strong apoptosis-inducing activity and suppressed cancer cell growth. This might be attributed to the acti-vation of caspases-3. To make it available for in vivo application, the immunogenicity of RIP was reduced by chemical modification with 20 kDa (mPEG)2-Lys-NHS. The inhibition activity of both PEGylated and non-PEGylated RIP against cancer cells was much stronger than against normal cells, and the antigenicity of PEGylated RIP was reduced significantly. Our results suggested that the PEGylated RIP might be potentially developed as anti-cancer drug.

  13. The intermediate filament protein vimentin binds specifically to a recombinant integrin α2/β1 cytoplasmic tail complex and co-localizes with native α2/β1 in endothelial cell focal adhesions

    Integrin receptors are crucial players in cell adhesion and migration. Identification and characterization of cellular proteins that interact with their short α and β cytoplasmic tails will help to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which integrins mediate bi-directional signaling across the plasma membrane. Integrin α2β1 is a major collagen receptor but to date, only few proteins have been shown to interact with the α2 cytoplasmic tail or with the α2β1 complex. In order to identify novel binding partners of a α2β1cytoplasmic domain complex, we have generated recombinant GST-fusion proteins, incorporating the leucine zipper heterodimerization cassettes of Jun and Fos. To ascertain proper functionality of the recombinant proteins, interaction with natural binding partners was tested. GST-α2 and GST-Jun α2 bound His-tagged calreticulin while GST-β1 and GST-Fos β1 proteins bound talin. In screening assays for novel binding partners, the immobilized GST-Jun α2/GST-Fos β1 heterodimeric complex, but not the single subunits, interacted specifically with endothelial cell-derived vimentin. Vimentin, an abundant intermediate filament protein, has previously been shown to co-localize with αvβ3-positive focal contacts. Here, we provide evidence that this interaction also occurs with α2β1-enriched focal adhesions and we further show that this association is lost after prolonged adhesion of endothelial cells to collagen

  14. Characterization of MspA, an Immunogenic Autotransporter Protein That Mediates Adhesion to Epithelial and Endothelial Cells in Neisseria meningitidis

    Turner, D. P. J.; Marietou, A. G.; Johnston, L; Ho, K. K. L.; Rogers, A. J.; Wooldridge, K. G.; Ala'Aldeen, D. A. A.

    2006-01-01

    A novel putative autotransporter protein (NMB1998) was identified in the available genomic sequence of meningococcal strain MC58 (ET-5; ST-32). The mspA gene is absent from the genomic sequences of meningococcal strain Z2491 (ET-IV; ST-4) and the gonococcal strain FA1090. An orthologue is present in the meningococcal strain FAM18 (ET-37; ST-11), but the sequence contains a premature stop codon, suggesting that the protein may not be expressed in this strain. MspA is predicted to be a 157-kDa ...

  15. [Age-related post-translational modification of proteins in human tissue and its use determination of age in forensic medicine. Review].

    Pilin, A; Pudil, F; Sajdok, J; Zídková, J; Bezdícková, D; Bencko, V

    2003-10-01

    This article deals with some of posttranslational modification of proteins which are, or could be useful to work out objective and standard methods for age estimation in forensic medicine. From many posttranslational modifications other than racemization, the evaluation of pentosidine, one of the products of nonenzymatic glycosylation, seems to be promising. The enlargement of menu of methods for age estimation is important mainly for forensic sciences when determination of the age of an unknown dead body is necessary. Morphological methods are quite often subjective and charged with errors. PMID:14661529

  16. Characterization of MspA, an immunogenic autotransporter protein that mediates adhesion to epithelial and endothelial cells in Neisseria meningitidis.

    Turner, D P J; Marietou, A G; Johnston, L; Ho, K K L; Rogers, A J; Wooldridge, K G; Ala'Aldeen, D A A

    2006-05-01

    A novel putative autotransporter protein (NMB1998) was identified in the available genomic sequence of meningococcal strain MC58 (ET-5; ST-32). The mspA gene is absent from the genomic sequences of meningococcal strain Z2491 (ET-IV; ST-4) and the gonococcal strain FA1090. An orthologue is present in the meningococcal strain FAM18 (ET-37; ST-11), but the sequence contains a premature stop codon, suggesting that the protein may not be expressed in this strain. MspA is predicted to be a 157-kDa protein with low cysteine content, and it exhibits 36 and 33% identity to the meningococcal autotransporter proteins immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) protease and App, respectively. Search of the Pfam database predicts the presence of IgA1 protease and autotransporter beta-barrel domains. MspA was cloned, and a recombinant protein of the expected size was expressed and after being affinity purified was used to raise rabbit polyclonal monospecific antiserum. Immunoblot studies showed that ca. 125- and 95-kDa fragments of MspA are secreted in meningococcal strain MC58, which are absent from the isogenic mutant. Secretion of MspA was shown to be modified in an AspA isogenic mutant. A strain survey showed that MspA is expressed by all ST-32 and ST-41/44 (lineage 3) strains, but none of the ST-8 (A4) strains examined. Sera from patients convalescing from meningococcal disease were shown to contain MspA-specific antibodies. In bactericidal assays, anti-MspA serum was shown to kill the homologous strain (MC58) and another ST-32 strain. Escherichia coli-expressing recombinant MspA was shown to adhere to both human bronchial epithelial cells and brain microvascular endothelial cells. PMID:16622234

  17. The Autistic Phenotype Exhibits a Remarkably Localized Modification of Brain Protein by Products of Free Radical-Induced Lipid Oxidation

    Teresa A. Evans

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative damage has been documented in the peripheral tissues of autism patients. In this study, we sought evidence of oxidative injury in autistic brain. Carboxyethyl pyrrole (CEP and iso[4]levuglandin (iso[4]LGE2-protein adducts, that are uniquely generated through peroxidation of docosahexaenoate and arachidonate-containing lipids respectively, and heme oxygenase-1 were detected immunocytochemically in cortical brain tissues and by ELISA in blood plasma. Significant immunoreactivity toward all three of these markers of oxidative damage in the white matter and often extending well into the grey matter of axons was found in every case of autism examined. This striking threadlike pattern appears to be a hallmark of the autistic brain as it was not seen in any control brain, young or aged, used as controls for the oxidative assays. Western blot and immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed neurofilament heavy chain to be a major target of CEP-modification. In contrast, in plasma from 27 autism spectrum disorder patients and 11 age-matched healthy controls we found similar levels of plasma CEP (124.5 ± 57.9 versus 110.4 ± 30.3 pmol/mL, iso[4]LGE2 protein adducts (16.7 ± 5.8 versus 13.4 ± 3.4 nmol/mL, anti-CEP (1.2 ± 0.7 versus 1.2 ± 0.3 and anti-iso[4]LGE2 autoantibody titre (1.3 ± 1.6 versus 1.0 ± 0.9, and no differences between the ratio of NO2Tyr/Tyr (7.81 E-06 ± 3.29 E-06 versus 7.87 E-06 ± 1.62 E-06. These findings provide the first direct evidence of increased oxidative stress in the autistic brain. It seems likely that oxidative injury of proteins in the brain would be associated with neurological abnormalities and provide a cellular basis at the root of autism spectrum disorders.

  18. Laser-assisted modification of polystyrene surfaces for cell culture applications

    Laser-assisted patterning and modification of polystyrene (PS) was investigated with respect to applications in micro-fluidics and cell culture. For this purpose the wettability, the adsorption of proteins and the adhesion of animal cells were investigated as function of laser- and processing parameters. The change of surface chemistry was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The local formation of chemical structures suitable for improved cell adhesion was realized on PS surfaces by UV laser irradiation. Above and below the laser ablation threshold two different mechanisms affecting cell adhesion were detected. In the first case the debris deposited on and along laser irradiated areas was responsible for improved cell adhesion, while in the second case a photolytic activation of the polymer surface including a subsequent oxidization in oxygen or ambient air is leading to a highly localized alteration of protein adsorption from cell culture media and finally to increased cell adhesion. Laser modifications of PS using suitable exposure doses and an appropriate choice of the processing gas (helium or oxygen) enabled a highly localized control of wetting. The dynamic advancing contact angle could be adjusted between 2o and 150o. The hydrophilic and hydrophobic behaviour are caused by chemical and topographical surface changes

  19. Focal Adhesion Kinases in Adhesion Structures and Disease

    Pierre P. Eleniste

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases.

  20. Focal adhesion kinases in adhesion structures and disease.

    Eleniste, Pierre P; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases. PMID:22888421