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Sample records for adhesion dynamics determines

  1. Determination of Water Diffusion Coefficients and Dynamics in Adhesive/ Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Resin Composite Joints

    WANG Chao; WANG Zhi; WANG Jing; SU Tao

    2007-01-01

    To determinate the water diffusion coefficients and dynamics in adhesive/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin composite joints, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis(EDX) is used to establish the content change of oxygen in the adhesive in adhesive/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin composite joints. As water is made up of oxygen and hydrogen, the water diffusion coefficients and dynamics in adhesive/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin composite joints can be obtained from the change in the content of oxygen in the adhesive during humidity aging, via EDX analysis. The authors have calculated the water diffusion coefficients and dynamics in the adhesive/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin composite joints with the aid of both energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The determined results with EDX analysis are almost the same as those determined with elemental analysis and the results also show that the durability of the adhesive/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin composite joints subjected to silane coupling agent treatment is better than those subjected to sand paper burnishing treatment and chemical oxidation treatment.

  2. Coupling of cytoplasm and adhesion dynamics determines cell polarization and locomotion

    Bock, Martin; Möhl, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Observations of single epidermal cells on flat adhesive substrates have revealed two distinct morphological and functional states, namely a non-migrating symmetric unpolarized state and a migrating asymmetric polarized state. These states are characterized by different spatial distributions and dynamics of important biochemical cell components: F-actin and myosin-II form the contractile part of the cytoskeleton, and integrin receptors in the plasma membrane connect F-actin filaments to the substratum. In this way, focal adhesion complexes are assembled, which determine cytoskeletal force transduction and subsequent cell locomotion. So far, physical models have reduced this phenomenon either to gradients in regulatory control molecules or to different mechanics of the actin filament system in different regions of the cell. Here we offer an alternative and self-organizational model incorporating polymerization, pushing and sliding of filaments, as well as formation of adhesion sites and their force dependent ki...

  3. Sliding Adhesion Dynamics of Isolated Gecko Setal Arrays

    Sponberg, Simon; Autumn, Kellar

    2003-03-01

    The tokay gecko (Gekko gecko) can adhere to nearly any surface through van der Waals interactions of the specialized setae (b-keratin "hairs") of its toe pads. Our recent research has suggested that a gecko is substantially overbuilt for static adhesion requiring as little as 0.03of its theoretical adhesive capacity. We performed the first sliding adhesion experiments on this novel biological adhesive to determine its response to dynamic loading. We isolated arrays of setae and constructed a precision controlled Robo-toe to study sliding effects. Our results indicate that, unlike many typical adhesives, gecko setal arrays exhibit an increased frictional force upon sliding (mk > ms) which further increases with velocity, suggesting that perturbation rejection may be an evolutionary design principle underlying the evolution of the gecko adhesive. We compare these dynamic properties with those of other adhesives and explore the impacts of these results on the design of artificial adhesives.

  4. Dynamic analysis of two adhesively bonded rods

    Kenneth L. Kuttler

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This work presents two models for the dynamic analysis of two rods that are adhesively bonded. The first model assumes that the adhesive is an elasto-plastic material and that complete debonding occurs when the stress reaches the yield limit. In the second model the degradation of the adhesive is described by the introduction of material damage. Failure occurs when the material is completely damaged, or the damage reaches a critical floor value. Both models are analyzed and the existence of a weak solution is established for the model with damage. In the quasistatic case, a new condition for adhesion is found as the limit of the adhesive thickness tends to zero.

  5. Adhesion Dynamics in Probing Micro- and Nanoscale Thin Solid Films

    Xiaoling He

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on modeling the probe dynamics in scratching and indenting thin solid films at micro- and nanoscales. The model identifies bifurcation conditions that define the stick-slip oscillation patterns of the tip. It is found that the local energy fluctuations as a function of the inelastic deformation, defect formation, material properties, and contact parameters determine the oscillation behavior. The transient variation of the localized function makes the response nonlinear at the adhesion junction. By quantifying the relation between the bifurcation parameters and the oscillation behavior, this model gives a realistic representation of the complex adhesion dynamics. Specifically, the model establishes the link between the stick-slip behavior and the inelastic deformation and the local potentials. This model justifies the experimental observations and the molecular dynamics simulation of the adhesion and friction dynamics in both the micro- and nanoscale contact.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Adhesion at Epoxy Interfaces

    Frankland, Sarah-Jane V.; Clancy, Thomas C.; Hinkley, J. A.; Gates. T. S.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of moisture on adhesives used in aerospace applications can be modeled with chemically specific techniques such as molecular dynamics simulation. In the present study, the surface energy and work of adhesion are calculated for epoxy surfaces and interfaces, respectively, by using molecular dynamics simulation. Modifications are made to current theory to calculate the work of adhesion at the epoxy-epoxy interface with and without water. Quantitative agreement with experimental values is obtained for the surface energy and work of adhesion at the interface without water. The work of adhesion agrees qualitatively with the experimental values for the interface with water: the magnitude is reduced 15% with respect to the value for the interface without water. A variation of 26% in the magnitude is observed depending on the water configuration at a concentration of 1.6 wt%. The methods and modifications to the method that are employed to obtain these values are expected to be applicable for other epoxy adhesives to determine the effects of moisture uptake on their work of adhesion.

  7. Characteristics of the adhesive determinants of Lactobacillus fermentum 104.

    Henriksson, A; Szewzyk, R; Conway, P L

    1991-01-01

    The adhesion of Lactobacillus fermentum 104-R and the variant strain 104-S to porcine gastric squamous epithelium was investigated. An epithelium-specific adhesion was detected for strain 104-S; however, strain 104-R expressed enhanced adhesion capacity to the control surfaces of polystyrene and bovine serum albumin. To characterize the adhesive determinants, the bacterial cells were exposed to various treatments. The adhesion pattern of bacterial cells in buffers of pH values ranging from 2 ...

  8. Dynamic mechanical and thermal properties of seven polyurethane adhesives

    Hoffman, D.M.

    1981-03-01

    Seven polyurethane adhesives have been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). These adhesives, designated Halthanes were synthesized because of OSHA restrictions on the use of the curing agent methylene bis(2-chloroaniline). Four of the Halthanes were made from LLNL-developed 4,4'-methylene bis(phenylisocyanate) terminated prepolymers cured with a blend of polyols; three were made from an LLNL-developed prepolymer terminated with Hylene W and cured with aromatic diamines. In this paper the dynamic mechanical and thermal behavior of these seven segmented polyurethanes are discussed. The chemical structure of the hard and soft segments, the concentrations of each block, and the presence of tetrafunctional crosslinker determined the dynamic mechanical and thermal properties of the three types of polyurethane adhesives, 73-, 87-, and 88-series Halthanes studied. Aromatic-aliphatic MDI- butanediol urethane hard segments produce lower modulus (10/sup 6/ Pa) materials in the rubbery region than cyclic unsaturated-aromatic urea hard segments. Incorporation of chemical crosslinks in the hard segments extended the rubbery plateau beyond the hard segment transitions up to temperatures where the polymer begins to degrade. Concentration of hard and soft segments can also be used to control the modulus between the glass transition temperatures of the two blocks.

  9. An adhesion-dependent switch between mechanisms that determine motile cell shape.

    Erin L Barnhart

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Keratocytes are fast-moving cells in which adhesion dynamics are tightly coupled to the actin polymerization motor that drives migration, resulting in highly coordinated cell movement. We have found that modifying the adhesive properties of the underlying substrate has a dramatic effect on keratocyte morphology. Cells crawling at intermediate adhesion strengths resembled stereotypical keratocytes, characterized by a broad, fan-shaped lamellipodium, clearly defined leading and trailing edges, and persistent rates of protrusion and retraction. Cells at low adhesion strength were small and round with highly variable protrusion and retraction rates, and cells at high adhesion strength were large and asymmetrical and, strikingly, exhibited traveling waves of protrusion. To elucidate the mechanisms by which adhesion strength determines cell behavior, we examined the organization of adhesions, myosin II, and the actin network in keratocytes migrating on substrates with different adhesion strengths. On the whole, our results are consistent with a quantitative physical model in which keratocyte shape and migratory behavior emerge from the self-organization of actin, adhesions, and myosin, and quantitative changes in either adhesion strength or myosin contraction can switch keratocytes among qualitatively distinct migration regimes.

  10. Dynamic strength of molecular adhesion bonds.

    Evans, E; Ritchie, K

    1997-01-01

    In biology, molecular linkages at, within, and beneath cell interfaces arise mainly from weak noncovalent interactions. These bonds will fail under any level of pulling force if held for sufficient time. Thus, when tested with ultrasensitive force probes, we expect cohesive material strength and strength of adhesion at interfaces to be time- and loading rate-dependent properties. To examine what can be learned from measurements of bond strength, we have extended Kramers' theory for reaction k...

  11. The capillary adhesion technique: a versatile method for determining the liquid adhesion force and sample stiffness

    Daniel Gandyra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a novel, practical technique for the concerted, simultaneous determination of both the adhesion force of a small structure or structural unit (e.g., an individual filament, hair, micromechanical component or microsensor to a liquid and its elastic properties. The method involves the creation and development of a liquid meniscus upon touching a liquid surface with the structure, and the subsequent disruption of this liquid meniscus upon removal. The evaluation of the meniscus shape immediately before snap-off of the meniscus allows the quantitative determination of the liquid adhesion force. Concurrently, by measuring and evaluating the deformation of the structure under investigation, its elastic properties can be determined. The sensitivity of the method is remarkably high, practically limited by the resolution of the camera capturing the process. Adhesion forces down to 10 µN and spring constants up to 2 N/m were measured. Three exemplary applications of this method are demonstrated: (1 determination of the water adhesion force and the elasticity of individual hairs (trichomes of the floating fern Salvinia molesta. (2 The investigation of human head hairs both with and without functional surface coatings (a topic of high relevance in the field of hair cosmetics was performed. The method also resulted in the measurement of an elastic modulus (Young’s modulus for individual hairs of 3.0 × 105 N/cm2, which is within the typical range known for human hair. (3 Finally, the accuracy and validity of the capillary adhesion technique was proven by examining calibrated atomic force microscopy cantilevers, reproducing the spring constants calibrated using other methods.

  12. Adhesive capsulitis and dynamic splinting: a controlled, cohort study

    Willis F Buck; Gaspar Paul D

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Adhesive Capsulitis (AC) affects patient of all ages, and stretching protocols are commonly prescribed for this condition. Dynamic splinting has been shown effective in contracture reduction from pathologies including Trismus to plantar fasciitis. The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of dynamic splinting on patients with AC. Methods This controlled, cohort study, was conducted at four physical therapy, sports medicine clinics in Texas and California. Sixty...

  13. Multiscale Stick-Slip Dynamics of Adhesive Tape Peeling

    Dalbe, Marie-Julie; Cortet, Pierre-Philippe; Ciccotti, Matteo; Vanel, Loic; Santucci, Stephane

    2015-01-01

    Using a high-speed camera, we follow the propagation of the detachment front during the peeling of an adhesive tape from a flat surface. In a given range of peeling velocity, this front displays a multiscale unstable dynamics, entangling two well-separated spatiotemporal scales, which correspond to microscopic and macroscopic dynamical stick-slip instabilities. While the periodic release of the stretch energy of the whole peeled ribbon drives the classical macro-stick-slip, we show that the m...

  14. Dynamic monitoring of changes in endothelial cell-substrate adhesiveness during leukocyte adhesion by microelectrical impedance assay

    Yakun Ge; Tongle Deng; Xiaoxiang Zheng

    2009-01-01

    Adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial cells in inflammation processes leads to changes of endothelial cell-substrate adhesiveness, and understanding of such changes will provide us with important information of inflammation processes. In this study, we used a non-invasive biosensor system referred to as real-time cell electronic sensor (RT-CES) system to monitor the changes in endothelial cell-substrate adhesiveness induced by human monoblastic cell line U937 cell adhesion in a dynamic and quantitative manner. This assay, which is based on cell-substrate impedance readout, is able to monitor transient changes in cell-substrate adhesiveness as a result of U937 cell adhesion. The U937 cell adhesion to endothelial cells was induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in a dose-dependent manner. Although the number of adherent U937 cells to the endothelial cells was verified by a standard assay, the adhesiveness of endothelial cells after addition of U937 cells was monitored by the RT-CES system. Furthermore, focal adhesion kinase protein decrease and F-actin rearrangement in endothelial cells were observed after addition of U937 cells. Our results indicated that the adhesion of U937 cells to LPS-treated endothelial cells reduced the cell adhesiveness to the substrate, and such reduction might facilitate infiltration of leukocytes.

  15. Manipulation of Microobjects Based on Dynamic Adhesion Control

    Tao Chen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to scale effects, microoperation, especially the releasing of microobjects, has been a long‐standing challenge in micromanipulation applications. In this paper a micromanipulation method is presented based on dynamic adhesion control with compound vibration. This adhesion control technique employs inertia force to overcome adhesion force achieving 100% repeatability with releasing accuracy of 4± 0.5μm, which was experimentally quantified through the manipulation of 20‐100μm polystyrene spheres under an optical microscope. The micromanipulation system consists of a microgripper and a piezoelectric ceramics module. The compound vibration comes from the electrostatic actuator and the piezoelectrically driven actuator. Surface and bulk micromachining technology is employed to fabricate the microgripper used in the system from a single crystal silicon wafer. Experimental results confirmed that this adhesion control technique is independent of substrate. Theoretical analyses were conducted to understand the picking up and releasing mechanism. Based on this preliminary study, the micromanipulation system proved to be an effective solution for active picking up and releasing of micromanipulation.

  16. Accurate Method for Determining Adhesion of Cantilever Beams

    Michalske, T.A.; de Boer, M.P.

    1999-01-08

    Using surface micromachined samples, we demonstrate the accurate measurement of cantilever beam adhesion by using test structures which are adhered over long attachment lengths. We show that this configuration has a deep energy well, such that a fracture equilibrium is easily reached. When compared to the commonly used method of determining the shortest attached beam, the present method is much less sensitive to variations in surface topography or to details of capillary drying.

  17. Adhesive capsulitis and dynamic splinting: a controlled, cohort study

    Willis F Buck

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adhesive Capsulitis (AC affects patient of all ages, and stretching protocols are commonly prescribed for this condition. Dynamic splinting has been shown effective in contracture reduction from pathologies including Trismus to plantar fasciitis. The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of dynamic splinting on patients with AC. Methods This controlled, cohort study, was conducted at four physical therapy, sports medicine clinics in Texas and California. Sixty-two patients diagnosed with Stage II Adhesive Capsulitis were grouped by intervention. The intervention categories were as follows: Group I (Control; Group II (Physical Therapy exclusively with standardized protocols; Group III; (Shoulder Dynasplint system exclusively; Group IV (Combined treatment with Shoulder Dynasplint and standardized Physical Therapy. The duration of this study was 90 days for all groups, and the main outcome measures were change in active, external rotation. Results Significant difference was found for all treatment groups (p Conclusion The difference for the combined treatment group was attributed to patients' receiving the best PT combined with structured "home therapy" that contributed an additional 90 hours of end-range stretching. This adjunct should be included in the standard of care for adhesive Capsulitis. Trial Registration Trial Number: NCT00873158

  18. Analysis of Adhesive Characteristics of Asphalt Based on Atomic Force Microscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Xu, Meng; Yi, Junyan; Feng, Decheng; Huang, Yudong; Wang, Dongsheng

    2016-05-18

    Asphalt binder is a very important building material in infrastructure construction; it is commonly mixed with mineral aggregate and used to produce asphalt concrete. Owing to the large differences in physical and chemical properties between asphalt and aggregate, adhesive bonds play an important role in determining the performance of asphalt concrete. Although many types of adhesive bonding mechanisms have been proposed to explain the interaction forces between asphalt binder and mineral aggregate, few have been confirmed and characterized. In comparison with chemical interactions, physical adsorption has been considered to play a more important role in adhesive bonding between asphalt and mineral aggregate. In this study, the silicon tip of an atomic force microscope was used to represent silicate minerals in aggregate, and a nanoscale analysis of the characteristics of adhesive bonding between asphalt binder and the silicon tip was conducted via an atomic force microscopy (AFM) test and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results of the measurements and simulations could help in better understanding of the bonding and debonding procedures in asphalt-aggregate mixtures during hot mixing and under traffic loading. MD simulations on a single molecule of a component of asphalt and monocrystalline silicon demonstrate that molecules with a higher atomic density and planar structure, such as three types of asphaltene molecules, can provide greater adhesive strength. However, regarding the real components of asphalt binder, both the MD simulations and AFM test indicate that the colloidal structural behavior of asphalt also has a large influence on the adhesion behavior between asphalt and silicon. A schematic model of the interaction between asphalt and silicon is presented, which can explain the effect of aging on the adhesion behavior of asphalt. PMID:27115043

  19. Fracture mechanics applied to the determination of adhesion strength between epoxies and hydraulic mortars

    Aguiar, J. L. Barroso de

    2001-01-01

    The determination of adhesion strength between polymers and mortars always creates problems. The use of traditional tests like direct tension, flexure or shear, normally doesn`t make possible the correct determination of the adhesion strength. If the adhesive is good and the mortar surfaces are well prepared, the failure is in the mortar. With this kind of failures it is possible to say that adhesion strength is higher than the failure stress. But is not possible to give a numerical value of ...

  20. Non-destructive method of determination of elastic properties and adhesion coefficient of different coating materials

    M. Kubisztal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The paper presents a non-destructive method of determination of Young’s modulus and adhesion coefficient of different coating materials (metallic coatings, polymer, composite etc.. Some of the results obtained by applying this method are discussed in detail.Design/methodology/approach: The presented method consists in measuring the dynamic response of the examined material in the form of a flat rectangular bar subjected to external periodic mechanical stress i.e. the so called vibrating reed technique. General equations describing elastic properties of the sample consisting of a substrate and a deposited coating are derived and discussed in detail.Findings: It was shown that the application of the proposed approach to the metallic, polymeric and composite coatings allowed to obtain a quantitative data concerning the change of both the elastic properties and the adhesion coefficient with a change of: coating thickness, measurement temperature, chemical composition of coating, surface preparation or in the case of epoxy resin coatings with a change of curing time or curing temperature.Research limitations/implications: The proposed method can be applied in many scientific problems in the field of coating materials (e.g. elastic properties of porous coating, crystallization of amorphous coating, adhesion of different polymeric coatings.Practical implications: It was shown that the described method can be successfully used in optimisation of some technological processes of deposition of different coatings on metallic substrate.Originality/value: The paper presents methodology of a non-destructive approach to determination of elastic properties and adhesion coefficient of coating materials with an overview of some applications already publish and also the new ones. Especially interesting are the results concerning the influence of surface preparation on adhesion coefficient which are published for the first time.

  1. Dynamic force spectroscopy to probe adhesion strength of living cells

    Prechtel, K.; Bausch, A. R.; Marchi-Artzner, V.; Kantlehner, M.; Kessler, H; Merkel, R

    2002-01-01

    We studied the mechanical strength of the adhesion of living cells to model membranes. The latter contained a RGD lipopeptide which is a high affinity binding site for a cell adhesion molecule (integrin alpha(V)beta(3)). Cells adhered specifically to the vesicles. We used micropipette aspiration for breaking this adhesion with well defined forces. Systematic variation of the rate of force application revealed pronounced kinetic effects. The dependence of the detachment forces on the loading r...

  2. Determination of mode of fracture of adhesive restorative materials. An invitro study.

    Nayak Ullal; Suasha P

    2002-01-01

    In the present invitro study, four adhesive restorative materials were evaluated for the determination of mode of fracture. The four materials chosen were TPH composite resin, Dyract, Fuji II LC and Fuji II. The mode of fracture was determined at a magnification of 10X. The TPH composite resin and Dyract showed adhesive fracture whereas the glass ionomer group showed cohesive fracture.

  3. State diagram for adhesion dynamics of deformable capsules under shear flow.

    Luo, Zheng Yuan; Bai, Bo Feng

    2016-08-17

    Due to the significance of understanding the underlying mechanisms of cell adhesion in biological processes and cell capture in biomedical applications, we numerically investigate the adhesion dynamics of deformable capsules under shear flow by using a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic model. This model is based on the coupling of the front tracking-finite element method for elastic mechanics of the capsule membrane and the adhesion kinetics simulation for adhesive interactions between capsules and functionalized surfaces. Using this model, three distinct adhesion dynamic states are predicted, such as detachment, rolling and firm-adhesion. Specifically, the effects of capsule deformability quantified by the capillary number on the transitions of these three dynamic states are investigated by developing an adhesion dynamic state diagram for the first time. At low capillary numbers (e.g. Ca numbers (e.g. 0.0075 number exceeds a critical value (e.g. Ca = 0.0175), the rolling state no longer appears, since capsules exhibit large deviation from the spherical shape. PMID:27492192

  4. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-11-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils.

  5. Comparative dynamics of retrograde actin flow and focal adhesions: formation of nascent adhesions triggers transition from fast to slow flow.

    Antonina Y Alexandrova

    Full Text Available Dynamic actin network at the leading edge of the cell is linked to the extracellular matrix through focal adhesions (FAs, and at the same time it undergoes retrograde flow with different dynamics in two distinct zones: the lamellipodium (peripheral zone of fast flow, and the lamellum (zone of slow flow located between the lamellipodium and the cell body. Cell migration involves expansion of both the lamellipodium and the lamellum, as well as formation of new FAs, but it is largely unknown how the position of the boundary between the two flow zones is defined, and how FAs and actin flow mutually influence each other. We investigated dynamic relationship between focal adhesions and the boundary between the two flow zones in spreading cells. Nascent FAs first appeared in the lamellipodium. Within seconds after the formation of new FAs, the rate of actin flow decreased locally, and the lamellipodium/lamellum boundary advanced towards the new FAs. Blocking fast actin flow with cytochalasin D resulted in rapid dissolution of nascent FAs. In the absence of FAs (spreading on poly-L-lysine-coated surfaces retrograde flow was uniform and the velocity transition was not observed. We conclude that formation of FAs depends on actin dynamics, and in its turn, affects the dynamics of actin flow by triggering transition from fast to slow flow. Extension of the cell edge thus proceeds through a cycle of lamellipodium protrusion, formation of new FAs, advance of the lamellum, and protrusion of the lamellipodium from the new base.

  6. Comparative dynamics of retrograde actin flow and focal adhesions: formation of nascent adhesions triggers transition from fast to slow flow.

    Alexandrova, Antonina Y; Arnold, Katya; Schaub, Sébastien; Vasiliev, Jury M; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Bershadsky, Alexander D; Verkhovsky, Alexander B

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic actin network at the leading edge of the cell is linked to the extracellular matrix through focal adhesions (FAs), and at the same time it undergoes retrograde flow with different dynamics in two distinct zones: the lamellipodium (peripheral zone of fast flow), and the lamellum (zone of slow flow located between the lamellipodium and the cell body). Cell migration involves expansion of both the lamellipodium and the lamellum, as well as formation of new FAs, but it is largely unknown how the position of the boundary between the two flow zones is defined, and how FAs and actin flow mutually influence each other. We investigated dynamic relationship between focal adhesions and the boundary between the two flow zones in spreading cells. Nascent FAs first appeared in the lamellipodium. Within seconds after the formation of new FAs, the rate of actin flow decreased locally, and the lamellipodium/lamellum boundary advanced towards the new FAs. Blocking fast actin flow with cytochalasin D resulted in rapid dissolution of nascent FAs. In the absence of FAs (spreading on poly-L-lysine-coated surfaces) retrograde flow was uniform and the velocity transition was not observed. We conclude that formation of FAs depends on actin dynamics, and in its turn, affects the dynamics of actin flow by triggering transition from fast to slow flow. Extension of the cell edge thus proceeds through a cycle of lamellipodium protrusion, formation of new FAs, advance of the lamellum, and protrusion of the lamellipodium from the new base. PMID:18800171

  7. Dynamic cell adhesion and migration on nanoscale grooved substrates

    E Lamers

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Organised nanotopography mimicking the natural extracellular matrix can be used to control morphology, cell motility, and differentiation. However, it is still unknown how specific cell types react with specific patterns. Both initial adhesion and preferential cell migration may be important to initiate and increase cell locomotion and coverage with cells, and thus achieve an enhanced wound healing response around an implantable material. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate how MC3T3-E1 osteoblast initial adhesion and directional migration are influenced by nanogrooves with pitches ranging from 150 nm up to 1000 nm. In this study, we used a multi-patterned substrate with five different groove patterns and a smooth area with either a concentric or radial orientation. Initial cell adhesion measurements after 10 s were performed using atomic force spectroscopy-assisted single-cell force spectroscopy, and demonstrated that nascent cell adhesion was highly induced by a 600 nm pitch and reduced by a 150 nm pitch. Addition of RGD peptide significantly reduced adhesion, indicating that integrins and cell adhesive proteins (e.g. fibronectin or vitronectin are key factors in specific cell adhesion on nanogrooved substrates. Also, cell migration was highly dependent on the groove pitch; the highest directional migration parallel to the grooves was observed on a 600 nm pitch, whereas a 150 nm pitch restrained directional cell migration. From this study, we conclude that grooves with a pitch of 600 nm may be favourable to enhance fast wound closure, thereby promoting tissue regeneration.

  8. Comparison of dynamic and quasi-static measurements of thin film adhesion

    Adhesive failure and the attendant delamination of a thin film on a substrate is controlled by the fracture energy required to propagate a crack along the interface. Numerous testing protocols have been introduced to characterize this critical property, but are limited by difficulties associated with applying precise loads, introducing well-defined pre-cracks, tedious sample preparation and complex analysis of plastic deformation in the films. The quasi-static four-point bend test is widely accepted in the microelectronics industry as the standard for measuring adhesion properties for a range of multilayer thin film systems. Dynamic delamination methods, which use laser-induced stress waves to rapidly load the thin film interface, have recently been offered as an alternative method for extracting interfacial fracture energy. In this work, the interfacial fracture energy of an aluminium (Al) thin film on a silicon (Si) substrate is determined for a range of dynamic loading conditions and compared with values measured under quasi-static conditions in a four-point bend test. Controlled dynamic delamination of the Al/Si interface is achieved by efficient conversion of the kinetic energy associated with a laser-induced stress wave into fracture energy. By varying the laser fluence, the fracture energy is investigated over a range of stress pulse amplitudes and velocities. For lower amplitudes of the stress wave, the fracture energy is nearly constant and compares favourably with the critical fracture energy obtained using the four-point bend technique, about 2.5 J m-2. As the pulse amplitude increases, however, a rate dependence of the dynamic fracture energy is observed. The fracture energy increases almost linearly with pulse amplitude until reaching a plateau value of about 6.0 J m-2.

  9. Dynamic Cell Adhesion and Migration on Nanoscale Grooved Substrates

    Lamers, E.; Riet, te J.; Domanski, M.; Luttge, R.; Figdor, C.G.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Organised nanotopography mimicking the natural extracellular matrix can be used to control morphology, cell motility, and differentiation. However, it is still unknown how specific cell types react with specific patterns. Both initial adhesion and preferential cell migration may be important to init

  10. Dynamic cell adhesion and migration on nanoscale grooved substrates.

    Lamers, E.; Riet, J. te; Domanski, M.; Luttge, R.; Figdor, C.G.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Organised nanotopography mimicking the natural extracellular matrix can be used to control morphology, cell motility, and differentiation. However, it is still unknown how specific cell types react with specific patterns. Both initial adhesion and preferential cell migration may be important to init

  11. The Effect of Water on the Work of Adhesion at Epoxy Interfaces by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Hinkley, J.A.; Frankland, S.J.V.; Clancy, T.C.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation can be used to explore the detailed effects of chemistry on properties of materials. In this paper, two different epoxies found in aerospace resins are modeled using molecular dynamics. The first material, an amine-cured tetrafunctional epoxy, represents a composite matrix resin, while the second represents a 177 C-cured adhesive. Surface energies are derived for both epoxies and the work of adhesion values calculated for the epoxy/epoxy interfaces agree with experiment. Adding water -- to simulate the effect of moisture exposure -- reduced the work of adhesion in one case, and increased it in the other. To explore the difference, the various energy terms that make up the net work of adhesion were compared and the location of the added water was examined.

  12. Intermittent stick-slip dynamics during the peeling of an adhesive tape from a roller

    Cortet, Pierre-Philippe; Dalbe, Marie-Julie; Guerra, Claudia; Cohen, Caroline; Ciccotti, Matteo; Santucci, Stéphane; Vanel, Loïc

    2013-01-01

    We study experimentally the fracture dynamics during the peeling at a constant velocity of a roller adhesive tape mounted on a freely rotating pulley. Thanks to a high speed camera, we measure, in an intermediate range of peeling velocities, high frequency oscillations between phases of slow and rapid propagation of the peeling fracture. This so-called stick-slip regime is well known as the consequence of a decreasing fracture energy of the adhesive in a certain range of peeling velocity coup...

  13. A computational study of stress fiber-focal adhesion dynamics governing cell contractility

    Maraldi, Mirko; Valero, Clara; Garikipati, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    We apply a recently developed model of cytoskeletal force generation to study a cell intrinsic contractility, as well as its response to external loading. The model is based on a non-equilibrium thermodynamic treatment of the mechano-chemistry governing force in the stress fiber-focal adhesion system. Our computational study suggests that the mechanical coupling between the stress fibers and focal adhesions leads to a complex, dynamic, mechano-chemical response. We collect the results in resp...

  14. Dynamical arrest, percolation, gelation, and glass formation in model nanoparticle dispersions with thermoreversible adhesive interactions.

    Eberle, Aaron P R; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón; Kim, Jung M; Wagner, Norman J

    2012-01-24

    We report an experimental study of the dynamical arrest transition for a model system consisting of octadecyl coated silica suspended in n-tetradecane from dilute to concentrated conditions spanning the state diagram. The dispersion's interparticle potential is tuned by temperature affecting the brush conformation leading to a thermoreversible model system. The critical temperature for dynamical arrest, T*, is determined as a function of dispersion volume fraction by small-amplitude dynamic oscillatory shear rheology. We corroborate this transition temperature by measuring a power-law decay of the autocorrelation function and a loss of ergodicity via fiber-optic quasi-elastic light scattering. The structure at T* is measured using small-angle neutron scattering. The scattering intensity is fit to extract the interparticle pair-potential using the Ornstein-Zernike equation with the Percus-Yevick closure approximation, assuming a square-well interaction potential with a short-range interaction (1% of particle diameter). (1) The strength of attraction is characterized using the Baxter temperature (2) and mapped onto the adhesive hard sphere state diagram. The experiments show a continuous dynamical arrest transition line that follows the predicted dynamical percolation line until ϕ ≈ 0.41 where it subtends the predictions toward the mode coupling theory attractive-driven glass line. An alternative analysis of the phase transition through the reduced second virial coefficient B(2)* shows a change in the functional dependence of B(2)* on particle concentration around ϕ ≈ 0.36. We propose this signifies the location of a gel-to-glass transition. The results presented herein differ from those observed for depletion flocculated dispersion of micrometer-sized particles in polymer solutions, where dynamical arrest is a consequence of multicomponent phase separation, suggesting dynamical arrest is sensitive to the physical mechanism of attraction. PMID:22148874

  15. Determination of adhesion between single Aspergillus niger spores in aqueous solutions using an atomic force microscope.

    Wargenau, Andreas; Kwade, Arno

    2010-07-01

    The interaction force between single cells in contact is of high interest in various interdisciplinary fields of biotechnology, for instance, in cultivation or biofilm formation. A method for the determination of adhesion forces between two single Aspergillus niger spores in different aqueous solutions was established in this study. Adhesion force distributions were determined at three different sodium chloride concentrations and two different pH values using an atomic force microscope (AFM). It was pointed out that adhesion data can be described by log-normal density functions, of which corresponding parameters have been estimated. Using the knowledge of distribution shape, the influence of the environmental condition on the mean values of adhesion force could be studied quantitatively. The highest value of 0.95 nN was observed at pH 2.5 and an ionic strength of 0.5 mol L(-1). Decreasing the ionic strength to 0.05 mol L(-1) decreases the adhesion force mean for about 25%. Increasing the pH value to pH 5 at a sodium chloride concentration of 0.154 mol L(-1) entails a decrease of adhesion from 0.88 to 0.56 nN. These results qualitatively agree with the absolute value of the expected surface potential of Aspergillus niger spores, which is much higher at pH 5 and should take more effect at lower concentrations of counterions. PMID:20387816

  16. Dynamic testing of adhesive joints using a shock testing machine

    Aanhold, J.E. van; Weersink, A.F.J.; Ludolphy, J.W.L.

    1998-01-01

    A light-weight shock testing machine, designed for type approval testing of naval equipment up to 300 kg mass, has been modified into a dynamic tensile test rig. This enables to test structural details for high rate dynamic tensile loadings such as occur during underwater shock. The maximum capacity

  17. Molecular dynamics for lateral surface adhesion and peeling behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes on gold surfaces

    Highlights: ► Adhesion and peeling behaviors of SWCNTs are investigated by detailed, fully atomistic MD simulations. ► Adhesion energy of SWCNTs are discussed. ► Dynamical behaviors of SWCNTs in low temperature adhesion are analyzed. ► Adhesion strengths of SWCNTs obtained from MD simulations are compared with the predictions of Hamaker theory and JKR model. - Abstract: Functional gecko-inspired adhesives have attracted a lot of research attention in the last decade. In this work, the lateral surface adhesion and normal peeling-off behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on gold substrates are investigated by performing detailed, fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The effects of the diameter and adhered length of CNTs on the adhesive properties were systematically examined. The simulation results indicate that adhesion energies between the SWCNTs and the Au surface varied from 220 to 320 mJ m−2 over the reported chirality range. The adhesion forces on the lateral surface and the tip of the nanotubes obtained from MD simulations agree very well with the predictions of Hamaker theory and Johnson–Kendall–Roberts (JKR) model. The analyses of covalent bonds indicate that the SWCNTs exhibited excellent flexibility and extensibility when adhering at low temperatures (∼100 K). This mechanism substantially increases adhesion time compared to that obtained at higher temperatures (300–700 K), which makes SWCNTs promising for biomimetic adhesives in ultra-low temperature surroundings.

  18. Molecular dynamics for lateral surface adhesion and peeling behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes on gold surfaces

    Huang, Pei-Hsing, E-mail: phh@mail.npust.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Pingtung 912, Taiwan (China)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adhesion and peeling behaviors of SWCNTs are investigated by detailed, fully atomistic MD simulations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adhesion energy of SWCNTs are discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamical behaviors of SWCNTs in low temperature adhesion are analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adhesion strengths of SWCNTs obtained from MD simulations are compared with the predictions of Hamaker theory and JKR model. - Abstract: Functional gecko-inspired adhesives have attracted a lot of research attention in the last decade. In this work, the lateral surface adhesion and normal peeling-off behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on gold substrates are investigated by performing detailed, fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The effects of the diameter and adhered length of CNTs on the adhesive properties were systematically examined. The simulation results indicate that adhesion energies between the SWCNTs and the Au surface varied from 220 to 320 mJ m{sup -2} over the reported chirality range. The adhesion forces on the lateral surface and the tip of the nanotubes obtained from MD simulations agree very well with the predictions of Hamaker theory and Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model. The analyses of covalent bonds indicate that the SWCNTs exhibited excellent flexibility and extensibility when adhering at low temperatures ({approx}100 K). This mechanism substantially increases adhesion time compared to that obtained at higher temperatures (300-700 K), which makes SWCNTs promising for biomimetic adhesives in ultra-low temperature surroundings.

  19. Assessment of Fevicol (adhesive Drying Process through Dynamic Speckle Techniques

    Mohammad Z. Ansari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic laser speckle (or biospeckle analysis is a useful measurement tool to analyze micro-motion on a sample surface via temporal statistics based on a sequence of speckle images. The aim of this work was to evaluate the use of dynamic speckles as an alternative tool to monitoring Fevicol drying process. Experimental demonstration of intensity-based algorithm to monitor Fevicol drying process is reported. The experiment was explored with the technique called Inertia Moment of co-occurrence matrix. The results allowed verifying the drying process and it was possible to observe different activity stages during the drying process. Statistical Tukey test at 5% significance level allowed differentiating different stages of drying. In conclusion, speckle activity, measured by the Inertia Moment, can be used to monitor drying processes of the Fevicol.

  20. Dynamic Regulation of Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule–mediated Homotypic Cell Adhesion through the Actin CytoskeletonV⃞

    Nelissen, Judith M. D. T.; Peters, Inge M.; de Grooth, Bart G.; Van Kooyk, Yvette; Figdor, Carl G.

    2000-01-01

    Restricted expression of activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) by hematopoietic cells suggests an important role in the immune system and hematopoiesis. To get insight into the mechanisms that control ALCAM-mediated adhesion we have investigated homotypic ALCAM–ALCAM interactions. Here, we demonstrate that the cytoskeleton regulates ALCAM-mediated cell adhesion because inhibition of actin polymerization by cytochalasin D (CytD) strongly induces homotypic ALCAM–ALCAM interactions....

  1. Conformational Dynamics of the Focal Adhesion Targeting Domain Control Specific Functions of Focal Adhesion Kinase in Cells

    Kadaré, Gress

    2015-01-02

    Focal adhesion (FA) kinase (FAK) regulates cell survival and motility by transducing signals from membrane receptors. The C-terminal FA targeting (FAT) domain of FAK fulfils multiple functions, including recruitment to FAs through paxillin binding. Phosphorylation of FAT on Tyr925 facilitates FA disassembly and connects to the MAPK pathway through Grb2 association, but requires dissociation of the first helix (H1) of the four-helix bundle of FAT. We investigated the importance of H1 opening in cells by comparing the properties of FAK molecules containing wild-type or mutated FAT with impaired or facilitated H1 openings. These mutations did not alter the activation of FAK, but selectively affected its cellular functions, including self-association, Tyr925 phosphorylation, paxillin binding, and FA targeting and turnover. Phosphorylation of Tyr861, located between the kinase and FAT domains, was also enhanced by the mutation that opened the FAT bundle. Similarly phosphorylation of Ser910 by ERK in response to bombesin was increased by FAT opening. Although FAK molecules with the mutation favoring FAT opening were poorly recruited at FAs, they efficiently restored FA turnover and cell shape in FAK-deficient cells. In contrast, the mutation preventing H1 opening markedly impaired FAK function. Our data support the biological importance of conformational dynamics of the FAT domain and its functional interactions with other parts of the molecule.

  2. SPH modeling of adhesion in fast dynamics: Application to the Cold Spray process

    Profizi, Paul; Combescure, Alain; Ogawa, Kahuziro

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to show, in a specific case, the importance of modeling adhesive forces when simulating the bouncing of very small particles impacting a substrate at high speed. The implementation of this model into a fast-dynamics SPH code is described. Taking the example of an impacted elastic cylinder, we show that the adhesive forces, which are surface forces, play a significant role only if the particles are sufficiently small. The effect of the choice of the type of interaction law in the cohesive zone is studied and some conclusions on the relevance of the modeling of the adhesive forces for fast-dynamics impacts are drawn. Then, the adhesion model is used to simulate the Cold Spray process. An aluminum particle is projected against a substrate made of the same material at a velocity ranging from 200 to 1000 m ṡs-1. We study the effects of the various modeling assumptions on the final result: bouncing or sticking. Increasingly complex models are considered. At a 200 m ṡs-1 impact velocity, elastic behavior is assumed, the substrate being simply supported at its base and supplied with absorbing boundaries. The same absorbing boundaries are also used for all the other simulations. Then, plasticity is introduced and the impact velocity is increased up to 1000 m ṡs-1. At the highest velocities, the resulting strains are very significant. The calculations show that if the adhesion model is appropriately chosen, it is possible to reproduce the experimental observations: the particles stick to the substrate in a range of impact velocities surrounded by two velocity ranges in which the particles bounce.

  3. Metastable states and activated dynamics in thin-film adhesion to patterned surfaces

    Lindström, Stefan B.; Johansson, Lars; Karlsson, Nils R.

    2014-01-01

    We consider adhesion due to London–van der Waals attraction between a thin film and a patterned surface with nanometer asperities. Depending on the surface topography and the stiffness of the film, three regimes of adhesion are identified: complete contact adhesion, partial contact adhesion, and glassy adhesion. For complete contact adhesion, the film conforms to the undulations of the surface, whereas for partial contact and glassy adhesion, the adhesive interface breaks down into microscopi...

  4. Dynamic Switch Between Two Adhesion Phenotypes in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    Geng, Yue; Chandrasekaran, Siddarth; Agastin, Sivaprakash; Li, Jiahe; King, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    The hematogenous metastatic cascade is mediated by the interaction of cancer cells and the endothelial cell lining of blood vessels. In this work, we examine the colon cancer cell line COLO 205, which grows simultaneously in both adherent and suspended states in culture and can serve as a good model for studying tumor heterogeneity. The two subpopulations of cells have different molecular characteristics despite being from the same parent cell line. We found that the ratio of adherent to suspended cells in culture is maintained at 7:3 (equilibrium ratio). The ratio was maintained even when we separate the two populations and culture them separately. After 8 h in culture the equilibrium was achieved only from either adherent or suspended population. The adherent cells were found to express less E-selectin binding glycans and demonstrated significantly weaker interaction with E-selectin under flow than the suspended cells. Manipulation of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers β-catenin and E-cadherin expression, either by siRNA knockdown of β-catenin or incubation with E-cadherin antibody-coated microbeads, shifted the ratio of adherent to suspended cells to 9:1. Interestingly, human plasma supplemented media shifted the ratio of adherent to suspended cells in the opposite direction to 1:9, favoring the suspended state. The dynamic COLO 205 population switch presents unique differential phenotypes of their subpopulations and could serve as a good model for studying cell heterogeneity and the EMT process in vitro. PMID:24575161

  5. Changes in membrane sphingolipid composition modulate dynamics and adhesion of integrin nanoclusters.

    Eich, Christina; Manzo, Carlo; de Keijzer, Sandra; Bakker, Gert-Jan; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; García-Parajo, Maria F; Cambi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Sphingolipids are essential constituents of the plasma membrane (PM) and play an important role in signal transduction by modulating clustering and dynamics of membrane receptors. Changes in lipid composition are therefore likely to influence receptor organisation and function, but how this precisely occurs is difficult to address given the intricacy of the PM lipid-network. Here, we combined biochemical assays and single molecule dynamic approaches to demonstrate that the local lipid environment regulates adhesion of integrin receptors by impacting on their lateral mobility. Induction of sphingomyelinase (SMase) activity reduced sphingomyelin (SM) levels by conversion to ceramide (Cer), resulting in impaired integrin adhesion and reduced integrin mobility. Dual-colour imaging of cortical actin in combination with single molecule tracking of integrins showed that this reduced mobility results from increased coupling to the actin cytoskeleton brought about by Cer formation. As such, our data emphasizes a critical role for the PM local lipid composition in regulating the lateral mobility of integrins and their ability to dynamically increase receptor density for efficient ligand binding in the process of cell adhesion. PMID:26869100

  6. Adhesion kinetics of human primary monocytes, dendritic cells, and macrophages: Dynamic cell adhesion measurements with a label-free optical biosensor and their comparison with end-point assays.

    Orgovan, Norbert; Ungai-Salánki, Rita; Lukácsi, Szilvia; Sándor, Noémi; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Erdei, Anna; Szabó, Bálint; Horvath, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs), and macrophages (MFs) are closely related immune cells that differ in their main functions. These specific functions are, to a considerable degree, determined by the differences in the adhesion behavior of the cells. To study the inherently and essentially dynamic aspects of the adhesion of monocytes, DCs, and MFs, dynamic cell adhesion assays were performed with a high-throughput label-free optical biosensor [Epic BenchTop (BT)] on surfaces coated with either fibrinogen (Fgn) or the biomimetic copolymer PLL-g-PEG-RGD. Cell adhesion profiles typically reached their maximum at ∼60 min after cell seeding, which was followed by a monotonic signal decrease, indicating gradually weakening cell adhesion. According to the biosensor response, cell types could be ordered by increasing adherence as monocytes, MFs, and DCs. Notably, all three cell types induced a larger biosensor signal on Fgn than on PLL-g-PEG-RGD. To interpret this result, the molecular layers were characterized by further exploiting the potentials of the biosensor: by measuring the adsorption signal induced during the surface coating procedure, the authors could estimate the surface density of adsorbed molecules and, thus, the number of binding sites potentially presented for the adhesion receptors. Surfaces coated with PLL-g-PEG-RGD presented less RGD sites, but was less efficient in promoting cell spreading than those coated with Fgn; hence, other binding sites in Fgn played a more decisive role in determining cell adherence. To support the cell adhesion data obtained with the biosensor, cell adherence on Fgn-coated surfaces 30-60 min after cell seeding was measured with three complementary techniques, i.e., with (1) a fluorescence-based classical adherence assay, (2) a shear flow chamber applying hydrodynamic shear stress to wash cells away, and (3) an automated micropipette using vacuum-generated fluid flow to lift cells up. These techniques confirmed the results

  7. In vitro adhesion of staphylococci to diamond-like carbon polymer hybrids under dynamic flow conditions.

    Soininen, Antti; Levon, Jaakko; Katsikogianni, Maria; Myllymaa, Katja; Lappalainen, Reijo; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Kinnari, Teemu J; Tiainen, Veli-Matti; Missirlis, Yannis

    2011-03-01

    This study compares the ability of selected materials to inhibit adhesion of two bacterial strains commonly implicated in implant-related infections. These two strains are Staphylococcus aureus (S-15981) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 35984). In experiments we tested six different materials, three conventional implant metals: titanium, tantalum and chromium, and three diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings: DLC, DLC-polydimethylsiloxane hybrid (DLC-PDMS-h) and DLC-polytetrafluoroethylene hybrid (DLC-PTFE-h) coatings. DLC coating represents extremely hard material whereas DLC hybrids represent novel nanocomposite coatings. The two DLC polymer hybrid films were chosen for testing due to their hardness, corrosion resistance and extremely good non-stick (hydrophobic and oleophobic) properties. Bacterial adhesion assay tests were performed under dynamic flow conditions by using parallel plate flow chambers (PPFC). The results show that adhesion of S. aureus to DLC-PTFE-h and to tantalum was significantly (P coating showed as low susceptibility to S. aureus adhesion as all the tested conventional implant metals. The adherence of S. epidermidis to biomaterials was not significantly (P coating without increasing the risk of implant-related infections. PMID:21243516

  8. Influence of Copolyester Composition on Adhesion to Soda-Lime Glass via Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Hanson, Ben; Hofmann, John; Pasquinelli, Melissa A

    2016-06-01

    Copolyesters are a subset of polymers that have the desirable properties of strength and clarity while retaining chemical resistance, and are thus potential candidates for enhancing the impact resistance of soda-lime glass. Adhesion between the polymer and the glass relates to the impact performance of the system, as well as the longevity of the bond between the polymer and the glass under various conditions. Modifying the types of diols and diacids present in the copolyester provides a method for fine-tuning the physical properties of the polymer. In this study, we used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to examine the influence of the chemical composition of the polymers on adhesion of polymer film laminates to two soda-lime glass surfaces, one tin-rich and one oxygen-rich. By calculating properties such as adhesion energies and contact angles, these results provide insights into how the polymer-glass interaction is impacted by the polymer composition, temperature, and other factors such as the presence of free volume or pi stacking. These results can be used to optimize the adhesion of copolyester films to glass surfaces. PMID:27206103

  9. Neutrophil surface adhesion molecule and toll like receptor dynamics in crossbred cows suffering from Staphylococcus aureus subclinical and clinical mastitis

    Dilip Kumar Swain

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Host elicits stage specific expression of surface adhesion molecules and TLR2 and TLR4 as dynamic host innate immune response against Staphylococcal mastitis. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2016; 3(2.000: 99-105

  10. Dynamic adhesive force measurements under vertical and horizontal motions of interacting rough surfaces.

    Yeo, Chang-Dong; Lee, Sung-Chang; Polycarpou, Andreas A

    2008-01-01

    An instrument to measure dynamic adhesive forces between interacting rough surfaces has been developed. It consists of four parts, namely, main instrument body, vertical positioning system with both micrometer and nanometer positioning accuracies, horizontal positioning system with nanometer positioning accuracy, and custom-built high-resolution, and high dynamic bandwidth capacitive force transducer. The vertical piezoelectric actuator (PZT) controls the vertical (approaching and retracting) motion of the upper specimen, while the horizontal PZT controls the horizontal (reciprocal) motion of the lower specimen. The force transducer is placed in line with the upper specimen and vertical PZT, and directly measures the adhesive forces with a root-mean-square load resolution of 1.7 microN and a dynamic bandwidth of 1.7 kHz. The newly developed instrument enables reliable measurements of near-contact and contact adhesive forces for microscale devices under different dynamic conditions. Using the developed instrument, dynamic pull-in and pull-off force measurements were performed between an aluminum-titanium-carbide sphere and a 10 nm thick carbon film disk sample. Three different levels of contact force were investigated; where for each contact force level the vertical velocity of the upper sample was varied from 0.074 to 5.922 microms, while the lower sample was stationary. It was found that slower approaching and retracting velocities result in higher pull-in and pull-off forces. The noncontact attractive force was also measured during horizontal movement of the lower sample, and it was found that the periodic movements of the lower disk sample also affect the noncontact surface interactions. PMID:18248070

  11. Receding dynamics of contact lines and size-dependent adhesion on microstructured hydrophobic surfaces.

    Li, Dandan; Xue, Yahui; Lv, Pengyu; Huang, Shenglin; Lin, Hao; Duan, Huiling

    2016-05-14

    The microstructure size on textured surfaces of a given solid fraction exhibits an important effect on their properties. To understand the size effect on surface adhesion, we study the receding dynamics of the microscopic three-phase contact lines, the adhesive properties, and the relation between them on microstructured surfaces. Two types of surfaces are used, which are micropillar and micropore, respectively. First, the receding process of the contact line is directly observed by laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), which shows distinct characteristics on the two types of surfaces. The micro contact line experiences pinnning, sliding, and rupture on micropillar-patterned surfaces while no rupture occurs on micropore-patterned surfaces. The three-dimensional morphology of the micromeniscus on the micropillared surfaces and the two-dimensional scanning of the cross-sections of the micromeniscus along the diagonal direction are imaged. Based on the images, the local contact angles around the micropillar at the receding front, and the curvatures of the micro-meniscus are obtained. Then, the adhesive force on these surfaces is measured, which surprisingly shows an increasing trend with the size of the microstructure for micropillared surfaces but no obvious size dependence for micropored surfaces. Wetting hysteresis is also measured to testify the similar trend with the size for the two types of surfaces. Further investigation shows that the monotonic increase of the adhesive force with the increasing size of micropillars is due to the growing difficulty of the detachment of the contact lines. The underlying mechanism responsible for the size dependence of the adhesive force is the enhancement of the local reduced pressure exerted on the top of the micropillar with increasing size, resulting from the concave profile of the outer micromeniscus. PMID:27072295

  12. Angiogenin enhances cell migration by regulating stress fiber assembly and focal adhesion dynamics.

    Saisai Wei

    Full Text Available Angiogenin (ANG acts on both vascular endothelial cells and cancer cells, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we carried out a co-immunoprecipitation assay in HeLa cells and identified 14 potential ANG-interacting proteins. Among these proteins, β-actin, α-actinin 4, and non-muscle myosin heavy chain 9 are stress fiber components and involved in cytoskeleton organization and movement, which prompted us to investigate the mechanism of action of ANG in cell migration. Upon confirmation of the interactions between ANG and the three proteins, further studies revealed that ANG co-localized with β-actin and α-actinin 4 at the leading edge of migrating cells. Down-regulation of ANG resulted in fewer but thicker stress fibers with less dynamics, which was associated with the enlargements of focal adhesions. The focal adhesion kinase activity and cell migration capacity were significantly decreased in ANG-deficient cells. Taken together, our data demonstrated that the existence of ANG in the cytoplasm optimizes stress fiber assembly and focal adhesion formation to accommodate cell migration. The finding that ANG promoted cancer cell migration might provide new clues for tumor metastasis research.

  13. Decipher the dynamic coordination between enzymatic activity and structural modulation at focal adhesions in living cells

    Lu, Shaoying; Seong, Jihye; Wang, Yi; Chang, Shiou-Chi; Eichorst, John Paul; Ouyang, Mingxing; Li, Julie Y.-S.; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao

    2014-07-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are dynamic subcellular structures crucial for cell adhesion, migration and differentiation. It remains an enigma how enzymatic activities in these local complexes regulate their structural remodeling in live cells. Utilizing biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we developed a correlative FRET imaging microscopy (CFIM) approach to quantitatively analyze the subcellular coordination between the enzymatic Src activation and the structural FA disassembly. CFIM reveals that the Src kinase activity only within the microdomain of lipid rafts at the plasma membrane is coupled with FA dynamics. FA disassembly at cell periphery was linearly dependent on this raft-localized Src activity, although cells displayed heterogeneous levels of response to stimulation. Within lipid rafts, the time delay between Src activation and FA disassembly was 1.2 min in cells seeded on low fibronectin concentration ([FN]) and 4.3 min in cells on high [FN]. CFIM further showed that the level of Src-FA coupling, as well as the time delay, was regulated by cell-matrix interactions, as a tight enzyme-structure coupling occurred in FA populations mediated by integrin αvβ3, but not in those by integrin α5β1. Therefore, different FA subpopulations have distinctive regulation mechanisms between their local kinase activity and structural FA dynamics.

  14. Determining dynamical equations is hard

    Cubitt, Toby S; Wolf, Michael M

    2010-01-01

    The behaviour of any physical system is governed by its underlying dynamical equations--the differential equations describing how the system evolves with time--and much of physics is ultimately concerned with discovering these dynamical equations and understanding their consequences. At the end of the day, any such dynamical law is identified by making measurements at different times, and computing the dynamical equation consistent with the acquired data. In this work, we show that, remarkably, this process is a provably computationally intractable problem (technically, it is NP-hard). That is, even for a moderately complex system, no matter how accurately we have specified the data, discovering its dynamical equations can take an infeasibly long time (unless P=NP). As such, we find a complexity-theoretic solution to both the quantum and the classical embedding problems; the classical version is a long-standing open problem, dating from 1937, which we finally lay to rest.

  15. Behind adhesion of uranyl onto montmorillonite surface: A molecular dynamics study

    Highlights: • We investigated the adsorption of uranyl onto Montmorillonite surface. • We studied the surface energy between layered Montmorillonite sheets. • We studied the work of adhesion between radionuclide and charged Montmorillonite. -- Abstract: We have performed molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the adsorption of radionuclide elements species onto substituted Montmorillonite (001) surface in the presence of different counterions. The structure and the dynamics of uranyl ion as well as its aquo, chloride ion, and carbonate complexes are analyzed. In addition, we have studied the surface energy between layered Montmorillonite sheets and the work of adhesion between radionuclide and charged Montmorillonite. The clay model used here is a Wyoming-type Montmorillonite with 0.75e negative charge per unit cell resulting from substitutions in Octahedral and Tetrahedral sheets. The system model was constructed based on CLAYFF force field potential model. To evaluate the thermodynamic work of adhesion, each surface and clay layer regions are converted to a thin film model. One and two species of radionuclide elements (UO2(H2O)5,UO2CO3(H2O)5, and UO2Cl2(H2O)5) were deposited near the clay surface in a pseudo-two-dimensional periodic cell. Analysis shows that the uranyl ion structure is preserved with two axial oxygen atoms detected at 1.8 Å. Radial distribution functions results indicate that average U-Ow distances are 2.45–2.61 Å, and 2.29–2.40 Å for U-Oc distance. Average U-Cl distances are 2.78–3.08 Å, which is relatively larger than that of Uranium atom-Oxygen atom because of electrostatic factors

  16. The Integrated Role of Wnt/β-Catenin, N-Glycosylation, and E-Cadherin-Mediated Adhesion in Network Dynamics.

    Vargas, Diego A; Sun, Meng; Sadykov, Khikmet; Kukuruzinska, Maria A; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2016-07-01

    The cellular network composed of the evolutionarily conserved metabolic pathways of protein N-glycosylation, Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion plays pivotal roles in determining the balance between cell proliferation and intercellular adhesion during development and in maintaining homeostasis in differentiated tissues. These pathways share a highly conserved regulatory molecule, β-catenin, which functions as both a structural component of E-cadherin junctions and as a co-transcriptional activator of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, whose target is the N-glycosylation-regulating gene, DPAGT1. Whereas these pathways have been studied independently, little is known about the dynamics of their interaction. Here we present the first numerical model of this network in MDCK cells. Since the network comprises a large number of molecules with varying cell context and time-dependent levels of expression, it can give rise to a wide range of plausible cellular states that are difficult to track. Using known kinetic parameters for individual reactions in the component pathways, we have developed a theoretical framework and gained new insights into cellular regulation of the network. Specifically, we developed a mathematical model to quantify the fold-change in concentration of any molecule included in the mathematical representation of the network in response to a simulated activation of the Wnt/ β-catenin pathway with Wnt3a under different conditions. We quantified the importance of protein N-glycosylation and synthesis of the DPAGT1 encoded enzyme, GPT, in determining the abundance of cytoplasmic β-catenin. We confirmed the role of axin in β-catenin degradation. Finally, our data suggest that cell-cell adhesion is insensitive to E-cadherin recycling in the cell. We validate the model by inhibiting β-catenin-mediated activation of DPAGT1 expression and predicting changes in cytoplasmic β-catenin concentration and stability

  17. Determination of adhesion between thermoplastic and liquid silicone rubbers in hard-soft-combinations via mechanical peeling test

    Kühr, C.; Spörrer, A.; Altstädt, V.

    2014-05-01

    The production of hard-soft-combinations via multi injection molding gained more and more importance in the last years. This is attributed to different factors. One principle reason is that the use of two-component injection molding technique has many advantages such as cancelling subsequent and complex steps and shortening the process chain. Furthermore this technique allows the combination of the properties of the single components like the high stiffness of the hard component and the elastic properties of the soft component. Because of the incompatibility of some polymers the adhesion on the interface has to be determined. Thereby adhesion is not only influenced by the applied polymers, but also by the injection molding parameters and the characteristics of the mold. Besides already known combinations of thermoplastics with thermoplastic elastomers (TPE), there consists the possibility to apply liquid silicone rubber (LSR) as soft component. A thermoplastic/LSR combination gains in importance due to the specific advantages of LSR to TPE. The faintly adhesion between LSR and thermoplastics is currently one of the key challenges when dealing with those combinations. So it is coercively necessary to improve adhesion between the two components by adding an adhesion promoter. To determine the promoters influence, it is necessary to develop a suitable testing method to investigate e.g. the peel resistance. The current German standard "VDI Richtlinie 2019', which is actually only employed for thermoplastic/TPE combinations, can serve as a model to determine the adhesion of thermoplastic/LSR combinations.

  18. Determination of carbon fiber adhesion to thermoplastic polymers using the single fiber/matrix tensile test

    Bascom, W. D.; Cordner, L. W.; Hinkley, J. L.; Johnston, N. J.

    1986-01-01

    The single fiber adhesion shear test has been adapted to testing the adhesion between carbon fiber and thermoplastic polymers. Tests of three thermoplastics, polycarbonate, polyphenylene oxide and polyetherimide indicate the shear adhesion strength is significantly less than of an epoxy polymer to the same carbon fiber.

  19. A role for the juxtamembrane cytoplasm in the molecular dynamics of focal adhesions.

    Haguy Wolfenson

    Full Text Available Focal adhesions (FAs are specialized membrane-associated multi-protein complexes that link the cell to the extracellular matrix and play crucial roles in cell-matrix sensing. Considerable information is available on the complex molecular composition of these sites, yet the regulation of FA dynamics is largely unknown. Based on a combination of FRAP studies in live cells, with in silico simulations and mathematical modeling, we show that the FA plaque proteins paxillin and vinculin exist in four dynamic states: an immobile FA-bound fraction, an FA-associated fraction undergoing exchange, a juxtamembrane fraction experiencing attenuated diffusion, and a fast-diffusing cytoplasmic pool. The juxtamembrane region surrounding FAs displays a gradient of FA plaque proteins with respect to both concentration and dynamics. Based on these findings, we propose a new model for the regulation of FA dynamics in which this juxtamembrane domain acts as an intermediary layer, enabling an efficient regulation of FA formation and reorganization.

  20. Rigid multibody simulation of a helix-like structure: the dynamics of bacterial adhesion pili.

    Zakrisson, Johan; Wiklund, Krister; Servin, Martin; Axner, Ove; Lacoursière, Claude; Andersson, Magnus

    2015-07-01

    We present a coarse-grained rigid multibody model of a subunit assembled helix-like polymer, e.g., adhesion pili expressed by bacteria, that is capable of describing the polymer's force-extension response. With building blocks representing individual subunits, the model appropriately describes the complex behavior of pili expressed by the gram-negative uropathogenic Escherichia coli bacteria under the action of an external force. Numerical simulations show that the dynamics of the model, which include the effects of both unwinding and rewinding, are in good quantitative agreement with the characteristic force-extension response as observed experimentally for type 1 and P pili. By tuning the model, it is also possible to reproduce the force-extension response in the presence of anti-shaft antibodies, which dramatically changes the mechanical properties. Thus, the model and results in this work give enhanced understanding of how a pilus unwinds under the action of external forces and provide a new perspective of the complex bacterial adhesion processes. PMID:25851543

  1. Circulating cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules in normal pregnancy and preeclampsia determined by multiplex suspension array

    Bekő Gabriella

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preeclampsia is a severe complication of pregnancy characterized by an excessive maternal systemic inflammatory response with activation of both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules are central to innate and adaptive immune processes. The purpose of this study was to determine circulating levels of cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules in normal pregnancy and preeclampsia in a comprehensive manner, and to investigate their relationship to the clinical features and laboratory parameters of the study participants, including markers of overall inflammation (C-reactive protein, endothelial activation (von Willebrand factor antigen and endothelial injury (fibronectin, oxidative stress (malondialdehyde and trophoblast debris (cell-free fetal DNA. Results Serum levels of interleukin (IL-1beta, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-18, interferon (IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha, transforming growth factor (TGF-beta1, interferon-gamma-inducible protein (IP-10, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1 were measured in 60 preeclamptic patients, 60 healthy pregnant women and 59 healthy non-pregnant women by multiplex suspension array and ELISA. In normal pregnancy, the relative abundance of circulating IL-18 over IL-12p70 and the relative deficiency of the bioactive IL-12p70 in relation to IL-12p40 might favour Th2-type immunity. Although decreased IL-1ra, TNF-alpha and MCP-1 concentrations of healthy pregnant relative to non-pregnant women reflect anti-inflammatory changes in circulating cytokine profile, their decreased serum IL-10 and increased IP-10 levels might drive pro-inflammatory responses. In addition to a shift towards Th1-type immunity (expressed by the increased IL-2/IL-4 and IFN-gamma/IL-4 ratios, circulating levels of

  2. Influence of nitric laser (ultraviolet) on dynamics of adhesion formation in peritoneum

    The investigation of adhesion formation in peritoneums after ultraviolet laser irradiation was carried out by morphological methods. It was revealed that ultraviolet laser irradiation prevents the adhesion formation, because this laser decreases the rate of the proliferation of mesotheliomas. This phenomenon may be used for the prophylaxis of adhesions formation. (author)

  3. Pulse voltage determination for electrostatic micro manipulation considering surface conductivity and adhesion of glass particle

    Ryo Fujiwara

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A model with surface conductivity and adhesional force is proposed to investigate the mechanism for electrostatic micro manipulation of a dielectric object using a single probe. The manipulation system consists of three elements: a conductive probe as a manipulator, a conductive plate as a substrate, and a dielectric particle as the target object for manipulation. The particle can be successfully picked up/placed if a rectangular pulse voltage is applied between the probe and the plate. The reliability of the picking up/placing operation is improved by applying a pulse voltage that is determined by a theoretical model considering surface conductivity and adhesion. To verify the theoretical prediction, manipulation experiment is conducted using soda-lime glass particles with radii of 20 μm and 40 μm.

  4. Simultaneous determination of protein structure and dynamics

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Best, Robert B.; DePristo, M. A.;

    2005-01-01

    We present a protocol for the experimental determination of ensembles of protein conformations that represent simultaneously the native structure and its associated dynamics. The procedure combines the strengths of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy-for obtaining experimental information at...

  5. Determining the Resistance to Delamination of Wood Adhesives using a Vacuum Pressure Impregnation Method

    Mills, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The thesis was completed for the Research and Development (R&D) laboratory at Kiilto Oy. The purpose of the thesis was to study the delamination of glued solid timber and glulam, glued with moisture cured one component polyurethane adhesives (1K PUR) and an emulsion polymer isocyanate adhesive (EPI) using the new easyQ DLA appliance. Delamination is the failure of the adhesive layer between wood lamellae, used to produce glued solid timber and glued laminated timber (glulam). Delamination ...

  6. Atraumatic Pulsatile Leukocyte Circulation for Long-Term In Vitro Dynamic Culture and Adhesion Assays.

    Mazza, Giulia; Stoiber, Martin; Pfeiffer, Dagmar; Schima, Heinrich

    2015-11-01

    Low flow rate pumping of cell suspensions finds current applications in bioreactors for short-term dynamic cell culture and adhesion assays. The aim of this study was to develop an atraumatic pump and hemodynamically adapted test circuit to allow operating periods of at least several hours. A computer-controlled mini-pump (MP) was constructed based on non-occlusive local compression of an elastic tube with commercial bi-leaflet valves directing the pulsatile flow into a compliant circuit. Cell damage and activation in the system were tested with whole blood in comparison with a set with a conventional peristaltic pump (PP). Activation of circulating THP-1 monocytes was tested by measuring the expression of CD54 (ICAM-1). Additionally, monocyte-endothelial interactions were monitored using a parallel-plate flow chamber with an artificial stenosis. The system required a priming volume of only 20 mL, delivering a peak pulsatile flow of up to 35 mL/min. After 8 h, blood hemolysis was significantly lower for MP with 11 ± 3 mg/dL compared with PP with 100 ± 16 mg/dL. CD142 (tissue factor) expression on blood monocytes was 50% lower for MP. With MP, THP-1 cells could be pumped for extended periods (17 h), with no enhanced expression of CD54 permitting the long-term co-culture of THP-1 with endothelial cells and the analysis of flow pattern effects on cell adhesion. A low-damage assay setup was developed, which allows the pulsatile flow of THP-1 cells and investigation of their interaction with other cells or surfaces for extended periods of time. PMID:25894522

  7. Universal relationships to determine adhesion energy from vesicle-substrate interactions

    Irajizad, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion molecules play an integral role in diverse biological functions ranging from cellular growth to transport. Estimation of their binding affinity, therefore, becomes important to quantify their biophysical impact on these phenomena. In this paper, we use curvature elasticity to present non-intuitive, yet remarkably simple, universal relationships to tease out adhesion energy from vesicle-substrate experiments. Our study reveals that the inverse of the height, exponential of the contact area, and the force required to detach the vesicle from the substrate vary linearly with the square root of the adhesion energy. We validate the modeling predictions with experimental data from two previous studies.

  8. An Ultrasonic Technique to Determine the Residual Strength of Adhesive Bonds

    Achenbach, J. D.; Tang, Z.

    1999-01-01

    In this work, ultrasonic techniques to nondestructively evaluate adhesive bond degradation have been studied. The key to the present approach is the introduction of an external factor which pulls the adhesive bond in the nonlinear range, simultaneously with the application of an ultrasonic technique. With the aid of an external static tensile loading, a superimposed longitudinal wave has.been used to obtain the slopes of the stress-strain curve of an adhesive bond at a series of load levels. The critical load, at which a reduction of the slope is detected by the superimposed longitudinal wave, is an indication of the onset of nonlinear behavior of the adhesive bond, and therefore of bond degradation. This approach has been applied to the detection of adhesive bond degradation induced by cyclic fatigue loading. Analogously to the longitudinal wave case, a superimposed shear wave has been used to obtain the effective shear modulus of adhesive layers at different shear load levels. The onset of the nonlinear behavior of an adhesive bond under shear loading has been detected by the use of a superimposed shear wave. Experiments show that a longitudinal wave can also detect the nonlinear behavior when an adhesive bond is subjected to shear loading. An optimal combination of ultrasonic testing and mechanical loading methods for the detection of degradation related nonlinear behavior of adhesive bonds has been discussed. For the purpose of a practical application, an ultrasonic technique that uses a temperature increase as an alternative to static loading has also been investigated. A general strain-temperature correspondence principle that relates a mechanical strain to a temperature has been presented. Explicit strain-temperature correspondence relations for both the tension and shear cases have been derived. An important parameter which quantifies the relation between the wave velocity and temperature has been defined. This parameter, which is indicative of adhesive

  9. Microhardness and adhesion of TiB sub 2 coatings produced by dynamic ion mixing

    Riviere, J.P.; Guesdon, P. (Lab. de Matallurgie Physique, Faculte des Sciences, 86 - Poitiers (France)); Farges, G.; Degout, D. (Etablissement Technique Central de l' Armement, 94 - Arcueil (France))

    1990-10-01

    The production at room temperature of adherent ceramic coatings on metallic substrates necessitates the improvement of conventional deposition techniques. Ion beam deposition processes using low energy ion beams have proved to be powerful methods for producing a wide variety of surface alloys. More recently, the use of high energy heavy ion beams in coating technology was investigated in order to improve the interface mixing effect and to control the structural state of the coating. We have deposited TiB{sub 2} alloy films on a tool steel via dynamic ion mixing (DIM) using either 320 keV Ar{sup 2+} ions or 320 keV Xe{sup 2+} ions. The depositing atom flux was obtained by sputtering a TiB{sub 2} target with an intense Ar{sup +} ion beam of 1.2 keV delivered by a Kaufman-type ion source. The microstructure of the films was characterized by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. It is recognized that crystallization is induced by DIM and that the interface mixing has a beneficial influence on the adhesion performance of the coating. The relative increase in the Vickers microhardness of the coated tool steel substrate is of the order of 23%. The intrinsic hardness of the 1 {mu}m TiB{sub 2} coatings on these substrates is estimated to about 2200 kgf mm{sup -2} by application of the composite hardness model. (orig.).

  10. Amino-terminal domain of classic cadherins determines the specificity of the adhesive interactions

    Klingelhöfer, Jörg; Troyanovsky, R B; Laur, O Y; Troyanovsky, S

    Classic cadherins are transmembrane receptors involved in cell type-specific calcium-dependent intercellular adhesion. The specificity of adhesion is mediated by homophilic interactions between cadherins extending from opposing cell surfaces. In addition, classic cadherins can self......-associate forming lateral dimers. Whereas it is widely excepted that lateral dimerization of cadherins is critical for adhesion, details of this process are not known. Yet, no evidence for physical association between different classic cadherins in cells expressing complex cadherin patterns has been reported. To...... study lateral and adhesive intercadherin interactions, we examined interactions between two classic cadherins, E- and P-cadherins, in epithelial A-431 cells co-producing both proteins. We showed that these cells exhibited heterocomplexes consisting of laterally assembled E- and P-cadherins. These...

  11. Variability in primary productivity determines metapopulation dynamics

    2016-01-01

    Temporal variability in primary productivity can change habitat quality for consumer species by affecting the energy levels available as food resources. However, it remains unclear how habitat-quality fluctuations may determine the dynamics of spatially structured populations, where the effects of habitat size, quality and isolation have been customarily assessed assuming static habitats. We present the first empirical evaluation on the effects of stochastic fluctuations in primary productivity—a major outcome of ecosystem functions—on the metapopulation dynamics of a primary consumer. A unique 13-year dataset from an herbivore rodent was used to test the hypothesis that inter-annual variations in primary productivity determine spatiotemporal habitat occupancy patterns and colonization and extinction processes. Inter-annual variability in productivity and in the growing season phenology significantly influenced habitat colonization patterns and occupancy dynamics. These effects lead to changes in connectivity to other potentially occupied habitat patches, which then feed back into occupancy dynamics. According to the results, the dynamics of primary productivity accounted for more than 50% of the variation in occupancy probability, depending on patch size and landscape configuration. Evidence connecting primary productivity dynamics and spatiotemporal population processes has broad implications for metapopulation persistence in fluctuating and changing environments. PMID:27053739

  12. Ovarian Cancer Cell Adhesion/Migration Dynamics on Micro-Structured Laminin Gradients Fabricated by Multiphoton Excited Photochemistry

    Ruei-Yu He; Visar Ajeti; Shean-Jen Chen; Brewer, Molly A; Campagnola, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Haptotaxis, i.e., cell migration in response to adhesive gradients, has been previously implicated in cancer metastasis. A better understanding of cell migration dynamics and their regulation could ultimately lead to new drug targets, especially for cancers with poor prognoses, such as ovarian cancer. Haptotaxis has not been well-studied due to the lack of biomimetic, biocompatible models, where, for example, microcontact printing and microfluidics approaches are primarily limited to 2D surfa...

  13. A short-time scale colloidal system reveals early bacterial adhesion dynamics.

    Christophe Beloin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of bacteria on abiotic surfaces has important public health and sanitary consequences. However, despite several decades of study of bacterial adhesion to inert surfaces, the biophysical mechanisms governing this process remain poorly understood, due, in particular, to the lack of methodologies covering the appropriate time scale. Using micrometric colloidal surface particles and flow cytometry analysis, we developed a rapid multiparametric approach to studying early events in adhesion of the bacterium Escherichia coli. This approach simultaneously describes the kinetics and amplitude of early steps in adhesion, changes in physicochemical surface properties within the first few seconds of adhesion, and the self-association state of attached and free-floating cells. Examination of the role of three well-characterized E. coli surface adhesion factors upon attachment to colloidal surfaces--curli fimbriae, F-conjugative pilus, and Ag43 adhesin--showed clear-cut differences in the very initial phases of surface colonization for cell-bearing surface structures, all known to promote biofilm development. Our multiparametric analysis revealed a correlation in the adhesion phase with cell-to-cell aggregation properties and demonstrated that this phenomenon amplified surface colonization once initial cell-surface attachment was achieved. Monitoring of real-time physico-chemical particle surface properties showed that surface-active molecules of bacterial origin quickly modified surface properties, providing new insight into the intricate relations connecting abiotic surface physicochemical properties and bacterial adhesion. Hence, the biophysical analytical method described here provides a new and relevant approach to quantitatively and kinetically investigating bacterial adhesion and biofilm development.

  14. Determination of interfacial adhesion strength between oxide scale and substrate for metallic SOFC interconnects

    Sun, X.; Liu, W. N.; Stephens, E.; Khaleel, M. A.

    The interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and the substrate is crucial to the reliability and durability of metallic interconnects in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) operating environments. It is necessary, therefore, to establish a methodology to quantify the interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and the metallic interconnect substrate, and furthermore to design and optimize the interconnect material as well as the coating materials to meet the design life of an SOFC system. In this paper, we present an integrated experimental/analytical methodology for quantifying the interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and a ferritic stainless steel interconnect. Stair-stepping indentation tests are used in conjunction with subsequent finite element analyses to predict the interfacial strength between the oxide scale and Crofer 22 APU substrate.

  15. Crowdfunding : Determinants of success and funding dynamics

    CROSETTO, Paolo; Regner, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Over the past years crowdfunding emerged as an alternative funding channel for entrepreneurs. In contrast to traditional financiers (banks, venture capital firms or angel investors), crowdfunding allows individuals to fund entrepreneurs directly even with small amounts. We received individual- level data from Startnext, the biggest crowdfunding platform in Germany, enabling us to investigate funding dynamics, explore pledgers' motivations and analyze projects' success determinants. We find su...

  16. Weak scale: Dynamical determination versus accidental stabilization

    Triantaphyllou, George

    2001-01-01

    Is it a mere accident that the weak scale is exactly so much smaller than the Planck scale, and at the same time exactly so much larger than the QCD scale? Or are the experimentally-measured values of the corresponding gauge couplings enough to help us determine dynamically these energy scales? And if nature has indeed offered us the possibility of such a determination, why dismiss it and fix these scales instead by means of arbitrary parameters within a multitude of jejune theoretical framew...

  17. Modeling keratinocyte wound healing dynamics: Cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained collective migration.

    Nardini, John T; Chapnick, Douglas A; Liu, Xuedong; Bortz, David M

    2016-07-01

    The in vitro migration of keratinocyte cell sheets displays behavioral and biochemical similarities to the in vivo wound healing response of keratinocytes in animal model systems. In both cases, ligand-dependent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) activation is sufficient to elicit collective cell migration into the wound. Previous mathematical modeling studies of in vitro wound healing assays assume that physical connections between cells have a hindering effect on cell migration, but biological literature suggests a more complicated story. By combining mathematical modeling and experimental observations of collectively migrating sheets of keratinocytes, we investigate the role of cell-cell adhesion during in vitro keratinocyte wound healing assays. We develop and compare two nonlinear diffusion models of the wound healing process in which cell-cell adhesion either hinders or promotes migration. Both models can accurately fit the leading edge propagation of cell sheets during wound healing when using a time-dependent rate of cell-cell adhesion strength. The model that assumes a positive role of cell-cell adhesion on migration, however, is robust to changes in the leading edge definition and yields a qualitatively accurate density profile. Using RNAi for the critical adherens junction protein, α-catenin, we demonstrate that cell sheets with wild type cell-cell adhesion expression maintain migration into the wound longer than cell sheets with decreased cell-cell adhesion expression, which fails to exhibit collective migration. Our modeling and experimental data thus suggest that cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained migration as cells pull neighboring cells into the wound during wound healing. PMID:27105673

  18. Dynamic bio-adhesion of polymer nanoparticles on MDCK epithelial cells and its impact on bio-membranes, endocytosis and paracytosis

    He, Bing; Yuan, Lan; Dai, Wenbing; Gao, Wei; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xueqing; Fang, Weigang; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays, concern about the use of nanotechnology for biomedical application is unprecedentedly increasing. In fact, nanosystems applied for various potential clinical uses always have to cross the primary biological barrier consisting of epithelial cells. However, little is really known currently in terms of the influence of the dynamic bio-adhesion of nanosystems on bio-membranes as well as on endocytosis and transcytosis. This was investigated here using polymer nanoparticles (PNs) and MDCK epithelial cells as the models. Firstly, the adhesion of PNs on cell membranes was found to be time-dependent with a shift of both location and dispersion pattern, from the lateral adhesion of mainly mono-dispersed PNs initially to the apical coverage of the PN aggregate later. Then, it was interesting to observe in this study that the dynamic bio-adhesion of PNs only affected their endocytosis but not their transcytosis. It was important to find that the endocytosis of PNs was not a constant process. A GM1 dependent CDE (caveolae dependent endocytosis) pathway was dominant in the preliminary stage, followed by the co-existence of a CME (clathrin-mediated endocytosis) pathway for the PN aggregate at a later stage, in accordance with the adhesion features of PNs, suggesting the modification of PN adhesion patterns on the endocytosis pathways. Next, the PN adhesion was noticed to affect the structure of cell junctions, via altering the extra- and intra-cellular calcium levels, leading to the enhanced paracellular transport of small molecules, but not favorably enough for the obviously increased passing of PNs themselves. Finally, FRAP and other techniques all demonstrated the obvious impact of PN adhesion on the membrane confirmation, independent of the adhesion location and time, which might lower the threshold for the internalization of PNs, even their aggregates. Generally, these findings confirm that the transport pathway mechanism of PNs through epithelial cells is rather

  19. Determinants of Welfare Dynamics in Rural Nicaragua

    Jakobsen, Kristian Thor

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the determinants of poverty movements in rural Nicaragua by introducing a bivariate probate model, making it possible to treat the initial state of poverty as endogenous and thus avoiding introducing selection bias. The results indicate that this is relevant when exploring...... welfare dynamics in rural Nicaragua, as initially poor households face a higher probability of being poor in the subsequent period compared with non-poor households. It is also found that household composition, access to non-agriculture wage income and ownership of productive assets are important factors...

  20. The scratch test - Different critical load determination techniques. [adhesive strength of thin hard coatings

    Sekler, J.; Hintermann, H. E.; Steinmann, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    Different critical load determination techniques such as microscopy, acoustic emission, normal, tangential, and lateral forces used for scratch test evaluation of complex or multilayer coatings are investigated. The applicability of the scratch test to newly developed coating techniques, systems, and applications is discussed. Among the methods based on the use of a physical measurement, acoustic emission detection is the most effective. The dynamics ratio between the signals below and above the critical load for the acoustic emission (much greater than 100) is well above that obtained with the normal, tangential, and lateral forces. The present commercial instruments are limited in load application performance. A scratch tester able to apply accurate loads as low as 0.01 N would probably overcome most of the actual limitations and would be expected to extend the scratch testing technique to different application fields such as optics and microelectronics.

  1. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of Adhesion between TATB Surfaces and Amorphous Fluoropolymers

    Gee, R H; Maiti, A; Bastea, S; Fried, L

    2007-01-25

    Atomistic simulations are used to study the adhesion properties of amorphous perfluoro- and fluoro-polymers onto two different crystal surfaces of 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB). Properties of the bulk amorphous polymer melts are also investigated. The fluoropolymers studied in this article include Kel-F 800, Teflon{reg_sign} AF, Hyflon AD{reg_sign}, and Cytop{reg_sign}. Simulations of the bulk polymer melts were performed over a wide range of temperatures including the volumetric glass transition temperature, so as to validate the interaction parameters used. The computed glass transition temperatures and densities compare well with experiment. The solubility parameters for the various polymers also compare well with calculations based on group additive methods. The local molecular structure at the TATB interface, as well as the degree of adhesion varies from one polymer to another. All polymers except Hyflon show a propensity to readily wet the two TATB surfaces studied.

  2. Dynamic characteristics determination using noise analysis

    Using noise analysis techniques dynamical reference properties of selected variables were investigated for 250 kW TRIGA Mark II reactor during normal operation. Reference power spectra of neutron noise of the percent power channel were computed in the frequency band from 0,01 Hz to 100 Hz and operational power dependence was determined. Detailed analyses of neutron noise at very low frequencies between 0,0004 Hz and 0,2 Hz led to the conclusion that using noise analyses characteristical time constants of TRIGA reactor operating at powers from 10 kW to 250 kW can be extracted. For interpreting the experimental results a new stochastical model was developed on the basis of a nonlinear model of the TRIGA reactor. The model enabled simulation of operation at powers from 10 kW to 250 kW during small reactivity insertions. (author)

  3. A method to determine Young's modulus of soft gels for cell adhesion

    Xiaoling Peng; Jianyong Huang; Lei Qin; Chunyang Xiong; Jing Fang

    2009-01-01

    A convenient technique is reported in this note for measuring elastic modulus of extremely soft material for cellular adhesion. Specimens of bending cylinder under gravity are used to avoid contact problem between testing device and sample, and a beam model is presented for evaluating the curvatures of gel beams with large elastic deformation. A self-adaptive algorithm is also proposed to search for the best estimation of gels' elastic moduli by comparing the experimental bending curvatures with those computed from the beam model with preestimated moduli. Application to the measurement of the property of polyacrylamide gels indicates that the material compliance varies with the concentrations of bis-acrylamide, and the gels become softer after being immersed in a culture medium for a period of time, no matter to what extent they are polymerized.

  4. Abdominal Adhesions

    ... adhesions? Abdominal adhesions can cause intestinal obstruction and female infertility—the inability to become pregnant after a year of trying. Abdominal adhesions can lead to female infertility by preventing fertilized eggs from reaching the uterus, ...

  5. Ovarian Cancer Cell Adhesion/Migration Dynamics on Micro-Structured Laminin Gradients Fabricated by Multiphoton Excited Photochemistry

    Ruei-Yu He

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Haptotaxis, i.e., cell migration in response to adhesive gradients, has been previously implicated in cancer metastasis. A better understanding of cell migration dynamics and their regulation could ultimately lead to new drug targets, especially for cancers with poor prognoses, such as ovarian cancer. Haptotaxis has not been well-studied due to the lack of biomimetic, biocompatible models, where, for example, microcontact printing and microfluidics approaches are primarily limited to 2D surfaces and cannot produce the 3D submicron features to which cells respond. Here we used multiphoton excited (MPE phototochemistry to fabricate nano/microstructured gradients of laminin (LN as 2.5D models of the ovarian basal lamina to study the haptotaxis dynamics of a series of ovarian cancer cells. Using these models, we found that increased LN concentration increased migration speed and also alignment of the overall cell morphology and their cytoskeleton along the linear axis of the gradients. Both these metrics were enhanced on LN compared to BSA gradients of the same design, demonstrating the importance of both topographic and ECM cues on the adhesion/migration dynamics. Using two different gradient designs, we addressed the question of the roles of local concentration and slope and found that the specific haptotactic response depends on the cell phenotype and not simply the gradient design. Moreover, small changes in concentration strongly affected the migration properties. This work is a necessary step in studying haptotaxis in more complete 3D models of the tumor microenvironment for ovarian and other cancers.

  6. Proteinaceous determinants of surface colonization in bacteria: Bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation from a protein secretion perspective

    MickaelDesvaux

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial colonization of biotic or abiotic surfaces results from two quite distinct physiological processes, namely bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. Broadly speaking, a biofilm is defined as the sessile development of microbial cells. Biofilm formation arises following bacterial adhesion but not all single bacterial cells adhering reversibly or irreversibly engage inexorably into a sessile mode of growth. Among molecular determinants promoting bacterial colonization, surface proteins are the most functionally diverse active components. To be present on the bacterial cell surface, though, a protein must be secreted in the first place. Considering the close association of secreted proteins with their cognate secretion systems, the secretome (which refers both to the secretion systems and their protein substrates is a key concept to apprehend the protein secretion and related physiological functions. The protein secretion systems are here considered in light of the differences in the cell-envelope architecture between diderm-LPS (archetypal Gram-negative, monoderm (archetypal Gram-positive and diderm-mycolate (archetypal acid-fast bacteria. Besides, their cognate secreted proteins engaged in the bacterial colonization process are regarded from single protein to supramolecular protein structure as well as the non-classical protein secretion. This state-of-the-art on the complement of the secretome (the secretion systems and their cognate effectors involved in the surface colonization process in diderm-LPS and monoderm bacteria paves the way for future research directions in the field.

  7. Method of determining dynamic retention of mesh phase separator

    Давыдов, Сергей Александрович

    2010-01-01

    In given work the engineering design procedure of dynamic retention of mesh phase’s delimiters is presented. This allows to determine functionability of means fuel continuity support in dynamic conditions at a stage of outline designing.

  8. Antiobesity Action of ACAM by Modulating the Dynamics of Cell Adhesion and Actin Polymerization in Adipocytes.

    Murakami, Kazutoshi; Eguchi, Jun; Hida, Kazuyuki; Nakatsuka, Atsuko; Katayama, Akihiro; Sakurai, Miwa; Choshi, Haruki; Furutani, Masumi; Ogawa, Daisuke; Takei, Kohji; Otsuka, Fumio; Wada, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor-like membrane protein (CLMP) was identified as the tight junction-associated transmembrane protein of epithelial cells with homophilic binding activities. CLMP is also recognized as adipocyte adhesion molecule (ACAM), and it is upregulated in mature adipocytes in rodents and humans with obesity. Here, we present that aP2 promoter-driven ACAM transgenic mice are protected from obesity and diabetes with the prominent reduction of adipose tissue mass and smaller size of adipocytes. ACAM is abundantly expressed on plasma membrane of mature adipocytes and associated with formation of phalloidin-positive polymerized form of cortical actin (F-actin). By electron microscopy, the structure of zonula adherens with an intercellular space of ∼10-20 nm was observed with strict parallelism of the adjoining cell membranes over distances of 1-20 μm, where ACAM and γ-actin are abundantly expressed. The formation of zonula adherens may increase the mechanical strength, inhibit the adipocyte hypertrophy, and improve the insulin sensitivity. PMID:26956488

  9. The Exponentially Faster Stick-Slip Dynamics of the Peeling of an Adhesive Tape

    MISHRA, NACHIKETA; Parida, Nigam Chandra; Raha, Soumyendu

    2014-01-01

    The stick-slip dynamics is considered from the nonlinear differential-algebraic equation (DAE) point of view and the peeling dynamics is shown to be a switching differential index DAE model. In the stick-slip regime with bifurcations, the differential index can be arbitrarily high. The time scale of the peeling velocity, the algebraic variable, in this regime is shown to be exponentially faster compared to the angular velocity of the spool and/or the stretch rate of the tape. A homogenization...

  10. MVL-PLA2, a snake venom phospholipase A2, inhibits angiogenesis through an increase in microtubule dynamics and disorganization of focal adhesions.

    Bazaa, Amine; Pasquier, Eddy; Defilles, Céline; Limam, Ines; Kessentini-Zouari, Raoudha; Kallech-Ziri, Olfa; El Battari, Assou; Braguer, Diane; El Ayeb, Mohamed; Marrakchi, Naziha; Luis, José

    2010-01-01

    Integrins are essential protagonists of the complex multi-step process of angiogenesis that has now become a major target for the development of anticancer therapies. We recently reported and characterized that MVL-PLA2, a novel phospholipase A2 from Macrovipera lebetina venom, exhibited anti-integrin activity. In this study, we show that MVL-PLA2 also displays potent anti-angiogenic properties. This phospholipase A2 inhibited adhesion and migration of human microvascular-endothelial cells (HMEC-1) in a dose-dependent manner without being cytotoxic. Using Matrigel and chick chorioallantoic membrane assays, we demonstrated that MVL-PLA2, as well as its catalytically inactivated form, significantly inhibited angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. We have also found that the actin cytoskeleton and the distribution of alphav beta3 integrin, a critical regulator of angiogenesis and a major component of focal adhesions, were disturbed after MVL-PLA2 treatment. In order to further investigate the mechanism of action of this protein on endothelial cells, we analyzed the dynamic instability behavior of microtubules in living endothelial cells. Interestingly, we showed that MVL-PLA2 significantly increased microtubule dynamicity in HMEC-1 cells by 40%. We propose that the enhancement of microtubule dynamics may explain the alterations in the formation of focal adhesions, leading to inhibition of cell adhesion and migration. PMID:20405031

  11. Changes in membrane sphingolipid composition modulate dynamics and adhesion of integrin nanoclusters

    C. Eich (Christina); C. Manzo (Carlo); S. de Keijzer (Sandra); G.J. Bakker (Gert-Jan); I. Reinieren-Beeren (Inge); M.F. García-Parajo (Maria); A. Cambi (Alessandra)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractSphingolipids are essential constituents of the plasma membrane (PM) and play an important role in signal transduction by modulating clustering and dynamics of membrane receptors. Changes in lipid composition are therefore likely to influence receptor organisation and function, but how t

  12. Dynamic strain distribution measurement and crack detection of an adhesive-bonded single-lap joint under cyclic loading using embedded FBG

    In this study, the dynamic strain distribution measurement of an adhesive-bonded single-lap joint was carried out in a cyclic load test using a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor embedded into the adhesive/adherend interface along the overlap length direction. Unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) substrates were bonded by epoxy resin to form the joint, and the FBG sensor was embedded into the surface of one substrate during its curing. The measurement was carried out with a sampling rate of 5 Hz by the sensing system, based on the optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) throughout the test. A finite element analysis (FEA) was performed for the measurement evaluation using a three-dimensional model, which included the embedded FBG sensor. The crack detection method, based on the longitudinal strain distribution measurement, was introduced and performed to estimate the cracks that occurred at the adhesive/adherend interface in the test. (paper)

  13. A Semi-Analytical Method for Determining the Energy Release Rate of Cracks in Adhesively-Bonded Single-Lap Composite Joints

    Yang, Charles; Sun, Wenjun; Tomblin, John S.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2007-01-01

    A semi-analytical method for determining the strain energy release rate due to a prescribed interface crack in an adhesively-bonded, single-lap composite joint subjected to axial tension is presented. The field equations in terms of displacements within the joint are formulated by using first-order shear deformable, laminated plate theory together with kinematic relations and force equilibrium conditions. The stress distributions for the adherends and adhesive are determined after the appropriate boundary and loading conditions are applied and the equations for the field displacements are solved. Based on the adhesive stress distributions, the forces at the crack tip are obtained and the strain energy release rate of the crack is determined by using the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT). Additionally, the test specimen geometry from both the ASTM D3165 and D1002 test standards are utilized during the derivation of the field equations in order to correlate analytical models with future test results. The system of second-order differential field equations is solved to provide the adherend and adhesive stress response using the symbolic computation tool, Maple 9. Finite element analyses using J-integral as well as VCCT were performed to verify the developed analytical model. The finite element analyses were conducted using the commercial finite element analysis software ABAQUS. The results determined using the analytical method correlated well with the results from the finite element analyses.

  14. Characterization of fatigue damage in adhesively bonded lap joints through dynamic, full-spectral interrogation of fiber Bragg grating sensors: 2. Simulations

    In this paper, we simulate the response of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors embedded in the adhesive layer of a composite lap that is subjected to harmonic excitation. To simulate accumulated fatigue damage at the adhesive layer, two forms of numerical nonlinearities are introduced into the model: (1) progressive plastic deformation of the adhesive and (2) changing the boundary of an interfacial defect at the adhesive layer across the overlap shear area. The simulation results are compared with previous measurements of the dynamic, full-spectral response of such FBG sensors for condition monitoring of the lap joint. Short-time Fourier transforms (STFT) of the locally extracted axial strain time histories reveal a transition to nonlinear behavior of the composite lap joint by means of intermittent frequencies that were observed in the experimental measurements and are not associated with the external excitation. The simulation results verify that the nonlinear changes in measured dynamic FBG responses are due to the progression of damage in the lap joint. (paper)

  15. Adhesive Categories

    Lack, Stephen; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2003-01-01

    We introduce adhesive categories, which are categories with structure ensuring that pushouts along monomorphisms are well-behaved. Many types of graphical structures used in computer science are shown to be examples of adhesive categories. Double-pushout graph rewriting generalises well to...... rewriting on arbitrary adhesive categories....

  16. Adhesive Categories

    Lack, Stephen; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2004-01-01

    We introduce adhesive categories, which are categories with structure ensuring that pushouts along monomorphisms are well-behaved. Many types of graphical structures used in computer science are shown to be examples of adhesive categories. Double-pushout graph rewriting generalises well to...... rewriting on arbitrary adhesive categories....

  17. Practical measurements of adhesion and strain for improved optical coatings

    Adhesion and strain are two important physical properties which determine the success or failure of thin-film coatings in optical applications. In this paper we describe the design and operation of a dynamically loaded scratch tester for making measurements of relative adhesive strength, and a modulated transmission ellipsometer for measuring total and internal strain. Numerous examples for coating/substrate systems of interest to optical applications are given

  18. Large-Scale Gas Dynamics in the Adhesion Model: Implications for Massive Galaxy Formation

    Domínguez-Tenreiro, R; Martínez-Serrano, F; Serna, A

    2010-01-01

    The mass assembly and star formation histories of massive galaxies identified at low redshift z in different cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, have been studied through a detailed follow-up backwards in time of their constituent mass elements (sampled by particles) of different types. Then, the configurations they depict at progressively higher zs have been analysed. The analyses show that these histories share common generic patterns, irrespective of particular circumstances. In any case, the results we have found are different depending on the particle type. The most outstanding differences follow. We have found that by z ~ 3.5 - 6, mass elements identified as stellar particles at z=0 exhibit a gaseous cosmic-web-like morphology with scales of ~ 1 physical Mpc, where the densest mass elements have already turned into stars by z ~ 6. These settings are in fact the densest pieces of the cosmic web, where no hot particles show up, and dynamically organized as a hierarchy of flow convergence regions, tha...

  19. Characterization of fatigue damage in adhesively bonded lap joints through dynamic, full-spectral interrogation of fiber Bragg grating sensors: 1. Experiments

    In this study we measure the in situ response of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor embedded in the adhesive layer of a single composite lap joint, subjected to harmonic excitation after fatigue loading. After a fully reversed cyclic fatigue loading is applied to the composite lap joint, the full-spectral response of the sensor is interrogated at 100 kHz during two loading conditions: with and without an added harmonic excitation. The full-spectral information avoided dynamic measurement errors often experienced using conventional peak wavelength and edge filtering techniques. The short-time Fourier transform (STFT) is computed for the extracted peak wavelength information to reveal time-dependent frequencies and amplitudes of the dynamic FBG sensor response. The dynamic response of the FBG sensor indicated a transition to strong nonlinear dynamic behavior as fatigue-induced damage progressed. The ability to measure the dynamic response of the lap joint through sensors embedded in the adhesive layer can provide in situ monitoring of the lap joint condition. (paper)

  20. Surgical adhesives

    I. A. THOMAZINI-SANTOS

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors have performed a literature review of surgical adhesives, such as cyanoacrylate, collagen gelatin, and fibrin glue. They have included different types of commercial and non-commercial fibrin sealants and have reported on the different components in these adhesives, such as fibrinogen, cryoprecipitate, bovine thrombin, and thrombin-like fraction of snake venom.

  1. A stochastic phase-field model determined from molecular dynamics

    von Schwerin, Erik

    2010-03-17

    The dynamics of dendritic growth of a crystal in an undercooled melt is determined by macroscopic diffusion-convection of heat and by capillary forces acting on the nanometer scale of the solid-liquid interface width. Its modelling is useful for instance in processing techniques based on casting. The phase-field method is widely used to study evolution of such microstructural phase transformations on a continuum level; it couples the energy equation to a phenomenological Allen-Cahn/Ginzburg-Landau equation modelling the dynamics of an order parameter determining the solid and liquid phases, including also stochastic fluctuations to obtain the qualitatively correct result of dendritic side branching. This work presents a method to determine stochastic phase-field models from atomistic formulations by coarse-graining molecular dynamics. It has three steps: (1) a precise quantitative atomistic definition of the phase-field variable, based on the local potential energy; (2) derivation of its coarse-grained dynamics model, from microscopic Smoluchowski molecular dynamics (that is Brownian or over damped Langevin dynamics); and (3) numerical computation of the coarse-grained model functions. The coarse-grained model approximates Gibbs ensemble averages of the atomistic phase-field, by choosing coarse-grained drift and diffusion functions that minimize the approximation error of observables in this ensemble average. © EDP Sciences, SMAI, 2010.

  2. Differential Dynamics of α5 Integrin, Paxillin, and α-Actinin during Formation and Disassembly of Adhesions in Migrating Cells

    Laukaitis, Christina M; Webb, Donna J.; Donais, Karen; Horwitz, Alan F.

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms by which adhesions form and disperse in migrating cells, we expressed α5 integrin, α-actinin, and paxillin as green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions. All localized with their endogenous counterparts and did not perturb migration when expressed at moderate levels. α5-GFP also rescued the adhesive defects in CHO B2 cells, which are α5 integrin deficient. In ruffling cells, α5-GFP and α-actinin–GFP localized prominently at the leading edge in membrane protrusions. ...

  3. INDIRECT DETERMINATION METHOD OF DYNAMIC FORCEBY USING CEPSTRUM ANALYSIS

    吴淼; 魏任之

    1996-01-01

    The dynamic load spectrum is one of the most important basis of design and dynamic characteristics analysis of machines. But it is difficult to measure it on many occasions, especially for mining machines, due to their bad working circumstances and high cost of measurements. For such situation, the load spectrum has to be obtained by indirect determination methods. A new method to identify the load spectrum, cepstrum analysis method, was presented in this paper.This method can be used to eliminate the filtering influence of transfer function to the response signals so that the load spectrum can be determined indirectly. The experimental and engineering actual examples indicates that this method has the advantages that the calculation is simple and the measurement is easy.

  4. Determination of eigenvalues of dynamical systems by symbolic computation

    Howard, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    A symbolic computation technique for determining the eigenvalues of dynamical systems is described wherein algebraic operations, symbolic differentiation, matrix formulation and inversion, etc., can be performed on a digital computer equipped with a formula-manipulation compiler. An example is included that demonstrates the facility with which the system dynamics matrix and the control distribution matrix from the state space formulation of the equations of motion can be processed to obtain eigenvalue loci as a function of a system parameter. The example chosen to demonstrate the technique is a fourth-order system representing the longitudinal response of a DC 8 aircraft to elevator inputs. This simplified system has two dominant modes, one of which is lightly damped and the other well damped. The loci may be used to determine the value of the controlling parameter that satisfied design requirements. The results were obtained using the MACSYMA symbolic manipulation system.

  5. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...... between two identical fragments of the NCAM. Also during the past year, a link between homophilic cell adhesion and several signal transduction pathways has been proposed, connecting the event of cell surface adhesion to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth. Finally, the stimulation of neurite...

  6. A system dynamics model to determine products mix

    Mahtab Hajghasem; Payam Makvandi; Seyed Shahrooz Seyedi Hosseininia

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an implementation of system dynamics model to determine appropriate product mix by considering various factors such as labor, materials, overhead, etc. for an Iranian producer of cosmetic and sanitary products. The proposed model of this paper considers three hypotheses including the relationship between product mix and profitability, optimum production capacity and having minimum amount of storage to take advantage of low cost production. The implementation of system dyna...

  7. Stretchable, Adhesion-Tunable Dry Adhesive by Surface Wrinkling

    Jeong, Hoon Eui

    2010-02-16

    We introduce a simple yet robust method of fabricating a stretchable, adhesion-tunable dry adhesive by combining replica molding and surface wrinkling. By utilizing a thin, wrinkled polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) sheet with a thickness of 1 mm with built-in micropillars, active, dynamic control of normal and shear adhesion was achieved. Relatively strong normal (∼10.8 N/cm2) and shear adhesion (∼14.7 N/cm2) forces could be obtained for a fully extended (strained) PDMS sheet (prestrain of∼3%), whereas the forces could be rapidly reduced to nearly zero once the prestrain was released (prestrain of ∼0.5%). Moreover, durability tests demonstrated that the adhesion strength in both the normal and shear directions was maintained over more than 100 cycles of attachment and detachment. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  8. Probing effects of pH change on dynamic response of Claudin-2 mediated adhesion using single molecule force spectroscopy

    Claudins belong to a large family of transmembrane proteins that localize at tight junctions (TJs) where they play a central role in regulating paracellular transport of solutes and nutrients across epithelial monolayers. Their ability to regulate the paracellular pathway is highly influenced by changes in extracellular pH. However, the effect of changes in pH on the strength and kinetics of claudin mediated adhesion is poorly understood. Using atomic force microscopy, we characterized the kinetic properties of homophilic trans-interactions between full length recombinant GST tagged Claudin-2 (Cldn2) under different pH conditions. In measurements covering three orders of magnitude change in force loading rate of 102-104 pN/s, the Cldn2/Cldn2 force spectrum (i.e., unbinding force versus loading rate) revealed a fast and a slow loading regime that characterized a steep inner activation barrier and a wide outer activation barrier throughout pH range of 4.5-8. Comparing to the neutral condition (pH 6.9), differences in the inner energy barriers for the dissociation of Cldn2/Cldn2 mediated interactions at acidic and alkaline environments were found to be BT, which is much lower than the outer dissociation energy barrier (> 1.37 kBT). The relatively stable interaction of Cldn2/Cldn2 in neutral environment suggests that electrostatic interactions may contribute to the overall adhesion strength of Cldn2 interactions. Our results provide an insight into the changes in the inter-molecular forces and adhesion kinetics of Cldn2 mediated interactions in acidic, neutral and alkaline environments

  9. Applicability and limitations of technical testing methods for determining the adhesive strength of hard-facing overlay applied by welding

    Since 1978 the VdTUeV Test paper 1156 has been used as test regulation in the testing iron-plating and armatures. In addition to destruction - free testing, hardness measurement and metallographic studies, technological tests (bending tests) are an absolute requirement. In certain cases, angles of bending without leading to chipping of the iron-plating is required. These bending angles are not of relevance in the evaluation of the actual adhesion to the basic material. In the meantime manufacturers have developed their own testing regulations - in particular in the area of nuclear technology. The most detailed and well known is the Work Regulation D 17.1/000 of the company KWU. It is based on the above-mentioned VdTUeV-Test Paper and contains in addition a whole series of requirements in particular in the area of destructive-free testing. (orig.)

  10. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    parameters, which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to...... tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion is...... the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental...

  11. Plekhh2, a novel podocyte protein downregulated in human focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, is involved in matrix adhesion and actin dynamics.

    Perisic, Ljubica; Lal, Mark; Hulkko, Jenny; Hultenby, Kjell; Önfelt, Björn; Sun, Ying; Dunér, Fredrik; Patrakka, Jaakko; Betsholtz, Christer; Uhlen, Mathias; Brismar, Hjalmar; Tryggvason, Karl; Wernerson, Annika; Pikkarainen, Timo

    2012-11-01

    Pleckstrin homology domain-containing, family H (with MyTH4 domain), member 2 (Plekhh2) is a 1491-residue intracellular protein highly enriched in renal glomerular podocytes for which no function has been ascribed. Analysis of renal biopsies from patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis revealed a significant reduction in total podocyte Plekhh2 expression compared to controls. Sequence analysis indicated a putative α-helical coiled-coil segment as the only recognizable domain within the N-terminal half of the polypeptide, while the C-terminal half contains two PH, a MyTH4, and a FERM domain. We identified a phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate consensus-binding site in the PH1 domain required for Plekhh2 localization to peripheral regions of cell lamellipodia. The N-terminal half of Plekkh2 is not necessary for lamellipodial targeting but mediates self-association. Yeast two-hybrid screening showed that Plekhh2 directly interacts through its FERM domain with the focal adhesion protein Hic-5 and actin. Plekhh2 and Hic-5 coprecipitated and colocalized at the soles of podocyte foot processes in situ and Hic-5 partially relocated from focal adhesions to lamellipodia in Plekhh2-expressing podocytes. In addition, Plekhh2 stabilizes the cortical actin cytoskeleton by attenuating actin depolymerization. Our findings suggest a structural and functional role for Plekhh2 in the podocyte foot processes. PMID:22832517

  12. Dynamic change of Adamalysin 19 (ADAM19) in human placentas and its effects on cell invasion and adhesion in human trophoblastic cells

    SANG; QingXiang; Amy

    2009-01-01

    Human ADAM19 is a recently identified member of the ADAM family.It is highly expressed in human placentas,but its dynamic change and function at the human feto-maternal interface during placentation remain to be elucidated.In this present study,the spatial and temporal expression and cellular localization of ADAM19 in normal human placentas were first demonstrated,and the effects of ADAM19 on trophoblast cell adhesion and invasion were further investigated by using a human choriocarcinoma cell line(JEG-3) as an in vitro model.The data demonstrated that ADAM19 was widely distributed in villous cytotrophoblast cells,syncytiotrophoblast cells,column trophoblasts,and villous capillary endothelial cells during early pregnancy.The mRNA and protein level of ADAM19 in placentas was high at gestational weeks 8-9,but diminished significantly at mid-and term pregnancy.In JEG-3 cells,the overexpression of ADAM19 led to diminished cell invasion,as well as increases in cell adhesiveness and the expression of E-cadherin,with no changes in β-catenin expression observed.These data indicate that ADAM19 may participate in the coordinated regulation of human trophoblast cell behaviors during the process of placentation.

  13. A system dynamics model to determine products mix

    Mahtab Hajghasem

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an implementation of system dynamics model to determine appropriate product mix by considering various factors such as labor, materials, overhead, etc. for an Iranian producer of cosmetic and sanitary products. The proposed model of this paper considers three hypotheses including the relationship between product mix and profitability, optimum production capacity and having minimum amount of storage to take advantage of low cost production. The implementation of system dynamics on VENSIM software package has confirmed all three hypotheses of the survey and suggested that in order to reach better mix product, it is necessary to reach optimum production planning, take advantage of all available production capacities and use inventory management techniques.

  14. Clustering determines the dynamics of complex contagions in multiplex networks

    Zhuang, Yong; Yağan, Osman

    2016-01-01

    We present the mathematical analysis of generalized complex contagions in clustered multiplex networks for susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR)-like dynamics. The model is intended to understand diffusion of influence, or any other spreading process implying a threshold dynamics, in setups of interconnected networks with significant clustering. The contagion is assumed to be general enough to account for a content-dependent linear threshold model, where each link type has a different weight (for spreading influence) that may depend on the content (e.g., product, rumor, political view) that is being spread. Using the generating functions formalism, we determine the conditions, probability, and expected size of the emergent global cascades. This analysis provides a generalization of previous approaches and is specially useful in problems related to spreading and percolation. The results present non trivial dependencies between the clustering coefficient of the networks and its average degree. In particular, sev...

  15. An improved layer-by-layer self-assembly technique to generate biointerfaces for platelet adhesion studies: Dynamic LbL

    Lopez, Juan Manuel

    sequentially at selected surface locations to generate a composite overlap of presumed platelet adhesion as a function of fibrinogen distribution. The method was unable to distinguish the surface from the adhered cells. The surface inhomogeneity and porosity retained a large amount of acridine orange stain, even in the absence of platelets, and components in the platelet-rich plasma (PRP) were found to fix acridine orange in a mode that fluoresced in the FITC imaging FM. Both of these problems obfuscated the platelet adhesion FM results when using s-LbL surfaces and acridine orange staining of platelets. A dynamic process (d-LbL) was developed in which a solution of the molecule to be layered was constantly washed over the surface, and was constantly mixed to maintain a more homogeneous distribution of solute relative to the surface during the layering process. The d-LbL surfaces were tested as described above, and found to reduce the size and number of regions of anomalous acridine orange pooling trapped by the surface, providing a greater consistency and reliability in identifying platelets. The improved surface was then used in a series of platelet adhesion experiments under static and dynamic flow conditions, and with and without the chemical additive L-arginine. The complex microcharmel system used in prior studies was replaced with a simpler system involving fewer nuisance variables for these tests. The tests were performed on both collagen and fibrinogen surfaces. Collagen has been used as a thrombogenic surface in multiple studies in the literature, but produces additional variables in thrombogenesis control that are avoided when fibrinogen is used. In these tests, fibrinogen was found to be as thrombogenic as collagen, and platelet coverage of both biointerfaces was reduced by L-arginine in a manner similar to previously reported work. The simpler system differed from the previous microchannel system in important factors: (1) It exposed the platelets to much lower

  16. Detecting cell-adhesive sites in extracellular matrix using force spectroscopy mapping

    The cell microenvironment is composed of extracellular matrix (ECM), which contains specific binding sites that allow the cell to adhere to its surroundings. Cells employ focal adhesion proteins, which must be able to resist a variety of forces to bind to ECM. Current techniques for detecting the spatial arrangement of these adhesions, however, have limited resolution and those that detect adhesive forces lack sufficient spatial characterization or resolution. Using a unique application of force spectroscopy, we demonstrate here the ability to determine local changes in the adhesive property of a fibronectin substrate down to the resolution of the fibronectin antibody-functionalized tip diameter, ∼ 20 nm. To verify the detection capabilities of force spectroscopy mapping (FSM), changes in loading rate and temperature were used to alter the bond dynamics and change the adhesion force. Microcontact printing was also used to pattern fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated fibronectin in order to mimic the discontinuous adhesion domains of native ECM. Fluorescent detection was used to identify the pattern while FSM was used to map cell adhesion sites in registry with the initial fluorescent image. The results show that FSM can be used to detect the adhesion domains at high resolution and may subsequently be applied to native ECM with randomly distributed cell adhesion sites.

  17. New method of determination of spot welding-adhesive joint fatigue life using full field strain evolution

    Sadowski, T.; Kneć, M.

    2016-04-01

    Fatigue tests were conducted since more than two hundred years ago. Despite this long period, as fatigue phenomena are very complex, assessment of fatigue response of standard materials or composites still requires a long time. Quite precise way to estimate fatigue parameters is to test at least 30 standardized specimens for the analysed material and further statistical post processing is required. In case of structural elements analysis like hybrid joints (Figure 1), the situation is much more complex as more factors influence the fatigue load capacity due to much more complicated structure of the joint in comparison to standard materials specimen, i.e. occurrence of: welded hot spots or rivets, adhesive layers, local notches creating the stress concentrations, etc. In order to shorten testing time some rapid methods are known: Locati's method [1] - step by step load increments up to failure, Prot's method [2] - constant increase of the load amplitude up to failure; Lehr's method [2] - seeking for the point during regular fatigue loading when an increase of temperature or strains become non-linear. The present article proposes new method of the fatigue response assessment - combination of the Locati's and Lehr's method.

  18. Determination of dynamic fracture toughness using a new experimental technique

    Cady Carl M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In other studies dynamic fracture toughness has been measured using Charpy impact and modified Hopkinson Bar techniques. In this paper results will be shown for the measurement of fracture toughness using a new test geometry. The crack propagation velocities range from ∼0.15 mm/s to 2.5 m/s. Digital image correlation (DIC will be the technique used to measure both the strain and the crack growth rates. The boundary of the crack is determined using the correlation coefficient generated during image analysis and with interframe timing the crack growth rate and crack opening can be determined. A comparison of static and dynamic loading experiments will be made for brittle polymeric materials. The analysis technique presented by Sammis et al. [1] is a semi-empirical solution, however, additional Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics analysis of the strain fields generated as part of the DIC analysis allow for the more commonly used method resembling the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD experiment. It should be noted that this technique was developed because limited amounts of material were available and crack growth rates were to fast for a standard CTOD method.

  19. Quantifying the Determinants of Evolutionary Dynamics Leading to Drug Resistance.

    Guillaume Chevereau

    Full Text Available The emergence of drug resistant pathogens is a serious public health problem. It is a long-standing goal to predict rates of resistance evolution and design optimal treatment strategies accordingly. To this end, it is crucial to reveal the underlying causes of drug-specific differences in the evolutionary dynamics leading to resistance. However, it remains largely unknown why the rates of resistance evolution via spontaneous mutations and the diversity of mutational paths vary substantially between drugs. Here we comprehensively quantify the distribution of fitness effects (DFE of mutations, a key determinant of evolutionary dynamics, in the presence of eight antibiotics representing the main modes of action. Using precise high-throughput fitness measurements for genome-wide Escherichia coli gene deletion strains, we find that the width of the DFE varies dramatically between antibiotics and, contrary to conventional wisdom, for some drugs the DFE width is lower than in the absence of stress. We show that this previously underappreciated divergence in DFE width among antibiotics is largely caused by their distinct drug-specific dose-response characteristics. Unlike the DFE, the magnitude of the changes in tolerated drug concentration resulting from genome-wide mutations is similar for most drugs but exceptionally small for the antibiotic nitrofurantoin, i.e., mutations generally have considerably smaller resistance effects for nitrofurantoin than for other drugs. A population genetics model predicts that resistance evolution for drugs with this property is severely limited and confined to reproducible mutational paths. We tested this prediction in laboratory evolution experiments using the "morbidostat", a device for evolving bacteria in well-controlled drug environments. Nitrofurantoin resistance indeed evolved extremely slowly via reproducible mutations-an almost paradoxical behavior since this drug causes DNA damage and increases the mutation

  20. Determining habitat quality for species that demonstrate dynamic habitat selection.

    Beerens, James M; Frederick, Peter C; Noonburg, Erik G; Gawlik, Dale E

    2015-12-01

    Determining habitat quality for wildlife populations requires relating a species' habitat to its survival and reproduction. Within a season, species occurrence and density can be disconnected from measures of habitat quality when resources are highly seasonal, unpredictable over time, and patchy. Here we establish an explicit link among dynamic selection of changing resources, spatio-temporal species distributions, and fitness for predictive abundance and occurrence models that are used for short-term water management and long-term restoration planning. We used the wading bird distribution and evaluation models (WADEM) that estimate (1) daily changes in selection across resource gradients, (2) landscape abundance of flocks and individuals, (3) conspecific foraging aggregation, and (4) resource unit occurrence (at fixed 400 m cells) to quantify habitat quality and its consequences on reproduction for wetland indicator species. We linked maximum annual numbers of nests detected across the study area and nesting success of Great Egrets (Ardea alba), White Ibises (Eudocimus albus), and Wood Storks (Mycteria americana) over a 20-year period to estimated daily dynamics of food resources produced by WADEM over a 7490 km(2) area. For all species, increases in predicted species abundance in March and high abundance in April were strongly linked to breeding responses. Great Egret nesting effort and success were higher when birds also showed greater conspecific foraging aggregation. Synthesis and applications: This study provides the first empirical evidence that dynamic habitat selection processes and distributions of wading birds over environmental gradients are linked with reproductive measures over periods of decades. Further, predictor variables at a variety of temporal (daily-multiannual) resolutions and spatial (400 m to regional) scales effectively explained variation in ecological processes that change habitat quality. The process used here allows managers to

  1. Determination of the dynamic elastic constants of recycled aggregate concrete

    Tsoumani, A. A.; Barkoula, N.-M.; Matikas, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    Nowadays, construction and demolition waste constitutes a major portion of the total solid waste production in the world. Due to both environmental and economical reasons, an increasing interest concerning the use of recycled aggregate to replace aggregate from natural sources is generated. This paper presents an investigation on the properties of recycled aggregate concrete. Concrete mixes are prepared using recycled aggregates at a substitution level between 0 and 100% of the total coarse aggregate. The influence of this replacement on strengthened concrete's properties is being investigated. The properties estimated are: density and dynamic modulus of elasticity at the age of both 7 and 28 days. Also, flexural strength of 28 days specimens is estimated. The determination of the dynamic elastic modulus was made using the ultrasonic pulse velocity method. The results reveal that the existence of recycled aggregates affects the properties of concrete negatively; however, in low levels of substitution the influence of using recycled aggregates is almost negligible. Concluding, the controlled use of recycled aggregates in concrete production may help solve a vital environmental issue apart from being a solution to the problem of inadequate concrete aggregates.

  2. Determination of Reference Chemical Potential Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Krishnadeo Jatkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method implementing molecular dynamics (MD simulations for calculating the reference properties of simple gas hydrates has been proposed. The guest molecules affect interaction between adjacent water molecules distorting the hydrate lattice, which requires diverse values of reference properties for different gas hydrates. We performed simulations to validate the experimental data for determining Δ0, the chemical potential difference between water and theoretical empty cavity at the reference state, for structure II type gas hydrates. Simulations have also been used to observe the variation of the hydrate unit cell volume with temperature. All simulations were performed using TIP4P water molecules at the reference temperature and pressure conditions. The values were close to the experimental values obtained by the Lee-Holder model, considering lattice distortion.

  3. Dynamic determination reserves of the underground gas storage

    谭羽非

    2004-01-01

    One of the key problems in the use of underground gas storage is frequent leakage. It can lead to the actual gas storage amount being less than that accounted for. Combining numerical simulation and parameter auto fit, this paper ascertains the dynamic variation of the pressure in the storage reservoir, adjusts the actual injecting and producing gas to fit the accounted pressure with the tested pressure, obtains the gas leakage of the storage, and then determines the difference between accounted amount and leakage amount. The result is the actual reserves of the storage. The simulation result shows that the method presented can provide a theoretic foundation for estimating the leakage amount, thereby ensuring the actual reserves, searching the leakage route,and reducing leakage by adjusting the storage method.

  4. Adhesion and Cohesion

    J. Anthony von Fraunhofer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomena of adhesion and cohesion are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to dentistry. This review considers the forces involved in cohesion and adhesion together with the mechanisms of adhesion and the underlying molecular processes involved in bonding of dissimilar materials. The forces involved in surface tension, surface wetting, chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, diffusive adhesion, and mechanical adhesion are reviewed in detail and examples relevant to adhesive dentistry and bonding are given. Substrate surface chemistry and its influence on adhesion, together with the properties of adhesive materials, are evaluated. The underlying mechanisms involved in adhesion failure are covered. The relevance of the adhesion zone and its importance with regard to adhesive dentistry and bonding to enamel and dentin is discussed.

  5. Dynamic and reduced-dynamic precise orbit determination of satellites in low earth orbits

    The precise positioning of satellites in Low Earth Orbits (LEO) has become a key technology for advanced space missions. Dedicated satellite missions, such as CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE, that aim to map the Earths gravity field and its variation over time with unprecedented accuracy, initiated the demand for highly precise orbit solutions of LEO satellites. Furthermore, a wide range of additional science opportunities opens up with the capability to generate accurate LEO orbits. For all considered satellite missions, the primary measurement system for navigation is a spaceborne GPS receiver. The goal of this thesis is to establish and implement methods for Precise Orbit Determination (POD) of LEO satellites using GPS. Striving for highest precision using yet efficient orbit generation strategies, the attained orbit solutions are aimed to be competitive with the most advanced solutions of other institutions. Dynamic and reduced-dynamic orbit models provide the basic concepts of this work. These orbit models are subsequently adjusted to the highly accurate GPS measurements. The GPS measurements are introduced at the zero difference level in the ionosphere free linear combination. Appropriate procedures for GPS data screening and editing are established to detect erroneous data and to employ measurements of good quality only. For the dynamic orbit model a sophisticated force model, especially designed for LEO satellites, has been developed. In order to overcome the limitations that are induced by the deficiencies of the purely dynamical model, two different types of empirical parameters are introduced into the force model. These reduced-dynamic orbit models allow for the generation of much longer orbital arcs while preserving the spacecraft dynamics to the most possible extent. The two methods for reduced-dynamic orbit modeling are instantaneous velocity changes (pulses) or piecewise constant accelerations. For both techniques highly efficient modeling algorithms are

  6. Bond formation and slow heterogeneous dynamics in adhesive spheres with long--ranged repulsion: Quantitative test of Mode Coupling Theory

    Henrich, Oliver; Puertas, Antonio M.; Sperl, Matthias; Baschnagel, Jörg; Fuchs, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    A colloidal system of spheres interacting with both a deep and narrow attractive potential and a shallow long-ranged barrier exhibits a prepeak in the static structure factor. This peak can be related to an additional mesoscopic length scale of clusters and/or voids in the system. Simulation studies of this system have revealed that it vitrifies upon increasing the attraction into a gel-like solid at intermediate densities. The dynamics at the mesoscopic length scale corresponding to the prep...

  7. Advanced adhesives in electronics

    Bailey, C

    2011-01-01

    Adhesives are widely used in the manufacture of electronic devices to act as passive and active components. Recently there has been considerable interest in the use of conductive adhesives. This book reviews key types of conductive adhesives, processing methods, properties and the way they can be modelled as well as potential applications.$bAdhesives for electronic applications serve important functional and structural purposes in electronic components and packaging, and have developed significantly over the last few decades. Advanced adhesives in electronics reviews recent developments in adhesive joining technology, processing and properties. The book opens with an introduction to adhesive joining technology for electronics. Part one goes on to cover different types of adhesive used in electronic systems, including thermally conductive adhesives, isotropic and anisotropic conductive adhesives and underfill adhesives for flip-chip applications. Part two focuses on the properties and processing of electronic ...

  8. Determination of the dynamical structure of galaxies using optical spectra

    De Rijcke, S.; Dejonghe, H.

    1998-01-01

    Galaxy spectra are a rich source of kinematical information since the shapes of the absorption lines reflect the movement of stars along the line-of-sight. We present a technique to directly build a dynamical model for a galaxy by fitting model spectra, calculated from a dynamical model, to the observed galaxy spectra. Using synthetic spectra from a known galaxy model we demonstrate that this technique indeed recovers the essential dynamical characteristics of the galaxy model. Moreover, the ...

  9. Bioassay-Guided Isolation and HPLC Determination of Bioactive Compound That Relate to the Antiplatelet Activity (Adhesion, Secretion, and Aggregation from Solanum lycopersicum

    Eduardo Fuentes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In seeking the functionality of foodstuff applicable to medicine, ripe tomato fruits were found to show an antiplatelet activity. Therefore, the bioactive compound was isolated, structurally identified, and studied for an inhibitory effects on platelet adhesion, secretion, and aggregation. The concentration of adenosine in ripe tomato fruits (pulp and skin extracts and its processing by-products (paste and pomace was determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. According to platelet aggregation inhibition induced by ADP, the total extract residual was fractionated by liquid-liquid separation, obtaining aqueous, ethyl acetate and petroleum ether extracts. The aqueous extract was subjected to repeated permeation over sephadex LH-20 and semipreparative TLC. The isolate finally obtained was identified as adenosine on the basis of ESI-MS, 1H NMR, HPLC, and UV spectra. Adenosine concentration dependently (2.3–457 μM platelet aggregation inhibited induced by ADP. Also, adenosine present inhibition of platelet secretion and thrombus formation under flow conditions. The quantitative HPLC analysis revealed significant amounts of adenosine in ripe tomato fruits and its processing by-products. From these results, extracts/fractions of ripe tomato fruits and their processing by-products may be referred to as functional food and functional ingredients containing a compound that inhibits platelet function with a potent preventive effect on thrombus formation, as those that occur in stroke.

  10. Bond formation and slow heterogeneous dynamics in adhesive spheres with long-ranged repulsion: quantitative test of mode coupling theory.

    Henrich, O; Puertas, A M; Sperl, M; Baschnagel, J; Fuchs, M

    2007-09-01

    A colloidal system of spheres interacting with both a deep and narrow attractive potential and a shallow long-ranged barrier exhibits a prepeak in the static structure factor. This peak can be related to an additional mesoscopic length scale of clusters and/or voids in the system. Simulation studies of this system have revealed that it vitrifies upon increasing the attraction into a gel-like solid at intermediate densities. The dynamics at the mesoscopic length scale corresponding to the prepeak represents the slowest mode in the system. Using mode coupling theory with all input directly taken from simulations, we reveal the mechanism for glassy arrest in the system at 40% packing fraction. The effects of the low-q peak and of polydispersity are considered in detail. We demonstrate that the local formation of physical bonds is the process whose slowing down causes arrest. It remains largely unaffected by the large-scale heterogeneities, and sets the clock for the slow cluster mode. Results from mode-coupling theory without adjustable parameters agree semiquantitatively with the local density correlators but overestimate the lifetime of the mesoscopic structure (voids). PMID:17930244

  11. Cellular prion protein is required for neuritogenesis: fine-tuning of multiple signaling pathways involved in focal adhesions and actin cytoskeleton dynamics

    Alleaume-Butaux A

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aurélie Alleaume-Butaux,1,2 Caroline Dakowski,1,2 Mathéa Pietri,1,2 Sophie Mouillet-Richard,1,2 Jean-Marie Launay,3,4 Odile Kellermann,1,2 Benoit Schneider1,2 1INSERM, UMR-S 747, 2Paris Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR-S 747, 3Public Hospital of Paris, Department of Biochemistry, INSERM UMR-S 942, Lariboisière Hospital, Paris, France; 4Pharma Research Department, Hoffmann La Roche Ltd, Basel, Switzerland Abstract: Neuritogenesis is a dynamic phenomenon associated with neuronal differentiation that allows a rather spherical neuronal stem cell to develop dendrites and axon, a prerequisite for the integration and transmission of signals. The acquisition of neuronal polarity occurs in three steps: (1 neurite sprouting, which consists of the formation of buds emerging from the postmitotic neuronal soma; (2 neurite outgrowth, which represents the conversion of buds into neurites, their elongation and evolution into axon or dendrites; and (3 the stability and plasticity of neuronal polarity. In neuronal stem cells, remodeling and activation of focal adhesions (FAs associated with deep modifications of the actin cytoskeleton is a prerequisite for neurite sprouting and subsequent neurite outgrowth. A multiple set of growth factors and interactors located in the extracellular matrix and the plasma membrane orchestrate neuritogenesis by acting on intracellular signaling effectors, notably small G proteins such as RhoA, Rac, and Cdc42, which are involved in actin turnover and the dynamics of FAs. The cellular prion protein (PrPC, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchored membrane protein mainly known for its role in a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases, has emerged as a central player in neuritogenesis. Here, we review the contribution of PrPC to neuronal polarization and detail the current knowledge on the signaling pathways fine-tuned by PrPC to promote neurite sprouting, outgrowth, and maintenance. We emphasize that Pr

  12. Collagen remodeling by phagocytosis is determined by collagen substrate topology and calcium-dependent interactions of gelsolin with nonmuscle myosin IIA in cell adhesions

    Arora, P. D.; Wang, Y.; Bresnick, A.; Dawson, J.; Janmey, P. A.; McCulloch, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    We examine how collagen substrate topography, free intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i, and the association of gelsolin with nonmuscle myosin IIA (NMMIIA) at collagen adhesions are regulated to enable collagen phagocytosis. Fibroblasts plated on planar, collagen-coated substrates show minimal increase of [Ca2+]i, minimal colocalization of gelsolin and NMMIIA in focal adhesions, and minimal intracellular collagen degradation. In fibroblasts plated on collagen-coated latex beads th...

  13. Does the transition to chaos determine the dynamic aperture?

    We review the important notion of the dynamic aperture of a storage ring with emphasis on its relation to general ideas of dynamical instability, notably the transition to chaos. Practical approaches to the problem are compared. We suggest a somewhat novel quantitative guide to the old problem of choosing machine tunes based on a heuristic blend of KAM theory and resonance selection rules

  14. Adhesion in microelectronics

    Mittal, K L

    2014-01-01

    This comprehensive book will provide both fundamental and applied aspects of adhesion pertaining to microelectronics in a single and easily accessible source. Among the topics to be covered include; Various theories or mechanisms of adhesionSurface (physical or chemical) characterization of materials as it pertains to adhesionSurface cleaning as it pertains to adhesionWays to improve adhesionUnraveling of interfacial interactions using an array of pertinent techniquesCharacterization of interfaces / interphasesPolymer-polymer adhesionMetal-polymer adhesion  (metallized polymers)Polymer adhesi

  15. Computational Chemistry of Adhesive Bonds

    Phillips, Donald H.

    1999-01-01

    This investigation is intended to determine the electrical mechanical, and chemical properties of adhesive bonds at the molecular level. The initial determinations will be followed by investigations of the effects of environmental effects on the chemistry and properties of the bond layer.

  16. Thermal Characterization of Adhesive

    Spomer, Ken A.

    1999-01-01

    The current Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle adhesive bond system is being replaced due to obsolescence. Down-selection and performance testing of the structural adhesives resulted in the selection of two candidate replacement adhesives, Resin Technology Group's Tiga 321 and 3M's EC2615XLW. This paper describes rocket motor testing of these two adhesives. Four forty-pound charge motors were fabricated in configurations that would allow side by side comparison testing of the candidate replacement adhesives and the current RSRM adhesives. The motors provided an environment where the thermal performance of adhesives in flame surface bondlines was compared. Results of the FPC testing show that: 1) The phenolic char depths on radial bond lines is approximately the same and vary depending on the position in the blast tube regardless of which adhesive was used; 2) The adhesive char depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the char depth of the current adhesives; 3) The heat-affected depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the heat-affected depth of the current adhesives; and 4) The ablation rates for both replacement adhesives are slower than that of the current adhesives.

  17. New Dynamic Spin Rig Capabilities Used to Determine Rotating Blade Dynamics

    Provenza, Andrew J.

    2004-01-01

    The Dynamic Spin Rig Facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center is used to determine the structural response of rotating engine components without the effects of aerodynamic loading. Recently, this rig's capabilities were enhanced through the replacement of grease-lubricated ball bearings with magnetic bearings. Magnetic bearings offer a number of advantages--the most important here being that they not only fully support the rotor system, but excite it as well. Three magnetic bearings support the rotor and provide five axes of controlled motion: an x- and y-axis translation at each of two radial bearings and a z-axis translation in the vertical or axial direction. Sinusoidal excitation (most commonly used) can be imparted on the rotor through the radial magnetic bearings in either a fixed or rotating frame of reference. This excitation is added directly to the magnetic bearing control output. Since the rotor is fully levitated, large translations and rotations of the rotor system can be achieved. Some of the capabilities of this excitation system were determined and reported. The accelerations obtained at the tip of a titanium flat plate test article versus the swept sine excitation sent to both radial bearings in phase and perpendicular to the plane containing the two blades are shown. Recent tests required the excitation of fundamental bending and torsional blade resonances at rotor speeds up to 10,000 rpm. Successful fixed synchronous rotation of the excitation signal provided the best detectable blade resonant vibrations at excitation frequencies up to 1100 Hz for the particular blades of interest. A noncontacting laser measurement system was used to collect blade-tip motions. From these data, the amplitude and frequency of the motion could be determined as well as the blade damping properties. Damping could be determined using two methods: (1) free decay and (2) curve fitting the vibration amplitude as a function of frequency in and around the resonance of

  18. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    H. G. Silverman; F. F. Roberto

    2007-12-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.

  19. Understanding marine mussel adhesion.

    Silverman, Heather G; Roberto, Francisco F

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  20. Calibration of a Computation Model for a Reinforced Concrete Structure Against the Experimentally Determined Dynamic Characteristics

    Gavriloaia, Constantin; Budescu, Mihai; Ţăranu, Nicolae; Hohan, Raluca

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic characteristics of the structures range are depending on their mass and lateral stiffness. In the present paper a method for improving the computation model is proposed, thus creating a link between the dynamic characteristics obtained with the computation model based on the finite element method and the experimentally determined dynamic characteristics. The finite element model was obtained using the program ETABS and the experimental dynamic characteristics were obtained on a lo...

  1. Statistical determination of space shuttle component dynamic magnification factors

    Lehner, F.

    1973-01-01

    A method is presented of obtaining vibration design loads for components and brackets. Dynamic Magnification Factors from applicable Saturn/Apollo qualification, reliability, and vibroacoustic tests have been statistically formulated into design nomographs. These design nomographs have been developed for different component and bracket types, mounted on backup structure or rigidly mounted and excited by sinusoidal or random inputs. Typical nomographs are shown.

  2. Quantitative differences in adhesiveness of type 1 fimbriated Escherichia coli due to structural differences in fimH genes.

    Sokurenko, E V; Courtney, H S; Maslow, J; Siitonen, A; Hasty, D L

    1995-01-01

    Type 1 fimbriae are heteropolymeric surface organelles responsible for the D-mannose-sensitive (MS) adhesion of Escherichia coli. We recently reported that variation of receptor specificity of type 1 fimbriae can result solely from minor alterations in the structure of the gene for the FimH adhesin subunit. To further study the relationship between allelic variation of the fimH gene and adhesive properties of type 1 fimbriae, the fimH genes from five additional strains were cloned and used to complement the FimH deletion in E. coli KB18. When the parental and recombinant strains were tested for adhesion to immobilized mannan, a wide quantitative range in the ability of bacteria to adhere was noted. The differences in adhesion do not appear to be due to differences in the levels of fimbriation or relative levels of incorporation of FimH, because these parameters were similar in low-adhesion and high-adhesion strains. The nucleotide sequence for each of the fimH genes was determined. Analysis of deduced FimH sequences allowed identification of two sequence homology groups, based on the presence of Asn-70 and Ser-78 or Ser-70 and Asn-78 residues. The consensus sequences for each group conferred very low adhesion activity, and this low-adhesion phenotype predominated among a group of 43 fecal isolates. Strains isolated from a different host niche, the urinary tract, expressed type 1 fimbriae that conferred an increased level of adhesion. The results presented here strongly suggest that the quantitative variations in MS adhesion are due primarily to structural differences in the FimH adhesin. The observed differences in MS adhesion among populations of E. coli isolated from different host niches call attention to the possibility that phenotypic variants of FimH may play a functional role in populations dynamics. PMID:7601831

  3. Determination of dynamic Young’s modulus of vulnerable speleothems

    Konečný, Pavel; Lednická, Markéta; Souček, Kamil; Staš, Lubomír; Kubina, Lukáš; Gribovszki, K.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 2 (2015), s. 156-163. ISSN 1335-1788 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : dynamic Young´s modulus * speleothem * bulk density * X-Ray Computed Tomography Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.329, year: 2014 http://actamont.tuke.sk/pdf/2015/n2/10Konecny.pdf

  4. Determination of the Dynamic ITER Energy Confinement Time Scalings

    Sonnino, Giorgio; Sonnino, Alberto; Evslin, Jarah; Steinbrecher, György

    2014-01-01

    We derive the differential equation, which is satisfied by the ITER scalings for the dynamic energy confinement time. We show that this differential equation can also be obtained from the differential equation for the energy confinement time, derived from the energy balance equation, when the plasma is near the steady state. We find that the values of the scaling parameters are linked to the second derivative of the power loss, estimated at the steady state. As an example of an application, t...

  5. Determination of the Complex Dielectric Permittivity Industrial Materials of the Adhesive Products for the Modeling of an Electromagnetic Field at the Level of a Glue Joint

    Mahmoud Abbas

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available To achieve out this work we were interested in the study of microwaves techniques and also of the measurement of complex relative dielectric permittivity. It is important to measure this dielectric permittivity for the used adhesive before subjecting it to electromagnetic energy. This prediction enables us to avoid an exothermic phenomenon due to the brutal rise in the temperature in the joint of adhesive. However, these results are used calculations program, to trace cartography of the electric field and of a temperature gradient in standardized test-tubes. At the end of this step, we have physical and experimental tools that can be used in the study of an optimized process using the microwaves. We check also the strong absorption of energy on the level of joint of adhesive (attenuation electric field, that the microwaves make it possible to well polymerize the adhesives with less times and low energy consumption without rise in prejudicial temperature of the parts to be stucked.

  6. Investigation of the Wood/Phenol-Formaldehyde Adhesive Interphase Morphology

    Laborie, Marie-Pierre Genevieve

    2002-01-01

    This work addresses the morphology of the wood/ Phenol-Formaldehyde (PF) adhesive interphase using yellow-poplar. In this case, morphology refers to the scale or dimension of adhesive penetration into wood. The objective is to develop methods for revealing ever smaller levels of wood/resin morphology. Dynamic techniques that are commonly utilized in polymer blend studies are investigated as potential methods for probing the wood/ adhesive interphase morphology. These are Dynamic Mechanica...

  7. The evolution of adhesiveness as a social adaptation.

    Garcia, Thomas; Doulcier, Guilhem; De Monte, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Cellular adhesion is a key ingredient to sustain collective functions of microbial aggregates. Here, we investigate the evolutionary origins of adhesion and the emergence of groups of genealogically unrelated cells with a game-theoretical model. The considered adhesiveness trait is costly, continuous and affects both group formation and group-derived benefits. The formalism of adaptive dynamics reveals two evolutionary stable strategies, at each extreme on the axis of adhesiveness. We show that cohesive groups can evolve by small mutational steps, provided the population is already endowed with a minimum adhesiveness level. Assortment between more adhesive types, and in particular differential propensities to leave a fraction of individuals ungrouped at the end of the aggregation process, can compensate for the cost of increased adhesiveness. We also discuss the change in the social nature of more adhesive mutations along evolutionary trajectories, and find that altruism arises before directly beneficial behavior, despite being the most challenging form of cooperation. PMID:26613415

  8. Determination of Scaling Parameter and Dynamical Resonances in Complex-Rotated Hamiltonian Ⅱ: Numerical Analysis

    LIU Zong-Liang; ZHAO Fang; LI Shao-Hua; ZHAO Mei-Shan; CHEN Chang-Yong

    2008-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the determination of a unique scaling parameter in complex scaling analysis and with accurate calculation of dynamics resonances. In the preceding paper we have presented a theoretical analysis and provided a formalism for dynamical resonance calculations. In this paper we present accurate numerical results for two non-trivial dynamical processes, namely, models of diatomie molecular predissoeiation and of barrier potential scattering for resonances. The results presented in this paper confirm our theoretical analysis, remove a theoretical ambiguity on determination of the complex scaling parameter, and provide an improved understanding for dynamical resonance calculations in rigged Hilbert space.

  9. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  10. Lignin-Furfural Based Adhesives

    Prajakta Dongre

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lignin recovered from the hot-water extract of sugar maple (Acer saccharum is used in this study to synthesize adhesive blends to replace phenol-formaldehyde (PF resin. Untreated lignin is characterized by lignin content and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR analysis. The molecular weight distribution of the lignin and the blends are characterized by size exclusion chromatography (SEC. The effect of pH (0.3, 0.65 and 1, ex situ furfural, and curing conditions on the tensile properties of adhesive reinforced glass fibers is determined and compared to the reinforcement level of commercially available PF resin. The adhesive blend prepared at pH = 0.65 with no added furfural exhibits the highest tensile properties and meets 90% of the PF tensile strength.

  11. The F-Landscape: Dynamically Determining the Multiverse

    Li, Tianjun; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V; Walker, Joel W

    2011-01-01

    We evolve our Multiverse Blueprints to characterize our local neighborhood of the String Landscape and the Multiverse of plausible string, M- and F-theory vacua. Building upon the tripodal foundations of i) the Flipped SU(5) Grand Unified Theory (GUT), ii) extra TeV-Scale vector-like multiplets derived out of F-theory, and iii) the dynamics of No-Scale Supergravity, together dubbed No-Scale F-SU(5), we demonstrate the existence of a continuous family of solutions which might adeptly describe the dynamics of distinctive universes. This Multiverse landscape of F-SU(5) solutions, which we shall refer to as the F-Landscape, accommodates a subset of universes compatible with the presently known experimental uncertainties of our own universe. We show that by secondarily minimizing the minimum of the scalar Higgs potential of each solution within the F-Landscape, a continuous hypervolume of distinct minimum minimorum can be engineered which comprise a regional dominion of universes, with our own universe cast as the...

  12. Particle adhesion and removal

    Mittal, K L

    2015-01-01

    The book provides a comprehensive and easily accessible reference source covering all important aspects of particle adhesion and removal.  The core objective is to cover both fundamental and applied aspects of particle adhesion and removal with emphasis on recent developments.  Among the topics to be covered include: 1. Fundamentals of surface forces in particle adhesion and removal.2. Mechanisms of particle adhesion and removal.3. Experimental methods (e.g. AFM, SFA,SFM,IFM, etc.) to understand  particle-particle and particle-substrate interactions.4. Mechanics of adhesion of micro- and  n

  13. Properties of Nano SiO2 Modified PVF Adhesive

    CHEN He-sheng; SUN Zhen-ya; XUE Li-hui

    2004-01-01

    Some properties of nano SiO2 modified PVF adhesive were studied. The experimental results show that nano SiO2 can improve the properties of PVF adhesive very well. Meanwhile the modification mechanism of nano SiO2 to PVF adhesive and the applications of this adhesive in paper-plastic composite, concrete and fireproof paint were discussed by using IR and XRD determination.

  14. Adhesion energy, surface traction and surface tension in Fe-Mg binary alloy

    We present adhesion and surface energies in Fe-Mg binary alloy from simulation studies. The adhesion energy was calculated using the assumption that work is done when atoms come into contact by moving two surfaces from equilibrium position zo to ∞, while the surface traction was determined from the atomic interactions between atoms. The surface tension variation with temperature was investigated from diffusion coefficient obtained by performing molecular dynamics simulations at temperatures above eutetic temperature of Fe-Mg. It was observed that the structural information as well as the calculated surface tension suggest segregation in Fe-Mg alloy at all investigated temperatures. (author)

  15. Experimental determination of the dynamics of an acoustically levitated sphere

    Pérez, Nicolás; Andrade, Marco A. B.; Canetti, Rafael; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2014-11-01

    Levitation of solids and liquids by ultrasonic standing waves is a promising technique to manipulate materials without contact. When a small particle is introduced in certain areas of a standing wave field, the acoustic radiation force pushes the particle to the pressure node. This movement is followed by oscillations of the levitated particle. Aiming to investigate the particle oscillations in acoustic levitation, this paper presents the experimental and numerical characterization of the dynamic behavior of a levitated sphere. To obtain the experimental response, a small sphere is lifted by the acoustic radiation force. After the sphere lift, it presents a damped oscillatory behavior, which is recorded by a high speed camera. To model this behavior, a mass-spring-damper system is proposed. In this model, the acoustic radiation force that acts on the sphere is theoretically predicted by the Gor'kov theory and the viscous forces are modeled by two damping terms, one term proportional to the square of the velocity and another term proportional to the particle velocity. The proposed model was experimentally verified by using different values of sound pressure amplitude. The comparison between numerical and experimental results shows that the model can accurately describe the oscillatory behavior of the sphere in an acoustic levitator.

  16. Experimental determination of the dynamics of an acoustically levitated sphere

    Pérez, Nicolás, E-mail: nico@fisica.edu.uy [Centro Universitario de Paysandú, Universidad de la República, Paysandú (Uruguay); Andrade, Marco A. B. [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Canetti, Rafael [Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de la República, Montevideo (Uruguay); Adamowski, Julio C. [Department of Mechatronics and Mechanical Systems Engineering, Escola Politécnica, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-11-14

    Levitation of solids and liquids by ultrasonic standing waves is a promising technique to manipulate materials without contact. When a small particle is introduced in certain areas of a standing wave field, the acoustic radiation force pushes the particle to the pressure node. This movement is followed by oscillations of the levitated particle. Aiming to investigate the particle oscillations in acoustic levitation, this paper presents the experimental and numerical characterization of the dynamic behavior of a levitated sphere. To obtain the experimental response, a small sphere is lifted by the acoustic radiation force. After the sphere lift, it presents a damped oscillatory behavior, which is recorded by a high speed camera. To model this behavior, a mass-spring-damper system is proposed. In this model, the acoustic radiation force that acts on the sphere is theoretically predicted by the Gor'kov theory and the viscous forces are modeled by two damping terms, one term proportional to the square of the velocity and another term proportional to the particle velocity. The proposed model was experimentally verified by using different values of sound pressure amplitude. The comparison between numerical and experimental results shows that the model can accurately describe the oscillatory behavior of the sphere in an acoustic levitator.

  17. A practical method to determine background signals in dynamic control rod reactivity measurement

    A practical method to eliminate background signals from measured detector signals was developed for the Dynamic Control rod Reactivity Measurement (DCRM). The developed method is applied to determine the rod worth of Nuclear Power Plants in KOREA. (author)

  18. Anti-Slip/Skid Re-Adhesion Control Based on Disturbance Observer Considering Bogie Vibration

    Shimizu, Yosuke; Ohishi, Kiyoshi; Sano, Takashi; Yasukawa, Shinobu

    In order to suppress slip/skid phenomenon, we have already proposed anti-slip/skid re-adhesion control system based on disturbance observer, and we have confirmed that this system drives the train with high adhesion force utilization ratio. However, this system does not consider the vibration phenomenon of actual bogie dynamics of electric commuter train, tangential force estimation is affected by bogie vibration. Hence, the drive control system cannot determine the appropriate motor torque reference, and sometimes reduces the adhesion force utilization ratio. This paper proposes a new anti-slip/skid re-adhesion control system based on the disturbance observer considering the first resonant frequency of the bogie system. In order to confirm the validity of the performance of the proposed anti-slip/skid re-adhesion control system, this paper confirms the validity of the proposed system by using the numerical simulation. This paper shows the numerical simulation results simulated using 4M1C motor car model which has a sensor-less vector control system. As the results, the proposed disturbance observer is effective for the vibration suppression of estimated tangential force. The numerical simulation results point out that the proposed adhesion control method has the fine performance.

  19. Adhesion property of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR-based adhesives containing calcium carbonate

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The adhesion property (i.e. viscosity, loop tack and peel strength of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR 25 and ENR 50 grade-based pressure-sensitive adhesive was studied in the presence of calcium carbonate. The range of calcium carbonate loaded was from 10 to 50 parts per hundred parts of rubber (phr. Coumarone-indene resin was used as the tackifier and its concentration was fixed at 80 phr. Toluene was chosen as the solvent throughout the investigation. The substrates (PET film/paper were coated with the adhesive using a SHEEN hand coater at a coating thickness of 60 µm. Viscosity of the adhesive was measured by a HAAKE Rotary Viscometer whereas loop tack and peel strength were determined by a Llyod Adhesion Tester operating at 30 cm/min. Results show that viscosity of ENR-based adhesives increases gradually with increase in calcium carbonate loading due to the concentration effect of the filler. However, for loop tack and peel strength, it passes through a maximum at 30 phr calcium carbonate, an observation which is attributed to the optimum wettability of adhesive on the substrate at this adhesive composition. ENR 25-based adhesive consistently exhibits higher adhesion property than ENR 50 for all calcium carbonate loadings studied.

  20. The rheology of adhesive hard sphere dispersions

    Woutersen, A. T. J. M.; de Kruif, C. G.

    1991-04-01

    The influence of an attractive interparticle potential on the rheology of a sterically stabilized silica dispersion was investigated. Using a marginal solvent, there was an effective attraction between the particles which depended on the temperature. Three experiments in which different properties of the dispersion were probed showed that a square well model can be used to describe the temperature dependence of the pair potential. The turbidity of a dilute dispersion was measured as a function of the volume fraction and the temperature. Using dynamic light scattering techniques, the effect of the strength of the interparticle attraction on the diffusion coefficient was investigated. Furthermore, the steady shear viscosity was measured as a function of the volume fraction and the temperature. A microscopic theory for the low shear viscosity of a semidilute dispersion of adhesive hard spheres was successfully used to determine the interaction parameters. Viscosity measurement on dense suspensions showed that while the system is still in the one-phase state, temporal aggregates are formed by the interparticle forces which are disrupted by both shear and Brownian motion of the particles. The shear thinning behavior of a concentrated dispersion of adhesive hard spheres scales in a dimensionless shear stress. This group is the ratio of the forces, arising from the shear and the interparticle potential.

  1. System identification approach for determining flight dynamical characteristics of an airship from flight data

    Kornienko, Andrei

    2006-01-01

    The knowledge of dynamical characteristics of a flight vehicle is necessary for the control system design and realization of high fidelity flight simulators. The development of a flight mechanical model and determination of its basic components, as for example mass properties and the major aerodynamic terms, addresses a complex process involving various analytical, numerical and experimental techniques. The objective of this dissertation is a determination of the basic dynamical character...

  2. The role of adhesion strength in human mesenchymal stem cell osteoblastic differentiation on biodegradable polymers

    Krizan, Sylva Jana

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) are promising candidates for promoting bone growth on biodegradable polymer scaffolds however little is known about early hMSC-polymer interactions. Adhesion is highly dynamic and during adhesive reinforcement, numerous proteins form adhesion plaques linking the cell's cytoskeleton with the extracellular environment. These proteins are known to affect cellular function but their role in hMSC differentiation is less clear. Adhesion plaques are associated with adhesive force, still a detachment force of hMSC on polycaprolactone (PCL), poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) or alginate has never been described or shown to affect downstream function. We demonstrate that hMSC attached to PCL, PLGA and alginate exhibit different adhesion strengths (tau50) as determined by both fluid shear and spinning disk systems, with PLGA demonstrating the greatest tau 50. Elastic modulus and hydrophobicity were characterized for these surfaces and correlated positively with tau50 to an optimum. Attachment studies of hMSC showed that adhesion plateau timespans were independent of cell line and surface but both morphology and focal adhesion expression varied by polymer type. Differentiation studies of hMSC on PLGA and PCL showed a strong association between markers of differentiation (alkaline phosphatase activity and mineral content) and tau50 within polymer groups, but a poor relationship was found between tau50 and differentiation across polymer groups, suggesting that other polymer properties may be important for differentiation. Subsequently, we examined the role of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Rho-GTPase (RhoA) on hMSC adhesion and differentiation when plated onto PLGA. hMSC were retrovirally transduced with mutant constructs of FAK and RhoA cDNA. Alternatively, hMSC were treated with Rho-kinase inhibitor, Y27632. Both cells transduced with mutant RhoA or FAK constructs, or those treated with Y27632 displayed aberrant cell morphology and changes

  3. Highly compliant shape memory polymer gels for tunable damping and reversible adhesion

    Mrozek, Randy A.; Berg, Michael C.; Gold, Christopher S.; Leighliter, Brad; Morton, Jeffrey T.; Lenhart, Joseph L.

    2016-02-01

    Materials that can dynamically change their properties to better adapt to the local environment have potential utility in robotics, aerospace, and coatings. For some of these applications, most notably robotics, it is advantageous for these responsive materials to be highly compliant in an effort to provide dynamic changes in adhesion and mechanical damping within a broad temperature operational environment. In this report, non-aqueous, highly compliant shape-memory polymer gels are developed by incorporating a low density of chemical cross-links into a physically cross-linked thermoplastic elastomer gel. Chemical cross-linkers were evaluated by varying there size and degree of functionality to determine the impact on the mechanical and adhesive properties. As a result of the chemical cross-linking, the gels exhibit modulus plateaus around room temperature and at elevated temperatures above 100 °C, where the thermoplastic elastomer gel typically melts. The materials were designed so that moduli in the plateaued regions were above and below the Dahlquist criteria of 4 × 104 Pa, respectively, where materials with a modulus below this value typically exhibit an increase in adhesion. The shape memory polymer gels were also integrated into fiber-reinforced composites to determine the temperature-dependent changes in mechanical damping. It is anticipated that this work will provide insight into materials design to provide dynamic changes in adhesion and damping to improve robotic appendage manipulation and platform mobility.

  4. Determination of dynamic pressure on infinite piezoelectric hollow cylinder from electric potential difference measurement

    An analytical method is developed for evaluating the dynamic pressure acted at the surface of infinite piezoelectric hollow cylinder by measuring the electric potential difference between the internal and external surfaces. By virtue of the separation of variables method and the orthogonal expansion technique, the inverse boundary problem is transformed to a second kind Volterra integral equation about the unknown dynamic pressure. The interpolation method is employed to solve the integral equation and the dynamic pressure is determined. The present method is suitable for the hollow cylinder with arbitrary thickness subjected to arbitrary dynamic pressure. Numerical experiments are also presented.

  5. CFD Based Determination of Dynamic Stability Derivatives in Yaw for a Bird

    M. A. Moelyadi; G. Sachs

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic yaw stability derivatives of a gull bird are determined using Computational Fluid Dynamics(CFD) method. Two kinds of motions are applied for calculating the dynamic yaw stability derivatives CNr and CNβ. The first one relates to a lateral translation and, separately, to a yaw rotation. The second one consists of a combined translational and rotational motion. To determine dynamic yaw stability derivatives, the simulation of an unsteady flow with a bird model showing a harmonic motion is performed. The flow solution for each time step is obtained by solving unsteady Euler equations based on a finite volume approach for a small reduced frequency. Then, an evaluation of unsteady forces and moments for one cycle is conducted using harmonic Fourier analysis. The results of the dynamic yaw stability derivatives for both simulations of the model show a good agreement.

  6. MVL-PLA2, a Snake Venom Phospholipase A2, Inhibits Angiogenesis through an Increase in Microtubule Dynamics and Disorganization of Focal Adhesions

    Bazaa, Amine,; Pasquier, Eddy; Defilles, Céline; Limam, Ines; Kessentini-Zouari, Raoudha; Kallech-Ziri, Olfa; Battari, Assou El; Braguer, Diane; Ayeb, Mohamed El; Marrakchi, Naziha; Luis, José

    2010-01-01

    Integrins are essential protagonists of the complex multi-step process of angiogenesis that has now become a major target for the development of anticancer therapies. We recently reported and characterized that MVL-PLA2, a novel phospholipase A2 from Macrovipera lebetina venom, exhibited anti-integrin activity. In this study, we show that MVL-PLA2 also displays potent anti-angiogenic properties. This phospholipase A2 inhibited adhesion and migration of human microvascular-endothelial cells (H...

  7. Radiation-curable adhesives

    Radiation-curable adhesives may be classified into two broad categories. In the first category, adhesive bonding occurs as a direct result of irradiation. The second category includes pressure-sensitive and hot-melt adhesives, which are composed of linear or lightly cross-linked polymers prepared by a radiation-induced polymerization reaction. This chapter is mainly concerned with radiation-curable adhesives of the first category. The various adhesive types are discussed and adhesive performance is examined, particularly in relation to the chemistry and chemical technology which underlies the individual materials. A description of a limited number of representative applications is included as is an outline of recent developments of curing and dispensing equipment. 268 refs., 14 figs., 13 tabs

  8. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach that....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will...

  9. Effects of urea on freeze-thaw stability of starch-based wood adhesive.

    Wang, Zhenjiong; Gu, Zhengbiao; Li, Zhaofeng; Hong, Yan; Cheng, Li

    2013-06-01

    Urea was used to improve the freeze-thaw (F/T) stability of a renewable starch-based wood adhesive (SWA). The improved stability was supported by the enhanced viscosity stability and bonding performance stability after repeated F/T cycling. The results of dynamic time sweep experiments, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (PNMR) showed that the improved stability can be due to the ability of urea to inhibit the retrogradation of starch molecules in the starch-based wood adhesive system. Urea can be used as an effective additive for improving storage properties of starch-based wood adhesive in low temperature environment. Approximately 15% (w/w) urea was the determined optimal dosage. PMID:23618285

  10. How actin/myosin crosstalks guide the adhesion, locomotion and polarization of cells.

    Sackmann, Erich

    2015-11-01

    Cell-tissue-tissue interaction is determined by specific short range forces between cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) and ligands of the tissue, long range repulsion forces mediated by cell surface grafted macromolecules and adhesion-induced elastic stresses in the cell envelope. This interplay of forces triggers the rapid random clustering of tightly coupled linkers. By coupling of actin gel patches to the intracellular domains of the CAMs, these clusters can grow in a secondary process resulting in the formation of functional adhesion microdomains (ADs). The ADs can act as biochemical steering centers by recruiting and activating functional proteins, such as GTPases and associated regulating proteins, through electrostatic-hydrophobic forces with cationic lipid domains that act as attractive centers. First, I summarize physical concepts of cell adhesion revealed by studies of biomimetic systems. Then I describe the role of the adhesion domains as biochemical signaling platforms and force transmission centers promoting cellular protrusions, in terms of a shell string model of cells. Protrusion forces are generated by actin gelation triggered by molecular machines (focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Src-kinases and associated adaptors) which assemble around newly formed integrin clusters. They recruit and activate the GTPases Rac-1 and actin gelation promoters to charged membrane domains via electrostatic-hydrophobic forces. The cell front is pushed forward in a cyclic and stepwise manner and the step-width is determined by the dynamics antagonistic interplay between Rac-1 and RhoA. The global cell polarization in the direction of motion is mediated by the actin-microtubule (MT) crosstalk at adhesion domains. Supramolecular actin-MT assemblies at the front help to promote actin polymerization. At the rear they regulate the dismantling of the ADs through the Ca(++)-mediated activation of the protease calpain and trigger their disruption by RhoA mediated contraction via

  11. Determinants of International Migration to the OECD in a Three-Way Dynamic Panel Framework

    I. RUYSSEN; G. EVERAERT; G. RAYP

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the determinants of bilateral immigrant ows to 19 OECD countries between 1998 and 2007 from both advanced and developing origin countries. We pay particular attention to dynamics by including both the lagged migrant ow and the migrant stock to capture partial adjustment and network effects. To correct for the dynamic panel data bias of the fixed effects estimator we use a bootstrap algorithm. Our results indicate that immigrants are primarily attracted by better income...

  12. Determinants and dynamics of migration to OECD countries in a three-dimensional panel framework

    Ruyssen, Ilse; Everaert, Gerdie; Rayp, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the determinants of bilateral immigrant flows to 19 OECD countries between 1998 and 2007 from both advanced and developing origin countries. We pay particular attention to dynamics by including both the lagged migrant flow and the migrant stock to capture partial adjustment and network effects. To correct for the dynamic panel data bias of the fixed effects estimator we use a bootstrap algorithm. Our results indicate that immigrants are primarily attracted by better in...

  13. Hydration and chain entanglement determines the optimum thickness of poly(HEMA-co-PEG₁₀MA) brushes for effective resistance to settlement and adhesion of marine fouling organisms.

    Yandi, Wetra; Mieszkin, Sophie; Martin-Tanchereau, Pierre; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A; Tyson, Lyndsey; Liedberg, Bo; Ederth, Thomas

    2014-07-23

    Understanding how surface physicochemical properties influence the settlement and adhesion of marine fouling organisms is important for the development of effective and environmentally benign marine antifouling coatings. We demonstrate that the thickness of random poly(HEMA-co-PEG10MA) copolymer brushes affect antifouling behavior. Films of thicknesses ranging from 50 to 1000 Å were prepared via surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization and characterized using infrared spectroscopy, ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy and contact angle measurements. The fouling resistance of these films was investigated by protein adsorption, attachment of the marine bacterium Cobetia marina, settlement and strength of attachment tests of zoospores of the marine alga Ulva linza and static immersion field tests. These assays show that the polymer film thickness influenced the antifouling performance, in that there is an optimum thickness range, 200-400 Å (dry thickness), where fouling of all types, as well as algal spore adhesion, was lower. Field test results also showed lower fouling within the same thickness range after 2 weeks of immersion. Studies by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation and underwater captive bubble contact angle measurements show a strong correlation between lower fouling and higher hydration, viscosity and surface energy of the poly(HEMA-co-PEG10MA) brushes at thicknesses around 200-400 Å. We hypothesize that the reduced antifouling performance is caused by a lower hydration capacity of the polymer for thinner films, and that entanglement and crowding in the film reduces the conformational freedom, hydration capacity and fouling resistance for thicker films. PMID:24945705

  14. Tissue adhesives in otorhinolaryngology

    Schneider, Gerlind

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of medical tissue adhesives has a long history without finding an all-purpose tissue adhesive for clinical daily routine. This is caused by the specific demands which are made on a tissue adhesive, and the different areas of application. In otorhinolaryngology, on the one hand, this is the mucosal environment as well as the application on bones, cartilage and periphery nerves. On the other hand, there are stressed regions (skin, oral cavity, pharynx, oesophagus, trachea and unstressed regions (middle ear, nose and paranasal sinuses, cranial bones. But due to the facts that adhesives can have considerable advantages in assuring surgery results, prevention of complications and so reduction of medical costs/treatment expenses, the search for new adhesives for use in otorhinolaryngology will be continued intensively. In parallel, appropriate application systems have to be developed for microscopic and endoscopic use.

  15. Experimental and numerical investigations on adhesively bonded joints

    Negru, R.; Marsavina, L.; Hluscu, M.

    2016-04-01

    Two types of adhesively bonded joints were experimental and numerical investigated. Firstly, the adhesives were characterized through a set of tests and the main elastic and mechanical properties were obtained. After that, the stress distributions at interface and middle of adhesive layer were determined using a linear elastic FEA. The numerical data were fitted by a power law in order to determine the critical values of intensity of stress singularity.

  16. The application of virtual prototyping methods to determine the dynamic parameters of mobile robot

    Kurc, Krzysztof; Szybicki, Dariusz; Burghardt, Andrzej; Muszyńska, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents methods used to determine the parameters necessary to build a mathematical model of an underwater robot with a crawler drive. The parameters present in the dynamics equation will be determined by means of advanced mechatronic design tools, including: CAD/CAE software andMES modules. The virtual prototyping process is described as well as the various possible uses (design adaptability) depending on the optional accessories added to the vehicle. A mathematical model is presented to show the kinematics and dynamics of the underwater crawler robot, essential for the design stage.

  17. Isolation and biochemical characterization of underwater adhesives from diatoms.

    Poulsen, Nicole; Kröger, Nils; Harrington, Matthew J; Brunner, Eike; Paasch, Silvia; Buhmann, Matthias T

    2014-01-01

    Many aquatic organisms are able to colonize surfaces through the secretion of underwater adhesives. Diatoms are unicellular algae that have the capability to colonize any natural and man-made submerged surfaces. There is great technological interest in both mimicking and preventing diatom adhesion, yet the biomolecules responsible have so far remained unidentified. A new method for the isolation of diatom adhesive material is described and its amino acid and carbohydrate composition determined. The adhesive materials from two model diatoms show differences in their amino acid and carbohydrate compositions, but also share characteristic features including a high content of uronic acids, the predominance of hydrophilic amino acid residues, and the presence of 3,4-dihydroxyproline, an extremely rare amino acid. Proteins containing dihydroxyphenylalanine, which mediate underwater adhesion of mussels, are absent. The data on the composition of diatom adhesives are consistent with an adhesion mechanism based on complex coacervation of polyelectrolyte-like biomolecules. PMID:24689803

  18. Multitechnique monitoring of fatigue damage in adhesively bonded composite lap-joints

    Karpenko, Oleksii; Koricho, Ermias; Khomenko, Anton; Dib, Gerges; Haq, Mahmoodul; Udpa, Lalita

    2015-03-01

    The requirement for reduced structural weight has driven the development of adhesively bonded joints. However, a major issue preventing their full acceptance is the initiation of premature failure in the form of a disbond between adherends, mainly due to fatigue, manufacturing flaws or impact damage. This work presents the integrated approach for in-situ monitoring of degradation of the adhesive bond in the GFRP composite lap-joint using ultrasonic guided waves and dynamic measurements from strategically embedded FBG sensors. Guided waves are actuated with surface mounted piezoelectric elements and mode tuning is used to provide high sensitivity to the degradation of the adhesive layer parameters. Composite lap-joints are subjected to fatigue loading, and data from piezoceramic transducers are collected at regular intervals to evaluate the progression of damage. Results demonstrate that quasi-static loading affects guided wave measurements considerably, but FBG sensors can be used to monitor the applied load levels and residual strains in the adhesive bond. The proposed technique shows promise for determining the post-damage stiffness of adhesively bonded joints.

  19. Use of high and low frequency dielectric measurements in the NDE of adhesively bonded composite joints

    Pethrick, R. A.; Hayward, D.; McConnell, B. K.; Crane, R. L.

    2005-05-01

    Dielectric spectroscopy has been developed as a non-destructive technique for assessment of moisture content and structural integrity of adhesively bonded joints. Knowledge of these parameters is particularly crucial for the aerospace industry, since environmental degradation of adhesive joints presents a major limit on their utilization. High and low frequency measurements have been carried out on joints assembled from CFRP adherend, and a commercially available adhesive (AF 163-2K). The samples have been aged in deionised water at 75oC to chart the effect water ingress has on bond durability. In addition, some joints have been exposed to cryogenic temperatures to mimic the conditions joints experience whilst an aircraft is in flight. In this way it has been possible to determine the extent of degradation caused by freezing of water within the joint structure. Dielectric behaviour of the joints was studied in both the frequency and in the time domain. Frequency domain analysis allows the amount and effects of moisture ingress in the bondline to be assessed, whereas the time domain highlights the onset of joint defects with increasing exposure time. Mechanical testing of the joints has been carried out to enable correlation between changes in strength and failure mechanism due to moisture ingress, with changes in the dielectric data. In addition, dielectric studies of the neat adhesive have been undertaken, as have gravimetric and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis. These have helped reveal the effects of ageing upon the adhesive layer itself.

  20. Handbook of adhesion

    Packham, D E

    2006-01-01

    This second edition of the successful Handbook of Adhesion provides concise and authoritative articles covering many aspects of the science and technology associated with adhesion and adhesives. It is intended to fill a gap between the necessarily simplified treatment of the student textbook and the full and thorough treatment of the research monograph and review article. The articles are structured in such a way, with internal cross-referencing and external literature references, that the reader can build up a broader and deeper understanding, as their needs require.This second edition includ

  1. Lactobacillus Adhesion to Mucus

    Maxwell L. Van Tassell

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Mucus provides protective functions in the gastrointestinal tract and plays an important role in the adhesion of microorganisms to host surfaces. Mucin glycoproteins polymerize, forming a framework to which certain microbial populations can adhere, including probiotic Lactobacillus species. Numerous mechanisms for adhesion to mucus have been discovered in lactobacilli, including partially characterized mucus binding proteins. These mechanisms vary in importance with the in vitro models studied, which could significantly affect the perceived probiotic potential of the organisms. Understanding the nature of mucus-microbe interactions could be the key to elucidating the mechanisms of probiotic adhesion within the host.

  2. A Unified Approach to Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion Control with Parameter Determination by Eigenvalue Assignment

    Yu-Chi Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a unified approach to nonlinear dynamic inversion control algorithm with the parameters for desired dynamics determined by using an eigenvalue assignment method, which may be applied in a very straightforward and convenient way. By using this method, it is not necessary to transform the nonlinear equations into linear equations by feedback linearization before beginning control designs. The applications of this method are not limited to affine nonlinear control systems or limited to minimum phase problems if the eigenvalues of error dynamics are carefully assigned so that the desired dynamics is stable. The control design by using this method is shown to be robust to modeling uncertainties. To validate the theory, the design of a UAV control system is presented as an example. Numerical simulations show the performance of the design to be quite remarkable.

  3. Quaternion determinant expressions for multilevel dynamical correlation functions of parametric random matrices

    Parametric random matrix ensembles which describe the transition among different matrix symmetries are studied. In the case of the transition to the hermitian symmetry, exact expressions for dynamical correlation functions among many eigenvalues at different times are shown to have quaternion determinant forms

  4. Quaternion determinant expressions for multilevel dynamical correlation functions of parametric random matrices

    Nagao, Taro; Forrester, Peter J

    1999-12-20

    Parametric random matrix ensembles which describe the transition among different matrix symmetries are studied. In the case of the transition to the hermitian symmetry, exact expressions for dynamical correlation functions among many eigenvalues at different times are shown to have quaternion determinant forms.

  5. Sticking around: an up-close look at drop adhesion

    Paxson, Adam T

    2013-01-01

    We present a fluid dynamics video showing the adhesion of a drop to a superhydrophobic surface. We use environmental scanning electron microscopy to observe depinning events at the microscale. As the drop moves along the surface, the advancing portion of the contact line simply lies down onto the upcoming roughness features, contributing negligibly to adhesion. After measuring the local receding contact angle of capillary bridges formed on a micropillar array, we find that these depinning events follow the Gibbs depinning criterion. We further extend this technique to two-scale hierarchical structures to reveal a self-similar depinning mechanism in which the adhesion of the entire drop depends only on the pinning at the very smallest level of roughness hierarchy. With this self-similar depinning mechanism we develop a model to predict the adhesion of drops to superhydrophobic surfaces that explains both the low adhesion on sparsely structured surfaces and the surprisingly high adhesion on surfaces whose featu...

  6. Adhesion of Lunar Dust

    Walton, Otis R.

    2007-04-01

    This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e., from rover wheels, astronaut boots and rocket engine blast) and static electric effects (from UV photo-ionization and/or tribo-electric charging) are likely to be the major contributors to the transport of dust particles. If fine regolith particles are deposited on a surface, then surface energy-related (e.g., van der Walls) adhesion forces and static-electric-image forces are likely to be the strongest contributors to adhesion. Some measurement techniques are offered to quantify the strength of adhesion forces. And finally some dust removal techniques are discussed.

  7. Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (LAD)

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (LAD) LAD is an immune deficiency in ... are slow to heal also may have LAD. Treatment and Research Doctors prescribe antibiotics to prevent and ...

  8. Management of adhesive capsulitis

    Neviaser, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Kristen L Stupay,1 Andrew S Neviaser2 1Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2George Washington University Medical Faculty Associates, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder is a condition of capsular contracture that reduces both active and passive glenohumeral motion. The cause of adhesive capsulitis is not known but it is strongly associated with endocrine abnormalities such as diabetes. Diverse terminology and the absence of definitive cri...

  9. [Adhesion to the antiretroviral treatment].

    Carballo, M

    2004-12-01

    The objective of the therapy antiretroviral is to improve the quality of life and the survival of the persons affected by the VIH through the suppression of the viral replication. Nevertheless one of the present problems is the resistant apparition of stumps to the new medicines caused by an incorrect management of the therapeutic plan; by an incorrect adhesion of the personal processing. Since the therapeutic success will depend, among others factors, and of important form of the degree of implication and commitment of the person affected, is a matter of identifying prematurely the possible situations concomitants (personal factors and of addiction, psycho-social, related to the processing and its possible secondary effects, associated factors to the own illness or even to the relation professional-patient) that can interfere in a correct adhesion. For it is necessary of the interaction multidisciplinary of the welfare team, and fundamental the work of nursing at the moment of to detect the possible determinant factors and the intervention definition of strategies arrived at by consensus with the own person, that they promote it or it improve. The quantification of the degree of adhesion (measure in %) values through various direct and indirect methods and should keep in mind in it takes of therapeutic decisions being able to come to be advised the suspension of the processing until obtaining to conscience to the person affected of the importance of a correct therapeutic compliance. PMID:15672996

  10. Thickness determination in textile material design: dynamic modeling and numerical algorithms

    Textile material design is of paramount importance in the study of functional clothing design. It is therefore important to determine the dynamic heat and moisture transfer characteristics in the human body–clothing–environment system, which directly determine the heat–moisture comfort level of the human body. Based on a model of dynamic heat and moisture transfer with condensation in porous fabric at low temperature, this paper presents a new inverse problem of textile thickness determination (IPTTD). Adopting the idea of the least-squares method, we formulate the IPTTD into a function minimization problem. By means of the finite-difference method, quasi-solution method and direct search method for one-dimensional minimization problems, we construct iterative algorithms of the approximated solution for the IPTTD. Numerical simulation results validate the formulation of the IPTTD and demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed numerical algorithms. (paper)

  11. Comparison of Two GC Methods for the Determination of Halogenated Hydrocarbons in Adhesives Method%两种GC法测定胶粘剂中卤代烃的方法比较研究

    张惠; 冷中成; 王强

    2012-01-01

    The hydrogen flame ionization detector and electron capture detector were used to determinate the content of four kinds of halogenated hydrocarbons in adhesives method.By comparison,these two methods were simple,and had accurate results.But the sensitivity of these two methods,the detection limit,the linear range and practialrange were different.%采用氢火焰离子化检测器与电子捕获检测器两种方法对胶粘剂中四种卤代烃的含量进行测定。通过比较,两种方法操作简便,结果比较准确;但两种方法的灵敏度、检测限及线性范围有较大区别,实用范围不同。

  12. Dynamic Yield Strength and Spall Strength Determination for AerMet 100 Steels

    Well-controlled impact studies have been conducted on ''as-received'' and heat-treated AerMet 100 steel alloy samples to determine their dynamic material properties. In particular, gas gun and time-resolved laser interferometer have been used to measure the fine structure in the particle velocity profiles resulting from symmetric plate impact. Impact velocities ranged from 0.40 km/s to 0.90 km/s. These experiments have allowed us to estimate the dynamic yield and span strengths of the ''as-received'' and heat-treated AerMet 100 steel

  13. Determination of Mean Inner Potential by Electron Holography Along with Electron Dynamic Simulation

    王岩国; 刘红荣; 杨奇斌; 张泽

    2003-01-01

    Off-axis electron holography in a field-emission-gun transmission electron microscope and electron dynamic simulation is used to determine the mean inner potential of copper. The phase shift of object wave versus specimen thickness is calculated up to 30 nm using electron dynamic formula, and the sample thickness is decided by match of the experimental and calculated phase shift. Based on the measured phase shift, the calculated mean inner potential of Cu is 21.2 V, which agrees with the reported values within the experimental error.

  14. Pulsatile microfluidics as an analytical tool for determining the dynamic characteristics of microfluidic systems

    Vedel, Søren; Olesen, Laurits Højgaard; Bruus, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of all fluid dynamic time scales is needed to fully understand and hence exploit the capabilities of fluid flow in microfluidic systems. We propose the use of harmonically oscillating microfluidics as an analytical tool for the deduction of these time scales. Furthermore, we......-filled interconnected elastic microfluidic tubes containing a large, trapped air bubble and driven by a pulsatile pressure difference. We demonstrate good agreement between the system-level model and the experimental results, allowing us to determine the dynamic time scales of the system. However, the generic analysis...... can be applied to all microfluidic systems, both ac and dc....

  15. Study of Osteoclast Adhesion to Cortical Bone Surfaces: A Correlative Microscopy Approach for Concomitant Imaging of Cellular Dynamics and Surface Modifications.

    Shemesh, Michal; Addadi, Sefi; Milstein, Yonat; Geiger, Benjamin; Addadi, Lia

    2016-06-22

    Bone remodeling relies on the coordinated functioning of osteoblasts, bone-forming cells, and osteoclasts, bone-resorbing cells. The effects of specific chemical and physical bone features on the osteoclast adhesive apparatus, the sealing zone ring, and their relation to resorption functionality are still not well-understood. We designed and implemented a correlative imaging method that enables monitoring of the same area of bone surface by time-lapse light microscopy, electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy before, during, and after exposure to osteoclasts. We show that sealing zone rings preferentially develop around surface protrusions, with lateral dimensions of several micrometers, and ∼1 μm height. Direct overlay of sealing zone rings onto resorption pits on the bone surface shows that the rings adapt to pit morphology. The correlative procedure presented here is noninvasive and performed under ambient conditions, without the need for sample labeling. It can potentially be applied to study various aspects of cell-matrix interactions. PMID:26682493

  16. Dependence of polymer thin film adhesion energy on cohesive interactions between chains

    Xia, Wenjie; Hsu, David; Keten, Sinan

    2014-01-01

    The adhesion of supported polymer thin films is predominantly influenced by the substrate-film interfacial properties. Utilizing steered molecular dynamics simulations, here we uncover that the cohesive noncovalent forces between polymer chains in the film also have a significant effect on the adhesive properties of supported film. We demonstrate that weaker interchain interactions, all else being the same, can induce higher adhesion energy within the interface. Three different adhesion regim...

  17. Dynamic capabilities for cooperation in Brazilian multinational and factors determining its management

    Priscila Rezende da Costa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the context of emerging companies’ growth, current challenges depend on the local generation of product and process innovations, as well as dynamic capability to generate innovative solutions cooperatively and new globe business models. The objective of this study is to analyse the determining managerial factors for the dynamic capability of cooperation in Brazilian multinationals (BMNs. A survey was conducted with a sample of 60 BMNs, and a structured questionnaire and statistical tests with factorial analysis and Cronbach's alpha were used. The aggregate analysis of the results indicates that BMNs are going through a transitional process between the operational capability of cooperation and the capability for dynamic cooperation, which are relevant to the continuous adaptation of already-established cooperative management routines and the evaluation and incorporation of the relational capability of management practices that consider systemic flows, open innovation and integrate strategic intentionality into cooperative processes.

  18. Determination of dynamic performance of freight cars taking into account technical condition of side bearers

    S.Myamlin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The railway transport plays an important role in social and economic life of the country and carries out the large containment of transportation activities. The transport industry should migrate towards innovation changes and increase its significance as an important transit subsystem on the way of renovation of both the infrastructure and the strategy of all transportation process components including the interaction with other transport modes. At present the life sets strategic challenges for the railway branch, and the basic goals among them are as follows: high-speed train traffic development, increase of the weight of freight trains, new rolling stock development etc. Due to the urgency of this subject, the researchers should cope with the task devoted to one of aspects of improving the freight transportation efficiency, namely to the study of effects of various factors and characteristics of technical conditions of the freight cars running gears (which are unavoidable to arise during operation on their basic dynamic indices. The deviations of technical conditions of running gears from the normal state of the wedge system of bogie swing suspension also play an important role among them. The purpose of the paper is to investigate the influence of different factors of the technical conditions of freight car running gears (size deviation in both the bearers and the wedge system during operation on their basic indices – coefficients of horizontal and vertical dynamics, vehicle body acceleration, frame strength, and derailment stability coefficient. Methodology. The study was conducted by numerical integration and mathematical modeling of the freight car dynamic loading using the software package “Dynamics of Rail Vehicles” (“DYNRAIL”. Findings. As a result of the research for freight car dynamic coefficients determination taking into account technical conditions of the side bearers, the dependencies of the basic freight cars

  19. Climate Effects and Feedback Structure Determining Weed Population Dynamics in a Long-Term Experiment

    Lima, Mauricio; Navarrete, Luis; González-Andujar, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    Pest control is one of the areas in which population dynamic theory has been successfully applied to solve practical problems. However, the links between population dynamic theory and model construction have been less emphasized in the management and control of weed populations. Most management models of weed population dynamics have emphasized the role of the endogenous process, but the role of exogenous variables such as climate have been ignored in the study of weed populations and their management. Here, we use long-term data (22 years) on two annual weed species from a locality in Central Spain to determine the importance of endogenous and exogenous processes (local and large-scale climate factors). Our modeling study determined two different feedback structures and climate effects in the two weed species analyzed. While Descurainia sophia exhibited a second-order feedback and low climate influence, Veronica hederifolia was characterized by a first-order feedback structure and important effects from temperature and rainfall. Our results strongly suggest the importance of theoretical population dynamics in understanding plant population systems. Moreover, the use of this approach, discerning between the effect of exogenous and endogenous factors, can be fundamental to applying weed management practices in agricultural systems and to controlling invasive weedy species. This is a radical change from most approaches currently used to guide weed and invasive weedy species managements. PMID:22272362

  20. Determination of Inelastic Mean Free Path by Electron Holography Along with Electron Dynamic Calculation

    王岩国; 刘红荣; 杨奇斌; 张泽

    2003-01-01

    Off-axis electron holography in a field emission gun transmission-electron microscope and electron dynamic calculation are used to determine the absorption coefficient and inelastic mean free path (IMFP) of copper.Dependence of the phase shift of the exit electron wave on the specimen thickness is established by electron dynamic simulation. The established relationship makes it possible to determine the specimen thickness with the calculated phase shift by match of the phase shift measured in the reconstructed phase image. Based on the measured amplitudes in reconstructed exit electron wave and reference wave in the vacuum, the examined IMFP of electron with energy of 200kV in Cu is obtained to be 96nm.

  1. Towards wafer scale inductive determination of magnetostatic and dynamic parameters of magnetic thin films and multilayers

    Sievers, Sibylle; Nass, Paul; Serrano-Guisan, Santiago; Pasquale, Massimo; Schumacher, Hans Werner

    2013-01-01

    We investigate an inductive probe head suitable for non-invasive characterization of the magnetostatic and dynamic parameters of magnetic thin films and multilayers on the wafer scale. The probe is based on a planar waveguide with rearward high frequency connectors that can be brought in close contact to the wafer surface. Inductive characterization of the magnetic material is carried out by vector network analyzer ferromagnetic resonance. Analysis of the field dispersion of the resonance allows the determination of key material parameters such as the saturation magnetization MS or the effective damping parameter Meff. Three waveguide designs are tested. The broadband frequency response is characterized and the suitability for inductive determination of MS and Meff is compared. Integration of such probes in a wafer prober could in the future allow wafer scale in-line testing of magnetostatic and dynamic key material parameters of magnetic thin films and multilayers.

  2. Determinants of house price dynamics. What can we learn from search engine data?

    Oestmann, Marco; Bennöhr, Lars

    2015-01-01

    There is a broad literature on determinants of house prices, which received increasing attention in the aftermath of the subprime crisis. Additional to macroeconomic standard variables, there might be other hard to measure or even unobservable factors influencing real estate price dynamics. Using quarterly data, we try to increase the informational input of conventional models and capture such effects by including Google search engine query information into a set of standard fundamental varia...

  3. Determine the effect of neck muscle fatigue on dynamic visual acuity in healthy young adults

    Al Saif, Amer A.; Al Senany, Samira

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine whether neck muscle fatigue affects dynamic visual acuity in healthy young participants. [Subjects and Methods] This study was a double-blinded, prospective, randomized, controlled trial. Thirty healthy young subjects (ages 21 to 30 years) participated in the study. Participants were randomly divided into an experimental group (n=15) and a control group (n=15). The experimental group performed an exercise designed to induce neck muscle fatigue ...

  4. Efficiency Determinants and Dynamic Efficiency Changes in Latin American Banking Industries

    M Kabir Hassan; Benito Sanchez

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the dynamic and the determinants of banking industry efficiency in Latin America. Allocative, technical, pure technical and scale efficiencies are calculated and analyzed in each country. We find that Latin American bank managers have been using resources efficiently, but they are not choosing an optimal input/output. Additionally, we find that traditional banking performance measures are positively correlated with efficiencies while variables that measure banking and ...

  5. Dynamic karyotype evolution and unique sex determination systems in Leptidea wood white butterflies

    VOLENÍKOVÁ, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements such as fusions and fissions play an important role in promoting and maintaining speciation. To study these phenomena, genome architecture of three cryptic species of Leptidea wood white butterflies was investigated by means of standard and molecular cytogenetics. High variability in chromosome number and localization of cytogenetic markers was revealed, suggesting dynamic karyotype evolution in these species. Moreover, unique sex-determination system with 3-4 W chr...

  6. Friction and adhesion mediated by supramolecular host-guest complexes

    Guerra, Roberto; Benassi, Andrea; Vanossi, Andrea; Ma, Ming; Urbakh, Michael

    The adhesive and frictional response of an AFM tip connected to a substrate through supramolecular host-guest complexes is investigated by dynamic Monte Carlo simulations. The variation of the pull-off force with the unloading rate recently observed in experiments is here unraveled by evidencing a simultaneous (progressive) break of the bonds at fast (slow) rates. The model reveals the origin of the observed plateaus in the retraction force as a function of tip-surface distance, showing that they ensue from the tip geometrical features. In lateral sliding, the model exhibits a wide range of dynamic behaviors ranging from smooth sliding to stick-slip at different velocities, with the average friction force determined by the characteristic formation/rupture rates of the complexes. In particular, it is shown that for some molecular complexes friction can become almost constant over a wide range of velocities. Also, we show the possibility to exploit ageing effect through slide-hold-slide experiments, in order to infer the characteristic formation rate. Finally, our model predicts a novel "anti-ageing" effect which is characterized by a decrease of static friction force with the hold time. Such effect is explained in terms of enhancement of adhesion during sliding, especially observed at high driving velocities.

  7. Crack Propagation in a Toughened Epoxy Adhesive under Repeated Impacts

    Ian A. Ashcroft

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Adhesives are being increasingly used in structural applications, especially in aerospace, automotive and naval structures, making their structural integrity an important issue. In-service loading histories of such structures usually contain low-energy impacts, repetition of which can significantly affect their performance. This paper deals with the behaviour of the toughened epoxy adhesive FM73 under repeated impacts, known as impact fatigue. Izod impact fatigue tests were performed on FM73 specimens in order to study the evolution of damage and to characterise this via measurable parameters, such as the maximum force and the contact time. A finite element model was developed to simulate the impact tests and this was used to calculate the dynamic strain energy release rate, which was compared with that determined using a simple analytical method. A relationship between the maximum dynamic strain energy release rate and impact fatigue crack growth rate was established that was used as the basis of an impact fatigue crack growth law.

  8. Friction and adhesion mediated by supramolecular host-guest complexes.

    Guerra, Roberto; Benassi, Andrea; Vanossi, Andrea; Ma, Ming; Urbakh, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The adhesive and frictional response of an AFM tip connected to a substrate through supramolecular host-guest complexes is investigated by dynamic Monte Carlo simulations. Here, the variation of the pull-off force with the unloading rate recently observed in experiments is unraveled by evidencing simultaneous (progressive) breaking of the bonds at fast (slow) rates. The model reveals the origin of the observed plateaus in the retraction force as a function of the tip-surface distance, showing that they result from the tip geometrical features. In lateral sliding, the model exhibits a wide range of dynamic behaviors ranging from smooth sliding to stick-slip at different velocities, with the average friction force determined by the characteristic formation/rupture rates of the complexes. In particular, it is shown that for some molecular complexes friction can become almost constant over a wide range of velocities. Also, we show the possibility of exploiting the ageing effect through slide-hold-slide experiments, in order to infer the characteristic formation rate. Finally, our model predicts a novel "anti-ageing" effect which is characterized by a decrease of the static friction force with the hold time. Such an effect is explained in terms of enhancement of adhesion during sliding, especially observed at high driving velocities. PMID:26975343

  9. A new dynamic formula for determining the coefficient of Smagorinsky model

    2011-01-01

    The most common method to determine the coefficient of Smagorinsky model now is to employ the Germano identity,however it is too complex and expensive in numerical calculation. In this letter we propose a new dynamic formula for determining the coefficient,which is based on the Kolmogorov equation of filtered velocity in physical space.The simplified formula is quite easy to implement in calculation.It is then verified in both homogeneous isotropic turbulence and wall-bounded turbulence by A Priori and A...

  10. Fracture mechanics characterisation of medium-size adhesive joint specimens

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Jacobsen, T.K.

    2004-01-01

    Medium-size specimens (<2 m in length), consisting of two glass-fibre beams bonded together by an adhesive layer were tested in four point bending to determine their load carrying capacity. Specimens having different thickness were tested. Except for onespecimen, the cracking occurred as cracking...... along the adhesive layer; initially cracking occurred along the adhesive/laminate interface, but after some crack extension the cracking took place inside the laminate (for one specimen the later part of thecracking occurred unstably along the adhesive/ laminate interface). Crack bridging by fibres was...

  11. Electrically Conductive Epoxy Adhesives

    Lan Bai

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Conductive adhesives are widely used in electronic packaging applications such as die attachment and solderless interconnections, component repair, display interconnections, and heat dissipation. The effects of film thickness as functions of filler volume fraction, conductive filler size, shape, as well as uncured adhesive matrix viscosity on the electrical conduction behavior of epoxy-based adhesives are presented in this work. For this purpose, epoxy-based adhesives were prepared using conductive fillers of different size, shape, and types, including Ni powder, flakes, and filaments, Ag powder, and Cu powder. The filaments were 20 μm in diameter, and 160 or 260 μm in length. HCl and H3PO4 acid solutions were used to etch and remove the surface oxide layers from the fillers. The plane resistance of filled adhesive films was measured using the four-point method. In all cases of conductive filler addition, the planar resistivity levels for the composite adhesive films increased when the film thickness was reduced. The shape of resistivity-thickness curves was negative exponential decaying type and was modeled using a mathematical relation. The relationships between the conductive film resistivities and the filler volume fractions were also derived mathematically based on the experimental data. Thus, the effects of surface treatment of filler particles, the type, size, shape of fillers, and the uncured epoxy viscosity could be included empirically by using these mathematical relations based on the experimental data. By utilizing the relations we proposed to model thickness-dependent and volume fraction-dependent conduction behaviors separately, we were able to describe the combined and coupled volume fraction-film thickness relationship mathematically based on our experimental data.

  12. Repeated origin and loss of adhesive toepads in geckos.

    Tony Gamble

    Full Text Available Geckos are well known for their extraordinary clinging abilities and many species easily scale vertical or even inverted surfaces. This ability is enabled by a complex digital adhesive mechanism (adhesive toepads that employs van der Waals based adhesion, augmented by frictional forces. Numerous morphological traits and behaviors have evolved to facilitate deployment of the adhesive mechanism, maximize adhesive force and enable release from the substrate. The complex digital morphologies that result allow geckos to interact with their environment in a novel fashion quite differently from most other lizards. Details of toepad morphology suggest multiple gains and losses of the adhesive mechanism, but lack of a comprehensive phylogeny has hindered efforts to determine how frequently adhesive toepads have been gained and lost. Here we present a multigene phylogeny of geckos, including 107 of 118 recognized genera, and determine that adhesive toepads have been gained and lost multiple times, and remarkably, with approximately equal frequency. The most likely hypothesis suggests that adhesive toepads evolved 11 times and were lost nine times. The overall external morphology of the toepad is strikingly similar in many lineages in which it is independently derived, but lineage-specific differences are evident, particularly regarding internal anatomy, with unique morphological patterns defining each independent derivation.

  13. Nanoscale deicing by molecular dynamics simulation

    Xiao, Senbo; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2016-07-01

    Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice adhesion strength by an aqueous water layer, and provide atomistic details that support previous experimental studies. Our results contribute quantitative comparison of nanoscale adhesion strength of ice on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, and supply for the first time theoretical references for understanding the mechanics at the atomistic origins of macroscale ice adhesion.Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice

  14. What physiological changes and cerebral traces tell us about adhesion to fiction during theater-watching?

    Marie-Noëlle Metz-Lutz

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Live theater is typically designed to alter the state of mind of the audience. Indeed, the perceptual inputs issuing from a live theatrical performance are intended to represent something else, and the actions, emphasised by the writing and staging, are the key prompting the adhesion of viewers to fiction, i.e. their belief that it is real. This phenomenon raises the issue of the cognitive processes governing access to a fictional reality during live theater and of their cerebral underpinnings. To get insight into the physiological substrates of adhesion we recreated the peculiar context of watching live drama in a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment, with simultaneous recording of heart activity. The instants of adhesion were defined as the co-occurrence of theatrical events determined a priori by the stage director and the spectators’ offline reports of moments when fiction acted as reality. These data served to specify, for each spectator, individual fMRI time-series, used in a random-effect group analysis to define the pattern of brain response to theatrical events. The changes in this pattern related to subjects’ adhesion to fiction, were investigated using a region of interest analysis. The results showed that adhesion to theatrical events correlated with increased activity in the left BA47 and pSTS, together with a decrease in dynamic heart rate variability, leading us to discuss the hypothesis of subtle changes in the subjects’ state of awareness, enabling them to mentally dissociate physical and mental (drama-viewing experiences, to account for the phenomenon of adhesion to dramatic fiction.

  15. Determination of thermal/dynamic characteristics of lava flow from surface thermal measurements

    Ismail-Zadeh, Alik; Melnik, Oleg; Korotkii, Alexander; Tsepelev, Igor; Kovtunov, Dmitry

    2016-04-01

    Rapid development of ground based thermal cameras, drones and satellite data allows getting repeated thermal images of the surface of the lava flow. Available instrumentation allows getting a large amount of data during a single lava flow eruption. These data require development of appropriate quantitative techniques to link subsurface dynamics with observations. We present a new approach to assimilation of thermal measurements at lava's surface to the bottom of the lava flow to determine lava's thermal and dynamic characteristics. Mathematically this problem is reduced to solving an inverse boundary problem. Namely, using known conditions at one part of the model boundary we determine the missing condition at the remaining part of the boundary. Using an adjoint method we develop a numerical approach to the mathematical problem based on the determination of the missing boundary condition and lava flow characteristics. Numerical results show that in the case of smooth input data lava temperature and velocity can be determined with a high accuracy. A noise imposed on the smooth input data results in a less accurate solution, but still acceptable below some noise level. The proposed approach to assimilate measured data brings an opportunity to estimate thermal budget of the lava flow.

  16. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives.

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-11-01

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm(2) provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects. PMID:26457864

  17. Cooling Rate Dependent Ellipsometry Measurements to Determine the Dynamics of Thin Glassy Films.

    Glor, Ethan C; Fakhraai, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    This report aims to fully describe the experimental technique of using ellipsometry for cooling rate dependent Tg (CR-Tg) experiments. These measurements are simple high-throughput characterization experiments, which can determine the glass transition temperature (Tg), average dynamics, fragility and the expansion coefficient of the super-cooled liquid and glassy states for a variety of glassy materials. This technique allows for these parameters to be measured in a single experiment, while other methods must combine a variety of different techniques to investigate all of these properties. Measurements of dynamics close to Tg are particularly challenging. The advantage of cooling rate dependent Tg measurements over other methods which directly probe bulk and surface relaxation dynamics is that they are relatively quick and simple experiments, which do not utilize fluorophores or other complicated experimental techniques. Furthermore, this technique probes the average dynamics of technologically relevant thin films in temperature and relaxation time (τα) regimes relevant to the glass transition (τα > 100 sec). The limitation to using ellipsometry for cooling rate dependent Tg experiments is that it cannot probe relaxation times relevant to measurements of viscosity (τα film remains throughout the experiment. PMID:26863256

  18. Experimental determination of the dynamic shape factor of primary sodium peroxide aerosols

    A hypothetical accident in a fast breeeder reactor could cause aerosols to be generated in a sodium fire. The computer codes relative to the modeling of such accidents make it necessary to use various input parameters among which the dynamic shape factor kappa of the aerosols produced. This study concerns the shape factor of sodium peroxide; the discrepancies between the values of this parameter given in the literature justifies the usefulness of our work. We have tried to use the simplest method. The dynamic shape factor is proportional to the ratio of the equivalent volume diameter to the aerodynamic diameter for a given particle. Therefore, these two quantities must be determined. The particles are classified by means of a centrifuge as a function of their aerodynamic diameter; the equivalent volume diameter of the particles thus selected can then be determined by assessing the mass (neutron activation) and the number (electron microscope) on the same sample of particles. Our results show that the dynamic shape factor of sodium peroxide submicronic particles generated by a fire is nearly 1 and the values of this parameter increase with the particles size

  19. Application of static and dynamic enclosures in determining DMS and OCS fluxes in Sphagnum peatlands

    Demello, William Zamboni; Hines, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    A static enclosure method was applied to determine the exchange of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and OCS between the surface of Sphagnum peatlands and the atmosphere. Measurements were performed concurrently with dynamic enclosure measurements with S-free air used as sweep gas. DMS emission rates determined by both methods were comparable between 5 and 500 nmol/m(sup -2)h(sup -1). The dynamic method provided positive OCS flux rates (emission) for measurements performed at sites containing Sphagnum. Conversely, data from the static method indicated that OCS was consumed from the atmosphere. Measurements using both techniques at a site devoid of vegetation showed that peat is a source of both DMS and OCS. Results suggested that OCS is produced in surface peat but it is taken up from the atmosphere by Sphagnum mosses. However, the net effect of both processes is that OCS uptake exceeds emission. The dynamic enclosure technique is adequate to measure rates of emissions of S gases which are produced in peatlands but not consumed, as long as attention is paid to the rate of sweep flow.

  20. Multibody simulation of adhesion pili

    Zakrisson, Johan; Servin, Martin; Axner, Ove; Lacoursiere, Claude; Andersson, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    We present a coarse grained rigid multibody model of a subunit assembled helix-like polymer, e.g., adhesion pili expressed by bacteria, that is capable of describing the polymers force-extension response. With building blocks representing individual subunits the model appropriately describes the complex behavior of pili expressed by the gram-negative uropathogenic Escherichia coli bacteria under the action of an external force. Numerical simulations show that the dynamics of the model, which include both the effects of unwinding and rewinding, are in good quantitative agreement with the characteristic force-extension response as observed experimentally for type 1 and P pili. By tuning the model, it is also possible to reproduce the force-extension response in the presence of anti-shaft antibodies, which dramatically changes the mechanical properties. Thus, the model and the results in this work give enhanced understanding of how a pilus unwinds under action of external forces and provide new perspective of th...

  1. Determination of macroscopic transport coefficients of a dissipative particle dynamics solvent

    Azarnykh, Dmitrii; Litvinov, Sergey; Bian, Xin; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach to determine macroscopic transport coefficients of a dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) solvent. Shear viscosity, isothermal speed of sound, and bulk viscosity result from DPD-model input parameters and can be determined only a posteriori. For this reason approximate predictions of these quantities are desirable in order to set appropriate DPD input parameters. For the purpose of deriving an improved approximate prediction we analyze the autocorrelation of shear and longitudinal modes in Fourier space of a DPD solvent for Kolmogorov flow. We propose a fitting function with nonexponential properties which gives a good approximation to these autocorrelation functions. Given this fitting function we improve significantly the capability of a priori determination of macroscopic solvent transport coefficients in comparison to previously used exponential fitting functions.

  2. Determination of macroscopic transport coefficients of a dissipative particle dynamics solvent.

    Azarnykh, Dmitrii; Litvinov, Sergey; Bian, Xin; Adams, Nikolaus A

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach to determine macroscopic transport coefficients of a dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) solvent. Shear viscosity, isothermal speed of sound, and bulk viscosity result from DPD-model input parameters and can be determined only a posteriori. For this reason approximate predictions of these quantities are desirable in order to set appropriate DPD input parameters. For the purpose of deriving an improved approximate prediction we analyze the autocorrelation of shear and longitudinal modes in Fourier space of a DPD solvent for Kolmogorov flow. We propose a fitting function with nonexponential properties which gives a good approximation to these autocorrelation functions. Given this fitting function we improve significantly the capability of a priori determination of macroscopic solvent transport coefficients in comparison to previously used exponential fitting functions. PMID:26871186

  3. Wood Composite Adhesives

    Gomez-Bueso, Jose; Haupt, Robert

    The global environment, in which phenolic resins are being used for wood composite manufacture, has changed significantly during the last decade. This chapter reviews trends that are driving the use and consumption of phenolic resins around the world. The review begins with recent data on volume usage and regional trends, followed by an analysis of factors affecting global markets. In a section on environmental factors, the impact of recent formaldehyde emission regulations is discussed. The section on economics introduces wood composite production as it relates to the available adhesive systems, with special emphasis on the technical requirement to improve phenolic reactivity. Advances in composite process technology are introduced, especially in regard to the increased demands the improvements place upon adhesive system performance. The specific requirements for the various wood composite families are considered in the context of adhesive performance needs. The results of research into current chemistries are discussed, with a review of recent findings regarding the mechanisms of phenolic condensation and acceleration. Also, the work regarding alternate natural materials, such as carbohydrates, lignins, tannins, and proteinaceous materials, is presented. Finally, new developments in alternative adhesive technologies are reported.

  4. Tracheomalacia in adults with cystic fibrosis: determination of prevalence and severity with dynamic cine CT.

    McDermott, Shaunagh

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the prevalence and severity of tracheomalacia in adults with cystic fibrosis (CF) by using dynamic cine multidetector computed tomography (CT) and to correlate these findings with pulmonary function test (PFT) results and the severity of parenchymal lung disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this institutional review board-approved HIPAA-compliant study, 40 patients with CF (22 men, 18 women; mean age, 28 years +\\/- 8 [standard deviation]; age range, 18-54 years) prospectively underwent PFTs, standard thin-section CT, and two dynamic cine multidetector CT acquisitions. Ten control subjects underwent dynamic cine multidetector CT. After standard thin-section CT was completed, dynamic cine multidetector CT was performed during a forced expiratory maneuver and during coughing. Dynamic cine multidetector CT images in nine patients were excluded. Maximal inspiratory, dynamic expiratory, and end-expiratory tracheal luminal areas were compared (Student t test) and correlated (Spearman rank) with PFT results and severity of parenchymal lung disease. RESULTS: Mean predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)) was 70.6% +\\/- 20.7, and mean Bhalla CT score was 41.8% +\\/- 13.6. In patients with CF, dynamic cine mean tracheal cross-sectional area reduction was 51.7% +\\/- 18.4 (range, 9%-89%) for forced expiratory maneuvers and 68.8% +\\/- 11.7 (range, 18%-88%) for coughing (P = .001). Tracheomalacia was demonstrated in 24 (69%) patients and no control subjects during forced expiratory maneuvers (P = .001) and in 10 (29%) patients and one (10%) control subject during coughing. For end-expiration images, mean tracheal luminal reduction was 16.1% +\\/- 14.0% (range, 0.0%-53.0%), with one patient demonstrating tracheal luminal reduction of more than 50%. There was no correlation between tracheal cross-sectional luminal reduction and either predicted FEV(1) or CT Bhalla score. CONCLUSION: Tracheomalacia depicted at dynamic cine multidetector CT is a

  5. The interplay of cell–cell and cell–substrate adhesion in collective cell migration

    Wang, Chenlu; Chowdhury, Sagar; Driscoll, Meghan; Parent, Carole A.; Gupta, S.K.; Losert, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Collective cell migration often involves notable cell–cell and cell–substrate adhesions and highly coordinated motion of touching cells. We focus on the interplay between cell–substrate adhesion and cell–cell adhesion. We show that the loss of cell-surface contact does not significantly alter the dynamic pattern of protrusions and retractions of fast migrating amoeboid cells (Dictyostelium discoideum), but significantly changes their ability to adhere to other cells. Analysis of the dynamics ...

  6. Recipes for cantilever parameter determination in dynamic force spectroscopy: spring constant and amplitude

    Measuring procedures for sensor parameters in frequency modulation dynamic force microscopy have been studied. As the tip-sample interaction forces cannot be recalculated from the experimental data without knowledge of the sensor's spring constant and oscillation amplitude, a treatment for normal spring constant calibration and newly developed schemes for the determination of the cantilever oscillation amplitude are presented. The amplitude evaluation techniques are based either on tunnelling current operation or frequency shift detection and are therefore applicable to many tip-sample systems. Although the amplitudes measured were larger than 1 nm, the scheme is applicable over a wide range of stable oscillation conditions, in particular for very small amplitudes. The ideas have been developed with the aid of simple calculations and simulations. Findings are supported by results from our low-temperature ultrahigh vacuum, dual-mode dynamic force and scanning tunnelling microscope. A quartz tuning fork has been used as a force sensor

  7. Pulsatile microfluidics as an analytical tool for determining the dynamic characteristics of microfluidic systems

    An understanding of all fluid dynamic time scales is needed to fully understand and hence exploit the capabilities of fluid flow in microfluidic systems. We propose the use of harmonically oscillating microfluidics as an analytical tool for the deduction of these time scales. Furthermore, we suggest the use of system-level equivalent circuit theory as an adequate theory of the behavior of the system. A novel pressure source capable of operation in the desired frequency range is presented for this generic analysis. As a proof of concept, we study the fairly complex system of water-filled interconnected elastic microfluidic tubes containing a large, trapped air bubble and driven by a pulsatile pressure difference. We demonstrate good agreement between the system-level model and the experimental results, allowing us to determine the dynamic time scales of the system. However, the generic analysis can be applied to all microfluidic systems, both ac and dc.

  8. Signal processing for determining water height in steam pipes with dynamic surface conditions

    Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2015-03-01

    An enhanced signal processing method based on the filtered Hilbert envelope of the auto-correlation function of the wave signal has been developed to monitor the height of condensed water through the steel wall of steam pipes with dynamic surface conditions. The developed signal processing algorithm can also be used to estimate the thickness of the pipe to determine the cut-off frequency for the low pass filter frequency of the Hilbert Envelope. Testing and analysis results by using the developed technique for dynamic surface conditions are presented. A multiple array of transducers setup and methodology are proposed for both the pulse-echo and pitch-catch signals to monitor the fluctuation of the water height due to disturbance, water flow, and other anomaly conditions.

  9. Determination of Quantum Chemistry Based Force Fields for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Aromatic Polymers

    Jaffe, Richard; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations for model molecules can be used to parameterize force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of polymers. Emphasis in our research group is on using quantum chemistry-based force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of organic polymers in the melt and glassy states, but the methodology is applicable to simulations of small molecules, multicomponent systems and solutions. Special attention is paid to deriving reliable descriptions of the non-bonded and electrostatic interactions. Several procedures have been developed for deriving and calibrating these parameters. Our force fields for aromatic polyimide simulations will be described. In this application, the intermolecular interactions are the critical factor in determining many properties of the polymer (including its color).

  10. Dynamics and determinants of dividend policy in Pakistan (evidence from Karachi stock exchange non-financial listed firms)

    Ahmed, Hafeez; Javid, Attiya Yasmin

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the dynamics and determinants of dividend payout policy of 320 non-financial firms listed in Karachi Stock Exchange during the period of 2001 to 2006. It is also one of the very first examples which try to identify the potential dynamics and determinants of dividend payout in Pakistan by using the well established dividend models in context of emerging market. For dynamic equation we used the extended model of Lintner, Fama and Babiak and ‘Proposed’ model in dynamic se...

  11. Coating Reduces Ice Adhesion

    Smith, Trent; Prince, Michael; DwWeese, Charles; Curtis, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    The Shuttle Ice Liberation Coating (SILC) has been developed to reduce the adhesion of ice to surfaces on the space shuttle. SILC, when coated on a surface (foam, metal, epoxy primer, polymer surfaces), will reduce the adhesion of ice by as much as 90 percent as compared to the corresponding uncoated surface. This innovation is a durable coating that can withstand several cycles of ice growth and removal without loss of anti-adhesion properties. SILC is made of a binder composed of varying weight percents of siloxane(s), ethyl alcohol, ethyl sulfate, isopropyl alcohol, and of fine-particle polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The combination of these components produces a coating with significantly improved weathering characteristics over the siloxane system alone. In some cases, the coating will delay ice formation and can reduce the amount of ice formed. SILC is not an ice prevention coating, but the very high water contact angle (greater than 140 ) causes water to readily run off the surface. This coating was designed for use at temperatures near -170 F (-112 C). Ice adhesion tests performed at temperatures from -170 to 20 F (-112 to -7 C) show that SILC is a very effective ice release coating. SILC can be left as applied (opaque) or buffed off until the surface appears clear. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data show that the coating is still present after buffing to transparency. This means SILC can be used to prevent ice adhesion even when coating windows or other objects, or items that require transmission of optical light. Car windshields are kept cleaner and SILC effectively mitigates rain and snow under driving conditions.

  12. Analysis of the surface effects on adhesion in MEMS structures

    Rusu, F.; Pustan, M.; Bîrleanu, C.; Müller, R.; Voicu, R.; Baracu, A.

    2015-12-01

    One of the main failure causes in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is stiction. Stiction is the adhesion of contacting surfaces due to surface forces. Adhesion force depends on the operating conditions and is influenced by the contact area. In this study, the adhesion force between MEMS materials and the AFM tips is analyzed using the spectroscopy in point mode of the AFM. The aim is to predict the stiction failure mode in MEMS. The investigated MEMS materials are silicon, polysilicon, platinum, aluminum, and gold. Three types of investigations were conducted. The first one aimed to determine the variation of the adhesion force with respect to the variation of the roughness. The roughness has a strong influence on the adhesion because the contact area between components increases if the roughness decreases. The second type of investigation aimed to determine the adhesion force in multiple points of each considered sample. The values obtained experimentally for the adhesion force were also validated using the JKR and DMT models. The third type of investigation was conducted with the purpose of determining the influence of the temperature on the adhesion force.

  13. The electron beam cure of epoxy paste adhesives

    Recently developed epoxy paste adhesives were electron beam cured and experimentally explored to determine their suitability for use in an aerospace-quality aircraft component. There were two major goals for this program. The first was to determine whether the electron beam-curable past adhesives were capable of meeting the requirements of the US Air Force T-38 supersonic jet trainer composite windshield frame. The T-38 windshield frame's arch is currently manufactured by bonding thin stainless steel plies using an aerospace-grade thermally-cured epoxy film adhesive. The second goal was to develop the lowest cost hand layup and debulk process that could be used to produce laminated steel plies with acceptable properties. The laminate properties examined to determine adhesive suitability include laminate mechanical and physical properties at room, adhesive tack, out-time capability, and the debulk requirements needed to achieve these properties. Eighteen past adhesives and four scrim cloths were experimentally examined using this criteria. One paste adhesive was found to have suitable characteristics in each of these categories and was later chosen for the manufacture of the T-38 windshield frame. This experimental study shows that by using low-cost debulk and layup processes, the electron beam-cured past adhesive mechanical and physical properties meet the specifications of the T-38 composite windshield frame

  14. Adaptive SLICE method: an enhanced method to determine nonlinear dynamic respiratory system mechanics

    The objective of this paper is to introduce and evaluate the adaptive SLICE method (ASM) for continuous determination of intratidal nonlinear dynamic compliance and resistance. The tidal volume is subdivided into a series of volume intervals called slices. For each slice, one compliance and one resistance are calculated by applying a least-squares-fit method. The volume window (width) covered by each slice is determined based on the confidence interval of the parameter estimation. The method was compared to the original SLICE method and evaluated using simulation and animal data. The ASM was also challenged with separate analysis of dynamic compliance during inspiration. If the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the respiratory data decreased from +∞ to 10 dB, the relative errors of compliance increased from 0.1% to 22% for the ASM and from 0.2% to 227% for the SLICE method. Fewer differences were found in resistance. When the SNR was larger than 40 dB, the ASM delivered over 40 parameter estimates (42.2 ± 1.3). When analyzing the compliance during inspiration separately, the estimates calculated with the ASM were more stable. The adaptive determination of slice bounds results in consistent and reliable parameter values. Online analysis of nonlinear respiratory mechanics will profit from such an adaptive selection of interval size. (paper)

  15. Pathogenesis of postoperative adhesion formation

    Hellebrekers, B.W.J.; Kooistra, T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Current views on the pathogenesis of adhesion formation are based on the "classical concept of adhesion formation", namely that a reduction in peritoneal fibrinolytic activity following peritoneal trauma is of key importance in adhesion development. Methods: A non-systematic literature s

  16. Interfacial adhesion of graphene by multiscale models

    Huang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a multiscale study on adhesive interactions between graphene and its substrates. First, van der Waals (vdW) interactions between graphene and a SiO2 substrate are studied by first-principle density functional theory (DFT) calculations with dispersion corrections. It is found that the interaction strength is strongly influenced by changes of the SiO2 surface structures due to surface reactions with water. To scale up the model, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are perf...

  17. A Novel Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Platform for Determining Protein O-GlcNAcylation Dynamics.

    Wang, Xiaoshi; Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Fan, Jing; Karch, Kelly R; Ball, Lauren E; Denu, John M; Garcia, Benjamin A

    2016-07-01

    Over the past decades, protein O-GlcNAcylation has been found to play a fundamental role in cell cycle control, metabolism, transcriptional regulation, and cellular signaling. Nevertheless, quantitative approaches to determine in vivo GlcNAc dynamics at a large-scale are still not readily available. Here, we have developed an approach to isotopically label O-GlcNAc modifications on proteins by producing (13)C-labeled UDP-GlcNAc from (13)C6-glucose via the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway. This metabolic labeling was combined with quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics to determine protein O-GlcNAcylation turnover rates. First, an efficient enrichment method for O-GlcNAc peptides was developed with the use of phenylboronic acid solid-phase extraction and anhydrous DMSO. The near stoichiometry reaction between the diol of GlcNAc and boronic acid dramatically improved the enrichment efficiency. Additionally, our kinetic model for turnover rates integrates both metabolomic and proteomic data, which increase the accuracy of the turnover rate estimation. Other advantages of this metabolic labeling method include in vivo application, direct labeling of the O-GlcNAc sites and higher confidence for site identification. Concentrating only on nuclear localized GlcNAc modified proteins, we are able to identify 105 O-GlcNAc peptides on 42 proteins and determine turnover rates of 20 O-GlcNAc peptides from 14 proteins extracted from HeLa nuclei. In general, we found O-GlcNAcylation turnover rates are slower than those published for phosphorylation or acetylation. Nevertheless, the rates widely varied depending on both the protein and the residue modified. We believe this methodology can be broadly applied to reveal turnovers/dynamics of protein O-GlcNAcylation from different biological states and will provide more information on the significance of O-GlcNAcylation, enabling us to study the temporal dynamics of this critical modification for the first time. PMID:27114449

  18. The determination of the attitude and attitude dynamics of TeamSat

    Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif; Riis, Troels;

    1999-01-01

    The second qualification flight of Ariane 5 was launched from the European Space Port in French Guiana on October 30, 1997. It carried on board a small technology demonstration satellite dubbed TeamSat into which five experiments, proposed by various universities and research institutions, were...... integrated. Among them, the Autonomous Vision System, AVS, a fully autonomous star tracker and vision system. This paper gives a short overview of the TeamSat satellite design, implementation and mission objectives. The AVS is described in more details. The main science objectives of the AVS were to verify...... determined the attitude and attitude dynamics of TeamSat....

  19. Determination of Consumer Behaviour Dynamics Relating to Food Products: “Trakya Region Example”

    I. H. Inan; Oraman, Y.; E. Yilmaz

    2009-01-01

    In this study, it has been determined the dynamics of consumer behaviours of individuals who live in rural and urban areas concerning food products and it analyses the effective factors on consumers food consumption choice in families, based in Trakya Region (Tekirdag, Edirne, Kırklareli). The study was conducted with a total of 770 households 385 people in towns and 385 people in rural areas, 770 people in total of which 385 was from rural areas, and 385 from urban areas.The effective factor...

  20. Determination of the dynamic nonlinearity of semiconductor and combined detectors for computer-assisted tomography

    The experimental arrangement described reproduces values of the x-ray photon flux density that are typical of computer-assisted tomography (108-1010 cm-2 x sec-1) and its rates of relative change. The authors give the results of determination of the dynamic nonlinearity γ/sup d/ of combined detectors [CsI(Tl) +- Si photodiode and CdWO4 + FEU-60 photomultiplier] and semiconducting CdTe. The CdTe detector has the highest value, γ/sup d/ ≥ 36%, while CdWO4 + FEU-60 has the lowest values, γ/sup d/ ≤ 1%, on the trailing edge of the current signal

  1. Polymerization contraction stress in dentin adhesives bonded to dentin and enamel

    M. Hashimoto; A.J. de Gee; A.J. Feilzer

    2008-01-01

    Objective In a previous study on of polymerization contraction stress determinations of adhesives bonded to dentin a continuous decline of stress was observed after the adhesives had been light-cured. The decline was ascribed to stress relief caused by diffusion into the adhesive layer of water and/

  2. From genotypes to phenotypes: classification of the tumour profiles for different variants of the cadherin adhesion pathway

    Ramis-Conde, Ignacio; Drasdo, Dirk

    2012-06-01

    The E-cadherin adhesive profile expressed by a tumour is a characterization of the intracellular and intercellular protein interactions that control cell-cell adhesion. Within the intracellular proteins that determine the tumour adhesive profile, Src and PI3 are two essentials to initiate the formation of the E-cadherin adhesion complex. On the other hand, Src has also the capability of disrupting the β-catenin-E-cadherin complex and down-regulating cell-cell adhesion. In this paper, using a multi-scale mathematical model, we study the role of each of these proteins in the adhesive profile and invasive properties of the tumour. To do this, we create three versions of an intracellular model that explains the interplay between the proteins E-cadherin, β-catenin, Src and PI3; and we couple them to the strength of the cell-cell adhesion forces within an individual-cell-based model. The simulation results show how the tumour profile and its aggressive potential may change depending on the intrinsic characteristics of the protein pathways, and how these pathways may influence the early stages of cancer invasion. Our major findings may be summarized as follows. (1) Intermediate levels of Src synthesis rates generate the least invasive tumour phenotype. (2) Conclusions drawn from findings obtained from the intracellular molecular dynamics (here cadherin-catenin binding complexes) to the multi-cellular invasive potential of a tumour may be misleading or erroneous. The conclusions should be validated in a multi-cellular context on timescales relevant for population growth. (3) Monoclonal populations of more cohesive cells with otherwise equal properties tend to grow slower. (4) Less cohesive cells tend to outcompete more cohesive cells. (5) Less cohesive cells have a larger probability of invasion as migration forces can more easily outbalance cohesive forces.

  3. From genotypes to phenotypes: classification of the tumour profiles for different variants of the cadherin adhesion pathway

    The E-cadherin adhesive profile expressed by a tumour is a characterization of the intracellular and intercellular protein interactions that control cell–cell adhesion. Within the intracellular proteins that determine the tumour adhesive profile, Src and PI3 are two essentials to initiate the formation of the E-cadherin adhesion complex. On the other hand, Src has also the capability of disrupting the β-catenin–E-cadherin complex and down-regulating cell–cell adhesion. In this paper, using a multi-scale mathematical model, we study the role of each of these proteins in the adhesive profile and invasive properties of the tumour. To do this, we create three versions of an intracellular model that explains the interplay between the proteins E-cadherin, β-catenin, Src and PI3; and we couple them to the strength of the cell–cell adhesion forces within an individual-cell-based model. The simulation results show how the tumour profile and its aggressive potential may change depending on the intrinsic characteristics of the protein pathways, and how these pathways may influence the early stages of cancer invasion. Our major findings may be summarized as follows. (1) Intermediate levels of Src synthesis rates generate the least invasive tumour phenotype. (2) Conclusions drawn from findings obtained from the intracellular molecular dynamics (here cadherin–catenin binding complexes) to the multi-cellular invasive potential of a tumour may be misleading or erroneous. The conclusions should be validated in a multi-cellular context on timescales relevant for population growth. (3) Monoclonal populations of more cohesive cells with otherwise equal properties tend to grow slower. (4) Less cohesive cells tend to outcompete more cohesive cells. (5) Less cohesive cells have a larger probability of invasion as migration forces can more easily outbalance cohesive forces. (paper)

  4. THE DYNAMICS OF STUDENTS’ PROFESSIONAL SELF-DETERMINATION VALUE ORIENTATION (THE SOCIOLOGICAL ASPECT

    Evgeniya Vladislavovna Yarina

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the issues of students’ professional self-determination in the university community. It represents empirical analysis of the dynamics of professional value orientation of students in the period of  2005– 2013 as exemplified by the students of Moscow state university of railway engineering .The analysis revealed the motives for choice and the evaluation of the potential of the profession, the youngsters are studying for  in the university. The results of the research in certainty and expectations of the students in terms of employment are compared to the official statistic in the recruitment sphere.  The article also represented clearly defined conditions necessary for the provision of the successful formation of the professional self-determination in tertiary education.

  5. Detailed balance method for chemical potential determination in Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations

    We present a new, nondestructive, method for determining chemical potentials in Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. The method estimates a value for the chemical potential such that one has a balance between fictitious successful creation and destruction trials in which the Monte Carlo method is used to determine success or failure of the creation/destruction attempts; we thus call the method a detailed balance method. The method allows one to obtain estimates of the chemical potential for a given species in any closed ensemble simulation; the closed ensemble is paired with a ''natural'' open ensemble for the purpose of obtaining creation and destruction probabilities. We present results for the Lennard-Jones system and also for an embedded atom model of liquid palladium, and compare to previous results in the literature for these two systems. We are able to obtain an accurate estimate of the chemical potential for the Lennard-Jones system at higher densities than reported in the literature

  6. Habitat heterogeneity determines climate impact on zooplankton community structure and dynamics.

    Saskia A Otto

    Full Text Available Understanding and predicting species distribution in space and time and consequently community structure and dynamics is an important issue in ecology, and particularly in climate change research. A crucial factor determining the composition and dynamics of animal populations is habitat heterogeneity, i.e., the number of structural elements in a given locality. In the marine pelagic environment habitat heterogeneity is represented by the distribution of physical oceanographic parameters such as temperature, salinity and oxygen that are closely linked to atmospheric conditions. Little attention has been given, however, to the role of habitat heterogeneity in modulating the response of animal communities to external climate forcing. Here we investigate the long-term dynamics of Acartia spp., Temora longicornis, and Pseudocalanus acuspes, three dominant zooplankton species inhabiting different pelagic habitats in the Central Baltic Sea (CBS. We use the three copepods as indicator species for changes in the CBS zooplankton community and apply non-linear statistical modeling techniques to compare spatial population trends and to identify their drivers. We demonstrate that effects of climate variability and change depend strongly on species-specific habitat utilization, being more direct and pronounced at the upper water layer. We propose that the differential functional response to climate-related drivers in relation to strong habitat segregation is due to alterations of the species' environmental niches. We stress the importance of understanding how anticipated climate change will affect ecological niches and habitats in order to project spatio-temporal changes in species abundance and distribution.

  7. Determination of Dynamics of Plant Plasma Membrane Proteins with Fluorescence Recovery and Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy.

    Laňková, Martina; Humpolíčková, Jana; Vosolsobě, Stanislav; Cit, Zdeněk; Lacek, Jozef; Čovan, Martin; Čovanová, Milada; Hof, Martin; Petrášek, Jan

    2016-04-01

    A number of fluorescence microscopy techniques are described to study dynamics of fluorescently labeled proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and whole organelles. However, for studies of plant plasma membrane (PM) proteins, the number of these techniques is still limited because of the high complexity of processes that determine the dynamics of PM proteins and the existence of cell wall. Here, we report on the usage of raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) for studies of integral PM proteins in suspension-cultured tobacco cells and show its potential in comparison with the more widely used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching method. For RICS, a set of microscopy images is obtained by single-photon confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Fluorescence fluctuations are subsequently correlated between individual pixels and the information on protein mobility are extracted using a model that considers processes generating the fluctuations such as diffusion and chemical binding reactions. As we show here using an example of two integral PM transporters of the plant hormone auxin, RICS uncovered their distinct short-distance lateral mobility within the PM that is dependent on cytoskeleton and sterol composition of the PM. RICS, which is routinely accessible on modern CLSM instruments, thus represents a valuable approach for studies of dynamics of PM proteins in plants. PMID:27041337

  8. Method for the experimental determination of dynamic coefficients of journal bearings; Messverfahren zur experimentellen Bestimmung dynamischer Koeffizienten von Gleitlagern

    Kuehl, S. [Fachhochschule Wuerzburg-Schweinfurt (Germany). Fachbereich Maschinenbau, Maschinenelemente und Konstruktionslehre; Schueler, D.; Schueler, E. [Ruhr-Univ. Bochum (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Maschinenelemente und Konstruktionslehre

    2007-07-01

    For the determination of stiffness and damping coefficients of large journal bearings, needed e. g. for the analysis of the rotational dynamics of turbine runners, a low-effort experimental method is presented that provides high accuracy of the resulting coefficients. The specialty is that the test bearing is loaded with dynamic forces of two vibrators concurrently and that the fluid film forces are calculated directly rather than through the amplitude of the dynamic forces. (orig.)

  9. Engineering bio-adhesive functions in an antimicrobial polymer multilayer

    Functionalization of a biomaterial surface with adhesive ligands is an effective way to promote specific cell adhesion. Ideally, biomaterial for applications in biomedical implants should simultaneously promote host cell adhesion and inhibit bacterial adhesion. Currently, little attention has been paid to the design of antimicrobial biomaterial with selective adhesiveness towards only targeted cells or tissues. In this study, the role of two typical adhesive ligands on the bioadhesion functions of a model antimicrobial film was elucidated. First, an adhesive ligand including an RGD peptide or collagen (CL) was chemically coupled to an antimicrobial polymeric multilayer composed of dextran sulfate (DS) and chitosan (CS). It was demonstrated that the density of RGD and CL immobilized on the DS/CS multilayer ranges between 4 to 137 ng cm−2 and 100 to 1000 ng cm−2, respectively. Then the effect of immobilized RGD or CL on both bacterial and fibroblast adhesion was investigated. By determining the density and morphology of adherent fibroblast on a DS/CS multilayer with or without an adhesive ligand, it was shown that RGD or CL effectively promoted fibroblast adhesion and proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner. Interestingly, the type of adhesive ligands imposed distinct effects in bacterial adhesion. Immobilized RGD did not enhance Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli adhesion on DS/CS multilayers under all concentrations. In contrast, CL triggered significant S. aureus adhesion on DS/CS multilayers even at low surface concentration and when fibroblast adhesion was absent. Moreover, the detachment forces of individual S. aureus on CL coated DS/CS multilayers probed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) was 3 times and 20 times higher than that on the control substrate and on unmodified DS/CS multilayers, respectively. Interestingly, the lowest detachment force of E. coli was found on the CL coated DS/CS multilayers. This study demonstrated the

  10. Management of adhesive capsulitis

    Stupay KL

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kristen L Stupay,1 Andrew S Neviaser2 1Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2George Washington University Medical Faculty Associates, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder is a condition of capsular contracture that reduces both active and passive glenohumeral motion. The cause of adhesive capsulitis is not known but it is strongly associated with endocrine abnormalities such as diabetes. Diverse terminology and the absence of definitive criteria for diagnosis make evaluating treatment modalities difficult. Many treatment methods have been reported, most with some success, but few have been proved to alter the natural course of this disease. Most afflicted patients will achieve acceptable shoulder function without surgery. Those who remain debilitated after 8–12 months are reasonable candidates for invasive treatments. Here, the various treatment methods and the data to support their use are reviewed. Keywords: frozen shoulder, stiff shoulder, periarthritis, painful shoulder 

  11. INVESTIGATION OF THE STRUCTURE OF ADHESIVE JOINTS WITH A MICROTOMOGRAPHY METHOD

    Chauzov K. V.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The article provides a comparative analysis of two methods for assessing the structure of adhesive joint: optical microscopy and microtomography. Comparative analysis of the accuracy of measurement was shown; we have also built the graphs of the thickness of adhesive joint. The depth of penetration adhesive into the wood was determined. The structure of adhesive joint for two types of binders was studied

  12. Determination of trace elements in serum by dynamic reaction cell inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    D' Ilio, S. [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy)]. E-mail: sdilio@iss.it; Violante, N. [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Caimi, S. [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Di Gregorio, M. [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Petrucci, F. [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Senofonte, O. [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy)

    2006-07-28

    An inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS), equipped with a dynamic reaction cell (DRC) and coupled with a desolvating nebulizing system (Apex-ACM) to reduce the oxide formation, was used in the determination of Al, Co, Cr, Mn, Ni and Se in serum samples. The effect of the operating conditions of the DRC system was studied to get the best signal-to-background (S/B) ratio. The potentially interfering molecular ions at the masses m/z {sup 27}Al, {sup 59}Co, {sup 52}Cr, {sup 55}Mn, {sup 60}Ni and {sup 78}Se, were significantly reduced in intensity by using NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}, as the reaction cell gases in the DRC, while a proper Dynamic Bandpass Tuning parameter q (RPq) value was optimized. The detection limits for {sup 27}Al, {sup 59}Co, {sup 52}Cr, {sup 55}Mn, {sup 60}Ni and {sup 78}Se, estimated with 3-{sigma} method, resulted to be 0.14, 0.003, 0.002, 0.01, 0.01 and 1.8 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively. This analytical method was developed on both a human serum certified reference material and a lyophilized animal serum produced and proposed in an intercomparison study. The results obtained for the reference samples agreed satisfactorily with the certified values. Precision (expressed as CV%) between sample replicates was better than 10% for elements determination, with the only exception of aluminium (14%)

  13. Determination of trace elements in serum by dynamic reaction cell inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    An inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS), equipped with a dynamic reaction cell (DRC) and coupled with a desolvating nebulizing system (Apex-ACM) to reduce the oxide formation, was used in the determination of Al, Co, Cr, Mn, Ni and Se in serum samples. The effect of the operating conditions of the DRC system was studied to get the best signal-to-background (S/B) ratio. The potentially interfering molecular ions at the masses m/z 27Al, 59Co, 52Cr, 55Mn, 60Ni and 78Se, were significantly reduced in intensity by using NH3 and H2, as the reaction cell gases in the DRC, while a proper Dynamic Bandpass Tuning parameter q (RPq) value was optimized. The detection limits for 27Al, 59Co, 52Cr, 55Mn, 60Ni and 78Se, estimated with 3-σ method, resulted to be 0.14, 0.003, 0.002, 0.01, 0.01 and 1.8 μg L-1, respectively. This analytical method was developed on both a human serum certified reference material and a lyophilized animal serum produced and proposed in an intercomparison study. The results obtained for the reference samples agreed satisfactorily with the certified values. Precision (expressed as CV%) between sample replicates was better than 10% for elements determination, with the only exception of aluminium (14%)

  14. The role of self-determined motivation in job search: A dynamic approach.

    da Motta Veiga, Serge P; Gabriel, Allison S

    2016-03-01

    Job search is a dynamic self-regulated process during which job seekers need to stay motivated to secure a job. However, past research has taken a relatively static approach to examining motivation during the job search, in addition to ignoring how the quality of one's motivation--ranging from autonomous to controlled--can influence job search processes. Adopting a within-person perspective, the current study extends self-determination theory (SDT) to the job search context to investigate (a) when autonomous and controlled motivations are more or less prevalent and (b) whether they influence job search effort through metacognitive strategies in differing ways depending upon the amount of time elapsed in the search. In a weekly study of new labor market entrants (Level-2 n = 149; Level-1 n = 691), results indicated that autonomous motivation decreased until the midpoint of the job search and then plateaued, whereas controlled motivation remained stable. Results also showed that autonomous motivation had a consistent, positive relation with metacognitive strategies, whereas the relation between controlled motivation and such strategies was negative early in the job search, but became positive as the job search progressed. Finally, the effects of motivation on job search effort occurred via metacognitive strategies differentially depending upon the time elapsed in the search. Combined, we provide a first glimpse into the dynamics of self-determined motivation on job search processes. PMID:26595757

  15. Syndecans and cell adhesion

    Couchman, J R; Chen, L; Woods, A

    2001-01-01

    Now that transmembrane signaling through primary cell-matrix receptors, integrins, is being elucidated, attention is turning to how integrin-ligand interactions can be modulated. Syndecans are transmembrane proteoglycans implicated as coreceptors in a variety of physiological processes, including...... cell adhesion, migration, response to growth factors, development, and tumorigenesis. This review will describe this family of proteoglycans in terms of their structures and functions and their signaling in conjunction with integrins, and indicate areas for future research....

  16. Ceramic microstructure and adhesion

    Buckley, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with a ceramic, a polymer, or a metal, strong bond forces can develop between the materials. The bonding forces will depend upon the state of the surfaces, cleanliness and the fundamental properties of the two solids, both surface and bulk. Adhesion between a ceramic and another solid are discussed from a theoretical consideration of the nature of the surfaces and experimentally by relating bond forces to interface resulting from solid state contact. Surface properties of ceramics correlated with adhesion include, orientation, reconstruction and diffusion as well as the chemistry of the surface specie. Where a ceramic is in contact with a metal their interactive chemistry and bond strength is considered. Bulk properties examined include elastic and plastic behavior in the surficial regions, cohesive binding energies, crystal structures and crystallographic orientation. Materials examined with respect to interfacial adhesive interactions include silicon carbide, nickel zinc ferrite, manganese zinc ferrite, and aluminum oxide. The surfaces of the contacting solids are studied both in the atomic or molecularly clean state and in the presence of selected surface contaminants.

  17. How cells tiptoe on adhesive surfaces before sticking

    Pierres, Anne; Touchard, Dominique; Bongrand, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Cell membranes are studded with protrusions that were thoroughly analyzed with electron microscopy. However, the nanometer-scale three-dimensional motions generated by cell membranes to fit the topography of foreign surfaces and initiate adhesion remain poorly understood. Here, we describe the dynamics of surface deformations displayed by monocytic cells bumping against fibronectin-coated surfaces. We observed membrane undulations with typically 5 nm amplitude and 5-10 second lifetime. Cell membranes behaved as independent units of micrometer size. Cells detected the presence of foreign surfaces at 50 nm separation, resulting in time-dependent amplification of membrane undulations. Molecular contact then ensued with apparent cell-membrane separation of 30-40 nm, and this distance steadily decreased during the following tens of seconds. Contact maturation was associated with in-plane egress of bulky molecules and robust membrane fluctuations. Thus, membrane undulations may be the major determinant of cell sens...

  18. A Dynamic Analysis on Determining of Housing Demand: A Comparison for Turkey, Hungary, and UK

    Selahattin Bekmez; Ash Ozpolat

    2014-01-01

    Housing is both good and investment assets so that it plays an important role in the economy. Housing also can be characterized the most complex economic good because of its durability, heterogeneity, locational fixity, the possibility to raise loans against housing collateral, and the effect on well-developed secondary markets. On the other hand, income distribution, socio-economic justice, and regional disparities imply that housing market is an important concept for social and cultural transformation. In this study, the determinants of housing demand were compared for countries. These countries are selected according to economic situation: Turkey, Hungary, and United Kingdom. As a scope of this, the dynamic relationship between the housing demand and variables determining the housing demand in Turkey, Hungary, and UK has been analyzed. The model estimated uses quarterly data from January 2002 to January 2014. Building permits has been considered as housing demand. The other variables used for determining the housing demand are GDP, monetary aggregate, interest rate, and share prices. The long term relationship among variables has been analyzed with Vector Autoregressive Model (VAR) as impulse response and variance decomposition. The findings indicate that determining of housing demand changes according to economic and financial components such as government policies, mortgage system, consumer choice, tax, and subsidy in selected countries. All variables play an important role in housing demand, although the level of their impacts varies.

  19. Localized Modeling of Biochemical and Flow Interactions during Cancer Cell Adhesion.

    Julie Behr

    Full Text Available This work focuses on one component of a larger research effort to develop a simulation tool to model populations of flowing cells. Specifically, in this study a local model of the biochemical interactions between circulating melanoma tumor cells (TC and substrate adherent polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN is developed. This model provides realistic three-dimensional distributions of bond formation and attendant attraction and repulsion forces that are consistent with the time dependent Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD framework of the full system model which accounts local pressure, shear and repulsion forces. The resulting full dynamics model enables exploration of TC adhesion to adherent PMNs, which is a known participating mechanism in melanoma cell metastasis. The model defines the adhesion molecules present on the TC and PMN cell surfaces, and calculates their interactions as the melanoma cell flows past the PMN. Biochemical rates of reactions between individual molecules are determined based on their local properties. The melanoma cell in the model expresses ICAM-1 molecules on its surface, and the PMN expresses the β-2 integrins LFA-1 and Mac-1. In this work the PMN is fixed to the substrate and is assumed fully rigid and of a prescribed shear-rate dependent shape obtained from micro-PIV experiments. The melanoma cell is transported with full six-degrees-of-freedom dynamics. Adhesion models, which represent the ability of molecules to bond and adhere the cells to each other, and repulsion models, which represent the various physical mechanisms of cellular repulsion, are incorporated with the CFD solver. All models are general enough to allow for future extensions, including arbitrary adhesion molecule types, and the ability to redefine the values of parameters to represent various cell types. The model presented in this study will be part of a clinical tool for development of personalized medical treatment programs.

  20. Adhesion Development and the Expression of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase

    David M. Svinarich

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was conducted to determine whether nitric oxide (NO, a potent vasodilator and inhibitor of thrombus formation, is involved in the formation and maintenance of adhesions.

  1. High-Temperature Adhesive Strain Gage Developed

    Pereira, J. Michael; Roberts, Gary D.

    1997-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center have developed a unique strain gage and adhesive system for measuring the mechanical properties of polymers and polymer composites at elevated temperatures. This system overcomes some of the problems encountered in using commercial strain gages and adhesives. For example, typical commercial strain gage adhesives require a postcure at temperatures substantially higher than the maximum test temperature. The exposure of the specimen to this temperature may affect subsequent results, and in some cases may be higher than the glass-transition temperature of the polymer. In addition, although typical commercial strain gages can be used for short times at temperatures up to 370 C, their long-term use is limited to 230 C. This precludes their use for testing some high-temperature polyimides near their maximum temperature capability. Lewis' strain gage and adhesive system consists of a nonencapsulated, unbacked gage grid that is bonded directly to the polymer after the specimen has been cured but prior to the normal postcure cycle. The gage is applied with an adhesive specially formulated to cure under the specimen postcure conditions. Special handling, mounting, and electrical connection procedures were developed, and a fixture was designed to calibrate each strain gage after it was applied to a specimen. A variety of tests was conducted to determine the performance characteristics of the gages at elevated temperatures on PMR-15 neat resin and titanium specimens. For these tests, which included static tension, thermal exposure, and creep tests, the gage and adhesive system performed within normal strain gage specifications at 315 C. An example of the performance characteristics of the gage can be seen in the figure, which compares the strain gage measurement on a polyimide specimen at 315 C with an extensometer measurement.

  2. Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion on hydrophobic and hydrophilic textured biomaterial surfaces

    It is of great interest to use nano- or micro-structured surfaces to inhibit microbial adhesion and biofilm formation and thereby to prevent biomaterial-associated infection, without modification of the surface chemistry or bulk properties of the materials and without use of the drugs. Our previous study showed that a submicron textured polyurethane surface can inhibit staphylococcal bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. To further understand the effect of the geometry of textures on bacterial adhesion as well as the underlying mechanism, in this study, submicron and micron textured polyurethane surfaces featuring ordered arrays of pillars were fabricated and modified to have different wettabilities. All the textured surfaces were originally hydrophobic and showed significant reductions in Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62A adhesion in phosphate buffered saline or 25% platelet poor plasma solutions under shear, as compared to smooth surfaces. After being subjected to an air glow discharge plasma treatment, all polyurethane surfaces were modified to hydrophilic, and reductions in bacterial adhesion on surfaces were subsequently found to be dependent on the size of the patterns. The submicron patterned surfaces reduced bacterial adhesion, while the micron patterned surfaces led to increased bacterial adhesion. The extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from the S. epidermidis cell surfaces were extracted and purified, and were coated on a glass colloidal surface so that the adhesion force and separation energy in interactions of the EPS and the surface could be measured by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy. These results were consistent with the bacterial adhesion observations. Overall, the data suggest that the increased surface hydrophobicity and the decreased availability of the contact area contributes to a reduction in bacterial adhesion to the hydrophobic textured surfaces, while the availability of the contact area is the primary determinant factor

  3. THE USE OF Orbignya speciosa FLOUR IN PLYWOOD ADHESIVE MIX

    Vanessa Coelho Almeida

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/1980509813340The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the addition of babaçu flour on urea-formaldehyde adhesive properties and compare it to the adhesives produced with wheat flour, which is the extender usually used for plywood production. An amount of 0, 10, 20 and 30 parts of extender per weight of the adhesive were added. Ammonium sulfate was used as catalyst, in the proportion of 1.5% on dry weight of solid content. The following properties of the adhesive were determined: viscosity, nonvolatile content, gel time, working life and pH. The babaçu flour presented similar properties to wheat flour. Both, in general, although contributed to the increase of the adhesives viscosity, reduced its reactivity, as increased pH value, gel time and working life.

  4. Preparation of an Adhesive in Emulsion for Maxillofacial Prosthetic

    Joaquín Palacios-Alquisira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Maxillofacial prostheses is a dental medicine specialty aimed at restoring anatomical facial defects caused by cancer, trauma or congenital malformations through an artificial device, which is commonly attached to the skin with the help of an adhesive. The purpose of our research was to develop a pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA based on acrylic monomers, characterizing and determining its drying kinetics, that is to say the time it takes to lose 50 to 90% of its moisture. The adhesive synthesis was realized by means of emulsion polymerization; the composition of formulations was: (AA‑MMA‑EA and (AA‑MMA‑2EHA with different molar ratios. The formulation based on (AA‑MMA‑2EHA with 50 w% of solids, presented good adhesive properties such as tack, bond strength, and short drying time. We propose this formulation as a PSA, because it offers an alternative for systemically compromised patients, by less irritation compared to organic solvent-based adhesives.

  5. Characterization of adhesively bonded joints using bulk adhesive properties

    Kon, Haruhiko

    1991-01-01

    Though using bulk adhesive properties to predict adhesively bonded joint response has yet to be proven infallible, based upon the success of previous works, this effort attempts to shed some light on the stresses present in a typical automotive bonded joint. Adhesive material properties obtained in previous works were used in a finite element analysis of a simulated automotive joint to predict the stresses in that joint. The automotive joint analyzed was a simplified repr...

  6. PREPARATION AND IN VITRO ASSESSMENT OF VARIOUS MUCOSA-ADHESIVE FILMS FOR BUCCAL DELIVERY

    SEYED-AL1REZA MORTAZAVI REZA ABOOFAZELI

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine various polymers considered to have mucosa-adhesive properties for the preparation of buccal-adhesive films and their in vitro evaluation. A number of materials, such as cellulose derivatives, carbopols and natural polymers, were employed for the preparation of buccal-adhesive films. Aqueous solutions containing the mucosa-adhesive polymer and a plasticizer were prepared and used to prepare films by the "solvent cast" method. Prepared films were then evaluated in terms of their physical appearance and film forming ability, in vitro mucosa-adhesive strength and duration of mucosa-adhesion. Results showed that among the various materials examined, sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC formed very flexible films with the greatest mucosa-adhesive strength. Further studies showed that the combination of carbopols and CMC, along with glycerin as the plasticizer, resulted in the formation of films with desirable appearance and a relatively stronger mucosa-adhesive strength than films containing CMC alone. In vitro studies showed that films containing carbopol 934P, CMC and glycerin gave the greatest mucosa-adhesive strength and longer mucosa-adhesion. In conclusion, this formulation is proposed as a good base for the preparation of buccal-adhesive films and patches. Furthermore, it is suggested that in the development of buccal-adhesive drug delivery systems, and in particular films and patches, duration of mucosa-adhesion determined by in vitro experiments is a critical factor in the selection of the ultimate formulation.

  7. Adhesion of PBO Fiber in Epoxy Composites

    2007-01-01

    The high mechanical and thermal performance of poly p-phenylene- 2, 6-benzobisoxazole ( PBO ) fiber provides great potential applications as reinforcement fibers for composites. A composite of PBO fiber and epoxy resin has excellent electrical insulation properties, therefore, it is considered to be the best choice for the reinforcement in high magnetic field coils for pulsed magnetic fields up to 100 T.However, poor adhesion between PBO fiber and matrix is found because of the chemically inactive and/or relatively smooth surface of the reinforcement fiber preventing efficient chemical bonding in the interface, which is a challenging issue to improve mechanical properties. Here, we report the surface modification of PBO fibers by ultraviolet (UV)irradiation, O2 and NH3 plasma, as well as acidic treatments. The interfacial adhesion strength values of all the treatments show the similar level as determined for aramid fibers by pull-out tests, a significant impact on fibermatrix-adhesion was not achieved. The surface free energy and roughness are increased for both sized and extracted fibers after plasma treatments together with maleic anhydride grafting. The sized fiber shows marginal improvement in adhesion strength and no change in fiber tensile strength because of the barrier effect of the finish.For the extracted fiber, different surface treatments either show no apparent effect or cause reduction in adhesion strength. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) topography analysis of the fracture surfaces proved adhesive failure at the fiber surface. The fiber surface roughness is increased and more surface flaws are induced, which could result in coarse interface structures when the treated fiber surface has no adequate wetting and functional groups. The adhesion failure is further confirmed by similar adhesion strength and compression shear strength values when the fiber was embedded in various epoxy resins with different temperature behavior. The tensile strength of fiber

  8. Molecular simulations and lattice dynamics determination of Stillinger-Weber GaN thermal conductivity

    The bulk thermal conductivity of Stillinger-Weber (SW) wurtzite GaN in the [0001] direction at a temperature of 300 K is calculated using equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD), non-equilibrium MD (NEMD), and lattice dynamics (LD) methods. While the NEMD method predicts a thermal conductivity of 166 ± 11 W/m·K, both the EMD and LD methods predict thermal conductivities that are an order of magnitude greater. We attribute the discrepancy to significant contributions to thermal conductivity from long-mean free path phonons. We propose that the Grüneisen parameter for low-frequency phonons is a good predictor of the severity of the size effects in NEMD thermal conductivity prediction. For weakly anharmonic crystals characterized by small Grüneisen parameters, accurate determination of thermal conductivity by NEMD is computationally impractical. The simulation results also indicate the GaN SW potential, which was originally developed for studying the atomic-level structure of dislocations, is not suitable for prediction of its thermal conductivity

  9. Aggregate size and structure determination of nanomaterials in physiological media: importance of dynamic evolution

    Most in vitro nanotoxicological assays are performed after 24 h exposure. However, in determining size and shape effect of nanoparticles in toxicity assays, initial characterization data are generally used to describe experimental outcome. The dynamic size and structure of aggregates are typically ignored in these studies. This brief communication reports dynamic evolution of aggregation characteristics of gold nanoparticles. The study finds that gradual increase in aggregate size of gold nanospheres (AuNS) occurs up to 6 h duration; beyond this time period, the aggregation process deviates from gradual to a more abrupt behavior as large networks are formed. Results of the study also show that aggregated clusters possess unique structural conformation depending on nominal diameter of the nanoparticles. The differences in fractal dimensions of the AuNS samples likely occurred due to geometric differences, causing larger packing propensities for smaller sized particles. Both such observations can have profound influence on dosimetry for in vitro nanotoxicity analyses.Graphical Abstract

  10. Dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy techniques for size determination of polyurethane nanoparticles

    Giehl Zanetti-Ramos, Betina [Laboratorio de Bioenergetica e Bioquimica de Macromoleculas, Departamento de Ciencias Farmaceuticas (Brazil)], E-mail: betinagzramos@pq.cnpq.br; Beddin Fritzen-Garcia, Mauricia [Laboratorio de Bioenergetica e Bioquimica de Macromoleculas, Departamento de Ciencias Farmaceuticas (Brazil); Schweitzer de Oliveira, Cristian; Avelino Pasa, Andre [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos e Superficie, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Soldi, Valdir [Grupo de Estudos em Materiais Polimericos, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Borsali, Redouane [Centre de Recherche sur les Macromolecules Vegetales CERMAV/CNRS, 38041 - Grenoble (France); Creczynski-Pasa, Tania Beatriz [Laboratorio de Bioenergetica e Bioquimica de Macromoleculas, Departamento de Ciencias Farmaceuticas (Brazil)

    2009-03-01

    Nanoparticles have applications in various industrial fields principally in drug delivery. Nowadays, there are several processes for manufacturing colloidal polymeric systems and methods of preparation as well as of characterization. In this work, Dynamic Light Scattering and Atomic Force Microscopy techniques were used to characterize polyurethane nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were prepared by miniemulsion technique. The lipophilic monomers, isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) and natural triol, were emulsified in water containing surfactant. In some formulations the poly(ethylene glycol) was used as co-monomer to obtain the hydrophilic and pegylated nanoparticles. Polyurethane nanoparticles observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) were spherical with diameter around 209 nm for nanoparticles prepared without PEG. From AFM imaging two populations of nanoparticles were observed in the formulation prepared with PEG (218 and 127 nm) while dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements showed a monodisperse size distribution around 250 nm of diameters for both formulations. The polydispersity index of the formulations and the experimental procedures could influence the particle size determination with these techniques.

  11. Vortices determine the dynamics of biodiversity in cyclical interactions with protection spillovers

    Szolnoki, Attila; Perc, Matjaž

    2015-11-01

    If rock beats scissors and scissors beat paper, one might assume that rock beats paper too. But this is not the case for intransitive relationships that make up the famous rock-paper-scissors game. However, the sole presence of paper might prevent rock from beating scissors, simply because paper beats rock. This is the blueprint for the rock-paper-scissors game with protection spillovers, which has recently been introduced as a new paradigm for biodiversity in well-mixed microbial populations. Here we study the game in structured populations, demonstrating that protection spillovers give rise to spatial patterns that are impossible to observe in the classical rock-paper-scissors game. We show that the spatiotemporal dynamics of the system is determined by the density of stable vortices, which may ultimately transform to frozen states, to propagating waves, or to target waves with reversed propagation direction, depending further on the degree and type of randomness in the interactions among the species. If vortices are rare, the fixation to waves and complex oscillatory solutions is likelier. Moreover, annealed randomness in interactions favors the emergence of target waves, while quenched randomness favors collective synchronization. Our results demonstrate that protection spillovers may fundamentally change the dynamics of cyclic dominance in structured populations, and they outline the possibility of programming pattern formation in microbial populations.

  12. Determination of Original Infection Source of H7N9 Avian Influenza by Dynamical Model

    Zhang, Juan; Jin, Zhen; Sun, Gui-Quan; Sun, Xiang-Dong; Wang, You-Ming; Huang, Baoxu

    2014-05-01

    H7N9, a newly emerging virus in China, travels among poultry and human. Although H7N9 has not aroused massive outbreaks, recurrence in the second half of 2013 makes it essential to control the spread. It is believed that the most effective control measure is to locate the original infection source and cut off the source of infection from human. However, the original infection source and the internal transmission mechanism of the new virus are not totally clear. In order to determine the original infection source of H7N9, we establish a dynamical model with migratory bird, resident bird, domestic poultry and human population, and view migratory bird, resident bird, domestic poultry as original infection source respectively to fit the true dynamics during the 2013 pandemic. By comparing the date fitting results and corresponding Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) values, we conclude that migrant birds are most likely the original infection source. In addition, we obtain the basic reproduction number in poultry and carry out sensitivity analysis of some parameters.

  13. Molecular simulations and lattice dynamics determination of Stillinger-Weber GaN thermal conductivity

    Liang, Zhi [Rensselaer Nanotechnology Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Jain, Ankit; McGaughey, Alan J. H., E-mail: mcgaughey@cmu.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Keblinski, Pawel, E-mail: keblip@rpi.edu [Rensselaer Nanotechnology Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2015-09-28

    The bulk thermal conductivity of Stillinger-Weber (SW) wurtzite GaN in the [0001] direction at a temperature of 300 K is calculated using equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD), non-equilibrium MD (NEMD), and lattice dynamics (LD) methods. While the NEMD method predicts a thermal conductivity of 166 ± 11 W/m·K, both the EMD and LD methods predict thermal conductivities that are an order of magnitude greater. We attribute the discrepancy to significant contributions to thermal conductivity from long-mean free path phonons. We propose that the Grüneisen parameter for low-frequency phonons is a good predictor of the severity of the size effects in NEMD thermal conductivity prediction. For weakly anharmonic crystals characterized by small Grüneisen parameters, accurate determination of thermal conductivity by NEMD is computationally impractical. The simulation results also indicate the GaN SW potential, which was originally developed for studying the atomic-level structure of dislocations, is not suitable for prediction of its thermal conductivity.

  14. Towards physical dynamic tolerance: an approach to resolve the conflict between free will and physical determinism.

    Hong, Felix T

    2003-01-01

    This paper attempts to resolve the conflict between free will and determinism. The problem is approached by demonstrating that: (a) some well-established experimental observations indicate that irreversibility persists at the molecular level, (b) microscopic reversibility is not fully compatible with macroscopic irreversibility, (c) an overall consistency can be maintained if microscopic reversibility is regarded only as an excellent approximation, whereas microscopic irreversibility together with chaos can account for macroscopic reversibility, and (d) endogenous noise serves a vital function of nerve excitation. Thus, the mean of position and momentum specified by a non-deterministic law of motion gives the law its superficially deterministic behavior and predictability, whereas its dispersion grants dynamic tolerance and irreversibility. Therefore, causality is preserved while a limited degree of freedom allows for the exercise of free will. However, it is argued that free will can never be proven or disproven by a conventional behavioral experiment. PMID:12595111

  15. Role of the first coordination shell in determining the equilibrium structure and dynamics of simple liquids

    Toxværd, Søren; Dyre, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    . Lett. 103, 170601 (2009);10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.170601 J. Chem. Phys. 134, 214503 (2011)10.1063/1.3592709] . We present simulations of the standard Lennard-Jones liquid at several condensed-fluid state points, including a fairly low density state and a very high density state, as well as simulations......The traditional view that the physical properties of a simple liquid are determined primarily by its repulsive forces was recently challenged by Berthier and Tarjus, who showed that in some cases ignoring the attractions leads to large errors in the dynamics [L. Berthier and G. Tarjus, Phys. Rev...... are included in the simulations. What matters is whether or not interactions are included from all particles within the first coordination shell – the attractive forces can thus be ignored, but only at extremely high densities. The recognition of the importance of a local shell in condensed fluids...

  16. Determination of the critical conditions for the initiation of dynamic recrystallization in boron microalloyed steels

    Research highlights: → Critical conditions for the DRX onset of boron microalloyed steels are determined. → σc and εc tend to increase as strain rate increases and temperature decreases. → σc and εc tend to decrease as boron content increases. → Critical ratios σc/σp and εc/εp remain fairly constant (∼0.82 and ∼0.53). → Boron additions promote solid solution softening and acceleration of the DRX onset. - Abstract: From the present research, the critical conditions associated with the onset of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) of hot deformed boron microalloyed steels were precisely determined based on changes in the strain hardening rate (θ) as a function of the flow stress. For this purpose, a low carbon steel microalloyed with four different amounts of boron (29, 49, 62 and 105 ppm) was deformed by uniaxial hot-compression tests at high temperature (950, 1000, 1050 and 1100 deg. C) and constant true strain rate (10-3, 10-2 and 10-1 s-1). Results indicate that the critical conditions for the initiation of dynamic recrystallization depend on the temperature and strain rate. In addition, both critical stress σc, and critical strain εc, were noticed to decrease as boron content increased. Such a behavior is attributed to a solute drag effect by boron atoms on the austenitic grain boundaries and also to a solid solution softening effect. The critical ratios σc/σp and εc/εp for all boron microalloyed steels remain fairly constant (∼0.82 and ∼0.53, respectively), such values are in agreement with those commonly reported for Al-killed, C-Mn, Nb, Nb-Ti, high carbon and stainless steels.

  17. Molecular determinants of epidermal growth factor binding: a molecular dynamics study.

    Jeffrey M Sanders

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family that plays a role in multiple cellular processes. Activation of EGFR requires binding of a ligand on the extracellular domain to promote conformational changes leading to dimerization and transphosphorylation of intracellular kinase domains. Seven ligands are known to bind EGFR with affinities ranging from sub-nanomolar to near micromolar dissociation constants. In the case of EGFR, distinct conformational states assumed upon binding a ligand is thought to be a determining factor in activation of a downstream signaling network. Previous biochemical studies suggest the existence of both low affinity and high affinity EGFR ligands. While these studies have identified functional effects of ligand binding, high-resolution structural data are lacking. To gain a better understanding of the molecular basis of EGFR binding affinities, we docked each EGFR ligand to the putative active state extracellular domain dimer and 25.0 ns molecular dynamics simulations were performed. MM-PBSA/GBSA are efficient computational approaches to approximate free energies of protein-protein interactions and decompose the free energy at the amino acid level. We applied these methods to the last 6.0 ns of each ligand-receptor simulation. MM-PBSA calculations were able to successfully rank all seven of the EGFR ligands based on the two affinity classes: EGF>HB-EGF>TGF-α>BTC>EPR>EPG>AR. Results from energy decomposition identified several interactions that are common among binding ligands. These findings reveal that while several residues are conserved among the EGFR ligand family, no single set of residues determines the affinity class. Instead we found heterogeneous sets of interactions that were driven primarily by electrostatic and Van der Waals forces. These results not only illustrate the complexity of EGFR dynamics but also pave the way for structure-based design of

  18. Molecular determinants of epidermal growth factor binding: a molecular dynamics study.

    Sanders, Jeffrey M; Wampole, Matthew E; Thakur, Mathew L; Wickstrom, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family that plays a role in multiple cellular processes. Activation of EGFR requires binding of a ligand on the extracellular domain to promote conformational changes leading to dimerization and transphosphorylation of intracellular kinase domains. Seven ligands are known to bind EGFR with affinities ranging from sub-nanomolar to near micromolar dissociation constants. In the case of EGFR, distinct conformational states assumed upon binding a ligand is thought to be a determining factor in activation of a downstream signaling network. Previous biochemical studies suggest the existence of both low affinity and high affinity EGFR ligands. While these studies have identified functional effects of ligand binding, high-resolution structural data are lacking. To gain a better understanding of the molecular basis of EGFR binding affinities, we docked each EGFR ligand to the putative active state extracellular domain dimer and 25.0 ns molecular dynamics simulations were performed. MM-PBSA/GBSA are efficient computational approaches to approximate free energies of protein-protein interactions and decompose the free energy at the amino acid level. We applied these methods to the last 6.0 ns of each ligand-receptor simulation. MM-PBSA calculations were able to successfully rank all seven of the EGFR ligands based on the two affinity classes: EGF>HB-EGF>TGF-α>BTC>EPR>EPG>AR. Results from energy decomposition identified several interactions that are common among binding ligands. These findings reveal that while several residues are conserved among the EGFR ligand family, no single set of residues determines the affinity class. Instead we found heterogeneous sets of interactions that were driven primarily by electrostatic and Van der Waals forces. These results not only illustrate the complexity of EGFR dynamics but also pave the way for structure-based design of therapeutics targeting EGF

  19. Adhesive tape exfoliation

    Bohr, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Single-crystal graphite can be cleaved by the use of an adhesive tape. This was also the initial route for obtaining graphene, a one-layer thick graphite slab. In this letter a few simple and fun considerations are presented in an attempt to shed some light on why this procedure is successful. In...... particular on the nature of the surprisingly small number of repetitive steps that are needed in order to obtain a single-layer slab. Two frameworks for exfoliation are investigated: parallel exfoliation involving repetitive simultaneous cleaving, the other, serial exfoliation, which involves the repetitive...

  20. Polyurethane adhesive ingestion.

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Bronstein, Alvin C

    2013-02-01

    Polyurethane adhesives are found in a large number of household products in the United States and are used for a variety of purposes. Several brands of these expanding wood glues (those containing diphenylmethane diisocyanate [MDI]) have the potential to form gastrointestinal (GI) foreign bodies if ingested. The ingested adhesive forms an expanding ball of glue in the esophagus and gastric lumen. This expansion is caused by a polymerization reaction using the heat, water, and gastric acids of the stomach. A firm mass is created that can be 4-8 times its original volume. As little as 2 oz of glue have been reported to develop gastric foreign bodies. The obstructive mass is reported to form within minutes of ingestion of the adhesive. The foreign body can lead to esophageal impaction and obstruction, airway obstruction, gastric outflow obstruction, mucosal hemorrhage, ulceration, laceration, perforation of the esophageal and gastric linings, and death. Clinical signs following ingestion include anorexia, lethargy, vomiting, tachypnea, and abdominal distention and pain, and typically develop within 12 hours. Clinical signs may depend upon the size of the mass. If left untreated, perforation and rupture of the esophagus or stomach can occur. The glue mass does not stick to the GI mucosa and is not always detectable on abdominal palpation. Radiographs are recommended to confirm the presence of the "glue-ball" foreign body, and radiographic evidence of the obstruction may be seen as early as 4-6 hours following ingestion. Emesis is contraindicated owing to the risk of aspiration of the glue into the respiratory tree or the subsequent lodging of the expanding glue mass in the esophagus. Likewise, efforts to dilute the glue and prevent the formation of the foreign body through administration of liquids, activated charcoal, or bulk-forming products to push the foreign body through the GI tract have proven ineffective. Even endoscopy performed to remove the foreign body has

  1. Syndecan proteoglycans and cell adhesion

    Woods, A; Oh, E S; Couchman, J R

    1998-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that a family of transmembrane proteoglycans, the syndecans, have important roles in cell adhesion. They participate through binding of matrix ligand to their glycosaminoglycan chains, clustering, and the induction of signaling cascades to modify the internal microfilament...... organization. Syndecans can modulate the type of adhesive responses induced by other matrix ligand-receptor interactions, such as those involving the integrins, and so contribute to the control of cell morphology, adhesion and migration....

  2. Dynamic sorption preconcentration and X-ray fluorescence determination of elements in natural waters

    In this work a dynamic preconcentration procedure for the recovery of flow-formed pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC) compounds of elements on cellulose filters and a combined method for the elements determination in natural water and soil extracts including preconcentration and multielemental XRF determination were proposed. Relative standard deviations for elements XRF determination did not exceed 0.1 for most of the elements in the whole calibration range. The detection limits, calculated according to the 3s-criterion, were 0,1-4,0 μg of an element on a filter. Thus, preconcentration of the elements on paraffin-treated cellulose filters from 100 ml of the sample yields the detection limits of 1-40 μg dm-3. It was found that the increase of the reagent concentration from 0.01% to 0.1% leads to competitive sorption of the reagent itself, which results in the decline of recovery of Cd(PDTC)2 on standard cellulose, modified cellulose and membrane filters; the decline of recovery in due course while pumping the sample through the modified cellulose filters is related to the consumption of the filter sorption capacity; the increase of the recovery of hydrophobic Cd(PDTC)2 compounds on the naphthalene or paraffin treated cellulose filters instead of ordinary cellulose filters is due to higher hydrophoby of the sorbents' surface. The recovery of As(III), Se(IV) and Bi spikes from natural water were also investigated. Quantitative recovery of these elements was achieved by the introduction of the carrier ion and the application of paraffin-treated cellulose filters. The combination of these two techniques yields correct determination of spikes to river and sea water even without pre-decomposition of the sample. (authors)

  3. Application of Vehicle Dynamic Modeling in Uavs for Precise Determination of Exterior Orientation

    Khaghani, M.; Skaloud, J.

    2016-06-01

    Advances in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and especially micro aerial vehicle (MAV) technology together with increasing quality and decreasing price of imaging devices have resulted in growing use of MAVs in photogrammetry. The practicality of MAV mapping is seriously enhanced with the ability to determine parameters of exterior orientation (EO) with sufficient accuracy, in both absolute and relative senses (change of attitude between successive images). While differential carrier phase GNSS satisfies cm-level positioning accuracy, precise attitude determination is essential for both direct sensor orientation (DiSO) and integrated sensor orientation (ISO) in corridor mapping or in block configuration imaging over surfaces with low texture. Limited cost, size, and weight of MAVs represent limitations on quality of onboard navigation sensors and puts emphasis on exploiting full capacity of available resources. Typically short flying times (10-30 minutes) also limit the possibility of estimating and/or correcting factors such as sensor misalignment and poor attitude initialization of inertial navigation system (INS). This research aims at increasing the accuracy of attitude determination in both absolute and relative senses with no extra sensors onboard. In comparison to classical INS/GNSS setup, novel approach is presented here to integrated state estimation, in which vehicle dynamic model (VDM) is used as the main process model. Such system benefits from available information from autopilot and physical properties of the platform in enhancing performance of determination of trajectory and parameters of exterior orientation consequently. The navigation system employs a differential carrier phase GNSS receiver and a micro electro-mechanical system (MEMS) grade inertial measurement unit (IMU), together with MAV control input from autopilot. Monte-Carlo simulation has been performed on trajectories for typical corridor mapping and block imaging. Results reveal

  4. Determination of bisphenol a in epoxy resin adhesives by high performance liquid chromatography%高效液相色谱法测定环氧树脂粘接剂中的双酚A

    赖莺; 王鸿辉; 蔡鹭欣; 林睿; 葛秀秀; 林海霞; 黄龙

    2012-01-01

    建立了进出口建筑用环氧树脂粘接剂中双酚A的高效液相色谱-荧光检测法.对提取方法和色谱条件进行了研究,结果表明采用乙醇超声提取样品15min可获得良好的提取效果.以乙腈和水为流动相,采用梯度洗脱可消除样品的基质干扰.方法对环氧树脂粘接剂中双酚A的定量限(LOQ)为0.5 mg/kg,在2~4000 ng/mL范围内,线性相关系数为0.9996.在5个添加水平下回收率在89.1%~100.8%之间.%Bisphenol A in epoxy resin adhesives was determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with a fluorescence detector. The conditions of sample pretreatment and chromatographicparameters were studied. Results showed that the extraction of the BPA could reach a good performance with ethanol under ultrasonic extraction for 15 min. Matrix interference was eliminated by gradient elution with a acetonitrile and water the mobile phase. The quantification limit (LOQ) of BPA was 0. 5 mg/kg. The calibration curve was linear in the range of 2 -4000 ng/mL with a correlation coefficient of 0. 9996. The recoveries ranged from 89. L%to 100. 8% with five addition levels.

  5. Temporal dynamics and determinants of whole brain tissue volume changes during recovery from alcohol dependence.

    Gazdzinski, Stefan; Durazzo, Timothy C; Meyerhoff, Dieter J

    2005-06-01

    Brain shrinkage and its partial reversibility with abstinence is a common neuroimaging finding in alcohol dependent individuals. We used an automated three-dimensional whole brain magnetic resonance imaging method (boundary shift integral) in 23 alcohol dependent individuals to measure the temporal dynamics of cerebral tissue and spinal fluid volume changes over a 12-month interval and to examine the major determinants of brain tissue change rates during abstinence and non-abstinence. We found more rapid brain tissue gain during the first month of sobriety than in the following months. The most rapid volume recovery was observed in abstinent individuals with the greatest baseline brain shrinkage and drinking severity. The rapid reversal of brain volume gains in non-abstinent individuals and tissue volume changes are modulated by duration of abstinence and non-abstinence periods, as well as recency of non-abstinence. Age, family history density of alcoholism, relapse severity, and duration or age of onset of heavy drinking were not major determinants of brain shrinkage and brain volume recovery rates. Treatment providers may use this tangible information to reinforce the biomedical benefits of sobriety. Previous quantitative measurements of brain volumes in alcohol dependent individuals performed after several weeks of abstinence likely underestimated the full extent of chronic alcohol-associated brain shrinkage. PMID:15893157

  6. Determination of the Lyapunov exponents and the information dimension in some dynamical systems

    Classical phase space for some dynamical systems relevant in nuclear physics are studied. The nuclei is described by convex billiards or in the mean field theory. In both cases, besides the Poincare surface of sections which gives a qualitative description, each trajectory is characterized by its maximum Lyapunov exponent. The analytic monodromy matrix for a free particle in convex billiards rotating around an axis perpendicular to the plan of billiards, is determined, generalizing a previous result obtained for static billiards. In the frame of the mean field theory, it is shown an interesting alternative to the Lyapunov exponent, which is the dimension of the manifold in the phase space associated to the trajectory, leading to the evaluation of the relative chaotic volume in phase space as a function of the different parameters. The dimension appears as a character which could be determined easily for the rotating mean field, where the dimension of the manifold on which the trajectory is lying could be equal to 5 or 4 for chaotic trajectories, and less or equal to 3 for regular ones

  7. Shock melting method to determine melting curve by molecular dynamics: Cu, Pd, and Al

    Liu, Zhong-Li, E-mail: zl.liu@163.com [College of Physics and Electric Information, Luoyang Normal University, Luoyang 471022 (China); Zhang, Xiu-Lu [Laboratory for Extreme Conditions Matter Properties, Southwest University of Science and Technology, 621010 Mianyang, Sichuan (China); Cai, Ling-Cang [Laboratory for Shock Wave and Detonation Physics Research, Institute of Fluid Physics, P.O. Box 919-102, 621900 Mianyang, Sichuan (China)

    2015-09-21

    A melting simulation method, the shock melting (SM) method, is proposed and proved to be able to determine the melting curves of materials accurately and efficiently. The SM method, which is based on the multi-scale shock technique, determines melting curves by preheating and/or prepressurizing materials before shock. This strategy was extensively verified using both classical and ab initio molecular dynamics (MD). First, the SM method yielded the same satisfactory melting curve of Cu with only 360 atoms using classical MD, compared to the results from the Z-method and the two-phase coexistence method. Then, it also produced a satisfactory melting curve of Pd with only 756 atoms. Finally, the SM method combined with ab initio MD cheaply achieved a good melting curve of Al with only 180 atoms, which agrees well with the experimental data and the calculated results from other methods. It turned out that the SM method is an alternative efficient method for calculating the melting curves of materials.

  8. Mesoscopic Modeling of Blood Clotting: Coagulation Cascade and Platelets Adhesion

    Yazdani, Alireza; Li, Zhen; Karniadakis, George

    2015-11-01

    The process of clot formation and growth at a site on a blood vessel wall involve a number of multi-scale simultaneous processes including: multiple chemical reactions in the coagulation cascade, species transport and flow. To model these processes we have incorporated advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) of multiple species into an extended version of Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) method which is considered as a coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics method. At the continuum level this is equivalent to the Navier-Stokes equation plus one advection-diffusion equation for each specie. The chemistry of clot formation is now understood to be determined by mechanisms involving reactions among many species in dilute solution, where reaction rate constants and species diffusion coefficients in plasma are known. The role of blood particulates, i.e. red cells and platelets, in the clotting process is studied by including them separately and together in the simulations. An agonist-induced platelet activation mechanism is presented, while platelets adhesive dynamics based on a stochastic bond formation/dissociation process is included in the model.

  9. Improved Adhesion and Compliancy of Hierarchical Fibrillar Adhesives.

    Li, Yasong; Gates, Byron D; Menon, Carlo

    2015-08-01

    The gecko relies on van der Waals forces to cling onto surfaces with a variety of topography and composition. The hierarchical fibrillar structures on their climbing feet, ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale, are hypothesized to be key elements for the animal to conquer both smooth and rough surfaces. An epoxy-based artificial hierarchical fibrillar adhesive was prepared to study the influence of the hierarchical structures on the properties of a dry adhesive. The presented experiments highlight the advantages of a hierarchical structure despite a reduction of overall density and aspect ratio of nanofibrils. In contrast to an adhesive containing only nanometer-size fibrils, the hierarchical fibrillar adhesives exhibited a higher adhesion force and better compliancy when tested on an identical substrate. PMID:26167951

  10. Effect of adhesive thickness on adhesively bonded T-joint

    The aim of this work is to analyze the effect of adhesive thickness on tensile strength of adhesively bonded stainless steel T-joint. Specimens were made from SUS 304 Stainless Steel plate and SUS 304 Stainless Steel perforated plate. Four T-joint specimens with different adhesive thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm) were made. Experiment result shows T-joint specimen with adhesive thickness of 1.0 mm yield highest maximum load. Identical T-joint specimen jointed by spot welding was also tested. Tensile test shows welded T-Joint had eight times higher tensile load than adhesively bonded T-joint. However, in low pressure application such as urea granulator chamber, high tensile strength is not mandatory. This work is useful for designer in fertilizer industry and others who are searching for alternative to spot welding

  11. Diminished glucose transport and phosphorylation in Alzheimer`s disease determined by dynamic FDG-PET

    Piert, M.; Koeppe, R.A.; Giordani, B.; Berent, S.; Kuhl, D.E. [Univ. of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Using dynamic [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and PET, kinetic rate constants that describe influx (K{sub 1}) and efflux (k{sub 2}) of FDG as well s phosphorylation (k{sub 3}) and dephosphorylation (k{sub 4}) were determined in patients with probable Alzheimer`s disease and similarly aged normal controls. The regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMR{sub glu}) was calculated from individually fitted rate constants in frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital cerebral cortex, caudate nucleus, putamen, thalamus and cerebellar cortex. Dynamic PET scans were obtained in normal controls (n = 10, mean age = 67) and Alzheimer`s disease patients (n = 8, mean age = 67) for 60 min following injection of 10 mCi of FDG. The Alzheimer`s disease group was characterized by decreases of the CMR{sub glu} ranging from 13.3% in the frontal to 40.9% in the parietal cortex, which achieved significance in all regions except the thalamus. K{sub 1} was significantly reduced in the parietal (p < 0.01) and temporal cortices (p < 0.005), temporal and occipital cortex, and in the putamen and cerebellum (p < 0.05). The rate constants k{sub 2} and k{sub 4} were unchanged in the Alzheimer`s disease group. These data suggest that hypometabolism in Alzheimer`s disease is related to reduced glucose phosphorylation activity as well as diminished glucose transport, particularly in the most metabolically affected areas of the brain, the parietal and temporal cortex. 60 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Syndecans, signaling, and cell adhesion

    Couchman, J R; Woods, A

    1996-01-01

    structures within the heparan sulfate chains, leaving the roles of chondroitin sulfate chains and extracellular portion of the core proteins to be elucidated. Evidence that syndecans are a class of receptor involved in cell adhesion is mounting, and their small cytoplasmic domains may link with the...... transmembrane signaling from matrix to cytoskeleton, as proposed for other classes of adhesion receptors....

  13. Determination of Activation Energy of Relaxation Events in Composite Solid Propellants by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis

    B. K Bihari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The shelf life of a composite solid propellant is one of the critical aspects for the usage of solid propellants. To assess the ageing behavior of the composite solid propellant, the activation energy is a key parameter. The activation energy is determined by analysis of visco-elastic response of the composite solid propellant when subjected to sinusoidal excitation. In the present study, dynamic mechanical analyzer was used to characterize six different types of propellants based on hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene, aluminium, ammonium perchlorate cured with toluene diisocyanate having burning rates varying from 5 mm/s to 25 mm/s at 7000 kPa. Each propellant sample was given a multi-frequency strain of 0.01 percent at three discrete frequencies (3.5 Hz, 11 Hz, 35 Hz in the temperature range -80 °C to + 80 °C. It was observed that all the propellants have shown two relaxation events (α- and β- transition in the temperature range -80 °C to +80 °C. The α-transition was observed between -66 °C and -51 °C and β-transition between 7 °C and 44 °C for the propellants studied. The activation energy for both transitions was determined by Arrhenius plot from dynamic properties measured at different frequencies and also by time temperature superposition principle using Williams-Landel-Ferry and Arrhenius temperature dependence equations. The data reveal that the activation energy corresponding to α-transition varies from 90 kJ/mol to 125 kJ/mol for R-value between 0.7 to 0.9 while for β-transition the values are from 75 kJ/mol to 92 kJ/mol. The activation energy corresponding to β-transition may be used to predict the useful life of solid propellant.Defence Science Journal, 2014, 64(2, pp. 173-178. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.64.3818

  14. Mitigation of biological adhesion to aircraft leading edge surfaces

    Kok, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    Contamination caused by insects on aircraft leading edge surfaces can result in premature transition of the boundary layer, leading to an increase in skin friction drag and fuel consumption. Consequently, the use of novel low surface energy coatings to mitigate insect residue adhesion was investigated. In order to determine the effect of surface characteristics on insect residue adhesion a range of surfaces, from superhydrophobic to hydrophilic, were evaluated. Surfaces were characterized in ...

  15. Cell Adhesion on Polycaprolactone Modified by Plasma Treatment

    Nina Recek; Matic Resnik; Helena Motaln; Tamara Lah-Turnšek; Robin Augustine; Nandakumar Kalarikkal; Sabu Thomas; Miran Mozetič

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of various plasma treatments of electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds on the adhesion and proliferation of human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC). The PCL scaffolds were treated in plasmas created in O2, NH3 or SO2 gas at identical conditions. Surface functionalization of plasma-treated samples was determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Cell adhesion and morphology were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and the influence of p...

  16. Hyaluronan-mediated cellular adhesion

    Curtis, Jennifer

    2005-03-01

    Many cells surround themselves with a cushioning halo of polysaccharides that is further strengthened and organized by proteins. In fibroblasts and chrondrocytes, the primary component of this pericellular matrix is hyaluronan, a large linear polyanion. Hyaluronan production is linked to a variety of disease, developmental, and physiological processes. Cells manipulate the concentration of hyaluronan and hyaluronan receptors for numerous activities including modulation of cell adhesion, cell motility, and differentiation. Recent investigations by identify hyaluronan's role in mediating early-stage cell adhesion. An open question is how the cell removes the 0.5-10 micron thick pericellular matrix to allow for further mature adhesion events requiring nanometer scale separations. In this investigation, holographic optical tweezers are used to study the adhesion and viscoelastic properties of chondrocytes' pericellular matrix. Ultimately, we aim to shed further light on the spatial and temporal details of the dramatic transition from micron to nanometer gaps between the cell and its adhesive substrate.

  17. [Retention of adhesive bridges].

    Raes, F; De Boever, J

    1994-04-01

    Since the development of adhesive bridges in the early seventies, the retention and therefore the durability of these bridges has been tremendously improved. Conditioning of the non-precious metal by silanisation, careful acid etching of the enamel and the use of the appropriate composite resin are of prime importance. Furthermore, the meticulous preparation with enough interproximal embrace, occlusal rests, interocclusal clearance and cingulum stops is equally important. Including more teeth in the design does not necessarily lead to an improved retention. Besides the material and technical aspects, the whole clinical procedure needs much attention. The retention does not depend on one single factor, but on the precision of all the necessary clinical steps and on a well-defined selection of the material. In this way a five-year survival rate of close to 80% can be obtained. PMID:11830965

  18. Effect of fibril shape on adhesive properties

    Soto, Daniel; Hill, Ginel; Parness, Aaron; Esparza, Noé; Cutkosky, Mark; Kenny, Tom

    2010-08-01

    Research into the gecko's adhesive system revealed a unique architecture for adhesives using tiny hairs. By using a stiff material (β-keratin) to create a highly structured adhesive, the gecko's system demonstrates properties not seen in traditional pressure-sensitive adhesives which use a soft, unstructured planar layer. In contrast to pressure sensitive adhesives, the gecko adhesive displays frictional adhesion, in which increased shear force allows it to withstand higher normal loads. Synthetic fibrillar adhesives have been fabricated but not all demonstrate this frictional adhesion property. Here we report the dual-axis force testing of single silicone rubber pillars from synthetic adhesive arrays. We find that the shape of the adhesive pillar dictates whether frictional adhesion or pressure-sensitive behavior is observed. This work suggests that both types of behavior can be achieved with structures much larger than gecko terminal structures. It also indicates that subtle differences in the shape of these pillars can significantly influence their properties.

  19. Vortices determine the dynamics of biodiversity in cyclical interactions with protection spillovers

    Szolnoki, Attila

    2015-01-01

    If rock beats scissors and scissors beat paper, one might assume that rock beats paper too. But this is not the case for intransitive relationships that make up the famous rock-paper-scissors game. However, the sole presence of paper might prevent rock from beating scissors, simply because paper beats rock. This is the blueprint for the rock-paper-scissors game with protection spillovers, which has recently been introduced as a new paradigm for biodiversity in well-mixed microbial populations. Here we study the game in structured populations, demonstrating that protection spillovers give rise to spatial patterns that are impossible to observe in the classical rock-paper-scissors game. We show that the spatiotemporal dynamics of the system is determined by the density of stable vortices, which may ultimately transform to frozen states, to propagating waves, or to target waves with reversed propagation direction, depending further on the degree and type of randomness in the interactions among the species. If vo...

  20. Determination of Consumer Behaviour Dynamics Relating to Food Products: “Trakya Region Example”

    I.H. Inan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it has been determined the dynamics of consumer behaviours of individuals who live in rural and urban areas concerning food products and it analyses the effective factors on consumers food consumption choice in families, based in Trakya Region (Tekirdag, Edirne, Kırklareli. The study was conducted with a total of 770 households 385 people in towns and 385 people in rural areas, 770 people in total of which 385 was from rural areas, and 385 from urban areas.The effective factors on consumer behaviour when purchasing food products have been evaluated by Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA and T-Test and Factor Analysis Methods in rural and urban areas in Trakya Region.This study indicates that families who live in urban areas of Trakya Region give more importance to food consumption compared to the ones living in rural areas. Also families living in urban and rural areas are concerned about “the Foot-and-Mouth Disease Mad Cow (BSE and Avian Influenza”.

  1. Transcription closed and open complex dynamics studies reveal balance between genetic determinants and co-factors

    Sala, Adrien; Shoaib, Muhammad; Anufrieva, Olga; Mutharasu, Gnanavel; Jahan Hoque, Rawnak; Yli-Harja, Olli; Kandhavelu, Meenakshisundaram

    2015-05-01

    In E. coli, promoter closed and open complexes are key steps in transcription initiation, where magnesium-dependent RNA polymerase catalyzes RNA synthesis. However, the exact mechanism of initiation remains to be fully elucidated. Here, using single mRNA detection and dual reporter studies, we show that increased intracellular magnesium concentration affects Plac initiation complex formation resulting in a highly dynamic process over the cell growth phases. Mg2+ regulates transcription transition, which modulates bimodality of mRNA distribution in the exponential phase. We reveal that Mg2+ regulates the size and frequency of the mRNA burst by changing the open complex duration. Moreover, increasing magnesium concentration leads to higher intrinsic and extrinsic noise in the exponential phase. RNAP-Mg2+ interaction simulation reveals critical movements creating a shorter contact distance between aspartic acid residues and Nucleotide Triphosphate residues and increasing electrostatic charges in the active site. Our findings provide unique biophysical insights into the balanced mechanism of genetic determinants and magnesium ion in transcription initiation regulation during cell growth.

  2. Albedo of the South Pole on Mars Determined by Topographic Forcing of Atmosphere Dynamics

    Colaprete, Anthony; Barnes, Jeffrey R.; Haberle, Robert M.; Hollingsworth, Jeffery L.; Kleffer, Hugh H.; Titus, Timothy N.

    2005-01-01

    The nature of the martian south polar cap has remained enigmatic since the first spacecraft observations. In particular, the presence of a perennial carbon dioxide ice cap, the formation of a vast area of black slab ice known as the Cryptic region and the asymmetric springtime retreat of the cap have eluded explanation. Here we present observations and climate modelling that indicate the south pole of Mars is characterized by two distinct regional climates that are the result of dynamical forcing by the largest southern impact basins, Argyre and Hellas. The style of surface frost deposition is controlled by these regional climates. In the cold and stormy conditions that exist poleward of 60 degrees S and extend 180 degrees in longitude west from the Mountains of Mitchel (about 30 degrees W), surface frost accumulation is dominated by precipitation. In the opposite hemisphere, the polar atmosphere is relatively warm and clear and frost accumulation is dominated by direct vapour deposition. It is the differences in these deposition styles that determine the cap albedo.

  3. Motivational dynamics of eating regulation: a self-determination theory perspective

    Verstuyf Joke

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Within Western society, many people have difficulties adequately regulating their eating behaviors and weight. Although the literature on eating regulation is vast, little attention has been given to motivational dynamics involved in eating regulation. Grounded in Self-Determination Theory (SDT, the present contribution aims to provide a motivational perspective on eating regulation. The role of satisfaction and thwarting of the basic psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness is introduced as a mechanism to (a explain the etiology of body image concerns and disordered eating and (b understand the optimal regulation of ongoing eating behavior for healthy weight maintenance. An overview of empirical studies on these two research lines is provided. In a final section, the potential relevance and value of SDT in relation to prevailing theoretical models in the domain of eating regulation is discussed. Although research on SDT in the domain of eating regulation is still in its early stages and more research is clearly needed, this review suggests that the SDT represents a promising framework to more thoroughly study and understand the motivational processes involved in eating regulation and associated problems.

  4. Interaction between age and aerobic fitness in determining heart rate dynamics

    Heart rate variability (HRV) and phase-rectified signal averaging (PRSA) estimates of heart rate dynamics are diminished in older people compared with younger people. However, it is not fully elucidated whether these differences are related to age per se or to the concomitant influence of aerobic fitness. Aerobic fitness (peak oxygen uptake, gas exchange threshold, oxygen uptake kinetics, exercise economy) was assessed in 70 healthy adults (41 male) aged 18–57 years. Participants also underwent a 24 h, ambulatory ECG for the derivation of HRV and PRSA variables. HRV was most sensitive to age and aerobic fitness when measured during the morning period (6 am–12 pm). HRV and PRSA were both diminished with age and were higher in aerobically superior participants. The decline in HRV with age was predominantly attributable to age itself (33%), with aerobic fitness representing an additional modulating factor. The present study also provides tentative evidence that assessment of the influence of aerobic fitness should not rely on .VO2peak alone. These findings demonstrate that age per se is an important factor in determining HRV. However, given the clinical importance of diminished HRV and the immutable nature of aging, the potential significance of physical activity/training to enhance cardiac regulatory function should not be underestimated. (paper)

  5. Impact of oils and coatings on adhesion of structural adhesives

    Hagström, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    This is a master thesis project conducted for Scania CV AB in collaboration with Swerea Kimab. The purpose is to examine how oils and coatings on the surface affect the adhesion of adhesives. Earlier work done by Scania indicate that the amount of oil applied may have an impact on the adhesion. Substrates tested are hot dipped galvanised steel, electro galvanised. AlSi and ZnMg. Oils used are Anticorit RP 3802 that is an anti-corrosive oil and Renoform 3802 that is a drawing oil. The two adhes...

  6. Wet adhesion and adhesive locomotion of snails on anti-adhesive non-wetting surfaces.

    Neil J Shirtcliffe

    Full Text Available Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted, texture (smooth, rough or granular or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces.

  7. Wet Adhesion and Adhesive Locomotion of Snails on Anti-Adhesive Non-Wetting Surfaces

    Shirtcliffe, Neil J.; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted), texture (smooth, rough or granular) or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces. PMID:22693563

  8. Mesenchymal stem cell-induced 3D displacement field of cell-adhesion matrices with differing elasticities.

    Morita, Yasuyuki; Kawase, Naoki; Ju, Yang; Yamauchi, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Cells maintain homeostasis and perform various functions by interacting mechanically with a cell-adhesive matrix. Regarding cellular differentiation, it has been found that matrix elasticity can determine the differentiation lineage of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Direct quantitative measurements of the mechanical interaction between MSCs and matrix for differentiation, however, have yet to be reported. Herein, the displacement field of the cell-adhesive matrix was observed quantitatively using a digital volume correlation (DVC) method. Maximum displacement and cellular traction stress were analyzed when the MSC differentiated into a neuron-like cell or an osteoblast-like cell on a soft or hard elastic matrix, respectively. The function of non-muscle myosin II (NMM II), which plays an important role in intracellular cytoskeletal dynamics, was investigated during cellular differentiation. The mechanical interaction (maximum displacement and subjected area of the matrix) between the cell and matrix was dependent on matrix elasticity. It has also been shown that the mechanical interaction between the intracellular cytoskeleton and cell-adhesion matrix is indispensable for cellular differentiation. This work provides the first quantitative visualization of the mechanical interaction between MSCs and the cell-adhesion matrix for differentiation. PMID:26945874

  9. Nanostructured niobium oxide coatings influence osteoblast adhesion.

    Eisenbarth, E; Velten, D; Müller, M; Thull, R; Breme, J

    2006-10-01

    The interaction of osteoblasts was correlated to the roughness of nanosized surface structures of Nb(2)O(5) coatings on polished CP titanium grade 2. Nb(2)O(5) sol-gel coatings were selected as a model surface to study the interaction of osteoblasts with nanosized surface structures. The surface roughness was quantified by determination of the average surface finish (Ra number) by means of atomic force microscopy. Surface topographies with Ra = 7, 15, and 40 nm were adjusted by means of the annealing process parameters (time and temperature) within a sol-gel coating procedure. The observed osteoblast migration was fastest on smooth surfaces with Ra = 7 nm. The adhesion strength, spreading area, and collagen-I synthesis showed the best results on an intermediate roughness of Ra = 15 nm. The surface roughness of Ra = 40 nm was rather peaked and reduced the speed of cell reactions belonging to the adhesion process. PMID:16788971

  10. Adhesive joint and composites modeling in SIERRA.

    Ohashi, Yuki; Brown, Arthur A.; Hammerand, Daniel Carl; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Chambers, Robert S.; Foulk, James W., III (.,; )

    2005-11-01

    Polymers and fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites play an important role in many Defense Program applications. Recently an advanced nonlinear viscoelastic model for polymers has been developed and incorporated into ADAGIO, Sandia's SIERRA-based quasi-static analysis code. Standard linear elastic shell and continuum models for fiber-reinforced polymer-matrix composites have also been added to ADAGIO. This report details the use of these models for advanced adhesive joint and composites simulations carried out as part of an Advanced Simulation and Computing Advanced Deployment (ASC AD) project. More specifically, the thermo-mechanical response of an adhesive joint when loaded during repeated thermal cycling is simulated, the response of some composite rings under internal pressurization is calculated, and the performance of a composite container subjected to internal pressurization, thermal loading, and distributed mechanical loading is determined. Finally, general comparisons between the continuum and shell element approaches for modeling composites using ADAGIO are given.

  11. Marine Bioinspired Underwater Contact Adhesion.

    Clancy, Sean K; Sodano, Antonio; Cunningham, Dylan J; Huang, Sharon S; Zalicki, Piotr J; Shin, Seunghan; Ahn, B Kollbe

    2016-05-01

    Marine mussels and barnacles are sessile biofouling organisms that adhere to a number of surfaces in wet environments and maintain remarkably strong bonds. Previous synthetic approaches to mimic biological wet adhesive properties have focused mainly on the catechol moiety, present in mussel foot proteins (mfps), and especially rich in the interfacial mfps, for example, mfp-3 and -5, found at the interface between the mussel plaque and substrate. Barnacles, however, do not use Dopa for their wet adhesion, but are instead rich in noncatecholic aromatic residues. Due to this anomaly, we were intrigued to study the initial contact adhesion properties of copolymerized acrylate films containing the key functionalities of barnacle cement proteins and interfacial mfps, for example, aromatic (catecholic or noncatecholic), cationic, anionic, and nonpolar residues. The initial wet contact adhesion of the copolymers was measured using a probe tack testing apparatus with a flat-punch contact geometry. The wet contact adhesion of an optimized, bioinspired copolymer film was ∼15.0 N/cm(2) in deionized water and ∼9.0 N/cm(2) in artificial seawater, up to 150 times greater than commercial pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) tapes (∼0.1 N/cm(2)). Furthermore, maximum wet contact adhesion was obtained at ∼pH 7, suggesting viability for biomedical applications. PMID:27046671

  12. Adhesion and multi-materials

    Adhesion is a multidisciplinary science relevant to many practical fields. The main application of adhesion is bonding by adhesives. This technique is widely used in the industrial world and more specifically in the advanced technical domains. Adhesion is also involved in multi-component materials such as coatings, multilayer materials, polymer blends, composite materials... The multidisciplinary aspect of adhesion is well demonstrated by considering the wide variety of concepts, models and theories proposed for its description. An example of the adhesion between a fiber and a matrix in a composite material will lead to a general model relating the molecular properties of the interface to its capacity of stress transfer and hence to the macroscopic mechanical properties of the composite. This relationship is valid whatever the fiber (glass, carbon, polymeric) or the polymer matrix (thermoplastics, thermosetting). Any deviation from this model can be attributed to the existence of an interfacial zone or interphase exhibiting properties, mainly mechanical properties, different from the bulk matrix. Two examples are examined: the first one deals with the creation of a trans crystalline interphase in a semi-crystalline thermoplastic matrix and the second one is concerned with the formation of a pseudo glassy interphase in an elastomer matrix. These examples stress the need for complementary approaches in the understanding of adhesion phenomena at different levels of knowledge, from molecular to macroscopic. They also show how important it is to understand the mechanisms of formation of inter phases in order to be able to master the performance of multicomponent materials. (Author)

  13. Humidity dependence of adhesion for silane coated microcantilevers

    This study examines adhesion between silane-coated micromachined surfaces that are exposed to humid conditions. Our quantitative values for interfacial adhesion energies are determined from an in-situ optical measurement of deformations in partly-adhered cantilever beams. We coated micromachined cantilevers with either ODTS (C(sub 18)H(sub 37)SiCl(sub 3)) or FDTS (C(sub 8)F(sub 17)C(sub 2)H(sub 4)SiCl(sub 3)) with the objective of creating hydrophobic surfaces whose adhesion would be independent of humidity. In both cases, the adhesion energy is significantly lower than for uncoated, hydrophilic surfaces. For relative humidities (RH) less than 95% (ODTS) and 80% (FDTS) the adhesion energy was extremely low and constant. In fact, ODTS-coated beams exposed to saturated humidity conditions and long (48 hour) exposures showed only a factor of two increase in adhesion energy. Surprisingly, FDTS coated beams, which initially have a higher contact angle (115(degree)) with water than do ODTS coated beams (112(degree)), proved to be much more sensitive to humidity. The FDTS coated surfaces showed a factor of one hundred increase in adhesion energy after a seven hour exposure to 90% RH. Atomic force microscopy revealed agglomerated coating material after exposed to high RH, suggesting a redistribution of the monolayer film. This agglomeration was more prominent for FDTS than ODTS. These findings suggest a new mechanism for uptake of moisture under high humidity conditions. At high humidities, the silane coatings can reconfigure from a surface to a bulk phase leaving behind locally hydrophilic sites which increase the average measured adhesion energy. In order for the adhesion increase to be observed, a significant fraction of the monolayer must be converted from the surface to the bulk phase

  14. Wind tunnel determination of dynamic cross-coupling derivatives - A new approach

    Hanff, E. S.; Orlik-Rueckemann, J.

    1980-01-01

    The latest developments in the NAE ongoing dynamic stability research program are briefly summarized. Emphasis is placed on the recently developed wind-tunnel data reduction procedures used to obtain cross and cross-coupling derivatives due to an oscillatory motion. These procedures, which account for the dynamic behaviour of the model-balance subsystem, are described for the balance configurations currently in use. The principles on which they are based, however, are quite general and can therefore be applied to other balance configurations. Two full-model dynamic stability apparatuses are described and typical results, obtained from dynamic calibrations as well as from wind-tunnel experiments, are presented.

  15. Relationship between the adhesive properties of bacteria and their transport and colonization in the subsurface environment. Final technical report

    Fletcher, M.

    1997-03-13

    The adhesion of bacteria to sediment particle or rock surfaces considerably effects their transport in subsurface environments. This research focuses on the macromolecular properties of bacteria that determine their adhesiveness and on the significance of adhesion in transport of subsurface bacteria. Specific objectives include (1) to obtain adhesion mutants of subsurface Pseudomonas species altered in surface adhesives; (2) to determine alterations in adhesives in selected mutants; (3) to evaluate the effect of adhesiveness on transport and long-term distribution and colonization of bacteria in porous media. Primary methods will be tranposon mutagenesis to generate adhesion mutants, biochemical analyses of cell surface polymers, and the use of laboratory columns containing subsurface materials to study the distribution and transport of bacteria along flow paths over time.

  16. Shearing Nanometer-Thick Confined Hydrocarbon Films: Friction and Adhesion

    Sivebæk, I. M.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2016-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics (MD) friction and adhesion calculations for nanometer-thick confined hydrocarbon films with molecular lengths 20, 100 and 1400 carbon atoms. We study the dependency of the frictional shear stress on the confining pressure and sliding speed. We present results for the...

  17. Focal Adhesion Kinases in Adhesion Structures and Disease

    Pierre P. Eleniste

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases.

  18. Focal adhesion kinases in adhesion structures and disease.

    Eleniste, Pierre P; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases. PMID:22888421

  19. Hemodynamic aspects of reduced platelet adhesion on bioinspired microstructured surfaces.

    Pham, Tam Thanh; Wiedemeier, Stefan; Maenz, Stefan; Gastrock, Gunter; Settmacher, Utz; Jandt, Klaus D; Zanow, Jürgen; Lüdecke, Claudia; Bossert, Jörg

    2016-09-01

    Occlusion by thrombosis due to the absence of the endothelial cell layer is one of the most frequent causes of failure of artificial vascular grafts. Bioinspired surface structures may have a potential to reduce the adhesion of platelets contributing to hemostasis. The aim of this study was to investigate the hemodynamic aspects of platelet adhesion, the main cause of thrombosis, on bioinspired microstructured surfaces mimicking the endothelial cell morphology. We tested the hypothesis that platelet adhesion is statistically significantly reduced on bioinspired microstructured surfaces compared to unstructured surfaces. Platelet adhesion as a function of the microstructure dimensions was investigated under flow conditions on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces by a combined experimental and theoretical approach. Platelet adhesion was statistically significantly reduced (by up to 78%; p≤0.05) on the microstructured PDMS surfaces compared to that on the unstructured control surface. Finite element method (FEM) simulations of blood flow dynamic revealed a micro shear gradient on the microstructure surfaces which plays a pivotal role in reducing platelet adhesion. On the surfaces with the highest differences of the shear stress between the top of the microstructures and the ground areas, platelet adhesion was reduced most. In addition, the microstructures help to reduce the interaction strength between fluid and surfaces, resulting in a larger water contact angle but no higher resistance to flow compared to the unstructured surface. These findings provide new insight into the fundamental mechanisms of reducing platelet adhesion on microstructured bioinspired surfaces and may lay the basis for the development of innovative next generation artificial vascular grafts with reduced risk of thrombosis. PMID:27239904

  20. Determination of the Orientation and Dynamics of Ergosterol in Model Membranes Using Uniform 13C Labeling and Dynamically Averaged 13C Chemical Shift Anisotropies as Experimental Restraints

    Soubias, O.; Jolibois, F.; Massou, S.; Milon, A.; Réat, V.

    2005-01-01

    A new strategy was established to determine the average orientation and dynamics of ergosterol in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine model membranes. It is based on the analysis of chemical shift anisotropies (CSAs) averaged by the molecular dynamics. Static 13C CSA tensors were computed by quantum chemistry, using the gauge-including atomic-orbital approach within Hartree-Fock theory. Uniformly 13C-labeled ergosterol was purified from Pichia pastoris cells grown on labeled methanol. After reconstitution into dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine lipids, the complete 1H and 13C assignment of ergosterol's resonances was performed using a combination of magic-angle spinning two-dimensional experiments. Dynamically averaged CSAs were determined by standard side-band intensity analysis for isolated 13C resonances (C3 and ethylenic carbons) and by off-magic-angle spinning experiments for other carbons. A set of 18 constraints was thus obtained, from which the sterol's molecular order parameter and average orientation could be precisely defined. The validity of using computed CSAs in this strategy was verified on cholesterol model systems. This new method allowed us to quantify ergosterol's dynamics at three molar ratios: 16 mol % (Ld phase), 30 mol % (Lo phase), and 23 mol % (mixed phases). Contrary to cholesterol, ergosterol's molecular diffusion axis makes an important angle (14°) with the inertial axis of the rigid four-ring system. PMID:15923221

  1. Photovoltaic module with adhesion promoter

    Xavier, Grace

    2013-10-08

    Photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters and methods for fabricating photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters are described. A photovoltaic module includes a solar cell including a first surface and a second surface, the second surface including a plurality of interspaced back-side contacts. A first glass layer is coupled to the first surface by a first encapsulating layer. A second glass layer is coupled to the second surface by a second encapsulating layer. At least a portion of the second encapsulating layer is bonded directly to the plurality of interspaced back-side contacts by an adhesion promoter.

  2. Adhesives from modified soy protein

    Sun, Susan; Wang, Donghai; Zhong, Zhikai; Yang, Guang

    2008-08-26

    The, present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF and PPF resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

  3. Evidence that talin alternative splice variants from Ciona intestinalis have different roles in cell adhesion

    McCann Richard O

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Talins are large, modular cytoskeletal proteins found in animals and amoebozoans such as Dictyostelium discoideum. Since the identification of a second talin gene in vertebrates, it has become increasingly clear that vertebrate Talin1 and Talin2 have non-redundant roles as essential links between integrins and the actin cytoskeleton in distinct plasma membrane-associated adhesion complexes. The conserved C-terminal I/LWEQ module is important for talin function. This structural element mediates the interaction of talins with F-actin. The I/LWEQ module also targets mammalian Talin1 to focal adhesion complexes, which are dynamic multicomponent assemblies required for cell adhesion and cell motility. Although Talin1 is essential for focal adhesion function, Talin2 is not targeted to focal adhesions. The nonvertebrate chordate Ciona intestinalis has only one talin gene, but alternative splicing of the talin mRNA produces two proteins with different C-terminal I/LWEQ modules. Thus, C. intestinalis contains two talins, Talin-a and Talin-b, with potentially different activities, despite having only one talin gene. Results We show here that, based on their distribution in cDNA libraries, Talin-a and Talin-b are differentially expressed during C. intestinalis development. The I/LWEQ modules of the two proteins also have different affinities for F-actin. Consistent with the hypothesis that Talin-a and Talin-b have different roles in cell adhesion, the distinct I/LWEQ modules of Talin-a and Talin-b possess different subcellular targeting determinants. The I/LWEQ module of Talin-a is targeted to focal adhesions, where it most likely serves as the link between integrin and the actin cytoskeleton. The Talin-b I/LWEQ module is not targeted to focal adhesions, but instead preferentially labels F-actin stress fibers. These different properties of C. intestinalis the Talin-a and Talin-b I/LWEQ modules mimic the differences between mammalian

  4. Comparison of renal dynamic imaging and modified MDRD equation in determining the stage of chronic kidney disease patients

    Objective: To compare the accuracy of 99Tcm-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (99Tcm-DTPA) renal dynamic imaging and modified modification of diet in renal disease trail (MDRD) equation in determining the stage of the chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients in clinical practice. Methods: A total of 169 patients were enrolled whose glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were determined simultaneously by 3 methods: dual plasma sample clearance method, renal dynamic imaging and modified MDRD equation. The dual plasma sample clearance method was employed as the reference method. The accuracy of the other methods in determining the stage of CKD patients was compared and the comparison was repeated based on the different stages. Results: The accuracy of renal dynamic imaging and modified MDRD equation was 56.80% and 68.64%, respectively (P=0.019<0.05). And only in the stage of uremia, the difference of the above-mentioned two method reached statistical significance (P=0.012<0.05), while in other stages they showed similar performance (P=0.180, 0.424, 0.629 and 0.754, all P>0.05). Conclusion: Modified MDRD equation showed better performance than renal dynamic imaging or as good as the second one in determining the stage of CKD patients and the former one should be the first choice in clinical practice because of its simplicity and economy. (authors)

  5. Focal Adhesion Kinases in Adhesion Structures and Disease

    Pierre P. Eleniste; Angela Bruzzaniti

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organiza...

  6. Ultrastructural and Histochemical Characterization of the Zebra Mussel Adhesive Apparatus

    Farsad, Nikrooz

    Since their accidental introduction into the Great Lakes in mid- to late-1980s, the freshwater zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha, have colonized most lakes and waterways across eastern North America. Their rapid spread is partly attributed to their ability to tenaciously attach to hard substrates via an adhesive apparatus called the byssus, resulting in serious environmental and economic impacts. A detailed ultrastructural study of the byssus revealed a 10 nm adhesive layer at the attachment interface. Distributions of the main adhesive amino acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), and its oxidizing (cross-linking) enzyme, catechol oxidase, were determined histochemically. It was found that, upon aging, DOPA levels remained high in the portion of the byssus closest to the interface, consistent with an adhesive role. In contrast, reduced levels of DOPA corresponded well with high levels of catechol oxidase in the load-bearing component of the byssus, presumably forming cross-links and increasing the cohesive strength.

  7. Adhesive properties of PTFE modified by DC discharge

    It is shown that low-pressure DC discharge treatment of PTFE films at both the anode and cathode leads to substantial enhancement of the contact properties of the polymer surface and alters considerably the adhesion properties of PTFE film surface. A procedure is developed for determination the adhesion characteristics of the modified surface of plasma treated thin polymer films using Scotch® 810 adhesive tape. The procedure comprises of a study of the surface coating created by means of physical vapor deposition of an aluminum layer with thickness of the order of 100 nm, an adhesive joint of the film with Scotch® 810 tape, and T-peel testing of the specimen. Using this procedure, the peel resistance of the initial and the modified PTFE film on both the anode and the cathode in DC discharge is measured.

  8. Biomimetic emulsions reveal the effect of homeostatic pressure on cell-cell adhesion

    Pontani, Lea-Laetitia; Viasnoff, Virgile; Brujic, Jasna

    2012-01-01

    Cell-cell contacts in tissues are continuously subject to mechanical forces due to homeostatic pressure and active cytoskeleton dynamics. While much is known about the molecular pathways of adhesion, the role of mechanics is less well understood. To isolate the role of pressure we present a dense packing of functionalized emulsion droplets in which surface interactions are tuned to mimic those of real cells. By visualizing the microstructure in 3D we find that a threshold compression force is necessary to overcome electrostatic repulsion and surface elasticity and establish protein-mediated adhesion. Varying the droplet interaction potential maps out a phase diagram for adhesion as a function of force and salt concentration. Remarkably, fitting the data with our theoretical model predicts binder concentrations in the adhesion areas that are similar to those found in real cells. Moreover, we quantify the adhesion size dependence on the applied force and thus reveal adhesion strengthening with increasing homeos...

  9. Water droplet excess free energy determined by cluster mitosis using guided molecular dynamics

    Lau, Gabriel V.; Müller, Erich A.; Jackson, George [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Hunt, Patricia A. [Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Ford, Ian J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-28

    Atmospheric aerosols play a vital role in affecting climate by influencing the properties and lifetimes of clouds and precipitation. Understanding the underlying microscopic mechanisms involved in the nucleation of aerosol droplets from the vapour phase is therefore of great interest. One key thermodynamic quantity in nucleation is the excess free energy of cluster formation relative to that of the saturated vapour. In our current study, the excess free energy is extracted for clusters of pure water modelled with the TIP4P/2005 intermolecular potential using a method based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics and the Jarzynski relation. The change in free energy associated with the “mitosis” or division of a cluster of N water molecules into two N/2 sub-clusters is evaluated. This methodology is an extension of the disassembly procedure used recently to calculate the excess free energy of argon clusters [H. Y. Tang and I. J. Ford, Phys. Rev. E 91, 023308 (2015)]. Our findings are compared to the corresponding excess free energies obtained from classical nucleation theory (CNT) as well as internally consistent classical theory (ICCT). The values of the excess free energy that we obtain with the mitosis method are consistent with CNT for large cluster sizes but for the smallest clusters, the results tend towards ICCT; for intermediate sized clusters, we obtain values between the ICCT and CNT predictions. Furthermore, the curvature-dependent surface tension which can be obtained by regarding the clusters as spherical droplets of bulk density is found to be a monotonically increasing function of cluster size for the studied range. The data are compared to other values reported in the literature, agreeing qualitatively with some but disagreeing with the values determined by Joswiak et al. [J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4, 4267 (2013)] using a biased mitosis approach; an assessment of the differences is the main motivation for our current study.

  10. Dynamics and molecular determinants of cytoplasmic lipid droplet clustering and dispersion.

    David J Orlicky

    Full Text Available Perilipin-1 (Plin1, a prominent cytoplasmic lipid droplet (CLD binding phosphoprotein and key physiological regulator of triglyceride storage and lipolysis in adipocytes, is thought to regulate the fragmentation and dispersion of CLD that occurs in response to β-adrenergic activation of adenylate cyclase. Here we investigate the dynamics and molecular determinants of these processes using cell lines stably expressing recombinant forms of Plin1 and/or other members of the perilipin family. Plin1 and a C-terminal CLD-binding fragment of Plin1 (Plin1CT induced formation of single dense CLD clusters near the microtubule organizing center, whereas neither an N-terminal CLD-binding fragment of Plin1, nor Plin2 or Plin3 induced clustering. Clustered CLD coated by Plin1, or Plin1CT, dispersed in response to isoproterenol, or other agents that activate adenylate cyclase, in a process inhibited by the protein kinase A inhibitor, H89, and blocked by microtubule disruption. Isoproterenol-stimulated phosphorylation of CLD-associated Plin1 on serine 492 preceded their dispersion, and live cell imaging showed that cluster dispersion involved initial fragmentation of tight clusters into multiple smaller clusters, which then fragmented into well-dispersed individual CLD. siRNA knockdown of the cortical actin binding protein, moesin, induced disaggregation of tight clusters into multiple smaller clusters, and inhibited the reaggregation of dispersed CLD into tight clusters. Together these data suggest that the clustering and dispersion processes involve a complex orchestration of phosphorylation-dependent, microtubule-dependent and independent, and microfilament dependent steps.

  11. Water droplet excess free energy determined by cluster mitosis using guided molecular dynamics

    Atmospheric aerosols play a vital role in affecting climate by influencing the properties and lifetimes of clouds and precipitation. Understanding the underlying microscopic mechanisms involved in the nucleation of aerosol droplets from the vapour phase is therefore of great interest. One key thermodynamic quantity in nucleation is the excess free energy of cluster formation relative to that of the saturated vapour. In our current study, the excess free energy is extracted for clusters of pure water modelled with the TIP4P/2005 intermolecular potential using a method based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics and the Jarzynski relation. The change in free energy associated with the “mitosis” or division of a cluster of N water molecules into two N/2 sub-clusters is evaluated. This methodology is an extension of the disassembly procedure used recently to calculate the excess free energy of argon clusters [H. Y. Tang and I. J. Ford, Phys. Rev. E 91, 023308 (2015)]. Our findings are compared to the corresponding excess free energies obtained from classical nucleation theory (CNT) as well as internally consistent classical theory (ICCT). The values of the excess free energy that we obtain with the mitosis method are consistent with CNT for large cluster sizes but for the smallest clusters, the results tend towards ICCT; for intermediate sized clusters, we obtain values between the ICCT and CNT predictions. Furthermore, the curvature-dependent surface tension which can be obtained by regarding the clusters as spherical droplets of bulk density is found to be a monotonically increasing function of cluster size for the studied range. The data are compared to other values reported in the literature, agreeing qualitatively with some but disagreeing with the values determined by Joswiak et al. [J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4, 4267 (2013)] using a biased mitosis approach; an assessment of the differences is the main motivation for our current study

  12. Water droplet excess free energy determined by cluster mitosis using guided molecular dynamics

    Lau, Gabriel V.; Hunt, Patricia A.; Müller, Erich A.; Jackson, George; Ford, Ian J.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play a vital role in affecting climate by influencing the properties and lifetimes of clouds and precipitation. Understanding the underlying microscopic mechanisms involved in the nucleation of aerosol droplets from the vapour phase is therefore of great interest. One key thermodynamic quantity in nucleation is the excess free energy of cluster formation relative to that of the saturated vapour. In our current study, the excess free energy is extracted for clusters of pure water modelled with the TIP4P/2005 intermolecular potential using a method based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics and the Jarzynski relation. The change in free energy associated with the "mitosis" or division of a cluster of N water molecules into two N/2 sub-clusters is evaluated. This methodology is an extension of the disassembly procedure used recently to calculate the excess free energy of argon clusters [H. Y. Tang and I. J. Ford, Phys. Rev. E 91, 023308 (2015)]. Our findings are compared to the corresponding excess free energies obtained from classical nucleation theory (CNT) as well as internally consistent classical theory (ICCT). The values of the excess free energy that we obtain with the mitosis method are consistent with CNT for large cluster sizes but for the smallest clusters, the results tend towards ICCT; for intermediate sized clusters, we obtain values between the ICCT and CNT predictions. Furthermore, the curvature-dependent surface tension which can be obtained by regarding the clusters as spherical droplets of bulk density is found to be a monotonically increasing function of cluster size for the studied range. The data are compared to other values reported in the literature, agreeing qualitatively with some but disagreeing with the values determined by Joswiak et al. [J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4, 4267 (2013)] using a biased mitosis approach; an assessment of the differences is the main motivation for our current study.

  13. How to determine the dynamic fracture energy of concrete. Theoretical considerations and experimental evidence

    Weerheijm, J.; Vegt, I.

    2011-01-01

    Data on the dynamic fracture energy of concrete are scarce and also not consistent due to different test methods, data analyses and definitions. In [1] the authors summarized and evaluated the test methods. Suggestions for the standardization of dynamic tensile testing were given. In the current pap

  14. Biomaterial based novel polyurethane adhesives for wood to wood and metal to metal bonding

    Mitesh Ramanlal Patel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyurethane adhesives made from synthetic chemicals are non-biodegradable, costly and difficult to find raw materials from local market. To avoid solid pollution problem, cost effectiveness and easy availability of raw materials, biomaterials based polyurethane adhesives are used in current industrial interest. Direct use of castor oil in polyurethane adhesive gives limited hardness. Modification on active sites of castor oil to utilize double bond of unsaturated fatty acid and carboxyl group yields new modified or activated polyols, which can be utilized for polyurethane adhesive formulation. In view of this, we have synthesized polyurethane adhesives from polyester polyols, castor oil based polyols and epoxy based polyols with Isocyanate adducts based on castor oil and trimethylolpropane. To study the effects of polyurethane adhesive strength (i.e. lap shear strength on wood-to-wood and metal-to-metal bonding through various types of polyols, cross-linking density, isocyanate adducts and also to compare adhesive strength between wood to wood and metal to metal surface. These polyols and polyurethanes were characterized through GPC, NMR and IR-spectroscopy, gel and surface drying time. Thermal stability of PU adhesives was determined under the effect of cross-linking density (NCO/OH ratio. The NCO/OH ratio (1.5 was optimized for adhesives as the higher NCO/OH ratio (2.0 increasing cross-linking density and decreases adhesion. Lower NCO/OH ratio (1.0 provideslow cross-linking density and low strength of adhesives.

  15. A Review of Cell Adhesion Studies for Biomedical and Biological Applications

    Ahmad Khalili, Amelia; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    Cell adhesion is essential in cell communication and regulation, and is of fundamental importance in the development and maintenance of tissues. The mechanical interactions between a cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) can influence and control cell behavior and function. The essential function of cell adhesion has created tremendous interests in developing methods for measuring and studying cell adhesion properties. The study of cell adhesion could be categorized into cell adhesion attachment and detachment events. The study of cell adhesion has been widely explored via both events for many important purposes in cellular biology, biomedical, and engineering fields. Cell adhesion attachment and detachment events could be further grouped into the cell population and single cell approach. Various techniques to measure cell adhesion have been applied to many fields of study in order to gain understanding of cell signaling pathways, biomaterial studies for implantable sensors, artificial bone and tooth replacement, the development of tissue-on-a-chip and organ-on-a-chip in tissue engineering, the effects of biochemical treatments and environmental stimuli to the cell adhesion, the potential of drug treatments, cancer metastasis study, and the determination of the adhesion properties of normal and cancerous cells. This review discussed the overview of the available methods to study cell adhesion through attachment and detachment events. PMID:26251901

  16. Oxide film microstructure: the link between surface preparation processes and strength/durability of adhesively bonded aluminum. Final report

    Hsia, K. Jimmy; Pearlstein, Arne J.; Scheeline, Alexander; Shang, Jian Ku

    2000-11-30

    Strength and durability of adhesive bonding of aluminum alloys structures are intrinsically determined by the surface microstructures and interfacial failure micromechanisms. The current project presents a multidisciplinary approach to addressing critical issues controlling the strength and durability of adhesive bonds of aluminum alloys. Three main thrust areas have been pursued: surface treatment technology development to achieve desirable surface microstructures; relationship between surface structure and properties of adhesive bonds; and failure mechanisms of adhesively bonded components.

  17. Denture Adhesives - A Literature Review

    Sudhanshu Shekhar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Successful complete denture treatment combines exemplary technique, effective patient rapport and education and familiarity with all possible management options to provide the highest degree of patient satisfaction. Dentists need to know about denture adhesives to be able to identify those patients who actually need them and to be able to educate them about the advantages, disadvantages and correct use of these products. Denture adhesives are commercially available nontoxic, soluble materials that when applied to the tissue surface of dentures enhance their retention, stability and performance. They were introduced in dentistry in the late 18th century. The first patent related to adhesives was issued in 1913, followed in the 1920’s and 1930’s. The purpose of the use of denture adhesives can be described as to subjectively benefit denture-wearers with improved stability, retention and comfort of their dentures, and with improved incisal force, masticatory ability, and confidence.

  18. Laser surface modification and adhesion

    Mittal, K L

    2014-01-01

    The book provides a unique overview on laser techniques and applications for the purpose of improving adhesion by altering surface chemistry and topography/morphology of the substrate. It details laser surface modification techniques for a wide range of industrially relevant materials (plastics, metals, ceramics, composites) with the aim to improve and enhance their adhesion to other materials. The joining of different materials is of critical importance in the fabrication of many and varied products.

  19. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    Akihiko Murata; Shin-Ichi Hayashi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of...

  20. Adhesive capsulitis: a case report

    Kazemi, Mohsen

    2000-01-01

    Adhesive capsulitis or frozen shoulder is an uncommon entity in athletes. However, it is a common cause of shoulder pain and disability in the general population. Although it is a self limiting ailment, its rather long, restrictive and painful course forces the affected person to seek treatment. Conservative management remains the mainstay treatment of adhesive capsulitis. This includes chiropractic manipulation of the shoulder, therapeutic modalities, mobilization, exercise, soft tissue ther...

  1. Climate determined differences in carbon dioxide fluxes dynamics between two comparable agroecosystems of Central Russia

    Yaroslavtsev, Alexis; Meshalkina, Joulia; Mazirov, Ilya; Valentini, Riccardo; Vasenev, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    fields. Pristen field's soil water content was higher through the growing season due to better chernozem's moisture retention capacity. Amount and dynamics of precipitation and as a result soil water content at studied plots differed distinctly. Moscow field had a higher precipitation values. Diurnal values of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) clearly showed significant interseasonal and interplot differences. Diurnal patterns of NEE were considerably higher in Pristen site with similar to Moscow patterns for all months of growing season, except May due to earlier sowing in Chernozem region. Maximal CO2 sink were observed during June for both fields and made -6 and -3 g C CO2 m-2 d-1, for Pristen and Moscow fields, respectively. The Pristen site showed similar sink values and dynamics for May. Main GPP dynamics driver was different crop development stage: Pristen's barley earlier sowing and longer growing period. Higher GPP values were due to better climate and soil parameters in Pristen (higher PAR, temperature and soil moisture). The number of net sink days for Pristen and Moscow fields were 85 and 67 days, respectively. All cumulative functions for growing season were consistently higher in Pristen than in Moscow: cumulative NEE were -160 g C CO2 m-2 and -80 g C CO2 m-2, cumulative Reco were 450 g CCO2 m-2 and 300 g C CO2 m-2, cumulative GPP were 610 g C CO2 m-2 and 380 g C CO2 m-2, respectively. As a result, we can conclude that essentially higher GPP values were in Pristen due to its better climate and soil parameters (higher PAR, temperature and soil moisture). General trends for ecosystem's respiration (Reco) and GPP were determined by crop phase. Reco peaks corresponded well to raining periods. Differences in carbon loss can be explained by differences in soil microbial community due to different soil type, what highlights important role of soil in carbon exchange for agroecosystems. Obtained unique for Russian agriculture data will be used for land-use models

  2. Distinct Photopolymerization Efficacy on Dentin of Self-etch Adhesives

    Zhang, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of application mode on polymerization effectiveness of self-etch adhesives with different pHs has rarely been studied. We applied 2 self-etch adhesives—Adper Prompt L-Pop (APLP, pH ~ 0.8) and Adper Easy-Bond (AEB, pH ~ 2.5)—to dentin with or without agitation (dynamic or static application), to investigate photopolymerization efficacy on dentin, and to understand the role of chemical interaction/reaction between adhesives and dentin. Micro-Raman spectra and imaging were acquired ac...

  3. Adhesion energy, surface traction and surface tension in liquid xenon

    B Mathew; G A Adebayo

    2011-12-01

    We calculated the adhesion energy, the surface traction and the surface energy of liquid xenon using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The value of the adhesion energy for liquid xenon at a reduced density of 0.630 was found to be 0.591 J/m2 and the surface traction has a peak at = 3.32 Å. It was observed that the attraction of the molecules in the liquid surface which produces a resistance to penetration decreases with temperature. This may be attributed to the greater average separation of molecules at higher temperature.

  4. DYNAMICS AND THEIR DETERMINANTS IN HOUSEHOLD DEPOSITS IN LEI. CASE OF ROMANIA AFTER THE FINANCIAL CRISIS OF 2008

    Zaharia Marian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article are examined on the one hand the dynamics of household deposits as the important component of saving behaviour and on the other hand the most important determinants of household deposits behaviour. The paper was structured in 4 sections. The first section represents a short overview of the related literature. Source data and methodological aspects are described in section 2. The dynamics of the population's deposits, is discussed in section 3, while section 4 explains the results obtained from the analysis carried out. The results of this study confirm the direct and influence of the variable like the exchange rate on the household deposits.

  5. Determining the Role of Dynamic Hyperinflation in Patients with Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Klooster, Karin; ten Hacken, Nick H. T.; Hartman, Jorine E.; Sciurba, Frank C.; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Slebos, Dirk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dynamic hyperinflation due to increased respiratory frequency during exercise is associated with limitations in exercise capacity in patients with moderately severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Objectives: The present study assessed whether the manually paced tachypnea (

  6. Impact of static and dynamic A-form heterogeneity on the determination of RNA global structural dynamics using NMR residual dipolar couplings

    We examined how static and dynamic deviations from the idealized A-form helix propagate into errors in the principal order tensor parameters determined using residual dipolar couplings (rdcs). A 20-ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the HIV-1 transactivation response element (TAR) RNA together with a survey of spin relaxation studies of RNA dynamics reveals that pico-to-nanosecond local motions in non-terminal Watson-Crick base-pairs will uniformly attenuate base and sugar one bond rdcs by ∼7%. Gaussian distributions were generated for base and sugar torsion angles through statistical comparison of 40 RNA X-ray structures solved to <3.0 A resolution. For a typical number (≥11) of one bond C-H base and sugar rdcs, these structural deviations together with rdc uncertainty (1.5 Hz) lead to average errors in the magnitude and orientation of the principal axis of order that are <9% and <4 deg., respectively. The errors decrease to <5% and <4 deg. for ≥17 rdcs. A protocol that allows for estimation of error in A-form order tensors due to both angular deviations and rdc uncertainty (Aform-RDC) is validated using theoretical simulations and used to analyze rdcs measured previously in TAR in the free state and bound to four distinct ligands. Results confirm earlier findings that the two TAR helices undergo large changes in both their mean relative orientation and dynamics upon binding to different targets

  7. Analysis of dynamic and static filtration and determination of MUD cake parameters

    Calcada, L.A.; Scheid, C.M.; Araujo, C.A.O. de [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropedica, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica], e-mail: calcada@ufrrj.br; Waldmann, A.T.A.; Martins, A.L. [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (CENPES/PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    2011-07-15

    Drilling operations around the world employ a concept called overbalance. During this process, it is well known that dynamic and static filtration can occur. Thin filter cakes and low fluid-invasion rates are extremely desirable to promote optimal logging conditions and permeability return. The aim of this work was to compare the different behavior between dynamic and static filtration in drilling wells. To investigate the filtration process of Newtonian suspensions, we built a dynamic and static filtration loop with which we acquired experimental filtration volume data as a function of time. The filtration loop included a tank mixer where a Newtonian aqueous calcium carbonate polydisperse suspension was homogenized. The suspension was pumped through tubes to a dynamic or a static filtration cell. We validated a theoretical model based on Darcy's law and on mass conservation proposed by Ferreira and Massarani (2005). That model predicted mud cake buildup and filtrate flow rate for Newtonian suspensions. Relying on both models and the experimental data, filter cake parameters were calculated. We discuss, based on these parameters, the effects of the filtration configuration in dynamic and static modes. Finally, we generalized Ferreira and Massarani's model (2005) for procedures involving non-Newtonian suspensions. This new model can predict dynamic filtration and fluid invasion for non-Newtonian suspensions as drilling fluids. (author)

  8. Environmental factors that determine the occurrence and seasonal dynamics of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae

    Yoshimasa YAMAMOTO

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the seasonal dynamics of two populations of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae Ralfs ex Bornet & Flahault var. flos-aquae and four populations of A. flos-aquae var. klebahnii Elenkin in eutrophic water bodies over 1 year from February 2006 to January 2007. The growth of A. flos-aquae var. flos-aquae was promoted at high temperatures even if in one case the biomass development was very low when other co-occurring cyanoprokaryotes (Anabaena spp. and Microcystis spp. were abundant. In contrast, the highest density of the other population of A. flos-aquae var. flos-aquae was observed in August when the population density of M. aeruginosa (Kützing Kützing reached an annual peak. A. flos-aquae var. flos-aquae usually bloomed in summer but could also tolerate low temperatures in the winter, and was present in relatively high densities. The populations of A. flos-aquae var. klebahnii observed in this study can be divided into three groups based on preferred temperature; three populations increased in winter, and the other increased in summer. Large biomasses of the low-temperature-adapted A. flos-aquae were observed mainly during winter when population densities of co-occurring cyanoprokaryotes (Anabaena spp., Microcystis spp. and Planktothrix raciborskii (Woloszynska Anagnostidis & Komárek were relatively low or almost absent. The increase in or existence of cooccurring cyanoprokaryotes during the summer resulted in a decrease of the A. flos-aquae population density. It was revealed that high temperatures (20-25 °C are suitable for maintaining A. flos-aquae var. klebahnii strains isolated from the study ponds, implying that low-temperature-adapted A. flos-aquae can grow over a wide range of water temperatures. The high-temperatureadapted A. flos-aquae var. klebahnii co-existed with M. aeruginosa during summer; however, its peak population density was significantly lower than those in previous years when M. aeruginosa was absent

  9. Differential adhesion of tumor cells to capillary endothelial cells in vitro.

    Alby, L; Auerbach, R

    1984-01-01

    Adhesion studies were carried out to determine the relative ability of glioma cells and ovary-derived teratoma cells to adhere to endothelial cells obtained from mouse brain capillaries (designated MBE cell line) or mouse ovaries (designated MOE cell line). The teratoma cells showed preferential adhesion to MOE cells, whereas the glioma cells showed preferential adhesion to the MBE cell line. In contrast, the glioma and teratoma cells adhered equally to L929 and 3T3 fibroblasts. A testicular ...

  10. Plasma polymerization for cell adhesive/anti-adhesive implant coating

    Meichsner, Juergen; Testrich, Holger; Rebl, Henrike; Nebe, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Plasma polymerization of ethylenediamine (C2H8N2, EDA) and perfluoropropane (C3F8, PFP) with admixture of argon and hydrogen, respectively, was studied using an asymmetric 13.56 MHz CCP. The analysis of the plasma chemical gas phase processes for stable molecules revealed consecutive reactions: C2H8N2 consumption, intermediate product NH3, and main final product HCN. In C3F8- H2 plasma the precursor molecule C3F8 and molecular hydrogen are consumed and HF as well as CF4 and C2F6 are found as main gaseous reaction products. The deposited plasma polymer films on the powered electrode are strongly cross-linked due to ion bombardment. The stable plasma polymerized films from EDA are characterized by high content of nitrogen with N/C ratio of about 0.35. The plasma polymerized fluorocarbon film exhibit a reduced F/C ratio of about 1.2. Adhesion tests with human osteoblast cell line MG-63 on coated Ti6Al4V samples (polished) compared with uncoated reference sample yielded both, the enhanced cell adhesion for plasma polymerized EDA and significantly reduced cell adhesion for fluorocarbon coating, respectively. Aging of the plasma polymerized EDA film, in particular due to the reactions with oxygen from air, showed no significant change in the cell adhesion. The fluorocarbon coating with low cell adhesion is of interest for temporary implants. Funded by the Campus PlasmaMed.

  11. Adhesion quality of glued joints from different commercial wood species

    Alexandre Miguel do Nascimento

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the effect of wood density, adhesive type and gluing pressure on the shear strength of glued joints of fourteen commercial wood species. Wood pieces were classified in three density classes (Class 1: less than 0.55 g cm-3; Class 2: from 0.55 to 0.75 g cm-3; and Class 3: greater than 0.75 g cm-3 and joints bonded with two adhesives: polyvinyl acetate (PVA and urea-formaldehyde (UF, under two different pressures: 6 and 12 kgf cm-2. Glued joints bonded with PVA adhesive presented higher shear strength than those bonded with UF adhesive. For percentage of wood failure, the PVA adhesive had the best performance, however, only Classes 1 and 2 reached the values required by ASTM 3110 standard. Glued joints from Class 3, bonded with UF adhesive, did not reach the values of solid wood. The gluing pressure of 12 kgf cm-2 was more efficient for Class 3, for both shear strength and percentage of wood failure.

  12. Investigating On-Orbit Attitude Determination Anomalies for the Solar Dynamics Observatory Mission

    Vess, Melissa F.; Starin, Scott R.; Chia-Kuo, Alice Liu

    2011-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) was launched on February 11, 2010 from Kennedy Space Center on an Atlas V launch vehicle into a geosynchronous transfer orbit. SDO carries a suite of three scientific instruments, whose observations are intended to promote a more complete understanding of the Sun and its effects on the Earth's environment. After a successful launch, separation, and initial Sun acquisition, the launch and flight operations teams dove into a commissioning campaign that included, among other things, checkout and calibration of the fine attitude sensors and checkout of the Kalman filter (KF) and the spacecraft s inertial pointing and science control modes. In addition, initial calibration of the science instruments was also accomplished. During that process of KF and controller checkout, several interesting observations were noticed and investigated. The SDO fine attitude sensors consist of one Adcole Digital Sun Sensor (DSS), two Galileo Avionica (GA) quaternion-output Star Trackers (STs), and three Kearfott Two-Axis Rate Assemblies (hereafter called inertial reference units, or IRUs). Initial checkout of the fine attitude sensors indicated that all sensors appeared to be functioning properly. Initial calibration maneuvers were planned and executed to update scale factors, drift rate biases, and alignments of the IRUs. After updating the IRU parameters, the KF was initialized and quickly reached convergence. Over the next few hours, it became apparent that there was an oscillation in the sensor residuals and the KF estimation of the IRU bias. A concentrated investigation ensued to determine the cause of the oscillations, their effect on mission requirements, and how to mitigate them. The ensuing analysis determined that the oscillations seen were, in fact, due to an oscillation in the IRU biases. The low frequencies of the oscillations passed through the KF, were well within the controller bandwidth, and therefore the spacecraft was actually

  13. Amygdalin influences bladder cancer cell adhesion and invasion in vitro.

    Jasmina Makarević

    Full Text Available The cyanogenic diglucoside amygdalin, derived from Rosaceae kernels, is employed by many patients as an alternative anti-cancer treatment. However, whether amygdalin indeed acts as an anti-tumor agent is not clear. Metastasis blocking properties of amygdalin on bladder cancer cell lines was, therefore, investigated. Amygdalin (10 mg/ml was applied to UMUC-3, TCCSUP or RT112 bladder cancer cells for 24 h or for 2 weeks. Tumor cell adhesion to vascular endothelium or to immobilized collagen as well as tumor cell migration was examined. Effects of drug treatment on integrin α and β subtypes, on integrin-linked kinase (ILK and total and activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK were also determined. Integrin knock-down was carried out to evaluate integrin influence on migration and adhesion. A 24 h or 2 week amygdalin application distinctly reduced tumor cell adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 and RT112 cells. TCCSUP adhesion was also reduced, but migration was elevated under amygdalin. Integrin subtype expression was significantly and specifically altered by amygdalin depending on the cell line. ILK was moderately, and activated FAK strongly, lost in all tumor cell lines in the presence of amygdalin. Knock down of β1 integrin caused a significant decrease in both adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 cells, but a significant increase in TCCSUP adhesion. Knock down of β4 integrin caused a significant decrease in migration of RT112 cells. Since the different actions of amygdalin on the different cell lines was mirrored by β1 or β4 knock down, it is postulated that amygdalin influences adhesion and migratory properties of bladder cancer cells by modulating β1 or β4 integrin expression. The amygdalin induced increase in TCCSUP migratory behavior indicates that any anti-tumor benefits from amygdalin (seen with the other two cell lines may depend upon the cancer cell type.

  14. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    Bryan, Tom; Macleod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry; Williams, Scott; McCoy, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA gripper pad surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and

  15. Failure strength prediction for adhesively bonded single lap joints

    Rahman, Niat Mahmud

    experimentally measured crack tip opening angles (CTOA) using DCB tests and CTOAs extracted from FEA using SLJs at failure loads follow similar trend when adhesive thickness was considered as variable. A factor was proposed to accommodate differences. Proposed method was also adopted for SLJs with overlap length as variable. Reasons for discrepancies were identified for such case. For generating adherend failure, graphite fiber epoxy composite was used as adherend. To avoid singularity, an area based approach was adopted. It is considered that failure within composite adherend occurs when size of the damaged zone reaches a critical value. This value was determined using test data and then FEA of SLJ. Using this hypothesis, various strength of material based failure models were tested for SLJs with different geometries. According to the study, Azzi-Tsai model works well for SLJs having different geometric parameters. Only composite failure parallel to interface and within the first ply was considered here.

  16. Elastocapilllarity in insect adhesion: the case of beetle adhesive hair

    Gernay, Sophie; Gilet, Tristan; Lambert, Pierre; Federle, Walter

    2014-11-01

    The feet of many insects are covered with dense arrays of hair-like structures called setae. Liquid capillary bridges at the tip of these micrometric structures are responsible for the controlled adhesion of the insect on a large variety of substrates. The resulting adhesion force can exceed several times the body weight of the insect. The high aspect-ratio of setae suggests that flexibility is a key ingredient in this capillary-based adhesion mechanism. There is indeed a strong coupling between their elastic deformation and the shape of the liquid meniscus. In this experimental work, we observe and quantify the local deflection of dock beetle seta tips under perpendicular loading using interference microscopy. Our results are then interpreted in the light of an analytic model of elastocapillarity. This research has been funded by the FRIA/FNRS and the Interuniversity Attraction Poles Programme (IAP 7/38 MicroMAST) initiated by the Belgian Science Policy Office.

  17. Effect of molecular weight and testing rate on adhesion property of pressure-sensitive adhesives prepared from epoxidized natural rubber

    Research highlights: → Elucidation of adhesion property of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR 25). → Correlation of peel and shear strength with molecular weight and rate of testing. → Confirmation of miscibility of tackifier and ENR 25 by DSC and FTIR study. → Applicability of Fox equation in ENR 25/coumarone-indene resin system. -- Abstract: The dependence of peel strength and shear strength of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR 25)-based pressure-sensitive adhesive on molecular weight and rate of testing was investigated using coumarone-indene as the tackifying resin. Toluene and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) were used as the solvent and substrate respectively throughout the study. A SHEEN hand coater was used to coat the adhesive on the substrate at a coating thickness of 120 μm. All the adhesion properties were determined by a Llyod Adhesion Tester operating at different rates of testing. Result shows that peel strength and shear strength increases up to an optimum molecular weight of 6.5 x 104 of ENR 25. For peel strength, the observation is attributed to the combined effects of wettability and mechanical strength of rubber at the optimum molecular weight, whereas for the shear strength, it is ascribed to the increasing amount of adhesive present in the coating layer which enhances the shear resistance of the adhesive. Peel strength and shear strength also increases with increase in rate of testing, an observation which is associated to the viscoeslastic response of the adhesive. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) study confirms the miscibility of tackifier and the ENR 25.

  18. DETERMINATION OF FRICTION PERFORMANCE INFLUENCE IN THE SYSTEM "BODY–BOGIE" ON THE FREIGHT CAR DYNAMICS

    S. V. Myamlin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The main requirements for the design of a new generation of cars, according to the Program of rolling stock renovation, are the requirements reducing the operating costs and increasing the cost-effectiveness of their use, taking into account the achievements of scientific and technical thought. Due to the urgency of this subject the paper is devoted to the study of the friction coefficient influence in the bearing connection «center plate – center bowl – bearers»of freight cars on their main dynamic parameters – coefficients of horizontal and vertical dynamics, body acceleration, frame strength, derailment stability factor. Methodology. The study was conducted by numerical integration and mathematical modeling of the freight car dynamic loading using the software package «Dynamics of Rail Vehicles» («DYNRAIL». Findings. Investigations have shown that the safety movement parameters are influenced by both the friction parameters in bearing connection «center plate – center bowl – bearers» of freight cars in empty and loaded state with bogies TSNII-X3 (model 18-100. Effect have other components of freight car dynamics, namely: radii of curved track sections, height of outer rail, etc. Originality. The author investigated the friction influence on the car dynamic loading using new approaches to solving the problem of predicting the rolling stock dynamics. Prediction was carried out on the basis of significantly updated theoretical material that covers all history of the friction theory and includes the results of recent experimental studies because of the speed on the straights and curves of small-and medium-range sections of the road.Practical value. The obtained results have practical orientation. During the research and after modeling with the improved method of accounting of friction processes dependencies of main dynamic parameters of a four-freight gondola on the value of the friction coefficient in the "body

  19. Role of attractive forces in determining the equilibrium structure and dynamics of simple liquids

    Toxværd, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Molecular Dynamics simulations of a Lennard-Jones system with different range of attraction show that the attractive forces modify the radial distribution of the particles. For condensed liquids only, the forces within the the first coordination shell (FCS) are important, but for gases and moderate...... condensed fluids, even the attractive forces outside the FCS play a role. The changes in the distribution caused by neglecting the attractive forces, lead to a too high pressure. The weak long-range attractions damp the dynamics and the diffusion of the particles in gas-, super critical fluid- and in liquid...

  20. Adhesion and friction characteristics of carbon nanotube arrays

    There has been a great deal of interest in understanding, design and fabrication of bio-mimetic and bio-inspired adhesives in recent years. In this paper we present theoretical investigations on adhesion, friction behaviors and characteristics of fibrillar arrays composed of noninteracting carbon nanotubes for bio-inspired dry adhesives. Contact, compression, subsequent pulling off and dry sliding friction simulations were performed. It is demonstrated that there are two different adhesion forces during pull off. Static friction force values are in between 40 and 60 N cm−2 at different loads and they are significantly larger than the normal adhesion forces. Dynamic friction force and load are anisotropic and they depend on the direction of the motion. It is also found that friction force values and friction coefficients decrease although contact length and contact area increase when the loads are high. This is due to the arms of the nanotubes which bend significantly and act as stiffer springs at high loads. (paper)

  1. Lap Shear and Impact Testing of Ochre and Beeswax in Experimental Middle Stone Age Compound Adhesives

    2016-01-01

    The production of compound adhesives using disparate ingredients is seen as some of the best evidence of advanced cognition outside of the use of symbolism. Previous field and laboratory testing of adhesives has shown the complexities involved in creating an effective Middle Stone Age glue using Acacia gum. However, it is currently unclear how efficient different adhesive recipes are, how much specific ingredients influence their performance, and how difficult it may have been for those ingredients to be combined to maximum effect. We conducted a series of laboratory-based lap shear and impact tests, following modern adhesion testing standards, to determine the efficacy of compound adhesives, with particular regard to the ingredient ratios. We tested rosin (colophony) and gum adhesives, containing additives of beeswax and ochre in varying ratios. During both lap shear and impact tests compound rosin adhesives performed better than single component rosin adhesives, and pure acacia gum was the strongest. The large difference in performance between each base adhesive and the significant changes in performance that occur due to relatively small changes in ingredient ratios lend further support to the notion that high levels of skill and knowledge were required to consistently produce the most effective adhesives. PMID:26983080

  2. Decreased cell adhesion promotes angiogenesis in a Pyk2-dependent manner

    Angiogenesis is regulated by both soluble growth factors and cellular interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM). While cell adhesion via integrins has been shown to be required for angiogenesis, the effects of quantitative changes in cell adhesion and spreading against the ECM remain less clear. Here, we show that angiogenic sprouting in natural and engineered three-dimensional matrices exhibited a biphasic response, with peak sprouting when adhesion to the matrix was limited to intermediate levels. Examining changes in global gene expression to determine a genetic basis for this response, we demonstrate a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced upregulation of genes associated with vascular invasion and remodeling when cell adhesion was limited, whereas cells on highly adhesive surfaces upregulated genes associated with proliferation. To explore a mechanistic basis for this effect, we turned to focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a central player in adhesion signaling previously implicated in angiogenesis, and its homologue, proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2). While FAK signaling had some impact, our results suggested that Pyk2 can regulate both gene expression and endothelial sprouting through its enhanced activation by VEGF in limited adhesion contexts. We also demonstrate decreased sprouting of tissue explants from Pyk2-null mice as compared to wild type mice as further confirmation of the role of Pyk2 in angiogenic sprouting. These results suggest a surprising finding that limited cell adhesion can enhance endothelial responsiveness to VEGF and demonstrate a novel role for Pyk2 in the adhesive regulation of angiogenesis.

  3. Lap Shear and Impact Testing of Ochre and Beeswax in Experimental Middle Stone Age Compound Adhesives.

    Kozowyk, P R B; Langejans, G H J; Poulis, J A

    2016-01-01

    The production of compound adhesives using disparate ingredients is seen as some of the best evidence of advanced cognition outside of the use of symbolism. Previous field and laboratory testing of adhesives has shown the complexities involved in creating an effective Middle Stone Age glue using Acacia gum. However, it is currently unclear how efficient different adhesive recipes are, how much specific ingredients influence their performance, and how difficult it may have been for those ingredients to be combined to maximum effect. We conducted a series of laboratory-based lap shear and impact tests, following modern adhesion testing standards, to determine the efficacy of compound adhesives, with particular regard to the ingredient ratios. We tested rosin (colophony) and gum adhesives, containing additives of beeswax and ochre in varying ratios. During both lap shear and impact tests compound rosin adhesives performed better than single component rosin adhesives, and pure acacia gum was the strongest. The large difference in performance between each base adhesive and the significant changes in performance that occur due to relatively small changes in ingredient ratios lend further support to the notion that high levels of skill and knowledge were required to consistently produce the most effective adhesives. PMID:26983080

  4. Strenght of the glue line of edge glued panels of Pinus taeda made with different adhesives

    Merielen de Carvalho Lopes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The study compares the strength of the glue line of edge glued panels of Pinus taeda made with different industrial adhesives. Three types of adhesives (poly(vinyl acetate (PVAc, emulsion polymer isocyanate (EPI and polyurethane (PU glued in two side gluing orientation (radial and tangential and analyzed after the conditioning tests (dry and wet were analyzed. The 360 specimens were prepared for determining the shear strength of edge glued panels of Pinus taeda, and these were tested in a universal testing machine called EMIC. The shear strength of the glue line at dry condition was lower in the tangential side for the three types of adhesives analyzed. The PU adhesive showed the highest values of shear strength in the applied conditions, differing from PVAc and EPI adhesive when tested on dry condition and did not differ from the others adhesives when tested on wet condition. The highest percentage of wood failure was observed after the shear strength test at dry condition to EPI adhesive glued in the radial side. And in the wet condition, the EPI adhesive and PU adhesive glued in tangential side showed higher mean values of wood failure. Thus, it was possible to conclude that the strength of the glue line of Pinus taeda wood was influenced by the type of adhesive and side gluing orientation, and showed differently behavior according to the condition of use (wet or dry.

  5. Antigenic variation of pilin regulates adhesion of Neisseria meningitidis to human epithelial cells.

    Nassif, X; Lowy, J; Stenberg, P; O'Gaora, P; Ganji, A; So, M

    1993-05-01

    Pili have been shown to play an essential role in the adhesion of Neisseria meningitidis to epithelial cells. However, among piliated strains, both inter- and intrastrain variability exist with respect to their degree of adhesion to epithelial cells in vitro (Virji et al., 1992). This suggests that factors other than the presence of pili per se are involved in this process. The N. meningitidis pilin subunit undergoes extensive antigenic variation. Piliated low- and high-adhesive derivatives of the same N. meningitidis strain were selected and the nucleotide sequence of the pilin gene expressed in each was determined. The highly adhesive derivatives had the same pilin sequence. The alleles encoding the pilin subunit of the low-adhesive derivatives were completely different from the one found in the high-adhesive isolates. Using polyclonal antibodies raised against one hyperadhesive variant, it was confirmed that the low-adhesive piliated derivatives expressed pilin variants antigenically different from the highly adhesive strains. The role of antigenic variation in the adhesive process of N. meningitidis was confirmed by performing allelic exchanges of the pilE locus between low- and high-adhesive isolates. Antigenic variation has been considered a means by which virulent bacteria evade the host immune system. This work provides genetic proof that a bacterial pathogen, N. meningitidis, can use antigenic variation to modulate their degree of virulence. PMID:8332064

  6. Quantitative multicolor compositional imaging resolves molecular domains in cell-matrix adhesions.

    Eli Zamir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cellular processes occur within dynamic and multi-molecular compartments whose characterization requires analysis at high spatio-temporal resolution. Notable examples for such complexes are cell-matrix adhesion sites, consisting of numerous cytoskeletal and signaling proteins. These adhesions are highly variable in their morphology, dynamics, and apparent function, yet their molecular diversity is poorly defined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present here a compositional imaging approach for the analysis and display of multi-component compositions. This methodology is based on microscopy-acquired multicolor data, multi-dimensional clustering of pixels according to their composition similarity and display of the cellular distribution of these composition clusters. We apply this approach for resolving the molecular complexes associated with focal-adhesions, and the time-dependent effects of Rho-kinase inhibition. We show here compositional variations between adhesion sites, as well as ordered variations along the axis of individual focal-adhesions. The multicolor clustering approach also reveals distinct sensitivities of different focal-adhesion-associated complexes to Rho-kinase inhibition. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Multicolor compositional imaging resolves "molecular signatures" characteristic to focal-adhesions and related structures, as well as sub-domains within these adhesion sites. This analysis enhances the spatial information with additional "contents-resolved" dimensions. We propose that compositional imaging can serve as a powerful tool for studying complex multi-molecular assemblies in cells and for mapping their distribution at sub-micron resolution.

  7. GABA[subscript A] Receptors Determine the Temporal Dynamics of Memory Retention

    McNally, Gavan P.; Augustyn, Katarzyna A.; Richardson, Rick

    2008-01-01

    Four experiments studied the role of GABA[subscript A] receptors in the temporal dynamics of memory retention. Memory for an active avoidance response was a nonmonotonic function of the retention interval. When rats were tested shortly (2 min) or some time (24 h) after training, retention was excellent, but when they were tested at intermediate…

  8. Important factors determining the nanoscale tracking precision of dynamic microtubule ends.

    Bohner, G; Gustafsson, N; Cade, N I; Maurer, S P; Griffin, L D; Surrey, T

    2016-01-01

    Tracking dynamic microtubule ends in fluorescence microscopy movies provides insight into the statistical properties of microtubule dynamics and is vital for further analysis that requires knowledge of the trajectories of the microtubule ends. Here we analyse the performance of a previously developed automated microtubule end tracking routine; this has been optimized for comparatively low signal-to-noise image sequences that are characteristic of microscopy movies of dynamic microtubules growing in vitro. Sequences of simulated microtubule images were generated assuming a variety of different experimental conditions. The simulated movies were then tracked and the tracking errors were characterized. We found that the growth characteristics of the microtubules within realistic ranges had a negligible effect on the tracking precision. The fluorophore labelling density, the pixel size of the images, and the exposure times were found to be important parameters limiting the tracking precision which could be explained using concepts of single molecule localization microscopy. The signal-to-noise ratio was found to be a good single predictor of the tracking precision: typical experimental signal-to-noise ratios lead to tracking precisions in the range of tens of nanometres, making the tracking program described here a useful tool for dynamic microtubule end tracking with close to molecular precision. PMID:26444439

  9. Ionosphere/thermosphere heating determined from dynamic magnetosphere-ionosphere/thermosphere coupling

    Tu, Jiannan; Song, Paul; Vasyliūnas, Vytenis M.

    2011-09-01

    Ionosphere/thermosphere heating driven by magnetospheric convection is investigated through a three-fluid inductive (including Faraday's law) approach to describing magnetosphere-ionosphere/thermosphere coupling, for a 1-D stratified ionosphere/thermosphere in this initial study. It is shown that the response of the ionosphere/thermosphere and thus the heating is dynamic and height-dependent. The heating is essentially frictional in nature rather than Joule heating as commonly assumed. The heating rate reaches a quasi-steady state after about 25 Alfvén travel times. During the dynamic period, the heating can be enhanced and displays peaks at multiple times due to wave reflections. The dynamic heating rate can be more than twice greater than the quasi-steady state value. The heating is strongest in the E-layer but the heating rate per unit mass is concentrated around the F-layer peak height. This implies a potential mechanism of driving O+ upflow from O+ rich F-layer. It is shown that the ionosphere/thermosphere heating caused by the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling can be simply evaluated through the relative velocity between the plasma and neutrals without invoking field-aligned currents, ionospheric conductance, and electric field. The present study provides understanding of the dynamic magnetosphere-ionosphere/thermosphere coupling from the ionospheric/thermospheric view in addition to magnetospheric perspectives.

  10. Application of Computational Fluid Dynamics in the problems of determining the aerodynamic characteristics of the helicopter

    Andrei Batrakov; Lyaisan Garipova; Aleksandr Kysumov; George Barakos

    2014-01-01

    In this article, computational Fluid Dynamics is used to study the complex interactions between the rotor and fuselage of the helicopter. Helicopter flows have been under investigation using isolated fuselage models, actuator disks as well as complete rotor-fuselage configurations. The paper highlights the flow detail that can be available to modern helicopter engineers equipped with modern software and computer clusters.

  11. The effect of binaries on the dynamical mass determination of star clusters

    Kouwenhoven, M B N

    2007-01-01

    The total mass of distant star clusters is often derived from the virial theorem, using line-of-sight velocity dispersion measurements and half-light radii. Although most stars form in binary systems, this is mostly ignored when interpreting the observations. The components of binary stars exhibit orbital motion, which may increase the measured velocity dispersion, and may therefore result in a dynamical mass overestimation. In this paper we quantify the effect of neglecting the binary population on the derivation of the dynamical mass of a star cluster. We simulate star clusters numerically, and study the dependence of the derived dynamical mass on the properties of the binary population. We find that the presence of binaries plays a crucial role for very sparse clusters with a stellar density comparable to that of the field star population (~0.1 stars/pc3), as the velocity dispersion is fully dominated by the binary orbital motion. For such clusters, the dynamical mass may overestimate the true mass by up t...

  12. Fractal dimensions of soy protein nanoparticle aggregates determined by dynamic mechanical method

    The fractal dimension of the protein aggregates can be estimated by dynamic mechanical methods when the particle aggregates are imbedded in a polymer matrix. Nanocomposites were formed by mixing hydrolyzed soy protein isolate (HSPI) nanoparticle aggregates with styrene-butadiene (SB) latex, followe...

  13. A novel technique for determining dynamic fracture toughness in sub- sized specimens

    Couque, H.; Hudak, S.J. Jr.; Leung, C.P.; Dexter, R.J. (Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States))

    1993-02-01

    In order to perform structural reliability assessments, utilities need to characterize fracture properties from small specimens-not only for economic reasons but because in many situations only a small quantity of material is available. This report presents a novel experimental-analytic procedure to measure dynamic fracture toughness properties of steel using small specimens.

  14. Photo-dynamical mass determination of the multi-planetary system K2-19

    Barros, S C C; Demangeon, O; Tsantaki, M; Santerne, A; Armstrong, D J; Barrado, D; Brown, D; Deleuil, M; Lillo-Box, J; Osborn, H; Pollacco, D; Abe, L; Andre, P; Bendjoya, P; Boisse, I; Bonomo, A S; Bouchy, F; Bruno, G; Cerda, J Rey; Courcol, B; Díaz, R F; Hébrard, G; Kirk, J; Lachurié, J C; Lam, K W F; Martinez, P; McCormac, J; Moutou, C; Rajpurohit, A; Rivet, J -P; Spake, J; Suarez, O; Toublanc, D; Walker, S R

    2015-01-01

    K2-19 is the second multi-planetary system discovered with K2 observations. The system is composed of two Neptune size planets close to the 3:2 mean-motion resonance. To better characterise the system we obtained two additional transit observations of K2-19b and five additional radial velocity observations. These were combined with K2 data and fitted simultaneously with the system dynamics (photo-dynamical model) which increases the precision of the transit time measurements. The higher transit time precision allows us to detect the chopping signal of the dynamic interaction of the planets that in turn permits to uniquely characterise the system. Although the reflex motion of the star was not detected, dynamic modelling of the system allowed us to derive planetary masses of $M_b= 44 \\pm 12\\, M_{\\oplus}$ and $M_c = 15.9 \\pm 7.0\\, M_{\\oplus}$ for the inner and the outer planets respectively, leading to densities close to Uranus. We also show that our method allows the derivation of mass ratios using only the 80...

  15. Tool for a configurable integrated circuit that uses determination of dynamic power consumption

    French, Matthew C. (Inventor); Wang, Li (Inventor); Agarwal, Deepak (Inventor); Davoodi, Azadeh (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A configurable logic tool that allows minimization of dynamic power within an FPGA design without changing user-entered specifications. The minimization of power may use minimized clock nets as a first order operation, and a second order operation that minimizes other factors, such as area of placement, area of clocks and/or slack.

  16. A dynamic approach to the determinants of immigrants’ language proficiency : the United States, 1980-2000

    Tubergen, F.A. van; Kalmijn, M.

    2009-01-01

    This article proposes a dynamic perspective on immigrants’ language proficiency. Hypotheses are formulated about immigrants’ language skills at arrival and about the speed with which immigrants learn the language thereafter. It pools data from the 1980, 1990, and 2000 U.S. Censuses, and uses a synth

  17. Quantification of Depletion-Induced Adhesion of Red Blood Cells

    Steffen, P.; Verdier, C.; Wagner, C.

    2013-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux due to the presence of plasma proteins under physiological conditions. The formation of rouleaux can also be induced in vitro by the addition of macromolecules to the RBC suspension. Current data on the adhesion strength between red blood cells in their natural discocyte shapes mostly originate from indirect measurements such as flow chamber experiments, but data is lacking at the single cell level. Here, we present measurements on the dextran-induced aggregation of red blood cells using atomic force microscopy-based single cell force spectroscopy. The effects of dextran concentration and molecular weight on the interaction energy of adhering RBCs were determined. The results on adhesion energy are in excellent agreement with a model based on the depletion effect and previous experimental studies. Furthermore, our method allowed to determine the adhesion force, a quantity that is needed in theoretical investigations on blood flow.

  18. Surface modification of an epoxy resin with polyamines and polydopamine: Adhesion toward electroless deposited copper

    Schaubroeck, David; Mader, Lothar; Dubruel, Peter; Vanfleteren, Jan

    2015-10-01

    In this paper the influence of the epoxy roughness, surface modifications and ELD (electroless copper deposition) temperatures on the adhesive strength of the copper is studied. Good adhesion at low roughness values is targeted due to their applicability in high density electronic circuits. Roughened epoxy surfaces are modified with adsorbed polyamines, polydopamine and polyamines grafted to polydopamine. Next the, adhesive strength of ELD copper is determined with peel strength measurements and the interphases are examined with SEM (scanning electron microscopy). Polydopamine and polyamines grafted to polydopamine can lead to increased adhesive strength at lower roughness values compared to the non-modified samples at specific plating temperatures.

  19. feedback between population and evolutionary dynamics determines the fate of social microbial populations.

    Alvaro Sanchez

    Full Text Available The evolutionary spread of cheater strategies can destabilize populations engaging in social cooperative behaviors, thus demonstrating that evolutionary changes can have profound implications for population dynamics. At the same time, the relative fitness of cooperative traits often depends upon population density, thus leading to the potential for bi-directional coupling between population density and the evolution of a cooperative trait. Despite the potential importance of these eco-evolutionary feedback loops in social species, they have not yet been demonstrated experimentally and their ecological implications are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the presence of a strong feedback loop between population dynamics and the evolutionary dynamics of a social microbial gene, SUC2, in laboratory yeast populations whose cooperative growth is mediated by the SUC2 gene. We directly visualize eco-evolutionary trajectories of hundreds of populations over 50-100 generations, allowing us to characterize the phase space describing the interplay of evolution and ecology in this system. Small populations collapse despite continual evolution towards increased cooperative allele frequencies; large populations with a sufficient number of cooperators "spiral" to a stable state of coexistence between cooperator and cheater strategies. The presence of cheaters does not significantly affect the equilibrium population density, but it does reduce the resilience of the population as well as its ability to adapt to a rapidly deteriorating environment. Our results demonstrate the potential ecological importance of coupling between evolutionary dynamics and the population dynamics of cooperatively growing organisms, particularly in microbes. Our study suggests that this interaction may need to be considered in order to explain intraspecific variability in cooperative behaviors, and also that this feedback between evolution and ecology can critically affect the

  20. Determination of SMES capacity to enhance the dynamic stability of power system

    Shi, J., E-mail: shijing_hust@126.co [R and D Center of Applied Superconductivity, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Tang, Y. [R and D Center of Applied Superconductivity, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Dai, T. [Department of Information and Electrical Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology , Qingdao (China); Ren, L.; Li, J.; Cheng, S. [R and D Center of Applied Superconductivity, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)

    2010-11-01

    This paper proposes the principle of SMES capacity determination for power system stable operation. Adopting the energy function method, the mechanism of SMES damping power oscillation in the classical single-machine infinite-bus (SMIB) system is analyzed. The released kinetic energy during disturbance is the original of power system oscillation, which is taken as the principle of SMES capacity determination. Then, the influence of fault type, fault position, and fault clearing time on the SMES capacity determination are discussed. Using MATLAB simulation, the principle of SMES capacity determination is evaluated.

  1. Effect of thermal shock loadings on stability of dentin-composite polymer material adhesive interfaces

    Bessudnova, Nadezda O.; Shlyapnikova, Olga A.; Venig, Sergey B.; Gribov, Andrey N.

    2015-03-01

    In the past several decades the problem of longevity and durability of adhesive interfaces between hard tooth tissues and composite resin-based materials are of great interest among dental researchers and clinicians. These parameters are partially determined by adhesive system mechanical properties. In the present research project nanoindentation has been examined to test hardness of dental adhesive systems. A series of laboratory experiments was performed to study the effect of light curing time and oxygen inhibition phenomenon on light-cured adhesive material hardness. An adhesive system AdperTM Single Bond (3M ESPE) was selected as a material for testing. The analysis of experimental data revealed that the maximum values of hardness were observed after the material had been light-cured for 20 seconds, as outlined in guidelines for polymerization time of the adhesive system. The experimental studies of oxygen inhibition influence on adhesive system hardness pointed out to the fact that the dispersive layer removal led to increase in adhesive system hardness. A long - time exposure of polymerized material of adhesive system at open air at room temperature resulted in no changes in its hardness, which was likely to be determined by the mutual effect of rival processes of air oxygen inhibition and directed light curing.

  2. Comparison of TOPEX/Poseidon orbit determination solutions obtained by the Goddard Space Flight Center Flight Dynamics Division and Precision Orbit Determination Teams

    Doll, C.; Mistretta, G.; Hart, R.; Oza, D.; Cox, C.; Nemesure, M.; Bolvin, D.; Samii, Mina V.

    1993-01-01

    Orbit determination results are obtained by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) using the Goddard Trajectory Determination System (GTDS) and a real-time extended Kalman filter estimation system to process Tracking Data and Relay Satellite (TDRS) System (TDRSS) measurements in support of the Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/Poseidon spacecraft navigation and health and safety operations. GTDS is the operational orbit determination system used by the FDD, and the extended Kalman fliter was implemented in an analysis prototype system, the Real-Time Orbit Determination System/Enhanced (RTOD/E). The Precision Orbit Determination (POD) team within the GSFC Space Geodesy Branch generates an independent set of high-accuracy trajectories to support the TOPEX/Poseidon scientific data. These latter solutions use the Geodynamics (GEODYN) orbit determination system with laser ranging tracking data. The TOPEX/Poseidon trajectories were estimated for the October 22 - November 1, 1992, timeframe, for which the latest preliminary POD results were available. Independent assessments were made of the consistencies of solutions produced by the batch and sequential methods. The batch cases were assessed using overlap comparisons, while the sequential cases were assessed with covariances and the first measurement residuals. The batch least-squares and forward-filtered RTOD/E orbit solutions were compared with the definitive POD orbit solutions. The solution differences were generally less than 10 meters (m) for the batch least squares and less than 18 m for the sequential estimation solutions. The differences among the POD, GTDS, and RTOD/E solutions can be traced to differences in modeling and tracking data types, which are being analyzed in detail.

  3. Effect of Heartwood and Sapwood Ratio on Adhesion Strength of Finished Wood Species

    Turgay Ozdemir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine adhesion strength of samples from wood species coated with cellulose varnish as function of heartwood and sapwood ratio. Roughness of the specimens from four different species was measured employing stylus type equipment before they were coated with varnish. Pull-off testing unit was employed to determine adhesion strength of the samples. Based on the findings in this work it seems that no significant difference was determined between adhesion strength values of the samples prepared from heartwood and sapwood portions. The highest adhesion strength value of 2.62 N/mm2 was found for the beech samples sanded with 80-grit sand paper. Overall rougher surfaces of the samples resulted in higher adhesion strength between finish and substrate.

  4. Adhesion of food-borne bacteria to stainless steel is reduced by food conditioning films

    Bernbom, Nete; Ng, Yin; Jorgensen, R.L.;

    2009-01-01

    Preconditioning of stainless steel with aqueous cod muscle extract significantly impedes subsequent bacterial adhesion most likely due to repelling effects of fish tropomyosin. The purpose of this study was to determine if other food conditioning films decrease or enhance bacterial adhesion...

  5. Neural cell adhesion molecule differentially interacts with isoforms of the fibroblast growth factor receptor

    Christensen, Claus; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) can be activated through direct interactions with various fibroblast growth factors or through a number of cell adhesion molecules, including the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). We produced recombinant proteins comprising the ligand...... the expression pattern of various FGFR isoforms determines the cell context-specific effects of NCAM signaling through FGFR....

  6. Bacterial Adhesion Forces to Ag-Impregnated Contact Lens Cases and Transmission to Contact Lenses

    Qu, Wenwen; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Hooymans, Johanna M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To measure adhesion forces of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Serratia marcescens to a rigid contact lens (CL), standard polypropylene, and Ag-impregnated lens cases using atomic force microscopy and determine bacterial transmission from lens case to CL. Methods: Adhesion

  7. Influence of surface roughness on streptococcal adhesion forces to composite resins

    Mei, Li; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C; Ren, Yijin

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine streptococcal adhesion forces with composite resins with different surface roughness. METHODS: Polishing and grinding were applied to obtain smooth (roughness 20 nm), moderately rough (150 nm) and rough (350 nm) surfaces of two orthodontic, light-cured composites. Adhesion fo

  8. A method for predicting critical load evaluating adhesion of coatings in scratch testing

    CHEN Xi-fang(陈溪芳); YAN Mi(严密); YANG De-ren(杨德人); HIROSE Yukio

    2003-01-01

    In this paper based on the experiment principle of evaluating adhesion property by scratch testing, the peeling mechanism of thin films is discussed by applying contact theory and surface physics theory. A mathematical model predicting the critical load is proposed for calculating critical load as determined by scratch testing. The factors for correctly evaluating adhesion of coatings according to the experimental data are discussed.

  9. A method for predicting critical load evaluating adhesion of coatings in scratch testing

    陈溪芳; 严密; 杨德人; HIROSEYukio

    2003-01-01

    In this paper based on the experiment principle of evaluating adhesion property by scratch testing, the peeling mechanism of thin films is discussed by applying contact theory and surface physics theory. A mathematical model predicting the critical load is proposed for calculating critical load as determined byscratch testing. The factors for correctly evaluating adhesion of coatings according to the experimental data arediscussed.

  10. Cell Adhesion, the Backbone of the Synapse: “Vertebrate” and “Invertebrate” Perspectives

    Giagtzoglou, Nikolaos; Ly, Cindy V.; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2009-01-01

    Synapses are asymmetric intercellular junctions that mediate neuronal communication. The number, type, and connectivity patterns of synapses determine the formation, maintenance, and function of neural circuitries. The complexity and specificity of synaptogenesis relies upon modulation of adhesive properties, which regulate contact initiation, synapse formation, maturation, and functional plasticity. Disruption of adhesion may result in structural and functional imbalance that may lead to neu...

  11. Plasticizers increase adhesion of the deteriogenic fungus Aureobasidium pullulans to polyvinyl chloride

    Webb, JS; Van der Mei, HC; Nixon, M; Eastwood, IM; Greenhalgh, M; Read, SJ; Robson, GD; Handley, PS

    1999-01-01

    Initial adhesion of fungi to plasticized polyvinyl chloride (pPVC) may determine subsequent colonization and biodeterioration processes. The deteriogenic fungus Aureobasidium pullulans was used to investigate the physicochemical nature of adhesion to both unplasticized PVC (uPVC) and pPVC containing

  12. Radiation curing of laminating adhesives : lamination of pvc films on wood (fibreboard) substrate

    A study was set up in an attempt to aquire a better understanding of factors influencing the adhesion in the EB curing lamination of PVC films on wood substrates. Various acrylated polyester, epoxy and urethane oligomers with monofunctional and difunctional monomers were investigated. The contact angle, viscosity, pendulum hardness and peel strength were determined to give a brief explanation of the adhesion mechanism

  13. Testing Object-Oriented Programs using Dynamic Aspects and Non-Determinism

    Achenbach, Michael; Ostermann, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    decisions exposing private data. We present an approach that both improves the expressiveness of test cases using non-deterministic choice and reduces design modifications using dynamic aspect-oriented programming techniques. Non-deterministic choice facilitates local definitions of multiple executions......The implementation of unit tests with mock objects and stubs often involves substantial manual work. Stubbed methods return simple default values, therefore variations of these values require separate test cases. The integration of mock objects often requires more infrastructure code and design...... without parameterization or generation of tests. It also eases modelling naturally non-deterministic program features like IO or multi-threading in integration tests. Dynamic AOP facilitates powerful design adaptations without exposing test features, keeping the scope of these adaptations local to each...

  14. Determining the Energetics of Small β-Sheet Peptides using Adaptive Steered Molecular Dynamics.

    Bureau, Hailey R; Hershkovits, Eli; Quirk, Stephen; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2016-04-12

    Mechanically driven unfolding is a useful computational tool for extracting the energetics and stretching pathway of peptides. In this work, two representative β-hairpin peptides, chignolin (PDB: 1UAO ) and trpzip1 (PDB: 1LE0 ), were investigated using an adaptive variant of the original steered molecular dynamics method called adaptive steered molecular dynamics (ASMD). The ASMD method makes it possible to perform energetic calculations on increasingly complex biological systems. Although the two peptides are similar in length and have similar secondary structures, their unfolding energetics are quite different. The hydrogen bonding profile and specific residue pair interaction energies provide insight into the differing stabilities of these peptides and reveal which of the pairs provides the most significant stabilization. PMID:26930270

  15. Towards the Determination of Mytilus edulis Food Preferences Using the Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) Theory

    Picoche, Coralie; Le Gendre, Romain; Flye-Sainte-Marie, Jonathan; Françoise, Sylvaine; Maheux, Frank; Simon, Benjamin; Gangnery, Aline

    2014-01-01

    The blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, is a commercially important species, with production based on both fisheries and aquaculture. Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) models have been extensively applied to study its energetics but such applications require a deep understanding of its nutrition, from filtration to assimilation. Being filter feeders, mussels show multiple responses to temporal fluctuations in their food and environment, raising questions that can be investigated by modeling. To provide a ...

  16. Determination of transverse slope of the runway is paved in view of dynamic phenomena hidrohlisuvannya aircraft

    В.М. Золотоперий

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available  An engineering method is offered and calculations are executed on a ground minimum of possible paved runway’s crossfalls for different classes of the civil airdromes and for the different rain shower zones. The recommendations for planning paved runway’s cross direction profiles and taking special measures for prevention of airplane’s wheels dynamic hydrogliding have been formulated.

  17. Telomeric overhang length determines structural dynamics and accessibility to telomerase and ALT associated proteins

    Hwang, Helen; Kreig, Alex; Calvert, Jacob; Lormand, Justin; Kwon, Yongho; Daley, James M.; Sung, Patrick; Opresko, Patricia L.; Myong, Sua

    2014-01-01

    The G-rich single stranded DNA at the 3′ end of human telomeres can self-fold into G-quaduplex (GQ). However, telomere lengthening by telomerase or the recombination-based alternative lengthening of telomere (ALT) mechanism requires protein loading on the overhang. Using single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy we discovered that lengthening the telomeric overhang also increased the rate of dynamic exchanges between structural conformations. Overhangs with five to seven TTAGGG repeats, compa...

  18. Lattice dynamics of polyaniline and poly(p-pyridyl vinyline) : first-principles determination.

    Zheng, G.; Clark, S J; Brand, S; Abram, R A

    2006-01-01

    First-principles density functional studies of the dynamical properties of the conjugated polymers polyaniline and poly(p-pyridyl vinyline) are presented in this work. We have employed linear response within density functional perturbation theory, as implemented in the CASTEP code, to investigate the Born effective charges, polarizabilities, and vibrational properties. With regard to the last, we have calculated the vibrational frequencies and made assignments of the m...

  19. Specificity of Trypsin and Chymotrypsin: Loop Motion Controlled Dynamic Correlation as a Determinant

    Ma, Wenzhe; Tang, Chao; Lai, Luhua

    2005-01-01

    Trypsin and chymotrypsin are both serine proteases with high sequence and structural similarities, but with different substrate specificity. Previous experiments have demonstrated the critical role of the two loops outside the binding pocket in controlling the specificity of the two enzymes. To understand the mechanism of such a control of specificity by distant loops, we have used the Gaussian network model to study the dynamic properties of trypsin and chymotrypsin and the roles played by t...

  20. Determination of optimum rotational speed of heterogeneous catalytic reactor using computational fluid dynamic

    Rungrote Kokoo; Phavanee Narataruksa; Karn Pana-Suppamassadu; Sabaithip Tungkamani

    2008-01-01

    Solid suspension in a stirrer tank reactor is relevant in many chemical process industries. For a heterogeneous catalyticreactor, the degree of solid suspension is a crucial parameter in the design and scaling-up processes. The suspension of solid catalysts at a minimum impeller speed can reduce the operating cost of processes. To ensure optimum conditions for suspension, a 3D simulation technique by Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) was used to study flow characteristics in a heterogeneous c...

  1. The Determinants of Bank Interest Margins: Estimates of a Dynamic Model

    Dia, E; Giulidori, M

    2009-01-01

    We develop a monopolistic version of a dynamic model of banking, where financial intermediation and payment services play a relevant role. We then empirically test the model using balance-sheet data for large European and US banks, and find strong support for the main predictions of the model. Interest revenues and costs are in fact very persistent, and they are strongly influenced by revenues from fees, and industrial and default costs. Interest margins rise with both short and long-term int...

  2. Application of Computational Fluid Dynamics in the problems of determining the aerodynamic characteristics of the helicopter

    Andrei Batrakov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, computational Fluid Dynamics is used to study the complex interactions between the rotor and fuselage of the helicopter. Helicopter flows have been under investigation using isolated fuselage models, actuator disks as well as complete rotor-fuselage configurations. The paper highlights the flow detail that can be available to modern helicopter engineers equipped with modern software and computer clusters.

  3. Quantitative scanning thermal microscopy based on determination of thermal probe dynamic resistance.

    Bodzenta, J; Juszczyk, J; Chirtoc, M

    2013-09-01

    Resistive thermal probes used in scanning thermal microscopy provide high spatial resolution of measurement accompanied with high sensitivity to temperature changes. At the same time their sensitivity to variations of thermal conductivity of a sample is relatively low. In typical dc operation mode the static resistance of the thermal probe is measured. It is shown both analytically and experimentally that the sensitivity of measurement can be improved by a factor of three by measuring the dynamic resistance of a dc biased probe superimposed with small ac current. The dynamic resistance can be treated as a complex value. Its amplitude represents the slope of the static voltage-current U-I characteristic for a given I while its phase describes the delay between the measured ac voltage and applied ac current component in the probe. The phase signal also reveals dependence on the sample thermal conductivity. Signal changes are relatively small but very repeatable. In contrast, the difference between dynamic and static resistance has higher sensitivity (the same maximum value as that of the 2nd and 3rd harmonics), and also much higher amplitude than higher harmonics. The proposed dc + ac excitation scheme combines the benefits of dc excitation (mechanical stability of probe-sample contact, average temperature control) with those of ac excitation (base-line stability, rejection of ambient temperature influence, high sensitivity, lock-in signal processing), when the experimental conditions prohibit large ac excitation. PMID:24089831

  4. A miniaturized, high frequency mechanical scanner for high speed atomic force microscope using suspension on dynamically determined points

    Herfst, Rodolf; Dekker, Bert; Witvoet, Gert; Crowcombe, Will; Lange, Dorus de [Department of Optomechatronics, Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research, TNO, Delft (Netherlands); Sadeghian, Hamed, E-mail: hamed.sadeghianmarnani@tno.nl, E-mail: h.sadeghianmarnani@tudelft.nl [Department of Optomechatronics, Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research, TNO, Delft (Netherlands); Department of Precision and Microsystems Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    One of the major limitations in the speed of the atomic force microscope (AFM) is the bandwidth of the mechanical scanning stage, especially in the vertical (z) direction. According to the design principles of “light and stiff” and “static determinacy,” the bandwidth of the mechanical scanner is limited by the first eigenfrequency of the AFM head in case of tip scanning and by the sample stage in terms of sample scanning. Due to stringent requirements of the system, simply pushing the first eigenfrequency to an ever higher value has reached its limitation. We have developed a miniaturized, high speed AFM scanner in which the dynamics of the z-scanning stage are made insensitive to its surrounding dynamics via suspension of it on specific dynamically determined points. This resulted in a mechanical bandwidth as high as that of the z-actuator (50 kHz) while remaining insensitive to the dynamics of its base and surroundings. The scanner allows a practical z scan range of 2.1 μm. We have demonstrated the applicability of the scanner to the high speed scanning of nanostructures.

  5. Determination of Fatty Acid Metabolism with Dynamic 11C-Palmitate Positron Emission Tomography of Mouse Heart In Vivo

    Li, Yinlin; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Xinyue; Zhong, Min; Walker, Natalie N.; He, Jiang; Berr, Stuart S.; Keller, Susanna R.; Kundu, Bijoy K.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to establish a quantitative method for measuring FA metabolism with partial volume (PV) and spill-over (SP) corrections using dynamic 11C-palmitate PET images of mouse heart in vivo. Methods Twenty-minute dynamic 11C-palmitate PET scans of four 18–20 week old male C57BL/6 mice under isoflurane anesthesia were performed using a Focus 120 PET scanner. A model corrected blood input function (MCIF), by which the input function with SP and PV corrections and the metabolic rate constants (k1−k5) are simultaneously estimated from the dynamic 11C-palmitate PET images of mouse hearts in a 4-compartment tracer kinetic model, was used to determine rates of myocardial FA oxidation (MFAO), myocardial FA esterification (MFAE), myocardial FA utilization (MFAU) and myocardial FA uptake (MFAUp). Results The MFAO thus measured in C57BL/6 mice was 375.03±43.83 nmoles/min/g. This compares well with the MFAO measured in perfused working C57BL/6 mouse hearts ex vivo of about 350 nmoles/g/min and 400 nmoles/min/g. Conclusions FA metabolism was measured for the first time in mouse heart in vivo using dynamic 11C-palmitate PET in a 4-compartment tracer kinetic model. MFAO obtained with this model were validated by results previously obtained with mouse hearts ex vivo. PMID:26462138

  6. A ring circuit for the determination of dynamic error rates in high-temperature superconductor RSFQ circuits

    Ruck, B.; Oelze, B.; Sodtke, E.

    1997-12-01

    We have designed and simulated a circuit for the experimental determination of the rate of dynamic switching errors in high-temperature superconductor RSFQ circuits. The proposal is that a series-connected pair of Josephson junctions is read out by SFQ pulses circulating in a ring-shaped Josephson transmission line at high frequency. Suitable bias currents determine the switching thresholds of the junction pair. By measuring the voltage across the transmission line, it is proposed that the occurrence of a switching error can be detected. The bit error rate can be determined from the mean time before false switching together with the SFQ circulation frequency. The circuit design allows measurements over a wide temperature range.

  7. A ring circuit for the determination of dynamic error rates in high-temperature superconductor RSFQ circuits

    Ruck, B.; Oelze, B.; Sodtke, E. [Institute of Thin Film and Ion Technology, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany)

    1997-12-01

    We have designed and simulated a circuit for the experimental determination of the rate of dynamic switching errors in high-temperature superconductor RSFQ circuits. The proposal is that a series-connected pair of Josephson junctions is read out by SFQ pulses circulating in a ring-shaped Josephson transmission line at high frequency. Suitable bias currents determine the switching thresholds of the junction pair. By measuring the voltage across the transmission line, it is proposed that the occurrence of a switching error can be detected. The bit error rate can be determined from the mean time before false switching together with the SFQ circulation frequency. The circuit design allows measurements over a wide temperature range. (author)

  8. A ring circuit for the determination of dynamic error rates in high-temperature superconductor RSFQ circuits

    We have designed and simulated a circuit for the experimental determination of the rate of dynamic switching errors in high-temperature superconductor RSFQ circuits. The proposal is that a series-connected pair of Josephson junctions is read out by SFQ pulses circulating in a ring-shaped Josephson transmission line at high frequency. Suitable bias currents determine the switching thresholds of the junction pair. By measuring the voltage across the transmission line, it is proposed that the occurrence of a switching error can be detected. The bit error rate can be determined from the mean time before false switching together with the SFQ circulation frequency. The circuit design allows measurements over a wide temperature range. (author)

  9. Complementarity of PALM and SOFI for super-resolution live cell imaging of focal adhesions

    Deschout, Hendrik; Sharipov, Azat; Szlag, Daniel; Feletti, Lely; Vandenberg, Wim; Dedecker, Peter; Hofkens, Johan; Leutenegger, Marcel; Lasser, Theo; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Live cell imaging of focal adhesions requires a sufficiently high temporal resolution, which remains a challenging task for super-resolution microscopy. We have addressed this important issue by combining photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM) with super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI). Using simulations and fixed cell focal adhesion images, we investigated the complementarity between PALM and SOFI in terms of spatial and temporal resolution. This PALM-SOFI framework was used to image focal adhesions in living cells, while obtaining a temporal resolution below 10 s. We visualized the dynamics of focal adhesions, and revealed local mean velocities around 190 nm per minute. The complementarity of PALM and SOFI was assessed in detail with a methodology that integrates a quantitative resolution and signal-to-noise metric. This PALM and SOFI concept provides an enlarged quantitative imaging framework, allowing unprecedented functional exploration of focal adhesions through the estimation of m...

  10. Blister Test for Measurements of Adhesion and Adhesion Degradation of Organic Polymers on AA2024-T3

    Rincon Troconis, Brendy Carolina

    cleaning/desmutting and conversion coating (CC) on the adhesion strength of acetoacetate to AA2024-T3 and the effects of improper water rinse temperature after cleaner were assessed using the BT. The results showed that pretreatments improve the adhesion strength of acetoacetate primer on AA2024-T3, but the comparative behavior depends on the specific treatment. Process control is of paramount importance for the performance of acetoacetate coated systems applied on AA2024-T3. The lack of thermal activity in the water rinse after cleaning step produces deleterious effects on the adhesion and blistering resistance of CC. Finally, a test sample incorporating a coated and scribed Al alloy panel and uncoated through-hole fasteners (Ti, SS316, AA2024-T3) was designed to provide accelerated response during atmospheric corrosion testing in the field (long-term beach exposure) or in laboratory chambers (ASTM B117). The results after only three weeks of exposure to ASTM B117 correlated well with long-term beach exposure, allowing rapid ranking of different coating systems. Of the fastener materials studied, visual observation and volume lost determination indicated that the worst attack occurred near SS316 fasteners its effect was explained by Scanning Kelvin Probe measurements and the available cathodic current measured in chloride solution.

  11. Implementation of a methodology for determining elastic properties of lipid assemblies from molecular dynamics simulations

    Johner, Niklaus; Harries, Daniel; Khelashvili, George

    2016-01-01

    Background The importance of the material properties of membranes for diverse cellular processes is well established. Notably, the elastic properties of the membrane, which depend on its composition, can directly influence membrane reshaping and fusion processes as well as the organisation and function of membrane proteins. Determining these properties is therefore key for a mechanistic understanding of how the cell functions. Results We have developed a method to determine the bending rigidi...

  12. Adhesion of biocompatible and biodegradable micropatterned surfaces

    Kaiser, J.S.; Kamperman, M.M.G.; Souza, E.J.; Schick, B.; Arzt, E.

    2011-01-01

    We studied the effects of pillar dimensions and stiffness of biocompatible and biodegradable micropatterned surfaces on adhesion on different compliant substrates. The micropatterned adhesives were based on biocompatible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PL

  13. NEXT GENERATION OF TELESCOPES OR DYNAMICS REQUIRED TO DETERMINE IF EXO-MOONS HAVE PROGRADE OR RETROGRADE ORBITS

    We survey the methods proposed in the literature for detecting moons of extrasolar planets in terms of their ability to distinguish between prograde and retrograde moon orbits, an important tracer of the moon formation channel. We find that most moon detection methods, in particular, sensitive methods for detecting moons of transiting planets, cannot observationally distinguishing prograde and retrograde moon orbits. The prograde and retrograde cases can only be distinguished where the dynamical evolution of the orbit due to, e.g., three body effects is detectable, where one of the two cases is dynamically unstable, or where new observational facilities, which can implement a technique capable of differentiating the two cases, come online. In particular, directly imaged planets are promising targets because repeated spectral and photometric measurements, which are required to determine moon orbit direction, could also be conducted with the primary interest of characterizing the planet itself

  14. NEXT GENERATION OF TELESCOPES OR DYNAMICS REQUIRED TO DETERMINE IF EXO-MOONS HAVE PROGRADE OR RETROGRADE ORBITS

    Lewis, Karen M.; Fujii, Yuka [Earth-Life Science Institute (WPI-ELSI), Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama, Meguro district, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

    2014-08-20

    We survey the methods proposed in the literature for detecting moons of extrasolar planets in terms of their ability to distinguish between prograde and retrograde moon orbits, an important tracer of the moon formation channel. We find that most moon detection methods, in particular, sensitive methods for detecting moons of transiting planets, cannot observationally distinguishing prograde and retrograde moon orbits. The prograde and retrograde cases can only be distinguished where the dynamical evolution of the orbit due to, e.g., three body effects is detectable, where one of the two cases is dynamically unstable, or where new observational facilities, which can implement a technique capable of differentiating the two cases, come online. In particular, directly imaged planets are promising targets because repeated spectral and photometric measurements, which are required to determine moon orbit direction, could also be conducted with the primary interest of characterizing the planet itself.

  15. Rotation Dynamics Do Not Determine the Unexpected Isotropy of Methyl Radical EPR Spectra.

    Benetis, Nikolas P; Dmitriev, Yurij; Mocci, Francesca; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2015-09-01

    A simple first-principles electronic structure computation, further qc (quantum chemistry) computation, of the methyl radical gives three equal hf (hyperfine) couplings for the three protons with the unpaired electron. The corresponding dipolar tensors were notably rhombic and had different orientations and regular magnitude components, as they should, but what the overall A-tensor was seen by the electron spin is a different story! The final g = (2.002993, 2.002993, 2.002231) tensor and the hf coupling results obtained in vacuum, at the B3LYP/EPRIII level of theory clearly indicate that in particular the above A = (-65.19, -65.19, 62.54) MHz tensor was axial to a first approximation without considering any rotational dynamics for the CH3. This approximation was not applicable, however, for the trifluoromethyl CF3 radical, a heavier and nonplanar rotor with very anisotropic hf coupling, used here for comparison. Finally, a derivation is presented explaining why there is actually no need for the CH3 radicals to consider additional rotational dynamics in order for the electron to obtain an axially symmetric hf (hyperfine) tensor by considering the simultaneous dipolar couplings of the three protons. An additional consequence is an almost isotropic A-tensor for the electron spin of the CH3 radical. To the best of our knowledge, this point has not been discussed in the literature before. The unexpected isotropy of the EPR parameters of CH3 was solely attributed to the rotational dynamics and was not clearly separated from the overall symmetry of the species. The present theoretical results allowed a first explanation of the "forbidden" satellite lines in the CH3 EPR spectrum. The satellites are a fingerprint of the radical rotation, helping thus in distinguishing the CH3 reorientation from quantum rotation at very low temperatures. PMID:26262753

  16. Dynamic stiffness matrix modal characteristic determination by means of the lambda matrix strategy

    Náprstek, Jiří; Fischer, Cyril

    Kippen: Civil-Comp Press, 2014 - (Topping, B.; Iványi, P.), s. 140 ISBN 978-1-905088-61-4. ISSN 1759-3433. [International conference on Computational Structures Technology /12./. Neapol (IT), 02.09.2014-05.09.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC13-34405J Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : dynamic stiffness matrix * lambda matrices * self-adjoint operators * approximation Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering http://www.ctresources.info/ccp/paper.html?id=8283

  17. Determination of light and strange quark masses from two-flavour dynamical lattice QCD

    We compute the light and strange quark masses ml =(mu+md)/2 and ms, respectively, in unquenched lattice QCD with Nf=2 flavours of light dynamical quarks. The renormalisation constants, which convert bare quark masses into renormalised quark masses, are computed nonperturbatively, including the effect of quark-line disconnected diagrams. We obtain mlMS-bar (2 GeV)=4.7(2)(3) MeV and msMS-bar (2 GeV)=119(5)(8) MeV, using r0=0.467 fm to set the scale

  18. New Arrangement of Dynamic Permeation Method for Determination of Gas Separation Ability of Ionic Liquids

    Řezníčková Čermáková, Jiřina; Suen, S.-Y.; Petričkovič, Roman; Setničková, Kateřina; Luo, Y.-M.; Wagner, Zdeněk; Uchytil, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 147, JUN 16 (2015), s. 1-8. ISSN 1383-5866 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/09/1165 Grant ostatní: MST(TW) MOST 99-2923-E- 005-001-MY2; MST(TW) MOST 102-2221-E-005-065-MY2 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : dynamic permeation method * ionic liquid * support arrangement Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 3.091, year: 2014

  19. A novel silanized CoFe2O4/fluorinated waterborne polyurethane pressure sensitive adhesive

    Highlights: • The hydrophobicity, thermal stability, dynamic mechanical properties, as well as adhesive properties of silanized. • CoFe2O4/fluorinated waterborne polyurethane (SC/FWPU) were improved with the incorporation of silanized CoFe2O4 into FWPU. • The higher the spreading-penetration parameter is, the faster the contact angle reaches equilibrium, and the faster the SC/FWPU pressure sensitive adhesive penetrates and spreads. - Abstract: A novel silanized CoFe2O4/fluorinated waterborne polyurethane (SC/FWPU) pressure sensitive adhesive was synthesized and characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and contact angle tester. The adhesive properties were measured in a test machine. Experimental results showed that the hydrophobicity, thermal stability, dynamic mechanical properties, as well as adhesive properties of SC/FWPU were improved with the incorporation of SC into FWPU. The dynamic hydrophobicity can be well described by the wetting kinetic model. The spreading-penetration parameter increased with an increase in SC content. The higher the spreading-penetration parameter is, the faster the contact angle reaches equilibrium, and the faster the SC/FWPU pressure sensitive adhesive penetrates and spreads

  20. Constitutive behaviour of mixed mode loaded adhesive layer

    Högberg, J.L.; Sørensen, Bent F.; Stigh, U.

    Mixed mode testing of adhesive layer is performed with the Mixed mode double Cantilever Bean? specimen. During the experiments, the specimens are loaded by transversal and/or shear forces; seven different mode mixities are tested. The J-integral is used to evaluate the energy dissipation in the...... failure process zone. The constitutive behaviour of the adhesive layer is obtained by a so called inverse method and fitting an existing mixed mode cohesive model, which uses a coupled formulation to describe a mode dependent constitutive behaviour. The cohesive parameters are determined by optimizing the...

  1. Bi facial silicon solar cell study in modelling in frequency dynamic regime under multispectral illumination: Recombination parameters determination methods

    A bibliographic study on the techniques of characterization of silicon solar cell, diodes, massifs and silicon wafer are presented. The influence of the modulation frequency and recombination in volume and in surface phenomena of on the profiles of carriers' densities, photocurrent and photovoltage has been put in evidence. The study of surface recombination velocities permitted to show that the bi facial silicon solar cell of Back Surface Field type behaves like an ohmic contacts solar cell for modulation frequencies above 40 khz. pplicability in frequency dynamic regime in the frequency range [0 - 40 khz] of three techniques of steady state recombination parameters determination is shown. A technique of diffusion length determination, in the range of (200 Hz - 40 khz] is proposed. It rests on the measurement of the short circuit current phase that is compared with the theoretical curve of short circuit current phase. The intersection of the experimental short circuit current phase and the theoretical curve of short circuit current phase permits to get the minority carriers effective diffusion length. An equivalent electric model of a solar cell in frequency dynamic regime is proposed. A study in modelling of the bi facial solar cell shunt resistance and space charge zone capacity is led from a determination method of these parameters proposed in steady state. (Author

  2. Biases in the determination of dynamical parameters of star clusters: today and in the Gaia era

    Sollima, A; Zocchi, A; Balbinot, E; Gieles, M; Henault-Brunet, V; Varri, A L

    2015-01-01

    The structural and dynamical properties of star clusters are generally derived by means of the comparison between steady-state analytic models and the available observables. With the aim of studying the biases of this approach, we fitted different analytic models to simulated observations obtained from a suite of direct N-body simulations of star clusters in different stages of their evolution and under different levels of tidal stress to derive mass, mass function and degree of anisotropy. We find that masses can be under/over-estimated up to 50% depending on the degree of relaxation reached by the cluster, the available range of observed masses and distances of radial velocity measures from the cluster center and the strength of the tidal field. The mass function slope appears to be better constrainable and less sensitive to model inadequacies unless strongly dynamically evolved clusters and a non-optimal location of the measured luminosity function are considered. The degree and the characteristics of the ...

  3. Aggrecan nanoscale solid-fluid interactions are a primary determinant of cartilage dynamic mechanical properties.

    Nia, Hadi Tavakoli; Han, Lin; Bozchalooi, Iman Soltani; Roughley, Peter; Youcef-Toumi, Kamal; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Ortiz, Christine

    2015-03-24

    Poroelastic interactions between interstitial fluid and the extracellular matrix of connective tissues are critical to biological and pathophysiological functions involving solute transport, energy dissipation, self-stiffening and lubrication. However, the molecular origins of poroelasticity at the nanoscale are largely unknown. Here, the broad-spectrum dynamic nanomechanical behavior of cartilage aggrecan monolayer is revealed for the first time, including the equilibrium and instantaneous moduli and the peak in the phase angle of the complex modulus. By performing a length scale study and comparing the experimental results to theoretical predictions, we confirm that the mechanism underlying the observed dynamic nanomechanics is due to solid-fluid interactions (poroelasticity) at the molecular scale. Utilizing finite element modeling, the molecular-scale hydraulic permeability of the aggrecan assembly was quantified (kaggrecan = (4.8 ± 2.8) × 10(-15) m(4)/N·s) and found to be similar to the nanoscale hydraulic permeability of intact normal cartilage tissue but much lower than that of early diseased tissue. The mechanisms underlying aggrecan poroelasticity were further investigated by altering electrostatic interactions between the molecule's constituent glycosaminoglycan chains: electrostatic interactions dominated steric interactions in governing molecular behavior. While the hydraulic permeability of aggrecan layers does not change across species and age, aggrecan from adult human cartilage is stiffer than the aggrecan from newborn human tissue. PMID:25758717

  4. Local sharing as a predominant determinant of synaptic matrix molecular dynamics.

    Shlomo Tsuriel

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that central nervous system synapses can persist for weeks, months, perhaps lifetimes, yet little is known as to how synapses maintain their structural and functional characteristics for so long. As a step toward a better understanding of synaptic maintenance we examined the loss, redistribution, reincorporation, and replenishment dynamics of Synapsin I and ProSAP2/Shank3, prominent presynaptic and postsynaptic matrix molecules, respectively. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and photoactivation experiments revealed that both molecules are continuously lost from, redistributed among, and reincorporated into synaptic structures at time-scales of minutes to hours. Exchange rates were not affected by inhibiting protein synthesis or proteasome-mediated protein degradation, were accelerated by stimulation, and greatly exceeded rates of replenishment from somatic sources. These findings indicate that the dynamics of key synaptic matrix molecules may be dominated by local protein exchange and redistribution, whereas protein synthesis and degradation serve to maintain and regulate the sizes of local, shared pools of these proteins.

  5. Adhesion properties of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR/Standard Malaysian Rubber (SMR L-based adhesives in the presence of phenol formaldehyde resin

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The adhesion properties, i. e. viscosity, tack and peel strength of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR/Standard Malaysian Rubber (SMR L-based pressure-sensitive adhesive was studied using phenol formaldehyde resin as the tackifying resin. Toluene was used as the solvent throughout the experiment. SBR composition in SBR/SMR L blend used was 0, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100%. Three different resin loadings, i. e. 40, 80 and 120 parts per hundred parts of rubber (phr were used in the adhesive formulation. The viscosity of adhesive was determined by a HAAKE Rotary Viscometer whereas loop tack and peel strength of paper/polyethylene terephthalate (PET film were measured using a Lloyd Adhesion Tester operating at 30 cm/min. Results indicate that the viscosity of adhesive decreases with increasing % SBR whereas loop tack passes through a maximum value at 20% SBR for all resin loadings. Except for the control sample (without resin, the peel strength shows a maximum value at 60% SBR for the three modes of peel tests. For a fixed % SBR, adhesive sample containing 40 phr phenol formaldehyde resin always exhibits the highest loop tack and peel strength, an observation which is associated to the optimum wettability of adhesive on the substrate.

  6. Film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells

    A R M Yusoff; M N Syahrul; K Henkel

    2007-08-01

    A major issue encountered during fabrication of triple junction -Si solar cells on polyimide substrates is the adhesion of the solar cell thin films to the substrates. Here, we present our study of film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells made on different polyimide substrates (Kapton VN, Upilex-S and Gouldflex), and the effect of tie coats on film adhesion.

  7. Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces polyurethane adhesive

    Roseland, L. M.

    1967-01-01

    Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces the adhesive properties of a polyurethane adhesive that fastens hardware to exterior surfaces of aluminum tanks. The mat is embedded in the uncured adhesive. It ensures good control of the bond line and increases the peel strength.

  8. Analysis of adhesion characteristics of liner dental materials

    Đorđević Maja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adhesive characteristics of materials used in dental practice are determined by indirect methods, by measuring mechanical properties of liner materials. In that procedure, the adhesion is defined by using measured mechanical properties of the bond material-test sample, which has several shortages. In the presented research the focus was based on the multi-component, composite, materials, which have, both organic and inorganic components in their structures. The direct measure of material-dentine bond was used in order to quantify the adhesion properties of investigated liner materials. Artificial saliva was the media for inducing the liner-dentine bond destruction. Destruction measurements were made by applying the quantification of visual information methodology. Obtained results were used to calculate the adhesion coefficient of the liner materials. The results were correlated with the mechanical test. There are no references on comparative testing of adhesion mechanical properties of dental material in the literature with presented methodology. The presented methodology proved to be useful for the functional quality ranking of dental materials.

  9. Effect of fluid inertia on probe-tack adhesion.

    Dias, Eduardo O; Miranda, José A

    2012-01-01

    One way of determining the adhesive strength of liquids is provided by a probe-tack test, which involves measuring the force required to pull apart two parallel flat plates separated by a thin fluid film. The large majority of existing theoretical and experimental work on probe-tack adhesion use very viscous fluids and considers relatively low lifting plate velocities, so that effects due to fluid inertia can be neglected. However, the employment of low-viscosity fluids and the increase in operating speeds of modern lifting apparatus can modify this scenario. By dealing with a proper gap averaging of the Navier-Stokes equation, we obtain a modified Darcy-law-like description of the problem and derive an adhesion force which incorporates the effects of fluid inertia, fluid viscosity (for Newtonian and power law fluids), and the contribution of the compliance and inertia of the probe-tack apparatus. Our results indicate that fluid inertia may have a significant influence on the adhesion force profiles, inducing a considerable increase in the force peaks and producing oscillations in the force-displacement curves as the plate-plate separation is increased. The combined role of inertial and non-Newtonian fluid behaviors on the adhesion force response is also investigated. PMID:22400663

  10. Neutron imaging inspections of composite honeycomb adhesive bonds

    Numerous commercial and military aircraft, including the Canadian Forces CF188 Hornet, use composite honeycomb structures in the design of their flight control surfaces (FCS). These structures provide excellent strength to weight ratios, but are often susceptible to degradation from moisture ingress. Once inside the honeycomb structure moisture causes the structural adhesive bonds to weaken, which can lead to complete failure of the FCS in flight. There are two critical structural adhesive bonds: the node bond and the filet bond. The node bond is integral to the honeycomb portion of the composite core and is located between the honeycomb cells. The filet bond is the adhesive bond located between the skin and the core. In order to asses overall structural degradation and develop repair procedures, it is important to determine the degree of degradation in each type of bond. Neutron radiography and tomography of the adhesive bonds was conducted at the Royal Military College (RMC) and FRM-II. Honeycomb samples were manufactured from FCS with in-service water ingress. The radiographs and tomograms provided important information about the degree of degradation in the core as well as about which adhesive bonds are more susceptible. The information obtained from this study will help to develop repair techniques and assess the flight worthiness of FCS.

  11. Dodging the dark matter degeneracy while determining the dynamics of dark energy

    Busti, Vinicius C.; Clarkson, Chris

    2016-05-01

    One of the key issues in cosmology is to establish the nature of dark energy, and to determine whether the equation of state evolves with time. When estimating this from distance measurements there is a degeneracy with the matter density. We show that there exists a simple function of the dark energy equation of state and its first derivative which is independent of this degeneracy at all redshifts, and so is a much more robust determinant of the evolution of dark energy than just its derivative. We show that this function can be well determined at low redshift from supernovae using Gaussian Processes, and that this method is far superior to a variety of parameterisations which are also subject to priors on the matter density. This shows that parametrised models give very biased constraints on the evolution of dark energy.

  12. Dynamics

    Goodman, Lawrence E

    2001-01-01

    Beginning text presents complete theoretical treatment of mechanical model systems and deals with technological applications. Topics include introduction to calculus of vectors, particle motion, dynamics of particle systems and plane rigid bodies, technical applications in plane motions, theory of mechanical vibrations, and more. Exercises and answers appear in each chapter.

  13. Tangential adhesion strength of cement mortars in masonry

    Derkach V.N.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The initial shear strength (tangential adhesion and the angle of internal friction in the horizontal plane of mortar joints are among important characteristics, determining the masonry strength and stiffness qualities in case of share. These characteristics influence largely over the limit state approach of buildings and facilities during seismic activity and over wind, crane and other load, causing the panel frame distortion in frame buildings with masonry infill.In the paper the experimental studies results of tangential adhesion strength of cement mortars with solid and hollow ceramic bricks, porous stones, calcium silicate bricks and cellular concrete blocks are presented. This research gives experimental dependences of mortar adhesive strength with mentioned types of masonry units on compressive strength of cement mortar. There is also the comparison of the obtained results with Russian and foreign standards in this paper.

  14. Determinant representation for dynamical correlation functions of the Quantum nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    Kojima, T; Slavnov, N A

    1997-01-01

    Painlevé analysis of correlation functions of the impenetrable Bose gas by M. Jimbo, T. Miwa, Y. Mori and M. Sato was based on the determinant representation of these correlation functions obtained by A. Lenard. The impenetrable Bose gas is the free fermionic case of the quantum nonlinear Schrödinger equation. In this paper we generalize the Lenard determinant representation for $$ to the non-free fermionic case. We also include time and temperature dependence. In forthcoming publications we shall perform the JMMS analysis of this correlation function. This will give us a completely integrable equation and asymptotic for the quantum correlation function of interacting fermions.

  15. Are the determinants of young SMEs profitability different?: empirical evidence using dynamic estimators

    Viveiros, Ana Catarina Raposo

    2010-01-01

    Based in two sub-samples of Portuguese SMEs: 1) 495 young SMEs; and 2) 1350 old SMEs, we conclude that age is a determinant factor in the relationships formed between determinants and profitability. Age, size, liquidity and long-term debt are of greater relative importance for the increased profitability of young SMEs, while risk is of greater relative importance for the diminished profitability of this type of SME, compared to the case of old SMEs. R&D expenditure is of greate...

  16. Physical characterization of the liquid adhesive from orb-weaving spiders

    Torres, Fernando G., E-mail: fgtorres@pucp.edu.pe; Troncoso, Omar P.; Cavalie, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Orb-weaving spiders produce bioadhesives that are used to capture their prey. In this paper, the physical properties of these adhesives are characterised. The liquid adhesive from Argiope argentata spiders has been studied and the morphological properties of the droplets, including size, shape and volume were determined. An estimation of viscosity and Young's modulus using atomic force microscopy has also been carried out. Morphological characterization confirmed that the liquid adhesive displayed a typical beads-on-a-string (BOAS) morphology on the silk fibres. The experimental data confirmed that the elastic modulus of the liquid adhesive from A. argentata was in the range 20–100 kPa which is in agreement with the Dahlquist criterion for adhesives. - Highlights: • The adhesive of the A. Argentata spiders displayed a beads-on-a-string morphology. • The adhesive drops had an average radius of 6.5 μm. • The adhesive drops had an estimated contact angle of 10°. • The estimated apparent viscosity of the adhesive was in the range 340–680 Pa·s. • AFM indentation measurements provided a Young's modulus value of 70 ± 47 kPa.

  17. Potential of the adhesion of bacteria isolated from drinking water to materials.

    Simões, Lúcia Chaves; Simões, Manuel; Oliveira, Rosário; Vieira, Maria João

    2007-04-01

    Heterotrophic bacteria (11 genera, 14 species, 25 putative strains) were isolated from drinking water, identified either biochemically or by partial 16s rDNA gene sequencing and their adherence characteristics were determined by two methods: i. thermodynamic prediction of adhesion potential by measuring hydrophobicity (contact angle measurements) and ii. by measuring adherence to eight different substrata (ASI 304 and 316 stainless steel, copper, polyvinyl chloride, polypropylene, polyethylene, silicone and glass). All the test organisms were hydrophilic and inter-species variation in hydrophobicity occurred only for Comamonas acidovorans. Stainless steel 304 (SS 304), copper, polypropylene (PP), polyethylene (PE) and silicone thermodynamically favoured adhesion for the majority of test strains (>18/25), whilst adhesion was generally less thermodynamically favorable for stainless steel 316 (SS 316), polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and glass. The predictability of thermodynamic adhesion test methods was validated by comparison with 24-well microtiter plate assays using nine reference strains and three adhesion surfaces (SS 316, PVC and PE). Results for Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Burkolderia cepacia and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia sp. 2 were congruent between both methods whilst they differed for the other bacteria to at least one material. Only A. calcoaceticus had strongly adherent properties to the three tested surfaces. Strain variation in adhesion ability was detected only for Sphingomonas capsulata. Analysis of adhesion demonstrated that in addition to physicochemical surface properties of bacterium and substratum, biological factors are involved in early adhesion processes, suggesting that reliance on thermodynamic approaches alone may not accurately predict adhesion capacity. PMID:17440920

  18. Physical characterization of the liquid adhesive from orb-weaving spiders

    Orb-weaving spiders produce bioadhesives that are used to capture their prey. In this paper, the physical properties of these adhesives are characterised. The liquid adhesive from Argiope argentata spiders has been studied and the morphological properties of the droplets, including size, shape and volume were determined. An estimation of viscosity and Young's modulus using atomic force microscopy has also been carried out. Morphological characterization confirmed that the liquid adhesive displayed a typical beads-on-a-string (BOAS) morphology on the silk fibres. The experimental data confirmed that the elastic modulus of the liquid adhesive from A. argentata was in the range 20–100 kPa which is in agreement with the Dahlquist criterion for adhesives. - Highlights: • The adhesive of the A. Argentata spiders displayed a beads-on-a-string morphology. • The adhesive drops had an average radius of 6.5 μm. • The adhesive drops had an estimated contact angle of 10°. • The estimated apparent viscosity of the adhesive was in the range 340–680 Pa·s. • AFM indentation measurements provided a Young's modulus value of 70 ± 47 kPa

  19. Friction and Adhesion mediated by supramolecular host-guest complexes

    Guerra, Roberto; Benassi, Andrea; Vanossi, Andrea; Ma, Ming; Urbakh, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The adhesive and frictional response of an AFM tip connected to a substrate through supramolecular host-guest complexes is investigated by dynamic Monte Carlo simulations. The variation of the pull-off force with the unloading rate recently observed in experiments is here unraveled by evidencing a simultaneous (progressive) break of the bonds at fast (slow) rates. The model reveals the origin of the observed plateaus in the retraction force as a function of tip-surface distance, showing that ...

  20. A new method for the determination of surface tension from molecular dynamics simulations applied to liquid droplets

    For the determination of surface tension of liquid droplets by molecular dynamics simulations, the most time-consuming part is the calculation of pressure tensor in the transition layer, which makes it difficult to enhance the precision of the computation. A new method for the calculation of surface tension of liquid droplets to reduce the calculation quantity of pressure tensor in transition layer to the minimum is proposed in this paper. Two thousand particles are taken as example to show how to carry out our scheme. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  1. Plasma treated polyethylene grafted with adhesive molecules for enhanced adhesion and growth of fibroblasts

    The cell–material interface plays a crucial role in the interaction of cells with synthetic materials for biomedical use. The application of plasma for tailoring polymer surfaces is of abiding interest and holds a great promise in biomedicine. In this paper, we describe polyethylene (PE) surface tuning by Ar plasma irradiating and subsequent grafting of the chemically active PE surface with adhesive proteins or motives to support cell attachment. These simple modifications resulted in changed polymer surface hydrophilicity, roughness and morphology, which we thoroughly characterized. The effect of our modifications on adhesion and growth was tested in vitro using mouse embryonic fibroblasts (NIH 3T3 cell line). We demonstrate that the plasma treatment of PE had a positive effect on the adhesion, spreading, homogeneity of distribution and moderately on proliferation activity of NIH 3T3 cells. This effect was even more pronounced on PE coated with biomolecules. - Graphical abstract: High density polyethylene scaffolds (PE) were modified by deposition to Ar plasma. These surface reactive PE were further grafted with biomolecules to enhance cell attachment and proliferation. The changes in surface physico-chemical properties (hydrophilicity, morphology, roughness) of PE were measured. The effects of used substrates on the adhesion and growth of mouse embryonic fibroblasts were determined by a five-day cell culture study. The method for significant biocompatibility improvement was presented. Highlights: ► Argon plasma treatment altered polyethylene surface morphology and roughness ► Plasma treatment reduced contact angle of polyethylene ► Grafting of polyethylene with biomolecules further reduced contact angle ► Plasma treatment and peptide grafting increased polyethylene biocompatibility

  2. Bidirectional remodeling of β1-integrin adhesions during chemotropic regulation of nerve growth

    Carlstrom Lucas P

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemotropic factors in the extracellular microenvironment guide nerve growth by acting on the growth cone located at the tip of extending axons. Growth cone extension requires the coordination of cytoskeleton-dependent membrane protrusion and dynamic adhesion to the extracellular matrix, yet how chemotropic factors regulate these events remains an outstanding question. We demonstrated previously that the inhibitory factor myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG triggers endocytic removal of the adhesion receptor β1-integrin from the growth cone surface membrane to negatively remodel substrate adhesions during chemorepulsion. Here, we tested how a neurotrophin might affect integrin adhesions. Results We report that brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF positively regulates the formation of substrate adhesions in axonal growth cones during stimulated outgrowth and prevents removal of β1-integrin adhesions by MAG. Treatment of Xenopus spinal neurons with BDNF rapidly triggered β1-integrin clustering and induced the dynamic formation of nascent vinculin-containing adhesion complexes in the growth cone periphery. Both the formation of nascent β1-integrin adhesions and the stimulation of axon extension by BDNF required cytoplasmic calcium ion signaling and integrin activation at the cell surface. Exposure to MAG decreased the number of β1-integrin adhesions in the growth cone during inhibition of axon extension. In contrast, the BDNF-induced adhesions were resistant to negative remodeling by MAG, correlating with the ability of BDNF pretreatment to counteract MAG-inhibition of axon extension. Pre-exposure to MAG prevented the BDNF-induced formation of β1-integrin adhesions and blocked the stimulation of axon extension by BDNF. Conclusions Altogether, these findings demonstrate the neurotrophin-dependent formation of integrin-based adhesions in the growth cone and reveal how a positive regulator of substrate adhesions can block

  3. Reducing Ice Adhesion on Nonsmooth Metallic Surfaces: Wettability and Topography Effects.

    Ling, Edwin Jee Yang; Uong, Victor; Renault-Crispo, Jean-Sébastien; Kietzig, Anne-Marie; Servio, Phillip

    2016-04-01

    The effects of ice formation and accretion on external surfaces range from being mildly annoying to potentially life-threatening. Ice-shedding materials, which lower the adhesion strength of ice to its surface, have recently received renewed research attention as a means to circumvent the problem of icing. In this work, we investigate how surface wettability and surface topography influence the ice adhesion strength on three different surfaces: (i) superhydrophobic laser-inscribed square pillars on copper, (ii) stainless steel 316 Dutch-weave meshes, and (iii) multiwalled carbon nanotube-covered steel meshes. The finest stainless steel mesh displayed the best performance with a 93% decrease in ice adhesion relative to polished stainless steel, while the superhydrophobic square pillars exhibited an increase in ice adhesion by up to 67% relative to polished copper. Comparisons of dynamic contact angles revealed little correlation between surface wettability and ice adhesion. On the other hand, by considering the ice formation process and the fracture mechanics at the ice-substrate interface, we found that two competing mechanisms governing ice adhesion strength arise on nonplanar surfaces: (i) mechanical interlocking of the ice within the surface features that enhances adhesion, and (ii) formation of microcracks that act as interfacial stress concentrators, which reduce adhesion. Our analysis provides insight toward new approaches for the design of ice-releasing materials through the use of surface topographies that promote interfacial crack propagation. PMID:26953827

  4. Spatial Dynamics and Determinants of County-Level Education Expenditure in China

    Gu, Jiafeng

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a multivariate spatial autoregressive model of local public education expenditure determination with autoregressive disturbance is developed and estimated. The existence of spatial interdependence is tested using Moran's I statistic and Lagrange multiplier test statistics for both the spatial error and spatial lag models. The full…

  5. Temporal Dynamics and Decomposition of Reciprocal Determinism: A Reply to Phillips and Orton.

    Bandura, Albert

    1983-01-01

    In their analysis of reciprocal determinism, Phillips and Orton (TM 509 061) mistakenly assume that behavior, cognitive and other personal factors, and environmental events operate as a simultaneous wholistic interaction. Contrary to this belief, the interactants in triadic reciprocality work their mutual effects sequentially over variable time…

  6. Epidemiology, determinants and dynamics of cholera in pakistan: gaps and prospects for future research

    Cholera is one of the notifiable endemic diseases in Pakistan, but the reporting of cholera cases is still unsatisfactory. Most of the diagnosed cases are never reported to the relevant authorities. In the year 1993 - 2005, the country did not report any single case of cholera to the WHO. The objectives of this review were to understand the epidemiology and to identify the possible determinants of cholera infection in Pakistan. Medscape, Medline, PakMedinet and PubMed, was searched, using key words, epidemiology and determinants of cholera infection in Pakistan during 1995 - 2010. Morbidity and mortality due to cholera infection during 1995 - 2010, without any language restriction. Out of 27 articles published between 1995 - 2010, 17 articles were included in the review. Vibrio cholerae O139 identified as a major cause of infection in older age group, while O1 biotype of cholera as a predominant cause of cholera among young individuals. Mainly reported determinants of cholera in Pakistan include poor sanitation and hygiene practices, increased population density in urban areas, leading to rapid and unplanned urbanization of the major cities and climate change due to increased environmental pollution in Pakistan are plausible factors for endemicity of cholera in Pakistan. Cholera reporting as a notifiable disease to the relevant departments and timely action can prevent the risk of outbreaks. There is a need to identify specific behavioral and environmental determinants responsible for outbreaks and epidemics of cholera in Pakistan which can help to design appropriate preventive and control interventions. (author)

  7. The Role of Lipid Rafts in Cancer Cell Adhesion and Migration

    Toshiyuki Murai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid rafts are cholesterol-enriched microdomains of the cell membrane and possess a highly dynamic nature. They have been involved in various cellular functions including the regulation of cell adhesion and membrane signaling through proteins within lipid rafts. The dynamic features of the cancer cell surface may modulate the malignant phenotype of cancer, including adhesion disorders and aggressive phenotypes of migration and invasion. Recently, it was demonstrated that lipid rafts play critical roles in cancer cell adhesion and migration. This article summarizes the important roles of lipid rafts in cancer cell adhesion and migration, with a focus on the current state of knowledge. This article will improve the understanding of cancer progression and lead to the development of novel targets for cancer therapy.

  8. Combined modeling of cell aggregation and adhesion mediated by receptor–ligand interactions under shear flow

    Yu Du

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Blood cell aggregation and adhesion to endothelial cells under shear flow are crucial to many biological processes such as thrombi formation, inflammatory cascade, and tumor metastasis, in which these cellular interactions are mainly mediated by the underlying receptor–ligand bindings. While theoretical modeling of aggregation dynamics and adhesion kinetics of interacting cells have been well studied separately, how to couple these two processes remains unclear. Here we develop a combined model that couples cellular aggregation dynamics and adhesion kinetics under shear flow. The impacts of shear rate (or shear stress and molecular binding affinity were elucidated. This study provides a unified model where the action of a fluid flow drives cell aggregation and adhesion under the modulations of the mechanical shear flow and receptor–ligand interaction kinetics. It offers an insight into understanding the relevant biological processes and functions.

  9. Potassium dynamics are attenuated in hyperkalemia and a determinant of QT adaptation in exercising hemodialysis patients

    Tran, Cao Thach; Bundgaard, Henning; Ladefoged, Søren Daustrand; Haunsø, Stig; Kjeldsen, Keld

    2013-01-01

    Disturbances in plasma potassium concentration (pK) are well known risk factors for the development of cardiac arrhythmia. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the effect of hemodialysis on exercise pK dynamics and QT hysteresis, and whether QT hysteresis is associated with the p......K decrease following exercise. Twenty-two end-stage renal disease patients exercised on a cycle ergometer with incremental work load before and after hemodialysis. ECG was recorded and pK was measured during exercise and recovery. During exercise, pK increased from 5.1 ± 0.2 to 6.1 ± 0.2 mM (mean ± SE; P...

  10. The dynamics of mergers and acquisitions: ancestry as the seminal determinant.

    Viegas, Eduardo; Cockburn, Stuart P; Jensen, Henrik J; West, Geoffrey B

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the fundamental mechanisms behind the complex landscape of corporate mergers and acquisitions is of crucial importance to economies across the world. Adapting ideas from the fields of complexity and evolutionary dynamics to analyse business ecosystems, we show here that ancestry, i.e. the cumulative sum of historical mergers across all ancestors, is the key characteristic to company mergers and acquisitions. We verify this by comparing an agent-based model to an extensive range of business data, covering the period from the 1830s to the present day and a range of industries and geographies. This seemingly universal mechanism leads to imbalanced business ecosystems, with the emergence of a few very large, but sluggish 'too big to fail' entities, and very small, niche entities, thereby creating a paradigm where a configuration akin to effective oligopoly or monopoly is a likely outcome for free market systems. PMID:25383025

  11. Dynamics of Soil Erosion in Xingguo County, China,Determined Using Remote Sensing and GIS

    PAN Jian-Jun; ZHANG Tao-Lin; ZHAO Qi-Guo

    2005-01-01

    The spatial and temporal dynamics of soil erosion in Xingguo County, Jiangxi Province, China were studied using multi-period remote sensing images and GIS. The results indicated that the soil erosion status of the region has been improving, particularly since the 1980s, with the erosion rate showing an evident decline over the past 30 years. The improvement showed not only in the decline of eroded soil area, but also with the reduction in the extent of erosion. The extent of erosion mainly changed by one level, and the change primarily occurred with the severely or moderately eroded soil types. However, in general, soil erosion was still an overriding problem in the region with some areas becoming more serious, especially those with large quantities of granite.

  12. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in determining histopathological prognostic factors of invasive breast cancers

    Objective: To evaluate the relation between morphological features and enhancement parameters in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (DCE-MR) imaging with histopathological prognostic factors. Materials and methods: Fifty-five patients with surgicopathological diagnosis of breast carcinoma were evaluated with 1.0 T MR scanner as a part of their preoperative diagnostic work-up. Dynamic studies were performed in axial plane using 3D fast low angle shot (FLASH) sequence. Time intensity curves (TICs) were obtained from the regions showing maximal enhancement in subtraction images. The correlations between enhancement parameters and histopathological findings were analyzed using stepwise multiple regression analysis, Student's t-test, χ2-tests and Pearson's moment correlation coefficient. Results: Significant correlations were found between the presence of lymph node metastasis and tumor size (P<0.05) and edge characteristics (P<0.05). A highly significant correlation was found between histopathological grades and qualitative enhancement patterns (r=0.403, P<0.01). Statistically significant differences were found between the groups with and without lymph node metastasis regarding enhancement in the first minute (P<0.01) and TIC slope (P<0.05). A significant difference was found between the histopathological grades I and III regarding all quantitative enhancement parameters, whereas no difference was found between the grades I-II, and II-III. Conclusion: DCE-MR imaging helps to predict prognostic factors of breast cancer by revealing morphological features and enhancement parameters of the primary tumor. Additional morphological factors further improve our ability to predict lymphatic metastasis

  13. Dynamical patterning modules: physico-genetic determinants of morphological development and evolution

    Newman, Stuart A.; Bhat, Ramray

    2008-03-01

    The shapes and forms of multicellular organisms arise by the generation of new cell states and types and changes in the numbers and rearrangements of the various kinds of cells. While morphogenesis and pattern formation in all animal species are widely recognized to be mediated by the gene products of an evolutionarily conserved 'developmental-genetic toolkit', the link between these molecular players and the physics underlying these processes has been generally ignored. This paper introduces the concept of 'dynamical patterning modules' (DPMs), units consisting of one or more products of the 'toolkit' genes that mobilize physical processes characteristic of chemically and mechanically excitable meso- to macroscopic systems such as cell aggregates: cohesion, viscoelasticity, diffusion, spatiotemporal heterogeneity based on lateral inhibition and multistable and oscillatory dynamics. We suggest that ancient toolkit gene products, most predating the emergence of multicellularity, assumed novel morphogenetic functions due to change in the scale and context inherent to multicellularity. We show that DPMs, acting individually and in concert with each other, constitute a 'pattern language' capable of generating all metazoan body plans and organ forms. The physical dimension of developmental causation implies that multicellular forms during the explosive radiation of animal body plans in the middle Cambrian, approximately 530 million years ago, could have explored an extensive morphospace without concomitant genotypic change or selection for adaptation. The morphologically plastic body plans and organ forms generated by DPMs, and their ontogenetic trajectories, would subsequently have been stabilized and consolidated by natural selection and genetic drift. This perspective also solves the apparent 'molecular homology-analogy paradox', whereby widely divergent modern animal types utilize the same molecular toolkit during development by proposing, in contrast to the Neo

  14. Dynamical patterning modules: physico-genetic determinants of morphological development and evolution

    The shapes and forms of multicellular organisms arise by the generation of new cell states and types and changes in the numbers and rearrangements of the various kinds of cells. While morphogenesis and pattern formation in all animal species are widely recognized to be mediated by the gene products of an evolutionarily conserved 'developmental-genetic toolkit', the link between these molecular players and the physics underlying these processes has been generally ignored. This paper introduces the concept of 'dynamical patterning modules' (DPMs), units consisting of one or more products of the 'toolkit' genes that mobilize physical processes characteristic of chemically and mechanically excitable meso- to macroscopic systems such as cell aggregates: cohesion, viscoelasticity, diffusion, spatiotemporal heterogeneity based on lateral inhibition and multistable and oscillatory dynamics. We suggest that ancient toolkit gene products, most predating the emergence of multicellularity, assumed novel morphogenetic functions due to change in the scale and context inherent to multicellularity. We show that DPMs, acting individually and in concert with each other, constitute a 'pattern language' capable of generating all metazoan body plans and organ forms. The physical dimension of developmental causation implies that multicellular forms during the explosive radiation of animal body plans in the middle Cambrian, approximately 530 million years ago, could have explored an extensive morphospace without concomitant genotypic change or selection for adaptation. The morphologically plastic body plans and organ forms generated by DPMs, and their ontogenetic trajectories, would subsequently have been stabilized and consolidated by natural selection and genetic drift. This perspective also solves the apparent 'molecular homology-analogy paradox', whereby widely divergent modern animal types utilize the same molecular toolkit during development by proposing, in contrast to the Neo

  15. Polyurethane structural adhesives applied in automotive composite joints

    Josue Garcia Quini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years structural adhesives technology has demonstrated great potential for application due to its capacity to transform complex structures into solid unitary and monolithic assemblies using different materials. Thus, seams or joints integrate these structures providing, besides a reduction in weight, a considerable increase in the mechanical resistance and stiffness. The increase in the industrial use of structural adhesives is mainly due to their ability to efficiently bond different materials in an irreversible manner, even replacing systems involving mechanical joints. In the automobile industry structural adhesives have been widely used for the bonding of metal substrates, thermoplastics and composites, frequently employing these in combination, particularly glass fiber and polyester resin composites molded using RTM and SMC processes. However, the use of urethane structural adhesives in applications involving composites and thermoplastics has been the subject of few investigations. In this study the effects of temperature and time on the shear strength of RTM, SMC and ABS joints, applying temperatures of -40, 25, 80, 120 and 177 °C and times of 20 minutes and 500 hours, were determined. The objective was to evaluate the performance under extreme conditions of use in order to assess whether these joints could be used in passenger or off-road vehicles. The results showed that the urethane structural adhesive promoted the efficient bonding of these materials, considering that due to the high adhesive strength the failures occurred in the substrates without adversely affecting the bonded area. For each test condition the joint failure modes were also determined.

  16. Mechanical strength of adhesive-bonding

    In order to meet the prospective application of a GFRP dewar for energy storage system using a large superconducting magnet, the dewar with a complex structure together with a large size are desired to be made. It is difficult to manufacture such a type of the dewars in one united body. These dewars can be manufactured by the adhesive-bonding method. In the present study, the mechanical strength of adhesive-bonding is studied from this point of view. The mechanical strength of the adhesive-bonding has been investigated by the static tensile method and the impact loading method using small test samples. From the static tensile tests, the following results have been obtained. For the sample adhesive-bonded with insertion structure, the mechanical strength of the adhesive-bonding is found to depend on the adhesives used and on the difference of the thermal contraction between the materials which are adhesive-bonded each other. Using a soft adhesive as Araldite 106, the mechanical strength of the adhesive-bonding is small at room temperature, but it remarkably increases at cryogenic temperatures. For a hard adhesive as Araldite 103 and Stycast 2850 FT, it is large at room temperature, and it further increases at cryogenic temperatures. The dewar has to be strong enough not only at cryogenic temperatures but also at room temperature. A soft adhesive is not suitable for constructing the dewar. For the sample adhesive-bonded with screwing structure, the mechanical strength of the adhesive-bonding depends on the shear strength of GFRP itself. The mechanical strength of the adhesive-bonded part increases with the decreasing temperature. Therefore, this screwing method is advantageous for the construction of the dewar. According to the impact loading tests, it is found that the adhesive-bonding of screwing structure is not brittle at cryogenic temperature. This is due to inherent property of GFRP. (J.P.N.)

  17. Environment-friendly adhesives for surface bonding of wood-based flooring using natural tannin to reduce formaldehyde and TVOC emission.

    Kim, Sumin

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop environment-friendly adhesives for face fancy veneer bonding of engineered flooring using the natural tannin form bark in the wood. The natural wattle tannin adhesive were used to replace UF resin in the formaldehyde-based resin system in order to reduce formaldehyde and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from the adhesives used between plywoods and fancy veneers. PVAc was added to the natural tannin adhesive to increase viscosity of tannin adhesive for surface bonding. For tannin/PVAc hybrid adhesives, 5%, 10%, 20% and 30% of PVAc to the natural tannin adhesives were added. tannin/PVAc hybrid adhesives showed better bonding than the commercial natural tannin adhesive with a higher level of wood penetration. The initial adhesion strength was sufficient to be maintained within the optimum initial tack range. The standard formaldehyde emission test (desiccator method), field and laboratory emission cell (FLEC) and VOC analyzer were used to determine the formaldehyde and VOC emissions from engineered flooring bonded with commercial the natural tannin adhesive and tannin/PVAc hybrid adhesives. By desiccator method and FLEC, the formaldehyde emission level of each adhesive showed the similar tendency. All adhesives satisfied the E(1) grade (below 1.5 mg/L) and E(0) grade (below 0.5 mg/L) with UV coating. VOC emission results by FLEC and VOC analyzer were different with the formaldehyde emission results. TVOC emission was slightly increased as adding PVAc. PMID:18710801

  18. Characterization of pipes and adhesives of glass fiber reinforced plastics used in offshore platforms; Caracterizacao de tubo e adesivo utilizados em tubulacoes de plastico reforcado com fibras de vidro aplicados em plataformas maritimas

    Pessanha, Maikon C.R.; Dias, Dylmar P. [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro (UENF), Campos de Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Engenharia Civil]. E-mail: maikon@uenf.br; Filgueira, Marcello; Paranhos, Ronaldo P.R. [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro (UENF), Campos de Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Materiais Avancados; Farias, Otavio L. de [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-01-15

    Glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) have been applied in the offshore industry owing to their high resistance to corrosion and high specific mechanical strength. The present work aimed at characterizing pipes and adhesives used in offshore platforms in order to evaluate the thermo-mechanical performance of these materials. The techniques used were: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetry analysis (TGA), dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) and Vicat softening temperature. Specimens of GFRP pipe and adhesive components (referred to as A and B) were evaluated individually. The adhesive samples were made in the following ratios (% weight): 40% A-60% B, 50% A-50% B and 60%A-40% B. The results showed it to be possible to determinate the composition and structure of the materials, as well as the mechanical behavior regarding thermal degradation. The adhesive and pipe exhibited satisfactory performance at room temperature, with regard to degradation and stiffness. Nevertheless, at higher temperatures, both materials, especially the adhesives, presented abrupt strength reduction. (author)

  19. Determination of reactivity by a revised rod-drop technique in the muse-4 programme - comparison with dynamic measurements

    The MUSE-4 experimental programme in the zero power fast facility MASURCA at CEA Cadarache aims at studying accelerator-driven-systems (ADS). One of the main objectives is the qualification of measuring and monitoring sub-critical reactivities. Rossi α and Feynman α and pulsed neutron source techniques based on the use of the GENEPI deuteron accelerator are investigated to assess the prompt neutron decay constant a and to deduce the reactivity. Reactivity reference levels are determined using a revised rod drop technique and static source multiplication methods for comparison with values extracted from dynamic measurements. This article focuses on the determination of the inherent source and the reactivity sensitivity to kinetic constants and counting rate in the rod drop technique using the point kinetic model. (author)

  20. In Silico Determination of Gas Permeabilities by Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics: CO2 and He through PIM-1

    Hendrik Frentrup

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We study the permeation dynamics of helium and carbon dioxide through an atomistically detailed model of a polymer of intrinsic microporosity, PIM-1, via non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD simulations. This work presents the first explicit molecular modeling of gas permeation through a high free-volume polymer sample, and it demonstrates how permeability and solubility can be obtained coherently from a single simulation. Solubilities in particular can be obtained to a very high degree of confidence and within experimental inaccuracies. Furthermore, the simulations make it possible to obtain very specific information on the diffusion dynamics of penetrant molecules and yield detailed maps of gas occupancy, which are akin to a digital tomographic scan of the polymer network. In addition to determining permeability and solubility directly from NEMD simulations, the results shed light on the permeation mechanism of the penetrant gases, suggesting that the relative openness of the microporous topology promotes the anomalous diffusion of penetrant gases, which entails a deviation from the pore hopping mechanism usually observed in gas diffusion in polymers.

  1. In Silico Determination of Gas Permeabilities by Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics: CO2 and He through PIM-1.

    Frentrup, Hendrik; Hart, Kyle E; Colina, Coray M; Müller, Erich A

    2015-01-01

    We study the permeation dynamics of helium and carbon dioxide through an atomistically detailed model of a polymer of intrinsic microporosity, PIM-1, via non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations. This work presents the first explicit molecular modeling of gas permeation through a high free-volume polymer sample, and it demonstrates how permeability and solubility can be obtained coherently from a single simulation. Solubilities in particular can be obtained to a very high degree of confidence and within experimental inaccuracies. Furthermore, the simulations make it possible to obtain very specific information on the diffusion dynamics of penetrant molecules and yield detailed maps of gas occupancy, which are akin to a digital tomographic scan of the polymer network. In addition to determining permeability and solubility directly from NEMD simulations, the results shed light on the permeation mechanism of the penetrant gases, suggesting that the relative openness of the microporous topology promotes the anomalous diffusion of penetrant gases, which entails a deviation from the pore hopping mechanism usually observed in gas diffusion in polymers. PMID:25764366

  2. Cell adhesion molecules and hyaluronic acid as markers of inflammation, fibrosis and response to antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis C patients

    Esther Granot

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cell adhesion molecules (intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 and hyaluronic acid, markers of inflammation and fibrosis were monitored in hepatitis C patients to determine whether changes in plasma levels, during antiviral treatment, can predict long-term response to therapy.

  3. Direct observation of microbial adhesion to membranes.

    Wang, Sunny; Guillen, Greg; Hoek, Eric M V

    2005-09-01

    Direct microscopic observation and an interfacial force model were used to better understand and control microbial adhesion to polymeric ultrafiltration membranes. The model was used to predict a "critical flux", below which cells deposited reversibly, and direct observation was used to visually quantify cell deposition and removal. In preliminary direct observation experiments, permeate reversal (backpulsing) was more effective than cross-flow hydrodynamics at removing deposited cells. In experiments conducted below the critical flux, no cell accumulation was observed over repeated forward-reverse filtration cycles; however, a small fraction of cells deposited irreversibly regardless of the flux, membrane, or solution chemistry. The fraction of irreversibly deposited cells was consistent with the equilibrium surface coverage attained without permeation (i.e., due to heterogeneous adsorption). Although steric forces were not invoked to establish a critical flux, when operating above the critical flux, a balance between permeation drag and steric repulsion appeared to determine the strength of adhesion of cells to membranes. Direct observation also confirmed that above the critical flux fouling occurred and pressure losses accumulated over several backpulse cycles, whereas below the critical flux there were no observable pressure losses or fouling. PMID:16190200

  4. UV-cured adhesives for carbon fiber composite applications

    Lu, Hsiao-Chun

    Carbon fiber composite materials are increasingly used in automobile, marine, and aerospace industries due to their unique properties, including high strength, high stiffness and low weight. However, due to their brittle characteristic, these structures are prone to physical damage, such as a bird strike or impact damage. Once the structure is damaged, it is important to have fast and reliable temporary repair until the permanent repair or replacement can take place. In this dissertation, UV-based adhesives were used to provide a bonding strength for temporary repair. Adhesively bonded patch repair is an efficient and effective method for temporary repair. In this study, precured patches (hard patches) and dry fabric patches with laminating resins (soft patches) were performed. UV-based epoxy adhesives were applied to both patch repair systems. For precured patch repair, the bonding strengths were investigated under different surface treatments for bonding area and different adhesives thicknesses. The shear stresses of different UV exposure times and curing times were tested. Besides, the large patch repair was investigated as well. For soft patch repair, the hand wet lay-up was applied due to high viscosity of UV resins. A modified single lap shear testing (ASTM D5868) was applied to determine the shear stress. The large patches used fiber glass instead of carbon fiber to prove the possibility of repair with UV epoxy resin by hand wet lay-up process. The hand lay-up procedure was applied and assisted by vacuum pressure to eliminate the air bubbles and consolidate the patches. To enhance the bonding strength and effective soft patch repair, vacuum assisted resin transferring molding (VaRTM) is the better option. However, only low viscosity resins can be operated by VaRTM. Hence, new UV-based adhesives were formulated. The new UV-based adhesives included photoinitiator (PI), epoxy and different solvents. Solvents were used to compound the photoinitiator into epoxy

  5. Determinant representation for dynamical correlation functions of the quantum nonlinear Schroedinger equation

    Kojima, T. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Mathematical Sciences; Korepin, V.E. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Slavnov, N.A. [Steklov Mathematical Institute, Gubkina 8, Moscow 117966 (Russian Federation)

    1997-10-01

    Painleve analysis of correlation functions of the impenetrable Bose gas by M. Jimbo, T. Miwa, Y. Mori and M. Sato was based on the determinant representation of these correlation functions obtained by A. Lenard. The impenetrable Bose gas is the free fermionic case of the quantum nonlinearSchroedinger equation. In this paper we generalize the Lenard determinant representation for left angle {psi}(0,0){psi}{sup {dagger}}(x,t) right angle to the non-free fermionic case. We also include time and temperature dependence. In forthcoming publications we shall perform the JMMS analysis of this correlation function. This will give us a completely integrable equation and asymptotic for the quantum correlation function of interacting fermions. (orig.) 19 refs.

  6. Determinant Representation for Dynamical Correlation Functions of the Quantum Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation

    Kojima, T.; Korepin, V. E.; Slavnov, N. A.

    Painlevé analysis of correlation functions of the impenetrable Bose gas by M. Jimbo, T. Miwa, Y. Mori and M. Sato [1] was based on the determinant representation of these correlation functions obtained by A. Lenard [2]. The impenetrable Bose gas is the free fermionic case of the quantum nonlinear Schrödinger equation. In this paper we generalize the Lenard determinant representation for ψ (0,0)ψ (x,t)> to the non-free fermionic case. We also include time and temeprature dependence. In forthcoming publications we shall perform the JMMS analysis of this correlationl function. This will give us a completely integrable equation and asymptotic for the quantum correlation function of interacting fermions.

  7. X-ray magnetic dichroism: from quantitative determination of magnetic moments to imaging of magnetization dynamics

    In this document, I use some results of my research activities of the last ten years to show the power of x-ray magnetic dichroism for determining magnetic properties of thin layers, multilayers and nano-structures. The use of sum rules for x-ray dichroism allows a quantitative determination of the spin and orbital contributions to the magnetic moment, for each element of a heterogeneous material separately. Used in a qualitative way, x-ray dichroism allows monitoring the magnetization of the different layers in a multilayer material as a function of applied field. In combination with the temporal structure of synchrotron radiation, it is possible to study fast magnetization reversal with element selectivity, which is important for devices like spin valves and magnetic tunnel junctions. Adding the spatial resolution of a photoelectron emission microscope (PEEM), it becomes possible to study all the details of the fast magnetization reversal in complex magnetic systems. (author)

  8. Influence of fluoride-containing adhesives and bleaching agents on enamel bond strength

    Vanessa Cavalli; Priscila Cristiane Suzy Liporoni; Marcos Augusto do Rego; Sandrine Bittencourt Berger; Marcelo Giannini

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of fluoride-containing carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agents and adhesive systems on bonded enamel interfaces that are part of the dynamic pH cycling and thermal cycling models. The buccal surfaces of 60 bovine incisors were restored with a composite resin and bonded with three- and two-step, etch-and-rinse, fluoride-containing adhesives, Optibond FL (FL) and Optibond Solo Plus (SP), respectively. Restored teeth were subjected to thermal cycling to age th...

  9. Monocytes mediate metastatic breast tumor cell adhesion to endothelium under flow

    Evani, Shankar J.; Prabhu, Rajesh G.; Gnanaruban, V.; Finol, Ender A.; Anand K. Ramasubramanian

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial adhesion is necessary for the hematogenous dissemination of tumor cells. However, the metastatic breast tumor cell MDA-MB-231 does not bind to the endothelium under physiological flow conditions, suggesting alternate mechanisms of adhesion. Since monocytes are highly represented in the tumor microenvironment, and also bind to endothelium during inflammation, we hypothesized that the monocytes assist in the arrest of MDA-MB-231 on the endothelium. Using in vitro models of the dynam...

  10. Snail1 controls epithelial–mesenchymal lineage commitment in focal adhesion kinase–null embryonic cells

    Li, Xiao-Yan; Zhou, Xiaoming; Rowe, R. Grant; Hu, Yuexian; Schlaepfer, David D.; Ilić, Dusko; Dressler, Gregory; Park, Ann; Guan, Jun-Lin; Weiss, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Mouse embryonic cells isolated from focal adhesion kinase (FAK)–null animals at embryonic day 7.5 display multiple defects in focal adhesion remodeling, microtubule dynamics, mechanotransduction, proliferation, directional motility, and invasion. To date, the ability of FAK to modulate cell function has been ascribed largely to its control of posttranscriptional signaling cascades in this embryonic cell population. In this paper, we demonstrate that FAK unexpectedly exerts control over an epi...

  11. Fungicide residues in grapes determined the dynamics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains during spontaneous wine fermentation

    Čuš Franc; Čadež Neža J.; Raspor Peter I.

    2011-01-01

    Impact of three fungicides against B. cinerea (iprodione, pyrimethanil and f ludioxonil plus cyprodinil) on the population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains during the spontaneous alcoholic fermentation was studied. With regard to the use of fungicides in the vineyard at two stages of the grapevine growth we followed four different spontaneous fermentations: control, iprodione, pyrimethanil and f ludioxonil plus cyprodinil. The fungicide residues in the grapes were determined by GC/MS...

  12. Ultrastructural and biochemical studies of two dynamically expressed cell surface determinants on Candida albicans.

    Brawner, D L; Cutler, J E

    1986-01-01

    Variability in the expression of two different cell surface carbohydrate determinants was examined with two agglutinating immunoglobulin M monoclonal antibodies (H9 and C6) and immunoelectron microscopy during growth of three strains of Candida albicans. A single strain of Candida parapsilosis did not express either antigen at any time during growth. Antigens were detected on the surface of C. albicans by agglutination tests with either H9 or C6 over a 48-h growth period. The difference in sp...

  13. Shear bond strength of metallic and ceramic brackets using color change adhesives

    Aisha de Souza Gomes Stumpf

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets using color change adhesives that are supposed to aid in removing excess of bonding material and compare them to a traditional adhesive. METHODS: Ninety metallic and ninety ceramic brackets were bonded to bovine incisors using two color change adhesives and a regular one. A tensile stress was applied by a universal testing machine. The teeth were observed in a microscope after debonding in order to determine the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI. RESULTS: The statistical analysis (ANOVA, Tukey, and Kruskall-Wallis tests demonstrated that the mean bond strength presented no difference when metallic and ceramic brackets were compared but the bond resistance values were significantly different for the three adhesives used. The most common ARI outcome was the entire adhesive remaining on the enamel. CONCLUSIONS: The bond strength was similar for metallic and ceramic brackets when the same adhesive system was used. ARI scores demonstrated that bonding with these adhesives is safe even when ceramic brackets were used. On the other hand, bond strength was too low for orthodontic purposes when Ortho Lite Cure was used.

  14. Determination of populations of vibrational levels of carbon dioxide molecules in gas dynamic lasers by ir spectroscopy

    Bakhir, L.P.; Overchenko, Yu.V.

    1979-01-01

    The absorption and emission spectra of some vibrational and rotational transitions of the carbon dioxide molecule in the range of 4.3, 10, and 15 ..mu.. m are analyzed under non-equilibrium conditions at the outlet of a gas-dynamic laser; and an examination is made of the possibility of their use to determine the populations of lower vibrational levels of carbon dioxide at different degrees of expansion. In view of the sharp distinction of relaxation rates for various degrees of freedom in a gas-dynamic laser, the vibrational temperatures of various levels of CO/sub 2/ may differ significantly from each other, as well as from rotational and translational temperatures. In describing populations in terms of the length of a jet, vibrational and rotational energies are separated and population temperatures equal to mode temperatures are assumed for purely symmetric deformation and asymmetric vibrations. A method for determining the absolute populations of low vibrational levels of the carbon dioxide molecule is developed according to measurements of absorption and brightness of a non-equilibrium jet near given frequencies.

  15. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    Pesika, Noshir S.; Zeng, Hongbo; Kristiansen, Kai; Zhao, Boxin; Tian, Yu; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2009-11-01

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  16. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  17. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    Pesika, Noshir S [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Zeng Hongbo [Chemical and Materials Engineering Department, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2V4 (Canada); Kristiansen, Kai; Israelachvili, Jacob [Chemical Engineering Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Zhao, Boxin [Chemical Engineering Department and Waterloo Institute of Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Tian Yu [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Department of Precision Instruments, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Autumn, Kellar, E-mail: npesika@tulane.ed [Department of Biology, Lewis and Clark College, Portland, OR 97219 (United States)

    2009-11-18

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  18. Adhesive mechanisms in cephalopods: a review.

    von Byern, Janek; Klepal, Waltraud

    2006-01-01

    Several genera of cephalopods (Nautilus, Sepia, Euprymna and Idiosepius) produce adhesive secretions, which are used for attachment to the substratum, for mating and to capture prey. These adhesive structures are located in different parts of the body, viz. in the digital tentacles (Nautilus), in the ventral surface of the mantle and fourth arm pair (Sepia), in the dorsal epidermis (Euprymna), or in the dorsal mantle side and partly on the fins (Idiosepius). Adhesion in Sepia is induced by suction of dermal structures on the mantle, while for Nautilus, Euprymna and Idiosepius adhesion is probably achieved by chemical substances. Histochemical studies indicate that in Nautilus and Idiosepius secretory cells that appear to be involved in adhesion stain for carbohydrates and protein, whilst in Euprymna only carbohydrates are detectable. De-adhesion is either achieved by muscle contraction of the tentacles and mantle (Nautilus and Sepia) or by secretion of substances (Euprymna). The de-adhesive mechanism used by Idiosepius remains unknown. PMID:17110356

  19. Bacterial adhesion and biofilms on surfaces

    Trevor Roger Garrett; Manmohan Bhakoo; Zhibing Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion has become a significant problem in industry and in the domicile,and much research has been done for deeper understanding of the processes involved.A generic biological model of bacterial adhesion and population growth called the bacterial biofilm growth cycle,has been described and modified many times.The biofilm growth cycle encompasses bacterial adhesion at all levels,starting with the initial physical attraction of bacteria to a substrate,and ending with the eventual liberation of cell dusters from the biofilm matrix.When describing bacterial adhesion one is simply describing one or more stages of biofilm development,neglecting the fact that the population may not reach maturity.This article provides an overview of bacterial adhesion.cites examples of how bac-terial adhesion affects industry and summarises methods and instrumentation used to improve our understanding of the adhesive prop-erties of bacteria.

  20. Host Selection of Microbiota via Differential Adhesion.

    McLoughlin, Kirstie; Schluter, Jonas; Rakoff-Nahoum, Seth; Smith, Adrian L; Foster, Kevin R

    2016-04-13

    The host epithelium is the critical interface with microbial communities, but the mechanisms by which the host regulates these communities are poorly understood. Here we develop the hypothesis that hosts use differential adhesion to select for and against particular members of their microbiota. We use an established computational, individual-based model to study the impact of host factors that regulate adhesion at the epithelial surface. Our simulations predict that host-mediated adhesion can increase the competitive advantage of microbes and create ecological refugia for slow-growing species. We show how positive selection via adhesion can be transformed into negative selection if the host secretes large quantities of a matrix such as mucus. Our work predicts that adhesion is a powerful mechanism for both positive and negative selection within the microbiota. We discuss molecules-mucus glycans and IgA-that affect microbe adhesion and identify testable predictions of the adhesion-as-selection model. PMID:27053168

  1. The effects of cryosolvents on DOPC-β-sitosterol bilayers determined from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Hughes, Zak E; Malajczuk, Chris J; Mancera, Ricardo L

    2013-03-28

    Polyhydroxylated alcohols and DMSO are common cryosolvents that can damage cell membranes at sufficiently high concentrations. The interaction of representative plant cell membranes composed of mixed 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC)-β-sitosterol bilayers, at a range of compositions, with a variety of cryosolvent molecules (DMSO, propylene glycol, ethylene glycol, glycerol, and methanol) has been investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. All the cryosolvents cause the bilayers to thin and become disordered; however, DMSO and propylene glycol have a greater disordering effect on the bilayer. Propylene glycol is shown to have the ability to cause the formation of pores in pure DOPC bilayers in a manner similar to that previously shown for DMSO. As the concentration of β-sitosterol within the bilayer increases, the membranes become more resistant to the deleterious effects of the cryosolvents. All three polyhydroxylated species are observed to form hydrogen bonds to multiple phospholipid molecules, effectively acting as cross-linkers, with glycerol being the most effective cross-linker. Increases in the concentration of β-sitosterol reduce overall hydrogen bonding of the bilayer with the cryosolvents as well as cross-linking, with glycerol and ethylene glycol being the most affected. The ability of all of these cryosolvents to affect the integrity of cell membranes appears to be the result of the balance of their ability to disorder lipid bilayers, to diffuse across them, and to interact with the lipid head groups. PMID:23445456

  2. Determination of optimum rotational speed of heterogeneous catalytic reactor using computational fluid dynamic

    Rungrote Kokoo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Solid suspension in a stirrer tank reactor is relevant in many chemical process industries. For a heterogeneous catalyticreactor, the degree of solid suspension is a crucial parameter in the design and scaling-up processes. The suspension of solid catalysts at a minimum impeller speed can reduce the operating cost of processes. To ensure optimum conditions for suspension, a 3D simulation technique by Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD was used to study flow characteristics in a heterogeneous catalytic reactor. A case study of a 200 milliliter cylindrical reactor was modeled together with equipped parts, i.e. a sampling port, 2 baffles, one thermocouple and a mechanical stirrer. The results show that the total velocity increases from the impeller’s center to the impeller’s tip and decreases from the impeller’s tip to the side wall of the reactor. The vertical velocity at the bottom of the impellers directs flow upward while the velocity at the top directs flow downward. These simulations provide a good preview of solid suspension without doing experiments. It is recommended that the vertical velocity at thebottom of the reactor is in the range between minimum fluidization velocity and terminal velocity to ensure solid suspension inthe system.

  3. A Direct Comparison between Static and Dynamic Melting Temperature Determinations below 100 GPa

    SUN Yu-Huai; HUANG Hai-Jun; LIU Fu-Sheng; YANG Mei-Xia; JING Fu-Qian

    2005-01-01

    @@ A preliminary experiment of sound velocity measurements for porous iron with initial average density of 6.275 g/cm3 has been performed at pressures below 100 GPa, in order to clarify a long-standing problem that the static melting temperature Tm, mostly below 100 GPa due to its technical limitations, is notably lower than the extrapolated melting data inferred from the shock wave experiments made above 200 GPa, for the sake of making a direct comparison between the experimental static and dynamic melting temperatures in the same pressure region.With the lately proposed Hugoniot sound velocity data analysis technique [Chin. Phys. Lett. 22 (2005) 863], the results deduced from this Hugoniot sound velocity measurement is Tm = 3200 K at 87GPa and Tm = 3080 K at80 GPa, which are in good agreement with the two latest static data ofTm = 3510 K at 105 GPa and Tm = 2750 K at 58 GPa, which utilized modern improved double-side laser heating and in situ accurate x-ray diffraction techniques in experiments. It can be concluded that consensus Tm data would be obtained from static and shock wave experiments in the case that the recently improved techniques are adopted in investigations.

  4. High frequency variability of environmental drivers determining benthic community dynamics in headwater streams.

    Snell, M A; Barker, P A; Surridge, B W J; Large, A R G; Jonczyk, J; Benskin, C McW H; Reaney, S; Perks, M T; Owen, G J; Cleasby, W; Deasy, C; Burke, S; Haygarth, P M

    2014-07-01

    Headwater streams are an important feature of the landscape, with their diversity in structure and associated ecological function providing a potential natural buffer against downstream nutrient export. Phytobenthic communities, dominated in many headwaters by diatoms, must respond to physical and chemical parameters that can vary in magnitude within hours, whereas the ecological regeneration times are much longer. How diatom communities develop in the fluctuating, dynamic environments characteristic of headwaters is poorly understood. Deployment of near-continuous monitoring technology in sub-catchments of the River Eden, NW England, provides the opportunity for measurement of temporal variability in stream discharge and nutrient resource supply to benthic communities, as represented by monthly diatom samples collected over two years. Our data suggest that the diatom communities and the derived Trophic Diatom Index, best reflect stream discharge conditions over the preceding 18-21 days and Total Phosphorus concentrations over a wider antecedent window of 7-21 days. This is one of the first quantitative assessments of long-term diatom community development in response to continuously-measured stream nutrient concentration and discharge fluctuations. The data reveal the sensitivity of these headwater communities to mean conditions prior to sampling, with flow as the dominant variable. With sufficient understanding of the role of antecedent conditions, these methods can be used to inform interpretation of monitoring data, including those collected under the European Water Framework Directive and related mitigation efforts. PMID:24647601

  5. Tuning hydrophobicity and water adhesion by electrospinning and silanization.

    Pisuchpen, Thanarath; Chaim-ngoen, Navarun; Intasanta, Narupol; Supaphol, Pitt; Hoven, Voravee P

    2011-04-01

    Electrospinning and silanization were synergistically employed to fabricate poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and PVA/silica mixtures into flexible and chemically modifiable nanostructured surfaces with varying degrees of hydrophobicity and water adhesion. Surfaces possessing the greatest advancing water contact angle yet exhibiting a high level of water adhesion (θ(A)/θ(R) ≈ 168°/0°) were achieved by the reaction of PVA fiber mats with multiple cycles of SiCl(4)/H(2)O treatment, followed by silanization with (1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyl)trichlorosilane. It is postulated that the strong pinning effect and hence the water adhesion originated from the collapse of the underlying fibrous structures and the removal of air pockets. The addition of silica to the PVA matrix improved the rigidity and thus prevented the fibers from collapsing, allowing air to remain trapped within the fibrous structure and giving the surface greater water repellency. Throughout the investigation, the three wetting models--Wenzel's, Cassie-Baxter's, and the Cassie-impregnating--were regularly referred to as a conceptual framework. The hydrophobic surface that exhibited strong water adhesion, or the so-called "Petal effect", was elucidated in correlation with the fibrous structure of the film, as reviewed by microscopic analysis. In summary, electrospinning as a facile and cost-effective method provides promising opportunities for investigating the mechanistic character of nanowetting, nanoprinting, and nanocoating where the precise control of the dynamical three-phase contact line is of paramount importance. PMID:21401064

  6. Theory and simulations of adhesion receptor dimerization on membrane surfaces.

    Wu, Yinghao; Honig, Barry; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam

    2013-03-19

    The equilibrium constants of trans and cis dimerization of membrane bound (2D) and freely moving (3D) adhesion receptors are expressed and compared using elementary statistical-thermodynamics. Both processes are mediated by the binding of extracellular subdomains whose range of motion in the 2D environment is reduced upon dimerization, defining a thin reaction shell where dimer formation and dissociation take place. We show that the ratio between the 2D and 3D equilibrium constants can be expressed as a product of individual factors describing, respectively, the spatial ranges of motions of the adhesive domains, and their rotational freedom within the reaction shell. The results predicted by the theory are compared to those obtained from a novel, to our knowledge, dynamical simulations methodology, whereby pairs of receptors perform realistic translational, internal, and rotational motions in 2D and 3D. We use cadherins as our model system. The theory and simulations explain how the strength of cis and trans interactions of adhesive receptors are affected both by their presence in the constrained intermembrane space and by the 2D environment of membrane surfaces. Our work provides fundamental insights as to the mechanism of lateral clustering of adhesion receptors after cell-cell contact and, more generally, to the formation of lateral microclusters of proteins on cell surfaces. PMID:23528081

  7. Adhesion of novel high performance polymers to carbon fibers : fiber surface treatment, characterization, and microbond single fiber pull-out test

    Heisey, Cheryl L.

    1993-01-01

    The adhesion of carbon fibers to several high performance polymers, including a phosphorus-containing bismaleimide, a cyanate ester resin, and a pyridine-containing thermoplastic, was evaluated using the microbond single fiber pull-out test. The objective was to determine the chemical and mechanical properties of the fiber and the polymer which affect the fiber/polymer adhesion in a given composite system. Fiber/matrix adhesion is of interest since the degree of adhesion and th...

  8. Electrochemical Corrosion of Adhesive Joints

    Vondrák, Jiří

    Vol. 2. Brno: Akademické nakladatelství CERM, 2000 - (Vondrák, J.; Sedlaříková, M.), s. 10.1-10.2 ISBN 80-214-1615-7. [Advanced Batteries and Accumulators /1./. Brno (CZ), 28.08.2000-01.09.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : adhesive * joints * corrosion Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  9. Underwater adhesion: The barnacle way

    Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.

    surrounded by calcium carbonate (calcite). It has been suggested that the anionic groups on the matric proteins may serve as sites for nucleation during calcification [47]. The disruption in such interactions can thus bring about hindrance during... of bones, nerves and blood vessels in an aqueous environment and dental filling without the need for drilling [83]. It has been suggested that with the advances in biomimetics, future dentin adhesive monomers may contain domains derived from...

  10. A method to screen and evaluate tissue adhesives for joint repair applications

    Dehne Tilo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue adhesives are useful means for various medical procedures. Since varying requirements cause that a single adhesive cannot meet all needs, bond strength testing remains one of the key applications used to screen for new products and study the influence of experimental variables. This study was conducted to develop an easy to use method to screen and evaluate tissue adhesives for tissue engineering applications. Method Tissue grips were designed to facilitate the reproducible production of substrate tissue and adhesive strength measurements in universal testing machines. Porcine femoral condyles were used to generate osteochondral test tissue cylinders (substrates of different shapes. Viability of substrates was tested using PI/FDA staining. Self-bonding properties were determined to examine reusability of substrates (n = 3. Serial measurements (n = 5 in different operation modes (OM were performed to analyze the bonding strength of tissue adhesives in bone (OM-1 and cartilage tissue either in isolation (OM-2 or under specific requirements in joint repair such as filling cartilage defects with clinical applied fibrin/PLGA-cell-transplants (OM-3 or tissues (OM-4. The efficiency of the method was determined on the basis of adhesive properties of fibrin glue for different assembly times (30 s, 60 s. Seven randomly generated collagen formulations were analyzed to examine the potential of method to identify new tissue adhesives. Results Viability analysis of test tissue cylinders revealed vital cells (>80% in cartilage components even 48 h post preparation. Reuse (n = 10 of test substrate did not significantly change adhesive characteristics. Adhesive strength of fibrin varied in different test settings (OM-1: 7.1 kPa, OM-2: 2.6 kPa, OM-3: 32.7 kPa, OM-4: 30.1 kPa and was increasing with assembly time on average (2.4-fold. The screening of the different collagen formulations revealed a substance with significant

  11. A Dynamic Analysis of Capital Structure Determinants. Empirical Results for Romanian Capital Market

    Mihaela Dragota

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of capital structure and its determinants represents an useful approach for the Romanian and foreign investors and for the companies, at the same time. The main conclusion for capital structure analysis was that Romanian listed companies sustained their assets, in this order, on equity, commercial debt and, finally, on financial debt. The four variables used in the regression model are significant. The pecking order theory seemed to be more appropriate for the Romanian capital market, but the signalling theory was not entirely rejected.

  12. Determination of Scaling Parameter and Dynamical Resonances in Complex-Rotated Hamiltonian Ⅰ: Theory

    LI Heng-Mei; ZHAO Fang; YUAN Hong-Chun; ZHAO Mei-Shan

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a theoretical analysis on the determination of the scaling parameter in the complex-rotated Hamiltonian, which has served as a basis for successful applications of the rigged Hilbert space theory for resonances. Based on the complex energy eigenvalue, E(θ) = En(θ) - iF(θ)/2, as a function of the scaling parameter The condition dER(θR)/ dθ = 0 is merely a consequence of the Virial theorem and θⅠ = θR is not a necessary condition for a resonance state. We also provide a harmonic approximation formalism for resonances in scattering over a potential barrier.

  13. Culinary Medicine-Jalebi Adhesions.

    Kapoor, Vinay K

    2016-02-01

    Culinary terms have been used to describe anatomy (bean-shaped kidneys), pathology (strawberry gall bladder), clinical signs (café-au-lait spots), radiological images (sausage-shaped pancreas), etc. While Indian cuisine is popular all over the world, no Indian dish finds mention in medical terminology. In intra-abdominal adhesions, sometimes, the intestinal loops are so densely adherent that it is difficult to make out proximal from distal and it is impossible to separate them without injuring the bowel resulting in spill of contents-resection is the only option (Fig. 1). Jalebi, an Indian dessert, has a single long tubular strip of fried batter filled with sugary syrup so intertwined that it is impossible to discern its ends; if broken, the syrup spills out-the best way to relish it is to chew the whole piece (Fig. 2). Because of these similarities between them, I propose to name dense intra-abdominal adhesions as 'jalebi adhesions.' PMID:27186047

  14. Host genetics determine susceptibility to avian influenza infection and transmission dynamics.

    Ruiz-Hernandez, Raul; Mwangi, William; Peroval, Marylene; Sadeyen, Jean-Remy; Ascough, Stephanie; Balkissoon, Devanand; Staines, Karen; Boyd, Amy; McCauley, John; Smith, Adrian; Butter, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Host-genetic control of influenza virus infection has been the object of little attention. In this study we determined that two inbred lines of chicken differing in their genetic background , Lines 0 and C-B12, were respectively relatively resistant and susceptible to infection with the low pathogenicity influenza virus A/Turkey/England/647/77 as defined by substantial differences in viral shedding trajectories. Resistant birds, although infected, were unable to transmit virus to contact birds, as ultimately only the presence of a sustained cloacal shedding (and not oropharyngeal shedding) was critical for transmission. Restriction of within-bird transmission of virus occurred in the resistant line, with intra-nares or cloacal infection resulting in only local shedding and failing to transmit fully through the gastro-intestinal-pulmonary tract. Resistance to infection was independent of adaptive immune responses, including the expansion of specific IFNγ secreting cells or production of influenza-specific antibody. Genetic resistance to a novel H9N2 virus was less robust, though significant differences between host genotypes were still clearly evident. The existence of host-genetic determination of the outcome of influenza infection offers tools for the further dissection of this regulation and also for understanding the mechanisms of influenza transmission within and between birds. PMID:27279280

  15. Host genetics determine susceptibility to avian influenza infection and transmission dynamics

    Ruiz-Hernandez, Raul; Mwangi, William; Peroval, Marylene; Sadeyen, Jean-Remy; Ascough, Stephanie; Balkissoon, Devanand; Staines, Karen; Boyd, Amy; McCauley, John; Smith, Adrian; Butter, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Host-genetic control of influenza virus infection has been the object of little attention. In this study we determined that two inbred lines of chicken differing in their genetic background , Lines 0 and C-B12, were respectively relatively resistant and susceptible to infection with the low pathogenicity influenza virus A/Turkey/England/647/77 as defined by substantial differences in viral shedding trajectories. Resistant birds, although infected, were unable to transmit virus to contact birds, as ultimately only the presence of a sustained cloacal shedding (and not oropharyngeal shedding) was critical for transmission. Restriction of within-bird transmission of virus occurred in the resistant line, with intra-nares or cloacal infection resulting in only local shedding and failing to transmit fully through the gastro-intestinal-pulmonary tract. Resistance to infection was independent of adaptive immune responses, including the expansion of specific IFNγ secreting cells or production of influenza-specific antibody. Genetic resistance to a novel H9N2 virus was less robust, though significant differences between host genotypes were still clearly evident. The existence of host-genetic determination of the outcome of influenza infection offers tools for the further dissection of this regulation and also for understanding the mechanisms of influenza transmission within and between birds. PMID:27279280

  16. Determining leaf trajectories for dynamic multileaf collimators with consideration of marker visibility. An algorithm study

    The purpose of this study was to develop a leaf-setting algorithm for Dynamic Multileaf Collimator-Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (DMLC-IMRT) for optimal marker visibility. Here, a leaf-setting algorithm (called a Delta algorithm) was developed with the objective of maximizing marker visibility so as to improve the tracking effectiveness of fiducial markers during treatment delivery. The initial leaf trajectories were generated using a typical leaf-setting algorithm, then the leaf trajectories were adjusted by Delta algorithm operations (analytical computations and a series of matrix calculations) to achieve the optimal solution. The performance of the Delta algorithm was evaluated with six test fields (with randomly generated intensity profiles) and 15 clinical fields from IMRT plans of three prostate cancer patients. Compared with the initial solution, the Delta algorithm kept the total delivered intensities (TDIs) constant (without increasing the beam delivery time), but improved marker visibility (the percentage ratio of marker visibility time to beam delivery time). For the artificial fields (with three markers), marker visibility increased from 68.00-72.00% for a small field (5 x 5), from 38.46-43.59% for a medium field (10 x 10), and from 28.57-37.14% for a large field (20 x 20). For the 15 clinical fields, marker visibility increased 6-30% for eight fields and > 50% for two fields but did not change for five fields. A Delta algorithm was proposed to maximize marker visibility for DMLC-IMRT without increasing beam delivery time, and this will provide theoretical fundamentals for future studies of 4D DMLC tracking radiotherapy. (author)

  17. Towards the determination of Mytilus edulis food preferences using the dynamic energy budget (DEB theory.

    Coralie Picoche

    Full Text Available The blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, is a commercially important species, with production based on both fisheries and aquaculture. Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB models have been extensively applied to study its energetics but such applications require a deep understanding of its nutrition, from filtration to assimilation. Being filter feeders, mussels show multiple responses to temporal fluctuations in their food and environment, raising questions that can be investigated by modeling. To provide a better insight into mussel-environment interactions, an experiment was conducted in one of the main French growing zones (Utah Beach, Normandy. Mussel growth was monitored monthly for 18 months, with a large number of environmental descriptors measured in parallel. Food proxies such as chlorophyll a, particulate organic carbon and phytoplankton were also sampled, in addition to non-nutritious particles. High-frequency physical data recording (e.g., water temperature, immersion duration completed the habitat description. Measures revealed an increase in dry flesh mass during the first year, followed by a high mass loss, which could not be completely explained by the DEB model using raw external signals. We propose two methods that reconstruct food from shell length and dry flesh mass variations. The former depends on the inversion of the growth equation while the latter is based on iterative simulations. Assemblages of food proxies are then related to reconstructed food input, with a special focus on plankton species. A characteristic contribution is attributed to these sources to estimate nutritional values for mussels. M. edulis shows no preference between most plankton life history traits. Selection is based on the size of the ingested particles, which is modified by the volume and social behavior of plankton species. This finding reveals the importance of diet diversity and both passive and active selections, and confirms the need to adjust DEB models to

  18. Towards the determination of Mytilus edulis food preferences using the dynamic energy budget (DEB) theory.

    Picoche, Coralie; Le Gendre, Romain; Flye-Sainte-Marie, Jonathan; Françoise, Sylvaine; Maheux, Frank; Simon, Benjamin; Gangnery, Aline

    2014-01-01

    The blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, is a commercially important species, with production based on both fisheries and aquaculture. Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) models have been extensively applied to study its energetics but such applications require a deep understanding of its nutrition, from filtration to assimilation. Being filter feeders, mussels show multiple responses to temporal fluctuations in their food and environment, raising questions that can be investigated by modeling. To provide a better insight into mussel-environment interactions, an experiment was conducted in one of the main French growing zones (Utah Beach, Normandy). Mussel growth was monitored monthly for 18 months, with a large number of environmental descriptors measured in parallel. Food proxies such as chlorophyll a, particulate organic carbon and phytoplankton were also sampled, in addition to non-nutritious particles. High-frequency physical data recording (e.g., water temperature, immersion duration) completed the habitat description. Measures revealed an increase in dry flesh mass during the first year, followed by a high mass loss, which could not be completely explained by the DEB model using raw external signals. We propose two methods that reconstruct food from shell length and dry flesh mass variations. The former depends on the inversion of the growth equation while the latter is based on iterative simulations. Assemblages of food proxies are then related to reconstructed food input, with a special focus on plankton species. A characteristic contribution is attributed to these sources to estimate nutritional values for mussels. M. edulis shows no preference between most plankton life history traits. Selection is based on the size of the ingested particles, which is modified by the volume and social behavior of plankton species. This finding reveals the importance of diet diversity and both passive and active selections, and confirms the need to adjust DEB models to different

  19. A dynamic watershed model for determining the effects of transient storage on nitrogen export to rivers

    Chen, Dingjiang; Hu, Minpeng; Dahlgren, Randy A.

    2014-10-01

    Legacy anthropogenic nitrogen (N) has been suggested as a major cause for increasing riverine N exports despite significant declines in anthropogenic N inputs in many regions. However, little quantitative knowledge exists concerning the contribution of the legacy N pool to riverine N export. This study developed a dynamic watershed N delivery model to address the role of transient storage of anthropogenic N inputs on riverine N flux. Employing simple mass balance and equivalent substitution rules, the model expresses the transient storage of legacy N mass with a term that combines the previous one year's riverine total N (TN) flux, relevant explanatory variables, and unknown parameters, enabling us to inversely calibrate the model parameters from measurable variables using Bayesian statistics. The model efficacy was demonstrated through application to the Yong'an River watershed in eastern China based on a 31 year record (1980-2010) of riverine TN fluxes. The model can quantify annual transient storage of legacy N and its resulting contribution to annual riverine N flux. The model also allows partitioning of the complete long-term mass balance for the fate (e.g., transient storage, riverine export, and loss/retention by denitrification, biomass uptake and wood product export) of annual anthropogenic N inputs. To further improve the model, various N input-output processes can be specified and long-term measurements of N fates are required to further verify the model results. This study demonstrates the need to consider transient storage effects as an improvement to current watershed models and for developing and assessing N pollution control measures.

  20. A feasibility study for experimentally determining dynamic force distribution in a lap joint.

    Mayes, Randall Lee

    2013-11-01

    Developing constitutive models of the physics in mechanical joints is currently stymied by inability to measure forces and displacements within the joint. The current state of the art estimates whole joint stiffness and energy loss per cycle from external measured force input and one or two acceleration responses. To validate constitutive models beyond this state requires a measurement of the distributed forces and displacements at the joint interface. Unfortunately, introducing measurement devices at the interface completely disrupts the desired physics. A feasibility study is presented for a non-intrusive method of solving for the interface dynamic forces from an inverse problem using full field measured responses. The responses come from the viewable surface of a beam. The noise levels associated with digital image correlation and continuous scanning laser Doppler velocimetry are evaluated from typical beam experiments. Two inverse problems are simulated. One utilizes the extended Sum of Weighted Accelerations Technique (SWAT). The second is a new approach dubbed the method of truncated orthogonal forces. These methods are much more robust if the contact patch geometry is well identified. Various approaches to identifying the contact patch are investigated, including ion marker tracking, Prussian blue and ultrasonic measurements. A typical experiment is conceived for a beam which has a lap joint at one end with a single bolt connecting it to another identical beam. In a virtual test using the beam finite element analysis, it appears that the SWAT inverse method requires evaluation of too many coefficients to adequately identify the force distribution to be viable. However, the method of truncated orthogonal forces appears viable with current digital image correlation (and probably other) imaging techniques.