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Sample records for adherens junction formation

  1. Adherens junction function and regulation during zebrafish gastrulation

    Schepis, Antonino; Nelson, W. James

    2012-01-01

    The adherens junction (AJ) comprises multi-protein complexes required for cell-cell adhesion in embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis. Mutations in key proteins and mis-regulation of AJ adhesive properties can lead to pathologies such as cancer. In recent years, the zebrafish has become an excellent model organism to integrate cell biology in the context of a multicellular organization. The combination of classical genetic approaches with new tools for live imaging and biophysica...

  2. Fibroblast growth factor signaling potentiates VE-cadherin stability at adherens junctions by regulating SHP2.

    Kunihiko Hatanaka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The fibroblast growth factor (FGF system plays a critical role in the maintenance of vascular integrity via enhancing the stability of VE-cadherin at adherens junctions. However, the precise molecular mechanism is not well understood. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the detailed mechanism of FGF regulation of VE-cadherin function that leads to endothelial junction stabilization. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In vitro studies demonstrated that the loss of FGF signaling disrupts the VE-cadherin-catenin complex at adherens junctions by increasing tyrosine phosphorylation levels of VE-cadherin. Among protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs known to be involved in the maintenance of the VE-cadherin complex, suppression of FGF signaling reduces SHP2 expression levels and SHP2/VE-cadherin interaction due to accelerated SHP2 protein degradation. Increased endothelial permeability caused by FGF signaling inhibition was rescued by SHP2 overexpression, indicating the critical role of SHP2 in the maintenance of endothelial junction integrity. CONCLUSIONS: These results identify FGF-dependent maintenance of SHP2 as an important new mechanism controlling the extent of VE-cadherin tyrosine phosphorylation, thereby regulating its presence in adherens junctions and endothelial permeability.

  3. PLEKHA7 Recruits PDZD11 to Adherens Junctions to Stabilize Nectins.

    Guerrera, Diego; Shah, Jimit; Vasileva, Ekaterina; Sluysmans, Sophie; Méan, Isabelle; Jond, Lionel; Poser, Ina; Mann, Matthias; Hyman, Anthony A; Citi, Sandra

    2016-05-20

    PLEKHA7 is a junctional protein implicated in stabilization of the cadherin protein complex, hypertension, cardiac contractility, glaucoma, microRNA processing, and susceptibility to bacterial toxins. To gain insight into the molecular basis for the functions of PLEKHA7, we looked for new PLEKHA7 interactors. Here, we report the identification of PDZ domain-containing protein 11 (PDZD11) as a new interactor of PLEKHA7 by yeast two-hybrid screening and by mass spectrometry analysis of PLEKHA7 immunoprecipitates. We show that PDZD11 (17 kDa) is expressed in epithelial and endothelial cells, where it forms a complex with PLEKHA7, as determined by co-immunoprecipitation analysis. The N-terminal Trp-Trp (WW) domain of PLEKHA7 interacts directly with the N-terminal 44 amino acids of PDZD11, as shown by GST-pulldown assays. Immunofluorescence analysis shows that PDZD11 is localized at adherens junctions in a PLEKHA7-dependent manner, because its junctional localization is abolished by knock-out of PLEKHA7, and is rescued by re-expression of exogenous PLEKHA7. The junctional recruitment of nectin-1 and nectin-3 and their protein levels are decreased via proteasome-mediated degradation in epithelial cells where either PDZD11 or PLEKHA7 have been knocked-out. PDZD11 forms a complex with nectin-1 and nectin-3, and its PDZ domain interacts directly with the PDZ-binding motif of nectin-1. PDZD11 is required for the efficient assembly of apical junctions of epithelial cells at early time points in the calcium-switch model. These results show that the PLEKHA7-PDZD11 complex stabilizes nectins to promote efficient early junction assembly and uncover a new molecular mechanism through which PLEKHA7 recruits PDZ-binding membrane proteins to epithelial adherens junctions. PMID:27044745

  4. Carcinoembryonic antigen promotes colorectal cancer progression by targeting adherens junction complexes

    Bajenova, Olga, E-mail: o.bazhenova@spbu.ru [Theodosius Dobzhansky Center for Genome Bioinformatics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Department of Genetics and Biotechnology, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Chaika, Nina [Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Tolkunova, Elena; Davydov-Sinitsyn, Alexander [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194064 (Russian Federation); Gapon, Svetlana [Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Thomas, Peter [Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); O’Brien, Stephen [Theodosius Dobzhansky Center for Genome Bioinformatics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation)

    2014-06-10

    Oncomarkers play important roles in the detection and management of human malignancies. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM5) and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) are considered as independent tumor markers in monitoring metastatic colorectal cancer. They are both expressed by cancer cells and can be detected in the blood serum. We investigated the effect of CEA production by MIP101 colorectal carcinoma cell lines on E-cadherin adherens junction (AJ) protein complexes. No direct interaction between E-cadherin and CEA was detected; however, the functional relationships between E-cadherin and its AJ partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins were impaired. We discovered a novel interaction between CEA and beta-catenin protein in the CEA producing cells. It is shown in the current study that CEA overexpression alters the splicing of p120 catenin and triggers the release of soluble E-cadherin. The influence of CEA production by colorectal cancer cells on the function of E-cadherin junction complexes may explain the link between the elevated levels of CEA and the increase in soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. - Highlights: • Elevated level of CEA increases the release of soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. • CEA over-expression alters the binding preferences between E-cadherin and its partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins in adherens junction complexes. • CEA produced by colorectal cancer cells interacts with beta-catenin protein. • CEA over-expression triggers the increase in nuclear beta-catenin. • CEA over-expression alters the splicing of p120 catenin protein.

  5. Carcinoembryonic antigen promotes colorectal cancer progression by targeting adherens junction complexes

    Oncomarkers play important roles in the detection and management of human malignancies. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM5) and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) are considered as independent tumor markers in monitoring metastatic colorectal cancer. They are both expressed by cancer cells and can be detected in the blood serum. We investigated the effect of CEA production by MIP101 colorectal carcinoma cell lines on E-cadherin adherens junction (AJ) protein complexes. No direct interaction between E-cadherin and CEA was detected; however, the functional relationships between E-cadherin and its AJ partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins were impaired. We discovered a novel interaction between CEA and beta-catenin protein in the CEA producing cells. It is shown in the current study that CEA overexpression alters the splicing of p120 catenin and triggers the release of soluble E-cadherin. The influence of CEA production by colorectal cancer cells on the function of E-cadherin junction complexes may explain the link between the elevated levels of CEA and the increase in soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. - Highlights: • Elevated level of CEA increases the release of soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. • CEA over-expression alters the binding preferences between E-cadherin and its partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins in adherens junction complexes. • CEA produced by colorectal cancer cells interacts with beta-catenin protein. • CEA over-expression triggers the increase in nuclear beta-catenin. • CEA over-expression alters the splicing of p120 catenin protein

  6. Mammary epithelial cell phagocytosis downstream of TGF-β3 is characterized by adherens junction reorganization.

    Fornetti, J; Flanders, K C; Henson, P M; Tan, A-C; Borges, V F; Schedin, P

    2016-02-01

    After weaning, during mammary gland involution, milk-producing mammary epithelial cells undergo apoptosis. Effective clearance of these dying cells is essential, as persistent apoptotic cells have a negative impact on gland homeostasis, future lactation and cancer susceptibility. In mice, apoptotic cells are cleared by the neighboring epithelium, yet little is known about how mammary epithelial cells become phagocytic or whether this function is conserved between species. Here we use a rat model of weaning-induced involution and involuting breast tissue from women, to demonstrate apoptotic cells within luminal epithelial cells and epithelial expression of the scavenger mannose receptor, suggesting conservation of phagocytosis by epithelial cells. In the rat, epithelial transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling is increased during involution, a pathway known to promote phagocytic capability. To test whether TGF-β enhances the phagocytic ability of mammary epithelial cells, non-transformed murine mammary epithelial EpH4 cells were cultured to achieve tight junction impermeability, such as occurs during lactation. TGF-β3 treatment promoted loss of tight junction impermeability, reorganization and cleavage of the adherens junction protein E-cadherin (E-cad), and phagocytosis. Phagocytosis correlated with junction disruption, suggesting junction reorganization is necessary for phagocytosis by epithelial cells. Supporting this hypothesis, epithelial cell E-cad reorganization and cleavage were observed in rat and human involuting mammary glands. Further, in the rat, E-cad cleavage correlated with increased γ-secretase activity and β-catenin nuclear localization. In vitro, pharmacologic inhibitors of γ-secretase or β-catenin reduced the effect of TGF-β3 on phagocytosis to near baseline levels. However, β-catenin signaling through LiCl treatment did not enhance phagocytic capacity, suggesting a model in which both reorganization of cell junctions and

  7. HIV-associated disruption of tight and adherens junctions of oral epithelial cells facilitates HSV-1 infection and spread.

    Irna Sufiawati

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus (HSV types 1 and 2 are the most common opportunistic infections in HIV/AIDS. In these immunocompromised individuals, HSV-1 reactivates and replicates in oral epithelium, leading to oral disorders such as ulcers, gingivitis, and necrotic lesions. Although the increased risk of HSV infection may be mediated in part by HIV-induced immune dysfunction, direct or indirect interactions of HIV and HSV at the molecular level may also play a role. In this report we show that prolonged interaction of the HIV proteins tat and gp120 and cell-free HIV virions with polarized oral epithelial cells leads to disruption of tight and adherens junctions of epithelial cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. HIV-induced disruption of oral epithelial junctions facilitates HSV-1 paracellular spread between the epithelial cells. Furthermore, HIV-associated disruption of adherens junctions exposes sequestered nectin-1, an adhesion protein and critical receptor for HSV envelope glycoprotein D (gD. Exposure of nectin-1 facilitates binding of HSV-1 gD, which substantially increases HSV-1 infection of epithelial cells with disrupted junctions over that of cells with intact junctions. Exposed nectin-1 from disrupted adherens junctions also increases the cell-to-cell spread of HSV-1 from infected to uninfected oral epithelial cells. Antibodies to nectin-1 and HSV-1 gD substantially reduce HSV-1 infection and cell-to-cell spread, indicating that HIV-promoted HSV infection and spread are mediated by the interaction of HSV gD with HIV-exposed nectin-1. Our data suggest that HIV-associated disruption of oral epithelial junctions may potentiate HSV-1 infection and its paracellular and cell-to-cell spread within the oral mucosal epithelium. This could be one of the possible mechanisms of rapid development of HSV-associated oral lesions in HIV-infected individuals.

  8. Adherens junction distribution mechanisms during cell-cell contact elongation in Drosophila.

    Gabrielle Goldenberg

    Full Text Available During Drosophila gastrulation, amnioserosa (AS cells flatten and spread as an epithelial sheet. We used AS morphogenesis as a model to investigate how adherens junctions (AJs distribute along elongating cell-cell contacts in vivo. As the contacts elongated, total AJ protein levels increased along their length. However, genetically blocking this AJ addition indicated that it was not essential for maintaining AJ continuity. Implicating other remodeling mechanisms, AJ photobleaching revealed non-directional lateral mobility of AJs along the elongating contacts, as well as local AJ removal from the membranes. Actin stabilization with jasplakinolide reduced AJ redistribution, and live imaging of myosin II along elongating contacts revealed fragmented, expanding and contracting actomyosin networks, suggesting a mechanism for lateral AJ mobility. Actin stabilization also increased total AJ levels, suggesting an inhibition of AJ removal. Implicating AJ removal by endocytosis, clathrin endocytic machinery accumulated at AJs. However, dynamin disruption had no apparent effect on AJs, suggesting the involvement of redundant or dynamin-independent mechanisms. Overall, we propose that new synthesis, lateral diffusion, and endocytosis play overlapping roles to populate elongating cell-cell contacts with evenly distributed AJs in this in vivo system.

  9. The asymmetric self-assembly mechanism of adherens junctions: a cellular push–pull unit

    To form adherens junctions (AJ), cells first establish contact by sending out lamellipodia onto neighboring cells. We investigated the role of contacting cells in AJ assembly by studying an asymmetric AJ motif: finger-like AJ extending across the cell–cell interface. Using a cytoskeleton replica and immunofluorescence, we observed that actin bundles embedded in the lamellipodia are co-localized with stress fibers in the neighboring cell at the AJ. This suggests that donor lamellipodia present actin fingers, which are stabilized by acceptor lamellae via acto-myosin contractility. Indeed, we show that changes in actin network geometry promoted by Rac overexpression lead to corresponding changes in AJ morphology. Moreover, contractility inhibition and enhancement (via drugs or local traction) lead respectively to the disappearance and further growth of AJ fingers. Thus, we propose that receiving lamellae exert a local pull on AJ, promoting further polymerization of the donor actin bundles. In spite of different compositions, AJ and focal contacts both act as cellular mechanosensors

  10. Curcumin prevents cisplatin-induced decrease in the tight and adherens junctions: relation to oxidative stress.

    Trujillo, Joyce; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Medina-Campos, Omar Noel; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rafael; Reyes, José Luis; Loredo, María L; Barrera-Oviedo, Diana; Pinzón, Enrique; Rodríguez-Rangel, Daniela Saraí; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2016-01-20

    Curcumin is a polyphenol and cisplatin is an antineoplastic agent that induces nephrotoxicity associated with oxidative stress, apoptosis, fibrosis and decrease in renal tight junction (TJ) proteins. The potential effect of curcumin against alterations in TJ structure and function has not been evaluated in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. The present study explored whether curcumin is able to prevent the cisplatin-induced fibrosis and decreased expression of the TJ and adherens junction (AJ) proteins occludin, claudin-2 and E-cadherin in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Curcumin (200 mg kg(-1)) was administered in three doses, and rats were sacrificed 72 h after cisplatin administration. Curcumin was able to scavenge, in a concentration-dependent way, superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical, peroxyl radical, singlet oxygen, peroxynitrite anion, hypochlorous acid and hydrogen peroxide. Cisplatin-induced renal damage was associated with alterations in plasma creatinine, expression of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and of kidney injury molecule-1, histological damage, increase in apoptosis, fibrosis (evaluated by transforming growth factor β1, collagen I and IV and α-smooth muscle actin expressions), increase in oxidative/nitrosative stress (evaluated by Hsp70/72 expression, protein tyrosine nitration, superoxide anion production in isolated glomeruli and proximal tubules, and protein levels of NADPH oxidase subunits p47(phox) and gp91(phox), protein kinase C β2, and Nrf2) as well as by decreased expression of occludin, claudin-2, β-catenin and E-cadherin. Curcumin treatment prevented all the above-described alterations. The protective effect of curcumin against cisplatin-induced fibrosis and decreased proteins of the TJ and AJ was associated with the prevention of glomerular and proximal tubular superoxide anion production induced by NADPH oxidase activity. PMID:26467482

  11. Negative pressure induces p120-catenin-dependent adherens junction disassembly in keratinocytes during wound healing.

    Huang, Ching-Hui; Hsu, Chih-Chin; Chen, Carl Pai-Chu; Chow, Shu-Er; Wang, Jong-Shyan; Shyu, Yu-Chiau; Lu, Mu-Jie

    2016-09-01

    A negative-pressure of 125mmHg (NP) has been widely used to treat chronic wounds in modern medicine. Keratinocytes under NP treatment have shown accelerated cell movement and decreased E-cadherin expression. However, the molecular mechanism of E-cadherin regulation under NP remains incompletely understood. Therefore, we investigated the E-cadherin regulation in keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) under NP. HaCaT cells were treated at ambient pressure (AP) and NP for 12h. Cell movement was measured by traditional and electric wound healing assays at the 2 different pressures. Mutants with overexpression of p120-catenin (p120(ctn)) were used to observe the effect of NP on p120(ctn) and E-cadherin expression during wound healing. Cell fractionation and immunoblotting data showed that NP increased Y228-phosphorylated p120(ctn) level and resulted in the translocation of p120(ctn) from the plasma membrane to cytoplasm. Immunofluorescence images revealed that NP decreased the co-localization of p120(ctn) and E-cadherin on the plasma membrane. Knockdown of p120(ctn) reduced E-cadherin expression and accelerated cell movement under AP. Overexpression of the Y228-phosphorylation-mimic p120(ctn) decreased E-cadherin membrane expression under both AP and NP. Phosphorylation-deficient mutants conferred restored adherens junctions (AJs) under NP. The Src inhibitor blocked the phosphorylation of p120(ctn) and impeded cell migration under NP. In conclusion, Src-dependent phosphorylation of p120(ctn) can respond rapidly to NP and contribute to E-cadherin downregulation. The NP-induced disassembly of the AJ further accelerates wound healing. PMID:27220534

  12. The F-BAR protein pacsin2 inhibits asymmetric VE-cadherin internalization from tensile adherens junctions.

    Dorland, Yvonne L; Malinova, Tsveta S; van Stalborch, Anne-Marieke D; Grieve, Adam G; van Geemen, Daphne; Jansen, Nicolette S; de Kreuk, Bart-Jan; Nawaz, Kalim; Kole, Jeroen; Geerts, Dirk; Musters, René J P; de Rooij, Johan; Hordijk, Peter L; Huveneers, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Vascular homoeostasis, development and disease critically depend on the regulation of endothelial cell-cell junctions. Here we uncover a new role for the F-BAR protein pacsin2 in the control of VE-cadherin-based endothelial adhesion. Pacsin2 concentrates at focal adherens junctions (FAJs) that are experiencing unbalanced actomyosin-based pulling. FAJs move in response to differences in local cytoskeletal geometry and pacsin2 is recruited consistently to the trailing end of fast-moving FAJs via a mechanism that requires an intact F-BAR domain. Photoconversion, photobleaching, immunofluorescence and super-resolution microscopy reveal polarized dynamics, and organization of junctional proteins between the front of FAJs and their trailing ends. Interestingly, pacsin2 recruitment inhibits internalization of the VE-cadherin complex from FAJ trailing ends and is important for endothelial monolayer integrity. Together, these findings reveal a novel junction protective mechanism during polarized trafficking of VE-cadherin, which supports barrier maintenance within dynamic endothelial tissue. PMID:27417273

  13. Microtubule plus-end and minus-end capture at adherens junctions is involved in the assembly of apico-basal arrays in polarised epithelial cells.

    Bellett, Gemma; Carter, Jane M; Keynton, Jennifer; Goldspink, Deborah; James, Colin; Moss, David K; Mogensen, Mette M

    2009-10-01

    Apico-basal polarisation of epithelial cells involves a dramatic reorganisation of the microtubule cytoskeleton. The classic radial array of microtubules focused on a centrally located centrosome typical of many animal cells is lost or greatly reduced and a non-centrosomal apico-basal array develops. The molecules and mechanisms responsible for the assembly and positioning of these non-centrosomal microtubules have not been fully elucidated. Using a Nocodazole induced regrowth assay in invitro culture (MDCK) and in situ epithelial (cochlear Kolliker's) cell models we establish that the apico-basal array originates from the centrosome and that the non-centrosomal microtubule minus-end anchoring sites do not contribute significantly to their nucleation. Confocal and electron microscopy revealed that an extended radial array assembles with microtubule plus-ends targeting cadheren sites at adherens junctions and EB1 and CLIP-170 co-localising with beta-catenin and dynein clusters at the junction sites. The extended radial array is likely to be a vital intermediate step in the assembly process with cortical anchored dynein providing the mechanical force required for microtubule release, translocation and capture. Ultrastructural analyses of the apico-basal arrays in fully polarised MDCK and Kolliker's cells revealed microtubule minus-end association with the most apical adherens junction (Zonula adherens). We propose that a release and capture model involving both microtubule plus- and minus-end capture at adherens junctions is responsible for the generation of non-centrosomal apico-basal arrays in most centrosome containing polarised epithelial cells. PMID:19479825

  14. Striatins as plaque molecules of zonulae adhaerentes in simple epithelia, of tessellate junctions in stratified epithelia, of cardiac composite junctions and of various size classes of lateral adherens junctions in cultures of epithelia- and carcinoma-derived cells.

    Franke, Werner W; Rickelt, Steffen; Zimbelmann, Ralf; Dörflinger, Yvette; Kuhn, Caecilia; Frey, Norbert; Heid, Hans; Rosin-Arbesfeld, Rina

    2015-03-01

    Proteins of the striatin family (striatins 1-4; sizes ranging from 90 to 110 kDa on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) are highly homologous in their amino acid sequences but can differ in their cell-type-specific gene expression patterns and biological functions. In various cell types, we have found one, two or three polypeptides of this evolutionarily old and nearly ubiquitous family of proteins known to serve as scaffold proteins for diverse protein complexes. Light and electron microscopic immunolocalization methods have revealed striatins in mammalian cell-cell adherens junctions (AJs). In simple epithelia, we have localized striatins as constitutive components of the plaques of the subapical zonulae adhaerentes of cells, including intestinal, glandular, ductal and urothelial cells and hepatocytes. Striatins colocalize with E-cadherin or E-N-cadherin heterodimers and with the plaque proteins α- and β-catenin, p120 and p0071. In some epithelia and carcinomas and in cultured cells derived therefrom, striatins are also seen in lateral AJs. In stratified epithelia and in corresponding squamous cell carcinomas, striatins can be found in plaques of some forms of tessellate junctions. Moreover, striatins are major plaque proteins of composite junctions (CJs; areae compositae) in the intercalated disks connecting cardiomyocytes, colocalizing with other CJ molecules, including plectin and ankyrin-G. We discuss the "multimodulator" scaffold roles of striatins in the initiation and regulation of the formation of various complex particles and structures. We propose that striatins are included in the diagnostic candidate list of proteins that, in the CJs of human hearts, can occur in mutated forms in the pathogeneses of hereditary cardiomyopathies, as seen in some types of genetically determined heart damage in boxer dogs. PMID:25501894

  15. Genetic deletion of afadin causes hydrocephalus by destruction of adherens junctions in radial glial and ependymal cells in the midbrain.

    Hideaki Yamamoto

    Full Text Available Adherens junctions (AJs play a role in mechanically connecting adjacent cells to maintain tissue structure, particularly in epithelial cells. The major cell-cell adhesion molecules at AJs are cadherins and nectins. Afadin binds to both nectins and α-catenin and recruits the cadherin-β-catenin complex to the nectin-based cell-cell adhesion site to form AJs. To explore the role of afadin in radial glial and ependymal cells in the brain, we generated mice carrying a nestin-Cre-mediated conditional knockout (cKO of the afadin gene. Newborn afadin-cKO mice developed hydrocephalus and died neonatally. The afadin-cKO brain displayed enlarged lateral ventricles and cerebral aqueduct, resulting from stenosis of the caudal end of the cerebral aqueduct and obliteration of the ventral part of the third ventricle. Afadin deficiency further caused the loss of ependymal cells from the ventricular and aqueductal surfaces. During development, radial glial cells, which terminally differentiate into ependymal cells, scattered from the ventricular zone and were replaced by neurons that eventually covered the ventricular and aqueductal surfaces of the afadin-cKO midbrain. Moreover, the denuded ependymal cells were only occasionally observed in the third ventricle and the cerebral aqueduct of the afadin-cKO midbrain. Afadin was co-localized with nectin-1 and N-cadherin at AJs of radial glial and ependymal cells in the control midbrain, but these proteins were not concentrated at AJs in the afadin-cKO midbrain. Thus, the defects in the afadin-cKO midbrain most likely resulted from the destruction of AJs, because AJs in the midbrain were already established before afadin was genetically deleted. These results indicate that afadin is essential for the maintenance of AJs in radial glial and ependymal cells in the midbrain and is required for normal morphogenesis of the cerebral aqueduct and ventral third ventricle in the midbrain.

  16. Downregulation of blood-brain barrier phenotype by proinflammatory cytokines involves NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS generation: consequences for interendothelial adherens and tight junctions.

    Keith D Rochfort

    Full Text Available Blood-brain barrier (BBB dysfunction is an integral feature of neurological disorders and involves the action of multiple proinflammatory cytokines on the microvascular endothelial cells lining cerebral capillaries. There is still however, considerable ambiguity throughout the scientific literature regarding the mechanistic role(s of cytokines in this context, thereby warranting a comprehensive in vitro investigation into how different cytokines may cause dysregulation of adherens and tight junctions leading to BBB permeabilization.The present study employs human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMvECs to compare/contrast the effects of TNF-α and IL-6 on BBB characteristics ranging from the expression of interendothelial junction proteins (VE-cadherin, occludin and claudin-5 to endothelial monolayer permeability. The contribution of cytokine-induced NADPH oxidase activation to altered barrier phenotype was also investigated.In response to treatment with either TNF-α or IL-6 (0-100 ng/ml, 0-24 hrs, our studies consistently demonstrated significant dose- and time-dependent decreases in the expression of all interendothelial junction proteins examined, in parallel with dose- and time-dependent increases in ROS generation and HBMvEC permeability. Increased expression and co-association of gp91 and p47, pivotal NADPH oxidase subunits, was also observed in response to either cytokine. Finally, cytokine-dependent effects on junctional protein expression, ROS generation and endothelial permeability could all be attenuated to a comparable extent using a range of antioxidant strategies, which included ROS depleting agents (superoxide dismutase, catalase, N-acetylcysteine, apocynin and targeted NADPH oxidase blockade (gp91 and p47 siRNA, NSC23766.A timely and wide-ranging investigation comparing the permeabilizing actions of TNF-α and IL-6 in HBMvECs is presented, in which we demonstrate how either cytokine can similarly downregulate the

  17. Defect formation in long Josephson junctions

    Gordeeva, Anna; Pankratov, Andrey

    2010-01-01

    We study numerically a mechanism of vortex formation in a long Josephson junction within the framework of the one-dimensional sine-Gordon model. This mechanism is switched on below the critical temperature. It is shown that the number of fluxons versus velocity of cooling roughly scales according...

  18. Protective role of p120-catenin in maintaining the integrity of adherens and tight junctions in ventilator-induced lung injury

    Gu, Changping; LIU, MENGJIE; Zhao, Tao; Wang, Dong; Wang, Yuelan

    2015-01-01

    Background Ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) is one of the most common complications for patients with acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Although p120 is an important protein in the regulation of cell junctions, further mechanisms should be explored for prevention and treatment of VILI. Methods Mouse lung epithelial cells (MLE-12), which were transfected with p120 small interfering (si)RNA, p120 cDNA, wild-type E-cadherin juxtamembrane domain or a K83R...

  19. Tight junction protein ZO-2 expression and relative function of ZO-1 and ZO-2 during mouse blastocyst formation

    Apicolateral tight junctions (TJs) between epithelial cells are multiprotein complexes regulating membrane polarity and paracellular transport and also contribute to signalling pathways affecting cell proliferation and gene expression. ZO-2 and other ZO family members form a sub-membranous scaffold for binding TJ constituents. We investigated ZO-2 contribution to TJ biogenesis and function during trophectoderm epithelium differentiation in mouse preimplantation embryos. Our data indicate that ZO-2 is expressed from maternal and embryonic genomes with maternal ZO-2 protein associated with nuclei in zygotes and particularly early cleavage stages. Embryonic ZO-2 assembled at outer blastomere apicolateral junctional sites from the late 16-cell stage. Junctional ZO-2 first co-localised with E-cadherin in a transient complex comprising adherens junction and TJ constituents before segregating to TJs after their separation from the blastocyst stage (32-cell onwards). ZO-2 siRNA microinjection into zygotes or 2-cell embryos resulted in specific knockdown of ZO-2 mRNA and protein within blastocysts. Embryos lacking ZO-2 protein at trophectoderm TJs exhibited delayed blastocoel cavity formation but underwent normal cell proliferation and outgrowth morphogenesis. Quantitative analysis of trophectoderm TJs in ZO-2-deficient embryos revealed increased assembly of ZO-1 but not occludin, indicating ZO protein redundancy as a compensatory mechanism contributing to the mild phenotype observed. In contrast, ZO-1 knockdown, or combined ZO-1 and ZO-2 knockdown, generated a more severe inhibition of blastocoel formation indicating distinct roles for ZO proteins in blastocyst morphogenesis

  20. Linker-dependent Junction Formation Probability in Single-Molecule Junctions

    Yoo, Pil Sun; Kim, Taekyeong [HankukUniversity of Foreign Studies, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    We compare the junction formation probabilities of single-molecule junctions with different linker molecules by using a scanning tunneling microscope-based break-junction technique. We found that the junction formation probability varies as SH > SMe > NH2 for the benzene backbone molecule with different types of anchoring groups, through quantitative statistical analysis. These results are attributed to different bonding forces according to the linker groups formed with Au atoms in the electrodes, which is consistent with previous works. Our work allows a better understanding of the contact chemistry in the metal.molecule junction for future molecular electronic devices.

  1. Model building to facilitate understanding of holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and holliday junction resolution.

    Selvarajah, Geeta; Selvarajah, Susila

    2016-07-01

    Students frequently expressed difficulty in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in chromosomal recombination. Therefore, we explored alternative methods for presenting the two concepts of the double-strand break model: Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. In addition to a lecture and computer-animated video, we included a model building activity using pipe cleaners. Biotechnology undergraduates (n = 108) used the model to simulate Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. Based on student perception, an average of 12.85 and 78.35% students claimed that they completely and partially understood the two concepts, respectively. A test conducted to ascertain their understanding about the two concepts showed that 66.1% of the students provided the correct response to the three multiple choice questions. A majority of the 108 students attributed the inclusion of model building to their better understanding of Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. This underlines the importance of incorporating model building, particularly in concepts that require spatial visualization. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):381-390, 2016. PMID:26899144

  2. Get Ready to Wnt: Prepatterning in Neuromuscular Junction Formation

    Zhang, Bin; Xiong, Wen C.; Mei, Lin

    2009-01-01

    Clustering of acetylcholine receptors (AChR) in muscle fibers prior to innervation by motor neurons is thought to be involved in neuromuscular junction formation. Jing et al. now report in Neuron that this prepatterning of AChRs, via a novel MuSK-dependent Wnt pathway, may guide motor axons to the central region of muscle fibers for synapse formation in zebrafish.

  3. Radiation effects on adherens contacts in cultured Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells

    The cell contacts (junctions) are considered to be sensitive and important targets of ionizing radiation. In this work, the effect of X-irradiation was studied on the localization and relative quantity of two structural proteins of adherent junction, i.e. cadherins and b-catenin, in cultured Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells by immunohistochemical and Western blotting procedures. Irradiation was found to induce the rapid redistribution and quantitative loss in these proteins resulting in their separation from the adherens junction sites. As a consequence, the structure and functionality of adherent junctions are also suggested to be affected by ionizing radiation in MDCK cells. Since morphological alteration of cell contact sites is also leading to temporary or permanent disturbances in adherens junction related functions (i.e. paracellular permeability), cell junctions might really be regarded as primary biomembrane target areas for radiation effects. The radiation-induced loss of b-catenin is probably related to the altered Wnt-signaling, too. (author)

  4. Large-Scale Atomistic Simulations of Environmental Effects on the Formation and Properties of Molecular Junctions

    French, William R.; Iacovella, Christopher R.; Cummings, Peter T.

    2012-01-01

    Using an updated simulation tool, we examine molecular junctions comprised of benzene-1,4-dithiolate bonded between gold nanotips, focusing on the importance of environmental factors and inter-electrode distance on the formation and structure of bridged molecules. We investigate the complex relationship between monolayer density and tip separation, finding that the formation of multi-molecule junctions is favored at low monolayer density, while single-molecule junctions are favored at high de...

  5. [Molecular mechanisms underlying the formation of neuromuscular junction].

    Higuchi, Osamu; Yamanashi, Yuji

    2011-07-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is a synapse between a motor neuron and skeletal muscle. The contraction of skeletal muscle is controlled by the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh), which is released from the motor nerve terminal. To achieve efficient neuromuscular transmission, acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) must be densely clustered on the muscle membrane of the NMJ. Failure of AChR clustering is associated with disorders of neuromuscular transmission such as congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) and myasthenia gravis (MG). Motoneuronal agrin and muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK) are known to play essential roles in the formation and maintenance of NMJs in the central region of each muscle. However, it had been unclear how agrin activates MuSK. Recent studies have elucidated the roles of several key molecules, including the cytoplasmic adaptor protein Dok-7 and LDL receptor-related protein 4 (Lrp4), in agrin-induced MuSK activation. Moreover, new evidence indicates that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) regulates postsynaptic differentiation. In this review, we summarize the latest developments in molecular mechanisms underlying NMJ formation in vertebrates. PMID:21747134

  6. Formation and stability of ridge-ridge-ridge triple junctions in rheologically realistic lithosphere model

    Gerya, Taras; Burov, Evgueni

    2015-04-01

    Triple junctions are probably the most remarkable features of plate boundaries since their presence constitutes one of the major demonstrations of plate tectonics theory. Divergent (R-R-R) triple junctions (at 120° and T junctions) are particular ones since their stability depends on the exact values of the relative velocities of plate divergence and hence is strongly affected by plate rheology and processes of crustal accretion. The mechanisms of their formation and long-term steadiness are not well understood even though it is commonly accepted, generally based on common sense, that the geometry and stability of triple junctions should be related to the intuitively acceptable geometric considerations that 3-branch configurations should be "stable" over the time on a 3D Earth surface. That said, most plate boundaries are in fact 2D in terms that they involve only two plates, while junctions with 3 and more branches, if even mechanically not excluded, are generally short-lived and hence rarely observed at tectonic scale. Indeed, it has been long-time suggested that triple junctions result from evolution of short-lived quadruple junctions, yet, without providing a consistent mechanical explanation or experimental demonstration of this process, due to the rheological complexity of the lithosphere and that of strain localization and crustal accretion processes. For example, it is supposed that R-R-R junctions form as result of axisymmetric mantle upwellings. However, impingement of buoyant fluid on a non-pre-stressed lithosphere should result in multiple radial cracks, as is well known from previous analog and numerical experiments. In case of uni-directionally pre-stressed lithosphere, it has also shown that linear 2D rift structures should be formed. Therefore, a complete 3D thermos-mechanically consistent approach is needed to understand the processes of formation of multi-branch junctions. With this goal we here reproduce and study the processes of multi

  7. The cell adhesion molecule nectin-1 is critical for normal enamel formation in mice

    Barron, Martin J.; Brookes, Steven J.; Draper, Clare E.; Garrod, David; Kirkham, Jennifer; Shore, Roger C.; Dixon, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Nectin-1 is a member of a sub-family of immunoglobulin-like adhesion molecules and a component of adherens junctions. In the current study, we have shown that mice lacking nectin-1 exhibit defective enamel formation in their incisor teeth. Although the incisors of nectin-1-null mice were hypomineralized, the protein composition of the enamel matrix was unaltered. While strong immunostaining for nectin-1 was observed at the interface between the maturation-stage ameloblasts and the underlying ...

  8. E-cadherin junction formation involves an active kinetic nucleation process.

    Biswas, Kabir H; Hartman, Kevin L; Yu, Cheng-han; Harrison, Oliver J; Song, Hang; Smith, Adam W; Huang, William Y C; Lin, Wan-Chen; Guo, Zhenhuan; Padmanabhan, Anup; Troyanovsky, Sergey M; Dustin, Michael L; Shapiro, Lawrence; Honig, Barry; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Groves, Jay T

    2015-09-01

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions play important roles in the development and maintenance of tissue structure in multicellular organisms. E-cadherin adhesion is thus a key element of the cellular microenvironment that provides both mechanical and biochemical signaling inputs. Here, we report in vitro reconstitution of junction-like structures between native E-cadherin in living cells and the extracellular domain of E-cadherin (E-cad-ECD) in a supported membrane. Junction formation in this hybrid live cell-supported membrane configuration requires both active processes within the living cell and a supported membrane with low E-cad-ECD mobility. The hybrid junctions recruit α-catenin and exhibit remodeled cortical actin. Observations suggest that the initial stages of junction formation in this hybrid system depend on the trans but not the cis interactions between E-cadherin molecules, and proceed via a nucleation process in which protrusion and retraction of filopodia play a key role. PMID:26290581

  9. Formation of Silicon Carbide Y Junctions by the Coalescence of Catalysts

    Liu, Zhenyu; Yang, Judith C.; Srot, V.; van Aken, Peter A.; Rühle, M.

    2009-03-01

    We previously reported the formation of crystalline SiC nanocones by the released iron catalytic procedure, where the initially carbon- encapsulated iron nanoparticles escape from their carbon shells and agglomerate while catalyzing 1D SiC growth. Here we show that the coalescence of the iron nanoparticles can lead to Y junctions. Y junctions where the SiC branches are either parallel or inclined with respect to each other have been observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The microstructure of the resulting products is analyzed by various techniques, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) as well as electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The Y junction with two parallel branches of various diameters suggests that the Y junction can be induced by the growth kinetics attributed to the diameter dependence, such as by the Gibbs-Thomson or surface tension effect. The proposed formation mechanism of Y junctions by the coalescence of catalyst droplets is a promising method to the construction of heterostructure nanowire devices.

  10. Saltatory formation, sliding and dissolution of ER–PM junctions in migrating cancer cells

    Dingsdale, Hayley; Okeke, Emmanuel; Awais, Muhammad; Haynes, Lee; Criddle, David N.; Sutton, Robert; Tepikin, Alexei V.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrated three novel forms of dynamic behaviour of junctions between the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) and the PM (plasma membrane) in migrating cancer cells: saltatory formation, long-distance sliding and dissolution. The individual ER–PM junctions formed near the leading edge of migrating cells (usually within 0.5 μm of polymerized actin and close to focal adhesions) and appeared suddenly without sliding from the interior of the cell. The long distance sliding and dissolution of ER–PM j...

  11. Rapid thermal annealing of spin-coated phosphoric acid films for shallow junction formation

    Sivoththaman, S.; Laureys, W.; Nijs, J.; Mertens, R.

    1997-07-01

    Rapid thermal annealing (RTA) of spin-coated phosphoric acid (H3PO4) films on silicon substrates has been studied for the formation of shallow junctions. The junctions are characterized by spreading resistance profiling. Device quality, shallow (750 °C), below which absorption bands originating from water species are noted. More than 15% efficient, shallow emitter, large-area (10 cm×10 cm) n+pp+ silicon solar cells are fabricated with a short-time processing using this rapid thermal processing technique.

  12. Gas bubble formation and its pressure signature in T-junction of a microreactor

    Pouya, Shahram; Koochesfahani, Manoochehr

    2013-11-01

    The segmented gas-liquid flow is of particular interest in microreactors used for high throughput material synthesis with enhanced mixing and more efficient reaction. A typical geometry to introduce gas plugs into the reactor is a T-junction where the dispersed liquid is squeezed and pinched by the continuous fluid in the main branch of the junction. We present experimental data of time resolved pressure along with synchronous imaging of the drop formation at the junction to show the transient behavior of the process. The stability of the slug regime and the regularity of the slug/plug pattern are investigated in this study. This work was supported by the CRC Program of the National Science Foundation, Grant Number CHE-0714028.

  13. Shear-induced reorganization of renal proximal tubule cell actin cytoskeleton and apical junctional complexes.

    Duan, Yi; Gotoh, Nanami; Yan, Qingshang; Du, Zhaopeng; Weinstein, Alan M; Wang, Tong; Weinbaum, Sheldon

    2008-08-12

    In this study, we demonstrate that fluid shear stress (FSS)-induced actin cytoskeletal reorganization and junctional formation in renal epithelial cells are nearly completely opposite the corresponding changes in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) [Thi MM et al. (2004) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 101:16483-16488]. Mouse proximal tubule cells (PTCs) were subjected to 5 h of FSS (1 dyn/cm(2)) to investigate the dynamic responses of the cytoskeletal distribution of filamentous actin (F-actin), ZO-1, E-cadherin, vinculin, and paxillin to FSS. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that FSS caused basal stress fiber disruption, more densely distributed peripheral actin bands (DPABs), and the formation of both tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs). A dramatic reinforcement of vinculin staining was found at the cell borders as well as the cell interior. These responses were abrogated by the actin-disrupting drug, cytochalasin D. To interpret these results, we propose a "junctional buttressing" model for PTCs in which FSS enables the DPABs, TJs, and AJs to become more tightly connected. In contrast, in the "bumper-car" model for ECs, all junctional connections were severely disrupted by FSS. This "junctional buttressing" model explains why a FSS of only 1/10 of that used in the EC study can cause a similarly dramatic, cytoskeletal response in these tall, cuboidal epithelial cells; and why junctional buttressing between adjacent cells may benefit renal epithelium in maximizing flow-activated, brush border-dependent, transcellular salt and water reabsorption. PMID:18685100

  14. Kartogenin induces cartilage-like tissue formation in tendon–bone junction

    Zhang, Jianying; Wang, James H-C.

    2014-01-01

    Tendon–bone junctions (TBJs) are frequently injured, especially in athletic settings. Healing of TBJ injuries is slow and is often repaired with scar tissue formation that compromises normal function. This study explored the feasibility of using kartogenin (KGN), a biocompound, to enhance the healing of injured TBJs. We first determined the effects of KGN on the proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and patellar tendon stem/progenitor cells...

  15. The spontaneous formation of single-molecule junctions via terminal alkynes

    Pla-Vilanova, Pepita; Aragonès, Albert C.; Ciampi, Simone; Sanz, Fausto; Darwish, Nadim; Diez-Perez, Ismael

    2015-09-01

    Herein, we report the spontaneous formation of single-molecule junctions via terminal alkyne contact groups. Self-assembled monolayers that form spontaneously from diluted solutions of 1, 4-diethynylbenzene (DEB) were used to build single-molecule contacts and assessed using the scanning tunneling microscopy-break junction technique (STM-BJ). The STM-BJ technique in both its dynamic and static approaches was used to characterize the lifetime (stability) and the conductivity of a single-DEB wire. It is demonstrated that single-molecule junctions form spontaneously with terminal alkynes and require no electrochemical control or chemical deprotonation. The alkyne anchoring group was compared against typical contact groups exploited in single-molecule studies, i.e. amine (benzenediamine) and thiol (benzendithiol) contact groups. The alkyne contact showed a conductance magnitude comparable to that observed with amine and thiol groups. The lifetime of the junctions formed from alkynes were only slightly less than that of thiols and greater than that observed for amines. These findings are important as (a) they extend the repertoire of chemical contacts used in single-molecule measurements to 1-alkynes, which are synthetically accessible and stable and (b) alkynes have a remarkable affinity toward silicon surfaces, hence opening the door for the study of single-molecule transport on a semiconducting electronic platform.

  16. Interfering amino terminal peptides and functional implications for heteromeric gap junction formation

    Richard David Veenstra

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Connexin43 (Cx43 is widely expressed in many different tissues of the human body. In cells of some organs, Cx43 is co-expressed with other connexins (Cx, including Cx46 and Cx50 in lens, Cx40 in atrium, Purkinje fibers, and the blood vessel wall, Cx45 in heart, and Cx37 in the ovary. Interactions with the co-expressed connexins may have profound functional implications. The abilities of Cx37, Cx45, Cx46, and Cx50 to function in heteromeric gap junction combinations with Cx43 are well documented. Different studies disagree regarding the ability of Cx43 and Cx40 to produce functional heteromeric gap junctions with each other. We review previous studies regarding the heteromeric interactions of Cx43. The possibility of negative functional interactions between the cytoplasmic pore-forming amino terminal (NT domains of these connexins was assessed using pentameric connexin sequence-specific NT domain (iNT peptides applied to cells expressing homomeric Cx40, Cx37, Cx45, Cx46, and Cx50 gap junctions. A Cx43 iNT peptide corresponding to amino acids 9 to 13 (Ac-KLLDK-NH2 specifically inhibited the electrical coupling of Cx40 gap junctions in a transjunctional (Vj voltage-dependent manner without affecting the function of homologous Cx37, Cx46, Cx50, and Cx45 gap junctions. A Cx40 iNT (Ac-EFLEE-OH peptide counteracted the Vj-dependent block of Cx40 gap junctions, whereas a similarly charged Cx50 iNT (Ac-EEVNE-OH peptide did not, suggesting that these NT domain interactions are not solely based on electrostatics. These data are consistent with functional Cx43 heteromeric gap junction formation with Cx37, Cx45, Cx46, and Cx50 and suggest that Cx40 uniquely experiences functional suppressive interactions with a Cx43 NT domain sequence. These findings present unique functional implications about the heteromeric interactions between Cx43 and Cx40 that may influence cardiac conduction in atrial myocardium and the specialized conduction system.

  17. Merits and demerits of light absorbers for ultra-shallow junction formation by green laser annealing

    Matsuno, Akira [Research Center for Nanodevices and Systems, Hiroshima University, 1-4-2 Kagamiyama, Higashihiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Phoeton Corp., Atsugi AXT Main Tower 4F Incubation room II, Okada 3050, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0021 (Japan); Takii, Eisuke [Research Center for Nanodevices and Systems, Hiroshima University, 1-4-2 Kagamiyama, Higashihiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Eto, Takanori [Research Center for Nanodevices and Systems, Hiroshima University, 1-4-2 Kagamiyama, Higashihiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Kurobe, Ken-ichi [Research Center for Nanodevices and Systems, Hiroshima University, 1-4-2 Kagamiyama, Higashihiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Shibahara, Kentaro [Research Center for Nanodevices and Systems, Hiroshima University, 1-4-2 Kagamiyama, Higashihiroshima 739-8527 (Japan)]. E-mail: ksshiba@hiroshima-u.ac.jp

    2005-08-01

    Ultra-shallow junction formation using an all-solid-state green laser (532 nm) has been investigated. Considering too large penetration depth of the green laser into Si, a light absorber layer was formed on a Si substrate. TiN or Mo was deposited on Si after Sb{sup +} implantation through the 2-nm screen oxide. The TiN light absorber was effective in reducing the laser energy density to activate dopant but Mo increased the required energy density. Junction depth fundamentally depended on amorphous layer depth, however, the annealing with the absorber easily led to overmelt of c-Si. Mechanisms of these results were discussed utilizing one-dimensional thermal diffusion analysis.

  18. A membrane fusion protein αSNAP is a novel regulator of epithelial apical junctions.

    Nayden G Naydenov

    Full Text Available Tight junctions (TJs and adherens junctions (AJs are key determinants of the structure and permeability of epithelial barriers. Although exocytic delivery to the cell surface is crucial for junctional assembly, little is known about the mechanisms controlling TJ and AJ exocytosis. This study was aimed at investigating whether a key mediator of exocytosis, soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor (NSF attachment protein alpha (αSNAP, regulates epithelial junctions. αSNAP was enriched at apical junctions in SK-CO15 and T84 colonic epithelial cells and in normal human intestinal mucosa. siRNA-mediated knockdown of αSNAP inhibited AJ/TJ assembly and establishment of the paracellular barrier in SK-CO15 cells, which was accompanied by a significant down-regulation of p120-catenin and E-cadherin expression. A selective depletion of p120 catenin effectively disrupted AJ and TJ structure and compromised the epithelial barrier. However, overexpression of p120 catenin did not rescue the defects of junctional structure and permeability caused by αSNAP knockdown thereby suggesting the involvement of additional mechanisms. Such mechanisms did not depend on NSF functions or induction of cell death, but were associated with disruption of the Golgi complex and down-regulation of a Golgi-associated guanidine nucleotide exchange factor, GBF1. These findings suggest novel roles for αSNAP in promoting the formation of epithelial AJs and TJs by controlling Golgi-dependent expression and trafficking of junctional proteins.

  19. Fluid displacement during droplet formation at microfluidic flow-focusing junctions.

    Huang, Haishui; He, Xiaoming

    2015-11-01

    Microdroplets and microcapsules have been widely produced using microfluidic flow-focusing junctions for biomedical and chemical applications. However, the multiphase microfluidic flow at the flow-focusing junction has not been well investigated. In this study, the displacement of two (core and shell) aqueous fluids that disperse into droplets altogether in a carrier oil emulsion was investigated both numerically and experimentally. It was found that extensive displacement of the two aqueous fluids within the droplet during its formation could occur as a result of the shear effect of the carrier fluid and the capillary effect of interfacial tension. We further identified that the two mechanisms of fluid displacement can be evaluated by two dimensionless parameters. The quantitative relationship between the degree of fluid displacement and these two dimensionless parameters was determined experimentally. Finally, we demonstrated that the degree of fluid displacement could be controlled to generate hydrogel microparticles of different morphologies using planar or nonplanar flow-focusing junctions. These findings should provide useful guidance to the microfluidic production of microscale droplets or capsules for various biomedical and chemical applications. PMID:26381220

  20. Kartogenin induces cartilage-like tissue formation in tendon–bone junction

    Zhang, Jianying; Wang, James H-C

    2014-01-01

    Tendon–bone junctions (TBJs) are frequently injured, especially in athletic settings. Healing of TBJ injuries is slow and is often repaired with scar tissue formation that compromises normal function. This study explored the feasibility of using kartogenin (KGN), a biocompound, to enhance the healing of injured TBJs. We first determined the effects of KGN on the proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and patellar tendon stem/progenitor cells (PTSCs) in vitro. KGN enhanced cell proliferation in both cell types in a concentration-dependent manner and induced chondrogenic differentiation of stem cells, as demonstrated by high expression levels of chondrogenic markers aggrecan, collagen II and Sox-9. Besides, KGN induced the formation of cartilage-like tissues in cell cultures, as observed through the staining of abundant proteoglycans, collagen II and osteocalcin. When injected into intact rat patellar tendons in vivo, KGN induced cartilage-like tissue formation in the injected area. Similarly, when KGN was injected into experimentally injured rat Achilles TBJs, wound healing in the TBJs was enhanced, as evidenced by the formation of extensive cartilage-like tissues. These results suggest that KGN may be used as an effective cell-free clinical therapy to enhance the healing of injured TBJs. PMID:25419468

  1. Kartogenin induces cartilage-like tissue formation in tendon-bone junction

    Jianying Zhang; James H-C Wang

    2014-01-01

    Tendon-bone junctions (TBJs) are frequently injured, especially in athletic settings. Healing of TBJ injuries is slow and is often repaired with scar tissue formation that compromises normal function. This study explored the feasibility of using kartogenin (KGN), a biocompound, to enhance the healing of injured TBJs. We first determined the effects of KGN on the proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and patellar tendon stem/progenitor cells (PTSCs) in vitro. KGN enhanced cell proliferation in both cell types in a concentration-dependent manner and induced chondrogenic differentiation of stem cells, as demonstrated by high expression levels of chondrogenic markers aggrecan, collagen II and Sox-9. Besides, KGN induced the formation of cartilage-like tissues in cell cultures, as observed through the staining of abundant proteoglycans, collagen II and osteocalcin. When injected into intact rat patellar tendons in vivo, KGN induced cartilage-like tissue formation in the injected area. Similarly, when KGN was injected into experimentally injured rat Achilles TBJs, wound healing in the TBJs was enhanced, as evidenced by the formation of extensive cartilage-like tissues. These results suggest that KGN may be used as an effective cell-free clinical therapy to enhance the healing of injured TBJs.

  2. Kartogenin induces cartilage-like tissue formation in tendon-bone junction.

    Zhang, Jianying; Wang, James H-C

    2014-01-01

    Tendon-bone junctions (TBJs) are frequently injured, especially in athletic settings. Healing of TBJ injuries is slow and is often repaired with scar tissue formation that compromises normal function. This study explored the feasibility of using kartogenin (KGN), a biocompound, to enhance the healing of injured TBJs. We first determined the effects of KGN on the proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and patellar tendon stem/progenitor cells (PTSCs) in vitro. KGN enhanced cell proliferation in both cell types in a concentration-dependent manner and induced chondrogenic differentiation of stem cells, as demonstrated by high expression levels of chondrogenic markers aggrecan, collagen II and Sox-9. Besides, KGN induced the formation of cartilage-like tissues in cell cultures, as observed through the staining of abundant proteoglycans, collagen II and osteocalcin. When injected into intact rat patellar tendons in vivo, KGN induced cartilage-like tissue formation in the injected area. Similarly, when KGN was injected into experimentally injured rat Achilles TBJs, wound healing in the TBJs was enhanced, as evidenced by the formation of extensive cartilage-like tissues. These results suggest that KGN may be used as an effective cell-free clinical therapy to enhance the healing of injured TBJs. PMID:25419468

  3. Atomic nitrogen source for the formation of aluminum nitride tunnel barrier SIS junctions

    A 2.45 GHz electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma source has been adopted to form AlN barriers of Nb/Al-AlN/Nb SIS junctions. Good quality AlN barriers with tunnel resistivities as small as 7 Ωμm2 have been realized. The optical emission spectrum of the nitrogen plasma has been investigated in order to evaluate the dissociation rate of N2. AlN barriers with less leakage current were formed when the relative intensity of the emission lines of atomic N was stronger. Nitridation by atomic N could be beneficial in the formation of low resistivity, low leakage current AlN barriers.

  4. A Lattice Boltzmann study of the effects of viscoelasticity on droplet formation in microfluidic cross-junctions

    Gupta, Anupam

    2015-01-01

    Based on mesoscale lattice Boltzmann (LB) numerical simulations, we investigate the effects of viscoelasticity on the break-up of liquid threads in microfluidic cross-junctions, where droplets are formed by focusing a liquid thread of a dispersed (d) phase into another co-flowing continuous (c) immiscible phase. Working at small Capillary numbers, we investigate the effects of non-Newtonian phases in the transition from droplet formation at the cross-junction (DCJ) to droplet formation downstream of the cross-junction (DC) (Liu $\\&$ Zhang, ${\\it Phys. ~Fluids.}$ ${\\bf 23}$, 082101 (2011)). We will analyze cases with ${\\it Droplet ~Viscoelasticity}$ (DV), where viscoelastic properties are confined in the dispersed phase, as well as cases with ${\\it Matrix ~Viscoelasticity}$ (MV), where viscoelastic properties are confined in the continuous phase. Moderate flow-rate ratios $Q \\approx {\\cal O}(1)$ of the two phases are considered in the present study. Overall, we find that the effects are more pronounced in ...

  5. Formation and manipulation of ferrofluid droplets at a microfluidic T-junction

    This paper reports the formation and manipulation of ferrofluid droplets at a microfluidic T-junction in the presence of a permanent magnetic field. A small circular permanent magnet with a diameter of 3 mm is used to control the size of the ferrofluid droplets within a microfluidic device. In the absence of a magnetic field, the size of the ferrofluid droplets decreases linearly with the increase of the flow rate of the continuous phase. In the presence of a magnetic field, the size of the droplets depends on the magnetic field strength, magnetic field gradient and the magnetization of the ferrofluid. The magnetic field strength is adjusted in our experiment by the location of the magnet. The induced attractive magnetic force affects the droplet formation process leading to the change in the size of the formed droplets. Experimental observation also shows that the relative change in the size of the droplet depends on the flow rate of the continuous phase. Furthermore, the paper compares the evolving shape of the ferrofluid droplet during the formation process with and without the magnetic field.

  6. Porous silicon formation by hole injection from a back side p+/n junction for electrical insulation applications

    Fèvre, A.; Menard, S.; Defforge, T.; Gautier, G.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose to study the formation of porous silicon (PS) in low doped (1 × 1014 cm-3) n-type silicon through hole injection from a back side p+/n junction in the dark. This technique is investigated within the framework of electrical insulation. Three different types of junctions are investigated. The first one is an epitaxial n-type layer grown on p+ doped silicon wafer. The two other junctions are carried out by boron diffusion leading to p+ regions with junction depths of 20 and 115 μm. The resulting PS morphology is a double layer with a nucleation layer (NL) and macropores fully filled with mesoporous material. This result is unusual for low doped n-type silicon. Morphology variations are described depending on the junction formation process, the electrolyte composition, the anodization current density and duration. In order to validate the more interesting industrial potentialities of the p+/n injection technique, a comparison is achieved with back side illumination in terms of resulting morphology and experiments confirm comparable results. Electrical characterizations of the double layer, including NL and fully filled macropores, are then performed. To our knowledge, this is the first electrical investigation in low doped n type silicon with this morphology. Compared to the bulk silicon, the measured electrical resistivities are 6-7 orders of magnitude higher at 373 K.

  7. Experimental investigation of liquid-liquid plug formation in a T-junction microchannel

    Angeli, Panagiota; Chinaud, Maxime; Roumpea, Eynagelia-Panagiota; Weheliye, Weheliye; Omar. K. Matar Collaboration; Lyes Kahouadji Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Plug formation mechanism of two immiscible liquids was studied experimentally in a 200 μm microchannel using two innovative micro Particle Image Velocimetry (μ PIV) techniques i.e. two-colour μ PIV and high speed bright field μ PIV. The aqueous phase was a water/glycerol solution whereas the organic phase was silicon oil with a range of viscosities from 5 to 155 cSt. Experiments were conducted for different fluid flow rate combinations in the T-junction inlet and it was observed that velocity profiles within the forming plugs depend on the flow rate ratios. The velocity field studies provided insight into the plug mechanism revealing that the interface curvature at the rear of the forming plug changes sign at the later stages of plug formation and accelerates the thinning of the meniscus leading to plug breakage. Results from the two-colour PIV show that the continuous phase resists the flow of the dispersed phase into the main channel at the rear of the plug meniscus and causes the change in the interface curvature. Department of Chemical Engineering South Kensington Campus Imperial College London SW7 2AZ.

  8. Cluster-formation in the Rosette molecular cloud at the junctions of filaments

    Schneider, N; Hennemann, M; Motte, F; Didelon, P; Federrath, C; Bontemps, S; Di Francesco, J; Arzoumanian, D; Minier, V; André, Ph; Hill, T; Zavagno, A; Nguyen-Luong, Q; Attard, M; Bernard, J -Ph; Elia, D; Fallscheer, C; Griffin, M; Kirk, J; Klessen, R; Könyves, V; Martin, P; Men'shchikov, A; Palmeirim, P; Peretto, N; Pestalozzi, M; Russeil, D; Sadavoy, S; Sousbie, T; Testi, L; Tremblin, P; Ward-Thompson, D; White, G

    2012-01-01

    For many years feedback processes generated by OB-stars in molecular clouds, including expanding ionization fronts, stellar winds, or UV-radiation, have been proposed to trigger subsequent star formation. However, hydrodynamic models including radiation and gravity show that UV-illumination has little or no impact on the global dynamical evolution of the cloud. The Rosette molecular cloud, irradiated by the NGC2244 cluster, is a template region for triggered star-formation, and we investigated its spatial and density structure by applying a curvelet analysis, a filament-tracing algorithm (DisPerSE), and probability density functions (PDFs) on Herschel column density maps, obtained within the HOBYS key program. The analysis reveals not only the filamentary structure of the cloud but also that all known infrared clusters except one lie at junctions of filaments, as predicted by turbulence simulations. The PDFs of sub-regions in the cloud show systematic differences. The two UV-exposed regions have a double-peak...

  9. Claudin-16 Deficiency Impairs Tight Junction Function in Ameloblasts, Leading to Abnormal Enamel Formation.

    Bardet, Claire; Courson, Frédéric; Wu, Yong; Khaddam, Mayssam; Salmon, Benjamin; Ribes, Sandy; Thumfart, Julia; Yamaguti, Paulo M; Rochefort, Gael Y; Figueres, Marie-Lucile; Breiderhoff, Tilman; Garcia-Castaño, Alejandro; Vallée, Benoit; Le Denmat, Dominique; Baroukh, Brigitte; Guilbert, Thomas; Schmitt, Alain; Massé, Jean-Marc; Bazin, Dominique; Lorenz, Georg; Morawietz, Maria; Hou, Jianghui; Carvalho-Lobato, Patricia; Manzanares, Maria Cristina; Fricain, Jean-Christophe; Talmud, Deborah; Demontis, Renato; Neves, Francisco; Zenaty, Delphine; Berdal, Ariane; Kiesow, Andreas; Petzold, Matthias; Menashi, Suzanne; Linglart, Agnes; Acevedo, Ana Carolina; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa; Müller, Dominik; Houillier, Pascal; Chaussain, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    Claudin-16 protein (CLDN16) is a component of tight junctions (TJ) with a restrictive distribution so far demonstrated mainly in the kidney. Here, we demonstrate the expression of CLDN16 also in the tooth germ and show that claudin-16 gene (CLDN16) mutations result in amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) in the 5 studied patients with familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC). To investigate the role of CLDN16 in tooth formation, we studied a murine model of FHHNC and showed that CLDN16 deficiency led to altered secretory ameloblast TJ structure, lowering of extracellular pH in the forming enamel matrix, and abnormal enamel matrix protein processing, resulting in an enamel phenotype closely resembling human AI. This study unravels an association of FHHNC owing to CLDN16 mutations with AI, which is directly related to the loss of function of CLDN16 during amelogenesis. Overall, this study indicates for the first time the importance of a TJ protein in tooth formation and underlines the need to establish a specific dental follow-up for these patients. PMID:26426912

  10. The Influence of Ion Dose and Energy on the Formation of ZnO/Boron P-N Junction

    Research on the influence of dose and energy of the boron ion to the formation of ZnO/boron P-N junction by using ion implantation technique has been carried out. The objective of this research is to study the formation of P-N junction between ZnO semiconductor and boron ion. To obtain a good P-N junction, variation of ion energy 70 keV and 100 keV as well as ion doses from 1.1 x 1017 ion/cm2 up to 4.8 x 1018 ion/cm2 had been done. While to investigate the formation of P-N junction, a measurement at backward and forward bias resistivity had been done using digital multi meter. Characteristics of voltage versus current was measured using curve tracer, while the sheet resistivity of the sample was measured using four point probe method. It was found the following best result : the smallest forward resistivity of 0.3 mega ohm, the highest backward bias resistivity was 20 mega ohm, the best forward bias voltage was 5 volt, and the 200 volt of the highest backward voltage as well as the best sheet resistivity of 110 ohm/cm2. These results were achieved by the implantation of ion boron at energy 100 keV and dose 3.6 x 1018 ion/cm2. (author)

  11. p-n junction formation in n-InP by Be ion implantation

    Be-implanted LPE n-InP layers have exhibited p-n junction behaviour. C-V measurements have shown either abrupt or graded junction behaviour which was implant-fluence-dependent. SIMS results indicated that the graded junction behaviour was due to Be in-depth migration. Mesa diodes have shown ideality factors close to unity and avalanche breakdown in reverse bias. (author)

  12. Vitamin D3 regulates the formation and degradation of gap junctions in androgen-responsive human prostate cancer cells.

    Linda Kelsey

    Full Text Available 1α-25(OH2 vitamin D3 (1-25D, an active hormonal form of Vitamin D3, is a well-known chemopreventive and pro-differentiating agent. It has been shown to inhibit the growth of several prostate cancer cell lines. Gap junctions, formed of proteins called connexins (Cx, are ensembles of cell-cell channels, which permit the exchange of small growth regulatory molecules between adjoining cells. Cell-cell communication mediated by gap junctional channels is an important homeostatic control mechanism for regulating cell growth and differentiation. We have investigated the effect of 1-25D on the formation and degradation of gap junctions in an androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell line, LNCaP, which expresses retrovirally-introduced Cx32. Connexin32 is expressed by the luminal and well-differentiated cells of normal prostate and prostate tumors. Our results document that 1-25D enhances the expression of Cx32 and its subsequent assembly into gap junctions. Our results further show that 1-25D prevents androgen-regulated degradation of Cx32, post-translationally, independent of androgen receptor (AR-mediated signaling. Finally, our findings document that formation of gap junctions sensitizes Cx32-expressing LNCaP cells to the growth inhibitory effects of 1-25D and alters their morphology. These findings suggest that the growth-inhibitory effects of 1-25D in LNCaP cells may be related to its ability to modulate the assembly of Cx32 into gap junctions.

  13. Molecular anatomy of interendothelial junctions in human blood-brain barrier microvessels.

    Andrzej W Vorbrodt

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Immunogold cytochemical procedure was used to study the localization at the ultrastructural level of interendothelial junction-associated protein molecules in the human brain blood microvessels, representing the anatomic site of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. Ultrathin sections of Lowicryl K4M-embedded biopsy specimens of human cerebral cortex obtained during surgical procedures were exposed to specific antibodies, followed by colloidal gold-labeled secondary antibodies. All tight junction-specific integral membrane (transmembrane proteins--occludin, junctional adhesion molecule (JAM-1, and claudin-5--as well as peripheral zonula occludens protein (ZO-1 were highly expressed. Immunoreactivity of the adherens junction-specific transmembrane protein VE-cadherin was of almost similar intensity. Immunolabeling of the adherens junction-associated peripheral proteins--alpha-catenin, beta-catenin, and p120 catenin--although positive, was evidently less intense. The expression of gamma-catenin (plakoglobin was considered questionable because solitary immunosignals (gold particles appeared in only a few microvascular profiles. Double labeling of some sections made possible to observe strict colocalization of the junctional molecules, such as occludin and ZO-1 or JAM-1 and VE-cadherin, in the interendothelial junctions. We found that in human brain microvessels, the interendothelial junctional complexes contain molecular components specific for both tight and adherens junctions. It is assumed that the data obtained can help us find the immunodetectable junctional molecules that can serve as sensitive markers of normal or abnormal function of the BBB.

  14. Vinculin-dependent Cadherin mechanosensing regulates efficient epithelial barrier formation

    Floor Twiss

    2012-09-01

    Proper regulation of the formation and stabilization of epithelial cell–cell adhesion is crucial in embryonic morphogenesis and tissue repair processes. Defects in this process lead to organ malformation and defective epithelial barrier function. A combination of chemical and mechanical cues is used by cells to drive this process. We have investigated the role of the actomyosin cytoskeleton and its connection to cell–cell junction complexes in the formation of an epithelial barrier in MDCK cells. We find that the E-cadherin complex is sufficient to mediate a functional link between cell–cell contacts and the actomyosin cytoskeleton. This link involves the actin binding capacity of α-catenin and the recruitment of the mechanosensitive protein Vinculin to tensile, punctate cell–cell junctions that connect to radial F-actin bundles, which we name Focal Adherens Junctions (FAJ. When cell–cell adhesions mature, these FAJs disappear and linear junctions are formed that do not contain Vinculin. The rapid phase of barrier establishment (as measured by Trans Epithelial Electrical Resistance (TER correlates with the presence of FAJs. Moreover, the rate of barrier establishment is delayed when actomyosin contraction is blocked or when Vinculin recruitment to the Cadherin complex is prevented. Enhanced presence of Vinculin increases the rate of barrier formation. We conclude that E-cadherin-based FAJs connect forming cell–cell adhesions to the contractile actomyosin cytoskeleton. These specialized junctions are sites of Cadherin mechanosensing, which, through the recruitment of Vinculin, is a driving force in epithelial barrier formation.

  15. Disruption of Nfic Causes Dissociation of Odontoblasts by Interfering With the Formation of Intercellular Junctions and Aberrant Odontoblast Differentiation

    Lee, Tae-Yeon; Lee, Dong-Seol; Kim, Hyun-Man; Ko, Jea Seung; Gronostajski, Richard M; Cho, Moon-Il; Son, Ho-Hyun; Park, Joo-Cheol

    2009-01-01

    We reported previously that Nfic-deficient mice exhibit short and abnormal molar roots and severely deformed incisors. The objective of this study is to address the mechanisms responsible for these changes using morphological, IHC, and RT-PCR analysis. Nfic-deficient mice exhibited aberrant odontoblasts and abnormal dentin formation in molar roots and the labial crown analog of incisors. The most striking changes observed in these aberrant odontoblasts were the loss of intercellular junctions...

  16. Unique cell type-specific junctional complexes in vascular endothelium of human and rat liver sinusoids.

    Cyrill Géraud

    Full Text Available Liver sinusoidal endothelium is strategically positioned to control access of fluids, macromolecules and cells to the liver parenchyma and to serve clearance functions upstream of the hepatocytes. While clearance of macromolecular debris from the peripheral blood is performed by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs using a delicate endocytic receptor system featuring stabilin-1 and -2, the mannose receptor and CD32b, vascular permeability and cell trafficking are controlled by transcellular pores, i.e. the fenestrae, and by intercellular junctional complexes. In contrast to blood vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells in other organs, the junctional complexes of LSECs have not yet been consistently characterized in molecular terms. In a comprehensive analysis, we here show that LSECs express the typical proteins found in endothelial adherens junctions (AJ, i.e. VE-cadherin as well as α-, β-, p120-catenin and plakoglobin. Tight junction (TJ transmembrane proteins typical of endothelial cells, i.e. claudin-5 and occludin, were not expressed by rat LSECs while heterogenous immunreactivity for claudin-5 was detected in human LSECs. In contrast, junctional molecules preferentially associating with TJ such as JAM-A, B and C and zonula occludens proteins ZO-1 and ZO-2 were readily detected in LSECs. Remarkably, among the JAMs JAM-C was considerably over-expressed in LSECs as compared to lung microvascular endothelial cells. In conclusion, we show here that LSECs form a special kind of mixed-type intercellular junctions characterized by co-occurrence of endothelial AJ proteins, and of ZO-1 and -2, and JAMs. The distinct molecular architecture of the intercellular junctional complexes of LSECs corroborates previous ultrastructural findings and provides the molecular basis for further analyses of the endothelial barrier function of liver sinusoids under pathologic conditions ranging from hepatic inflammation to formation of liver metastasis.

  17. Endothelial Cell Permeability and Adherens Junction Disruption Induced by Junín Virus Infection

    Lander, Heather M.; Grant, Ashley M.; Albrecht, Thomas; Hill, Terence; Peters, Clarence J.

    2014-01-01

    Junín virus (JUNV) is endemic to the fertile Pampas of Argentina, maintained in nature by the rodent host Calomys musculinus, and the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF), which is characterized by vascular dysfunction and fluid distribution abnormalities. Clinical as well as experimental studies implicate involvement of the endothelium in the pathogenesis of AHF, although little is known of its role. JUNV has been shown to result in productive infection of endothelial cells (...

  18. Formation of p-n-p junction with ionic liquid gate in graphene

    Ionic liquid gating is a technique which is much more efficient than solid gating to tune carrier density. To observe the electronic properties of such a highly doped graphene device, a top gate made of ionic liquid has been used. By sweeping both the top and back gate voltage, a p-n-p junction has been created. The mechanism of forming the p-n-p junction has been discussed. Tuning the carrier density by ionic liquid gate can be an efficient method to be used in flexible electronics

  19. Junction formation and current transport mechanisms in hybrid n-Si/PEDOT:PSS solar cells

    Jäckle, Sara; Mattiza, Matthias; Liebhaber, Martin; Brönstrup, Gerald; Rommel, Mathias; Lips, Klaus; Christiansen, Silke

    2015-08-01

    We investigated hybrid inorganic-organic solar cells combining monocrystalline n-type silicon (n-Si) and a highly conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). The build-in potential, photo- and dark saturation current at this hybrid interface are monitored for varying n-Si doping concentrations. We corroborate that a high build-in potential forms at the hybrid junction leading to strong inversion of the n-Si surface. By extracting work function and valence band edge of the polymer from ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, a band diagram of the hybrid n-Si/PEDOT:PSS heterojunction is presented. The current-voltage characteristics were analyzed using Schottky and abrupt pn-junction models. The magnitude as well as the dependence of dark saturation current on n-Si doping concentration proves that the transport is governed by diffusion of minority charge carriers in the n-Si and not by thermionic emission of majorities over a Schottky barrier. This leads to a comprehensive explanation of the high observed open-circuit voltages of up to 634 mV connected to high conversion efficiency of almost 14%, even for simple planar device structures without antireflection coating or optimized contacts. The presented work clearly shows that PEDOT:PSS forms a hybrid heterojunction with n-Si behaving similar to a conventional pn-junction and not, like commonly assumed, a Schottky junction.

  20. Time-resolved mixing and flow-field measurements during droplet formation in a flow-focusing junction

    Carrier, Odile; Gökhan Ergin, F.; Li, Huai-Zhi; Watz, Bo B.; Funfschilling, Denis

    2015-08-01

    Highly monodispersed emulsions can be produced in microfluidic flow-focusing junctions (Anna et al 2003 Appl. Phys. Lett. 82 364-6, Baroud et al 2010 Lab Chip 10 2032-45). This is the reason why many industrial processes in the medical industry among others are based on droplet manipulation and involve at some point a step of dripping within a junction. However, only a few studies have focused on the flow field inside and outside the droplet, even though it is a necessary step for understanding the physical mechanism involved and for modeling the droplet formation process. Water-in-oil emulsions are produced in flow-focusing junctions of square cross sections. The fluids constituting the emulsion are (i) a 5.0 mPa·s silicon oil for the oil phase and (ii) distilled water containing 2.0 wt% of sodium dodecyl sulfate surfactant for the aqueous phase. Time-resolved shadow particle images are acquired using a microscale particle image velocimetry (µPIV) system and flow fields are calculated using an adaptive PIV algorithm in combination with dynamic masking. Inside the microchannel and in the permanent regime, the droplet has an internal circulation that has been well established by Sarrazin et al (AICHE J. 52 4061-70). But during the formation of a droplet in a flow-focusing junction, the flow field is not so well known, and the circulation in the finger flows forward along the sides and returns along the center. The mechanism can be described in terms of four distinct steps: droplet growth, necking, rupture, and recoil. The liquid expelled from the neck just before rupture is also well observed. The flow field and mixing are measured in detail during a complete cycle of formation of a main droplet and satellite droplets using high-speed imaging. This allows us to develop a better understanding of the different forces that are present and of the physical mechanism of droplet formation.

  1. Formation of Co-implanted Silicon Ultra-Shallow Junctions for Low Thermal Budget Applications

    We present a systematic study to create ultra-shallow junctions in n-type silicon substrates and investigate both pre- and post-annealing processes to create a processing strategy for potential applications in nano-devices. Starting wafers were co-implanted with indium and C atoms at energies of 70 keV and 10 keV, respectively. A carefully chosen implantation schedule provides an abrupt ultra-shallow junction between 17 and 43 nm with suppressed sheet resistance and appropriate retained sheet carrier concentration at low thermal budget. A defect doping matrix, primarily the behavior and movement of co-implant generated interstitials at different annealing temperatures, may be engineered to form sufficiently activated ultra-shallow devices

  2. THE CELULAR JUNCTIONS AND THE EMERGENCE OF ANIMALS

    Urquiza-Bardone, Sergio

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of multicellularity and epithelia in relation to the appearance of cellular junctions, in order to illustrate the first steps of animal evolution, is discussed. We analyzed the structure and roles of adherens and occludins, considered to be the oldest. Also treated are some aspects of the main proteins that constitute them, the cadherins and claudins, as well as the related structures observed in sponges and choanoflagellates, the most ancient animals and the ancestors of these, respectively. It was concluded that the animal ancestor probably possessed some kind of adherens and possibly occludins, appearing as the first of major importance. These junctions increased in complexity through until the complexity observed in modern times.

  3. Alteration of cadherin isoform expression and inhibition of gap junctions in stomach carcinoma cells

    2001-01-01

    To explore cell malignant phenotype correlated changes of cell surface adhesion molecules and cell-cell communication in carcinogenesis, human stomach transformed and cancer cell lines were investigated. Expressions of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, ?-catenin, ?-catenin as well as gap junction (GJ) protein Cx32 were studied by utilization of immunoblotting, immunocytochemical and fluorescent dye transfer methods. Mammalian normal stomach mucosal cells expressed E-cadherin but not N-cadherin. E-cadherin immunofluorescence was detected at cell membranous adherens junctions (AJ) where colocalization with immunofluorescent staining of inner surface adhesion plaque proteins ?- and ?-catenins was observed. The existence of E-cadherin/ catenin (?-, ?-) protein complexes as AJ was suggested. In transformed and stomach cancer cells E-cadherin was inhibited, instead, N-cadherin was expressed and localized at membranous AJ where co-staining with ?- and ?-catenin fluorescence was observed. Formation of N-cadherin/catenin (?-, ?-) protein complex at AJs of transformed and cancer cells was suggested. The above observations were further supported by immunoblotting results. Normal stomach muscosal and transformed cells expressed Cx32 at membranous GJ and were competent of gap junction communication (GJIC). In stomach cancer cells, Cx32 was inhibited and GJIC was defective. The results suggested that changes of signal pathways mediated by both cell adhesion and cell communication systems are associated intracellular events of stomach carcinogenesis. The alteration of cadherin isoform from E- to N-cadherin in transformed and stomach cancer cells is the first report.

  4. Junction formation of Cu3BiS3 investigated by Kelvin probe force microscopy and surface photovoltage measurements

    Fredy Mesa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the compound semiconductor Cu3BiS3 has been demonstrated to have a band gap of ~1.4 eV, well suited for photovoltaic energy harvesting. The preparation of polycrystalline thin films was successfully realized and now the junction formation to the n-type window needs to be developed. We present an investigation of the Cu3BiS3 absorber layer and the junction formation with CdS, ZnS and In2S3 buffer layers. Kelvin probe force microscopy shows the granular structure of the buffer layers with small grains of 20–100 nm, and a considerably smaller work-function distribution for In2S3 compared to that of CdS and ZnS. For In2S3 and CdS buffer layers the KPFM experiments indicate negatively charged Cu3BiS3 grain boundaries resulting from the deposition of the buffer layer. Macroscopic measurements of the surface photovoltage at variable excitation wavelength indicate the influence of defect states below the band gap on charge separation and a surface-defect passivation by the In2S3 buffer layer. Our findings indicate that Cu3BiS3 may become an interesting absorber material for thin-film solar cells; however, for photovoltaic application the band bending at the charge-selective contact has to be increased.

  5. Bubble formation in yield stress fluids using flow-focusing and T-Junction devices

    Laborie, Benoît; Rouyer, Florence; Angelescu, Dan,; Lorenceau, Elise

    2015-01-01

    We study the production of bubbles inside yield stress fluids (YSFs) in axisymmetric T-junction and flow-focusing devices. Taking advantage of yield stress over capillary stress, we exhibit a robust break-up mechanism reminiscent of the geometrical operating regime in 2D flow-focusing devices for Newtonian fluids. We report that when the gas is pressure driven, the dynamics is unsteady due to hydrodynamic feedback and YSF deposition on the walls of the channels. However, the present study als...

  6. Bubble Formation in Yield Stress Fluids Using Flow-Focusing and T-Junction Devices

    Laborie, Benoît; Rouyer, Florence; Angelescu, Dan,; Lorenceau, Elise

    2015-01-01

    We study the production of bubbles inside yield stress fluids (YSFs) in axisymmetric T-junction and flow-focusing devices. Taking advantage of yield stress over capillary stress, we exhibit a robust break-up mechanism reminiscent of the geometrical operating regime in 2D flow-focusing devices for Newtonian fluids. We report that when the gas is pressure driven, the dynamics is unsteady due to hydrodynamic feedback and YSF deposition on the walls of the channels. However, the present study als...

  7. Junction formation and current transport mechanisms in hybrid n-Si/PEDOT:PSS solar cells

    Sara Jäckle; Matthias Mattiza; Martin Liebhaber; Gerald Brönstrup; Mathias Rommel; Klaus Lips; Silke Christiansen

    2015-01-01

    We investigated hybrid inorganic-organic solar cells combining monocrystalline n-type silicon (n-Si) and a highly conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). The build-in potential, photo- and dark saturation current at this hybrid interface are monitored for varying n-Si doping concentrations. We corroborate that a high build-in potential forms at the hybrid junction leading to strong inversion of the n-Si surface. By extracting work function and ...

  8. Oncostatin M induces upregulation of claudin-2 in rodent hepatocytes coinciding with changes in morphology and function of tight junctions

    In rodent livers, integral tight junction (TJ) proteins claudin-1, -2, -3, -5 and -14 are detected and play crucial roles in the barrier to keep bile in bile canaculi away from the blood circulation. Claudin-2 shows a lobular gradient increasing from periportal to pericentral hepatocytes, whereas claudin-1 and -3 are expressed in the whole liver lobule. Although claudin-2 expression induces cation-selective channels in tight junctions of epithelial cells, the physiological functions and regulation of claudin-2 in hepatocytes remain unclear. Oncostatin M (OSM) is a multifunctional cytokine implicated in the differentiation of hepatocytes that induces formation of E-cadherin-based adherens junctions in fetal hepatocytes. In this study, we examined whether OSM could induce expression and function of claudin-2 in rodent hepatocytes, immortalized mouse and primary cultured proliferative rat hepatocytes. In the immortalized mouse and primary cultured proliferative rat hepatocytes, treatment with OSM markedly increased mRNA and protein of claudin-2 together with formation of developed networks of TJ strands. The increase of claudin-2 enhanced the paracellular barrier function which depended on molecular size. The increase of claudin-2 expression induced by OSM in rodent hepatocytes was regulated through distinct signaling pathways including PKC. These results suggest that expression of claudin-2 in rodent hepatocytes may play a specific role as controlling the size of paracellular permeability in the barrier to keep bile in bile canaculi

  9. Ultrastructural studies of the junctional complex in the musculature of the arrow-worm (Sagitta setosa) (Chaetognatha).

    Duvert, M; Gros, D; Salat, C

    1980-01-01

    In the A fibres of the primary musculature of Sagitta, the junctional complex is made up of three kinds of junctions. From the apex to the base they occur in the following order: an apical zonula adherens, a columnar zonula then columnar maculae intermingled with gap junction. Each columnar junction joins two intracellular filament networks in adjacent cells; this cytoskeleton is largely developed around the nucleus of the A fibres and in close relation with the contractile apparatus, especially at the I band level. The B fibres, which never reach the general cavity, lack zonula adherens and columnar zonula. The columnar junction constitutes a new type of junction which seems to belong to the adherens kind. At their level fibrous columns cross the extracellular space, joining the membranes. Each column faces two cytoplasmic densities localized against the cytoplasmic leaflets of the membranes. A cytoskeleton composed of bunldes of cytoplasmic filaments is in close contact with these cytoplasmic densities. The great number of columnar junctions and associated cytoskeleton assure the cohesion of the tissue and the distribution of contractile forces in the absence of connective tissue. The abundance of gap junctions can account for the metabolic and ionic coupling of the fibres. PMID:7189067

  10. Colorimetric detection of gene transcript by target-induced three-way junction formation.

    Wang, Xuchu; Liu, Weiwei; Yin, Binbin; Yu, Pan; Duan, Xiuzhi; Liao, Zhaoping; Liu, Chunhua; Sang, Yiwen; Zhang, Gong; Chen, Yuhua; Tao, Zhihua

    2016-09-01

    Gene transcript often varies by alternative splicing, which plays different biological role that results in diversity of gene expression. Therefore, a simple and accurate identification of targeted transcript variant is of prime importance to achieve a precise molecular diagnosis. In this work, we presented a three-way junction based system where two split G-quadruplex forming sequences were coupled into two probes. Only upon the introduction of target gene transcript that offering a specific recognizable splicing site did the two probes assembled into three way junction conformation in a devised process, thus providing a functional G-quadruplex conformation that greatly enhanced hemin peroxidation. A notable resolution for gene splicing site detection was achieved. The detection limitation by colorimetric assay was 0.063μM, and this system has been proved to discriminate even in a single base false level around splicing site (about 3 times of single mismatched analyte to gain an equal signal by perfect analyte ). Furthermore, recoveries of 78.1%, 88.1%, 104.6% were obtained with 0.75μM, 0.25μM, 0.083μM of target, respectively, showing a capacity to further exploit a simple equipped device for gene transcript detection. PMID:27343570

  11. Ultra shallow junction formation and dopant activation study of Ga implanted Si

    Gwilliam, R. [Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: r.gwilliam@surrey.ac.uk; Gennaro, S. [ITC-irst Istituto Trentino di Cultura, Centro per la Ricerca Scientifica e Tecnologica, Via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy); Claudio, G. [Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Sealy, B.J. [Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Mulcahy, C. [Cascade Scientific Ltd., ETC Building, Brunel Science Park Uxbridge, Middlesex UB8 3PH (United Kingdom); Biswas, S. [Cascade Scientific Ltd., ETC Building, Brunel Science Park Uxbridge, Middlesex UB8 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2005-08-01

    The trend for decreasing geometries within CMOS architecture is driving the need for ever shallower, highly doped, low resistivity layers in silicon. The conventional dopant of choice, boron, as a result of its light mass requires that implant energies be ever reduced to meet the demands of these shallow junctions, with the inevitable effect on throughput due to implanter beam current limitations. In this paper we investigate using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), spreading resistance profiling (SRP) and Hall effect measurements, the alternate p-type dopant species of Ga and its behaviour in the energy range 2-5 keV, implanted into both single crystal Si and pre-amorphised material.

  12. Doping Evolution and Junction Formation in Stacked Cyanine Dye Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells.

    Jenatsch, Sandra; Wang, Lei; Bulloni, Matia; Véron, Anna C; Ruhstaller, Beat; Altazin, Stéphane; Nüesch, Frank; Hany, Roland

    2016-03-16

    Cyanine dyes are fluorescent organic salts with intrinsic conductivity for ionic and electronic charges. Recently ( J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2013 , 135 , 18008 - 18011 ), these features have been exploited in cyanine light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs). Here, we demonstrate that stacked, constant-voltage driven trimethine cyanine LECs with various counteranions develop a p-i-n junction that is composed of p- and n-doped zones and an intrinsic region where light-emission occurs. We introduce a method that combines spectral photocurrent response measurements with optical modeling and find that at maximum current the intrinsic region is centered at ∼37% away from the anode. Transient capacitance, photoluminescence and attenuance experiments indicate a device situation with a narrow p-doped region, an undoped region that occupies ∼72% of the dye layer thickness and an n-doped region with a maximum doping concentration of 0.08 dopant/cyanine molecule. Finally, we observe that during device relaxation the parent cyanines are not reformed. We ascribe this to irreversible reactions between doped cyanine radicals. For sterically conservative cyanine dyes, this suggests that undesired radical decomposition pathways limit the LEC long-term stability in general. PMID:26914281

  13. tal1 regulates the formation of intercellular junctions and the maintenance of identity in the endocardium

    Schumacher, Jennifer A.; Bloomekatz, Joshua; Garavito-Aguilar, Zayra V.; Yelon, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    The endocardium forms the inner lining of the heart tube, where it enables blood flow and also interacts with the myocardium during the formation of valves and trabeculae. Although a number of studies have identified regulators of the morphogenesis of the myocardium, relatively little is known about the molecules that control endocardial morphogenesis. Prior work has implicated the bHLH transcription factor Tal1 in endocardial tube formation: in zebrafish embryos lacking Tal1, endocardial cel...

  14. Formation of hydrothermal deposits at Kings Triple Junction, northern Lau back-arc basin, SW Pacific: The geochemical perspectives

    Paropkari, Anil L.; Ray, Durbar; Balaram, V.; Surya Prakash, L.; Mirza, Imran H.; Satyanarayana, M.; Gnaneshwar Rao, T.; Kaisary, Sujata

    2010-04-01

    An inactive hydrothermal field was discovered near Kings Triple Junction (KTJ) in northern Lau back-arc basin during 19th cruise of R/V Akademik Mstislav Keldysh in 1990. The field consisted of a large elongated basal platform 'the pedestal' with several 'small' chimneys on its periphery and one 'main mound' superposed over it. The surrounding region is carpeted with lava pillows having ferromanganese 'precipitate' as infillings. The adjoining second field consisted of small chimney like growths termed as 'Christmas Tree' Field. The basal pedestal, the peripheral chimneys and small 'Christmas Tree' like growths (samples collected by MIR submersibles), though parts of the same hydrothermal field, differ significantly in their mineralogy and elemental composition indicating different history of formation. The pedestal slab consisting of chalcopyrite and pyrite as major minerals and rich in Cu is likely to have formed at higher temperatures than sphalerite dominated peripheral chimney. Extremely low concentration of high field strength elements (e.g. Zr, Hf, Nb and Ta) and enrichment of light REE in these sulfides indicate prominent influence of aqueous arc-magma, rich in subduction components. The oxide growths in the 'Christmas Tree' Field have two distinct layers, Fe rich orange-red basal part which seems to have formed at very low temperature as precipitates from diffused hydrothermal flows from the seafloor whereas Mn rich black surface coating is formed from hydrothermal fluids emanated from the seafloor during another episode of hydrothermal activity. Perhaps this is for the first time such unique hydrothermal oxide growths are being reported in association with hydrothermal system. Here, we discuss the possible processes responsible for the formation of these different hydrothermal deposits based on their mineralogy and geochemistry.

  15. Specific detection of DNA and RNA targets using a novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification assay based on the formation of a three-way junction structure

    Wharam, Susan D.; Marsh, Peter; Lloyd, John S.; Ray, Trevor D.; Mock, Graham A.; Assenberg, René; McPhee, Julie E.; Brown, Philip; Weston, Anthony; Cardy, Donald L. N.

    2001-01-01

    The formation of DNA three-way junction (3WJ) structures has been utilised to develop a novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification assay (SMART) for the detection of specific DNA or RNA targets. The assay consists of two oligonucleotide probes that hybridise to a specific target sequence and, only then, to each other forming a 3WJ structure. One probe (template for the RNA signal) contains a non-functional single-stranded T7 RNA polymerase promoter sequence. This ...

  16. Specific permeability and selective formation of gap junction channels in connexin-transfected HeLa cells

    1995-01-01

    DNAs coding for seven murine connexins (Cx) (Cx26, Cx31, Cx32, Cx37, Cx40, Cx43, and Cx45) are functionally expressed in human HeLa cells that were deficient in gap junctional communication. We compare the permeabilities of gap junctions comprised of different connexins to iontophoretically injected tracer molecules. Our results show that Lucifer yellow can pass through all connexin channels analyzed. On the other hand, propidium iodide and ethidium bromide penetrate very poorly or not at all...

  17. Dok-7 promotes slow muscle integrity as well as neuromuscular junction formation in a zebrafish model of congenital myasthenic syndromes.

    Müller, Juliane S; Jepson, Catherine D; Laval, Steven H; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2010-05-01

    The small signalling adaptor protein Dok-7 has recently been reported as an essential protein of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Mutations resulting in partial loss of Dok-7 activity cause a distinct limb-girdle subtype of the inherited NMJ disorder congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs), whereas complete loss of Dok-7 results in a lethal phenotype in both mice and humans. Here we describe the zebrafish orthologue of Dok-7 and study its in vivo function. Dok-7 deficiency leads to motility defects in zebrafish embryos and larvae. The relative importance of Dok-7 at different stages of NMJ development varies; it is crucial for the earliest step, the formation of acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clusters in the middle of the muscle fibre prior to motor neuron contact. At later stages, presence of Dok-7 is not absolutely essential, as focal and non-focal synapses do form when Dok-7 expression is downregulated. These contacts however are smaller than in the wild-type zebrafish, reminiscent of the neuromuscular endplate pathology seen in patients with DOK7 mutations. Intriguingly, we also observed changes in slow muscle fibre arrangement; previously, Dok-7 has not been linked to functions other than postsynaptic AChR clustering. Our results suggest an additional role of Dok-7 in muscle. This role seems to be independent of the muscle-specific tyrosine kinase MuSK, the known binding partner of Dok-7 at the NMJ. Our findings in the zebrafish model contribute to a better understanding of the signalling pathways at the NMJ and the pathomechanisms of DOK7 CMSs. PMID:20147321

  18. Regulation of cytoskeletal organization and junctional remodeling by the atypical cadherin Fat

    Marcinkevicius, Emily; Zallen, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    The atypical cadherin Fat is a conserved regulator of planar cell polarity, but the mechanisms by which Fat controls cell shape and tissue structure are not well understood. Here, we show that Fat is required for the planar polarized organization of actin denticle precursors, adherens junction proteins and microtubules in the epidermis of the late Drosophila embryo. In wild-type embryos, spatially regulated cell-shape changes and rearrangements organize cells into highly aligned columns. Junc...

  19. Gap Junctions

    Goodenough, Daniel A.; Paul, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell–cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hex...

  20. Gap Junctions

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of ...

  1. Ultra-Shallow P+/N Junction Formation in Si Using Low Temperature Solid Phase Epitaxy Assisted with Laser Activation

    A combination of Ge pre-amorphization implantation (Ge-PAI), low-energy B implantation and laser annealing is a promising method to form highly-activated, abrupt and ultra-shallow junctions (USJ). In our previous report of IIT 2006, we succeeded in forming pn junctions less than 10 nm using non-melt double-pulsed green laser. However, a large leakage current under reverse bias was observed consequently due to residual defects in the implanted layer. In this study, a method to form USJ is proposed: a combination of low-temperature solid phase epitaxy and non-melt laser irradiation for B activation. Ge pre-amorphization implantation was performed at energy of 6 keV with a dose of 3x1014/cm2. Then B implantation was performed at energy of 0.2 keV with a dose of 1.2x1015/cm2. Samples were annealed at 400 deg. C for 10 h in nitrogen atmosphere. Subsequently, non-melt laser irradiation was performed at energy of 690 mJ/cm2 and pulse duration of 100 ns with intervals of 300 ns. As a result, USJ around 10 nm with better crystallinity was successfully formed. And the leakage current of pn diodes was reduced significantly. Moreover, it is proven from secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis that transient enhanced diffusion (TED) of B is specifically suppressed.

  2. Time-dependent effects of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure argon plasma on epithelial cell attachment, viability and tight junction formation in vitro

    Hoentsch, Maxi; von Woedtke, Thomas; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Nebe, J. Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The application of physical plasma to living tissues is expected to promote wound healing by plasma disinfection and stimulation of tissue regeneration. However, the effects of plasma on healthy cells must be studied and understood. In our experiments we used an argon plasma jet (kINPen®09) to gain insights into time-dependent plasma effects on cell attachment, viability and tight junction formation in vitro. Murine epithelial cells mHepR1 were suspended in complete cell culture medium and were irradiated with argon plasma (direct approach) for 30, 60 and 120 s. Suspecting that physical plasma may exert its effect via the medium, cell culture medium alone was first treated with argon plasma (indirect approach) and immediately afterwards, cells were added and also cultured for 24 h. Cell morphology and vitality were verified using light microscopy and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Already after 30 s of treatment the mHepR1 cells lost their capability to adhere and the cell vitality decreased with increasing treatment time. Interestingly, the same inhibitory effect was observed in the indirect approach. Furthermore, the argon plasma-treated culture medium-induced large openings of the cell's tight junctions, were verified by the zonula occludens protein ZO-1, which we observed for the first time in confluently grown epithelial cells.

  3. Time-dependent effects of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure argon plasma on epithelial cell attachment, viability and tight junction formation in vitro

    The application of physical plasma to living tissues is expected to promote wound healing by plasma disinfection and stimulation of tissue regeneration. However, the effects of plasma on healthy cells must be studied and understood. In our experiments we used an argon plasma jet (kINPen®09) to gain insights into time-dependent plasma effects on cell attachment, viability and tight junction formation in vitro. Murine epithelial cells mHepR1 were suspended in complete cell culture medium and were irradiated with argon plasma (direct approach) for 30, 60 and 120 s. Suspecting that physical plasma may exert its effect via the medium, cell culture medium alone was first treated with argon plasma (indirect approach) and immediately afterwards, cells were added and also cultured for 24 h. Cell morphology and vitality were verified using light microscopy and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Already after 30 s of treatment the mHepR1 cells lost their capability to adhere and the cell vitality decreased with increasing treatment time. Interestingly, the same inhibitory effect was observed in the indirect approach. Furthermore, the argon plasma-treated culture medium-induced large openings of the cell's tight junctions, were verified by the zonula occludens protein ZO-1, which we observed for the first time in confluently grown epithelial cells. (paper)

  4. An outdoor investigation of the absorption degradation of single-junction amorphous silicon photovoltaic module due to localized heat/hot spot formation

    Osayemwenre Gilbert O; Meyer Edson L; Mamphweli Sampson

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the absorbance degradation of single-junction amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) photovoltaic (PV) module, due to the presence of localized heat. The decrease in optical density is a huge challenge due to the long-term degradation of PV modules. The reduction in solar cell optical density causes a decline in its conversion efficiency. This decreases the photogenerating current, hence reduces the effective efficiency of the PV device. An infrared thermography was used for mapping the module temperature profile. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used for the absorption characterization. The rationale behind the outdoor deployment was to deduce a practical effect of hot spot formation on the module’s absorption ability.The results show a direct correlation between localized heat and the absorption degradation.

  5. Glutamine supplementation attenuates ethanol-induced disruption of apical junctional complexes in colonic epithelium and ameliorates gut barrier dysfunction and fatty liver in mice.

    Chaudhry, Kamaljit K; Shukla, Pradeep K; Mir, Hina; Manda, Bhargavi; Gangwar, Ruchika; Yadav, Nikki; McMullen, Megan; Nagy, Laura E; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2016-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies showed that glutamine (Gln) prevents acetaldehyde-induced disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers and human colonic mucosa. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of Gln supplementation on ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction and liver injury in mice in vivo. Ethanol feeding caused a significant increase in inulin permeability in distal colon. Elevated permeability was associated with a redistribution of tight junction and adherens junction proteins and depletion of detergent-insoluble fractions of these proteins, suggesting that ethanol disrupts apical junctional complexes in colonic epithelium and increases paracellular permeability. Ethanol-induced increase in colonic mucosal permeability and disruption of junctional complexes were most severe in mice fed Gln-free diet. Gln supplementation attenuated ethanol-induced mucosal permeability and disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in a dose-dependent manner, indicating the potential role of Gln in nutritional intervention to alcoholic tissue injury. Gln supplementation dose-dependently elevated reduced-protein thiols in colon without affecting the level of oxidized-protein thiols. Ethanol feeding depleted reduced protein thiols and elevated oxidized protein thiols. Ethanol-induced protein thiol oxidation was most severe in mice fed with Gln-free diet and absent in mice fed with Gln-supplemented diet, suggesting that antioxidant effect is one of the likely mechanisms involved in Gln-mediated amelioration of ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction. Ethanol feeding elevated plasma transaminase and liver triglyceride, which was accompanied by histopathologic lesions in the liver; ethanol-induced liver damage was attenuated by Gln supplementation. These results indicate that Gln supplementation ameliorates alcohol-induced gut and liver injury. PMID:26365579

  6. Calcium-Ask1-MKK7-JNK2-c-Src Signaling Cascade Mediates Disruption of Intestinal Epithelial Tight Junctions by Dextran Sulfate Sodium

    Samak, Geetha; Chaudhry, Kamaljit K.; Gangwar, Ruchika; Narayanan, Damodaran; Jaggar, Jonathan H.; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions is an important event in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) induces colitis in mice with the symptoms similar to ulcerative colitis. However, the mechanism of DSS-induced colitis is unknown. We investigated the mechanism of DSS-induced disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions and barrier dysfunction in Caco-2 cell monolayers in vitro and mouse colon in vivo. DSS treatment resulted in disruption of tight junctions, adherens junctions and actin cytoskeleton leading to barrier dysfunction in Caco-2 cell monolayers. DSS induced a rapid activation of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and the inhibition or knockdown of JNK2 attenuated DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. In mice, DSS administration for 4 days caused redistribution of tight junction and adherens junction proteins from the epithelial junctions, which was blocked by JNK inhibitor. In Caco-2 cell monolayers, DSS increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration, and depletion of intracellular Ca2+ by BAPTA or thapsigargin attenuated DSS-induced JNK activation, tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. Knockdown of Ask1 or MKK7 blocked DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. DSS activated c-Src by a Ca2+ and JNK-dependent mechanism. Inhibition of Src kinase activity or knockdown of c-Src blocked DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. DSS increased Tyr-phosphorylation of occludin, ZO-1, E-cadherin and β-catenin. SP600125 abrogated DSS-induced Tyr-phosphorylation of junctional proteins. Recombinant JNK2 induced threonine phosphorylation and auto phosphorylation of c-Src. This study demonstrates that Ca2+-Ask1-MKK7-JNK2-cSrc signaling cascade mediates DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. PMID:25377781

  7. The intracellular domain of cadherin-11 is not required for the induction of cell aggregation, adhesion or gap-junction formation.

    Braungart, E; Hartman, E; Bechler, K; Höfler, H; Atkinson, M J

    2001-01-01

    The cadherin family of cell adhesion molecules demonstrates calcium-dependent homophilic binding, leading to cellular recognition and adhesion. The adhesion mediated by the classical type I cadherins is strengthened through catenin-mediated coupling of the cytoplasmic domain to the cytoskeleton. This cytoskeletal interaction may not be essential for the adhesion promoted by all cadherins, several of which lack cytosolic catenin-binding sequences. Cadherin-11, a classical cadherin, possesses a cytoplasmic domain that interacts with catenins, but may also occur as a variant form expressing a truncated cytoplasmic domain. To study the role of the cytoplasmic sequence in cadherin-11 mediated adhesion we have constructed and expressed a truncated cadherin-11 protein lacking the cytoplasmic domain and unable to bind beta-catenin. Expression of the truncated cadherin-11 in MDA-MB-435S human mammary carcinoma cells reduced their motility and promoted calcium-dependent cell aggregation, frequent cell contacts, and functional gap-junctions. We conclude that the intracellular catenin-binding domain of cadherin-11, and by inference cytoskeletal interaction, is not required for the initiation and formation of cell adhesion. PMID:11775026

  8. Crustal structure in the junction of Qinling Orogen, Yangtze Craton and Tibetan Plateau: implications for the formation of the Dabashan Orocline and the growth of Tibetan Plateau

    Jiang, Chengxin; Yang, Yingjie; Zheng, Yong

    2016-03-01

    The crust at the junction of Qinling Orogen, Yangtze Craton and NE Tibetan Plateau bears imprints of the Triassic collision and later intra-continental orogeny between the Qinling Orogen and the Yangtze Craton, and the Cenozoic growth of Tibetan Plateau. Investigating detailed crustal structures in this region helps to better understand these tectonic processes. In this study, we construct a 3-D crustal Vs model using seismic ambient noise data recorded at 321 seismic stations. Ambient noise tomography is performed to generate Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps at 8-50 s periods, which are then inverted for a 3D isotropic Vs model using a Bayesian Monte-Carlo method. Our 3D model reveals deep-rooted high velocities beneath the Hannan-Micang and Shennong-Huangling Domes, which are located on the west and east sides of the Dabashan Orocline. Similar high velocities are observed in the upper/mid crust of the western Qinling Orogen. We suggest the crustal-scale bodies with high velocity beneath the two domes and the western Qinling Orogen may represent mechanically strong rocks, which not only assisted the formation of the major Dabashan Orocline during late Mesozoic intra-continental orogeny, but also have impeded the northeastward expansion of the Tibetan Plateau during the Cenozoic era.

  9. Ultra-shallow junction formation by excimer laser annealing and low energy (<1 keV) B implantation: A two-dimensional analysis

    Formation of shallow junctions has been investigated by using excimer laser annealing in combination with two implantation schemes: BF2-ions at 20 keV and B-ions at low energies (<1 keV). The latter approach was shown to produce best results, with ultra-shallow profiles extending to a depth as low as 35 nm. The lateral distribution of the implanted B following laser annealing has been studied with two-dimensional measurements using selective etching and cross-section transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on samples where the implanted dopant was confined within an oxide mask. The results show that there is substantial lateral diffusion of B under the oxide mask when melting occurs in this region while, if melting under the oxide mask is prevented, the implanted B close to the oxide mask edge was not activated by laser annealing. The results have been explained by numerical heat-flow calculations and it is concluded that the melting of the Si under the masked region and, therefore, the lateral diffusion, can be controlled by the oxide mask thickness

  10. Crustal structure in the junction of Qinling Orogen, Yangtze Craton and Tibetan Plateau: implications for the formation of the Dabashan Orocline and the growth of Tibetan Plateau

    Jiang, Chengxin; Yang, Yingjie; Zheng, Yong

    2016-06-01

    The crust at the junction of Qinling Orogen, Yangtze Craton and NE Tibetan Plateau bears imprints of the Triassic collision and later intracontinental orogeny between the Qinling Orogen and the Yangtze Craton, and the Cenozoic growth of Tibetan Plateau. Investigating detailed crustal structures in this region helps to better understand these tectonic processes. In this study, we construct a 3-D crustal Vs model using seismic ambient noise data recorded at 321 seismic stations. Ambient noise tomography is performed to generate Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps at 8-50 s periods, which are then inverted for a 3-D isotropic Vs model using a Bayesian Monte Carlo method. Our 3-D model reveals deep-rooted high velocities beneath the Hannan-Micang and Shennong-Huangling Domes, which are located on the west and east sides of the Dabashan Orocline. Similar high velocities are observed in the upper/mid crust of the western Qinling Orogen. We suggest the crustal-scale bodies with high velocity beneath the two domes and the western Qinling Orogen may represent mechanically strong rocks, which not only assisted the formation of the major Dabashan Orocline during late Mesozoic intracontinental orogeny, but also have impeded the northeastward expansion of the Tibetan Plateau during the Cenozoic era.

  11. Ochratoxim A alters cell adhesion and gap junction intercellular communication in MDCK cells

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is one of the most potent renal carcinogens studied to date, but the mechanism of tumor formation by ochratoxin A remains largely unknown. Cell adhesion and cell-cell communication participate in the regulation of signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation and growth control and it is therefore not surprising that modulation of cell-cell signaling has been implicated in cancer development. Several nephrotoxicants and renal carcinogens have been shown to alter cell-cell signaling by interference with gap junction intercell communication (GJIC) and/or cell adhesion, and the aim of this study was to determine if disruption of cell-cell interactions occurs in kidney epithelial cells in response to OTA treatment. MDCK cells were treated with OTA (0-50 μM) for up to 24 h and gap junction function was analyzed using the scrape-load/dye transfer assay. In addition, expression and intracellular localization of Cx43, E-cadherin and β-catenin were determined by immunoblot and immunofluorescence analysis. A clear decrease in the distance of dye transfer was evident following treatment with OTA at concentrations/incubation times which did not affect cell viability. Consistent with the functional inhibition of GJIC, treatment with OTA resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in Cx43 expression. In contrast to Cx43, OTA did not alter total amount of the adherens junction proteins E-cadherin and β-catenin. Moreover, Western blot analysis of Triton X-100 soluble and insoluble protein fractions did not indicate translocation of cell adhesion molecules from the membrane to the cytoplasm. However, a ∼78 kDa fragment of β-catenin was detected in the detergent soluble fraction, indicating proteolytic cleavage of β-catenin. Immunofluorescence analysis also revealed changes in the pattern of both β-catenin and E-cadherin labeling, suggesting that OTA may alter cell-adhesion. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that disruption of cell

  12. Neisseria gonorrhoeae induced disruption of cell junction complexes in epithelial cells of the human genital tract.

    Rodríguez-Tirado, Carolina; Maisey, Kevin; Rodríguez, Felipe E; Reyes-Cerpa, Sebastián; Reyes-López, Felipe E; Imarai, Mónica

    2012-03-01

    Pathogenic microorganisms, such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae, have developed mechanisms to alter epithelial barriers in order to reach subepithelial tissues for host colonization. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of gonococci on cell junction complexes of genital epithelial cells of women. Polarized Ishikawa cells, a cell line derived from endometrial epithelium, were used for experimental infection. Infected cells displayed a spindle-like shape with an irregular distribution, indicating potential alteration of cell-cell contacts. Accordingly, analysis by confocal microscopy and cellular fractionation revealed that gonococci induced redistribution of the adherens junction proteins E-cadherin and its adapter protein β-catenin from the membrane to a cytoplasmic pool, with no significant differences in protein levels. In contrast, gonococcal infection did not induce modification of either expression or distribution of the tight junction proteins Occludin and ZO-1. Similar results were observed for Fallopian tube epithelia. Interestingly, infected Ishikawa cells also showed an altered pattern of actin cytoskeleton, observed in the form of stress fibers across the cytoplasm, which in turn matched a strong alteration on the expression of fibronectin, an adhesive glycoprotein component of extracellular matrix. Interestingly, using western blotting, activation of the ERK pathway was detected after gonococcal infection while p38 pathway was not activated. All effects were pili and Opa independent. Altogether, results indicated that gonococcus, as a mechanism of pathogenesis, induced disruption of junction complexes with early detaching of E-cadherin and β-catenin from the adherens junction complex, followed by a redistribution and reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and fibronectin within the extracellular matrix. PMID:22146107

  13. Lactobacillus plantarum MB452 enhances the function of the intestinal barrier by increasing the expression levels of genes involved in tight junction formation

    McCann Mark J

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intestinal barrier function is important for preserving health, as a compromised barrier allows antigen entry and can induce inflammatory diseases. Probiotic bacteria can play a role in enhancing intestinal barrier function; however, the mechanisms are not fully understood. Existing studies have focused on the ability of probiotics to prevent alterations to tight junctions in disease models, and have been restricted to a few tight junction bridging proteins. No studies have previously investigated the effect of probiotic bacteria on healthy intestinal epithelial cell genes involved in the whole tight junction signalling pathway, including those encoding for bridging, plaque and dual location tight junction proteins. Alteration of tight junction signalling in healthy humans is a potential mechanism that could lead to the strengthening of the intestinal barrier, resulting in limiting the ability of antigens to enter the body and potentially triggering undesirable immune responses. Results The effect of Lactobacillus plantarum MB452 on tight junction integrity was determined by measuring trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER across Caco-2 cell layers. L. plantarum MB452 caused a dose-dependent TEER increase across Caco-2 cell monolayers compared to control medium. Gene expression was compared in Caco-2 cells untreated or treated with L. plantarum MB452 for 10 hours. Caco-2 cell RNA was hybridised to human oligonucleotide arrays. Data was analysed using linear models and differently expressed genes were examined using pathway analysis tools. Nineteen tight junction-related genes had altered expression levels in response to L. plantarum MB452 (modified-P 1.2, including those encoding occludin and its associated plaque proteins that anchor it to the cytoskeleton. L. plantarum MB452 also caused changes in tubulin and proteasome gene expression levels which may be linked to intestinal barrier function. Caco-2 tight junctions

  14. Zurek-Kibble mechanism for the spontaneous vortex formation in Nb-Al/Al-ox/Nb Josephson tunnel junctions: New theory and experiment

    Monaco, R.; Mygind, Jesper; Aarøe, Morten;

    2006-01-01

    New scaling behavior has been both predicted and observed in the spontaneous production of fluxons in quenched Nb-Al/Al-ox/Nb annular Josephson tunnel junctions (JTJs) as a function of the quench time, tau(Q). The probability f(1) to trap a single defect during the normal-metal-superconductor pha...

  15. In Situ Formation of Disorder-Engineered TiO2(B)-Anatase Heterophase Junction for Enhanced Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution.

    Cai, Jinmeng; Wang, Yating; Zhu, Yingming; Wu, Moqing; Zhang, Hao; Li, Xingang; Jiang, Zheng; Meng, Ming

    2015-11-18

    Hydrogenation of semiconductors is an efficient way to increase their photocatalytic activity by forming disorder-engineered structures. Herein, we report a facile hydrogenation process of TiO2(B) nanobelts to in situ generate TiO2(B)-anatase heterophase junction with a disordered surface shell. The catalyst exhibits an excellent performance for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution under the simulated solar light irradiation (∼580 μmol h(-1), 0.02 g photocatalyst). The atomically well-matched heterophase junction, along with the disorder-engineered surface shell, promotes the separation of electron-hole and inhibits their recombination. This strategy can be further employed to design other disorder-engineered composite photocatalysts for solar energy utilization. PMID:26536137

  16. Tight junctions in Hailey-Hailey and Darier’s diseases

    Laura Raiko

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Hailey-Hailey disease (HHD and Darier’s disease (DD are caused by mutations in Ca2+-ATPases with the end result of desmosomal disruption and suprabasal acantholysis. Tight junctions (TJ are located in the granular cell layer in normal skin and contribute to the epidermal barrier. Aberrations in the epidermal differentiation, such as in psoriasis, have been shown to lead to changes in the expression of TJ components. Our aim was to elucidate the expression and dynamics of the TJ proteins during the disruption of desmosomes in HHD and DD lesions. Indirect immunofluorescence and avidin-biotin labeling for TJ, desmosomal and adherens junction proteins, and subsequent analyses with the confocal laser scanning microscope were carried out on 14 HHD and 14 DD skin samples. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL was measured in normal and lesional epidermis of nine HHD and eight DD patients to evaluate the function of the epidermal barrier in HHD and DD skin. The localization of TJ proteins claudin-1, claudin-4, ZO-1, and occludin in perilesional HHD and DD epidermis was similar to that previously described in normal skin. In HHD lesions the tissue distribution of ZO-1 expanded to the acantholytic spinous cells. In agreement with previous findings, desmoplakin was localized intracellularly. In contrast claudin-1 and ZO-1 persisted in the cell-cell contact sites of acantholytic cells. TEWL was increased in the lesional skin. The current results suggest that TJ components follow different dynamics in acantholysis of HHD and DD compared to desmosomal and adherens junction proteins.

  17. Overexpression of galectin-7 in mouse epidermis leads to loss of cell junctions and defective skin repair.

    Gaëlle Gendronneau

    Full Text Available The proteins of the galectin family are implicated in many cellular processes, including cell interactions, polarity, intracellular trafficking, and signal transduction. In human and mouse, galectin-7 is almost exclusively expressed in stratified epithelia, notably in the epidermis. Galectin-7 expression is also altered in several human tumors of epithelial origin. This study aimed at dissecting the consequences of galectin-7 overexpression on epidermis structure and functions in vivo.We established transgenic mice specifically overexpressing galectin-7 in the basal epidermal keratinocytes and analyzed the consequences on untreated skin and after UVB irradiation or mechanical injury.The intercellular cohesion of the epidermis is impaired in transgenic animals, with gaps developing between adjacent keratinocytes, associated with loss of adherens junctions. The epidermal architecture is aberrant with perturbations in the multilayered cellular organisation of the tissue, and structural defects in the basement membrane. These transgenic animals displayed a reduced re-epithelialisation potential following superficial wound, due to a defective collective migration of keratinocytes. Finally, a single mild dose of UVB induced an abnormal apoptotic response in the transgenic epidermis.These results indicate that an excess of galectin-7 leads to a destabilisation of adherens junctions associated with defects in epidermal repair. As this phenotype shares similarities with that of galectin-7 null mutant mice, we conclude that a critical level of this protein is required for maintaining proper epidermal homeostasis. This study brings new insight into the mode of action of galectins in normal and pathological situations.

  18. The junctional complex in the intestine of Sagitta setosa (Chaetognatha): the paired septate junction.

    Duvert, M; Gros, D; Salat, C

    1980-04-01

    The junctional complex of the intestine of Sagitta setosa has been studied in tissues stained with uranyl acetate or after lanthanum impregnation, and by freeze-cleavage. All types of junctions have been characterized in both perpendicular and tangential planes. From the apex to the base of the cell the following junctions occur in this order: a zonula adhaerens; a septate junction where the septa occur in pairs; a pleated sheet septate junction; and numerous gap junctions of the A-type. From the upper part of the cells inwards to the septate junction, the membranes follow a relatively straight path. In the lower part of the cells the membranes are deeply interdigitating. At the intersection between 3 cells a very different junction is to be observed where small units, periodically disposed, bind the membranes of the 3 adjoining cells. Each unit is composed of 3 short segments which bind the cell membranes to a central ring 16.6 +/- 2.3 nm in outer diameter. The paired septate junction constitutes a new type. Its main features are that the septa are paired and occur in 2 formations, one the 'loose formation', with elements between the septa of each pair, and the other, a 'tight formation'. After lanthanum impregnation, the thickness of each septum is seen to be about 3 nm and the undulation period 12.6 +/- 1.6 nm. On freeze-fractures 10-nm particles are found on crests on the PF face and in furrows on the EF face. The possible significance of this type of junction is discussed. The junctional complex described is analogous to those found in various invertebrate epithelia. PMID:6105159

  19. Comparison of boron diffusion in silicon during shallow p{sup +}/n junction formation by non-melt excimer and green laser annealing

    Aid, Siti Rahmah; Matsumoto, Satoru [Department of Electronics and Electrical Engineering, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kouhoku-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8522 (Japan); Fuse, Genshu [SEN Corporation, SBS Tower 9F, 4-10-1 Yoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-0097 (Japan); Sakuragi, Susumu [Sumitomo Heavy Industries Ltd., 19 Natsushima-cho, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 237-8555 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    The combination of Ge pre-amorphization implantation, low-energy boron implantation, and non-melt laser annealing is a promising method for forming ultrashallow p{sup +}/n junctions in silicon. In this study, shallow p{sup +}/n junctions were formed by non-melt annealing implanted samples using a green laser (visible laser). The dopant diffusion, activation, and recrystallization of an amorphous silicon layer were compared with those obtained in our previous study in which non-melt annealing was performed using a KrF excimer laser (UV laser). The experimental results reveal that only slight diffusion of boron in the tail region occurred in green-laser-annealed samples. In contrast, remarkable boron diffusion occurred in KrF-laser-annealed samples for very short annealing times. Recrystallization of the amorphous silicon layer was slower in green-laser-annealed samples than in KrF-laser-annealed samples. We consider the penetration depth and the pulse duration are important factors that may affect boron diffusion. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Solitons in Josephson junctions

    Ustinov, A. V.

    1998-11-01

    Magnetic flux quanta in Josephson junctions, often called fluxons, in many cases behave as solitons. A review of recent experiments and modelling of fluxon dynamics in Josephson circuits is presented. Classic quasi-one-dimensional junctions, stacked junctions (Josephson superlattices), and discrete Josephson transmission lines (JTLs) are discussed. Applications of fluxon devices as high-frequency oscillators and digital circuits are also addressed.

  1. A role for the retinoblastoma protein as a regulator of mouse osteoblast cell adhesion: implications for osteogenesis and osteosarcoma formation.

    Bernadette Sosa-García

    Full Text Available The retinoblastoma protein (pRb is a cell cycle regulator inactivated in most human cancers. Loss of pRb function results from mutations in the gene coding for pRb or for any of its upstream regulators. Although pRb is predominantly known as a cell cycle repressor, our data point to additional pRb functions in cell adhesion. Our data show that pRb regulates the expression of a wide repertoire of cell adhesion genes and regulates the assembly of the adherens junctions required for cell adhesion. We conducted our studies in osteoblasts, which depend on both pRb and on cell-to-cell contacts for their differentiation and function. We generated knockout mice in which the RB gene was excised specifically in osteoblasts using the cre-lox P system and found that osteoblasts from pRb knockout mice did not assemble adherens junction at their membranes. pRb depletion in wild type osteoblasts using RNAi also disrupted adherens junctions. Microarrays comparing pRb-expressing and pRb-deficient osteoblasts showed that pRb controls the expression of a number of cell adhesion genes, including cadherins. Furthermore, pRb knockout mice showed bone abnormalities consistent with osteoblast adhesion defects. We also found that pRb controls the function of merlin, a well-known regulator of adherens junction assembly, by repressing Rac1 and its effector Pak1. Using qRT-PCR, immunoblots, co-immunoprecipitation assays, and immunofluorescent labeling, we observed that pRb loss resulted in Rac1 and Pak1 overexpression concomitant with merlin inactivation by Pak1, merlin detachment from the membrane, and adherens junction loss. Our data support a pRb function in cell adhesion while elucidating the mechanism for this function. Our work suggests that in some tumor types pRb inactivation results in both a loss of cell cycle control that promotes initial tumor growth as well as in a loss of cell-to-cell contacts, which contributes to later stages of metastasis.

  2. Japanese encephalitis virus disrupts cell-cell junctions and affects the epithelial permeability barrier functions.

    Tanvi Agrawal

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV is a neurotropic flavivirus, which causes viral encephalitis leading to death in about 20-30% of severely-infected people. Although JEV is known to be a neurotropic virus its replication in non-neuronal cells in peripheral tissues is likely to play a key role in viral dissemination and pathogenesis. We have investigated the effect of JEV infection on cellular junctions in a number of non-neuronal cells. We show that JEV affects the permeability barrier functions in polarized epithelial cells at later stages of infection. The levels of some of the tight and adherens junction proteins were reduced in epithelial and endothelial cells and also in hepatocytes. Despite the induction of antiviral response, barrier disruption was not mediated by secreted factors from the infected cells. Localization of tight junction protein claudin-1 was severely perturbed in JEV-infected cells and claudin-1 partially colocalized with JEV in intracellular compartments and targeted for lysosomal degradation. Expression of JEV-capsid alone significantly affected the permeability barrier functions in these cells. Our results suggest that JEV infection modulates cellular junctions in non-neuronal cells and compromises the permeability barrier of epithelial and endothelial cells which may play a role in viral dissemination in peripheral tissues.

  3. Endothelial cell senescence is associated with disrupted cell-cell junctions and increased monolayer permeability

    Krouwer Vincent J D

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular senescence is associated with cellular dysfunction and has been shown to occur in vivo in age-related cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. Atherogenesis is accompanied by intimal accumulation of LDL and increased extravasation of monocytes towards accumulated and oxidized LDL, suggesting an affected barrier function of vascular endothelial cells. Our objective was to study the effect of cellular senescence on the barrier function of non-senescent endothelial cells. Methods Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were cultured until senescence. Senescent cells were compared with non-senescent cells and with co-cultures of non-senescent and senescent cells. Adherens junctions and tight junctions were studied. To assess the barrier function of various monolayers, assays to measure permeability for Lucifer Yellow (LY and horseradish peroxidase (PO were performed. Results The barrier function of monolayers comprising of senescent cells was compromised and coincided with a change in the distribution of junction proteins and a down-regulation of occludin and claudin-5 expression. Furthermore, a decreased expression of occludin and claudin-5 was observed in co-cultures of non-senescent and senescent cells, not only between senescent cells but also along the entire periphery of non-senescent cells lining a senescent cell. Conclusions Our findings show that the presence of senescent endothelial cells in a non-senescent monolayer disrupts tight junction morphology of surrounding young cells and increases the permeability of the monolayer for LY and PO.

  4. Reinforcing endothelial junctions prevents microvessel permeability increase and tumor cell adhesion in microvessels in vivo

    Fu, Bingmei M.; Yang, Jinlin; Cai, Bin; Fan, Jie; Zhang, Lin; Zeng, Min

    2015-10-01

    Tumor cell adhesion to the microvessel wall is a critical step during tumor metastasis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a secretion of tumor cells, can increase microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion in the microvessel. To test the hypothesis that inhibiting permeability increase can reduce tumor cell adhesion, we used in vivo fluorescence microscopy to measure both microvessel permeability and adhesion rates of human mammary carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells in post-capillary venules of rat mesentery under the treatment of VEGF and a cAMP analog, 8-bromo-cAMP, which can decrease microvessel permeability. By immunostaining adherens junction proteins between endothelial cells forming the microvessel wall, we further investigated the structural mechanism by which cAMP abolishes VEGF-induced increase in microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion. Our results demonstrate that 1) Pretreatment of microvessels with cAMP can abolish VEGF-enhanced microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion; 2) Tumor cells prefer to adhere to the endothelial cell junctions instead of cell bodies; 3) VEGF increases microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion by compromising endothelial junctions while cAMP abolishes these effects of VEGF by reinforcing the junctions. These results suggest that strengthening the microvessel wall integrity can be a potential approach to inhibiting hematogenous tumor metastasis.

  5. Zurek-Kibble Mechanism for the Spontaneous Vortex Formation in Nb-Al/Alox/Nb Josephson Tunnel Junctions: New Theory and Experiment

    New scaling behavior has been both predicted and observed in the spontaneous production of fluxons in quenched Nb-Al/Alox/Nb annular Josephson tunnel junctions (JTJs) as a function of the quench time, τQ. The probability f1 to trap a single defect during the normal-metal-superconductor phase transition clearly follows an allometric dependence on τQ with a scaling exponent σ=0.5, as predicted from the Zurek-Kibble mechanism for realistic JTJs formed by strongly coupled superconductors. This definitive experiment replaces one reported by us earlier, in which an idealized model was used that predicted σ=0.25, commensurate with the then much poorer data. Our experiment remains the only condensed matter experiment to date to have measured a scaling exponent with any reliability

  6. Molecular electronic junction transport

    Solomon, Gemma C.; Herrmann, Carmen; Ratner, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Whenasinglemolecule,oracollectionofmolecules,isplacedbetween two electrodes and voltage is applied, one has a molecular transport junction. We discuss such junctions, their properties, their description, and some of their applications. The discussion is qualitative rather than quantitative......, and focuses on mechanism, structure/function relations, regimes and mechanisms of transport, some molecular regularities, and some substantial challenges facing the field. Because there are many regimes and mechanisms in transport junctions, we will discuss time scales, geometries, and inelastic scattering...

  7. Self-organizing actomyosin patterns on the cell cortex at epithelial cell-cell junctions.

    Moore, Thomas; Wu, Selwin K; Michael, Magdalene; Yap, Alpha S; Gomez, Guillermo A; Neufeld, Zoltan

    2014-12-01

    The behavior of actomyosin critically determines morphologically distinct patterns of contractility found at the interface between adherent cells. One such pattern is found at the apical region (zonula adherens) of cell-cell junctions in epithelia, where clusters of the adhesion molecule E-cadherin concentrate in a static pattern. Meanwhile, E-cadherin clusters throughout lateral cell-cell contacts display dynamic movements in the plane of the junctions. To gain insight into the principles that determine the nature and organization of these dynamic structures, we analyze this behavior by modeling the 2D actomyosin cell cortex as an active fluid medium. The numerical simulations show that the stability of the actin filaments influences the spatial structure and dynamics of the system. We find that in addition to static Turing-type patterns, persistent dynamic behavior occurs in a wide range of parameters. In the 2D model, mechanical stress-dependent actin breakdown is shown to produce a continuously changing network of actin bridges, whereas with a constant breakdown rate, more isolated clusters of actomyosin tend to form. The model qualitatively reproduces the dynamic and stable patterns experimentally observed at the junctions between epithelial cells. PMID:25468344

  8. Stacked Josephson Junctions

    Madsen, Søren Find; Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2010-01-01

    Long Josephson junctions have for some time been considered as a source of THz radiation. Solitons moving coherently in the junctions is a possible source for this radiation. Analytical computations of the bunched state and bunching-inducing methods are reviewed. Experiments showing THz radiation...

  9. Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs)

    2001-01-01

    We review the giant tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in ferromagnetic-insulator-ferromagnetic junctions discovered in recent years, which is the magnetoresistance (MR) associated with the spin-dependent tunneling between two ferromagnetic metal films separated by an insulating thin tunnel barrier. The theoretical and experimental results including junction conductance, magnetoresistance and their temperature and bias dependences are described.

  10. Assemble four-arm DNA junctions into nanoweb

    2001-01-01

    DNA is of structural polymorphism, which is useful in nanoarchitecture; especially, four-arm DNA junc tions can be used to assemble nanowebs. The static four-arm DNA junctions were designed and synthesized. One-arm DNA and two-arm DNA came out simultaneously with the four-arm DNA junction's formation. A new method, termed the two-step method, was proposed and the productivity of four-arm DNA junctions was increased. A nanoweb was assembled successfully, but it showed irregularity itself. It was not the same as we expected. We consider that it is aresult from the flexibility of four-arm DNA junction.

  11. Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate Stimulates Expression of Blood-Testis-Barrier Proteins Claudin-3 and -5 and Tight Junction Formation via a Gnα11-Coupled Receptor in Sertoli Cells

    Papadopoulos, Dimitrios; Dietze, Raimund; Shihan, Mazen; Kirch, Ulrike; Scheiner-Bobis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) is a circulating sulfated steroid considered to be a pro-androgen in mammalian physiology. Here we show that at a physiological concentration (1 μM), DHEAS induces the phosphorylation of the kinase Erk1/2 and of the transcription factors CREB and ATF-1 in the murine Sertoli cell line TM4. This signaling cascade stimulates the expression of the tight junction (TJ) proteins claudin-3 and claudin-5. As a consequence of the increased expression, tight junction connections between neighboring Sertoli cells are augmented, as demonstrated by measurements of transepithelial resistance. Phosphorylation of Erk1/2, CREB, or ATF-1 is not affected by the presence of the steroid sulfatase inhibitor STX64. Erk1/2 phosphorylation was not observed when dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) was used instead of DHEAS. Abrogation of androgen receptor (AR) expression by siRNA did not affect DHEAS-stimulated Erk1/2 phosphorylation, nor did it change DHEAS-induced stimulation of claudin-3 and claudin-5 expression. All of the above indicate that desulfation and conversion of DHEAS into a different steroid hormone is not required to trigger the DHEAS-induced signaling cascade. All activating effects of DHEAS, however, are abolished when the expression of the G-protein Gnα11 is suppressed by siRNA, including claudin-3 and -5 expression and TJ formation between neighboring Sertoli cells as indicated by reduced transepithelial resistance. Taken together, these results are consistent with the effects of DHEAS being mediated through a membrane-bound G-protein-coupled receptor interacting with Gnα11 in a signaling pathway that resembles the non-classical signaling pathways of steroid hormones. Considering the fact that DHEAS is produced in reproductive organs, these findings also suggest that DHEAS, by acting as an autonomous steroid hormone and influencing the formation and dynamics of the TJ at the blood-testis barrier, might play a crucial role for the

  12. Engineering Strategies for the Formation of Embryoid Bodies from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Pettinato, Giuseppe; Wen, Xuejun; Zhang, Ning

    2015-07-15

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are powerful tools for regenerative therapy and studying human developmental biology, attributing to their ability to differentiate into many functional cell types in the body. The main challenge in realizing hPSC potential is to guide their differentiation in a well-controlled manner. One way to control the cell differentiation process is to recapitulate during in vitro culture the key events in embryogenesis to obtain the three developmental germ layers from which all cell types arise. To achieve this goal, many techniques have been tested to obtain a cellular cluster, an embryoid body (EB), from both mouse and hPSCs. Generation of EBs that are homogeneous in size and shape would allow directed hPSC differentiation into desired cell types in a more synchronous manner and define the roles of cell-cell interaction and spatial organization in lineage specification in a setting similar to in vivo embryonic development. However, previous success in uniform EB formation from mouse PSCs cannot be extrapolated to hPSCs possibly due to the destabilization of adherens junctions on cell surfaces during the dissociation into single cells, making hPSCs extremely vulnerable to cell death. Recently, new advances have emerged to form uniform human embryoid bodies (hEBs) from dissociated single cells of hPSCs. In this review, the existing methods for hEB production from hPSCs and the results on the downstream differentiation of the hEBs are described with emphases on the efficiency, homogeneity, scalability, and reproducibility of the hEB formation process and the yield in terminal differentiation. New trends in hEB production and directed differentiation are discussed. PMID:25900308

  13. Quantum Junction Solar Cells

    Tang, Jiang

    2012-09-12

    Colloidal quantum dot solids combine convenient solution-processing with quantum size effect tuning, offering avenues to high-efficiency multijunction cells based on a single materials synthesis and processing platform. The highest-performing colloidal quantum dot rectifying devices reported to date have relied on a junction between a quantum-tuned absorber and a bulk material (e.g., TiO 2); however, quantum tuning of the absorber then requires complete redesign of the bulk acceptor, compromising the benefits of facile quantum tuning. Here we report rectifying junctions constructed entirely using inherently band-aligned quantum-tuned materials. Realizing these quantum junction diodes relied upon the creation of an n-type quantum dot solid having a clean bandgap. We combine stable, chemically compatible, high-performance n-type and p-type materials to create the first quantum junction solar cells. We present a family of photovoltaic devices having widely tuned bandgaps of 0.6-1.6 eV that excel where conventional quantum-to-bulk devices fail to perform. Devices having optimal single-junction bandgaps exhibit certified AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies of 5.4%. Control over doping in quantum solids, and the successful integration of these materials to form stable quantum junctions, offers a powerful new degree of freedom to colloidal quantum dot optoelectronics. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  14. RhoA-JNK Regulates the E-Cadherin Junctions of Human Gingival Epithelial Cells.

    Lee, G; Kim, H J; Kim, H-M

    2016-03-01

    The junctional epithelium (JE) is unique with regard to its wide intercellular spaces and sparsely developed intercellular junctions. Thus, knowledge of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the formation of the intercellular junctions of the junctional epithelium may be essential to understand the pathophysiology of the JE. HOK-16B cells, a normal human gingival epithelial cell line, were used to identify the molecules involved in the regulation of the formation of intercellular E-cadherin junctions between human gingival epithelial cells. Activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) disrupted the intercellular junctions through the dissociation of E-cadherin. The role of JNK in the formation of these E-cadherin junctions was further confirmed by demonstrating that JNK inhibition induced the formation of intercellular E-cadherin junctions. The upstream signaling of JNK was also examined. Activation of the small GTPase RhoA disrupted the formation of E-cadherin junctions between HOK-16B cells, which was accompanied by JNK activation. Disruption of these intercellular junctions upon RhoA activation was prevented when JNK activity was inhibited. In contrast, RhoA inactivation led to HOK-16B cell aggregation and the formation of intercellular junctions, even under conditions in which the cellular junctions were naturally disrupted by growth on a strongly adhesive surface. Furthermore, the JE of mouse molars had high JNK activity associated with low E-cadherin expression, which was reversed in the other gingival epithelia, including the sulcular epithelium. Interestingly, JNK activity was increased in cells grown on a solid surface, where cells showed higher RhoA activity than those grown on soft surfaces. Together, these results indicate that the decreased formation of intercellular E-cadherin junctions within the JE may be coupled to high JNK activity, which is activated by the upregulation of RhoA on solid tooth surfaces. PMID:26635280

  15. Quantifying cadherin mechanotransduction machinery assembly/disassembly dynamics using fluorescence covariance analysis

    Vedula, Pavan; Cruz, Lissette A.; Gutierrez, Natasha; Davis, Justin; Ayee, Brian; Abramczyk, Rachel; Rodriguez, Alexis J.

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying multi-molecular complex assembly in specific cytoplasmic compartments is crucial to understand how cells use assembly/disassembly of these complexes to control function. Currently, biophysical methods like Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer and Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy provide quantitative measurements of direct protein-protein interactions, while traditional biochemical approaches such as sub-cellular fractionation and immunoprecipitation remain the main approaches used to study multi-protein complex assembly/disassembly dynamics. In this article, we validate and quantify multi-protein adherens junction complex assembly in situ using light microscopy and Fluorescence Covariance Analysis. Utilizing specific fluorescently-labeled protein pairs, we quantified various stages of adherens junction complex assembly, the multiprotein complex regulating epithelial tissue structure and function following de novo cell-cell contact. We demonstrate: minimal cadherin-catenin complex assembly in the perinuclear cytoplasm and subsequent localization to the cell-cell contact zone, assembly of adherens junction complexes, acto-myosin tension-mediated anchoring, and adherens junction maturation following de novo cell-cell contact. Finally applying Fluorescence Covariance Analysis in live cells expressing fluorescently tagged adherens junction complex proteins, we also quantified adherens junction complex assembly dynamics during epithelial monolayer formation. PMID:27357130

  16. Junction-FET dosimeter

    The performance of a new junction-FET dosimeter and its application to the beam profile measurement are presented. One of the two junction FET's making up an astable multivibrator is used as a small-size (approx.0.4x0.4 mm) high-level dose detector. The irradiated dose can be estimated by the amount of the decrease of the oscillator period of the multivibrator. The distinct advantages in its small size and superior resistive property to radiation effect enable us to measure the cross-sectional profile of the electron beam from a linac with high spatial resolution of about 0.4 mm

  17. Mapping the Transmission Functions of Single-Molecule Junctions.

    Capozzi, Brian; Low, Jonathan Z; Xia, Jianlong; Liu, Zhen-Fei; Neaton, Jeffrey B; Campos, Luis M; Venkataraman, Latha

    2016-06-01

    Charge transport phenomena in single-molecule junctions are often dominated by tunneling, with a transmission function dictating the probability that electrons or holes tunnel through the junction. Here, we present a new and simple technique for measuring the transmission functions of molecular junctions in the coherent tunneling limit, over an energy range of 1.5 eV around the Fermi energy. We create molecular junctions in an ionic environment with electrodes having different exposed areas, which results in the formation of electric double layers of dissimilar density on the two electrodes. This allows us to electrostatically shift the molecular resonance relative to the junction Fermi levels in a manner that depends on the sign of the applied bias, enabling us to map out the junction's transmission function and determine the dominant orbital for charge transport in the molecular junction. We demonstrate this technique using two groups of molecules: one group having molecular resonance energies relatively far from EF and one group having molecular resonance energies within the accessible bias window. Our results compare well with previous electrochemical gating data and with transmission functions computed from first principles. Furthermore, with the second group of molecules, we are able to examine the behavior of a molecular junction as a resonance shifts into the bias window. This work provides a new, experimentally simple route for exploring the fundamentals of charge transport at the nanoscale. PMID:27186894

  18. Metal-free molecular junctions on ITO via amino-silane binding-towards optoelectronic molecular junctions.

    Sergani, S; Furmansky, Y; Visoly-Fisher, I

    2013-11-15

    Light control over currents in molecular junctions is desirable as a non-contact input with high spectral and spatial resolution provided by the photonic input and the molecular electronics element, respectively. Expanding the study of molecular junctions to non-metallic transparent substrates, such as indium tin oxide (ITO), is vital for the observation of molecular optoelectronic effects. Non-metallic electrodes are expected to decrease the probability of quenching of molecular photo-excited states, light-induced plasmonic effects, or significant electrode expansion under visible light. We have developed micron-sized, metal free, optically addressable ITO molecular junctions with a conductive polymer serving as the counter-electrode. The electrical transport was shown to be dominated by the nature of the self-assembled monolayer (SAM). The use of amino-silane (APTMS) as the chemical binding scheme to ITO was found to be significant in determining the transport properties of the junctions. APTMS allows high junction yields and the formation of dense molecular layers preventing electrical short. However, polar amino-silane binding to the ITO significantly decreased the conductance compared to thiol-bound SAMs, and caused tilted geometry and disorder in the molecular layer. As the effect of the molecular structure on transport properties is clearly observed in our junctions, such metal-free junctions are suitable for characterizing the optoelectronic properties of molecular junctions. PMID:24129428

  19. Metal-free molecular junctions on ITO via amino-silane binding—towards optoelectronic molecular junctions

    Sergani, S.; Furmansky, Y.; Visoly-Fisher, I.

    2013-11-01

    Light control over currents in molecular junctions is desirable as a non-contact input with high spectral and spatial resolution provided by the photonic input and the molecular electronics element, respectively. Expanding the study of molecular junctions to non-metallic transparent substrates, such as indium tin oxide (ITO), is vital for the observation of molecular optoelectronic effects. Non-metallic electrodes are expected to decrease the probability of quenching of molecular photo-excited states, light-induced plasmonic effects, or significant electrode expansion under visible light. We have developed micron-sized, metal free, optically addressable ITO molecular junctions with a conductive polymer serving as the counter-electrode. The electrical transport was shown to be dominated by the nature of the self-assembled monolayer (SAM). The use of amino-silane (APTMS) as the chemical binding scheme to ITO was found to be significant in determining the transport properties of the junctions. APTMS allows high junction yields and the formation of dense molecular layers preventing electrical short. However, polar amino-silane binding to the ITO significantly decreased the conductance compared to thiol-bound SAMs, and caused tilted geometry and disorder in the molecular layer. As the effect of the molecular structure on transport properties is clearly observed in our junctions, such metal-free junctions are suitable for characterizing the optoelectronic properties of molecular junctions.

  20. Metal-free molecular junctions on ITO via amino-silane binding—towards optoelectronic molecular junctions

    Light control over currents in molecular junctions is desirable as a non-contact input with high spectral and spatial resolution provided by the photonic input and the molecular electronics element, respectively. Expanding the study of molecular junctions to non-metallic transparent substrates, such as indium tin oxide (ITO), is vital for the observation of molecular optoelectronic effects. Non-metallic electrodes are expected to decrease the probability of quenching of molecular photo-excited states, light-induced plasmonic effects, or significant electrode expansion under visible light. We have developed micron-sized, metal free, optically addressable ITO molecular junctions with a conductive polymer serving as the counter-electrode. The electrical transport was shown to be dominated by the nature of the self-assembled monolayer (SAM). The use of amino-silane (APTMS) as the chemical binding scheme to ITO was found to be significant in determining the transport properties of the junctions. APTMS allows high junction yields and the formation of dense molecular layers preventing electrical short. However, polar amino-silane binding to the ITO significantly decreased the conductance compared to thiol-bound SAMs, and caused tilted geometry and disorder in the molecular layer. As the effect of the molecular structure on transport properties is clearly observed in our junctions, such metal-free junctions are suitable for characterizing the optoelectronic properties of molecular junctions. (paper)

  1. Canted magnetization texture in ferromagnetic tunnel junctions

    Kuzmenko, Igor; Falko, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    We study the formation of inhomogeneous magnetization texture in the vicinity of a tunnel junction between two ferromagnetic wires nominally in the antiparallel configuration and its influence on the magnetoresistance of such a device. The texture, dependent on magnetization rigidity and crystalline anisotropy energy in the ferromagnet, appears upon an increase of ferromagnetic inter-wire coupling above a critical value and it varies with an external magnetic field.

  2. Particulate matter air pollution disrupts endothelial cell barrier via calpain-mediated tight junction protein degradation

    Wang Ting

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to particulate matter (PM is a significant risk factor for increased cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality. The mechanism of PM-mediated pathophysiology remains unknown. However, PM is proinflammatory to the endothelium and increases vascular permeability in vitro and in vivo via ROS generation. Objectives We explored the role of tight junction proteins as targets for PM-induced loss of lung endothelial cell (EC barrier integrity and enhanced cardiopulmonary dysfunction. Methods Changes in human lung EC monolayer permeability were assessed by Transendothelial Electrical Resistance (TER in response to PM challenge (collected from Ft. McHenry Tunnel, Baltimore, MD, particle size >0.1 μm. Biochemical assessment of ROS generation and Ca2+ mobilization were also measured. Results PM exposure induced tight junction protein Zona occludens-1 (ZO-1 relocation from the cell periphery, which was accompanied by significant reductions in ZO-1 protein levels but not in adherens junction proteins (VE-cadherin and β-catenin. N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC, 5 mM reduced PM-induced ROS generation in ECs, which further prevented TER decreases and atteneuated ZO-1 degradation. PM also mediated intracellular calcium mobilization via the transient receptor potential cation channel M2 (TRPM2, in a ROS-dependent manner with subsequent activation of the Ca2+-dependent protease calpain. PM-activated calpain is responsible for ZO-1 degradation and EC barrier disruption. Overexpression of ZO-1 attenuated PM-induced endothelial barrier disruption and vascular hyperpermeability in vivo and in vitro. Conclusions These results demonstrate that PM induces marked increases in vascular permeability via ROS-mediated calcium leakage via activated TRPM2, and via ZO-1 degradation by activated calpain. These findings support a novel mechanism for PM-induced lung damage and adverse cardiovascular outcomes.

  3. Disordered graphene Josephson junctions

    Munoz, W. A.; Covaci, L.; Peeters, F. M.

    2014-01-01

    A tight-binding approach based on the Chebyshev-Bogoliubov-de Gennes method is used to describe disordered single-layer graphene Josephson junctions. Scattering by vacancies, ripples or charged impurities is included. We compute the Josephson current and investigate the nature of multiple Andreev reflections, which induce bound states appearing as peaks in the density of states for energies below the superconducting gap. In the presence of single atom vacancies, we observe a strong suppressio...

  4. Crystal Phase Transformation in Self-Assembled InAs Nanowire Junctions on Patterned Si Substrates.

    Rieger, Torsten; Rosenbach, Daniel; Vakulov, Daniil; Heedt, Sebastian; Schäpers, Thomas; Grützmacher, Detlev; Lepsa, Mihail Ion

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate the growth and structural characteristics of InAs nanowire junctions evidencing a transformation of the crystalline structure. The junctions are obtained without the use of catalyst particles. Morphological investigations of the junctions reveal three structures having an L-, T-, and X-shape. The formation mechanisms of these structures have been identified. The NW junctions reveal large sections of zinc blende crystal structure free of extended defects, despite the high stacking fault density obtained in individual InAs nanowires. This segment of zinc blende crystal structure in the junction is associated with a crystal phase transformation involving sets of Shockley partial dislocations; the transformation takes place solely in the crystal phase. A model is developed to demonstrate that only the zinc blende phase with the same orientation as the substrate can result in monocrystalline junctions. The suitability of the junctions to be used in nanoelectronic devices is confirmed by room-temperature electrical experiments. PMID:26881450

  5. Quantitative global phosphoproteomics of human umbilical vein endothelial cells after activation of the Rap signaling pathway

    Meijer, L.A.T.; Zhou, H.; Chan, O.Y.A.; Altelaar, A.F.M.; Hennrich, M.L.; Mohammed, S.; Bos, J.L.; Heck, A.J.R.

    2013-01-01

    The small GTPase Rap1 is required for proper cell–cell junction formation and also plays a key role in mediating cAMP-induced tightening of adherens junctions and subsequent increased barrier function of endothelial cells. To further study how Rap1 controls barrier function, we performed quantitativ

  6. String networks with junctions in competition models

    Avelino, P P; Losano, L; Menezes, J; de Oliveira, B F

    2016-01-01

    In this work we give specific examples of competition models, with six and eight species, whose three-dimensional dynamics naturally leads to the formation of string networks with junctions, associated with regions that have a high concentration of enemy species. We study the two- and three-dimensional evolution of such networks, both using stochastic network and mean field theory simulations. If the predation, reproduction and mobility probabilities do not vary in space and time, we find that the networks attain scaling regimes with a characteristic length roughly proportional to $t^{1/2}$, where $t$ is the physical time, thus showing that the presence of junctions, on its own, does not have a significant impact on their scaling properties.

  7. Age-dependant expression of alpha-macula adherens protein in rat heart%α-黏着斑蛋白在大鼠心脏表达分布随增龄变化的特征

    张光谋; 吴俊琢; 张艳芬; 郭志坤

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Macula adherens protein is found closely associated with congenital cardiac malformation and myocardial differentiation. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the expression characteristics of α-macula adherens protein in rat heart, as well as the property of age-dependant expression during myocardial growth. DESIGN: Randomized controlled, observational comparative study. SETTING: Department of Cell Biology of Xinxiang Medical College; Department of Bioengineering and Agricultural Economics of Puyang Vocational Technical School. MATERIALS: This study was conducted at the Morphological Laboratory of Xinxiang Medical College between January and June 2003. Totally 28 Wistar rats of clean grade were divided into infant group, youth group,middle-age group, and old-age group with 7 rats in each group. METHODS: All rats were anaesthetized and then cardiac tissues were cut into consecutive coronal slices of 5 μm thick. The expression of α-macula adherens protein in rat myocardium of infant, youth, middle-age and oldage groups was detected using IHC method. The positive cells displayed brownish yellow granules on the surface, cytoplasm and intercalated disc. Routine HE staining was performed on all specimens for structural comparison. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The expression of α-macula adherens protein in rat myocardium of different groups. RESULTS: All the 28 rats entered the final results analysis. ① α-macula adherens protein was found to be expressed in myocardium in atrium, ventricle, papilla muscles and interventricular septum. ② In infant rats, the expression of α-macula adherens protein was mainly observed in intercalated disc at the end of myocardium, with less expression on cell surface and in cytoplasm; in contrast, α-macula adherens protein in young, middleaged and old rats was found to be typically expressed in intercalated disc at the end of myocardium. CONCLUSION: The expression of α-macula adherens protein displays age-dependant manner during rat

  8. Josephson junction simulation of neurons

    Crotty, Patrick; Schult, Daniel; Segall, Ken

    2010-01-01

    With the goal of understanding the intricate behavior and dynamics of collections of neurons, we present superconducting circuits containing Josephson junctions that model biologically realistic neurons. These "Josephson junction neurons" reproduce many characteristic behaviors of biological neurons such as action potentials, refractory periods, and firing thresholds. They can be coupled together in ways that mimic electrical and chemical synapses. Using existing fabrication technologies, lar...

  9. Fluid Flow at Branching Junctions

    Sochi, Taha

    2013-01-01

    The flow of fluids at branching junctions plays important kinematic and dynamic roles in most biological and industrial flow systems. The present paper highlights some key issues related to the flow of fluids at these junctions with special emphasis on the biological flow networks particularly blood transportation vasculature.

  10. Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    Laimer, Martin; Lanschuetzer, Christoph M; Diem, Anja; Bauer, Johann W

    2010-01-01

    Junctional epidermolysis bullosa type Herlitz (JEB-H) is the autosomal recessively inherited, more severe variant of "lucidolytic" JEB. Characterized by generalized, extensive mucocutaneous blistering at birth and early lethality, this devastating condition is most often caused by homozygous null mutations in the genes LAMA3, LAMB3, or LAMC2, each encoding for 1 of the 3 chains of the heterotrimer laminin-332. The JEB-H subtype usually presents as a severe and clinically diverse variant of the EB group of mechanobullous genodermatoses. This article outlines the epidemiology, presentation, and diagnosis of JEB-H. Morbidity and mortality are high, necessitating optimized protocols for early (including prenatal) diagnosis and palliative care. Gene therapy remains the most promising perspective. PMID:19945616

  11. The human myotendinous junction

    Knudsen, A B; Larsen, M; Mackey, Abigail;

    2015-01-01

    The myotendinous junction (MTJ) is a specialized structure in the musculotendinous system, where force is transmitted from muscle to tendon. Animal models have shown that the MTJ takes form of tendon finger-like processes merging with muscle tissue. The human MTJ is largely unknown and has never...... from all 14 patients. TEM images displayed similarities to observations in animals: Sarcolemmal evaginations observed as finger-like processes from the tendon and endomysium surrounding the muscle fibers, with myofilaments extending from the final Z-line of the muscle fiber merging with the tendon...... been described in three dimensions (3D). The aim of this study was to describe the ultrastructure of the human MTJ and render 3D reconstructions. Fourteen subjects (age 25 ± 3 years) with isolated injury of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), scheduled for reconstruction with a semitendinosus...

  12. Disordered graphene Josephson junctions

    Muñoz, W. A.; Covaci, L.; Peeters, F. M.

    2015-02-01

    A tight-binding approach based on the Chebyshev-Bogoliubov-de Gennes method is used to describe disordered single-layer graphene Josephson junctions. Scattering by vacancies, ripples, or charged impurities is included. We compute the Josephson current and investigate the nature of multiple Andreev reflections, which induce bound states appearing as peaks in the density of states for energies below the superconducting gap. In the presence of single-atom vacancies, we observe a strong suppression of the supercurrent, which is a consequence of strong intervalley scattering. Although lattice deformations should not induce intervalley scattering, we find that the supercurrent is still suppressed, which is due to the presence of pseudomagnetic barriers. For charged impurities, we consider two cases depending on whether the average doping is zero, i.e., existence of electron-hole puddles, or finite. In both cases, short-range impurities strongly affect the supercurrent, similar to the vacancies scenario.

  13. TRANSITIONAL FLOW IN CHANNEL JUNCTIONS

    NI Han-gen; LIU Ya-kun

    2004-01-01

    On the basis of energy and continuity equations a simple one-dimensional formulation was proposed to predict the transitional flow at an open-channel junction. An empilical relation between the junction losses, the junction angle, and the discharge ratio was suggested which agrees well with the experimental results. The results calculated by the present formulation for the depth ratio were compared with the results of earlier one-dimensional formulations and experiments. It is found that the present results coincide better with experiments than those of others.

  14. Electronic properties of nanotube junctions

    Lambin, Ph.; Meunier, V.

    1998-08-01

    The possibility of realizing junctions between two different nanotubes has recently attracted a great interest, even though much remains to be done for putting this idea in concrete form. Pentagon-heptagon pair defects in the otherwise perfect graphitic network make such connections possible, with virtually infinite varieties. In this paper, the literature devoted to nanotube junctions is briefly reviewed. A special emphasize is put on the electronic properties of C nanotube junctions, together with an indication on how their current-voltage characteristics may look like.

  15. Tight Junction Disruption Induced by Type 3 Secretion System Effectors Injected by Enteropathogenic and Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    Ugalde-Silva, Paul; Gonzalez-Lugo, Octavio; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium consists of a single cell layer, which is a critical selectively permeable barrier to both absorb nutrients and avoid the entry of potentially harmful entities, including microorganisms. Epithelial cells are held together by the apical junctional complexes, consisting of adherens junctions, and tight junctions (TJs), and by underlying desmosomes. TJs lay in the apical domain of epithelial cells and are mainly composed by transmembrane proteins such as occludin, claudins, JAMs, and tricellulin, that are associated with the cytoplasmic plaque formed by proteins from the MAGUK family, such as ZO-1/2/3, connecting TJ to the actin cytoskeleton, and cingulin and paracingulin connecting TJ to the microtubule network. Extracellular bacteria such as EPEC and EHEC living in the intestinal lumen inject effectors proteins directly from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm, where they play a relevant role in the manipulation of the eukaryotic cell functions by modifying or blocking cell signaling pathways. TJ integrity depends on various cell functions such as actin cytoskeleton, microtubule network for vesicular trafficking, membrane integrity, inflammation, and cell survival. EPEC and EHEC effectors target most of these functions. Effectors encoded inside or outside of locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) disrupt the TJ strands. EPEC and EHEC exploit the TJ dynamics to open this structure, for causing diarrhea. EPEC and EHEC secrete effectors that mimic host proteins to manipulate the signaling pathways, including those related to TJ dynamics. In this review, we focus on the known mechanisms exploited by EPEC and EHEC effectors for causing TJ disruption. PMID:27606286

  16. SIS junction reactance complete compensation

    SIS junction geometrical capacitance together with out of phase current Ikk impedance component forms sufficient junction reactance XSIS = (ωC + BQ)-1. This paper suggests the way to resonate out both ωC and BQ by using additional identical SIS junction connected to the first through a long line impedance inverter and RF + DC biased symmetrically to the first. Pumped IV curves without quantum reactance and frequency impedance patterns of the system were calculated. Calculations demonstrated the presence of high and even negative induced dynamic resistance regions at high order quasiparticle steps for the case of SIS junction reactance complete compensation. The suggested method may be used in SIS mixers and detectors for a better RF matching

  17. Thermal conductance of superlattice junctions

    Lu, Simon; McGaughey, Alan J. H., E-mail: mcgaughey@cmu.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We use molecular dynamics simulations and the lattice-based scattering boundary method to compute the thermal conductance of finite-length Lennard-Jones superlattice junctions confined by bulk crystalline leads. The superlattice junction thermal conductance depends on the properties of the leads. For junctions with a superlattice period of four atomic monolayers at temperatures between 5 and 20 K, those with mass-mismatched leads have a greater thermal conductance than those with mass-matched leads. We attribute this lead effect to interference between and the ballistic transport of emergent junction vibrational modes. The lead effect diminishes when the temperature is increased, when the superlattice period is increased, and when interfacial disorder is introduced, but is reversed in the harmonic limit.

  18. Thermal conductance of superlattice junctions

    Simon Lu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We use molecular dynamics simulations and the lattice-based scattering boundary method to compute the thermal conductance of finite-length Lennard-Jones superlattice junctions confined by bulk crystalline leads. The superlattice junction thermal conductance depends on the properties of the leads. For junctions with a superlattice period of four atomic monolayers at temperatures between 5 and 20 K, those with mass-mismatched leads have a greater thermal conductance than those with mass-matched leads. We attribute this lead effect to interference between and the ballistic transport of emergent junction vibrational modes. The lead effect diminishes when the temperature is increased, when the superlattice period is increased, and when interfacial disorder is introduced, but is reversed in the harmonic limit.

  19. Electronic thermometry in tunable tunnel junction

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-03-15

    A tunable tunnel junction thermometry circuit includes a variable width tunnel junction between a test object and a probe. The junction width is varied and a change in thermovoltage across the junction with respect to the change in distance across the junction is determined. Also, a change in biased current with respect to a change in distance across the junction is determined. A temperature gradient across the junction is determined based on a mathematical relationship between the temperature gradient, the change in thermovoltage with respect to distance and the change in biased current with respect to distance. Thermovoltage may be measured by nullifying a thermoelectric tunneling current with an applied voltage supply level. A piezoelectric actuator may modulate the probe, and thus the junction width, to vary thermovoltage and biased current across the junction. Lock-in amplifiers measure the derivatives of the thermovoltage and biased current modulated by varying junction width.

  20. Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic interlayer

    Wild, Georg Hermann

    2012-03-04

    We report on the fabrication of superconductor/insulator/ferromagnetic metal/superconductor (Nb/AlO{sub x}/Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18}/Nb) Josephson junctions (SIFS JJs) with high critical current densities, large normal resistance times area products, and high quality factors. For these junctions, a transition from 0- to {pi}-coupling is observed for a thickness d{sub F}=6 nm of the ferromagnetic Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18} interlayer. The magnetic field dependence of the critical current of the junctions demonstrates good spatial homogeneity of the tunneling barrier and ferromagnetic interlayer. Magnetic characterization shows that the Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18} has an out-of-plane anisotropy and large saturation magnetization indicating negligible dead layers at the interfaces. A careful analysis of Fiske modes up to about 400 GHz provides valuable information on the junction quality factor and the relevant damping mechanisms. Whereas losses due to quasiparticle tunneling dominate at low frequencies, at high frequencies the damping is explained by the finite surface resistance of the junction electrodes. High quality factors of up to 30 around 200 GHz have been achieved. They allow to study the junction dynamics, in particular the switching probability from the zero-voltage into the voltage state with and without microwave irradiation. The experiments with microwave irradiation are well explained within semi-classical models and numerical simulations. In contrast, at mK temperature the switching dynamics without applied microwaves clearly shows secondary quantum effects. Here, we could observe for the first time macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson junctions with a ferromagnetic interlayer. This observation excludes fluctuations of the critical current as a consequence of an unstable magnetic domain structure of the ferromagnetic interlayer and affirms the suitability of SIFS Josephson junctions for quantum information processing.

  1. Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic interlayer

    We report on the fabrication of superconductor/insulator/ferromagnetic metal/superconductor (Nb/AlOx/Pd0.82Ni0.18/Nb) Josephson junctions (SIFS JJs) with high critical current densities, large normal resistance times area products, and high quality factors. For these junctions, a transition from 0- to π-coupling is observed for a thickness dF=6 nm of the ferromagnetic Pd0.82Ni0.18 interlayer. The magnetic field dependence of the critical current of the junctions demonstrates good spatial homogeneity of the tunneling barrier and ferromagnetic interlayer. Magnetic characterization shows that the Pd0.82Ni0.18 has an out-of-plane anisotropy and large saturation magnetization indicating negligible dead layers at the interfaces. A careful analysis of Fiske modes up to about 400 GHz provides valuable information on the junction quality factor and the relevant damping mechanisms. Whereas losses due to quasiparticle tunneling dominate at low frequencies, at high frequencies the damping is explained by the finite surface resistance of the junction electrodes. High quality factors of up to 30 around 200 GHz have been achieved. They allow to study the junction dynamics, in particular the switching probability from the zero-voltage into the voltage state with and without microwave irradiation. The experiments with microwave irradiation are well explained within semi-classical models and numerical simulations. In contrast, at mK temperature the switching dynamics without applied microwaves clearly shows secondary quantum effects. Here, we could observe for the first time macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson junctions with a ferromagnetic interlayer. This observation excludes fluctuations of the critical current as a consequence of an unstable magnetic domain structure of the ferromagnetic interlayer and affirms the suitability of SIFS Josephson junctions for quantum information processing.

  2. Neuromuscular junctional disorders.

    Girija, A S; Ashraf, V V

    2008-07-01

    Neuromuscular junctional disorders (NMJ) in children are distinct entity. They may be acquired or hereditary. They pose problem in diagnosis because of the higher occurrence of sero negative Myasthenia Gravis (MG) cases in children. The identity of MusK antibody positivity in a good percentage of sero negative cases further adds to problems in diagnosis. The Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome (CMS) which are rare disorders of hereditary neuromuscular transmission (NMT) has to be differentiated because immunotherapy has no benefit in this group. Molecular genetic studies of these diseases helps to identify specific type of CMS which is important as other drugs like Fluoxetine, Quinidine are found to be effective in some. In infancy, all can manifest as floppy infant syndrome. The important key to diagnosis is by detailed electrophysiological studies including repetitive nerve stimulation at slow and high rates and its response to anticholinesterases and estimation of Acetyl choline receptor antibodies. Other causes of neuromuscular transmission defects viz. snake venom poisoning and that due to drugs are discussed. PMID:18716738

  3. Confocal Annular Josephson Tunnel Junctions

    Monaco, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The physics of Josephson tunnel junctions drastically depends on their geometrical configurations and here we show that also tiny geometrical details play a determinant role. More specifically, we develop the theory of short and long annular Josephson tunnel junctions delimited by two confocal ellipses. The behavior of a circular annular Josephson tunnel junction is then seen to be simply a special case of the above result. For junctions having a normalized perimeter less than one, the threshold curves in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field of arbitrary orientations are derived and computed even in the case with trapped Josephson vortices. For longer junctions, a numerical analysis is carried out after the derivation of the appropriate motion equation for the Josephson phase. We found that the system is modeled by a modified and perturbed sine-Gordon equation with a space-dependent effective Josephson penetration length inversely proportional to the local junction width. Both the fluxon statics and dynamics are deeply affected by the non-uniform annulus width. Static zero-field multiple-fluxon solutions exist even in the presence of a large bias current. The tangential velocity of a traveling fluxon is not determined by the balance between the driving and drag forces due to the dissipative losses. Furthermore, the fluxon motion is characterized by a strong radial inward acceleration which causes electromagnetic radiation concentrated at the ellipse equatorial points.

  4. Confocal Annular Josephson Tunnel Junctions

    Monaco, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    The physics of Josephson tunnel junctions drastically depends on their geometrical configurations and here we show that also tiny geometrical details play a determinant role. More specifically, we develop the theory of short and long annular Josephson tunnel junctions delimited by two confocal ellipses. The behavior of a circular annular Josephson tunnel junction is then seen to be simply a special case of the above result. For junctions having a normalized perimeter less than one, the threshold curves in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field of arbitrary orientations are derived and computed even in the case with trapped Josephson vortices. For longer junctions, a numerical analysis is carried out after the derivation of the appropriate motion equation for the Josephson phase. We found that the system is modeled by a modified and perturbed sine-Gordon equation with a space-dependent effective Josephson penetration length inversely proportional to the local junction width. Both the fluxon statics and dynamics are deeply affected by the non-uniform annulus width. Static zero-field multiple-fluxon solutions exist even in the presence of a large bias current. The tangential velocity of a traveling fluxon is not determined by the balance between the driving and drag forces due to the dissipative losses. Furthermore, the fluxon motion is characterized by a strong radial inward acceleration which causes electromagnetic radiation concentrated at the ellipse equatorial points.

  5. Chlorpromazine reduces the intercellular communication via gap junctions in mammalian cells

    In the work presented herein, we evaluated the effect of chlorpromazine (CPZ) on gap junctions expressed by two mammalian cell types; Gn-11 cells (cell line derived from mouse LHRH neurons) and rat cortical astrocytes maintained in culture. We also attempted to elucidate possible mechanisms of action of CPZ effects on gap junctions. CPZ, in concentrations comparable with doses used to treat human diseases, was found to reduce the intercellular communication via gap junctions as evaluated with measurements of dye coupling (Lucifer yellow). In both cell types, maximal inhibition of functional gap junctions was reached within about 1 h of treatment with CPZ, an recovery was almost complete at about 5 h after CPZ wash out. In both cell types, CPZ treatment increased the phosphorylation state of connexin43 (Cx43), a gap junction protein subunit. Moreover, CPZ reduced the reactivity of Cx43 (immunofluorescence) at cell interfaces and concomitantly increased its reactivity in intracellular vesicles, suggesting an increased retrieval from and/or reduced insertion into the plasma membrane. CPZ also caused cellular retraction reducing cell-cell contacts in a reversible manner. The reduction in contact area might destabilize existing gap junctions and abrogate formation of new ones. Moreover, the CPZ-induced reduction in gap junctional communication may depend on the connexins (Cxs) forming the junctions. If Cx43 were the only connexin expressed, MAPK-dependent phosphorylation of this connexin would induce closure of gap junction channels

  6. Single Molecule Junctions: Probing Contact Chemistry and Fundamental Circuit Laws

    Hybertsen M. S.

    2013-04-11

    By exploiting selective link chemistry, formation of single molecule junctions with reproducible conductance has become established. Systematic studies reveal the structure-conductance relationships for diverse molecules. I will draw on experiments from my collaborators at Columbia University, atomic-scale calculations and theory to describe progress in two areas. First, I will describe a novel route to form single molecule junctions, based on SnMe3 terminated molecules, in which gold directly bonds to carbon in the molecule backbone resulting in near ideal contact resistance [1]. Second, comparison of the conductance of junctions formed with molecular species containing either one backbone or two backbones in parallel allows demonstration of the role of quantum interference in the conductance superposition law at the molecular scale [2].

  7. Analysis of astronomical data from optical superconducting tunnel junctions

    De Bruijne, J H J; Perryman, M A C; Favata, F; Peacock, A; Bruijne, Jos H.J. de; Reynolds, Alastair P; Perryman, Michael .A.C.; Favata, Fabio; Peacock, Anthony

    2001-01-01

    Currently operating optical superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detectors, developed in ESA, can simultaneously measure the wavelength (delta lambda = 50 nm at 500 nm) and arrival time (to within ~5 micros) of individual photons in the range 310-720 nm with an efficiency of ~70%, and with count rates of order 5,000 photons per second per junction. A number of STJ junctions placed in an array format generates four-dimensional data: photon arrival time, energy, and array element (X,Y). Such STJ cameras are ideally suited for, e.g., high time- resolution spectrally-resolved monitoring of variable sources or low-resolution spectroscopy of faint extragalactic objects. The reduction of STJ data involves detector efficiency correction, atmo- spheric extinction correction, sky background subtraction, and, unlike that of data from CCD-based systems, a more complex energy calibration, barycentric arrival time correction, energy range selection, and time binning; these steps are, in many respects, analogous to procedu...

  8. Oxygen adsorption at noble metal/TiO2 junctions

    Hossein-Babaei, F.; Alaei-Sheini, Navid; Lajvardi, Mehdi M.

    2016-03-01

    Electric conduction in titanium dioxide is known to be oxygen sensitive and the conductivity of a TiO2 ceramic body is determined mainly by the concentration of its naturally occurring oxygen vacancy. Recently, fabrications and electronic features of a number of noble metal/TiO2-based electronic devices, such as solar cells, UV detectors, gas sensors and memristive devices have been demonstrated. Here, we investigate the effect of oxygen adsorption at the noble metal/TiO2 junction in such devices, and show the potentials of these junctions in chemical sensor fabrication. The polycrystalline, poly-phase TiO2 layers are grown by the selective and controlled oxidation of titanium thin films vacuum deposited on silica substrates. Noble metal thin films are deposited on the oxide layers by physical vapor deposition. Current-voltage (I-V) diagrams of the fabricated devices are studied for Ag/, Au/, and Pt/TiO2 samples. The raw samples show no junction energy barrier. After a thermal annealing in air at 250° C, I-V diagrams change drastically. The annealed samples demonstrate highly non-linear I-V indicating the formation of high Schottky energy barriers at the noble metal/TiO2 junctions. The phenomenon is described based on the effect of the oxygen atoms adsorbed at the junction.

  9. In silico identification of a multi-functional regulatory protein involved in Holliday junction resolution in bacteria

    2012-01-01

    Background Homologous recombination is a fundamental cellular process that is most widely used by cells to rearrange genes and accurately repair DNA double-strand breaks. It may result in the formation of a critical intermediate named Holliday junction, which is a four-way DNA junction and needs to be resolved to allow chromosome segregation. Different Holliday junction resolution systems and enzymes have been characterized from all three domains of life. In bacteria, the RuvABC complex is th...

  10. Modelling of Dual-Junction Solar Cells including Tunnel Junction

    Abdelaziz Amine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Monolithically stacked multijunction solar cells based on III–V semiconductors materials are the state-of-art of approach for high efficiency photovoltaic energy conversion, in particular for space applications. The individual subcells of the multi-junction structure are interconnected via tunnel diodes which must be optically transparent and connect the component cells with a minimum electrical resistance. The quality of these diodes determines the output performance of the solar cell. The purpose of this work is to contribute to the investigation of the tunnel electrical resistance of such a multi-junction cell through the analysis of the current-voltage (J-V characteristics under illumination. Our approach is based on an equivalent circuit model of a diode for each subcell. We examine the effect of tunnel resistance on the performance of a multi-junction cell using minimization of the least squares technique.

  11. Observation of fluctuation-induced tunneling conduction in micrometer-sized tunnel junctions

    Yu-Ren Lai

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Micrometer-sized Al/AlOx/Y tunnel junctions were fabricated by the electron-beam lithography technique. The thin (≈ 1.5–2 nm thickness insulating AlOx layer was grown on top of the Al base electrode by O2 glow discharge. The zero-bias conductances G(T and the current-voltage characteristics of the junctions were measured in a wide temperature range 1.5–300 K. In addition to the direct tunneling conduction mechanism observed in low-G junctions, high-G junctions reveal a distinct charge transport process which manifests the thermally fluctuation-induced tunneling conduction (FITC through short nanoconstrictions. We ascribe the experimental realization of the FITC mechanism to originating from the formations of “hot spots” (incomplete pinholes in the AlOx layer owing to large junction-barrier interfacial roughness.

  12. Dislocation Dynamics Simulations of Junctions in Hexagonal Close-Packed Crystals

    Wu, C; Aubry, S; Chung, P; Arsenlis, A

    2011-12-05

    The formation and strength of dislocations in the hexagonal closed packed material beryllium are studied through dislocation junctions and the critical stress required to break them. Dislocation dynamics calculations (using the code ParaDiS) of junction maps are compared to an analytical line tension approximation in order to validate our model. Results show that the two models agree very well. Also the critical shear stress necessary to break 30{sup o} - 30{sup o} and 30{sup o} - 90{sup o} dislocation junctions is computed numerically. Yield surfaces are mapped out for these junctions to describe their stability regions as function of resolved shear stresses on the glide planes. The example of two non-coplanar binary dislocation junctions with slip planes [2-1-10] (01-10) and [-12-10] (0001) corresponding to a prismatic and basal slip respectively is chosen to verify and validate our implementation.

  13. Vertically-stacked interface-treated Josephson junctions fabricated by new in situ process

    We have developed a new in situ preparation process for trilayer structures of vertically-stacked Josephson junctions. We adopted YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) as a base electrode, and YbBa2Cu3O7-x (YbBCO) as a counter electrode in these junctions. The barrier was formed by sputtering in a reduced total gas pressure and subsequent annealing. As the gas pressure decreases, the mean free path of the negative ions increases, which results in the bombardment of higher energy ions to the substrate and in etching the base electrode surface. The critical current Ic of the obtained junction was modulated up to 50% by applying an external magnetic field. The difference of the characteristics between the junctions fabricated by this new technique and conventional interface-treated junctions would be attributed to the difference in the species and their energy distributions of the particles incident to the sample during the barrier formation

  14. Transport properties of molecular junctions

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive overview of the physical mechanisms that control electron transport and the characteristics of metal-molecule-metal (MMM) junctions is presented. As far as possible, methods and formalisms presented elsewhere to analyze electron transport through molecules are avoided. This title introduces basic concepts—a description of the electron transport through molecular junctions—and briefly describes relevant experimental methods. Theoretical methods commonly used to analyze the electron transport through molecules are presented. Various effects that manifest in the electron transport through MMMs, as well as the basics of density-functional theory and its applications to electronic structure calculations in molecules are presented. Nanoelectronic applications of molecular junctions and similar systems are discussed as well. Molecular electronics is a diverse and rapidly growing field. Transport Properties of Molecular Junctions presents an up-to-date survey of the field suitable for researchers ...

  15. NbN tunnel junctions

    All-niobium nitride Josephon junctions have been prepared successfully using a new processing called SNOP: Selective Niobium (nitride) Overlap Process. Such a process involves the ''trilayer'' deposition on the whole wafer before selective patterning of the electrodes by optically controlled dry reactive ion etching. Only two photomask levels are need to define an ''overlap'' or a ''cross-type'' junction with a good accuracy. The properties of the niobium nitride films deposited by DC-magnetron sputtering and the surface oxide growth are analysed. The most critical point to obtain high quality and high gap value junctions resides in the early stage of the NbN counterelectrode growth. Some possibilities to overcome such a handicap exist even if the fabrication needs substrate temperatures below 2500C

  16. Gap Junctions in C. elegans

    ChristianC.Naus

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available As in other multicellular organisms, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans uses gap junctions to provide direct cell-to-cell contact. The nematode gap junctions are formed by innexins (invertebrate analogs of the connexins; a family of proteins that surprisingly share no primary sequence homology, but do share structural and functional similarity with connexins. The model organism C. elegans contains 25 innexin genes and innexins are found in virtually all cell types and tissues. Additionally, many innexins have dynamic expression patterns during development, and several innexins are essential genes in the nematode. C. elegans is a popular invertebrate model due to several features including a simple anatomy, a complete cell lineage, sequenced genome and an array of genetic resources. Thus the worm has potential to offer valuable insights into the various functions of gap junction mediated intercellular communication.

  17. Josephson junctions based on pnictide superconductors

    Josephson junctions are a powerful tool for understanding more about the physical behaviour of pnictide superconductors. We built different kinds of Josephson junctions based on pnictide thin films. Planar junctions, edge type junctions, and junctions on bicrystalline substrates were prepared. We present manufacturing techniques and also the electronical properties of the different junctions and compare them. The measurement of I-V-characteristics show a strong excess current. We have to mind this when calculating the IcRN product. The effective IcRN values are 6.5 μV for the grain boundary junction, 7.9 μV for the planar structure, and 7.5 μV for the edge junction.

  18. Dynamics of pi-junction interferometer circuits

    Kornkev, V.K.; Mozhaev, P.B.; Borisenko, I.V.; Ovsyannikov, G.A.; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    The pi-junction superconducting circuit dynamics was studied by means of numerical simulation technique. Parallel arrays consisting of Josephson junctions of both 0- and pi-type were studied as a model of high-T-c grain-boundary Josephson junction. The array dynamics and the critical current...... dependence on magnetic field are discussed. Experimental results for dc interferometers with 0 and pi high-T-c bi-crystal Josephson junctions are reported and discussed in comparison with numerical simulation....

  19. Nano-Molecular Junctions on STM Tips

    Chun Huang∗; Jianshu Yang

    2011-01-01

    We present a technique for building metal-organic-metal junctions, which contain ten or fewer conjugated molecules between each of such junction, and the investigations of the I-V response of these junctions. The junctions are made by self assembling thiolated molecules onto gold coated tips for use in scanning tunneling microscopy. We show that this easy technique probes the qualitative properties of the molecules. Current-voltage characteristics of a Tour wire and a new molecular rectifier are presented.

  20. Interfacial thermal transport in atomic junctions

    Zhang, Lifa; Keblinski, Pawel; Wang, Jian-Sheng; Li, Baowen

    2011-01-01

    We study ballistic interfacial thermal transport across atomic junctions. Exact expressions for phonon transmission coefficients are derived for thermal transport in one-junction and two-junction chains, and verified by numerical calculation based on a nonequilibrium Green's function method. For a single-junction case, we find that the phonon transmission coefficient typically decreases monotonically with increasing freqency. However, in the range between equal frequency spectrum and equal ac...

  1. Leakage current and deep levels in CoSi{sub 2} silicided junctions

    Codegoni, D. [ST Microelectronics Via Olivetti 2, 20041 Agrate Brianza, Milan (Italy); Carnevale, G.P. [ST Microelectronics Via Olivetti 2, 20041 Agrate Brianza, Milan (Italy); De Marco, C. [ST Microelectronics Via Olivetti 2, 20041 Agrate Brianza, Milan (Italy); Mica, I. [ST Microelectronics Via Olivetti 2, 20041 Agrate Brianza, Milan (Italy); Polignano, M.L. [ST Microelectronics Via Olivetti 2, 20041 Agrate Brianza, Milan (Italy)]. E-mail: marialuisa.polignano@st.com

    2005-12-05

    In this work the leakage current of junctions with a self-aligned cobalt silicide is studied. It is shown that junctions with a self-aligned CoSi{sub 2} layer show a leakage current excess which is strongly reduced by increasing the PAI energy. This indicates that the observed leakage current excess is related to the CoSi{sub 2} formation conditions. The mechanism responsible for the leakage of CoSi{sub 2} junctions is investigated by current versus temperature measurements and by deep level transient spectroscopy. In addition, the role of the mechanical stress is investigated by comparing different isolation structures and by numerical stress calculations. It is concluded that the shallow trench isolation (STI) induced stress and the cobalt silicide formation concur to produce a junction leakage current increase by creating a deep level in silicon located close to midgap. This level can possibly identified with a level ascribed to a point defect excess.

  2. Josephson tunnel junction microwave attenuator

    Koshelets, V. P.; Shitov, S. V.; Shchukin, A. V.;

    1993-01-01

    A new element for superconducting electronic circuitry-a variable attenuator-has been proposed, designed, and successfully tested. The principle of operation is based on the change in the microwave impedance of a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) Josephson tunnel junction when dc biased...

  3. Dynamics of pi-junction interferometer circuits

    Kornkev, V.K.; Mozhaev, P.B.; Borisenko, I.V.;

    2002-01-01

    The pi-junction superconducting circuit dynamics was studied by means of numerical simulation technique. Parallel arrays consisting of Josephson junctions of both 0- and pi-type were studied as a model of high-T-c grain-boundary Josephson junction. The array dynamics and the critical current...

  4. delta-biased Josephson tunnel junctions

    Monaco, R.; Mygind, Jesper; Koshelet, V.;

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: The behavior of a long Josephson tunnel junction drastically depends on the distribution of the dc bias current. We investigate the case in which the bias current is fed in the central point of a one-dimensional junction. Such junction configuration has been recently used to detect the...

  5. Soliton excitations in Josephson tunnel junctions

    Lomdahl, P. S.; Sørensen, O. H.; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    1982-01-01

    A detailed numerical study of a sine-Gordon model of the Josephson tunnel junction is compared with experimental measurements on junctions with different L / λJ ratios. The soliton picture is found to apply well on both relatively long (L / λJ=6) and intermediate (L / λJ=2) junctions. We find good...

  6. Soliton bunching in annular Josephson junctions

    Vernik, I.V; Lazarides, Nickos; Sørensen, Mads Peter;

    1996-01-01

    By studying soliton (fluxon) motion in long annular Josephson junctions it is possible to avoid the influence of the boundaries and soliton-soliton collisions present in linear junctions. A new experimental design consisting of a niobium coil placed on top of an annular junction has been used to...

  7. Acetylcholinesterase Clustering at the Neuromuscular Junction Involves Perlecan and Dystroglycan

    Peng, H. Benjamin; Xie, Hongbo; Rossi, Susanna G.; Rotundo, Richard L.

    1999-01-01

    Formation of the synaptic basal lamina at vertebrate neuromuscular junction involves the accumulation of numerous specialized extracellular matrix molecules including a specific form of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), the collagenic-tailed form. The mechanisms responsible for its localization at sites of nerve– muscle contact are not well understood. To understand synaptic AChE localization, we synthesized a fluorescent conjugate of fasciculin 2, a snake α-neurotoxin that tightly binds to the ca...

  8. LRP4 Is Critical for Neuromuscular Junction Maintenance

    Barik, Arnab; Lu, Yisheng; Sathyamurthy, Anupama; Bowman, Andrew; Shen, Chengyong; Li, Lei(Beijing Institute of Petrochemical Technology, Beijing, 102617, People's Republic of China); Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2014-01-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is a synapse between motor neurons and skeletal muscle fibers, and is critical for control of muscle contraction. Its formation requires neuronal agrin that acts by binding to LRP4 to stimulate MuSK. Mutations have been identified in agrin, MuSK, and LRP4 in patients with congenital myasthenic syndrome, and patients with myasthenia gravis develop antibodies against agrin, LRP4, and MuSK. However, it remains unclear whether the agrin signaling pathway is critic...

  9. Molecular transport junctions: vibrational effects

    Transport of electrons in a single molecule junction is the simplest problem in the general subject area of molecular electronics. In the past few years, this area has been extended to probe beyond the simple tunnelling associated with large energy gaps between electrode Fermi level and molecular levels, to deal with smaller gaps, with near-resonance tunnelling and, particularly, with effects due to interaction of electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom. This overview is devoted to the theoretical and computational approaches that have been taken to understanding transport in molecular junctions when these vibronic interactions are involved. After a short experimental overview, and discussion of different test beds and measurements, we define a particular microscopic model Hamiltonian. That overall Hamiltonian can be used to discuss all of the phenomena dealt with subsequently. These include transition from coherent to incoherent transport as electron/vibration interaction increases in strength, inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy and its interpretation and measurement, affects of interelectronic repulsion treated at the Hubbard level, noise in molecular transport junctions, non-linear conductance phenomena, heating and heat conduction in molecular transport junctions and current-induced chemical reactions. In each of these areas, we use the same simple model Hamiltonian to analyse energetics and dynamics. While this overview does not attempt survey the literature exhaustively, it does provide appropriate references to the current literature (both experimental and theoretical). We also attempt to point out directions in which further research is required to answer cardinal questions concerning the behaviour and understanding of vibrational effects in molecular transport junctions. (topical review)

  10. Modulating Neuromuscular Junction Density Changes in Botulinum Toxin–Treated Orbicularis Oculi Muscle

    Harrison, Andrew R; Berbos, Zachary; Zaldivar, Renzo A.; Anderson, Brian C.; Semmer, Mollie; Lee, Michael S.; McLoon, Linda K.

    2011-01-01

    While botulinum toxin injections are effective in reducing muscle spasms in blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm patients, they have a relatively short duration of action due to formation of new functional neuromuscular junctions. Co-injection of botulinum toxin–treated eyelids with corticotrophin-releasing factor or antibody to insulin growth factor–receptor prevented neuromuscular junction increases. The long-term goal is to increase the duration of effectiveness of botulinum toxin and reduce...

  11. Fabrication of high quality ferromagnetic Josephson junctions

    Weides, M. [Institute for Solid State Research, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany) and CNI-Center of Nanoelectronic Systems for Information Technology, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)]. E-mail: m.weides@fz-juelich.de; Tillmann, K. [Institute for Solid State Research, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Kohlstedt, H. [Institute for Solid State Research, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); CNI-Center of Nanoelectronic Systems for Information Technology, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Department of Material Science and Engineering and Department of Physics, University of Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    We present ferromagnetic Nb/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ni{sub 60}Cu{sub 40}/Nb Josephson junctions (SIFS) with an ultrathin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tunnel barrier. The junction fabrication was optimized regarding junction insulation and homogeneity of current transport. Using ion-beam-etching and anodic oxidation we defined and insulated the junction mesas. The additional 2 nm thin Cu-layer below the ferromagnetic NiCu (SINFS) lowered interface roughness and ensured very homogeneous current transport. A high yield of junctional devices with j {sub c} spreads less than 2% was obtained.

  12. Fabrication of high quality ferromagnetic Josephson junctions

    We present ferromagnetic Nb/Al2O3/Ni60Cu40/Nb Josephson junctions (SIFS) with an ultrathin Al2O3 tunnel barrier. The junction fabrication was optimized regarding junction insulation and homogeneity of current transport. Using ion-beam-etching and anodic oxidation we defined and insulated the junction mesas. The additional 2 nm thin Cu-layer below the ferromagnetic NiCu (SINFS) lowered interface roughness and ensured very homogeneous current transport. A high yield of junctional devices with j c spreads less than 2% was obtained

  13. Nonequilibrium electron-vibration coupling and conductance fluctuations in a C60 junction

    Ulstrup, Søren; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2012-01-01

    We investigate chemical bond formation and conductance in a molecular C60 junction under finite bias voltage using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's functions (DFT-NEGF). At the point of contact formation we identify a remarkably strong co...

  14. Conductance of Alkanedithiol Single-Molecule Junctions: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    Paulsson, Magnus; Krag, Casper; Frederiksen, Thomas;

    2009-01-01

    We study formation and conductance of alkanedithiol junctions using density functional based molecular dynamics. The formation involves straightening of the molecule, migration of thiol end-groups, and pulling out Au atoms. Plateaus are found in the low-bias conductance traces which decrease by 1...

  15. Nonequilibrium electron-vibration coupling and conductance fluctuations in a C-60 junction

    Ulstrup, Soren; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2012-01-01

    We investigate chemical bond formation and conductance in a molecular C-60 junction under finite bias voltage using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's functions (DFT-NEGF). At the point of contact formation we identify a remarkably strong c...

  16. Modelling of Dual-Junction Solar Cells including Tunnel Junction

    Abdelaziz Amine; Yamina Mir; Mimoun Zazoui

    2013-01-01

    Monolithically stacked multijunction solar cells based on III–V semiconductors materials are the state-of-art of approach for high efficiency photovoltaic energy conversion, in particular for space applications. The individual subcells of the multi-junction structure are interconnected via tunnel diodes which must be optically transparent and connect the component cells with a minimum electrical resistance. The quality of these diodes determines the output performance of the solar cell. The p...

  17. The small GTPase RhoA is required to maintain spinal cord neuroepithelium organization and the neural stem cell pool

    Herzog, Dominik; Loetscher, Pirmin; van Hengel, Jolanda;

    2011-01-01

    The regulation of adherens junctions (AJs) is critical for multiple events during CNS development, including the formation and maintenance of the neuroepithelium. We have addressed the role of the small GTPase RhoA in the developing mouse nervous system using tissue-specific conditional gene...

  18. Rapid disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junction and barrier dysfunction by ionizing radiation in mouse colon in vivo: protection by N-acetyl-l-cysteine.

    Shukla, Pradeep K; Gangwar, Ruchika; Manda, Bhargavi; Meena, Avtar S; Yadav, Nikki; Szabo, Erzsebet; Balogh, Andrea; Lee, Sue Chin; Tigyi, Gabor; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2016-05-01

    The goals of this study were to evaluate the effects of ionizing radiation on apical junctions in colonic epithelium and mucosal barrier function in mice in vivo. Adult mice were subjected to total body irradiation (4 Gy) with or without N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) feeding for 5 days before irradiation. At 2-24 h postirradiation, the integrity of colonic epithelial tight junctions (TJ), adherens junctions (AJ), and the actin cytoskeleton was assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblot analysis of detergent-insoluble fractions for TJ and AJ proteins. The barrier function was evaluated by measuring vascular-to-luminal flux of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-inulin in vivo and luminal-to-mucosal flux in vitro. Oxidative stress was evaluated by measuring protein thiol oxidation. Confocal microscopy showed that radiation caused redistribution of occludin, zona occludens-1, claudin-3, E-cadherin, and β-catenin, as well as the actin cytoskeleton as early as 2 h postirradiation, and this effect was sustained for at least 24 h. Feeding NAC before irradiation blocked radiation-induced disruption of TJ, AJ, and the actin cytoskeleton. Radiation increased mucosal permeability to inulin in colon, which was blocked by NAC feeding. The level of reduced-protein thiols in colon was depleted by radiation with a concomitant increase in the level of oxidized-protein thiol. NAC feeding blocked the radiation-induced protein thiol oxidation. These data demonstrate that radiation rapidly disrupts TJ, AJ, and the actin cytoskeleton by an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism that can be prevented by NAC feeding. PMID:26822914

  19. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron–phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions. (topical review)

  20. How coherent are Josephson junctions?

    Paik, Hanhee; Bishop, Lev S; Kirchmair, G; Catelani, G; Sears, A P; Johnson, B R; Reagor, M J; Frunzio, L; Glazman, L; Schoelkopf, R J

    2011-01-01

    Attaining sufficient coherence is a requirement for realizing a large-scale quantum computer. We present a new implementation of a superconducting transmon qubit that is strongly coupled to a three-dimensional superconducting cavity. We observe a reproducible increase in the coherence times of qubit (both $T_1$ and $T_2$ > 10 microseconds) and cavity ($T_{cav}$ ~ 50 microseconds) by more than an order of magnitude compared to the current state-of-art superconducting qubits. This enables the study of the stability and quality of Josephson junctions at precisions exceeding one part per million. Surprisingly, we see no evidence for $1/f$ critical current noise. At elevated temperatures, we observe the dissipation due to a small density (< 1 - 10 ppm) of thermally-excited quasiparticles. The results suggest that the overall quality of Josephson junctions will allow error rates of a few $10^{-4}$, approaching the error correction threshold.

  1. Electron transport in molecular junctions

    Jin, Chengjun

    charge position are in quantitative agreement with the experiments, while pure DFT is not. This is the consequence of the accurate energy level alignment, where the DFT+∑ method corrects the self-interaction error in the standard DFT functional and uses a static image charge model to include the image......This thesis addresses the electron transport in molecular junctions, focusing on the energy level alignment and correlation effects. Various levels of theory have been applied to study the structural and electronic effects in different molecular junctions, starting from the single particle density...... the lowest unoccupied molecular level (LUMO) of the 44BP molecule hybridizes strongly with Ni 3d orbitals, the gating is auxiliary by the so-called spinterface. Finally, the correlation effect of the image charge beyond the energy level renormalization has been studied. It is shown that the finite response...

  2. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A.

    2016-05-01

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron–phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

  3. Counting Statistics in Nanoscale Junctions

    Liu, Yu-Shen; Chen, Yu-Chang

    2010-01-01

    We present first-principles calculations for moments of the current up to the third order in atomic-scale junctions. The quantum correlations of the current are calculated using the current operator in terms of the wave functions obtained self-consistently within the static density-functional theory. We investigate the relationships of the conductance, the second, and the third moment of the current for carbon atom chains of various lengths bridging two metal electrodes in the linear and nonl...

  4. Imaging of cervicothoracic junction trauma

    Kaewlai, Rathachai

    2013-01-01

    Sirote Wongwaisayawan,1 Ruedeekorn Suwannanon,2 Rathachai Kaewlai11Department of Radiology, Ramathibodi Hospital and Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, ThailandAbstract: Cervicothoracic junction trauma is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in trauma patients. Imaging has played an important role in identifying injuries and guiding appropriate, timely therapy. Computed tomography is currently a...

  5. Thermoelectric efficiency of molecular junctions.

    Perroni, C A; Ninno, D; Cataudella, V

    2016-09-21

    Focus of the review is on experimental set-ups and theoretical proposals aimed to enhance thermoelectric performances of molecular junctions. In addition to charge conductance, the thermoelectric parameter commonly measured in these systems is the thermopower, which is typically rather low. We review recent experimental outcomes relative to several junction configurations used to optimize the thermopower. On the other hand, theoretical calculations provide estimations of all the thermoelectric parameters in the linear and non-linear regime, in particular of the thermoelectric figure of merit and efficiency, completing our knowledge of molecular thermoelectricity. For this reason, the review will mainly focus on theoretical studies analyzing the role of not only electronic, but also of the vibrational degrees of freedom. Theoretical results about thermoelectric phenomena in the coherent regime are reviewed focusing on interference effects which play a significant role in enhancing the figure of merit. Moreover, we review theoretical studies including the effects of molecular many-body interactions, such as electron-vibration couplings, which typically tend to reduce the efficiency. Since a fine tuning of many parameters and coupling strengths is required to optimize the thermoelectric conversion in molecular junctions, new theoretically proposed set-ups are discussed in the conclusions. PMID:27420149

  6. Giant tunnel magneto-resistance in graphene based molecular tunneling junction

    Wang, Bin; Li, Jianwei; Yu, Yunjin; Wei, Yadong; Wang, Jian; Guo, Hong

    2016-02-01

    We propose and theoretically investigate a class of stable zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) based molecular magnetic tunneling junctions (MTJs). For those junctions having pentagon-connecting formations, huge tunnel magneto-resistance (TMR) is found. Different from most of the other proposed molecular junctions, the huge TMR in our structures is generic, and is not significantly affected by external parameters such as bias voltage, gate voltage, length of the molecule and width of the ZGNRs. The double pentagon-connecting formation between the molecule and ZGNRs is critical for the remarkable TMR ratio, which is as large as ~2 × 105. These molecular MTJs behave as almost perfect spin filters and spin valve devices. Other connecting formations of the ZGNR based MTJs lead to much smaller TMR. By first principles analysis, we reveal the microscopic physics responsible for this phenomenon.

  7. Carbon nanobamboo: Junctions between left and right handed single walled carbon nanotubes

    Heating of organic molecules, for example, fullerenes encapsulated in single walled carbon nanotubes can result in the coalescence of the molecules forming an inner tube. The growth of tubes with different diameters and/or chiralities can start at different places at the same time. The formation of a junction between the two different tubes depends on many parameters. A special case is when the two tubes have the same chiralities, but opposite handedness. We have shown using topological and combinatorial arguments that at least two non-equivalent junctions can be formed in these cases, with different arrangements of the pentagons and heptagons in the junction. We optimized the geometry using first principles method and investigated the effect of the junction on the electronic density of states of the bamboo-type nanotube. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Fermion states on domain-wall junctions and the flavor number

    In this paper we address the problem of localizing fermion states on stable domain-wall junctions. The study focus on the consequences of intersecting six independent 8d domain walls to form 4d junctions in a ten-dimensional spacetime. This is related to the mechanism of relaxing to three space dimensions through the formation of domain-wall junctions. The model is based on six bulk real scalar fields, the φ 4 model in its broken phase, the prototype of the Higgs field, and is such that the fermion and scalar modes bound to the domain walls are the zero mode and a single massive bound state, which can be regarded as a two-level system, at least at sufficiently low energy. Inside the junction, we use the fact that some states are statistically more favored to address the possibility of constraining the flavor number of the elementary fermions. (orig.)

  9. Algorithms for Junctions in Directed Acyclic Graphs

    Ferreira, Carlos Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Given a pair of distinct vertices u, v in a graph G, we say that s is a junction of u, v if there are in G internally vertex disjoint directed paths from s to u and from s to v. We show how to characterize junctions in directed acyclic graphs. We also consider the two problems in the following and derive efficient algorithms to solve them. Given a directed acyclic graph G and a vertex s in G, how can we find all pairs of vertices of G such that s is a junction of them? And given a directed acyclic graph G and k pairs of vertices of G, how can we preprocess G such that all junctions of k given pairs of vertices could be listed quickly? All junctions of k pairs problem arises in an application in Anthropology and we apply our algorithm to find such junctions on kinship networks of some brazilian indian ethnic groups.

  10. Hysteresis development in superconducting Josephson junctions

    The resistively and capacitive shunted junction model is used to investigate hysteresis development in superconducting Josephson junctions. Two empirical formulas that relate the hysteresis width and the quasi-particle diffusion length in terms of the junctions electrical parameters, temperature and frequency are obtained. The obtained formulas provide a simple tool to investigate the full potentials of the hysteresis phenomena. (author). 9 refs, 3 figs

  11. The Fluxion in a Curved Josephson Junction

    Dobrowolski, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    The curved Josephson junction is described. In the framework of the Maxwell equations the equation that describes the influence of the curvature on the fluxion motion was obtained. The method of geometrical reduction of the sine-Gordon model from three to lower dimensional manifold was applied to the long Josephson junction. It was argued that the geometrical reduction describes the junctions with slowly varying curvatures.

  12. Palladium Electrodes for Molecular Tunnel Junctions

    Chang, Shuai; Sen, Suman; Zhang, Peiming; Gyarfas, Brett; Ashcroft, Brian; Lefkowitz, Steven; Peng, Hongbo; Lindsay, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Gold has been the metal of choice for research on molecular tunneling junctions, but it is incompatible with CMOS fabrication because it forms deep level traps in silicon. Palladium electrodes do not contaminate silicon, and also give higher tunnel current signals in the molecular tunnel junctions we have studied. The result is cleaner signals in a recognition-tunneling junction that recognizes the four natural DNA bases as well as 5-methyl cytosine, with no spurious background signals. More ...

  13. Electron optics with ballistic graphene junctions

    Chen, Shaowen; Han, Zheng; Elahi, Mirza M.; Habib, K. M. Masum; Wang, Lei; Wen, Bo; Gao, Yuanda; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Hone, James; Ghosh, Avik W.; Dean, Cory R.

    2016-01-01

    Electrons transmitted across a ballistic semiconductor junction undergo refraction, analogous to light rays across an optical boundary. A pn junction theoretically provides the equivalent of a negative index medium, enabling novel electron optics such as negative refraction and perfect (Veselago) lensing. In graphene, the linear dispersion and zero-gap bandstructure admit highly transparent pn junctions by simple electrostatic gating, which cannot be achieved in conventional semiconductors. M...

  14. Gap Junctions Couple Astrocytes and Oligodendrocytes

    Orthmann-Murphy, Jennifer L.; ABRAMS, CHARLES K.; Scherer, Steven S.

    2008-01-01

    In vertebrates, a family of related proteins called connexins form gap junctions (GJs), which are intercellular channels. In the central nervous system (CNS), GJs couple oligodendrocytes and astrocytes (O/A junctions) and adjacent astrocytes (A/A junctions), but not adjacent oligodendrocytes, forming a “glial syncytium.” Oligodendrocytes and astrocytes each express different connexins. Mutations of these connexin genes demonstrate that the proper functioning of myelin and oligodendrocytes req...

  15. String junction as a baryonic constituent

    Kalashnikova, Yu S

    1995-01-01

    We extend the model for QCD string with quarks to consider the Mercedes Benz string configuration describing the three-quark baryon. Under the assumption of adiabatic separation of quark and string junction motion we formulate and solve the classical equation of motion for the junction.We dare to quantize the motion of the junction, and discuss the impact of these modes on the baryon spectra.

  16. Modulated microwave absorption spectra from Josephson junctions on a scratched niobium wire

    Modulated microwave absorption (MMA) spectra from Josephson junction formations on a scratched Nb wire have been studied at 9.3 GHz and 4 K. The peak-to-peak separation, δH of the Josephson lines was found to vary linearly with P1/2, where P is the applied microwave power, in contrast to a recent interpretation of junction formation in pressed lead pieces by Rubins, Drumheller, and Trybula. The interpretation of the MMA data on Nb are given in terms of the theory of Vichery, Beuneu, and Lejay for superconducting loops containing weak links. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  17. Microwave photonics with Josephson junction arrays

    Zueco, David; Solano, Enrique; García-Ripoll, Juan José

    2011-01-01

    We introduce an architecture for a photonic crystal in the microwave regime based on superconducting transmission lines interrupted by Josephson junctions. A study of the scattering properties of a single junction in the line shows that the junction behaves as a perfect mirror when the photon frequency matches the Josephson plasma frequency. We generalize our calculations to periodic arrangements of junctions, demonstrating that they can be used for tunable band engineering, forming what we call a quantum circuit crystal. As a relevant application, we discuss the creation of stationary entanglement between two superconducting qubits interacting through a disordered media.

  18. Thermodynamics of two-dimensional Josephson junctions

    We derive the effective free energy of a two-dimensional Josephson junction in the presence of an external current and predict that the junction has a phase transition at a temperature TJ below the bulk transition temperature Tc. In the range TJ c is reduced by thermal fluctuations; for a junction of size L, Ic ∝ Lb(T) where b(T) J c vanishes at L → ∞) while 0 J. Our results may account for the absence of an observable supercurrent at temperatures below Tc in YBa2Cu3Ox-and Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8-based junctions. (orig.)

  19. Analysis of vertebrate gap junction protein.

    Finbow, M E; Shuttleworth, J.; Hamilton, A.E.; Pitts, J D

    1983-01-01

    A new method for the purification of gap junctions is described which depends on the extraction of cell monolayers or tissue homogenates with Triton X-100. The major band on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) of junctional preparations from a variety of vertebrate sources has an apparent mol. wt. of 16,000 (16 K). Further evidence for the junctional origin of the 16 K protein is provided by the results of four different experimental approaches. (i) The junctions form a sharp band i...

  20. RWGSCAT - RECTANGULAR WAVEGUIDE JUNCTION SCATTERING PROGRAM

    Hoppe, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    In order to optimize frequency response and determine the tolerances required to meet RF specifications, accurate computer modeling of passive rectangular waveguide components is often required. Many rectangular waveguide components may be represented either exactly or approximately as a number of different size rectangular waveguides which are connected in series. RWGSCAT, Rectangular WaveGuide junction SCATtering program, solves for the scattering properties of a waveguide device. This device must consist of a number of rectangular waveguide sections of different cross sectional area which are connected in series. Devices which fall into this category include step transformers, filters, and smooth or corrugated rectangular horns. RWGSCAT will model such devices and accurately predict the reflection and transmission characteristics, taking into account higher order (other than dominant TE 10) mode excitation if it occurs, as well as multiple reflections and stored energy at each discontinuity. For devices which are large with respect to the wavelength of operation, the characteristics of the device may be required for computing a higher order mode or a number of higher order modes exciting the device. Such interactions can be represented by defining a scattering matrix for each discontinuity in the device, and then cascading the individual scattering matrices in order to determine the scattering matrix for the overall device. The individual matrices are obtained using the mode matching method. RWGSCAT is written in FORTRAN 77 for IBM PC series and compatible computers running MS-DOS. It has been successfully compiled and implemented using Lahey FORTRAN 77 under MS-DOS. A sample MS-DOS executable is provided on the distribution medium. It requires 377K of RAM for execution. Sample input data is also provided on the distribution medium. The standard distribution medium for this program is one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. The contents of the diskette are

  1. Black Diamonds at Brane Junctions

    Chamblin, Andrew; Csaki, Csaba; Erlich, Joshua; Timothy J. Hollowood

    2000-01-01

    We discuss the properties of black holes in brane-world scenarios where our universe is viewed as a four-dimensional sub-manifold of some higher-dimensional spacetime. We consider in detail such a model where four-dimensional spacetime lies at the junction of several domain walls in a higher dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime. In this model there may be any number p of infinitely large extra dimensions transverse to the brane-world. We present an exact solution describing a black p-brane wh...

  2. Effects of junction geometry in crossover temperature to macroscopic quantum tunneling regime of intrinsic Josephson junctions

    We investigated the phase dynamics of Bi-2212 intrinsic Josephson junctions with two types of junction geometry. We found that a crossover temperature to the macroscopic quantum tunneling regime was quite different between the two types of junction geometry. The observed behavior is discussed in terms of an edge effect in long Josephson junctions dependent on the junction geometry. We investigated the phase dynamics of long intrinsic Josephson junctions, which were fabricated on a narrow bridge structure of Bi2Sr2CaCu2Oy (Bi-2212) single crystals by using a focused ion-beam etching. We measured the probability distribution of the switching events from the zero-voltage state for two types of junction geometry. One is a junction where the bridge width (L1) is larger than the Josephson penetration depth, λJ, and the distance between two slits (L2) is comparable to λJ, while the other is a junction where L1 is comparable to λJ and L2 is larger than λJ. We found that a crossover temperature from the thermally activated regime to the macroscopic quantum tunneling regime was quite different between the two types of junction geometry. We discuss the observed behavior in terms of an edge effect in long Josephson junctions dependent on the junction geometry.

  3. Electron transport through molecular junctions

    At present, metal–molecular tunnel junctions are recognized as important active elements in molecular electronics. This gives a strong motivation to explore physical mechanisms controlling electron transport through molecules. In the last two decades, an unceasing progress in both experimental and theoretical studies of molecular conductance has been demonstrated. In the present work we give an overview of theoretical methods used to analyze the transport properties of metal–molecular junctions as well as some relevant experiments and applications. After a brief general description of the electron transport through molecules we introduce a Hamiltonian which can be used to analyze electron–electron, electron–phonon and spin–orbit interactions. Then we turn to description of the commonly used transport theory formalisms including the nonequilibrium Green’s functions based approach and the approach based on the “master” equations. We discuss the most important effects which could be manifested through molecules in electron transport phenomena such as Coulomb, spin and Frank–Condon blockades, Kondo peak in the molecular conductance, negative differential resistance and some others. Bearing in mind that first principles electronic structure calculations are recognized as the indispensable basis of the theory of electron transport through molecules, we briefly discuss the main equations and some relevant applications of the density functional theory which presently is often used to analyze important characteristics of molecules and molecular clusters. Finally, we discuss some kinds of nanoelectronic devices built using molecules and similar systems such as carbon nanotubes, various nanowires and quantum dots.

  4. Grand Junction Remedial Action Program

    The Grand Junction Remedial Action Program (hereinafter referred to as the Program) originated in 1972 due to a recognized need to reduce the levels of radiation found in some of the structures identified in Grand Junction, Colorado that were constructed in part with uranium mill tailings. Out of over 640 locations eventually identified as qualifying for corrective action, the Program performed remedial construction on 594 of them. The owners of over 45 unremediated structures either did not wish to participate in the voluntary Program, or the structures were torn down, burned down, or were abandoned before the Program could take action on them. Because this was the first remedial action program of its type, and because its task was to reduce the radiation levels as soon as practical, there was no time for lengthly research and development of remedial methods or techniques. Trial and error combined with basic engineering and health physics produced a Program that learned as it progressed. At a cost of $22.7 million over a 15-year period, a substantial portion of the community had radiation exposure reduced because many public buildings such as schools, churches, and businesses, as well as private residences were remediated. 21 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs

  5. Genetics Home Reference: junctional epidermolysis bullosa

    ... Junctional epidermolysis bullosa results from mutations in the LAMA3 , LAMB3 , LAMC2 , and COL17A1 genes. Mutations in each ... of all cases of junctional epidermolysis bullosa . The LAMA3 , LAMB3 , and LAMC2 genes each provide instructions for ...

  6. Gap junctions and connexin-interacting proteins

    Giepmans, Ben N G

    2004-01-01

    Gap junctions form channels between adjacent cells. The core proteins of these channels are the connexins. Regulation of gap junction communication (GJC) can be modulated by connexin-associating proteins, such as regulatory protein phosphatases and protein kinases, of which c-Src is the best-studied

  7. Electrophysiological study in neuromuscular junction disorders

    Cherian, Ajith; Baheti, Neeraj N.; Iype, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This review is on ultrastructure and subcellular physiology at normal and abnormal neuromuscular junctions. The clinical and electrophysiological findings in myasthenia gravis, Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), congenital myasthenic syndromes, and botulinum intoxication are discussed. Single fiber electromyography (SFEMG) helps to explain the basis of testing neuromuscular junction function by repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS). SFEMG requires skill and patience and its availability i...

  8. Shot noise in YBCO bicrystal Josephson junctions

    Constantinian, K.Y.; Ovsyannikov, G.A.; Borisenko, I.V.; Mygind, Jesper; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    2003-01-01

    We measured spectral noise density in YBCO symmetric bicrystal Josephson junctions on sapphire substrates at bias voltages up to 100 mV and T 4.2 K. Normal state resistance of the Josephson junctions, R-N = 20-90 Omega and ICRN up to 2.2 mV have been observed in the experimental samples. Noise me...

  9. Hall effect in NS and SNS junctions

    Zhou, F.; Spivak, B.

    1997-01-01

    Hall effect in SN and SNS junctions is considered. It is shown that at small temperature the Hall voltage is significantly suppressed as compared to its normal metal value. The time dependence of the Hall voltage in SNS junctions has a form of narrow pulses with the Josephson frequency.

  10. Zipper and freeway shear zone junctions

    Passchier, Cees; Platt, John

    2016-04-01

    Ductile shear zones are usually presented as isolated planar high-strain domains in a less deformed wall rock, characterised by shear sense indicators such as characteristic deflected foliation traces. Many shear zones, however, form branched systems and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting geometry can be complicated and lead to unusual fabric geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone junctions with three simultaneously operating branches, and with slip directions at a high angle to the branch line, eight basic types of shear zone triple junctions are possible, divided into three groups. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense on all three branches. If shear sense is different on the three branches, this can lead to space problems. Some of these junctions have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch, named zipper junctions, or a single shear zone which splits to form two, known as wedge junctions. Closing zipper junctions are most unusual, since they form a non-active high-strain zone with opposite deflection of foliations. Shear zipper and shear wedge junctions have two shear zones with similar shear sense, and one with the opposite sense. All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic flow patterns in the shear zone and its wall rock. Shear zone junctions with slip directions normal to the branch line can easily be studied, since ideal sections of shear sense indicators lie in the plane normal to the shear zone branches and the branch line. Expanding the model to allow slip oblique and parallel to the branch line in a full 3D setting gives rise to a large number of geometries in three main groups. Slip directions can be parallel on all branches but oblique to the branch line: two slip directions can be parallel and a third oblique, or all three branches can have slip in different directions. Such more complex shear zone junctions cannot be studied to advantage in a

  11. A double junction superconductive detector based on a single material

    We study a class of superconductive radiation detectors in which the absorption of energy occurs in a long superconductive strip while the readout stage is provided by superconductive tunnel junctions positioned at the two ends of the strip. This configuration has been extensively studied in the last years almost invariably using two superconducting materials one of which, with a lower gap, used to fabricate the junctions, has the role of a trap for the nonequilibrium quasiparticles. In this work we study in detail the signal formation and the performances of such a device based on a single superconducting material, i.e. one without traps. We show that the trap-free device is capable both of imaging and energy resolution. We calculate the detector response in the form of collected charges at the two junctions, for Ta and Al devices and discuss a few features, specific to the trap-free detector, which can facilitate a rapid characterization of the device before use under radiation

  12. Tunable ground states in helical p-wave Josephson junctions

    Cheng, Qiang; Zhang, Kunhua; Yu, Dongyang; Chen, Chongju; Zhang, Yinhan; Jin, Biao

    2016-07-01

    We study new types of Josephson junctions composed of helical p-wave superconductors with {k}x\\hat{x}+/- {k}y\\hat{y} and {k}y\\hat{x}+/- {k}x\\hat{y}-pairing symmetries using quasi-classical Green’s functions with generalized Riccati parametrization. The junctions can host rich ground states: π phase, 0 + π phase, φ 0 phase and φ phase. The phase transition can be tuned by rotating the magnetization in the ferromagnetic interface. We present the phase diagrams in the parameter space formed by the orientation of the magnetization or by the magnitude of the interfacial potentials. The selection rules for the lowest order current which are responsible for the formation of the rich phases are summarized from the current-phase relations based on the numerical calculation. We construct a Ginzburg–Landau type of free energy for the junctions with d-vectors and the magnetization, which not only reveals the interaction forms of spin-triplet superconductivity and ferromagnetism, but can also directly lead to the selection rules. In addition, the energies of the Andreev bound states and the novel symmetries in the current-phase relations are also investigated. Our results are helpful both in the prediction of novel Josephson phases and in the design of quantum circuits.

  13. Measuring quantum systems with tunnel junctions

    Full text: We present a formalism that allows to describe a quantum system modulating the transmission of a tunnel junction. The tunnel junction acts as an environment for the quantum system. Contrary to the conventional approach to open quantum systems we retain a degree of freedom of the environment, the charge passed through the junction, after averaging over the bath degrees of freedom, employing a projection operator technique. The resulting object characterizing the joint dynamics of the system and the charge is the charge specific density matrix. We derive a master equation describing the time evolution of the charge specific density matrix. We consider two examples of quantum systems coupled to the junction: a spin and a harmonic oscillator. In the spin case we are able to analyze a quantum measurement process in detail. For the oscillator we investigate the noise in the tunnel junction induced by the coupling. (author)

  14. Spin accumulation in triplet Josephson junction

    We employ a Hamiltonian method to study the equal-spin pairing triplet Josephson junction with different orbital symmetries of pair potentials. Both the spin/charge supercurrent and possible spin accumulation at the interface of the junction are analyzed by means of the Keldysh Green's function. It is found that a spontaneous angle-resolved spin accumulation can form at the junction's interface when the orbital symmetries of Cooper pairs in two triplet superconductors are different, the physical origin is the combined effect of the different orbital symmetries and different spin states of Cooper pairs due to the misalignment of two d vectors in triplet leads. An abrupt current reversal effect induced by misalignment of d vectors is observed and can survive in a strong interface barrier scattering because the zero-energy state appears at the interface of the junction. These properties of the p-wave Josephson junction may be helpful for identifying the order parameter symmetry.

  15. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson tunnel junctions and Coulomb blockade in single small tunnel junctions

    Experiments investigating the process of macroscopic quantum tunneling in a moderately-damped, resistively shunted, Josephson junction are described, followed by a discussion of experiments performed on very small capacitance normal-metal tunnel junctions. The experiments on the resistively-shunted Josephson junction were designed to investigate a quantum process, that of the tunneling of the Josephson phase variable under a potential barrier, in a system in which dissipation plays a major role in the dynamics of motion. All the parameters of the junction were measured using the classical phenomena of thermal activation and resonant activation. Theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental results, showing good agreement with no adjustable parameters; the tunneling rate in the moderately damped (Q ∼ 1) junction is seen to be reduced by a factor of 300 from that predicted for an undamped junction. The phase is seen to be a good quantum-mechanical variable. The experiments on small capacitance tunnel junctions extend the measurements on the larger-area Josephson junctions from the region in which the phase variable has a fairly well-defined value, i.e. its wavefunction has a narrow width, to the region where its value is almost completely unknown. The charge on the junction becomes well-defined and is predicted to quantize the current through the junction, giving rise to the Coulomb blockade at low bias. I present the first clear observation of the Coulomb blockade in single junctions. The electrical environment of the tunnel junction, however, strongly affects the behavior of the junction: higher resistance leads are observed to greatly sharpen the Coulomb blockade over that seen with lower resistance leads. I present theoretical descriptions of how the environment influences the junctions; comparisons with the experimental results are in reasonable agreement

  16. Schottky Barrier Formation at a Carbon Nanotube–Scandium Junction

    Recent experiment shows that scandium (Sc) can make a good performance contact with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to fabricate n-type field effect transistor (n-FET). We study the Schottky barrier (SB) of scandium (Sc) and palladium (Pd) with a (8,0) single-wall CNT (SWCNT) using first-principles calculation. It is found that the p-type SB height (SBH) of the Pd–CNT contact is about 0.34 eV, which is in good agreement with the experimental data. For the Sc-CNT contact, an n-type contact is formed and the SBH is about 0.08 eV in agreement with the experimental observations. Our calculation demonstrates that by contacting CNT with Pd and Sc, p-FET and n-FET can be fabricated, respectively. The dipole effect at the interface is used to explain our result

  17. DNA three-way junction-ruthenium complex assemblies

    Irvoas, Joris; Noirot, Arielle; Chouini-Lalanne, Nadia; Reynes, Olivier; Sartor, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    Three-way junction building blocks were designed to construct novel 2D ruthenium-DNA assemblies. Discrete three - branched DNA motifs were formed with 1 to 3 sticky ends of 14-, 20- and/or 24-mer nucleotides. Hybridization with the complementary mono Ru-DNA conjugates afforded the formation of a family of three-way assemblies with 1 to 3 peripheral ruthenium complexes. The use of sticky ends of different lengths allowed us to modulate the number of metallic complexes introduced and also to ex...

  18. Chaos in junctions and devices

    The plan of the paper is as follows. Section 2 is an introduction into chaos in dissipative systems with an emphasis on period doubling and intermittency. The logistic map and the circle map are discussed and their significance as describing systems of continuous dynamics is emphasized. Section 3 is subdivided into two parts after the introduction of the RSJ equations. The first is on the ac driven Josephson junction without a dc bias and the second on the same with a dc current. Each of these subdivisions includes a discussion of experiments as well. There is also a section on investigations that do not fit into either of the above categories. Section 4 is devoted to the dc-SQUID, in the first part as a magnetic flux gauge and in the second as a four dimensional dynamical system, which can be simulated with great accuracy and compared with one dimensional models. (orig./BUD)

  19. Cylindrical Josephson junctions in magnetic fields

    The radial Josephson current I/sub J/ between co-axial cylinders was measured as a function of axial and azimuthal magnetic fields. The junctions were of two types: 0.25 mm diameter Nb-oxide-Sn single junctions and 0.25 mm film diameter Nb-oxide-Sn film double junctions. The Sn film of the single junctions was 160 nm or 200 nm. The Sn films of the double junctions were both either 155 nm or 230 nm. For a pair of cylinders I/sub J/ is zero except when both members are in the same fluxoid quantum state. When I/sub J/not equal to O, the relative phase is independent of aximuthal angle theta. In all measurements the cylinders were in fluxoid state zero. There was a critical value of axial field B/sub s/ which destroyed the Josephson coupling for each junction. This critical field is smallest for the outer tin junction of the double junction. It depends upon geometry and film thickness but is independent of the value of I/sub J/. The calculated value of the Gibbs function per unit volume of the tin films is, however, nearly the same for all junctions at their respective critical fields. Th Josephson current for the 160 nm Sn film single cylindrical junction was measured as a function of axial field B/sub z/ and azimuthal field B/sub theta/. When the axial field was zero the Josephson current as a function of azimuthal field showed the Fraunhofer like pattern of a flat junction in a magnetic field. As the axial field was increased, the central lobe of the Fraunhofer pattern decreased and disappeared at the critical field leaving the side lobes broadened. It is well known that a Josephson junction may switch to the voltage state at any current less than the maximum Josephson current. For some cylindrical junctions the switching currents are not continuously distributed but discrete with certain values occurring repeatedly. This observation is not understood

  20. Expression of Tight Junction Proteins and Cadherin 17 in the Small Intestine of Young Goats Offered a Reduced N and/or Ca Diet

    Wilkens, Mirja R.; Breves, Gerhard; Langeheine, Marion; Brehm, Ralph; Muscher-Banse, Alexandra S.

    2016-01-01

    Diets fed to ruminants should contain nitrogen (N) as low as possible to reduce feed costs and environmental pollution. Though possessing effective N-recycling mechanisms to maintain the N supply for rumen microbial protein synthesis and hence protein supply for the host, an N reduction caused substantial changes in calcium (Ca) and phosphate homeostasis in young goats including decreased intestinal transepithelial Ca absorption as reported for monogastric species. In contrast to the transcellular component of transepithelial Ca transport, the paracellular route has not been investigated in young goats. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterise the effects of dietary N and/or Ca reduction on paracellular transport mechanisms in young goats. Electrophysiological properties of intestinal epithelia were investigated by Ussing chamber experiments. The expression of tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) proteins in intestinal epithelia were examined on mRNA level by qPCR and on protein level by western blot analysis. Dietary N reduction led to a segment specific increase in tissue conductances in the proximal jejunum which might be linked to concomitantly decreased expression of cadherin 17 mRNA. Expression of occludin (OCLN) and zonula occludens protein 1 was increased in mid jejunal epithelia of N reduced fed goats on mRNA and partly on protein level. Reduced dietary Ca supply resulted in a segment specific increase in claudin 2 and claudin 12 expression and decreased the expression of OCLN which might have been mediated at least in part by calcitriol. These data show that dietary N as well as Ca reduction affected expression of TJ and AJ proteins in a segment specific manner in young goats and may thus be involved in modulation of paracellular Ca permeability. PMID:27120348

  1. Expression of Tight Junction Proteins and Cadherin 17 in the Small Intestine of Young Goats Offered a Reduced N and/or Ca Diet.

    Kristin Elfers

    Full Text Available Diets fed to ruminants should contain nitrogen (N as low as possible to reduce feed costs and environmental pollution. Though possessing effective N-recycling mechanisms to maintain the N supply for rumen microbial protein synthesis and hence protein supply for the host, an N reduction caused substantial changes in calcium (Ca and phosphate homeostasis in young goats including decreased intestinal transepithelial Ca absorption as reported for monogastric species. In contrast to the transcellular component of transepithelial Ca transport, the paracellular route has not been investigated in young goats. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterise the effects of dietary N and/or Ca reduction on paracellular transport mechanisms in young goats. Electrophysiological properties of intestinal epithelia were investigated by Ussing chamber experiments. The expression of tight junction (TJ and adherens junction (AJ proteins in intestinal epithelia were examined on mRNA level by qPCR and on protein level by western blot analysis. Dietary N reduction led to a segment specific increase in tissue conductances in the proximal jejunum which might be linked to concomitantly decreased expression of cadherin 17 mRNA. Expression of occludin (OCLN and zonula occludens protein 1 was increased in mid jejunal epithelia of N reduced fed goats on mRNA and partly on protein level. Reduced dietary Ca supply resulted in a segment specific increase in claudin 2 and claudin 12 expression and decreased the expression of OCLN which might have been mediated at least in part by calcitriol. These data show that dietary N as well as Ca reduction affected expression of TJ and AJ proteins in a segment specific manner in young goats and may thus be involved in modulation of paracellular Ca permeability.

  2. Expression of Tight Junction Proteins and Cadherin 17 in the Small Intestine of Young Goats Offered a Reduced N and/or Ca Diet.

    Elfers, Kristin; Marr, Isabell; Wilkens, Mirja R; Breves, Gerhard; Langeheine, Marion; Brehm, Ralph; Muscher-Banse, Alexandra S

    2016-01-01

    Diets fed to ruminants should contain nitrogen (N) as low as possible to reduce feed costs and environmental pollution. Though possessing effective N-recycling mechanisms to maintain the N supply for rumen microbial protein synthesis and hence protein supply for the host, an N reduction caused substantial changes in calcium (Ca) and phosphate homeostasis in young goats including decreased intestinal transepithelial Ca absorption as reported for monogastric species. In contrast to the transcellular component of transepithelial Ca transport, the paracellular route has not been investigated in young goats. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterise the effects of dietary N and/or Ca reduction on paracellular transport mechanisms in young goats. Electrophysiological properties of intestinal epithelia were investigated by Ussing chamber experiments. The expression of tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) proteins in intestinal epithelia were examined on mRNA level by qPCR and on protein level by western blot analysis. Dietary N reduction led to a segment specific increase in tissue conductances in the proximal jejunum which might be linked to concomitantly decreased expression of cadherin 17 mRNA. Expression of occludin (OCLN) and zonula occludens protein 1 was increased in mid jejunal epithelia of N reduced fed goats on mRNA and partly on protein level. Reduced dietary Ca supply resulted in a segment specific increase in claudin 2 and claudin 12 expression and decreased the expression of OCLN which might have been mediated at least in part by calcitriol. These data show that dietary N as well as Ca reduction affected expression of TJ and AJ proteins in a segment specific manner in young goats and may thus be involved in modulation of paracellular Ca permeability. PMID:27120348

  3. Search for the in-phase Flux Flow mode in stacked Josephson junctions

    Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Madsen, Søren Peder

    2006-01-01

    Josephson vortex flux flow states in stacked Josephson junctions are investigated numerically. The aim of the work is to understand the mechanisms behind the formation of triangular (anti-phase) and square (in-phase) vortex lattices, and is motivated by recent experiments on layered BSCCO type high...

  4. The Asymmetry of the Distribution Density Volume Uncompensated Charge at the Metallurgical p-n Junction

    A.S. Mazinov

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The features of the formation of shallow junction and its calculation for a solar cell based on single-crystal silicon with front boron were considered. The ambiguity of the calculated profiles recompensating impurity, which is dependent on the accuracy of the constants of diffusion equations, was shown.

  5. Characterization of pure boron depositions integrated in silicon diodes for nanometer-deep junction applications

    Sarubbi, F.

    2010-01-01

    Doping technologies for formation of ultrashallow and highly-doped p+ junctions are continuously demanded to face the challenges in front-end processing that have emerged due to the aggressive downscaling of vertical dimensions for future semiconductor devices. As an alternative to implantations, cu

  6. Electric field breakdown in single molecule junctions.

    Li, Haixing; Su, Timothy A; Zhang, Vivian; Steigerwald, Michael L; Nuckolls, Colin; Venkataraman, Latha

    2015-04-22

    Here we study the stability and rupture of molecular junctions under high voltage bias at the single molecule/single bond level using the scanning tunneling microscope-based break-junction technique. We synthesize carbon-, silicon-, and germanium-based molecular wires terminated by aurophilic linker groups and study how the molecular backbone and linker group affect the probability of voltage-induced junction rupture. First, we find that junctions formed with covalent S-Au bonds are robust under high voltage and their rupture does not demonstrate bias dependence within our bias range. In contrast, junctions formed through donor-acceptor bonds rupture more frequently, and their rupture probability demonstrates a strong bias dependence. Moreover, we find that the junction rupture probability increases significantly above ∼1 V in junctions formed from methylthiol-terminated disilanes and digermanes, indicating a voltage-induced rupture of individual Si-Si and Ge-Ge bonds. Finally, we compare the rupture probabilities of the thiol-terminated silane derivatives containing Si-Si, Si-C, and Si-O bonds and find that Si-C backbones have higher probabilities of sustaining the highest voltage. These results establish a new method for studying electric field breakdown phenomena at the single molecule level. PMID:25675085

  7. Supercurrent decay in extremely underdamped Josephson junctions

    We present an experimental study of the effective dissipation relevant in the thermally activated supercurrent decay of extremely underdamped Josephson junctions. Data referring to the supercurrent decay of Nb/AlOx/Nb Josephson junctions are compared with the Kramers theory. Our measurements allow us to obtain the open-quotes effectiveclose quotes resistance to be used in the resistively shunted junction model that results to be the subgap resistance due to the presence of thermally activated quasiparticles. The extremely low dissipation level obtained at low temperatures renders our result quite interesting in view of experiments in the quantum limit. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  8. δ-biased Josephson tunnel junctions

    The behavior of a long Josephson tunnel junction drastically depends on the distribution of the dc bias current. We investigate the case in which the bias current is fed in the central point of a one-dimensional junction. Such junction configuration has been recently used to detect the persistent currents circulating in a superconducting loop. Analytical and numerical results indicate that the presence of fractional vortices leads to remarkable differences from the conventional case of uniformly distributed dc bias current. The theoretical findings are supported by detailed measurements on a number of δ-biased samples having different electrical and geometrical parameters.

  9. Plasticity of single-atom Pb junctions

    Müller, M.; Salgado, C.; Néel, N.; Palacios, J. J.; Kröger, J.

    2016-06-01

    A low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope was used to fabricate atomic contacts on Pb(111). Conductance characteristics of the junctions were simultaneously recorded with forming and subsequent breaking of the contacts. A pronounced hysteresis effect in conductance traces was observed from junctions comprising the clean Pb(111) surface. The hysteretic behavior was less profound in contacts to single Pb atoms adsorbed to Pb(111). Density-functional calculations reproduced the experimental results by performing a full ab initio modeling of plastic junction deformations. A comprehensive description of the experimental findings was achieved by considering different atomic tip apex geometries.

  10. Graded junction termination extensions for electronic devices

    Merrett, J. Neil (Inventor); Isaacs-Smith, Tamara (Inventor); Sheridan, David C. (Inventor); Williams, John R. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A graded junction termination extension in a silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device and method of its fabrication using ion implementation techniques is provided for high power devices. The properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make this wide band gap semiconductor a promising material for high power devices. This potential is demonstrated in various devices such as p-n diodes, Schottky diodes, bipolar junction transistors, thyristors, etc. These devices require adequate and affordable termination techniques to reduce leakage current and increase breakdown voltage in order to maximize power handling capabilities. The graded junction termination extension disclosed is effective, self-aligned, and simplifies the implementation process.

  11. Palladium electrodes for molecular tunnel junctions.

    Chang, Shuai; Sen, Suman; Zhang, Peiming; Gyarfas, Brett; Ashcroft, Brian; Lefkowitz, Steven; Peng, Hongbo; Lindsay, Stuart

    2012-10-26

    Gold has been the metal of choice for research on molecular tunneling junctions, but it is incompatible with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor fabrication because it forms deep level traps in silicon. Palladium electrodes do not contaminate silicon, and also give higher tunnel current signals in the molecular tunnel junctions that we have studied. The result is cleaner signals in a recognition-tunneling junction that recognizes the four natural DNA bases as well as 5-methyl cytosine, with no spurious background signals. More than 75% of all the recorded signal peaks indicate the base correctly. PMID:23037952

  12. Palladium electrodes for molecular tunnel junctions

    Gold has been the metal of choice for research on molecular tunneling junctions, but it is incompatible with complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor fabrication because it forms deep level traps in silicon. Palladium electrodes do not contaminate silicon, and also give higher tunnel current signals in the molecular tunnel junctions that we have studied. The result is cleaner signals in a recognition-tunneling junction that recognizes the four natural DNA bases as well as 5-methyl cytosine, with no spurious background signals. More than 75% of all the recorded signal peaks indicate the base correctly. (paper)

  13. Bioavailability and efficacy of a gap junction enhancer (PQ7 in a mouse mammary tumor model.

    Stephanie N Shishido

    Full Text Available The loss of gap junctional intercellular communication is characteristic of neoplastic cells, suggesting that the restoration with a gap junction enhancer may be a new therapeutic treatment option with less detrimental effects than traditional antineoplastic drugs. A gap junction enhancer, 6-methoxy-8-[(2-furanylmethyl amino]-4-methyl-5-(3-trifluoromethylphenyloxy quinoline (PQ7, on the normal tissue was evaluated in healthy C57BL/6J mice in a systemic drug distribution study. Immunoblot analysis of the vital organs indicates a reduction in Cx43 expression in PQ7-treated animals with no observable change in morphology. Next the transgenic strain FVB/N-Tg(MMTV-PyVT 634Mul/J (also known as PyVT was used as a spontaneous mammary tumor mouse model to determine the biological and histological effects of PQ7 on tumorigenesis and metastasis at three stages of development: Pre tumor, Early tumor, and Late tumor formation. PQ7 was assessed to have a low toxicity through intraperitoneal administration, with the majority of the compound being detected in the heart, liver, and lungs six hours post injection. The treatment of tumor bearing animals with PQ7 had a 98% reduction in tumor growth, while also decreasing the total tumor burden compared to control mice during the Pre stage of development. PQ7 treatment increased Cx43 expression in the neoplastic tissue during Pre-tumor formation; however, this effect was not observed in Late stage tumor formation. This study shows that the gap junction enhancer, PQ7, has low toxicity to normal tissue in healthy C57BL/6J mice, while having clinical efficacy in the treatment of spontaneous mammary tumors of PyVT mice. Additionally, gap junctional intercellular communication and neoplastic cellular growth are shown to be inversely related, while treatment with PQ7 inhibits tumor growth through targeting gap junction expression.

  14. Motorway junction design with emphasis on traffic performance and safety assesment - case study junction Ljubljana Rudnik

    Mlaker, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Thesis encompasses reconstruction predesign of the motorway junction Ljubljana Rudnik into motorway interchange. In this area is intended to be the junction of main arterial road with highway network, while today serves only as a minor junction of Rudnik and Ig area on the motorway. The purpose of reconstruction is to enable free traffic flow on most congested directions of the interchange, but also preserve the present function, in which Ig and Rudnik area are connected with the motorway. Bu...

  15. A p-i-n junction diode based on locally doped carbon nanotube network

    Xiaodong Liu; Changxin Chen; Liangming Wei; Nantao Hu; Chuanjuan Song; Chenghao Liao; Rong He; Xusheng Dong; Ying Wang; Qinran Liu; Yafei Zhang

    2016-01-01

    A p-i-n junction diode constructed by the locally doped network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) was investigated. In this diode, the two opposite ends of the SWNT-network channel were selectively doped by triethyloxonium hexachloroantimonate (OA) and polyethylenimine (PEI) to obtain the air-stable p- and n-type SWNTs respectively while the central area of the SWNT-network remained intrinsic state, resulting in the formation of a p-i-n junction with a strong built-in electronic field...

  16. Current trends in salivary gland tight junctions.

    Baker, Olga J

    2016-01-01

    Tight junctions form a continuous intercellular barrier between epithelial cells that is required to separate tissue spaces and regulate selective movement of solutes across the epithelium. They are composed of strands containing integral membrane proteins (e.g., claudins, occludin and tricellulin, junctional adhesion molecules and the coxsackie adenovirus receptor). These proteins are anchored to the cytoskeleton via scaffolding proteins such as ZO-1 and ZO-2. In salivary glands, tight junctions are involved in polarized saliva secretion and barrier maintenance between the extracellular environment and the glandular lumen. This review seeks to provide an overview of what is currently known, as well as the major questions and future research directions, regarding tight junction expression, organization and function within salivary glands. PMID:27583188

  17. Josephson tunnel junctions in niobium films

    A method of fabricating stable Josephson tunnel junctions with reproducible characteristics is described. The junctions have a sandwich structure consisting of a vacuum evaporated niobium film, a niobium oxide layer produced by the glow discharge method and a lead film deposited by vacuum evaporation. Difficulties in producing thin-film Josephson junctions are discussed. Experimental results suggest that the lower critical field of the niobium film is the most essential parameter when evaluating the quality of these junctions. The dependence of the lower critical field on the film thickness and on the Ginzburg-Landau parameter of the film is studied analytically. Comparison with the properties of the evaporated films and with the previous calculations for bulk specimens shows that the presented model is applicable for most of the prepared samples. (author)

  18. Molecular junctions: Single-molecule contacts exposed

    Nichols, Richard J.; Higgins, Simon J.

    2015-05-01

    Using a scanning tunnelling microscopy-based method it is now possible to get an atomistic-level description of the most probable binding and contact configuration for single-molecule electrical junctions.

  19. Chirality effect in disordered graphene ribbon junctions

    We investigate the influence of edge chirality on the electronic transport in clean or disordered graphene ribbon junctions. By using the tight-binding model and the Landauer-Büttiker formalism, the junction conductance is obtained. In the clean sample, the zero-magnetic-field junction conductance is strongly chirality-dependent in both unipolar and bipolar ribbons, whereas the high-magnetic-field conductance is either chirality-independent in the unipolar or chirality-dependent in the bipolar ribbon. Furthermore, we study the disordered sample in the presence of magnetic field and find that the junction conductance is always chirality-insensitive for both unipolar and bipolar ribbons with adequate disorders. In addition, the disorder-induced conductance plateaus can exist in all chiral bipolar ribbons provided the disorder strength is moderate. These results suggest that we can neglect the effect of edge chirality in fabricating electronic devices based on the magnetotransport in a disordered graphene ribbon. (paper)

  20. Superconducting switch made of graphene nanoribbon junctions

    Liang, Qifeng; Dong, Jinming

    2008-09-01

    The transmission of superconductor-graphene nanoribbon-superconductor junctions (SGS) has been studied by the non-equilibrium Green's function method. It is found that the on-site potential U in the center zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) of the SGS junction plays an important role in the magnitude of the supercurrent Ic. As the effective Fermi energy μeff (μeff = μF-U) goes from negative to positive, the SGS junction would suddenly transform from an 'OFF' state to an 'ON' state. And, as μeff increases further, the Ic will continue to increase. This switching behavior of the SGS junction shares the same origin with the zigzag GNR valley-isospin valve (Rycerz et al 2007 Nat. Phys. 3 172). Besides the valley-isospin, the density of states will also have an effect on the suppression of Ic.

  1. Controllable spin transport in ferromagnetic graphene junctions

    Yokoyama, Takehito

    2008-01-01

    We study spin transport in normal/ferromagnetic/normal graphene junctions where a gate electrode is attached to the ferromagnetic graphene. We find that due to the exchange field of the ferromagnetic graphene, spin current through the junctions has an oscillatory behavior with respect to the chemical potential in the ferromagnetic graphene, which can be tuned by the gate voltage. Especially, we obtain a controllable spin current reversal by the gate voltage. Our prediction of high controllabi...

  2. Heat dissipation in atomic-scale junctions

    Lee, Woochul; Kim, Kyeongtae; Jeong, Wonho; Zotti, Linda Angela; Pauly, Fabian; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Reddy, Pramod

    2013-01-01

    Atomic and single-molecule junctions represent the ultimate limit to the miniaturization of electrical circuits. They are also ideal platforms for testing quantum transport theories that are required to describe charge and energy transfer in novel functional nanometre-scale devices. Recent work has successfully probed electric and thermoelectric phenomena in atomic-scale junctions. However, heat dissipation and transport in atomic-scale devices remain poorly characterized owing to experimenta...

  3. Spinal Gap Junction Channels in Neuropathic Pain

    Jeon, Young Hoon; Youn, Dong Ho

    2015-01-01

    Damage to peripheral nerves or the spinal cord is often accompanied by neuropathic pain, which is a complex, chronic pain state. Increasing evidence indicates that alterations in the expression and activity of gap junction channels in the spinal cord are involved in the development of neuropathic pain. Thus, this review briefly summarizes evidence that regulation of the expression, coupling, and activity of spinal gap junction channels modulates pain signals in neuropathic pain states induced...

  4. Exotic hadron and string junction model

    Hadron structure is investigated adopting string junction model as a realization of confinement. Besides exotic hadrons (M4, B5 etc.), unconventional hadrons appear. A mass formula for these hadrons is proposed. New selection rule is introduced which requires the covalence of constituent line at hadron vertex. New duality appears due to the freedom of junction, especially in anti BB→anti BB reaction. A possible assignment of exotic and unconventional hadrons to recently observed narrow meson states is presented. (auth.)

  5. Degradation of connexins and gap junctions

    Falk, Matthias M.; Kells, Rachael M.; Berthoud, Viviana M.

    2014-01-01

    Connexin proteins are short-lived within the cell, whether present in the secretory pathway or in gap junction plaques. Their levels can be modulated by their rate of degradation. Connexins, at different stages of assembly, are degraded through the proteasomal, endo-/lysosomal, and phago-/lysosomal pathways. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about connexin and gap junction degradation including the signals and protein-protein interactions that participate in their targeting f...

  6. Supercurrent Switch in Graphene π Junctions

    Linder, Jacob; Yokoyama, Takehito; Huertas-Hernando, Daniel; Sudbø, Asle

    2008-05-01

    We study the supercurrent in a superconductor/ferromagnet/superconductor graphene junction. In contrast to its metallic counterpart, the oscillating critical current in our setup decays only weakly upon increasing the exchange field and junction width. We find an unusually large residual value of the supercurrent at the oscillatory cusps due to a strong deviation from a sinusoidal current-phase relationship. Our findings suggest a very efficient device for dissipationless supercurrent switching.

  7. Supercurrent switch in graphene pi junctions.

    Linder, Jacob; Yokoyama, Takehito; Huertas-Hernando, Daniel; Sudbø, Asle

    2008-05-01

    We study the supercurrent in a superconductor/ferromagnet/superconductor graphene junction. In contrast to its metallic counterpart, the oscillating critical current in our setup decays only weakly upon increasing the exchange field and junction width. We find an unusually large residual value of the supercurrent at the oscillatory cusps due to a strong deviation from a sinusoidal current-phase relationship. Our findings suggest a very efficient device for dissipationless supercurrent switching. PMID:18518411

  8. Black diamonds at brane junctions

    Chamblin, Andrew; Csáki, Csaba; Erlich, Joshua; Hollowood, Timothy J.

    2000-08-01

    We discuss the properties of black holes in brane-world scenarios where our Universe is viewed as a four-dimensional sub-manifold of some higher-dimensional spacetime. We consider in detail such a model where four-dimensional spacetime lies at the junction of several domain walls in a higher dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime. In this model there may be any number p of infinitely large extra dimensions transverse to the brane-world. We present an exact solution describing a black p-brane which will induce on the brane-world the Schwarzschild solution. This exact solution is unstable to the Gregory-Laflamme instability, whereby long-wavelength perturbations cause the extended horizon to fragment. We therefore argue that at late times a non-rotating uncharged black hole in the brane-world is described by a deformed event horizon in p+4 dimensions which will induce, to good approximation, the Schwarzschild solution in the four-dimensional brane world. When p=2, this deformed horizon resembles a black diamond and more generally for p>2, a polyhedron.

  9. Black Diamonds at Brane Junctions

    Chamblin, A; Erlich, J; Hollowood, Timothy J; Chamblin, Andrew; Csaki, Csaba; Erlich, Joshua; Hollowood, Timothy J.

    2000-01-01

    We discuss the properties of black holes in brane-world scenarios where ouruniverse is viewed as a four-dimensional sub-manifold of somehigher-dimensional spacetime. We consider in detail such a model wherefour-dimensional spacetime lies at the junction of several domain walls in ahigher dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime. In this model there may be anynumber p of infinitely large extra dimensions transverse to the brane-world. Wepresent an exact solution describing a black p-brane which will induce on thebrane-world the Schwarzschild solution. This exact solution is unstable to theGregory-Laflamme instability, whereby long-wavelength perturbations cause theextended horizon to fragment. We therefore argue that at late times anon-rotating uncharged black hole in the brane-world is described by a deformedevent horizon in p+4 dimensions which will induce, to good approximation, theSchwarzschild solution in the four-dimensional brane world. When p=2, thisdeformed horizon resembles a black diamond and more gener...

  10. Black diamonds at brane junctions

    We discuss the properties of black holes in brane-world scenarios where our Universe is viewed as a four-dimensional sub-manifold of some higher-dimensional spacetime. We consider in detail such a model where four-dimensional spacetime lies at the junction of several domain walls in a higher dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime. In this model there may be any number p of infinitely large extra dimensions transverse to the brane-world. We present an exact solution describing a black p-brane which will induce on the brane-world the Schwarzschild solution. This exact solution is unstable to the Gregory-Laflamme instability, whereby long-wavelength perturbations cause the extended horizon to fragment. We therefore argue that at late times a non-rotating uncharged black hole in the brane-world is described by a deformed event horizon in p+4 dimensions which will induce, to good approximation, the Schwarzschild solution in the four-dimensional brane world. When p=2, this deformed horizon resembles a black diamond and more generally for p>2, a polyhedron. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society