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Sample records for adenovirus-mediated gene therapy

  1. Adenovirus-mediated IL-12 gene therapy in combination with radiotherapy for murine liver cancer

    Objective: To investigate the synergistic antitumor effects of adenovirus-mediated IL-12 gene therapy in combination with radiotherapy in mice bearing liver cancer. Methods: Balb/c mice bearing liver cancer received the treatment at day 1 with tumor local irradiation (TLI) of 20 Gy or mask irradiation when tumor size reached 0.6-1.0 cm. Within 1 hour after irradiation, adenovirus containing IL-12 gene or PBS was intra-tumor injected once a week. Forty-eight hours after the second injection, IFN-γ levels in sera and the supernatant of cultured spleen cells were assayed by ELISA, CTL activity of spleen cells was measured by 3H-TdR release assay, and phenotypes of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes were analysed by immunohistochemical staining. Results: The growth of tumors in animals treated with a combination of IL-12 gene therapy and TLI was inhibited more significantly than those with either single treatment (P + and CD8+ lymphocyte infiltration and tumor-specific cytolytic activities, and the levels of IFN-γ in sera were higher in IL-12 gene therapy and IL-12 gene therapy combined with TLI groups. Conclusion: These results suggest that IL-12 gene therapy combined with radiotherapy is more effective than both single treatment modalities and can induce specific antitumor immuno-response greatly

  2. Up-regulation of integrin β3 in radioresistant pancreatic cancer impairs adenovirus-mediated gene therapy

    Adenovirus-mediated gene therapy is a promising approach for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. We previously reported that radiation enhanced adenovirus-mediated gene expression in pancreatic cancer, suggesting that adenoviral gene therapy might be more effective in radioresistant pancreatic cancer cells. In the present study, we compared the transduction efficiency of adenovirus-delivered genes in radiosensitive and radioresistant cells, and investigated the underlying mechanisms. We used an adenovirus expressing the hepatocyte growth factor antagonist, NK4 (Ad-NK4), as a representative gene therapy. We established two radioresistant human pancreatic cancer cell lines using fractionated irradiation. Radiosensitive and radioresistant pancreatic cancer cells were infected with Ad-NK4, and NK4 levels in the cells were measured. In order to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the differences in the transduction efficiency between these cells, we measured expression of the genes mediating adenovirus infection and endocytosis. The results revealed that NK4 levels in radioresistant cells were significantly lower (P<0.01) than those in radiosensitive cells, although there were no significant differences in adenovirus uptake between radiosensitive cells and radioresistant cells. Integrin β3 was up-regulated and the Coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor was down-regulated in radioresistant cells, and inhibition of integrin β3 promoted adenovirus gene transfer. These results suggest that inhibition of integrin β3 in radioresistant pancreatic cancer cells could enhance adenovirus-mediated gene therapy. (author)

  3. Combination Adenovirus-Mediated HSV-tk/GCV and Antisense IGF-1 Gene Therapy for Rat Glioma

    2000-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of combination adenovirus-mediated HSV-tk/GCV system and antisense IGF-1 gene therapy for rat glioma and analyze the mechanism.Methods Using the recombinant adenovirus vector,GCV killing effeciency after combined gene transfer of HSV-tk and antisense IGF-1 was observed in vitro.Rat glioma was treated with HSV-tk/GCV and antisense IGF-1 and the survival rate of rats was observed.Results C6 cells transfected with tk and antisense IGF-1 gene were more sensitive to GCV than that transfected with tk gene alone.The survival of the combination gene therapy group was prolonged significantly and large amounts of CD+4,CD+8 lymphocytes were detected in the tumor tissues.Conclusion Antisense IGF-1 gene may enhance the tumor-killing effects of HSV-tk/GCV.

  4. Synergistic tumor suppression by adenovirus-mediated ING4/PTEN double gene therapy for gastric cancer.

    Zhang, H; Zhou, X; Xu, C; Yang, J; Xiang, J; Tao, M; Xie, Y

    2016-01-01

    Both inhibitor of growth 4 (ING4) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) have been shown to be strong candidate tumor suppressors. However, the combined efficacy of ING4 and PTEN for human gastric cancer remains to be determined. In this report, we constructed a multiple promoter expression cassette-based recombinant adenovirus coexpressing ING4 and PTEN (AdVING4/PTEN), assessed the combined effects of AdVING4/PTEN on gastric cancer using wild-type p53 AGS and SNU-1 human gastric cancer cell lines, and elucidated its underlying mechanisms. We found that AdVING4/PTEN-induced synergistic growth inhibition and apoptosis in vitro AGS or SNU-1 tumor cells and in vivo AGS xenografted tumors subcutaneously inoculated in athymic BALB/c nude mice. Mechanistically, AdVING4/PTEN exhibited an enhanced effect on upregulation of p53, Ac-p53 (K382), P21, Bax, PUMA, Noxa, cleaved Caspase-9, cleaved Caspase-3 and cleaved PARP as well as downregulation of Bcl-2 in vitro and in vivo. In addition, AdVING4/PTEN synergistically downregulated tumor vessel CD34 expression and reduced microvessel density, and additively inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in vivo. The synergistic tumor suppression elicited by AdVING4/PTEN was closely associated with the synergistic induction of apoptosis possibly via enhancement of endogenous p53 responses through cooperatively facilitating p53's stability and acetylation, and the synergistic inhibition of tumor angiogenesis probably via overlapping reduction of VEGF through cooperatively downregulating hypoxia inducible factor-1α's level and transcription activity. Thus, our results indicate that cancer gene therapy combining ING4 and PTEN may constitute a novel and effective therapeutic modality for human gastric cancer and other cancers. PMID:26564429

  5. Adenovirus-mediated interleukin-12 gene therapy for metastatic colon carcinoma.

    M. CARUSO; Pham-Nguyen, K; Kwong, Y. L.; Xu, B; Kosai, K I; Finegold, M; Woo, S L; Chen, S. H.

    1996-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviral mediated delivery of suicide and cytokine genes has been investigated as a treatment for hepatic metastases of colon carcinoma in mice. Liver tumors were established by intrahepatic implantation of a poorly immunogenic colon carcinoma cell line (MCA-26), which is syngeneic in BALB/c mice. Intratumoral transfer of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) and the murine interleukin (mIL)-2 genes resulted in substantial hepatic tumor regression, induced an...

  6. Efficacy and toxicity of replication-competent adenovirus-mediated double suicide gene therapy in combination with radiation therapy in an orthotopic mouse prostate cancer model

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of replication-competent adenovirus-mediated double suicide gene therapy in an adjuvant setting with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in an experimental prostate cancer model in preparation for a Phase I clinical study in humans. Methods: For efficacy studies, i.m. DU145 and intraprostatic LNCaP C4-2 tumors were established in immune-deficient mice. Tumors were injected with the lytic, replication-competent Ad5-CD/TKrep adenovirus containing a cytosine deaminase (CD)/herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-1 TK) fusion gene. Two days later, mice were administered 1 week of 5-fluorocytosine + ganciclovir (GCV) prodrug therapy and fractionated doses of EBRT (trimodal therapy). Tumor control rate of trimodal therapy was compared to that of EBRT alone. For toxicology studies, immune-competent male mice received a single intraprostatic injection (1010 vp) of the replication-competent Ad5-CD/TKrep adenovirus. Two days later, mice were administered 4 weeks of 5-fluorocytosine + GCV prodrug therapy and 56 Gy EBRT to the pelvic region. The toxicity of trimodal therapy was assessed by histopathologic analysis of major organs and clinical chemistries. Results: In both the i.m. DU145 and intraprostatic LNCaP C4-2 tumor models, trimodal therapy significantly improved primary tumor control beyond that of EBRT alone. In the DU145 model, trimodal therapy resulted in a tumor growth delay (70 days) that was more than twice that (32 days) of EBRT alone. Whereas EBRT failed to eradicate DU145 tumors, trimodal therapy resulted in 25% tumor cure. In the LNCaP C4-2 tumor model, EBRT slowed the growth of intraprostatic tumors, but resulted in no tumor cures, and 57% of the mice developed retroperitoneal lymph node metastases at 3 months. By contrast, trimodal therapy resulted in 44% tumor cure and reduced significantly the percentage (13%) of lymph node metastases relative to EBRT alone. Overall

  7. Combination of radiotherapy and adenovirus-mediated p53 gene therapy for MDM2-overexpressing hepatocellular carcinoma

    The p53 gene plays a determinant role in radiation-induced cell death and its protein product is negatively regulated by MDM2. We investigated whether adenovirus-mediated modified p53 gene transfer, which blocks p53-MDM2 binding, is effective for radiation-induced cell death in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) at different MDM2 cellular levels. Human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines expressing MDM2 at low levels (Huh7) and high levels (SK-Hep1) were used. Ad-p53 and Ad-p53vp are replication-deficient adenoviral vectors containing human wild-type or modified p53, respectively. The anti-tumor effect was highest for Ad-p53 + radiotherapy (RT) in the low-level MDM2 cells, whereas this effect was highest for Ad-p53vp + RT in the MDM2-overexpressing cells. In Huh-7 cells, Ad-p53 + RT decreased cell viability (32%) in vitro and inhibited tumor growth (enhancement factor, 1.86) in vivo. Additionally, p21 expression and apoptosis were increased. In contrast, in SK-Hep1 cells, Ad-p53vp + RT showed decreased cell viability (51%) in vitro and inhibition of tumor growth (enhancement factor, 3.07) in vivo. Caspase-3 expression and apoptosis were also increased. Adenovirus-expressing modified p53, which blocks p53-MDM2 binding, was effective in killing tumor cells overexpressing MDM2. Furthermore, the combination strategy for disruption of the p53-MDM2 interaction with RT demonstrated enhanced anti-tumor effects both in vitro and in vivo. (author)

  8. Adenovirus-mediated REIC/Dkk-3 gene therapy: Development of an autologous cancer vaccination therapy (Review)

    Watanabe, Masami; Nasu,Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    Reduced expression in immortalized cells (REIC)/Dickkopf (Dkk)-3 is a tumor suppressor and therapeutic gene and has been studied with respect to the application of cancer gene therapy. Our previous studies demonstrated that the intratumoral injection of an adenovirus vector carrying the human REIC/Dkk-3 gene (Ad-REIC) suppresses tumor growth in mouse models of prostate, breast and testicular cancer and malignant mesothelioma. The mechanisms underlying these antitumor therapeutic effects have ...

  9. Prospective Randomized Phase 2 Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With or Without Oncolytic Adenovirus-Mediated Cytotoxic Gene Therapy in Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of combining oncolytic adenovirus-mediated cytotoxic gene therapy (OAMCGT) with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-four men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer were randomly assigned to receive either OAMCGT plus IMRT (arm 1; n=21) or IMRT only (arm 2; n=23). The primary phase 2 endpoint was acute (≤90 days) toxicity. Secondary endpoints included quality of life (QOL), prostate biopsy (12-core) positivity at 2 years, freedom from biochemical/clinical failure (FFF), freedom from metastases, and survival. Results: Men in arm 1 exhibited a greater incidence of low-grade influenza-like symptoms, transaminitis, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia than men in arm 2. There were no significant differences in gastrointestinal or genitourinary events or QOL between the 2 arms. Two-year prostate biopsies were obtained from 37 men (84%). Thirty-three percent of men in arm 1 were biopsy-positive versus 58% in arm 2, representing a 42% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm (P=.13). There was a 60% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm in men with <50% positive biopsy cores at baseline (P=.07). To date, 1 patient in each arm exhibited biochemical failure (arm 1, 4.8%; arm 2, 4.3%). No patient developed hormone-refractory or metastatic disease, and none has died from prostate cancer. Conclusions: Combining OAMCGT with IMRT does not exacerbate the most common side effects of prostate radiation therapy and suggests a clinically meaningful reduction in positive biopsy results at 2 years in men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer

  10. Prospective Randomized Phase 2 Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With or Without Oncolytic Adenovirus-Mediated Cytotoxic Gene Therapy in Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Freytag, Svend O., E-mail: sfreyta1@hfhs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Stricker, Hans [Vattikuti Urology Institute, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Lu, Mei [Public Health Sciences, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Elshaikh, Mohamed; Aref, Ibrahim; Pradhan, Deepak; Levin, Kenneth; Kim, Jae Ho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Peabody, James [Vattikuti Urology Institute, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Siddiqui, Farzan; Barton, Kenneth; Pegg, Jan; Zhang, Yingshu; Cheng, Jingfang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Oja-Tebbe, Nancy; Bourgeois, Renee [Public Health Sciences, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Gupta, Nilesh; Lane, Zhaoli [Pathology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Rodriguez, Ron [Urology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); DeWeese, Theodore [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); and others

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of combining oncolytic adenovirus-mediated cytotoxic gene therapy (OAMCGT) with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-four men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer were randomly assigned to receive either OAMCGT plus IMRT (arm 1; n=21) or IMRT only (arm 2; n=23). The primary phase 2 endpoint was acute (≤90 days) toxicity. Secondary endpoints included quality of life (QOL), prostate biopsy (12-core) positivity at 2 years, freedom from biochemical/clinical failure (FFF), freedom from metastases, and survival. Results: Men in arm 1 exhibited a greater incidence of low-grade influenza-like symptoms, transaminitis, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia than men in arm 2. There were no significant differences in gastrointestinal or genitourinary events or QOL between the 2 arms. Two-year prostate biopsies were obtained from 37 men (84%). Thirty-three percent of men in arm 1 were biopsy-positive versus 58% in arm 2, representing a 42% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm (P=.13). There was a 60% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm in men with <50% positive biopsy cores at baseline (P=.07). To date, 1 patient in each arm exhibited biochemical failure (arm 1, 4.8%; arm 2, 4.3%). No patient developed hormone-refractory or metastatic disease, and none has died from prostate cancer. Conclusions: Combining OAMCGT with IMRT does not exacerbate the most common side effects of prostate radiation therapy and suggests a clinically meaningful reduction in positive biopsy results at 2 years in men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer.

  11. Gene Therapy by Targeted Adenovirus-mediated Knockdown of Pulmonary Endothelial Tph1 Attenuates Hypoxia-induced Pulmonary Hypertension

    Morecroft, Ian; White, Katie; Caruso, Paola; Nilsen, Margaret; Loughlin, Lynn; Alba, Raul; Reynolds, Paul N; Danilov, Sergei M.; Andrew H. Baker; MacLean, Margaret R.

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin is produced by pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAEC) via tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (Tph1). Pathologically, serotonin acts on underlying pulmonary arterial cells, contributing to vascular remodeling associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The effects of hypoxia on PAEC-Tph1 activity are unknown. We investigated the potential of a gene therapy approach to PAH using selective inhibition of PAEC-Tph1 in vivo in a hypoxic model of PAH. We exposed cultured bovine pulmo...

  12. Methylation of PLCD1 and adenovirus-mediated PLCD1 overexpression elicits a gene therapy effect on human breast cancer

    Our previous study showed that PLCD1 significantly decreases cell proliferation and affects cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells. In the present study, we aimed to investigate its functional and molecular mechanisms, and whether or not can become a new target for gene therapies. We found reduced PLCD1 protein expression in breast tumor tissues compared with paired surgical margin tissues. PLCD1 promoter CpG methylation was detected in 55 of 96 (57%) primary breast tumors, but not in surgical-margin tissues and normal breast tissues. Ectopic expression of PLCD1 inhibited breast tumor cell proliferation in vivo by inducing apoptosis and suppressed tumor cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins including RhoA and phospho-cofilin. Furthermore, we found that PLCD1 induced p53 accumulation, increased p27 and p21 protein levels, and cleaved PARP. Finally, we constructed an adenoviral vector expressing PLCD1 (AdH5-PLCD1), which exhibited strong cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells. Our findings provide insights into the development of PLCD1 gene therapies for breast cancer and perhaps, other human cancers. - Highlights: • PLCD1 is downregulated via hypermethylation in breast cancer. • PLCD1 suppressed cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins. • Adenovirus AdHu5-PLCD1 may be a novel therapeutic option for breast cancer

  13. Methylation of PLCD1 and adenovirus-mediated PLCD1 overexpression elicits a gene therapy effect on human breast cancer

    Mu, Haixi [Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Department of Endocrine and breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Wang, Na; Zhao, Lijuan; Li, Shuman; Li, Qianqian; Chen, Ling; Luo, Xinrong; Qiu, Zhu [Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Li, Lili [Cancer Epigenetics Laboratory, Department of Clinical Oncology, Sir YK Pao Center for Cancer and Li Ka Shing Institute of Health Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong and CUHK Shenzhen Research Institute (Hong Kong); Ren, Guosheng [Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Department of Endocrine and breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Xu, Yongzhu [Chongqing Health Service Center, Chongqing 400020 (China); Zhou, Xiangyang [The Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Xiang, Tingxiu, E-mail: xiangtx1@gmail.com [Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2015-03-15

    Our previous study showed that PLCD1 significantly decreases cell proliferation and affects cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells. In the present study, we aimed to investigate its functional and molecular mechanisms, and whether or not can become a new target for gene therapies. We found reduced PLCD1 protein expression in breast tumor tissues compared with paired surgical margin tissues. PLCD1 promoter CpG methylation was detected in 55 of 96 (57%) primary breast tumors, but not in surgical-margin tissues and normal breast tissues. Ectopic expression of PLCD1 inhibited breast tumor cell proliferation in vivo by inducing apoptosis and suppressed tumor cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins including RhoA and phospho-cofilin. Furthermore, we found that PLCD1 induced p53 accumulation, increased p27 and p21 protein levels, and cleaved PARP. Finally, we constructed an adenoviral vector expressing PLCD1 (AdH5-PLCD1), which exhibited strong cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells. Our findings provide insights into the development of PLCD1 gene therapies for breast cancer and perhaps, other human cancers. - Highlights: • PLCD1 is downregulated via hypermethylation in breast cancer. • PLCD1 suppressed cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins. • Adenovirus AdHu5-PLCD1 may be a novel therapeutic option for breast cancer.

  14. BCL-XS adenovirus-mediated gene therapy approach sensitizes cancer cells to radiation-induced apoptosis

    Purpose: Apoptosis, a process in which a genetic program is activated ultimately leading to programmed cell death, has been shown to play a role in radiation therapy (RT)-induced cell death. We and others have previously shown that members of the bcl-2 family (including bcl-xl) protect cells from RT-induced apoptosis through p53-dependent and -independent pathways. Therefore, we postulated that inactivation of bcl-2 family members by overexpression of bcl-xs (a functional inhibitor of the bcl-2 family) would enhance RT-induced apoptosis. Overexpression of bcl-xs was achieved using two strategies: stable transfection and transient infection using an adenovirus (AV) vector. Methods: An expression plasmid encodingbcl-xs (pSFFVneo-bcl-xs) or a control plasmid (pSFFVneo) was stably transfected into MCF-7 (breast cancer), K562 (human leukemia), and FL512 (pro B-cell) cells and clonogenic survival was determined following RT. The second method used to overexpress bcl-xs involved construction of an AV vector that expresses bcl-xs by inserting the bcl-xs coding sequence into the pADRSV vector. Immunoblotting using a rabbit polyclonal antibody raised against the bcl-x protein revealed that K562 cells infected with the bcl-xs AV, but not the control AV that contains the β-galactosidase gene, expressed the 21 kDA bcl-xs protein. K562 cells were infected with the bcl-xs AV or the control AV at titres to achieve 90-95% infection. Various doses of RT were given 24 hrs following infection since maximal expression of bcl-xs was achieved at this time. Colony forming ability following RT was performed. Apoptotic death at 24 and 48 hrs following RT was assayed by flow cytometry using propidium iodide which quantitates DNA damage. Results: Bcl-xs overexpression by stable transfection in all three cell lines tested induced a marked increase in radiosensitivity. Bcl-xs overexpressing K562, FL512, and MCF-7 cells were more sensitive to RT-induced clonogenic death than their neo

  15. Overexpression of MicroRNA-30b Improves Adenovirus-Mediated p53 Cancer Gene Therapy for Laryngeal Carcinoma

    Liang Li

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs play important roles in laryngeal carcinoma and other cancers. However, the expression of microRNAs in paracancerous tissue has been studied less. Here, using laser capture microdissection (LCM, we detected the expression of microRNAs in paracancerous tissues. Among all down-regulated microRNAs in the center area of tumor tissues, only miR-30b expression was significantly reduced in paracancerous tissues compared to surgical margins. Therefore, to further investigate the effect of miR-30b on laryngeal carcinoma, we stably overexpressed miR-30b in laryngeal carcinoma cell line HEp-2 cells. It was found that although there was no significant difference in cell viability between miR-30b overexpressed cells and control HEp-2 cells, p53 expression was obviously enhanced in miR-30b overexpressed cells. Whether miR-30b could improve the anti-tumor effect of adenovirus-p53 (Ad-p53 in laryngeal carcinoma and other cancer cell lines was also evaluated. It was found that in miR-30b overexpressed HEp-2 cells, p53-mediated tumor cell apoptosis was obviously increased both in vitro and in vivo. MDM2-p53 interaction might be involved in miR-30b-mediated anti-tumor effect. Together, results suggested that miR-30b could modulate p53 pathway and enhance p53 gene therapy-induced apoptosis in laryngeal carcinoma, which could provide a novel microRNA target in tumor therapy.

  16. Preliminary study of MR diffusion weighted imaging in nude mice models of hepatic Bel7402 tumors after adenovirus-mediated cytosine diaminase-thymidine kinase gene therapy

    Objective: To study the characteristics of DWI in nude mice models of hepatic Bel7402 tumors after treatment with adenovirus-mediated cytosine diaminase-thymidine kinase (Ad. CD-TK) double suicide gene therapy, and then to identify whether DWI can be used for assessing curative effect of postoperative tumors. Methods: Thirty nude mice models of hepatic Bel7402 tumors were successfully created using cell suspension method, after the tumor grew to more than 1 cm in diameter, 20 tumor models were treated by intratumoral administration of Ad. CD-TK for 3 days plus intraperitonea (i.p.) treatment with 5-Fc and GCV for the duration of the study.Then they were randomly divided into three groups during 5-Fc and GCV treatment. The remaining 10 tumor models were used as controls. MR scanning were performed in 10th day before and after tumor implantation in all models by using EPI-SE series and SENSE technology for treatment group. Tumor volumes and ADC values were calculated pretreatment and posttreatment. Cell apoptosis were determined by using TUNEL method. Analyze the change of ADC and apoptosis index (AI) in different times, t test was used for comparison the difference of AI and ADC values respectively. Results: After 10 days,the tumor volumes of the treatment groups and controls were respectively (724.16 ±57.45) mm3, (754.57 ± 66.84) mm3, with no significant difference (t=0.488, P >0.05). The ADC values of the treatment groups were (0.98 ±0.11) × 10-3 mm2/s,the ones of the control groups were (0.68 ±0.04) × 10-3 mm2/s; AI of the treatment groups were (23.25 ±6.57)%, the ones of the control groups were (2.57 ± 0.58)%. There were difference in both groups (t=4.473, 5.874; P<0.01). Conclusion: DWI can be effectively to monitor the early pathological changes of hepatic Bel7402 tumors after Ad. CD-TK double suicide gene therapy, and provide experimental evidences for clinical application. (authors)

  17. Chimeric smooth muscle-specific enhancer/promoters: valuable tools for adenovirus-mediated cardiovascular gene therapy.

    Ribault, S; Neuville, P; Méchine-Neuville, A; Augé, F; Parlakian, A; Gabbiani, G; Paulin, D; Calenda, V

    2001-03-16

    Gene transfer with adenoviral vectors is an attractive approach for the treatment of atherosclerosis and restenosis. However, because expression of a therapeutic gene in nontarget tissues may have deleterious effects, artery-specific expression is desirable. Although expression vectors containing transcriptional regulatory elements of genes expressed solely in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) have proved efficient to restrict expression of the transgene, their use in the clinical setting can be limited by their reduced strength. In the present study, we show that low levels of transgene expression are obtained with the smooth muscle (SM)-specific SM22alpha promoter compared with the viral cytomegalovirus (CMV) enhancer/promoter. We have generated chimeric transcriptional cassettes containing either a SM (SM-myosin heavy chain) or a skeletal muscle (creatine kinase) enhancer combined with the SM22alpha promoter. With both constructs we observed significantly stronger expression that remains SM-specific. In vivo, reporter gene expression was restricted to arterial SMCs with no detectable signal at remote sites. Moreover, when interferon-gamma expression was driven by one of these two chimeras, SMC growth was inhibited as efficiently as with the CMV promoter. Finally, we demonstrate that neointima formation in the rat carotid balloon injury model was reduced to the same extent by adenoviral gene transfer of interferon-gamma driven either by the SM-myosin heavy chain enhancer/SM22alpha promoter or the CMV promoter. These results indicate that such vectors can be useful for the treatment of hyperproliferative vascular disorders. PMID:11249869

  18. Recombinant adenovirus-mediated gene transfer suppresses experimental arthritis

    E. Quattrocchi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Collagen Induced Arthritis (CIA is a widely studied animal model to develop and test novel therapeutic approaches for treating Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA in humans. Soluble Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA4-Ig, which binds B7 molecule on antigen presenting cells and blocks CD28 mediated T-lymphocyte activation, has been shown to ameliorate experimental autoimmune diseases such as lupus, diabetes and CIA. Objective of our research was to investigate in vivo the effectiveness of blocking the B7/CD28 T-lymphocyte co-stimulatory pathway, utilizing a gene transfer technology, as a therapeutic strategy against CIA. Replication-deficient adenoviruses encoding a chimeric CTLA4-Ig fusion protein, or β-galactosidase as control, have been injected intravenously once at arthritis onset. Disease activity has been monitored by the assessment of clinical score, paw thickness and type II collagen (CII specific cellular and humoral immune responses for 21 days. The adenovirally delivered CTLA4-Ig fusion protein at a dose of 2×108 pfu suppressed established CIA, whereas the control β-galactosidase did not significantly affect the disease course. CII-specific lymphocyte proliferation, IFNg production and anti-CII antibodies were significantly reduced by CTLA4-Ig treatment. Our results demonstrate that blockade of the B7/CD28 co-stimulatory pathway by adenovirus-mediated CTLA4-Ig gene transfer is effective in treating established CIA suggesting its potential in treating RA.

  19. Anti-tumor effect of adenovirus-mediated suicide gene therapy under control of tumor-specific and radio-inducible chimeric promoter in combination with γ-ray irradiation in vivo

    Objective: To detect the selective inhibitory effects of irradiation plus adenovirus-mediated horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) suicide gene system using tumor-specific and radio-inducible chimeric promoter on human hepatocellular carcinoma subcutaneously xenografted in nude mouse. Methods: Recombinant replicated-deficient adenovirus vector containing HRP gene and chimeric human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter carrying 6 radio-inducible CArG elements was constructed. A human subcutaneous transplanting hepatocellular carcinoma (MHCC97 cell line) model was treated with γ-ray irradiation plus intra-tumor injections of adenoviral vector and intra-peritoneal injections of prodrug IAA. The change of tumor volume and tumor growth inhibiting rate, the survival time of nude mice, as well as histopathology of xenograft tumor and normal tissues were evaluated. Results: Thirty one days after the treatment, the relative tumor volumes in the negative, adenovirus therapy, irradiation, and combination groups were 49.23±4.55, 27.71±7.74, 28.53±10.48 and 11.58±3.23, respectively.There was a significantly statistical difference among them (F=16.288, P<0.01).The inhibition effect in the combination group was strongest as compared with that in other groups, and its inhibition ratio was 76.5%. The survival period extended to 43 d in the combination group, which showed a significantly difference with that in the control group (χ2=18.307, P<0.01). The area of tumors necrosis in the combination group was larger than that in the other groups, and the normal tissues showed no treatment-related toxic effect in all groups. However, multiple hepatocellular carcinoma metastases were observed in the liver in the control group, there were a few metastases in the monotherapy groups and no metastasis in the combination group. Conclusions: Adenovirus-mediated suicide gene therapy plus radiotherapy dramatically could inhibit tumor growth and prolong median

  20. SYNERGISTIC EFFICACY OF ADENOVIRUS-MEDIATED BCL-XS GENE TRANSFER AND TOPOTECAN IN OVARIAN CANCER CELL

    2001-01-01

    To observe the synergistic efficacy between Adenovirus-mediated bcl-Xs(Adv-bcl-Xs) gene transfer and chemotherapy on ovarian cancer cell growth. Methods: NuTu-19 cells were infected by different titers of Adv-bcl-Xs and treated with topotecan in the meantime. Cell proliferation was measured 3 days later by MTT. Graphical representations and statistical analyses for their interaction in tumor cells were done. Results: The statistical result and Graphical representations of the statistical modeling showed synergy effect on cell growth inhibition (P<0.01). Conclusion: There were synergistic efficacies between Adv-bcl-Xs gene therapy and Topotecan in ovarian cancer cell growth.

  1. Adenovirus-mediated CTLA4Ig gene inhibits infiltration of immune cells and cell apoptosis in rats after liver transplantation

    Guo-Ping Jiang; Zhen-Hua Hu; Shu-Sen Zheng; Chang-Ku Jia; Ai-Bin Zhang; Wei-Lin Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of adenovirus-mediated CTLA4Ig gene therapy in inhibiting the infiltration of macrophages and CD8+T cells and cell apoptosis after liver transplantation.METHODS: The rat orthotopic liver transplantation model was applied. The rats were divided into three groups:group Ⅰ: rejection control (SD-to-Wistar); group Ⅱ: acute rejection treated with intramuscular injection of CsA injection of 1× 109 PFU adenovirus-mediated CTLA4Ig gene liquor in dorsal vein of penis 7 d before liver transplantation(SD-to-Wistar+CTLA4Ig). Immunohistochemistry and transferase-mediated dUTPnick-end labeling (TUNEL)were used to analyze the expression of CTLA4Ig gene in liver, infiltration of macrophages and CD8+T cells, cell apoptosis in grafts at different time-points after liver transplantation. Histopathological examination was done.RESULTS: CTLA4Ig gene expression was positive in liver on d 7 after administering adenovirus-mediated CTLA4Ig gene via vein, and remained positive until day 60 after liver transplantation. Infiltration of macrophages and CD8+T cells in CTLA4Ig-treated group was less than in rejection control group and CsA-treated group. The apoptotic index of rejection group on d 3, 5, and 7 were significantly higher than that of CTLA4Ig-treated group. A good correlation was found between severity of rejection reaction and infiltration of immune activator cells or cell apoptotic index in grafts.CONCLUSION: CTLA4Ig gene is constantly expressed in liver and plays an important role in inducing immune tolerance.

  2. GROWTH INHIBITION OF HUMAN LARYNGEAL CANCER CELL WITH THE ADENOVIRUS-MEDIATED p53 GENE

    WANG Qi; HAN De-min; WANG Wen-ge; WU Zu-ze; ZHANG Wei

    1999-01-01

    Objective: In most laryngeal cancers, the function of p53 gene is down regulated. To explore the potential use of p53 in gene therapy of laryngeal cancer, by introducing wild-type p53 into laryngeal cancer cell line via a recombinant adenoviral vector, Ad5CMV-p53 and analyzing its effects on cell and tumor growth. Methods: A human laryngeal cancer cell line Hep-2 was used.Recombinant cytomegalovirus-promoted adenoviruses containing human wild-type p53 cDNA was transiently introduced into Hep-2 line. The growth suppression of the Hep-2 cells and established s.c. squamous carcinoma model was examined. The p53 protein expression was detected using immunohistochemical analysis. Results: The transduction efficiencies of Hep-2 cell line were 100% at a multiplicity of 100 or greater. The p53 protein expression peaked on day 2 after infection and lasted far 5 days. In vitro growth assays revealed cell death following Ad5CMV-p53 infected. In vivo studies, Ad5CMV-p53 inhibited the tumorigenicity of Hep-2 cell, and in nude mice with established s.c. squamous carcinoma nodules showed that tumor volumes were significantly reduced in mice that received peritumoral infiltration of Ad5CMV-p53. Conclusion: Adenovirus-mediated antitumor therapy carrying the p53 gene is an efficient method to inhibit laryngeal cancer growth. Transfection of laryngeal cancer cells with the wild-type p53 gene via Ad5CMV-p53 is a potential novel approach to the therapy of laryngeal cancer.

  3. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated therapy for prostate cancer

    Sweeney K; Halldén G

    2016-01-01

    Katrina Sweeney, Gunnel Halldén Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK Abstract: Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death and morbidity in men in the Western world. Tumor progression is dependent on functioning androgen receptor signaling, and initial administration of antiandrogens and hormone therapy (androgen-deprivation therapy) prevent growth and spread. Tumors frequently develop escape mechanisms t...

  4. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated therapy for prostate cancer.

    Sweeney, Katrina; Halldén, Gunnel

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death and morbidity in men in the Western world. Tumor progression is dependent on functioning androgen receptor signaling, and initial administration of antiandrogens and hormone therapy (androgen-deprivation therapy) prevent growth and spread. Tumors frequently develop escape mechanisms to androgen-deprivation therapy and progress to castration-resistant late-stage metastatic disease that, in turn, inevitably leads to resistance to all current therapeutics, including chemotherapy. In spite of the recent development of more effective inhibitors of androgen-androgen receptor signaling such as enzalutamide and abiraterone, patient survival benefits are still limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have proven efficacy in prostate cancer cells and cause regression of tumors in preclinical models of numerous drug-resistant cancers. Data from clinical trials demonstrate that adenoviral mutants have limited toxicity to normal tissues and are safe when administered to patients with various solid cancers, including prostate cancer. While efficacy in response to adenovirus administration alone is marginal, findings from early-phase trials targeting local-ized and metastatic prostate cancer suggest improved efficacy in combination with cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapy. Here, we review recent progress in the development of multimodal oncolytic adenoviruses as biological therapeutics to improve on tumor elimination in prostate cancer patients. These optimized mutants target cancer cells by several mechanisms including viral lysis and by expression of cytotoxic transgenes and immune-stimulatory factors that activate the host immune system to destroy both infected and noninfected prostate cancer cells. Additional modifications of the viral capsid proteins may support future systemic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses. PMID:27579296

  5. Adenovirus-mediated gene transduction of truncated lκBα enhances radiosensitivity in human colon cancer cells

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is a transcription factor that is known to regulate apoptosis when cells are exposed to DNA-damaging agents such as ionizing radiation and cytotoxic drugs. We sought to determine if inhibition of NF-κB could enhance radiosensitivity in human colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. To inhibit NF-κB activation specifically, we constructed a recombinant adenovirus vector expressing a truncated form of the inhibitor protein IκBα (IκBαΔN) that lacks the phosphorylation sites essential for activation of NF-κB, and transfected two human colon cancer cell lines (HT29 and HCT15) with this vector. In vitro colony-forming assays revealed that the overexpression of the stable lκBα by AxIκBαΔN infection significantly suppressed cell growth after irradiation in both cell lines as compared to infection with a control vector, AxLacZ. Treatment with AxIκBαΔN and irradiation successfully inhibited the growth of HT29 xenografted subcutaneous tumors in nude mice with an 83.8% volume reduction on day 38 as compared to the untreated tumors. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that apoptosis was increased by adenovirus-mediated gene transduction of IκBαΔN in vitro and in vivo. These results indicated that inhibition of NF-κB could enhance radiosensitivity through an increase in radiation-induced apoptosis. We believe that radio-gene therapy using adenovirus-mediated gene transduction of IκBαΔN could be an attractive candidate as a treatment strategy for colorectal cancer. (author)

  6. IMPROVEMENT OF HUMAN ISLET FUNCTION BY ADENOVIRUS MEDIATED HO-1 GENE TRANSFER

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate in vitro heme oxygenase-1 gene (HO-1) delivery to human pancreatic islets by adenovirus vectors. Methods Recombinant adenovirus containing HO-1 or enhanced green fluorescent protein gene(EGFP) was generated by using the AdEasy System. The purified human pancreatic islets were infected with recombinant adenovirus vectors at various multiplicity of infection (MOI). Transduction was confirmed by fluorescence photographs and Western blot. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was detected by using Human insulin radioimmunoassay kits and was used to assess the function of human islets infected by recombinant adenovirus.Results Viral titers of Ad-hHO-1 and Ad-EGFP were 1.96×109 and 1.99×109 pfu/mL, respectively. Human pancreatic islets were efficiently infected by recombinant adenovirus vectors in vitro. Transfection of human islets at an MOI of 20 did not inhibit islet function. Recombinant adenovirus mediated HO-1gene transfer significantly improved the islet function of insulin release when simulated by high level glucose. Conclusion Recombinant adenovirus is efficient to deliver exogenous gene into human pancreatic islets in vitro. HO-1 gene transfection can improve human islet function.

  7. Adenovirus-mediated p53 gene transfer increases radiosensitivity of human gastric carcinoma cells

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of adenovirus-mediated p53 gene (Adp53) on apoptosis and radiosensitivity of human gastric carcinoma cell lines. Methods: Recombinant adenovirus carrying wild-type p53 gene was transferred into four human gastric carcinoma cell lines with different p53 genetic status. P53 protein expression was detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blot assay. Cell survival was assessed using a clonogenic assay. TUNEL assay was used in determination of apoptosis. The four human gastric carcinoma cell line infected with Adp53 were irradiated with 4 Gy, and cell cycle distribution and apoptotic rate were assayed by flow cytometry. Nude mice xenograft models of W and M cell were intratumorally injected with Adp53 and 48 h later were irradiated with 6 Gy. Relative volume in growth curve of tumor was used to observe tumor regression. Results: G2/M arrest, apoptosis and inhibition of tumor cell proliferation were induced by infection with Adp53 at 100 MOI, which caused high transfer rate of wild-type p53 and strong expression of P53 protein in the four human gastric carcinoma cell line cells. When evaluating radio-biologic efficacy by apoptotic rate, the apoptotic enhancement ratio of Adp53 at 4 Gy was 3.0 for W cell, 3.6 for M cell, 2.2 for neo cell and 2.5 for 823 cell respectively, in vitro. The antitumor enhancement ratio of Adp53 at 6 Gy was 1.41 for cell-implanted tumor and 1.91 for M cell-implanted tumor in vivo. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that Adp53 transfer increased cellular apoptosis and radiosensitivity of human gastric carcinoma

  8. Effect of human hepatocyte growth factor on promoting wound healing and preventing scar formation by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer

    哈小琴; 李元敏; 劳妙芬; 苑宾; 吴祖泽

    2003-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) on the prevention of scar formation and the promotion of wound healing by gene transfer. Methods A total of 12 female New Zealand rabbits were used in this study. Rabbits were anesthetized with an intravenous injection of sodium pentobarbital, and identical wounds were made over the ventral surface of each ear. Five circular wounds, 7 mm in diameter, were created in each ear by excision through the skin to the underlying cartilage using sterile technique. After the surgical procedures, 10 of the rabbits were randomly allocated to five groups, with 2 rabbits in each group: Ad-HGF group 1, Ad-HGF group 2, Ad-HGF group 3, Ad-GFP (a reporter gene) group and the solvent group. Immediately after surgery, 6×107 pfu Ad-HGF, 6×108 pfu Ad-HGF, 6×109 pfu of Ad-HGF, 6×109 pfu of Ad-GFP, or same volume of solvent (PBS, pH 7.2) was applied once to each wound in groups 1 to 5, respectively. One additional rabbit was used to evaluate the transfer efficiency of the adenovirus vector by transferring Ad-GFP (6×109 pfu) into its wounds. Ice slides of wounds from this animal were observed under fluorescence microscopy. Another additional rabbit was used to evaluate the expression of HGF and TGFβ1 after transferring Ad-HGF (6×109 pfu) into each of its wound. Immunohistochemistry was used for detection. Results The effect of HGF on reducing excessive dermal scarring was observed by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer. Transfection of the human HGF cDNA into skin wounds through an adenoviral vector suppressed the over-expression of TGFβ1, which plays an essential role in the progression of dermal fibrogenesis. Application of HGF to the wounds significantly enhanced wound healing and inhibited over scarring.Conclusion HGF gene therapy could be a new approach for preventing excessive dermal scarring in wound healing.

  9. Dual effects of adenovirus-mediated thrombopoietin gene transfer on hepatic oval cell proliferation and platelet counts

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is the growth factor for megakaryocytes and platelets, however, it also acts as a potent regulator of stem cell proliferation. To examine the significance of TPO expression in proliferation of hepatic oval cells, the effect of adenovirus-mediated TPO gene transfer into livers of the Solt-Farber model, which mimics the condition where liver regeneration is impaired, was examined. Hepatic TPO mRNA peaked its expression at 2 days after gene transduction and then gradually decreased. The peripheral platelet number began to increase at 4 days (P < 0.05) and reached its plateau at 9 days (P < 0.01). Oval cells expressed c-Mpl, a receptor for TPO as well as immature hematopoietic and hepatocytic surface markers such as CD34 and AFP. The proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive oval cells in rats into which adenovirus-TPO gene was transferred at 7 and 9 days were significantly greater than those in adenovirus-LacZ gene transferred (P < 0.05, each), and the total numbers of oval cells in the adenovirus-TPO gene transferred at 9 and 13 days were also significantly greater than those in adenovirus-LacZ gene transferred (P < 0.05, each). Expression of SCF protein was increased at 4, 7, and 9 days by TPO gene administration and that of c-Kit was increased at 4 and 7 days. These data suggest that adenovirus-mediated TPO gene transfer stimulated oval cell proliferation in liver as well as increasing peripheral platelet counts, emphasizing the significance of the TPO/c-Mpl system in proliferation of hepatic oval cells

  10. Adenovirus-mediated expression of human sodium-iodide symporter gene permits in vivo tracking of adipose tissue-derived stem cells in a canine myocardial infarction model

    Introduction: In vivo tracking of the transplanted stem cells is important in pre-clinical research of stem cell therapy for myocardial infarction. We examined the feasibility of adenovirus-mediated sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene to cell tracking imaging of transplanted stem cells in a canine infarcted myocardium by clinical single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Methods: Beagle dogs were injected intramyocardially with NIS-expressing adenovirus-transfected canine stem cells (Ad-hNIS-canine ADSCs) a week after myocardial infarction (MI) development. 99mTc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (99mTc-MIBI) and 99mTc-pertechnetate (99mTcO4−) SPECT imaging were performed for assessment of infarcted myocardium and viable stem cell tracking. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed to monitor any functional cardiac changes. Results: Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was decreased after LAD ligation. There was no significant difference in EF between the groups with the stem cell or saline injection. 125I uptake was higher in Ad-hNIS-canine ADSCs than in non-transfected ADSCs. Cell proliferation and differentiation were not affected by hNIS-carrying adenovirus transfection. 99mTc-MIBI myocardial SPECT imaging showed decreased radiotracer uptake in the infarcted apex and mid-anterolateral regions. Ad-hNIS-canine ADSCs were identified as a region of focally increased 99mTcO4− uptake at the lateral wall and around the apex of the left ventricle, peaked at 2 days and was observed until day 9. Conclusions: Combination of adenovirus-mediated NIS gene transfection and clinical nuclear imaging modalities enables to trace the fate of transplanted stem cells in infarcted myocardium for translational in vivo cell tracking study for prolonged duration

  11. The effect of adenovirus-mediated gene expression of FHIT in small cell lung cancer cells

    Zandi, Roza; Xu, Kai; Poulsen, Hans S;

    2011-01-01

    The candidate tumor suppressor fragile histidine traid (FHIT) is frequently inactivated in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Mutations in the p53 gene also occur in the majority of SCLC leading to the accumulation of the mutant protein. Here we evaluated the effect of FHIT gene therapy alone or in...

  12. The effect of adenovirus-mediated gene expression of FHIT in small cell lung cancer cells

    Zandi, Roza; Xu, Kai; Poulsen, Hans S;

    2011-01-01

    The candidate tumor suppressor fragile histidine traid (FHIT) is frequently inactivated in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Mutations in the p53 gene also occur in the majority of SCLC leading to the accumulation of the mutant protein. Here we evaluated the effect of FHIT gene therapy alone or in...... combination with the mutant p53-reactivating molecule, PRIMA-1(Met)/APR-246, in SCLC. Overexpression of FHIT by recombinant adenoviral vector (Ad-FHIT)-mediated gene transfer in SCLC cells inhibited their growth by inducing apoptosis and when combined with PRIMA-1(Met)/APR-246, a synergistic cell growth...

  13. Adenovirus mediated angiostatin gene therapy for ovarian cancer: experiment with nude mice%重组腺病毒载体介导血管抑素基因治疗裸鼠卵巢癌的实验研究

    贾长茹; 杨树艳; 韩世愈; 孙蕾

    2008-01-01

    Objective To built an expression vector of angiostatin (AG) gene with recombinated replication defective adenovirus and investigate the therapeutic effect of human AG gene on ovarian cancer. Methods (1) Human AG K ( 1-3 ) cDNA was inserted into the vector pShuttle to build the recombinant plasmid pShttle-AG ( K1-3 ). pAdeno-X-AG (K1-3) was built by double-cut and recombinated pShttle-AG (K1-3) to vector pAdeno-X, and then recombinant adenovirus was finally prepared by transinfection of pAdeno-X-AG (K1-3) into to the human embryo kidney cells of the line 293. (2) Human ovarian cancer cells of the line SKOV3 were inoculated subcutaneously into nude mice of the line BALB/c nu/nu to establish model of human ovarian cancer. Then the mice were randomly divided into 3 groups to be injected with Ad = AG (K1-3), Ad-LacZ, or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) around the cancer every 5 days. The tumor size was measured every 5 days to calculate the tumor volume and tumor inhibition rate. Three days after the last injection the mice were killed. The tumor tissues, livers, and kidneys of the mice underwent imunohistochemistry to calculate the microvessel density (MVD) and expression of vessel endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and AG. Results The tumor volume and weight of the Ad-AG ( K1-3 ) group were significantly less than those of the PBS and Ad-LacZ groups ( all P 0. 05). The expression levels of CD34 and VEGF of the Ad-AG( K1-3 ) group were both significantly lower than those of the PBS and Ad-LacZ groups (all P 0. 05 ). Conclusion Human angiostatin mediated by adenovirus suppresses the angiogenesis and the growth of human ovarian cancer in the nude mice model, which suggests that it is promising in clinical application.%目的 构建携带血管抑素(AG)基因K(1-3)重组复制缺陷型腺病毒表达载体,研究腺病毒介导的人血管抑素基因对卵巢癌的治疗作用.方法 (1)将人血管抑素K(1-3)cDNA插入穿梭载体pShuttle产生重组质粒pShttle-AG(K1

  14. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of RA538 gene and its antitumor effect

    程金科; 林晨; 隗玥; 张雪艳; 邢嵘; 牟巨伟; 王秀琴; 吴旻

    1999-01-01

    The RA538 cDNA was transferred into human ovarian cancer cell line SK-OV-3 and human melanoma cell line WM-983A by its recombinant adenoviral vector constructed through homologous recombination. It was demonstrated that the recombinant adenovirus could transfer RA538 gene with high efficiency, and could obviously inhibit tumor growth, with the inhibiting rates of 85% and 73% respectively, at the same time greatly repress the colony forming ability of the cells. The therapeutic experiments on transplanted subcutaneous tumor model in nude mice demonstrated that RA538 could significantly inhibit tumor growth. Flow cytometry and DNA fragmentation analysis indicated that RA538 could induce the cell cycle G1 arrest/apoptosis of the tumor cells. The expression of cmyc gene was found pronouncedly reduced by Western blot analysis. These results suggest that the RA538 recombinant adenovirus could be a promising drug in cancer gene therapy.

  15. Adenovirus-mediated delivery of interferon-γ gene inhibits the growth of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Liu Ran-yi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferon-γ (IFN-γ is regarded as a potent antitumor agent, but its clinical application is limited by its short half-life and significant side effects. In this paper, we tried to develop IFN-γ gene therapy by a replication defective adenovirus encoding the human IFN-γ (Ad-IFNγ, and evaluate the antitumoral effects of Ad-IFNγ on nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC cell lines in vitro and in xenografts model. Methods The mRNA levels of human IFN-γ in Ad-IFNγ-infected NPC cells were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, and IFN-γ protein concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA in the culture supernatants of NPC cells and tumor tissues and bloods of nude mice treated with Ad-IFNγ. The effects of Ad-IFNγ on NPC cell proliferation was determined using MTT assay, cell cycle distribution was determined by flow cytometry analysis for DNA content, and cells apoptosis were analyzed by Annexin V-FITC/7-AAD binding assay and hoechst 33342/PI double staining. The anti-tumor effects and toxicity of Ad-IFNγ were evaluated in BALB/c nude mice carrying NPC xenografts. Results The results demonstrated that Ad-IFNγ efficiently expressed human IFN-γ protein in NPC cell lines in vitro and in vivo. Ad-IFNγ infection resulted in antiproliferative effects on NPC cells by inducing G1 phase arrest and cell apoptosis. Intratumoral administration of Ad-IFNγ significantly inhibited the growth of CNE-2 and C666-1 cell xenografts in nude mice, while no significant toxicity was observed. Conclusions These findings indicate IFN-γ gene therapy mediated by replication defective adenoviral vector is likely a promising approach in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  16. Adenovirus-mediated human brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene-modified bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for spinal cord injury

    Changsheng Wang; Jianhua Lin; Chaoyang Wu; Rongsheng Chen

    2011-01-01

    Rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells expressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor were successfully obtained using a gene transfection method, then intravenously transplanted into rats with spinal cord injury. At 1, 3, and 5 weeks after transplantation, the expression of ??brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurofilament-200 was upregulated in the injured spinal cord, spinal cord injury was alleviated, and Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan scores of hindlimb motor function were significantly increased. This evidence suggested that intravenous transplantation of adenovirus- mediated brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene-modified rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells could play a dual role, simultaneously providing neural stem cells and neurotrophic factors.

  17. Adenovirus-mediated gene delivery to hypothalamic magnocellular neurons in mice

    Vasquez, E. C.; Beltz, T. G.; Meyrelles, S. S.; Johnson, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    Vasopressin is synthesized by magnocellular neurons in supraoptic (SON) and paraventricular (PVN) hypothalamic nuclei and released by their axon terminals in the neurohypophysis (NH). With its actions as an antidiuretic hormone and vasoactive agent, vasopressin plays a pivotal role in the control of body fluids and cardiovascular homeostasis. Because of its well-defined neurobiology and functional importance, the SON/PVN-NH system is ideal to establish methods for gene transfer of genetic material into specific pathways in the mouse central nervous system. In these studies, we compared the efficiency of transferring the gene lacZ, encoding for beta-galactosidase (beta-gal), versus a gene encoding for green fluorescent protein by using replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) vectors in adult mice. Transfection with viral concentrations up to 2 x 10(7) plaque-forming units per coverslip of NH, PVN, and SON in dissociated, cultured cells caused efficient transfection without cytotoxicity. However, over an extended period of time, higher levels (50% to 75% of the cells) of beta-gal expression were detected in comparison with green fluorescent protein (5% to 50% of the cells). With the use of a stereotaxic approach, the pituitary glands of mice were injected with Ad (4 x 10(6) plaque-forming units). In material from these animals, we were able to visualize the expression of the beta-gal gene in the NH and in magnocellular neurons of both the PVN and SON. The results of these experiments indicate that Ad-Rous sarcoma virus promoter-beta-gal is taken up by nerve terminals at the injection site (NH) and retrogradely transported to the soma of the neurons projecting to the NH. We conclude that the application of these experimental approaches will provide powerful tools for physiological studies and potential approaches to deliver therapeutic genes to treat diseases.

  18. Adenovirus-mediated gene delivery to cells of the magnocellular hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system

    Vasquez, E. C.; Beltz, T. G.; Haskell, R. E.; Johnson, R. F.; Meyrelles, S. S.; Davidson, B. L.; Johnson, A. K.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to define the optimum conditions for using replication-defective adenovirus (Ad) to transfer the gene for the green fluorescent protein (GFP) to the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic (SON) nuclei and cells of the neurohypophysis (NH). As indicated by characterizing cell survival over 15 days in culture and in electrophysiological whole cell patch-clamp studies, viral concentrations up to 2 x 10(7) pfu/coverslip did not affect viability of transfected PVN and NH cultured cells from preweanling rats. At 2 x 10(7) pfu, GFP gene expression was higher (40% of GFP-positive cells) and more sustained (up to 15 days). Using a stereotaxic approach in adult rats, we were able to directly transduce the PVN, SON, and NH and visualize gene expression in coronal brain slices and in the pituitary 4 days after injection of Ad. In animals receiving NH injections of Ad, the virus was retrogradely transported to PVN and SON neurons as indicated by the appearance of GFP-positive neurons in cultures of dissociated cells from those brain nuclei and by polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses of PVN and SON tissues. Adenoviral concentrations of up to 8 x 10(6) pfu injected into the NH did not affect cell viability and did not cause inflammatory responses. Adenoviral injection into the pituitary enabled the selective delivery of genes to the soma of magnocellular neurons. The experimental approaches described here provide potentially useful strategies for the treatment of disordered expression of the hormones vasopressin or oxytocin. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  19. Infection with adenovirus-mediated luciferase reporter gene in mesenchymal stem cells and bioluminescence imaging

    Objective: To construct adenovirus vector containing firefly luciferase reporter gene (Ad-Luc) and infect bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC), then to take bioluminescence imaging in vitro and in vivo for identification. Methods: The luciferase gene was amplified with PCR from psiCHECK-2 plasmid and cloned into the adenoviral shuttle vector (pShuttle-CMV). It was confirmed by Nhe Ⅰ/Xba Ⅰ digestion and sequencing. PShuttle-CMV-Luc and backbone vector (pAdeno) were homologous recombined. Then the recombinant plasmid was packaged in HEK293 cells and the virus titer was detected. The BMSC were infected by the recombinant adenovirus. The bioluminescence imaging in vitro was performed to determine the best multiplicity of infection (MOI), and the relationship between bioluminescence intensity and MOI was analyzed by curve fitting regression analysis. Viability was evaluated via Trypan blue staining. The transfected BMSC (1 × 106) were implanted into the muscles of forelimb of SD rats,and then tracked by bioluminescence imaging in vivo. Cell viability was compared using two-way repeated measures analysis of variance between groups. Results: Enzyme digestion and sequence analysis indicated that Ad-Luc was successfully constructed. The virus titer was 1 × 1010 plaque forming unit (PFU)/ml. The bioluminescence detection in vitro showed that Ad-Luc could infect BMSC high efficiently to express luciferase and the best MOI was 50. The bioluminescence intensity enhanced with increase of MOI (R2 =0.98). No statistically significant difference was found in cell viability between transfected and untransfected BMSC at 1, 3, 5, 7 d. The cell survival rates were (92.5±2.3)% vs (94.1±1.8)%, (91.4±0.9)% vs (92.7±2.0)%, (92.1±1.6)% vs (93.3± 2.4)%, (91.9 ± 1.5)% vs (93.0 ± 3.1)%, respectively (F=4.38, P>0.05). The bioluminescence imaging in vivo showed that BMSC survived 1, 3, 7 d after implantation. However, bioluminescence signal decreased gradually over time

  20. ADENOVIRUS-MEDIATED P53 GENE TRANSFER INCREASES THE THERMOSENSITIVITY OF HUMAN GASTRIC CARCINOMA CELL LINES (IN VITRO AND IN VIVO)

    张珊文; 肖绍文; 吕有勇

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of adenovirus- mediated p53 (Adp53) transfer on thermosensitivity of human gastric carcinoma cell lines (BGC823). Methods: Two human gastric carcinoma cell lines with different p53 status, BGC823-wtp53 cell (abbreviate W) bearing the wilt-type p53 and BGC823-mutp53 cell (abbreviate M) bearing the mutant p53, were cultured with DMEM medium and were infected with Adp53 at a viral multiplicity of infection of 100 (1:100MOI) for 48h before heating. Cell cycle redistribution and apoptosis of two human gastric carcinoma cell lines in 24h at 37℃ after heat treatment at 42℃ for 2h or 43℃ for 0.5h were analyzed by flow cytometry. Relative tumor volume growth curves were used in a nude mouse tumor model of the two cell lines following hyperthermia at 43℃ for 0.5h after 48h intratumoral injection of 1(108 pfu of Adp53 to evaluate thermoenhancemet effect in vivo. Results: In vitro study showed that both W and M cells infected with Adp53 and treated with heating had strong arrest in G2 (after heating at 42℃ for 2h, 34.0% of original population for W cells and 25.3% of original population for M cells) and produced obvious apoptotic response. The apoptosis rate showed 230% increased (for W cells) and 110% increase (for M cells) compared with heating only control. In vivo study showed that the growth of tumor of both W cells and M cells was significantly delayed by hyperthemia combining with Adp53 as compared to tumors receiving either treatment alone. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that Adp53 transfer increased cellular apoptosis and thermo- sensitivity in vitro and tumor thermosensitivity in vivo independent of cellular intrinsic p53 status. These results support the combined used of p53 gene therapy with hyperthermia in clinical trials.

  1. Adenovirus-mediated interleukin-12 gene transfer combined with cytosine deaminase followed by 5-fluorocytosine treatment exerts potent antitumor activity in Renca tumor-bearing mice

    Therapeutic gene transfer affords a clinically feasible and safe approach to cancer treatment but a more effective modality is needed to improve clinical outcomes. Combined transfer of therapeutic genes with different modes of actions may be a means to this end. Interleukin-12 (IL-12), a heterodimeric immunoregulatory cytokine composed of covalently linked p35 and p40 subunits, has antitumor activity in animal models. The enzyme/prodrug strategy using cytosine deaminase (CD) and 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) has been used for cancer gene therapy. We have evaluated the antitumor effect of combining IL-12 with CD gene transfer in mice bearing renal cell carcinoma (Renca) tumors. Adenoviral vectors were constructed encoding one or both subunits of murine IL-12 (Ad.p35, Ad.p40 and Ad.IL-12) or cytosine deaminase (Ad.CD). The functionality of the IL-12 or CD gene products expressed from these vectors was validated by splenic interferon (IFN)-γ production or viability assays in cultured cells. Ad.p35 plus Ad.p40, or Ad.IL-12, with or without Ad.CD, were administered (single-dose) intratumorally to Renca tumor-bearing mice. The animals injected with Ad.CD also received 5-FC intraperitoneally. The antitumor effects were then evaluated by measuring tumor regression, mean animal survival time, splenic natural killer (NK) cell activity and IFN-γ production. The inhibition of tumor growth in mice treated with Ad.p35 plus Ad.p40 and Ad.CD, followed by injection of 5-FC, was significantly greater than that in mice treated with Ad.CD/5-FC, a mixture of Ad.p35 plus Ad.p40, or Ad.GFP (control). The combined gene transfer increased splenic NK cell activity and IFN-γ production by splenocytes. Ad.CD/5-FC treatment significantly increased the antitumor effect of Ad.IL-12 in terms of tumor growth inhibition and mean animal survival time. The results suggest that adenovirus-mediated IL-12 gene transfer combined with Ad.CD followed by 5-FC treatment may be useful for treating cancers

  2. Adenovirus-mediated interleukin-12 gene transfer combined with cytosine deaminase followed by 5-fluorocytosine treatment exerts potent antitumor activity in Renca tumor-bearing mice

    Kim Samyong

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Therapeutic gene transfer affords a clinically feasible and safe approach to cancer treatment but a more effective modality is needed to improve clinical outcomes. Combined transfer of therapeutic genes with different modes of actions may be a means to this end. Interleukin-12 (IL-12, a heterodimeric immunoregulatory cytokine composed of covalently linked p35 and p40 subunits, has antitumor activity in animal models. The enzyme/prodrug strategy using cytosine deaminase (CD and 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC has been used for cancer gene therapy. We have evaluated the antitumor effect of combining IL-12 with CD gene transfer in mice bearing renal cell carcinoma (Renca tumors. Methods Adenoviral vectors were constructed encoding one or both subunits of murine IL-12 (Ad.p35, Ad.p40 and Ad.IL-12 or cytosine deaminase (Ad.CD. The functionality of the IL-12 or CD gene products expressed from these vectors was validated by splenic interferon (IFN-γ production or viability assays in cultured cells. Ad.p35 plus Ad.p40, or Ad.IL-12, with or without Ad.CD, were administered (single-dose intratumorally to Renca tumor-bearing mice. The animals injected with Ad.CD also received 5-FC intraperitoneally. The antitumor effects were then evaluated by measuring tumor regression, mean animal survival time, splenic natural killer (NK cell activity and IFN-γ production. Results The inhibition of tumor growth in mice treated with Ad.p35 plus Ad.p40 and Ad.CD, followed by injection of 5-FC, was significantly greater than that in mice treated with Ad.CD/5-FC, a mixture of Ad.p35 plus Ad.p40, or Ad.GFP (control. The combined gene transfer increased splenic NK cell activity and IFN-γ production by splenocytes. Ad.CD/5-FC treatment significantly increased the antitumor effect of Ad.IL-12 in terms of tumor growth inhibition and mean animal survival time. Conclusion The results suggest that adenovirus-mediated IL-12 gene transfer combined with Ad.CD followed by

  3. In vivo study on the effect of adenovirus mediating Smad 7 gene expression regulated by radiation via Egr-1 promoter in C57BL mice implanted with lewis lung cancer

    Objective: Objective To study the effect of adenovirus mediating Smad 7 gene regulated by radiation via Egr-1 on the primary tumor and lung metastasis in C57BL mice implanted with Lewis lung cancer. Methods: The radio-inducible elements from the Egr-1 gene promoter were inserted upstream to a cDNA encoding Smad 7 and integrated into a replication-defective adenovirus to generate recombinant adenovirus (AD. Egr-Smad 7). 270 mice implanted with Lewis lung cancer in the hind legs were used and the experiment was started when the transplanted tumor diameter reached 0.8 to l.0 cm. Then three investigations were undertaken, each demanding 90 mice implanted with Lewis lung cancer respectively. To each group, 90 mice models were randomized into 3 groups: the normal control group; the NS control group; and the implanted AD. Egr-Smad 7 group. Every 6 mice in each group were irradiated by different single close to study the following: 1. The maximal and minimal diameters of the tumor were recorded to observe the tumor growth tendency, the tumor growth delay and the mice survival time, 2. The incidence of lung metastasis two weeks after the radiation was recorded. 3. The incidence of lung metastasis when the tumor volume was four times as large as that at the beginning of radiation was recorded. Results: The adenovirus mediating Smad 7 gene expression regulated by irradiation via Egr-1 in C57BL mice implanted with Lewis lung cancer was able to inhibit the progression of the primary tumor and prolong the survival of the mice significantly as compared with the control group (P 0.05). Conclusions: The gene expression of AD. Egr-Smad 7 regulated by radiation is not risky in promoting the local progression and distant metastasis of Lewis lung cancer in mice. On the other hand, the gene expression of AD. Egr-Smad 7 regulated by radiation could inhibit the progression of the primary tumor and prolong the survival time of the mice significantly. It is safe, to some extent, of using AD

  4. Adenovirus-mediated human β-nerve growth factor gene transfer has a protective effect on cochlear spiral ganglion after blast exposure

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study whether adenovirus-mediated human β-nerve growth factor (Ad-hNGFβ) gene has any protective effect on blast hearing impairment. Methods:Deafness was induced by blast exposure (172. 0 dB) in 30 healthy guinea pigs. On day 7 of blast exposure, Ad-hNGFβ was infused into the perilymphatic space of 20 animals as the study group (hNGFβ group), and artificial perilymph fluid (APF) was infused into the perilymphatic space of the other 10 animals as the control group. At weeks 1, 4 and 8 after blast exposure, the animals were sacrificed and the cochleae were removed for immunohis-tochemical and HE stainings. Results: Expression of Ad-hNGFβ protein was detected in each turn of the cochlea at the 1st week, with almost equal intensity in all turns. At the 4th week, the reactive intensity of the expression of Ad-hNGFβ protein decreased. At the 8th week, no expression was detectable. The results of HE staining showed that the amount of spiral ganglions in hNGFβ group was significantly greater than that of the control group at week 4 (F<0. 01). Conclusion: Ad-hNGFβ can be expressed at a high level and for a relatively long period in the blast impaired cochlea, suggesting that Ad-hNGFβ has a protective effect on cochlear spiral ganglion cells after blast exposure and the efficient gene transfer into cochlea had been achieved without toxicity.

  5. Construction and identification of recombinant adenovirus-mediated gene transfer system for rat vascular endothelial growth factor

    Hongyu Yang; Hong Qi; Junjie Zou; Xiwei Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To construct the recombinant adenovirus vector carrying rat vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGF), as preparation for genetic transfection that follows. Methods: Rat VEGF was obtained by using RT-PCR amplification and then cloned into the shutter plasmid pDC316. Subsequently, this newly constructed plasmid pDC316-VEGF, after identification by nuclease digestion analysis and sequencing analysis, was transfected into human embryonic kidney cells HEK293 by Lipofectamine 2000 mediation, together with adenovirus-packaging plasmid pBHGE3. Based on the homologous recombination of the two plasmids within HEK293 cells, the recombinant adenovirus vector carrying VEGF and VDC316-VEGF was created. VDC316-VEGF was subsequently identified using PCR, purified using repeated plaque passages, proliferated using freezing and melting within HEK293 cells, and titrated using 50% Tissue Culture Infective Dose(TCID50) assay. Results:The newly constructed recombinant adenovirus was confirmed to carry rat VEGF based on PCR results, and its titration value determined based on TCID50 assay was 3×109 pfu/ml. Conclusion:The recombinant adenovirus carrying rat VEGF was successfully constructed. The newly constructed adenovirus can produce a sufficiently high titration value within HEK293 cells, providing a reliable tool for genetic transfection in further gene therapy researches.

  6. Adenovirus-Mediated Herpes Simplex Virus Thymidine Kinase Gene Transfer Driver by KDR Promoter in Treatment of Experimental Human HepatocelLular Carcinoma in Nude Mice

    LI Bao-jin; ZHANG Chao; YI Yuan-xue; HAO Ying; LIU Xiao-ping; OU Qing-jia

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the therapeutic efficacy of adenovirus-mediated herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene transfer under the driving of KDR promoter (AdKDR-tk) in combination of ganciclovir (GCV) against human hepatocellular carcinoma in nude mice. Methods: HepG2 cell line was implanted subcutaneously into 32 nude mice, which were subsequently divided into 4 groups (n=8 each group): Ganciclovir group (Ⅰ), Ad group (Ⅱ), AdCMV-tk/GCV group (under the driving of CMV promoter) (Ⅲ) and AdKDR-tk/GCV group (Ⅳ). Then intratumoral injection of recombinant adenovirus or Ad was performed in all nude mice, and repeated 24 h later. For the following 10 d GCV was given at a dose of 100 mg/(kg·d), ip. All the treated animals were killed to evaluate the tumor weight and the histopathological changes and the microvessel density of tumors after the treatment was determined. Results: Compared with group Ⅰ, the tumor inhibitory rate was 12.3% in group Ⅲ and 24.5% in group Ⅳ; the inhibition rates were significantly different between group Ⅲ and Ⅳ (P<0.05). The mean MVDs in group Ⅰ, Ⅱ, Ⅲand Ⅳ were 37.4±8.6, 30.6±7.8, 27.6±7.1, and 10.7±4.1 (microvessels/mm2), respectively. Significant differences were found between group Ⅲ and Ⅱ (P<0.05), Ⅳ and Ⅱ (P<0.01), and Ⅳ and Ⅲ (P<0.01). Conclusion: Intratumoral injection of AdKDR-tk results in marked inhibition of HCC growth through inhibition angiogenesis in nude mice. It may be a new treatment approach for human HCC.

  7. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of the PTEN gene inhibits human colorectal cancer growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Saito, Y; Swanson, X; Mhashilkar, A M; Oida, Y; Schrock, R; Branch, C D; Chada, S; Zumstein, L; Ramesh, R

    2003-11-01

    The tumor-suppressor gene PTEN encodes a multifunctional phosphatase that is mutated in a variety of human cancers. PTEN inhibits the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway and downstream functions, including activation of Akt/protein kinase B (PKB), cell survival, and cell proliferation in tumor cells carrying mutant- or deletion-type PTEN. In such tumor cells, enforced expression of PTEN decreases cell proliferation through cell-cycle arrest at G1 phase accompanied, in some cases, by induction of apoptosis. More recently, the tumor-suppressive effect of PTEN has been reported in ovarian and thyroid tumors that are wild type for PTEN. In the present study, we examined the tumor-suppressive effect of PTEN in human colorectal cancer cells that are wild type for PTEN. Adenoviral-mediated transfer of PTEN (Ad-PTEN) suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis significantly in colorectal cancer cells (DLD-1, HT29, and SW480) carrying wtPTEN than in normal colon fibroblast cells (CCD-18Co) carrying wtPTEN. This suppression was induced through downregulation of the Akt/PKB pathway, dephosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cell-cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, but not the G1 phase. Furthermore, treatment of human colorectal tumor xenografts (HT-29, and SW480) with Ad-PTEN resulted in significant (P=0.01) suppression of tumor growth. These results indicate that Ad-PTEN exerts its tumor-suppressive effect on colorectal cancer cells through inhibition of cell-cycle progression and induction of cell death. Thus Ad-PTEN may be a potential therapeutic for treatment of colorectal cancers. PMID:14528320

  8. Adenovirus-mediates gene transfer of brain-derived neurotrophic factor for repairing sciatic nerve injury%重组腺病毒载体AxCA-BDNF基因转染修复坐骨神经损伤

    李培建; 李兵仓

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: How to accelerate injury repair and regeneration following peripheral nerve injury is the research focus. Gene therapy may be the possible treatment for this problem.OBJECTIVE: To observe the expression of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDN F) gene after microinjected adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of BDNF (AxCA-BDNF) to the sciatic nerve for peripheral nerve regeneration.METHODS: Based on silicone tube graft as a support to bridge adult rat sciatic nerve gaps, Wistar rat were microinjected recombinant adenovirus vector of BDNF (AxCA-BDNF), BDNF and simple injection of virus buffer to the sciatic nerve respectively.With the methods of in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry, the BDNF gene expression was certified, the number of the new nerve fibers and motoneurons in anterior horn of the spinal cord were calculated, and the myelin sheath thickness of the new nerve fibers was measu red at 3, 7, 14 days and 1 , 2, 4 months after operation.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Compared with the BDNF and control group, the expression of the BDNF gene in the proximal end, distal end and spinal cord (L3-6) of injured sciatic nerve were obviously higher than that of the BDNF and control groups (P < 0.01). The result of retrograde axonal transport of HRP tracer indicated the survival neurons, regenerated nerve fibers,thickness of myelin sheath, as well as the re-formation of nerve connection of the AxCA-BDNF group were superior to the control group(P < 0.01). The results demonstrated that exogenous BDNF gene and its express proteins were uptaken to the spinal cord motoneurons through retrograde axonal transport. Gene therapy for sciatic nerve injury of adult rats by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in vivo not only promotes nerve regeneration but also protects the neurons in the spinal cord.%背景:如何促进周围神经损伤修复与再生一直是基础与临床研究的热点.基因治疗有可能成为今后

  9. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene

  10. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    Kim, Chang Min; Kwon, Hee Chung

    1998-04-01

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene.

  11. Beta-Adrenergic gene therapy for cardiovascular disease

    Koch Walter J

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gene therapy using in vivo recombinant adenovirus-mediated gene transfer is an effective technique that offers great potential to improve existing drug treatments for the complex cardiovascular diseases of heart failure and vascular smooth muscle intimal hyperplasia. Cardiac-specific adenovirus-mediated transfer of the carboxyl-terminus of the β-adrenergic receptor kinase (βARKct, acting as a Gβγ-β-adrenergic receptor kinase (βARK1 inhibitor, improves basal and agonist-induced cardiac performance in both normal and failing rabbit hearts. In addition, βARKct adenovirus infection of vascular smooth muscle is capable of significantly diminishing neointimal proliferation after angioplasty. Therefore, further investigation is warranted to determine whether inhibition of βARK1 activity and sequestration of Gβγ via an adenovirus that encodes the βARKct transgene might be a useful clinical tool for the treatment of cardiovascular pathologies.

  12. Adenovirus-mediated p53 and ING4 gene co-transfer elicits synergistic antitumor effects through enhancement of p53 acetylation in breast cancer.

    Wu, Jie; Zhu, Yanbo; Xu, Chun; Xu, Hong; Zhou, Xiumin; Yang, Jicheng; Xie, Yufeng; Tao, Min

    2016-01-01

    Multigene-based combination therapy may be an effective practice in cancer gene therapy. Substantial studies have demonstrated that tumor suppressor p53 acetylation is indispensable for p53 activation. Inhibitor of growth 4 (ING4), as a novel tumor suppressor, is capable of remarkably enhancing p53 acetylation and its transcriptional activity. Hence, we assumed that combined treatment of p53 and ING4 double tumor suppressors would exhibit enhanced antitumor effects. The combined therapeutic efficacy of p53 and ING4 for human cancers has not been previously reported. We thus generated multiple promoter expression cassette-based recombinant adenovirus-co-expressing ING4 and p53 double tumor suppressor genes (AdVING4/p53), evaluated the combined effects of AdVING4/p53 on breast cancer using the MDA-MB-231 (mutant p53) human breast cancer cell line, and also elucidated its underlying molecular mechanisms. We demonstrated that AdVING4/p53-mediated p53 and ING4 co-expression induced synergistic growth inhibition and apoptosis as well as enhanced effects on upregulation of acetylated p53, P21, Bax, PUMA, Noxa, cleaved caspase-9, cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP, and downregulation of Bcl-2, CD31 and microvessel density (MVD) in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer in vitro and/or in vivo subcutaneous (s.c.) xenografted tumors. The synergistic antitumor activity elicited by AdVING4/p53 was closely associated with the enhanced activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and synergistic inhibition of tumor angiogenesis, very possibly via ING4-mediated enhancement of p53 acetylation and activity. Thus, our results indicate that cancer gene therapy combining two or more tumor suppressors such as p53 and ING4 may constitute a novel and effective therapeutic modality for human breast cancer and other cancers. PMID:26530780

  13. Long-term doxycycline-controlled expression of human tyrosine hydroxylase after direct adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to a rat model of Parkinson’s disease

    Corti, Olga; Sánchez-Capelo, Amelia; Colin, Philippe; Hanoun, Naïma; Hamon, Michel; Mallet, Jacques

    1999-01-01

    Developments of technologies for delivery of foreign genes to the central nervous system are opening the field to promising treatments for human neurodegenerative diseases. Gene delivery vectors need to fulfill several criteria of efficacy and safety before being applied to humans. The ability to drive expression of a therapeutic gene in an adequate number of cells, to maintain long-term expression, and to allow exogenous control over the transgene product are essential requirements for clini...

  14. Adenovirus-mediated neurotrophin-3 gene can over-express neurotrophin-3 in the motoneurons located at ventral horn of rat spinal cord%腺病毒介导的神经营养素-3基因能够在大鼠脊髓前角运动神经元内过表达神经营养素-3

    陈元峰; 曾湘; 曾园山

    2011-01-01

    Objective To observe whether adenovirus-mediated neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) gene could over-express neu-rotrophin-3 in the motoneurons located at ventral hom of rat spinal cord, and derived efferent fibers of sciatic nerve. Methods NT-3 gene recombination adenovirus with green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene (report gene) were injected into the sciatic nerve. NT-3 overexpression of motoneurons located at ventral hom of spinal cord were observed under the fluorescent microscope, using immunofluorescence histochemistal staining technique, seven days after injecting the gene recombination adenovirus. Results GFP positive labeling cells were observed on cross sections of L, and L5 spinal cord segments in the animals of the GFP express (the control group) and NT-3+GFP express groups. In the NT-3+GFP express group, NT-3 positive labeling cells were observed also in L4 and L5 spinal cord segments. These cells were merged with GFP positive labeling cells, and were ventral horn's motoneurons over-expressing NT-3. Compared with the morphous of ventral horn's motoneurons in the GFP express group, motoneurons overexpress-ing NT-3 showed more branching processes in the NT-3+GFP express group. Conclusion Adenovirus-mediated NT-3 gene can over-express neurotrophin-3 in the motoneurons located at ventral hom of rat spinal cord and derived efferent fibers of sciatic nerve. The finding provides an initial experimental data for utilizing further a strategy of NT-3 gene therapy to repair experimental spinal cord injury.%目的 观察腺病毒介导的神经营养素-3 (NT-3)基因在发出坐骨神经传出纤维的大鼠脊髓前角运动神经元的过表达.方法 在坐骨神经内直接注射含有绿色荧光蛋白(GFP)基因(报告基因)的NT-3基因重组腺病毒(Ad-NT-3-GFP),7d后应用免疫荧光组织化学染色技术,在荧光显微镜下观察脊髓前角运动神经元的NT-3过表达.结果 GFP表达组(对照组)和NT-3加GFP表达组两组动物的L4和L5脊髓段横

  15. Effects of recombinant adenovirus-mediated hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha gene on proliferation and differentiation of endogenous neural stem cells in rats following intracerebral hemorrhage

    Zhen Yu; Li-Fen Chen; Ling Tang; Chang-Lin Hu

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effects of adenovirus(Ad)-mediated hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha(HIF-1α) gene on proliferation and differentiation of endogenous neural stem cells(NSCs) in rats following intracerebral hemorrhage(ICH) and the underlying mechanisms.Methods:A total of120 specific pathogen-free, adult, maleSprague-Dawley rats were included in this study.After establishment ofICH models in rats,PBS,Ad, orAd-HIF-1αwas administered via the ischemic ventricle.On the1st,7th,14th,21st and28th d afterICH, rat neurological deficits were scored, doublecortin(DCX) expression in the subventricular zone cells was detected by immunohistochemical staining, and5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine(BrdU)-,BrdU/DCX-, andBrdU/glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cells in the subventricular zone were counted using immumofluorescence method amongPBS,Ad, andAd-HIF-1α groups.Results:On the7th, 14th,21st and28th d afterICH, neurological deficit scores in theAd-HIF-1α group were significantly lower than in thePBS andAd groups(P<0.05).In theAd-HIF-1α group,DCX expression was significantly increased on the7th d, peaked on the14th d, and then gradually decreased.In theAd-HIF-1α group,BrdU-positive cells were significantly increased over time course, and significant difference inBrdU-positive cell counts was observed when compared with thePBS andAd groups at each time point(P<0.01 or0.05).On the7th,14th,21st and28th d after ICH, the number ofDCX-,BrdU-,BrdU/DCX-, andBrdU/DCX-positive cells in theAd-HIF-1α group was significantly greater than in thePBS andAd groups(P<0.05).Conclusions:HIF-1α gene can promote the proliferation, migration and differentiation of endogenous neural stem cells afterICH, thereby contributing to neurofunctional recovery afterICH.

  16. Effects of adenovirus mediated vascular endothelial growth factor gene transfer on reconstitution of hematopoiesis in post-bone marrow transplantation mice

    ZHONG Zhao-dong; ZOU Ping; HU Xian-shi; YOU Yong; CHEN Zhi-chao; HUANG Shi-ang

    2005-01-01

    Background Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) conditioning procedure is considered as the cause of damage to bone marrow microvasculature and the delay of hematopoiesis recovery. However, hematopoiesis regulation post BMT by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has not yet been studied. In this study, adenovirus were used to investigate the effects of VEGF gene transfer on preventing damages to bone marrow microenvironment and its promotion of hematopoiesis in post-BMT mice.Methods Recombinant adenovirus (Ad)-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)/hVEGF165 was injected via tail vein into BALB/c mice undergoing syngeneic BMT. During the different phases post BMT, the distribution of adenovirus and the plasma levels of hVEGF were measured as well as the numbers of white blood cells (WBC), platelet (PLT) and red blood cells (RBC) in peripheral blood. At the same time, the mice were injected with Chinese ink via tail vein, following which the tibias were separated and were used for analysis of bone marrow microvasculature surface area and cellularity.Results Significant expression of EGFP and hVEGF was observed in multiple organs at different phases post BMT, and the plasma level of hVEGF was up to (866.67±97.13) pg/ml. The recovery of WBC, PLT and RBC of the group treated with recombinant adenovirus Ad-EGFP/hVEGF165 were significantly more rapid than those of other BMT groups (P0.05]. The restoration of hematopoiesis was retarded more than that of microvasculature. The cellularity of bone marrow in each group was still lower than that of normal control [(62.3±4.0)%, P<0.05] at the 30th day post BMT, but the percentage in group treated with VEGF at the 20th and 30th days post BMT [(46.5±5.0)% and (55.1±4.5)%] exceeded those of other BMT groups (P<0.05, respectively).Conclusion VEGF gene transfer mediated by adenovirus may protect the hematopoietic microenvironment to promote the restoration of hematopoiesis in post-BMT mice.

  17. THE BIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF ADENOVIRUS-MEDIATED IL-18 GENE-MODIFIED MURINE COLORECTAL ADENOCARCINOMA CELL IN VIVO AND IN VITRO

    SONG; Wen-gang

    2001-01-01

    [1]Meyer Zum Buschenfelde C, Cramer S, Trumpfheller C, et al. Trypanosoma cruzi induces strong IL-12 and IL-18 gene expression in vivo: correlation with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production [J]. Clin Exp Immunol 1997; 110:378.[2]Tominaga K, Yoshimoto T, Torigoe K, et al. IL-12 synergizes with IL-18 or IL-1beta for IFN-gamma production from human T cells [J]. Int Immunol 2000; 12:151.[3]Takeda K, Tsutsui H, Yoshimoto T, et al. Defective NK cell activity and Th1 response in IL-18-deficient mice [J]. Immunity 1998; 8:383.[4]Tomura M, Zhou XY, Maruo S, et al. A critical role for IL-18 in the proliferation and activation of NK1.1+ CD3- cells [J]. J Immunol 1998; 160:4738.[5]Okamura H, Kashiwamura S, Tsutsui H, et al. Regulation of interferon-gamma production by IL-12 and IL-18 [J]. Curr Opin Immunol 1998; 10:259.[6]Osaki T, Hashimoto W, Gambotto A, et al. Potent antitumor effects mediated by local expression of the mature form of the interferon-gamma inducing factor, interleukin-18 (IL-18) [J]. Gene Ther 1999; 6:808.[7]Dinarello CA. IL-18: A TH1-inducing, proinflammatory cytokine and new member of the IL-1 family [J]. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1999; 103:11.[8]Matsui K, Yoshimoto T, Tsutsui H, et al. Propionibacterium acnes treatment diminishes CD4+ NK1.1+ T cells but induces type I T cells in the liver by induction of IL-12 and IL-18 production from Kupffer cells [J]. J Immunol 1997; 159:97.[9]Akira S. The role of IL-18 in innate immunity [J]. Curr Opin Immunol 2000; 12:59.[10]Lauwerys BR, Garot N, Renauld JC, et al. Cytokine production and killer activity of NK/T-NK cells derived with IL-2, IL-15, or the combination of IL-12 and IL-18 [J]. J Immunol 2000; 165:1847.[11]Micallef MJ, Yoshida K, Kawai S, et al. In vivo antitumor effects of murine interferon-gamma-inducing factor/interleukin-18 in mice bearing syngeneic Meth A sarcoma malignant ascites [J]. Cancer Immunol Immunother 1997; 43:361.[12]Micallef MJ, Tanimoto T

  18. 制备源自HBsAg基因修饰树突状细胞的外切体%Generation of exosomes derived from adenovirus-mediated HBsAg gene-modified dendritic cells

    杨静悦; 高琳; 付蓉; 薛妍; 刘文超

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To obtain exosomes derived from adenovirus - mediated HBsAg gene - modified dendritic cells. Methods: Full length HBsAg cDNAs were cloned into shuttle2 vector. The HBsAg gene fragments resulted from the - S digested with PI - See and I - Ceu were linked to the linear adeno - X virus DNA. After packaged with HEK293 cells, the adenovirus expression vector was obtained. Then the recombinant adenovirus expression plasmid AdVHBsAg was transfected into human monocyte - derived dendritic cells. The exosomes were isolated from superna-tant of transfected DCs. Transmission electron microscopy was used to observe their structures. The expressions of several proteins were investigated by flow cytometry. Results: The shuttle2 - S showed that band with 630 bp by di-gested with PI - See and I - Ceu, HBsAg gene in the inserted DNA of AdVHBsAg was confirmed by PCR, and pre-dictive fragments proved by restriction enzyme digestion analysis were exhibited. CPE appear 10 after days HEK293 cells transfected AdVHBsAg. Application of the isolation procedure to transfected DCs revealed exosome vesicles by transmission electron microscopy. Protein analysis by Western blot was performed and revealed that the costimulatory molecule CD86,CD83 and HBsAg was detectable. Conclusion; The exosomes derived from HBsAg - DC may be a tool of the HBV related hepatocellular carcinoma immunotherapy.%目的:制备一种新型负载HBsAg基因的外切体(exosome)瘤苗,并探讨其生物学特性、免疫学功能.方法:运用分子克隆和病毒载体转染HBsAg基因构建AdVHBsAg-DC肝癌瘤苗,采用流式细胞术鉴定转染基因表达;提取exosome;以透射电镜观察、Western blot法鉴定exosome.结果:构建的重组AdVHBsAg腺病毒载体,经PCR和酶切鉴定,结果显示HBsAg基因片段已正确插入腺病毒载体中.包装的腺病毒载体具有良好的感染性,可以在293细胞中形成病毒颗粒.提取的exosome在透射电镜下可观察到直径为50-100nm

  19. Genes and Gene Therapy

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  20. Adenovirus-mediated human endostatin gene delivery in the treatment of mouse melanoma%腺病毒载体介导的内皮抑素基因治疗小鼠黑素瘤的实验研究

    曹瑞华; 廖万清; 温海; 刘翠杰

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨腺病毒载体介导的内皮抑素基因(Ad-mES)在体外和体内的生物学活性.方法 不同感染复度(MOI)的腺病毒体外感染靶细胞;RT-PCR法检测目的基因的表达;MTT法检测Ad-mES对靶细胞生物活性的影响.观察各组小鼠黑素瘤的生长、转移和生存率;免疫组化法鉴定肿瘤组织内内皮抑素蛋白的表达.电子透射电镜观察肿瘤组织内皮细胞、肿瘤细胞的凋亡情况.结果 腺病毒体外能够有效感染靶细胞,MOI为10,20,50,100,200,500时,B16F10细胞和ECV304细胞的腺病毒感染率分别为15.6%、35%、73%、88%、95.2%、97%和19%、35%、80%、90%、97%、98.5%.靶细胞明确表达内皮抑素基因;Ad-mES对B16F10细胞的增殖没有影响;而Ad-mES能抑制ECV304细胞的增殖,且随MOI增大,抑制内皮细胞增殖效果越强.瘤细胞接种后第8天,各组成瘤率100%.开始出现小鼠死亡的最早日:PBS组第16天、Ad-GFP组第18天、Ad-mES单剂、重复治疗组均在第20天.结论 Ad-mES体外和体内均影响靶细胞的生物学活性;Ad-mES治疗组小鼠平均生存时间延长(P<0.05),肿瘤体积增长减慢(P<0.05).%Objective To observe the bioactivity of adenovirus-mediated human endostatin gene in vivo and in vitro.Methods B16F10 melanoma cells and human endothelial cells(ECV 304)were both transfected with recombinant adenovirus containing green fluorescent protein(Ad-GFP)or human endostatin gene (Ad-mES) at various multiplicity of infection(MOI).Then,the expression of endostatin gene was detected by RT-PCR,and the growth of cells by MTT assay.B16F10 cells were inoculated into the back of mice to establish melanoma models,which were classified into treated groups intratumorally injected with Ad-mES once (single Ad-mES group) or repeatedly(repetitive Ad-mES group)with an interval of 7 days,and control groups intratumorally injected with Ad-GFP (Ad-GFP group)or phosphate buffred solution (PBS group).Subsequently,the growth of tumors was

  1. 腺病毒介导CDglyTK双自杀基因系统对裸鼠皮下移植瘢痕疙瘩的治疗作用%Effects of recombinant adenovirus-mediated double suicide genes on implanted human keloid: experiment with athymic mice

    徐斌; 刘振中; 张敬; 宗宪磊; 蔡景龙

    2008-01-01

    implanted with human keloid obtained during operation so as to establish mouse keloid models and then were randomly divided into 4 equal groups :Group A, injected with normal saline (NS) into the keloid once per 3 days for 18 days totally, Group B injected with NS into the keloid and injected intraperitoneally with 5-Fc and GCV;Group C injected with CDglyTK into the keloid, and Group D injected with CDglyTK into the keloid aud 5-Fc and GCV injected intraperitoneally.The volume of the implanted keloid tissue was measured 2, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42 days after operation.On day 42 the keloid tissues were removed to undergo morphological examination, TUNEL method was used to examine the apeptosis of the fibroblasts, and the expression of Bcl-2 and BAX, products of apoptosis-related genes, were detected by immunohistochemistry.Results Compared to those before treatment the volume of the implanted keloid of Group D began to decrease since 14 days after treatment time-dependently (all P < 0.05), and the volumes of the other 3 groups continued to increase and peaked on days 21, 14, or 7 respectively (all P < 0.05).Microscopy showed infiltration of a larger quantity of histiocyte in the keloid tissue, and more obvious collagen disorganization and apoptosis of fibroblasts in Group D than in the other 3 groups.The protein expression of Bcl-2 was more remarkable and the protein expression of BAX was less remarkable in Group D than iu the other 3 groups.Condusions The recombinant adenovirus-mediated double suicide gene therapy is effective on the implanted keloid tissue.The main mechanism may be induction of apoptosis in the keloid fibroblasts.

  2. Gene therapy.

    Mota Biosca, Anna

    1992-01-01

    Applications of gene therapy have been evaluated in virtually every oral tissue, and many of these have proved successful at least in animal models. While gene therapy will not be used routinely in the next decade, practitioners of oral medicine should be aware of the potential of this novel type of treatment that doubtless will benefit many patients with oral diseases.

  3. Gene therapy

    2005-01-01

    2005147 CNHK200-hA-a gene-viral therapeutic system and its antitumor effect on lung cancer. WANG Wei-guo(王伟国),et al. Viral & Gene Ther Center, Eastern Hepatobilli Surg Instit 2nd Milit Univ, Shanghai 200438. Chin J Oncol,2005:27(2):69-72. Objective: To develop a novel vector system, which combines the advantages of the gene therapy,

  4. Enhancement of radiotherapy by hyperthermia-regulated gene therapy

    Purpose: Interleukin 12 (IL-12) has shown strong antitumoral effects in numerous pre-clinical studies and appears to act synergistically with radiation in murine tumors. The major impediment to its clinical use has been its systemic toxicity. While using intratumorally injected viral gene therapy vectors encoding IL-12 reduces systemic side effects substantially, elevated systemic transgene levels are still observed because adenovirus can reach the circulation. Further restricting IL-12 expression in the tumor is therefore desirable in a combined radiation and adenovirus mediated cancer gene therapy regimen. Methods and Materials: Hyperthermia-regulated gene therapy was tested in a nonimmunogenic B16.F10 melanoma line that is syngeneic with C57BL/6 mice. For hyperthermic gene therapy, an adenoviral vector coding for IL-12 under the control of the promoter of the human heat shock protein 70B (hsp70B) was used. One week after transplantation (at a 5-7 mm diameter), tumors were irradiated with 3 x 11 Gy (mo-we-fri). Adenovirus was injected at 3 x 108 pfu/tumor 24 h before the last radiation fraction or 3 days afterwards. Hyperthermia was performed 24 h later at 42.5 deg. C. Growth delay to reaching 3 times initial tumor volume was chosen as the biologic endpoint. IL-12 levels in tumor and serum were determined by using the enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). Results: Adenovirus mediated intratumoral expression of IL-12 under the control of a heat inducible promoter in combination with hyperthermia is almost as effective as that under the control of a constitutive cytomegaly virus (CMV) promoter while systemic transgene levels are substantially reduced with the heat inducible promoter. The response to radiotherapy is improved considerably when combined with heat inducible gene therapy without apparent systemic toxicity. When used as a single dose, applying IL-12 gene therapy after completion of radiotherapy appears to be beneficial. Conclusions: Hyperthermia

  5. Adenovirus-mediated wild-type p53 gene transfer in combination with bronchial arterial infusion for treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, one year follow-up

    Yong-song GUAN; Yuan LIU; Qing ZOU; Qing HE; Zi LA; Lin YANG; Ying HU

    2009-01-01

    Objective: In the present study, we have examined the safety and efficacy of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene (rAd-p53) injection in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the combination with the therapy of bronchial arterial infusion (BAI). Methods: A total of 58 patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled in a non-randomized, two-armed clinical trial. Of which, 19 received a combination treatment of BAI and rAd-p53 (the combo group), while the remaining 39 were treated with only BAI (the control group). Patients were followed up for 12 months, with safety and local response evaluated by the National Cancer Institute's Common Toxicity Criteria and response evaluation criteria in solid tumor (RECIST), respectively. Time to progression (TTP) and survival rates were also analyzed by Kaplan-Meier method. Results: In the combo group,19 patients received a total of 49 injections of rAd-p53 and 46 times of BAI, respectively, while 39 patients in the control group received a total of 113 times of BAI. The combination treatment was found to have less adverse events such as anorexia, nausea and emesis, pain, and leucopenia (P0.05). Patients in the combo group had a longer TTP than those in the control group (a median 7.75 vs 5.5 months, P=0.018). However, the combination treatment did not lead to better survival, with survival rates at 3, 6, and 12 months in the combo group being 94.74%, 89.47%, and 52.63%, respectively, com-pared with 92.31%, 69.23%, and 38.83% in the control group (P=0.224). Conclusion: Our results show that the combination of rAd-p53 and BAI was well tolerated in patients with NSCLC and may have improved the quality of life and delayed the disease progression. A further study to better determine the efficacy of this combination therapy is warranted.

  6. Co-expression of interleukin 12 enhances antitumor effects of a novel chimeric promoter-mediated suicide gene therapy in an immunocompetent mouse model

    Xu, Yu, E-mail: xuyu1001@gmail.com [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Liu, Zhengchun, E-mail: l135027@126.com [Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Kong, Haiyan, E-mail: suppleant@163.com [Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Sun, Wenjie, E-mail: wendy11240325@163.com [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Liao, Zhengkai, E-mail: fastbeta@gmail.com [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zhou, Fuxiang, E-mail: happyzhoufx@sina.com [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Xie, Conghua, E-mail: chxie_65@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); and others

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} A novel chimeric promoter consisting of CArG element and hTERT promoter was developed. {yields} The promoter was characterized with radiation-inducibility and tumor-specificity. {yields} Suicide gene system driven by the promoter showed remarkable cytotoxicity in vitro. {yields} Co-expression of IL12 enhanced the promoter mediated suicide gene therapy in vivo. -- Abstract: The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter has been widely used in target gene therapy of cancer. However, low transcriptional activity limited its clinical application. Here, we designed a novel dual radiation-inducible and tumor-specific promoter system consisting of CArG elements and the hTERT promoter, resulting in increased expression of reporter genes after gamma-irradiation. Therapeutic and side effects of adenovirus-mediated horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/indole-3-acetic (IAA) system downstream of the chimeric promoter were evaluated in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma, combining with or without adenovirus-mediated interleukin 12 (IL12) gene driven by the cytomegalovirus promoter. The combination treatment showed more effective suppression of tumor growth than those with single agent alone, being associated with pronounced intratumoral T-lymphocyte infiltration and minor side effects. Our results suggest that the combination treatment with HRP/IAA system driven by the novel chimeric promoter and the co-expression of IL12 might be an effective and safe target gene therapy strategy of cancer.

  7. Co-expression of interleukin 12 enhances antitumor effects of a novel chimeric promoter-mediated suicide gene therapy in an immunocompetent mouse model

    Highlights: → A novel chimeric promoter consisting of CArG element and hTERT promoter was developed. → The promoter was characterized with radiation-inducibility and tumor-specificity. → Suicide gene system driven by the promoter showed remarkable cytotoxicity in vitro. → Co-expression of IL12 enhanced the promoter mediated suicide gene therapy in vivo. -- Abstract: The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter has been widely used in target gene therapy of cancer. However, low transcriptional activity limited its clinical application. Here, we designed a novel dual radiation-inducible and tumor-specific promoter system consisting of CArG elements and the hTERT promoter, resulting in increased expression of reporter genes after gamma-irradiation. Therapeutic and side effects of adenovirus-mediated horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/indole-3-acetic (IAA) system downstream of the chimeric promoter were evaluated in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma, combining with or without adenovirus-mediated interleukin 12 (IL12) gene driven by the cytomegalovirus promoter. The combination treatment showed more effective suppression of tumor growth than those with single agent alone, being associated with pronounced intratumoral T-lymphocyte infiltration and minor side effects. Our results suggest that the combination treatment with HRP/IAA system driven by the novel chimeric promoter and the co-expression of IL12 might be an effective and safe target gene therapy strategy of cancer.

  8. 腺病毒介导荧光素酶报告基因感染间充质干细胞的研究%Infection with adenovirus-mediated luciferase reporter gene in mesenchymal stem cells and bioluminescence imaging

    王一帆; 夏睿; 郭玉林; 郜发宝

    2013-01-01

    目的 构建携带萤火虫荧光素酶(Luc)报告基因的腺病毒载体(Ad-Luc),研究其感染大鼠骨髓间充质干细胞(BMSC)后的体内外生物发光成像.方法 从psiCHECK-2质粒中用PCR扩增Luc基因,克隆入腺病毒穿梭载体pShuttle-CMV后行Nhe Ⅰ/Xba Ⅰ双酶切和测序鉴定.重组腺病毒穿梭载体与骨架载体pAdeno同源重组并包装纯化后,测定其病毒滴度.用重组Ad-Luc感染BMSC,行体外生物发光成像确定最佳感染复数(MOI),并采用曲线拟合回归分析生物发光强度与MOI的关系.以锥虫蓝染色法评价细胞活力变化,计算细胞存活率.将转染后BMSC(1×106个)植入SD大鼠前肢肌肉内,行体内生物发光成像.细胞存活率组间比较采用两因素重复测量资料方差分析.结果 经酶切和测序鉴定证明,Ad-Luc构建成功,病毒滴度为1×1010空斑形成单位(PFU)/ml.体外生物发光检测结果显示最佳MOI值为50,Ad-Luc可高效感染BMSC,使其表达Luc,且拟合曲线示细胞生物发光强度随MOI增加而增强(R2 =0.98).转染组和未转染组细胞培养1、3、5、7d时,细胞存活率分别为(92.5±2.3)%与(94.1±1.8)%、(91.4±0.9)%与(92.7±2.0)%、(92.1±1.6)%与(93.3±2.4)%、(91.9±1.5)%与(93.0±3.1)%,2组间细胞活力的差异无统计学意义(F=4.38,P>0.05).体内生物发光成像结果示BMSC移植1、3、7d后仍有存活,但随时间延长,生物发光信号逐渐减弱.结论 Luc报告基因通过腺病毒载体成功转入BMSC,实现了光学报告基因成像对移植干细胞的示踪.%Objective To construct adenovirus vector containing firefly luciferase reporter gene (AdLuc) and infect bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC),then to take bioluminescence imaging in vitro and in vivo for identification.Methods The luciferase gene was amplified with PCR from psiCHECK-2 plasmid and cloned into the adenoviral shuttle vector (pShuttle-CMV).It was confirmed by Nhe Ⅰ/Xba Ⅰ digestion and sequencing

  9. Adenovirus-mediated expression of Tob1 sensitizes breast cancer cells to ionizing radiation

    Yang JIAO; Chun-min GE; Qing-hui MENG; Jian-ping CAO; Jian TONG; Sai-jun FAN

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of the Tobl gene, a member of the Transducing Molecule of ErbB2/B-cell Translocation Ggene (TOB/BTG) family, by using the adenovirus-mediated expression of Tob 1 on radiosensitivity in a human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. Methods: Cell survival was determined by clonogenic assay. Apoptosis was evaluated by DNA fragmentation gel electro-phoresis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling assay. Protein expression was analyzed by Western blot assay and DNA repair was measured by a host cell reactivation assay. Results: We demonstrated that pre-irradiation treatment with Ad5-Tob 1 significantly increased radiosensitivity,accompanying the increased induction of apoptosis and the repression of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, Ad5-Tob 1-mediated radiosensitivity correlates with the upregulation of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax and the downregulation of several DNA double strand break repair proteins, including DNA-dependent protein kinases, Ku70 and Ku80, and X-ray-sensitive complementation group 4.Conclusion: Tobl, as a new radiosensitizer, is a new target in the radiotherapy of breast cancer via increasing apoptosis and suppressing DNA repair.

  10. Adenovirus-mediated transfection with glucose transporter 3 suppresses PC12 cell apoptosis following ischemic injury

    Junliang Li; Xinke Xu; Shanyi Zhang; Meiguang Zheng; Zhonghua Wu; Yinlun Weng; Leping Ouyang; Jian Yu; Fangcheng Li

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of adenovirus-mediated transfection of PC12 cells with glucose transporter 3 after ischemic injury. The results of flow cytometry and TUNEL showed that exogenous glucose transporter 3 significantly suppressed PC12 cell apoptosis induced by ischemic injury. The results of isotopic scintiscan and western blot assays showed that, the glucose uptake rate was significantly increased and nuclear factor kappaB expression was significantly decreased after adenovirus-mediated transfection of ischemic PC12 cells with glucose transporter 3. These results suggest that adenovirus-mediated transfection of cells with glucose transporter 3 elevates the energy metabolism of PC12 cells with ischemic injury, and inhibits cell apoptosis.

  11. Principles of gene therapy

    Mammen Biju; Ramakrishnan T; Sudhakar Uma; Vijayalakshmi

    2007-01-01

    Genes are specific sequences of bases that encode instructions to make proteins. When genes are altered so that encoded proteins are unable to carry out their normal functions, genetic disorders can result. Gene therapy is designed to introduce genetic material into cells to compensate for abnormal genes or to make a beneficial protein. This article reviews the fundamentals in gene therapy and its various modes of administration with an insight into the role of gene therapy in Periodontics an...

  12. The antitumor efficacy of a novel adenovirus-mediated anti-p21Ras single chain fragment variable antibody on human cancers in vitro and in vivo.

    Yang, Ju-Lun; Pan, Xin-Yan; Zhao, Wen-Xing; Hu, Qi-Chan; Ding, Feng; Feng, Qiang; Li, Gui-Yun; Luo, Ying

    2016-03-01

    Activated ras genes are found in a large number of human tumors, and therefore are one of important targets for cancer therapy. This study investigated the antitumor effects of a novel single chain fragment variable antibody (scFv) against ras protein, p21Ras. The anti-p21Ras scFv gene was constructed by phage display library from hybridoma KGHR1, and then subcloned into replication-defective adenovirus vector to obtain recombinant adenovirus KGHV100. Human tumor cell lines with high expression of p21Ras SW480, MDA-MB‑231, OVCAR-3, BEL-7402, as well as tumor cell line with low expression of p21Ras, SKOV3, were employed to investigate antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that KGHV100 was able to express intracellularly anti-p21Ras scFv antibody in cultured tumor cells and in transplantation tumor cells. MTT, Transwell, colony formation, and flow cytometry analysis showed that KGHV100 led to significant growth arrest in tumor cells with high p21Ras expression, and induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in the studied tumor cell lines. In vivo, KGHV100 significantly inhibited tumor growth following intratumoral injection, and the survival rates of the mice were higher than the control group. These results indicate that the adenovirus-mediated intracellular expression of the novel anti-p21Ras scFv exerted strong antitumoral effects, and may be a potential method for therapy of cancers with p21Ras overexpression. PMID:26780944

  13. Principles of gene therapy

    Mammen Biju

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Genes are specific sequences of bases that encode instructions to make proteins. When genes are altered so that encoded proteins are unable to carry out their normal functions, genetic disorders can result. Gene therapy is designed to introduce genetic material into cells to compensate for abnormal genes or to make a beneficial protein. This article reviews the fundamentals in gene therapy and its various modes of administration with an insight into the role of gene therapy in Periodontics and future percepts and the technical and ethical issues of using gene therapy.

  14. EFFECTS OF p53 GENE THERAPY COMBINED WITH CYCLOOXYGENASE-2 INHIBITOR ON CYCLOOXYGENASE-2 GENE EXPRESSION AND GROWTH INHIBITION OF HUMAN LUNG CANCER CELLS

    WANG Zhao-Xia; LU Bin-Bin; WANG Teng; YIN Yong-Mei; DE Wei; SHU Yong-Qian

    2007-01-01

    Background Gene therapy by adenovirus-mediated wild-type p53 gene transfer has been shown to inhibit lung cancer growth in vitro, in animal models, and in human clinical trials. The antitumor effect of selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors has been demonstrated in preclinical studies. However, no information is available on the effects of p53 gene therapy combined with selective COX-2 inhibitor on COX-2 gene expression and growth inhibition of human lung cancer cells. Methods We evaluated the effects of recombinant adenovirus-p53 (Ad-p53) gene therapy combined with selective COX-2 inhibitor on the proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell line, and the effects of tumor suppressor exogenous wild type p53 on COX-2 gene expression. Results Ad-p53 gene therapy combined with selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib shows significant synergistic inhibition effects on the growth of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell line. Exogenous p53 gene can suppress COX-2 gene expression. Conclusions Significant synergistic inhibition effects of A549 cell line by the combined Ad-p53 and selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib may be achieved by enhancement of growth inhibition, apoptosis induction and suppression of COX-2 gene expression. This study provides first evidence that the administration of p53 gene therapy in combination with COX-2 inhibitors might be a new clinical strategy for the treatment or prevention of NSCLC.

  15. Cochlear Gene Therapy

    Lustig, Lawrence R.; Akil, Omar

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight recent advances in cochlear gene therapy over the past several years. Cochlear gene therapy has undergone tremendous advances over the past decade. Beginning with some groundbreaking work in 2005 documenting hair cell regeneration using virallymediated delivery of the mouse atonal 1 gene, gene therapy is now being explored as a possible treatment for a variety of causes of hearing loss.

  16. The effect of adenovirus-mediated recombinant Tum5 gene expression on Rhesus retinal vascular endothelial cells under high glucose%腺病毒介导Tum5重组基因对高糖刺激下恒河猴视网膜血管内皮细胞增生、迁移及管腔形成的影响

    杨伟; 张琰; 孙靖; 韩倩; 贾育蓉; 张红

    2015-01-01

    Objective To observe the expression in vitro and the influence of adenovirus-mediated recombinant Tum5 gene to the proliferation,migration and tubing of Rhesus RF/6A cell under high glucose.Methods To construct the adenovirus vector of recombinant Tum5 gene (rAd-TumS),and then infected RF/6A cell with it.The Flow Cytometry was used to detect the infection efficiency.RF/6A cells were divided into normal group,high glucose (HG)-control group (HG group),empty expression vector group (HG+rAd-GFP),and HG+rAd-Tum5 group.Western blot was used to detect the expression of TumS.The CCK-8 test was applied to detect the proliferation of RF/6A cell,the Transwell test was applied to detect the migration and the Matrigel test was applied to detect the tubing of RF/6A cell under high glucose.The proliferation,migration and tubing of RF/6A were tested respectively by CCK-8 test,Transwell test and Matrigel test.Results The adenovirus vector of recombinant Tum5 gene was successfully constructed.The infection efficiency of rAd-Tum5 in RF/6A cell was 50.31% and rAd-GFP was 55.13% by the Flow Cytometry.The results of Western blot indicated that Tum5 was successfully expressed in RF/6A cell.The result of CCK-8 test,Transwell test and Matrigel test indicated that there were statistical differences between all groups in proliferation,migration and tubing of the RF/6A cell (F=44.484,772.666,137.696;P<0.05).The comparison of each group indicated that the HG group was higher than normal group (P< 0.05).There were no statistical differences between HG group and HG+ rAd-GFP group (P>0.05).However,the HG+rAd-Tum5 group was less than HG group (P<0.05),and the same to HG+rAd-GFP (P<0.05).Conclusion The adenovirus vector of recombinant Tum5 gene can inhibit the proliferation,migration and tubing of RF/6A cell under high glucose.%目的 观察腺病毒介导Tum5重组基因对高糖刺激下恒河猴视网膜血管内皮细胞(RF/6A细胞)增生、迁移

  17. Cancer gene therapy

    Mitrović Tatjana; Radulović Siniša

    2005-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy can be defined as transfer of nucleic acids into tumor or normal cells with aim to eradicate or reduce tumor mass by direct killing of cells, immunomodulation or correction of genetic errors, and reversion of malignant status. Initially started with lots of optimism and enthusiasm, cancer gene therapy has shown limited success in treatment of patients. This review highlights current limitations and almost endless possibilities of cancer gene therapy. The major difficulty i...

  18. American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy

    ... Resources Clinical Trials Information Gene Therapy and Cell Therapy Terminology Gene Therapy & Cell Therapy Breakthroughs FAQs Gene Therapy and Cell Therapy Defined Gene Therapy and Cell Therapy for Diseases Sites of ...

  19. Gene Therapy of Cancerous Diseases

    Valenčáková, A.; Dziaková, A.; Hatalová, E.

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy of cancerous diseases provides new means of curing patients with oncologic illnesses. There are several approaches in treating cancer by gene therapy. Most commonly used methods are: cancer immunogene therapy, suicide gene therapy, application of tumor-suppressor genes, antiangiogenic therapy, mesenchymal stem cells used as vectors, gene directed enzyme/prodrug therapy and bacteria used as anti-cancer agents. Cancer gene immunotherapy uses several immunologic agents for the purp...

  20. Gene therapy: An overview

    Sudip Indu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy "the use of genes as medicine" involves the transfer of a therapeutic or working copy of a gene into specific cells of an individual in order to repair a faulty gene copy. The technique may be used to replace a faulty gene, or to introduce a new gene whose function is to cure or to favorably modify the clinical course of a condition. The objective of gene therapy is to introduce new genetic material into target cells while causing no damage to the surrounding healthy cells and tissues, hence the treatment related morbidity is decreased. The delivery system includes a vector that delivers a therapeutic gene into the patient′s target cell. Functional proteins are created from the therapeutic gene causing the cell to return to a normal stage. The vectors used in gene therapy can be viral and non-viral. Gene therapy, an emerging field of biomedicine, is still at infancy and much research remains to be done before this approach to the treatment of condition will realize its full potential.

  1. Adenovirus Vectors for Gene Therapy, Vaccination and Cancer Gene Therapy

    Wold, William S.M.; Toth, Karoly

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are the most commonly employed vector for cancer gene therapy. They are also used for gene therapy and as vaccines to express foreign antigens. Adenovirus vectors can be replication-defective; certain essential viral genes are deleted and replaced by a cassette that expresses a foreign therapeutic gene. Such vectors are used for gene therapy, as vaccines, and for cancer therapy. Replication-competent (oncolytic) vectors are employed for cancer gene therapy. Oncolytic vector...

  2. Adenovirus-mediated Expression of both Antisense Ornithine Decarboxylase and S-adenosylmethionine Decarboxylase Inhibits Lung Cancer Cell Growth

    Hui TIAN; Xianxi LIU; Bing ZHANG; Qifeng SUN; Dongfeng SUN

    2007-01-01

    Polyamine biosynthesis is controlled primarily by ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and Sadenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC). Antisense sequences of ODC and AdoMetDC genes were cloned into an adenoviral vector (named Ad-ODC-AdoMetDCas). To evaluate the effects of recombinant adenovirus Ad-ODC-AdoMetDCas that can simultaneously express both antisense ODC and AdoMetDC,the human lung cancer cell line A-549 was infected with Ad-ODC-AdoMetDCas or the control vector.Viable cell counting, determination of polyamine concentrations, cell cycle analysis, and Matrigel invasion assays were carried out to assess the properties of tumor growth and invasiveness. Our study showed that adenovirus-mediated antisense ODC and AdoMetDC expression inhibits tumor cell growth through blocking the polyamine synthesis pathway. Tumor cells were arrested at the G1 phase after gene transfer and the invasiveness was reduced. It suggested that the recombinant adenovirus Ad-ODC-AdoMetDCas might be a new anticancer reagent in the treatment of lung cancers.

  3. Gene therapy in periodontics

    Anirban Chatterjee; Nidhi Singh; Mini Saluja

    2013-01-01

    GENES are made of DNA - the code of life. They are made up of two types of base pair from different number of hydrogen bonds AT, GC which can be turned into instruction. Everyone inherits genes from their parents and passes them on in turn to their children. Every person′s genes are different, and the changes in sequence determine the inherited differences between each of us. Some changes, usually in a single gene, may cause serious diseases. Gene therapy is ′the use of genes as medicine′. It...

  4. Preclinical Safety and Efficacy of in Situ REIC/Dkk-3 Gene Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Sakaguchi,Masakiyo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The preclinical safety and therapeutic efficacy of adenoviral vectors that express the REIC/Dkk-3 tumor suppressor gene (Ad-REIC was examined for use in prostate cancer gene therapy. The Ad-human (h and mouse (m REIC were previously demonstrated to induce strong anti-cancer effects in vitro and in vivo, and we herein report the results of two in vivo studies. First, intra-tumor Ad-hREIC administration was examined for toxicity and therapeutic effects in a subcutaneous tumor model using the PC3 prostate cancer cell line. Second, intra-prostatic Ad-mREIC administration was tested for toxicity in normal mice. The whole-body and spleen weights, hematological and serum chemistry parameters, and histological evaluation of tissues from throughout the body were analyzed. Both experiments indicated that there was no significant difference in the examined parameters between the Ad-REIC-treated group and the control (PBS- or Ad-LacZ-treated group. In the in vitro analysis using PC3 cells, a significant apoptotic effect was observed after Ad-hREIC treatment. Confirming this observation, the robust anti-tumor efficacy of Ad-hREIC was demonstrated in the in vivo subcutaneous prostate cancer model. Based on the results of these preclinical experiments, we consider the adenovirus-mediated REIC/Dkk-3 in situ gene therapy to be safe and useful for the clinical treatment of prostate cancer.

  5. Gene therapy for thyroid cancer

    Gene therapy for thyroid cancer include immunotherapy, suicide gene therapy, tumor suppressor replacement, 131I therapy by sodium/iodide symporter and antisense therapy and so on. Gene therapy has wide perspectives, but there are many problems need to be solved for clinical application

  6. Delivery Systems in Gene Therapy

    Liu Hu; Anas El-Aneed; Cui Guohui

    2005-01-01

    1 Gene therapy Gene therapy includes the treatment of both genetically based and infectious diseases by introducing genetic materials which have therapeutic effects[1~3]. In its simplest terms, a wild type gene (which is non-functional in the cell leading to disease development) is introduced into the somatic cell lacking this gene to restore the normal gene function in this cell. Many gene therapy strategies, however, utilize genes to destroy specific cells.

  7. Intra-arterial adenoviral mediated tumor transfection in a novel model of cancer gene therapy

    Siemionow Maria

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present study was to develop and characterize a novel in vivo cancer gene therapy model in which intra-arterial adenoviral gene delivery can be characterized. In this model, the rat cremaster muscle serves as the site for tumor growth and provides convenient and isolated access to the tumor parenchyma with discrete control of arterial and venous access for delivery of agents. Results Utilizing adenovirus encoding the green fluorescent protein we demonstrated broad tumor transfection. We also observed a dose dependant increment in luciferase activity at the tumor site using an adenovirus encoding the luciferase reporter gene. Finally, we tested the intra-arterial adenovirus dwelling time required to achieve optimal tumor transfection and observed a minimum time of 30 minutes. Conclusion We conclude that adenovirus mediated tumor transfection grown in the cremaster muscle of athymic nude rats via an intra-arterial route could be achieved. This model allows definition of the variables that affect intra-arterial tumor transfection. This particular study suggests that allowing a defined intra-tumor dwelling time by controlling the blood flow of the affected organ during vector infusion can optimize intra-arterial adenoviral delivery.

  8. 腺病毒介导的白介素-24转移对脂多糖诱导的大鼠肾小球系膜细胞凋亡和周期调节蛋白p21、p27及CyclinE的影响%Effects of adenovirus mediated IL-24 gene transfer on apoptosis and cell cycle regulatory protein p21,p27 and CyclinE of rat gomerular mesangial cells induced by lipopolysaccharide

    王晓浪; 周建华; 王从俊

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of interleukin-24(IL-24)gene transfer on glomerular mesangial cells(GMCs) apoptosis and to find out the effect of IL-24 on cell cycle regulatory protein p21,p27 and CyclinE of GMCs induced by LpS. Methods 293 cells were cultured in 10%FBS/DMEM and Ad. IL-24 and Ad. GFp were amplifycated in 293 cells. GMCs were analysed after 4 to 6 generations. ①They were divided into four groups:control group,Ad. IL-24 group,LpS group and LpS+Ad. IL-24 group. And control group and LpS group werenˊt infected with Ad. IL-24,Ad. IL-24 group and LpS+Ad. IL-24 group GMCs were infected with Ad. IL-24,then LpS+Ad. IL-24 group GMCs were cultured in 5%FBS/DMEM with LpS(10 mg·L-1 ). The apoptosis of the GMCs was examined by AnnexinV/FITC flow cytometry;②The effect of IL-24 on cell cycle regulatory protein p21, p27 and CyclinE of GMCs induced by LpS were determined. They were divided into three groups:control group,Ad-GFp group and IL-24 group. Control group GMCs were cultured in 5%FBS/DMEM. Ad-GFp group GMCs were infected with Ad. GFp and then cultured in 5%FBS/DMEM with LpS(10 mg·L-1 ). GMCs were infected with Ad. IL-24. The expressions of cell cycle regulatory protein p21,p27 and cyclinE were examined by Western-blotting. Results The GMCs were cultured for 24 hours and 48 hours. The apoptosis rate was(0. 86 ± 0. 15)% and(0. 98 ± 0. 4)% in the control group,(1. 02 ± 0. 22)% and(1. 43 ± 0. 31)% in the Ad. IL-24 group,(2. 19 ± 0. 81)% and(2. 49 ± 0. 12)% in the LpS group,(18. 01 ± 1. 17)% and(26. 82 ± 5. 01)% in LpS + Ad. IL-24 group. There was no difference between control group and Ad. IL-24 group,and the apoptosis rate of LpS group was higher than control group(P<0. 05). The apoptosis rate of LpS+Ad. IL-24 group was the highest while there was no change in Ad. IL-24 group(P<0. 05). ②The expressions of p21 and p27 were down-regulated while CyclinE expression was up-regulated in GMC by LpS(P<0. 05). Adenovirus mediated IL-24 gene transfer

  9. Gene therapy for mucopolysaccharidosis

    Ponder, Katherine P.; Haskins, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) are due to deficiencies in activities of lysosomal enzymes that degrade glycosaminoglycans. Some attempts at gene therapy for MPS in animal models have involved intravenous injection of vectors derived from an adeno-associated virus (AAV), adenovirus, retrovirus or a plasmid, which primarily results in expression in liver and secretion of the relevant enzyme into blood. Most vectors can correct disease in liver and spleen, although correction in other organs includ...

  10. Gene therapy of liver cancer

    Hernandez-Alcoceba, R. (Rubén); B. Sangro; Prieto, J.

    2006-01-01

    The application of gene transfer technologies to the treatment of cancer has led to the development of new experimental approaches like gene directed enzyme/pro-drug therapy (GDEPT), inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. In addition, gene therapy has a big impact on other fields like cancer immunotherapy, anti-angiogenic therapy and virotherapy. These strategies are being evaluated for the treatment of primary and metastatic liver cancer and some of them have reac...

  11. nanosheets for gene therapy

    Kou, Zhongyang; Wang, Xin; Yuan, Renshun; Chen, Huabin; Zhi, Qiaoming; Gao, Ling; Wang, Bin; Guo, Zhaoji; Xue, Xiaofeng; Cao, Wei; Guo, Liang

    2014-10-01

    A new class of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterial, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) such as MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2 which have fantastic physical and chemical properties, has drawn tremendous attention in different fields recently. Herein, we for the first time take advantage of the great potential of MoS2 with well-engineered surface as a novel type of 2D nanocarriers for gene delivery and therapy of cancer. In our system, positively charged MoS2-PEG-PEI is synthesized with lipoic acid-modified polyethylene glycol (LA-PEG) and branched polyethylenimine (PEI). The amino end of positively charged nanomaterials can bind to the negatively charged small interfering RNA (siRNA). After detection of physical and chemical characteristics of the nanomaterial, cell toxicity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) was investigated as a well-known oncogene, which was a critical regulator of cell cycle transmission at multiple levels. Through knockdown of PLK1 with siRNA carried by novel nanovector, qPCR and Western blot were used to measure the interfering efficiency; apoptosis assay was used to detect the transfection effect of PLK1. All results showed that the novel nanocarrier revealed good biocompatibility, reduced cytotoxicity, as well as high gene-carrying ability without serum interference, thus would have great potential for gene delivery and therapy.

  12. Gene therapy of liver cancer

    Ruben Hernandez-Alcoceba; Bruno Sangro; Jesus Prieto

    2006-01-01

    The application of gene transfer technologies to the treatment of cancer has led to the development of new experimental approaches like gene directed enzyme/prodrug therapy (GDEPT), inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. In addition,gene therapy has a big impact on other fields like cancer immunotherapy, anti-angiogenic therapy and virotherapy.These strategies are being evaluated for the treatment of primary and metastatic liver cancer and some of them have reached clinical phases. We present a review on the basis and the actual status of gene therapy approaches applied to liver cancer.

  13. Human Gene Therapy: Genes without Frontiers?

    Simon, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the latest advancements and setbacks in human gene therapy to provide reference material for biology teachers to use in their science classes. Focuses on basic concepts such as recombinant DNA technology, and provides examples of human gene therapy such as severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome, familial hypercholesterolemia, and…

  14. Construction of Recombinant Adenovirus Carrying gfp Gene and Adenovirus-mediated GFP Expression in Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells%携带绿色荧光蛋白基因的重组腺病毒的构建及其在人血管平滑肌细胞中的表达

    张蕾; 王家宁; 郭凌郧; 孔霞; 杨建业; 唐俊明; 黄永章; 郑飞

    2009-01-01

    of about 4.5 × 1012pfu/ml.The infection efficiency of aden06rus for hVSMC Was 100%.GFP could be efficiently expressed in hVSMC.Conclusion The recombinant adenovims expressing GFP Was packaged and prepared successfully.The adenovirus could infect hVSMC efficiently and GFP could express very well.This investigation provides a good control vector for study on GFP as a reporter gene in gene therapy of RNA interference.

  15. Gene therapy for psychiatric disorders

    Thome, Johannes; HÄSSLER, FRANK; ZACHARIOU, VANNA

    2011-01-01

    There is no indication that gene therapy can be applied in psychiatric patients any time soon. However, there are several promising developments on the level of experimental neuroscience indicating that gene therapy approaches have an effect in animal models of several psychiatric disorders including drug addiction, affective disorders, psychoses and dementia, modifying behavioural parameters via interventions on the molecular and cellular level. However, before gene therapy in psychiatric di...

  16. Gene Therapy of Cancerous Diseases

    Valenčáková, A.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy of cancerous diseases provides new means of curing patients with oncologic illnesses. There are several approaches in treating cancer by gene therapy. Most commonly used methods are: cancer immunogene therapy, suicide gene therapy, application of tumor-suppressor genes, antiangiogenic therapy, mesenchymal stem cells used as vectors, gene directed enzyme/prodrug therapy and bacteria used as anti-cancer agents. Cancer gene immunotherapy uses several immunologic agents for the purpose of explaining effective anti-tumor immune response. Another method is suicide gene therapy, based on introducing viral or bacterial agents to tumor cells, allowing the conversion of a non-toxic compound to a lethal medication. The application of intact suppressor genes to cancer cells will avert their neoplastic behavior and will induce tumor regression. Inhibition of angiogenesis is also a promising strategy for treating oncologic patients. Mesenchymal stem cells can also be used as vectors in targeted gene therapy. An increasing list of experimental evidence shows, that therapeutically modified mesenchymal stem cells in “gene directed enzyme/prodrug therapy” can attack cancer tissue can kill tumor cells, cancer stem cells included. Bacteria are used as anti-cancer agents independently of in combination with conventional therapeutic methods.

  17. Gene Therapy and Children (For Parents)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Gene Therapy and Children KidsHealth > For Parents > Gene Therapy ... that don't respond to conventional therapies. About Genes Our genes help make us unique. Inherited from ...

  18. Imaging gene expression in gene therapy

    Wiebe, Leonard I. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton (Canada). Noujaim Institute for Pharmaceutical Oncology Research

    1997-12-31

    Full text. Gene therapy can be used to introduce new genes, or to supplement the function of indigenous genes. At the present time, however, there is non-invasive test to demonstrate efficacy of the gene transfer and expression processes. It has been postulated that scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the site at which the transferred gene is expressed, and the degree of expression, both of which are critical issue for safety and clinical efficacy. Many current studies are based on `suicide gene therapy` of cancer. Cells modified to express these genes commit metabolic suicide in the presence of an enzyme encoded by the transferred gene and a specifically-convertible pro drug. Pro drug metabolism can lead to selective metabolic trapping, required for scintigraphy. Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (H S V-1 t k{sup +}) has been use for `suicide` in vivo tumor gene therapy. It has been proposed that radiolabelled nucleosides can be used as radiopharmaceuticals to detect H S V-1 t k{sup +} gene expression where the H S V-1 t k{sup +} gene serves a reporter or therapeutic function. Animal gene therapy models have been studied using purine-([{sup 18} F]F H P G; [{sup 18} F]-A C V), and pyrimidine- ([{sup 123}/{sup 131} I]I V R F U; [{sup 124}/{sup 131I}]) antiviral nucleosides. Principles of gene therapy and gene therapy imaging will be reviewed and experimental data for [{sup 123}/{sup 131I}]I V R F U imaging with the H S V-1 t k{sup +} reporter gene will be presented

  19. Imaging gene expression in gene therapy

    Full text. Gene therapy can be used to introduce new genes, or to supplement the function of indigenous genes. At the present time, however, there is non-invasive test to demonstrate efficacy of the gene transfer and expression processes. It has been postulated that scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the site at which the transferred gene is expressed, and the degree of expression, both of which are critical issue for safety and clinical efficacy. Many current studies are based on 'suicide gene therapy' of cancer. Cells modified to express these genes commit metabolic suicide in the presence of an enzyme encoded by the transferred gene and a specifically-convertible pro drug. Pro drug metabolism can lead to selective metabolic trapping, required for scintigraphy. Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (H S V-1 t k+) has been use for 'suicide' in vivo tumor gene therapy. It has been proposed that radiolabelled nucleosides can be used as radiopharmaceuticals to detect H S V-1 t k+ gene expression where the H S V-1 t k+ gene serves a reporter or therapeutic function. Animal gene therapy models have been studied using purine-([18 F]F H P G; [18 F]-A C V), and pyrimidine- ([123/131 I]I V R F U; [124/131I]) antiviral nucleosides. Principles of gene therapy and gene therapy imaging will be reviewed and experimental data for [123/131I]I V R F U imaging with the H S V-1 t k+ reporter gene will be presented

  20. Adenovirus-mediated p53 gene therapy in human nasopharyngeal cancer%重组人p53腺病毒基因药物对人鼻咽癌细胞的抑制实验

    敖敏; 何刚

    2010-01-01

    目的 探索p53基因在鼻咽癌基因治疗方面的可行性.方法 以人鼻咽癌CNE细胞株为实验对象,将重组人p53腺病毒药物(1010rAd/p53)转染人鼻咽癌CNE细胞,用MTT比色实验及流式细胞仪实验的方法进行体外实验,观察重组人p53腺病毒药物(rAd/p53)对人鼻咽癌CNE细胞体外生长的影响.结果 各浓度重组人p53腺病毒药物(1010rAd/p53、109rAd/p53、108rAd/p53、107rAd/p53)对人鼻咽癌CNE细胞生长有抑制.尤以1010rAd/p53明显.转染3天后,重组人p53腺病毒药物(rAd/p53)诱导人鼻咽癌CNE细胞明显凋亡.结论 重组人p53腺病毒药物(rAd/p53)对人鼻咽癌CNE细胞生长能有效抑制,为鼻咽癌的基因治疗提供了实验依据.

  1. 重组人p53腺病毒药物对人喉癌细胞的抑制实验%ADENOVIRUS-MEDIATED P53 GENE THERAPY OF HUMAN LARYNGEAL CANCER

    敖敏; 何刚; 梁传余

    2007-01-01

    [目的]探索p53基因在喉癌基因治疗方面的可行性.[方法]以人喉癌细胞系Hep-2为实验对象,将重组人p53腺病毒药物(rAd/p53)转染Hep-2细胞,体外实验观察重组人p53腺病毒药物(rAd/p53)对Hep-2细胞生长的影响.[结果]各浓度重组人p53 腺病毒药物(rAd/p53)(1010、109、108、107)对Hep-2生长均有抑制.尤以1010明显.转染3d后,重组人p53腺病毒药物(rAd/p53)诱导Hep-2细胞明显凋亡.[结论]重组人p53腺病毒药物(rAd/p53)对Hep-2细胞生长能有效抑制,能明显诱导其凋亡,为喉癌的治疗提供了临床前依据.

  2. Gene therapy in gastric cancer

    Xu Chang-tai; Guo Xue-gang; Pan Bo-rong

    2003-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction We have reviewed the gene therapy in gastrointestinal diseases[1]. Gastric cancer is common in China[2~20] ,and its early diagnosis andtreatment are still difficult up to now[13~36]. The expression of anexogenous gene introduced by gene therapy into patients with gliomascan be monitored non- invasively by positron- emission tomography[4]. In recent years, gene study in cancer is a hotspot, and great progress hasbeen achieved[33~41].

  3. Gene therapy and radionuclides targeting therapy in mammary carcinoma

    Breast carcinoma's gene therapy is a hotspot in study of the tumor's therapy in the recent years. Currently the major therapy methods that in the experimentative and primary clinical application phases include immunological gene therapy, multidrug resistance gene therapy, antisense oligonucleotide therapy and suicide gene therapy. The gene targeting brachytherapy, which is combined with gene therapy and radiotherapy has enhanced the killer effects of the suicide gene and nuclide in tumor cells. That has break a new path in tumor's gene therapy. The further study in this field will step up it's space to the clinical application

  4. Adenovirus-mediated expression of an elastase-specific inhibitor (elafin): a comparison of different promoters.

    Sallenave, J M; Xing, Z; Simpson, A J; Graham, F L; Gauldie, J

    1998-03-01

    This report describes the design and construction of three recombinant adenoviruses of serotype 5 (Ad5) expressing elafin (EL), also called elastase-specific inhibitor. Three promoters were chosen to drive the synthesis of elafin: the small (380 bp) human cytomegalovirus promoter (HCMV), the Ad2 major late promoter (MLP) and the mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) promoter. Human alveolar epithelial cells (A549), as well as rat and human primary pulmonary fibroblasts were infected with Ad5-HCMV-EL, Ad5-MLP-EL, Ad5-MCMV-EL and with the control Ad5-dl70/3. The MCMV promoter was the most efficient promoter in all cells studied. MLP was the least efficient promoter Intermediate between MCMV and MLP was HCMV which was able to induce significant amounts of elafin, particularly in human A549 cells. When compared in vivo in rat lungs, results were similar; MCMV was the only promoter which induced significant amounts of elafin as assessed by Northern blot analysis and ELISA, even with a low dose of virus (3 x 10(8) p.f.u.). Our data indicate that the MCMV promoter is the promoter of choice for the strong induction of adenovirus-mediated transgenes in the lung and suggest its suitability both in rodent experimental models and in humans for investigative and therapeutic purposes. PMID:9614555

  5. Gene therapy in pancreatic cancer

    Liu, Si-Xue; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Zhong, Ying-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly lethal disease and notoriously difficult to treat. Only a small proportion of PC patients are eligible for surgical resection, whilst conventional chemoradiotherapy only has a modest effect with substantial toxicity. Gene therapy has become a new widely investigated therapeutic approach for PC. This article reviews the basic rationale, gene delivery methods, therapeutic targets and developments of laboratory research and clinical trials in gene therapy of PC...

  6. Gene therapy: progress and predictions

    Collins, Mary; Thrasher, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    The first clinical gene delivery, which involved insertion of a marker gene into lymphocytes from cancer patients, was published 25 years ago. In this review, we describe progress since then in gene therapy. Patients with some inherited single-gene defects can now be treated with their own bone marrow stem cells that have been engineered with a viral vector carrying the missing gene. Patients with inherited retinopathies and haemophilia B can also be treated by local or systemic injection of ...

  7. Gene Therapy for Diseases and Genetic Disorders

    ... Mentor Submit Your Press Release Donate Home ASGCT Gene Therapy for Diseases Gene Therapy has made important ... Among the most notable advancements are the following: Gene Therapy for Genetic Disorders Severe Combined Immune Deficiency ( ...

  8. In vivo comparison of transduction efficiency with recombinant adenovirus-mediated p53 in a human colon cancer mouse model by different delivery routes%rAd/p53不同给药途径治疗人类结肠癌荷瘤鼠模型p53导入效率的在体评价

    Qi Xie; Biling Liang; ling Zhang; Qihua Yang; Xiongfei Gu; Jing Xu; Mingwang Chen

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate transduction efficiency with recombinant adenovirus-mediated p53 (rAd/p53) therapy in a human colon cancer mouse model by intra-tumoral injection and intra-arterial delivery. Methods: The tumor pieces of human colon cancer SW480 were implanted in the livers of 45 nude mice. These mice were administrated with rAd/p53 by intratu-moral injection and intra-arterial delivery. After 24 h, 48 h and 72 h rAd/p53 administration, 5 mice each group were killed with over anesthesia and their livers were removed. P53 expression and apoptosis of tumor and liver were assessed. Results: P53 expression and apoptosis of intratumoral administration group was higher than tail vein group and control group. Apoptosis and p53 expression of livers in three groups had no significant difference. Conclusion: p53 gene transduction efficiency and anticancer effect of tAd/p53 is much better by intra-tumoral injection than intra-arterial delivery.

  9. Gene Therapy for Parkinson's Disease

    Rachel Denyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Current pharmacological and surgical treatments for Parkinson's disease offer symptomatic improvements to those suffering from this incurable degenerative neurological disorder, but none of these has convincingly shown effects on disease progression. Novel approaches based on gene therapy have several potential advantages over conventional treatment modalities. These could be used to provide more consistent dopamine supplementation, potentially providing superior symptomatic relief with fewer side effects. More radically, gene therapy could be used to correct the imbalances in basal ganglia circuitry associated with the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, or to preserve or restore dopaminergic neurons lost during the disease process itself. The latter neuroprotective approach is the most exciting, as it could theoretically be disease modifying rather than simply symptom alleviating. Gene therapy agents using these approaches are currently making the transition from the laboratory to the bedside. This paper summarises the theoretical approaches to gene therapy for Parkinson's disease and the findings of clinical trials in this rapidly changing field.

  10. Construction of recombinant adenovirus vector containing AFP and generation of adenovirus-mediated AFP gene modified dendritic cells vaccine%含人AFP基因重组腺病毒载体的构建及其转染树突状细胞瘤苗的制备

    杨静悦; 曹大勇; 刘文超; 斯小明

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To construct recombinant adenovirus vectors containing human AFP genes,and infect dendritic cell. Methods: Full length AFP cDNAs were subcloned into pIND vector,followed by being cloned into shuttle2 vector.The AFP gene fragments resulted from the shuttle2-AFP digested with PI-Sce and I-Ceu were linked to the linear adeno-X virus DNA.After packaged with HEK293 cells,the adenovirus expression vector was obtained.The plasmid pAdeno-AFP was identified by endonuclease and PCR.After dendritic cells were infected pAdeno-AFP,the surface molecules of pAdeno-AFP/DC were analysed by flow cytometry.AFP levels in culture supernatant of pAdeno-AFP/DC were measured by ELISA. Results: AFP gene in the inserted DNA of adeno-AFP was confirmed by PCR,and predictive fragments proved by restriction enzyme digestion analysis were exhibited.All the above results indicated that human AFP gene had been connected with pAdeno-X vectors correctly.The recombinant adenovirus vector of human AFP gene packaged in HEK293 cells,it will be used to introduce the target gene into dendritic cell.pAdeno-AFP/DC were able to upregulate CD1a,CD11c,CD80,CD86 and HLA-DR.And pAdeno-AFP/DC could secrete high level of AFP in vitro. Conclusion: The recombinant adenovirus vector of human AFP gene have been constructed successfully.The established AFP -DC vaccine may be a tool of the hepatocellular carcinoma immunotherapy,and it will be the foundation of future clinical use of DC vaccine.%目的:构建含人AFP基因的腺病毒载体,体外转染树突状细胞,制备树突状细胞肝癌瘤苗.方法: 将AFP基因亚克隆到pIND 载体和Shuttle2载体中,构建穿梭载体Shuttle2-AFP.用PI-Sce Ⅰ和I-CeuⅠ双酶切后将所获AFP基因片段再与线性化的腺病毒载体pAdeno-X连接,构成pAdeno-AFP重组腺病毒载体.其后,用重组腺病毒载体转染HEK293细胞,包装腺病毒表达载体.通过酶切、PCR对腺病毒载体进行鉴定.包装好的重组病毒载体pAdeno-AFP体外

  11. Gene therapy in clinical medicine

    Selkirk, S

    2004-01-01

    Although the field of gene therapy has experienced significant setbacks and limited success, it is one of the most promising and active research fields in medicine. Interest in this therapeutic modality is based on the potential for treatment and cure of some of the most malignant and devastating diseases affecting humans. Over the next decade, the relevance of gene therapy to medical practices will increase and it will become important for physicians to understand the basic principles and st...

  12. Gene therapy and radiotherapy in malignant tumor

    Tumor treatment is one of the most important fields in medical research. Nowadays, a novel method which is combined gene therapy with radiotherapy plays an important role in the field of cancer research, and mainly includes immune gene therapy combined with radiotherapy, suicide gene therapy or tumor suppressor gene therapy combined with radiotherapy, antiangiogenesis gene therapy combined with radiotherapy and protective gene therapy combined with radiotherapy based on the technical features. This review summarized the current status of combined therapies of gene therapy and radiotherapy and possible mechanism. (authors)

  13. Adenovirus-mediated expression of UHRF1 reduces the radiosensitivity of cervical cancer HeLa cells to γ-irradiation

    Xin-li LI; Qing-hui MENG; Sai-jun FAN

    2009-01-01

    Aim:An in vitro study was carried out to determine the effect of UHRF1 overexpression on radiosensitivity in human cervical cancer HeLa ceUs using adenovirus-mediated UHRF1 gene transfer (Ad5-UHRF1). Methods: Cell survival was evaluated using the clonogenic survival assay and the MTT assay; apoptosis and cell cycle distribution were monitored by flow cytometry. Protein levels were measured by Western blotting. Silencing XRCC4 expression was performed by transfection of small interfering RNA (siRNA).Results: Increased expression of UHRF1 by AdS-UHRF1 significantly reduced the radiosensitivity of HeLa cells. The UHRF1-mediated radioresistance was correlated with increased DNA repair capability and increased expression of the DNA damage repair protein, XRCC4. Knocking down XRCC4 expression in the cells using XRCC4 siRNA markedly reduced the UHRFl-mediated radioresistance. Conclusion: These results provide the first evidence for revealing a functional role of UHRF1 in human cervical cancer cells as a negative regulator of radiosensitivity.

  14. Gene Therapy Used in Cancer Treatment

    Thomas Wirth; Seppo Ylä-Herttuala

    2014-01-01

    Cancer has been, from the beginning, a target of intense research for gene therapy approaches. Currently, more than 60% of all on-going clinical gene therapy trials worldwide are targeting cancer. Indeed, there is a clear unmet medical need for novel therapies. This is further urged by the fact that current conventional cancer therapies are frequently troubled by their toxicities. Different gene therapy strategies have been employed for cancer, such as pro-drug activating suicide gene therapy...

  15. Delivery systems for gene therapy

    Shrikant Mali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of DNA was unraveled by Watson and Crick in 1953, and two decades later Arber, Nathans and Smith discovered DNA restriction enzymes, which led to the rapid growth in the field of recombinant DNA technology. From expressing cloned genes in bacteria to expressing foreign DNA in transgenic animals, DNA is now slated to be used as a therapeutic agent to replace defective genes in patients suffering from genetic disorders or to kill tumor cells in cancer patients. Gene therapy provides modern medicine with new perspectives that were unthinkable two decades ago. Progress in molecular biology and especially, molecular medicine is now changing the basics of clinical medicine. A variety of viral and non-viral possibilities are available for basic and clinical research. This review summarizes the delivery routes and methods for gene transfer used in gene therapy.

  16. Human germline gene therapy reconsidered.

    Resnik, D B; Langer, P J

    2001-07-20

    This paper reevaluates the notion of human germline gene therapy (HGLGT) in light of developments in biomedicine, biotechnology, and ethical and policy analysis. The essay makes the following key points. First, because the distinction among "therapy," "prevention," and "enhancement" is not clear in human genetics, "gene therapy" is an inadequate descriptor of the process and goals of germline genetic alterations. The alternate use of the phrase "human germline genome modification" (HGLGM) could avoid a misleading label. Second, procedures that could be construed as genetic "enhancement" may not be as morally problematic as some have supposed, once one understands that the boundaries between therapy, prevention, and enhancement are not obvious in genetic medicine. Third, HGLGM might be the medically and morally most appropriate way of avoiding the birth of a child with a genetic disease in only a small range of cases. Fourth, there are still many ethical and scientific problems relating to the safety and efficacy of HGLGM. PMID:11485636

  17. GENE THERAPY FOR VENTRICULAR TACHYARRHYTHMIAS

    Donahue, J. Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac arrest is the leading cause of death in the United States and other developed countries. Ventricular tachyarrhythmias are the most prominent cause of cardiac arrest, and patients with structural heart disease are at increased risk for these abnormal heart rhythms. Drug and device therapy have important limitations that make them inadequate to meet this challenge. We and others have proposed development of arrhythmia gene therapy as an alternative to current treatment methods. In this ...

  18. Gene therapy for Parkinson's disease.

    Lawlor, Patricia A; During, Matthew J

    2004-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a debilitating neurodegenerative disorder arising from loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and subsequent depletion of striatal dopamine levels, which results in distressing motor symptoms. The current standard pharmacological treatment for PD is direct replacement of dopamine by treatment with its precursor, levodopa (L-dopa). However, this does not significantly alter disease progression and might contribute to the ongoing pathology. Several features of PD make this disease one of the most promising targets for clinical gene therapy of any neurological disease. The confinement of the major pathology to a compact, localised neuronal population and the anatomy of the basal ganglia circuitry mean that global gene transfer is not required and there are well-defined sites for gene transfer. The multifactorial aetiology of idiopathic PD means that it is unlikely any single gene will cure the disease, and as a result at least three separate gene-transfer strategies are currently being pursued: transfer of genes for enzymes involved in dopamine production; transfer of genes for growth factors involved in dopaminergic cell survival and regeneration; and transfer of genes to reset neuronal circuitry by switching cellular phenotype. The merits of these strategies are discussed here, along with remaining hurdles that might impede transfer of gene therapy technology to the clinic as a treatment for PD. PMID:15000692

  19. Progress in Gene Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    KamranAliAhmed; BrianJamesDavis; TorrenceMWilson; GregoryAWiseman; MarkJFederspiel; JohnCMorris

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy has held promise to correct various disease processes. Prostate cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. A number of clinical trials involving gene therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer have been reported. The ability to efficiently transduce tumors with effective levels of therapeutic genes has been identified as a fundamental barrier to effective cancer gene therapy. The approach utilizing gene therapy in prostate cancer patients at our...

  20. Ethics of Gene Therapy Debated.

    Borman, Stu

    1991-01-01

    Presented are the highlights of a press conference featuring biomedical ethicist LeRoy Walters of Georgetown University and attorney Andrew Kimbrell of the Foundation on Economic Trends. The opposing points of view of these two speakers serve to outline the pros and cons of the gene therapy issue. (CW)

  1. Measurement of feline cytokines interleukin-12 and interferon- g produced by heat inducible gene therapy adenoviral vector using real time PCR

    Biologic tumor therapy using Interleukin-12 (IL-12) has shown promise as an adjuvant to radiation therapy. The goals for cancer gene immunotherapy include effective eradication of established tumors and generation of a lasting systemic immune response. Among the cytokines, IL-12 has been found to be most effective gene in eradicating experimental tumors, preventing the development of metastases, and eliciting long-term antitumor immunity. Depending on the tumor model, IL-12 can exert antitumor activities via T cells, NK cells or NKT cells. It induces the production of IFN-g and IFN-inducible protein-10. It is also postulated to have antiangiogenic effects, thus inhibiting tumor formation and metastases. However, its use in clinical trials has been restricted largely owing to its systemic hematologic and hepatotoxicity. We tested the efficacy of adenovirus mediated expression of feline IL-12 gene placed under the control of an inducible promoter, the heat shock proteins (hsp70B). This places gene expression under the control of an external physical agent (hyperthermia), thus offering an 'on-off' switch and potentially reducing systemic toxicity by restricting its expression locally to the tumor. Crandell Feline Kidney (CrFK) cells were infected using the construct and the supernatant was then used to stimulate production of interferon g (IFN-g) in feline peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). As there is no commercially available ELISA kit currently available to detect or measure feline cytokines, we used real time-PCR to measure cytokine mRNA. These results will be used to initiate a clinical trial in cats with soft tissue sarcomas examining hyperthermia Induced gene therapy in conjunction with radiation therapy. The real time- PCR techniques developed here will be used to quantitatively measure cytokine mRNA levels in the punch biopsy samples obtained from the cats during the clinical trial. Support for this study was in part by NCI grant CA72745

  2. Gene therapy in lung transplantation.

    Sato, Masaaki; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2006-08-01

    Lung transplantation is effective life-saving therapy for the treatment of a variety of end-stage lung diseases. However, the application of lung transplantation is hindered by multiple factors such as the shortage of organ donors, early graft failure and chronic graft dysfunction. These problems are related to various lung injuries before and after transplantation including donor brain-death-related lung injury, ischemia, reperfusion and immune-mediated injuries. Gene transfection presents a potential molecular therapeutic solution to modify the transplanted organ such that it is better able to deal with these obstacles. In fact, in many ways lung transplantation is an ideal situation for gene therapy in that: 1) the targeted injuries are predictable (e.g. IR injury), 2) only transient gene expression is needed in many instances, 3) the immunosuppressive regimen necessary to prevent rejection of the transplanted organ attenuates vector-induced inflammation and the immune response to the vectors or the transgene products, and thus effectively augments and prolongs gene expression; 4) the anatomical structure of the lung enables trans-airway access and local gene delivery - as well as re-transfection. A number of issues need to be considered to develop a strategy of gene delivery in lung transplantation: administration route (intra-airway, trans-vascular, intravenous, intramuscular), timing (donor in-vivo, ex-vivo organ transfection or recipient), vector selection and gene selection. Based on our work and the work of others, over the last decade, we present the state of art of in gene therapy in lung transplantation and exciting future directions in the field. PMID:16918334

  3. Gene Therapy for Bone Engineering

    Balmayor, Elizabeth Rosado; van Griensven, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Bone has an intrinsic healing capacity that may be exceeded when the fracture gap is too big or unstable. In that moment, osteogenic measures need to be taken by physicians. It is important to combine cells, scaffolds and growth factors, and the correct mechanical conditions. Growth factors are clinically administered as recombinant proteins. They are, however, expensive and needed in high supraphysiological doses. Moreover, their half-life is short when administered to the fracture. Therefore, gene therapy may be an alternative. Cells can constantly produce the protein of interest in the correct folding, with the physiological glycosylation and in the needed amounts. Genes can be delivered in vivo or ex vivo by viral or non-viral methods. Adenovirus is mostly used. For the non-viral methods, hydrogels and recently sonoporation seem to be promising means. This review will give an overview of recent advancements in gene therapy approaches for bone regeneration strategies. PMID:25699253

  4. Gene Therapy for Coagulation Disorders.

    Swystun, Laura L; Lillicrap, David

    2016-04-29

    Molecular genetic details of the human coagulation system were among the first successes of the genetic revolution in the 1980s. This information led to new molecular diagnostic strategies for inherited disorders of hemostasis and the development of recombinant clotting factors for the treatment of the common inherited bleeding disorders. A longer term goal of this knowledge has been the establishment of gene transfer to provide continuing access to missing or defective hemostatic proteins. Because of the relative infrequency of inherited coagulation factor disorders and the availability of safe and effective alternative means of management, the application of gene therapy for these conditions has been slow to realize clinical application. Nevertheless, the tools for effective and safe gene transfer are now much improved, and we have started to see examples of clinical gene therapy successes. Leading the way has been the use of adeno-associated virus-based strategies for factor IX gene transfer in hemophilia B. Several small phase 1/2 clinical studies using this approach have shown prolonged expression of therapeutically beneficial levels of factor IX. Nevertheless, before the application of gene therapy for coagulation disorders becomes widespread, several obstacles need to be overcome. Immunologic responses to the vector and transgenic protein need to be mitigated, and production strategies for clinical grade vectors require enhancements. There is little doubt that with the development of more efficient and facile strategies for genome editing and the application of other nucleic acid-based approaches to influence the coagulation system, the future of genetic therapies for hemostasis is bright. PMID:27126652

  5. Gene therapy for gastric cancer: A review

    Chao Zhang; Zhan-Kui Liu

    2003-01-01

    Gastric cancer is common in China, and its early diagnosis and treatment are difficult. In recent years great progress has been achieved in gene therapy, and a wide array of gene therapy systems for gastric cancer has been investigated. The present article deals with the general principles of gene therapy and then focuses on how these principles may be applied to gastric cancer.

  6. Advancement and prospects of tumor gene therapy

    Zhang, Chao; Wang, Qing-Tao; Liu, He; Zhang, Zhen-Zhu; Huang, Wen-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy is one of the most attractive fields in tumor therapy. In past decades, significant progress has been achieved. Various approaches, such as viral and non-viral vectors and physical methods, have been developed to make gene delivery safer and more efficient. Several therapeutic strategies have evolved, including gene-based (tumor suppressor genes, suicide genes, antiangiogenic genes, cytokine and oxidative stress-based genes) and RNA-based (antisense oligonucleotides and RNA inter...

  7. Adenovirus Mediated BIMS Transfer Induces Growth Supression and Apoptosis in Raji Lymphoma Cells

    ZHAO Ya Ning; LI Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Objective To transfer pro-apoptotic BIM directly into tumor cells bypass the complicated biological processes of BIM activation so as to reverse the chemoresistance of cancer cells. Methods BIMS was specifically amplified from HL-60 cells by RT-PCR, confirmed to be correct by sequencing and cloned into shuttle vector pAdTrack-CMV carrying a green fluorescence protein gene to generate a recombinant plasmid pAdTrack-CMV-BIMS. This plasmid and adenovirus backbone plasmid pAdEasy-1 were linearized and electroporated into E.coli BJ5183 host bacteria to mediate homologous recombination. The positive clone was identified by restrict endonuclease digestion. The recombinant pAdEasy-CMV-BIMS was transferred into HEK293 cells for packaging and amplification. The successful construction of recombinant human BIMS adenovirus (Ad-BIMS) was demonstrated by Western blot. To test whether Ad-BIMS has the capability of inducing apoptosis of tumor cells, Ad-BIMS was used to infect GC resistant Burkitt lymphoma Raji cells. Results After infected for 2-5 days, BIMS expression in Raji cells was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot. The significant growth retardation and apoptosis of Raji cells were also observed by MTT and flow cytometry. Conclusion These results indicated that BIMS might be a potential candidate of gene therapy for chemoresistant tumor cells.

  8. Gene Therapy in Human Breast Cancer

    Abaan, Ogan D.

    2002-01-01

    Gene therapy, being a novel treatment for many diseases, is readily applicable for the treatment of cancer patients. Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. There are many clinical protocols for the treatment of breast cancer, and gene therapy is now being considered within current protocols. This review will focus on the basic concepts of cancer gene therapy strategies (suicide gene, tumor suppressor gene, anti-angiogenesis, immunotherapy, oncolytic viruses and ribozyme/antisens...

  9. Orthopedic Gene Therapy in 2008

    Evans, Christopher H.; Ghivizzani, Steven C; Robbins, Paul D.

    2008-01-01

    Orthopedic disorders, although rarely fatal, are the leading cause of morbidity and impose a huge socioeconomic burden. Their prevalence will increase dramatically as populations age and gain weight. Many orthopedic conditions are difficult to treat by conventional means; however, they are good candidates for gene therapy. Clinical trials have already been initiated for arthritis and the aseptic loosening of prosthetic joints, and the development of bone-healing applications is at an advanced...

  10. Phoenix rising: gene therapy makes a comeback

    Maria P.Limberis

    2012-01-01

    Despite the first application of gene therapy in 1990,gene therapy has until recently failed to meet the huge expectations set forth by researchers,clinicians,and patients,thus dampening enthusiasm for an imminent cure for many life-threatening genetic diseases.Nonetheless,in recent years we have witnessed a strong comeback for gene therapy,with clinical successes in young and adult subjects suffering from inherited forms of blindness or from X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disease.In this review,various gene therapy vectors progressing into clinical development and pivotal advances in gene therapy trials will be discussed.

  11. Gene Therapy Used in Cancer Treatment

    Thomas Wirth

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cancer has been, from the beginning, a target of intense research for gene therapy approaches. Currently, more than 60% of all on-going clinical gene therapy trials worldwide are targeting cancer. Indeed, there is a clear unmet medical need for novel therapies. This is further urged by the fact that current conventional cancer therapies are frequently troubled by their toxicities. Different gene therapy strategies have been employed for cancer, such as pro-drug activating suicide gene therapy, anti-angiogenic gene therapy, oncolytic virotherapy, gene therapy-based immune modulation, correction/compensation of gene defects, genetic manipulation of apoptotic and tumor invasion pathways, antisense, and RNAi strategies. Cancer types, which have been targeted with gene therapy, include brain, lung, breast, pancreatic, liver, colorectal, prostate, bladder, head and neck, skin, ovarian, and renal cancer. Currently, two cancer gene therapy products have received market approval, both of which are in China. In addition, the stimulation of the host’s immune system, using gene therapeutic approaches, has gained vast interest. The intention of this review is to point out the most commonly viral and non-viral vectors and methods used in cancer gene therapy, as well as highlight some key results achieved in clinical trials.

  12. Advancement and prospects of tumor gene therapy

    Chao Zhang; Qing-Tao Wang; He Liu; Zhen-Zhu Zhang; Wen-Lin Huang

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy is one of the most attractive fields in tumor therapy. In past decades, significant progress has been achieved. Various approaches, such as viral and non-viral vectors and physical methods, have been developed to make gene delivery safer and more efficient. Several therapeutic strategies have evolved, including gene-based (tumor suppressor genes, suicide genes, antiangiogenic genes, cytokine and oxidative stress-based genes) and RNA-based (antisense oligonucieotides and RNA interference) approaches. In addition, immune response-based strategies (dendritic cell- and T cell-based therapy) are also under investigation in tumor gene therapy. This review highlights the progress and recent developments in gene delivery systems, therapeutic strategies, and possible clinical directions for gene therapy.

  13. Vector development for suicide gene therapy

    Aints, Alar

    2002-01-01

    Gene therapy is used to treat conditions that arise from errors in the genetic makeup of cells either congenital diseases resulting from a deletion or mutation in a gene or malignant diseases where genetic regulation mechanisms have been deranged. Suicide gene therapy is one of several gene therapeutic approaches to treat cancer. A suicide gene is a gene encoding a protein, frequently an enzyme, that in itself is non-toxic to the genetically modified cell. However, when ...

  14. Viral vectors for vascular gene therapy

    Fischer, Lukas; Preis, Meir; Weisz, Anat; Koren, Belly; Lewis, Basil S; Flugelman, Moshe Y

    2002-01-01

    Vascular gene therapy is the focus of multiple experimental and clinical research efforts. While several genes with therapeutic potential have been identified, the best method of gene delivery is unknown. Viral vectors have the capacity to transfer genes at high efficiency rates. Several viral-based vectors have been used in experimental vascular gene therapy for in vivo and ex vivo gene transfer. Adenoviral-based vectors are being used for the induction of angiogenesis in phase 1 and 2 clini...

  15. Gene Therapy For Ischemic Heart Disease

    Lavu, Madhav; Gundewar, Susheel; Lefer, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Current pharmacologic therapy for ischemic heart disease suffers multiple limitations such as compliance issues and side effects of medications. Revascularization procedures often end with need for repeat procedures. Patients remain symptomatic despite maximal medical therapy. Gene therapy offers an attractive alternative to current pharmacologic therapies and may be beneficial in refractory disease. Gene therapy with isoforms of growth factors such as VEGF, FGF and HGF induces angiogenesis, ...

  16. Gensko zdravljenje raka: Cancer gene therapy:

    Serša, Gregor; Čemažar, Maja; KOČEVAR, NINA

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy uses genes to treat diseases. Large amount of research is based on cancer because current methods for cancer treatment have limited efficiencyand unwanted side effects. In the following article we first presentthe basic principles of gene therapy. Next, we describe the main delivery systems, which are viral and non-viral, and then the main therapeuticstrategies of cancer gene therapy. These can be divided into immunological, where we take advantage of the immune system for cancer...

  17. Gene therapy and its implications in Periodontics

    Mahale Swapna; Dani Nitin; Ansari Shumaila; Kale Triveni

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy is a field of Biomedicine. With the advent of gene therapy in dentistry, significant progress has been made in the control of periodontal diseases and reconstruction of dento-alveolar apparatus. Implementation in periodontics include: -As a mode of tissue engineering with three approaches: cell, protein-based and gene delivery approach. -Genetic approach to Biofilm Antibiotic Resistance. Future strategies of gene therapy in preventing periodontal diseases: -Enhances host defense...

  18. Gene therapy for prostate cancer.

    Tangney, Mark

    2012-01-31

    Cancer remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Despite advances in understanding, detection, and treatment, it accounts for almost one-fourth of all deaths per year in Western countries. Prostate cancer is currently the most commonly diagnosed noncutaneous cancer in men in Europe and the United States, accounting for 15% of all cancers in men. As life expectancy of individuals increases, it is expected that there will also be an increase in the incidence and mortality of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer may be inoperable at initial presentation, unresponsive to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, or recur following appropriate treatment. At the time of presentation, patients may already have metastases in their tissues. Preventing tumor recurrence requires systemic therapy; however, current modalities are limited by toxicity or lack of efficacy. For patients with such metastatic cancers, the development of alternative therapies is essential. Gene therapy is a realistic prospect for the treatment of prostate and other cancers, and involves the delivery of genetic information to the patient to facilitate the production of therapeutic proteins. Therapeutics can act directly (eg, by inducing tumor cells to produce cytotoxic agents) or indirectly by upregulating the immune system to efficiently target tumor cells or by destroying the tumor\\'s vasculature. However, technological difficulties must be addressed before an efficient and safe gene medicine is achieved (primarily by developing a means of delivering genes to the target cells or tissue safely and efficiently). A wealth of research has been carried out over the past 20 years, involving various strategies for the treatment of prostate cancer at preclinical and clinical trial levels. The therapeutic efficacy observed with many of these approaches in patients indicates that these treatment modalities will serve as an important component of urological malignancy treatment in the clinic, either in isolation or

  19. Gene therapy for prostate cancer.

    Tangney, Mark; Ahmad, Sarfraz; Collins, Sara A; O'Sullivan, Gerald C

    2010-05-01

    Cancer remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Despite advances in understanding, detection, and treatment, it accounts for almost one-fourth of all deaths per year in Western countries. Prostate cancer is currently the most commonly diagnosed noncutaneous cancer in men in Europe and the United States, accounting for 15% of all cancers in men. As life expectancy of individuals increases, it is expected that there will also be an increase in the incidence and mortality of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer may be inoperable at initial presentation, unresponsive to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, or recur following appropriate treatment. At the time of presentation, patients may already have metastases in their tissues. Preventing tumor recurrence requires systemic therapy; however, current modalities are limited by toxicity or lack of efficacy. For patients with such metastatic cancers, the development of alternative therapies is essential. Gene therapy is a realistic prospect for the treatment of prostate and other cancers, and involves the delivery of genetic information to the patient to facilitate the production of therapeutic proteins. Therapeutics can act directly (eg, by inducing tumor cells to produce cytotoxic agents) or indirectly by upregulating the immune system to efficiently target tumor cells or by destroying the tumor's vasculature. However, technological difficulties must be addressed before an efficient and safe gene medicine is achieved (primarily by developing a means of delivering genes to the target cells or tissue safely and efficiently). A wealth of research has been carried out over the past 20 years, involving various strategies for the treatment of prostate cancer at preclinical and clinical trial levels. The therapeutic efficacy observed with many of these approaches in patients indicates that these treatment modalities will serve as an important component of urological malignancy treatment in the clinic, either in isolation or

  20. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging for cardiac gene therapy

    Inubushi, Masayuki [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Molecular Imaging, Sapporo (Japan); Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2007-06-15

    In the field of cardiac gene therapy, angiogenic gene therapy has been most extensively investigated. The first clinical trial of cardiac angiogenic gene therapy was reported in 1998, and at the peak, more than 20 clinical trial protocols were under evaluation. However, most trials have ceased owing to the lack of decisive proof of therapeutic effects and the potential risks of viral vectors. In order to further advance cardiac angiogenic gene therapy, remaining open issues need to be resolved: there needs to be improvement of gene transfer methods, regulation of gene expression, development of much safer vectors and optimisation of therapeutic genes. For these purposes, imaging of gene expression in living organisms is of great importance. In radionuclide reporter gene imaging, ''reporter genes'' transferred into cell nuclei encode for a protein that retains a complementary ''reporter probe'' of a positron or single-photon emitter; thus expression of the reporter genes can be imaged with positron emission tomography or single-photon emission computed tomography. Accordingly, in the setting of gene therapy, the location, magnitude and duration of the therapeutic gene co-expression with the reporter genes can be monitored non-invasively. In the near future, gene therapy may evolve into combination therapy with stem/progenitor cell transplantation, so-called cell-based gene therapy or gene-modified cell therapy. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging is now expected to contribute in providing evidence on the usefulness of this novel therapeutic approach, as well as in investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying neovascularisation and safety issues relevant to further progress in conventional gene therapy. (orig.)

  1. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging for cardiac gene therapy

    In the field of cardiac gene therapy, angiogenic gene therapy has been most extensively investigated. The first clinical trial of cardiac angiogenic gene therapy was reported in 1998, and at the peak, more than 20 clinical trial protocols were under evaluation. However, most trials have ceased owing to the lack of decisive proof of therapeutic effects and the potential risks of viral vectors. In order to further advance cardiac angiogenic gene therapy, remaining open issues need to be resolved: there needs to be improvement of gene transfer methods, regulation of gene expression, development of much safer vectors and optimisation of therapeutic genes. For these purposes, imaging of gene expression in living organisms is of great importance. In radionuclide reporter gene imaging, ''reporter genes'' transferred into cell nuclei encode for a protein that retains a complementary ''reporter probe'' of a positron or single-photon emitter; thus expression of the reporter genes can be imaged with positron emission tomography or single-photon emission computed tomography. Accordingly, in the setting of gene therapy, the location, magnitude and duration of the therapeutic gene co-expression with the reporter genes can be monitored non-invasively. In the near future, gene therapy may evolve into combination therapy with stem/progenitor cell transplantation, so-called cell-based gene therapy or gene-modified cell therapy. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging is now expected to contribute in providing evidence on the usefulness of this novel therapeutic approach, as well as in investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying neovascularisation and safety issues relevant to further progress in conventional gene therapy. (orig.)

  2. GENE THERAPY AND ITS IMPLICATIONS IN SPORTS

    Biljana Vitošević

    2011-01-01

    Thanks to the very successful Human Genome Project and the identification of genes involved in genetic disease, we now have the ability to treat many conditions. However, the identification of the genes which code certain phenotype characteristics has opened the way for abuse in the fields of sport and physical exercise. The principles of gene therapy and the ways in which genes are transferred have completely been copied from gene therapy and are now being used to increase the physical abili...

  3. Somatic gene therapy for hypertension

    Phillips M.I.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy for hypertension is needed for the next generation of antihypertensive drugs. Current drugs, although effective, have poor compliance, are expensive and short-lasting (hours or one day. Gene therapy offers a way to produce long-lasting antihypertensive effects (weeks, months or years. We are currently using two strategies: a antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AS-ODN and b antisense DNA delivered in viral vectors to inhibit genes associated with vasoconstrictive properties. It is not necessary to know all the genes involved in hypertension, since many years of experience with drugs show which genes need to be controlled. AS-ODN are short, single-stranded DNA that can be injected in naked form or in liposomes. AS-ODN, targeted to angiotensin type 1 receptors (AT1-R, angiotensinogen (AGT, angiotensin converting enzyme, and ß1-adrenergic receptors effectively reduce hypertension in rat models (SHR, 2K-1C and cold-induced hypertension. A single dose is effective up to one month when delivered with liposomes. No side effects or toxic effects have been detected, and repeated injections can be given. For the vector, adeno-associated virus (AAV is used with a construct to include a CMV promoter, antisense DNA to AGT or AT1-R and a reporter gene. Results in SHR demonstrate reduction and slowing of development of hypertension, with a single dose administration. Left ventricular hypertrophy is also reduced by AAV-AGT-AS treatment. Double transgenic mice (human renin plus human AGT with high angiotensin II causing high blood pressure, treated with AAV-AT1-R-AS, show a normalization of blood pressure for over six months with a single injection of vector. We conclude that ODNs will probably be developed first because they can be treated like drugs for the treatment of hypertension with long-term effects. Viral vector delivery needs more engineering to be certain of its safety, but one day may be used for a very prolonged control of blood pressure.

  4. Adenovirus-mediated siRNA targeting CXCR2 attenuates titanium particle-induced osteolysis by suppressing osteoclast formation.

    Wang, Chen; Liu, Yang; Wang, Yang; Li, Hao; Zhang, Ran-Xi; He, Mi-Si; Chen, Liang; Wu, Ning-Ning; Liao, Yong; Deng, Zhong-Liang

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Wear particle-induced peri-implant loosening is the most common complication affecting long-term outcomes in patients who undergo total joint arthroplasty. Wear particles and by-products from joint replacements may cause chronic local inflammation and foreign body reactions, which can in turn lead to osteolysis. Thus, inhibiting the formation and activity of osteoclasts may improve the functionality and long-term success of total joint arthroplasty. The aim of this study was to interfere with CXC chemokine receptor type 2 (CXCR2) to explore its role in wear particle-induced osteolysis. MATERIAL AND METHODS Morphological and biochemical assays were used to assess osteoclastogenesis in vivo and in vitro. CXCR2 was upregulated in osteoclast formation. RESULTS Local injection with adenovirus-mediated siRNA targeting CXCR2 inhibited titanium-induced osteolysis in a mouse calvarial model in vivo. Furthermore, siCXCR2 suppressed osteoclast formation both directly by acting on osteoclasts themselves and indirectly by altering RANKL and OPG expression in osteoblasts in vitro. CONCLUSIONS CXCR2 plays a critical role in particle-induced osteolysis, and siCXCR2 may be a novel treatment for aseptic loosening. PMID:26939934

  5. Progress in gene therapy for prostate cancer

    KamranAliAhmed

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy has held promise to correct various disease processes. Prostate cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. A number of clinical trials involving gene therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer have been reported. The ability to efficiently transduce tumors with effective levels of therapeutic genes has been identified as a fundamental barrier to effective cancer gene therapy. The approach utilizing gene therapy in prostate cancer patients at our institution attempts to address this deficiency. The sodium-iodide symporter (NIS is responsible for the ability of the thyroid gland to transport and concentrate iodide. The characteristics of the NIS gene suggest that it could represent an ideal therapeutic gene for cancer therapy. Published results from Mayo Clinic researchers have indicated several important successes with the use of the NIS gene and prostate gene therapy. Studies have demonstrated that transfer of the human NIS gene into prostate cancer using adenovirus vectors in vitro and in vivo results in efficient uptake of radioactive iodine and significant tumor growth delay with prolongation of survival. Preclinical successes have culminated in the opening of a phase I trial for patients with advanced prostate disease which is currently accruing patients. Further study will reveal the clinical promise of NIS gene therapy in the treatment of prostate as well as other malignancies.

  6. Combined adenovirus-mediated artificial microRNAs targeting mfgl2, mFas, and mTNFR1 protect against fulminant hepatic failure in mice.

    Dong Xi

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV-related acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF has a poor prognosis with high in-hospital mortality. Hepatic and circulating inflammatory cytokines, such as fibrinogen like protein 2 (fgl2, FasL/Fas, and TNFα/TNFR1, play a significant role in the pathophysiology of ACLF. This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic effect of recombinant adenoviral vectors carrying constructed DNA code for non-native microRNA (miRNA targeting mouse fgl2 (mfgl2 or both mFas and mTNFR1 on murine hepatitis virus (MHV-3-induced fulminant hepatitis in BALB/cJ mice. Artificial miRNA eukaryotic expression plasmids against mfgl2, mFas, and mTNFR1 were constructed, and their inhibitory effects on the target genes were confirmed in vitro. pcDNA6.2-mFas-mTNFR1- miRNA,which expresses miRNA against both mFas and mTNFR1 simultaneously,was constructed. To construct a miRNA adenovirus expression vector against mfgl2, pcDNA6.2-mfgl2-miRNA was cloned using Gateway technology. Ad-mFas-mTNFR1- miRNA was also constructed by the same procedure. Adenovirus vectors were delivered by tail-vein injection into MHV-3-infected BALB/cJ mice to evaluate the therapeutic effect. 8 of 18 (44.4% mice recovered from fulminant viral hepatitis in the combined interference group treated with Ad-mfgl2-miRNA and Ad-mFas-mTNFR1-miRNA. But only 4 of 18 (22.2% mice receiving Ad-mfgl2-miRNA and 3 of 18 (16.7% mice receiving Ad-mFas-mTNFR1- miRNA survived. These adenovirus vectors significantly ameliorated inflammatory infiltration, fibrin deposition, hepatocyte necrosis and apoptosis, and prolonged survival time. Our data illustrated that combined interference using adenovirus-mediated artificial miRNAs targeting mfgl2, mFas, and mTNFR1 might have significant therapeutic potential for the treatment of fulminant hepatitis.

  7. Gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies.

    Fischer, A; Hacein-Bey Abina, S; Touzot, F; Cavazzana, M

    2015-12-01

    Gene therapy has effectively entered Medicine via the field of primary immunodeficiencies (PID). Because hematopoietic stem cells are accessible and because it was understood that genetic correction of lymphocyte progenitor cells carrying a genetic defect impairing differentiation, could result in the production of long-lived T lymphocytes, it was reasoned that ex vivo gene transfer in hematopoietic cells could lead to disease phenotype correction. Retroviral vectors were designed to ex vivo transduce such cells. This has indeed been shown to lead to sustained correction of the T cell immunodeficiency associated with two forms of severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID) for now more than ten years. Occurrence in some patients of genotoxicity related to retroviral vectors integration close to and transactivation of oncogenes has led to the development of retroviral vectors devoid of its enhancer element. Results of recent trials performed for several forms of PID indeed suggest that their use is both safe and efficacious. It is thus anticipated that their application to the treatment of many more life threatening PID will be developed over the coming years. PMID:25708106

  8. Gene therapy of metachromatic leukodystrophy.

    Matzner, Ulrich; Gieselmann, Volkmar

    2005-01-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is a lysosomal storage disease that is caused by a deficiency of arylsulfatase A (ASA). The deficiency results in the intralysosomal accumulation of the acidic sphingolipid 3-O-sulfogalactosyl-ceramide (sulfatide). Patients suffer from progressive demyelination and die from multiple neurological deficits. Curative treatment is not available. ASA bears mannose 6-phosphate residues which function as recognition markers in endosome/lysosome-specific targeting pathways. The endocytic targeting route can be exploited to deliver exogenous ASA to the lysosomes of ASA-deficient cells. ASA knockout mice, which develop a disorder related to MLD, have therefore been treated by ex vivo and in vivo gene therapy. Following transplantation of bone marrow cells overexpressing ASA from a retroviral vector, donor-type cells secrete ASA, which is endocytosed by recipient cells. The enzyme transfer results in the metabolic cross-correction of recipient cells and the improvement of biochemical, histological and clinical parameters. For the transfer of the ASA cDNA to non-dividing cells, adenovirus, adeno-associated virus and lentivirus vectors have been constructed. Such vectors might be particularly advantageous for direct ASA gene delivery to the brain, which is the main site of disease in MLD. PMID:15709909

  9. Gene Therapy in Oral Cancer: A Review

    Kumar, M. Sathish; Masthan, K.M.K.; Babu, N. Aravindha; Dash, Kailash Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy is the use of DNA as an agent to treat disease. Gene therapy aims at the insertion of a functional gene into the cells of a patient for the correction of an inborn error of metabolism, to alter or repair an acquired genetic abnormality, and to provide new function to the cell. Many experiments have been done with respect to its application in various diseases.Today, most of the gene therapy studies are aimed at cancer and hereditary diseases which are linked to genetic defects. C...

  10. [Gene therapy with cytokines against cervical cancer].

    Bermúdez-Morales, Victor Hugo; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2005-01-01

    Gene therapy is an excellent alternative for treatment of many diseases. Capacity to manipulate the DNA has allowed direct the gene therapy to correct the function of an altered gene, to increase the expression of a gene and to favour the activation of the immune response. This way, it can intend the use of the DNA like medication able to control, to correct or to cure many diseases. Gene therapy against cancer has an enormous potential, and actually the use of the DNA has increased to control diverse cancer in animal models, with very encouraging results that have allowed its applications in experimental protocols in human. This work concentrates a review of the foundations of the gene therapy and its application on cervical cancer, from the point of view of the alterations of the immune system focused on the tumour micro-environment, and the use of the cytokines as immunomodulators. PMID:16983992

  11. Adenoviral Vectors for Hemophilia Gene Therapy

    Brunetti-Pierri, N; Ng, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Hemophilia is an inherited blood clotting disorder resulting from deficiency of blood coagulation factors. Current standard of care for hemophilia patients is frequent intravenous infusions of the missing coagulation factor. Gene therapy for hemophilia involves the introduction of a normal copy of the deficient coagulation factor gene thereby potentially offering a definitive cure for the bleeding disorder. A variety of approaches have been pursued for hemophilia gene therapy and this review article focuses on those that use adenoviral vectors. PMID:24883229

  12. Adenoviral Vectors for Hemophilia Gene Therapy

    Brunetti-Pierri, N.; Ng, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Hemophilia is an inherited blood clotting disorder resulting from deficiency of blood coagulation factors. Current standard of care for hemophilia patients is frequent intravenous infusions of the missing coagulation factor. Gene therapy for hemophilia involves the introduction of a normal copy of the deficient coagulation factor gene thereby potentially offering a definitive cure for the bleeding disorder. A variety of approaches have been pursued for hemophilia gene therapy and this review ...

  13. Switching on the Lights for Gene Therapy

    Alexandra Winkeler; Miguel Sena-Esteves; Paulis, Leonie E.M.; Hongfeng Li; Yannic Waerzeggers; Benedikt Rückriem; Uwe Himmelreich; Markus Klein; Parisa Monfared; Rueger, Maria A.; Michael Heneka; Stefan Vollmar; Mathias Hoehn; Cornel Fraefel; Rudolf Graf

    2007-01-01

    Strategies for non-invasive and quantitative imaging of gene expression in vivo have been developed over the past decade. Non-invasive assessment of the dynamics of gene regulation is of interest for the detection of endogenous disease-specific biological alterations (e.g., signal transduction) and for monitoring the induction and regulation of therapeutic genes (e.g., gene therapy). To demonstrate that non-invasive imaging of regulated expression of any type of gene after in vivo transductio...

  14. A short perspective on gene therapy: Clinical experience on gene therapy of gliomablastoma multiforme

    Wirth, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    More than two decades have passed since the first gene therapy clinical trial was conducted. During this time, we have gained much knowledge regarding gene therapy in general, but also learned to understand the fear that persists in society. We have experienced drawbacks and successes. More than 1700 clinical trials have been conducted where gene therapy is used as a means for therapy. In the very first trial, patients with advanced melanoma were treated with tumor infiltrating lymphocytes ge...

  15. An overview of gene therapy in head and neck cancer

    Amit Bali; Deepika Bali; Ashutosh Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy is a new treatment modality in which new gene is introduced or existing gene is manipulated to cause cancer cell death or slow the growth of the tumor. In this review, we have discussed the different treatment approaches for cancer gene therapy; gene addition therapy, immunotherapy, gene therapy using oncolytic viruses, antisense ribonucleic acid (RNA) and RNA interference-based gene therapy. Clinical trials to date in head and neck cancer have shown evidence of gene transduction...

  16. GENE THERAPY AND ITS IMPLICATIONS IN SPORTS

    Biljana Vitošević

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to the very successful Human Genome Project and the identification of genes involved in genetic disease, we now have the ability to treat many conditions. However, the identification of the genes which code certain phenotype characteristics has opened the way for abuse in the fields of sport and physical exercise. The principles of gene therapy and the ways in which genes are transferred have completely been copied from gene therapy and are now being used to increase the physical abilities of athletes. The genes most frequently used by athletes include: the the ACE gene, the ACTN3 gene, myostatin, the erythropoietin gene, PPAR-delta and the like. The misuse of these genes with the aim of increasing physical abilities has already become part of sport and is extremely difficult to identify, since genes and gene sequences entering the human body are proteins that are already struc-tural and functional parts of the organism. On the other hand, viral vectors as the instruments for gene transfer attack and destroy the human immune system, and the reaction of the human body can be negative, with a danger of insertional mutagenesis and the appearance of oncogenes. Gene ther-apy might actually be much more useful in treating sports injuries, but even these procedures are still far from clinical practice. There is a fine line between gene therapy and gene doping in athletes. A number of growth factors will enhance repair, but it happen that expression of these factors increase the strength of bones and tendons, so that giving an adventage to competitors. First of all, it is neces-sary to acquaint athletes as much as possible with the negative consequences of using gene therapy. However victory and glory may be strong achievements, the health of these young people, and respect for fundamental and ethical principles, humanity, and fair play game have a more lasting value and represent the heavier weight on the scales.

  17. Adenovirus-mediated ING4 expression reduces multidrug resistance of human gastric carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Mao, Zong-Lei; He, Song-Bing; Sheng, Wei-Hua; Dong, Xiao-Qiang; Yang, Ji-Cheng

    2013-11-01

    Chemotherapy is the primary treatment for both resectable and advanced gastric carcinoma, yet multiple drug resistance (MDR) of gastric carcinoma remains a significant therapeutic obstacle. The development of novel strategies to reduce MDR in gastric carcinoma would yield a better outcome following chemotherapy. ING4, a member of the inhibitor of growth (ING) tumor-suppressor family, possesses antitumor and radiosensitization or chemosensitization effects in a variety of human cancers. The present study investigated the effects and possible mechanisms of action of adenovirus-mediated ING4 (AdVING4) on the reversion of human gastric carcinoma cell MDR in vitro and in vivo in nude mouse xenografts. The data showed that the expression of ING4 mRNA and protein was dramatically downregulated (or lost) in gastric carcinoma SGC7901/CDDP cells after CDDP-induced MDR phenotype and in the parental SGC7901 cells. AdVING4‑induced ING4 expression reversed MDR and induced apoptosis of SGC7901/CDDP cells in vitro and in vivo in the SGC7901/CDDP xenograft tumors. Furthermore, AdVING4 substantially downregulated the expression of MDR-related proteins P-gp and MRP1 and apoptosis‑related proteins Bcl-2 and survivin, but upregulated the expression of apoptosis-related protein Bax in the SGC7901/CDDP xenograft tissues. The reversion effects elicited by AdVING4 on gastric cancer cell MDR were closely associated with the downregulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters and activation of apoptotic pathways. Thus, these findings suggest that AdVING4 may be a feasible modulator for the MDR phenotype of gastric carcinoma cells. PMID:23969950

  18. Cancer Treatment with Gene Therapy and Radiation Therapy

    Kaliberov, Sergey A.; Buchsbaum, Donald J.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation therapy methods have evolved remarkably in recent years which have resulted in more effective local tumor control with negligible toxicity of surrounding normal tissues. However, local recurrence and distant metastasis often occur following radiation therapy mostly due to the development of radioresistance through the deregulation of the cell cycle, apoptosis, and inhibition of DNA damage repair mechanisms. Over the last decade, extensive progress in radiotherapy and gene therapy co...

  19. Adenovirus-mediated wild-type PTEN promoting glioma stem/progenitor cells autophagy activity

    ZHAO Yao-dong; Zi-long WEI; Zhang, Quan-Bin; LOU Mei-qing; HUANG, QIANG

    2013-01-01

    Background PTEN is an anti-oncogene frequently inactivating in glioma. The previous study found that PTEN was closely related to cellular autophagy activity. The purpose of this paper is to study whether the inactivation of PTEN in glioma stem/progenitor cells (GSPCs) is correlative with the low autophagic activity in GSPCs. Methods Wild-type PTEN genes were transferred into GSPCs mediated by adenovirus. The autophagic activity in GSPCs before or after the introduction of wild-type PTEN was...

  20. Adenovirus-mediated wild-type PTEN promoting glioma stem/progenitor cells autophagy activity

    ZHAO Yao-dong

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background PTEN is an anti-oncogene frequently inactivating in glioma. The previous study found that PTEN was closely related to cellular autophagy activity. The purpose of this paper is to study whether the inactivation of PTEN in glioma stem/progenitor cells (GSPCs is correlative with the low autophagic activity in GSPCs. Methods Wild-type PTEN genes were transferred into GSPCs mediated by adenovirus. The autophagic activity in GSPCs before or after the introduction of wild-type PTEN was detected by immunocytochemistry, electron microscopy, and Western blotting assay. Results After transfection of wild-type PTEN, a large number of microtuble-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (MAP1LC3-positive granules could be found in the cytoplasm of GSPCs under a confocal microscopy, and these granules were demonstrated to be autophagosomes under an electron microscope. Moreover, the expression of autophagy-related gene Beclin-1 significantly increased after the transfection of wild-type PTEN gene. Conclusion The inactivation of PTEN in GSPCs is one reason of the low autophagic activity of GSPCs.

  1. Gene therapy in India: A focus

    Sarvani Chodisetty; Everette Jacob Remington Nelson

    2014-06-01

    Gene therapy refers to the treatment of genetic diseases using normal copies of the defective genes. It has the potential to cure any genetic disease with long-lasting therapeutic benefits. It remained an enigma for a long period of time, which was followed by a series of setbacks in the late 1990s. Gene therapy has re-emerged as a therapeutic option with reports of success from recent clinical studies. The United States and Europe has been pioneers in this field for over two decades. Recently, reports of gene therapy have started coming in from Asian countries like China, Japan and Korea. This review focuses on the current status of gene therapy in India.

  2. Translational Approaches towards Cancer Gene Therapy: Hurdles and Hopes

    Yadollah Omidi; Jaleh Barar

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Of the cancer gene therapy approaches, gene silencing, suicide/apoptosis inducing gene therapy, immunogene therapy and targeted gene therapy are deemed to sub­stantially control the biological consequences of genomic changes in cancerous cells. Thus, a large number of clinical trials have been conducted against various malignancies. In this review, we will discuss recent translational progresses of gene and cell therapy of cancer. Methods: Essential information on gene therapy o...

  3. Immuno-gene therapy in hepatocarcinoma

    1999-01-01

    @@Hepatocarcinoma is a disease that threatens human health. To date,the known etiology of hepatocarcinomahas not been narrowed down to just one factor. It is possible that there are their own causes in different areas.Thus, there are no absolute, but relative therapy to cure all kinds of hepatocarcinoma. Presently,there exists other treatment for the hepatocarcinoma which cannot be operated by surgery, such as cryosurgery,photodynamic therapy,immunotherapy,interventional radiotherapy and targeting therapy. With the development of molecular biology ,gene therapy offers new possibilities in the treatment of genetic diseases,tumors,AIDS and other gene defect disease.

  4. The bystander effect of cancer gene therapy

    Cancer gene therapy is a new, promising therapeutic agent. In the clinic, it should be used in combination with existing modalities, such as tumour irradiation. First, we summarise the most important fields of cancer gene therapy: gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy; the activation of an anti-tumour immune attack; restoration of the wild type p53 status; the application of new, replication competent and oncolytic viral vectors; tumour specific, as well as radiation- and hypoxia-induced gene expression. Special emphasizes are put on the combined effect of these modalities with local tumour irradiation. Using the available vector systems, only a small portion of the cancer cells will contain the therapeutic genes under therapeutic situations. Bystander cell killing might contribute to the success of various gene therapy protocols. We summarise the evidences that lethal bystander effects may occur during cancer gene therapy. Bystander effects are especially important in the gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy. There, bystander cell killing might have different routes: cell communication through gap junction intercellular contacts; release of toxic metabolites into the neighbourhood or to larger distances; phagocytosis of apoptotic bodies; and the activation of the immune system. Bystander cell killing can be enhanced by the introduction of gap junction proteins into the cells, by further activating the immune system with immune-stimulatory molecules, or by introducing genes into the cells that help the transfer of cytotoxic genes and / or metabolites into the bystander cells. In conclusion, there should be additional improvements in cancer gene therapy for the more efficient clinical application. (orig.)

  5. The bystander effect of cancer gene therapy

    Lumniczky, K.; Safrany, G. (Department of Molecular and Tumour Radiobiology, National Research Institute for Radiobiology and Radiohygiene, Budapest (Hungary))

    2008-12-15

    Cancer gene therapy is a new, promising therapeutic agent. In the clinic, it should be used in combination with existing modalities, such as tumour irradiation. First, we summarise the most important fields of cancer gene therapy: gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy; the activation of an anti-tumour immune attack; restoration of the wild type p53 status; the application of new, replication competent and oncolytic viral vectors; tumour specific, as well as radiation- and hypoxia-induced gene expression. Special emphasizes are put on the combined effect of these modalities with local tumour irradiation. Using the available vector systems, only a small portion of the cancer cells will contain the therapeutic genes under therapeutic situations. Bystander cell killing might contribute to the success of various gene therapy protocols. We summarise the evidences that lethal bystander effects may occur during cancer gene therapy. Bystander effects are especially important in the gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy. There, bystander cell killing might have different routes: cell communication through gap junction intercellular contacts; release of toxic metabolites into the neighbourhood or to larger distances; phagocytosis of apoptotic bodies; and the activation of the immune system. Bystander cell killing can be enhanced by the introduction of gap junction proteins into the cells, by further activating the immune system with immune-stimulatory molecules, or by introducing genes into the cells that help the transfer of cytotoxic genes and / or metabolites into the bystander cells. In conclusion, there should be additional improvements in cancer gene therapy for the more efficient clinical application. (orig.)

  6. Gene Therapy Techniques for Peripheral Arterial Disease

    Somatic gene therapy is the introduction of new genetic material into selective somatic cells with resulting therapeutic benefits. Vascular wall and, subsequently, cardiovascular diseases have become an interesting target for gene therapy studies.Arteries are an attractive target for gene therapy since vascular interventions, both open surgical and endovascular, are well suited for minimally invasive, easily monitored gene delivery. Promising therapeutic effects have been obtained in animal models in preventing post-angioplasty restenosis and vein graft thickening, as well as increasing blood flow and collateral development in ischemic limbs.First clinical trials suggest a beneficial effect of vascular endothelial growth factor in achieving therapeutic angiogenesis in chronic limb ischemia and the efficacy of decoy oligonucleotides to prevent infrainguinal vein graft stenosis. However, further studies are mandatory to clarify the safety issues, to develop better gene delivery vectors and delivery catheters, to improve transgene expression, as well as to find the most effective and safe treatment genes

  7. Biodegradable nanoparticles for gene therapy technology

    Rapid propagations in materials technology together with biology have initiated great hopes in the possibility of treating many diseases by gene therapy technology. Viral and non-viral gene carriers are currently applied for gene delivery. Non-viral technology is safe and effective for the delivery of genetic materials to cells and tissues. Non-viral systems are based on plasmid expression containing a gene encoding a therapeutic protein and synthetic biodegradable nanoparticles as a safe carrier of gene. Biodegradable nanoparticles have shown great interest in drug and gene delivery systems as they are easy to be synthesized and have no side effect in cells and tissues. This review provides a critical view of applications of biodegradable nanoparticles on gene therapy technology to enhance the localization of in vitro and in vivo and improve the function of administered genes

  8. Biodegradable nanoparticles for gene therapy technology

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein, E-mail: hosseinkhani@mail.ntust.edu.tw; He, Wen-Jie [National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech), Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering (China); Chiang, Chiao-Hsi [School of Pharmacy, National Defense Medical Center (China); Hong, Po-Da [National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech), Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering (China); Yu, Dah-Shyong [Nanomedicine Research Center, National Defense Medical Center (China); Domb, Abraham J. [The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Institute of Drug Research, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology and The Alex Grass Center for Drug Design and Synthesis (Israel); Ou, Keng-Liang [College of Oral Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Research Center for Biomedical Devices and Prototyping Production (China)

    2013-07-15

    Rapid propagations in materials technology together with biology have initiated great hopes in the possibility of treating many diseases by gene therapy technology. Viral and non-viral gene carriers are currently applied for gene delivery. Non-viral technology is safe and effective for the delivery of genetic materials to cells and tissues. Non-viral systems are based on plasmid expression containing a gene encoding a therapeutic protein and synthetic biodegradable nanoparticles as a safe carrier of gene. Biodegradable nanoparticles have shown great interest in drug and gene delivery systems as they are easy to be synthesized and have no side effect in cells and tissues. This review provides a critical view of applications of biodegradable nanoparticles on gene therapy technology to enhance the localization of in vitro and in vivo and improve the function of administered genes.

  9. Antiangiogenic gene therapy of cancer: recent developments

    Libutti Steven K; Blazer Dan G; Tandle Anita

    2004-01-01

    Abstract With the role of angiogenesis in tumor growth and progression firmly established, considerable effort has been directed to antiangiogenic therapy as a new modality to treat human cancers. Antiangiogenic agents have recently received much widespread attention but strategies for their optimal use are still being developed. Gene therapy represents an attractive alternative to recombinant protein administration for several reasons. This review evaluates the potential advantages of gene t...

  10. Gene therapy for carcinoma of the breast

    Stoff-Khalili, MA; Dall, P.; Curiel, DT

    2006-01-01

    In view of the limited success of available treatment modalities for breast cancer, alternative and complementary strategies need to be developed. The delineation of the molecular basis of breast cancer provides the possibility of specific intervention by gene therapy through the introduction of genetic material for therapeutic purposes. In this regard, several gene therapy approaches for carcinoma of the breast have been developed. These approaches can be divided into six broad categories: (...

  11. Adenovirus-mediated sphingomyelin synthase 2 increases atherosclerotic lesions in ApoE KO mice

    Zhao Yarui

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sphingomyelin synthase 2 (SMS2 contributes to de novo sphingomyelin (SM biosynthesis. Its activity is related to SM levels in the plasma and the cell membrane. In this study, we investigated the possibility of a direct relationship between SMS and atherosclerosis. Methods The Adenovirus containing SMS2 gene was given into 10-week ApoE KO C57BL/6J mice by femoral intravenous injection. In the control group, the Adenovirus containing GFP was given. To confirm this model, we took both mRNA level examination (RT-PCR and protein level examination (SMS activity assay. Result We generated recombinant adenovirus vectors containing either human SMS2 cDNA (AdV-SMS2 or GFP cDNA (AdV-GFP. On day six after intravenous infusion of 2 × 1011 particle numbers into ten-week-old apoE KO mice, AdV-SMS2 treatment significantly increased liver SMS2 mRNA levels and SMS activity (by 2.7-fold, 2.3-fold, p Conclusions Our results present direct morphological evidence for the pro-atherogenic capabilities of SMS2. SMS2 could be a potential target for treating atherosclerosis.

  12. STATE-OF-THE-ART HUMAN GENE THERAPY: PART I. GENE DELIVERY TECHNOLOGIES

    Wang, Dan; Gao, Guangping

    2014-01-01

    Safe and effective gene delivery is a prerequisite for successful gene therapy. In the early age of human gene therapy, setbacks due to problematic gene delivery vehicles plagued the exciting therapeutic outcome. However, gene delivery technologies rapidly evolved ever since. With the advancement of gene delivery techniques, gene therapy clinical trials surged during the past decade. As the first gene therapy product has obtained regulatory approval and reached clinic, human gene therapy fina...

  13. Strategies in Gene Therapy for Glioblastoma

    Kwiatkowska, Aneta; Nandhu, Mohan S.; Behera, Prajna; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Viapiano, Mariano S., E-mail: mviapiano@partners.org [Department of Neurosurgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2013-10-22

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive form of brain cancer, with a dismal prognosis and extremely low percentage of survivors. Novel therapies are in dire need to improve the clinical management of these tumors and extend patient survival. Genetic therapies for GBM have been postulated and attempted for the past twenty years, with variable degrees of success in pre-clinical models and clinical trials. Here we review the most common approaches to treat GBM by gene therapy, including strategies to deliver tumor-suppressor genes, suicide genes, immunomodulatory cytokines to improve immune response, and conditionally-replicating oncolytic viruses. The review focuses on the strategies used for gene delivery, including the most common and widely used vehicles (i.e., replicating and non-replicating viruses) as well as novel therapeutic approaches such as stem cell-mediated therapy and nanotechnologies used for gene delivery. We present an overview of these strategies, their targets, different advantages, and challenges for success. Finally, we discuss the potential of gene therapy-based strategies to effectively attack such a complex genetic target as GBM, alone or in combination with conventional therapy.

  14. Strategies in Gene Therapy for Glioblastoma

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive form of brain cancer, with a dismal prognosis and extremely low percentage of survivors. Novel therapies are in dire need to improve the clinical management of these tumors and extend patient survival. Genetic therapies for GBM have been postulated and attempted for the past twenty years, with variable degrees of success in pre-clinical models and clinical trials. Here we review the most common approaches to treat GBM by gene therapy, including strategies to deliver tumor-suppressor genes, suicide genes, immunomodulatory cytokines to improve immune response, and conditionally-replicating oncolytic viruses. The review focuses on the strategies used for gene delivery, including the most common and widely used vehicles (i.e., replicating and non-replicating viruses) as well as novel therapeutic approaches such as stem cell-mediated therapy and nanotechnologies used for gene delivery. We present an overview of these strategies, their targets, different advantages, and challenges for success. Finally, we discuss the potential of gene therapy-based strategies to effectively attack such a complex genetic target as GBM, alone or in combination with conventional therapy

  15. Adenovirus mediated homozygous endometrial epithelial Pten deletion results in aggressive endometrial carcinoma

    Pten is the most frequently mutated gene in uterine endometriod carcinoma (UEC) and its precursor complex atypical hyperplasia (CAH). Because the mutation frequency is similar in CAH and UEC, Pten mutations are thought to occur relatively early in endometrial tumorigenesis. Previous work from our laboratory using the Pten+/- mouse model has demonstrated somatic inactivation of the wild type allele of Pten in both CAH and UEC. In the present study, we injected adenoviruses expressing Cre into the uterine lumen of adult Pten floxed mice in an attempt to somatically delete both alleles of Pten specifically in the endometrium. Our results demonstrate that biallelic inactivation of Pten results in an increased incidence of carcinoma as compared to the Pten+/- mouse model. In addition, the carcinomas were more aggressive with extension beyond the uterus into adjacent tissues and were associated with decreased expression of nuclear ERα as compared to associated CAH. Primary cultures of epithelial and stromal cells were prepared from uteri of Pten floxed mice and Pten was deleted in vitro using Cre expressing adenovirus. Pten deletion was evident in both the epithelial and stromal cells and the treatment of the primary cultures with estrogen had different effects on Akt activation as well as Cyclin D3 expression in the two purified components. This study demonstrates that somatic biallelic inactivation of Pten in endometrial epithelium in vivo results in an increased incidence and aggressiveness of endometrial carcinoma compared to mice carrying a germline deletion of one allele and provides an important in vivo and in vitro model system for understanding the genetic underpinnings of endometrial carcinoma.

  16. Adenovirus mediated homozygous endometrial epithelial Pten deletion results in aggressive endometrial carcinoma

    Joshi, Ayesha; Ellenson, Lora Hedrick, E-mail: lora.ellenson@med.cornell.edu

    2011-07-01

    Pten is the most frequently mutated gene in uterine endometriod carcinoma (UEC) and its precursor complex atypical hyperplasia (CAH). Because the mutation frequency is similar in CAH and UEC, Pten mutations are thought to occur relatively early in endometrial tumorigenesis. Previous work from our laboratory using the Pten{sup +/-} mouse model has demonstrated somatic inactivation of the wild type allele of Pten in both CAH and UEC. In the present study, we injected adenoviruses expressing Cre into the uterine lumen of adult Pten floxed mice in an attempt to somatically delete both alleles of Pten specifically in the endometrium. Our results demonstrate that biallelic inactivation of Pten results in an increased incidence of carcinoma as compared to the Pten{sup +/-} mouse model. In addition, the carcinomas were more aggressive with extension beyond the uterus into adjacent tissues and were associated with decreased expression of nuclear ER{alpha} as compared to associated CAH. Primary cultures of epithelial and stromal cells were prepared from uteri of Pten floxed mice and Pten was deleted in vitro using Cre expressing adenovirus. Pten deletion was evident in both the epithelial and stromal cells and the treatment of the primary cultures with estrogen had different effects on Akt activation as well as Cyclin D3 expression in the two purified components. This study demonstrates that somatic biallelic inactivation of Pten in endometrial epithelium in vivo results in an increased incidence and aggressiveness of endometrial carcinoma compared to mice carrying a germline deletion of one allele and provides an important in vivo and in vitro model system for understanding the genetic underpinnings of endometrial carcinoma.

  17. Adenovirus-mediated expression of SSAT inhibits colorectal cancer cell growth in vitro

    Hui SUN; Bin LIU; Ya-pei YANG; Chun-xiao XU; Yun-fei YAN; Wei WANG; Xian-xi LIU

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To construct a recombinant adenovirus that can express human spermidine/ spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT) and detect its inhibitory effect on colorectal cancer cell growth in vitro. Methods: A 516 bp eDNA of SSAT was amplified and cloned into a pGL3-hTERT plasmid. The pGL3-hTERT-SSAT recombinant was digested, and the small fragment was cloned into the shuttle vector pAdTrack. The pAdTrack-hTERT-SSAT plasmids were recombined with pAdEasy-1 vectors in AdEasy-1 cells. Positive clones were selected and transfected into the HEK293 packaging cells (transformed human embryonic kidney cells) after they were lin-earized by PacI. The process of adenovirus packaging and amplification was monitored by green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression. The SSAT protein levels were determined by Western blotting, and the intracellular polyamine con-tent was detected by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography. The MTS (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiaol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxy-methoxyphenyl)-2-(-4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt) and colony-forming assays were used to analyze the gene transduction efficiency and effect on the growth of HT-29 and LoVo cells. A viable cell count was used to determine the cell growth with or without exogenous polyamines. Results: The GFP expression in 293 cells during virus packing and amplification was observed by fluorescence microscopy. Western blotting results demonstrated that Ad-hTERT-SSAT could increase the expres-sion of SSAT, and consequently, spermidine and spermine were reduced to low levels. The MTS and colony-forming assay results showed that HT-29 and LoVo cell growth were significantly inhibited, and the inhibitory effect could be partially reversed by exogenous spermidine and spermine. Conclusion: The successfully constructed recombinant adenovirus Ad-hTERT-SSAT could accelerate polyamine catabolism and inhibit the colorectal cell growth in vitro. It also has therapeutic potential in the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  18. HCCS1-armed, quadruple-regulated oncolytic adenovirus specific for liver cancer as a cancer targeting gene-viro-therapy strategy

    Xu Hai-Neng

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In previously published studies, oncolytic adenovirus-mediated gene therapy has produced good results in targeting cancer cells. However, safety and efficacy, the two most important aspects in cancer therapy, remain serious challenges. The specific expression or deletion of replication related genes in an adenovirus has been frequently utilized to regulate the cancer cell specificity of a virus. Accordingly, in this study, we deleted 24 bp in E1A (bp924-bp947 and the entirety of E1B, including those genes encoding E1B 55kDa and E1B19kDa. We used the survivin promoter (SP to control E1A in order to construct a new adenovirus vector named Ad.SP.E1A(Δ24.ΔE1B (briefly Ad.SPDD. HCCS1 (hepatocellular carcinoma suppressor 1 is a novel tumor suppressor gene that is able to specifically induce apoptosis in cancer cells. The expression cassette AFP-HCCS1-WPRE-SV40 was inserted into Ad.SPDD to form Ad.SPDD-HCCS1, enabling us to improve the safety and efficacy of oncolytic-mediated gene therapy for liver cancer. Results Ad.SPDD showed a decreased viral yield and less toxicity in normal cells but enhanced toxicity in liver cancer cells, compared with the cancer-specific adenovirus ZD55 (E1B55K deletion. Ad.SPDD-HCCS1 exhibited a potent anti-liver-cancer ability and decreased toxicity in vitro. Ad.SPDD-HCCS1 also showed a measurable capacity to inhibit Huh-7 xenograft tumor growth on nude mice. The underlying mechanism of Ad.SPDD-HCCS1-induced liver cancer cell death was found to be via the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Conclusions These results demonstrate that Ad.SPDD-HCCS1 was able to elicit reduced toxicity and enhanced efficacy both in vitro and in vivo compared to a previously constructed oncolytic adenovirus. Ad.SPDD-HCCS1 could be a promising candidate for liver cancer therapy.

  19. Targeted cancer gene therapy : the flexibility of adenoviral gene therapy vectors

    Rots, MG; Curiel, DT; Gerritsen, WR; Haisma, HJ

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors are promising reagents for therapeutic interventions in humans, including gene therapy for biologically complex diseases like cancer and cardiovascular diseases. In this regard, the major advantage of adenoviral vectors is their superior in vivo gene transfer efficienc

  20. Current gene therapy for stomach carcinoma

    Chang-Tai Xu; Lian-Tian Huang; Bo-Rong Pan

    2001-01-01

    astric cancer is common in China [1-42],and its early diagnosis and treatment in advanced stage are difficult [31-50].In recent years ,gene study in cancer is a hotspot ,and great progress has been achieved [41-80] .Cancer gene therapy has shifted from the imagination into the laboratory and clinical trials.

  1. Why commercialization of gene therapy stalled; examining the life cycles of gene therapy technologies.

    Ledley, F D; McNamee, L M; Uzdil, V; Morgan, I W

    2014-02-01

    This report examines the commercialization of gene therapy in the context of innovation theories that posit a relationship between the maturation of a technology through its life cycle and prospects for successful product development. We show that the field of gene therapy has matured steadily since the 1980s, with the congruent accumulation of >35 000 papers, >16 000 US patents, >1800 clinical trials and >$4.3 billion in capital investment in gene therapy companies. Gene therapy technologies comprise a series of dissimilar approaches for gene delivery, each of which has introduced a distinct product architecture. Using bibliometric methods, we quantify the maturation of each technology through a characteristic life cycle S-curve, from a Nascent stage, through a Growing stage of exponential advance, toward an Established stage and projected limit. Capital investment in gene therapy is shown to have occurred predominantly in Nascent stage technologies and to be negatively correlated with maturity. Gene therapy technologies are now achieving the level of maturity that innovation research and biotechnology experience suggest may be requisite for efficient product development. Asynchrony between the maturation of gene therapy technologies and capital investment in development-focused business models may have stalled the commercialization of gene therapy. PMID:24305420

  2. Employment of Salmonella in Cancer Gene Therapy.

    Lee, Che-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    One of the primary limitations of cancer gene therapy is lack of selectivity of the therapeutic gene to tumor cells. Current efforts are focused on discovering and developing tumor-targeting vectors that selectively target only cancer cells but spare normal cells to improve the therapeutic index. The use of preferentially tumor-targeting bacteria as vectors is one of the innovative approaches for the treatment of cancer. This is based on the observation that some obligate or facultative-anaerobic bacteria are capable of multiplying selectively in tumors and inhibiting their growth. In this study, we exploited attenuated Salmonella as a tumoricidal agent and a vector to deliver genes for tumor-targeted gene therapy. Attenuated Salmonella, carrying a eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding an anti-angiogenic gene, was used to evaluate its' ability for tumor targeting and gene delivery in murine tumor models. We also investigated the use of a polymer to modify or shield Salmonella from the pre-existing immune response in the host in order to improve gene delivery to the tumor. These results suggest that tumor-targeted gene therapy using Salmonella carrying a therapeutic gene, which exerts tumoricidal and anti-angiogenic activities, represents a promising strategy for the treatment of tumors. PMID:26846804

  3. International perceptions and approval of gene therapy.

    Macer, D R; Akiyama, S; Alora, A T; Asada, Y; Azariah, J; Azariah, H; Boost, M V; Chatwachirawong, P; Kato, Y; Kaushik, V

    1995-06-01

    Gene therapy is in clinical trials in a number of countries, raising the question of whether different ethical standards can be justified in different countries. One key issue is how divergent are the perceptions and bioethical reasoning of peoples around the world. An International Bioethics Survey with 150 questions, including 35 open ones, was developed to look at how people think about diseases, life, nature, and selected issues of science and technology, biotechnology, genetic engineering, genetic screening, and gene therapy. The mail response survey was conducted in 1993 among the public in Australia, India, Israel, Japan, New Zealand, Russia, and Thailand, and the same written survey was conducted among university students in Australia, Hong Kong, India, Japan, New Zealand, The Philippines, Russia, Singapore, and Thailand. Similar questions were included in an international high school education bioethics survey among high school teachers in Australia, Japan, and New Zealand. Further international comparisons to the United States and Europe are made. About three-quarters of all samples supported personal use of gene therapy, with higher support for children's use of gene therapy. The diversity of views was generally similar within each country. The major reasons given were to save life and increase the quality of life. About 5-7% rejected gene therapy, considering it to be playing God, or unnatural. There was very little concern about eugenics (0.5-2%), and more respondents gave supportive reasons like "improving genes," especially in Thailand and India. Support for specific applications was significantly less for "improving physical characters," "improving intelligence," or "making people more ethical" than for curing diseases like cancer or diabetes, but there was little difference between inheritable or noninheritable gene therapy. PMID:7548279

  4. Gene and cell therapy for muscle regeneration

    Stilhano, Roberta Sessa; Martins, Leonardo; Ingham, Sheila Jean McNeill; Pesquero, João Bosco; Huard, Johnny

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle injury and healing are multifactorial processes, involving three steps of healing: (1) degeneration and inflammation, (2) regeneration, and (3) fibrosis. Fibrous tissue hinders the muscle’s complete recovery and current therapies fail in achieving total muscle recovery. Gene and cell therapy (or both) are potential future treatments for severe muscular injuries. Stem cells’ properties associated with growth factors or/and cytokines can improve muscle healing and permit long-te...

  5. The Use of Viral Vectors in Gene Transfer Therapy

    Dziaková, A.; Valenčáková, A.; Hatalová, E.; J. Kalinová

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy is strategy based on using genes as pharmaceuticals. Gene therapy is a treatment that involves altering the genes inside body's cells to stop disease. Genes contain DNA- the code controlling body form and function. Genes that do not work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds a new gene in an attempt to cure disease or improve the ability of the body to fight disease. Gene therapy holds promise for treating a wide range of diseases, including canc...

  6. Human gene therapy: why draw a line?

    Anderson, W F

    1989-12-01

    Despite widespread agreement that it would be ethical to use somatic cell gene therapy to correct serious diseases, there is still uneasiness on the part of the public about this procedure. The basis for this concern lies less with the procedure's clinical risks than with fear that genetic engineering could lead to changes in human nature. Legitimate concerns about the potential for misuse of gene transfer technology justify drawing a moral line that includes corrective germline therapy but excludes enhancement interventions in both somatic and germline contexts. PMID:2614286

  7. Moving forward: cystic fibrosis gene therapy.

    Griesenbach, Uta; Alton, Eric W F W

    2013-10-15

    Since cloning of the CFTR gene more than 20 years ago a large number of pre-clinical and clinical CF gene therapy studies have been performed and a vast amount of information and know-how has been generated. Here, we will review key studies with a particular emphasis on clinical findings. We have learnt that the lung is a more difficult target than originally anticipated, and we describe the strength and weaknesses of the most commonly used airway gene transfer agents (GTAs). In our view, one of the most significant developments in recent years is the generation of lentiviral vectors, which efficiently transduce lung tissue. However, focused and co-ordinated efforts assessing lentiviral vector safety and scaling up of production will be required to move this vector into clinical lung gene therapy studies. PMID:23918661

  8. Multifunctional Delivery Systems for Cancer Gene Therapy

    McErlean, Emma M.; McCrudden, Cian M; McCarthy, Helen O.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines key concepts with respect to cancer gene therapy and the current issues with respect to non-viral delivery. The biological and molecular barriers that need to be overcome before effective non-viral delivery systems can be appropriately designed for oncology applications are highlighted and ways to overcome these are discussed. Strategies developed to evade the immune response are also described and targeted gene delivery is examined with the most effective strategies hig...

  9. Radiopharmaceutical and Gene Therapy Program

    Buchsbaum, Donald J.

    2006-02-09

    The objective of our research program was to determine whether novel receptors can be induced in solid cancers as a target for therapy with radiolabeled unmodified peptides that bind to the receptors. The hypothesis was that induction of a high number of receptors on the surface of these cancer cells would result in an increased uptake of the radiolabeled monomeric peptides as compared to published results with radiolabeled antibodies or peptides to naturally expressed antigens or receptors, and therefore a better therapeutic outcome. The following is a summary of published results.

  10. The effects of combining ionizing radiation and adenovirus-mediated p53 gene transfer in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell lines

    Purpose/Objective: We have previously demonstrated that the introduction of human recombinant wild-type p53 carried by the adenoviral vector (Ad5CMV-p53) into two human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell lines (CNE-1 and CNE-2Z) resulted in significant cytotoxicity. In the current work, we wanted to evaluate the results of this strategy when combined with ionizing radiation (XRT). Materials and Methods: CNE-1, CNE-2Z, and a normal human nasopharyngeal fibroblast strain KS1, were infected with iso-effective doses of 2, 6 and 6 pfu/cell of Ad5CMV-p53 respectively. XRT was administered 24 hours post-infection, to coincide with the time of maximal recombinant p53 expression. Western blot analyses were conducted for p53, p21WAF1/CIP1, bax and bcl-2. Cell viability was evaluated using both the MTT and clonogenic assays. Presence of apoptosis was determined by using DNA agarose gel electrophoresis. Results: We observed that the combination of Ad5CMV-p53 + XRT (2, 4, and 6 Gy) resulted in an approximately 1-log greater level of cytotoxicity compared to that observed with XRT alone for both NPC cell lines. The MTT assay indicated sparing of the KS1 cells when subjected to the identical treatments. XRT alone stimulated minimal p53 expression; Ad5CMV-p53 alone induced significant recombinant p53 expression, which was not further enhanced by the addition of XRT. Similar observations were made for p21WAF1/CIP1 expression. No changes were observed for bax and bcl-2 expression with any of these treatments. Apoptosis was induced following 4 Gy of XRT alone, but was observed earlier, at 2 Gy when combined with Ad5CMV-p53. Conclusion: Additional cytotoxicity was observed for the NPC cell lines when XRT was combined with Ad5CMV-p53 infection, with concurrent sparing of normal cells (KS1). This cytotoxicity also appeared to be mediated through the induction of the apoptotic pathway. These results support our previous observation of the potential application of this strategy in the treatment of NPC, particularly when combined with XRT

  11. Developments in gene therapy for muscular dystrophy.

    Hartigan-O'Connor, D; Chamberlain, J S

    Gene therapy for muscular dystrophy (MD) presents significant challenges, including the large amount of muscle tissue in the body, the large size of many genes defective in different muscular dystrophies, and the possibility of a host immune response against the therapeutic gene. Overcoming these challenges requires the development and delivery of suitable gene transfer vectors. Encouraging progress has been made in modifying adenovirus (Ad) vectors to reduce immune response and increase capacity. Recently developed gutted Ad vectors can deliver full-length dystrophin cDNA expression vectors to muscle tissue. Using muscle-specific promoters to drive dystrophin expression, a strong immune response has not been observed in mdx mice. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors can deliver small genes to muscle without provocation of a significant immune response, which should allow long-term expression of several MD genes. AAV vectors have also been used to deliver sarcoglycan genes to entire muscle groups. These advances and others reviewed here suggest that barriers to gene therapy for MD are surmountable. PMID:10679969

  12. Gene therapy of cancer by vaccines carrying inserted immunostimulatory genes

    Bubeník, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2007), s. 71-73. ISSN 0015-5500 Grant ostatní: EU-FP6 NoE Clinigene(XE) 018933; Liga proti rakovině, Praha(CZ) XX Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : gene therapy * immunostimulatory genes * vaccine Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.596, year: 2007

  13. Gene therapy--its potential in surgery.

    Gojo, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Shin; Patience, Clive; Leguern, Christian; Cooper, David K.C.

    2002-01-01

    Advances in techniques have resulted in practical applications for gene therapy, which is becoming applicable for the treatment of human disease. This review outlines the advantages and disadvantages of the techniques available. Examples of research efforts in the treatment of diseases of relevance to the surgeon (cardiovascular diseases, cancer, wound healing, fracture repair, and in organ transplantation) are presented.

  14. Switching on the lights for gene therapy.

    Alexandra Winkeler

    Full Text Available Strategies for non-invasive and quantitative imaging of gene expression in vivo have been developed over the past decade. Non-invasive assessment of the dynamics of gene regulation is of interest for the detection of endogenous disease-specific biological alterations (e.g., signal transduction and for monitoring the induction and regulation of therapeutic genes (e.g., gene therapy. To demonstrate that non-invasive imaging of regulated expression of any type of gene after in vivo transduction by versatile vectors is feasible, we generated regulatable herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 amplicon vectors carrying hormone (mifepristone or antibiotic (tetracycline regulated promoters driving the proportional co-expression of two marker genes. Regulated gene expression was monitored by fluorescence microscopy in culture and by positron emission tomography (PET or bioluminescence (BLI in vivo. The induction levels evaluated in glioma models varied depending on the dose of inductor. With fluorescence microscopy and BLI being the tools for assessing gene expression in culture and animal models, and with PET being the technology for possible application in humans, the generated vectors may serve to non-invasively monitor the dynamics of any gene of interest which is proportionally co-expressed with the respective imaging marker gene in research applications aiming towards translation into clinical application.

  15. Amelioration of radiation-induced skin injury by adenovirus-mediated heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) overexpression in rats

    Radiation-induced skin injury remains a serious concern for radiation therapy. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme catabolism, has been reported to have potential antioxidant and anti-apoptotic properties. However, the role of HO-1 in radiation-induced skin damage remains unclear. This study aims to elucidate the effects of HO-1 on radiation-induced skin injury in rats. A control adenovirus (Ad-EGFP) and a recombinant adenovirus (Ad-HO1-EGFP) were constructed. Rats were irradiated to the buttock skin with a single dose of 45 Gy followed by a subcutaneous injection of PBS, 5 × 109 genomic copies of Ad-EGFP or Ad-HO1-EGFP (n = 8). After treatment, the skin MDA concentration, SOD activity and apoptosis were measured. The expression of antioxidant and pro-apoptotic genes was determined by RT-PCR and real-time PCR. Skin reactions were measured at regular intervals using the semi-quantitative skin injury score. Subcutaneous injection of Ad-HO1-EGFP infected both epidermal and dermal cells and could spread to the surrounding regions. Radiation exposure upregulated the transcription of the antioxidant enzyme genes, including SOD-1, GPx2 and endogenous HO-1. HO-1 overexpression decreased lipid peroxidation and inhibited the induction of ROS scavenging proteins. Moreover, HO-1 exerted an anti-apoptotic effect by suppressing FAS and FASL expression. Subcutaneous injection of Ad-HO1-EGFP demonstrated significant improvement in radiation-induced skin injury. The present study provides evidences for the protective role of HO-1 in alleviating radiation-induced skin damage in rats, which is helpful for the development of therapy for radiation-induced skin injury

  16. Adenovirus-mediated NDRG2 inhibits the proliferation of human renal cell carcinoma cell line OS-RC-2 in vitro

    Sheng Qiang; Zhen-Fang Du; Min Huang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the inhibitory effects of adenovirus-mediated NDRG2 on the proliferation of human renal cell carcinoma cell line OS-RC-2 in vitro. Methods: NDRG2 was harvested by RT-PCR, confirmed by DNA sequencing, and then cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pIRES2-EGFP, which encodes green fluorescent protein (GFP), to construct pIRES2-EGFP-NDRG2 plasmid. OS-RC-2 cells with NDRG2 negative expression were transfected with pIRES2-EGFP-NDRG2 plasmid. The growth of transfected OS-RC-2 cells was observed under light and fluorescence microscopes. After colony-forming cell assays, cell proliferation detection and MTT assays, the growth curves of cells in each group were plotted to investigate the inhibitory effects of adenovirus-mediated NDRG2 on the proliferation of OS-RC-2 cells. Cell cycle was determined by flow cytometry. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that NDRG2 protein was specifically located on subcellular organelle. Results: A eukaryotic expression vector pIRES2-EGFP-NDRG2 was successfully constructed. After NDRG2 transfection, the growth of OS-RC-2 cells was inhibited. Flow cytometry showed that cells were arrested in S phase but the peak of cell apoptosis was not present, and confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that NDRG2 protein was located in mitochondrion. Conclusions: NDRG2 can significantly inhibit the proliferation of OS-RC-2 cells in vitro and its protein is specifically expressed in the mitochondrion.

  17. Aerosolized Medications for Gene and Peptide Therapy.

    Laube, Beth L

    2015-06-01

    Inhalation therapy has matured to include drugs that: (1) deliver nucleic acids that either lead to the restoration of a gene construct or protein coding sequence in a population of cells or suppress or disrupt production of an abnormal gene product (gene therapy); (2) deliver peptides that target lung diseases such as asthma, sarcoidosis, pulmonary hypertension, and cystic fibrosis; and (3) deliver peptides to treat diseases outside the lung whose target is the systemic circulation (systemic drug delivery). These newer applications for aerosol therapy are the focus of this paper, and I discuss the status of each and the challenges that remain to their successful development. Drugs that are highlighted include: small interfering ribonucleic acid to treat lung cancer and Mycobacterium tuberculosis; vectors carrying the normal alpha-1 antitrypsin gene to treat alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency; vectors carrying the normal cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene to treat cystic fibrosis; vasoactive intestinal peptide to treat asthma, pulmonary hypertension, and sarcoidosis; glutathione to treat cystic fibrosis; granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor to treat pulmonary alveolar proteinosis; calcitonin for postmenopausal osteoporosis; and insulin to treat diabetes. The success of these new aerosol applications will depend on many factors, such as: (1) developing gene therapy formulations that are safe for acute and chronic administrations to the lung, (2) improving the delivery of the genetic material beyond the airway mucus barrier and cell membrane and transferring the material to the cell cytoplasm or the cell nucleus, (3) developing aerosol devices that efficiently deliver genetic material and peptides to their lung targets over a short period of time, (4) developing devices that increase aerosol delivery to the lungs of infants, (5) optimizing the bioavailability of systemically delivered peptides, and (6) developing peptide formulations for

  18. Oncolytic adenovirus mediated Survivin knockdown by RNA interference suppresses human colorectal carcinoma growth in vitro and in vivo

    Wang Chun-Yi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer is a one of the most common alimentary malignancies. Survivin has been proved by many studies to be an ideal target for cancer gene therapy because of its strong anti-apoptotic effect. The reduction of Survivin expression by means of chemically synthesized small interfering RNA or small hairpin RNA expressed from plasmid and resulted growth inhibition of cancer cells had been proved by many studies including ours, but the transfection efficiency was not encouraging. So for the first time we constructed the Survivin shRNA into an oncolytic adenovirus, tested its effects on colorectal cancer cell lines and nude mice xenograft model. Methods In this study, we constructed an oncolytic adenovirus with a Survivin targeted small hairpin RNA and a reporter gene (ZD55-Sur-EGFP. The expression of Survivin mRNA and protein were analyzed by RT-PCR and western blot. The cell growth and apoptosis were tested by in vitro cytopathic assay, MTT assay and flow cytometry respectively. The effect of the constructed virus on xenograft model was evaluated by tumor volume and western blot analysis. Results ZD55-Sur-EGFP replicated in cancer cells specifically, reduced the expression of Survivin mRNA and protein expression effectively (P Conclusion We conclude Survivin RNA interference combining with oncolytic adenovirus virotherapy to be a promising treatment for colorectal cancer.

  19. Gene Tests May Improve Therapy for Endometrial Cancer

    ... External link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Gene Tests May Improve Therapy for Endometrial Cancer By analyzing genes in hundreds of endometrial tumors, scientists identified details ...

  20. Newer Gene Editing Technologies toward HIV Gene Therapy

    Premlata Shankar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the great success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in ameliorating the course of HIV infection, alternative therapeutic approaches are being pursued because of practical problems associated with life-long therapy. The eradication of HIV in the so-called “Berlin patient” who received a bone marrow transplant from a CCR5-negative donor has rekindled interest in genome engineering strategies to achieve the same effect. Precise gene editing within the cells is now a realistic possibility with recent advances in understanding the DNA repair mechanisms, DNA interaction with transcription factors and bacterial defense mechanisms. Within the past few years, four novel technologies have emerged that can be engineered for recognition of specific DNA target sequences to enable site-specific gene editing: Homing Endonuclease, ZFN, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 system. The most recent CRISPR/Cas9 system uses a short stretch of complementary RNA bound to Cas9 nuclease to recognize and cleave target DNA, as opposed to the previous technologies that use DNA binding motifs of either zinc finger proteins or transcription activator-like effector molecules fused to an endonuclease to mediate sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Unlike RNA interference, which requires the continued presence of effector moieties to maintain gene silencing, the newer technologies allow permanent disruption of the targeted gene after a single treatment. Here, we review the applications, limitations and future prospects of novel gene-editing strategies for use as HIV therapy.

  1. Noninvasive tracking of gene transcript and neuroprotection after gene therapy.

    Ren, J; Chen, Y I; Liu, C H; Chen, P-C; Prentice, H; Wu, J-Y; Liu, P K

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy holds exceptional potential for translational medicine by improving the products of defective genes in diseases and/or providing necessary biologics from endogenous sources during recovery processes. However, validating methods for the delivery, distribution and expression of the exogenous genes from such therapy can generally not be applicable to monitor effects over the long term because they are invasive. We report here that human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) complimentary DNA (cDNA) encoded in self-complementary adeno-associated virus-type 2 adeno-associated virus, as delivered through eye drops at multiple time points after cerebral ischemia using bilateral carotid occlusion for 60 min (BCAO-60) led to significant reduction in mortality rates, cerebral atrophy and neurological deficits in C57black6 mice. Most importantly, we validated hG-CSF cDNA expression using translatable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in living brains. This noninvasive approach for monitoring exogenous gene expression in the brains has potential for great impact in the area of experimental gene therapy in animal models of heart attack, stroke, Alzheimer's dementia, Parkinson's disorder and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and the translation of such techniques to emergency medicine. PMID:26207935

  2. Gene Therapy Shows Early Promise Against Heart Failure

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158046.html Gene Therapy Shows Early Promise Against Heart Failure Inserting ... who suffer from heart failure: A trial using gene therapy appears to have boosted patients' cardiac function. " ...

  3. AAV-Based Targeting Gene Therapy

    Wenfang Shi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the first parvovirus serotype AAV2 was isolated from human and used as a vector for gene therapy application, there have been significant progresses in AAV vector development. AAV vectors have been extensively investigated in gene therapy for a broad application. AAV vectors have been considered as the first choice of vector due to efficient infectivity, stable expression and non-pathogenicity. However, the untoward events in AAV mediated in vivo gene therapy studies proposed the new challenges for their further applications. Deep understanding of the viral life cycle, viral structure and replication, infection mechanism and efficiency of AAV DNA integration, in terms of contributing viral, host-cell factors and circumstances would promote to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages and provide more insightful information for the possible clinical applications. In this review, main effort will be focused on the recent progresses in gene delivery to the target cells via receptor-ligand interaction and DNA specific integration regulation. Furthermore AAV receptor and virus particle intracellular trafficking are also discussed.

  4. Gene therapy: prospects for glycolipid storage diseases.

    Gieselmann, Volkmar; Matzner, Ulrich; Klein, Diana; Mansson, Jan Eric; D'Hooge, Rudi; DeDeyn, Peter D; Lüllmann Rauch, Renate; Hartmann, Dieter; Harzer, Klaus

    2003-05-29

    Lysosomal storage diseases comprise a group of about 40 disorders, which in most cases are due to the deficiency of a lysosomal enzyme. Since lysosomal enzymes are involved in the degradation of various compounds, the diseases can be further subdivided according to which pathway is affected. Thus, enzyme deficiencies in the degradation pathway of glycosaminoglycans cause mucopolysaccharidosis, and deficiencies affecting glycopeptides cause glycoproteinosis. In glycolipid storage diseases enzymes are deficient that are involved in the degradation of sphingolipids. Mouse models are available for most of these diseases, and some of these mouse models have been used to study the applicability of in vivo gene therapy. We review the rationale for gene therapy in lysosomal disorders and present data, in particular, about trials in an animal model of metachromatic leukodystrophy. The data of these trials are compared with those obtained with animal models of other lysosomal diseases. PMID:12803926

  5. Pluripotent Stem Cells and Gene Therapy

    Simara, Pavel; Motl, Jason A.; Kaufman, Dan S.

    2013-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent an accessible cell source for novel cell-based clinical research and therapies. With the realization of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), it is possible to produce almost any desired cell type from any patient's cells. Current developments in gene modification methods have opened the possibility for creating genetically corrected human iPSCs for certain genetic diseases that could be used later in autologous transplantation. Promising preclinical studies have demonstrated correction of disease-causing mutations in a number of hematological, neuronal and muscular disorders. This review aims to summarize these recent advances with a focus on iPSC generation techniques, as well as gene modification methods. We will then further discuss some of the main obstacles remaining to be overcome before successful application of human pluripotent stem cell-based therapy arrives in the clinic and what the future of stem cell research may look like. PMID:23353080

  6. Cell Targeting in Anti-Cancer Gene Therapy

    Lila, Mohd Azmi Mohd; Siew, John Shia Kwong; Zakaria, Hayati; Saad, Suria Mohd; Ni, Lim Shen; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising approach towards cancer treatment. The main aim of the therapy is to destroy cancer cells, usually by apoptotic mechanisms, and preserving others. However, its application has been hindered by many factors including poor cellular uptake, non-specific cell targeting and undesirable interferences with other genes or gene products. A variety of strategies exist to improve cellular uptake efficiency of gene-based therapies. This paper highlights advancements in gene th...

  7. Gene therapy approaches for spinal cord injury

    Bright, Corinne

    As the biomedical engineering field expands, combination technologies are demonstrating enormous potential for treating human disease. In particular, intersections between the rapidly developing fields of gene therapy and tissue engineering hold promise to achieve tissue regeneration. Nonviral gene therapy uses plasmid DNA to deliver therapeutic proteins in vivo for extended periods of time. Tissue engineering employs biomedical materials, such as polymers, to support the regrowth of injured tissue. In this thesis, a combination strategy to deliver genes and drugs in a polymeric scaffold was applied to a spinal cord injury model. In order to develop a platform technology to treat spinal cord injury, several nonviral gene delivery systems and polymeric scaffolds were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Nonviral vector trafficking was evaluated in primary neuronal culture to develop an understanding of the barriers to gene transfer in neurons and their supporting glia. Although the most efficient gene carrier in vitro differed from the optimal gene carrier in vivo, confocal and electron microscopy of these nonviral vectors provided insights into the interaction of these vectors with the nucleus. A novel pathway for delivering nanoparticles into the nuclei of neurons and Schwann cells via vesicle trafficking was observed in this study. Reporter gene expression levels were evaluated after direct and remote delivery to the spinal cord, and the optimal nonviral vector, dose, and delivery strategy were applied to deliver the gene encoding the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) to the spinal cord. An injectable and biocompatible gel, composed of the amphiphillic polymer poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-PCL-PEG) was evaluated as a drug and gene delivery system in vitro, and combined with the optimized nonviral gene delivery system to treat spinal cord injury. Plasmid DNA encoding the bFGF gene and the therapeutic NEP1--40 peptide

  8. Transcriptional Targeting in Cancer Gene Therapy

    Tracy Robson; David G. Hirst

    2003-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy has been one of the most exciting areas of therapeutic research in the past decade. In this review, we discuss strategies to restrict transcription of transgenes to tumour cells. A range of promoters which are tissue-specific, tumour-specific, or inducible by exogenous agents are presented. Transcriptional targeting should prevent normal tissue toxicities associated with other cancer treatments, such as radiation and chemotherapy. In addition, the specificity of these stra...

  9. Revertant mosaicism in skin: natural gene therapy

    Joey E Lai-Cheong; McGrath, John A; Uitto, Jouni

    2010-01-01

    Revertant mosaicism is a naturally occurring phenomenon involving spontaneous correction of a pathogenic mutation in a somatic cell. Recent studies suggest that it is not a rare event and that it could be clinically relevant to phenotypic expression and patient treatment. Indeed, revertant cell therapy represents a potential “natural gene therapy” because in vivo reversion obviates the need for further genetic correction. Revertant mosaicism has been observed in several inherited conditions, ...

  10. Pluripotent Stem Cells and Gene Therapy

    Simara, Pavel; Motl, Jason A.; Kaufman, Dan S.

    2013-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent an accessible cell source for novel cell-based clinical research and therapies. With the realization of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), it is possible to produce almost any desired cell type from any patient's cells. Current developments in gene modification methods have opened the possibility for creating genetically corrected human iPSCs for certain genetic diseases that could be used later in autologous transplantation. Promising preclinical s...

  11. Gene therapy in glaucoma-3: Therapeutic approaches

    Mohamed Abdel-Monem Soliman Mahdy

    2010-01-01

    Recently, several promising genetic therapeutic approaches had been investigated. Some are either used to stop apoptosis and halt further glaucomatous damage, wound healing modulating effect or long lasting intraocular pressure lowering effects than the conventional commercially available antiglaucoma medications. Method of Literature Search The literature was searched on the Medline database using the PubMed interface. The key words for search were glaucoma, gene therapy, and genetic diagnosis of glaucoma.

  12. Gene Therapy: Implications for Craniofacial Regeneration

    Scheller, Erica L.; Villa-Diaz, Luis G.; Krebsbach, Paul H.

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy in the craniofacial region provides a unique tool for delivery of DNA to coordinate protein production in both time and space. The drive to bring this technology to the clinic is derived from the fact that over 85% of the global population may at one time require repair or replacement of a craniofacial structure. This need ranges from mild tooth decay and tooth loss to temporomandibular joint disorders and large-scale reconstructive surgery. Our ability to insert foreign DNA into...

  13. Targeted Gene Therapy of Cancer: Second Amendment toward Holistic Therapy

    Jaleh Barar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available It seems solid tumors are developing smart organs with specialized cells creating specified bio-territory, the so called “tumor microenvironment (TME”, in which there is reciprocal crosstalk among cancer cells, immune system cells and stromal cells. TME as an intricate milieu also consists of cancer stem cells (CSCs that can resist against chemotherapies. In solid tumors, metabolism and vascularization appears to be aberrant and tumor interstitial fluid (TIF functions as physiologic barrier. Thus, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and gene therapy often fail to provide cogent clinical outcomes. It looms that it is the time to accept the fact that initiation of cancer could be generation of another form of life that involves a cluster of thousands of genes, while we have failed to observe all aspects of it. Hence, the current treatment modalities need to be re-visited to cover all key aspects of disease using combination therapy based on the condition of patients. Perhaps personalized cluster of genes need to be simultaneously targeted.

  14. [Cellular therapy and gene therapy: perspectives in neuromuscular pathology].

    Fardeau, M

    1993-10-01

    Identification of the gene coding for the protein (dystrophin) which is lacking or abnormal in Duchenne or Becker type human muscular dystrophies was a decisive turning point in neuro-muscular pathology. Since that time, a considerable number of gene abnormalities have been identified or at least localized. The severity of these diseases, their steady evolution and the absence of any efficient drug therapy, have lead to the development of new therapeutic approaches based on restoring the genetic capacities of the muscle cell. There are two possibilities for therapy. The first is based on the transfer of myogenic cells derived from the 'satellite' cells normally present at the periphery of muscle fibers. The results obtained from a murine model of Duchenne dystrophy ('mdx' mouse) were very promising. However, the results from application of the same techniques to the canine model (GRMDX) or to affected children are, at the present time, disappointing. A number of biological questions remain to be solved before this technique can be more extensively applied to humans. The second possibility is based on gene transfer, through a viral vector. The adenovirus is presently a possible vector. The first experimental results, on 'mdx' mice, are again very encouraging. Extension of these studies to the canine model is a necessary prerequisite for any human application. It should be noted that these two approaches are complementary. Their future applications may depend on the diffuse or selective nature of the skeletal muscle atrophy, and on whether cardiac and respiratory muscles are involved. PMID:8290312

  15. An overview of gene therapy in head and neck cancer

    Amit Bali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy is a new treatment modality in which new gene is introduced or existing gene is manipulated to cause cancer cell death or slow the growth of the tumor. In this review, we have discussed the different treatment approaches for cancer gene therapy; gene addition therapy, immunotherapy, gene therapy using oncolytic viruses, antisense ribonucleic acid (RNA and RNA interference-based gene therapy. Clinical trials to date in head and neck cancer have shown evidence of gene transduction and expression, mediation of apoptosis and clinical response including pathological complete responses. The objective of this article is to provide an overview of the current available gene therapies for head and neck cancer.

  16. In utero recombinant adeno-associated virus gene transfer in mice, rats, and primates

    Marrero Luis

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene transfer into the amniotic fluid using recombinant adenovirus vectors was shown previously to result in high efficiency transfer of transgenes into the lungs and intestines. Adenovirus mediated in utero gene therapy, however, resulted in expression of the transgene for less than 30 days. Recombinant adenovirus associated viruses (rAAV have the advantage of maintaining the viral genome in daughter cells thus providing for long-term expression of transgenes. Methods Recombinant AAV2 carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP was introduced into the amniotic sac of fetal rodents and nonhuman primates. Transgene maintenance and expression was monitor. Results Gene transfer resulted in rapid uptake and long-term gene expression in mice, rats, and non-human primates. Expression and secretion of the reporter gene, GFP, was readily demonstrated within 72 hours post-therapy. In long-term studies in rats and nonhuman primates, maintenance of GFP DNA, protein expression, and reporter gene secretion was documented for over one year. Conclusions Because only multipotential stem cells are present at the time of therapy, these data demonstrated that in utero gene transfer with AAV2 into stem cells resulted in long-term systemic expression of active transgene roducts. Thus, in utero gene transfer via the amniotic fluid may be useful in treatment of gene disorders.

  17. The Use of Viral Vectors in Gene Transfer Therapy

    A. Dziaková

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy is strategy based on using genes as pharmaceuticals. Gene therapy is a treatment that involves altering the genes inside body's cells to stop disease. Genes contain DNA- the code controlling body form and function. Genes that do not work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds a new gene in an attempt to cure disease or improve the ability of the body to fight disease. Gene therapy holds promise for treating a wide range of diseases, including cancer, cystic fibrosis, heart disease, diabetes, hemophilia and AIDS. Various types of genetic material are used in gene therapy; double-stranded DNA (dsDNA, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA, plasmid DNA and antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ASON. The success of gene therapy depends on assuring the entrance of the therapeutic gene to targeted cells without any form of biodegradation. Commonly used vectors in gene therapy are: adenoviruses (400 clinical studies; 23.8%, retroviruses (344 clinical studies; 20.5%, unenveloped/plasmid DNA (304 clinical studies, 17.7%, adeno-associated viruses (75 clinical studies; 4.5% and others. In this paper, we have reviewed the major gene delivery vectors and recent improvements made in their design meant to overcome the issues that commonly arise with the use of gene therapy vectors.

  18. Suicide genes or p53 gene and p53 target genes as targets for cancer gene therapy by ionizing radiation

    Radiotherapy has some disadvantages due to the severe side-effect on the normal tissues at a curative dose of ionizing radiation (IR). Similarly, as a new developing approach, gene therapy also has some disadvantages, such as lack of specificity for tumors, limited expression of therapeutic gene, potential biological risk. To certain extent, above problems would be solved by the suicide genes or p53 gene and its target genes therapies targeted by ionizing radiation. This strategy not only makes up the disadvantage from radiotherapy or gene therapy alone, but also promotes success rate on the base of lower dose. By present, there have been several vectors measuring up to be reaching clinical trials. This review focused on the development of the cancer gene therapy through suicide genes or p53 and its target genes mediated by IR. (authors)

  19. Gene therapy for gastric cancer: Is it promising?

    Sutter, Andreas P; Fechner, Henry

    2006-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common tumors worldwide. The therapeutic outcome of conventional therapies is inefficient. Thus, new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. Gene therapy is a promising molecular alternative in the treatment of gastric cancer, including the replacement of defective tumor suppressor genes, the inactivation of oncogenes, the introduction of suicide genes, genetic immunotherapy, anti-angiogenetic gene therapy, and virotherapy. Improved molecular biological t...

  20. Challenges and opportunities in dystrophin-deficient cardiomyopathy gene therapy

    Duan, Dongsheng

    2006-01-01

    The last decade has evidenced unprecedented progress in gene therapy of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD and BMD) skeletal muscle disease. Cardiomyopathy is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in both patients and carriers of DMD, BMD and X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy. However, there is little advance in heart gene therapy. The gene, the vector, vector delivery, the target tissue and animal models are five fundamental components in developing an effective gene therapy. Int...

  1. Liver-directed Gene Therapy for Dyslipidemia and Diabetes

    Oka, Kazuhiro; Chan, Lawrence

    2004-01-01

    This article provides an update of liver-directed gene therapy for dyslipidemia, reviewing papers published since 2002 and summarizing progress in gene transfer vectors. Despite the availability of polypharmacy and other therapeutic interventions, the treatment of severe dyslipidemia remains a challenge and continues to be an important target for experimental gene therapy. Gene therapy strategies that focus on long-term therapeutic efficacy of different regimens are emerging from small animal...

  2. Gene therapy for carcinoma of the breast: Genetic toxins

    Gene therapy was initially envisaged as a potential treatment for genetically inherited, monogenic disorders. The applications of gene therapy have now become wider, however, and include cardiovascular diseases, vaccination and cancers in which conventional therapies have failed. With regard to oncology, various gene therapy approaches have been developed. Among them, the use of genetic toxins to kill cancer cells selectively is emerging. Two different types of genetic toxins have been developed so far: the metabolic toxins and the dominant-negative class of toxins. This review describes these two different approaches, and discusses their potential applications in cancer gene therapy

  3. Gene Therapy of Cancer: Induction of Anti-Tumor Immunity

    ChengQian; JesusPrieto

    2004-01-01

    Many malignancies lack satisfactory treatment and new therapeutic options are urgently needed. Gene therapy is a new modality to treat both inherited and acquired diseases based on the transfer of genetic material to the tissues. Different gene therapy strategies against cancers have been developed. A considerable number of preclinical studies indicate that a great variety of cancers are amenable to gene therapy. Among these strategies, induction of anti-tumor immunity is the most promising approach. Gene therapy with cytokines has reached unprecedented success in preclinical models of cancer. Synergistic rather than additive effects have been demonstrated by combination of gene transfer of cytokines/chemokines, costimulatory molecules or adoptive cell therapy. Recent progress in vector technology and in imaging techniques allowing in vivo assessment of gene expression will facilitate the development of clinical applications of gene therapy, a procedure which may have a notorious impact in the management of cancers lacking effective treatment. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(2):105-111.

  4. Gene Therapy of Cancer: Induction of Anti-Tumor Immunity

    Cheng Qian; Jesus Prieto

    2004-01-01

    Many malignancies lack satisfactory treatment and new therapeutic options are urgently needed. Gene therapy is a new modality to treat both inherited and acquired diseases based on the transfer of genetic material to the tissues. Different gene therapy strategies against cancers have been developed. A considerable number of preclinical studies indicate that a great variety of cancers are amenable to gene therapy. Among these strategies,induction of anti-tumorimmunity is the most promising approach. Gene therapy with cytokines has reached unprecedented success in preclinical models of cancer. Synergistic rather than additive effects have beendemonstrated by combination of gene transfer of cytokines/chemokines, costimulatory molecules or adoptive cell therapy. Recent progress in vector technology and in imaging techniques allowing in vivo assessment of gene expression will facilitate the development of clinical applications of gene therapy, a procedure which may have a notorious impact in the management of cancers lacking effective treatment.

  5. Gene therapy for lung inflammatory diseases: not so far away?

    Sallenave, J M; Porteous, D. J.; Haslett, C

    1997-01-01

    The lung is a readily accessible target organ for gene therapy. To date, therapeutic gene delivery has largely focused on introducing functional, corrective genes in lung diseases arising from single gene defects such as cystic fibrosis. More recently interest has centred on gene therapy as a potential therapeutic tool in modulating complex pathological processes such as pulmonary inflammation. Genetic modification of critical components of the inflammatory process may be beneficial-for...

  6. Retinal Gene Therapy: Current Progress and Future Prospects

    Ku, Cristy A; Pennesi, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials treating inherited retinal dystrophy caused by RPE65 mutations had put retinal gene therapy at the forefront of gene therapy. Both successes and limitations in these clinical trials have fueled developments in gene vectors, which continue to further advance the field. These novel gene vectors aim to more safely and efficiently transduce retinal cells, expand the gene packaging capacity of AAV, and utilize new strategies to correct the varying mechanisms of dysfunction found wi...

  7. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Gene Therapy

    Anne M. Rowzee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 is a small peptide component of the prohormone, proglucagon, that is produced in the gut. Exendin-4, a GLP-1 receptor agonist originally isolated from the saliva of H. suspectum or Gila monster, is a peptide that shares sequence and functional homology with GLP-1. Both peptides have been demonstrated to stimulate insulin secretion, inhibit glucagon secretion, promote satiety and slow gastric emptying. As such, GLP-1 and Exendin-4 have become attractive pharmaceutical targets as an adjunctive therapy for individuals with type II diabetes mellitus, with several products currently available clinically. Herein we summarize the cell biology leading to GLP-1 production and secretion from intestinal L-cells and the endocrine functions of this peptide and Exendin-4 in humans. Additionally, gene therapeutic applications of GLP-1 and Exendin-4 are discussed with a focus on recent work using the salivary gland as a gene therapy target organ for the treatment of diabetes mellitus.

  8. Perspectives on best practices for gene therapy programs.

    Cheever, Thomas R; Berkley, Dale; Braun, Serge; Brown, Robert H; Byrne, Barry J; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S; Cwik, Valerie; Duan, Dongsheng; Federoff, Howard J; High, Katherine A; Kaspar, Brian K; Klinger, Katherine W; Larkindale, Jane; Lincecum, John; Mavilio, Fulvio; McDonald, Cheryl L; McLaughlin, James; Weiss McLeod, Bonnie; Mendell, Jerry R; Nuckolls, Glen; Stedman, Hansell H; Tagle, Danilo A; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Wang, Hao; Wernett, Pamela J; Wilson, James M; Porter, John D; Gubitz, Amelie K

    2015-03-01

    With recent successes in gene therapy trials for hemophilia and retinal diseases, the promise and prospects for gene therapy are once again garnering significant attention. To build on this momentum, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the Muscular Dystrophy Association jointly hosted a workshop in April 2014 on "Best Practices for Gene Therapy Programs," with a focus on neuromuscular disorders. Workshop participants included researchers from academia and industry as well as representatives from the regulatory, legal, and patient advocacy sectors to cover the gamut from preclinical optimization to intellectual property concerns and regulatory approval. The workshop focused on three key issues in the field: (1) establishing adequate scientific premise for clinical trials in gene therapy, (2) addressing regulatory process issues, and (3) intellectual property and commercialization issues as they relate to gene therapy. The outcomes from the discussions at this workshop are intended to provide guidance for researchers and funders in the gene therapy field. PMID:25654329

  9. Improved Animal Models for Testing Gene Therapy for Atherosclerosis

    Du, Liang; Zhang, Jingwan; De Meyer, Guido R. Y.; Flynn, Rowan; Dichek, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy delivered to the blood vessel wall could augment current therapies for atherosclerosis, including systemic drug therapy and stenting. However, identification of clinically useful vectors and effective therapeutic transgenes remains at the preclinical stage. Identification of effective vectors and transgenes would be accelerated by availability of animal models that allow practical and expeditious testing of vessel-wall-directed gene therapy. Such models would include humanlike le...

  10. 78 FR 70307 - Guidance for Industry: Preclinical Assessment of Investigational Cellular and Gene Therapy...

    2013-11-25

    ... Investigational Cellular and Gene Therapy Products; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Preclinical Assessment of Investigational Cellular and Gene Therapy... and Gene Therapies (OCTGT). The product areas covered by this guidance are cellular therapy,...

  11. Gene therapy for gastric cancer: Is it promising?

    Andreas P Sutter; Henry Fechner

    2006-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common tumors worldwide. The therapeutic outcome of conventional therapies is inefficient. Thus, new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. Gene therapy is a promising molecular alternative in the treatment of gastric cancer,including the replacement of defective tumor suppressor genes, the inactivation of oncogenes, the introduction of suicide genes, genetic immunotherapy, anti-angiogenetic gene therapy, and virotherapy. Improved molecular biological techniques and a better understanding of gastric carcinogenesis have allowed us to validate a variety of genes as molecular targets for gene therapy.This review provides an update of the new developments in cancer gene therapy, new principles, techniques,strategies and vector systems, and shows how they may be applied in the treatment of gastric cancer.

  12. Lentiviral Vectors and Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy

    Massimo Conese

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is a chronic autosomic recessive syndrome, caused by mutations in the CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR gene, a chloride channel expressed on the apical side of the airway epithelial cells. The lack of CFTR activity brings a dysregulated exchange of ions and water through the airway epithelium, one of the main aspects of CF lung disease pathophysiology. Lentiviral (LV vectors, of the Retroviridae family, show interesting properties for CF gene therapy, since they integrate into the host genome and allow long-lasting gene expression. Proof-of-principle that LV vectors can transduce the airway epithelium and correct the basic electrophysiological defect in CF mice has been given. Initial data also demonstrate that LV vectors can be repeatedly administered to the lung and do not give rise to a gross inflammatory process, although they can elicit a T cell-mediated response to the transgene. Future studies will clarify the efficacy and safety profile of LV vectors in new complex animal models with CF, such as ferrets and pigs.

  13. Gene Therapy May Offer Hope for 'Bubble Boy' Disease

    ... news/fullstory_158415.html Gene Therapy May Offer Hope for 'Bubble Boy' Disease Preliminary research tries new ... by a mutation in the IL2RG gene that leaves boys with little or no immune system protection, ...

  14. A hybrid lentivirus-transposon vector for safer gene therapy

    Vink, C. A.

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy vectors based on the HIV-1 lentivirus are an attractive option for clinical applications because they enter a broad range of target cells efficiently and deliver stable gene expression through integration into host chromosomes. However, lentiviral vectors are known to integrate preferentially within actively transcribing genes. Leukaemia-like expansions observed in gene therapy trials using gammaretroviral vectors and are thought to have been caused by disruption o...

  15. Gene Therapy, Early Promises, Subsequent Problems, and Recent Breakthroughs

    Saeideh Razi Soofiyani; Behzad Baradaran; Farzaneh Lotfipour; Tohid Kazemi; Leila Mohammadnejad

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy is one of the most attractive fields in medicine. The concept of gene delivery to tissues for clinical applications has been discussed around half a century, but scientist’s ability to manipulate genetic material via recombinant DNA technology made this purpose to reality. Various approaches, such as viral and non-viral vectors and physical methods, have been developed to make gene delivery safer and more efficient. While gene therapy initially conceived as a way t...

  16. Modification of pGH cDNA using the first intron and adenovirus-mediated expression in CHO cells

    李秀锦; 仲飞; 齐顺章

    2003-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to investigate the function of the first intron of porcine growth hormone (pGH) gene in the gene expression.Methods PCR method was used to amplify the first intron from pig genomic DNA. The intron was then inserted into pGH cDNA to construct pGH cDNA-intron (pGH cDNA-in). The recombinant adenoviruses containing pGH cDNA and pGH cDNA-in genes under control of CMV promoter were generated by homologous recombination method in HEK 293 cells respectively. The effect of the first intron on gene expression was evaluated by comparing the expression levels of pGH cDNA-in and pGH cDNA mediated by adenovirus vectors in CHO cells.Results The expression level of pGH cDNA containing the first intron increased by 117%, which was significantly higher than that of pGH cDNA without the intron (P<0.001). Conclusion The first intron of pGH gene has the function to improve pGH gene expression.

  17. Enhancement of myoblast microencapsulation for gene therapy.

    Li, Anna Aihua; Shen, Feng; Zhang, Tao; Cirone, Pasquale; Potter, Murray; Chang, Patricia L

    2006-05-01

    One method of nonviral-based gene therapy is to implant microencapsulated nonautologous cells genetically engineered to secrete the desired gene products. Encapsulating the cells within a biocompatible permselective hydrogel, such as alginate-poly-L-lysine-alginate (APA), protects the foreign cells from the host immune system while allowing diffusion of nutrients and the therapeutic gene products. An important consideration is which kind of cells is the best candidate for long-term implantation. Our previous work has shown that proliferation and differentiation of encapsulated C2C12 myoblasts in vitro are significantly improved by inclusion of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), insulin growth factor II (IGF-II), and collagen within the microcapsules ("enhanced" capsules). However, the effects of such inclusions on the functional status of the microcapsules in vivo are unknown. Here we found that comparing the standard with the enhanced APA microcapsules; there was no difference in the rates of diffusion of recombinant products of different sizes, that is, human factor IX (FIX, 65 kDa), murine IgG (150 kDa), and a lysosomal enzyme, beta-glucuronidase (300 kDa), thus providing a key requirement of such an immunoprotective device. Furthermore, the creatine phosphokinase activity and myosin heavy chain staining (markers for differentiation of the myoblasts) and the cell number per capsule in the enhanced microcapsules indicated a higher degree of differentiation and proliferation when compared to the standard microcapsules, thus demonstrating an improved microenvironment for the encapsulated cells. Efficacy was tested in a melanoma cancer tumor model by treating tumor induced by B16-F0/neu tumor cells in mice with myoblasts secreting angiostatin from either the standard or enhanced APA microcapsules. Mice treated with enhanced APA-microcapsules had an 80% reduction in tumor volume at day 21 compared to a 70% reduction in those treated with standard APA

  18. Adenoviral gene therapy in gastric cancer: A review

    Nima Khalighinejad; Hesammodin Hariri; Omid Behnamfar; Arash Yousefi; Amir Momeni

    2008-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. With current therapeutic approaches the prognosis of gastric cancer is very poor, as gastric cancer accounts for the second most common cause of death in cancer related deaths. Gastric cancer like almost all other cancers has a molecular genetic basis which relies on disruption in normal cellular regulatory mechanisms regarding cell growth, apoptosis and cell division. Thus novel therapeutic approaches such as gene therapy promise to become the alternative choice of treatment in gastric cancer. In gene therapy, suicide genes, tumor suppressor genes and anti-angiogenesis genes among many others are introduced to cancer cells via vectors.Some of the vectors widely used in gene therapy are Adenoviral vectors. This review provides an update of the new developments in adenoviral cancer gene therapy including strategies for inducing apoptosis, inhibiting metastasis and targeting the cancer cells.

  19. Progress in Chimeric Vector and Chimeric Gene Based Cardiovascular Gene Therapy

    HU Chun-Song; YOON Young-sup; ISNER Jeffrey M.; LOSORDO Douglas W.

    2003-01-01

    Gene therapy for cardiovascular diseases has developed from preliminary animal experiments to clinical trials. However, vectors and target genes used currently in gene therapy are mainly focused on viral, nonviral vector and single target gene or monogene. Each vector system has a series of advantages and limitations. Chimeric vectors which combine the advantages of viral and nonviral vector,chimeric target genes which combine two or more target genes and novel gene delivery modes are being developed. In this article, we summarized the progress in chimeric vectors and chimeric genes based cardiovascular gene therapy, which including proliferative or occlusive vascular diseases such as atheroslerosis and restenosis, hypertonic vascular disease such as hypertension and cardiac diseases such as myocardium ischemia, dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure, even heart transplantation. The development of chimeric vector, chimeric gene and their cardiovascular gene therapy is promising.

  20. Gene therapy in head and neck cancer: a review

    Chisholm, E; Bapat, U.; Chisholm, C; Alusi, G.; Vassaux, G

    2007-01-01

    Gene therapy for cancer is a rapidly evolving field with head and neck squamous cell cancer being one of the more frequently targeted cancer types. The number of clinical trials in the UK is growing and there is already a commercially available agent in China. Various gene therapy strategies along with delivery mechanisms for targeting head and neck cancer are reviewed.

  1. Prospects for Gene Therapy in the Fragile X Syndrome

    Rattazzi, Mario C.; LaFauci, Giuseppe; Brown, W. Ted

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy is unarguably the definitive way to treat, and possibly cure, genetic diseases. A straightforward concept in theory, in practice it has proven difficult to realize, even when directed to easily accessed somatic cell systems. Gene therapy for diseases in which the central nervous system (CNS) is the target organ presents even greater…

  2. Designing gene therapy vectors targeting tumor cell endothelium

    Pınar ÖZKAL BAYDIN; AKBULUT, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for tumor growth and metastasis. Targeting angiogenesis is one of the recent progresses in the therapeutic area of cancer. Gene therapy is one of the promis- ing strategies in the treatment of cancer. The gene therapy vectors targeting tumor endothelium carry the great therapeu- tic potential in cancer.

  3. Development of gene and stem cell therapy for ocular neurodegeneration

    Jing-Xue; Zhang; Ning-Li; Wang; Qing-Jun; Lu

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases pose a serious threat to eye health, but there is currently no effective treatment available. Recent years have witnessed rapid development of several cutting-edge technologies, such as gene therapy, stem cell therapy, and tissue engineering. Due to the special features of ocular structure, some of these technologies have been translated into ophthalmological clinic practice with fruitful achievements, setting a good example for other fields. This paper reviews the development of the gene and stem cell therapies in ophthalmology.

  4. Taking stock of gene therapy for cystic fibrosis

    Alton Eric WFW

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The identification of the cystic fibrosis (CF gene opened the way for gene therapy. In the ten years since then, proof of principle in vitro and then in animal models in vivo has been followed by numerous clinical studies using both viral and non-viral vectors to transfer normal copies of the gene to the lungs and noses of CF patients. A wealth of data have emerged from these studies, reflecting enormous progress and also helping to focus and define key difficulties that remain unresolved. Gene therapy for CF remains the most promising possibility for curative rather than symptomatic therapy.

  5. Antagonism between gene therapy and epigenetic therapy on human laryngeal carcinoma tumor-bearing mice

    LIAN Meng; WANG Qi; FANG Ju-gao; WANG Hong; FAN Er-zhong

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene therapy and epigenetic therapy have gained more attention in cancer treatment.However,the effect of a combined treatment of gene therapy and epigenetic therapy on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma have not been studied yet.To study the mechanism and clinical application,human laryngeal carcinoma cell (Hep-2) tumor-bearing mice were used.Methods A xenograft tumor model was established by the subcutaneous inoculation of Hep-2 cells in the right armpit of BALB/c nu/nu mice.The mice with well-formed tumor were randomly divided into six groups.Multisite injections of rAd-p53 and/or 5-aza-dC were used to treat tumor.Tumor growth was monitored by measuring tumor volume and growth rate.p53 and E-cadherin protein levels in tumor tissues were detected by immunohistochemical staining.The mRNA levels were monitored with FQ-PCR.Results Gene therapy was much more effective than single epigenetic therapy and combined therapy.The gene therapy group has the lowest tumor growth rate and the highest expression levels of p53 and E-cadherin.Conclusions The combined treatment of gene and epigenetic therapy is not suggested for treating head and neck carcinoma,because gene therapy shows an antagonistic effect to epigenetic therapy.However,the mechanisms of action are still unclear.

  6. Bacteriophage-Derived Vectors for Targeted Cancer Gene Therapy

    Md Zahidul Islam Pranjol; Amin Hajitou

    2015-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy expanded and reached its pinnacle in research in the last decade. Both viral and non-viral vectors have entered clinical trials, and significant successes have been achieved. However, a systemic administration of a vector, illustrating safe, efficient, and targeted gene delivery to solid tumors has proven to be a major challenge. In this review, we summarize the current progress and challenges in the targeted gene therapy of cancer. Moreover, we highlight the recent dev...

  7. Advances in gene therapy technologies to treat retinitis pigmentosa

    Petrs-Silva, Hilda

    2013-01-01

    Hilda Petrs-Silva, Rafael LindenInstitute of Biophysics, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, BrazilAbstract: Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a class of diseases that leads to progressive degeneration of the retina. Experimental approaches to gene therapy for the treatment of inherited retinal dystrophies have advanced in recent years, inclusive of the safe delivery of genes to the human retina. This review is focused on the development of gene therapy for RP using recombinant a...

  8. Gene Therapy for Cancer Treatment: Past, Present and Future

    Cross, Deanna; Burmester, James K.

    2006-01-01

    The broad field of gene therapy promises a number of innovative treatments that are likely to become important in preventing deaths from cancer. In this review, we discuss the history, highlights and future of three different gene therapy treatment approaches: immunotherapy, oncolytic virotherapy and gene transfer. Immunotherapy uses genetically modified cells and viral particles to stimulate the immune system to destroy cancer cells. Recent clinical trials of second and third generation vacc...

  9. Transcriptionally targeted gene therapy to detect and treat cancer

    Wu, Lily; Johnson, Mai; Sato, Makoto

    2003-01-01

    The greatest challenge in cancer treatment is to achieve the highest levels of specificity and efficacy. Cancer gene therapy could be designed specifically to express therapeutic genes to induce cancer cell destruction. Cancer-specific promoters are useful tools to accomplish targeted expression; however, high levels of gene expression are needed to achieve therapeutic efficacy. Incorporating an imaging reporter gene in tandem with the therapeutic gene will allow tangible proof of principle t...

  10. Translational Approaches towards Cancer Gene Therapy: Hurdles and Hopes

    Yadollah Omidi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Of the cancer gene therapy approaches, gene silencing, suicide/apoptosis inducing gene therapy, immunogene therapy and targeted gene therapy are deemed to sub­stantially control the biological consequences of genomic changes in cancerous cells. Thus, a large number of clinical trials have been conducted against various malignancies. In this review, we will discuss recent translational progresses of gene and cell therapy of cancer. Methods: Essential information on gene therapy of cancer were reviewed and discussed towards their clinical translations. Results: Gene transfer has been rigorously studied in vitro and in vivo, in which some of these gene therapy endeavours have been carried on towards translational investigations and clinical applications. About 65% of gene therapy trials are related to cancer therapy. Some of these trials have been combined with cell therapy to produce personalized medicines such as Sipuleucel-T (Provenge®, marketed by Dendreon, USA for the treatment of asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Conclusion: Translational approach links two diverse boundaries of basic and clinical researches. For successful translation of geno­medicines into clinical applications, it is essential 1 to have the guidelines and standard operating procedures for development and application of the genomedicines specific to clinically relevant biomarker(s; 2 to conduct necessary animal experimental studies to show the “proof of concept” for the proposed genomedicines; 3 to perform an initial clinical investigation; and 4 to initiate extensive clinical trials to address all necessary requirements. In short, translational researches need to be refined to accelerate the geno­medicine development and clinical applications.