WorldWideScience

Sample records for adenovirus virus-associated rnai

  1. Adenovirus vectors lacking virus-associated RNA expression enhance shRNA activity to suppress hepatitis C virus replication

    Pei, Zheng; Shi, Guoli; Kondo, Saki; Ito, Masahiko; Maekawa, Aya; Suzuki, Mariko; Saito, Izumu; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Kanegae, Yumi

    2013-12-01

    First-generation adenovirus vectors (FG AdVs) expressing short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) effectively downregulate the expressions of target genes. However, this vector, in fact, expresses not only the transgene product, but also virus-associated RNAs (VA RNAs) that disturb cellular RNAi machinery. We have established a production method for VA-deleted AdVs lacking expression of VA RNAs. Here, we showed that the highest shRNA activity was obtained when the shRNA was inserted not at the popularly used E1 site, but at the E4 site. We then compared the activities of shRNAs against hepatitis C virus (HCV) expressed from VA-deleted AdVs or conventional AdVs. The VA-deleted AdVs inhibited HCV production much more efficiently. Therefore, VA-deleted AdVs were more effective than the currently used AdVs for shRNA downregulation, probably because of the lack of competition between VA RNAs and the shRNAs. These VA-deleted AdVs might enable more effective gene therapies for chronic hepatitis C.

  2. Inhibition of KIT RNAi mediated with adenovirus in gastrointestinal stromal tumor xenograft

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate a therapeutic method for gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) based on KIT RNA interference (RNAi) with AdMax adenovirus. METHODS: KIT short hairpin RNA (shRNA), whose lateral sides were decorated with restriction endonuclease sequences, was designed. T 4 DNA ligase catalyzed the joint of the KIT shRNA and the green fluorescent protein-containing PDC316-EGFP-U6 to form PDC316EGFP-U6-KIT. Homologous recombination of AdEGFPU6-KIT was performed with the AdMax system. Heterotopically transp...

  3. RNAi2015 - Ten years of RNAi Oxford.

    Bewicke-Copley, Findlay; Samuel, Priya; Carter, David Rf

    2015-01-01

    The tenth RNAi conference was held at St. Hilda's College Oxford on the 24-26 March 2015. The conference offered researchers from all over the world the chance to present, discuss and discover work pertaining to the field of RNAi. RNAi has become an essential technique in genomic research for functional validation as well as an exciting avenue to explore in therapeutic medicine. Emerging techniques such as CRISPR as well as improvements in efficiency of existing techniques and expansions in libraries have cemented the importance of RNAi at the cutting edge of research. Featured presentations and posters showcased recent research in the field ranging from RNA detection in bio fluids through to potential oligonucleotide therapies. PMID:26557153

  4. Epigenetics: heterochromatin meets RNAi

    Ingela Djupedal; Karl Ekwall

    2009-01-01

    The term epigenetics refers to heritable changes not encoded by DNA. The organization of DNA into chromatin fibers affects gene expression in a heritable manner and is therefore one mechanism of epigenetic inheritance. Large parts of eukaryotic genomes consist of constitutively highly condensed heterochromatin, important for maintaining genome integrity but also for silencing of genes within. Small RNA, together with factors typically associated with RNA interference (RNAi) targets homologous DNA sequences and recruits factors that modify the chromatin, com-monly resulting in formation of heterochromatin and silencing of target genes. The scope of this review is to provide an overview of the roles of small RNA and the RNAi components, Dicer, Argonaute and RNA dependent polymeras-es in epigenetic inheritance via heterochromatin formation, exemplified with pathways from unicellular eukaryotes, plants and animals.

  5. Modulation of breast cancer resistance protein mediated atypical multidrug resistance using RNA interference delivered by adenovirus

    LI Wen-tong; ZHOU Geng-yin; WANG Chun-ling; GUO Cheng-hao; SONG Xian-rang; CHI Wei-ling

    2005-01-01

    @@ Clinical multidrug resistance (MDR) of malignancies to many antineoplastic agents is the major obstacle in the successful treatment of cancer. The emergence of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, has necessitated the development of antagonists. To overcome the BCRP-mediated atypical MDR, RNA interference (RNAi) delivered by adenovirus targeting BCRP mRNA was used to inhibit the atypical MDR expression by infecting MCF-7/MX100 cell lines with constructed RNAi adenovirus.

  6. Environmental RNAi in herbivorous insects.

    Ivashuta, Sergey; Zhang, Yuanji; Wiggins, B Elizabeth; Ramaseshadri, Partha; Segers, Gerrit C; Johnson, Steven; Meyer, Steve E; Kerstetter, Randy A; McNulty, Brian C; Bolognesi, Renata; Heck, Gregory R

    2015-05-01

    Environmental RNAi (eRNAi) is a sequence-specific regulation of endogenous gene expression in a receptive organism by exogenous double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Although demonstrated under artificial dietary conditions and via transgenic plant presentations in several herbivorous insects, the magnitude and consequence of exogenous dsRNA uptake and the role of eRNAi remains unknown under natural insect living conditions. Our analysis of coleopteran insects sensitive to eRNAi fed on wild-type plants revealed uptake of plant endogenous long dsRNAs, but not small RNAs. Subsequently, the dsRNAs were processed into 21 nt siRNAs by insects and accumulated in high quantities in insect cells. No accumulation of host plant-derived siRNAs was observed in lepidopteran larvae that are recalcitrant to eRNAi. Stability of ingested dsRNA in coleopteran larval gut followed by uptake and transport from the gut to distal tissues appeared to be enabling factors for eRNAi. Although a relatively large number of distinct coleopteran insect-processed plant-derived siRNAs had sequence complementarity to insect transcripts, the vast majority of the siRNAs were present in relatively low abundance, and RNA-seq analysis did not detect a significant effect of plant-derived siRNAs on insect transcriptome. In summary, we observed a broad genome-wide uptake of plant endogenous dsRNA and subsequent processing of ingested dsRNA into 21 nt siRNAs in eRNAi-sensitive insects under natural feeding conditions. In addition to dsRNA stability in gut lumen and uptake, dosage of siRNAs targeting a given insect transcript is likely an important factor in order to achieve measurable eRNAi-based regulation in eRNAi-competent insects that lack an apparent silencing amplification mechanism. PMID:25802407

  7. Interferon induction by adenoviruses

    All human, simian, bovine and avian adenovirus types tested so far and the canine hepatitis virus induce interferon production in chick cells. This finding indicated this property to be characteristic for viruses belonging to the adenovirus group. Trypsin treatment, which had no effect upon the infectivity, diminished or eliminated the interferon-inducing abilities of crude adenoviruses, and thus the need for a trypsin-sensitive protein in interferon induction was suggested. T antigen and interferon were formed simultaneously in chick embryo fibroblast cells infected with human adenovirus type 12, and there-fore the adenovirus-specific T antigen was resitant to the action of endogenous interferon synthetized by the same cells. In chicks inoculated with human types, the appearance of interferon was biphasic: an 'early' and a 'late' interferon could be demonstrated with maximum titre 4 and 10 hr, respectively, after virus infection. In chicks infected with adenoviruses, first interferon production and then a decreased primary immune response to sheep red blood cells was observed. It was assumed that in adenovirus-infected chicks the interferon produced by viral stimulus resulted in a transient immunosuppression. (author)

  8. Renaissance of mammalian endogenous RNAi

    Svoboda, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 588, č. 15 (2014), 2550–2556. ISSN 0014-5793 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH13084; GA ČR GA13-29531S Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : RNAi * Dicer * Oocyte * Virus * Retrotransposon Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.169, year: 2014

  9. Structure of human adenovirus

    Nemerow, Glen R.; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Reddy, Vijay S. (Scripps); (Vanderbilt)

    2012-07-11

    A detailed structural analysis of the entire human adenovirus capsid has been stymied by the complexity and size of this 150 MDa macromolecular complex. Over the past 10 years, the steady improvements in viral genome manipulation concomitant with advances in crystallographic techniques and data processing software has allowed structure determination of this virus by X-ray diffraction at 3.5 {angstrom} resolution. The virus structure revealed the location, folds, and interactions of major and minor (cement proteins) on the inner and outer capsid surface. This new structural information sheds further light on the process of adenovirus capsid assembly and virus-host cell interactions.

  10. Adenovirus (For Parents)

    ... respiratory tract as well, causing bronchiolitis , croup , or viral pneumonia, which is less common but can cause serious illness in infants. Adenovirus can also produce a dry, harsh cough that can resemble whooping cough (pertussis) . Gastroenteritis is an inflammation of the stomach and the ...

  11. Nymphal RNAi: systemic RNAi mediated gene knockdown in juvenile grasshopper

    Dong Ying

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Grasshopper serves as important model system in neuroscience, development and evolution. Representatives of this primitive insect group are also highly relevant targets of pest control efforts. Unfortunately, the lack of genetics or gene specific molecular manipulation imposes major limitations to the study of grasshopper biology. Results We investigated whether juvenile instars of the grasshopper species Schistocerca americana are conducive to gene silencing via the systemic RNAi pathway. Injection of dsRNA corresponding to the eye colour gene vermilion into first instar nymphs triggered suppression of ommochrome formation in the eye lasting through two instars equivalent to 10–14 days in absolute time. QRT-PCR analysis revealed a two fold decrease of target transcript levels in affected animals. Control injections of EGFP dsRNA did not result in detectable phenotypic changes. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization detected ubiquitous expression of the grasshopper homolog of the dsRNA channel protein gene sid-1 in embryos, nymphs and adults. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that systemic dsRNA application elicits specific and long-term gene silencing in juvenile grasshopper instars. The conservation of systemic RNAi in the grasshopper suggests that this pathway can be exploited for gene specific manipulation of juvenile and adult instars in a wide range of primitive insects.

  12. Distribution of viruses associated with particles in waste water.

    Hejkal, T W; Wellings, F M; Lewis, A. L.; LaRock, P A

    1981-01-01

    The distribution of solids-associated viruses in wastewater was studied to determine the effect of treatment processes on viruses associated with solids. Solids less than 0.3 micrometers in diameter were separated from the liquid phase of each sample by using a continuous-flow centrifuge. The percentage of virus associated with solids larger than 0.3 micrometers decreased from 28% in the influent to 3.4% in unchlorinated effluent, and this was accompanied by a 92% decrease in the total concen...

  13. Human adenovirus type identification

    Banik U; Adhikary AK

    2015-01-01

    Urmila Banik,1 Arun Kumar Adhikary21Unit of Pathology, 2Unit of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, AIMST University, Bedong, Kedah, MalaysiaThe published paper in your journal entitling “Human adenovirus type 8 epidemic keratoconjunctivitis with large corneal epithelial full-layer detachment: an endemic outbreak with uncommon manifestations” has come into our attention.1 The article provides interesting clinical presentation of corneal epithelial layer detachment among 25%...

  14. Progress on RNAi-based molecular medicines

    Chen J; Xie JP

    2012-01-01

    Jing Chen, Jianping XieInstitute of Modern Biopharmaceuticals, State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Ministry of Education Eco-Environment of the Three Gorges Reservoir Region, School of Life Sciences, Southwest University, Chongqing, ChinaAbstract: RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising strategy to suppress the expression of disease-relevant genes and induce post-transcriptional gene silencing. Their simplicity and stability endow RNAi with great advantages in molecular medicine. Several RNA...

  15. Conditional RNAi Using the Lentiviral GLTR System.

    Pfeiffenberger, Elisabeth; Sigl, Reinhard; Geley, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has become an essential technology for functional gene analysis. Its success depends on the effective expression of target gene-specific RNAi-inducing small double-stranded interfering RNA molecules (siRNAs). Here, were describe the use of a recently developed lentiviral RNAi system that allows the rapid generation of stable cell lines with inducible RNAi based on conditional expression of double-stranded short hairpin RNA (shRNA). These lentiviral vectors can be generated rapidly using the GATEWAY recombination cloning technology. Conditional cell lines can be established by using either a two-vector system in which the regulator is encoded by a separate vector or by a one-vector system. The available different lentiviral vectors for conditional shRNA expression cassette delivery co-express additional genes that allow (1) the use of fluorescent proteins for color-coded combinatorial RNAi or monitoring RNAi induction (pGLTR-FP), (2) selection of transduced cells (pGLTR-S), and (3) the generation of conditional cell lines using a one-vector system (pGLTR-X). PMID:27317178

  16. RNAi-mediated plant protection against aphids.

    Yu, Xiu-Dao; Liu, Zong-Cai; Huang, Si-Liang; Chen, Zhi-Qin; Sun, Yong-Wei; Duan, Peng-Fei; Ma, You-Zhi; Xia, Lan-Qin

    2016-06-01

    Aphids (Aphididae) are major agricultural pests that cause significant yield losses of crop plants each year by inflicting damage both through the direct effects of feeding and by vectoring harmful plant viruses. Expression of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) directed against suitable insect target genes in transgenic plants has been shown to give protection against pests through plant-mediated RNA interference (RNAi). Thus, as a potential alternative and effective strategy for insect pest management in agricultural practice, plant-mediated RNAi for aphid control has received close attention in recent years. In this review, the mechanism of RNAi in insects and the so far explored effective RNAi target genes in aphids, their potential applications in the development of transgenic plants for aphid control and the major challenges in this regard are reviewed, and the future prospects of using plant-mediated RNAi for aphid control are discussed. This review is intended to be a helpful insight into the generation of aphid-resistant plants through plant-mediated RNAi strategy. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:26888776

  17. Adenovirus infection in immunocompromised patients

    Sylwia Rynans

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Human adenoviruses belong to the Adenoviridae family and they are divided into seven species, including 56 types. Adenoviruses are common opportunistic pathogens that are rarely associated with clinical symptoms in immunocompetent patients. However, they are emerging pathogens causing morbidity and mortality in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplants, HIV infected patients and patients with primary immune deficiencies. Clinical presentation ranges from asymptomatic viraemia to respiratory and gastrointestinal disease, haemorrhagic cystitis and severe disseminated illness. There is currently no formally approved therapy for the treatment of adenovirus infections.This article presents current knowledge about adenoviruses, their pathogenicity and information about available methods to diagnose and treat adenoviral infections.

  18. Tracking adenovirus infections in reptiles

    Ball, Inna

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to screen reptiles for the presence of adenovirus (AdV) infection, develop serological tests for the detection of antibodies against AdVs in squamate reptiles and to examine the serological relationships between lizard and snake AdVs, helping to ensure the establishment and maintenance of healthy populations. An additional aim of the project was the establishment of an agamid cell line and isolation of adenoviruses from bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps). A...

  19. Functional and mechanistic aspects of endogenous RNAi in C. elegans

    van Wolfswinkel, J. C.

    2009-01-01

    RNAi is widely used as a genetic tool in a range of model organisms, however still relatively little is known about the endogenous functions of RNAi. In this thesis we have studied several aspects of the endogenous role of RNAi in order to enhance our understanding of the capabilities of this mechanism. We investigated an RNAi-related silencing mechanism (cosuppression) which is triggered by repetitive sequences resulting in silencing of endogenous genes in trans. We found both chromatin remo...

  20. Canine adenovirus based rabies vaccines.

    Tordo, N; Foumier, A; Jallet, C; Szelechowski, M; Klonjkowski, B; Eloit, M

    2008-01-01

    Adenovirus based vectors are very attractive candidates for vaccination purposes as they induce in mammalian hosts potent humoral, mucosal and cellular immune responses to antigens encoded by the inserted genes. We have generated E1-deleted and replication-competent recombinant canine type-2 adenoviruses expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (G). The effectiveness of both vectors to express a native G protein has been characterized in vitro in permissive cell lines. We compared the humoral and cellular immune responses induced in mice by intramuscular injection of the recombinant canine adenovirus vectors with those induced by a human (Ad5) E1-deleted virus expressing the same rabies G protein. Humoral responses specific to the adenoviruses or the rabies glycoprotein antigens were studied. The influence of the mouse strain was observed using replication-competent canine adenovirus. A high level of rabies neutralizing antibody was observed upon i.m. inoculation, and 100% of mice survived lethal challenge. These results are very promising in the perspective of oral vaccine for dog rabies control. PMID:18634509

  1. Validation of RNAi by real time PCR

    Josefsen, Knud; Lee, Ying Chiu

    2011-01-01

    Real time PCR is the analytic tool of choice for quantification of gene expression, while RNAi is concerned with downregulation of gene expression. Together, they constitute a powerful approach in any loss of function studies of selective genes. We illustrate here the use of real time PCR to verify...

  2. Oncolytic Adenoviruses in Cancer Treatment

    Ramon Alemany

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic use of viruses against cancer has been revived during the last two decades. Oncolytic viruses replicate and spread inside tumors, amplifying their cytotoxicity and simultaneously reversing the tumor immune suppression. Among different viruses, recombinant adenoviruses designed to replicate selectively in tumor cells have been clinically tested by intratumoral or systemic administration. Limited efficacy has been associated to poor tumor targeting, intratumoral spread, and virocentric immune responses. A deeper understanding of these three barriers will be required to design more effective oncolytic adenoviruses that, alone or combined with chemotherapy or immunotherapy, may become tools for oncologists.

  3. Adenovirus retargeting and systemic delivery

    Seymour, L. W.; Fisher, K. D.; Green, N. K.; Hale, S. J.; Lyons, M.; Mautner, V.; Nicum, S.; Onion, D.; Oupický, D.; Stevenson, M.; Ulbrich, Karel

    Berlin: Springer Verlag, 2003 - (Rubanyi, G.; Ylä-Herttuala, S.), s. 107-117 ISBN 3-540-00413-0 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK4055109 Keywords : gene delivery * adenovirus * HPMA copolymers Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  4. A unique mitigator sequence determines the species specificity of the major late promoter in adenovirus type 12 DNA.

    Zock, C; Iselt, A; Doerfler, W

    1993-01-01

    Human adenovirus type 12 (Ad12) cannot replicate in hamster cells, whereas human cells are permissive for Ad12. Ad12 DNA replication and late-gene and virus-associated RNA expression are blocked in hamster cells. Early Ad12 genes are transcribed, and the viral DNA can be integrated into the host genome. Ad12 DNA replication and late-gene transcription can be complemented in hamster cells by E1 functions of Ad2 or Ad5, for which hamster cells are fully permissive (for a review, see W. Doerfler...

  5. Structural and Biochemical Advances in Mammalian RNAi

    Collins, Robert E.; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2006-01-01

    RNAi is a collection of processes mediated by small RNAs that silence gene expression in a sequence-specific manner. Studies of processes as divergent as post-transcriptional gene silencing, transcriptional silencing through RNA-directed DNA methylation, or heterochromatin formation, and even RNA-guided DNA elimination have converged on a core pathway. This review will highlight recent structural and mechanistic studies illustrating siRNA and miRNA processing, RISC formation, the execution of...

  6. siRNA and RNAi optimization.

    Alagia, Adele; Eritja, Ramon

    2016-05-01

    The discovery and examination of the posttranscriptional gene regulatory mechanism known as RNA interference (RNAi) contributed to the identification of small interfering RNA (siRNA) and the comprehension of its enormous potential for clinical purposes. Theoretically, the ability of specific target gene downregulation makes the RNAi pathway an appealing solution for several diseases. Despite numerous hurdles resulting from the inherent properties of siRNA molecule and proper delivery to the target tissue, more than 50 RNA-based drugs are currently under clinical testing. In this work, we analyze the recent literature in the optimization of siRNA molecules. In detail, we focused on describing the most recent advances of siRNA field aimed at optimize siRNA pharmacokinetic properties. Special attention has been given in describing the impact of RNA modifications in the potential off-target effects (OTEs) such as saturation of the RNAi machinery, passenger strand-mediated silencing, immunostimulation, and miRNA-like OTEs as well as to recent developments on the delivery issue. The novel delivery systems and modified siRNA provide significant steps toward the development of reliable siRNA molecules for therapeutic use. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:316-329. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1337 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26840434

  7. Modulation of gene expression by RNAi.

    Wójcik, Cezary; Fabunmi, Rosalind; DeMartino, George N

    2005-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a form of posttranscriptional gene silencing in which the presence within the cell of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) leads to the specific degradation of mRNA with a complimentary sequence. RNAi is a natural phenomenon that can be exploited as a powerful tool to study gene function by generating gene "knockdowns" in various cell types. RNAi is mediated by short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which are generated within cells from long dsRNAs. To avoid generalized toxic effects, mammalian cells are transfected directly with 21-23-bp-long siRNAs generated either by chemical synthesis or obtained by a series of enzymatic reactions. The present chapter deals with siRNA design, synthesis, transfection, and readout of efficiency in a mammalian cell culture system. The general principle is illustrated by the functional knockdown of p97/VCP (valosin-containing protein) in HeLa cells using five different siRNA sequences. PMID:16028696

  8. Screening of target genes for RNAi in Tetranychus urticae and RNAi toxicity enhancement by chimeric genes.

    Kwon, Deok Ho; Park, Ji Hyun; Ashok, Patil Anandrao; Lee, Unggyu; Lee, Si Hyeock

    2016-06-01

    Due to its rapid development of resistance to nearly all arrays of acaricide, Tetranychus urticae is extremely hard to control using conventional acaricides. As an alternative control measure of acaricide-resistant mites, RNA interference (RNAi)-based method has recently been suggested. A double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) delivery method using multi-unit chambers was established and employed to screen the RNAi toxicity of 42 T. urticae genes. Among them, the dsRNA treatment of coatomer I (COPI) genes, such as coatomer subunit epsilon (COPE) and beta 2 (COPB2), resulted in high mortality [median lethal time (LT50)=89.7 and 120.3h, respectively]. The transcript level of the COPE gene was significantly (F3,9=16.2, P=0.001) reduced by up to 24% following dsRNA treatment, suggesting that the toxicity was likely mediated by the RNAi of the target gene. As a toxicity enhancement strategy, the recombinant dsRNA was generated by reciprocally recombining half-divided fragments of COPE and COPB2. The two recombinant dsRNAs exhibited higher toxicity than the respective single dsRNA treatments as determined by LT50 values (79.2 and 81.5h, respectively). This finding indicates that the recombination of different genes can enhance RNAi toxicity and be utilized to generate synthetic dsRNA with improved RNAi efficacy. PMID:27155477

  9. Twenty-Five New Viruses Associated with the Drosophilidae (Diptera)

    Webster, Claire L.; Longdon, Ben; Lewis, Samuel H.; Obbard, Darren J.

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is an important laboratory model for studies of antiviral immunity in invertebrates, and Drosophila species provide a valuable system to study virus host range and host switching. Here, we use metagenomic RNA sequencing of about 1600 adult flies to discover 25 new RNA viruses associated with six different drosophilid hosts in the wild. We also provide a comprehensive listing of viruses previously reported from the Drosophilidae. The new viruses include Iflaviruses, Rhabdoviruses, Nodaviruses, and Reoviruses, and members of unclassified lineages distantly related to Negeviruses, Sobemoviruses, Poleroviruses, Flaviviridae, and Tombusviridae. Among these are close relatives of Drosophila X virus and Flock House virus, which we find in association with wild Drosophila immigrans. These two viruses are widely used in experimental studies but have not been previously reported to naturally infect Drosophila. Although we detect no new DNA viruses, in D. immigrans and Drosophila obscura, we identify sequences very closely related to Armadillidium vulgare iridescent virus (Invertebrate iridescent virus 31), bringing the total number of DNA viruses found in the Drosophilidae to three. PMID:27375356

  10. RNAi-Assisted Genome Evolution (RAGE) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Si, Tong; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi)-assisted genome evolution (RAGE) applies directed evolution principles to engineer Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomes. Here, we use acetic acid tolerance as a target trait to describe the key steps of RAGE. Briefly, iterative cycles of RNAi screening are performed to accumulate multiplex knockdown modifications, enabling directed evolution of the yeast genome and continuous improvement of a target phenotype. Detailed protocols are provided on the reconstitution of RNAi machinery, creation of genome-wide RNAi libraries, identification and integration of beneficial knockdown cassettes, and repeated RAGE cycles. PMID:27581294

  11. Magnesium-Dependent Interaction of PKR with Adenovirus VAI

    K Launer -Felty; C Wong; A Wahid; G Conn; J Cole

    2011-12-31

    Protein kinase R (PKR) is an interferon-induced kinase that plays a pivotal role in the innate immunity pathway for defense against viral infection. PKR is activated to undergo autophosphorylation upon binding to RNAs that contain duplex regions. Activated PKR phosphorylates the {alpha}-subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2, thereby inhibiting protein synthesis in virus-infected cells. Viruses have evolved diverse PKR-inhibitory strategies to evade the antiviral response. Adenovirus encodes virus-associated RNA I (VAI), a highly structured RNA inhibitor that binds PKR but fails to activate. We have characterized the stoichiometry and affinity of PKR binding to define the mechanism of PKR inhibition by VAI. Sedimentation velocity and isothermal titration calorimetry measurements indicate that PKR interactions with VAI are modulated by Mg{sup 2+}. Two PKR monomers bind in the absence of Mg{sup 2+}, but a single monomer binds in the presence of divalent ion. Known RNA activators of PKR are capable of binding multiple PKR monomers to allow the kinase domains to come into close proximity and thus enhance dimerization. We propose that VAI acts as an inhibitor of PKR because it binds and sequesters a single PKR in the presence of divalent cation.

  12. Nanoparticle-Based Delivery System for Biomedical Applications of RNAi

    Yang, Chuanxu

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a post-transcriptional gene silencing process triggered by double-strand RNA, including synthetic short interfering RNA (siRNA) and endogenous microRNA (miRNA). RNAi has attracted great attention for developing a new class of therapeutics, due to its capability to speci...

  13. Imaging-guided delivery of RNAi for anticancer treatment.

    Wang, Junqing; Mi, Peng; Lin, Gan; Wáng, Yì Xiáng J; Liu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-09-01

    The RNA interference (RNAi) technique is a new modality for cancer therapy, and several candidates are being tested clinically. In the development of RNAi-based therapeutics, imaging methods can provide a visible and quantitative way to investigate the therapeutic effect at anatomical, cellular, and molecular level; to noninvasively trace the distribution; to and study the biological processes in preclinical and clinical stages. Their abilities are important not only for therapeutic optimization and evaluation but also for shortening of the time of drug development to market. Typically, imaging-functionalized RNAi therapeutics delivery that combines nanovehicles and imaging techniques to study and improve their biodistribution and accumulation in tumor site has been progressively integrated into anticancer drug discovery and development processes. This review presents an overview of the current status of translating the RNAi cancer therapeutics in the clinic, a brief description of the biological barriers in drug delivery, and the roles of imaging in aspects of administration route, systemic circulation, and cellular barriers for the clinical translation of RNAi cancer therapeutics, and with partial content for discussing the safety concerns. Finally, we focus on imaging-guided delivery of RNAi therapeutics in preclinical development, including the basic principles of different imaging modalities, and their advantages and limitations for biological imaging. With growing number of RNAi therapeutics entering the clinic, various imaging methods will play an important role in facilitating the translation of RNAi cancer therapeutics from bench to bedside. PMID:26805788

  14. RNAi Screening of Leukemia Cells Using Electroporation.

    Agarwal, Anupriya; Tyner, Jeffrey W

    2016-01-01

    RNAi-mediated screening has been an integral tool for biological discovery for the past 15 years. A variety of approaches have been employed for implementation of this technique, including pooled, depletion/enrichment screening with lentiviral shRNAs, and segregated screening of panels of individual siRNAs. The latter approach of siRNA panel screening requires efficient methods for transfection of siRNAs into the target cells. In the case of suspension leukemia cell lines and primary cells, many of the conventional transfection techniques using liposomal or calcium phosphate-mediated transfection provide very low efficiency. In this case, electroporation is the only transfection technique offering high efficiency transfection of siRNAs into the target leukemia cells. Here, we describe methods for optimization and implementation of siRNA electroporation into leukemia cell lines and primary patient specimens, and we further offer suggested electroporation settings for some commonly used leukemia cell lines. PMID:27581286

  15. RNAi and heterochromatin repress centromeric meiotic recombination

    Ellermeier, Chad; Higuchi, Emily C; Phadnis, Naina;

    2010-01-01

    During meiosis, the formation of viable haploid gametes from diploid precursors requires that each homologous chromosome pair be properly segregated to produce an exact haploid set of chromosomes. Genetic recombination, which provides a physical connection between homologous chromosomes, is....... Surprisingly, one mutant derepressed for recombination in the heterochromatic mating-type region during meiosis and several mutants derepressed for centromeric gene expression during mitotic growth are not derepressed for centromeric recombination during meiosis. These results reveal a complex relation between...... types of repression by heterochromatin. Our results also reveal a previously undemonstrated role for RNAi and heterochromatin in the repression of meiotic centromeric recombination and, potentially, in the prevention of birth defects by maintenance of proper chromosome segregation during meiosis....

  16. Current issues of RNAi therapeutics delivery and development.

    Haussecker, D

    2014-12-10

    12 years following the discovery of the RNAi mechanism in Man, a number of RNAi therapeutics development candidates have emerged with profiles suggesting that they could become drugs of significant medical importance for diseases like TTR amyloidosis, HBV, solid cancers, and hemophilia. Despite this robust progress, the perception of RNAi therapeutics has been on a roller-coaster ride driven not only by science, but also regulatory trends, the stock markets, and Big Pharma business development decisions [1]. This presentation provides an update on the current state of RNAi therapeutics development with a particular focus on what RNAi delivery can achieve today and key challenges to be overcome to expand therapeutic opportunities. The delivery of RNAi triggers to disease-relevant cell types clearly represents the rate-limiting factor in broadly expanding the applicability of RNAi therapeutics. Today, with at least 3 delivery options (lipid nanoparticles/LNPs, GalNAc-siRNA conjugates, Dynamic PolyConjugates/DPCs) for which profound gene knockdowns have been demonstrated in non-human primates and in the clinic, RNAi therapeutics should in principle be able to address most diseases related to gene expression in the liver. Given the central importance of the liver in systemic physiology, this already represents a significant therapeutic and commercial opportunity rivaling that of e.g. monoclonal antibodies. Beyond the liver, there is a reason to believe that current RNAi therapeutics technologies can address a number of solid tumors (e.g. LNPs), diseases of the eye (e.g. self-delivering RNAi triggers) as well as diseases involving the respiratory epithelium (e.g. aerosolized LNPs), certain phagocytic cells (LNPs), hematopoietic stem cells and their progeny (lentiviral DNA-directed RNAi), vascular endothelial cells (cationic lipoplexes), and certain cell types in the kidney (self-delivering RNAi triggers, DPCs; Table 1). Despite this success, there has been a sense that

  17. Anti-Viral Drugs for Human Adenoviruses

    Chor Wing Sing

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available There are many stages in the development of a new drug for viral infection and such processes are even further complicated for adenovirus by the fact that there are at least 51 serotypes, forming six distinct groups (A–F, with different degree of infectivity. This review attempts to address the importance of developing pharmaceuticals for adenovirus and also review recent development in drug discovery for adenovirus, including newer strategies such as microRNA approaches. Different drug screening strategies will also be discussed.

  18. Normal RNAi response in human fragile x fibroblasts

    Madsen, Charlotte; Grønskov, Karen; Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fragile x syndrome is caused by loss of expression of the FMRP protein involved in the control of a large number of mRNA targets. The Drosophila ortholog dFXR interacts with a protein complex that includes Argonaute2, an essential component of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC......). Furthermore dFXR associates with Dicer, another essential processing enzyme of the RNAi pathway. Both microRNA and microRNA precursors can co-immunoprecipitate with dFXR. Consequently it has been suggested that the Fragile x syndrome may be due to a defect in an RNAi-related apparatus. FINDINGS: We have...... investigated the RNAi response in Fragile x patient cells lacking FMRP compared with normal controls. RNAi responses were successfully detected, but no statistically significant difference between the response in normal cells compared to patients cells was found - neither one nor two days after transfection...

  19. Ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi) and control of citrus pests

    Ribonucleic acid interference, RNAi, applications and function are described for the non-scientist to bring a better understanding of how this emerging technology is providing environmentally friendly, non-transgenic, insect pest control. ...

  20. Inducible RNAi system and its application in novel therapeutics.

    Liao, Yi; Tang, Liling

    2016-08-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) was discovered as a cellular defense mechanism more than decade ago. It has been exploited as a powerful tool for genetic manipulation. Characterized with specifically silencing target gene expression, it has great potential application for disease treatment. Currently, there are human clinical trials in progress or planned. Despite the excitement regarding this prominent technology, there are many obstacles and concerns that prevent RNAi from being widely used in the therapeutic field. Among them, the non-spatial and non-temporal control is the most difficult challenge, as well as off-target effects and triggering type I immune responses. Inducible RNAi technology can effectively regulate target genes by inducer-mediated small hairpin RNA expression. Combination with inducible regulation systems this makes RNAi technology more sophisticated and may provide a wider application field. This review discusses approaches of inducible RNAi systems, the potential problem areas and solutions and their therapeutic applications. Given the limitations discussed herein being resolved, we believe that inducible RNAi will be a major therapeutic modality within the next several years. PMID:25697568

  1. In Vivo RNAi-Based Screens: Studies in Model Organisms

    Miki Yamamoto-Hino

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is a technique widely used for gene silencing in organisms and cultured cells, and depends on sequence homology between double-stranded RNA (dsRNA and target mRNA molecules. Numerous cell-based genome-wide screens have successfully identified novel genes involved in various biological processes, including signal transduction, cell viability/death, and cell morphology. However, cell-based screens cannot address cellular processes such as development, behavior, and immunity. Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans are two model organisms whose whole bodies and individual body parts have been subjected to RNAi-based genome-wide screening. Moreover, Drosophila RNAi allows the manipulation of gene function in a spatiotemporal manner when it is implemented using the Gal4/UAS system. Using this inducible RNAi technique, various large-scale screens have been performed in Drosophila, demonstrating that the method is straightforward and valuable. However, accumulated results reveal that the results of RNAi-based screens have relatively high levels of error, such as false positives and negatives. Here, we review in vivo RNAi screens in Drosophila and the methods that could be used to remove ambiguity from screening results.

  2. Enfermedad neurologica por adenovirus Neurologic disease due to adenovirus infection

    Cristina L. Lema

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la prevalencia de adenovirus (ADV en las infecciones del sistema nervioso central (SNC. Se analizaron 108 muestras de líquido cefalorraquídeo (LCR provenientes de 79 casos de encefalitis, 7 meningitis y 22 de otras patologías neurológicas, recibidas en el período 2000-2002. Cuarenta y nueve (47.35% se obtuvieron de pacientes inmunocomprometidos. La presencia de ADV se investigó mediante reacción en cadena de la polimerasa en formato anidado (Nested-PCR. La identificación del genogrupo se realizó mediante análisis filogenético de la secuencia nucleotídica parcial de la región que codifica para la proteína del hexón. Se detectó la presencia de ADV en 6 de 108 (5.5% muestras de LCR analizadas. Todos los casos positivos pertenecieron a pacientes con encefalitis que fueron 79, (6/79, 7.6%. No se observó diferencia estadísticamente significativa entre los casos de infección por ADV en pacientes inmunocomprometidos e inmunocompetentes (p>0.05. Las cepas de ADV detectadas se agruparon en los genogrupos B1 y C. En conclusión, nuestros resultados describen el rol de los ADV en las infecciones neurológicas en Argentina. La información presentada contribuye al conocimiento de su epidemiología, en particular en casos de encefalitis.The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of adenovirusm (ADV infections in neurological disorders. A total of 108 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples from 79 encephalitis cases, 7 meningitis and 22 other neurological diseases analysed in our laboratory between 2000 and 2002 were studied. Forty nine (47.4% belonged to immunocompromised patients. Viral genome was detected using nested polymerase chain reaction (Nested-PCR and ADV genotypes were identified using partial gene sequence analysis of hexon gene. Adenovirus were detected in 6 of 108 (5.5% CSF samples tested. All of these were from encephalitis cases, 6/79, representing 7.6% of them. No statistically

  3. Precore mutant hepatitis B virus-associated fulminant hepatitis during infliximab therapy for rheumatoid arthritis

    Kuwabara, Hiroko; Fukuda, Akira; Tsuda, Yasuhiro; Shibayama, Yuro

    2010-01-01

    A 73-year-old female, who suffered from rheumatoid arthritis for 10 years, developed precore mutant hepatitis B virus-associated fulminant hepatitis after 1 year of infliximab therapy and subsequent methotrexate withdrawal. We emphasize the importance of preemptive antiviral therapy before starting infliximab administration and withdrawing immunosuppressive drugs.

  4. Fatal adenovirus 32 infection in a bone marrow transplant recipient.

    Charles, A K; Caul, E. O.; Porter, H J; Oakhill, A

    1995-01-01

    A case of disseminated adenovirus type 32 infection causing severe hepatitis, gastrointestinal ulceration and also with respiratory involvement is reported in a bone marrow transplant recipient. Typical viral inclusions were seen in the postmortem histological sections and adenovirus infection was confirmed using in situ hybridisation and isolation of adenovirus type 32 from separate organs at necropsy. This is the first case in which adenovirus 32 was the cause of fatal disseminated disease ...

  5. Suppression of RNA interference increases alphavirus replication and virus-associated mortality in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes

    Geiss Brian J

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses can persistently infect and cause limited damage to mosquito vectors. RNA interference (RNAi is a mosquito antiviral response important in restricting RNA virus replication and has been shown to be active against some arboviruses. The goal of this study was to use a recombinant Sindbis virus (SINV; family Togaviridae; genus Alphavirus that expresses B2 protein of Flock House virus (FHV; family Nodaviridae; genus Alphanodavirus, a protein that inhibits RNAi, to determine the effects of linking arbovirus infection with RNAi inhibition. Results B2 protein expression from SINV (TE/3'2J inhibited the accumulation of non-specific small RNAs in Aedes aegypti mosquito cell culture and virus-specific small RNAs both in infected cell culture and Ae. aegypti mosquitoes. More viral genomic and subgenomic RNA accumulated in cells and mosquitoes infected with TE/3'2J virus expressing B2 (TE/3'2J/B2 compared to TE/3'2J and TE/3'2J virus expressing GFP. TE/3'2J/B2 exhibited increased infection rates, dissemination rates, and infectious virus titers in mosquitoes following oral bloodmeal. Following infectious oral bloodmeal, significantly more mosquitoes died when TE/3'2J/B2 was ingested. The virus was 100% lethal following intrathoracic inoculation of multiple mosquito species and lethality was dose-dependent in Ae. aegypti. Conclusion We show that RNAi is active in Ae. aegypti cell culture and that B2 protein inhibits RNAi in mosquito cells when expressed by a recombinant SINV. Also, SINV more efficiently replicates in mosquito cells when RNAi is inhibited. Finally, TE/3'2J/B2 kills mosquitoes in a dose-dependent manner independent of infection route and mosquito species.

  6. RNA Viruses and RNAi: Quasispecies Implications for Viral Escape

    John B. Presloid

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to high mutation rates, populations of RNA viruses exist as a collection of closely related mutants known as a quasispecies. A consequence of error-prone replication is the potential for rapid adaptation of RNA viruses when a selective pressure is applied, including host immune systems and antiviral drugs. RNA interference (RNAi acts to inhibit protein synthesis by targeting specific mRNAs for degradation and this process has been developed to target RNA viruses, exhibiting their potential as a therapeutic against infections. However, viruses containing mutations conferring resistance to RNAi were isolated in nearly all cases, underlining the problems of rapid viral evolution. Thus, while promising, the use of RNAi in treating or preventing viral diseases remains fraught with the typical complications that result from high specificity of the target, as seen in other antiviral regimens.

  7. A novel strategy for cancer gene therapy: RNAi

    PAN Qiuwei; CAI Rong; LIU Xinyuan; QIAN Cheng

    2006-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) induces genesilencing at a level of posttranscription mediated bydouble stranded RNA. There are numerous methods for delivery of small double-stranded interference RNA (siRNA) to the target cells, including nonviral and viral vectors. Among these methods, viral vectors are the more efficient vehicles. The expression of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) by viral vectors in target cells can be cut by Dicer enzyme to become ~21 bp siRNA, which could guide degradation of cognate mRNA. RNAi technology can be directed against cancer using a variety of strategies, including the inhibition of overexpressed oncogenes, promoting apoptosis, regulating cell cycle, antiangiogenesis and enhancing the efficacy of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Since RNAi technology has become an excellent strategy for cancer gene therapy, this review outlines the latest developments and applications of such a novel technology.

  8. Identification of neural outgrowth genes using genome-wide RNAi.

    Katharine J Sepp

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available While genetic screens have identified many genes essential for neurite outgrowth, they have been limited in their ability to identify neural genes that also have earlier critical roles in the gastrula, or neural genes for which maternally contributed RNA compensates for gene mutations in the zygote. To address this, we developed methods to screen the Drosophila genome using RNA-interference (RNAi on primary neural cells and present the results of the first full-genome RNAi screen in neurons. We used live-cell imaging and quantitative image analysis to characterize the morphological phenotypes of fluorescently labelled primary neurons and glia in response to RNAi-mediated gene knockdown. From the full genome screen, we focused our analysis on 104 evolutionarily conserved genes that when downregulated by RNAi, have morphological defects such as reduced axon extension, excessive branching, loss of fasciculation, and blebbing. To assist in the phenotypic analysis of the large data sets, we generated image analysis algorithms that could assess the statistical significance of the mutant phenotypes. The algorithms were essential for the analysis of the thousands of images generated by the screening process and will become a valuable tool for future genome-wide screens in primary neurons. Our analysis revealed unexpected, essential roles in neurite outgrowth for genes representing a wide range of functional categories including signalling molecules, enzymes, channels, receptors, and cytoskeletal proteins. We also found that genes known to be involved in protein and vesicle trafficking showed similar RNAi phenotypes. We confirmed phenotypes of the protein trafficking genes Sec61alpha and Ran GTPase using Drosophila embryo and mouse embryonic cerebral cortical neurons, respectively. Collectively, our results showed that RNAi phenotypes in primary neural culture can parallel in vivo phenotypes, and the screening technique can be used to identify many new

  9. BK virus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis after pediatric stem cell transplantation.

    Han, Seung Beom; Cho, Bin; Kang, Jin Han

    2014-12-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis is a common stem cell transplantation-related complication. The incidence of early-onset hemorrhagic cystitis, which is related to the pretransplant conditioning regimen, has decreased with the concomitant use of mesna and hyperhydration. However, late-onset hemorrhagic cystitis, which is usually caused by the BK virus, continues to develop. Although the BK virus is the most common pathogenic microorganism of poststem cell transplantation late-onset hemorrhagic cystitis, pediatricians outside the hemato-oncology and nephrology specialties tend to be unfamiliar with hemorrhagic cystitis and the BK virus. Moreover, no standard guidelines for the early diagnosis and treatment of BK virus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis after stem cell transplantation have been established. Here, we briefly introduce poststem cell transplantation BK virus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis. PMID:25653684

  10. A Metagenomics and Case-Control Study To Identify Viruses Associated with Bovine Respiratory Disease

    Ng, Terry Fei Fan; Kondov, Nikola O.; Deng, Xutao; Van Eenennaam, Alison; Neibergs, Holly L.; Delwart, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is a common health problem for both dairy and beef cattle, resulting in significant economic loses. In order to identify viruses associated with BRD, we used a metagenomics approach to enrich and sequence viral nucleic acids in the nasal swabs of 50 young dairy cattle with symptoms of BRD. Following deep sequencing, de novo assembly, and translated protein sequence similarity searches, numerous known and previously uncharacterized viruses were identified. Bovi...

  11. Deaths from Adenovirus in the US Military

    2012-03-26

    Dr. Joel Gaydos, science advisor for the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center, and Dr. Robert Potter, a research associate for the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System, discuss deaths from adenovirus in the US military.  Created: 3/26/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 3/29/2012.

  12. Rapid generation of fowl adenovirus 9 vectors.

    Pei, Yanlong; Griffin, Bryan; de Jong, Jondavid; Krell, Peter J; Nagy, Éva

    2015-10-01

    Fowl adenoviruses (FAdV) have the largest genomes of any fully sequenced adenovirus genome, and are widely considered as excellent platforms for vaccine development and gene therapy. As such, there is a strong need for stream-lined protocols/strategies for the generation of recombinant adenovirus genomes. Current genome engineering strategies rely upon plasmid based homologous recombination in Escherichia coli BJ5183. This process is time-consuming, involves multiple cloning steps, and low efficiency recombination. This report describes a novel system for the more rapid generation of recombinant fowl adenovirus genomes using the lambda Red recombinase system in E. coli DH10B. In this strategy, PCR based amplicons with around 50 nt long homologous arms, a unique SwaI site and a chloramphenicol resistance gene fragment (CAT cassette), are introduced into the FAdV-9 genome in a highly efficient and site-specific manner. To demonstrate the efficacy of this system we generated FAdV-9 ORF2, and FAdV-9 ORF11 deleted, CAT marked and unmarked FAdV-9 infectious clones (FAdmids), and replaced either ORF2 or ORF11, with an EGFP expression cassette or replaced ORF2 with an EGFP coding sequence via the unique SwaI sites, in approximately one month. All recombinant FAdmids expressed EGFP and were fully infectious in CH-SAH cells. PMID:26238923

  13. Mouse adenovirus type 1 infection of macrophages

    Ashley, S.L.; Welton, A.R.; Harwood, K.M.; Rooijen, van N.; Spindler, K.R.

    2009-01-01

    Mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) causes acute and persistent infections in mice, with high levels of virus found in the brain, spinal cord and spleen in acute infections. MAV-1 infects endothelial cells throughout the mouse, and monocytes/macrophages have also been implicated as targets of the virus.

  14. Structure and Uncoating of Immature Adenovirus

    Perez-Berna, A.J.; Mangel, W.; Marabini, R.; Scheres, S. H. W., Menendez-Conejero, R.; Dmitriev, I. P.; Curiel, D. T.; Flint, S. J.; San Martin, C.

    2009-09-18

    Maturation via proteolytic processing is a common trait in the viral world and is often accompanied by large conformational changes and rearrangements in the capsid. The adenovirus protease has been shown to play a dual role in the viral infectious cycle: (a) in maturation, as viral assembly starts with precursors to several of the structural proteins but ends with proteolytically processed versions in the mature virion, and (b) in entry, because protease-impaired viruses have difficulties in endosome escape and uncoating. Indeed, viruses that have not undergone proteolytic processing are not infectious. We studied the three-dimensional structure of immature adenovirus particles as represented by the adenovirus type 2 thermosensitive mutant ts1 grown under non-permissive conditions and compared it with the mature capsid. Our three-dimensional electron microscopy maps at subnanometer resolution indicate that adenovirus maturation does not involve large-scale conformational changes in the capsid. Difference maps reveal the locations of unprocessed peptides pIIIa and pVI and help define their role in capsid assembly and maturation. An intriguing difference appears in the core, indicating a more compact organization and increased stability of the immature cores. We have further investigated these properties by in vitro disassembly assays. Fluorescence and electron microscopy experiments reveal differences in the stability and uncoating of immature viruses, both at the capsid and core levels, as well as disassembly intermediates not previously imaged.

  15. Traceless bioresponsive coating of adenovirus vectors

    Prill, J.-M.; Šubr, Vladimír; Engler, T.; Ulbrich, Karel; Kochanek, S.; Kreppel, F.

    Milwaukee: American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy, 2011. s. 416. [Annual Meeting of American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy /14./. 18.05.2011-21.05.2011, Seattle] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00500803 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : adenovirus * HPMA copolymers * surface modification Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  16. RNAi technology: A Revolutionary tool for the colorectal cancer therapeutics

    Wei Lv; Chao Zhang; Jia Hao

    2006-01-01

    With the many changes that have taken place in people's diet and lifestyle, colorectal cancer (CRC) has become a global concern. There were approximately 950000 new cases diagnosed and 500000 deaths recorded worldwide in 2000. It is the second most common type of cancer in the Western world, and it is the third most common type of digestive tumor in China. It is reported that the morbidity of CRC is 4.08/100000 for men and 3.30/100000 for women in China. Despite the rate of improvements in surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the overall five-year survival is around 50%. Therefore, novel treatment need to be developed in order to add to the therapeutic armamentarium.RNA interference (RNAi) is a sequence-specific posttranscriptional gene silencing mechanism, which is triggered by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and causes degradation of mRNA homologous in sequence to the dsRNA.This new approach has been successfully adopted to inhibit virus replication and tumorigenicity. Recent reports have described DNA vector-based strategies for delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) into mammalian cells, further expanding the utility of RNAi. With the development of the RNAi technology and deeper understanding of this field, a promising new modality of treatment appeared, which can be used in combination with the existing therapies .We reviewed the proceedings on the actualities and advancement of RNAi technology for colorectal cancer therapeutics.

  17. Transgenic RNAi in mouse oocytes: The first decade

    Malík, Radek; Svoboda, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 134, 1-2 (2012), s. 64-68. ISSN 0378-4320 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : RNAi * oocyte * transgene * silencing Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.897, year: 2012

  18. Control of the interferon response in RNAi experiments

    Nejepínská, Jana; Flemr, Matyáš; Svoboda, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 820, - (2012), s. 133-161. ISSN 1064-3745 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA501110701; GA ČR GA204/09/0085 Grant ostatní: EMBO SDIG(DE) 1483 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : RNAi * interferon * siRNA Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  19. The interaction of fungi with the environment orchestrated by RNAi.

    Villalobos-Escobedo, José Manuel; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo; Carreras-Villaseñor, Nohemí

    2016-01-01

    The fungal kingdom has been key in the investigation of the biogenesis and function of small RNAs (sRNAs). The discovery of phenomena such as quelling in Neurospora crassa represents pioneering work in the identification of the main elements of the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery. Recent discoveries in the regulatory mechanisms in some yeast and filamentous fungi are helping us reach a deeper understanding of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene-silencing mechanisms involved in genome protection against viral infections, DNA damage and transposon activity. Although most of these mechanisms are reasonably well understood, their role in the physiology, response to the environment and interaction of fungi with other organisms had remained elusive. Nevertheless, studies in fungi such as Mucor circinelloides, Magnaporthe oryzae, Cryptococcus neoformans, Trichoderma atroviride, Botrytis cinerea and others have started to shed light on the relevance of the RNAi pathway. In these fungi gene regulation by RNAi is important for growth, reproduction, control of viral infections and transposon activity, as well as in the development of antibiotic resistance and interactions with their hosts. Moreover, the increasing number of reports of the discovery of microRNA-like RNAs in fungi under different conditions highlights the importance of fungi as models for understanding adaptation to the environment using regulation by sRNAs. The goal of this review is to provide the reader with an up-to-date overview of the importance of RNAi in the interaction of fungi with their environment. PMID:26932186

  20. Role of RNA interference (RNAi) in the moss Physcomitrella patens

    Arif, Muhammad Asif

    2013-01-14

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism that regulates genes by either transcriptional (TGS) or posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS), required for genome maintenance and proper development of an organism. Small non-coding RNAs are the key players in RNAi and have been intensively studied in eukaryotes. In plants, several classes of small RNAs with specific sizes and dedicated functions have evolved. The major classes of small RNAs include microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which differ in their biogenesis. miRNAs are synthesized from a short hairpin structure while siRNAs are derived from long double-stranded RNAs (dsRNA). Both miRNA and siRNAs control the expression of cognate target RNAs by binding to reverse complementary sequences mediating cleavage or translational inhibition of the target RNA. They also act on the DNA and cause epigenetic changes such as DNA methylation and histone modifications. In the last years, the analysis of plant RNAi pathways was extended to the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens, a non-flowering, non-vascular ancient land plant that diverged from the lineage of seed plants approximately 450 million years ago. Based on a number of characteristic features and its phylogenetic key position in land plant evolution P. patens emerged as a plant model species to address basic as well as applied topics in plant biology. Here we summarize the current knowledge on the role of RNAi in P. patens that shows functional overlap with RNAi pathways from seed plants, and also unique features specific to this species. 2013 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

  1. Protection of adenovirus from neutralizing antibody by cationic PEG derivative ionically linked to adenovirus

    Sun X

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Qin Zeng, Jianfeng Han, Dong Zhao, Tao Gong, Zhirong Zhang, Xun SunKey Laboratory of Drug Targeting and Drug Delivery Systems, Ministry of Education, West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: The generation of anti-adenovirus neutralizing antibody (NAb in humans severely restricts the utilization of recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 vectors in gene therapy for a wide range of clinical trials. To overcome this limitation, we ionically complexed Ad5 with a newly synthesized copolymer, which we called APC, making an adenovirus shielded from NAb.Methods: APC, a cationic polyethylene glycol derivative, was synthesized via two steps of ring-opening copolymerization of ethylene oxide and allyl glycidyl ether, followed by the addition of 2-mercaptoethylamine. The copolymer or the control PEI-2k was ionically complexed to anionic Ad5 in 5% glucose, and in vitro transduction assays were carried out in coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor-positive cells (A549 and coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor-negative cells (B16 and SKOV3. The physical properties and morphology of adenovirus alone or the complexes were investigated respectively by zeta potential, size distribution, and transmission electron microscopy image. Then cytotoxicity of APC was examined using 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays. Finally, the ability of APC to protect adenovirus from NAb was evaluated by transfection assays after a neutralizing effect.Results: APC was successfully synthesized and showed a low cytotoxicity. Positively charged Ad5/APC exhibited slightly increased diameter (130.2 ± 0.60 nm than naked Ad5 (115.6 ± 5.46 nm while Ad5/PEI-2k showed severe aggregation (1382 ± 79.9 nm. Ad5/APC achieved a gene transfection level as high as Ad5/PEI-2k in A549 or B16 cells, and significantly higher than Ad5/PEI-2k in SKOV3 cells. Most importantly, after the exposure to the neutralizing

  2. Adenovirus: an emerging factor in red squirrel Sciurus vulgaris conservation

    Everest, David J; Shuttleworth, Craig M.; Stidworthy, Mark F.; Grierson, Sylvia S.; Duff, J. Paul; Kenward, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    1. Adenovirus is an emerging threat to red squirrel Sciurus vulgaris conservation, but confirming clinically significant adenovirus infections in red squirrels is challenging. Rapid intestinal autolysis after death in wild animals frequently obscures pathology characteristic of the disease in animals found dead. 2. We review the available literature to determine current understanding of both subclinical and clinically significant adenovirus infections in free-living wild and captive red sq...

  3. Construction and identification of the recombinant adenovirus vector carrying a small interfering RNA targeting the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ

    LIU Ming; WANG Yi-sheng; LI Yue-bai; ZHAO Guo-qiang

    2012-01-01

    Background Steroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) is a common clinical disease,with a high disability rate.At present,efficient prevention and treatment of steroid-induced ONFH is still lacking.The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is recognized as an important pathogenic gene for the development of steroid-induced ONFH.RNA interference (RNAi) is a tool for functional gene analysis,which has been successfully used to down-regulate the levels of specific target proteins.Therefore,down-regulation of PPARγ expression by RNAi may prevent the incidence of steroid-induced ONFH.Methods According to the principles of siRNA design,three duplex siRNA sequences (971-989,1253-1271 and 1367-1385) derived from the PPARy gene (NM_001082148) were synthesized.These duplexes were annealed,purified and ligated into 1.0-cytomegalovirus (CMV) shuttle vector.The shuttle vector was transfected into HEK293 cells.The HEK293 generated recombinant adenovirus vector carrying PPARγ siRNA sequences was purified and the titer of recombinant adenovirus was determined.Results After the annealing of single-strand DNA oligo encoding short hairpin RNA (shRNA) sequences,products were identified by gel electrophoresis.These products were ligated into the 1.0-CMV shuttle vector and the recombinant shuttle vectors 1.0-CMV-971,1.0-CMV-1253 and 1.0-CMV-1367 were constructed.These sequences of these recombinant vectors were confirmed.We then successfully constructed the recombinant adenovirus vector carrying siRNA targeting PPARγ.After purification,the virus titer was higher than 1010 plaque forming unit (PFU)/ml.Conclusion In this study,three recombinant adenovirus shuttle vectors carrying siRNA targeting PPARγ,including shuttle vectors 1.0-CMV-971,1.0-CMV-1253 and 1.0-CMV-1367,were successfully constructed and high titers of recombinant adenovirus were obtained.

  4. [Inhibition of adenovirus reproduction in cell culture by specific antibodies].

    Povnytsia, O Iu; Nosach, L M; Zhovnovata, V L; Zahorodnia, S D; Vantsak, N P; Tokarchuk, L V; Polishchuk, O M; Diachenko, N S

    2009-01-01

    The capacity of specific antibodies to inhibit the reproduction of homo- and heterologous adenoviruses in Hela cell added to culture medium after virus adsorption was studied. The inhibiting effect of polyclonal antivirus and monospecific antihexone antibodies to homo- and heterologous adenoviruses was shown. The effect was more expressed when using antibodies to homologous antibodies. The intensity of inhibition depended on antibodies concentration in the medium and infecting dose of the virus. Essential reduction of the quantity of infected cells and a decrease of the titer of adenovirus synthesized in the presence of homo- and heterologous antibodies was shown but adenovirus reproduction was not inhibited completely. PMID:19663330

  5. Epstein-Barr virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome mimicking severe sepsis

    Spivack Talya

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe sepsis is amongst the most common reasons for admission to the intensive care unit (ICU throughout the world and is a common cause of death. The diagnosis of sepsis is usually straightforward, being based on a constellation of clinical and laboratory features. Noninfectious disorders, including pancreatitis, drug reactions, and autoimmune disorders, may cause a systemic inflammatory response that mimics sepsis. We present the case of a 32-year-old male with Epstein-Barr virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome who presented to the ICU with features of severe sepsis which progressed to multisystem organ failure and death despite aggressive supportive measures.

  6. Delivery of RNAi-Based Oligonucleotides by Electropermeabilization

    Muriel Golzio

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available For more than a decade, understanding of RNA interference (RNAi has been a growing field of interest. The potent gene silencing ability that small oligonucleotides have offers new perspectives for cancer therapeutics. One of the present limits is that many biological barriers exist for their efficient delivery into target cells or tissues. Electropermeabilization (EP is one of the physical methods successfully used to transfer small oligonucleotides into cells or tissues. EP consists in the direct application of calibrated electric pulses to cells or tissues that transiently permeabilize the plasma membranes, allowing efficient in vitro and in vivo. cytoplasmic delivery of exogenous molecules. The present review reports on the type of therapeutic RNAi-based oligonucleotides that can be electrotransferred, the mechanism(s of their electrotransfer and the technical settings for pre-clinical purposes.

  7. Mouse Adenovirus Type 1 Infection of Macrophages

    Ashley, Shanna L.; Welton, Amanda R.; Harwood, Kirsten M.; van Rooijen, Nico; Spindler, Katherine R.

    2009-01-01

    Mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) causes acute and persistent infections in mice, with high levels of virus found in the brain, spinal cord and spleen in acute infections. MAV-1 infects endothelial cells throughout the mouse, and monocytes/macrophages have also been implicated as targets of the virus. Here we determined the extent and functional importance of macrophage infection by MAV-1. Bone marrow-derived macrophages expressed MAV-1 mRNAs and proteins upon ex vivo infection. Adherent perito...

  8. Isolation and Epidemiology of Falcon Adenovirus

    Oaks, J. Lindsay; Schrenzel, Mark; Rideout, Bruce; Sandfort, Cal

    2005-01-01

    An adenovirus was detected by electron microscopy in tissues from falcons that died during an outbreak of inclusion body hepatitis and enteritis that affected neonatal Northern aplomado (Falco femoralis septentrionalis) and peregrine (Falco peregrinus anatum) falcons. Molecular characterization has identified the falcon virus as a new member of the aviadenovirus group (M. Schrenzel, J. L. Oaks, D. Rotstein, G. Maalouf, E. Snook, C. Sandfort, and B. Rideout, J. Clin. Microbiol. 43:3402-3413, 2...

  9. RNA Viruses and RNAi: Quasispecies Implications for Viral Escape

    Presloid, John B.; Novella, Isabel S.

    2015-01-01

    Due to high mutation rates, populations of RNA viruses exist as a collection of closely related mutants known as a quasispecies. A consequence of error-prone replication is the potential for rapid adaptation of RNA viruses when a selective pressure is applied, including host immune systems and antiviral drugs. RNA interference (RNAi) acts to inhibit protein synthesis by targeting specific mRNAs for degradation and this process has been developed to target RNA viruses, exhibiting their potenti...

  10. ADENOVIRUS INTERACTION WITH ITS CELLULAR RECEPTOR CAR

    The mechanism of adenovirus attachment to the host cell plasma membrane has been revealed in detail by research over the past 10 years. It has long been known that receptor binding activity is associated with the viral fibers, trimeric spike proteins that protrude radially from the vertices of the icosahedral capsid (Philipson et al. 1968). In some adenovirus serotypes, fiber and other virus structural proteins are synthesized in excess and accumulate in the cell nucleus during late stages of infection. Fiber protein can be readily purified from lysates of cells infected with subgroup C viruses, for example Ad2 and Ad5 (Boulanger and Puvion 1973). Addition of purified fiber protein to virus suspensions during adsorption strongly inhibits infection, indicating that fiber and intact virus particles compete for binding sites on host cells (Philipson et al. 1968; Hautala et al. 1998). Cell binding studies using purified radiolabeled fiber demonstrated that fiber binds specifically and with high affinity to the cell plasma membrane, and that cell lines typically used for laboratory propagation of adenovirus have approximately 10(sup 4) high-affinity receptor sites per cell (Persson et al. 1985; Freimuth 1996). Similar numbers of high-affinity binding sites for radiolabeled intact virus particles also were observed (Seth et al. 1994)

  11. ADENOVIRUS INTERACTION WITH ITS CELLULAR RECEPTOR CAR.

    HOWITT,J.; ANDERSON,C.W.; FREIMUTH,P.

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of adenovirus attachment to the host cell plasma membrane has been revealed in detail by research over the past 10 years. It has long been known that receptor binding activity is associated with the viral fibers, trimeric spike proteins that protrude radially from the vertices of the icosahedral capsid (Philipson et al. 1968). In some adenovirus serotypes, fiber and other virus structural proteins are synthesized in excess and accumulate in the cell nucleus during late stages of infection. Fiber protein can be readily purified from lysates of cells infected with subgroup C viruses, for example Ad2 and Ad5 (Boulanger and Puvion 1973). Addition of purified fiber protein to virus suspensions during adsorption strongly inhibits infection, indicating that fiber and intact virus particles compete for binding sites on host cells (Philipson et al. 1968; Hautala et al. 1998). Cell binding studies using purified radiolabeled fiber demonstrated that fiber binds specifically and with high affinity to the cell plasma membrane, and that cell lines typically used for laboratory propagation of adenovirus have approximately 10{sup 4} high-affinity receptor sites per cell (Persson et al. 1985; Freimuth 1996). Similar numbers of high-affinity binding sites for radiolabeled intact virus particles also were observed (Seth et al. 1994).

  12. Affinity approaches in RNAi-based therapeutics purification.

    Pereira, Patrícia; Queiroz, João A; Figueiras, Ana; Sousa, Fani

    2016-05-15

    The recent investigation on RNA interference (RNAi) related mechanisms and applications led to an increased awareness of the importance of RNA in biology. Nowadays, RNAi-based technology has emerged as a potentially powerful tool for silencing gene expression, being exploited to develop new therapeutics for treating a vast number of human disease conditions, as it is expected that this technology can be translated onto clinical applications in a near future. This approach makes use of a large number of small (namely short interfering RNAs, microRNAs and PIWI-interacting RNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), which are likely to have a crucial role as the next generation therapeutics. The commercial and biomedical interest in these RNAi-based therapy applications have fostered the need to develop innovative procedures to easily and efficiently purify RNA, aiming to obtain the final product with high purity degree, good quality and biological activity. Recently, affinity chromatography has been applied to ncRNAs purification, in view of the high specificity. Therefore, this article intends to review the biogenesis pathways of regulatory ncRNAs and also to discuss the most significant and recent developments as well as applications of affinity chromatography in the challenging task of purifying ncRNAs. In addition, the importance of affinity chromatography in ncRNAs purification is addressed and prospects for what is forthcoming are presented. PMID:26830537

  13. A Zebrafish Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor Homologue Interacts with Coxsackie B Virus and Adenovirus

    Petrella, JenniElizabeth; Cohen, Christopher J.; Gaetz, Jedidiah; Bergelson, Jeffrey M.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, a zebrafish homologue of the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) protein was identified. Although the extracellular domain of zebrafish CAR (zCAR) is less than 50% identical to that of human CAR (hCAR), zCAR mediated infection of transfected cells by both adenovirus type 5 and coxsackievirus B3. CAR residues interacting deep within the coxsackievirus canyon are highly conserved in zCAR and hCAR, which is consistent with the idea that receptor contacts within the canyon...

  14. Functional Diversity of RNAi-Associated sRNAs in Fungi

    Francisco E Nicolás; Ruiz-Vázquez, Rosa M

    2013-01-01

    Yeast and filamentous fungi have been essential model systems for unveiling the secrets of RNA interference (RNAi). Research on these organisms has contributed to identifying general mechanisms and conserved eukaryotic RNAi machinery that can be found from fungi to mammals. The development of deep sequencing technologies has brought on the last wave of studies on RNAi in fungi, which has been focused on the identification of new types of functional small RNAs (sRNAs). These studies have disco...

  15. Induction and suppression of tick cell antiviral RNAi responses by tick-borne flaviviruses

    Schnettler, E.; Tykalova, H.; Watson, M.(School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom); Sharma, M; Sterken, M.G.; Obbard, D. J.; Lewis, S. H.; McFarlane, M.; Bell-Sakyi, L.; Barry, G; Weisheit, S.; Best, S. M.; Kuhn, R J; Pijlman, G.P.; Chase-Topping, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    Arboviruses are transmitted by distantly related arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes (class Insecta) and ticks (class Arachnida). RNA interference (RNAi) is the major antiviral mechanism in arthropods against arboviruses. Unlike in mosquitoes, tick antiviral RNAi is not understood, although this information is important to compare arbovirus/host interactions in different classes of arbovirus vectos. Using an Ixodes scapularis-derived cell line, key Argonaute proteins involved in RNAi and the...

  16. The Role of RNA Interference (RNAi) in Arbovirus-Vector Interactions

    Carol D. Blair; Olson, Ken E

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) was shown over 18 years ago to be a mechanism by which arbovirus replication and transmission could be controlled in arthropod vectors. During the intervening period, research on RNAi has defined many of the components and mechanisms of this antiviral pathway in arthropods, yet a number of unexplored questions remain. RNAi refers to RNA-mediated regulation of gene expression. Originally, the term described silencing of endogenous genes by introduction of exogenous doub...

  17. Live Cell Microscopy-Based RNAi Screening in the Moss Physcomitrella patens.

    Miki, Tomohiro; Nakaoka, Yuki; Goshima, Gohta

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful technique enabling the identification of the genes involved in a certain cellular process. Here, we discuss protocols for microscopy-based RNAi screening in protonemal cells of the moss Physcomitrella patens, an emerging model system for plant cell biology. Our method is characterized by the use of conditional (inducible) RNAi vectors, transgenic moss lines in which the RNAi vector is integrated, and time-lapse fluorescent microscopy. This method allows for effective and efficient screening of >100 genes involved in various cellular processes such as mitotic cell division, organelle distribution, or cell growth. PMID:27581297

  18. RNAi mediates post-transcriptional repression of gene expression in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Highlights: • Protein coding genes accumulate anti-sense sRNAs in fission yeast S. pombe. • RNAi represses protein-coding genes in S. pombe. • RNAi-mediated gene repression is post-transcriptional. - Abstract: RNA interference (RNAi) is a gene silencing mechanism conserved from fungi to mammals. Small interfering RNAs are products and mediators of the RNAi pathway and act as specificity factors in recruiting effector complexes. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome encodes one of each of the core RNAi proteins, Dicer, Argonaute and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (dcr1, ago1, rdp1). Even though the function of RNAi in heterochromatin assembly in S. pombe is established, its role in controlling gene expression is elusive. Here, we report the identification of small RNAs mapped anti-sense to protein coding genes in fission yeast. We demonstrate that these genes are up-regulated at the protein level in RNAi mutants, while their mRNA levels are not significantly changed. We show that the repression by RNAi is not a result of heterochromatin formation. Thus, we conclude that RNAi is involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing in S. pombe

  19. The Insect Ecdysone Receptor is a Good Potential Target for RNAi-based Pest Control

    Yu, Rong; Xu, Xinping; Liang, Yongkang; Tian, Honggang; Pan, Zhanqing; Jin, Shouheng; Wang, Na; Zhang, Wenqing

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has great potential for use in insect pest control. However, some significant challenges must be overcome before RNAi-based pest control can become a reality. One challenge is the proper selection of a good target gene for RNAi. Here, we report that the insect ecdysone receptor (EcR) is a good potential target for RNAi-based pest control in the brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens, a serious insect pest of rice plants. We demonstrated that the use of a 360 bp fragment ...

  20. RNAi technologies in agricultural biotechnology: The Toxicology Forum 40th Annual Summer Meeting.

    Sherman, James H; Munyikwa, Tichafa; Chan, Stephen Y; Petrick, Jay S; Witwer, Kenneth W; Choudhuri, Supratim

    2015-11-01

    During the 40th Annual Meeting of The Toxicology Forum, the current and potential future science, regulations, and politics of agricultural biotechnology were presented and discussed. The meeting session described herein focused on the technology of RNA interference (RNAi) in agriculture. The general process by which RNAi works, currently registered RNAi-based plant traits, example RNAi-based traits in development, potential use of double stranded RNA (dsRNA) as topically applied pesticide active ingredients, research related to the safety of RNAi, biological barriers to ingested dsRNA, recent regulatory RNAi science reviews, and regulatory considerations related to the use of RNAi in agriculture were discussed. Participants generally agreed that the current regulatory framework is robust and appropriate for evaluating the safety of RNAi employed in agricultural biotechnology and were also supportive of the use of RNAi to develop improved crop traits. However, as with any emerging technology, the potential range of future products, potential future regulatory frameworks, and public acceptance of the technology will continue to evolve. As such, continuing dialogue was encouraged to promote education of consumers and science-based regulations. PMID:26361858

  1. RNAi mediates post-transcriptional repression of gene expression in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Smialowska, Agata, E-mail: smialowskaa@gmail.com [Center for Biosciences, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge 141-83 (Sweden); School of Life Sciences, Södertörn Högskola, Huddinge 141-89 (Sweden); Djupedal, Ingela; Wang, Jingwen [Center for Biosciences, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge 141-83 (Sweden); Kylsten, Per [School of Life Sciences, Södertörn Högskola, Huddinge 141-89 (Sweden); Swoboda, Peter [Center for Biosciences, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge 141-83 (Sweden); Ekwall, Karl, E-mail: Karl.Ekwall@ki.se [Center for Biosciences, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge 141-83 (Sweden); School of Life Sciences, Södertörn Högskola, Huddinge 141-89 (Sweden)

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Protein coding genes accumulate anti-sense sRNAs in fission yeast S. pombe. • RNAi represses protein-coding genes in S. pombe. • RNAi-mediated gene repression is post-transcriptional. - Abstract: RNA interference (RNAi) is a gene silencing mechanism conserved from fungi to mammals. Small interfering RNAs are products and mediators of the RNAi pathway and act as specificity factors in recruiting effector complexes. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome encodes one of each of the core RNAi proteins, Dicer, Argonaute and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (dcr1, ago1, rdp1). Even though the function of RNAi in heterochromatin assembly in S. pombe is established, its role in controlling gene expression is elusive. Here, we report the identification of small RNAs mapped anti-sense to protein coding genes in fission yeast. We demonstrate that these genes are up-regulated at the protein level in RNAi mutants, while their mRNA levels are not significantly changed. We show that the repression by RNAi is not a result of heterochromatin formation. Thus, we conclude that RNAi is involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing in S. pombe.

  2. Extracorporeal photochemotherapy for Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoma after lung transplantation.

    Schoch, O D; Boehler, A; Speich, R; Nestle, F O

    1999-10-15

    Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a serious complication after transplantation of solid organs. Highest incidence rates have been reported for lung transplant recipients. With the current treatment strategy for early onset PTLD, a reduction of immunosuppressive drugs, mortality of lung transplant recipients with PTLD remains high, due to both, incomplete control of PTLD and transplant rejection. We present a lung transplant recipient with a history of acute rejection and Epstein Barr virus-associated posttransplantation malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Extracorporeal photochemotherapy, in combination with a moderate reduction of immunosuppressive therapy, resulted in complete disappearance of PTLD. After a first year of follow-up, no further rejection and no recurrence of PTLD have occurred. Treatment with ECP, with its beneficial effects on both, rejection after organ transplantation and malignant lymphoma, may be a particularly valuable approach for the treatment of PTLD in patients after lung transplantation, with its increased risk for transplant rejection. PMID:10532551

  3. Successful hyperbaric oxygen therapy for refractory BK virus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis after cord blood transplantation.

    Hosokawa, K; Yamazaki, H; Nakamura, T; Yoroidaka, T; Imi, T; Shima, Y; Ohata, K; Takamatsu, H; Kotani, T; Kondo, Y; Takami, A; Nakao, S

    2014-10-01

    BK virus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis (BKV-HC) is a common and major cause of morbidity in recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. A 32-year-old woman developed severe BKV-HC on day 24 after cord blood transplantation (CBT). Despite supportive therapies - such as hyperhydration, forced diuresis, and urinary catheterization - macroscopic hematuria and bladder irritation persisted for over a month. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy at 2.1 atmospheres for 90 min per day was started on day 64 after CBT. Macroscopic hematuria resolved within a week, and microscopic hematuria was no longer detectable within 2 weeks. Hematuria did not recur after 11 sessions of HBO therapy, and no significant side effects were observed during or after treatment. HBO therapy could thus be useful in controlling refractory BKV-HC after CBT. PMID:25040402

  4. PEGylated Adenoviruses: From Mice to Monkeys

    Piyanuch Wonganan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Covalent modification with polyethylene glycol (PEG, a non-toxic polymer used in food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical preparations for over 60 years, can profoundly influence the pharmacokinetic, pharmacologic and toxciologic profile of protein and peptide-based therapeutics. This review summarizes the history of PEGylation and PEG chemistry and highlights the value of this technology in the context of the design and development of recombinant viruses for gene transfer, vaccination and diagnostic purposes. Specific emphasis is placed on the application of this technology to the adenovirus, the most potent viral vector with the most highly characterized toxicity profile to date, in several animal models.

  5. Construction of RNAi lentiviral vector targeting mouse Islet-1 gene

    Shen-shen ZHI

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To construct and select RNAi lentiviral vectors that can silence mouse Islet-1 gene effectively.Methods Three groups of RNAi-target of mouse Islet-1 gene were designed,and corresponding shRNA oligo(sh1,sh2 and sh3 were synthesized,and then they were respectively inserted to the PLVTHM vector that had been digested by endonuclease.Agarose gel electrophoresis and sequencing were used to select and indentify the positive clones.The positive clones were extracted and then mixed with E.coli to amplify positive clones.The amplified clones were then infected into 293T along with the other 3 helper plasmids to produce lentiviral vector.After the construction of the lentiviral vector,plaque formation test was performed to determine the titer of lentiviral vector.The lentiviral vectors were then infected into C3H10T1/2 cells.The transfect efficiency of the lentiviral vectors was determined with flow cytometry with detection of green fluorescent protein(GFP.Q-PCR was employed to detect the RNAi efficiency of the lentiviral vectors.Results Agarose gel electrophoresis analysis showed that the clones with right gene at the target size were successfully established;gene sequencing showed that the right DNA fragments had been inserted;plaque formation test showed that the titer of the virus solution was 3.87×108TU/ml;the transfect efficiency of the lentiviral vector infected into C3H10T1/2 cells was 90.36%.All the 3 groups of shRNA targets(sh1,sh2 and sh3 showed an inhibitory effect on Islet-1 gene,and the sh1 showed the highest inhibitory effect(76.8%,as compared with that of normal cells(P < 0.05.Conclusion The RNAi lentiviral vector that can effectively silence the mouse Islet-1 gene has been constructed successfully,which may lay a foundation for further investigation of Islet-1 gene.

  6. Enhancement of RNAi by a small molecule antibiotic enoxacin

    Qiangzhe Zhang; Caihong Zhang; Zhen Xi

    2008-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, RNAi has become a mainstream molecular tool for assessing the functions of genes in mammalian cells [1].Large-scale RNA interference-based analyses are often complicated by false positive and negative hits due to off-target effects [2] and interferon response [3],which can be attributed at least in part to the use of high concentrations of siRNA.Lowering the amounts of siRNAs and shRNAs can effectively and expediently mitigate the off-target effect and interferon response [4].

  7. Chitosan-based nanoparticles for mucosal delivery of RNAi therapeutics.

    Martirosyan, Alina; Olesen, Morten Jarlstad; Howard, Kenneth A

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) gene silencing by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) offers a potent and highly specific therapeutic strategy; however, enabling technologies that overcome extracellular and intracellular barriers are required. Polycation-based nanoparticles (termed polyplexes) composed of the polysaccharide chitosan have been used to facilitate delivery of siRNA across mucosal surfaces following local administration. This chapter describes the mucosal barriers that need to be addressed in order to design an effective mucosal delivery strategy and the utilization of the mucoadhesive properties of chitosan. Focus is given to preparation methods and the preclinical application of chitosan nanoparticles for respiratory and oral delivery of siRNA. PMID:25409611

  8. Adrenal gland infection by serotype 5 adenovirus requires coagulation factors.

    Lucile Tran

    Full Text Available Recombinant, replication-deficient serotype 5 adenovirus infects the liver upon in vivo, systemic injection in rodents. This infection requires the binding of factor X to the capsid of this adenovirus. Another organ, the adrenal gland is also infected upon systemic administration of Ad, however, whether this infection is dependent on the cocksackie adenovirus receptor (CAR or depends on the binding of factor X to the viral capsid remained to be determined. In the present work, we have used a pharmacological agent (warfarin as well as recombinant adenoviruses lacking the binding site of Factor X to elucidate this mechanism in mice. We demonstrate that, as observed in the liver, adenovirus infection of the adrenal glands in vivo requires Factor X. Considering that the level of transduction of the adrenal glands is well-below that of the liver and that capsid-modified adenoviruses are unlikely to selectively infect the adrenal glands, we have used single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT imaging of gene expression to determine whether local virus administration (direct injection in the kidney could increase gene transfer to the adrenal glands. We demonstrate that direct injection of the virus in the kidney increases gene transfer in the adrenal gland but liver transduction remains important. These observations strongly suggest that serotype 5 adenovirus uses a similar mechanism to infect liver and adrenal gland and that selective transgene expression in the latter is more likely to be achieved through transcriptional targeting.

  9. Molecular Epidemiology of Adenoviruses among Respiratory Infected Patients

    Nazari, N. (BSc

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Respiratory tract infections (RTI are the most common infectious disorders, worldwide. About 80%-90% of RTI are caused by four viruses such as Adenoviruses, 51 serotypes have been introduced so far. The aim of this survey was to evaluate the frequency of Adenovirus in respiratory infected patients by PCR method in Golestan province, Iran. Material and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 400 patients with clinical diagnosis of flu-like respiratory infection, 2010-2012. In addition to collecting demographic and clinical data, nasopharyngeal swabs were taken and transferred to the virology laboratory in viral transport medium (VTM, and evaluated by PCR method for Adenovirus after genomic extraction. Using SPSS v.11 software, we analyzed the data. Results: Thirty-seven (9.2 % were positive for Adenovirus. No significant correlation was found between being positive for Adenovirus and the variables such as age, gender and season. Clinical signs were coughing (27; 73%, body pain (25; 67.6%, and fever (24; 64.9%. Thirty-five of the patients (94.5% had at least one symptom. Conclusion: Our findings are consistent with other research conducted in Iran and other countries. There is a significant correlation between Adenovirus infection and clinical symptoms. Keywords: Respiratory Infection, Adenovirus, PCR, Golestan, Iran

  10. Altered Virome and Bacterial Microbiome in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    Monaco, Cynthia L; Gootenberg, David B; Zhao, Guoyan; Handley, Scott A; Ghebremichael, Musie S; Lim, Efrem S; Lankowski, Alex; Baldridge, Megan T; Wilen, Craig B; Flagg, Meaghan; Norman, Jason M; Keller, Brian C; Luévano, Jesús Mario; Wang, David; Boum, Yap; Martin, Jeffrey N; Hunt, Peter W; Bangsberg, David R; Siedner, Mark J; Kwon, Douglas S; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with increased intestinal translocation of microbial products and enteropathy as well as alterations in gut bacterial communities. However, whether the enteric virome contributes to this infection and resulting immunodeficiency remains unknown. We characterized the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome in a cohort of Ugandan patients, including HIV-uninfected or HIV-infected subjects and those either treated with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) or untreated. Low peripheral CD4 T cell counts were associated with an expansion of enteric adenovirus sequences and this increase was independent of ART treatment. Additionally, the enteric bacterial microbiome of patients with lower CD4 T counts exhibited reduced phylogenetic diversity and richness with specific bacteria showing differential abundance, including increases in Enterobacteriaceae, which have been associated with inflammation. Thus, immunodeficiency in progressive HIV infection is associated with alterations in the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome, which may contribute to AIDS-associated enteropathy and disease progression. PMID:26962942

  11. Respiratory Viruses Associated Hospitalization among Children Aged <5 Years in Bangladesh: 2010-2014.

    Nusrat Homaira

    Full Text Available We combined hospital-based surveillance and health utilization survey data to estimate the incidence of respiratory viral infections associated hospitalization among children aged < 5 years in Bangladesh.Surveillance physicians collected respiratory specimens from children aged <5 years hospitalized with respiratory illness and residing in the primary hospital catchment areas. We tested respiratory specimens for respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza viruses, human metapneumovirus, influenza, adenovirus and rhinoviruses using rRT-PCR. During 2013, we conducted a health utilization survey in the primary catchment areas of the hospitals to determine the proportion of all hospitalizations for respiratory illness among children aged <5 years at the surveillance hospitals during the preceding 12 months. We estimated the respiratory virus-specific incidence of hospitalization by dividing the estimated number of hospitalized children with a laboratory confirmed infection with a respiratory virus by the population aged <5 years of the catchment areas and adjusted for the proportion of children who were hospitalized at the surveillance hospitals.We estimated that the annual incidence per 1000 children (95% CI of all cause associated respiratory hospitalization was 11.5 (10-12. The incidences per 1000 children (95% CI per year for respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza, adenovirus, human metapneumovirus and influenza infections were 3(2-3, 0.5(0.4-0.8, 0.4 (0.3-0.6, 0.4 (0.3-0.6, and 0.4 (0.3-0.6 respectively. The incidences per 1000 children (95%CI of rhinovirus-associated infections among hospitalized children were 5 (3-7, 2 (1-3, 1 (0.6-2, and 3 (2-4 in 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013, respectively.Our data suggest that respiratory viruses are associated with a substantial burden of hospitalization in children aged <5 years in Bangladesh.

  12. Respiratory Viruses Associated Hospitalization among Children Aged <5 Years in Bangladesh: 2010-2014

    Homaira, Nusrat; Luby, Stephen P.; Hossain, Kamal; Islam, Kariul; Ahmed, Makhdum; Rahman, Mustafizur; Rahman, Ziaur; Paul, Repon C.; Bhuiyan, Mejbah Uddin; Brooks, W. Abdullah; Sohel, Badrul Munir; Banik, Kajal Chandra; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Willby, Melisa; Rahman, Mahmudur; Bresee, Joseph; Ramirez, Katharine-Sturm; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Background We combined hospital-based surveillance and health utilization survey data to estimate the incidence of respiratory viral infections associated hospitalization among children aged < 5 years in Bangladesh. Methods Surveillance physicians collected respiratory specimens from children aged <5 years hospitalized with respiratory illness and residing in the primary hospital catchment areas. We tested respiratory specimens for respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza viruses, human metapneumovirus, influenza, adenovirus and rhinoviruses using rRT-PCR. During 2013, we conducted a health utilization survey in the primary catchment areas of the hospitals to determine the proportion of all hospitalizations for respiratory illness among children aged <5 years at the surveillance hospitals during the preceding 12 months. We estimated the respiratory virus-specific incidence of hospitalization by dividing the estimated number of hospitalized children with a laboratory confirmed infection with a respiratory virus by the population aged <5 years of the catchment areas and adjusted for the proportion of children who were hospitalized at the surveillance hospitals. Results We estimated that the annual incidence per 1000 children (95% CI) of all cause associated respiratory hospitalization was 11.5 (10–12). The incidences per 1000 children (95% CI) per year for respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza, adenovirus, human metapneumovirus and influenza infections were 3(2–3), 0.5(0.4–0.8), 0.4 (0.3–0.6), 0.4 (0.3–0.6), and 0.4 (0.3–0.6) respectively. The incidences per 1000 children (95%CI) of rhinovirus-associated infections among hospitalized children were 5 (3–7), 2 (1–3), 1 (0.6–2), and 3 (2–4) in 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013, respectively. Conclusion Our data suggest that respiratory viruses are associated with a substantial burden of hospitalization in children aged <5 years in Bangladesh. PMID:26840782

  13. Structure of adenovirus bound to cellular receptor car

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2007-01-02

    Disclosed is a mutant CAR-DI-binding adenovirus which has a genome comprising one or more mutations in sequences which encode the fiber protein knob domain wherein the mutation causes the encoded viral particle to have a significantly weakened binding affinity for CAR-DI relative to wild-type adenovirus. Such mutations may be in sequences which encode either the AB loop, or the HI loop of the fiber protein knob domain. Specific residues and mutations are described. Also disclosed is a method for generating a mutant adenovirus which is characterized by a receptor binding affinity or specificity which differs substantially from wild type.

  14. In vitro growth of some fastidious adenoviruses from stool specimens.

    Kidd, A H; Madeley, C R

    1981-01-01

    Sixty-seven stool specimens from 51 children, positive for adenoviruses by electron microscopy and negative for growth in human-embryo kidney cells, were tested for growth in Chang conjunctiva cells. Twenty-eight specimens caused a cytopathic effect over more than one passage in these cultures, and several adenovirus strains grew better at 33 degree C than at 37 degree C. Most of the culture-positive specimens also induced the development of adenovirus antigens in KB cells detectable by a gro...

  15. Preliminary mechanistic research on STAT3 and ErbB2 RNAi as targets for radiation sensitization in astrocytoma cell

    Constitutively activated STAT3 and ErbB2 are involved in pathogenesis of many tumors including astrocytoma. The effects of plasmid vector mediated STAT3 and ErbB2 RNAi on growth of U251 astrocytoma cell line were examined. Increased apoptosis and decreased proliferation were induced by STAT3 and ErbB2 RNAi in U251 cell. STAT3 and ErbB2 RNAi showed synergetic effect. Combination of RNAi and irradiation showed synergetic effect. However, STAT3 and ErbB2 RNAi showed no obvious effects on NA cell. At the same time, an U251 xenograft model was used to determine the in vivo effect of combined therapy of RNAi and irradiation. The result suggested that both STAT3 RNAi and ErbB2 RNAi could inhibit the tumor growth. The effect was more pronounced when the two genes were both down regulated. Comparing STAT3 RNAi or ErbB2 RNAi alone respectively, STAT3 RNAi plus 2 Gy radiotherapy or ErbB2 RNAi plus 2 Gy radiotherapy further inhibited the tumor growth. Among the different treatment, combining STAT3 and ErbB2 RNAi with 2 Gy radiotherapy lead to the most significant inhibition of tumor growth. (author)

  16. Molecular Characterization of a Lizard Adenovirus Reveals the First Atadenovirus with Two Fiber Genes and the First Adenovirus with Either One Short or Three Long Fibers per Penton

    Pénzes, Judit J.; Menéndez-Conejero, Rosa; Condezo, Gabriela N.; Ball, Inna; Papp, Tibor; Doszpoly, Andor; Paradela, Alberto; Pérez-Berná, Ana J.; López-Sanz, María; Nguyen, Thanh H.; van Raaij, Mark J.; Marschang, Rachel E.; Harrach, Balázs; Benkő, Mária; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Although adenoviruses (AdVs) have been found in a wide variety of reptiles, including numerous squamate species, turtles, and crocodiles, the number of reptilian adenovirus isolates is still scarce. The only fully sequenced reptilian adenovirus, snake adenovirus 1 (SnAdV-1), belongs to the Atadenovirus genus. Recently, two new atadenoviruses were isolated from a captive Gila monster (Heloderma suspectum) and Mexican beaded lizards (Heloderma horridum). Here we report the full genomic and prot...

  17. RNA Interference in the Age of CRISPR: Will CRISPR Interfere with RNAi?

    Unniyampurath, Unnikrishnan; Pilankatta, Rajendra; Krishnan, Manoj N.

    2016-01-01

    The recent emergence of multiple technologies for modifying gene structure has revolutionized mammalian biomedical research and enhanced the promises of gene therapy. Over the past decade, RNA interference (RNAi) based technologies widely dominated various research applications involving experimental modulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Recently, a new gene editing technology, Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) and the CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) (CRISPR/Cas9) system, has received unprecedented acceptance in the scientific community for a variety of genetic applications. Unlike RNAi, the CRISPR/Cas9 system is bestowed with the ability to introduce heritable precision insertions and deletions in the eukaryotic genome. The combination of popularity and superior capabilities of CRISPR/Cas9 system raises the possibility that this technology may occupy the roles currently served by RNAi and may even make RNAi obsolete. We performed a comparative analysis of the technical aspects and applications of the CRISPR/Cas9 system and RNAi in mammalian systems, with the purpose of charting out a predictive picture on whether the CRISPR/Cas9 system will eclipse the existence and future of RNAi. The conclusion drawn from this analysis is that RNAi will still occupy specific domains of biomedical research and clinical applications, under the current state of development of these technologies. However, further improvements in CRISPR/Cas9 based technology may ultimately enable it to dominate RNAi in the long term. PMID:26927085

  18. RNA Interference in the Age of CRISPR: Will CRISPR Interfere with RNAi?

    Unnikrishnan Unniyampurath

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The recent emergence of multiple technologies for modifying gene structure has revolutionized mammalian biomedical research and enhanced the promises of gene therapy. Over the past decade, RNA interference (RNAi based technologies widely dominated various research applications involving experimental modulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Recently, a new gene editing technology, Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR and the CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9 system, has received unprecedented acceptance in the scientific community for a variety of genetic applications. Unlike RNAi, the CRISPR/Cas9 system is bestowed with the ability to introduce heritable precision insertions and deletions in the eukaryotic genome. The combination of popularity and superior capabilities of CRISPR/Cas9 system raises the possibility that this technology may occupy the roles currently served by RNAi and may even make RNAi obsolete. We performed a comparative analysis of the technical aspects and applications of the CRISPR/Cas9 system and RNAi in mammalian systems, with the purpose of charting out a predictive picture on whether the CRISPR/Cas9 system will eclipse the existence and future of RNAi. The conclusion drawn from this analysis is that RNAi will still occupy specific domains of biomedical research and clinical applications, under the current state of development of these technologies. However, further improvements in CRISPR/Cas9 based technology may ultimately enable it to dominate RNAi in the long term.

  19. Improved Production of Gutted Adenovirus in Cells Expressing Adenovirus Preterminal Protein and DNA Polymerase

    Hartigan-O’Connor, Dennis; Amalfitano, Andrea; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    1999-01-01

    Production of gutted, or helper-dependent, adenovirus vectors by current methods is inefficient. Typically, a plasmid form of the gutted genome is transfected with helper viral DNA into 293 cells; the resulting lysate is serially passaged to increase the titer of gutted virions. Inefficient production of gutted virus particles after cotransfection is likely due to suboptimal association of replication factors with the abnormal origins found in these plasmid substrates. To test this hypothesis...

  20. High-Throughput, Liquid-Based Genome-Wide RNAi Screening in C. elegans.

    O'Reilly, Linda P; Knoerdel, Ryan R; Silverman, Gary A; Pak, Stephen C

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a process in which double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) molecules mediate the inhibition of gene expression. RNAi in C. elegans can be achieved by simply feeding animals with bacteria expressing dsRNA against the gene of interest. This "feeding" method has made it possible to conduct genome-wide RNAi experiments for the systematic knockdown and subsequent investigation of almost every single gene in the genome. Historically, these genome-scale RNAi screens have been labor and time intensive. However, recent advances in automated, high-throughput methodologies have allowed the development of more rapid and efficient screening protocols. In this report, we describe a fast and efficient, liquid-based method for genome-wide RNAi screening. PMID:27581291

  1. A Drosophila RNAi library modulates Hippo pathway-dependent tissue growth

    Vissers, Joseph H.A.; Manning, Samuel A.; Kulkarni, Aishwarya; Harvey, Kieran F.

    2016-01-01

    Libraries of transgenic Drosophila melanogaster carrying RNA interference (RNAi) constructs have been used extensively to perform large-scale functional genetic screens in vivo. For example, RNAi screens have facilitated the discovery of multiple components of the Hippo pathway, an evolutionarily conserved growth-regulatory network. Here we investigate an important technical limitation with the widely used VDRC KK RNAi collection. We find that approximately 25% of VDRC KK RNAi lines cause false-positive enhancement of the Hippo pathway, owing to ectopic expression of the Tiptop transcription factor. Of relevance to the broader Drosophila community, ectopic tiptop (tio) expression can also cause organ malformations and mask phenotypes such as organ overgrowth. To enhance the use of the VDRC KK RNAi library, we have generated a D. melanogaster strain that will allow researchers to test, in a single cross, whether their genetic screen of interest will be affected by ectopic tio expression. PMID:26758424

  2. Acute Hepatitis and Pancytopenia in Healthy Infant with Adenovirus

    Amr Matoq

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are a common cause of respiratory infection, pharyngitis, and conjunctivitis in infants and young children. They are known to cause hepatitis and liver failure in immunocompromised patients; they are a rare cause of hepatitis in immunocompetent patients and have been known to cause fulminant hepatic failure. We present a 23-month-old immunocompetent infant who presented with acute noncholestatic hepatitis, hypoalbuminemia, generalized anasarca, and pancytopenia secondary to adenovirus infection.

  3. Acute Hepatitis and Pancytopenia in Healthy Infant with Adenovirus.

    Matoq, Amr; Salahuddin, Asma

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses are a common cause of respiratory infection, pharyngitis, and conjunctivitis in infants and young children. They are known to cause hepatitis and liver failure in immunocompromised patients; they are a rare cause of hepatitis in immunocompetent patients and have been known to cause fulminant hepatic failure. We present a 23-month-old immunocompetent infant who presented with acute noncholestatic hepatitis, hypoalbuminemia, generalized anasarca, and pancytopenia secondary to adenovirus infection. PMID:27340581

  4. New Adenovirus Species Found in a Patient Presenting with Gastroenteritis▿

    Jones, Morris Saffold; Harrach, Balázs; Ganac, Robert D.; Gozum, Mary M. A.; Dela Cruz, Wilfred P.; Riedel, Brian; Pan, Chao; Delwart, Eric L.; David P Schnurr

    2007-01-01

    An unidentified agent was cultured in primary monkey cells at the Los Angeles County Public Health Department from each of five stool specimens submitted from an outbreak of gastroenteritis. Electron microscopy and an adenovirus-specific monoclonal antibody confirmed this agent to be an adenovirus. Since viral titers were too low, complete serotyping was not possible. Using the DNase-sequence-independent viral nucleic acid amplification method, we identified several nucleotide sequences with ...

  5. Adenovirus Vectors for Gene Therapy, Vaccination and Cancer Gene Therapy

    Wold, William S.M.; Toth, Karoly

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are the most commonly employed vector for cancer gene therapy. They are also used for gene therapy and as vaccines to express foreign antigens. Adenovirus vectors can be replication-defective; certain essential viral genes are deleted and replaced by a cassette that expresses a foreign therapeutic gene. Such vectors are used for gene therapy, as vaccines, and for cancer therapy. Replication-competent (oncolytic) vectors are employed for cancer gene therapy. Oncolytic vector...

  6. An Update on Canine Adenovirus Type 2 and Its Vectors

    Kremer, Eric J.; Sara Salinas; Thierry Bru

    2010-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors have significant potential for long- or short-term gene transfer. Preclinical and clinical studies using human derived adenoviruses (HAd) have demonstrated the feasibility of flexible hybrid vector designs, robust expression and induction of protective immunity. However, clinical use of HAd vectors can, under some conditions, be limited by pre-existing vector immunity. Pre-existing humoral and cellular anti-capsid immunity limits the efficacy and duration of transgene expre...

  7. Clinical characteristics analysis of adult human adenovirus type 7 infection

    张乃春

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical characteristics of patients infected with human adenovirus type 7 and to provide guidance for early diagnosis and timely control of the outbreak.Methods A total of 301 patients infected with the human adenoviruses who were quarantined in hospital from December 2012 to February 2013 were observed.Epidemiological questionnaires were used to collect data of clinical features of the disease including

  8. Vaccine Design: Replication-Defective Adenovirus Vectors.

    Zhou, Xiangyang; Xiang, Zhiquan; Ertl, Hildegund C J

    2016-01-01

    Replication-defective adenovirus (Ad) vectors were initially developed for gene transfer for correction of genetic diseases. Although Ad vectors achieved high levels of transgene product expression in a variety of target cells, expression of therapeutic proteins was found to be transient as vigorous T cell responses directed to components of the vector as well as the transgene product rapidly eliminate Ad vector-transduced cells. This opened the use of Ad vectors as vaccine carriers and by now a multitude of preclinical as well as clinical studies has shown that Ad vectors induce very potent and sustained transgene product-specific T and B cell responses. This chapter provides guidance on developing E1-deleted Ad vectors based on available viral molecular clones. Specifically, it describes methods for cloning, viral rescue and purification as well as quality control studies. PMID:27076309

  9. Polymeric oncolytic adenovirus for cancer gene therapy.

    Choi, Joung-Woo; Lee, Young Sook; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, Sung Wan

    2015-12-10

    Oncolytic adenovirus (Ad) vectors present a promising modality to treat cancer. Many clinical trials have been done with either naked oncolytic Ad or combination with chemotherapies. However, the systemic injection of oncolytic Ad in clinical applications is restricted due to significant liver toxicity and immunogenicity. To overcome these issues, Ad has been engineered physically or chemically with numerous polymers for shielding the Ad surface, accomplishing extended blood circulation time and reduced immunogenicity as well as hepatotoxicity. In this review, we describe and classify the characteristics of polymer modified oncolytic Ad following each strategy for cancer treatment. Furthermore, this review concludes with the highlights of various polymer-coated Ads and their prospects, and directions for future research. PMID:26453806

  10. In vitro RNA synthesis by infectious pancreatic necrosis virus-associated RNA polymerase.

    Mertens, P P; Jamieson, P B; Dobos, P

    1982-03-01

    The presence of an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase was demonstrated in purified infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV). The enzyme was active in vitro without any pretreatment of the virus. Optimum activity was shown at 30 degrees C, pH 8 and in the presence of 6 mM-magnesium ions. Approx. 50% of the polymerase product remained associated with the dsRNA template of the virions. The remainder was found as extravirion ssRNA broken down to 5S to 7S fragments by virus-associated RNase(s). Although the addition of bentonite considerably reduced the amount of RNA synthesized, it protected the ssRNA product from degradation. This, in turn, permitted the synthesis of small amounts of ssRNA, which when analysed by sucrose gradient centrifugation or polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis behaved identically to the 24S single-stranded virus mRNA produced in infected cells. The virion polymerase was not stimulated by S-adenosyl-L-methionine or the addition of cellular or capped reovirus ssRNA. Several other modifications of the assay system were tried in an attempt to increase 24S RNA synthesis, but with little success. When [3H]uridine-labelled virus was used in the polymerase reaction, some labelled 24S ssRNA was obtained, indicating that in vitro transcription may proceed by a semi-conservative (displacement) mechanism. PMID:6175731

  11. Nuevos virus asociados con gastroenteritis New viruses associated with acute diarrheal disease

    Carlos Aguirre

    1992-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Se hace un resumen de las características comunes y específicas de los diversos virus asociados con enfermedad diarreica aguda, con énfasis en la importancia que tienen en la génesis de este síndrome y en el hecho de que la mayoría de los casos, aunque sean severos, pueden ser manejados adecuadamente mediante el reemplazo de líquidos y electrolitos.

    A synopsis of the common and specific features of the various viruses associated with acute diarrheal disease is presented; emphasis Is made on their importance as etiologic agents of this syndrome and on the fact that most cases, even If they are severe, can be appropriately treated by fluid and electrolyte replacement.

  12. Adenovirus Vector-Derived VA-RNA-Mediated Innate Immune Responses

    Hiroyuki Mizuguchi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The major limitation of the clinical use of replication-incompetent adenovirus (Ad vectors is the interference by innate immune responses, including induction of inflammatory cytokines and interferons (IFN, following in vivo application of Ad vectors. Ad vector-induced production of inflammatory cytokines and IFNs also results in severe organ damage and efficient induction of acquired immune responses against Ad proteins and transgene products. Ad vector-induced innate immune responses are triggered by the recognition of Ad components by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs. In order to reduce the side effects by Ad vector-induced innate immune responses and to develop safer Ad vectors, it is crucial to clarify which PRRs and which Ad components are involved in Ad vector-induced innate immune responses. Our group previously demonstrated that myeloid differentiating factor 88 (MyD88 and toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9 play crucial roles in the Ad vector-induced inflammatory cytokine production in mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Furthermore, our group recently found that virus associated-RNAs (VA-RNAs, which are about 160 nucleotide-long non-coding small RNAs encoded in the Ad genome, are involved in IFN production through the IFN-β promoter stimulator-1 (IPS-1-mediated signaling pathway following Ad vector transduction. The aim of this review is to highlight the Ad vector-induced innate immune responses following transduction, especially VA-RNA-mediated innate immune responses. Our findings on the mechanism of Ad vector-induced innate immune responses should make an important contribution to the development of safer Ad vectors, such as an Ad vector lacking expression of VA-RNAs.

  13. Rejection of adenovirus infection is independent of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor expression in cisplatin-resistant human lung cancer cells.

    Zhang, Nian-Hua; Peng, Rui-Qing; Ding, Ya; Zhang, Xiao-Shi

    2016-08-01

    The adenovirus vector-based cancer gene therapy is controversial. Low transduction efficacy is believed to be one of the main barriers for the decreased expression of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) on tumor cells. However, the expression of CAR on primary tumor tissue and tumor tissue survived from treatment has still been not extensively studied. The present study analyzed the adenovirus infection rates and CAR expression in human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 and its cisplatin-resistant subline A549/DDP. The results showed that although the CAR expression in A549 and A549/DDP was not different, compared with the A549, A549/DDP appeared obviously to reject adenovirus infection. Moreover, we modified CAR expression in the two cell lines with proteasome inhibitor MG-132 and histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA), and analyzed the adenovirus infection rates after modifying agent treatments. Both TSA and MG-132 pretreatments could increase the CAR expression in the two cell lines, but the drug pretreatments could only make A549 cells more susceptible to adenovirus infectivity. PMID:27373420

  14. Molecular characterization of viruses associated with gastrointestinal infection in HIV-positive patients

    Raquel C Silva

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diarrhea is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected patients worldwide. OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine the frequency of viral gastrointestinal infections among Brazilian HIV-infected patients with diarrhea. METHODS: A collection of 90 fecal specimens from HIV-infected individuals with diarrhea, previously tested for the presence of bacteria and parasite was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis for the presence of enteric viruses such as astrovirus, norovirus, rotavirus groups A, B and C, adenovirus, herpes simplex virus, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, and human bocavirus. RESULTS: Twenty patients (22.2%; n = 90 were infected with parasites (11 single infections and nine coinfected with virus. Enteropathogenic bacteria were not found. Virus infections were detected in 28.9% (26/90 of the specimens. Cytomegalovirus was the most common virus detected (24.4%; 22/90. Coinfections with viruses and/or parasite were observed in 10 (11.1% samples. CONCLUSION: Gastrointestinal virus infections were more frequent than parasitic or bacterial infections in this patient population.

  15. Potential and development of inhaled RNAi therapeutics for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Man, Dede K W; Chow, Michael Y T; Casettari, Luca; Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Lam, Jenny K W

    2016-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by the infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), continues to pose a serious threat to public health, and the situation is worsening with the rapid emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) TB. Current TB regimens require long duration of treatment, and their toxic side effects often lead to poor adherence and low success rates. There is an urgent need for shorter and more effective treatment for TB. In recent years, RNA interference (RNAi) has become a powerful tool for studying gene function by silencing the target genes. The survival of Mtb in host macrophages involves the attenuation of the antimicrobial responses mounted by the host cells. RNAi technology has helped to improve our understanding of how these bacilli interferes with the bactericidal effect and host immunity during TB infection. It has been suggested that the host-directed intervention by modulation of host pathways can be employed as a novel and effective therapy against TB. This therapeutic approach could be achieved by RNAi, which holds enormous potential beyond a laboratory to the clinic. RNAi therapy targeting TB is being investigated for enhancing host antibacterial capacity or improving drug efficacy on drug resistance strains while minimizing the associated adverse effects. One of the key challenges of RNAi therapeutics arises from the delivery of the RNAi molecules into the target cells, and inhalation could serve as a direct administration route for the treatment of pulmonary TB in a non-invasive manner. However, there are still major obstacles that need to be overcome. This review focuses on the RNAi candidates that are currently explored for the treatment of TB and discusses the major barriers of pulmonary RNAi delivery. From this, we hope to stimulate further studies of local RNAi therapeutics for pulmonary TB treatment. PMID:27108702

  16. Polyomavirus specific cellular immunity: from BK-virus-specific cellular immunity to BK-virus-associated nephropathy ?

    manon edekeyser

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In renal transplantation, BK-virus-associated nephropathy has emerged as a major complication, with a prevalence of 5–10% and graft loss in >50% of cases. BK-virus is a member of the Polyomavirus family and rarely induces apparent clinical disease in the general population. However, replication of polyomaviruses, associated with significant organ disease, is observed in patients with acquired immunosuppression, which suggests a critical role for virus-specific cellular immunity to control virus replication and prevent chronic disease. Monitoring of specific immunity combined with viral load could be used to individually assess the risk of viral reactivation and virus control. We review the current knowledge on BK-virus specific cellular immunity and, more specifically, in immunocompromised patients. In the future, immune-based therapies could allow us to treat and prevent BK-virus-associated nephropathy.

  17. Serosurvey for viruses associated with reproductive failure in newly introduced gilts and in multiparous sows in Belgian sow herds

    Lefebvre, David; Van Reeth, Kristien; Vangroenweghe, Fr; Maes, Dominiek; Van Driessche, E; Laitat, M.; Nauwynck, Hans

    2009-01-01

    A serosurvey for viruses associated with reproductive disorders was conducted in 25 conventional Belgian farms. Serum antibody titers for porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), porcine parvovirus (PPV), porcine enteroviruses (PEV) and swine influenza viruses (SIV) were determined in gilts and sows. All the animals were seropositive for PCV2 and >95% were seropositive for all 4 embryopathogenic PEV serotypes. Consequently, special prevent...

  18. Influenza A (H1N1) virus-associated pneumonia: High-resolution computed tomography–pathologic correlation

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe the high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) features of fatal cases of Influenza A (H1N1) virus-associated pneumonia and to correlate them with pathologic findings. Methods: The study included six adult patients who died following Influenza A (H1N1) virus-associated pneumonia. All patients had undergone HRCT, and the images were retrospectively analyzed by two chest radiologists, who reached decisions by consensus. Two experienced lung pathologists reviewed all pathological specimens. The HRCT findings were correlated with the histopathologic data. Results: The predominant HRCT findings included areas of airspace consolidation (n = 6) and ground-glass opacities (n = 3). The main pathological features consisted of diffuse alveolar damage with hyaline membrane formation (n = 5), associated with various degrees of pulmonary congestion, edema, hemorrhage, inflammatory infiltration and bronchiolitis. A patient who survived longer showed findings of organizing pneumonia. Conclusion: Fatal cases of Influenza A (H1N1) virus-associated pneumonia can present as areas of consolidation on CT, with or without ground-glass opacities. These abnormalities can be pathologically correlated with diffuse alveolar damage. Patients with longer survival may present with findings of organizing pneumonia.

  19. Disrupted Adenovirus-Based Vaccines Against Small Addictive Molecules Circumvent Anti-Adenovirus Immunity

    De, Bishnu P.; Pagovich, Odelya E; Hicks, Martin J.; Rosenberg, Jonathan B.; Moreno, Amira Y.; Janda, Kim D.; Koob, George F; Worgall, Stefan; Kaminsky, Stephen M; Sondhi, Dolan; Crystal, Ronald G

    2012-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) vaccine vectors have been used for many applications due to the capacity of the Ad capsid proteins to evoke potent immune responses, but these vectors are often ineffective in the context of pre-existing anti-Ad immunity. Leveraging the knowledge that E1−E3− Ad gene transfer vectors are potent immunogens, we have developed a vaccine platform against small molecules by covalently coupling analogs of small molecules to the capsid proteins of disrupted Ad (dAd5). We hypothesized ...

  20. 9 CFR 113.202 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus...; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.202 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed...

  1. Plant-mediated RNAi of a gap gene-enhanced tobacco tolerance against the Myzus persicae.

    Mao, Jianjun; Zeng, Fanrong

    2014-02-01

    Plant-mediated RNAi has been developed as a powerful weapon in the fight against agricultural insect pests. The gap gene hunchback (hb) is of crucial importance in insect axial patterning and knockdown of hb is deforming and lethal to the next generation. The peach potato aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer), has many host plants and can be found throughout the world. To investigate the effect of plant-mediated RNAi on control of this insect, the hb gene in M. persicae was cloned, plant RNAi vector was constructed, and transgenic tobacco expressing Mphb dsRNA was developed. Transgenic tobacco had a different integration pattern of the transgene. Bioassays were performed by applying neonate aphids to homozygous transgenic plants in the T2 generation. Results revealed that continuous feeding of transgenic diet reduced Mphb mRNA level in the fed aphids and inhibited insect reproduction, indicating successful knockdown of the target gene in M. persicae by plant-mediated RNAi. PMID:23949691

  2. Soaking RNAi in Bombyx mori BmN4-SID1 cells arrests cell cycle progression.

    Mon, Hiroaki; Li, Zhiqing; Kobayashi, Isao; Tomita, Shuichiro; Lee, JaeMan; Sezutsu, Hideki; Tamura, Toshiki; Kusakabe, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for sequence-specific gene silencing. Previously, the BmN4-SID1 cell expressing Caenorhabditis ele gans SID-1 was established, in which soaking RNAi could induce effective gene silencing. To establish its utility, 6 cell cycle progression related cDNAs, CDK1, MYC, MYB, RNRS, CDT1, and GEMININ, were isolated from the silkworm, Bombyx mori L. (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae), and their expressions were further silenced by soaking RNAi in the BmN4-SID1 cells. The cell cycle progression analysis using flow cytometer demonstrated that the small amount of double stranded RNA was enough to arrest cell cycle progression at the specific cell phases. These data suggest that RNAi in the BmN4-SID1 cells can be used as a powerful tool for loss-of-function analysis of B. mori genes. PMID:24773378

  3. Synthetic heterochromatin bypasses RNAi and centromeric repeats to establish functional centromeres.

    Kagansky, Alexander; Folco, Hernan Diego; Almeida, Ricardo; Pidoux, Alison L; Boukaba, Abdelhalim; Simmer, Femke; Urano, Takeshi; Hamilton, Georgina L; Allshire, Robin C

    2009-06-26

    In the central domain of fission yeast centromeres, the kinetochore is assembled on CENP-A(Cnp1) nucleosomes. Normally, small interfering RNAs generated from flanking outer repeat transcripts direct histone H3 lysine 9 methyltransferase Clr4 to homologous loci to form heterochromatin. Outer repeats, RNA interference (RNAi), and centromeric heterochromatin are required to establish CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin. We demonstrated that tethering Clr4 via DNA-binding sites at euchromatic loci induces heterochromatin assembly, with or without active RNAi. This synthetic heterochromatin completely substitutes for outer repeats on plasmid-based minichromosomes, promoting de novo CENP-A(Cnp1) and kinetochore assembly, to allow their mitotic segregation, even with RNAi inactive. Thus, the role of outer repeats in centromere establishment is simply the provision of RNAi substrates to direct heterochromatin formation; H3K9 methylation-dependent heterochromatin is alone sufficient to form functional centromeres. PMID:19556509

  4. Latest Insights on Adenovirus Structure and Assembly

    Carmen San Martín

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus (AdV capsid organization is considerably complex, not only because of its large size (~950 Å and triangulation number (pseudo T = 25, but also because it contains four types of minor proteins in specialized locations modulating the quasi-equivalent icosahedral interactions. Up until 2009, only its major components (hexon, penton, and fiber had separately been described in atomic detail. Their relationships within the virion, and the location of minor coat proteins, were inferred from combining the known crystal structures with increasingly more detailed cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM maps. There was no structural information on assembly intermediates. Later on that year, two reports described the structural differences between the mature and immature adenoviral particle, starting to shed light on the different stages of viral assembly, and giving further insights into the roles of core and minor coat proteins during morphogenesis [1,2]. Finally, in 2010, two papers describing the atomic resolution structure of the complete virion appeared [3,4]. These reports represent a veritable tour de force for two structural biology techniques: X-ray crystallography and cryoEM, as this is the largest macromolecular complex solved at high resolution by either of them. In particular, the cryoEM analysis provided an unprecedented clear picture of the complex protein networks shaping the icosahedral shell. Here I review these latest developments in the field of AdV structural studies.

  5. Adenovirus 36 and Obesity: An Overview

    Eleonora Ponterio

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available There is an epidemic of obesity starting about 1980 in both developed and undeveloped countries definitely associated with multiple etiologies. About 670 million people worldwide are obese. The incidence of obesity has increased in all age groups, including children. Obesity causes numerous diseases and the interaction between genetic, metabolic, social, cultural and environmental factors are possible cofactors for the development of obesity. Evidence emerging over the last 20 years supports the hypothesis that viral infections may be associated with obesity in animals and humans. The most widely studied infectious agent possibly linked to obesity is adenovirus 36 (Adv36. Adv36 causes obesity in animals. In humans, Adv36 associates with obesity both in adults and children and the prevalence of Adv36 increases in relation to the body mass index. In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that the viral E4orf1 protein (early region 4 open reading frame 1, Adv mediates the Adv36 effect including its adipogenic potential. The Adv36 infection should therefore be considered as a possible risk factor for obesity and could be a potential new therapeutic target in addition to an original way to understand the worldwide rise of the epidemic of obesity. Here, the data indicating a possible link between viral infection and obesity with a particular emphasis to the Adv36 will be reviewed.

  6. Increasing the Efficacy of Oncolytic Adenovirus Vectors

    William S. M. Wold

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic adenovirus (Ad vectors present a new modality to treat cancer. These vectors attack tumors via replicating in and killing cancer cells. Upon completion of the vector replication cycle, the infected tumor cell lyses and releases progeny virions that are capable of infecting neighboring tumor cells. Repeated cycles of vector replication and cell lysis can destroy the tumor. Numerous Ad vectors have been generated and tested, some of them reaching human clinical trials. In 2005, the first oncolytic Ad was approved for the treatment of head-and-neck cancer by the Chinese FDA. Oncolytic Ads have been proven to be safe, with no serious adverse effects reported even when high doses of the vector were injected intravenously. The vectors demonstrated modest anti-tumor effect when applied as a single agent; their efficacy improved when they were combined with another modality. The efficacy of oncolytic Ads can be improved using various approaches, including vector design, delivery techniques, and ancillary treatment, which will be discussed in this review.

  7. Adenovirus hexon modifications influence in vitro properties of pseudotyped human adenovirus type 5 vectors.

    Solanki, Manish; Zhang, Wenli; Jing, Liu; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Commonly used human adenovirus (HAdV)-5-based vectors are restricted by their tropism and pre-existing immunity. Here, we characterized novel HAdV-5 vectors pseudotyped with hypervariable regions (HVRs) and surface domains (SDs) of other HAdV types. Hexon-modified HAdV-5 vectors (HV-HVR5, HV-HVR12, HV-SD12 and HV-SD4) could be reconstituted and amplified in human embryonic kidney cells. After infection of various cell lines, we measured transgene expression levels by performing luciferase reporter assays or coagulation factor IX (FIX) ELISA. Dose-dependent studies revealed that luciferase expression levels were comparable for HV-HVR5, HV-SD12 and HV-SD4, whereas HV-HVR12 expression levels were significantly lower. Vector genome copy numbers (VCNs) from genomic DNA and nuclear extracts were then determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Surprisingly, determination of cell- and nuclear fraction-associated VCNs revealed increased VCNs for HV-HVR12 compared with HV-SD12 and HV-HVR5. Increased nuclear fraction-associated HV-HVR12 DNA molecules and decreased transgene expression levels were independent of the cell line used, and we observed the same effect for a hexon-modified high-capacity adenoviral vector encoding canine FIX. In conclusion, studying hexon-modified adenoviruses in vitro demonstrated that HVRs but also flanking hexon regions influence uptake and transgene expression of adenoviral vectors. PMID:26519158

  8. Genome-Wide RNAi Screens in C. elegans to Identify Genes Influencing Lifespan and Innate Immunity.

    Sinha, Amit; Rae, Robbie

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference is a rapid, inexpensive, and highly effective tool used to inhibit gene function. In C. elegans, whole genome screens have been used to identify genes involved with numerous traits including aging and innate immunity. RNAi in C. elegans can be carried out via feeding, soaking, or injection. Here we outline protocols used to maintain, grow, and carry out RNAi via feeding in C. elegans and determine whether the inhibited genes are essential for lifespan or innate immunity. PMID:27581293

  9. The status of RNAi-based transgenic research in plant nematology

    Tushar K. Dutta; Banakar, Prakash; Rao, Uma

    2015-01-01

    With the understanding of nematode-plant interactions at the molecular level, new avenues for engineering resistance have opened up, with RNA interference being one of them. Induction of RNAi by delivering double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) has been very successful in the model non-parasitic nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, while in plant nematodes, dsRNA delivery has been accomplished by soaking nematodes with dsRNA solution mixed with synthetic neurostimulants. The success of in vitro RNAi of tar...

  10. Engineered Mammalian RNAi Can Elicit Antiviral Protection that Negates the Requirement for the Interferon Response

    Asiel Arturo Benitez; Laura Adrienne Spanko; Mehdi Bouhaddou; David Sachs; Benjamin Robert tenOever

    2015-01-01

    While the intrinsic antiviral cell defenses of many kingdoms utilize pathogen-specific small RNAs, the antiviral response of chordates is primarily protein-based and not uniquely tailored to the incoming microbe. In an effort to explain this evolutionary bifurcation, we determined whether antiviral RNA interference (RNAi) was sufficient to replace the protein-based type I interferon (IFN-I) system of mammals. To this end, we recreated an RNAi-like response in mammals and determined its effect...

  11. Rapid assessment of RNAi-mediated protein depletion by selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry

    Glukhova, Veronika A.; Tomazela, Daniela M.; Findlay, Geoffrey D.; Monnat, Raymond J.; MacCoss, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the use of a targeted proteomics approach, Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry, to detect and assess RNAi-mediated depletion or ‘knockdown’ of specific proteins from human cells and from Drosophila flies. This label-free approach does not require any specific reagents to confirm the depletion of RNAi target protein(s) in unfractionated cell or whole organism extracts. The protocol described here is general, can be developed rapidly and can be multiplexed to detect...

  12. funRNA: a fungi-centered genomics platform for genes encoding key components of RNAi

    Choi, Jaeyoung; Kim, Ki-Tae; Jeon, Jongbum; Wu, Jiayao; Song, Hyeunjeong; Asiegbu, Fred O; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background RNA interference (RNAi) is involved in genome defense as well as diverse cellular, developmental, and physiological processes. Key components of RNAi are Argonaute, Dicer, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP), which have been functionally characterized mainly in model organisms. The key components are believed to exist throughout eukaryotes; however, there is no systematic platform for archiving and dissecting these important gene families. In addition, few fungi ...

  13. The Role of RNA Interference (RNAi in Arbovirus-Vector Interactions

    Carol D. Blair

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi was shown over 18 years ago to be a mechanism by which arbovirus replication and transmission could be controlled in arthropod vectors. During the intervening period, research on RNAi has defined many of the components and mechanisms of this antiviral pathway in arthropods, yet a number of unexplored questions remain. RNAi refers to RNA-mediated regulation of gene expression. Originally, the term described silencing of endogenous genes by introduction of exogenous double-stranded (dsRNA with the same sequence as the gene to be silenced. Further research has shown that RNAi comprises three gene regulation pathways that are mediated by small RNAs: the small interfering (siRNA, micro (miRNA, and Piwi-interacting (piRNA pathways. The exogenous (exo-siRNA pathway is now recognized as a major antiviral innate immune response of arthropods. More recent studies suggest that the piRNA and miRNA pathways might also have important roles in arbovirus-vector interactions. This review will focus on current knowledge of the role of the exo-siRNA pathway as an arthropod vector antiviral response and on emerging research into vector piRNA and miRNA pathway modulation of arbovirus-vector interactions. Although it is assumed that arboviruses must evade the vector’s antiviral RNAi response in order to maintain their natural transmission cycles, the strategies by which this is accomplished are not well defined. RNAi is also an important tool for arthropod gene knock-down in functional genomics studies and in development of arbovirus-resistant mosquito populations. Possible arbovirus strategies for evasion of RNAi and applications of RNAi in functional genomics analysis and arbovirus transmission control will also be reviewed.

  14. Simultaneous analysis of large-scale RNAi screens for pathogen entry

    Rämö, Pauli; Drewek, Anna; Arrieumerlou, Cécile; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Ben-Tekaya, Houchaima; Cardel, Bettina; Casanova, Alain; Conde-Alvarez, Raquel; Cossart, Pascale; Csúcs, Gábor; Eicher, Simone; Emmenlauer, Mario; Greber, Urs; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich; Helenius, Ari

    2014-01-01

    Background Large-scale RNAi screening has become an important technology for identifying genes involved in biological processes of interest. However, the quality of large-scale RNAi screening is often deteriorated by off-targets effects. In order to find statistically significant effector genes for pathogen entry, we systematically analyzed entry pathways in human host cells for eight pathogens using image-based kinome-wide siRNA screens with siRNAs from three vendors. We propose a Parallel M...

  15. The insect ecdysone receptor is a good potential target for RNAi-based pest control.

    Yu, Rong; Xu, Xinping; Liang, Yongkang; Tian, Honggang; Pan, Zhanqing; Jin, Shouheng; Wang, Na; Zhang, Wenqing

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has great potential for use in insect pest control. However, some significant challenges must be overcome before RNAi-based pest control can become a reality. One challenge is the proper selection of a good target gene for RNAi. Here, we report that the insect ecdysone receptor (EcR) is a good potential target for RNAi-based pest control in the brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens, a serious insect pest of rice plants. We demonstrated that the use of a 360 bp fragment (NlEcR-c) that is common between NlEcR-A and NlEcR-B for feeding RNAi experiments significantly decreased the relative mRNA expression levels of NlEcR compared with those in the dsGFP control. Feeding RNAi also resulted in a significant reduction in the number of offspring per pair of N. lugens. Consequently, a transgenic rice line expressing NlEcR dsRNA was constructed by Agrobacterium- mediated transformation. The results of qRT-PCR showed that the total copy number of the target gene in all transgenic rice lines was 2. Northern blot analysis showed that the small RNA of the hairpin dsNlEcR-c was successfully expressed in the transgenic rice lines. After newly hatched nymphs of N. lugens fed on the transgenic rice lines, effective RNAi was observed. The NlEcR expression levels in all lines examined were decreased significantly compared with the control. In all lines, the survival rate of the nymphs was nearly 90%, and the average number of offspring per pair in the treated groups was significantly less than that observed in the control, with a decrease of 44.18-66.27%. These findings support an RNAi-based pest control strategy and are also important for the management of rice insect pests. PMID:25516715

  16. Simultaneous Detection of Seven Enteric Viruses Associated with Acute Gastroenteritis by a Multiplexed Luminex-Based Assay

    Liu, Yan; Xu, Zi-qian; Zhang, Qing; Jin, Miao; Yu, Jie-mei; Li, Jin-song; Liu, Na; Cui, Shu-Xian; Kong, Xiang-Yu; Wang, Hong; Li, Hui-Ying; Cheng, Wei-Xia; Ma, Xue-Jun; Duan, Zhao-jun

    2012-01-01

    Rapid and broad diagnostic methods are needed for the identification of viral agents of gastroenteritis. In this study, we used Luminex xMAP technology to develop a multiplexed assay for the simultaneous identification of major enteric viral pathogens, including rotavirus A (RVA), noroviruses (NoVs) (including genogroups GI and GII), sapoviruses (SaV), human astrovirus (HAstV), enteric adenoviruses (EAds), and human bocavirus 2 (HBoV2). The analytical sensitivity allowed detection of 103 (EAd...

  17. Preclinical evaluation of RNAi as a treatment for transthyretin-mediated amyloidosis.

    Butler, James S; Chan, Amy; Costelha, Susete; Fishman, Shannon; Willoughby, Jennifer L S; Borland, Todd D; Milstein, Stuart; Foster, Donald J; Gonçalves, Paula; Chen, Qingmin; Qin, June; Bettencourt, Brian R; Sah, Dinah W; Alvarez, Rene; Rajeev, Kallanthottathil G; Manoharan, Muthiah; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Meyers, Rachel E; Nochur, Saraswathy V; Saraiva, Maria J; Zimmermann, Tracy S

    2016-06-01

    ATTR amyloidosis is a systemic, debilitating and fatal disease caused by transthyretin (TTR) amyloid accumulation. RNA interference (RNAi) is a clinically validated technology that may be a promising approach to the treatment of ATTR amyloidosis. The vast majority of TTR, the soluble precursor of TTR amyloid, is expressed and synthesized in the liver. RNAi technology enables robust hepatic gene silencing, the goal of which would be to reduce systemic levels of TTR and mitigate many of the clinical manifestations of ATTR that arise from hepatic TTR expression. To test this hypothesis, TTR-targeting siRNAs were evaluated in a murine model of hereditary ATTR amyloidosis. RNAi-mediated silencing of hepatic TTR expression inhibited TTR deposition and facilitated regression of existing TTR deposits in pathologically relevant tissues. Further, the extent of deposit regression correlated with the level of RNAi-mediated knockdown. In comparison to the TTR stabilizer, tafamidis, RNAi-mediated TTR knockdown led to greater regression of TTR deposits across a broader range of affected tissues. Together, the data presented herein support the therapeutic hypothesis behind TTR lowering and highlight the potential of RNAi in the treatment of patients afflicted with ATTR amyloidosis. PMID:27033334

  18. A Multi-RNAi Microsponge Platform for Simultaneous Controlled Delivery of Multiple Small Interfering RNAs.

    Roh, Young Hoon; Deng, Jason Z; Dreaden, Erik C; Park, Jae Hyon; Yun, Dong Soo; Shopsowitz, Kevin E; Hammond, Paula T

    2016-03-01

    Packaging multiple small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules into nanostructures at precisely defined ratios is a powerful delivery strategy for effective RNA interference (RNAi) therapy. We present a novel RNA nanotechnology based approach to produce multiple components of polymerized siRNA molecules that are simultaneously self-assembled and densely packaged into composite sponge-like porous microstructures (Multi-RNAi-MSs) by rolling circle transcription. The Multi-RNAi-MSs were designed to contain a combination of multiple polymeric siRNA molecules with precisely controlled stoichiometry within a singular microstructure by manipulating the types and ratios of the circular DNA templates. The Multi-RNAi-MSs were converted into nanosized complexes by polyelectrolyte condensation to manipulate their physicochemical properties (size, shape, and surface charge) for favorable delivery, while maintaining the multifunctional properties of the siRNAs for combined therapeutic effects. These Multi-RNAi-MS systems have great potential in RNAi-mediated biomedical applications, for example, for the treatment of cancer, genetic disorders, and viral infections. PMID:26695874

  19. Morphological Profiles of RNAi-Induced Gene Knockdown Are Highly Reproducible but Dominated by Seed Effects.

    Shantanu Singh

    Full Text Available RNA interference and morphological profiling-the measurement of thousands of phenotypes from individual cells by microscopy and image analysis-are a potentially powerful combination. We show that morphological profiles of RNAi-induced knockdown using the Cell Painting assay are in fact highly sensitive and reproducible. However, we find that the magnitude and prevalence of off-target effects via the RNAi seed-based mechanism make morphological profiles of RNAi reagents targeting the same gene look no more similar than reagents targeting different genes. Pairs of RNAi reagents that share the same seed sequence produce image-based profiles that are much more similar to each other than profiles from pairs designed to target the same gene, a phenomenon previously observed in small-scale gene-expression profiling experiments. Various strategies have been used to enrich on-target versus off-target effects in the context of RNAi screening where a narrow set of phenotypes are measured, mostly based on comparing multiple sequences targeting the same gene; however, new approaches will be needed to make RNAi morphological profiling (that is, comparing multi-dimensional phenotypes viable. We have shared our raw data and computational pipelines to facilitate research.

  20. Capsid-like Arrays in Crystals of Chimpanzee Adenovirus Hexon

    The major coat protein, hexon, from a chimpanzee adenovirus (AdC68) is of interest as a target for vaccine vector modification. AdC68 hexon has been crystallized in the orthorhombic space group C222 with unit cell dimensions of a = 90.8 Angstroms, b = 433.0 Angstroms, c = 159.3 Angstroms, and one trimer (3 x 104,942 Da) in the asymmetric unit. The crystals diffract to 2.1 Angstroms resolution. Initial studies reveal that the molecular arrangement is quite unlike that in hexon crystals for human adenovirus. In the AdC68 crystals, hexon trimers are parallel and pack closely in two-dimensional continuous arrays similar to those formed on electron microscope grids. The AdC68 crystals are the first in which adenovirus hexon has molecular interactions that mimic those used in constructing the viral capsid

  1. Effects of cold atmospheric plasmas on adenoviruses in solution

    Experiments were performed with cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) to inactivate adenovirus, a non-enveloped double stranded DNA virus, in solution. The plasma source used was a surface micro-discharge technology operating in air. Various plasma diagnostic measurements and tests were performed in order to determine the efficacy of CAPs and to understand the inactivation mechanism(s). Different stages of the adenovirus ‘life cycle’ were investigated—infectivity and gene expression as well as viral replication and spread. Within 240 s of CAP treatment, inactivation of up to 6 decimal log levels can be achieved. (paper)

  2. Infecciones por adenovirus en Cuba (2000-2008)

    González Muñoz, Grehete

    2013-01-01

    Las infecciones por adenovirus causan un variado espectro clínico en el hombre, con un rango que incluye desde la infección asintomática hasta la enfermedad diseminada con peligro para la vida. En el presente estudio, se analizó el comportamiento de las infecciones por adenovirus en síndromes de etiología viral como la infección respiratoria aguda, la miocarditis viral, la conjuntivitis hemorrágica y el síndrome neurológico infeccioso. Además, se estudió la participación de estos agentes en l...

  3. Comparative study of adenoviruses with monoclonal antibodies Estudo comparativo de diferentes tipos de adenovirus através de anticorpos monoclonais

    Terezinha Maria de Paiva; Sueko Takimoto; María Akíko Ishida; María Candida Oliveira de Souza; Tuneo Ishimaru; Jorge Neumann; Jorge Kalil

    1992-01-01

    The obtainment of monoclonal antibodies for adenovirus species 4(Ad4) is described.The specificities of selected monoclonal antibodies were determined by means of viral neutralization test in cell culture, immunofluorescence and Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA), in the presence of the following species of human adenovirus: 1, 2, 5 (subgenus C), 4 (subgenus E), 7 and 16 (subgenus B) and 9 (subgenus D). Two monoclonal antibodies species specific to adenovirus 4 (1CIII and 3DIII) and on...

  4. Identification and characterization of a novel adenovirus in the cloacal bursa of gulls

    Bodewes, R.; Bildt, M.W.G. van de; Schapendonk, C.M.E. [Department of Viroscience, Erasmus Medical Centre, Dr. Molewaterplein 50, 3015 GE Rotterdam (Netherlands); Leeuwen, M. van [Viroclinics Biosciences, Marconistraat 16, 3029 AK Rotterdam (Netherlands); Boheemen, S. van [Department of Viroscience, Erasmus Medical Centre, Dr. Molewaterplein 50, 3015 GE Rotterdam (Netherlands); Jong, A.A.W. de [Department of Pathology, Erasmus Medical Centre, Dr. Molewaterplein 50, 3015 GE Rotterdam (Netherlands); Osterhaus, A.D.M.E.; Smits, S.L. [Department of Viroscience, Erasmus Medical Centre, Dr. Molewaterplein 50, 3015 GE Rotterdam (Netherlands); Viroclinics Biosciences, Marconistraat 16, 3029 AK Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kuiken, T., E-mail: t.Kuiken@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Viroscience, Erasmus Medical Centre, Dr. Molewaterplein 50, 3015 GE Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-05-25

    Several viruses of the family of Adenoviridae are associated with disease in birds. Here we report the detection of a novel adenovirus in the cloacal bursa of herring gulls (Larus argentatus) and lesser black-backed gulls (Larus fuscus) that were found dead in the Netherlands in 2001. Histopathological analysis of the cloacal bursa revealed cytomegaly and karyomegaly with basophilic intranuclear inclusions typical for adenovirus infection. The presence of an adenovirus was confirmed by electron microscopy. By random PCR in combination with deep sequencing, sequences were detected that had the best hit with known adenoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis of complete coding sequences of the hexon, penton and polymerase genes indicates that this novel virus, tentatively named Gull adenovirus, belongs to the genus Aviadenovirus. The present study demonstrates that birds of the Laridae family are infected by family-specific adenoviruses that differ from known adenoviruses in other bird species. - Highlights: ► Lesions typical for adenovirus infection detected in cloacal bursa of dead gulls. ► Confirmation of adenovirus infection by electron microscopy and deep sequencing. ► Sequence analysis indicates that it is a novel adenovirus in the genus Aviadenovirus. ► The novel (Gull) adenovirus was detected in multiple organs of two species of gulls.

  5. Feasibility, limitation and possible solutions of RNAi-based technology for insect pest control

    Hao Zhang; Hai-Chao Li; Xue-Xia Miao

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies indicate that target gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi)could lead to insect death.This phenomenon has been considered as a potential strategy for insect pest control,and it is termed RNAi-mediated crop protection.However,there are many limitations using RNAi-based technology for pest control,with the effectiveness target gene selection and reliable double-strand RNA(dsRNA)delivery being two of the major challenges.With respect to target gene selection,at present,the use of homologous genes and genome-scale high-throughput screening are the main strategies adopted by researchers.Once the target gene is identified,dsRNA can be delivered by micro-injection or by feeding as a dietary component.However,micro-injection,which is the most common method,can only be used in laboratory experiments.Expression of dsRNAs directed against insect genes in transgenic plants and spraying dsRNA reagents have been shown to induce RNAi effects on target insects.Hence,RNAi-mediated crop protection has been considered as a potential new-generation technology for pest control,or as a complementary method of existing pest control strategies;however,further development to improve the efficacy of protection and range of species affected is necessary.In this review,we have summarized current research on RNAi-based technology for pest insect management.Current progress has proven that RNAi technology has the potential to be a tool for designing a new generation of insect control measures.To accelerate its practical application in crop protection,further study on dsRNA uptake mechanisms based on the knowledge of insect physiology and biochemistry is needed.

  6. Feasibility, limitation and possible solutions of RNAi-based technology for insect pest control.

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Hai-Chao; Miao, Xue-Xia

    2013-02-01

    Numerous studies indicate that target gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) could lead to insect death. This phenomenon has been considered as a potential strategy for insect pest control, and it is termed RNAi-mediated crop protection. However, there are many limitations using RNAi-based technology for pest control, with the effectiveness target gene selection and reliable double-strand RNA (dsRNA) delivery being two of the major challenges. With respect to target gene selection, at present, the use of homologous genes and genome-scale high-throughput screening are the main strategies adopted by researchers. Once the target gene is identified, dsRNA can be delivered by micro-injection or by feeding as a dietary component. However, micro-injection, which is the most common method, can only be used in laboratory experiments. Expression of dsRNAs directed against insect genes in transgenic plants and spraying dsRNA reagents have been shown to induce RNAi effects on target insects. Hence, RNAi-mediated crop protection has been considered as a potential new-generation technology for pest control, or as a complementary method of existing pest control strategies; however, further development to improve the efficacy of protection and range of species affected is necessary. In this review, we have summarized current research on RNAi-based technology for pest insect management. Current progress has proven that RNAi technology has the potential to be a tool for designing a new generation of insect control measures. To accelerate its practical application in crop protection, further study on dsRNA uptake mechanisms based on the knowledge of insect physiology and biochemistry is needed. PMID:23955822

  7. Identification of genes differentially expressed as result of adenovirus type 5- and adenovirus type 12-transformation

    Kellam Paul

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cells transformed by human adenoviruses (Ad exhibit differential capacities to induce tumours in immunocompetent rodents; for example, Ad12-transformed rodent cells are oncogenic whereas Ad5-transformed cells are not. The E1A gene determines oncogenic phenotype, is a transcriptional regulator and dysregulates host cell gene expression, a key factor in both cellular transformation and oncogenesis. To reveal differences in gene expression between cells transformed with oncogenic and non-oncogenic adenoviruses we have performed comparative analysis of transcript profiles with the aim of identifying candidate genes involved in the process of neoplastic transformation. Results Analysis of microarray data revealed that a total of 232 genes were differentially expressed in Ad12 E1- or Ad5 E1-transformed BRK cells compared to untransformed baby rat kidney (BRK cells. Gene information was available for 193 transcripts and using gene ontology (GO classifications and literature searches it was possible to assign known or suggested functions to 166 of these identified genes. A subset of differentially-expressed genes from the microarray was further examined by real-time PCR and Western blotting using BRK cells immortalised by Ad12 E1A or Ad5 E1A in addition to Ad12 E1- or Ad5 E1-transformed BRK cells. Up-regulation of RelA and significant dysregulation of collagen type I mRNA transcripts and proteins were found in Ad-transformed cells. Conclusion These results suggest that a complex web of cellular pathways become altered in Ad-transformed cells and that Ad E1A is sufficient for the observed dysregulation. Further work will focus on investigating which splice variant of Ad E1A is responsible for the observed dysregulation at the pathway level, and the mechanisms of E1A-mediated transcriptional regulation.

  8. Viral RNA Silencing Suppressors (RSS): Novel Strategy of Viruses to Ablate the Host RNA Interference (RNAi) Defense System

    Bivalkar-Mehla, Shalmali; Vakharia, Janaki; Mehla, Rajeev; Abreha, Measho; Kanwar, Jagat Rakesh; Tikoo, Akshay; Chauhan, Ashok

    2010-01-01

    Pathogenic viruses have developed a molecular defense arsenal for their survival by counteracting the host anti-viral system known as RNA interference (RNAi). Cellular RNAi, in addition to regulating gene expression through microRNAs, also serves as a barrier against invasive foreign nucleic acids. RNAi is conserved across the biological species, including plants, animals and invertebrates. Viruses in turn, have evolved mechanisms that can counteract this anti-viral defense of the host. Recen...

  9. RNAi-mediated gene silencing reveals involvement of Arabidopsis chromatin-related genes in Agrobacterium-mediated root transformation

    Crane, Yan Ma; Gelvin, Stanton B

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the effect of RNAi-mediated gene silencing of 109 Arabidopsis thaliana chromatin-related genes (termed “chromatin genes” hereafter) on Agrobacterium-mediated root transformation. Each of the RNAi lines contains a single- or low-copy-number insertion of a hairpin construction that silences the endogenous copy of the target gene. We used three standard transient and stable transformation assays to screen 340 independent RNAi lines, representing 109 target genes, for the rat (res...

  10. Low seroprevalent species D adenovirus vectors as influenza vaccines.

    Weaver, Eric A; Barry, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza remains a constant threat. While standard influenza vaccines have great utility, the need for improved vaccine technologies have been brought to light by the 2009 swine flu pandemic, highly pathogenic avian influenza infections, and the most recent early and widespread influenza activity. Species C adenoviruses based on serotype 5 (AD5) are potent vehicles for gene-based vaccination. While potent, most humans are already immune to this virus. In this study, low seroprevalent species D adenoviruses Ad26, 28, and 48 were cloned and modified to express the influenza virus A/PR/8/34 hemagglutinin gene for vaccine studies. When studied in vivo, these species D Ad vectors performed quite differently as compared to species C Ad vectors depending on the route of immunization. By intramuscular injection, species D vaccines were markedly weaker than species C vaccines. In contrast, the species D vaccines were equally efficient as species C when delivered mucosally by the intranasal route. Intranasal adenovirus vaccine doses as low as 10(8) virus particles per mouse induced complete protection against a stringent lethal challenge dose of influenza. These data support translation of species D adenoviruses as mucosal vaccines and highlight the fundamental effects of differences in virus tropism on vaccine applications. PMID:23991187

  11. Localization of adenovirus DNA replication in KB cells

    Vlak, J.M.; Rozijn, Th.H.; Spies, F.

    1975-01-01

    The localization of adenovirus type 5 DNA replication has been investigated by both fractionation of isolated nuclei and electron-microscope autoradiography. Nuclear fractionation by means of the M-band-technique of Tremblay et al. (Tremblay, G. Y., Daniels, M. J., and Schaechter, M. (1969). J. Mol.

  12. Bioaccumulation of animal adenoviruses in the pink shrimp.

    Luz, Roger B; Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Fabres, Rafael B; Soliman, Mayra C; Souza, Fernanda G; Gonçalves, Raoni; Fausto, Ivone V; Rigotto, Caroline; Heinzelmann, Larissa S; Henzel, Andréia; Fleck, Juliane D; Spilki, Fernando R

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses are among the most promising viral markers of fecal contamination. They are frequently found in the water, sediment and soil of regions impacted by human activity. Studies of the bioaccumulation of enteric viruses in shrimp are scarce. The cities located in the northern coast of the lake systems in Southern Brazil have high urbanization and intensive farming rates, and poor sewage collection and treatment. One hundred (n = 100) Farfantepenaeus paulensis pink-shrimp specimens and 48 water samples were collected from coastal lagoons between June 2012 and May 2013. Water samples were concentrated and the shrimp, mashed. After DNA extraction, samples were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in order to detect and quantify viral genomes. Thirty-five percent of shrimp samples were positive for contamination, predominantly by avian adenoviruses. A total of 91.7% of water samples contained adenoviruses DNA, with the human form being the most frequent. Our results provided evidence of significant bioaccumulation of adenoviruses in shrimp, showing the extent of the impact of fecal pollution on aquatic ecosystems. PMID:26413052

  13. Bioaccumulation of animal adenoviruses in the pink shrimp

    Roger B. Luz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are among the most promising viral markers of fecal contamination. They are frequently found in the water, sediment and soil of regions impacted by human activity. Studies of the bioaccumulation of enteric viruses in shrimp are scarce. The cities located in the northern coast of the lake systems in Southern Brazil have high urbanization and intensive farming rates, and poor sewage collection and treatment. One hundred (n = 100 Farfantepenaeus paulensis pink-shrimp specimens and 48 water samples were collected from coastal lagoons between June 2012 and May 2013. Water samples were concentrated and the shrimp, mashed. After DNA extraction, samples were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR in order to detect and quantify viral genomes. Thirty-five percent of shrimp samples were positive for contamination, predominantly by avian adenoviruses. A total of 91.7% of water samples contained adenoviruses DNA, with the human form being the most frequent. Our results provided evidence of significant bioaccumulation of adenoviruses in shrimp, showing the extent of the impact of fecal pollution on aquatic ecosystems.

  14. Adenovirus-derived vectors for prostate cancer gene therapy

    de Vrij, J.; Willemsen, R. A.; Lindholm, L.; Hoeben, R. C.; Bangma, Ch. H.; Barber, Ch.; Behr, J.-P.; Briggs, S.; Carlisle, R.; Cheng, W.-S.; Dautzenberg, I. J. C.; de Ridder, C.; Dzojic, H.; Erbacher, P.; Essand, M.; Fisher, K.; Frazier, A.; Georgopoulos, L. J.; Jennings, I.; Kochanek, S.; Koppers-Lalic, D.; Kraaij, R.; Kreppel, F.; Magnusson, M.; Maitland, N.; Neuberg, P.; Nugent, R.; Ogris, M.; Remy, J.-S.; Scaife, M.; Schenk, E.; Schooten, E.; Seymour, L.; Slade, M.; Szyjanowicz, P.; Totterman, T.; Uil, T. G.; Ulbrich, Karel; van der Weel, L.; van Weerden, W.; Wagner, E.; Zuber, G.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 7 (2010), s. 795-805. ISSN 1043-0342 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 512087 - GIANT Keywords : adenovirus * gene delivery * prostate cancer Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.829, year: 2010

  15. Isolating genes involved with genotoxic drug response in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans using genome-wide RNAi screening

    Schøler, Lone Vedel; Møller, Tine Hørning; Nørgaard, Steffen; Vestergård, Lotte; Olsen, Anders

    The soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has become a popular genetic model organism used to study a broad range of complex biological processes, including development, aging, apoptosis, and DNA damage responses. Many genetic tools and tricks have been developed in C. elegans including knock down...... of gene expression via RNA interference (RNAi). In C. elegans RNAi can effectively be administrated via feeding the nematodes bacteria expressing double-stranded RNA targeting the gene of interest. Several commercial C. elegans RNAi libraries are available and hence gene inactivation using RNAi can...

  16. Versatile Viral Vector Strategies for Postscreening Target Validation and RNAi ON-Target Control.

    Christel, Carl J; Schmied, Patricia; Jagusch, Verena; Schrödel, Silke; Thirion, Christian; Schmitt, Kathrin; Salomon, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Our approach aims to optimize postscreening target validation strategies using viral vector-driven RNA interference (RNAi) cell models. The RNAiONE validation platform is an array of plasmid-based expression vectors that each drives tandem expression of the gene of interest (GOI) with one small hairpin RNA (shRNA) from a set of computed candidate sequences. The best-performing shRNA (>85% silencing efficiency) is then integrated in an inducible, all-in-one lentiviral vector to transduce pharmacologically relevant cell types that endogenously express the GOI. VariCHECK is used subsequently to combine the inducible knockdown with an equally inducible rescue of the GOI for ON-target phenotype verification. The complete RNAiONE-VariCHECK system relies on three key elements to ensure high predictability: (1) maximized silencing efficiencies by a focused shRNA validation process, (2) homogeneity of the RNAi cell pools by application of sophisticated viral vector technologies, and (3) exploiting the advantages of inducible expression systems. By using a reversible expression system, our strategy adds critical information to hot candidates from RNAi screens and avoids potential side effects that may be caused by other, irreversible genomic manipulation methods such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) or clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas). This approach will add credibility to top-hit screening candidates and protect researchers from costly misinterpretations early in the preclinical drug development process. PMID:25873558

  17. Core RNAi machinery and gene knockdown in the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis).

    Zhao, Chaoyang; Alvarez Gonzales, Miguel A; Poland, Therese M; Mittapalli, Omprakash

    2015-01-01

    The RNA interference (RNAi) technology has been widely used in insect functional genomics research and provides an alternative approach for insect pest management. To understand whether the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis), an invasive and destructive coleopteran insect pest of ash tree (Fraxinus spp.), possesses a strong RNAi machinery that is capable of degrading target mRNA as a response to exogenous double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) induction, we identified three RNAi pathway core component genes, Dicer-2, Argonaute-2 and R2D2, from the A. planipennis genome sequence. Characterization of these core components revealed that they contain conserved domains essential for the proteins to function in the RNAi pathway. Phylogenetic analyses showed that they are closely related to homologs derived from other coleopteran species. We also delivered the dsRNA fragment of AplaScrB-2, a β-fructofuranosidase-encoding gene horizontally acquired by A. planipennis as we reported previously, into A. planipennis adults through microinjection. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis on the dsRNA-treated beetles demonstrated a significantly decreased gene expression level of AplaScrB-2 appearing on day 2 and lasting until at least day 6. This study is the first record of RNAi applied in A. planipennis. PMID:25541004

  18. Recent advances in RNAi-based strategies for therapy and prevention of HIV-1/AIDS.

    Swamy, Manjunath N; Wu, Haoquan; Shankar, Premlata

    2016-08-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) provides a powerful tool to silence specific gene expression and has been widely used to suppress host factors such as CCR5 and/or viral genes involved in HIV-1 replication. Newer nuclease-based gene-editing technologies, such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFN), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system, also provide powerful tools to ablate specific genes. Because of differences in co-receptor usage and the high mutability of the HIV-1 genome, a combination of host factors and viral genes needs to be suppressed for effective prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection. Whereas the continued presence of small interfering/short hairpin RNA (si/shRNA) mediators is needed for RNAi to be effective, the continued expression of nucleases in the gene-editing systems is undesirable. Thus, RNAi provides the only practical way for expression of multiple silencers in infected and uninfected cells, which is needed for effective prevention/treatment of infection. There have been several advances in the RNAi field in terms of si/shRNA design, targeted delivery to HIV-1 susceptible cells, and testing for efficacy in preclinical humanized mouse models. Here, we comprehensively review the latest advances in RNAi technology towards prevention and treatment of HIV-1. PMID:27013255

  19. Metagenomic analysis of viruses associated with field-grown and retail lettuce identifies human and animal viruses.

    Aw, Tiong Gim; Wengert, Samantha; Rose, Joan B

    2016-04-16

    The emergence of culture- and sequence-independent metagenomic methods has not only provided great insight into the microbial community structure in a wide range of clinical and environmental samples but has also proven to be powerful tools for pathogen detection. Recent studies of the food microbiome have revealed the vast genetic diversity of bacteria associated with fresh produce. However, no work has been done to apply metagenomic methods to tackle viruses associated with fresh produce for addressing food safety. Thus, there is a little knowledge about the presence and diversity of viruses associated with fresh produce from farm-to-fork. To address this knowledge gap, we assessed viruses on commercial romaine and iceberg lettuces in fields and a produce distribution center using a shotgun metagenomic sequencing targeting both RNA and DNA viruses. Commercial lettuce harbors an immense assemblage of viruses that infect a wide range of hosts. As expected, plant pathogenic viruses dominated these communities. Sequences of rotaviruses and picobirnaviruses were also identified in both field-harvest and retail lettuce samples, suggesting an emerging foodborne transmission threat that has yet to be fully recognized. The identification of human and animal viruses in lettuce samples in the field emphasizes the importance of preventing viral contamination on leafy greens starting at the field. Although there are still some inherent experimental and bioinformatics challenges in applying viral metagenomic approaches for food safety testing, this work will facilitate further application of this unprecedented deep sequencing method to food samples. PMID:26894328

  20. Virus-Associated Hemophagocytic Syndrome in Renal Transplant Recipients: Report of 2 Cases from a Single Center

    Koji Nanmoku

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS is a potentially fatal complication of immunosuppression for transplantation. However, it presents with heterogeneous clinical symptoms (fever, disturbed consciousness, and hepatosplenomegaly and laboratory findings (pancytopenia, elevated hepatic enzyme levels, abnormal coagulation, and hyperferritinemia, impeding diagnosis. Case 1: A 39-year-old female developed fever 4 years after ABO-incompatible living-related renal transplantation. Laboratory findings revealed thrombocytopenia, elevated hepatic enzymes, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV DNA seropositivity, and hyperferritinemia. EBV-associated HPS was confirmed by bone marrow aspiration. Steroid pulse therapy and etoposide were ineffective. Disseminated intravascular coagulation resulted in multiple organ failure, and the patient died 32 days after disease onset. Case 2: A 67-year-old male was admitted with rotavirus enteritis a month after living-unrelated renal transplantation. He developed sudden-onset high fever, disturbance of consciousness, and tachypnea 8 days after admission. Laboratory findings revealed elevated hepatic enzyme levels, hyperkalemia, and hyperferritinemia. Emergency continuous hemodiafiltration ameliorated the fever, and steroid pulse therapy improved abnormal laboratory values. Varicella-zoster virus meningitis was confirmed by spinal tap. Acyclovir improved consciousness, and he was discharged 87 days after admission. Fatal virus-associated HPS may develop in organ transplant patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy. Pathognomonic hyperferritinemia is useful for differential diagnosis.

  1. Human erythrocytes bind and inactivate type 5 adenovirus by presenting Coxsackie virus-adenovirus receptor and complement receptor 1

    Carlisle, R. C.; Di, Y.; Cerny, A. M.; Sonnen, A. F. P.; Sim, R. B.; Green, N. K.; Šubr, Vladimír; Ulbrich, Karel; Gilbert, R. J. C.; Fisher, K. D.; Finberg, R. W.; Seymour, L. W.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 9 (2009), s. 1909-1918. ISSN 0006-4971 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 512087 - GIANT Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : adenovirus * erythrocyte * complement receptor 1 Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 10.555, year: 2009

  2. RNAi-based validation of antibodies for reverse phase protein arrays

    Sahin Özgür

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA have been demonstrated to be a useful experimental platform for quantitative protein profiling in a high-throughput format. Target protein detection relies on the readout obtained from a single detection antibody. For this reason, antibody specificity is a key factor for RPPA. RNAi allows the specific knockdown of a target protein in complex samples and was therefore examined for its utility to assess antibody performance for RPPA applications. Results To proof the feasibility of our strategy, two different anti-EGFR antibodies were compared by RPPA. Both detected the knockdown of EGFR but at a different rate. Western blot data were used to identify the most reliable antibody. The RNAi approach was also used to characterize commercial anti-STAT3 antibodies. Out of ten tested anti-STAT3 antibodies, four antibodies detected the STAT3-knockdown at 80-85%, and the most sensitive anti-STAT3 antibody was identified by comparing detection limits. Thus, the use of RNAi for RPPA antibody validation was demonstrated to be a stringent approach to identify highly specific and highly sensitive antibodies. Furthermore, the RNAi/RPPA strategy is also useful for the validation of isoform-specific antibodies as shown for the identification of AKT1/AKT2 and CCND1/CCND3-specific antibodies. Conclusions RNAi is a valuable tool for the identification of very specific and highly sensitive antibodies, and is therefore especially useful for the validation of RPPA-suitable detection antibodies. On the other hand, when a set of well-characterized RPPA-antibodies is available, large-scale RNAi experiments analyzed by RPPA might deliver useful information for network reconstruction.

  3. Robust RNAi enhancement via human Argonaute-2 overexpression from plasmids, viral vectors and cell lines

    Börner, Kathleen; Niopek, Dominik; Cotugno, Gabriella; Kaldenbach, Michaela; Pankert, Teresa; Willemsen, Joschka; Zhang, Xian; Schürmann, Nina; Mockenhaupt, Stefan; Serva, Andrius; Hiet, Marie-Sophie; Wiedtke, Ellen; Castoldi, Mirco; Starkuviene, Vytaute; Erfle, Holger

    2013-01-01

    As the only mammalian Argonaute protein capable of directly cleaving mRNAs in a small RNA-guided manner, Argonaute-2 (Ago2) is a keyplayer in RNA interference (RNAi) silencing via small interfering (si) or short hairpin (sh) RNAs. It is also a rate-limiting factor whose saturation by si/shRNAs limits RNAi efficiency and causes numerous adverse side effects. Here, we report a set of versatile tools and widely applicable strategies for transient or stable Ago2 co-expression, which overcome thes...

  4. RNAi dynamics in Juvenile Fasciola spp. Liver flukes reveals the persistence of gene silencing in vitro.

    Paul McVeigh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fasciola spp. liver fluke cause pernicious disease in humans and animals. Whilst current control is unsustainable due to anthelmintic resistance, gene silencing (RNA interference, RNAi has the potential to contribute to functional validation of new therapeutic targets. The susceptibility of juvenile Fasciola hepatica to double stranded (dsRNA-induced RNAi has been reported. To exploit this we probe RNAi dynamics, penetrance and persistence with the aim of building a robust platform for reverse genetics in liver fluke. We describe development of standardised RNAi protocols for a commercially-available liver fluke strain (the US Pacific North West Wild Strain, validated via robust transcriptional silencing of seven virulence genes, with in-depth experimental optimisation of three: cathepsin L (FheCatL and B (FheCatB cysteine proteases, and a σ-class glutathione transferase (FheσGST.Robust transcriptional silencing of targets in both F. hepatica and Fasciola gigantica juveniles is achievable following exposure to long (200-320 nt dsRNAs or 27 nt short interfering (siRNAs. Although juveniles are highly RNAi-susceptible, they display slower transcript and protein knockdown dynamics than those reported previously. Knockdown was detectable following as little as 4h exposure to trigger (target-dependent and in all cases silencing persisted for ≥25 days following long dsRNA exposure. Combinatorial silencing of three targets by mixing multiple long dsRNAs was similarly efficient. Despite profound transcriptional suppression, we found a significant time-lag before the occurrence of protein suppression; FheσGST and FheCatL protein suppression were only detectable after 9 and 21 days, respectively.In spite of marked variation in knockdown dynamics, we find that a transient exposure to long dsRNA or siRNA triggers robust RNAi penetrance and persistence in liver fluke NEJs supporting the development of multiple-throughput phenotypic screens for control

  5. RNAi-mediated down-regulation of SHATTERPROOF gene in transgenic oilseed rape

    Kord, Hadis; Shakib, Ali Mohammad; Daneshvar, Mohammad Hossein; Azadi, Pejman; Bayat, Vahid; Mashayekhi, Mohsen; Zarea, Mahboobeh; Seifi, Alireza; Ahmad-Raji, Mana

    2014-01-01

    Oilseed rape is one of the important oil plants. Pod shattering is one of the problems in oilseed rape production especially in regions with dry conditions. One of the important genes in Brassica pod opening is SHATTERPROOF1 (SHP1). Down-regulation of BnSHP1 expression by RNAi can increase resistance to pod shattering. A 470 bp of the BnSHP1 cDNA sequence constructed in an RNAi-silencing vector was transferred to oilseed rape cv. SLM046. Molecular analysis of T2 transgenic plants by RT-PCR an...

  6. Biosafety research for non-target organism risk assessment of RNAi-based GE plants

    Roberts, Andrew F.; DEVOS Yann; Lemgo, Godwin N. Y.; Zhou, Xuguo

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference, or RNAi, refers to a set of biological processes that make use of conserved cellular machinery to silence genes. Although there are several variations in the source and mechanism, they are all triggered by double stranded RNA (dsRNA) which is processed by a protein complex into small, single stranded RNA, referred to as small interfering RNAs (siRNA) with complementarity to sequences in genes targeted for silencing. The use of the RNAi mechanism to develop new traits in plan...

  7. The NS3 protein of rice hoja blanca virus complements the RNAi suppressor function of HIV-1 Tat

    Schnettler, E.; Vries, de W.; Hemmes, J.C.; Haasnoot, J.; Kormelink, R.J.M.; Goldbach, R.W.; Berkhout, B.

    2009-01-01

    The question of whether RNA interference (RNAi) acts as an antiviral mechanism in mammalian cells remains controversial. The antiviral interferon (IFN) response cannot easily be distinguished from a possible antiviral RNAi pathway owing to the involvement of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) as a common i

  8. The NS3 protein of rice hoja blanca virus complements the RNAi suppressor function of HIV-1 Tat

    E. Schnettler; W. de Vries; H. Hemmes; J. Haasnoot; R. Kormelink; R. Goldbach; B. Berkhout

    2009-01-01

    The question of whether RNA interference (RNAi) acts as an antiviral mechanism in mammalian cells remains controversial. The antiviral interferon (IFN) response cannot easily be distinguished from a possible antiviral RNAi pathway owing to the involvement of double-stranded RNA ( dsRNA) as a common

  9. Production and purification of non replicative canine adenovirus type 2 derived vectors

    Szelechowski, Marion; Bergeron, Corinne; Gonzalez Dunia, Daniel; Klonjkowski, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) derived vectors have been widely used for short or long-term gene transfer, both for gene therapy and vaccine applications. Because of the frequent pre-existing immunity against the classically used human adenovirus type 5, canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV2) has been proposed as an alternative vector for human gene transfer. The well-characterized biology of CAV2, together with its ease of genetic manipulation, offer major advantages, notably for gene transfer into the central ne...

  10. Incidence of enteric adenoviruses among children in Thailand and the significance of these viruses in gastroenteritis.

    Herrmann, J E; Blacklow, N R; Perron-Henry, D M; Clements, E; Taylor, D N; Echeverria, P

    1988-01-01

    In countries with temperate climates, enteric adenoviruses have been shown to be a substantial cause of pediatric gastroenteritis. To determine the incidence of adenovirus infection in a tropical climate, stools were collected from children under age 7 during a 1-year period at an outpatient clinic in Bangkok, Thailand. Stools from 1,114 children with gastroenteritis and from 947 children without gastroenteritis were tested. Each stool was tested for adenovirus group antigen and for specific ...

  11. The frequency of rotavirus and enteric adenovirus in children with acute gastroenteritis in Mardin

    Alicem Tekin

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Infectious gastroenteritis is one of most important causes of morbidity and mortality in children. Rotavirus and enteric adenoviruses are the most important agents of infectious gastroenteritis. Little is known about the epide-miology of rotavirus and enteric adenovirus gastroenteritis in our region. This study was aimed to determine the fre-quency of rotavirus and enteric adenovirus gastroenteritis in pediatric patients admitted to our hospital.Materials and Methods: Fresh stool ...

  12. Identification of Adenoviruses in Specimens from High-Risk Pediatric Stem Cell Transplant Recipients and Controls▿

    Zheng, Xiaotian; Lu, Xiaoyan; Erdman, Dean D.; Anderson, Evan J.; Guzman-Cottrill, Judith A.; Kletzel, Morris; Katz, Ben Z.

    2008-01-01

    Adenovirus infection is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in stem cell transplant recipients. We report species and type-specific analysis from a prospective study of high-risk adenovirus infections following hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation prior to, during, and after treatment with cidofovir, as well as species analysis of contemporaneously collected samples from control patients. Nine different adenovirus types representing all six recognized species were identified, and mixed infections were commonly found in this group of patients. PMID:17989198

  13. Identification of Adenoviruses in Specimens from High-Risk Pediatric Stem Cell Transplant Recipients and Controls▿

    Zheng, Xiaotian; Lu, Xiaoyan; Erdman, Dean D.; Anderson, Evan J.; Guzman-Cottrill, Judith A.; Kletzel, Morris; Katz, Ben Z.

    2007-01-01

    Adenovirus infection is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in stem cell transplant recipients. We report species and type-specific analysis from a prospective study of high-risk adenovirus infections following hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation prior to, during, and after treatment with cidofovir, as well as species analysis of contemporaneously collected samples from control patients. Nine different adenovirus types representing all six recognized species were identifie...

  14. Nucleotide sequence analysis of regions of adenovirus 5 DNA containing the origins of DNA replication

    The purpose of the investigations described is the determination of nucleotide sequences at the molecular ends of the linear adenovirus type 5 DNA. Knowledge of the primary structure at the termini of this DNA molecule is of particular interest in the study of the mechanism of replication of adenovirus DNA. The initiation- and termination sites of adenovirus DNA replication are located at the ends of the DNA molecule. (Auth.)

  15. TheQ1 Influence of Innate and Pre-Existing Immunity on Adenovirus Therapy

    Zaiss, Anne K.; Machado, Hidevaldo B.; Herschman, Harvey R.

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors have been studied extensively in preclinical gene therapy models and in a range of clinical trials. However, innate immune responses to adenovirus vectors limit effectiveness of Ad5 based therapies. Moreover, extensive pre-existing Ad5 immunity in human populations will likely limit the clinical utility of adenovirus vectors, unless methods to circumvent neutralizing antibodies that bind virus and block target cell transduction can be developed;...

  16. Heterologous Immunity between Adenoviruses and Hepatitis C Virus: A New Paradigm in HCV Immunity and Vaccines

    Singh, Shakti; Vedi, Satish; Samrat, Subodh Kumar; Li, Wen; Kumar, Rakesh; Agrawal, Babita

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ad) are commonly used as vectors for gene therapy and/or vaccine delivery. Recombinant Ad vectors are being tested as vaccines for many pathogens. We have made a surprising observation that peptides derived from various hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigens contain extensive regions of homology with multiple adenovirus proteins, and conclusively demonstrate that adenovirus vector can induce robust, heterologous cellular and humoral immune responses against multiple HCV antigens. Intr...

  17. Genomic variation of adenovirus type 5 isolates recovered from bone marrow transplant recipients.

    Webb, D H; Shields, A. F.; Fife, K H

    1987-01-01

    We characterized the genomic variation of adenovirus type 5 isolates recovered from bone marrow transplant recipients in Seattle between 1976 and 1982. By restriction endonuclease analysis, we identified three new adenovirus genomic variants, each associated with a single invasive adenovirus infection. In addition, we were able to obtain suggestive evidence for a nosocomial spread of a particular group of isolates within this population. This study demonstrates that the technique of restricti...

  18. Expression of adenovirus type 2 DNA polymerase in insect cells infected with a recombinant baculovirus.

    Watson, C J; Hay, R T

    1990-01-01

    Sequences encoding adenovirus type 2 DNA polymerase were placed under control of the polyhedrin promoter and inserted into the baculovirus Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus by homologous recombination. Insect cells infected with the recombinant virus produced substantial amounts of the adenovirus type 2 DNA polymerase protein which was functional in both DNA polymerase and replication initiation reactions. Thus, the baculovirus expression system can provide active adenovirus t...

  19. THE OCCURRENCE OF ADENOVIRUS PRECIPITATING ANTIBODIES IN HUMAN SERA IN IRAN

    A. AFSHAR

    1969-01-01

    Full Text Available By irnmunocdiffusion tests 312 serum samples from human were examined for the presence of antibodies to the group.reactive precipitatng antigen of adenoviruses. of the total sera from female, 19.6% and from male, 15.8% had antibody to the group reactive antigen prepared from bovine adenovirus type 3. No significant difference was demo., nstrated on account of sex or age. The results suggest that adenovirus infection is widespread among the human population in Iran.

  20. Host Cell Autophagy Modulates Early Stages of Adenovirus Infections in Airway Epithelial Cells

    Zeng, Xuehuo; Carlin, Cathleen R

    2013-01-01

    Human adenoviruses typically cause mild infections in the upper or lower respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, or ocular epithelium. However, adenoviruses may be life-threatening in patients with impaired immunity and some serotypes cause epidemic outbreaks. Attachment to host cell receptors activates cell signaling and virus uptake by endocytosis. At present, it is unclear how vital cellular homeostatic mechanisms affect these early steps in the adenovirus life cycle. Autophagy is a lys...

  1. The Serological and Virological Investigation of Canine Adenovirus Infection on the Dogs

    Oya Bulut; Orhan Yapici; Oguzhan Avci; Atilla Simsek; Kamil Atli; Irmak Dik; Sibel Yavru; Sibel Hasircioglu; Mehmet Kale; Nuri Mamak

    2013-01-01

    Two types of Canine Adenovirus (CAVs), Canine Adenovirus type 1 (CAV-1), the virus which causes infectious canine hepatitis, and Canine Adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2), which causes canine infectious laryngotracheitis, have been found in dogs. In this study, blood samples taken from 111 dogs, which were admitted to the Internal Medicine Clinic of Selcuk University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, with clinical symptoms. Seventy-seven dogs were sampled from Isparta and Burdur dog shelters by random ...

  2. [Characteristics of intranuclear inclusions formed during the reproduction of bovine adenoviruses].

    Nosach, L N; Belousova, R V; Diachenko, N S; Kolenkova, L M

    1986-01-01

    A cytomorphological method was used to study the reproduction of bovine adenoviruses: Ad bos 1 - Ad bos 3, belonging to the serological subgroup I, and Ad bos 4, Ad bos 5, Ad bos 7, Ad bos 8, belonging to the serological subgroup II, and those isolated from animal adenoviruses N18 and N3056. Cytomorphological method is supposed to be used not only for revealing bovine adenoviruses but also for determining preliminarily their subgroup belonging. PMID:3754069

  3. Suppression of RNAi by dsRNA-degrading RNaseIII enzymes of viruses in animals and plants.

    Isabel Weinheimer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Certain RNA and DNA viruses that infect plants, insects, fish or poikilothermic animals encode Class 1 RNaseIII endoribonuclease-like proteins. dsRNA-specific endoribonuclease activity of the RNaseIII of rock bream iridovirus infecting fish and Sweet potato chlorotic stunt crinivirus (SPCSV infecting plants has been shown. Suppression of the host antiviral RNA interference (RNAi pathway has been documented with the RNaseIII of SPCSV and Heliothis virescens ascovirus infecting insects. Suppression of RNAi by the viral RNaseIIIs in non-host organisms of different kingdoms is not known. Here we expressed PPR3, the RNaseIII of Pike-perch iridovirus, in the non-hosts Nicotiana benthamiana (plant and Caenorhabditis elegans (nematode and found that it cleaves double-stranded small interfering RNA (ds-siRNA molecules that are pivotal in the host RNA interference (RNAi pathway and thereby suppresses RNAi in non-host tissues. In N. benthamiana, PPR3 enhanced accumulation of Tobacco rattle tobravirus RNA1 replicon lacking the 16K RNAi suppressor. Furthermore, PPR3 suppressed single-stranded RNA (ssRNA--mediated RNAi and rescued replication of Flock House virus RNA1 replicon lacking the B2 RNAi suppressor in C. elegans. Suppression of RNAi was debilitated with the catalytically compromised mutant PPR3-Ala. However, the RNaseIII (CSR3 produced by SPCSV, which cleaves ds-siRNA and counteracts antiviral RNAi in plants, failed to suppress ssRNA-mediated RNAi in C. elegans. In leaves of N. benthamiana, PPR3 suppressed RNAi induced by ssRNA and dsRNA and reversed silencing; CSR3, however, suppressed only RNAi induced by ssRNA and was unable to reverse silencing. Neither PPR3 nor CSR3 suppressed antisense-mediated RNAi in Drosophila melanogaster. These results show that the RNaseIII enzymes of RNA and DNA viruses suppress RNAi, which requires catalytic activities of RNaseIII. In contrast to other viral silencing suppression proteins, the RNaseIII enzymes are

  4. RNAi nanomaterials targeting immune cells as an anti-tumor therapy: the missing link in cancer treatment?

    João Conde

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available siRNA delivery targeting tumor cells and cancer-associated immune cells has been gaining momentum in the last few years. A combinatorial approach for silencing crucial factors essential for tumor progression in cancer-associated immune cells and in cancer cells simultaneously can effectively shift the tumor microenvironment from pro-oncogenic to anti-tumoral. Gene-therapy using RNAi nanomaterials can help shift this balance; however, fully utilizing the potential of RNAi relies on effective and specific delivery. RNAi nanomaterials can act as a Trojan horse which delivers siRNAs against immunosuppressive factors and reverses the regulatory activity of tumor immune cells residing in the tumor microenvironment. Here we review potential RNAi targets, means to activate and control the immune response, as well as ways to design delivery nanovehicles for successful RNAi immunotherapy.

  5. ENTERIC ADENOVIRUS INFECTION IN INFANTS AND YOUNG CHILDREN WITH ACUTE GASTROENTERITIS IN TEHRAN

    F. Jam-Afzon S. Modarres

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are one of the most important etiological agents of serious gastroenteritis among infants and young children. Fecal specimens from patients with an acute gastroenteritis were evaluated for the presence of adenovirus (Ad40, 41 from April 2002 to February 2004. During the study, 1052 samples were collected from children under the age of 5 years in six educational and therapeutic pediatric centers. The specimens were tested for adenovirus (Ad40, 41 by EIA technique in the Virology Department of Pasteur Institute of Iran. Adenoviruses (Ad40, 41 were detected from 27(2.6% samples, but were not detected in 150 samples of healthy control group. In this study the highest rate of adenovirus was found in children aged 6 to 12 months (40.7%, but the male to female ratio inpatients was approximately equal. Adenovirus (Ad40, 41 infections peaked in the winter as 48.1% was detected from December to March. There were a statistically significant difference between age and infection (P < 0.001, also between season with adenovirus (Ad40, 41 infection (P = 0.005. Breast-feeding had a protective action against adenovirus (Ad40, 41 infection. This study revealed that enteric adenovirus (Ad40, 41 is an etiological agent of acute gastroenteritis among children in Tehran.

  6. Interferon induction by adenovirus type 12: stimulatory function of early region 1A

    Adenoviruses are generally weak interferon inducers, triggering chicken embryo fibroblast cells by a UV-resistant viral component, probably the capsid or capsid elements, to produce 50 to 100 IU of interferon per ml. Adenovirus types 12, 18, and 31, however, can induce 10 to 20 times more interferon than other types do by a UV-sensitive mechanism. By using mutant and recombinant adenoviruses, we demonstrated that early region 1A was responsible for the enhanced interferon production of chicken cells infected with adenovirus type 12

  7. First detection of adenovirus in the vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus) in Brazil.

    Lima, Francisco Esmaile de Sales; Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Elesbao, Felipe; Carnieli Junior, Pedro; Batista, Helena Beatriz de Carvalho Ruthner; Roehe, Paulo Michel; Franco, Ana Cláudia

    2013-10-01

    This paper describes the first detection of adenovirus in a Brazilian Desmodus rotundus bat, the common vampire bat. As part of a continuous rabies surveillance program, three bat specimens were captured in Southern Brazil. Total DNA was extracted from pooled organs and submitted to a nested PCR designed to amplify a 280 bp long portion of the DNA polymerase gene of adenoviruses. One positive sample was subjected to nucleotide sequencing, confirming that this DNA fragment belongs to a member of the genus Mastadenovirus. This sequence is approximately 25 % divergent at the nucleotide level from equine adenovirus 1 and two other recently characterized bat adenoviruses. PMID:23828618

  8. Interferon induction by adenovirus type 12: stimulatory function of early region 1A

    Toth, M.I.; Arya, B.; Pusztai, R.; Shiroki, K.; Beladi, I.

    1987-07-01

    Adenoviruses are generally weak interferon inducers, triggering chicken embryo fibroblast cells by a UV-resistant viral component, probably the capsid or capsid elements, to produce 50 to 100 IU of interferon per ml. Adenovirus types 12, 18, and 31, however, can induce 10 to 20 times more interferon than other types do by a UV-sensitive mechanism. By using mutant and recombinant adenoviruses, we demonstrated that early region 1A was responsible for the enhanced interferon production of chicken cells infected with adenovirus type 12.

  9. Dielectrophoresis and dielectrophoretic impedance detection of adenovirus and rotavirus

    Nakano, Michihiko; Ding, Zhenhao; Suehiro, Junya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is the electrical detection of pathogenic viruses, namely, adenovirus and rotavirus, using dielectrophoretic impedance measurement (DEPIM). DEPIM consists of two simultaneous processes: dielectrophoretic trapping of the target and measurement of the impedance change and increase in conductance with the number of trapped targets. This is the first study of applying DEPIM, which was originally developed to detect bacteria suspended in aqueous solutions, to virus detection. The dielectric properties of the viruses were also investigated in terms of their dielectrophoretic behavior. Although their estimated dielectric properties were different from those of bacteria, the trapped viruses increased the conductance of the microelectrode in a manner similar to that in bacteria detection. We demonstrated the electrical detection of viruses within 60 s at concentrations as low as 70 ng/ml for adenovirus and 50 ng/ml for rotavirus.

  10. Effect of immunization with fetal cells on adenovirus-12 oncogenesis

    Abe,Shinji

    1974-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of immunization with hamster fetal cells on the tumor induction by adnovirus type 12 was studied by in vivo and in vitro. The immunization with lO-day old fetal cells showed a recognizable inhibition on the tumor induction by adenovirus type 12. The inhibition was observed only in males but not in females. For the inhibition, immnization with 107 or more cells was required. The immunization with same dose of l2-day-old fetal cells were ineffective. The inoculation of the spleen cells from hamsters immunized with un· irradiated fetal cells strongly inhibited the adenovirus·12 onocogenesis. Membrane immunofluorescent test, however, failed to demonstrate the fetal antigens in any of adnovirus-12-induced tumor cells, SV40induced tumor cells and cells from spontaneous hamster lymphoma.

  11. Adenovirus delivered short hairpin RNA targeting a conserved site in the 5' non-translated region inhibits all four serotypes of dengue viruses.

    Anil Babu Korrapati

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease caused by four closely related serotypes of Dengue viruses (DENVs. This disease whose symptoms range from mild fever to potentially fatal haemorrhagic fever and hypovolemic shock, threatens nearly half the global population. There is neither a preventive vaccine nor an effective antiviral therapy against dengue disease. The difference between severe and mild disease appears to be dependent on the viral load. Early diagnosis may enable timely therapeutic intervention to blunt disease severity by reducing the viral load. Harnessing the therapeutic potential of RNA interference (RNAi to attenuate DENV replication may offer one approach to dengue therapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We screened the non-translated regions (NTRs of the RNA genomes of representative members of the four DENV serotypes for putative siRNA targets mapping to known transcription/translation regulatory elements. We identified a target site in the 5' NTR that maps to the 5' upstream AUG region, a highly conserved cis-acting element essential for viral replication. We used a replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 (AdV5 vector to deliver a short-hairpin RNA (shRNA targeting this site into cells. We show that this shRNA matures to the cognate siRNA and is able to inhibit effectively antigen secretion, viral RNA replication and infectious virus production by all four DENV serotypes. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The data demonstrate the feasibility of using AdV5-mediated delivery of shRNAs targeting conserved sites in the viral genome to achieve inhibition of all four DENV serotypes. This paves the way towards exploration of RNAi as a possible therapeutic strategy to curtail DENV infection.

  12. Highly Sensitive Method for Titration of Adenovirus Vectors

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Hildegund Ertl, ZhiQuan Xiang, Yan Li, Dongming Zhou, Xiangyang Zhou, Wynetta Giles-Davis & Yi-lin E. Liu ### Abstract Clinical development of vaccines based on adenovirus (Ad) vectors requires accurate techniques to determine vector doses including contents of infectious particles. For vectors derived from Ad virus of human serotype 5 content of infectious particles can readily be determined by plaque assays. Vaccine vectors based on alternative Ad serotypes such as thos...

  13. Synergistic Antitumor Efficacy of Oncolytic Adenovirus Combined with Chemotherapy

    LI Yue-min; QIAN Qi-jun; SONG San-tai; JIANG Ze-fei; ZHANG Qi; QU Yi-mei; SU Chang-qing; ZHAO Chuan-hua; LI Zhi-qiang; GE Fei-jiao

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Chemotherapy is an effective means of treating breast cancer, and cancer-specific replicative adenovirus is also a promising antitumor agent in recent years. Our investigation aims to demonstrate that CNHK300 can mediate selective antitumor efficacy and produce synergistic cytotoxicity with chemotherapy on HER-2 over-expressing breast cancer. Methods: We engineered the telomerase-dependent replicative adenovirus CNHK300 by placing the E1A gene under the control of the human hTERT promoter. By analysis of E1A expression, we proved the fidelity of hTERT promoter in adenovirus genome and the selective expression of E1A in telomerase-positive breast cancer cells but not in normal fibroblast cells. By proliferation test, we further showed efficient replication of CNHK300 in breast cancer cells with apparently attenuated proliferation in normal fibroblast cells. Finally, we demonstrated by MTT methods that CNHK300 virus caused potent cytolysis and produced synergistic cytotoxicity with chemotherapy in breast cancer cells with attenuated cytotoxicity on normal cells. Results: In this virus, the E1A gene is successfully placed under the control of the human hTERT promoter. CNHK300 virus replicated as efficiently as the wild-type adenovirus and caused intensive cell killing in HER-2 over-expressing breast cancer cells in vitro. In contrast, telomerase-negative normal fibroblast cells, which expressed no hTERT activity, were not able to support CNHK300 replication. Combined treatment of CNHK300 with paclitaxel improved cytotoxicity on cancer cells. Conclusion: We conclude that CNHK300 can produce selective antitumor efficacy and enhance the in vitro response of chemotherapy on HER-2 overexpressing breast cancer.

  14. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated therapy for prostate cancer.

    Sweeney, Katrina; Halldén, Gunnel

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death and morbidity in men in the Western world. Tumor progression is dependent on functioning androgen receptor signaling, and initial administration of antiandrogens and hormone therapy (androgen-deprivation therapy) prevent growth and spread. Tumors frequently develop escape mechanisms to androgen-deprivation therapy and progress to castration-resistant late-stage metastatic disease that, in turn, inevitably leads to resistance to all current therapeutics, including chemotherapy. In spite of the recent development of more effective inhibitors of androgen-androgen receptor signaling such as enzalutamide and abiraterone, patient survival benefits are still limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have proven efficacy in prostate cancer cells and cause regression of tumors in preclinical models of numerous drug-resistant cancers. Data from clinical trials demonstrate that adenoviral mutants have limited toxicity to normal tissues and are safe when administered to patients with various solid cancers, including prostate cancer. While efficacy in response to adenovirus administration alone is marginal, findings from early-phase trials targeting local-ized and metastatic prostate cancer suggest improved efficacy in combination with cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapy. Here, we review recent progress in the development of multimodal oncolytic adenoviruses as biological therapeutics to improve on tumor elimination in prostate cancer patients. These optimized mutants target cancer cells by several mechanisms including viral lysis and by expression of cytotoxic transgenes and immune-stimulatory factors that activate the host immune system to destroy both infected and noninfected prostate cancer cells. Additional modifications of the viral capsid proteins may support future systemic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses. PMID:27579296

  15. Association of Adenovirus with the Microtubule Organizing Center

    Bailey, Christopher J.; Crystal, Ronald G.; Leopold, Philip L.

    2003-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ad) must deliver their genomes to the nucleus of the target cell to initiate an infection. Following entry into the cell and escape from the endosome, Ad traffics along the microtubule cytoskeleton toward the nucleus. In the final step in Ad trafficking, Ad must leave the microtubule and establish an association with the nuclear envelope. We hypothesized that in cells lacking a nucleus, the capsid moves to and associates with the microtubule organizing center (MTOC). To test thi...

  16. Technological development of structural DNA/RNA-based RNAi systems and their applications.

    Jeong, Eun Hye; Kim, Hyejin; Jang, Bora; Cho, Hyesoo; Ryu, Jaehee; Kim, Boyeon; Park, Youngkuk; Kim, Jieun; Lee, Jong Bum; Lee, Hyukjin

    2016-09-01

    RNA interference (RNAi)-based gene therapy has drawn tremendous attention due to its highly specific gene regulation by selective degradation of any target mRNA. There have been multiple reports regarding the development of various cationic materials for efficient siRNA delivery, however, many studies still suffer from the conventional delivery problems such as suboptimal transfection performance, a lack of tissue specificity, and potential cytotoxicity. Despite the huge therapeutic potential of siRNAs, conventional gene carriers have failed to guarantee successful gene silencing in vivo, thus not warranting clinical trials. The relatively short double-stranded structure of siRNAs has resulted in uncompromising delivery formulations, as well as low transfection efficiency, compared with the conventional nucleic acid drugs such as plasmid DNAs. Recent developments in structural siRNA and RNAi nanotechnology have enabled more refined and reliable in vivo gene silencing with multiple advantages over naked siRNAs. This review focuses on recent progress in the development of structural DNA/RNA-based RNAi systems and their potential therapeutic applications. In addition, an extensive list of prior reports on various RNAi systems is provided and categorized by their distinctive molecular characters. PMID:26494399

  17. The proper splicing of RNAi factors is critical for pericentric heterochromatin assembly in fission yeast.

    Scott P Kallgren

    Full Text Available Heterochromatin preferentially assembles at repetitive DNA elements, playing roles in transcriptional silencing, recombination suppression, and chromosome segregation. The RNAi machinery is required for heterochromatin assembly in a diverse range of organisms. In fission yeast, RNA splicing factors are also required for pericentric heterochromatin assembly, and a prevailing model is that splicing factors provide a platform for siRNA generation independently of their splicing activity. Here, by screening the fission yeast deletion library, we discovered four novel splicing factors that are required for pericentric heterochromatin assembly. Sequencing total cellular RNAs from the strongest of these mutants, cwf14Δ, showed intron retention in mRNAs of several RNAi factors. Moreover, introducing cDNA versions of RNAi factors significantly restored pericentric heterochromatin in splicing mutants. We also found that mutations of splicing factors resulted in defective telomeric heterochromatin assembly and mis-splicing the mRNA of shelterin component Tpz1, and that replacement of tpz1+ with its cDNA partially rescued heterochromatin defects at telomeres in splicing mutants. Thus, proper splicing of RNAi and shelterin factors contributes to heterochromatin assembly at pericentric regions and telomeres.

  18. RNAi-mediated Double Gene Knockdown and Gustatory Perception Measurement in Honey Bees (Apis mellifera)

    Wang, Ying; Baker, Nicholas; Amdam, Gro V.

    2013-01-01

    This video demonstrates novel techniques of RNA interference (RNAi) which downregulate two genes simultaneously in honey bees using double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) injections. It also presents a protocol of proboscis extension response (PER) assay for measuring gustatory perception.

  19. Clone mapper: an online suite of tools for RNAi experiments in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Thakur, Nishant; Pujol, Nathalie; Tichit, Laurent; Ewbank, Jonathan J

    2014-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi), mediated by the introduction of a specific double-stranded RNA, is a powerful method to investigate gene function. It is widely used in the Caenorhabditis elegans research community. An expanding number of laboratories conduct genome-wide RNAi screens, using standard libraries of bacterial clones each designed to produce a specific double-stranded RNA. Proper interpretation of results from RNAi experiments requires a series of analytical steps, from the verification of the identity of bacterial clones, to the identification of the clones' potential targets. Despite the popularity of the technique, no user-friendly set of tools allowing these steps to be carried out accurately, automatically, and at a large scale, is currently available. We report here the design and production of Clone Mapper, an online suite of tools specifically adapted to the analysis pipeline typical for RNAi experiments with C. elegans. We show that Clone Mapper overcomes the limitations of existing techniques and provide examples illustrating its potential for the identification of biologically relevant genes. The Clone Mapper tools are freely available via http://www.ciml.univ-mrs.fr/EWBANK_jonathan/software.html. PMID:25187039

  20. An Arabidopsis tissue-specific RNAi method for studying genes essential to mitosis.

    Burgos-Rivera, Brunilís; Dawe, R Kelly

    2012-01-01

    A large fraction of the genes in plants can be considered essential in the sense that when absent the plant fails to develop past the first few cell divisions. The fact that angiosperms pass through a haploid gametophyte stage can make it challenging to propagate such mutants even in the heterozygous condition. Here we describe a tissue-specific RNAi method that allows us to visualize cell division phenotypes in petals, which are large dispensable organs. Portions of the APETALA (AP3) and PISTILLATA (PI) promoters confer early petal-specific expression. We show that when either promoter is used to drive the expression of a beta-glucuronidase (GUS) RNAi transgene in plants uniformly expressing GUS, GUS expression is knocked down specifically in petals. We further tested the system by targeting the essential kinetochore protein CENPC and two different components of the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (MAD2 and BUBR1). Plant lines expressing petal-specific RNAi hairpins targeting these genes exhibited an array of petal phenotypes. Cytological analyses of the affected flower buds confirmed that CENPC knockdown causes cell cycle arrest but provided no evidence that either MAD2 or BUBR1 are required for mitosis (although both genes are required for petal growth by this assay). A key benefit of the petal-specific RNAi method is that the phenotypes are not expressed in the lineages leading to germ cells, and the phenotypes are faithfully transmitted for at least four generations despite their pronounced effects on growth. PMID:23236491

  1. RNAi-based insecticidal crops: potential effects on non-target species

    RNAi is a sequence specific mechanism that silences protein production when particular mRNAs are bound and enzymatically cleaved. Genetically modified crops that silence critical gene function in insect pests have been developed, and are a likely future direction for commercial pest management. Pote...

  2. RNAi and emerging psyllid genomes - increasing the number of genetic targets

    Genomics has changed the strategies used to manage insects and diseases. The ability to effect a change in proteins and transcripts through RNA-interference (RNAi) has produced a rush towards the development of the most state-of-the-art pest suppression strategy available. To rapidly advance these e...

  3. Human Papillomavirus: Current and Future RNAi Therapeutic Strategies for Cervical Cancer

    Hun Soon Jung

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomaviruses (HPVs are small DNA viruses; some oncogenic ones can cause different types of cancer, in particular cervical cancer. HPV-associated carcinogenesis provides a classical model system for RNA interference (RNAi based cancer therapies, because the viral oncogenes E6 and E7 that cause cervical cancer are expressed only in cancerous cells. Previous studies on the development of therapeutic RNAi facilitated the advancement of therapeutic siRNAs and demonstrated its versatility by siRNA-mediated depletion of single or multiple cellular/viral targets. Sequence-specific gene silencing using RNAi shows promise as a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of a variety of diseases that currently lack effective treatments. However, siRNA-based targeting requires further validation of its efficacy in vitro and in vivo, for its potential off-target effects, and of the design of conventional therapies to be used in combination with siRNAs and their drug delivery vehicles. In this review we discuss what is currently known about HPV-associated carcinogenesis and the potential for combining siRNA with other treatment strategies for the development of future therapies. Finally, we present our assessment of the most promising path to the development of RNAi therapeutic strategies for clinical settings.

  4. RNAi as a management tool for the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera.

    Fishilevich, Elane; Vélez, Ana M; Storer, Nicholas P; Li, Huarong; Bowling, Andrew J; Rangasamy, Murugesan; Worden, Sarah E; Narva, Kenneth E; Siegfried, Blair D

    2016-09-01

    The western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, is the most important pest of corn in the US Corn Belt. Economic estimates indicate that costs of control and yield loss associated with WCR damage exceed $US 1 billion annually. Historically, corn rootworm management has been extremely difficult because of its ability to evolve resistance to both chemical insecticides and cultural control practices. Since 2003, the only novel commercialized developments in rootworm management have been transgenic plants expressing Bt insecticidal proteins. Four transgenic insecticidal proteins are currently registered for rootworm management, and field resistance to proteins from the Cry3 family highlights the importance of developing traits with new modes of action. One of the newest approaches for controlling rootworm pests involves RNA interference (RNAi). This review describes the current understanding of the RNAi mechanisms in WCR and the use of this technology for WCR management. Further, the review addresses ecological risk assessment of RNAi and insect resistance management of RNAi for corn rootworm. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:27218412

  5. Progress on adenovirus-vectored universal influenza vaccines.

    Xiang, Kui; Ying, Guan; Yan, Zhou; Shanshan, Yan; Lei, Zhang; Hongjun, Li; Maosheng, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection causes serious health problems and heavy financial burdens each year worldwide. The classical inactivated influenza virus vaccine (IIVV) and live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) must be updated regularly to match the new strains that evolve due to antigenic drift and antigenic shift. However, with the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved antigens, and the CD8(+) T cell responses targeting viral internal proteins nucleoprotein (NP), matrix protein 1 (M1) and polymerase basic 1 (PB1), it is possible to develop a universal influenza vaccine based on the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) stem, NP, and matrix proteins. Recombinant adenovirus (rAd) is an ideal influenza vaccine vector because it has an ideal stability and safety profile, induces balanced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses due to activation of innate immunity, provides 'self-adjuvanting' activity, can mimic natural IFV infection, and confers seamless protection against mucosal pathogens. Moreover, this vector can be developed as a low-cost, rapid-response vaccine that can be quickly manufactured. Therefore, an adenovirus vector encoding conserved influenza antigens holds promise in the development of a universal influenza vaccine. This review will summarize the progress in adenovirus-vectored universal flu vaccines and discuss future novel approaches. PMID:25876176

  6. Brain tumors induced in rats by human adenovirus type 12

    Murao,Tsuyoshi

    1974-02-01

    Full Text Available Oncogenesis of human adenovirus type 12 in the brain of rats was examined. Newborn rats of Sprague-Dawley and Donryu strains were injected intracranially with human adenovirus type 12. The incidence of intracranial tumors was 91% (30/33 in SpragueDawley and 56% (14/25 in Donryu rats. Except for one tumor nodule located in the parietal cortex of a Sprague.Dawley rat, all tumors developed in the paraventricular areas or in the meninges. Tumors were quite similar histologically to those induced in hamsters and mice resembling the undifferentiated human brain tumors such as medulloblastoma, ependymoblastoma and embryonic gliomas. From the histological features and primary sites of tumor development, it is suggested that the tumors in the brain of rats induced by adenovirus type 12 originate from the embryonic cells in the paraventricular area and also from the undifferentiated supporting cells of the peripheral nerves in the leptomeninges.

  7. Packaging of viral RNAs in virions of adenoviruses

    Xing Li

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Earlier, we detected viral RNAs packaged in the porcine adenovirus (PAdV -3 virions. Using Southern blot analysis, we further demonstrated that the viral RNAs were predominantly packaged in CsCl purified mature capsids (containing viral genome than empty/intermediate capsids. Some of the packaged viral RNAs appear to be polyadenylated. Real-time reverse transcription (RT-PCR analysis indicated that the copy number of the tested viral mRNAs encoding E1Bsmall and fiber proteins was less than one per full capsid. Moreover, detection of viral RNA packaged in CsCl purified human adenovirus (HAdV -5 virions indicates that the viral RNA packaging might be a common phenomenon in members of Adenoviridae family. Further quantitative analysis of viral protein, DNA, and RNA in CsCl purified mature and empty/intermediate capsids of recombinant HAdV-5 expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein indicated that the traceable viral RNA detected in empty/intermediate capsids seems associated with the presence of traceable viral genomic DNA. Taken together, our data suggest that the viral RNAs may be passively packaged in adenovirus virion during encapsidation of viral genomic DNA in cell nuclei. Thus, viral RNA packaging may be a characteristic feature of adenoviral genomic DNA encapsidation.

  8. An Update on Canine Adenovirus Type 2 and Its Vectors

    Eric J. Kremer

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus vectors have significant potential for long- or short-term gene transfer. Preclinical and clinical studies using human derived adenoviruses (HAd have demonstrated the feasibility of flexible hybrid vector designs, robust expression and induction of protective immunity. However, clinical use of HAd vectors can, under some conditions, be limited by pre-existing vector immunity. Pre-existing humoral and cellular anti-capsid immunity limits the efficacy and duration of transgene expression and is poorly circumvented by injections of larger doses and immuno-suppressing drugs. This review updates canine adenovirus serotype 2 (CAV-2, also known as CAdV-2 biology and gives an overview of the generation of early region 1 (E1-deleted to helper-dependent (HD CAV-2 vectors. We also summarize the essential characteristics concerning their interaction with the anti-HAd memory immune responses in humans, the preferential transduction of neurons, and its high level of retrograde axonal transport in the central and peripheral nervous system. CAV-2 vectors are particularly interesting tools to study the pathophysiology and potential treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, as anti-tumoral and anti-viral vaccines, tracer of synaptic junctions, oncolytic virus and as a platform to generate chimeric vectors.

  9. History of the restoration of adenovirus type 4 and type 7 vaccine, live oral (Adenovirus Vaccine) in the context of the Department of Defense acquisition system.

    Hoke, Charles H; Snyder, Clifford E

    2013-03-15

    Respiratory pathogens cause morbidity and mortality in US military basic trainees. Following the influenza pandemic of 1918, and stimulated by WWII, the need to protect military personnel against epidemic respiratory disease was evident. Over several decades, the US military elucidated etiologies of acute respiratory diseases and invented and deployed vaccines to prevent disease caused by influenza, meningococcus, and adenoviruses. In 1994, the Adenovirus Vaccine manufacturer stopped its production. By 1999, supplies were exhausted and adenovirus-associated disease, especially serotype 4-associated febrile respiratory illness, returned to basic training installations. Advisory bodies persuaded Department of Defense leaders to initiate restoration of Adenovirus Vaccine. In 2011, after 10 years of effort by government and contractor personnel and at a cost of about $100 million, the Adenovirus Vaccine was restored to use at all military basic training installations. Disease and adenovirus serotype 4 isolation rates have fallen dramatically since vaccinations resumed in October 2011 and remain very low. Mindful of the adage that "The more successful a vaccine is, the more quickly the need for it will be forgotten.", sustainment of the supply of the Adenovirus Vaccine may be a challenge, and careful management will be required for such sustainment. PMID:23291475

  10. Repression of germline RNAi pathways in somatic cells by retinoblastoma pathway chromatin complexes.

    Xiaoyun Wu

    Full Text Available The retinoblastoma (Rb tumor suppressor acts with a number of chromatin cofactors in a wide range of species to suppress cell proliferation. The Caenorhabditis elegans retinoblastoma gene and many of these cofactors, called synMuv B genes, were identified in genetic screens for cell lineage defects caused by growth factor misexpression. Mutations in many synMuv B genes, including lin-35/Rb, also cause somatic misexpression of the germline RNA processing P granules and enhanced RNAi. We show here that multiple small RNA components, including a set of germline-specific Argonaute genes, are misexpressed in the soma of many synMuv B mutant animals, revealing one node for enhanced RNAi. Distinct classes of synMuv B mutants differ in the subcellular architecture of their misexpressed P granules, their profile of misexpressed small RNA and P granule genes, as well as their enhancement of RNAi and the related silencing of transgenes. These differences define three classes of synMuv B genes, representing three chromatin complexes: a LIN-35/Rb-containing DRM core complex, a SUMO-recruited Mec complex, and a synMuv B heterochromatin complex, suggesting that intersecting chromatin pathways regulate the repression of small RNA and P granule genes in the soma and the potency of RNAi. Consistent with this, the DRM complex and the synMuv B heterochromatin complex were genetically additive and displayed distinct antagonistic interactions with the MES-4 histone methyltransferase and the MRG-1 chromodomain protein, two germline chromatin regulators required for the synMuv phenotype and the somatic misexpression of P granule components. Thus intersecting synMuv B chromatin pathways conspire with synMuv B suppressor chromatin factors to regulate the expression of small RNA pathway genes, which enables heightened RNAi response. Regulation of small RNA pathway genes by human retinoblastoma may also underlie its role as a tumor suppressor gene.

  11. Repression of germline RNAi pathways in somatic cells by retinoblastoma pathway chromatin complexes.

    Wu, Xiaoyun; Shi, Zhen; Cui, Mingxue; Han, Min; Ruvkun, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor acts with a number of chromatin cofactors in a wide range of species to suppress cell proliferation. The Caenorhabditis elegans retinoblastoma gene and many of these cofactors, called synMuv B genes, were identified in genetic screens for cell lineage defects caused by growth factor misexpression. Mutations in many synMuv B genes, including lin-35/Rb, also cause somatic misexpression of the germline RNA processing P granules and enhanced RNAi. We show here that multiple small RNA components, including a set of germline-specific Argonaute genes, are misexpressed in the soma of many synMuv B mutant animals, revealing one node for enhanced RNAi. Distinct classes of synMuv B mutants differ in the subcellular architecture of their misexpressed P granules, their profile of misexpressed small RNA and P granule genes, as well as their enhancement of RNAi and the related silencing of transgenes. These differences define three classes of synMuv B genes, representing three chromatin complexes: a LIN-35/Rb-containing DRM core complex, a SUMO-recruited Mec complex, and a synMuv B heterochromatin complex, suggesting that intersecting chromatin pathways regulate the repression of small RNA and P granule genes in the soma and the potency of RNAi. Consistent with this, the DRM complex and the synMuv B heterochromatin complex were genetically additive and displayed distinct antagonistic interactions with the MES-4 histone methyltransferase and the MRG-1 chromodomain protein, two germline chromatin regulators required for the synMuv phenotype and the somatic misexpression of P granule components. Thus intersecting synMuv B chromatin pathways conspire with synMuv B suppressor chromatin factors to regulate the expression of small RNA pathway genes, which enables heightened RNAi response. Regulation of small RNA pathway genes by human retinoblastoma may also underlie its role as a tumor suppressor gene. PMID:22412383

  12. Detection of Adenoviruses from clinical samples in bone marrow transplant patients by nested PCR (polymerase chain reaction)

    Fatemeh Sabagh; Michael Roggendorf

    2012-01-01

    Adenoviruses are recognized as common human pathogens that are responsible for a wide variety of infectious syndromes. Bone marrow transplant patients are prone to life threatening opportunistic infections like adenoviruses. The nested polymerase chain reaction has provided an alternative, sensitive diagnostic method for detection of Adenoviruses. In this study we developed PCR from hexon genes as rapid diagnostic method of Advs infections on different clinical samples. Adenovirus infections ...

  13. Inhibition of proteolytic processing of adenoviral proteins by epsilon-aminocaproic acid and ambenum in adenovirus-infected cells.

    Nosach, Lidiya; Dyachenko, Nataliya; Zhovnovataya, Valentina; Lozinskiy, Miron; Lozitsky, Victor

    2002-01-01

    Maturation of adenovirus particles is markedly affected by proteolytic processing. The possibility for blocking the conversion of precursor structural core protein (preVII) into mature structure protein VII by officinal drugs epsilon-aminocaproic acid and ambenum has been demonstrated in Hep-2 cells infected with adenovirus. Proteolytic processing may be regarded as one of the targets for inhibiting adenovirus reproduction. PMID:12545207

  14. Adenovirus-based vaccines against avian-origin H5N1 influenza viruses.

    He, Biao; Zheng, Bo-jian; Wang, Qian; Du, Lanying; Jiang, Shibo; Lu, Lu

    2015-02-01

    Since 1997, human infection with avian H5N1, having about 60% mortality, has posed a threat to public health. In this review, we describe the epidemiology of H5N1 transmission, advantages and disadvantages of different influenza vaccine types, and characteristics of adenovirus, finally summarizing advances in adenovirus-based H5N1 systemic and mucosal vaccines. PMID:25479556

  15. E1A genes of adenovirus type 2 and type 5 are expressed at different levels

    Moritz, Constanze; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    Adenoviruses are an extensively studied system for modeling oncogenesis and for experimental cancer therapy. The most commonly analyzed virus types are 2 and 5, and little distinction has been made between them in past studies. Adenoviruses used for therapeutic purposes are frequently hybrids...

  16. Crystal Structure of the Fibre Head Domain of the Atadenovirus Snake Adenovirus 1

    Singh, Abhimanyu K.; Menéndez-Conejero, Rosa; San Martín, Carmen; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviruses are non-enveloped icosahedral viruses with trimeric fibre proteins protruding from their vertices. There are five known genera, from which only Mastadenoviruses have been widely studied. Apart from studying adenovirus as a biological model system and with a view to prevent or combat viral infection, there is a major interest in using adenovirus for vaccination, cancer therapy and gene therapy purposes. Adenoviruses from the Atadenovirus genus have been isolated from squamate reptile hosts, ruminants and birds and have a characteristic gene organization and capsid morphology. The carboxy-terminal virus-distal fibre head domains are likely responsible for primary receptor recognition. We determined the high-resolution crystal structure of the Snake Adenovirus 1 (SnAdV-1) fibre head using the multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) method. Despite the absence of significant sequence homology, this Atadenovirus fibre head has the same beta-sandwich propeller topology as other adenovirus fibre heads. However, it is about half the size, mainly due to much shorter loops connecting the beta-strands. The detailed structure of the SnAdV-1 fibre head and other animal adenovirus fibre heads, together with the future identification of their natural receptors, may lead to the development of new strategies to target adenovirus vectors to cells of interest. PMID:25486282

  17. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell... hepatitis, the test is inconclusive and may be repeated. (B) If at least 19 of the 20 vaccinates do...

  18. Immunocompetent syngeneic cotton rat tumor models for the assessment of replication-competent oncolytic adenovirus

    Oncolytic adenoviruses as a treatment for cancer have demonstrated limited clinical activity. Contributing to this may be the relevance of preclinical animal models used to study these agents. Syngeneic mouse tumor models are generally non-permissive for adenoviral replication, whereas human tumor xenograft models exhibit attenuated immune responses to the vector. The cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) is susceptible to human adenovirus infection, permissive for viral replication and exhibits similar inflammatory pathology to humans with adenovirus replicating in the lungs, respiratory passages and cornea. We evaluated three transplantable tumorigenic cotton rat cell lines, CCRT, LCRT and VCRT as models for the study of oncolytic adenoviruses. All three cells lines were readily infected with adenovirus type-5-based vectors and exhibited high levels of transgene expression. The cell lines supported viral replication demonstrated by the induction of cytopathogenic effect (CPE) in tissue culture, increase in virus particle numbers and assembly of virions seen on transmission electron microscopy. In vivo, LCRT and VCRT tumors demonstrated delayed growth after injection with replicating adenovirus. No in vivo antitumor activity was seen in CCRT tumors despite in vitro oncolysis. Adenovirus was also rapidly cleared from the CCRT tumors compared to LCRT and VCRT tumors. The effect observed with the different cotton rat tumor cell lines mimics the variable results of human clinical trials highlighting the potential relevance of this model for assessing the activity and toxicity of oncolytic adenoviruses

  19. Adenovirus Type F Subtype 41 Causing Disseminated Disease following Bone Marrow Transplantation for Immunodeficiency

    Slatter, Mary A.; Read, Steven; Taylor, Clive E.; Crooks, Bruce N. A.; Abinun, Mario; Flood, Terence J.; Cant, Andrew J; Wright, Christopher; Gennery, Andrew R.

    2005-01-01

    Adenovirus causes disseminated disease following bone marrow transplantation (BMT). We report a child who underwent T-cell-depleted BMT. Adenovirus subgenus F serotype 41 was detected antemortem by PCR in cerebrospinal fluid and postmortem in other tissues. Serotypes 40 and 41, associated with gastrointestinal disease, have not previously been implicated in disseminated disease.

  20. Presence of adenovirus species C in infiltrating lymphocytes of human sarcoma.

    Karin Kosulin

    Full Text Available Human adenoviruses are known to persist in T-lymphocytes of tonsils, adenoids and intestinal tract. The oncogenic potential of different adenovirus types has been widely studied in rodents, in which adenovirus inoculation can induce multiple tumors such as undifferentiated sarcomas, adenocarcinomas and neuroectodermal tumors. However, the oncogenic potential of this virus has never been proven in human subjects. Using a highly sensitive broad-spectrum qRT-PCR, we have screened a set of different human sarcomas including leiomyosarcoma, liposarcoma and gastro intestinal stroma tumors. Primers binding the viral oncogene E1A and the capsid-coding gene Hexon were used to detect the presence of adenovirus DNA in tumor samples. We found that 18% of the tested leiomyosarcomas and 35% of the liposarcomas were positive for the presence of adenovirus DNA, being species C types the most frequently detected adenoviruses. However, only in one sample of the gastro intestinal stroma tumors the virus DNA could be detected. The occurrence of adenovirus in the tumor sections was confirmed by subsequent fluorescence in-situ-hybridization analysis and co-staining with the transcription factor Bcl11b gives evidence for the presence of the virus in infiltrating T-lymphocytes within the tumors. Together these data underline, for the first time, the persistence of adenovirus in T-lymphocytes infiltrated in muscular and fatty tissue tumor samples. If an impaired immune system leads to the viral persistence and reactivation of the virus is involved in additional diseases needs further investigation.

  1. Experimental study of tissue-engineered cartilage allograft with RNAi chondrocytes in vivo

    Wang ZH

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Zhenghui Wang,1 Xiaoli Li,2 Xi-Jing He,3 Xianghong Zhang,1 Zhuangqun Yang,4 Min Xu,1 Baojun Wu,1 Junbo Tu,5 Huanan Luo,1 Jing Yan11Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, 2Department of Dermatology, 3Department of Orthopedics, The Second Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University, 4Department of Plastic and Burns Surgery, The First Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University, 5Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Plastic Surgery, The Stomatological Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of ChinaPurpose: To determine the effects of RNA interference (RNAi on chondrocyte proliferation, function, and immunological rejection after allogenic tissue-engineered cartilage transplantation within bone matrix gelatin scaffolds.Methods: Seven million rat normal and RNAi chondrocytes were harvested and separately composited with fibrin glue to make the cell suspension, and then transplanted subcutaneously into the back of Sprague Dawley rats after being cultured for 10 days in vitro. Untransplanted animals served as the control group. The allograft and immunological response were examined at 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 months postoperatively with hematoxylin and eosin histochemical staining, immunohistochemical staining (aggrecan, type II collagen, class I and II major histocompatibility complex, and flow cytometry for peripheral blood cluster of differentiation 4+ (CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells.Results: There was no infection or death in the rats except one, which died in the first week. Compared to the control group, the RNAi group had fewer eukomonocytes infiltrated, which were only distributed around the graft. The ratio of CD4+/CD8+ T-cells in the RNAi group was significantly lower than the normal one (P<0.05. There were many more positively stained chondrocytes and positively stained areas around the cells in the RNAi group, which were not found in the control group.Conclusion: The aggrecanase-1 and aggrecanase-2 RNAi for chondrocytes

  2. Seroprevalence of neutralizing antibodies to human adenoviruses type-5 and type-26 and chimpanzee adenovirus type-68 in healthy Chinese adults.

    Zhang, Shujun; Huang, Wenxiang; Zhou, Xiangyang; Zhao, Qiquan; Wang, Qun; Jia, Bei

    2013-06-01

    Replication-defective adenoviruses have been utilized as candidate vaccine vectors. However, clinical application of the best-studied human adenovirus type-5 (AdHu5) is limited by the high prevalence of preexisting neutralizing antibodies resulting from natural infection. Therefore, rare adenovirus serotypes, such as human adenovirus type-26 (AdHu26) and chimpanzee adenovirus type-68 (AdC68), have been employed as substitutes for AdHu5. However, few studies have described the epidemiology of pre-existing immunity to these adenoviruses in China. Thus, 1,154 participants from six regions in China were examined to assess the presence of neutralizing antibodies against AdHu5, AdHu26, and AdC68. The seroprevalence rates of neutralizing antibodies were as follows: AdHu5, 73.1% (844/1,154) (95% confidence interval: 70.5-75.6%); AdHu26, 35.3% (407/1,154) (95% confidence interval: 32.6-38.1%); and AdC68, 12.7% (147/1,154) (95% confidence interval: 10.9-14.8%), respectively. The most frequently detected and highest titer antibodies were specific for AdHu5. The results indicate that AdHu26 and AdC68 serve as more suitable vaccine vectors than AdHu5. PMID:23588735

  3. HSF1 overexpression enhances oncolytic effect of replicative adenovirus

    Deng Youwen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background E1B55kD deleted oncolytic adenovirus was designed to achieve cancer-specific cytotoxicity, but showed limitations in clinical study. To find a method to increase its efficacy, we investigated the correlation between oncolytic effect of such oncolytic adenovirus Adel55 and intracellular heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1 activity. Methods In the present study, human breast cancer cell line Bcap37 was stably transfected with constitutively active HSF1 (cHSF1 or HSF1 specific siRNA (HSF1i to establish increased or decreased HSF1 expression levels. Cytotoxicity of Adel55 was analyzed in these cell lines in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, Adel55 incorporated with cHSF1 (Adel55-cHSF1 was used to treat various tumor xenografts. Results Adel55 could achieve more efficient oncolysis in cHSF1 transfected Bcap37 cells, both in vitro and in vivo. However, inhibition of HSF1 expression by HSF1i could rescue Bcap37 cell line from oncolysis by Adel55. A time course study of viral replication established a correlation between higher replication of Adel55 and cytolysis or tumor growth inhibition. Then, we constructed Adel55-cHSF1 for tumor gene therapy and demonstrated that it is more potent than Adel55 itself in oncolysis and replication in both Bcap37 and SW620 xenografts. Conclusions cHSF1 enhances the Adel55 cell-killing potential through increasing the viral replication and is a potential therapeutic implication to augment the potential of E1B55kD deleted oncolytic adenovirus by increasing its burst.

  4. Three-Dimensional Spheroid Cell Culture Model for Target Identification Utilizing High-Throughput RNAi Screens.

    Iles, LaKesla R; Bartholomeusz, Geoffrey A

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic limitations of 2D monolayer cell culture models have prompted the development of 3D cell culture model systems for in vitro studies. Multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) models closely simulate the pathophysiological milieu of solid tumors and are providing new insights into tumor biology as well as differentiation, tissue organization, and homeostasis. They are straightforward to apply in high-throughput screens and there is a great need for the development of reliable and robust 3D spheroid-based assays for high-throughput RNAi screening for target identification and cell signaling studies highlighting their potential in cancer research and treatment. In this chapter we describe a stringent standard operating procedure for the use of MCTS for high-throughput RNAi screens. PMID:27581289

  5. Synthesis and properties of vitamin E analog-conjugated neomycin for delivery of RNAi drugs to liver cells.

    Iwata, Rintaro; Nakayama, Futoshi; Hirochi, Sakie; Sato, Kazuki; Piao, Wenying; Nishina, Kazutaka; Yokota, Takanori; Wada, Takeshi

    2015-02-15

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising tool to regulate gene expression by external double stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) such as siRNAs. As an efficient method to deliver siRNAs to liver cells, we propose a novel strategy using vitamin E (VE)-conjugated neomycin derivatives. With the aim of delivering RNAi-based drugs to liver cells, several tripod-type and prodrug-type neomycin derivatives were synthesized, all of which were thermodynamically stabilized RNA duplexes. The prodrug-type derivative 7 and the tripod-type derivative 10 were delivered to liver cancer cells and successfully induced RNAi activity. These results indicated the potential use of natural aminoglycosides as carriers of RNAi drugs. PMID:25597008

  6. Canine adenovirus type 1 in a fennec fox (Vulpes zerda).

    Choi, Jeong-Won; Lee, Hyun-Kyoung; Kim, Seong-Hee; Kim, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Oem, Jae-Ku

    2014-12-01

    A 10-mo-old female fennec fox (Vulpes zerda) with drooling suddenly died and was examined postmortem. Histologic examination of different tissue samples was performed. Vacuolar degeneration and diffuse fatty change were observed in the liver. Several diagnostic methods were used to screen for canine parvovirus, canine distemper virus, canine influenza virus, canine coronavirus, canine parainfluenza virus, and canine adenovirus (CAdV). Only CAdV type 1 (CAdV-1) was detected in several organs (liver, lung, brain, kidney, spleen, and heart), and other viruses were not found. CAdV-1 was confirmed by virus isolation and nucleotide sequencing. PMID:25632689

  7. Genome-wide RNAi Screen Identifies Networks Involved in Intestinal Stem Cell Regulation in Drosophila

    Xiankun Zeng; Lili Han; Shree Ram Singh; Hanhan Liu; Ralph A. Neumüller; Dong Yan; Yanhui Hu; Ying Liu; Wei Liu; Xinhua Lin; Steven X. Hou

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is the most rapidly self-renewing tissue in adult animals and maintained by intestinal stem cells (ISCs) in both Drosophila and mammals. To comprehensively identify genes and pathways that regulate ISC fates, we performed a genome-wide transgenic RNAi screen in adult Drosophila intestine and identified 405 genes that regulate ISC maintenance and lineage-specific differentiation. By integrating these genes into publicly available interaction databases, we further deve...

  8. Genome-wide RNAi Screen Identifies Networks Involved in Intestinal Stem Cell Regulation in Drosophila

    Zeng, Xiankun; Han, Lili; Singh, Shree Ram; Liu, Hanhan; Neumüller, Ralph A.; Yan, Dong; Hu, Yanhui; Liu, Ying; Liu, Wei; Lin, Xinhua; Steven X Hou

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is the most rapidly self-renewing tissue in adult animals and maintained by intestinal stem cells (ISCs) in both Drosophila and mammals. To comprehensively identify genes and pathways that regulate ISC fates, we performed a genome-wide transgenic RNAi screen in adult Drosophila intestine and identified 405 genes that regulate ISC maintenance and lineage-specific differentiation. Through integrating these genes into publicly available interaction databases, we further...

  9. An Optimized microRNA Backbone for Effective Single-Copy RNAi

    Christof Fellmann; Thomas Hoffmann; Vaishali Sridhar; Barbara Hopfgartner; Matthias Muhar; Mareike Roth; Dan Yu Lai; Inês A.M. Barbosa; Jung Shick Kwon; Yuanzhe Guan; Nishi Sinha; Johannes Zuber

    2013-01-01

    Short hairpin RNA (shRNA) technology enables stable and regulated gene repression. For establishing experimentally versatile RNAi tools and minimizing toxicities, synthetic shRNAs can be embedded into endogenous microRNA contexts. However, due to our incomplete understanding of microRNA biogenesis, such “shRNAmirs” often fail to trigger potent knockdown, especially when expressed from a single genomic copy. Following recent advances in design of synthetic shRNAmir stems, here we take a system...

  10. Bidirectional transfer of RNAi between honey bee and Varroa destructor: Varroa gene silencing reduces Varroa population.

    Yael Garbian; Eyal Maori; Haim Kalev; Sharoni Shafir; Ilan Sela

    2012-01-01

    Author Summary Acquisition of RNAi components (dsRNA, siRNA) by ingestion and their spread within the recipient organism has been previously reported by us and others. Here we extend such observations, demonstrating cross-species horizontal transmission of dsRNA which, upon transmission from one organism to another still retains its biological activity. We show that dsRNA ingested by honey bees is further transmitted to the parasitic mite Varroa destructor that feeds on the honey bee's hemoly...

  11. Drosophila RNAi screen identifies host genes important for influenza virus replication

    Hao, Linhui; Sakurai, Akira; Watanabe, Tokiko; Sorensen, Ericka; Nidom, Chairul A.; Newton, Michael A.; Ahlquist, Paul; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2008-01-01

    All viruses rely on host cell proteins and their associated mechanisms to complete the viral life cycle. Identifying the host molecules that participate in each step of virus replication could provide valuable new targets for antiviral therapy, but this goal may take several decades to achieve with conventional forward genetic screening methods and mammalian cell cultures. Here we describe a novel genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen in Drosophila1 that can be used to identify host gene...

  12. RNAi mediated down regulation of myo-inositol-3-phosphate synthase to generate low phytate rice

    Ali, Nusrat; Paul, Soumitra; Gayen, Dipak; Sarkar, Sailendra Nath; Datta, Swapan K.; Datta, Karabi

    2013-01-01

    Background Phytic acid (InsP6) is considered as the major source of phosphorus and inositol phosphates in cereal grains. Reduction of phytic acid level in cereal grains is desirable in view of its antinutrient properties to maximize mineral bioavailability and minimize the load of phosphorus waste management. We report here RNAi mediated seed-specific silencing of myo-inositol-3-phosphate synthase (MIPS) gene catalyzing the first step of phytic acid biosynthesis in rice. Moreover, we also stu...

  13. Mosquito RNAi is the major innate immune pathway controlling arbovirus infection and transmission

    Carol D. Blair

    2011-01-01

    Mosquito-borne arboviruses cause serious diseases in humans that are increasingly becoming public health problems, yet arbovirus infections cause minimal pathology in the mosquito vector, allowing persistent infections and lifelong virus transmission. The principal mosquito innate immune response to virus infections, RNAi, differs substantially from the human immune response and this difference could be the basis for the disparate outcomes of infection in the two hosts. Understanding the mosq...

  14. The new therapy strategy of glioma--STAT3 RNAi combined with traditional radiotherapy

    STAT3 is an important inhibitor of apoptosis gene discovered in recent years, with a bifunction of inhibiting apoptosis and getting involved in cell cycle control. A lot of basic and clinical researches have found the relation between STAT3 gene and sensitivity to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Researches have been focused on knocking down its expression to inhibit the growth of tumor and improve the sensitivity to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, especialy by RNAi approach. (authors)

  15. RNAiFold2T: Constraint Programming design of thermo-IRES switches

    Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Dotu, Ivan; Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Lozano, Gloria; Ramajo, Jorge; Martinez-Salas, Encarnacion; Clote, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: RNA thermometers (RNATs) are cis-regulatory ele- ments that change secondary structure upon temperature shift. Often involved in the regulation of heat shock, cold shock and virulence genes, RNATs constitute an interesting potential resource in synthetic biology, where engineered RNATs could prove to be useful tools in biosensors and conditional gene regulation. Results: Solving the 2-temperature inverse folding problem is critical for RNAT engineering. Here we introduce RNAiFold2...

  16. Heterochromatin and RNAi Are Required to Establish CENP-A Chromatin at Centromeres

    Folco, Hernan Diego; Pidoux, Alison L.; Urano, Takeshi; Allshire, Robin C.

    2008-01-01

    Heterochromatin is defined by distinct posttranslational modifications on histones, such as methylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 (H3K9), which allows heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1)-related chromodomain proteins to bind. Heterochromatin is frequently found near CENP-A chromatin, which is the key determinant of kinetochore assembly. We have discovered that the RNA interference (RNAi)-directed heterochromatin flanking the central kinetochore domain at fission yeast centromeres is required to p...

  17. Synthetic heterochromatin bypasses RNAi and centromeric repeats to establish functional centromeres

    Kagansky, Alexander; Folco, Hernan Diego; Almeida, Ricardo; Pidoux, Alison L.; Boukaba, Abdelhalim; Simmer, Femke; Urano, Takeshi; Hamilton, Georgina L.; Allshire, Robin C.

    2009-01-01

    In the central domain of fission yeast centromeres, the kinetochore is assembled on CENP-A(Cnp1) nucleosomes. Normally, small interfering RNAs generated from flanking outer repeat transcripts direct histone H3 lysine 9 methyltransferase Clr4 to homologous loci to form heterochromatin. Outer repeats, RNA interference (RNAi), and centromeric heterochromatin are required to establish CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin. We demonstrated that tethering Clr4 via DNA-binding sites at euchromatic loci induces het...

  18. Genome-wide RNAi screen reveals a role for the ESCRT complex in rotavirus cell entry

    Silva-Ayala, Daniela; López, Tomás; Gutiérrez, Michelle; Perrimon, Norbert; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F.

    2013-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) is the major cause of childhood gastroenteritis worldwide. This study presents a functional genome-scale analysis of cellular proteins and pathways relevant for RV infection using RNAi. Among the 522 proteins selected in the screen for their ability to affect viral infectivity, an enriched group that participates in endocytic processes was identified. Within these proteins, subunits of the vacuolar ATPase, small GTPases, actinin 4, and, of special interest, components of the en...

  19. RNA Interference in the Age of CRISPR: Will CRISPR Interfere with RNAi?

    Unnikrishnan Unniyampurath; Rajendra Pilankatta; Krishnan, Manoj N.

    2016-01-01

    The recent emergence of multiple technologies for modifying gene structure has revolutionized mammalian biomedical research and enhanced the promises of gene therapy. Over the past decade, RNA interference (RNAi) based technologies widely dominated various research applications involving experimental modulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Recently, a new gene editing technology, Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) and the CRISPR-associa...

  20. Synthetic Pre-miRNA-Based shRNA as Potent RNAi Triggers

    Kazuya Terasawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is a powerful tool for studying gene function owing to the ease with which it can selectively silence genes of interest, and it has also attracted attention because of its potential for therapeutic applications. Chemically synthesized small interfering RNAs (siRNAs and DNA vector-based short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs are now widely used as RNAi triggers. In contrast to expressed shRNAs, the use of synthetic shRNAs is limited. Here we designed shRNAs modeled on a precursor microRNA (pre-miRNA and evaluated their biological activity. We demonstrated that chemically synthetic pre-miRNA-based shRNAs have more potent RNAi activity than their corresponding siRNAs and found that their antisense strands are more efficiently incorporated into the RNA-induced silencing complex. Although greater off-target effects and interferon responses were induced by shRNAs than by their corresponding siRNAs, these effects could be overcome by simply using a lower concentration or by optimizing and chemically modifying shRNAs similar to synthetic siRNAs. These are challenges for the future.

  1. Heterochromatin and RNAi are required to establish CENP-A chromatin at centromeres.

    Folco, Hernan Diego; Pidoux, Alison L; Urano, Takeshi; Allshire, Robin C

    2008-01-01

    Heterochromatin is defined by distinct posttranslational modifications on histones, such as methylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 (H3K9), which allows heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1)-related chromodomain proteins to bind. Heterochromatin is frequently found near CENP-A chromatin, which is the key determinant of kinetochore assembly. We have discovered that the RNA interference (RNAi)-directed heterochromatin flanking the central kinetochore domain at fission yeast centromeres is required to promote CENP-A(Cnp1) and kinetochore assembly over the central domain. The H3K9 methyltransferase Clr4 (Suv39); the ribonuclease Dicer, which cleaves heterochromatic double-stranded RNA to small interfering RNA (siRNA); Chp1, a component of the RNAi effector complex (RNA-induced initiation of transcriptional gene silencing; RITS); and Swi6 (HP1) are required to establish CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin on naïve templates. Once assembled, CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin is propagated by epigenetic means in the absence of heterochromatin. Thus, another, potentially conserved, role for centromeric RNAi-directed heterochromatin has been identified. PMID:18174443

  2. Silencing mutant SOD1 using RNAi protects against neurodegeneration and extends survival in an ALS model.

    Ralph, G Scott; Radcliffe, Pippa A; Day, Denise M; Carthy, Janine M; Leroux, Marie A; Lee, Debbie C P; Wong, Liang-Fong; Bilsland, Lynsey G; Greensmith, Linda; Kingsman, Susan M; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Mazarakis, Nicholas D; Azzouz, Mimoun

    2005-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease resulting in the selective death of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Some familial cases of ALS are caused by dominant mutations in the gene encoding superoxide dismutase (SOD1). The emergence of interfering RNA (RNAi) for specific gene silencing could be therapeutically beneficial for the treatment of such dominantly inherited diseases. We generated a lentiviral vector to mediate expression of RNAi molecules specifically targeting the human SOD1 gene (SOD1). Injection of this vector into various muscle groups of mice engineered to overexpress a mutated form of human SOD1 (SOD1(G93A)) resulted in an efficient and specific reduction of SOD1 expression and improved survival of vulnerable motor neurons in the brainstem and spinal cord. Furthermore, SOD1 silencing mediated an improved motor performance in these animals, resulting in a considerable delay in the onset of ALS symptoms by more than 100% and an extension in survival by nearly 80% of their normal life span. These data are the first to show a substantial extension of survival in an animal model of a fatal, dominantly inherited neurodegenerative condition using RNAi and provide the highest therapeutic efficacy observed in this field to date. PMID:15768029

  3. Adenovirus vaccine vectors expressing hepatitis B surface antigen: importance of regulatory elements in the adenovirus major late intron.

    Mason, B B; Davis, A R; Bhat, B M; Chengalvala, M; Lubeck, M D; Zandle, G; Kostek, B; Cholodofsky, S; Dheer, S; Molnar-Kimber, K

    1990-08-01

    Adenovirus types 4 and 7 are currently used as live oral vaccines for prevention of acute respiratory disease caused by these adenovirus serotypes. To investigate the concept of producing live recombinant vaccines using these serotypes, adenovirus types 4 (Ad4) and 7 (Ad7) were constructed that produce HBsAg upon infection of cell cultures. Ad4 recombinants were constructed that express HBsAg from a cassette inserted 135 bp from the right-hand terminus of the viral genome. The cassette contained the Ad4 major late promoter followed by leader 1 of the tripartite leader, the first intervening sequence between leaders 1 and 2, leaders 2 and 3, the HBsAg gene, and tandem polyadenylation signals from the Ad4 E3B and hexon genes. Using this same cassette, a series of Ad4 recombinants expressing HBsAg were constructed with deletions in the intervening sequence between leaders 1 and 2 to evaluate the contribution of the downstream control elements more precisely. Inclusion of regions located between +82 and +148 as well as +148 and +232 resulted in increases in expression levels of HBsAg in A549-infected cells by 22-fold and 44-fold, respectively, over the levels attained by an adenovirus recombinant retaining only sequences from +1 to +82, showing the importance of these elements in the activation of the major late promoter during the course of a natural Ad4 viral infection. Parallel increases were also observed in steady-state levels of cytoplasmic HBsAg-specific mRNA. When similar Ad7 recombinant viruses were constructed, these viruses also expressed 20-fold more HBsAg due to the presence of the intron. All Ad4 and Ad7 recombinants produced HBsAg particles containing gp27 and p24 which were secreted in the medium. When dogs were immunized intratracheally with one of these Ad7 recombinants, they seroconverted to both Ad7 and HBsAg to a high level. PMID:2371766

  4. IMPROVEMENT OF HUMAN ISLET FUNCTION BY ADENOVIRUS MEDIATED HO-1 GENE TRANSFER

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate in vitro heme oxygenase-1 gene (HO-1) delivery to human pancreatic islets by adenovirus vectors. Methods Recombinant adenovirus containing HO-1 or enhanced green fluorescent protein gene(EGFP) was generated by using the AdEasy System. The purified human pancreatic islets were infected with recombinant adenovirus vectors at various multiplicity of infection (MOI). Transduction was confirmed by fluorescence photographs and Western blot. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was detected by using Human insulin radioimmunoassay kits and was used to assess the function of human islets infected by recombinant adenovirus.Results Viral titers of Ad-hHO-1 and Ad-EGFP were 1.96×109 and 1.99×109 pfu/mL, respectively. Human pancreatic islets were efficiently infected by recombinant adenovirus vectors in vitro. Transfection of human islets at an MOI of 20 did not inhibit islet function. Recombinant adenovirus mediated HO-1gene transfer significantly improved the islet function of insulin release when simulated by high level glucose. Conclusion Recombinant adenovirus is efficient to deliver exogenous gene into human pancreatic islets in vitro. HO-1 gene transfection can improve human islet function.

  5. Combined use of chemotherapeutics and oncolytic adenovirus in treatment of AFP-expressing hepatocellular carcinoma

    Chen-Yu Mao; Han-Ju Hua; Ping Chen; De-Chao Yu; Jiang Cao; Li-Song Teng

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) which is always refractory to most chemotherapeutic agents may result in poor survival of patients with advanced HCC. Oncolytic adenovirus is a new form for cancer gene therapy via its ability to replicate and kill tumor cells in a tumor-speciifc manner. In order to eradicate tumors effectively, the combination of chemotherapeutic agents and oncolytic adenovirus has been considered. This study aimed to systematically analyze the possibility of synergistic cytotoxicity of oncolytic adenoviruses in combination with chemotherapeutic agents. METHODS: Several types of human HCC cell lines were used to determine the speciifcity and cytotoxicity of oncolytic adenovirus Ad5-HC and Ad5-AFP (IRES) by measuring cell viabilityin vitro and antitumor efifciency in vivo. The cytotoxicity of Ad5-HC and Ad5-AFP (IRES) combined with chemotherapeutic agents were also assessed by the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay. RESULTS: Both Ad5-HC and Ad5-AFP (IRES) were signiifcantly cytotoxic to HCC cells with great speciifcity in vitro andin vivo. The combination of oncolytic adenovirus with 5-FU, doxorubicin, and paclitaxel was synergistically effective for the killing of HCC cells. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that oncolytic adenovirus sensitize tumors to chemotherapy and the combination therapy of chemotherapeutic agents and oncolytic adenovirus has an enhanced antitumor effect on HCC cells.

  6. Non-Replicating Adenovirus-Vectored Anthrax Vaccine

    As bioterrorism is emerging as a national threat, it is urgent to develop a new generation of anthrax vaccines that can be rapidly produced and mass administered in an emergency setting. We have demonstrated that protective immunity against anthrax spores could be elicited in mice by intranasal administration of a non-replicating human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)-derived vector encoding Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) in a single-dose regimen. The potency of an Ad5 vector encoding PA was remarkably enhanced by codon optimization of the PA gene to match the tRNA pool found in human cells. This nasal vaccine can be mass-administered by non-medical personnel during a bioterrorist attack. In addition, replication-competent adenovirus (RCA)-free Ad5-vectored anthrax vaccines can be mass produced in PER.C6 cells in serum-free wave bioreactors and purified by column chromatography to meet a surge in demand. The non-replicating nature of this new generation of anthrax vaccine ensures an excellent safety profile for vaccines and the environment.(author)

  7. Mucosal vaccination by adenoviruses displaying reovirus sigma 1

    We developed adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying the sigma 1 protein from reovirus as mucosal vaccines. Ad5-sigma retargets to JAM-1 and sialic acid, but has 40-fold reduced gene delivery when compared to Ad5. While weaker at transduction, Ad5-sigma generates stronger T cell responses than Ad5 when used for mucosal immunization. In this work, new Ad5-fiber-sigma vectors were generated by varying the number of fiber β-spiral shaft repeats (R) between the fiber tail and sigma. Increasing chimera length led to decreasing insertion of these proteinsAd5 virions. Ad-R3 and R14 vectors effectively targeted JAM-1 in vitro while R20 did not. When wereused to immunize mice by the intranasal route, Ad5-R3-sigma produced higher serum and vaginal antibody responses than Ad5. These data suggest optimized Ad-sigma vectors may be useful vectors for mucosal vaccination. - Highlights: • Constructed adenoviruses (Ads) displaying different reovirus sigma 1 fusion proteins. • Progressively longer chimeras were more poorly encapsidated onto Ad virions. • Ad5-R3-sigma mediated better systemic and mucosal immune responses than Ad5

  8. A novel adenovirus of Western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla

    Ludwig Carsten

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Adenoviruses (AdV broadly infect vertebrate hosts including a variety of primates. We identified a novel AdV in the feces of captive gorillas by isolation in cell culture, electron microscopy and PCR. From the supernatants of infected cultures we amplified DNA polymerase (DPOL, preterminal protein (pTP and hexon gene sequences with generic pan primate AdV PCR assays. The sequences in-between were amplified by long-distance PCRs of 2 - 10 kb length, resulting in a final sequence of 15.6 kb. Phylogenetic analysis placed the novel gorilla AdV into a cluster of primate AdVs belonging to the species Human adenovirus B (HAdV-B. Depending on the analyzed gene, its position within the cluster was variable. To further elucidate its origin, feces samples of wild gorillas were analyzed. AdV hexon sequences were detected which are indicative for three distinct and novel gorilla HAdV-B viruses, among them a virus nearly identical to the novel AdV isolated from captive gorillas. This shows that the discovered virus is a member of a group of HAdV-B viruses that naturally infect gorillas. The mixed phylogenetic clusters of gorilla, chimpanzee, bonobo and human AdVs within the HAdV-B species indicate that host switches may have been a component of the evolution of human and non-human primate HAdV-B viruses.

  9. Mucosal vaccination by adenoviruses displaying reovirus sigma 1

    Weaver, Eric A. [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Translational Immunovirology and Biodefense Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States); Camacho, Zenaido T. [Department of Cell Biology, Department of Natural Sciences, Western New Mexico University, Silver City, NM 88062 (United States); Hillestad, Matthew L. [Nephrology Training Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States); Crosby, Catherine M.; Turner, Mallory A.; Guenzel, Adam J.; Fadel, Hind J. [Virology and Gene Therapy Graduate Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States); Mercier, George T. [Department of Physics, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77004 (United States); Barry, Michael A., E-mail: mab@mayo.edu [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Translational Immunovirology and Biodefense Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States); Department of Immunology and Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    We developed adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying the sigma 1 protein from reovirus as mucosal vaccines. Ad5-sigma retargets to JAM-1 and sialic acid, but has 40-fold reduced gene delivery when compared to Ad5. While weaker at transduction, Ad5-sigma generates stronger T cell responses than Ad5 when used for mucosal immunization. In this work, new Ad5-fiber-sigma vectors were generated by varying the number of fiber β-spiral shaft repeats (R) between the fiber tail and sigma. Increasing chimera length led to decreasing insertion of these proteinsAd5 virions. Ad-R3 and R14 vectors effectively targeted JAM-1 in vitro while R20 did not. When wereused to immunize mice by the intranasal route, Ad5-R3-sigma produced higher serum and vaginal antibody responses than Ad5. These data suggest optimized Ad-sigma vectors may be useful vectors for mucosal vaccination. - Highlights: • Constructed adenoviruses (Ads) displaying different reovirus sigma 1 fusion proteins. • Progressively longer chimeras were more poorly encapsidated onto Ad virions. • Ad5-R3-sigma mediated better systemic and mucosal immune responses than Ad5.

  10. Recombinant adenovirus-mediated gene transfer suppresses experimental arthritis

    E. Quattrocchi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Collagen Induced Arthritis (CIA is a widely studied animal model to develop and test novel therapeutic approaches for treating Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA in humans. Soluble Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA4-Ig, which binds B7 molecule on antigen presenting cells and blocks CD28 mediated T-lymphocyte activation, has been shown to ameliorate experimental autoimmune diseases such as lupus, diabetes and CIA. Objective of our research was to investigate in vivo the effectiveness of blocking the B7/CD28 T-lymphocyte co-stimulatory pathway, utilizing a gene transfer technology, as a therapeutic strategy against CIA. Replication-deficient adenoviruses encoding a chimeric CTLA4-Ig fusion protein, or β-galactosidase as control, have been injected intravenously once at arthritis onset. Disease activity has been monitored by the assessment of clinical score, paw thickness and type II collagen (CII specific cellular and humoral immune responses for 21 days. The adenovirally delivered CTLA4-Ig fusion protein at a dose of 2×108 pfu suppressed established CIA, whereas the control β-galactosidase did not significantly affect the disease course. CII-specific lymphocyte proliferation, IFNg production and anti-CII antibodies were significantly reduced by CTLA4-Ig treatment. Our results demonstrate that blockade of the B7/CD28 co-stimulatory pathway by adenovirus-mediated CTLA4-Ig gene transfer is effective in treating established CIA suggesting its potential in treating RA.