WorldWideScience

Sample records for adenosine triphosphatase

  1. Functional proteomics of adenosine triphosphatase system in the rat striatum during aging

    Roberto Federico Villa; Federica Ferrari; Antonella Gorini

    2012-01-01

    The maximum rates of adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) systems related to energy consumption were systematically evaluated in synaptic plasma membranes isolated from the striata of male Wistar rats aged 2, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months, because of their key role in presynaptic nerve ending homeostasis. The following enzyme activities were evaluated: sodium-potassium-magnesium adenosine triphosphatase (Na+, K+, Mg2+-ATPase); ouabain-insensitive magnesium adenosine triphosphatase (Mg2+-ATPase); sodium-potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na+, K+-ATPase); direct magnesium adenosine triphosphatase (Mg2+-ATPase); calcium-magnesium adenosine triphosphatase (Ca2+, Mg2+-ATPase); and acetylcholinesterase. The results showed that Na+, K+-ATPase decreased at 18 and 24 months, Ca2+, Mg2+-ATPase and acetylcholinesterase decreased from 6 months, while Mg2+-ATPase was unmodified. Therefore, ATPases vary independently during aging, suggesting that the ATPase enzyme systems are of neuropathological and pharmacological importance. This could be considered as an experimental model to study regeneration processes, because of the age-dependent modifications of specific synaptic plasma membranes. ATPases cause selective changes in some cerebral functions, especially bioenergetic systems. This could be of physiopathological significance, particularly in many central nervous system diseases, where, during regenerative processes, energy availability is essential.

  2. Adenosine triphosphatase, acetylcholinesterase and sulfhydryl groups of rat skin at local x-ray irradiation

    The activity of acetylcholinesterase (ACE), adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase), and sulfhydryl groups(SH-groups) in different structural elements of skin in the course of radiation epidermitis was studied. The posterior extremities of Wistar rats were exposed to single x-ray irradiation at a dose of 30 Gy

  3. Hydrogen potassium adenosine triphosphatase activity inhibition and downregulation of its expression by bioactive fraction DLBS2411 from Cinnamomum burmannii in gastric parietal cells

    Tjandrawinata RR; Nailufar F; Arifin PF

    2013-01-01

    Raymond R Tjandrawinata1,2, Florensia Nailufar2, Poppy F Arifin11Section of Molecular Pharmacology, 2Section of Animal Pharmacology, Dexa Medica, Cikarang, IndonesiaAbstract: This study assessed the gastric acid antisecretory effect of DLBS2411 fractionated from Cinnamomum burmannii. Hydrogen potassium adenosine triphosphatase (H+/K+ ATPase) activity and its gene expression were observed, and the antioxidant activity of DLBS2411 was also investigated. Treatment of DLBS2411 decreased the level...

  4. Possible mechanism for the inhibition of gastric (H+ + K+)-adenosine triphosphatase by the proton pump inhibitor AG-1749

    Mechanisms related to the inhibition of (H+ + K+)-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) by 2-[[[3-methyl-4-(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)-2-pyridyl]methyl] sulfinyl]-1H-benzimidazole (AG-1749) were studied using canine gastric microsomes. AG-1749 (1-100 microM) inhibited the K+-stimulated ATP hydrolysis and vesicular accumulation of H+. AG-1749 bound to the microsomes concentration-dependently and decreased the number of free SH groups; the binding correlating with the enzyme inhibition. Both the binding and inhibition were antagonized by dithiothreitol. N-ethylmaleimide inhibited the (H+ + K+)-ATPase and decreased the binding of [14C]AG-1749 to the microsomes. The inhibitory effect of AG-1749 gradually increased with incubation time, and was enhanced by lowering the pH. AG-2000 and AG-1812, acid-induced rearrangement products of AG-1749, inhibited (H+ + K+)-ATPase potently, rapidly and independently of pH; the inhibition was antagonized by dithiothreitol. We propose that AG-1749 is transformed into its active forms within the acidic compartment of the parietal cells and that the active compounds inhibit (H+ + K+)-ATPase activity by reacting with the SH groups of the enzyme

  5. Ultracytochemical localization of H+—adenosine triphosphatase activity in autophagic vacuoles induced by vinblastine in rat liver

    LUOSHENQIU; MASAHIROSAKAI; 等

    1990-01-01

    H-adenosine triphosphatase (H+-ATPase) activity was demonstrated cytochemically in autophagic vacuoles(AVs) of rat hepatocytes using a modification of the method for the demonstration of neutral p-nitrophenyl phosphatase(p-NPPase) activity[1].When an inhibitor of H+-ATPase,N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) or 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'disulfonic acid,disodium salt (DIDS) was included in the incubation medium the enyzme activity was abolished indicating that p-NPPase demonstrated in this study represents H+-ATPase.Autophagy was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of vinblastine sulfate(VBL).The number of AVs increased remarkably in hepatocytes from 40 min after VBL treatment.H+-ATPase activity was observed mainly on the membranes of lysosomes and AVs.However,early forms of AVs containing only incompletely digested material showed no H+-ATPase activity.Most AVs revealing a positive reaction seemed to be in advanced stages of development.Acid phosphatase acticity was demonstrable in mature but not in early forms of AVs.The present investigation showed that membranes of advanced stage AVs possess an H+-ATPase which may be derived from lysosomal membranes.

  6. Insecticidal properties of essential oils against Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) and their inhibitory effects on acetylcholinesterase and adenosine triphosphatases.

    Abou-Taleb, Hamdy K; Mohamed, Magdy I E; Shawir, Mohamed S; Abdelgaleil, Samir A M

    2016-01-01

    Essential oils from 20 Egyptian plants were obtained by using hydrodistillation. The chemical composition of the isolated oils was identified by gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer. Fumigant and contact toxicities of the essential oils were evaluated against the adults of Tribolium castaneum. In fumigation assays, the oil of Origanum vulgare (LC50 = 9.97 mg/L air) displayed the highest toxicity towards the adults of T. castaneum. In contact assays, the oils of Artemisia monosperma (LC50 = 0.07 mg/cm(2)) and O. vulgare (LC50 = 0.07 mg/cm(2)) were the most potent toxicants against the adults of T. castaneum. Biochemical studies showed that the tested oils caused pronounced inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and adenosine triphosphatases (ATPases) isolated from the larvae of T. castaneum. The oil Cupressus macrocarpa (IC50 = 12.3 mg/L) was the most potent inhibitor of AChE, while the oil of Calistemon viminals (IC50 = 4.4 mg/L) was the most potent inhibitor of ATPases. PMID:25978134

  7. Influence of the α-, β- and γ-subunits of the energy-transducing adenosine triphosphatase from Micrococcus lysodeikticus in the immunochemical properties of the protein and in their reconstitution studied by a radioimmunoassay method

    A sensitive radioimmunoassay was developed for the energy-transducing adenosine triphosphatase (F1-ATPase, EC 3.6.1.3) of Micrococcus lysodeikticus and the assay was extended to the α-, β- and γ-subunits of the enzyme. These subunits were isolated and cross-reactions studied. (author)

  8. Membrane bound pyrophosphatase and P-type adenosine triphosphatase of Leishmania donovani as possible chemotherapeutic targets: similarities and differences in inhibitor sensitivities.

    Sen, S S; Bhuyan, N R; Lakshman, K; Roy, A K; Chakraborty, B; Bera, T

    2009-12-01

    The activities of inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPase) and adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) were studied in the plasma membrane of Leishmania donovani promastigotes and amastigotes. It was shown that the specific activity of PPase was greater than that of ATPase in the promastigote plasma membrane. We characterized H+-PPase present in the plasma membrane of L. donovani and investigated its possible role in the survival of promastigote and amastigote. PPase activity was stimulated by K+ and sodium orthovanadate and inhibited by pyrophosphate analogs (imidodiphosphate and alendronate), KF, N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), thiol reagents (p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonate (PCMBS), N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), and phenylarsine oxide (PAO)), the ABC superfamily transport modulator verapamil, and also by the F(1)F(o)-ATPase inhibitor quercetin. ATPase activity was stimulated by K+ and verapamil, inhibited by DCCD, PCMBS, NEM, sodium azide, sodium orthovanadate, and quercetin, and was unaffected by PAO. We conclude that there are significant differences within promastigote, amastigote, and mammalian host in cytosolic pH homeostasis to merit the inclusion of PPase transporter as a putative target for rational drug design. PMID:19961421

  9. Effect of an antioxidant combination on the distribution of acetylcholinesterase and adenosine triphosphatase activities in the cerebellum of in lindane-intoxicated mice

    Devendra Kumar Bhatt

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present investigation ascertains a protective potential of a combination of antioxidants against lindane-induced toxicity in cerebellum of mice. Methods: For the study, animals are divided into four groups. First group is control and it is given only vehicle. Second group is treated with lindane and analysed if there are any lesions in the brain. Third group is purely antioxidants treated group; four antioxidants, i.e. resveratrol, ascorbic acid, alpha lipoic acid and vitamin E, are subcutaneously administered in a suitable combination to the animals of this group. Fourth group is treated with both lindane and antioxidants. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE and adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase activities are used as histochemical markers for manifestation of lindane-induced acute toxicity. Biochemical levels of glutathione (GSH and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS were also evaluated for different groups to confirm the toxicity of lindane in cerebellum. Results: Treatment with lindane caused decrease in AChE and ATPase activities, and GSH levels in cerebellum whereas a significant increase was recorded in TBARS. Antioxidants treatment increased the enzymatic activities. A significant rise in GSH level was recorded in the antioxidant treatment group as compared to group I and group II whereas TBARS levels were significantly reduced. GSH and TBARS levels altered significantly in group IV as compared to control group and lindane-treated group. In group III, AChE and ATPase activities increased in layers and nuclei of cerebellum as compared to control group. Conclusions: Since the use of antioxidants prevents the inhibition of AChE and ATPase, functions which are altered due to lindane-toxicity may be protected. [J Exp Integr Med 2013; 3(2.000: 103-112

  10. Oxidative stress parameters and erythrocyte membrane adenosine triphosphatase activities in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats administered aqueous preparation of Kalanchoe Pinnata leaves

    Nikhil Menon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disease that according to the World Health Organization affects more than 382 million people. The rise in diabetes mellitus coupled with the lack of an effective treatment has led many to investigate medicinal plants to identify a viable alternative. Objective: To evaluate red blood cell (RBC membrane adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase activities and antioxidant levels in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats administered aqueous preparation of Kalanchoe pinnata leaves. Materials and Methods: Diabetes mellitus was induced in rats by a single administration of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg. Diabetic rats were then treated with aqueous K. pinnata preparation (three mature leaves ~ 9.96 g/70 kg body weight or about 0.14 g/kg body weight/day for 30 days. Serum glucose, RBC membrane ATPase activities, and antioxidant levels were determined. Results: We noted weight loss and reduced food consumption in the treated diabetic group. Serum glucose levels were reduced in the treated diabetic group compared to the other groups. Superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione levels were not significantly elevated in the treated group compared to the diabetic group. However, serum catalase activity was significantly (P < 0.05 increased in the treated diabetic group compared to the other groups. Serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances were not significantly altered among the groups. There was a significant (P < 0.05 increase in Mg2+ ATPase activity and a nonsignificant increase in Na+/K+ ATPase activity in the RBC membrane of the treated diabetic group compared to the diabetic group. Conclusion: The consumption of aqueous preparation of K. pinnata may accrue benefits in the management of diabetes by lowering oxidative stress often associated with the disease and improving the availability of cellular magnesium through an increase in the magnesium ATPase pump in the RBC membrane for increased cellular metabolism

  11. Effects of basic fibroblast growth factor on adenosine triphosphatase activity and antioxidation of alcoholism rat models%碱性成纤维细胞生长因子对乙醇中毒大鼠ATP酶及抗氧化作用的影响

    黄俊杰; 王彩冰; 何显教; 黄丽娟; 黄彦峰; 梁祚仁; 阳秀英; 黎昀; 赵善民

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Basic fibroblast growth factor(bFGF) has multiple biological activities, and has positive effect on the recovery oftissue trauma. But the effect of bFGF against alcoholism has not been reported.OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of bFGF on the activities of adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) and superoxide dismutase(SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA)in cerebral cortex and liver tissue of alcoholism rat model.METHODS: The alcoholism rat models were established by perfusing stomach with alcohol. Thirty Wistar rats were randomlydivided into three groups. Normal saline group and bFGF treatment group were injected with normal saline and bFGF,respectively, at 60 days after modeling; Alcoholism model group was treated with no intervention. Another 10 rats without alcoholserved as control group.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The activities of ATPase and SOD in the cerebral cortex and livertissue of alcoholism modelgroup were significantly decreased than those in the control group, but the content of M DA was significantly higher than that inthe control group (P<0.05). After bFGF intervention, the activities of ATPase and SOD in the cerebral cortex and livertissuewere significantly increased compared with the normal saline group and alcoholism model group, but the content of MDA wassignificantly decreased (P<0.05-0.01). bFGF can increase the activities of ATPase and the antioxidative ability of brain tissue inalcoholism model rats. The bFGF can protect the brain and liver of rats against alcoholism.%背景:碱性成纤维细胞生长因子具有多种生物活性,对组织创伤具有修复作用,但其对乙醇中毒的保护作用至今未见报道.目的:观察碱性成纤维细胞生长因子对乙醇中毒大鼠脑和肝组织中ATP 酶、超氧化物歧化酶活力和丙二醛水平的影响.方法:选择成年Wistar 雄性大鼠,采用白酒灌胃建立乙醇中毒模型,30 只造模成功的大鼠分为3 组,生理盐水组和碱性成纤维细胞生长

  12. Alteration in the expression of Na+-K+-adenosine triphosphatase in denervated rat skeletal muscle%去除神经支配大鼠骨骼肌中钠钾三磷酸腺苷酶表达的变化

    赵海燕; Hundal HS

    2006-01-01

    苷酶亚基的表达机制被破坏.%BACKGROUND: Insulin-induced alteration in ion transport has impact on metabolic regulation and reduced Na+-K+-adenosine triphosphatase(ATPase) activity in insulin resistauce results in hypertension and decrease in glycolysis, glucose oxidation and production of ATP.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the regulation of expression of Na+-K+-AT-Pase in insulin resistance model system.DESIGN: Controlled experiment.SETTING: Division of Molecular Physiology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, UK.MATERIALS: The study was performed from October 1999 to February2000,in which, 15 adult male Sprague Dawley rats (200-250 g) of clean grade were employed. The experiment was performed with 5 rats each time and repeated for 3 times.METHODS:Unilateral hindlimbs innervation of rats were severed. Four days later, skeletal muscle was dissected from denervated and contralateral control hindlimbs. Grude muscle membranes were prepared from red muscle (soleus and red gastrocnemius) and white gastrocnemius. Western Blotting and Northern Blotting analysis were employed to examine protein and mRNA expression of Na+-K+-ATPase subunit isoforms respectively.The intensity of protein and mRNA signals was quantitated with a BioRad GS-670 imaging densitometer.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Levels of protein and mRNA of Na+-K+-ATPase subunit isoforms in control and denervated hindlimb skeletal muscles.RESULTS: Fifteen rats all entered the stage of results analysis. Compared with control, in denervated hindlimb ① the protein levels of α2-and β1-subunit in red muscle were reduced markedly by 46% and 77% respectively. The abundance of α1 protein was increased in red and white muscle by 20% and 15% respectively. There was no significant change in protein expression of β2-subunit in red and white gastrocnemius (WG). ② The mRNA level of α2-subunit decreased by 29% and 39% in red gastrocnemius (RG) and soleus, respectively, and that of β1-subunit decreased 80%and

  13. Mapping the active site of vaccinia virus RNA triphosphatase

    The RNA triphosphatase component of vaccinia virus mRNA capping enzyme (the product of the viral D1 gene) belongs to a family of metal-dependent phosphohydrolases that includes the RNA triphosphatases of fungi, protozoa, Chlorella virus, and baculoviruses. The family is defined by two glutamate-containing motifs (A and C) that form the metal-binding site. Most of the family members resemble the fungal and Chlorella virus enzymes, which have a complex active site located within the hydrophilic interior of a topologically closed eight-stranded β barrel (the so-called ''triphosphate tunnel''). Here we queried whether vaccinia virus capping enzyme is a member of the tunnel subfamily, via mutational mapping of amino acids required for vaccinia triphosphatase activity. We identified four new essential side chains in vaccinia D1 via alanine scanning and illuminated structure-activity relationships by conservative substitutions. Our results, together with previous mutational data, highlight a constellation of six acidic and three basic amino acids that likely compose the vaccinia triphosphatase active site (Glu37, Glu39, Arg77, Lys107, Glu126, Asp159, Lys161, Glu192, and Glu194). These nine essential residues are conserved in all vertebrate and invertebrate poxvirus RNA capping enzymes. We discerned no pattern of clustering of the catalytic residues of the poxvirus triphosphatase that would suggest structural similarity to the tunnel proteins (exclusive of motifs A and C). We infer that the poxvirus triphosphatases are a distinct lineage within the metal-dependent RNA triphosphatase family. Their unique active site, which is completely different from that of the host cell's capping enzyme, recommends the poxvirus RNA triphosphatase as a molecular target for antipoxviral drug discovery

  14. Effect of Ethanol on Branchial Adenosine Triphosphatases in Oreochromis mossambicus (Peters)

    Bhanu, Smitha V.; Philip, Babu

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the toxicity of ethanol in an aquatic system by means of bioassays with Oreochromis mossambicus (Peters) as a test organism. The study revealed changes in the gill ATPase activities. The results obtained indicated that ethanol brought about a decrease in the body weight, followed by significant inhibition on total ATPase, Na+/K+ ATPase, Ca2+ ATPase and Mg2+ ATPase activities. The studies also indicated that these can be employed as suitable biomarkers in ...

  15. Effect of nitration and D2O on the kinetics of beef heart mitochondrial adenosine triphosphatase

    The role of tyrosine in the catalytic mechanism of nucleoside triphosphate hydrolysis by beef heart mitochondrial ATPase is explored. Compared are the rates of the ATPase reaction by both nitrated and native F1 at both pH 8 and pH 6. The pH-activity profile of nitrated F1 is compared to the pH-activity profile of the unmodified enzyme. These data indicate that the phenolic group of an active-site tyrosine must be protonated during the hydrolysis reaction. Deuterium oxide is used in the reaction buffer to explore the role of protons in the ATPase reaction. Kinetic constants of the nucleoside triphosphates are obtained at various levels of D20 using both the nitrated and native forms of F1. Several nucleoside diphosphates are used as inhibitors of F1-catalyzed ITP hydrolysis. Dissociation constants of these inhibitors are obtained at both low and high concentrations of D20 for both the nitrated and native F1. We explore the possibility that a tyrosine and an arginine lie in close proximity in the F1 active site by studying the effects of sequential modification of arginine and tyrosine. These results are interpreted in terms of possible ATP hydrolysis mechanisms. Two possible roles for tyrosine in the hydrolysis of nucleoside triphosphates by F1 are suggested

  16. Adenosine in exercise adaptation.

    Simpson, R E; Phillis, J. W.

    1992-01-01

    By influencing the regulation of the mechanisms of angiogenesis, erythropoietin production, blood flow, myocardial glucose uptake, glycogenolysis, systolic blood pressure, respiration, plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine levels, adenosine may exert a significant effect on the body's adaptation response to exercise. However, adenosine's possible influence over the vasodilatory response to exercise in skeletal muscle is controversial and more research is required to resolve this issue. Variou...

  17. Adenosine Receptors and Asthma

    Wilson, Constance N; Nadeem, Ahmed; Spina, Domenico; Brown, Rachel; Page, Clive P.; Jamal Mustafa, S.

    2009-01-01

    The pathophysiological processes underlying respiratory diseases like asthma are complex, resulting in an overwhelming choice of potential targets for the novel treatment of this disease. Despite this complexity, asthmatic subjects are uniquely sensitive to a range of substances like adenosine, thought to act indirectly to evoke changes in respiratory mechanics and in the underlying pathology, and thereby to offer novel insights into the pathophysiology of this disease. Adenosine is of partic...

  18. Effect of nitration and D/sub 2/O on the kinetics of beef heart mitochondrial adenosine triphosphatase

    Dorgan, L.J.; Schuster, S.M.

    1981-04-25

    The role of tyrosine in the catalytic mechanism of nucleoside triphosphate hydrolysis by beef heart mitochondrial ATPase is explored. Compared are the rates of the ATPase reaction by both nitrated and native F1 at both pH 8 and pH 6. The pH-activity profile of nitrated F1 is compared to the pH-activity profile of the unmodified enzyme. These data indicate that the phenolic group of an active-site tyrosine must be protonated during the hydrolysis reaction. Deuterium oxide is used in the reaction buffer to explore the role of protons in the ATPase reaction. Kinetic constants of the nucleoside triphosphates are obtained at various levels of D20 using both the nitrated and native forms of F1. Several nucleoside diphosphates are used as inhibitors of F1-catalyzed ITP hydrolysis. Dissociation constants of these inhibitors are obtained at both low and high concentrations of D20 for both the nitrated and native F1. We explore the possibility that a tyrosine and an arginine lie in close proximity in the F1 active site by studying the effects of sequential modification of arginine and tyrosine. These results are interpreted in terms of possible ATP hydrolysis mechanisms. Two possible roles for tyrosine in the hydrolysis of nucleoside triphosphates by F1 are suggested.

  19. Retinoic acid inhibits calmodulin binding to human erythrocyte membranes and reduces membrane Ca2(+)-adenosine triphosphatase activity.

    Davis, F B; Smith, T. J.; Deziel, M R; Davis, P J; Blas, S D

    1990-01-01

    Ca2(+)-ATPase activity in human red cell membranes is dependent on the presence of calmodulin. All trans-retinoic acid inhibited human red cell membrane Ca2(+)-ATPase activity in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner (10(-8) to 10(-4) M). In contrast, retinol, retinal, 13-cis-retinoic acid and the benzene ring analogue of retinoic acid did not alter enzyme activity. Purified calmodulin (up to 500 ng/ml, 3 X 10(-8) M) added to red cell membranes, in the presence of inhibitory concentration...

  20. Pre-steady-state studies of the adenosine triphosphatase activity of coupled submitochondrial particles. Regulation by ADP.

    Martins, O B; Tuena de Gómez-Puyou, M; Gómez-Puyou, A

    1988-09-20

    ATPase activities were measured in 10 mM MgCl2, 5 mM ATP, 1 mM ADP, and 1 microM FCCP with submitochondrial particles from bovine heart that had been stimulated by delta mu H+-forming substrates and with particles whose natural inhibitor protein was partially removed by heating. The activities were not linear with time. With both particles, the rate of ATP hydrolysis in the 7-fold greater than that in the steady state. Pre-steady-state and steady-state kinetic studies showed that the decrease of ATPase activity was due to the binding of ADP in a high-affinity site of the enzyme (K0.5 of 10 microM). Inhibition of ATP hydrolysis was accompanied by the binding of approximately 1 mol of ADP/mol of particulate F1; 10 microM ADP gave half-maximal binding. ADP could be replaced by IDP, but with an affinity 50-fold lower (K0.5 of 0.5 mM). Maximal inhibition by ADP and IDP was achieved in less than 5 s. Inhibition was enhanced by uncouplers. Even in the presence of pyruvate kinase and phosphoenolpyruvate, the rates of hydrolysis were about 2.5-fold higher in the first seconds of reaction than in the steady state. This decrease of ATPase activity also correlated with the binding of nearly 1 mol of ADP/mol of F1. This inhibitory ADP remained bound to the enzyme after several thousand turnovers. Apparently, it is possible to observe maximal rates of hydrolysis only in the first few catalytic cycles of the enzyme. PMID:2974725

  1. Magnetic resonance and kinetic studies of the mechanism of membrane-bound sodium and potassium ion- activated adenosine triphosphatase.

    Grisham, C M; Mildvan, A S

    1975-01-01

    EPR and water proton relaxation rate (1/T1) studies of partially (40%) and "fully" (90%) purified preparations of membrane-bound (Na+ + K+) activated ATPase from sheep kidney indicate one tight binding site for Mn2+ per enzyme dimer, with a dissociation constant (KD = 0.88 muM) in agreement with the kinetically determined activator constant, identifying this Mn2+-binding site as the active site of the ATPase. Competition studies indicate that Mg2+ binds at this site with a dissociation constant of 1 mM in agreement with its activator constant. Inorganic phosphate and methylphosphonate bind to the enzyme-Mn2+ complex with similar high affinities and decrease 1/T1 of water protons due to a decrease from four to three in the number of rapidly exchanging water protons in the coordination sphere of enzyme-bound Mn2+. The relative effectiveness of Na+ and K+ in facilitating ternary complex formation with HPO2-4 and CH3PO2-3 as a function of pH indicates that Na+ induces the phosphate monoanion to interact with enzyme-bound Mn2+. Thus protonation of an enzyme-bound phosphoryl group would convert a K+-binding site to a Na+-binding site. Dissociation constants for K+ and Na+, estimated from NMR titrations, agreed with kinetically determined activator constants of these ions consistent with binding to the active site. Parallel 32Pi-binding studies show negligible formation (less than 7%) of a covalent E-P complex under these conditions, indicating that the NMR method has detected an additional noncovalent intermediate in ion transport. Ouabain, which increases the extent of phosphorylation of the enzyme to 24% at pH 7.8 and to 106% at pH 6.1, produced further decreases in 1/T1 of water protons. Preliminary 31P- relaxation studies of CH3PO2-3 in the presence of ATPase and Mn2+ yield an Mn to P distance (6.9 +/- 0.5 A) suggesting a second sphere enzyme-Mn-ligand-CH3PO2-3 complex. Previous kinetic studies have shown that T1+ substitutes for K+ in the activation of the enzyme but competes with Na+ at higher levels. From the paramagnetic effect of Mn2+ at the active site on the enzyme on I/T1 of 205T1 bound at the Na+ site, a Mn2+ to T1+ distance of 4.0 +/- 0.1 A is calculated, suggesting the sharing of a common ligand atomy by Mn2+ and T1+ on the ATPase. Addition of Pi increases this distance to 5.4 A consistent with the insertion of P between Mn2+ and T1+. These results are consistent with a mechanism for the (Na+ + K+)-ATPase and for ion transport in which the ionization state of Pi at a single enzyme active site controls the binding and transport of Na+ and K+, and indicate that the transport site for monovalent cations is very near the catalytic site of the ATPase. Our mechanism also accounts for the order of magnitude weaker binding of Na+ compared to K+. PMID:171521

  2. Adenosine and sleep

    Behavioral and biochemical approaches have been used to determine the relative contribution of endogenous adenosine and adenosine receptors to the sleep-wake cycle in the rat. Adenosine concentrations in specific areas of the rat brain were not affected by 24 hours of total sleep deprivation, or by 24 or 48 hours of REM sleep deprivation. In order to assess the effect of REM sleep deprivation on adenosine A1 receptors, 3H-L-PIA binding was measured. The Bmax values for 3H-L-PIA binding to membrane preparations of the cortices and corpus striata from 48 hour REM sleep-deprived animals were increased 14.8% and 23%, respectively. These increases were not maintained following the cessation of sleep deprivation and recovered within 2 hours. The results of a 96 hour REM deprivation experiment were similar to those of the 48 hour REM sleep deprivation experiment. However, these increases were not evident in similar structures taken from stress control animals, and conclusively demonstrated that the changes in 3H-L-PIA binding resulted from REM sleep deprivation and not from stress

  3. Adenosine and sleep

    Yanik, G.M. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Behavioral and biochemical approaches have been used to determine the relative contribution of endogenous adenosine and adenosine receptors to the sleep-wake cycle in the rat. Adenosine concentrations in specific areas of the rat brain were not affected by 24 hours of total sleep deprivation, or by 24 or 48 hours of REM sleep deprivation. In order to assess the effect of REM sleep deprivation on adenosine A/sub 1/ receptors, /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding was measured. The Bmax values for /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding to membrane preparations of the cortices and corpus striata from 48 hour REM sleep-deprived animals were increased 14.8% and 23%, respectively. These increases were not maintained following the cessation of sleep deprivation and recovered within 2 hours. The results of a 96 hour REM deprivation experiment were similar to those of the 48 hour REM sleep deprivation experiment. However, these increases were not evident in similar structures taken from stress control animals, and conclusively demonstrated that the changes in /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding resulted from REM sleep deprivation and not from stress.

  4. Detergent inhibited, heat labile nucleoside triphosphatase in cores of avian myeloblastosis virus

    Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1978-01-01

    Endogenous DNA synthesis was studied in isolated core particles of avian myeloblastosis virus. It was found that cores contained an enzymatic activity which rapidly converted the added nucleoside triphosphates to diphosphates (but not further) at 0 degrees C, thus inhibiting DNA synthesis. This t...... triphosphatase probably originates from the viral membranes. In the cores the enzyme is completely inactivated by low concentrations (0.02%) of Nonident P-40. Also, the enzyme is very thermolabile and denatures rapidly at 38 degrees C....

  5. Adenosine and Sleep

    Bjorness, Theresa E.; Greene, Robert W.

    2009-01-01

    Over the last several decades the idea that adenosine (Ado) plays a role in sleep control was postulated due in large part to pharmacological studies that showed the ability of Ado agonists to induce sleep and Ado antagonists to decrease sleep. A second wave of research involving in vitro cellular analytic approaches and subsequently, the use of neurochemical tools such as microdialysis, identified a population of cells within the brainstem and basal forebrain arousal centers, with activity t...

  6. WISP3 and RhoC guanosine triphosphatase cooperate in the development of inflammatory breast cancer

    Kleer, Celina G.; Zhang, Yanhong; Pan, Quintin; Gallagher, Gary; Wu, Mei; Wu, Zhi-fen; Merajver, Sofia D

    2003-01-01

    Background Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most lethal form of locally advanced breast cancer. We found concordant and consistent alterations of two genes in 90% of IBC tumors when compared with stage-matched non-IBC tumors: overexpression of RhoC guanosine triphosphatase and loss of WNT-1 induced secreted protein 3 (WISP3). Further work revealed that RhoC is a transforming oncogene for human mammary epithelial (HME) cells. Despite the aggressiveness of the RhoC-driven phenotype, it d...

  7. Adenosine-Associated Delivery Systems

    Kazemzadeh-Narbat, Mehdi; Annabi, Nasim; Tamayol, Ali; Oklu, Rahmi; Ghanem, Amyl; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine is a naturally occurring purine nucleoside in every cell. Many critical treatments such as modulating irregular heartbeat (arrhythmias), regulation of central nervous system (CNS) activity, and inhibiting seizural episodes can be carried out using adenosine. Despite the significant potential therapeutic impact of adenosine and its derivatives, the severe side effects caused by their systemic administration have significantly limited their clinical use. In addition, due to adenosine’s extremely short half-life in human blood (less than 10 s), there is an unmet need for sustained delivery systems to enhance efficacy and reduce side effects. In this paper, various adenosine delivery techniques, including encapsulation into biodegradable polymers, cell-based delivery, implantable biomaterials, and mechanical-based delivery systems, are critically reviewed and the existing challenges are highlighted. PMID:26453156

  8. Hybrid integrated biological-solid-state system powered with adenosine triphosphate

    Roseman, Jared M.; Lin, Jianxun; Ramakrishnan, Siddharth; Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2015-12-01

    There is enormous potential in combining the capabilities of the biological and the solid state to create hybrid engineered systems. While there have been recent efforts to harness power from naturally occurring potentials in living systems in plants and animals to power complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor integrated circuits, here we report the first successful effort to isolate the energetics of an electrogenic ion pump in an engineered in vitro environment to power such an artificial system. An integrated circuit is powered by adenosine triphosphate through the action of Na+/K+ adenosine triphosphatases in an integrated in vitro lipid bilayer membrane. The ion pumps (active in the membrane at numbers exceeding 2 × 106 mm-2) are able to sustain a short-circuit current of 32.6 pA mm-2 and an open-circuit voltage of 78 mV, providing for a maximum power transfer of 1.27 pW mm-2 from a single bilayer. Two series-stacked bilayers provide a voltage sufficient to operate an integrated circuit with a conversion efficiency of chemical to electrical energy of 14.9%.

  9. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms That Increase Expression of the Guanosine Triphosphatase RAC1 Are Associated With Ulcerative Colitis

    Aleixo M Muise; Walters, Thomas; Xu, Wei; Shen-Tu, Grace; Guo, Cong-Hui; Fattouh, Ramzi; Lam, Grace Y; Wolters, Victorien M; Bennitz, Joshua; Van Limbergen, Johan; Renbaum, Paul; Kasirer, Yair; Ngan, Bo-yee; Turner, Dan; Denson, Lee A.

    2011-01-01

    Background & AimsRAC1 is a guanosine triphosphatase that has an evolutionarily conserved role in coordinating immune defenses, from plants to mammals. Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases are associated with dysregulation of immune defenses. We studied the role of RAC1 in inflammatory bowel diseases using human genetic and functional studies and animal models of colitis.MethodsWe used a candidate gene approach to HapMap-Tag single nucleotide polymorphisms in a discovery cohort; findings we...

  10. New member of the guanosine triphosphatase activating protein family in the human epididymis

    Xiangqi Li; Qiang Liu; Shigui Liu; Jinsong Zhang; Yonglian Zhang

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the guanosine triphosphatase activating proteins (GAPs) on spermatogenesis has been studied for years,though no GAPs have been explored in epididymis, an essential organ for sperm maturation. In this study, a new GAP member, designated as MacGAP, was cloned in human epididymis. The MacGAP gene encodes a protein of 618 amino acids with a putative size of 70 kDa and harbors the conservedRhoGAPdomain. The N-terminal and C-terminal peptides of MacGAP were expressed and their corresponding antiserawere prepared. The antisera against N-terminal peptide could detect antigen as low as 0.3 ng, and its specificity was alsoconfirmed. However, the antisera against C-terminal peptide failed to detect its antigen because of its low sensitivity.Immunohistochemistry showed that the MacGAP protein was dependent on epididymis and had a region-specific expression pattern, with high expression in the epithelial cells' basal section in the caput region. The results have created a foundation for further interpretation of the biological effects of GAPs in sperm maturation.

  11. Diversification of the RAB Guanosine Triphosphatase Family in Dicots and Monocots

    2007-01-01

    RAB guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) are key regulators of vesicle trafficking and are essential to the growth and development of all eukaryotic cells. During evolution, the RAB family has expanded in different patterns to facilitate distinct cellular, developmental and physiological adaptations. Yeast has only 11 family members, whereas mammalian RABs have expanded to 18 RAB subfamilies. Plant RABs have diversified primarily by duplicating members within a single subfamily. Plant RABs are divided into eight subfamilies, corresponding to mammalian RAB1, RAB2, RAB5, RAB6,RAB7, RAB8, RAB11 and RAB18. Functional diversification of these is exemplified by the RAB11s, orthologs of which are partitioned into unique cell compartments in plants where they function to transport vesicles during localized tip growth.Similarly, the RAB2 family in grasses is likely involved in vesicle secretion associated with wall expansion, as determined by analysis of over-expression mutants. We propose that dicots and monocots have also diverged in their RAB profiles to accommodate unique cellular functions between the two groups. Here we present a bioinformatics analysis comparing the RAB sub-families of rice, maize and Arabidopsis. These results will guide future functional studies to test for the role of diversification of subfamilies unique to monocots compared to dicots.

  12. [Properties of the enzymes of energy supply in the common frog under various physiological states. II. Changes in the heat resistance of adenosine triphosphatases and succinate dehydrogenase].

    Glushankova, M A; Ivanova, G I; Pisareva, L N

    1986-05-01

    The heat resistance of SDG, Na, K-ATPase and Mg-ATPase of the grass frog was determined in January, March and May, the number of animals examined being 30-40 in either experiment. It was found that the average level of the heat resistance of the enzymes studied shows significant, often differently directed changes, which depend on the physiological state of an organism. Negligible correlation between the thermal sensitivity of different enzymes of an organism during hibernation, completely disappear during the activity state. PMID:3016954

  13. Adenosine-induced activation of esophageal nociceptors.

    Ru, F; Surdenikova, L; Brozmanova, M; Kollarik, M

    2011-03-01

    Clinical studies implicate adenosine acting on esophageal nociceptive pathways in the pathogenesis of noncardiac chest pain originating from the esophagus. However, the effect of adenosine on esophageal afferent nerve subtypes is incompletely understood. We addressed the hypothesis that adenosine selectively activates esophageal nociceptors. Whole cell perforated patch-clamp recordings and single-cell RT-PCR analysis were performed on the primary afferent neurons retrogradely labeled from the esophagus in the guinea pig. Extracellular recordings were made from the isolated innervated esophagus. In patch-clamp studies, adenosine evoked activation (inward current) in a majority of putative nociceptive (capsaicin-sensitive) vagal nodose, vagal jugular, and spinal dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons innervating the esophagus. Single-cell RT-PCR analysis indicated that the majority of the putative nociceptive (transient receptor potential V1-positive) neurons innervating the esophagus express the adenosine receptors. The neural crest-derived (spinal DRG and vagal jugular) esophageal nociceptors expressed predominantly the adenosine A(1) receptor while the placodes-derived vagal nodose nociceptors expressed the adenosine A(1) and/or A(2A) receptors. Consistent with the studies in the cell bodies, adenosine evoked activation (overt action potential discharge) in esophageal nociceptive nerve terminals. Furthermore, the neural crest-derived jugular nociceptors were activated by the selective A(1) receptor agonist CCPA, and the placodes-derived nodose nociceptors were activated by CCPA and/or the selective adenosine A(2A) receptor CGS-21680. In contrast to esophageal nociceptors, adenosine failed to stimulate the vagal esophageal low-threshold (tension) mechanosensors. We conclude that adenosine selectively activates esophageal nociceptors. Our data indicate that the esophageal neural crest-derived nociceptors can be activated via the adenosine A(1) receptor while the placodes

  14. Adenosine in inflammatory joint diseases

    Chan, E. S. L.; Fernandez, P.; Cronstein, B. N.

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory joint diseases are a group of heterogeneous disorders with a variety of different etiologies and disease manifestations. However, there are features that are common to all of them: first, the recruitment of various inflammatory cell types that are attracted to involved tissues over the course of the disease process. Second, the treatments used in many of these diseases are commonly medications that suppress or alter immune function. The demonstration that adenosine has endogenous...

  15. High inorganic triphosphatase activities in bacteria and mammalian cells: identification of the enzymes involved.

    Gregory Kohn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We recently characterized a specific inorganic triphosphatase (PPPase from Nitrosomonas europaea. This enzyme belongs to the CYTH superfamily of proteins. Many bacterial members of this family are annotated as predicted adenylate cyclases, because one of the founding members is CyaB adenylate cyclase from A. hydrophila. The aim of the present study is to determine whether other members of the CYTH protein family also have a PPPase activity, if there are PPPase activities in animal tissues and what enzymes are responsible for these activities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Recombinant enzymes were expressed and purified as GST- or His-tagged fusion proteins and the enzyme activities were determined by measuring the release of inorganic phosphate. We show that the hitherto uncharacterized E. coli CYTH protein ygiF is a specific PPPase, but it contributes only marginally to the total PPPase activity in this organism, where the main enzyme responsible for hydrolysis of inorganic triphosphate (PPP(i is inorganic pyrophosphatase. We further show that CyaB hydrolyzes PPP(i but this activity is low compared to its adenylate cyclase activity. Finally we demonstrate a high PPPase activity in mammalian and quail tissue, particularly in the brain. We show that this activity is mainly due to Prune, an exopolyphosphatase overexpressed in metastatic tumors where it promotes cell motility. CONCLUSIONS AND GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE: We show for the first time that PPPase activities are widespread in bacteria and animals. We identified the enzymes responsible for these activities but we were unable to detect significant amounts of PPP(i in E. coli or brain extracts using ion chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. The role of these enzymes may be to hydrolyze PPP(i, which could be cytotoxic because of its high affinity for Ca(2+, thereby interfering with Ca(2+ signaling.

  16. Nucleoside triphosphatase and RNA helicase activities associated with GB virus B nonstructural protein 3.

    Zhong, W; Ingravallo, P; Wright-Minogue, J; Skelton, A; Uss, A S; Chase, R; Yao, N; Lau, J Y; Hong, Z

    1999-09-01

    GB virus B (GBV-B) is a positive-stranded RNA virus that belongs to the Flaviviridae family. This virus is closely related to hepatitis C virus (HCV) and causes acute hepatitis in tamarins (Saguinus species). Nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) of GBV-B contains sequence motifs predictive of three enzymatic activities: serine protease, nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase), and RNA helicase. The N-terminal serine protease has been characterized and shown to share similar substrate specificity with the HCV NS3 protease. In this report, a full-length GBV-B NS3 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. This recombinant protein was shown to possess polynucleotide-stimulated NTPase and double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) unwinding activities. Both activities were abolished by a single amino acid substitution, from the Lys (K) residue in the conserved walker motif A (or Ia) "AXXXXGK(210)S" to an Ala (A), confirming that they are intrinsic to GBV-B NS3. Kinetic parameters (K(m) and k(cat)) for hydrolysis of various NTPs or dNTPs were obtained. The dsRNA unwinding activity depends on the presence of divalent metal ions and ATP and requires an RNA duplex substrate with 3' unpaired regions (RNAs with 5' unpaired regions only or with blunt ends are not suitable substrates for this enzyme). This indicates that GBV-B NS3 RNA helicase unwinds dsRNA in the 3' to 5' direction. Direct interaction of the GBV-B NS3 protein with a single-stranded RNA was established using a gel-based RNA bandshift assay. Finally, a homology model of GBV-B NS3 RNA helicase domain based on the 3-dimensional structure of the HCV NS3 helicase that shows a great similarity in overall structure and surface charge distribution between the two proteins was proposed. PMID:10497107

  17. Neurofibromatosis: The role of guanosine triphosphatase activating proteins in sensory neuron function

    Cynthia M. Hingtgen

    2008-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common autosomal dominant disease characterized by formation of multiple benign and malignant tumors. People with this disorder also experience chronic pain, which can be disabling. Neurofibromin, the protein product of the Nfl gene, is a gnanosine triphosphatase activating protein (GAP) for p21Ras (Ras). Loss of Nfl results in an increase in activity of the Ras transduction cascade. Because of the growing evidence suggesting involvement of downstream components of the Ras transduction cascade in the sensitization of nociceptive sensory neurons, we examined the stimulus-evoked release of the neuropeptides, substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), from primary sensory neurons of mice with a mutation of the Nfl gene (NfI+1-). Measuring the levels of SP and CGRP by radioimmunoassay, we demonstrated that capsaicin-stimulated release of neuropep-tides is 3-5 folds higher in spinal cord slices from Nfl+1-mice than that from wildtype mouse tissue. In addition, the potassium- and capsaicin-stimulated release of CGRP from the culture of sensory neurons isolated from Nfl+1- mice was more than double that from the culture of wildtype neurons. Using patch-clamp electrophysiological techniques, we also examined the excitability of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons. It was found that the number of action potentials generated by the neurons from Nfl+1- mice, responsing to a ramp of depolarizing current, was more than three times of that generated by wildtype neurons. Consistent with that observation, neurons from Nfl+1- mice had lower firing thresholds, lower rheobase currents and shorter firing latencies compared with wildtype neurons. These data clearly demonstrate that GAPs, such as neurofihromin, can alter the excitability of nociceptive sensory neurons. The augmented response of sensory neurons with altered Ras signaling may explain the abnormal pain sensations experienced by people with NFI and suggests an important

  18. WISP3 and RhoC guanosine triphosphatase cooperate in the development of inflammatory breast cancer

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most lethal form of locally advanced breast cancer. We found concordant and consistent alterations of two genes in 90% of IBC tumors when compared with stage-matched non-IBC tumors: overexpression of RhoC guanosine triphosphatase and loss of WNT-1 induced secreted protein 3 (WISP3). Further work revealed that RhoC is a transforming oncogene for human mammary epithelial (HME) cells. Despite the aggressiveness of the RhoC-driven phenotype, it does not quantitatively reach that of the true IBC tumors. We have demonstrated that WISP3 has tumor growth and angiogenesis inhibitory functions in IBC. We proposed that RhoC and WISP3 cooperate in the development of IBC. Using an antisense approach, we blocked WISP3 expression in HME cells. Cellular proliferation and growth were determined using the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and anchorage-independent growth in a soft agar assay. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was measured in conditioned medium by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antisense inhibition of WISP3 in HME cells increased RhoC mRNA levels and resulted in an increase in cellular proliferation, anchorage-independent growth and VEGF levels in the conditioned medium. Conversely, restoration of WISP3 expression in the highly malignant IBC cell line SUM149 was able to decrease the expression of RhoC protein. WISP3 modulates RhoC expression in HME cells and in the IBC cell line SUM149. This provides further evidence that these two genes act in concert to give rise to the highly aggressive IBC phenotype. We propose a model of this interaction as a starting point for further investigations

  19. Role of extracellular adenosine in Drosophila

    FENCKOVÁ, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes several aspects of the role for extracellular adenosine in Drosophila. Reverse genetic, molecular and microscopic methods together with the most forefront Drosophila research techniques have been applied to elucidate the role of adenosine signaling in the regulation of development, physiology and metabolism of Drosophila larvae. The thesis helps to establish the model for extracellular adenosine as a stress-signal for the release of energy stores. It also describes the e...

  20. Transcriptional activation of the nitrogenase promoter in vitro: adenosine nucleotides are required for inhibition of NIFA activity by NIFL.

    Eydmann, T; Söderbäck, E; Jones, T; Hill, S; Austin, S; Dixon, R

    1995-03-01

    The enhancer-binding protein NIFA is required for transcriptional activation of nif promoters by the alternative holoenzyme form of RNA polymerase, which contains the sigma factor sigma 54 (sigma N). NIFA hydrolyzes nucleoside triphosphates to catalyze the isomerization of closed promoter complexes to transcriptionally competent open complexes. The activity of NIFA is antagonized by the regulatory protein NIFL in response to oxygen and fixed nitrogen in vivo. We have investigated the requirement for nucleotides in the formation and stability of open promoter complexes by NIFA and inhibition of its activity by NIFL at the Klebsiella pneumoniae nifH promoter. Open complexes formed by sigma 54-containing RNA polymerase are considerably more stable to heparin challenge in the presence of GTP than in the presence of ATP. This differential stability is most probably a consequence of GTP being the initiating nucleotide at this promoter. Adenosine nucleosides are specifically required for Azotobacter vinelandii NIFL to inhibit open complex formation by native NIFA, and the nucleoside triphosphatase activity of NIFA is strongly inhibited by NIFL under these conditions. We propose a model in which NIFL modulates the activity of NIFA via an adenosine nucleotide switch. PMID:7868590

  1. Immobilized polyphosphate kinase: preparation, properties, and potential for use in adenosine 5'-triphosphate regeneration

    Polyphosphate kinase partially purified from Escherichia coli, has been immobilized on glutaraldehyde-activated aminoethyl cellulose with a 10% retention of enzymatic activity. The immobilized enzyme can carry out the synthesis of ATP from ADP, using long-chain inorganic polyphosphate as a phosphoryl donor. Chromatographic analyses of the product mixture produced from ADP and [32P]polyphosphate demonstrated that 98% of the 32P was incorporated into ATP, indicating that the immobilized polyphosphate kinase is substantially free from contaminating polyphosphate phosphohydrolase, adenosine triphosphatase, and adenylate kinase. Immobilized polyphosphate kinase loses no activity when stored in an aqueous suspension for 2 months at 5 degrees C or for 1-2 weeks at 25 degrees C. It may be stored indefinitely as a lyophilized powder at -10 degrees C. Michaelis constants for ADP and polyphosphate were determined to be 160 and 120 microM, respectively, for the immobilized enzyme. A small-batch reactor was found to produce ATP linearly with time up to 65% conversion of polyphosphate into ATP and to attain greater than 85% conversion to ATP at equilibrium. The ease of purification and immobilization of E. coli polyphosphate kinase, its storage stability, the purity and yield of its ATP product, and the low values of the Michaelis constants for its substrates make it a highly promising enzyme for ATP regeneration

  2. Effect of adenosine and adenosine analogs on [14C]aminopyrine accumulation by rabbit parietal cells

    Adenosine receptors that modulate adenylate cyclase activity have been identified recently in a number of tissues. Adenosine A2 receptor is stimulatory to adenylate cyclase, whereas adenosine A1 receptor is inhibitory to adenylate cyclase. We investigated the effect of adenosine and its analogs on [14C]aminopyrine accumulation by rabbit parietal cells. Rabbit gastric mucosal cells were isolated by enzyme digestion. Parietal cells were enriched by nonlinear percoll gradients. [14C]Aminopyrine accumulation was used as an indicator of acid secretion. The effect of 2-chloroadenosine on histamine-stimulated [14C]aminopyrine accumulation was studied. The effects of N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine, 2-chloroadenosine, stable analogs of adenosine, and adenosine on [14C]aminopyrine accumulation were assessed. Cyclic AMP content of parietal cells was determined by radioimmunoassay. Histamine and carbachol, known secretagogues, stimulated [14C]aminopyrine accumulation. 2-Chloroadenosine did not suppress histamine-stimulated [14C]aminopyrine accumulation. 2-Chloroadenosine, N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine, and adenosine dose dependently increased [14C]aminopyrine accumulation. The order of potency was N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine greater than 2-chloroadenosine greater than adenosine. 8-Phenyltheophylline and theophylline, adenosine-receptor antagonists, or cimetidine did not have significant effects on the increase of AP uptake induced by 2-chloroadenosine. Coadministration of dipyridamole, and adenosine uptake inhibitor, augmented the effect of adenosine on [14C]aminopyrine accumulation. 2-Chloroadenosine, N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine, and adenosine each induced a significant increase in cellular cyclic AMP. We conclude that there may be adenosine A2 receptors on rabbit parietal cells which modulate gastric acid secretion

  3. Optical Aptasensors for Adenosine Triphosphate

    Ng, Stella; Lim, Hui Si; Ma, Qian; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acids are among the most researched and applied biomolecules. Their diverse two- and three-dimensional structures in conjunction with their robust chemistry and ease of manipulation provide a rare opportunity for sensor applications. Moreover, their high biocompatibility has seen them being used in the construction of in vivo assays. Various nucleic acid-based devices have been extensively studied as either the principal element in discrete molecule-like sensors or as the main component in the fabrication of sensing devices. The use of aptamers in sensors - aptasensors, in particular, has led to improvements in sensitivity, selectivity, and multiplexing capacity for a wide verity of analytes like proteins, nucleic acids, as well as small biomolecules such as glucose and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This article reviews the progress in the use of aptamers as the principal component in sensors for optical detection of ATP with an emphasis on sensing mechanism, performance, and applications with some discussion on challenges and perspectives. PMID:27446501

  4. Adenosine regulation of alveolar fluid clearance

    Factor, Phillip; Mutlu, Göskhan M.; Chen, Lan; Mohameed, Jameel; Akhmedov, Alexander T.; Meng, Fan Jing; Jilling, Tamas; Lewis, Erin Rachel; Johnson, Meshell D.; Xu, Anna; Kass, Daniel; Martino, Janice M.; Bellmeyer, Amy; Albazi, John S.; Emala, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Adenosine is a purine nucleoside that regulates cell function through G protein-coupled receptors that activate or inhibit adenylyl cyclase. Based on the understanding that cAMP regulates alveolar epithelial active Na+ transport, we hypothesized that adenosine and its receptors have the potential to regulate alveolar ion transport and airspace fluid content. Herein, we report that type 1 (A1R), 2a (A2aR), 2b (A2bR), and 3 (A3R) adenosine receptors are present in rat and mouse lungs and alveol...

  5. Adenosine triphosphate inhibition of yeast trehalase.

    Panek, A D

    1969-09-01

    Yeast trehalase has been found to be inhibited non-competitively by adenosine triphosphate. Such a biological control could explain the accumulation of trehalose during the stationary phase of the growth curve. PMID:5370287

  6. Role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance

    Caffeine is a competitive antagonist at adenosine receptors. Receptor up-regulation during chronic drug treatment has been proposed to be the mechanism of tolerance to the behavioral stimulant effects of caffeine. This study reassessed the role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance. Separate groups of rats were given scheduled access to drinking bottles containing plain tap water or a 0.1% solution of caffeine. Daily drug intake averaged 60-75 mg/kg and resulted in complete tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity, which could not be surmounted by increasing the dose of caffeine. 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (0.001-1.0 mg/kg) dose dependently decreased the locomotor activity of caffeine-tolerant rats and their water-treated controls but was 8-fold more potent in the latter group. Caffeine (1.0-10 mg/kg) injected concurrently with 5-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine antagonized the decreases in locomotor activity comparably in both groups. Apparent pA2 values for tolerant and control rats also were comparable: 5.05 and 5.11. Thus, the adenosine-antagonist activity of caffeine was undiminished in tolerant rats. The effects of chronic caffeine administration on parameters of adenosine receptor binding and function were measured in cerebral cortex. There were no differences between brain tissue from control and caffeine-treated rats in number and affinity of adenosine binding sites or in receptor-mediated increases (A2 adenosine receptor) and decreases (A1 adenosine receptor) in cAMP accumulation. These results are consistent with theoretical arguments that changes in receptor density should not affect the potency of a competitive antagonist. Experimental evidence and theoretical considerations indicate that up-regulation of adenosine receptors is not the mechanism of tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity

  7. Electrocardiographic profile of adenosine pharmacological stress testing

    Sun, Hao; TIAN, YUEQIN; ZHENG, LIHUI; Pan, Qingrong; XIE, BOQIA

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine stress testing in conjunction with radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging has become a common approach for the detection of coronary artery diseases in patients who are unable to perform adequate levels of exercise. However, specific electrocardiographic alterations during the test have been rarely described. Using a Chinese population, the aim of the present study was to provide a detailed electrocardiographic profile of adenosine stress testing. The study population included 1,...

  8. Adenosine stress protocols for myocardial perfusion imaging

    Baškot Branislav

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Treadmill test combined with myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS is a commonly used technique in the assessment of coronary artery disease. There are many patients, however, who may not be able to undergo treadmill test. Such patients would benefit from pharmacological stress procedures combined with MPS. The most commonly used pharmacological agents for cardiac stress are coronary vasodilatators (adenosine, dipyridamol and catecholamines. Concomitant low-level treadmill exercise with adenosine pharmacologic stress (AdenoEX during MPS has become commonly used in recent years. A number of studies have demonstrated a beneficial impact of AdenoEX protocol. The aim of the study was, besides introducing into practice the two types of protocols of pharmatological stress test with adenosine, as a preparation for MPS, to compare and monitor the frequency of their side effects to quality, acquisition, as well as to standardize the onset time of acquisition (diagnostic imaging for both protocols. Methods. A total of 130 patients underwent pharmacological stress test with adenosine (vasodilatator. In 108 of the patients we performed concomitant exercise (AdenoEX of low level (50W by a bicycle ergometar. In 28 of the patients we performed Adenosine abbreviated protocol (AdenoSCAN. Side effects of adenosine were followed and compared between the two kinds of protocols AdenoEX and AdenoSCAN. Also compared were image quality and suggested time of acquisition after the stress test. Results. Numerous side effects were found, but being short-lived they did not require any active interventions. The benefit of AdenoEX versus AdenoSCAN included decreased side effects (62% vs 87%, improved safety and patients tolerance, improved target-to-background ratios because of less subdiaphragmatic activity, earlier acquisition, and improved sensitivity. Conclusion. The safety and efficacy of adenosine pharmacological stress is even better with concomitant

  9. Internalization and desensitization of adenosine receptors

    Klaasse, Elisabeth C.; IJzerman, Adriaan P.; de Grip, Willem J.; Beukers, Margot W.

    2007-01-01

    Until now, more than 800 distinct G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been identified in the human genome. The four subtypes of the adenosine receptor (A1, A2A, A2B and A3 receptor) belong to this large family of GPCRs that represent the most widely targeted pharmacological protein class. Since adenosine receptors are widespread throughout the body and involved in a variety of physiological processes and diseases, there is great interest in understanding how the different subtypes are re...

  10. Characterization of a Trifunctional Mimivirus mRNA Capping Enzyme and Crystal Structure of the RNA Triphosphatase Domain

    Benarroch,D.; Smith, P.; Shuman, S.

    2008-01-01

    The RNA triphosphatase (RTPase) components of the mRNA capping apparatus are a bellwether of eukaryal taxonomy. Fungal and protozoal RTPases belong to the triphosphate tunnel metalloenzyme (TTM) family, exemplified by yeast Cet1. Several large DNA viruses encode metal-dependent RTPases unrelated to the cysteinyl-phosphatase RTPases of their metazoan host organisms. The origins of DNA virus RTPases are unclear because they are structurally uncharacterized. Mimivirus, a giant virus of amoeba, resembles poxviruses in having a trifunctional capping enzyme composed of a metal-dependent RTPase module fused to guanylyltransferase (GTase) and guanine-N7 methyltransferase domains. The crystal structure of mimivirus RTPase reveals a minimized tunnel fold and an active site strikingly similar to that of Cet1. Unlike homodimeric fungal RTPases, mimivirus RTPase is a monomer. The mimivirus TTM-type RTPase-GTase fusion resembles the capping enzymes of amoebae, providing evidence that the ancestral large DNA virus acquired its capping enzyme from a unicellular host.

  11. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040 Section 864.7040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Adenosine triphosphate release assay. (a) Identification. An adenosine triphosphate release assay is...

  12. Study of Ectonucleotidases and Adenosine Deaminases in Drosophila

    PREUER, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate and extracellular adenosine are important regulatory molecules in the human immune system. The concentrations of these molecules are in turn regulated by ectonucleotidases and adenosine deaminases. In this thesis I attempt to test the gene silencing efficiency of RNA interference for three different genes coding for such enzymes in the model organism Drosophila melanogaster.

  13. Internalization and desensitization of adenosine receptors.

    Klaasse, E.C.; IJzerman, A.P.; Grip, W.J. de; Beukers, M.W.

    2008-01-01

    Until now, more than 800 distinct G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been identified in the human genome. The four subtypes of the adenosine receptor (A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3) receptor) belong to this large family of GPCRs that represent the most widely targeted pharmacological protein clas

  14. Effects of adenosine infusion into renal interstitium on renal hemodynamics

    This study was designed to investigate the hemodynamic effects of exogenous adenosine in the interstitium of the rat kidney. Adenosine or its analogues were infused into the renal interstitium by means of chronically implanted capsules. In fusion of adenosine decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR) from 0.81 +/- 0.06 to 0.37 +/- 0.06 ml/min while having no effect on renal blood flow (RBF). The metabolically stable analogue, 2-chloradenosine (2-ClAdo), decreased GFR from 0.73 +/- 0.07 to 021 +/- 0.06 ml/min. Interstitial infusion of theophylline, an adenosine receptor antagonist, completely abolished the effects of adenosine and 2-ClAdo on GFR. The distribution of adenosine, when infused into the renal interstitium, was determined using radiolabeled 5'-(N-ethyl)-carboxamidoadenosine (NECA), a metabolically stable adenosine agonist. After continuous infusion, [3H]NECA was distributed throughout the kidney. The effects of NECA to reduce GFR were similar to those of adenosine and 2-ClAdo. They conclude that increased levels of adenosine in the renal interstitium markedly decrease GFR without affecting RBF in steady-state conditions. The marked effects of adenosine agonists during their infusion into the renal interstitium and the complete blockade of these effects by theophylline suggest an extracellular action of adenosine

  15. Adenosine: An immune modulator of inflammatory bowel diseases

    Jeff Huaqing Ye; Vazhaikkurichi M Rajendran

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a common and lifelong disabling gastrointestinal disease. Emerging treatments are being developed to target inflammatory cytokines which initiate and perpetuate the immune response. Adenosine is an important modulator of inflammation and its anti-inflammatory effects have been well established in humans as well as in animal models. High extracellular adenosine suppresses and resolves chronic inflammation in IBD models. High extracellular adenosine levels could be achieved by enhanced adenosine absorption and increased de novo synthesis. Increased adenosine concentration leads to activation of the A2a receptor on the cell surface of immune and epithelial cells that would be a potential therapeutic target for chronic intestinal inflammation. Adenosine is transported via concentrative nucleoside transporter and equilibrative nucleoside transporter transporters that are localized in apical and basolateral membranes of intestinal epithelial cells, respectively. Increased extracellular adenosine levels activate the A2a receptor, which would reduce cytokines responsible for chronic inflammation.

  16. Adenosine receptors and asthma in humans

    Wilson, C N

    2008-01-01

    According to an executive summary of the GINA dissemination committee report, it is now estimated that approximately 300 million people (5% of the global population or 1 in 20 persons) have asthma. Despite the scientific progress made over the past several decades toward improving our understanding of the pathophysiology of asthma, there is still a great need for improved therapies, particularly oral therapies that enhance patient compliance and that target new mechanisms of action. Adenosine...

  17. Aminopyrimidine derivatives as adenosine antagonists / Janke Kleynhans

    Kleynhans, Janke

    2013-01-01

    Aims of this project - The aim of this study was to design and synthesise novel 2-aminopyrimidine derivatives as potential adenosine A1 and A2A receptor antagonists. Background and rationale - Parkinson’s disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder (after Alzheimer’s disease) and is characterised by the selective death of the dopaminergic neurons of the nigro-striatal pathway. Distinctive motor symptoms include bradykinesia, muscle rigidity and tremor, while non-m...

  18. Role of adenosine in oligodendrocyte precursor maturation

    Elisabetta Coppi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Differentiation and maturation of oligodendroglial cells are postnatal processes involving specific morphological changes correlated with the expression of stage-specific surface antigens and functional voltage-gated ion channels. A small fraction of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs generated during development are maintained in an immature and slowly proliferative or quiescent state in the adult central nervous system (CNS representing an endogenous reservoir of immature cells. Adenosine receptors are expressed by OPCs and a key role of adenosine in oligodendrocyte maturation has been recently recognised. As evaluated on OPC cultures, adenosine by stimulating A1 receptors, promotes oligodendrocyte maturation and inhibits their proliferation; on the contrary by stimulating A2A receptors, it inhibits oligodendrocyte maturation. A1 and A2A receptor-mediated effects are related to opposite modifications of outward delayed rectifying membrane K+ currents (IK that are involved in regulation of oligodendrocyte differentiation. Brain A1 and A2A receptors might represent new molecular targets for drugs useful in demyelinating pathologies, such as multiple sclerosis (MS, stroke and brain trauma.

  19. Effect of adenosine and adenosine analogs on ( sup 14 C)aminopyrine accumulation by rabbit parietal cells

    Ota, S.; Hiraishi, H.; Terano, A.; Mutoh, H.; Kurachi, Y.; Shimada, T.; Ivey, K.J.; Sugimoto, T. (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan))

    1989-12-01

    Adenosine receptors that modulate adenylate cyclase activity have been identified recently in a number of tissues. Adenosine A2 receptor is stimulatory to adenylate cyclase, whereas adenosine A1 receptor is inhibitory to adenylate cyclase. We investigated the effect of adenosine and its analogs on (14C)aminopyrine accumulation by rabbit parietal cells. Rabbit gastric mucosal cells were isolated by enzyme digestion. Parietal cells were enriched by nonlinear percoll gradients. (14C)Aminopyrine accumulation was used as an indicator of acid secretion. The effect of 2-chloroadenosine on histamine-stimulated (14C)aminopyrine accumulation was studied. The effects of N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine, 2-chloroadenosine, stable analogs of adenosine, and adenosine on (14C)aminopyrine accumulation were assessed. Cyclic AMP content of parietal cells was determined by radioimmunoassay. Histamine and carbachol, known secretagogues, stimulated (14C)aminopyrine accumulation. 2-Chloroadenosine did not suppress histamine-stimulated (14C)aminopyrine accumulation. 2-Chloroadenosine, N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine, and adenosine dose dependently increased (14C)aminopyrine accumulation. The order of potency was N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine greater than 2-chloroadenosine greater than adenosine. 8-Phenyltheophylline and theophylline, adenosine-receptor antagonists, or cimetidine did not have significant effects on the increase of AP uptake induced by 2-chloroadenosine. Coadministration of dipyridamole, and adenosine uptake inhibitor, augmented the effect of adenosine on (14C)aminopyrine accumulation. 2-Chloroadenosine, N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine, and adenosine each induced a significant increase in cellular cyclic AMP. We conclude that there may be adenosine A2 receptors on rabbit parietal cells which modulate gastric acid secretion.

  20. Protective effect of taurine on hypochlorous acid toxicity to nuclear nucleoside triphosphatase in isolated nuclei from rat liver

    Ju-Xiang Li; Yong-Zheng Pang; Chao-Shu Tang; Zai-Quan Li

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Taurine has been shown to be an effective scavenger of hypochlorous acid (HOCI). The role of HOCI is well established in tissue damage associated with inflammation and injury. In the present study, the effect of HOCI on nuclear nucleoside triphosphatase of hepatocytes and the ability of taurine to prevent this effect were investigated.METHODS: Isolated hepatic nuclei from rat liver were exposed to HOCI with or without taurine. The NTPase activity on nuclear envelope was assayed using ATP and GTP as substrates, respectively.RESULTS: The first series of experiments evaluated the toxicity of HOCl and the efficacy of taurine to protect NTPase.HOCI at 10-9-5×10-6 mol/L reduced nuclear NTPase activities in a concentration dependent manner (ATP and GTP as substrates) (P<0.01). HOCI at 10-6 mol/L reduced the NTPase activity by 65% (ATP as substrate) and 76% (GTP as substrate). Taurine (10-7 to 10-4 mol/L) was tested for protection against HOCI at 10-6 mol/L and the nuclei treated with 5x10-4 mol/L taurine exhibited only 20% and 12% reduction in NTPase activities compared to untreated controls. A second study was performed comparing taurine to glutathione (GSH). GSH and HOCI at 10-6 mol/L exhibited 46% and 67.4% reduction in NTPase activities compared with control. GSH (10-4 mol/L) which was incubated with the nuclei and HOCi still exhibited 44.2% and 44.8% reduction in NTPase activities of untreated control. Taurine with HOCI only exhibited 15.2% and 17.1% reduction in NTPase activities, which provided more powerful protection against HOCI than GSH. The third experiment was undertaken to evaluate the specificity of taurine against HOCI. Incubation of rat hepatic nuclei with Fe3+/H2O2 (1 m mol/L vS 5μ mol/L) resulted in a decrease in nuclear NTPase activities (P<0.01).When hepatic nuclei were incubated with Tau (10-4 mol/L) and Fe3+/H2O2 (1m mol/L vS 5μ mol/L), nuclear NTPase activities were only slightly increased as compared with that of incubation with Fe3+/H

  1. Turnover of adenosine in plasma of human and dog blood

    To determine half-life and turnover of plasma adenosine, heparinized blood from healthy volunteers was incubated with radiolabeled adenosine in the physiological concentration range of 0.1-1 microM. Plasma levels of adenosine in vitro were 82 +/- 14 nM and were similar to those determined immediately after blood collection with a ''stopping solution.'' Dipyridamole (83 microM) and erythro-9(2-hydroxynon-3yl)-adenine (EHNA) (8 microM) did not measurably alter basal adenosine levels but completely blocked the uptake of added adenosine. Inhibition of ecto-5'-nucleotidase with 100 microM alpha, beta-methyleneadenosine 5'-diphosphate (AOPCP) reduced plasma adenosine to 22 +/- 6 nM. For the determination of adenosine turnover, the decrease in specific radioactivity of added [3H]adenosine was measured using a dipyridamole-containing stopping solution. Without altering basal adenosine levels, the half-life was estimated to be 0.6 s. Similar experiments were carried out with washed erythrocytes or in the presence of AOPCP, yielding half-lives of 0.7 and 0.9 s, respectively. When the initial adenosine concentration was 1 microM, its specific activity decreased by only 11% within 5 s, whereas total plasma adenosine exponentially decreased with a half-life of 1.5 s. Venous plasma concentrations were measured after relief of a 3-min forearm ischemia. Changes in plasma adenosine did not correlate well with changes in blood flow but were augmented in the presence of dipyridamole

  2. Silk Fibroin Encapsulated Powder Reservoirs for Sustained Release of Adenosine

    Pritchard, Eleanor M.; Szybala, Cory; Boison, Detlev; Kaplan, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Due to its unique properties, silk fibroin was studied as a biodegradable polymer vehicle for sustained, local delivery of the anticonvulsant adenosine from encapsulated reservoirs. Silk is a biologically derived protein polymer that is biocompatible, mechanically strong and degrades to non-toxic products in vivo. To achieve local, sustained, controlled adenosine release from fully degradable implants, solid adenosine powder reservoirs were coated with silk fibroin. Material properties of the...

  3. Adenosine A1 receptor agonists inhibit trigeminovascular nociceptive transmission

    Goadsby, P J; Hoskin, K L; Storer, R J;

    2002-01-01

    There is a considerable literature to suggest that adenosine A1 receptor agonists may have anti-nociceptive effects, and we sought to explore the role of adenosine A1 receptors in a model of trigeminovascular nociceptive transmission. Cats were anaesthetized (alpha-chloralose 60 mg/kg, intraperit......There is a considerable literature to suggest that adenosine A1 receptor agonists may have anti-nociceptive effects, and we sought to explore the role of adenosine A1 receptors in a model of trigeminovascular nociceptive transmission. Cats were anaesthetized (alpha-chloralose 60 mg...

  4. A Metabolic Immune Checkpoint: Adenosine in Tumor Microenvironment

    Ohta, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Within tumors, some areas are less oxygenated than others. Since their home ground is under chronic hypoxia, tumor cells adapt to this condition by activating aerobic glycolysis; however, this hypoxic environment is very harsh for incoming immune cells. Deprivation of oxygen limits availability of energy sources and induces accumulation of extracellular adenosine in tumors. Extracellular adenosine, upon binding with adenosine receptors on the surface of various immune cells, suppresses pro-inflammatory activities. In addition, signaling through adenosine receptors upregulates a number of anti-inflammatory molecules and immunoregulatory cells, leading to the establishment of a long-lasting immunosuppressive environment. Thus, due to hypoxia and adenosine, tumors can discourage antitumor immune responses no matter how the response was induced, whether it was spontaneous or artificially introduced with a therapeutic intention. Preclinical studies have shown the significance of adenosine in tumor survival strategy by demonstrating tumor regression after inactivation of adenosine receptors, inhibition of adenosine-producing enzymes, or reversal of tissue hypoxia. These promising results indicate a potential use of the inhibitors of the hypoxia–adenosine pathway for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27066002

  5. Pretreatment with adenosine and adenosine A1 receptor agonist protects against intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in rat

    V Haktan Ozacmak; Hale Sayan

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effects of adenosine and A1 receptor activation on reperfusion-induced small intestinal injury.METHODS: Rats were randomized into groups with sham operation, ischemia and reperfusion, and systemic treatments with either adenosine or 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine, A1 receptor agonist or 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, A1 receptor antagonist, plus adenosine before ischemia. Following reperfusion, contractions of ileum segments in response to KCl, carbachol and substance P were recorded. Tissue myeloperoxidase,malondialdehyde, and reduced glutathione levels were measured.RESULTS: Ischemia significantly decreased both contraction and reduced glutathione level which were ameliorated by adenosine and agonist administration. Treatment also decreased neutrophil infiltration and membrane lipid peroxidation. Beneficial effects of adenosine were abolished by pretreatment with A1 receptor antagonist.CONCLUSION: The data suggest that adenosine and A1 receptor stimulation attenuate ischemic intestinal injury via decreasing oxidative stress, lowering neutrophil infiltration, and increasing reduced glutathione content.

  6. Intravenous adenosine and radiopharmaceutical injection in the same line was feasible in adenosine stress myocardial perfusion imaging

    Adenosine stress myocardial perfusion imaging was performed with an intravenous adenosine and radiopharmaceutical injection in the same line. A syringe containing 720 μ/kg of adenosine in 40 ml of saline was prepared and injected at the constant infusion rate of 400 ml/h. Adenosine was temporarily stopped by the stopcock when 1.5 ml of thallium was injected for 0.5 second from the three-way stopcock with two ways opened. Thereafter, the stopcock was returned to the original position in 0.5 second, and adenosine flow returned to the constant flow rate again. In this method, 0.75% of adenosine total dose was injected at a rate of 3.0 ml/s and adenosine was stopped for 3.6 second. There were no significant differences in either effects and adverse events of adenosine between this method and two intravenous injection line methods. Adenosine stress in one venous line method would be an easy method maintaining the dose effect and safety. (author)

  7. Mechanism of protection of adenosine from sulphate radical anion and repair of adenosine radicals by caffeic acid in aqueous solution

    M Sudha Swaraga; L Charitha; M Adinarayana

    2005-07-01

    The photooxidation of adenosine in presence of peroxydisulphate (PDS) has been studied by spectrophotometrically measuring the absorbance of adenosine at 260 nm. The rates of oxidation of adenosine by sulphate radical anion have been determined in the presence of different concentrations of caffeic acid. Increase in [caffeic acid] is found to decrease the rate of oxidation of adenosine suggesting that caffeic acid acts as an efficient scavenger of $SO_{4}^{\\bullet-}$ and protects adenosine from it. Sulphate radical anion competes for adenosine as well as for caffeic acid. The quantum yields of photooxidation of adenosine have been calculated from the rates of oxidation of adenosine and the light intensity absorbed by PDS at 254 nm, the wavelength at which PDS is activated to sulphate radical anion. From the results of experimentally determined quantum yields (exptl) and the quantum yields calculated (cal) assuming caffeic acid acting only as a scavenger of $SO_{4}^{\\bullet-}$ show that exptl values are lower than cal values. The ' values, which are experimentally found quantum yield values at each caffeic acid concentration and corrected for $SO_{4}^{\\bullet-}$ scavenging by caffeic acid, are also found to be greater than exptl values. These observations suggest that the transient adenosine radicals are repaired by caffeic acid in addition to scavenging of sulphate radical anions.

  8. Characterization of adenosine binding proteins in human placental membranes

    We have characterized two adenosine binding proteins in human placenta. In membranes, one site is detected with [3H] -N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine ([3H]NECA). This site is similar to the adenosine A2 receptor. We call this site the adenosine A2-like binding site. In detergent extracts, the second site is detected and has the characteristics of an adenosine A1 receptor. The soluble adenosine A2-like binding site cannot be detected without a rapid assay. Binding to the adenosine A1 receptor with [3H]-2-chloroadenosine and [3H]NECA is time dependent, saturable, and reversible. Equilibrium displacement analysis with adenosine agonists reveals an A1 specificity: 2-chloroadenosine > R-phenylisopropyladenosine > 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine. The antagonist potency order is 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine > isobutylmethylxanthine > theophylline. Competition analysis of membranes with the A,-selective ligands [3H]-cyclohexyladenosine [3H] cylopentylxanthine revealed adenosine A1 agonist and antagonist potency orders. We have purified the adenosine A2-like binding site. The adenosine A2-like binding site is an ubiquitous major cellular protein. It is glycosylated, highly asymmetric, and acidic. The native protein is an homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of 98 kDa. The sedimentation coefficient and partial specific volume of the binding complex are 6.9 s and 0.698 ml/g, respectively. The Stokes' radius is 70 Angstrom. The native molecular mass of the detergent-protein complex is 230 kDa. The adenosine A2-like binding site has an agonist potency order of 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > 2-chloroadenosine >> R-phenylisopropyladenosine and an antagonist potency order of isobutylmethylxanthine > theophylline >> 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine

  9. Characterization of adenosine binding proteins in human placental membranes

    Hutchison, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    We have characterized two adenosine binding proteins in human placenta. In membranes, one site is detected with ({sup 3}H) -N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (({sup 3}H)NECA). This site is similar to the adenosine A{sub 2} receptor. We call this site the adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site. In detergent extracts, the second site is detected and has the characteristics of an adenosine A{sub 1} receptor. The soluble adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site cannot be detected without a rapid assay. Binding to the adenosine A{sub 1} receptor with ({sup 3}H)-2-chloroadenosine and ({sup 3}H)NECA is time dependent, saturable, and reversible. Equilibrium displacement analysis with adenosine agonists reveals an A{sub 1} specificity: 2-chloroadenosine > R-phenylisopropyladenosine > 5{prime}-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine. The antagonist potency order is 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine > isobutylmethylxanthine > theophylline. Competition analysis of membranes with the A,-selective ligands ({sup 3}H)-cyclohexyladenosine ({sup 3}H) cylopentylxanthine revealed adenosine A{sub 1} agonist and antagonist potency orders. We have purified the adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site. The adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site is an ubiquitous major cellular protein. It is glycosylated, highly asymmetric, and acidic. The native protein is an homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of 98 kDa. The sedimentation coefficient and partial specific volume of the binding complex are 6.9 s and 0.698 ml/g, respectively. The Stokes' radius is 70 {Angstrom}. The native molecular mass of the detergent-protein complex is 230 kDa. The adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site has an agonist potency order of 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > 2-chloroadenosine >> R-phenylisopropyladenosine and an antagonist potency order of isobutylmethylxanthine > theophylline >> 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine.

  10. High-dose adenosine overcomes the attenuation of myocardial perfusion reserve caused by caffeine.

    Reyes, E.; Loong, C Y; Harbinson, Mark; Donovan, J; Anagnostopoulos, C.; Underwood, S. R.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives:We studied whether an increase in adenosine dose overcomes caffeine antagonism on adenosine-mediated coronary vasodilation.Background:Caffeine is a competitive antagonist at the adenosine receptors, but it is unclear whether caffeine in coffee alters the actions of exogenous adenosine, and whether the antagonism can be surmounted by increasing the adenosine dose.Methods:Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) was used to assess adenosine-induced hyperemia in 30 patients before (bas...

  11. Adenosine and its receptors as therapeutic targets: An overview

    Sachdeva, Sakshi; Gupta, Monika

    2012-01-01

    The main goal of the authors is to present an overview of adenosine and its receptors, which are G-protein coupled receptors. The four known adenosine receptor subtypes are discussed along with the therapeutic potential indicating that these receptors can serve as targets for various dreadful diseases.

  12. Effect of theophylline on adenosine production in the canine myocardium

    Adenosine is thought to participate in local regulation of coronary blood flow. However, competitive antagonists of adenosine fail to block myocardial active hyperemia. The authors examined the effect of locally administered theophylline on active hyperemia and myocardial adenosine production during intracoronary isoproterenol infusion in the dog heart. Isoproterenol decreased coronary resistance and increased myocardial adenosine production. Infusion of theophylline at a rate that attenuated the vasodilator response to exogenously administered adenosine failed to attenuate the increase in coronary blood flow produced by isoproterenol. However, theophylline plus isoproterenol production greater increases in myocardial adensine production than isoproterenol alone. The curves relating resistance and adenosine in the presence of theophylline fell to the right of those in the absence of theophylline. These findings suggest that the failure of theophylline to attenuate isoproterenol hyperemia in the dog heart results at least in part from an increase in adenosine concentration at the arteriole to a level beyond that blocked by this competitive antagonist and that adenosine may in fact play a role in isoproterenol-induced active hyperemia

  13. A High-Affinity Adenosine Kinase from Anopheles Gambiae

    M Cassera; M Ho; E Merino; E Burgos; A Rinaldo-Matthis; S Almo; V Schramm

    2011-12-31

    Genome analysis revealed a mosquito orthologue of adenosine kinase in Anopheles gambiae (AgAK; the most important vector for the transmission of Plasmodium falciparum in Africa). P. falciparum are purine auxotrophs and do not express an adenosine kinase but rely on their hosts for purines. AgAK was kinetically characterized and found to have the highest affinity for adenosine (K{sub m} = 8.1 nM) of any known adenosine kinase. AgAK is specific for adenosine at the nucleoside site, but several nucleotide triphosphate phosphoryl donors are tolerated. The AgAK crystal structure with a bound bisubstrate analogue Ap{sub 4}A (2.0 {angstrom} resolution) reveals interactions for adenosine and ATP and the geometry for phosphoryl transfer. The polyphosphate charge is partly neutralized by a bound Mg{sup 2+} ion and an ion pair to a catalytic site Arg. The AgAK structure consists of a large catalytic core in a three-layer {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} sandwich, and a small cap domain in contact with adenosine. The specificity and tight binding for adenosine arise from hydrogen bond interactions of Asn14, Leu16, Leu40, Leu133, Leu168, Phe168, and Thr171 and the backbone of Ile39 and Phe168 with the adenine ring as well as through hydrogen bond interactions between Asp18, Gly64, and Asn68 and the ribosyl 2'- and 3'-hydroxyl groups. The structure is more similar to that of human adenosine kinase (48% identical) than to that of AK from Toxoplasma gondii (31% identical). With this extraordinary affinity for AgAK, adenosine is efficiently captured and converted to AMP at near the diffusion limit, suggesting an important role for this enzyme in the maintenance of the adenine nucleotide pool. mRNA analysis verifies that AgAK transcripts are produced in the adult insects.

  14. Extracellular formation and uptake of adenosine during skeletal muscle contraction in the rat: role of adenosine transporters.

    Lynge, J; Juel, C; Hellsten, Y

    2001-12-01

    1. The existence of adenosine transporters in plasma membrane giant vesicles from rat skeletal muscles and in primary skeletal muscle cell cultures was investigated. In addition, the contribution of intracellularly or extracellularly formed adenosine to the overall extracellular adenosine concentration during muscle contraction was determined in primary skeletal muscle cell cultures. 2. In plasma membrane giant vesicles, the carrier-mediated adenosine transport demonstrated saturation kinetics with Km = 177 +/- 36 microM and Vmax = 1.9 +/- 0.2 nmol x ml(-1) x s(-1) (0.7 nmol (mg protein)(-1) x s(-1)). The existence of an adenosine transporter was further evidenced by the inhibition of the carrier-mediated adenosine transport in the presence of NBMPR (nitrobenzylthioinosine; 72% inhibition) or dipyridamol (64% inhibition; P electro-stimulation of skeletal muscle is due to production of adenosine in the extracellular space of skeletal muscle and that adenosine is taken up rather than released by the skeletal muscle cells during contraction. PMID:11731589

  15. A kinetic description for sodium and potassium effects on (Na+ plus K+)-adenosine triphosphatase: a model for a two-nonequivalent site potassium activation and an analysis of multiequivalent site models for sodium activation.

    Lindenmayer, G E; Schwartz, A; Thompson, H K

    1974-01-01

    1. Dissociation constants for sodium and potassium of a site that modulates the rate of ouabain-(Na(+)+K(+))-ATPase interaction were applied to models for potassium activation of (Na(+)+K(+))-ATPase. The constants for potassium (0.213 mM) and for sodium (13.7 mM) were defined, respectively, as activation constant, K(a) and inhibitory constant, K(i).2. Tests of the one- and the two-equivalent site models, that describe sodium and potassium competition, revealed that neither model adequately predicts the activation effects of potassium in the presence of 100 or 200 mM sodium.3. The potassium-activation data, obtained at low potassium and high sodium, were explained by a two-nonequivalent site model where the dissociation constants of the first site are 0.213 mM for potassium and 13.7 mM for sodium. The second site was characterized by dissociation constants of 0.091 mM for potassium and 74.1 mM for sodium.4. The two-nonequivalent site model adequately predicted the responses to concentrations of potassium between 0.25 and 5 mM in the presence of 100-500 mM sodium. At lower sodium concentrations the predicted responses formed an upper limit for the function of observed activities. This limit was reached at lower concentrations of potassium and higher concentrations of sodium, which inferred saturation of the sodium-activation sites with sodium.5. Sodium-activation data were corrected for sodium interaction with potassium-activation sites by use of the two-nonequivalent site model for potassium activation. Tests of equivalent site models suggested that the corrected data for sodium activation may be most consistent with a model that has three-equivalent sites. Other multiequivalent site models (n = 2, 4, 5 or 6), however, cannot be statistically eliminated as possibilities. The three-equivalent site activation model was characterized by dissociation constants of 1.39 mM for sodium and 11.7 mM for potassium. The system theoretically would be half-maximally activated by 5.35 mM sodium in the absence of potassium.6. Derivation of the model for sodium activation assumed that the affinities of these sites for sodium and potassium are independent of cation interactions with the potassium-activation sites. Therefore, the kinetic descriptions for sodium and potassium effects form a composite model that is consistent with simultaneous transport of sodium and potassium.7. Predictions of the composite equation are in reasonable agreement with data obtained by variation of sodium (potassium = 10 mM), variation of potassium (sodium = 100 mM) and by simultaneous variation of sodium and potassium (sodium:potassium = 10). Sodium-activation data (2.5-20 mM sodium) also agree with predictions of the model in the presence of potassium concentrations which are thought to be present at the sodium-activation sites in vivo.8. The kinetic description for sodium (three-equivalent sites) and potassium (two-nonequivalent sites) activation of the transport-ATPase is in accord with the probable stoichiometric requirements of the sodium pump. The model is also in general agreement with other studies on intact transporting systems and (Na(+)+K(+))-ATPase in fragmented membrane preparations with respect to potassium activation, although there is a quantitative disagreement. The model for sodium activation, though consistent with data obtained by other studies on fragmented (Na(+)+K(+))-ATPase preparations, is in apparent variance with much of the data obtained for intact transporting systems. The description for potassium activation suggests that the rates of ouabain binding to (Na(+)+K(+))-ATPase are modulated by competition between sodium and potassium for one of the two potassium-activation sites. PMID:4274214

  16. Common channels for water and protons at apical and basolateral cell membranes of frog skin and urinary bladder epithelia. Effects of oxytocin, heavy metals, and inhibitors of H(+)-adenosine triphosphatase

    Harvey, B.; Lacoste, I.; Ehrenfeld, J. (Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Villefranche-sur-mer (France))

    1991-04-01

    We have compared the response of proton and water transport to oxytocin treatment in isolated frog skin and urinary bladder epithelia to provide further insights into the nature of water flow and H+ flux across individual apical and basolateral cell membranes. In isolated spontaneous sodium-transporting frog skin epithelia, lowering the pH of the apical solution from 7.4 to 6.4, 5.5, or 4.5 produced a fall in pHi in principal cells which was completely blocked by amiloride, indicating that apical Na+ channels are permeable to protons. When sodium transport was blocked by amiloride, the H+ permeability of the apical membranes of principal cells was negligible but increased dramatically after treatment with antidiuretic hormone (ADH). In the latter condition, lowering the pH of the apical solution caused a voltage-dependent intracellular acidification, accompanied by membrane depolarization, and an increase in membrane conductance and transepithelial current. These effects were inhibited by adding Hg2+ (100 microM) or dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD, 10(-5) M) to the apical bath. Net titratable H+ flux across frog skin was increased from 30 +/- 8 to 115 +/- 18 neq.h-1.cm-2 (n = 8) after oxytocin treatment (at apical pH 5.5 and serosal pH 7.4) and was completely inhibited by DCCD (10(-5) M). The basolateral membranes of the principal cells in frog skin epithelium were found to be spontaneously permeable to H+ and passive electrogenic H+ transport across this membrane was not affected by oxytocin. Lowering the pH of the basolateral bathing solution (pHb) produced an intracellular acidification and membrane depolarization (and an increase in conductance when the normal dominant K+ conductance of this membrane was abolished by Ba2+ 1 mM). These effects of low pHb were blocked by micromolar concentrations of heavy metals (Zn2+, Ni2+, Co2+, Cd2+, and Hg2+).

  17. The role of adenosine receptors and endogenous adenosine in citalopram-induced cardiovascular toxicity

    Kubilay Oransay; Nil Hocaoglu; Mujgan Buyukdeligoz; Yesim Tuncok; Sule Kalkan

    2014-01-01

    Aim: We investigated the role of adenosine in citalopram-induced cardiotoxicity. Materials and Methods: Protocol 1: Rats were randomized into four groups. Sodium cromoglycate was administered to rats. Citalopram was infused after the 5% dextrose, 8-Cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX; A 1 receptor antagonist), 8-(-3-chlorostyryl)-caffeine (CSC; A 2a receptor antagonist), or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) administrations. Protocol 2: First group received 5% dextrose intraperitoneally 1 hour...

  18. Modulation of bladder function by luminal adenosine turnover and A1 receptor activation

    Prakasam, H. Sandeep; Herrington, Heather; Roppolo, James R.; Jackson, Edwin K.; Apodaca, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    The bladder uroepithelium transmits information to the underlying nervous and musculature systems, is under constant cyclical strain, expresses all four adenosine receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3), and is a site of adenosine production. Although adenosine has a well-described protective effect in several organs, there is a lack of information about adenosine turnover in the uroepithelium or whether altering luminal adenosine concentrations impacts bladder function or overactivity. We observed ...

  19. Proton transfer in oxidized adenosine self-aggregates.

    Capobianco, Amedeo; Caruso, Tonino; Celentano, Maurizio; La Rocca, Mario Vincenzo; Peluso, Andrea

    2013-10-14

    The UV-vis and the IR spectra of derivativized adenosine in dichloromethane have been recorded during potentiostatic oxidation at an optically transparent thin layer electrode. Oxidized adenosine shows a broad Zundel like absorption extending from 2800 up to 3600 cm(-1), indicating that a proton transfer process is occurring. Theoretical computations predict that proton transfer is indeed favored in oxidized 1:1 self-association complexes and allow to assign all the observed transient spectroscopic signals. PMID:24116647

  20. Distribution of adenosine receptors in human sclera fibroblasts

    Cui, Dongmei; Trier, Klaus; Chen, Xiang; Zeng, Junwen; Yang, Xiao; Hu, Jianmin; Ge, Jian

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Systemic treatment with adenosine receptor antagonists has been reported to affect the biochemistry and ultrastructure of rabbit sclera. This study was conducted to determine whether adenosine receptors (ADORs) are present in human scleral fibroblasts (HSF). Methods Primary HSF were cultured in vitro and identified with anti-vimentin, anti-keratin, anti-desmin, and anti-S-100 antibodies. Confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to study the distribution of ADORs in the HSF cell lines...

  1. The major nucleoside triphosphatase in pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclei and in rat liver nuclei share common epitopes also present in nuclear lamins

    Tong, C. G.; Dauwalder, M.; Clawson, G. A.; Hatem, C. L.; Roux, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    The major nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) activities in mammalian and pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclei are associated with enzymes that are very similar both biochemically and immunochemically. The major NTPase from rat liver nuclei appears to be a 46-kD enzyme that represents the N-terminal portion of lamins A and C, two lamina proteins that apparently arise from the same gene by alternate splicing. Monoclonal antibody (MAb) G2, raised to human lamin C, both immunoprecipitates the major (47 kD) NTPase in pea nuclei and recognizes it in western blot analyses. A polyclonal antibody preparation raised to the 47-kD pea NTPase (pc480) reacts with the same lamin bands that are recognized by MAb G2 in mammalian nuclei. The pc480 antibodies also bind to the same lamin-like bands in pea nuclear envelope-matrix preparations that are recognized by G2 and three other MAbs known to bind to mammalian lamins. In immunofluorescence assays, pc480 and anti-lamin antibodies stain both cytoplasmic and nuclear antigens in plant cells, with slightly enhanced staining along the periphery of the nuclei. These results indicate that the pea and rat liver NTPases are structurally similar and that, in pea nuclei as in rat liver nuclei, the major NTPase is probably derived from a lamin precursor by proteolysis.

  2. Regulation of Adenosine Deaminase on Induced Mouse Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis.

    Liang, Dongchun; Zuo, Aijun; Zhao, Ronglan; Shao, Hui; Kaplan, Henry J; Sun, Deming

    2016-03-15

    Adenosine is an important regulator of the immune response, and adenosine deaminase (ADA) inhibits this regulatory effect by converting adenosine into functionally inactive molecules. Studies showed that adenosine receptor agonists can be anti- or proinflammatory. Clarification of the mechanisms that cause these opposing effects should provide a better guide for therapeutic intervention. In this study, we investigated the effect of ADA on the development of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) induced by immunizing EAU-prone mice with a known uveitogenic peptide, IRBP1-20. Our results showed that the effective time to administer a single dose of ADA to suppress induction of EAU was 8-14 d postimmunization, shortly before EAU expression; however, ADA treatment at other time points exacerbated disease. ADA preferentially inhibited Th17 responses, and this effect was γδ T cell dependent. Our results demonstrated that the existing immune status strongly influences the anti- or proinflammatory effects of ADA. Our observations should help to improve the design of ADA- and adenosine receptor-targeted therapies. PMID:26856700

  3. Antagonism by theophylline of respiratory inhibition induced by adenosine.

    Eldridge, F L; Millhorn, D E; Kiley, J P

    1985-11-01

    The effects on respiration of an analogue of adenosine, L-2-N6-(phenylisopropyl)adenosine (PIA), and of the methylxanthine, theophylline, were determined in 19 vagotomized glomectomized cats whose end-tidal PCO2 was kept constant by means of a servo-controlled ventilator. Integrated phrenic nerve activity was used to represent respiratory output. Our results show that PIA, whether given systemically or into the third cerebral ventricle, depressed respiration. Systemically administered theophylline stimulated respiration. Theophylline given intravenously, or into the third ventricle not only reversed the depressive effects of previously administered PIA but caused further increases of respiration above the control level. Prior systemic administration of theophylline blocked both respiratory and hypotensive effects of subsequently administered PIA. Effects of either agent on medullary extracellular fluid pH did not explain the results. We conclude that the adenosine analogue PIA, acts to inhibit neurons in the brain that are involved in the control of respiration and that its effects are blocked by theophylline. We suggest that adenosine acts as a tonic modulator of respiration and that theophylline stimulates breathing by competitive antagonism of adenosine at neuronal receptor sites. PMID:4066573

  4. Modification of survival of gamma irradiated mice by adenosine nucleotides

    The administration prior to irradiation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) or other adenosine nucleotides, singly or in combination, increased the radioresistance of mice. Post-irradiation treatment with the adenosine nucleotides had no effect on the survival of the irradiated mice. Dose reduction factors of 2.32 could be obtained by pretreatment of mice with the following combination of protective agents: S-2(4-aminobutylamino)ethyl phosphorothioic aced (WR 2822), cysteamine (MEA) and ATP. Since cyclic AMP levels were unchanged in the spleen or gut by administration of cysteamine and other protectors it is unlikely that the increase in protection was due to changes in cyclic AMP levels. The calcium salt of ATP provided a higher level of protection than the ATP alone, indicating that the protective mechanism of ATP is probably not related to anoxia. (orig.)

  5. Thallium-201 scintigraphy of the myocardium in connection with adenosine

    It is shown that thallium-201 SPECT studies of the myocardium performed subsequent to intravenous infusion of adenosine provide results at least as valuable as those from exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. The infusion of adenosine offers great advantages over exercise studies in that it is a standardized procedure uninfluenced by a patient's physical fitness, which can thus be used in all cases. There are quite a number of clinically tolerable untoward reactions that may be associated with discomfort but do not warrant discontinuation of the procedure. Serious, verifiable side-effects are rare and disappear immediately on termination of the infusion. The most recent research in this field has shown that newly developed compounds of 99mTc are also suitable for radionuclide studies of the myocardium with adenosine vasodilation. (orig.)

  6. DMPD: Shaping of monocyte and macrophage function by adenosine receptors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Full Text Available 17056121 Shaping of monocyte and macrophage function by adenosine receptors. Hasko G, Pacher...e Shaping of monocyte and macrophage function by adenosine receptors. Authors Hasko G, Pacher

  7. Investigating real-time activation of adenosine receptors by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique

    Huang, Yimei; Yang, Hongqin; Zheng, Liqin; Chen, Jiangxu; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen

    2013-02-01

    Adenosine receptors play important roles in many physiological and pathological processes, for example regulating myocardial oxygen consumption and the release of neurotransmitters. The activations of adenosine receptors have been studied by some kinds of techniques, such as western blot, immunohistochemistry, etc. However, these techniques cannot reveal the dynamical response of adenosine receptors under stimulation. In this paper, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique was introduced to study the real-time activation of adenosine receptors by monitoring the dynamics of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) level. The results showed that there were significant differences between adenosine receptors on real-time responses under stimulation. Moreover, the dynamics of cAMP level demonstrated that competition between adenosine receptors existed. Taken together, our study indicates that monitoring the dynamics of cAMP level using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique could be one potential approach to investigate the mechanism of competitions between adenosine receptors.

  8. Tween 20-stabilized gold nanoparticles combined with adenosine triphosphate-BODIPY conjugates for the fluorescence detection of adenosine with more than 1000-fold selectivity

    Graphical abstract: A simple, enzyme-free, label-free, sensitive and selective system was developed for detecting adenosine based on the use of Tween 20-stabilized gold nanoparticles as an efficient quencher for boron dipyrromethene-conjugated adenosine 5′-triphosphate and as a recognition element for adenosine. - Highlights: • The proposed method can detect adenosine with more than 1000-fold selectivity. • The analysis of adenosine is rapid (∼6 min) using the proposed method. • This method provided better sensitivity for adenosine as compared to aptamer-based sensors. • This method can be applied for the determination of adenosine in urine. - Abstract: This study describes the development of a simple, enzyme-free, label-free, sensitive, and selective system for detecting adenosine based on the use of Tween 20-stabilized gold nanoparticles (Tween 20-AuNPs) as an efficient fluorescence quencher for boron dipyrromethene-conjugated adenosine 5′-triphosphate (BODIPY-ATP) and as a recognition element for adenosine. BODIPY-ATP can interact with Tween 20-AuNPs through the coordination between the adenine group of BODIPY-ATP and Au atoms on the NP surface, thereby causing the fluorescence quenching of BODIPY-ATP through the nanometal surface energy transfer (NSET) effect. When adenosine attaches to the NP surface, the attached adenosine exhibits additional electrostatic attraction to BODIPY-ATP. As a result, the presence of adenosine enhances the efficiency of AuNPs in fluorescence quenching of BODIPY-ATP. The AuNP-induced fluorescence quenching of BODIPY-ATP progressively increased with an increase in the concentration of adenosine; the detection limit at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 for adenosine was determined to be 60 nM. The selectivity of the proposed system was more than 1000-fold for adenosine over any adenosine analogs and other nucleotides. The proposed system combined with a phenylboronic acid-containing column was successfully applied to the

  9. Why do premature newborn infants display elevated blood adenosine levels?

    Panfoli, Isabella; Cassanello, Michela; Bruschettini, Matteo; Colella, Marina; Cerone, Roberto; Ravera, Silvia; Calzia, Daniela; Candiano, Giovanni; Ramenghi, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Our preliminary data show high levels of adenosine in the blood of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, positively correlating to their prematurity (i.e. body weight class). This prompted us to look for a mechanism promoting such impressive adenosine increase. We hypothesized a correlation with oxygen challenge. In fact, it is recognized that either oxygen lack or its excess contribute to the pathogenesis of the injuries of prematurity, such as retinopathy (ROP) and periventricular white matter lesions (PWMI). The optimal concentration of oxygen for resuscitation of VLBW infants is currently under revision. We propose that the elevated adenosine blood concentrations of VLBW infants recognizes two sources. The first could be its activity-dependent release from unmyelinated brain axons. Adenosine in this respect would be an end-product of the hypometabolic VLBW newborn unmyelinated axon intensely firing in response to the environmental stimuli consequent to premature birth. Adenosine would be eventually found in the blood due to blood-brain barrier immaturity. In fact, adenosine is the primary activity-dependent signal promoting differentiation of premyelinating oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPC) into myelinating cells in the Central Nervous System, while inhibiting their proliferation and inhibiting synaptic function. The second, would be the ecto-cellular ATP synthesized by the endothelial cell plasmalemma exposed to ambient oxygen concentrations due to premature breathing, especially in lung. ATP would be rapidly transformed into adenosine by the ectonucleotidase activities such as NTPDase I (CD39), and NT5E (CD73). An ectopic extra-mitochondrial aerobic ATP synthetic ability was reported in many cell plasma-membranes, among which endothelial cells. The potential implications of the cited hypotheses for the neonatology area would be great. The amount of oxygen administration for reviving of newborns would find a molecular basis for its assessment. VLBW

  10. No role of interstitial adenosine in insulin-mediated vasodilation

    Dela, F; Stallknecht, B

    1999-01-01

    healthy subjects (H) and in four subjects with a complete, high (C5-C6/7) spinal cord injury (SCI) a hyperinsulinaemic (480 mU min-1 kg-1), isoglycaemic clamp was performed. SCI subjects were included as it has been proposed that adenosine and adenine nucleotides may be released from nerve endings in the...... skeletal muscle. Adenosine concentrations in the extracellular fluid (ECF) of skeletal muscle in the thigh were measured by means of the microdialysis technique. Leg blood flow (LBF) was measured by termodilution. In response to insulin infusion, LBF always increased (P < 0.05) (from 228 +/- 25 and 318...

  11. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate phosphodiesterase in brain: effect on anxiety.

    Beer, B; Chasin, M; Clody, D E; Vogel, J R

    1972-04-28

    Drugs that reduce anxiety may be mediated by cyclic adenosine monophosphate in the brain because (i) potent anxiety-reducing drugs are also potent inhibitors of brain phosphodiesterase activity; (ii) dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate has the ability to reduce anxiety; (iii) the methylxanthines show significant anxiety-reducing effects; (iv) theophylline and chlordiazepoxide produce additive anxiety-reducing activity; and (v) there is a significant correlation between the anxiety-reducing property of drugs and their ability to inhibit phosphodiesterase activity in the brain. PMID:4402069

  12. Adenosine transiently modulates stimulated dopamine release in the caudate putamen via A1 receptors

    Ross, Ashley E.; Venton, B. Jill

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine modulates dopamine in the brain via A1 and A2A receptors, but that modulation has only been characterized on a slow time scale. Recent studies have characterized a rapid signaling mode of adenosine that suggests a possible rapid modulatory role. Here, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry was used to characterize the extent to which transient adenosine changes modulate stimulated dopamine release (5 pulses at 60 Hz) in rat caudate putamen brain slices. Exogenous adenosine was applied and dop...

  13. Adenosine and a selective A2a receptor agonist regadenoson used in myocardial stress test

    Adenosine pharmacological myocardial stress test has been widely used in clinic. However, the side effects related with adenosine administration has been an issue of controversy. Current Phase Ⅲ study of regadenoson, a selective A2a receptor agonist, reveals its potential to substitute adenosine as a new agent for pharmacological myocardial stress test. This review briefs adenosine and regadenoson and their clinical utilities in myocardial stress test. (authors)

  14. Cytotoxic purine nucleoside analogues bind to A1, A2A and A3 adenosine receptors

    Jensen, Kyle; Johnson, L’Aurelle A.; Jacobson, Pamala A.; Kachler, Sonja; Kirstein, Mark N.; Lamba, Jatinder; Klotz, Karl-Norbert

    2012-01-01

    Fludarabine, clofarabine and cladribine are anti-cancer agents which are analogues of the purine nucleoside adenosine. These agents have been associated with cardiac and neurological toxicities. Because these agents are analogues of adenosine, they may act through adenosine receptors to elicit their toxic effects. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of cytotoxic nucleoside analogues to bind and activate adenosine receptor subtypes (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3). Radioligand bindin...

  15. Adenosine as a signaling molecule in the retina: biochemical and developmental aspects

    ROBERTO PAES-DE-CARVALHO

    2002-01-01

    The nucleoside adenosine plays an important role as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the central nervous system, including the retina. In the present paper we review compelling evidence showing that adenosine is a signaling molecule in the developing retina. In the chick retina, adenosine transporters are present since early stages of development before the appearance of adenosine A1 receptors modulating dopamine-dependent adenylate cyclase activity or A2 receptors that directly activa...

  16. The adenosine metabolite inosine is a functional agonist of the adenosine A2A receptor with a unique signaling bias.

    Welihinda, Ajith A; Kaur, Manmeet; Greene, Kelly; Zhai, Yongjiao; Amento, Edward P

    2016-06-01

    Inosine is an endogenous purine nucleoside that is produced by catabolism of adenosine. Adenosine has a short half-life (approximately 10s) and is rapidly deaminated to inosine, a stable metabolite with a half-life of approximately 15h. Resembling adenosine, inosine acting through adenosine receptors (ARs) exerts a wide range of anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects in vivo. The immunomodulatory effects of inosine in vivo, at least in part, are mediated via the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), an observation that cannot be explained fully by in vitro pharmacological characterization of inosine at the A2AR. It is unclear whether the in vivo effects of inosine are due to inosine or a metabolite of inosine engaging the A2AR. Here, utilizing a combination of label-free, cell-based, and membrane-based functional assays in conjunction with an equilibrium agonist-binding assay we provide evidence for inosine engagement at the A2AR and subsequent activation of downstream signaling events. Inosine-mediated A2AR activation leads to cAMP production with an EC50 of 300.7μM and to extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 and -2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation with an EC50 of 89.38μM. Our data demonstrate that inosine produces ERK1/2-biased signaling whereas adenosine produces cAMP-biased signaling at the A2AR, highlighting pharmacological differences between these two agonists. Given the in vivo stability of inosine, our data suggest an additional, previously unrecognized, mechanism that utilizes inosine to functionally amplify and prolong A2AR activation in vivo. PMID:26903141

  17. Contraction induced secretion of VEGF from skeletal muscle cells is mediated by adenosine

    Høier, Birgitte; Olsen, Karina; Nyberg, Michael Permin; Bangsbo, Jens; Hellsten, Ylva

    2010-01-01

    and during knee extensor exercise. The dialysate was analyzed for content of VEGF protein and adenosine. The mechanism of VEGF secretion from muscle cells in culture was examined in resting and electro stimulated cells, and in response to the adenosine analogue NECA, and the adenosine A(2A) receptor...

  18. Inosine triphosphatase allele frequency and association with ribavirin-induced anaemia in Brazilian patients receiving antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C

    Nathália Delvaux

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Inosine triphosphatase (ITPA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are strongly associated with protection against ribavirin (RBV-induced anaemia in European, American and Asian patients; however, there is a paucity of data for Brazilian patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ITPA SNP (rs7270101/rs1127354 frequency in healthy and hepatitis C virus (HCV-infected patients from Brazil and the association with the development of severe anaemia during antiviral therapy. ITPA SNPs were determined in 200 HCV infected patients and 100 healthy individuals by sequencing. Biochemical parameters and haemoglobin (Hb levels were analysed in 97 patients who underwent antiviral therapy. A combination of AArs7270101+CCrs1127354 (100% ITPase activity was observed in 236/300 individuals. Anaemia was observed in 87.5% and 86.2% of treated patients with AA (rs7270101 and CC genotypes (rs1127354, respectively. Men with AA (rs7270101 showed a considerable reduction in Hb at week 12 compared to those with AC/CC (p = 0.1475. In women, there was no influence of genotype (p = 0.5295. For rs1127354, men with the CC genotype also showed a sudden reduction in Hb compared to those with AC. Allelic distribution of rs7270101 and rs1127354 shows high rates of the genotypes AA and CC, respectively, suggesting that the study population had a great propensity for developing RBV-induced anaemia. A progressive Hb reduction during treatment was observed; however, this reduction was greater in men at week 12 than in women.

  19. Searching Inhibitors of Adenosine Kinase by Simulation Methods

    ZHU Rui-Xin; ZHANG Xing-Long; DONG Xi-Cheng; CHEN Min-Bo

    2006-01-01

    Searching new inhibitors of adenosine kinase (AK) is still drawing attention of experimental scientists. A better and solid model is here proposed by means of simulation methods from different ways, the direct analysis of receptor itself, the conventional 3D-QSAR methods and the integration of docking method and the conventional QSAR analysis.

  20. Adenosine receptor modulation of seizure susceptibility in rats

    Adenosine is considered to be a neuromodulator or cotransmitter in the periphery and CNS. This neuromodulatory action of adenosine may be observed as an anticonvulsant effect. Dose-response curves for R-phenylisopropyladenosine (PIA), cycohexyladenosine (CHA), 2-chloroadenosine (2-ClAdo), N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) and S-PIA were generated against PTZ seizure thresholds in the rat. The rank order of potency for adenosine agonists to elevate PTZ seizure threshold was R-PIA > 2-ClAdo > NECA > CHA > S-PIA. R-PIA was approximately 80-fold more potent than S-PIA. This 80-fold difference in potency between the diasteriomers of PIA was consistent with an A1 adenoise receptor-mediated response. The anticonvulsant action of 2-ClAdo was reversed by pretreatment with theoplylline. Chronic administration of theophylline significantly increased the specific binding of 3H-cyclohexyladenosine in membranes of the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of the rat. Chronic exposure to theophylline produced a significant increase in the densities of both the high- and low-affinity forms of A1 adenosine receptors in the cerebral cortex

  1. Mechanism of A2 adenosine receptor activation. I. Blockade of A2 adenosine receptors by photoaffinity labeling

    Lohse, M.J.; Klotz, K.N.; Schwabe, U.

    1991-04-01

    It has previously been shown that covalent incorporation of the photoreactive adenosine derivative (R)-2-azido-N6-p-hydroxy-phenylisopropyladenosine ((R)-AHPIA) into the A1 adenosine receptor of intact fat cells leads to a persistent activation of this receptor, resulting in a reduction of cellular cAMP levels. In contrast, covalent incorporation of (R)-AHPIA into human platelet membranes, which contain only stimulatory A2 adenosine receptors, reduces adenylate cyclase stimulation via these receptors. This effect of (R)-AHPIA is specific for the A2 receptor and can be prevented by the adenosine receptor antagonist theophylline. Binding studies indicate that up to 90% of A2 receptors can be blocked by photoincorporation of (R)-AHPIA. However, the remaining 10-20% of A2 receptors are sufficient to mediate an adenylate cyclase stimulation of up to 50% of the control value. Similarly, the activation via these 10-20% of receptors occurs with a half-life that is only 2 times longer than that in control membranes. This indicates the presence of a receptor reserve, with respect to both the extent and the rate of adenylate cyclase stimulation. These observations require a modification of the models of receptor-adenylate cyclase coupling.

  2. Metabolic changes of cultured DRG neurons induced by adenosine using confocal microscopy imaging

    Zheng, Liqin; Huang, Yimei; Chen, Jiangxu; Wang, Yuhua; Yang, Hongqin; Zhang, Yanding; Xie, Shusen

    2012-12-01

    Adenosine exerts multiple effects on pain transmission in the peripheral nervous system. This study was performed to use confocal microscopy to evaluate whether adenosine could affect dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons in vitro and test which adenosine receptor mediates the effect of adenosine on DRG neurons. After adding adenosine with different concentration, we compared the metabolic changes by the real time imaging of calcium and mitochondria membrane potential using confocal microscopy. The results showed that the effect of 500 μM adenosine on the metabolic changes of DRG neurons was more significant than others. Furthermore, four different adenosine receptor antagonists were used to study which receptor mediated the influences of adenosine on the cultured DRG neurons. All adenosine receptor antagonists especially A1 receptor antagonist (DPCPX) had effect on the Ca2+ and mitochondria membrane potential dynamics of DRG neurons. The above studies demonstrated that the effect of adenosine which may be involved in the signal transmission on the sensory neurons was dose-dependent, and all the four adenosine receptors especially the A1R may mediate the transmission.

  3. Adenosine contributes to blood flow regulation in the exercising human leg by increasing prostaglandin and nitric oxide formation

    Mortensen, Stefan; Nyberg, Michael; Thaning, Pia;

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine can induce vasodilation in skeletal muscle, but to what extent adenosine exerts its effect via formation of other vasodilators and whether there is redundancy between adenosine and other vasodilators remain unclear. We tested the hypothesis that adenosine, prostaglandins, and NO act in...

  4. Adenosine-mediated modulation of ventral horn interneurons and spinal motoneurons in neonatal mice.

    Witts, Emily C; Nascimento, Filipe; Miles, Gareth B

    2015-10-01

    Neuromodulation allows neural networks to adapt to varying environmental and biomechanical demands. Purinergic signaling is known to be an important modulatory system in many parts of the CNS, including motor control circuitry. We have recently shown that adenosine modulates the output of mammalian spinal locomotor control circuitry (Witts EC, Panetta KM, Miles GB. J Neurophysiol 107: 1925-1934, 2012). Here we investigated the cellular mechanisms underlying this adenosine-mediated modulation. Whole cell patch-clamp recordings were performed on ventral horn interneurons and motoneurons within in vitro mouse spinal cord slice preparations. We found that adenosine hyperpolarized interneurons and reduced the frequency and amplitude of synaptic inputs to interneurons. Both effects were blocked by the A1-type adenosine receptor antagonist DPCPX. Analysis of miniature postsynaptic currents recorded from interneurons revealed that adenosine reduced their frequency but not amplitude, suggesting that adenosine acts on presynaptic receptors to modulate synaptic transmission. In contrast to interneurons, recordings from motoneurons revealed an adenosine-mediated depolarization. The frequency and amplitude of synaptic inputs to motoneurons were again reduced by adenosine, but we saw no effect on miniature postsynaptic currents. Again these effects on motoneurons were blocked by DPCPX. Taken together, these results demonstrate differential effects of adenosine, acting via A1 receptors, in the mouse spinal cord. Adenosine has a general inhibitory action on ventral horn interneurons while potentially maintaining motoneuron excitability. This may allow for adaptation of the locomotor pattern generated by interneuronal networks while helping to ensure the maintenance of overall motor output. PMID:26311185

  5. Abiotic regioselective phosphorylation of adenosine with borate in formamide.

    Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kim, Hyo-Joong; Hutter, Daniel; Benner, Steven A

    2015-04-01

    Nearly 40 years ago, Schoffstall and his coworkers used formamide as a solvent to permit the phosphorylation of nucleosides by inorganic phosphate to give nucleoside phosphates, which (due to their thermodynamic instability with respect to hydrolysis) cannot be easily created in water by an analogous phosphorylation (the "water problem" in prebiotic chemistry). More recently, we showed that borate could stabilize certain carbohydrates against degradation (the "asphalt problem"). Here, we combine the two concepts to show that borate can work in formamide to guide the reactivity of nucleosides under conditions where they are phosphorylated. Specifically, reaction of adenosine in formamide with inorganic phosphate and pyrophosphate in the presence of borate gives adenosine-5'-phosphate as the only detectable phosphorylated product, with formylation (as opposed to hydrolysis) being the competing reaction. PMID:25826074

  6. Effects of adenosine metabolism in astrocytes on central nervous system oxygen toxicity.

    Chen, Yu-liang; Zhang, Ya-nan; Wang, Zhong-zhuang; Xu, Wei-gang; Li, Run-ping; Zhang, Jun-dong

    2016-03-15

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) is widely used in military operations, especially underwater missions. However, prolonged and continuous inhalation of HBO can cause central nervous system oxygen toxicity (CNS-OT), which greatly limits HBO's application. The regulation of astrocytes to the metabolism of adenosine is involved in epilepsy. In our study, we aimed to observe the effects of HBO exposure on the metabolism of adenosine in the brain. Furthermore, we aimed to confirm the possible mechanism underlying adenosine's mediation of the CNS-OT. Firstly, anesthetized rats exposed to 5 atm absolute HBO for 80 min. The concentrations of extracellular adenosine, ATP, ADP, and AMP were detected. Secondly, free-moving rats were exposed to HBO at the same pressure for 20 min, and the activities of 5'-nucleotidase and ADK in brain tissues were measured. For the mechanism studies, we observed the effects of a series of different doses of drugs related to adenosine metabolism on the latency of CNS-OT. Results showed HBO exposure could increase adenosine content by inhibiting ADK activity and improving 5'-nucleotidase activity. And adenosine metabolism during HBO exposure may be a protective response against HBO-induced CNS-OT. Moreover, the improvement of adenosine concentration, activation of adenosine A1R, or suppression of ADK and adenosine A2AR, which are involved in the prevention of HBO-induced CNS-OT. This is the first study to demonstrate HBO exposure regulated adenosine metabolism in the brain. Adenosine metabolism and adenosine receptors are related to HBO-induced CNS-OT development. These results will provide new potential targets for the termination or the attenuation of CNS-OT. PMID:26806404

  7. Adenosine receptors and stress : Studies using methylmercury, caffeine and hypoxia

    Björklund, Olga

    2008-01-01

    Brain development is a precisely organized process that can be disturbed by various stress factors present in the diet (e.g. exposure to xenobiotics) as well as insults such as decreased oxygen supply. The consequent adverse changes in nervous system function may not necessarily be apparent until a critical age when neurodevelopmental defects may be unmasked by a subsequent challenge. Adenosine and its receptors (AR) (A1, A2A, A2B and A3) which participate in the brain stres...

  8. Adenosine Signaling in Striatal Circuits and Alcohol Use Disorders

    Nam, Hyung Wook; Bruner, Robert C.; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine signaling has been implicated in the pathophysiology of alcohol use disorders and other psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression. Numerous studies have indicated a role for A1 receptors (A1R) in acute ethanol-induced motor incoordination, while A2A receptors (A2AR) mainly regulate the rewarding effect of ethanol in mice. Recent findings have demonstrated that dampened A2AR-mediated signaling in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) promotes ethanol-seeking behaviors. Moreover, ...

  9. The emerging role of adenosine deaminases in insects

    Doleželová, Eva; Žurovec, Michal; Doležal, T.; Šimek, Petr; Bryant, P. J.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 5 (2005), s. 381-389. ISSN 0965-1748 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/04/1205; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5007107 Grant ostatní: United States National Science Foundation(US) 440860-21565 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : adenosine deaminase * ADA * growth factor Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.733, year: 2005

  10. Myocardial energy metabolism in ischemic preconditioning, role of adenosine catabolism

    Kavianipour, Mohammad

    2002-01-01

    Brief episodes of ischemia and reperfusion render the myocardium more resistant to necrosis from a subsequent, otherwise lethal ischemic insult. This phenomenon is called ischemic preconditioning(IP). Today, much is known about the signalling pathways involved in IP; however, the details of the final steps leading to cardioprotection, remain elusive. Adenosine (a catabolite of ATP) plays a major role in the signalling pathways of IP. Following IP there is an unexplained discrepancy between an...

  11. Adenosine signaling in striatal circuits and alcohol use disorders.

    Nam, Hyung Wook; Bruner, Robert C; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2013-09-01

    Adenosine signaling has been implicated in the pathophysiology of alcohol use disorders and other psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression. Numerous studies have indicated a role for A1 receptors (A1R) in acute ethanol-induced motor incoordination, while A2A receptors (A2AR) mainly regulate the rewarding effect of ethanol in mice. Recent findings have demonstrated that dampened A2AR-mediated signaling in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) promotes ethanol-seeking behaviors. Moreover, decreased A2AR function is associated with decreased CREB activity in the DMS, which enhances goal-oriented behaviors and contributes to excessive ethanol drinking in mice. Interestingly, caffeine, the most commonly used psychoactive substance, is known to inhibit both the A1R and A2AR. This dampened adenosine receptor function may mask some of the acute intoxicating effects of ethanol. Furthermore, based on the fact that A2AR activity plays a role in goal-directed behavior, caffeine may also promote ethanol-seeking behavior. The A2AR is enriched in the striatum and exclusively expressed in striatopallidal neurons, which may be responsible for the regulation of inhibitory behavioral control over drug rewarding processes through the indirect pathway of the basal ganglia circuit. Furthermore, the antagonistic interactions between adenosine and dopamine receptors in the striatum also play an integral role in alcoholism and addiction-related disorders. This review focuses on regulation of adenosine signaling in striatal circuits and the possible implication of caffeine in goal-directed behaviors and addiction. PMID:23912595

  12. Anxiolytic activity of adenosine receptor activation in mice.

    Jain, N; Kemp, N; Adeyemo, O; Buchanan, P; Stone, T W

    1995-10-01

    1. Purine analogues have been examined for anxiolytic- and anxiogenic-like activity in mice, by use of the elevated plus-maze. 2. The selective A1 receptor agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) had marked anxiolytic-like activity at 10 and 50 microg kg(-1), with no effect on locomotor performance at these doses. 3. The A1 selective adenosine receptor antagonist, 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (CPX) had no significant effect on anxiety-related measures or locomotor behaviour, but blocked the anxiolytic-like activity of CPA. The hydrophilic xanthine, 8-(p-sulphophenyl) theophylline did not prevent anxiolysis by CPA. 4. Caffeine had anxiogenic-like activity at 30 mg kg(-1) which was prevented by CPA at 50 micro kg(-1). 5. The A2 receptor agonist, N6-[2-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2(2-methylphenyl)-ethyl]adenosine (DPMA) had no effect on anxiety behaviour but depressed locomotor activity at the highest dose tested of 1 mg kg(-1). The A2 receptor antagonist, 1,3-dimethyl-l-propargylxanthine (DMPX) had no effect on anxiety-related measures or locomotion and did not modify the anxiolytic-like activity of CPA. 6. Administration of DPMA in combination with anxiolytic doses of CPA prevented the anxiolytic-like activity of the latter. 7. The results suggest that the selective activation of central A1 adenosine receptors induces anxiolytic-like behaviour, while the activation of A2 sites causes locomotor depression and reduces the effects of A1 receptor activation. The absence of any effect of CPX alone suggests that the receptors involved in modulating behaviour in the elevated plus-maze in mice are not activated tonically by endogenous adenosine. PMID:8640355

  13. Intracellular signalling pathways in the vasoconstrictor response of mouse afferent arterioles to adenosine

    Hansen, Pernille B. Lærkegaard; Friis, Ulla Glenert; Uhrenholt, Torben Rene;

    2007-01-01

    calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), stimulated presumably by IP(3), is involved in the adenosine contraction mechanism of the afferent arteriole. In agreement with this notion is the observation that 2 aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (100 microM) blocked the adenosine-induced constriction whereas the...... protein kinase C inhibitor calphostin C had no effect. The calcium-activated chloride channel inhibitor IAA-94 (30 microM) inhibited the adenosine-mediated constriction. Patch clamp experiments showed that adenosine treatment induced a depolarizing current in preglomerular smooth muscle cells which was....... METHODS AND RESULTS: Adenosine (10(-7) M) significantly increased the intracellular calcium concentration in mouse isolated afferent arterioles measured by fura-2 fluorescence. Pre-treatment with thapsigargin (2 microM) blocked the vasoconstrictor action of adenosine (10(-7) M) indicating that release of...

  14. Adenosine A1 Receptor Antagonist Versus Montelukast on Airway Reactivity and Inflammation

    Nadeem, Ahmed; Obiefuna, Peter C.M.; Wilson, Constance N.; Mustafa, S. Jamal

    2006-01-01

    Adenosine produces bronchoconstriction in allergic rabbits, primates, and humans by activating adenosine A1 receptors. Previously, it is reported that a high dose of L-97-1, a water-soluble, small molecule adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, blocks early and late allergic responses, and bronchial hyper-responsiveness to histamine in a hyper-responsive rabbit model of allergic asthma. Effects of a lower dose of L-97-1 are compared to montelukast, a cysteinyl leukotriene-1 receptor antagonist on ...

  15. Traditional Acupuncture Triggers a Local Increase in Adenosine in Human Subjects

    Takano, Takahiro; Chen, Xiaolin; Luo, Fang; Fujita, Takumi; Ren, Zeguang; Goldman, Nanna; Zhao, Yuanli; Markman, John D.; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2012-01-01

    Acupuncture is a form of Eastern medicine that has been practiced for centuries. Despite its long history and worldwide application, the biological mechanisms of acupuncture in relieving pain have been poorly defined. Recent studies in mice, however, demonstrate that acupuncture triggers increases in interstitial adenosine, which reduces the severity of chronic pain through adenosine A1 receptors, suggesting that adenosine-mediated antinociception contributes to the clinical benefits of acupu...

  16. Preventive Effect of Phytic Acid on Isoproterenol-Induced Cardiotoxicity in Wistar Rats

    Brindha, E.; Rajasekapandiyan, M.

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the preventive role of phytic acid on membrane bound enzymes such as sodium potassium- dependent adenosine triphosphatase (Na+ /K+ ATPase), calcium-dependent adenosine triphosphatase (Ca2+ ATPase) and magnesium- dependent adenosine triphosphatase (Mg2+ ATPase) and glycoproteins such as hexose, hexosamine, fucose and sialic acid in isoproterenol (ISO)-induced myocardial infarction (MI) in rats. Male albino Wistar rats were pretreated with phytic acid (25 and 50...

  17. Respiratory stimulant effects of adenosine in man after caffeine and enprofylline.

    Smits, P; Schouten, J; Thien, T.

    1987-01-01

    In a double-blind and randomized study the respiratory stimulant effect of continuous intravenous adenosine infusion was studied after previous administration of caffeine, placebo and enprofylline in 10 healthy young volunteers. After placebo, adenosine induced an increase of minute ventilation (from 6.3 to 12.5 l min-1), tidal volume (from 0.60 to 0.96 l), and breathing rate (from 11.0 to 14.8 min-1). Venous pCO2 fell and pH rose after adenosine. Caffeine significantly reduced the adenosine-...

  18. Effects of adenosine and adenosine A2A receptor agonist on motor nerve conduction velocity and nerve blood flow in experimental diabetic neuropathy.

    Kumar, Sokindra; Arun, K H S; Kaul, Chaman L; Sharma, Shyam S

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the effects of chronic administration of adenosine and CGS 21680 hydrochloride (adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist) on motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV), nerve blood flow (NBF) and histology of sciatic nerve in animal model of diabetic neuropathy. Adenosinergic agents were administered for 2 weeks after 6 weeks of streptozotocin-induced (50 mg/kg i.p.) diabetes in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Significant reduction in sciatic MNCV and NBF were observed after 8 weeks in diabetic animals in comparison with control (non diabetic) rats. Adenosine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly improved sciatic MNCV and NBF in diabetic rats. The protective effect of adenosine on MNCV and NBF was completely reversed by theophylline (50 mg/kg, i.p.), a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist, suggesting that the adenosine effect was mediated via adenosinergic receptors. CGS 21680 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly improved NBF; however, MNCV was not significantly improved in diabetic rats. At a dose of 1 mg/kg, neither MNCV nor NBF was improved by CGS 21680 in diabetic rats. ZM 241385 (adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist) prevented the effect of CGS 21680 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.). Histological changes observed in sciatic nerve were partially improved by the adenosinergic agents in diabetic rats. Results of the present study, suggest the potential of adenosinergic agents in the therapy of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:15829161

  19. Characterization of spontaneous, transient adenosine release in the caudate-putamen and prefrontal cortex.

    Michael D Nguyen

    Full Text Available Adenosine is a neuroprotective agent that inhibits neuronal activity and modulates neurotransmission. Previous research has shown adenosine gradually accumulates during pathologies such as stroke and regulates neurotransmission on the minute-to-hour time scale. Our lab developed a method using carbon-fiber microelectrodes to directly measure adenosine changes on a sub-second time scale with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV. Recently, adenosine release lasting a couple of seconds has been found in murine spinal cord slices. In this study, we characterized spontaneous, transient adenosine release in vivo, in the caudate-putamen and prefrontal cortex of anesthetized rats. The average concentration of adenosine release was 0.17±0.01 µM in the caudate and 0.19±0.01 µM in the prefrontal cortex, although the range was large, from 0.04 to 3.2 µM. The average duration of spontaneous adenosine release was 2.9±0.1 seconds and 2.8±0.1 seconds in the caudate and prefrontal cortex, respectively. The concentration and number of transients detected do not change over a four hour period, suggesting spontaneous events are not caused by electrode implantation. The frequency of adenosine transients was higher in the prefrontal cortex than the caudate-putamen and was modulated by A1 receptors. The A1 antagonist DPCPX (8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, 6 mg/kg i.p. increased the frequency of spontaneous adenosine release, while the A1 agonist CPA (N(6-cyclopentyladenosine, 1 mg/kg i.p. decreased the frequency. These findings are a paradigm shift for understanding the time course of adenosine signaling, demonstrating that there is a rapid mode of adenosine signaling that could cause transient, local neuromodulation.

  20. Is adenosine a modulator of peripheral vasoconstrictor responses?

    Dayan, Lior; Brill, Silviu; Hochberg, Uri; Jacob, Giris

    2016-01-01

    Background Local vasoconstrictor reflexes, the vascular myogenic response (VMR) and the veno-arterial reflex (VAR) are necessary for the maintenance of regional blood flow and systemic arterial blood pressure during orthostatic stress. Their molecular mechanism is unknown. We postulated that adenosine is involved in the activation of these local reflexes. Methods This hypothesis was tested in 10 healthy male volunteers (age 29 ± 3 years, BMI 24 ± 1 kg/m2). We used veno-occlusive plethysmograp...

  1. Differential response of Drosophila cell lines to extracellular adenosine

    Fleischmannová, J.; Kučerová, Lucie; Šandová, Kateřina; Steinbauerová, Veronika; Brož, Václav; Šimek, Petr; Žurovec, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 5 (2012), s. 321-331. ISSN 0965-1748 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06077 Grant ostatní: AV ČR(CZ) KJB501410801; European Community´s Seventh Framwork Programme (FP7/2007-2013)(CZ) 229518 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : adenosine recycling * nucleoside transport * Mbn2 Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0965174812000033

  2. Anxiolytic activity of adenosine receptor activation in mice.

    Jain, N; Kemp, N; Adeyemo, O; Buchanan, P.; Stone, T W

    1995-01-01

    1. Purine analogues have been examined for anxiolytic- and anxiogenic-like activity in mice, by use of the elevated plus-maze. 2. The selective A1 receptor agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) had marked anxiolytic-like activity at 10 and 50 microg kg(-1), with no effect on locomotor performance at these doses. 3. The A1 selective adenosine receptor antagonist, 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (CPX) had no significant effect on anxiety-related measures or locomotor behaviour, but blocked ...

  3. Comparison of exogenous adenosine and voluntary exercise on human skeletal muscle perfusion and perfusion heterogeneity

    Heinonen, Ilkka H.A.; Kemppainen, Jukka; Kaskinoro, Kimmo;

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine is a widely used pharmacological agent to induce a 'high flow' control condition to study the mechanisms of exercise hyperemia, but it is not known how well adenosine infusion depicts exercise-induced hyperemia especially in terms of blood flow distribution at the capillary level in hum...

  4. Role of adenosine in regulating the heterogeneity of skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise in humans

    Heinonen, Ilkka; Nesterov, Sergey V; Kemppainen, Jukka;

    2007-01-01

    Evidence from both animal and human studies suggests that adenosine plays a role in the regulation of exercise hyperemia in skeletal muscle. We tested whether adenosine also plays a role in the regulation of blood flow (BF) distribution and heterogeneity among and within quadriceps femoris (QF...

  5. Stimulation of adenosine receptors: approach to enhancement of hematopoiesis suppressed by chemoradiotherapy

    Elevated extracellular adenosine has been found to stimulate hematopoiesis in experimental mice exposed to radiotherapy (gamma-rays), chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil), or combined action of both these modalities (gamma-rays + carboplatin). These findings have been obtained after treatment of the animals with the combination of dipyridamole (DP), preventing the cellular uptake of adenosine, and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), acting as adenosine prodrug. Increased cycling of hematopoietic progenitor cells following the administration of DP + AMP has been shown to represent an important mechanism of acceleration of regeneration of suppressed hematopoiesis. In recent experiments, non-degradable synthetic adenosine receptor agonists, more or less specific for individual subtypes of adenosine receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3 subtypes) have been studied. These studies have included 5'-(N-ethylcarboxamido)adenosine (NECA, rather non-selective agonist with relatively high affinity to A2B receptor subtype), N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, agonist specific for A1 receptor subtype), 2-p-(carboxyethyl)phene thylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS 21680, agonist specific for A2A receptor subtype), and 1-deoxy-1-([((3- iodophenyl)methyl)-amino]-9H-purin-9-yl)-N-methyl-beta-D-ribofuranoamide (IB-MECA, agonist specific for A3 receptor subtype). Results from these studies have stressed the potential significance of stimulation of various adenosine receptor subtypes for modulation of functional status of hematopoietic progenitor cells. These findings may find important practical implications in the treatment of side effects of chemoradiotherapy

  6. Role of adenosine in the sympathetic activation produced by isometric exercise in humans.

    Costa, F.; Biaggioni, I

    1994-01-01

    Isometric exercise increases sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure. This exercise pressor reflex is partly mediated by metabolic products activating muscle afferents (metaboreceptors). Whereas adenosine is a known inhibitory neuromodulator, there is increasing evidence that it activates afferent nerves. We, therefore, examined the hypothesis that adenosine stimulates muscle afferents and participates in the exercise pressor reflex in healthy volunteers. Intraarterial administration of...

  7. Lack of adenosine A(3) receptors causes defects in mouse peripheral blood parameters

    Hofer, Michal; Pospíšil, Milan; Dušek, L.; Hoferová, Zuzana; Komůrková, Denisa

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 3 (2014), s. 509-514. ISSN 1573-9538 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0128 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Adenosine A(3) receptor * Adenosine A(3) receptor knockout mice * Hematopoiesis Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.886, year: 2014

  8. Feed-Forward Inhibition of CD73 and Upregulation of Adenosine Deaminase Contribute to the Loss of Adenosine Neuromodulation in Postinflammatory Ileitis

    Cátia Vieira; Maria Teresa Magalhães-Cardoso; Fátima Ferreirinha; Isabel Silva; Ana Sofia Dias; Julie Pelletier; Jean Sévigny; Paulo Correia-de-Sá

    2014-01-01

    Purinergic signalling is remarkably plastic during gastrointestinal inflammation. Thus, selective drugs targeting the “purinome” may be helpful for inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases. The myenteric neuromuscular transmission of healthy individuals is fine-tuned and controlled by adenosine acting on A2A excitatory receptors. Here, we investigated the neuromodulatory role of adenosine in TNBS-inflamed longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus of the rat ileum. Seven-day postinflammation ileitis ...

  9. Adenosine signaling and the energetic costs of induced immunity.

    Lazzaro, Brian P

    2015-04-01

    Life history theory predicts that trait evolution should be constrained by competing physiological demands on an organism. Immune defense provides a classic example in which immune responses are presumed to be costly and therefore come at the expense of other traits related to fitness. One strategy for mitigating the costs of expensive traits is to render them inducible, such that the cost is paid only when the trait is utilized. In the current issue of PLOS Biology, Bajgar and colleagues elegantly demonstrate the energetic and life history cost of the immune response that Drosophila melanogaster larvae induce after infection by the parasitoid wasp Leptopilina boulardi. These authors show that infection-induced proliferation of defensive blood cells commands a diversion of dietary carbon away from somatic growth and development, with simple sugars instead being shunted to the hematopoetic organ for rapid conversion into the raw energy required for cell proliferation. This metabolic shift results in a 15% delay in the development of the infected larva and is mediated by adenosine signaling between the hematopoietic organ and the central metabolic control organ of the host fly. The adenosine signal thus allows D. melanogaster to rapidly marshal the energy needed for effective defense and to pay the cost of immunity only when infected. PMID:25915419

  10. Adenosine signaling and the energetic costs of induced immunity.

    Brian P Lazzaro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Life history theory predicts that trait evolution should be constrained by competing physiological demands on an organism. Immune defense provides a classic example in which immune responses are presumed to be costly and therefore come at the expense of other traits related to fitness. One strategy for mitigating the costs of expensive traits is to render them inducible, such that the cost is paid only when the trait is utilized. In the current issue of PLOS Biology, Bajgar and colleagues elegantly demonstrate the energetic and life history cost of the immune response that Drosophila melanogaster larvae induce after infection by the parasitoid wasp Leptopilina boulardi. These authors show that infection-induced proliferation of defensive blood cells commands a diversion of dietary carbon away from somatic growth and development, with simple sugars instead being shunted to the hematopoetic organ for rapid conversion into the raw energy required for cell proliferation. This metabolic shift results in a 15% delay in the development of the infected larva and is mediated by adenosine signaling between the hematopoietic organ and the central metabolic control organ of the host fly. The adenosine signal thus allows D. melanogaster to rapidly marshal the energy needed for effective defense and to pay the cost of immunity only when infected.

  11. Adenosine Amine Congener as a Cochlear Rescue Agent

    Srdjan M. Vlajkovic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that adenosine amine congener (ADAC, a selective A1 adenosine receptor agonist, can ameliorate noise- and cisplatin-induced cochlear injury. Here we demonstrate the dose-dependent rescue effects of ADAC on noise-induced cochlear injury in a rat model and establish the time window for treatment. Methods. ADAC (25–300 μg/kg was administered intraperitoneally to Wistar rats (8–10 weeks old at intervals (6–72 hours after exposure to traumatic noise (8–16 kHz, 110 dB sound pressure level, 2 hours. Hearing sensitivity was assessed using auditory brainstem responses (ABR before and 12 days after noise exposure. Pharmacokinetic studies investigated ADAC concentrations in plasma after systemic (intravenous administration. Results. ADAC was most effective in the first 24 hours after noise exposure at doses >50 μg/kg, providing up to 21 dB protection (averaged across 8–28 kHz. Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated a short (5 min half-life of ADAC in plasma after intravenous administration without detection of degradation products. Conclusion. Our data show that ADAC mitigates noise-induced hearing loss in a dose- and time-dependent manner, but further studies are required to establish its translation as a clinical otological treatment.

  12. Distribution of adenosine receptors in human sclera fibroblasts

    Cui, Dongmei; Trier, Klaus; Chen, Xiang; Zeng, Junwen; Yang, Xiao; Hu, Jianmin

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Systemic treatment with adenosine receptor antagonists has been reported to affect the biochemistry and ultrastructure of rabbit sclera. This study was conducted to determine whether adenosine receptors (ADORs) are present in human scleral fibroblasts (HSF). Methods Primary HSF were cultured in vitro and identified with anti-vimentin, anti-keratin, anti-desmin, and anti-S-100 antibodies. Confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to study the distribution of ADORs in the HSF cell lines and in the frozen human scleral sections. ADOR protein expression in HSF and human sclera was confirmed by western blot analysis of cell lysates. Results ADORs were expressed in both HSF and human sclera. This was confirmed by western blot. ADORA1 expression was concentrated in the nucleus. ADORA2A was concentrated mainly in one side of the cytoplasm, and ADORA2B was found both in the nucleus and the cytoplasm. ADORA3 was expressed weakly in the cytoplasm. Conclusions All four subtypes of ADOR were found in HSF and may play a role in scleral remodeling. PMID:18385786

  13. Cloning, expression and pharmacological characterization of rabbit adenosine A1 and A3 receptors.

    Hill, R J; Oleynek, J J; Hoth, C F; Kiron, M A; Weng, W; Wester, R T; Tracey, W R; Knight, D R; Buchholz, R A; Kennedy, S P

    1997-01-01

    The role of adenosine A1 and A3 receptors in mediating cardioprotection has been studied predominantly in rabbits, yet the pharmacological characteristics of rabbit adenosine A1 and A3 receptor subtypes are unknown. Thus, the rabbit adenosine A3 receptor was cloned and expressed, and its pharmacology was compared with that of cloned adenosine A1 receptors. Stable transfection of rabbit A1 or A3 cDNAs in Chinese hamster ovary-K1 cells resulted in high levels of expression of each of the receptors, as demonstrated by high-affinity binding of the A1/A3 adenosine receptor agonist N6-(4-amino-3-[125I]iodobenzyl)adenosine (125I-ABA). For both receptors, binding of 125I-ABA was inhibited by the GTP analog 5'-guanylimidodiphosphate, and forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation was inhibited by the adenosine receptor agonist (R)-phenylisopropyladenosine. The rank orders of potency of adenosine receptor agonists for inhibition of 125I-ABA binding were as follows: rabbit A1, N6-cyclopentyladenosine = (R)-phenylisopropyladenosine > N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > or = I-ABA > or = N6-2-(4-aminophenyl) ethyladenosine > > N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide > N6-(4-amino-3-benzyl)adenosine; rabbit A3, N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide > or = I-ABA > > N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > N6-2-(4-aminophenyl) ethyladenosine = N6-cyclopentyladenosine = (R)-phenylisopropyladenosine > N6-(4-amino-3-benzyl)adenosine. The adenosine receptor antagonist rank orders were as follow: rabbit A1, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine > 1,3- dipropyl-8-(4-acrylate)phenylxanthine > or = xanthine amine congener > > 8-(p-sulfophenyl)theophylline; rabbit A3, xanthine amine congener > 1,3-dipropyl-8-(4-acrylate)phenylxanthine > or = 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine > > 8-(p-sulfophenyl)theophylline. These observations confirm the identity of the expressed proteins as A1 and A3 receptors. The results will facilitate further in-depth studies of the roles of A1 and A3 receptors in

  14. Quantitative analysis of adenosine using Liquid Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization - tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC/APCI-MS/MS)

    Van Dycke, Annelies; Verstraete, Alain; Pil, Kristof; Raedt, Robrecht; Vonck, Kristl; Boison, Detlev; Boon, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine-secreting cellular brain implants constitute a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of epilepsy. To engineer neural stem cells for therapeutic adenosine delivery, a reliable and fast analytical method is necessary to quantify cell-based adenosine release. Here we describe the development, optimization and validation of adenosine measurement using liquid chromatography – atmospheric pressure chemical ionization – tandem mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS/MS). LC-MS/MS in posit...

  15. Distinct Roles for the A2B Adenosine Receptor in Acute and Chronic Stages of Bleomycin-Induced Lung Injury

    Yang ZHOU; Schneider, Daniel J.; Morschl, Eva; Song, Ling; Pedroza, Mesias; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Le, Thuy.; Sun, Chun-Xiao; Blackburn, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine is an extracellular signaling molecule that is generated in response to cell injury where it orchestrates tissue protection and repair. Whereas adenosine is best known for promoting anti-inflammatory activities during acute injury responses, prolonged elevations can enhance destructive tissue remodeling processes associated with chronic disease states. The generation of adenosine and the subsequent activation of the adenosine 2B receptor (A2BR) is an important processes in the regul...

  16. Adenosine stimulates DNA fragmentation in human thymocytes by Ca(2+)-mediated mechanisms.

    Szondy, Z

    1994-12-15

    Incubation of human thymocytes with an optimum concentration of adenosine and its receptor site agonist, 2-chloroadenosine, induced increases in intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) (from a resting 0.6 +/- 0.1 to 4.1 +/- 0.2 pmol/10(7) cells within 5 min) and Ca2+ (from the resting 85 +/- 7 nM to a peak of 210 +/- 25 nM) levels and resulted in internucleosomal DNA fragmentation and cell death (apoptosis). Other adenosine analogues were also effective at inducing DNA fragmentation, the order of potency being 2-p-(carboxyethylphenylethylamino)-5'-carboxyamidoadenosine 13399-13402], at 60 ng/ml concentration also prevented adenosine-induced DNA fragmentation when added prior to adenosine. This suggested a complex cross-talk between the adenosine-triggered signal transduction cascade and the activation state of protein kinase C in regulating apoptosis of human thymocytes. PMID:7818494

  17. Interaction of porphyrins with adenine and adenosine complexes. Effect of a metal nature

    Reactions of complex formation of 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphine (H2TPP) and tetra-tert-butylphthalocyanine (H2(t-Bu)4Pc) with adenine and adenosine complexes of d-metals (M=Cd, Co, Cu, Hg, Zn) in DMSO and ethanol are studied. It was found that H2TPP reacts with Cu(II) and Hg(II) adeninates and adenosinates in DMSO, but does not react with Zn(II), Co(II), and Cd(II) adeninates and adenosinates (with both bridging and monodentate type of the ligand coordination). H2(t-Bu)4Pc enters the complex formation reaction with adeninates and adenosinates of all studied metals in DMSO at almost equal rates. The states of adenine and adenosine complexes of different d-metals in DMSO and ethanol are proposed on the basis of kinetic data obtained

  18. 2-(1-Hexyn-1-yl)adenosine-induced intraocular hypertension is mediated via K+ channel opening through adenosine A2A receptor in rabbits.

    Konno, Takashi; Uchibori, Takehiro; Nagai, Akihiko; Kogi, Kentaro; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2005-08-22

    The present study was performed to clarify the mechanism of change in intraocular pressure by 2-(1-hexyn-1-yl)adenosine (2-H-Ado), a selective adenosine A2 receptor agonist, in rabbits. 2-H-Ado (0.1%, 50 microl)-induced ocular hypertension (E(max): 7.7 mm Hg) was inhibited by an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist 1,3,7-trimethyl-8-(3-chlorostyryl)xanthine, ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker glibenclamide or 5-hydroxydecanoic acid, but not by an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, an adenosine A2B receptor antagonist alloxazine or a cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. The outflow facility induced by 2-H-Ado seems to be independent of increase in intraocular pressure or ATP-sensitive K+ channel. In contrast, the recovery rate in intraocular pressure decreased by hypertonic saline was accelerated by 2-H-Ado, and this response was dependent on ATP-sensitive K+ channel. These results suggest that 2-H-Ado-induced ocular hypertension is mediated via K+ channel opening through adenosine A2A receptor, and this is probably due to aqueous formation, but independent of change in outflow facility or prostaglandin production. PMID:16023100

  19. Autophagy occurs within an hour of adenosine triphosphate treatment after nerve cell damage:the neuroprotective effects of adenosine triphosphate against apoptosis

    Na Lu; Baoying Wang; Xiaohui Deng; Honggang Zhao; Yong Wang; Dongliang Li

    2014-01-01

    After hypoxia, ischemia, or inlfammatory injuries to the central nervous system, the damaged cells release a large amount of adenosine triphosphate, which may cause secondary neuronal death. Autophagy is a form of cell death that also has neuroprotective effects. Cell Counting Kit assay, monodansylcadaverine staining, lfow cytometry, western blotting, and real-time PCR were used to determine the effects of exogenous adenosine triphosphate treatment at different concentrations (2, 4, 6, 8, 10 mmol/L) over time (1, 2, 3, and 6 hours) on the apoptosis and autophagy of SH-SY5Y cells. High concentrations of extracellular adenosine triphosphate induced autophagy and apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells. The enhanced autophagy ifrst appeared, and peaked at 1 hour after treatment with adenosine triphosphate. Cell apoptosis peaked at 3 hours, and persisted through 6 hours. With prolonged exposure to the adenosine triphosphate treatment, the fraction of apoptotic cells increased. These data suggest that the SH-SY5Y neural cells initiated autophagy against apoptosis within an hour of adenosine triphosphate treatment to protect themselves against injury.

  20. Involvement of adenosine A2a receptor in intraocular pressure decrease induced by 2-(1-octyn-1-yl)adenosine or 2-(6-cyano-1-hexyn-1-yl)adenosine.

    Konno, Takashi; Murakami, Akira; Uchibori, Takehiro; Nagai, Akihiko; Kogi, Kentaro; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2005-04-01

    The aim of the present study is to clarify the mechanism for the decrease in intraocular pressure by 2-alkynyladenosine derivatives in rabbits. The receptor binding analysis revealed that 2-(1-octyn-1-yl)adenosine (2-O-Ado) and 2-(6-cyano-1-hexyn-1-yl)adenosine (2-CN-Ado) selectively bound to the A(2a) receptor with a high affinity. Ocular hypotensive responses to 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado were inhibited by the adenosine A(2a)-receptor antagonist 1,3,7-trimethyl-8-(3-chlorostyryl)xanthine (CSC), but not by the adenosine A(1)-receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) or the adenosine A(2b)-receptor antagonist alloxazine. In addition, 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado caused an increase in outflow facility, which was inhibited by CSC, but not by DPCPX or alloxazine. Moreover, 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado increased cAMP in the aqueous humor, and the 2-O-Ado-induced an increase in cAMP was inhibited by CSC. These results suggest that 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado reduced intraocular pressure via an increase in outflow facility. The ocular hypotension may be mainly mediated through the activation of adenosine A(2a) receptor, although a possible involvement of adenosine A(1) receptor cannot be completely ruled out. 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado are useful lead compounds for the treatment of glaucoma. PMID:15821340

  1. Specificity of synergistic coronary flow enhancement by adenosine and pulsatile perfusion in the dog.

    Pagliaro, P; Senzaki, H; Paolocci, N; Isoda, T; Sunagawa, G; Recchia, F A; Kass, D A

    1999-10-01

    1. Coronary flow elevation from enhanced perfusion pulsatility is synergistically amplified by adenosine. This study determined the specificity of this interaction and its potential mechanisms. 2. Mean and phasic coronary flow responses to increasing pulsatile perfusion were assessed in anaesthetized dogs, with the anterior descending coronary artery servoperfused to regulate real-time physiological flow pulsatility at constant mean pressure. Pulsatility was varied between 40 and 100 mmHg. Hearts ejected into the native aorta whilst maintaining stable loading. 3. Increasing pulsatility elevated mean coronary flow +11.5 +/- 1.7 % under basal conditions. Co-infusion of adenosine sufficient to raise baseline flow 66 % markedly amplified this pulsatile perfusion response (+82. 6 +/- 14.3 % increase in mean flow above adenosine baseline), due to a leftward shift of the adenosine-coronary flow response curve at higher pulsatility. Flow augmentation with pulsatility was not linked to higher regional oxygen consumption, supporting direct rather than metabolically driven mechanisms. 4. Neither bradykinin, acetylcholine nor verapamil reproduced the synergistic amplification of mean flow by adenosine and higher pulsatility, despite being administered at doses matching basal flow change with adenosine. 5. ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) activation (pinacidil) amplified the pulse-flow response 3-fold, although this remained significantly less than with adenosine. Co-administration of the phospholipase A2 inhibitor quinacrine virtually eliminated adenosine-induced vasodilatation, yet synergistic interaction between adenosine and pulse perfusion persisted, albeit at a reduced level. 6. Thus, adenosine and perfusion pulsatility specifically interact to enhance coronary flow. This synergy is partially explained by KATP agonist action and additional non-flow-dependent mechanisms, and may be important for modulating flow reserve during exercise or other high output states where

  2. Real-time monitoring of extracellular adenosine using enzyme-linked microelectrode arrays.

    Hinzman, Jason M; Gibson, Justin L; Tackla, Ryan D; Costello, Mark S; Burmeister, Jason J; Quintero, Jorge E; Gerhardt, Greg A; Hartings, Jed A

    2015-12-15

    Throughout the central nervous system extracellular adenosine serves important neuroprotective and neuromodulatory functions. However, current understanding of the in vivo regulation and effects of adenosine is limited by the spatial and temporal resolution of available measurement techniques. Here, we describe an enzyme-linked microelectrode array (MEA) with high spatial (7500 µm(2)) and temporal (4 Hz) resolution that can selectively measure extracellular adenosine through the use of self-referenced coating scheme that accounts for interfering substances and the enzymatic breakdown products of adenosine. In vitro, the MEAs selectively measured adenosine in a linear fashion (r(2)=0.98±0.01, concentration range=0-15 µM, limit of detection =0.96±0.5 µM). In vivo the limit of detection was 0.04±0.02 µM, which permitted real-time monitoring of the basal extracellular concentration in rat cerebral cortex (4.3±1.5 µM). Local cortical injection of adenosine through a micropipette produced dose-dependent transient increases in the measured extracellular concentration (200 nL: 6.8±1.8 µM; 400 nL: 19.4±5.3 µM) [P<0.001]. Lastly, local injection of dipyridamole, which inhibits transport of adenosine through equilibrative nucleoside transporter, raised the measured extracellular concentration of adenosine by 120% (5.6→12.3 µM) [P<0.001]. These studies demonstrate that MEAs can selectively measure adenosine on temporal and spatial scales relevant to adenosine signaling and regulation in normal and pathologic states. PMID:26183072

  3. Overexpression, purification and crystallographic analysis of a unique adenosine kinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Adenosine kinase from M. tuberculosis has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized in the presence of adenosine. Structure determination using molecular replacement with diffraction data collected at 2.2 Å reveals a dimeric structure. Adenosine kinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the only prokaryotic adenosine kinase that has been isolated and characterized. The enzyme catalyzes the phosphorylation of adenosine to adenosine monophosphate and is involved in the activation of 2-methyladenosine, a compound that has demonstrated selective activity against M. tuberculosis. The mechanism of action of 2-methyladenosine is likely to be different from those of current tuberculosis treatments and this compound (or other adenosine analogs) may prove to be a novel therapeutic intervention for this disease. The M. tuberculosis adenosine kinase was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and the enzyme was purified with activity comparable to that reported previously. The protein was crystallized in the presence of adenosine using the vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted X-rays to high resolution and a complete data set was collected to 2.2 Å using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belonged to space group P3121, with unit-cell parameters a = 70.2, c = 111.6 Å, and contained a single protein molecule in the asymmetric unit. An initial structural model of the protein was obtained by the molecular-replacement method, which revealed a dimeric structure. The monomers of the dimer were related by twofold crystallographic symmetry. An understanding of how the M. tuberculosis adenosine kinase differs from the human homolog should aid in the design of more potent and selective antimycobacterial agents that are selectively activated by this enzyme

  4. Online cleanup of accelerated solvent extractions for determination of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) in royal jelly using high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Xue, Xiaofeng; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Jinhui; Chen, Fang; Li, Yi; Zhao, Jing

    2009-06-10

    Determination of the levels of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) in royal jelly is important for the study of its pharmacological activities, health benefits, and adenosine phosphate degradation. In this study was developed a novel method to determine ATP, ADP, and AMP levels in royal jelly using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) followed by online cleanup and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with diode array detection (DAD). The optimum extraction conditions were obtained using an 11 mL ASE cell, ethanol/water (5:5 v/v) as the extraction solvent, 1500 psi, 80 degrees C, a 5 min static time, and a 60% flush volume. Optimum separation of the three compounds was achieved in extraction procedures developed here were compared with the classical adenosine phosphate extraction procedures (perchloric acid). The results indicate that the two techniques are similar in terms of recovery and reproducibility, but when other factors such as extraction time, environmental protection, and worker's health are considered, ASE is preferable to the classical extraction method. With this ASE-HPLC method, a minisurvey of ATP, ADP, and AMP levels in 15 samples of royal jelly of different origins was performed. Sample results indicated that the AMP concentration was 24.2-2214.4 mg kg(-1), whereas ATP and ADP were not detectable or present only at low levels. PMID:19435312

  5. Susceptibility to seizure-induced sudden death in DBA/2 mice is altered by adenosine.

    Faingold, Carl L; Randall, Marc; Kommajosyula, Srinivasa P

    2016-08-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is rare but is an important public health burden due to the number of patient years lost. Respiratory dysfunction following generalized convulsive seizure is a common sequence of events in witnessed SUDEP cases. The DBA/2 mouse model of SUDEP exhibits generalized convulsive audiogenic seizures (AGSz), which result in seizure-induced respiratory arrest (S-IRA) in ∼75% of these animals, while the remaining DBA/2 mice exhibit AGSz without S-IRA. SUDEP induction may involve actions of adenosine, which is released during generalized seizures in animals and patients and is known to depress respiration. This study examined the effects of systemic administration of agents that alter the actions of adenosine on the incidence of S-IRA in DBA/2 mice. DBA/2 mice that consistently exhibited AGSz without S-IRA showed a significantly increased incidence of S-IRA following treatment with 5-iodotubercidin, which blocks adenosine metabolism. Treatment of DBA/2 mice that consistently exhibited AGSz followed by S-IRA with a non-selective adenosine antagonist, caffeine, or an A2A adenosine receptor subtype-selective antagonist (SCH 442416) significantly reduced S-IRA incidence. By contrast, an A1 adenosine receptor antagonist (DPCPX) was not effective in reducing S-IRA incidence. These findings suggest that preventative approaches for SUDEP should consider agents that reduce the actions of adenosine. PMID:27259068

  6. Role of adenosine signalling and metabolism in β-cell regeneration

    Andersson, Olov, E-mail: olov.andersson@ki.se

    2014-02-01

    Glucose homeostasis, which is controlled by the endocrine cells of the pancreas, is disrupted in both type I and type II diabetes. Deficiency in the number of insulin-producing β cells – a primary cause of type I diabetes and a secondary contributor of type II diabetes – leads to hyperglycemia and hence an increase in the need for insulin. Although diabetes can be controlled with insulin injections, a curative approach is needed. A potential approach to curing diabetes involves regenerating the β-cell mass, e.g. by increasing β-cell proliferation, survival, neogenesis or transdifferentiation. The nucleoside adenosine and its cognate nucleotide ATP have long been known to affect insulin secretion, but have more recently been shown to increase β-cell proliferation during homeostatic control and regeneration of the β-cell mass. Adenosine is also known to have anti-inflammatory properties, and agonism of adenosine receptors can promote the survival of β-cells in an inflammatory microenvironment. In this review, both intracellular and extracellular mechanisms of adenosine and ATP are discussed in terms of their established and putative effects on β-cell regeneration. - Highlights: • A potential way to cure diabetes is to regenerate the β-cell mass by promoting cell survival, proliferation or neogenesis. • Adenosine may promote β-cell regeneration through several cellular mechanisms. • Adenosine and its cognate nucleotide ATP can each promote β-cell proliferation. • Do adenosine and ATP interact in promoting β-cell proliferation?.

  7. The Role of Adenosine in Pulmonary Vein Isolation: A Critical Review

    Dallaglio, Paolo D.; Betts, Timothy R.; Ginks, Matthew; Bashir, Yaver; Anguera, Ignasi; Rajappan, Kim

    2016-01-01

    The cornerstone of atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation is pulmonary vein isolation (PVI), which can be achieved in more than 95% of patients at the end of the procedure. However, AF recurrence rates remain high and are related to recovery of PV conduction. Adenosine testing is used to unmask dormant pulmonary vein conduction (DC). The aim of this study is to review the available literature addressing the role of adenosine testing and determine the impact of ablation at sites of PV reconnection on freedom from AF. Adenosine infusion, by restoring the excitability threshold, unmasks reversible injury that could lead to recovery of PV conduction. The studies included in this review suggest that adenosine is useful to unmask nontransmural lesions at risk of reconnection and that further ablation at sites of DC is associated with improvement in freedom from AF. Nevertheless it has been demonstrated that adenosine is not able to predict all veins at risk of later reconnection, which means that veins without DC are not necessarily at low risk. The role of the waiting period in the setting of adenosine testing has also been analyzed, suggesting that in the acute phase adenosine use should be accompanied by enough waiting time. PMID:26981309

  8. Adenosine, ketogenic diet and epilepsy: the emerging therapeutic relationship between metabolism and brain activity.

    Masino, S A; Kawamura, M; Wasser, C D; Wasser, C A; Pomeroy, L T; Ruskin, D N

    2009-09-01

    For many years the neuromodulator adenosine has been recognized as an endogenous anticonvulsant molecule and termed a "retaliatory metabolite." As the core molecule of ATP, adenosine forms a unique link between cell energy and neuronal excitability. In parallel, a ketogenic (high-fat, low-carbohydrate) diet is a metabolic therapy that influences neuronal activity significantly, and ketogenic diets have been used successfully to treat medically-refractory epilepsy, particularly in children, for decades. To date the key neural mechanisms underlying the success of dietary therapy are unclear, hindering development of analogous pharmacological solutions. Similarly, adenosine receptor-based therapies for epilepsy and myriad other disorders remain elusive. In this review we explore the physiological regulation of adenosine as an anticonvulsant strategy and suggest a critical role for adenosine in the success of ketogenic diet therapy for epilepsy. While the current focus is on the regulation of adenosine, ketogenic metabolism and epilepsy, the therapeutic implications extend to acute and chronic neurological disorders as diverse as brain injury, inflammatory and neuropathic pain, autism and hyperdopaminergic disorders. Emerging evidence for broad clinical relevance of the metabolic regulation of adenosine will be discussed. PMID:20190967

  9. Severe hemorrhage attenuates cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via NTS adenosine receptors.

    Minic, Zeljka; Li, Cailian; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2014-09-15

    Selective stimulation of inhibitory A1 and facilitatory A2a adenosine receptor subtypes located in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) powerfully inhibits cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) control of regional sympathetic outputs via different mechanisms: direct inhibition of glutamate release and facilitation of an inhibitory neurotransmitter release, respectively. However, it remains unknown whether adenosine naturally released into the NTS has similar inhibitory effects on the CCR as the exogenous agonists do. Our previous study showed that adenosine is released into the NTS during severe hemorrhage and contributes to reciprocal changes of renal (decreases) and adrenal (increases) sympathetic nerve activity observed in this setting. Both A1 and A2a adenosine receptors are involved. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that, during severe hemorrhage, CCR control of the two sympathetic outputs is attenuated by adenosine naturally released into the NTS. We compared renal and adrenal sympathoinhibitory responses evoked by right atrial injections of 5HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (2-8 μg/kg) under control conditions, during hemorrhage, and during hemorrhage preceded by blockade of NTS adenosine receptors with bilateral microinjections of 8-(p-sulfophenyl) theophylline (1 nmol/100 nl) in urethane/chloralose anesthetized rats. CCR-mediated inhibition of renal and adrenal sympathetic activity was significantly attenuated during severe hemorrhage despite reciprocal changes in the baseline activity levels, and this attenuation was removed by bilateral blockade of adenosine receptors in the caudal NTS. This confirmed that adenosine endogenously released into the NTS has a similar modulatory effect on integration of cardiovascular reflexes as stimulation of NTS adenosine receptors with exogenous agonists. PMID:25063794

  10. The Adverse Events and Hemodynamic Effects of Adenosine-Based Cardiac MRI

    We wanted to prospectively assess the adverse events and hemodynamic effects associated with an intravenous adenosine infusion in patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease and who were undergoing cardiac MRI. One hundred and sixty-eight patients (64 ± 9 years) received adenosine (140 μg/kg/min) during cardiac MRI. Before and during the administration, the heart rate, systemic blood pressure, and oxygen saturation were monitored using a MRI-compatible system. We documented any signs and symptoms of potential adverse events. In total, 47 out of 168 patients (28%) experienced adverse effects, which were mostly mild or moderate. In 13 patients (8%), the adenosine infusion was discontinued due to intolerable dyspnea or chest pain. No high grade atrioventricular block, bronchospasm or other life-threatening adverse events occurred. The hemodynamic measurements showed a significant increase in the heart rate during adenosine infusion (69.3 ± 11.7 versus 82.4 ± 13.0 beats/min, respectively; p < 0.001). A significant but clinically irrelevant increase in oxygen saturation occurred during adenosine infusion (96 ± 1.9% versus 97 ± 1.3%, respectively; p < 0.001). The blood pressure did not significantly change during adenosine infusion (systolic: 142.8 ± 24.0 versus 140.9 ± 25.7 mmHg; diastolic: 80.2 ± 12.5 mmHg versus 78.9 ± 15.6, respectively). This study confirms the safety of adenosine infusion during cardiac MRI. A considerable proportion of all patients will experience minor adverse effects and some patients will not tolerate adenosine infusion. However, all adverse events can be successfully managed by a radiologist. The increased heart rate during adenosine infusion highlights the need to individually adjust the settings according to the patient, e.g., the number of slices of myocardial perfusion imaging.

  11. Cancer exosomes express CD39 and CD73, which suppress T cells through adenosine production.

    Clayton, Aled; Al-Taei, Saly; Webber, Jason; Mason, Malcolm D; Tabi, Zsuzsanna

    2011-07-15

    Extracellular adenosine is elevated in cancer tissue, and it negatively regulates local immune responses. Adenosine production from extracellular ATP has attracted attention as a mechanism of regulatory T cell-mediated immune regulation. In this study, we examined whether small vesicles secreted by cancer cells, called exosomes, contribute to extracellular adenosine production and hence modulate immune effector cells indirectly. We found exosomes from diverse cancer cell types exhibit potent ATP- and 5'AMP-phosphohydrolytic activity, partly attributed to exosomally expressed CD39 and CD73, respectively. Comparable levels of activity were seen with exosomes from pleural effusions of mesothelioma patients. In such fluids, exosomes accounted for 20% of the total ATP-hydrolytic activity. Exosomes can perform both hydrolytic steps sequentially to form adenosine from ATP. This exosome-generated adenosine can trigger a cAMP response in adenosine A(2A) receptor-positive but not A(2A) receptor-negative cells. Similarly, significantly elevated cAMP was also triggered in Jurkat cells by adding exosomes with ATP but not by adding exosomes or ATP alone. A proportion of healthy donor T cells constitutively express CD39 and/or CD73. Activation of T cells by CD3/CD28 cross-linking could be inhibited by exogenously added 5'AMP in a CD73-dependent manner. However, 5'AMP converted to adenosine by exosomes inhibits T cell activation independently of T cell CD73 expression. This T cell inhibition was mediated through the adenosine A(2A) receptor. In summary, the data highlight exosome enzymic activity in the production of extracellular adenosine, and this may play a contributory role in negative modulation of T cells in the tumor environment. PMID:21677139

  12. Possible therapeutic benefits of adenosine-potentiating drugs in reducing age-related degenerative disease in dogs and cats.

    Scaramuzzi, R J; Baker, D J

    2003-10-01

    Adenosine is a ubiquitous, biologically important molecule that is a precursor of other biologically active molecules. It also is a component of some co-factors and has distinct physiological actions in its own right. Levels are maintained by synthesis from dietary precursors and re-cycling. The daily turnover of adenosine is very high. Adenosine can act either as a hormone by binding to adenosine receptors, four adenosine receptor subtypes have been identified, and as an intracellular modulator, after transport into the cell by membrane transporter proteins. One of the principal intracellular actions of adenosine is inhibition of the enzyme phosphodiesterase. Extracellular adenosine also has specific neuromodulatory actions on dopamine and glutamate. Selective and nonselective agonists and antagonists of adenosine are available. The tasks of developing, evaluating and exploiting the therapeutic potential of these compounds is still in its infancy. Adenosine has actions in the central nervous system (CNS), heart and vascular system, skeletal muscle and the immune system and the presence of receptors suggests potential actions in the gonads and other organs. Adenosine agonists improve tissue perfusion through actions on vascular smooth muscle and erythrocyte fluidity and they can be used to improve the quality of life in aged dogs. This article reviews the therapeutic potential of adenosine-potentiating drugs in the treatment of age-related conditions in companion animals, some of which may be exacerbated by castration or spaying at an early age. PMID:14633184

  13. Adenosine derived from Staphylococcus aureus-engulfed macrophages functions as a potent stimulant for the induction of inflammatory cytokines in mast cells

    Ma, Ying Jie; Kim, Chan-Hee; Ryu, Kyoung-Hwa; Kim, Min-Su; So, Young-In; Lee, Kong-Joo; Garred, Peter; Lee, Bok-Luel

    2011-01-01

    adenosine receptor blocker, verified that purified adenosine can induce interleukin-8 production via adenosine receptors on mast cells. Moreover, adenosine was purified from S. aureusengulfed RAW264.7 cells, a murine macrophage cell line, used to induce phagocytosis of S. aureus. These results show a novel...

  14. Receptor crosstalk: haloperidol treatment enhances A2A adenosine receptor functioning in a transfected cell model

    Trincavelli, Maria Letizia; Cuboni, Serena; Catena Dell’Osso, Mario; Maggio, Roberto; Klotz, Karl-Norbert; Novi, Francesca; Panighini, Anna; Daniele, Simona; Martini, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    A2A adenosine receptors are considered an excellent target for drug development in several neurological and psychiatric disorders. It is noteworthy that the responses evoked by A2A adenosine receptors are regulated by D2 dopamine receptor ligands. These two receptors are co-expressed at the level of the basal ganglia and interact to form functional heterodimers. In this context, possible changes in A2A adenosine receptor functional responses caused by the chronic blockade/activation of D2 dop...

  15. Dopamine/adenosine interactions involved in effort-related aspects of food motivation

    Salamone, John D.; Correa, Merce

    2009-01-01

    Nucleus accumbens dopamine (DA) is involved in effort-related aspects of food motivation. Accumbens DA depletions reduce the tendency of rats to work for food, and alter effort-related choice, but leave other aspects of food motivation and appetite intact. DA and adenosine receptors interact to regulate effort-related processes. Adenosine A2A antagonists can reverse the effects of DA D2 antagonists on effort-related choice, and intra-accumbens injections of a adenosine A2A agonist produce eff...

  16. Adenosine-induced hyperpolarization of the membrane voltage in rat mesangial cells in primary culture.

    Pavenstädt, H. (Hermann); Ruh, J; Greger, R; Schollmeyer, P.

    1994-01-01

    1. The effect of adenosine on membrane voltage and ion currents was studied in rat mesangial cells in primary culture. Membrane voltage was measured with the patch clamp technique in the slow- or fast whole cell configuration. The resting membrane voltage of mesangial cells was -48 +/- 0.5 mV. Adenosine (10(-8)-10(-3) M) induced a sustained and concentration-dependent hyperpolarization of membrane voltage (ED50 approximately 6 x 10(-7) M). Adenosine (10(-5) M) hyperpolarized the membrane volt...

  17. Anti-Inflammatory and Immunosuppressive Effects of the A2A Adenosine Receptor

    Gillian R. Milne; Palmer, Timothy M.

    2011-01-01

    The production of adenosine represents a critical endogenous mechanism for regulating immune and inflammatory responses during conditions of stress, injury, or infection. Adenosine exerts predominantly protective effects through activation of four 7-transmembrane receptor subtypes termed A1, A2A, A2B, and A3, of which the A2A adenosine receptor (A2AAR) is recognised as a major mediator of anti-inflammatory responses. The A2AAR is widely expressed on cells of the immune system and numerous in ...

  18. Intravenous infusion of adenosine but not inosine stimulates respiration in man.

    Reid, P G; Watt, A H; Routledge, P A; Smith, A P

    1987-01-01

    The effects on respiration of intravenous infusions of the endogenous nucleoside adenosine and its deaminated metabolite, inosine, administered in random order, single-blind, were compared in six healthy volunteers. The infusion rate of each nucleoside was initially 3.1 mg min-1 and was increased stepwise every 2 min, as tolerated, up to a possible maximum of 23.4 mg ml-1. The maximum dose rates received by all subjects were 8.5 mg min-1 for adenosine and 16.8 mg min-1 for inosine. Adenosine ...

  19. Role of endogenous adenosine in the expression of opiate withdrawal in rats.

    Salem, A; Hope, W

    1999-03-12

    Samples of extracellular fluid from striatum and nucleus accumbens of anaesthetised rats undergoing opiate withdrawal were collected using microdialysis and then analysed for adenosine and its metabolites using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and ultraviolet (UV) detection. Although the amount of adenosine present in the dialysate from either brain region was below the limit of detection by 90 min after probe placement, the metabolites could still be detected. Samples of dialysates collected from the nucleus accumbens contained significantly higher concentrations of hypoxanthine and inosine following naloxone challenge. The data are compatible with the hypothesis that endogenous adenosine might be involved in the expression of the opiate abstinence syndrome. PMID:10204679

  20. The role of adenosine A2A receptors on neuromuscular transmission upon ageing

    Pousinha, Paula Isabel Antunes, 1978-

    2012-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento, Ciências Biomédicas (Neurociências), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Medicina, 2012 Adenosine is a neuromodulator with important actions in the nervous system. The activation of adenosine A2A receptors has been shown to modulate the action of other receptors. Considering that it was observed an interaction between adenosine A2A receptors and TrkB receptors in hippocampus, I hypothesized that the activation of A2A receptors could also facilitate BDNF actions on ne...

  1. Adenosine A2A receptor binding profile of two antagonists, ST1535 and KW6002: consideration on the presence of atypical adenosine A2A binding sites

    Teresa Riccioni

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine A2A receptors seem to exist in typical (more in striatum and atypical (more in hippocampus and cortex subtypes. In the present study, we investigated the affinity of two adenosine A2A receptor antagonists, ST1535 [2 butyl -9-methyl-8-(2H-1,2,3-triazol 2-yl-9H-purin-6-xylamine] and KW6002 [(E-1,3-diethyl-8-(3,4-dimethoxystyryl-7-methyl-3,7-dihydro-1H-purine-2,6,dione] to the “typical” and “atypical” A2A binding sites. Affinity was determined by radioligand competition experiments in membranes from rat striatum and hippocampus. Displacement of the adenosine analog [3H]CGS21680 [2-p-(2-carboxyethylphenethyl-amino-5’-N-ethylcarbox-amidoadenosine] was evaluated in the absence or in the presence of either CSC [8-(3-chlorostyryl-caffeine], an adenosine A2A antagonist that pharmacologically isolates atypical binding sites, or DPCPX (8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist that pharmacologically isolates typical binding site. ZM241385 [84-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl [1,2,4]-triazol[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-yl amino]ethyl phenol] and SCH58261 [(5-amino-7-(β-phenylethyl-2-(8-furylpyrazolo(4,3-e-1,2,4-triazolo(1,5-c pyrimidine], two other adenosine A2A receptor antagonists, which were reported to differently bind to atypical and typical A2A receptors, were used as reference compounds. ST1535, KW6002, ZM241385 and SCH58261 displaced [3H]CGS21680 with higher affinity in striatum than in hippocampus. In hippocampus, no typical adenosine A2A binding was detected, and ST1535 was the only compound that occupied atypical A2A adenosine receptors. Present data are explained in terms of heteromeric association among adenosine A2A, A2B and A1 receptors, rather than with the presence of atypical A2A receptor subtype.

  2. The role of muscarinic receptors in the beneficial effects of adenosine against myocardial reperfusion injury in rats.

    Lei Sun

    Full Text Available Adenosine, a catabolite of ATP, displays a wide variety of effects in the heart including regulation of cardiac response to myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury. Nonetheless, the precise mechanism of adenosine-induced cardioprotection is still elusive. Isolated Sprague-Dawley rat hearts underwent 30 min global ischemia and 120 min reperfusion using a Langendorff apparatus. Both adenosine and acetylcholine treatment recovered the post-reperfusion cardiac function associated with adenosine and muscarinic receptors activation. Simultaneous administration of adenosine and acetylcholine failed to exert any additive protective effect, suggesting a shared mechanism between the two. Our data further revealed a cross-talk between the adenosine and acetylcholine receptor signaling in reperfused rat hearts. Interestingly, the selective M(2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist methoctramine significantly attenuated the cardioprotective effect of adenosine. In addition, treatment with adenosine upregulated the expression and the maximal binding capacity of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, which were inhibited by the selective A(1 adenosine receptor antagonist 8-Cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX and the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(ω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME. These data suggested a possible functional coupling between the adenosine and muscarinic receptors behind the observed cardioprotection. Furthermore, nitric oxide was found involved in triggering the response to each of the two receptor agonist. In summary, there may be a cross-talk between the adenosine and muscarinic receptors in ischemic/reperfused myocardium with nitric oxide synthase might serve as the distal converging point. In addition, adenosine contributes to the invigorating effect of adenosine on muscarinic receptor thereby prompting to regulation of cardiac function. These findings argue for a potentially novel mechanism behind the adenosine

  3. Adenosine formation in contracting primary rat skeletal muscle cells and endothelial cells in culture

    Hellsten, Ylva; Frandsen, Ulrik

    1997-01-01

    1. The present study examined the capacity for adenosine formation, uptake and metabolism in contracting primary rat muscle cells and in microvascular endothelial cells in culture. 2. Strong and moderate electrical simulation of skeletal muscle cells led to a significantly greater increase in the...... extracellular adenosine concentration (421 +/- 91 and 235 +/- 30 nmol (g protein)-1, respectively; P < 0.05) compared with non-stimulated muscle cells (161 +/- 20 nmol (g protein)-1). The ATP concentration was lower (18%; P < 0.05) in the intensely contracted, but not in the moderately contracted muscle cells....... 3. Addition of microvascular endothelial cells to the cultured skeletal muscle cells enhanced the contraction-induced accumulation of extracellular adenosine (P < 0.05), whereas endothelial cells in culture alone did not cause extracellular accumulation of adenosine. 4. Skeletal muscle cells were...

  4. Laboratory procedures manual for the firefly luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.; Curtis, C. A.; Knust, E. A.; Nibley, D. A.; Vance, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    A manual on the procedures and instruments developed for the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) luciferase assay is presented. Data cover, laboratory maintenance, maintenance of bacterial cultures, bacteria measurement, reagents, luciferase procedures, and determination of microbal susceptibility to antibiotics.

  5. Acute hyperammonemia and systemic inflammation is associated with increased extracellular brain adenosine in rats

    Bjerring, Peter Nissen; Dale, Nicholas; Larsen, Fin Stolze

    2015-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) can lead to brain edema, cerebral hyperperfusion and intracranial hypertension. These complications are thought to be mediated by hyperammonemia and inflammation leading to altered brain metabolism. As increased levels of adenosine degradation products have been found in...... cerebral blood flow (CBF). We measured the adenosine concentration with biosensors in rat brain slices exposed to ammonia and in a rat model with hyperammonemia and systemic inflammation. Exposure to ammonia in concentrations from 0.15-10 mM led to increases in the cortical adenosine concentration up to 18...... µM in brain slices. In vivo recordings showed a tendency towards increased adenosine levels in rats with hyperammonemia and systemic inflammation compared to a control group (3.7 ± 0.7 vs. 0.8 ± 0.2 µM, P = 0.06). This was associated with a significant increase in ICP and CBF. Intervention with the...

  6. Actinides and rare earths complexation with adenosine phosphate nucleotides

    Organophosphorus compounds are important molecules in both nuclear industry and living systems fields. Indeed, several extractants of organophosphorus compounds (such as TBP, HDEHP) are used in the nuclear fuel cycle reprocessing and in the biological field. For instance, the nucleotides are organophosphates which play a very important role in various metabolic processes. Although the literature on the interactions of actinides with inorganic phosphate is abundant, published studies with organophosphate compounds are generally limited to macroscopic and / or physiological approaches. The objective of this thesis is to study the structure of several organophosphorus compounds with actinides to reach a better understanding and develop new specific buildings blocks. The family of the chosen molecules for this procedure consists of three adenine nucleotides mono, bi and triphosphate (AMP, adenosine monophosphate - ADP, adenosine diphosphate - ATP, adenosine triphosphate) and an amino-alkylphosphate (AEP O-phosphoryl-ethanolamine). Complexes synthesis was conducted in aqueous and weakly acidic medium (2.8-4) for several lanthanides (III) (Lu, Yb, Eu) and actinides (U (VI), Th (IV) and Am (III)). Several analytical and spectroscopic techniques have been used to describe the organization of the synthesized complexes: spectrometric analysis performed by FTIR and NMR were used to identify the functional groups involved in the complexation, analysis by ESI-MS and pH-metric titration were used to determine the solution speciation and EXAFS analyzes were performed on Mars beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron, have described the local cation environment, for both solution and solid compounds. Some theoretical approaches of DFT were conducted to identify stable structures in purpose of completing the experimental studies. All solid complexes (AMP, ADP, ATP and AEP) have polynuclear structures, while soluble ATP complexes are mononuclear. For all synthesized complexes, it has been

  7. Regulation of aggregate size and pattern by adenosine and caffeine in cellular slime molds

    Jaiswal Pundrik; Soldati Thierry; Thewes Sascha; Baskar Ramamurthy

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Multicellularity in cellular slime molds is achieved by aggregation of several hundreds to thousands of cells. In the model slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, adenosine is known to increase the aggregate size and its antagonist caffeine reduces the aggregate size. However, it is not clear if the actions of adenosine and caffeine are evolutionarily conserved among other slime molds known to use structurally unrelated chemoattractants. We have examined how the known factor...

  8. Local adenosine receptor blockade accentuates the sympathetic responses to fatiguing exercise

    Cui, Jian; Leuenberger, Urs A.; Blaha, Cheryl; Yoder, Jonathan; Gao, Zhaohui; Sinoway, Lawrence I.

    2010-01-01

    The role adenosine plays in evoking the exercise pressor reflex in humans remains controversial. We hypothesized that localized forearm adenosine receptor blockade would attenuate muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) responses to fatiguing handgrip exercise in humans. Blood pressure (Finometer), heart rate, and MSNA from the peroneal nerve were assessed in 11 healthy young volunteers during fatiguing isometric handgrip, postexercise circulatory occlusion (PECO), and passive muscle stretch...

  9. Severe hemorrhage attenuates cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via NTS adenosine receptors

    Minic, Zeljka; Li, Cailian; O'Leary, Donal S.; Scislo, Tadeusz J.

    2014-01-01

    Selective stimulation of inhibitory A1 and facilitatory A2a adenosine receptor subtypes located in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) powerfully inhibits cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) control of regional sympathetic outputs via different mechanisms: direct inhibition of glutamate release and facilitation of an inhibitory neurotransmitter release, respectively. However, it remains unknown whether adenosine naturally released into the NTS has similar inhibitory effects on the CCR as th...

  10. Methotrexate inhibits neutrophil function by stimulating adenosine release from connective tissue cells.

    Cronstein, B. N.; Eberle, M A; Gruber, H E; Levin, R I

    1991-01-01

    Although commonly used to control a variety of inflammatory diseases, the mechanism of action of a low dose of methotrexate remains a mystery. Methotrexate accumulates intracellularly where it may interfere with purine metabolism. Therefore, we determined whether a 48-hr pretreatment with methotrexate affected adenosine release from [14C]adenine-labeled human fibroblasts and umbilical vein endothelial cells. Methotrexate significantly increased adenosine release by fibroblasts from 4 +/- 1% t...

  11. Adenosine, Caffeine, and Performance: From Cognitive Neuroscience of Sleep to Sleep Pharmacogenetics

    Urry, Emily; Landolt, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    An intricate interplay between circadian and sleep-wake homeostatic processes regulate cognitive performance on specific tasks, and individual differences in circadian preference and sleep pressure may contribute to individual differences in distinct neurocognitive functions. Attentional performance appears to be particularly sensitive to time of day modulations and the effects of sleep deprivation. Consistent with the notion that the neuromodulator, adenosine adenosine , plays an important r...

  12. Reduced striatal ecto-nucleotidase activity in schizophrenia patients supports the “adenosine hypothesis”

    Aliagas, Elisabet; Villar-Menéndez, Izaskun; Sévigny, Jean; Roca, Mercedes; Romeu, Miriam; Ferrer, Isidre; Martín-Satué, Mireia; Barrachina, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is a major chronic neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by a hyperdopaminergic state. The hypoadenosinergic hypothesis proposes that reduced extracellular adenosine levels contribute to dopamine D2 receptor hyperactivity. ATP, through the action of ecto-nucleotidases, constitutes a main source of extracellular adenosine. In the present study, we examined the activity of ecto-nucleotidases (NTPDases, ecto-5′-nucleotidase, and alkaline phosphatase) in the postmortem putame...

  13. Cordycepin Increases Nonrapid Eye Movement Sleep via Adenosine Receptors in Rats

    Zhenzhen Hu; Chung-Il Lee; Vikash Kumar Shah; Eun-Hye Oh; Jin-Yi Han; Jae-Ryong Bae; Kinam Lee; Myong-Soo Chong; Jin Tae Hong; Ki-Wan Oh

    2013-01-01

    Cordycepin (3′-deoxyadenosine) is a naturally occurring adenosine analogue and one of the bioactive constituents isolated from Cordyceps militaris/Cordyceps sinensis, species of the fungal genus Cordyceps. It has traditionally been a prized Chinese folk medicine for the human well-being. Because of similarity of chemical structure of adenosine, cordycepin has been focused on the diverse effects of the central nervous systems (CNSs), like sleep regulation. Therefore, this study was undertaken ...

  14. Radio-chromatographic determination of plasmatic adenosine deaminase (A.D.)

    We were able, by using a radio-chromatographic method, to measure an adenosine deaminase activity in normal human heparinized platelet-poor plasma, which can degrade 0.016 μM adenosine. This activity suppressed by heating 56 C for 30 minutes is inhibited by high concentrations of urea and is proportional to the amount of plasma, source of enzyme, in the systems. (authors)

  15. Methotrexate inhibits neutrophil function by stimulating adenosine release from connective tissue cells

    Although commonly used to control a variety of inflammatory diseases, the mechanism of action of a low dose of methotrexate remains a mystery. Methotrexate accumulates intracellularly where it may interfere with purine metabolism. Therefore, the authors determined whether a 48-hr pretreatment with methotrexate affected adenosine release from [14C]adenine-labeled human fibroblasts and umbilical vein endothelial cells. Methotrexate significantly increased adenosine release by fibroblasts. The effect of methotrexate on adenosine release was not due to cytotoxicity since cells treated with maximal concentrations of methotrexate took up [14C]adenine and released 14C-labeled purine (a measure of cell injury) in a manner identical to control cells. Methotrexate treatment of fibroblasts dramatically inhibited adherence to fibroblasts by both unstimulated neutrophils and stimulated neutrophils. One hypothesis that explains the effect of methotrexate on adenosine release is that, by inhibition of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) transformylase, methotrexate induces the accumulation of AICAR, the nucleoside precursor of which has previously been shown to cause adenosine release from ischemic cardiac tissue. The observation that the antiinflammatory actions of methotrexate are due to the capacity of methotrexate to induce adenosine release may form the basis for the development of an additional class of antiinflammatory drugs

  16. Aptamer-based Electrochemical Biosensors for Highly Selective and Quantitative Detection of Adenosine

    ZHENG Fan; WU Zai-sheng; ZHANG Song-bai; GUO Meng-meng; CHEN Chen-rui; SHEN Guo-li; YU Ru-qin

    2008-01-01

    A new adenosine biosensor based on aptamer probe is introduced in this article.An amino-labeled aptamer probe was immobilized on the gold electrode modified with an o-phenylenediamine electropolymerized film.When adenosine is bound specifically to the aptamer probe,the interface of the biosensor is changed,resulting in the decrement of the peak current.The response current is proportional to the amount of adenosine in sample.The used electrode can be easily regenerated in hot water.The proposed biosensor represents a linear response to adenosine over a concentration range of 1.0×10-7-1.0×10-4 mol/L with a detection limit of 1.0×10-8 mol/L.The presented biosensor exhibits a nice specificity towards adenosine.It offers a promising approach for adenosine assay due to its excellent electrochemical properties that are believed to be very attractive for electrochemical studies and electroanalytical applications.

  17. Serum adenosine deaminase as oxidative stress marker in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Shashikala Magadi Dasegowda

    2015-05-01

    Results: The study observed an increased level of serum adenosine deaminase, malondialdehyde and decreased levels of total antioxidant capacity in type 2 diabetes mellitus compared to controls. Serum adenosine deaminase levels in type 2 diabetics were 50.77 +/- 6.95 and in controls was 17.86 +/- 4.04. Serum Malondialdehyde levels in type 2 diabetics was 512.13 +/- 70.15 and in controls was 239.32 +/- 23.97. Serum total antioxidant levels in type 2 diabetics was 0.39+/-0.15 and in controls was 1.66+/-0.25. Positive correlation was seen between serum adenosine deaminase and malondialdehyde and it was statistically significant. Statistically significant negative correlation was seen between serum adenosine deaminase and total antioxidant capacity. Conclusion: Adenosine deaminase can be used as oxidative stress marker. Their increased levels indicate oxidative stress in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Therefore, estimation of serum adenosine deaminase levels help in early prediction and prevention of long term complications occurring due to oxidative stress in diabetics, thereby decreasing the mortality and morbidity in them. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(5.000: 1195-1198

  18. Suppression of adenosine-activated chloride transport by ethanol in airway epithelia.

    Sammeta V Raju

    Full Text Available Alcohol abuse is associated with increased lung infections. Molecular understanding of the underlying mechanisms is not complete. Airway epithelial ion transport regulates the homeostasis of airway surface liquid, essential for airway mucosal immunity and lung host defense. Here, air-liquid interface cultures of Calu-3 epithelial cells were basolaterally exposed to physiologically relevant concentrations of ethanol (0, 25, 50 and 100 mM for 24 hours and adenosine-stimulated ion transport was measured by Ussing chamber. The ethanol exposure reduced the epithelial short-circuit currents (I(SC in a dose-dependent manner. The ion currents activated by adenosine were chloride conductance mediated by cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, a cAMP-activated chloride channel. Alloxazine, a specific inhibitor for A(2B adenosine receptor (A(2BAR, largely abolished the adenosine-stimulated chloride transport, suggesting that A(2BAR is a major receptor responsible for regulating the chloride transport of the cells. Ethanol significantly reduced intracellular cAMP production upon adenosine stimulation. Moreover, ethanol-suppression of the chloride secretion was able to be restored by cAMP analogs or by inhibitors to block cAMP degradation. These results imply that ethanol exposure dysregulates CFTR-mediated chloride transport in airways by suppression of adenosine-A(2BAR-cAMP signaling pathway, which might contribute to alcohol-associated lung infections.

  19. Intravenous adenosine (adenoscan) versus exercise in the noninvasive assessment of coronary artery disease by SPECT

    LaManna, M.M.; Mohama, R.; Slavich, I.L. 3d.; Lumia, F.J.; Cha, S.D.; Rambaran, N.; Maranhao, V. (Deborah Heart and Lung Center, Browns Mills, NJ (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Fifteen patients at a mean age of 58 underwent adenosine and maximal exercise thallium SPECT imaging. All scans were performed 1 week apart and within 4 weeks of cardiac catheterization. SPECT imaging was performed after the infusion of 140 micrograms/kg/min of adenosine for 6 minutes. Mean heart rate increment during adenosine administration was 67 +/- 3.7 to 77 +/- 4.1. Mean blood pressure was 136 +/- 7.2 to 135 +/- 6.2 systolic and 78 +/- 1.8 to 68 +/- 2.6 diastolic. No adverse hemodynamic effects were observed. There were no changes in PR or QRS in intervals. Five stress ECGs were ischemic. No ST changes were observed with adenosine. Although 68% of the patients had symptoms of flushing, light-headedness, and dizziness during adenosine infusion, symptoms resolved within 1 minute of dosage adjustment or termination of the infusion in all but one patient, who required theophylline. Sensitivity for coronary artery detection was 77% and specificity 100%. Concordance between adenoscans and exercise thallium scintigraphy was high (13/15 = 87%). In two patients, there were minor scintigraphic differences. The authors conclude that adenosine is a sensitive, specific, and safe alternative to exercise testing in patients referred for thallium imaging and may be preferable to dipyridamole.

  20. Adenosine concentration in the porcine coronary artery wall and A2A receptor involvement in hypoxia-induced vasodilatation

    Frøbert, Ole; Haink, Gesine; Simonsen, Ulf; Gravholt, Claus H; Levin, Max; Deussen, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    We tested whether hypoxia-induced coronary artery dilatation could be mediated by an increase in adenosine concentration within the coronary artery wall or by an increase in adenosine sensitivity. Porcine left anterior descendent coronary arteries, precontracted with prostaglandin F2α (10−5m), were mounted in a pressure myograph and microdialysis catheters were inserted into the tunica media. Dialysate adenosine concentrations were analysed by HPLC. Glucose, lactate and pyruvate were measured by an automated spectrophotometric kinetic enzymatic analyser. The exchange fraction of [14C]adenosine over the microdialysis membrane increased from 0.32 ± 0.02 to 0.46 ± 0.02 (n = 4, P < 0.01) during the study period. At baseline, interstitial adenosine was in the region of 10 nm which is significantly less than previously found myocardial concentrations. Hypoxia (PO2 30 mmHg for 60 min, n = 5) increased coronary diameters by 20.0 ± 2.6% (versus continuous oxygenation −3.1 ± 2.4%, n = 6, P < 0.001) but interstitial adenosine concentration fell. Blockade of adenosine deaminase (with erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl-)-adenine, 5 μm), adenosine kinase (with iodotubericidine, 10 μm) and adenosine transport (with n-nitrobenzylthioinosine, 1 μm) increased interstitial adenosine but the increase was unrelated to hypoxia or diameter. A coronary dilatation similar to that during hypoxia could be obtained with 30 μm of adenosine in the organ bath and the resulting interstitial adenosine concentrations (n = 5) were 20 times higher than the adenosine concentration measured during hypoxia. Adenosine concentration–response experiments showed vasodilatation to be more pronounced during hypoxia (n = 9) than during normoxia (n = 9, P < 0.001) and the A2A receptor antagonist ZM241385 (20 nm, n = 5), attenuated hypoxia-induced vasodilatation while the selective A2B receptor antagonist MRS1754 (20 nm, n = 4), had no effect. The lactate/pyruvate ratio was significantly increased in

  1. In Vitro Functional Study of Rice Adenosine 5'-Phosphosulfate Kinase

    WANG De-zhen; CHEN Guo-guo; LU Lu-jia; JIANG Zhao-jun; RAO Yu-chun; SUN Mei-hao

    2016-01-01

    Sulfate can be activated by ATP sulfurylase and adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate kinase (APSK)in vivo. Recent studies suggested that APSK inArabidopsis thaliana regulated the partition between APS reduction and phosphorylation and its activity can be modulated by cellular redox status. In order to study regulation of APSK in rice (OsAPSK),OsAPSK1 gene was cloned and its activity was analyzed. OsAPSK1 C36 and C69 were found to be the conserved counterparts of C86 and C119, which involved in disulfide formation in AtAPSK.C36A/C69A OsAPSK1 double mutation was made by site directed mutagenesis. OsAPSK1 and its mutant were prokaryotically over-expressed and purified, and then assayed for APS phosphorylation activity. OsAPSK1 activity was depressed by oxidized glutathione, while the activity of its mutantwas not. Further studies in the case that oxidative stress will fluctuatein vivo3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate content, and all APSK isoenzymes have similar regulation patterns are necessary to be performed.

  2. Adenosine to Inosine editing frequency controlled by splicing efficiency.

    Licht, Konstantin; Kapoor, Utkarsh; Mayrhofer, Elisa; Jantsch, Michael F

    2016-07-27

    Alternative splicing and adenosine to inosine (A to I) RNA-editing are major factors leading to co- and post-transcriptional modification of genetic information. Both, A to I editing and splicing occur in the nucleus. As editing sites are frequently defined by exon-intron basepairing, mRNA splicing efficiency should affect editing levels. Moreover, splicing rates affect nuclear retention and will therefore also influence the exposure of pre-mRNAs to the editing-competent nuclear environment. Here, we systematically test the influence of splice rates on RNA-editing using reporter genes but also endogenous substrates. We demonstrate for the first time that the extent of editing is controlled by splicing kinetics when editing is guided by intronic elements. In contrast, editing sites that are exclusively defined by exonic structures are almost unaffected by the splicing efficiency of nearby introns. In addition, we show that editing levels in pre- and mature mRNAs do not match. This phenomenon can in part be explained by the editing state of an RNA influencing its splicing rate but also by the binding of the editing enzyme ADAR that interferes with splicing. PMID:27112566

  3. Adenosine, type 1 receptors: role in proximal tubule Na+ reabsorption.

    Welch, W J

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine type 1 receptor (A1 -AR) antagonists induce diuresis and natriuresis in experimental animals and humans. Much of this effect is due to inhibition of A1 -ARs in the proximal tubule, which is responsible for 60-70% of the reabsorption of filtered Na(+) and fluid. Intratubular application of receptor antagonists indicates that A1 -AR mediates a portion of Na(+) uptake in PT and PT cells, via multiple transport systems, including Na(+) /H(+) exchanger-3 (NHE3), Na(+) /PO4(-) co-transporter and Na(+) -dependent glucose transporter, SGLT. Renal microperfusion and recollection studies have shown that fluid reabsorption is reduced by A1 -AR antagonists and is lower in A1 -AR KO mice, compared to WT mice. Absolute proximal reabsorption (APR) measured by free-flow micropuncture is equivocal, with studies that show either lower APR or similar APR in A1 -AR KO mice, compared to WT mice. Inhibition of A1 -ARs lowers elevated blood pressure in models of salt-sensitive hypertension, partially due to their effects in the proximal tubule. PMID:25345761

  4. Adenosine preconditioning attenuates hepatic reperfusion injury in the rat by preventing the down-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    Serracino-Inglott, Ferdinand; Virlos, Ioannis T; Habib, Nagy A; Williamson, Robin CN; Mathie, Robert T

    2002-01-01

    Background Previous work has suggested that in the liver, adenosine preconditioning is mediated by nitric oxide. Whether the endothelial isoform of nitric oxide synthase plays a part in this mechanism has however not yet been investigated. Methods Wistar rats were used (6 in each group) – Groups: (1) sham, (2) ischemia-reperfusion, (3) adenosine + ischemia-reperfusion, (4) endothelial isoform inhibitor + adenosine + ischemia-reperfusion. Results Using immunohistochemistry, this study has revealed a decrease in the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase following hepatic ischemia-reperfusion. This was prevented by adenosine pre-treatment. When an inhibitor of endothelial nitric oxide synthase was administered prior to adenosine pre-treatment, pre-conditioning did not occur despite normal expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Conclusions These findings suggest that adenosine attenuates hepatic injury by preventing the downregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase that occurs during ischemia-reperfusion. PMID:12241560

  5. Radio-chromatographic determination of plasmatic adenosine deaminase (A.D.); Determination radiochromatographique de l'adenosine deaminase (A.D.)

    Chivot, J.J.; Depernet, D.; Caen, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France). Centre d' Etudes

    1970-07-01

    We were able, by using a radio-chromatographic method, to measure an adenosine deaminase activity in normal human heparinized platelet-poor plasma, which can degrade 0.016 {mu}M adenosine. This activity suppressed by heating 56 C for 30 minutes is inhibited by high concentrations of urea and is proportional to the amount of plasma, source of enzyme, in the systems. (authors) [French] Nous avons pu, en utilisant une methode radiochromatographique, mesurer une activite adenosine deaminasique dans le plasma humain pauvre en plaquettes heparine qui peut degrader 0,016 {mu}M d'adenosine. Cette activite qui est supprimee par chauffage a 56 degres pendant 30 minutes, est reduite par conservation a -20 C pendant une semaine, est inhibee par d'importantes concentrations d'uree et ne l'est pas, ni par le dipyridamol, ni par le pHMB. Cette activite est proportionnelle a la quantite de plasma, source d'enzyme, mise dans les differents systemes reactifs. (auteur)

  6. Adenosine elicits an eNOS-independent reduction in arterial blood pressure in conscious mice that involves adenosine A(2A) receptors

    Andersen, Henrik; Jaff, Mohammad G; Høgh, Ditte;

    2011-01-01

    Aims:  Adenosine plays an important role in the regulation of heart rate and vascular reactivity. However, the mechanisms underlying the acute effect of adenosine on arterial blood pressure in conscious mice are unclear. Therefore, the present study investigated the effect of the nucleoside on mean...... arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) in conscious mice. Methods:  Chronic indwelling catheters were placed in C57Bl/6J (WT) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase knock-out (eNOS(-/-) ) mice for continuous measurements of MAP and HR. Using PCR and myograph analysis involment of adenosine...... receptors was investigated in human and mouse renal blood vessels Results:  Bolus infusion of 0.5 mg/kg adenosine elicited significant transient decreases in MAP (99.3±2.3 to 70.4±4.5 mmHg) and HR (603.2±18.3 to 364.3±49.2 min(-1) ) which were inhibited by the A(2A) receptor antagonist ZM 241385. Activation...

  7. A2A adenosine receptor-mediated increase in coronary flow in hyperlipidemic APOE–knockout mice

    Teng, Bunyen

    2011-01-01

    Bunyen Teng, S Jamal MustafaDepartment of Physiology and Pharmacology and Center for Cardiovascular and Respiratory Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USAAbstract: Adenosine-induced coronary vasodilation is predominantly A2A adenosine receptor (AR)-mediated, whereas A1 AR is known to negatively modulate the coronary flow (CF). However, the coronary responses to adenosine in hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis are not well understood. Using hyperlipidemic/atherosclerotic apolip...

  8. Modulation of adenosine A(2A) receptor function by interacting proteins. New targets for Huntington’s disease

    Bakešová, Jana

    2012-01-01

    [eng] In this dissertation we studied the pharmacological and functional consequences of adenosine A2A receptor interaction with other proteins, as other neurotransmitter receptores localized in the human brain and an important enzyme regulating the extracellular concentration of adenosine, the ecto-ADA (adenosine desaminase). The first aim of this thesis was to study the molecular and functional interaction of A(2A)Rwith ADA. We found out that A(2A)Racted as a membrane anchoring protein of A...

  9. Comparative study of adenosine deaminase activity, insulin resistance and lipoprotein(a) among smokers and healthy non-smokers

    Ramesh Ramasamy; Sathish Babu Murugaiyan; Arulkumaran U.; Sathiya R.; Kuzhandai Velu V.; Niranjan Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adenosine deaminase also known as adenosine aminohydrolase involved in purine metabolism. Its primary function is development and maintenance of immune system. The main objective of the study was to estimate adenosine deaminase (ADA) enzyme and find its correlation with lipoprotein(a) and insulin resistance among smokers and healthy non-smokers. Methods: Fifty smokers and fifty healthy non-smokers were selected based on WHO definition. ADA, lipid profile and glucose was estimat...

  10. Sleep-wake sensitive mechanisms of adenosine release in the basal forebrain of rodents: an in vitro study.

    Robert Edward Sims

    Full Text Available Adenosine acting in the basal forebrain is a key mediator of sleep homeostasis. Extracellular adenosine concentrations increase during wakefulness, especially during prolonged wakefulness and lead to increased sleep pressure and subsequent rebound sleep. The release of endogenous adenosine during the sleep-wake cycle has mainly been studied in vivo with microdialysis techniques. The biochemical changes that accompany sleep-wake status may be preserved in vitro. We have therefore used adenosine-sensitive biosensors in slices of the basal forebrain (BFB to study both depolarization-evoked adenosine release and the steady state adenosine tone in rats, mice and hamsters. Adenosine release was evoked by high K(+, AMPA, NMDA and mGlu receptor agonists, but not by other transmitters associated with wakefulness such as orexin, histamine or neurotensin. Evoked and basal adenosine release in the BFB in vitro exhibited three key features: the magnitude of each varied systematically with the diurnal time at which the animal was sacrificed; sleep deprivation prior to sacrifice greatly increased both evoked adenosine release and the basal tone; and the enhancement of evoked adenosine release and basal tone resulting from sleep deprivation was reversed by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS inhibitor, 1400 W. These data indicate that characteristics of adenosine release recorded in the BFB in vitro reflect those that have been linked in vivo to the homeostatic control of sleep. Our results provide methodologically independent support for a key role for induction of iNOS as a trigger for enhanced adenosine release following sleep deprivation and suggest that this induction may constitute a biochemical memory of this state.

  11. Adenosine deaminase regulates Treg expression in autologous T cell-dendritic cell cocultures from patients infected with HIV-1.

    Naval-Macabuhay, Isaac; Casanova, Víctor; Navarro, Gemma; García, Felipe; León, Agathe; Miralles, Laia; Rovira, Cristina; Martinez-Navio, José M; Gallart, Teresa; Mallol, Josefa; Gatell, José M; Lluís, Carme; Franco, Rafael; McCormick, Peter J; Climent, Núria

    2016-02-01

    Regulatory T cells have an important role in immune suppression during HIV-1 infection. As regulatory T cells produce the immunomodulatory molecule adenosine, our aim here was to assess the potential of adenosine removal to revert the suppression of anti-HIV responses exerted by regulatory T cells. The experimental setup consisted of ex vivo cocultures of T and dendritic cells, to which adenosine deaminase, an enzyme that hydrolyzes adenosine, was added. In cells from healthy individuals, adenosine hydrolysis decreased CD4(+)CD25(hi) regulatory T cells. Addition of 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine, an adenosine receptor agonist, significantly decreased CD4(+)CD25(lo) cells, confirming a modulatory role of adenosine acting via adenosine receptors. In autologous cocultures of T cells with HIV-1-pulsed dendritic cells, addition of adenosine deaminase led to a significant decrease of HIV-1-induced CD4(+)CD25(hi) forkhead box p3(+) cells and to a significant enhancement of the HIV-1-specific CD4(+) responder T cells. An increase in the effector response was confirmed by the enhanced production of CD4(+) and CD8(+) CD25(-)CD45RO(+) memory cell generation and secretion of Th1 cytokines, including IFN-γ and IL-15 and chemokines MIP-1α/CCL3, MIP-1β/CCL4, and RANTES/CCL5. These ex vivo results show, in a physiologically relevant model, that adenosine deaminase is able to enhance HIV-1 effector responses markedly. The possibility to revert regulatory T cell-mediated inhibition of immune responses by use of adenosine deaminase, an enzyme that hydrolyzes adenosine, merits attention for restoring T lymphocyte function in HIV-1 infection. PMID:26310829

  12. Chronic hypoxia enhances adenosine release in rat PC12 cells by altering adenosine metabolism and membrane transport.

    Kobayashi, S; Zimmermann, H; Millhorn, D E

    2000-02-01

    Acute exposure to hypoxia causes a release of adenosine (ADO) that is inversely related to the O2 levels in oxygen-sensitive pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. In the current study, chronic exposure (48 h) of PC12 cells to moderate hypoxia (5% O2) significantly enhanced the release of ADO during severe, acute hypoxia (1% O2). Investigation into the intra- and extracellular mechanisms underpinning the secretion of ADO in PC12 cells chronically exposed to hypoxia revealed changes in gene expression and activities of several key enzymes associated with ADO production and metabolism, as well as the down-regulation of a nucleoside transporter. Decreases in the enzymatic activities of ADO kinase and ADO deaminase accompanied by an increase in those of cytoplasmic and ecto-5'-nucleotidases bring about an increased capacity to produce intra- and extracellular ADO. This increased potential to generate ADO and decreased capacity to metabolize ADO indicate that PC12 cells shift toward an ADO producer phenotype during hypoxia. The reduced function of the rat equilibrative nucleoside transporter rENT1 also plays a role in controlling extracellular ADO levels. The hypoxia-induced alterations in the ADO metabolic enzymes and the rENT1 transporter seem to increase the extracellular concentration of ADO. The biological significance of this regulation is unclear but is likely to be associated with modulating cellular activity during hypoxia. PMID:10646513

  13. Three minute versus six minute adenosine infusion in myocardial perfusion scintigraphy

    Pharmacological stress imaging techniques are used widely in clinical nuclear cardiology for evaluation of ischemic heart disease. Adenosine is often used but is expensive and causes significant side effects .The aim of this retrospective review was to study the tolerance and efficacy, of adenosine infusion of a 3 minute (min) versus the conventional 6 min stress protocol and to assess the cost efficiency of the 3 min protocol. Three hundred thirty one patients had myocardial scintigraphy using adenosine as a stressing agent. Blood pressure, heart rate and ECG were recorded at baseline and during the test. Symptoms (flushing, headache, chest pain, dyspnoea, neck pain) were recorded throughout the adenosine infusion. All the patients had had either 6 min or 3 min adenosine infusion at 140 mg/kg per minute. 169 of them had side effects. Flushing (32% at 3 min vs 50 % at 6 min, p<0.05), headache (11.5% at 3 min vs 7 % at 6 min p-not significant-ns), chest pain (8% at 3 min vs 13 % at 6 min, ns), dyspnoea (7% at 3 min vs %10 at 6 min, ns), ECG changes (10% at 3 min vs 28% at 6 min, p<0.05), neck pain (4.5% at 3 min vs 9% at 6 min, ns), abdominal discomfort (3% at 3 min vs 3% at 6 min, ns) and fall in blood pressure (6% at 3 min vs 8.5% at 6 min, ns). The change in heart rate was not significant with either protocol. The 6 min and 3 min infusions of adenosine had similar accuracy (73% vs 70%) for the detection of coronary artery disease. The patients tolerated the 3 min protocol better with only 40% of the patients having minimal side effects compared with 60% for the 6 mon protocol. The 3 min protocol is also cost effective as it uses less adenosine and therefore reduces total costs by 40 US$ per patient. (author)

  14. Structural basis of the substrate specificity of Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase

    Dessanti, Paola [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-1301 (United States); Università di Sassari, (Italy); Zhang, Yang [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-1301 (United States); Allegrini, Simone [Università di Sassari, (Italy); Tozzi, Maria Grazia [Università di Pisa, (Italy); Sgarrella, Francesco [Università di Sassari, (Italy); Ealick, Steven E., E-mail: see3@cornell.edu [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-1301 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Adenosine phosphorylase from B. cereus shows a strong preference for adenosine over other 6-oxopurine nucleosides. Mutation of Asp204 to asparagine reduces the efficiency of adenosine cleavage but does not affect inosine cleavage, effectively reversing the substrate specificity. The structures of D204N complexes explain these observations. Purine nucleoside phosphorylases catalyze the phosphorolytic cleavage of the glycosidic bond of purine (2′-deoxy)nucleosides, generating the corresponding free base and (2′-deoxy)ribose 1-phosphate. Two classes of PNPs have been identified: homotrimers specific for 6-oxopurines and homohexamers that accept both 6-oxopurines and 6-aminopurines. Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase (AdoP) is a hexameric PNP; however, it is highly specific for 6-aminopurines. To investigate the structural basis for the unique substrate specificity of AdoP, the active-site mutant D204N was prepared and kinetically characterized and the structures of the wild-type protein and the D204N mutant complexed with adenosine and sulfate or with inosine and sulfate were determined at high resolution (1.2–1.4 Å). AdoP interacts directly with the preferred substrate through a hydrogen-bond donation from the catalytically important residue Asp204 to N7 of the purine base. Comparison with Escherichia coli PNP revealed a more optimal orientation of Asp204 towards N7 of adenosine and a more closed active site. When inosine is bound, two water molecules are interposed between Asp204 and the N7 and O6 atoms of the nucleoside, thus allowing the enzyme to find alternative but less efficient ways to stabilize the transition state. The mutation of Asp204 to asparagine led to a significant decrease in catalytic efficiency for adenosine without affecting the efficiency of inosine cleavage.

  15. Structural basis of the substrate specificity of Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase

    Adenosine phosphorylase from B. cereus shows a strong preference for adenosine over other 6-oxopurine nucleosides. Mutation of Asp204 to asparagine reduces the efficiency of adenosine cleavage but does not affect inosine cleavage, effectively reversing the substrate specificity. The structures of D204N complexes explain these observations. Purine nucleoside phosphorylases catalyze the phosphorolytic cleavage of the glycosidic bond of purine (2′-deoxy)nucleosides, generating the corresponding free base and (2′-deoxy)ribose 1-phosphate. Two classes of PNPs have been identified: homotrimers specific for 6-oxopurines and homohexamers that accept both 6-oxopurines and 6-aminopurines. Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase (AdoP) is a hexameric PNP; however, it is highly specific for 6-aminopurines. To investigate the structural basis for the unique substrate specificity of AdoP, the active-site mutant D204N was prepared and kinetically characterized and the structures of the wild-type protein and the D204N mutant complexed with adenosine and sulfate or with inosine and sulfate were determined at high resolution (1.2–1.4 Å). AdoP interacts directly with the preferred substrate through a hydrogen-bond donation from the catalytically important residue Asp204 to N7 of the purine base. Comparison with Escherichia coli PNP revealed a more optimal orientation of Asp204 towards N7 of adenosine and a more closed active site. When inosine is bound, two water molecules are interposed between Asp204 and the N7 and O6 atoms of the nucleoside, thus allowing the enzyme to find alternative but less efficient ways to stabilize the transition state. The mutation of Asp204 to asparagine led to a significant decrease in catalytic efficiency for adenosine without affecting the efficiency of inosine cleavage

  16. Angina pectoris-like pain provoked by intravenous adenosine in healthy volunteers.

    Sylvén, C; Beermann, B; Jonzon, B; Brandt, R

    1986-07-26

    In a study to characterise the chest pain induced by adenosine this agent was given as a bolus into a peripheral vein to six healthy volunteers (five men) aged 30-44. On the first day the maximum tolerable dose was determined in each case. On the second day three doses of adenosine (one third, two thirds, and the full maximum tolerable dose) and three doses of saline were given single blind in randomised order. Thereafter aminophylline 5 mg/kg was given and the procedure repeated in a different randomised order. On the third day between two thirds and the full maximum tolerable dose was given followed by 10 mg dipyridamole intravenously and a second injection of the same dose of adenosine. Heart rate and atrioventricular blocks were recorded by electrocardiography. One minute after each dose of adenosine the chest pain was scored. The maximum tolerable dose of adenosine ranged from 10.6 to 37.1 mg. All subjects experienced uneasy central chest pain provoking anxiety. The pain radiated to the shoulders, ulnar aspect of the arms, epigastric area, back, and into the throat. The pain began about 20 seconds after the injection and lasted 10-15 seconds. Increasing the dose of adenosine increased the intensity of the pain. Administration of aminophylline reduced the pain significantly. Second degree heart block was recorded in five of the six subjects during the time that the pain was experienced. After aminophylline no block was observed. Dipyridamole increased the intensity of pain. The duration of second degree heart block increased in four of the subjects, and in two of these third degree heart block occurred. These findings suggest that adenosine released from the myocardium during ischaemia induces angina pectoris by stimulating theophylline sensitive receptors. PMID:3089465

  17. Bradykinin and adenosine receptors mediate desflurane induced postconditioning in human myocardium: role of reactive oxygen species

    Gérard Jean-Louis

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Desflurane during early reperfusion has been shown to postcondition human myocardium, in vitro. We investigated the role of adenosine and bradykinin receptors, and generation of radical oxygen species in desflurane-induced postconditioning in human myocardium. Methods We recorded isometric contraction of human right atrial trabeculae hanged in an oxygenated Tyrode's solution (34 degrees Celsius, stimulation frequency 1 Hz. After a 30-min hypoxic period, desflurane 6% was administered during the first 5 min of reoxygenation. Desflurane was administered alone or with pretreatment of N-mercaptopropionylglycine, a reactive oxygen species scavenger, 8-(p-Sulfophenyltheophylline, an adenosine receptor antagonist, HOE140, a selective B2 bradykinin receptor antagonist. In separate groups, adenosine and bradykinin were administered during the first minutes of reoxygenation alone or in presence of N-mercaptopropionylglycine. The force of contraction of trabeculae was recorded continuously. Developed force at the end of a 60-min reoxygenation period was compared (mean ± standard deviation between the groups by a variance analysis and post hoc test. Results Desflurane 6% (84 ± 6% of baseline enhanced the recovery of force after 60-min of reoxygenation as compared to control group (51 ± 8% of baseline, P N-mercaptopropionylglycine (54 ± 3% of baseline, 8-(p-Sulfophenyltheophylline (62 ± 9% of baseline, HOE140 (58 ± 6% of baseline abolished desflurane-induced postconditioning. Adenosine (80 ± 9% of baseline and bradykinin (83 ± 4% of baseline induced postconditioning (P vs control, N-mercaptopropionylglycine abolished the beneficial effects of adenosine and bradykinin (54 ± 8 and 58 ± 5% of baseline, respectively. Conclusions In vitro, desflurane-induced postconditioning depends on reactive oxygen species production, activation of adenosine and bradykinin B2 receptors. And, the cardioprotective effect of adenosine and bradykinin

  18. Impairment of ATP hydrolysis decreases adenosine A1 receptor tonus favoring cholinergic nerve hyperactivity in the obstructed human urinary bladder.

    Silva-Ramos, M; Silva, I; Faria, M; Magalhães-Cardoso, M T; Correia, J; Ferreirinha, F; Correia-de-Sá, P

    2015-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether reduced adenosine formation linked to deficits in extracellular ATP hydrolysis by NTPDases contributes to detrusor neuromodulatory changes associated with bladder outlet obstruction in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The kinetics of ATP catabolism and adenosine formation as well as the role of P1 receptor agonists on muscle tension and nerve-evoked [(3)H]ACh release were evaluated in mucosal-denuded detrusor strips from BPH patients (n = 31) and control organ donors (n = 23). The neurogenic release of ATP and [(3)H]ACh was higher (P bladders. Relaxation of detrusor contractions induced by acetylcholine required 30-fold higher concentrations of adenosine. Despite VAChT-positive cholinergic nerves exhibiting higher A(1) immunoreactivity in BPH bladders, the endogenous adenosine tonus revealed by adenosine deaminase is missing. Restoration of A1 inhibition was achieved by favoring (1) ATP hydrolysis with apyrase (2 U mL(-1)) or (2) extracellular adenosine accumulation with dipyridamole or EHNA, as these drugs inhibit adenosine uptake and deamination, respectively. In conclusion, reduced ATP hydrolysis leads to deficient adenosine formation and A(1) receptor-mediated inhibition of cholinergic nerve activity in the obstructed human bladder. Thus, we propose that pharmacological manipulation of endogenous adenosine levels and/or A(1) receptor activation might be useful to control bladder overactivity in BPH patients. PMID:26521170

  19. Adenosine triphosphate inhibits melatonin synthesis in the rat pineal gland.

    Souza-Teodoro, Luis Henrique; Dargenio-Garcia, Letícia; Petrilli-Lapa, Camila Lopes; Souza, Ewerton da Silva; Fernandes, Pedro A C M; Markus, Regina P; Ferreira, Zulma S

    2016-03-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is released onto the pinealocyte, along with noradrenaline, from sympathetic neurons and triggers P2Y1 receptors that enhance β-adrenergic-induced N-acetylserotonin (NAS) synthesis. Nevertheless, the biotransformation of NAS into melatonin, which occurs due to the subsequent methylation by acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase (ASMT; EC 2.1.1.4), has not yet been evaluated in the presence of purinergic stimulation. We therefore evaluated the effects of purinergic signaling on melatonin synthesis induced by β-adrenergic stimulation. ATP increased NAS levels, but, surprisingly, inhibited melatonin synthesis in an inverse, concentration-dependent manner. Our results demonstrate that enhanced NAS levels, which depend on phospholipase C (PLC) activity (but not the induction of gene transcription), are a post-translational effect. By contrast, melatonin reduction is related to an ASMT inhibition of expression at both the gene transcription and protein levels. These results were independent of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) translocation. Neither the P2Y1 receptor activation nor the PLC-mediated pathway was involved in the decrease in melatonin, indicating that ATP regulates pineal metabolism through different mechanisms. Taken together, our data demonstrate that purinergic signaling differentially modulates NAS and melatonin synthesis and point to a regulatory role for ATP as a cotransmitter in the control of ASMT, the rate-limiting enzyme in melatonin synthesis. The endogenous production of melatonin regulates defense responses; therefore, understanding the mechanisms involving ASMT regulation might provide novel insights into the development and progression of neurological disorders since melatonin presents anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, and neurogenic effects. PMID:26732366

  20. Behavior and stability of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) during chlorine disinfection.

    Nescerecka, Alina; Juhna, Talis; Hammes, Frederik

    2016-09-15

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analysis is a cultivation-independent alternative method for the determination of bacterial viability in both chlorinated and non-chlorinated water. Here we investigated the behavior and stability of ATP during chlorination in detail. Different sodium hypochlorite doses (0-22.4 mg-Cl2 L(-1); 5 min exposure) were applied to an Escherichia coli pure culture suspended in filtered river water. We observed decreasing intracellular ATP with increasing chlorine concentrations, but extracellular ATP concentrations only increased when the chlorine dose exceeded 0.35 mg L(-1). The release of ATP from chlorine-damaged bacteria coincided with severe membrane damage detected with flow cytometry (FCM). The stability of extracellular ATP was subsequently studied in different water matrixes, and we found that extracellular ATP was stable in sterile deionized water and also in chlorinated water until extremely high chlorine doses (≤11.2 mg-Cl2 L(-1); 5 min exposure). In contrast, ATP decreased relatively slowly (k = 0.145 h(-1)) in 0.1 μm filtered river water, presumably due to degradation by either extracellular enzymes or the fraction of bacteria that were able to pass through the filter. Extracellular ATP decreased considerably faster (k = 0.368 h(-1)) during batch growth of a river water bacterial community. A series of growth potential tests showed that extracellular ATP molecules were utilized as a phosphorus source during bacteria proliferation. From the combined data we conclude that ATP released from bacteria at high chlorine doses could promote bacteria regrowth, contributing to biological instability in drinking water distribution systems. PMID:27295623

  1. The adenosine A2B receptor is involved in anion secretion in human pancreatic duct Capan-1 epithelial cells.

    Hayashi, M; Inagaki, A; Novak, I; Matsuda, H

    2016-07-01

    Adenosine modulates a wide variety of biological processes via adenosine receptors. In the exocrine pancreas, adenosine regulates transepithelial anion secretion in duct cells and is considered to play a role in acini-to-duct signaling. To identify the functional adenosine receptors and Cl(-) channels important for anion secretion, we herein performed experiments on Capan-1, a human pancreatic duct cell line, using open-circuit Ussing chamber and gramicidin-perforated patch-clamp techniques. The luminal addition of adenosine increased the negative transepithelial potential difference (V te) in Capan-1 monolayers with a half-maximal effective concentration value of approximately 10 μM, which corresponded to the value obtained on whole-cell Cl(-) currents in Capan-1 single cells. The effects of adenosine on V te, an equivalent short-circuit current (I sc), and whole-cell Cl(-) currents were inhibited by CFTRinh-172, a cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel inhibitor. The adenosine A2B receptor agonist, BAY 60-6583, increased I sc and whole-cell Cl(-) currents through CFTR Cl(-) channels, whereas the A2A receptor agonist, CGS 21680, had negligible effects. The A2B receptor antagonist, PSB 603, inhibited the response of I sc to adenosine. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the A2A and A2B receptors colocalized with Ezrin in the luminal membranes of Capan-1 monolayers and in rat pancreatic ducts. Adenosine elicited the whole-cell Cl(-) currents in guinea pig duct cells. These results demonstrate that luminal adenosine regulates anion secretion by activating CFTR Cl(-) channels via adenosine A2B receptors on the luminal membranes of Capan-1 cells. The present study endorses that purinergic signaling is important in the regulation of pancreatic secretion. PMID:26965147

  2. The Three Possible 2-(Pyrenylethynyl) Adenosines: Rotameric Energy Barriers Govern the Photodynamics of These Structural Isomers.

    Reuss, Andreas J; Grünewald, Christian; Braun, Markus; Engels, Joachim W; Wachtveitl, Josef

    2016-05-01

    This article presents a comprehensive study of the photophysics of 2-(2-pyrenylethynyl) adenosine and 2-(4-pyrenylethynyl) adenosine, which are structural isomers of the well-established fluorescent RNA label 2-(1-pyrenylethynyl) adenosine. We performed steady-state and ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy studies along with time-resolved fluorescence emission experiments in different solvents to work out the interplay of locally excited and charge-transfer states. We found the ultrafast photodynamics to be crucial for the fluorescence decay behavior, which extends up to tens of nanoseconds and is partially multi-exponential. These features in the ultrafast dynamics are indicative of the rotational energy barriers in the first excited state. PMID:26635201

  3. Circadian rhythm in adenosine A1 receptor of mouse cerebral cortex

    In order to investigate diurnal variation in adenosine A1 receptors binding parameters, Bmax and Kd values of specifically bound N6-cyclohexyl-[3H]adenosine were determined in the cerebral cortex of mice that had been housed under controlled light-dark cycles for 4 weeks. Significant differences were found for Bmax values measured at 3-hr intervals across a 24-h period, with low Bmax values during the light period and high Bmax values during the dark period. The amplitude between 03.00 and 18.00 hr was 33%. No substantial rhythm was found in the Kd values. It is suggested that the changes in the density of A1 receptors could reflect a physiologically-relevant mechanism by which adenosine exerts its modulatory role in the central nervous system

  4. Adenosine concentrations in the interstitium of resting and contracting human skeletal muscle

    Hellsten, Ylva; Maclean, D.; Rådegran, G.;

    1998-01-01

    effect remain unanswered. METHODS AND RESULTS: The interstitial adenosine concentration was determined in the vastus lateralis muscle of healthy humans via dialysis probes inserted in the muscle. The probes were perfused with buffer, and the dialysate samples were collected at rest and during graded knee...... extensor exercise. At rest, the interstitial concentration of adenosine was 220+/-100 nmol/L and femoral arterial blood flow (FaBF) was 0.19+/-0.02 L/min. When the subjects exercised lightly, at a work rate of 10 W, there was a markedly higher (1140+/-540 nmol/L; P... and demonstrates that adenosine and its precursors increase in the exercising muscle interstitium, at a rate associated with intensity of muscle contraction and the magnitude of muscle blood flow....

  5. 2'-O methylation of internal adenosine by flavivirus NS5 methyltransferase.

    Hongping Dong

    Full Text Available RNA modification plays an important role in modulating host-pathogen interaction. Flavivirus NS5 protein encodes N-7 and 2'-O methyltransferase activities that are required for the formation of 5' type I cap (m(7GpppAm of viral RNA genome. Here we reported, for the first time, that flavivirus NS5 has a novel internal RNA methylation activity. Recombinant NS5 proteins of West Nile virus and Dengue virus (serotype 4; DENV-4 specifically methylates polyA, but not polyG, polyC, or polyU, indicating that the methylation occurs at adenosine residue. RNAs with internal adenosines substituted with 2'-O-methyladenosines are not active substrates for internal methylation, whereas RNAs with adenosines substituted with N⁶-methyladenosines can be efficiently methylated, suggesting that the internal methylation occurs at the 2'-OH position of adenosine. Mass spectroscopic analysis further demonstrated that the internal methylation product is 2'-O-methyladenosine. Importantly, genomic RNA purified from DENV virion contains 2'-O-methyladenosine. The 2'-O methylation of internal adenosine does not require specific RNA sequence since recombinant methyltransferase of DENV-4 can efficiently methylate RNAs spanning different regions of viral genome, host ribosomal RNAs, and polyA. Structure-based mutagenesis results indicate that K61-D146-K181-E217 tetrad of DENV-4 methyltransferase forms the active site of internal methylation activity; in addition, distinct residues within the methyl donor (S-adenosyl-L-methionine pocket, GTP pocket, and RNA-binding site are critical for the internal methylation activity. Functional analysis using flavivirus replicon and genome-length RNAs showed that internal methylation attenuated viral RNA translation and replication. Polymerase assay revealed that internal 2'-O-methyladenosine reduces the efficiency of RNA elongation. Collectively, our results demonstrate that flavivirus NS5 performs 2'-O methylation of internal adenosine of

  6. Adenosine receptor antagonists alter the stability of human epileptic GABAA receptors

    Roseti, Cristina; Martinello, Katiuscia; Fucile, Sergio; Piccari, Vanessa; Mascia, Addolorata; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Manfredi, Mario; Esposito, Vincenzo; Cantore, Gianpaolo; Arcella, Antonella; Simonato, Michele; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Limatola, Cristina; Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    We examined how the endogenous anticonvulsant adenosine might influence γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor stability and which adenosine receptors (ARs) were involved. Upon repetitive activation (GABA 500 μM), GABAA receptors, microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes from neurosurgically resected epileptic human nervous tissues, exhibited an obvious GABAA-current (IGABA) run-down, which was consistently and significantly reduced by treatment with the nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist CGS15943 (100 nM) or with adenosine deaminase (ADA) (1 units/ml), that inactivates adenosine. It was also found that selective antagonists of A2B (MRS1706, 10 nM) or A3 (MRS1334, 30 nM) receptors reduced IGABA run-down, whereas treatment with the specific A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX (10 nM) was ineffective. The selective A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 (10 nM) reduced or potentiated IGABA run-down in ≈40% and ≈20% of tested oocytes, respectively. The ADA-resistant, AR agonist 2-chloroadenosine (2-CA) (10 μM) potentiated IGABA run-down but only in ≈20% of tested oocytes. CGS15943 administration again decreased IGABA run-down in patch-clamped neurons from either human or rat neocortex slices. IGABA run-down in pyramidal neurons was equivalent in A1 receptor-deficient and wt neurons but much larger in neurons from A2A receptor-deficient mice, indicating that, in mouse cortex, GABAA-receptor stability is tonically influenced by A2A but not by A1 receptors. IGABA run-down from wt mice was not affected by 2-CA, suggesting maximal ARs activity by endogenous adenosine. Our findings strongly suggest that cortical A2–A3 receptors alter the stability of GABAA receptors, which could offer therapeutic opportunities. PMID:18809912

  7. Adenosine transport systems on dissociated brain cells from mouse, guinea-pig, and rat

    Johnston, M.E.; Geiger, J.D. (Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg (Canada))

    1990-09-01

    The kinetics and sodium dependence of adenosine transport were determined using an inhibitor-stop method on dissociated cell body preparations obtained from mouse, guinea-pig and rat brain. Transport affinity (KT) values for the high affinity adenosine transport systems KT(H) were significantly different between these three species; mean +/- SEM values were 0.34 +/- 0.1 in mouse, 0.9 +/- 0.2 in rat, and 1.5 +/- 0.5 microM in guinea-pig. The KT values for the low affinity transport system KT(L) were not different between the three species. Brain cells from rat displayed a significantly greater maximal capacity to accumulate (3H)adenosine (Vmax) than did mouse or guinea-pig for the high affinity system, or than did mouse for the low affinity system. When sodium chloride was replaced in the transport medium with choline chloride, the KT(H) values for guinea-pig and rat were both increased by approximately 100%; only in rat did the change reach statistical significance. The sodium-dependence of adenosine transport in mouse brain was clearly absent. The differences between KT(H) values in mouse and those in guinea-pig or rat were accentuated in the absence of sodium. The differences in kinetic values, ionic requirements, and pharmacological characteristics between adenosine transporters in CNS tissues of mouse, guinea-pig and rat may help account for some of the variability noted among species in terms of their physiological responses to adenosine.

  8. Magnetically assisted fluorescence ratiometric assays for adenosine deaminase using water-soluble conjusated polymers

    HE Fang; YU MingHui; WANG Shu

    2009-01-01

    A magnetically assisted fluorescence ratiometric technique has been developed for adenosine deami-nase assays with high sensitivity using water-soluble cationic conjugated polymers (CCPs).The assay contains three elements:a biotin-labeled aptamer of adenosine (biotin-aptamer),a signaling probe single-stranded DNA-tagged fiuorescein at terminus (ssDNA-FI) and a CCP.The specific binding of adenosine to biotin-aptamer makes biotin-aptamer and ssDNA-FI unhybridized,and the ssDNA-FI is washed out after streptavidin-coated magnetic beads are added and separated from the assay solution under magnetic field.In this case,after the addition of CCP to the magnetic beads solution,the fluo-rescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from CCP to fluorescein is inefficient.Upon adding adenosine deaminase,the adenosine is converted into inosine,and the biotin-aptamer is hybridized with ssDNA-FI to form doubled stranded DNA (biotin-dsDNA-FI).The ssONA-FI is attached to the mag-netic beads at the separation step,and the addition of CCP to the magnetic beads solution leads to efficient FRET from CCP to fluorescein.Thus the adenosine deaminase activity can be monitored by fluorescence spectra in view of the intensity decrease of CCP emission or the increase of fluorescein emission in aqueous solutions.The assay integrates surface-functionalized magnetic particles with significant amplification of detection signal of water-soluble cationic conjugated polymers.

  9. Increase of adenosine plasma levels after oral trimetazidine: a pharmacological preconditioning?

    Blardi, Patrizia; de Lalla, Arianna; Volpi, Luciana; Auteri, Alberto; Di Perri, Tullio

    2002-01-01

    Trimetazidine (1-[2,3,4-trimethoxybenzyl] piperazine) (TMZ) is a cellular anti-ischemic agent able to prevent intracellular ATP decrease, limit intracellular acidosis, protect against oxygen-free radical-induced toxicity and inhibit neutrophil infiltration. However, its definitive mechanism of action had not been identified. Recent studies showed the existence of an endogenous mechanism of cellular protection against ischemia, defined as 'ischemic preconditioning'. This mechanism was related mainly to cellular liberation of adenosine, a nucleoside with protective effects in myocardial ischemia. Since TMZ acts by increasing cell tolerance to ischemia and adenosine is the mediator of ischemic preconditioning, in this study we investigated a possible interaction between TMZ and adenosine. Two groups of patients affected by angina pectoris, were admitted to the study. They received a single oral dose of TMZ. One group was treated, during different sessions, with TMZ 10 and 20 mg, the other group with TMZ 40 and 80 mg. After a 3 day wash-out from drug administration, each group received a placebo. Blood samples were collected at baseline (time 0) and 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 h after drug administration, in order to detect plasma levels of adenosine by a high-performance liquid chromatography method. We observed that the administration of TMZ at doses of 10, 20, 40 and 80 mg induced an increase of adenosine plasma levels of 19, 50, 62 and 62%, respectively. We hypothesized that the activity of TMZ could depend, at least in part, on adenosine mediation and this interaction opens a new interpretation of the drug antischemic effect. PMID:11820865

  10. Lack of effect of adenosine on the function of rodent osteoblasts and osteoclasts in vitro.

    Hajjawi, Mark O R; Patel, Jessal J; Corcelli, Michelangelo; Arnett, Timothy R; Orriss, Isabel R

    2016-06-01

    Extracellular ATP, signalling through P2 receptors, exerts well-documented effects on bone cells, inhibiting mineral deposition by osteoblasts and stimulating the formation and resorptive activity of osteoclasts. The aims of this study were to determine the potential osteotropic effects of adenosine, the hydrolysis product of ATP, on primary bone cells in vitro. We determined the effect of exogenous adenosine on (1) the growth, alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) activity and bone-forming ability of osteoblasts derived from the calvariae of neonatal rats and mice and the marrow of juvenile rats and (2) the formation and resorptive activity of osteoclasts from juvenile mouse marrow. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed marked differences in the expression of P1 receptors in osteoblasts from different sources. Whilst mRNA for the A1 and A2B receptors was expressed by all primary osteoblasts, A2A receptor expression was limited to rat bone marrow and mouse calvarial osteoblasts and the A3 receptor to rat bone marrow osteoblasts. We found that adenosine had no detectable effects on cell growth, TNAP activity or bone formation by rodent osteoblasts in vitro. The analogue 2-chloroadenosine, which is hydrolysed more slowly than adenosine, had no effects on rat or mouse calvarial osteoblasts but increased TNAP activity and bone formation by rat bone marrow osteoblasts by 30-50 % at a concentration of 1 μM. Osteoclasts were found to express the A2A, A2B and A3 receptors; however, neither adenosine (≤100 μM) nor 2-chloroadenosine (≤10 μM) had any effect on the formation or resorptive activity of mouse osteoclasts in vitro. These results suggest that adenosine, unlike ATP, is not a major signalling molecule in the bone. PMID:26861849

  11. Plasma concentrations of the cyclic nucleotides, adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and guanosine 3'.5'-monophosphate, in healthy adults treated with theophylline

    Fenger, M; Eriksen, P B; Andersen, O; Nielsen, M K; Knudsen, P J

    1982-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate were measured in 10 health adults before, during and after periods of theophylline administration. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate concentrations did not change significantly, but cyclic guanosine monophosph...

  12. Interleukin-6-type cytokines in neuroprotection and neuromodulation: Oncostatin M, but not leukemia inhibitory factor, requires neuronal Adenosine A1 receptor function

    Moidunny, S.; Dias, R.; Van Calker, D.; Boddeke, H.; Sebastiao, A.; Biber, K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Adenosine is a neuromodulator in the central nervous system exhibiting anticonvulsive, neuroprotective and sedating/sleep regulating properties. A pathophysiological importance of adenosine in various neuropsychiatric diseases (e.g. epilepsy, neurodegenerative disorders, apoplexia and moo

  13. 钙离子ATP酶2a基因修饰骨髓间充质干细胞移植改善慢性心力衰竭大鼠的心功能%Enhancement of cardiac function of chronic heart failure rats by marrow stromal cell-based sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ adenosine triphosphatase gene therapy

    郭豫涛; 李小鹰; 鲁小春; 吴迪; 姚克群; 陈平; 马康涛; 周春燕

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are still few effective methods to repair injured myocardium after myocardial failure and pathologically rebuild reverral myocardium. As a new therapy, normal myocytes and therapeutic gene to interfere injured myocardium have advantageous effects in improving heart function.OBJECTIVE: To observe the efficiency and stability of adenovirus-medicated gene transferred into different passages of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) and investigate the effect of MSC-based sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase gene (SERCA2a) gene therapy for rats with chronic heart failure. To compare the effects of gene therapy, cell transplantation and MSC-based SERCA2a gene therapy for chronic heart failure. DESIGN: Randomized controlled study.SETTING: Department of Senile Angiocardiopathy, General Hospital of Chinese PLA; Department of Biochemistry, Beijing Medical University. MATERIALS: Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats with 4 weeks old, clean grade and weighing 45-50 g provided by the Animal Experimental Center, Peking Medical University were used as donators of bone marrow. Other female SD rats of 12 weeks old, clean grade and weighing 200-250 g were used as receptors of cell transplantation and gene therapy. Sry gene of Y chromosome in male rats was used to evaluate whether transplanted cells of donators lived in myocardium of receptor rats. Ad-SERCa2a and Ad-EGFP were constructed by Doctor Lu Xiao-chun; MSC in the 3rd and 8th generations was isolating cultured on its own. METHODS: The experiment was carried out in the Zhou CY Laboratory (BSL-2), Department of Biochemistry, Beijing Medical University from July 2004 to December 2005. Thirty female SD rats received ligation at the left coronary artery to make models with chronic cardiac failure following acute myocardial infarction. And then, 29 rats were randomly divided into four groups, including gene therapy group (n=7), MSC group (n=7), gene-modified MSC group (n=8) and control group (n=7). Rats in the four groups were given the interventions of SERCA2a gene, MSC transplantation, MSC+Ad/SERCa2a and empty adenoviral vector, respectively. MSCs were separated and cultured, and then Ad-SERCA2a-GFP was used to transfer MSC in the 3rd and 8th generations.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Ad-SERCA2a-GFP transfection rate of MSC was measured by using flow cytometer. Before and at 14 and 21 days after treatment, cardiac function was evaluated by ultrasonic echocardiogram. Expression of cytokine Ⅷ was tested by immunohistochemical staining. SERCA2a gene and protein expression were evaluated by RT-PCR and Western blot respectively, as well as SERCA2a enzyme activity. RESULTS: ① Transfection rate: The infection efficiency of adenovirus-medicated gene into different passages of MSC was over 80%, and there was no difference between passage three (P3) MSC and P8 MSC (P > 0.05). ② Heart function: Left ventricle wall was thickened obviously in group MSC and group MSC+Ad/SERCa2a on the 21st day after treatment, while volume was shortened and gradually rounded. Compared to control group, ejection fraction (EF) and shortening fraction (FS) of group Ad-SERCa2a, group MSC and group MSC+Ad/SERCa2a were elevated significantly on the 14th day after therapy (P 0.05).②大鼠心功能:治疗后14 d,与腺病毒空载体对照组相比,其余3组左室射血分数均明显升高(P < 0.01).治疗后 21 d,与腺病毒空载体对照组相比,干细胞移植治疗组和基因修饰的干细胞移植组大鼠室壁增厚;干细胞移植治疗组和基因修饰的干细胞移植组左室射血分数和左室短轴缩短率改善率持续升高(P < 0.01),基因治疗组两指标改善率较治疗14 d时下降.与腺病毒空载体对照组相比,基因修饰的干细胞移植组左室前壁和室间隔收缩期纵向峰值速度显著升高(P < 0.01),左室前壁和室间隔舒张期纵向峰值速度亦呈现相同改善(P < 0.01).③心肌SERCA2a的基因、蛋白水平表达和功能活性,以及Ⅷ因子表达:携带SERCA2a基因的骨髓干细胞在宿主心肌能有效地合成和表达有功能的SERCA2a蛋白.与腺病毒空载体对照组相比,基因修饰的干细胞移植组SERCA2a基因、蛋白表达和酶活性均显著增强.干细胞移植组心力衰竭大鼠心脏瘢痕区可观察到Ⅷ因子表达.结论:①第3和8代骨髓间充质干细胞均具有高腺病毒转染率,骨髓间充质干细胞是基因治疗的良好细胞载体,其介导的SERCA2a基因治疗对衰竭心肌具有持续稳定的心功能改善作用.②骨髓间充质干细胞移植改善心功能的作用可能与促进血管新生有关.

  14. NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via a GABAergic mechanism.

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2015-07-01

    Adenosine is a powerful central neuromodulator acting via opposing A1 (inhibitor) and A2a (activator) receptors. However, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), both adenosine receptor subtypes attenuate cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) sympathoinhibition of renal, adrenal, and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and attenuate reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Adenosine A1 receptors inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the CCR pathway, whereas adenosine A2a receptors most likely facilitate release of an unknown inhibitory neurotransmitter, which, in turn, inhibits the CCR. We hypothesized that adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the CCR via facilitation of GABA release in the NTS. In urethane-chloralose-anesthetized rats (n = 51), we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of the 5-HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (1-8 μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors [microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 (20 pmol/50 nl)] preceded by blockade of GABAA or GABAB receptors in the NTS [bicuculline (10 pmol/100 nl) or SCH-50911 (1 nmol/100 nl)]. Blockade of GABAA receptors virtually abolished adenosine A2a receptor-mediated inhibition of the CCR. GABAB receptors had much weaker but significant effects. These effects were similar for the different sympathetic outputs. We conclude that stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibits CCR-evoked hemodynamic and regional sympathetic reflex responses via a GABA-ergic mechanism. PMID:25910812

  15. Adenosine inhibits neutrophil vascular endothelial growth factor release and transendothelial migration via A2B receptor activation.

    Wakai, A

    2012-02-03

    The effects of adenosine on neutrophil (polymorphonuclear neutrophils; PMN)-directed changes in vascular permeability are poorly characterized. This study investigated whether adenosine modulates activated PMN vascular endothelial growth factor (vascular permeability factor; VEGF) release and transendothelial migration. PMN activated with tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha, 10 ng\\/mL) were incubated with adenosine and its receptor-specific analogues. Culture supernatants were assayed for VEGF. PMN transendothelial migration across human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayers was assessed in vitro. Adhesion molecule receptor expression was assessed flow cytometrically. Adenosine and some of its receptor-specific analogues dose-dependently inhibited activated PMN VEGF release. The rank order of potency was consistent with the affinity profile of human A2B receptors. The inhibitory effect of adenosine was reversed by 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine, an A2 receptor antagonist. Adenosine (100 microM) or the A2B receptor agonist 5\\'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA, 100 microM) significantly reduced PMN transendothelial migration. However, expression of activated PMN beta2 integrins and HUVEC ICAM-1 were not significantly altered by adenosine or NECA. Adenosine attenuates human PMN VEGF release and transendothelial migration via the A2B receptor. This provides a novel target for the modulation of PMN-directed vascular hyperpermeability in conditions such as the capillary leak syndrome.

  16. Comparison of adenosine and treadmill exercise thallium-201 stress tests for the detection of coronary artery disease.

    Abe, S; Takeishi, Y; Chiba, J; Ikeda, K; Tomoike, H

    1993-12-01

    To determine the clinical usefulness of adenosine Tl-201 imaging for the evaluation of coronary artery disease, 22 patients with suspected coronary artery disease who underwent adenosine and exercise Tl-201 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were studied. The peak levels of heart rate (83 vs 123 bpm, p pressure products (10220 vs 20410 bpm x mmHg, p < 0.001) were markedly smaller during adenosine infusion than during exercise. Segmental agreements between adenosine and exercise tests were 90% (218 of 242 segments) regarding the presence of perfusion defects and 89% (215 of 242 segments) regarding the presence of redistribution. Regional Tl-201 uptake (r = 0.85, p < 0.001) and the extent (r = 0.75, p < 0.001) and intensity (r = 0.83, p < 0.001) of Tl-201 defects during adenosine testing were closely correlated with those of exercise testing. Adenosine and exercise tests showed similar sensitivities for the identification of individual coronary stenosis (85% vs 78%). However, in patients who were unable to perform adequate exercise (maximal heart rate < 120 bpm), the sensitivity of adenosine imaging tended to be higher than that of exercise imaging (92% vs 69%, p = 0.07). Adenosine Tl-201 imaging is an alternative to the exercise test for assessing the severity and loci of coronary artery disease, especially in patients who are unable to perform adequate physical exercise. PMID:8283603

  17. Molecular expression of adenosine receptors in OVCAR-3, Caov-4 and SKOV-3 human ovarian cancer cell lines.

    Hajiahmadi, S; Panjehpour, M; Aghaei, M; Mousavi, S

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine receptors (A1, A2a, A2b and A3) have several physiological and pathological roles in cancer cell lines. The present study was carried out to evaluate the mRNA and protein expression profile and functional role of adenosine receptors in OVCAR-3, Caov-4 and SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cell lines. The levels of mRNA and protein expression of A1, A2a, A2b and A3 adenosine receptors in the ovarian cancer cell lines were measured by Real-time PCR and western blotting. The functional roles of adenosine receptors were investigated through measurement of cAMP levels after agonist treatment. The mRNA and protein of all adenosine receptors subtypes were expressed in the ovarian cancer cell lines. Our findings demonstrated that A2b and A3 had the most mRNA and protein expression. Moreover, cAMP assay confirmed the functional role of A2b and A3 adenosine receptors. This findings demonstrated that A2b and A3 subtypes are most important adenosine receptors in humn ovarian cancer cell lines. This information provide a strong possibility into the relationship of A2b and A3 adenosine receptor and ovarian cancer. PMID:26430456

  18. Molecular expression of adenosine receptors in OVCAR-3, Caov-4 and SKOV-3 human ovarian cancer cell lines

    Hajiahmadi, S.; Panjehpour, M.; Aghaei, M.; Mousavi, S.

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine receptors (A1, A2a, A2b and A3) have several physiological and pathological roles in cancer cell lines. The present study was carried out to evaluate the mRNA and protein expression profile and functional role of adenosine receptors in OVCAR-3, Caov-4 and SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cell lines. The levels of mRNA and protein expression of A1, A2a, A2b and A3 adenosine receptors in the ovarian cancer cell lines were measured by Real-time PCR and western blotting. The functional roles of adenosine receptors were investigated through measurement of cAMP levels after agonist treatment. The mRNA and protein of all adenosine receptors subtypes were expressed in the ovarian cancer cell lines. Our findings demonstrated that A2b and A3 had the most mRNA and protein expression. Moreover, cAMP assay confirmed the functional role of A2b and A3 adenosine receptors. This findings demonstrated that A2b and A3 subtypes are most important adenosine receptors in humn ovarian cancer cell lines. This information provide a strong possibility into the relationship of A2b and A3 adenosine receptor and ovarian cancer. PMID:26430456

  19. Adenosine A1 Receptor Mediates Delayed Cardioprotective Effect of Sildenafil in Mouse

    Salloum, Fadi N.; Das, Anindita; Thomas, Christopher S; Yin, Chang; Kukreja, Rakesh C.

    2007-01-01

    Sildenafil induces powerful cardioprotection against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Since adenosine is known to be major trigger of ischemic preconditioning, we hypothesized that A1 adenosine receptor (A1AR) activation plays a role in sildenafil-induced cardioprotective signaling. Adult male C57BL-wild type (WT) mice or their corresponding A1AR knockout (A1AR-KO) mice were treated intraperitoneally (i.p.) with either sildenafil (0.71 mg/kg, equivalent to 50 mg dose for a 70 kg patient) or...

  20. Wound Healing Is Accelerated by Agonists of Adenosine A2 (Gα s-linked) Receptors

    Montesinos, M. Carmen; Gadangi, Pratap; Longaker, Michael; Sung, Joanne; Levine, Jamie; Nilsen, Diana; Reibman, Joan; Min LI; Jiang, Chuan-Kui; Hirschhorn, Rochelle; Recht, Phoebe A.; Ostad, Edward; Levin, Richard I.; Cronstein, Bruce N.

    1997-01-01

    The complete healing of wounds is the final step in a highly regulated response to injury. Although many of the molecular mediators and cellular events of healing are known, their manipulation for the enhancement and acceleration of wound closure has not proven practical as yet. We and others have established that adenosine is a potent regulator of the inflammatory response, which is a component of wound healing. We now report that ligation of the Gαs-linked adenosine receptors on the cells o...

  1. Regulation of photoreceptor gap junction phosphorylation by adenosine in zebrafish retina.

    Li, Hongyan; Chuang, Alice Z; O'Brien, John

    2014-05-01

    Electrical coupling of photoreceptors through gap junctions suppresses voltage noise, routes rod signals into cone pathways, expands the dynamic range of rod photoreceptors in high scotopic and mesopic illumination, and improves detection of contrast and small stimuli. In essentially all vertebrates, connexin 35/36 (gene homologs Cx36 in mammals, Cx35 in other vertebrates) is the major gap junction protein observed in photoreceptors, mediating rod-cone, cone-cone, and possibly rod-rod communication. Photoreceptor coupling is dynamically controlled by the day/night cycle and light/dark adaptation, and is directly correlated with phosphorylation of Cx35/36 at two sites, serine110 and serine 276/293 (homologous sites in teleost fish and mammals, respectively). Activity of protein kinase A (PKA) plays a key role during this process. Previous studies have shown that activation of dopamine D4 receptors on photoreceptors inhibits adenylyl cyclase, down-regulates cAMP and PKA activity, and leads to photoreceptor uncoupling, imposing the daytime/light condition. In this study, we explored the role of adenosine, a nighttime signal with a high extracellular concentration at night and a low concentration in the day, in regulating photoreceptor coupling by examining photoreceptor Cx35 phosphorylation in zebrafish retina. Adenosine enhanced photoreceptor Cx35 phosphorylation in daytime, but with a complex dose-response curve. Selective pharmacological manipulations revealed that adenosine A2a receptors provide a potent positive drive to phosphorylate photoreceptor Cx35 under the influence of endogenous adenosine at night. A2a receptors can be activated in the daytime as well by micromolar exogenous adenosine. However, the higher affinity adenosine A1 receptors are also present and have an antagonistic though less potent effect. Thus, the nighttime/darkness signal adenosine provides a net positive drive on Cx35 phosphorylation at night, working in opposition to dopamine to

  2. Adenosine as a signaling molecule in the retina: biochemical and developmental aspects

    ROBERTO PAES-DE-CARVALHO

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The nucleoside adenosine plays an important role as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the central nervous system, including the retina. In the present paper we review compelling evidence showing that adenosine is a signaling molecule in the developing retina. In the chick retina, adenosine transporters are present since early stages of development before the appearance of adenosine A1 receptors modulating dopamine-dependent adenylate cyclase activity or A2 receptors that directly activate the enzyme. Experiments using retinal cell cultures revealed that adenosine is taken up by specific cell populations that when stimulated by depolarization or neurotransmitters such as dopamine or glutamate, release the nucleoside through calcium-dependent transporter-mediated mechanisms. The presence of adenosine in the extracellular medium and the long-term activation of adenosine receptors is able to regulate the survival of retinal neurons and blocks glutamate excitoxicity. Thus, adenosine besides working as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the mature retina, is considered as an important signaling molecule during retinal development having important functions such as regulation of neuronal survival and differentiation.O nucleosídeo adenosina apresenta um importante papel como neurotransmissor ou neuromodulador no sistema nervoso central, inclusive na retina. Neste artigo apresentamos uma revisão das evidências que mostram que a adenosina é uma molécula sinalizadora na retina em desenvolvimento. Na retina de pinto, transportadores de adenosina estão presentes desde estágios precoces do desenvolvimento, antes do aparecimento dos receptores A1 que modulam a atividade adenilato ciclase dependente de dopamina ou dos receptores A2 que ativam diretamente a enzima. Experimentos usando culturas de células de retina revelaram que a adenosina é captada por populações celulares específicas que, quando estimuladas por despolarização ou por

  3. Pharmacological Characterization of Novel A3 Adenosine Receptor-selective Antagonists

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Park, Kyung-Sun; JIANG, JI-LONG; KIM, YONG-CHUL; Olah, Mark E.; Stiles, Gary L.; Ji, Xiao-duo

    1997-01-01

    The effects of putative A3 adenosine receptor antagonists of three diverse chemical classes (the flavonoid MRS 1067, the 6-phenyl-1,4-dihydropyridines MRS 1097 and MRS 1191, and the triazoloquinazo-line MRS 1220) were characterized in receptor binding and functional assays. MRS1067, MRS 1191 and MRS 1220 were found to be competitive in saturation binding studies using the agonist radioligand [125I]AB-MECA (N6-(4-amino-3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide) at cloned human brain A3 recep...

  4. Adenosine and the adenosine A2A receptor agonist, CGS21680, upregulate CD39 and CD73 expression through E2F-1 and CREB in regulatory T cells isolated from septic mice.

    Bao, Rui; Shui, Xianqi; Hou, Jiong; Li, Jinbao; Deng, Xiaoming; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Tao

    2016-09-01

    The number of regulatory T cells (Treg cells) and the expression of ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 1 (ENTPD1; also known as CD39) and 5'-ectonucleotidase (NT5E; also known as CD73) on the Treg cell surface are increased during sepsis. In this study, to determine the factors leading to the high expression of CD39 and CD73, and the regulation of the CD39/CD73/adenosine pathway in Treg cells under septic conditions, we constructed a mouse model of sepsis and separated the Treg cells using a flow cytometer. The Treg cells isolated from the peritoneal lavage and splenocytes of the mice were treated with adenosine or the specific adenosine A2A receptor agonist, CGS21680, and were transfected with specific siRNA targeting E2F transcription factor 1 (E2F-1) or cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element-binding protein (CREB), which are predicted transcription regulatory factors of CD39 or CD73. The regulatory relationships among these factors were then determined by western blot analysis and dual-luciferase reporter assay. In addition, changes in adenosine metabolism were measured in the treated cells. The results revealed that adenosine and CGS21680 significantly upregulated CD39 and CD73 expression (PTreg cell surface during sepsis. Adenosine and its A2A receptor agonist served as the signal transducer factors of the CD39/CD73/adenosine pathway, accelerating adenosine generation. Our study may benefit further research on adenosine metabolism for the treatment of sepsis. PMID:27430240

  5. Adenosine modulates hypoxia-induced responses in rat PC12 cells via the A2A receptor.

    Kobayashi, S; Conforti, L; Pun, R Y; Millhorn, D E

    1998-04-01

    1. The present study was undertaken to determine the role of adenosine in mediating the cellular responses to hypoxia in rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells, an oxygen-sensitive clonal cell line. 2. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction studies revealed that PC12 cells express adenosine deaminase (the first catalysing enzyme of adenosine degradation) and the A2A and A2B adenosine receptors, but not the A1 or A3 adenosine receptors. 3. Whole-cell current- and voltage-clamp experiments showed that adenosine attenuated the hypoxia-induced membrane depolarization. The hypoxia-induced suppression of the voltage-sensitive potassium current (IK(V)) was markedly reduced by adenosine. Furthermore, extracellularly applied adenosine increased the peak amplitudes of IK(V) in a concentration-dependent manner. This increase was blocked by pretreatment not only with a non-specific adenosine receptor antagonist, 8-phenyltheophylline (8-PT), but also with a selective A2A receptor antagonist, ZM241385. 4. Ca2+ imaging studies using fura-2 acetoxymethyl ester (fura-2 AM) revealed that the increase in intracellular free Ca2+ during hypoxic exposure was attenuated significantly by adenosine. Voltage-clamp studies showed that adenosine inhibited the voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents (ICa) in a concentration-dependent fashion. This inhibition was also abolished by both 8-PT and ZM241385. 5. The modulation of both IK(V) and ICa by adenosine was prevented by intracellular application of an inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA), PKA inhibitor fragment (6-22) amide. In addition, the effect of adenosine on either IK(V) or ICa was absent in PKA-deficient PC12 cells. 6. These results indicate that the modulatory effects of adenosine on the hypoxia-induced membrane responses of PC12 cells are likely to be mediated via activation of the A2A receptor, and that the PKA pathway is required for these modulatory actions. We propose that this modulation serves to regulate membrane excitability in

  6. Systemic administration of the adenosine A2A agonist CGS 21680 induces sedation at doses that suppress lever pressing and food intake

    Mingote, Susana; Pereira, Mariana; Farrar, Andrew M.; McLaughlin, Peter J.; Salamone, John D.

    2008-01-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors are involved in the regulation of several behavioral functions. Adenosine A2A antagonists exert antiparkinsonian effects in animal models, and adenosine A2A agonists suppress locomotion and impair various aspects of motor control. The present experiments were conducted to study the effects of low doses of the adenosine A2A agonist CGS 21680 on lever pressing, specific parameters of food intake, and sedation. In the first experiment, the effects of CGS 21680 on fixed ra...

  7. Dielectric spectra broadening as a signature for dipole-matrix interaction. III. Water in adenosine monophosphate/adenosine-5'-triphosphate solutions.

    Puzenko, Alexander; Levy, Evgeniya; Shendrik, Andrey; Talary, Mark S; Caduff, Andreas; Feldman, Yuri

    2012-11-21

    In this, the third part of our series on the dielectric spectrum symmetrical broadening of water, we consider the nucleotide aqueous solutions. Where in Parts I [E. Levy et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 114502 (2012)] and II [E. Levy et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 114503 (2012)], the dipole-dipole or ion-dipole interaction had a dominant feature, now the interplay between these two types of dipole-matrix interactions will be considered. We present the results of high frequency dielectric measurements of different concentrations of adenosine monophosphate/adenosine-5'-triphosphate aqueous solutions. We observed the Cole-Cole broadening of the main relaxation peak of the solvent in the solutions. Moreover, depending on the nucleotide concentration, we observed both types of dipole-matrix interaction. The 3D trajectory approach (described in detail in Part I) is applied in order to highlight the differences between the two types of interaction. PMID:23181321

  8. Adenosine induces vasoconstriction through Gi-dependent activation of phospholipase C in isolated perfused afferent arterioles of mice

    Hansen, Pernille B; Castrop, Hayo; Briggs, Josie; Schnermann, Jurgen

    2003-01-01

    Adenosine induces vasoconstriction of renal afferent arterioles through activation of A1 adenosine receptors (A1AR). A1AR are directly coupled to Gi/Go, resulting in inhibition of adenylate cyclase, but the contribution of this signaling pathway to smooth muscle cell activation is unclear. In......-induced vasoconstriction was stable for up to 30 min and was most pronounced in the most distal part of the afferent arterioles. Adenosine did not cause vasoconstriction in arterioles from A1AR-/- mice. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin (PTX) (400 ng/ml) for 2 h blocked the vasoconstricting action of adenosine or N(6......) blocked the constriction responses to both adenosine and angiotensin II. In contrast, the adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 (10 micro M) and the protein kinase A antagonist KT5720 (0.1 and 1 micro M) did not induce significant vasoconstriction of afferent arterioles. It is concluded that the...

  9. Adenosine A(1) Receptors in the Central Nervous System : Their Functions in Health and Disease, and Possible Elucidation by PET Imaging

    Paul, S.; Elsinga, P. H.; Ishiwata, K.; Dierckx, R. A. J. O.; van Waarde, A.

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine is a neuromodulator with several functions in the central nervous system (CNS), such as inhibition of neuronal activity in many signaling pathways. Most of the sedating, anxiolytic, seizure-inhibiting and protective actions of adenosine are mediated by adenosine A(1) receptors (A(1)R) on t

  10. Recent developments in A2B adenosine receptor ligands.

    Kalla, Rao V; Zablocki, Jeff; Tabrizi, Mojgan Aghazadeh; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    A selective, high-affinity A(2B) adenosine receptor (AR) antagonist will be useful as a pharmacological tool to help determine the role of the A(2B)AR in inflammatory diseases and angiogenic diseases. Based on early A(2B)AR-selective ligands with nonoptimal pharmaceutical properties, such as 15 (MRS 1754: K(i)(hA(2B)) = 2 nM; K(i)(hA(1)) = 403 nM; K(i)(hA(2A)) = 503 NM, and K(i)(hA(3)) = 570 nM), several groups have discovered second-generation A(2B)AR ligands that are suitable for development. Scientists at CV Therapeutics have discovered the selective, high-affinity A(2B)AR antagonist 22, a 8-(4-pyrazolyl)-xanthine derivative, (CVT-6883, K(i)(hA(2B)) = 22 nM; K(i)(hA(1)) = 1,940 nM; K(i)(hA(2A)) = 3,280; and K(i)(hA(3)) = 1,070 nM). Compound 22 has demonstrated favorable pharmacokinetic (PK) properties (T(1/2) = 4 h and F > 35% rat), and it is a functional antagonist at the A(2B)AR(K (B) = 6 nM). In a mouse model of asthma, compound 22 demonstrated a dose-dependent efficacy supporting the role of the A(2B)AR in asthma. In two Phase I clinical trails, 22 (CVT-6883) was found to be safe, well tolerated, and suitable for once-daily dosing. Baraldi et al. have independently discovered a selective, high-affinity A(2B)AR antagonist, 30 (MRE2029F20), 8-(5-pyrazolyl)-xanthine (K(i)(hA(2B)) = 5.5 nM; K(i)(hA(1)) = 200 nM; K(i)(hA(2A), A(3)) > 1,000, that has been selected for development in conjunction with King Pharmaceuticals. Compound 30 has been demonstrated to be a functional antagonist of the A(2B)AR, and it has been radiolabeled for use in pharmacological studies. A third compound, 58 (LAS-38096), is a 2-aminopyrimidine derivative (discovered by the Almirall group) that has high A(2B)AR affinity and selectivity (K(i)(hA(2B)) = 17 nM; K(i)(hA(1)) > 1,000 nM; K(i)(hA(2A)) > 2,500; and K(i)(hA(3)) > 1,000 nM), and 58 has been moved into preclinical safety testing. A fourth selective, high-affinity A(2B)AR antagonist, 54 (OSIP339391 K(i))(hA(2B)) = 0.5 nM; K(i))(hA(1

  11. Erythropoiesis- and Thrombopoiesis-Characterizing Parameters in Adenosine A(3) Receptor Knock-Out Mice

    Hofer, Michal; Pospíšil, Milan; Dušek, L.; Hoferová, Zuzana; Weiterová, Lenka

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 3 (2013), s. 305-311. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0128 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : ELEVATING EXTRACELLULAR ADENOSINE * COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR * HEMATOPOIETIC PROGENITOR CELLS Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.487, year: 2013

  12. Adenosine A2A Receptors Modulate Acute Injury and Neuroinflammation in Brain Ischemia

    Felicita Pedata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular concentration of adenosine in the brain increases dramatically during ischemia. Adenosine A2A receptor is expressed in neurons and glial cells and in inflammatory cells (lymphocytes and granulocytes. Recently, adenosine A2A receptor emerged as a potential therapeutic attractive target in ischemia. Ischemia is a multifactorial pathology characterized by different events evolving in the time. After ischemia the early massive increase of extracellular glutamate is followed by activation of resident immune cells, that is, microglia, and production or activation of inflammation mediators. Proinflammatory cytokines, which upregulate cell adhesion molecules, exert an important role in promoting recruitment of leukocytes that in turn promote expansion of the inflammatory response in ischemic tissue. Protracted neuroinflammation is now recognized as the predominant mechanism of secondary brain injury progression. A2A receptors present on central cells and on blood cells account for important effects depending on the time-related evolution of the pathological condition. Evidence suggests that A2A receptor antagonists provide early protection via centrally mediated control of excessive excitotoxicity, while A2A receptor agonists provide protracted protection by controlling massive blood cell infiltration in the hours and days after ischemia. Focus on inflammatory responses provides for adenosine A2A receptor agonists a wide therapeutic time-window of hours and even days after stroke.

  13. Efficacy of Adenosine for Acute Treatment of Supraventricular Tachycardia in Infants and Children

    Seyed Mohammad Dalili

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was done to assess the efficacy and adverse effects of the different doses of adenosine in the pediatric age group with respect to multiple patient variables. Methods: Over a period of 1 year, 86 occasions of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT were treated with adenosine in 81 infants and children aged between 18 days and 12 years (median of 1.3 years, SD=3. Adenosine efficacy was evaluated in terms of the patients’ demographics, SVT rate, electrocardiogram characteristics, and route of drug administration.Results: The dose of 50μg/kg was effective only in 24% of the SVT cases, and the additional doses of 100μg/kg, 150μg/kg, and 200μg/kg were effective in another 29% of the cases. The drug efficacy was higher in the infants than that in the older children. There were no predictors other than age for the estimation of the efficacy of the drug. Conclusion: Our findings showed that the current recommended doses of adenosine are ineffective in the vast majority of children and infants with SVT. No patient-related factor other than age seems to affect the efficacy of the drug

  14. SIGNIFICANCE OF ADENOSINE DEAMINASE SERUM CONCENTRATIONS IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF EXTRA-PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS

    Stevanovic G,

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Extra pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB is a growing problem worldwide. Due to the nature of the disease, the diversity of clinical pictures as well as its minor epidemiological importance, the diagnosis is difficult and often late.In addition to standard TB diagnostic techniques use of new biochemical (surrogate markers are increased. With this work we wanted to examine the usefulness of serum adenosine deaminase levels as a diagnostic parameter for EPTB.The work included 116 patients with fever of unknown origin in which tuberculosis or infectious mononucleosis was not proven and 51 person who had proven EPTB. Correlated adenosine deaminase levels between these two groups we obtained significantly higher values ​​in patients with EPTB. The calculated sensitivity was 0.56, specificity 0.89, positive predictive value 0.80 and negative predictive value 0.72. Certain reducing of the values observed during anti TB therapy. In previous studies the diagnostic importance of adenosine deaminase in the diagnosis of tuberculosis serosityes was demonstrated. The significance of serum levels in diagnosis is rarely evaluated during EPTB. Our findings are similar to the results of authors who have conducted such testing in the pediatric population.Increased concentrations of serum adenosine deaminase have shown the potential of usable screening test and can be used as an indicative EPTB parameter. To fully assess its diagnostic significance require future clinical research.

  15. Hematopoiesis in 5-Fluorouracil-Treated Adenosine A(3) Receptor Knock-Out Mice

    Hofer, Michal; Pospíšil, Milan; Dušek, L.; Hoferová, Zuzana; Komůrková, Denisa

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 2 (2015), s. 255-262. ISSN 0862-8408 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Adenosine A(3) receptor knock-out mice * Hematopoiesis * 5-fluorouracil-induced hematotoxicity Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  16. A2BR adenosine receptor modulates sweet taste in circumvallate taste buds.

    Shinji Kataoka

    Full Text Available In response to taste stimulation, taste buds release ATP, which activates ionotropic ATP receptors (P2X2/P2X3 on taste nerves as well as metabotropic (P2Y purinergic receptors on taste bud cells. The action of the extracellular ATP is terminated by ectonucleotidases, ultimately generating adenosine, which itself can activate one or more G-protein coupled adenosine receptors: A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. Here we investigated the expression of adenosine receptors in mouse taste buds at both the nucleotide and protein expression levels. Of the adenosine receptors, only A2B receptor (A2BR is expressed specifically in taste epithelia. Further, A2BR is expressed abundantly only in a subset of taste bud cells of posterior (circumvallate, foliate, but not anterior (fungiform, palate taste fields in mice. Analysis of double-labeled tissue indicates that A2BR occurs on Type II taste bud cells that also express Gα14, which is present only in sweet-sensitive taste cells of the foliate and circumvallate papillae. Glossopharyngeal nerve recordings from A2BR knockout mice show significantly reduced responses to both sucrose and synthetic sweeteners, but normal responses to tastants representing other qualities. Thus, our study identified a novel regulator of sweet taste, the A2BR, which functions to potentiate sweet responses in posterior lingual taste fields.

  17. Structural basis of the substrate specificity of Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase

    Dessanti, Paola; Zhang, Yang; Allegrini, Simone; Tozzi, Maria Grazia; Sgarrella, Francesco; Ealick, Steven E. (Cornell); (Sassari); (Pisa)

    2012-10-08

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylases catalyze the phosphorolytic cleavage of the glycosidic bond of purine (2{prime}-deoxy)nucleosides, generating the corresponding free base and (2{prime}-deoxy)ribose 1-phosphate. Two classes of PNPs have been identified: homotrimers specific for 6-oxopurines and homohexamers that accept both 6-oxopurines and 6-aminopurines. Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase (AdoP) is a hexameric PNP; however, it is highly specific for 6-aminopurines. To investigate the structural basis for the unique substrate specificity of AdoP, the active-site mutant D204N was prepared and kinetically characterized and the structures of the wild-type protein and the D204N mutant complexed with adenosine and sulfate or with inosine and sulfate were determined at high resolution (1.2-1.4 {angstrom}). AdoP interacts directly with the preferred substrate through a hydrogen-bond donation from the catalytically important residue Asp204 to N7 of the purine base. Comparison with Escherichia coli PNP revealed a more optimal orientation of Asp204 towards N7 of adenosine and a more closed active site. When inosine is bound, two water molecules are interposed between Asp204 and the N7 and O6 atoms of the nucleoside, thus allowing the enzyme to find alternative but less efficient ways to stabilize the transition state. The mutation of Asp204 to asparagine led to a significant decrease in catalytic efficiency for adenosine without affecting the efficiency of inosine cleavage.

  18. High fetal plasma adenosine concentration: a role for the fetus in preeclampsia?

    Espinoza, Jimmy

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: Clinical observations suggest a role for the fetus in the maternal manifestations of preeclampsia, but the possible signaling mechanisms remain unclear. This study compares the fetal plasma concentrations of adenosine from normal pregnancies with those from preeclampsia. STUDY DESIGN: This secondary data analysis included normal pregnancies (n = 27) and patients with preeclampsia (n = 39). Patients with preeclampsia were subclassified into patients with (n = 25) and without (n = 14) abnormal uterine artery Doppler velocimetry (UADV). RESULTS: Fetal plasma concentrations of adenosine were significantly higher in patients with preeclampsia (1.35 +\\/- 0.09 mumol\\/L) than in normal pregnancies (0.52 +\\/- 0.06 mumol\\/L; P < .0001). Fetal plasma concentrations of adenosine in patients with preeclampsia with abnormal UADV (1.78 +\\/- 0.15 mumol\\/L), but not with normal UADV (0.58 +\\/- 0.14 mumol\\/L), were significantly higher than in normal pregnancies (P < .0001). CONCLUSION: Patients with preeclampsia with sonographic evidence of chronic uteroplacental ischemia have high fetal plasma concentrations of adenosine.

  19. Passive targeting of ischemic-reperfused myocardium with adenosine-loaded silica nanoparticles

    Galagudza M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Michael Galagudza1, Dmitry Korolev1, Viktor Postnov2, Elena Naumisheva2, Yulia Grigorova3, Ivan Uskov1, Eugene Shlyakhto11Institute of Experimental Medicine, VA Almazov Federal Heart, Blood and Endocrinology Center, 2Chemical Faculty, St Petersburg State University, 3Department of Pathophysiology, IP Pavlov State Medical University, St Petersburg, Russian FederationAbstract: Pharmacological agents suggested for infarct size limitation have serious side effects when used at cardioprotective doses which hinders their translation into clinical practice. The solution to the problem might be direct delivery of cardioprotective drugs into ischemic-reperfused myocardium. In this study, we explored the potential of silica nanoparticles for passive delivery of adenosine, a prototype cardioprotective agent, into ischemic-reperfused heart tissue. In addition, the biodegradation of silica nanoparticles was studied both in vitro and in vivo. Immobilization of adenosine on the surface of silica nanoparticles resulted in enhancement of adenosine-mediated infarct size limitation in the rat model. Furthermore, the hypotensive effect of adenosine was attenuated after its adsorption on silica nanoparticles. We conclude that silica nanoparticles are biocompatible materials that might potentially be used as carriers for heart-targeted drug delivery.Keywords: silica nanoparticles, targeted drug delivery, myocardium, ischemia, reperfusion

  20. Outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency

    Hassan, Amel; Booth, Claire; Brightwell, Alex; Allwood, Zoe; Veys, Paul; Rao, Kanchan; Hoenig, Manfred; Friedrich, Wilhelm; Gennery, Andrew; Slatter, Mary; Bredius, Robbert; Finocchi, Andrea; Cancrini, Caterina; Aiuti, Alessandro; Porta, Fulvio; Lanfranchi, Arnalda; Ridella, Michela; Steward, Colin; Filipovich, Alexandra; Marsh, Rebecca; Bordon, Victoria; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Al-Mousa, Hamoud; Alsum, Zobaida; Al-Dhekri, Hasan; Al Ghonaium, Abdulaziz; Speckmann, Carsten; Fischer, Alain; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Nichols, Kim E.; Grunebaum, Eyal; Al Zahrani, Daifulah; Roifman, Chaim M.; Boelens, Jaap; Davies, E. Graham; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Notarangelo, Luigi; Gaspar, H. Bobby

    2012-01-01

    Deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme adenosine deaminase leads to SCID (ADA-SCID). Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) can lead to a permanent cure of SCID; however, little data are available on outcome of HCT for ADA-SCID in particular. In this multicenter retrospective study, we analyzed o

  1. Brain stem adenosine receptors modulate centrally mediated hypotensive responses in conscious rats: A review

    Noha N. Nassar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine is implicated in the modulation of cardiovascular responses either at the peripheral or at central level in experimental animals. However, there are no dedicated reviews on the involvement of adenosine in mediating the hypotensive response of centrally administered clonidine in general and specifically in aortically barodenervated rats (ABD. The conscious ABD rat model exhibits surgically induced baroreflex dysfunction and exaggerated hypotensive response, compared with conscious sham-operated (SO rats. The current review focuses on, the role of adenosine receptors in blood pressure (BP regulation and their possible crosstalk with other receptors e.g. imidazoline (I1 and alpha (α2A adrenergic receptor (AR. The former receptor is a molecular target for clonidine, whose hypotensive effect is enhanced approx. 3-fold in conscious ABD rats. We also discussed how the balance between the brain stem adenosine A1 and A2A receptors is regulated by baroreceptors and how such balance influences the centrally mediated hypotensive responses. The use of the ABD rat model yielded insight into the downstream signaling cascades following clonidine-evoked hypotension in a surgical model of baroreflex dysfunction.

  2. Hyperalgesia, anxiety, and decreased hypoxic neuroprotection in mice lacking the adenosine A1 receptor.

    Johansson, B; Halldner, L; Dunwiddie, T V; Masino, S A; Poelchen, W; Giménez-Llort, L; Escorihuela, R M; Fernández-Teruel, A; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Z; Xu, X J; Hårdemark, A; Betsholtz, C; Herlenius, E; Fredholm, B B

    2001-07-31

    Caffeine is believed to act by blocking adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors (A(1)R, A(2A)R), indicating that some A(1) receptors are tonically activated. We generated mice with a targeted disruption of the second coding exon of the A(1)R (A(1)R(-/-)). These animals bred and gained weight normally and had a normal heart rate, blood pressure, and body temperature. In most behavioral tests they were similar to A(1)R(+/+) mice, but A(1)R(-/-) mice showed signs of increased anxiety. Electrophysiological recordings from hippocampal slices revealed that both adenosine-mediated inhibition and theophylline-mediated augmentation of excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission were abolished in A(1)R(-/-) mice. In A(1)R(+/-) mice the potency of adenosine was halved, as was the number of A(1)R. In A(1)R(-/-) mice, the analgesic effect of intrathecal adenosine was lost, and thermal hyperalgesia was observed, but the analgesic effect of morphine was intact. The decrease in neuronal activity upon hypoxia was reduced both in hippocampal slices and in brainstem, and functional recovery after hypoxia was attenuated. Thus A(1)Rs do not play an essential role during development, and although they significantly influence synaptic activity, they play a nonessential role in normal physiology. However, under pathophysiological conditions, including noxious stimulation and oxygen deficiency, they are important. PMID:11470917

  3. Downregulation of adenosine and P2X receptor-mediated cardiovascular responses in heart failure rats

    Zhao, Xin; Sun, X Y; Erlinge, D;

    2000-01-01

    degradation product adenosine, experiments were performed in a rat model of ischaemic CHF. In this model, ischaemia was induced in rats by ligation of the left coronary artery. Our results demonstrate that there is a selective downregulation of P2X receptor-mediated pressor effects, while the hypotensive...

  4. Stimulation of Glia Reveals Modulation of Mammalian Spinal Motor Networks by Adenosine.

    David Acton

    Full Text Available Despite considerable evidence that glia can release modulators to influence the excitability of neighbouring neurons, the importance of gliotransmission for the operation of neural networks and in shaping behaviour remains controversial. Here we characterise the contribution of glia to the modulation of the mammalian spinal central pattern generator for locomotion, the output of which is directly relatable to a defined behaviour. Glia were stimulated by specific activation of protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1, an endogenous G-protein coupled receptor preferentially expressed by spinal glia during ongoing activity of the spinal central pattern generator for locomotion. Selective activation of PAR1 by the agonist TFLLR resulted in a reversible reduction in the frequency of locomotor-related bursting recorded from ventral roots of spinal cord preparations isolated from neonatal mice. In the presence of the gliotoxins methionine sulfoximine or fluoroacetate, TFLLR had no effect, confirming the specificity of PAR1 activation to glia. The modulation of burst frequency upon PAR1 activation was blocked by the non-selective adenosine-receptor antagonist theophylline and by the A1-receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, but not by the A2A-receptor antagonist SCH5826, indicating production of extracellular adenosine upon glial stimulation, followed by A1-receptor mediated inhibition of neuronal activity. Modulation of network output following glial stimulation was also blocked by the ectonucleotidase inhibitor ARL67156, indicating glial release of ATP and its subsequent degradation to adenosine rather than direct release of adenosine. Glial stimulation had no effect on rhythmic activity recorded following blockade of inhibitory transmission, suggesting that glial cell-derived adenosine acts via inhibitory circuit components to modulate locomotor-related output. Finally, the modulation of network output by endogenous adenosine was found to

  5. Nucleus tractus solitarii A(2a) adenosine receptors inhibit cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of sympathetic outputs.

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2014-02-01

    Previously we have shown that stimulation of inhibitory A1 adenosine receptors located in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) attenuates cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) evoked inhibition of renal, adrenal and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Activation of facilitatory A2a adenosine receptors, which dominate over A1 receptors in the NTS, contrastingly alters baseline activity of regional sympathetic outputs: it decreases renal, increases adrenal and does not change lumbar nerve activity. Considering that NTS A2a receptors may facilitate release of inhibitory transmitters we hypothesized that A2a receptors will act in concert with A1 receptors differentially inhibiting regional sympathetic CCR responses (adrenal>lumbar>renal). In urethane/chloralose anesthetized rats (n=38) we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of serotonin 5HT3 receptor agonist, phenylbiguanide, (1-8μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation, blockade or combined blockade and stimulation of NTS A2a adenosine receptors (microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 0.2-20pmol/50nl, ZM-241385 40pmol/100nl or ZM-241385+CGS-21680, respectively). We found that stimulation of A2a adenosine receptors uniformly inhibited the regional sympathetic and hemodynamic reflex responses and this effect was abolished by the selective blockade of NTS A2a receptors. This indicates that A2a receptor triggered inhibition of CCR responses and the contrasting shifts in baseline sympathetic activity are mediated via different mechanisms. These data implicate that stimulation of NTS A2a receptors triggers unknown inhibitory mechanism(s) which in turn inhibit transmission in the CCR pathway when adenosine is released into the NTS during severe hypotension. PMID:24216055

  6. Role of nitric oxide in adenosine-induced vasodilation in humans

    Costa, F.; Biaggioni, I.; Robertson, D. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Vasodilation is one of the most prominent effects of adenosine and one of the first to be recognized, but its mechanism of action is not completely understood. In particular, there is conflicting information about the potential contribution of endothelial factors. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of nitric oxide in the vasodilatory effect of adenosine. Forearm blood flow responses to intrabrachial adenosine infusion (125 microg/min) were assessed with venous occlusion plethysmography during intrabrachial infusion of saline or the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) (12.5 mg/min). Intrabrachial infusions of acetylcholine (50 microg/min) and nitroprusside (3 microg/min) were used as a positive and negative control, respectively. These doses were chosen to produce comparable levels of vasodilation. In a separate study, a second saline infusion was administered instead of L-NMMA to rule out time-related effects. As expected, pretreatment with L-NMMA reduced acetylcholine-induced vasodilation; 50 microg/min acetylcholine increased forearm blood flow by 150+/-43% and 51+/-12% during saline and L-NMMA infusion, respectively (P<.01, n=6). In contrast, L-NMMA did not affect the increase in forearm blood flow produced by 3 microg/min nitroprusside (165+/-30% and 248+/-41% during saline and L-NMMA, respectively) or adenosine (173+/-48% and 270+/-75% during saline and L-NMMA, respectively). On the basis of our observations, we conclude that adenosine-induced vasodilation is not mediated by nitric oxide in the human forearm.

  7. Mechanisms of the adenosine A2A receptor-induced sensitization of esophageal C fibers.

    Brozmanova, M; Mazurova, L; Ru, F; Tatar, M; Hu, Y; Yu, S; Kollarik, M

    2016-02-01

    Clinical studies indicate that adenosine contributes to esophageal mechanical hypersensitivity in some patients with pain originating in the esophagus. We have previously reported that the esophageal vagal nodose C fibers express the adenosine A2A receptor. Here we addressed the hypothesis that stimulation of the adenosine A2A receptor induces mechanical sensitization of esophageal C fibers by a mechanism involving transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1). Extracellular single fiber recordings of activity originating in C-fiber terminals were made in the ex vivo vagally innervated guinea pig esophagus. The adenosine A2A receptor-selective agonist CGS21680 induced robust, reversible sensitization of the response to esophageal distention (10-60 mmHg) in a concentration-dependent fashion (1-100 nM). At the half-maximally effective concentration (EC50: ≈3 nM), CGS21680 induced an approximately twofold increase in the mechanical response without causing an overt activation. This sensitization was abolished by the selective A2A antagonist SCH58261. The adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin mimicked while the nonselective protein kinase inhibitor H89 inhibited mechanical sensitization by CGS21680. CGS21680 did not enhance the response to the purinergic P2X receptor agonist α,β-methylene-ATP, indicating that CGS21680 does not nonspecifically sensitize to all stimuli. Mechanical sensitization by CGS21680 was abolished by pretreatment with two structurally different TRPA1 antagonists AP18 and HC030031. Single cell RT-PCR and whole cell patch-clamp studies in isolated esophagus-specific nodose neurons revealed the expression of TRPA1 in A2A-positive C-fiber neurons and demonstrated that CGS21682 potentiated TRPA1 currents evoked by allylisothiocyanate. We conclude that stimulation of the adenosine A2A receptor induces mechanical sensitization of nodose C fibers by a mechanism sensitive to TRPA1 antagonists indicating the involvement of TRPA1. PMID:26564719

  8. Adenosine stress myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in pediatric patients after arterial switch operation

    Arterial switch operation (ASO) has become the established treatment for correction of transposition of great arteries (TGA). Despite the immediate correction of abnormal hemodynamics, acute and delayed complications related to the coronaries may cause morbidity and mortality. We evaluated the incidence of perfusion abnormalities and safety of adenosine by stress–rest myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) [myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS)] using Tc-99m Sestamibi (MIBI) in asymptomatic children post-ASO. Prospective study. We conducted a prospective, single-institutional study where stress–rest MPS was performed on 10 children of age between 1.25 and 6 years. Two of the patients had additional ventricular septal defect, one patient had left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, and another had Taussig–Bing anomaly. All the patients underwent corrective surgery as a single-stage procedure at the age of 176 ± 212 days (range 9-560 days). Adenosine was administered at a rate of 140 μg/kg/min intravenously as continuous infusion for duration of 6 min. All the continuous variables were summarized as mean ± standard deviation, or range and median. Mann–Whitney test for unpaired data and Wilcoxon Rank test for paired samples were used. The average increase in heart rate over the basal heart rate after adenosine stress was 59.7 ± 17.0%. No acute or remote complications were observed in any case. None of the patients demonstrated myocardial perfusion defects, either at rest or after adenosine stress. MPS post-adenosine induced vasodilatation is safe and feasible in patients of ASO for transposition of great arteries. One-stage repair, implantation of excised coronary buttons within neo-aortic sinus, and minimal or no mobilization of proximal coronaries may eliminate the occurrence of perfusion defects in patients of corrected TGA

  9. Value of adenosine infusion for infarct size determination using real-time myocardial contrast echocardiography

    da Luz Protásio

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myocardial contrast echocardiography has been used for determination of infarct size (IS in experimental models. However, with intermittent harmonic imaging, IS seems to be underestimated immediately after reperfusion due to areas with preserved, yet dysfunctional, microvasculature. The use of exogenous vasodilators showed to be useful to unmask these infarcted areas with depressed coronary flow reserve. This study was undertaken to assess the value of adenosine for IS determination in an open-chest canine model of coronary occlusion and reperfusion, using real-time myocardial contrast echocardiography (RTMCE. Methods Nine dogs underwent 180 minutes of coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion. PESDA (Perfluorocarbon-Exposed Sonicated Dextrose Albumin was used as contrast agent. IS was determined by RTMCE before and during adenosine infusion at a rate of 140 mcg·Kg-1·min-1. Post-mortem necrotic area was determined by triphenyl-tetrazolium chloride (TTC staining. Results IS determined by RTMCE was 1.98 ± 1.30 cm2 and increased to 2.58 ± 1.53 cm2 during adenosine infusion (p = 0.004, with good correlation between measurements (r = 0.91; p 2 and showed no significant difference with IS determined by RTMCE before or during hyperemia. A slight better correlation between RTMCE and TTC measurements was observed during adenosine (r = 0.99; p Conclusion RTMCE can accurately determine IS in immediate period after acute myocardial infarction. Adenosine infusion results in a slight better detection of actual size of myocardial damage.

  10. Electrochemical aptasensor for the detection of adenosine by using PdCu@MWCNTs-supported bienzymes as labels.

    Wu, Dan; Ren, Xiang; Hu, Lihua; Fan, Dawei; Zheng, Yang; Wei, Qin

    2015-12-15

    A highly sensitive electrochemical adenosine aptasensor was fabricated by covalently immobilizing 3'-NH2-terminated capture probe (SSDNA1) and thionine (TH) on Au-GS modified glassy carbon electrode. 3'-SH-terminated adenosine aptamer (SSDNA2) was adsorbed onto palladium/copper alloyed supported on MWCNTs (PdCu@MWCNTs)-conjugated multiple bienzymes, glucose oxidase (GOx), and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) (SSDNA2/PdCu@MWCNTs/HRP/GOx). Then, it was immobilized onto the electrode surface through the hybridization between the adenosine aptamer and the capture probe. The signal was amplified based on the gradual electrocatalytic reduction of GOx-generated hydrogen peroxide by the multiple HRP through the mediating ability of the loaded multiple TH. However, the peak current of TH decreased in the presence of adenosine because the interaction between adenosine and its aptamer made SSDNA2/PdCu@MWCNTs/HRP/GOx release from the modified electrode. Various experimental parameters have been optimized for the detection of adenosine and tests for selectivity, reproducibility and stability have also been performed. Under the optimal condition, the proposed aptasensor displayed a wide linear range (10-400 nM) with the low detection limit (2.5 nM), which has been applied in human serum samples with satisfactory results. Thus, the combination of Au-GS as a sensor platform and PdCu@MWCNTs/HRP/GOx as labels can be a promising amplification strategy for highly sensitive adenosine detection. PMID:26164010