WorldWideScience

Sample records for additional steady-state acquisition

  1. Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography with additional steady-state acquisition of the infragenicular arteries in patients with peripheral arterial disease

    Nielsen, Yousef W; Eiberg, Jonas P; Løgager, Vibeke B; Just, Sven; Schroeder, Torben V; Thomsen, Henrik S; Nielsen, Yousef Jesper Wirenfeldt; Eiberg, Jonas Peter; Løgager, Vibeke Berg; Just, Sven Richardt Lundgren; Schroeder, Torben Veith; Thomsen, Henrik Segelcke

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if addition of infragenicular steady-state (SS) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) to first-pass imaging improves diagnostic performance compared with first-pass imaging alone in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) undergoing whole......-body (WB) MRA. Twenty consecutive patients with PAD referred to digital-subtraction angiography (DSA) underwent WB-MRA. Using a bolus-chase technique, first-pass WB-MRA was performed from the supra-aortic vessels to the ankles. The blood-pool contrast agent gadofosveset trisodium was used at a dose of 0...

  2. Whole-Body Magnetic Resonance Angiography with Additional Steady-State Acquisition of the Infragenicular Arteries in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if addition of infragenicular steady-state (SS) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) to first-pass imaging improves diagnostic performance compared with first-pass imaging alone in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) undergoing whole-body (WB) MRA. Twenty consecutive patients with PAD referred to digital-subtraction angiography (DSA) underwent WB-MRA. Using a bolus-chase technique, first-pass WB-MRA was performed from the supra-aortic vessels to the ankles. The blood-pool contrast agent gadofosveset trisodium was used at a dose of 0.03 mmol/kg body weight. Ten minutes after injection of the contrast agent, high-resolution (0.7-mm isotropic voxels) SS-MRA of the infragenicular arteries was performed. Using DSA as the 'gold standard,' sensitivities and specificities for detecting significant arterial stenoses (≥50% luminal narrowing) with first-pass WB-MRA, SS-MRA, and combined first-pass and SS-MRA were calculated. Kappa statistics were used to determine intermodality agreement between MRA and DSA. Overall sensitivity and specificity for detecting significant arterial stenoses with first-pass WB-MRA was 0.70 (95% confidence interval 0.61 to 0.78) and 0.97 (0.94 to 0.99), respectively. In first-pass WB-MRA, the lowest sensitivity was in the infragenicular region, with a value of 0.42 (0.23 to 0.63). Combined analysis of first-pass WB-MRA and SS-MRA increased sensitivity to 0.81 (0.60 to 0.93) in the infragenicular region, with specificity of 0.94 (0.88 to 0.97). Sensitivity and specificity for detecting significant arterial stenoses with isolated infragenicular SS-MRA was 0.47 (0.27 to 0.69) and 0.86 (0.78 to 0.91), respectively. Intermodality agreement between MRA and DSA in the infragenicular region was moderate for first-pass WB-MRA (κ = 0.49), fair for SS-MRA (κ = 0.31), and good for combined first-pass/SS-MRA (κ = 0.71). Addition of infragenicular SS-MRA to first-pass WB MRA improves diagnostic

  3. Data acquisition and control system for steady state neutral beam injector

    This paper presents the control system overview, hardware, software and network for Data acquisition and Control system for steady state neutral beam injector (NBIDACS) to be used for heating of plasma in steady state superconducting tokamak (SST-1). The task for NBIDACS is not only to safely deliver 1.7 MW of neutral beams at 55 keV H deg. a period of 1000 s with 16.7% duty cycle but also to acquire the data related to house keeping of the system and its auxiliaries and diagnostics which determine the quality and parameters of the beam. Major issues concerning the design of the system stem from operation duty cycle of 1000 s ON/5000 s OFF. This calls for use of intelligent techniques not only for managing a large amount (100 MB) of data per shot but also to obtain failsafe, reliable control system and to archive the recorded data

  4. Data acquisition system for steady state experiments at multi-sites

    A high-performance data acquisition system (LABCOM system) has been developed for steady state fusion experiments in Large Helical Device (LHD). The most important characteristics of this system are the 110 MB/s high-speed real-time data acquisition capability and also the scalability on its performance by using unlimited number of data acquisition (DAQ) units. It can also acquire experimental data from multiple remote sites through the 1 Gbps fusion-dedicated virtual private network (SNET) in Japan. In LHD steady-state experiments, the DAQ cluster has established the world record of acquired data amount of 90 GB/shot which almost reaches the ITER data estimate. Since all the DAQ, storage, and data clients of LABCOM system are distributed on the local area network (LAN), remote experimental data can be also acquired simply by extending the LAN to the wide-area SNET. The speed lowering problem in long-distance TCP/IP data transfer has been improved by using an optimized congestion control and packet pacing method. Japan-France and Japan-US network bandwidth tests have revealed that this method actually utilize 90% of ideal throughput in both cases. Toward the fusion goal, a common data access platform is indispensable so that detailed physics data can be easily compared between multiple large and small experiments. The demonstrated bilateral collaboration scheme will be analogous to that of ITER and the supporting machines. (author)

  5. Development of data acquisition set-up for steady-state experiments

    For short duration experiments, generally digitized data is transferred for processing and storage after the experiment whereas in case of steady-state experiment the data is acquired, processed, displayed and stored continuously in pipelined manner. This requires acquiring data through special techniques for storage and on the go viewing data to display the current data trends for various physical parameters. A small data acquisition set-up is developed for continuously acquiring signals from various physical parameters at different sampling rate for long duration experiment. This includes the hardware set-up for signal digitization, FPGA based timing system for clock synchronization and event/trigger distribution, time slicing of data streams for storage of data chunks to enable viewing of data during acquisition and channel profile display through down sampling etc. To store a long data stream of indefinite/long time duration, the data stream is divided into data slices/chunks of user defined time duration. Data chunks avoid the problem of non-access of data until the channel data file is closed at the end of the long duration experiment. A graphical user interface has been developed in LabVIEW application development environment for configuring the data acquisition hardware and storing data chunks on local machine as well as at remote data server for further data access. The data plotting and analysis utilities have been developed with Python software, which provides tools for further data processing. This paper describes the detailed development and implementation of data acquisition for steady-state experiment. (author)

  6. Control, data acquisition and remote participation for steady-state operation in LHD

    Sudo, S. [National Institute of Natural Sciences, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)]. E-mail: sudo@nifs.ac.jp; Nagayama, Y. [National Institute of Natural Sciences, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Emoto, M. [National Institute of Natural Sciences, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Nakanishi, H. [National Institute of Natural Sciences, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Chikaraishi, H. [National Institute of Natural Sciences, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Imazu, S. [National Institute of Natural Sciences, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Iwata, C. [National Institute of Natural Sciences, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Kogi, Y. [KASTEC, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Kojima, M. [National Institute of Natural Sciences, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Komada, S. [National Institute of Natural Sciences, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Kubo, S. [National Institute of Natural Sciences, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Kumazawa, R. [National Institute of Natural Sciences, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Mase, A. [KASTEC, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Miyazawa, J. [National Institute of Natural Sciences, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Mutoh, T. [National Institute of Natural Sciences, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Nakamura, Y. [National Institute of Natural Sciences, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Nonomura, M. [National Institute of Natural Sciences, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Ohsuna, M. [National Institute of Natural Sciences, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Saito, K. [National Institute of Natural Sciences, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Sakamoto, R.; Seki, T.; Shoji, M.; Tsuda, K.; Yoshida, M. [National Institute of Natural Sciences, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2006-07-15

    Control, data acquisition, plasma monitoring and remote participation for steady state operation in the large helical device (LHD) are reviewed. By controlling the impedance matching of ICH, the plasma position and the electron density, high temperature plasma is confined for 1905s. The plasma parameters are monitored in real time. Data are continuously sampled by the YOKOGAWA WE7000 system and by the NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS CompactPCI system. Those data are managed by the object-oriented database system based on ObjectStore in distributed servers with mass storage. By using the multi protocol label switching-virtual private network (MPLS-VPN) technology, the local area network of LHD is expanded to the Japanese fusion community. This provides the remote participants with the same environment of the LHD control room.

  7. Control, data acquisition and remote participation for steady-state operation in LHD

    Control, data acquisition, plasma monitoring and remote participation for steady state operation in the large helical device (LHD) are reviewed. By controlling the impedance matching of ICH, the plasma position and the electron density, high temperature plasma is confined for 1905s. The plasma parameters are monitored in real time. Data are continuously sampled by the YOKOGAWA WE7000 system and by the NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS CompactPCI system. Those data are managed by the object-oriented database system based on ObjectStore in distributed servers with mass storage. By using the multi protocol label switching-virtual private network (MPLS-VPN) technology, the local area network of LHD is expanded to the Japanese fusion community. This provides the remote participants with the same environment of the LHD control room

  8. Data Acquisition System for Steady State Experiments at Multi-Sites

    Full text: A high-performance data acquisition system (LABCOM system) has been developed for steady state fusion experiments in Large Helical Device (LHD). It also acquires experimental data of multiple remote machines through the 1 Gbps fusion-dedicated virtual private network (SNET) in Japan. The LABCOM system consists of distributed data acquisition (DAQ) computers, data storage devices, and the index database of data locations. Its key objectives are (1) real-time DAQ with the same sampling rates as burst acquisition, and (2) scalability of both the performance and quantity, even in the number of sites. LHD now uses 80 DAQs in parallel and acquires 10.6 GB/shot raw data in short-pulse experiments of 3 min. iteration. In steady state operation, huge kHz or MHz fluctuation data for plasma diagnostics must be processed in real time. In LHD, each DAQ computer can deal with max. 110 MB/s continuous data. The DAQ cluster has established the world record of acquired data amount of 90 GB/shot, which almost reaches the ITER data estimate of 100 or 1000 GB/shot. As for the data storage, the massively parallel processing (MPP) structure is important for scalable input/output performance and data redundancy. Hundreds of tera-byte compressed data are stored in the two-stage storage devices. The data mediation service is a distinguishing characteristic that manages the peer-to-peer data handling among many server and client computers. As every element of the LABCOM system are distributed on the local area network (LAN), the data of remote fusion devices are acquired simply by extending the LAN to the wide-area SNET. LABCOM system acquires data from three remote experiments of different universities. The speed lowering problem in distant TCP/IP communication, e.g. 60 Mbps on 1 Gbps SNET, is improved by using the optimized congestion control and packet pacing technology. Its bandwidth tests between Japan and France achieved effective 881 Mbps over 10 000 s. A light

  9. High spatial resolution brain functional MRI using submillimeter balanced steady-state free precession acquisition

    Wu, Pei-Hsin; Chung, Hsiao-Wen [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Ping-Huei [Imaging Research Center, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan and Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ming-Long, E-mail: minglong.wu@csie.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Medical Informatics, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan and Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Chuang, Tzu-Chao [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Shih, Yi-Yu [Siemens Limited Healthcare Sector, Taipei 11503, Taiwan (China); Huang, Teng-Yi [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: One of the technical advantages of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is its precise localization of changes from neuronal activities. While current practice of fMRI acquisition at voxel size around 3 × 3 × 3 mm{sup 3} achieves satisfactory results in studies of basic brain functions, higher spatial resolution is required in order to resolve finer cortical structures. This study investigated spatial resolution effects on brain fMRI experiments using balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging with 0.37 mm{sup 3} voxel volume at 3.0 T. Methods: In fMRI experiments, full and unilateral visual field 5 Hz flashing checkerboard stimulations were given to healthy subjects. The bSSFP imaging experiments were performed at three different frequency offsets to widen the coverage, with functional activations in the primary visual cortex analyzed using the general linear model. Variations of the spatial resolution were achieved by removing outerk-space data components. Results: Results show that a reduction in voxel volume from 3.44 × 3.44 × 2 mm{sup 3} to 0.43 × 0.43 × 2 mm{sup 3} has resulted in an increase of the functional activation signals from (7.7 ± 1.7)% to (20.9 ± 2.0)% at 3.0 T, despite of the threefold SNR decreases in the original images, leading to nearly invariant functional contrast-to-noise ratios (fCNR) even at high spatial resolution. Activation signals aligning nicely with gray matter sulci at high spatial resolution would, on the other hand, have possibly been mistaken as noise at low spatial resolution. Conclusions: It is concluded that the bSSFP sequence is a plausible technique for fMRI investigations at submillimeter voxel widths without compromising fCNR. The reduction of partial volume averaging with nonactivated brain tissues to retain fCNR is uniquely suitable for high spatial resolution applications such as the resolving of columnar organization in the brain.

  10. Application of HDF5 in long-pulse quasi-steady state data acquisition at high sampling rate

    Highlights: • The new data-acquisition system supports long-pulse EAST data acquisition. • The new data-acquisition system is capable for most of the high frequency signals of EAST experiments. • The system's total throughput is about 500 MB/s. • The system uses HDF5 to store data. - Abstract: A new high sampling rate quasi-steady state data-acquisition system has been designed for the microwave reflectometry diagnostic of EAST experiments. In order to meet the requirements of long-pulse discharge and high sampling rate, it is designed based on PXI Express technology. A high-performance digitizer National Instruments PXIe-5122 with two synchronous analog input channels in which the maximum sampling rate is 100 MHz has been adopted. Two PXIe-5122 boards at 60 MSPS and one PXIe-6368 board at 2 MSPS are used in the system and the total throughput is about 500 MB/s. To guarantee the large amounts of data being saved continuously in the long-pulse discharge, an external hard-disk data stream enclosure NI HDD-8265 in which the capacity of sustained speed of reading and writing is 700 MB/s. And in RAID-5 mode its storage capacity is 80% of the total. The obtained raw data firstly stream continuously into NI HDD-8265 during the discharge. Then it will be transferred to the data server automatically and converted into HDF5 file format. HDF5 is an open source file format for data storage and management which has been widely used in various fields, and suitable for long term case. The details of the system are described in the paper

  11. STEADY-STATE DESIGN OF VERTICAL WELLS FOR LIQUIDS ADDITION AT BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS

    This paper presents design charts that a landfill engineer can use for the design of a vertical well system for liquids addition at bioreactor landfills. The flow rate and lateral and vertical zones of impact of a vertical well were estimated as a function of input variables su...

  12. Cranial nerve assessment in cavernous sinus tumors with contrast-enhanced 3D fast-imaging employing steady-state acquisition MR imaging

    Amemiya, Shiori; Aoki, Shigeki; Ohtomo, Kuni [University of Tokyo, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study is to apply contrast-enhanced 3D fast-imaging employing steady-state acquisition (3D-FIESTA) imaging to the evaluation of cranial nerves (CN) in patients with cavernous sinus tumors. Contrast-enhanced 3D-FIESTA images were acquired from ten patients with cavernous sinus tumors with a 3-T unit. In all cases, the trigeminal nerve with tumor involvement was easily identified in the cavernous portions. Although oculomotor and abducens nerves were clearly visualized against the tumor area with intense contrast enhancement, they were hardly identifiable within the area lacking contrast enhancement. The trochlear nerve was visualized in part, but not delineated as a linear structure outside of the lesion. Contrast-enhanced 3D-FIESTA can be useful in the assessment of cranial nerves in and around the cavernous sinus with tumor involvement. (orig.)

  13. Cranial nerve assessment in cavernous sinus tumors with contrast-enhanced 3D fast-imaging employing steady-state acquisition MR imaging

    The purpose of this study is to apply contrast-enhanced 3D fast-imaging employing steady-state acquisition (3D-FIESTA) imaging to the evaluation of cranial nerves (CN) in patients with cavernous sinus tumors. Contrast-enhanced 3D-FIESTA images were acquired from ten patients with cavernous sinus tumors with a 3-T unit. In all cases, the trigeminal nerve with tumor involvement was easily identified in the cavernous portions. Although oculomotor and abducens nerves were clearly visualized against the tumor area with intense contrast enhancement, they were hardly identifiable within the area lacking contrast enhancement. The trochlear nerve was visualized in part, but not delineated as a linear structure outside of the lesion. Contrast-enhanced 3D-FIESTA can be useful in the assessment of cranial nerves in and around the cavernous sinus with tumor involvement. (orig.)

  14. Steady-state analysis of a bistable system subject to a coloured multiplicative noise and a white additive noise with coloured cross-correlated noises

    Wang Can-Jun; Chen Shi-Bo; Mei Dong-Cheng

    2006-01-01

    The steady-state properties of a bistable system are investigated when both the multiplicative noise and the coupling between additive and multiplicative noises are coloured with different values of noise correlation times τ1 and 72. After introducing a dimensionless parameter R(R = α/D, D is the intensity of the multiplicative noise and α is the intensity of the additive noise), and performing the numerical computations, we find the following points: (1) For the case ofR > 1, λ (the intensity of correlation between additive and multiplicative noises), τ1 and τ2 can induce the stationary probability distribution (SPD) transition from bimodal to unimodal in structure, but for the cases of R ≤ 1,the bimodal structure is preserved; (2) α can also induce the SPD transition from bimodal to unimodal in structure;(3) the bimodal structure of the SPD exhibits a symmetrical structure as D increases.

  15. Steady state neutral beam injector

    Learning from operational reliability of neutral beam injectors in particular and various heating schemes including RF in general on TFTR, JET, JT-60, it has become clear that neutral beam injectors may find a greater role assigned to them for maintaining the plasma in steady state devices under construction. Many technological solutions, integrated in the present day generation of injectors have given rise to capability of producing multimegawatt power at many tens of kV. They have already operated for integrated time >105 S without deterioration in the performance. However, a new generation of injectors for steady state devices have to address to some basic issues. They stem from material erosion under particle bombardment, heat transfer > 10 MW/m2, frequent regeneration of cryopanels, inertial power supplies, data acquisition and control of large volume of data. Some of these engineering issues have been addressed to in the proposed neutral beam injector for SST-1 at our institute; the remaining shall have to wait for the inputs of the database generated from the actual experience with steady state injectors. (author)

  16. Multiple Steady States in Distillation

    Bekiaris, Nikolaos

    1995-01-01

    We study multiple steady states in distillation. We first analyze the simplest case of ternary homogeneous azeotropic mixtures. We show that in the case of infinite reflux and an infinite number of trays (∞/∞ case) one can construct bifurcation diagrams on physical grounds with the distillate flow as the bifurcation parameter. Multiple steady states exist when the distillate flow varies non-monotonically along the continuation path of the bifurcation diagram. We derive a necessary and suffici...

  17. Comparison of two single-breath-held 3-D acquisitions with multi-breath-held 2-D cine steady-state free precession MRI acquisition in children with single ventricles

    Atweh, Lamya A.; Dodd, Nicholas A.; Krishnamurthy, Ramkumar; Chu, Zili D. [Texas Children' s Hospital, EB Singleton Department of Pediatric Radiology, Cardiovascular Imaging, Houston, TX (United States); Pednekar, Amol [Philips Healthcare, Houston, TX (United States); Krishnamurthy, Rajesh [Texas Children' s Hospital, EB Singleton Department of Pediatric Radiology, Cardiovascular Imaging, Houston, TX (United States); Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Houston, TX (United States); Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Breath-held two-dimensional balanced steady-state free precession cine acquisition (2-D breath-held SSFP), accelerated with parallel imaging, is the method of choice for evaluating ventricular function due to its superior blood-to-myocardial contrast, edge definition and high intrinsic signal-to-noise ratio throughout the cardiac cycle. The purpose of this study is to qualitatively and quantitatively compare the two different single-breath-hold 3-D cine SSFP acquisitions using 1) multidirectional sensitivity encoding (SENSE) acceleration factors (3-D multiple SENSE SSFP), and 2) k-t broad-use linear acceleration speed-up technique (3-D k-t SSFP) with the conventional 2-D breath-held SSFP in non-sedated asymptomatic volunteers and children with single ventricle congenital heart disease. Our prospective study was performed on 30 non-sedated subjects (9 healthy volunteers and 21 functional single ventricle patients), ages 12.5 +/- 2.8 years. Two-dimensional breath-held SSFP with SENSE acceleration factor of 2, eight-fold accelerated 3-D k-t SSFP, and 3-D multiple SENSE SSFP with total parallel imaging factor of 4 were performed to evaluate ventricular volumes and mass in the short-axis orientation. Image quality scores (blood myocardial contrast, edge definition and interslice alignment) and volumetric analysis (end systolic volume, end diastolic volume and ejection fraction) were performed on the data sets by experienced users. Paired t-test was performed to compare each of the 3-D k-t SSFP and 3-D multiple SENSE SSFP clinical scores against 2-D breath-held SSFP. Bland-Altman analysis was performed on left ventricle (LV) and single ventricle volumetry. Interobserver and intraobserver variability in volumetric measurements were determined using intraclass coefficients. The clinical scores were highest for the 2-D breath-held SSFP images. Between the two 3-D sequences, 3-D multiple SENSE SSFP performed better than 3-D k-t SSFP. Bland-Altman analysis for volumes

  18. Steady-State Process Modelling

    Cameron, Ian; Gani, Rafiqul

    illustrate the “equation oriented” approach as well as the “sequential modular” approach to solving complex flowsheets for steady state applications. The applications include the Williams-Otto plant, the hydrodealkylation (HDA) of toluene, conversion of ethylene to ethanol and a bio-ethanol process.......This chapter covers the basic principles of steady state modelling and simulation using a number of case studies. Two principal approaches are illustrated that develop the unit operation models from first principles as well as through application of standard flowsheet simulators. The approaches...

  19. Steady-State Process Modelling

    Cameron, Ian; Gani, Rafiqul

    2011-01-01

    illustrate the “equation oriented” approach as well as the “sequential modular” approach to solving complex flowsheets for steady state applications. The applications include the Williams-Otto plant, the hydrodealkylation (HDA) of toluene, conversion of ethylene to ethanol and a bio-ethanol process....

  20. Staffing in a Steady State.

    Owens, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Options for faculty utilization in a steady state are examined, with consideration for their economy or ability to increase turnover or flexibility: early retirement, part retirement, retraining, exchange with other institutions or industry, and fixed-term appointments or lecturer positions. (MSE)

  1. Steady-state eternal inflation

    Since the advent of inflation, several theorems have been proven suggesting that although inflation can (and generically does) continue eternally into the future, it cannot be extended eternally into the past to create a 'steady-state' model with no initial time. Here we provide a construction that circumvents these theorems and allows a self-consistent, geodesically complete, and physically sensible steady-state eternally inflating universe, based on the flat slicing of de Sitter space. This construction could be used as the background spacetime for creation events that form big-bang-like regions, and hence could form the basis for a cosmology that is compatible with observations and yet which avoids an initial singularity or beginning of time

  2. Free Radical Addition Polymerization Kinetics without Steady-State Approximations: A Numerical Analysis for the Polymer, Physical, or Advanced Organic Chemistry Course

    Iler, H. Darrell; Brown, Amber; Landis, Amanda; Schimke, Greg; Peters, George

    2014-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the free radical addition polymerization system is described that provides those teaching polymer, physical, or advanced organic chemistry courses the opportunity to introduce students to numerical methods in the context of a simple but mathematically stiff chemical kinetic system. Numerical analysis can lead students to an…

  3. Inconsistencies in steady state thermodynamics

    Dickman, Ronald; Motai, Ricardo

    2014-03-01

    We address the issue of extending thermodynamics to nonequilibrium steady states. Using driven stochastic lattice gases, we ask whether consistent definitions of an effective chemical potential μ, and an effective temperature Te, are possible. These quantities are determined via zero-flux conditions of particles and energy between the driven system and a reservoir. For the models considered here, the fluxes are given in terms of certain stationary average densities, eliminating the need to perturb the system by actually exchanging particles; μ and Te are thereby obtained via open-circuit measurements, using a virtual reservoir. In the lattice gas with nearest-neighbor exclusion, temperature is not relevant, and we find that the effective chemical potential, a function of density and drive strength, satisfies the zeroth law, and correctly predicts the densities of coexisting systems. In the Katz-Lebowitz-Spohn driven lattice gas, both μ and Te need to be defined. We show analytically that the zeroth law is violated, and determine the size of the violations numerically. Our results highlight a fundamental inconsistency in the extension of thermodynamics to nonequilibrium steady states. Research supported by CNPq, Brazil.

  4. A Note on Equations for Steady-State Optimal Landscapes

    Liu, H.H.

    2010-06-15

    Based on the optimality principle (that the global energy expenditure rate is at its minimum for a given landscape under steady state conditions) and calculus of variations, we have derived a group of partial differential equations for describing steady-state optimal landscapes without explicitly distinguishing between hillslopes and channel networks. Other than building on the well-established Mining's equation, this work does not rely on any empirical relationships (such as those relating hydraulic parameters to local slopes). Using additional constraints, we also theoretically demonstrate that steady-state water depth is a power function of local slope, which is consistent with field data.

  5. Elimination of thermodynamically infeasible loops in steady-state metabolic models.

    Schellenberger, Jan; Lewis, Nathan E; Palsson, Bernhard Ø

    2011-02-01

    The constraint-based reconstruction and analysis (COBRA) framework has been widely used to study steady-state flux solutions in genome-scale metabolic networks. One shortcoming of current COBRA methods is the possible violation of the loop law in the computed steady-state flux solutions. The loop law is analogous to Kirchhoff's second law for electric circuits, and states that at steady state there can be no net flux around a closed network cycle. Although the consequences of the loop law have been known for years, it has been computationally difficult to work with. Therefore, the resulting loop-law constraints have been overlooked. Here, we present a general mixed integer programming approach called loopless COBRA (ll-COBRA), which can be used to eliminate all steady-state flux solutions that are incompatible with the loop law. We apply this approach to improve flux predictions on three common COBRA methods: flux balance analysis, flux variability analysis, and Monte Carlo sampling of the flux space. Moreover, we demonstrate that the imposition of loop-law constraints with ll-COBRA improves the consistency of simulation results with experimental data. This method provides an additional constraint for many COBRA methods, enabling the acquisition of more realistic simulation results. PMID:21281568

  6. Accelerator based steady state neutron source

    Using high current, cw linear accelerator technology, a spallation neutron source can achieve much higher average intensities than existing or proposed pulsed spallation sources. With about 100 mA of 300 MeV protons or deuterons, the accelerator based neutron research facility (ABNR) would initially achieve the 1016 n/cm2s thermal flux goal of the advanced steady state neutron source, and upgrading could provide higher steady state fluxes. The relatively low ion energy compared to other spallation sources has an important impact on R and D requirements as well as capital cost, for which a range of $300-450 M is estimated by comparison to other accelerator-based neutron source facilities. The source is similar to a reactor source is most respects. It has some higher energy neutrons but fewer gamma rays, and the moderator region is free of many of the design constraints of a reactor, which helps to implement sources for various neutron energy spectra, many beam tubes, etc., with the development of a multibeam concept and the basis for currents greater than 100 mA that is assumed in the R and D plan, the ABNR would serve many additional uses, such as fusion materials development, production of proton-rich isotopes, and other energy and defense program needs

  7. An accelerator based steady state neutron source

    Using high current, cw linear accelerator technology, a spallation neutron source can achieve much higher average intensities than existing or proposed pulsed spallation sources. With about 100 mA of 300 MeV protons or deuterons, the accelerator based neutron research facility (ABNR) would initially achieve the 1016 n/cm2 s themal flux goal of the advanced steady state neutron source, and upgrading could provide higher steady state fluxes. The relatively low ion energy compared to other spallation sources has an important impact on R and D requirements as well as capital cost, for which a range of Dollar 300-450 is estimated by comparison to other accelerator-based neutron source facilities. The source is similar to a reactor source in most respects. It has some higher energy neutrons but fewer gamma rays, and the moderator region is free of many of the design constraints of a reactor, which helps to implement sources for various neutron energy spectra, many beam tubes, etc. With the development of a multibeam concept and the basis for currents greater than 100 mA that is assumed in the R and D plan, the ABNR would serve many additional uses, such as fusion materials development, production of proton-rich isotopes, and other energy and defense program needs. (orig.)

  8. Chemical reaction systems with toric steady states

    Millan, Mercedes Perez; Shiu, Anne; Conradi, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Mass-action chemical reaction systems are frequently used in Computational Biology. The corresponding polynomial dynamical systems are often large, consisting of tens or even hundreds of ordinary differential equations, and poorly parameterized (due to noisy measurement data and a small number of data points and repetitions). Therefore, it is often difficult to establish the existence of (positive) steady states or to determine whether more complicated phenomena such as multistationarity exist. If, however, the steady state ideal of the system is a binomial ideal, then we show that these questions can be answered easily. The focus of this work is on systems with this property, and we say that such systems have toric steady states. Our main result gives sufficient conditions for a chemical reaction system to have toric steady states. Furthermore, we analyze the capacity of such a system to exhibit positive steady states and multistationarity. Examples of systems with toric steady states include weakly-reversib...

  9. 快速稳态进动采集序列MR检查在胎儿成像中的应用%Application of MR imaging with fast-imaging employing steady-state acquisition sequence in normal fetus

    石银龙; 王传兵; 刘伟

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨快速稳态进动采集序列(FIESTA)在胎儿MR检查中的应用价值.方法 对30例20周以上正常胎儿行MR检查,采用FIESTA序列对胎儿头颅、躯干行轴位、冠状位、矢状位扫描,观察胎儿各系统主要器官,包括脑、肺、心脏、肝、脾、胃肠道等的解剖和MR表现.结果 孕20周时,胎儿各主要器官均已发育.中枢神经系统在FIESTA图像脑室系统高信号的衬托下,大脑三层结构清晰可辨,脑室系统呈生理性扩大状态.30周后脑沟、回形成逐渐明显;非神经系统亦可较清晰显示.结论 FIESTA可清楚显示胎儿各主要器官的正常解剖和发育变化,胎儿主要器官和MR表现与新生儿有较大区别.%Objective To investigate the value of MR imaging with fast-imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) sequence in normal fetus. Methods Thirty normal fetuses with gestational age greater than 20 weeks underwent MR imaging with FIESTA sequence on sagittal and axial view of the fetus body and the head. The normal fetus anatomy of the brain, lungs, heart, liver, spleen,gastrointestinal tract and their MR manifestations were observed. Reulls The main organs of fetus had developed in 20 weeks gestation. In the central nervous system .against the high signal of the ventricular system, three layers of the cerebrum were identified, and the ventricular system was extended physiologically. Cerebral gyri and sulcus developed significantly after 30 weeks gestation. Non-central nervous system( non-CNS) tissues could also be clearly observed. Conclusion FIESTA sequence MR imaging can clearly show the normal fetal anatomy of main organs, which are quite different from those in newborns.

  10. Steady state nutrition by transpiration controlled nutrient supply

    Braakhekke, W.G.; Labe, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    Programmed nutrient addition with a constant relative addition rate has been advocated as a suitable research technique for inducing steady state nutrition in exponentially growing plants. Transpiration controlled nutrient supply is proposed as an alternative technique for plants with a short or no

  11. Multiple steady state phenomenon in martensitic transformation

    2001-01-01

    Based on the basic facts that the martensitic transformation is a physical phenomenon which occurs in non-equilibrium conditions and there exists the feedback mechanism in the martensitic transformation, the dynamical processes of the isothermal and athermal martensitic transformations were analyzed by using nonlinear theory and a bifurcation theory model was established. It is shown that a multiple steady state phenomenon can take place as austenite is cooled, and the transitions of the steady state temperature between the branches of stable steady states can be considered the transformation from austenite to martensite. This model can estimate the starting temperature of the martensitic transformation and explain some experimental features of the martensitic transformation such as the effects of cooling rate, fluctuation and austenitic grain size on the martensitic transformation.

  12. A steady state theory for processive cellulases

    Cruys-Bagger, Nicolaj; Olsen, Jens Elmerdahl; Præstgaard, Eigil;

    2013-01-01

    remains to be fully developed. In this paper, we suggest a deterministic kinetic model that relies on a processive set of enzyme reactions and a quasi steady-state assumption. It is shown that this approach is practicable in the sense that it leads to mathematically simple expressions for the steady-state...... rate, and only requires data from standard assay techniques as experimental input. Specifically, it is shown that the processive reaction rate at steady state may be expressed by a hyperbolic function related to the conventional Michaelis–Menten equation. The main difference is a ‘kinetic processivity....... This has significant kinetic implications, for example the maximal specific rate (Vmax/E0) for processive cellulases is much lower than the catalytic rate constant (kcat). We discuss how relationships based on this theory may be used in both comparative and mechanistic analyses of cellulases....

  13. Steady-state spheromak reactor studies

    After summarizing the essential elements of a gun-sustained spheromak, the potential for a steady-state is explored by means of a comprehensive physics/engineering/costing model. A range of cost-optimized reactor design points is presented, and the sensitivity of cost to key physics, engineering, and operational variables is reported

  14. Thermodynamics of Stability of Nonequilibrium Steady States.

    Rastogi, R. P.; Shabd, Ram

    1983-01-01

    Presented is a concise and critical account of developments in nonequilibrium thermodynamics. The criterion for stability of nonequilibrium steady states is critically examined for consecutive and monomolecular triangular reactions, autocatalytic reactions, auto-inhibited reactions, and the Lotka-Volterra model. (JN)

  15. Technical challenges in the construction of the steady-state stellarator Wendelstein 7-X

    The next step in the Wendelstein stellarator line is the large superconducting device Wendelstein 7-X, currently under construction in Greifswald, Germany. Steady-state operation is an intrinsic feature of stellarators, and one key element of the Wendelstein 7-X mission is to demonstrate steady-state operation under plasma conditions relevant for a fusion power plant. Steady-state operation of a fusion device, on the one hand, requires the implementation of special technologies, giving rise to technical challenges during the design, fabrication and assembly of such a device. On the other hand, also the physics development of steady-state operation at high plasma performance poses a challenge and careful preparation. The electron cyclotron resonance heating system, diagnostics, experiment control and data acquisition are prepared for plasma operation lasting 30 min. This requires many new technological approaches for plasma heating and diagnostics as well as new concepts for experiment control and data acquisition. (special topic)

  16. Steady State Analysis of Towed Marine Cables

    WANG Fei; HUANG Guo-liang; DENG De-heng

    2008-01-01

    Efficient numerical schemes were presented for the steady state solutions of towed marine cables. For most of towed systems, the steady state problem can be resolved into two-point boundary-value problem, or initial value problem in some special cases where the initial values are available directly. A new technique was proposed and attempted to solve the two-point boundary-value problem rather than the conventional shooting method due to its algorithm complexity and low efficiency. First, the boundary conditions are transformed into a set of nonlinear governing equations about the initial values, then bisection method is employed to solve these nonlinear equations with the aid of 4th order Runge-Kutta method. In common sense, non-uniform (sheared) current is assumed, which varies in magnitude and direction with depth. The schemes are validated through the DE Zoysa's example, then several numerical examples are also presented to illustrate the numerical schemes.

  17. Development of steady state magnetic sensor

    Hara, Shigemitsu; Nakayama, Takahide [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Nagashima, Akira; Kasai, Satoshi

    1998-12-01

    A prototype of new mechanical sensor based on the steady state electromagnetic force (J x B force) measurement has been developed and tested. The mechanical force sensor is a new type of the magnetic sensor which is available for frequencies smaller than 0.1 Hz. The prototype of the mechanical sensor has been examined, and the following results were obtained; (1) A signal was proportional to simulated force in the load cell tests. (2) A signal drift concerning the temperature was reproducible over the range of the ITER environment. (3) A signal was proportional to the magnetic field in the steady state magnetic field measurement tests. (4) A load cell linearity error did not increase significantly after irradiation of 7.2 x 10{sup 6} Gy. These results indicate that the mechanical sensor will provide the practical feasibility in the long time magnetic field measurement. (author)

  18. Variational methods in steady state diffusion problems

    Classical variational techniques are used to obtain accurate solutions to the multigroup multiregion one dimensional steady state neutron diffusion equation. Analytic solutions are constructed for benchmark verification. Functionals with cubic trial functions and conservational lagrangian constraints are exhibited and compared with nonconservational functionals with respect to neutron balance and to relative flux and current at interfaces. Excellent agreement of the conservational functionals using cubic trial functions is obtained in comparison with analytic solutions

  19. Steady State versus Pulsed Tokamak DEMO

    Full text: The present report deals with a Review of problems for a Steady state(SS) DEMO, related argument is treated about the models and the present status of comparison between the characteristics of DEMO pulsed versus a Steady state device.The studied SS DEMO Models (SLIM CS, PPCS model C EU-DEMO, ARIES-RS) are analyzed from the point of view of the similarity scaling laws and critical issues for a steady state DEMO. A comparison between steady state and pulsed DEMO is therefore carried out: in this context a new set of parameters for a pulsed (6 — 8 hours pulse) DEMO is determined working below the density limit, peak temperature of 20 keV, and requiring a modest improvement in the confinement factor(HIPBy2 = 1.1) with respect to the H-mode. Both parameters density and confinement parameter are lower than the DEMO models presently considered. The concept of partially non-inductive pulsed DEMO is introduced since a pulsed DEMO needs heating and current drive tools for plasma stability and burn control. The change of the main parameter design for a DEMO working at high plasma peak temperatures Te ∼ 35 keV is analyzed: in this range the reactivity increases linearly with temperature, and a device with smaller major radius (R = 7.5 m) is compatible with high temperature. Increasing temperature is beneficial for current drive efficiency and heat load on divertor, being the synchrotron radiation one of the relevant components of the plasma emission at high temperatures and current drive efficiency increases with temperature. Technology and engineering problems are examined including efficiency and availability R&D issues for a high temperature DEMO. Fatigue and creep-fatigue effects of pulsed operations on pulsed DEMO components are considered in outline to define the R&D needed for DEMO development. (author)

  20. On Typicality in Nonequilibrium Steady States

    Evans, Denis J.; Williams, Stephen R.; Searles, Debra J.; Rondoni, Lamberto

    2016-08-01

    From the statistical mechanical viewpoint, relaxation of macroscopic systems and response theory rest on a notion of typicality, according to which the behavior of single macroscopic objects is given by appropriate ensembles: ensemble averages of observable quantities represent the measurements performed on single objects, because " almost all" objects share the same fate. In the case of non-dissipative dynamics and relaxation toward equilibrium states, " almost all" is referred to invariant probability distributions that are absolutely continuous with respect to the Lebesgue measure. In other words, the collection of initial micro-states (single systems) that do not follow the ensemble is supposed to constitute a set of vanishing, phase space volume. This approach is problematic in the case of dissipative dynamics and relaxation to nonequilibrium steady states, because the relevant invariant distributions attribute probability 1 to sets of zero volume, while evolution commonly begins in equilibrium states, i.e., in sets of full phase space volume. We consider the relaxation of classical, thermostatted particle systems to nonequilibrium steady states. We show that the dynamical condition known as Ω T-mixing is necessary and sufficient for relaxation of ensemble averages to steady state values. Moreover, we find that the condition known as weak T-mixing applied to smooth observables is sufficient for ensemble relaxation to be independent of the initial ensemble. Lastly, we show that weak T-mixing provides a notion of typicality for dissipative dynamics that is based on the (non-invariant) Lebesgue measure, and that we call physical ergodicity.

  1. Master equation based steady-state cluster perturbation theory

    Nuss, Martin; Dorn, Gerhard; Dorda, Antonius; von der Linden, Wolfgang; Arrigoni, Enrico

    2015-09-01

    A simple and efficient approximation scheme to study electronic transport characteristics of strongly correlated nanodevices, molecular junctions, or heterostructures out of equilibrium is provided by steady-state cluster perturbation theory. In this work, we improve the starting point of this perturbative, nonequilibrium Green's function based method. Specifically, we employ an improved unperturbed (so-called reference) state ρ̂S, constructed as the steady state of a quantum master equation within the Born-Markov approximation. This resulting hybrid method inherits beneficial aspects of both the quantum master equation as well as the nonequilibrium Green's function technique. We benchmark this scheme on two experimentally relevant systems in the single-electron transistor regime: an electron-electron interaction based quantum diode and a triple quantum dot ring junction, which both feature negative differential conductance. The results of this method improve significantly with respect to the plain quantum master equation treatment at modest additional computational cost.

  2. Preparation of Steady State Operation of the Wendelstein 7-X Stellarator

    Full text: Wendelstein 7-X has been designed to demonstrate the steady state capability of the stellarator concept. At 10 MW of heating power a pulse duration of 30 minutes is envisaged. Short pulses of additional heating power are foreseen to access beta and equilibrium limits and study fast ion confinement and fast ion driven instabilities. The large variety of time scales is strongly affecting the design of plasma diagnostics, heating and fuelling systems, data acquisition and device control. For steady state heating ten 1 MW continuous wave gyrotrons are foreseen, operating at 140 GHz second harmonic heating at 2.5 T. Using a system of mirrors, relaying the micro waves through air to Wendelstein 7-X, a very high transmission efficiency has been achieved. Front steering mirrors, one for each gyrotron, individually change the poloidal and toroidal launch angles, thus controlling the radial deposition and current drive. Recent modifications to the gyrotron design include an improved power handling in the collector using a rotating transverse magnetic field. The main heating scenarios are 2nd harmonic X-mode (X2) heating below the cut-off density of 1.2 x 1020 m-3 and 2nd harmonic O-mode (O2) heating at higher densities. Owing to non-absorbed power, significant levels of stray radiation are expected for O2-heating, during the transition from X2- to O2-heating, and also during plasma start-up with electron cyclotron resonance waves. Therefore all in-vessel components have to be qualified and if necessary protected to withstand up to 50 kW/m2 of continuous micro-wave power flux. Many diagnostic techniques require a specific adaptation or even new developments to cope with steady state operation. Besides the measurement of fast events, also the long times scales have to be covered. As a consequence not only data rates increase, but the total amount of data. This requires special efforts for real time plasma control, and for continuous data acquisition and data

  3. Small steady-state tokamak (TST) for divertor testing

    The TST is a small steady-state tokamak designed for testing diverters under conditions similar to those anticipated in future large tokamaks. An initial design has R0/a = 2.5, R0 = 0.75 m, a = 0.3 m, and Bt0 = 2.2 T with full inductive capability. With heating and current drive power of 4.5 MW, the heat flux at the plasma edge Q perpendicular can be as high as 0.3 MW/m2. Plasma currents Ip above 500 kA can be maintained by 1 MW of lower hybrid power (2.45 GHz) for average densities ne up to 3 x 1019 m-3. Additional power via ICRF (2 MW) and neutral beams (1.5 MW) maintain current for ne up to 5 x 1019 m-3. Fully demountable, actively cooled, steady-state toroidal field coils permit ample access for the auxiliary systems and diverter cassettes. The toroidal field magnets require a steady-state supply of less than 40 MW. The size and cost of the TST can be reduced by eliminating the solenoid, reducing Bt0 to 1.4 T, and lowering R0/a to 1.7. This option permits low-R0/a experimentation while maintaining the capability for testing divertors but requires successful noninductive current initiation and maintenance in the low-R0/a regime

  4. Extracting Steady State Components from Synchrophasor Data Using Kalman Filters

    Farhan Mahmood

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Data from phasor measurement units (PMUs may be exploited to provide steady state information to the applications which require it. As PMU measurements may contain errors and missing data, the paper presents the application of a Kalman Filter technique for real-time data processing. PMU data captures the power system’s response at different time-scales, which are generated by different types of power system events; the presented Kalman Filter methods have been applied to extract the steady state components of PMU measurements that can be fed to steady state applications. Two KF-based methods have been proposed, i.e., a windowing-based KF method and “the modified KF”. Both methods are capable of reducing noise, compensating for missing data and filtering outliers from input PMU signals. A comparison of proposed methods has been carried out using the PMU data generated from a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL experimental setup. In addition, a performance analysis of the proposed methods is performed using an evaluation metric.

  5. Siple Dome: Is it in Steady State?

    Pettit, E. C.; Waddington, E. D.; Nereson, N. A.; Zumberge, M. A.; Hamilton, G. S.

    2001-12-01

    Changes in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet since the end of the last ice age have implications for how we interpret its present behavior, in terms of both its stability and its record of climate history. Siple Dome, the ridge between Ice Streams C and D, is not presently thinning and is close to being in balance with present environmental conditions. We present three independent measurements of ice thickness change in the divide region of Siple Dome: a GPS surface horizontal strain network, fiber optic vertical strain measurements at depth, and precision GPS measurements of vertical motion of near-surface ice ("coffee-can" method). From the horizontal strain network, we calculate the divergence of the horizontal velocity. This divergence is equal to the gradient of vertical velocity at the surface and, with some assumptions about the distribution of strain rates with depth, we can calculate the vertical velocity at the surface. For steady state, the vertical velocity must be balanced by the local accumulation rate. The fiber optic instruments provide a profile of the relative vertical velocity with depth. We fit a theoretical vertical velocity pattern to these data and extrapolate to find the surface vertical velocity. Our third method (coffee-can) directly measures the vertical motion of a marker 20 meters deep using precision GPS and compares it with the local long-term rate of snow accumulation to calculate the net rate of ice sheet thickness change. All three methods reach the same conclusion: Siple Dome is currently very close to being in steady state. This result has two implications. First, ice dynamics models developed to interpret radar images or ice core data can assume steady state behavior, simplifying the models. Second, our result suggests that the central part of the Ross Embayment may have had a low-elevation profile during the late Holocene, even though other areas of the WAIS may have been thicker.

  6. Steady state phreatic surfaces in sloping aquifers

    Loáiciga, Hugo A.

    2005-08-01

    Steady state groundwater flow driven by constant recharge in an unconfined aquifer overlying sloping bedrock is shown to be represented, using the Dupuit approximation, by an ordinary differential equation of the Abel type y(x) . y'(x) + a . y(x) + x = 0, whose analytical solution is derived in this work. This article first investigates the case of zero saturated thickness at the upstream boundary, a flow system reminiscent of perched groundwater created by percolation of precipitation or irrigation in a sloping aquifer fully draining at its downstream boundary. A variant of this flow system occurs when the phreatic surface mounds and produces groundwater discharge toward the upstream boundary. This variant is a generalization of the classical groundwater flow problem involving two lakes connected by an aquifer, the latter being on sloping terrain in this instance. Analytical solutions for the phreatic surface's steady state geometry are derived for the case of monotonically declining hydraulic head as well as for the case of a mounded phreatic surface. These solutions are of practical interest in drainage studies, slope stability, and runoff formation investigations. It is shown that the flow factor a = -$\\sqrt{{\\rm K}/{\\rm N} tan β (where K, N, and tan β are the hydraulic conductivity, vertical recharge, and aquifer slope, respectively) has a commanding role on the phreatic surface's solutions. Two computational examples illustrate the implementation of this article's results.

  7. Magnetic sensor for steady state tokamak

    Neyatani, Yuzuru; Mori, Katsuharu; Oguri, Shigeru; Kikuchi, Mitsuru [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1996-06-01

    A new type of magnetic sensor has been developed for the measurement of steady state magnetic fields without DC-drift such as integration circuit. The electromagnetic force induced to the current which leads to the sensor was used for the measurement. For the high frequency component which exceeds higher than the vibration frequency of sensor, pick-up coil was used through the high pass filter. From the results using tokamak discharges, this sensor can measure the magnetic field in the tokamak discharge. During {approx}2 hours measurement, no DC drift was observed. The sensor can respond {approx}10ms of fast change of magnetic field during disruptions. We confirm the extension of measured range to control the current which leads to the sensor. (author).

  8. Control of unstable steady states by extended time-delayed feedback

    Dahms, Thomas; Hoevel, Philipp; Schoell, Eckehard

    2007-01-01

    Time-delayed feedback methods can be used to control unstable periodic orbits as well as unstable steady states. We present an application of extended time delay autosynchronization introduced by Socolar et al. to an unstable focus. This system represents a generic model of an unstable steady state which can be found for instance in a Hopf bifurcation. In addition to the original controller design, we investigate effects of control loop latency and a bandpass filter on the domain of control. ...

  9. Small steady-state tokamak (TST) for divertor testing

    Peng, Y.M.; Colchin, R.J.; Swain, D.W.; Nelson, B.E.; Monday, J.F. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Blevins, J.; Delisle, M.; Stringer, J. (Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project, Mississauga, ON (Canada)); Bonoli, P.; Luckhardt, S. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Pauletti, R. (Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil))

    1992-01-01

    The TST is a small steady-state tokamak designed for testing diverters under conditions similar to those anticipated in future large tokamaks. An initial design has R{sub 0}/a = 2.5, R{sub 0} = 0.75 m, a = 0.3 m, and Bt{sub 0} = 2.2 T with full inductive capability. With heating and current drive power of 4.5 MW, the heat flux at the plasma edge Q{perpendicular} can be as high as 0.3 MW/m{sup 2}. Plasma currents I{sub p} above 500 kA can be maintained by 1 MW of lower hybrid power (2.45 GHz) for average densities n{sub e} up to 3 {times} 10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}3}. Additional power via ICRF (2 MW) and neutral beams (1.5 MW) maintain current for n{sub e} up to 5 {times} 10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}3}. Fully demountable, actively cooled, steady-state toroidal field coils permit ample access for the auxiliary systems and diverter cassettes. The toroidal field magnets require a steady-state supply of less than 40 MW. The size and cost of the TST can be reduced by eliminating the solenoid, reducing Bt{sub 0} to 1.4 T, and lowering R{sub 0}/a to 1.7. This option permits low-R{sub 0}/a experimentation while maintaining the capability for testing divertors but requires successful noninductive current initiation and maintenance in the low-R{sub 0}/a regime.

  10. Potential multiple steady-states in the long-term carbon cycle

    Tennenbaum, Stephen; Schwartzman, David

    2013-01-01

    Modelers of the long term carbon cycle in Earth history have previously assumed there is only one stable climatic steady state. Here we investigate the possibility of multiple steady states. We find them in Abiotic World, lacking any biotic influence, resulting from possible variations in planetary albedo in different temperature, atmospheric carbon dioxide level regimes, with the same weathering forcing balancing a volcanic source to the atmosphere, ocean pool. In Plant World modeling relevant to the Phanerozoic, we include the additional effects of biotic enhancement of weathering on land, organic carbon burial, oxidation of reduced organic carbon in terrestrial sediments and the variation of biotic productivity with temperature, finding a second stable steady state appearing between twenty and fifty degrees C. The very warm early Triassic climate may be the prime candidate for an upper temperature steady state. Given our results, the anthropogenic driven rise of atmospheric carbon dioxide could potentially...

  11. Steady State Vapor Bubble in Pool Boiling.

    Zou, An; Chanana, Ashish; Agrawal, Amit; Wayner, Peter C; Maroo, Shalabh C

    2016-01-01

    Boiling, a dynamic and multiscale process, has been studied for several decades; however, a comprehensive understanding of the process is still lacking. The bubble ebullition cycle, which occurs over millisecond time-span, makes it extremely challenging to study near-surface interfacial characteristics of a single bubble. Here, we create a steady-state vapor bubble that can remain stable for hours in a pool of sub-cooled water using a femtosecond laser source. The stability of the bubble allows us to measure the contact-angle and perform in-situ imaging of the contact-line region and the microlayer, on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces and in both degassed and regular (with dissolved air) water. The early growth stage of vapor bubble in degassed water shows a completely wetted bubble base with the microlayer, and the bubble does not depart from the surface due to reduced liquid pressure in the microlayer. Using experimental data and numerical simulations, we obtain permissible range of maximum heat transfer coefficient possible in nucleate boiling and the width of the evaporating layer in the contact-line region. This technique of creating and measuring fundamental characteristics of a stable vapor bubble will facilitate rational design of nanostructures for boiling enhancement and advance thermal management in electronics. PMID:26837464

  12. Steady State Vapor Bubble in Pool Boiling

    Zou, An; Chanana, Ashish; Agrawal, Amit; Wayner, Peter C.; Maroo, Shalabh C.

    2016-02-01

    Boiling, a dynamic and multiscale process, has been studied for several decades; however, a comprehensive understanding of the process is still lacking. The bubble ebullition cycle, which occurs over millisecond time-span, makes it extremely challenging to study near-surface interfacial characteristics of a single bubble. Here, we create a steady-state vapor bubble that can remain stable for hours in a pool of sub-cooled water using a femtosecond laser source. The stability of the bubble allows us to measure the contact-angle and perform in-situ imaging of the contact-line region and the microlayer, on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces and in both degassed and regular (with dissolved air) water. The early growth stage of vapor bubble in degassed water shows a completely wetted bubble base with the microlayer, and the bubble does not depart from the surface due to reduced liquid pressure in the microlayer. Using experimental data and numerical simulations, we obtain permissible range of maximum heat transfer coefficient possible in nucleate boiling and the width of the evaporating layer in the contact-line region. This technique of creating and measuring fundamental characteristics of a stable vapor bubble will facilitate rational design of nanostructures for boiling enhancement and advance thermal management in electronics.

  13. Steady-state creep in the mantle

    G. RANALLI

    1977-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY - The creep equations for steady-state flow of olivine at high
    pressure and temperature are compared in an attempt to elucidate the rheological
    behaviour of the mantle. Results are presented in terms of applied deformation
    maps and curves of effective viscosity v depth.
    In the upper mantle, the transition stress between dislocation and diffusion
    creep is between 10 to 102 bar (as orders of magnitude for grain sizes from
    0.01 to 1 cm. The asthenosphere under continents is deeper, and has higher
    viscosity, than under oceans. Predominance of one creep mechanism above the
    others depends on grain size, strain rate, and volume fraction of melt; the
    rheological response can be different for different geodynamic processes.
    In the lower mantle, on the other hand, dislocation creep is predominant
    at all realistic grain sizes and strain rates. If the effective viscosity has to be only
    slightly higher than in the upper mantle, as some interpretations of glacioisostatic
    rebound suggest, then the activation volume cannot be larger than
    11 cm3 mole^1.

  14. Constrained optimal steady-state control for isolated traffic intersections

    Jack HADDAD; David MAHALEL; Ilya IOSLOVICH; Per-Olof GUTMAN

    2014-01-01

    The steady-state or cyclic control problem for a simplified isolated traffic intersection is considered. The optimization problem for the green-red switching sequence is formulated with the help of a discrete-event max-plus model. Two steady-state control problems are formulated: optimal steady-state with green duration constraints, and optimal steady-state control with lost time. In the case when the criterion is a strictly increasing, linear function of the queue lengths, the steady-state control problems can be solved analytically. The structure of constrained optimal steady-state traffic control is revealed, and the effect of the lost time on the optimal solution is illustrated.

  15. Defining Features of Steady-State Timbres

    Hall, Michael D.

    1995-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted to define steady -state features of timbre for a group of well-trained musicians. Experiment 1 evaluated whether or not pairs of three critical dimensions of timbre--spectral slope (6 or 12 dB/octave), formant structure (/a/ or /i/ vowel), and inharmonicity of partials (harmonic or inharmonic)--were processed in a separable or integral fashion. Accuracy and speed for classification of values along one dimension were examined under different conditions of variability along a second dimension (fixed, correlated, or orthogonal). Spectral slope and formant structure were integral, with classification speed for the target dimension depending upon variability along the orthogonal dimension. In contrast, evidence of asymmetric separability was obtained for inharmonicity. Classification speed for slope and formant structure did not depend on inharmonicity, whereas RT for the target dimension of inharmonicity was strongly influenced by variability along either slope or formant structure. Since the results of Experiment 1 provided a basis for manipulating spectral slope and formant structure as a single feature, these dimensions were correlated in Experiment 2. Subjects searched for targets containing potential features of timbre within arrays of 1-4 inharmonic distractor pitches. Distractors were homogeneous with respect to the dimensions of timbre. When targets had /a/ formants with shallow spectral slopes, search time increased nonlinearly with array size in a manner consistent with the parallel processing of items, and thus feature search. Feature search was not obtained for targets with /i/ formants and steep slopes. Thus, the feature was coded as the presence or absence of /a/ formants with shallow spectral slopes. A search task using heterogeneous distractor values along slope/formant structure was used in Experiment 3 to evaluate whether or not the feature of timbre and pitch were automatically conjoined (integral). Search times for

  16. Steady-state solution methods for open quantum optical systems

    Nation, P D

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the numerical solution methods available when solving for the steady-state density matrix of a time-independent open quantum optical system, where the system operators are expressed in a suitable basis representation as sparse matrices. In particular, we focus on the difficulties posed by the non-Hermitian structure of the Lindblad super operator, and the numerical techniques designed to mitigate these pitfalls. In addition, we introduce a doubly iterative inverse-power method that can give reduced memory and runtime requirements in situations where other iterative methods are limited due to poor bandwidth and profile reduction. The relevant methods are demonstrated on several prototypical quantum optical systems where it is found that iterative methods based on iLU factorization using reverse Cuthill-Mckee ordering tend to outperform other solution techniques in terms of both memory consumption and runtime as the size of the underlying Hilbert space increases. For eigenvalue solving, Krylov iterat...

  17. Positive Steady States of a Competitor-Competitor-Mutualist Model

    Wen-yan Chen; Ming-xin Wang

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we deal with the positive steady states of a Competitor-Competitor-Mutualist model with diffusion and homogeneous Dirichlet boundary conditions.We rst give the necessary conditions,and then establish the su cient conditions for the existence of positive steady states.

  18. ITER steady-state magnetic sensors: design status and performance

    (private communication); [2] P. Moreau et al, Fusion Engineering and Design 84 (2009) 1344-1350; [3] ITER Design Description Document 55.A5,A6 Outer Vessel Steady State Sensors (private communication); [4] GRT047 Technical Report on Equilibrium reconstruction in ITER using external pick-up and steady state sensors, in preparation (private communication); [5] GRT047 Technical Report on Total toroidal current reconstruction in ITER using external pick-up and steady state sensors, in preparation (private communication). (authors)

  19. Steady State of Pedestrian Flow in Bottleneck Experiments

    Liao, Weichen; Seyfried, Armin; Chraibi, Mohcine; Drzycimski, Kevin; Zheng, Xiaoping; Zhao, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Experiments with pedestrians could depend strongly on initial conditions. Comparisons of the results of such experiments require to distinguish carefully between transient state and steady state. In this work, a feasible algorithm - Cumulative Sum Control Chart - is proposed and improved to automatically detect steady states from density and speed time series of bottleneck experiments. The threshold of the detection parameter in the algorithm is calibrated using an autoregressive model. Comparing the detected steady states with previous manually selected ones, the modified algorithm gives more reproducible results. For the applications, three groups of bottleneck experiments are analysed and the steady states are detected. The study about pedestrian flow shows that the difference between the flows in all states and in steady state mainly depends on the ratio of pedestrian number to bottleneck width. When the ratio is higher than a critical value (approximately 115 persons/m), the flow in all states is almost ...

  20. Steady-State Performance of Kalman Filter for DPLL

    QIAN Yi; CUI Xiaowei; LU Mingquan; FENG Zhenming

    2009-01-01

    For certain system models, the structure of the Kalman filter is equivalent to a second-order vari-able gain digital phase-locked loop (DPLL). To apply the knowledge of DPLLs to the design of Kalman filters, this paper studies the steady-state performance of Kalman filters for these system models. The results show that the steady-state Kalman gain has the same form as the DPLL gain. An approximate simple form for the steady-state Kalman gain is used to derive an expression for the equivalent loop bandwidth of the Kalman filter as a function of the process and observation noise variances. These results can be used to analyze the steady-state performance of a Kalman filter with DPLL theory or to design a Kalman filter model with the same steady-state performance as a given DPLL.

  1. Steady state plasma operation in RF dominated regimes on EAST

    Zhang, X. J.; Zhao, Y. P.; Gong, X. Z.; Hu, C. D.; Liu, F. K.; Hu, L. Q.; Wan, B. N., E-mail: bnwan@ipp.ac.cn; Li, J. G. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2015-12-10

    Significant progress has recently been made on EAST in the 2014 campaign, including the enhanced CW H&CD system over 20MW heating power (LHCD, ICRH and NBI), more than 70 diagnostics, ITER-like W-monoblock on upper divertor, two inner cryo-pumps and RMP coils, enabling EAST to investigate long pulse H mode operation with dominant electron heating and low torque to address the critical issues for ITER. H-mode plasmas were achieved by new H&CD system or 4.6GHz LHCD alone for the first time. Long pulse high performance H mode has been obtained by LHCD alone up to 28s at H{sub 98}∼1.2 or by combing of ICRH and LHCD, no or small ELM was found in RF plasmas, which is essential for steady state operation in the future Tokamak. Plasma operation in low collision regimes were implemented by new 4.6GHz LHCD with core Te∼4.5keV. The non-inductive scenarios with high performance at high bootstrap current fraction have been demonstrated in RF dominated regimes for long pulse operation. Near full non-inductive CD discharges have been achieved. In addition, effective heating and decoupling method under multi-transmitter for ICRF system were developed in this campaign, etc. EAST could be in operation with over 30MW CW heating and current drive power (LHCD ICRH NBI and ECRH), enhanced diagnostic capabilities and full actively-cooled metal wall from 2015. It will therefore allow to access new confinement regimes and to extend these regimes towards to steady state operation.

  2. Measurement of non-steady-state free fatty acid turnover

    The accuracy of non-steady-state equations for measuring changes in free fatty acid rate of appearance (Ra) is unknown. In the present study, endogenous lipolysis (traced with [14C]-linoleate) was pharmacologically suppressed in six conscious mongrel dogs. A computer-responsive infusion pump was then used to deliver an intravenous oleic acid emulsion in both constant and linear gradient infusion modes. Both non-steady-state equations with various effective volumes of distribution (V) and steady-state equations were used to measure oleate Ra [(14C]oleate). Endogenous lipolysis did not change during the experiment. When oleate Ra increased in a linear gradient fashion, only non-steady-state equations with a large (150 ml/kg) V resulted in erroneous values (9% overestimate, P less than 0.05). In contrast, when oleate Ra decreased in a similar fashion, steady-state and standard non-steady-state equations (V = plasma volume = 50 ml/kg) overestimated total oleate Ra (18 and 7%, P less than 0.001 and P less than 0.05, respectively). Overall, non-steady-state equations with an effective V of 90 ml/kg (1.8 x plasma volume) allowed the most accurate estimates of oleate Ra

  3. Measurement of non-steady-state free fatty acid turnover

    Jensen, M.D.; Heiling, V.; Miles, J.M. (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The accuracy of non-steady-state equations for measuring changes in free fatty acid rate of appearance (Ra) is unknown. In the present study, endogenous lipolysis (traced with ({sup 14}C)-linoleate) was pharmacologically suppressed in six conscious mongrel dogs. A computer-responsive infusion pump was then used to deliver an intravenous oleic acid emulsion in both constant and linear gradient infusion modes. Both non-steady-state equations with various effective volumes of distribution (V) and steady-state equations were used to measure oleate Ra (({sup 14}C)oleate). Endogenous lipolysis did not change during the experiment. When oleate Ra increased in a linear gradient fashion, only non-steady-state equations with a large (150 ml/kg) V resulted in erroneous values (9% overestimate, P less than 0.05). In contrast, when oleate Ra decreased in a similar fashion, steady-state and standard non-steady-state equations (V = plasma volume = 50 ml/kg) overestimated total oleate Ra (18 and 7%, P less than 0.001 and P less than 0.05, respectively). Overall, non-steady-state equations with an effective V of 90 ml/kg (1.8 x plasma volume) allowed the most accurate estimates of oleate Ra.

  4. Pre-Steady-State Kinetic Analysis of Single-Nucleotide Incorporation by DNA Polymerases.

    Su, Yan; Peter Guengerich, F

    2016-01-01

    Pre-steady-state kinetic analysis is a powerful and widely used method to obtain multiple kinetic parameters. This protocol provides a step-by-step procedure for pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of single-nucleotide incorporation by a DNA polymerase. It describes the experimental details of DNA substrate annealing, reaction mixture preparation, handling of the RQF-3 rapid quench-flow instrument, denaturing polyacrylamide DNA gel preparation, electrophoresis, quantitation, and data analysis. The core and unique part of this protocol is the rationale for preparation of the reaction mixture (the ratio of the polymerase to the DNA substrate) and methods for conducting pre-steady-state assays on an RQF-3 rapid quench-flow instrument, as well as data interpretation after analysis. In addition, the methods for the DNA substrate annealing and DNA polyacrylamide gel preparation, electrophoresis, quantitation and analysis are suitable for use in other studies. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27248785

  5. Enhancement of the steady-state magnetization in TROSY experiments

    Under the condition that the longitudinal relaxation time of spin I is shorter than the longitudinal relaxation time of spin S the steady-state magnetization in [S,I]-TROSY-type experiments can be enhanced by intermediate storage of a part of the steady-state magnetization of spin I on spin S with a pulse sequence element during the relaxation delay. It is demonstrated with samples ranging in size from the 1 kDa cyclosporin to the 110 kDa 15N,2H-labeled dihydroneopterin Aldolase that intermediate storage of steady-state magnetization in a [15N,1H]-TROSY experiment yields a signal gain of 10-25%. The method proposed here for intermediate storage of steady-state magnetization can be implemented in any [15N,1H]-TROSY-type experiments

  6. SUPERENERGY-2: a multiassembly, steady-state computer code for LMFBR core thermal-hydraulic analysis

    Core thermal-hydraulic design and performance analyses for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs) require repeated detailed multiassembly calculations to determine radial temperature profiles and subchannel outlet temperatures for various core configurations and subassembly structural analyses. At steady-state, detailed core-wide temperature profiles are required for core restraint calculations and subassembly structural analysis. In addition, sodium outlet temperatures are routinely needed for each reactor operating cycle. The SUPERENERGY-2 thermal-hydraulic code was designed specifically to meet these designer needs. It is applicable only to steady-state, forced-convection flow in LMFBR core geometries

  7. Steady-state current transfer and scattering theory

    Ben-Moshe, Vered; Rai, Dhurba; Skourtis, Spiros S.; Nitzan, Abraham

    2010-01-01

    The correspondence between the steady state theory of current transfer and scattering theory in a system of coupled tight-binding models of 1-dimensional wires is explored. For weak interwire coupling both calculations give nearly identical results, except at singular points associated with band edges. The effect of decoherence in each of these models is studied using a generalization of the Liouville-von Neuman equation suitable for steady-state situations. An example of a single impurity mo...

  8. TRANSIENT AND STEADY-STATE DYNAMICS OF GRANULAR SHEAR FLOWS

    Losert, W.; Kwon, G.

    2001-01-01

    The initiation and steady-state dynamics of granular shear flow are investigated experimentally in a Couette geometry with independently moveable outer and inner cylinders. The motion of particles on the top surface is analyzed using fast imaging. During steady state rotation of both cylinders at different rates, a shear band develops close to the inner cylinder for all combinations of speeds of each cylinder we investigated. Experiments on flow initiation were carried out with one of the cyl...

  9. Steady-state leaching of tritiated water from silica gel

    Das, H.A.; Hou, Xiaolin

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous leaching of tritium from silica gel, loaded by absorption of water vapor, makes part of reactor de-commissioning. It is found to follow the formulation of steady-state diffusion.......Aqueous leaching of tritium from silica gel, loaded by absorption of water vapor, makes part of reactor de-commissioning. It is found to follow the formulation of steady-state diffusion....

  10. Applications of mixed Petrov-Galerkin finite element methods to transient and steady state creep analysis

    The mixed Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation is applied to transiente and steady state creep problems. Numerical analysis has shown additional stability of this method compared to classical Galerkin formulations. The accuracy of the new formulation is confirmed in some representative examples of two dimensional and axisymmetric problems. (author)

  11. Technical Challenges in the Construction of the Steady-State Stellarator Wendelsetin 7-X

    Full text: The 'fully-optimized' stellarator Wendelstein 7-X stellarator, presently under construction in Greifswald, combines a quasi-isodynamic magnetic field configuration sustained by superconducting coils with a steady-state exhaust concept, steady-state heating at high power, and a size sufficient to reach reactor-relevant nΤτ-values. It is the mission of the project to demonstrate the reactor potential of the optimized stellarator line. For the development of a credible stellarator reactor concept, steady-state operation has to be demonstrated with fully integrated discharge scenarios at high heating power with a divertor providing suitable power and particle exhaust. The development of reactor-relevant operation regimes is the chief scientific goal of Wendelstein 7-X. The subject of steady-state operation, however, is of more general interest, as this is also of great concern and interest for future tokamak devices. Consistent with the physics requirements of steady-state plasmas must be the engineering aspects of a steady-state fusion device. We discuss these issues for the design, manufacturing, and assembly of Wendelstein 7-X. The major components of Wendelstein 7-X have been manufactured, tested and delivered: 70 super-conducting coils, 121 superconducting bus-bars for the 7 coil current circuits, about 1000 cryo pipes, 10 half-modules of the central support structure, the plasma vessel and outer vessel, and 254 ports. The main focus of the project has in recent years shifted to the assembly process and considerable progress has been achieved. Although in the early phases of the Wendelstein 7-X construction several schedule delays have accumulated, there have been no major project delays for more than four years and completion of the device is foreseen for mid 2014. A summary of the technological challenges that have been faced in the project and solutions found are discussed in this paper. In addition the route towards completion, commissioning, and

  12. A simplified system for steady state process simulation

    The system described in this report represents an attempt to apply the function of industrial flow sheet simulators to tritium processing applications. To overcome some of the difficulties associated with the use of larger simulation packages, report formats have been designed to accommodate wide ranges of component concentrations; and physical property data requirements have been designed around commonly available data. The simulation system includes a predefined structure for storage of stream and component data, unit operation block parameters, and the other data needed to describe a simulation. Other support subroutines, which are needed to perform computations common to different unit operation subroutines, are included, along with some of the more common unit operation modules. To perform a simulation, the user codes an executive routine that calls the appropriate support and unit operation subroutines - as well as any additional support or unit operation subroutines not already part of the system. This code is then compiled and linked to a library, which contains the existent parts of the system, to produce an executable program. This program is run, with the user's data file as input, to compute the steady state performance of the flow sheet being simulated. The existent part of the system is coded in Microsoft FORTRAN-77, which should be largely compatible with other FORTRAN compilers. The simulation system has been compiled and placed in a library which is usable by a Microsoft linkage editor on an IBM PC

  13. Estimation of the Maximal Lactate Steady State in Endurance Runners.

    Llodio, I; Gorostiaga, E M; Garcia-Tabar, I; Granados, C; Sánchez-Medina, L

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to predict the velocity corresponding to the maximal lactate steady state (MLSSV) from non-invasive variables obtained during a maximal multistage running field test (modified University of Montreal Track Test, UMTT), and to determine whether a single constant velocity test (CVT), performed several days after the UMTT, could estimate the MLSSV. Within 4-5 weeks, 20 male runners performed: 1) a modified UMTT, and 2) several 30 min CVTs to determine MLSSV to a precision of 0.25 km·h(-1). Maximal aerobic velocity (MAV) was the best predictor of MLSSV. A regression equation was obtained: MLSSV=1.425+(0.756·MAV); R(2)=0.63. Running velocity during the CVT (VCVT) and blood lactate at 6 (La6) and 30 (La30) min further improved the MLSSV prediction: MLSSV=VCVT+0.503 - (0.266·ΔLa30-6); R(2)=0.66. MLSSV can be estimated from MAV during a single maximal multistage running field test among a homogeneous group of trained runners. This estimation can be further improved by performing an additional CVT. In terms of accuracy, simplicity and cost-effectiveness, the reported regression equations can be used for the assessment and training prescription of endurance runners. PMID:27116348

  14. Steady state operation of tokamaks. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    The first IAEA Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) on Steady State Operation of Tokamaks was organized to discuss the operations of present long-pulse tokamaks (TRIAM-1M, TORE SUPRA, MT-7, HT-7M, HL-1M) and the plans for future steady-state tokamaks such as SST-1, CIEL, and HT-7U. This meeting, held from 13-15 October 1998, was hosted by the Academia Sinica Institute of Plasma Physics (ASIPP), Hefei, China. Participants from China, France, India, Japan, the Russian Federation, and the IAEA participated in the meeting. There were 18 individual presentations plus general discussions on many topics, including superconducting magnet systems, cryogenics, plasma position control, non-inductive current drive, auxiliary heating, plasma-wall interactions, high heat flux components, particle control, and data acquisition

  15. Lake contamination models for evolution towards steady state

    Johan C. VAREKAMP

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Most lakes are in an average steady state for water but contaminants may not yet have reached steady state or are gradually being flushed out in a clean-up program. The evolution towards steady state for fully mixed or stratified lakes can be described by basic equations of mass flow. The time-concentration paths for fully mixed lakes are asymptotic toward a steady state concentration, which is reached in about 6 contaminant residence times (and clean-up also takes about 6 residence times. Stratified lakes also evolve towards a whole-lake steady state concentration but show oscillating patterns of concentration versus time, with the amplitude and dampening period depending on the volume ratio of epilimnion to total lake volume. In most natural lakes, the compositional contrast between epilimnion and hypolimnion will become almost erased in 2-4 residence times. An acid lake in North-Patagonia is used as an example of contamination of a thermally stratified lake by volcanic effluents.

  16. Non-steady state effects in diurnal 180 discrimination by Picea sitchensis branches in the field.

    Seibt, U; Wingate, L; Berry, J A; Lloyd, J

    2006-05-01

    We report diurnal variations in 18O discrimination (18 delta) during photosynthesis (18 delta A) and respiration (18 delta R) of Picea sitchensis branches measured in branch chambers in the field. These observations were compared with predicted 18 delta (18 delta pred) based on concurrent measurements of branch gas exchange to evaluate steady state and non-steady state (NSS) models of foliage water 18O enrichment for predicting the impact of this ecosystem on the Delta 18O of atmospheric CO2. The non-steady state approach substantially improved the agreement between 18 delta pred and observed 18 delta (18 delta obs) compared with the assumption of isotopic steady state (ISS) for the Delta 18O signature of foliage water. In addition, we found direct observational evidence for NSS effects: extremely high apparent 18 delta values at dusk, dawn and during nocturnal respiration. Our experiments also show the importance of bidirectional foliage gas exchange at night (isotopic equilibration in addition to the net flux). Taken together, neglecting these effects leads to an underestimation of daily net canopy isofluxes from this forest by up to 30%. We expect NSS effects to be most pronounced in species with high specific leaf water content such as conifers and when stomata are open at night or when there is high relative humidity, and we suggest modifications to ecosystem and global models of delta 18O of CO2. PMID:17087476

  17. Nonequilibrium steady states in fluids of platelike colloidal particles

    Bier, Markus; van Roij, René

    2008-02-01

    Nonequilibrium steady states in an open system connecting two reservoirs of platelike colloidal particles are investigated by means of a recently proposed phenomenological dynamic density functional theory [M. Bier and R. van Roij, Phys. Rev. E 76, 021405 (2007)]. The platelike colloidal particles are approximated within the Zwanzig model of restricted orientations, which exhibits an isotropic-nematic bulk phase transition. Inhomogeneities of the local chemical potential generate a diffusion current which relaxes to a nonvanishing value if the two reservoirs coupled to the system sustain different chemical potentials. The relaxation process of initial states towards the steady state turns out to comprise two regimes: a smoothening of initial steplike structures followed by an ultimate relaxation of the slowest diffusive mode. The position of a nonequilibrium interface and the particle current of steady states depend nontrivially on the structure of the reservoirs due to the coupling between translational and orientational degrees of freedom of the fluid.

  18. Stable MIMO Constrained Predictive Control with Steady state Objective Optimization

    2000-01-01

    A two-stage multi-objective optimization model-predictive control algorithms(MPC) strategy is pre sented. A domain MPC controller with input constraints is used to increase freedom for steady-state objective and enhance stabilization of the controller. A steady-state objective optimization algorithm oriented to transient process is adopted to realize optimization of objectives else than dynamic control. It is proved that .the stabilization for both dynamic control and steady-state objective optimization can be guaranteed. The theoretical results are demonstrated and discussed using a distillation tower as the model. Theoretical analysis and simulation results show that this control strategy is efficient and provides a good strategic solution to practical process control.

  19. From Steady-State To Cyclic Metal Forming Processes

    Montmitonnet, Pierre

    2007-05-01

    Continuous processes often exhibit a high proportion of steady state, and have been modeled with steady-state formulations for thirty years, resulting in very CPU-time efficient computations. On the other hand, incremental forming processes generally remain a challenge for FEM software, because of the local nature of deformation compared with the size of the part to be formed, and of the large number of deformation steps needed. Among them however, certain semi-continuous metal forming processes can be characterized as periodic, or cyclic. In this case, an efficient computational strategy can be derived from the ideas behind the steady-state models. This will be illustrated with the example of pilgering, a seamless tube cold rolling process.

  20. Avoiding Rebound through a Steady-State Economy

    Nørgaard, Jørgen

    conditions in many parts of the world, the transition towards a steady-state economy needs to begin first in the affluent countries, including the Nordic countries from where most of the information in this chapter is drawn. The politicians in these countries are not seeking a steady-state economy, but some...... only buy some time. From this perspective, the environmental problem with the rebound effect is not the higher energy efficiency, which pushes towards lower flows of resources through the economy, but rather the conventional economy which rebounds the savings, because of its quest for higher flows. In...... this chapter, I shall take the rebound debate further by discussing the possible role of energy efficiency in a sustainable economy that is based on the notion of ‘sufficiency’. The assumption is that globally we need to achieve a ‘steady-state economy’. Considering the urgent need for better material...

  1. Free Boundary Problem of Ono—steady State Seepage Flow

    XiaomingGUO; Ying-SUN; 等

    1999-01-01

    Along with the vigorous developing construction,the number of various underground engineerings is greatly increasing,Such as:the foundations of dams and high-rise multistoried houses,subways and tunnels,water and oil wells etc., where the close attention is always payed to the seepage behaviour in the media around the strutures.The Variatonal Inequality formulation and its FEM solution for the free boundary problem of 2D steady state seepage flow was given by the authors,In this paper a further investigation is made on the non-steady state seepage problem,taken the seepage flow of wells as an example.The presented approach-Variational Inequality and its FEM solution-is also very beneficial to the non-steady state problems,where the transient free boundary can also be defined directly without conventional iterations.

  2. Thermalization of Starlight in the Steady-State Cosmology

    Ibison, M

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the fate of starlight in the Steady-State Cosmology. We discover that it is largely unaffected by the presence of ions in intergalactic space as it gets progressively red-shifted from the visible all the way down to the plasma frequency of the intergalactic matter. At that point, after about 450 Gyr - and contrary to previously published claims - the radiation will be thermalized. Under the assumptions adopted by Gold, Bondi, Hoyle, Narlikar, Burbidge and others concerning the creation of matter in the Steady-State Cosmology, and using reasonable estimates for the baryonic mass-density and mass-fraction of 4He, the analysis predicts a universal radiation field matching the CMB, i.e. having a black-body spectrum and temperature of about 2.7 K. The Steady-state Cosmology predicts that this radiation field will appear to originate from the intergalactic plasma.

  3. Steady State Advanced Tokamak (SSAT): The mission and the machine

    Extending the tokamak concept to the steady state regime and pursuing advances in tokamak physics are important and complementary steps for the magnetic fusion energy program. The required transition away from inductive current drive will provide exciting opportunities for advances in tokamak physics, as well as important impetus to drive advances in fusion technology. Recognizing this, the Fusion Policy Advisory Committee and the US National Energy Strategy identified the development of steady state tokamak physics and technology, and improvements in the tokamak concept, as vital elements in the magnetic fusion energy development plan. Both called for the construction of a steady state tokamak facility to address these plan elements. Advances in physics that produce better confinement and higher pressure limits are required for a similar unit size reactor. Regimes with largely self-driven plasma current are required to permit a steady-state tokamak reactor with acceptable recirculating power. Reliable techniques of disruption control will be needed to achieve the availability goals of an economic reactor. Thus the central role of this new tokamak facility is to point the way to a more attractive demonstration reactor (DEMO) than the present data base would support. To meet the challenges, we propose a new ''Steady State Advanced Tokamak'' (SSAT) facility that would develop and demonstrate optimized steady state tokamak operating mode. While other tokamaks in the world program employ superconducting toroidal field coils, SSAT would be the first major tokamak to operate with a fully superconducting coil set in the elongated, divertor geometry planned for ITER and DEMO

  4. Steady-state hydrodynamic instabilities of active liquid crystals: Hybrid lattice Boltzmann simulations

    Marenduzzo, D.; Orlandini, E.; Cates, M. E.; Yeomans, J. M.

    2007-09-01

    We report hybrid lattice Boltzmann (HLB) simulations of the hydrodynamics of an active nematic liquid crystal sandwiched between confining walls with various anchoring conditions. We confirm the existence of a transition between a passive phase and an active phase, in which there is spontaneous flow in the steady state. This transition is attained for sufficiently “extensile” rods, in the case of flow-aligning liquid crystals, and for sufficiently “contractile” ones for flow-tumbling materials. In a quasi-one-dimensional geometry, deep in the active phase of flow-aligning materials, our simulations give evidence of hysteresis and history-dependent steady states, as well as of spontaneous banded flow. Flow-tumbling materials, in contrast, rearrange themselves so that only the two boundary layers flow in steady state. Two-dimensional simulations, with periodic boundary conditions, show additional instabilities, with the spontaneous flow appearing as patterns made up of “convection rolls.” These results demonstrate a remarkable richness (including dependence on anchoring conditions) in the steady-state phase behavior of active materials, even in the absence of external forcing; they have no counterpart for passive nematics. Our HLB methodology, which combines lattice Boltzmann for momentum transport with a finite difference scheme for the order parameter dynamics, offers a robust and efficient method for probing the complex hydrodynamic behavior of active nematics.

  5. Steady-state hydrodynamic instabilities of active liquid crystals: hybrid lattice Boltzmann simulations.

    Marenduzzo, D; Orlandini, E; Cates, M E; Yeomans, J M

    2007-09-01

    We report hybrid lattice Boltzmann (HLB) simulations of the hydrodynamics of an active nematic liquid crystal sandwiched between confining walls with various anchoring conditions. We confirm the existence of a transition between a passive phase and an active phase, in which there is spontaneous flow in the steady state. This transition is attained for sufficiently "extensile" rods, in the case of flow-aligning liquid crystals, and for sufficiently "contractile" ones for flow-tumbling materials. In a quasi-one-dimensional geometry, deep in the active phase of flow-aligning materials, our simulations give evidence of hysteresis and history-dependent steady states, as well as of spontaneous banded flow. Flow-tumbling materials, in contrast, rearrange themselves so that only the two boundary layers flow in steady state. Two-dimensional simulations, with periodic boundary conditions, show additional instabilities, with the spontaneous flow appearing as patterns made up of "convection rolls." These results demonstrate a remarkable richness (including dependence on anchoring conditions) in the steady-state phase behavior of active materials, even in the absence of external forcing; they have no counterpart for passive nematics. Our HLB methodology, which combines lattice Boltzmann for momentum transport with a finite difference scheme for the order parameter dynamics, offers a robust and efficient method for probing the complex hydrodynamic behavior of active nematics. PMID:17930285

  6. Steady-state and transient wellbore temperatures during drilling

    McDonald, W.J.

    1976-05-20

    An extensive literature search was made to locate technical publications and computer programs relating to wellbore temperatures during drilling operations. The search confirmed the need for knowledge of transient and steady state circulating temperatures in the design of geothermal bits. Two approaches were used in calculating borehole temperatures. The steady state solution of Holmes and Swift was programmed and 2100 cases calculated for various borehole configurations. For transient temperature studies, calculations were made for ten borehole configurations. These calculations help emphasize the need for better high temperature bit performance and improved engineering procedures in drilling. The conclusions and recommendations are based on latest available technology for calculating wellbore temperatures.

  7. Correlation Between Steady State and Impulse Earth Resistance Values

    N. M. Nor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presented experimental results of earthing systems under low-magnitude currents and under high impulse currents. The details of the measuring circuit involved for both types of testing were described. Three field sites were selected. At each site, three earth electrodes configurations were used. This makes up to nine earthing systems. From both low magnitude and impulse tests, the correlation between the steady state earth resistance value and the earth resistance under fast impulse currents can be observed. The relation between the calculated and measured steady state earth resistance is also shown in this study.

  8. Influence of the epithermal effects on the MCF steady state

    This work is devoted to the correct interpretation of the steady-state parameters of the muon catalyzed fusion (MCF) process in a D/T mixture. Previously the influence of the epithermal effects (dtμ-molecule formation by 'hot', non-thermalized tμ atoms) on the steady-state parameters was studied only for measurements with a low-density target (density φ=0.01 relative to the liquid hydrogen density). We suggest a new method allowing direct determination of the necessary corrections to the MCF cycling rate for high-density data (φ≥0.4)

  9. Steady-state entanglement activation in optomechanical cavities

    Farace, Alessandro; Ciccarello, Francesco; Fazio, Rosario; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2014-02-01

    Quantum discord, and related indicators, are raising a relentless interest as a novel paradigm of nonclassical correlations beyond entanglement. Here, we discover a discord-activated mechanism yielding steady-state entanglement production in a realistic continuous-variable setup. This comprises two coupled optomechanical cavities, where the optical modes (OMs) communicate through a fiber. We first use a simplified model to highlight the creation of steady-state discord between the OMs. We show next that such discord improves the level of stationary optomechanical entanglement attainable in the system, making it more robust against temperature and thermal noise.

  10. Electric machines steady state, transients, and design with Matlab

    Boldea, Ion

    2009-01-01

    Part I: Steady StateIntroductionElectric Energy and Electric MachinesBasic Types of Transformers and Electric MachinesLosses and EfficiencyPhysical Limitations and RatingsNameplate RatingsMethods of AnalysisState of the Art and Perspective Electric TransformersAC Coil with Magnetic Core and Transformer Principles Magnetic Materials in EMs and Their LossesElectric Conductors and Their Skin EffectsComponents of Single- and 3-Phase TransformersFlux Linkages and Inductances of Single-Phase TransformersCircuit Equations of Single-Phase Transformers With Core LossesSteady State and Equivalent Circui

  11. Plasticity, Fracture and Friction in Steady-State Plate Cutting

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup; Wierzbicki, Tomasz

    1997-01-01

    A closed form solution to the problem of steady-state wedge cutting through a ductile metal plate is presented. The considered problem is an idealization of a ship bottom raking process, i.e. a continuous cutting damage of a ship bottom by a hard knife-like rock in a grounding event. A new...

  12. Plasticity, Fracture and Friction in Steady-State Plate Cutting

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup; Wierzbicki, Tomasz

    1997-01-01

    A closed form solution to the problem of steady-state wedge cutting through a ductile metal plate is presented. The considered problem is an idealization of a ship bottom raking process, i.e. a continuous cutting damage of a ship bottom by a hard knife-like rock in a grounding event. A new kinema...

  13. SBWR Model for Steady-State and Transient Analysis

    Gilberto Espinosa-Paredes; Alejandro Nuñez-Carrera

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a model of a simplified boiling water reactor (SBWR) to analyze the steady-state and transient behavior. The SBWR model is based on approximations of lumped and distributed parameters to consider neutronics and natural circulation processes. The main components of the model are vessel dome, downcomer, lower plenum, core (ch...

  14. Dark Entangled Steady States of Interacting Rydberg Atoms

    Dasari, Durga; Mølmer, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    their short-lived excited states lead to rapid, dissipative formation of an entangled steady state. We show that for a wide range of physical parameters, this entangled state is formed on a time scale given by the strengths of coherent Raman and Rabi fields applied to the atoms, while it is only weakly...

  15. A displacement based FE formulation for steady state problems

    Yu, Yuhong

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis a new displacement based formulation is developed for elasto-plastic deformations in steady state problems. In this formulation the displacements are the primary variables, which is in contrast to the more common formulations in terms of the velocities as the primary variables. In a s

  16. On the steady states of weakly reversible chemical reaction networks

    Deng, Jian; Jones, Christopher; Feinberg, Martin; Nachman, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    A natural condition on the structure of the underlying chemical reaction network, namely weak reversibility, is shown to guarantee the existence of an equilibrium (steady state) in each positive stoichiometric compatibility class for the associated mass-action system. Furthermore, an index formula is given for the set of equilibria in a given stoichiometric compatibility class.

  17. Optimising performance in steady state for a supermarket refrigeration system

    Green, Torben; Kinnaert, Michel; Razavi-Far, Roozbeh; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    Using a supermarket refrigeration system as an illustrative example, the paper postulates that by appropriately utilising knowledge of plant operation, the plant wide performance can be optimised based on a small set of variables. Focusing on steady state operations, the total system performance is...

  18. Extending the quasi-steady state approximation by changing variables

    Borghans, J.A.M.; Boer, R.J. de; Segel, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    The parameter domain for which the quasi-steady state assumption is valid can be considerably extended merely by a simple change of variable. This is demonstrated for a variety of biologically significant examples taken from enzyme kinetics, immunology and ecology.

  19. Steady-State Pharmacokinetics of Bupropion SR in Juvenile Patients

    Daviss, W. Burleson; Perel, James M.; Rudolph, George R.; Axelson, David A.; Gilchrist, Richard; Nuss, Sharon; Birmaher, Boris; Brent, David A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine the steady-state pharmacokinetic properties of bupropion sustained release (SR) and their potential developmental differences in youths. Method: Eleven boys and eight girls aged 11 to 17 years old were prescribed bupropion SR monotherapy for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (n = 16) and/or depressive disorders (n =…

  20. Combined Steady-State and Dynamic Heat Exchanger Experiment

    Luyben, William L.; Tuzla, Kemal; Bader, Paul N.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a heat-transfer experiment that combines steady-state analysis and dynamic control. A process-water stream is circulated through two tube-in-shell heat exchangers in series. In the first, the process water is heated by steam. In the second, it is cooled by cooling water. The equipment is pilot-plant size: heat-transfer areas…

  1. Analysis of steady-state hydraulic tests in fractured rock

    A model for the analysis of steady-state hydraulic injection tests into single fractures of a rock-mass is presented, and solved analytically. It is used to obtain a probability distribution for the transmissivities of fractures in Cornish granite. (author)

  2. The Second Law of Steady State Thermodynamics for Nonequilibrium Quantum Dynamics

    Yukawa, Satoshi

    2001-01-01

    The second law of ordinary thermodynamics and the second law of steady state thermodynamics, as proposed by Oono and Paniconi, are investigated from the microscopic point of view for the open quantum system. Based on the H-theorem of Lindblad, we show that both second laws are consistent with the quantum dynamics generated by the completely positive map. In addition, microscopic expressions of entropy production and ``housekeeping heat'' are obtained for some classes of dynamical quantum syst...

  3. Persistent Probability Currents in Non-equilibrium Steady States

    Zia, Royce; Mellor, Andrew; Mobilia, Mauro; Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Weiss, Jeffrey

    For many interesting phenomena in nature, from all life forms to the global climate, the fundamental hypothesis of equilibrium statistical mechanics does not apply. Instead, they are perhaps better characterized by non-equilibrium steady states, evolving with dynamical rules which violate detailed balance. In particular, such dynamics leads to the existence of non-trivial, persistent probability currents - a principal characteristic of non-equilibrium steady states. In turn, they give rise to the notion of 'probability angular momentum'. Observable manifestations of such abstract concepts will be illustrated in two distinct contexts: a heterogeneous nonlinear voter model and our ocean heat content. Supported in part by grants from the Bloom Agency (Leeds, UK) and the US National Science Foundation: OCE-1245944. AM acknowledges the support of EPSRC Industrial CASE Studentship, Grant No. EP/L50550X/1.

  4. Steady-state propagation of interface corner crack

    Veluri, Badrinath; Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    2013-01-01

    Steady-state propagation of interface cracks close to three-dimensional corners has been analyzed. Attention was focused on modeling the shape of the interface crack front and calculating the critical stress for steady-state propagation of the crack. The crack propagation was investigated by...... estimating the fracture mechanics parameters that includes the strain energy release rate, crack front profiles and the three-dimensional mode-mixity along the interface crack front. A numerical approach was then applied for coupling the far field solutions based on the Finite Element Method to the near...... field (crack tip) solutions based on the J-integral. The adopted two-dimensional numerical approach for the calculation of fracture mechanical properties was compared with three-dimensional models for quarter-circular and straight sided crack front shapes. A quantitative approach was formulated based on...

  5. Steady states of the parametric rotator and pendulum

    Bouzas, Antonio O

    2011-01-01

    We discuss several steady-state rotation and oscillation modes of the planar parametric rotator and pendulum with damping. We consider a general elliptic trajectory of the suspension point for both rotator and pendulum, for the latter at an arbitrary angle with gravity, with linear and circular trajectories as particular cases. We treat the damped, non-linear equation of motion of the parametric rotator and pendulum perturbatively for small parametric excitation and damping, although our perturbative approach can be extended to other regimes as well. Our treatment involves only ordinary second-order differential equations with constant coefficients, and provides numerically accurate perturbative solutions in terms of elementary functions. Some of the steady-state rotation and oscillation modes studied here have not been discussed in the previous literature. Other well-known ones, such as parametric resonance and the inverted pendulum, are extended to elliptic parametric excitation tilted with respect to gravi...

  6. The Steady State Calculation for SMART with MIDAS/SMR

    KAERI is developing a new concept of reactor that all the main components such as the steam generator, the coolant pumps and the pressurizer are located inside the reactor vessel. Before the severe accident sequences are estimated, it is prerequisite that MIDAS code predicts the steady state conditions properly. But MIDAS code does not include the heat transfer model for the helical tube. Therefore, the heat transfer models for the helical tube from TASS/SMR-S were implemented into MIDAS code. To estimate the validity of the implemented heat transfer correlations for the helical tube and the input data, the steady state was recalculated with MIDAS/SMR based on design level 2 and compared with the design values

  7. The Steady State Calculation for SMART with MIDAS/SMR

    Park, Jong Hwa; Kim, Dong Ha; Chung, Young Jong; Park, Sun Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seong Won [KORTIC, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    KAERI is developing a new concept of reactor that all the main components such as the steam generator, the coolant pumps and the pressurizer are located inside the reactor vessel. Before the severe accident sequences are estimated, it is prerequisite that MIDAS code predicts the steady state conditions properly. But MIDAS code does not include the heat transfer model for the helical tube. Therefore, the heat transfer models for the helical tube from TASS/SMR-S were implemented into MIDAS code. To estimate the validity of the implemented heat transfer correlations for the helical tube and the input data, the steady state was recalculated with MIDAS/SMR based on design level 2 and compared with the design values

  8. Nonequilibrium Steady States of a Stochastic Model System.

    Zhang, Qiwei

    We study the nonequilibrium steady state of a stochastic lattice gas model, originally proposed by Katz, Lebowitz and Spohn (Phys. Rev. B 28: 1655 (1983)). Firstly, we solve the model on some small lattices exactly in order to see the general dependence of the steady state upon different parameters of the model. Nextly, we derive some analytical results for infinite lattice systems by taking some suitable limits. We then present some renormalization group results for the continuum version of the model via field theoretical techniques, the supersymmetry of the critical dynamics in zero field is also explored. Finally, we report some very recent 3-D Monte Carlo simulation results, which have been obtained by applying Multi-Spin-Coding techniques on a CDC vector supercomputer - Cyber 205 at John von Neumann Center.

  9. Steady-state current transfer and scattering theory.

    Ben-Moshe, Vered; Rai, Dhurba; Skourtis, Spiros S; Nitzan, Abraham

    2010-08-01

    The correspondence between the steady-state theory of current transfer and scattering theory in a system of coupled tight-binding models of one-dimensional wires is explored. For weak interwire coupling both calculations give nearly identical results, except at singular points associated with band edges. The effect of decoherence in each of these models is studied using a generalization of the Liouville-von Neuman equation suitable for steady-state situations. An example of a single impurity model is studied in detail, leading to a lattice model of scattering off target that affects both potential scattering and decoherence. For an impurity level lying inside the energy band, the transmission coefficient diminishes with increasing dephasing rate, while the opposite holds for impurity energy outside the band. The efficiency of current transfer in the coupled wire system decreases with increasing dephasing. PMID:20707524

  10. Theory of minimum dissipation of energy for the steady state

    The magnetic configuration of an inductively driven steady-state plasma bounded by a surface (or two adjacent surfaces) on which B·n = 0 is force-free: ∇xB = 2αB, where α is a constant, in time and in space. α is the ratio of the Poynting flux to the magnetic helicity flux at the boundary. It is also the ratio of the dissipative rates of the magnetic energy to the magnetic helicity in the plasma. The spatial extent of the configuration is noninfinitesimal. This global constraint is a result of the requirement that, for a steady-state plasma, the rate of change of the vector potential, ∂A/∂t, is constant in time and uniform in space

  11. Turnover of messenger RNA: Polysome statistics beyond the steady state

    Valleriani, A.; Ignatova, Z.; Nagar, A.; Lipowsky, R.

    2010-03-01

    The interplay between turnover or degradation and ribosome loading of messenger RNA (mRNA) is studied theoretically using a stochastic model that is motivated by recent experimental results. Random mRNA degradation affects the statistics of polysomes, i.e., the statistics of the number of ribosomes per mRNA as extracted from cells. Since ribosome loading of newly created mRNA chains requires some time to reach steady state, a fraction of the extracted mRNA/ribosome complexes does not represent steady state conditions. As a consequence, the mean ribosome density obtained from the extracted complexes is found to be inversely proportional to the mRNA length. On the other hand, the ribosome density profile shows an exponential decrease along the mRNA for prokaryotes and becomes uniform in eukaryotic cells.

  12. Steady State Dynamic Operating Behavior of Universal Motor

    Muhammad Khan Burdi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A detailed investigation of the universal motor is developed and used for various dynamic steady state and transient operating conditions of loads. In the investigation, output torque, motor speed, input current, input/output power and efficiency are computed, compared and analyzed for different loads. While this paper discusses the steady-state behavior of the universal motor, another companion paper, ?Transient dynamic behavior of universal motor?, will discuss its transient behavior in detail. A non-linear generalized electric machine model of the motor is considered for the analysis. This study was essential to investigate effect of output load on input current, power, speed and efficiency of the motor during operations. Previously such investigation is not known

  13. Steady-state Physics, Effective Temperature Dynamics in Holography

    Kundu, Arnab

    2013-01-01

    Using the gauge-gravity duality, we argue that for a certain class of out-of-equilibrium steady-state systems in contact with a heat bath at a given temperature, the macroscopic physics can be captured by an effective thermodynamic description. The steady-state is obtained by applying a constant electric field that results in a stationary current flow. Within holography, we consider generic probe systems where an open string equivalence principle and an open string metric govern the effective thermodynamics. This description comes equipped with an effective temperature, which is larger than the bath temperature, and a corresponding effective entropy. For conformal or scale-invariant theories, certain scaling behaviours follow immediately. In general, in the large electric field limit, this effective temperature is also observed to obey certain generic relations with various physical parameters in the system.

  14. Steady state test on PWR steam generator thermohydraulics

    Experimental activity on U-tube steam generator thermal hydraulics is under way at CISE and SIET in the framework of ENEA's LWR safety research programme. The test section includes 9 tubes. Hot side and cold side can be separated simulated, with primary and secondary fluid in full thermalhydraulic conditions. The experimental matrix includes: steady state tests (in both adiabatic and diabatic conditions); transients tests that simulate various accidents. Some steady state tests are reported. The secondary side average density, measured by the quick closing valve technique can be accurately calculated by the Zuber-Dix and Zuber-Rohuani correlations. Continuous pressure drops can be very well predicted by an adapted version of Thom correlation and CISE DIF-3 correlation: the development of an empirical correlation was, instead, necessary for assessment of the local pressure drops across spacer grids

  15. Simulation of Power Electronic Converters Using Quasi Steady State Approximation

    Predrag Pejović

    2012-01-01

    A new method to compute voltage and current waveforms of power electronic converters is proposed in the paper. The method relies on simulation result of averaged circuit model, and superimposes the ripple of the inductor currents to the obtained average values, assuming that the linear ripple approximation applies. To determine the amplitude of the switching ripple, a quasi steady state approximation is proposed. After the inductor currents are obtained, currents of switching components are c...

  16. A Steady State Tokamak Operation by Use of Magnetic Monopoles

    Narihara, K.

    1991-01-01

    A steady state tokamak operation based on a magnetic monopole circuit is considered. Circulation of a chain of iron cubes which trap magnetic monopoles generates the needed loop voltage. The monopole circuit is enclosed by a series of solenoid coils in which the magnetic field is feedback controlled so that the force on the circuit balance against the mechanical friction. The driving power is supplied through the current sources of poloidal, ohmic and solenoid coils. The current drive efficie...

  17. Non-equilibrium steady states for chains of four rotors

    Cuneo, Noé; Eckmann, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We study a chain of four interacting rotors (rotators) connected at both ends to stochastic heat baths at different temperatures. We show that for non-degenerate interaction potentials the system relaxes, at a stretched exponential rate, to a non-equilibrium steady state (NESS). Rotors with high energy tend to decouple from their neighbors due to fast oscillation of the forces. Because of this, the energy of the central two rotors, which interact with the heat baths only through the external ...

  18. Steady-State Oscillations in Resonant Electrostatic Vibration Energy Harvesters

    Blokhina, Elena; Galayko, Dimitri; Basset, Philippe; Feely, Orla

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a formal analysis and description of the steady-state behavior of an electrostatic vibration energy harvester operating in constant-charge mode and using different types of electromechanical transducers. The method predicts parameter values required to start oscillations, allows a study of the dynamics of the transient process, and provides a rigorous description of the system, necessary for further investigation of the related nonlinear phenomena and for the optimis...

  19. Steady State Plasma Accelerators and their Applications in Thermonuclear Research

    Steady state plasma accelerators make it possible in principle to obtain plasma fluxes of high energy and large flow rate. This is of interest in thermonuclear research for two reasons. Firstly, the accelerator can be used for injecting plasma into existing traps; secondly, it can be used to design new-types of thermonuclear reactors, which might be referred to as, ''Flow-type Reactors'' in which a positive yield is-realised during the time the material passes through the reactor system. The main types of accelerating mechanisms operating in this accelerator are described and a brief review is given of theoretical, numerical and experimental investigations carried out by the author and his colleagues. The numerical and theoretical analysis of the processes taking place in coaxial steady state accelerators revealed the possible existence of steady-state compressive flows during which the applied electromagnetic energy is not converted into kinetic plasma energy but is used for compression of the plasma. When the compressed flow is allowed to expand its thermal energy is converted into kinetic energy. Devices in which compressive flow is attained are referred to as magnetic plasma compressors. At the present stage the existence of compressive flows has been confirmed experimentally. To ensure a positive yield in-the region of compression a density of 1020 - 1020 cm-3 is essential. The possibility of obtaining a positive yield in linear ''Flow type Reactors'' is discussed. Such reactors consist of magnetic plasma guides of length ∼ 100 m, in which a flow of hot plasma is produced by a steady state plasma accelerator. (author)

  20. Optimization of steady-state beam-driven tokamak reactors

    Recent developments in neutral beam technology prompt us to reconsider the prospects for steady-state tokamak reactors. A mathematical reactor model is developed that includes the physics of beam-driven currents and reactor power balance, as well as reactor and beam system costs. This model is used to find the plasma temperatures that minimize the reactor cost per unit of net electrical output. The optimum plasma temperatures are nearly independent of β and are roughly twice as high as the optimum temperatures for ignited reactors. If beams of neutral deuterium atoms with near-optimum energies of 1 to 2 MeV are used to drive the current in a reactor the size of the International Tokamak Reactor, then the optimum temperatures are typically T /SUB e/ approx. = 12 to 15 keV and T /SUB i/ approx. = 17 to 21 keV for a wide range of model parameters. Net electrical output rises rapidly with increasing deuterium beam energy for E /SUB b/ less than or equal to 400 keV, but rises only slowly above E /SUB b/ about 1 MeV. We estimate that beam-driven steady-state reactors could be economically competitive with pulsed-ignition reactors if cyclic-loading problems limit the toroidal magnetic field strength of pulsed reactors to less than or equal to 85% of that allowed in steady-state reactors

  1. Transient and steady-state currents in epoxy resin

    Charging and discharging currents have been measured in a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A epoxy resin with and without silica fillers, below and above its glass transition temperature Tg = 65 deg. C. Both transient and steady-state current densities have been analysed. The average applied fields ranged from 3 to 35 kV mm-1 with a sample thickness of 0.5 mm. Above Tg, transient currents suggested a phenomenon of charge injection forming trapped space charges even at low fields. Steady-state currents confirmed that the behaviour was not Ohmic and suggested Schottky-type injection. Below Tg, the current is not controlled by the metal-dielectric interface but by the conduction in the volume: the current is Ohmic at low fields and both transient and steady-state currents suggest a phenomenon of space-charge limited currents at high fields. The field threshold is similar in the filler-free and the filled resin. Values in the range 12-17 kV mm-1 have been measured

  2. SBWR Model for Steady-State and Transient Analysis

    Gilberto Espinosa-Paredes

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model of a simplified boiling water reactor (SBWR to analyze the steady-state and transient behavior. The SBWR model is based on approximations of lumped and distributed parameters to consider neutronics and natural circulation processes. The main components of the model are vessel dome, downcomer, lower plenum, core (channel and fuel, upper plenum, pressure, and level controls. Further consideration of the model is the natural circulation path in the internal circuit of the reactor, which governs the safety performance of the SBWR. To demonstrate the applicability of the model, the predictions were compared with plant data, manufacturer_s predictions, and RELAP5 under steady-state and transient conditions of a typical BWR. In steady-state conditions, the profiles of the main variables of the SBWR core such as superficial velocity, void fraction, temperatures, and convective heat transfer coefficient are presented and analyzed. The transient behavior of SBWR was analyzed during the closure of all main steam line isolation valves (MSIVs. Our results in this transient show that the cooling system due to natural circulation in the SBWR is around 70% of the rated core flow. According to the results shown here, one of the main conclusions of this work is that the simplified model could be very helpful in the licensing process.

  3. Towards steady-state tokamak operation with double transport barriers

    Internal Transport Barriers characteristic for the Optimised Shear regime and an edge transport barrier of an ELMy H-mode regime have been superposed in the Double Barrier mode. In DT discharges the Double Barrier mode has resulted in 50% higher fusion power output and a factor 2 higher fusion gain Q than in conventional sawtoothing steady-state ELMy H-mode plasmas. Steady-state conditions in temperature and density profiles have been approached in Double Barrier discharges in deuterium. The Double Barrier mode has been routinely established in the new Gas Box divertor configuration on JET. Off-axis LHCD has been used for current profile control during the high performance phase. In preparation of a new DTE2 campaign on JET the potential of the Double Barrier mode for sustained high fusion performance has been explored in modelling studies. Steady-state operation on ITER has been studied in transport code modelling for Advanced Tokamak scenarios in the Double Barrier mode. (author)

  4. Transient and steady-state currents in epoxy resin

    Guillermin, Christophe [Schneider Electric Industries S.A.S., 37 quai Paul-Louis Merlin, 38050 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Rain, Pascal [Laboratoire d' Electrostatique et de Materiaux Dielectriques (LEMD), CNRS, 25 avenue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Rowe, Stephen W [Schneider Electric Industries S.A.S., 37 quai Paul-Louis Merlin, 38050 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2006-02-07

    Charging and discharging currents have been measured in a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A epoxy resin with and without silica fillers, below and above its glass transition temperature T{sub g} = 65 deg. C. Both transient and steady-state current densities have been analysed. The average applied fields ranged from 3 to 35 kV mm{sup -1} with a sample thickness of 0.5 mm. Above T{sub g}, transient currents suggested a phenomenon of charge injection forming trapped space charges even at low fields. Steady-state currents confirmed that the behaviour was not Ohmic and suggested Schottky-type injection. Below T{sub g}, the current is not controlled by the metal-dielectric interface but by the conduction in the volume: the current is Ohmic at low fields and both transient and steady-state currents suggest a phenomenon of space-charge limited currents at high fields. The field threshold is similar in the filler-free and the filled resin. Values in the range 12-17 kV mm{sup -1} have been measured.

  5. Steady state theta pinch concept for slow formation of FRC

    A steady state high beta plasma flow through a channel along the magnetic field increasing downstream can be regarded as a ''steady state theta pinch'', because if we see the plasma riding on the flow we should observe very similar process taking place in a theta pinch. Anticipating to produce an FRC without using very high voltage technics such as the ones required in a conventional theta pinch, we have studied after the analogy a ''steady state reversed field theta pinch'' which is brought about by steady head-on collision of counter plasma streams along the channel as ejected from two identical co-axial plasma sources mounted at the both ends of the apparatus. The ideal Poisson and shock adiabatic flow models are employed for the analysis of the steady colliding process. It is demonstrated that an FRC involving large numbers of particles is produced only by the weak shock mode which is achieved in case energetic plasma flow is decelerated almost to be stagnated through Poisson adiabatic process before the streams are collided. (author)

  6. Optimization of steady-state beam-driven tokamak reactors

    Recent developments in neutral beam technology prompt us to reconsider the prospects for steady-state tokamak reactors. A mathematical reactor model is developed which includes the physics of beam-driven currents and reactor power balance, as well as reactor and beam system costs. This model is used to find the plasma temperatures which minimize the reactor cost per unit of net electrical output. The optimum plasma temperatures are nearly independent of β and are roughly twice as high as the optimum temperatures for ignited reactors. If beams of neutral deuterium atoms with near-optimum energies of 1 to 2 MeV are used to drive the current in an INTOR-sized reactor, then the optimum temperatures are typically T/sub e/ approx. = 12 to 15 keV and T/sub i/ approx. = keV for a wide range of model parameters. Net electrical output rises rapidly with increasing deuterium beam energy for E/sub b/ less than or equal to 400 keV, but rises only slowly above E/sub b/ approx. 1 MeV. We estimate that beam-driven steady-state reactors could be economically competitive with pulsed-ignition reactors if cyclic-loading problems limit the toroidal magnetic field strength of pulsed reactors to less than or equal to 85% of that allowed in steady-state reactors

  7. Multiple steady-state solutions for a two-phase natural circulation loop with subcooled boiling

    The present study derives a transcendental equation for mass flow rate in a simple two-phase natural circulation loop using the drift flux two-phase flow thermal nonequilibrium model. The representative power and loop mass flow rate are derived and used to normalize the equation. The nondimensional parameters affecting steady-state loop flow rate are thus identified and their effects are studied. Two regions of multiple steady-state solutions of loop mass flow rate at a given power are found. The first one is near the incipient power for two-phase flow. The other region of multiple solutions appears at high powers, in which, typically, three flow rates exist at a given power. One of them is very low and dryout in the loop could occur. In addition, the existence of multiple solutions implies hysteresis effect. Heating and cooling processes will have different path for mass flow rate as a function of power. (author)

  8. THE APPARENT VISCOSITY OF SEMI-SOLID AZ91D ALLOY AT STEADY STATE

    Z.S. Zhen; W.M. Mao; S.J. Yan; A.M. Zhao; C.L. CuI; X.Y. Zhong

    2002-01-01

    The Rheological behavior of semi-solid AZ91D at steady state is studied using a Couettetype viscometer in the present paper. The results show that the apparent viscosity ofsemi-solid AZ91D at the steady state increases with the solid fraction increasing, andgoes up sharply when the solid fraction reaches a certain value, which is called criticalfraction. In addition, the apparent viscosity of semi-solid AZ91D at the steady statetakes on a distinct downtrend with the shearing rate increasing, which indicates astrong shear thinning property. In addition, the critical solid fraction becomes higherunder larger shearing rate, owing to the more globular shape of the solid particles.Based on the present experiment results, an empirical equation is built as that, relatingthe steady state apparent viscosity of semi-solid AZ91D with the solid fraction fs andshearing rate γ at the same time: ηapp=10. 74exp(6.95fs)γ-0.86.

  9. Relation between beam driven seed-current and rotation in steady state FRC

    We consider an field steady state reversed configuration whose current is maintained by a steady state beam. Without quadrupole fields, back current can be inhibited by the Ohkawa effect if Z/sub b/ < Z/sub eff/, where Z/sub b/ and Z/sub eff/ are the beam charge number and effective charge number of background ions. However, the resulting rotation of the plasma often leads to instability. For systems, with a large bootstrap effect, the rotation can be moderate, but it is then difficult to contain fusion products. An additional problem is that the Ohkawa effect due to alpha particles tends to dissemble the equilibrium. It has previously been shown that the presence of a quadrupole field inhibit back current. Here we show that a steady state flux can be maintained with moderate input power in both reactors and present day experiments with the resulting rotation slow enough to fulfill stability conditions. However, experimental means must be devised to supply a continual source of particles and additional energy. 17 refs., 3 figs

  10. Data system design considerations for a pseudo-steady-state device

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility is being designed to run in a steady state. This places stringent requirements on a data system, since it must provide steady-state support that is equivalent to the support users are accustomed to from pulsed experiments; i.e., enough capacity to reduce diagnostic data for live presentation. Parameters such as density, position, and temperature must be presented live (i.e., within 0.1 s). Quantities such as plasma shape or internal structure should be available with a minimum of delay. The traditional solution to providing such capabilities is to use distributed processing to off-load data acquisition from the analysis computers. However, this suffers in a real-time environment because of the necessity of moving large quantities of data from acquisition to analysis. We expect to solve the problem by using a pipelined design that will acquire data directly into shared memory, where any one of four CPU's (VAX 11/780's) can proceed with analysis

  11. Phase-sensitive fat suppression steady-state free procession sequence with phase correction

    Zu Zhong-Liang; Zhou Kun; Zhang Shi-Gang; Gao Song; Bao Shang-Lian

    2008-01-01

    Robust and fast fat suppression is a challenge in balanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) magnetic resonance imaging.Although single-acquisition phase-sensitive SSFP can provide fat-suppressed images in short scan time,phase errors,especially spatially-dependent phase shift,caused by a variety of factors may result in misplacement of fat and water voxels.In this paper,a novel phase correction algorithm was used to calibrate those phase errors during image reconstruction.This algorithm corrects phase by region growing,employing both the magnitude and the phase information of image pixels.Phantom and in vivo imagings were performed to validate the technique.As a result,excellent fat-suppressed images were acquired by using single-acquisition phase-seusitive SSFP with phase correction.

  12. A Data Filter for Identifying Steady-State Operating Points in Engine Flight Data for Condition Monitoring Applications

    Simon, Donald L.; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm that automatically identifies and extracts steady-state engine operating points from engine flight data. It calculates the mean and standard deviation of select parameters contained in the incoming flight data stream. If the standard deviation of the data falls below defined constraints, the engine is assumed to be at a steady-state operating point, and the mean measurement data at that point are archived for subsequent condition monitoring purposes. The fundamental design of the steady-state data filter is completely generic and applicable for any dynamic system. Additional domain-specific logic constraints are applied to reduce data outliers and variance within the collected steady-state data. The filter is designed for on-line real-time processing of streaming data as opposed to post-processing of the data in batch mode. Results of applying the steady-state data filter to recorded helicopter engine flight data are shown, demonstrating its utility for engine condition monitoring applications.

  13. Steady state free radical budgets and ozone photochemistry during TOPSE

    Cantrell, Christopher A.; Mauldin, L.; Zondlo, M.; Eisele, F.; Kosciuch, E.; Shetter, R.; Lefer, B.; Hall, S.; Campos, T.; Ridley, B.; Walega, J.; Fried, A.; Wert, B.; Flocke, F.; Weinheimer, A.; Hannigan, J.; Coffey, M.; Atlas, E.; Stephens, S.; Heikes, B.; Snow, J.; Blake, D.; Blake, N.; Katzenstein, A.; Lopez, J.; Browell, E. V.; Dibb, J.; Scheuer, E.; Seid, G.; Talbot, R.

    2003-02-01

    A steady state model, constrained by a number of measured quantities, was used to derive peroxy radical levels for the conditions of the Tropospheric Ozone Production about the Spring Equinox (TOPSE) campaign. The analysis is made using data collected aboard the NCAR/NSF C-130 aircraft from February through May 2000 at latitudes from 40° to 85°N, and at altitudes from the surface to 7.6 km. HO2 + RO2 radical concentrations were measured during the experiment, which are compared with model results over the domain of the study showing good agreement on the average. Average measurement/model ratios are 1.04 (σ = 0.73) and 0.96 (σ = 0.52) for the MLB and HLB, respectively. Budgets of total peroxy radical levels as well as of individual free radical members were constructed, which reveal interesting differences compared to studies at lower latitudes. The midlatitude part of the study region is a significant net source of ozone, while the high latitudes constitute a small net sink leading to the hypothesis that transport from the middle latitudes can explain the observed increase in ozone in the high latitudes. Radical reservoir species concentrations are modeled and compared with the observations. For most conditions, the model does a good job of reproducing the formaldehyde observations, but the peroxide observations are significantly less than steady state for this study. Photostationary state (PSS) derived total peroxy radical levels and NO/NO2 ratios are compared with the measurements and the model; PSS-derived results are higher than observations or the steady state model at low NO concentrations.

  14. Mimicking Nonequilibrium Steady States with Time-Periodic Driving

    Raz, O.; Subaşı, Y.; Jarzynski, C.

    2016-04-01

    Under static conditions, a system satisfying detailed balance generically relaxes to an equilibrium state in which there are no currents. To generate persistent currents, either detailed balance must be broken or the system must be driven in a time-dependent manner. A stationary system that violates detailed balance evolves to a nonequilibrium steady state (NESS) characterized by fixed currents. Conversely, a system that satisfies instantaneous detailed balance but is driven by the time-periodic variation of external parameters—also known as a stochastic pump (SP)—reaches a periodic state with nonvanishing currents. In both cases, these currents are maintained at the cost of entropy production. Are these two paradigmatic scenarios effectively equivalent? For discrete-state systems, we establish a mapping between nonequilibrium stationary states and stochastic pumps. Given a NESS characterized by a particular set of stationary probabilities, currents, and entropy production rates, we show how to construct a SP with exactly the same (time-averaged) values. The mapping works in the opposite direction as well. These results establish a proof of principle: They show that stochastic pumps are able to mimic the behavior of nonequilibrium steady states, and vice versa, within the theoretical framework of discrete-state stochastic thermodynamics. Nonequilibrium steady states and stochastic pumps are often used to model, respectively, biomolecular motors driven by chemical reactions and artificial molecular machines steered by the variation of external, macroscopic parameters. Our results loosely suggest that anything a biomolecular machine can do, an artificial molecular machine can do equally well. We illustrate this principle by showing that kinetic proofreading, a NESS mechanism that explains the low error rates in biochemical reactions, can be effectively mimicked by a constrained periodic driving.

  15. Quantum-classical correspondence in steady states of nonadiabatic systems

    We first present nonadiabatic path integral which is exact formulation of quantum dynamics in nonadiabatic systems. Then, by applying the stationary phase approximations to the nonadiabatic path integral, a semiclassical quantization condition, i.e., quantum-classical correspondence, for steady states of nonadiabatic systems is presented as a nonadiabatic trace formula. The present quantum-classical correspondence indicates that a set of primitive hopping periodic orbits, which are invariant under time evolution in the phase space of the slow degree of freedom, should be quantized. The semiclassical quantization is then applied to a simple nonadiabatic model and accurately reproduces exact quantum energy levels

  16. Curva de Laffer para Portugal, perspetiva de steady state

    Azevedo, Diogo Ricardo Reis

    2014-01-01

    São analisadas as receitas de imposto sobre o trabalho, consumo e capital, em termos de curva de Laffer, através da aplicação de um modelo neoclássico, especialmente calibrado para a economia Portuguesa, envolvendo o período de tempo de 1995 a 2012. Foi encontrada a evidência, robusta, de curvas de Laffer para a tributação sobre o trabalho e capital. Este estudo concluiu que Portugal tem margem para aumentar impostos, numa perspetiva de steady state, sendo que Portugal pode aumentar a sua rec...

  17. Skewness of steady-state current fluctuations in nonequilibrium systems

    Belousov, Roman; Cohen, E. G. D.; Wong, Chun-Shang; Goree, John A.; Feng, Yan

    2016-04-01

    A skewness of the probability for instantaneous current fluctuations, in a nonequilibrium steady state, is observed experimentally in a dusty plasma. This skewness is attributed to the spatial asymmetry, which is imminent to the nonequilibrium systems due to the external hydrodynamic gradient. Using the modern framework of the large deviation theory, we extend the Onsager-Machlup ansatz for equilibrium fluctuations to systems with a preferred spatial direction, and provide a modulated Gaussian probability distribution, which is tested by simulations. This probability distribution is also of potential interest for other statistical disciplines. Connections with the principles of statistical mechanics, due to Boltzmann and Gibbs, are discussed as well.

  18. Control algorithms for quasi-steady-state reactor operation

    Specialized algorithms for digitally controlling the quasi-steady-state operation of reactors can be derived from the well-known neutron and energy balance equations for reactors. Utilizing the appropriate assumptions, these equations can be reduced to yield the classical proportional-integral-derivative feedback control approach. This method may be applied to single- or multiple-region reactors to control fuel temperature or neutron flux by manipulating system reactivity, specifically control rod reactivity. This paper discusses the development of single- and multiple-region flux and temperature control as well as numerical and experimental testing of these algorithms

  19. Steady-state Compartmentalization of Lipid Membranes by Active Proteins

    Sabra, Mads Christian; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1998-01-01

    -protein assembly reorganizes into a steady-state structure with a typical length scale determined by the strength of the external drive. In the specific case of a mixed dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine-distearoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer in the gel-fluid coexistence region, it is shown explicitly by computer...... conformational excitations governed by an external drive, and the deexcitation is controlled by interaction of the protein with its lipid surroundings. In response to the flux of energy into the proteins from the environment and the subsequent dissipation of energy into the lipid bilayer, the lipid...

  20. Steady-State Plasmas in KT5D Magnetized Torus

    ZHU Zhenhua; LIU Wandong; WAN Baonian; ZHAO Yanping; LI Jiangang; YAN Longwen; YANG Qingwei; DING Xuantong; XU Min; YU Yi; WANG Zhijiang; LU Ronghua; WEN Yizhi; YU Changxuan; MA Jinxiu; WAN Shude

    2007-01-01

    Steady-state plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) wave in the KT5D magnetized torus was studied using a fast high-resolution camera and Langmuir probes. It was found that both the discharge patterns taken by the camera and the plasma parameters measured by the probes were very sensitive to the working gas pressure and the magnetic configuration of the torus both without and with vertical fields. There existed fast vertical motion of the plasma. Tentative discussion is presented about the observed phenomena such as the bright resonance layer at a high gas pressure and the wave absorption mechanism at a low pressure. Further explanations should be found.

  1. Steady State of the Dusty Plasma in a dc Discharge

    马锦秀; 郁明阳; 梁小平; 郑坚; 刘万东; 俞昌旋

    2002-01-01

    The steady state formed by the diffusion of plasma particles in an inhomogeneous dusty plasma is investigated theoretically and compared with our previous experimental results /Nucl. Fusion Plasma Phys. 20(2000)180 (in Chinese); Phys. Plasmas 8(2001)1459]. The negatively charged dust grains with an average charge number of the order of 105 on a single grain enhance the plasma inhomogeneity by decreasing the diffusion velocity, and can cause significant depletion of electrons. The theoretical electron density profile is in good agreement with the experiment, and the theoretical profile of the electron-to-ion density ratio is in reasonable agreement with experimentally estimated data.

  2. Long Pulse Operation on Tore-Supra: Towards Steady State

    The experimental programme of Tore Supra is devoted to the study of technology and physics issues associated to long-duration high performance discharges. This new domain of operation requires simultaneously and in steady state: heat removal capability, particle exhaust, fully non-inductive current drive, advanced technology integration and real time plasma control. The long discharge allows for addressing new time scale physic such as the wall particle retention and erosion. Moreover, the physics of fully non-inductive discharges is full of novelty, namely: the MHD stability, the slow spontaneous oscillation of the central electron temperature or the outstanding inward particle pinch

  3. Steady-state and transient wellbore temperatures during drilling

    McDonald, W.J.

    1976-05-20

    An extensive literature search was made to locate technical publications and computer programs relating to wellbore temperatures during drilling operations. Publications obtained are listed in the References. Two approaches were used in calculating borehole temperatures: The steady state solution of Holmes and Swift was programmed and 2100 cases calculated for various borehole configurations. For transient temperature studies, Exxon Production Research Co. made calculations for ten borehole configurations under subcontract. These calculations emphasize the need for better high temperature bit performance and improved engineering procedures in drilling.

  4. Literature review: Steady-state modelling of loop heat pipes

    Siedel, B.; Sartre, V.; Lefèvre, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Loop heat pipes (LHPs) are efficient and reliable heat transfer systems whose operation is based on the liquid–vapour phase-change phenomenon. They use the capillary pressure generated in a porous structure to passively circulate the fluid from a heat source to a heat sink. In this paper, an exhaustive literature review is carried out in order to investigate the existing steady-state models of LHPs. These models can be divided into three categories: numerical models of the entire system, nume...

  5. Analysis of steady-state ductile crack growth

    Niordson, Christian

    1999-01-01

    The fracture strength under quasi-static steady-state crack growth in an elastic-plastic material joined by a laser weld is analyzed. Laser welding gives high mismatch between the yield stress within the weld and the yield stress in the base material. This is due to the fast termic cycle, which the...... fracture zone. Both models predict that in general a thinner laser weld gives higher interface strength. Furthermore, both fracture criteria show, that the preferred path of the crack is close outside the weld material; a phenomenon also observed in experiments....

  6. Steady-state organization of binary mixtures by active impurities

    Sabra, Mads Christian; Gilhøj, Henriette; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1998-01-01

    The structural reorganization of a phase-separated binary mixture in the presence of an annealed dilution of active impurities is studied by computer-simulation techniques via a simple two-dimensional lattice-gas model. The impurities, each of which has two internal states with different affinity...... for the two species, become active by an external driving of a transition between the two impurity states, leading to an energy flow from the impurities into the binary mixture. In steady state, the drive is found to break down the phase-separated state and lead to a new finite length scale controlled...

  7. Steady-state capabilities for hydroturbines with OpenFOAM

    The availability of a high quality Open Source CFD simulation platform like OpenFOAM offers new R and D opportunities by providing direct access to models and solver implementation details. Efforts have been made by Hydro-Quebec to adapt OpenFOAM to hydroturbines for the development of steady-state capabilities. The paper describes the developments that have been made to implement new turbomachinery related capabilities: Multiple Frame of Reference solver, domain coupling interfaces (GGI, cyclicGGI and mixing plane) and specialized boundary conditions. Practical use of the new turbomachinery capabilities are demonstrated for the analysis of a 195-MW Francis hydroturbine.

  8. Scaling of the steady state and stability behaviour of single and two-phase natural circulation systems

    Scaling methods for both single-phase and two-phase natural circulation systems have been presented. For single-phase systems, simulation of the steady state flow can be achieved by preserving just one nondimensional parameter. For uniform diameter two-phase systems also, it is possible to simulate the steady state behaviour with just one non-dimensional parameter. Simulation of the stability behaviour requires geometric similarity in addition to the similarity of the physical parameters appearing in the governing equations. The scaling laws proposed have been tested with experimental data in case of single-phase natural circulation. (author)

  9. Steady-state operation of spheromaks by inductive techniques

    A method to maintain a steady-state spheromak configuration inductively using the S-1 Spheromak device is described. The S-1 Spheromak formation apparatus can be utilized to inject magnetic helicity continuously (C.W., not pulsed or D.C.) into the spheromak configuration after equilibrium is achieved in the linked mode of operation. Oscillation of both poloidal- and toroidal-field currents in the flux core (psi-phi Pumping), with proper phasing, injects a net time-averaged helicity into the plasma. Steady-state maintenance relies on flux conversion, which has been earlier identified. Relevant experimental data from the operation of S-1 are described. Helicity flow has been measured and the proposed injection scheme simulated. In a reasonable time practical voltages and frequencies can inject an amount of helicity comparable to that in the initial plasma. Plasma currents can be maintained or increased. This pumping technique is similar to F-THETA Pumping of a Reversed-Field-Pinch but is applied to this inverse-pinch formation

  10. A steady-state measurement system for total hemispherical emissivity

    A steady-state calorimetric technique was developed for measuring the total hemispherical emissivity of a conductive material. The system uses a thin strip of the conductive sample electrically heated by alternating current to high temperatures in a vacuum chamber. The emissivity was measured in a central region of the sample with an approximately uniform temperature distribution. Considering the influences of the gray body assumption, wire heat losses, effects of residual gas and conductive heat loss from the region to the rest of the strip, the emissivity was accurately determined by solving the inverse one-dimension steady-state heat transfer problem. The emissivities of various metal samples (nickel and 45# steel) were measured to verify the system accuracy. And the results were then analyzed to estimate the relative errors of emissivity arising from the gray body assumption, wire heat losses, effects of residual gas, non-uniform temperature distribution and the measurement uncertainty of emissivity. In the temperature range from 700 to 1300 K, the accuracy is acceptable for practical applications within the total measurement uncertainties of 1.1%. To increase the system applicability, some issues related to sample specifications, heating power control and temperature uniformity of sample test section were discussed. Thus, this system can provide accurate measurements of the total hemispherical emissivity of conductive samples at high temperatures. (paper)

  11. Concept study of the Steady State Tokamak Reactor (SSTR)

    The Steady State Tokamak Reactor (SSTR) concept has been proposed as a realistic fusion power reactor to be built in the near future. An overall concept of SSTR is introduced which is based on a small extension of the present day physics and technologies. The major feature of SSTR is the maximum utilization of a bootstrap current in order to reduce the power required for the steady state operation. This requirement leads to the choice of moderate current (12 MA), and high βp (2.0) for the device, which are achieved by selecting high aspect ratio (A=4) and high toroidal magnetic field (16.5 T). A negative-ion-based neutral beam injection system is used both for heating and central current drive. Notable engineering features of SSTR are: the use of a uniform vacuum vessel and periodical replacements of the first wall and blanket layers and significant reduction of the electromagnetic force with the use of functionally gradient material. It is shown that a tokamak machine comparable to ITER in size can become a power reactor capable of generating about 1 GW of electricity with a plant efficiency of ∼30%. (author)

  12. Steady states of the parametric rotator and pendulum

    We discuss several steady-state rotation and oscillation modes of the planar parametric rotator and pendulum with damping. We consider a general elliptic trajectory of the suspension point for both rotator and pendulum, for the latter at an arbitrary angle with gravity, with linear and circular trajectories as particular cases. We treat the damped, nonlinear equation of motion of the parametric rotator and pendulum perturbatively for small parametric excitation and damping, although our perturbative approach can be extended to other regimes as well. Our treatment involves only ordinary second-order differential equations with constant coefficients, and provides numerically accurate perturbative solutions in terms of elementary functions. Some of the steady-state rotation and oscillation modes studied here have not been discussed in the previous literature. Other well-known ones, such as parametric resonance and the inverted pendulum, are extended to elliptic parametric excitation tilted with respect to gravity. The results presented here should be accessible to advanced undergraduates, and of interest to graduate students and specialists in the field of nonlinear mechanics.

  13. Plasma control issues for an advanced steady state tokamak reactor

    This paper deals with specific control issues related to the advanced tokamak scenarios in which rather accurate tailoring of the current density profile is a requirement in connection with the steady state operation of a reactor in a high confinement optimized shear mode. It is found that adequate current profile control can be performed if real-time magnetic flux reconstruction is available through a set of dedicated diagnostics and computers, with sufficient accuracy to deduce the radial profile of the safety factor and of the internal plasma loop voltage. It is also shown that the safety factor can be precisely controlled in the outer half of the plasma through the surface loop voltage and the off-axis current drive power, but that a compromise must be made between the accuracy of the core safety factor control and the total duration of the current and fuel density ramp-up phases, so that the demonstration of the steady state reactor potential of the optimized/reversed shear concept in the Next Step device will demand pulse lengths of the order of one thousand seconds (or more for an ITER-size machine). (author)

  14. Steady states of the parametric rotator and pendulum

    Bouzas, Antonio O, E-mail: abouzas@fis.mda.cinvestav.m [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, CINVESTAV-IPN, Carretera Antigua a Progreso Km. 6, Apdo Postal 73 ' Cordemex' , Merida 97310, Yucatan (Mexico)

    2010-11-15

    We discuss several steady-state rotation and oscillation modes of the planar parametric rotator and pendulum with damping. We consider a general elliptic trajectory of the suspension point for both rotator and pendulum, for the latter at an arbitrary angle with gravity, with linear and circular trajectories as particular cases. We treat the damped, nonlinear equation of motion of the parametric rotator and pendulum perturbatively for small parametric excitation and damping, although our perturbative approach can be extended to other regimes as well. Our treatment involves only ordinary second-order differential equations with constant coefficients, and provides numerically accurate perturbative solutions in terms of elementary functions. Some of the steady-state rotation and oscillation modes studied here have not been discussed in the previous literature. Other well-known ones, such as parametric resonance and the inverted pendulum, are extended to elliptic parametric excitation tilted with respect to gravity. The results presented here should be accessible to advanced undergraduates, and of interest to graduate students and specialists in the field of nonlinear mechanics.

  15. Transient and steady-state selection in the striatal microcircuit

    Adam Tomkins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the basal ganglia have been widely studied and implicated in signal processing and action selection, little information is known about the active role the striatal microcircuit plays in action selection in the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical loops. To address this knowledge gap we use a large scale three dimensional spiking model of the striatum, combined with a rate coded model of the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical loop, to asses the computational role the striatum plays in action selection. We identify a robust transient phenomena generated by the striatal microcircuit, which temporarily enhances the difference between two competing cortical inputs. We show that this transient is sufficient to modulate decision making in the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuit. We also find that the transient selection originates from a novel adaptation effect in single striatal projection neurons, which is amenable to experimental testing. Finally, we compared transient selection with models implementing classical steady-state selection. We challenged both forms of model to account for recent reports of paradoxically enhanced response selection in Huntington's Disease patients. We found that steady-state selection was uniformly impaired under all simulated Huntington's conditions, but transient selection was enhanced given a sufficient Huntington's-like increase in NMDA receptor sensitivity. Thus our models provide an intriguing hypothesis for the mechanisms underlying the paradoxical cognitive improvements in manifest Huntington's patients.

  16. Nonequilibrium many-body steady states via Keldysh formalism

    Maghrebi, Mohammad F.; Gorshkov, Alexey V.

    2016-01-01

    Many-body systems with both coherent dynamics and dissipation constitute a rich class of models which are nevertheless much less explored than their dissipationless counterparts. The advent of numerous experimental platforms that simulate such dynamics poses an immediate challenge to systematically understand and classify these models. In particular, nontrivial many-body states emerge as steady states under nonequilibrium dynamics. While these states and their phase transitions have been studied extensively with mean-field theory, the validity of the mean-field approximation has not been systematically investigated. In this paper, we employ a field-theoretic approach based on the Keldysh formalism to study nonequilibrium phases and phase transitions in a variety of models. In all cases, a complete description via the Keldysh formalism indicates a partial or complete failure of the mean-field analysis. Furthermore, we find that an effective temperature emerges as a result of dissipation, and the universal behavior including the dynamics near the steady state is generically described by a thermodynamic universality class.

  17. Non-steady state tidal heating of Enceladus

    Shoji, D.; Hussmann, H.; Sohl, F.; Kurita, K.

    2014-06-01

    Enceladus is one of the most geologically active bodies in the Solar System. The satellite's diverse surface suggests that Enceladus was subject to past episodic heating. It is largely probable that the activity of Enceladus is not in a steady state. In order to analyze the non-steady state heating, thermal and orbital coupled calculation is needed because they affect each other. We perform the coupled calculation assuming conductive ice layer and low melting temperature. Although the heating state of Enceladus strongly depends on the rheological parameters used, episodic heating is induced if the Q-value of Saturn is less than 23,000 and Enceladus' core radius is less than 161 km. The duration of one episodic heating cycle is around one hundred million years. The cyclic change in ice thickness is consistent with the origin of a partial ocean which is suggested by plume emissions and diverse surface states of Enceladus. Although the obtained tidal heating rate is smaller than the observed heat flux of a few giga watt, other heating mechanisms involving e.g., liquid water and/or specific chemical reactions may be initiated by the formation of a partial or global subsurface ocean.

  18. The technology and science of steady-state operation in magnetically confined plasmas

    The steady-state operation of magnetically confined fusion plasmas is considered as one of the 'grand challenges' of future decades, if not the ultimate goal of the research and development activities towards a new source of energy. Reaching such a goal requires the high-level integration of both science and technology aspects of magnetic fusion into self-consistent plasma regimes in fusion-grade devices. On the physics side, the first constraint addresses the magnetic confinement itself which must be made persistent. This means to either rely on intrinsically steady-state configurations, like the stellarator one, or turn the inductively driven tokamak configuration into a fully non-inductive one, through a mix of additional current sources. The low efficiency of the external current drive methods and the necessity to minimize the re-circulating power claim for a current mix strongly weighted by the internal 'pressure driven' bootstrap current, itself strongly sensitive to the heat and particle transport properties of the plasma. A virtuous circle may form as the heat and particle transport properties are themselves sensitive to the current profile conditions. Note that several other factors, e.g. plasma rotation profile, magneto-hydro-dynamics activity, also influence the equilibrium state. In the present tokamak devices, several examples of such 'advanced tokamak' physics research demonstrate the feasibility of steady-state regimes, though with a number of open questions still under investigation. The modelling activity also progresses quite fast in this domain and supports understanding and extrapolation. This high level of physics sophistication of the plasma scenario however needs to be combined with steady-state technological constraints. The technology constraints for steady-state operation are basically twofold: the specific technologies required to reach the steady-state plasma conditions and the generic technologies linked to the long pulse operation of a

  19. Effect of RF field strength on steady-state NOE enhancement

    The steady-state properties of a spin system irradiated by RF field are analysed. The steady-state NOE experiment is described by the extended Solomon equations. The steady-state NOE enhancement factor is obtained and verified by the experiments of liquids and solids

  20. Physics studies for steady state operation coordinated by the ITPA

    Full text of publication follows. The International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) aims at cooperation on an international level in development of the physics basis for burning tokamak plasmas, supporting the preparation of ITER operation, and tokamak research worldwide. The topical group on 'Integrated Operation Scenarios' coordinates research in the following 4 areas: First, IEA collaboration experiments, coordinated by the ITPA. These experiments, performed as joint experiments in several different machines, mainly concern the validation of ITER operation scenarios, including the hybrid and steady state scenarios for ITER. Specific access conditions of these two scenarios are studied together with operation close to ITER conditions. For the heating systems, specific experiments are coordinated to study the coupling of ICRH and LHCD. Secondly, modelling and benchmarking of heating systems (actuators). Benchmarking of the actuators available for heating and current drive is an important area of international collaboration. They have been performed and completed in recent years for LHCD, for ICRH and for NBCD. In particular, LHCD at high plasma density have been studied and compared to experimental data. Thirdly, the coordinated modelling of ITER scenarios. Simulations for hybrid and steady state scenarios have a particular focus on comparing code to code results (benchmarking). For hybrid scenarios the current rise phase and the current profile evolution toward q(0)=1 were modelled with various integrated modelling codes. ITER H-mode scenarios at low plasma density have been modelled showing that the burn can be sustained for > 1000 s, suitable for neutron fluence studies in ITER. The effectiveness of the ITER day-1 heating systems for obtaining steady state scenarios as well as potential heating and current drive upgrades for ITER have been evaluated. Fourth, real time control requirements. Control of burning plasma remains a focus of research

  1. Computation of Effective Steady-State Creep of Porous Ni–YSZ Composites with Reconstructed Microstructures

    Kwok, Kawai; Jørgensen, Peter Stanley; Frandsen, Henrik Lund

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the effective steady-state creep response of porous Ni–YSZ composites used in solid oxide fuel cell applications by numerical homogenization based on three-dimensional microstructural reconstructions and steadystate creep properties of the constituent phases. The Ni phase is...... found to carry insignificant stress in the composite and has a negligible role in the effective creep behavior. Thus, when determining effective creep, porous Ni–YSZ composites can be regarded as porous YSZ in which the Ni phase is counted as additional porosity. The stress exponents of porous YSZ are...

  2. Relativistic Hydrodynamics and Non-Equilibrium Steady States

    Spillane, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We review recent interest in the relativistic Riemann problem as a method for generating a non-equilibrium steady state. In the version of the problem under con- sideration, the initial conditions consist of a planar interface between two halves of a system held at different temperatures in a hydrodynamic regime. The new double shock solutions are in contrast with older solutions that involve one shock and one rarefaction wave. We use numerical simulations to show that the older solutions are preferred. Briefly we discuss the effects of a conserved charge. Finally, we discuss deforming the relativistic equations with a nonlinear term and how that deformation affects the temperature and velocity in the region connecting the asymptotic fluids.

  3. Factorised steady states and condensation transitions in nonequilibrium systems

    M R Evans

    2005-06-01

    Systems driven out of equilibrium can often exhibit behaviour not seen in systems in thermal equilibrium – for example phase transitions in one-dimensional systems. In this talk I will review a simple model of a nonequilibrium system known as the `zero-range process' and its recent developments. The nonequilibrium stationary state of this model factorises and this property allows a detailed analysis of several `condensation' transitions wherein a finite fraction of the constituent particles condenses onto a single lattice site. I will then consider a more general class of mass transport models, encompassing continuous mass variables and discrete time updating, and present a necessary and sufficient condition for the steady state to factorise. The property of factorisation again allows an analysis of the condensation transitions which may occur.

  4. Modelling of pulsed and steady-state DEMO scenarios

    Giruzzi, G.; Artaud, J. F.; Baruzzo, M.; Bolzonella, T.; Fable, E.; Garzotti, L.; Ivanova-Stanik, I.; Kemp, R.; King, D. B.; Schneider, M.; Stankiewicz, R.; Stępniewski, W.; Vincenzi, P.; Ward, D.; Zagórski, R.

    2015-07-01

    Scenario modelling for the demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) has been carried out using a variety of simulation codes. Two DEMO concepts have been analysed: a pulsed tokamak, characterized by rather conventional physics and technology assumptions (DEMO1) and a steady-state tokamak, with moderately advanced physics and technology assumptions (DEMO2). Sensitivity to impurity concentrations, radiation, and heat transport models has been investigated. For DEMO2, the impact of current driven non-inductively by neutral beams has been studied by full Monte Carlo simulations of the fast ion distribution. The results obtained are a part of a more extensive research and development (R&D) effort carried out in the EU in order to develop a viable option for a DEMO reactor, to be adopted after ITER for fusion energy research.

  5. Simulation of Power Electronic Converters Using Quasi Steady State Approximation

    Predrag Pejović

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A new method to compute voltage and current waveforms of power electronic converters is proposed in the paper. The method relies on simulation result of averaged circuit model, and superimposes the ripple of the inductor currents to the obtained average values, assuming that the linear ripple approximation applies. To determine the amplitude of the switching ripple, a quasi steady state approximation is proposed. After the inductor currents are obtained, currents of switching components are computed by multiplying them with appropriate switching functions. The algorithmprovides an efficient tool to generate the converter waveforms in order to compute their spectra, mean and RMS values, which are of interest in designing filters and estimating converter losses.

  6. Steady-state, cavity-less, multimode superradiance

    Greenberg, Joel A

    2012-01-01

    The study of collective light-matter interactions, where the dynamics of an individual scatterer depend on the state of the entire multi-scatterer system, has recently received much attention in the areas of fundamental research and photonic technologies. Cold atomic vapors represent an exciting system for studying such effects because light-based manipulation of internal and center-of-mass atomic states lead to reduced instability thresholds and new phonomena. Previous investigations required single-mode cavities to realize strong light mediated atom-atom interactions, though, which limits the observable phenomena. Here we demonstrate steady-state, mirrorless superradiance in a cold vapor pumped by weak optical fields. Beyond a critical pumping strength, the vapor spontaneously transforms into a spatially self-organized state: a density grating forms. Scattering of the pump beams off this grating generates new optical fields that act back on the vapor to enhance the atomic organization. This system has appli...

  7. The thermal vacuum for non-equilibrium steady state

    Imai, Ryosuke; Kuwahara, Yukiro; Nakamura, Yusuke; Yamanaka, Yoshiya

    Our purpose is to construct a theoretical description of non-equilibrium steady state (NESS), employing thermo field dynamics (TFD). TFD is the operator-based formalism of thermal quautum field theory, where every degree of freedom is doubled and thermal averages are given by expectation values of the thermal vacuum. To specify the thermal vacuum for NESS is a non-trivial issue, and we attempt it on the analogy between the superoperator formalism and TFD. Using the thermal vacuum thus obtained, we analyze the NESS which is realized in the two-reservoir model. It will be shown that the NESS vacuum of the model coincides with the fixed point solutions of the quantum transport equation derived by the self-consistent renormalization of the self-energy in non-equilibrium TFD.

  8. Avoiding Rebound through a Steady-State Economy

    Nørgaard, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    The debate on the rebound effect as presented in most chapters in this book is based upon experience from the past more than visions of the future. The analyses are dominated by conventional economic theory, which implicitly assumes insatiable demand for energy services. Material consumption is...... only buy some time. From this perspective, the environmental problem with the rebound effect is not the higher energy efficiency, which pushes towards lower flows of resources through the economy, but rather the conventional economy which rebounds the savings, because of its quest for higher flows. In...... this chapter, I shall take the rebound debate further by discussing the possible role of energy efficiency in a sustainable economy that is based on the notion of ‘sufficiency’. The assumption is that globally we need to achieve a ‘steady-state economy’. Considering the urgent need for better material...

  9. An Adsorption Equilibria Model for Steady State Analysis

    Ismail, Azhar Bin

    2016-02-29

    The investigation of adsorption isotherms is a prime factor in the ongoing development of adsorption cycles for a spectrum of advanced, thermally-driven engineering applications, including refrigeration, natural gas storage, and desalination processes. In this work, a novel semi-empirical mathematical model has been derived that significantly enhances the prediction of the steady state uptake in adsorbent surfaces. This model, a combination of classical Langmuir and a novel modern adsorption isotherm equation, allows for a higher degree of regression of both energetically homogenous and heterogeneous adsorbent surfaces compared to several isolated classical and modern isotherm models, and has the ability to regress isotherms for all six types under the IUPAC classification. Using a unified thermodynamic framework, a single asymmetrical energy distribution function (EDF) has also been proposed that directly relates the mathematical model to the adsorption isotherm types. This fits well with the statistical rate theory approach and offers mechanistic insights into adsorption isotherms.

  10. Steady-state negative Wigner functions of nonlinear nanomechanical oscillators

    Rips, Simon; Wilson-Rae, Ignacio; Hartmann, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    We propose a scheme to prepare nanomechanical oscillators in non-classical steady states, characterized by a pronounced negative Wigner function. In our optomechanical approach, the mechanical oscillator couples to multiple laser driven resonances of an optical cavity. By lowering the resonant frequency of the oscillator via an inhomogeneous electrostatic field, we significantly enhance its intrinsic geometric nonlinearity per phonon. This causes the motional sidebands to split into separate spectral lines for each phonon number and transitions between individual phonon Fock states can be selectively addressed. We show that this enables preparation of the nanomechanical oscillator in a single phonon Fock state. Our scheme can for example be implemented with a carbon nanotube dispersively coupled to the evanescent field of a state of the art whispering gallery mode microcavity.

  11. Steady-state negative Wigner functions of nonlinear nanomechanical oscillators

    We propose a scheme for preparing nanomechanical oscillators in nonclassical steady states, characterized by a pronounced negative Wigner function. In our optomechanical approach, the mechanical oscillator couples to multiple laser-driven resonances of an optical cavity. By lowering the resonance frequency of the oscillator via an inhomogeneous electrostatic field, we significantly enhance its intrinsic geometric nonlinearity per phonon. This causes the motional sidebands to split into separate spectral lines for each phonon number and transitions between individual phonon Fock states can be selectively addressed. We show that this enables the preparation of the nanomechanical oscillator in a single-phonon Fock state. Our scheme can, for example, be implemented with a carbon nanotube dispersively coupled to the evanescent field of a state of the art whispering gallery mode microcavity. (paper)

  12. Waveguides formed by quasi-steady-state photorefractive spatial solitons

    Morin, Matthew; Duree, Galen; Salamo, Gregory; Segev, Mordechai

    1995-10-01

    We show that a quasi-steady-state photorefractive spatial soliton forms a waveguide structure in the bulk of a photorefractive material. Although the optically induced waveguide is formed by a very low-power (microwatts) soliton beam, it can guide a powerful (watt) beam of a longer wavelength at which the medium is nonphotosensitive. Furthermore, the waveguide survives, either in the dark or when guiding the longer-wavelength beam, for a long time after the soliton beam is turned off. We take advantage of the solitons' property of evolution from a relatively broad input beam into a narrow channel and show that the soliton induces a tapered waveguide (an optical funnel) that improves the coupling efficiency of light into the waveguiding structure.

  13. Steady State Rheological Characteristic of Semisolid Magnesium Alloy

    2007-01-01

    Isothermal compressive experiments at different temperatures, strain rates and holding time for semisolid AZ91D, Zr modified AZ91D and MB15 alloy with higher solid volume fraction were carried out by using Gleeble-15000 simulator and the true stress-strain curves were given directly. The relationship of apparent viscosity vs temperature, shear rate and holding time of the three kinds of semi-solid magnesium alloys, as well as isothermal steady state rheological characteristic and mechanical behavior were studied. The results show that the three magnesium alloys had the characteristic of shear-thinning. The rheological characteristic of the semi-solid MB15 is different from that of semi-solid AZ91D. The semi-solid MB15 has higher apparent viscosity and deformation resistance.

  14. NASA Lewis Steady-State Heat Pipe Code Architecture

    Mi, Ye; Tower, Leonard K.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has developed the LERCHP code. The PC-based LERCHP code can be used to predict the steady-state performance of heat pipes, including the determination of operating temperature and operating limits which might be encountered under specified conditions. The code contains a vapor flow algorithm which incorporates vapor compressibility and axially varying heat input. For the liquid flow in the wick, Darcy s formula is employed. Thermal boundary conditions and geometric structures can be defined through an interactive input interface. A variety of fluid and material options as well as user defined options can be chosen for the working fluid, wick, and pipe materials. This report documents the current effort at GRC to update the LERCHP code for operating in a Microsoft Windows (Microsoft Corporation) environment. A detailed analysis of the model is presented. The programming architecture for the numerical calculations is explained and flowcharts of the key subroutines are given

  15. Steady-State Chemotactic Response in E. coli

    Kafri, Yariv

    2007-01-01

    The bacterium E. coli maneuvers itself to regions with high chemoattractant concentrations by performing two stereotypical moves: `runs', in which it moves in near straight lines, and `tumbles', in which it does not advance but changes direction randomly. The duration of each move is stochastic and depends upon the chemoattractant concentration experienced in the recent past. We relate this stochastic behavior to the steady-state density of a bacterium population, and we derive the latter as a function of chemoattractant concentration. In contrast to earlier treatments, here we account for the effects of temporal correlations and variable tumbling durations. A range of behaviors obtains, that depends subtly upon several aspects of the system - memory, correlation, and tumbling stochasticity in particular.

  16. Steady state asymmetric planetary electrical induction. [by solar wind

    Horning, B. L.; Schubert, G.

    1974-01-01

    An analytic solution is presented for the steady state electric and magnetic fields induced by the motional electric field of the solar wind in the atmosphere or interior of a planet that is asymmetrically surrounded by solar wind plasma. The electrically conducting ionosphere or interior must be in direct electrical contact with the solar wind over the day side of the planet. The conducting region of the planet is modeled by a sphere or a spherical shell of arbitrarily stratified electrical conductivity. A monoconducting cylindrical cavity is assumed to extend downstream on the night side of the planet. The solar wind is assumed to be highly conducting so that the induced fields are confined to the planet and cavity. Induced currents close as sheet currents at the solar wind-cavity and solar wind-planet interfaces. Numerical evaluations of the analytic formulas are carried out for a uniformly conducting spherical model.

  17. Steady States in SIRS Epidemical Model of Mobile Individuals

    Zhang, Duan-Ming; He, Min-Hua; Yu, Xiao-Ling; Pan, Gui-Jun; Sun, Hong-Zhang; Su, Xiang-Ying; Sun, Fan; Yin, Yan-Ping; Li, Rui; Liu, Dan

    2006-01-01

    We consider an epidemical model within socially interacting mobile individuals to study the behaviors of steady states of epidemic propagation in 2D networks. Using mean-field approximation and large scale simulations, we recover the usual epidemic behavior with critical thresholds δc and pc below which infectious disease dies out. For the population density δ far above δc, it is found that there is linear relationship between contact rate λ and the population density δ in the main. At the same time, the result obtained from mean-field approximation is compared with our numerical result, and it is found that these two results are similar by and large but not completely the same.

  18. Entanglement structure of non-equilibrium steady states

    Mahajan, Raghu; Mumford, Sam; Tubman, Norm; Swingle, Brian

    2016-01-01

    We study the problem of calculating transport properties of interacting quantum systems, specifically electrical and thermal conductivities, by computing the non-equilibrium steady state (NESS) of the system biased by contacts. Our approach is based on the structure of entanglement in the NESS. With reasonable physical assumptions, we show that a NESS close to local equilibrium is lightly entangled and can be represented via a computationally efficient tensor network. We further argue that the NESS may be found by dynamically evolving the system within a manifold of appropriate low entanglement states. A physically realistic law of dynamical evolution is Markovian open system dynamics, or the Lindblad equation. We explore this approach in a well-studied free fermion model where comparisons with the literature are possible. We study both electrical and thermal currents with and without disorder, and compute entropic quantities such as mutual information and conditional mutual information. We conclude with a di...

  19. Fast Prediction Method for Steady-State Heat Convection

    Wáng, Yì

    2012-03-14

    A reduced model by proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and Galerkin projection methods for steady-state heat convection is established on a nonuniform grid. It was verified by thousands of examples that the results are in good agreement with the results obtained from the finite volume method. This model can also predict the cases where model parameters far exceed the sample scope. Moreover, the calculation time needed by the model is much shorter than that needed for the finite volume method. Thus, the nonuniform POD-Galerkin projection method exhibits high accuracy, good suitability, and fast computation. It has universal significance for accurate and fast prediction. Also, the methodology can be applied to more complex modeling in chemical engineering and technology, such as reaction and turbulence. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Stationary Distribution and Thermodynamic Relation in Nonequilibrium Steady States

    Komatsu, Teruhisa S.

    2010-01-01

    We describe our recent attempts toward statistical mechanics and thermodynamics for nonequilibrium steady states (NESS) realized, e.g., in a heat conducting system. Our first result is a simple expression of the probability distribution (of microscopic states) of a NESS. Our second result is a natural extension of the thermodynamic Clausius relation and a definition of an accompanying entropy in NESS. This entropy coincides with the normalization constant appearing in the above mentioned microscopic expression of NESS, and has an expression similar to the Shannon entropy (with a further symmetrization). The NESS entropy proposed here is a clearly defined measurable quantity even in a system with a large degrees of freedom. We numerically measure the NESS entropy in hardsphere fluid systems with a heat current, by observing energy exchange between the system and the heat baths when the temperatures of the baths are changed according to specified protocols.

  1. Stabilization of unstable steady states by variable delay feedback control

    Gjurchinovski, Aleksandar

    2008-01-01

    We report on a dramatic improvement of the performance of the classical time-delayed autosynchronization method (TDAS) to control unstable steady states, by applying a time-varying delay in the TDAS control scheme in a form of a deterministic or stochastic delay-modulation in a fixed interval around a nominal value $T_0$. The successfulness of this variable delay feedback control (VDFC) is illustrated by a numerical control simulation of the Lorenz and R\\"{o}ssler systems using three different types of time-delay modulations: a sawtooth wave, a sine wave, and a uniform random distribution. We perform a comparative analysis between the VDFC method and the standard TDAS method for a sawtooth-wave modulation by analytically determining the domains of control for the generic case of an unstable fixed point of focus type.

  2. Transient and steady state modelling of a coupled WECS

    Nathan, G. K.; Tan, J. K.

    The paper presents a method for simulation of a wind turbine using a dc motor. The armature and field voltages of the dc motor are independently regulated to obtain torque-speed characteristics which correspond to those of a wind turbine at different wind speeds. The mass moment of inertia of the wind turbine is represented by adding a rotating mass to a parallel shaft which is positively coupled to the motor shaft. To verify the method of simulation, an American multiblade wind turbine is chosen, loaded by coupling to a centrifugal pump. Using the principle of conservation of energy and characteristics of both constituent units, two mathematical models are proposed: one for steady state operation and another for the transient state. The close comparison between the theoretical and the experimental results validates the proposed models and the method of simulation. The experimental method is described and the results of the experimental and theoretical investigation are presented.

  3. Charged particle creation in the steady state universe

    The birth of a particle of charge q(0), initial mass m(0), and radius a in the steady state universe is studied. With the particle's birth, in accord with causality, gravity, and Coulomb fields propagate away from it with the speed of light. Field energies are supplied by the particle's mass which subsequently decays in time. Asymptotic solution to a nonlinear equation for the remaining mass gives the criterion m(0) is greater that q(0)2/2ac2 as a necessary condition for the initial mass to survive the field expansion. The resulting radius of a classical charged particle is found to be greater than the standard value obtained by equating self- and rest-mass energies of the initial particle. 12 refs

  4. Preliminary design study of a steady state tokamak device

    Preliminary design study has been made for a steady tokamak with the plasma current of 10MA, as the next to the JT-60U experimental programs. The goal of the research program is the integrated study of steady state, high-power physics and technology. Present candidate design is to use superconducting TF and PF magnet systems and long pulse operation of 100's-1000's of sec with non inductive current drive mainly by 500keV negative ion beam injection of 60MW. Low activation material such as titanium alloy is chosen for the water tank type vacuum vessel, which is also the nuclear shield for the superconducting coils. The present preliminary design study shows that the device can meet the existing JT-60U facility capability. (author)

  5. Determining "small parameters" for quasi-steady state

    Goeke, Alexandra; Walcher, Sebastian; Zerz, Eva

    2015-08-01

    For a parameter-dependent system of ordinary differential equations we present a systematic approach to the determination of parameter values near which singular perturbation scenarios (in the sense of Tikhonov and Fenichel) arise. We call these special values Tikhonov-Fenichel parameter values. The principal application we intend is to equations that describe chemical reactions, in the context of quasi-steady state (or partial equilibrium) settings. Such equations have rational (or even polynomial) right-hand side. We determine the structure of the set of Tikhonov-Fenichel parameter values as a semi-algebraic set, and present an algorithmic approach to their explicit determination, using Groebner bases. Examples and applications (which include the irreversible and reversible Michaelis-Menten systems) illustrate that the approach is rather easy to implement.

  6. A mathematical model of pan evaporation under steady state conditions

    Lim, Wee Ho; Roderick, Michael L.; Farquhar, Graham D.

    2016-09-01

    In the context of changing climate, global pan evaporation records have shown a spatially-averaged trend of ∼ -2 to ∼ -3 mm a-2 over the past 30-50 years. This global phenomenon has motivated the development of the "PenPan" model (Rotstayn et al., 2006). However, the original PenPan model has yet to receive an independent experimental evaluation. Hence, we constructed an instrumented US Class A pan at Canberra Airport (Australia) and monitored it over a three-year period (2007-2010) to uncover the physics of pan evaporation under non-steady state conditions. The experimental investigations of pan evaporation enabled theoretical formulation and parameterisation of the aerodynamic function considering the wind, properties of air and (with or without) the bird guard effect. The energy balance investigation allowed for detailed formulation of the short- and long-wave radiation associated with the albedos and the emissivities of the pan water surface and the pan wall. Here, we synthesise and generalise those earlier works to develop a new model called the "PenPan-V2" model for application under steady state conditions (i.e., uses a monthly time step). Two versions (PenPan-V2C and PenPan-V2S) are tested using pan evaporation data available across the Australian continent. Both versions outperformed the original PenPan model with better representation of both the evaporation rate and the underlying physics of a US Class A pan. The results show the improved solar geometry related calculations (e.g., albedo, area) for the pan system led to a clear improvement in representing the seasonal cycle of pan evaporation. For general applications, the PenPan-V2S is simpler and suited for applications including an evaluation of long-term trends in pan evaporation.

  7. Laguna Verde BWRs operational experience: steady-state fuel performance

    The two BWR at Laguna Verde nuclear power station are finishing 21 and 15 years of continuous successful operation as of 2010. During Unit 1 and 2 commercial operations only Ge/GNF fuel designs have been employed; fuel lattice designs 8 x 8 and 10 x 10 were used at the reactor, with an original licensed thermal power (OLTP: 1931 MWt) and the reactor's first power up-rates of 5%. GNF fuel will be also used for the second EPU to reach 120% of OLTP in the near future. Thermal and gamma traversing in-core probes (Tip) are used for power monitoring purposes along with the Ge (now GNF-A) core monitoring system, 3-dimensional MonicoreTM. GNF-A has also participated by preparing the core management plan that is regularly fine-tuned in collaboration with Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE owner of the Laguna Verde reactors). For determination of thermal margins and eigenvalue prediction, GNF-A employs the NRC-licensed steady-state core simulator PANAC11. Tip comparisons are routinely used to adapt power distributions for a better thermal margin calculation. Over the years, several challenges have appeared in the near and long term fuel management planning such as increasing cycle length, optimization of the thermal margins, rated power increase, etc. Each challenge has been successfully overcome via operational strategy, code improvements and better fuel designs. This paper summarizes Laguna Verde Unit 1 and 2 steady-state performance from initial commercial operation, with a discussion of the nuclear and thermal-hydraulic design features, as well as of the operational strategies that set and interesting benchmark for future fuel applications, code development and operation of the BWRs. (Author)

  8. Steady-state spectroscopy of new biological probes

    Abou-Zied, Osama K.

    2007-02-01

    The steady state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy of 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) and (2,2'-bipyridine)-3,3'-diol (BP(OH) II) were studied here free in solution and in human serum albumin (HSA) in order to test their applicability as new biological probes. HBO and BP(OH) II are known to undergo intramolecular proton transfers in the excited state. Their absorption and fluorescence spectra are sensitive to environmental change from hydrophilic to hydrophobic, thus allowing the opportunity to use them as environment-sensitive probes. The effect of water on the steady state spectra of the two molecules also shows unique features which may position them as water sensors in biological systems. For HBO in buffer, fluorescence is only due to the syn-keto tautomer, whereas in HSA the fluorescence is due to four species in equilibrium in the excited state (the syn-keto tautomer, the anti-enol tautomer, the solvated syn-enol tautomer, and the anion species of HBO). Analysis of the fluorescence spectra of HBO in HSA indicates that HBO is exposed to less water in the HBO:HSA complex. For the BP(OH) II molecule, unique absorption due to water was observed in the spectral region of 400-450 nm. This absorption decreases in the presence of HSA due to less accessibility to water as a result of binding to HSA. Fluorescence of BP(OH) II is due solely to the di-keto tautomer after double proton transfer in the excited state. The fluorescence peak of BP(OH) II shows a red-shift upon HSA recognition which is attributed to the hydrophobic environment inside the binding site of HSA. We discuss also the effect of probe-inclusion inside well-defined hydrophobic cavities of cyclodextrins.

  9. Concentrations of OH and HO2 radicals during NAMBLEX: measurements and steady state analysis

    S. C. Smith

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OH and HO2 concentrations were measured simultaneously at the Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station in the summer of 2002 during the NAMBLEX (North Atlantic Marine Boundary Layer EXperiment field campaign. OH was measured by laser-induced fluorescence employing the FAGE (Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion technique, with a mean daytime detection limit of 2.7×105 molecule cm−3 (5 min acquisition period; signal-to-noise ratio = 1. HO2 was detected as OH following its chemical conversion through addition of NO, with a mean detection limit of 4.4×106 molecule cm−3. The diurnal variation of OH was measured on 24 days, and that of HO2 on 17 days. The local solar noon OH concentrations ranged between (3–8×106 molecule cm−3, with a 24 h mean concentration of 9.1×105 molecule cm−3. The local solar noon HO2 concentrations were (0.9–2.1×108 molecule cm−3 (3.5–8.2 pptv, with a 24 h mean concentration of 4.2×107 molecule cm−3 (1.6 pptv. HO2 radicals in the range (2–3×107 molecule cm−3 were observed at night. During NAMBLEX, a comprehensive suite of supporting measurements enabled a detailed study of the behaviour of HOx radicals under primarily clean marine conditions. Steady state expressions are used to calculate OH and HO2 concentrations and to evaluate the effect of different free-radical sources and sinks. The diurnally averaged calculated to measured OH ratio was 1.04±0.36, but the ratio displays a distinct diurnal variation, being less than 1 during the early morning and late afternoon/evening, and greater than 1 in the middle of the day. For HO2 there was an overprediction, with the agreement between calculated and measured concentrations improved by including reaction with measured IO and BrO radicals and uptake to aerosols. Increasing the concentration of IO radicals included in the calculations to above that measured by a DOAS instrument with an absorption path located mainly over the ocean, reflecting the

  10. Concentrations of OH and HO2 radicals during NAMBLEX: measurements and steady state analysis

    G. P. Johnson

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available OH and HO2 concentrations were measured simultaneously at the Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station in the summer of 2002 during the NAMBLEX (North Atlantic Marine Boundary Layer EXperiment field campaign. OH was measured by laser-induced fluorescence employing the FAGE (Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion technique, with a mean daytime detection limit of 2.7×105 molecule cm−3 (5 min acquisition period; signal-to-noise ratio = 1. HO2 was detected as OH following its chemical conversion through addition of NO, with a mean detection limit of 4.4×106 molecule cm−3. The diurnal variation of OH was measured on 24 days, and that of HO2 on 17 days. The local solar noon OH concentrations ranged between (3–8×106 molecule cm−3, with a 24 h mean concentration of 9.1×105 molecule cm−3. The local solar noon HO2 concentrations were (0.9–2.1×108 molecule cm−3 (3.5–8.2 pptv, with a 24 h mean concentration of 4.2×107 molecule cm−3. HO2 radicals in the range (2–3×107 molecule cm−3 were observed at night. During NAMBLEX, a comprehensive suite of supporting measurements enabled a detailed study of the behaviour of HOx radicals under primarily clean marine conditions. Case study periods highlight the typical radical levels observed under different conditions. Steady state expressions are used to calculate OH and HO2 concentrations and to evaluate the effect of different free-radical sources and sinks. The diurnally averaged calculated to measured OH ratio was 1.04±0.36, but the ratio displays a distinct diurnal variation, being less than 1 during the early morning and late afternoon/evening, and greater than 1 in the middle of the day. For HO2 there was an overprediction, with the agreement between calculated and measured concentrations improved by including reaction with measured IO and BrO radicals and uptake to aerosols. Increasing the concentration of IO radicals included in the calculations to above that measured by a DOAS

  11. Seeing the talker’s face supports executive processing of speech in steady state noise

    Sushmit eMishra

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Listening to speech in noise depletes cognitive resources, affecting speech processing. The present study investigated how remaining resources or cognitive spare capacity (CSC can be deployed by young adults with normal hearing. We administered a test of CSC (CSCT, Mishra et al., 2013 along with a battery of established cognitive tests to 20 participants with normal hearing. In the CSCT, lists of two-digit numbers were presented with and without visual cues in quiet, as well as in steady-state and speech-like noise at a high intelligibility level. In low load conditions, two numbers were recalled according to instructions inducing executive processing (updating, inhibition and in high load conditions the participants were additionally instructed to recall one extra number, which was the always the first item in the list. In line with previous findings, results showed that CSC was sensitive to memory load and executive function but generally not related to working memory capacity. Furthermore, CSCT scores in quiet were lowered by visual cues, probably due to distraction. In steady-state noise, the presence of visual cues improved CSCT scores, probably by enabling better encoding. Contrary to our expectation, CSCT performance was disrupted more in steady-state than speech-like noise, although only without visual cues, possibly because selective attention could be used to ignore the speech-like background and provide an enriched representation of target items in working memory similar to that obtained in quiet. This interpretation is supported by a consistent association between CSCT scores and updating skills.

  12. Modeling of the blood rheology in steady-state shear flows

    We undertake here a systematic study of the rheology of blood in steady-state shear flows. As blood is a complex fluid, the first question that we try to answer is whether, even in steady-state shear flows, we can model it as a rheologically simple fluid, i.e., we can describe its behavior through a constitutive model that involves only local kinematic quantities. Having answered that question positively, we then probe as to which non-Newtonian model best fits available shear stress vs shear-rate literature data. We show that under physiological conditions blood is typically viscoplastic, i.e., it exhibits a yield stress that acts as a minimum threshold for flow. We further show that the Casson model emerges naturally as the best approximation, at least for low and moderate shear-rates. We then develop systematically a parametric dependence of the rheological parameters entering the Casson model on key physiological quantities, such as the red blood cell volume fraction (hematocrit). For the yield stress, we base our description on its critical, percolation-originated nature. Thus, we first determine onset conditions, i.e., the critical threshold value that the hematocrit has to have in order for yield stress to appear. It is shown that this is a function of the concentration of a key red blood cell binding protein, fibrinogen. Then, we establish a parametric dependence as a function of the fibrinogen and the square of the difference of the hematocrit from its critical onset value. Similarly, we provide an expression for the Casson viscosity, in terms of the hematocrit and the temperature. A successful validation of the proposed formula is performed against additional experimental literature data. The proposed expression is anticipated to be useful not only for steady-state blood flow modeling but also as providing the starting point for transient shear, or more general flow modeling

  13. Modeling of the blood rheology in steady-state shear flows

    Apostolidis, Alex J.; Beris, Antony N., E-mail: beris@udel.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    We undertake here a systematic study of the rheology of blood in steady-state shear flows. As blood is a complex fluid, the first question that we try to answer is whether, even in steady-state shear flows, we can model it as a rheologically simple fluid, i.e., we can describe its behavior through a constitutive model that involves only local kinematic quantities. Having answered that question positively, we then probe as to which non-Newtonian model best fits available shear stress vs shear-rate literature data. We show that under physiological conditions blood is typically viscoplastic, i.e., it exhibits a yield stress that acts as a minimum threshold for flow. We further show that the Casson model emerges naturally as the best approximation, at least for low and moderate shear-rates. We then develop systematically a parametric dependence of the rheological parameters entering the Casson model on key physiological quantities, such as the red blood cell volume fraction (hematocrit). For the yield stress, we base our description on its critical, percolation-originated nature. Thus, we first determine onset conditions, i.e., the critical threshold value that the hematocrit has to have in order for yield stress to appear. It is shown that this is a function of the concentration of a key red blood cell binding protein, fibrinogen. Then, we establish a parametric dependence as a function of the fibrinogen and the square of the difference of the hematocrit from its critical onset value. Similarly, we provide an expression for the Casson viscosity, in terms of the hematocrit and the temperature. A successful validation of the proposed formula is performed against additional experimental literature data. The proposed expression is anticipated to be useful not only for steady-state blood flow modeling but also as providing the starting point for transient shear, or more general flow modeling.

  14. Quasi-steady state reduction of molecular motor-based models of directed intermittent search.

    Newby, Jay M; Bressloff, Paul C

    2010-10-01

    We present a quasi-steady state reduction of a linear reaction-hyperbolic master equation describing the directed intermittent search for a hidden target by a motor-driven particle moving on a one-dimensional filament track. The particle is injected at one end of the track and randomly switches between stationary search phases and mobile nonsearch phases that are biased in the anterograde direction. There is a finite possibility that the particle fails to find the target due to an absorbing boundary at the other end of the track. Such a scenario is exemplified by the motor-driven transport of vesicular cargo to synaptic targets located on the axon or dendrites of a neuron. The reduced model is described by a scalar Fokker-Planck (FP) equation, which has an additional inhomogeneous decay term that takes into account absorption by the target. The FP equation is used to compute the probability of finding the hidden target (hitting probability) and the corresponding conditional mean first passage time (MFPT) in terms of the effective drift velocity V, diffusivity D, and target absorption rate λ of the random search. The quasi-steady state reduction determines V, D, and λ in terms of the various biophysical parameters of the underlying motor transport model. We first apply our analysis to a simple 3-state model and show that our quasi-steady state reduction yields results that are in excellent agreement with Monte Carlo simulations of the full system under physiologically reasonable conditions. We then consider a more complex multiple motor model of bidirectional transport, in which opposing motors compete in a "tug-of-war", and use this to explore how ATP concentration might regulate the delivery of cargo to synaptic targets. PMID:20169417

  15. Quasi-steady State Reduction of Molecular Motor-Based Models of Directed Intermittent Search

    Newby, Jay M.

    2010-02-19

    We present a quasi-steady state reduction of a linear reaction-hyperbolic master equation describing the directed intermittent search for a hidden target by a motor-driven particle moving on a one-dimensional filament track. The particle is injected at one end of the track and randomly switches between stationary search phases and mobile nonsearch phases that are biased in the anterograde direction. There is a finite possibility that the particle fails to find the target due to an absorbing boundary at the other end of the track. Such a scenario is exemplified by the motor-driven transport of vesicular cargo to synaptic targets located on the axon or dendrites of a neuron. The reduced model is described by a scalar Fokker-Planck (FP) equation, which has an additional inhomogeneous decay term that takes into account absorption by the target. The FP equation is used to compute the probability of finding the hidden target (hitting probability) and the corresponding conditional mean first passage time (MFPT) in terms of the effective drift velocity V, diffusivity D, and target absorption rate λ of the random search. The quasi-steady state reduction determines V, D, and λ in terms of the various biophysical parameters of the underlying motor transport model. We first apply our analysis to a simple 3-state model and show that our quasi-steady state reduction yields results that are in excellent agreement with Monte Carlo simulations of the full system under physiologically reasonable conditions. We then consider a more complex multiple motor model of bidirectional transport, in which opposing motors compete in a "tug-of-war", and use this to explore how ATP concentration might regulate the delivery of cargo to synaptic targets. © 2010 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  16. KIR channel activation contributes to onset and steady-state exercise hyperemia in humans.

    Crecelius, Anne R; Luckasen, Gary J; Larson, Dennis G; Dinenno, Frank A

    2014-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that activation of inwardly rectifying potassium (KIR) channels and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, two pathways that lead to hyperpolarization of vascular cells, contributes to both the onset and steady-state hyperemic response to exercise. We also determined whether after inhibiting these pathways nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins (PGs) are involved in the hyperemic response. Forearm blood flow (FBF; Doppler ultrasound) was determined during rhythmic handgrip exercise at 10% maximal voluntary contraction for 5 min in the following conditions: control [saline; trial 1 (T1)]; with combined inhibition of KIR channels and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase alone [via barium chloride (BaCl2) and ouabain, respectively; trial 2 (T2)]; and with additional combined nitric oxide synthase (N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine) and cyclooxygenase inhibition [ketorolac; trial 3 (T3)]. In T2, the total hyperemic responses were attenuated ~50% from control (P 120 ± 15 ml/min; -29 ± 3%; P < 0.05 vs. T2). In protocol 3 (n = 8), BaCl2 alone reduced FBF during onset (~50%) and steady-state exercise (~30%) as observed in protocols 1 and 2, respectively, and addition of ouabain had no further impact. Our data implicate activation of KIR channels as a novel contributing pathway to exercise hyperemia in humans. PMID:24973385

  17. Steady-state compact neutron sources with HTS magnets

    Full text of publication follows. Recent advantages in the development of high temperature superconductors (HTS), and encouraging results of first tests of HTS coils on a tokamak [1], open new prospects for compact high field TF magnets for Spherical Tokamaks (STs). High β (ratio of the plasma pressure to magnetic pressure) values have been achieved in STs, which opens a path to compact Fusion devices, as the Fusion power is proportional to β2Bt4V. To make advantages of high β in compact STs, the toroidal field should be maximised, which is challenging, and all present STs operate at fields < 1 T. The favourable dependence of confinement on Bt recently found in STs [2] may allow enhanced performance in high-field STs, also encouraging increase in Bt. We investigate feasibility of HTS magnets in next-step STs and compare such designs with proposed conventional aspect ratio designs with HTS magnets (VECTOR, VULCAN etc). Main issues are: - the capital cost (will the use of HTS increase the capital cost?); - running cost (can the use of HTS reduce the running cost?); - will increase in the field in STs easy requirements on current drive?; - how much use of HTS will affect the size (e.g. the cost) of a neutron source (divertor, blanket maintenance options, shielding etc.)? Several physics aspects of a low- and medium-power steady-state neutron source will be discussed. These include fast particle and alpha particle losses, effect of increase in Bt on micro-stability etc. The demonstration of reliable steady state operations in a compact ST even at the level of a few MW Fusion output (which easy application of HTS) as a first step will significantly advance not only the mainstream Fusion for Energy research, but also the commercial exploitation of Fusion Power. [1] M Gryaznevich et al., 'Progress in applications of High Temperature Superconductor in Tokamak Magnets', Fusion Engineering and Design, accepted for publication, (2013). [2] M. Valovic et al, Nucl

  18. 76 FR 14562 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Additional Requirements for Market Research

    2011-03-16

    ... 52 RIN 9000-AL50 Federal Acquisition Regulation; Additional Requirements for Market Research AGENCY... interim rule amending the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) to implement section 826, Market Research... items engages in market research as necessary before making purchases. DATES: Effective Date: April...

  19. Design of Infusion Schemes for Neuroreceptor Imaging: Application to [11C]Flumazenil-PET Steady-State Study

    Feng, Ling; Svarer, Claus; Madsen, Karine; Ziebell, Morten; Dyssegaard, Agnete; Ettrup, Anders; Hansen, Hanne Demant; Lehel, Szabolcs; Yndgaard, Stig; Paulson, Olaf Bjarne; Knudsen, Gitte Moos; Pinborg, Lars Hageman

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at developing a simulation system that predicts the optimal study design for attaining tracer steady-state conditions in brain and blood rapidly. Tracer kinetics was determined from bolus studies and used to construct the system. Subsequently, the system was used to design inputs for bolus infusion (BI) or programmed infusion (PI) experiments. Steady-state quantitative measurements can be made with one short scan and venous blood samples. The GABAA receptor ligand [11C]Flumazenil (FMZ) was chosen for this purpose, as it lacks a suitable reference region. Methods. Five bolus [11C]FMZ-PET scans were conducted, based on which population-based PI and BI schemes were designed and tested in five additional healthy subjects. The design of a PI was assisted by an offline feedback controller. Results. The system could reproduce the measurements in blood and brain. With PI, [11C]FMZ steady state was attained within 40 min, which was 8 min earlier than the optimal BI (B/I ratio = 55 min). Conclusions. The system can design both BI and PI schemes to attain steady state rapidly. For example, subjects can be [11C]FMZ-PET scanned after 40 min of tracer infusion for 40 min with venous sampling and a straight-forward quantification. This simulation toolbox is available for other PET-tracers.

  20. Development and steady states of transverse dunes: A numerical analysis of dune pattern coarsening and giant dunes

    Gao, Xin; Narteau, Clément; Rozier, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the development and steady states of transverse dunes for ranges of flow depths and velocities using a cellular automaton dune model. Subsequent to the initial bed instability, dune pattern coarsening is driven by bed form interactions. Collisions lead to two types of coalescence associated with upstream or downstream dominant dunes. In addition, a single collision-ejection mechanism enhances the exchange of mass between two adjacent bed forms (throughpassing dunes). The power law increases in wavelength and amplitude exhibit the same exponents, which are independent of flow properties. Contrary to the wavelength, dune height is limited not only by flow depth but also by the strength of the flow. Superimposed bed forms may propagate and continuously destabilize the largest dunes. We identify three classes of steady state transverse dune fields according to the periodicity in crest-to-crest spacing and the mechanism of size limitation. In all cases, the steady state is reached and maintained through the dynamic equilibrium between flow strength and dune aspect ratio. In the limit of low flow strength, where it becomes the primary factor of size limitation, the bed shear stress in the dune trough regions is close to its critical value for motion inception. Comparisons with natural dune fields suggest that many of them may have reached a steady state. Finally, we infer that the sedimentary patterns in the model may be used to bring new constraints on the development of modern and ancient dune fields.

  1. Design of Infusion Schemes for Neuroreceptor Imaging: Application to [(11)C]Flumazenil-PET Steady-State Study.

    Feng, Ling; Svarer, Claus; Madsen, Karine; Ziebell, Morten; Dyssegaard, Agnete; Ettrup, Anders; Hansen, Hanne Demant; Lehel, Szabolcs; Yndgaard, Stig; Paulson, Olaf Bjarne; Knudsen, Gitte Moos; Pinborg, Lars Hageman

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at developing a simulation system that predicts the optimal study design for attaining tracer steady-state conditions in brain and blood rapidly. Tracer kinetics was determined from bolus studies and used to construct the system. Subsequently, the system was used to design inputs for bolus infusion (BI) or programmed infusion (PI) experiments. Steady-state quantitative measurements can be made with one short scan and venous blood samples. The GABAA receptor ligand [(11)C]Flumazenil (FMZ) was chosen for this purpose, as it lacks a suitable reference region. Methods. Five bolus [(11)C]FMZ-PET scans were conducted, based on which population-based PI and BI schemes were designed and tested in five additional healthy subjects. The design of a PI was assisted by an offline feedback controller. Results. The system could reproduce the measurements in blood and brain. With PI, [(11)C]FMZ steady state was attained within 40 min, which was 8 min earlier than the optimal BI (B/I ratio = 55 min). Conclusions. The system can design both BI and PI schemes to attain steady state rapidly. For example, subjects can be [(11)C]FMZ-PET scanned after 40 min of tracer infusion for 40 min with venous sampling and a straight-forward quantification. This simulation toolbox is available for other PET-tracers. PMID:27123457

  2. Interplanetary cosmic ray radial gradients with steady state modulation models

    Potgieter, M.S.; Le Roux, J.A.; Burger, R.A.

    1989-03-01

    We have used steady state modulation models of increasing complexity, with emphasis on drift models, to establish to what extent these models can simulate the observed cosmic ray integral radial gradient (energygreater than or equal to60--70 MeV/nucleon) in the heliosphere from 1977 to 1986. Special attention has been given to the apparent asymmetric behavior of the radial gradient with respect to the recent interplanetary magnetic field polarity reversal, and the remarkable constant radial gradient for the years 1977--1982. Instead of using differential intensities at specific energies, we presented integral radial gradients calculated from the computed integral intensities which made comparison with observations more realistic. We found that nondrift models had difficulties producing constant radial gradients over several years of increasing solar activity, because these models depend primarily on changes of the radial diffusion coefficient K/sub r//sub r/ to simulate an 11-year cycle and therefore produce, in general, radial gradients symmetric with respect to solar maximum activity. Making these models independent of changes in K/sub r//sub r/ needs, in our opinion, unrealistic changes in the conventional modulation parameters.

  3. Hyperbolic method for magnetic reconnection process in steady state magnetohydrodynamics

    Baty, Hubert; Nishikawa, Hiroaki

    2016-06-01

    A recent numerical approach for solving the advection-diffusion and Navier-Stokes equations is extended for the first time to a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, aiming in particular consistent improvements over classical methods for investigating the magnetic reconnection process. In this study, we mainly focus on a two-dimensional incompressible set of resistive MHD equations written in flux-vorticity scalar variables. The originality of the method is based on hyperbolic reformulation of the dissipative terms, leading to the construction of an equivalent hyperbolic first-order (spatial derivatives) system. This enables the use of approximate Riemann solvers for handling dissipative and advective flux in the same way. A simple second-order finite-volume discretization on rectangular grids using an upwind flux is employed. The advantages of this method are illustrated by a comparison to two particular analytical steady state solutions of the inviscid magnetic reconnection mechanism, namely the magnetic annihilation and the reconnective diffusion problems. In particular, the numerical solution is obtained with the same order of accuracy for the solution and gradient for a wide range of magnetic Reynolds numbers, without any deterioration characteristic of more conventional schemes. The amelioration of the hyperbolic method and its extension to time-dependent MHD problems related to solar flares mechanisms is also discussed.

  4. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis. XX. The Steady State

    Calvin, M.; Massini, Peter

    1952-09-01

    The separation of the phenomenon of photosynthesis in green plants into a photochemical reaction and into the light-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide is discussed, The reduction of carbon dioxide and the fate of the assimilated carbon were investigated with the help of the tracer technique (exposure of the planks to the radioactive C{sup 14}O{sub 2}) and of paper chromatography. A reaction cycle is proposed in which phosphoglyceric acid is the first isolable assimilations product. Analyses of the algal extracts which had assimilated radioactive carbon dioxide in a stationary condition ('steady-state' photosynthesis) for a long time provided further information concerning the proposed cycle and permitted the approximate estimation, for a number of compounds of what fraction of each compound was taking part in the cycle. The earlier supposition that light influences the respiration cycle was confirmed. The possibility of the assistance of {alpha}-lipoic acid, or of a related substance, in this influence and in the photosynthesis cycle, is discussed.

  5. Development of the ITER Advanced Steady State and Hybrid Scenarios

    Full discharge simulations are performed to examine the plasma current rampup, flattop and rampdown phases self-consistently with the poloidal field (PF) coils and their limitations, plasma transport evolution, and heating/current drive (H/CD) sources. Steady state scenarios are found that obtain 100% non-inductive current with Ip = 7.3-10.0 MA, ΒN ∼ 2.5 for H98 = 1.6, Q's range from 3 to 6, n/nGr = 0.75-1.0, and NB, IC, EC, and LH source have been examined. The scenarios remain within CS/PF coil limits by advancing the pre-magnetization by 40 Wb. Hybrid scenarios have been identified with 35-40% non-inductive current for Ip = 12.5 MA, H98 ∼ 1.25, with q(0) reaching 1 at or after the end of rampup. The equilibrium operating space for the hybrid shows a large range of scenarios can be accommodated, and access 925-1300 s flattop burn durations.

  6. Flavour fields in steady state: stress tensor and free energy

    Banerjee, Avik; Kundu, Arnab; Kundu, Sandipan

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of a probe brane in a given gravitational background is governed by the Dirac-Born-Infeld action. The corresponding open string metric arises naturally in studying the fluctuations on the probe. In Gauge-String duality, it is known that in the presence of a constant electric field on the worldvolume of the probe, the open string metric acquires an event horizon and therefore the fluctuation modes on the probe experience an effective temperature. In this article, we bring together various properties of such a system to a formal definition and a subsequent narration of the effective thermodynamics and the stress tensor of the corresponding flavour fields, also including a non-vanishing chemical potential. In doing so, we point out a potentially infinitely-degenerate scheme-dependence of regularizing the free energy, which nevertheless yields a universal contribution in certain cases. This universal piece appears as the coefficient of a log-divergence in free energy when a space-filling probe brane is embedded in AdS d+1-background, for d = 2, 4, and is related to conformal anomaly. For the special case of d = 2, the universal factor has a striking resemblance to the well-known heat current formula in (1 + 1)-dimensional conformal field theory in steady-state, which endows a plausible physical interpretation to it. Interestingly, we observe a vanishing conformal anomaly in d = 6.

  7. Nonequilibrium steady states of ideal bosonic and fermionic quantum gases

    Vorberg, Daniel; Wustmann, Waltraut; Schomerus, Henning; Ketzmerick, Roland; Eckardt, André

    2015-12-01

    We investigate nonequilibrium steady states of driven-dissipative ideal quantum gases of both bosons and fermions. We focus on systems of sharp particle number that are driven out of equilibrium either by the coupling to several heat baths of different temperature or by time-periodic driving in combination with the coupling to a heat bath. Within the framework of (Floquet-)Born-Markov theory, several analytical and numerical methods are described in detail. This includes a mean-field theory in terms of occupation numbers, an augmented mean-field theory taking into account also nontrivial two-particle correlations, and quantum-jump-type Monte Carlo simulations. For the case of the ideal Fermi gas, these methods are applied to simple lattice models and the possibility of achieving exotic states via bath engineering is pointed out. The largest part of this work is devoted to bosonic quantum gases and the phenomenon of Bose selection, a nonequilibrium generalization of Bose condensation, where multiple single-particle states are selected to acquire a large occupation [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 240405 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.240405]. In this context, among others, we provide a theory for transitions where the set of selected states changes, describe an efficient algorithm for finding the set of selected states, investigate beyond-mean-field effects, and identify the dominant mechanisms for heat transport in the Bose-selected state.

  8. Kinematical Analysis along Maximal Lactate Steady State Swimming Intensity

    Pedro Figueiredo, Rafael Nazario, Marisa Sousa, Jailton Gregório Pelarigo, João Paulo Vilas-Boas, Ricardo Fernandes

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to conduct a kinematical analysis during swimming at the intensity corresponding to maximal lactate steady state (MLSS. Thirteen long distance swimmers performed, in different days, an intermittent incremental protocol of n x 200 m until exhaustion and two to four 30-min submaximal constant speed bouts to determine the MLSS. The video analysis, using APAS System (Ariel Dynamics Inc., USA, allowed determining the following relevant swimming determinants (in five moments of the 30-min test: 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100%: stroke rate, stroke length, trunk incline, intracyclic velocity variation, propelling efficiency, index of coordination and the time allotted to propulsion per distance unit. An ANOVA for repeated measures was used to compare the parameters mean values along each moment of analysis. Stoke rate tended to increase and stroke length to decrease along the test; a tendency to decrease was also found for intracyclic velocity variation and propelling efficiency whereas the index of coordination and the propulsive impulse remained stable during the MLSS test. It can be concluded that the MLSS is not only an intensity to maintain without a significant increase of blood lactate concentration, but a concomitant stability for some biomechanical parameters exists (after an initial adaptation. However, efficiency indicators seem to be more sensitive to changes occurring during swimming at this threshold intensity.

  9. Mimicking Nonequilibrium Steady States with Time-Periodic Driving

    Raz, Oren; Subasi, Yigit; Jarzynski, Christopher

    Under static conditions, a system satisfying detailed balance generically relaxes to an equilibrium state in which there are no currents: to generate persistent currents, either detailed balance must be broken or the system must be driven in a time-dependent manner. A stationary system that violates detailed balance evolves to a nonequilibrium steady state (NESS) characterized by fixed currents. Conversely, a system that satisfies instantaneous detailed balance but is driven by the time-periodic variation of external parameters - also known as a stochastic pump (SP) - reaches a periodic state with non-vanishing currents. In both cases, these currents are maintained at the cost of entropy production. Are these two paradigmatic scenarios effectively equivalent? For discrete-state systems we establish a mapping between NESS and SP. Given a NESS characterized by a particular set of stationary probabilities, currents and entropy production rates, we show how to construct a SP with exactly the same (time-averaged) values. The mapping works in the opposite direction as well. These results establish a proof of principle: they show that SP are able to mimic the behavior of NESS, and vice-versa, within the theoretical framework of discrete-state stochastic thermodynamics.

  10. Steady state relativistic stellar dynamics around a massive black hole

    Bar-Or, Ben

    2015-01-01

    A massive black hole (MBH) consumes stars whose orbits evolve into the small phase-space volume of unstable orbits, the "loss-cone", which take them directly into the MBH, or close enough to interact strongly with it. The resulting phenomena: tidal heating and tidal disruption, binary capture and hyper-velocity star ejection, gravitational wave (GW) emission by inspiraling compact remnants, or hydrodynamical interactions with an accretion disk, are of interest as they can produce observable signatures and thereby reveal the existence of the MBH, affect its mass and spin evolution, probe strong gravity, and provide information on stars and gas near the MBH. The continuous loss of stars and the processes that resupply them shape the central stellar distribution. We investigate relativistic stellar dynamics near the loss-cone of a non-spinning MBH in steady-state analytically and by Monte Carlo simulations of the diffusion of the orbital parameters. These take into account Newtonian mass precession due to enclos...

  11. Comparison of Gene Regulatory Networks via Steady-State Trajectories

    Seungchan Kim

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The modeling of genetic regulatory networks is becoming increasingly widespread in the study of biological systems. In the abstract, one would prefer quantitatively comprehensive models, such as a differential-equation model, to coarse models; however, in practice, detailed models require more accurate measurements for inference and more computational power to analyze than coarse-scale models. It is crucial to address the issue of model complexity in the framework of a basic scientific paradigm: the model should be of minimal complexity to provide the necessary predictive power. Addressing this issue requires a metric by which to compare networks. This paper proposes the use of a classical measure of difference between amplitude distributions for periodic signals to compare two networks according to the differences of their trajectories in the steady state. The metric is applicable to networks with both continuous and discrete values for both time and state, and it possesses the critical property that it allows the comparison of networks of different natures. We demonstrate application of the metric by comparing a continuous-valued reference network against simplified versions obtained via quantization.

  12. Comparison of Gene Regulatory Networks via Steady-State Trajectories

    Choi Woonjung

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The modeling of genetic regulatory networks is becoming increasingly widespread in the study of biological systems. In the abstract, one would prefer quantitatively comprehensive models, such as a differential-equation model, to coarse models; however, in practice, detailed models require more accurate measurements for inference and more computational power to analyze than coarse-scale models. It is crucial to address the issue of model complexity in the framework of a basic scientific paradigm: the model should be of minimal complexity to provide the necessary predictive power. Addressing this issue requires a metric by which to compare networks. This paper proposes the use of a classical measure of difference between amplitude distributions for periodic signals to compare two networks according to the differences of their trajectories in the steady state. The metric is applicable to networks with both continuous and discrete values for both time and state, and it possesses the critical property that it allows the comparison of networks of different natures. We demonstrate application of the metric by comparing a continuous-valued reference network against simplified versions obtained via quantization.

  13. Steady-state growth of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana

    Olson, R.J. (Scripps Inst. of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA); SooHoo, J.B.; Kiefer, D.A.

    1980-09-01

    Seasonal studies of the vertical distribution of nitrate, nitrite, and phytoplankton in the oceans and studies using /sup 15/N as a tracer of nitrate metabolism indicate that the reduction of nitrate by phytoplankton is a source of nitrite in the upper waters of the ocean. To better understand this process, the relationship between nitrate uptake and nitrite production has been examined with continuous cultures of the small marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. In a turbidostat culture, the rates of nitrite production by T. Pseudonana increase with light intensity. This process is only loosely coupled to rates of nitrate assimilation since the ratio of net nitrite production to total nitrate assimilation increases with increased rates of growth. In continuous cultures where steady-state concentrations of nitrate and nitrite were varied, T. pseudonana produced nitrite at rates which increased with increasing concentrations of nitrate. Again, the rates of nitrite production were uncoupled from rates of nitrate assimilation. The study was used to derive a mathematical description of nitrate and nitrite metabolism by T. pseudonana. The validity of this model was supported by the results of a study in which /sup 15/N-labeled nitrite was introduced into the continuous culture, and the model was used to examine patterns in distribution of nitrite in the Antarctic Ocean and the Sargasso Sea.

  14. Steady-state growth of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana

    Seasonal studies of the vertical distribution of nitrate, nitrite, and phytoplankton in the oceans and studies using 15N as a tracer of nitrate metabolism indicate that the reduction of nitrate by phytoplankton is a source of nitrite in the upper waters of the ocean. To better understand this process, the relationship between nitrate uptake and nitrite production has been examined with continuous cultures of the small marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. In a turbidostat culture, the rates of nitrite production by T. Pseudonana increase with light intensity. This process is only loosely coupled to rates of nitrate assimilation since the ratio of net nitrite production to total nitrate assimilation increases with increased rates of growth. In continuous cultures where steady-state concentrations of nitrate and nitrite were varied, T. pseudonana produced nitrite at rates which increased with increasing concentrations of nitrate. Again, the rates of nitrite production were uncoupled from rates of nitrate assimilation. The study was used to derive a mathematical description of nitrate and nitrite metabolism by T. pseudonana. The validity of this model was supported by the results of a study in which 15N-labeled nitrite was introduced into the continuous culture, and the model was used to examine patterns in distribution of nitrite in the Antarctic Ocean and the Sargasso Sea

  15. Nonequilibrium steady states of ideal bosonic and fermionic quantum gases.

    Vorberg, Daniel; Wustmann, Waltraut; Schomerus, Henning; Ketzmerick, Roland; Eckardt, André

    2015-12-01

    We investigate nonequilibrium steady states of driven-dissipative ideal quantum gases of both bosons and fermions. We focus on systems of sharp particle number that are driven out of equilibrium either by the coupling to several heat baths of different temperature or by time-periodic driving in combination with the coupling to a heat bath. Within the framework of (Floquet-)Born-Markov theory, several analytical and numerical methods are described in detail. This includes a mean-field theory in terms of occupation numbers, an augmented mean-field theory taking into account also nontrivial two-particle correlations, and quantum-jump-type Monte Carlo simulations. For the case of the ideal Fermi gas, these methods are applied to simple lattice models and the possibility of achieving exotic states via bath engineering is pointed out. The largest part of this work is devoted to bosonic quantum gases and the phenomenon of Bose selection, a nonequilibrium generalization of Bose condensation, where multiple single-particle states are selected to acquire a large occupation [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 240405 (2013)]. In this context, among others, we provide a theory for transitions where the set of selected states changes, describe an efficient algorithm for finding the set of selected states, investigate beyond-mean-field effects, and identify the dominant mechanisms for heat transport in the Bose-selected state. PMID:26764644

  16. Dynamic steady-state of periodically-driven quantum systems

    Yudin, V I; Basalaev, M Yu; Kovalenko, D

    2015-01-01

    Using the density matrix formalism, we prove an existence theorem of the periodic steady-state for an arbitrary periodically-driven system. This state has the same period as the modulated external influence, and it is realized as an asymptotic solution ($t$$\\to$$+\\infty$) due to relaxation processes. The presented derivation simultaneously contains a simple computational algorithm non-using both Floquet and Fourier theories, i.e. our method automatically guarantees a full account of all frequency components. The description is accompanied by the examples demonstrating a simplicity and high efficiency of our method. In particular, for three-level $\\Lambda$-system we calculate the lineshape and field-induced shift of the dark resonance formed by the field with periodically modulated phase. For two-level atom we obtain the analytical expressions for signal of the direct frequency comb spectroscopy with rectangular light pulses. In this case it was shown the radical dependence of the spectroscopy lineshape on pul...

  17. Steady-state propagation speed of rupture fronts along 1D frictional interfaces

    Amundsen, David Skålid; Thøgersen, Kjetil; Katzav, Eytan; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Scheibert, Julien

    2015-01-01

    The rupture of dry frictional interfaces occurs through the propagation of fronts breaking the contacts at the interface. Recent experiments have shown that the velocities of these rupture fronts range from quasi-static velocities proportional to the external loading rate to velocities larger than the shear wave speed. The way system parameters influence front speed is still poorly understood. Here we study steady-state rupture propagation in a 1D spring-block model of an extended frictional interface, for various friction laws. With the classical Amontons--Coulomb friction law, we derive a closed-form expression for the steady-state rupture velocity as a function of the interfacial shear stress just prior to rupture. We then consider an additional shear stiffness of the interface and show that the softer the interface, the slower the rupture fronts. We provide an approximate closed form expression for this effect. We finally show that adding a bulk viscosity on the relative motion of blocks accelerates stead...

  18. Progress toward steady-state tokamak operation exploiting the high bootstrap current fraction regime

    Ren, Q. L.; Garofalo, A. M.; Gong, X. Z.; Holcomb, C. T.; Lao, L. L.; McKee, G. R.; Meneghini, O.; Staebler, G. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Qian, J. P.; Solomon, W. M.; Turnbull, A. D.; Holland, C.; Guo, W. F.; Ding, S. Y.; Pan, C. K.; Xu, G. S.; Wan, B. N.

    2016-06-01

    Recent DIII-D experiments have increased the normalized fusion performance of the high bootstrap current fraction tokamak regime toward reactor-relevant steady state operation. The experiments, conducted by a joint team of researchers from the DIII-D and EAST tokamaks, developed a fully noninductive scenario that could be extended on EAST to a demonstration of long pulse steady-state tokamak operation. Improved understanding of scenario stability has led to the achievement of very high values of βp and βN , despite strong internal transport barriers. Good confinement has been achieved with reduced toroidal rotation. These high βp plasmas challenge the energy transport understanding, especially in the electron energy channel. A new turbulent transport model, named TGLF-SAT1, has been developed which improves the transport prediction. Experiments extending results to long pulse on EAST, based on the physics basis developed at DIII-D, have been conducted. More investigations will be carried out on EAST with more additional auxiliary power to come online in the near term.

  19. Open chemical reaction networks, steady-state loads and Braess-like paradox

    Banerjee, Kinshuk

    2014-01-01

    Open chemical reaction systems involve matter-exchange with the surroundings. As a result, species can accumulate inside a system during the course of the reaction. We study the role of network topology in governing the concentration build-up inside a fixed reaction volume at steady state, particularly focusing on the effect of additional paths. The problem is akin to that in traffic networks where an extra route, surprisingly, can increase the overall travel time. This is known as the Braess' paradox. Here, we report chemical analogues of such a paradox in suitably chosen reaction networks, where extra reaction step(s) can inflate the total concentration, denoted as `load', at steady state. It is shown that, such counter-intuitive behavior emerges in a qualitatively similar pattern in networks of varying complexities. We then explore how such extra routes affect the load in a biochemical scheme of uric acid degradation. From a thorough analysis of this network, we propose a functional role of some decomposit...

  20. Effect of non-condensable gas on steady-state operation of a loop thermosyphon

    Non-condensable gas (NCG) generated inside two-phase heat transfer devices can adversely affect the thermal performance and limit the lifetime of such devices. In this work, extensive experimental investigation of the effect of NCG on the steady-state operation of an ammonia-stainless steel loop thermosyphon was conducted. In the experiments, nitrogen was injected into the loop thermosyphon as NCG, and the thermal performance of the loop thermosyphon was tested at different NCG inventories, heat loads applied to the evaporator and condenser cooling conditions, i.e. natural air cooling or circulating ethanol cooling. Experimental results reveal that NCG elevates the steady-state operating temperature of the evaporator, especially when the loop thermosyphon is operating in the low temperature range; meanwhile, the more NCG exists in the loop thermosyphon, the higher the operating temperature of the evaporator, and the lower the reservoir temperature. In addition, the existence of NCG results in the decrease of the overall thermal conductance of the loop thermosyphon, and the overall thermal conductance under the ethanol cooling condition may be even lower than that under the air cooling condition when the heat load is smaller than a certain value. Finally, the experimental results are theoretically analysed and explained. (authors)

  1. Cyclic steady state performance of adsorption chiller with low regeneration temperature zeolite

    Qian, Mr. Suxin [University of Maryland, College Park; Gluesenkamp, Kyle R [ORNL; Hwang, Dr. Yunho [University of Maryland, College Park; Radermacher, Reinhard [University of Maryland, College Park; Chun, Mr. Ho-Hwan [University of Maryland, College Park

    2013-10-01

    Adsorption chillers are capable of utilizing inexpensive or free low grade thermal energy such as waste heat and concentrated solar thermal energy. Recently developed low regeneration temperature working pairs allow adsorption chillers to be driven by even lower temperature sources such as engine coolant and flat plate solar collectors. In this work, synthetic zeolite/water was implemented into a 3kW adsorption chiller test facility driven by hot water at 70 C. The zeolite was coated onto two fin-and-tube heat exchangers, with heat recovery employed between the two. Cyclic steady state parametric studies were experimentally conducted to evaluate the chiller's performance, resulting in a cooling coefficient of performance (COP) ranging from 0.1 to 0.6 at different operating conditions. Its performance was compared with published values for other low regeneration temperature working pairs. The physical limitations of the synthetic zeolite revealed by parametric study results were then discussed. A novel operating control strategy was proposed based on the unique characteristics of synthetic zeolite. In addition, a physics-based COP prediction model was derived to predict the performance of the chiller under equilibrium loading, and was validated by the experiment results. This analytical expression can be used to estimate the cyclic steady state performance for future studies.

  2. Cell-Autonomous Gβ Signaling Defines Neuron-Specific Steady State Serotonin Synthesis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Xu, Lu; Choi, Sunju; Xie, Yusu; Sze, Ji Ying

    2015-09-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins regulate a vast array of cellular functions via specific intracellular effectors. Accumulating pharmacological and biochemical studies implicate Gβ subunits as signaling molecules interacting directly with a wide range of effectors to modulate downstream cellular responses, in addition to their role in regulating Gα subunit activities. However, the native biological roles of Gβ-mediated signaling pathways in vivo have been characterized only in a few cases. Here, we identified a Gβ GPB-1 signaling pathway operating in specific serotonergic neurons to the define steady state serotonin (5-HT) synthesis, through a genetic screen for 5-HT synthesis mutants in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that signaling through cell autonomous GPB-1 to the OCR-2 TRPV channel defines the baseline expression of 5-HT synthesis enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase tph-1 in ADF chemosensory neurons. This Gβ signaling pathway is not essential for establishing the serotonergic cell fates and is mechanistically separated from stress-induced tph-1 upregulation. We identified that ADF-produced 5-HT controls specific innate rhythmic behaviors. These results revealed a Gβ-mediated signaling operating in differentiated cells to specify intrinsic functional properties, and indicate that baseline TPH expression is not a default generic serotonergic fate, but is programmed in a cell-specific manner in the mature nervous system. Cell-specific regulation of TPH expression could be a general principle for tailored steady state 5-HT synthesis in functionally distinct neurons and their regulation of innate behavior. PMID:26402365

  3. Estimating steady state and transient characteristics of molten salt natural circulation loop using CFD

    The steady state and transient characteristics of a molten salt natural circulation loop (NCL) are obtained by 3D CFD simulations. The working fluid is a mixture of NaNO3 and KNO3 in 60:40 ratio. Simulation is performed using PHOENICS CFD software. The computational domain is discretized by a body fitted grid generated using in-built mesh generator. The CFD model includes primary side. Primary side fluid is subjected to heat addition in heater section, heat loss to ambient (in piping connecting heater and cooler) and to secondary side (in cooler section). Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations are solved along with the standard k-ε turbulence model. Validation of the model is done by comparing the computed steady state Reynolds number with that predicted by various correlations proposed previously. Transient simulations were carried out to study the flow initiations transients for different heater powers and different configurations. Similarly the ''power raising'' transient is computed and compared with in-house experimental data. It is found that, using detailed information obtained from 3D transient CFD simulations, it is possible to understand the physics of oscillatory flow patterns obtained in the loop under certain conditions.

  4. Enhanced magnetic flux density mapping using coherent steady state equilibrium signal in MREIT

    Jeong, Woo Chul; Lee, Mun Bae; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2016-03-01

    Measuring the z-component of magnetic flux density B = (Bx, By, Bz) induced by transversally injected current, magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) aims to visualize electrical property (current density and/or conductivity distribution) in a three-dimensional imaging object. For practical implementations of MREIT technique, it is critical to reduce injection of current pulse within safety requirements. With the goal of minimizing the noise level in measured Bz data, we propose a new method to enhance the measure Bz data using steady-state coherent gradient multi-echo (SSC-GME) MR pulse sequence combining with injection current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) method in MREIT, where the ICNE technique injects current during a readout gradient to maximize the signal intensity of phase signal including Bz. The total phase offset in SSC-GME includes additional magnetic flux density due to the injected current, which is different from the phase signal for the conventional spoiled MR pulse sequence. We decompose the magnetization precession phase from the total phase offset including Bz and optimize Bz data using the steady-state equilibrium signal. Results from a real phantom experiment including different kinds of anomalies demonstrated that the proposed method enhanced Bz comparing to a conventional spoiled pulse sequence.

  5. Enzyme Kinetics: A critique of the quasi-steady-state approximation

    Bhattacharyya, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    The standard two-step model of homogeneous-catalyzed reactions had been theoretically analyzed at various levels of approximations from time to time. The primary aim was to check the validity of the quasi-steady-state approximation, and hence emergence of the Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with various substrate-enzyme ratios. But, conclusions vary. We solve here the desired set of coupled nonlinear differential equations by invoking a new set of dimensionless variables. Approximate solutions are obtained via the power-series method aided by Pade approximants. The scheme works very successfully in furnishing the initial dynamics at least up to the region where existence of any steady state can be checked. A few conditions for its validity are put forward and tested against the findings. Temporal profiles of the substrate and the product are analyzed in addition to that of the complex to gain further insights into legitimacy of the above approximation. Some recent observations like the reactant stationary approxim...

  6. Transcriptional monitoring of steady state and effects of anaerobic phases in chemostat cultures of the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei

    Penttilä Merja

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemostat cultures are commonly used in production of cellular material for systems-wide biological studies. We have used the novel TRAC (transcript analysis with aid of affinity capture method to study expression stability of approximately 30 process relevant marker genes in chemostat cultures of the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei and its transformant expressing laccase from Melanocarpus albomyces. Transcriptional responses caused by transient oxygen deprivations and production of foreign protein were also studied in T. reesei by TRAC. Results In cultures with good steady states, the expression of the marker genes varied less than 20% on average between sequential samples for at least 5 or 6 residence times. However, in a number of T. reesei cultures continuous flow did not result in a good steady state. Perturbations to the steady state were always evident at the transcriptional level, even when they were not measurable as changes in biomass or product concentrations. Both unintentional and intentional perturbations of the steady state demonstrated that a number of genes involved in growth, protein production and secretion are sensitive markers for culture disturbances. Exposure to anaerobic conditions caused strong responses at the level of gene expression, but surprisingly the cultures could regain their previous steady state quickly, even after 3 h O2 depletion. The main effect of producing M. albomyces laccase was down-regulation of the native cellulases compared with the host strain. Conclusion This study demonstrates the usefulness of transcriptional analysis by TRAC in ensuring the quality of chemostat cultures prior to costly and laborious genome-wide analysis. In addition TRAC was shown to be an efficient tool in studying gene expression dynamics in transient conditions.

  7. Steady State Performance Investigation of a Three Phase Induction Motor Running Off Unbalanced Supply Voltages

    Aslan Sabahaldeen Jalal Abdi

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the performance of a conventional three phase induction motor supplied by unbalanced voltages. An effort to study the motor steady state performance under this disturbance is introduced. Using per phase equivalent circuit analysis with the concept of symmetrical components approach, the steady state performance is theoretically calculated. Also, a model for the induction motor with the MATLAB/Simulink SPS tools has been implemented and steady state...

  8. Fast Estimation of Plant Steady State, with Application to Static RTO

    Rodrigues, Diogo; Amrhein, Michael; Billeter, Julien; Bonvin, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    In the operation of continuous processes, many tasks require the knowledge of plant steady state at various operating points. This is for example the case in the context of kinetic modeling, response surface modeling and real-time optimization. If the computational techniques are in principle straightforward, the time needed to reach steady state represents the main limiting factor. This work proposes a novel way of speeding up the estimation of plant steady state through...

  9. Superconducting magnets and cryogenics for the steady state superconducting tokamak SST-1

    SST-1 is a steady state superconducting tokamak for studying the physics of the plasma processes in tokamak under steady state conditions and to learn technologies related to the steady state operation of the tokamak. SST-1 will have superconducting magnets made from NbTi based conductors operating at 4.5 K temperature. The design of the superconducting magnets and the cryogenic system of SST-1 tokamak are described. (author)

  10. A Review of Fusion and Tokamak Research Towards Steady-State Operation: A JAEA Contribution

    Mitsuru Kikuchi

    2010-01-01

    Providing a historical overview of 50 years of fusion research, a review of the fundamentals and concepts of fusion and research efforts towards the implementation of a steady state tokamak reactor is presented. In 1990, a steady-state tokamak reactor (SSTR) best utilizing the bootstrap current was developed. Since then, significant efforts have been made in major tokamaks, including JT-60U, exploring advanced regimes relevant to the steady state operation of tokamaks. In this paper, the fund...

  11. Kinematical Analysis along Maximal Lactate Steady State Swimming Intensity

    Figueiredo, Pedro; Nazario, Rafael; Sousa, Marisa; Pelarigo, Jailton Gregório; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo; Fernandes, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a kinematical analysis during swimming at the intensity corresponding to maximal lactate steady state (MLSS). Thirteen long distance swimmers performed, in different days, an intermittent incremental protocol of n x 200 m until exhaustion and two to four 30-min submaximal constant speed bouts to determine the MLSS. The video analysis, using APAS System (Ariel Dynamics Inc., USA), allowed determining the following relevant swimming determinants (in five moments of the 30-min test: 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100%): stroke rate, stroke length, trunk incline, intracyclic velocity variation, propelling efficiency, index of coordination and the time allotted to propulsion per distance unit. An ANOVA for repeated measures was used to compare the parameters mean values along each moment of analysis. Stoke rate tended to increase and stroke length to decrease along the test; a tendency to decrease was also found for intracyclic velocity variation and propelling efficiency whereas the index of coordination and the propulsive impulse remained stable during the MLSS test. It can be concluded that the MLSS is not only an intensity to maintain without a significant increase of blood lactate concentration, but a concomitant stability for some biomechanical parameters exists (after an initial adaptation). However, efficiency indicators seem to be more sensitive to changes occurring during swimming at this threshold intensity. Key Points In MLSS swimming intensity, stability of the stroke length and stroke frequency occurs after an initial adaptation. Efficiency indicators seem to be more sensitive to possible changes occurring through time at MLSS intensity. MLSS is a useful and practical swimming intensity to be maintained for a long period of time, but some constraints in technique can occur. PMID:25177189

  12. Impact of aquifer desaturation on steady-state river seepage

    Morel-Seytoux, Hubert J.; Miracapillo, Cinzia; Mehl, Steffen

    2016-02-01

    Flow exchange between surface and ground water is of great importance be it for beneficial allocation and use of the water resources or for the proper exercise of water rights. That exchange can take place under a saturated or unsaturated flow regime. Which regimes occur depend on conditions in the vicinity of the interactive area. Withdrawals partially sustained by seepage may not bring about desaturation but greater amounts eventually will. The problem considered in this paper deals only with the steady-state case. It is meant as a first step toward a simple, yet accurate and physically based treatment of the transient situation. The primary purpose of the article is to provide simple criteria for determination of the initiation of desaturation in an aquifer originally in saturated hydraulic connection with a river or a recharge area. The extent of the unsaturated zone in the aquifer will increase with increasing withdrawals while at the same time the seepage rate from the river increases. However the seepage increase will stop once infiltration takes place strictly by gravity in the aquifer and is no longer opposed by the capillary rise from the water table below the riverbed. Following desaturation simple criteria are derived and simple analytical formulae provided to estimate the river seepage based on the position of the water table mound below the clogging layer and at some distance away from the river bank. They fully account for the unsaturated flow phenomena, including the existence of a drainage entry pressure. Two secondary objectives were to verify that (1) the assumption of uniform vertical flow through a clogging layer and that (2) the approximation of the water table mound below the seepage area as a flat surface were both reasonably legitimate. This approach will be especially advantageous for the implementation of the methodology in large-scale applications of integrated hydrologic models used for management.

  13. Steady State Analysis of Multiple Effect Evaporation (MEE) Desalination Process

    Life without water is not possible. Like other natural resources, the global resources of fresh water are unevenly distributed. The world population is increasing at very rapid rate while the natural water resources remain constant. This gap is expected to widen dramatically in the near future. Our country like most countries in the east suffer from water stressed condition. Desalination is only the logical or available solution. In MED units, the feed seawater sprayed individually in each effect is heated to form pure vapors, which condense to form product water. Irrespective of the continuous development of the desalination industry the thermal desalination is still expensive. The study presented in this thesis is motivated by, to study the impact of various cost controlling parameters on the performance of MEE desalination process. KANUPP has two desalination plants (RO and NDDP). The NDDP has parallel feed cross flow multiple effect evaporation (MEE-PC) configurations. The study presented in this thesis describes a simplified steady state mathematical model to analyze the MED systems. The results obtained by the model are compared with the NDDP data. The developed model is used to investigate the effect of the parameters controlling the product water cost. These parameters includes thermal performance ratio, cooling water flow rate and heat transfer area. It can also be used to study the effect of variation in the operating conditions of the plant on the plant performance. The effect of the process variables on the performance of MED is carried out. This includes the effect of number of effects, intake seawater salinity and heating stream temperature, vacuum condition in term of vapor temperature of last effect. (author)

  14. A new perspective on steady-state cosmology: from Einstein to Hoyle

    O'Raifeartaigh, Cormac

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported the discovery of an unpublished manuscript by Albert Einstein in which he attempted a 'steady-state' model of the universe, i.e., a cosmic model in which the expanding universe remains essentially unchanged due to a continuous formation of matter from empty space. The manuscript was apparently written in early 1931, many years before the steady-state models of Fred Hoyle, Hermann Bondi and Thomas Gold. We compare Einstein's steady-state cosmology with that of Hoyle, Bondi and Gold and consider the reasons Einstein abandoned his model. The relevance of steady-state models for today's cosmology is briefly reviewed.

  15. NASA Glenn Steady-State Heat Pipe Code GLENHP: Compilation for 64- and 32-Bit Windows Platforms

    Tower, Leonard K.; Geng, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    A new version of the NASA Glenn Steady State Heat Pipe Code, designated "GLENHP," is introduced here. This represents an update to the disk operating system (DOS) version LERCHP reported in NASA/TM-2000-209807. The new code operates on 32- and 64-bit Windows-based platforms from within the 32-bit command prompt window. An additional evaporator boundary condition and other features are provided.

  16. Progress towards high-performance, steady-state spherical torus.

    Lee, S.G (Korea Basic Science Institute, Taejon, Republic of Korea); Kugel, W. (Princeton University, NJ); Efthimion, P. C. (Princeton University, NJ); Kissick, M. W. (University of Wisconsin, WI); Bourdelle, C. (CEA Cadarache, France); Kim, J.H (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon, Republic of Korea); Gray, T. (Princeton University, NJ); Garstka, G. D. (University of Wisconsin, WI); Fonck, R. J. (University of Wisconsin, WI); Doerner, R. (University of California, San Diego, CA); Diem, S.J. (University of Wisconsin, WI); Pacella, D. (ENEA, Frascati, Italy); Nishino, N. (Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan); Ferron, J. R. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA); Skinner, C. H. (Princeton University, NJ); Stutman, D. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Soukhanovskii, V. (Princeton University, NJ); Choe, W. (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon, Republic of Korea); Chrzanowski, J. (Princeton University, NJ); Mau, T.K. (University of California, San Diego, CA); Bell, Michael G. (Princeton University, NJ); Raman, R. (University of Washington, Seattle, WA); Peng, Y-K. M. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Ono, M. (Princeton University, NJ); Park, W. (Princeton University, NJ); Hoffman, D. (Princeton University, NJ); Maqueda, R. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Kaye, S. M. (Princeton University, NJ); Kaita, R. (Princeton University, NJ); Jarboe, T.R. (University of Washington, Seattle, WA); Hill, K.W. (Princeton University, NJ); Heidbrink, W. (University of California, Irvine, CA); Spaleta, J. (Princeton University, NJ); Sontag, A.C (University of Wisconsin, WI); Seraydarian, R. (University of California, San Diego, CA); Schooff, R.J. (University of Wisconsin, WI); Sabbagh, S.A. (Columbia University, New York, NY); Menard, J. (Princeton University, NJ); Mazzucato, E. (Princeton University, NJ); Lee, K. (University of California, Davis, CA); LeBlanc, B. (Princeton University, NJ); Probert, P. H. (University of Wisconsin, WI); Blanchard, W. (Princeton University, NJ); Wampler, William R.; Swain, D. W. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Ryan, P.M. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Rosenberg, A. (Princeton University, NJ); Ramakrishnan, S. (Princeton University, NJ); Phillips, C.K. (Princeton University, NJ); Park, H.K. (Princeton University, NJ); Roquemore, A. L. (Princeton University, NJ); Paoletti, F. (Columbia University, New York, NY); Medley, S. S. (Princeton University, NJ); Fredrickson, E. D. (Princeton University, NJ); Kessel, C. E. (Princeton University, NJ); Stevenson, T. (Princeton University, NJ); Darrow, D. S. (Princeton University, NJ); Majeski, R. (Princeton University, NJ); Bitter, M. (Princeton University, NJ); Neumeyer, C. (Princeton University, NJ); Nelson, B.A. (University of Washington, Seattle, WA); Paul, S. F. (Princeton University, NJ); Manickam, J. (Princeton University, NJ); Ostrander, C. N. (University of Wisconsin, WI); Mueller, D. (Princeton University, NJ); Lewicki, B.T (University of Wisconsin, WI); Luckhardt, S. (University of California, San Diego, CA); Johnson, D.W. (Princeton University, NJ); Grisham, L.R. (Princeton University, NJ); Kubota, Shigeru (University of California, Los Angeles, CA); Gates, D.A. (Princeton University, NJ); Bush, C. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Synakowski, E.J. (Princeton University, NJ); Schaffer, M. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA); Boedo, J. (University of California, San Diego, CA); Maingi, R. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Redi, M. (Princeton University, NJ); Pinsker, R. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA); Bigelow, T. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Bell, R. E. (Princeton University, NJ)

    2004-06-01

    Research on the spherical torus (or spherical tokamak) (ST) is being pursued to explore the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more moderate aspect ratio devices, such as the conventional tokamak. The ST experiments are being conducted in various US research facilities including the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton, and three medium sized ST research facilities: PEGASUS at University of Wisconsin, HIT-II at University of Washington, and CDX-U at Princeton. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the US, an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a Demo device, are being discussed. For these, it is essential to develop high performance, steady-state operational scenarios. The relevant scientific issues are energy confinement, MHD stability at high beta ({beta}), non-inductive sustainment, Ohmic-solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In the confinement area, the NSTX experiments have shown that the confinement can be up to 50% better than the ITER-98-pby2 H-mode scaling, consistent with the requirements for an ST-based CTF and Demo. In NSTX, CTF-relevant average toroidal beta values {beta}{sub T} of up to 35% with a near unity central {beta}{sub T} have been obtained. NSTX will be exploring advanced regimes where {beta}{sub T} up to 40% can be sustained through active stabilization of resistive wall modes. To date, the most successful technique for non-inductive sustainment in NSTX is the high beta poloidal regime, where discharges with a high non-inductive fraction ({approx}60% bootstrap current+NBI current drive) were sustained over the resistive skin time. Research on radio-frequency (RF) based heating and current drive utilizing high harmonic fast wave and electron Bernstein wave is also pursued on NSTX, PEGASUS, and CDX-U. For non-inductive start-up, the coaxial helicity injection, developed in HIT/HIT-II, has been adopted on NSTX

  17. Progress Towards High Performance, Steady-state Spherical Torus

    M. Ono; M.G. Bell; R.E. Bell; T. Bigelow; M. Bitter; W. Blanchard; J. Boedo; C. Bourdelle; C. Bush; W. Choe; J. Chrzanowski; D.S. Darrow; S.J. Diem; R. Doerner; P.C. Efthimion; J.R. Ferron; R.J. Fonck; E.D. Fredrickson; G.D. Garstka; D.A. Gates; T. Gray; L.R. Grisham; W. Heidbrink; K.W. Hill; D. Hoffman; T.R. Jarboe; D.W. Johnson; R. Kaita; S.M. Kaye; C. Kessel; J.H. Kim; M.W. Kissick; S. Kubota; H.W. Kugel; B.P. LeBlanc; K. Lee; S.G. Lee; B.T. Lewicki; S. Luckhardt; R. Maingi; R. Majeski; J. Manickam; R. Maqueda; T.K. Mau; E. Mazzucato; S.S. Medley; J. Menard; D. Mueller; B.A. Nelson; C. Neumeyer; N. Nishino; C.N. Ostrander; D. Pacella; F. Paoletti; H.K. Park; W. Park; S.F. Paul; Y.-K. M. Peng; C.K. Phillips; R. Pinsker; P.H. Probert; S. Ramakrishnan; R. Raman; M. Redi; A.L. Roquemore; A. Rosenberg; P.M. Ryan; S.A. Sabbagh; M. Schaffer; R.J. Schooff; R. Seraydarian; C.H. Skinner; A.C. Sontag; V. Soukhanovskii; J. Spaleta; T. Stevenson; D. Stutman; D.W. Swain; E. Synakowski; Y. Takase; X. Tang; G. Taylor; J. Timberlake; K.L. Tritz; E.A. Unterberg; A. Von Halle; J. Wilgen; M. Williams; J.R. Wilson; X. Xu; S.J. Zweben; R. Akers; R.E. Barry; P. Beiersdorfer; J.M. Bialek; B. Blagojevic; P.T. Bonoli; M.D. Carter; W. Davis; B. Deng; L. Dudek; J. Egedal; R. Ellis; M. Finkenthal; J. Foley; E. Fredd; A. Glasser; T. Gibney; M. Gilmore; R.J. Goldston; R.E. Hatcher; R.J. Hawryluk; W. Houlberg; R. Harvey; S.C. Jardin; J.C. Hosea; H. Ji; M. Kalish; J. Lowrance; L.L. Lao; F.M. Levinton; N.C. Luhmann; R. Marsala; D. Mastravito; M.M. Menon; O. Mitarai; M. Nagata; G. Oliaro; R. Parsells; T. Peebles; B. Peneflor; D. Piglowski; G.D. Porter; A.K. Ram; M. Rensink; G. Rewoldt; P. Roney; K. Shaing; S. Shiraiwa; P. Sichta; D. Stotler; B.C. Stratton; R. Vero; W.R. Wampler; G.A. Wurden

    2003-10-02

    Research on the Spherical Torus (or Spherical Tokamak) is being pursued to explore the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more moderate aspect-ratio devices, such as the conventional tokamak. The Spherical Tours (ST) experiments are being conducted in various U.S. research facilities including the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton, and three medium-size ST research facilities: Pegasus at University of Wisconsin, HIT-II at University of Washington, and CDX-U at Princeton. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the U.S., an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a Demo device, are being discussed. For these, it is essential to develop high-performance, steady-state operational scenarios. The relevant scientific issues are energy confinement, MHD stability at high beta (B), noninductive sustainment, ohmic-solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In the confinement area, the NSTX experiments have shown that the confinement can be up to 50% better than the ITER-98-pby2 H-mode scaling, consistent with the requirements for an ST-based CTF and Demo. In NSTX, CTF-relevant average toroidal beta values bT of up to 35% with the near unity central betaT have been obtained. NSTX will be exploring advanced regimes where bT up to 40% can be sustained through active stabilization of resistive wall modes. To date, the most successful technique for noninductive sustainment in NSTX is the high beta-poloidal regime, where discharges with a high noninductive fraction ({approx}60% bootstrap current + neutral-beam-injected current drive) were sustained over the resistive skin time. Research on radio-frequency-based heating and current drive utilizing HHFW (High Harmonic Fast Wave) and EBW (Electron Bernstein Wave) is also pursued on NSTX, Pegasus, and CDX-U. For noninductive start-up, the Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI), developed in HIT/HIT-II, has been

  18. Progress towards high-performance, steady-state spherical torus

    Ono, M.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Bigelow, T.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Boedo, J.; Bourdelle, C.; Bush, C.; Choe, W.; Chrzanowski, J.; Darrow, D. S.; Diem, S. J.; Doerner, R.; Efthimion, P. C.; Ferron, J. R.; Fonck, R. J.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Garstka, G. D.; Gates, D A; Gray, T.; Grisham, L. R.; Heidbrink, W.; Hill, K. W.; Hoffman, D.; Jarboe, T. R.; Johnson, D. W.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S. M.; Kessel, C.; Kim, J. H.; Kissick, M. W.; Kubota, S.; Kugel, H. W.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Lee, K.; Lee, S. G.; Lewicki, B. T.; Luckhardt, S.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Manickam, J.; Maqueda, R.; Mau, T. K.; Mazzucato, E.; Medley, S. S.; Menard, J.; Mueller, D.; Nelson, B. A.; Neumeyer, C.; Nishino, N.; Ostrander, C. N.; Pacella, D.; Paoletti, F.; Park, H. K.; Park, W.; Paul, S. F.; Peng, Y-K M.; Phillips, C. K.; Pinsker, R.; Probert, P. H.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Raman, R.; Redi, M.; Roquemore, A. L.; Rosenberg, A.; Ryan, P. M.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Schaffer, M.; Schooff, R. J.; Seraydarian, R.; Skinner, C. H.; Sontag, A. C.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Spaleta, J.; Stevenson, T.; Stutman, D.; Swain, D. W.; Synakowski, E.; Takase, Y.; Tang, X.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Tritz, K. L.; Unterberg, E. A.; Halle, A. Von.; Wilgen, J.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Xu, X.; Zweben, S. J.; Akers, R.; Barry, R. E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bialek, J. M.; Blagojevic, B.; Bonoli, P. T.; Carter, M. D.; Davis, W.; Deng, B.; Dudek, L.; Egedal, J.; Ellis, R.; Finkenthal, M.; Foley, J.; Fredd, E.; Glasser, A.; Gibney, T.; Gilmore, M.; Goldston, R. J.; Hatcher, R. E.; Hawryluk, R. J.; Houlberg, W.; Harvey, R.; Jardin, S. C.; Hosea, J. C.; Ji, H.; Kalish, M.; Lowrance, J.; Lao, L. L.; Levinton, F. M.; Luhmann, N. C.; Marsala, R.; Mastravito, D.; Menon, M. M.; Mitarai, O.; Nagata, M.; Oliaro, G.; Parsells, R.; Peebles, T.; Peneflor, B.; Piglowski, D.; Porter, G. D.; Ram, A. K.; Rensink, M.; Rewoldt, G.; Robinson, J.; Roney, P.; Shaing, K.; Shiraiwa, S.; Sichta, P.; Stotler, D.; Stratton, B. C.; Vero, R.; Wampler, W. R.; Wurden, G. A.

    2003-12-01

    Research on the spherical torus (or spherical tokamak) (ST) is being pursued to explore the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more moderate aspect ratio devices, such as the conventional tokamak. The ST experiments are being conducted in various US research facilities including the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton, and three medium sized ST research facilities: PEGASUS at University of Wisconsin, HIT-II at University of Washington, and CDX-U at Princeton. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the US, an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a Demo device, are being discussed. For these, it is essential to develop high performance, steady-state operational scenarios. The relevant scientific issues are energy confinement, MHD stability at high beta (β), non-inductive sustainment, Ohmic-solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In the confinement area, the NSTX experiments have shown that the confinement can be up to 50% better than the ITER-98-pby2 H-mode scaling, consistent with the requirements for an ST-based CTF and Demo. In NSTX, CTF-relevant average toroidal beta values βT of up to 35% with a near unity central βT have been obtained. NSTX will be exploring advanced regimes where βT up to 40% can be sustained through active stabilization of resistive wall modes. To date, the most successful technique for non-inductive sustainment in NSTX is the high beta poloidal regime, where discharges with a high non-inductive fraction (~ 60% bootstrap current+NBI current drive) were sustained over the resistive skin time. Research on radio-frequency (RF) based heating and current drive utilizing high harmonic fast wave and electron Bernstein wave is also pursued on NSTX, PEGASUS, and CDX-U. For non-inductive start-up, the coaxial helicity injection, developed in HIT/HIT-II, has been adopted on NSTX to

  19. The diffusion equation and the steady state. Chapter 2

    We shall now study the equations that govern the neutron field in a reactor. These equations are based on the concept of local neutron balance, which takes into account the reaction rates in an element of volume and the net leakage rates out of the volume. The reaction rates are written in terms of the local cross sections, assumed known from a preprocessed database (e.g., ENDF/B-VI). The starting equation is the Maxwell-Boltzmann transport equation, in its integro-differential form. The various approximations required to go from the transport equation to the neutron diffusion equation will be presented first, because all finite-reactor calculations are based on the diffusion approximation. We shall then discuss the multi-group formalism of the diffusion equations and study the mathematical properties of this equation in steady state. This preliminary step will allow us to derive in a more accurate way, in the next chapter, the reactor point-kinetics equations. In the diffusion approximation, neutrons diffuse from regions of high concentration to regions of low concentration, just as heat diffuses from regions of high temperature to those of low temperature, or, rather, as gas molecules diffuse to reduce spatial variations in concentration. While it is sufficiently accurate to treat the transport of gas molecules as a diffusion process, this approach is too limiting for neutron transport. In contrast to a gas, where collisions are very frequent, the cross sections for the interaction of neutrons with nuclei are relatively small, as we saw in chapter 1 (of the order of barns, i.e., 10-24cm2) . This implies that neutrons traverse appreciable distances (of the order of a centimetre) between collisions. This relatively long neutron mean free path, together with the heterogeneity of the physical medium, requires that a more complete treatment be carried out, taking account of variations in the angular distribution of neutron speed in the vicinity of highly absorbing

  20. Progress Towards High-Performance, Steady-State Spherical Torus

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2004-01-04

    Research on the spherical torus (or spherical tokamak) (ST) is being pursued to explore the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more moderate aspect ratio devices, such as the conventional tokamak. The ST experiments are being conducted in various US research facilities including the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton, and three medium sized ST research facilities: PEGASUS at University of Wisconsin, HIT-II at University of Washington, and CDX-U at Princeton. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the US, an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a Demo device, are being discussed. For these, it is essential to develop high performance, steady-state operational scenarios. The relevant scientific issues are energy confinement, MHD stability at high beta ({beta}), non-inductive sustainment, Ohmic-solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In the confinement area, the NSTX experiments have shown that the confinement can be up to 50% better than the ITER-98-pby2 H-mode scaling, consistent with the requirements for an ST-based CTF and Demo. In NSTX, CTF-relevant average toroidal beta values {beta}{sub T} of up to 35% with a near unity central {beta}{sub T} have been obtained. NSTX will be exploring advanced regimes where {beta}{sub T} up to 40% can be sustained through active stabilization of resistive wall modes. To date, the most successful technique for non-inductive sustainment in NSTX is the high beta poloidal regime, where discharges with a high non-inductive fraction ({approx}60% bootstrap current+NBI current drive) were sustained over the resistive skin time. Research on radio-frequency (RF) based heating and current drive utilizing high harmonic fastwave and electron Bernstein wave is also pursued on NSTX, PEGASUS, and CDX-U. For non-inductive start-up, the coaxial helicity injection, developed in HIT/HIT-II, has been adopted on NSTX

  1. Progress Towards High Performance, Steady-state Spherical Torus

    Research on the Spherical Torus (or Spherical Tokamak) is being pursued to explore the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more moderate aspect-ratio devices, such as the conventional tokamak. The Spherical Tours (ST) experiments are being conducted in various U.S. research facilities including the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton, and three medium-size ST research facilities: Pegasus at University of Wisconsin, HIT-II at University of Washington, and CDX-U at Princeton. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the U.S., an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a Demo device, are being discussed. For these, it is essential to develop high-performance, steady-state operational scenarios. The relevant scientific issues are energy confinement, MHD stability at high beta (B), noninductive sustainment, ohmic-solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In the confinement area, the NSTX experiments have shown that the confinement can be up to 50% better than the ITER-98-pby2 H-mode scaling, consistent with the requirements for an ST-based CTF and Demo. In NSTX, CTF-relevant average toroidal beta values bT of up to 35% with the near unity central betaT have been obtained. NSTX will be exploring advanced regimes where bT up to 40% can be sustained through active stabilization of resistive wall modes. To date, the most successful technique for noninductive sustainment in NSTX is the high beta-poloidal regime, where discharges with a high noninductive fraction (∼60% bootstrap current + neutral-beam-injected current drive) were sustained over the resistive skin time. Research on radio-frequency-based heating and current drive utilizing HHFW (High Harmonic Fast Wave) and EBW (Electron Bernstein Wave) is also pursued on NSTX, Pegasus, and CDX-U. For noninductive start-up, the Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI), developed in HIT/HIT-II, has been adopted

  2. Nonequilibrium current-carrying steady states in the anisotropic X Y spin chain

    Lancaster, Jarrett L.

    2016-05-01

    Out-of-equilibrium behavior is explored in the one-dimensional anisotropic X Y model. Initially preparing the system in the isotropic X X model with a linearly varying magnetic field to create a domain-wall magnetization profile, dynamics is generated by rapidly changing the exchange interaction anisotropy and external magnetic field. Relaxation to a nonequilibrium steady state is studied analytically at the critical transverse Ising point, where correlation functions may be computed in closed form. For arbitrary values of anisotropy and external field, an effective generalized Gibbs' ensemble is shown to accurately describe observables in the long-time limit. Additionally, we find spatial oscillations in the exponentially decaying, transverse spin-spin correlation functions with wavelength set by the magnetization jump across the initial domain wall. This wavelength depends only weakly on anisotropy and magnetic field in contrast to the current, which is highly dependent on these parameters.

  3. Erratum to: Study on Chloride Ion Penetration Resistance of Rubberized Concrete Under Steady State Condition

    Md Noor Nurazuwa

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of crumb rubber, CR as fine aggregate in the concrete to enhance concrete durability against chloride ion diffusion was studied. Chloride ion diffusion in rubberized concrete was tested by migration test under steady state condition. Concrete specimen with water-to-cement ratio of 0.50 was prepared to study the CR effectiveness in comparison with lower water-to-cement ratio. In addition, 10% silica fume, SF was added to provide denser concrete and to understand its effectiveness against chloride ion diffusion. Results showed that chloride transport characteristics were improved by the increasing amount of CR in all mixed due to the fact that CR has the ability to repel water. Meanwhile, rubberized concrete with w/c = 0.35 gave better resistance against chloride ion penetration compared to w/c = 0.50. This was much improved with combination of CR and SF.

  4. Sampling of transport coefficients in steady state Townsend Monte Carlo simulation

    In this paper a complete and consistent set of equations for sampling of the data in steady state Townsend (SST) Monte Carlo simulations (MCS) is developed. Standard implementation of a Monte Carlo simulation code for time of flight (TOF) allows us to add SST sampling. Membrane's sampling has an advantage in obtaining spatial variation of properties with high spatial resolution but with a problem in poor statistics for low energy electrons that move perpendicular to the field axis. The box sampling overcomes this problem but suffers from a poorer statistics than membrane sampling. The results show the effect of non-conservative collisions in the difference between SST and TOF results. In addition the internal consistency between two methods of SST sampling is very good. The present paper also gives a complete set of equations for conversion between the two types of experiments TOF and SST. Our simulation provided us also with a way to test the conversion formulae and their convergence

  5. Differentiation and function of mouse monocyte-derived dendritic cells in steady state and inflammation.

    Domínguez, Pilar M; Ardavín, Carlos

    2010-03-01

    Although monocytes were originally described as precursors to all the different subpopulations of macrophages found in the steady state and formed under inflammatory and infectious conditions, recent data have demonstrated conclusively that monocytes can also differentiate into dendritic cells (DCs). Monocytes are the precursors to different subsets of DCs, such as Langerhans cells and DCs found in the lamina propria of the gastrointestinal, respiratory, and urogenital tracts. In addition, monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs), newly formed during inflammatory reactions, appear to fulfill an essential role in defense mechanisms against pathogens by participating in the induction of both adaptive and innate immune responses. In this regard, moDCs have the capacity to activate antigen-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses and to cross-prime CD8(+) T cells, during viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections. In addition, monocytes have been recently described as the precursors to a subset of DCs specialized in innate immunity against pathogens, named TipDCs [for TNF-alpha (tumor necrosis factor-alpha)-iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase)-producing DCs] that display a remarkable microbicidal activity and also provide iNOS-dependent help for antibody production by B cells. Importantly, in contrast to DCs developing in the steady state, moDCs formed during inflammatory and infectious processes are subjected to diverse soluble mediators that determine the multiple functional specificities displayed by moDCs, as a result of the remarkable developmental plasticity of monocytes. In this review, we discuss recent findings dealing with the differentiation and functional relevance of moDCs that have widened the frontiers of DC immunobiology in relation to innate and adaptive immunity and the etiology of chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:20193014

  6. Glucose Regulation of Pre-steady State Kinetics of ATP Hydrolysis by Na,K-ATPase

    Mohammad Mahfuzul HAQUE; Nikhat MANZOOR; Mohammad AMIN; Mohammad Ejaz HUSSAIN; Luqman Ahmad KHAN

    2007-01-01

    The effect of glucose and 2-deoxy-D-glucose on pre-steady state kinetics of ATP hydrolysis by Na,K-ATPase has been investigated by following pH transients in a stopped-flow spectrophotometer. A typical pre-steady state signal showed an initial decrease then subsequent increase in acidity. Under optimal Na+ (120 mM) and K+ (30 mM) concentrations, magnitudes of both H+ release and H+ absorption were found to be approximately 1.0/ATPase molecule. The presence of 1 mM glucose significantly decreased H+ absorption at high Na+ concentrations, whereas it was ineffective at low Na+. H+ release was decreased significantly in the presence of 1 mM glucose at Na+ concentrations ranging from 30 mM to 120 mM. Similar to the control,K+ did not show any effect on either H+ release or H+ absorption at all tested combinations of Na+ and K+ concentrations. Pre-steady state H+ signal obtained in the presence of 2-deoxy-D-glucose did not vary significantly as compared with glucose. Delayed addition of K+ (by 30 ms) to the mixture (enzyme+120 mM Na++ATP+glucose) showed that only small fractions of population absorb H+ in the absence of K+. No H+ absorption was observed in the absence of Na+. Delayed mixing of Na+ or K+ did not have any effect on H+ release. Effect of 2-deoxy-D-glucose on H+ absorption and release was almost the same as that of glucose at all combinations of Na+ and K+ concentrations. Results obtained have been discussed in terms of an extended kinetic scheme which shows that, in the presence of either glucose or 2-deoxy-D-glucose, significantly fewer enzyme molecules reache the E~P(3Na+) stage and that K+ plays an important role in the conversion of E1.ADP.P(3Na+) to H+.E1~(3Na+) complex.

  7. Challenges to radiative divertor/mantle operations in advanced, steady-state scenarios

    Full text of publication follows. Managing the heat exhaust problem is well recognized to be a major challenge in transforming present successes in magnetic confinement fusion experiments to demonstration of cost-effective, steady-state power generation from fusion [1][2]. One approach is to convert plasma thermal energy, normally directed to isolated surfaces, to isotropic photon emission, distributing exhaust power over a large surface area. Successful demonstrations of this technique on existing short pulse devices are shown, along with the inherent limitations; the collapse of core confinement with excessive radiation from the bulk plasma and restrictions to dissipation in the divertor volume. Feedback control of impurity seeding is discussed, showing recent examples from tokamaks [3]. For steady-state devices, additional constraints on divertor scenarios are driven by long-term plasma material interaction effects, with fuel recycling, net erosion limits and surface morphology changes forcing detached plasma operation where both heat and particle fluxes are substantially reduced. The instability of these detachment layers in standard X-point divertors with impurity seeding is outlined. Achieving these steady-state, high performance scenarios also restricts the divertor solution by requiring it be compatible with current-drive actuators and enhanced core confinement regimes. While ITER will operate with impurity seeding in a conventional tokamak geometry [4], it is not clear that this concept will reliably scale to a reactor and has been identified as a major risk factor in the development of fusion power [2]. Alternatives concepts are discussed, including the snowflake [5] and super-X divertor [6], along with their respective proof of principle experiments. The complications in convincingly scaling these concepts to a reactor are outlined, including challenges in validating numerical simulations of advanced, dissipative divertors. References: [1] Greenwald, M

  8. Steady-state and time-dependent modelling of parallel transport in the scrape-off layer

    Havlickova, E.; Fundamenski, W.; Naulin, Volker; Nielsen, Anders Henry; Zagorski, R.; Seidl, J.; Horacek, J.

    2011-01-01

    The one-dimensional fluid code SOLF1D has been used for modelling of plasma transport in the scrape-off layer (SOL) along magnetic field lines, both in steady state and under transient conditions that arise due to plasma turbulence. The presented work summarizes results of SOLF1D with attention...... supersonic transport when plasma–neutral interactions are not present. Asymmetric heat and particle fluxes are analysed for a case with poloidally asymmetric radial outflow (ballooning) and for a radial outflow with parallel momentum (rotation). In addition, parallel damping of the density and electron...... temperature calculated in SOLF1D is compared with the approximative model used in the turbulence code ESEL both for steady-state and turbulent SOL. Dynamics of the parallel transport are investigated for a simple transient event simulating the propagation of particles and energy to the targets from a blob...

  9. Thermodynamic simulation and evaluation of sugar refinery evaporators using a steady state modelling approach

    In a sugar refinery, the juice is concentrated through evaporation, with the objective of concentrating the juice to syrup as rapidly as possible. Because the heat of vaporization of water is relatively high, the evaporation process can be highly energy intensive, and therefore the economical use of steam is important in the refinery. This paper reports on the development of a simulation model for the evaporation sections of two Mauritian sugar refineries. The first objective was to use the simulation model to carry out an energy balance over the evaporators in order to assess the economy of steam usage over the refinery. The second objective was to examine to what extent a fundamental steady state model, based on thermodynamics (not kinetics) was capable of predicting the material and energy flows in two operating sugar refineries and thereby to evaluate the applicability of the modelling framework. The simulation model was validated using historical data as well as data from the plant DCS system. The simulation results generally correlated well with the measured values, except for one of the evaporators on one refinery. Some suggestions were made as to the cause of the discrepancy. On balance, it was found that both refineries are extremely efficient in terms of steam and equipment usage and that there is not much scope for energy optimisation within the present configuration - nor for much spare steam capacity for an additional refinery. It was also shown that steady state process simulation, using thermodynamic models, can generate a very useful representation of a working refinery. Besides being able to use the model to 'benchmark' the operation and thus evaluate its performance as a whole as well as across individual units, it could also be used to evaluate refinery performance across refineries, nationally as well as globally.

  10. Transient and steady state creep response of ice I and magnesium sulfate hydrate eutectic aggregates

    McCarthy, C.; Cooper, R.F.; Goldsby, D.L.; Durham, W.B.; Kirby, S.H.

    2011-01-01

    Using uniaxial compression creep experiments, we characterized the transient and steady state deformation behaviors of eutectic aggregates of system ice I and MgSO4 11H2O (MS11; meridianiite), which has significance because of its likely presence on moons of the outer solar system. Synthetic samples of eutectic liquid bulk composition, which produce eutectic colonies containing 0.35-0.50 volume fraction MS11, were tested as functions of colony size and lamellar spacing, temperature (230-250 K), and confining pressure (0.1 and 50 MPa) to strains ???0.2. Up to a differential stress of 6 MPa, the ice I-MS11 aggregates display an order of magnitude higher effective viscosity and higher stress sensitivity than do aggregates of pure polycrystalline ice at the same conditions. The creep data and associated microstructural observations demonstrate, however, that the aggregates are additionally more brittle than pure ice, approaching rate-independent plasticity that includes rupture of the hydrate phase at 6-8 MPa, depending on the scale of the microstructure. Microstructures of deformed samples reveal forms of semibrittle flow in which the hydrate phase fractures while the ice phase deforms plastically. Semibrittle flow in the icy shell of a planetary body would truncate the lithospheric strength envelope and thereby decrease the depth to the brittle-ductile transition by 55% and reduce the failure limit for compressional surface features from 10 to ???6 MPa. A constitutive equation that includes eutectic colony boundary sliding and intracolony flow is used to describe the steady state rheology of the eutectic aggregates. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.