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Sample records for adaptors regulate floral

  1. DMPD: The SAP family of adaptors in immune regulation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Full Text Available 15541655 The SAP family of adaptors in immune regulation. Latour S, Veillette A. Se...min Immunol. 2004 Dec;16(6):409-19. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The SAP family of adaptors in immune ...regulation. PubmedID 15541655 Title The SAP family of adaptors in immune regulation. Authors Latour S, Veill

  2. DMPD: Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor proteins. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Full Text Available 17667936 Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor prote... (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor proteins. ...PubmedID 17667936 Title Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 recep

  3. FON2 SPARE1 redundantly regulates floral meristem maintenance with FLORAL ORGAN NUMBER2 in rice.

    Takuya Suzaki

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available CLAVATA signaling restricts stem cell identity in the shoot apical meristem (SAM in Arabidopsis thaliana. In rice (Oryza sativa, FLORAL ORGAN NUMBER2 (FON2, closely related to CLV3, is involved as a signaling molecule in a similar pathway to negatively regulate stem cell proliferation in the floral meristem (FM. Here we show that the FON2 SPARE1 (FOS1 gene encoding a CLE protein functions along with FON2 in maintenance of the FM. In addition, FOS1 appears to be involved in maintenance of the SAM in the vegetative phase, because constitutive expression of FOS1 caused termination of the vegetative SAM. Genetic analysis revealed that FOS1 does not need FON1, the putative receptor of FON2, for its action, suggesting that FOS1 and FON2 may function in meristem maintenance as signaling molecules in independent pathways. Initially, we identified FOS1 as a suppressor that originates from O. sativa indica and suppresses the fon2 mutation in O. sativa japonica. FOS1 function in japonica appears to be compromised by a functional nucleotide polymorphism (FNP at the putative processing site of the signal peptide. Sequence comparison of FOS1 in about 150 domesticated rice and wild rice species indicates that this FNP is present only in japonica, suggesting that redundant regulation by FOS1 and FON2 is commonplace in species in the Oryza genus. Distribution of the FNP also suggests that this mutation may have occurred during the divergence of japonica from its wild ancestor. Stem cell maintenance may be regulated by at least three negative pathways in rice, and each pathway may contribute differently to this regulation depending on the type of the meristem. This situation contrasts with that in Arabidopsis, where CLV signaling is the major single pathway in all meristems.

  4. Autoinhibition of Mint1 adaptor protein regulates amyloid precursor protein binding and processing

    Matos, Maria F.; Xu, Yibin; Dulubova, Irina; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Richardson, John M.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Rizo, Josep; Ho, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Mint adaptor proteins bind to the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and regulate APP processing associated with Alzheimer’s disease; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying Mint regulation in APP binding and processing remain unclear. Biochemical, biophysical, and cellular experiments now show that the Mint1 phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domain that binds to APP is intramolecularly inhibited by the adjacent C-terminal linker region. The crystal structure of a C-terminally extended Mint1 PT...

  5. Synapse formation is regulated by the signaling adaptor GIT1

    Zhang, Huaye; Webb, Donna J.; Asmussen, Hannelore; Horwitz, Alan F.

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic spines in the central nervous system undergo rapid actin-based shape changes, making actin regulators potential modulators of spine morphology and synapse formation. Although several potential regulators and effectors for actin organization have been identified, the mechanisms by which these molecules assemble and localize are not understood. Here we show that the G protein–coupled receptor kinase–interacting protein (GIT)1 serves such a function by targeting actin regulators and lo...

  6. Direct regulation of the floral homeotic APETALA1 gene by APETALA3 and PISTILLATA in Arabidopsis.

    Sundström, Jens F; Nakayama, Naomi; Glimelius, Kristina; Irish, Vivian F

    2006-05-01

    The floral homeotic gene APETALA1 (AP1) specifies floral meristem identity and sepal and petal identity in Arabidopsis. Consistent with its multiple roles during floral development, AP1 is initially expressed throughout the floral meristem, and later its expression becomes restricted to sepal and petal primordia. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we show that the floral homeotic PISTILLATA (PI) protein, required for petal and stamen development, has the ability to bind directly to the promoter region of AP1. In support of the hypothesis that PI, and its interacting partner APETALA3 (AP3), regulates the transcription of AP1, we show that AP1 transcript levels are elevated in strong ap3-3 mutant plants. Kinetic studies, using transgenic Arabidopsis plants in which both AP3 and PI are under post-translational control, show that AP1 transcript levels are down regulated within 2 h of AP3/PI activation. This implies that the reduction in AP1 transcripts is an early event in the cascade following AP3/PI induction and provides independent support for the hypothesis that AP1 is a direct target of the AP3/PI heterodimer. Together these results suggest a model whereby AP3/PI directly acts, in combination with other factors, to restrict the expression of AP1 during early stages of floral development. PMID:16640596

  7. Phosphorylation-Dependent Regulation of the DNA Damage Response of Adaptor Protein KIBRA in Cancer Cells.

    Mavuluri, Jayadev; Beesetti, Swarnalatha; Surabhi, Rohan; Kremerskothen, Joachim; Venkatraman, Ganesh; Rayala, Suresh K

    2016-05-01

    Multifunctional adaptor proteins encompassing various protein-protein interaction domains play a central role in the DNA damage response pathway. In this report, we show that KIBRA is a physiologically interacting reversible substrate of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase. We identified the site of phosphorylation in KIBRA as threonine 1006, which is embedded within the serine/threonine (S/T) Q consensus motif, by site-directed mutagenesis, and we further confirmed the same with a phospho-(S/T) Q motif-specific antibody. Results from DNA repair functional assays such as the γ-H2AX assay, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), Comet assay, terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, and clonogenic cell survival assay using stable overexpression clones of wild-type (wt.) KIBRA and active (T1006E) and inactive (T1006A) KIBRA phosphorylation mutants showed that T1006 phosphorylation on KIBRA is essential for optimal DNA double-strand break repair in cancer cells. Further, results from stable retroviral short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown (KD) clones of KIBRA and KIBRA knockout (KO) model cells generated by a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas9 system showed that depleting KIBRA levels compromised the DNA repair functions in cancer cells upon inducing DNA damage. All these phenotypic events were reversed upon reconstitution of KIBRA into cells lacking KIBRA knock-in (KI) model cells. All these results point to the fact that phosphorylated KIBRA might be functioning as a scaffolding protein/adaptor protein facilitating the platform for further recruitment of other DNA damage response factors. In summary, these data demonstrate the imperative functional role of KIBRAper se(KIBRA phosphorylation at T1006 site as a molecular switch that regulates the DNA damage response, possibly via the nonhomologous end joining [NHEJ] pathway), suggesting that KIBRA could be a potential

  8. Regulation of APETALA3 floral homeotic gene expression by meristem identity genes.

    Lamb, Rebecca S; Hill, Theresa A; Tan, Queenie K-G; Irish, Vivian F

    2002-05-01

    The Arabidopsis APETALA3 (AP3) floral homeotic gene is required for specifying petal and stamen identities, and is expressed in a spatially limited domain of cells in the floral meristem that will give rise to these organs. Here we show that the floral meristem identity genes LEAFY (LFY) and APETALA1 (AP1) are required for the activation of AP3. The LFY transcription factor binds to a sequence, with dyad symmetry, that lies within a region of the AP3 promoter required for early expression of AP3. Mutation of this region abolishes LFY binding in vitro and in yeast one hybrid assays, but has no obvious effect on AP3 expression in planta. Experiments using a steroid-inducible form of LFY show that, in contrast to its direct transcriptional activation of other floral homeotic genes, LFY acts in both a direct and an indirect manner to regulate AP3 expression. This LFY-induced expression of AP3 depends in part on the function of the APETALA1 (AP1) floral homeotic gene, since mutations in AP1 reduce LFY-dependent induction of AP3 expression. LFY therefore appears to act through several pathways, one of which is dependent on AP1 activity, to regulate AP3 expression. PMID:11959818

  9. Adaptor protein LNK is a negative regulator of brain neural stem cell proliferation after stroke.

    Ahlenius, Henrik; Devaraju, Karthikeyan; Monni, Emanuela; Oki, Koichi; Wattananit, Somsak; Darsalia, Vladimer; Iosif, Robert E; Torper, Olof; Wood, James C; Braun, Sebastian; Jagemann, Lucas; Nuber, Ulrike A; Englund, Elisabet; Jacobsen, Sten-Eirik W; Lindvall, Olle; Kokaia, Zaal

    2012-04-11

    Ischemic stroke causes transient increase of neural stem and progenitor cell (NSPC) proliferation in the subventricular zone (SVZ), and migration of newly formed neuroblasts toward the damaged area where they mature to striatal neurons. The molecular mechanisms regulating this plastic response, probably involved in structural reorganization and functional recovery, are poorly understood. The adaptor protein LNK suppresses hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal, but its presence and role in the brain are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that LNK is expressed in NSPCs in the adult mouse and human SVZ. Lnk(-/-) mice exhibited increased NSPC proliferation after stroke, but not in intact brain or following status epilepticus. Deletion of Lnk caused increased NSPC proliferation while overexpression decreased mitotic activity of these cells in vitro. We found that Lnk expression after stroke increased in SVZ through the transcription factors STAT1/3. LNK attenuated insulin-like growth factor 1 signaling by inhibition of AKT phosphorylation, resulting in reduced NSPC proliferation. Our findings identify LNK as a stroke-specific, endogenous negative regulator of NSPC proliferation, and suggest that LNK signaling is a novel mechanism influencing plastic responses in postischemic brain. PMID:22496561

  10. ATP binding to p97/VCP D1 domain regulates selective recruitment of adaptors to its proximal N-domain.

    Wei Sheng Chia

    Full Text Available p97/Valosin-containing protein (VCP is a member of the AAA-ATPase family involved in many cellular processes including cell division, intracellular trafficking and extraction of misfolded proteins in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD. It is a homohexamer with each subunit containing two tandem D1 and D2 ATPase domains and N- and C-terminal regions that function as adaptor protein binding domains. p97/VCP is directed to its many different functional pathways by associating with various adaptor proteins. The regulation of the recruitment of the adaptor proteins remains unclear. Two adaptor proteins, Ufd1/Npl4 and p47, which bind exclusively to the p97/VCP N-domain and direct p97/VCP to either ERAD-related processes or homotypic fusion of Golgi fragments, were studied here. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor-based assays allowed the study of binding kinetics in real time. In competition experiments, it was observed that in the presence of ATP, Ufd1/Npl4 was able to compete more effectively with p47 for binding to p97/VCP. By using non-hydrolysable ATP analogues and the hexameric truncated p97/N-D1 fragment, it was shown that binding rather than hydrolysis of ATP to the proximal D1 domain strengthened the Ufd1/Npl4 association with the N-domain, thus regulating the recruitment of either Ufd1/Npl4 or p47. This novel role of ATP and an assigned function to the D1 AAA-ATPase domain link the multiple functions of p97/VCP to the metabolic status of the cell.

  11. The ULTRAPETALA1 gene functions early in Arabidopsis development to restrict shoot apical meristem activity and acts through WUSCHEL to regulate floral meristem determinacy.

    Carles, Cristel C.; Lertpiriyapong, Kvin; Reville, Keira; Fletcher, Jennifer C

    2004-01-01

    Shoot and floral meristem activity in higher plants is controlled by complex signaling networks consisting of positive and negative regulators. The Arabidopsis ULTRAPETALA1 (ULT1) gene has been shown to act as a negative regulator of meristem cell accumulation in inflorescence and floral meristems, as loss-of-function ult1 mutations cause inflorescence meristem enlargement, the production of extra flowers and floral organs, and a decrease in floral meristem determinacy. To investigate whether...

  12. Four tomato FLOWERING LOCUS T-like proteins act antagonistically to regulate floral initiation

    Kai eCao; Lirong eCui; Xiaoting eZhou; Lin eYe; Zhirong eZou; Shulin eDeng

    2016-01-01

    The transition from vegetative growth to floral meristems in higher plants is regulated through the integration of internal cues and environmental signals. We were interested to examine the molecular mechanism of flowering in the day-neutral plant tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) and the effect of environmental conditions on tomato flowering. Analysis of the tomato genome uncovered 13 PEBP (phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein) genes, and found six of them were FT-like genes which named a...

  13. Four Tomato FLOWERING LOCUS T-Like Proteins Act Antagonistically to Regulate Floral Initiation

    Cao, Kai; Cui, Lirong; Zhou, Xiaoting; Lin YE; Zou, Zhirong; Deng, Shulin

    2016-01-01

    The transition from vegetative growth to floral meristems in higher plants is regulated through the integration of internal cues and environmental signals. We were interested to examine the molecular mechanism of flowering in the day-neutral plant tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) and the effect of environmental conditions on tomato flowering. Analysis of the tomato genome uncovered 13 PEBP (phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein) genes, and found six of them were FT-like genes which named a...

  14. Nck adaptors are positive regulators of the size and sensitivity of the T-cell repertoire.

    Roy, Edwige; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Holdorf, Amy D; Trubetskoy, Dmitry; Nabti, Sabrina; Küblbeck, Günter; Klevenz, Alexandra; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Leithäuser, Frank; Möller, Peter; Bladt, Friedhelm; Hämmerling, Günter; Arnold, Bernd; Pawson, Tony; Tafuri, Anna

    2010-08-31

    The size and sensitivity of the T-cell repertoire governs the effectiveness of immune responses against invading pathogens. Both are modulated by T-cell receptor (TCR) activity through molecular mechanisms, which remain unclear. Here, we provide genetic evidence that the SH2/SH3 domain containing proteins Nck lower the threshold of T-cell responsiveness. The hallmarks of Nck deletion were T-cell lymphopenia and hyporeactivity to TCR-mediated stimulation. In the absence of the Nck adaptors, peripheral T cells expressing a TCR with low avidity for self-antigens were strongly reduced, whereas an overall impairment of T-cell activation by weak antigenic stimulation was observed. Mechanistically, Nck deletion resulted in a significant decrease in calcium mobilization and ERK phosphorylation upon TCR engagement. Taken together, our findings unveil a crucial role for the Nck adaptors in shaping the T-cell repertoire to ensure maximal antigenic coverage and optimal T cell excitability. PMID:20709959

  15. Nck adaptors are positive regulators of the size and sensitivity of the T-cell repertoire

    Roy, Edwige; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Holdorf, Amy D.; Trubetskoy, Dmitry; Nabti, Sabrina; Küblbeck, Günter; Klevenz, Alexandra; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Leithäuser, Frank; Möller, Peter; Bladt, Friedhelm; Hämmerling, Günter; Arnold, Bernd; Pawson, Tony; Tafuri, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The size and sensitivity of the T-cell repertoire governs the effectiveness of immune responses against invading pathogens. Both are modulated by T-cell receptor (TCR) activity through molecular mechanisms, which remain unclear. Here, we provide genetic evidence that the SH2/SH3 domain containing proteins Nck lower the threshold of T-cell responsiveness. The hallmarks of Nck deletion were T-cell lymphopenia and hyporeactivity to TCR-mediated stimulation. In the absence of the Nck adaptors, pe...

  16. Circadian regulation of sunflower heliotropism, floral orientation, and pollinator visits.

    Atamian, Hagop S; Creux, Nicky M; Brown, Evan A; Garner, Austin G; Blackman, Benjamin K; Harmer, Stacey L

    2016-08-01

    Young sunflower plants track the Sun from east to west during the day and then reorient during the night to face east in anticipation of dawn. In contrast, mature plants cease movement with their flower heads facing east. We show that circadian regulation of directional growth pathways accounts for both phenomena and leads to increased vegetative biomass and enhanced pollinator visits to flowers. Solar tracking movements are driven by antiphasic patterns of elongation on the east and west sides of the stem. Genes implicated in control of phototropic growth, but not clock genes, are differentially expressed on the opposite sides of solar tracking stems. Thus, interactions between environmental response pathways and the internal circadian oscillator coordinate physiological processes with predictable changes in the environment to influence growth and reproduction. PMID:27493185

  17. The WIGGUM gene is required for proper regulation of floral meristem size in Arabidopsis

    Running, Mark P; Fletcher, Jennifer C; Meyerowitz, Elliot M.

    1998-01-01

    The study of cell division control within developing tissues is central to understanding the processes of pattern formation. The floral meristem of angiosperms gives rise to floral organs in a particular number and pattern. Despite its critical role, little is known about how cell division is controlled in the floral meristem, and few genes involved have been identified. We describe the phenotypic effects of mutations in WIGGUM, a gene required for control of cell proliferation in the floral ...

  18. Regulation and function of the CD3¿ DxxxLL motif: a binding site for adaptor protein-1 and adaptor protein-2 in vitro

    Dietrich, J; Kastrup, J; Nielsen, B L;

    1997-01-01

    /CD3gamma chimeras; and in vitro by binding CD3gamma peptides to clathrin-coated vesicle adaptor proteins (APs). We find that the CD3gamma D127xxxLL131/132 sequence represents one united motif for binding of both AP-1 and AP-2, and that this motif functions as an active sorting motif in monomeric CD4...... and for AP binding in vitro. Furthermore, we provide evidence indicating that phosphorylation of CD3gamma S126 in the context of the complete TCR induces a conformational change that exposes the DxxxLL sequence for AP binding. Exposure of the DxxxLL motif causes an increase in the TCR internalization...

  19. Cysteine-based regulation of the CUL3 adaptor protein Keap1

    Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) is a master transcription factor containing a powerful acidic transcriptional activation domain. Nrf2-dependent gene expression impacts cancer chemoprevention strategies, inflammatory responses, and progression of neurodegenerative diseases. Under basal conditions, association of Nrf2 with the CUL3 adaptor protein Keap1 results in the rapid Nrf2 ubiquitylation and proteasome-dependent degradation. Inhibition of Keap1 function blocks ubiquitylation of Nrf2, allowing newly synthesized Nrf2 to translocate into the nucleus, bind to ARE sites and direct target gene expression. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments coupled with proteomic analysis support a model in which Keap1 contains at least 2 distinct cysteine motifs. The first is located at Cys 151 in the BTB domain. The second is located in the intervening domain and centers around Cys 273 and 288. Adduction or oxidation at Cys151 has been shown to produce a conformational change in Keap1 that results in dissociation of Keap1 from CUL3, thereby inhibiting Nrf2 ubiquitylation. Thus, adduction captures specific chemical information and translates it into biochemical information via changes in structural conformation.

  20. Three R2R3-MYB transcription factors regulate distinct floral pigmentation patterning in Phalaenopsis spp.

    Hsu, Chia-Chi; Chen, You-Yi; Tsai, Wen-Chieh; Chen, Wen-Huei; Chen, Hong-Hwa

    2015-05-01

    Orchidaceae are well known for their fascinating floral morphologic features, specialized pollination, and distinctive ecological strategies. With their long-lasting flowers of various colors and pigmentation patterning, Phalaenopsis spp. have become important ornamental plants worldwide. In this study, we identified three R2R3-MYB transcription factors PeMYB2, PeMYB11, and PeMYB12. Their expression profiles were concomitant with red color formation in Phalaenopsis spp. flowers. Transient assay of overexpression of three PeMYBs verified that PeMYB2 resulted in anthocyanin accumulation, and these PeMYBs could activate the expression of three downstream structural genes Phalaenopsis spp. Flavanone 3-hydroxylase5, Phalaenopsis spp. Dihydroflavonol 4-reductase1, and Phalaenopsis spp. Anthocyanidin synthase3. In addition, these three PeMYBs participated in the distinct pigmentation patterning in a single flower, which was revealed by virus-induced gene silencing. In the sepals/petals, silencing of PeMYB2, PeMYB11, and PeMYB12 resulted in the loss of the full-red pigmentation, red spots, and venation patterns, respectively. Moreover, different pigmentation patterning was regulated by PeMYBs in the sepals/petals and lip. PeMYB11 was responsive to the red spots in the callus of the lip, and PeMYB12 participated in the full pigmentation in the central lobe of the lip. The differential pigmentation patterning was validated by RNA in situ hybridization. Additional assessment was performed in six Phalaenopsis spp. cultivars with different color patterns. The combined expression of these three PeMYBs in different ratios leads to a wealth of complicated floral pigmentation patterning in Phalaenopsis spp. PMID:25739699

  1. Multiple pathways for regulation of sigmaS (RpoS) stability in Escherichia coli via the action of multiple anti-adaptors.

    Bougdour, Alexandre; Cunning, Christofer; Baptiste, Patrick Jean; Elliott, Thomas; Gottesman, Susan

    2008-04-01

    SigmaS, the stationary phase sigma factor of Escherichia coli and Salmonella, is regulated at multiple levels. The sigmaS protein is unstable during exponential growth and is stabilized during stationary phase and after various stress treatments. Degradation requires both the ClpXP protease and the adaptor RssB. The small antiadaptor protein IraP is made in response to phosphate starvation and interacts with RssB, causing sigmaS stabilization under this stress condition. IraP is essential for sigmaS stabilization in some but not all starvation conditions, suggesting the existence of other anti-adaptor proteins. We report here the identification of new regulators of sigmaS stability, important under other stress conditions. IraM (inhibitor of RssB activity during Magnesium starvation) and IraD (inhibitor of RssB activity after DNA damage) inhibit sigmaS proteolysis both in vivo and in vitro. Our results reveal that multiple anti-adaptor proteins allow the regulation of sigmaS stability through the regulation of RssB activity under a variety of stress conditions. PMID:18383615

  2. Regulation of ITAM adaptor molecules and their receptors by inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT signalling during late stage osteoclast differentiation

    Highlights: ► Calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors FK506 and VIVIT treated human PBMC derived osteoclasts in vitro. ► Differential regulation of ITAM receptors and adaptor molecules by calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors. ► FK506 and VIVIT suppress ITAM factors during late phase osteoclast differentiation. -- Abstract: Osteoclasts are specialised bone resorptive cells responsible for both physiological and pathological bone loss. Osteoclast differentiation and activity is dependent upon receptor activator NF-kappa-B ligand (RANKL) interacting with its receptor RANK to induce the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1). The immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-dependent pathway has been identified as a co-stimulatory pathway in osteoclasts. Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) and triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells (TREM2) are essential receptors that pair with adaptor molecules Fc receptor common gamma chain (FcRγ) and DNAX-activating protein 12 kDa (DAP12) respectively to induce calcium signalling. Treatment with calcineurin-NFAT inhibitors, Tacrolimus (FK506) and the 11R-VIVIT (VIVIT) peptide, reduces NFATc1 expression consistent with a reduction in osteoclast differentiation and activity. This study aimed to investigate the effects of inhibiting calcineurin-NFAT signalling on the expression of ITAM factors and late stage osteoclast genes including cathepsin K (CathK), Beta 3 integrin (β3) and Annexin VIII (AnnVIII). Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were differentiated with RANKL and macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) over 10 days in the presence or absence of FK506 or VIVIT. Osteoclast formation (as assessed by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)) and activity (assessed by dentine pit resorption) were significantly reduced with treatment. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis demonstrated that FK506 treatment

  3. Regulation of ITAM adaptor molecules and their receptors by inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT signalling during late stage osteoclast differentiation

    Zawawi, M.S.F. [Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) (Malaysia); Discipline of Anatomy and Pathology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Dharmapatni, A.A.S.S.K.; Cantley, M.D. [Discipline of Anatomy and Pathology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); McHugh, K.P. [University of Florida, College of Dentistry, Fl (United States); Haynes, D.R. [Discipline of Anatomy and Pathology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Crotti, T.N., E-mail: tania.crotti@adelaide.edu.au [Discipline of Anatomy and Pathology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia)

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors FK506 and VIVIT treated human PBMC derived osteoclasts in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differential regulation of ITAM receptors and adaptor molecules by calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FK506 and VIVIT suppress ITAM factors during late phase osteoclast differentiation. -- Abstract: Osteoclasts are specialised bone resorptive cells responsible for both physiological and pathological bone loss. Osteoclast differentiation and activity is dependent upon receptor activator NF-kappa-B ligand (RANKL) interacting with its receptor RANK to induce the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1). The immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-dependent pathway has been identified as a co-stimulatory pathway in osteoclasts. Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) and triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells (TREM2) are essential receptors that pair with adaptor molecules Fc receptor common gamma chain (FcR{gamma}) and DNAX-activating protein 12 kDa (DAP12) respectively to induce calcium signalling. Treatment with calcineurin-NFAT inhibitors, Tacrolimus (FK506) and the 11R-VIVIT (VIVIT) peptide, reduces NFATc1 expression consistent with a reduction in osteoclast differentiation and activity. This study aimed to investigate the effects of inhibiting calcineurin-NFAT signalling on the expression of ITAM factors and late stage osteoclast genes including cathepsin K (CathK), Beta 3 integrin ({beta}3) and Annexin VIII (AnnVIII). Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were differentiated with RANKL and macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) over 10 days in the presence or absence of FK506 or VIVIT. Osteoclast formation (as assessed by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)) and activity (assessed by dentine pit resorption) were significantly reduced with treatment. Quantitative real

  4. A Cyclic di-GMP-binding Adaptor Protein Interacts with Histidine Kinase to Regulate Two-component Signaling.

    Xu, Linghui; Venkataramani, Prabhadevi; Ding, Yichen; Liu, Yang; Deng, Yinyue; Yong, Grace Lisi; Xin, Lingyi; Ye, Ruijuan; Zhang, Lianhui; Yang, Liang; Liang, Zhao-Xun

    2016-07-29

    The bacterial messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) binds to a diverse range of effectors to exert its biological effect. Despite the fact that free-standing PilZ proteins are by far the most prevalent c-di-GMP effectors known to date, their physiological function and mechanism of action remain largely unknown. Here we report that the free-standing PilZ protein PA2799 from the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa interacts directly with the hybrid histidine kinase SagS. We show that PA2799 (named as HapZ: histidine kinase associated PilZ) binds directly to the phosphoreceiver (REC) domain of SagS, and that the SagS-HapZ interaction is further enhanced at elevated c-di-GMP concentration. We demonstrate that binding of HapZ to SagS inhibits the phosphotransfer between SagS and the downstream protein HptB in a c-di-GMP-dependent manner. In accordance with the role of SagS as a motile-sessile switch and biofilm growth factor, we show that HapZ impacts surface attachment and biofilm formation most likely by regulating the expression of a large number of genes. The observations suggest a previously unknown mechanism whereby c-di-GMP mediates two-component signaling through a PilZ adaptor protein. PMID:27231351

  5. Small RNA and transcriptome deep sequencing proffers insight into floral gene regulation in Rosa cultivars

    Kim Jungeun

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Roses (Rosa sp., which belong to the family Rosaceae, are the most economically important ornamental plants—making up 30% of the floriculture market. However, given high demand for roses, rose breeding programs are limited in molecular resources which can greatly enhance and speed breeding efforts. A better understanding of important genes that contribute to important floral development and desired phenotypes will lead to improved rose cultivars. For this study, we analyzed rose miRNAs and the rose flower transcriptome in order to generate a database to expound upon current knowledge regarding regulation of important floral characteristics. A rose genetic database will enable comprehensive analysis of gene expression and regulation via miRNA among different Rosa cultivars. Results We produced more than 0.5 million reads from expressed sequences, totalling more than 110 million bp. From these, we generated 35,657, 31,434, 34,725, and 39,722 flower unigenes from Rosa hybrid: ‘Vital’, ‘Maroussia’, and ‘Sympathy’ and Rosa rugosa Thunb. , respectively. The unigenes were assigned functional annotations, domains, metabolic pathways, Gene Ontology (GO terms, Plant Ontology (PO terms, and MIPS Functional Catalogue (FunCat terms. Rose flower transcripts were compared with genes from whole genome sequences of Rosaceae members (apple, strawberry, and peach and grape. We also produced approximately 40 million small RNA reads from flower tissue for Rosa, representing 267 unique miRNA tags. Among identified miRNAs, 25 of them were novel and 242 of them were conserved miRNAs. Statistical analyses of miRNA profiles revealed both shared and species-specific miRNAs, which presumably effect flower development and phenotypes. Conclusions In this study, we constructed a Rose miRNA and transcriptome database, and we analyzed the miRNAs and transcriptome generated from the flower tissues of four Rosa cultivars. The database provides a

  6. The adaptor protein alpha-syntrophin regulates adipocyte lipid droplet growth.

    Eisinger, Kristina; Rein-Fischboeck, Lisa; Pohl, Rebekka; Meier, Elisabeth M; Krautbauer, Sabrina; Buechler, Christa

    2016-07-01

    The scaffold protein alpha-syntrophin (SNTA) regulates lipolysis indicating a role in lipid homeostasis. Adipocytes are the main lipid storage cells in the body, and here, the function of SNTA has been analyzed in 3T3-L1 cells. SNTA is expressed in preadipocytes and is induced early during adipogenesis. Knock-down of SNTA in preadipocytes increases their proliferation. Proteins which are induced during adipogenesis like adiponectin and caveolin-1, and the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 are at normal levels in the mature cells differentiated from preadipocytes with low SNTA. This suggests that SNTA does neither affect differentiation nor inflammation. Expression of proteins with a role in cholesterol and triglyceride homeostasis is unchanged. Consequently, basal and epinephrine induced lipolysis as well as insulin stimulated phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2 are normal. Importantly, adipocytes with low SNTA form smaller lipid droplets and store less triglycerides. Stearoyl-CoA reductase and MnSOD are reduced upon SNTA knock-down but do not contribute to lower lipid levels. Oleate uptake is even increased in cells with SNTA knock-down. In summary, current data show that SNTA is involved in the expansion of lipid droplets independent of adipogenesis. Enhanced preadipocyte proliferation and capacity to store surplus fatty acids may protect adipocytes with low SNTA from lipotoxicity in obesity. PMID:27242274

  7. The ERECTA, CLAVATA and class III HD-ZIP Pathways Display Synergistic Interactions in Regulating Floral Meristem Activities.

    Udi Landau

    Full Text Available In angiosperms, the production of flowers marks the beginning of the reproductive phase. At the emergence of flower primordia on the flanks of the inflorescence meristem, the WUSCHEL (WUS gene, which encodes a homeodomain transcription factor starts to be expressed and establishes de novo stem cell population, founder of the floral meristem (FM. Similarly to the shoot apical meristem a precise spatial and temporal expression pattern of WUS is required and maintained through strict regulation by multiple regulatory inputs to maintain stem cell homeostasis. However, following the formation of a genetically determined fixed number of floral organs, this homeostasis is shifted towards organogenesis and the FM is terminated. In here we performed a genetic study to test how a reduction in ERECTA, CLAVATA and class III HD-ZIP pathways affects floral meristem activity and flower development. We revealed strong synergistic phenotypes of extra flower number, supernumerary whorls, total loss of determinacy and extreme enlargement of the meristem as compared to any double mutant combination indicating that the three pathways, CLV3, ER and HD-ZIPIII distinctively regulate meristem activity and that they act in parallel. Our findings yield several new insights into stem cell-driven development. We demonstrate the crucial requirement for coupling floral meristem termination with carpel formation to ensure successful reproduction in plants. We also show how regulation of meristem size and alternation in spatial structure of the meristem serve as a mechanism to determine flower organogenesis. We propose that the loss of FM determinacy due to the reduction in CLV3, ER and HD-ZIPIII activity is genetically separable from the AGAMOUS core mechanism of meristem termination.

  8. ARGONAUTE10 and ARGONAUTE1 regulate the termination of floral stem cells through two microRNAs in Arabidopsis.

    Lijuan Ji

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are crucial in morphogenesis in plants and animals. Much is known about the mechanisms that maintain stem cell fates or trigger their terminal differentiation. However, little is known about how developmental time impacts stem cell fates. Using Arabidopsis floral stem cells as a model, we show that stem cells can undergo precise temporal regulation governed by mechanisms that are distinct from, but integrated with, those that specify cell fates. We show that two microRNAs, miR172 and miR165/166, through targeting APETALA2 and type III homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip genes, respectively, regulate the temporal program of floral stem cells. In particular, we reveal a role of the type III HD-Zip genes, previously known to specify lateral organ polarity, in stem cell termination. Both reduction in HD-Zip expression by over-expression of miR165/166 and mis-expression of HD-Zip genes by rendering them resistant to miR165/166 lead to prolonged floral stem cell activity, indicating that the expression of HD-Zip genes needs to be precisely controlled to achieve floral stem cell termination. We also show that both the ubiquitously expressed ARGONAUTE1 (AGO1 gene and its homolog AGO10, which exhibits highly restricted spatial expression patterns, are required to maintain the correct temporal program of floral stem cells. We provide evidence that AGO10, like AGO1, associates with miR172 and miR165/166 in vivo and exhibits "slicer" activity in vitro. Despite the common biological functions and similar biochemical activities, AGO1 and AGO10 exert different effects on miR165/166 in vivo. This work establishes a network of microRNAs and transcription factors governing the temporal program of floral stem cells and sheds light on the relationships among different AGO genes, which tend to exist in gene families in multicellular organisms.

  9. An Arabidopsis F-box protein acts as a transcriptional co-factor to regulate floral development.

    Chae, Eunyoung; Tan, Queenie K-G; Hill, Theresa A; Irish, Vivian F

    2008-04-01

    Plants flower in response to both environmental and endogenous signals. The Arabidopsis LEAFY (LFY) transcription factor is crucial in integrating these signals, and acts in part by activating the expression of multiple floral homeotic genes. LFY-dependent activation of the homeotic APETALA3 (AP3) gene requires the activity of UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO), an F-box component of an SCF ubiquitin ligase, yet how this regulation is effected has remained unclear. Here, we show that UFO physically interacts with LFY both in vitro and in vivo, and this interaction is necessary to recruit UFO to the AP3 promoter. Furthermore, a transcriptional repressor domain fused to UFO reduces endogenous LFY activity in plants, supporting the idea that UFO acts as part of a transcriptional complex at the AP3 promoter. Moreover, chemical or genetic disruption of proteasome activity compromises LFY-dependent AP3 activation, indicating that protein degradation is required to promote LFY activity. These results define an unexpected role for an F-box protein in functioning as a DNA-associated transcriptional co-factor in regulating floral homeotic gene expression. These results suggest a novel mechanism for promoting flower development via protein degradation and concomitant activation of the LFY transcription factor. This mechanism may be widely conserved, as homologs of UFO and LFY have been identified in a wide array of plant species. PMID:18287201

  10. Down-Regulation of TM29, a Tomato SEPALLATA Homolog, Causes Parthenocarpic Fruit Development and Floral Reversion1

    Ampomah-Dwamena, Charles; Morris, Bret A.; Sutherland, Paul; Veit, Bruce; Yao, Jia-Long

    2002-01-01

    We have characterized the tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) MADS box gene TM29 that shared a high amino acid sequence homology to the Arabidopsis SEP1, 2, and 3 (SEPALLATA1, 2, and 3) genes. TM29 showed similar expression profiles to SEP1, with accumulation of mRNA in the primordia of all four whorls of floral organs. In addition, TM29 mRNA was detected in inflorescence and vegetative meristems. To understand TM29 function, we produced transgenic tomato plants in which TM29 expression was down-regulated by either cosuppression or antisense techniques. These transgenic plants produced aberrant flowers with morphogenetic alterations in the organs of the inner three whorls. Petals and stamens were green rather than yellow, suggesting a partial conversion to a sepalloid identity. Stamens and ovaries were infertile, with the later developing into parthenocarpic fruit. Ectopic shoots with partially developed leaves and secondary flowers emerged from the fruit. These shoots resembled the primary transgenic flowers and continued to produce parthenocarpic fruit and additional ectopic shoots. Based on the temporal and spatial expression pattern and transgenic phenotypes, we propose that TM29 functions in floral organ development, fruit development, and maintenance of floral meristem identity in tomato. PMID:12376628

  11. Down-regulation of TM29, a tomato SEPALLATA homolog, causes parthenocarpic fruit development and floral reversion.

    Ampomah-Dwamena, Charles; Morris, Bret A; Sutherland, Paul; Veit, Bruce; Yao, Jia-Long

    2002-10-01

    We have characterized the tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) MADS box gene TM29 that shared a high amino acid sequence homology to the Arabidopsis SEP1, 2, and 3 (SEPALLATA1, 2, and 3) genes. TM29 showed similar expression profiles to SEP1, with accumulation of mRNA in the primordia of all four whorls of floral organs. In addition, TM29 mRNA was detected in inflorescence and vegetative meristems. To understand TM29 function, we produced transgenic tomato plants in which TM29 expression was down-regulated by either cosuppression or antisense techniques. These transgenic plants produced aberrant flowers with morphogenetic alterations in the organs of the inner three whorls. Petals and stamens were green rather than yellow, suggesting a partial conversion to a sepalloid identity. Stamens and ovaries were infertile, with the later developing into parthenocarpic fruit. Ectopic shoots with partially developed leaves and secondary flowers emerged from the fruit. These shoots resembled the primary transgenic flowers and continued to produce parthenocarpic fruit and additional ectopic shoots. Based on the temporal and spatial expression pattern and transgenic phenotypes, we propose that TM29 functions in floral organ development, fruit development, and maintenance of floral meristem identity in tomato. PMID:12376628

  12. Overexpression of AtAP1M3 regulates flowering time and floral development in Arabidopsis and effects key flowering-related genes in poplar.

    Chen, Zhong; Ye, Meixia; Su, Xiaoxing; Liao, Weihua; Ma, Huandi; Gao, Kai; Lei, Bingqi; An, Xinmin

    2015-08-01

    APETALA1 plays a crucial role in the transition from vegetative to reproductive phase and in floral development. In this study, to determine the effect of AP1 expression on flowering time and floral organ development, transgenic Arabidopsis and poplar overexpressing of AtAP1M3 (Arabidopsis AP1 mutant by dominant negative mutation) were generated. Transgenic Arabidopsis with e35Spro::AtAP1M3 displayed phenotypes with delayed-flowering compared to wild-type and flowers with abnormal sepals, petals and stamens. In addition, transgenic Arabidopsis plants exhibited reduced growth vigor compared to the wild-type plants. Ectopic expression of AtAP1M3 in poplar resulted in up- or down-regulation of some endogenous key flowering-related genes, including floral meristems identity gene LFY, B-class floral organ identity genes AP3 and PI, flowering pathway integrator FT1 and flower repressors TFL1 and SVP. These results suggest that AtAP1M3 regulates flowering time and floral development in plants. PMID:25820621

  13. Adaptor bypass mutations of Bacillus subtilis spx suggest a mechanism for YjbH-enhanced proteolysis of the regulator Spx by ClpXP

    Chan, Chio Mui; Hahn, Erik; Zuber, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Summary The global regulator, Spx, is under proteolytic control exerted by the adaptor YjbH and ATP-dependent protease ClpXP in Bacillus subtilis. While YjbH is observed to bind the Spx C-terminus, YjbH shows little affinity for ClpXP, indicating adaptor activity that does not operate by tethering. Chimeric proteins derived from B. subtilis AbrB and the Spx C-terminus showed that a 28 residue C-terminal section of Spx (AbrB28), but not the last 12 or 16 residues (AbrB12, AbrB16), was required for YjbH interaction and for ClpXP proteolysis, although the rate of AbrB28 proteolysis was not affected by YjbH addition. The result suggested that the YjbH-targeted 28 residue segment of the Spx C-terminus bears a ClpXP-recognition element(s) that is hidden in the intact Spx protein. Residue substitutions in the conserved helix α6 of the C-terminal region generated Spx substrates that were degraded by ClpXP at accelerated rates compared to wild type Spx, and showed reduced dependency on the YjbH activity. The residue substitutions also weakened the interaction between Spx and YjbH. The results suggest a model in which YjbH, through interaction with residues of α6 helix, exposes the C-terminus of Spx for recognition and proteolysis by ClpXP. PMID:24942655

  14. Adaptor protein containing PH domain, PTB domain and leucine zipper (APPL1) regulates the protein level of EGFR by modulating its trafficking

    Highlights: ► APPL1 regulates the protein level of EGFR in response to EGF stimulation. ► Depletion of APPL1 accelerates the movement of EGF/EGFR from the cell surface to the perinuclear region in response to EGF. ► Knockdown of APPL1 enhances the activity of Rab5. -- Abstract: The EGFR-mediated signaling pathway regulates multiple biological processes such as cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Previously APPL1 (adaptor protein containing PH domain, PTB domain and leucine zipper 1) has been reported to function as a downstream effector of EGF-initiated signaling. Here we demonstrate that APPL1 regulates EGFR protein levels in response to EGF stimulation. Overexpression of APPL1 enhances EGFR stabilization while APPL1 depletion by siRNA reduces EGFR protein levels. APPL1 depletion accelerates EGFR internalization and movement of EGF/EGFR from cell surface to the perinuclear region in response to EGF treatment. Conversely, overexpression of APPL1 decelerates EGFR internalization and translocation of EGF/EGFR to the perinuclear region. Furthermore, APPL1 depletion enhances the activity of Rab5 which is involved in internalization and trafficking of EGFR and inhibition of Rab5 in APPL1-depleted cells restored EGFR levels. Consistently, APPL1 depletion reduced activation of Akt, the downstream signaling effector of EGFR and this is restored by inhibition of Rab5. These findings suggest that APPL1 is required for EGFR signaling by regulation of EGFR stabilities through inhibition of Rab5.

  15. Fission yeast arrestin-related trafficking adaptor, Arn1/Any1, is ubiquitinated by Pub1 E3 ligase and regulates endocytosis of Cat1 amino acid transporter

    Akio Nakashima

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Tsc1–Tsc2 complex homologous to human tuberous sclerosis complex proteins governs amino acid uptake by regulating the expression and intracellular distribution of amino acid transporters in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here, we performed a genetic screening for molecules that are involved in amino acid uptake and found Arn1 (also known as Any1. Arn1 is homologous to ART1, an arrestin-related trafficking adaptor (ART in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and contains a conserved arrestin motif, a ubiquitination site, and two PY motifs. Overexpression of arn1+ confers canavanine resistance on cells, whereas its disruption causes hypersensitivity to canavanine. We also show that Arn1 regulates endocytosis of the Cat1 amino acid transporter. Furthermore, deletion of arn1+ suppresses a defect of amino acid uptake and the aberrant Cat1 localization in tsc2Δ. Arn1 interacts with and is ubiquitinated by the Pub1 ubiquitin ligase, which is necessary to regulate Cat1 endocytosis. Cat1 undergoes ubiquitinations on lysine residues within the N-terminus, which are mediated, in part, by Arn1 to determine Cat1 localization. Correctively, Arn1 is an ART in S. pombe and contributes to amino acid uptake through regulating Cat1 endocytosis in which Tsc2 is involved.

  16. A conserved serine residue regulates the stability of Drosophila Salvador and human WW domain-containing adaptor 45 through proteasomal degradation

    Wu, Di, E-mail: DiWu@mail.nankai.edu.cn; Wu, Shian

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Ser-17 is key for the stability of Drosophila Sav. •Ala mutation of Ser-17 promotes the proteasomal degradation of Sav. •Ser-17 residue is not the main target of Hpo-induced Sav stabilization. •Hpo-dependent and -independent mechanisms regulate Sav stability. •This mechanism is conserved in the homologue of Sav, human WW45. -- Abstract: The Hippo (Hpo) pathway is a conserved tumor suppressor pathway that controls organ size through the coordinated regulation of apoptosis and proliferation. Drosophila Salvador (Sav), which limits organ size, is a core component of the Hpo pathway. In this study, Ser-17 was shown to be important for the stability of Sav. Alanine mutation of Ser-17 promoted the proteasomal degradation of Sav. Destabilization and stabilization of the Sav protein mediated by alanine mutation of Ser-17 and by Hpo, respectively, were independent of each other. This implies that the stability of Sav is controlled by two mechanisms, one that is Ser-17-dependent and Hpo-independent, and another that is Ser-17-independent and Hpo-dependent. These dual mechanisms also regulated the human counterpart of Drosophila Sav, WW domain-containing adaptor 45 (WW45). The conservation of this regulation adds to its significance in normal physiology and tumorigenesis.

  17. Skb5, an SH3 adaptor protein, regulates Pmk1 MAPK signaling by controlling the intracellular localization of the MAPKKK Mkh1.

    Kanda, Yuki; Satoh, Ryosuke; Matsumoto, Saki; Ikeda, Chisato; Inutsuka, Natsumi; Hagihara, Kanako; Matzno, Sumio; Tsujimoto, Sho; Kita, Ayako; Sugiura, Reiko

    2016-08-15

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is a highly conserved signaling module composed of MAPK kinase kinases (MAPKKKs), MAPK kinases (MAPKK) and MAPKs. The MAPKKK Mkh1 is an initiating kinase in Pmk1 MAPK signaling, which regulates cell integrity in fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe). Our genetic screen for regulators of Pmk1 signaling identified Shk1 kinase binding protein 5 (Skb5), an SH3-domain-containing adaptor protein. Here, we show that Skb5 serves as an inhibitor of Pmk1 MAPK signaling activation by downregulating Mkh1 localization to cell tips through its interaction with the SH3 domain. Consistent with this, the Mkh1(3PA) mutant protein, with impaired Skb5 binding, remained in the cell tips, even when Skb5 was overproduced. Intriguingly, Skb5 needs Mkh1 to localize to the growing ends as Mkh1 deletion and disruption of Mkh1 binding impairs Skb5 localization. Deletion of Pck2, an upstream activator of Mkh1, impaired the cell tip localization of Mkh1 and Skb5 as well as the Mkh1-Skb5 interaction. Interestingly, both Pck2 and Mkh1 localized to the cell tips at the G1/S phase, which coincided with Pmk1 MAPK activation. Taken together, Mkh1 localization to cell tips is important for transmitting upstream signaling to Pmk1, and Skb5 spatially regulates this process. PMID:27451356

  18. Arabidopsis WUSCHEL is a bifunctional transcription factor that acts as a repressor in stem cell regulation and as an activator in floral patterning.

    Ikeda, Miho; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2009-11-01

    Most transcription factors act either as activators or repressors, and no such factors with dual function have been unequivocally identified and characterized in plants. We demonstrate here that the Arabidopsis thaliana protein WUSCHEL (WUS), which regulates the maintenance of stem cell populations in shoot meristems, is a bifunctional transcription factor that acts mainly as a repressor but becomes an activator when involved in the regulation of the AGAMOUS (AG) gene. We show that the WUS box, which is conserved among WOX genes, is the domain that is essential for all the activities of WUS, namely, for regulation of stem cell identity and size of floral meristem. All the known activities of WUS were eliminated by mutation of the WUS box, including the ability of WUS to induce the expression of AG. The mutation of the WUS box was complemented by fusion of an exogenous repression domain, with resultant induction of somatic embryogenesis in roots and expansion of floral meristems as observed upon ectopic expression of WUS. By contrast, fusion of an exogenous activation domain did not result in expanded floral meristems but induced flowers similar to those induced by the ectopic expression of AG. Our results demonstrate that WUS acts mainly as a repressor and that its function changes from that of a repressor to that of an activator in the case of regulation of the expression of AG. PMID:19897670

  19. Duplication and Divergence of Floral MADS-Box Genes in Grasses: Evidence for the Generation and Modification of Novel Regulators

    Guixia Xu; Hongzhi Kong

    2007-01-01

    The process of flowering is controlled by a hierarchy of floral genes that act as flowering time genes, inflorescence/floral meristem identity genes, and/or floral organ-identity genes. The most important and well-characterized floral genes are those that belong to the MADS-box family of transcription factors. Compelling evidence suggests that floral MADS-box genes have experienced a few large-scale duplication events. In particular, the pre-core eudicot duplication events have been considered to correlate with the emergence and diversification of core eudicots. Duplication of floral MADS-box genes has also been documented in monocots, particularly in grasses, although a systematic study is lacking. In the present study, by conducting extensive phylogenetic analyses, we identified pre-Poaceae gene duplication events in each of the AP1, PI, AG, AGL11, AGL2/3/4, and AGL9gene lineages. Comparative genomic studies further indicated that some of these duplications actually resulted from the genome doubling event that occurred 66-70 million years ago (MYA). In addition, we found that after gene duplication, exonization (of intron sequences) and pseudoexonization (of exon sequences) have contributed to the divergence of duplicate genes in sequence structure and, possibly, gene function.

  20. Floral volatiles: from biosynthesis to function.

    Muhlemann, Joëlle K; Klempien, Antje; Dudareva, Natalia

    2014-08-01

    Floral volatiles have attracted humans' attention since antiquity and have since then permeated many aspects of our lives. Indeed, they are heavily used in perfumes, cosmetics, flavourings and medicinal applications. However, their primary function is to mediate ecological interactions between flowers and a diverse array of visitors, including pollinators, florivores and pathogens. As such, they ultimately ensure the plants' reproductive and evolutionary success. To date, over 1700 floral volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have been identified. Interestingly, they are derived from only a few biochemical networks, which include the terpenoid, phenylpropanoid/benzenoid and fatty acid biosynthetic pathways. These pathways are intricately regulated by endogenous and external factors to enable spatially and temporally controlled emission of floral volatiles, thereby fine-tuning the ecological interactions facilitated by floral volatiles. In this review, we will focus on describing the biosynthetic pathways leading to floral VOCs, the regulation of floral volatile emission, as well as biological functions of emitted volatiles. PMID:24588567

  1. A putative miR172-targeted CeAPETALA2-like gene is involved in floral patterning regulation of the orchid Cymbidium ensifolium.

    Yang, F X; Zhu, G F; Wang, Z; Liu, H L; Huang, D

    2015-01-01

    APETALA2 plays critical roles in establishing meristem and organ identity during plant floral development. In this study, we obtained a CeAP2-like gene by using the mRNA differential display technique to analyze the wild type and a multitepal mutant of the orchid Cymbidium ensifolium. The full-length cDNA encoding the CeAP2-like transcription factor shows significant similarity to the cDNA of AP2 from Erycina pusilla and contains nucleotides complementary to miR172. Using a transient gene expression system of Arabidopsis protoplasts, we found that the accumulation of CeAP2-like protein and transcripts was negatively regulated by miR172, indicating this gene as a putative target of miR172. Northern blotting revealed that CeAP2-like is dominantly expressed in the sepals and petals of the wild-type flower, and shows low expression in the gynostemium. In contrast, the accumulation of CeAP2-like transcripts decreased significantly, especially in the central part of the mutant flower, corresponding to its abnormal petals and the absence of the gynostemium. Furthermore, we found an antagonistic expression pattern between CeAP2-like and AGAMOUS in the wild type, representing A- and C-class genes that specify floral organ fate. However, this antagonistic distribution was modified in the multitepal mutant, and both genes showed lower expression than that in the wild type. This result suggested that the balance between CeAP2-like and AGAMOUS activity was important for the regulation of floral patterning in C. ensifolium. This study represents the first report on a class A gene and its regulatory role for floral development in the orchid C. ensifolium. PMID:26505352

  2. Cul3 and the BTB adaptor insomniac are key regulators of sleep homeostasis and a dopamine arousal pathway in Drosophila.

    Cory Pfeiffenberger

    Full Text Available Sleep is homeostatically regulated, such that sleep drive reflects the duration of prior wakefulness. However, despite the discovery of genes important for sleep, a coherent molecular model for sleep homeostasis has yet to emerge. To better understand the function and regulation of sleep, we employed a reverse-genetics approach in Drosophila. An insertion in the BTB domain protein CG32810/insomniac (inc exhibited one of the strongest baseline sleep phenotypes thus far observed, a ~10 h sleep reduction. Importantly, this is coupled to a reduced homeostatic response to sleep deprivation, consistent with a disrupted sleep homeostat. Knockdown of the INC-interacting protein, the E3 ubiquitin ligase Cul3, results in reduced sleep duration, consolidation, and homeostasis, suggesting an important role for protein turnover in mediating INC effects. Interestingly, inc and Cul3 expression in post-mitotic neurons during development contributes to their adult sleep functions. Similar to flies with increased dopaminergic signaling, loss of inc and Cul3 result in hyper-arousability to a mechanical stimulus in adult flies. Furthermore, the inc sleep duration phenotype can be rescued by pharmacological inhibition of tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme for dopamine biosynthesis. Taken together, these results establish inc and Cul3 as important new players in setting the sleep homeostat and a dopaminergic arousal pathway in Drosophila.

  3. The ERECTA receptor kinase regulates Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem size, phyllotaxy and floral meristem identity

    Mandel, Tali; Moreau, Fanny; Kutsher, Yaarit; Fletcher, Jennifer C; Carles, Cristel C.; Williams, Leor Eshed

    2014-01-01

    In plants, the shoot apical meristem (SAM) serves as a reservoir of pluripotent stem cells from which all above ground organs originate. To sustain proper growth, the SAM must maintain homeostasis between the self-renewal of pluripotent stem cells and cell recruitment for lateral organ formation. At the core of the network that regulates this homeostasis in Arabidopsis are the WUSCHEL (WUS) transcription factor specifying stem cell fate and the CLAVATA (CLV) ligand-receptor system limiting WU...

  4. The genome and transcriptome of Phalaenopsis yield insights into floral organ development and flowering regulation

    Cheng, Ting-Chi; Huang, Ya-Wen; Tsai, Yi-Jung; Chen, Yi-Wen; Lee, Chueh-Pai; Chung, Wan-Chia

    2016-01-01

    The Phalaenopsis orchid is an important potted flower of high economic value around the world. We report the 3.1 Gb draft genome assembly of an important winter flowering Phalaenopsis ‘KHM190’ cultivar. We generated 89.5 Gb RNA-seq and 113 million sRNA-seq reads to use these data to identify 41,153 protein-coding genes and 188 miRNA families. We also generated a draft genome for Phalaenopsis pulcherrima ‘B8802,’ a summer flowering species, via resequencing. Comparison of genome data between the two Phalaenopsis cultivars allowed the identification of 691,532 single-nucleotide polymorphisms. In this study, we reveal that the key role of PhAGL6b in the regulation of labellum organ development involves alternative splicing in the big lip mutant. Petal or sepal overexpressing PhAGL6b leads to the conversion into a lip-like structure. We also discovered that the gibberellin pathway that regulates the expression of flowering time genes during the reproductive phase change is induced by cool temperature. Our work thus depicted a valuable resource for the flowering control, flower architecture development, and breeding of the Phalaenopsis orchids. PMID:27190718

  5. Changes in cis-regulatory elements of a key floral regulator are associated with divergence of inflorescence architectures

    E. Kusters; S. Della Pina; R. Castel; E. Souer; R. Koes

    2015-01-01

    Higher plant species diverged extensively with regard to the moment (flowering time) and position (inflorescence architecture) at which flowers are formed. This seems largely caused by variation in the expression patterns of conserved genes that specify floral meristem identity (FMI), rather than ch

  6. PRR7 Is a transmembrane adaptor protein expressed in activated T cells involved in regulation of T cell receptor signaling and apoptosis

    Hrdinka, Matouš; Dráber, Peter; Štěpánek, Ondřej; Ormsby, Tereza; Otáhal, Pavel; Angelisová, Pavla; Brdička, Tomáš; Pačes, Jan; Hořejší, Václav; Drbal, Karel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 286, č. 22 (2011), s. 19617-19629. ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0506 Grant ostatní: GAČR(CZ) MEM/09/E011 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : PRR7 * transmembrane adaptor protein * apoptosis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.773, year: 2011

  7. The Transmembrane Adaptor Protein SIT Inhibits TCR-Mediated Signaling

    Arndt, Börge; Krieger, Tina; Kalinski, Thomas; Thielitz, Anja; Reinhold, Dirk; Roessner, Albert; Schraven, Burkhart; Simeoni, Luca

    2011-01-01

    Transmembrane adaptor proteins (TRAPs) organize signaling complexes at the plasma membrane, and thus function as critical linkers and integrators of signaling cascades downstream of antigen receptors. We have previously shown that the transmembrane adaptor protein SIT regulates the threshold for thymocyte selection. Moreover, T cells from SIT-deficient mice are hyperresponsive to CD3 stimulation and undergo enhanced lymphopenia-induced homeostatic proliferation, thus indicating that SIT inhib...

  8. Small RNA and transcriptome deep sequencing proffers insight into floral gene regulation in Rosa cultivars

    Kim Jungeun; Park June; Lim Chan; Lim Jae; Ryu Jee-Youn; Lee Bong-Woo; Choi Jae-Pil; Kim Woong; Lee Ha; Choi Yourim; Kim Donghyun; Hur Cheol-Goo; Kim Sukweon; Noh Yoo-Sun; Shin Chanseok

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Roses (Rosa sp.), which belong to the family Rosaceae, are the most economically important ornamental plants—making up 30% of the floriculture market. However, given high demand for roses, rose breeding programs are limited in molecular resources which can greatly enhance and speed breeding efforts. A better understanding of important genes that contribute to important floral development and desired phenotypes will lead to improved rose cultivars. For this study, we analyz...

  9. Changes in cis-regulatory elements of a key floral regulator are associated with divergence of inflorescence architectures

    Kusters, E.; Pina, Della, S.; Castel, R; Souer, E.; Koes, R

    2015-01-01

    Higher plant species diverged extensively with regard to the moment (flowering time) and position (inflorescence architecture) at which flowers are formed. This seems largely caused by variation in the expression patterns of conserved genes that specify floral meristem identity (FMI), rather than changes in the encoded proteins. Here, we report a functional comparison of the promoters of homologous FMI genes from Arabidopsis, petunia, tomato and Antirrhinum. Analysis of promoter-reporter cons...

  10. The ERECTA, CLAVATA and class III HD-ZIP Pathways Display Synergistic Interactions in Regulating Floral Meristem Activities

    Landau, Udi; Asis, Lior; Eshed Williams, Leor

    2015-01-01

    In angiosperms, the production of flowers marks the beginning of the reproductive phase. At the emergence of flower primordia on the flanks of the inflorescence meristem, the WUSCHEL (WUS) gene, which encodes a homeodomain transcription factor starts to be expressed and establishes de novo stem cell population, founder of the floral meristem (FM). Similarly to the shoot apical meristem a precise spatial and temporal expression pattern of WUS is required and maintained through strict regulatio...

  11. Discrete spatial and temporal cis-acting elements regulate transcription of the Arabidopsis floral homeotic gene APETALA3.

    Hill, T A; Day, C D; Zondlo, S C; Thackeray, A G; Irish, V F

    1998-05-01

    The APETALA3 floral homeotic gene is required for petal and stamen development in Arabidopsis. APETALA3 transcripts are first detected in a meristematic region that will give rise to the petal and stamen primordia, and expression is maintained in this region during subsequent development of these organs. To dissect how the APETALA3 gene is expressed in this spatially and temporally restricted domain, various APETALA3 promoter fragments were fused to the uidA reporter gene encoding beta-glucuronidase and assayed for the resulting patterns of expression in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Based on these promoter analyses, we defined cis-acting elements required for distinct phases of APETALA3 expression, as well as for petal-specific and stamen-specific expression. By crossing the petal-specific construct into different mutant backgrounds, we have shown that several floral genes, including APETALA3, PISTILLATA, UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS, and APETALA1, encode trans-acting factors required for second-whorl-specific APETALA3 expression. We have also shown that the products of the APETALA1, APETALA3, PISTILLATA and AGAMOUS genes bind to several conserved sequence motifs within the APETALA3 promoter. We present a model whereby spatially and temporally restricted APETALA3 transcription is controlled via interactions between proteins binding to different domains of the APETALA3 promoter. PMID:9521909

  12. Floral induction, floral hormones and flowering

    Pol, van der P.A.

    1972-01-01

    The factors, influencing the synthesis and action of floral hormones, and possible differences between floral hormones in different plants were studied. The experimental results are summarized in the conclusions 1-20, on pages 35-36 (Crassulaceae'); 21-39 on pages 58-59 ('Xanthium strumarium') and 4

  13. Regulatory mechanisms for floral homeotic gene expression.

    Liu, Zhongchi; Mara, Chloe

    2010-02-01

    Proper regulation of floral homeotic gene (or ABCE gene) expression ensures the development of floral organs in the correct number, type, and precise spatial arrangement. This review summarizes recent advances on the regulation of floral homeotic genes, highlighting the variety and the complexity of the regulatory mechanisms involved. As flower development is one of the most well characterized developmental processes in higher plants, it facilitates the discovery of novel regulatory mechanisms. To date, mechanisms for the regulation of floral homeotic genes range from transcription to post-transcription, from activators to repressors, and from microRNA- to ubiquitin-mediated post-transcriptional regulation. Region-specific activation of floral homeotic genes is dependent on the integration of a flower-specific activity provided by LEAFY (LFY) and a region- and stage-specific activating function provided by one of the LFY cofactors. Two types of regulatory loops, the feed-forward and the feedback loop, provide properly timed gene activation and subsequent maintenance and refinement in proper spatial and temporal domains of ABCE genes. Two different microRNA/target modules may have been independently recruited in different plant species to regulate C gene expression. Additionally, competition among different MADS box proteins for common interacting partners may represent a mechanism in whorl boundary demarcation. Future work using systems approaches and the development of non-model plants will provide integrated views on floral homeotic gene regulation and insights into the evolution of morphological diversity in flowering plants. PMID:19922812

  14. Changes in cis-regulatory elements of a key floral regulator are associated with divergence of inflorescence architectures.

    Kusters, Elske; Della Pina, Serena; Castel, Rob; Souer, Erik; Koes, Ronald

    2015-08-15

    Higher plant species diverged extensively with regard to the moment (flowering time) and position (inflorescence architecture) at which flowers are formed. This seems largely caused by variation in the expression patterns of conserved genes that specify floral meristem identity (FMI), rather than changes in the encoded proteins. Here, we report a functional comparison of the promoters of homologous FMI genes from Arabidopsis, petunia, tomato and Antirrhinum. Analysis of promoter-reporter constructs in petunia and Arabidopsis, as well as complementation experiments, showed that the divergent expression of leafy (LFY) and the petunia homolog aberrant leaf and flower (ALF) results from alterations in the upstream regulatory network rather than cis-regulatory changes. The divergent expression of unusual floral organs (UFO) from Arabidopsis, and the petunia homolog double top (DOT), however, is caused by the loss or gain of cis-regulatory promoter elements, which respond to trans-acting factors that are expressed in similar patterns in both species. Introduction of pUFO:UFO causes no obvious defects in Arabidopsis, but in petunia it causes the precocious and ectopic formation of flowers. This provides an example of how a change in a cis-regulatory region can account for a change in the plant body plan. PMID:26220938

  15. Functional analyses of two tomato APETALA3 genes demonstrate diversification in their roles in regulating floral development.

    de Martino, Gemma; Pan, Irvin; Emmanuel, Eyal; Levy, Avraham; Irish, Vivian F

    2006-08-01

    The floral homeotic APETALA3 (AP3) gene in Arabidopsis thaliana encodes a MADS box transcription factor required for specifying petal and stamen identities. AP3 is a member of the euAP3 lineage, which arose by gene duplication coincident with radiation of the core eudicots. Although Arabidopsis lacks genes in the paralogous Tomato MADS box gene 6 (TM6) lineage, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) possesses both euAP3 and TM6 genes, which have functionally diversified. A loss-of-function mutation in Tomato AP3 (TAP3) resulted in homeotic transformations of both petals and stamens, whereas RNA interference-induced reduction in TM6 function resulted in flowers with homeotic defects primarily in stamens. The functional differences between these genes can be ascribed partly to different expression domains. When overexpressed in an equivalent domain, both genes can partially rescue the tap3 mutant, indicating that relative levels as well as spatial patterns of expression contribute to functional differences. Our results also indicate that the two proteins have differing biochemical capabilities. Together, these results suggest that TM6 and TAP3 play qualitatively different roles in floral development; they also support the ideas that the ancestral role of AP3 lineage genes was in specifying stamen development and that duplication and divergence in the AP3 lineage allowed for the acquisition of a role in petal specification in the core eudicots. PMID:16844904

  16. Identification, functional characterization, and regulation of the enzyme responsible for floral (E)-nerolidol biosynthesis in kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis)

    Green, Sol A.; Chen, Xiuyin; Nieuwenhuizen, Niels J.; Matich, Adam J.; Wang, Mindy Y.; Bunn, Barry J.; Yauk, Yar-Khing; Atkinson, Ross G.

    2012-01-01

    Flowers of the kiwifruit species Actinidia chinensis produce a mixture of sesquiterpenes derived from farnesyl diphosphate (FDP) and monoterpenes derived from geranyl diphosphate (GDP). The tertiary sesquiterpene alcohol (E)-nerolidol was the major emitted volatile detected by headspace analysis. Contrastingly, in solvent extracts of the flowers, unusually high amounts of (E,E)-farnesol were observed, as well as lesser amounts of (E)-nerolidol, various farnesol and farnesal isomers, and linalool. Using a genomics-based approach, a single gene (AcNES1) was identified in an A. chinensis expressed sequence tag library that had significant homology to known floral terpene synthase enzymes. In vitro characterization of recombinant AcNES1 revealed it was an enzyme that could catalyse the conversion of FDP and GDP to the respective (E)-nerolidol and linalool terpene alcohols. Enantiomeric analysis of both AcNES1 products in vitro and floral terpenes in planta showed that (S)-(E)-nerolidol was the predominant enantiomer. Real-time PCR analysis indicated peak expression of AcNES1 correlated with peak (E)-nerolidol, but not linalool accumulation in flowers. This result, together with subcellular protein localization to the cytoplasm, indicated that AcNES1 was acting as a (S)-(E)-nerolidol synthase in A. chinensis flowers. The synthesis of high (E,E)-farnesol levels appears to compete for the available pool of FDP utilized by AcNES1 for sesquiterpene biosynthesis and hence strongly influences the accumulation and emission of (E)-nerolidol in A. chinensis flowers. PMID:22162874

  17. Building beauty: the genetic control of floral patterning

    Lohmann, J. U., and Weigel, D.

    2002-02-01

    OAK-B135 Floral organ identity is controlled by combinatorial action of homeotic genes expressed in different territories within the emerging flower. This review discusses recent progress in our understanding of floral homeotic genes, with an emphasis on how their region-specific expression is regulated.

  18. A novel interaction between the SH2 domain of signaling adaptor protein Nck-1 and the upstream regulator of the Rho family GTPase Rac1 engulfment and cell motility 1 (ELMO1) promotes Rac1 activation and cell motility.

    Zhang, Guo; Chen, Xia; Qiu, Fanghua; Zhu, Fengxin; Lei, Wenjing; Nie, Jing

    2014-08-15

    Nck family proteins function as adaptors to couple tyrosine phosphorylation signals to actin cytoskeleton reorganization. Several lines of evidence indicate that Nck family proteins involve in regulating the activity of Rho family GTPases. In the present study, we characterized a novel interaction between Nck-1 with engulfment and cell motility 1 (ELMO1). GST pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that the Nck-1-ELMO1 interaction is mediated by the SH2 domain of Nck-1 and the phosphotyrosine residues at position 18, 216, 395, and 511 of ELMO1. A R308K mutant of Nck-1 (in which the SH2 domain was inactive), or a 4YF mutant of ELMO1 lacking these four phosphotyrosine residues, diminished Nck-1-ELMO1 interaction. Conversely, tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor treatment and overexpression of Src family kinase Hck significantly enhanced Nck-1-ELMO1 interaction. Moreover, wild type Nck-1, but not R308K mutant, significantly augmented the interaction between ELMO1 and constitutively active RhoG (RhoG(V12A)), thus promoted Rac1 activation and cell motility. Taken together, the present study characterized a novel Nck-1-ELMO1 interaction and defined a new role for Nck-1 in regulating Rac1 activity. PMID:24928514

  19. Characterization of Toll-like receptors in primary lung epithelial cells: strong impact of the TLR3 ligand poly(I:C on the regulation of Toll-like receptors, adaptor proteins and inflammatory response

    Weith Andreas

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial and viral exacerbations play a crucial role in a variety of lung diseases including COPD or asthma. Since the lung epithelium is a major source of various inflammatory mediators that affect the immune response, we analyzed the inflammatory reaction of primary lung epithelial cells to different microbial molecules that are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLR. Methods The effects of TLR ligands on primary small airway epithelial cells were analyzed in detail with respect to cytokine, chemokine and matrix metalloproteinase secretion. In addition, the regulation of the expression of TLRs and their adaptor proteins in small airway epithelial cells was investigated. Results Our data demonstrate that poly(I:C, a synthetic analog of viral dsRNA, mediated the strongest proinflammatory effects among the tested ligands, including an increased secretion of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, GM-CSF, GRO-α, TARC, MCP-1, MIP-3α, RANTES, IFN-β, IP-10 and ITAC as well as an increased release of MMP-1, MMP-8, MMP-9, MMP-10 and MMP-13. Furthermore, our data show that poly(I:C as well as type-1 and type-2 cytokines have a pronounced effect on the expression of TLRs and molecules involved in TLR signaling in small airway epithelial cells. Poly(I:C induced an elevated expression of TLR1, TLR2 and TLR3 and increased the gene expression of the general TLR adaptor MyD88 and IRAK-2. Simultaneously, poly(I:C decreased the expression of TLR5, TLR6 and TOLLIP. Conclusion Poly(I:C, an analog of viral dsRNA and a TLR3 ligand, triggers a strong inflammatory response in small airway epithelial cells that is likely to contribute to viral exacerbations of pulmonary diseases like asthma or COPD. The pronounced effects of poly(I:C on the expression of Toll-like receptors and molecules involved in TLR signaling is assumed to influence the immune response of the lung epithelium to viral and bacterial infections. Likewise, the regulation of TLR expression by type

  20. No time for candy: passionfruit (Passiflora edulis) plants down-regulate damage-induced extra floral nectar production in response to light signals of competition.

    Izaguirre, Miriam M; Mazza, Carlos A; Astigueta, María S; Ciarla, Ana M; Ballaré, Carlos L

    2013-09-01

    Plant fitness is often defined by the combined effects of herbivory and competition, and plants must strike a delicate balance between their ability to capture limiting resources and defend against herbivore attack. Many plants use indirect defenses, such as volatile compounds and extra floral nectaries (EFN), to attract canopy arthropods that are natural enemies of herbivorous organisms. While recent evidence suggests that upon perception of low red to far-red (R:FR) ratios, which signal the proximity of competitors, plants down-regulate resource allocation to direct chemical defenses, it is unknown if a similar phytochrome-mediated response occurs for indirect defenses. We evaluated the interactive effects of R:FR ratio and simulated herbivory on nectar production by EFNs of passion fruit (Passiflora edulis f. flavicarpa). The activity of petiolar EFNs dramatically increased in response to simulated herbivory and hormonal treatment with methyl jasmonate (MeJA). Low R:FR ratios, which induced a classic "shade-avoidance" repertoire of increased stem elongation in P. edulis, strongly suppressed the EFN response triggered by simulated herbivory or MeJA application. Strikingly, the EFN response to wounding and light quality was localized to the branches that received the treatments. In vines like P. edulis, a local response would allow the plants to precisely adjust their light harvesting and defense phenotypes to the local conditions encountered by individual branches when foraging for resources in patchy canopies. Consistent with the emerging paradigm that phytochrome regulation of jasmonate signaling is a central modulator of adaptive phenotypic plasticity, our results demonstrate that light quality is a strong regulator of indirect defenses. PMID:23839264

  1. The fifth adaptor protein complex.

    Jennifer Hirst; Barlow, Lael D.; Gabriel Casey Francisco; Sahlender, Daniela A.; Seaman, Matthew N.J.; Dacks, Joel B.; Robinson, Margaret S.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptor protein (AP) complexes sort cargo into vesicles for transport from one membrane compartment of the cell to another. Four distinct AP complexes have been identified, which are present in most eukaryotes. We report the existence of a fifth AP complex, AP-5. Tagged AP-5 localises to a late endosomal compartment in HeLa cells. AP-5 does not associate with clathrin and is insensitive to brefeldin A. Knocking down AP-5 subunits interferes with the trafficking of the cation-independent manno...

  2. The Fifth Adaptor Protein Complex

    Hirst, Jennifer; D. Barlow, Lael; Francisco, Gabriel Casey; Sahlender, Daniela A.; Seaman, Matthew N.J.; Dacks, Joel B.; Robinson, Margaret S.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptor protein (AP) complexes sort cargo into vesicles for transport from one membrane compartment of the cell to another. Four distinct AP complexes have been identified, which are present in most eukaryotes. We report the existence of a fifth AP complex, AP-5. Tagged AP-5 localises to a late endosomal compartment in HeLa cells. AP-5 does not associate with clathrin and is insensitive to brefeldin A. Knocking down AP-5 subunits interferes with the trafficking of the cation-independent manno...

  3. The fifth adaptor protein complex.

    Jennifer Hirst

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Adaptor protein (AP complexes sort cargo into vesicles for transport from one membrane compartment of the cell to another. Four distinct AP complexes have been identified, which are present in most eukaryotes. We report the existence of a fifth AP complex, AP-5. Tagged AP-5 localises to a late endosomal compartment in HeLa cells. AP-5 does not associate with clathrin and is insensitive to brefeldin A. Knocking down AP-5 subunits interferes with the trafficking of the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor and causes the cell to form swollen endosomal structures with emanating tubules. AP-5 subunits can be found in all five eukaryotic supergroups, but they have been co-ordinately lost in many organisms. Concatenated phylogenetic analysis provides robust resolution, for the first time, into the evolutionary order of emergence of the adaptor subunit families, showing AP-3 as the basal complex, followed by AP-5, AP-4, and AP-1 and AP-2. Thus, AP-5 is an evolutionarily ancient complex, which is involved in endosomal sorting, and which has links with hereditary spastic paraplegia.

  4. Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS 5 utilises distinct domains for regulation of JAK1 and interaction with the adaptor protein Shc-1.

    Edmond M Linossi

    Full Text Available Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS5 is thought to act as a tumour suppressor through negative regulation of JAK/STAT and epidermal growth factor (EGF signaling. However, the mechanism/s by which SOCS5 acts on these two distinct pathways is unclear. We show for the first time that SOCS5 can interact directly with JAK via a unique, conserved region in its N-terminus, which we have termed the JAK interaction region (JIR. Co-expression of SOCS5 was able to specifically reduce JAK1 and JAK2 (but not JAK3 or TYK2 autophosphorylation and this function required both the conserved JIR and additional sequences within the long SOCS5 N-terminal region. We further demonstrate that SOCS5 can directly inhibit JAK1 kinase activity, although its mechanism of action appears distinct from that of SOCS1 and SOCS3. In addition, we identify phosphoTyr317 in Shc-1 as a high-affinity substrate for the SOCS5-SH2 domain and suggest that SOCS5 may negatively regulate EGF and growth factor-driven Shc-1 signaling by binding to this site. These findings suggest that different domains in SOCS5 contribute to two distinct mechanisms for regulation of cytokine and growth factor signaling.

  5. Role of adaptor proteins in secretory granule biogenesis and maturation

    RichardEMains

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In the regulated secretory pathway, secretory granules (SGs store peptide hormones that are released on demand. SGs are formed at the trans-Golgi network (TGN and must undergo a maturation process to become responsive to secretagogues. The production of mature SGs requires concentrating newly synthesized soluble content proteins in granules whose membranes contain the appropriate integral membrane proteins. The mechanisms underlying the sorting of soluble and integral membrane proteins destined for SGs from other proteins are not yet well understood. For soluble proteins, luminal pH and divalent metals can affect aggregation and interaction with surrounding membranes. The trafficking of granule membrane proteins can be controlled by both luminal and cytosolic factors. Cytosolic adaptor proteins, which recognize the cytosolic domains of proteins that span the SG membrane, have been shown to play essential roles in the assembly of functional SGs. Adaptor protein 1A (AP-1A is known to interact with specific motifs in its cargo proteins and with the clathrin heavy chain, contributing to the formation of a clathrin coat. AP-1A is present in patches on immature SG membranes, where it removes cargo and facilitates SG maturation. AP-1A recruitment to membranes can be modulated by PACS-1 (Phosphofurin Acidic Cluster Sorting protein 1, a cytosolic protein which interacts with both AP-1A and cargo that has been phosphorylated by casein kinase II. A cargo/PACS-1/AP-1A complex is necessary to drive the appropriate transport of several cargo proteins within the regulated secretory pathway. The GGA (Golgi-localized, -ear containing, ADP-ribosylation factor binding family of adaptor proteins serve a similar role. We review the functions of AP-1A, PACS-1 and GGAs in facilitating the retrieval of proteins from immature SGs and review examples of cargo proteins whose trafficking within the regulated secretory pathway is governed by adaptor proteins.

  6. The E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Adaptor Protein Skp1 Is Glycosylated by an Evolutionarily Conserved Pathway That Regulates Protist Growth and Development.

    Rahman, Kazi; Zhao, Peng; Mandalasi, Msano; van der Wel, Hanke; Wells, Lance; Blader, Ira J; West, Christopher M

    2016-02-26

    Toxoplasma gondii is a protist parasite of warm-blooded animals that causes disease by proliferating intracellularly in muscle and the central nervous system. Previous studies showed that a prolyl 4-hydroxylase related to animal HIFα prolyl hydroxylases is required for optimal parasite proliferation, especially at low O2. We also observed that Pro-154 of Skp1, a subunit of the Skp1/Cullin-1/F-box protein (SCF)-class of E3-ubiquitin ligases, is a natural substrate of this enzyme. In an unrelated protist, Dictyostelium discoideum, Skp1 hydroxyproline is modified by five sugars via the action of three glycosyltransferases, Gnt1, PgtA, and AgtA, which are required for optimal O2-dependent development. We show here that TgSkp1 hydroxyproline is modified by a similar pentasaccharide, based on mass spectrometry, and that assembly of the first three sugars is dependent on Toxoplasma homologs of Gnt1 and PgtA. Reconstitution of the glycosyltransferase reactions in extracts with radioactive sugar nucleotide substrates and appropriate Skp1 glycoforms, followed by chromatographic analysis of acid hydrolysates of the reaction products, confirmed the predicted sugar identities as GlcNAc, Gal, and Fuc. Disruptions of gnt1 or pgtA resulted in decreased parasite growth. Off target effects were excluded based on restoration of the normal glycan chain and growth upon genetic complementation. By analogy to Dictyostelium Skp1, the mechanism may involve regulation of assembly of the SCF complex. Understanding the mechanism of Toxoplasma Skp1 glycosylation is expected to help develop it as a drug target for control of the pathogen, as the glycosyltransferases are absent from mammalian hosts. PMID:26719340

  7. Challenges in using cultured primary rodent hepatocytes or cell lines to study hepatic HDL receptor SR-BI regulation by its cytoplasmic adaptor PDZK1.

    Kosuke Tsukamoto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: PDZK1 is a four PDZ-domain containing cytoplasmic protein that binds to a variety of membrane proteins via their C-termini and can influence the abundance, localization and/or function of its target proteins. One of these targets in hepatocytes in vivo is the HDL receptor SR-BI. Normal hepatic expression of SR-BI protein requires PDZK1 - <5% of normal hepatic SR-BI is seen in the livers of PDZK1 knockout mice. Progress has been made in identifying features of PDZK1 required to control hepatic SR-BI in vivo using hepatic expression of wild-type and mutant forms of PDZK1 in wild-type and PDZK1 KO transgenic mice. Such in vivo studies are time consuming and expensive, and cannot readily be used to explore many features of the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we have explored the potential to use either primary rodent hepatocytes in culture using 2D collagen gels with newly developed optimized conditions or PDZK1/SR-BI co-transfected cultured cell lines (COS, HEK293 for such studies. SR-BI and PDZK1 protein and mRNA expression levels fell rapidly in primary hepatocyte cultures, indicating this system does not adequately mimic hepatocytes in vivo for analysis of the PDZK1 dependence of SR-BI. Although PDZK1 did alter SR-BI protein expression in the cell lines, its influence was independent of SR-BI's C-terminus, and thus is not likely to occur via the same mechanism as that which occurs in hepatocytes in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Caution must be exercised in using primary hepatocytes or cultured cell lines when studying the mechanism underlying the regulation of hepatic SR-BI by PDZK1. It may be possible to use SR-BI and PDZK1 expression as sensitive markers for the in vivo-like state of hepatocytes to further improve primary hepatocyte cell culture conditions.

  8. Floral evolution: Beyond traditional viewpoint of pollinator mediated floral design

    YANG Chunfeng; GUO Youhao

    2005-01-01

    Pollination biology provides new insight for understanding the evolutionary mechanism and process of the existing diversity in floral design of angiosperms. Evolutionary biologists have established some rules and models to try to explain the ubiquitous relationship between pollination system and floral evolution. However, as new techniques have been applied and more and more new pollination events found in recent years, the relationship between pollination system and floral evolution has become less clear. Researchers realized that floral evolution is more complicated and idiosyncratic than simple adaptive models. The traditional viewpoints of pollinator mediated floral design urgently need new reevaluation. This paper attempts to make a brief review of such main opinions and introduce their new insights according to recent studies. Finally, we also give some suggestions for future study by reviewing several new viewpoints about floral evolution.

  9. Transcriptional control of floral anthocyanin pigmentation in monkeyflowers (Mimulus)

    Yuan, Yao-Wu; Sagawa, Janelle M.; Frost, Laura; Vela, James P.; Bradshaw, Harvey D.

    2014-01-01

    A molecular description of the control of floral pigmentation in a multi-species group displaying various flower color patterns is of great interest for understanding the molecular bases of phenotypic diversification and pollinator-mediated speciation.Through transcriptome profiling, mutant analyses, and transgenic experiments, we aim to establish a ‘baseline’ floral anthocyanin regulation model in Mimulus lewisii and to examine the different ways of tinkering with this model in generating th...

  10. Motors and Adaptors : Transport Regulation within Neurons

    van Spronsen, C.S.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Human thoughts and behavior are the outcome of communication between neurons in our brains. There is an entire world inside each of these neurons where transactions are established and meeting points are set. By using molecular motors to transport proteins and organelles along cytoskeletal tracks, neurons create the internal order of the bustling community of macromolecules. Given the challenging geometry of the neuron, the mechanisms that deliver fuel and materials to sustain the distant syn...

  11. ABC model and floral evolution

    LI Guisheng; MENG Zheng; KONG Hongzhi; CHEN Zhiduan; LU Anming

    2003-01-01

    The paper introduces the classical ABC model of floral development and thereafter ABCD, ABCDE and quartet models, and presents achievements in the studies on floral evolution such as the improved understanding on the relationship of reproductive organs between gnetophytes and angiosperms, new results in perianth evolution and identified homology of floral organs between dicots and monocots. The evo-devo studies on plant taxa at different evolutionary levels are useful to better understanding the homology of floral organs, and to clarifying the mysteries of the origin and subsequent diversification of flowers.

  12. An Activated Form of UFO Alters Leaf Development and Produces Ectopic Floral and Inflorescence Meristems

    Eddy Risseeuw; Prakash Venglat; Daoquan Xiang; Kristina Komendant; Tim Daskalchuk; Vivijan Babic; William Crosby; Raju Datla

    2013-01-01

    Plants are unique in their ability to continuously produce new meristems and organ primordia. In Arabidopsis, the transcription factor LEAFY (LFY) functions as a master regulator of a gene network that is important for floral meristem and organ specification. UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) is a co-activator of LEAFY and is required for proper activation of APETALA3 in the floral meristem during the specification of stamens and petals. The ufo mutants display defects in other parts of the flower ...

  13. The AP-3 adaptor complex is required for vacuolar function in Arabidopsis

    Zwiewka, M.; Feraru, E.; Moller, B.K.; Hwang, I.; Feraru, M.I.; Kleine-Vehn, J.; Weijers, D.; Friml, J.

    2011-01-01

    Subcellular trafficking is required for a multitude of functions in eukaryotic cells. It involves regulation of cargo sorting, vesicle formation, trafficking and fusion processes at multiple levels. Adaptor protein (AP) complexes are key regulators of cargo sorting into vesicles in yeast and mammals

  14. Dermatoses among floral shop workers.

    Thiboutot, D M; Hamory, B H; Marks, J G

    1990-01-01

    Concern about the increasing incidence of hand dermatitis in floral shop workers in the United States and its possible association to the plant Alstroemeria, a flower that has become popular since its introduction in 1981, prompted investigation of the prevalence and cause of hand dermatitis in a sample of floral workers. Fifty-seven floral workers were surveyed, and 15 (26%) reported hand dermatitis within the previous 12 months. Sixteen floral workers (eight with dermatitis) volunteered to be patch tested to the North American Contact Dermatitis Group Standard and Perfume Trays, a series of eight pesticides and 20 plant allergens. Of four of seven floral designers and arrangers who reported hand dermatitis, three reacted positively to patch tests to tuliposide A, the allergen in Alstroemeria. Patch test readings for all other plant extracts were negative. A positive reading for a test to one pesticide, difolatan (Captafol), was noted, the relevance of which is unknown. PMID:2137139

  15. PAG - a multipurpose transmembrane adaptor protein

    Hrdinka, Matouš; Hořejší, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 41 (2014), s. 4881-4892. ISSN 0950-9232 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : PAG * adaptor protein * membrane raft Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 8.459, year: 2014

  16. Palmitoylated transmembrane adaptor proteins in leukocyte signaling

    Štěpánek, Ondřej; Dráber, Peter; Hořejší, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 5 (2014), s. 895-902. ISSN 0898-6568 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Leukocyte * Adaptor * Palmitoylation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.315, year: 2014

  17. Preliminary Proteomic Analysis of Tobacco Leaves Influenced by Floral Scent from Rose

    Ping Yu; Yuan Su; Xiaogan Zhou

    2012-01-01

    The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play an important role in plant communication.There are many VOCs such as:aroma alcohols,esters and terpenes in rose floral scent.The tobacco would be influenced by floral scent from rose is unclear.To understand tobacco response induced by rose floral scent,we carried out proteomic analysis of tobacco leaves influenced by floral scent from rose using 2-DE.Protein profiles showed that 470 ±37 protein spots could be detected in sole tobacco and 319 ±18 in tobacco/rose respectively.Among them,26 protein spots showed 2-fold change in protein expression level,6 protein spots were up-regulated and 20 were down-regulated.We hope to acquire more information to interpret proteomic change of tobacco leaves influenced by floral scent from rose after MS identification above differential expression proteins.

  18. POWERDRESS and diversified expression of the MIR172 gene family bolster the floral stem cell network.

    Rae Eden Yumul

    Full Text Available Termination of the stem cells in the floral meristem (also known as floral determinacy is critical for the reproductive success of plants, and the molecular activities regulating floral determinacy are precisely orchestrated during the course of floral development. In Arabidopsis thaliana, regulators of floral determinacy include several transcription factor genes, such as APETALA2 (AP2, AGAMOUS (AG, SUPERMAN (SUP, and CRABSCLAW (CRC, as well as a microRNA (miRNA, miR172, which targets AP2. How the transcription factor and miRNA genes are coordinately regulated to achieve floral determinacy is unknown. A mutation in POWERDRESS (PWR, a previously uncharacterized gene encoding a SANT-domain-containing protein, was isolated in this study as an enhancer of the weakly indeterminate ag-10 allele. PWR was found to promote the transcription of CRC, MIR172a, b, and c and/or enhance Pol II occupancy at their promoters, without affecting MIR172d or e. A mutation in mature miR172d was additionally found to enhance the determinacy defects of ag-10 in an AP2-dependent manner, providing direct evidence that miR172d is functional in repressing AP2 and thereby contributes to floral determinacy. Thus, while PWR promotes floral determinacy by enhancing the expression of three of the five MIR172 members as well as CRC, MIR172d, whose expression is PWR-independent, also functions in floral stem cell termination. Taken together, these findings demonstrate how transcriptional diversification and functional redundancy of a miRNA family along with PWR-mediated co-regulation of miRNA and transcription factor genes contribute to the robustness of the floral determinacy network.

  19. Adaptor protein complexes and intracellular transport

    2014-01-01

    The AP (adaptor protein) complexes are heterotetrameric protein complexes that mediate intracellular membrane trafficking along endocytic and secretory transport pathways. There are five different AP complexes: AP-1, AP-2 and AP-3 are clathrin-associated complexes; whereas AP-4 and AP-5 are not. These five AP complexes localize to different intracellular compartments and mediate membrane trafficking in distinct pathways. They recognize and concentrate cargo proteins into vesicular carriers th...

  20. Hormonal changes during flower development in floral tissues of Lilium.

    Arrom, L; Munné-Bosch, S

    2012-08-01

    Much effort has been focussed on better understanding the key signals that modulate floral senescence. Although ethylene is one of the most important regulators of floral senescence in several species, Lilium flowers show low sensitivity to ethylene; thus their senescence may be regulated by other hormones. In this study we have examined how (1) endogenous levels of hormones in various floral tissues (outer and inner tepals, androecium and gynoecium) vary throughout flower development, (2) endogenous levels of hormones in such tissues change in cut versus intact flowers at anthesis, and (3) spray applications of abscisic acid and pyrabactin alter flower longevity. Results show that floral tissues behave differently in their hormonal changes during flower development. Cytokinin and auxin levels mostly increased in tepals prior to anthesis and decreased later during senescence. In contrast, levels of abscisic acid increased during senescence, but only in outer tepals and the gynoecium, and during the latest stages. In addition, cut flowers at anthesis differed from intact flowers in the levels of abscisic acid and auxins in outer tepals, salicylic acid in inner tepals, cytokinins, gibberellins and jasmonic acid in the androecium, and abscisic acid and salicylic acid in the gynoecium, thus showing a clear differential response between floral tissues. Furthermore, spray applications of abscisic acid and pyrabactin in combination accelerated the latest stages of tepal senescence, yet only when flower senescence was delayed with Promalin. It is concluded that (1) floral tissues differentially respond in their endogenous variations of hormones during flower development, (2) cut flowers have drastic changes in the hormonal balance not only of outer and inner tepals but also of androecium and gynoecium, and (3) abscisic acid may accelerate the progression of tepal senescence in Lilium. PMID:22367063

  1. SR proteins are NXF1 adaptors that link alternative RNA processing to mRNA export.

    Müller-McNicoll, Michaela; Botti, Valentina; de Jesus Domingues, Antonio M; Brandl, Holger; Schwich, Oliver D; Steiner, Michaela C; Curk, Tomaz; Poser, Ina; Zarnack, Kathi; Neugebauer, Karla M

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear export factor 1 (NXF1) exports mRNA to the cytoplasm after recruitment to mRNA by specific adaptor proteins. How and why cells use numerous different export adaptors is poorly understood. Here we critically evaluate members of the SR protein family (SRSF1-7) for their potential to act as NXF1 adaptors that couple pre-mRNA processing to mRNA export. Consistent with this proposal, >1000 endogenous mRNAs required individual SR proteins for nuclear export in vivo. To address the mechanism, transcriptome-wide RNA-binding profiles of NXF1 and SRSF1-7 were determined in parallel by individual-nucleotide-resolution UV cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (iCLIP). Quantitative comparisons of RNA-binding sites showed that NXF1 and SR proteins bind mRNA targets at adjacent sites, indicative of cobinding. SRSF3 emerged as the most potent NXF1 adaptor, conferring sequence specificity to RNA binding by NXF1 in last exons. Interestingly, SRSF3 and SRSF7 were shown to bind different sites in last exons and regulate 3' untranslated region length in an opposing manner. Both SRSF3 and SRSF7 promoted NXF1 recruitment to mRNA. Thus, SRSF3 and SRSF7 couple alternative splicing and polyadenylation to NXF1-mediated mRNA export, thereby controlling the cytoplasmic abundance of transcripts with alternative 3' ends. PMID:26944680

  2. [Floral essences, a fascinating world].

    Llonch, María

    2005-05-01

    Floral essences were discovered in the decade of the thirties by the English doctor, bacteriologist and homeopath Dr. Edward Bach. He described 38 remedies elaborated with flowers and shoots; each one correspondeds to an emotional pattern or a typical personality. Furthermore, he describes a remedy developed for emergency situations. PMID:15981972

  3. PIP2: choreographer of actin-adaptor proteins in the HIV-1 dance

    Rocha-Perugini, Vera; Gordon-Alonso, Mónica; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton plays a key role during the replication cycle of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1). HIV-1 infection is affected by cellular proteins that influence the clustering of viral receptors or the subcortical actin cytoskeleton. Several of these actin-adaptor proteins are controlled by the second messenger phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2), an important regulator of actin organization. PIP2 production is induced by HIV-1 attachment and facilitates viral infection. However, the importance of PIP2 in regulating cytoskeletal proteins and thus HIV-1 infection has been overlooked. This review examines recent reports describing the roles played by actin-adaptor proteins during HIV-1 infection of CD4+ T cells, highlighting the influence of the signaling lipid PIP2 in this process. PMID:24768560

  4. Chromatin Adaptor Brd4 Modulates E2 Transcription Activity and Protein Stability*

    Lee, A-Young; Chiang, Cheng-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Brd4 is a chromatin adaptor containing tandem bromodomains binding to acetylated histone H3 and H4. Although Brd4 has been implicated in the transcriptional control of papillomavirus-encoded E2 protein, it is unclear how Brd4 regulates E2 function and whether the involvement of Brd4 in transactivation and transrepression is common to different types of E2 proteins. Using DNase I footprinting performed with in vitro reconstituted human papillomavirus (HPV) chromatin and...

  5. Biochemical and Structural Studies on the Adaptor Protein p130Cas

    Nasertorabi, Fariborz

    2005-01-01

    Crk associated substrate (Cas) is an adaptor protein that becomes phosphorylated upon integrin signaling and influences regulation of cell processes such as migration, proliferation and survival. It consists of multiple domains and regions that can interact with several signaling proteins involved in different signaling pathways. Cas was first discovered as a highly phosphorylated protein in v-Src and v-Crk transformed cells, showing involvement of this protein in cell transformation High lev...

  6. Down-regulation of AUXIN RESPONSE FACTORS 6 and 8 by microRNA 167 leads to floral development defects and female sterility in tomato.

    Liu, Ning; Wu, Shan; Van Houten, Jason; Wang, Ying; Ding, Biao; Fei, Zhangjun; Clarke, Thomas H; Reed, Jason W; van der Knaap, Esther

    2014-06-01

    Auxin regulates the expression of diverse genes that affect plant growth and development. This regulation requires AUXIN RESPONSE FACTORS (ARFs) that bind to the promoter regions of these genes. ARF6 and ARF8 in Arabidopsis thaliana are required to promote inflorescence stem elongation and late stages of petal, stamen, and gynoecium development. All seed plants studied thus far have ARF6 and ARF8 orthologues as well as the microRNA miR167, which targets ARF6 and ARF8. Whether these genes have broadly conserved roles in flower development is not known. To address this question, the effects of down-regulation of ARF6 and ARF8 were investigated through transgenic expression of Arabidopsis MIR167a in tomato, which diverged from Arabidopsis before the radiation of dicotyledonous plants approximately 90-112 million years ago. The transgenic tomato plants overexpressing MIR167a exhibited reductions in leaf size and internode length as well as shortened petals, stamens, and styles. More significantly, the transgenic plants were female-sterile as a result of failure of wild-type pollen to germinate on the stigma surface and/or to grow through the style. RNA-Seq analysis identified many genes with significantly altered expression patterns, including those encoding products with functions in 'transcription regulation', 'cell wall' and 'lipid metabolism' categories. Putative orthologues of a subset of these genes were also differentially expressed in Arabidopsis arf6 arf8 mutant flowers. These results thus suggest that ARF6 and ARF8 have conserved roles in controlling growth and development of vegetative and flower organs in dicots. PMID:24723401

  7. Down-regulation of AUXIN RESPONSE FACTORS 6 and 8 by microRNA 167 leads to floral development defects and female sterility in tomato

    Liu, Ning; Clarke, Thomas H.; van der Knaap, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Auxin regulates the expression of diverse genes that affect plant growth and development. This regulation requires AUXIN RESPONSE FACTORS (ARFs) that bind to the promoter regions of these genes. ARF6 and ARF8 in Arabidopsis thaliana are required to promote inflorescence stem elongation and late stages of petal, stamen, and gynoecium development. All seed plants studied thus far have ARF6 and ARF8 orthologues as well as the microRNA miR167, which targets ARF6 and ARF8. Whether these genes have broadly conserved roles in flower development is not known. To address this question, the effects of down-regulation of ARF6 and ARF8 were investigated through transgenic expression of Arabidopsis MIR167a in tomato, which diverged from Arabidopsis before the radiation of dicotyledonous plants approximately 90–112 million years ago. The transgenic tomato plants overexpressing MIR167a exhibited reductions in leaf size and internode length as well as shortened petals, stamens, and styles. More significantly, the transgenic plants were female-sterile as a result of failure of wild-type pollen to germinate on the stigma surface and/or to grow through the style. RNA-Seq analysis identified many genes with significantly altered expression patterns, including those encoding products with functions in ‘transcription regulation’, ‘cell wall’ and ‘lipid metabolism’ categories. Putative orthologues of a subset of these genes were also differentially expressed in Arabidopsis arf6 arf8 mutant flowers. These results thus suggest that ARF6 and ARF8 have conserved roles in controlling growth and development of vegetative and flower organs in dicots. PMID:24723401

  8. Floral reward in Ranunculaceae species

    Bożena Denisow

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Floral reward is important in ecological and evolutionary perspectives and essential in pollination biology. For example, floral traits, nectar and pollen features are essential for understanding the functional ecology, the dynamics of pollen transport, competition for pollinator services, and patterns of specialization and generalization in plant–pollinator interactions. We believe to present a synthetic description in the field of floral reward in Ranunculaceae family important in pollination biology and indicating connections between ecological and evolutionary approaches. The links between insect visitors’ behaviour and floral reward type and characteristics exist. Ranunculaceae is a family of aboot 1700 species (aboot 60 genera, distributed worldwide, however the most abundant representatives are in temperate and cool regions of the northern and southern hemispheres. The flowers are usually radially symmetric (zygomorphic and bisexual, but in Aconitum, Aquilegia are bilaterally symmetric (zygomorphic. Most Ranunculaceae flowers offer no nectar, only pollen (e.g., Ranunculus, Adonis vernalis, Thalictrum, but numerous species create trophic niches for different wild pollinators (e.g. Osmia, Megachile, Bombus, Andrena (Denisow et al. 2008. Pollen is a source of protein, vitamins, mineral salts, organic acids and hormones, but the nutritional value varies greatly between different plant species. The pollen production can differ significantly between Ranunculacea species. The mass of pollen produced in anthers differ due to variations in the number of developed anthers. For example, interspecies differences are considerable, 49 anthers are noted in Aquilegia vulgaris, 70 anthers in Ranunculus lanuginosus, 120 in Adonis vernalis. A significant intra-species differences’ in the number of anthers are also noted (e.g. 41 to 61 in Aquilegia vulgaris, 23-45 in Ranunculus cassubicus. Pollen production can be up to 62 kg per ha for Ranunculus acer

  9. Regulators of floral fragrance production and their target genes in petunia are not exclusively active in the epidermal cells of petals.

    Van Moerkercke, Alex; Galván-Ampudia, Carlos S; Verdonk, Julian C; Haring, Michel A; Schuurink, Robert C

    2012-05-01

    In which cells of the flower volatile biosynthesis takes place is unclear. In rose and snapdragon, some enzymes of the volatile phenylpropanoid/benzenoid pathway have been shown to be present in the epidermal cells of petals. It is therefore generally believed that the production of these compounds occurs in these cells. However, whether the entire pathway is active in these cells and whether it is exclusively active in these cells remains to be proven. Cell-specific transcription factors activating these genes will determine in which cells they are expressed. In petunia, the transcription factor EMISSION OF BENZENOIDS II (EOBII) activates the ODORANT1 (ODO1) promoter and the promoter of the biosynthetic gene isoeugenol synthase (IGS). The regulator ODO1 in turn activates the promoter of the shikimate gene 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS). Here the identification of a new target gene of ODO1, encoding an ABC transporter localized on the plasma membrane, PhABCG1, which is co-expressed with ODO1, is described. PhABCG1 expression is up-regulated in petals overexpressing ODO1 through activation of the PhABCG1 promoter. Interestingly, the ODO1, PhABCG1, and IGS promoters were active in petunia protoplasts originating from both epidermal and mesophyll cell layers of the petal, suggesting that the volatile phenylpropanoid/benzenoid pathway in petunia is active in these different cell types. Since volatile release occurs from epidermal cells, trafficking of (volatile) compounds between cell layers must be involved, but the exact function of PhABCG1 remains to be resolved. PMID:22345641

  10. Effects of floral display on pollinator behavior and pollen dispersal

    Lulu Tang; Bing Han

    2007-01-01

    Complete understanding of floral function requires the recognition of floral traits at two aspects: floral design and floral display. Floral display, the fundamental unit of plant mating, refers to the number, type and arrangement of the open flowers on the plant in a certain period. Interactions between the flowers on a plant could influence pollinator behaviors on the plant and consequently may govern the mating outcomes. Pollinators prefer large floral displays, which often receive more vi...

  11. Science Signaling Podcast for 12 July 2016: Adaptor proteins limit signaling.

    Wiley, H Steven; VanHook, Annalisa M

    2016-01-01

    This Podcast features an interview with Steven Wiley, senior author of a Research Article that appears in the 12 July 2016 issue of Science Signaling, about how the abundance of adaptor proteins and feedback regulators affect the flow of information downstream of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Information flows through a signaling pathway by sequential interactions between core components of the pathway, many of which have enzymatic activity. Adaptor proteins do not directly participate in relaying the signal and do not have enzymatic activity, but are important for signaling because they facilitate interactions between the core components. Using quantitative methods, Shi et al demonstrated that core components of the EGFR pathway were highly abundant in both normal cells and cancer cells. However, adaptor proteins were present in much lower abundance in both cell types, indicating that it is the abundance of these proteins that limit signaling downstream of EGFR. The authors also found that differences in EGFR signaling between different cell types likely resulted from the variable abundance of feedback regulators.Listen to Podcast. PMID:27405978

  12. Temporal relationship between the transcription of two Arabidopsis MADS box genes and the floral organ identity genes.

    Savidge, B; Rounsley, S D; Yanofsky, M F

    1995-06-01

    MADS box genes play important roles in specifying floral meristem and floral organ identity. We characterized the temporal and spatial expression patterns of two members of this gene family, AGL4 and AGL5 (for AGAMOUS [AG]-like). AGL4 RNA initially accumulates after the onset of expression of the floral meristem identity genes but before the onset of expression of the floral organ identity genes. AGL4 is, therefore, a putative target of the floral meristem identity genes and/or a potential regulator of the floral organ identity genes. AGL5 is initially expressed early in carpel development, shortly after the onset of AG expression. The loss of AGL5 expression in flowers of ag mutants, the activation of AGL5 by ectopic expression of AG, and the specific binding of AG to an element in the AGL5 promoter identify AGL5 as a putative direct target of AG. Our study provides possible links between the establishment of floral meristem and floral organ identity as well as subsequent steps in flower development. PMID:7647563

  13. The adaptor molecule CARD9 is essential for tuberculosis control

    Dorhoi, Anca; Desel, Christiane; Yeremeev, Vladimir; Pradl, Lydia; Brinkmann, Volker; Mollenkopf, Hans J; Hanke, Karin; Gross, Olaf; Ruland, Jürgen; Stefan H. E. Kaufmann

    2010-01-01

    The cross talk between host and pathogen starts with recognition of bacterial signatures through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which mobilize downstream signaling cascades. We investigated the role of the cytosolic adaptor caspase recruitment domain family, member 9 (CARD9) in tuberculosis. This adaptor was critical for full activation of innate immunity by converging signals downstream of multiple PRRs. Card9(-/-) mice succumbed early after aerosol infection, with higher mycobacteria...

  14. Patterning and evolution of floral structures - marking time.

    McKim, Sarah; Hay, Angela

    2010-08-01

    The diversity of flowering structures dazzles the eye, dominates the landscape, and invites evolutionary questions regarding the development of such variety. Comparative work in a number of genetically tractable plant species has addressed how diverse floral architectures develop, and started to reveal the balance between conservation and divergence of the patterning mechanisms responsible for when and where flowers form on a plant. We highlight findings from Petunia where conserved LFY/UFO function is under species-specific regulation, and a novel mechanism involving WOX homeodomain proteins for modulating cyme development in diverse nightshades. We also draw attention to recent findings in Arabidopsis of miRNA and chromatin-based timing mechanisms controlling floral development, and illustrate how genetic studies in Arabidopsis relatives can reveal how evolutionary changes in such mechanisms generate diversity in form. PMID:20452201

  15. Selective autophagy of non-ubiquitylated targets in plants: looking for cognate receptor/adaptor proteins

    Vasko eVeljanovski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular homeostasis is essential for the physiology of eukaryotic cells. Eukaryotic cells, including plant cells, utilize two main pathways to adjust the level of cytoplasmic components, namely the proteasomal and the lysosomal/vacuolar pathways. Macroautophagy is a lysosomal/vacuolar pathway which, until recently, was thought to be non-specific and a bulk degradation process. However, selective autophagy which can be activated in the cell under various physiological conditions, involves the specific degradation of defined macromolecules or organelles by a conserved molecular mechanism. For this process to be efficient, the mechanisms underlying the recognition and selection of the cargo to be engulfed by the double-membrane autophagosome are critical, and not yet well understood. Ubiquitin (poly-ubiquitin conjugation to the target appears to be a conserved ligand mechanism in many types of selective autophagy, and defined receptors/adaptors recognizing and regulating the autophagosomal capture of the ubiquitylated target have been characterized. However, non-proteinaceous and non-ubiquitylated cargoes are also selectively degraded by this pathway. This ubiquitin-independent selective autophagic pathway also involves receptor and/or adaptor proteins linking the cargo to the autophagic machinery. Some of these receptor/adaptor proteins including accessory autophagy-related (Atg and non-Atg proteins have been described in yeast and animal cells but not yet in plants. In this review we discuss the ubiquitin-independent cargo selection mechanisms in selective autophagy degradation of organelles and macromolecules and speculate on potential plant receptor/adaptor proteins.

  16. Mint3/X11γ Is an ADP-Ribosylation Factor-dependent Adaptor that Regulates the Traffic of the Alzheimer's Precursor Protein from the Trans-Golgi Network

    Shrivastava-Ranjan, Punya; Faundez, Victor; Fang, Guofu; Rees, Howard; Lah, James J.; Allan I Levey; Kahn, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    β-Amyloid peptides (Aβ) are the major component of plaques in brains of Alzheimer's patients, and are they derived from the proteolytic processing of the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP). The movement of APP between organelles is highly regulated, and it is tightly connected to its processing by secretases. We proposed previously that transport of APP within the cell is mediated in part through its sorting into Mint/X11-containing carriers. To test our hypothesis, we purified APP-containing ...

  17. Spatiotemporal Floral Scent Variation of Penstemon digitalis.

    Burdon, Rosalie C F; Raguso, Robert A; Kessler, André; Parachnowitsch, Amy L

    2015-07-01

    Variability in floral volatile emissions can occur temporally through floral development, during diel cycles, as well as spatially within a flower. These spatiotemporal patterns are hypothesized to provide additional information to floral visitors, but they are rarely measured, and their attendant hypotheses are even more rarely tested. In Penstemon digitalis, a plant whose floral scent has been shown to be under strong phenotypic selection for seed fitness, we investigated spatiotemporal variation in floral scent by using dynamic headspace collection, respectively solid-phase microextraction, and analyzed the volatile samples by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Total volatile emission was greatest during flowering and peak pollinator activity hours, suggesting its importance in mediating ecological interactions. We also detected tissue and reward-specific compounds, consistent with the hypothesis that complexity in floral scent composition reflects several ecological functions. In particular, we found tissue-specific scents for the stigma, stamens, and staminode (a modified sterile stamen common to all Penstemons). Our findings emphasize the dynamic nature of floral scents and highlight a need for greater understanding of ecological and physiological mechanisms driving spatiotemporal patterns in scent production. PMID:26133675

  18. Dynamics of DNA methylation and Histone H4 acetylation during floral bud differentiation in azalea

    Valledor Luis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to control the timing of flowering is a key strategy for planning production in ornamental species such as azalea, however it requires a thorough understanding of floral transition. Floral transition is achieved through a complex genetic network and regulated by multiple environmental and endogenous cues. Dynamic changes between chromatin states facilitating or inhibiting DNA transcription regulate the expression of floral induction pathways in response to environmental and developmental signals. DNA methylation and histone modifications are involved in controlling the functional state of chromatin and gene expression. Results The results of this work indicate that epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation and histone H4 acetylation have opposite and particular dynamics during the transition from vegetative to reproductive development in the apical shoots of azalea. Global levels of DNA methylation and histone H4 acetylation as well as immunodetection of 5-mdC and acetylated H4, in addition to a morphological study have permitted the delimitation of four basic phases in the development of the azalea bud and allowed the identification of a stage of epigenetic reprogramming which showed a sharp decrease of whole DNA methylation similar to that is defined in other developmental processes in plants and in mammals. Conclusion The epigenetic control and reorganization of chromatin seem to be decisive for coordinating floral development in azalea. DNA methylation and H4 deacetylation act simultaneously and co-ordinately, restructuring the chromatin and regulating the gene expression during soot apical meristem development and floral differentiation.

  19. Parallel SCF adaptor capture proteomics reveals a role for SCFFBXL17 in NRF2 activation via BACH1 repressor turnover.

    Tan, Meng-Kwang Marcus; Lim, Hui-Jun; Bennett, Eric J; Shi, Yang; Harper, J Wade

    2013-10-10

    Modular cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) use substrate binding adaptor proteins to specify target ubiquitylation. Many of the ~200 human CRL adaptor proteins remain poorly studied due to a shortage of efficient methods to identify biologically relevant substrates. Here, we report the development of parallel adaptor capture (PAC) proteomics and its use to systematically identify candidate targets for the leucine-rich repeat family of F-box proteins (FBXLs) that function with SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein (SCF) E3s. In validation experiments, we identify the unstudied F-box protein FBXL17 as a regulator of the NFR2 oxidative stress pathway. We demonstrate that FBXL17 controls the transcription of the NRF2 target HMOX1 via turnover of the transcriptional repressor BACH1 in the absence or presence of extrinsic oxidative stress. This work identifies a role for SCF(FBXL17) in controlling the threshold for NRF2-dependent gene activation and provides a framework for elucidating the functions of CRL adaptor proteins. PMID:24035498

  20. Floral induction in Eucalyptus nitens.

    Moncur, M W; Hasan, O

    1994-11-01

    Eucalyptus nitens (Deane & Maiden) Maiden takes at least five years to initiate flower buds from seed and is an infrequent and light flowerer. Because this behavior constitutes a major impediment to breeding programs, we examined the mechanisms controlling floral induction in E. nitens, with the long-term aim of reducing generation time and increasing seed yield. Application of paclobutrazol reduced the concentration of endogenous gibberellic acid (GA) in apical tissue and enhanced the reproductive activity of grafted trees maintained outside over winter in Canberra, Australia. Grafts maintained in a warm greenhouse over winter did not produce flower buds, despite the paclobutrazol-induced reduction in GA concentration of the apical tissue. Exposing untreated grafts, which had been maintained over winter in a warm greenhouse, to low temperature the following spring reduced growth but did not induce flower bud production. Addition of GA(3) to paclobutrazol-treated grafts reduced the effect of paclobutrazol on reproductive activity. PMID:14967619

  1. Fenología floral y visitantes florales en drimys granadensis (winteraceae)

    Lara Katherine; Sarmiento Rodrigo; Marquínez-Casas Xavier

    2009-01-01

    El propósito de este trabajo fue caracterizar las fases fenológicas florales y determinar los visitantes florales en una población natural de Drimys granadensis (Winteraceae) ubicada en Altos de Yerbabuena (2850 m), cerros orientales de la Sabana de Bogotá, (Colombia). El desarrollo fenológico floral duró 9.5 días cuando la floración ocurrió en época soleada, 12.5 días en época lluviosa y 16 días cuando se excluyeron a los visitantes florales mediante embolsado. Se realizaron observaciones de...

  2. Multimodal floral signals and moth foraging decisions.

    Jeffrey A Riffell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Combinations of floral traits - which operate as attractive signals to pollinators - act on multiple sensory modalities. For Manduca sexta hawkmoths, how learning modifies foraging decisions in response to those traits remains untested, and the contribution of visual and olfactory floral displays on behavior remains unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using M. sexta and the floral traits of two important nectar resources in southwestern USA, Datura wrightii and Agave palmeri, we examined the relative importance of olfactory and visual signals. Natural visual and olfactory cues from D. wrightii and A. palmeri flowers permits testing the cues at their native intensities and composition - a contrast to many studies that have used artificial stimuli (essential oils, single odorants that are less ecologically relevant. Results from a series of two-choice assays where the olfactory and visual floral displays were manipulated showed that naïve hawkmoths preferred flowers displaying both olfactory and visual cues. Furthermore, experiments using A. palmeri flowers - a species that is not very attractive to hawkmoths - showed that the visual and olfactory displays did not have synergistic effects. The combination of olfactory and visual display of D. wrightii, however - a flower that is highly attractive to naïve hawkmoths - did influence the time moths spent feeding from the flowers. The importance of the olfactory and visual signals were further demonstrated in learning experiments in which experienced moths, when exposed to uncoupled floral displays, ultimately chose flowers based on the previously experienced olfactory, and not visual, signals. These moths, however, had significantly longer decision times than moths exposed to coupled floral displays. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results highlight the importance of specific sensory modalities for foraging hawkmoths while also suggesting that they learn the floral displays as

  3. A novel role of BELL1-like homeobox genes, PENNYWISE and POUND-FOOLISH, in floral patterning.

    Yu, Lifeng; Patibanda, Varun; Smith, Harley M S

    2009-02-01

    Flowers are determinate shoots comprised of perianth and reproductive organs displayed in a whorled phyllotactic pattern. Floral organ identity genes display region-specific expression patterns in the developing flower. In Arabidopsis, floral organ identity genes are activated by LEAFY (LFY), which functions with region-specific co-regulators, UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) and WUSCHEL (WUS), to up-regulate homeotic genes in specific whorls of the flower. PENNYWISE (PNY) and POUND-FOOLISH (PNF) are redundant functioning BELL1-like homeodomain proteins that are expressed in shoot and floral meristems. During flower development, PNY functions with a co-repressor complex to down-regulate the homeotic gene, AGAMOUS (AG), in the outer whorls of the flower. However, the function of PNY as well as PNF in regulating floral organ identity in the central whorls of the flower is not known. In this report, we show that combining mutations in PNY and PNF enhance the floral patterning phenotypes of weak and strong alleles of lfy, indicating that these BELL1-like homeodomain proteins play a role in the specification of petals, stamens and carpels during flower development. Expression studies show that PNY and PNF positively regulate the homeotic genes, APETALA3 and AG, in the inner whorls of the flower. Moreover, PNY and PNF function in parallel with LFY, UFO and WUS to regulate homeotic gene expression. Since PNY and PNF interact with the KNOTTED1-like homeodomain proteins, SHOOTMERISTEMLESS (STM) and KNOTTED-LIKE from ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA2 (KNAT2) that regulate floral development, we propose that PNY/PNF-STM and PNY/PNF-KNAT2 complexes function in the inner whorls to regulate flower patterning events. PMID:19082619

  4. Optimized Adaptor Polymerase Chain Reaction Method for Efficient Genomic Walking

    Peng XU; Rui-Ying HU; Xiao-Yan DING

    2006-01-01

    Genomic walking is one of the most useful approaches in genome-related research. Three kinds of PCR-based methods are available for this purpose. However, none of them has been generally applied because they are either insensitive or inefficient. Here we present an efficient PCR protocol, an optimized adaptor PCR method for genomic walking. Using a combination of a touchdown PCR program and a special adaptor, the optimized adaptor PCR protocol achieves high sensitivity with low background noise. By applying this protocol, the insertion sites of a gene trap mouse line and two gene promoters from the incompletely sequenced Xenopus laevis genome were successfully identified with high efficiency. The general application of this protocol in genomic walking was promising.

  5. The Clathrin Adaptor AP-1A Mediates Basolateral Polarity

    Gravotta, Diego; Carvajal-Gonzalez, Jose Maria; Mattera, Rafael; Deborde, Sylvie; Banfelder, Jason R.; Bonifacino, Juan S.; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Clathrin and the epithelial-specific clathrin adaptor AP-1B mediate basolateral trafficking in epithelia. However, several epithelia lack AP-1B and mice knocked-out for AP-1B are viable, suggesting the existence of additional mechanisms that control basolateral polarity. Here, we demonstrate a distinct role of the ubiquitous clathrin adaptor AP-1A in basolateral protein sorting. Knock-down of AP-1A causes missorting of basolateral proteins in MDCK cells but only after knock-down of AP-1B, sug...

  6. Cytosol- and clathrin-dependent stimulation of endocytosis in vitro by purified adaptors

    1992-01-01

    Using stage-specific assays for receptor-mediated endocytosis of transferrin (Tfn) into perforated A431 cells we show that purified adaptors stimulate coated pit assembly and ligand sequestration into deeply invaginated coated pits. Late events in endocytosis involving membrane fission and coated vesicle budding which lead to the internalization of Tfn are unaffected. AP2, plasma membrane adaptors, are active at physiological concentrations, whereas AP1, Golgi adaptors, are inactive. Adaptor-...

  7. Proteomic insights into floral biology.

    Li, Xiaobai; Jackson, Aaron; Xie, Ming; Wu, Dianxing; Tsai, Wen-Chieh; Zhang, Sheng

    2016-08-01

    The flower is the most important biological structure for ensuring angiosperms reproductive success. Not only does the flower contain critical reproductive organs, but the wide variation in morphology, color, and scent has evolved to entice specialized pollinators, and arguably mankind in many cases, to ensure the successful propagation of its species. Recent proteomic approaches have identified protein candidates related to these flower traits, which has shed light on a number of previously unknown mechanisms underlying these traits. This review article provides a comprehensive overview of the latest advances in proteomic research in floral biology according to the order of flower structure, from corolla to male and female reproductive organs. It summarizes mainstream proteomic methods for plant research and recent improvements on two dimensional gel electrophoresis and gel-free workflows for both peptide level and protein level analysis. The recent advances in sequencing technologies provide a new paradigm for the ever-increasing genome and transcriptome information on many organisms. It is now possible to integrate genomic and transcriptomic data with proteomic results for large-scale protein characterization, so that a global understanding of the complex molecular networks in flower biology can be readily achieved. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics - a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock. PMID:26945514

  8. Cooperative and independent roles of the Drp1 adaptors Mff, MiD49 and MiD51 in mitochondrial fission.

    Osellame, Laura D; Singh, Abeer P; Stroud, David A; Palmer, Catherine S; Stojanovski, Diana; Ramachandran, Rajesh; Ryan, Michael T

    2016-06-01

    Cytosolic dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1, also known as DNM1L) is required for both mitochondrial and peroxisomal fission. Drp1-dependent division of these organelles is facilitated by a number of adaptor proteins at mitochondrial and peroxisomal surfaces. To investigate the interplay of these adaptor proteins, we used gene-editing technology to create a suite of cell lines lacking the adaptors MiD49 (also known as MIEF2), MiD51 (also known as MIEF1), Mff and Fis1. Increased mitochondrial connectivity was observed following loss of individual adaptors, and this was further enhanced following the combined loss of MiD51 and Mff. Moreover, loss of adaptors also conferred increased resistance of cells to intrinsic apoptotic stimuli, with MiD49 and MiD51 showing the more prominent role. Using a proximity-based biotin labeling approach, we found close associations between MiD51, Mff and Drp1, but not Fis1. Furthermore, we found that MiD51 can suppress Mff-dependent enhancement of Drp1 GTPase activity. Our data indicates that Mff and MiD51 regulate Drp1 in specific ways to promote mitochondrial fission. PMID:27076521

  9. Exploring potential new floral organ morphogenesis genes of Arabidopsis thaliana using systems biology approach.

    Xie, Wenchuan; Huang, Junfeng; Liu, Yang; Rao, Jianan; Luo, Da; He, Miao

    2015-01-01

    Flowering is one of the important defining features of angiosperms. The initiation of flower development and the formation of different floral organs are the results of the interplays among numerous genes. But until now, just fewer genes have been found linked with flower development. And the functions of lots of genes of Arabidopsis thaliana are still unknown. Although, the quartet model successfully simplified the ABCDE model to elaborate the molecular mechanism by introducing protein-protein interactions (PPIs). We still don't know much about several important aspects of flower development. So we need to discriminate even more genes involving in the flower development. In this study, we identified seven differentially modules through integrating the weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) method to analyze co-expression network and PPIs using the public floral and non-floral expression profiles data of Arabidopsis thaliana. Gene set enrichment analysis was used for the functional annotation of the related genes, and some of the hub genes were identified in each module. The potential floral organ morphogenesis genes of two significant modules were integrated with PPI information in order to detail the inherent regulation mechanisms. Finally, the functions of the floral patterning genes were elucidated by combining the PPI and evolutionary information. It was indicated that the sub-networks or complexes, rather than the genes, were the regulation unit of flower development. We found that the most possible potential new genes underlining the floral pattern formation in A. thaliana were FY, CBL2, ZFN3, and AT1G77370; among them, FY, CBL2 acted as an upstream regulator of AP2; ZFN3 activated the flower primordial determining gene AP1 and AP2 by HY5/HYH gene via photo induction possibly. And AT1G77370 exhibited similar function in floral morphogenesis, same as ELF3. It possibly formed a complex between RFC3 and RPS15 in

  10. Exploring potential new floral organ morphogenesis genes of Arabidopsis thaliana using systems biology approach

    Wenchuan eXie

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Flowering is one of the important defining features of angiosperms. The initiation of flower development and the formation of different floral organs are the results of the interplays among numerous genes. But until now, just fewer genes have been found linked with flower development. And the functions of lots of genes of Arabidopsis thaliana are still unknown. Although, the quartet model successfully simplified the ABCDE model to elaborate the molecular mechanism by introducing protein-protein interactions (PPIs. We still don't know much about several important aspects of flower development. So we need to discriminate even more genes involving in the flower development. In this study, we identified seven differentially modules through integrating the weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA and Support Vector Machine (SVM method to analyze co-expression network and PPIs using the public floral and non-floral expression profiles data of Arabidopsis thaliana. Gene set enrichment analysis was used for the functional annotation of the related genes, and some of the hub genes were identified in each module. The potential floral organ morphogenesis genes of two significant modules were integrated with PPI information in order to detail the inherent regulation mechanisms. Finally, the functions of the floral patterning genes were elucidated by combining the PPI and evolutionary information. It was indicated that the sub-networks or complexes, rather than the genes, were the regulation unit of flower development. We found that the most possible potential new genes underlining the floral pattern formation in A. thaliana were FY, CBL2, ZFN3 and AT1G77370; among them, FY, CBL2 acted as an upstream regulator of AP2; ZFN3 activated the flower primordial determining gene AP1 and AP2 by HY5/HYH gene via photo induction possibly. And AT1G77370 exhibited similar function in floral morphogenesis, same as ELF3. It possibly formed a complex between RFC3

  11. Spiral biasing adaptor for use in Si drift detectors and Si drift detector arrays

    Li, Zheng; Chen, Wei

    2016-07-05

    A drift detector array, preferably a silicon drift detector (SDD) array, that uses a low current biasing adaptor is disclosed. The biasing adaptor is customizable for any desired geometry of the drift detector single cell with minimum drift time of carriers. The biasing adaptor has spiral shaped ion-implants that generate the desired voltage profile. The biasing adaptor can be processed on the same wafer as the drift detector array and only one biasing adaptor chip/side is needed for one drift detector array to generate the voltage profiles on the front side and back side of the detector array.

  12. Floral organogenesis of Delavaya toxocarpa (Sapindaceae; Sapindales)

    Li-Min CAO; Nian-He XIA

    2009-01-01

    The floral organogenesis and development of Delavaya toxocarpa Franch. (Sapindaceae) were studied under scanning electron microscope and light microscope to determine its systematic position within Sapindaceae. Flowers arise in terminal thyrses. The sepal primordia initiate in a spiral (2/5) sequence, which are not synchronous. The five petal primordia initiate almost synchronously and alternate with sepal primordia. Eight stamens initiate almost simultaneously and their differentiation precedes that of the petals. The last formed petal and one stamen initiate from a common primordium. Mature stamens curve inwards and cover the ovary in bud. The gynoecium begins as a hemispheric primordium on which two carpellary lobes arise simultaneously. Later in development a single gynocium is formed with two locules and two ovules per locule. Floral morphology suggests a closer affinity with Sapindaceae, although certain features of floral ontogenesis are similar to those observed in certain members of the former Hippocastanaceae, such as Handeliodendron.

  13. Mutation scanning of peach floral genes

    Wilde H Dayton

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutation scanning technology has been used to develop crop species with improved traits. Modifications that improve screening throughput and sensitivity would facilitate the targeted mutation breeding of crops. Technical innovations for high-resolution melting (HRM analysis are enabling the clinic-based screening for human disease gene polymorphism. We examined the application of two HRM modifications, COLD-PCR and QMC-PCR, to the mutation scanning of genes in peach, Prunus persica. The targeted genes were the putative floral regulators PpAGAMOUS and PpTERMINAL FLOWER I. Results HRM analysis of PpAG and PpTFL1 coding regions in 36 peach cultivars found one polymorphic site in each gene. PpTFL1 and PpAG SNPs were used to examine approaches to increase HRM throughput. Cultivars with SNPs could be reliably detected in pools of twelve genotypes. COLD-PCR was found to increase the sensitivity of HRM analysis of pooled samples, but worked best with small amplicons. Examination of QMC-PCR demonstrated that primary PCR products for further analysis could be produced from variable levels of genomic DNA. Conclusions Natural SNPs in exons of target peach genes were discovered by HRM analysis of cultivars from a southeastern US breeding program. For detecting natural or induced SNPs in larger populations, HRM efficiency can be improved by increasing sample pooling and template production through approaches such as COLD-PCR and QMC-PCR. Technical advances developed to improve clinical diagnostics can play a role in the targeted mutation breeding of crops.

  14. Major transcriptome reprogramming underlies floral mimicry induced by the rust fungus Puccinia monoica in Boechera stricta.

    Liliana M Cano

    Full Text Available Pucciniamonoica is a spectacular plant parasitic rust fungus that triggers the formation of flower-like structures (pseudoflowers in its Brassicaceae host plant Boecherastricta. Pseudoflowers mimic in shape, color, nectar and scent co-occurring and unrelated flowers such as buttercups. They act to attract insects thereby aiding spore dispersal and sexual reproduction of the rust fungus. Although much ecological research has been performed on P. monoica-induced pseudoflowers, this system has yet to be investigated at the molecular or genomic level. To date, the molecular alterations underlying the development of pseudoflowers and the genes involved have not been described. To address this, we performed gene expression profiling to reveal 256 plant biological processes that are significantly altered in pseudoflowers. Among these biological processes, plant genes involved in cell fate specification, regulation of transcription, reproduction, floral organ development, anthocyanin (major floral pigments and terpenoid biosynthesis (major floral volatile compounds were down-regulated in pseudoflowers. In contrast, plant genes involved in shoot, cotyledon and leaf development, carbohydrate transport, wax biosynthesis, cutin transport and L-phenylalanine metabolism (pathway that results in phenylethanol and phenylacetaldehyde volatile production were up-regulated. These findings point to an extensive reprogramming of host genes by the rust pathogen to induce floral mimicry. We also highlight 31 differentially regulated plant genes that are enriched in the biological processes mentioned above, and are potentially involved in the formation of pseudoflowers. This work illustrates the complex perturbations induced by rust pathogens in their host plants, and provides a starting point for understanding the molecular mechanisms of pathogen-induced floral mimicry.

  15. Functional analyses of a flavonol synthase - like gene from Camellia nitidissima reveal its roles in flavonoid metabolism during floral pigmentation

    Xing-Wen Zhou; Zheng-Qi Fan; Yue Chen; Yu-Lin Zhu; Ji-Yuan Li; Heng-Fu Yin

    2013-09-01

    The flavonoids metabolic pathway plays central roles in floral coloration, in which anthocyanins and flavonols are derived from common precursors, dihydroflavonols. Flavonol synthase (FLS) catalyses dihydroflavonols into flavonols, which presents a key branch of anthocyanins biosynthesis. The yellow flower of Camellia nitidissima Chi. is a unique feature within the genus Camellia, which makes it a precious resource for breeding yellow camellia varieties. In this work, we characterized the secondary metabolites of pigments during floral development of C. nitidissima and revealed that accumulation of flavonols correlates with floral coloration. We first isolated CnFLS1 and showed that it is a FLS of C. nitidissima by gene family analysis. Second, expression analysis during floral development and different floral organs indicated that the expression level of CnFLS1 was regulated by developmental cues, which was in agreement with the accumulating pattern of flavonols. Furthermore, over-expression of CnFLS1 in Nicotiana tabacum altered floral colour into white or light yellow, and metabolic analysis showed significant increasing of flavonols and reducing of anthocyanins in transgenic plants. Our work suggested CnFLS1 plays critical roles in yellow colour pigmentation and is potentially a key point of genetic engineering toward colour modification in Camellia.

  16. The Adaptor Protein Rai/ShcC Promotes Astrocyte-Dependent Inflammation during Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Ulivieri, Cristina; Savino, Maria Teresa; Luccarini, Ilaria; Fanigliulo, Emanuela; Aldinucci, Alessandra; Bonechi, Elena; Benagiano, Marisa; Ortensi, Barbara; Pelicci, Giuliana; D'Elios, Mario Milco; Ballerini, Clara; Baldari, Cosima Tatiana

    2016-07-15

    Th17 cells have been casually associated to the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. We have previously demonstrated that Rai/ShcC, a member of the Shc family of adaptor proteins, negatively regulates Th17 cell differentiation and lupus autoimmunity. In this study, we have investigated the pathogenic outcome of the Th17 bias associated with Rai deficiency on multiple sclerosis development, using the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model. We found that, unexpectedly, EAE was less severe in Rai(-/-) mice compared with their wild-type counterparts despite an enhanced generation of myelin-specific Th17 cells that infiltrated into the CNS. Nevertheless, when adoptively transferred into immunodeficient Rai(+/+) mice, these cells promoted a more severe disease compared with wild-type encephalitogenic Th17 cells. This paradoxical phenotype was caused by a dampened inflammatory response of astrocytes, which were found to express Rai, to IL-17. The results provide evidence that Rai plays opposite roles in Th17 cell differentiation and astrocyte activation, with the latter dominant over the former in EAE, highlighting this adaptor as a potential novel target for the therapy of multiple sclerosis. PMID:27288534

  17. Lilium floral fragrance: A biochemical and genetic resource for aroma and flavor.

    Johnson, Timothy S; Schwieterman, Michael L; Kim, Joo Young; Cho, Keun H; Clark, David G; Colquhoun, Thomas A

    2016-02-01

    Hybrid Lilium (common name lily) cultivars are among the top produced domestic fresh cut flowers and potted plants in the US today. Many hybrid Lilium cultivars produce large and showy flowers that emit copious amounts of volatile molecules, which can negatively affect a consumer's appreciation or limit use of the plant product. There are few publications focused on the biochemistry, genetics, and/or molecular regulation of floral volatile biosynthesis for Lilium cultivars. In an initial pursuit to provide breeders with molecular markers for floral volatile biosynthesis, a total of five commercially available oriental and oriental-trumpet hybrid Lilium cultivars were selected for analytical characterization of floral volatile emission. In total, 66 volatile molecules were qualified and quantitated among all cultivars. Chemical classes of identified volatiles include monoterpene hydrocarbons, monoterpene alcohols and aldehydes, phenylpropanoids, benzenoids, fatty-acid-derived, nitrogen-containing, and amino-acid-derived compounds. In general, the floral volatile profiles of the three oriental-trumpet hybrids were dominated by monoterpene hydrocarbons, monoterpene alcohols and aldehydes, while the two oriental hybrids were dominated by monoterpene alcohols and aldehydes and phenylpropanoids, respectively. Tepal tissues (two petal whirls) emitted the vast majority of total volatile molecules compared to the reproductive organs of the flowers. Tepal volatile profiles were cultivar specific with a high degree of distinction, which indicates the five cultivars chosen will provide an excellent differential genetic environment for gene discovery through comparative transcriptomics in the future. Cloning and assaying transcript accumulation from four floral volatile biosynthetic candidates provided few immediate or obvious trends with floral volatile emission. PMID:26654856

  18. Diversity of floral visitors to sympatric Lithophragma species differing in floral morphology

    Cuautle, Mariana; Thompson, John N

    2010-01-01

    Most coevolving relationships between pairs of species are embedded in a broader multispecific interaction network. The mutualistic interaction between Lithophragma parviflorum (Saxifragaceae) and its pollinating floral parasite Greya politella (Lepidoptera, Prodoxidae) occurs in some communities as a pairwise set apart from most other interactions in those communities. In other communities, however, this pair of species occurs with congeners and with other floral visitors to Lithophragma. We...

  19. An activated form of UFO alters leaf development and produces ectopic floral and inflorescence meristems.

    Eddy Risseeuw

    Full Text Available Plants are unique in their ability to continuously produce new meristems and organ primordia. In Arabidopsis, the transcription factor LEAFY (LFY functions as a master regulator of a gene network that is important for floral meristem and organ specification. UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO is a co-activator of LEAFY and is required for proper activation of APETALA3 in the floral meristem during the specification of stamens and petals. The ufo mutants display defects in other parts of the flower and the inflorescence, suggestive of additional roles. Here we show that the normal determinacy of the developing Arabidopsis leaves is affected by the expression of a gain-of-function UFO fusion protein with the VP16 transcriptional activator domain. In these lines, the rosette and cauline leaf primordia exhibit reiterated serration, and upon flowering produce ectopic meristems that develop into flowers, bract leaves and inflorescences. These striking phenotypes reveal that developing leaves maintain the competency to initiate flower and inflorescence programs. Furthermore, the gain-of-function phenotypes are dependent on LFY and the SEPALLATA (SEP MADS-box transcription factors, indicative of their functional interactions with UFO. The findings of this study also suggest that UFO promotes the establishment of the lateral meristems and primordia in the peripheral zone of the apical and floral meristems by enhancing the activity of LFY. These novel phenotypes along with the mutant phenotypes of UFO orthologs in other plant species suggest a broader function for UFO in plants.

  20. An activated form of UFO alters leaf development and produces ectopic floral and inflorescence meristems.

    Risseeuw, Eddy; Venglat, Prakash; Xiang, Daoquan; Komendant, Kristina; Daskalchuk, Tim; Babic, Vivijan; Crosby, William; Datla, Raju

    2013-01-01

    Plants are unique in their ability to continuously produce new meristems and organ primordia. In Arabidopsis, the transcription factor LEAFY (LFY) functions as a master regulator of a gene network that is important for floral meristem and organ specification. UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) is a co-activator of LEAFY and is required for proper activation of APETALA3 in the floral meristem during the specification of stamens and petals. The ufo mutants display defects in other parts of the flower and the inflorescence, suggestive of additional roles. Here we show that the normal determinacy of the developing Arabidopsis leaves is affected by the expression of a gain-of-function UFO fusion protein with the VP16 transcriptional activator domain. In these lines, the rosette and cauline leaf primordia exhibit reiterated serration, and upon flowering produce ectopic meristems that develop into flowers, bract leaves and inflorescences. These striking phenotypes reveal that developing leaves maintain the competency to initiate flower and inflorescence programs. Furthermore, the gain-of-function phenotypes are dependent on LFY and the SEPALLATA (SEP) MADS-box transcription factors, indicative of their functional interactions with UFO. The findings of this study also suggest that UFO promotes the establishment of the lateral meristems and primordia in the peripheral zone of the apical and floral meristems by enhancing the activity of LFY. These novel phenotypes along with the mutant phenotypes of UFO orthologs in other plant species suggest a broader function for UFO in plants. PMID:24376756

  1. FENOLOGÍA FLORAL Y VISITANTES FLORALES EN Drimys granadensis (WINTERACEAE

    Lara Katherine

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available El propósito de este trabajo fue caracterizar las fases fenológicas florales y determinar los visitantes florales en una población natural de Drimys granadensis (Winteraceae ubicada en Altos de Yerbabuena (2850 m, cerros orientales de la Sabana de Bogotá, (Colombia. El desarrollo fenológico floral duró 9.5 días cuando la floración ocurrió en época soleada, 12.5 días en época lluviosa y 16 días cuando se excluyeron a los visitantes florales mediante embolsado. Se realizaron observaciones del recurso utilizado, fase fenólogica de la flor visitada y cargas polínicas en los visitante florales, los cuales correspondieron a 6 órdenes, 21 familias y 29 morfoespecies de insectos. Cuatro especies de coleópteros y dos de dípteros fueron considerados posibles polinizadores por su abundancia y carga de polen. Los resultados obtenidos se discuten en relación con aquellos reportados en otras especies del género Drimys y de la familia Winteraceae.

  2. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor modulation of Kv1.3 channel is disregulated by adaptor proteins Grb10 and nShc

    Marks David R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurotrophins are important regulators of growth and regeneration, and acutely, they can modulate the activity of voltage-gated ion channels. Previously we have shown that acute brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF activation of neurotrophin receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB suppresses the Shaker voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv1.3 via phosphorylation of multiple tyrosine residues in the N and C terminal aspects of the channel protein. It is not known how adaptor proteins, which lack catalytic activity, but interact with members of the neurotrophic signaling pathway, might scaffold with ion channels or modulate channel activity. Results We report the co-localization of two adaptor proteins, neuronal Src homology and collagen (nShc and growth factor receptor-binding protein 10 (Grb10, with Kv1.3 channel as demonstrated through immunocytochemical approaches in the olfactory bulb (OB neural lamina. To further explore the specificity and functional ramification of adaptor/channel co-localization, we performed immunoprecipitation and Western analysis of channel, kinase, and adaptor transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK 293. nShc formed a direct protein-protein interaction with Kv1.3 that was independent of BDNF-induced phosphorylation of Kv1.3, whereas Grb10 did not complex with Kv1.3 in HEK 293 cells. Both adaptors, however, co-immunoprecipitated with Kv1.3 in native OB. Grb10 was interestingly able to decrease the total expression of Kv1.3, particularly at the membrane surface, and subsequently eliminated the BDNF-induced phosphorylation of Kv1.3. To examine the possibility that the Src homology 2 (SH2 domains of Grb10 were directly binding to basally phosphorylated tyrosines in Kv1.3, we utilized point mutations to substitute multiple tyrosine residues with phenylalanine. Removal of the tyrosines 111–113 and 449 prevented Grb10 from decreasing Kv1.3 expression. In the absence of either adaptor protein

  3. Contributions of iridescence to floral patterning.

    Whitney, Heather M; Kolle, Mathias; Alvarez-Fernandez, Ruben; Steiner, Ullrich; Glover, Beverley J

    2009-05-01

    The Hibiscus trionum flower is distinctly patterned, with white petals each with a patch of red pigment at the base, producing a 'bulls-eye' pattern on the whole flower. The red pigmented patches are also iridescent, due to the presence of a series of overlying cuticular striations that act as a diffraction grating. We have previously reported that scanning electron microscopy revealed a sharply defined difference between the surface structure overlying the pigmented patch and that over the rest of the petal, with the diffraction grating only present over the pigmented region. Here we show that differences in petal surface structure overlie differences in pigment color in three other species, in a range of different patterns. Floral patterns have previously been shown to be advantageous in pollinator attraction, and we discuss whether emphasis of pigment patterns by structural color may increase floral recognition by pollinators. PMID:19641739

  4. Unique and conserved features of floral evocation in legumes

    Lim Chee Liew; Mohan B.Singh; Prem L.Bhalla

    2014-01-01

    Legumes, with their unique ability to fix atmo-spheric nitrogen, play a vital role in ensuring future food security and mitigating the effects of climate change because they use less fossil energy and produce less greenhouse gases compared with N-fertilized systems. Grain legumes are second only to cereal crops as a source of human and animal food, and they contribute approximately one third of the protein consumed by the human population. The productivity of seed crops, such as grain legumes, is dependent on flowering. Despite the genetic variation and importance of flowering in legume production, studies of the molecular pathways that control flowering in legumes are limited. Recent advances in genomics have revealed that legume flowering pathways are divergent from those of such model species as Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we discuss the current understanding of flowering time regulation in legumes and highlight the unique and conserved features of floral evocation in legumes.

  5. Involvement of the MADS-box gene ZMM4 in floral induction and inflorescence development in maize.

    Danilevskaya, Olga N; Meng, Xin; Selinger, David A; Deschamps, Stéphane; Hermon, Pedro; Vansant, Gordon; Gupta, Rajeev; Ananiev, Evgueni V; Muszynski, Michael G

    2008-08-01

    The switch from vegetative to reproductive growth is marked by the termination of vegetative development and the adoption of floral identity by the shoot apical meristem (SAM). This process is called the floral transition. To elucidate the molecular determinants involved in this process, we performed genome-wide RNA expression profiling on maize (Zea mays) shoot apices at vegetative and early reproductive stages using massively parallel signature sequencing technology. Profiling revealed significant up-regulation of two maize MADS-box (ZMM) genes, ZMM4 and ZMM15, after the floral transition. ZMM4 and ZMM15 map to duplicated regions on chromosomes 1 and 5 and are linked to neighboring MADS-box genes ZMM24 and ZMM31, respectively. This gene order is syntenic with the vernalization1 locus responsible for floral induction in winter wheat (Triticum monococcum) and similar loci in other cereals. Analyses of temporal and spatial expression patterns indicated that the duplicated pairs ZMM4-ZMM24 and ZMM15-ZMM31 are coordinately activated after the floral transition in early developing inflorescences. More detailed analyses revealed ZMM4 expression initiates in leaf primordia of vegetative shoot apices and later increases within elongating meristems acquiring inflorescence identity. Expression analysis in late flowering mutants positioned all four genes downstream of the floral activators indeterminate1 (id1) and delayed flowering1 (dlf1). Overexpression of ZMM4 leads to early flowering in transgenic maize and suppresses the late flowering phenotype of both the id1 and dlf1 mutations. Our results suggest ZMM4 may play roles in both floral induction and inflorescence development. PMID:18539775

  6. Floral volatiles play a key role in specialized ant pollination

    Vega, Clara de; Carlos M Herrera; Dötterl, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Chemical signals emitted by plants are crucial to understand the ecology and evolution of plant–animal interactions. Scent is an important component of floral phenotype and represents a decisive communication channel between plants and floral visitors. Floral volatiles promote attraction of mutualistic pollinators and, in some cases, serve to prevent flower visitation by antagonists such as ants. Despite ant visits to flowers have been suggested to be detrimental to plant fitness, in recent y...

  7. Diesel exhaust rapidly degrades floral odours used by honeybees

    Girling, Robbie D.; Inka Lusebrink; Emily Farthing; Newman, Tracey A.; Poppy, Guy M.

    2013-01-01

    Honeybees utilise floral odours when foraging for flowers; we investigated whether diesel exhaust pollution could interrupt these floral odour stimuli. A synthetic blend of eight floral chemicals, identified from oilseed rape, was exposed to diesel exhaust pollution. Within one minute of exposure the abundances of four of the chemicals were significantly lowered, with two components rendered undetectable. Honeybees were trained to recognise the full synthetic odour mix; altering the blend, by...

  8. Histone Acetylation Accompanied with Promoter Sequences Displaying Differential Expression Profiles of B-Class MADS-Box Genes for Phalaenopsis Floral Morphogenesis

    Hsu, Chia-Chi; Wu, Pei-Shan; Chen, Tien-Chih; Yu, Chun-Wei; Tsai, Wen-Chieh; Wu, Keqiang; Wu, Wen-Luan; Chen, Wen-Huei; Chen, Hong-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Five B-class MADS-box genes, including four APETALA3 (AP3)-like PeMADS2∼5 and one PISTILLATA (PI)-like PeMADS6, specify the spectacular flower morphology in orchids. The PI-like PeMADS6 ubiquitously expresses in all floral organs. The four AP3-like genes, resulted from two duplication events, express ubiquitously at floral primordia and early floral organ stages, but show distinct expression profiles at late floral organ primordia and floral bud stages. Here, we isolated the upstream sequences of PeMADS2∼6 and studied the regulatory mechanism for their distinct gene expression. Phylogenetic footprinting analysis of the 1.3-kb upstream sequences of AP3-like PeMADS2∼5 showed that their promoter regions have sufficiently diverged and contributed to their subfunctionalization. The amplified promoter sequences of PeMADS2∼6 could drive beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene expression in all floral organs, similar to their expression at the floral primordia stage. The promoter sequence of PeMADS4, exclusively expressed in lip and column, showed a 1.6∼3-fold higher expression in lip/column than in sepal/petal. Furthermore, we noted a 4.9-fold increase in histone acetylation (H3K9K14ac) in the translation start region of PeMADS4 in lip as compared in petal. All these results suggest that the regulation via the upstream sequences and increased H3K9K14ac level may act synergistically to display distinct expression profiles of the AP3-like genes at late floral organ primordia stage for Phalaenopsis floral morphogenesis. PMID:25501842

  9. Histone acetylation accompanied with promoter sequences displaying differential expression profiles of B-class MADS-box genes for phalaenopsis floral morphogenesis.

    Chia-Chi Hsu

    Full Text Available Five B-class MADS-box genes, including four APETALA3 (AP3-like PeMADS2∼5 and one PISTILLATA (PI-like PeMADS6, specify the spectacular flower morphology in orchids. The PI-like PeMADS6 ubiquitously expresses in all floral organs. The four AP3-like genes, resulted from two duplication events, express ubiquitously at floral primordia and early floral organ stages, but show distinct expression profiles at late floral organ primordia and floral bud stages. Here, we isolated the upstream sequences of PeMADS2∼6 and studied the regulatory mechanism for their distinct gene expression. Phylogenetic footprinting analysis of the 1.3-kb upstream sequences of AP3-like PeMADS2∼5 showed that their promoter regions have sufficiently diverged and contributed to their subfunctionalization. The amplified promoter sequences of PeMADS2∼6 could drive beta-glucuronidase (GUS gene expression in all floral organs, similar to their expression at the floral primordia stage. The promoter sequence of PeMADS4, exclusively expressed in lip and column, showed a 1.6∼3-fold higher expression in lip/column than in sepal/petal. Furthermore, we noted a 4.9-fold increase in histone acetylation (H3K9K14ac in the translation start region of PeMADS4 in lip as compared in petal. All these results suggest that the regulation via the upstream sequences and increased H3K9K14ac level may act synergistically to display distinct expression profiles of the AP3-like genes at late floral organ primordia stage for Phalaenopsis floral morphogenesis.

  10. Histone acetylation accompanied with promoter sequences displaying differential expression profiles of B-class MADS-box genes for phalaenopsis floral morphogenesis.

    Hsu, Chia-Chi; Wu, Pei-Shan; Chen, Tien-Chih; Yu, Chun-Wei; Tsai, Wen-Chieh; Wu, Keqiang; Wu, Wen-Luan; Chen, Wen-Huei; Chen, Hong-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Five B-class MADS-box genes, including four APETALA3 (AP3)-like PeMADS2∼5 and one PISTILLATA (PI)-like PeMADS6, specify the spectacular flower morphology in orchids. The PI-like PeMADS6 ubiquitously expresses in all floral organs. The four AP3-like genes, resulted from two duplication events, express ubiquitously at floral primordia and early floral organ stages, but show distinct expression profiles at late floral organ primordia and floral bud stages. Here, we isolated the upstream sequences of PeMADS2∼6 and studied the regulatory mechanism for their distinct gene expression. Phylogenetic footprinting analysis of the 1.3-kb upstream sequences of AP3-like PeMADS2∼5 showed that their promoter regions have sufficiently diverged and contributed to their subfunctionalization. The amplified promoter sequences of PeMADS2∼6 could drive beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene expression in all floral organs, similar to their expression at the floral primordia stage. The promoter sequence of PeMADS4, exclusively expressed in lip and column, showed a 1.6∼3-fold higher expression in lip/column than in sepal/petal. Furthermore, we noted a 4.9-fold increase in histone acetylation (H3K9K14ac) in the translation start region of PeMADS4 in lip as compared in petal. All these results suggest that the regulation via the upstream sequences and increased H3K9K14ac level may act synergistically to display distinct expression profiles of the AP3-like genes at late floral organ primordia stage for Phalaenopsis floral morphogenesis. PMID:25501842

  11. In planta localisation patterns of MADS domain proteins during floral development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Kaufmann Kerstin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MADS domain transcription factors play important roles in various developmental processes in flowering plants. Members of this family play a prominent role in the transition to flowering and the specification of floral organ identity. Several studies reported mRNA expression patterns of the genes encoding these MADS domain proteins, however, these studies do not provide the necessary information on the temporal and spatial localisation of the proteins. We have made GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN (GFP translational fusions with the four MADS domain proteins SEPALLATA3, AGAMOUS, FRUITFULL and APETALA1 from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and analysed the protein localisation patterns in living plant tissues by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Results We unravelled the protein localisation patterns of the four MADS domain proteins at a cellular and subcellular level in inflorescence and floral meristems, during development of the early flower bud stages, and during further differentiation of the floral organs. The protein localisation patterns revealed a few deviations from known mRNA expression patterns, suggesting a non-cell autonomous action of these factors or alternative control mechanisms. In addition, we observed a change in the subcellular localisation of SEPALLATA3 from a predominantly nuclear localisation to a more cytoplasmic localisation, occurring specifically during petal and stamen development. Furthermore, we show that the down-regulation of the homeodomain transcription factor WUSCHEL in ovular tissues is preceded by the occurrence of both AGAMOUS and SEPALLATA3 proteins, supporting the hypothesis that both proteins together suppress WUSCHEL expression in the ovule. Conclusion This approach provides a highly detailed in situ map of MADS domain protein presence during early and later stages of floral development. The subcellular localisation of the transcription factors in the cytoplasm, as observed at

  12. Floral biology of candeia (Eremanthus erythropappus, Asteraceae)

    Biologia floral da candeia (Eremanthus erythropappus, Asteraceae)

    Fábio de Almeida Vieira; Cristiane Gouvêa Fajardo; Dulcinéia de Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    Floral biology and pollinators of candeia (Eremanthus erythropappus) were analyzed in a natural population. We studied anthesis, flower morphology, stigmatic receptivity, pollen viability and floral visitors. The small flowers (10.17 mm in length) are pink, hermaphrodites and organized in dense capitula (mean = 29 flowers). We observed a large percentage of viable pollen (77.25%) and relatively scarce nectar availability for floral visitors (0.63 μL). The bees Apis mellifera and Trigona sp. w...

  13. The adaptedness of the floral phenotype in a relict endemic, hawkmoth-pollinated violet. 1. Reproductive correlates of floral variation

    Herrera, Carlos M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between quantitative variation in floral morphology (sizes of petals, spur and peduncle) and maternal reproductive success (seed production) in Viola cazorlensic (Violaceae), a narrowly endemic violet of south-eastern Spain pollinated by day-flying hawkmoths (Sphingidae). This plant is characterized by broad intraspecific variation in size and proportions of floral parts. Floral morphology does not influence significantly the probability of fruit set. Amon...

  14. Spatial and temporal expression of the orchid floral homeotic gene DOMADS1 is mediated by its upstream regulatory regions.

    Yu, Hao; Yang, Shu Hua; Goh, Chong Jin

    2002-05-01

    The orchid floral homeotic gene, DOMADSI, is a marker gene specifically expressed in the transitional shoot apical meristem during floral transition in Dendrobium Madame Thong-In. DOMADSI is not detectable in vegetative tissues except a weak expression in the stem. Its transcript is uniformly localized in both of the inflorescence meristem and floral primordia, and later expressed in almost all of the floral organs. We isolated and sequenced a 3.5 kb DOMADSI promoter fragment upstream of the transcription start site, demonstrating the location of several putative DNA-binding sites, through which MADS-box and class I knox genes may modulate the DOMADSI expression. To gain insight into the molecular basis of the regulation of DOMADS1, deletion analysis of the DOMADSI::beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene fusions was performed by means of the stable orchid transformation systems. The study shows that the full-length upstream promoter sequence confers the same spatial and temporal GUS staining pattern as that of the distribution of DOMADSI RNA during orchid development. We also identified the distinct cis-acting regulatory regions required for the control of DOMADS1 expression in vegetative and reproductive tissues, as well as the shoot apical meristem during floral transition. PMID:11999377

  15. The N-Terminus of the Floral Arabidopsis TGA Transcription Factor PERIANTHIA Mediates Redox-Sensitive DNA-Binding

    Gutsche, Nora; Zachgo, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis TGA transcription factor (TF) PERIANTHIA (PAN) regulates the formation of the floral organ primordia as revealed by the pan mutant forming an abnormal pentamerous arrangement of the outer three floral whorls. The Arabidopsis TGA bZIP TF family comprises 10 members, of which PAN and TGA9/10 control flower developmental processes and TGA1/2/5/6 participate in stress-responses. For the TGA1 protein it was shown that several cysteines can be redox-dependently modified. TGA protein...

  16. Mediator subunit18 controls flowering time and floral organ identity in Arabidopsis.

    Zhengui Zheng

    Full Text Available Mediator is a conserved multi-protein complex that plays an important role in regulating transcription by mediating interactions between transcriptional activator proteins and RNA polymerase II. Much evidence exists that Mediator plays a constitutive role in the transcription of all genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II. However, evidence is mounting that specific Mediator subunits may control the developmental regulation of specific subsets of RNA polymerase II-dependent genes. Although the Mediator complex has been extensively studied in yeast and mammals, only a few reports on Mediator function in flowering time control of plants, little is known about Mediator function in floral organ identity. Here we show that in Arabidopsis thaliana, MEDIATOR SUBUNIT 18 (MED18 affects flowering time and floral organ formation through FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC and AGAMOUS (AG. A MED18 loss-of-function mutant showed a remarkable syndrome of later flowering and altered floral organ number. We show that FLC and AG mRNA levels and AG expression patterns are altered in the mutant. Our results support parallels between the regulation of FLC and AG and demonstrate a developmental role for Mediator in plants.

  17. A Big-Five Personality Profile of the Adaptor and Innovator.

    Kwang, Ng Aik; Rodrigues, Daphne

    2002-01-01

    A study explored the relationship between two creative types (adaptor and innovator) and the Big Five personality traits (extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness to experience), in 164 teachers in Singapore. Adaptors were significantly more conscientious than innovators, while innovators were significantly more…

  18. Structure of the periplasmic adaptor protein from a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) multidrug efflux pump.

    Hinchliffe, Philip; Greene, Nicholas P; Paterson, Neil G; Crow, Allister; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2014-08-25

    Periplasmic adaptor proteins are key components of bacterial tripartite efflux pumps. The 2.85 Å resolution structure of an MFS (major facilitator superfamily) pump adaptor, Aquifex aeolicus EmrA, shows linearly arranged α-helical coiled-coil, lipoyl, and β-barrel domains, but lacks the fourth membrane-proximal domain shown in other pumps to interact with the inner membrane transporter. The adaptor α-hairpin, which binds outer membrane TolC, is exceptionally long at 127 Å, and the β-barrel contains a conserved disordered loop. The structure extends the view of adaptors as flexible, modular components that mediate diverse pump assembly, and suggests that in MFS tripartite pumps a hexamer of adaptors could provide a periplasmic seal. PMID:24996185

  19. Protein Interaction Profiling of the p97 Adaptor UBXD1 Points to a Role for the Complex in Modulating ERGIC-53 Trafficking*

    Haines, Dale S.; Lee, J. Eugene; Beauparlant, Stephen L.; Kyle, Dane B.; den Besten, Willem; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Graham, Robert L. J.; Hess, Sonja; Deshaies, Raymond J

    2012-01-01

    UBXD1 is a member of the poorly understood subfamily of p97 adaptors that do not harbor a ubiquitin association domain or bind ubiquitin-modified proteins. Of clinical importance, p97 mutants found in familial neurodegenerative conditions Inclusion Body Myopathy Paget's disease of the bone and/or Frontotemporal Dementia and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis are defective at interacting with UBXD1, indicating that functions regulated by a p97-UBXD1 complex are altered in these diseases. We have pe...

  20. Floral patterning defects induced by Arabidopsis APETALA2 and microRNA172 expression in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Mlotshwa, Sizolwenkosi; Yang, Zhiyong; Kim, Yunju; Chen, Xuemei

    2006-07-01

    Floral patterning and morphogenesis are controlled by many transcription factors including floral homeotic proteins, by which floral organ identity is determined. Recent studies have uncovered widespread regulation of transcription factors by microRNAs (miRNAs), approximately 21-nucleotide non-coding RNAs that regulate protein-coding RNAs through transcript cleavage and/or translational inhibition. The regulation of the floral homeotic gene APETALA2 (AP2) by miR172 is crucial for normal Arabidopsis flower development and is likely to be conserved across plant species. Here we probe the activity of the AP2/miR172 regulatory circuit in a heterologous Solanaceae species, Nicotiana benthamiana. We generated transgenic N. benthamiana lines expressing Arabidopsis wild type AP2 (35S::AP2), miR172-resistant AP2 mutant (35S::AP2m3) and MIR172a-1 (35S::MIR172) under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. 35S::AP2m3 plants accumulated high levels of AP2 mRNA and protein and exhibited floral patterning defects that included proliferation of numerous petals, stamens and carpels indicating loss of floral determinacy. On the other hand, nearly all 35S::AP2 plants accumulated barely detectable levels of AP2 mRNA or protein and were essentially non-phenotypic. Overall, the data indicated that expression of the wild type Arabidopsis AP2 transgene was repressed at the mRNA level by an endogenous N. benthamiana miR172 homologue that could be detected using Arabidopsis miR172 probe. Interestingly, 35S::MIR172 plants had sepal-to-petal transformations and/or more sepals and petals, suggesting interference with N. benthamiana normal floral homeotic gene function in perianth organs. Our studies uncover the potential utility of the Arabidopsis AP2/miR172 system as a tool for manipulation of floral architecture and flowering time in non-model plants. PMID:16897492

  1. Air pollutants degrade floral scents and increase insect foraging times

    Fuentes, Jose D.; Chamecki, Marcelo; Roulston, T.'ai; Chen, Bicheng; Pratt, Kenneth R.

    2016-09-01

    Flowers emit mixtures of scents that mediate plant-insect interactions such as attracting insect pollinators. Because of their volatile nature, however, floral scents readily react with ozone, nitrate radical, and hydroxyl radical. The result of such reactions is the degradation and the chemical modification of scent plumes downwind of floral sources. Large Eddy Simulations (LES) are developed to investigate dispersion and chemical degradation and modification of floral scents due to reactions with ozone, hydroxyl radical, and nitrate radical within the atmospheric surface layer. Impacts on foraging insects are investigated by utilizing a random walk model to simulate insect search behavior. Results indicate that even moderate air pollutant levels (e.g., ozone mixing ratios greater than 60 parts per billion on a per volume basis, ppbv) substantially degrade floral volatiles and alter the chemical composition of released floral scents. As a result, insect success rates of locating plumes of floral scents were reduced and foraging times increased in polluted air masses due to considerable degradation and changes in the composition of floral scents. Results also indicate that plant-pollinator interactions could be sensitive to changes in floral scent composition, especially if insects are unable to adapt to the modified scentscape. The increase in foraging time could have severe cascading and pernicious impacts on the fitness of foraging insects by reducing the time devoted to other necessary tasks.

  2. Ozone degrades floral scent and reduces pollinator attraction to flowers.

    Farré-Armengol, Gerard; Peñuelas, Josep; Li, Tao; Yli-Pirilä, Pasi; Filella, Iolanda; Llusia, Joan; Blande, James D

    2016-01-01

    In this work we analyzed the degradation of floral scent volatiles from Brassica nigra by reaction with ozone along a distance gradient and the consequences for pollinator attraction. For this purpose we used a reaction system comprising three reaction tubes in which we conducted measurements of floral volatiles using a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) and GC-MS. We also tested the effects of floral scent degradation on the responses of the generalist pollinator Bombus terrestris. The chemical analyses revealed that supplementing air with ozone led to an increasing reduction in the concentrations of floral volatiles in air with distance from the volatile source. The results revealed different reactivities with ozone for different floral scent constituents, which emphasized that ozone exposure not only degrades floral scents, but also changes the ratios of compounds in a scent blend. Behavioural tests revealed that floral scent was reduced in its attractiveness to pollinators after it had been exposed to 120 ppb O3 over a 4.5 m distance. The combined results of chemical analyses and behavioural responses of pollinators strongly suggest that high ozone concentrations have significant negative impacts on pollination by reducing the distance over which floral olfactory signals can be detected by pollinators. PMID:26346807

  3. Nickel accumulation by Streptanthus polygaloides (Brassicaceae) reduces floral visitation rate.

    Meindl, George A; Ashman, Tia-Lynn

    2014-02-01

    Hyperaccumulation is the phenomenon whereby plants take up and sequester in high concentrations elements that generally are excluded from above-ground tissues. It largely is unknown whether the metals taken up by these plants are transferred to floral rewards (i.e., nectar and pollen) and, if so, whether floral visitation is affected. We grew Streptanthus polygaloides, a nickel (Ni) hyperaccumulator, in short-term Ni supplemented soils and control soils to determine whether Ni is accumulated in floral rewards and whether floral visitation is affected by growth in Ni-rich soils. We found that while supplementation of soils with Ni did not alter floral morphology or reward quantity (i.e., anther size or nectar volume), Ni did accumulate in the nectar and pollen-filled anthers-providing the first demonstration that Ni is accumulated in pollinator rewards. Further, S. polygaloides grown in Ni-supplemented soils received fewer visits per flower per hour from both bees and flies (both naïve to Ni-rich floral resources in the study area) relative to plants grown in control soils, although the probability a plant was visited initially was unaffected by Ni treatment. Our findings show that while Ni-rich floral rewards decrease floral visitation, floral visitors are not completely deterred, so some floral visitors may collect and ingest potentially toxic resources from metal-hyperaccumulating plants. In addition to broadening our understanding of the effects of metal accumulation on ecological interactions in natural populations, these results have implications for the use of insect-pollinated plants in phytoremediation. PMID:24477333

  4. Crystal structure of the mammalian Grb2 adaptor.

    Maignan, S; Guilloteau, J P; Fromage, N; Arnoux, B; Becquart, J; Ducruix, A

    1995-04-14

    The mammalian growth factor receptor-binding protein Grb2 is an adaptor that mediates activation of guanine nucleotide exchange on Ras. Grb2 binds to the receptor through its SH2 domain and to the carboxyl-terminal domain of Son of sevenless through its two SH3 domains. It is thus a key element in the signal transduction pathway. The crystal structure of Grb2 was determined to 3.1 angstrom resolution. The asymmetric unit is composed of an embedded dimer. The interlaced junctions between the SH2 and SH3 domains bring the two adjacent faces of the SH3 domains in van der Waals contact but leave room for the binding of proline-rich peptides. PMID:7716522

  5. Study on the isothermal forging process of MB26 magnesium alloy adaptor

    Xu Wenchen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The isothermal forging process is an effective method to manufacture complex-shaped components of hard-to-work materials, such as magnesium alloys. This study investigates the isothermal forging process of an MB26 magnesium alloy adaptor with three branches. The results show that two-step forging process is appropriate to form the adaptor forging, which not only improves the filling quality but also reduces the forging load compared with one-step forging process. Moreover, the flow line is distributed along the contour of the complex-shaped adaptor forging.

  6. Structure of the periplasmic adaptor protein from a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) multidrug efflux pump

    Hinchliffe, Philip; Greene, Nicholas P.; Paterson, Neil G.; Crow, Allister; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2014-01-01

    Periplasmic adaptor proteins are key components of bacterial tripartite efflux pumps. The 2.85 Å resolution structure of an MFS (major facilitator superfamily) pump adaptor, Aquifex aeolicus EmrA, shows linearly arranged α-helical coiled-coil, lipoyl, and β-barrel domains, but lacks the fourth membrane-proximal domain shown in other pumps to interact with the inner membrane transporter. The adaptor α-hairpin, which binds outer membrane TolC, is exceptionally long at 127 Å, and the β-barrel co...

  7. The role of jasmonates in floral nectar secretion.

    Venkatesan Radhika

    Full Text Available Plants produce nectar in their flowers as a reward for their pollinators and most of our crops depend on insect pollination, but little is known on the physiological control of nectar secretion. Jasmonates are well-known for their effects on senescence, the development and opening of flowers and on plant defences such as extrafloral nectar. Their role in floral nectar secretion has, however, not been explored so far. We investigated whether jasmonates have an influence on floral nectar secretion in oil-seed rape, Brassica napus. The floral tissues of this plant produced jasmonic acid (JA endogenously, and JA concentrations peaked shortly before nectar secretion was highest. Exogenous application of JA to flowers induced nectar secretion, which was suppressed by treatment with phenidone, an inhibitor of JA synthesis. This effect could be reversed by additional application of JA. Jasmonoyl-isoleucine and its structural mimic coronalon also increased nectar secretion. Herbivory or addition of JA to the leaves did not have an effect on floral nectar secretion, demonstrating a functional separation of systemic defence signalling from reproductive nectar secretion. Jasmonates, which have been intensively studied in the context of herbivore defences and flower development, have a profound effect on floral nectar secretion and, thus, pollination efficiency in B. napus. Our results link floral nectar secretion to jasmonate signalling and thereby integrate the floral nectar secretion into the complex network of oxylipid-mediated developmental processes of plants.

  8. The Role of the Clathrin Adaptor AP-1: Polarized Sorting and Beyond

    Fubito Nakatsu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The selective transport of proteins or lipids by vesicular transport is a fundamental process supporting cellular physiology. The budding process involves cargo sorting and vesicle formation at the donor membrane and constitutes an important process in vesicular transport. This process is particularly important for the polarized sorting in epithelial cells, in which the cargo molecules need to be selectively sorted and transported to two distinct destinations, the apical or basolateral plasma membrane. Adaptor protein (AP-1, a member of the AP complex family, which includes the ubiquitously expressed AP-1A and the epithelium-specific AP-1B, regulates polarized sorting at the trans-Golgi network and/or at the recycling endosomes. A growing body of evidence, especially from studies using model organisms and animals, demonstrates that the AP-1-mediated polarized sorting supports the development and physiology of multi-cellular units as functional organs and tissues (e.g., cell fate determination, inflammation and gut immune homeostasis. Furthermore, a possible involvement of AP-1B in the pathogenesis of human diseases, such as Crohn’s disease and cancer, is now becoming evident. These data highlight the significant contribution of AP-1 complexes to the physiology of multicellular organisms, as master regulators of polarized sorting in epithelial cells.

  9. Biologia floral de Virola surinamensis (Rol.) Warb. (Myristicaceae) Virola surinamensis (Rol.) Warb. (Myristicaceae) floral biology

    Mario Augusto Gonçalves Jardim; Cléo Gomes da Mota

    2007-01-01

    Neste artigo são apresentadas informações sobre a biologia floral de Virola surinamensis (Rol.) Warb. (Myristicaceae), espécie florestal dióica de relevante importância econômica na região amazônica. O estudo foi realizado em uma área de várzea próximo à bacia do igarapé Murutucum, lado direito do rio Guamá, localizada no Campus da Faculdade de Ciências Agrárias do Pará, na cidade de Belém, Estado do Pará, no período de janeiro a dezembro de 2001. Avaliou-se a biologia floral desde o aparecim...

  10. Specialist Osmia bees forage indiscriminately among hybridizing Balsamorhiza floral hosts.

    Cane, James H

    2011-09-01

    Pollinators, even floral generalists (=polyleges), typically specialize during individual foraging bouts, infrequently switching between floral hosts. Such transient floral constancy restricts pollen flow, and thereby gene flow, to conspecific flowers in mixed plant communities. Where incipient flowering species meet, however, weak cross-fertility and often similar floral traits can yield mixed reproductive outcomes among pollinator-dependent species. In these cases, floral constancy by polyleges sometimes serves as an ethological mating barrier. More often, their foraging infidelities instead facilitate host introgression and hybridization. Many other bee species are oligolectic (taxonomic specialists for pollen). Oligoleges could be more discriminating connoisseurs than polyleges when foraging among their limited set of related floral hosts. If true, greater foraging constancy might ensue, contributing to positive assortative mating and disruptive selection, thereby facilitating speciation among their interfertile floral hosts. To test this Connoisseur Hypothesis, nesting females of two species of oligolectic Osmia bees were presented with randomized mixed arrays of flowers of two sympatric species of their pollen host, Balsamorhiza, a genus known for hybridization. In a closely spaced grid, the females of both species preferred the larger flowered B. macrophylla, evidence for discrimination. However, both species' females showed no floral constancy whatsoever during their individual foraging bouts, switching randomly between species proportional to their floral preference. In a wider spaced array in which the bouquets reflected natural plant spacing, foraging oligolectic bees often transferred pollen surrogates (fluorescent powders) both between conspecific flowers (geitonogamy and xenogamy) and between the two Balsamorhiza species. The Connoisseur Hypothesis was therefore rejected. Foraging infidelity by these oligolectic Osmia bees will contribute to

  11. Dependency on floral resources determines the animals' responses to floral scents

    Junker, Robert R; Blüthgen, Nico

    2010-01-01

    Animal-pollinated angiosperms either depend on cross-pollination or may also reproduce after self-pollination—the former are thus obligately, the latter facultatively dependent on the service of animal-pollinators. Analogously, flower visitors either solely feed on floral resources or complement their diet with these, and are hence dependent or not on the flowers they visit. We assume that obligate flower visitors evolved abilities that enable them to effectively forage on flowers including m...

  12. Non-Additive Effects of Genotypic Diversity Increase Floral Abundance and Abundance of Floral Visitors

    Mark A Genung; Jean-Philippe Lessard; Claire B Brown; Bunn, Windy A.; Cregger, Melissa A.; W M Nicholas Reynolds; Emmi Felker-Quinn; Stevenson, Mary L.; Hartley, Amanda S.; Gregory M. Crutsinger; Schweitzer, Jennifer A.; Bailey, Joseph K.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the emerging field of community and ecosystem genetics, genetic variation and diversity in dominant plant species have been shown to play fundamental roles in maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function. However, the importance of intraspecific genetic variation and diversity to floral abundance and pollinator visitation has received little attention. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using an experimental common garden that manipulated genotypic diversity (the number of dist...

  13. Study on the isothermal forging process of MB26 magnesium alloy adaptor

    Xu Wenchen; Yang Chuan; Shaninst Debin; Xu Fuchang; Wang Guan; Guo Bin

    2015-01-01

    The isothermal forging process is an effective method to manufacture complex-shaped components of hard-to-work materials, such as magnesium alloys. This study investigates the isothermal forging process of an MB26 magnesium alloy adaptor with three branches. The results show that two-step forging process is appropriate to form the adaptor forging, which not only improves the filling quality but also reduces the forging load compared with one-step forging process. Moreover, the flow line is di...

  14. Progress Report for DOE DE-FG03-98ER20317 ''Regulation of the floral homeotic gene AGAMOUS'' Current and Final Funding Period: September 1, 2002, to December 31, 2002

    Weigel, D.

    2003-03-11

    OAK-B135 Results obtained during this funding period: (1) Phylogenetic footprinting of AG regulatory sequences Sequences necessary and sufficient for AGAMOUS (AG) expression in the center of Arabidopsis flowers are located in the second intron, which is about 3 kb in size. This intron contains binding sites for two transcription factors, LEAFY (LFY) and WUSCHEL (WUS), which are direct activators of AG. We used the new method of phylogenetic shadowing to identify new regulatory elements. Among 29 Brassicaceae, several other motifs, but not the LFY and WUS binding sites previously identified, are largely invariant. Using reporter gene analyses, we tested six of these motifs and found that they are all functionally important for activity of AG regulatory sequences in A. thaliana. (2) Repression of AG by MADS box genes A candidate for repressing AG in the shoot apical meristem has been the MADS box gene FUL, since it is expressed in the shoot apical meristem and since an activated version (FUL:VP16) leads to ectopic AG expression in the shoot apical meristem. However, there is no ectopic AG expression in full single mutants. We therefore started to generate VP16 fusions of several other MADS box genes expressed in the shoot apical meristem, to determine which of these might be candidates for FUL redundant genes. We found that AGL6:VP16 has a similar phenotype as FUL:VP16, suggesting that AGL6 and FUL interact. We are now testing this hypothesis. (3) Two candidate AG regulators, WOW and ULA Because the phylogenetic footprinting project has identified several new candidate regulatory motifs, of which at least one (the CCAATCA motif) has rather strong effects, we had decided to put the analysis of WOW and ULA on hold, and to focus on using the newly identified motifs as tools. We conduct ed yeast one-hybrid screen with two of the conserved motifs, and identified several classes of transcription factors that can interact with them. One of these is encoded by the PAN gene

  15. Differential expression of MYB gene (OgMYB1) determines color patterning in floral tissue of Oncidium Gower Ramsey.

    Chiou, Chung-Yi; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2008-03-01

    The yellow coloration pattern in Oncidium floral lip associated with red sepal and petal tissues is an ideal model to study coordinate regulation of anthocyanin synthesis. In this study, chromatography analysis revealed that the red coloration in floral tissues was composed of malvidin-3-O-galactoside, peonidin-3-O-glucoside, delphinidin-3-O-glucoside and cyanidin-3-O-glucoside compounds. By contrary, these pigments were not detected in yellow lip tissue. Four key genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway, i.e. chalcone synthase (OgCHS), chalcone isomerase (OgCHI), dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (OgDFR) and anthocyanidin synthase (OgANS) were isolated and their expression patterns were characterized. Northern blot analysis confirmed that although they are active during floral development, OgCHI and OgDFR genes are specifically down-regulated in yellow lip tissue. Bombardment with OgCHI and OgDFR genes into lip tissue driven by a flower-specific promoter, Pchrc (chromoplast-specific carotenoid-associated gene), demonstrated that transient expression of these two genes resulted in anthocyanin production in yellow lip. Further analysis of a R2R3 MYB transcription factor, OgMYB1, revealed that although it is actively expressed during floral development, it is not expressed in yellow lip tissue. Transient expression of OgMYB1 in lip tissues by bombardment can also induce formation of red pigments through the activation of OgCHI and OgDFR transcription. These results demonstrate that differential expression of OgMYB1 is critical to determine the color pattern of floral organ in Oncidium Gower Ramsey. PMID:18161007

  16. Floral scent and pollinators of the holoparasite Pilostyles thurberi (Apodanthaceae

    Sedonia D Sipes

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Floral scent is likely important to the pollination of parasitic plants, despite that it has not been well-studied. We studied the pollination ecology of the North American stem holoparasite Pilostyles thurberi (Apodanthaceae at two field sites in Texas. To identify effective pollinators, we collected floral visitors to P. thurberi flowers, observed their foraging behavior, and looked for P. thurberi pollen on their bodies. Augochloropsis metallica bees (Halictidae and eumenine potter wasps (Vespidae were pollinators. P. thurberi flowers are visually inconspicuous but produce a strong fruity fragrance. GC/MS analysis of whole floral extracts and dynamic headspace samples revealed the fragrance to be an unusually simple bouquet of raspberry ketone and several eugenols. Comparison of scent profiles to those from uninfected host plants (Dalea formosa allowed putative separation of parasite and host volatiles. This is the first report of the constituents of floral fragrance in Apodanthaceae.

  17. New functions for secondary compounds in floral nectar

    2007-01-01

    @@ Floral nectar, which is mainly composed of sugar, plays a major role in attracting pollinators. However, many studies show that most of the nectar also contains antiherbivore secondary compounds, such as phenolics, which could keep away some flower visitors.

  18. Autumn floral inventory : Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is an autumn floral inventory conducted on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge formerly Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge in 1991.

  19. Three-dimensional geometric morphometrics for studying floral shape variation

    Van der Niet, T; Zollikofer, C P E; Ponce de León, M S; Johnson, S D; H. P. Linder

    2010-01-01

    Variation in floral shape is of major interest to evolutionary and pollination biologists, plant systematists and developmental geneticists. Quantifying this variation has been difficult due to the three-dimensional (3D) complexity of angiosperm flowers. By combining 3D geometric representations of flowers obtained by micro-computed tomography scanning with geometric morphometric methods, well established in zoology and anthropology, floral shape variation can be analyzed quantitatively, allo...

  20. Floral isolation between Aquilegia formosa and Aquilegia pubescens

    Fulton, M; Hodges, S. A.

    1999-01-01

    The acquisition of floral nectar spurs is correlated with increased species diversity across multiple clades. We tested whether variation in nectar spurs influences reproductive isolation and, thus, can potentially promote species diversity using two species of Aquilegia, Aquilegia formosa and Aquilegia pubescens, which form narrow hybrid zones. Floral visitors strongly discriminated between the two species both in natural populations and at mixed-species arrays of individual flowers. Bees an...

  1. Floral scent and pollinators of the holoparasite Pilostyles thurberi (Apodanthaceae)

    Sipes, Sedonia D.; Kara E. Huff Hartz; Hardik Amin; Nickrent, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Floral scent is likely important to the pollination of parasitic plants, despite that it has not been well-studied. We studied the pollination ecology of the North American stem holoparasite Pilostyles thurberi (Apodanthaceae) at two field sites in Texas. To identify effective pollinators, we collected floral visitors to P. thurberi flowers, observed their foraging behavior, and looked for P. thurberi pollen on their bodies. Augochloropsis metallica bees (Halictidae) and eumenine potter wasps...

  2. Natural selection on floral morphology can be influenced by climate

    Campbell, DR; Powers, JM

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Royal Society of London. All rights reserved. Climate has the potential to influence evolution, but how it influences the strength or direction of natural selection is largely unknown. We quantified the strength of selection on four floral traits of the subalpine herb Ipomopsis sp. in 10 years that differed in precipitation, causing extreme temporal variation in the date of snowmelt in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. The chosen floral traits were under selection by hummingbird and hawkmo...

  3. Flavonoids patterns of French honeys with different floral origin

    Soler, C.; Gil, M. I.; Garcia-Viguera, C.; Tomás-Barberán, F.A.

    1995-01-01

    The flavonoid profiles of 12 different unifloral French honey samples were analysed by HPLC to evaluate if these substances could be used as markers of the floral origin of honey. In this analysis, the characteristic flavonoids from propolis and/or beeswax (chrysin, galangin, tectochrysin, pinocembrin and pinobanksin) were separated from those originating mainly from nectar and/or pollen (polyhydroxylated flavonoid aglycones), which would be related to their floral origin. All the analysed sa...

  4. Floral thermogenesis: An adaptive strategy of pollination biology in Magnoliaceae

    Wang, Ruohan; Zhang, Zhixiang

    2015-01-01

    Floral thermogenesis plays a crucial role in pollination biology, especially in plant–pollinator interactions. We have recently explored how thermogenesis is related to pollinator activity and odour release in Magnolia sprengeri. By analyzing flower temperatures, emission of volatiles, and insect visitation, we found that floral blends released during pistillate and staminate stages were similar and coincided with sap beetle visitation. Thus, odour mimicry of staminate-stage flowers may occur...

  5. Floral sesquiterpenes and their synthesis in dioecious kiwifruit

    Nieuwenhuizen, Niels J.; Green, Sol; Atkinson, Ross G.

    2010-01-01

    Kiwifruit species are vigorously growing dioecious vines that rely on bees and other insects for pollen transfer between spatially separated male and female individuals. Floral volatile terpene cues for insect pollinator attraction were characterized from flowers of the most widely grown and economically important kiwifruit cultivar Actinidia deliciosa ‘Hayward’ and its male pollinator ‘Chieftain’. The sesquiterpenes α-farnesene and germacrene D dominated in all floral tissues and the emissio...

  6. Nuclear Translocation of Crk Adaptor Proteins by the Influenza A Virus NS1 Protein

    Ylösmäki, Leena; Fagerlund, Riku; Kuisma, Inka; Julkunen, Ilkka; Saksela, Kalle

    2016-01-01

    The non-structural protein-1 (NS1) of many influenza A strains, especially those of avian origin, contains an SH3 ligand motif, which binds tightly to the cellular adaptor proteins Crk (Chicken tumor virus number 10 (CT10) regulator of kinase) and Crk-like adapter protein (CrkL). This interaction has been shown to potentiate NS1-induced activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), but additional effects on the host cell physiology may exist. Here we show that NS1 can induce an efficient translocation of Crk proteins from the cytoplasm into the nucleus, which results in an altered pattern of nuclear protein tyrosine phosphorylation. This was not observed using NS1 proteins deficient in SH3 binding or engineered to be exclusively cytoplasmic, indicating a physical role for NS1 as a carrier in the nuclear translocation of Crk. These data further emphasize the role of Crk proteins as host cell interaction partners of NS1, and highlight the potential for host cell manipulation gained by a viral protein simply via acquiring a short SH3 binding motif. PMID:27092521

  7. Nuclear Translocation of Crk Adaptor Proteins by the Influenza A Virus NS1 Protein.

    Ylösmäki, Leena; Fagerlund, Riku; Kuisma, Inka; Julkunen, Ilkka; Saksela, Kalle

    2016-01-01

    The non-structural protein-1 (NS1) of many influenza A strains, especially those of avian origin, contains an SH3 ligand motif, which binds tightly to the cellular adaptor proteins Crk (Chicken tumor virus number 10 (CT10) regulator of kinase) and Crk-like adapter protein (CrkL). This interaction has been shown to potentiate NS1-induced activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), but additional effects on the host cell physiology may exist. Here we show that NS1 can induce an efficient translocation of Crk proteins from the cytoplasm into the nucleus, which results in an altered pattern of nuclear protein tyrosine phosphorylation. This was not observed using NS1 proteins deficient in SH3 binding or engineered to be exclusively cytoplasmic, indicating a physical role for NS1 as a carrier in the nuclear translocation of Crk. These data further emphasize the role of Crk proteins as host cell interaction partners of NS1, and highlight the potential for host cell manipulation gained by a viral protein simply via acquiring a short SH3 binding motif. PMID:27092521

  8. Nuclear Translocation of Crk Adaptor Proteins by the Influenza A Virus NS1 Protein

    Leena Ylösmäki

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The non-structural protein-1 (NS1 of many influenza A strains, especially those of avian origin, contains an SH3 ligand motif, which binds tightly to the cellular adaptor proteins Crk (Chicken tumor virus number 10 (CT10 regulator of kinase and Crk-like adapter protein (CrkL. This interaction has been shown to potentiate NS1-induced activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K, but additional effects on the host cell physiology may exist. Here we show that NS1 can induce an efficient translocation of Crk proteins from the cytoplasm into the nucleus, which results in an altered pattern of nuclear protein tyrosine phosphorylation. This was not observed using NS1 proteins deficient in SH3 binding or engineered to be exclusively cytoplasmic, indicating a physical role for NS1 as a carrier in the nuclear translocation of Crk. These data further emphasize the role of Crk proteins as host cell interaction partners of NS1, and highlight the potential for host cell manipulation gained by a viral protein simply via acquiring a short SH3 binding motif.

  9. Polarity in the early floral meristem of Arabidopsis

    Thoma, Rahere; Chandler, John William

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of angiosperm flowers depends on organ meristy and position. However, the signaling pathways that establish polarity and positional information remain largely unelucidated. Use of the founder-cell marker DORNRÖSCHEN-LIKE (DRNL) in Arabidopsis has recently highlighted the importance of the abaxial–adaxial axis for early floral development. We have extended the use of DRNL::GFP to further characterize floral organogenesis in genotypes that are altered in floral organ meristy or position, including ettin (ett-3) and blade-on-petiole (bop)1–11 bop2–4 double mutants. The creation of supernumery sepals by the splitting of sepal founder-cell populations along an ab-/adaxial axis strengthens the importance of the ab-/adaxial developmental axis in early floral meristem development. Furthermore, we confirm the dependency of the wildtype sequence of sepal initiation on bract suppression and demonstrate that supernumery stamens derive from the imprecise resolution of a ring of DRNL expression. Expression of DRNL in apetala1 (ap1–1) and ap2–8 mutants reflect the altered whorl structure and show that these homeotic genes function upstream of DRNL. Analyzing the dynamism of early floral meristem ontogeny at a fine temporal and spatial resolution in Arabidopsis can reveal mechanisms of organogenesis and is applicable to other species with differing floral body plans in a comparative evolutionary context. PMID:25806573

  10. Surfactant Protein A Enhances Constitutive Immune Functions of Clathrin Heavy Chain and Clathrin Adaptor Protein 2.

    Moulakakis, Christina; Steinhäuser, Christine; Biedziak, Dominika; Freundt, Katja; Reiling, Norbert; Stamme, Cordula

    2016-07-01

    NF-κB transcription factors are key regulators of pulmonary inflammatory disorders and repair. Constitutive lung cell type- and microenvironment-specific NF-κB/inhibitor κBα (IκB-α) regulation, however, is poorly understood. Surfactant protein (SP)-A provides both a critical homeostatic and lung defense control, in part by immune instruction of alveolar macrophages (AMs) via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The central endocytic proteins, clathrin heavy chain (CHC) and the clathrin adaptor protein (AP) complex AP2, have pivotal alternative roles in cellular homeostasis that are endocytosis independent. Here, we dissect endocytic from alternative functions of CHC, the α-subunit of AP2, and dynamin in basal and SP-A-modified LPS signaling of macrophages. As revealed by pharmacological inhibition and RNA interference in primary AMs and RAW264.7 macrophages, respectively, CHC and α-adaptin, but not dynamin, prevent IκB-α degradation and TNF-α release, independent of their canonical role in membrane trafficking. Kinetics studies employing confocal microscopy, Western analysis, and immunomagnetic sorting revealed that SP-A transiently enhances the basal protein expression of CHC and α-adaptin, depending on early activation of protein kinase CK2 (former casein kinase II) and Akt1 in primary AMs from rats, SP-A(+/+), and SP-A(-/-) mice, as well as in vivo when intratracheally administered to SP-A(+/+) mice. Constitutive immunomodulation by SP-A, but not SP-A-mediated inhibition of LPS-induced NF-κB activity and TNF-α release, requires CHC, α-adaptin, and dynamin. Our data demonstrate that endocytic proteins constitutively restrict NF-κB activity in macrophages and provide evidence that SP-A enhances the immune regulatory capacity of these proteins, revealing a previously unknown pathway of microenvironment-specific NF-κB regulation in the lung. PMID:26771574

  11. Genetic Deletion of the Clathrin Adaptor GGA3 Reduces Anxiety and Alters GABAergic Transmission

    Albrecht, David; Lomoio, Selene; Haydon, Philip G.; Moss, Stephen J.; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    Golgi-localized γ-ear-containing ARF binding protein 3 (GGA3) is a monomeric clathrin adaptor that has been shown to regulate the trafficking of the Beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE1), which is required for production of the Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-associated amyloid βpeptide. Our previous studies have shown that BACE1 is degraded via the lysosomal pathway and that depletion of GGA3 results in increased BACE1 levels and activity owing to impaired lysosomal trafficking and degradation. We further demonstrated the role of GGA3 in the regulation of BACE1 in vivo by showing that BACE1 levels are increased in the brain of GGA3 null mice. We report here that GGA3 deletion results in novelty-induced hyperactivity and decreased anxiety-like behaviors. Given the pivotal role of GABAergic transmission in the regulation of anxiety-like behaviors, we performed electrophysiological recordings in hippocampal slices and found increased phasic and decreased tonic inhibition in the dentate gyrus granule cells (DGGC). Moreover, we found that the number of inhibitory synapses is increased in the dentate gyrus of GGA3 null mice in further support of the electrophysiological data. Thus, the increased GABAergic transmission is a leading candidate mechanism underlying the reduced anxiety-like behaviors observed in GGA3 null mice. All together these findings suggest that GGA3 plays a key role in GABAergic transmission. Since BACE1 levels are elevated in the brain of GGA3 null mice, it is possible that at least some of these phenotypes are a consequence of increased processing of BACE1 substrates. PMID:27192432

  12. The AP-3 adaptor complex is required for vacuolar function in Arabidopsis

    Maria Zwiewka; Elena Feraru; Barbara M(o)ller; Inhwan Hwang; Mugurel I Feraru; Jürgen Kleine-Vehn; Dolf Weijers; Ji(n) Friml

    2011-01-01

    Subcellular trafficking is required for a multitude of functions in eukaryotic cells.It involves regulation of cargo sorting,vesicle formation,trafficking and fusion processes at multiple levels.Adaptor protein (AP) complexes are key regulators of cargo sorting into vesicles in yeast and mammals but their existence and function in plants have not been demonstrated.Here we report the identification of the protein-affected trafficking 4 (pat4) mutant defective in the putative δ subunit of the AP-3 complex.pat4 and pat2,a mutant isolated from the same GFP imaging-based forward genetic screen that lacks a functional putative AP-3 β,as well as dominant negative AP-3 μ transgenic lines display undistinguishable phenotypes characterized by largely normal morphology and development,but strong intracellular accumulation of membrane proteins in aberrant vacuolar structures.All mutants are defective in morphology and function of lytic and protein storage vacuoles (PSVs) but show normal sorting of reserve proteins to PSVs.Immunoprecipitation experiments and genetic studies revealed tight functional and physical associations of putative AP-3 β and AP-3 δ subunits.Furthermore,both proteins are closely linked with putative AP-3 μ and σ subunits and several components of the clathrin and dynamin machineries.Taken together,these results demonstrate that AP complexes,similar to those in other eukaryotes,exist in plants,and that AP-3 plays a specific role in the regulation of biogenesis and function of vacuoles in plant cells.

  13. Pollination ecology and breeding system of Xylopia championii (Annonaceae): curculionid beetle pollination, promoted by floral scents and elevated floral temperatures

    Saunders, RMK; Ratnayake, RMCS; Gunatilleke, IAUN; Wijesundara, DSA

    2007-01-01

    Data on the reproductive biology of the Annonaceae are rather fragmentary, particularly for paleotropical species. The pollination ecology and breeding system of the Sri Lankan endemic Xylopia championii (Annonaceae) are described in detail. The pollination ecology was investigated using a diverse range of approaches, including (1) observations of flower-level and population-level phenology, (2) assessments of floral visitors and effective pollinators, (3) monitoring of floral temperature in ...

  14. Biologia floral de Virola surinamensis (Rol. Warb. (Myristicaceae Virola surinamensis (Rol. Warb. (Myristicaceae floral biology

    Mario Augusto Gonçalves Jardim

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo são apresentadas informações sobre a biologia floral de Virola surinamensis (Rol. Warb. (Myristicaceae, espécie florestal dióica de relevante importância econômica na região amazônica. O estudo foi realizado em uma área de várzea próximo à bacia do igarapé Murutucum, lado direito do rio Guamá, localizada no Campus da Faculdade de Ciências Agrárias do Pará, na cidade de Belém, Estado do Pará, no período de janeiro a dezembro de 2001. Avaliou-se a biologia floral desde o aparecimento dos botões florais até a senescência das flores estaminadas, bem como a formação de frutos nas flores pistiladas. Testes bioquímicos foram aplicados para verificação de odor, pigmentos, osmóforos e receptividade do estigma. A observação no comportamento dos visitantes florais foi realizada durante o período diurno, registrando-se os horários de visitas, tempo de permanência na flor e freqüência; alguns indivíduos foram coletados com rede entomológica e identificados no Departamento de Zoologia do Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi. A antese ocorreu entre 6 e 16 h nas flores estaminadas e entre 8 e 16 h nas flores pistiladas; a presença de odor foi constatada apenas nas flores estaminadas, enquanto os pigmentos e osmóforos foram encontrados em ambas as flores; o estigma mostrou-se receptivo no período entre 12 e 14 h. Os insetos da ordem diptera foram os visitantes mais freqüentes nas flores estaminadas e pistiladas e as espécies Copestylum sp. e Erystalys sp., as responsáveis pela polinização.Information was obtained on the floral biology of Virola surinamensis (Rol. Warb. (Myristicaceae, a dioecious arboreal species of great importance for the Amazon region economy. The study was carried out in the floodplain area near the Murucutu stream, on the right side of the Guamá River, at the Universidade Federal Rural da Amazônia-UFRA, Belém-Pará , from January to December 2001. Floral biology was assessed from

  15. A de novo floral transcriptome reveals clues into Phalaenopsis orchid flower development.

    Huang, Jian-Zhi; Lin, Chih-Peng; Cheng, Ting-Chi; Chang, Bill Chia-Han; Cheng, Shu-Yu; Chen, Yi-Wen; Lee, Chen-Yu; Chin, Shih-Wen; Chen, Fure-Chyi

    2015-01-01

    Phalaenopsis has a zygomorphic floral structure, including three outer tepals, two lateral inner tepals and a highly modified inner median tepal called labellum or lip; however, the regulation of its organ development remains unelucidated. We generated RNA-seq reads with the Illumina platform for floral organs of the Phalaenopsis wild-type and peloric mutant with a lip-like petal. A total of 43,552 contigs were obtained after de novo assembly. We used differentially expressed gene profiling to compare the transcriptional changes in floral organs for both the wild-type and peloric mutant. Pair-wise comparison of sepals, petals and labellum between peloric mutant and its wild-type revealed 1,838, 758 and 1,147 contigs, respectively, with significant differential expression. PhAGL6a (CUFF.17763), PhAGL6b (CUFF.17763.1), PhMADS1 (CUFF.36625.1), PhMADS4 (CUFF.25909) and PhMADS5 (CUFF.39479.1) were significantly upregulated in the lip-like petal of the peloric mutant. We used real-time PCR analysis of lip-like petals, lip-like sepals and the big lip of peloric mutants to confirm the five genes' expression patterns. PhAGL6a, PhAGL6b and PhMADS4 were strongly expressed in the labellum and significantly upregulated in lip-like petals and lip-like sepals of peloric-mutant flowers. In addition, PhAGL6b was significantly downregulated in the labellum of the big lip mutant, with no change in expression of PhAGL6a. We provide a comprehensive transcript profile and functional analysis of Phalaenopsis floral organs. PhAGL6a PhAGL6b, and PhMADS4 might play crucial roles in the development of the labellum in Phalaenopsis. Our study provides new insights into how the orchid labellum differs and why the petal or sepal converts to a labellum in Phalaenopsis floral mutants. PMID:25970572

  16. A spatial dissection of the Arabidopsis floral transcriptome by MPSS

    Sanchez-Leon Nidia

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have further characterized floral organ-localized gene expression in the inflorescence of Arabidopsis thaliana by comparison of massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS data. Six libraries of RNA sequence tags from immature inflorescence tissues were constructed and matched to their respective loci in the annotated Arabidopsis genome. These signature libraries survey the floral transcriptome of wild-type tissue as well as the floral homeotic mutants, apetala1, apetala3, agamous, a superman/apetala1 double mutant, and differentiated ovules dissected from the gynoecia of wild-type inflorescences. Comparing and contrasting these MPSS floral expression libraries enabled demarcation of transcripts enriched in the petals, stamens, stigma-style, gynoecia, and those with predicted enrichment within the sepal/sepal-petals, petal-stamens, or gynoecia-stamens. Results By comparison of expression libraries, a total of 572 genes were found to have organ-enriched expression within the inflorescence. The bulk of characterized organ-enriched transcript diversity was noted in the gynoecia and stamens, whereas fewer genes demonstrated sepal or petal-localized expression. Validation of the computational analyses was performed by comparison with previously published expression data, in situ hybridizations, promoter-reporter fusions, and reverse transcription PCR. A number of well-characterized genes were accurately delineated within our system of transcript filtration. Moreover, empirical validations confirm MPSS predictions for several genes with previously uncharacterized expression patterns. Conclusion This extensive MPSS analysis confirms and supplements prior microarray floral expression studies and illustrates the utility of sequence survey-based expression analysis in functional genomics. Spatial floral expression data accrued by MPSS and similar methods will be advantageous in the elucidation of more comprehensive genetic

  17. Integrative effect of drought and low temperature on litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) floral initiation revealed by dynamic genome-wide transcriptome analysis.

    Shen, Jiyuan; Xiao, Qiusheng; Qiu, Haiji; Chen, Chengjie; Chen, Houbin

    2016-01-01

    Floral induction in litchi is influenced by multiple environment cues including temperature and soil water condition. In the present study, we determined that a combined treatment consisting of 14-day drought imposed prior to exposure to 35-day low temperature (T3) significantly promoted litchi flowering relative to the low temperature alone (T2), suggesting an integrative effect of drought and low temperature on litchi floral initiation. Analysis of transcriptomic changes in leaves from different treatments showed that 2,198 and 4,407 unigenes were differentially expressed in response to drought and low temperature, respectively. 1,227 of these unigenes were expressed in response to both treatments, implying an interaction of drought and low temperature on expression of genes involved in litchi floral initiation. Additionally, 932 unigenes were consistently differentially expressed during floral induction between T2 and T3 plants, which potentially accounts for the difference of flowering time. Thirty-eight transcription factors out of these 932 unigenes were identified as hub genes with central roles in regulation of litchi floral induction. The expression of litchi homologs of well-known flowering genes was also investigated, and one Flowering Locus T (FT) homolog may play a crucial role in litchi flowering in responses to drought and low temperature. PMID:27557749

  18. N-terminal tyrosine modulation of the endocytic adaptor function of the beta-arrestins.

    Marion, Sébastien; Fralish, Gregory B; Laporte, Stéphane; Caron, Marc G; Barak, Larry S

    2007-06-29

    The highly homologous beta-arrestin1 and -2 adaptor proteins play important roles in the function of G protein-coupled receptors. Either beta-arrestin variant can function as a molecular chaperone for clathrin-mediated receptor internalization. This role depends primarily upon two distinct, contiguous C-terminal beta-arrestin motifs recognizing clathrin and the beta-adaptin subunit of AP2. However, a molecular basis is lacking to explain the different endocytic efficacies of the two beta-arrestin isoforms and the observation that beta-arrestin N-terminal substitution mutants can act as dominant negative inhibitors of receptor endocytosis. Despite the near identity of the beta-arrestins throughout their N termini, sequence variability is present at a small number of residues and includes tyrosine to phenylalanine substitutions. Here we show that corresponding N-terminal (Y/F)VTL sequences in beta-arrestin1 and -2 differentially regulate mu-adaptin binding. Our results indicate that the beta-arrestin1 Tyr-54 lessens the interaction with mu-adaptin and moreover is a Src phosphorylation site. A gain of endocytic function is obtained with the beta-arrestin1 Y54F substitution, which improves both the beta-arrestin1 interaction with mu-adaptin and the ability to enhance beta2-adrenergic receptor internalization. These data indicate that beta-arrestin2 utilizes mu-adaptin as an endocytic partner, and that the inability of beta-arrestin1 to sustain a similar degree of interaction with mu-adaptin may result from coordination of Tyr-54 by neighboring residues or its modification by Src kinase. Additionally, these naturally occurring variations in beta-arrestins may also differentially regulate the composition of the signaling complexes organized on the receptor. PMID:17456469

  19. The tomato floral homeotic protein FBP1-like gene, SlGLO1, plays key roles in petal and stamen development.

    Guo, Xuhu; Hu, Zongli; Yin, Wencheng; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhu, Zhiguo; Zhang, Jianling; Chen, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    MADS-box transcription factors play important role in plant growth and development, especially floral organ identities. In our study, a MADS-box gene SlGLO1- tomato floral homeotic protein FBP1-like gene was isolated. Its tissue-specific expression profile analysis showed that SlGLO1 was highly expressed in petals and stamens. RNAi (RNA interference) repression of SlGLO1 resulted in floral organ abnormal phenotypes, including green petals with shorter size, and aberrant carpelloid stamens. SlGLO1-silenced lines are male sterile. Total chlorophyll content was increased and chlorophyll biosynthetic genes were significantly up-regulated in SlGLO1-silenced petals and stamens. Furthermore, B-class genes expression analysis indicated that the repressed function of SlGLO1 led to the enhanced expression of TAP3 and the down-regulation of TPI in the petals and stamens, while the expression of TM6 was reduced in petals and increased in stamens and carpels of SlGLO1-RNAi plants. Additionally, pollen grains of transgenic lines were aberrant and failed to germinate and tomato pollen-specific genes were down-regulated by more than 90% in SlGLO1-silenced lines. These results suggest that SlGLO1 plays important role in regulating plant floral organ and pollen development in tomato. PMID:26842499

  20. Non-additive effects of genotypic diversity increase floral abundance and abundance of floral visitors.

    Mark A Genung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the emerging field of community and ecosystem genetics, genetic variation and diversity in dominant plant species have been shown to play fundamental roles in maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function. However, the importance of intraspecific genetic variation and diversity to floral abundance and pollinator visitation has received little attention. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using an experimental common garden that manipulated genotypic diversity (the number of distinct genotypes per plot of Solidago altissima, we document that genotypic diversity of a dominant plant can indirectly influence flower visitor abundance. Across two years, we found that 1 plant genotype explained 45% and 92% of the variation in flower visitor abundance in 2007 and 2008, respectively; and 2 plant genotypic diversity had a positive and non-additive effect on floral abundance and the abundance of flower visitors, as plots established with multiple genotypes produced 25% more flowers and received 45% more flower visits than would be expected under an additive model. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results provide evidence that declines in genotypic diversity may be an important but little considered factor for understanding plant-pollinator dynamics, with implications for the global decline in pollinators due to reduced plant diversity in both agricultural and natural ecosystems.

  1. Floral visitors of Ananas comosus in Ghana: A preliminary assessment

    Peter Kwapong

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Ananas comosus var comosus (L. Merr. is the third most important tropical fruit in the world production and the leading foreign exchange earner among fresh fruits exported from Ghana. A survey was conducted in pineapple farms in the Central region of Ghana to identify floral visitors and their activities on the flowers. Nectar concentration and energetics and effect of floral visitors on fruit production were determined. Fourteen species of butterflies and one ant species were the main insect floral visitors as well as four species of sunbirds. The mean nectar concentration was 23.3% (± 0.39, SE and pollination limitation did not significantly affect fruit yield (weight: p = 0.285; length: p = 0.056; width: p= 0.268. The study showed that butterflies, ants and sunbirds are the main floral visitors on A. comosus. However their visits did not results in pollination and fruit production was not affected in any way by floral visitation. Still, it was found that A. comosus provides an important nectar resource for its foragers. Even if pollination is not crucial in pineapple cultivation, it is still essential in pineapple breeding programs to promote genetic diversity and conservation.

  2. Floral nectar guide patterns discourage nectar robbing by bumble bees.

    Anne S Leonard

    Full Text Available Floral displays are under selection to both attract pollinators and deter antagonists. Here we show that a common floral trait, a nectar guide pattern, alters the behavior of bees that can act opportunistically as both pollinators and as antagonists. Generally, bees access nectar via the floral limb, transporting pollen through contact with the plant's reproductive structures; however bees sometimes extract nectar from a hole in the side of the flower that they or other floral visitors create. This behavior is called "nectar robbing" because bees may acquire the nectar without transporting pollen. We asked whether the presence of a symmetric floral nectar guide pattern on artificial flowers affected bumble bees' (Bombus impatiens propensity to rob or access nectar "legitimately." We discovered that nectar guides made legitimate visits more efficient for bees than robbing, and increased the relative frequency of legitimate visits, compared to flowers lacking nectar guides. This study is the first to show that beyond speeding nectar discovery, a nectar guide pattern can influence bees' flower handling in a way that could benefit the plant.

  3. MEMORIA Y APRENDIZAJE EN LA ESCOGENCIA FLORAL DE LAS ABEJAS

    AMAYA MARISOL

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN

    Los polinizadores altamente especializados en su dieta, no hacen escogencias florales, ellos visitan un recurso específico siguiendo el dictado de la información almacenada en sus genes. En contraste, para la abeja social Apis mellifera una escogencia floral implica, la toma de una decisión, usualmente con criterio económico, basada en información aprendida y almacenada en alguna forma de memoria. Aunque existen numerosos estudios y modelos sobre la escogencia floral en abejas, la gran mayoría de éstos, han derivado sus conclusiones a partir de condiciones temporalmente fijas de la interacción. Muy pocos estudios han abordado la dinámica propia del contexto ecológico, en el cual el mercado floral de las abejas cambia con las estaciones del año y con los patrones diarios de antesis floral. Este cambio en la disponibilidad de especies florales enfrenta a los polinizadores, a realizar escogencias secuenciales acerca del alimento a explotar. En este trabajo abordo el tema del forrajeo secuencial en parches florales heterospecíficos, enfocándome en el uso que la abeja melífera hace de la información previamente aprendida en un contexto, cuando se enfrenta a la explotación de alimento en un contexto ecológicamente diferente. He realizado experimentos sobre escogencia floral simulando las condiciones de cambio del paisaje floral, exponiendo abejas individuales de A. mellifera a decidir sobre cuales especies forrajear en cada parche. Los resultados indican que la abeja invierte en procesos de aprendizaje en un muestreo inicial, pero una vez almacenada la información, utiliza una pieza de la información previamente aprendida (color para explotar parches florales heteroespecíficos siguiendo una imagen de búsqueda de color. En esta revisión discuto situaciones biológicas de la interacción planta-abeja, las cuales apoyan la idea que en la naturaleza el uso de imágenes de búsqueda de color por parte de abejas

  4. An RNA-seq transcriptome analysis of histone modifiers and RNA silencing genes in soybean during floral initiation process.

    Lim Chee Liew

    Full Text Available Epigenetics has been recognised to play vital roles in many plant developmental processes, including floral initiation through the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. The histone modifying proteins that mediate these modifications involve the SET domain-containing histone methyltransferases, JmjC domain-containing demethylase, acetylases and deacetylases. In addition, RNA interference (RNAi-associated genes are also involved in epigenetic regulation via RNA-directed DNA methylation and post-transcriptional gene silencing. Soybean, a major crop legume, requires a short day to induce flowering. How histone modifications regulate the plant response to external cues that initiate flowering is still largely unknown. Here, we used RNA-seq to address the dynamics of transcripts that are potentially involved in the epigenetic programming and RNAi mediated gene silencing during the floral initiation of soybean. Soybean is a paleopolyploid that has been subjected to at least two rounds of whole genome duplication events. We report that the expanded genomic repertoire of histone modifiers and RNA silencing genes in soybean includes 14 histone acetyltransferases, 24 histone deacetylases, 47 histone methyltransferases, 15 protein arginine methyltransferases, 24 JmjC domain-containing demethylases and 47 RNAi-associated genes. To investigate the role of these histone modifiers and RNA silencing genes during floral initiation, we compared the transcriptional dynamics of the leaf and shoot apical meristem at different time points after a short-day treatment. Our data reveal that the extensive activation of genes that are usually involved in the epigenetic programming and RNAi gene silencing in the soybean shoot apical meristem are reprogrammed for floral development following an exposure to inductive conditions.

  5. Understanding the Effects of Floral Density on Flower Visitation Rates and Species Composition of Flower Visitors

    Essenberg, Carla Jean

    2012-01-01

    Pollinator responses to varying floral density have important implications for plant population dynamics, conservation, and the evolution of floral traits. Floral density can influence both flower visitation rates and the species composition of flower visitors, but neither of these effects is well understood. In my dissertation, I generate and test hypotheses explaining the relations of flower visitation rate and flower visitor species composition to floral density.In the first chapter, I p...

  6. Flowering phenology, floral traits and pollinator composition in a herbaceous Mediterranean plant community

    Bosch, Jordi; Retana, Javier; CERDÁ, XIM

    1997-01-01

    The relationships between flowering plants and their insect visitors were studied in a Mediterranean grassland in north-east Spain. Floral traits (size, shape, symmetry, and colour), floral rewards (pollen and nectar), flowering period, and floral visitors were recorded for the 17 most abundant plants in the community. Flowering was year-round, but most species flowered in spring. The three species that flowered after spring had small flowers, but the distribution of floral features (includin...

  7. Plant regeneration and floral bud formation from intact floral parts of African violet (Saintpaulia ionantha H. Wendl.) cultured in vitro.

    Daud, N; Taha, R M

    2008-04-01

    Intact immature flower buds of African violet (Saintpaulia ionantha H. Wendl.) were used as explant sources for in vitro studies. The effect of exogenous hormones, NAA and BAP on the indirect organogenesis of this species was observed. Callus was formed on the cut end (base) of pedicels of floral buds where they were in contact with the medium. When maintained on the same medium, callus was differentiated into adventitious shoots after 10 weeks in culture. MS media supplemented with 2.0 mg L(-1) NAA and 1.0 mg L(-1) BAP gave the highest number of sterile or vegetative floral buds from the surface of callus of the explants, but these buds failed to develop further. The floral buds were expanded as abnormal flowers. The floral structures were smaller in size compared to intact flowers. Petals (corolla) were white to purple in colour but did not form any reproductive organs, i.e., stamens or pistils. All sterile or vegetative floral buds and abnormal flowers survived for 3 months in culture but failed to reach anthesis. PMID:18810979

  8. Floral sesquiterpenes and their synthesis in dioecious kiwifruit

    Green, Sol; Atkinson, Ross G

    2010-01-01

    Kiwifruit species are vigorously growing dioecious vines that rely on bees and other insects for pollen transfer between spatially separated male and female individuals. Floral volatile terpene cues for insect pollinator attraction were characterized from flowers of the most widely grown and economically important kiwifruit cultivar Actinidia deliciosa ‘Hayward’ and its male pollinator ‘Chieftain’. The sesquiterpenes α-farnesene and germacrene D dominated in all floral tissues and the emission of these compounds was detected throughout the day, with lower levels at night. Two terpene synthase (TPS) genes were isolated from A. deliciosa petals that produced (+)-germacrene D and (E,E)-α-farnesene respectively. Both TPS genes were expressed in the same tissues and at the same times as their corresponding floral volatiles. Here we discuss these results with respect to plant and insect ecology and the evolution and structure of sesquiterpene synthases. PMID:20592812

  9. Stepping motor adaptor actuator for a commercial uhv linear motion feedthrough

    An adaptor coupling has been developed that will allow the attachment of a standard stepping motor to a precision commercial (Varian) uhv linear motion feedthrough. The assembly, consisting of the motor, motor adaptor, limit switches, etc. is clamped to the feedthrough body which can be done under vacuum conditions if necessary. With a 500 step/rev. stepping motor the resolution is 1.27 μm per step. We presently use this assembly in a remote location for the precise positioning of a beam sensing monitor. 2 refs., 3 figs

  10. The pleiotropic ABNORMAL FLOWER AND DWARF1 affects plant height, floral development and grain yield in rice

    Deyong Ren; Li Zhu; Zhenyu Gao; Guojun Dong; Guangheng Zhang; Longbiao Guo; Dali Zeng; and Qian Qian; Yuchun Rao; Liwen Wu; Qiankun Xu; Zizhuang Li; Haiping Yu; Yu Zhang; Yujia Leng; Jiang Hu

    2016-01-01

    Moderate plant height and successful establish-ment of reproductive organs play pivotal roles in rice grain production. The molecular mechanism that controls the two aspects remains unclear in rice. In the present study, we characterized a rice gene, ABNORMAL FLOWER AND DWARF1 (AFD1) that determined plant height, floral development and grain yield. The afd1 mutant showed variable defects including the dwarfism, long panicle, low seed setting and reduced grain yield. In addition, abnormal floral organs were also observed in the afd1 mutant including slender and thick hulls, and hull-like lodicules. AFD1 encoded a DUF640 domain protein and was ex-pressed in all tested tissues and organs. Subcellular localization showed AFD1-green fluorescent fusion protein (GFP) was localized in the nucleus. Meantime, our results suggested that AFD1 regulated the expression of cell division and expansion related genes.

  11. Two GATA transcription factors are downstream effectors of floral homeotic gene action in Arabidopsis.

    Mara, Chloe D; Irish, Vivian F

    2008-06-01

    Floral organogenesis is dependent on the combinatorial action of MADS-box transcription factors, which in turn control the expression of suites of genes required for growth, patterning, and differentiation. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the specification of petal and stamen identity depends on the action of two MADS-box gene products, APETALA3 (AP3) and PISTILLATA (PI). In a screen for genes whose expression was altered in response to the induction of AP3 activity, we identified GNC (GATA, nitrate-inducible, carbon-metabolism-involved) as being negatively regulated by AP3 and PI. The GNC gene encodes a member of the Arabidopsis GATA transcription factor family and has been implicated in the regulation of chlorophyll biosynthesis as well as carbon and nitrogen metabolism. In addition, we found that the GNC paralog, GNL (GNC-like), is also negatively regulated by AP3 and PI. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we showed that promoter sequences of both GNC and GNL are bound by PI protein, suggesting a direct regulatory interaction. Analyses of single and double gnc and gnl mutants indicated that the two genes share redundant roles in promoting chlorophyll biosynthesis, suggesting that in repressing GNC and GNL, AP3/PI have roles in negatively regulating this biosynthetic pathway in flowers. In addition, coexpression analyses of genes regulated by AP3, PI, GNC, and GNL indicate a complex regulatory interplay between these transcription factors in regulating a variety of light and nutrient responsive genes. Together, these results provide new insights into the transcriptional cascades controlling the specification of floral organ identities. PMID:18417639

  12. The TIR-domain containing adaptor TRAM is required for TLR7 mediated RANTES production.

    Enda Shevlin

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7 plays a vital role in the immune response to ssRNA viruses such as human rhinovirus (HRV and Influenza, against which there are currently no treatments or vaccines with long term efficacy available. Clearly, a more comprehensive understanding of the TLR7 signaling axis will contribute to its molecular targeting. TRIF related adaptor molecule (TRAM plays a vital role in TLR4 signaling by recruiting TRIF to TLR4, followed by endosomal trafficking of the complex and initiation of IRF3 dependent type I interferon production as well as NF-κB dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Towards understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate TLR7 functionality, we found that TRAM(-/- murine macrophages exhibited a transcriptional and translational impairment in TLR7 mediated RANTES, but not TNFα, production. Suppression of TRAM expression in human macrophages also resulted in an impairment in TLR7 mediated CCL5 and IFN-β, but not TNFα, gene induction. Furthermore, suppression of endogenous human TRAM expression in human macrophages significantly impaired RV16 induced CCL5 and IFNβ, but not TNFα gene induction. Additionally, TRAM-G2A dose-dependently inhibited TLR7 mediated activation of CCL5, IFNβ and IFNα reporter genes. TLR7-mediated phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3 was impaired in TRAM(-/- cells. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation studies indicated that TRAM physically interacts with MyD88 upon TLR7 stimulation, but not under basal conditions. Our results clearly demonstrate that TRAM plays a, hitherto unappreciated, role in TLR7 signaling through a novel signaling axis containing, but not limited to, MyD88, TRAM and IRF3 towards the activation of anti-viral immunity.

  13. The Toll-Like receptor adaptor TRIF contributes to otitis media pathogenesis and recovery

    Pak Kwang

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toll-like receptor (TLR signalling is crucial for innate immune responses to infection. The involvement of TLRs in otitis media (OM, the most prevalent childhood disease in developed countries, has been implicated by studies in middle ear cell lines, by association studies of TLR-related gene polymorphisms, and by altered OM in mice bearing mutations in TLR genes. Activated TLRs signal via two alternative intracellular signaling molecules with differing effects; MyD88 (Myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 inducing primarily interleukin expression and TRIF (Tir-domain-containing adaptor inducing interferon β mediating type I interferon (IFN expression. We tested the hypothesis that TRIF and type I IFN signaling play a role in OM, using a murine model of OM induced by non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi. The ME inflammatory response to NTHi was examined in wild-type (WT and TRIF-/- mice by qPCR, gene microarray, histopathology and bacterial culture. Results Expression of TRIF mRNA was only modesty enhanced during OM, but both type I IFN signalling genes and type I IFN-inducible genes were significantly up-regulated in WT mice. TRIF-deficient mice showed reduced but more persistent mucosal hyperplasia and less leukocyte infiltration into the ME in response to NTHi infection than did WT animals. Viable bacteria could be cultured from MEs of TRIF-/- mice for much longer in the course of disease than was the case for middle ears of WT mice. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that activation of TRIF/type I IFN responses is important in both the pathogenesis and resolution of NTHi-induced OM.

  14. Study on the Development of Yunnan Floral E-commerce

    Yulan; KUANG; Qifang; LI; Wangyun; NING

    2013-01-01

    Cut flower production in Yunnan accounts for 80%nationwide.In order to expand the Yunnan Flower sales channels,the promotion of the development of e-commerce is necessary.In 2012 China’s online shopping users reached 247 million people,but e-commerce of fresh flowers lagged behind due to the constraints of preservation facilities and logistics cost.The analysis of the factors restricting the development of floral e-commerce and the proposition of solutions to this problem can promote faster development of Yunnan floral e-commerce.

  15. Floral colour change as a potential signal to pollinators.

    Ruxton, Graeme D; Schaefer, H Martin

    2016-08-01

    Colour change in flowers (with age and/or after pollination) is taxonomically widespread, has evolved repeatedly, and has a range of putative selective benefits linked to modifying pollinator behaviour; however, this phenomenon seems paradoxically uncommon. We explore this paradox by reviewing the empirical evidence and argue that the evolution and maintenance of floral colour change as a signal to modify pollinator behaviour require special ecological circumstances that will often not be met across a plant population for a sustained number of generations, which potentially explains the scarcity of this phenomenon. We discuss alternative explanations for floral colour change and potentially fruitful lines of future research. PMID:27428780

  16. Genetic architecture, biochemical underpinnings and ecological impact of floral UV patterning.

    Brock, Marcus T; Lucas, Lauren K; Anderson, Nickolas A; Rubin, Matthew J; Markelz, R J Cody; Covington, Michael F; Devisetty, Upendra K; Chapple, Clint; Maloof, Julin N; Weinig, Cynthia

    2016-03-01

    Floral attraction traits can significantly affect pollinator visitation patterns, but adaptive evolution of these traits may be constrained by correlations with other traits. In some cases, molecular pathways contributing to floral attraction are well characterized, offering the opportunity to explore loci potentially underlying variation among individuals. Here, we quantify the range of variation in floral UV patterning (i.e. UV 'bulls-eye nectar guides) among crop and wild accessions of Brassica rapa. We then use experimental crosses to examine the genetic architecture, candidate loci and biochemical underpinnings of this patterning as well as phenotypic manipulations to test the ecological impact. We find qualitative variation in UV patterning between wild (commonly lacking UV patterns) and crop (commonly exhibiting UV patterns) accessions. Similar to the majority of crops, recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from an oilseed crop × WI fast-plant® cross exhibit UV patterns, the size of which varies extensively among genotypes. In RILs, we further observe strong statistical-genetic and QTL correlations within petal morphological traits and within measurements of petal UV patterning; however, correlations between morphology and UV patterning are weak or nonsignificant, suggesting that UV patterning is regulated and may evolve independently of overall petal size. HPLC analyses reveal a high concentration of sinapoyl glucose in UV-absorbing petal regions, which, in concert with physical locations of UV-trait QTLs, suggest a regulatory and structural gene as candidates underlying observed quantitative variation. Finally, insects prefer flowers with UV bulls-eye patterns over those that lack patterns, validating the importance of UV patterning in pollen-limited populations of B. rapa. PMID:26800256

  17. FENOLOGÍA FLORAL Y VISITANTES FLORALES EN Drimys granadensis L.f. (WINTERACEAE Floral Phenology And Flower Visitors In Drimys granadensis L.f. (Winteraceae

    XAVIER MARQUINEZ

    Full Text Available El propósito de este trabajo fue caracterizar las fases fenológicas florales y determinar los visitantes florales en una población natural de Drimys granadensis (nombre común: canelo; Winteraceae ubicada en Altos de Yerbabuena ( 2.850 m , cerros orientales de la Sabana de Bogotá, (Colombia. El desarrollo fenológico floral duró 9,5 días cuando la floración ocurrió en época soleada, 12,5 días en época lluviosa y 16 días cuando se excluyeron a los visitantes florales mediante embolsado. Se realizaron observaciones del recurso utilizado, fase fenólogica de la flor visitada y cargas polínicas en los visitante florales, los cuales correspondieron a seis órdenes, 21 familias y 29 morfoespecies de insectos. Cuatro especies de coleópteros y dos de dípteros fueron considerados posibles polinizadores por su abundancia y carga de polen. Los resultados obtenidos se discuten en relación con aquellos reportados en otras especies del género Drimys y de la familia Winteraceae.The purpose of this research was to characterize the flowering phenological phases and to determine the flower visitors in a natural population of Drimys granadensis (common name: canelo; Winteraceae in Altos de Yerbabuena, eastern mountains of Sabana de Bogotá ( Colombia . Floral phenology development lasted 9.5 days when flowering occurred under sunny conditions, 12.5 days under rainy conditions and 16 days when flower visitors were excluded using cloth bags. It was done observations related with the resources used, the phenological phases of visited flowers and the pollen load on the flower visitors. Visitors corresponded with 29 morphospecies, 6 orders y 21 families of insects. Four species of coleoptera and two species of diptera were considered as possible pollinators taking in account abundance and pollen load. The results are analyzed in relation with those reported for other species in the genus Drimys and in the family Winteraceae.

  18. Anatomía floral de cocos nucifera l. (arecaceae, arecoideae) Floral anatomy of Cocos nucifera L. (Arecaceae, Arecoideae)

    Lorena GUEVARA O; Damelis JÁUREGUI

    2008-01-01

    El cocotero (Cocos nucifera) es una especie monoica cuyo fruto uniseminado de gran tamaño es comercializado en toda la región tropical. Se realizó el estudio anatómico de las flores estaminadas y pistiladas con el fin de aportar información para el conocimiento de la biología floral de esta especie. El material vegetal fue fijado y deshidratado aplicándose técnicas anatómicas convencionales para su estudio. Las estructuras florales se caracterizan por presentar abundante tejido esclerenquimát...

  19. MEMORIA Y APRENDIZAJE EN LA ESCOGENCIA FLORAL DE LAS ABEJAS Memory And Learning In Bees' Floral Choices

    MARISOL AMAYA MÁRQUEZ

    Full Text Available Los polinizadores altamente especializados en su dieta, no hacen escogencias florales, ellos visitan un recurso específico siguiendo el dictado de la información almacenada en sus genes. En contraste, para la abeja social Apis mellifera una escogencia floral implica, la toma de una decisión, usualmente con criterio económico, basada en información aprendida y almacenada en alguna forma de memoria. Aunque existen numerosos estudios y modelos sobre la escogencia floral en abejas, la gran mayoría de éstos, han derivado sus conclusiones a partir de condiciones temporalmente fijas de la interacción. Muy pocos estudios han abordado la dinámica propia del contexto ecológico, en el cual el mercado floral de las abejas cambia con las estaciones del año y con los patrones diarios de antesis floral. Este cambio en la disponibilidad de especies florales enfrenta a los polinizadores, a realizar escogencias secuenciales acerca del alimento a explotar. En este trabajo abordo el tema del forrajeo secuencial en parches florales heterospecíficos, enfocándome en el uso que la abeja melífera hace de la información previamente aprendida en un contexto, cuando se enfrenta a la explotación de alimento en un contexto ecológicamente diferente. He realizado experimentos sobre escogencia floral simulando las condiciones de cambio del paisaje floral, exponiendo abejas individuales de A. mellifera a decidir sobre cuales especies forrajear en cada parche. Los resultados indican que la abeja invierte en procesos de aprendizaje en un muestreo inicial, pero una vez almacenada la información, utiliza una pieza de la información previamente aprendida (color para explotar parches florales heteroespecíficos siguiendo una imagen de búsqueda de color. En esta revisión discuto situaciones biológicas de la interacción planta-abeja, las cuales apoyan la idea que en la naturaleza el uso de imágenes de búsqueda de color por parte de abejas sociales puede ser m

  20. Floral biology and breeding system of three Ipomoea weeds Biologia floral e sistema reprodutivo de três espécies daninhas de Ipomoea

    R.C.S Maimoni-Rodella; Y.A.N.P. Yanagizawa

    2007-01-01

    The floral biology of three weeds, Ipomoea cairica, I. grandifolia and I. nil (Convolvulaceae), was studied in Botucatu and Jaboticabal, São Paulo, in southeastern Brazil. The three species are melittophilous, with a varied set of floral visitors, but with some overlapping. Cluster analysis using Jacquard similarity index indicated a greater similarity among different plant species in the same locality than among the populations at different places, in relation to floral visitor sets. The pro...

  1. Transmembrane adaptor molecules: a new category of lymphoid-cell markers

    Tedoldi, S.; Paterson, J.C.; Hansmann, M.-L.; Natkunam, Y.; Rüdiger, T.; Angelisová, Pavla; Du, M.Q.; Roberton, H.; Roncador, G.; Sanchez, L.; Pozzobon, M.; Masir, N.; Barry, R.; Pileri, S.; Mason, D.Y.; Marafioti, T.; Hořejší, Václav

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 1 (2006), s. 213-221. ISSN 0006-4971 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : transmembrane adaptors * PAG * LIME Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 10.370, year: 2006

  2. Floral biology of Stachytarpheta maximiliani Scham. (Verbenaceae) and its floral visitors Biologia floral de Stachytarpheta maximiliani Scham. (Verbenaceae) e seus visitantes florais

    Ivana de Freitas Barbola; Sebastião Laroca; Maria Christina de Almeida; Elynton Alves do Nascimento

    2006-01-01

    This study describes the reproductive system of Stachytarpheta maximiliani (Verbenaceae), including its floral biology, nectar and pollen availability and insect foraging patterns, identifying whose species act as pollinators. It was carried out in a Brazilian Atlantic rain forest site. Observations on the pollination biology of the Verbenaceae S. maximiliani indicate that their flowering period extends from September through May. Anthesis occurs from 5:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and nectar and pol...

  3. Diallel analysis of floral longevity in Impatiens walleriana

    Impatiens walleriana is currently among the most valuable and widely cultivated floriculture crops in the world. Highly floriferous cultivars are a primary goal for breeders of I. walleriana. Although breeders have selected for floriferousness, little consideration has been given to floral longevity...

  4. Drought and leaf herbivory influence floral volatiles and pollinator attraction.

    Burkle, Laura A; Runyon, Justin B

    2016-04-01

    The effects of climate change on species interactions are poorly understood. Investigating the mechanisms by which species interactions may shift under altered environmental conditions will help form a more predictive understanding of such shifts. In particular, components of climate change have the potential to strongly influence floral volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and, in turn, plant-pollinator interactions. In this study, we experimentally manipulated drought and herbivory for four forb species to determine effects of these treatments and their interactions on (1) visual plant traits traditionally associated with pollinator attraction, (2) floral VOCs, and (3) the visitation rates and community composition of pollinators. For all forbs tested, experimental drought universally reduced flower size and floral display, but there were species-specific effects of drought on volatile emissions per flower, the composition of compounds produced, and subsequent pollinator visitation rates. Moreover, the community of pollinating visitors was influenced by drought across forb species (i.e. some pollinator species were deterred by drought while others were attracted). Together, these results indicate that VOCs may provide more nuanced information to potential floral visitors and may be relatively more important than visual traits for pollinator attraction, particularly under shifting environmental conditions. PMID:26546275

  5. The co-optimization of floral display and nectar reward

    Prajakta V Belsare; Balasubramanian Sriram; Milind G Watve

    2009-12-01

    In most insect-pollinated flowers, pollinators cannot detect the presence of nectar without entering the flower. Therefore, flowers may cheat by not producing nectar and may still get pollinated. Earlier studies supported this ‘cheater flower’ hypothesis and suggested that the cost saving by cheater flowers could be the most predominant selective force in the evolution of nectarless flowers. Previous models as well as empirical studies have addressed the problem of optimizing the proportion of nectarless and nectarful flowers. However, there has been no attempt to optimize the investment in nectar production along with that in floral display. One of the key questions that arises is whether the floral display will evolve to be an honest indicator of nectar reward. We use a mathematical model to cooptimize the investments in nectar and floral display in order to achieve maximum reproductive success. The model assumes that pollinators rely on a relative rather than an absolute judgement of reward. A conspicuous floral display attracts naïve pollinators on the one hand and enhances pollinator learning on the other. We show that under these assumptions, plant–pollinator co-evolution leads to honest signalling, i.e. a positive correlation between display and reward.

  6. Functional interaction of megalin with the megalinbinding protein (MegBP), a novel tetratrico peptide repeat-containing adaptor molecule.

    Petersen, Helle Heibroch; Hilpert, Jan; Militz, Daniel; Zandler, Valerie; Jacobsen, Christian; Roebroek, Anton J M; Willnow, Thomas E

    2003-02-01

    Megalin is a member of the LDL receptor gene family that plays an important role in forebrain development and in cellular vitamin D metabolism through endocytic uptake of vitamin D metabolites. Similar to other receptors in this gene family, megalin is believed to functionally interact with intracellular proteins through adaptors that bind to the receptor tail and regulate its endocytic and signal transducing activities. Using yeast two-hybrid screens, we identified a novel scaffold protein with tetratrico peptide repeats, the megalin-binding protein (MegBP) that associates with the receptor. The binding site of MegBP was mapped to an N-terminal region on the receptor tail harboring a proline-rich peptide element. MegBP binding did not block the endocytic activity of the receptor; however, overexpression resulted in cellular lethality. In further screens, we identified proteins that bound to MegBP and thus might be recruited to the megalin tail. MegBP-interacting partners included several transcriptional regulators such as the SKI-interacting protein (SKIP), a co-activator of the vitamin D receptor. These finding suggest a model whereby megalin directly participates in transcriptional regulation through controlled sequestration or release of transcription factors via MegBP. PMID:12508107

  7. GLOBOSA: a homeotic gene which interacts with DEFICIENS in the control of Antirrhinum floral organogenesis.

    Tröbner, W; Ramirez, L; Motte, P; Hue, I; Huijser, P; Lönnig, W E; Saedler, H; Sommer, H; Schwarz-Sommer, Z

    1992-12-01

    GLOBOSA (GLO) is a homeotic gene whose mutants show sepaloid petals and carpelloid stamens. The similarity of Glo mutants to those of the DEFICIENS (DEFA) gene suggests that the two genes have comparable functions in floral morphogenesis. The GLO cDNA has been cloned by virtue of its homology to the MADS-box, a conserved DNA-binding domain also contained in the DEFA gene. We have determined the structure of the wild type GLO gene as well as of several glo mutant alleles which contain transposable element insertions responsible for somatic and germinal instability of Glo mutants. Analyses of the temporal and spatial expression patterns of the DEFA and GLO genes during development of wild type flowers and in flowers of various stable and unstable defA and glo alleles indicate independent induction of DEFA and GLO transcription. In contrast, organ-specific up-regulation of the two genes in petals and stamens depends on expression of both DEFA and GLO. In vitro DNA-binding studies were used to demonstrate that the DEFA and GLO proteins specifically bind, as a heterodimer, to motifs in the promoters of both genes. A model is presented which proposes both combinatorial and cross-regulatory interactions between the DEFA and GLO genes during petal and stamen organogenesis in the second and third whorls of the flower. The function of the two genes controlling determinate growth of the floral meristem is also discussed. PMID:1361166

  8. Insulin Receptor Substrate Adaptor Proteins Mediate Prognostic Gene Expression Profiles in Breast Cancer

    Becker, Marc A.; Ibrahim, Yasir H.; Oh, Annabell S.; Fagan, Dedra H.; Byron, Sara A.; Sarver, Aaron L.; Lee, Adrian V.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Fan, Cheng; Perou, Charles M.; Yee, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Therapies targeting the type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) have not been developed with predictive biomarkers to identify tumors with receptor activation. We have previously shown that the insulin receptor substrate (IRS) adaptor proteins are necessary for linking IGF1R to downstream signaling pathways and the malignant phenotype in breast cancer cells. The purpose of this study was to identify gene expression profiles downstream of IGF1R and its two adaptor proteins. IRS-null breast cancer cells (T47D-YA) were engineered to express IRS-1 or IRS-2 alone and their ability to mediate IGF ligand-induced proliferation, motility, and gene expression determined. Global gene expression signatures reflecting IRS adaptor specific and primary vs. secondary ligand response were derived (Early IRS-1, Late IRS-1, Early IRS-2 and Late IRS-2) and functional pathway analysis examined. IRS isoforms mediated distinct gene expression profiles, functional pathways, and breast cancer subtype association. For example, IRS-1/2-induced TGFb2 expression and blockade of TGFb2 abrogated IGF-induced cell migration. In addition, the prognostic value of IRS proteins was significant in the luminal B breast tumor subtype. Univariate and multivariate analyses confirmed that IRS adaptor signatures correlated with poor outcome as measured by recurrence-free and overall survival. Thus, IRS adaptor protein expression is required for IGF ligand responses in breast cancer cells. IRS-specific gene signatures represent accurate surrogates of IGF activity and could predict response to anti-IGF therapy in breast cancer. PMID:26991655

  9. Characterizing Floral Symmetry in the Core Goodeniaceae with Geometric Morphometrics

    Gardner, Andrew G.; Fitz Gerald, Jonathan N.; Menz, John; Shepherd, Kelly A.; Howarth, Dianella G.; Jabaily, Rachel S.

    2016-01-01

    Core Goodeniaceae is a clade of ~330 species primarily distributed in Australia. Considerable variation in flower morphology exists within this group and we aim to use geometric morphometrics to characterize this variation across the two major subclades: Scaevola sensu lato (s.l.) and Goodenia s.l., the latter of which was hypothesized to exhibit greater variability in floral symmetry form. We test the hypothesis that floral morphological variation can be adequately characterized by our morphometric approach, and that discrete groups of floral symmetry morphologies exist, which broadly correlate with subjectively determined groups. From 335 images of 44 species in the Core Goodeniaceae, two principal components were computed that describe >98% of variation in all datasets. Increasing values of PC1 ventralize the dorsal petals (increasing the angle between them), whereas increasing values of PC2 primarily ventralize the lateral petals (decreasing the angle between them). Manipulation of these two morphological “axes” alone was sufficient to recreate any of the general floral symmetry patterns in the Core Goodeniaceae. Goodenia s.l. exhibits greater variance than Scaevola s.l. in PC1 and PC2, and has a significantly lower mean value for PC1. Clustering clearly separates fan-flowers (with dorsal petals at least 120° separated) from the others, whereas the distinction between pseudo-radial and bilabiate clusters is less clear and may form a continuum rather than two distinct groups. Transitioning from the average fan-flower to the average non-fan-flower is described almost exclusively by PC1, whereas PC2 partially describes the transition between bilabiate and pseudo-radial morphologies. Our geometric morphometric method accurately models Core Goodeniaceae floral symmetry diversity. PMID:27148960

  10. Patterns of pollen removal and deposition in Polemonium brandegeei (Polemoniaceae): the role of floral visitors, floral design and sexual interference.

    Kulbaba, M W; Worley, A C

    2014-11-01

    The arrangement, colour, shape and size of floral parts (collectively floral design) have evolved primarily to promote mating success via animal-mediated pollen transfer. Although numerous studies have examined variation in pollinator assemblages, relatively few have examined patterns of pollen removal and deposition in the presence of fluctuating pollinators and ineffective floral visitors; therefore, net pollen removal and deposition by entire visitor assemblages are unclear. We studied the timing (diurnal or nocturnal) and effects of floral traits on pollen removal and deposition under a dynamic visitor assemblage of Polemonium brandegeei. We quantified pollen grains remaining in anthers (pollen removal) and deposited on stigmas (pollen deposition) of plants visited during either the day (07:30-20:00 h) or night (20:30-07:30 h) in natural populations over two flowering seasons. Pollen removal and deposition occurred both diurnally and nocturnally during our study. Increased diurnal removal and deposition coincided with peak floral visitations in 2006. This increase in pollen removal and deposition may reflect increased visits by pollen consumers, effective hawkmoth pollinators and increased self-pollen deposition due to hot, dry weather. Nonlinear effects of style length significantly affected pollen removal, with less pollen remaining in flowers with intermediate style lengths. Pollen deposition was more complex, with herkogamy and anther height affecting deposition. Further, close proximity of stigmas and anthers increased the potential for sexual interference between pollen removal and deposition. Overall, flower visitations and pollen removal and deposition varied between years and populations, but sex organ placement consistently influenced the removal and deposition of pollen. PMID:24850527

  11. Rice ABERRANT PANICLE ORGANIZATION 1, encoding an F-box protein, regulates meristem fate.

    Ikeda, Kyoko; Ito, Momoyo; Nagasawa, Nobuhiro; Kyozuka, Junko; Nagato, Yasuo

    2007-09-01

    Inflorescence architecture is one of the most important agronomical traits. Characterization of rice aberrant panicle organization 1 (apo1) mutants revealed that APO1 positively controls spikelet number by suppressing the precocious conversion of inflorescence meristems to spikelet meristems. In addition, APO1 is associated with the regulation of the plastchron, floral organ identity, and floral determinacy. Phenotypic analyses of apo1 and floral homeotic double mutants demonstrate that APO1 positively regulates class-C floral homeotic genes, but not class-B genes. Molecular studies revealed that APO1 encodes an F-box protein, an ortholog of Arabidopsis UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGAN (UFO), which is a positive regulator of class-B genes. Overexpression of APO1 caused an increase in inflorescence branches and spikelets. As the mutant inflorescences and flowers differed considerably between apo1 and ufo, the functions of APO1 and UFO appear to have diverged during evolution. PMID:17666027

  12. Arranging the bouquet of disease: floral traits and the transmission of plant and animal pathogens.

    McArt, Scott H; Koch, Hauke; Irwin, Rebecca E; Adler, Lynn S

    2014-05-01

    Several floral microbes are known to be pathogenic to plants or floral visitors such as pollinators. Despite the ecological and economic importance of pathogens deposited in flowers, we often lack a basic understanding of how floral traits influence disease transmission. Here, we provide the first systematic review regarding how floral traits attract vectors (for plant pathogens) or hosts (for animal pathogens), mediate disease establishment and evolve under complex interactions with plant mutualists that can be vectors for microbial antagonists. Attraction of floral visitors is influenced by numerous phenological, morphological and chemical traits, and several plant pathogens manipulate floral traits to attract vectors. There is rapidly growing interest in how floral secondary compounds and antimicrobial enzymes influence disease establishment in plant hosts. Similarly, new research suggests that consumption of floral secondary compounds can reduce pathogen loads in animal pollinators. Given recent concerns about pollinator declines caused in part by pathogens, the role of floral traits in mediating pathogen transmission is a key area for further research. We conclude by discussing important implications of floral transmission of pathogens for agriculture, conservation and human health, suggesting promising avenues for future research in both basic and applied biology. PMID:24528408

  13. Wild bees preferentially visit Rudbeckia flower heads with exaggerated ultraviolet absorbing floral guides.

    Horth, Lisa; Campbell, Laura; Bray, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report on the results of an experimental study that assessed the visitation frequency of wild bees to conspecific flowers with different sized floral guides. UV absorbent floral guides are ubiquitous in Angiosperms, yet surprisingly little is known about conspecific variation in these guides and very few studies have evaluated pollinator response to UV guide manipulation. This is true despite our rich understanding about learning and color preferences in bees. Historical dogma indicates that flower color serves as an important long-range visual signal allowing pollinators to detect the flowers, while floral guides function as close-range signals that direct pollinators to a reward. We initiated the work presented here by first assessing the population level variation in UV absorbent floral guides for conspecific flowers. We assessed two species, Rudbeckia hirta and R. fulgida. We then used several petal cut-and-paste experiments to test whether UV floral guides can also function to attract visitors. We manipulated floral guide size and evaluated visitation frequency. In all experiments, pollinator visitation rates were clearly associated with floral guide size. Diminished floral guides recruited relatively few insect visitors. Exaggerated floral guides recruited more visitors than smaller or average sized guides. Thus, UV floral guides play an important role in pollinator recruitment and in determining the relative attractiveness of conspecific flower heads. Consideration of floral guides is therefore important when evaluating the overall conspicuousness of flower heads relative to background coloration. This work raises the issue of whether floral guides serve as honest indicators of reward, since guide size varies in nature for conspecific flowers at the same developmental stage and since preferences for larger guides were found. To our knowledge, these are the first cut-and-paste experiments conducted to examine whether UV absorbent floral guides affect

  14. Wild bees preferentially visit Rudbeckia flower heads with exaggerated ultraviolet absorbing floral guides

    Lisa Horth

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report on the results of an experimental study that assessed the visitation frequency of wild bees to conspecific flowers with different sized floral guides. UV absorbent floral guides are ubiquitous in Angiosperms, yet surprisingly little is known about conspecific variation in these guides and very few studies have evaluated pollinator response to UV guide manipulation. This is true despite our rich understanding about learning and color preferences in bees. Historical dogma indicates that flower color serves as an important long-range visual signal allowing pollinators to detect the flowers, while floral guides function as close-range signals that direct pollinators to a reward. We initiated the work presented here by first assessing the population level variation in UV absorbent floral guides for conspecific flowers. We assessed two species, Rudbeckia hirta and R. fulgida. We then used several petal cut-and-paste experiments to test whether UV floral guides can also function to attract visitors. We manipulated floral guide size and evaluated visitation frequency. In all experiments, pollinator visitation rates were clearly associated with floral guide size. Diminished floral guides recruited relatively few insect visitors. Exaggerated floral guides recruited more visitors than smaller or average sized guides. Thus, UV floral guides play an important role in pollinator recruitment and in determining the relative attractiveness of conspecific flower heads. Consideration of floral guides is therefore important when evaluating the overall conspicuousness of flower heads relative to background coloration. This work raises the issue of whether floral guides serve as honest indicators of reward, since guide size varies in nature for conspecific flowers at the same developmental stage and since preferences for larger guides were found. To our knowledge, these are the first cut-and-paste experiments conducted to examine whether UV absorbent

  15. Wild bees preferentially visit Rudbeckia flower heads with exaggerated ultraviolet absorbing floral guides

    Horth, Lisa; Campbell, Laura; Bray, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report on the results of an experimental study that assessed the visitation frequency of wild bees to conspecific flowers with different sized floral guides. UV absorbent floral guides are ubiquitous in Angiosperms, yet surprisingly little is known about conspecific variation in these guides and very few studies have evaluated pollinator response to UV guide manipulation. This is true despite our rich understanding about learning and color preferences in bees. Historical dogma indicates that flower color serves as an important long-range visual signal allowing pollinators to detect the flowers, while floral guides function as close-range signals that direct pollinators to a reward. We initiated the work presented here by first assessing the population level variation in UV absorbent floral guides for conspecific flowers. We assessed two species, Rudbeckia hirta and R. fulgida. We then used several petal cut-and-paste experiments to test whether UV floral guides can also function to attract visitors. We manipulated floral guide size and evaluated visitation frequency. In all experiments, pollinator visitation rates were clearly associated with floral guide size. Diminished floral guides recruited relatively few insect visitors. Exaggerated floral guides recruited more visitors than smaller or average sized guides. Thus, UV floral guides play an important role in pollinator recruitment and in determining the relative attractiveness of conspecific flower heads. Consideration of floral guides is therefore important when evaluating the overall conspicuousness of flower heads relative to background coloration. This work raises the issue of whether floral guides serve as honest indicators of reward, since guide size varies in nature for conspecific flowers at the same developmental stage and since preferences for larger guides were found. To our knowledge, these are the first cut-and-paste experiments conducted to examine whether UV absorbent floral

  16. Distribution of XTH, Expansin, and Secondary-wall-related CesA in Floral and Fruit Abscission Zones during Fruit Development in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum

    Mutsumi eTsuchiya

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available After fruit development is triggered by pollination, the abscission zone (AZ in the fruit pedicel strengthens its adhesion to keep the fruit attached. We previously reported that xyloglucan and arabinan accumulation in the AZ accompanies the shedding of unpollinated flowers. After the fruit has developed and is fully ripened, shedding occurs easily in the AZ due to lignin accumulation. Regulation of cell wall metabolism may play an important role in these processes, but it is not well understood. In the present report, we used immunohistochemistry to visualize changes in the distributions of xyloglucan and arabinan metabolism-related enzymes in the AZs of pollinated and unpollinated flowers, and in ripened fruits. During floral abscission, we observed a gradual increase in polyclonal antibody labeling of expansin in the AZ. The intensities of LM6 and LM15 labeling of arabinan and xyloglucan, respectively, also increased. However, during floral abscission, we observed a large 1 day post anthesis (DPA peak in the polyclonal antibody labeling of XTH in the AZ, which then decreased. These results suggest that expansin and XTH play important, but different roles in the floral abscission process. During fruit abscission, unlike during floral abscission, no AZ-specific expansin and XTH were observed. Although lignification was seen in the AZ of over-ripe fruit pedicels, secondary cell wall-specific cellulose synthase signals were not observed. This suggests that cellulose metabolism-related enzymes do not play important roles in the AZ prior to fruit abscission.

  17. Phosphorylation of APP-CTF-AICD domains and interaction with adaptor proteins: signal transduction and/or transcriptional role--relevance for Alzheimer pathology.

    Schettini, Gennaro; Govoni, Stefano; Racchi, Marco; Rodriguez, Guido

    2010-12-01

    In recent decades, the study of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and of its proteolytic products carboxy terminal fragment (CTF), APP intracellular C-terminal domain (AICD) and amyloid beta has been mostly focussed on the role of APP as a producer of the toxic amyloid beta peptide. Here, we reconsider the role of APP suggesting, in a provocative way, the protein as a central player in a putative signalling pathway. We highlight the presence in the cytosolic tail of APP of the YENPTY motif which is typical of tyrosine kinase receptors, the phosphorylation of the tyrosine, serine and threonine residues, the kinases involved and the interaction with intracellular adaptor proteins. In particular, we examine the interaction with Shc and Grb2 regulators, which through the activation of Ras proteins elicit downstream signalling events such as the MAPK pathway. The review also addresses the interaction of APP, CTFs and AICD with other adaptor proteins and in particular with Fe65 for nuclear transcriptional activity and the importance of phosphorylation for sorting the secretases involved in the amyloidogenic or non-amyloidogenic pathways. We provide a novel perspective on Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, focussing on the perturbation of the physiological activities of APP-CTFs and AICD as an alternative perspective from that which normally focuses on the accumulation of neurotoxic proteolytic fragments. PMID:21039524

  18. Aromas florales y su interacción con los insectos polinizadores Floral scents and their interaction with insect pollinators

    Julieta Grajales-Conesa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Las plantas emplean diversas señales visuales y olfativas con la finalidad de atraer a los polinizadores que en su mayoría son insectos. Algunas plantas han desarrollado mecanismos, basándose en mensajes olfativos que los hacen únicos para sus polinizadores específicos. Estos mecanismos, así como las variaciones intra- e interespecíficas en el perfil de los aromas florales han evolucionado para determinadas especies. Los aromas florales son un conjunto de compuestos volátiles orgánicos y para su estudio hay varios métodos que requieren de técnicas que cada vez son más eficientes. El uso de estos aromas podría ser una opción en determinados sistemas de polinización, utilizándolos como atrayente de polinizadores o de depredadores y/o herbívoro para incrementar la producción y disminuir los daños por plagas. En este trabajo se revisan las distintas interacciones de los insectos y los aromas florales, los sistemas específicos planta-polinizador, los métodos de análisis, así como algunos patrones o tendencias de estas interacciones y su aplicación e importancia.Plants use visual and olfactory cues to attract pollinators and to allow them to detect the presence of flowers, which most of them are insects. Some plants have evolved with their pollinators, based on the olfactory messages, which make them unique for their specific pollinators. These mechanisms have evolved in certain plants in relation to their pollinators, and there are also inter and intra-specific variation in fragrance cues which show specific chemical profile for each plant species, so insects attracted are specific to them. Most of the floral scents are organic compounds identified with techniques and methodologies which become more specific and efficient along the time. The application of floral scent could be used as a tool in pollination and pest management. In these studies, insect interaction with floral scent is reviewed and specificity of plant

  19. Floral flavonoids and ultraviolet patterns in Viguiera (Compositae)

    Variation occurs among species of Viguiera series Viguiera for ultraviolet (UV) absorption/reflection patterns of ligules. Floral flavonoids that cause UV absorption occur in epidermal papillae. Flavonoids are further localized to the proximal portion of the ligule in the seven taxa that have only proximal UV absorption. Floral flavonoids involved in UV absorption consist of flavone, flavonol, and anthochlor (chalcone/aurone) glycosides. Quercetin 3-methyl ether glycosides characterize the ligules of 10 taxa occurring in Baja California, Mexico, and nearby areas, and these taxa appear to form one taxonomic group. The anthochlor pair, marein/maritimein, characterizes V. dentata, and the lack of ligule flavonoids distinguishes V. potosina from the remaining taxa. The presence of the anthochlor pair, marein/maritimein, only in V. dentata and the lack of ligule flavonoids in V. potosina concur with other data to indicate that these species are not correctly placed with each other or with the other species currently included in series Viguiera. (author)

  20. ER Adaptor SCAP Translocates and Recruits IRF3 to Perinuclear Microsome Induced by Cytosolic Microbial DNAs.

    Wei Chen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Stimulator of interferon genes (STING, also known as MITA, ERIS or MPYS induces the activation of TBK1 kinase and IRF3 transcription factor, upon sensing of microbial DNAs. How IRF3 is recruited onto the STING signalosome remains unknown. We report here that silencing of the ER adaptor SCAP markedly impairs the IRF3-responsive gene expression induced by STING. Scap knockdown mice are more susceptible to HSV-1 infection. Interestingly, SCAP translocates from ER, via Golgi, to perinuclear microsome in a STING-dependent manner. Mechanistically, the N-terminal transmembrane domain of SCAP interacts with STING, and the C-terminal cytosolic domain of SCAP binds to IRF3, thus recruiting IRF3 onto STING signalosome. Mis-localization of SCAP abolishes its antiviral function. Collectively, this study characterizes SCAP as an essential adaptor in the STING signaling pathway, uncovering a critical missing link in DNAs-triggered host antiviral responses.

  1. The interaction between the adaptor protein APS and Enigma is involved in actin organisation

    Barres, Romain; Gonzalez, Teresa; Le Marchand-Brustel, Yannick; Tanti, Jean-François

    2005-01-01

    APS (adaptor protein with PH and SH2 domains) is an adaptor protein phosphorylated by several tyrosine kinase receptors including the insulin receptor. To identify novel binding partners of APS, we performed yeast two-hybrid screening. We identified Enigma, a PDZ and LIM domain-containing protein...... that was previously shown to be associated with the actin cytoskeleton. In HEK 293 cells, Enigma interacted specifically with APS, but not with the APS-related protein SH2-B. This interaction required the NPTY motif of APS and the LIM domains of Enigma. In NIH-3T3 cells that express the insulin...... receptor, Enigma and APS were partially co-localised with F-actin in small ruffling structures. Insulin increased the complex formation between APS and Enigma and their co-localisation in large F-actin containing ruffles. While in NIH-3T3 and HeLa cells the co-expression of both Enigma and APS did not...

  2. attracting antagonists: does floral nectar increase leaf herbivory?

    Adler, L.S.; Bronstein, J. L.

    2004-01-01

    Traits that are attractive to mutualists may also attract antagonists, resulting in conflicting selection pressures. Here we develop the idea that increased floral nectar production can, in some cases, increase herbivory. In these situations, selection for increased nectar production to attract pollinators may be constrained by a linked cost of herbivore attraction. In support of this hypothesis, we report that experimentally supplementing nectar rewards in Datura stramonium led to increased ...

  3. The Floral Symbol in the Poetry of Heinrich Heine

    Aleksandra Chepelyk

    2013-01-01

    The article is devoted the plant symbolics which became the inalienable constituent of the original creation of Heinrich Heine. The distinctive traits of the artist’s lyric poetry are floral images, which are able to reflect the psychology of the human soul in the correlation with the spiritual substance – the divine nature. The immersion of Heinrich Heine in the world of the plants was conducived to the activation of the special emotional and psychological loading with the purpose of the com...

  4. Pestalotioid fungi from Restionaceae in the Cape Floral Kingdom.

    2006-01-01

    Eight pestalotioid fungi were isolated from the Restionaceae growing in the Cape Floral Kingdom of South Africa. Sarcostroma restionis, Truncatella megaspora, T. restionacearum and T. spadicea are newly described. New records include Pestalotiopsis matildae, Sarcostroma lomatiae, Truncatella betulae and T. hartigii. To resolve generic affiliations, phylogenetic analyses were performed on ITS (ITS1, 5.8S, ITS2) and part of 28S rDNA. DNA data support the original generic concept of Truncatella,...

  5. Study on the Development of Yunnan Floral E-commerce

    Kuang, Yulan; Li, Qifang; Ning, Wangyun

    2013-01-01

    Cut flower production in Yunnan accounts for 80% nationwide. In order to expand the Yunnan Flower sales channels, the promotion of the development of e-commerce is necessary. In 2012 China's online shopping users reached 247 million people, but e-commerce of fresh flowers lagged behind due to the constraints of preservation facilities and logistics cost. The analysis of the factors restricting the development of floral e-commerce and the proposition of solutions to this problem can promote fa...

  6. Active pollination favours sexual dimorphism in floral scent

    Okamoto, Tomoko; Kawakita, Atsushi; Goto, Ryutaro; Svensson, Glenn P.; Kato, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Zoophilous flowers often transmit olfactory signals to attract pollinators. In plants with unisexual flowers, such signals are usually similar between the sexes because attraction of the same animal to both male and female flowers is essential for conspecific pollen transfer. Here, we present a remarkable example of sexual dimorphism in floral signal observed in reproductively highly specialized clades of the tribe Phyllantheae (Phyllanthaceae). These plants are pollinated by species-specific...

  7. Quantitative trait loci for floral morphology in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Juenger, T; Purugganan, M.; Mackay, T F

    2000-01-01

    A central question in biology is how genes control the expression of quantitative variation. We used statistical methods to estimate genetic variation in eight Arabidopsis thaliana floral characters (fresh flower mass, petal length, petal width, sepal length, sepal width, long stamen length, short stamen length, and pistil length) in a cosmopolitan sample of 15 ecotypes. In addition, we used genome-wide quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping to evaluate the genetic basis of variation in these...

  8. Floral and ecological isolation between Aquilegia formosa and Aquilegia pubescens.

    Hodges, S. A.; Arnold, M L

    1994-01-01

    Habitat preference and pollination syndrome have been suggested as major factors in reproductive isolation among plant species. The columbine genus Aquilegia contains species that have been used as classic examples of reproductive isolation due to ecological and floral factors. In this analysis Aquilegia formosa, Aquilegia pubescens, and natural hybrid populations between these two species were assayed for genetic and morphological variation. Clinal variation was evident for three "random amp...

  9. Clathrin and HA2 adaptors: effects of potassium depletion, hypertonic medium, and cytosol acidification

    1993-01-01

    The effects of methods known to perturb endocytosis from clathrin- coated pits on the localization of clathrin and HA2 adaptors in HEp-2 carcinoma cells have been studied by immunofluorescence and ultrastructural immunogold microscopy, using internalization of transferrin as a functional assay. Potassium depletion, as well as incubation in hypertonic medium, remove membrane-associated clathrin lattices: flat clathrin lattices and coated pits from the plasma membrane, and clathrin-coated vesic...

  10. Floral homeotic C function genes repress specific B function genes in the carpel whorl of the basal eudicot California poppy (Eschscholzia californica

    Yellina Aravinda L

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The floral homeotic C function gene AGAMOUS (AG confers stamen and carpel identity and is involved in the regulation of floral meristem termination in Arabidopsis. Arabidopsis ag mutants show complete homeotic conversions of stamens into petals and carpels into sepals as well as indeterminacy of the floral meristem. Gene function analysis in model core eudicots and the monocots rice and maize suggest a conserved function for AG homologs in angiosperms. At the same time gene phylogenies reveal a complex history of gene duplications and repeated subfunctionalization of paralogs. Results EScaAG1 and EScaAG2, duplicate AG homologs in the basal eudicot Eschscholzia californica show a high degree of similarity in sequence and expression, although EScaAG2 expression is lower than EScaAG1 expression. Functional studies employing virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS demonstrate that knock down of EScaAG1 and 2 function leads to homeotic conversion of stamens into petaloid structures and defects in floral meristem termination. However, carpels are transformed into petaloid organs rather than sepaloid structures. We also show that a reduction of EScaAG1 and EScaAG2 expression leads to significantly increased expression of a subset of floral homeotic B genes. Conclusions This work presents expression and functional analysis of the two basal eudicot AG homologs. The reduction of EScaAG1 and 2 functions results in the change of stamen to petal identity and a transformation of the central whorl organ identity from carpel into petal identity. Petal identity requires the presence of the floral homeotic B function and our results show that the expression of a subset of B function genes extends into the central whorl when the C function is reduced. We propose a model for the evolution of B function regulation by C function suggesting that the mode of B function gene regulation found in Eschscholzia is ancestral and the C-independent regulation as

  11. Scents as Floral Defence : Impact on Species and Communities, Mechanisms and Ecological Consequences

    Junker, Robert R

    2010-01-01

    Floral scents are compositions of diverse volatile substances. Despite the chemical complexity, the interpretation of their ecological relevance was mostly confined to the attractive function facilitating interactions with pollinators. However, the negative impact on plants’ reproduction by non-pollinating flower visitors is pronounced and demands floral adaptations that exclude antagonists. The aim of this dissertation was to explore the defensive properties of floral odours and to imbed the...

  12. Relative floral density of an invasive plant affects pollinator foraging behaviour on a native plant

    Amy Marie Iler; Karen Goodell

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between invasive and native plants for pollinators vary from competition to facilitation of pollination of native plants. Theory predicts that relative floral densities should account for some of this variation in outcomes, with facilitation at low floral densities and competition at high floral densities of the invader. We tested this prediction by quantifying pollination and female reproductive success of a native herb, Geranium maculatum, in three experimental arrays that vari...

  13. The dual role of floral traits: Pollinator attraction and plant defense

    Irwin, R. E.; Adler, L.S.; Brody, A. K.

    2004-01-01

    Plants are under siege from a diversity of enemies that consume both leaf and floral parts. Plants resist damage to leaves in a variety of ways, and we now have a rich literature documenting how plants defend themselves against herbivore attack. In contrast, the mechanisms by which plants resist enemies that consume floral parts or resources are much less known, even though damage to floral tissue usually has tighter links to plant fitness than damage to leaf tissue. Many plants experience ne...

  14. UFO in the Arabidopsis inflorescence apex is required for floral-meristem identity and bract suppression.

    Hepworth, Shelley R; Klenz, Jennifer E; Haughn, George W

    2006-03-01

    The UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) gene of Arabidopsis encodes an F-box protein required for the determination of floral-organ and floral-meristem identity. Mutation of UFO leads to dramatic changes in floral-organ type which are well-characterized whereas inflorescence defects are more subtle and less understood. These defects include an increase in the number of secondary inflorescences, nodes that alternate between forming flowers and secondary inflorescences, and nodes in which a single flower is subtended by a bract. Here, we show how inflorescence defects correlate with the abnormal development of floral primordia and establish a temporal requirement for UFO in this process. At the inflorescence apex of ufo mutants, newly formed primordia are initially bract-like. Expression of the floral-meristem identity genes LFY and AP1 are confined to a relatively small adaxial region of these primordia with expression of the bract-identity marker FIL observed in cells that comprise the balance of the primordia. Proliferation of cells in the adaxial region of these early primordia is delayed by several nodes such that primordia appear "chimeric" at several nodes, having visible floral and bract components. However, by late stage 2 of floral development, growth of the bract generally ceases and is overtaken by development of the floral primordium. This abnormal pattern of floral meristem development is not rescued by expression of UFO from the AP1 promoter, indicating that UFO is required prior to AP1 activation for normal development of floral primordia. We propose that UFO and LFY are jointly required in the inflorescence meristem to both promote floral meristem development and inhibit, in a non-cell autonomous manner, growth of the bract. PMID:16244866

  15. Relationship between floral colour and pollinator composition in four plant communities

    Reverté Saiz, Sara; Bosch Gras, Jordi; Retana Alumbreros, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Pollinators use a variety of floral cues to locate resources, but the relative importance of these different cues on pollinator foraging decisions is unclear. However, floral colour is undoubtedly one of the most important, as evidenced in previous works revealing the importance of floral colour on pollinator choices and determining flower visitor composition. Our purpose is to establish whether there is a relationship between flower colour and pollinator composition in natural communities. W...

  16. Floral volatile alleles can contribute to pollinator-mediated reproductive isolation in monkeyflowers (Mimulus)

    Byers, Kelsey J.R.P.; Vela, James P.; Peng, Foen; Riffell, Jeffrey A.; Bradshaw, H D

    2014-01-01

    Pollinator-mediated reproductive isolation is a major factor in driving the diversification of flowering plants. Studies of floral traits involved in reproductive isolation have focused nearly exclusively on visual signals, such as flower color. The role of less obvious signals, such as floral scent, has been studied only recently. In particular, the genetics of floral volatiles involved in mediating differential pollinator visitation remains unknown. The bumblebee-pollinated Mimulus lewisii ...

  17. Convergent evolution of floral signals underlies the success of Neotropical orchids.

    Papadopulos A.S.; Powell M.P.; Pupulin F.; Warner J.; Hawkins J.A.; Salamin N.; Chittka L.; Williams N.H.; Whitten W.M.; Loader D.; Valente L.M.; Chase M.W.; Savolainen V.

    2013-01-01

    The great majority of plant species in the tropics require animals to achieve pollination, but the exact role of floral signals in attraction of animal pollinators is often debated. Many plants provide a floral reward to attract a guild of pollinators, and it has been proposed that floral signals of non-rewarding species may converge on those of rewarding species to exploit the relationship of the latter with their pollinators. In the orchid family (Orchidaceae), pollination is almost univers...

  18. Floral symmetry genes and the origin and maintenance of zygomorphy in a plant-pollinator mutualism

    Zhang, Wenheng; Kramer, Elena M.; Davis, Charles Cavender

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of floral zygomorphy is an important innovation in flowering plants and is thought to arise principally from specialization on various insect pollinators. Floral morphology of neotropical Malpighiaceae is distinctive and highly conserved, especially with regard to symmetry, and is thought to be caused by selection by its oil-bee pollinators. We sought to characterize the genetic basis of floral zygomorphy in Malpighiaceae by investigating CYCLOIDEA2-like (CYC2-like) genes, which...

  19. The Dynamics of Soybean Leaf and Shoot Apical Meristem Transcriptome Undergoing Floral Initiation Process

    Wong, Chui E; Mohan B. Singh; Bhalla, Prem L

    2013-01-01

    Flowering process governs seed set and thus affects agricultural productivity. Soybean, a major legume crop, requires short-day photoperiod conditions for flowering. While leaf-derived signal(s) are essential for the photoperiod-induced floral initiation process at the shoot apical meristem, molecular events associated with early floral transition stages in either leaves or shoot apical meristems are not well understood. To provide novel insights into the molecular basis of floral initiation,...

  20. Cytokinin pathway mediates APETALA1 function in the establishment of determinate floral meristems in Arabidopsis

    Han, Yingying; Zhang, Cui; Yang, Haibian; Jiao, Yuling

    2014-01-01

    Indeterminate growth of shoots continually produces new tissues from the dividing apical meristem. In contrast, determinate growth of the floral meristem produces flowers of a particular size and form by specification of floral organs and termination of stem-cell divisions in the meristem. To achieve this specification, floral organs do not form meristems in organ axils, although leaves can form axillary meristems and thus have reiterative developmental potential. In this study, we found that...

  1. New Insights to Clathrin and Adaptor Protein 2 for the Design and Development of Therapeutic Strategies

    Ebbe Toftgaard Poulsen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP has been extensively studied for its role as the precursor of the β-amyloid protein (Aβ in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. However, our understanding of the normal function of APP is still patchy. Emerging evidence indicates that a dysfunction in APP trafficking and degradation can be responsible for neuronal deficits and progressive degeneration in humans. We recently reported that the Y682 mutation in the 682YENPTY687 domain of APP affects its binding to specific adaptor proteins and leads to its anomalous trafficking, to defects in the autophagy machinery and to neuronal degeneration. In order to identify adaptors that influence APP function, we performed pull-down experiments followed by quantitative mass spectrometry (MS on hippocampal tissue extracts of three month-old mice incubated with either the 682YENPTY687 peptide, its mutated form, 682GENPTY687 or its phosphorylated form, 682pYENPTY687. Our experiments resulted in the identification of two proteins involved in APP internalization and trafficking: Clathrin heavy chain (hc and its Adaptor Protein 2 (AP-2. Overall our results consolidate and refine the importance of Y682 in APP normal functions from an animal model of premature aging and dementia. Additionally, they open the perspective to consider Clathrin hc and AP-2 as potential targets for the design and development of new therapeutic strategies.

  2. The adaptor molecule Trif contributes to murine host defense during Leptospiral infection.

    Jayaraman, Priya A; Devlin, Amy A; Miller, Jennifer C; Scholle, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease and is caused by pathogenic species of the Leptospira genus, including Leptospira interrogans (L. interrogans). Humans, domestic and wild animals are susceptible to acute or chronic infection. The innate immune response is a critical defense mechanism against Leptospira interrogans, and has been investigated in mouse models. Murine Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been shown to be key factors in sensing and responding to L. interrogans infection. Specifically, TLR2, TLR4 and the TLR adaptor molecule MyD88 are essential for host defense against L. interrogans; however, the role of the TLR adaptor molecule TIR-domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon β (TRIF) in the response to L. interrogans has not been previously determined. In the present study, TRIF was found to play an important role during leptospiral infection. Following challenge with L. interrogans, Trif(-/-) mice exhibited delayed weight gain compared to wild-type mice. Moreover, Trif(-/-) mice exhibited an increase in L. interrogans burden in the kidneys, lungs, and blood at early time points (less than 7days post infection). Multiple components of the innate immune responses were dampened in response to leptospiral infection including transcription and production of cytokines, and the humoral response, which suggested that TRIF contributes to expression and production of cytokines important for the host defense against L. interrogans. PMID:27259371

  3. Heritability of floral volatiles and pleiotropic responses to artificial selection in Brassica rapa.

    Zu, Pengjuan; Blanckenhorn, Wolf U; Schiestl, Florian P

    2016-02-01

    The evolution of the vast diversity of floral volatiles is little understood, although they serve fundamental functions, such as pollinator attraction and herbivore deterrence. Floral volatiles are often species specific, yet highly variable and sensitive to environmental factors. To date, nothing is known about the heritability of floral volatiles, and whether individual compounds can evolve independently or solely in concert with the whole volatile bouquet. We conducted bi-directional artificial selection on four target floral volatiles to estimate heritability and correlated pleiotropic responses in the wild turnip (Brassica rapa). The realized heritability of the four target volatiles ranged from 20% to 45%. The average narrow-sense heritability of all 13 analyzed floral volatiles was 18% based on parent-offspring regressions. There were pleiotropic effects of the selected floral volatile compounds on other constituents of the floral scent bouquet, on flowering time and on some morphological traits. We found that the whole floral scent bouquet changed, even when there was selection only on single compounds, with the overall phenotypic covariance being unaffected. Our study demonstrates that floral scent can evolve rapidly under phenotypic selection, but with additional correlated responses in traits that are not direct targets of selection. PMID:26391626

  4. Macroevolutionary patterns of ultraviolet floral pigmentation explained by geography and associated bioclimatic factors.

    Koski, Matthew H; Ashman, Tia-Lynn

    2016-07-01

    Selection driven by biotic interactions can generate variation in floral traits. Abiotic selection, however, also contributes to floral diversity, especially with respect to patterns of pigmentation. Combining comparative studies of floral pigmentation and geography can reveal the bioclimatic factors that may drive macroevolutionary patterns of floral color. We create a molecular phylogeny and measure ultraviolet (UV) floral pattern for 177 species in the Potentilleae tribe (Rosaceae). Species are similar in flower shape and visible color but vary in UV floral pattern. We use comparative approaches to determine whether UV pigmentation variation is associated with geography and/or bioclimatic features (UV-B, precipitation, temperature). Floral UV pattern was present in half of the species, while others were uniformly UV-absorbing. Phylogenetic signal was detected for presence/absence of pattern, but among patterned species, quantitative variation in UV-absorbing area was evolutionarily labile. Uniformly UV-absorbing species tended to experience higher UV-B irradiance. Patterned species occurring at higher altitudes had larger UV-absorbing petal areas, corresponding with low temperature and high UV exposure. This analysis expands our understanding of the covariation of UV-B irradiance and UV floral pigmentation from within species to that among species, and supports the view that abiotic selection is associated with floral diversification among species. PMID:26987355

  5. Floral gradient in flowering tobacco in relation to free amino acids

    CHENYONGNING; WENANLI

    1993-01-01

    By employing TCLs (thin cell layers) culture, the floral gradient in flowering tobacco of different developmental stages was confirmed. The TCLs from early flowering tobacco regenerated more floral buds than those from the tobacco plants in full blooming or fruiting stages. Analysis of free amino acid levels revealed the acropetal gradient of Pro in flowering tobacco stem. L-Pro. L-Trp. D,L-Met and L-Arg were respectively added into the culture medium for testing their influence on floral bud formation from tobacco pedicel segments. Only L-Trp evidently enhanced the floral bud neoformation.

  6. Floral phenology, floral rewards and insect visitation in an ornamental species Geranium platypetalum Fisch. and C. A. Mey., Geraniaceae

    Marzena Masierowska

    2012-01-01

    This 4-year study examined the flowering pattern, floral display, nectar and pollen production as well as insect visitation to a perennial Geranium platypetalum Fisch. and C. A. Mey. G. platypetalum bloomed from the end of May until the end of June. The pattern of flowering shows the skewed distribution with a tendency towards a more symmetrical curve. The flower display size fluctuated during the flowering season. The most intense blooming fell in the 2nd and 3rd flowering week. The flowers ...

  7. Floral gene resources from basal angiosperms for comparative genomics research

    Zhang Xiaohong

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Floral Genome Project was initiated to bridge the genomic gap between the most broadly studied plant model systems. Arabidopsis and rice, although now completely sequenced and under intensive comparative genomic investigation, are separated by at least 125 million years of evolutionary time, and cannot in isolation provide a comprehensive perspective on structural and functional aspects of flowering plant genome dynamics. Here we discuss new genomic resources available to the scientific community, comprising cDNA libraries and Expressed Sequence Tag (EST sequences for a suite of phylogenetically basal angiosperms specifically selected to bridge the evolutionary gaps between model plants and provide insights into gene content and genome structure in the earliest flowering plants. Results Random sequencing of cDNAs from representatives of phylogenetically important eudicot, non-grass monocot, and gymnosperm lineages has so far (as of 12/1/04 generated 70,514 ESTs and 48,170 assembled unigenes. Efficient sorting of EST sequences into putative gene families based on whole Arabidopsis/rice proteome comparison has permitted ready identification of cDNA clones for finished sequencing. Preliminarily, (i proportions of functional categories among sequenced floral genes seem representative of the entire Arabidopsis transcriptome, (ii many known floral gene homologues have been captured, and (iii phylogenetic analyses of ESTs are providing new insights into the process of gene family evolution in relation to the origin and diversification of the angiosperms. Conclusion Initial comparisons illustrate the utility of the EST data sets toward discovery of the basic floral transcriptome. These first findings also afford the opportunity to address a number of conspicuous evolutionary genomic questions, including reproductive organ transcriptome overlap between angiosperms and gymnosperms, genome-wide duplication history, lineage

  8. Transmembrane adaptor proteins in membrane microdomains: important regulators of immunoreceptor signaling

    Hořejší, Václav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 29, 1-2 (2004), s. 43-49. ISSN 0165-2478 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : immunoreceptor * signalling Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 2.136, year: 2004

  9. Adaptor protein sorting nexin 17 regulates amyloid precursor protein trafficking and processing in the early endosomes

    Lee, Jiyeon; Retamal, Claudio; Cuitino, Loreto; Caruano-Yzermans, Amy; Shin, Jung-Eun; van Kerkhof, Peter; Marzolo, Maria-Paz; Bu, Guojun

    2008-01-01

    Accumulation of extracellular amyloid beta peptide (A beta), generated from amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing by beta- and gamma-secretases, is toxic to neurons and is central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. Production of A beta from APP is greatly affected by the subcellular loca

  10. A combinatorial F box protein directed pathway controls TRAF adaptor stability to regulate inflammation

    Chen, Bill B; Coon, Tiffany A.; Glasser, Jennifer R; McVerry, Bryan J.; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Yutong; Zou, Chunbin; Ellis, Bryon; Sciurba, Frank C.; Zhang, Yingze; Mallampalli, Rama K.

    2013-01-01

    Uncontrolled activation of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor (TRAF) proteins may result in profound tissue injury by linking surface signals to cytokine release. Here we show that a ubiquitin E3 ligase component, Fbxo3, potently stimulates cytokine secretion from human inflammatory cells by destabilizing a sentinel TRAF inhibitor, Fbxl2. Fbxo3 and TRAF protein in circulation positively correlated with cytokine responses in septic subjects and we furthermore identified a hypofun...