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Sample records for adaptor molecule grb2

  1. Crystal structure of the mammalian Grb2 adaptor.

    Maignan, S; Guilloteau, J P; Fromage, N; Arnoux, B; Becquart, J; Ducruix, A

    1995-04-14

    The mammalian growth factor receptor-binding protein Grb2 is an adaptor that mediates activation of guanine nucleotide exchange on Ras. Grb2 binds to the receptor through its SH2 domain and to the carboxyl-terminal domain of Son of sevenless through its two SH3 domains. It is thus a key element in the signal transduction pathway. The crystal structure of Grb2 was determined to 3.1 angstrom resolution. The asymmetric unit is composed of an embedded dimer. The interlaced junctions between the SH2 and SH3 domains bring the two adjacent faces of the SH3 domains in van der Waals contact but leave room for the binding of proline-rich peptides. PMID:7716522

  2. Gads (Grb2-related adaptor downstream of Shc) is required for BCR-ABL-mediated lymphoid leukemia

    Gillis, LC; Berry, DM; Minden, MD; McGlade, CJ; Barber, DL

    2016-01-01

    Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemias, including chronic myeloid leukemia and B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), are driven by the oncogenic BCR-ABL fusion protein. Animal modeling experiments utilizing retroviral transduction and subsequent bone marrow transplantation have demonstrated that BCR-ABL generates both myeloid and lymphoid disease in mice receiving whole bone marrow transduced with BCR-ABL. Y177 of BCR-ABL is critical to the development of myeloid disease, and phosphorylation of Y177 has been shown to induce GRB2 binding to BCR-ABL, followed by activation of the Ras and phosphoinositide 3 kinase signaling pathways. We show that the GRB2-related adapter protein, GADS, also associates with BCR-ABL, specifically through Y177 and demonstrate that BCR-ABL-driven lymphoid disease requires Gads. BCR-ABL transduction of Gads(−/−) bone marrow results in short latency myeloid disease within 3–4 weeks of transplant, while wild-type mice succumb to both a longer latency lymphoid and myeloid diseases. We report that GADS mediates a unique BCR-ABL complex with SLP-76 in BCR-ABL-positive cell lines and B-ALL patient samples. These data suggest that GADS mediates lymphoid disease downstream of BCR-ABL through the recruitment of specific signaling intermediates. PMID:23399893

  3. Association between receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase RPTPalpha and the Grb2 adaptor. Dual Src homology (SH) 2/SH3 domain requirement and functional consequences

    Su, J; Yang, L T; Sap, J

    1996-01-01

    binding site in RPTPalpha was studied further by expression of wild type or mutant RPTPalpha proteins in PC12 cells. In these cells, wild type RPTPalpha interferes with acidic fibroblast growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth; this effect requires both the catalytic activity and the Grb2 binding Tyr798...

  4. The adaptor molecule CARD9 is essential for tuberculosis control

    Dorhoi, Anca; Desel, Christiane; Yeremeev, Vladimir; Pradl, Lydia; Brinkmann, Volker; Mollenkopf, Hans J; Hanke, Karin; Gross, Olaf; Ruland, Jürgen; Stefan H. E. Kaufmann

    2010-01-01

    The cross talk between host and pathogen starts with recognition of bacterial signatures through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which mobilize downstream signaling cascades. We investigated the role of the cytosolic adaptor caspase recruitment domain family, member 9 (CARD9) in tuberculosis. This adaptor was critical for full activation of innate immunity by converging signals downstream of multiple PRRs. Card9(-/-) mice succumbed early after aerosol infection, with higher mycobacteria...

  5. Short-hairpin RNA-mediated stable silencing of Grb2 impairs cell growth and DNA synthesis

    Grb2 is an SH2-SH3 protein adaptor responsible for linking growth factor receptors with intracellular signaling cascades. To study the role of Grb2 in cell growth, we have generated a new COS7 cell line (COS7shGrb2), based on RNAi technology, as null mutations in mammalian Grb2 genes are lethal in early development. This novel cell line continuously expresses a short hairpin RNA that targets endogenous Grb2. Stable COS7shGrb2 cells had the shGrb2 integrated into the genomic DNA and carried on SiL construct (made refractory to the shRNA-mediated interference), but not with an SH2-deficient mutant (R86K). Thus, a viable knock-down and rescue protocol has demonstrated that Grb2 is crucial for cell proliferation

  6. The adaptor molecule Trif contributes to murine host defense during Leptospiral infection.

    Jayaraman, Priya A; Devlin, Amy A; Miller, Jennifer C; Scholle, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease and is caused by pathogenic species of the Leptospira genus, including Leptospira interrogans (L. interrogans). Humans, domestic and wild animals are susceptible to acute or chronic infection. The innate immune response is a critical defense mechanism against Leptospira interrogans, and has been investigated in mouse models. Murine Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been shown to be key factors in sensing and responding to L. interrogans infection. Specifically, TLR2, TLR4 and the TLR adaptor molecule MyD88 are essential for host defense against L. interrogans; however, the role of the TLR adaptor molecule TIR-domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon β (TRIF) in the response to L. interrogans has not been previously determined. In the present study, TRIF was found to play an important role during leptospiral infection. Following challenge with L. interrogans, Trif(-/-) mice exhibited delayed weight gain compared to wild-type mice. Moreover, Trif(-/-) mice exhibited an increase in L. interrogans burden in the kidneys, lungs, and blood at early time points (less than 7days post infection). Multiple components of the innate immune responses were dampened in response to leptospiral infection including transcription and production of cytokines, and the humoral response, which suggested that TRIF contributes to expression and production of cytokines important for the host defense against L. interrogans. PMID:27259371

  7. Transmembrane adaptor molecules: a new category of lymphoid-cell markers.

    Tedoldi, Sara; Paterson, Jennifer C; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Natkunam, Yasodha; Rüdiger, Thomas; Angelisova, Pavla; Du, Ming Q; Roberton, Helen; Roncador, Giovanna; Sanchez, Lydia; Pozzobon, Michela; Masir, Noraidah; Barry, Richard; Pileri, Stefano; Mason, David Y; Marafioti, Teresa; Horejsí, Václav

    2006-01-01

    Transmembrane adaptor proteins (of which 7 have been identified so far) are involved in receptor signaling in immune cells. They have only a short extracellular region, with most of the molecule comprising a substantial intracytoplasmic region carrying multiple tyrosine residues that can be phosphorylated by Src- or Syk-family kinases. In this paper, we report an immunohistologic study of 6 of these molecules in normal and neoplastic human tissue sections and show that they are restricted to subpopulations of lymphoid cells, being present in either T cells (LAT, LIME, and TRIM), B cells (NTAL), or subsets of both cell types (PAG and SIT). Their expression in neoplastic lymphoid cells broadly reflects that of normal lymphoid tissue, including the positivity of plasma cells and myeloma/plasmacytoma for LIME, NTAL, PAG, and SIT. However, this study also revealed some reactions that may be of diagnostic/prognostic value. For example, lymphocytic lymphoma and mantle-cell lymphoma showed similar profiles but differed clearly from follicle-center lymphoma, whereas PAG tended to be selectively expressed in germinal center-derived subsets of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. These molecules represent a potentially important addition to the panel of immunophenotypic markers detectable in routine biopsies that can be used in hematopathologic studies. PMID:16160011

  8. Grb2 Is Important for T Cell Development, Th Cell Differentiation, and Induction of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Radtke, Daniel; Lacher, Sonja M; Szumilas, Nadine; Sandrock, Lena; Ackermann, Jochen; Nitschke, Lars; Zinser, Elisabeth

    2016-04-01

    The small adaptor protein growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2) modulates and integrates signals from receptors on cellular surfaces in inner signaling pathways. In murine T cells, Grb2 is crucial for amplification of TCR signaling. T cell-specific Grb2(fl/fl) Lckcre(tg) Grb2-deficient mice show reduced T cell numbers due to impaired negative and positive selection. In this study, we found that T cell numbers in Grb2(fl/fl) CD4cre(tg) mice were normal in the thymus and were only slightly affected in the periphery. Ex vivo analysis of CD4(+) Th cell populations revealed an increased amount of Th1 cells within the CD4(+) population of Grb2(fl/fl) CD4cre(tg) mice. Additionally, Grb2-deficient T cells showed a greater potential to differentiate into Th17 cells in vitro. To test whether these changes in Th cell differentiation potential rendered Grb2(fl/fl) CD4cre(tg) mice more prone to inflammatory diseases, we used the murine Th1 cell- and Th17 cell-driven model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In contrast to our expectations, Grb2(fl/fl) CD4cre(tg) mice developed a milder form of EAE. The impaired EAE disease can be explained by the reduced proliferation rate of Grb2-deficient CD4(+) T cells upon stimulation with IL-2 or upon activation by allogeneic dendritic cells, because the activation of T cells by dendritic cells and the subsequent T cell proliferation are known to be crucial factors for the induction of EAE. In summary, Grb2-deficient T cells show defects in T cell development, increased Th1 and Th17 cell differentiation capacities, and impaired proliferation after activation by dendritic cells, which likely reduce the clinical symptoms of EAE. PMID:26921310

  9. The adaptor molecule Nck localizes the WAVE complex to promote actin polymerization during CEACAM3-mediated phagocytosis of bacteria.

    Stefan Pils

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CEACAM3 is a granulocyte receptor mediating the opsonin-independent recognition and phagocytosis of human-restricted CEACAM-binding bacteria. CEACAM3 function depends on an intracellular immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM-like sequence that is tyrosine phosphorylated by Src family kinases upon receptor engagement. The phosphorylated ITAM-like sequence triggers GTP-loading of Rac by directly associating with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF Vav. Rac stimulation in turn is critical for actin cytoskeleton rearrangements that generate lamellipodial protrusions and lead to bacterial uptake. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In our present study we provide biochemical and microscopic evidence that the adaptor proteins Nck1 and Nck2, but not CrkL, Grb2 or SLP-76, bind to tyrosine phosphorylated CEACAM3. The association is phosphorylation-dependent and requires the Nck SH2 domain. Overexpression of the isolated Nck1 SH2 domain, RNAi-mediated knock-down of Nck1, or genetic deletion of Nck1 and Nck2 interfere with CEACAM3-mediated bacterial internalization and with the formation of lamellipodial protrusions. Nck is constitutively associated with WAVE2 and directs the actin nucleation promoting WAVE complex to tyrosine phosphorylated CEACAM3. In turn, dominant-negative WAVE2 as well as shRNA-mediated knock-down of WAVE2 or the WAVE-complex component Nap1 reduce internalization of bacteria. CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide novel mechanistic insight into CEACAM3-initiated phagocytosis. We suggest that the CEACAM3 ITAM-like sequence is optimized to co-ordinate a minimal set of cellular factors needed to efficiently trigger actin-based lamellipodial protrusions and rapid pathogen engulfment.

  10. Chromosome locations of genes encoding human signal transduction adapter proteins, Nck (NCK), Shc (SHC1), and Grb2 (GRB2)

    Huebner, K; Kastury, K; Druck, T;

    1994-01-01

    Abnormalities due to chromosomal aberration or point mutation in gene products of growth factor receptors or in ras gene products, which lie on the same signaling pathway, can cause disease in animals and humans. Thus, it can be important to determine chromosomal map positions of genes encoding...... "adapter" proteins, which are involved in transducing signals from receptor tyrosine kinases to downstream signal recipients such as ras, because adaptor protein genes could also, logically, serve as targets of mutation, rearrangement, or other aberration in disease. Therefore, DNAs from panels of rodent-human...... hybrids carrying defined complements of human chromosomes were assayed for the presence of the cognate genes for NCK, SHC, and GRB2, three SH2 or SH2/SH3 (Src homology 2 and 3) domain-containing adapter proteins. Additionally, NCK and SHC genes were more narrowly localized by chromosomal in situ...

  11. Transmembrane adaptor molecules: a new category of lymphoid-cell markers

    Tedoldi, S.; Paterson, J.C.; Hansmann, M.-L.; Natkunam, Y.; Rüdiger, T.; Angelisová, Pavla; Du, M.Q.; Roberton, H.; Roncador, G.; Sanchez, L.; Pozzobon, M.; Masir, N.; Barry, R.; Pileri, S.; Mason, D.Y.; Marafioti, T.; Hořejší, Václav

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 1 (2006), s. 213-221. ISSN 0006-4971 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : transmembrane adaptors * PAG * LIME Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 10.370, year: 2006

  12. Adaptor protein complexes AP-1 and AP-3 are required by the HHV-7 Immunoevasin U21 for rerouting of class I MHC molecules to the lysosomal compartment.

    Lisa A Kimpler

    Full Text Available The human herpesvirus-7 (HHV-7 U21 gene product binds to class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules and reroutes them to a lysosomal compartment. Trafficking of integral membrane proteins to lysosomes is mediated through cytoplasmic sorting signals that recruit heterotetrameric clathrin adaptor protein (AP complexes, which in turn mediate protein sorting in post-Golgi vesicular transport. Since U21 can mediate rerouting of class I molecules to lysosomes even when lacking its cytoplasmic tail, we hypothesize the existence of a cellular protein that contains the lysosomal sorting information required to escort class I molecules to the lysosomal compartment. If such a protein exists, we expect that it might recruit clathrin adaptor protein complexes as a means of lysosomal sorting. Here we describe experiments demonstrating that the μ adaptins from AP-1 and AP-3 are involved in U21-mediated trafficking of class I molecules to lysosomes. These experiments support the idea that a cellular protein(s is necessary for U21-mediated lysosomal sorting of class I molecules. We also examine the impact of transient versus chronic knockdown of these adaptor protein complexes, and show that the few remaining μ subunits in the cells are eventually able to reroute class I molecules to lysosomes.

  13. Regulation of ITAM adaptor molecules and their receptors by inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT signalling during late stage osteoclast differentiation

    Highlights: ► Calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors FK506 and VIVIT treated human PBMC derived osteoclasts in vitro. ► Differential regulation of ITAM receptors and adaptor molecules by calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors. ► FK506 and VIVIT suppress ITAM factors during late phase osteoclast differentiation. -- Abstract: Osteoclasts are specialised bone resorptive cells responsible for both physiological and pathological bone loss. Osteoclast differentiation and activity is dependent upon receptor activator NF-kappa-B ligand (RANKL) interacting with its receptor RANK to induce the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1). The immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-dependent pathway has been identified as a co-stimulatory pathway in osteoclasts. Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) and triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells (TREM2) are essential receptors that pair with adaptor molecules Fc receptor common gamma chain (FcRγ) and DNAX-activating protein 12 kDa (DAP12) respectively to induce calcium signalling. Treatment with calcineurin-NFAT inhibitors, Tacrolimus (FK506) and the 11R-VIVIT (VIVIT) peptide, reduces NFATc1 expression consistent with a reduction in osteoclast differentiation and activity. This study aimed to investigate the effects of inhibiting calcineurin-NFAT signalling on the expression of ITAM factors and late stage osteoclast genes including cathepsin K (CathK), Beta 3 integrin (β3) and Annexin VIII (AnnVIII). Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were differentiated with RANKL and macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) over 10 days in the presence or absence of FK506 or VIVIT. Osteoclast formation (as assessed by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)) and activity (assessed by dentine pit resorption) were significantly reduced with treatment. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis demonstrated that FK506 treatment

  14. Regulation of ITAM adaptor molecules and their receptors by inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT signalling during late stage osteoclast differentiation

    Zawawi, M.S.F. [Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) (Malaysia); Discipline of Anatomy and Pathology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Dharmapatni, A.A.S.S.K.; Cantley, M.D. [Discipline of Anatomy and Pathology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); McHugh, K.P. [University of Florida, College of Dentistry, Fl (United States); Haynes, D.R. [Discipline of Anatomy and Pathology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Crotti, T.N., E-mail: tania.crotti@adelaide.edu.au [Discipline of Anatomy and Pathology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia)

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors FK506 and VIVIT treated human PBMC derived osteoclasts in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differential regulation of ITAM receptors and adaptor molecules by calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FK506 and VIVIT suppress ITAM factors during late phase osteoclast differentiation. -- Abstract: Osteoclasts are specialised bone resorptive cells responsible for both physiological and pathological bone loss. Osteoclast differentiation and activity is dependent upon receptor activator NF-kappa-B ligand (RANKL) interacting with its receptor RANK to induce the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1). The immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-dependent pathway has been identified as a co-stimulatory pathway in osteoclasts. Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) and triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells (TREM2) are essential receptors that pair with adaptor molecules Fc receptor common gamma chain (FcR{gamma}) and DNAX-activating protein 12 kDa (DAP12) respectively to induce calcium signalling. Treatment with calcineurin-NFAT inhibitors, Tacrolimus (FK506) and the 11R-VIVIT (VIVIT) peptide, reduces NFATc1 expression consistent with a reduction in osteoclast differentiation and activity. This study aimed to investigate the effects of inhibiting calcineurin-NFAT signalling on the expression of ITAM factors and late stage osteoclast genes including cathepsin K (CathK), Beta 3 integrin ({beta}3) and Annexin VIII (AnnVIII). Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were differentiated with RANKL and macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) over 10 days in the presence or absence of FK506 or VIVIT. Osteoclast formation (as assessed by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)) and activity (assessed by dentine pit resorption) were significantly reduced with treatment. Quantitative real

  15. Preliminary crystallographic characterization of the Grb2 SH2 domain in complex with a FAK-derived phosphotyrosyl peptide

    Crystals of the Grb2 SH2 domain in complex with a phosphotyrosyl peptide corresponding to residues 921–930 of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) have been obtained using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique. Data have been collected to 2.49 Å resolution. Growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2) is an adaptor protein with a single SH2 domain that specifically binds to focal adhesion kinase (FAK) when residue Tyr925 of FAK is phosphorylated. The Grb2–FAK interaction is associated with cellular integrin-activated signal transduction events leading to the activation of the Ras-MAPK pathway. Crystals of the Grb2 SH2 domain in complex with a phosphopeptide corresponding to residues 921–930 of FAK have been obtained using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique. The crystals belonged to space group P3121, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 102.7, c = 127.6 Å, α = β = 90.0, γ = 120.0°. A diffraction data set was collected from a flash-cooled crystal at 100 K to 2.49 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. Structure determination by molecular replacement and analysis of the detailed structure of the complex are currently in progress

  16. Structural and biophysical investigation of the interaction of a mutant Grb2 SH2 domain (W121G) with its cognate phosphopeptide.

    Papaioannou, Danai; Geibel, Sebastian; Kunze, Micha B A; Kay, Christopher W M; Waksman, Gabriel

    2016-03-01

    The adaptor protein Grb2 is a key element of mitogenetically important signaling pathways. With its SH2 domain it binds to upstream targets while its SH3 domains bind to downstream proteins thereby relaying signals from the cell membranes to the nucleus. The Grb2 SH2 domain binds to its targets by recognizing a phosphotyrosine (pY) in a pYxNx peptide motif, requiring an Asn at the +2 position C-terminal to the pY with the residue either side of this Asn being hydrophobic. Structural analysis of the Grb2 SH2 domain in complex with its cognate peptide has shown that the peptide adopts a unique β-turn conformation, unlike the extended conformation that phosphopeptides adopt when bound to other SH2 domains. TrpEF1 (W121) is believed to force the peptide into this unusual conformation conferring this unique specificity to the Grb2 SH2 domain. Using X-ray crystallography, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), we describe here a series of experiments that explore the role of TrpEF1 in determining the specificity of the Grb2 SH2 domain. Our results demonstrate that the ligand does not adopt a pre-organized structure before binding to the SH2 domain, rather it is the interaction between the two that imposes the hairpin loop to the peptide. Furthermore, we find that the peptide adopts a similar structure when bound to both the wild-type Grb2 SH2 domain and a TrpEF1Gly mutant. This suggests that TrpEF1 is not the determining factor for the conformation of the phosphopeptide. PMID:26645482

  17. Purification, stabilization, and crystallization of a modular protein: Grb2.

    Guilloteau, J P; Fromage, N; Ries-Kautt, M; Reboul, S; Bocquet, D; Dubois, H; Faucher, D; Colonna, C; Ducruix, A; Becquart, J

    1996-05-01

    We report here the purification and the crystallization of the modular protein Grb2. The protein was expressed as a fusion with glutathione-S-transferase and purified by affinity chromatography on glutathione agarose. It was apparent from reverse phase chromatography that the purified protein was conformationally unstable. Instability was overcome by the addition of 100 mM arginine to the buffers. Because Grb2 appeared to be extremely sensitive to oxidation, crystallization experiments were performed with a dialysis button technique involving daily addition of fresh DTT to the reservoirs. The presence of 8 to 14% glycerol was necessary to obtain monocrystals. These results are discussed in relation with the modular nature of Grb2. PMID:8727323

  18. Functional interaction of megalin with the megalinbinding protein (MegBP), a novel tetratrico peptide repeat-containing adaptor molecule.

    Petersen, Helle Heibroch; Hilpert, Jan; Militz, Daniel; Zandler, Valerie; Jacobsen, Christian; Roebroek, Anton J M; Willnow, Thomas E

    2003-02-01

    Megalin is a member of the LDL receptor gene family that plays an important role in forebrain development and in cellular vitamin D metabolism through endocytic uptake of vitamin D metabolites. Similar to other receptors in this gene family, megalin is believed to functionally interact with intracellular proteins through adaptors that bind to the receptor tail and regulate its endocytic and signal transducing activities. Using yeast two-hybrid screens, we identified a novel scaffold protein with tetratrico peptide repeats, the megalin-binding protein (MegBP) that associates with the receptor. The binding site of MegBP was mapped to an N-terminal region on the receptor tail harboring a proline-rich peptide element. MegBP binding did not block the endocytic activity of the receptor; however, overexpression resulted in cellular lethality. In further screens, we identified proteins that bound to MegBP and thus might be recruited to the megalin tail. MegBP-interacting partners included several transcriptional regulators such as the SKI-interacting protein (SKIP), a co-activator of the vitamin D receptor. These finding suggest a model whereby megalin directly participates in transcriptional regulation through controlled sequestration or release of transcription factors via MegBP. PMID:12508107

  19. Grb2 depletion under non-stimulated conditions inhibits PTEN, promotes Akt-induced tumor formation and contributes to poor prognosis in ovarian cancer.

    Timsah, Z; Ahmed, Z; Ivan, C; Berrout, J; Gagea, M; Zhou, Y; Pena, G N A; Hu, X; Vallien, C; Kingsley, C V; Lu, Y; Hancock, J F; Liu, J; Gladden, A B; Mills, G B; Lopez-Berestein, G; Hung, M-C; Sood, A K; Bogdanov, M; Ladbury, J E

    2016-04-28

    In the absence of extracellular stimulation the adaptor protein growth factor receptor-bound protein (Grb2) and the phospholipase Plcγ1 compete for the same binding site on fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2). Reducing cellular Grb2 results in upregulation of Plcγ1 and depletion of the phospholipid PI(4,5)P2. The functional consequences of this event on signaling pathways are unknown. We show that the decrease in PI(4,5)P2 level under non-stimulated conditions inhibits PTEN activity leading to the aberrant activation of the oncoprotein Akt. This results in excessive cell proliferation and tumor progression in a xenograft mouse model. As well as defining a novel mechanism of Akt phosphorylation with important therapeutic consequences, we also demonstrate that differential expression levels of FGFR2, Plcγ1 and Grb2 correlate with patient survival. Oncogenesis through fluctuation in the expression levels of these proteins negates extracellular stimulation or mutation and defines them as novel prognostic markers in ovarian cancer. PMID:26212011

  20. Grb2 is regulated by foxd3 and has roles in preventing accumulation and aggregation of mutant huntingtin.

    Shounak Baksi

    Full Text Available Growth factor receptor protein binding protein 2 (Grb2 is known to be associated with intracellular growth and proliferation related signaling cascades. Huntingtin (Htt, a ubiquitously expressed protein, when mutated, forms toxic intracellular aggregates - the hallmark of Huntington's disease (HD. We observed an elevated expression of Grb2 in neuronal cells in animal and cell models of HD. Grb2 overexpression was predominantly regulated by the transcription factor Forkhead Box D3 (Foxd3. Exogenous expression of Grb2 also reduced aggregation of mutant Htt in Neuro2A cells. Grb2 is also known to interact with Htt, depending on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR activation. Grb2- mutant Htt interaction in the contrary, took place in vesicular structures, independent of EGFR activation that eventually merged with autophagosomes and activated the autophagy machinery helping in autophagosome and lysosome fusion. Grb2, with its emerging dual role, holds promise for a survival mechanism for HD.

  1. A high-content imaging workflow to study Grb2 signaling complexes by expression cloning.

    Freeman, Jamie; Kriston-Vizi, Janos; Seed, Brian; Ketteler, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Signal transduction by growth factor receptors is essential for cells to maintain proliferation and differentiation and requires tight control. Signal transduction is initiated by binding of an external ligand to a transmembrane receptor and activation of downstream signaling cascades. A key regulator of mitogenic signaling is Grb2, a modular protein composed of an internal SH2 (Src Homology 2) domain flanked by two SH3 domains that lacks enzymatic activity. Grb2 is constitutively associated with the GTPase Son-Of-Sevenless (SOS) via its N-terminal SH3 domain. The SH2 domain of Grb2 binds to growth factor receptors at phosphorylated tyrosine residues thus coupling receptor activation to the SOS-Ras-MAP kinase signaling cascade. In addition, other roles for Grb2 as a positive or negative regulator of signaling and receptor endocytosis have been described. The modular composition of Grb2 suggests that it can dock to a variety of receptors and transduce signals along a multitude of different pathways(1-3). Described here is a simple microscopy assay that monitors recruitment of Grb2 to the plasma membrane. It is adapted from an assay that measures changes in sub-cellular localization of green-fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Grb2 in response to a stimulus(4-6). Plasma membrane receptors that bind Grb2 such as activated Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) recruit GFP-Grb2 to the plasma membrane upon cDNA expression and subsequently relocate to endosomal compartments in the cell. In order to identify in vivo protein complexes of Grb2, this technique can be used to perform a genome-wide high-content screen based on changes in Grb2 sub-cellular localization. The preparation of cDNA expression clones, transfection and image acquisition are described in detail below. Compared to other genomic methods used to identify protein interaction partners, such as yeast-two-hybrid, this technique allows the visualization of protein complexes in mammalian cells at the sub

  2. Characterization, genomic organization, and expression profiles of MyD88, a key adaptor molecule in the TLR signaling pathways in miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy).

    Tang, Da; Gao, Yunhang; Wang, Rixin; Sun, Yuena; Xu, Tianjun

    2012-12-01

    Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) is an important adaptor protein in the TLR signaling pathways. In the present study, we firstly cloned and characterized Miichthys miiuy MyD88 (Mimi-MyD88) cDNA and gene. The Mimi-MyD88 gene was 3,470 bp consisting of five exons and four introns. The cDNA was composed of 1,627 bp with an 867-bp open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 288 amino acid residues. The theoretical molecular mass and isoelectric point of this polypeptide were 33.25 and 4.96 kDa. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence showed that the conserved death domain and the typical Toll/IL-1 receptor domain are very similar to those presented in other mammals, amphibians, and fishes. To identify potential role of MyD88 in fish innate immunological surveillance, the constitutive Mimi-MyD88 mRNA is detected by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results demonstrated that Mimi-MyD88 is broadly expressed in ten normal tissues, with the lowest expression was observed in kidney and the highest was in liver. The transcriptional expression also revealed that Mimi-MyD88 was significantly up-regulated in liver, kidney, and spleen after challenge by Gram-negative bacteria, Vibrio anguillarum. Via contrasted the expression of MyD88 and TLR2 in kidney, we evaluated TLR2 plays an indispensable role in MyD88 transcription, but not absolutely dominant. The combined expression still indicated that MyD88 plays a universal role in keeping immune surveillance for pathogens. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that Mimi-MyD88 gene is classified into the piscine cluster and most closely related to large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea. PMID:23053604

  3. *611540 SH3-DOMAIN GRB2-LIKE (ENDOPHILIN)-INTERACTING PROTEIN 1; SGIP1 [OMIM

    Full Text Available FIELD NO 611540 FIELD TI 611540 SH3-DOMAIN GRB2-LIKE (ENDOPHILIN)-INTERACTING PROTEIN 1; SGIP1 F ... differential-display PCR of hypothalamic RNA from lean ... and obese Psammomys obesus (Israeli sand rats), a ... nhibition of Sgip1 hypothalamic expression in both lean ... P. obesus and Sprague-Dawley rats caused a signifi ...

  4. Growth hormone-promoted tyrosyl phosphorylation of SHC proteins and SHC association with Grb2

    VanderKuur, J; Allevato, G; Billestrup, Nils;

    1995-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has been shown to stimulate the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases designated ERKs (extracellular signal regulated kinases) 1 and 2. One pathway by which ERKs 1 and 2 are activated by tyrosine kinases involves the Src homology (SH)-2 containing proteins SHC and Grb2. To...... phosphorylation of 66-, 52-, and 46-kDa SHC proteins in 3T3-F442A fibroblasts. GH also promoted binding of GHR and JAK2 to the SH2 domain of 46/52-kDa SHC protein fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST). Constitutively phosphorylated JAK2, from COS-7 cells transiently transfected with murine JAK2 cDNA, bound to...

  5. The fifth adaptor protein complex.

    Jennifer Hirst; Barlow, Lael D.; Gabriel Casey Francisco; Sahlender, Daniela A.; Seaman, Matthew N.J.; Dacks, Joel B.; Robinson, Margaret S.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptor protein (AP) complexes sort cargo into vesicles for transport from one membrane compartment of the cell to another. Four distinct AP complexes have been identified, which are present in most eukaryotes. We report the existence of a fifth AP complex, AP-5. Tagged AP-5 localises to a late endosomal compartment in HeLa cells. AP-5 does not associate with clathrin and is insensitive to brefeldin A. Knocking down AP-5 subunits interferes with the trafficking of the cation-independent manno...

  6. The Fifth Adaptor Protein Complex

    Hirst, Jennifer; D. Barlow, Lael; Francisco, Gabriel Casey; Sahlender, Daniela A.; Seaman, Matthew N.J.; Dacks, Joel B.; Robinson, Margaret S.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptor protein (AP) complexes sort cargo into vesicles for transport from one membrane compartment of the cell to another. Four distinct AP complexes have been identified, which are present in most eukaryotes. We report the existence of a fifth AP complex, AP-5. Tagged AP-5 localises to a late endosomal compartment in HeLa cells. AP-5 does not associate with clathrin and is insensitive to brefeldin A. Knocking down AP-5 subunits interferes with the trafficking of the cation-independent manno...

  7. The fifth adaptor protein complex.

    Jennifer Hirst

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Adaptor protein (AP complexes sort cargo into vesicles for transport from one membrane compartment of the cell to another. Four distinct AP complexes have been identified, which are present in most eukaryotes. We report the existence of a fifth AP complex, AP-5. Tagged AP-5 localises to a late endosomal compartment in HeLa cells. AP-5 does not associate with clathrin and is insensitive to brefeldin A. Knocking down AP-5 subunits interferes with the trafficking of the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor and causes the cell to form swollen endosomal structures with emanating tubules. AP-5 subunits can be found in all five eukaryotic supergroups, but they have been co-ordinately lost in many organisms. Concatenated phylogenetic analysis provides robust resolution, for the first time, into the evolutionary order of emergence of the adaptor subunit families, showing AP-3 as the basal complex, followed by AP-5, AP-4, and AP-1 and AP-2. Thus, AP-5 is an evolutionarily ancient complex, which is involved in endosomal sorting, and which has links with hereditary spastic paraplegia.

  8. Inhibition of Grb2-mediated activation of MAPK signal transduction suppresses NOR1/CB1954-induced cytotoxicity in the HepG2 cell line.

    Gui, Rong; Li, Dengqing; Qi, Guannan; Suhad, Ali; Nie, Xinmin

    2012-09-01

    The nitroreductase oxidored-nitro domain containing protein 1 (NOR1) gene may be involved in the chemical carcinogenesis of hepatic cancer and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). We have previously demonstrated that NOR1 overexpression is capable of converting the monofunctional alkylating agent 5-(aziridin-1-yl)-2,4-dinitrobenzamide (CB1954) into a toxic form by reducing the 4-nitro group of CB1954. Toxic CB1954 is able to enhance cell killing in the NPC cell line CNE1; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Using cDNA microarrays and quantitative real-time PCR, we previously discovered that NOR1 increases the expression of growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2) mRNA by 4.8-fold in the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2. In the present study, we revealed that NOR1 increased Grb2 protein expression by 3-fold in HepG2 cells. Additionally, we demonstrated that NOR1 enhanced CB1954-induced cell killing in HepG2 cells, and cell cytotoxicity was inhibited with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein, or by stable transfection of Grb2 small hairpin RNA (shRNA) pU6(+27)-shGrb2 to silence the expression of Grb2. Western blot analysis revealed that Grb2 downregulation may reduce the activity of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Inhibiting the activation of MAPK using the methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) inhibtor PD98059 suppressed CB1954-induced cell killing. These results suggested that the NOR1 gene enhances CB1954-mediated cell cytotoxicity through the upregulation of Grb2 expression and the activation of MAPK signal transduction in the HepG2 cell line. PMID:23741254

  9. Grb2 Is a Negative Modulator of the Intrinsic Ras-GEF Activity of hSos1

    Zarich, Natasha; Oliva, José Luis; Martínez, Natalia; Jorge, Rocío; Ballester, Alicia; Gutiérrez-Eisman, Silvia; García-Vargas, Susana; Rojas, José M

    2006-01-01

    hSos1 is a Ras guanine-nucleotide exchange factor. It was suggested that the carboxyl-terminal region of hSos1 down-regulates hSos1 functionality and that the intrinsic guanine-nucleotide exchange activity of this protein may be different before and after stimulation of tyrosine kinase receptors. Using different myristoylated hSos1 full-length and carboxyl-terminal truncated mutants, we show that Grb2 function accounts not only for recruitment of hSos1 to the plasma membrane but also for modu...

  10. α-Dystrobrevin-1 recruits Grb2 and α-catulin to organize neurotransmitter receptors at the neuromuscular junction.

    Gingras, Jacinthe; Gawor, Marta; Bernadzki, Krzysztof M; Grady, R Mark; Hallock, Peter; Glass, David J; Sanes, Joshua R; Proszynski, Tomasz J

    2016-03-01

    Neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), the synapses made by motor neurons on muscle fibers, form during embryonic development but undergo substantial remodeling postnatally. Several lines of evidence suggest that α-dystrobrevin, a component of the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex (DGC), is a crucial regulator of the remodeling process and that tyrosine phosphorylation of one isoform, α-dystrobrevin-1, is required for its function at synapses. We identified a functionally important phosphorylation site on α-dystrobrevin-1, generated phosphorylation-specific antibodies to it and used them to demonstrate dramatic increases in phosphorylation during the remodeling period, as well as in nerve-dependent regulation in adults. We then identified proteins that bind to this site in a phosphorylation-dependent manner and others that bind to α-dystrobrevin-1 in a phosphorylation-independent manner. They include multiple members of the DGC, as well as α-catulin, liprin-α1, Usp9x, PI3K, Arhgef5 and Grb2. Finally, we show that two interactors, α-catulin (phosphorylation independent) and Grb2 (phosphorylation dependent) are localized to NMJs in vivo, and that they are required for proper organization of neurotransmitter receptors on myotubes. PMID:26769899

  11. Expression pattern of FGFR2, Grb2 and Plcγ1 acts as a novel prognostic marker of recurrence recurrence-free survival in lung adenocarcinoma

    Timsah, Zahra; Berrout, Jonathan; Suraokar, Milind; Behrens, Carmen; Song, Juhee; Lee, J Jack; Ivan, Cristina; Gagea, Mihai; Shires, Michael; Hu, Xin; Vallien, Courtney; Kingsley, Charles V; Wistuba, IgnacioI; Ladbury, John E

    2015-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma is characterized by complex biology involving alterations at the genomic and protein expression levels. FGFR2 mutation and/or amplification are key drivers of disease progression and drug resistance in lung adenocarcinoma patients. These genetic alterations drive oncogenic downstream signalling due to the deregulated activity of the receptor. We have previously reported that wild type FGFR2 provides a binding site for which two proteins, Grb2 and Plcγ1, compete in a concentration-dependent manner. Metastasis and invasion ensue when Plcγ1 prevails on the receptor giving rise to oncogenic outcome in the absence of gene mutation/deletion. The effect of this signalling mechanism on FGFR2-driven lung adenocarcinoma has not previously been considered. In this study we show that fluctuation in the combinatorial expression levels of FGFR2, Grb2 and Plcγ1 modulates cell invasive properties, tumor formation and is linked to recurrence-free survival in 150 lung adenocarcinoma patients. High levels of expression of FGFR2 and Plcγ1 in a low background of Grb2 significantly correlates with poor prognosis. On the other hand, low levels of expression of FGFR2 and Plcγ1 in a high background of Grb2 correlates with favourable prognosis. This study defines the expression pattern of FGFR2, Plcγ1 and Grb2 as a novel prognostic marker in human lung adenocarcinoma. Thus, consideration of the Grb2 and Plcγ1-mediated mechanism of FGFR2 regulation will enhance the therapeutic targeting of aberrant FGFR2 activity to provide the much-needed improvement to the treatment regimen of this high mortality disease. PMID:26693065

  12. Mapping the X(+1) binding site of the Grb2-SH2 domain with alpha,alpha-disubstituted cyclic alpha-amino acids.

    García-Echeverría, C; Gay, B; Rahuel, J; Furet, P

    1999-10-18

    A series of phosphopeptides containing alpha,alpha-disubstituted cyclic alpha-amino acids (Ac(n)c, 3 activity as antagonists of the Grb2-SH2 domain has been determined in competitive binding assays. The SAR data obtained have been interpreted by using models constructed from the X-ray structure of the ligand-bound Grb2-SH2 domain. The used of alpha,alpha-disubstituted cyclic alpha-amino acids to map the binding pockets of proteins expands the classical alanine scan concept and takes advantage of the known conformational preferences of these amino acids. PMID:10571147

  13. PAG - a multipurpose transmembrane adaptor protein

    Hrdinka, Matouš; Hořejší, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 41 (2014), s. 4881-4892. ISSN 0950-9232 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : PAG * adaptor protein * membrane raft Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 8.459, year: 2014

  14. Palmitoylated transmembrane adaptor proteins in leukocyte signaling

    Štěpánek, Ondřej; Dráber, Peter; Hořejší, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 5 (2014), s. 895-902. ISSN 0898-6568 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Leukocyte * Adaptor * Palmitoylation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.315, year: 2014

  15. Grb2 and the non-T cell activation linker NTAL constitute a Ca(2+)-regulating signal circuit in B lymphocytes

    Stork, B.; Engelke, M.; Frey, J.; Hořejší, Václav; Hamm-Baarke, A.; Schraven, B.; Kurosaki, T.; Wienands, J.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 5 (2004), s. 681-691. ISSN 1074-7613 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : NTAL * Grb2 * lymphocyte Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 15.448, year: 2004

  16. Adaptor protein complexes and intracellular transport

    2014-01-01

    The AP (adaptor protein) complexes are heterotetrameric protein complexes that mediate intracellular membrane trafficking along endocytic and secretory transport pathways. There are five different AP complexes: AP-1, AP-2 and AP-3 are clathrin-associated complexes; whereas AP-4 and AP-5 are not. These five AP complexes localize to different intracellular compartments and mediate membrane trafficking in distinct pathways. They recognize and concentrate cargo proteins into vesicular carriers th...

  17. Phosphorylation of APP-CTF-AICD domains and interaction with adaptor proteins: signal transduction and/or transcriptional role--relevance for Alzheimer pathology.

    Schettini, Gennaro; Govoni, Stefano; Racchi, Marco; Rodriguez, Guido

    2010-12-01

    In recent decades, the study of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and of its proteolytic products carboxy terminal fragment (CTF), APP intracellular C-terminal domain (AICD) and amyloid beta has been mostly focussed on the role of APP as a producer of the toxic amyloid beta peptide. Here, we reconsider the role of APP suggesting, in a provocative way, the protein as a central player in a putative signalling pathway. We highlight the presence in the cytosolic tail of APP of the YENPTY motif which is typical of tyrosine kinase receptors, the phosphorylation of the tyrosine, serine and threonine residues, the kinases involved and the interaction with intracellular adaptor proteins. In particular, we examine the interaction with Shc and Grb2 regulators, which through the activation of Ras proteins elicit downstream signalling events such as the MAPK pathway. The review also addresses the interaction of APP, CTFs and AICD with other adaptor proteins and in particular with Fe65 for nuclear transcriptional activity and the importance of phosphorylation for sorting the secretases involved in the amyloidogenic or non-amyloidogenic pathways. We provide a novel perspective on Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, focussing on the perturbation of the physiological activities of APP-CTFs and AICD as an alternative perspective from that which normally focuses on the accumulation of neurotoxic proteolytic fragments. PMID:21039524

  18. Grb2-associated binder 1 polymorphism was associated with the risk of Helicobactor pylori infection and gastric atrophy

    Yasuyuki Goto, Takafumi Ando, Kazuko Nishio, Sayo Kawai, Yoshiko Ishida, Mariko Naito, Hidemi Goto, Nobuyuki Hamajima

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Various single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs have explained the association between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and gastric atrophy and cancer. This study investigated the associations of Grb2 associated binder 1 (Gab1 polymorphism and the combination of PTPN11 gene encoding src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP2 and Gab1 gene with gastric cancer and gastric atrophy among H. pylori seropositive subjects. Methods: A single nucleotide polymorphism at intron 2 of Gab1 (JST164345 was examined for 454 Japanese health checkup examinees (126 males and 328 females aged 35 to 85 without a history of gastric cancer and 202 gastric cancer patients (134 males and 68 females aged 33 to 94 with pathologically confirmed diagnosis of gastric adenocarcinoma. Results: The decreased OR of the Gab1 A/A for H. pylori seropositivity was 0.25 (95% confidence interval (CI: 0.08-0.71. Among seropositive healthy controls, the OR of the Gab1 G/A+A/A for gastric atrophy was significant (OR=1.95, 95% CI: 1.12 -3.40. Seropositive individuals with PTPN11 G/G and Gab1 G/A+A/A demonstrated the highest risk of gastric atrophy with significance (OR=3.49, 95% CI: 1.54-7.90 relative to PTPN11 G/A+A/A and Gab1 G/G, the lowest risk combination, as a reference. However, the gene-gene interaction between PTPN11 and Gab1 was not observed (OR=1.39, 95% CI: 0.41-4.66. Compared to gastric cancer case, the Gab1 did not influence the step of atrophy/metaplasia-gastric cancer sequence. Conclusions: This study represents that the Gab1 polymorphism was associated with the low risk of H. pylori infection and the high risk of gastric atrophy among seropositive healthy controls, and that seropositive individuals with PTPN11 G/G and Gab1 G/A+G/G were associated with the greatest risk of gastric atrophy. These findings require confirmation in much larger studies.

  19. Application of Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition “Click Chemistry” for the Synthesis of Grb2 SH2 Domain-Binding Macrocycles

    Choi, Won Jun; Shi, Zhen-Dan; Worthy, Karen M.; Bindu, Lakshman; Karki, Rajeshri G.; Nicklaus, Marc C.; Fisher, Robert J.; Burke, Terrence R

    2006-01-01

    Copper (I) promoted [3+2] Huisgen cycloaddition of azides with terminal alkynes was used to prepare triazole-containing macrocycles based on the Grb2 SH2 domain-binding motif, “Pmp-Ac6 c-Asn”, where Pmp and Ac6 c stand for 4-phosphonomethylphenylalanine and 1-aminocyclohexanecarboxylic acid, respectively. When cycloaddition reactions were conducted at 1 mM substrate concentrations cyclization of monomeric units occurred. At 2 mM substrate concentrations the predominant products were macrocycl...

  20. The Transmembrane Adaptor Protein SIT Inhibits TCR-Mediated Signaling

    Arndt, Börge; Krieger, Tina; Kalinski, Thomas; Thielitz, Anja; Reinhold, Dirk; Roessner, Albert; Schraven, Burkhart; Simeoni, Luca

    2011-01-01

    Transmembrane adaptor proteins (TRAPs) organize signaling complexes at the plasma membrane, and thus function as critical linkers and integrators of signaling cascades downstream of antigen receptors. We have previously shown that the transmembrane adaptor protein SIT regulates the threshold for thymocyte selection. Moreover, T cells from SIT-deficient mice are hyperresponsive to CD3 stimulation and undergo enhanced lymphopenia-induced homeostatic proliferation, thus indicating that SIT inhib...

  1. Solution structure of N-terminal SH3 domain of Vav and the recognition site for Grb2 C-terminal SH3 domain

    The three-dimensional structure of the N-terminal SH3 domain (residues 583-660) of murine Vav, which contains a tetra-proline sequence (Pro 607-Pro 610), was determined by NMR. The solution structure of the SH3 domain shows a typical SH3 fold, but it exists in two conformations due to cis-trans isomerization at the Gly614-Pro615 bond. The NMR structure of the P615G mutant, where Pro615 is replaced by glycine, reveals that the tetra-proline region is inserted into the RT-loop and binds to its own SH3 structure. The C-terminal SH3 domain of Grb2 specifically binds to the trans form of the N-terminal SH3 domain of Vav. The surface of Vav N-terminal SH3 which binds to Grb2 C-terminal SH3 was elucidated by chemical shift mapping experiments using NMR. The surface does not involve the tetra-proline region but involves the region comprising the n-src loop, the N-terminal and the C-terminal regions. This surface is located opposite to the tetra-proline containing region, consistent with that of our previous mutagenesis studies

  2. A transgenic Drosophila model demonstrates that the Helicobacter pylori CagA protein functions as a eukaryotic Gab adaptor.

    Crystal M Botham

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Infection with the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is associated with a spectrum of diseases including gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma, and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. The cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA protein of H. pylori, which is translocated into host cells via a type IV secretion system, is a major risk factor for disease development. Experiments in gastric tissue culture cells have shown that once translocated, CagA activates the phosphatase SHP-2, which is a component of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK pathways whose over-activation is associated with cancer formation. Based on CagA's ability to activate SHP-2, it has been proposed that CagA functions as a prokaryotic mimic of the eukaryotic Grb2-associated binder (Gab adaptor protein, which normally activates SHP-2. We have developed a transgenic Drosophila model to test this hypothesis by investigating whether CagA can function in a well-characterized Gab-dependent process: the specification of photoreceptors cells in the Drosophila eye. We demonstrate that CagA expression is sufficient to rescue photoreceptor development in the absence of the Drosophila Gab homologue, Daughter of Sevenless (DOS. Furthermore, CagA's ability to promote photoreceptor development requires the SHP-2 phosphatase Corkscrew (CSW. These results provide the first demonstration that CagA functions as a Gab protein within the tissue of an organism and provide insight into CagA's oncogenic potential. Since many translocated bacterial proteins target highly conserved eukaryotic cellular processes, such as the RTK signaling pathway, the transgenic Drosophila model should be of general use for testing the in vivo function of bacterial effector proteins and for identifying the host genes through which they function.

  3. Optimized Adaptor Polymerase Chain Reaction Method for Efficient Genomic Walking

    Peng XU; Rui-Ying HU; Xiao-Yan DING

    2006-01-01

    Genomic walking is one of the most useful approaches in genome-related research. Three kinds of PCR-based methods are available for this purpose. However, none of them has been generally applied because they are either insensitive or inefficient. Here we present an efficient PCR protocol, an optimized adaptor PCR method for genomic walking. Using a combination of a touchdown PCR program and a special adaptor, the optimized adaptor PCR protocol achieves high sensitivity with low background noise. By applying this protocol, the insertion sites of a gene trap mouse line and two gene promoters from the incompletely sequenced Xenopus laevis genome were successfully identified with high efficiency. The general application of this protocol in genomic walking was promising.

  4. The Clathrin Adaptor AP-1A Mediates Basolateral Polarity

    Gravotta, Diego; Carvajal-Gonzalez, Jose Maria; Mattera, Rafael; Deborde, Sylvie; Banfelder, Jason R.; Bonifacino, Juan S.; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Clathrin and the epithelial-specific clathrin adaptor AP-1B mediate basolateral trafficking in epithelia. However, several epithelia lack AP-1B and mice knocked-out for AP-1B are viable, suggesting the existence of additional mechanisms that control basolateral polarity. Here, we demonstrate a distinct role of the ubiquitous clathrin adaptor AP-1A in basolateral protein sorting. Knock-down of AP-1A causes missorting of basolateral proteins in MDCK cells but only after knock-down of AP-1B, sug...

  5. Cytosol- and clathrin-dependent stimulation of endocytosis in vitro by purified adaptors

    1992-01-01

    Using stage-specific assays for receptor-mediated endocytosis of transferrin (Tfn) into perforated A431 cells we show that purified adaptors stimulate coated pit assembly and ligand sequestration into deeply invaginated coated pits. Late events in endocytosis involving membrane fission and coated vesicle budding which lead to the internalization of Tfn are unaffected. AP2, plasma membrane adaptors, are active at physiological concentrations, whereas AP1, Golgi adaptors, are inactive. Adaptor-...

  6. DMPD: The SAP family of adaptors in immune regulation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Full Text Available 15541655 The SAP family of adaptors in immune regulation. Latour S, Veillette A. Se...min Immunol. 2004 Dec;16(6):409-19. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The SAP family of adaptors in immune ...regulation. PubmedID 15541655 Title The SAP family of adaptors in immune regulation. Authors Latour S, Veill

  7. A dimer of the Toll-like receptor 4 cytoplasmic domain provides a specific scaffold for the recruitment of signalling adaptor proteins.

    Ricardo Núñez Miguel

    Full Text Available The Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 is a class I transmembrane receptor expressed on the surface of immune system cells. TLR4 is activated by exposure to lipopolysaccharides derived from the outer membrane of Gram negative bacteria and forms part of the innate immune response in mammals. Like other class 1 receptors, TLR4 is activated by ligand induced dimerization, and recent studies suggest that this causes concerted conformational changes in the receptor leading to self association of the cytoplasmic Toll/Interleukin 1 receptor (TIR signalling domain. This homodimerization event is proposed to provide a new scaffold that is able to bind downstream signalling adaptor proteins. TLR4 uses two different sets of adaptors; TRAM and TRIF, and Mal and MyD88. These adaptor pairs couple two distinct signalling pathways leading to the activation of interferon response factor 3 (IRF-3 and nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB respectively. In this paper we have generated a structural model of the TLR4 TIR dimer and used molecular docking to probe for potential sites of interaction between the receptor homodimer and the adaptor molecules. Remarkably, both the Mal and TRAM adaptors are strongly predicted to bind at two symmetry-related sites at the homodimer interface. This model of TLR4 activation is supported by extensive functional studies involving site directed mutagenesis, inhibition by cell permeable peptides and stable protein phosphorylation of receptor and adaptor TIR domains. Our results also suggest a molecular mechanism for two recent findings, the caspase 1 dependence of Mal signalling and the protective effects conferred by the Mal polymorphism Ser180Leu.

  8. Spiral biasing adaptor for use in Si drift detectors and Si drift detector arrays

    Li, Zheng; Chen, Wei

    2016-07-05

    A drift detector array, preferably a silicon drift detector (SDD) array, that uses a low current biasing adaptor is disclosed. The biasing adaptor is customizable for any desired geometry of the drift detector single cell with minimum drift time of carriers. The biasing adaptor has spiral shaped ion-implants that generate the desired voltage profile. The biasing adaptor can be processed on the same wafer as the drift detector array and only one biasing adaptor chip/side is needed for one drift detector array to generate the voltage profiles on the front side and back side of the detector array.

  9. Role of adaptor proteins in secretory granule biogenesis and maturation

    RichardEMains

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In the regulated secretory pathway, secretory granules (SGs store peptide hormones that are released on demand. SGs are formed at the trans-Golgi network (TGN and must undergo a maturation process to become responsive to secretagogues. The production of mature SGs requires concentrating newly synthesized soluble content proteins in granules whose membranes contain the appropriate integral membrane proteins. The mechanisms underlying the sorting of soluble and integral membrane proteins destined for SGs from other proteins are not yet well understood. For soluble proteins, luminal pH and divalent metals can affect aggregation and interaction with surrounding membranes. The trafficking of granule membrane proteins can be controlled by both luminal and cytosolic factors. Cytosolic adaptor proteins, which recognize the cytosolic domains of proteins that span the SG membrane, have been shown to play essential roles in the assembly of functional SGs. Adaptor protein 1A (AP-1A is known to interact with specific motifs in its cargo proteins and with the clathrin heavy chain, contributing to the formation of a clathrin coat. AP-1A is present in patches on immature SG membranes, where it removes cargo and facilitates SG maturation. AP-1A recruitment to membranes can be modulated by PACS-1 (Phosphofurin Acidic Cluster Sorting protein 1, a cytosolic protein which interacts with both AP-1A and cargo that has been phosphorylated by casein kinase II. A cargo/PACS-1/AP-1A complex is necessary to drive the appropriate transport of several cargo proteins within the regulated secretory pathway. The GGA (Golgi-localized, -ear containing, ADP-ribosylation factor binding family of adaptor proteins serve a similar role. We review the functions of AP-1A, PACS-1 and GGAs in facilitating the retrieval of proteins from immature SGs and review examples of cargo proteins whose trafficking within the regulated secretory pathway is governed by adaptor proteins.

  10. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Analysis Reveals the Protection against Hypoxia-Induced Oxidative Injury in the Intestine of Tibetans via the Inhibition of GRB2/EGFR/PTPN11 Pathways

    Gesang, Luobu; Dan, Zeng; Gusang, Lamu

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms for hypoxic environment causing the injury of intestinal mucosal barrier (IMB) are widely unknown. To address the issue, Han Chinese from 100 m altitude and Tibetans from high altitude (more than 3650 m) were recruited. Histological and transcriptome analyses were performed. The results showed intestinal villi were reduced and appeared irregular, and glandular epithelium was destroyed in the IMB of Tibetans when compared with Han Chinese. Transcriptome analysis revealed 2573 genes with altered expression. The levels of 1137 genes increased and 1436 genes decreased in Tibetans when compared with Han Chinese. Gene ontology (GO) analysis indicated most immunological responses were reduced in the IMB of Tibetans when compared with Han Chinese. Gene microarray showed that there were 25-, 22-, and 18-fold downregulation for growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and tyrosine-protein phosphatase nonreceptor type 11 (PTPN11) in the IMB of Tibetans when compared with Han Chinese. The downregulation of EGFR, GRB2, and PTPN11 will reduce the production of reactive oxygen species and protect against oxidative stress-induced injury for intestine. Thus, the transcriptome analysis showed the protecting functions of IMB patients against hypoxia-induced oxidative injury in the intestine of Tibetans via affecting GRB2/EGFR/PTPN11 pathways.

  11. Autologous antibody to src-homology 3-domain GRB2-like 1 specifically increases in the sera of patients with low-grade gliomas

    Matsutani Tomoo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioma is the most common primary malignant central nervous system tumor in adult, and is usually not curable in spite of various therapeutic approaches. Clarification of the oncogenic process in its early stage is important for the diagnosis and effective therapy. Methods In the present study, we used the serological identification of antigens by recombinant cDNA expression cloning (SEREX to explore the subtle changes of the protein expression in low-grade glioma. The levels of serum autoantibodies to the SEREX-identified glioma-related antigens were analyzed by ELISA, and the epitope site was identified using deletion mutants and overlap peptide array. Changes in the serum autoantibody levels were examined in the rat glioma model using C6 and 9 L glioma cell lines. Results We identified 31 glioma-related antigens by SEREX. Among them, the serum level of autoantibody to src-homology 3-domain GRB2-like 1 (SH3GL1 was significantly higher in patients with low-grade glioma than healthy volunteers or high-grade gliomas. The 10 amino-acids at the C-terminal were identified as the epitope site by the overlap peptide array and the ELISA using deletion mutants. The tissue expression of SH3GL1 protein increased in proportion to glioma progression. The rat glioma models confirmed the increase of anti-SH3GL1 autoantibody level in the early stage and the suppression in the late stage. Conclusion SH3GL1 may be involved in the oncogenic process of gliomas and effectively elicit an autologous antibody response in low-grade gliomas. The immunological reaction to SH3GL1 would contribute to the establishment of a novel diagnostic and therapeutic target for gliomas.

  12. A Big-Five Personality Profile of the Adaptor and Innovator.

    Kwang, Ng Aik; Rodrigues, Daphne

    2002-01-01

    A study explored the relationship between two creative types (adaptor and innovator) and the Big Five personality traits (extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness to experience), in 164 teachers in Singapore. Adaptors were significantly more conscientious than innovators, while innovators were significantly more…

  13. Structure of the periplasmic adaptor protein from a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) multidrug efflux pump.

    Hinchliffe, Philip; Greene, Nicholas P; Paterson, Neil G; Crow, Allister; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2014-08-25

    Periplasmic adaptor proteins are key components of bacterial tripartite efflux pumps. The 2.85 Å resolution structure of an MFS (major facilitator superfamily) pump adaptor, Aquifex aeolicus EmrA, shows linearly arranged α-helical coiled-coil, lipoyl, and β-barrel domains, but lacks the fourth membrane-proximal domain shown in other pumps to interact with the inner membrane transporter. The adaptor α-hairpin, which binds outer membrane TolC, is exceptionally long at 127 Å, and the β-barrel contains a conserved disordered loop. The structure extends the view of adaptors as flexible, modular components that mediate diverse pump assembly, and suggests that in MFS tripartite pumps a hexamer of adaptors could provide a periplasmic seal. PMID:24996185

  14. The effects of rehabilitative training on neural function and the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule-1 after traumatic brain injury%康复训练对脑损伤后大鼠神经功能及胶原纤维酸性蛋白和离子钙接头分子表达的影响

    刘苏; 沈光宇; 吴勤峰; 张志军; 郭爱松; 李欣嫄; 邹玉婷

    2012-01-01

    目的 研究康复功能训练对大鼠脑损伤神经功能恢复及损伤边缘皮质胶原纤维酸性蛋白(GFAP)和离子钙接头分子(Iba-1)表达的影响.方法 SD大鼠131只,按随机数字表法选取30只为假手术组,其余101只制作脑损伤模型.剔除制模未达标大鼠11只,余90只按随机数字表法分为康复训练组、制动组和自由活动组,每组30只大鼠.康复训练组于术后第4天开始每天给予平衡、旋转、行走等功能训练,每项15min,共训练45min,每周6d;制动组置于网状笼内固定;自由活动组和假手术组置于普通笼内饲养.在术后第3天及术后1、2、3和4周对上述4组分别进行神经和运动功能评估,观察其恢复状况;同时采用免疫荧光染色观察损伤区边缘皮质GFAP和Iba-1的表达.结果 康复训练组术后2、3和4周在功能评估方面优于制动组和自由活动组(P<0.05);术后4周自由活动组较制动组的神经运动功能也有所恢复(P<0.05).脑损伤术后2、3和4周康复训练组GFAP阳性细胞灰度值和术后3、4周康复训练组Iba-1阳性细胞平均灰度值均明显低于制动组和自由活动组(P<0.01).结论 康复功能训练可促进大鼠脑损伤的神经功能恢复,其机制可能与损伤区边缘皮质星形胶质细胞和小胶质细胞的活化数目减少有关.%Objective To study the effectsof rehabilitative training on neural function and the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule-1 (Iba-1) in rats after traumatic brain injury.Methods A left hemisphere traumatic brain injury model was established in ninety Sprague-Dawley rats.They were then randomly divided into a rehabilitation training group,an immobilization group and a free-running group,with 30 rats in each group.Another thirty rats received sham injury as the shamoperated group.Beginning 4 days post-operation the rats of the rehabilitation training group were given

  15. Tetraspanins and Transmembrane Adaptor Proteins As Plasma Membrane Organizers—Mast Cell Case

    Halova, Ivana; Draber, Petr

    2016-01-01

    The plasma membrane contains diverse and specialized membrane domains, which include tetraspanin-enriched domains (TEMs) and transmembrane adaptor protein (TRAP)-enriched domains. Recent biophysical, microscopic, and functional studies indicated that TEMs and TRAP-enriched domains are involved in compartmentalization of physicochemical events of such important processes as immunoreceptor signal transduction and chemotaxis. Moreover, there is evidence of a cross-talk between TEMs and TRAP-enriched domains. In this review we discuss the presence and function of such domains and their crosstalk using mast cells as a model. The combined data based on analysis of selected mast cell-expressed tetraspanins [cluster of differentiation (CD)9, CD53, CD63, CD81, CD151)] or TRAPs [linker for activation of T cells (LAT), non-T cell activation linker (NTAL), and phosphoprotein associated with glycosphingolipid-enriched membrane microdomains (PAG)] using knockout mice or specific antibodies point to a diversity within these two families and bring evidence of the important roles of these molecules in signaling events. An example of this diversity is physical separation of two TRAPs, LAT and NTAL, which are in many aspects similar but show plasma membrane location in different microdomains in both non-activated and activated cells. Although our understanding of TEMs and TRAP-enriched domains is far from complete, pharmaceutical applications of the knowledge about these domains are under way.

  16. The Role of the Clathrin Adaptor AP-1: Polarized Sorting and Beyond

    Fubito Nakatsu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The selective transport of proteins or lipids by vesicular transport is a fundamental process supporting cellular physiology. The budding process involves cargo sorting and vesicle formation at the donor membrane and constitutes an important process in vesicular transport. This process is particularly important for the polarized sorting in epithelial cells, in which the cargo molecules need to be selectively sorted and transported to two distinct destinations, the apical or basolateral plasma membrane. Adaptor protein (AP-1, a member of the AP complex family, which includes the ubiquitously expressed AP-1A and the epithelium-specific AP-1B, regulates polarized sorting at the trans-Golgi network and/or at the recycling endosomes. A growing body of evidence, especially from studies using model organisms and animals, demonstrates that the AP-1-mediated polarized sorting supports the development and physiology of multi-cellular units as functional organs and tissues (e.g., cell fate determination, inflammation and gut immune homeostasis. Furthermore, a possible involvement of AP-1B in the pathogenesis of human diseases, such as Crohn’s disease and cancer, is now becoming evident. These data highlight the significant contribution of AP-1 complexes to the physiology of multicellular organisms, as master regulators of polarized sorting in epithelial cells.

  17. Study on the isothermal forging process of MB26 magnesium alloy adaptor

    Xu Wenchen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The isothermal forging process is an effective method to manufacture complex-shaped components of hard-to-work materials, such as magnesium alloys. This study investigates the isothermal forging process of an MB26 magnesium alloy adaptor with three branches. The results show that two-step forging process is appropriate to form the adaptor forging, which not only improves the filling quality but also reduces the forging load compared with one-step forging process. Moreover, the flow line is distributed along the contour of the complex-shaped adaptor forging.

  18. Structure of the periplasmic adaptor protein from a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) multidrug efflux pump

    Hinchliffe, Philip; Greene, Nicholas P.; Paterson, Neil G.; Crow, Allister; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2014-01-01

    Periplasmic adaptor proteins are key components of bacterial tripartite efflux pumps. The 2.85 Å resolution structure of an MFS (major facilitator superfamily) pump adaptor, Aquifex aeolicus EmrA, shows linearly arranged α-helical coiled-coil, lipoyl, and β-barrel domains, but lacks the fourth membrane-proximal domain shown in other pumps to interact with the inner membrane transporter. The adaptor α-hairpin, which binds outer membrane TolC, is exceptionally long at 127 Å, and the β-barrel co...

  19. Study on the isothermal forging process of MB26 magnesium alloy adaptor

    Xu Wenchen; Yang Chuan; Shaninst Debin; Xu Fuchang; Wang Guan; Guo Bin

    2015-01-01

    The isothermal forging process is an effective method to manufacture complex-shaped components of hard-to-work materials, such as magnesium alloys. This study investigates the isothermal forging process of an MB26 magnesium alloy adaptor with three branches. The results show that two-step forging process is appropriate to form the adaptor forging, which not only improves the filling quality but also reduces the forging load compared with one-step forging process. Moreover, the flow line is di...

  20. The TIR-domain containing adaptor TRAM is required for TLR7 mediated RANTES production.

    Enda Shevlin

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7 plays a vital role in the immune response to ssRNA viruses such as human rhinovirus (HRV and Influenza, against which there are currently no treatments or vaccines with long term efficacy available. Clearly, a more comprehensive understanding of the TLR7 signaling axis will contribute to its molecular targeting. TRIF related adaptor molecule (TRAM plays a vital role in TLR4 signaling by recruiting TRIF to TLR4, followed by endosomal trafficking of the complex and initiation of IRF3 dependent type I interferon production as well as NF-κB dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Towards understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate TLR7 functionality, we found that TRAM(-/- murine macrophages exhibited a transcriptional and translational impairment in TLR7 mediated RANTES, but not TNFα, production. Suppression of TRAM expression in human macrophages also resulted in an impairment in TLR7 mediated CCL5 and IFN-β, but not TNFα, gene induction. Furthermore, suppression of endogenous human TRAM expression in human macrophages significantly impaired RV16 induced CCL5 and IFNβ, but not TNFα gene induction. Additionally, TRAM-G2A dose-dependently inhibited TLR7 mediated activation of CCL5, IFNβ and IFNα reporter genes. TLR7-mediated phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3 was impaired in TRAM(-/- cells. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation studies indicated that TRAM physically interacts with MyD88 upon TLR7 stimulation, but not under basal conditions. Our results clearly demonstrate that TRAM plays a, hitherto unappreciated, role in TLR7 signaling through a novel signaling axis containing, but not limited to, MyD88, TRAM and IRF3 towards the activation of anti-viral immunity.

  1. The Toll-Like receptor adaptor TRIF contributes to otitis media pathogenesis and recovery

    Pak Kwang

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toll-like receptor (TLR signalling is crucial for innate immune responses to infection. The involvement of TLRs in otitis media (OM, the most prevalent childhood disease in developed countries, has been implicated by studies in middle ear cell lines, by association studies of TLR-related gene polymorphisms, and by altered OM in mice bearing mutations in TLR genes. Activated TLRs signal via two alternative intracellular signaling molecules with differing effects; MyD88 (Myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 inducing primarily interleukin expression and TRIF (Tir-domain-containing adaptor inducing interferon β mediating type I interferon (IFN expression. We tested the hypothesis that TRIF and type I IFN signaling play a role in OM, using a murine model of OM induced by non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi. The ME inflammatory response to NTHi was examined in wild-type (WT and TRIF-/- mice by qPCR, gene microarray, histopathology and bacterial culture. Results Expression of TRIF mRNA was only modesty enhanced during OM, but both type I IFN signalling genes and type I IFN-inducible genes were significantly up-regulated in WT mice. TRIF-deficient mice showed reduced but more persistent mucosal hyperplasia and less leukocyte infiltration into the ME in response to NTHi infection than did WT animals. Viable bacteria could be cultured from MEs of TRIF-/- mice for much longer in the course of disease than was the case for middle ears of WT mice. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that activation of TRIF/type I IFN responses is important in both the pathogenesis and resolution of NTHi-induced OM.

  2. Expression of Chicken Toll-Like Receptors and Signal Adaptors in Spleen and Cecum of Young Chickens Infected with Eimeria tenella

    ZHOU Zuo-yong; HU Shi-jun; WANG Zhi-ying; GUO Zhi-li; QIN Bo; NIE Kui

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a group of highly conserved molecules which initiate the innate immune response to pathogens by recognizing structural motifs of microbes. Understanding the changes in chicken Toll-like receptors (ChTLRs) and signal adaptors expression that occur with Eimeria tenella infection will help to elucidate the molecular basis of immune control of coccidiosis caused by Eimeria. The present study detected the dynamic changes in the expression of ChTLRs and associated signal adaptors in the spleen and cecum of E. tenella-infected chickens during the early stage of infection. The results showed that the expression peak for ChTLRs, MyD88 and TRIF occurred at 12 h post-infection (hpi), ChTLR3, ChTLR15 and MyD88 mRNA expression in the spleen of E. tenella infected chickens were signiifcantly higher (P<0.05) than that of negative control chickens, and there were similar tendencies of these molecules expression in the cecum and spleen of E. tenella-infected chickens. The expression of MyD88 was upregulated at four time points in the cecum of E. tenella-infected chickens. The results of this study indicate that ChTLR3, ChTLR15 and MyD88 play a role in young chickens infected with E. tenella.

  3. Stepping motor adaptor actuator for a commercial uhv linear motion feedthrough

    An adaptor coupling has been developed that will allow the attachment of a standard stepping motor to a precision commercial (Varian) uhv linear motion feedthrough. The assembly, consisting of the motor, motor adaptor, limit switches, etc. is clamped to the feedthrough body which can be done under vacuum conditions if necessary. With a 500 step/rev. stepping motor the resolution is 1.27 μm per step. We presently use this assembly in a remote location for the precise positioning of a beam sensing monitor. 2 refs., 3 figs

  4. DMPD: Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor proteins. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Full Text Available 17667936 Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor prote... (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor proteins. ...PubmedID 17667936 Title Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 recep

  5. TLR adaptor MyD88 is essential for pathogen control during oral toxoplasma gondii infection but not adaptive immunity induced by a vaccine strain of the parasite.

    Sukhumavasi, Woraporn; Egan, Charlotte E; Warren, Amy L; Taylor, Gregory A; Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J; Denkers, Eric Y

    2008-09-01

    TLR adaptor MyD88 activation is important in host resistance to Toxoplasma gondii during i.p. infection, but the function of this signaling pathway during oral infection, in which mucosal immunity assumes a predominant role, has not been examined. In this study, we show that MyD88(-/-) mice fail to control the parasite and succumb within 2 wk of oral infection. Early during infection, T cell IFN-gamma production, recruitment of neutrophils and induction of p47 GTPase IGTP (Irgm3) in the intestinal mucosa were dependent upon functional MyD88. Unexpectedly, these responses were MyD88-independent later during acute infection. In particular, CD4(+) T cell IFN-gamma reached normal levels independently of MyD88, despite continued absence of IL-12 in these animals. The i.p. vaccination of MyD88(-/-) mice with an avirulent T. gondii uracil auxotroph elicited robust IFN-gamma responses and protective immunity to challenge with a high virulence T. gondii strain. Our results demonstrate that MyD88 is required to control Toxoplasma infection, but that the parasite can trigger adaptive immunity without the need for this TLR adaptor molecule. PMID:18714019

  6. The AP-3 adaptor complex is required for vacuolar function in Arabidopsis

    Zwiewka, M.; Feraru, E.; Moller, B.K.; Hwang, I.; Feraru, M.I.; Kleine-Vehn, J.; Weijers, D.; Friml, J.

    2011-01-01

    Subcellular trafficking is required for a multitude of functions in eukaryotic cells. It involves regulation of cargo sorting, vesicle formation, trafficking and fusion processes at multiple levels. Adaptor protein (AP) complexes are key regulators of cargo sorting into vesicles in yeast and mammals

  7. SR proteins are NXF1 adaptors that link alternative RNA processing to mRNA export.

    Müller-McNicoll, Michaela; Botti, Valentina; de Jesus Domingues, Antonio M; Brandl, Holger; Schwich, Oliver D; Steiner, Michaela C; Curk, Tomaz; Poser, Ina; Zarnack, Kathi; Neugebauer, Karla M

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear export factor 1 (NXF1) exports mRNA to the cytoplasm after recruitment to mRNA by specific adaptor proteins. How and why cells use numerous different export adaptors is poorly understood. Here we critically evaluate members of the SR protein family (SRSF1-7) for their potential to act as NXF1 adaptors that couple pre-mRNA processing to mRNA export. Consistent with this proposal, >1000 endogenous mRNAs required individual SR proteins for nuclear export in vivo. To address the mechanism, transcriptome-wide RNA-binding profiles of NXF1 and SRSF1-7 were determined in parallel by individual-nucleotide-resolution UV cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (iCLIP). Quantitative comparisons of RNA-binding sites showed that NXF1 and SR proteins bind mRNA targets at adjacent sites, indicative of cobinding. SRSF3 emerged as the most potent NXF1 adaptor, conferring sequence specificity to RNA binding by NXF1 in last exons. Interestingly, SRSF3 and SRSF7 were shown to bind different sites in last exons and regulate 3' untranslated region length in an opposing manner. Both SRSF3 and SRSF7 promoted NXF1 recruitment to mRNA. Thus, SRSF3 and SRSF7 couple alternative splicing and polyadenylation to NXF1-mediated mRNA export, thereby controlling the cytoplasmic abundance of transcripts with alternative 3' ends. PMID:26944680

  8. Synapse formation is regulated by the signaling adaptor GIT1

    Zhang, Huaye; Webb, Donna J.; Asmussen, Hannelore; Horwitz, Alan F.

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic spines in the central nervous system undergo rapid actin-based shape changes, making actin regulators potential modulators of spine morphology and synapse formation. Although several potential regulators and effectors for actin organization have been identified, the mechanisms by which these molecules assemble and localize are not understood. Here we show that the G protein–coupled receptor kinase–interacting protein (GIT)1 serves such a function by targeting actin regulators and lo...

  9. Insulin Receptor Substrate Adaptor Proteins Mediate Prognostic Gene Expression Profiles in Breast Cancer

    Becker, Marc A.; Ibrahim, Yasir H.; Oh, Annabell S.; Fagan, Dedra H.; Byron, Sara A.; Sarver, Aaron L.; Lee, Adrian V.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Fan, Cheng; Perou, Charles M.; Yee, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Therapies targeting the type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) have not been developed with predictive biomarkers to identify tumors with receptor activation. We have previously shown that the insulin receptor substrate (IRS) adaptor proteins are necessary for linking IGF1R to downstream signaling pathways and the malignant phenotype in breast cancer cells. The purpose of this study was to identify gene expression profiles downstream of IGF1R and its two adaptor proteins. IRS-null breast cancer cells (T47D-YA) were engineered to express IRS-1 or IRS-2 alone and their ability to mediate IGF ligand-induced proliferation, motility, and gene expression determined. Global gene expression signatures reflecting IRS adaptor specific and primary vs. secondary ligand response were derived (Early IRS-1, Late IRS-1, Early IRS-2 and Late IRS-2) and functional pathway analysis examined. IRS isoforms mediated distinct gene expression profiles, functional pathways, and breast cancer subtype association. For example, IRS-1/2-induced TGFb2 expression and blockade of TGFb2 abrogated IGF-induced cell migration. In addition, the prognostic value of IRS proteins was significant in the luminal B breast tumor subtype. Univariate and multivariate analyses confirmed that IRS adaptor signatures correlated with poor outcome as measured by recurrence-free and overall survival. Thus, IRS adaptor protein expression is required for IGF ligand responses in breast cancer cells. IRS-specific gene signatures represent accurate surrogates of IGF activity and could predict response to anti-IGF therapy in breast cancer. PMID:26991655

  10. The non-palindromic adaptor-PCR method for the identification of the T-cell receptor genes of an interferon-gamma-secreting T-cell hybridomaspecific for trans-sialidase, an immunodominant Trypanosoma cruzi antigen

    M.I. Hiyane

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Cloning of the T-cell receptor genes is a critical step when generating T-cell receptor transgenic mice. Because T-cell receptor molecules are clonotypical, isolation of their genes requires reverse transcriptase-assisted PCR using primers specific for each different Valpha or Vß genes or by the screening of cDNA libraries generated from RNA obtained from each individual T-cell clone. Although feasible, these approaches are laborious and costly. The aim of the present study was to test the application of the non-palindromic adaptor-PCR method as an alternative to isolate the genes encoding the T-cell receptor of an antigen-specific T-cell hybridoma. For this purpose, we established hybridomas specific for trans-sialidase, an immunodominant Trypanosoma cruzi antigen. These T-cell hybridomas were characterized with regard to their ability to secrete interferon-gamma, IL-4, and IL-10 after stimulation with the antigen. A CD3+, CD4+, CD8- interferon-gamma-producing hybridoma was selected for the identification of the variable regions of the T-cell receptor by the non-palindromic adaptor-PCR method. Using this methodology, we were able to rapidly and efficiently determine the variable regions of both T-cell receptor chains. The results obtained by the non-palindromic adaptor-PCR method were confirmed by the isolation and sequencing of the complete cDNA genes and by the recognition with a specific antibody against the T-cell receptor variable ß chain. We conclude that the non-palindromic adaptor-PCR method can be a valuable tool for the identification of the T-cell receptor transcripts of T-cell hybridomas and may facilitate the generation of T-cell receptor transgenic mice.

  11. ER Adaptor SCAP Translocates and Recruits IRF3 to Perinuclear Microsome Induced by Cytosolic Microbial DNAs.

    Wei Chen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Stimulator of interferon genes (STING, also known as MITA, ERIS or MPYS induces the activation of TBK1 kinase and IRF3 transcription factor, upon sensing of microbial DNAs. How IRF3 is recruited onto the STING signalosome remains unknown. We report here that silencing of the ER adaptor SCAP markedly impairs the IRF3-responsive gene expression induced by STING. Scap knockdown mice are more susceptible to HSV-1 infection. Interestingly, SCAP translocates from ER, via Golgi, to perinuclear microsome in a STING-dependent manner. Mechanistically, the N-terminal transmembrane domain of SCAP interacts with STING, and the C-terminal cytosolic domain of SCAP binds to IRF3, thus recruiting IRF3 onto STING signalosome. Mis-localization of SCAP abolishes its antiviral function. Collectively, this study characterizes SCAP as an essential adaptor in the STING signaling pathway, uncovering a critical missing link in DNAs-triggered host antiviral responses.

  12. Nck adaptors are positive regulators of the size and sensitivity of the T-cell repertoire.

    Roy, Edwige; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Holdorf, Amy D; Trubetskoy, Dmitry; Nabti, Sabrina; Küblbeck, Günter; Klevenz, Alexandra; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Leithäuser, Frank; Möller, Peter; Bladt, Friedhelm; Hämmerling, Günter; Arnold, Bernd; Pawson, Tony; Tafuri, Anna

    2010-08-31

    The size and sensitivity of the T-cell repertoire governs the effectiveness of immune responses against invading pathogens. Both are modulated by T-cell receptor (TCR) activity through molecular mechanisms, which remain unclear. Here, we provide genetic evidence that the SH2/SH3 domain containing proteins Nck lower the threshold of T-cell responsiveness. The hallmarks of Nck deletion were T-cell lymphopenia and hyporeactivity to TCR-mediated stimulation. In the absence of the Nck adaptors, peripheral T cells expressing a TCR with low avidity for self-antigens were strongly reduced, whereas an overall impairment of T-cell activation by weak antigenic stimulation was observed. Mechanistically, Nck deletion resulted in a significant decrease in calcium mobilization and ERK phosphorylation upon TCR engagement. Taken together, our findings unveil a crucial role for the Nck adaptors in shaping the T-cell repertoire to ensure maximal antigenic coverage and optimal T cell excitability. PMID:20709959

  13. PIP2: choreographer of actin-adaptor proteins in the HIV-1 dance

    Rocha-Perugini, Vera; Gordon-Alonso, Mónica; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton plays a key role during the replication cycle of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1). HIV-1 infection is affected by cellular proteins that influence the clustering of viral receptors or the subcortical actin cytoskeleton. Several of these actin-adaptor proteins are controlled by the second messenger phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2), an important regulator of actin organization. PIP2 production is induced by HIV-1 attachment and facilitates viral infection. However, the importance of PIP2 in regulating cytoskeletal proteins and thus HIV-1 infection has been overlooked. This review examines recent reports describing the roles played by actin-adaptor proteins during HIV-1 infection of CD4+ T cells, highlighting the influence of the signaling lipid PIP2 in this process. PMID:24768560

  14. The interaction between the adaptor protein APS and Enigma is involved in actin organisation

    Barres, Romain; Gonzalez, Teresa; Le Marchand-Brustel, Yannick; Tanti, Jean-François

    2005-01-01

    APS (adaptor protein with PH and SH2 domains) is an adaptor protein phosphorylated by several tyrosine kinase receptors including the insulin receptor. To identify novel binding partners of APS, we performed yeast two-hybrid screening. We identified Enigma, a PDZ and LIM domain-containing protein...... that was previously shown to be associated with the actin cytoskeleton. In HEK 293 cells, Enigma interacted specifically with APS, but not with the APS-related protein SH2-B. This interaction required the NPTY motif of APS and the LIM domains of Enigma. In NIH-3T3 cells that express the insulin...... receptor, Enigma and APS were partially co-localised with F-actin in small ruffling structures. Insulin increased the complex formation between APS and Enigma and their co-localisation in large F-actin containing ruffles. While in NIH-3T3 and HeLa cells the co-expression of both Enigma and APS did not...

  15. Chromatin Adaptor Brd4 Modulates E2 Transcription Activity and Protein Stability*

    Lee, A-Young; Chiang, Cheng-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Brd4 is a chromatin adaptor containing tandem bromodomains binding to acetylated histone H3 and H4. Although Brd4 has been implicated in the transcriptional control of papillomavirus-encoded E2 protein, it is unclear how Brd4 regulates E2 function and whether the involvement of Brd4 in transactivation and transrepression is common to different types of E2 proteins. Using DNase I footprinting performed with in vitro reconstituted human papillomavirus (HPV) chromatin and...

  16. Selective autophagy of non-ubiquitylated targets in plants: looking for cognate receptor/adaptor proteins

    Vasko eVeljanovski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular homeostasis is essential for the physiology of eukaryotic cells. Eukaryotic cells, including plant cells, utilize two main pathways to adjust the level of cytoplasmic components, namely the proteasomal and the lysosomal/vacuolar pathways. Macroautophagy is a lysosomal/vacuolar pathway which, until recently, was thought to be non-specific and a bulk degradation process. However, selective autophagy which can be activated in the cell under various physiological conditions, involves the specific degradation of defined macromolecules or organelles by a conserved molecular mechanism. For this process to be efficient, the mechanisms underlying the recognition and selection of the cargo to be engulfed by the double-membrane autophagosome are critical, and not yet well understood. Ubiquitin (poly-ubiquitin conjugation to the target appears to be a conserved ligand mechanism in many types of selective autophagy, and defined receptors/adaptors recognizing and regulating the autophagosomal capture of the ubiquitylated target have been characterized. However, non-proteinaceous and non-ubiquitylated cargoes are also selectively degraded by this pathway. This ubiquitin-independent selective autophagic pathway also involves receptor and/or adaptor proteins linking the cargo to the autophagic machinery. Some of these receptor/adaptor proteins including accessory autophagy-related (Atg and non-Atg proteins have been described in yeast and animal cells but not yet in plants. In this review we discuss the ubiquitin-independent cargo selection mechanisms in selective autophagy degradation of organelles and macromolecules and speculate on potential plant receptor/adaptor proteins.

  17. Autoinhibition of Mint1 adaptor protein regulates amyloid precursor protein binding and processing

    Matos, Maria F.; Xu, Yibin; Dulubova, Irina; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Richardson, John M.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Rizo, Josep; Ho, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Mint adaptor proteins bind to the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and regulate APP processing associated with Alzheimer’s disease; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying Mint regulation in APP binding and processing remain unclear. Biochemical, biophysical, and cellular experiments now show that the Mint1 phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domain that binds to APP is intramolecularly inhibited by the adjacent C-terminal linker region. The crystal structure of a C-terminally extended Mint1 PT...

  18. Nck adaptors are positive regulators of the size and sensitivity of the T-cell repertoire

    Roy, Edwige; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Holdorf, Amy D.; Trubetskoy, Dmitry; Nabti, Sabrina; Küblbeck, Günter; Klevenz, Alexandra; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Leithäuser, Frank; Möller, Peter; Bladt, Friedhelm; Hämmerling, Günter; Arnold, Bernd; Pawson, Tony; Tafuri, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The size and sensitivity of the T-cell repertoire governs the effectiveness of immune responses against invading pathogens. Both are modulated by T-cell receptor (TCR) activity through molecular mechanisms, which remain unclear. Here, we provide genetic evidence that the SH2/SH3 domain containing proteins Nck lower the threshold of T-cell responsiveness. The hallmarks of Nck deletion were T-cell lymphopenia and hyporeactivity to TCR-mediated stimulation. In the absence of the Nck adaptors, pe...

  19. Biochemical and Structural Studies on the Adaptor Protein p130Cas

    Nasertorabi, Fariborz

    2005-01-01

    Crk associated substrate (Cas) is an adaptor protein that becomes phosphorylated upon integrin signaling and influences regulation of cell processes such as migration, proliferation and survival. It consists of multiple domains and regions that can interact with several signaling proteins involved in different signaling pathways. Cas was first discovered as a highly phosphorylated protein in v-Src and v-Crk transformed cells, showing involvement of this protein in cell transformation High lev...

  20. Clathrin and HA2 adaptors: effects of potassium depletion, hypertonic medium, and cytosol acidification

    1993-01-01

    The effects of methods known to perturb endocytosis from clathrin- coated pits on the localization of clathrin and HA2 adaptors in HEp-2 carcinoma cells have been studied by immunofluorescence and ultrastructural immunogold microscopy, using internalization of transferrin as a functional assay. Potassium depletion, as well as incubation in hypertonic medium, remove membrane-associated clathrin lattices: flat clathrin lattices and coated pits from the plasma membrane, and clathrin-coated vesic...

  1. Science Signaling Podcast for 12 July 2016: Adaptor proteins limit signaling.

    Wiley, H Steven; VanHook, Annalisa M

    2016-01-01

    This Podcast features an interview with Steven Wiley, senior author of a Research Article that appears in the 12 July 2016 issue of Science Signaling, about how the abundance of adaptor proteins and feedback regulators affect the flow of information downstream of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Information flows through a signaling pathway by sequential interactions between core components of the pathway, many of which have enzymatic activity. Adaptor proteins do not directly participate in relaying the signal and do not have enzymatic activity, but are important for signaling because they facilitate interactions between the core components. Using quantitative methods, Shi et al demonstrated that core components of the EGFR pathway were highly abundant in both normal cells and cancer cells. However, adaptor proteins were present in much lower abundance in both cell types, indicating that it is the abundance of these proteins that limit signaling downstream of EGFR. The authors also found that differences in EGFR signaling between different cell types likely resulted from the variable abundance of feedback regulators.Listen to Podcast. PMID:27405978

  2. New Insights to Clathrin and Adaptor Protein 2 for the Design and Development of Therapeutic Strategies

    Ebbe Toftgaard Poulsen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP has been extensively studied for its role as the precursor of the β-amyloid protein (Aβ in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. However, our understanding of the normal function of APP is still patchy. Emerging evidence indicates that a dysfunction in APP trafficking and degradation can be responsible for neuronal deficits and progressive degeneration in humans. We recently reported that the Y682 mutation in the 682YENPTY687 domain of APP affects its binding to specific adaptor proteins and leads to its anomalous trafficking, to defects in the autophagy machinery and to neuronal degeneration. In order to identify adaptors that influence APP function, we performed pull-down experiments followed by quantitative mass spectrometry (MS on hippocampal tissue extracts of three month-old mice incubated with either the 682YENPTY687 peptide, its mutated form, 682GENPTY687 or its phosphorylated form, 682pYENPTY687. Our experiments resulted in the identification of two proteins involved in APP internalization and trafficking: Clathrin heavy chain (hc and its Adaptor Protein 2 (AP-2. Overall our results consolidate and refine the importance of Y682 in APP normal functions from an animal model of premature aging and dementia. Additionally, they open the perspective to consider Clathrin hc and AP-2 as potential targets for the design and development of new therapeutic strategies.

  3. Regulation and function of the CD3¿ DxxxLL motif: a binding site for adaptor protein-1 and adaptor protein-2 in vitro

    Dietrich, J; Kastrup, J; Nielsen, B L;

    1997-01-01

    /CD3gamma chimeras; and in vitro by binding CD3gamma peptides to clathrin-coated vesicle adaptor proteins (APs). We find that the CD3gamma D127xxxLL131/132 sequence represents one united motif for binding of both AP-1 and AP-2, and that this motif functions as an active sorting motif in monomeric CD4...... and for AP binding in vitro. Furthermore, we provide evidence indicating that phosphorylation of CD3gamma S126 in the context of the complete TCR induces a conformational change that exposes the DxxxLL sequence for AP binding. Exposure of the DxxxLL motif causes an increase in the TCR internalization...

  4. Proteins recruited by SH3 domains of Ruk/CIN85 adaptor identified by LC-MS/MS

    Havrylov Serhiy

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ruk/CIN85 is a mammalian adaptor molecule with three SH3 domains. Using its SH3 domains Ruk/CIN85 can cluster multiple proteins and protein complexes, and, consequently, facilitates organisation of elaborate protein interaction networks with diverse regulatory roles. Previous research linked Ruk/CIN85 with the regulation of vesicle-mediated transport and cancer cell invasiveness. Despite the recent findings, precise molecular functions of Ruk/CIN85 in these processes remain largely elusive and further research is hampered by a lack of complete lists of its partner proteins. Results In the present study we employed a LC-MS/MS-based experimental pipeline to identify a considerable number (over 100 of proteins recruited by the SH3 domains of Ruk/CIN85 in vitro. Most of these identifications are novel Ruk/CIN85 interaction candidates. The identified proteins have diverse molecular architectures and can interact with other proteins, as well as with lipids and nucleic acids. Some of the identified proteins possess enzymatic activities. Functional profiling analyses and literature mining demonstrate that many of the proteins recruited by the SH3 domains of Ruk/CIN85 identified in this work were involved in the regulation of membranes and cytoskeletal structures necessary for vesicle-mediated transport and cancer cell invasiveness. Several groups of the proteins were also associated with few other cellular processes not previously related to Ruk/CIN85, most prominently with cell division. Conclusion Obtained data support the notion that Ruk/CIN85 regulates vesicle-mediated transport and cancer cell invasiveness through the assembly of multimeric protein complexes governing coordinated remodelling of membranes and underlying cytoskeletal structures, and imply its important roles in formation of coated vesicles and biogenesis of invadopodia. In addition, this study points to potential involvement of Ruk/CIN85 in other cellular

  5. DNA as Tunable Adaptor for siRNA Polyplex Stabilization and Functionalization.

    Heissig, Philipp; Klein, Philipp M; Hadwiger, Philipp; Wagner, Ernst

    2016-01-01

    siRNA and microRNA are promising therapeutic agents, which are engaged in a natural mechanism called RNA interference that modulates gene expression posttranscriptionally. For intracellular delivery of such nucleic acid triggers, we use sequence-defined cationic polymers manufactured through solid phase chemistry. They consist of an oligoethanamino amide core for siRNA complexation and optional domains for nanoparticle shielding and cell targeting. Due to the small size of siRNA, electrostatic complexes with polycations are less stable, and consequently intracellular delivery is less efficient. Here we use DNA oligomers as adaptors to increase size and charge of cargo siRNA, resulting in increased polyplex stability, which in turn boosts transfection efficiency. Extending a single siRNA with a 181-nucleotide DNA adaptor is sufficient to provide maximum gene silencing aided by cationic polymers. Interestingly, this simple strategy was far more effective than merging defined numbers (4-10) of siRNA units into one DNA scaffolded construct. For DNA attachment, the 3' end of the siRNA passenger strand was beneficial over the 5' end. The impact of the attachment site however was resolved by introducing bioreducible disulfides at the connection point. We also show that DNA adaptors provide the opportunity to readily link additional functional domains to siRNA. Exemplified by the covalent conjugation of the endosomolytic influenza peptide INF-7 to siRNA via a DNA backbone strand and complexing this construct with a targeting polymer, we could form a highly functional polyethylene glycol-shielded polyplex to downregulate a luciferase gene in folate receptor-positive cells. PMID:26928236

  6. Evidence for an evolutionary relationship between the large adaptor nucleoporin Nup192 and karyopherins.

    Stuwe, Tobias; Lin, Daniel H; Collins, Leslie N; Hurt, Ed; Hoelz, André

    2014-02-18

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport is facilitated by nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), which are massive proteinaceous transport channels embedded in the nuclear envelope. Nup192 is a major component of an adaptor nucleoporin subcomplex proposed to link the NPC coat with the central transport channel. Here, we present the structure of the ∼110-kDa N-terminal domain (NTD) of Nup192 at 2.7-Å resolution. The structure reveals an open ring-shaped architecture composed of Huntingtin, EF3, PP2A, and TOR1 (HEAT) and Armadillo (ARM) repeats. A comparison of different conformations indicates that the NTD consists of two rigid halves connected by a flexible hinge. Unexpectedly, the two halves of the ring are structurally related to karyopherin-α (Kap-α) and β-karyopherin family members. Biochemically, we identify a conserved patch that binds an unstructured segment in Nup53 and show that a C-terminal tail region binds to a putative helical fragment in Nic96. The Nup53 segment that binds Nup192 is a classical nuclear localization-like sequence that interacts with Kap-α in a mutually exclusive and mechanistically distinct manner. The disruption of the Nup53 and Nic96 binding sites in vivo yields growth and mRNA export defects, revealing their critical role in proper NPC function. Surprisingly, both interactions are dispensable for NPC localization, suggesting that Nup192 possesses another nucleoporin interaction partner. These data indicate that the structured domains in the adaptor nucleoporin complex are held together by peptide interactions that resemble those found in karyopherin•cargo complexes and support the proposal that the adaptor nucleoporins arose from ancestral karyopherins. PMID:24505056

  7. The clathrin adaptor complexes as a paradigm for membrane-associated allostery

    Canagarajah, Bertram J.; Ren, Xuefeng; Bonifacino, Juan S.; Hurley, James H.

    2013-01-01

    The clathrin-associated adaptor protein (AP) complexes AP-1 and AP-2 are two members of a family of heterotetrameric assemblies that connect transmembrane protein cargo to vesicular coats. Cargo binding by AP-1 is activated by the small GTPase Arf1, while AP-2 is activated by the phosphoinositide PI(4,5)P2. The structures of both AP-1 and AP-2 have been determined in their locked and unlocked conformations. The structures show how different activators use different mechanisms to trigger simil...

  8. Transmembrane adaptor proteins in the high-affinity IgE receptor signaling

    Dráber, Petr; Hálová, Ivana; Levi-Schaffer, F.; Dráberová, Lubica

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2, 11.1. (2012), s. 95. ISSN 1664-3224 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0506; GA ČR GA301/09/1826; GA ČR GAP302/10/1759; GA AV ČR KAN200520701 Grant ostatní: AV ČR(CZ) M200520901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : IgE receptor * LAT/LAT1 * LAX * NTAL/Lab/LAT2 * PAG/Cbp * mast cells * plasma membrane * transmembrane adaptor proteins Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  9. Photoisomerisable molecules

    Peris Fajarnes, Eduardo Víctor; Mata Martínez, José Antonio; Márquez Linares, Francisco Manuel; Sabater Picot, María José

    2005-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to a molecule comprising at least one carbon-carbon double bond which is substituted by at least one cyclopentadienyl-metal-cyclopentadienyl complex, having the cis/trans isomerisation property, in a reversible manner in response to the absorption of light. Preferably, the rest of the molecule comprises a dendrimer of any generation, advantageously of the polypropylenimine octaamine type. The inventive molecule can be used as a molecular switch and in various differ...

  10. The role of small adaptor proteins in the control of oncogenic signaling driven by tyrosine kinases in human cancer

    Naudin, Cécile; Chevalier, Clément; Roche, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation on tyrosine (Tyr) residues has evolved as an important mechanism to coordinate cell communication in multicellular organisms. The importance of this process has been revealed by the discovery of the prominent oncogenic properties of tyrosine kinases (TK) upon deregulation of their physiological activities, often due to protein overexpression and/or somatic mutation. Recent reports suggest that TK oncogenic signaling is also under the control of small adaptor proteins. These cytosolic proteins lack intrinsic catalytic activity and signal by linking two functional members of a catalytic pathway. While most adaptors display positive regulatory functions, a small group of this family exerts negative regulatory functions by targeting several components of the TK signaling cascade. Here, we review how these less studied adaptor proteins negatively control TK activities and how their loss of function induces abnormal TK signaling, promoting tumor formation. We also discuss the therapeutic consequences of this novel regulatory mechanism in human oncology. PMID:26788993

  11. The Adaptor Protein Rai/ShcC Promotes Astrocyte-Dependent Inflammation during Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Ulivieri, Cristina; Savino, Maria Teresa; Luccarini, Ilaria; Fanigliulo, Emanuela; Aldinucci, Alessandra; Bonechi, Elena; Benagiano, Marisa; Ortensi, Barbara; Pelicci, Giuliana; D'Elios, Mario Milco; Ballerini, Clara; Baldari, Cosima Tatiana

    2016-07-15

    Th17 cells have been casually associated to the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. We have previously demonstrated that Rai/ShcC, a member of the Shc family of adaptor proteins, negatively regulates Th17 cell differentiation and lupus autoimmunity. In this study, we have investigated the pathogenic outcome of the Th17 bias associated with Rai deficiency on multiple sclerosis development, using the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model. We found that, unexpectedly, EAE was less severe in Rai(-/-) mice compared with their wild-type counterparts despite an enhanced generation of myelin-specific Th17 cells that infiltrated into the CNS. Nevertheless, when adoptively transferred into immunodeficient Rai(+/+) mice, these cells promoted a more severe disease compared with wild-type encephalitogenic Th17 cells. This paradoxical phenotype was caused by a dampened inflammatory response of astrocytes, which were found to express Rai, to IL-17. The results provide evidence that Rai plays opposite roles in Th17 cell differentiation and astrocyte activation, with the latter dominant over the former in EAE, highlighting this adaptor as a potential novel target for the therapy of multiple sclerosis. PMID:27288534

  12. The Cytoplasmic Adaptor Protein Dok7 Activates the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase MuSK via Dimerization

    Bergamin, E.; Hallock, P; Burden, S; Hubbard, S

    2010-01-01

    Formation of the vertebrate neuromuscular junction requires, among others proteins, Agrin, a neuronally derived ligand, and the following muscle proteins: LRP4, the receptor for Agrin; MuSK, a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK); and Dok7 (or Dok-7), a cytoplasmic adaptor protein. Dok7 comprises a pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain, a phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain, and C-terminal sites of tyrosine phosphorylation. Unique among adaptor proteins recruited to RTKs, Dok7 is not only a substrate of MuSK, but also an activator of MuSK's kinase activity. Here, we present the crystal structure of the Dok7 PH-PTB domains in complex with a phosphopeptide representing the Dok7-binding site on MuSK. The structure and biochemical data reveal a dimeric arrangement of Dok7 PH-PTB that facilitates trans-autophosphorylation of the kinase activation loop. The structure provides the molecular basis for MuSK activation by Dok7 and for rationalizing several Dok7 loss-of-function mutations found in patients with congenital myasthenic syndromes.

  13. Effectiveness of Needleless Vial Adaptors and Blunt Cannulas for Drug Administration in a Microgravity Environment

    Hailey, M.; Bayuse, T.

    2010-01-01

    Fluid Isolation in the medication vial: Air/ fluid isolation maneuvers were used to move the medication to the septum end of vial. This isolation may be achieved in multiple ways based on the experience of the astronaut with fluid management in microgravity. If vial adaptors/blunt cannula or syringe assembly is inserted into the to vial before fluid isolation commences, the stability of this assembly should be considered in an effort to limit the risk of "slinging off" of the vial during isolation. Alternatively, fluid isolation can be performed prior to attaching the syringe/vial adaptor assembly. Terrestrial practices for medication withdrawal from a nonvented vial require injection of an equivalent amount of air as the expected medication volume prior to withdrawing liquid. In microgravity, this action is still valid, however the injection of additional air into the vial creates a multitude of micro bubbles and increases the volume of medication mixed with air that then must be withdrawn to achieve the desired drug volume in syringe. This practice is more likely to be required when using vials >30ml in size and injection volumes >10mL. It is felt that based on the microgravity flight, the practice of air injection is more of a hindrance than help.

  14. Enumerating molecules.

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr. (, . Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN); Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Roe, Diana C.

    2004-04-01

    This report is a comprehensive review of the field of molecular enumeration from early isomer counting theories to evolutionary algorithms that design molecules in silico. The core of the review is a detail account on how molecules are counted, enumerated, and sampled. The practical applications of molecular enumeration are also reviewed for chemical information, structure elucidation, molecular design, and combinatorial library design purposes. This review is to appear as a chapter in Reviews in Computational Chemistry volume 21 edited by Kenny B. Lipkowitz.

  15. Parallel SCF adaptor capture proteomics reveals a role for SCFFBXL17 in NRF2 activation via BACH1 repressor turnover.

    Tan, Meng-Kwang Marcus; Lim, Hui-Jun; Bennett, Eric J; Shi, Yang; Harper, J Wade

    2013-10-10

    Modular cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) use substrate binding adaptor proteins to specify target ubiquitylation. Many of the ~200 human CRL adaptor proteins remain poorly studied due to a shortage of efficient methods to identify biologically relevant substrates. Here, we report the development of parallel adaptor capture (PAC) proteomics and its use to systematically identify candidate targets for the leucine-rich repeat family of F-box proteins (FBXLs) that function with SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein (SCF) E3s. In validation experiments, we identify the unstudied F-box protein FBXL17 as a regulator of the NFR2 oxidative stress pathway. We demonstrate that FBXL17 controls the transcription of the NRF2 target HMOX1 via turnover of the transcriptional repressor BACH1 in the absence or presence of extrinsic oxidative stress. This work identifies a role for SCF(FBXL17) in controlling the threshold for NRF2-dependent gene activation and provides a framework for elucidating the functions of CRL adaptor proteins. PMID:24035498

  16. Phosphorylation-Dependent Regulation of the DNA Damage Response of Adaptor Protein KIBRA in Cancer Cells.

    Mavuluri, Jayadev; Beesetti, Swarnalatha; Surabhi, Rohan; Kremerskothen, Joachim; Venkatraman, Ganesh; Rayala, Suresh K

    2016-05-01

    Multifunctional adaptor proteins encompassing various protein-protein interaction domains play a central role in the DNA damage response pathway. In this report, we show that KIBRA is a physiologically interacting reversible substrate of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase. We identified the site of phosphorylation in KIBRA as threonine 1006, which is embedded within the serine/threonine (S/T) Q consensus motif, by site-directed mutagenesis, and we further confirmed the same with a phospho-(S/T) Q motif-specific antibody. Results from DNA repair functional assays such as the γ-H2AX assay, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), Comet assay, terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, and clonogenic cell survival assay using stable overexpression clones of wild-type (wt.) KIBRA and active (T1006E) and inactive (T1006A) KIBRA phosphorylation mutants showed that T1006 phosphorylation on KIBRA is essential for optimal DNA double-strand break repair in cancer cells. Further, results from stable retroviral short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown (KD) clones of KIBRA and KIBRA knockout (KO) model cells generated by a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas9 system showed that depleting KIBRA levels compromised the DNA repair functions in cancer cells upon inducing DNA damage. All these phenotypic events were reversed upon reconstitution of KIBRA into cells lacking KIBRA knock-in (KI) model cells. All these results point to the fact that phosphorylated KIBRA might be functioning as a scaffolding protein/adaptor protein facilitating the platform for further recruitment of other DNA damage response factors. In summary, these data demonstrate the imperative functional role of KIBRAper se(KIBRA phosphorylation at T1006 site as a molecular switch that regulates the DNA damage response, possibly via the nonhomologous end joining [NHEJ] pathway), suggesting that KIBRA could be a potential

  17. Effectiveness of Needles Vial Adaptors and Blunt Cannulas for Drug Administration in a Microgravity Environment

    Hailey, Melinda; Bayuse, Tina

    2009-01-01

    The need for a new system of injectable medications aboard the International Space Station (ISS) was identified. It is desired that this system fly medications in their original manufacturer's packaging, allowing the system to comply with United States Pharmacopeia (USP) guidelines while minimizing the resupply frequency due to medication expiration. Pre-filled syringes are desired, however, the evolving nature of the healthcare marketplace requires flexibility in the redesign. If medications must be supplied in a vial, a system is required that allows for the safe withdrawal of medication from the vial into a syringe for administration in microgravity. During two reduced gravity flights, the effectiveness of two versions of a blunt cannula and needleless vial adaptors was evaluated to facilitate the withdrawal of liquid medication from a vial into a syringe for injection. Other parameters assessed included the ability to withdraw the required amount of medication and whether this is dependent on vial size, liquid, or the total volume of fluid within the vial. Injectable medications proposed for flight on ISS were used for this evaluation. Due to differing sizes of vials and the fluid properties of the medications, the needleless vial adaptors proved to be too cumbersome to recommend for use on the ISS. The blunt cannula, specifically the plastic version, proved to be more effective at removing medication from the various sizes of vials and are the recommended hardware for ISS. Fluid isolation within the vials and syringes is an important step in preparing medication for injection regardless of the hardware used. Although isolation is a challenge in the relatively short parabolas during flight, it is not an obstacle for sustained microgravity. This presentation will provide an overview of the products tested as well as the challenges identified during the microgravity flights.

  18. The Influences of Connectors and Adaptors to Fiber-To-The-Home Network Performance

    Mohammad S. Ab-Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The reliability of the entire communications network was dependent on the reliability of each single element. Connector was important devices that can affect the performance of the fiber communication. There were a large number of issues that affect the performance of fiber optic connectors in todays networks. These factors were increasingly as data rates, the number of wavelengths and transmission distances continue to escalate. Approach: Therefore this study was carried out to test on the influence of connectors and adapters to the performance of the optical network. Initially the actual attenuation of connector and adaptor were tested by using multifunction loss tester. The first two 1 m corning optical fibers with a connector at each end are measured. Then, both the 1 m corning optical fibers were joined together by an adaptor and connected to the Multifunction loss tester. Three types of wavelength are used as the source to test the attenuation of the fiber which is 1310, 1490-1550 nm. In order to measure the Bit Error Rate (BER and the power loss in optical fiber communication, a simple simulation was carried out by using software opti sys. Results: The attenuation on the connector was caused mainly by existence of impurities in the connector, less perfect connection, scattering of beam and others. These causes the parameter such as power received, Q-factor, minimum BER and also the eye-height to change. Changes in these parameters also affect the performance at the user end. It was very critical that causes of attenuation to be eliminated. Conclusion/Recommendations: From the result it can be concluded that, the greater the attenuation, the greater the decrease in power received. It also affects the Q-factor of the system where as the attenuation increase, the maximum Q-factor decreases. As for the minimum BER, minimum BER changes as the attenuation increase initially, after a maximum value it decreases as the

  19. Involvement of β3A Subunit of Adaptor Protein-3 in Intracellular Trafficking of Receptor-like Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PCP-2

    Hui DONG; Hong YUAN; Weirong JIN; Yan SHEN; Xiaojing XU; Hongyang WANG

    2007-01-01

    PCP-2 is a human receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase and a member of the MAM domain family cloned in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells. Previous studies showed that PCP-2 directly interacted with β-catenin through the juxtamembrane domain, dephosphorylated β-catenin and played an important role in the regulation of cell adhesion. Recent study showed that PCP-2 was also involved in the repression of β-catenin-induced transcriptional activity. Here we describe the interactions of PCP-2 with the β3A subunit of adaptor protein (AP)-3 and sorting nexin (SNX) 3. These protein complexes were detected using the yeast two-hybrid assay with the juxtamembrane and membrane-proximal catalytic domain of PCP-2 as "bait". Both AP-3 and SNX3 are molecules involved in intracellular trafficking of membrane receptors. The association between the β3A subunit of AP-3 and PCP-2 was further confirmed in mammalian cells. Our results suggested a possible mechanism of intracellular trafficking of PCP-2 mediated by AP-3 and SNX3 which might participate in the regulation of PCP-2 functions.

  20. Fission yeast arrestin-related trafficking adaptor, Arn1/Any1, is ubiquitinated by Pub1 E3 ligase and regulates endocytosis of Cat1 amino acid transporter

    Akio Nakashima

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Tsc1–Tsc2 complex homologous to human tuberous sclerosis complex proteins governs amino acid uptake by regulating the expression and intracellular distribution of amino acid transporters in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here, we performed a genetic screening for molecules that are involved in amino acid uptake and found Arn1 (also known as Any1. Arn1 is homologous to ART1, an arrestin-related trafficking adaptor (ART in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and contains a conserved arrestin motif, a ubiquitination site, and two PY motifs. Overexpression of arn1+ confers canavanine resistance on cells, whereas its disruption causes hypersensitivity to canavanine. We also show that Arn1 regulates endocytosis of the Cat1 amino acid transporter. Furthermore, deletion of arn1+ suppresses a defect of amino acid uptake and the aberrant Cat1 localization in tsc2Δ. Arn1 interacts with and is ubiquitinated by the Pub1 ubiquitin ligase, which is necessary to regulate Cat1 endocytosis. Cat1 undergoes ubiquitinations on lysine residues within the N-terminus, which are mediated, in part, by Arn1 to determine Cat1 localization. Correctively, Arn1 is an ART in S. pombe and contributes to amino acid uptake through regulating Cat1 endocytosis in which Tsc2 is involved.

  1. Crystal structure of Toll-like receptor adaptor MAL/TIRAP reveals the molecular basis for signal transduction and disease protection

    Valkov, Eugene; Stamp, Anna; DiMaio, Frank; Baker, David; Verstak, Brett; Roversi, Pietro; Kellie, Stuart; Sweet, Matthew J.; Mansell, Ashley; Gay, Nicholas J.; Jennifer L Martin; Kobe, Bostjan

    2011-01-01

    Initiation of the innate immune response requires agonist recognition by pathogen-recognition receptors such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing adaptors are critical in orchestrating the signal transduction pathways after TLR and interleukin-1 receptor activation. Myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) adaptor-like (MAL)/TIR domain-containing adaptor protein (TIRAP) is involved in bridging MyD88 to TLR2 and TLR4 in response...

  2. Comparison Study on Finite Element Model for Structural Analysis of Lower CTS Cylinder Lifting Adaptor in ITER Assembly Tool

    The ITER tokamak assembly tools are purpose-built and specially designed to complete the ITER tokamak machine which includes; Vacuum Vessel (VV), VV Thermal Shield (VVTS) and Cryostat Thermal Shield (CTS), Toroidal Field Coil (TFC) and Poloidal Field (PF) coils, and other components contained in the cryostat. Based on the engineering design and design description documents prepared by the ITER organization (IO). In this paper, FE models to verify the structural integrity of the Lower Cryostat Thermal Shield (LCTS) Lifting Adaptor are prepared and compared with their structure analysis result. In the paper, each analysis result with difference BC applied was compared with the equivalent stress and the results of analysis were evaluated according to SM490YB's allowable stress. And the conclusions of this paper are summarized as following. - The structural stabilities of the LCTS lift adaptor have been studied using ANSYS codes for verifying structural strength for this tool

  3. ATP binding to p97/VCP D1 domain regulates selective recruitment of adaptors to its proximal N-domain.

    Wei Sheng Chia

    Full Text Available p97/Valosin-containing protein (VCP is a member of the AAA-ATPase family involved in many cellular processes including cell division, intracellular trafficking and extraction of misfolded proteins in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD. It is a homohexamer with each subunit containing two tandem D1 and D2 ATPase domains and N- and C-terminal regions that function as adaptor protein binding domains. p97/VCP is directed to its many different functional pathways by associating with various adaptor proteins. The regulation of the recruitment of the adaptor proteins remains unclear. Two adaptor proteins, Ufd1/Npl4 and p47, which bind exclusively to the p97/VCP N-domain and direct p97/VCP to either ERAD-related processes or homotypic fusion of Golgi fragments, were studied here. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor-based assays allowed the study of binding kinetics in real time. In competition experiments, it was observed that in the presence of ATP, Ufd1/Npl4 was able to compete more effectively with p47 for binding to p97/VCP. By using non-hydrolysable ATP analogues and the hexameric truncated p97/N-D1 fragment, it was shown that binding rather than hydrolysis of ATP to the proximal D1 domain strengthened the Ufd1/Npl4 association with the N-domain, thus regulating the recruitment of either Ufd1/Npl4 or p47. This novel role of ATP and an assigned function to the D1 AAA-ATPase domain link the multiple functions of p97/VCP to the metabolic status of the cell.

  4. Chemical-genetic disruption of clathrin function spares adaptor complex 3–dependent endosome vesicle biogenesis

    Zlatic, Stephanie A.; Grossniklaus, Emily J.; Ryder, Pearl V.; Salazar, Gloria; Mattheyses, Alexa L.; Peden, Andrew A.; Faundez, Victor

    2013-01-01

    A role for clathrin in AP-3–dependent vesicle biogenesis has been inferred from biochemical interactions and colocalization between this adaptor and clathrin. The functionality of these molecular associations, however, is controversial. We comprehensively explore the role of clathrin in AP-3–dependent vesicle budding, using rapid chemical-genetic perturbation of clathrin function with a clathrin light chain–FKBP chimera oligomerizable by the drug AP20187. We find that AP-3 interacts and coloc...

  5. LIME: a new membrane raft-associated adaptor protein involved in CD4 and CD8 coreceptor signaling

    Brdičková, Naděžda; Brdička, Tomáš; Angelisová, Pavla; Horváth, Ondřej; Špička, Jiří; Hilgert, Ivan; Pačes, Jan; Simeoni, L.; Kliche, S.; Merten, C.; Schraven, B.; Hořejší, Václav

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 198, č. 10 (2003), s. 1453-1462. ISSN 0022-1007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A079; GA MŠk LN00A026 Grant ostatní: Wellcome Trust(GB) J1116W24Z Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : immunology * T-lymphocyte * adaptor protein Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 15.302, year: 2003

  6. Molecular protein adaptor with genetically encoded interaction sites guiding the hierarchical assembly of plasmonically active nanoparticle architectures

    Schreiber, Andreas; Huber, Matthias C.; Cölfen, Helmut; Schiller, Stefan M.

    2015-03-01

    The control over the defined assembly of nano-objects with nm-precision is important to create systems and materials with enhanced properties, for example, metamaterials. In nature, the precise assembly of inorganic nano-objects with unique features, for example, magnetosomes, is accomplished by efficient and reliable recognition schemes involving protein effectors. Here we present a molecular approach using protein-based ‘adaptors/connectors’ with genetically encoded interaction sites to guide the assembly and functionality of different plasmonically active gold nanoparticle architectures (AuNP). The interaction of the defined geometricaly shaped protein adaptors with the AuNP induces the self-assembly of nanoarchitectures ranging from AuNP encapsulation to one-dimensional chain-like structures, complex networks and stars. Synthetic biology and bionanotechnology are applied to co-translationally encode unnatural amino acids as additional site-specific modification sites to generate functionalized biohybrid nanoarchitectures. This protein adaptor-based nano-object assembly approach might be expanded to other inorganic nano-objects creating biohybrid materials with unique electronic, photonic, plasmonic and magnetic properties.

  7. Adaptor protein LNK is a negative regulator of brain neural stem cell proliferation after stroke.

    Ahlenius, Henrik; Devaraju, Karthikeyan; Monni, Emanuela; Oki, Koichi; Wattananit, Somsak; Darsalia, Vladimer; Iosif, Robert E; Torper, Olof; Wood, James C; Braun, Sebastian; Jagemann, Lucas; Nuber, Ulrike A; Englund, Elisabet; Jacobsen, Sten-Eirik W; Lindvall, Olle; Kokaia, Zaal

    2012-04-11

    Ischemic stroke causes transient increase of neural stem and progenitor cell (NSPC) proliferation in the subventricular zone (SVZ), and migration of newly formed neuroblasts toward the damaged area where they mature to striatal neurons. The molecular mechanisms regulating this plastic response, probably involved in structural reorganization and functional recovery, are poorly understood. The adaptor protein LNK suppresses hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal, but its presence and role in the brain are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that LNK is expressed in NSPCs in the adult mouse and human SVZ. Lnk(-/-) mice exhibited increased NSPC proliferation after stroke, but not in intact brain or following status epilepticus. Deletion of Lnk caused increased NSPC proliferation while overexpression decreased mitotic activity of these cells in vitro. We found that Lnk expression after stroke increased in SVZ through the transcription factors STAT1/3. LNK attenuated insulin-like growth factor 1 signaling by inhibition of AKT phosphorylation, resulting in reduced NSPC proliferation. Our findings identify LNK as a stroke-specific, endogenous negative regulator of NSPC proliferation, and suggest that LNK signaling is a novel mechanism influencing plastic responses in postischemic brain. PMID:22496561

  8. Nrf2 reduces levels of phosphorylated tau protein by inducing autophagy adaptor protein NDP52

    Jo, Chulman; Gundemir, Soner; Pritchard, Susanne; Jin, Youngnam N.; Rahman, Irfan; Johnson, Gail V. W.

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a pivotal transcription factor in the defence against oxidative stress. Here we provide evidence that activation of the Nrf2 pathway reduces the levels of phosphorylated tau by induction of an autophagy adaptor protein NDP52 (also known as CALCOCO2) in neurons. The expression of NDP52, which we show has three antioxidant response elements (AREs) in its promoter region, is strongly induced by Nrf2, and its overexpression facilitates clearance of phosphorylated tau in the presence of an autophagy stimulator. In Nrf2-knockout mice, phosphorylated and sarkosyl-insoluble tau accumulates in the brains concurrent with decreased levels of NDP52. Moreover, NDP52 associates with phosphorylated tau from brain cortical samples of Alzheimer disease cases, and the amount of phosphorylated tau in sarkosyl-insoluble fractions is inversely proportional to that of NDP52. These results suggest that NDP52 plays a key role in autophagy-mediated degradation of phosphorylated tau in vivo.

  9. Cysteine-based regulation of the CUL3 adaptor protein Keap1

    Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) is a master transcription factor containing a powerful acidic transcriptional activation domain. Nrf2-dependent gene expression impacts cancer chemoprevention strategies, inflammatory responses, and progression of neurodegenerative diseases. Under basal conditions, association of Nrf2 with the CUL3 adaptor protein Keap1 results in the rapid Nrf2 ubiquitylation and proteasome-dependent degradation. Inhibition of Keap1 function blocks ubiquitylation of Nrf2, allowing newly synthesized Nrf2 to translocate into the nucleus, bind to ARE sites and direct target gene expression. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments coupled with proteomic analysis support a model in which Keap1 contains at least 2 distinct cysteine motifs. The first is located at Cys 151 in the BTB domain. The second is located in the intervening domain and centers around Cys 273 and 288. Adduction or oxidation at Cys151 has been shown to produce a conformational change in Keap1 that results in dissociation of Keap1 from CUL3, thereby inhibiting Nrf2 ubiquitylation. Thus, adduction captures specific chemical information and translates it into biochemical information via changes in structural conformation.

  10. The role of palmitoylation and transmembrane domain in sorting of transmembrane adaptor proteins.

    Chum, Tomáš; Glatzová, Daniela; Kvíčalová, Zuzana; Malínský, Jan; Brdička, Tomáš; Cebecauer, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteins synthesised at the endoplasmic reticulum are delivered to the cell surface via sorting pathways. Hydrophobic mismatch theory based on the length of the transmembrane domain (TMD) dominates discussion about determinants required for protein sorting to the plasma membrane. Transmembrane adaptor proteins (TRAP) are involved in signalling events which take place at the plasma membrane. Members of this protein family have TMDs of varying length. We were interested in whether palmitoylation or other motifs contribute to the effective sorting of TRAP proteins. We found that palmitoylation is essential for some, but not all, TRAP proteins independent of their TMD length. We also provide evidence that palmitoylation and proximal sequences can modulate sorting of artificial proteins with TMDs of suboptimal length. Our observations point to a unique character of each TMD defined by its primary amino acid sequence and its impact on membrane protein localisation. We conclude that, in addition to the TMD length, secondary sorting determinants such as palmitoylation or flanking sequences have evolved for the localisation of membrane proteins. PMID:26585312

  11. Nuclear Translocation of Crk Adaptor Proteins by the Influenza A Virus NS1 Protein

    Ylösmäki, Leena; Fagerlund, Riku; Kuisma, Inka; Julkunen, Ilkka; Saksela, Kalle

    2016-01-01

    The non-structural protein-1 (NS1) of many influenza A strains, especially those of avian origin, contains an SH3 ligand motif, which binds tightly to the cellular adaptor proteins Crk (Chicken tumor virus number 10 (CT10) regulator of kinase) and Crk-like adapter protein (CrkL). This interaction has been shown to potentiate NS1-induced activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), but additional effects on the host cell physiology may exist. Here we show that NS1 can induce an efficient translocation of Crk proteins from the cytoplasm into the nucleus, which results in an altered pattern of nuclear protein tyrosine phosphorylation. This was not observed using NS1 proteins deficient in SH3 binding or engineered to be exclusively cytoplasmic, indicating a physical role for NS1 as a carrier in the nuclear translocation of Crk. These data further emphasize the role of Crk proteins as host cell interaction partners of NS1, and highlight the potential for host cell manipulation gained by a viral protein simply via acquiring a short SH3 binding motif. PMID:27092521

  12. Nuclear Translocation of Crk Adaptor Proteins by the Influenza A Virus NS1 Protein.

    Ylösmäki, Leena; Fagerlund, Riku; Kuisma, Inka; Julkunen, Ilkka; Saksela, Kalle

    2016-01-01

    The non-structural protein-1 (NS1) of many influenza A strains, especially those of avian origin, contains an SH3 ligand motif, which binds tightly to the cellular adaptor proteins Crk (Chicken tumor virus number 10 (CT10) regulator of kinase) and Crk-like adapter protein (CrkL). This interaction has been shown to potentiate NS1-induced activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), but additional effects on the host cell physiology may exist. Here we show that NS1 can induce an efficient translocation of Crk proteins from the cytoplasm into the nucleus, which results in an altered pattern of nuclear protein tyrosine phosphorylation. This was not observed using NS1 proteins deficient in SH3 binding or engineered to be exclusively cytoplasmic, indicating a physical role for NS1 as a carrier in the nuclear translocation of Crk. These data further emphasize the role of Crk proteins as host cell interaction partners of NS1, and highlight the potential for host cell manipulation gained by a viral protein simply via acquiring a short SH3 binding motif. PMID:27092521

  13. Nuclear Translocation of Crk Adaptor Proteins by the Influenza A Virus NS1 Protein

    Leena Ylösmäki

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The non-structural protein-1 (NS1 of many influenza A strains, especially those of avian origin, contains an SH3 ligand motif, which binds tightly to the cellular adaptor proteins Crk (Chicken tumor virus number 10 (CT10 regulator of kinase and Crk-like adapter protein (CrkL. This interaction has been shown to potentiate NS1-induced activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K, but additional effects on the host cell physiology may exist. Here we show that NS1 can induce an efficient translocation of Crk proteins from the cytoplasm into the nucleus, which results in an altered pattern of nuclear protein tyrosine phosphorylation. This was not observed using NS1 proteins deficient in SH3 binding or engineered to be exclusively cytoplasmic, indicating a physical role for NS1 as a carrier in the nuclear translocation of Crk. These data further emphasize the role of Crk proteins as host cell interaction partners of NS1, and highlight the potential for host cell manipulation gained by a viral protein simply via acquiring a short SH3 binding motif.

  14. Canine hepacivirus NS3 serine protease can cleave the human adaptor proteins MAVS and TRIF.

    Mariona Parera

    Full Text Available Canine hepacivirus (CHV was recently identified in domestic dogs and horses. The finding that CHV is genetically the virus most closely related to hepatitis C virus (HCV has raised the question of whether HCV might have evolved as the result of close contact between dogs and/or horses and humans. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the NS3/4A serine protease of CHV specifically cleaves human mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS and Toll-IL-1 receptor domain-containing adaptor inducing interferon-beta (TRIF. The proteolytic activity of CHV NS3/4A was evaluated using a bacteriophage lambda genetic screen. Human MAVS- and TRIF-specific cleavage sites were engineered into the lambda cI repressor. Upon infection of Escherichia coli cells coexpressing these repressors and a CHV NS3/4A construct, lambda phage replicated up to 2000-fold more efficiently than in cells expressing a CHV protease variant carrying the inactivating substitution S139A. Comparable results were obtained when several HCV NS3/4A constructs of genotype 1b were assayed. This indicates that CHV can disrupt the human innate antiviral defense signaling pathway and suggests a possible evolutionary relationship between CHV and HCV.

  15. Surfactant Protein A Enhances Constitutive Immune Functions of Clathrin Heavy Chain and Clathrin Adaptor Protein 2.

    Moulakakis, Christina; Steinhäuser, Christine; Biedziak, Dominika; Freundt, Katja; Reiling, Norbert; Stamme, Cordula

    2016-07-01

    NF-κB transcription factors are key regulators of pulmonary inflammatory disorders and repair. Constitutive lung cell type- and microenvironment-specific NF-κB/inhibitor κBα (IκB-α) regulation, however, is poorly understood. Surfactant protein (SP)-A provides both a critical homeostatic and lung defense control, in part by immune instruction of alveolar macrophages (AMs) via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The central endocytic proteins, clathrin heavy chain (CHC) and the clathrin adaptor protein (AP) complex AP2, have pivotal alternative roles in cellular homeostasis that are endocytosis independent. Here, we dissect endocytic from alternative functions of CHC, the α-subunit of AP2, and dynamin in basal and SP-A-modified LPS signaling of macrophages. As revealed by pharmacological inhibition and RNA interference in primary AMs and RAW264.7 macrophages, respectively, CHC and α-adaptin, but not dynamin, prevent IκB-α degradation and TNF-α release, independent of their canonical role in membrane trafficking. Kinetics studies employing confocal microscopy, Western analysis, and immunomagnetic sorting revealed that SP-A transiently enhances the basal protein expression of CHC and α-adaptin, depending on early activation of protein kinase CK2 (former casein kinase II) and Akt1 in primary AMs from rats, SP-A(+/+), and SP-A(-/-) mice, as well as in vivo when intratracheally administered to SP-A(+/+) mice. Constitutive immunomodulation by SP-A, but not SP-A-mediated inhibition of LPS-induced NF-κB activity and TNF-α release, requires CHC, α-adaptin, and dynamin. Our data demonstrate that endocytic proteins constitutively restrict NF-κB activity in macrophages and provide evidence that SP-A enhances the immune regulatory capacity of these proteins, revealing a previously unknown pathway of microenvironment-specific NF-κB regulation in the lung. PMID:26771574

  16. Genetic Deletion of the Clathrin Adaptor GGA3 Reduces Anxiety and Alters GABAergic Transmission

    Albrecht, David; Lomoio, Selene; Haydon, Philip G.; Moss, Stephen J.; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    Golgi-localized γ-ear-containing ARF binding protein 3 (GGA3) is a monomeric clathrin adaptor that has been shown to regulate the trafficking of the Beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE1), which is required for production of the Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-associated amyloid βpeptide. Our previous studies have shown that BACE1 is degraded via the lysosomal pathway and that depletion of GGA3 results in increased BACE1 levels and activity owing to impaired lysosomal trafficking and degradation. We further demonstrated the role of GGA3 in the regulation of BACE1 in vivo by showing that BACE1 levels are increased in the brain of GGA3 null mice. We report here that GGA3 deletion results in novelty-induced hyperactivity and decreased anxiety-like behaviors. Given the pivotal role of GABAergic transmission in the regulation of anxiety-like behaviors, we performed electrophysiological recordings in hippocampal slices and found increased phasic and decreased tonic inhibition in the dentate gyrus granule cells (DGGC). Moreover, we found that the number of inhibitory synapses is increased in the dentate gyrus of GGA3 null mice in further support of the electrophysiological data. Thus, the increased GABAergic transmission is a leading candidate mechanism underlying the reduced anxiety-like behaviors observed in GGA3 null mice. All together these findings suggest that GGA3 plays a key role in GABAergic transmission. Since BACE1 levels are elevated in the brain of GGA3 null mice, it is possible that at least some of these phenotypes are a consequence of increased processing of BACE1 substrates. PMID:27192432

  17. N-terminal tyrosine modulation of the endocytic adaptor function of the beta-arrestins.

    Marion, Sébastien; Fralish, Gregory B; Laporte, Stéphane; Caron, Marc G; Barak, Larry S

    2007-06-29

    The highly homologous beta-arrestin1 and -2 adaptor proteins play important roles in the function of G protein-coupled receptors. Either beta-arrestin variant can function as a molecular chaperone for clathrin-mediated receptor internalization. This role depends primarily upon two distinct, contiguous C-terminal beta-arrestin motifs recognizing clathrin and the beta-adaptin subunit of AP2. However, a molecular basis is lacking to explain the different endocytic efficacies of the two beta-arrestin isoforms and the observation that beta-arrestin N-terminal substitution mutants can act as dominant negative inhibitors of receptor endocytosis. Despite the near identity of the beta-arrestins throughout their N termini, sequence variability is present at a small number of residues and includes tyrosine to phenylalanine substitutions. Here we show that corresponding N-terminal (Y/F)VTL sequences in beta-arrestin1 and -2 differentially regulate mu-adaptin binding. Our results indicate that the beta-arrestin1 Tyr-54 lessens the interaction with mu-adaptin and moreover is a Src phosphorylation site. A gain of endocytic function is obtained with the beta-arrestin1 Y54F substitution, which improves both the beta-arrestin1 interaction with mu-adaptin and the ability to enhance beta2-adrenergic receptor internalization. These data indicate that beta-arrestin2 utilizes mu-adaptin as an endocytic partner, and that the inability of beta-arrestin1 to sustain a similar degree of interaction with mu-adaptin may result from coordination of Tyr-54 by neighboring residues or its modification by Src kinase. Additionally, these naturally occurring variations in beta-arrestins may also differentially regulate the composition of the signaling complexes organized on the receptor. PMID:17456469

  18. The AP-3 adaptor complex is required for vacuolar function in Arabidopsis

    Maria Zwiewka; Elena Feraru; Barbara M(o)ller; Inhwan Hwang; Mugurel I Feraru; Jürgen Kleine-Vehn; Dolf Weijers; Ji(n) Friml

    2011-01-01

    Subcellular trafficking is required for a multitude of functions in eukaryotic cells.It involves regulation of cargo sorting,vesicle formation,trafficking and fusion processes at multiple levels.Adaptor protein (AP) complexes are key regulators of cargo sorting into vesicles in yeast and mammals but their existence and function in plants have not been demonstrated.Here we report the identification of the protein-affected trafficking 4 (pat4) mutant defective in the putative δ subunit of the AP-3 complex.pat4 and pat2,a mutant isolated from the same GFP imaging-based forward genetic screen that lacks a functional putative AP-3 β,as well as dominant negative AP-3 μ transgenic lines display undistinguishable phenotypes characterized by largely normal morphology and development,but strong intracellular accumulation of membrane proteins in aberrant vacuolar structures.All mutants are defective in morphology and function of lytic and protein storage vacuoles (PSVs) but show normal sorting of reserve proteins to PSVs.Immunoprecipitation experiments and genetic studies revealed tight functional and physical associations of putative AP-3 β and AP-3 δ subunits.Furthermore,both proteins are closely linked with putative AP-3 μ and σ subunits and several components of the clathrin and dynamin machineries.Taken together,these results demonstrate that AP complexes,similar to those in other eukaryotes,exist in plants,and that AP-3 plays a specific role in the regulation of biogenesis and function of vacuoles in plant cells.

  19. Adaptor protein CRK induces epithelial–mesenchymal transition and metastasis of bladder cancer cells through HGF/c-Met feedback loop

    Matsumoto, Ryuji; Tsuda, Masumi; Wang, Lei; Maishi, Nako; Abe, Takashige; Kimura, Taichi; Tanino, Mishie; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Hida, Kyoko; Ohba, Yusuke; Shinohara, Nobuo; Nonomura, Katsuya; Tanaka, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported that an adaptor protein CRK, including CRK-I and CRK-II, plays essential roles in the malignant potential of various aggressive human cancers, suggesting the validity of targeting CRK in molecular targeted therapy of a wide range of cancers. Nevertheless, the role of CRK in human bladder cancer with marked invasion, characterized by distant metastasis and poor prognosis, remains obscure. In the present study, immunohistochemistry indicated a striking enhancement of CRK-I/-II, but not CRK-like, in human bladder cancer tissues compared to normal urothelium. We established CRK-knockdown bladder cancer cells using 5637 and UM-UC-3, which showed a significant decline in cell migration, invasion, and proliferation. It is noteworthy that an elimination of CRK conferred suppressed phosphorylation of c-Met and the downstream scaffold protein Gab1 in a hepatocyte growth factor-dependent and -independent manner. In epithelial–mesenchymal transition-related molecules, E-cadherin was upregulated by CRK elimination, whereas N-cadherin, vimentin, and Zeb1 were downregulated. A similar effect was observed following treatment with c-Met inhibitor SU11274. Depletion of CRK significantly decreased cell proliferation of 5637 and UM-UC-3, consistent with reduced activity of ERK. An orthotopic xenograft model with bioluminescent imaging revealed that CRK knockdown significantly attenuated not only tumor volume but also the number of circulating tumor cells, resulted in a complete abrogation of metastasis. Taken together, this evidence uncovered essential roles of CRK in invasive bladder cancer through the hepatocyte growth factor/c-Met/CRK feedback loop for epithelial–mesenchymal transition induction. Thus, CRK might be a potent molecular target in bladder cancer, particularly for preventing metastasis, leading to the resolution of clinically longstanding critical issues. PMID:25816892

  20. Cooperative and independent roles of the Drp1 adaptors Mff, MiD49 and MiD51 in mitochondrial fission.

    Osellame, Laura D; Singh, Abeer P; Stroud, David A; Palmer, Catherine S; Stojanovski, Diana; Ramachandran, Rajesh; Ryan, Michael T

    2016-06-01

    Cytosolic dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1, also known as DNM1L) is required for both mitochondrial and peroxisomal fission. Drp1-dependent division of these organelles is facilitated by a number of adaptor proteins at mitochondrial and peroxisomal surfaces. To investigate the interplay of these adaptor proteins, we used gene-editing technology to create a suite of cell lines lacking the adaptors MiD49 (also known as MIEF2), MiD51 (also known as MIEF1), Mff and Fis1. Increased mitochondrial connectivity was observed following loss of individual adaptors, and this was further enhanced following the combined loss of MiD51 and Mff. Moreover, loss of adaptors also conferred increased resistance of cells to intrinsic apoptotic stimuli, with MiD49 and MiD51 showing the more prominent role. Using a proximity-based biotin labeling approach, we found close associations between MiD51, Mff and Drp1, but not Fis1. Furthermore, we found that MiD51 can suppress Mff-dependent enhancement of Drp1 GTPase activity. Our data indicates that Mff and MiD51 regulate Drp1 in specific ways to promote mitochondrial fission. PMID:27076521

  1. The AP-1A and AP-1B clathrin adaptor complexes define biochemically and functionally distinct membrane domains

    Fölsch, Heike; Pypaert, Marc; Maday, Sandra; Pelletier, Laurence; Mellman, Ira

    2003-01-01

    Most epithelial cells contain two AP-1 clathrin adaptor complexes. AP-1A is ubiquitously expressed and involved in transport between the TGN and endosomes. AP-1B is expressed only in epithelia and mediates the polarized targeting of membrane proteins to the basolateral surface. Both AP-1 complexes are heterotetramers and differ only in their 50-kD μ1A or μ1B subunits. Here, we show that AP-1A and AP-1B, together with their respective cargoes, define physically and functionally distinct membra...

  2. Competitive and Cooperative Interactions Mediate RNA Transfer from Herpesvirus Saimiri ORF57 to the Mammalian Export Adaptor ALYREF

    Tunnicliffe, Richard B.; Hautbergue, Guillaume M.; Wilson, Stuart A.; Priti Kalra; Golovanov, Alexander P.

    2014-01-01

    The essential herpesvirus adaptor protein HVS ORF57, which has homologs in all other herpesviruses, promotes viral mRNA export by utilizing the cellular mRNA export machinery. ORF57 protein specifically recognizes viral mRNA transcripts, and binds to proteins of the cellular transcription-export (TREX) complex, in particular ALYREF. This interaction introduces viral mRNA to the NXF1 pathway, subsequently directing it to the nuclear pore for export to the cytoplasm. Here we have used a range o...

  3. Characterization of Toll-like receptors in primary lung epithelial cells: strong impact of the TLR3 ligand poly(I:C on the regulation of Toll-like receptors, adaptor proteins and inflammatory response

    Weith Andreas

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial and viral exacerbations play a crucial role in a variety of lung diseases including COPD or asthma. Since the lung epithelium is a major source of various inflammatory mediators that affect the immune response, we analyzed the inflammatory reaction of primary lung epithelial cells to different microbial molecules that are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLR. Methods The effects of TLR ligands on primary small airway epithelial cells were analyzed in detail with respect to cytokine, chemokine and matrix metalloproteinase secretion. In addition, the regulation of the expression of TLRs and their adaptor proteins in small airway epithelial cells was investigated. Results Our data demonstrate that poly(I:C, a synthetic analog of viral dsRNA, mediated the strongest proinflammatory effects among the tested ligands, including an increased secretion of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, GM-CSF, GRO-α, TARC, MCP-1, MIP-3α, RANTES, IFN-β, IP-10 and ITAC as well as an increased release of MMP-1, MMP-8, MMP-9, MMP-10 and MMP-13. Furthermore, our data show that poly(I:C as well as type-1 and type-2 cytokines have a pronounced effect on the expression of TLRs and molecules involved in TLR signaling in small airway epithelial cells. Poly(I:C induced an elevated expression of TLR1, TLR2 and TLR3 and increased the gene expression of the general TLR adaptor MyD88 and IRAK-2. Simultaneously, poly(I:C decreased the expression of TLR5, TLR6 and TOLLIP. Conclusion Poly(I:C, an analog of viral dsRNA and a TLR3 ligand, triggers a strong inflammatory response in small airway epithelial cells that is likely to contribute to viral exacerbations of pulmonary diseases like asthma or COPD. The pronounced effects of poly(I:C on the expression of Toll-like receptors and molecules involved in TLR signaling is assumed to influence the immune response of the lung epithelium to viral and bacterial infections. Likewise, the regulation of TLR expression by type

  4. Downstream Toll-like receptor signaling mediates adaptor-specific cytokine expression following focal cerebral ischemia

    Bolanle Famakin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deletion of some Toll-like receptors (TLRs affords protection against cerebral ischemia, but disruption of their known major downstream adaptors does not. To determine whether compensation in the production of downstream effectors by one pathway when the other is disrupted can explain these findings, we examined cytokine/chemokine expression and inflammatory infiltrates in wild-type (WT, MyD88−/− and TRIF-mutant mice following permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO. Methods Cytokine/chemokine expression was measured with a 25-plex bead array in the serum and brains of all three groups of mice at baseline (no surgery/naïve and at 3 hours and 24 hours following pMCAO. Brain inflammatory and neutrophil infiltrates were examined 24 hours following pMCAO. Results IL-6, keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF and IL-10 were significantly decreased in MyD88−/− mice compared to WT mice following pMCAO. Significantly, decreased levels of the neutrophil chemoattractants KC and G-CSF corresponded with a trend toward fewer neutrophils in the brains of MyD88−/− mice. IP-10 was significantly decreased when either pathway was disrupted. MIP-1α was significantly decreased in TRIF-mutant mice, consistent with TRIF-dependent production. MyD88−/− mice showed elevations of a number of Th2 cytokines, such as IL-13, at baseline, which became significantly decreased following pMCAO. Conclusions Both MyD88 and TRIF mediate pathway-specific cytokine production following focal cerebral ischemia. Our results also suggest a compensatory Th2-type skew at baseline in MyD88−/− mice and a paradoxical switch to a Th1 phenotype following focal cerebral ischemia. The MyD88 pathway directs the expression of neutrophil chemoattractants following cerebral ischemia.

  5. One-way membrane trafficking of SOS in receptor-triggered Ras activation.

    Christensen, Sune M; Tu, Hsiung-Lin; Jun, Jesse E; Alvarez, Steven; Triplet, Meredith G; Iwig, Jeffrey S; Yadav, Kamlesh K; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Roose, Jeroen P; Groves, Jay T

    2016-09-01

    SOS is a key activator of the small GTPase Ras. In cells, SOS-Ras signaling is thought to be initiated predominantly by membrane recruitment of SOS via the adaptor Grb2 and balanced by rapidly reversible Grb2-SOS binding kinetics. However, SOS has multiple protein and lipid interactions that provide linkage to the membrane. In reconstituted-membrane experiments, these Grb2-independent interactions were sufficient to retain human SOS on the membrane for many minutes, during which a single SOS molecule could processively activate thousands of Ras molecules. These observations raised questions concerning how receptors maintain control of SOS in cells and how membrane-recruited SOS is ultimately released. We addressed these questions in quantitative assays of reconstituted SOS-deficient chicken B-cell signaling systems combined with single-molecule measurements in supported membranes. These studies revealed an essentially one-way trafficking process in which membrane-recruited SOS remains trapped on the membrane and continuously activates Ras until being actively removed via endocytosis. PMID:27501536

  6. Disruption of adaptor protein 2mu (AP-2mu) in cochlear hair cells impairs vesicle reloading of synaptic release sites and hearing

    Jung, S.; Maritzen, T.; Wichmann, C.; Jing, Z.; Neef, A.; Revelo, N.H.; Al-Moyed, H.; Meese, S.; Wojcik, S.M.; Panou, I.; Bulut, H.; Schu, P.; Ficner, R.; Reisinger, E.; Rizzoli, S.O.; Neef, J.; Strenzke, N.; Haucke, V.; Moser, T.

    2015-01-01

    Active zones (AZs) of inner hair cells (IHCs) indefatigably release hundreds of vesicles per second, requiring each release site to reload vesicles at tens per second. Here, we report that the endocytic adaptor protein 2mu (AP-2mu) is required for release site replenishment and hearing. We show that

  7. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor modulation of Kv1.3 channel is disregulated by adaptor proteins Grb10 and nShc

    Marks David R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurotrophins are important regulators of growth and regeneration, and acutely, they can modulate the activity of voltage-gated ion channels. Previously we have shown that acute brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF activation of neurotrophin receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB suppresses the Shaker voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv1.3 via phosphorylation of multiple tyrosine residues in the N and C terminal aspects of the channel protein. It is not known how adaptor proteins, which lack catalytic activity, but interact with members of the neurotrophic signaling pathway, might scaffold with ion channels or modulate channel activity. Results We report the co-localization of two adaptor proteins, neuronal Src homology and collagen (nShc and growth factor receptor-binding protein 10 (Grb10, with Kv1.3 channel as demonstrated through immunocytochemical approaches in the olfactory bulb (OB neural lamina. To further explore the specificity and functional ramification of adaptor/channel co-localization, we performed immunoprecipitation and Western analysis of channel, kinase, and adaptor transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK 293. nShc formed a direct protein-protein interaction with Kv1.3 that was independent of BDNF-induced phosphorylation of Kv1.3, whereas Grb10 did not complex with Kv1.3 in HEK 293 cells. Both adaptors, however, co-immunoprecipitated with Kv1.3 in native OB. Grb10 was interestingly able to decrease the total expression of Kv1.3, particularly at the membrane surface, and subsequently eliminated the BDNF-induced phosphorylation of Kv1.3. To examine the possibility that the Src homology 2 (SH2 domains of Grb10 were directly binding to basally phosphorylated tyrosines in Kv1.3, we utilized point mutations to substitute multiple tyrosine residues with phenylalanine. Removal of the tyrosines 111–113 and 449 prevented Grb10 from decreasing Kv1.3 expression. In the absence of either adaptor protein

  8. A Patient-Controlled Analgesia Adaptor to Mitigate Postsurgical Pain for Combat Casualties With Multiple Limb Amputation: A Case Series.

    Pasquina, Paul F; Isaacson, Brad M; Johnson, Elizabeth; Rhoades, Daniel S; Lindholm, Mark P; Grindle, Garrett G; Cooper, Rory A

    2016-08-01

    The use of explosive armaments during Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom, and Operation New Dawn has resulted in a significant number of injured U.S. service members. These weapons often generate substantial extremity trauma requiring multiple surgical procedures to preserve life, limb, and restore function. For those individuals who require multiple surgeries, the use of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) devices can be an effective way to achieve adequate pain management and promote successful rehabilitation and recovery during inpatient treatment. A subpopulation of patients are unable to independently control a PCA device because of severe multiple limb dysfunction and/or loss. In response to the needs of these patients, our team designed and developed a custom adaptor to assist service members who would otherwise not be able to use a PCA. Patient feedback of the device indicated a positive response, improved independence, and overall satisfaction during inpatient hospitalization. PMID:27483540

  9. Shc adaptor proteins are key transducers of mitogenic signaling mediated by the G protein-coupled thrombin receptor

    Chen, Y; Grall, D; Salcini, A E; Pelicci, P G; Pouysségur, J; Van Obberghen-Schilling, E

    1996-01-01

    The serine protease thrombin activates G protein signaling systems that lead to Ras activation and, in certain cells, proliferation. Whereas the steps leading to Ras activation by G protein-coupled receptors are not well defined, the mechanisms of Ras activation by receptor tyrosine kinases have...... kinase activation, gene induction and cell growth. From these data, we conclude that Shc represents a crucial point of convergence between signaling pathways activated by receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors....... recently been elucidated biochemically and genetically. The present study was undertaken to determine whether common signaling components are used by these two distinct classes of receptors. Here we report that the adaptor protein Shc, is phosphorylated on tyrosine residues following stimulation of the...

  10. Structural and functional insights into CARDs of zebrafish (Danio rerio) NOD1 and NOD2, and their interaction with adaptor protein RIP2.

    Maharana, Jitendra; Dehury, Budheswar; Sahoo, Jyoti Ranjan; Jena, Itishree; Bej, Aritra; Panda, Debashis; Sahoo, Bikash Ranjan; Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Pradhan, Sukanta Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 (NOD1) and NOD2 are cytosolic pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) composed of an N-terminal caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARD), a central NACHT domain and C-terminal leucine-rich repeats (LRRs). They play a vital role in innate immune signaling by activating the NF-κB pathway via recognition of peptidoglycans by LRRs, and ATP-dependent self-oligomerization of NACHT followed by downstream signaling. After oligomerization, CARD/s play a crucial role in activating downstream signaling via the adaptor molecule, RIP2. Due to the inadequacy of experimental 3D structures of CARD/s of NOD2 and RIP2, and results from differential experimental setups, the RIP2-mediated CARD-CARD interaction has remained as a contradictory statement. We employed a combinatorial approach involving protein modeling, docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and binding free energy calculation to illuminate the molecular mechanism that shows the possible involvement of either the acidic or basic patch of zebrafish NOD1/2-CARD/a and RIP2-CARD in CARD-CARD interaction. Herein, we have hypothesized 'type-I' mode of CARD-CARD interaction in NOD1 and NOD2, where NOD1/2-CARD/a involve their acidic surfaces to interact with RIP2. Asp37 and Glu51 (of NOD1) and Arg477, Arg521 and Arg529 (of RIP2) were identified to be crucial for NOD1-RIP2 interaction. However, in NOD2-RIP2, Asp32 (of NOD2) and Arg477 and Arg521 (of RIP2) were anticipated to be significant for downstream signaling. Furthermore, we found that strong electrostatic contacts and salt bridges are crucial for protein-protein interactions. Altogether, our study has provided novel insights into the RIP2-mediated CARD-CARD interaction in zebrafish NOD1 and NOD2, which will be helpful to understand the molecular basis of the NOD1/2 signaling mechanism. PMID:26079944

  11. Competitive and cooperative interactions mediate RNA transfer from herpesvirus saimiri ORF57 to the mammalian export adaptor ALYREF.

    Richard B Tunnicliffe

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The essential herpesvirus adaptor protein HVS ORF57, which has homologs in all other herpesviruses, promotes viral mRNA export by utilizing the cellular mRNA export machinery. ORF57 protein specifically recognizes viral mRNA transcripts, and binds to proteins of the cellular transcription-export (TREX complex, in particular ALYREF. This interaction introduces viral mRNA to the NXF1 pathway, subsequently directing it to the nuclear pore for export to the cytoplasm. Here we have used a range of techniques to reveal the sites for direct contact between RNA and ORF57 in the absence and presence of ALYREF. A binding site within ORF57 was characterized which recognizes specific viral mRNA motifs. When ALYREF is present, part of this ORF57 RNA binding site, composed of an α-helix, binds preferentially to ALYREF. This competitively displaces viral RNA from the α-helix, but contact with RNA is still maintained by a flanking region. At the same time, the flexible N-terminal domain of ALYREF comes into contact with the viral RNA, which becomes engaged in an extensive network of synergistic interactions with both ALYREF and ORF57. Transfer of RNA to ALYREF in the ternary complex, and involvement of individual ORF57 residues in RNA recognition, were confirmed by UV cross-linking and mutagenesis. The atomic-resolution structure of the ORF57-ALYREF interface was determined, which noticeably differed from the homologous ICP27-ALYREF structure. Together, the data provides the first site-specific description of how viral mRNA is locked by a herpes viral adaptor protein in complex with cellular ALYREF, giving herpesvirus access to the cellular mRNA export machinery. The NMR strategy used may be more generally applicable to the study of fuzzy protein-protein-RNA complexes which involve flexible polypeptide regions.

  12. Origins and Early Evolution of the tRNA Molecule

    Koji Tamura

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern transfer RNAs (tRNAs are composed of ~76 nucleotides and play an important role as “adaptor” molecules that mediate the translation of information from messenger RNAs (mRNAs. Many studies suggest that the contemporary full-length tRNA was formed by the ligation of half-sized hairpin-like RNAs. A minihelix (a coaxial stack of the acceptor stem on the T-stem of tRNA can function both in aminoacylation by aminoacyl tRNA synthetases and in peptide bond formation on the ribosome, indicating that it may be a vestige of the ancestral tRNA. The universal CCA-3′ terminus of tRNA is also a typical characteristic of the molecule. “Why CCA?” is the fundamental unanswered question, but several findings give a comprehensive picture of its origin. Here, the origins and early evolution of tRNA are discussed in terms of various perspectives, including nucleotide ligation, chiral selectivity of amino acids, genetic code evolution, and the organization of the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center (PTC. The proto-tRNA molecules may have evolved not only as adaptors but also as contributors to the composition of the ribosome.

  13. Toll-Like Receptor Adaptor MyD88 is Essential for Pathogen Control During Oral Toxoplasma gondii Infection but not Adaptive Immunity Induced by a Vaccine Strain of the Parasite1

    Sukhumavasi, Woraporn; Egan, Charlotte E.; Warren, Amy L.; Taylor, Gregory A.; Fox, Barbara A.; Bzik, David J.; Denkers, Eric Y.

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR)/MyD88 activation is important in host resistance to Toxoplasma gondii during i. p. infection, but the function of this signaling pathway during oral infection, in which mucosal immunity assumes a predominant role, has not been examined. Here, we show that MyD88−/− mice fail to control the parasite and succumb within two weeks of oral infection. Early during infection, T cell IFN-γ production, recruitment of neutrophils and induction of p47 GTPase Irgm3/IGTP in the intestinal mucosa were dependent upon functional MyD88. Unexpectedly, these responses were MyD88-independent later during acute infection. In particular, CD4+ T cell IFN-γ reached normal levels independently of MyD88, despite continued absence of IL-12 in these animals. Intraperitoneal vaccination of MyD88−/− mice with an avirulent T. gondii uracil axotroph elicited robust IFN-γ responses and protective immunity to challenge with a high virulence T. gondii strain. Our results demonstrate that MyD88 is required to control Toxoplasma infection, but that the parasite can trigger adaptive immunity without the need for this TLR adaptor molecule. PMID:18714019

  14. A combinatorial F box protein directed pathway controls TRAF adaptor stability to regulate inflammation.

    Chen, Bill B; Coon, Tiffany A; Glasser, Jennifer R; McVerry, Bryan J; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Yutong; Zou, Chunbin; Ellis, Bryon; Sciurba, Frank C; Zhang, Yingze; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2013-05-01

    Uncontrolled activation of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor (TRAF) proteins may result in profound tissue injury by linking surface signals to cytokine release. Here we show that a ubiquitin E3 ligase component, Fbxo3, potently stimulates cytokine secretion from human inflammatory cells by destabilizing a sentinel TRAF inhibitor, Fbxl2. Fbxo3 and TRAF protein in circulation positively correlated with cytokine responses in subjects with sepsis, and we identified a polymorphism in human Fbxo3, with one variant being hypofunctional. A small-molecule inhibitor targeting Fbxo3 was sufficient to lessen severity of cytokine-driven inflammation in several mouse disease models. These studies identified a pathway of innate immunity that may be useful to detect subjects with altered immune responses during critical illness or provide a basis for therapeutic intervention targeting TRAF protein abundance. PMID:23542741

  15. CD molecules 2005: human cell differentiation molecules

    Zola, H.; Swart, B.; Nicholson, I.; Aasted, B.; Bensussan, A.; Boumsell, L.; Buckley, C.; Clark, G.; Drbal, Karel; Engel, P.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Isacke, C.; Macardle, P.; Malavasi, F.; Mason, D.; Olive, D.; Saalmüller, A.; Schlossman, S.F.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Simmons, P.; Tedder, T.F.; Uguccioni, M.; Warren, H.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 9 (2005), s. 3123-3126. ISSN 0006-4971 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules * leukocyte antigen Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 10.131, year: 2005

  16. PRR7 Is a transmembrane adaptor protein expressed in activated T cells involved in regulation of T cell receptor signaling and apoptosis

    Hrdinka, Matouš; Dráber, Peter; Štěpánek, Ondřej; Ormsby, Tereza; Otáhal, Pavel; Angelisová, Pavla; Brdička, Tomáš; Pačes, Jan; Hořejší, Václav; Drbal, Karel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 286, č. 22 (2011), s. 19617-19629. ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0506 Grant ostatní: GAČR(CZ) MEM/09/E011 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : PRR7 * transmembrane adaptor protein * apoptosis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.773, year: 2011

  17. Protein Interaction Profiling of the p97 Adaptor UBXD1 Points to a Role for the Complex in Modulating ERGIC-53 Trafficking*

    Haines, Dale S.; Lee, J. Eugene; Beauparlant, Stephen L.; Kyle, Dane B.; den Besten, Willem; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Graham, Robert L. J.; Hess, Sonja; Deshaies, Raymond J

    2012-01-01

    UBXD1 is a member of the poorly understood subfamily of p97 adaptors that do not harbor a ubiquitin association domain or bind ubiquitin-modified proteins. Of clinical importance, p97 mutants found in familial neurodegenerative conditions Inclusion Body Myopathy Paget's disease of the bone and/or Frontotemporal Dementia and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis are defective at interacting with UBXD1, indicating that functions regulated by a p97-UBXD1 complex are altered in these diseases. We have pe...

  18. Syk Kinase-Coupled C-type Lectin Receptors Engage Protein Kinase C-δ to Elicit Card9 Adaptor-Mediated Innate Immunity

    Strasser, Dominikus; Neumann, Konstantin; Bergmann, Hanna; Marakalala, Mohlopheni J.; Guler, Reto; Rojowska, Anna; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Brombacher, Frank; Urlaub, Henning; Baier, Gottfried; Brown, Gordon D.; Leitges, Michael; Ruland, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Summary C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) that couple with the kinase Syk are major pattern recognition receptors for the activation of innate immunity and host defense. CLRs recognize fungi and other forms of microbial or sterile danger, and they induce inflammatory responses through the adaptor protein Card9. The mechanisms relaying CLR proximal signals to the core Card9 module are unknown. Here we demonstrated that protein kinase C-δ (PKCδ) was activated upon Dectin-1-Syk signaling, mediated ...

  19. Multiple pathways for regulation of sigmaS (RpoS) stability in Escherichia coli via the action of multiple anti-adaptors.

    Bougdour, Alexandre; Cunning, Christofer; Baptiste, Patrick Jean; Elliott, Thomas; Gottesman, Susan

    2008-04-01

    SigmaS, the stationary phase sigma factor of Escherichia coli and Salmonella, is regulated at multiple levels. The sigmaS protein is unstable during exponential growth and is stabilized during stationary phase and after various stress treatments. Degradation requires both the ClpXP protease and the adaptor RssB. The small antiadaptor protein IraP is made in response to phosphate starvation and interacts with RssB, causing sigmaS stabilization under this stress condition. IraP is essential for sigmaS stabilization in some but not all starvation conditions, suggesting the existence of other anti-adaptor proteins. We report here the identification of new regulators of sigmaS stability, important under other stress conditions. IraM (inhibitor of RssB activity during Magnesium starvation) and IraD (inhibitor of RssB activity after DNA damage) inhibit sigmaS proteolysis both in vivo and in vitro. Our results reveal that multiple anti-adaptor proteins allow the regulation of sigmaS stability through the regulation of RssB activity under a variety of stress conditions. PMID:18383615

  20. Matrilin-2, an extracellular adaptor protein, is needed for the regeneration of muscle, nerve and other tissues

    va Korpos; Ferenc Dek; Ibolya Kiss

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) performs essential functions in the differentiation, maintenance and remodeling of tissues during development and regeneration, and it undergoes dynamic chang-es during remodeling concomitant to alterations in the cell-ECM interactions. Here we discuss recent data addressing the critical role of the widely expressed ECM protein, matrilin-2 (Matn2) in the timely onset of differentiation and regeneration processes in myogenic, neural and other tissues and in tumorigenesis. As a multiadhesion adaptor protein, it interacts with other ECM proteins and integrins. Matn2 promotes neurite outgrowth, Schwann cell migration, neuromuscular junc-tion formation, skeletal muscle and liver regeneration and skin wound healing. Matn2 deposition by myoblasts is crucial for the timely induction of the global switch toward terminal myogenic differentiation during muscle regeneration by affecting transforming growth factor beta/bone morphogenetic protein 7/Smad and other signal transduction pathways. Depending on the type of tissue and the pathomechanism, Matn2 can also promote or suppress tumor growth.

  1. Early Loss of Telomerase Action in Yeast Creates a Dependence on the DNA Damage Response Adaptor Proteins.

    Jay, Kyle A; Smith, Dana L; Blackburn, Elizabeth H

    2016-07-15

    Telomeres cap the ends of chromosomes, protecting them from degradation and inappropriate DNA repair processes that can lead to genomic instability. A short telomere elicits increased telomerase action on itself that replenishes telomere length, thereby stabilizing the telomere. In the prolonged absence of telomerase activity in dividing cells, telomeres eventually become critically short, inducing a permanent cell cycle arrest (senescence). We recently showed that even early after telomerase inactivation (ETI), yeast cells have accelerated mother cell aging and mildly perturbed cell cycles. Here, we show that the complete disruption of DNA damage response (DDR) adaptor proteins in ETI cells causes severe growth defects. This synthetic-lethality phenotype was as pronounced as that caused by extensive DNA damage in wild-type cells but showed genetic dependencies distinct from such damage and was completely alleviated by SML1 deletion, which increases deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pools. Our results indicated that these deleterious effects in ETI cells cannot be accounted for solely by the slow erosion of telomeres due to incomplete replication that leads to senescence. We propose that normally occurring telomeric DNA replication stress is resolved by telomerase activity and the DDR in two parallel pathways and that deletion of Sml1 prevents this stress. PMID:27161319

  2. The Adaptor Protein-1 μ1B Subunit Expands the Repertoire of Basolateral Sorting Signal Recognition in Epithelial Cells

    Guo, Xiaoli; Mattera, Rafael; Ren, Xuefeng; Chen, Yu; Retamal, Claudio; González, Alfonso; Bonifacino, Juan S.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY An outstanding question in protein sorting is why polarized epithelial cells express two isoforms of the μ1 subunit of the AP-1 clathrin adaptor complex: the ubiquitous μ1A and the epithelial-specific μ1B. Previous studies led to the notion that μ1A and μ1B mediate basolateral sorting predominantly from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and recycling endosomes, respectively. Using improved analytical tools, however, we find that μ1A and μ1B largely colocalize with each other. They also colocalize to similar extents with TGN and recycling endosome markers, as well as with basolateral cargoes transiting biosynthetic and endocytic-recycling routes. Instead, the two isoforms differ in their signal-recognition specificity. In particular, μ1B preferentially binds a subset of signals from cargoes that are sorted basolaterally in a μ1B-dependent manner. We conclude that expression of distinct μ1 isoforms in epithelial cells expands the repertoire of signals recognized by AP-1 for sorting of a broader range of cargoes to the basolateral surface. PMID:24229647

  3. A Cyclic di-GMP-binding Adaptor Protein Interacts with Histidine Kinase to Regulate Two-component Signaling.

    Xu, Linghui; Venkataramani, Prabhadevi; Ding, Yichen; Liu, Yang; Deng, Yinyue; Yong, Grace Lisi; Xin, Lingyi; Ye, Ruijuan; Zhang, Lianhui; Yang, Liang; Liang, Zhao-Xun

    2016-07-29

    The bacterial messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) binds to a diverse range of effectors to exert its biological effect. Despite the fact that free-standing PilZ proteins are by far the most prevalent c-di-GMP effectors known to date, their physiological function and mechanism of action remain largely unknown. Here we report that the free-standing PilZ protein PA2799 from the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa interacts directly with the hybrid histidine kinase SagS. We show that PA2799 (named as HapZ: histidine kinase associated PilZ) binds directly to the phosphoreceiver (REC) domain of SagS, and that the SagS-HapZ interaction is further enhanced at elevated c-di-GMP concentration. We demonstrate that binding of HapZ to SagS inhibits the phosphotransfer between SagS and the downstream protein HptB in a c-di-GMP-dependent manner. In accordance with the role of SagS as a motile-sessile switch and biofilm growth factor, we show that HapZ impacts surface attachment and biofilm formation most likely by regulating the expression of a large number of genes. The observations suggest a previously unknown mechanism whereby c-di-GMP mediates two-component signaling through a PilZ adaptor protein. PMID:27231351

  4. The cytoskeleton adaptor protein ankyrin-1 is upregulated by p53 following DNA damage and alters cell migration.

    Hall, A E; Lu, W-T; Godfrey, J D; Antonov, A V; Paicu, C; Moxon, S; Dalmay, T; Wilczynska, A; Muller, P A J; Bushell, M

    2016-01-01

    The integrity of the genome is maintained by a host of surveillance and repair mechanisms that are pivotal for cellular function. The tumour suppressor protein p53 is a major component of the DNA damage response pathway and plays a vital role in the maintenance of cell-cycle checkpoints. Here we show that a microRNA, miR-486, and its host gene ankyrin-1 (ANK1) are induced by p53 following DNA damage. Strikingly, the cytoskeleton adaptor protein ankyrin-1 was induced over 80-fold following DNA damage. ANK1 is upregulated in response to a variety of DNA damage agents in a range of cell types. We demonstrate that miR-486-5p is involved in controlling G1/S transition following DNA damage, whereas the induction of the ankyrin-1 protein alters the structure of the actin cytoskeleton and sustains limited cell migration during DNA damage. Importantly, we found that higher ANK1 expression correlates with decreased survival in cancer patients. Thus, these observations highlight ANK1 as an important effector downstream of the p53 pathway. PMID:27054339

  5. Formation of Ultracold Molecules

    Cote, Robin [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Advances in our ability to slow down and cool atoms and molecules to ultracold temperatures have paved the way to a revolution in basic research on molecules. Ultracold molecules are sensitive of very weak interactions, even when separated by large distances, which allow studies of the effect of those interactions on the behavior of molecules. In this program, we have explored ways to form ultracold molecules starting from pairs of atoms that have already reached the ultracold regime. We devised methods that enhance the efficiency of ultracold molecule production, for example by tuning external magnetic fields and using appropriate laser excitations. We also investigates the properties of those ultracold molecules, especially their de-excitation into stable molecules. We studied the possibility of creating new classes of ultra-long range molecules, named macrodimers, thousand times more extended than regular molecules. Again, such objects are possible because ultra low temperatures prevent their breakup by collision. Finally, we carried out calculations on how chemical reactions are affected and modified at ultracold temperatures. Normally, reactions become less effective as the temperature decreases, but at ultracold temperatures, they can become very effective. We studied this counter-intuitive behavior for benchmark chemical reactions involving molecular hydrogen.

  6. Trapping molecules on chips

    Santambrogio, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, it was demonstrated that neutral molecules can be loaded on a microchip directly from a supersonic beam. The molecules are confined in microscopic traps that can be moved smoothly over the surface of the chip. Once the molecules are trapped, they can be decelerated to a standstill, for instance, or pumped into selected quantum states by laser light or microwaves. Molecules are detected on the chip by time-resolved spatial imaging, which allows for the study of the distribution in the phase space of the molecular ensemble.

  7. Mutations in BICD2, which encodes a golgin and important motor adaptor, cause congenital autosomal-dominant spinal muscular atrophy.

    Neveling, Kornelia; Martinez-Carrera, Lilian A; Hölker, Irmgard; Heister, Angelien; Verrips, Aad; Hosseini-Barkooie, Seyyed Mohsen; Gilissen, Christian; Vermeer, Sascha; Pennings, Maartje; Meijer, Rowdy; te Riele, Margot; Frijns, Catharina J M; Suchowersky, Oksana; MacLaren, Linda; Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine; Sinke, Richard J; Zerres, Klaus; Lowry, R Brian; Lemmink, Henny H; Garbes, Lutz; Veltman, Joris A; Schelhaas, Helenius J; Scheffer, Hans; Wirth, Brunhilde

    2013-06-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a heterogeneous group of neuromuscular disorders caused by degeneration of lower motor neurons. Although functional loss of SMN1 is associated with autosomal-recessive childhood SMA, the genetic cause for most families affected by dominantly inherited SMA is unknown. Here, we identified pathogenic variants in bicaudal D homolog 2 (Drosophila) (BICD2) in three families afflicted with autosomal-dominant SMA. Affected individuals displayed congenital slowly progressive muscle weakness mainly of the lower limbs and congenital contractures. In a large Dutch family, linkage analysis identified a 9q22.3 locus in which exome sequencing uncovered c.320C>T (p.Ser107Leu) in BICD2. Sequencing of 23 additional families affected by dominant SMA led to the identification of pathogenic variants in one family from Canada (c.2108C>T [p.Thr703Met]) and one from the Netherlands (c.563A>C [p.Asn188Thr]). BICD2 is a golgin and motor-adaptor protein involved in Golgi dynamics and vesicular and mRNA transport. Transient transfection of HeLa cells with all three mutant BICD2 cDNAs caused massive Golgi fragmentation. This observation was even more prominent in primary fibroblasts from an individual harboring c.2108C>T (p.Thr703Met) (affecting the C-terminal coiled-coil domain) and slightly less evident in individuals with c.563A>C (p.Asn188Thr) (affecting the N-terminal coiled-coil domain). Furthermore, BICD2 levels were reduced in affected individuals and trapped within the fragmented Golgi. Previous studies have shown that Drosophila mutant BicD causes reduced larvae locomotion by impaired clathrin-mediated synaptic endocytosis in neuromuscular junctions. These data emphasize the relevance of BICD2 in synaptic-vesicle recycling and support the conclusion that BICD2 mutations cause congenital slowly progressive dominant SMA. PMID:23664116

  8. Dephosphorylation of the adaptor LAT and phospholipase C-γ by SHP-1 inhibits natural killer cell cytotoxicity.

    Matalon, Omri; Fried, Sophia; Ben-Shmuel, Aviad; Pauker, Maor H; Joseph, Noah; Keizer, Danielle; Piterburg, Marina; Barda-Saad, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells discriminate between healthy cells and virally infected or transformed self-cells by tuning activating and inhibitory signals received through cell surface receptors. Inhibitory receptors inhibit NK cell function by recruiting and activating the tyrosine phosphatase Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) to the plasma membrane. However, to date, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor VAV1 is the only direct SHP-1 substrate identified in NK cells. We reveal that the adaptor protein linker for activation of T cells (LAT) as well as phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1) and PLC-γ2 are SHP-1 substrates. Dephosphorylation of Tyr(132) in LAT by SHP-1 in NK cells abrogated the recruitment of PLC-γ1 and PLC-γ2 to the immunological synapse between the NK cell and a cancer cell target, which reduced NK cell degranulation and target cell killing. Furthermore, the ubiquitylation of LAT by the E3 ubiquitin ligases c-Cbl and Cbl-b, which was induced by LAT phosphorylation, led to the degradation of LAT in response to the engagement of inhibitory receptors on NK cells, which abrogated NK cell cytotoxicity. Knockdown of the Cbl proteins blocked LAT ubiquitylation, which promoted NK cell function. Expression of a ubiquitylation-resistant mutant LAT blocked inhibitory receptor signaling, enabling cells to become activated. Together, these data identify previously uncharacterized SHP-1 substrates and inhibitory mechanisms that determine the response of NK cells. PMID:27221712

  9. The adaptor CARD9 is required for adaptive but not innate immunity to oral mucosal Candida albicans infections.

    Bishu, Shrinivas; Hernández-Santos, Nydiaris; Simpson-Abelson, Michelle R; Huppler, Anna R; Conti, Heather R; Ghilardi, Nico; Mamo, Anna J; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2014-03-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC [thrush]) is an opportunistic infection caused by the commensal fungus Candida albicans. OPC is common in individuals with HIV/AIDS, infants, patients on chemotherapy, and individuals with congenital immune defects. Immunity to OPC is strongly dependent on the interleukin-23 (IL-23)/IL-17R axis, as mice and humans with defects in IL-17R signaling (IL17F, ACT1, IL-17RA) or in genes that direct Th17 differentiation (STAT3, STAT1, CARD9) are prone to mucocutaneous candidiasis. Conventional Th17 cells are induced in response to C. albicans infection via signals from C-type lectin receptors, which signal through the adaptor CARD9, leading to production of Th17-inducing cytokines such as IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-23. Recent data indicate that IL-17 can also be made by numerous innate cell subsets. These innate "type 17" cells resemble conventional Th17 cells, but they can be activated without need for prior antigen exposure. Because C. albicans is not a commensal organism in rodents and mice are thus naive to this fungus, we had the opportunity to assess the role of CARD9 in innate versus adaptive responses using an OPC infection model. As expected, CARD9(-/-) mice failed to mount an adaptive Th17 response following oral Candida infection. Surprisingly, however, CARD9(-/-) mice had preserved innate IL-17-dependent responses to Candida and were almost fully resistant to OPC. Thus, CARD9 is important primarily for adaptive immunity to C. albicans, whereas alternate recognition systems appear to be needed for effective innate responses. PMID:24379290

  10. Electron correlation in molecules

    Wilson, S

    2007-01-01

    Electron correlation effects are of vital significance to the calculation of potential energy curves and surfaces, the study of molecular excitation processes, and in the theory of electron-molecule scattering. This text describes methods for addressing one of theoretical chemistry's central problems, the study of electron correlation effects in molecules.Although the energy associated with electron correlation is a small fraction of the total energy of an atom or molecule, it is of the same order of magnitude as most energies of chemical interest. If the solution of quantum mechanical equatio

  11. Development of novel on-chip, customer-design spiral biasing adaptor on for Si drift detectors and detector arrays for X-ray and nuclear physics experiments

    A novel on-chip, customer-design spiral biasing adaptor (SBA) has been developed. A single SBA is used for biasing a Si drift detector (SDD) and SDD array. The use of an SBA reduces the biasing current. This paper shows the calculation of the geometry of an SBA and an SDD to get the best drift field in the SDD and SDD array. Prototype SBAs have been fabricated to verify the concept. Electrical measurements on these SBAs are in agreement with the expectations. The new SDD array with an SBA can be used for X-ray detection and in nuclear physics experiments

  12. Enigma interacts with adaptor protein with PH and SH2 domains to control insulin-induced actin cytoskeleton remodeling and glucose transporter 4 translocation

    Barres, Romain; Grémeaux, Thierry; Gual, Philippe;

    2006-01-01

    and Glut 4 translocation without alterations in proximal insulin signaling. This inhibitory effect was prevented with the deletion of the LIM domains of Enigma. Using time-lapse fluorescent microscopy of green fluorescent protein-actin, we demonstrated that the overexpression of Enigma altered insulin......APS (adaptor protein with PH and SH2 domains) initiates a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-independent pathway involved in insulin-stimulated glucose transport. We recently identified Enigma, a PDZ and LIM domain-containing protein, as a partner of APS and showed that APS-Enigma complex plays...

  13. Mutations in the Gene Encoding the Sigma 2 Subunit of the Adaptor Protein 1 Complex, AP1S2, Cause X-Linked Mental Retardation

    Tarpey, Patrick S. ; Stevens, Claire ; Teague, Jon ; Edkins, Sarah ; O’Meara, Sarah ; Avis, Tim ; Barthorpe, Syd ; Buck, Gemma ; Butler, Adam ; Cole, Jennifer ; Dicks, Ed ; Gray, Kristian ; Halliday, Kelly ; Harrison, Rachel ; Hills, Katy 

    2006-01-01

    In a systematic sequencing screen of the coding exons of the X chromosome in 250 families with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR), we identified two nonsense mutations and one consensus splice-site mutation in the AP1S2 gene on Xp22 in three families. Affected individuals in these families showed mild-to-profound mental retardation. Other features included hypotonia early in life and delay in walking. AP1S2 encodes an adaptin protein that constitutes part of the adaptor protein complex found ...

  14. Single molecules and nanotechnology

    Vogel, Horst

    2007-01-01

    This book focuses on recent advances in the rapidly evolving field of single molecule research. These advances are of importance for the investigation of biopolymers and cellular biochemical reactions, and are essential to the development of quantitative biology. Written by leading experts in the field, the articles cover a broad range of topics, including: quantum photonics of organic dyes and inorganic nanoparticles their use in detecting properties of single molecules the monitoring of single molecule (enzymatic) reactions single protein (un)folding in nanometer-sized confined volumes the dynamics of molecular interactions in biological cells The book is written for advanced students and scientists who wish to survey the concepts, techniques and results of single molecule research and assess them for their own scientific activities.

  15. Electron-molecule collisions

    Takayanagi, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    Scattering phenomena play an important role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made through collision experiments. Amongst diverse kinds of collision systems, this book sheds light on the collision of an electron with a molecule. The electron-molecule collision provides a basic scattering problem. It is scattering by a nonspherical, multicentered composite particle with its centers having degrees of freedom of motion. The molecule can even disintegrate, Le., dissociate or ionize into fragments, some or all of which may also be molecules. Although it is a difficult problem, the recent theoretical, experimental, and computational progress has been so significant as to warrant publication of a book that specializes in this field. The progress owes partly to technical develop­ ments in measurements and computations. No less important has been the great and continuing stimulus from such fields of application as astrophysics, the physics of the earth's upper atmosphere, laser physics, radiat...

  16. Optothermal Molecule Trap

    Duhr, Stefan; Braun, Dieter

    2006-01-01

    Thermophoresis moves molecules along temperature gradients, typically from hot to cold. We superpose fluid flow with thermophoretic molecule flow under well defined microfluidic conditions, imaged by fluorescence microscopy. DNA is trapped and accumulated 16-fold in regions where both flows move in opposite directions. Strong 800-fold accumulation is expected, however with slow trapping kinetics. The experiment is equally described by a three-dimensional and one-dimensional analytical model. ...

  17. Mutations in the gene encoding the Sigma 2 subunit of the adaptor protein 1 complex, AP1S2, cause X-linked mental retardation.

    Tarpey, Patrick S; Stevens, Claire; Teague, Jon; Edkins, Sarah; O'Meara, Sarah; Avis, Tim; Barthorpe, Syd; Buck, Gemma; Butler, Adam; Cole, Jennifer; Dicks, Ed; Gray, Kristian; Halliday, Kelly; Harrison, Rachel; Hills, Katy; Hinton, Jonathon; Jones, David; Menzies, Andrew; Mironenko, Tatiana; Perry, Janet; Raine, Keiran; Richardson, David; Shepherd, Rebecca; Small, Alexandra; Tofts, Calli; Varian, Jennifer; West, Sofie; Widaa, Sara; Yates, Andy; Catford, Rachael; Butler, Julia; Mallya, Uma; Moon, Jenny; Luo, Ying; Dorkins, Huw; Thompson, Deborah; Easton, Douglas F; Wooster, Richard; Bobrow, Martin; Carpenter, Nancy; Simensen, Richard J; Schwartz, Charles E; Stevenson, Roger E; Turner, Gillian; Partington, Michael; Gecz, Jozef; Stratton, Michael R; Futreal, P Andrew; Raymond, F Lucy

    2006-12-01

    In a systematic sequencing screen of the coding exons of the X chromosome in 250 families with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR), we identified two nonsense mutations and one consensus splice-site mutation in the AP1S2 gene on Xp22 in three families. Affected individuals in these families showed mild-to-profound mental retardation. Other features included hypotonia early in life and delay in walking. AP1S2 encodes an adaptin protein that constitutes part of the adaptor protein complex found at the cytoplasmic face of coated vesicles located at the Golgi complex. The complex mediates the recruitment of clathrin to the vesicle membrane. Aberrant endocytic processing through disruption of adaptor protein complexes is likely to result from the AP1S2 mutations identified in the three XLMR-affected families, and such defects may plausibly cause abnormal synaptic development and function. AP1S2 is the first reported XLMR gene that encodes a protein directly involved in the assembly of endocytic vesicles. PMID:17186471

  18. Towards single molecule switches.

    Zhang, Jia Lin; Zhong, Jian Qiang; Lin, Jia Dan; Hu, Wen Ping; Wu, Kai; Xu, Guo Qin; Wee, Andrew T S; Chen, Wei

    2015-05-21

    The concept of using single molecules as key building blocks for logic gates, diodes and transistors to perform basic functions of digital electronic devices at the molecular scale has been explored over the past decades. However, in addition to mimicking the basic functions of current silicon devices, molecules often possess unique properties that have no parallel in conventional materials and promise new hybrid devices with novel functions that cannot be achieved with equivalent solid-state devices. The most appealing example is the molecular switch. Over the past decade, molecular switches on surfaces have been intensely investigated. A variety of external stimuli such as light, electric field, temperature, tunneling electrons and even chemical stimulus have been used to activate these molecular switches between bistable or even multiple states by manipulating molecular conformations, dipole orientations, spin states, charge states and even chemical bond formation. The switching event can occur either on surfaces or in break junctions. The aim of this review is to highlight recent advances in molecular switches triggered by various external stimuli, as investigated by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM) and the break junction technique. We begin by presenting the molecular switches triggered by various external stimuli that do not provide single molecule selectivity, referred to as non-selective switching. Special focus is then given to selective single molecule switching realized using the LT-STM tip on surfaces. Single molecule switches operated by different mechanisms are reviewed and discussed. Finally, molecular switches embedded in self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and single molecule junctions are addressed. PMID:25757483

  19. Physical activation of molecules

    A brief review of processes of physical activation of molecules on the basis of phenomena of electronic and vibrational excitation, electron polarization is presented. Consideration is given to activation by electron impact, photo-, magneto- and mechanoactivation, as well as to radiation activation, proceeding under the effect of high-power radiations (102-107 eV). The character of disturbance of molecules, participating in chemical reactions, under the effect of different types of ionizing radiation (α-particles, electrons, γ-quanta etc.) is discussed

  20. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  1. Prebiologically Important Interstellar Molecules

    Kuan, Y.-J.; Huang, H.-C.; Charnley, S. B.; Tseng, W.-L.; Snyder, L. E.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Kisiel, Z.; Thorwirth, S.; Bohn, R. K.; Wilson, T. L.

    2004-06-01

    Understanding the organic chemistry of molecular clouds, particularly the formation of biologically important molecules, is fundamental to the study of the processes which lead to the origin, evolution and distribution of life in the Galaxy. Determining the level of molecular complexity attainable in the clouds, and the nature of the complex organic material available to protostellar disks and the planetary systems that form from them, requires an understanding of the possible chemical pathways and is therefore a central question in astrochemistry. We have thus searched for prebiologically important molecules in the hot molecular cloud cores: Sgr B2(N-LMH), W51 e1/e2 and Orion-KL. Among the molecules searched: Pyrimidine is the unsubstituted ring analogue for three of the DNA and RNA bases. 2H-Azirine and Aziridine are azaheterocyclic compounds. And Glycine is the simplest amino acid. Detections of these interstellar organic molecular species will thus have important implications for Astrobiology. Our preliminary results indicate a tentative detection of interstellar glycine. If confirmed, this will be the first detection of an amino acid in interstellar space and will greatly strengthen the thesis that interstellar organic molecules could have played a pivotal role in the prebiotic chemistry of the early Earth.

  2. OMG: Open Molecule Generator

    Peironcely Julio E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG, which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck.

  3. Exotic helium molecules

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range 4He2(23S1-23P0) molecule, or a 4He2(23S1-23S1) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 ± 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range 4He2(23S1-23S1) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime τ = (1.4 ± 0.3) μs is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  4. Bacterial invasion reconstructed molecule by molecule

    Werner, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We propose to visualize the initial stages of bacterial infection of a human host cell with unmatched spatial and temporal resolution. This work will develop a new capability for the laboratory (super-resolution optical imaging), will test unresolved scientific hypotheses regarding host-pathogen interaction dynamics, and leverages state of the art 3D molecular tracking instrumentation developed recently by our group. There is much to be gained by applying new single molecule tools to the important and familiar problem of pathogen entry into a host cell. For example, conventional fluorescence microscopy has identified key host receptors, such as CD44 and {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin, that aggregate near the site of Salmonella typhimurium infection of human cells. However, due to the small size of the bacteria ({approx} 2 {micro}m) and the diffraction of the emitted light, one just sees a fluorescent 'blob' of host receptors that aggregate at the site of attachment, making it difficult to determine the exact number of receptors present or whether there is any particular spatial arrangement of the receptors that facilitates bacterial adhesion/entry. Using newly developed single molecule based super-resolution imaging methods, we will visualize how host receptors are directed to the site of pathogen adhesion and whether host receptors adopt a specific spatial arrangement for successful infection. Furthermore, we will employ our 3D molecular tracking methods to follow the injection of virulence proteins, or effectors, into the host cell by the pathogen Type III secretion system (TTSS). We expect these studies to provide mechanistic insights into the early events of pathogen infection that have here-to-fore been technically beyond our reach. Our Research Goals are: Goal 1--Construct a super-resolution fluorescence microscope and use this new capability to image the spatial distribution of different host receptors (e.g. CD44, as {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin) at the

  5. Identification of a novel immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-containing molecule, STAM2, by mass spectrometry and its involvement in growth factor and cytokine receptor signaling pathways

    Pandey, A; Fernandez, M M; Steen, H;

    2000-01-01

    molecule containing a Src homology 3 domain as well as an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). This molecule is 55% identical to a previously isolated molecule designated signal transducing adaptor molecule (STAM) that was identified as an interleukin (IL)-2-induced phosphoprotein and is...... therefore designated STAM2. Tyrosine phosphorylation of STAM2 is induced by growth factors such as epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor as well as by cytokines like IL-3. Several of the deletion mutants tested except the one containing only the amino-terminal region underwent tyrosine...... phosphorylation upon growth factor stimulation, implying that STAM2 is phosphorylated on several tyrosine residues. STAM2 is downstream of the Jak family of kinases since coexpression of STAM2 with Jak1 or Jak2 but not an unrelated Tec family kinase, Etk, resulted in its tyrosine phosphorylation. In contrast to...

  6. Atoms, molecules & elements

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Young scientists will be thrilled to explore the invisible world of atoms, molecules and elements. Our resource provides ready-to-use information and activities for remedial students using simplified language and vocabulary. Students will label each part of the atom, learn what compounds are, and explore the patterns in the periodic table of elements to find calcium (Ca), chlorine (Cl), and helium (He) through hands-on activities.

  7. Molecules without electrons

    Electrons are the glue that holds the atoms in molecules together. Without them the positive charges of nuclei would repel each other, and the world would be a much simpler place. But in the quest to gain control over matter at a fundamental level, physicists in Russia and Canada have come up with a way of binding charged nuclei without any electrons. Instead the researchers use intense laser light. (U.K.)

  8. Single Molecule Mechanochemistry

    Li, Shaowei; Zhang, Yanxing; Ho, Wilson; Wu, Ruqian; Ruqian Wu, Yanxing Zhang Team; Wilson Ho, Shaowei Li Team

    Mechanical forces can be used to trigger chemical reactions through bending and stretching of chemical bonds. Using the reciprocating movement of the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), mechanical energy can be provided to a single molecule sandwiched between the tip and substrate. When the mechanical pulse center was moved to the outer ring feature of a CO molecule, the reaction rate was significantly increased compared with bare Cu surface and over Au atoms. First, DFT calculations show that the presence of CO makes the Cu cavity more attractive toward H2 Second, H2 prefers the horizontal adsorption geometry in the Cu-Cu and Au-Cu cavities and no hybridization occurs between the antibonding states of H2 and states of Cu atoms. While H2 loses electrons from its bonding state in all three cavities, the filling of its anti-bonding state only occurs in the CO-Cu cavity. Both make the CO-Cu cavity much more effectively to chop the H2 molecule. Work was supported by the National Science Foundation Center for Chemical Innovation on Chemistry at the Space-Time Limit (CaSTL) under Grant No. CHE-1414466.

  9. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  10. A novel method for evaluating microglial activation using ionized calcium-binding adaptor protein-1 staining: cell body to cell size ratio

    Iris Bertha Hovens

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to validate a newly developed methodology of semi-automatic image analysis to analyze microglial morphology as marker for microglial activation in ionized calcium-binding adaptor protein-1 (IBA-1 stained brain sections. Methods: The novel method was compared to currently used analysis methods, visual characterization of activation stage and optical density measurement, in brain sections of young and aged rats that had undergone surgery or remained naοve. Results: The cell body to cell size ratio of microglia was strongly correlated to the visual characterization activation stage. In addition, we observed specific surgery and age-related changes in cell body size, size of the dendritic processes and cell body to cell size ratio. Conclusion: The novel analysis method provides a sensitive marker for microglial activation in the rat brain, which is quick and easy to perform and provides additional information about microglial morphology.

  11. Expression of the neuronal adaptor protein X11alpha protects against memory dysfunction in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Mitchell, Jacqueline C

    2010-01-01

    X11alpha is a neuronal-specific adaptor protein that binds to the amyloid-beta protein precursor (AbetaPP). Overexpression of X11alpha reduces Abeta production but whether X11alpha also protects against Abeta-related memory dysfunction is not known. To test this possibility, we crossed X11alpha transgenic mice with AbetaPP-Tg2576 mice. AbetaPP-Tg2576 mice produce high levels of brain Abeta and develop age-related defects in memory function that correlate with increasing Abeta load. Overexpression of X11alpha alone had no detectable adverse effect upon behavior. However, X11alpha reduced brain Abeta levels and corrected spatial reference memory defects in aged X11alpha\\/AbetaPP double transgenics. Thus, X11alpha may be a therapeutic target for Alzheimer\\'s disease.

  12. Adaptor bypass mutations of Bacillus subtilis spx suggest a mechanism for YjbH-enhanced proteolysis of the regulator Spx by ClpXP

    Chan, Chio Mui; Hahn, Erik; Zuber, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Summary The global regulator, Spx, is under proteolytic control exerted by the adaptor YjbH and ATP-dependent protease ClpXP in Bacillus subtilis. While YjbH is observed to bind the Spx C-terminus, YjbH shows little affinity for ClpXP, indicating adaptor activity that does not operate by tethering. Chimeric proteins derived from B. subtilis AbrB and the Spx C-terminus showed that a 28 residue C-terminal section of Spx (AbrB28), but not the last 12 or 16 residues (AbrB12, AbrB16), was required for YjbH interaction and for ClpXP proteolysis, although the rate of AbrB28 proteolysis was not affected by YjbH addition. The result suggested that the YjbH-targeted 28 residue segment of the Spx C-terminus bears a ClpXP-recognition element(s) that is hidden in the intact Spx protein. Residue substitutions in the conserved helix α6 of the C-terminal region generated Spx substrates that were degraded by ClpXP at accelerated rates compared to wild type Spx, and showed reduced dependency on the YjbH activity. The residue substitutions also weakened the interaction between Spx and YjbH. The results suggest a model in which YjbH, through interaction with residues of α6 helix, exposes the C-terminus of Spx for recognition and proteolysis by ClpXP. PMID:24942655

  13. Watching single molecules dance

    Mehta, Amit Dinesh

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy, from ATP hydrolysis or ion flow, into mechanical motion. A variety of increasingly precise mechanical probes have been developed to monitor and perturb these motors at the single molecule level. Several outstanding questions can be best approached at the single molecule level. These include: how far does a motor progress per energy quanta consumed? how does its reaction cycle respond to load? how many productive catalytic cycles can it undergo per diffusional encounter with its track? and what is the mechanical stiffness of a single molecule connection? A dual beam optical trap, in conjunction with in vitro ensemble motility assays, has been used to characterize two members of the myosin superfamily: muscle myosin II and chick brain myosin V. Both move the helical polymer actin, but myosin II acts in large ensembles to drive muscle contraction or cytokinesis, while myosin V acts in small numbers to transport vesicles. An optical trapping apparatus was rendered sufficiently precise to identify a myosin working stroke with 1nm or so, barring systematic errors such as those perhaps due to random protein orientations. This and other light microscopic motility assays were used to characterize myosin V: unlike myosin II this vesicle transport protein moves through many increments of travel while remaining strongly bound to a single actin filament. The step size, stall force, and travel distance of myosin V reveal a remarkably efficient motor capable of moving along a helical track for over a micrometer without significantly spiraling around it. Such properties are fully consistent with the putative role of an organelle transport motor, present in small numbers to maintain movement over long ranges relative to cellular size scales. The contrast between myosin II and myosin V resembles that between a human running on the moon and one walking on earth, where the former allows for faster motion when in larger ensembles but for less

  14. Ultra-cold molecule production.

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jamie; Chandler, David W.; Strecker, Kevin; Rahn, Larry A.

    2005-12-01

    The production of Ultra-cold molecules is a goal of many laboratories through out the world. Here we are pursuing a unique technique that utilizes the kinematics of atomic and molecular collisions to achieve the goal of producing substantial numbers of sub Kelvin molecules confined in a trap. Here a trap is defined as an apparatus that spatially localizes, in a known location in the laboratory, a sample of molecules whose temperature is below one degree absolute Kelvin. Further, the storage time for the molecules must be sufficient to measure and possibly further cool the molecules. We utilize a technique unique to Sandia to form cold molecules from near mass degenerate collisions between atoms and molecules. This report describes the progress we have made using this novel technique and the further progress towards trapping molecules we have cooled.

  15. Magnetic field modification of ultracold molecule-molecule collisions

    Tscherbul, T. V.; Suleimanov, Yu. V.; Aquilanti, V.; Krems, R.V.

    2008-01-01

    We present an accurate quantum mechanical study of molecule-molecule collisions in the presence of a magnetic field. The work focusses on the analysis of elastic scattering and spin relaxation in collisions of O2(3Sigma_g) molecules at cold (~0.1 K) and ultracold (~10^{-6} K) temperatures. Our calculations show that magnetic spin relaxation in molecule-molecule collisions is extremely efficient except at magnetic fields below 1 mT. The rate constant for spin relaxation at T=0.1 K and a magnet...

  16. Passing Current through Touching Molecules

    Schull, G.; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads;

    2009-01-01

    The charge flow from a single C-60 molecule to another one has been probed. The conformation and electronic states of both molecules on the contacting electrodes have been characterized using a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. While the contact conductance of a single molecule between two...

  17. Efficient single molecule detection and single molecule photochemistry

    Affleck, R.L.; Ambrose, W.P.; Goodwin, P.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Single molecule detection efficiencies greater than 90% in flowing sample streams can be attained by confining the sample to the center of the excitation laser beam and photobleaching the reagent stream immediately before it enters the detection flow cell. Photolysis of single molecules of B-Phycoerythrin dissolved in aqueous solution is observed as an abrupt cessation of the fluorescence from these molecules as they flow through {approximately}40 pl probe volume. An analysis of the survival times of individual molecules in the laser beams yields the photodestruction quantum yield of the molecule. Photon pair correlation measurements of the fluorescence detected from single B-PE molecules demonstrate that the molecule fluoresces from only one bilin chromophore at a time.

  18. Photochemistry of biological molecules

    Earlier studies of the photodamage induced by 254nm irradiation of linear alanine peptides in the solid state have been supplemented by an investigation into the gaseous photoproducts from the cyclic dipeptide, 3,6-dimethyl-2,5-diketopiperazine. The trans and cis isomers have been prepared and the photoproducts compared with those from the DL-mixture. The conformation of the molecule did influence the yield of gaseous products. CO was produced by peptide bond rupture with concomitant release of hydrogen. C02 was also produced. The use of N- and C-deuterated analogues together with relevant crystallographic and EPR data has enabled a detailed study of the mechanism of photodegradation to be made, from which it was concluded that the methyl protons are not inert but rather are the major source of the hydrogen observed on photolysis. (author)

  19. Forces in molecules.

    Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Fang, De-Chai; Bader, Richard F W

    2007-01-01

    Chemistry is determined by the electrostatic forces acting within a collection of nuclei and electrons. The attraction of the nuclei for the electrons is the only attractive force in a molecule and is the force responsible for the bonding between atoms. This is the attractive force acting on the electrons in the Ehrenfest force and on the nuclei in the Feynman force, one that is countered by the repulsion between the electrons in the former and by the repulsion between the nuclei in the latter. The virial theorem relates these forces to the energy changes resulting from interactions between atoms. All bonding, as signified by the presence of a bond path, has a common origin in terms of the mechanics determined by the Ehrenfest, Feynman and virial theorems. This paper is concerned in particular with the mechanics of interaction encountered in what are classically described as 'nonbonded interactions'--are atoms that 'touch' bonded or repelling one another? PMID:17328425

  20. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    Tang, Jinkui

    2015-01-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs, and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures – an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and...

  1. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    Tang, Jinkui; Zhang, Peng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun (China). Changchun Inst. of Applied Chemistry

    2015-10-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures - an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and explore new directions.

  2. Human kidney anion exchanger 1 interacts with adaptor-related protein complex 1 {mu}1A (AP-1 mu1A)

    Sawasdee, Nunghathai; Junking, Mutita [Division of Medical Molecular Biology and BIOTEC-Medical Biotechnology Unit, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Ngaojanlar, Piengpaga [Division of Medical Molecular Biology and BIOTEC-Medical Biotechnology Unit, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Department of Immunology and Graduate Program in Immunology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Sukomon, Nattakan; Ungsupravate, Duangporn [Division of Medical Molecular Biology and BIOTEC-Medical Biotechnology Unit, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Limjindaporn, Thawornchai [Division of Medical Molecular Biology and BIOTEC-Medical Biotechnology Unit, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Akkarapatumwong, Varaporn [Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Mahidol University at Salaya Campus, Nakorn Pathom 73170 (Thailand); Noisakran, Sansanee [Division of Medical Molecular Biology and BIOTEC-Medical Biotechnology Unit, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai, E-mail: grpye@mahidol.ac.th [Division of Medical Molecular Biology and BIOTEC-Medical Biotechnology Unit, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand)

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Trafficking defect of kAE1 is a cause of dRTA but trafficking pathway of kAE1 has not been clearly described. {yields} Adaptor-related protein complex 1 {mu}1A (AP-1 mu1A) was firstly reported to interact with kAE1. {yields} The interacting site for AP-1 mu1A on Ct-kAE1 was found to be Y904DEV907, a subset of YXXO motif. {yields} AP-1 mu1A knockdown showed a marked reduction of kAE1 on the cell membrane and its accumulation in endoplasmic reticulum. {yields} AP-1 mu1A has a critical role in kAE1 trafficking to the plasma membrane. -- Abstract: Kidney anion exchanger 1 (kAE1) mediates chloride (Cl{sup -}) and bicarbonate (HCO{sub 3}{sup -}) exchange at the basolateral membrane of kidney {alpha}-intercalated cells. Impaired trafficking of kAE1 leads to defect of the Cl{sup -}/HCO{sub 3}{sup -} exchange at the basolateral membrane and failure of proton (H{sup +}) secretion at the apical membrane, causing a kidney disease - distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). To gain a better insight into kAE1 trafficking, we searched for proteins physically interacting with the C-terminal region of kAE1 (Ct-kAE1), which contains motifs crucial for intracellular trafficking, by a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system. An adaptor-related protein complex 1 {mu}1A (AP-1 mu1A) subunit was found to interact with Ct-kAE1. The interaction between either Ct-kAE1 or full-length kAE1 and AP-1 mu1A were confirmed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T by co-immunoprecipitation, affinity co-purification, co-localization, yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-based protein fragment complementation assay (PCA) and GST pull-down assay. The interacting site for AP-1 mu1A on Ct-kAE1 was found to be Y904DEV907, a subset of YXXO motif. Interestingly, suppression of endogenous AP-1 mu1A in HEK 293T by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreased membrane localization of kAE1 and increased its intracellular accumulation, suggesting for the first time that AP-1 mu1A is involved in the kAE1

  3. The adaptor function of TRAPPC2 in mammalian TRAPPs explains TRAPPC2-associated SEDT and TRAPPC9-associated congenital intellectual disability.

    Min Zong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The TRAPP (Transport protein particle complex is a conserved protein complex functioning at various steps in vesicle transport. Although yeast has three functionally and structurally distinct forms, TRAPPI, II and III, emerging evidence suggests that mammalian TRAPP complex may be different. Mutations in the TRAPP complex subunit 2 (TRAPPC2 cause X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda, while mutations in the TRAPP complex subunit 9 (TRAPPC9 cause postnatal mental retardation with microcephaly. The structural interplay between these subunits found in mammalian equivalent of TRAPPI and those specific to TRAPPII and TRAPPIII remains largely unknown and we undertook the present study to examine the interaction between these subunits. Here, we reveal that the mammalian equivalent of the TRAPPII complex is structurally distinct from the yeast counterpart thus leading to insight into mechanism of disease. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed how TRAPPII- or TRAPPIII- specific subunits interact with the six-subunit core complex of TRAPP by co-immunoprecipitation in mammalian cells. TRAPPC2 binds to TRAPPII-specific subunit TRAPPC9, which in turn binds to TRAPPC10. Unexpectedly, TRAPPC2 can also bind to the putative TRAPPIII-specific subunit, TRAPPC8. Endogenous TRAPPC9-positive TRAPPII complex does not contain TRAPPC8, suggesting that TRAPPC2 binds to either TRAPPC9 or TRAPPC8 during the formation of the mammalian equivalents of TRAPPII or TRAPPIII, respectively. Therefore, TRAPPC2 serves as an adaptor for the formation of these complexes. A disease-causing mutation of TRAPPC2, D47Y, failed to interact with either TRAPPC9 or TRAPPC8, suggesting that aspartate 47 in TRAPPC2 is at or near the site of interaction with TRAPPC9 or TRAPPC8, mediating the formation of TRAPPII and/or TRAPPIII. Furthermore, disease-causing deletional mutants of TRAPPC9 all failed to interact with TRAPPC2 and TRAPPC10. CONCLUSIONS: TRAPPC2 serves as an adaptor for the

  4. Human kidney anion exchanger 1 interacts with adaptor-related protein complex 1 μ1A (AP-1 mu1A)

    Research highlights: → Trafficking defect of kAE1 is a cause of dRTA but trafficking pathway of kAE1 has not been clearly described. → Adaptor-related protein complex 1 μ1A (AP-1 mu1A) was firstly reported to interact with kAE1. → The interacting site for AP-1 mu1A on Ct-kAE1 was found to be Y904DEV907, a subset of YXXO motif. → AP-1 mu1A knockdown showed a marked reduction of kAE1 on the cell membrane and its accumulation in endoplasmic reticulum. → AP-1 mu1A has a critical role in kAE1 trafficking to the plasma membrane. -- Abstract: Kidney anion exchanger 1 (kAE1) mediates chloride (Cl-) and bicarbonate (HCO3-) exchange at the basolateral membrane of kidney α-intercalated cells. Impaired trafficking of kAE1 leads to defect of the Cl-/HCO3- exchange at the basolateral membrane and failure of proton (H+) secretion at the apical membrane, causing a kidney disease - distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). To gain a better insight into kAE1 trafficking, we searched for proteins physically interacting with the C-terminal region of kAE1 (Ct-kAE1), which contains motifs crucial for intracellular trafficking, by a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system. An adaptor-related protein complex 1 μ1A (AP-1 mu1A) subunit was found to interact with Ct-kAE1. The interaction between either Ct-kAE1 or full-length kAE1 and AP-1 mu1A were confirmed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T by co-immunoprecipitation, affinity co-purification, co-localization, yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-based protein fragment complementation assay (PCA) and GST pull-down assay. The interacting site for AP-1 mu1A on Ct-kAE1 was found to be Y904DEV907, a subset of YXXO motif. Interestingly, suppression of endogenous AP-1 mu1A in HEK 293T by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreased membrane localization of kAE1 and increased its intracellular accumulation, suggesting for the first time that AP-1 mu1A is involved in the kAE1 trafficking of kidney α-intercalated cells.

  5. Thread bonds in molecules

    Ivlev, B

    2015-01-01

    Unusual chemical bonds are proposed. Each bond is almost covalent but is characterized by the thread of a small radius $\\sim 0.6\\times 10^{-11}$cm, between two nuclei in a molecule. The main electron density is concentrated outside the thread as in a covalent bond. The thread is formed by the electron wave function which has a tendency to be singular on it. The singularity along the thread is cut off by electron "vibrations" due to the interaction with zero point electromagnetic oscillations. The electron energy has its typical value of (1-10)eV. Due to the small tread radius the uncertainty of the electron momentum inside the thread is large resulting in a large electron kinetic energy $\\sim 1 MeV$. This energy is compensated by formation of a potential well due to the reduction of the energy of electromagnetic zero point oscillations. This is similar to formation of a negative van der Waals potential. Thread bonds are stable and cannot be created or destructed in chemical or optical processes.

  6. Reactions of oriented molecules.

    Brooks, P R

    1976-07-01

    Beams of oriented molecules have been used to directly study geometrical requirements in chemical reactions. These studies have shown that reactivity is much greater in some orientations than others and demonstrated the existence of steric effects. For some reactions portions of the orientation results are in good accord with traditional views of steric hindrance, but for others it is clear that our chemical intuition needs recalibrating. Indeed, the information gained from simultaneously orienting the reactants and observing the scattering angle of the products may lead to new insights about the detailed mechanism of certain reactions. Further work must be done to extend the scope and detail of the studies described here. More detailed information is needed on the CH(3)I reaction and the CF(3)I reaction. The effects of alkyl groups of various sizes and alkali metals of various sizes are of interest. In addition, reactions where a long-lived complex is formed should be studied to see if orientation is important. Finally, it would be of interest to apply the technique to the sort of reactions that led to our interest in the first place: the S(N)2 displacements in alkyl halides where the fascinating Walden inversion occurs. PMID:17793988

  7. Molecule-based magnets

    J V Yakhmi

    2009-06-01

    The conventional magnetic materials used in current technology, such as, Fe, Fe2O3, Cr2O3, SmCo5, Nd2Fe14B etc are all atom-based, and their preparation/processing require high temperature routes. Employing self-assembly methods, it is possible to engineer a bulk molecular material with long-range magnetic order, mainly because one can play with the weak intermolecular interactions. Since the first successful synthesis of molecular magnets in 1986, a large variety of them have been synthesized, which can be categorized on the basis of the chemical nature of the magnetic units involved: organic-, metal-based systems, heterobimetallic assemblies, or mixed organic–inorganic systems. The design of molecule-based magnets has also been extended to the design of poly-functional molecular magnets, such as those exhibiting second-order optical nonlinearity, liquid crystallinity, or chirality simultaneously with long-range magnetic order. Solubility, low density and biocompatibility are attractive features of molecular magnets. Being weakly coloured, unlike their opaque classical magnet ‘cousins’ listed above, possibilities of photomagnetic switching exist. Persistent efforts also continue to design the ever-elusive polymer magnets towards applications in industry. While providing a brief overview of the field of molecular magnetism, this article highlights some recent developments in it, with emphasis on a few studies from the author’s own lab.

  8. Organic Molecules in Meteorites

    Martins, Zita

    2015-08-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites are primitive samples from the asteroid belt, containing 3-5wt% organic carbon. The exogenous delivery of organic matter by carbonaceous meteorites may have contributed to the organic inventory of the early Earth. The majority (>70%) of the meteoritic organic material consist of insoluble organic matter (IOM) [1]. The remaining meteoritic organic material (Haber-Bosch type gas-grain reactions after the meteorite parent body cooled to lower temperatures [13, 14].The analysis of the abundances and distribution of the organic molecules present in meteorites helps to determine the physical and chemical conditions of the early solar system, and the prebiotic organic compounds available on the early Earth.[1] Cody and Alexander (2005) GCA 69, 1085. [2] Cronin and Chang (1993) in: The Chemistry of Life’s Origin. pp. 209-258. [3] Martins and Sephton (2009) in: Amino acids, peptides and proteins in organic chemistry. pp. 1-42. [4] Martins (2011) Elements 7, 35. [5] Botta et al. (2007) MAPS 42, 81. [6] Martins et al. (2015) MAPS, in press. [7] Cooper and Cronin (1995) GCA 59, 1003. [8] Glavin et al. (2006) MAPS. 41, 889. [9] Glavin et al. (2011) MAPS 45, 1948. [10] Elsila et al. (2005) GCA 5, 1349. [11] Glavin and Dworkin (2009) PNAS 106, 5487. [12] Pizzarello et al. (2003) GCA 67, 1589. [13] Chan et al. (2012) MAPS. 47, 1502. [14] Burton et al. (2011) MAPS 46, 1703.

  9. Tunnelling of a molecule

    A quantum-mechanical description of tunnelling is presented for a one-dimensional system with internal oscillator degrees of freedom. The 'charged diatomic molecule' is frustrated on encountering a barrier potential by its centre of charge not being coincident with its centre of mass, resulting in transitions amongst internal states. In an adiabatic limit, the tunnelling of semiclassical coherent-like oscillator states is shown to exhibit the Hartman and Bueuttiker-Landauer times tH and tBL, with the time dependence of the coherent state parameter for the tunnelled state given by α(t) = α e-iω(t+Δt) , Δt = tH - itBL. A perturbation formalism is developed, whereby the exact transfer matrix can be expanded to any desired accuracy in a suitable limit. An 'intrinsic' time, based on the oscillator transition rate during tunnelling, transmission or reflection, is introduced. In simple situations the resulting intrinsic tunnelling time is shown to vanish to lowest order. In the general case a particular (nonzero) parametrisation is inferred, and its properties discussed in comparison with the literature on tunnelling times for both wavepackets and internal clocks. Copyright (1998) CSIRO Australia

  10. Strongly interacting ultracold polar molecules

    Gadway, Bryce; Yan, Bo

    2016-08-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in the study of strongly interacting systems of dipolar molecules. Heteronuclear molecules feature large and tunable electric dipole moments, which give rise to long-range and anisotropic dipole–dipole interactions. Ultracold samples of dipolar molecules with long-range interactions offer a unique platform for quantum simulations and the study of correlated many-body physics. We provide an introduction to the physics of dipolar quantum gases, both electric and magnetic, and summarize the multipronged efforts to bring dipolar molecules into the quantum regime. We discuss in detail the recent experimental progress in realizing and studying strongly interacting systems of polar molecules trapped in optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the study of interacting spin systems and non-equilibrium quantum magnetism. Finally, we conclude with a brief discussion of the future prospects for studies of strongly interacting dipolar molecules.

  11. Strongly interacting ultracold polar molecules

    Gadway, Bryce

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in the study of strongly interacting systems of dipolar molecules. Heteronuclear molecules feature large and tunable electric dipole moments, which give rise to long-range and anisotropic dipole-dipole interactions. Ultracold samples of dipolar molecules with long-range interactions offer a unique platform for quantum simulations and the study of correlated many-body physics. We provide an introduction to the physics of dipolar quantum gases, both electric and magnetic, and summarize the multipronged efforts to bring dipolar molecules into the quantum regime. We discuss in detail the recent experimental progress in realizing and studying strongly interacting systems of polar molecules trapped in optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the study of interacting spin systems and non-equilibrium quantum magnetism. Finally, we conclude with a brief discussion of the future prospects for studies of strongly interacting dipolar molecules.

  12. Combinatorial H3K9acS10ph Histone Modification in IgH Locus S Regions Targets 14-3-3 Adaptors and AID to Specify Antibody Class-Switch DNA Recombination

    Guideng Li

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Class-switch DNA recombination (CSR is central to the antibody response, in that it changes the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH constant region, thereby diversifying biological effector functions of antibodies. The activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID-centered CSR machinery excises and rejoins DNA between an upstream (donor and a downstream (acceptor S region, which precede the respective constant region DNA. AID is stabilized on S regions by 14-3-3 adaptors. These adaptors display a high affinity for 5′-AGCT-3′ repeats, which recur in all S regions. However, how 14-3-3, AID, and the CSR machinery target exclusively the donor and acceptor S regions is poorly understood. Here, we show that histone methyltransferases and acetyltransferases are induced by CD40 or Toll-like receptor signaling and catalyze H3K4me3 and H3K9ac/K14ac histone modifications, which are enriched in S regions but do not specify the S region targets of CSR. By contrast, the combinatorial H3K9acS10ph modification specifically marks the S regions set to recombine and directly recruits 14-3-3 adaptors for AID stabilization there. Inhibition of the enzymatic activity of GCN5 and PCAF histone acetyltransferases reduces H3K9acS10ph in S regions, 14-3-3 and AID stabilization, and CSR. Thus, H3K9acS10ph is a histone code that is “written” specifically in S regions and is “read” by 14-3-3 adaptors to target AID for CSR as an important biological outcome.

  13. Increased abundance of the adaptor protein containing pleckstrin homology domain, phosphotyrosine binding domain and leucine zipper motif (APPL1) in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes: evidence for altered adiponectin signalling

    Holmes, R.M.; Yi, Z; De Filippis, E.; Berria, R.; S. Shahani; P. Sathyanarayana; Sherman, V.; K. Fujiwara; Meyer, C.; Christ-Roberts, C.; Hwang, H; Finlayson, J.; Dong, L. Q.; Mandarino, L. J.; Bajaj, M.

    2011-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis The adiponectin signalling pathway is largely unknown, but recently the adaptor protein containing pleckstrin homology domain, phosphotyrosine binding domain and leucine zipper motif (APPL1), has been shown to interact directly with adiponectin receptor (ADIPOR)1. APPL1 is present in C2C12 myoblasts and mouse skeletal muscle, but its presence in human skeletal muscle has not been investigated. Methods Samples from type 2 diabetic, and lean and non-diabetic obese participants w...

  14. Molecules Best Paper Award 2012

    Derek J. McPhee

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecules starts to institute the “Best Paper” award to recognize these outstanding papers in the area of natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the first “Molecules Best Paper Award” for 2012. Nominations were selected by the editor-in-chief and selected editorial board members from all the papers published in 2008. [...

  15. Molecules Best Paper Award 2014

    Derek J. McPhee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecules instituted some years ago a “Best Paper” award to recognize the most outstanding papers in the area of natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published each year in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the third “Molecules Best Paper Award” for 2014. The winners were chosen by the Editor-in-Chief and selected editorial board members from among all the papers published in 2010. Reviews and research papers were evaluated separately.

  16. Molecules Best Paper Award 2013

    Derek J. McPhee

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecules has started to institute a "Best Paper" award to recognize the most outstanding papers in the area of natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the second "Molecules Best Paper Award" for 2013. Candidates were chosen by the Editor-in-Chief and selected editorial board members from among all the papers published in 2009.

  17. Recoiling DNA Molecule: Simulation & Experiment

    Neto, Jose Coelho; Dickman, Ronald; Mesquita, O. N.

    2002-01-01

    Single molecule DNA experiments often generate data from force versus extension measurements involving the tethering of a microsphere to one end of a single DNA molecule while the other is attached to a substrate. We show that the persistence length of single DNA molecules can also be measured based on the recoil dynamics of these DNA-microsphere complexes if appropriate corrections are made to the friction coefficient of the microsphere in the vicinity of the substrate. Comparison between co...

  18. STM investigation of surfactant molecules

    2002-01-01

    Adsorption and self-organization of sodium alkyl sulfonates (STS and SHS) have been studied on HOPG by using the in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Both SHS and STS molecules adsorb on the HOPG surface and form long-range well-ordered monolayers. The neighboring molecules in different rows form a "head to head" configuration. In the high-resolution images of STS and SHS molecules, one end of the molecules shows bright spots which are attributed to the SO3- groups.

  19. Labelled molecules, modern research implements

    Details of the synthesis of carbon 14- and tritium-labelled molecules are examined. Although the methods used are those of classical organic chemistry the preparation of carbon 14-labelled molecules differs in some respects, most noticeably in the use of 14CO2 which requires very special handling techniques. For the tritium labelling of organic molecules the methods are somewhat different, very often involving exchange reactions. The following are described in turn: the so-called Wilzbach exchange method; exchange by catalysis in solution; catalytic hydrogenation with tritium; reductions with borotritides. Some applications of labelled molecules in organic chemistry, biochemistry and pharmacology are listed

  20. Aromatic molecules as spintronic devices

    In this paper, we study the spin-dependent electron transport through aromatic molecular chains attached to two semi-infinite leads. We model this system taking into account different geometrical configurations which are all characterized by a tight binding Hamiltonian. Based on the Green's function approach with a Landauer formalism, we find spin-dependent transport in short aromatic molecules by applying external magnetic fields. Additionally, we find that the magnetoresistance of aromatic molecules can reach different values, which are dependent on the variations in the applied magnetic field, length of the molecules, and the interactions between the contacts and the aromatic molecule

  1. Molecules Best Paper Award 2015

    Derek J. McPhee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecules instituted some years ago a “Best Paper” award to recognize the most outstanding papers in the area of organic synthesis, natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published each year in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the third “Molecules Best Paper Award” for 2015. The winners were chosen by the Editor-in-Chief and selected editorial board members from among all the papers published in 2011. Reviews and research papers were evaluated separately. We are pleased to announce that the following eight papers have won the Molecules Best Paper Award for 2015:[...

  2. The adaptor protein DCAF7 mediates the interaction of the adenovirus E1A oncoprotein with the protein kinases DYRK1A and HIPK2.

    Glenewinkel, Florian; Cohen, Michael J; King, Cason R; Kaspar, Sophie; Bamberg-Lemper, Simone; Mymryk, Joe S; Becker, Walter

    2016-01-01

    DYRK1A is a constitutively active protein kinase that has a critical role in growth and development which functions by regulating cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. DCAF7 (also termed WDR68 or HAN11) is a cellular binding partner of DYRK1A and also regulates signalling by the protein kinase HIPK2. DCAF7 is an evolutionarily conserved protein with a single WD40 repeat domain and has no catalytic activity. We have defined a DCAF7 binding motif of 12 amino acids in the N-terminal domain of class 1 DYRKs that is functionally conserved in DYRK1 orthologs from Xenopus, Danio rerio and the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. A similar sequence was essential for DCAF7 binding to HIPK2, whereas the closely related HIPK1 family member did not bind DCAF7. Immunoprecipitation and pulldown experiments identified DCAF7 as an adaptor for the association of the adenovirus E1A protein with DYRK1A and HIPK2. Furthermore, DCAF7 was required for the hyperphosphorylation of E1A in DYRK1A or HIPK2 overexpressing cells. Our results characterize DCAF7 as a substrate recruiting subunit of DYRK1A and HIPK2 and suggest that it is required for the negative effect of DYRK1A on E1A-induced oncogenic transformation. PMID:27307198

  3. Skb5, an SH3 adaptor protein, regulates Pmk1 MAPK signaling by controlling the intracellular localization of the MAPKKK Mkh1.

    Kanda, Yuki; Satoh, Ryosuke; Matsumoto, Saki; Ikeda, Chisato; Inutsuka, Natsumi; Hagihara, Kanako; Matzno, Sumio; Tsujimoto, Sho; Kita, Ayako; Sugiura, Reiko

    2016-08-15

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is a highly conserved signaling module composed of MAPK kinase kinases (MAPKKKs), MAPK kinases (MAPKK) and MAPKs. The MAPKKK Mkh1 is an initiating kinase in Pmk1 MAPK signaling, which regulates cell integrity in fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe). Our genetic screen for regulators of Pmk1 signaling identified Shk1 kinase binding protein 5 (Skb5), an SH3-domain-containing adaptor protein. Here, we show that Skb5 serves as an inhibitor of Pmk1 MAPK signaling activation by downregulating Mkh1 localization to cell tips through its interaction with the SH3 domain. Consistent with this, the Mkh1(3PA) mutant protein, with impaired Skb5 binding, remained in the cell tips, even when Skb5 was overproduced. Intriguingly, Skb5 needs Mkh1 to localize to the growing ends as Mkh1 deletion and disruption of Mkh1 binding impairs Skb5 localization. Deletion of Pck2, an upstream activator of Mkh1, impaired the cell tip localization of Mkh1 and Skb5 as well as the Mkh1-Skb5 interaction. Interestingly, both Pck2 and Mkh1 localized to the cell tips at the G1/S phase, which coincided with Pmk1 MAPK activation. Taken together, Mkh1 localization to cell tips is important for transmitting upstream signaling to Pmk1, and Skb5 spatially regulates this process. PMID:27451356

  4. Adaptor protein containing PH domain, PTB domain and leucine zipper (APPL1) regulates the protein level of EGFR by modulating its trafficking

    Highlights: ► APPL1 regulates the protein level of EGFR in response to EGF stimulation. ► Depletion of APPL1 accelerates the movement of EGF/EGFR from the cell surface to the perinuclear region in response to EGF. ► Knockdown of APPL1 enhances the activity of Rab5. -- Abstract: The EGFR-mediated signaling pathway regulates multiple biological processes such as cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Previously APPL1 (adaptor protein containing PH domain, PTB domain and leucine zipper 1) has been reported to function as a downstream effector of EGF-initiated signaling. Here we demonstrate that APPL1 regulates EGFR protein levels in response to EGF stimulation. Overexpression of APPL1 enhances EGFR stabilization while APPL1 depletion by siRNA reduces EGFR protein levels. APPL1 depletion accelerates EGFR internalization and movement of EGF/EGFR from cell surface to the perinuclear region in response to EGF treatment. Conversely, overexpression of APPL1 decelerates EGFR internalization and translocation of EGF/EGFR to the perinuclear region. Furthermore, APPL1 depletion enhances the activity of Rab5 which is involved in internalization and trafficking of EGFR and inhibition of Rab5 in APPL1-depleted cells restored EGFR levels. Consistently, APPL1 depletion reduced activation of Akt, the downstream signaling effector of EGFR and this is restored by inhibition of Rab5. These findings suggest that APPL1 is required for EGFR signaling by regulation of EGFR stabilities through inhibition of Rab5.

  5. Multiple molecular forms of adaptor protein Ruk/CIN85 specifically associate with different subcellular compartments in human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells.

    Vynnytska-Myronovska, B O; Bobak, Ya P; Pasichnyk, G V; Igumentseva, N I; Samoylenko, A A; Drobot, L B

    2014-01-01

    Ruk/CIN85 is a receptor-proximal 'signalling' adaptor that possesses three SH3 domains, Pro- and Ser-rich regions and C-terminal coiled-coil domain. It employs distinct domains and motifs to act as a transducer platform in intracellular signaling. Based on cDNA analysis, various isoforms of Ruk/CIN85 with different combination of protein-protein interaction domains as well as additional Ruk/CIN85 forms that are the products of post-translational modifications have been demonstrated. Nevertheless, there is no precise information regarding both the subcellular distribution and the role of Ruk/CIN85 multiple molecular forms in cellular responses. Using MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells and cell fractionation technique, specific association of Ruk/CIN85 molecular forms with different subcellular compartments was demonstrated. Induction of apoptosis of MCF-7 cells by doxorubicin treatment or by serum deprivation resulted in the system changes of Ruk/CIN85 molecular forms intracellular localization as well as their ratio. The data obtained provide a new insight into potential physiological significance of Ruk/CIN85 molecular forms in the regulation of various cellular functions. PMID:25816594

  6. Identification and Characterization of KCASH2 and KCASH3, 2 Novel Cullin3 Adaptors Suppressing Histone Deacetylase and Hedgehog Activity in Medulloblastoma

    Enrico De Smaele

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is the most common pediatric malignant brain tumor, arising from aberrant cerebellar precursors' development, a process mainly controlled by Hedgehog (Hh signaling pathway. Histone deacetylase HDAC1 has been recently shown to modulate Hh signaling, deacetylating its effectors Gli1/2 and enhancing their transcriptional activity. Therefore, HDAC may represent a potential therapeutic target for Hh-dependent tumors, but still little information is available on the physiological mechanisms of HDAC regulation. The putative tumor suppressor RENKCTD11 acts through ubiquitination-dependent degradation of HDAC1, thereby affecting Hh activity and medulloblastoma growth. We identify and characterize here two RENKCTD11 homologues, defining a new family of proteins named KCASH, as “KCTD containing, Cullin3 adaptor, suppressor of Hedgehog.” Indeed, the novel genes (KCASH2KCTD21 and KCASH3KCTD6 share with RENKCTD11 a number of features, such as a BTB domain required for the formation of a Cullin3 ubiquitin ligase complex and HDAC1 ubiquitination and degradation capability, suppressing the acetylation-dependent Hh/Gli signaling. Expression of KCASH2 and -3 is observed in cerebellum, whereas epigenetic silencing and allelic deletion are observed in human medulloblastoma. Rescuing KCASHs expression reduces the Hedgehog-dependent medulloblastoma growth, suggesting that loss of members of this novel family of native HDAC inhibitors is crucial in sustaining Hh pathway-mediated tumorigenesis. Accordingly, they might represent a promising class of endogenous “agents” through which this pathway may be targeted.

  7. A conserved serine residue regulates the stability of Drosophila Salvador and human WW domain-containing adaptor 45 through proteasomal degradation

    Wu, Di, E-mail: DiWu@mail.nankai.edu.cn; Wu, Shian

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Ser-17 is key for the stability of Drosophila Sav. •Ala mutation of Ser-17 promotes the proteasomal degradation of Sav. •Ser-17 residue is not the main target of Hpo-induced Sav stabilization. •Hpo-dependent and -independent mechanisms regulate Sav stability. •This mechanism is conserved in the homologue of Sav, human WW45. -- Abstract: The Hippo (Hpo) pathway is a conserved tumor suppressor pathway that controls organ size through the coordinated regulation of apoptosis and proliferation. Drosophila Salvador (Sav), which limits organ size, is a core component of the Hpo pathway. In this study, Ser-17 was shown to be important for the stability of Sav. Alanine mutation of Ser-17 promoted the proteasomal degradation of Sav. Destabilization and stabilization of the Sav protein mediated by alanine mutation of Ser-17 and by Hpo, respectively, were independent of each other. This implies that the stability of Sav is controlled by two mechanisms, one that is Ser-17-dependent and Hpo-independent, and another that is Ser-17-independent and Hpo-dependent. These dual mechanisms also regulated the human counterpart of Drosophila Sav, WW domain-containing adaptor 45 (WW45). The conservation of this regulation adds to its significance in normal physiology and tumorigenesis.

  8. DVC1 (C1orf124) is a DNA damage-targeting p97 adaptor that promotes ubiquitin-dependent responses to replication blocks.

    Mosbech, Anna; Gibbs-Seymour, Ian; Kagias, Konstantinos; Thorslund, Tina; Beli, Petra; Povlsen, Lou; Nielsen, Sofie Vincents; Smedegaard, Stine; Sedgwick, Garry; Lukas, Claudia; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Lukas, Jiri; Choudhary, Chunaram; Pocock, Roger; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2012-11-01

    Ubiquitin-mediated processes orchestrate critical DNA-damage signaling and repair pathways. We identify human DVC1 (C1orf124; Spartan) as a cell cycle-regulated anaphase-promoting complex (APC) substrate that accumulates at stalled replication forks. DVC1 recruitment to sites of replication stress requires its ubiquitin-binding UBZ domain and PCNA-binding PIP box motif but is independent of RAD18-mediated PCNA monoubiquitylation. Via a conserved SHP box, DVC1 recruits the ubiquitin-selective chaperone p97 to blocked replication forks, which may facilitate p97-dependent removal of translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerase η (Pol η) from monoubiquitylated PCNA. DVC1 knockdown enhances UV light-induced mutagenesis, and depletion of human DVC1 or the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog DVC-1 causes hypersensitivity to replication stress-inducing agents. Our findings establish DVC1 as a DNA damage-targeting p97 adaptor that protects cells from deleterious consequences of replication blocks and suggest an important role of p97 in ubiquitin-dependent regulation of TLS. PMID:23042605

  9. The Src homology and collagen A (ShcA) adaptor protein is required for the spatial organization of the costamere/Z-disk network during heart development.

    Mlih, Mohamed; Host, Lionel; Martin, Sophie; Niederhoffer, Nathalie; Monassier, Laurent; Terrand, Jérôme; Messaddeq, Nadia; Radke, Michael; Gotthardt, Michael; Bruban, Véronique; Kober, Frank; Bernard, Monique; Canet-Soulas, Emmanuelle; Abt-Jijon, Francisco; Boucher, Philippe; Matz, Rachel L

    2015-01-23

    Src homology and collagen A (ShcA) is an adaptor protein that binds to tyrosine kinase receptors. Its germ line deletion is embryonic lethal with abnormal cardiovascular system formation, and its role in cardiovascular development is unknown. To investigate its functional role in cardiovascular development in mice, ShcA was deleted in cardiomyocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells by crossing ShcA flox mice with SM22a-Cre transgenic mice. Conditional mutant mice developed signs of severe dilated cardiomyopathy, myocardial infarctions, and premature death. No evidence of a vascular contribution to the phenotype was observed. Histological analysis of the heart revealed aberrant sarcomeric Z-disk and M-band structures, and misalignments of T-tubules with Z-disks. We find that not only the ErbB3/Neuregulin signaling pathway but also the baroreceptor reflex response, which have been functionally associated, are altered in the mutant mice. We further demonstrate that ShcA interacts with Caveolin-1 and the costameric protein plasma membrane Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent ATPase (PMCA), and that its deletion leads to abnormal dystrophin signaling. Collectively, these results demonstrate that ShcA interacts with crucial proteins and pathways that link Z-disk and costamere. PMID:25488665

  10. The Src Homology and Collagen A (ShcA) Adaptor Protein Is Required for the Spatial Organization of the Costamere/Z-disk Network during Heart Development*

    Mlih, Mohamed; Host, Lionel; Martin, Sophie; Niederhoffer, Nathalie; Monassier, Laurent; Terrand, Jérôme; Messaddeq, Nadia; Radke, Michael; Gotthardt, Michael; Bruban, Véronique; Kober, Frank; Bernard, Monique; Canet-Soulas, Emmanuelle; Abt-Jijon, Francisco; Boucher, Philippe; Matz, Rachel L.

    2015-01-01

    Src homology and collagen A (ShcA) is an adaptor protein that binds to tyrosine kinase receptors. Its germ line deletion is embryonic lethal with abnormal cardiovascular system formation, and its role in cardiovascular development is unknown. To investigate its functional role in cardiovascular development in mice, ShcA was deleted in cardiomyocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells by crossing ShcA flox mice with SM22a-Cre transgenic mice. Conditional mutant mice developed signs of severe dilated cardiomyopathy, myocardial infarctions, and premature death. No evidence of a vascular contribution to the phenotype was observed. Histological analysis of the heart revealed aberrant sarcomeric Z-disk and M-band structures, and misalignments of T-tubules with Z-disks. We find that not only the ErbB3/Neuregulin signaling pathway but also the baroreceptor reflex response, which have been functionally associated, are altered in the mutant mice. We further demonstrate that ShcA interacts with Caveolin-1 and the costameric protein plasma membrane Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent ATPase (PMCA), and that its deletion leads to abnormal dystrophin signaling. Collectively, these results demonstrate that ShcA interacts with crucial proteins and pathways that link Z-disk and costamere. PMID:25488665

  11. Single-molecule magnet engineering

    Pedersen, Kasper Steen; Bendix, Jesper; Clérac, Rodolphe

    2014-01-01

    to delicately tune, for instance, the properties of molecules that behave as "magnets", the so-called single-molecule magnets (SMMs). Although many interesting SMMs have been prepared by a more or less serendipitous approach, the assembly of predesigned, isolatable molecular entities into higher nuclearity...

  12. Small-Molecule Stabilization of the 14-3-3/Gab2 Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) Interface.

    Bier, David; Bartel, Maria; Sies, Katharina; Halbach, Sebastian; Higuchi, Yusuke; Haranosono, Yu; Brummer, Tilman; Kato, Nobuo; Ottmann, Christian

    2016-04-19

    Small-molecule modulation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is one of the most promising new areas in drug discovery. In the vast majority of cases only inhibition or disruption of PPIs is realized, whereas the complementary strategy of targeted stabilization of PPIs is clearly under-represented. Here, we report the example of a semi-synthetic natural product derivative--ISIR-005--that stabilizes the cancer-relevant interaction of the adaptor protein 14-3-3 and Gab2. The crystal structure of ISIR-005 in complex with 14-3-3 and the binding motif of Gab2 comprising two phosphorylation sites (Gab2pS210pT391) showed how the stabilizing molecule binds to the rim-of-the-interface of the protein complex. Only in the direct vicinity of 14-3-3/Gab2pT391 site is a pre-formed pocket occupied by ISIR-005; binding of the Gab2pS210 motif to 14-3-3 does not create an interface pocket suitable for the molecule. Accordingly, ISIR-005 only stabilizes the binding of the Gab2pT391 but not the Gab2pS210 site. This study represents structural and biochemical proof of the druggability of the 14-3-3/Gab2 PPI interface with important implications for the development of PPI stabilizers. PMID:26644359

  13. When water molecules meet air

    Hsie, Cho-Shuen; Campen, R. Kramer; Verde, Ana Vila; Bolhuis, Peter; Nienhuys, Han-Kwang; Bonn, Mischa

    2012-01-01

    About 70% of our planet is covered in water. Most of that water exists as water in the bulk – the neighbors of water molecules are other water molecules – and only a small fraction of molecules are at the air-water interface. Despite the small relative abundance of interfacial water, it is of the utmost importance: it governs the chemistry involving the surface of oceans and seawater aerosols, or the small water droplets forming clouds. Reactions at the air-water interface are directly releva...

  14. Quantum transport through aromatic molecules

    In this paper, we study the electronic transport properties through aromatic molecules connected to two semi-infinite leads. The molecules are in different geometrical configurations including arrays. Using a nearest neighbor tight-binding approach, the transport properties are analyzed into a Green's function technique within a real-space renormalization scheme. We calculate the transmission probability and the Current-Voltage characteristics as a function of a molecule-leads coupling parameter. Our results show different transport regimes for these systems, exhibiting metal-semiconductor-insulator transitions and the possibility to employ them in molecular devices

  15. Impaired Lysosomal Integral Membrane Protein 2-dependent Peroxiredoxin 6 Delivery to Lamellar Bodies Accounts for Altered Alveolar Phospholipid Content in Adaptor Protein-3-deficient pearl Mice.

    Kook, Seunghyi; Wang, Ping; Young, Lisa R; Schwake, Michael; Saftig, Paul; Weng, Xialian; Meng, Ying; Neculai, Dante; Marks, Michael S; Gonzales, Linda; Beers, Michael F; Guttentag, Susan

    2016-04-15

    The Hermansky Pudlak syndromes (HPS) constitute a family of disorders characterized by oculocutaneous albinism and bleeding diathesis, often associated with lethal lung fibrosis. HPS results from mutations in genes of membrane trafficking complexes that facilitate delivery of cargo to lysosome-related organelles. Among the affected lysosome-related organelles are lamellar bodies (LB) within alveolar type 2 cells (AT2) in which surfactant components are assembled, modified, and stored. AT2 from HPS patients and mouse models of HPS exhibit enlarged LB with increased phospholipid content, but the mechanism underlying these defects is unknown. We now show that AT2 in the pearl mouse model of HPS type 2 lacking the adaptor protein 3 complex (AP-3) fails to accumulate the soluble enzyme peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6) in LB. This defect reflects impaired AP-3-dependent trafficking of PRDX6 to LB, because pearl mouse AT2 cells harbor a normal total PRDX6 content. AP-3-dependent targeting of PRDX6 to LB requires the transmembrane protein LIMP-2/SCARB2, a known AP-3-dependent cargo protein that functions as a carrier for lysosomal proteins in other cell types. Depletion of LB PRDX6 in AP-3- or LIMP-2/SCARB2-deficient mice correlates with phospholipid accumulation in lamellar bodies and with defective intraluminal degradation of LB disaturated phosphatidylcholine. Furthermore, AP-3-dependent LB targeting is facilitated by protein/protein interaction between LIMP-2/SCARB2 and PRDX6 in vitro and in vivo Our data provide the first evidence for an AP-3-dependent cargo protein required for the maturation of LB in AT2 and suggest that the loss of PRDX6 activity contributes to the pathogenic changes in LB phospholipid homeostasis found HPS2 patients. PMID:26907692

  16. The Ras suppressor Rsu-1 binds to the LIM 5 domain of the adaptor protein PINCH1 and participates in adhesion-related functions

    Rsu-1 is a highly conserved leucine rich repeat (LRR) protein that is expressed ubiquitously in mammalian cells. Rsu-1 was identified based on its ability to inhibit transformation by Ras, and previous studies demonstrated that ectopic expression of Rsu-1 inhibited anchorage-independent growth of Ras-transformed cells and human tumor cell lines. Using GAL4-based yeast two-hybrid screening, the LIM domain protein, PINCH1, was identified as the binding partner of Rsu-1. PINCH1 is an adaptor protein that localizes to focal adhesions and it has been implicated in the regulation of adhesion functions. Subdomain mapping in yeast revealed that Rsu-1 binds to the LIM 5 domain of PINCH1, a region not previously identified as a specific binding domain for any other protein. Additional testing demonstrated that PINCH2, which is highly homologous to PINCH1, except in the LIM 5 domain, does not interact with Rsu-1. Glutathione transferase fusion protein binding studies determined that the LRR region of Rsu-1 interacts with PINCH1. Transient expression studies using epitope-tagged Rsu-1 and PINCH1 revealed that Rsu-1 co-immunoprecipitated with PINCH1 and colocalized with vinculin at sites of focal adhesions in mammalian cells. In addition, endogenous P33 Rsu-1 from 293T cells co-immunoprecipitated with transiently expressed myc-tagged PINCH1. Furthermore, RNAi-induced reduction in Rsu-1 RNA and protein inhibited cell attachment, and while previous studies demonstrated that ectopic expression of Rsu-1 inhibited Jun kinase activation, the depletion of Rsu-1 resulted in activation of Jun and p38 stress kinases. These studies demonstrate that Rsu-1 interacts with PINCH1 in mammalian cells and functions, in part, by altering cell adhesion

  17. Theoretical Investigations Regarding Single Molecules

    Pedersen, Kim Georg Lind

    interfere destructively or constructively. Destructive interference effects in electron transport could potentially improve thermo-electrics, organic logic circuits and energy harvesting. We have investigated destructive interference in off-resonant transport through organic molecules, and have found a set...

  18. Polar molecule dominated electrorheological effect

    Lu Kun-Quan; Shen Rong; Wang Xue-Zhao; Sun Gang; Wen Wei-Jia; Liu Ji-Xing

    2006-01-01

    The yield stress of our newly developed electrorheological (ER) fluids consisting of dielectric nano-particles suspended in silicone oil reaches hundreds of kPa, which is orders of magnitude higher than that of conventional ones. We found that the polar molecules adsorbed on the particles play a decisive role in such new ER fluids. To explain this polar molecule dominated ER (PM-ER) effect a model is proposed based on the interaction of polar molecule-charge between the particles, where the local electric field is significantly enhanced and results in the polar molecules aligning in the direction of the electric field. The model can well explain the giant ER effect and a near-linear dependence of the yield stress on the electric field. The main effective factors for achieving high-performance PM-ER fluids are discussed. The PM-ER fluids with the yield stress higher than one MPa can be expected.

  19. Absorption characteristics of bacteriorhodopsin molecules

    H K T Kumar; K Appaji Gowda

    2000-03-01

    The bacteriorhodopsin molecule absorbs light and undergoes a series of structural transformation following a well-defined photocycle. The complex photocycle is transformed to an equivalent level diagram by considering the lifetime of the intermediate states. Assuming that only and states are appreciably populated at any instant of time, the level diagram is further simplified to two-level system. Based on the rate equations for two-level system, an analytic expression for the absorption coefficient of bacteriorhodopsin molecule is derived. It is applied to study the behaviour of absorption coefficient of bacteriorhodopsin film in the visible wavelength region of 514 nm. The dependence of absorption coefficient of bacteriorhodopsin film on the thickness of the film, total number density of active molecules and initial number density of molecules in -state is presented in the graphical form.

  20. Nuclear molecules with three clusters

    Full text: Recently, in the cold fusion of 252 Cf, indications where found for the existence of nuclear molecules with three clusters. The system identified is 96 Sr + 10 Be + 146 Ba. In the first half of the talk the geometric model for three-cluster molecules is resumed and calculations done are presented. Problems and restrictions of the geometric model will be discussed. In the second half an Ansatz for an algebraic model for nuclear molecules is given. In a first step we restrict to two clusters only, which might have an application to standard two-cluster molecules. A Hamiltonian is proposed. The mapping to a geometric potential is described, which is fitted to the calculation of internuclear potentials using double-folding techniques. (Author)

  1. Single-Molecule DNA Analysis

    Efcavitch, J. William; Thompson, John F.

    2010-07-01

    The ability to detect single molecules of DNA or RNA has led to an extremely rich area of exploration of the single most important biomolecule in nature. In cases in which the nucleic acid molecules are tethered to a solid support, confined to a channel, or simply allowed to diffuse into a detection volume, novel techniques have been developed to manipulate the DNA and to examine properties such as structural dynamics and protein-DNA interactions. Beyond the analysis of the properties of nucleic acids themselves, single-molecule detection has enabled dramatic improvements in the throughput of DNA sequencing and holds promise for continuing progress. Both optical and nonoptical detection methods that use surfaces, nanopores, and zero-mode waveguides have been attempted, and one optically based instrument is already commercially available. The breadth of literature related to single-molecule DNA analysis is vast; this review focuses on a survey of efforts in molecular dynamics and nucleic acid sequencing.

  2. Ultracold molecules and ultracold chemistry

    Softley, Tim; Bell, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The recent development of a range of new methods for producing samples of gas phase molecules that are translationally cold (T < 1 K) or ultracold (T < 1 mK) is driving efforts to study reactive and inelastic collisional processes in these temperature regimes. In this review article the new methods for cold/ultracold molecule production are reviewed in the context of their potential or current use in collisional studies and progress in the application of these methods i...

  3. Vibrational Circular Dichroism Spectra for Large Molecules through Molecules-in-Molecules Fragment-Based Approach.

    Jose, K V Jovan; Beckett, Daniel; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2015-09-01

    We present the first implementation of the vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectrum of large molecules through the Molecules-in-Molecules (MIM) fragment-based method. An efficient projection of the relevant higher energy derivatives from smaller fragments to the parent molecule enables the extension of the MIM method for the evaluation of VCD spectra (MIM-VCD). The overlapping primary subsystems in this work are constructed from interacting fragments using a number-based scheme and the dangling bonds are saturated with link hydrogen atoms. Independent fragment calculations are performed to evaluate the energies, Hessian matrix, atomic polar tensor (APT), and the atomic axial tensor (AAT). Subsequently, the link atom tensor components are projected back onto the corresponding host and supporting atoms through the Jacobian projection method, as in the ONIOM approach. In the two-layer model, the long-range interactions between fragments are accounted for using a less computationally intensive lower level of theory. The performance of the MIM model is calibrated on the d- and l-enantiomers of 10 carbohydrate benchmark molecules, with strong intramolecular interactions. The vibrational frequencies and VCD intensities are accurately reproduced relative to the full, unfragmented, results for these systems. In addition, the MIM-VCD method is employed to predict the VCD spectra of perhydrotriphenylene and cryptophane-A, yielding spectra in agreement with experiment. The accuracy and performance of the benchmark systems validate the MIM-VCD model for exploring vibrational circular dichroism spectra of large molecules. PMID:26575919

  4. Raman Optical Activity Spectra for Large Molecules through Molecules-in-Molecules Fragment-Based Approach.

    Jovan Jose, K V; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2016-02-01

    We present an efficient method for the calculation of the Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra for large molecules through the molecules-in-molecules (MIM) fragment-based method. The relevant higher energy derivatives from smaller fragments are used to build the property tensors of the parent molecule to enable the extension of the MIM method for evaluating ROA spectra (MIM-ROA). Two factors were found to be particularly important in yielding accurate results. First, the link-atom tensor components are projected back onto the corresponding host and supporting atoms through the Jacobian projection method, yielding a mathematically rigorous method. Second, the long-range interactions between fragments are taken into account by using a less computationally expensive lower level of theory. The performance of the MIM-ROA model is calibrated on the enantiomeric pairs of 10 carbohydrate benchmark molecules, with strong intramolecular interactions. The vibrational frequencies and ROA intensities are accurately reproduced relative to the full, unfragmented, results for these systems. In addition, the MIM-ROA method is employed to predict the ROA spectra of d-maltose, α-D-cyclodextrin, and cryptophane-A, yielding spectra in excellent agreement with experiment. The accuracy and performance of the benchmark systems validate the MIM-ROA model for exploring ROA spectra of large molecules. PMID:26760444

  5. The Molecule Cloud - compact visualization of large collections of molecules

    Ertl Peter

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis and visualization of large collections of molecules is one of the most frequent challenges cheminformatics experts in pharmaceutical industry are facing. Various sophisticated methods are available to perform this task, including clustering, dimensionality reduction or scaffold frequency analysis. In any case, however, viewing and analyzing large tables with molecular structures is necessary. We present a new visualization technique, providing basic information about the composition of molecular data sets at a single glance. Summary A method is presented here allowing visual representation of the most common structural features of chemical databases in a form of a cloud diagram. The frequency of molecules containing particular substructure is indicated by the size of respective structural image. The method is useful to quickly perceive the most prominent structural features present in the data set. This approach was inspired by popular word cloud diagrams that are used to visualize textual information in a compact form. Therefore we call this approach “Molecule Cloud”. The method also supports visualization of additional information, for example biological activity of molecules containing this scaffold or the protein target class typical for particular scaffolds, by color coding. Detailed description of the algorithm is provided, allowing easy implementation of the method by any cheminformatics toolkit. The layout algorithm is available as open source Java code. Conclusions Visualization of large molecular data sets using the Molecule Cloud approach allows scientists to get information about the composition of molecular databases and their most frequent structural features easily. The method may be used in the areas where analysis of large molecular collections is needed, for example processing of high throughput screening results, virtual screening or compound purchasing. Several example visualizations of large

  6. Electron Collisions with Large Molecules

    McKoy, Vincent

    2006-10-01

    In recent years, interest in electron-molecule collisions has increasingly shifted to large molecules. Applications within the semiconductor industry, for example, require electron collision data for molecules such as perfluorocyclobutane, while almost all biological applications involve macromolecules such as DNA. A significant development in recent years has been the realization that slow electrons can directly damage DNA. This discovery has spurred studies of low-energy collisions with the constituents of DNA, including the bases, deoxyribose, the phosphate, and larger moieties assembled from them. In semiconductor applications, a key goal is development of electron cross section sets for plasma chemistry modeling, while biological studies are largely focused on understanding the role of localized resonances in inducing DNA strand breaks. Accurate calculations of low-energy electron collisions with polyatomic molecules are computationally demanding because of the low symmetry and inherent many-electron nature of the problem; moreover, the computational requirements scale rapidly with the size of the molecule. To pursue such studies, we have adapted our computational procedure, known as the Schwinger multichannel method, to run efficiently on highly parallel computers. In this talk, we will present some of our recent results for fluorocarbon etchants used in the semiconductor industry and for constituents of DNA and RNA. In collaboration with Carl Winstead, California Institute of Technology.

  7. Laser spectroscopy of cold molecules

    Borri, Simone

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent results in high-resolution spectroscopy on cold molecules. Laser spectroscopy of cold molecules addresses issues of symmetry violation, like in the search for the electric dipole moment of the electron and the studies on energy differences in enantiomers of chiral species; tries to improve the precision to which fundamental physical constants are known and tests for their possible variation in time and space; tests quantum electrodynamics, and searches for a fifth force. Further, we briefly review the recent technological progresses in the fields of cold molecules and mid-infrared lasers, which are the tools that mainly set the limits for the resolution that is currently attainable in the measurements.

  8. VgrG C terminus confers the type VI effector transport specificity and is required for binding with PAAR and adaptor-effector complex.

    Bondage, Devanand D; Lin, Jer-Sheng; Ma, Lay-Sun; Kuo, Chih-Horng; Lai, Erh-Min

    2016-07-01

    Type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a macromolecular machine used by many Gram-negative bacteria to inject effectors/toxins into eukaryotic hosts or prokaryotic competitors for survival and fitness. To date, our knowledge of the molecular determinants and mechanisms underlying the transport of these effectors remains limited. Here, we report that two T6SS encoded valine-glycine repeat protein G (VgrG) paralogs in Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 specifically control the secretion and interbacterial competition activity of the type VI DNase toxins Tde1 and Tde2. Deletion and domain-swapping analysis identified that the C-terminal extension of VgrG1 specifically confers Tde1 secretion and Tde1-dependent interbacterial competition activity in planta, and the C-terminal variable region of VgrG2 governs this specificity for Tde2. Functional studies of VgrG1 and VgrG2 variants with stepwise deletion of the C terminus revealed that the C-terminal 31 aa (C31) of VgrG1 and 8 aa (C8) of VgrG2 are the molecular determinants specifically required for delivery of each cognate Tde toxin. Further in-depth studies on Tde toxin delivery mechanisms revealed that VgrG1 interacts with the adaptor/chaperone-effector complex (Tap-1-Tde1) in the absence of proline-alanine-alanine-arginine (PAAR) and the VgrG1-PAAR complex forms independent of Tap-1 and Tde1. Importantly, we identified the regions involved in these interactions. Although the entire C31 segment is required for binding with the Tap-1-Tde1 complex, only the first 15 aa of this region are necessary for PAAR binding. These results suggest that the VgrG1 C terminus interacts sequentially or simultaneously with the Tap-1-Tde1 complex and PAAR to govern Tde1 translocation across bacterial membranes and delivery into target cells for antibacterial activity. PMID:27313214

  9. Recoiling DNA Molecule Simulation & Experiment

    Neto, J C; Mesquita, O N; Neto, Jose Coelho; Dickman, Ronald

    2002-01-01

    Many recent experiments with single DNA molecules are based on force versus extension measurements and involve tethering a microsphere to one of its extremities and the other to a microscope coverglass. In this work we show that similar results can also be obtained by studying the recoil dynamics of the tethered microspheres. Computer simulations of the corresponding Langevin equation indicate which assumptions are required for a reliable analysis of the experimental recoil curves. We have measured the persistence length A of single naked DNA molecules and DNA-Ethidium Bromide complexes using this approach.

  10. Teaching lasers to control molecules

    We simulate a method to teach a laser pulse sequences to excite specified molecular states. We use a learning procedure to direct the production of pulses based on ''fitness'' information provided by a laboratory measurement device. Over a series of pulses the algorithm learns an optimal sequence. The experimental apparatus, which consists of a laser, a sample of molecules and a measurement device, acts as an analog computer that solves Schroedinger's equation n/Iexactly, in real time. We simulate an apparatus that learns to excite specified rotational states in a diatomic molecule

  11. Technetium-aspirin molecule complexes

    Technetium-aspirin and technetium-aspirin-like molecule complexes were prepared. The structure of N-acetylanthranilic acid (NAA) has been decided through CNDO calculations. The ionization potential and electron affinity of the NAA molecule as well as the charge densities were calculated. The electronic absorption spectra of Tc(V)-Asp and Tc(V)-ATS complexes have two characteristic absorption bands at 450 and 600 nm, but the Tc(V)-NAA spectrum has one characteristic band at 450 nm. As a comparative study, Mo-ATS complex was prepared and its electronic absorption spectrum is comparable with the Tc-ATS complex spectrum. (author)

  12. Phase structure of soliton molecules

    Temporal optical soliton molecules were recently demonstrated; they potentially allow further increase of data rates in optical telecommunication. Their binding mechanism relies on the internal phases, but these have not been experimentally accessible so far. Conventional frequency-resolved optical gating techniques are not suited for measurement of their phase profile: Their algorithms fail to converge due to zeros both in their temporal and their spectral profile. We show that the VAMPIRE (very advanced method of phase and intensity retrieval of E-fields) method performs reliably. With VAMPIRE the phase profile of soliton molecules has been measured, and further insight into the mechanism is obtained

  13. Phase structure of soliton molecules

    Hause, A.; Hartwig, H.; Seifert, B.; Stolz, H.; Böhm, M.; Mitschke, F.

    2007-06-01

    Temporal optical soliton molecules were recently demonstrated; they potentially allow further increase of data rates in optical telecommunication. Their binding mechanism relies on the internal phases, but these have not been experimentally accessible so far. Conventional frequency-resolved optical gating techniques are not suited for measurement of their phase profile: Their algorithms fail to converge due to zeros both in their temporal and their spectral profile. We show that the VAMPIRE (very advanced method of phase and intensity retrieval of E -fields) method performs reliably. With VAMPIRE the phase profile of soliton molecules has been measured, and further insight into the mechanism is obtained.

  14. Orbital molecules in electronic materials

    Attfield, J. Paul, E-mail: j.p.attfield@ed.ac.uk [Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions and School of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    Orbital molecules are made up of coupled orbital states on several metal ions within an orbitally ordered (and sometimes also charge-ordered) solid such as a transition metal oxide. Spin-singlet dimers are known in many materials, but recent discoveries of more exotic species such as 18-electron heptamers in AlV{sub 2}O{sub 4} and magnetic 3-atom trimerons in magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) have shown that orbital molecules constitute a general new class of quantum electronic states in solids.

  15. Exotic helium molecules; Molecules exotiques d'helium

    Portier, M

    2007-12-15

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}P{sub 0}) molecule, or a {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 {+-} 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime {tau} = (1.4 {+-} 0.3) {mu}s is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  16. Quantum interferometry with complex molecules

    Arndt, Markus; Hornberger, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    This chapter reviews recent experiments on matter wave interferometry with large molecules. Starting from an elementary introduction to matter wave physics we discuss far-field diffraction and near-field interferometry with thermally excited many-body systems. We describe the constraints imposed by decoherence and dephasing effects, and present an outlook to the future challenges in macromolecule and cluster interferometry.

  17. Monitoring Molecules: Insights and Progress

    Wightman, R Mark

    2014-01-01

    In August, 2014, neuroscientists and physical scientists gathered together on the campus of the University of California, Los Angeles to discuss how to monitor molecules in neuroscience. This field has seen significant growth since its inception in the 1970s. Here, the advances in this field are documented, including its advance into understanding the actions that specific neurotransmitters mediate during behavior.

  18. Azobenzene-functionalized cascade molecules

    Archut, A.; Vogtle, F.; De Cola, L.;

    1998-01-01

    Cascade molecules bearing up to 32 azobenzene groups in the periphery have been prepared from poly(propylene imine) dendrimers and N-hydroxysuccinimide esters. The dendritic azobenzene species show similar isomerization properties as the corresponding azobenzene monomers. The all-E azobenzene den...

  19. Engineering crystals of dendritic molecules.

    Lukin, Oleg; Schubert, Dirk; Müller, Claudia M; Schweizer, W Bernd; Gramlich, Volker; Schneider, Julian; Dolgonos, Grygoriy; Shivanyuk, Alexander

    2009-07-01

    A detailed single-crystal X-ray study of conformationally flexible sulfonimide-based dendritic molecules with systematically varied molecular architectures was undertaken. Thirteen crystal structures reported in this work include 9 structures of the second-generation dendritic sulfonimides decorated with different aryl groups, 2 compounds bearing branches of both second and first generation, and 2 representatives of the first generation. Analysis of the packing patterns of 9 compounds bearing second-generation branches shows that despite their lack of strong directive functional groups there is a repeatedly reproduced intermolecular interaction mode consisting in an anchor-type packing of complementary second-generation branches of neighbouring molecules. The observed interaction tolerates a wide range of substituents in meta- and para-positions of the peripheral arylsulfonyl rings. Quantum chemical calculations of the molecule-molecule interaction energies agree at the qualitative level with the packing preferences found in the crystalline state. The calculations can therefore be used as a tool to rationalize and predict molecular structures with commensurate and non-commensurate branches for programming of different packing modes in crystal. PMID:19549870

  20. Multiphoton dissociation of polyatomic molecules

    The dynamics of infrared multiphoton excitation and dissociation of SF6 was investigated under collision free conditions by a crossed laser-molecular beam method. In order to understand the excitation mechanism and to elucidate the requirements of laser intensity and energy fluence, a series of experiments were carried out to measure the dissociation yield dependences on energy fluence, vibrational temperature of SF6, the pulse duration of the CO2 laser and the frequency in both one and two laser experiments. Translational energy distributions of the SF5 dissociation product measured by time of flight and angular distributions and the dissociation lifetime of excited SF6 as inferred from the observation of secondary dissociation of SF5 into SF4 and F during the laser pulse suggest that the dynamics of dissociation of excited molecules is dominated by complete energy randomization and rapid intramolecular energy transfer on a nanosecond timescale, and can be adequately described by RRKM theory. An improved phenomenological model including the initial intensity dependent excitation, a rate equation describing the absorption and stimulated emission of single photons, and the unimolecular dissociation of excited molecules is constructed based on available experimental results. The model shows that the energy fluence of the laser determines the excitation of molecules in the quasi-continuum and the excess energy with which molecules dissociate after the laser pulse. The role played by the laser intensity in multiphoton dissociation is more significant than just that of overcoming the intensity dependent absorption in the lowest levels. 63 references

  1. Tunneling Ionization of Diatomic Molecules

    Svensmark, Jens Søren Sieg

    2016-01-01

    of tunneling ionizaion of molecules is presented and the results of numerical calculations are shown. One perhaps surprising result is, that the frequently used Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down for weak fields when describing tunneling ionization. An analytic theory applicable in the weak...

  2. Nucleic Acids as Information Molecules.

    McInerney, Joseph D.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity that aims at enabling students to recognize that DNA and RNA are information molecules whose function is to store, copy, and make available the information in biological systems, without feeling overwhelmed by the specialized vocabulary and the minutia of the central dogma. (JRH)

  3. Molecule-by-Molecule Writing Using a Focused Electron Beam

    Van Dorp, Willem F.; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Feringa, Ben L.; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; De Hosson, Jeff Th. M.

    2012-01-01

    The resolution of lithography techniques needs to be extended beyond their current limits to continue the trend of miniaturization and enable new applications. But what is the ultimate spatial resolution? It is known that single atoms can be imaged with a highly focused electron beam. Can single...... atoms also be written with an electron beam? We verify this with focused electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID), a direct-write technique that has the current record for the smallest feature written by (electron) optical lithography. We show that the deposition of an organometallic precursor on...... graphene can be followed molecule-by-molecule with FEBID. The results show that mechanisms that are inherent to the process inhibit a further increase in control over the process. Hence, our results present the resolution limit of (electron) optical lithography techniques. The writing of isolated...

  4. Observing electron motion in molecules

    We study analytically the possibility for monitoring electron motion in a molecule using two ultrashort laser pulses. The first prepares a coherent superposition of two electronic molecular states whereas the second (attosecond pulse) photoionizes the molecule. We show that interesting information about electron dynamics can be obtained from measurement of the photoelectron spectra as a function of the time delay between two pulses. In particular, asymmetries in photoelectron angular distribution provide a simple signature of the electron motion within the initial time-dependent coherently coupled two molecular states. Both asymmetries and electron spectra show very strong two-centre interference patterns. We illustrate these effects using as an example a dissociating hydrogen molecular ion probed by the attosecond pulses

  5. Nano trap for polar molecules

    A new ac/dc monopole trap for neutral polar particles, introduced and explored by Blümel (2011 Phys. Rev. A 83 045402 and 2011 Eur. Phys. J. D 64 85–101), is significantly advanced in several directions. (1) Previously shown to work only for polar classical particles and polar macro-molecules, the trap is shown to work for polar diatomic molecules. (2) A homogeneous electric field, optionally switched on for improved stability in the angular direction, leads to stable trapping in higher order stability regions of the Mathieu equation. (3) Based on the Floquet formalism, analytical and numerical calculations are presented that show that the trap is quantum mechanically stable. (4) Definition and derivation of a quantum pseudo-potential allow a qualitative understanding of the quantum trapping mechanism. (5) It is shown that the proposed ac/dc trap may be realized experimentally using currently available scanning tunnelling microscopy technology. (paper)

  6. Ballonet String Model of Molecules

    Gavril NIAC

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Strings of ballonets, modelling rows of orbitals, are assembled to molecule models by crossing them properly. The ballonets at the ends of the strings of 2, 3, 4 or 5 spheres represent bonding orbitals of hydrogen with other elements like C, N or O (the proton being inside the sphere, as well as nonbonding orbitals. The ballonets between them are modelling bonding orbitals among elements other than hydrogen - except the double bond in diborane, the atomic cores laying at the junction of two or more spheres.Advantages of elastic sphere models range from self-adjusting bond angles to resistance when closing cycles like cyclopropane or modeling double bonds.Examples comprise alkanes, including platonic hydrocarbons, ethene, acetylene, and some inorganic molecules.

  7. Electrochemical detection of single molecules.

    Fan, F R; Bard, A J

    1995-02-10

    The electrochemical behavior of a single molecule can be observed by trapping a small volume of a dilute solution of the electroactive species between an ultramicroelectrode tip with a diameter of approximately 15 nanometers and a conductive substrate. A scanning electrochemical microscope was used to adjust the tip-substrate distance ( approximately 10 nanometers), and the oxidation of [(trimethylammonio)methyl] ferrocene (Cp(2)FeTMA(+)) to Cp(2)FeTMA(2+) was carried out. The response was stochastic, and anodic current peaks were observed as the molecule moved into and out of the electrode-substrate gap. Similar experiments were performed with a solution containing two redox species, ferrocene carboxylate (Cp(2)FeCOO(-)) and Os(bpy)(3)(2+) (bpy is 2,2'-bipyridyl). PMID:17813918

  8. Laser tunneling from aligned molecules

    Smeenk, C T L; Sokolov, A V; Spanner, M; Lee, K F; Staudte, A; Villeneuve, D M; Corkum, P B

    2013-01-01

    We study multi-photon ionization from N_2, O_2 and benzene using circularly polarized light. By examining molecular frame photo-electron angular distributions, we illustrate how multi-photon ionization acts a momentum-selective probe of the local electron density in the Dyson orbitals for these molecules. We find good agreement with calculations based on a tunneling model and including saturation effects.

  9. Metagenomic small molecule discovery methods

    Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Milshteyn, Aleksandr; Brady, Sean F

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomic approaches to natural product discovery provide the means of harvesting bioactive small molecules synthesized by environmental bacteria without the requirement of first culturing these organisms. Advances in sequencing technologies and general metagenomic methods are beginning to provide the tools necessary to unlock the unexplored biosynthetic potential encoded by the genomes of uncultured environmental bacteria. Here, we highlight recent advances in sequence- and functional- bas...

  10. Bioactive molecules from sea hares.

    Kamiya, H; Sakai, R; Jimbo, M

    2006-01-01

    Sea hares, belonging to the order Opisthobranchia, subclass Gastropoda, are mollusks that have attracted many researchers who are interested in the chemical defense mechanisms of these soft and "shell-less" snails. Numbers of small molecules of dietary origin have been isolated from sea hares and some have ecologically relevant activities, such as fish deterrent activity or toxicity. Recently, however, greater attention has been paid to biomedically interesting sea hare isolates such as dolastatins, a series of antitumor peptide/macrolides isolated from Dolabella auricularia. Another series of bioactive peptide/macrolides, as represented by aplyronines, have been isolated from sea hares in Japanese waters. Although earlier studies indicated the potent antitumor activity of aplyronines, their clinical development has never been conducted because of the minute amount of compound available from the natural source. Recent synthetic studies, however, have made it possible to prepare these compounds and analogs for a structure-activity relationship study, and started to uncover their unique action mechanism towards their putative targets, microfilaments. Here, recent findings of small antitumor molecules isolated from Japanese sea hares are reviewed. Sea hares are also known to produce cytotoxic and antimicrobial proteins. In contrast to the small molecules of dietary origin, proteins are the genetic products of sea hares and they are likely to have some primary physiological functions in addition to ecological roles in the sea hare. Based on the biochemical properties and phylogenetic analysis of these proteins, we propose that they belong to one family of molecule, the "Aplysianin A family," although their molecular weights are apparently divided into two groups. Interestingly, the active principles in Aplysia species and Dolabella auricularia were shown to be L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO), a flavin enzyme that oxidizes an alpha-amino group of the substrate with