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Sample records for adaptive optics scanning

  1. Digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging system

    Liu, Changgeng; Kim, Myung K.

    2015-11-01

    A digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging (DAOLCI) system is proposed by applying digital holographic adaptive optics to a digital form of line-scanning confocal imaging system. In DAOLCI, each line scan is recorded by a digital hologram, which allows access to the complex optical field from one slice of the sample through digital holography. This complex optical field contains both the information of one slice of the sample and the optical aberration of the system, thus allowing us to compensate for the effect of the optical aberration, which can be sensed by a complex guide star hologram. After numerical aberration compensation, the corrected optical fields of a sequence of line scans are stitched into the final corrected confocal image. In DAOLCI, a numerical slit is applied to realize the confocality at the sensor end. The width of this slit can be adjusted to control the image contrast and speckle noise for scattering samples. DAOLCI dispenses with the hardware pieces, such as Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and deformable mirror, and the closed-loop feedbacks adopted in the conventional adaptive optics confocal imaging system, thus reducing the optomechanical complexity and cost. Numerical simulations and proof-of-principle experiments are presented that demonstrate the feasibility of this idea.

  2. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging: technology update

    Merino D

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available David Merino, Pablo Loza-Alvarez The Institute of Photonic Sciences (ICFO, The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Castelldefels, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Adaptive optics (AO retinal imaging has become very popular in the past few years, especially within the ophthalmic research community. Several different retinal techniques, such as fundus imaging cameras or optical coherence tomography systems, have been coupled with AO in order to produce impressive images showing individual cell mosaics over different layers of the in vivo human retina. The combination of AO with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy has been extensively used to generate impressive images of the human retina with unprecedented resolution, showing individual photoreceptor cells, retinal pigment epithelium cells, as well as microscopic capillary vessels, or the nerve fiber layer. Over the past few years, the technique has evolved to develop several different applications not only in the clinic but also in different animal models, thanks to technological developments in the field. These developments have specific applications to different fields of investigation, which are not limited to the study of retinal diseases but also to the understanding of the retinal function and vision science. This review is an attempt to summarize these developments in an understandable and brief manner in order to guide the reader into the possibilities that AO scanning laser ophthalmoscopy offers, as well as its limitations, which should be taken into account when planning on using it. Keywords: high-resolution, in vivo retinal imaging, AOSLO

  3. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging: technology update

    Merino, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) retinal imaging has become very popular in the past few years, especially within the ophthalmic research community. Several different retinal techniques, such as fundus imaging cameras or optical coherence tomography systems, have been coupled with AO in order to produce impressive images showing individual cell mosaics over different layers of the in vivo human retina. The combination of AO with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy has been extensively used to generate impressive images of the human retina with unprecedented resolution, showing individual photoreceptor cells, retinal pigment epithelium cells, as well as microscopic capillary vessels, or the nerve fiber layer. Over the past few years, the technique has evolved to develop several different applications not only in the clinic but also in different animal models, thanks to technological developments in the field. These developments have specific applications to different fields of investigation, which are not limited to the study of retinal diseases but also to the understanding of the retinal function and vision science. This review is an attempt to summarize these developments in an understandable and brief manner in order to guide the reader into the possibilities that AO scanning laser ophthalmoscopy offers, as well as its limitations, which should be taken into account when planning on using it. PMID:27175057

  4. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope with integrated wide-field retinal imaging and tracking

    Ferguson, R. Daniel; Zhong, Zhangyi; Hammer, Daniel X.; Mujat, Mircea; Patel, Ankit H.; Deng, Cong; Zou, Weiyao; Burns, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a new, unified implementation of the adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) incorporating a wide-field line-scanning ophthalmoscope (LSO) and a closed-loop optical retinal tracker. AOSLO raster scans are deflected by the integrated tracking mirrors so that direct AOSLO stabilization is automatic during tracking. The wide-field imager and large-spherical-mirror optical interface design, as well as a large-stroke deformable mirror (DM), enable the AOSLO image fi...

  5. Integrated adaptive optics optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope system for simultaneous cellular resolution in vivo retinal imaging

    Zawadzki, RJ; Jones, SM; Pilli, S; Balderas-Mata, S; Kim, DY; Olivier, SS; Werner, JS

    2011-01-01

    We describe an ultrahigh-resolution (UHR) retinal imaging system that combines adaptive optics Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) with an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO) to allow simultaneous data acquisition by the two modalities. The AO-SLO subsystem was integrated into the previously described AO-UHR OCT instrument with minimal changes to the latter. This was done in order to ensure optimal performance and image quality of the AO- UHR OCT. In this d...

  6. Analysis of adaptive laser scanning optical system with focus-tunable components

    Pokorný, P.; Mikš, A.; Novák, J.; Novák, P.

    2015-05-01

    This work presents a primary analysis of an adaptive laser scanner based on two-mirror beam-steering device and focustunable components (lenses with tunable focal length). It is proposed an optical scheme of an adaptive laser scanner, which can focus the laser beam in a continuous way to a required spatial position using the lens with tunable focal length. This work focuses on a detailed analysis of the active optical or opto-mechanical components (e.g. focus-tunable lenses) mounted in the optical systems of laser scanners. The algebraic formulas are derived for ray tracing through different configurations of the scanning optical system and one can calculate angles of scanner mirrors and required focal length of the tunable-focus component provided that the position of the focused beam in 3D space is given with a required tolerance. Computer simulations of the proposed system are performed using MATLAB.

  7. High-resolution adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope with multiple deformable mirrors

    Chen, Diana C.; Olivier, Scot S.; Jones; Steven M.

    2010-02-23

    An adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopes is introduced to produce non-invasive views of the human retina. The use of dual deformable mirrors improved the dynamic range for correction of the wavefront aberrations compared with the use of the MEMS mirror alone, and improved the quality of the wavefront correction compared with the use of the bimorph mirror alone. The large-stroke bimorph deformable mirror improved the capability for axial sectioning with the confocal imaging system by providing an easier way to move the focus axially through different layers of the retina.

  8. Real-time blind deconvolution of retinal images in adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    Li, Hao; Lu, Jing; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Yudong

    2011-06-01

    With the use of adaptive optics (AO), the ocular aberrations can be compensated to get high-resolution image of living human retina. However, the wavefront correction is not perfect due to the wavefront measure error and hardware restrictions. Thus, it is necessary to use a deconvolution algorithm to recover the retinal images. In this paper, a blind deconvolution technique called Incremental Wiener filter is used to restore the adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) images. The point-spread function (PSF) measured by wavefront sensor is only used as an initial value of our algorithm. We also realize the Incremental Wiener filter on graphics processing unit (GPU) in real-time. When the image size is 512 × 480 pixels, six iterations of our algorithm only spend about 10 ms. Retinal blood vessels as well as cells in retinal images are restored by our algorithm, and the PSFs are also revised. Retinal images with and without adaptive optics are both restored. The results show that Incremental Wiener filter reduces the noises and improve the image quality.

  9. High-Resolution Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope with Dual Deformable Mirrors

    Chen, D C; Jones, S M; Silva, D A; Olivier, S S

    2006-08-11

    Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO SLO) has demonstrated superior optical quality of non-invasive view of the living retina, but with limited capability of aberration compensation. In this paper, we demonstrate that the use of dual deformable mirrors can effectively compensate large aberrations in the human retina. We used a bimorph mirror to correct large-stroke, low-order aberrations and a MEMS mirror to correct low-stroke, high-order aberration. The measured ocular RMS wavefront error of a test subject was 240 nm without AO compensation. We were able to reduce the RMS wavefront error to 90 nm in clinical settings using one deformable mirror for the phase compensation and further reduced the wavefront error to 48 nm using two deformable mirrors. Compared with that of a single-deformable-mirror SLO system, dual AO SLO offers much improved dynamic range and better correction of the wavefront aberrations. The use of large-stroke deformable mirrors provided the system with the capability of axial sectioning different layers of the retina. We have achieved diffraction-limited in-vivo retinal images of targeted retinal layers such as photoreceptor layer, blood vessel layer and nerve fiber layers with the combined phase compensation of the two deformable mirrors in the AO SLO.

  10. High-resolution adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope with dual deformable mirrors for large aberration correction

    Chen, D; Jones, S M; Silva, D A; Olivier, S S

    2007-01-25

    Scanning laser ophthalmoscopes with adaptive optics (AOSLO) have been shown previously to provide a noninvasive, cellular-scale view of the living human retina. However, the clinical utility of these systems has been limited by the available deformable mirror technology. In this paper, we demonstrate that the use of dual deformable mirrors can effectively compensate large aberrations in the human retina, making the AOSLO system a viable, non-invasive, high-resolution imaging tool for clinical diagnostics. We used a bimorph deformable mirror to correct low-order aberrations with relatively large amplitudes. The bimorph mirror is manufactured by Aoptix, Inc. with 37 elements and 18 {micro}m stroke in a 10 mm aperture. We used a MEMS deformable mirror to correct high-order aberrations with lower amplitudes. The MEMS mirror is manufactured by Boston Micromachine, Inc with 144 elements and 1.5 {micro}m stroke in a 3 mm aperture. We have achieved near diffraction-limited retina images using the dual deformable mirrors to correct large aberrations up to {+-} 3D of defocus and {+-} 3D of cylindrical aberrations with test subjects. This increases the range of spectacle corrections by the AO systems by a factor of 10, which is crucial for use in the clinical environment. This ability for large phase compensation can eliminate accurate refractive error fitting for the patients, which greatly improves the system ease of use and efficiency in the clinical environment.

  11. “Lucky Averaging”: Quality improvement on Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope Images

    Huang, Gang; Zhong, Zhangyi; Zou, Weiyao; Burns, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive optics(AO) has greatly improved retinal image resolution. However, even with AO, temporal and spatial variations in image quality still occur due to wavefront fluctuations, intra-frame focus shifts and other factors. As a result, aligning and averaging images can produce a mean image that has lower resolution or contrast than the best images within a sequence. To address this, we propose an image post-processing scheme called “lucky averaging”, analogous to lucky imaging (Fried, 1978...

  12. Optimisation of the ion optical range adaptation method for tracking of moving tumours with scanned ion beams

    Currently an ion optical solution for beam tracking of moving targets with scanned ion beams is being investigated at GSI for the treatment of moving tumours, such as lung cancer. Beam tracking compensates target motion by adapting the lateral beam position as well as the beam range according to the motion parameters. Tracking of the lateral position is achieved via scanning magnets. For range adaptation the proposed ion optical solution uses an energy degrader with variable thickness inserted into the therapy beam line downstream of the synchrotron. By deflecting the particle beam via dipole magnets to different positions on the degrader, the range of the Bragg peak can be adjusted in real-time. Hence density changes due to organ motion can be compensated for each target spot during beam scanning. In order to reach a beam quality suitable for therapy with this method, systematic studies on the ion optical parameters have to be carried out. Different degrader designs (ramp or discrete step shaped), different materials (e.g. PMMA, graphite), as well as optimised degrader positions have been examined. The results of simulated beam profiles are presented.

  13. High-resolution imaging of the retinal nerve fiber layer in normal eyes using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy.

    Kohei Takayama

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To conduct high-resolution imaging of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL in normal eyes using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO. METHODS: AO-SLO images were obtained in 20 normal eyes at multiple locations in the posterior polar area and a circular path with a 3-4-mm diameter around the optic disc. For each eye, images focused on the RNFL were recorded and a montage of AO-SLO images was created. RESULTS: AO-SLO images for all eyes showed many hyperreflective bundles in the RNFL. Hyperreflective bundles above or below the fovea were seen in an arch from the temporal periphery on either side of a horizontal dividing line to the optic disc. The dark lines among the hyperreflective bundles were narrower around the optic disc compared with those in the temporal raphe. The hyperreflective bundles corresponded with the direction of the striations on SLO red-free images. The resolution and contrast of the bundles were much higher in AO-SLO images than in red-free fundus photography or SLO red-free images. The mean hyperreflective bundle width around the optic disc had a double-humped shape; the bundles at the temporal and nasal sides of the optic disc were narrower than those above and below the optic disc (P<0.001. RNFL thickness obtained by optical coherence tomography correlated with the hyperreflective bundle widths on AO-SLO (P<0.001 CONCLUSIONS: AO-SLO revealed hyperreflective bundles and dark lines in the RNFL, believed to be retinal nerve fiber bundles and Müller cell septa. The widths of the nerve fiber bundles appear to be proportional to the RNFL thickness at equivalent distances from the optic disc.

  14. Tracking features in retinal images of adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope using KLT-SIFT algorithm.

    Li, Hao; Lu, Jing; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Yudong

    2010-01-01

    With the use of adaptive optics (AO), high-resolution microscopic imaging of living human retina in the single cell level has been achieved. In an adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) system, with a small field size (about 1 degree, 280 μm), the motion of the eye severely affects the stabilization of the real-time video images and results in significant distortions of the retina images. In this paper, Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) is used to abstract stable point features from the retina images. Kanade-Lucas-Tomasi(KLT) algorithm is applied to track the features. With the tracked features, the image distortion in each frame is removed by the second-order polynomial transformation, and 10 successive frames are co-added to enhance the image quality. Features of special interest in an image can also be selected manually and tracked by KLT. A point on a cone is selected manually, and the cone is tracked from frame to frame. PMID:21258443

  15. Objective assessment of foveal cone loss ratio in surgically closed macular holes using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy.

    Satoshi Yokota

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To use adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO to quantify cone loss ratio in the foveola in order to assess foveal cone status and to investigate relationships between foveal structural abnormalities and visual function in patients with macular hole (MH after surgery. METHODS: We evaluated 10 normal eyes of 10 healthy volunteers and 19 eyes of 18 patients in whom anatomically successful MH closure had been performed. All subjects underwent a comprehensive ophthalmologic examination that included measurements of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and AO-SLO. RESULTS: On AO-SLO regular cone mosaic was seen in all normal eyes whereas dark regions suggesting cone loss were seen in all eyes after MH repair. Visual acuity was better in eyes without dark regions at the center of the fovea than in eyes with them (P = 0.001. Cone loss ratio in the foveola correlated with postoperative visual acuity (P<0.001, mean foveal sensitivity (P = 0.029, thinner inner and outer segments at the center of the fovea (P = 0.002, larger size of the disrupted inner and outer segment junction line (P = 0.018, and cone outer segment tip line (P<0.001. Cone loss ratio in the foveola was significantly greater in eyes that had moderately reflective foveal lesions after surgery (P = 0.006. CONCLUSIONS: AO-SLO is a useful means of assessing foveal cone damage objectively and quantitatively. The location and extent of cone damage, especially if it involves the foveola, is an important factor determining visual function after MH surgery.

  16. [Adaptive optics for ophthalmology].

    Saleh, M

    2016-04-01

    Adaptive optics is a technology enhancing the visual performance of an optical system by correcting its optical aberrations. Adaptive optics have already enabled several breakthroughs in the field of visual sciences, such as improvement of visual acuity in normal and diseased eyes beyond physiologic limits, and the correction of presbyopia. Adaptive optics technology also provides high-resolution, in vivo imaging of the retina that may eventually help to detect the onset of retinal conditions at an early stage and provide better assessment of treatment efficacy. PMID:27019970

  17. Solar Adaptive Optics

    Thomas R. Rimmele

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive optics (AO has become an indispensable tool at ground-based solar telescopes. AO enables the ground-based observer to overcome the adverse effects of atmospheric seeing and obtain diffraction limited observations. Over the last decade adaptive optics systems have been deployed at major ground-based solar telescopes and revitalized ground-based solar astronomy. The relatively small aperture of solar telescopes and the bright source make solar AO possible for visible wavelengths where the majority of solar observations are still performed. Solar AO systems enable diffraction limited observations of the Sun for a significant fraction of the available observing time at ground-based solar telescopes, which often have a larger aperture than equivalent space based observatories, such as HINODE. New ground breaking scientific results have been achieved with solar adaptive optics and this trend continues. New large aperture telescopes are currently being deployed or are under construction. With the aid of solar AO these telescopes will obtain observations of the highly structured and dynamic solar atmosphere with unprecedented resolution. This paper reviews solar adaptive optics techniques and summarizes the recent progress in the field of solar adaptive optics. An outlook to future solar AO developments, including a discussion of Multi-Conjugate AO (MCAO and Ground-Layer AO (GLAO will be given.

  18. Adaptive optical processors.

    Ghosh, A

    1989-06-15

    There are two different approaches for improving the accuracy of analog optical associative processors: postprocessing with a bimodal system and preprocessing with a preconditioner. These two approaches can be combined to develop an adaptive optical multiprocessor that can adjust the computational steps depending on the data and produce solutions of linear algebra problems with a specified accuracy in a given amount of time. PMID:19752909

  19. Fluorescent scanning laser ophthalmoscopy for cellular resolution in vivo mouse retinal imaging: benefits and drawbacks of implementing adaptive optics (Conference Presentation)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Goswami, Mayank; Pugh, Edward N.; Zawadzki, Robert J.

    2016-03-01

    Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy (SLO) is a very important imaging tool in ophthalmology research. By combing with Adaptive Optics (AO) technique, AO-SLO can correct for ocular aberrations resulting in cellular level resolution, allowing longitudinal studies of single cells morphology in the living eyes. The numerical aperture (NA) sets the optical resolution that can be achieve in the "classical" imaging systems. Mouse eye has more than twice NA of the human eye, thus offering theoretically higher resolution. However, in most SLO based imaging systems the imaging beam size at mouse pupil sets the NA of that instrument, while most of the AO-SLO systems use almost the full NA of the mouse eye. In this report, we first simulated the theoretical resolution that can be achieved in vivo for different imaging beam sizes (different NA), assumingtwo cases: no aberrations and aberrations based on published mouse ocular wavefront data. Then we imaged mouse retinas with our custom build SLO system using different beam sizes to compare these results with theory. Further experiments include comparison of the SLO and AO-SLO systems for imaging different type of fluorescently labeled cells (microglia, ganglion, photoreceptors, etc.). By comparing those results and taking into account systems complexity and ease of use, the benefits and drawbacks of two imaging systems will be discussed.

  20. Feature Adaptive Sampling for Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Dahmen, Tim; Engstler, Michael; Pauly, Christoph; Trampert, Patrick; de Jonge, Niels; Mücklich, Frank; Slusallek, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    A new method for the image acquisition in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was introduced. The method used adaptively increased pixel-dwell times to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in areas of high detail. In areas of low detail, the electron dose was reduced on a per pixel basis, and a-posteriori image processing techniques were applied to remove the resulting noise. The technique was realized by scanning the sample twice. The first, quick scan used small pixel-dwell times to gener...

  1. Optical Profilometers Using Adaptive Signal Processing

    Hall, Gregory A.; Youngquist, Robert; Mikhael, Wasfy

    2006-01-01

    A method of adaptive signal processing has been proposed as the basis of a new generation of interferometric optical profilometers for measuring surfaces. The proposed profilometers would be portable, hand-held units. Sizes could be thus reduced because the adaptive-signal-processing method would make it possible to substitute lower-power coherent light sources (e.g., laser diodes) for white light sources and would eliminate the need for most of the optical components of current white-light profilometers. The adaptive-signal-processing method would make it possible to attain scanning ranges of the order of decimeters in the proposed profilometers.

  2. Scanning Tunneling Optical Resonance Microscopy

    Bailey, Sheila; Wilt, Dave; Raffaelle, Ryne; Gennett, Tom; Tin, Padetha; Lau, Janice; Castro, Stephanie; Jenkins, Philip; Scheiman, Dave

    2003-01-01

    Scanning tunneling optical resonance microscopy (STORM) is a method, now undergoing development, for measuring optoelectronic properties of materials and devices on the nanoscale by means of a combination of (1) traditional scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) with (2) tunable laser spectroscopy. In STORM, an STM tip probing a semiconductor is illuminated with modulated light at a wavelength in the visible-to-near-infrared range and the resulting photoenhancement of the tunneling current is measured as a function of the illuminating wavelength. The photoenhancement of tunneling current occurs when the laser photon energy is sufficient to excite charge carriers into the conduction band of the semiconductor. Figure 1 schematically depicts a proposed STORM apparatus. The light for illuminating the semiconductor specimen at the STM would be generated by a ring laser that would be tunable across the wavelength range of interest. The laser beam would be chopped by an achromatic liquid-crystal modulator. A polarization-maintaining optical fiber would couple the light to the tip/sample junction of a commercial STM. An STM can be operated in one of two modes: constant height or constant current. A STORM apparatus would be operated in the constant-current mode, in which the height of the tip relative to the specimen would be varied in order to keep the tunneling current constant. In this mode, a feedback control circuit adjusts the voltage applied to a piezoelectric actuator in the STM that adjusts the height of the STM tip to keep the tunneling current constant. The exponential relationship between the tunneling current and tip-to-sample distance makes it relatively easy to implement this mode of operation. The choice of method by which the photoenhanced portion of the tunneling current would be measured depends on choice of the frequency at which the input illumination would be modulated (chopped). If the frequency of modulation were low enough (typically < 10 Hz) that the

  3. New Adaptive Optics Technique Demonstrated

    2007-03-01

    Enrico Marchetti, the MAD Project Manager. "The system behaviour was very stable and the acquisition and closed loop operations were fast and smooth." ESO PR Photo 19d/07 ESO PR Photo 19d/07 AO Strehl Maps After routine checks on the closed loop stability and preliminary scans of the system parameters, the telescope was pointed to Omega Centauri, a very crowded area in the sky, and an optimal test case for extracting accurate measurements on AO correction performance with good spatial resolution on the FoV. Three 11 magnitude stars within a circle of ~1.5 arcmin diameter were selected as the baseline for wavefront sensing and the MCAO loop was closed successfully. Omega Centauri will be observed for several nights more, in order to test the AO correction in different seeing conditions. "This is a tremendous achievement that opens new perspectives in the era of extremely large telescopes," said Catherine Cesarsky, ESO's Director General. " "I am very proud of the ESO staff and wish to congratulate all involved for their prowess," she added. The MAD images perfectly show the validity of the concept. The image quality was almost uniform over the whole field of view and beautifully corrected for some of the atmospheric turbulence. More Information The Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO) Demonstrator MAD was built by ESO in collaboration with the Astronomical Observatories of Arcetri and Padova (Italy) and the Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade de Lisboa (Portugal), as a pathfinder for 2nd generation VLT instrumentation and the European Extremely Large Telescope project. The MCAO technique is based on probing the atmospheric turbulence on a large volume of atmosphere by means of several wavefront sensors (WFS), which point at different locations in the observed field of view, and by means of several deformable mirrors - optically conjugated at different altitudes on the atmosphere above the telescope - which correct for the atmospheric disturbance. The signals provided

  4. Handbook of optical and laser scanning

    Marshall, Gerald F

    2011-01-01

    From its initial publication titled Laser Beam Scanning in 1985 to Handbook of Optical and Laser Scanning, now in its second edition, this reference has kept professionals and students at the forefront of optical scanning technology. Carefully and meticulously updated in each iteration, the book continues to be the most comprehensive scanning resource on the market. It examines the breadth and depth of subtopics in the field from a variety of perspectives. The Second Edition covers: Technologies such as piezoelectric devices Applications of laser scanning such as Ladar (laser radar) Underwater

  5. FDM adaptive optics technology development

    Thibault, Simon; Doucet, Michel; Rioux, Myriam

    2004-10-01

    INO supports research on Ferrofluidic Deformable Mirror (FDM) adaptive optics technologies and, as such, its research activities include the development and characterization of FDM and high resolution (ExAO) adaptive optics systems using such FDMs. Liquid mirrors have long been recognized as a potential low-cost alternative to conventional solid mirrors. Since the trend is towards advanced adaptive optics systems, a need for deformable mirrors with a large number of low-cost actuators exists. This paper presents updated experimental results using a new INO FDM prototype (271 actuators, 50 µm stroke) as well as a theoretical model of surface behaviors.

  6. The research and development of the adaptive optics in ophthalmology

    Wu, Chuhan; Zhang, Xiaofang; Chen, Weilin

    2015-08-01

    Recently the combination of adaptive optics and ophthalmology has made great progress and become highly effective. The retina disease is diagnosed by retina imaging technique based on scanning optical system, so the scanning of eye requires optical system characterized by great ability of anti-moving and optical aberration correction. The adaptive optics possesses high level of adaptability and is available for real time imaging, which meets the requirement of medical retina detection with accurate images. Now the Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope and the Optical Coherence Tomography are widely used, which are the core techniques in the area of medical retina detection. Based on the above techniques, in China, a few adaptive optics systems used for eye medical scanning have been designed by some researchers from The Institute of Optics And Electronics of CAS(The Chinese Academy of Sciences); some foreign research institutions have adopted other methods to eliminate the interference of eye moving and optical aberration; there are many relevant patents at home and abroad. In this paper, the principles and relevant technique details of the Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope and the Optical Coherence Tomography are described. And the recent development and progress of adaptive optics in the field of eye retina imaging are analyzed and summarized.

  7. Maritime adaptive optics beam control

    Corley, Melissa S.

    2010-01-01

    The Navy is interested in developing systems for horizontal, near ocean surface, high-energy laser propagation through the atmosphere. Laser propagation in the maritime environment requires adaptive optics control of aberrations caused by atmospheric distortion. In this research, a multichannel transverse adaptive filter is formulated in Matlab's Simulink environment and compared to a complex lattice filter that has previously been implemented in large system simulations. The adaptive fil...

  8. Adaptive Optics for Large Telescopes

    Olivier, S

    2008-06-27

    The use of adaptive optics was originally conceived by astronomers seeking to correct the blurring of images made with large telescopes due to the effects of atmospheric turbulence. The basic idea is to use a device, a wave front corrector, to adjust the phase of light passing through an optical system, based on some measurement of the spatial variation of the phase transverse to the light propagation direction, using a wave front sensor. Although the original concept was intended for application to astronomical imaging, the technique can be more generally applied. For instance, adaptive optics systems have been used for several decades to correct for aberrations in high-power laser systems. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the world's largest laser system, the National Ignition Facility, uses adaptive optics to correct for aberrations in each of the 192 beams, all of which must be precisely focused on a millimeter scale target in order to perform nuclear physics experiments.

  9. Adaptive Optics for Large Telescopes

    The use of adaptive optics was originally conceived by astronomers seeking to correct the blurring of images made with large telescopes due to the effects of atmospheric turbulence. The basic idea is to use a device, a wave front corrector, to adjust the phase of light passing through an optical system, based on some measurement of the spatial variation of the phase transverse to the light propagation direction, using a wave front sensor. Although the original concept was intended for application to astronomical imaging, the technique can be more generally applied. For instance, adaptive optics systems have been used for several decades to correct for aberrations in high-power laser systems. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the world's largest laser system, the National Ignition Facility, uses adaptive optics to correct for aberrations in each of the 192 beams, all of which must be precisely focused on a millimeter scale target in order to perform nuclear physics experiments

  10. Adaptive optics projects at ESO

    Hubin, Norbert N.; Arsenault, Robin; Bonnet, Henri; Conan, Rodolphe; Delabre, Bernard; Donaldson, Robert; Dupuy, Christophe; Fedrigo, Enrico; Ivanescu, L.; Kasper, Markus E.; Kissler-Patig, Markus; Lizon, Jean-Luis; Le Louarn, Miska; Marchetti, Enrico; Paufique, J.; Stroebele, Stefan; Tordo, Sebastien

    2003-02-01

    Over the past two years ESO has reinforced its efforts in the field of Adaptive Optics. The AO team has currently the challenging objectives to provide 8 Adaptive Optics systems for the VLT in the coming years and has now a world-leading role in that field. This paper will review all AO projects and plans. We will present an overview of the Nasmyth Adaptive Optics System (NAOS) with its infrared imager CONICA installed successfully at the VLT last year. Sodium Laser Guide Star plans will be introduced. The status of the 4 curvature AO systems (MACAO) developed for the VLT interferometer will be discussed. The status of the SINFONI AO module developed to feed the infrared integral field spectrograph (SPIFFI) will be presented. A short description of the Multi-conjugate Adaptive optics Demonstrator MAD and its instrumentation will be introduced. Finally, we will present the plans for the VLT second-generation AO systems and the researches performed in the frame of OWL.

  11. All-optical scanning acoustic microscope

    Sharples, Steve David

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis a new instrument, the all-optical scanning acoustic microscope (O-SAM) is presented, it is a non contact scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) which uses lasers to both generate and detect surface acoustics waves (SAWs) The non contact nature of the O-SAM overcomes some difficulties associated with conventional SAMs because of the couplant and surface contact involved. This O-SAM also overcomes many of the problems associated with conventional laser ultrasound systems including th...

  12. Adaptive Optics for Industry and Medicine

    Dainty, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    wavefront corrector ophthalmic adaptive optics: design and alignment (oral paper) / Alfredo Dubra and David Williams. High speed simultaneous SLO/OCT imaging of the human retina with adaptive optics (oral paper) / M. Pircher ... [et al.]. Characterization of an AO-OCT system (oral paper) / Julia W. Evans ... [et al.]. Adaptive optics optical coherence tomography for retina imaging (oral paper) / Guohua Shi ... [et al.]. Development, calibration and performance of an electromagnetic-mirror-based adaptive optics system for visual optics (oral paper) / Enrique Gambra ... [et al.]. Adaptive eye model (poster paper) / Sergey O. Galetskzy and Alexty V. Kudryashov. Adaptive optics system for retinal imaging based on a pyramid wavefront sensor (poster paper) / Sabine Chiesa ... [et al.]. Modeling of non-stationary dynamic ocular aberrations (poster paper) / Conor Leahy and Chris Dainty. High-order aberrations and accommodation of human eye (poster paper) / Lixia Xue ... [et al.]. Electromagnetic deformable mirror: experimental assessment and first ophthalmic applications (poster paper) / L. Vabre ... [et al.]. Correcting ocular aberrations in optical coherence tomography (poster paper) / Simon Tuohy ... [et al.] -- pt. 4. Adaptive optics in optical storage and microscopy. The application of liquid crystal aberration compensator for the optical disc systems (invited paper) / Masakazu Ogasawara. Commercialization of the adaptive scanning optical microscope (ASOM) (oral paper) / Benjamin Potsaid ... [et al.]. A practical implementation of adaptive optics for aberration compensation in optical microscopy (oral paper) / A. J. Wright ... [et al.]. Active focus locking in an optically sectioning microscope using adaptive optics (poster paper) / S. Poland, A. J. Wright, J. M. Girkin. Towards four dimensional particle tracking for biological applications / Heather I. Campbell ... [et al.]. Adaptive optics for microscopy (poster paper) / Xavier Levecq -- pt. 5. Adaptive optics in lasers

  13. Optical-CT scanning of polymer gels

    The application of optical-CT scanning to achieve accurate high-resolution 3D dosimetry is a subject of current interest. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief overview of past research and achievements in optical-CT polymer gel dosimetry, and to review current issues and challenges. The origins of optical-CT imaging of light-scattering polymer gels are reviewed. Techniques to characterize and optimize optical-CT performance are presented. Particular attention is given to studies of artifacts in optical-CT imaging, an important area that has not been well studied to date. The technique of optical-CT simulation by Monte-Carlo modeling is introduced as a tool to explore such artifacts. New simulation studies are presented and compared with experimental data

  14. Optical transmission scanning for damage quantification in impacted GFRP composites

    Khomenko, Anton; Karpenko, Oleksii; Koricho, Ermias G.; Haq, Mahmoodul; Cloud, Gary L.; Udpa, Lalita

    2016-04-01

    Glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites constitute nearly 90% of the global composites market and are extensively used in aerospace, marine, automotive and construction industries. While their advantages of lightweight and superior mechanical properties are well explored, non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques that allow for damage/defect detection and assessment of its extent and severity are not fully developed. Some of the conventional NDE techniques for GFRPs include ultrasonics, X-ray, IR thermography, and a variety of optical techniques. Optical methods, specifically measuring the transmission properties (e.g. ballistic optical imaging) of specimens, provide noninvasive, safe, inexpensive, and compact solutions and are commonly used in biomedical applications. In this work, this technique is adapted for rapid NDE of GFRP composites. In its basic form, the system for optical transmission scanning (OTS) consists of a light source (laser diode), a photo detector and a 2D translation stage. The proposed technique provides high-resolution, rapid and non-contact OT (optical transmittance)-scans, and does not require any coupling. The OTS system was used for inspection of pristine and low-velocity impacted (damaged) GFRP samples. The OT-scans were compared with conventional ultrasonic C-scans and showed excellent agreement but with better resolution. Overall, the work presented lays the groundwork for cost-effective, non-contact, and rapid NDE of GFRP composite structures.

  15. Intelligent Optical Systems Using Adaptive Optics

    Clark, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, the phrase adaptive optics generally conjured images of large deformable mirrors being integrated into telescopes to compensate for atmospheric turbulence. However, the development of smaller, cheaper devices has sparked interest for other aerospace and commercial applications. Variable focal length lenses, liquid crystal spatial light modulators, tunable filters, phase compensators, polarization compensation, and deformable mirrors are becoming increasingly useful for other imaging applications including guidance navigation and control (GNC), coronagraphs, foveated imaging, situational awareness, autonomous rendezvous and docking, non-mechanical zoom, phase diversity, and enhanced multi-spectral imaging. The active components presented here allow flexibility in the optical design, increasing performance. In addition, the intelligent optical systems presented offer advantages in size and weight and radiation tolerance.

  16. A simplified adaptive optics system

    Ivanescu, Liviu; Racine, René; Nadeau, Daniel

    2003-02-01

    Affordable adaptive optics on small telescopes allow to introduce the technology to a large community and provide opportunities to train new specialists in the field. We have developed a low order, low cost adaptive optics system for the 1.6m telescope of the Mont Megantic Observatory. The system corrects tip-tilt, focus, astigmatisms and one trefoil term. It explores a number of new approaches. The sensor receives a single out-of-focus image of the reference star. The central obstruction of the telescope can free the focus detection from the effect of seeing and allows a very small defocus. The deformable mirror is profiled so as to preserve a parabolic shape under pressure from actuators located at its edge. A separate piezoelectric platform drives the tilt mirror.

  17. Contrast-based sensorless adaptive optics for retinal imaging

    Zhou, Xiaolin; Bedggood, Phillip; Bui, Bang; Nguyen, Christine T. O.; He, Zheng; Metha, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Conventional adaptive optics ophthalmoscopes use wavefront sensing methods to characterize ocular aberrations for real-time correction. However, there are important situations in which the wavefront sensing step is susceptible to difficulties that affect the accuracy of the correction. To circumvent these, wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (or non-wavefront sensing AO; NS-AO) imaging has recently been developed and has been applied to point-scanning based retinal imaging modalities. In thi...

  18. Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics ophthalmoscopy in the human eye

    Hofer, Heidi; Sredar, Nripun; Queener, Hope; Li, Chaohong; Porter, Jason

    2011-07-01

    Wavefront sensor noise and fidelity place a fundamental limit on achievable image quality in current adaptive optics ophthalmoscopes. Additionally, the wavefront sensor `beacon' can interfere with visual experiments. We demonstrate real-time (25 Hz), wavefront sensorless adaptive optics imaging in the living human eye with image quality rivaling that of wavefront sensor based control in the same system. A stochastic parallel gradient descent algorithm directly optimized the mean intensity in retinal image frames acquired with a confocal adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). When imaging through natural, undilated pupils, both control methods resulted in comparable mean image intensities. However, when imaging through dilated pupils, image intensity was generally higher following wavefront sensor-based control. Despite the typically reduced intensity, image contrast was higher, on average, with sensorless control. Wavefront sensorless control is a viable option for imaging the living human eye and future refinements of this technique may result in even greater optical gains.

  19. Optical characterication of probes for photon scanning tunnelling microscopy

    Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    The photon scanning tunnelling microscope is a well-established member of the family of scanning near-field optical microscopes used for optical imaging at the sub-wavelength scale. The quality of the probes, typically pointed uncoated optical fibres, used is however difficult to evaluate in a...

  20. Electron density measurements for plasma adaptive optics

    Neiswander, Brian; Matlis, Eric; Corke, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of using plasma as an adaptive optical medium for applications such as beam steering, wavefront control, and adaptive filtering. The optical path length of light propagating through plasma depends on the plasma electron density, which may be controlled via the prescribed voltage, frequency, pressure, gas, and electrode geometry. Accurate control of the optical path length requires characterization of the electron density over all operating conditions. E...

  1. Adaptive optical interconnects: the ADDAPT project

    Henker, Ronny; Pliva, Jan; Khafaji, Mahdi; Ellinger, Frank; Toifl, Thomas; Offrein, Bert; Cevrero, Alessandro; Oezkaya, Ilter; Seifried, Marc; Ledentsov, Nikolay; Kropp, Joerg-R.; Shchukin, Vitaly; Zoldak, Martin; Halmo, Leos; Turkiewicz, Jaroslaw; Meredith, Wyn; Eddie, Iain; Georgiades, Michael; Charalambides, Savvas; Duis, Jeroen; van Leeuwen, Pieter

    2015-09-01

    Existing optical networks are driven by dynamic user and application demands but operate statically at their maximum performance. Thus, optical links do not offer much adaptability and are not very energy-efficient. In this paper a novel approach of implementing performance and power adaptivity from system down to optical device, electrical circuit and transistor level is proposed. Depending on the actual data load, the number of activated link paths and individual device parameters like bandwidth, clock rate, modulation format and gain are adapted to enable lowering the components supply power. This enables flexible energy-efficient optical transmission links which pave the way for massive reductions of CO2 emission and operating costs in data center and high performance computing applications. Within the FP7 research project Adaptive Data and Power Aware Transceivers for Optical Communications (ADDAPT) dynamic high-speed energy-efficient transceiver subsystems are developed for short-range optical interconnects taking up new adaptive technologies and methods. The research of eight partners from industry, research and education spanning seven European countries includes the investigation of several adaptive control types and algorithms, the development of a full transceiver system, the design and fabrication of optical components and integrated circuits as well as the development of high-speed, low loss packaging solutions. This paper describes and discusses the idea of ADDAPT and provides an overview about the latest research results in this field.

  2. Adaptive noise Wiener filter for scanning electron microscope imaging system.

    Sim, K S; Teh, V; Nia, M E

    2016-03-01

    Noise on scanning electron microscope (SEM) images is studied. Gaussian noise is the most common type of noise in SEM image. We developed a new noise reduction filter based on the Wiener filter. We compared the performance of this new filter namely adaptive noise Wiener (ANW) filter, with four common existing filters as well as average filter, median filter, Gaussian smoothing filter and the Wiener filter. Based on the experiments results the proposed new filter has better performance on different noise variance comparing to the other existing noise removal filters in the experiments. SCANNING 38:148-163, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26235517

  3. Five modified boundary scan adaptive test generation algorithms

    Niu Chunping; Ren Zheping; Yao Zongzhong

    2006-01-01

    To study the diagnostic problem of Wire-OR (W-O) interconnect fault of PCB (Printed Circuit Board), five modified boundary scan adaptive algorithms for interconnect test are put forward. These algorithms apply Global-diagnosis sequence algorithm to replace the equal weight algorithm of primary test, and the test time is shortened without changing the fault diagnostic capability. The descriptions of five modified adaptive test algorithms are presented, and the capability comparison between the modified algorithm and the original algorithm is made to prove the validity of these algorithms.

  4. Computational adaptive optics of the human retina

    South, Fredrick A.; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-03-01

    It is well known that patient-specific ocular aberrations limit imaging resolution in the human retina. Previously, hardware adaptive optics (HAO) has been employed to measure and correct these aberrations to acquire high-resolution images of various retinal structures. While the resulting aberration-corrected images are of great clinical importance, clinical use of HAO has not been widespread due to the cost and complexity of these systems. We present a technique termed computational adaptive optics (CAO) for aberration correction in the living human retina without the use of hardware adaptive optics components. In CAO, complex interferometric data acquired using optical coherence tomography (OCT) is manipulated in post-processing to adjust the phase of the optical wavefront. In this way, the aberrated wavefront can be corrected. We summarize recent results in this technology for retinal imaging, including aberration-corrected imaging in multiple retinal layers and practical considerations such as phase stability and image optimization.

  5. Teaching Optics and Systems Engineering With Adaptive Optics Workbenches

    Harrington, David; Hunter, Lisa; Max, Claire; Hoffmann, Mark; Pitts, Mark; Armstrong, J D

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive optics workbenches are fully functional optical systems that can be used to illustrate and teach a variety of concepts and cognitive processes. Four systems have been funded, designed and constructed by various institutions and people as part of education programs associated with the Center for Adaptive Optics, the Professional Development Program and the Institute for Science and Engineer Educators. Activities can range from first-year undergraduate explorations to professional level training. These workbenches have been used in many venues including the Center for Adaptive Optics AO Summer School, the Maui Community College hosted Akamai Maui Short Course, classrooms, training of new staff in laboratories and other venues. The activity content has focused on various elements of systems thinking, characterization, feedback and system control, basic optics and optical alignment as well as advanced topics such as phase conjugation, wave-front sensing and correction concepts and system design. The work...

  6. Novel optical scanning cryptography using Fresnel telescope imaging.

    Yan, Aimin; Sun, Jianfeng; Hu, Zhijuan; Zhang, Jingtao; Liu, Liren

    2015-07-13

    We propose a new method called modified optical scanning cryptography using Fresnel telescope imaging technique for encryption and decryption of remote objects. An image or object can be optically encrypted on the fly by Fresnel telescope scanning system together with an encryption key. For image decryption, the encrypted signals are received and processed with an optical coherent heterodyne detection system. The proposed method has strong performance through use of secure Fresnel telescope scanning with orthogonal polarized beams and efficient all-optical information processing. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated by numerical simulations and experimental results. PMID:26191901

  7. Pulse front adaptive optics in multiphoton microscopy

    Sun, B.; Salter, P. S.; Booth, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    The accurate focusing of ultrashort laser pulses is extremely important in multiphoton microscopy. Using adaptive optics to manipulate the incident ultrafast beam in either the spectral or spatial domain can introduce significant benefits when imaging. Here we introduce pulse front adaptive optics: manipulating an ultrashort pulse in both the spatial and temporal domains. A deformable mirror and a spatial light modulator are operated in concert to modify contours of constant intensity in space and time within an ultrashort pulse. Through adaptive control of the pulse front, we demonstrate an enhancement in the measured fluorescence from a two photon microscope.

  8. Development of large aperture composite adaptive optics

    Kmetík, Viliam; Vítovec, Bohumil; Jiran, L.; Němcová, Š.; Zicha, J.; Inneman, A.; Mikuličková, L.; Pavlica, R.

    Vol. 9442. Bellingham: SPIE-INT SOC OPTICAL ENGINEERING, 2015 - (Kovačičinová, J.; Vít, T.), 94420L-94420L. (SPIE). ISBN 978-1-62841-557-5. ISSN 0277-786X. [Optics and Measurement Conference 2014 (OaM 2014). Liberec (CZ), 07.10.2014-10.10.2014] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010878 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Large aperture * adaptive optics * deformable mirror * bimorph deformable mirror * composite optics Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.2175713 .

  9. A Miniaturized Adaptive Optic Device for Optical Telecommunications Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To advance the state-of-the-art uplink laser communication technology, new adaptive optic beam compensation techniques are needed for removing various time-varying...

  10. Overview of Advanced LIGO Adaptive Optics

    Brooks, Aidan F.; Abbott, Benjamin; Arain, Muzammil A.; Ciani, Giacomo; Cole, Ayodele; Grabeel, Greg; Gustafson, Eric; Guido, Chris; Heintze, Matthew; Heptonstall, Alastair; Jacobson, Mindy; KIM, WON; King, Eleanor; Lynch, Alexander; O'Connor, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    This is an overview of the adaptive optics used in Advanced LIGO (aLIGO), known as the thermal compensation system (TCS). The thermal compensation system was designed to minimize thermally-induced spatial distortions in the interferometer optical modes and to provide some correction for static curvature errors in the core optics of aLIGO. The TCS is comprised of ring heater actuators, spatially tunable CO$_{2}$ laser projectors and Hartmann wavefront sensors. The system meets the requirements...

  11. Optical ballast and adaptive dynamic stable resonator

    Zhang Guang-Yin; Jiao Zhi-Yong; Guo Shu-Guang; Zhang Xiao-Hua; Gu Xue-Wen; Yan Cai-Fan; Wu Ding-Er; Song Feng

    2004-01-01

    In this paper a new concept of ‘optical ballast' is put forward. Optical ballast is a kind of device that can be used to decrease the variation and fluctuation of the propagation characteristics of light beams caused by the disturbance of refractive index of the medium. To illustrate the idea clearly and concretely, a fully adaptive dynamic stable solid-state laser resonator is presented as application example of optical ballast.

  12. Solar Ground-Layer Adaptive Optics

    Ren, Deqing; Jolissaint, Laurent; Zhang, Xi; Dou, Jianpei; Chen, Rui; Zhao, Gang; Zhu, Yongtian

    2015-05-01

    Solar conventional adaptive optics (CAO) with one deformable-mirror uses a small field-of-view (FOV) for wave-front sensing, which yields a small corrected FOV for high-resolution imaging. Solar activities occur in a two-dimensional extended FOV and studies of solar magnetic fields need high-resolution imaging over a FOV at least 60''. Recently, solar Tomography Adaptive Optics (TAO) and Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO) were being developed to overcome this problem of small AO corrected FOV. However, for both TAO and MCAO, wavefront distortions need to be tomographically reconstructed from measurements on multiple guide stars, which is a complicated and time-consuming process. Solar Ground-Layer Adaptive Optics (S-GLAO) uses one or several guide stars, and does not rely on a tomographic reconstruction of the atmospheric turbulence. In this publication, we present two unique wavefront sensing approaches for the S-GLAO. We show that our S-GLAO can deliver good to excellent performance at variable seeing conditions in the Near Infrared (NIR) J and H bands, and is much simpler to implement. We discuss details of our S-GLAO associated wavefront approaches, which make our S-GLAO a unique solution for sunspot high-resolution imaging that other current adaptive optics systems, including the solar MCAO, cannot offer.

  13. Optical characterication of probes for photon scanning tunnelling microscopy

    Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    The photon scanning tunnelling microscope is a well-established member of the family of scanning near-field optical microscopes used for optical imaging at the sub-wavelength scale. The quality of the probes, typically pointed uncoated optical fibres, used is however difficult to evaluate in a...... technique. Here we present experimental results obtained for optical characterization of two different probes by imaging of a well-specified near-field intensity distribution at various spatial frequencies. In particular, we observe that a sharply pointed dielectric probe can be highly suitable for imaging...

  14. The Adaptive Optics Summer School Laboratory Activities

    Ammons, S Mark; Armstrong, J D; Crossfield, Ian; Do, Tuan; Fitzgerald, Mike; Harrington, David; Hickenbotham, Adam; Hunter, Jennifer; Johnson, Jess; Johnson, Luke; Li, Kaccie; Lu, Jessica; Maness, Holly; Morzinski, Katie; Norton, Andrew; Putnam, Nicole; Roorda, Austin; Rossi, Ethan; Yelda, Sylvana

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive Optics (AO) is a new and rapidly expanding field of instrumentation, yet astronomers, vision scientists, and general AO practitioners are largely unfamiliar with the root technologies crucial to AO systems. The AO Summer School (AOSS), sponsored by the Center for Adaptive Optics, is a week-long course for training graduate students and postdoctoral researchers in the underlying theory, design, and use of AO systems. AOSS participants include astronomers who expect to utilize AO data, vision scientists who will use AO instruments to conduct research, opticians and engineers who design AO systems, and users of high-bandwidth laser communication systems. In this article we describe new AOSS laboratory sessions implemented in 2006-2009 for nearly 250 students. The activity goals include boosting familiarity with AO technologies, reinforcing knowledge of optical alignment techniques and the design of optical systems, and encouraging inquiry into critical scientific questions in vision science using AO sys...

  15. Transfer functions in collection scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnaya, Elena A.

    1999-01-01

    considered with respect to the relation between near-field optical images and the corresponding intensity distributions. Our conclusions are supported with numerical simulations and experimental results obtained by using a photon scanning tunneling microscope with an uncoated fiber tip....

  16. Adaptive Optics Simulations for Siding Spring

    Goodwin, Michael; Lambert, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Using an observational derived model optical turbulence profile (model-OTP) we have investigated the performance of Adaptive Optics (AO) at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO), Australia. The simulations cover the performance for AO techniques of single conjugate adaptive optics (SCAO), multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) and ground-layer adaptive optics (GLAO). The simulation results presented in this paper predict the performance of these AO techniques as applied to the Australian National University (ANU) 2.3 m and Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) 3.9 m telescopes for astronomical wavelength bands J, H and K. The results indicate that AO performance is best for the longer wavelengths (K-band) and in the best seeing conditions (sub 1-arcsecond). The most promising results are found for GLAO simulations (field of view of 180 arcsecs), with the field RMS for encircled energy 50% diameter (EE50d) being uniform and minimally affected by the free-atmosphere turbulence. The GLAO performance is reasonably good over...

  17. Pulse front control with adaptive optics

    Sun, B.; Salter, P. S.; Booth, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    The focusing of ultrashort laser pulses is extremely important for processes including microscopy, laser fabrication and fundamental science. Adaptive optic elements, such as liquid crystal spatial light modulators or membrane deformable mirrors, are routinely used for the correction of aberrations in these systems, leading to improved resolution and efficiency. Here, we demonstrate that adaptive elements used with ultrashort pulses should not be considered simply in terms of wavefront modification, but that changes to the incident pulse front can also occur. We experimentally show how adaptive elements may be used to engineer pulse fronts with spatial resolution.

  18. Contrast-based sensorless adaptive optics for retinal imaging.

    Zhou, Xiaolin; Bedggood, Phillip; Bui, Bang; Nguyen, Christine T O; He, Zheng; Metha, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Conventional adaptive optics ophthalmoscopes use wavefront sensing methods to characterize ocular aberrations for real-time correction. However, there are important situations in which the wavefront sensing step is susceptible to difficulties that affect the accuracy of the correction. To circumvent these, wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (or non-wavefront sensing AO; NS-AO) imaging has recently been developed and has been applied to point-scanning based retinal imaging modalities. In this study we show, for the first time, contrast-based NS-AO ophthalmoscopy for full-frame in vivo imaging of human and animal eyes. We suggest a robust image quality metric that could be used for any imaging modality, and test its performance against other metrics using (physical) model eyes. PMID:26417525

  19. Optical scanning system for quality control of GEM-foils

    An optical scanning system was commissioned and further developed in the Detector Laboratory of Helsinki Institute of Physics and University of Helsinki. It was designed to automatically scan, perform on-line analysis and to classify the overall quality of GEM-foils especially of the GEM-TPC detectors for Super-FRS at FAIR. The optical scanning system consists of precision positioning table, lighting, optics and operating system with analysis software. It has active scanning area of 95×95 cm2 and it can study this area with the minimum resolution of 128 lp/mm. Performance of the system and first results from the GEM-foil uniformity and quality analysis are presented.

  20. Optical axis jitter rejection for double overlapped adaptive optics systems

    Luo, Qi; Luo, Xi; Li, Xinyang

    2016-04-01

    Optical axis jitters, or vibrations, which arise from wind shaking and structural oscillations of optical platforms, etc., cause a deleterious impact on the performance of adaptive optics systems. When conventional integrators are utilized to reject such high frequency and narrow-band disturbance, the benefits are quite small despite their acceptable capabilities to reject atmospheric turbulence. In our case, two suits of complete adaptive optics systems called double overlapped adaptive optics systems (DOAOS) are used to counteract both optical jitters and atmospheric turbulence. A novel algorithm aiming to remove vibrations is proposed by resorting to combine the Smith predictor and notch filer. With the help of loop shaping method, the algorithm will lead to an effective and stable controller, which makes the characteristics of error transfer function close to notch filters. On the basis of the spectral analysis of observed data, the peak frequency and bandwidth of vibrations can be identified in advance. Afterwards, the number of notch filters and their parameters will be determined using coordination descending method. The relationship between controller parameters and filtering features is discussed, and the robustness of the controller against varying parameters of the control object is investigated. Preliminary experiments are carried out to validate the proposed algorithms. The overall control performance of DOAOS is simulated. Results show that time delays are a limit of the performance, but the algorithm can be successfully implemented on our systems, which indicate that it has a great potential to reject jitters.

  1. Teaching Optics and Systems Engineering With Adaptive Optics Workbenches

    Harrington, D. M.; Ammons, M.; Hunter, L.; Max, C.; Hoffmann, M.; Pitts, M.; Armstrong, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    Adaptive optics workbenches are fully functional optical systems that can be used to illustrate and teach a variety of concepts and cognitive processes. Four systems have been funded, designed and constructed by various institutions and people as part of education programs associated with the Center for Adaptive Optics, the Professional Development Program and the Institute for Scientist & Engineer Educators. Activities can range from first-year undergraduate explorations to professional level training. These workbenches have been used in many venues including the Center for Adaptive Optics AO Summer School, the Maui Community College-hosted Akamai Maui Short Course, classrooms, training of new staff in laboratories and other venues. The activity content has focused on various elements of systems thinking, characterization, feedback and system control, basic optics and optical alignment as well as advanced topics such as phase conjugation, wave-front sensing and correction concepts, and system design. The workbenches have slightly different designs and performance capabilities. We describe here outlines for several activities utilizing these different designs and some examples of common student learner outcomes and experiences.

  2. Adaptive Matching of the Scanning Aperture of the Environment Parameter

    Choni, Yu. I.; Yunusov, N. N.

    2016-04-01

    We analyze a matching system for the scanning aperture antenna radiating through a layer with unpredictably changing parameters. Improved matching has been achieved by adaptive motion of a dielectric plate in the gap between the aperture and the radome. The system is described within the framework of an infinite layered structure. The validity of the model has been confirmed by numerical simulation using CST Microwave Studio software and by an experiment. It is shown that the reflection coefficient at the input of some types of a matching device, which is due to the deviation of the load impedance from the nominal value, is determined by a compact and versatile formula. The potential efficiency of the proposed matching system is shown by a specific example, and its dependence on the choice of the starting position of the dielectric plate is demonstrated.

  3. Adaptive optics assisted reconfigurable liquid-driven optical switch

    Fuh, Yiin-Kuen; Huang, Wei-Chi

    2013-07-01

    This study demonstrates a mechanical-based, liquid-driven optical switch integrated with adaptive optics and a reconfigurable black liquid (dye-doped liquid). The device aperture can be continuously tuned between 0.6 and 6.9 mm, precisely achieved by a syringe pump for volume control. Adaptive optics (AO) capability and possible enhancement of the lost power intensity of the ink-polluted glass plate have also been experimentally investigated. While measuring power intensity with/without AO indicates only a marginal difference of ˜1%, a significant difference of 3 s in the response characteristic of "switching on" time can be observed. An extremely high contrast ratio of ˜105 for a red-colored light is achieved.

  4. Implementation of 3D Optical Scanning Technology for Automotive Applications.

    Kuş, Abdil

    2009-01-01

    Reverse engineering (RE) is a powerful tool for generating a CAD model from the 3D scan data of a physical part that lacks documentation or has changed from the original CAD design of the part. The process of digitizing a part and creating a CAD model from 3D scan data is less time consuming and provides greater accuracy than manually measuring the part and designing the part from scratch in CAD. 3D optical scanning technology is one of the measurement methods which have evolved over the last few years and it is used in a wide range of areas from industrial applications to art and cultural heritage. It is also used extensively in the automotive industry for applications such as part inspections, scanning of tools without CAD definition, scanning the casting for definition of the stock (i.e. the amount of material to be removed from the surface of the castings) model for CAM programs and reverse engineering. In this study two scanning experiments of automotive applications are illustrated. The first one examines the processes from scanning to re-manufacturing the damaged sheet metal cutting die, using a 3D scanning technique and the second study compares the scanned point clouds data to 3D CAD data for inspection purposes. Furthermore, the deviations of the part holes are determined by using different lenses and scanning parameters. PMID:22573995

  5. High-efficiency Autonomous Laser Adaptive Optics

    Baranec, Christoph; Law, Nicholas M; Ramaprakash, A N; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Hogstrom, Kristina; Bui, Khanh; Burse, Mahesh; Chordia, Pravin; Das, Hillol; Dekany, Richard; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Punnadi, Sujit

    2014-01-01

    As new large-scale astronomical surveys greatly increase the number of objects targeted and discoveries made, the requirement for efficient follow-up observations is crucial. Adaptive optics imaging, which compensates for the image-blurring effects of Earth's turbulent atmosphere, is essential for these surveys, but the scarcity, complexity and high demand of current systems limits their availability for following up large numbers of targets. To address this need, we have engineered and implemented Robo-AO, a fully autonomous laser adaptive optics and imaging system that routinely images over 200 objects per night with an acuity 10 times sharper at visible wavelengths than typically possible from the ground. By greatly improving the angular resolution, sensitivity, and efficiency of 1-3 m class telescopes, we have eliminated a major obstacle in the follow-up of the discoveries from current and future large astronomical surveys.

  6. HIGH-EFFICIENCY AUTONOMOUS LASER ADAPTIVE OPTICS

    As new large-scale astronomical surveys greatly increase the number of objects targeted and discoveries made, the requirement for efficient follow-up observations is crucial. Adaptive optics imaging, which compensates for the image-blurring effects of Earth's turbulent atmosphere, is essential for these surveys, but the scarcity, complexity and high demand of current systems limit their availability for following up large numbers of targets. To address this need, we have engineered and implemented Robo-AO, a fully autonomous laser adaptive optics and imaging system that routinely images over 200 objects per night with an acuity 10 times sharper at visible wavelengths than typically possible from the ground. By greatly improving the angular resolution, sensitivity, and efficiency of 1-3 m class telescopes, we have eliminated a major obstacle in the follow-up of the discoveries from current and future large astronomical surveys

  7. Adaptive optics without altering visual perception

    Koenig,, I.; NW, Hart; HJ, Hofer

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive optics combined with visual psychophysics creates the potential to study the relationship between visual function and the retina at the cellular scale. This potential is hampered, however, by visual interference from the wavefront-sensing beacon used during correction. For example, we have previously shown that even a dim, visible beacon can alter stimulus perception (Hofer, H. J., Blaschke, J., Patolia, J., & Koenig, D. E. (2012). Fixation light hue bias revisited: Implications for ...

  8. Overview of Advanced LIGO Adaptive Optics

    Brooks, Aidan F; Arain, Muzammil A; Ciani, Giacomo; Cole, Ayodele; Grabeel, Greg; Gustafson, Eric; Guido, Chris; Heintze, Matthew; Heptonstall, Alastair; Jacobson, Mindy; Kim, Won; King, Eleanor; Lynch, Alexander; O'Connor, Stephen; Ottaway, David; Mailand, Ken; Mueller, Guido; Munch, Jesper; Sannibale, Virginio; Shao, Zhenhua; Smith, Michael; Veitch, Peter; Vo, Thomas; Vorvick, Cheryl; Willems, Phil

    2016-01-01

    This is an overview of the adaptive optics used in Advanced LIGO (aLIGO), known as the thermal compensation system (TCS). The thermal compensation system was designed to minimize thermally-induced spatial distortions in the interferometer optical modes and to provide some correction for static curvature errors in the core optics of aLIGO. The TCS is comprised of ring heater actuators, spatially tunable CO$_{2}$ laser projectors and Hartmann wavefront sensors. The system meets the requirements of correcting for nominal distortion in Advanced LIGO to a maximum residual error of 5.4nm, weighted across the laser beam, for up to 125W of laser input power into the interferometer.

  9. Electron density measurements for plasma adaptive optics

    Neiswander, Brian W.

    Over the past 40 years, there has been growing interest in both laser communications and directed energy weapons that operate from moving aircraft. As a laser beam propagates from an aircraft in flight, it passes through boundary layers, turbulence, and shear layers in the near-region of the aircraft. These fluid instabilities cause strong density gradients which adversely affect the transmission of laser energy to a target. Adaptive optics provides corrective measures for this problem but current technology cannot respond quickly enough to be useful for high speed flight conditions. This research investigated the use of plasma as a medium for adaptive optics for aero-optics applications. When a laser beam passes through plasma, its phase is shifted proportionally to the electron density and gas heating within the plasma. As a result, plasma can be utilized as a dynamically controllable optical medium. Experiments were carried out using a cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma chamber which generated a sub-atmospheric pressure, low-temperature plasma. An electrostatic model of this design was developed and revealed an important design constraint relating to the geometry of the chamber. Optical diagnostic techniques were used to characterize the plasma discharge. Single-wavelength interferometric experiments were performed and demonstrated up to 1.5 microns of optical path difference (OPD) in a 633 nm laser beam. Dual-wavelength interferometry was used to obtain time-resolved profiles of the plasma electron density and gas heating inside the plasma chamber. Furthermore, a new multi-wavelength infrared diagnostic technique was developed and proof-of-concept simulations were conducted to demonstrate the system's capabilities.

  10. Adaption of optical Fresnel transform to optical Wigner transform

    Enlightened by the algorithmic isomorphism between the rotation of the Wigner distribution function (WDF) and the αth fractional Fourier transform, we show that the optical Fresnel transform performed on the input through an ABCD system makes the output naturally adapting to the associated Wigner transform, i.e. there exists algorithmic isomorphism between ABCD transformation of the WDF and the optical Fresnel transform. We prove this adaption in the context of operator language. Both the single-mode and the two-mode Fresnel operators as the image of classical Fresnel transform are introduced in our discussions, while the two-mode Wigner operator in the entangled state representation is introduced for fitting the two-mode Fresnel operator.

  11. Near field scanning optical microscopy of polycrystalline semiconductors

    Herndon, Mary Kay

    1999-09-01

    Photovoltaic devices are commonly used for space applications and remote terrestrial power requirements. Polycrystalline solar cell devices often have much lower efficiencies than their crystalline counterparts, but because they can be fabricated much more cheaply, they can still be cost-effective when compared to single crystal devices. The long term goal of this work is to provide information that will lead to higher quality devices with improved cost efficiency. In order to do this, a better understanding of the mechanisms that take place in these materials is needed. The goal of this thesis was to improve our understanding of these devices by adapting a novel characterization technique, Near Field Scanning Optical Microscopy (NSOM), to the study of polycrystalline films. Visible light NSOM is a relatively new technique that allows for optical characterization of materials with resolution beyond the far-field diffraction limit. By using NSOM to study the physical and electrical properties of polycrystalline solar cells, individual grains can be studied and more insight can be gained as to how various properties of the thin films affect the device efficiency. For this research, an NSOM was designed and built to be versatile enough to handle the sorts of samples and measurements required for studying a variety of photovoltaic devices. As a first step, the NSOM was used to characterize single crystal GaAs solar cell devices. Measurements of topography and NSOM-induced photocurrent were obtained simultaneously on cross sections of the material, allowing the p-n junction to be probed. Because the NSOM data could be compared to an expected result, this allowed verification of the new microscope's imaging capabilities and ensured accurate data interpretation. Effects of surface recombination were detected on the cleaved edges. The NSOM was used to characterize surface quality and study the effects of surface passivation treatments. Of the polycrystalline materials

  12. Compact piezoelectric transducer fiber scanning probe for optical coherence tomography.

    Zhang, Ning; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Ahsen, Osman O; Liang, Kaicheng; Lee, Hsiang-Chieh; Xue, Ping; Li, Xingde; Fujimoto, James G

    2014-01-15

    We developed a compact, optical fiber scanning piezoelectric transducer (PZT) probe for endoscopic and minimally invasive optical coherence tomography (OCT). Compared with previous forward-mount fiber designs, we present a reverse-mount design that achieves a shorter rigid length. The fiber was mounted at the proximal end of a quadruple PZT tube and scanned inside the hollow PZT tube to reduce the probe length. The fiber resonant frequency was 338 Hz using a 17-mm-long fiber. A 0.9 mm fiber deflection was achieved with a driving amplitude of 35 V. Using a GRIN lens-based optical design with a 1.3× magnification, a ∼6 μm spot was scanned over a 1.2 mm diameter field. The probe was encased in a metal hypodermic tube with a ∼25 mm rigid length and covered with a 3.2 mm outer diameter (OD) plastic sheath. Imaging was performed with a swept source OCT system based on a Fourier domain modelocked laser (FDML) light source at a 240 kHz axial scan rate and 8 μm axial resolution (in air). En face OCT imaging of skin in vivo and human colon ex vivo was demonstrated. PMID:24562102

  13. Adaptive optics and laser guide stars at Lick observatory

    Brase, J.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    For the past several years LLNL has been developing adaptive optics systems for correction of both atmospheric turbulence effects and thermal distortions in optics for high-power lasers. Our early work focused on adaptive optics for beam control in laser isotope separation and ground-based free electron lasers. We are currently developing innovative adaptive optics and laser systems for sodium laser guide star applications at the University of California`s Lick and Keck Observeratories. This talk will describe our adaptive optics technology and some of its applications in high-resolution imaging and beam control.

  14. In vivo cellular visualization of the human retina using optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics

    Olivier, S S; Jones, S M; Chen, D C; Zawadzki, R J; Choi, S S; Laut, S P; Werner, J S

    2006-01-05

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) sees the human retina sharply with adaptive optics. In vivo cellular visualization of the human retina at micrometer-scale resolution is possible by enhancing Fourier-domain optical-coherence tomography with adaptive optics, which compensate for the eye's optical aberrations.

  15. Thirty meter telescope adaptive optics computing challenges

    The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) will be used with Adaptive Optics (AO) systems to allow near diffraction-limited performance in the near-infrared and achieve the main TMT science goals. Adaptive optics systems reduce the effect of the atmospheric distortions by dynamically measuring the distortions with wavefront sensors, performing wavefront reconstruction with a real time controller (RTC), and then compensating for the distortions with deformable mirrors. The requirements for the RTC subsystem of the TMT first light AO system will represent a significant advance over the current generation of astronomical AO control systems. Memory and processing requirements would be at least 2 orders of magnitude greater than the currently most powerful AO systems using conventional approaches, so that innovative wavefront reconstruction algorithms and new hardware approaches will be required. In this paper, we will first present the requirements and challenges for the RTC of the first light AO system, together with the algorithms that have been developed to reduce the memory and processing requirements, and then two possible hardware architectures based on Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). (authors)

  16. Extreme Adaptive Optics Planet Imager: XAOPI

    Macintosh, B A; Graham, J; Poyneer, L; Sommargren, G; Wilhelmsen, J; Gavel, D; Jones, S; Kalas, P; Lloyd, J; Makidon, R; Olivier, S; Palmer, D; Patience, J; Perrin, M; Severson, S; Sheinis, A; Sivaramakrishnan, A; Troy, M; Wallace, K

    2003-09-17

    Ground based adaptive optics is a potentially powerful technique for direct imaging detection of extrasolar planets. Turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere imposes some fundamental limits, but the large size of ground-based telescopes compared to spacecraft can work to mitigate this. We are carrying out a design study for a dedicated ultra-high-contrast system, the eXtreme Adaptive Optics Planet Imager (XAOPI), which could be deployed on an 8-10m telescope in 2007. With a 4096-actuator MEMS deformable mirror it should achieve Strehl >0.9 in the near-IR. Using an innovative spatially filtered wavefront sensor, the system will be optimized to control scattered light over a large radius and suppress artifacts caused by static errors. We predict that it will achieve contrast levels of 10{sup 7}-10{sup 8} at angular separations of 0.2-0.8 inches around a large sample of stars (R<7-10), sufficient to detect Jupiter-like planets through their near-IR emission over a wide range of ages and masses. We are constructing a high-contrast AO testbed to verify key concepts of our system, and present preliminary results here, showing an RMS wavefront error of <1.3 nm with a flat mirror.

  17. Optical Design for Extremely Large Telescope Adaptive Optics Systems

    Bauman, B J

    2003-11-26

    Designing an adaptive optics (AO) system for extremely large telescopes (ELT's) will present new optical engineering challenges. Several of these challenges are addressed in this work, including first-order design of multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) systems, pyramid wavefront sensors (PWFS's), and laser guide star (LGS) spot elongation. MCAO systems need to be designed in consideration of various constraints, including deformable mirror size and correction height. The y,{bar y} method of first-order optical design is a graphical technique that uses a plot with marginal and chief ray heights as coordinates; the optical system is represented as a segmented line. This method is shown to be a powerful tool in designing MCAO systems. From these analyses, important conclusions about configurations are derived. PWFS's, which offer an alternative to Shack-Hartmann (SH) wavefront sensors (WFS's), are envisioned as the workhorse of layer-oriented adaptive optics. Current approaches use a 4-faceted glass pyramid to create a WFS analogous to a quad-cell SH WFS. PWFS's and SH WFS's are compared and some newly-considered similarities and PWFS advantages are presented. Techniques to extend PWFS's are offered: First, PWFS's can be extended to more pixels in the image by tiling pyramids contiguously. Second, pyramids, which are difficult to manufacture, can be replaced by less expensive lenslet arrays. An approach is outlined to convert existing SH WFS's to PWFS's for easy evaluation of PWFS's. Also, a demonstration of PWFS's in sensing varying amounts of an aberration is presented. For ELT's, the finite altitude and finite thickness of LGS's means that the LGS will appear elongated from the viewpoint of subapertures not directly under the telescope. Two techniques for dealing with LGS spot elongation in SH WFS's are presented. One method assumes that the laser will be pulsed and uses a segmented micro

  18. Optical design of the adaptive optics laser guide star system

    Bissinger, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    The design of an adaptive optics package for the 3 meter Lick telescope is presented. This instrument package includes a 69 actuator deformable mirror and a Hartmann type wavefront sensor operating in the visible wavelength; a quadrant detector for the tip-tile sensor and a tip-tilt mirror to stabilize atmospheric first order tip-tile errors. A high speed computer drives the deformable mirror to achieve near diffraction limited imagery. The different optical components and their individual design constraints are described. motorized stages and diagnostics tools are used to operate and maintain alignment throughout observation time from a remote control room. The expected performance are summarized and actual results of astronomical sources are presented.

  19. Processing of Graphene combining Optical Detection and Scanning Probe Lithography

    Zimmermann Sören

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental setup tailored for robotic processing of graphene with in-situ vision based control. A robust graphene detection approach is presented applying multiple image processing operations of the visual feedback provided by a high-resolution light microscope. Detected graphene flakes can be modified using a scanning probe based lithographical process that is directly linked to the in-situ optical images. The results of this process are discussed with respect to further application scenarios.

  20. Dual-thread parallel control strategy for ophthalmic adaptive optics

    Yu, Yongxin; Zhang, Yuhua

    2014-01-01

    To improve ophthalmic adaptive optics speed and compensate for ocular wavefront aberration of high temporal frequency, the adaptive optics wavefront correction has been implemented with a control scheme including 2 parallel threads; one is dedicated to wavefront detection and the other conducts wavefront reconstruction and compensation. With a custom Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor that measures the ocular wave aberration with 193 subapertures across the pupil, adaptive optics has achieved a ...

  1. Progress of MEMS Scanning Micromirrors for Optical Bio-Imaging

    Lih Y. Lin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS have an unmatched ability to incorporate numerous functionalities into ultra-compact devices, and due to their versatility and miniaturization, MEMS have become an important cornerstone in biomedical and endoscopic imaging research. To incorporate MEMS into such applications, it is critical to understand underlying architectures involving choices in actuation mechanism, including the more common electrothermal, electrostatic, electromagnetic, and piezoelectric approaches, reviewed in this paper. Each has benefits and tradeoffs and is better suited for particular applications or imaging schemes due to achievable scan ranges, power requirements, speed, and size. Many of these characteristics are fabrication-process dependent, and this paper discusses various fabrication flows developed to integrate additional optical functionality beyond simple lateral scanning, enabling dynamic control of the focus or mirror surface. Out of this provided MEMS flexibility arises some challenges when obtaining high resolution images: due to scanning non-linearities, calibration of MEMS scanners may become critical, and inherent image artifacts or distortions during scanning can degrade image quality. Several reviewed methods and algorithms have been proposed to address these complications from MEMS scanning. Given their impact and promise, great effort and progress have been made toward integrating MEMS and biomedical imaging.

  2. DKIST Adaptive Optics System: Simulation Results

    Marino, Jose; Schmidt, Dirk

    2016-05-01

    The 4 m class Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST), currently under construction, will be equipped with an ultra high order solar adaptive optics (AO) system. The requirements and capabilities of such a solar AO system are beyond those of any other solar AO system currently in operation. We must rely on solar AO simulations to estimate and quantify its performance.We present performance estimation results of the DKIST AO system obtained with a new solar AO simulation tool. This simulation tool is a flexible and fast end-to-end solar AO simulator which produces accurate solar AO simulations while taking advantage of current multi-core computer technology. It relies on full imaging simulations of the extended field Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (WFS), which directly includes important secondary effects such as field dependent distortions and varying contrast of the WFS sub-aperture images.

  3. Optical Design and Optimization of Translational Reflective Adaptive Optics Ophthalmoscopes

    Sulai, Yusufu N. B.

    The retina serves as the primary detector for the biological camera that is the eye. It is composed of numerous classes of neurons and support cells that work together to capture and process an image formed by the eye's optics, which is then transmitted to the brain. Loss of sight due to retinal or neuro-ophthalmic disease can prove devastating to one's quality of life, and the ability to examine the retina in vivo is invaluable in the early detection and monitoring of such diseases. Adaptive optics (AO) ophthalmoscopy is a promising diagnostic tool in early stages of development, still facing significant challenges before it can become a clinical tool. The work in this thesis is a collection of projects with the overarching goal of broadening the scope and applicability of this technology. We begin by providing an optical design approach for AO ophthalmoscopes that reduces the aberrations that degrade the performance of the AO correction. Next, we demonstrate how to further improve image resolution through the use of amplitude pupil apodization and non-common path aberration correction. This is followed by the development of a viewfinder which provides a larger field of view for retinal navigation. Finally, we conclude with the development of an innovative non-confocal light detection scheme which improves the non-invasive visualization of retinal vasculature and reveals the cone photoreceptor inner segments in healthy and diseased eyes.

  4. Optically sensitive Medipix2 detector for adaptive optics wavefront sensing

    Vallerga, John; Tremsina, Anton; Siegmund, Oswald; Mikulec, Bettina; Clark, Allan G; CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    A new hybrid optical detector is described that has many of the attributes desired for the next generation adaptive optics (AO) wavefront sensors. The detector consists of a proximity focused microchannel plate (MCP) read out by multi-pixel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) chips developed at CERN ("Medipix2") with individual pixels that amplify, discriminate and count input events. The detector has 256 x 256 pixels, zero readout noise (photon counting), can be read out at 1 kHz frame rates and is abutable on 3 sides. The Medipix2 readout chips can be electronically shuttered down to a temporal window of a few microseconds with an accuracy of 10 ns. When used in a Shack-Hartmann style wavefront sensor, a detector with 4 Medipix chips should be able to centroid approximately 5000 spots using 7 x 7 pixel sub-apertures resulting in very linear, off-null error correction terms. The quantum efficiency depends on the optical photocathode chosen for the bandpass of interest.

  5. Images of photoreceptors in living primate eyes using adaptive optics two-photon ophthalmoscopy

    Hunter, Jennifer J.; Masella, Benjamin; Dubra, Alfredo; Sharma, Robin; Yin, Lu; Merigan, William H.; Palczewska, Grazyna; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Williams, David R.

    2010-01-01

    In vivo two-photon imaging through the pupil of the primate eye has the potential to become a useful tool for functional imaging of the retina. Two-photon excited fluorescence images of the macaque cone mosaic were obtained using a fluorescence adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope, overcoming the challenges of a low numerical aperture, imperfect optics of the eye, high required light levels, and eye motion. Although the specific fluorophores are as yet unknown, strong in vivo intrins...

  6. Parsing optical scanned 3D data by Bayesian inference

    Xiong, Hanwei; Xu, Jun; Xu, Chenxi; Pan, Ming

    2015-10-01

    Optical devices are always used to digitize complex objects to get their shapes in form of point clouds. The results have no semantic meaning about the objects, and tedious process is indispensable to segment the scanned data to get meanings. The reason for a person to perceive an object correctly is the usage of knowledge, so Bayesian inference is used to the goal. A probabilistic And-Or-Graph is used as a unified framework of representation, learning, and recognition for a large number of object categories, and a probabilistic model defined on this And-Or-Graph is learned from a relatively small training set per category. Given a set of 3D scanned data, the Bayesian inference constructs a most probable interpretation of the object, and a semantic segment is obtained from the part decomposition. Some examples are given to explain the method.

  7. Proposed Multiconjugate Adaptive Optics Experiment at Lick Observatory

    Bauman, B J; Gavel, D T; Flath, L M; Hurd, R L; Max, C E; Olivier, S S

    2001-08-15

    While the theory behind design of multiconjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) systems is growing, there is still a paucity of experience building and testing such instruments. We propose using the Lick adaptive optics (AO) system as a basis for demonstrating the feasibility/workability of MCAO systems, testing underlying assumptions, and experimenting with different approaches to solving MCAO system issues.

  8. Using Site Testing Data for Adaptive Optics Simulations

    Herriot, Glen; Andersen, David; Conan, Rod; Ellerbroek, Brent; Gilles, Luc; Hickson, Paul; Jackson, Kate; Lardière, Olivier; Pfrommer, Thomas; Véran, Jean-Pierre; Wang, Lianqi

    2011-01-01

    Astronomical Site testing data plays a vital role in the simulation, design, evaluation and operation of adaptive optics systems for large telescope. We present the example of TMT and its first light facilitiy adaptive optics system NFIRAOS, and illustrate the many simulations done based on site testing data.

  9. Second-harmonic scanning optical microscopy of poled silica waveguides

    Pedersen, Kjeld; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Arentoft, Jesper;

    2000-01-01

    Second-harmonic scanning optical microscopy (SHSOM) is performed on electric-field poled silica-based waveguides. Two operation modes of SHSOM are considered. Oblique transmission reflection and normal reflection modes are used to image the spatial distribution of nonlinear susceptibilities in the...... limitations of the two operation modes when used for SHSOM studies of poled silica-based waveguides are discussed. The influence of surface defects on the resulting second-harmonic images is also considered. ©2000 American Institute of Physics....

  10. Optical and scanning electron microscopies in examination of ultrathin foils

    Konvalina, Ivo; Hovorka, Miloš; Fořt, Tomáš; Müllerová, Ilona

    Brno : Institute of Scientific Instruments AS CR, v.v.i, 2010 - (Mika, F.), s. 23-24 ISBN 978-80-254-6842-5. [International Seminar on Recent Trends in Charged Particle Optics and Surface Physics Instrumentation /12./. Skalský dvůr (CZ), 31.05.2010-04.06.2010] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100650902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : very low energy scanning transmission electron microscopy * ultrathin foils * laser confocal microscope Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  11. Optimized micromirror arrays for adaptive optics

    Michalicek, M. Adrian; Comtois, John H.; Hetherington, Dale L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the design, layout, fabrication, and surface characterization of highly optimized surface micromachined micromirror devices. Design considerations and fabrication capabilities are presented. These devices are fabricated in the state-of-the-art, four-level, planarized, ultra-low-stress polysilicon process available at Sandia National Laboratories known as the Sandia Ultra-planar Multi-level MEMS Technology (SUMMiT). This enabling process permits the development of micromirror devices with near-ideal characteristics that have previously been unrealizable in standard three-layer polysilicon processes. The reduced 1 μm minimum feature sizes and 0.1 μm mask resolution make it possible to produce dense wiring patterns and irregularly shaped flexures. Likewise, mirror surfaces can be uniquely distributed and segmented in advanced patterns and often irregular shapes in order to minimize wavefront error across the pupil. The ultra-low-stress polysilicon and planarized upper layer allow designers to make larger and more complex micromirrors of varying shape and surface area within an array while maintaining uniform performance of optical surfaces. Powerful layout functions of the AutoCAD editor simplify the design of advanced micromirror arrays and make it possible to optimize devices according to the capabilities of the fabrication process. Micromirrors fabricated in this process have demonstrated a surface variance across the array from only 2-3 nm to a worst case of roughly 25 nm while boasting active surface areas of 98% or better. Combining the process planarization with a ``planarized-by-design'' approach will produce micromirror array surfaces that are limited in flatness only by the surface deposition roughness of the structural material. Ultimately, the combination of advanced process and layout capabilities have permitted the fabrication of highly optimized micromirror arrays for adaptive optics.

  12. Beam shaping for laser-based adaptive optics in astronomy

    Béchet, Clémentine; Guesalaga, Andrés; Neichel, Benoit; Fesquet, Vincent; González-Núñez, Héctor; Zúñiga, Sebastián; Escarate, Pedro; Guzman, Dani

    2014-01-01

    The availability and performance of laser-based adaptive optics (AO) systems are strongly dependent on the power and quality of the laser beam before being projected to the sky. Frequent and time-consuming alignment procedures are usually required in the laser systems with free-space optics to optimize the beam. Despite these procedures, significant distortions of the laser beam have been observed during the first two years of operation of the Gemini South multi-conjugate adaptive optics syst...

  13. VASAO: visible all sky adaptive optics

    Veillet, Christian; Lai, Olivier; Salmon, Derrick; Pique, Jean-Paul

    2006-06-01

    Building on an extensive and successful experience in Adaptive Optics (AO) and on recent developments made in its funding nations, the Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope Corporation (CFHT) is studying the VASAO concept: an integrated AO system that would allow diffraction limited imaging of the whole sky in the visible as well as in the infrared. At the core of VASAO, Pueo-Hou (the new Pueo) is built on Pueo, the current CFHT AO bonnette. Pueo will be refurbished and improved to be able to image the isoplanetic field at 700 nm with Strehl ratios of 30% or better, making possible imaging with a resolution of 50 milliarcseconds between 500 and 700nm, and at the telescope limit of diffraction above. The polychromatic tip-tilt laser guide star currently envisioned will be generated by a single 330nm mode-less laser, and the relative position of the 330nm and 589nm artificial stars created on the mesosphere by the 330nm excitation of the sodium layer will be monitored to provide the atmospheric tip-tilt along the line of sight, following the philosophy developed for the ELP-OA project. The feasibility study of VASAO will take most of 2006 in parallel with the development of a science case making the best possible use of the unique capabilities of the system, If the feasibility study is encouraging, VASAO development could start in 2007 for a full deployment on the sky by 2011-2012.

  14. Stellar photometry with Multi Conjugate Adaptive Optics

    Fiorentino, Giuliana; McConnachie, Alan; Stetson, Peter B; Bono, Giuseppe; Turri, Paolo; Andersen, David; Veran, Jean-Pierre; Diolaiti, Emiliano; Schreiber, Laura; Ciliegi, Paolo; Bellazzini, Michele; Tolstoy, Eline; Monelli, Matteo; Iannicola, Giacinto; Ferraro, Ivan; Testa, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    We overview the current status of photometric analyses of images collected with Multi Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO) at 8-10m class telescopes that operated, or are operating, on sky. Particular attention will be payed to resolved stellar population studies. Stars in crowded stellar systems, such as globular clusters or in nearby galaxies, are ideal test particles to test AO performance. We will focus the discussion on photometric precision and accuracy reached nowadays. We briefly describe our project on stellar photometry and astrometry of Galactic globular clusters using images taken with GeMS at the Gemini South telescope. We also present the photometry performed with DAOPHOT suite of programs into the crowded regions of these globulars reaching very faint limiting magnitudes Ks ~21.5 mag on moderately large fields of view (~1.5 arcmin squared). We highlight the need for new algorithms to improve the modeling of the complex variation of the Point Spread Function across the ?eld of view. Finally, we outl...

  15. Adaptive optics at the PHELIX laser

    Heuck, Hans-Martin; Wittrock, Ulrich; Fils, Jérôme; Borneis, Stefan; Witte, Klaus; Eisenbart, Udo; Javorkova, Dasa; Bagnoud, Vincent; Götte, Stefan; Tauschwitz, Andreas; Onkels, Eckehard

    2007-05-01

    GSI Darmstadt currently builds a high-energy petawatt Nd:glass laser system, called PHELIX (Petawatt High-Energy Laser for Heavy-Ion Experiments). PHELIX will offer the world-wide unique combination of a high current, high-energy heavy-ion beam with an intense laser beam. Aberrations due to the beam transport and due to the amplification process limit the focusability and the intensity at the target. We have investigated the aberrations of the different amplification stages. The pre-amplifier stage consists of three rod-amplifiers which cause mainly defocus, but also a small part of coma and astigmatism. The main amplifier consists of five disk amplifiers with a clear aperture of 315 mm. These large disk-amplifiers cause pump-shot aberrations which occur instantly. After a shot, the disk amplifiers need a cooling time of several hours to relax to their initial state. This limits the repetition rate and causes long-term aberrations. We will present first measurements of the pump-shot and long-term aberrations caused by the pre- and the main amplifier in a single-pass configuration. In this context, we will present the adaptive optics system which is implemented in the PHELIX beam line and discuss its capability to compensate for the pump-shot and long-term aberrations.

  16. Visual Scanning Hartmann Optical Tester (VSHOT) Uncertainty Analysis (Milestone Report)

    Gray, A.; Lewandowski, A.; Wendelin, T.

    2010-10-01

    In 1997, an uncertainty analysis was conducted of the Video Scanning Hartmann Optical Tester (VSHOT). In 2010, we have completed a new analysis, based primarily on the geometric optics of the system, and it shows sensitivities to various design and operational parameters. We discuss sources of error with measuring devices, instrument calibrations, and operator measurements for a parabolic trough mirror panel test. These help to guide the operator in proper setup, and help end-users to understand the data they are provided. We include both the systematic (bias) and random (precision) errors for VSHOT testing and their contributions to the uncertainty. The contributing factors we considered in this study are: target tilt; target face to laser output distance; instrument vertical offset; laser output angle; distance between the tool and the test piece; camera calibration; and laser scanner. These contributing factors were applied to the calculated slope error, focal length, and test article tilt that are generated by the VSHOT data processing. Results show the estimated 2-sigma uncertainty in slope error for a parabolic trough line scan test to be +/-0.2 milliradians; uncertainty in the focal length is +/- 0.1 mm, and the uncertainty in test article tilt is +/- 0.04 milliradians.

  17. High resolution adaptive optics imaging complements standard spectral domain optical coherent tomography in retinal diseases with micro-structural details: a case series

    Gibran Syed Khurshid; Sasha Strul; Adam Boretsky; Massoud Motamedi; Praveena Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate if high resolution adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO) can be used as an adjunct complementary diagnostic tool to spectral domain optical coherent tomography (SD-OCT) in characterizing three macular diseases: rod-cone dystrophy, acute retinal pigment epitheliitis (Krill’s disease), and occult macular dystrophy. Methods: As part of a complete clinical examination, each patient was subjected to color fundus pictures, multimodal imaging scans with...

  18. Large Binocular Telescope Adaptive Optics System: New achievements and perspectives in adaptive optics

    Esposito, Simone; Pinna, Enrico; Puglisi, Alfio; Quirós-Pacheco, Fernando; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Xompero, Marco; Briguglio, Runa; Agapito, Guido; Busoni, Lorenzo; Fini, Luca; Argomedo, Javier; Gherardi, Alessandro; Brusa, Guido; Miller, Douglas; Guerra, Juan Carlos; Stefanini, Paolo; Salinari, Piero; 10.1117/12.898641

    2012-01-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) is a unique telescope featuring two co-mounted optical trains with 8.4m primary mirrors. The telescope Adaptive Optics (AO) system uses two innovative key components, namely an adaptive secondary mirror with 672 actuators and a high-order pyramid wave-front sensor. During the on-sky commissioning such a system reached performances never achieved before on large ground-based optical telescopes. Images with 40mas resolution and Strehl Ratios higher than 80% have been acquired in H band (1.6 micron). Such images showed a contrast as high as 10e-4. Based on these results, we compare the performances offered by a Natural Guide Star (NGS) system upgraded with the state-of-the-art technology and those delivered by existing Laser Guide Star (LGS) systems. The comparison, in terms of sky coverage and performances, suggests rethinking the current role ascribed to NGS and LGS in the next generation of AO systems for the 8-10 meter class telescopes and Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs)...

  19. Adaptive optics for daytime deep space laser communications to Mars

    Wilson, Keith E.; Wright, Malcolm; Lee, Shinkhak; Troy, Mitchell

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes JPL research in adaptive optics (AO) to reduce the daytime background noise on a Mars-to-Earth optical communications link. AO can reduce atmosphere-induced wavefront aberrations, and enable single mode receiver operation thereby buying back margin in the deep space optical communications link.

  20. Adaptive optics ophthalmologic systems using dual deformable mirrors

    Jones, S; Olivier, S; Chen, D; Sadda, S; Joeres, S; Zawadzki, R; Werner, J S; Miller, D

    2007-02-01

    Adaptive Optics (AO) have been increasingly combined with a variety of ophthalmic instruments over the last decade to provide cellular-level, in-vivo images of the eye. The use of MEMS deformable mirrors in these instruments has recently been demonstrated to reduce system size and cost while improving performance. However, currently available MEMS mirrors lack the required range of motion for correcting large ocular aberrations, such as defocus and astigmatism. In order to address this problem, we have developed an AO system architecture that uses two deformable mirrors, in a woofer/tweeter arrangement, with a bimorph mirror as the woofer and a MEMS mirror as the tweeter. This setup provides several advantages, including extended aberration correction range, due to the large stroke of the bimorph mirror, high order aberration correction using the MEMS mirror, and additionally, the ability to ''focus'' through the retina. This AO system architecture is currently being used in four instruments, including an Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) system and a retinal flood-illuminated imaging system at the UC Davis Medical Center, a Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope (SLO) at the Doheny Eye Institute, and an OCT system at Indiana University. The design, operation and evaluation of this type of AO system architecture will be presented.

  1. Novel adaptive laser scanning sensor for reverse engineering measurement

    Zhao Ji; Ma Zi; Lin Na; Zhu Quanmin

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a series of new techniques are used to optimize typical laser scanning sensor. The integrated prototype is compared with traditional approach to demonstrate the much improved performance. In the research and development, camera calibration is achieved by extracting characteristic points of the laser plane, so that the calibration efficiency is improved significantly. With feedback control of its intensity, the laser is automatically adjusted for different material. A modified algorithm is presented to improve the accuracy of laser stripe extraction. The fusion of data extracted from left and right camera is completed with re-sampling technique. The scanner is integrated with a robot arm and some other machinery for on-line measurement and inspection, which provides a flexible measurement tool for reverse engineering.

  2. A low-cost compact metric adaptive optics system

    Mansell, Justin D.; Henderson, Brian; Wiesner, Brennen; Praus, Robert; Coy, Steve

    2007-09-01

    The application of adaptive optics has been hindered by the cost, size, and complexity of the systems. We describe here progress we have made toward creating low-cost compact turn-key adaptive optics systems. We describe our new low-cost deformable mirror technology developed using polymer membranes, the associated USB interface drive electronics, and different ways that this technology can be configured into a low-cost compact adaptive optics system. We also present results of a parametric study of the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) control algorithm.

  3. A correction algorithm to simultaneously control dual deformable mirrors in a woofer-tweeter adaptive optics system

    Li, Chaohong; Sredar, Nripun; Ivers, Kevin M.; Queener, Hope; Porter, Jason

    2010-01-01

    We present a direct slope-based correction algorithm to simultaneously control two deformable mirrors (DMs) in a woofer-tweeter adaptive optics system. A global response matrix was derived from the response matrices of each deformable mirror and the voltages for both deformable mirrors were calculated simultaneously. This control algorithm was tested and compared with a 2-step sequential control method in five normal human eyes using an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope. The mean ...

  4. Simulating Astronomical Adaptive Optics Systems Using Yao

    Rigaut, François; Van Dam, Marcos

    2013-12-01

    Adaptive Optics systems are at the heart of the coming Extremely Large Telescopes generation. Given the importance, complexity and required advances of these systems, being able to simulate them faithfully is key to their success, and thus to the success of the ELTs. The type of systems envisioned to be built for the ELTs cover most of the AO breeds, from NGS AO to multiple guide star Ground Layer, Laser Tomography and Multi-Conjugate AO systems, with typically a few thousand actuators. This represents a large step up from the current generation of AO systems, and accordingly a challenge for existing AO simulation packages. This is especially true as, in the past years, computer power has not been following Moore's law in its most common understanding; CPU clocks are hovering at about 3GHz. Although the use of super computers is a possible solution to run these simulations, being able to use smaller machines has obvious advantages: cost, access, environmental issues. By using optimised code in an already proven AO simulation platform, we were able to run complex ELT AO simulations on very modest machines, including laptops. The platform is YAO. In this paper, we describe YAO, its architecture, its capabilities, the ELT-specific challenges and optimisations, and finally its performance. As an example, execution speed ranges from 5 iterations per second for a 6 LGS 60x60 subapertures Shack-Hartmann Wavefront sensor Laser Tomography AO system (including full physical image formation and detector characteristics) up to over 30 iterations/s for a single NGS AO system.

  5. ComPoScan: Adaptive Scanning for Efficient Concurrent Communications and Positioning with 802.11

    King, Thomas; Kjærgaard, Mikkel Baun

    2008-01-01

    Using 802.11 concurrently for communications and positioning is problematic, especially if location-based services (e.g., indoor navigation) are concurrently executed with real-time applications (e.g., VoIP, video conferencing). Periodical scanning for measuring the signal strength interrupts the...... by validation in several real-world deployments. Results from the emulation show that the system can realize different trade-offs by changing parameters. Furthermore, the emulation shows that the system works independently of the environment, the network card, the signal strength measurement...... technology, and number and placement of access points. We also show that ComPoScan does not harm the positioning accuracy of a positioning system. By validation in several real-world deployments, we provided evidence for that the real system works as predicted by the emulation. In addition, we provide...

  6. Adaptive optics OCT using 1060nm swept source and dual deformable lenses for human retinal imaging

    Jian, Yifan; Lee, Sujin; Cua, Michelle; Miao, Dongkai; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-03-01

    Adaptive optics concepts have been applied to the advancement of biological imaging and microscopy. In particular, AO has also been very successfully applied to cellular resolution imaging of the retina, enabling visualization of the characteristic mosaic patterns of the outer retinal layers using flood illumination fundus photography, Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy (SLO), and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). Despite the high quality of the in vivo images, there has been a limited uptake of AO imaging into the clinical environment. The high resolution afforded by AO comes at the price of limited field of view and specialized equipment. The implementation of a typical adaptive optics imaging system results in a relatively large and complex optical setup. The wavefront measurement is commonly performed using a Hartmann-Shack Wavefront Sensor (HS-WFS) placed at an image plane that is optically conjugated to the eye's pupil. The deformable mirror is also placed at a conjugate plane, relaying the wavefront corrections to the pupil. Due to the sensitivity of the HS-WFS to back-reflections, the imaging system is commonly constructed from spherical mirrors. In this project, we present a novel adaptive optics OCT retinal imaging system with significant potential to overcome many of the barriers to integration with a clinical environment. We describe in detail the implementation of a compact lens based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WSAO) 1060nm swept source OCT human retinal imaging system with dual deformable lenses, and present retinal images acquired in vivo from research volunteers.

  7. Architecture and performance of astronomical adaptive optics systems

    Bloemhof, E.

    2002-01-01

    In recent years the technological advances of adaptive optics have enabled a great deal of innovative science. In this lecture I review the system-level design of modern astronomical AO instruments, and discuss their current capabilities.

  8. High-sensitive scanning laser magneto-optical imaging system

    A high-sensitive scanning laser magneto-optical (MO) imaging system has been developed. The system is mainly composed of a laser source, galvano meters, and a high-sensitive differential optical-detector. Preliminary evaluation of system performance by using a Faraday indicator with a Faraday rotation coefficient of 3.47x10-5 rad/μm Oe shows a magnetic sensitivity of about 5 μT, without any need for accumulation or averaging processing. Using the developed MO system we have succeeded in the fast and quantitative imaging of a rotationally symmetric magnetic field distribution around an YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) strip line applied with dc-biased current, and also succeeded in the detection of quantized fine signals corresponding to magnetic flux quantum generation in a superconducting loop of an YBCO Josephson vortex flow transistor. Thus, the developed system enables us not only to do fast imaging and local signal detection but also to directly evaluate both the strength and direction of a magnetic signal.

  9. Non-linear optical measurements using a scanned, Bessel beam

    Collier, Bradley B.; Awasthi, Samir; Lieu, Deborah K.; Chan, James W.

    2015-03-01

    Oftentimes cells are removed from the body for disease diagnosis or cellular research. This typically requires fluorescent labeling followed by sorting with a flow cytometer; however, possible disruption of cellular function or even cell death due to the presence of the label can occur. This may be acceptable for ex vivo applications, but as cells are more frequently moving from the lab to the body, label-free methods of cell sorting are needed to eliminate these issues. This is especially true of the growing field of stem cell research where specialized cells are needed for treatments. Because differentiation processes are not completely efficient, cells must be sorted to eliminate any unwanted cells (i.e. un-differentiated or differentiated into an unwanted cell type). In order to perform label-free measurements, non-linear optics (NLO) have been increasingly utilized for single cell analysis because of their ability to not disrupt cellular function. An optical system was developed for the measurement of NLO in a microfluidic channel similar to a flow cytometer. In order to improve the excitation efficiency of NLO, a scanned Bessel beam was utilized to create a light-sheet across the channel. The system was tested by monitoring twophoton fluorescence from polystyrene microbeads of different sizes. Fluorescence intensity obtained from light-sheet measurements were significantly greater than measurements made using a static Gaussian beam. In addition, the increase in intensity from larger sized beads was more evident for the light-sheet system.

  10. Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics ophthalmoscopy in the human eye

    Hofer, Heidi; Sredar, Nripun; Queener, Hope; Li, Chaohong; Porter, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Wavefront sensor noise and fidelity place a fundamental limit on achievable image quality in current adaptive optics ophthalmoscopes. Additionally, the wavefront sensor ‘beacon’ can interfere with visual experiments. We demonstrate real-time (25 Hz), wavefront sensorless adaptive optics imaging in the living human eye with image quality rivaling that of wavefront sensor based control in the same system. A stochastic parallel gradient descent algorithm directly optimized the mean intensity in ...

  11. Solar adaptive optics at the Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife

    Soltau, Dirk; Berkefeld, Thomas; Schmidt, Dirk; von der Lühe, Oskar

    2013-10-01

    Observing the Sun with high angular resolution is difficult because the turbulence in the atmosphere is strongest during day time. In this paper we describe the principles of solar adaptive optics exemplified by the two German solar telescopes VTT and GREGOR at the Observatorio del Teide. With theses systems we obtain near diffraction limited images of the Sun. Ways to overcome the limits of conventional AO by applying multiconjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) are shown.

  12. Creating and Probing Graphene Electron Optics with Local Scanning Probes

    Stroscio, Joseph

    Ballistic propagation and the light-like dispersion of graphene charge carriers make graphene an attractive platform for optics-inspired graphene electronics where gate tunable potentials can control electron refraction and transmission. In analogy to optical wave propagation in lenses, mirrors and metamaterials, gate potentials can be used to create a negative index of refraction for Veselago lensing and Fabry-Pérot interferometers. In circular geometries, gate potentials can induce whispering gallery modes (WGM), similar to optical and acoustic whispering galleries albeit on a much smaller length scale. Klein scattering of Dirac carriers plays a central role in determining the coherent propagation of electron waves in these resonators. In this talk, I examine the probing of electron resonators in graphene confined by linear and circular gate potentials with the scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The tip in the STM tunnel junction serves both as a tunable local gate potential, and as a probe of the graphene states through tunneling spectroscopy. A combination of a back gate potential, Vg, and tip potential, Vb, creates and controls a circular pn junction that confines the WGM graphene states. The resonances are observed in two separate channels in the tunneling spectroscopy experiment: first, by directly tunneling into the state at the bias energy eVb, and, second, by tunneling from the resonance at the Fermi level as the state is gated by the tip potential. The second channel produces a fan-like set of WGM peaks, reminiscent of the fringes seen in planar geometries by transport measurements. The WGM resonances split in a small applied magnetic field, with a large energy splitting approaching the WGM spacing at 0.5 T. These results agree well with recent theory on Klein scattering in graphene electron resonators. This work is done in collaboration with Y. Zhao, J. Wyrick, F.D. Natterer, J. F. Rodriquez-Nieva, C. Lewandoswski, K. Watanabe, T. Taniguchi, N. B

  13. Optical and Electrical Characterization at the Nanoscale by a Transparent Tip of a Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    Sychugov, Ilya; Omi, Hiroo; Murashita, Toru; KOBAYASHI, Yoshihiro

    2009-01-01

    A new type of scanning probe microscope, combining features of the scanning tunnelling microscope, the scanning tunnelling luminescence microscope with a transparent probe and the aperture scanning near-field optical microscope, is described. Proof-of-concept experiments were performed under ultrahigh vacuum conditions at varying temperature on GaAs/AlAs heterostructures.

  14. Single crystalline film screens for cathode-ray tubes: New life of television scanning optical microscopy

    Advantages of television scanning optical microscopy are discussed in comparison with cameral microscopy. Peculiarities of new types of cathode-ray tubes with single crystalline film screens, as a source of scanning beam, are described

  15. Computational adaptive optics for broadband interferometric tomography of tissues and cells

    Adie, Steven G.; Mulligan, Jeffrey A.

    2016-03-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) can shape aberrated optical wavefronts to physically restore the constructive interference needed for high-resolution imaging. With access to the complex optical field, however, many functions of optical hardware can be achieved computationally, including focusing and the compensation of optical aberrations to restore the constructive interference required for diffraction-limited imaging performance. Holography, which employs interferometric detection of the complex optical field, was developed based on this connection between hardware and computational image formation, although this link has only recently been exploited for 3D tomographic imaging in scattering biological tissues. This talk will present the underlying imaging science behind computational image formation with optical coherence tomography (OCT) -- a beam-scanned version of broadband digital holography. Analogous to hardware AO (HAO), we demonstrate computational adaptive optics (CAO) and optimization of the computed pupil correction in 'sensorless mode' (Zernike polynomial corrections with feedback from image metrics) or with the use of 'guide-stars' in the sample. We discuss the concept of an 'isotomic volume' as the volumetric extension of the 'isoplanatic patch' introduced in astronomical AO. Recent CAO results and ongoing work is highlighted to point to the potential biomedical impact of computed broadband interferometric tomography. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of HAO vs. CAO for the effective shaping of optical wavefronts, and highlight opportunities for hybrid approaches that synergistically combine the unique advantages of hardware and computational methods for rapid volumetric tomography with cellular resolution.

  16. Amplitude variations on the Extreme Adaptive Optics testbed

    Evans, J; Thomas, S; Dillon, D; Gavel, D; Phillion, D; Macintosh, B

    2007-08-14

    High-contrast adaptive optics systems, such as those needed to image extrasolar planets, are known to require excellent wavefront control and diffraction suppression. At the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics on the Extreme Adaptive Optics testbed, we have already demonstrated wavefront control of better than 1 nm rms within controllable spatial frequencies. Corresponding contrast measurements, however, are limited by amplitude variations, including those introduced by the micro-electrical-mechanical-systems (MEMS) deformable mirror. Results from experimental measurements and wave optic simulations of amplitude variations on the ExAO testbed are presented. We find systematic intensity variations of about 2% rms, and intensity variations with the MEMS to be 6%. Some errors are introduced by phase and amplitude mixing because the MEMS is not conjugate to the pupil, but independent measurements of MEMS reflectivity suggest that some error is introduced by small non-uniformities in the reflectivity.

  17. In vivo high-resolution retinal imaging using adaptive optics.

    Seyedahmadi, Babak Jian; Vavvas, Demetrios

    2010-01-01

    Retinal imaging with conventional methods is only able to overcome the lowest order of aberration, defocus and astigmatism. The human eye is fraught with higher order of aberrations. Since we are forced to use the human optical system in retinal imaging, the images are degraded. In addition, all of these distortions are constantly changing due to head/eye movement and change in accommodation. Adaptive optics is a promising technology introduced in the field of ophthalmology to measure and compensate for these aberrations. High-resolution obtained by adaptive optics enables us to view and image the retinal photoreceptors, retina pigment epithelium, and identification of cone subclasses in vivo. In this review we will be discussing the basic technology of adaptive optics and hardware requirement in addition to clinical applications of such technology. PMID:21090998

  18. Horizontal Path Laser Communications Employing MEMS Adaptive Optics Correction

    Thompson, C A; Wilks, S C; Brase, J M; Young, R A; Johnson, G W; Ruggiero, A J

    2001-09-05

    Horizontal path laser communications are beginning to provide attractive alternatives for high-speed optical communications, In particular, companies are beginning to sell fiberless alternatives for intranet and sporting event video. These applications are primarily aimed at short distance applications (on the order of 1 km pathlength). There exists a potential need to extend this pathlength to distances much greater than a 1km. For cases of long distance optical propagation, atmospheric turbulence will ultimately limit the maximum achievable data rate. In this paper, we propose a method of improved signal quality through the use of adaptive optics. In particular, we show work in progress toward a high-speed, small footprint Adaptive Optics system for horizontal path laser communications. Such a system relies heavily on recent progress in Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) deformable mirrors as well as improved communication and computational components. In this paper we detail two Adaptive Optics approaches for improved through-put, the first is the compensated receiver (the traditional Adaptive Optics approach), the second is the compensated transmitter/receiver. The second approach allows for correction of the optical wavefront before transmission from the transmitter and prior to detection at the receiver.

  19. An Adaptive-Tabu GA for Registration of CT and Surface Laser Scan.

    Lee, Jiann-Der; Huang, Jau-Hua; Huang, Chung-Hsien; Liu, Li-Chang

    2005-01-01

    An adaptive-tabu GA (Genetic Algorithm) method is proposed to improve some traditional GA methods in the registration of computer tomography (CT) and surface laser scan. In this method, the adaptive memory structure and search strategy of Tabu Search (TS) with the modified chromosome crossover and adaptive mutation are proposed to increase the convergence speed and accuracy of the fitness function. This registration method can be used on non-fiducial stereo-tactic brain surgeries to assist surgeons to diagnose and treat brain diseases. PMID:17280970

  20. An adaptive non-raster scanning method in atomic force microscopy for simple sample shapes

    It is a significant challenge to reduce the scanning time in atomic force microscopy while retaining imaging quality. In this paper, a novel non-raster scanning method for high-speed imaging is presented. The method proposed here is developed for a specimen with the simple shape of a cell. The image is obtained by scanning the boundary of the specimen at successively increasing heights, creating a set of contours. The scanning speed is increased by employing a combined prediction algorithm, using a weighted prediction from the contours scanned earlier, and from the currently scanned contour. In addition, an adaptive change in the height step after each contour scan is suggested. A rigorous simulation test bed recreates the x–y specimen stage dynamics and the cantilever height control dynamics, so that a detailed parametric comparison of the scanning algorithms is possible. The data from different scanning algorithms are compared after the application of an image interpolation algorithm (the Delaunay interpolation algorithm), which can also run on-line. (paper)

  1. Ultrasharp carbon whisker optical fiber probes for scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Mensi, Mounir; Mikhailov, Gennadii; Pyatkin, Sergey; Adamcik, Jozef; Sekatskii, Sergey; Dietler, Giovanni

    2010-05-01

    We report the growth of ultrasharp carbon whiskers onto apertured near-field optical glass fiber probes. The ultrasharp carbon whiskers are produced by the electron-assisted dissociation of residual oil vapors present in the vacuum chamber during the electron beam exposition of the tip. This cost effective manufacturing procedure is reproducible, fast and allows controlling the shape of the carbon whisker. The radius of curvature of the whisker apex is approximately 10 nm while its small total length is around 100 nm thus fulfilling the requirements of aperture Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscope (SNOM) probes, i.e. to keep the distance between the sample and the optical aperture during the scanning at subwavelength scale. Furthermore, due to the intrinsic properties of the amorphous carbon whisker, the probes are durable. The carbon whisker optical fiber probes are mounted on tuning-forks using the earlier discussed double-resonant principle. This process ensures a high quality factor of the sensor in the range 2000-5500, which enables to cope with the large stiffness of the tuning-fork actuator and obtain a characteristic noise-limited sensitivity smaller than 10pN necessary to image soft biological samples without destroying them. To illustrate the sensor's performances, transmission near-field optical images of SNOM calibration grating as well as high-resolution state-of-the-art topographic images of single DNA molecules are presented. Prospects of further improvements of the fabrication method enabling to achieve the lighting rod enhancement of the optical near-field (nano-antenna effect) are briefly discussed.

  2. Time-domain scanning optical mammography: II. Optical properties and tissue parameters of 87 carcinomas

    Within a clinical trial on scanning time-domain optical mammography reported on in a companion publication (part I), craniocaudal and mediolateral projection optical mammograms were recorded from 154 patients, suspected of having breast cancer. Here we report on in vivo optical properties of the subset of 87 histologically validated carcinomas which were visible in optical mammograms recorded at two or three near-infrared wavelengths. Tumour absorption and reduced scattering coefficients were derived from distributions of times of flight of photons recorded at the tumour site employing the model of diffraction of photon density waves by a spherical inhomogeneity, located in an otherwise homogeneous tissue slab. Effective tumour radii, taken from pathology, and tumour location along the compression direction, deduced from off-axis optical scans of the tumour region, were included in the analysis as prior knowledge, if available. On average, tumour absorption coefficients exceeded those of surrounding healthy breast tissue by a factor of about 2.5 (670 nm), whereas tumour reduced scattering coefficients were larger by about 20% (670 nm). From absorption coefficients at 670 nm and 785 nm total haemoglobin concentration and blood oxygen saturation were deduced for tumours and surrounding healthy breast tissue. Apart from a few outliers total haemoglobin concentration was observed to be systematically larger in tumours compared to healthy breast tissue. In contrast, blood oxygen saturation was found to be a poor discriminator for tumours and healthy breast tissue; both median values of blood oxygen saturation are the same within their statistical uncertainties. However, the ratio of total haemoglobin concentration over blood oxygen saturation further improves discrimination between tumours and healthy breast tissue. For 29 tumours detected in optical mammograms recorded at three wavelengths (670 nm, 785 nm, 843 nm or 884 nm), scatter power was derived from transport

  3. PASSATA - Object oriented numerical simulation software for adaptive optics

    Agapito, G; Esposito, S

    2016-01-01

    We present the last version of the PyrAmid Simulator Software for Adaptive opTics Arcetri (PASSATA), an IDL and CUDA based object oriented software developed in the Adaptive Optics group of the Arcetri observatory for Monte-Carlo end-to-end adaptive optics simulations. The original aim of this software was to evaluate the performance of a single conjugate adaptive optics system for ground based telescope with a pyramid wavefront sensor. After some years of development, the current version of PASSATA is able to simulate several adaptive optics systems: single conjugate, multi conjugate and ground layer, with Shack Hartmann and Pyramid wavefront sensors. It can simulate from 8m to 40m class telescopes, with diffraction limited and resolved sources at finite or infinite distance from the pupil. The main advantages of this software are the versatility given by the object oriented approach and the speed given by the CUDA implementation of the most computational demanding routines. We describe the software with its...

  4. Photonic crystal-adaptive optical devices

    Buss, Thomas

    This Ph.D. thesis presents methods for enhancing the optical functionality of transparent glass panes by introduction of invisible nanoscale surface structures, such as gratings and planar photonic cyrstals. In this way the primary functionality of the glass - transparancy - may be enhanced with...... new properties, turning window glasses or glass surfaces of hand-held electronics into multifunctional devices. Common to all examples discussed, gratings and photonic crystals are used to engineer the optical dispersion and selectively modify the direction of guided light and transfer free...... minimized, thus allowing a homogeneous, glare-free, white-light daylighting into the room. Even more functionality can be achieved when the optical effects are tunable or reconfigurable. This is investigated with photonic crystal dye lasers. These lasers combine a photonic crystal resonator with a dye...

  5. Beaconless adaptive-optics technique for HEL beam control

    Khizhnyak, Anatoliy; Markov, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    Effective performance of forthcoming laser systems capable of power delivery on a distant target requires an adaptive optics system to correct atmospheric perturbations on the laser beam. The turbulence-induced effects are responsible for beam wobbling, wandering, and intensity scintillation, resulting in degradation of the beam quality and power density on the target. Adaptive optics methods are used to compensate for these negative effects. In its turn, operation of the AOS system requires a reference wave that can be generated by the beacon on the target. This report discusses a beaconless approach for wavefront correction with its performance based on the detection of the target-scattered light. Postprocessing of the beacon-generated light field enables retrieval and detailed characterization of the turbulence-perturbed wavefront -data that is essential to control the adaptive optics module of a high-power laser system.

  6. Wavelet methods in multi-conjugate adaptive optics

    The next generation ground-based telescopes rely heavily on adaptive optics for overcoming the limitation of atmospheric turbulence. In the future adaptive optics modalities, like multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO), atmospheric tomography is the major mathematical and computational challenge. In this severely ill-posed problem, a fast and stable reconstruction algorithm is needed that can take into account many real-life phenomena of telescope imaging. We introduce a novel reconstruction method for the atmospheric tomography problem and demonstrate its performance and flexibility in the context of MCAO. Our method is based on using locality properties of compactly supported wavelets, both in the spatial and frequency domains. The reconstruction in the atmospheric tomography problem is obtained by solving the Bayesian MAP estimator with a conjugate-gradient-based algorithm. An accelerated algorithm with preconditioning is also introduced. Numerical performance is demonstrated on the official end-to-end simulation tool OCTOPUS of European Southern Observatory. (paper)

  7. High resolution adaptive optics imaging complements standard spectral domain optical coherent tomography in retinal diseases with micro-structural details: a case series

    Gibran Syed Khurshid

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate if high resolution adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO can be used as an adjunct complementary diagnostic tool to spectral domain optical coherent tomography (SD-OCT in characterizing three macular diseases: rod-cone dystrophy, acute retinal pigment epitheliitis (Krill’s disease, and occult macular dystrophy. Methods: As part of a complete clinical examination, each patient was subjected to color fundus pictures, multimodal imaging scans with Heidelberg SpectralisTM and high resolution retinal images with a custom built adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmolscope (AO-SLO. The registered AO-SLO images were averaged to improve the signal to noise ratio and used to generate larger photoreceptor mosaics. Results: AO-SLO mosaics for all three conditions showed distinct, characteristic disruptions of the photoreceptors in areas that corresponded to the abnormalities observed on fundus photography and SD-OCT scans. Conclusions: AO-SLO defined fine structural changes associated with retinal pathology at the photoreceptor level that could not be achieved using standard diagnostic methods. A combination of adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO and SD-OCT provided views of the retina with enhanced lateral and axial resolution. High-resolution, ultra-structural details of the retina may provide additional insights into the disease etiology, progression and management of patients with vision threatening macular diseases.

  8. The New Weather Radar for America's Space Program in Florida: A Temperature Profile Adaptive Scan Strategy

    Carey, L. D.; Petersen, W. A.; Deierling, W.; Roeder, W. P.

    2009-01-01

    A new weather radar is being acquired for use in support of America s space program at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, NASA Kennedy Space Center, and Patrick AFB on the east coast of central Florida. This new radar replaces the modified WSR-74C at Patrick AFB that has been in use since 1984. The new radar is a Radtec TDR 43-250, which has Doppler and dual polarization capability. A new fixed scan strategy was designed to best support the space program. The fixed scan strategy represents a complex compromise between many competing factors and relies on climatological heights of various temperatures that are important for improved lightning forecasting and evaluation of Lightning Launch Commit Criteria (LCC), which are the weather rules to avoid lightning strikes to in-flight rockets. The 0 C to -20 C layer is vital since most generation of electric charge occurs within it and so it is critical in evaluating Lightning LCC and in forecasting lightning. These are two of the most important duties of 45 WS. While the fixed scan strategy that covers most of the climatological variation of the 0 C to -20 C levels with high resolution ensures that these critical temperatures are well covered most of the time, it also means that on any particular day the radar is spending precious time scanning at angles covering less important heights. The goal of this project is to develop a user-friendly, Interactive Data Language (IDL) computer program that will automatically generate optimized radar scan strategies that adapt to user input of the temperature profile and other important parameters. By using only the required scan angles output by the temperature profile adaptive scan strategy program, faster update times for volume scans and/or collection of more samples per gate for better data quality is possible, while maintaining high resolution at the critical temperature levels. The temperature profile adaptive technique will also take into account earth curvature and refraction

  9. Topographic, electrochemical, and optical images captured using standing approach mode scanning electrochemical/optical microscopy.

    Takahashi, Yasufumi; Hirano, Yu; Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Shiku, Hitoshi; Yamada, Hiroshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2006-12-01

    We developed a high-resolution scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) for the characterization of various biological materials. Electrode probes were fabricated by Ti/Pt sputtering followed by parylene C-vapor deposition polymerization on the pulled optical fiber or glass capillary. The effective electrode radius estimated from the cyclic voltammogram of ferrocyanide was found to be 35 nm. The optical aperture size was less than 170 nm, which was confirmed from the cross section of the near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) image of the quantum dot (QD) particles with diameters in the range of 10-15 nm. The feedback mechanism controlling the probe-sample distance was improved by vertically moving the probe by 0.1-3 microm to reduce the damage to the samples. This feedback mode, defined as "standing approach (STA) mode" (Yamada, H.; Fukumoto, H.; Yokoyama, T.; Koike, T. Anal. Chem. 2005, 77, 1785-1790), has allowed the simultaneous electrochemical and topographic imaging of the axons and cell body of a single PC12 cell under physiological conditions for the first time. STA-mode feedback imaging functions better than tip-sample regulation by the conventionally available AFM. For example, polystyrene beads (diameter approximately 6 microm) was imaged using the STA-mode SECM, whereas imaging was not possible using a conventional AFM instrument. PMID:17128996

  10. Human retinal imaging using visible-light optical coherence tomography guided by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy.

    Yi, Ji; Chen, Siyu; Shu, Xiao; Fawzi, Amani A; Zhang, Hao F

    2015-10-01

    We achieved human retinal imaging using visible-light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT) guided by an integrated scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO). We adapted a spectral domain OCT configuration and used a supercontinuum laser as the illumating source. The center wavelength was 564 nm and the bandwidth was 115 nm, which provided a 0.97 µm axial resolution measured in air. We characterized the sensitivity to be 86 dB with 226 µW incidence power on the pupil. We also integrated an SLO that shared the same optical path of the vis-OCT sample arm for alignment purposes. We demonstrated the retinal imaging from both systems centered at the fovea and optic nerve head with 20° × 20° and 10° × 10° field of view. We observed similar anatomical structures in vis-OCT and NIR-OCT. The contrast appeared different from vis-OCT to NIR-OCT, including slightly weaker signal from intra-retinal layers, and increased visibility and contrast of anatomical layers in the outer retina. PMID:26504622

  11. Hybrid Deconvolution of Adaptive Optics Retinal Images from Wavefront Sensing

    Adaptive optics can be used to compensate for the wave aberration of the human eyes to achieve high-resolution imaging in real time. However the correction is partial due to the limitation of hardware. We propose a kind of hybrid image post-processing method, which uses the blind deconvolution combined with the residual data in wavefront sensor to restore the partially adaptive optics corrected retinal image. This method is applied in the image restoration of the vivid human retinal images. The results show that it is effective to improve the retinal image quality

  12. A real-time simulation facility for astronomical adaptive optics

    Basden, Alastair

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we introduce the concept of real-time hardware-in-the-loop simulation for astronomical adaptive optics, and present the case for the requirement for such a facility. This real-time simulation, when linked with an adaptive optics real-time control system, provides an essential tool for the validation, verification and integration of the Extremely Large Telescope real-time control systems prior to commissioning at the telescope. We demonstrate that such a facility is crucial for the success of the future extremely large telescopes.

  13. Hybrid Deconvolution of Adaptive Optics Retinal Images from Wavefront Sensing

    TIAN Yu; RAO Chang-Hui; RAO Xue-Jun; WANG Cheng; YU Xiang; LIU Qian; XUE Li-Xia; LING Ning; JIANG Wen-Han

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive optics can be used to compensate for the wave aberration of the human eyes to achieve high-resolution imaging in real time.However the correction is partial due to the limitation of hardware.We propose a kind of hybrid image post-processing method.which uses the blind deconvolution combined with the residual data in wavefront sensor to restore the partially adaptive optics corrected retinal image.This method is applied in the image restoration of the vivid human retinal images.The results show that it is effective to improve the retinal image quality.

  14. Characterization and Operation of Liquid Crystal Adaptive Optics Phoropter

    Awwal, A; Bauman, B; Gavel, D; Olivier, S; Jones, S; Hardy, J L; Barnes, T; Werner, J S

    2003-02-05

    Adaptive optics (AO), a mature technology developed for astronomy to compensate for the effects of atmospheric turbulence, can also be used to correct the aberrations of the eye. The classic phoropter is used by ophthalmologists and optometrists to estimate and correct the lower-order aberrations of the eye, defocus and astigmatism, in order to derive a vision correction prescription for their patients. An adaptive optics phoropter measures and corrects the aberrations in the human eye using adaptive optics techniques, which are capable of dealing with both the standard low-order aberrations and higher-order aberrations, including coma and spherical aberration. High-order aberrations have been shown to degrade visual performance for clinical subjects in initial investigations. An adaptive optics phoropter has been designed and constructed based on a Shack-Hartmann sensor to measure the aberrations of the eye, and a liquid crystal spatial light modulator to compensate for them. This system should produce near diffraction-limited optical image quality at the retina, which will enable investigation of the psychophysical limits of human vision. This paper describes the characterization and operation of the AO phoropter with results from human subject testing.

  15. Holographic fluorescence microscopy with incoherent digital holographic adaptive optics

    Jang, Changwon; Kim, Jonghyun; Clark, David C.; Lee, Seungjae; Lee, Byoungho; Kim, Myung K.

    2015-11-01

    Introduction of adaptive optics technology into astronomy and ophthalmology has made great contributions in these fields, allowing one to recover images blurred by atmospheric turbulence or aberrations of the eye. Similar adaptive optics improvement in microscopic imaging is also of interest to researchers using various techniques. Current technology of adaptive optics typically contains three key elements: a wavefront sensor, wavefront corrector, and controller. These hardware elements tend to be bulky, expensive, and limited in resolution, involving, for example, lenslet arrays for sensing or multiactuator deformable mirrors for correcting. We have previously introduced an alternate approach based on unique capabilities of digital holography, namely direct access to the phase profile of an optical field and the ability to numerically manipulate the phase profile. We have also demonstrated that direct access and compensation of the phase profile are possible not only with conventional coherent digital holography, but also with a new type of digital holography using incoherent light: self­interference incoherent digital holography (SIDH). The SIDH generates a complex-i.e., amplitude plus phase-hologram from one or several interferograms acquired with incoherent light, such as LEDs, lamps, sunlight, or fluorescence. The complex point spread function can be measured using guide star illumination and it allows deterministic deconvolution of the full-field image. We present experimental demonstration of aberration compensation in holographic fluorescence microscopy using SIDH. Adaptive optics by SIDH provides new tools for improved cellular fluorescence microscopy through intact tissue layers or other types of aberrant media.

  16. Limitations to adaptive optics image quality in rodent eyes

    Zhou, Xiaolin; Bedggood, Phillip; Metha, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) retinal image quality of rodent eyes is inferior to that of human eyes, despite the promise of greater numerical aperture. This paradox challenges several assumptions commonly made in AO imaging, assumptions which may be invalidated by the very high power and dioptric thickness of the rodent retina. We used optical modeling to compare the performance of rat and human eyes under conditions that tested the validity of these assumptions. Results showed that AO image quality ...

  17. Optical Field Measurement of Nano-Apertures with a Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscope

    XU Tie-Jun; XU Ji-Ying; WANG Jia; TIAN Qian

    2004-01-01

    @@ We investigate optical near-field distributions of the unconventional C-apertures and the conventional square apertures in preliminary experiment with an aperture scanning near-field optical microscope. These nano-apertures are fabricated in Au film on a glass substrate with focused ion beam technology. The experimental results indicate the uptrend of output light intensity that a C-aperture enables the intensity maximum to increase at least 10times more than a square aperture with same unit length. The measured near-field light spot sizes of C-apertureand square aperture with 200-nm unit length are 439nm × 500nm and 245nm × 216nm, respectively.

  18. CCD-based optical CT scanning of highly attenuating phantoms

    Al-Nowais, Shamsa [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Doran, Simon J [CRUK Clinical MR Research Group, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Simon.Doran@icr.ac.uk

    2009-05-01

    The introduction of optical computed tomography (optical-CT) offers economic and easy to use 3-D optical readout for gel dosimeters. However, previous authors have noted some challenges regarding the accuracy of such imaging techniques at high values of optical density. In this paper, we take a closer look at the 'cupping' artefact evident in both light-scattering polymer systems and highly light absorbing phantoms using our CCD-based optical scanner. In addition, a technique is implemented whereby the maximum measurable optical absorbance is extended to correct for any errors that may have occurred in the estimated value of the dark current or ambient light reaching the detector. The results indicate that for absorbance values up to 2.0, the optical scanner results have good accuracy, whereas this is not the case at high absorbance values for reasons yet to be explained.

  19. Adaptive optics for control of the laser welding process

    Mrňa, Libor; Šarbort, Martin; Řeřucha, Šimon; Jedlička, Petr

    Praha: Institute of Plasma Physics, 2012 - (Vít, T.; Kovačičinová, J.; Lédl, V.), s. 93-98 ISBN 978-80-87026-02-1. [Optics and Measurement 2012. Liberec (CZ), 16.10.2012-18.10.2012] R&D Projects: GA MPO 2A-3TP1/113; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : laser welding beam shaping * adaptive optics, * power optics * beam shaping Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation

  20. Adaptive optical system for astronomical applications

    Merkle, F.; Bille, J.; Freischlad, K.; Frieben, M.; Jahn, G.; Reischmann, H.-L.

    The active optical system being developed for use with the 0.75-m RC telescope at the Landessternwarte in Heidelberg, FRG, is discussed. A 5-cm electrostatically deformable aluminum-coated polymer mirror (sensitivity 0.05 microns/V, maximum local tilt 3 microns/5 mm) is mounted in a gimbal with piezoelectric-actuator tilt control. The mirror control systems being tested are a modified shearing interferometer with crosstalk-compensated feedback and Fourier-modulus wavefront computation, both using a 32 x 32 diode array as detector. Modal phase compensation is achieved using Zernike polynomials and Karhunen-Loeve functions; the correction for the tilt terms of the series expansion is left to the overall-tilt compensation unit, for which preliminary test results are shown.

  1. Optic flow improves adaptability of spatiotemporal characteristics during split-belt locomotor adaptation with tactile stimulation.

    Eikema, Diderik Jan A; Chien, Jung Hung; Stergiou, Nicholas; Myers, Sara A; Scott-Pandorf, Melissa M; Bloomberg, Jacob J; Mukherjee, Mukul

    2016-02-01

    Human locomotor adaptation requires feedback and feed-forward control processes to maintain an appropriate walking pattern. Adaptation may require the use of visual and proprioceptive input to decode altered movement dynamics and generate an appropriate response. After a person transfers from an extreme sensory environment and back, as astronauts do when they return from spaceflight, the prolonged period required for re-adaptation can pose a significant burden. In our previous paper, we showed that plantar tactile vibration during a split-belt adaptation task did not interfere with the treadmill adaptation however, larger overground transfer effects with a slower decay resulted. Such effects, in the absence of visual feedback (of motion) and perturbation of tactile feedback, are believed to be due to a higher proprioceptive gain because, in the absence of relevant external dynamic cues such as optic flow, reliance on body-based cues is enhanced during gait tasks through multisensory integration. In this study, we therefore investigated the effect of optic flow on tactile-stimulated split-belt adaptation as a paradigm to facilitate the sensorimotor adaptation process. Twenty healthy young adults, separated into two matched groups, participated in the study. All participants performed an overground walking trial followed by a split-belt treadmill adaptation protocol. The tactile group (TC) received vibratory plantar tactile stimulation only, whereas the virtual reality and tactile group (VRT) received an additional concurrent visual stimulation: a moving virtual corridor, inducing perceived self-motion. A post-treadmill overground trial was performed to determine adaptation transfer. Interlimb coordination of spatiotemporal and kinetic variables was quantified using symmetry indices and analyzed using repeated-measures ANOVA. Marked changes of step length characteristics were observed in both groups during split-belt adaptation. Stance and swing time symmetries were

  2. Smart microscope: an adaptive optics learning system for aberration correction in multiphoton confocal microscopy.

    Albert, O; Sherman, L; Mourou, G; Norris, T B; Vdovin, G

    2000-01-01

    Off-axis aberrations in a beam-scanning multiphoton confocal microscope are corrected with a deformable mirror. The optimal mirror shape for each pixel is determined by a genetic learning algorithm, in which the second-harmonic or two-photon fluorescence signal from a reference sample is maximized. The speed of the convergence is improved by use of a Zernike polynomial basis for the deformable mirror shape. This adaptive optical correction scheme is implemented in an all-reflective system by use of extremely short (10-fs) optical pulses, and it is shown that the scanning area of an f:1 off-axis parabola can be increased by nine times with this technique. PMID:18059779

  3. Laser guide stars and adaptive optics for astronomy

    Max, C.E. [ed.

    1992-07-15

    Five papers are included: feasibility experiment for sodium-alyer laser guide stars at LLNL; system design for a high power sodium beacon laser; sodium guide star adaptive optics system for astronomical imaging in the visible and near-infrared; high frame-rate, large field wavefront sensor; and resolution limits for ground-based astronomical imaging. Figs, tabs, refs.

  4. Data-Driven Optimal Control for Adaptive Optics

    Hinnen, K.J.G.

    2007-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is a technique to actively correct the wavefront distortions introduced in a light beam as it propagates through a turbulent medium. Nowadays, it is commonly applied in ground-based telescopes to counteract the devastating effect of atmospheric turbulence. This thesis focuses on

  5. New algorithms for adaptive optics point-spread function reconstruction

    Gendron, E; Fusco, T; Rousset, G; Gendron, Eric; Cl\\'{e}net, Yann; Fusco, Thierry

    2006-01-01

    Context. The knowledge of the point-spread function compensated by adaptive optics is of prime importance in several image restoration techniques such as deconvolution and astrometric/photometric algorithms. Wavefront-related data from the adaptive optics real-time computer can be used to accurately estimate the point-spread function in adaptive optics observations. The only point-spread function reconstruction algorithm implemented on astronomical adaptive optics system makes use of particular functions, named $U\\_{ij}$. These $U\\_{ij}$ functions are derived from the mirror modes, and their number is proportional to the square number of these mirror modes. Aims. We present here two new algorithms for point-spread function reconstruction that aim at suppressing the use of these $U\\_{ij}$ functions to avoid the storage of a large amount of data and to shorten the computation time of this PSF reconstruction. Methods. Both algorithms take advantage of the eigen decomposition of the residual parallel phase covari...

  6. On the influence of the Illuminati in astronomical adaptive optics

    Morzinski, Katie M.; Males, Jared R.

    2012-01-01

    Astronomical adaptive optics (AO) has come into its own. Major O/IR telescopes are achieving diffraction-limited imaging; major facilities are being built with AO as an integral part. To the layperson, it may seem that AO has developed along a serpentine path. However, with a little illumination, the mark of Galileo's heirs becomes apparent in explaining the success of AO.

  7. The AVES adaptive optics spectrograph for the VLT: status report

    Pallavicini, Roberto; Delabre, Bernard; Pasquini, Luca; Zerbi, Filippo M.; Bonanno, Giovanni; Comari, Maurizio; Conconi, Paolo; Mazzoleni, Ruben; Santin, Paolo; Damiani, Francesco; Di Marcantonio, Paolo; Franchini, Mariagrazia; Spano, Paolo; Bonifacio, P.; Catalano, Santo; Molaro, Paolo P.; Randich, S.; Rodono, Marcello

    2003-03-01

    We report on the status of AVES, the Adaptive-optics Visual Echelle Spectrograph proposed for the secondary port of the Nasmyth Adaptive Optics System (NAOS) recently installed at the VLT. AVES is an intermediate resolution (R ≍ 16,000) high-efficiency fixed- format echelle spectrograph which operates in the spectral band 500 - 1,000 nm. In addition to a high intrinsic efficiency, comparable to that of ESI at Keck II, it takes advantage of the adaptive optics correction provided by NAOS to reduce the sky and detector contribution in background-limited observations of weak sources, thus allowing a further magnitude gain with respect to comparable non-adaptive optics spectrographs. Simulations show that the instrument will be capable of reaching a magnitude V = 22.5 at S/N > 10 in two hours, two magnitudes weaker than GIRAFFE at the same resolution and 3 magnitudes weaker than the higher resolution UVES spectrograph. Imaging and coronographic functions have also been implemented in the design. We present the results of the final design study and we dicuss the technical and operational issues related to its implementation at the VLT as a visitor instrument. We also discuss the possibility of using a scaled-up non-adaptive optics version of the same design as an element of a double- or triple-arm intermediate-resolution spectrograph for the VLT. Such an option looks attractive in the context of a high-efficiency large-bandwidth (320 - 1,500 nm) spectrograph ("fast-shooter") being considered by ESO as a 2nd-generation VLT instrument.

  8. Adaptive wide-field optical tomography

    Venugopal, Vivek; Intes, Xavier

    2013-03-01

    We describe a wide-field optical tomography technique, which allows the measurement-guided optimization of illumination patterns for enhanced reconstruction performances. The iterative optimization of the excitation pattern aims at reducing the dynamic range in photons transmitted through biological tissue. It increases the number of measurements collected with high photon counts resulting in a dataset with improved tomographic information. Herein, this imaging technique is applied to time-resolved fluorescence molecular tomography for preclinical studies. First, the merit of this approach is tested by in silico studies in a synthetic small animal model for typical illumination patterns. Second, the applicability of this approach in tomographic imaging is validated in vitro using a small animal phantom with two fluorescent capillaries occluded by a highly absorbing inclusion. The simulation study demonstrates an improvement of signal transmitted (˜2 orders of magnitude) through the central portion of the small animal model for all patterns considered. A corresponding improvement in the signal at the emission wavelength by 1.6 orders of magnitude demonstrates the applicability of this technique for fluorescence molecular tomography. The successful discrimination and localization (˜1 mm error) of the two objects with higher resolution using the optimized patterns compared with nonoptimized illumination establishes the improvement in reconstruction performance when using this technique.

  9. Adaptive optics assisted Fourier domain OCT with balanced detection

    Meadway, A.; Bradu, A.; Hathaway, M.; Van der Jeught, S.; Rosen, R. B.; Podoleanu, A. Gh.

    2011-03-01

    Two factors are of importance to optical coherence tomography (OCT), resolution and sensitivity. Adaptive optics improves the resolution of a system by correcting for aberrations causing distortions in the wave-front. Balanced detection has been used in time domain OCT systems by removing excess photon noise, however it has not been used in Fourier domain systems, as the cameras used in the spectrometers saturated before excess photon noise becomes a problem. Advances in camera technology mean that this is no longer the case and balanced detection can now be used to improve the signal to noise ratio in a Fourier domain (FD) OCT system. An FD-OCT system, enhanced with adaptive optics, is presented and is used to show the improvement that balanced detection can provide. The signal to noise ratios of single camera detection and balanced detection are assessed and in-vivo retinal images are acquired to demonstrate better image quality when using balance detection.

  10. Modeling for deformable mirrors and the adaptive optics optimization program

    We discuss aspects of adaptive optics optimization for large fusion laser systems such as the 192-arm National Ignition Facility (NIF) at LLNL. By way of example, we considered the discrete actuator deformable mirror and Hartmann sensor system used on the Beamlet laser. Beamlet is a single-aperture prototype of the 11-0-5 slab amplifier design for NIF, and so we expect similar optical distortion levels and deformable mirror correction requirements. We are now in the process of developing a numerically efficient object oriented C++ language implementation of our adaptive optics and wavefront sensor code, but this code is not yet operational. Results are based instead on the prototype algorithms, coded-up in an interpreted array processing computer language

  11. Widefield scanning imaging with optical super-resolution

    Li, Yanghui; Shi, Zhaoyi; Shuai, Shaojie; Wang, Le

    2015-08-01

    An economical, pollution-free microsphere-based widefield scanning imaging method is presented. This system is able to visualize the surface pattern of the sample through a transparent dielectric microsphere stuck onto a glass probe. The microsphere endows the system with super-resolution capability, while the field of view can easily be expanded by scanning and image stitching. The feasibilities and advantages of this method have been verified experimentally.

  12. Adaptive AFM scan speed control for high aspect ratio fast structure tracking

    Ahmad, Ahmad; Schuh, Andreas; Rangelow, Ivo W. [Department of Microelectronic and Nanoelectronic Systems, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology Ilmenau University of Technology, Gustav-Kirchhoffstr. 1, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Improved imaging rates in Atomic Force Microscopes (AFM) are of high interest for disciplines such as life sciences and failure analysis of semiconductor wafers, where the sample topology shows high aspect ratios. Also, fast imaging is necessary to cover a large surface under investigation in reasonable times. Since AFMs are composed of mechanical components, they are associated with comparably low resonance frequencies that undermine the effort to increase the acquisition rates. In particular, high and steep structures are difficult to follow, which causes the cantilever to temporarily loose contact to or crash into the sample. Here, we report on a novel approach that does not affect the scanner dynamics, but adapts the lateral scanning speed of the scanner. The controller monitors the control error signal and, only when necessary, decreases the scan speed to allow the z-piezo more time to react to changes in the sample's topography. In this case, the overall imaging rate can be significantly increased, because a general scan speed trade-off decision is not needed and smooth areas are scanned fast. In contrast to methods trying to increase the z-piezo bandwidth, our method is a comparably simple approach that can be easily adapted to standard systems.

  13. Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics optical coherence tomography for in vivo retinal imaging in mice

    Jian, Yifan; Xu, Jing; Gradowski, Martin A.; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2014-01-01

    We present wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WSAO) Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) for in vivo small animal retinal imaging. WSAO is attractive especially for mouse retinal imaging because it simplifies optical design and eliminates the need for wavefront sensing, which is difficult in the small animal eye. GPU accelerated processing of the OCT data permitted real-time extraction of image quality metrics (intensity) for arbitrarily selected retinal layers to be optimi...

  14. Advances in optical CT scanning for gel dosimetry

    Jordan, K.

    2004-01-01

    Optical computed tomography (CT) is physically similar to x-ray CT but is more versatile since many powerful light sources exist and optical elements such as mirrors, lenses, polarizers and efficient detectors are available. There are many potential forms of optical CT. Attenuation, fluorescence or scatter, polarization and refractive index spatial changes are all examples of optical CT. To date, optical CT for gel dosimetry has been limited to attenuation measurements that are the sum of scatter and absorption along defined lines. Polymerization gels turn white with absorbed dose and attenuation is due to scatter. Radiochromic gels also form a dose image due to changes in visible absorption. This short review concentrates on the papers published since the DOSGEL 2001 meeting and highlights experimental results and issues that are important for obtaining good quality input data for reconstruction. The format involves selected highlights from the papers and associated points from our experience with optical CT experimentation. The comments are intended to assist researchers unfamiliar with optical measurements to obtain high quality transmission data, a necessary step in quantitative gel dosimetry.

  15. Optical System Design For High Speed Bar Code Scanning

    Hellekson, Ronald; Reddersen, Brad; Campbell, Scott

    1987-04-01

    Spectra-Physics recently introduced the Model 750 SL scanner for use in the European point-of-sale market, to meet the European requirement for a scanner of less than 13 cm height. The model 750 SL uses a higher density computer designed scan pattern with a retrodirective collection system to scan and detect UPC, EAN, and JAN bar codes. The scanner "reads" these bar codes in such a way that the user need not precisely align the bar code symbol with respect to the window in the scanner even at package speeds up to 100 inches per second. By using a unique geometrical arrangement of mirrors, a polygonal mirror assembly, and a custom-designed plastic bifocal lens, a design was developed to meet these requirements. This paper describes the design of this new low cost scanner, the use of computer-aided design in the development of this scanner, and some observations on the future of bar code scanning.

  16. A Guided Mode View on Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy Measurements of Optical Magnetic Fields with Slit Probes

    Stoffer, Remco; Hammer, Manfred; Ivanova, O. V.; Hoekstra, Hugo J.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Recent Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopy (NSOM) experiments with slit metal coated probes claim to measure the out-of-plane optical magnetic field around a dielectric sample waveguide [1]. The observations can also be explained by mode overlap calculations.

  17. Proton irradiation of liquid crystal based adaptive optical devices

    To assess its radiation hardness, a liquid crystal based adaptive optical element has been irradiated using a 60 MeV proton beam. The device with the functionality of an optical beam steerer was characterised before, during and after the irradiation. A systematic set of measurements on the transmission and beam deflection angles was carried out. The measurements showed that the transmission decreased only marginally and that its optical performance degraded only after a very high proton fluence (1010p/cm2). The device showed complete annealing in the functionality as a beam steerer, which leads to the conclusion that the liquid crystal technology for optical devices is not vulnerable to proton irradiation as expected in space.

  18. Infinite impulse response modal filtering in visible adaptive optics

    Agapito, G; Quirós-Pacheco, F; Puglisi, A; Esposito, S

    2012-01-01

    Diffraction limited resolution adaptive optics (AO) correction in visible wavelengths requires a high performance control. In this paper we investigate infinite impulse response filters that optimize the wavefront correction: we tested these algorithms through full numerical simulations of a single-conjugate AO system comprising an adaptive secondary mirror with 1127 actuators and a pyramid wavefront sensor (WFS). The actual practicability of the algorithms depends on both robustness and knowledge of the real system: errors in the system model may even worsen the performance. In particular we checked the robustness of the algorithms in different conditions, proving that the proposed method can reject both disturbance and calibration errors.

  19. Infinite impulse response modal filtering in visible adaptive optics

    Agapito, G.; Arcidiacono, C.; Quirós-Pacheco, F.; Puglisi, A.; Esposito, S.

    2012-07-01

    Diffraction limited resolution adaptive optics (AO) correction in visible wavelengths requires a high performance control. In this paper we investigate infinite impulse response filters that optimize the wavefront correction: we tested these algorithms through full numerical simulations of a single-conjugate AO system comprising an adaptive secondary mirror with 1127 actuators and a pyramid wavefront sensor (WFS). The actual practicability of the algorithms depends on both robustness and knowledge of the real system: errors in the system model may even worsen the performance. In particular we checked the robustness of the algorithms in different conditions, proving that the proposed method can reject both disturbance and calibration errors.

  20. Fast calibration of high-order adaptive optics systems

    Kasper, Markus; Fedrigo, Enrico; Looze, Douglas P.; Bonnet, Henri; Ivanescu, Liviu; Oberti, Sylvain

    2004-06-01

    We present a new method of calibrating adaptive optics systems that greatly reduces the required calibration time or, equivalently, improves the signal-to-noise ratio. The method uses an optimized actuation scheme with Hadamard patterns and does not scale with the number of actuators for a given noise level in the wave-front sensor channels. It is therefore highly desirable for high-order systems and/or adaptive secondary systems on a telescope without a Gregorian focal plane. In the latter case, the measurement noise is increased by the effects of the turbulent atmosphere when one is calibrating on a natural guide star.

  1. Genomewide scan for adaptive differentiation along altitudinal gradient in the Andrew's toad Bufo andrewsi.

    Guo, Baocheng; Lu, Di; Liao, Wen Bo; Merilä, Juha

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies of humans, dogs and rodents have started to discover the genetic underpinnings of high altitude adaptations, yet amphibians have received little attention in this respect. To identify possible signatures of adaptation to altitude, we performed a genome scan of 15 557 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) obtained with restriction site-associated DNA sequencing of pooled samples from 11 populations of Andrew's toad (Bufo andrewsi) from the edge of the Tibetan Plateau, spanning an altitudinal gradient from 1690 to 2768 m.a.s.l. We discovered significant geographic differentiation among all sites, with an average FST   = 0.023 across all SNPs. Apart from clear patterns of isolation by distance, we discovered numerous outlier SNPs showing strong associations with variation in altitude (1394 SNPs), average annual temperature (1859 SNPs) or both (1051 SNPs). Levels and patterns of genetic differentiation in these SNPs were consistent with the hypothesis that they have been subject to directional selection and reflect adaptation to altitudinal variation among the study sites. Genes with footprints of selection were significantly enriched in binding and metabolic processes. Several genes potentially related to high altitude adaptation were identified, although the identity and functional significance of most genomic targets of selection remain unknown. In general, the results provide genomic support for results of earlier common garden and low coverage genetic studies that have uncovered substantial adaptive differentiation along altitudinal and latitudinal gradients in amphibians. PMID:27289071

  2. Algorithm for localized adaptive diffuse optical tomography and its application in bioluminescence tomography

    Naser, Mohamed A.; Patterson, Michael S.; Wong, John W.

    2014-04-01

    A reconstruction algorithm for diffuse optical tomography based on diffusion theory and finite element method is described. The algorithm reconstructs the optical properties in a permissible domain or region-of-interest to reduce the number of unknowns. The algorithm can be used to reconstruct optical properties for a segmented object (where a CT-scan or MRI is available) or a non-segmented object. For the latter, an adaptive segmentation algorithm merges contiguous regions with similar optical properties thereby reducing the number of unknowns. In calculating the Jacobian matrix the algorithm uses an efficient direct method so the required time is comparable to that needed for a single forward calculation. The reconstructed optical properties using segmented, non-segmented, and adaptively segmented 3D mouse anatomy (MOBY) are used to perform bioluminescence tomography (BLT) for two simulated internal sources. The BLT results suggest that the accuracy of reconstruction of total source power obtained without the segmentation provided by an auxiliary imaging method such as x-ray CT is comparable to that obtained when using perfect segmentation.

  3. Algorithm for localized adaptive diffuse optical tomography and its application in bioluminescence tomography

    A reconstruction algorithm for diffuse optical tomography based on diffusion theory and finite element method is described. The algorithm reconstructs the optical properties in a permissible domain or region-of-interest to reduce the number of unknowns. The algorithm can be used to reconstruct optical properties for a segmented object (where a CT-scan or MRI is available) or a non-segmented object. For the latter, an adaptive segmentation algorithm merges contiguous regions with similar optical properties thereby reducing the number of unknowns. In calculating the Jacobian matrix the algorithm uses an efficient direct method so the required time is comparable to that needed for a single forward calculation. The reconstructed optical properties using segmented, non-segmented, and adaptively segmented 3D mouse anatomy (MOBY) are used to perform bioluminescence tomography (BLT) for two simulated internal sources. The BLT results suggest that the accuracy of reconstruction of total source power obtained without the segmentation provided by an auxiliary imaging method such as x-ray CT is comparable to that obtained when using perfect segmentation. (paper)

  4. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes detected by near-field scanning optical microscopy

    Moers, M.H.P.; Kalle, W.H.J.; Ruiter, A.G.T.; Wiegant, J.C.A.G.; Raap, A.K.; Greve, J.; Grooth, de B.G.; Hulst, van N.F.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization o­n human metaphase chromosomes is detected by near-field scanning optical microscopy. This combination of cytochemical and scanning probe techniques enables the localization and identification of several fluorescently labelled genomic DNA fragments o­n a single ch

  5. Scanning probe and optical tweezer investigations of biomolecular interactions

    Rigby-Singleton, Shellie

    2002-07-01

    A complex array of intermolecular forces controls the interactions between and within biological molecules. The desire to empirically explore the fundamental forces has led to the development of several biophysical techniques. Of these, the atomic force microscope (AFM) and the optical tweezers have been employed throughout this thesis to monitor the intermolecular forces involved in biomolecular interactions. The AFM is a well-established force sensing technique capable of measuring biomolecular interactions at a single molecule level. However, its versatility has not been extrapolated to the investigation of a drug-enzyme complex. The energy landscape for the force induced dissociation of the DHFR-methotrexate complex was studied. Revealing an energy barrier to dissociation located {approx}0.3 nm from the bound state. Unfortunately, the AFM has a limited range of accessible loading rates and in order to profile the complete energy landscape alternative force sensing instrumentation should be considered, for example the BFP and optical tweezers. Thus, this thesis outlines the development and construction an optical trap capable of measuring intermolecular forces between biomolecules at the single molecule level. To demonstrate the force sensing abilities of the optical set up, proof of principle measurements were performed which investigate the interactions between proteins and polymer surfaces subjected to varying degrees of argon plasma treatment. Complementary data was gained from measurements performed independently by the AFM. Changes in polymer resistance to proteins as a response to changes in polymer surface chemistry were detected utilising both AFM and optical tweezers measurements. Finally, the AFM and optical tweezers were employed as ultrasensitive biosensors. Single molecule investigations of the antibody-antigen interaction between the cardiac troponin I marker and its complementary antibody, reveals the impact therapeutic concentrations of heparin

  6. Spot Weight Adaptation for Moving Target in Spot Scanning Proton Therapy

    Paul eMorel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study describes a real-time spot weight adaptation method in spot-scanning proton therapy for moving target or moving patient, so that the resultant dose distribution closely matches the planned dose distribution. Materials and Methods: The method proposed in this study adapts the weight (MU of the delivering pencil beam to that of the target spot it will actually hit during patient/target motion. The target spot a certain delivering pencil beam may hit relies on patient monitoring and/or motion modeling using four-dimensional (4D CT. After the adapted delivery, the required total weight (MU for this target spot is then subtracted from the planned value. With continuous patient motion and continuous spot scanning, the planned doses to all target spots will eventually be all fulfilled. In a proof-of-principle test, a lung case was presented with realistic temporal and motion parameters; the resultant dose distribution using spot weight adaptation was compared to that without using this method. The impact of the real-time patient/target position tracking or prediction was also investigated.Results: For moderate motion (i.e., mean amplitude 0.5 cm, D95% to the planning target volume (PTV was only 81.5% of the prescription (RX dose; with spot weight adaptation PTV D95% achieves 97.7%RX. For large motion amplitude (i.e., 1.5 cm, without spot weight adaptation PTV D95% is only 42.9% of RX; with spot weight adaptation, PTV D95% achieves 97.7%RX. Larger errors in patient/target position tracking or prediction led to worse final target coverage; an error of 3mm or smaller in patient/target position tracking is preferred. Conclusion: The proposed spot weight adaptation method was able to deliver the planned dose distribution and maintain target coverage when patient motion was involved. The successful implementation of this method would rely on accurate monitoring or prediction of patient/target motion.

  7. Adaptive circle-ellipse fitting method for estimating tree diameter based on single terrestrial laser scanning

    Bu, Guochao; Wang, Pei

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) has been used to extract accurate forest biophysical parameters for inventory purposes. The diameter at breast height (DBH) is a key parameter for individual trees because it has the potential for modeling the height, volume, biomass, and carbon sequestration potential of the tree based on empirical allometric scaling equations. In order to extract the DBH from the single-scan data of TLS automatically and accurately within a certain range, we proposed an adaptive circle-ellipse fitting method based on the point cloud transect. This proposed method can correct the error caused by the simple circle fitting method when a tree is slanted. A slanted tree was detected by the circle-ellipse fitting analysis, then the corresponding slant angle was found based on the ellipse fitting result. With this information, the DBH of the trees could be recalculated based on reslicing the point cloud data at breast height. Artificial stem data simulated by a cylindrical model of leaning trees and the scanning data acquired with the RIEGL VZ-400 were used to test the proposed adaptive fitting method. The results shown that the proposed method can detect the trees and accurately estimate the DBH for leaning trees.

  8. Adaptive Data Rates for Flexible Transceivers in Optical Networks

    Brian Thomas Teipen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Efforts towards commercializing higher-speed optical transmission have demonstrated the need for advanced modulation formats, several of which require similar transceiver hardware architecture. Adaptive transceivers can be built to have a number of possible operational configurations selected by software. Such software-defined transceiver configurations can create specific modulation formats to support sets of data rates, corresponding tolerances to system impairments, and sets of electronic digital signal processing schemes chosen to best function in a given network environment. In this paper, we discuss possibilities and advantages of reconfigurable, bit-rate flexible transceivers, and their potential applications in future optical networks.

  9. Adaptive optics for control of the laser welding process

    Jedlička Petr; Řeřucha Šimon; Šarbort Martin; Mrňa Libor

    2013-01-01

    The laser head with fixed focus optics is commonly used for the deep penetration laser welding. In such case the geometry and position of the beam waist are defined by the focusing lens. If the laser beam incident on the focusing lens is not well collimated but divergent and its divergence can be varied by proper adaptive optical elements, then also the geometry and position of the focus will be changeable. In this way it is possible to affect the energy coupling from the laser beam to t...

  10. Adaptive optics for improved retinal surgery and diagnostics

    Humayun, M S; Sadda, S R; Thompson, C A; Olivier, S S; Kartz, M W

    2000-08-21

    It is now possible to field a compact adaptive optics (AO) system on a surgical microscope for use in retinal diagnostics and surgery. Recent developments in integrated circuit technology and optical photonics have led to the capability of building an AO system that is compact and significantly less expensive than traditional AO systems. It is foreseen that such an AO system can be integrated into a surgical microscope while maintaining a package size of a lunchbox. A prototype device can be developed in a manner that lends itself well to large-scale manufacturing.

  11. Laser Tomography Adaptive Optics (LTAO): A performance study

    Tatulli, E

    2013-01-01

    We present an analytical derivation of the on-axis performance of Adaptive Optics systems using a given number of guide stars of arbitrary altitude, distributed at arbitrary angular positions in the sky. The expressions of the residual error are given for cases of both continuous and discrete turbulent atmospheric profiles. Assuming Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing with circular apertures, we demonstrate that the error is formally described by integrals of products of three Bessel functions. We compare the performance of Adaptive Optics correction when using natural, Sodium or Rayleigh laser guide stars. For small diameter class telescopes (~5m), we show that a few number of Rayleigh beacons can provide similar performance to that of a single Sodium laser, for a lower overall cost of the instrument. For bigger apertures, using Rayleigh stars may not be such a suitable alternative because of the too severe cone effect that drastically degrades the quality of the correction.

  12. Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics without Tip-tilt

    Davies, R; Lidman, C; Louarn, M Le; Kasper, M; Förster-Schreiber, N M; Roccatagliata, V; Ageorges, N; Amico, P; Dumas, C; Mannucci, F

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) systems allow a telescope to reach its diffraction limit at near infrared wavelengths. But to achieve this, a bright natural guide star (NGS) is needed for the wavefront sensing, severely limiting the fraction of the sky over which AO can be used. To some extent this can be overcome with a laser guide star (LGS). While the laser can be pointed anywhere in the sky, one still needs to have a natural star, albeit fainter, reasonably close to correct the image motion (tip-tilt) to which laser guide stars are insensitive. There are in fact many astronomical targets without suitable tip-tilt stars, but for which the enhanced resolution obtained with the Laser Guide Star Facility (LGSF) would still be very beneficial. This article explores what adaptive optics performance one might expect if one dispenses with the tip-tilt star, and in what situations this mode of observing might be needed.

  13. Neptune and Titan Observed with Keck Telescope Adaptive Optics

    Max, C.E.; Macintosh, B.A.; Gibbard, S.; Gavel, D.T.; Roe, H.; De Pater, I.; Ghez, A.M.; Acton, S.; Wizinowich, P.L.; Lai, O.

    2000-05-05

    The authors report on observations taken during engineering science validation time using the new adaptive optics system at the 10-m Keck II Telescope. They observe Neptune and Titan at near-infrared wavelengths. These objects are ideal for adaptive optics imaging because they are bright and small, yet have many diffraction-limited resolution elements across their disks. In addition Neptune and Titan have prominent physical features, some of which change markedly with time. They have observed infrared-bright storms on Neptune, and very low-albedo surface regions on Titan, Saturn's largest moon, Spatial resolution on Neptune and Titan was 0.05-0.06 and 0.04-0.05 arc sec, respectively.

  14. Adaptation technology between IP layer and optical layer in optical Internet

    Ji, Yuefeng; Li, Hua; Sun, Yongmei

    2001-10-01

    Wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) optical network provides a platform with high bandwidth capacity and is supposed to be the backbone infrastructure supporting the next-generation high-speed multi-service networks (ATM, IP, etc.). In the foreseeable future, IP will be the predominant data traffic, to make fully use of the bandwidth of the WDM optical network, many attentions have been focused on IP over WDM, which has been proposed as the most promising technology for new kind of network, so-called Optical Internet. According to OSI model, IP is in the 3rd layer (network layer) and optical network is in the 1st layer (physical layer), so the key issue is what adaptation technology should be used in the 2nd layer (data link layer). In this paper, firstly, we analyze and compare the current adaptation technologies used in backbone network nowadays. Secondly, aiming at the drawbacks of above technologies, we present a novel adaptation protocol (DONA) between IP layer and optical layer in Optical Internet and describe it in details. Thirdly, the gigabit transmission adapter (GTA) we accomplished based on the novel protocol is described. Finally, we set up an experiment platform to apply and verify the DONA and GTA, the results and conclusions of the experiment are given.

  15. Second-harmonic scanning optical microscopy of semiconductor quantum dots

    Vohnsen, B.; Bozhevolnyi, S.I.; Pedersen, K.; Østergaard, John Erland; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    transmission mode. In both cases the SH signal peaks at a pump wavelength of similar to 885 nm in correspondence to the maximum in the photoluminescence spectrum of the QD sample. SH near-field optical images exhibit spatial signal variations on a subwavelength scale that depend on the pump wavelength. We...

  16. Second-harmonic scanning optical microscopy of semiconductor quantum dots

    Vohnsen, B.; Bozhevolnyi, S.I.; Pedersen, K.;

    2001-01-01

    transmission mode. In both cases the SH signal peaks at a pump wavelength of similar to 885 nm in correspondence to the maximum in the photoluminescence spectrum of the QD sample. SH near-field optical images exhibit spatial signal variations on a subwavelength scale that depend on the pump wavelength. We...

  17. Performance of a MEMS-base Adaptive Optics Optical Coherency Tomography System

    Evans, J; Zadwadzki, R J; Jones, S; Olivier, S; Opkpodu, S; Werner, J S

    2008-01-16

    We have demonstrated that a microelectrical mechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror can be flattened to < 1 nm RMS within controllable spatial frequencies over a 9.2-mm aperture making it a viable option for high-contrast adaptive optics systems (also known as Extreme Adaptive Optics). The Extreme Adaptive Optics Testbed at UC Santa Cruz is being used to investigate and develop technologies for high-contrast imaging, especially wavefront control. A phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) measures wavefront errors with sub-nm precision and accuracy for metrology and wavefront control. Consistent flattening, required testing and characterization of the individual actuator response, including the effects of dead and low-response actuators. Stability and repeatability of the MEMS devices was also tested. An error budget for MEMS closed loop performance will summarize MEMS characterization.

  18. Light propagation studies on laser modified waveguides using scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Borrise, X.; Berini, Abadal Gabriel; Jimenez, D.; Perez-Murano, F.; Barniol, N.; Davis, Zachary James; Boisen, Anja

    2001-01-01

    By means of direct laser writing on Al, a new method to locally modify optical waveguides is proposed. This technique has been applied to silicon nitride waveguides, allowing modifications of the optical propagation along the guide. To study the formed structures, a scanning near-held optical...... microscope (SNOM) has been used. The laser modifications locally changes the optical properties of the waveguide. The change in the effective refractive index is attributed to a TE to TM mode conversion, Thus, the laser modification might be a new way to fabricate optical mode converters....

  19. A hybrid scanning probe microscope (SPM) module based on a DVD optical head

    The development of a highly sensitive (sub-nanometer) and multi-platform scanning probe microscope (SPM) module is presented. The module is based on an optical DVD pick-up head and uses its astigmatic detection scheme to detect the vertical displacement of the SPM cantilevers. The complete hybrid SPM module is capable of scanning in SPM intermittent contact, SPM contact and optical profilometry modes. The module can be used in a modified optical microscope or be implemented in a stand-alone system. Measurement results prove that the mechanical stability of this SPM module is high enough for atomic resolution imaging. Both scanning-sample and scanning-probe-type SPM setups have been tested based on this SPM module. The noise level and drift rate in the z-direction of the stand-alone system are 10 pm (rms) and 0.2 nm min−1, respectively

  20. Picosecond optical nonlinearities in symmetrical and unsymmetrical phthalocyanines studied using the Z-scan technique

    S Venugopal Rao; P T Anusha; L Giribabu; Surya P Tewari

    2010-11-01

    We present our experimental results on the picosecond nonlinear optical (NLO) studies of symmetrical and unsymmetrical phthalocyanines, examined using the Z-scan technique. Both the open-aperture and closed-aperture Z-scan curves for three samples were recorded and the nonlinear coefficients were extracted from the theoretical fits. The nonlinear absorption/refraction contribution from the solvent was also identified. The observed open aperture behaviour for these molecules is understood in terms of the absorption coefficients of these molecules near 800 nm and the peak intensities used. It is established that these phthalocyanines exhibit large optical nonlinearities and, hence, are suitable for optical limiting applications.

  1. Light amplification by stimulated emission from an optically pumped molecular junction in a scanning tunneling microscope

    Braun, K; Kern, A. M.; X. Wang; Adler, H.; Peisert, H.; Chasse, T.; Zhang, D.(Department of Physics, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, United States of America); Meixner, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we introduce and experimentally demonstrate optical amplification and stimulated emission from a single optically pumped molecular tunneling junction of a scanning tunneling microscope. The gap between a sharp gold tip and a flat gold substrate covered with a self-assembled monolayer of 5-chloro-2-mercaptobenzothiazole molecules forms an extremely small optical gain medium. When electrons tunnel from the molecules highest occupied molecular orbital to the tip, holes are left behind. The...

  2. Lens-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics swept source OCT.

    Jian, Yifan; Lee, Sujin; Ju, Myeong Jin; Heisler, Morgan; Ding, Weiguang; Zawadzki, Robert J; Bonora, Stefano; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has revolutionized modern ophthalmology, providing depth resolved images of the retinal layers in a system that is suited to a clinical environment. Although the axial resolution of OCT system, which is a function of the light source bandwidth, is sufficient to resolve retinal features at a micrometer scale, the lateral resolution is dependent on the delivery optics and is limited by ocular aberrations. Through the combination of wavefront sensorless adaptive optics and the use of dual deformable transmissive optical elements, we present a compact lens-based OCT system at an imaging wavelength of 1060 nm for high resolution retinal imaging. We utilized a commercially available variable focal length lens to correct for a wide range of defocus commonly found in patient's eyes, and a novel multi-actuator adaptive lens for aberration correction to achieve near diffraction limited imaging performance at the retina. With a parallel processing computational platform, high resolution cross-sectional and en face retinal image acquisition and display was performed in real time. In order to demonstrate the system functionality and clinical utility, we present images of the photoreceptor cone mosaic and other retinal layers acquired in vivo from research subjects. PMID:27278853

  3. Holographic Adaptive Laser Optics System (HALOS): Fast, Autonomous Aberration Correction

    Andersen, G.; MacDonald, K.; Gelsinger-Austin, P.

    2013-09-01

    We present an adaptive optics system which uses a multiplexed hologram to deconvolve the phase aberrations in an input beam. This wavefront characterization is extremely fast as it is based on simple measurements of the intensity of focal spots and does not require any computations. Furthermore, the system does not require a computer in the loop and is thus much cheaper, less complex and more robust as well. A fully functional, closed-loop prototype incorporating a 32-element MEMS mirror has been constructed. The unit has a footprint no larger than a laptop but runs at a bandwidth of 100kHz over an order of magnitude faster than comparable, conventional systems occupying a significantly larger volume. Additionally, since the sensing is based on parallel, all-optical processing, the speed is independent of actuator number running at the same bandwidth for one actuator as for a million. We are developing the HALOS technology with a view towards next-generation surveillance systems for extreme adaptive optics applications. These include imaging, lidar and free-space optical communications for unmanned aerial vehicles and SSA. The small volume is ideal for UAVs, while the high speed and high resolution will be of great benefit to the ground-based observation of space-based objects.

  4. Lens-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics swept source OCT

    Jian, Yifan; Lee, Sujin; Ju, Myeong Jin; Heisler, Morgan; Ding, Weiguang; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Bonora, Stefano; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has revolutionized modern ophthalmology, providing depth resolved images of the retinal layers in a system that is suited to a clinical environment. Although the axial resolution of OCT system, which is a function of the light source bandwidth, is sufficient to resolve retinal features at a micrometer scale, the lateral resolution is dependent on the delivery optics and is limited by ocular aberrations. Through the combination of wavefront sensorless adaptive optics and the use of dual deformable transmissive optical elements, we present a compact lens-based OCT system at an imaging wavelength of 1060 nm for high resolution retinal imaging. We utilized a commercially available variable focal length lens to correct for a wide range of defocus commonly found in patient’s eyes, and a novel multi-actuator adaptive lens for aberration correction to achieve near diffraction limited imaging performance at the retina. With a parallel processing computational platform, high resolution cross-sectional and en face retinal image acquisition and display was performed in real time. In order to demonstrate the system functionality and clinical utility, we present images of the photoreceptor cone mosaic and other retinal layers acquired in vivo from research subjects.

  5. Possibilities of joint application of adaptive optics technique and nonlinear optical phase conjugation to compensate for turbulent distortions

    Lukin, V. P.; Kanev, F. Yu; Kulagin, O. V.

    2016-05-01

    The efficiency of integrating the nonlinear optical technique based on forming a reverse wavefront and the conventional adaptive optics into a unified complex (for example, for adaptive focusing of quasi-cw laser radiation) is demonstrated. Nonlinear optical phase conjugation may provide more exact information about the phase fluctuations in the corrected wavefront in comparison with the adaptive optics methods. At the same time, the conventional methods of adaptive optics provide an efficient control of a laser beam projected onto a target for a rather long time.

  6. Thermally tuneable optical modulator adapted for differential signaling

    Zortman, William A.

    2016-01-12

    An apparatus for optical modulation is provided. The apparatus includes a modulator structure and a heater structure. The modulator structure comprises a ring or disk optical resonator having a closed curvilinear periphery and a pair of oppositely doped semiconductor regions within and/or adjacent to the optical resonator and conformed to modify the optical length of the optical resonator upon application of a bias voltage. The heater structure comprises a relatively resistive annulus of semiconductor material enclosed between an inner disk and an outer annulus of relatively conductive semiconductor material. The inner disk and the outer annulus are adapted as contact regions for a heater activation current. The heater structure is situated within the periphery of the optical resonator such that in operation, at least a portion of the resonator is heated by radial conductive heat flow from the heater structure. The apparatus further includes a substantially annular isolation region of dielectric or relatively resistive semiconductor material interposed between the heater structure and the modulator structure. The isolation region is effective to electrically isolate the bias voltage from the heater activation current.

  7. Dual wavelength optical CT scanning of anthropomorphic shaped 3D dosimeters

    To create an optical density map of 3D dosimeter phantoms, the ratio of the transmission profile (either a line or planar) acquired after irradiation of the dosimeter and a pre-irradiation reference scan of the same dosimeter phantom is taken. Any uncertainty in repositioning of the phantom may result in an uncertainty in the optical density map and finally also in the derived dose maps. Correct repositioning is paramount when scanning noncylindrical dosimeter phantoms as any repositioning error will give rise to severe imaging artifacts. We hereby propose a different scanning technique that does not require any repositioning of the dosimeter phantom. In this method, no pre-irradiation san is recorded but the dosimeter phantom is scanned twice with light at two different wavelengths. It is demonstrated that this method is accurate in scanning non-cylindrical anthropomorphic shaped phantoms

  8. Manufacturing of glassy thin shell for adaptive optics: results achieved

    Poutriquet, F.; Rinchet, A.; Carel, J.-L.; Leplan, H.; Ruch, E.; Geyl, R.; Marque, G.

    2012-07-01

    Glassy thin shells are key components for the development of adaptive optics and are part of future & innovative projects such as ELT. However, manufacturing thin shells is a real challenge. Even though optical requirements for the front face - or optical face - are relaxed compared to conventional passive mirrors, requirements concerning thickness uniformity are difficult to achieve. In addition, process has to be completely re-defined as thin mirror generates new manufacturing issues. In particular, scratches and digs requirement is more difficult as this could weaken the shell, handling is also an important issue due to the fragility of the mirror. Sagem, through REOSC program, has recently manufactured different types of thin shells in the frame of European projects: E-ELT M4 prototypes and VLT Deformable Secondary Mirror (VLT DSM).

  9. Scanning optical pyrometer for measuring temperatures in hollow cathodes

    Polk, J. E.; Marrese-Reading, C. M.; Thornber, B.; Dang, L.; Johnson, L. K.; Katz, I

    2007-01-01

    Life-limiting processes in hollow cathodes are determined largely by the temperature of the electron emitter. To support cathode life assessment, a noncontact temperature measurement technique which employs a stepper motor-driven fiber optic probe was developed. The probe is driven inside the hollow cathode and collects light radiated by the hot interior surface of the emitter. Ratio pyrometry is used to determine the axial temperature profile. Thermocouples on the orifice plate provide measu...

  10. Stochastic scanning method to shorten acquisition time using liquid crystal optical phased array

    Wang, Xiangru; Huang, Ziqiang; Tan, Qinggui; Kong, Lingjiang; Qiu, Qi

    2016-02-01

    Agile beam steering has been previously reported to be one of the unique properties of a liquid crystal optical phased array. We propose a stochastic scanning method using the property of agile beam steering to shorten acquisition time in building a free-space laser communication link. As a specific example, Gaussian stochastic scan enables higher acquisition probability and shorter acquisition time. In addition, there are two factors to influence the results: standard deviation of stochastic scanning angle and the width of the laser beam. Theoretical analysis is presented that the stochastic scanning method is a unique method to speed up the acquisition process in free-space laser communication.

  11. Confocal scanning optical microscopy of a 3-million-year-old Australopithecus afarensis femur.

    Bromage, T G; Goldman, H M; McFarlin, S C; Perez Ochoa, A; Boyde, A

    2009-01-01

    Portable confocal scanning optical microscopy (PCSOM) has been specifically developed for the noncontact and nondestructive imaging of early human fossil hard tissues, which here we describe and apply to a 3-million-year-old femur from the celebrated Ethiopian skeleton, "Lucy," referred to Australopithecus afarensis. We examine two bone tissue parameters that demonstrate the potential of this technology. First, subsurface reflection images from intact bone reveal bone cell spaces, the osteocyte lacunae, whose density is demonstrated to scale negatively with body size, reflecting aspects of metabolism and organismal life history. Second, images of a naturally fractured cross section near to Lucy's femoral mid-shaft, which match in sign those of transmitted circularly polarized light, reveal relative collagen fiber orientation patterns that are an important indicator of femoral biomechanical efficacy. Preliminary results indicate that Lucy was characterized by metabolic constraints typical for a primate her body size and that in her femur she was adapted to habitual bipedalism. Limitations imposed by the transport and invasive histology of unique or rare fossils motivated development of the PCSOM so that specimens may be examined wherever and whenever nondestructive imaging is required. PMID:19191265

  12. Computational adaptive optics for broadband optical interferometric tomography of biological tissue

    Boppart, Stephen A.

    2015-03-01

    High-resolution real-time tomography of biological tissues is important for many areas of biological investigations and medical applications. Cellular level optical tomography, however, has been challenging because of the compromise between transverse imaging resolution and depth-of-field, the system and sample aberrations that may be present, and the low imaging sensitivity deep in scattering tissues. The use of computed optical imaging techniques has the potential to address several of these long-standing limitations and challenges. Two related techniques are interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) and computational adaptive optics (CAO). Through three-dimensional Fourierdomain resampling, in combination with high-speed OCT, ISAM can be used to achieve high-resolution in vivo tomography with enhanced depth sensitivity over a depth-of-field extended by more than an order-of-magnitude, in realtime. Subsequently, aberration correction with CAO can be performed in a tomogram, rather than to the optical beam of a broadband optical interferometry system. Based on principles of Fourier optics, aberration correction with CAO is performed on a virtual pupil using Zernike polynomials, offering the potential to augment or even replace the more complicated and expensive adaptive optics hardware with algorithms implemented on a standard desktop computer. Interferometric tomographic reconstructions are characterized with tissue phantoms containing sub-resolution scattering particles, and in both ex vivo and in vivo biological tissue. This review will collectively establish the foundation for high-speed volumetric cellular-level optical interferometric tomography in living tissues.

  13. Nonlinear Optical Interactions in Bacteriorhodopsin Using Z-Scan

    Aranda, Francisco J.; Rao, Devulapalli V. G. L. N.; Wong, Chi L.; Zhou, Ping; Chen, Zhong; Akkara, Joseph A.; Kaplan, David L.; Roach, Joseph F.

    1995-06-01

    Nonlinear refractive index coefficient n2 of bacteriorhodopsin suspensions in water is measured by the Z-scan technique with a low power continuous wave laser at 647.1 manometer wavelength. Our results indicate that both the magnitude and the sign of n2 depend strongly on the light intensity. Negative values for n2 are obtained for on axis laser irradiance at the focus above 3 W/cm2. The observed self-defocusing phenomena can be attributed to the index change due to the light induced transition between the photochromic states. The results elucidate the origin of n2 and offer a plausible explanation for the differences in the reported n2 measurements.

  14. Images of photoreceptors in living primate eyes using adaptive optics two-photon ophthalmoscopy.

    Hunter, Jennifer J; Masella, Benjamin; Dubra, Alfredo; Sharma, Robin; Yin, Lu; Merigan, William H; Palczewska, Grazyna; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Williams, David R

    2010-01-01

    In vivo two-photon imaging through the pupil of the primate eye has the potential to become a useful tool for functional imaging of the retina. Two-photon excited fluorescence images of the macaque cone mosaic were obtained using a fluorescence adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope, overcoming the challenges of a low numerical aperture, imperfect optics of the eye, high required light levels, and eye motion. Although the specific fluorophores are as yet unknown, strong in vivo intrinsic fluorescence allowed images of the cone mosaic. Imaging intact ex vivo retina revealed that the strongest two-photon excited fluorescence signal comes from the cone inner segments. The fluorescence response increased following light stimulation, which could provide a functional measure of the effects of light on photoreceptors. PMID:21326644

  15. Adapting smartphones for low-cost optical medical imaging

    Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Vollet-Filho, José D.; Carbinatto, Fernanda M.; Blanco, Kate; Inada, Natalia M.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Kurachi, Cristina

    2015-06-01

    Optical images have been used in several medical situations to improve diagnosis of lesions or to monitor treatments. However, most systems employ expensive scientific (CCD or CMOS) cameras and need computers to display and save the images, usually resulting in a high final cost for the system. Additionally, this sort of apparatus operation usually becomes more complex, requiring more and more specialized technical knowledge from the operator. Currently, the number of people using smartphone-like devices with built-in high quality cameras is increasing, which might allow using such devices as an efficient, lower cost, portable imaging system for medical applications. Thus, we aim to develop methods of adaptation of those devices to optical medical imaging techniques, such as fluorescence. Particularly, smartphones covers were adapted to connect a smartphone-like device to widefield fluorescence imaging systems. These systems were used to detect lesions in different tissues, such as cervix and mouth/throat mucosa, and to monitor ALA-induced protoporphyrin-IX formation for photodynamic treatment of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia. This approach may contribute significantly to low-cost, portable and simple clinical optical imaging collection.

  16. Beam shaping for laser-based adaptive optics in astronomy

    Béchet, Clémentine; Neichel, Benoit; Fesquet, Vincent; González-Núñez, Héctor; Zúñiga, Sebastián; Escarate, Pedro; Guzman, Dani

    2014-01-01

    The availability and performance of laser-based adaptive optics (AO) systems are strongly dependent on the power and quality of the laser beam before being projected to the sky. Frequent and time-consuming alignment procedures are usually required in the laser systems with free-space optics to optimize the beam. Despite these procedures, significant distortions of the laser beam have been observed during the first two years of operation of the Gemini South multi-conjugate adaptive optics system (GeMS). A beam shaping concept with two deformable mirrors is investigated in order to provide automated optimization of the laser quality for astronomical AO. This study aims at demonstrating the correction of quasi-static aberrations of the laser, in both amplitude and phase, testing a prototype of this two-deformable mirror concept on GeMS. The paper presents the results of the preparatory study before the experimental phase. An algorithm to control amplitude and phase correction, based on phase retrieval techniques...

  17. Extreme Adaptive Optics Testbed: Results and Future Work

    Evans, J W; Sommargren, G; Poyneer, L; Macintosh, B; Severson, S; Dillon, D; Sheinis, A; Palmer, D; Kasdin, J; Olivier, S

    2004-07-15

    'Extreme' adaptive optics systems are optimized for ultra-high-contrast applications, such as ground-based extrasolar planet detection. The Extreme Adaptive Optics Testbed at UC Santa Cruz is being used to investigate and develop technologies for high-contrast imaging, especially wavefront control. A simple optical design allows us to minimize wavefront error and maximize the experimentally achievable contrast before progressing to a more complex set-up. A phase shifting diffraction interferometer is used to measure wavefront errors with sub-nm precision and accuracy. We have demonstrated RMS wavefront errors of <1.3 nm and a contrast of >10{sup -7} over a substantial region using a shaped pupil. Current work includes the installation and characterization of a 1024-actuator Micro-Electro-Mechanical- Systems (MEMS) deformable mirror, manufactured by Boston Micro-Machines, which will be used for wavefront control. In our initial experiments we can flatten the deformable mirror to 1.8-nm RMS wavefront error within a control radius of 5-13 cycles per aperture. Ultimately this testbed will be used to test all aspects of the system architecture for an extrasolar planet-finding AO system.

  18. High-resolution retinal imaging using adaptive optics and Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography

    Olivier, Scot S.; Werner, John S.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Laut, Sophie P.; Jones, Steven M.

    2010-09-07

    This invention permits retinal images to be acquired at high speed and with unprecedented resolution in three dimensions (4.times.4.times.6 .mu.m). The instrument achieves high lateral resolution by using adaptive optics to correct optical aberrations of the human eye in real time. High axial resolution and high speed are made possible by the use of Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography. Using this system, we have demonstrated the ability to image microscopic blood vessels and the cone photoreceptor mosaic.

  19. Scanning optical pyrometer for measuring temperatures in hollow cathodes

    Life-limiting processes in hollow cathodes are determined largely by the temperature of the electron emitter. To support cathode life assessment, a noncontact temperature measurement technique which employs a stepper motor-driven fiber optic probe was developed. The probe is driven inside the hollow cathode and collects light radiated by the hot interior surface of the emitter. Ratio pyrometry is used to determine the axial temperature profile. Thermocouples on the orifice plate provide measurements of the external temperature during cathode operation and are used to calibrate the pyrometer system in situ with a small oven enclosing the externally heated cathode. The diagnostic method and initial measurements of the temperature distribution in a hollow cathode are discussed

  20. Measurement of abrasion of polyethylene TEP cotyles ABG I of coax using optical scanning topography

    Mandát, Dušan; Nožka, Libor; Hrabovský, Miroslav

    Washington: SPIE, 2005 - (Štrba, A.; Senderáková, D.; Hrabovský, M.), 241-244. (Proceedings of SPIE. 5945). ISBN 0-8194-5951-8. ISSN 0277-786X. [Slovak-Czech-Polish Optical Conference on Wave and Quantum Aspects of Contemporary Optics /14./. Nitra (SK), 13.09.2004-17.09.2004] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A015 Keywords : 3D optical scanning topography * cotyle * WRML * image analysis * digital image processing * profile Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  1. Optical implementation for adaptive beamforming of array antenna

    Liu, Ming; Shi, Xiang quan

    2010-11-01

    It is difficult for the traditional phased array radar to process large array-element and high time-bandwidth-product signal in real time. An optical architecture of implement true time delay adaptive beamforming based on Stimulate Photon Echoes(SPE) is introduced. The principle of how to implement a true time delay based on SPE phenomenon with its theory models is established. the method of how to implement variable time delays using laser beams modulated by linear frequency chirped pulses is discussed, the relationship between chirp bandwidth and delay step is demonstrated by simulation results. As a result, it allows to filter thousands of simultaneous AOAs with 30 GHz dynamically in both spatial and spectral domains, which can be used to adaptively steer a large RF phased array antenna toward the direction of interest while minimizing the effects of unwanted interference signals.

  2. Adaptive noise reduction for fiber optic gyroscopes in borehole applications

    Yan, Tingyang; Zhang, Chunxi; Gao, Shuang; Ma, Zongfeng

    2006-11-01

    Fiber Optic Gyroscopes (FOGs) have been investigated and proposed as alternative sensors to magnetometers in borehole surveying applications due to their compactness, ruggedness, low cost and high environmental insensitivity. However, FOGs are subject to high measurement noise from various sources, which deteriorates the performance and quality of FOGs, thus the overall system accuracy is limited. To improve the accuracy of the surveying system, adaptive filtering techniques are utilized to reduce the noise level at the output of the FOG. A Forward Linear Prediction (FLP) filter based on Normalized Least-Mean-Square (NLMS) adaptive algorithm was designed and evaluated using kinematic data. Results show that the FLP filter can suppress the FOG noise to a certain degree and a satisfactory signal-to-noise ratio improvement can be achieved using this method.

  3. Night myopia studied with an adaptive optics visual analyzer.

    Pablo Artal

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Eyes with distant objects in focus in daylight are thought to become myopic in dim light. This phenomenon, often called "night myopia" has been studied extensively for several decades. However, despite its general acceptance, its magnitude and causes are still controversial. A series of experiments were performed to understand night myopia in greater detail. METHODS: We used an adaptive optics instrument operating in invisible infrared light to elucidate the actual magnitude of night myopia and its main causes. The experimental setup allowed the manipulation of the eye's aberrations (and particularly spherical aberration as well as the use of monochromatic and polychromatic stimuli. Eight subjects with normal vision monocularly determined their best focus position subjectively for a Maltese cross stimulus at different levels of luminance, from the baseline condition of 20 cd/m(2 to the lowest luminance of 22 × 10(-6 cd/m(2. While subjects performed the focusing tasks, their eye's defocus and aberrations were continuously measured with the 1050-nm Hartmann-Shack sensor incorporated in the adaptive optics instrument. The experiment was repeated for a variety of controlled conditions incorporating specific aberrations of the eye and chromatic content of the stimuli. RESULTS: We found large inter-subject variability and an average of -0.8 D myopic shift for low light conditions. The main cause responsible for night myopia was the accommodation shift occurring at low light levels. Other factors, traditionally suggested to explain night myopia, such as chromatic and spherical aberrations, have a much smaller effect in this mechanism. CONCLUSIONS: An adaptive optics visual analyzer was applied to study the phenomenon of night myopia. We found that the defocus shift occurring in dim light is mainly due to accommodation errors.

  4. Wide-field optical coherence tomography angiography enabled by two repeated measurements of B-scans.

    Wang, Ruikang K; Zhang, Anqi; Choi, Woo June; Zhang, Qinqin; Chen, Chieh-Li; Miller, Andrew; Gregori, Giovanni; Rosenfeld, Philip J

    2016-05-15

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) has increasingly become clinically important, particularly in ophthalmology. However, the field of view (FOV) for current OCTA imaging is severely limited due to A-scan rates that can be afforded by current clinical systems and, more importantly, the requirement of a repeated scanning protocol. This Letter evaluates the possibility of using only two repeated B-scans for OCTA for the purpose of an increased FOV. The effect of repeated numbers on the OCTA result is discussed through experiments on an animal model in vivo and evaluated using quantitative metrics for image quality. Demonstrated through in vivo imaging of a pathological human eye, we show that optical microangiography-based OCTA with two repeated B-scans can provide wide-field angiography up to 12×12  mm with clinically acceptable image quality. PMID:27176995

  5. Self-characterization of linear and nonlinear adaptive optics systems.

    Hampton, Peter J; Conan, Rodolphe; Keskin, Onur; Bradley, Colin; Agathoklis, Pan

    2008-01-10

    We present methods used to determine the linear or nonlinear static response and the linear dynamic response of an adaptive optics (AO) system. This AO system consists of a nonlinear microelectromechanical systems deformable mirror (DM), a linear tip-tilt mirror (TTM), a control computer, and a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. The system is modeled using a single-input-single-output structure to determine the one-dimensional transfer function of the dynamic response of the chain of system hardware. An AO system has been shown to be able to characterize its own response without additional instrumentation. Experimentally determined models are given for a TTM and a DM. PMID:18188192

  6. High Resolution Observations using Adaptive Optics: Achievements and Future Needs

    K. Sankarasubramanian; T. Rimmele

    2008-03-01

    Over the last few years, several interesting observations were obtained with the help of solar Adaptive Optics (AO). In this paper, few observations made using the solarAOare enlightened and briefly discussed. A list of disadvantages with the current AO system are presented. With telescopes larger than 1.5 m expected during the next decade, there is a need to develop the existing AO technologies for large aperture telescopes. Some aspects of this development are highlighted. Finally, the recent AO developments in India are also presented.

  7. Third MACAO-VLTI Curvature Adaptive Optics System now installed

    Arsenault, R.; Donaldson, R.; Dupuy, C.; Fedrigo, E.; Hubin, N.; Ivanescu, L.; Kasper, M.; Oberti, S.; Paufique, J.; Rossi, S.; Silber, A.; Delabre, B.; Lizon, J.-L.; Gigan, P.

    2004-09-01

    IN JULY of this year the MACAO team returned to Paranal for the third time to install another MACAOVLTI system. These are 4 identical 60 element curvature adaptive optics systems, located in the Coudé room of each UT whose aim is to feed a turbulence corrected wavefront to the VLTI Recombination Laboratory. This time the activities took place on Yepun (UT4). The naming convention has been to associate the MACAO-VLTI number to the UT number where it is installed. Therefore, although we speak here of MACAO#4, it is the third system installed in Paranal.

  8. Performance of the Gemini Planet Imager's adaptive optics system.

    Poyneer, Lisa A; Palmer, David W; Macintosh, Bruce; Savransky, Dmitry; Sadakuni, Naru; Thomas, Sandrine; Véran, Jean-Pierre; Follette, Katherine B; Greenbaum, Alexandra Z; Ammons, S Mark; Bailey, Vanessa P; Bauman, Brian; Cardwell, Andrew; Dillon, Daren; Gavel, Donald; Hartung, Markus; Hibon, Pascale; Perrin, Marshall D; Rantakyrö, Fredrik T; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Wang, Jason J

    2016-01-10

    The Gemini Planet Imager's adaptive optics (AO) subsystem was designed specifically to facilitate high-contrast imaging. A definitive description of the system's algorithms and technologies as built is given. 564 AO telemetry measurements from the Gemini Planet Imager Exoplanet Survey campaign are analyzed. The modal gain optimizer tracks changes in atmospheric conditions. Science observations show that image quality can be improved with the use of both the spatially filtered wavefront sensor and linear-quadratic-Gaussian control of vibration. The error budget indicates that for all targets and atmospheric conditions AO bandwidth error is the largest term. PMID:26835769

  9. Adaptive optics optical coherence tomography for in vivo mouse retinal imaging

    Jian, Yifan; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2013-05-01

    Small animal models of retinal diseases are important to vision research, and noninvasive high resolution in vivo rodent retinal imaging is becoming an increasingly important tool used in this field. We present a custom Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) instrument for high resolution imaging of mouse retina. In order to overcome aberrations in the mouse eye, we incorporated a commercial adaptive optics system into the sample arm of the refractive FD-OCT system. Additionally, a commercially available refraction canceling lens was used to reduce lower order aberrations and specular back-reflection from the cornea. Performance of the adaptive optics (AO) system for correcting residual wavefront aberration in the mice eyes is presented. Results of AO FD-OCT images of mouse retina acquired in vivo with and without AO correction are shown as well.

  10. Six-channel adaptive fibre-optic interferometer

    Romashko, R V; Bezruk, M N; Kamshilin, A A; Kulchin, Yurii N

    2012-06-30

    We have proposed and analysed a scheme for the multiplexing of orthogonal dynamic holograms in photorefractive crystals which ensures almost zero cross talk between the holographic channels upon phase demodulation. A six-channel adaptive fibre-optic interferometer was built, and the detection limit for small phase fluctuations in the channels of the interferometer was determined to be 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} rad W{sup 1/2} Hz{sup -1/2}. The channel multiplexing capacity of the interferometer was estimated. The formation of 70 channels such that their optical fields completely overlap in the crystal reduces the relative detection limit in the working channel by just 10 %. We found conditions under which the maximum cross talk between the channels was within the intrinsic noise level in the channels (-47 dB).

  11. ScanSim: A tool for simulating optical-CT imaging

    Oldham, Mark

    2010-01-01

    A software tool has been developed that can simulate image formation in a variety of optical-CT scanning configurations. The formalism of the simulation is introduced, including two main modes: a diverging point source mode, and a converging broad beam mode. Preliminary results are presented for scanning Presage dosimeters in both modes and immersed in refractive media of widely varying refractive index (RI), including air, water, and a fully matched medium. Pronounced differences in the edge...

  12. Can previous thyroid scan induce cytogenetic radio adaptive response in patients treated by radioiodine for hyperthyroidism?

    Background: Induction of radio adaptive responses in cells pretreated with a low dose radiation before exposure to a high dose is well documented by many in investigators. The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of chromosomal aberration in peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients treated by radioiodine (131 I) for hyperthyroidism, with or without previous thyroid scan with 99m Tc. Materials and methods: venous blood samples were obtained from 35 patients one month after radioiodine therapy and cytogenetic ally evaluated using analysis of metaphase in two groups. The first group (n=15, 13 females and 2 males, mean age=44.7±11.5 years and mean weight 74.4±7.9 Kg) received 5 mCi 99m Tc for thyroid scanning 38.6±19.9 days before radioiodine therapy with 10.4±3.4 mCi 131I. The second group (n=20, 14 females and 6 males, mean age=41.0±10.8 years and mean weight=68.1±9.2 Kg) didn't have history of thyroid scanning. We also studied a control group (n=29, 11 females and 8 males age=33.7±7.4 and mean weight=70.0±8.8 Kg) who didn't have any history of diagnostic or therapeutic and also occupational exposure. Results: The mean frequency of total chromosomal aberrations in the first and second groups and controls were 1.46±1.55, 1.65±1.62 and 0.93±0.92 respectively. Results also showed that the mean frequency of total chromosome aberration in two groups were higher than controls and significantly higher in patients who had not received 99m Tc compared those who had undertaken thyroid scan before radioiodine therapy (p=0.03). Conclusion: These findings may indicate the fact that the radiation dose received from 99m Tc could induce resistance to subsequent higher radiation dose of 131 I in peripheral blood lymphocytes and it might be due to cytogenetic radio adaptive response

  13. Handheld histology-equivalent sectioning laser-scanning confocal optical microscope for interventional imaging.

    Kumar, Karthik; Avritscher, Rony; Wang, Youmin; Lane, Nancy; Madoff, David C; Yu, Tse-Kuan; Uhr, Jonathan W; Zhang, Xiaojing

    2010-04-01

    A handheld, forward-imaging, laser-scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) demonstrating optical sectioning comparable with microtome slice thicknesses in conventional histology, targeted towards interventional imaging, is reported. Fast raster scanning (approximately 2.5 kHz line scan rate, 3.0-5.0 frames per second) was provided by a 2-axis microelectromechanical system (MEMS) scanning mirror fabricated by a method compatible with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) processing. Cost-effective rapid-prototyped packaging combined the MEMS mirror with micro-optical components into a probe with 18 mm outer diameter and 54 mm rigid length. ZEMAX optical design simulations indicate the ability of the handheld optical system to obtain lateral resolution of 0.31 and axial resolution of 2.85 microm. Lateral and axial resolutions are experimentally measured at 0.5 microm and 4.2 microm respectively, with field of view of 200 x 125 microm. Results of reflectance imaging of ex vivo swine liver, and fluorescence imaging of the expression of cytokeratin and mammaglobin tumor biomarkers in epithelial human breast tissue from metastatic breast cancer patients are presented. The results indicate that inexpensive, portable handheld optical microscopy tools based on silicon micromirror technologies could be important in interventional imaging, complementing existing coarse-resolution techniques to improve the efficacy of disease diagnosis, image-guided excisional microsurgery, and monitored photodynamic therapy. PMID:20012209

  14. Z-scan: A simple technique for determination of third-order optical nonlinearity

    Z-scan is a simple experimental technique to measure intensity dependent nonlinear susceptibilities of third-order nonlinear optical materials. This technique is used to measure the sign and magnitude of both real and imaginary part of the third order nonlinear susceptibility (χ(3)) of nonlinear optical materials. In this paper, we investigate third-order nonlinear optical properties of Ag-polymer composite film by using single beam z-scan technique with Q-switched, frequency doubled Nd: YAG laser (λ=532 nm) at 5 ns pulse. The values of nonlinear absorption coefficient (β), nonlinear refractive index (n2) and third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility (χ(3)) of permethylazine were found to be 9.64 × 10−7 cm/W, 8.55 × 10−12 cm2/W and 5.48 × 10−10 esu, respectively

  15. GPR Signal Processing with Geography Adaptive Scanning using Vector Radar for Antipersonal Landmine Detection

    Shinsuke Sato

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR is a promising sensor for landmine detection, however there are two major problems to overcome. One is the rough ground surface. The other problem is the distance between the antennas of GPR. It remains irremovable clutters on a sub-surface image output from GPR by first problem. Geography adaptive scanning is useful to image objects beneath rough ground surface. Second problem makes larger the nonlinearity of the relationship between the time for propagation and the depth of a buried object, imaging the small objects such as an antipersonnel landmine closer to the antennas. In this paper, we modify Kirchhoff migration so as to account for not only the variation of position of the sensor head, but also the antennas alignment of the vector radar. The validity of this method is discussed through application to the signals acquired in experiments.

  16. Image restoration of the open-loop adaptive optics retinal imaging system based on optical transfer function analysis

    Yu, Lei; Qi, Yue; Li, Dayu; Xia, Mingliang; Xuan, Li

    2013-07-01

    The residual aberrations of the adaptive optics retinal imaging system will decrease the quality of the retinal images. To overcome this obstacle, we found that the optical transfer function (OTF) of the adaptive optics retinal imaging system can be described as the Levy stable distribution. Then a new method is introduced to estimate the OTF of the open-loop adaptive optics system, based on analyzing the residual aberrations of the open-loop adaptive optics system in the residual aberrations measuring mode. At last, the estimated OTF is applied to restore the retinal images of the open-loop adaptive optics retinal imaging system. The contrast and resolution of the restored image is significantly improved with the Laplacian sum (LS) from 0.0785 to 0.1480 and gray mean grads (GMG) from 0.0165 to 0.0306.

  17. Measurement of Temperature Change in Nonlinear Optical Materials by Using the Z-Scan Technique

    DONG Shu-Guang; YANG Jun-Yi; SHUI Min; YI Chuan-Xiang; LI Zhong-Guo; SONG Ying-Lin

    2011-01-01

    @@ Spatial and temporal changes of temperature in a novel polymer are investigated by using the Z-scan technique under ns laser pulse excitation.According to the open aperture Z-scan experimental results, the nonlinear absorption coefficient of the polymer is determined.By solving the diffusion equation of heat conduction induced by optical absorption, the spatial and temporal changes in temperature are obtained.This change in temperature drives the photo-acoustic and electromagnetic wave propagating in the polymer and induces the change in refractive index, which serves as a negative lens, and the closed aperture Z-scan shows a peak and valley profile.Based on the numerical calculation, we achieve a good fit to the closed-aperture Z-scan curve with an optimized nonlinear refractive index.This consistency attests the existence of temperature change in the solution, and the Z-scan technique is suitable to investigate this change in temperature.

  18. Synthetic aperture laser optical feedback imaging using a translational scanning with galvanometric mirrors

    Glastre, Wilfried; Jacquin, Olivier; Hugon, Olivier; de Chatellus, Hugues Guillet; Lacot, Eric

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present an experimental setup based on Laser Optical Feedback Imaging (LOFI) and on Synthetic Aperture (SA) with translational scanning by galvanometric mirrors for the purpose of making deep and resolved images through scattering media. We provide real 2D optical synthetic-aperture image of a fixed scattering target with a moving aperture and an isotropic resolution. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that we can keep microscope resolution beyond the working dis...

  19. Scanning near-field optical microscopy utilizing silicon nitride probe photoluminescence

    Lulevich, V.; Ducker, W. A.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a simple method for performing high-resolution scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM). A commercial Si3N4 tip is illuminated by an intense light source, which causes the tip to emit redshifted (inelastically scattered) light. Part of the redshifted light passes through a sample, allowing transmission light microscopy. By simple modification of a commercial atomic force microscopes (AFM), we are able to image many different samples with high-resolution optical microscopy, ac...

  20. Full-color holographic 3D imaging system using color optical scanning holography

    Kim, Hayan; Kim, You Seok; Kim, Taegeun

    2016-06-01

    We propose a full-color holographic three-dimensional imaging system that composes a recording stage, a transmission and processing stage and reconstruction stage. In recording stage, color optical scanning holography (OSH) records the complex RGB holograms of an object. In transmission and processing stage, the recorded complex RGB holograms are transmitted to the reconstruction stage after conversion to off-axis RGB holograms. In reconstruction stage, the off-axis RGB holograms are reconstructed optically.

  1. Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics images of the Trapezium Cluster

    Bouy, H; Marchetti, E; Martín, E L; Huélamo, N; Navascues, D Barrado y

    2007-01-01

    Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO) combines the advantages of standard adaptive optics, which provides high contrast and high spatial resolution, and of wide field ~1' imaging. Up to recently, MCAO for astronomy was limited to laboratory experiments. In this paper, we present the first scientific results obtained with the first MCAO instrument put on the sky. We present a new study of the Trapezium cluster using deep MCAO images with a field of view of 1'x1' obtained at the VLT. We have used deep J, H and Ks images recently obtained with the prototype MCAO facility MAD at the VLT in order to search for new members and new multiple systems in the Trapezium cluster. On bright targets (Ks~9mag), these images allow us to reach DeltaKs~6mag as close as 0.4" We report the detection of 128 sources, including 10 new faint objects in the magnitude range between 16.1

  2. Ergodic capacity comparison of optical wireless communications using adaptive transmissions.

    Hassan, Md Zoheb; Hossain, Md Jahangir; Cheng, Julian

    2013-08-26

    Ergodic capacity is investigated for the optical wireless communications employing subcarrier intensity modulation with direct detection, and coherent systems with and without polarization multiplexing over the Gamma-Gamma turbulence channels. We consider three different adaptive transmission schemes: (i) variable-power, variable-rate adaptive transmission, (ii) complete channel inversion with fixed rate, and (iii) truncated channel inversion with fixed rate. For the considered systems, highly accurate series expressions for ergodic capacity are derived using a series expansion of the modified Bessel function and the Mellin transformation of the Gamma-Gamma random variable. Our asymptotic analysis reveals that the high SNR ergodic capacities of coherent, subcarrier intensity modulated, and polarization multiplexing systems gain 0.33 bits/s/Hz, 0.66 bits/s/Hz, and 0.66 bits/s/Hz respectively with 1 dB increase of average transmitted optical power. Numerical results indicate that a polarization control error less than 10° has little influence on the capacity performance of polarization multiplexing systems. PMID:24105580

  3. Adaptive Optics Imaging Survey of Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    Laag, E A; Canalizo, G; van Breugel, W; Gates, E L; de Vries, W; Stanford, S A

    2006-03-13

    We present high resolution imaging observations of a sample of previously unidentified far-infrared galaxies at z < 0.3. The objects were selected by cross-correlating the IRAS Faint Source Catalog with the VLA FIRST catalog and the HST Guide Star Catalog to allow for adaptive optics observations. We found two new ULIGs (with L{sub FIR} {ge} 10{sup 12} L{sub {circle_dot}}) and 19 new LIGs (with L{sub FIR} {ge} 10{sup 11} L{sub {circle_dot}}). Twenty of the galaxies in the sample were imaged with either the Lick or Keck adaptive optics systems in H or K{prime}. Galaxy morphologies were determined using the two dimensional fitting program GALFIT and the residuals examined to look for interesting structure. The morphologies reveal that at least 30% are involved in tidal interactions, with 20% being clear mergers. An additional 50% show signs of possible interaction. Line ratios were used to determine powering mechanism; of the 17 objects in the sample showing clear emission lines--four are active galactic nuclei and seven are starburst galaxies. The rest exhibit a combination of both phenomena.

  4. Non-iterative adaptive optical microscopy using wavefront sensing

    Tao, X.; Azucena, O.; Kubby, J.

    2016-03-01

    This paper will review the development of wide-field and confocal microscopes with wavefront sensing and adaptive optics for correcting refractive aberrations and compensating scattering when imaging through thick tissues (Drosophila embryos and mouse brain tissue). To make wavefront measurements in biological specimens we have modified the laser guide-star techniques used in astronomy for measuring wavefront aberrations that occur as star light passes through Earth's turbulent atmosphere. Here sodium atoms in Earth's mesosphere, at an altitude of 95 km, are excited to fluoresce at resonance by a high-power sodium laser. The fluorescent light creates a guide-star reference beacon at the top of the atmosphere that can be used for measuring wavefront aberrations that occur as the light passes through the atmosphere. We have developed a related approach for making wavefront measurements in biological specimens using cellular structures labeled with fluorescent proteins as laser guide-stars. An example is a fluorescently labeled centrosome in a fruit fly embryo or neurons and dendrites in mouse brains. Using adaptive optical microscopy we show that the Strehl ratio, the ratio of the peak intensity of an aberrated point source relative to the diffraction limited image, can be improved by an order of magnitude when imaging deeply into live dynamic specimens, enabling near diffraction limited deep tissue imaging.

  5. AVES: an adaptive optics visual echelle spectrograph for the VLT

    Pasquini, Luca; Delabre, Bernard; Avila, Gerardo; Bonaccini, Domenico

    1998-07-01

    We present the preliminary study of a low cost, high performance spectrograph for the VLT, for observations in the V, R and I bands. This spectrograph is meant for intermediate (R equals 16,000) resolution spectroscopy of faint (sky and/or detector limited) sources, with particular emphasis on the study of solar-type (F-G) stars belonging to the nearest galaxies and to distant (or highly reddened) galactic clusters. The spectrograph is designed to use the adaptive optics (AO) systems at the VLT Telescope. Even if these AO systems will not provide diffraction limited images in the V, R and I bands, the photon concentration will still be above approximately 60% of the flux in an 0.3 arcsecond aperture for typical Paranal conditions. This makes the construction of a compact, cheap and efficient echelle spectrograph possible. AVES will outperform comparable non adaptive optic instruments by more than one magnitude for sky- and/or detector-limited observations, and it will be very suitable for observations in crowded fields.

  6. Adaptive distributed Kalman filtering with wind estimation for astronomical adaptive optics.

    Massioni, Paolo; Gilles, Luc; Ellerbroek, Brent

    2015-12-01

    In the framework of adaptive optics (AO) for astronomy, it is a common assumption to consider the atmospheric turbulent layers as "frozen flows" sliding according to the wind velocity profile. For this reason, having knowledge of such a velocity profile is beneficial in terms of AO control system performance. In this paper we show that it is possible to exploit the phase estimate from a Kalman filter running on an AO system in order to estimate wind velocity. This allows the update of the Kalman filter itself with such knowledge, making it adaptive. We have implemented such an adaptive controller based on the distributed version of the Kalman filter, for a realistic simulation of a multi-conjugate AO system with laser guide stars on a 30 m telescope. Simulation results show that this approach is effective and promising and the additional computational cost with respect to the distributed filter is negligible. Comparisons with a previously published slope detection and ranging wind profiler are made and the impact of turbulence profile quantization is assessed. One of the main findings of the paper is that all flavors of the adaptive distributed Kalman filter are impacted more significantly by turbulence profile quantization than the static minimum mean square estimator which does not incorporate wind profile information. PMID:26831389

  7. Genome-Wide Scan for Adaptive Divergence and Association with Population-Specific Covariates.

    Gautier, Mathieu

    2015-12-01

    In population genomics studies, accounting for the neutral covariance structure across population allele frequencies is critical to improve the robustness of genome-wide scan approaches. Elaborating on the BayEnv model, this study investigates several modeling extensions (i) to improve the estimation accuracy of the population covariance matrix and all the related measures, (ii) to identify significantly overly differentiated SNPs based on a calibration procedure of the XtX statistics, and (iii) to consider alternative covariate models for analyses of association with population-specific covariables. In particular, the auxiliary variable model allows one to deal with multiple testing issues and, providing the relative marker positions are available, to capture some linkage disequilibrium information. A comprehensive simulation study was carried out to evaluate the performances of these different models. Also, when compared in terms of power, robustness, and computational efficiency to five other state-of-the-art genome-scan methods (BayEnv2, BayScEnv, BayScan, flk, and lfmm), the proposed approaches proved highly effective. For illustration purposes, genotyping data on 18 French cattle breeds were analyzed, leading to the identification of 13 strong signatures of selection. Among these, four (surrounding the KITLG, KIT, EDN3, and ALB genes) contained SNPs strongly associated with the piebald coloration pattern while a fifth (surrounding PLAG1) could be associated to morphological differences across the populations. Finally, analysis of Pool-Seq data from 12 populations of Littorina saxatilis living in two different ecotypes illustrates how the proposed framework might help in addressing relevant ecological issues in nonmodel species. Overall, the proposed methods define a robust Bayesian framework to characterize adaptive genetic differentiation across populations. The BayPass program implementing the different models is available at http://www1.montpellier

  8. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technology in the application of PET/CT whole body scans

    Objective: To improve image quality of low dose CT in whole body PET/CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) technology. Methods: Twice CT scans were performed with GE water model,scan parameters were: 120 kV, 120 and 300 mA respectively. In addition, 30 subjects treated with PET/CT were selected randomly, whole body PET/CT were performed after 18F-FDG injection of 3.70 MBq/kg, Sharp IR+time of flight + VUE Point HD technology were used for 1.5 min/bed in PET; CT of spiral scan was performed under 120 kV using automatic exposure control technology (30-210 mA, noise index 25). Model and patients whole body CT images were reconstructed with conventional and 40% ASiR methods respectively, and the CT attenuation value and noise index were measured. Results: Research of model and clinical showed that standard deviation of ASiR method in model CT was 33.0% lower than the conventional CT reconstruction method (t =27.76, P<0.01), standard deviation of CT in normal tissues (brain, lung, mediastinum, liver and vertebral body) and lesions (brain, lung, mediastinum, liver and vertebral body) reduced by 21.08% (t =23.35, P<0.01) and 24.43% (t =16.15, P<0.01) respectively, especially for normal liver tissue and liver lesions, standard deviations of CT were reduced by 51.33% (t=34.21, P<0.0) and 49.54% (t=15.21, P<0.01) respectively. Conclusion: ASiR reconstruction method was significantly reduced the noise of low dose CT image and improved the quality of CT image in whole body PET/CT, which seems more suitable for quantitative analysis and clinical applications. (authors)

  9. Combining optical tweezers and scanning probe microscopy to study DNA-protein interactions

    Huisstede, Jurgen H.G.; Subramaniam, Vinod; Bennink, Martin L.

    2007-01-01

    We present the first results obtained with a new instrument designed and built to study DNA-protein interactions at the single molecule level. This microscope combines optical tweezers with scanning probe microscopy and allows us to locate DNA-binding proteins on a single suspended DNA molecule. A s

  10. Wave Optical Calculation of Probe Size in Low Energy Scanning Electron Microscope

    Radlička, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, S4 (2015), s. 212-217. ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : scanning electron microscope * optical calculation Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.877, year: 2014

  11. Time-domain scanning optical mammography: I. Recording and assessment of mammograms of 154 patients

    Using a triple wavelength (670 nm, 785 nm, 843/884 nm) scanning laser-pulse mammograph we recorded craniocaudal and mediolateral projection optical mammograms of 154 patients, suspected of having breast cancer. From distributions of times of flight of photons recorded at typically 1000-2000 scan positions, optical mammograms were derived displaying (inverse) photon counts in selected time windows, absorption and reduced scattering coefficients or total haemoglobin concentration and blood oxygen saturation. Optical mammograms were analysed by comparing them with x-ray and MR mammograms, including results of histopathology, attributing a subjective visibility score to each tumour assessed. Out of 102 histologically confirmed tumours, 72 tumours were detected retrospectively in both optical projection mammograms, in addition 20 cases in one projection only, whereas 10 tumours were not detectable in any projection. Tumour contrast and contrast-to-noise ratios of mammograms of the same breast, but derived from measured DTOFs by various methods were quantitatively compared. On average, inverse photon counts in selected time windows, including total photon counts, provide highest tumour contrast and contrast-to-noise ratios. Based on the results of the present study we developed a multi-wavelength, multi-projection scanning time-domain optical mammograph with improved spectral and spatial (angular) sampling, that allows us to record entire mammograms simultaneously at various offsets between the transmitting fibre and receiving fibre bundle and provides first results for illustration

  12. Light amplification by stimulated emission from an optically pumped molecular junction in a scanning tunneling microscope

    Braun, K; Wang, X; Adler, H; Peisert, H; Chasse, T; Zhang, D; Meixner, A J

    2013-01-01

    Here, we introduce and experimentally demonstrate optical amplification and stimulated emission from a single optically pumped molecular tunneling junction of a scanning tunneling microscope. The gap between a sharp gold tip and a flat gold substrate covered with a self-assembled monolayer of 5-chloro-2-mercaptobenzothiazole molecules forms an extremely small optical gain medium. When electrons tunnel from the molecules highest occupied molecular orbital to the tip, holes are left behind. These can be repopulated by hot electrons induced by the laser-driven plasmon oscillation on the metal surfaces enclosing the cavity. Solving the laser-rate equations for this system shows that the repopulation process can be efficiently stimulated by the gap modes near field, TERS scattering from neighboring molecules acting as an optical seed. Our results demonstrate how optical enhancement inside the plasmonic cavity can be further increased by a stronger localization via tunneling through molecules. We anticipate that st...

  13. Accuracy of optical scanning methods of the Cerec®3D system in the process of making ceramic inlays

    Trifković Branka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. One of the results of many years of Cerec® 3D CAD/CAM system technological development is implementation of one intraoral and two extraoral optical scanning methods which, depending on the current indications, are applied in making fixed restorations. The aim of this study was to determine the degree of precision of optical scanning methods by the use of the Cerec®3D CAD/CAM system in the process of making ceramic inlays. Methods. The study was conducted in three experimental groups of inlays prepared using the procedure of three methods of scanning Cerec ®3D system. Ceramic inlays made by conventional methodology were the control group. The accuracy of optical scanning methods of the Cerec®3D system computer aided designcomputer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM was indirectly examined by measuring a marginal gap size between inlays and demarcation preparation by scanning electron microscope (SEM. Results. The results of the study showed a difference in the accuracy of the existing methods of scanning dental CAD/CAM systems. The highest level of accuracy was achieved by the extraoral optical superficial scanning technique. The value of marginal gap size inlays made with the technique of extraoral optical superficial scanning was 32.97 ± 13.17 μ. Techniques of intraoral optical superficial and extraoral point laser scanning showed a lower level of accuracy (40.29 ± 21.46 μ for inlays of intraoral optical superficial scanning and 99.67 ± 37.25 μ for inlays of extraoral point laser scanning. Conclusion. Optical scanning methods in dental CAM/CAM technologies are precise methods of digitizing the spatial models; application of extraoral optical scanning methods provides the hightest precision.

  14. The adaptation of methods in multilayer optics for the calculation of specular neutron reflection

    The adaptation of standard methods in multilayer optics to the calculation of specular neutron reflection is described. Their application is illustrated with examples which include a glass optical flat and a deuterated Langmuir-Blodgett film. (author)

  15. Segmentation of the Optic Disc in 3-D OCT Scans of the Optic Nerve Head

    Lee, Kyungmoo; Niemeijer, Meindert; Garvin, Mona K.; Kwon, Young H.; Sonka, Milan; Abràmoff, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Glaucoma is the second leading ocular disease causing blindness due to gradual damage to the optic nerve and resultant visual field loss. Segmentations of the optic disc cup and neuroretinal rim can provide important parameters for detecting and tracking this disease. The purpose of this study is to describe and evaluate a method that can automatically segment the optic disc cup and rim in spectral-domain 3-D OCT (SD-OCT) volumes. Four intraretinal surfaces were segmented using a fast multisc...

  16. `imaka - a ground-layer adaptive optics system on Maunakea

    Chun, Mark; Toomey, Douglas; Lu, Jessica; Service, Max; Baranec, Christoph; Thibault, Simon; Brousseau, Denis; Hayano, Yutaka; Oya, Shin; Santi, Shane; Kingery, Christopher; Loss, Keith; Gardiner, John; Steele, Brad

    2016-01-01

    We present the integration status for `imaka, the ground-layer adaptive optics (GLAO) system on the University of Hawaii 2.2-meter telescope on Maunakea, Hawaii. This wide-field GLAO pathfinder system exploits Maunakea's highly confined ground layer and weak free-atmosphere to push the corrected field of view to ~1/3 of a degree, an areal field approaching an order of magnitude larger than any existing or planned GLAO system, with a FWHM ~ 0.33 arcseconds in the visible and near infrared. We discuss the unique design aspects of the instrument, the driving science cases and how they impact the system, and how we will demonstrate these cases on the sky.

  17. Adaptive Optics Observations of Exoplanets, Brown Dwarfs, & Binary Stars

    Hinkley, Sasha

    2011-01-01

    The current direct observations of brown dwarfs and exoplanets have been obtained using instruments not specifically designed for overcoming the large contrast ratio between the host star and any wide-separation faint companions. However, we are about to witness the birth of several new dedicated observing platforms specifically geared towards high contrast imaging of these objects. The Gemini Planet Imager, VLT-SPHERE, Subaru HiCIAO, and Project 1640 at the Palomar 5m telescope will return images of numerous exoplanets and brown dwarfs over hundreds of observing nights in the next five years. Along with diffraction-limited coronagraphs and high-order adaptive optics, these instruments also will return spectral and polarimetric information on any discovered targets, giving clues to their atmospheric compositions and characteristics. Such spectral characterization will be key to forming a detailed theory of comparative exoplanetary science which will be widely applicable to both exoplanets and brown dwarfs. Fu...

  18. Multiple Object Adaptive Optics: Mixed NGS/LGS tomography

    Morris, Tim; Gendron, Eric; Basden, Alastair; Martin, Olivier; Osborn, James; Henry, David; Hubert, Zoltan; Sivo, Gaetano; Gratadour, Damien; Chemla, Fanny; Sevin, Arnaud; Cohen, Matthieu; Younger, Eddy; Vidal, Fabrice; Wilson, Richard; Batterley, Tim; Bitenc, Urban; Reeves, Andrew; Bharmal, Nazim; Raynaud, Henri-François; Kulcsar, Caroline; Conan, Jean-Marc; Guzman, Dani; De Cos Juez, Javier; Huet, Jean-Michel; Perret, Denis; Dickson, Colin; Atkinson, David; Baillie, Tom; Longmore, Andy; Todd, Stephen; Talbot, Gordon; Morris, Simon; Myers, Richard; Rousset, Gérard

    2013-12-01

    Open-loop adaptive optics has been successfully demonstrated on-sky by several groups, including the fully tomographic MOAO demonstration made using CANARY. MOAO instrumentation such as RAVEN will deliver the first astronomical science and other planned instruments aim to extend both open-loop AO performance and the number of corrected fields. Many of these planned systems rely on the use of tomographic open-loop LGS wavefront sensing. Here we present results from the combined NGS/LGS tomographic CANARY system and then compare the NGS- and LGS-based tomographic system performance. We identify the major system performance drivers, and highlight some potential routes for further exploitation of open-loop tomographic AO.

  19. Kalman filtering to suppress spurious signals in Adaptive Optics control

    Poyneer, L; Veran, J P

    2010-03-29

    In many scenarios, an Adaptive Optics (AO) control system operates in the presence of temporally non-white noise. We use a Kalman filter with a state space formulation that allows suppression of this colored noise, hence improving residual error over the case where the noise is assumed to be white. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this new filter in the case of the estimated Gemini Planet Imager tip-tilt environment, where there are both common-path and non-common path vibrations. We discuss how this same framework can also be used to suppress spatial aliasing during predictive wavefront control assuming frozen flow in a low-order AO system without a spatially filtered wavefront sensor, and present experimental measurements from Altair that clearly reveal these aliased components.

  20. Evanescent field characterisation for a d-shaped optical fibre using scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Scanning near field optical microscopy is used to measure the evanescent filed and mode profile of a Ge-doped D-shaped optical fibre. The structure of the fibre is determined by differential etching followed by an investigation of the resultant topography with an atomic force microscope. This information is then used to theoretically model the expected behaviour of the fibre and it is shown that the theoretically model the expected behaviour of the fibre and it is shown that the theoretical results are in excellent agreement with the experimentally observed fields

  1. Proposed adaptive optics system for Vainu Bappu Telescope

    Saxena, A. K.; Chinnappan, V.; Lancelot, J. P.

    It is known that the atmospheric turbulence spreads the star image as produced by the medium and large size optical telescopes by many orders resulting in reduction in the resolution of these telescopes. Adaptive optics system can partially or substantially sharpen the image thus improving the resolution and throughput of these telescopes. The atmospheric degradation can be effectively represented by Fried's parameter. We have measured Fried's parameter at very short intervals using speckle interferometer at VBT. Based on this input, an on-line wavefront error measurement and correction system was developed and tested in the laboratory. Low cost, high speed wavefront sensor using CMOS imager and Shack-Hartman lenslet array was developed and tested in the laboratory which could be used for on-line correction experiments. The wavefront errors are computed in terms of Zernike coefficients. MEMS based adaptive mirror with 37 actuators was used for the correction of higher order aberrations. Finite element analysis was carried out to know the mechanical properties and the influence function of the mirror. In-house developed Long Trace Profilometer was used to measure the surface produced by the mirror for various combination of actuator voltages and gave good insight about the behaviour of the mirror. An aberrated wavefront was captured by the wave-front sensor and the computed Zernike polynomials were used for correction of the wavefront. It is found that the peak intensity has increased about 3.8 times with reduction in size of the image. Now, the plan is to make a version that can be mounted at the cassegrain focus of the telescope. Here we deal with the low cost approach used in design; new algorithms developed for wavefront error computation from noisy data, speed optimization and related issues and the interface problems for using the system in the telescope.

  2. A compact combined ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunnelling microscope (UHV STM) and near-field optical microscope

    We have designed and constructed a hybrid scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM)–scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) instrument which operates under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. Indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated fibre-optic tips capable of high quality STM imaging and tunnelling spectroscopy are fabricated using a simple and reliable method which foregoes the electroless plating strategy previously employed by other groups. The fabrication process is reproducible, producing robust tips which may be exchanged under UHV conditions. We show that controlled contact with metal surfaces considerably enhances the STM imaging capabilities of fibre-optic tips. Light collection (from the cleaved back face of the ITO-coated fibre-optic tip) and optical alignment are facilitated by a simple two-lens arrangement where the in-vacuum collimation/collection lens may be adjusted using a slip-stick motor. A second in-air lens focuses the light (which emerges from the UHV system as a parallel beam) onto a cooled CCD spectrograph or photomultiplier tube. The application of the instrument to combined optical and electronic spectroscopy of Au and GaAs surfaces is discussed

  3. Signal to noise ratio of free space homodyne coherent optical communication after adaptive optics compensation

    Huang, Jian; Mei, Haiping; Deng, Ke; Kang, Li; Zhu, Wenyue; Yao, Zhoushi

    2015-12-01

    Designing and evaluating the adaptive optics system for coherent optical communication link through atmosphere requires to distinguish the effects of the residual wavefront and disturbed amplitude to the signal to noise ratio. Based on the new definition of coherent efficiency, a formula of signal to noise ratio for describing the performance of coherent optical communication link after wavefront compensation is derived in the form of amplitude non-uniformity and wavefront error separated. A beam quality metric is deduced mathematically to evaluate the effect of disturbed amplitude to the signal to noise ratio. Experimental results show that the amplitude fluctuation on the receiver aperture may reduce the signal to noise ratio about 24% on average when Fried coherent length r0=16 cm.

  4. Compact MEMS-based Adaptive Optics Optical Coherence Tomography for Clinical Use

    Chen, D; Olivier, S; Jones, S; Zawadzki, R; Evans, J; Choi, S; Werner, J

    2008-02-04

    We describe a compact MEMS-based adaptive optics (AO) optical coherence tomography system with improved AO performance and ease of clinical use. A typical AO system consists of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and a deformable mirror that measures and corrects the ocular and system aberrations. Because of the limitation on the current deformable mirror technologies, the amount of real-time ocular-aberration compensation is restricted and small in the previous AO-OCT instruments. In this instrument, we proposed to add an optical apparatus to correct the spectacle aberrations of the patients such as myopia, hyperopia and astigmatism. This eliminated the tedious process of the trial lenses in clinical imaging. Different amount of spectacle aberration compensation was achieved by motorized stages and automated with the AO computer for ease of clinical use. In addition, the compact AO-OCT was optimized to have minimum system aberrations to reduce AO registration errors and improve AO performance.

  5. 4th International Workshop on Adaptive Optics for Industry and Medicine

    Wittrock, Ulrich

    2005-01-01

    This book treats the development and application of adaptive optics for industry and medicine. The contributions describe recently developed components for adaptive-optics systems such as deformable mirrors, wavefront sensors, and mirror drivers as well as complete adaptive optical systems and their applications in industry and medicine. Applications range from laser-beam forming and adaptive aberration correction for high-power lasers to retinal imaging in ophthalmology. The contributions are based on presentations made at the 4th International Workshop on Adaptive Optics in Industry and Medicine which took place in Münster, Germany, in October 2003. This highly successful series of workshops on adaptive optics started in 1997 and continues with the 5th workshop in Beijing in 2005.

  6. Scanning a DNA molecule for bound proteins using hybrid magnetic and optical tweezers.

    Marijn T J van Loenhout

    Full Text Available The functional state of the genome is determined by its interactions with proteins that bind, modify, and move along the DNA. To determine the positions and binding strength of proteins localized on DNA we have developed a combined magnetic and optical tweezers apparatus that allows for both sensitive and label-free detection. A DNA loop, that acts as a scanning probe, is created by looping an optically trapped DNA tether around a DNA molecule that is held with magnetic tweezers. Upon scanning the loop along the λ-DNA molecule, EcoRI proteins were detected with ~17 nm spatial resolution. An offset of 33 ± 5 nm for the detected protein positions was found between back and forwards scans, corresponding to the size of the DNA loop and in agreement with theoretical estimates. At higher applied stretching forces, the scanning loop was able to remove bound proteins from the DNA, showing that the method is in principle also capable of measuring the binding strength of proteins to DNA with a force resolution of 0.1 pN/[Formula: see text]. The use of magnetic tweezers in this assay allows the facile preparation of many single-molecule tethers, which can be scanned one after the other, while it also allows for direct control of the supercoiling state of the DNA molecule, making it uniquely suitable to address the effects of torque on protein-DNA interactions.

  7. Polymer-based micro deformable mirror for adaptive optics applications

    Zamkotsian, Frederic; Conedera, Veronique; Liotard, Arnaud; Schroeder, Andreas; Fabre, Norbert; Camon, Henri; Lanzoni, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Next generation giant telescopes as well as next generation instrumentation for 10m-class telescopes relies on the availability of highly performing adaptive optical systems, for studying new fields like circumstellar disks and extrasolar planets. These systems require deformable mirrors with very challenging parameters, including number of actuators up to 250 000 and inter-actuator spacing around 500μm. MOEMS-based devices are promising for future deformable mirrors. However, only limited strokes for large driving voltages have been demonstrated. In order to overcome these limitations, we are currently developing a micro-deformable mirror based on an array of electrostatic actuators with attachment posts to a continuous mirror on top. The originality of our approach lies in the elaboration of a sacrificial layer and of a structural layer made of polymer materials, using low-temperature process. This process allows the realization of high optical quality mirrors on top of an actuator array made with various techniques. We have developed the first polymer piston-motion actuator in order to reach high strokes for low driving voltages: a 10μm thick mobile plate with four springs attached to the substrate, and with an air gap of 10μm exhibits a piston motion of 2μm for 30V. Preliminary comparison with FEM models show very good agreement and design of a complete polymer-based MDM looks possible.

  8. The Inner Kiloparsec of Mrk 273 with Keck Adaptive Optics

    Vivian, U; Sanders, David; Max, Claire; Armus, Lee; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Evans, Aaron; Kewley, Lisa; Fazio, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    There is X-ray, optical, and mid-infrared imaging and spectroscopic evidence that the late-stage ultraluminous infrared galaxy merger Mrk 273 hosts a powerful active galactic nucleus (AGN). However, the exact location of the AGN and the nature of the nuclei have been difficult to determine due to dust obscuration and the limited wavelength coverage of available high-resolution data. Here we present near-infrared integral-field spectra and images of the nuclear region of Mrk 273 taken with OSIRIS and NIRC2 on the Keck II Telescope with laser guide star adaptive optics. We observe three spatially resolved components, and analyze the local molecular and ionized gas emission lines and their kinematics. We confirm the presence of the hard X-ray AGN in the southwest nucleus. In the north nucleus, we find a strongly rotating gas disk whose kinematics indicate a central black hole of mass 1.04 +/- 0.1 x 10^9 Msun. The H2 emission line shows an increase in velocity dispersion along the minor axis in both directions, a...

  9. A 2-axis Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based electromagnetic MEMS scanning mirror for optical coherence tomography

    Kim, Sehui; Lee, Changho; Kim, Jin Young; Lim, Geunbae; Kim, Jeehyun; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive imaging tool for visualizing cross-sectional images of biological tissues on a microscale. Various microelectromechanical system (MEMS) techniques have been applied to OCT for endoscopic catheters and handheld probes. Despite having several advantages such as compact sizes and high speeds for real-time imaging, the complexities of the fabrication processes and relatively high costs were bottlenecks for fast clinical translation and commercialization of the earlier MEMS scanners. To overcome these issues, we developed a 2-axis polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based electromagnetic MEMS scanning mirror based on flexible, cost-effective, and handleable PDMS. The size of this MEMS scanner was 15 × 15 × 15 mm3. To realize the characteristics of the scanner, we obtained the DC/AC responses and scanning patterns. The measured maximum scanning angles were 16.6° and 11.6° along the X and Y axes, respectively. The resonance frequencies were 82 and 57 Hz along the X and Y axes, respectively. The scanning patterns (raster and Lissajous scan patterns) are also demonstrated by controlling the frequency and amplitude. Finally, we showed the in vivo 2D-OCT images of human fingers by using a spectral domain OCT system with a PDMSbased MEMS scanning mirror. We then reconstructed the 3D images of human fingers. The obtained field of view was 8 × 8 mm2. The PDMS-based MEMS scanning mirror has the potential to combine other optical modalities and be widely used in preclinical and clinical translation research.

  10. Nonlinear optical properties of zinc oxide doped bismuth thin films using Z-scan technique

    Abed, S.; Bouchouit, K.; Aida, M. S.; Taboukhat, S.; Sofiani, Z.; Kulyk, B.; Figa, V.

    2016-06-01

    ZnO doped Bi thin films were grown on glass substrates by spray ultrasonic technique. This paper presents the effect of Bi doping concentration on structural and nonlinear optical properties of zinc oxide thin films. These thin films were characterized by X-ray diffractometer technique. XRD analysis revealed that the ZnO:Bi thin films indicated good preferential orientation along c-axis perpendicular to the substrate. The nonlinear optical properties such as nonlinear absorption coefficient (β) and third order nonlinear susceptibility (Imχ(3)) are investigated. The calculations have been performed with a Z scan technique using Nd:YAG laser emitting 532 nm. The reverse saturable absorption (RSA) mechanism was responsible for the optical limiting effect. The results suggest that this material considered as a promising candidate for future optical device applications.