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Sample records for adaptive optics laser

  1. Adaptive optics and laser guide stars at Lick observatory

    Brase, J.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    For the past several years LLNL has been developing adaptive optics systems for correction of both atmospheric turbulence effects and thermal distortions in optics for high-power lasers. Our early work focused on adaptive optics for beam control in laser isotope separation and ground-based free electron lasers. We are currently developing innovative adaptive optics and laser systems for sodium laser guide star applications at the University of California`s Lick and Keck Observeratories. This talk will describe our adaptive optics technology and some of its applications in high-resolution imaging and beam control.

  2. High-efficiency Autonomous Laser Adaptive Optics

    Baranec, Christoph; Law, Nicholas M; Ramaprakash, A N; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Hogstrom, Kristina; Bui, Khanh; Burse, Mahesh; Chordia, Pravin; Das, Hillol; Dekany, Richard; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Punnadi, Sujit

    2014-01-01

    As new large-scale astronomical surveys greatly increase the number of objects targeted and discoveries made, the requirement for efficient follow-up observations is crucial. Adaptive optics imaging, which compensates for the image-blurring effects of Earth's turbulent atmosphere, is essential for these surveys, but the scarcity, complexity and high demand of current systems limits their availability for following up large numbers of targets. To address this need, we have engineered and implemented Robo-AO, a fully autonomous laser adaptive optics and imaging system that routinely images over 200 objects per night with an acuity 10 times sharper at visible wavelengths than typically possible from the ground. By greatly improving the angular resolution, sensitivity, and efficiency of 1-3 m class telescopes, we have eliminated a major obstacle in the follow-up of the discoveries from current and future large astronomical surveys.

  3. HIGH-EFFICIENCY AUTONOMOUS LASER ADAPTIVE OPTICS

    As new large-scale astronomical surveys greatly increase the number of objects targeted and discoveries made, the requirement for efficient follow-up observations is crucial. Adaptive optics imaging, which compensates for the image-blurring effects of Earth's turbulent atmosphere, is essential for these surveys, but the scarcity, complexity and high demand of current systems limit their availability for following up large numbers of targets. To address this need, we have engineered and implemented Robo-AO, a fully autonomous laser adaptive optics and imaging system that routinely images over 200 objects per night with an acuity 10 times sharper at visible wavelengths than typically possible from the ground. By greatly improving the angular resolution, sensitivity, and efficiency of 1-3 m class telescopes, we have eliminated a major obstacle in the follow-up of the discoveries from current and future large astronomical surveys

  4. Beam shaping for laser-based adaptive optics in astronomy

    Béchet, Clémentine; Guesalaga, Andrés; Neichel, Benoit; Fesquet, Vincent; González-Núñez, Héctor; Zúñiga, Sebastián; Escarate, Pedro; Guzman, Dani

    2014-01-01

    The availability and performance of laser-based adaptive optics (AO) systems are strongly dependent on the power and quality of the laser beam before being projected to the sky. Frequent and time-consuming alignment procedures are usually required in the laser systems with free-space optics to optimize the beam. Despite these procedures, significant distortions of the laser beam have been observed during the first two years of operation of the Gemini South multi-conjugate adaptive optics syst...

  5. Adaptive optics at the PHELIX laser

    Heuck, Hans-Martin; Wittrock, Ulrich; Fils, Jérôme; Borneis, Stefan; Witte, Klaus; Eisenbart, Udo; Javorkova, Dasa; Bagnoud, Vincent; Götte, Stefan; Tauschwitz, Andreas; Onkels, Eckehard

    2007-05-01

    GSI Darmstadt currently builds a high-energy petawatt Nd:glass laser system, called PHELIX (Petawatt High-Energy Laser for Heavy-Ion Experiments). PHELIX will offer the world-wide unique combination of a high current, high-energy heavy-ion beam with an intense laser beam. Aberrations due to the beam transport and due to the amplification process limit the focusability and the intensity at the target. We have investigated the aberrations of the different amplification stages. The pre-amplifier stage consists of three rod-amplifiers which cause mainly defocus, but also a small part of coma and astigmatism. The main amplifier consists of five disk amplifiers with a clear aperture of 315 mm. These large disk-amplifiers cause pump-shot aberrations which occur instantly. After a shot, the disk amplifiers need a cooling time of several hours to relax to their initial state. This limits the repetition rate and causes long-term aberrations. We will present first measurements of the pump-shot and long-term aberrations caused by the pre- and the main amplifier in a single-pass configuration. In this context, we will present the adaptive optics system which is implemented in the PHELIX beam line and discuss its capability to compensate for the pump-shot and long-term aberrations.

  6. Laser guide stars and adaptive optics for astronomy

    Max, C.E. [ed.

    1992-07-15

    Five papers are included: feasibility experiment for sodium-alyer laser guide stars at LLNL; system design for a high power sodium beacon laser; sodium guide star adaptive optics system for astronomical imaging in the visible and near-infrared; high frame-rate, large field wavefront sensor; and resolution limits for ground-based astronomical imaging. Figs, tabs, refs.

  7. Adaptive optics for control of the laser welding process

    Jedlička Petr; Řeřucha Šimon; Šarbort Martin; Mrňa Libor

    2013-01-01

    The laser head with fixed focus optics is commonly used for the deep penetration laser welding. In such case the geometry and position of the beam waist are defined by the focusing lens. If the laser beam incident on the focusing lens is not well collimated but divergent and its divergence can be varied by proper adaptive optical elements, then also the geometry and position of the focus will be changeable. In this way it is possible to affect the energy coupling from the laser beam to t...

  8. Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics without Tip-tilt

    Davies, R; Lidman, C; Louarn, M Le; Kasper, M; Förster-Schreiber, N M; Roccatagliata, V; Ageorges, N; Amico, P; Dumas, C; Mannucci, F

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) systems allow a telescope to reach its diffraction limit at near infrared wavelengths. But to achieve this, a bright natural guide star (NGS) is needed for the wavefront sensing, severely limiting the fraction of the sky over which AO can be used. To some extent this can be overcome with a laser guide star (LGS). While the laser can be pointed anywhere in the sky, one still needs to have a natural star, albeit fainter, reasonably close to correct the image motion (tip-tilt) to which laser guide stars are insensitive. There are in fact many astronomical targets without suitable tip-tilt stars, but for which the enhanced resolution obtained with the Laser Guide Star Facility (LGSF) would still be very beneficial. This article explores what adaptive optics performance one might expect if one dispenses with the tip-tilt star, and in what situations this mode of observing might be needed.

  9. Horizontal Path Laser Communications Employing MEMS Adaptive Optics Correction

    Thompson, C A; Wilks, S C; Brase, J M; Young, R A; Johnson, G W; Ruggiero, A J

    2001-09-05

    Horizontal path laser communications are beginning to provide attractive alternatives for high-speed optical communications, In particular, companies are beginning to sell fiberless alternatives for intranet and sporting event video. These applications are primarily aimed at short distance applications (on the order of 1 km pathlength). There exists a potential need to extend this pathlength to distances much greater than a 1km. For cases of long distance optical propagation, atmospheric turbulence will ultimately limit the maximum achievable data rate. In this paper, we propose a method of improved signal quality through the use of adaptive optics. In particular, we show work in progress toward a high-speed, small footprint Adaptive Optics system for horizontal path laser communications. Such a system relies heavily on recent progress in Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) deformable mirrors as well as improved communication and computational components. In this paper we detail two Adaptive Optics approaches for improved through-put, the first is the compensated receiver (the traditional Adaptive Optics approach), the second is the compensated transmitter/receiver. The second approach allows for correction of the optical wavefront before transmission from the transmitter and prior to detection at the receiver.

  10. Beam shaping for laser-based adaptive optics in astronomy

    Béchet, Clémentine; Neichel, Benoit; Fesquet, Vincent; González-Núñez, Héctor; Zúñiga, Sebastián; Escarate, Pedro; Guzman, Dani

    2014-01-01

    The availability and performance of laser-based adaptive optics (AO) systems are strongly dependent on the power and quality of the laser beam before being projected to the sky. Frequent and time-consuming alignment procedures are usually required in the laser systems with free-space optics to optimize the beam. Despite these procedures, significant distortions of the laser beam have been observed during the first two years of operation of the Gemini South multi-conjugate adaptive optics system (GeMS). A beam shaping concept with two deformable mirrors is investigated in order to provide automated optimization of the laser quality for astronomical AO. This study aims at demonstrating the correction of quasi-static aberrations of the laser, in both amplitude and phase, testing a prototype of this two-deformable mirror concept on GeMS. The paper presents the results of the preparatory study before the experimental phase. An algorithm to control amplitude and phase correction, based on phase retrieval techniques...

  11. Adaptive optics for control of the laser welding process

    Mrňa, Libor; Šarbort, Martin; Řeřucha, Šimon; Jedlička, Petr

    Praha: Institute of Plasma Physics, 2012 - (Vít, T.; Kovačičinová, J.; Lédl, V.), s. 93-98 ISBN 978-80-87026-02-1. [Optics and Measurement 2012. Liberec (CZ), 16.10.2012-18.10.2012] R&D Projects: GA MPO 2A-3TP1/113; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : laser welding beam shaping * adaptive optics, * power optics * beam shaping Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation

  12. Adaptive optics for laser power beaming

    Leland, Robert P.

    1992-01-01

    It has been proposed to use a high energy pulsed laser to beam power into space for satellites or a lunar base. The effects of atmospheric transmission are critical to such a system. Thermal blooming in the atmosphere can cause the beam to spread rapidly. Atmospheric turbulence can cause beam bending or beam spreading, resulting in the loss of transmitted energy that fails to hit the target receiver.

  13. Laser Tomography Adaptive Optics (LTAO): A performance study

    Tatulli, E

    2013-01-01

    We present an analytical derivation of the on-axis performance of Adaptive Optics systems using a given number of guide stars of arbitrary altitude, distributed at arbitrary angular positions in the sky. The expressions of the residual error are given for cases of both continuous and discrete turbulent atmospheric profiles. Assuming Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing with circular apertures, we demonstrate that the error is formally described by integrals of products of three Bessel functions. We compare the performance of Adaptive Optics correction when using natural, Sodium or Rayleigh laser guide stars. For small diameter class telescopes (~5m), we show that a few number of Rayleigh beacons can provide similar performance to that of a single Sodium laser, for a lower overall cost of the instrument. For bigger apertures, using Rayleigh stars may not be such a suitable alternative because of the too severe cone effect that drastically degrades the quality of the correction.

  14. Optical design of the adaptive optics laser guide star system

    Bissinger, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    The design of an adaptive optics package for the 3 meter Lick telescope is presented. This instrument package includes a 69 actuator deformable mirror and a Hartmann type wavefront sensor operating in the visible wavelength; a quadrant detector for the tip-tile sensor and a tip-tilt mirror to stabilize atmospheric first order tip-tile errors. A high speed computer drives the deformable mirror to achieve near diffraction limited imagery. The different optical components and their individual design constraints are described. motorized stages and diagnostics tools are used to operate and maintain alignment throughout observation time from a remote control room. The expected performance are summarized and actual results of astronomical sources are presented.

  15. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging: technology update

    Merino D

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available David Merino, Pablo Loza-Alvarez The Institute of Photonic Sciences (ICFO, The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Castelldefels, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Adaptive optics (AO retinal imaging has become very popular in the past few years, especially within the ophthalmic research community. Several different retinal techniques, such as fundus imaging cameras or optical coherence tomography systems, have been coupled with AO in order to produce impressive images showing individual cell mosaics over different layers of the in vivo human retina. The combination of AO with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy has been extensively used to generate impressive images of the human retina with unprecedented resolution, showing individual photoreceptor cells, retinal pigment epithelium cells, as well as microscopic capillary vessels, or the nerve fiber layer. Over the past few years, the technique has evolved to develop several different applications not only in the clinic but also in different animal models, thanks to technological developments in the field. These developments have specific applications to different fields of investigation, which are not limited to the study of retinal diseases but also to the understanding of the retinal function and vision science. This review is an attempt to summarize these developments in an understandable and brief manner in order to guide the reader into the possibilities that AO scanning laser ophthalmoscopy offers, as well as its limitations, which should be taken into account when planning on using it. Keywords: high-resolution, in vivo retinal imaging, AOSLO

  16. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging: technology update

    Merino, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) retinal imaging has become very popular in the past few years, especially within the ophthalmic research community. Several different retinal techniques, such as fundus imaging cameras or optical coherence tomography systems, have been coupled with AO in order to produce impressive images showing individual cell mosaics over different layers of the in vivo human retina. The combination of AO with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy has been extensively used to generate impressive images of the human retina with unprecedented resolution, showing individual photoreceptor cells, retinal pigment epithelium cells, as well as microscopic capillary vessels, or the nerve fiber layer. Over the past few years, the technique has evolved to develop several different applications not only in the clinic but also in different animal models, thanks to technological developments in the field. These developments have specific applications to different fields of investigation, which are not limited to the study of retinal diseases but also to the understanding of the retinal function and vision science. This review is an attempt to summarize these developments in an understandable and brief manner in order to guide the reader into the possibilities that AO scanning laser ophthalmoscopy offers, as well as its limitations, which should be taken into account when planning on using it. PMID:27175057

  17. Adaptive optics for ultra short pulsed lasers in UHV environment

    Deneuville, Francois; Ropert, Laurent; Sauvageot, Paul; Theis, Sébastien

    2015-02-01

    ISP SYSTEM has developed an electro-mechanical deformable mirror compatible with Ultra High Vacuum environment, suitable for ultra short pulsed lasers. The design of the MD-AME deformable mirror is based on force application on numerous locations. μ-AME actuators are driven by stepper motors, and their patented special design allows controlling the force with a very high accuracy. Materials and assembly method have been adapted to UHV constraints and the performances were evaluated on a first application for a beam with a diameter of 250mm. A Strehl ratio above 0.9 was reached for this application. Optical aberrations up to Zernike order 5 can be corrected with a very low residual error as for standard MD-AME mirror. Amplitude can reach up to several hundreds of μm for low order corrections. Hysteresis is lower than 0.1% and linearity better than 99%. Contrary to piezo-electric actuators, the μ-AME actuators avoid print-through effects and they permit to keep the mirror shape stable even unpowered, providing a high resistance to electro-magnetic pulses. The deformable mirror design allows changing easily an actuator or even the membrane if needed, in order to improve the facility availability. They are designed for circular, square or elliptical aperture from 30mm up to 500mm or more, with incidence angle from 0° to 45°. They can be equipped with passive or active cooling for high power lasers with high repetition rate.

  18. Adaptive optics for daytime deep space laser communications to Mars

    Wilson, Keith E.; Wright, Malcolm; Lee, Shinkhak; Troy, Mitchell

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes JPL research in adaptive optics (AO) to reduce the daytime background noise on a Mars-to-Earth optical communications link. AO can reduce atmosphere-induced wavefront aberrations, and enable single mode receiver operation thereby buying back margin in the deep space optical communications link.

  19. Holographic Adaptive Laser Optics System (HALOS): Fast, Autonomous Aberration Correction

    Andersen, G.; MacDonald, K.; Gelsinger-Austin, P.

    2013-09-01

    We present an adaptive optics system which uses a multiplexed hologram to deconvolve the phase aberrations in an input beam. This wavefront characterization is extremely fast as it is based on simple measurements of the intensity of focal spots and does not require any computations. Furthermore, the system does not require a computer in the loop and is thus much cheaper, less complex and more robust as well. A fully functional, closed-loop prototype incorporating a 32-element MEMS mirror has been constructed. The unit has a footprint no larger than a laptop but runs at a bandwidth of 100kHz over an order of magnitude faster than comparable, conventional systems occupying a significantly larger volume. Additionally, since the sensing is based on parallel, all-optical processing, the speed is independent of actuator number running at the same bandwidth for one actuator as for a million. We are developing the HALOS technology with a view towards next-generation surveillance systems for extreme adaptive optics applications. These include imaging, lidar and free-space optical communications for unmanned aerial vehicles and SSA. The small volume is ideal for UAVs, while the high speed and high resolution will be of great benefit to the ground-based observation of space-based objects.

  20. Integrated adaptive optics optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope system for simultaneous cellular resolution in vivo retinal imaging

    Zawadzki, RJ; Jones, SM; Pilli, S; Balderas-Mata, S; Kim, DY; Olivier, SS; Werner, JS

    2011-01-01

    We describe an ultrahigh-resolution (UHR) retinal imaging system that combines adaptive optics Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) with an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO) to allow simultaneous data acquisition by the two modalities. The AO-SLO subsystem was integrated into the previously described AO-UHR OCT instrument with minimal changes to the latter. This was done in order to ensure optimal performance and image quality of the AO- UHR OCT. In this d...

  1. Analysis of adaptive laser scanning optical system with focus-tunable components

    Pokorný, P.; Mikš, A.; Novák, J.; Novák, P.

    2015-05-01

    This work presents a primary analysis of an adaptive laser scanner based on two-mirror beam-steering device and focustunable components (lenses with tunable focal length). It is proposed an optical scheme of an adaptive laser scanner, which can focus the laser beam in a continuous way to a required spatial position using the lens with tunable focal length. This work focuses on a detailed analysis of the active optical or opto-mechanical components (e.g. focus-tunable lenses) mounted in the optical systems of laser scanners. The algebraic formulas are derived for ray tracing through different configurations of the scanning optical system and one can calculate angles of scanner mirrors and required focal length of the tunable-focus component provided that the position of the focused beam in 3D space is given with a required tolerance. Computer simulations of the proposed system are performed using MATLAB.

  2. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope with integrated wide-field retinal imaging and tracking

    Ferguson, R. Daniel; Zhong, Zhangyi; Hammer, Daniel X.; Mujat, Mircea; Patel, Ankit H.; Deng, Cong; Zou, Weiyao; Burns, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a new, unified implementation of the adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) incorporating a wide-field line-scanning ophthalmoscope (LSO) and a closed-loop optical retinal tracker. AOSLO raster scans are deflected by the integrated tracking mirrors so that direct AOSLO stabilization is automatic during tracking. The wide-field imager and large-spherical-mirror optical interface design, as well as a large-stroke deformable mirror (DM), enable the AOSLO image fi...

  3. Implantable collamer lens and femtosecond laser for myopia: comparison using an adaptive optics visual simulator

    Cari Pérez-Vives; César Albarrán-Diego; Santiago García-Lázaro; Teresa Ferrer-Blasco; Robert Montés-Micó

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare optical and visual quality of implantable collamer lens (ICL) implantation and femtosecond laser in situ keratomileusis (F-LASIK) for myopia. Methods: The CRX1 adaptive optics visual simulator (Imagine Eyes, Orsay, France) was used to simulate the wavefront aberration pattern after the two surgical procedures for -3-diopter (D) and -6-D myopia. Visual acuity at different contrasts and contrast sensitivities at 10, 20, and 25 cycles/degree (cpd) were measured for 3-mm an...

  4. Development of Mesospheric Sodium Laser Beacon for Atmospheric Adaptive Optics

    Jeys, T. H.

    1992-01-01

    A solid-state source of long pulse length, sodium-resonance radiation was developed for the purpose of generating an artificial star in the earth's mesospheric sodium layer. This radiation is generated by sum-frequency mixing the output of a 1.064 micron Nd:YAG laser with the output of a 1.319-micron Nd:YAG laser. By operating these lasers at wavelengths very close to the peak of their tuning curves, it is possible to match the wavelength of the sum-frequency radiation to that of the sodium D2 adsorption wavelength. Two pulsed laser systems were constructed, one producing as much as 0.6 J of sodium resonance radiation at a 10-Hz repetition rate and another producing as much as 24 mJ at a 840-Hz repetition rate. In both laser systems, the 1.06-micron and 1.32-micron Nd:YAG lasers are configured as mode-locked master oscillators followed by power amplifiers. Other aspects of this project are presented.

  5. Adaptive optics for control of the laser welding process

    Mrňa, Libor; Šarbort, Martin; Řeřucha, Šimon; Jedlička, Petr

    Vol. 48. Liberec : EDP Sciences, 2013, 00017:1-6. ISBN 9781632661944. [OaM 2012 International Conference on Optics and Measurement. Liberec (CZ), 16.10.2012-18.10.2012] R&D Projects: GA MPO 2A-3TP1/113; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Fresnel absorption * multiple reflections * keyhole * evolution Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation

  6. Adaptive synchronization in chaotic laser diodes subject to optical feedback(s)

    In this paper a proposal is made of an adaptive coupling function for achieving synchronization between two lasers subject to optical feedback. Such a control scheme requires knowledge of the systems' parameters. For the first time we demonstrate that when these parameters are not available on-line parameter estimation can be applied. Generalization of the approach to the multi-feedback systems is also presented. (author)

  7. Adaptive Bit Rate Video Streaming Through an RF/Free Space Optical Laser Link

    A. Akbulut

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a channel-adaptive video streaming scheme which adjusts video bit rate according to channel conditions and transmits video through a hybrid RF/free space optical (FSO laser communication system. The design criteria of the FSO link for video transmission to 2.9 km distance have been given and adaptive bit rate video streaming according to the varying channel state over this link has been studied. It has been shown that the proposed structure is suitable for uninterrupted transmission of videos over the hybrid wireless network with reduced packet delays and losses even when the received power is decreased due to weather conditions.

  8. Demonstration of adaptive optics for mitigating laser propagation through a random air-water interface

    Land, Phillip; Majumdar, Arun K.

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes a new concept of mitigating signal distortions caused by random air-water interface using an adaptive optics (AO) system. This is the first time the concept of using an AO for mitigating the effects of distortions caused mainly by a random air-water interface is presented. We have demonstrated the feasibility of correcting the distortions using AO in a laboratory water tank for investigating the propagation effects of a laser beam through an airwater interface. The AO system consisting of a fast steering mirror, deformable mirror, and a Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor for mitigating surface water distortions has a unique way of stabilizing and aiming a laser onto an object underneath the water. Essentially the AO system mathematically takes the complex conjugate of the random phase caused by air-water interface allowing the laser beam to penetrate through the water by cancelling with the complex conjugates. The results show the improvement of a number of metrics including Strehl ratio, a measure of the quality of optical image formation for diffraction limited optical system. These are the first results demonstrating the feasibility of developing a new sensor system such as Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) utilizing AO for mitigating surface water distortions.

  9. The Robo-AO KOI Survey: laser adaptive optics imaging of every Kepler exoplanet candidate

    Ziegler, Carl; Baranec, Christoph; Morton, Tim; Riddle, Reed; Atkinson, Dani; Nofi, Larissa

    2016-01-01

    The Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey is observing every Kepler planet candidate host star (KOI) with laser adaptive optics imaging to hunt for blended nearby stars which may be physically associated companions. With the unparalleled efficiency provided by the first fully robotic adaptive optics system, we perform the critical search for nearby stars (0.15" to 4.0" separation with contrasts up to 6 magnitudes) that dilute the observed planetary transit signal, contributing to inaccurate planetary characteristics or astrophysical false positives. We present 3313 high resolution observations of Kepler planetary hosts from 2012-2015, discovering 479 nearby stars. We measure an overall nearby star probability rate of 14.5\\pm0.8%. With this large data set, we are uniquely able to explore broad correlations between multiple star systems and the properties of the planets which they host, providing insight into the formation and evolution of planetary systems in our galaxy. Several KOIs of particular interest...

  10. High-resolution adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope with multiple deformable mirrors

    Chen, Diana C.; Olivier, Scot S.; Jones; Steven M.

    2010-02-23

    An adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopes is introduced to produce non-invasive views of the human retina. The use of dual deformable mirrors improved the dynamic range for correction of the wavefront aberrations compared with the use of the MEMS mirror alone, and improved the quality of the wavefront correction compared with the use of the bimorph mirror alone. The large-stroke bimorph deformable mirror improved the capability for axial sectioning with the confocal imaging system by providing an easier way to move the focus axially through different layers of the retina.

  11. Real-time blind deconvolution of retinal images in adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    Li, Hao; Lu, Jing; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Yudong

    2011-06-01

    With the use of adaptive optics (AO), the ocular aberrations can be compensated to get high-resolution image of living human retina. However, the wavefront correction is not perfect due to the wavefront measure error and hardware restrictions. Thus, it is necessary to use a deconvolution algorithm to recover the retinal images. In this paper, a blind deconvolution technique called Incremental Wiener filter is used to restore the adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) images. The point-spread function (PSF) measured by wavefront sensor is only used as an initial value of our algorithm. We also realize the Incremental Wiener filter on graphics processing unit (GPU) in real-time. When the image size is 512 × 480 pixels, six iterations of our algorithm only spend about 10 ms. Retinal blood vessels as well as cells in retinal images are restored by our algorithm, and the PSFs are also revised. Retinal images with and without adaptive optics are both restored. The results show that Incremental Wiener filter reduces the noises and improve the image quality.

  12. HIGH ENERGY LASER OPTICS

    Christiansen, W.

    1980-01-01

    This paper reviews briefly the theoretical understanding and properties of optical resonators. Starting from the theory of stable laser resonators, unstable resonators are discussed with emphasis on understanding their properties that ensure near diffraction limited performance of high power lasers. The growing field of adaptive optics for laser transmission is also examined as an added means of improving far field performance of a laser under adverse circumstances. The improvements obtained ...

  13. Experimental demonstration of laser tomographic adaptive optics on a 30-meter telescope at 800 nm

    Ammons, S., Mark; Johnson, Luke; Kupke, Renate; Gavel, Donald T.; Max, Claire E.

    2010-07-01

    A critical goal in the next decade is to develop techniques that will extend Adaptive Optics correction to visible wavelengths on Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs). We demonstrate in the laboratory the highly accurate atmospheric tomography necessary to defeat the cone effect on ELTs, an essential milestone on the path to this capability. We simulate a high-order Laser Tomographic AO System for a 30-meter telescope with the LTAO/MOAO testbed at UCSC. Eight Sodium Laser Guide Stars (LGSs) are sensed by 99x99 Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors over 75". The AO system is diffraction-limited at a science wavelength of 800 nm (S ~ 6-9%) over a field of regard of 20" diameter. Openloop WFS systematic error is observed to be proportional to the total input atmospheric disturbance and is nearly the dominant error budget term (81 nm RMS), exceeded only by tomographic wavefront estimation error (92 nm RMS). The total residual wavefront error for this experiment is comparable to that expected for wide-field tomographic adaptive optics systems of similar wavefront sensor order and LGS constellation geometry planned for Extremely Large Telescopes.

  14. Application of adaptive optics for controlling the NIF laser performance and spot size

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser will use a 192-beam multi-pass architecture capable of delivering several MJ of UV energy in temporal pulse formats varying from sub-ns square to 20 ns precisely-defined high-contrast shapes. Each beam wavefront will be subjected to effects of optics inhomogeneities, figuring errors, mounting distortions, prompt and slow thermal effects from flashlamps, driven and passive air-path turbulence, and gravity-driven deformations. A 39-actuator intra-cavity deformable mirror, controlled by data from a 77-lenslet Hartman sensor will be used to correct these wavefront aberrations and thus to assure that stringent farfield spot requirements are met. We have developed numerical models for the expected distortions, the operation of the adaptive optic system, and the anticipated effects on beam propagation, component damage, frequency conversion, and target-plane energy distribution. These models have been extensively validated against data from LLNL's Beamlet, and Amplab lasers. We review the expected beam wavefront aberrations and their potential for adverse effects on the laser performance, describe our model of the corrective system operation, and display our predictions for corrected-beam operation of the NI

  15. Robotic Laser-Adaptive-Optics Imaging of 715 Kepler Exoplanet Candidates using Robo-AO

    Law, Nicholas M; Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Ravichandran, Ganesh; Ziegler, Carl; Johnson, John Asher; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P; Bui, Khanh; Burse, Mahesh P; Das, H K; Dekany, Richard G; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Punnadi, Sujit; Ramaprakash, A N

    2013-01-01

    The Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey is designed to observe every Kepler planet candidate host star with laser adaptive optics imaging to search for blended nearby stars, which may be physically associated companions and/or responsible for transit false positives. In this paper we present the results from the 2012 observing season, searching for stars close to 715 representative Kepler planet candidate hosts. We find 53 companions, 44 of which are new discoveries. We detail the Robo-AO survey data reduction methods including a method of using the large ensemble of target observations as mutual point-spread-function references, along with a new automated companion-detection algorithm designed for large adaptive optics surveys. Our survey is sensitive to objects from 0.15" to 2.5" separation, with contrast ratios up to delta-m~6. We measure an overall nearby-star-probability for Kepler planet candidates of 7.4% +/- 1.0%, and calculate the effects of each detected nearby star on the Kepler-measured plan...

  16. Multi-laser-guided adaptive optics for the Large Binocular Telescope

    Lloyd-Hart, M.; Angel, R.; Green, R.; Stalcup, T.; Milton, N. M.; Powell, K.

    2007-09-01

    We describe the conceptual design of an advanced laser guide star facility (LGSF) for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), to be built in collaboration with the LBT's international partners. The highest priority goal for the facility is the correction of ground-layer turbulence, providing partial seeing compensation in the near IR bands over a 4' field. In the H band, GLAO is projected to improve the median seeing from 0.55" to 0.2". The new facility will build on the LBT's natural guide star AO system, integrated into the telescope with correction by adaptive secondary mirrors, and will draw on Arizona's experience in the construction of the first multi-laser adaptive optics (AO) system at the 6.5 m MMT. The LGSF will use four Rayleigh beacons at 532 nm, projected to an altitude of 25 km, on each of the two 8.4 m component telescopes. Initial use of the system for ground layer correction will deliver image quality well matched to the LBT's two LUCIFER near IR instruments. They will be used for direct imaging over a 4'×4' field and will offer a unique capability in high resolution multi-object spectroscopy. The LGSF is designed to include long-term upgrade paths. Coherent imaging at the combined focus of the two apertures will be exploited by the LBT Interferometer in the thermal IR. Using the same launch optics, an axial sodium or Rayleigh beacon can be added to each constellation, for tomographic wavefront reconstruction and diffraction limited imaging over the usual isoplanatic patch. In the longer term, a second DM conjugated to high altitude is foreseen for the LBT's LINC-NIRVANA instrument, which would extend the coherent diffraction-limited field to an arcminute in diameter with multi-conjugate AO.

  17. Implantable collamer lens and femtosecond laser for myopia: comparison using an adaptive optics visual simulator

    Cari Pérez-Vives

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare optical and visual quality of implantable collamer lens (ICL implantation and femtosecond laser in situ keratomileusis (F-LASIK for myopia. Methods: The CRX1 adaptive optics visual simulator (Imagine Eyes, Orsay, France was used to simulate the wavefront aberration pattern after the two surgical procedures for -3-diopter (D and -6-D myopia. Visual acuity at different contrasts and contrast sensitivities at 10, 20, and 25 cycles/degree (cpd were measured for 3-mm and 5-mm pupils. The modulation transfer function (MTF and point spread function (PSF were calculated for 5-mm pupils. Results: F-LASIK MTF was worse than ICL MTF, which was close to diffraction-limited MTF. ICL cases showed less spread out of PSF than F-LASIK cases. ICL cases showed better visual acuity values than F-LASIK cases for all pupils, contrasts, and myopic treatments (p0.05. For -6-D myopia, however, statistically significant differences in contrast sensitivities were found for both pupils for all evaluated spatial frequencies (p<0.05. Contrast sensitivities were better after ICL implantation than after F-LASIK. Conclusions: ICL implantation and F-LASIK provide good optical and visual quality, although the former provides better outcomes of MTF, PSF, visual acuity, and contrast sensitivity, especially for cases with large refractive errors and pupil sizes. These outcomes are related to the F-LASIK producing larger high-order aberrations.

  18. Morphologies of High Redshift, Dust Obscured Galaxies from Keck Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics

    Melbourne, J; Armus, Lee; Dey, Arjun; Brand, K; Thompson, D; Soifer, B T; Matthews, K; Jannuzi, B T; Houck, J R

    2008-01-01

    Spitzer MIPS images in the Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey have revealed a class of extremely dust obscured galaxy (DOG) at z~2. The DOGs are defined by very red optical to mid-IR (observed-frame) colors, R - [24 um] > 14 mag, i.e. f_v (24 um) / f_v (R) > 1000. They are Ultra-Luminous Infrared Galaxies with L_8-1000 um > 10^12 -10^14 L_sun, but typically have very faint optical (rest-frame UV) fluxes. We imaged three DOGs with the Keck Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics (LGSAO) system, obtaining ~0.06'' resolution in the K'-band. One system was dominated by a point source, while the other two were clearly resolved. Of the resolved sources, one can be modeled as a exponential disk system. The other is consistent with a de Vaucouleurs profile typical of elliptical galaxies. The non-parametric measures of their concentration and asymmetry, show the DOGs to be both compact and smooth. The AO images rule out double nuclei with separations of greater than 0.1'' (< 1 kpc at z=2), making it unlikely ...

  19. Maritime adaptive optics beam control

    Corley, Melissa S.

    2010-01-01

    The Navy is interested in developing systems for horizontal, near ocean surface, high-energy laser propagation through the atmosphere. Laser propagation in the maritime environment requires adaptive optics control of aberrations caused by atmospheric distortion. In this research, a multichannel transverse adaptive filter is formulated in Matlab's Simulink environment and compared to a complex lattice filter that has previously been implemented in large system simulations. The adaptive fil...

  20. Intelligent correction of laser beam propagation through turbulent media using adaptive optics

    Ko, Jonathan; Wu, Chensheng; Davis, Christopher C.

    2014-10-01

    Adaptive optics methods have long been used by researchers in the astronomy field to retrieve correct images of celestial bodies. The approach is to use a deformable mirror combined with Shack-Hartmann sensors to correct the slightly distorted image when it propagates through the earth's atmospheric boundary layer, which can be viewed as adding relatively weak distortion in the last stage of propagation. However, the same strategy can't be easily applied to correct images propagating along a horizontal deep turbulence path. In fact, when turbulence levels becomes very strong (Cn 2>10-13 m-2/3), limited improvements have been made in correcting the heavily distorted images. We propose a method that reconstructs the light field that reaches the camera, which then provides information for controlling a deformable mirror. An intelligent algorithm is applied that provides significant improvement in correcting images. In our work, the light field reconstruction has been achieved with a newly designed modified plenoptic camera. As a result, by actively intervening with the coherent illumination beam, or by giving it various specific pre-distortions, a better (less turbulence affected) image can be obtained. This strategy can also be expanded to much more general applications such as correcting laser propagation through random media and can also help to improve designs in free space optical communication systems.

  1. High-Resolution Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope with Dual Deformable Mirrors

    Chen, D C; Jones, S M; Silva, D A; Olivier, S S

    2006-08-11

    Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO SLO) has demonstrated superior optical quality of non-invasive view of the living retina, but with limited capability of aberration compensation. In this paper, we demonstrate that the use of dual deformable mirrors can effectively compensate large aberrations in the human retina. We used a bimorph mirror to correct large-stroke, low-order aberrations and a MEMS mirror to correct low-stroke, high-order aberration. The measured ocular RMS wavefront error of a test subject was 240 nm without AO compensation. We were able to reduce the RMS wavefront error to 90 nm in clinical settings using one deformable mirror for the phase compensation and further reduced the wavefront error to 48 nm using two deformable mirrors. Compared with that of a single-deformable-mirror SLO system, dual AO SLO offers much improved dynamic range and better correction of the wavefront aberrations. The use of large-stroke deformable mirrors provided the system with the capability of axial sectioning different layers of the retina. We have achieved diffraction-limited in-vivo retinal images of targeted retinal layers such as photoreceptor layer, blood vessel layer and nerve fiber layers with the combined phase compensation of the two deformable mirrors in the AO SLO.

  2. Laser-plasma interaction with an adaptive optics wavefront-corrected laser beam

    The propagation of an intense laser beam trough a preformed plasma is of particular interest in order to achieve laser inertial confinement fusion. Experiments carried out with a near-diffraction limited laser beam, producing a single hot spot interacting with the plasma, delivered new results, presented in this Ph.D. dissertation. In particular the first experimental observation of the filament instability confirms the numerous theoretical and numerical studies on the subject. Beam spreading and filament-ion thresholds are studied thanks to near-field and far-field images, with respect to laser intensity, time and space, and plasma transverse velocity. Same diagnostics have been applied to the stimulated Brillouin scattered light, enabling the first observation of the transverse Brillouin activity in the plasma. (author)

  3. Robotic laser adaptive optics imaging of 715 Kepler exoplanet candidates using Robo-AO

    The Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey is observing every Kepler planet candidate host star with laser adaptive optics imaging to search for blended nearby stars, which may be physically associated companions and/or responsible for transit false positives. In this paper, we present the results from the 2012 observing season, searching for stars close to 715 Kepler planet candidate hosts. We find 53 companions, 43 of which are new discoveries. We detail the Robo-AO survey data reduction methods including a method of using the large ensemble of target observations as mutual point-spread-function references, along with a new automated companion-detection algorithm designed for large adaptive optics surveys. Our survey is sensitive to objects from ≈0.''15 to 2.''5 separation, with magnitude differences up to Δm ≈ 6. We measure an overall nearby-star probability for Kepler planet candidates of 7.4% ± 1.0%, and calculate the effects of each detected nearby star on the Kepler-measured planetary radius. We discuss several Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) of particular interest, including KOI-191 and KOI-1151, which are both multi-planet systems with detected stellar companions whose unusual planetary system architecture might be best explained if they are 'coincident multiple' systems, with several transiting planets shared between the two stars. Finally, we find 98% confidence evidence that short-period giant planets are two to three times more likely than longer-period planets to be found in wide stellar binaries.

  4. Advancing adaptive optics technology: Laboratory turbulence simulation and optimization of laser guide stars

    Rampy, Rachel A.

    Since Galileo's first telescope some 400 years ago, astronomers have been building ever-larger instruments. Yet only within the last two decades has it become possible to realize the potential angular resolutions of large ground-based telescopes, by using adaptive optics (AO) technology to counter the blurring effects of Earth's atmosphere. And only within the past decade have the development of laser guide stars (LGS) extended AO capabilities to observe science targets nearly anywhere in the sky. Improving turbulence simulation strategies and LGS are the two main topics of my research. In the first part of this thesis, I report on the development of a technique for manufacturing phase plates for simulating atmospheric turbulence in the laboratory. The process involves strategic application of clear acrylic paint onto a transparent substrate. Results of interferometric characterization of the plates are described and compared to Kolmogorov statistics. The range of r0 (Fried's parameter) achieved thus far is 0.2--1.2 mm at 650 nm measurement wavelength, with a Kolmogorov power law. These plates proved valuable at the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics at University of California, Santa Cruz, where they have been used in the Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics testbed, during integration and testing of the Gemini Planet Imager, and as part of the calibration system of the on-sky AO testbed named ViLLaGEs (Visible Light Laser Guidestar Experiments). I present a comparison of measurements taken by ViLLaGEs of the power spectrum of a plate and the real sky turbulence. The plate is demonstrated to follow Kolmogorov theory well, while the sky power spectrum does so in a third of the data. This method of fabricating phase plates has been established as an effective and low-cost means of creating simulated turbulence. Due to the demand for such devices, they are now being distributed to other members of the AO community. The second topic of this thesis pertains to understanding and

  5. Mapping the Clumpy Structures within Submillimeter Galaxies using Laser-Guide Star Adaptive Optics Spectroscopy

    Menéndez-Delmestre, Karín; Swinbank, Mark; Smail, Ian; Ivison, Rob J; Chapman, Scott C; Gonçalves, Thiago S

    2013-01-01

    We present the first integral-field spectroscopic observations of high-redshift submillimeter-selected galaxies (SMGs) using Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics (LGS-AO). We target H-alpha emission of three SMGs at redshifts z~1.4-2.4 with the OH-Suppressing Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (OSIRIS) on Keck. The spatially-resolved spectroscopy of these galaxies reveals unresolved broad H-alpha line regions (FWHM>1000 km/s) likely associated with an AGN and regions of diffuse star formation traced by narrow-line H-alpha emission (FWHM<500 km/s) dominated by multiple Halpha-bright stellar clumps, each contributing 1-30% of the total clump-integrated H-alpha emission. We find that these SMGs host high star-formation rate surface densities, similar to local extreme sources, such as circumnuclear starbursts and luminous infrared galaxies. However, in contrast to these local environments, SMGs appear to be undergoing such intense activity on significantly larger spatial scales as revealed by extended H-alpha emission ...

  6. High-resolution adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope with dual deformable mirrors for large aberration correction

    Chen, D; Jones, S M; Silva, D A; Olivier, S S

    2007-01-25

    Scanning laser ophthalmoscopes with adaptive optics (AOSLO) have been shown previously to provide a noninvasive, cellular-scale view of the living human retina. However, the clinical utility of these systems has been limited by the available deformable mirror technology. In this paper, we demonstrate that the use of dual deformable mirrors can effectively compensate large aberrations in the human retina, making the AOSLO system a viable, non-invasive, high-resolution imaging tool for clinical diagnostics. We used a bimorph deformable mirror to correct low-order aberrations with relatively large amplitudes. The bimorph mirror is manufactured by Aoptix, Inc. with 37 elements and 18 {micro}m stroke in a 10 mm aperture. We used a MEMS deformable mirror to correct high-order aberrations with lower amplitudes. The MEMS mirror is manufactured by Boston Micromachine, Inc with 144 elements and 1.5 {micro}m stroke in a 3 mm aperture. We have achieved near diffraction-limited retina images using the dual deformable mirrors to correct large aberrations up to {+-} 3D of defocus and {+-} 3D of cylindrical aberrations with test subjects. This increases the range of spectacle corrections by the AO systems by a factor of 10, which is crucial for use in the clinical environment. This ability for large phase compensation can eliminate accurate refractive error fitting for the patients, which greatly improves the system ease of use and efficiency in the clinical environment.

  7. An adaptive optics system for solid-state laser systems used in inertial confinement fusion

    Using adaptive optics the authors have obtained nearly diffraction-limited 5 kJ, 3 nsec output pulses at 1.053 microm from the Beamlet demonstration system for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The peak Strehl ratio was improved from 0.009 to 0.50, as estimated from measured wavefront errors. They have also measured the relaxation of the thermally induced aberrations in the main beam line over a period of 4.5 hours. Peak-to-valley aberrations range from 6.8 waves at 1.053 microm within 30 minutes after a full system shot to 3.9 waves after 4.5 hours. The adaptive optics system must have enough range to correct accumulated thermal aberrations from several shots in addition to the immediate shot-induced error. Accumulated wavefront errors in the beam line will affect both the design of the adaptive optics system for NIF and the performance of that system

  8. The First Component of the Adaptive Optics Facility Enters Operations: The Laser Traffic Control System on Paranal

    Amico, P.; Santos, P.; Summers, D.; Duhoux, Ph.; Arsenault, R.; Bierwirth, Th.; Kuntschner, H.; Madec, P.-Y.; Prümm, M.; Rejkuba, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Laser Traffic Control System (LTCS) entered routine operations on 1 October 2015 at the Paranal Observatory as the first component of the Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF). LTCS allows the night operators to plan and execute the observations without having to worry about possible collisions between the AOF's powerful laser beams and other telescopes with laser-sensitive instruments. LTCS provides observers with real-time information about ongoing collisions, predictive information for possible collisions and priority resolution between telescope pairs, where at least one telescope is operating a laser. LTCS is now deployed and embedded in the observatory's operational environment, supporting high configurability of telescopes and instruments, right-of-way priority rules and interfacing with ESO's observing tools for Service and Visitor Mode observations.

  9. An adaptive optics approach for laser beam correction in turbulence utilizing a modified plenoptic camera

    Ko, Jonathan; Wu, Chensheng; Davis, Christopher C.

    2015-09-01

    Adaptive optics has been widely used in the field of astronomy to correct for atmospheric turbulence while viewing images of celestial bodies. The slightly distorted incoming wavefronts are typically sensed with a Shack-Hartmann sensor and then corrected with a deformable mirror. Although this approach has proven to be effective for astronomical purposes, a new approach must be developed when correcting for the deep turbulence experienced in ground to ground based optical systems. We propose the use of a modified plenoptic camera as a wavefront sensor capable of accurately representing an incoming wavefront that has been significantly distorted by strong turbulence conditions (C2n distortions. After the large distortions have been corrected, a secondary mode utilizing more traditional adaptive optics algorithms can take over to fine tune the wavefront correction. This two-stage algorithm can find use in free space optical communication systems, in directed energy applications, as well as for image correction purposes.

  10. World-wide deployment of Robo-AO visible-light robotic laser adaptive optics systems

    Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Law, Nicholas Michael; Lu, Jessica R.; Tonry, John; Tully, R. Brent; Wright, Shelley; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Severson, Scott; Choi, Philip; Ramaprakash, A.; Chun, Mark; Connelley, Mike; Tokunaga, Alan; Hall, Donald

    2015-08-01

    In the next few years, several modest-sized telescopes around the world will be upgraded with autonomous laser adaptive optics systems based on the Robo-AO prototype deployed at the Palomar Observatory 1.5-m telescope. The prototype commenced scientific operations in June 2012 and more than 19,000 observations have since been performed at the ~0.12" visible-light diffraction limit. We are planning to move the prototype system to the 2.1-m telescope at Kitt Peak for a 3-year deployment which will serve a consortium of users including Caltech, the University of Hawai`i, IUCAA, NCU and institutions in China. Additionally, 2 months per year will be made available to the US astronomical community.New Robo-AO systems are in various stages of development: a clone by IUCAA for the 2-m IGO telescope in India; a natural guide star variant, KAPAO, by Pomona College at the 1-m Table Mountain telescope in California; and second generation Robo-AO systems are planned for the 3-m IRTF and 2.2-m University of Hawai'i telescopes on Maunakea, Hawai`i. The latter will exploit Maunakea's excellent observing conditions to provide higher Strehl ratios, sharper imaging, ~0.07", and correction to lambda = 400 nm. An additional infrared integral-field spectrograph will be fed by the UH 2.2-m Robo-AO system to quickly classify transients, such as supernovae and asteroids, discovered by the ATLAS system in Hawai`i.

  11. MAPPING THE CLUMPY STRUCTURES WITHIN SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES USING LASER-GUIDE STAR ADAPTIVE OPTICS SPECTROSCOPY

    We present the first integral-field spectroscopic observations of high-redshift submillimeter-selected galaxies (SMGs) using Laser-Guide Star Adaptive Optics. We target Hα emission of three SMGs at redshifts z ∼ 1.4-2.4 with the OH-Suppressing Infrared Imaging Spectrograph on Keck. The spatially resolved spectroscopy of these galaxies reveals unresolved broad-Hα line regions (FWHM >1000 km s–1) likely associated with an active galactic nucleus (AGN) and regions of diffuse star formation traced by narrow-line Hα emission (FWHM ∼–1) dominated by multiple Hα-bright stellar clumps, each contributing 1%-30% of the total clump-integrated Hα emission. We find that these SMGs host high star formation rate surface densities, similar to local extreme sources, such as circumnuclear starbursts and luminous infrared galaxies. However, in contrast to these local environments, SMGs appear to be undergoing such intense activity on significantly larger spatial scales as revealed by extended Hα emission over 4-16 kpc. Hα kinematics show no evidence of ordered global motion as would be found in a disk, but rather large velocity offsets (∼few × 100 km s–1) between the distinct stellar clumps. Together with the asymmetric distribution of the stellar clumps around the AGN in these objects, it is unlikely that we are unveiling a clumpy disk structure as has been suggested in other high-redshift populations of star-forming galaxies. The SMG clumps in this sample may correspond to remnants of originally independent gas-rich systems that are in the process of merging, hence triggering the ultraluminous SMG phase.

  12. Adaptive Optics for Large Telescopes

    Olivier, S

    2008-06-27

    The use of adaptive optics was originally conceived by astronomers seeking to correct the blurring of images made with large telescopes due to the effects of atmospheric turbulence. The basic idea is to use a device, a wave front corrector, to adjust the phase of light passing through an optical system, based on some measurement of the spatial variation of the phase transverse to the light propagation direction, using a wave front sensor. Although the original concept was intended for application to astronomical imaging, the technique can be more generally applied. For instance, adaptive optics systems have been used for several decades to correct for aberrations in high-power laser systems. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the world's largest laser system, the National Ignition Facility, uses adaptive optics to correct for aberrations in each of the 192 beams, all of which must be precisely focused on a millimeter scale target in order to perform nuclear physics experiments.

  13. Adaptive Optics for Large Telescopes

    The use of adaptive optics was originally conceived by astronomers seeking to correct the blurring of images made with large telescopes due to the effects of atmospheric turbulence. The basic idea is to use a device, a wave front corrector, to adjust the phase of light passing through an optical system, based on some measurement of the spatial variation of the phase transverse to the light propagation direction, using a wave front sensor. Although the original concept was intended for application to astronomical imaging, the technique can be more generally applied. For instance, adaptive optics systems have been used for several decades to correct for aberrations in high-power laser systems. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the world's largest laser system, the National Ignition Facility, uses adaptive optics to correct for aberrations in each of the 192 beams, all of which must be precisely focused on a millimeter scale target in order to perform nuclear physics experiments

  14. “Lucky Averaging”: Quality improvement on Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope Images

    Huang, Gang; Zhong, Zhangyi; Zou, Weiyao; Burns, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive optics(AO) has greatly improved retinal image resolution. However, even with AO, temporal and spatial variations in image quality still occur due to wavefront fluctuations, intra-frame focus shifts and other factors. As a result, aligning and averaging images can produce a mean image that has lower resolution or contrast than the best images within a sequence. To address this, we propose an image post-processing scheme called “lucky averaging”, analogous to lucky imaging (Fried, 1978...

  15. Laser beam propagation through turbulence and adaptive optics for beam delivery improvement

    Nicolas, Stephane

    2015-10-01

    We report results from numerical simulations of laser beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence. In particular, we study the statistical variations of the fractional beam energy hitting inside an optical aperture placed at several kilometer distance. The simulations are performed for different turbulence conditions and engagement ranges, with and without the use of turbulence mitigation. Turbulence mitigation is simulated with phase conjugation. The energy fluctuations are deduced from time sequence realizations. It is shown that turbulence mitigation leads to an increase of the mean energy inside the aperture and decrease of the fluctuations even in strong turbulence conditions and long distance engagement. As an example, the results are applied to a high energy laser countermeasure system, where we determine the probability that a single laser pulse, or one of the pulses in a sequence, will provide a lethal energy inside the target aperture. Again, turbulence mitigation contributes to increase the performance of the system at long-distance and for strong turbulence conditions in terms of kill probability. We also discuss a specific case where turbulence contributes to increase the pulse energy within the target aperture. The present analysis can be used to evaluate the performance of a variety of systems, such as directed countermeasures, laser communication, and laser weapons.

  16. [Adaptive optics for ophthalmology].

    Saleh, M

    2016-04-01

    Adaptive optics is a technology enhancing the visual performance of an optical system by correcting its optical aberrations. Adaptive optics have already enabled several breakthroughs in the field of visual sciences, such as improvement of visual acuity in normal and diseased eyes beyond physiologic limits, and the correction of presbyopia. Adaptive optics technology also provides high-resolution, in vivo imaging of the retina that may eventually help to detect the onset of retinal conditions at an early stage and provide better assessment of treatment efficacy. PMID:27019970

  17. Development of adaptive optical system of both spatial and temporal beam shaping for UV-laser pulse

    We have been developing a stable and highly qualified UV-laser pulse as a light source of an rf gun for an injector candidate of future light sources. The CPA (chirped pulse amplification) Ti:Sapphire laser system is operated at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. At the third-harmonic generation (central wavelength: 263 nm), the laser pulse energy after a 45-cm silica rod is up to 850 mJ/pulse. In its present status, the laser's pulse energy stability has been improved down to 0.2-0.3% at the fundamental and 0.7-1.4% (rms; 10pps; 33,818 shots) at the third-harmonic generation, respectively. This stability has been held for one month continuously, 24 hours a day. The improvements we had passively implemented were to stabilize the laser system as well as the environmental conditions. We introduced a humidity-control system kept at 50-60% in a clean room to reduce damage to the optics. In addition, we prepared a deformable mirror for spatial shaping and a spatial light modulator based on fused-silica plates for temporal shaping. We are applying both of the adaptive optics to automatic optimization of the electron beam bunch to produce lower emittance with the feedback routine. After the improvements, we can now freely form any arbitrary laser intensity distribution on the surface of the cathode. A fiber bundle was used to passively shape the laser spatial and temporal profile for the backward cathode illumination. The profile was spatially shaped into a perfectly homogeneous one with a 90-cm long fiber bundle. This shaping technique is based in practice on pulse stacking with 1,300 different optical paths. The 80-fs laser is shaped as a quasi-Gaussian profile with a pulse duration of 16 ps (FWHM). Combining with the computer-aided deformable mirror, the fiber bundle laser homogenizer can realize the ideal ellipsoidal laser profile to suppress emittance growing due to the space charge effect. (author)

  18. Superresolving distant galaxies with gravitational telescopes : Keck laser guide star adaptive optics and Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the lens system SDSS J0737+3216

    Marshall, Philip J.; Treu, Tommaso; Melbourne, Jason; Gavazzi, Raphael; Bundy, Kevin; Ammons, S. Mark; Bolton, Adam S.; Burles, Scott; Larkin, James E.; Le Mignant, David; Koo, David C.; Koopmans, Leon V. E.; Max, Claire E.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Steinbring, Eric; Wright, Shelley A.

    2007-01-01

    We combine high-resolution images in four optical/infrared bands, obtained with the laser guide star adaptive optics ( LGSAO) system on the Keck telescope and with the Hubble Space Telescope ( HST), to study the gravitational lens system SDSS J0737 + 3216 ( lens redshift 0.3223, source redshift 0.58

  19. Working Beyond the Static Limits of Laser Stability by Use of Adaptive and Polarization-Conjugation Optics

    Moshe, Inon; Jackel, Steven; Lallouz, Raphael

    1998-09-01

    Strong thermo-optical aberrations in flash lamp-pumped Nd:Cr:GSGG rods were corrected to yield TEM 00 output at twice the efficiency of Nd:YAG. A hemispherical resonator operating at the limit of stability was employed. As much as 3 W of average power in a Gaussian beam ( M 2 1 ) was generated. Unique features were zero warm-up time and the ability to vary the repetition rate without varying energy, near- and far-field profiles, or polarization purity. Thermal focusing and astigmatism were corrected with a microprocessor-controlled adaptive-optics backmirror composed of discrete elements (variable-radius mirror). A reentrant resonator coupled polarizer losses back into the laser rod and corrected depolarization.

  20. High-resolution imaging of the retinal nerve fiber layer in normal eyes using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy.

    Kohei Takayama

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To conduct high-resolution imaging of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL in normal eyes using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO. METHODS: AO-SLO images were obtained in 20 normal eyes at multiple locations in the posterior polar area and a circular path with a 3-4-mm diameter around the optic disc. For each eye, images focused on the RNFL were recorded and a montage of AO-SLO images was created. RESULTS: AO-SLO images for all eyes showed many hyperreflective bundles in the RNFL. Hyperreflective bundles above or below the fovea were seen in an arch from the temporal periphery on either side of a horizontal dividing line to the optic disc. The dark lines among the hyperreflective bundles were narrower around the optic disc compared with those in the temporal raphe. The hyperreflective bundles corresponded with the direction of the striations on SLO red-free images. The resolution and contrast of the bundles were much higher in AO-SLO images than in red-free fundus photography or SLO red-free images. The mean hyperreflective bundle width around the optic disc had a double-humped shape; the bundles at the temporal and nasal sides of the optic disc were narrower than those above and below the optic disc (P<0.001. RNFL thickness obtained by optical coherence tomography correlated with the hyperreflective bundle widths on AO-SLO (P<0.001 CONCLUSIONS: AO-SLO revealed hyperreflective bundles and dark lines in the RNFL, believed to be retinal nerve fiber bundles and Müller cell septa. The widths of the nerve fiber bundles appear to be proportional to the RNFL thickness at equivalent distances from the optic disc.

  1. Interferometric adaptive optics for high power laser pointing, wave-front control and phasing

    Baker, K L; Stappaerts, E A; Homoelle, D C; Henesian, M A; Bliss, E S; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2009-01-21

    Implementing the capability to perform fast ignition experiments, as well as, radiography experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) places stringent requirements on the control of each of the beam's pointing and overall wavefront quality. One quad of the NIF beams, 4 beam pairs, will be utilized for these experiments and hydrodynamic and particle-in-cell simulations indicate that for the fast ignition experiments, these beams will be required to deliver 50% (4.0 kJ) of their total energy (7.96 kJ) within a 40 {micro}m diameter spot at the end of a fast ignition cone target. This requirement implies a stringent pointing and overall phase conjugation error budget on the adaptive optics system used to correct these beam lines. The overall encircled energy requirement is more readily met by phasing of the beams in pairs but still requires high Strehl ratios, Sr, and rms tip/tilt errors of approximately one {micro}rad. To accomplish this task we have designed an interferometric adaptive optics system capable of beam pointing, high Strehl ratio and beam phasing with a single pixilated MEMS deformable mirror and interferometric wave-front sensor. We present the design of a testbed used to evaluate the performance of this wave-front sensor below along with simulations of its expected performance level.

  2. Efficient reconstruction method for ground layer adaptive optics with mixed natural and laser guide stars.

    Wagner, Roland; Helin, Tapio; Obereder, Andreas; Ramlau, Ronny

    2016-02-20

    The imaging quality of modern ground-based telescopes such as the planned European Extremely Large Telescope is affected by atmospheric turbulence. In consequence, they heavily depend on stable and high-performance adaptive optics (AO) systems. Using measurements of incoming light from guide stars, an AO system compensates for the effects of turbulence by adjusting so-called deformable mirror(s) (DMs) in real time. In this paper, we introduce a novel reconstruction method for ground layer adaptive optics. In the literature, a common approach to this problem is to use Bayesian inference in order to model the specific noise structure appearing due to spot elongation. This approach leads to large coupled systems with high computational effort. Recently, fast solvers of linear order, i.e., with computational complexity O(n), where n is the number of DM actuators, have emerged. However, the quality of such methods typically degrades in low flux conditions. Our key contribution is to achieve the high quality of the standard Bayesian approach while at the same time maintaining the linear order speed of the recent solvers. Our method is based on performing a separate preprocessing step before applying the cumulative reconstructor (CuReD). The efficiency and performance of the new reconstructor are demonstrated using the OCTOPUS, the official end-to-end simulation environment of the ESO for extremely large telescopes. For more specific simulations we also use the MOST toolbox. PMID:26906596

  3. Interferometric adaptive optics for high-power laser pointing, wavefront control, and phasing

    Baker, K. L.; Stappaerts, E. A.; Homoelle, D. C.; Henesian, M. A.; Bliss, E. S.; Siders, C. W.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2009-02-01

    Implementing the capability to perform fast ignition experiments, as well as, radiography experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) places stringent requirements on the control of each of the beam's pointing and overall wavefront quality. One quad of the NIF beams, 4 beam pairs, will be utilized for these experiments and hydrodynamic and particle-in-cell simulations indicate that for the fast ignition experiments, these beams will be required to deliver 50%(4.0 kJ) of their total energy(7.96 kJ) within a 40 μm diameter spot at the end of a fast ignition cone target. This requirement implies a stringent pointing and overall phase conjugation error budget on the adaptive optics system used to correct these beam lines. The overall encircled energy requirement is more readily met by phasing of the beams in pairs but still requires high Strehl ratios, Sr, and RMS tip/tilt errors of approximately one μrad. To accomplish this task we have designed an interferometric adaptive optics system capable of beam pointing, high Strehl ratio and beam phasing with a single pixilated MEMS deformable mirror and interferometric wave-front sensor. We present the design of a testbed used to evaluate the performance of this wave-front sensor below along with simulations of its expected performance level.

  4. Conceptual Design of the Adaptive Optics System for the Laser Communication Relay Demonstration Ground Station at Table Mountain

    Roberts, Lewis C., Jr.; Page, Norman A.; Burruss, Rick S.; Truong, Tuan N.; Dew, Sharon; Troy, Mitchell

    2013-01-01

    The Laser Communication Relay Demonstration will feature a geostationary satellite communicating via optical links to multiple ground stations. The first ground station (GS-1) is the 1m OCTL telescope at Table Mountain in California. The optical link will utilize pulse position modulation (PPM) and differential phase shift keying (DPSK) protocols. The DPSK link necessitates that adaptive optics (AO) be used to relay the incoming beam into the single mode fiber that is the input of the modem. The GS-1 AO system will have two MEMS Deformable mirrors to achieve the needed actuator density and stroke limit. The AO system will sense the aberrations with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor using the light from the communication link's 1.55 microns laser to close the loop. The system will operate day and night. The system's software will be based on heritage software from the Palm 3000 AO system, reducing risk and cost. The AO system is being designed to work at r(sub 0) greater than 3.3 cm (measured at 500 nm and zenith) and at elevations greater than 20deg above the horizon. In our worst case operating conditions we expect to achieve Strehl ratios of over 70% (at 1.55 microns), which should couple 57% of the light into the single mode DPSK fiber. This paper describes the conceptual design of the AO system, predicted performance and discusses some of the trades that were conducted during the design process.

  5. Tunable laser optics

    Duarte, FJ

    2015-01-01

    This Second Edition of a bestselling book describes the optics and optical principles needed to build lasers. It also highlights the optics instrumentation necessary to characterize laser emissions and focuses on laser-based optical instrumentation. The book emphasizes practical and utilitarian aspects of relevant optics including the essential theory. This revised, expanded, and improved edition contains new material on tunable lasers and discusses relevant topics in quantum optics.

  6. Tracking features in retinal images of adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope using KLT-SIFT algorithm.

    Li, Hao; Lu, Jing; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Yudong

    2010-01-01

    With the use of adaptive optics (AO), high-resolution microscopic imaging of living human retina in the single cell level has been achieved. In an adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) system, with a small field size (about 1 degree, 280 μm), the motion of the eye severely affects the stabilization of the real-time video images and results in significant distortions of the retina images. In this paper, Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) is used to abstract stable point features from the retina images. Kanade-Lucas-Tomasi(KLT) algorithm is applied to track the features. With the tracked features, the image distortion in each frame is removed by the second-order polynomial transformation, and 10 successive frames are co-added to enhance the image quality. Features of special interest in an image can also be selected manually and tracked by KLT. A point on a cone is selected manually, and the cone is tracked from frame to frame. PMID:21258443

  7. A Miniaturized Adaptive Optic Device for Optical Telecommunications Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To advance the state-of-the-art uplink laser communication technology, new adaptive optic beam compensation techniques are needed for removing various time-varying...

  8. Solar Adaptive Optics

    Thomas R. Rimmele

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive optics (AO has become an indispensable tool at ground-based solar telescopes. AO enables the ground-based observer to overcome the adverse effects of atmospheric seeing and obtain diffraction limited observations. Over the last decade adaptive optics systems have been deployed at major ground-based solar telescopes and revitalized ground-based solar astronomy. The relatively small aperture of solar telescopes and the bright source make solar AO possible for visible wavelengths where the majority of solar observations are still performed. Solar AO systems enable diffraction limited observations of the Sun for a significant fraction of the available observing time at ground-based solar telescopes, which often have a larger aperture than equivalent space based observatories, such as HINODE. New ground breaking scientific results have been achieved with solar adaptive optics and this trend continues. New large aperture telescopes are currently being deployed or are under construction. With the aid of solar AO these telescopes will obtain observations of the highly structured and dynamic solar atmosphere with unprecedented resolution. This paper reviews solar adaptive optics techniques and summarizes the recent progress in the field of solar adaptive optics. An outlook to future solar AO developments, including a discussion of Multi-Conjugate AO (MCAO and Ground-Layer AO (GLAO will be given.

  9. Adaptive optics projects at ESO

    Hubin, Norbert N.; Arsenault, Robin; Bonnet, Henri; Conan, Rodolphe; Delabre, Bernard; Donaldson, Robert; Dupuy, Christophe; Fedrigo, Enrico; Ivanescu, L.; Kasper, Markus E.; Kissler-Patig, Markus; Lizon, Jean-Luis; Le Louarn, Miska; Marchetti, Enrico; Paufique, J.; Stroebele, Stefan; Tordo, Sebastien

    2003-02-01

    Over the past two years ESO has reinforced its efforts in the field of Adaptive Optics. The AO team has currently the challenging objectives to provide 8 Adaptive Optics systems for the VLT in the coming years and has now a world-leading role in that field. This paper will review all AO projects and plans. We will present an overview of the Nasmyth Adaptive Optics System (NAOS) with its infrared imager CONICA installed successfully at the VLT last year. Sodium Laser Guide Star plans will be introduced. The status of the 4 curvature AO systems (MACAO) developed for the VLT interferometer will be discussed. The status of the SINFONI AO module developed to feed the infrared integral field spectrograph (SPIFFI) will be presented. A short description of the Multi-conjugate Adaptive optics Demonstrator MAD and its instrumentation will be introduced. Finally, we will present the plans for the VLT second-generation AO systems and the researches performed in the frame of OWL.

  10. Integration of a laser doppler vibrometer and adaptive optics system for acoustic-optical detection in the presence of random water wave distortions

    Land, Phillip; Robinson, Dennis; Roeder, James; Cook, Dean; Majumdar, Arun K.

    2016-05-01

    A new technique has been developed for improving the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) of underwater acoustic signals measured above the water's surface. This technique uses a Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) and an Adaptive Optics (AO) system (consisting of a fast steering mirror, deformable mirror, and Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor) for mitigating the effect of surface water distortions encountered while remotely recording underwater acoustic signals. The LDV is used to perform non-contact vibration measurements of a surface via a two beam laser interferometer. We have demonstrated the feasibility of this technique to overcome water distortions artificially generated on the surface of the water in a laboratory tank. In this setup, the LDV beam penetrates the surface of the water and travels down to be reflected off a submerged acoustic transducer. The reflected or returned beam is then recorded by the LDV as a vibration wave measurement. The LDV extracts the acoustic wave information while the AO mitigates the water surface distortions, increasing the overall SNR. The AO system records the Strehl ratio, which is a measure of the quality of optical image formation. In a perfect optical system the Strehl ratio is unity, however realistic systems with imperfections have Strehl ratios below one. The operation of the AO control system in open-loop and closed-loop configurations demonstrates the utility of the AO-based LDV for many applications.

  11. Adaptive optical processors.

    Ghosh, A

    1989-06-15

    There are two different approaches for improving the accuracy of analog optical associative processors: postprocessing with a bimodal system and preprocessing with a preconditioner. These two approaches can be combined to develop an adaptive optical multiprocessor that can adjust the computational steps depending on the data and produce solutions of linear algebra problems with a specified accuracy in a given amount of time. PMID:19752909

  12. Tip-tilt compensation: Resolution limits for ground-based telescopes using laser guide star adaptive optics

    The angular resolution of long-exposure images from ground-based telescopes equipped with laser guide star adaptive optics systems is fundamentally limited by the the accuracy with which the tip-tilt aberrations introduced by the atmosphere can be corrected. Assuming that a natural star is used as the tilt reference, the residual error due to tilt anisoplanatism can significantly degrade the long-exposure resolution even if the tilt reference star is separated from the object being imaged by a small angle. Given the observed distribution of stars in the sky, the need to find a tilt reference star quite close to the object restricts the fraction of the sky over which long-exposure images with diffraction limited resolution can be obtained. In this paper, the authors present a comprehensive performance analysis of tip-tilt compensation systems that use a natural star as a tilt reference, taking into account properties of the atmosphere and of the Galactic stellar populations, and optimizing over the system operating parameters to determine the fundamental limits to the long-exposure resolution. Their results show that for a ten meter telescope on Mauna Kea, if the image of the tilt reference star is uncorrected, about half the sky can be imaged in the V band with long-exposure resolution less than 60 milli-arc-seconds (mas), while if the image of the tilt reference star is fully corrected, about half the sky can be imaged in the V band with long-exposure resolution less than 16 mas. Furthermore, V band images long-exposure resolution of less than 16 mas may be obtained with a ten meter telescope on Mauna Kea for unresolved objects brighter than magnitude 22 that are fully corrected by a laser guide star adaptive optics system. This level of resolution represents about 70% of the diffraction limit of a ten meter telescope in the V band and is more than a factor of 45 better than the median seeing in the V band on Mauna Kea

  13. Optics and lasers

    1976-01-01

    Report describes twenty-seven optical concepts developed for holographic viewing, spectral transmission, and film camera technology. Articles include developments in laser-Doppler systems, laser beam deflection controls, X-ray photography, and camera components.

  14. A Close Companion Search around L Dwarfs using Aperture Masking Interferometry and Palomar Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics

    Bernat, David; Ireland, Michael; Tuthill, Peter; Martinache, Frantz; Angione, John; Burruss, Rick S; Cromer, John L; Dekany, Richard G; Guiwits, Stephen R; Henning, John R; Hickey, Jeff; Kibblewhite, Edward; McKenna, Daniel L; Moore, Anna M; Petrie, Harold L; Roberts, Jennifer; Shelton, J Chris; Thicksten, Robert P; Trinh, Thang; Tripathi, Renu; Troy, Mitchell; Truong, Tuan; Velur, Viswa; Lloyd, James P

    2010-01-01

    We present a close companion search around sixteen known early-L dwarfs using aperture masking interferometry with Palomar laser guide star adaptive optics. The use of aperture masking allows the detection of close binaries, corresponding to projected physical separations of 0.6-10.0 AU for the targets of our survey. This survey achieved median contrast limits of Delta_K ~ 2.3 for separations between 1.2 - 4 lambda/D, and Delta_K ~ 1.4 at (2/3)lambda/D. We present four candidate binaries detected with moderate to high confidence (90-98%). Two have projected physical separations less than 1.5 AU. This may indicate that tight-separation binaries contribute more significantly to the binary fraction than currently assumed, consistent with spectroscopic and photometric overluminosity studies. Ten targets of this survey have previously been observed with the Hubble Space Telescope as part of companion searches. We use the increased resolution of aperture masking to search for close or dim companions that would be o...

  15. Objective assessment of foveal cone loss ratio in surgically closed macular holes using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy.

    Satoshi Yokota

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To use adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO to quantify cone loss ratio in the foveola in order to assess foveal cone status and to investigate relationships between foveal structural abnormalities and visual function in patients with macular hole (MH after surgery. METHODS: We evaluated 10 normal eyes of 10 healthy volunteers and 19 eyes of 18 patients in whom anatomically successful MH closure had been performed. All subjects underwent a comprehensive ophthalmologic examination that included measurements of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and AO-SLO. RESULTS: On AO-SLO regular cone mosaic was seen in all normal eyes whereas dark regions suggesting cone loss were seen in all eyes after MH repair. Visual acuity was better in eyes without dark regions at the center of the fovea than in eyes with them (P = 0.001. Cone loss ratio in the foveola correlated with postoperative visual acuity (P<0.001, mean foveal sensitivity (P = 0.029, thinner inner and outer segments at the center of the fovea (P = 0.002, larger size of the disrupted inner and outer segment junction line (P = 0.018, and cone outer segment tip line (P<0.001. Cone loss ratio in the foveola was significantly greater in eyes that had moderately reflective foveal lesions after surgery (P = 0.006. CONCLUSIONS: AO-SLO is a useful means of assessing foveal cone damage objectively and quantitatively. The location and extent of cone damage, especially if it involves the foveola, is an important factor determining visual function after MH surgery.

  16. Overview of Advanced LIGO Adaptive Optics

    Brooks, Aidan F.; Abbott, Benjamin; Arain, Muzammil A.; Ciani, Giacomo; Cole, Ayodele; Grabeel, Greg; Gustafson, Eric; Guido, Chris; Heintze, Matthew; Heptonstall, Alastair; Jacobson, Mindy; KIM, WON; King, Eleanor; Lynch, Alexander; O'Connor, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    This is an overview of the adaptive optics used in Advanced LIGO (aLIGO), known as the thermal compensation system (TCS). The thermal compensation system was designed to minimize thermally-induced spatial distortions in the interferometer optical modes and to provide some correction for static curvature errors in the core optics of aLIGO. The TCS is comprised of ring heater actuators, spatially tunable CO$_{2}$ laser projectors and Hartmann wavefront sensors. The system meets the requirements...

  17. Optical ballast and adaptive dynamic stable resonator

    Zhang Guang-Yin; Jiao Zhi-Yong; Guo Shu-Guang; Zhang Xiao-Hua; Gu Xue-Wen; Yan Cai-Fan; Wu Ding-Er; Song Feng

    2004-01-01

    In this paper a new concept of ‘optical ballast' is put forward. Optical ballast is a kind of device that can be used to decrease the variation and fluctuation of the propagation characteristics of light beams caused by the disturbance of refractive index of the medium. To illustrate the idea clearly and concretely, a fully adaptive dynamic stable solid-state laser resonator is presented as application example of optical ballast.

  18. Pulse front control with adaptive optics

    Sun, B.; Salter, P. S.; Booth, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    The focusing of ultrashort laser pulses is extremely important for processes including microscopy, laser fabrication and fundamental science. Adaptive optic elements, such as liquid crystal spatial light modulators or membrane deformable mirrors, are routinely used for the correction of aberrations in these systems, leading to improved resolution and efficiency. Here, we demonstrate that adaptive elements used with ultrashort pulses should not be considered simply in terms of wavefront modification, but that changes to the incident pulse front can also occur. We experimentally show how adaptive elements may be used to engineer pulse fronts with spatial resolution.

  19. Pulse front adaptive optics in multiphoton microscopy

    Sun, B.; Salter, P. S.; Booth, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    The accurate focusing of ultrashort laser pulses is extremely important in multiphoton microscopy. Using adaptive optics to manipulate the incident ultrafast beam in either the spectral or spatial domain can introduce significant benefits when imaging. Here we introduce pulse front adaptive optics: manipulating an ultrashort pulse in both the spatial and temporal domains. A deformable mirror and a spatial light modulator are operated in concert to modify contours of constant intensity in space and time within an ultrashort pulse. Through adaptive control of the pulse front, we demonstrate an enhancement in the measured fluorescence from a two photon microscope.

  20. Optical Profilometers Using Adaptive Signal Processing

    Hall, Gregory A.; Youngquist, Robert; Mikhael, Wasfy

    2006-01-01

    A method of adaptive signal processing has been proposed as the basis of a new generation of interferometric optical profilometers for measuring surfaces. The proposed profilometers would be portable, hand-held units. Sizes could be thus reduced because the adaptive-signal-processing method would make it possible to substitute lower-power coherent light sources (e.g., laser diodes) for white light sources and would eliminate the need for most of the optical components of current white-light profilometers. The adaptive-signal-processing method would make it possible to attain scanning ranges of the order of decimeters in the proposed profilometers.

  1. Adaptive micro axicons for laser applications

    Wallrabe Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the design, fabrication and testing of novel types of low-dispersion axicons for the adaptive shaping of ultrashort laser pulses. An overview is given on the basic geometries and operating principles of our purely reflective adaptive MEMS-type devices based on thermal or piezoelectric actuation. The flexible formation of nondiffracting beams at pulse durations down to a few oscillations of the optical field enables new applications in optical communication, pulse diagnostics, laser-matter interaction and particle manipulation. As an example, we show first promising results of adaptive autocorrelation. The combination of excellent pulse transfer, self-reconstruction properties and propagation invariance of nondiffracting beams with an adaptive approach promises to extend the field of practical applications significantly.

  2. Development of large aperture composite adaptive optics

    Kmetík, Viliam; Vítovec, Bohumil; Jiran, L.; Němcová, Š.; Zicha, J.; Inneman, A.; Mikuličková, L.; Pavlica, R.

    Vol. 9442. Bellingham: SPIE-INT SOC OPTICAL ENGINEERING, 2015 - (Kovačičinová, J.; Vít, T.), 94420L-94420L. (SPIE). ISBN 978-1-62841-557-5. ISSN 0277-786X. [Optics and Measurement Conference 2014 (OaM 2014). Liberec (CZ), 07.10.2014-10.10.2014] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010878 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Large aperture * adaptive optics * deformable mirror * bimorph deformable mirror * composite optics Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.2175713 .

  3. Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator

    Deri, R. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-13

    The Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator (GOLD) project has demonstrated a novel optical amplifier for high energy pulsed lasers operating at high repetition rates. The amplifier stores enough pump energy to support >10 J of laser output, and employs conduction cooling for thermal management to avoid the need for expensive and bulky high-pressure helium subsystems. A prototype amplifier was fabricated, pumped with diode light at 885 nm, and characterized. Experimental results show that the amplifier provides sufficient small-signal gain and sufficiently low wavefront and birefringence impairments to prove useful in laser systems, at repetition rates up to 60 Hz.

  4. Fiber optic laser rod

    Erickson, G.F.

    1988-04-13

    A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

  5. High-power optics lasers and applications

    Apollonov, Victor V

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the basics, realization and materials for high power laser systems and high power radiation interaction with  matter. The physical and technical fundamentals of high intensity laser optics and adaptive optics and the related physical processes in high intensity laser systems are explained. A main question discussed is: What is power optics? In what way is it different from ordinary optics widely used in cameras, motion-picture projectors, i.e., for everyday use? An undesirable consequence of the thermal deformation of optical elements and surfaces was discovered during studies of the interaction with powerful incident laser radiation. The requirements to the fabrication, performance and quality of optical elements employed within systems for most practical applications are also covered. The high-power laser performance is generally governed by the following: (i) the absorption of incident optical radiation (governed primarily by various absorption mechanisms), (ii) followed by a temperature ...

  6. Optics, light and lasers

    Meschede, Dieter

    2008-01-01

    Starting from the concepts of classical optics, Optics, Light and Lasers introduces in detail the phenomena of linear and nonlinear light matter interaction, the properties of modern laser sources, and the concepts of quantum optics. Several examples taken from the scope of modern research are provided to emphasize the relevance of optics in current developments within science and technology. The text has been written for newcomers to the topic and benefits from the author's ability to explain difficult sequences and effects in a straightforward and easily comprehensible way. To this second, c

  7. Adaptive Optics for Industry and Medicine

    Dainty, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    pt. 1. Wavefront correctors and control. Liquid crystal lenses for correction of presbyopia (Invited Paper) / Guoqiang Li and Nasser Peyghambarian. Converging and diverging liquid crystal lenses (oral paper) / Andrew X. Kirby, Philip J. W. Hands, and Gordon D. Love. Liquid lens technology for miniature imaging systems: status of the technology, performance of existing products and future trends (invited paper) / Bruno Berge. Carbon fiber reinforced polymer deformable mirrors for high energy laser applications (oral paper) / S. R. Restaino ... [et al.]. Tiny multilayer deformable mirrors (oral paper) / Tatiana Cherezova ... [et al.]. Performance analysis of piezoelectric deformable mirrors (oral paper) / Oleg Soloviev, Mikhail Loktev and Gleb Vdovin. Deformable membrane mirror with high actuator density and distributed control (oral paper) / Roger Hamelinck ... [et al.]. Characterization and closed-loop demonstration of a novel electrostatic membrane mirror using COTS membranes (oral paper) / David Dayton ... [et al.]. Electrostatic micro-deformable mirror based on polymer materials (oral paper) / Frederic Zamkotsian ... [et al.]. Recent progress in CMOS integrated MEMS A0 mirror development (oral paper) / A. Gehner ... [et al.]. Compact large-stroke piston-tip-tilt actuator and mirror (oral paper) / W. Noell ... [et al.]. MEMS deformable mirrors for high performance AO applications (oral paper) / Paul Bierden, Thomas Bifano and Steven Cornelissen. A versatile interferometric test-rig for the investigation and evaluation of ophthalmic AO systems (poster paper) / Steve Gruppetta, Jiang Jian Zhong and Luis Diaz-Santana. Woofer-tweeter adaptive optics (poster paper) / Thomas Farrell and Chris Dainty. Deformable mirrors based on transversal piezoeffect (poster paper) / Gleb Vdovin, Mikhail Loktev and Oleg Soloviev. Low-cost spatial light modulators for ophthalmic applications (poster paper) / Vincente Durán ... [et al.]. Latest MEMS DM developments and the path ahead

  8. Adaptive feedback beam shaping of the CO2 welding laser

    Jedlička, Petr; Mrňa, L.; Šarbort, M.; Řeřucha, Šimon

    Bellingham: SPIE, 2010, 77890V: 1-8. ISBN 978-0-8194-8285-3. [Laser Beam Shaping XI. San Diego (US), 02.08.2010] R&D Projects: GA MPO 2A-3TP1/113 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : laser beam welding * adaptive optics * laser welding control * light emission monitoring Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  9. Overview of Advanced LIGO Adaptive Optics

    Brooks, Aidan F; Arain, Muzammil A; Ciani, Giacomo; Cole, Ayodele; Grabeel, Greg; Gustafson, Eric; Guido, Chris; Heintze, Matthew; Heptonstall, Alastair; Jacobson, Mindy; Kim, Won; King, Eleanor; Lynch, Alexander; O'Connor, Stephen; Ottaway, David; Mailand, Ken; Mueller, Guido; Munch, Jesper; Sannibale, Virginio; Shao, Zhenhua; Smith, Michael; Veitch, Peter; Vo, Thomas; Vorvick, Cheryl; Willems, Phil

    2016-01-01

    This is an overview of the adaptive optics used in Advanced LIGO (aLIGO), known as the thermal compensation system (TCS). The thermal compensation system was designed to minimize thermally-induced spatial distortions in the interferometer optical modes and to provide some correction for static curvature errors in the core optics of aLIGO. The TCS is comprised of ring heater actuators, spatially tunable CO$_{2}$ laser projectors and Hartmann wavefront sensors. The system meets the requirements of correcting for nominal distortion in Advanced LIGO to a maximum residual error of 5.4nm, weighted across the laser beam, for up to 125W of laser input power into the interferometer.

  10. FDM adaptive optics technology development

    Thibault, Simon; Doucet, Michel; Rioux, Myriam

    2004-10-01

    INO supports research on Ferrofluidic Deformable Mirror (FDM) adaptive optics technologies and, as such, its research activities include the development and characterization of FDM and high resolution (ExAO) adaptive optics systems using such FDMs. Liquid mirrors have long been recognized as a potential low-cost alternative to conventional solid mirrors. Since the trend is towards advanced adaptive optics systems, a need for deformable mirrors with a large number of low-cost actuators exists. This paper presents updated experimental results using a new INO FDM prototype (271 actuators, 50 µm stroke) as well as a theoretical model of surface behaviors.

  11. Dynamic optics for ultrafast laser processing

    Salter Patrick; Booth Martin

    2013-01-01

    We present a range of dynamic optical methods to control focal fields for material processing using ultrafast lasers. Adaptive aberration correction maintains focal quality when focusing deep into materials. Dynamic parallelisation methods permit independent control of hundreds of fabrication spots. New adaptive methods for control of pulse front tilt are also presented.

  12. Dynamic optics for ultrafast laser processing

    Salter Patrick

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a range of dynamic optical methods to control focal fields for material processing using ultrafast lasers. Adaptive aberration correction maintains focal quality when focusing deep into materials. Dynamic parallelisation methods permit independent control of hundreds of fabrication spots. New adaptive methods for control of pulse front tilt are also presented.

  13. Self-referencing Mach-Zehnder interferometer as a laser system diagnostic: Active and adaptive optical systems

    We are incorporating a novel self-referencing Mach-Zehnder interferometer into a large scale laser system as a real time, interactive diagnostic tool for wavefront measurement. The instrument is capable of absolute wavefront measurements accurate to better than λ/10 pv over a wavelength range > 300 nm without readjustment of the optical components. This performance is achieved through the design of both refractive optics and catadioptric collimator to achromatize the Mach-Zehnder reference arm. Other features include polarization insensitivity through the use of low angles of incidence on all beamsplitters as well as an equal path length configuration that allows measurement of either broad-band or closely spaced laser-line sources. Instrument accuracy is periodically monitored in place by means of a thermally and mechanically stable wavefront reference source that is calibrated off-line with a phase conjugate interferometer. Video interferograms are analyzed using Fourier transform techniques on a computer that includes dedicated array processor. Computer and video networks maintain distributed interferometers under the control of a single analysis computer with multiple user access. 7 refs., 11 figs

  14. The Adaptive Optics Summer School Laboratory Activities

    Ammons, S Mark; Armstrong, J D; Crossfield, Ian; Do, Tuan; Fitzgerald, Mike; Harrington, David; Hickenbotham, Adam; Hunter, Jennifer; Johnson, Jess; Johnson, Luke; Li, Kaccie; Lu, Jessica; Maness, Holly; Morzinski, Katie; Norton, Andrew; Putnam, Nicole; Roorda, Austin; Rossi, Ethan; Yelda, Sylvana

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive Optics (AO) is a new and rapidly expanding field of instrumentation, yet astronomers, vision scientists, and general AO practitioners are largely unfamiliar with the root technologies crucial to AO systems. The AO Summer School (AOSS), sponsored by the Center for Adaptive Optics, is a week-long course for training graduate students and postdoctoral researchers in the underlying theory, design, and use of AO systems. AOSS participants include astronomers who expect to utilize AO data, vision scientists who will use AO instruments to conduct research, opticians and engineers who design AO systems, and users of high-bandwidth laser communication systems. In this article we describe new AOSS laboratory sessions implemented in 2006-2009 for nearly 250 students. The activity goals include boosting familiarity with AO technologies, reinforcing knowledge of optical alignment techniques and the design of optical systems, and encouraging inquiry into critical scientific questions in vision science using AO sys...

  15. Design and optimization of an adaptive optics system for a high-average-power multi-slab laser (HiLASE)

    Pilař, Jan; Slezák, Jiří; Sikocinski, Pawel; Divoký, Martin; Sawicka, Magdalena; Bonora, Stefano; Lucianetti, Antonio; Mocek, Tomáš; Jelínková, H.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 15 (2014), 3255-3261. ISSN 1559-128X R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/01.0027; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0143; GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0057 Grant ostatní: HILASE(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/01.0027; OP VK 6(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0143; OP VK 4 POSTDOK(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0057 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : adaptive optics * multislab * amplifier * wavefront Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.784, year: 2014

  16. PROPAGATION OF ADAPTIVELY CORRECTED LASER BEAMS THROUGH A TURBULENT ATMOSPHERE

    Bissonnette, L

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes a mathematical model for solving the propagation problem of laser beams travelling in atmospheric turbulence and corrected by adaptive optics. The modeling of the adaptive optics is mathematically simple but sufficiently general to encompass the majority of the existing systems. The method allows the prediction of the average irradiance and the irradiance variance beam profiles for arbitrary scintillation levels. Typical solutions are presented for 3.8 and 10.6 µm laser b...

  17. Electron density measurements for plasma adaptive optics

    Neiswander, Brian W.

    Over the past 40 years, there has been growing interest in both laser communications and directed energy weapons that operate from moving aircraft. As a laser beam propagates from an aircraft in flight, it passes through boundary layers, turbulence, and shear layers in the near-region of the aircraft. These fluid instabilities cause strong density gradients which adversely affect the transmission of laser energy to a target. Adaptive optics provides corrective measures for this problem but current technology cannot respond quickly enough to be useful for high speed flight conditions. This research investigated the use of plasma as a medium for adaptive optics for aero-optics applications. When a laser beam passes through plasma, its phase is shifted proportionally to the electron density and gas heating within the plasma. As a result, plasma can be utilized as a dynamically controllable optical medium. Experiments were carried out using a cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma chamber which generated a sub-atmospheric pressure, low-temperature plasma. An electrostatic model of this design was developed and revealed an important design constraint relating to the geometry of the chamber. Optical diagnostic techniques were used to characterize the plasma discharge. Single-wavelength interferometric experiments were performed and demonstrated up to 1.5 microns of optical path difference (OPD) in a 633 nm laser beam. Dual-wavelength interferometry was used to obtain time-resolved profiles of the plasma electron density and gas heating inside the plasma chamber. Furthermore, a new multi-wavelength infrared diagnostic technique was developed and proof-of-concept simulations were conducted to demonstrate the system's capabilities.

  18. Acousto-optical adaptive correction of a chirped laser pulse spectral profile in a Nd-phosphate glass regenerative amplifier

    We present results of experimental research carried out with the help of an acousto-optical light dispersive delay line (LDDL) on spectral correction of chirped laser pulses in a Nd-doped phosphate glass regenerative amplifier (RA) characterized by high gain (G ≈ 4 × 107). The spectral resolution of the LDDL was equal to 1.1 cm−1 at a diffraction efficiency greater than 80%. The use of the LDDL made it possible to implement operating conditions of the RA under which the duration of the output chirped pulse did not shorten in comparison with the duration of the input one, which meant that the width of the spectral emission could be preserved. (letter)

  19. Aurora laser optical system

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory KrF Aurora laser optical system is described. Conceptual, first-order, and detailed designs are presented for the major 248-nm ultraviolet optical, subsystems. In Aurora, a 5-ns front-end pulse is replicated and time encoded into a 96-beam, 480-ns pulse train, angle encoded, amplified, and then time and angle decoded so that all the 5-ns pulses arrive at the target plane simultaneously. The encoder and the centered optical system that directs the pulse train through the amplifiers have been installed, on major alignment system has been built and tested, and most decoder optical components have been designed and ordered. The plan is to have the entire optical system installed and initial integration completed by October 1987

  20. Aurora laser optical system

    Aurora is the Los Alamos short-pulse high-power krypton fluoride laser system. It is primarily an end-to-end technology demonstration prototype for large-scale UV laser systems of interest for short-wavelength inertial confinement fusion (ICF) investigations. The system is designed to employ optical angular multiplexing and aerial amplification by electron-beam-driven KrF laser amplifiers to deliver to ICF targets a stack of pulses with a duration of 5 ns containing several kilojoules at a wavelength of 248 nm. A program of high-energy density plasma physics investigations is now planned, and a sophisticated target chamber was constructed. The authors describe the design of the optical system for Aurora and report its status. This optical system was designed and is being constructed in two phases. The first phase carries only through the amplifier train and does not include a target chamber or any demultiplexing. Installation should be complete, and some performance results should be available. The second phase provides demultiplexing and carries the laser light to target. The complete design is reported

  1. Optical coatings for fiber lasers

    HONG Dong-mei; ZHU Zhen; YUE Wei

    2005-01-01

    Fiber laser is the future development direction for the high energy lasers. This paper describs two kinds of optical coatings for fiber laser, including long and short wave pass filters. The one characteristic of fiber laser coatings lies in that coatings should separate two closely wavelength light including laser pump wavelength (980 nm) and laser irradiation wavelength(1 050~1 100 nm). At the same time, the coatings should have high laser damage threshold.

  2. A Star-Forming Shock Front in Radio Galaxy 4C+41.17 Resolved with Laser-Assisted Adaptive Optics Spectroscopy

    Steinbring, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Near-infrared integral-field spectroscopy of redshifted [O III], H-beta and optical continuum emission from z=3.8 radio galaxy 4C+41.17 is presented, obtained with the laser-guide-star adaptive optics facility on the Gemini North telescope. Employing a specialized dithering technique, a spatial resolution of 0.10 arcsec or 0.7 kpc is achieved in each spectral element, with velocity resolution of ~70 km/s. Spectra similar to local starbursts are found for bright knots coincident in archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) restframe-ultraviolet images, which also allows a key line diagnostic to be mapped together with new kinematic information. There emerges a clearer picture of the nebular emission associated with the jet in 8.3 GHz and 15 GHz Very Large Array maps, closely tied to a Ly-alpha-bright shell-shaped structure seen with HST. This supports a previous interpretation of that arc tracing a bow shock, inducing 10^10-11 M_solar star-formation regions that comprise the clumpy broadband optical/ultraviolet mo...

  3. A star-forming shock front in radio galaxy 4C+41.17 resolved with laser-assisted adaptive optics spectroscopy

    Near-infrared integral-field spectroscopy of redshifted [O III], Hβ, and optical continuum emission from the z = 3.8 radio galaxy 4C+41.17 is presented, obtained with the laser-guide-star adaptive optics facility on the Gemini North telescope. Employing a specialized dithering technique, a spatial resolution of 0.''10, or 0.7 kpc, is achieved in each spectral element, with a velocity resolution of ∼70 km s–1. Spectra similar to local starbursts are found for bright knots coincident in archival Hubble Space Telescope ( HST) rest-frame ultraviolet images, which also allows a key line diagnostic to be mapped together with new kinematic information. There emerges a clearer picture of the nebular emission associated with the jet in 8.3 GHz and 15 GHz Very Large Array maps, closely tied to a Lyα-bright shell-shaped structure seen with HST. This supports a previous interpretation of that arc tracing a bow shock, inducing ∼1010–11 M ☉ star formation regions that comprise the clumpy broadband optical/ultraviolet morphology near the core.

  4. The research and development of the adaptive optics in ophthalmology

    Wu, Chuhan; Zhang, Xiaofang; Chen, Weilin

    2015-08-01

    Recently the combination of adaptive optics and ophthalmology has made great progress and become highly effective. The retina disease is diagnosed by retina imaging technique based on scanning optical system, so the scanning of eye requires optical system characterized by great ability of anti-moving and optical aberration correction. The adaptive optics possesses high level of adaptability and is available for real time imaging, which meets the requirement of medical retina detection with accurate images. Now the Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope and the Optical Coherence Tomography are widely used, which are the core techniques in the area of medical retina detection. Based on the above techniques, in China, a few adaptive optics systems used for eye medical scanning have been designed by some researchers from The Institute of Optics And Electronics of CAS(The Chinese Academy of Sciences); some foreign research institutions have adopted other methods to eliminate the interference of eye moving and optical aberration; there are many relevant patents at home and abroad. In this paper, the principles and relevant technique details of the Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope and the Optical Coherence Tomography are described. And the recent development and progress of adaptive optics in the field of eye retina imaging are analyzed and summarized.

  5. Intelligent Optical Systems Using Adaptive Optics

    Clark, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, the phrase adaptive optics generally conjured images of large deformable mirrors being integrated into telescopes to compensate for atmospheric turbulence. However, the development of smaller, cheaper devices has sparked interest for other aerospace and commercial applications. Variable focal length lenses, liquid crystal spatial light modulators, tunable filters, phase compensators, polarization compensation, and deformable mirrors are becoming increasingly useful for other imaging applications including guidance navigation and control (GNC), coronagraphs, foveated imaging, situational awareness, autonomous rendezvous and docking, non-mechanical zoom, phase diversity, and enhanced multi-spectral imaging. The active components presented here allow flexibility in the optical design, increasing performance. In addition, the intelligent optical systems presented offer advantages in size and weight and radiation tolerance.

  6. Integral Field Spectroscopy of High-Redshift Star Forming Galaxies with Laser Guided Adaptive Optics: Evidence for Dispersion-Dominated Kinematics

    Law, David R; Erb, Dawn K; Larkin, James E; Pettini, Max; Shapley, Alice E; Wright, Shelley A

    2007-01-01

    We present early results from an ongoing study of the kinematic structure of star-forming galaxies at redshift z ~ 2 - 3 using integral-field spectroscopy of rest-frame optical nebular emission lines in combination with Keck laser guide star adaptive optics (LGSAO). We show kinematic maps of 3 target galaxies Q1623-BX453, Q0449-BX93, and DSF2237a-C2 located at redshifts z = 2.1820, 2.0067, and 3.3172 respectively, each of which is well-resolved with a PSF measuring approximately 0.11 - 0.15 arcsec (~ 900 - 1200 pc at z ~ 2-3) after cosmetic smoothing. Neither galaxy at z ~ 2 exhibits substantial kinematic structure on scales >~ 30 km/s; both are instead consistent with largely dispersion-dominated velocity fields with sigma ~ 80 km/s along any given line of sight into the galaxy. In contrast, DSF2237a-C2 presents a well-resolved gradient in velocity over a distance of ~ 4 kpc with peak-to-peak amplitude of 140 km/s. It is unlikely that DSF2237a-C2 represents a dynamically cold rotating disk of ionized gas as ...

  7. Fluorescent scanning laser ophthalmoscopy for cellular resolution in vivo mouse retinal imaging: benefits and drawbacks of implementing adaptive optics (Conference Presentation)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Goswami, Mayank; Pugh, Edward N.; Zawadzki, Robert J.

    2016-03-01

    Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy (SLO) is a very important imaging tool in ophthalmology research. By combing with Adaptive Optics (AO) technique, AO-SLO can correct for ocular aberrations resulting in cellular level resolution, allowing longitudinal studies of single cells morphology in the living eyes. The numerical aperture (NA) sets the optical resolution that can be achieve in the "classical" imaging systems. Mouse eye has more than twice NA of the human eye, thus offering theoretically higher resolution. However, in most SLO based imaging systems the imaging beam size at mouse pupil sets the NA of that instrument, while most of the AO-SLO systems use almost the full NA of the mouse eye. In this report, we first simulated the theoretical resolution that can be achieved in vivo for different imaging beam sizes (different NA), assumingtwo cases: no aberrations and aberrations based on published mouse ocular wavefront data. Then we imaged mouse retinas with our custom build SLO system using different beam sizes to compare these results with theory. Further experiments include comparison of the SLO and AO-SLO systems for imaging different type of fluorescently labeled cells (microglia, ganglion, photoreceptors, etc.). By comparing those results and taking into account systems complexity and ease of use, the benefits and drawbacks of two imaging systems will be discussed.

  8. Optics and lasers: A compilation

    1976-01-01

    A number of innovative devices and techniques in optics and related fields were presented. The following areas were covered: advances in laser and holography technology, articles on spectroscopy and general optics, new information in the area of photography.

  9. A simplified adaptive optics system

    Ivanescu, Liviu; Racine, René; Nadeau, Daniel

    2003-02-01

    Affordable adaptive optics on small telescopes allow to introduce the technology to a large community and provide opportunities to train new specialists in the field. We have developed a low order, low cost adaptive optics system for the 1.6m telescope of the Mont Megantic Observatory. The system corrects tip-tilt, focus, astigmatisms and one trefoil term. It explores a number of new approaches. The sensor receives a single out-of-focus image of the reference star. The central obstruction of the telescope can free the focus detection from the effect of seeing and allows a very small defocus. The deformable mirror is profiled so as to preserve a parabolic shape under pressure from actuators located at its edge. A separate piezoelectric platform drives the tilt mirror.

  10. Optical Design for Extremely Large Telescope Adaptive Optics Systems

    Bauman, B J

    2003-11-26

    Designing an adaptive optics (AO) system for extremely large telescopes (ELT's) will present new optical engineering challenges. Several of these challenges are addressed in this work, including first-order design of multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) systems, pyramid wavefront sensors (PWFS's), and laser guide star (LGS) spot elongation. MCAO systems need to be designed in consideration of various constraints, including deformable mirror size and correction height. The y,{bar y} method of first-order optical design is a graphical technique that uses a plot with marginal and chief ray heights as coordinates; the optical system is represented as a segmented line. This method is shown to be a powerful tool in designing MCAO systems. From these analyses, important conclusions about configurations are derived. PWFS's, which offer an alternative to Shack-Hartmann (SH) wavefront sensors (WFS's), are envisioned as the workhorse of layer-oriented adaptive optics. Current approaches use a 4-faceted glass pyramid to create a WFS analogous to a quad-cell SH WFS. PWFS's and SH WFS's are compared and some newly-considered similarities and PWFS advantages are presented. Techniques to extend PWFS's are offered: First, PWFS's can be extended to more pixels in the image by tiling pyramids contiguously. Second, pyramids, which are difficult to manufacture, can be replaced by less expensive lenslet arrays. An approach is outlined to convert existing SH WFS's to PWFS's for easy evaluation of PWFS's. Also, a demonstration of PWFS's in sensing varying amounts of an aberration is presented. For ELT's, the finite altitude and finite thickness of LGS's means that the LGS will appear elongated from the viewpoint of subapertures not directly under the telescope. Two techniques for dealing with LGS spot elongation in SH WFS's are presented. One method assumes that the laser will be pulsed and uses a segmented micro

  11. Space simulators for laser optics

    Gardner, Frank H.

    1988-01-01

    Different approaches that are being utilized to test laser optical systems are described. One of the most crucial areas in the testing phase is the stability of the laser optics mounted inside the space simulator. The thermal vacuum system, the refrigeration system, and the space simulator are discussed.

  12. Beaconless adaptive-optics technique for HEL beam control

    Khizhnyak, Anatoliy; Markov, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    Effective performance of forthcoming laser systems capable of power delivery on a distant target requires an adaptive optics system to correct atmospheric perturbations on the laser beam. The turbulence-induced effects are responsible for beam wobbling, wandering, and intensity scintillation, resulting in degradation of the beam quality and power density on the target. Adaptive optics methods are used to compensate for these negative effects. In its turn, operation of the AOS system requires a reference wave that can be generated by the beacon on the target. This report discusses a beaconless approach for wavefront correction with its performance based on the detection of the target-scattered light. Postprocessing of the beacon-generated light field enables retrieval and detailed characterization of the turbulence-perturbed wavefront -data that is essential to control the adaptive optics module of a high-power laser system.

  13. Possibilities of joint application of adaptive optics technique and nonlinear optical phase conjugation to compensate for turbulent distortions

    Lukin, V. P.; Kanev, F. Yu; Kulagin, O. V.

    2016-05-01

    The efficiency of integrating the nonlinear optical technique based on forming a reverse wavefront and the conventional adaptive optics into a unified complex (for example, for adaptive focusing of quasi-cw laser radiation) is demonstrated. Nonlinear optical phase conjugation may provide more exact information about the phase fluctuations in the corrected wavefront in comparison with the adaptive optics methods. At the same time, the conventional methods of adaptive optics provide an efficient control of a laser beam projected onto a target for a rather long time.

  14. Keck Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics Monitoring of 2MASS J1534-2952AB: First Dynamical Mass Determination of a Binary T Dwarf

    Liu, Michael C; Ireland, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    (Abridged) We present multi-epoch imaging of the T5.0+T5.5 binary 2MASS J1534-2952AB obtained with the Keck laser guide star adaptive optics system. Combined with an extensive (re-)analysis of archival HST imaging, we find a total mass of 0.056+/-0.003 Msun (59+/-3 Mjup). This is the first field binary for which both components are directly confirmed to be substellar. This is also the coolest and lowest mass binary with a dynamical mass determination to date. Using evolutionary models, we derive an age of 0.78+/-0.09 Gyr for the system, and we find Teff = 1028+/-17 K and 978+/-17 K and masses of 0.0287+/-0.0016 Msun (30.1+/-1.7 Mjup) and 0.0269+/-0.0016 Msun (28.2+/-1.7 Mjup) for the individual components. These precise measurements generally agree with previous studies of T dwarfs and affirm the current theoretical models. However, (1) the temperatures are about 100 K cooler than derived for similar objects and suggest that the ages of field brown dwarfs may be overestimated. Also, (2) the H-R diagram positi...

  15. New Adaptive Optics Technique Demonstrated

    2007-03-01

    First ever Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics at the VLT Achieves First Light On the evening of 25 March 2007, the Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics Demonstrator (MAD) achieved First Light at the Visitor Focus of Melipal, the third Unit Telescope of the Very Large Telescope (VLT). MAD allowed the scientists to obtain images corrected for the blurring effect of atmospheric turbulence over the full 2x2 arcminute field of view. This world premiere shows the promises of a crucial technology for Extremely Large Telescopes. ESO PR Photo 19a/07 ESO PR Photo 19a/07 The MCAO Demonstrator Telescopes on the ground suffer from the blurring effect induced by atmospheric turbulence. This turbulence causes the stars to twinkle in a way which delights the poets but frustrates the astronomers, since it blurs the fine details of the images. However, with Adaptive Optics (AO) techniques, this major drawback can be overcome so that the telescope produces images that are as sharp as theoretically possible, i.e., approaching space conditions. Adaptive Optics systems work by means of a computer-controlled deformable mirror (DM) that counteracts the image distortion induced by atmospheric turbulence. It is based on real-time optical corrections computed from image data obtained by a 'wavefront sensor' (a special camera) at very high speed, many hundreds of times each second. The concept is not new. Already in 1989, the first Adaptive Optics system ever built for Astronomy (aptly named "COME-ON") was installed on the 3.6-m telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory, as the early fruit of a highly successful continuing collaboration between ESO and French research institutes (ONERA and Observatoire de Paris). Ten years ago, ESO initiated an Adaptive Optics program to serve the needs for its frontline VLT project. Today, the Paranal Observatory is without any doubt one of the most advanced of its kind with respect to AO with no less than 7 systems currently installed (NACO, SINFONI, CRIRES and

  16. Development of optical surface contouring technique using laser

    Laser contouring system capable of measuring relief profiles using a line-shaped laser beam with anisotropic magnification optics composed with two cylindrical lenses was developed. The anisotropic magnification optical system allows it to obtain higher resolution in the relief profile measurements. The image processing and 3-D display software are developed to reconstruct 3-D shape. The power supply of laser diode with adaptive current control circuit is designed. (author). 4 refs., 5 tabs., 33 figs

  17. Adaptive interferometric velocity measurements using a laser guide star

    Czarske, J.; Radner, H.; Büttner, L.

    2015-07-01

    We have harnessed the power of programmable photonics devices for an interferometric measurement technique. Laser interferometers are widely used for flow velocity measurements, since they offer high temporal and spatial resolutions. However, often optical wavefront distortions deteriorate the measurement properties. In principle, adaptive optics enables the correction of these disturbances. One challenge is to generate a suitable reference signal for the closed loop operation of the adaptive optics. An adaptive Mach Zehnder interferometer is presented to measure through a dynamic liquid-gas phase boundary, which can lead to a misalignment of the interfering laser beams. In order to generate the reference signal for the closed loop control, the Fresnel reflex of the phase boundary is used as Laser Guide Star (LGS) for the first time to the best of the authors' knowledge. The concept is related to the generation of artificial stars in astronomy, where the light transmitted by the atmosphere is evaluated. However, the adaptive interferometric flow velocity measurements at real world experiments require a different concept, since only the reflected light can be evaluated. The used LGS allows to measure the wavefront distortions induced by the dynamic phase boundary. Two biaxial electromagnetically driven steering mirrors are employed to correct the wavefront distortions. This opens up the possibility for accurate flow measurements through a dynamic phase boundary using only one optical access. Our work represents a paradigm shift in interferometric velocity measurement techniques from using static to dynamic optical elements.

  18. Optical pulses, lasers, measuring techniques

    Früngel, Frank B A

    1965-01-01

    High Speed Pulse Technology: Volume II: Optical Pulses - Lasers - Measuring Techniques focuses on the theoretical and engineering problems that result from the capacitor discharge technique.This book is organized into three main topics: light flash production from a capacitive energy storage; signal transmission and ranging systems by capacitor discharges and lasers; and impulse measuring technique. This text specifically discusses the air spark under atmospheric conditions, industrial equipment for laser flashing, and claims for light transmitting system. The application of light impulse sign

  19. Optical-vortex laser ablation

    Hamazaki, Junichi; Morita, Ryuji; Chujo, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Tanda, Satoshi; Omatsu, Takashige

    2010-01-01

    Laser ablation of Ta plates using nanosecond optical vortex pulses was carried out, for the first time. It was suggested that owing to orbital angular momentum of optical vortex, clearer and smoother processed surfaces were obtained with less ablation threshold fluence, in comparison with the ablation by a nonvortex annular beam modified from a spatially Gaussian beam.

  20. Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics ophthalmoscopy in the human eye

    Hofer, Heidi; Sredar, Nripun; Queener, Hope; Li, Chaohong; Porter, Jason

    2011-07-01

    Wavefront sensor noise and fidelity place a fundamental limit on achievable image quality in current adaptive optics ophthalmoscopes. Additionally, the wavefront sensor `beacon' can interfere with visual experiments. We demonstrate real-time (25 Hz), wavefront sensorless adaptive optics imaging in the living human eye with image quality rivaling that of wavefront sensor based control in the same system. A stochastic parallel gradient descent algorithm directly optimized the mean intensity in retinal image frames acquired with a confocal adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). When imaging through natural, undilated pupils, both control methods resulted in comparable mean image intensities. However, when imaging through dilated pupils, image intensity was generally higher following wavefront sensor-based control. Despite the typically reduced intensity, image contrast was higher, on average, with sensorless control. Wavefront sensorless control is a viable option for imaging the living human eye and future refinements of this technique may result in even greater optical gains.

  1. Optics assembly for high power laser tools

    Fraze, Jason D.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2016-06-07

    There is provided a high power laser rotational optical assembly for use with, or in high power laser tools for performing high power laser operations. In particular, the optical assembly finds applications in performing high power laser operations on, and in, remote and difficult to access locations. The optical assembly has rotational seals and bearing configurations to avoid contamination of the laser beam path and optics.

  2. Electron density measurements for plasma adaptive optics

    Neiswander, Brian; Matlis, Eric; Corke, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of using plasma as an adaptive optical medium for applications such as beam steering, wavefront control, and adaptive filtering. The optical path length of light propagating through plasma depends on the plasma electron density, which may be controlled via the prescribed voltage, frequency, pressure, gas, and electrode geometry. Accurate control of the optical path length requires characterization of the electron density over all operating conditions. E...

  3. Modeling for deformable mirrors and the adaptive optics optimization program

    We discuss aspects of adaptive optics optimization for large fusion laser systems such as the 192-arm National Ignition Facility (NIF) at LLNL. By way of example, we considered the discrete actuator deformable mirror and Hartmann sensor system used on the Beamlet laser. Beamlet is a single-aperture prototype of the 11-0-5 slab amplifier design for NIF, and so we expect similar optical distortion levels and deformable mirror correction requirements. We are now in the process of developing a numerically efficient object oriented C++ language implementation of our adaptive optics and wavefront sensor code, but this code is not yet operational. Results are based instead on the prototype algorithms, coded-up in an interpreted array processing computer language

  4. VASAO: visible all sky adaptive optics

    Veillet, Christian; Lai, Olivier; Salmon, Derrick; Pique, Jean-Paul

    2006-06-01

    Building on an extensive and successful experience in Adaptive Optics (AO) and on recent developments made in its funding nations, the Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope Corporation (CFHT) is studying the VASAO concept: an integrated AO system that would allow diffraction limited imaging of the whole sky in the visible as well as in the infrared. At the core of VASAO, Pueo-Hou (the new Pueo) is built on Pueo, the current CFHT AO bonnette. Pueo will be refurbished and improved to be able to image the isoplanetic field at 700 nm with Strehl ratios of 30% or better, making possible imaging with a resolution of 50 milliarcseconds between 500 and 700nm, and at the telescope limit of diffraction above. The polychromatic tip-tilt laser guide star currently envisioned will be generated by a single 330nm mode-less laser, and the relative position of the 330nm and 589nm artificial stars created on the mesosphere by the 330nm excitation of the sodium layer will be monitored to provide the atmospheric tip-tilt along the line of sight, following the philosophy developed for the ELP-OA project. The feasibility study of VASAO will take most of 2006 in parallel with the development of a science case making the best possible use of the unique capabilities of the system, If the feasibility study is encouraging, VASAO development could start in 2007 for a full deployment on the sky by 2011-2012.

  5. Catadioptric Optics for laser Doppler velocimeter applications

    Dunagan, Stephen E.

    1989-01-01

    In the design of a laser velocimeter system, attention must be given to the performance of the optical elements in their two principal tasks: focusing laser radiation into the probe volume, and collecting the scattered light. For large aperture applications, custom lens design and fabrication costs, long optical path requirements, and chromatic aberration (for two color operation) can be problematic. The adaptation of low cost Schmidt-Cassegrain astronomical telescopes to perform these laser beam manipulation and scattered light collection tasks is examined. A generic telescope design is analyzed using ray tracing and Gaussian beam propagation theory, and a simple modification procedure for converting from infinite to near unity conjugate ratio operation with image quality near the diffraction limit was identified. Modification requirements and performance are predicted for a range of geometries. Finally, a 200-mm-aperture telescope was modified for f/10 operation; performance data for this modified optic for both laser beam focusing and scattered light collection tasks agree well with predictions.

  6. Large Binocular Telescope Adaptive Optics System: New achievements and perspectives in adaptive optics

    Esposito, Simone; Pinna, Enrico; Puglisi, Alfio; Quirós-Pacheco, Fernando; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Xompero, Marco; Briguglio, Runa; Agapito, Guido; Busoni, Lorenzo; Fini, Luca; Argomedo, Javier; Gherardi, Alessandro; Brusa, Guido; Miller, Douglas; Guerra, Juan Carlos; Stefanini, Paolo; Salinari, Piero; 10.1117/12.898641

    2012-01-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) is a unique telescope featuring two co-mounted optical trains with 8.4m primary mirrors. The telescope Adaptive Optics (AO) system uses two innovative key components, namely an adaptive secondary mirror with 672 actuators and a high-order pyramid wave-front sensor. During the on-sky commissioning such a system reached performances never achieved before on large ground-based optical telescopes. Images with 40mas resolution and Strehl Ratios higher than 80% have been acquired in H band (1.6 micron). Such images showed a contrast as high as 10e-4. Based on these results, we compare the performances offered by a Natural Guide Star (NGS) system upgraded with the state-of-the-art technology and those delivered by existing Laser Guide Star (LGS) systems. The comparison, in terms of sky coverage and performances, suggests rethinking the current role ascribed to NGS and LGS in the next generation of AO systems for the 8-10 meter class telescopes and Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs)...

  7. Plenoptic microscope based on laser optical feedback imaging (LOFI)

    Glastre, W; Jacquin, O; de Chatellus, H Guillet; Lacot, E

    2015-01-01

    We present an overview of the performances of a plenoptic microscope which combines the high sensitivity of a laser optical feedback imaging setup , the high resolution of optical synthetic aperture and a shot noise limited signal to noise ratio by using acoustic photon tagging. By using an adapted phase filtering, this microscope allows phase drift correction and numerical aberration compensation (defocusing, coma, astigmatism ...). This new kind of microscope seems to be well adapted to make deep imaging through scattering and heterogeneous media.

  8. Retinal laser optical aids

    Das Traprasad

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of optics, comparative magnification and working field of view is essential for rational use of ophthalmoscopic contact lenses for retinal photocoagulation. The three commonly used contact lenses are described and compared.

  9. Adaptive optical interconnects: the ADDAPT project

    Henker, Ronny; Pliva, Jan; Khafaji, Mahdi; Ellinger, Frank; Toifl, Thomas; Offrein, Bert; Cevrero, Alessandro; Oezkaya, Ilter; Seifried, Marc; Ledentsov, Nikolay; Kropp, Joerg-R.; Shchukin, Vitaly; Zoldak, Martin; Halmo, Leos; Turkiewicz, Jaroslaw; Meredith, Wyn; Eddie, Iain; Georgiades, Michael; Charalambides, Savvas; Duis, Jeroen; van Leeuwen, Pieter

    2015-09-01

    Existing optical networks are driven by dynamic user and application demands but operate statically at their maximum performance. Thus, optical links do not offer much adaptability and are not very energy-efficient. In this paper a novel approach of implementing performance and power adaptivity from system down to optical device, electrical circuit and transistor level is proposed. Depending on the actual data load, the number of activated link paths and individual device parameters like bandwidth, clock rate, modulation format and gain are adapted to enable lowering the components supply power. This enables flexible energy-efficient optical transmission links which pave the way for massive reductions of CO2 emission and operating costs in data center and high performance computing applications. Within the FP7 research project Adaptive Data and Power Aware Transceivers for Optical Communications (ADDAPT) dynamic high-speed energy-efficient transceiver subsystems are developed for short-range optical interconnects taking up new adaptive technologies and methods. The research of eight partners from industry, research and education spanning seven European countries includes the investigation of several adaptive control types and algorithms, the development of a full transceiver system, the design and fabrication of optical components and integrated circuits as well as the development of high-speed, low loss packaging solutions. This paper describes and discusses the idea of ADDAPT and provides an overview about the latest research results in this field.

  10. Sequential optimization of adaptive arrays in coherent laser communications

    Belmonte Molina, Aniceto; Kahn, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    In optical wireless communications, a channelmatched adaptive coherent receiver may be implemented using an array of receive apertures. After atmospheric channel fading estimation, several replicas of a message received through the atmosphere are combined. As an alternative to training-based channel estimation, we analyze the performance of sequential techniques for direct optimization of multi-aperture array receivers in free-space coherent laser communications.

  11. Adaptive Tunable Laser Spectrometer for Space Applications

    Flesch, Gregory; Keymeulen, Didier

    2010-01-01

    An architecture and process for the rapid prototyping and subsequent development of an adaptive tunable laser absorption spectrometer (TLS) are described. Our digital hardware/firmware/software platform is both reconfigurable at design time as well as autonomously adaptive in real-time for both post-integration and post-launch situations. The design expands the range of viable target environments and enhances tunable laser spectrometer performance in extreme and even unpredictable environments. Through rapid prototyping with a commercial RTOS/FPGA platform, we have implemented a fully operational tunable laser spectrometer (using a highly sensitive second harmonic technique). With this prototype, we have demonstrated autonomous real-time adaptivity in the lab with simulated extreme environments.

  12. 4th International Workshop on Adaptive Optics for Industry and Medicine

    Wittrock, Ulrich

    2005-01-01

    This book treats the development and application of adaptive optics for industry and medicine. The contributions describe recently developed components for adaptive-optics systems such as deformable mirrors, wavefront sensors, and mirror drivers as well as complete adaptive optical systems and their applications in industry and medicine. Applications range from laser-beam forming and adaptive aberration correction for high-power lasers to retinal imaging in ophthalmology. The contributions are based on presentations made at the 4th International Workshop on Adaptive Optics in Industry and Medicine which took place in Münster, Germany, in October 2003. This highly successful series of workshops on adaptive optics started in 1997 and continues with the 5th workshop in Beijing in 2005.

  13. Optical resonator and laser applications

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor); Yariv, Amnon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention discloses a semi-ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP) optical resonator structure comprising a medium including an edge forming a reflective facet and a waveguide within the medium, the waveguide having opposing ends formed by the reflective facet. The performance of the SRFP resonator can be further enhanced by including a Mach-Zehnder interferometer in the waveguide on one side of the gain medium. The optical resonator can be employed in a variety of optical devices. Laser structures using at least one SRFP resonator are disclosed where the resonators are disposed on opposite sides of a gain medium. Other laser structures employing one or more resonators on one side of a gain region are also disclosed.

  14. Computational adaptive optics of the human retina

    South, Fredrick A.; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-03-01

    It is well known that patient-specific ocular aberrations limit imaging resolution in the human retina. Previously, hardware adaptive optics (HAO) has been employed to measure and correct these aberrations to acquire high-resolution images of various retinal structures. While the resulting aberration-corrected images are of great clinical importance, clinical use of HAO has not been widespread due to the cost and complexity of these systems. We present a technique termed computational adaptive optics (CAO) for aberration correction in the living human retina without the use of hardware adaptive optics components. In CAO, complex interferometric data acquired using optical coherence tomography (OCT) is manipulated in post-processing to adjust the phase of the optical wavefront. In this way, the aberrated wavefront can be corrected. We summarize recent results in this technology for retinal imaging, including aberration-corrected imaging in multiple retinal layers and practical considerations such as phase stability and image optimization.

  15. Teaching Optics and Systems Engineering With Adaptive Optics Workbenches

    Harrington, David; Hunter, Lisa; Max, Claire; Hoffmann, Mark; Pitts, Mark; Armstrong, J D

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive optics workbenches are fully functional optical systems that can be used to illustrate and teach a variety of concepts and cognitive processes. Four systems have been funded, designed and constructed by various institutions and people as part of education programs associated with the Center for Adaptive Optics, the Professional Development Program and the Institute for Science and Engineer Educators. Activities can range from first-year undergraduate explorations to professional level training. These workbenches have been used in many venues including the Center for Adaptive Optics AO Summer School, the Maui Community College hosted Akamai Maui Short Course, classrooms, training of new staff in laboratories and other venues. The activity content has focused on various elements of systems thinking, characterization, feedback and system control, basic optics and optical alignment as well as advanced topics such as phase conjugation, wave-front sensing and correction concepts and system design. The work...

  16. Coupled optical resonance laser locking

    Burd, S. C.; du Toit, P. J. W.; Uys, H.

    2014-10-01

    We have demonstrated simultaneous laser frequency stabilization of a UV and IR laser, to the same spectroscopic sample, by monitoring only the absorption of the UV laser. For trapping and cooling Yb$^{+}$ ions, a frequency stabilized laser is required at 369.95nm to drive the $^{2}S_{1/2}$ $ \\rightarrow $ $ ^{2}P_{1/2}$ cooling transition. Since the cycle is not closed, a 935.18nm laser is needed to drive the $^{2}D_{3/2}$ $\\rightarrow$ $^{3}D_{[3/2]1/2}$ transition which is followed by rapid decay to the $^{2}S_{1/2}$ state. Our 369nm laser is locked to Yb$^{+}$ ions generated in a hollow cathode discharge lamp using saturated absorption spectroscopy. Without pumping, the metastable $^{2}D_{3/2}$ level is only sparsely populated and direct absorption of 935nm light is difficult to detect. A resonant 369nm laser is able to significantly populate the $^{2}D_{3/2}$ state due to the coupling between the levels. Fast re-pumping to the $^{2}S_{1/2}$ state, by 935nm light, can be detected by observing the change in absorption of the 369nm laser using lock-in detection of the photodiode signal. In this way simultaneous locking of two optical frequencies in very different spectral regimes is accomplished. A rate equation model gives good qualitative agreement with the experimental results. This technique offers improved laser frequency stabilization compared to lasers locked individually to the sample and should be readily applicable to similar ion systems.

  17. Simulating Astronomical Adaptive Optics Systems Using Yao

    Rigaut, François; Van Dam, Marcos

    2013-12-01

    Adaptive Optics systems are at the heart of the coming Extremely Large Telescopes generation. Given the importance, complexity and required advances of these systems, being able to simulate them faithfully is key to their success, and thus to the success of the ELTs. The type of systems envisioned to be built for the ELTs cover most of the AO breeds, from NGS AO to multiple guide star Ground Layer, Laser Tomography and Multi-Conjugate AO systems, with typically a few thousand actuators. This represents a large step up from the current generation of AO systems, and accordingly a challenge for existing AO simulation packages. This is especially true as, in the past years, computer power has not been following Moore's law in its most common understanding; CPU clocks are hovering at about 3GHz. Although the use of super computers is a possible solution to run these simulations, being able to use smaller machines has obvious advantages: cost, access, environmental issues. By using optimised code in an already proven AO simulation platform, we were able to run complex ELT AO simulations on very modest machines, including laptops. The platform is YAO. In this paper, we describe YAO, its architecture, its capabilities, the ELT-specific challenges and optimisations, and finally its performance. As an example, execution speed ranges from 5 iterations per second for a 6 LGS 60x60 subapertures Shack-Hartmann Wavefront sensor Laser Tomography AO system (including full physical image formation and detector characteristics) up to over 30 iterations/s for a single NGS AO system.

  18. Output optics for laser velocimeters

    Lynch, Dana H. (Inventor); Gunter, William D. (Inventor); Mcalister, Kenneth W. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Space savings are effected in the optical output system of a laser velocimeter. The output system is comprised of pairs of optical fibers having output ends from which a beam of laser light emerges, a transfer lens for each light beam, and at least one final (LV) lens for receiving the light passing through the transfer lenses and for focussing that light at a common crossing point or area. In order to closely couple the transfer lenses to the final lens, each transfer lens is positioned relative to the final lens receiving light therefrom such that the output waist of the corresponding beam received by the final lens from the transfer lens is a virtual waist located before the transfer lens.

  19. Solar Ground-Layer Adaptive Optics

    Ren, Deqing; Jolissaint, Laurent; Zhang, Xi; Dou, Jianpei; Chen, Rui; Zhao, Gang; Zhu, Yongtian

    2015-05-01

    Solar conventional adaptive optics (CAO) with one deformable-mirror uses a small field-of-view (FOV) for wave-front sensing, which yields a small corrected FOV for high-resolution imaging. Solar activities occur in a two-dimensional extended FOV and studies of solar magnetic fields need high-resolution imaging over a FOV at least 60''. Recently, solar Tomography Adaptive Optics (TAO) and Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO) were being developed to overcome this problem of small AO corrected FOV. However, for both TAO and MCAO, wavefront distortions need to be tomographically reconstructed from measurements on multiple guide stars, which is a complicated and time-consuming process. Solar Ground-Layer Adaptive Optics (S-GLAO) uses one or several guide stars, and does not rely on a tomographic reconstruction of the atmospheric turbulence. In this publication, we present two unique wavefront sensing approaches for the S-GLAO. We show that our S-GLAO can deliver good to excellent performance at variable seeing conditions in the Near Infrared (NIR) J and H bands, and is much simpler to implement. We discuss details of our S-GLAO associated wavefront approaches, which make our S-GLAO a unique solution for sunspot high-resolution imaging that other current adaptive optics systems, including the solar MCAO, cannot offer.

  20. Laser diode array and transmission optics

    Kwon, Jin H.

    1989-01-01

    Information on laser diode array and transmission optics is given in viewgraph form. Information is given on coherent combining of laser diode arrays, amplification through a laser diode array, the far field pattern of a laser diode transmitter, and beam diameter at receiver vs. transmission distance.

  1. Adaptive Optics Simulations for Siding Spring

    Goodwin, Michael; Lambert, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Using an observational derived model optical turbulence profile (model-OTP) we have investigated the performance of Adaptive Optics (AO) at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO), Australia. The simulations cover the performance for AO techniques of single conjugate adaptive optics (SCAO), multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) and ground-layer adaptive optics (GLAO). The simulation results presented in this paper predict the performance of these AO techniques as applied to the Australian National University (ANU) 2.3 m and Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) 3.9 m telescopes for astronomical wavelength bands J, H and K. The results indicate that AO performance is best for the longer wavelengths (K-band) and in the best seeing conditions (sub 1-arcsecond). The most promising results are found for GLAO simulations (field of view of 180 arcsecs), with the field RMS for encircled energy 50% diameter (EE50d) being uniform and minimally affected by the free-atmosphere turbulence. The GLAO performance is reasonably good over...

  2. The ERIS Adaptive Optics System

    Riccardi, A; Agapito, G; Antichi, J; Biliotti, V; Blain, C; Briguglio, R; Busoni, L; Carbonaro, L; Di Rico, G; Giordano, C; Pinna, E; Puglisi, A; Spanò, P; Xompero, M; Baruffolo, A; Kasper, M; Egner, S; Valles, M Suàrez; Soenke, C; Downing, M; Reyes, J

    2016-01-01

    ERIS is the new AO instrument for VLT-UT4 led by a Consortium of Max-Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, UK-ATC, ETH-Zurich, ESO and INAF. The ERIS AO system provides NGS mode to deliver high contrast correction and LGS mode to extend high Strehl performance to large sky coverage. The AO module includes NGS and LGS wavefront sensors and, with VLT-AOF Deformable Secondary Mirror and Laser Facility, will provide AO correction to the high resolution imager NIX (1-5um) and the IFU spectrograph SPIFFIER (1-2.5um). In this paper we present the preliminary design of the ERIS AO system and the estimated correction performance.

  3. Laser-induced damage in optical materials

    Ristau, Detlev

    2014-01-01

    Dedicated to users and developers of high-powered systems, Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials focuses on the research field of laser-induced damage and explores the significant and steady growth of applications for high-power lasers in the academic, industrial, and military arenas. Written by renowned experts in the field, this book concentrates on the major topics of laser-induced damage in optical materials and most specifically addresses research in laser damage that occurs in the bulk and on the surface or the coating of optical components. It considers key issues in the field of hi

  4. Photonic crystal-adaptive optical devices

    Buss, Thomas

    This Ph.D. thesis presents methods for enhancing the optical functionality of transparent glass panes by introduction of invisible nanoscale surface structures, such as gratings and planar photonic cyrstals. In this way the primary functionality of the glass - transparancy - may be enhanced with...... new properties, turning window glasses or glass surfaces of hand-held electronics into multifunctional devices. Common to all examples discussed, gratings and photonic crystals are used to engineer the optical dispersion and selectively modify the direction of guided light and transfer free...... minimized, thus allowing a homogeneous, glare-free, white-light daylighting into the room. Even more functionality can be achieved when the optical effects are tunable or reconfigurable. This is investigated with photonic crystal dye lasers. These lasers combine a photonic crystal resonator with a dye...

  5. Springer handbook of lasers and optics

    2012-01-01

    The Springer Handbook of Lasers and Optics provides fast, up-to-date, comprehensive and authoritative coverage of the wide fields of optics and lasers. It is written for daily use in the office or laboratory and offers explanatory text, data, and references needed for anyone working with lasers and optical instruments. This second edition features numerous updates and additions. Especially four new chapters on Fiber Optics, Integrated Optics, Frequency Combs, and Interferometry reflect the major changes. In addition, chapters Optical Materials and Their Properties, Optical Detectors, Nanooptics, and Optics far Beyond the Diffraction Limit have been thoroughly revised and updated. The now 25 chapters are grouped into four parts which cover basic principles and materials, fabrication and properties of optical components, coherent and incoherent light sources, and, finally, selected applications and special fields such as terahertz photonics, x-ray optics and holography. Each chapter is authored by respected exp...

  6. Reflective optic systems for lasers

    Herein are introduced new reflective optic systems using, in sequence, expanders, adders, compressors, amplifiers, and recirculators. Techniques for shaping targets and wavefronts make possible new applications of laser power. These range from generations of plasmas simulating densities in any stellar body, very high isp rockets, cheap nuclear triggers, microwave, and x-ray and γ-ray impulse generators. Reflective systems make possible the symmetrical illumination of very small targets. Superfinishing surfaces practically eliminates scattering losses. Gravitational force on stars can force their evolution through main sequence, white dwarf, neutron, and hyperon stages. The same physical conditions can probably be equalled, in volumes of submicron extent, by crushing a solid pellet in an optical bottle augmented by magnetic pumping due to target vorticity. This possibility in the context of special relativity suggests some new physical principles. (auth)

  7. Optical axis jitter rejection for double overlapped adaptive optics systems

    Luo, Qi; Luo, Xi; Li, Xinyang

    2016-04-01

    Optical axis jitters, or vibrations, which arise from wind shaking and structural oscillations of optical platforms, etc., cause a deleterious impact on the performance of adaptive optics systems. When conventional integrators are utilized to reject such high frequency and narrow-band disturbance, the benefits are quite small despite their acceptable capabilities to reject atmospheric turbulence. In our case, two suits of complete adaptive optics systems called double overlapped adaptive optics systems (DOAOS) are used to counteract both optical jitters and atmospheric turbulence. A novel algorithm aiming to remove vibrations is proposed by resorting to combine the Smith predictor and notch filer. With the help of loop shaping method, the algorithm will lead to an effective and stable controller, which makes the characteristics of error transfer function close to notch filters. On the basis of the spectral analysis of observed data, the peak frequency and bandwidth of vibrations can be identified in advance. Afterwards, the number of notch filters and their parameters will be determined using coordination descending method. The relationship between controller parameters and filtering features is discussed, and the robustness of the controller against varying parameters of the control object is investigated. Preliminary experiments are carried out to validate the proposed algorithms. The overall control performance of DOAOS is simulated. Results show that time delays are a limit of the performance, but the algorithm can be successfully implemented on our systems, which indicate that it has a great potential to reject jitters.

  8. Teaching Optics and Systems Engineering With Adaptive Optics Workbenches

    Harrington, D. M.; Ammons, M.; Hunter, L.; Max, C.; Hoffmann, M.; Pitts, M.; Armstrong, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    Adaptive optics workbenches are fully functional optical systems that can be used to illustrate and teach a variety of concepts and cognitive processes. Four systems have been funded, designed and constructed by various institutions and people as part of education programs associated with the Center for Adaptive Optics, the Professional Development Program and the Institute for Scientist & Engineer Educators. Activities can range from first-year undergraduate explorations to professional level training. These workbenches have been used in many venues including the Center for Adaptive Optics AO Summer School, the Maui Community College-hosted Akamai Maui Short Course, classrooms, training of new staff in laboratories and other venues. The activity content has focused on various elements of systems thinking, characterization, feedback and system control, basic optics and optical alignment as well as advanced topics such as phase conjugation, wave-front sensing and correction concepts, and system design. The workbenches have slightly different designs and performance capabilities. We describe here outlines for several activities utilizing these different designs and some examples of common student learner outcomes and experiences.

  9. Cn2 and wind profiler method to quantify the frozen flow decay using wide-field laser guide stars adaptive optics

    Guesalaga, Andrés; Cortes, Angela; Béchet, Clémentine; Guzmán, Dani

    2014-01-01

    We use spatio-temporal cross-correlations of slopes from five Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors to analyse the temporal evolution of the atmospheric turbulence layers at different altitudes. The focus is on the verification of the frozen flow assumption. The data is coming from the Gemini South Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics System (GeMS). First, the Cn2 and wind profiling technique is presented. This method provides useful information for the AO system operation such as the number of existing turbulence layers, their associated velocities, altitudes and strengths and also a mechanism to estimate the dome seeing contribution to the total turbulence. Next, by identifying the turbulence layers we show that it is possible to estimate the rate of decay in time of the correlation among turbulence measurements. We reduce on-sky data obtained during 2011, 2012 and 2013 campaigns and the first results suggest that the rate of temporal de-correlation can be expressed in terms of a single parameter that is independent ...

  10. Adaptive slit beam shaping for direct laser written waveguides

    Salter, P. S.; Jesacher, A.; Spring, J.B.; Metcalf, B. J.; Thomas-Peter, N.; Simmonds, R. D.; Langford, N. K.; Walmsley, I.A.; Booth, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate an improved method for fabricating optical waveguides in bulk materials by means of femtosecond laser writing. We use an LC spatial light modulator (SLM) to shape the beam focus by generating adaptive slit illumination in the pupil of the objective lens. A diffraction grating is applied in a strip across the SLM to simulate a slit, with the first diffracted order mapped onto the pupil plane of the objective lens while the zeroth order is blocked. This technique enables real-tim...

  11. Non-iterative adaptive optical microscopy using wavefront sensing

    Tao, X.; Azucena, O.; Kubby, J.

    2016-03-01

    This paper will review the development of wide-field and confocal microscopes with wavefront sensing and adaptive optics for correcting refractive aberrations and compensating scattering when imaging through thick tissues (Drosophila embryos and mouse brain tissue). To make wavefront measurements in biological specimens we have modified the laser guide-star techniques used in astronomy for measuring wavefront aberrations that occur as star light passes through Earth's turbulent atmosphere. Here sodium atoms in Earth's mesosphere, at an altitude of 95 km, are excited to fluoresce at resonance by a high-power sodium laser. The fluorescent light creates a guide-star reference beacon at the top of the atmosphere that can be used for measuring wavefront aberrations that occur as the light passes through the atmosphere. We have developed a related approach for making wavefront measurements in biological specimens using cellular structures labeled with fluorescent proteins as laser guide-stars. An example is a fluorescently labeled centrosome in a fruit fly embryo or neurons and dendrites in mouse brains. Using adaptive optical microscopy we show that the Strehl ratio, the ratio of the peak intensity of an aberrated point source relative to the diffraction limited image, can be improved by an order of magnitude when imaging deeply into live dynamic specimens, enabling near diffraction limited deep tissue imaging.

  12. Fiber laser coupled optical spark delivery system

    Yalin, Azer; Willson, Bryan; Defoort, Morgan; Joshi, Sachin; Reynolds, Adam

    2008-03-04

    A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, and includes a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. The laser delivery assembly further includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. Other embodiments use a fiber laser to generate a spark. Embodiments of the present invention may be used to create a spark in an engine. Yet other embodiments include collecting light from the spark or a flame resulting from the spark and conveying the light for diagnostics. Methods of using the spark delivery systems and diagnostic systems are provided.

  13. Laser systems with diamond optical elements

    High power laser systems with optical elements of diamond having a thermal conductivity of at least 10 W/cm. 0K at 3000K and an optical absorption at the laser beam wavelength of no more than 10 to 20 percent are described. (U.S.)

  14. Fiber-Optic Probe For Laser Velocimetry

    Lynch, Dana H.; Mcalister, Kenneth W.; Gunter, William D., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Size and weight of optics reduced considerably. Proposed fiber-optic probe in laser velocimeter smaller (and, therefore, lighter in weight and more maneuverable) than previous probe. Proposed configuration is product of calculations and experiments showing virtual waists serve same purpose. Laser-velocimeter lens brought close to transfer lenses to focus on virtual waists, thereby shortening probe head considerably.

  15. Advanced Optics with Laser Pointer and Metersticks

    Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.

    2005-01-01

    We are using a laser pointer as a light source, and metersticks as an optical branch and the screen for wave optics experiments. It is shown the setup for measurements of wavelength of laser light and rating radial spacing of the CD, diffraction on a wire and a slit, observation of a polarization of light and observation of a hologram.

  16. The numerical simulation tool for the MAORY multiconjugate adaptive optics system

    Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Bregoli, Giovanni; Diolaiti, Emiliano; Foppiani, Italo; Agapito, Guido; Puglisi, Alfio; Xompero, Marco; Oberti, Sylvain; Cosentino, Giuseppe; Lombini, Matteo; Butler, Chris R; Ciliegi, Paolo; Cortecchia, Fausto; Patti, Mauro; Esposito, Simone; Feautrier, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The Multiconjugate Adaptive Optics RelaY (MAORY) is and Adaptive Optics module to be mounted on the ESO European-Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). It is a hybrid Natural and Laser Guide System that will perform the correction of the atmospheric turbulence volume above the telescope feeding the Multi-AO Imaging Camera for Deep Observations Near Infrared spectro-imager (MICADO). We developed an end-to-end Monte- Carlo adaptive optics simulation tool to investigate the performance of a the MAORY and the calibration, acquisition, operation strategies. MAORY will implement Multiconjugate Adaptive Optics combining Laser Guide Stars (LGS) and Natural Guide Stars (NGS) measurements. The simulation tool implements the various aspect of the MAORY in an end to end fashion. The code has been developed using IDL and uses libraries in C++ and CUDA for efficiency improvements. Here we recall the code architecture, we describe the modeled instrument components and the control strategies implemented in the code.

  17. Adaptive optics assisted reconfigurable liquid-driven optical switch

    Fuh, Yiin-Kuen; Huang, Wei-Chi

    2013-07-01

    This study demonstrates a mechanical-based, liquid-driven optical switch integrated with adaptive optics and a reconfigurable black liquid (dye-doped liquid). The device aperture can be continuously tuned between 0.6 and 6.9 mm, precisely achieved by a syringe pump for volume control. Adaptive optics (AO) capability and possible enhancement of the lost power intensity of the ink-polluted glass plate have also been experimentally investigated. While measuring power intensity with/without AO indicates only a marginal difference of ˜1%, a significant difference of 3 s in the response characteristic of "switching on" time can be observed. An extremely high contrast ratio of ˜105 for a red-colored light is achieved.

  18. Optical fibre laser velocimetry: a review

    The applications of optical fibre technology to laser velocimetry are diverse and often critical to their successful implementation, particularly in harsh environments. Applications range from the use of optical fibres for beam delivery and scattered light collection, aiding the miniaturization of instrument probes, to the use of imaging fibre bundles for imaging the flow field in planar velocimetry systems. Optical fibre techniques have also been used in signal processing, for example fibre frequency shifters, and optical fibre devices such as amplifiers and lasers have been exploited. This paper will review the use of optical fibres in point-wise laser velocimetry techniques such as laser Doppler velocimetry and laser transit anemometry, as well as in planar measurement techniques such as particle imaging velocimetry and planar Doppler velocimetry. (topical review)

  19. Modeling and Control of Magnetic Fluid Deformable Mirrors for Adaptive Optics Systems

    Wu, Zhizheng; Ben Amara, Foued

    2013-01-01

    Modeling and Control of Magnetic Fluid Deformable Mirrors for Adaptive Optics Systems presents a novel design of wavefront correctors based on magnetic fluid deformable mirrors (MFDM) as well as corresponding control algorithms. The presented wavefront correctors are characterized by their linear, dynamic response. Various mirror surface shape control algorithms are presented along with experimental evaluations of the performance of the resulting adaptive optics systems. Adaptive optics (AO) systems are used in various fields of application to enhance the performance of optical systems, such as imaging, laser, free space optical communication systems, etc. This book is intended for undergraduate and graduate students, professors, engineers, scientists and researchers working on the design of adaptive optics systems and their various emerging fields of application. Zhizheng Wu is an associate professor at Shanghai University, China. Azhar Iqbal is a research associate at the University of Toronto, Canada. Foue...

  20. Adaptive optics without altering visual perception

    Koenig,, I.; NW, Hart; HJ, Hofer

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive optics combined with visual psychophysics creates the potential to study the relationship between visual function and the retina at the cellular scale. This potential is hampered, however, by visual interference from the wavefront-sensing beacon used during correction. For example, we have previously shown that even a dim, visible beacon can alter stimulus perception (Hofer, H. J., Blaschke, J., Patolia, J., & Koenig, D. E. (2012). Fixation light hue bias revisited: Implications for ...

  1. Adaptive tracking and compensation of laser spot based on ant colony optimization

    Yang, Lihong; Ke, Xizheng; Bai, Runbing; Hu, Qidi

    2009-05-01

    Because the effect of atmospheric scattering and atmospheric turbulence on laser signal of atmospheric absorption,laser spot twinkling, beam drift and spot split-up occur ,when laser signal transmits in the atmospheric channel. The phenomenon will be seriously affects the stability and the reliability of laser spot receiving system. In order to reduce the influence of atmospheric turbulence, we adopt optimum control thoughts in the field of artificial intelligence, propose a novel adaptive optical control technology-- model-free optimized adaptive control technology, analyze low-order pattern wave-front error theory, in which an -adaptive optical system is employed to adjust errors, and design its adaptive structure system. Ant colony algorithm is the control core algorithm, which is characteristic of positive feedback, distributed computing and greedy heuristic search. . The ant colony algorithm optimization of adaptive optical phase compensation is simulated. Simulation result shows that, the algorithm can effectively control laser energy distribution, improve laser light beam quality, and enhance signal-to-noise ratio of received signal.

  2. Plasma optical modulators for intense lasers

    Yu, Lu-Le; Qian, Lie-Jia; Chen, Min; Weng, Su-Ming; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, D A; Mori, W B; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Optical modulators can be made nowadays with high modulation speed, broad bandwidth, while being compact, owing to the recent advance in material science and microfabrication technology. However, these optical modulators usually work for low intensity light beams. Here, we present an ultrafast, plasma-based optical modulator, which can directly modulate high power lasers with intensity up to 10^16 W/cm^2 level to produce an extremely broad spectrum with a fractional bandwidth over 100%, extending to the mid-infrared regime in the low-frequency side. This concept relies on two co-propagating laser beams in a sub-mm-scale underdense plasma, where a drive laser pulse first excites an electron plasma wave in its wake while a following carrier laser beam is modulated by the plasma wave. The laser and plasma parameters suitable for the modulator to work are presented. Such optical modulators may enable new applications in the high field physics.

  3. Adaptive search and detection of laser radiation

    Formation of cosmic optical line connected with the solving of difficult problems, among which stand out spatial search task, detection and target tracking. Indeed, the main advantage of systems of the optical diapason, high radiation direction leads to a challenging task of entering in communication, consisting in mutual targeting antenna receiving and transmitting systems. Algorithm detection, obtained by solving the corresponding statistical optimal detection test synthesis tasks detector determines the structure and quality of his work which depend on the average characteristics of the signal and the background radiation of the thermal noise require full priori certainty about the conditions of observation. Algorithm of the optimal detector of laser light modulated on a sub carrier frequency of intensity assumes a priori known intensity and efficiency background radiation and internal noise power photo detector

  4. Optical implementation for adaptive beamforming of array antenna

    Liu, Ming; Shi, Xiang quan

    2010-11-01

    It is difficult for the traditional phased array radar to process large array-element and high time-bandwidth-product signal in real time. An optical architecture of implement true time delay adaptive beamforming based on Stimulate Photon Echoes(SPE) is introduced. The principle of how to implement a true time delay based on SPE phenomenon with its theory models is established. the method of how to implement variable time delays using laser beams modulated by linear frequency chirped pulses is discussed, the relationship between chirp bandwidth and delay step is demonstrated by simulation results. As a result, it allows to filter thousands of simultaneous AOAs with 30 GHz dynamically in both spatial and spectral domains, which can be used to adaptively steer a large RF phased array antenna toward the direction of interest while minimizing the effects of unwanted interference signals.

  5. Adaption of optical Fresnel transform to optical Wigner transform

    Enlightened by the algorithmic isomorphism between the rotation of the Wigner distribution function (WDF) and the αth fractional Fourier transform, we show that the optical Fresnel transform performed on the input through an ABCD system makes the output naturally adapting to the associated Wigner transform, i.e. there exists algorithmic isomorphism between ABCD transformation of the WDF and the optical Fresnel transform. We prove this adaption in the context of operator language. Both the single-mode and the two-mode Fresnel operators as the image of classical Fresnel transform are introduced in our discussions, while the two-mode Wigner operator in the entangled state representation is introduced for fitting the two-mode Fresnel operator.

  6. Handbook of optical and laser scanning

    Marshall, Gerald F

    2011-01-01

    From its initial publication titled Laser Beam Scanning in 1985 to Handbook of Optical and Laser Scanning, now in its second edition, this reference has kept professionals and students at the forefront of optical scanning technology. Carefully and meticulously updated in each iteration, the book continues to be the most comprehensive scanning resource on the market. It examines the breadth and depth of subtopics in the field from a variety of perspectives. The Second Edition covers: Technologies such as piezoelectric devices Applications of laser scanning such as Ladar (laser radar) Underwater

  7. Plasma optical modulators for intense lasers

    Yu, Lu-Le; Zhao, Yao; Qian, Lie-Jia; Chen, Min; Weng, Su-Ming; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Mori, W. B.; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Optical modulators can have high modulation speed and broad bandwidth, while being compact. However, these optical modulators usually work for low-intensity light beams. Here we present an ultrafast, plasma-based optical modulator, which can directly modulate high-power lasers with intensity up to 1016 W cm−2 to produce an extremely broad spectrum with a fractional bandwidth over 100%, extending to the mid-infrared regime in the low-frequency side. This concept relies on two co-propagating laser pulses in a sub-millimetre-scale underdense plasma, where a drive laser pulse first excites an electron plasma wave in its wake while a following carrier laser pulse is modulated by the plasma wave. The laser and plasma parameters suitable for the modulator to work are based on numerical simulations. PMID:27283369

  8. Plasma optical modulators for intense lasers

    Yu, Lu-Le; Zhao, Yao; Qian, Lie-Jia; Chen, Min; Weng, Su-Ming; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Mori, W. B.; Zhang, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Optical modulators can have high modulation speed and broad bandwidth, while being compact. However, these optical modulators usually work for low-intensity light beams. Here we present an ultrafast, plasma-based optical modulator, which can directly modulate high-power lasers with intensity up to 1016 W cm-2 to produce an extremely broad spectrum with a fractional bandwidth over 100%, extending to the mid-infrared regime in the low-frequency side. This concept relies on two co-propagating laser pulses in a sub-millimetre-scale underdense plasma, where a drive laser pulse first excites an electron plasma wave in its wake while a following carrier laser pulse is modulated by the plasma wave. The laser and plasma parameters suitable for the modulator to work are based on numerical simulations.

  9. Optical Effects on Laser Ablated Polymer Surfaces

    Prabhu, R. D.; Govinthasamy, R.; Murthy, N. S.

    2006-03-01

    Laser ablation of poly (ethylene terephthalate) and polyimide films were investigated using Excimer-UV laser. SEM analyses indicate the presence of rings for a wide range of ablation parameters (fluence, frequency and number of pulses). It is proposed that the particles present in the plasma plume could cause the incident laser light to diffract, similar to the optical effects observed in the femtosecond laser ablation of solids. The polymer surface provides a perfect medium to register the optical signatures as seen in the SEM images. The fringe-spacings observed in the images are compared with the theoretical diffraction patterns and the height of the plasma particles above the surface is estimated using an optimization scheme. The results of the analysis are consistent with experimentally observed dynamics of the plasma plume. It is proposed that such optical effects could be a routine feature in the laser ablation of polymers. The significance of such artifacts for lithography is discussed.

  10. Laser fiber optics ordnance initiation system

    Yang, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    Recent progress on system development in the laser initiation of explosive devices is summarized. The topics included are: development of compact free-running mode and Q-switched lasers, development of low-loss fiber optic bundles and connectors, study of nuclear radiation effects on the system, characterization of laser initiation sensitivities of insensitive high explosives, and the design methods used to achieve attractive system weight and cost savings. Direction for future work is discussed.

  11. Applications of lasers and electro-optics

    Supported by the IRPA Programme on Laser Technology and Applications, many types of lasers have been designed, constructed and applied in various areas of science, medicine and industries. Amongst these lasers constructed were high power carbon dioxide lasers, rare gas halide excimer lasers, solid state Neodymium-YAG lasers, nitrogen lasers, flashlamp pumped dye lasers and nitrogen and excimer laser pumped dye lasers. These lasers and the associated electro-optics system, some with computer controlled, are designed and developed for the following areas of applications: 1. Industrial applications of high power carbon dioxide lasers for making of i.c. components and other materials processing purposes. Prototype operational systems have been developed. 2. Medical applications of lasers for cancer treatment using the technique of photodynamic therapy. A new and more effective treatment protocol has been proposed. 3. Agricultural applications of lasers in palm oil and palm fruit-fluorescence diagnostic studies. Fruit ripeness signature has been developed and palm oil oxidation level were investigated. 4. Development of atmospheric pollution monitoring systems using laser lidar techniques. Laboratory scale systems were developed. 5. Other applications of lasers including laser holographic and interferometric methods for the non destructive testing of materials. The activities of the group (from 1988-1990) have resulted in the submission of a patent for a laser device, publication of many research paper sin local and overseas journals and conference proceedings, completion of 1 Ph.D. dissertation and 6 M. Phil theses. Currently (1991), a total of 3 Ph.D., 6 M. Phil research programmes are involved in this research and development programme

  12. Advanced optic fabrication using ultrafast laser radiation

    Taylor, Lauren L.; Qiao, Jun; Qiao, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Advanced fabrication and finishing techniques are desired for freeform optics and integrated photonics. Methods including grinding, polishing and magnetorheological finishing used for final figuring and polishing of such optics are time consuming, expensive, and may be unsuitable for complex surface features while common photonics fabrication techniques often limit devices to planar geometries. Laser processing has been investigated as an alternative method for optic forming, surface polishing, structure writing, and welding, as direct tuning of laser parameters and flexible beam delivery are advantageous for complex freeform or photonics elements and material-specific processing. Continuous wave and pulsed laser radiation down to the nanosecond regime have been implemented to achieve nanoscale surface finishes through localized material melting, but the temporal extent of the laser-material interaction often results in the formation of a sub-surface heat affected zone. The temporal brevity of ultrafast laser radiation can allow for the direct vaporization of rough surface asperities with minimal melting, offering the potential for smooth, final surface quality with negligible heat affected material. High intensities achieved in focused ultrafast laser radiation can easily induce phase changes in the bulk of materials for processing applications. We have experimentally tested the effectiveness of ultrafast laser radiation as an alternative laser source for surface processing of monocrystalline silicon. Simulation of material heating associated with ultrafast laser-material interaction has been performed and used to investigate optimized processing parameters including repetition rate. The parameter optimization process and results of experimental processing will be presented.

  13. In vivo cellular visualization of the human retina using optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics

    Olivier, S S; Jones, S M; Chen, D C; Zawadzki, R J; Choi, S S; Laut, S P; Werner, J S

    2006-01-05

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) sees the human retina sharply with adaptive optics. In vivo cellular visualization of the human retina at micrometer-scale resolution is possible by enhancing Fourier-domain optical-coherence tomography with adaptive optics, which compensate for the eye's optical aberrations.

  14. Thirty meter telescope adaptive optics computing challenges

    The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) will be used with Adaptive Optics (AO) systems to allow near diffraction-limited performance in the near-infrared and achieve the main TMT science goals. Adaptive optics systems reduce the effect of the atmospheric distortions by dynamically measuring the distortions with wavefront sensors, performing wavefront reconstruction with a real time controller (RTC), and then compensating for the distortions with deformable mirrors. The requirements for the RTC subsystem of the TMT first light AO system will represent a significant advance over the current generation of astronomical AO control systems. Memory and processing requirements would be at least 2 orders of magnitude greater than the currently most powerful AO systems using conventional approaches, so that innovative wavefront reconstruction algorithms and new hardware approaches will be required. In this paper, we will first present the requirements and challenges for the RTC of the first light AO system, together with the algorithms that have been developed to reduce the memory and processing requirements, and then two possible hardware architectures based on Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). (authors)

  15. Extreme Adaptive Optics Planet Imager: XAOPI

    Macintosh, B A; Graham, J; Poyneer, L; Sommargren, G; Wilhelmsen, J; Gavel, D; Jones, S; Kalas, P; Lloyd, J; Makidon, R; Olivier, S; Palmer, D; Patience, J; Perrin, M; Severson, S; Sheinis, A; Sivaramakrishnan, A; Troy, M; Wallace, K

    2003-09-17

    Ground based adaptive optics is a potentially powerful technique for direct imaging detection of extrasolar planets. Turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere imposes some fundamental limits, but the large size of ground-based telescopes compared to spacecraft can work to mitigate this. We are carrying out a design study for a dedicated ultra-high-contrast system, the eXtreme Adaptive Optics Planet Imager (XAOPI), which could be deployed on an 8-10m telescope in 2007. With a 4096-actuator MEMS deformable mirror it should achieve Strehl >0.9 in the near-IR. Using an innovative spatially filtered wavefront sensor, the system will be optimized to control scattered light over a large radius and suppress artifacts caused by static errors. We predict that it will achieve contrast levels of 10{sup 7}-10{sup 8} at angular separations of 0.2-0.8 inches around a large sample of stars (R<7-10), sufficient to detect Jupiter-like planets through their near-IR emission over a wide range of ages and masses. We are constructing a high-contrast AO testbed to verify key concepts of our system, and present preliminary results here, showing an RMS wavefront error of <1.3 nm with a flat mirror.

  16. Projection optics for a laser velocimeter

    Rhodes, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    Projection optics for laser velocimeter (LV) scans constant focal volume over entire focus-position range. Optics thus simplify LV measurements over large flow fields (such as those encountered in wind tunnels) by eliminating calibrations required when focal volume varies with position.

  17. Principles of laser spectroscopy and quantum optics

    Berman, Paul R

    2011-01-01

    Principles of Laser Spectroscopy and Quantum Optics is an essential textbook for graduate students studying the interaction of optical fields with atoms. It also serves as an ideal reference text for researchers working in the fields of laser spectroscopy and quantum optics. The book provides a rigorous introduction to the prototypical problems of radiation fields interacting with two- and three-level atomic systems. It examines the interaction of radiation with both atomic vapors and condensed matter systems, the density matrix and the Bloch vector, and applications involving linear absorptio

  18. Beam shaping for laser initiated optical primers

    Lizotte, Todd E.

    2008-08-01

    Remington was one of the first firearm manufacturing companies to file a patent for laser initiated firearms, in 1969. Nearly 40 years later, the development of laser initiated firearms has not become a mainstream technology in the civilian market. Requiring a battery is definitely a short coming, so it is easy to see how such a concept would be problematic. Having a firearm operate reliably and the delivery of laser energy in an efficient manner to ignite the shock-sensitive explosive primer mixtures is a tall task indeed. There has been considerable research on optical element based methods of transferring or compressing laser energy to ignite primer charges, including windows, laser chip primers and various lens shaped windows to focus the laser energy. The focusing of laser light needs to achieve igniting temperatures upwards of >400°C. Many of the patent filings covering this type of technology discuss simple approaches where a single point of light might be sufficient to perform this task. Alternatively a multi-point method might provide better performance, especially for mission critical applications, such as precision military firearms. This paper covers initial design and performance test of the laser beam shaping optics to create simultaneous multiple point ignition locations and a circumferential intense ring for igniting primer charge compounds. A simple initial test of the ring beam shaping technique was evaluated on a standard large caliber primer to determine its effectiveness on igniting the primer material. Several tests were conducted to gauge the feasibility of laser beam shaping, including optic fabrication and mounting on a cartridge, optic durability and functional ignition performance. Initial data will be presented, including testing of optically elements and empirical primer ignition / burn analysis.

  19. Dual-thread parallel control strategy for ophthalmic adaptive optics

    Yu, Yongxin; Zhang, Yuhua

    2014-01-01

    To improve ophthalmic adaptive optics speed and compensate for ocular wavefront aberration of high temporal frequency, the adaptive optics wavefront correction has been implemented with a control scheme including 2 parallel threads; one is dedicated to wavefront detection and the other conducts wavefront reconstruction and compensation. With a custom Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor that measures the ocular wave aberration with 193 subapertures across the pupil, adaptive optics has achieved a ...

  20. Adaptive distributed Kalman filtering with wind estimation for astronomical adaptive optics.

    Massioni, Paolo; Gilles, Luc; Ellerbroek, Brent

    2015-12-01

    In the framework of adaptive optics (AO) for astronomy, it is a common assumption to consider the atmospheric turbulent layers as "frozen flows" sliding according to the wind velocity profile. For this reason, having knowledge of such a velocity profile is beneficial in terms of AO control system performance. In this paper we show that it is possible to exploit the phase estimate from a Kalman filter running on an AO system in order to estimate wind velocity. This allows the update of the Kalman filter itself with such knowledge, making it adaptive. We have implemented such an adaptive controller based on the distributed version of the Kalman filter, for a realistic simulation of a multi-conjugate AO system with laser guide stars on a 30 m telescope. Simulation results show that this approach is effective and promising and the additional computational cost with respect to the distributed filter is negligible. Comparisons with a previously published slope detection and ranging wind profiler are made and the impact of turbulence profile quantization is assessed. One of the main findings of the paper is that all flavors of the adaptive distributed Kalman filter are impacted more significantly by turbulence profile quantization than the static minimum mean square estimator which does not incorporate wind profile information. PMID:26831389

  1. DKIST Adaptive Optics System: Simulation Results

    Marino, Jose; Schmidt, Dirk

    2016-05-01

    The 4 m class Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST), currently under construction, will be equipped with an ultra high order solar adaptive optics (AO) system. The requirements and capabilities of such a solar AO system are beyond those of any other solar AO system currently in operation. We must rely on solar AO simulations to estimate and quantify its performance.We present performance estimation results of the DKIST AO system obtained with a new solar AO simulation tool. This simulation tool is a flexible and fast end-to-end solar AO simulator which produces accurate solar AO simulations while taking advantage of current multi-core computer technology. It relies on full imaging simulations of the extended field Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (WFS), which directly includes important secondary effects such as field dependent distortions and varying contrast of the WFS sub-aperture images.

  2. Laser conoscopy of large-sized optical crystals

    Conoscopic interferometry provides a simple method of non-destructive control of the quality of a number of ferro-piezoelectric and optical crystals. Standard optical microscopes, including some commercial instruments, are easily adapted for implementation of conoscopic studies, though limited to small handy samples with a thickness of the order of 0.5 mm. In the present work we show that the usage of wide convergent or divergent conical laser beams in a simple benchtop configuration makes it possible to examine large-sized optical crystals by the method of conoscopy, including samples elongated along the optical axis direction. As distinct from traditional optical microscopy the conoscopic figures obtained with the aid of the laser installment may contain tens and hundreds of isochrome fringes thus increasing the informative capabilities of the method. Large-sized crystals of LiNbO3 (Ø57×95 mm), TeO2 prisms (44×41×14mm) were examined experimentally at different angles between the optical axis and normal to the crystal surface. The experimental studies of different optical anomalies are confirmed by calculations based on the theoretical analysis given in a previous work of the authors

  3. Adaptable acylindrical microlenses fabricated by femtosecond laser micromachining

    Paiè, Petra; Bragheri, Francesca; Claude, Theo; Osellame, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    Microfluidic lenses are a powerful tool for many lab on a chip applications ranging from sensing to detection and also to imaging purpose, with the great advantage to increase the degree of integration and compactness of these micro devices. In this work we present the realization of such a compact microfluidic lens with reconfigurable optical properties. The technique used to realize the device we present is femtosecond laser micromachining followed by chemical etching, which allows to easily fabricate 3D microfluidic devices with an arbitrary shape. Thanks to that it has been possible to easily fabricate different lens made up by cylindrical microchannel in fused silica glasses filled with liquids with a proper refractive index. The optical properties of these devices are tested and shown to be in a good agreement with the theoretical model previously implemented. Furthermore we have also optimized the design of these microlenses in order to reduce the effects of spherical aberrations in the focal region, thus allowing us to obtain a set of different acylindrical microfluidic lenses, whose validation is also reported. In this work the lens adaptability can be achieved by replacing the liquid inside the microchannel, so that we can easily tune the feature of the focused beam. Thus increasing the possible range of applications of these micro optical elements, as an example we report on the validation of the device as a fast integrated optofluidic shutter.

  4. Space Optical Communications Using Laser Beam Amplification

    Agrawal, Govind

    2015-01-01

    The Space Optical Communications Using Laser Beam Amplification (SOCLBA) project will provide a capability to amplify a laser beam that is received in a modulating retro-reflector (MRR) located in a satellite in low Earth orbit. It will also improve the pointing procedure between Earth and spacecraft terminals. The technology uses laser arrays to strengthen the reflected laser beam from the spacecraft. The results of first year's work (2014) show amplification factors of 60 times the power of the signal beam. MMRs are mirrors that reflect light beams back to the source. In space optical communications, a high-powered laser interrogator beam is directed from the ground to a satellite. Within the satellite, the beam is redirected back to ground using the MMR. In the MMR, the beam passes through modulators, which encode a data signal onto the returning beam. MMRs can be used in small spacecraft for optical communications. The SOCLBA project is significant to NASA and small spacecraft due to its application to CubeSats for optical data transmission to ground stations, as well as possible application to spacecraft for optical data transmission.

  5. Optical Design and Optimization of Translational Reflective Adaptive Optics Ophthalmoscopes

    Sulai, Yusufu N. B.

    The retina serves as the primary detector for the biological camera that is the eye. It is composed of numerous classes of neurons and support cells that work together to capture and process an image formed by the eye's optics, which is then transmitted to the brain. Loss of sight due to retinal or neuro-ophthalmic disease can prove devastating to one's quality of life, and the ability to examine the retina in vivo is invaluable in the early detection and monitoring of such diseases. Adaptive optics (AO) ophthalmoscopy is a promising diagnostic tool in early stages of development, still facing significant challenges before it can become a clinical tool. The work in this thesis is a collection of projects with the overarching goal of broadening the scope and applicability of this technology. We begin by providing an optical design approach for AO ophthalmoscopes that reduces the aberrations that degrade the performance of the AO correction. Next, we demonstrate how to further improve image resolution through the use of amplitude pupil apodization and non-common path aberration correction. This is followed by the development of a viewfinder which provides a larger field of view for retinal navigation. Finally, we conclude with the development of an innovative non-confocal light detection scheme which improves the non-invasive visualization of retinal vasculature and reveals the cone photoreceptor inner segments in healthy and diseased eyes.

  6. Optically sensitive Medipix2 detector for adaptive optics wavefront sensing

    Vallerga, John; Tremsina, Anton; Siegmund, Oswald; Mikulec, Bettina; Clark, Allan G; CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    A new hybrid optical detector is described that has many of the attributes desired for the next generation adaptive optics (AO) wavefront sensors. The detector consists of a proximity focused microchannel plate (MCP) read out by multi-pixel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) chips developed at CERN ("Medipix2") with individual pixels that amplify, discriminate and count input events. The detector has 256 x 256 pixels, zero readout noise (photon counting), can be read out at 1 kHz frame rates and is abutable on 3 sides. The Medipix2 readout chips can be electronically shuttered down to a temporal window of a few microseconds with an accuracy of 10 ns. When used in a Shack-Hartmann style wavefront sensor, a detector with 4 Medipix chips should be able to centroid approximately 5000 spots using 7 x 7 pixel sub-apertures resulting in very linear, off-null error correction terms. The quantum efficiency depends on the optical photocathode chosen for the bandpass of interest.

  7. Coupled Optical Resonance Laser Lockin

    Burd, Shaun

    2013-01-01

    We have demonstrated simultaneous laser frequency stabilization of a UV and IR laser, to the same spectroscopic sample, by monitoring only the absorption of the UV laser. For trapping and cooling Yb$^{+}$ ions, a frequency stabilized laser is required at 369.95nm to drive the $^{2}S_{1/2}$ $ \\rightarrow $ $ ^{2}P_{1/2}$ cooling transition. Since the cycle is not closed, a 935.18nm laser is needed to drive the $^{2}D_{3/2}$ $\\rightarrow$ $^{3}D_{[3/2]1/2}$ transition which is followed by rapid decay to the $^{2}S_{1/2}$ state. Our 369nm laser is locked to Yb$^{+}$ ions generated in a hollow cathode discharge lamp using saturated absorption spectroscopy. Without pumping, the metastable $^{2}D_{3/2}$ level is only sparsely populated and direct absorption of 935nm light is difficult to detect. A resonant 369nm laser is able to significantly populate the $^{2}D_{3/2}$ state due to the coupling between the levels. Fast re-pumping to the $^{2}S_{1/2}$ state, by 935nm light, can be detected by observing the change in...

  8. Images of photoreceptors in living primate eyes using adaptive optics two-photon ophthalmoscopy

    Hunter, Jennifer J.; Masella, Benjamin; Dubra, Alfredo; Sharma, Robin; Yin, Lu; Merigan, William H.; Palczewska, Grazyna; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Williams, David R.

    2010-01-01

    In vivo two-photon imaging through the pupil of the primate eye has the potential to become a useful tool for functional imaging of the retina. Two-photon excited fluorescence images of the macaque cone mosaic were obtained using a fluorescence adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope, overcoming the challenges of a low numerical aperture, imperfect optics of the eye, high required light levels, and eye motion. Although the specific fluorophores are as yet unknown, strong in vivo intrins...

  9. Single laser beam based passive optical sorter

    Brzobohatý, Oto; Karásek, Vítězslav; Šiler, Martin; Chvátal, Lukáš; Čižmár, T.; Zemánek, Pavel

    Bellingham: SPIE, 2013, 863715:1-8. ISSN 0277-786X. [Conference on Complex Light and Optical Forces /7./ part of Photonics West. San Francisco (US), 05.02.2013-07.02.2013] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TE01020233; GA ČR GA202/09/0348; GA ČR GPP205/11/P294; GA MŠk LH12018; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : optical trapping * optical sorting * tractor beam * particle delivery Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  10. Light microscopy adapter for laser based microscopy techniques

    Šerý, Mojmír; Pochylý, A.; Lošťák, Z.; Jákl, Petr; Zemánek, Pavel

    Bellingham : SPIE, 2008, 71410D: 1-7. ISBN 978-0-8194-7383-7. ISSN 0277-786X. [Polish-Slovak-Czech Optical Conference on Wave and Quantum Aspects of Contemporary Optics /16./. Polanica Zdrój (PL), 08.09.2008-12.09.2008] R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC08034; GA AV ČR KJB100650601; GA MPO FT-TA2/059 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : laser diode * optical fiber * optical manipulation * photobleaching * microdissection Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  11. Optical transceiver platform for laser communication experiments

    Coffelt, Everett L.; Ebben, Thomas H.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a laser communication (lasercom) transceiver platform to be used for laboratory experiments. The platform features a directly modulated semiconductor laser, avalanche photodiode receiver, and microprocessor-controlled acquisition and tracking system. The platform provides a test-bed, enabling study in vital areas of lasercom hardware such as system performance versus link distance, optical power, tracking accuracy, and subsystem and component characterization for future system specifications, including critical areas limiting present system performance.

  12. Relaxation oscillations in optically pumped molecular lasers

    Lawandy, N. M.; Koepf, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    The observation of relaxation oscillations in both the (C-13)H3F and (C-12)H3F optically pumped lasers is reported. Expressions are derived for the oscillation frequency and its temperature and pressure dependences using a four-level rate equation model. Excellent agreement between measured frequencies and the theory presented is observed. Models are considered for using this phenomenon to determine the rotational and vibrational relaxation mechanisms of the laser gases.

  13. Proposed Multiconjugate Adaptive Optics Experiment at Lick Observatory

    Bauman, B J; Gavel, D T; Flath, L M; Hurd, R L; Max, C E; Olivier, S S

    2001-08-15

    While the theory behind design of multiconjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) systems is growing, there is still a paucity of experience building and testing such instruments. We propose using the Lick adaptive optics (AO) system as a basis for demonstrating the feasibility/workability of MCAO systems, testing underlying assumptions, and experimenting with different approaches to solving MCAO system issues.

  14. Using Site Testing Data for Adaptive Optics Simulations

    Herriot, Glen; Andersen, David; Conan, Rod; Ellerbroek, Brent; Gilles, Luc; Hickson, Paul; Jackson, Kate; Lardière, Olivier; Pfrommer, Thomas; Véran, Jean-Pierre; Wang, Lianqi

    2011-01-01

    Astronomical Site testing data plays a vital role in the simulation, design, evaluation and operation of adaptive optics systems for large telescope. We present the example of TMT and its first light facilitiy adaptive optics system NFIRAOS, and illustrate the many simulations done based on site testing data.

  15. Aero-optics overview. [laser applications

    Gilbert, K. G.

    1980-01-01

    Various aero-optical phenomena are discussed with reference to their effect on airborne high energy lasers. Major emphasis is placed on: compressibility effects induced in the surrounding flow field; viscous effects which manifests themselves as aircraft boundary layers or shear layers; inviscid flow fields surrounding the aircraft due to airflow around protuberance such as laser turret assemblies; and shocks, established whenever local flow exceeds Mach one. The significant physical parameters affecting the interaction of a laser beam with a turbulent boundary layer are also described.

  16. Optical eye simulator for laser dazzle events.

    Coelho, João M P; Freitas, José; Williamson, Craig A

    2016-03-20

    An optical simulator of the human eye and its application to laser dazzle events are presented. The simulator combines optical design software (ZEMAX) with a scientific programming language (MATLAB) and allows the user to implement and analyze a dazzle scenario using practical, real-world parameters. Contrary to conventional analytical glare analysis, this work uses ray tracing and the scattering model and parameters for each optical element of the eye. The theoretical background of each such element is presented in relation to the model. The overall simulator's calibration, validation, and performance analysis are achieved by comparison with a simpler model based uponCIE disability glare data. Results demonstrate that this kind of advanced optical eye simulation can be used to represent laser dazzle and has the potential to extend the range of applicability of analytical models. PMID:27140558

  17. Optical quality of pulsed aerodynamic laser windows

    The feasibility of using a shock tube-generated pulsed flow field as a single-shot window for short, high-energy laser pulses is investigated, with a view to single pulse gas laser-driven, inertial confinement fusion facility application. A scribed diaphragm shock tube with glass endwalls was used to simulate the window, and a ruby laser pulse was transmitted along the tube axis after the diaphragm burst. Pressure wave field optical quality and turbulent contact interface were recorded holographically at different delay times for a variety of pressures and gas compositions in the driver and driven sections of the shock tube. Interferograms were interpreted by means of digital techniques to determine beam-quality degradations, and showed that a beam quality of 1.33, adequate for laser fusion use, was routinely obtainable at the ruby laser wavelength

  18. Optimized micromirror arrays for adaptive optics

    Michalicek, M. Adrian; Comtois, John H.; Hetherington, Dale L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the design, layout, fabrication, and surface characterization of highly optimized surface micromachined micromirror devices. Design considerations and fabrication capabilities are presented. These devices are fabricated in the state-of-the-art, four-level, planarized, ultra-low-stress polysilicon process available at Sandia National Laboratories known as the Sandia Ultra-planar Multi-level MEMS Technology (SUMMiT). This enabling process permits the development of micromirror devices with near-ideal characteristics that have previously been unrealizable in standard three-layer polysilicon processes. The reduced 1 μm minimum feature sizes and 0.1 μm mask resolution make it possible to produce dense wiring patterns and irregularly shaped flexures. Likewise, mirror surfaces can be uniquely distributed and segmented in advanced patterns and often irregular shapes in order to minimize wavefront error across the pupil. The ultra-low-stress polysilicon and planarized upper layer allow designers to make larger and more complex micromirrors of varying shape and surface area within an array while maintaining uniform performance of optical surfaces. Powerful layout functions of the AutoCAD editor simplify the design of advanced micromirror arrays and make it possible to optimize devices according to the capabilities of the fabrication process. Micromirrors fabricated in this process have demonstrated a surface variance across the array from only 2-3 nm to a worst case of roughly 25 nm while boasting active surface areas of 98% or better. Combining the process planarization with a ``planarized-by-design'' approach will produce micromirror array surfaces that are limited in flatness only by the surface deposition roughness of the structural material. Ultimately, the combination of advanced process and layout capabilities have permitted the fabrication of highly optimized micromirror arrays for adaptive optics.

  19. Lasers and space optical systems study

    Giuliano, Concetto; Annaballi, Angela L.

    1998-01-01

    The Air Force and other government organizations have considered the application of space-based lasers since the early 1970s. Recent studies have identified the enormous potential of lasers and optical systems in space to support the Full-Spectrum Dominance envisioned by the Joint Chiefs of Staff in ``Joint Vision 2010.'' The Air Force Research Laboratory has undertaken the LAsers and S_pace O_ptical S_ystems (LASSOS) Study to examine in detail how space lasers and optics (defined as any laser system based in space or any terrestrial-based laser whose beam transits space) could best be used to satisfy this critical need. This twelve-month study will identify promising technology concepts for space laser/optic systems, develop system concepts based on these technologies with special emphasis on systems capable of performing multiple missions, assess how well these systems can accomplish operational tasks in a quantitative manner, and design technology development roadmaps for selected concepts. Since work on the study had commenced only days before the publication deadline, this manuscript is necessarily limited to a description of the background, motivation, and organization of the study. The ``Concept Definition'' phase of the study is scheduled to be completed by the time of the STAIF conference. By that time, study participants will have identified key concepts that best satisfy criteria for timely and cost-effective augmentation of combat capability. A final report, which will be made available to authorized recipients, will be written after completion of the study in August 1998.

  20. Acousto-optic filter for electronic laser tuning

    Harris, S. E.

    1972-01-01

    Electronically tunable lithium niobate filter utilizes acoustic-optic diffraction for tuning laser to desired frequencies. Filter placed inside laser cavity diffracts incident optical signal of one polarization into orthogonal polarization by collinearly propagating acoustic beam to desired wavelength.

  1. Simplified Optics and Controls for Laser Communications

    Chen, Chien-Chung; Hemmati, Hamid

    2006-01-01

    A document discusses an architecture of a spaceborne laser communication system that provides for a simplified control subsystem that stabilizes the line of sight in a desired direction. Heretofore, a typical design for a spaceborne laser communication system has called for a high-bandwidth control loop, a steering mirror and associated optics, and a fast steering-mirror actuator to stabilize the line of sight in the presence of vibrations. In the present architecture, the need for this fast steering-mirror subsystem is eliminated by mounting the laser-communication optics on a disturbance-free platform (DFP) that suppresses coupling of vibrations to the optics by 60 dB. Taking advantage of microgravitation, in the DFP, the optical assembly is free-flying relative to the rest of the spacecraft, and a low-spring-constant pointing control subsystem exerts small forces to regulate the position and orientation of the optics via voice coils. All steering is effected via the DFP, which can be controlled in all six degrees of freedom relative to the spacecraft. A second control loop, closed around a position sensor and the spacecraft attitude-control system, moves the spacecraft as needed to prevent mechanical contact with the optical assembly.

  2. An adaptive optics approach to the reduction of misalignments and beam jitters in gravitational wave interferometers

    We describe a study and the preliminary experimental results on the possibility of using adaptive optics systems for the reduction of geometrical fluctuations of input laser beams in long baseline interferometric detectors of gravitational waves. The experimental tests aimed to test the efficiency of Hermite-Gauss versus Shack-Hartmann wavefront reconstruction and feedback diagonalization. These preliminary results seem to indicate that the adaptive optics systems may be integrated in the near future as stabilization stages before a passive mode cleaner cavity, provided that the operational band of the mirror is increased together with the efficiency of the control system

  3. Optical turbulence in fiber lasers.

    Wabnitz, Stefan

    2014-03-15

    We analyze the nonlinear stage of modulation instability in passively mode-locked fiber lasers leading to chaotic or noise-like emission. We present the phase-transition diagram among different regimes of chaotic emission in terms of the key cavity parameters: amplitude or phase turbulence, and spatio-temporal intermittency. PMID:24690788

  4. Stellar photometry with Multi Conjugate Adaptive Optics

    Fiorentino, Giuliana; McConnachie, Alan; Stetson, Peter B; Bono, Giuseppe; Turri, Paolo; Andersen, David; Veran, Jean-Pierre; Diolaiti, Emiliano; Schreiber, Laura; Ciliegi, Paolo; Bellazzini, Michele; Tolstoy, Eline; Monelli, Matteo; Iannicola, Giacinto; Ferraro, Ivan; Testa, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    We overview the current status of photometric analyses of images collected with Multi Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO) at 8-10m class telescopes that operated, or are operating, on sky. Particular attention will be payed to resolved stellar population studies. Stars in crowded stellar systems, such as globular clusters or in nearby galaxies, are ideal test particles to test AO performance. We will focus the discussion on photometric precision and accuracy reached nowadays. We briefly describe our project on stellar photometry and astrometry of Galactic globular clusters using images taken with GeMS at the Gemini South telescope. We also present the photometry performed with DAOPHOT suite of programs into the crowded regions of these globulars reaching very faint limiting magnitudes Ks ~21.5 mag on moderately large fields of view (~1.5 arcmin squared). We highlight the need for new algorithms to improve the modeling of the complex variation of the Point Spread Function across the ?eld of view. Finally, we outl...

  5. Direct laser cooling Al+ ions optical clocks

    Zhang, J; Luo, J; Lu, Z H

    2016-01-01

    Al$^+$ ions optical clock is a very promising optical frequency standard candidate due to its extremely small blackbody radiation shift. It has been successfully demonstrated with indirect cooled, quantum-logic-based spectroscopy technique. Its accuracy is limited by second-order Doppler shift, and its stability is limited by the number of ions that can be probed in quantum logic processing. We propose a direct laser cooling scheme of Al$^+$ ions optical clocks where both the stability and accuracy of the clocks are greatly improved. In the proposed scheme, two Al$^+$ ions traps are utilized. The first trap is used to trap a large number of Al$^+$ ions to improve the stability of the clock laser, while the second trap is used to trap a single Al$^+$ ions to provide the ultimate accuracy. Both traps are cooled with a continuous wave 167 nm laser. The expected clock laser stability can reach $9.0\\times10^{-17}/\\sqrt{\\tau}$. For the second trap, in addition to 167 nm laser Doppler cooling, a second stage pulsed ...

  6. Miniaturized symmetrization optics for junction laser

    Hammer, Jacob M. (Inventor); Kaiser, Charlie J. (Inventor); Neil, Clyde C. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Miniaturized optics comprising transverse and lateral cylindrical lenses composed of millimeter-sized rods with diameters, indices-of-refraction and spacing such that substantially all the light emitted as an asymmetrical beam from the emitting junction of the laser is collected and translated to a symmetrical beam.

  7. Optical guiding in a free electron laser

    The coherent interaction between an optical wave and an electron beam in a free electron laser (FEL) is shown to be capable of optically guiding the light. The effect is analyzed using a two-dimensional approximation for the FEL equations, and using the properties of optical fibers. Results of two-dimensional (cylindrically symmetric) numerical simulations are presented, and found to agree reasonably well with the analytically derived criterion for guiding. Under proper conditions, the effect can be large and has important applications to short wavelength FEL's and to directing intense light

  8. Electro-Optical Laser Technology. Curriculum Utilization. Final Report.

    Nawn, John H.

    This report describes a program to prepare students for employment as laser technicians and laser operators and to ensure that they have the necessary skills required by the industry. The objectives are to prepare a curriculum and syllabus for an associate degree program in Electro-Optical Laser Technology. The 2-year Electro-Optical Laser program…

  9. All Optical Flip-Flop Based on Coupled Laser Diodes

    Hill, MT Martin

    1999-01-01

    An all optical set-reset flip flop is presented that is based on two coupled identical laser diodes. The lasers are coupled so that when one of the lasers lases it quenches lasing in the other laser. The state of the flip flop is determined by which laser is currently lasing. Rate equations are used to model the flip flop and obtain steady state characteristics. The flip flop is experimentally demonstrated by use of antireflection coated laser diodes and free space optics.

  10. Optical Frequency References for Laser Interferometry

    Hrabina, Jan; Šarbort, Martin; Acef, O.; Du Burck, F.; Chiodo, N.; Číp, Ondřej; Lazar, Josef

    Bellingham: SPIE, 2014, 94420F: 1-6. ISBN 9781628415575. ISSN 0277-786X. [Optics and Measurement Conference 2014 (OaM 2014). Liberec (CZ), 07.10.2014-10.10.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36681G; GA TA ČR TA02010711; GA TA ČR TA01010995; GA TA ČR TE01020233; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14FR040 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : laser standards * iodine absorption cells * spectroscopy * laser frequency stabilization Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Laser s

  11. The Inner Kiloparsec of Mrk 273 with Keck Adaptive Optics

    Vivian, U; Sanders, David; Max, Claire; Armus, Lee; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Evans, Aaron; Kewley, Lisa; Fazio, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    There is X-ray, optical, and mid-infrared imaging and spectroscopic evidence that the late-stage ultraluminous infrared galaxy merger Mrk 273 hosts a powerful active galactic nucleus (AGN). However, the exact location of the AGN and the nature of the nuclei have been difficult to determine due to dust obscuration and the limited wavelength coverage of available high-resolution data. Here we present near-infrared integral-field spectra and images of the nuclear region of Mrk 273 taken with OSIRIS and NIRC2 on the Keck II Telescope with laser guide star adaptive optics. We observe three spatially resolved components, and analyze the local molecular and ionized gas emission lines and their kinematics. We confirm the presence of the hard X-ray AGN in the southwest nucleus. In the north nucleus, we find a strongly rotating gas disk whose kinematics indicate a central black hole of mass 1.04 +/- 0.1 x 10^9 Msun. The H2 emission line shows an increase in velocity dispersion along the minor axis in both directions, a...

  12. Adaptive optics ophthalmologic systems using dual deformable mirrors

    Jones, S; Olivier, S; Chen, D; Sadda, S; Joeres, S; Zawadzki, R; Werner, J S; Miller, D

    2007-02-01

    Adaptive Optics (AO) have been increasingly combined with a variety of ophthalmic instruments over the last decade to provide cellular-level, in-vivo images of the eye. The use of MEMS deformable mirrors in these instruments has recently been demonstrated to reduce system size and cost while improving performance. However, currently available MEMS mirrors lack the required range of motion for correcting large ocular aberrations, such as defocus and astigmatism. In order to address this problem, we have developed an AO system architecture that uses two deformable mirrors, in a woofer/tweeter arrangement, with a bimorph mirror as the woofer and a MEMS mirror as the tweeter. This setup provides several advantages, including extended aberration correction range, due to the large stroke of the bimorph mirror, high order aberration correction using the MEMS mirror, and additionally, the ability to ''focus'' through the retina. This AO system architecture is currently being used in four instruments, including an Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) system and a retinal flood-illuminated imaging system at the UC Davis Medical Center, a Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope (SLO) at the Doheny Eye Institute, and an OCT system at Indiana University. The design, operation and evaluation of this type of AO system architecture will be presented.

  13. Comparison of Adaptive Optics and Phase-Conjugate Mirrors for Correction of Aberrations in Double-Pass Amplifiers

    Jackel, Steven; Moshe, Inon; Lavi, Raphy

    2003-02-01

    Correction of birefringence-induced effects (depolarization and bipolar focusing) were achieved in double-pass amplifiers by use of a Faraday rotator between the laser rod and the retroreflecting optic. A necessary condition was ray retrace. Retrace was limited by imperfect conjugate-beam fidelity and by nonreciprocal refractive indices. We compared various retroreflectors: stimulated-Brillouin-scatter phase-conjugate mirrors (PCMs), PCMs with rod-to-PCM relay imaging (IPCM), IPCMs with astigmatism-correcting adaptive optics, and all-adaptive-optics imaging variable-radius mirrors. Results with flash-lamp-pumped, Nd:Cr:GSGG double-pass amplifiers showed the superiority of adaptive optics over nonlinear optics retroreflectors in terms of maximum average power, improved beam quality, and broader oscillator pulse duration /bandwidth operating range. Hybrid PCM-adaptive optics retroreflectors yielded intermediate power /beam-quality results.

  14. A correction algorithm to simultaneously control dual deformable mirrors in a woofer-tweeter adaptive optics system

    Li, Chaohong; Sredar, Nripun; Ivers, Kevin M.; Queener, Hope; Porter, Jason

    2010-01-01

    We present a direct slope-based correction algorithm to simultaneously control two deformable mirrors (DMs) in a woofer-tweeter adaptive optics system. A global response matrix was derived from the response matrices of each deformable mirror and the voltages for both deformable mirrors were calculated simultaneously. This control algorithm was tested and compared with a 2-step sequential control method in five normal human eyes using an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope. The mean ...

  15. A low-cost compact metric adaptive optics system

    Mansell, Justin D.; Henderson, Brian; Wiesner, Brennen; Praus, Robert; Coy, Steve

    2007-09-01

    The application of adaptive optics has been hindered by the cost, size, and complexity of the systems. We describe here progress we have made toward creating low-cost compact turn-key adaptive optics systems. We describe our new low-cost deformable mirror technology developed using polymer membranes, the associated USB interface drive electronics, and different ways that this technology can be configured into a low-cost compact adaptive optics system. We also present results of a parametric study of the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) control algorithm.

  16. Fiber optic and laser sensors V; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, Aug. 17-19, 1987

    De Paula, Ramon P. (Editor); Udd, Eric (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The papers contained in this volume focus on recent developments in fiber optic and laser sensors. Topics discussed include electric and magnetic field sensors, fiber optic pressure sensors, fiber optic gyros, fiber optic sensors for aerospace applications, fiber sensor multiplexing, temperature sensors, and specialized fiber optic sensors. Papers are presented on remote fiber optic sensors for angular orientation; fiber optic rotation sensor for space missions; adaptation of an electro-optic monitoring system to aerospace structures; optical fiber sensor for dust concentration measurements; and communication-sensing system using a single optical fiber.

  17. Adaptive optics OCT using 1060nm swept source and dual deformable lenses for human retinal imaging

    Jian, Yifan; Lee, Sujin; Cua, Michelle; Miao, Dongkai; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-03-01

    Adaptive optics concepts have been applied to the advancement of biological imaging and microscopy. In particular, AO has also been very successfully applied to cellular resolution imaging of the retina, enabling visualization of the characteristic mosaic patterns of the outer retinal layers using flood illumination fundus photography, Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy (SLO), and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). Despite the high quality of the in vivo images, there has been a limited uptake of AO imaging into the clinical environment. The high resolution afforded by AO comes at the price of limited field of view and specialized equipment. The implementation of a typical adaptive optics imaging system results in a relatively large and complex optical setup. The wavefront measurement is commonly performed using a Hartmann-Shack Wavefront Sensor (HS-WFS) placed at an image plane that is optically conjugated to the eye's pupil. The deformable mirror is also placed at a conjugate plane, relaying the wavefront corrections to the pupil. Due to the sensitivity of the HS-WFS to back-reflections, the imaging system is commonly constructed from spherical mirrors. In this project, we present a novel adaptive optics OCT retinal imaging system with significant potential to overcome many of the barriers to integration with a clinical environment. We describe in detail the implementation of a compact lens based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WSAO) 1060nm swept source OCT human retinal imaging system with dual deformable lenses, and present retinal images acquired in vivo from research volunteers.

  18. Optical materials for space based laser systems

    Buoncristiani, A. M.; Armagan, G.; Byvik, C. E.; Albin, S.

    1989-01-01

    The design features and performance characteristics of a sensitized holmium laser applicable to differential lidar and Doppler windshear measurements are presented, giving attention to the optimal choice of sensitizing/activating dopant ions. This development of a 2-micron region eye-safe laser, where holmium is sensitized by either hulium or erbium, has called for interionic energy transfer processes whose rate will not result in gain-switched pulses that are excessively long for atmospheric lidar and Doppler windshear detection. The application of diamond films for optical component hardening is noted.

  19. Laser beam propagation in nonlinear optical media

    Guha, Shekhar

    2013-01-01

    ""This is very unique and promises to be an extremely useful guide to a host of workers in the field. They have given a generalized presentation likely to cover most if not all situations to be encountered in the laboratory, yet also highlight several specific examples that clearly illustrate the methods. They have provided an admirable contribution to the community. If someone makes their living by designing lasers, optical parametric oscillators or other devices employing nonlinear crystals, or designing experiments incorporating laser beam propagation through linear or nonlinear media, then

  20. Improved optics for laser light scattering

    Cheung, H. Michael

    1989-01-01

    Laser light scattering experiments contemplated for use in a microgravity environment must conform to a number of operational constraints which do not apply on Earth. In particular, the use of index matching fluid to control flare is unacceptable. Work to eliminate index matching fluids by the use of high spatial resolution receiving optics is described. By increasing on-axis spatial resolution flare from the sample cell walls (both the cell sample and cell air interfaces) can be effectively prevented from reaching the photodetector. In general, improving the on-axis discrimination degrades the angular resolution of a receiving optical train. Several different possible configurations of receiving optics are compared for their spatial resolution and angular resolution. For cylinder symmetric optics, the dual lens, fourier transform pair, receiving train with a center mask located between the lenses gives the best on-axis spatial resolution.

  1. Laser-induced contamination on high-reflective optics

    Wagner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Operating high power space-based laser systems in the visible and UV range is problematic due to laser-induced contamination. Organic materials are outgassing in vacuum and deposit on irradiated optical components. To provide reliable space-based laser systems the optical components quality plays a major role. In this thesis laser-induced contamination growth on high-reflective coated optics is investigated for UV irradiation of 355nm with naphthalene as contamination material. Four different...

  2. Architecture and performance of astronomical adaptive optics systems

    Bloemhof, E.

    2002-01-01

    In recent years the technological advances of adaptive optics have enabled a great deal of innovative science. In this lecture I review the system-level design of modern astronomical AO instruments, and discuss their current capabilities.

  3. Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics ophthalmoscopy in the human eye

    Hofer, Heidi; Sredar, Nripun; Queener, Hope; Li, Chaohong; Porter, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Wavefront sensor noise and fidelity place a fundamental limit on achievable image quality in current adaptive optics ophthalmoscopes. Additionally, the wavefront sensor ‘beacon’ can interfere with visual experiments. We demonstrate real-time (25 Hz), wavefront sensorless adaptive optics imaging in the living human eye with image quality rivaling that of wavefront sensor based control in the same system. A stochastic parallel gradient descent algorithm directly optimized the mean intensity in ...

  4. Contrast-based sensorless adaptive optics for retinal imaging

    Zhou, Xiaolin; Bedggood, Phillip; Bui, Bang; Nguyen, Christine T. O.; He, Zheng; Metha, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Conventional adaptive optics ophthalmoscopes use wavefront sensing methods to characterize ocular aberrations for real-time correction. However, there are important situations in which the wavefront sensing step is susceptible to difficulties that affect the accuracy of the correction. To circumvent these, wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (or non-wavefront sensing AO; NS-AO) imaging has recently been developed and has been applied to point-scanning based retinal imaging modalities. In thi...

  5. Solar adaptive optics at the Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife

    Soltau, Dirk; Berkefeld, Thomas; Schmidt, Dirk; von der Lühe, Oskar

    2013-10-01

    Observing the Sun with high angular resolution is difficult because the turbulence in the atmosphere is strongest during day time. In this paper we describe the principles of solar adaptive optics exemplified by the two German solar telescopes VTT and GREGOR at the Observatorio del Teide. With theses systems we obtain near diffraction limited images of the Sun. Ways to overcome the limits of conventional AO by applying multiconjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) are shown.

  6. Lasers and optical fibers in medicine

    Katzir, Abraham

    1993-01-01

    The increasing use of fiber optics in the field of medicine has created a need for an interdisciplinary perspective of the technology and methods for physicians as well as engineers and biophysicists. This book presents a comprehensive examination of lasers and optical fibers in an hierarchical, three-tier system. Each chapter is divided into three basic sections: the Fundamentals section provides an overview of basic concepts and background; the Principles section offers an in-depth engineering approach; and the Advances section features specific information on systems an

  7. Electro-optic and acousto-optic laser beam scanners

    Heberle, Johannes; Bechtold, Peter; Strauß, Johannes; Schmidt, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Electro-optical deflectors (EOD) and acousto-optical deflectors (AOD) are based on deflection of laser light within a solid state medium. As they do not contain any moving parts, they yield advantages compared to mechanical scanners which are conventionally used for laser beam deflection. Even for arbitrary scan paths high feed rates can be achieved. In this work the principles of operation and characteristic properties of EOD and AOD are presented. Additionally, a comparison to mirror based mechanical deflectors regarding deflection angles, speed and accuracy is made in terms of resolvable spots and the rate of resolvable spots. Especially, the latter one is up to one order of magnitude higher for EOD and AOD systems compared to conventional systems. Further characteristic properties such as response time, damage threshold, efficiency and beam distortions are discussed. Solid state laser beam deflectors are usually characterized by small deflection angles but high angular deflection velocities. As mechanical deflectors exhibit opposite properties an arrangement of a mechanical scanner combined with a solid state deflector provides a solution with the benefits of both systems. As ultrashort pulsed lasers with average power above 100 W and repetition rates in the MHz range have been available for several years this approach can be applied to fully exploit their capabilities. Thereby, pulse overlap can be reduced and by this means heat affected zones are prevented to provide proper processing results.

  8. Picosecond electron-optic diagnostics in laser studies

    Prokhorov, A. M.

    The papers included in this volume provide an overview of research aimed at the development of methods and instrumentation for ultrahigh-speed electron-optic detection and of their applications in laser physics, laser fusion, fiber-optic communication, picosecond spectroscopy, and photobiology. Topics discussed include the physics of a picosecond electron-optic converter, the aberration theory for cathode lenses, picosecond and subpicosecond laser sources, and a beam deflection system for a subpicosecond electron-optic converter.

  9. Optical properties of laser spinel

    Mironova-Ulmane, Nina; Skvortsova, Vera; Smirnovs, Andrejs; Riekstinya, Daina; Litvinov, L.; Sildos, Ilmo; Osvet, Andris

    1997-02-01

    The present work summarizes the results of absorption and luminescence spectra investigation of natural and synthetic magnesium aluminum spinels (MgO*nAl2O3) containing chromium and manganese ions. The spectra have been analyzed with an aim to determine the effect of stoichiometry 'n' on distribution of emitting ions. The Mn2+ is observed in both tetrahedral and octahedral coordinations providing green or orange emission. Absorption bands have been explained in terms of the Mn2+ configuration model. Laser excitation of chromium-comprising magnesium aluminum spinel crystals has been carried out at 7 K with the purpose to detect the nearest neighbors of Cr3+ ions. Luminescence emission spectra have been obtained for natural sample and three synthetic samples (MgO*nAl2O3, n equals 1, 2, 2.8). Decay time has been measured at different wavelengths and compared for crystals of different stoichiometry. In case n equals 2 or 2.8, computer simulation has been used to decompose smeared luminescence spectra in the 680 - 700 nm region. Gaussian curves corresponding to R- and N-lines of natural spinel spectrum have been applied as components in the calculations of nonstoichiometric spinel spectra. This suggests that there aren't normally arranged Cr-occupied octahedral positions in nonstoichiometric spinel (n equals 2.8, e.g.).

  10. Diamond diffraction optics for CO2 lasers

    A laser ablation method for the formation of a phase microrelief on diamond optical diffraction components, intended for the far-IR range, was proposed and implemented. A one-dimensional diffraction component was made for CO2 laser radiation (λ = 10.6 μm): it was a cylindrical lens of 4 mmx4 mm aperture and with a focal length 25 mm. Microstructuring of the surface was performed by selective ablation etching of diamond with KrF excimer laser radiation (λ = 248 nm). The distribution of the field intensity in the focal region of the lens, its depth of focus, and the diffraction efficiency were determined. A high degree of correlation was found between the experimental characteristics of the lens and the results of computer modelling. (letters to the editor)

  11. Design of smart composite platforms for adaptive trust vector control and adaptive laser telescope for satellite applications

    Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents design of smart composite platforms for adaptive trust vector control (TVC) and adaptive laser telescope for satellite applications. To eliminate disturbances, the proposed adaptive TVC and telescope systems will be mounted on two analogous smart composite platform with simultaneous precision positioning (pointing) and vibration suppression (stabilizing), SPPVS, with micro-radian pointing resolution, and then mounted on a satellite in two different locations. The adaptive TVC system provides SPPVS with large tip-tilt to potentially eliminate the gimbals systems. The smart composite telescope will be mounted on a smart composite platform with SPPVS and then mounted on a satellite. The laser communication is intended for the Geosynchronous orbit. The high degree of directionality increases the security of the laser communication signal (as opposed to a diffused RF signal), but also requires sophisticated subsystems for transmission and acquisition. The shorter wavelength of the optical spectrum increases the data transmission rates, but laser systems require large amounts of power, which increases the mass and complexity of the supporting systems. In addition, the laser communication on the Geosynchronous orbit requires an accurate platform with SPPVS capabilities. Therefore, this work also addresses the design of an active composite platform to be used to simultaneously point and stabilize an intersatellite laser communication telescope with micro-radian pointing resolution. The telescope is a Cassegrain receiver that employs two mirrors, one convex (primary) and the other concave (secondary). The distance, as well as the horizontal and axial alignment of the mirrors, must be precisely maintained or else the optical properties of the system will be severely degraded. The alignment will also have to be maintained during thruster firings, which will require vibration suppression capabilities of the system as well. The innovative platform has been

  12. Adaptive optics correction into single mode fiber for a low Earth orbiting space to ground optical communication link using the OPALS downlink.

    Wright, Malcolm W; Morris, Jeffery F; Kovalik, Joseph M; Andrews, Kenneth S; Abrahamson, Matthew J; Biswas, Abhijit

    2015-12-28

    An adaptive optics (AO) testbed was integrated to the Optical PAyload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) ground station telescope at the Optical Communications Telescope Laboratory (OCTL) as part of the free space laser communications experiment with the flight system on board the International Space Station (ISS). Atmospheric turbulence induced aberrations on the optical downlink were adaptively corrected during an overflight of the ISS so that the transmitted laser signal could be efficiently coupled into a single mode fiber continuously. A stable output Strehl ratio of around 0.6 was demonstrated along with the recovery of a 50 Mbps encoded high definition (HD) video transmission from the ISS at the output of the single mode fiber. This proof of concept demonstration validates multi-Gbps optical downlinks from fast slewing low-Earth orbiting (LEO) spacecraft to ground assets in a manner that potentially allows seamless space to ground connectivity for future high data-rates network. PMID:26832033

  13. Initial alignment method for free space optics laser beam

    Shimada, Yuta; Tashiro, Yuki; Izumi, Kiyotaka; Yoshida, Koichi; Tsujimura, Takeshi

    2016-08-01

    The authors have newly proposed and constructed an active free space optics transmission system. It is equipped with a motor driven laser emitting mechanism and positioning photodiodes, and it transmits a collimated thin laser beam and accurately steers the laser beam direction. It is necessary to introduce the laser beam within sensible range of the receiver in advance of laser beam tracking control. This paper studies an estimation method of laser reaching point for initial laser beam alignment. Distributed photodiodes detect laser luminescence at respective position, and the optical axis of laser beam is analytically presumed based on the Gaussian beam optics. Computer simulation evaluates the accuracy of the proposed estimation methods, and results disclose that the methods help us to guide the laser beam to a distant receiver.

  14. New challenges for Adaptive Optics Extremely Large Telescopes

    Le Louarn, M; Sarazin, M; Tokovinin, A

    2000-01-01

    The performance of an adaptive optics (AO) system on a 100m diameter ground based telescope working in the visible range of the spectrum is computed using an analytical approach. The target Strehl ratio of 60% is achieved at 0.5um with a limiting magnitude of the AO guide source near R~10, at the cost of an extremely low sky coverage. To alleviate this problem, the concept of tomographic wavefront sensing in a wider field of view using either natural guide stars (NGS) or laser guide stars (LGS) is investigated. These methods use 3 or 4 reference sources and up to 3 deformable mirrors, which increase up to 8-fold the corrected field size (up to 60\\arcsec at 0.5 um). Operation with multiple NGS is limited to the infrared (in the J band this approach yields a sky coverage of 50% with a Strehl ratio of 0.2). The option of open-loop wavefront correction in the visible using several bright NGS is discussed. The LGS approach involves the use of a faint (R ~22) NGS for low-order correction, which results in a sky cov...

  15. Even Illumination from Fiber-Optic-Coupled Laser Diodes

    Howard, Richard T.

    2006-01-01

    A method of equipping fiber-optic-coupled laser diodes to evenly illuminate specified fields of view has been proposed. The essence of the method is to shape the tips of the optical fibers into suitably designed diffractive optical elements. One of the main benefits afforded by the method would be more nearly complete utilization of the available light. Diffractive optics is a relatively new field of optics in which laser beams are shaped by use of diffraction instead of refraction.

  16. Broad-Area Laser Diode With Fiber-Optic Injection

    Hazel, Geoffrey; Mead, Patricia; Davis, Christopher; Cornwell, Donald

    1992-01-01

    Fiber-optic injection-locked broad-area laser diode features single-mode output via fiber-optic injection and serves as compact, rugged, high-power near-infrared source. Useful in free-space and fiber-optic communication links, as communication-receiver preamplifier, and pump source for solid-state lasers.

  17. Amplitude variations on the Extreme Adaptive Optics testbed

    Evans, J; Thomas, S; Dillon, D; Gavel, D; Phillion, D; Macintosh, B

    2007-08-14

    High-contrast adaptive optics systems, such as those needed to image extrasolar planets, are known to require excellent wavefront control and diffraction suppression. At the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics on the Extreme Adaptive Optics testbed, we have already demonstrated wavefront control of better than 1 nm rms within controllable spatial frequencies. Corresponding contrast measurements, however, are limited by amplitude variations, including those introduced by the micro-electrical-mechanical-systems (MEMS) deformable mirror. Results from experimental measurements and wave optic simulations of amplitude variations on the ExAO testbed are presented. We find systematic intensity variations of about 2% rms, and intensity variations with the MEMS to be 6%. Some errors are introduced by phase and amplitude mixing because the MEMS is not conjugate to the pupil, but independent measurements of MEMS reflectivity suggest that some error is introduced by small non-uniformities in the reflectivity.

  18. In vivo high-resolution retinal imaging using adaptive optics.

    Seyedahmadi, Babak Jian; Vavvas, Demetrios

    2010-01-01

    Retinal imaging with conventional methods is only able to overcome the lowest order of aberration, defocus and astigmatism. The human eye is fraught with higher order of aberrations. Since we are forced to use the human optical system in retinal imaging, the images are degraded. In addition, all of these distortions are constantly changing due to head/eye movement and change in accommodation. Adaptive optics is a promising technology introduced in the field of ophthalmology to measure and compensate for these aberrations. High-resolution obtained by adaptive optics enables us to view and image the retinal photoreceptors, retina pigment epithelium, and identification of cone subclasses in vivo. In this review we will be discussing the basic technology of adaptive optics and hardware requirement in addition to clinical applications of such technology. PMID:21090998

  19. Wave-Chaotic Optical Resonators and Lasers

    Stone, A. Douglas

    2001-10-01

    Deformed cylindrical and spherical dielectric optical resonators and lasers are analyzed from the perspective of non-linear dynamics and quantum chaos theory. In the short-wavelength limit such resonators behave like billiard systems with non-zero escape probability due to refraction. A ray model is introduced to predict the resonance lifetimes and emission patterns from such a cavity. A universal wavelength-independent broadening is predicted and found for large deformations of the cavity. However there are significant wave-chaotic corrections to the model which arise from chaos-assisted tunneling and dynamical localization effects. Highly directional emission from lasers based on these resonators is predicted from chaotic "whispering gallery" modes for index of refraction less than two. The detailed nature of the emission pattern can be understood from the nature of the phase-space flow in the billiard, and a dramatic variation of this pattern with index of refraction is found due to an effect we term "dynamical eclipsing". Semiconductor lasers of this type also show highly directional emission and high output power but from different modes associated with periodic orbits, both stable and unstable. A semiclassical approach to these modes is briefly reviewed. These asymmetric resonant cavities (ARCs) show promise as components in future integrated optical devices, providing perhaps the first application of quantum chaos theory.

  20. Grating THz laser with optical pumping

    Khoury, Jed; Haji-saeed, Bahareh; Woods, Charles; Kierstead, John

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we present a design for a widely tunable solid-state optically and electrically pumped THz laser based on the Smith-Purcell free-electron laser. In the free-electron laser, an energetic electron beam pumps a metallic grating to generate surface plasmons. Our solid-state optically pumped design consists of a thin layer of dielectic, such as SiNx, sandwiched between a corrugated structure and a thin metal or semiconductor layer. The lower layer is for current streaming, and replaces the electron beam in the original design. The upper layer consists of one micro-grating for coupling the electromagnetic field in, another for coupling out, and a nano-grating for coupling with the current in the lower layer for electromagnetic field generation. The surface plasmon waves generated from the upper layer by an external electromagnetic field, and the lower layer by the applied current, are coupled. Emission enhancement occurs when the plasmonic waves in both layers are resonantly coupled.

  1. Digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging system

    Liu, Changgeng; Kim, Myung K.

    2015-11-01

    A digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging (DAOLCI) system is proposed by applying digital holographic adaptive optics to a digital form of line-scanning confocal imaging system. In DAOLCI, each line scan is recorded by a digital hologram, which allows access to the complex optical field from one slice of the sample through digital holography. This complex optical field contains both the information of one slice of the sample and the optical aberration of the system, thus allowing us to compensate for the effect of the optical aberration, which can be sensed by a complex guide star hologram. After numerical aberration compensation, the corrected optical fields of a sequence of line scans are stitched into the final corrected confocal image. In DAOLCI, a numerical slit is applied to realize the confocality at the sensor end. The width of this slit can be adjusted to control the image contrast and speckle noise for scattering samples. DAOLCI dispenses with the hardware pieces, such as Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and deformable mirror, and the closed-loop feedbacks adopted in the conventional adaptive optics confocal imaging system, thus reducing the optomechanical complexity and cost. Numerical simulations and proof-of-principle experiments are presented that demonstrate the feasibility of this idea.

  2. Fabrication of Micro -Optical Devices by a Femtosecond Laser

    Kazuyuki; Hirao

    2003-01-01

    Femtosecond laser is a perfect laser source for materials processing when high accuracy and small structure size are required. Due to the ultra short interaction time and the high peak power, the process is generally characterized by the absence of heat diffusion and, consequently molten layers. Various induced structures have been observed in materials after the femtosecond laser irradiation. Here, we report on fabrication of micro-optical devices by the femtosecond laser. 1) formation of optical waveg...

  3. Mode-Locked Semiconductor Lasers for Optical Communication Systems

    Yvind, Kresten; Larsson, David; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo;

    2005-01-01

    We present investigations on 10 and 40 GHz monolithic mode-locked lasers for applications in optical communications systems. New all-active lasers with one to three quantum wells have been designed, fabricated and characterized.......We present investigations on 10 and 40 GHz monolithic mode-locked lasers for applications in optical communications systems. New all-active lasers with one to three quantum wells have been designed, fabricated and characterized....

  4. Optical coating on laser crystals for HiPER project

    Oulehla, Jindřich; Pokorný, Pavel; Lazar, Josef

    Bellingham: SPIE, 2011, 81900Q:1-4. ISBN 978-0-8194-8823-7. [2011 Laser Damage - Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers /43./. Boulder (US), 18.09.2011-21.09.2011] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN311610701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : interference coatings * thin layers * HiPER * laser crystals * fusion Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  5. Polarization sensitive optical elements by ultrafast laser nanostructuring of glass

    Gecevičius, Mindaugas

    2015-01-01

    In this theses I will concentrate on femtosecond laser induced modification in silica glass. One type of modification in fused silica is subwavelength nanogratings. This modification exhibits form birefringence and therefore optical elements can be fabricated based on nanogratings. The main goal of my work was development and fabrication of practical optical elements based on femtosecond laser induced nanogratings. In order to be able to fabricate optical elements, laser induced modificat...

  6. PASSATA - Object oriented numerical simulation software for adaptive optics

    Agapito, G; Esposito, S

    2016-01-01

    We present the last version of the PyrAmid Simulator Software for Adaptive opTics Arcetri (PASSATA), an IDL and CUDA based object oriented software developed in the Adaptive Optics group of the Arcetri observatory for Monte-Carlo end-to-end adaptive optics simulations. The original aim of this software was to evaluate the performance of a single conjugate adaptive optics system for ground based telescope with a pyramid wavefront sensor. After some years of development, the current version of PASSATA is able to simulate several adaptive optics systems: single conjugate, multi conjugate and ground layer, with Shack Hartmann and Pyramid wavefront sensors. It can simulate from 8m to 40m class telescopes, with diffraction limited and resolved sources at finite or infinite distance from the pupil. The main advantages of this software are the versatility given by the object oriented approach and the speed given by the CUDA implementation of the most computational demanding routines. We describe the software with its...

  7. Optical radiation, with particular reference to lasers

    Laser emissions cover wavelengths from 10 nm to 1 mm and are used in a wide variety of applications. The interactions between biological tissues and laser radiation depend on irradiance and radiant exposure, exposure duration and wavelength. Because of the relatively superficial absorption, the major biological effects are on the skin and the eye. The health hazards to the skin are both acute (thermal burns, sunburn, photosensitized reactions) and chronic (accelerated aging and photocarcinogenesis). The main health hazards to the eye are photokeratitis, corneal burns, photochemical and thermal cataract, ocular inflammation, and photo-chemical, thermal and thermo-acoustic retinal injury and optical breakdown within the eye. Secondary haemorrhage in the vitreous humour with complete loss of vision could be produced by severe damage to the retina. 59 refs, 6 figs, 8 tabs

  8. Optical reprogramming with ultrashort femtosecond laser pulses

    Uchugonova, Aisada; Breunig, Hans G.; Batista, Ana; König, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    The use of sub-15 femtosecond laser pulses in stem cell research is explored with particular emphasis on the optical reprogramming of somatic cells. The reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be evoked through the ectopic expression of defined transcription factors. Conventional approaches utilize retro/lenti-viruses to deliver genes/transcription factors as well as to facilitate the integration of transcription factors into that of the host genome. However, the use of viruses may result in insertional mutations caused by the random integration of genes and as a result, this may limit the use within clinical applications due to the risk of the formation of cancer. In this study, a new approach is demonstrated in realizing non-viral reprogramming through the use of ultrashort laser pulses, to introduce transcription factors into the cell so as to generate iPS cells.

  9. Optical laser systems at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Minitti, Michael P.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Coffee, Ryan N.; Edstrom, Steve; Gilevich, Sasha; Glownia, James M.; Granados, Eduardo; Hering, Philippe; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Miahnahri, Alan; Milathianaki, Despina; Polzin, Wayne; Ratner, Daniel; Tavella, Franz; Vetter, Sharon; Welch, Marc; White, William E.; Fry, Alan R., E-mail: alanfry@slac.stanford.edu [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2015-04-22

    This manuscript serves as a reference to describe the optical laser sources and capabilities at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Ultrafast optical lasers play an essential role in exploiting the unique capabilities of recently commissioned X-ray free-electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Pump–probe experimental techniques reveal ultrafast dynamics in atomic and molecular processes and reveal new insights in chemistry, biology, material science and high-energy-density physics. This manuscript describes the laser systems and experimental methods that enable cutting-edge optical laser/X-ray pump–probe experiments to be performed at LCLS.

  10. Monte-Carlo modelling of multi-conjugate adaptive optics performance on the European Extremely Large Telescope

    Basden, Alastair

    2015-01-01

    The performance of a wide-field adaptive optics system depends on input design parameters. Here we investigate the performance of a multi-conjugate adaptive optics system design for the European Extremely Large Telescope, using an end-to-end Monte-Carlo adaptive optics simulation tool, DASP. We consider parameters such as the number of laser guide stars, sodium layer depth, wavefront sensor pixel scale, number of deformable mirrors, mirror conjugation and actuator pitch. We provide potential areas where costs savings can be made, and investigate trade-offs between performance and cost. We conclude that a 6 laser guide star system using 3 DMs seems to be a sweet spot for performance and cost compromise.