WorldWideScience

Sample records for adaptive mesh refinement

  1. Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    Diachin, L; Hornung, R; Plassmann, P; WIssink, A

    2005-03-04

    As large-scale, parallel computers have become more widely available and numerical models and algorithms have advanced, the range of physical phenomena that can be simulated has expanded dramatically. Many important science and engineering problems exhibit solutions with localized behavior where highly-detailed salient features or large gradients appear in certain regions which are separated by much larger regions where the solution is smooth. Examples include chemically-reacting flows with radiative heat transfer, high Reynolds number flows interacting with solid objects, and combustion problems where the flame front is essentially a two-dimensional sheet occupying a small part of a three-dimensional domain. Modeling such problems numerically requires approximating the governing partial differential equations on a discrete domain, or grid. Grid spacing is an important factor in determining the accuracy and cost of a computation. A fine grid may be needed to resolve key local features while a much coarser grid may suffice elsewhere. Employing a fine grid everywhere may be inefficient at best and, at worst, may make an adequately resolved simulation impractical. Moreover, the location and resolution of fine grid required for an accurate solution is a dynamic property of a problem's transient features and may not be known a priori. Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is a technique that can be used with both structured and unstructured meshes to adjust local grid spacing dynamically to capture solution features with an appropriate degree of resolution. Thus, computational resources can be focused where and when they are needed most to efficiently achieve an accurate solution without incurring the cost of a globally-fine grid. Figure 1.1 shows two example computations using AMR; on the left is a structured mesh calculation of a impulsively-sheared contact surface and on the right is the fuselage and volume discretization of an RAH-66 Comanche helicopter [35]. Note the

  2. Adaptive Mesh Refinement in CTH

    This paper reports progress on implementing a new capability of adaptive mesh refinement into the Eulerian multimaterial shock- physics code CTH. The adaptivity is block-based with refinement and unrefinement occurring in an isotropic 2:1 manner. The code is designed to run on serial, multiprocessor and massive parallel platforms. An approximate factor of three in memory and performance improvements over comparable resolution non-adaptive calculations has-been demonstrated for a number of problems

  3. Adaptive mesh refinement in titanium

    Colella, Phillip; Wen, Tong

    2005-01-21

    In this paper, we evaluate Titanium's usability as a high-level parallel programming language through a case study, where we implement a subset of Chombo's functionality in Titanium. Chombo is a software package applying the Adaptive Mesh Refinement methodology to numerical Partial Differential Equations at the production level. In Chombo, the library approach is used to parallel programming (C++ and Fortran, with MPI), whereas Titanium is a Java dialect designed for high-performance scientific computing. The performance of our implementation is studied and compared with that of Chombo in solving Poisson's equation based on two grid configurations from a real application. Also provided are the counts of lines of code from both sides.

  4. Adaptive mesh refinement for storm surge

    Mandli, Kyle T.

    2014-03-01

    An approach to utilizing adaptive mesh refinement algorithms for storm surge modeling is proposed. Currently numerical models exist that can resolve the details of coastal regions but are often too costly to be run in an ensemble forecasting framework without significant computing resources. The application of adaptive mesh refinement algorithms substantially lowers the computational cost of a storm surge model run while retaining much of the desired coastal resolution. The approach presented is implemented in the GeoClaw framework and compared to ADCIRC for Hurricane Ike along with observed tide gauge data and the computational cost of each model run. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Storm Surge

    Mandli, Kyle T

    2014-01-01

    An approach to utilizing adaptive mesh refinement algorithms for storm surge modeling is proposed. Currently numerical models exist that can resolve the details of coastal regions but are often too costly to be run in an ensemble forecasting framework without significant computing resources. The application of adaptive mesh refinement algorithms substantially lowers the computational cost of a storm surge model run while retaining much of the desired coastal resolution. The approach presented is implemented in the \\geoclaw framework and compared to \\adcirc for Hurricane Ike along with observed tide gauge data and the computational cost of each model run.

  6. Parallel object-oriented adaptive mesh refinement

    Balsara, D.; Quinlan, D.J.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper we study adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) for elliptic and hyperbolic systems. We use the Asynchronous Fast Adaptive Composite Grid Method (AFACX), a parallel algorithm based upon the of Fast Adaptive Composite Grid Method (FAC) as a test case of an adaptive elliptic solver. For our hyperbolic system example we use TVD and ENO schemes for solving the Euler and MHD equations. We use the structured grid load balancer MLB as a tool for obtaining a load balanced distribution in a parallel environment. Parallel adaptive mesh refinement poses difficulties in expressing both the basic single grid solver, whether elliptic or hyperbolic, in a fashion that parallelizes seamlessly. It also requires that these basic solvers work together within the adaptive mesh refinement algorithm which uses the single grid solvers as one part of its adaptive solution process. We show that use of AMR++, an object-oriented library within the OVERTURE Framework, simplifies the development of AMR applications. Parallel support is provided and abstracted through the use of the P++ parallel array class.

  7. GRChombo: Numerical relativity with adaptive mesh refinement

    Clough, Katy; Figueras, Pau; Finkel, Hal; Kunesch, Markus; Lim, Eugene A.; Tunyasuvunakool, Saran

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we introduce {\\mathtt{GRChombo}}: a new numerical relativity code which incorporates full adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) using block structured Berger-Rigoutsos grid generation. The code supports non-trivial 'many-boxes-in-many-boxes' mesh hierarchies and massive parallelism through the message passing interface. {\\mathtt{GRChombo}} evolves the Einstein equation using the standard BSSN formalism, with an option to turn on CCZ4 constraint damping if required. The AMR capability permits the study of a range of new physics which has previously been computationally infeasible in a full 3 + 1 setting, while also significantly simplifying the process of setting up the mesh for these problems. We show that {\\mathtt{GRChombo}} can stably and accurately evolve standard spacetimes such as binary black hole mergers and scalar collapses into black holes, demonstrate the performance characteristics of our code, and discuss various physics problems which stand to benefit from the AMR technique.

  8. Fully implicit adaptive mesh refinement MHD algorithm

    Philip, Bobby

    2005-10-01

    In the macroscopic simulation of plasmas, the numerical modeler is faced with the challenge of dealing with multiple time and length scales. The former results in stiffness due to the presence of very fast waves. The latter requires one to resolve the localized features that the system develops. Traditional approaches based on explicit time integration techniques and fixed meshes are not suitable for this challenge, as such approaches prevent the modeler from using realistic plasma parameters to keep the computation feasible. We propose here a novel approach, based on implicit methods and structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR). Our emphasis is on both accuracy and scalability with the number of degrees of freedom. To our knowledge, a scalable, fully implicit AMR algorithm has not been accomplished before for MHD. As a proof-of-principle, we focus on the reduced resistive MHD model as a basic MHD model paradigm, which is truly multiscale. The approach taken here is to adapt mature physics-based technologyootnotetextL. Chac'on et al., J. Comput. Phys. 178 (1), 15- 36 (2002) to AMR grids, and employ AMR-aware multilevel techniques (such as fast adaptive composite --FAC-- algorithms) for scalability. We will demonstrate that the concept is indeed feasible, featuring optimal scalability under grid refinement. Results of fully-implicit, dynamically-adaptive AMR simulations will be presented on a variety of problems.

  9. Visualization of Scalar Adaptive Mesh Refinement Data

    VACET; Weber, Gunther; Weber, Gunther H.; Beckner, Vince E.; Childs, Hank; Ligocki, Terry J.; Miller, Mark C.; Van Straalen, Brian; Bethel, E. Wes

    2007-12-06

    Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) is a highly effective computation method for simulations that span a large range of spatiotemporal scales, such as astrophysical simulations, which must accommodate ranges from interstellar to sub-planetary. Most mainstream visualization tools still lack support for AMR grids as a first class data type and AMR code teams use custom built applications for AMR visualization. The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Science Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET) is currently working on extending VisIt, which is an open source visualization tool that accommodates AMR as a first-class data type. These efforts will bridge the gap between general-purpose visualization applications and highly specialized AMR visual analysis applications. Here, we give an overview of the state of the art in AMR scalar data visualization research.

  10. GRChombo : Numerical Relativity with Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    Clough, Katy; Finkel, Hal; Kunesch, Markus; Lim, Eugene A; Tunyasuvunakool, Saran

    2015-01-01

    Numerical relativity has undergone a revolution in the past decade. With a well-understood mathematical formalism, and full control over the gauge modes, it is now entering an era in which the science can be properly explored. In this work, we introduce GRChombo, a new numerical relativity code written to take full advantage of modern parallel computing techniques. GRChombo's features include full adaptive mesh refinement with block structured Berger-Rigoutsos grid generation which supports non-trivial "many-boxes-in-many-boxes" meshing hierarchies, and massive parallelism through the Message Passing Interface (MPI). GRChombo evolves the Einstein equation with the standard BSSN formalism, with an option to turn on CCZ4 constraint damping if required. We show that GRChombo passes all the standard "Apples-to-Apples" code comparison tests. We also show that it can stably and accurately evolve vacuum black hole spacetimes such as binary black hole mergers, and non-vacuum spacetimes such as scalar collapses into b...

  11. Elliptic Solvers for Adaptive Mesh Refinement Grids

    Quinlan, D.J.; Dendy, J.E., Jr.; Shapira, Y.

    1999-06-03

    We are developing multigrid methods that will efficiently solve elliptic problems with anisotropic and discontinuous coefficients on adaptive grids. The final product will be a library that provides for the simplified solution of such problems. This library will directly benefit the efforts of other Laboratory groups. The focus of this work is research on serial and parallel elliptic algorithms and the inclusion of our black-box multigrid techniques into this new setting. The approach applies the Los Alamos object-oriented class libraries that greatly simplify the development of serial and parallel adaptive mesh refinement applications. In the final year of this LDRD, we focused on putting the software together; in particular we completed the final AMR++ library, we wrote tutorials and manuals, and we built example applications. We implemented the Fast Adaptive Composite Grid method as the principal elliptic solver. We presented results at the Overset Grid Conference and other more AMR specific conferences. We worked on optimization of serial and parallel performance and published several papers on the details of this work. Performance remains an important issue and is the subject of continuing research work.

  12. Elliptic Solvers with Adaptive Mesh Refinement on Complex Geometries

    Phillip, B.

    2000-07-24

    Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) is a numerical technique for locally tailoring the resolution computational grids. Multilevel algorithms for solving elliptic problems on adaptive grids include the Fast Adaptive Composite grid method (FAC) and its parallel variants (AFAC and AFACx). Theory that confirms the independence of the convergence rates of FAC and AFAC on the number of refinement levels exists under certain ellipticity and approximation property conditions. Similar theory needs to be developed for AFACx. The effectiveness of multigrid-based elliptic solvers such as FAC, AFAC, and AFACx on adaptively refined overlapping grids is not clearly understood. Finally, a non-trivial eye model problem will be solved by combining the power of using overlapping grids for complex moving geometries, AMR, and multilevel elliptic solvers.

  13. AMR++: Object-Oriented Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    Quinlan, D.; Philip, B.

    2000-02-02

    Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) computations are complicated by their dynamic nature. The development of solvers for realistic applications is complicated by both the complexity of the AMR and the geometry of realistic problem domains. The additional complexity of distributed memory parallelism within such AMR applications most commonly exceeds the level of complexity that can be reasonable maintained with traditional approaches toward software development. This paper will present the details of our object-oriented work on the simplification of the use of adaptive mesh refinement on applications with complex geometries for both serial and distributed memory parallel computation. We will present an independent set of object-oriented abstractions (C++ libraries) well suited to the development of such seemingly intractable scientific computations. As an example of the use of this object-oriented approach we will present recent results of an application modeling fluid flow in the eye. Within this example, the geometry is too complicated for a single curvilinear coordinate grid and so a set of overlapping curvilinear coordinate grids' are used. Adaptive mesh refinement and the required grid generation work to support the refinement process is coupled together in the solution of essentially elliptic equations within this domain. This paper will focus on the management of complexity within development of the AMR++ library which forms a part of the Overture object-oriented framework for the solution of partial differential equations within scientific computing.

  14. Parallel Block Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement on Graphics Processing Units

    Beckingsale, D. A. [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Aldermaston (United Kingdom); Gaudin, W. P. [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Aldermaston (United Kingdom); Hornung, R. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gunney, B. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gamblin, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Herdman, J. A. [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Aldermaston (United Kingdom); Jarvis, S. A. [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Aldermaston (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-17

    Block-structured adaptive mesh refinement is a technique that can be used when solving partial differential equations to reduce the number of zones necessary to achieve the required accuracy in areas of interest. These areas (shock fronts, material interfaces, etc.) are recursively covered with finer mesh patches that are grouped into a hierarchy of refinement levels. Despite the potential for large savings in computational requirements and memory usage without a corresponding reduction in accuracy, AMR adds overhead in managing the mesh hierarchy, adding complex communication and data movement requirements to a simulation. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a native GPU-based AMR library, including: the classes used to manage data on a mesh patch, the routines used for transferring data between GPUs on different nodes, and the data-parallel operators developed to coarsen and refine mesh data. We validate the performance and accuracy of our implementation using three test problems and two architectures: an eight-node cluster, and over four thousand nodes of Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Titan supercomputer. Our GPU-based AMR hydrodynamics code performs up to 4.87× faster than the CPU-based implementation, and has been scaled to over four thousand GPUs using a combination of MPI and CUDA.

  15. PARAMESH V4.1: Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    MacNeice, Peter; Olson, Kevin M.; Mobarry, Clark; de Fainchtein, Rosalinda; Packer, Charles

    2011-06-01

    PARAMESH is a package of Fortran 90 subroutines designed to provide an application developer with an easy route to extend an existing serial code which uses a logically cartesian structured mesh into a parallel code with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Alternatively, in its simplest use, and with minimal effort, it can operate as a domain decomposition tool for users who want to parallelize their serial codes, but who do not wish to use adaptivity. The package builds a hierarchy of sub-grids to cover the computational domain, with spatial resolution varying to satisfy the demands of the application. These sub-grid blocks form the nodes of a tree data-structure (quad-tree in 2D or oct-tree in 3D). Each grid block has a logically cartesian mesh. The package supports 1, 2 and 3D models. PARAMESH is released under the NASA-wide Open-Source software license.

  16. Texture-based volume rendering of adaptive mesh refinement data

    Kähler, R.; Hege, H.

    2002-01-01

    Many phenomena in nature and engineering happen simultaneously on rather diverse spatial and temporal scales. In other words, they exhibit a multi-scale character. A special numerical multilevel technique associated with a particular hierarchical data structure is adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). This scheme achieves locally very high spatial and temporal resolutions. Due to its popularity, many scientists are in need of interactive visualization tools for AMR data. In this article, we present...

  17. The Nonlinear Sigma Model With Distributed Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    Liebling, Steven L.

    2004-01-01

    An adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) scheme is implemented in a distributed environment using Message Passing Interface (MPI) to find solutions to the nonlinear sigma model. Previous work studied behavior similar to black hole critical phenomena at the threshold for singularity formation in this flat space model. This work is a follow-up describing extensions to distribute the grid hierarchy and presenting tests showing the correctness of the model.

  18. A Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration Method for Block Adaptive Mesh Refinement.

    Ward, R. C. (Robert C.); Baker, R. S. (Randall S.); Morel, J. E. (Jim E.)

    2005-01-01

    A prototype two-dimensional Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration (DSA) method on a Block-based Adaptive Mesh Refinement (BAMR) transport mesh has been developed. The Block-Adaptive Mesh Refinement Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration (BAMR-DSA) method was tested in the PARallel TIme-Dependent SN (PARTISN) deterministic transport code. The BAMR-DSA equations are derived by differencing the DSA equation using a vertex-centered diffusion discretization that is diamond-like and may be characterized as 'partially' consistent. The derivation of a diffusion discretization that is fully consistent with diamond transport differencing on BAMR mesh does not appear to be possible. However, despite being partially consistent, the BAMR-DSA method is effective for many applications. The BAMR-DSA solver was implemented and tested in two dimensions for rectangular (XY) and cylindrical (RZ) geometries. Testing results confirm that a partially consistent BAMR-DSA method will introduce instabilities for extreme cases, e.g., scattering ratios approaching 1.0 with optically thick cells, but for most realistic problems the BAMR-DSA method provides effective acceleration. The initial use of a full matrix to store and LU-Decomposition to solve the BAMR-DSA equations has been extended to include Compressed Sparse Row (CSR) storage and a Conjugate Gradient (CG) solver. The CSR and CG methods provide significantly more efficient and faster storage and solution methods.

  19. Block-structured adaptive mesh refinement - theory, implementation and application

    Deiterding, Ralf [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR) techniques can enable cutting-edge simulations of problems governed by conservation laws. Focusing on the strictly hyperbolic case, these notes explain all algorithmic and mathematical details of a technically relevant implementation tailored for distributed memory computers. An overview of the background of commonly used finite volume discretizations for gas dynamics is included and typical benchmarks to quantify accuracy and performance of the dynamically adaptive code are discussed. Large-scale simulations of shock-induced realistic combustion in non-Cartesian geometry and shock-driven fluid-structure interaction with fully coupled dynamic boundary motion demonstrate the applicability of the discussed techniques for complex scenarios.

  20. Fully implicit adaptive mesh refinement algorithm for reduced MHD

    Philip, Bobby; Pernice, Michael; Chacon, Luis

    2006-10-01

    In the macroscopic simulation of plasmas, the numerical modeler is faced with the challenge of dealing with multiple time and length scales. Traditional approaches based on explicit time integration techniques and fixed meshes are not suitable for this challenge, as such approaches prevent the modeler from using realistic plasma parameters to keep the computation feasible. We propose here a novel approach, based on implicit methods and structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR). Our emphasis is on both accuracy and scalability with the number of degrees of freedom. As a proof-of-principle, we focus on the reduced resistive MHD model as a basic MHD model paradigm, which is truly multiscale. The approach taken here is to adapt mature physics-based technology to AMR grids, and employ AMR-aware multilevel techniques (such as fast adaptive composite grid --FAC-- algorithms) for scalability. We demonstrate that the concept is indeed feasible, featuring near-optimal scalability under grid refinement. Results of fully-implicit, dynamically-adaptive AMR simulations in challenging dissipation regimes will be presented on a variety of problems that benefit from this capability, including tearing modes, the island coalescence instability, and the tilt mode instability. L. Chac'on et al., J. Comput. Phys. 178 (1), 15- 36 (2002) B. Philip, M. Pernice, and L. Chac'on, Lecture Notes in Computational Science and Engineering, accepted (2006)

  1. Block-structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement - Theory, Implementation and Application

    Deiterding Ralf

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR techniques can enable cutting-edge simulations of problems governed by conservation laws. Focusing on the strictly hyperbolic case, these notes explain all algorithmic and mathematical details of a technically relevant implementation tailored for distributed memory computers. An overview of the background of commonly used finite volume discretizations for gas dynamics is included and typical benchmarks to quantify accuracy and performance of the dynamically adaptive code are discussed. Large-scale simulations of shock-induced realistic combustion in non-Cartesian geometry and shock-driven fluid-structure interaction with fully coupled dynamic boundary motion demonstrate the applicability of the discussed techniques for complex scenarios.

  2. Implicit adaptive mesh refinement for 2D reduced resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    Philip, Bobby; Chacón, Luis; Pernice, Michael

    2008-10-01

    An implicit structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR) solver for 2D reduced magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is described. The time-implicit discretization is able to step over fast normal modes, while the spatial adaptivity resolves thin, dynamically evolving features. A Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov method is used for the nonlinear solver engine. For preconditioning, we have extended the optimal "physics-based" approach developed in [L. Chacón, D.A. Knoll, J.M. Finn, An implicit, nonlinear reduced resistive MHD solver, J. Comput. Phys. 178 (2002) 15-36] (which employed multigrid solver technology in the preconditioner for scalability) to SAMR grids using the well-known Fast Adaptive Composite grid (FAC) method [S. McCormick, Multilevel Adaptive Methods for Partial Differential Equations, SIAM, Philadelphia, PA, 1989]. A grid convergence study demonstrates that the solver performance is independent of the number of grid levels and only depends on the finest resolution considered, and that it scales well with grid refinement. The study of error generation and propagation in our SAMR implementation demonstrates that high-order (cubic) interpolation during regridding, combined with a robustly damping second-order temporal scheme such as BDF2, is required to minimize impact of grid errors at coarse-fine interfaces on the overall error of the computation for this MHD application. We also demonstrate that our implementation features the desired property that the overall numerical error is dependent only on the finest resolution level considered, and not on the base-grid resolution or on the number of refinement levels present during the simulation. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the tool on several challenging problems.

  3. CONSTRAINED-TRANSPORT MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS WITH ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT IN CHARM

    We present the implementation of a three-dimensional, second-order accurate Godunov-type algorithm for magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in the adaptive-mesh-refinement (AMR) cosmological code CHARM. The algorithm is based on the full 12-solve spatially unsplit corner-transport-upwind (CTU) scheme. The fluid quantities are cell-centered and are updated using the piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), while the magnetic field variables are face-centered and are evolved through application of the Stokes theorem on cell edges via a constrained-transport (CT) method. The so-called multidimensional MHD source terms required in the predictor step for high-order accuracy are applied in a simplified form which reduces their complexity in three dimensions without loss of accuracy or robustness. The algorithm is implemented on an AMR framework which requires specific synchronization steps across refinement levels. These include face-centered restriction and prolongation operations and a reflux-curl operation, which maintains a solenoidal magnetic field across refinement boundaries. The code is tested against a large suite of test problems, including convergence tests in smooth flows, shock-tube tests, classical two- and three-dimensional MHD tests, a three-dimensional shock-cloud interaction problem, and the formation of a cluster of galaxies in a fully cosmological context. The magnetic field divergence is shown to remain negligible throughout.

  4. Constrained-transport Magnetohydrodynamics with Adaptive Mesh Refinement in CHARM

    Miniati, Francesco; Martin, Daniel F.

    2011-07-01

    We present the implementation of a three-dimensional, second-order accurate Godunov-type algorithm for magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in the adaptive-mesh-refinement (AMR) cosmological code CHARM. The algorithm is based on the full 12-solve spatially unsplit corner-transport-upwind (CTU) scheme. The fluid quantities are cell-centered and are updated using the piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), while the magnetic field variables are face-centered and are evolved through application of the Stokes theorem on cell edges via a constrained-transport (CT) method. The so-called multidimensional MHD source terms required in the predictor step for high-order accuracy are applied in a simplified form which reduces their complexity in three dimensions without loss of accuracy or robustness. The algorithm is implemented on an AMR framework which requires specific synchronization steps across refinement levels. These include face-centered restriction and prolongation operations and a reflux-curl operation, which maintains a solenoidal magnetic field across refinement boundaries. The code is tested against a large suite of test problems, including convergence tests in smooth flows, shock-tube tests, classical two- and three-dimensional MHD tests, a three-dimensional shock-cloud interaction problem, and the formation of a cluster of galaxies in a fully cosmological context. The magnetic field divergence is shown to remain negligible throughout.

  5. Enzo: An Adaptive Mesh Refinement Code for Astrophysics

    Bryan, Greg L; O'Shea, Brian W; Abel, Tom; Wise, John H; Turk, Matthew J; Reynolds, Daniel R; Collins, David C; Wang, Peng; Skillman, Samuel W; Smith, Britton; Harkness, Robert P; Bordner, James; Kim, Ji-hoon; Kuhlen, Michael; Xu, Hao; Goldbaum, Nathan; Hummels, Cameron; Kritsuk, Alexei G; Tasker, Elizabeth; Skory, Stephen; Simpson, Christine M; Hahn, Oliver; Oishi, Jeffrey S; So, Geoffrey C; Zhao, Fen; Cen, Renyue; Li, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the open-source code Enzo, which uses block-structured adaptive mesh refinement to provide high spatial and temporal resolution for modeling astrophysical fluid flows. The code is Cartesian, can be run in 1, 2, and 3 dimensions, and supports a wide variety of physics including hydrodynamics, ideal and non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics, N-body dynamics (and, more broadly, self-gravity of fluids and particles), primordial gas chemistry, optically-thin radiative cooling of primordial and metal-enriched plasmas (as well as some optically-thick cooling models), radiation transport, cosmological expansion, and models for star formation and feedback in a cosmological context. In addition to explaining the algorithms implemented, we present solutions for a wide range of test problems, demonstrate the code's parallel performance, and discuss the Enzo collaboration's code development methodology.

  6. Hydrodynamical Adaptive Mesh Refinement Simulations of Disk Galaxies

    Gibson, Brad K; Sanchez-Blazquez, Patricia; Teyssier, Romain; House, Elisa L; Brook, Chris B; Kawata, Daisuke

    2008-01-01

    To date, fully cosmological hydrodynamic disk simulations to redshift zero have only been undertaken with particle-based codes, such as GADGET, Gasoline, or GCD+. In light of the (supposed) limitations of traditional implementations of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), or at the very least, their respective idiosyncrasies, it is important to explore complementary approaches to the SPH paradigm to galaxy formation. We present the first high-resolution cosmological disk simulations to redshift zero using an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR)-based hydrodynamical code, in this case, RAMSES. We analyse the temporal and spatial evolution of the simulated stellar disks' vertical heating, velocity ellipsoids, stellar populations, vertical and radial abundance gradients (gas and stars), assembly/infall histories, warps/lopsideness, disk edges/truncations (gas and stars), ISM physics implementations, and compare and contrast these properties with our sample of cosmological SPH disks, generated with GCD+. These prelim...

  7. A Spectral Adaptive Mesh Refinement Method for the Burgers equation

    Nasr Azadani, Leila; Staples, Anne

    2013-03-01

    Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is a powerful technique in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Many CFD problems have a wide range of scales which vary with time and space. In order to resolve all the scales numerically, high grid resolutions are required. The smaller the scales the higher the resolutions should be. However, small scales are usually formed in a small portion of the domain or in a special period of time. AMR is an efficient method to solve these types of problems, allowing high grid resolutions where and when they are needed and minimizing memory and CPU time. Here we formulate a spectral version of AMR in order to accelerate simulations of a 1D model for isotropic homogenous turbulence, the Burgers equation, as a first test of this method. Using pseudo spectral methods, we applied AMR in Fourier space. The spectral AMR (SAMR) method we present here is applied to the Burgers equation and the results are compared with the results obtained using standard solution methods performed using a fine mesh.

  8. 3D Compressible Melt Transport with Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    Dannberg, Juliane; Heister, Timo

    2015-04-01

    Melt generation and migration have been the subject of numerous investigations, but their typical time and length-scales are vastly different from mantle convection, which makes it difficult to study these processes in a unified framework. The equations that describe coupled Stokes-Darcy flow have been derived a long time ago and they have been successfully implemented and applied in numerical models (Keller et al., 2013). However, modelling magma dynamics poses the challenge of highly non-linear and spatially variable material properties, in particular the viscosity. Applying adaptive mesh refinement to this type of problems is particularly advantageous, as the resolution can be increased in mesh cells where melt is present and viscosity gradients are high, whereas a lower resolution is sufficient in regions without melt. In addition, previous models neglect the compressibility of both the solid and the fluid phase. However, experiments have shown that the melt density change from the depth of melt generation to the surface leads to a volume increase of up to 20%. Considering these volume changes in both phases also ensures self-consistency of models that strive to link melt generation to processes in the deeper mantle, where the compressibility of the solid phase becomes more important. We describe our extension of the finite-element mantle convection code ASPECT (Kronbichler et al., 2012) that allows for solving additional equations describing the behaviour of silicate melt percolating through and interacting with a viscously deforming host rock. We use the original compressible formulation of the McKenzie equations, augmented by an equation for the conservation of energy. This approach includes both melt migration and melt generation with the accompanying latent heat effects. We evaluate the functionality and potential of this method using a series of simple model setups and benchmarks, comparing results of the compressible and incompressible formulation and

  9. Direct numerical simulation of bubbles with parallelized adaptive mesh refinement

    The study of two-phase Thermal-Hydraulics is a major topic for Nuclear Engineering for both security and efficiency of nuclear facilities. In addition to experiments, numerical modeling helps to knowing precisely where bubbles appear and how they behave, in the core as well as in the steam generators. This work presents the finest scale of representation of two-phase flows, Direct Numerical Simulation of bubbles. We use the 'Di-phasic Low Mach Number' equation model. It is particularly adapted to low-Mach number flows, that is to say flows which velocity is much slower than the speed of sound; this is very typical of nuclear thermal-hydraulics conditions. Because we study bubbles, we capture the front between vapor and liquid phases thanks to a downward flux limiting numerical scheme. The specific discrete analysis technique this work introduces is well-balanced parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR). With AMR, we refined the coarse grid on a batch of patches in order to locally increase precision in areas which matter more, and capture fine changes in the front location and its topology. We show that patch-based AMR is very adapted for parallel computing. We use a variety of physical examples: forced advection, heat transfer, phase changes represented by a Stefan model, as well as the combination of all those models. We will present the results of those numerical simulations, as well as the speed up compared to equivalent non-AMR simulation and to serial computation of the same problems. This document is made up of an abstract and the slides of the presentation. (author)

  10. An adaptive mesh-moving and refinement procedure for one-dimensional conservation laws

    Biswas, Rupak; Flaherty, Joseph E.; Arney, David C.

    1993-01-01

    We examine the performance of an adaptive mesh-moving and /or local mesh refinement procedure for the finite difference solution of one-dimensional hyperbolic systems of conservation laws. Adaptive motion of a base mesh is designed to isolate spatially distinct phenomena, and recursive local refinement of the time step and cells of the stationary or moving base mesh is performed in regions where a refinement indicator exceeds a prescribed tolerance. These adaptive procedures are incorporated into a computer code that includes a MacCormack finite difference scheme wih Davis' artificial viscosity model and a discretization error estimate based on Richardson's extrapolation. Experiments are conducted on three problems in order to qualify the advantages of adaptive techniques relative to uniform mesh computations and the relative benefits of mesh moving and refinement. Key results indicate that local mesh refinement, with and without mesh moving, can provide reliable solutions at much lower computational cost than possible on uniform meshes; that mesh motion can be used to improve the results of uniform mesh solutions for a modest computational effort; that the cost of managing the tree data structure associated with refinement is small; and that a combination of mesh motion and refinement reliably produces solutions for the least cost per unit accuracy.

  11. Adaptive mesh refinement and adjoint methods in geophysics simulations

    Burstedde, Carsten

    2013-04-01

    It is an ongoing challenge to increase the resolution that can be achieved by numerical geophysics simulations. This applies to considering sub-kilometer mesh spacings in global-scale mantle convection simulations as well as to using frequencies up to 1 Hz in seismic wave propagation simulations. One central issue is the numerical cost, since for three-dimensional space discretizations, possibly combined with time stepping schemes, a doubling of resolution can lead to an increase in storage requirements and run time by factors between 8 and 16. A related challenge lies in the fact that an increase in resolution also increases the dimensionality of the model space that is needed to fully parametrize the physical properties of the simulated object (a.k.a. earth). Systems that exhibit a multiscale structure in space are candidates for employing adaptive mesh refinement, which varies the resolution locally. An example that we found well suited is the mantle, where plate boundaries and fault zones require a resolution on the km scale, while deeper area can be treated with 50 or 100 km mesh spacings. This approach effectively reduces the number of computational variables by several orders of magnitude. While in this case it is possible to derive the local adaptation pattern from known physical parameters, it is often unclear what are the most suitable criteria for adaptation. We will present the goal-oriented error estimation procedure, where such criteria are derived from an objective functional that represents the observables to be computed most accurately. Even though this approach is well studied, it is rarely used in the geophysics community. A related strategy to make finer resolution manageable is to design methods that automate the inference of model parameters. Tweaking more than a handful of numbers and judging the quality of the simulation by adhoc comparisons to known facts and observations is a tedious task and fundamentally limited by the turnaround times

  12. Patch-based Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Multimaterial Hydrodynamics

    Lomov, I; Pember, R; Greenough, J; Liu, B

    2005-10-18

    We present a patch-based direct Eulerian adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm for modeling real equation-of-state, multimaterial compressible flow with strength. Our approach to AMR uses a hierarchical, structured grid approach first developed by (Berger and Oliger 1984), (Berger and Oliger 1984). The grid structure is dynamic in time and is composed of nested uniform rectangular grids of varying resolution. The integration scheme on the grid hierarchy is a recursive procedure in which the coarse grids are advanced, then the fine grids are advanced multiple steps to reach the same time, and finally the coarse and fine grids are synchronized to remove conservation errors during the separate advances. The methodology presented here is based on a single grid algorithm developed for multimaterial gas dynamics by (Colella et al. 1993), refined by(Greenough et al. 1995), and extended to the solution of solid mechanics problems with significant strength by (Lomov and Rubin 2003). The single grid algorithm uses a second-order Godunov scheme with an approximate single fluid Riemann solver and a volume-of-fluid treatment of material interfaces. The method also uses a non-conservative treatment of the deformation tensor and an acoustic approximation for shear waves in the Riemann solver. This departure from a strict application of the higher-order Godunov methodology to the equation of solid mechanics is justified due to the fact that highly nonlinear behavior of shear stresses is rare. This algorithm is implemented in two codes, Geodyn and Raptor, the latter of which is a coupled rad-hydro code. The present discussion will be solely concerned with hydrodynamics modeling. Results from a number of simulations for flows with and without strength will be presented.

  13. SIP-CESE MHD model of solar wind with adaptive mesh refinement of hexahedral meshes

    Feng, Xueshang; Xiang, Changqing; Zhong, Dingkun; Zhou, Yufen; Yang, Liping; Ma, Xiaopeng

    2014-07-01

    Solar-interplanetary space involves many features, such as discontinuities and heliospheric current sheet, with spatial scales many orders of magnitude smaller than the system size. The scalable, massively parallel, block-based, adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR) promises to resolve different temporal and spatial scales on which solar-wind plasma occurs throughout the vast solar-interplanetary space with even less cells but can generate a good enough resolution. Here, we carry out the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) implementation of our Solar-Interplanetary space-time conservation element and solution element (CESE) magnetohydrodynamic model (SIP-CESE MHD model) using a six-component grid system (Feng et al., 2007, 2010). The AMR realization of the SIP-CESE MHD model is naturalized directly in hexahedral meshes with the aid of the parallel AMR package PARAMESH available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/paramesh/. At the same time, the topology of the magnetic field expansion factor and the minimum angular separation (at the photosphere) between an open field foot point and its nearest coronal-hole boundary are merged into the model in order to determine the volumetric heating source terms. Our numerical results for the validation study of the solar-wind background of Carrington rotation 2060 show overall good agreements in the solar corona and in interplanetary space with the observations from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and spacecraft data from OMNI.

  14. RAM: a Relativistic Adaptive Mesh Refinement Hydrodynamics Code

    Zhang, Wei-Qun; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; MacFadyen, Andrew I.; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study

    2005-06-06

    The authors have developed a new computer code, RAM, to solve the conservative equations of special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) on parallel computers. They have implemented a characteristic-wise, finite difference, weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme using the full characteristic decomposition of the SRHD equations to achieve fifth-order accuracy in space. For time integration they use the method of lines with a third-order total variation diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme. They have also implemented fourth and fifth order Runge-Kutta time integration schemes for comparison. The implementation of AMR and parallelization is based on the FLASH code. RAM is modular and includes the capability to easily swap hydrodynamics solvers, reconstruction methods and physics modules. In addition to WENO they have implemented a finite volume module with the piecewise parabolic method (PPM) for reconstruction and the modified Marquina approximate Riemann solver to work with TVD Runge-Kutta time integration. They examine the difficulty of accurately simulating shear flows in numerical relativistic hydrodynamics codes. They show that under-resolved simulations of simple test problems with transverse velocity components produce incorrect results and demonstrate the ability of RAM to correctly solve these problems. RAM has been tested in one, two and three dimensions and in Cartesian, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. they have demonstrated fifth-order accuracy for WENO in one and two dimensions and performed detailed comparison with other schemes for which they show significantly lower convergence rates. Extensive testing is presented demonstrating the ability of RAM to address challenging open questions in relativistic astrophysics.

  15. A Parallel Algorithm for Adaptive Local Refinement of Tetrahedral Meshes Using Bisection

    LinBo Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Local mesh refinement is one of the key steps in the implementations of adaptive finite element methods. This paper presents a parallel algorithm for distributed memory parallel computers for adaptive local refinement of tetrahedral meshes using bisection. This algorithm is used in PHG, Parallel Hierarchical Grid (http: //lsec. cc. ac. cn/phg/J, a toolbox under active development for parallel adaptive finite element solutions of partial differential equations. The algorithm proposed is characterized by allowing simultaneous refinement of submeshes to arbitrary levels before synchronization between submeshes and without the need of a central coordinator process for managing new vertices. Using the concept of canonical refinement, a simple proof of the independence of the resulting mesh on the mesh partitioning is given, which is useful in better understanding the behaviour of the bisectioning refinement procedure.AMS subject classifications: 65Y05, 65N50

  16. GAMER: a GPU-Accelerated Adaptive Mesh Refinement Code for Astrophysics

    Schive, Hsi-Yu; Tsai, Yu-Chih; Chiueh, Tzihong

    2009-01-01

    We present the newly developed code, GAMER (GPU-accelerated Adaptive MEsh Refinement code), which has adopted a novel approach to improve the performance of adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) astrophysical simulations by a large factor with the use of the graphic processing unit (GPU). The AMR implementation is based on a hierarchy of grid patches with an oct-tree data structure. We adopt a three-dimensional relaxing TVD scheme for the hydrodynamic solver, and a multi-level relaxation scheme for ...

  17. An Adaptive Mesh Refinement Strategy for Immersed Boundary/Interface Methods

    Li, Zhilin; Song, Peng

    2012-01-01

    An adaptive mesh refinement strategy is proposed in this paper for the Immersed Boundary and Immersed Interface methods for two-dimensional elliptic interface problems involving singular sources. The interface is represented by the zero level set of a Lipschitz function φ(x,y). Our adaptive mesh refinement is done within a small tube of |φ(x,y)|≤ δ with finer Cartesian meshes. The discrete linear system of equations is solved by a multigrid solver. The AMR methods could obtain solutions with ...

  18. Thickness-based adaptive mesh refinement methods for multi-phase flow simulations with thin regions

    In numerical simulations of multi-scale, multi-phase flows, grid refinement is required to resolve regions with small scales. A notable example is liquid-jet atomization and subsequent droplet dynamics. It is essential to characterize the detailed flow physics with variable length scales with high fidelity, in order to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. In this paper, two thickness-based mesh refinement schemes are developed based on distance- and topology-oriented criteria for thin regions with confining wall/plane of symmetry and in any situation, respectively. Both techniques are implemented in a general framework with a volume-of-fluid formulation and an adaptive-mesh-refinement capability. The distance-oriented technique compares against a critical value, the ratio of an interfacial cell size to the distance between the mass center of the cell and a reference plane. The topology-oriented technique is developed from digital topology theories to handle more general conditions. The requirement for interfacial mesh refinement can be detected swiftly, without the need of thickness information, equation solving, variable averaging or mesh repairing. The mesh refinement level increases smoothly on demand in thin regions. The schemes have been verified and validated against several benchmark cases to demonstrate their effectiveness and robustness. These include the dynamics of colliding droplets, droplet motions in a microchannel, and atomization of liquid impinging jets. Overall, the thickness-based refinement technique provides highly adaptive meshes for problems with thin regions in an efficient and fully automatic manner

  19. Cosmological Shocks in Adaptive Mesh Refinement Simulations and the Acceleration of Cosmic Rays

    Skillman, Samuel W.; O'Shea, Brian W.; Hallman, Eric J.; Burns, Jack O.; Michael L. Norman

    2008-01-01

    We present new results characterizing cosmological shocks within adaptive mesh refinement N-Body/hydrodynamic simulations that are used to predict non-thermal components of large-scale structure. This represents the first study of shocks using adaptive mesh refinement. We propose a modified algorithm for finding shocks from those used on unigrid simulations that reduces the shock frequency of low Mach number shocks by a factor of ~3. We then apply our new technique to a large, (512 Mpc/h)^3, ...

  20. Performance Characteristics of an Adaptive Mesh Refinement Calculation on Scalar and Vector Platforms

    Welcome, Michael; Rendleman, Charles; Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak

    2006-01-01

    Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is a powerful technique that reduces the resources necessary to solve otherwise in-tractable problems in computational science. The AMR strategy solves the problem on a relatively coarse grid, and dynamically refines it in regions requiring higher resolution. However, AMR codes tend to be far more complicated than their uniform grid counterparts due to the software infrastructure necessary to dynamically manage the hierarchical grid framework. Despite this ...

  1. Adaptive mesh refinement and multilevel iteration for multiphase, multicomponent flow in porous media

    Hornung, R.D. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    1996-12-31

    An adaptive local mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm originally developed for unsteady gas dynamics is extended to multi-phase flow in porous media. Within the AMR framework, we combine specialized numerical methods to treat the different aspects of the partial differential equations. Multi-level iteration and domain decomposition techniques are incorporated to accommodate elliptic/parabolic behavior. High-resolution shock capturing schemes are used in the time integration of the hyperbolic mass conservation equations. When combined with AMR, these numerical schemes provide high resolution locally in a more efficient manner than if they were applied on a uniformly fine computational mesh. We will discuss the interplay of physical, mathematical, and numerical concerns in the application of adaptive mesh refinement to flow in porous media problems of practical interest.

  2. Relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell modelling using finite volumes and adaptive mesh refinement

    Wettervik, Benjamin Svedung; Siminos, Evangelos; Fülöp, Tünde

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of collisionless plasmas can be modelled by the Vlasov-Maxwell system of equations. An Eulerian approach is needed to accurately describe processes that are governed by high energy tails in the distribution function, but is of limited efficiency for high dimensional problems. The use of an adaptive mesh can reduce the scaling of the computational cost with the dimension of the problem. Here, we present a relativistic Eulerian Vlasov-Maxwell solver with block-structured adaptive mesh refinement in one spatial and one momentum dimension. The discretization of the Vlasov equation is based on a high-order finite volume method. A flux corrected transport algorithm is applied to limit spurious oscillations and ensure the physical character of the distribution function. We demonstrate a speed-up by a factor of five, because of the use of an adaptive mesh, in a typical scenario involving laser-plasma interaction in the self-induced transparency regime.

  3. An adaptive mesh refinement approach for average current nodal expansion method in 2-D rectangular geometry

    Highlights: ► A new adaptive h-refinement approach has been developed for a class of nodal method. ► The resulting system of nodal equations is more amenable to efficient numerical solution. ► The benefit of the approach is reducing computational efforts relative to the uniform fine mesh modeling. ► Spatially adaptive approach greatly enhances the accuracy of the solution. - Abstract: The aim of this work is to develop a spatially adaptive coarse mesh strategy that progressively refines the nodes in appropriate regions of domain to solve the neutron balance equation by zeroth order nodal expansion method. A flux gradient based a posteriori estimation scheme has been utilized for checking the approximate solutions for various nodes. The relative surface net leakage of nodes has been considered as an assessment criterion. In this approach, the core module is called in by adaptive mesh generator to determine gradients of node surfaces flux to explore the possibility of node refinements in appropriate regions and directions of the problem. The benefit of the approach is reducing computational efforts relative to the uniform fine mesh modeling. For this purpose, a computer program ANRNE-2D, Adaptive Node Refinement Nodal Expansion, has been developed to solve neutron diffusion equation using average current nodal expansion method for 2D rectangular geometries. Implementing the adaptive algorithm confirms its superiority in enhancing the accuracy of the solution without using fine nodes throughout the domain and increasing the number of unknown solution. Some well-known benchmarks have been investigated and improvements are reported

  4. Constrained-Transport Magnetohydrodynamics with Adaptive-Mesh-Refinement in CHARM

    Miniati, Francesco; Martin, Daniel F.

    2011-01-01

    We present the implementation of a three-dimensional, second order accurate Godunov-type algorithm for magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD), in the adaptive-mesh-refinement (AMR) cosmological code {\\tt CHARM}. The algorithm is based on the full 12-solve spatially unsplit Corner-Transport-Upwind (CTU) scheme. The fluid quantities are cell-centered and are updated using the Piecewise-Parabolic-Method (PPM), while the magnetic field variables are face-centered and are evolved through application of the St...

  5. Block Structured Adaptive Mesh and Time Refinement for Hybrid, Hyperbolic + N-body Systems

    Miniati, Francesco; Colella, Phillip

    2006-01-01

    We present a new numerical algorithm for the solution of coupled collisional and collisionless systems, based on the block structured adaptive mesh and time refinement strategy (AMR). We describe the issues associated with the discretization of the system equations and the synchronization of the numerical solution on the hierarchy of grid levels. We implement a code based on a higher order, conservative and directionally unsplit Godunov's method for hydrodynamics; a symmetric, time centered m...

  6. A High Order Godunov Scheme with Constrained Transport and Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Astrophysical MHD

    Fromang, S.; Hennebelle, P.; Teyssier, R.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new method to perform numerical simulations of astrophysical MHD flows using the Adaptive Mesh Refinement framework and Constrained Transport. The algorithm is based on a previous work in which the MUSCL--Hancock scheme was used to evolve the induction equation. In this paper, we detail the extension of this scheme to the full MHD equations and discuss its properties. Through a series of test problems, we illustrate the performances of this new code using two diffe...

  7. A Patch-based Partitioner for Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement : Implementation and Evaluation

    Vakili, Abbas

    2008-01-01

    To increase the speed of computer simulations we solve partial differential equations (PDEs) using structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR). During the execution of an SAMR-application, finer grids are superimposed dynamically on coarser grids where a more accurate solution is needed in the computation area. To further decrease the computation time, we use parallel computers and divide the computational work between the processors. This gives rise to challenging load balancing problem. The ...

  8. Achieving Extreme Resolution in Numerical Cosmology Using Adaptive Mesh Refinement: Resolving Primordial Star Formation

    Greg L. Bryan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available As an entry for the 2001 Gordon Bell Award in the "special" category, we describe our 3-d, hybrid, adaptive mesh refinement (AMR code Enzo designed for high-resolution, multiphysics, cosmological structure formation simulations. Our parallel implementation places no limit on the depth or complexity of the adaptive grid hierarchy, allowing us to achieve unprecedented spatial and temporal dynamic range. We report on a simulation of primordial star formation which develops over 8000 subgrids at 34 levels of refinement to achieve a local refinement of a factor of 1012 in space and time. This allows us to resolve the properties of the first stars which form in the universe assuming standard physics and a standard cosmological model. Achieving extreme resolution requires the use of 128-bit extended precision arithmetic (EPA to accurately specify the subgrid positions. We describe our EPA AMR implementation on the IBM SP2 Blue Horizon system at the San Diego Supercomputer Center.

  9. Adaptive mesh refinement with spectral accuracy for magnetohydrodynamics in two space dimensions

    We examine the effect of accuracy of high-order spectral element methods, with or without adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), in the context of a classical configuration of magnetic reconnection in two space dimensions, the so-called Orszag-Tang (OT) vortex made up of a magnetic X-point centred on a stagnation point of the velocity. A recently developed spectral-element adaptive refinement incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code is applied to simulate this problem. The MHD solver is explicit, and uses the Elsaesser formulation on high-order elements. It automatically takes advantage of the adaptive grid mechanics that have been described elsewhere in the fluid context (Rosenberg et al 2006 J. Comput. Phys. 215 59-80); the code allows both statically refined and dynamically refined grids. Tests of the algorithm using analytic solutions are described, and comparisons of the OT solutions with pseudo-spectral computations are performed. We demonstrate for moderate Reynolds numbers that the algorithms using both static and refined grids reproduce the pseudo-spectral solutions quite well. We show that low-order truncation-even with a comparable number of global degrees of freedom-fails to correctly model some strong (sup-norm) quantities in this problem, even though it satisfies adequately the weak (integrated) balance diagnostics

  10. A Parallel Ocean Model With Adaptive Mesh Refinement Capability For Global Ocean Prediction

    Herrnstein, A

    2005-09-08

    An ocean model with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) capability is presented for simulating ocean circulation on decade time scales. The model closely resembles the LLNL ocean general circulation model with some components incorporated from other well known ocean models when appropriate. Spatial components are discretized using finite differences on a staggered grid where tracer and pressure variables are defined at cell centers and velocities at cell vertices (B-grid). Horizontal motion is modeled explicitly with leapfrog and Euler forward-backward time integration, and vertical motion is modeled semi-implicitly. New AMR strategies are presented for horizontal refinement on a B-grid, leapfrog time integration, and time integration of coupled systems with unequal time steps. These AMR capabilities are added to the LLNL software package SAMRAI (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Infrastructure) and validated with standard benchmark tests. The ocean model is built on top of the amended SAMRAI library. The resulting model has the capability to dynamically increase resolution in localized areas of the domain. Limited basin tests are conducted using various refinement criteria and produce convergence trends in the model solution as refinement is increased. Carbon sequestration simulations are performed on decade time scales in domains the size of the North Atlantic and the global ocean. A suggestion is given for refinement criteria in such simulations. AMR predicts maximum pH changes and increases in CO{sub 2} concentration near the injection sites that are virtually unattainable with a uniform high resolution due to extremely long run times. Fine scale details near the injection sites are achieved by AMR with shorter run times than the finest uniform resolution tested despite the need for enhanced parallel performance. The North Atlantic simulations show a reduction in passive tracer errors when AMR is applied instead of a uniform coarse resolution. No

  11. Adaptive Mesh Refinement with the PLUTO Code for Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    Mignone, A; Tzeferacos, P; van Straalen, B; Colella, P; Bodo, G

    2011-01-01

    We present a description of the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) implementation of the PLUTO code for solving the equations of classical and special relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD and RMHD). The current release exploits, in addition to the static grid version of the code, the distributed infrastructure of the CHOMBO library for multidimensional parallel computations over block-structured, adaptively refined grids. We employ a conservative finite-volume approach where primary flow quantities are discretized at the cell-center in a dimensionally unsplit fashion using the Corner Transport Upwind (CTU) method. Time stepping relies on a characteristic tracing step where piecewise parabolic method (PPM), weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) or slope-limited linear interpolation schemes can be handily adopted. A characteristic decomposition-free version of the scheme is also illustrated. The solenoidal condition of the magnetic field is enforced by augmenting the equations with a generalized Lagrange mu...

  12. Single-Pass GPU-Raycasting for Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Data

    Kaehler, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement (SAMR) is a popular numerical technique to study processes with high spatial and temporal dynamic range. It reduces computational requirements by adapting the lattice on which the underlying differential equations are solved to most efficiently represent the solution. Particularly in astrophysics and cosmology such simulations now can capture spatial scales ten orders of magnitude apart and more. The irregular locations and extensions of the refined regions in the SAMR scheme and the fact that different resolution levels partially overlap, poses a challenge for GPU-based direct volume rendering methods. kD-trees have proven to be advantageous to subdivide the data domain into non-overlapping blocks of equally sized cells, optimal for the texture units of current graphics hardware, but previous GPU-supported raycasting approaches for SAMR data using this data structure required a separate rendering pass for each node, preventing the application of many advanced lighting sche...

  13. A high order special relativistic hydrodynamic code with space-time adaptive mesh refinement

    Zanotti, Olindo

    2013-01-01

    We present a high order one-step ADER-WENO finite volume scheme with space-time adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) for the solution of the special relativistic hydrodynamics equations. By adopting a local discontinuous Galerkin predictor method, a high order one-step time discretization is obtained, with no need for Runge-Kutta sub-steps. This turns out to be particularly advantageous in combination with space-time adaptive mesh refinement, which has been implemented following a "cell-by-cell" approach. As in existing second order AMR methods, also the present higher order AMR algorithm features time-accurate local time stepping (LTS), where grids on different spatial refinement levels are allowed to use different time steps. We also compare two different Riemann solvers for the computation of the numerical fluxes at the cell interfaces. The new scheme has been validated over a sample of numerical test problems in one, two and three spatial dimensions, exploring its ability in resolving the propagation of relativ...

  14. Block Structured Adaptive Mesh and Time Refinement for Hybrid, Hyperbolic + N-body Systems

    Miniati, F; Miniati, Francesco; Colella, Phillip

    2006-01-01

    We present a new numerical algorithm for the solution of coupled collisional and collisionless systems, based on the block structured adaptive mesh and time refinement strategy (AMR). We describe the issues associated with the discretization of the system equations and the synchronization of the numerical solution on the hierarchy of grid levels. We implement a code based on a higher order, conservative and directionally unsplit Godunov method for hydrodynamics; a symmetric, time centered modified symplectic scheme for collisionless component; and a multilevel, multigrid relaxation algorithm for the elliptic equation coupling the two components. Numerical results that illustrate the accuracy of the code and the relative merit of various implemented schemes are also presented.

  15. Development of a Godunov method for Maxwell's equations with Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    Barbas, Alfonso; Velarde, Pedro

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we present a second order 3D method for Maxwell's equations based on a Godunov scheme with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR). In order to achieve it, we apply a limiter which better preserves extrema and boundary conditions based on a characteristic fields decomposition. Despite being more complex, simplifications in the boundary conditions make the resulting method competitive in computer time consumption and accuracy compared to FDTD. AMR allows us to simulate systems with a sharp step in material properties with negligible rebounds and also large domains with accuracy in small wavelengths.

  16. voFoam - A geometrical Volume of Fluid algorithm on arbitrary unstructured meshes with local dynamic adaptive mesh refinement using OpenFOAM

    Maric, Tomislav; Marschall, Holger; Bothe, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    A new parallelized unsplit geometrical Volume of Fluid (VoF) algorithm with support for arbitrary unstructured meshes and dynamic local Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR), as well as for two and three dimensional computation is developed. The geometrical VoF algorithm supports arbitrary unstructured meshes in order to enable computations involving flow domains of arbitrary geometrical complexity. The implementation of the method is done within the framework of the OpenFOAM library for Computation...

  17. Radiation hydrodynamics including irradiation and adaptive mesh refinement with AZEuS. I. Methods

    Ramsey, J P

    2014-01-01

    Aims. The importance of radiation to the physical structure of protoplanetary disks cannot be understated. However, protoplanetary disks evolve with time, and so to understand disk evolution and by association, disk structure, one should solve the combined and time-dependent equations of radiation hydrodynamics. Methods. We implement a new implicit radiation solver in the AZEuS adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamics fluid code. Based on a hybrid approach that combines frequency-dependent ray-tracing for stellar irradiation with non-equilibrium flux limited diffusion, we solve the equations of radiation hydrodynamics while preserving the directionality of the stellar irradiation. The implementation permits simulations in Cartesian, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates, on both uniform and adaptive grids. Results. We present several hydrostatic and hydrodynamic radiation tests which validate our implementation on uniform and adaptive grids as appropriate, including benchmarks specifically designed for ...

  18. Constrained-Transport Magnetohydrodynamics with Adaptive-Mesh-Refinement in CHARM

    Miniati, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We present the implementation of a three-dimensional, second order accurate Godunov-type algorithm for magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD), in the adaptive-mesh-refinement (AMR) cosmological code {\\tt CHARM}. The algorithm is based on the full 12-solve spatially unsplit Corner-Transport-Upwind (CTU) scheme. The fluid quantities are cell-centered and are updated using the Piecewise-Parabolic-Method (PPM), while the magnetic field variables are face-centered and are evolved through application of the Stokes theorem on cell edges via a Constrained-Transport (CT) method. The multidimensional MHD source terms required in the predictor step for high-order accuracy are applied in a simplified form which reduces their complexity in three dimensions without loss of accuracy or robustness. The algorithm is implemented on an AMR framework which requires specific synchronization steps across refinement levels. These include face-centered restriction and prolongation operations and a {\\it reflux-curl} operation, which maintains a ...

  19. A new adaptive mesh refinement data structure with an application to detonation

    Ji, Hua; Lien, Fue-Sang; Yee, Eugene

    2010-11-01

    A new Cell-based Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement (CSAMR) data structure is developed. In our CSAMR data structure, Cartesian-like indices are used to identify each cell. With these stored indices, the information on the parent, children and neighbors of a given cell can be accessed simply and efficiently. Owing to the usage of these indices, the computer memory required for storage of the proposed AMR data structure is only {5}/{8} word per cell, in contrast to the conventional oct-tree [P. MacNeice, K.M. Olson, C. Mobary, R. deFainchtein, C. Packer, PARAMESH: a parallel adaptive mesh refinement community toolkit, Comput. Phys. Commun. 330 (2000) 126] and the fully threaded tree (FTT) [A.M. Khokhlov, Fully threaded tree algorithms for adaptive mesh fluid dynamics simulations, J. Comput. Phys. 143 (1998) 519] data structures which require, respectively, 19 and 2{3}/{8} words per cell for storage of the connectivity information. Because the connectivity information (e.g., parent, children and neighbors) of a cell in our proposed AMR data structure can be accessed using only the cell indices, a tree structure which was required in previous approaches for the organization of the AMR data is no longer needed for this new data structure. Instead, a much simpler hash table structure is used to maintain the AMR data, with the entry keys in the hash table obtained directly from the explicitly stored cell indices. The proposed AMR data structure simplifies the implementation and parallelization of an AMR code. Two three-dimensional test cases are used to illustrate and evaluate the computational performance of the new CSAMR data structure.

  20. GAMER: A Graphic Processing Unit Accelerated Adaptive-Mesh-Refinement Code for Astrophysics

    Schive, Hsi-Yu; Tsai, Yu-Chih; Chiueh, Tzihong

    2010-02-01

    We present the newly developed code, GPU-accelerated Adaptive-MEsh-Refinement code (GAMER), which adopts a novel approach in improving the performance of adaptive-mesh-refinement (AMR) astrophysical simulations by a large factor with the use of the graphic processing unit (GPU). The AMR implementation is based on a hierarchy of grid patches with an oct-tree data structure. We adopt a three-dimensional relaxing total variation diminishing scheme for the hydrodynamic solver and a multi-level relaxation scheme for the Poisson solver. Both solvers have been implemented in GPU, by which hundreds of patches can be advanced in parallel. The computational overhead associated with the data transfer between the CPU and GPU is carefully reduced by utilizing the capability of asynchronous memory copies in GPU, and the computing time of the ghost-zone values for each patch is diminished by overlapping it with the GPU computations. We demonstrate the accuracy of the code by performing several standard test problems in astrophysics. GAMER is a parallel code that can be run in a multi-GPU cluster system. We measure the performance of the code by performing purely baryonic cosmological simulations in different hardware implementations, in which detailed timing analyses provide comparison between the computations with and without GPU(s) acceleration. Maximum speed-up factors of 12.19 and 10.47 are demonstrated using one GPU with 40963 effective resolution and 16 GPUs with 81923 effective resolution, respectively.

  1. A High Order Godunov Scheme with Constrained Transport and Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Astrophysical MHD

    Fromang, S; Teyssier, R

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new method to perform numerical simulations of astrophysical MHD flows using the Adaptive Mesh Refinement framework and Constrained Transport. The algorithm is based on a previous work in which the MUSCL--Hancock scheme was used to evolve the induction equation. In this paper, we detail the extension of this scheme to the full MHD equations and discuss its properties. Through a series of test problems, we illustrate the performances of this new code using two different MHD Riemann solvers (Lax-Friedrich and Roe) and the need of the Adaptive Mesh Refinement capabilities in some cases. Finally, we show its versatility by applying it to two completely different astrophysical situations well studied in the past years: the growth of the magnetorotational instability in the shearing box and the collapse of magnetized cloud cores. We have implemented this new Godunov scheme to solve the ideal MHD equations in the AMR code RAMSES. It results in a powerful tool that can be applied to a grea...

  2. A high order Godunov scheme with constrained transport and adaptive mesh refinement for astrophysical magnetohydrodynamics

    Fromang, S.; Hennebelle, P.; Teyssier, R.

    2006-10-01

    Aims. In this paper, we present a new method to perform numerical simulations of astrophysical MHD flows using the Adaptive Mesh Refinement framework and Constrained Transport. Methods: . The algorithm is based on a previous work in which the MUSCL-Hancock scheme was used to evolve the induction equation. In this paper, we detail the extension of this scheme to the full MHD equations and discuss its properties. Results: . Through a series of test problems, we illustrate the performances of this new code using two different MHD Riemann solvers (Lax-Friedrich and Roe) and the need of the Adaptive Mesh Refinement capabilities in some cases. Finally, we show its versatility by applying it to two completely different astrophysical situations well studied in the past years: the growth of the magnetorotational instability in the shearing box and the collapse of magnetized cloud cores. Conclusions: . We have implemented a new Godunov scheme to solve the ideal MHD equations in the AMR code RAMSES. We have shown that it results in a powerful tool that can be applied to a great variety of astrophysical problems, ranging from galaxies formation in the early universe to high resolution studies of molecular cloud collapse in our galaxy.

  3. GAMER: A GRAPHIC PROCESSING UNIT ACCELERATED ADAPTIVE-MESH-REFINEMENT CODE FOR ASTROPHYSICS

    We present the newly developed code, GPU-accelerated Adaptive-MEsh-Refinement code (GAMER), which adopts a novel approach in improving the performance of adaptive-mesh-refinement (AMR) astrophysical simulations by a large factor with the use of the graphic processing unit (GPU). The AMR implementation is based on a hierarchy of grid patches with an oct-tree data structure. We adopt a three-dimensional relaxing total variation diminishing scheme for the hydrodynamic solver and a multi-level relaxation scheme for the Poisson solver. Both solvers have been implemented in GPU, by which hundreds of patches can be advanced in parallel. The computational overhead associated with the data transfer between the CPU and GPU is carefully reduced by utilizing the capability of asynchronous memory copies in GPU, and the computing time of the ghost-zone values for each patch is diminished by overlapping it with the GPU computations. We demonstrate the accuracy of the code by performing several standard test problems in astrophysics. GAMER is a parallel code that can be run in a multi-GPU cluster system. We measure the performance of the code by performing purely baryonic cosmological simulations in different hardware implementations, in which detailed timing analyses provide comparison between the computations with and without GPU(s) acceleration. Maximum speed-up factors of 12.19 and 10.47 are demonstrated using one GPU with 40963 effective resolution and 16 GPUs with 81923 effective resolution, respectively.

  4. GAMER: a GPU-Accelerated Adaptive Mesh Refinement Code for Astrophysics

    Schive, Hsi-Yu; Chiueh, Tzihong

    2009-01-01

    We present the newly developed code, GAMER (GPU-accelerated Adaptive MEsh Refinement code), which has adopted a novel approach to improve the performance of adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) astrophysical simulations by a large factor with the use of the graphic processing unit (GPU). The AMR implementation is based on a hierarchy of grid patches with an oct-tree data structure. We adopt a three-dimensional relaxing TVD scheme for the hydrodynamic solver, and a multi-level relaxation scheme for the Poisson solver. Both solvers have been implemented in GPU, by which hundreds of patches can be advanced in parallel. The computational overhead associated with the data transfer between CPU and GPU is carefully reduced by utilizing the capability of asynchronous memory copies in GPU, and the computing time of the ghost-zone values for each patch is made to diminish by overlapping it with the GPU computations. We demonstrate the accuracy of the code by performing several standard test problems in astrophysics. GAMER is...

  5. A Predictive Model of Fragmentation using Adaptive Mesh Refinement and a Hierarchical Material Model

    Koniges, A E; Masters, N D; Fisher, A C; Anderson, R W; Eder, D C; Benson, D; Kaiser, T B; Gunney, B T; Wang, P; Maddox, B R; Hansen, J F; Kalantar, D H; Dixit, P; Jarmakani, H; Meyers, M A

    2009-03-03

    Fragmentation is a fundamental material process that naturally spans spatial scales from microscopic to macroscopic. We developed a mathematical framework using an innovative combination of hierarchical material modeling (HMM) and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to connect the continuum to microstructural regimes. This framework has been implemented in a new multi-physics, multi-scale, 3D simulation code, NIF ALE-AMR. New multi-material volume fraction and interface reconstruction algorithms were developed for this new code, which is leading the world effort in hydrodynamic simulations that combine AMR with ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) techniques. The interface reconstruction algorithm is also used to produce fragments following material failure. In general, the material strength and failure models have history vector components that must be advected along with other properties of the mesh during remap stage of the ALE hydrodynamics. The fragmentation models are validated against an electromagnetically driven expanding ring experiment and dedicated laser-based fragmentation experiments conducted at the Jupiter Laser Facility. As part of the exit plan, the NIF ALE-AMR code was applied to a number of fragmentation problems of interest to the National Ignition Facility (NIF). One example shows the added benefit of multi-material ALE-AMR that relaxes the requirement that material boundaries must be along mesh boundaries.

  6. Single-pass GPU-raycasting for structured adaptive mesh refinement data

    Kaehler, Ralf; Abel, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement (SAMR) is a popular numerical technique to study processes with high spatial and temporal dynamic range. It reduces computational requirements by adapting the lattice on which the underlying differential equations are solved to most efficiently represent the solution. Particularly in astrophysics and cosmology such simulations now can capture spatial scales ten orders of magnitude apart and more. The irregular locations and extensions of the refined regions in the SAMR scheme and the fact that different resolution levels partially overlap, poses a challenge for GPU-based direct volume rendering methods. kD-trees have proven to be advantageous to subdivide the data domain into non-overlapping blocks of equally sized cells, optimal for the texture units of current graphics hardware, but previous GPU-supported raycasting approaches for SAMR data using this data structure required a separate rendering pass for each node, preventing the application of many advanced lighting schemes that require simultaneous access to more than one block of cells. In this paper we present the first single-pass GPU-raycasting algorithm for SAMR data that is based on a kD-tree. The tree is efficiently encoded by a set of 3D-textures, which allows to adaptively sample complete rays entirely on the GPU without any CPU interaction. We discuss two different data storage strategies to access the grid data on the GPU and apply them to several datasets to prove the benefits of the proposed method.

  7. Modeling gravitational instabilities in self-gravitating protoplanetary disks with adaptive mesh refinement techniques

    Lichtenberg, Tim

    2015-01-01

    The astonishing diversity in the observed planetary population requires theoretical efforts and advances in planet formation theories. Numerical approaches provide a method to tackle the weaknesses of current planet formation models and are an important tool to close gaps in poorly constrained areas. We present a global disk setup to model the first stages of giant planet formation via gravitational instabilities (GI) in 3D with the block-structured adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) hydrodynamics code ENZO. With this setup, we explore the impact of AMR techniques on the fragmentation and clumping due to large-scale instabilities using different AMR configurations. Additionally, we seek to derive general resolution criteria for global simulations of self-gravitating disks of variable extent. We run a grid of simulations with varying AMR settings, including runs with a static grid for comparison, and study the effects of varying the disk radius. Adopting a marginally stable disk profile (Q_init=1), we validate the...

  8. Brightest Cluster Galaxies in Cosmological Simulations with Adaptive Mesh Refinement: Successes and Failures

    Martizzi, Davide; Moore, Ben

    2014-01-01

    A large sample of cosmological hydrodynamical zoom-in simulations with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) is analysed to study the properties of simulated Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs). Following the formation and evolution of BCGs requires modeling an entire galaxy cluster, because the BCG properties are largely influenced by the state of the gas in the cluster and by interactions and mergers with satellites. BCG evolution is also deeply influenced by the presence of gas heating sources such as Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) that prevent catastrophic cooling of large amounts of gas. We show that AGN feedback is one of the most important mechanisms in shaping the properties of BCGs at low redshift by analysing our statistical sample of simulations with and without AGN feedback. When AGN feedback is included BCG masses, sizes, star formation rates and kinematic properties are closer to those of the observed systems. Some small discrepancies are observed only for the most massive BCGs, an effect that might be du...

  9. Adaptive mesh refinement simulations of collisional ring galaxies: effects of the interaction geometry

    Fiacconi, Davide; Ripamonti, Emanuele; Colpi, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Collisional ring galaxies are the outcome of nearly axisymmetric high-speed encounters between a disc and an intruder galaxy. We investigate the properties of collisional ring galaxies as a function of the impact parameter, the initial relative velocity and the inclination angle. We employ new adaptive mesh refinement simulations to trace the evolution with time of both stars and gas, taking into account star formation and supernova feedback. Axisymmetric encounters produce circular primary rings followed by smaller secondary rings, while off-centre interactions produce asymmetric rings with displaced nuclei. We propose an analytical treatment of the disc warping induced by an inclination angle greater then zero. The star formation history of our models is mainly influenced by the impact parameter: axisymmetric collisions induce impulsive short-lived starburst episodes, whereas off-centre encounters produce long-lived star formation. We compute synthetic colour maps of our models and we find that rings have a...

  10. Block structured adaptive mesh and time refinement for hybrid, hyperbolic + N-body systems

    Miniati, Francesco; Colella, Phillip

    2007-11-01

    We present a new numerical algorithm for the solution of coupled collisional and collisionless systems, based on the block structured adaptive mesh and time refinement strategy (AMR). We describe the issues associated with the discretization of the system equations and the synchronization of the numerical solution on the hierarchy of grid levels. We implement a code based on a higher order, conservative and directionally unsplit Godunov’s method for hydrodynamics; a symmetric, time centered modified symplectic scheme for collisionless component; and a multilevel, multigrid relaxation algorithm for the elliptic equation coupling the two components. Numerical results that illustrate the accuracy of the code and the relative merit of various implemented schemes are also presented.

  11. Numerical Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics with ADER Discontinuous Galerkin methods on adaptively refined meshes.

    Zanotti, O.; Dumbser, M.; Fambri, F.

    2016-05-01

    We describe a new method for the solution of the ideal MHD equations in special relativity which adopts the following strategy: (i) the main scheme is based on Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods, allowing for an arbitrary accuracy of order N+1, where N is the degree of the basis polynomials; (ii) in order to cope with oscillations at discontinuities, an ”a-posteriori” sub-cell limiter is activated, which scatters the DG polynomials of the previous time-step onto a set of 2N+1 sub-cells, over which the solution is recomputed by means of a robust finite volume scheme; (iii) a local spacetime Discontinuous-Galerkin predictor is applied both on the main grid of the DG scheme and on the sub-grid of the finite volume scheme; (iv) adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) with local time-stepping is used. We validate the new scheme and comment on its potential applications in high energy astrophysics.

  12. Astrophysical hydrodynamics with a high-order discontinuous Galerkin scheme and adaptive mesh refinement

    Schaal, Kevin; Chandrashekar, Praveen; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Klingenberg, Christian; Springel, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Solving the Euler equations of ideal hydrodynamics as accurately and efficiently as possible is a key requirement in many astrophysical simulations. It is therefore important to continuously advance the numerical methods implemented in current astrophysical codes, especially also in light of evolving computer technology, which favours certain computational approaches over others. Here we introduce the new adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code TENET, which employs a high-order Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) scheme for hydrodynamics. The Euler equations in this method are solved in a weak formulation with a polynomial basis by means of explicit Runge-Kutta time integration and Gauss-Legendre quadrature. This approach offers significant advantages over commonly employed finite volume (FV) solvers. In particular, the higher order capability renders it computationally more efficient, in the sense that the same precision can be obtained at significantly less computational cost. Also, the DG scheme inherently conserves a...

  13. Hybrid Characteristics: 3D radiative transfer for parallel adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamics

    Rijkhorst, E J; Dubey, A; Mellema, G R; Rijkhorst, Erik-Jan; Plewa, Tomasz; Dubey, Anshu; Mellema, Garrelt

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional radiative transfer method designed specifically for use with parallel adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamics codes. This new algorithm, which we call hybrid characteristics, introduces a novel form of ray tracing that can neither be classified as long, nor as short characteristics, but which applies the underlying principles, i.e. efficient execution through interpolation and parallelizability, of both. Primary applications of the hybrid characteristics method are radiation hydrodynamics problems that take into account the effects of photoionization and heating due to point sources of radiation. The method is implemented in the hydrodynamics package FLASH. The ionization, heating, and cooling processes are modelled using the DORIC ionization package. Upon comparison with the long characteristics method, we find that our method calculates the column density with a similarly high accuracy and produces sharp and well defined shadows. We show the quality of the new algorithm ...

  14. The Numerical Simulation of Ship Waves Using Cartesian Grid Methods with Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    Dommermuth, Douglas G; Beck, Robert F; O'Shea, Thomas T; Wyatt, Donald C; Olson, Kevin; MacNeice, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cartesian-grid methods with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) are ideally suited for simulating the breaking of waves, the formation of spray, and the entrainment of air around ships. As a result of the cartesian-grid formulation, minimal input is required to describe the ships geometry. A surface panelization of the ship hull is used as input to automatically generate a three-dimensional model. No three-dimensional gridding is required. The AMR portion of the numerical algorithm automatically clusters grid points near the ship in regions where wave breaking, spray formation, and air entrainment occur. Away from the ship, where the flow is less turbulent, the mesh is coarser. The numerical computations are implemented using parallel algorithms. Together, the ease of input and usage, the ability to resolve complex free-surface phenomena, and the speed of the numerical algorithms provide a robust capability for simulating the free-surface disturbances near a ship. Here, numerical predictions, with and without AMR,...

  15. Parallel Computation of Three-Dimensional Flows using Overlapping Grids with Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    Henshaw, W; Schwendeman, D

    2007-11-15

    This paper describes an approach for the numerical solution of time-dependent partial differential equations in complex three-dimensional domains. The domains are represented by overlapping structured grids, and block-structured adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is employed to locally increase the grid resolution. In addition, the numerical method is implemented on parallel distributed-memory computers using a domain-decomposition approach. The implementation is flexible so that each base grid within the overlapping grid structure and its associated refinement grids can be independently partitioned over a chosen set of processors. A modified bin-packing algorithm is used to specify the partition for each grid so that the computational work is evenly distributed amongst the processors. All components of the AMR algorithm such as error estimation, regridding, and interpolation are performed in parallel. The parallel time-stepping algorithm is illustrated for initial-boundary-value problems involving a linear advection-diffusion equation and the (nonlinear) reactive Euler equations. Numerical results are presented for both equations to demonstrate the accuracy and correctness of the parallel approach. Exact solutions of the advection-diffusion equation are constructed, and these are used to check the corresponding numerical solutions for a variety of tests involving different overlapping grids, different numbers of refinement levels and refinement ratios, and different numbers of processors. The problem of planar shock diffraction by a sphere is considered as an illustration of the numerical approach for the Euler equations, and a problem involving the initiation of a detonation from a hot spot in a T-shaped pipe is considered to demonstrate the numerical approach for the reactive case. For both problems, the solutions are shown to be well resolved on the finest grid. The parallel performance of the approach is examined in detail for the shock diffraction problem.

  16. Development of a scalable gas-dynamics solver with adaptive mesh refinement

    Korkut, Burak

    There are various computational physics areas in which Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and Particle in Cell (PIC) methods are being employed. The accuracy of results from such simulations depend on the fidelity of the physical models being used. The computationally demanding nature of these problems make them ideal candidates to make use of modern supercomputers. The software developed to run such simulations also needs special attention so that the maintainability and extendability is considered with the recent numerical methods and programming paradigms. Suited for gas-dynamics problems, a software called SUGAR (Scalable Unstructured Gas dynamics with Adaptive mesh Refinement) has recently been developed and written in C++ and MPI. Physical and numerical models were added to this framework to simulate ion thruster plumes. SUGAR is used to model the charge-exchange (CEX) reactions occurring between the neutral and ion species as well as the induced electric field effect due to ions. Multiple adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) meshes were used in order to capture different physical length scales present in the flow. A multiple-thruster configuration was run to extend the studies to cases for which there is no axial or radial symmetry present that could only be modeled with a three-dimensional simulation capability. The combined plume structure showed interactions between individual thrusters where AMR capability captured this in an automated way. The back flow for ions was found to occur when CEX and momentum-exchange (MEX) collisions are present and strongly enhanced when the induced electric field is considered. The ion energy distributions in the back flow region were obtained and it was found that the inclusion of the electric field modeling is the most important factor in determining its shape. The plume back flow structure was also examined for a triple-thruster, 3-D geometry case and it was found that the ion velocity in the back flow region appears to be

  17. A Parallel Implicit Adaptive Mesh Refinement Algorithm for Predicting Unsteady Fully-Compressible Reactive Flows

    Northrup, Scott A.

    A new parallel implicit adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm is developed for the prediction of unsteady behaviour of laminar flames. The scheme is applied to the solution of the system of partial-differential equations governing time-dependent, two- and three-dimensional, compressible laminar flows for reactive thermally perfect gaseous mixtures. A high-resolution finite-volume spatial discretization procedure is used to solve the conservation form of these equations on body-fitted multi-block hexahedral meshes. A local preconditioning technique is used to remove numerical stiffness and maintain solution accuracy for low-Mach-number, nearly incompressible flows. A flexible block-based octree data structure has been developed and is used to facilitate automatic solution-directed mesh adaptation according to physics-based refinement criteria. The data structure also enables an efficient and scalable parallel implementation via domain decomposition. The parallel implicit formulation makes use of a dual-time-stepping like approach with an implicit second-order backward discretization of the physical time, in which a Jacobian-free inexact Newton method with a preconditioned generalized minimal residual (GMRES) algorithm is used to solve the system of nonlinear algebraic equations arising from the temporal and spatial discretization procedures. An additive Schwarz global preconditioner is used in conjunction with block incomplete LU type local preconditioners for each sub-domain. The Schwarz preconditioning and block-based data structure readily allow efficient and scalable parallel implementations of the implicit AMR approach on distributed-memory multi-processor architectures. The scheme was applied to solutions of steady and unsteady laminar diffusion and premixed methane-air combustion and was found to accurately predict key flame characteristics. For a premixed flame under terrestrial gravity, the scheme accurately predicted the frequency of the natural

  18. EMMA: an adaptive mesh refinement cosmological simulation code with radiative transfer

    Aubert, Dominique; Deparis, Nicolas; Ocvirk, Pierre

    2015-11-01

    EMMA is a cosmological simulation code aimed at investigating the reionization epoch. It handles simultaneously collisionless and gas dynamics, as well as radiative transfer physics using a moment-based description with the M1 approximation. Field quantities are stored and computed on an adaptive three-dimensional mesh and the spatial resolution can be dynamically modified based on physically motivated criteria. Physical processes can be coupled at all spatial and temporal scales. We also introduce a new and optional approximation to handle radiation: the light is transported at the resolution of the non-refined grid and only once the dynamics has been fully updated, whereas thermo-chemical processes are still tracked on the refined elements. Such an approximation reduces the overheads induced by the treatment of radiation physics. A suite of standard tests are presented and passed by EMMA, providing a validation for its future use in studies of the reionization epoch. The code is parallel and is able to use graphics processing units (GPUs) to accelerate hydrodynamics and radiative transfer calculations. Depending on the optimizations and the compilers used to generate the CPU reference, global GPU acceleration factors between ×3.9 and ×16.9 can be obtained. Vectorization and transfer operations currently prevent better GPU performance and we expect that future optimizations and hardware evolution will lead to greater accelerations.

  19. Level-by-level artificial viscosity and visualization for MHD simulation with adaptive mesh refinement

    Hatori, Tomoharu; Ito, Atsushi M.; Nunami, Masanori; Usui, Hideyuki; Miura, Hideaki

    2016-08-01

    We propose a numerical method to determine the artificial viscosity in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) method, where the artificial viscosity is adaptively changed due to the resolution level of the AMR hierarchy. Although the suitable value of the artificial viscosity depends on the governing equations and the model of target problem, it can be determined by von Neumann stability analysis. By means of the new method, "level-by-level artificial viscosity method," MHD simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) are carried out with the AMR method. The validity of the level-by-level artificial viscosity method is confirmed by the comparison of the linear growth rates of RTI between the AMR simulations and the simple simulations with uniform grid and uniform artificial viscosity whose resolution is the same as that in the highest level of the AMR simulation. Moreover, in the nonlinear phase of RTI, the secondary instability is clearly observed where the hierarchical data structure of AMR calculation is visualized as high resolution region floats up like terraced fields. In the applications of the method to general fluid simulations, the growth of small structures can be sufficiently reproduced, while the divergence of numerical solutions can be suppressed.

  20. Kinematic dynamos using constrained transport with high order Godunov schemes and adaptive mesh refinement

    Teyssier, Romain; Fromang, Sébastien; Dormy, Emmanuel

    2006-10-01

    We propose to extend the well-known MUSCL-Hancock scheme for Euler equations to the induction equation modeling the magnetic field evolution in kinematic dynamo problems. The scheme is based on an integral form of the underlying conservation law which, in our formulation, results in a “finite-surface” scheme for the induction equation. This naturally leads to the well-known “constrained transport” method, with additional continuity requirement on the magnetic field representation. The second ingredient in the MUSCL scheme is the predictor step that ensures second order accuracy both in space and time. We explore specific constraints that the mathematical properties of the induction equations place on this predictor step, showing that three possible variants can be considered. We show that the most aggressive formulations (referred to as C-MUSCL and U-MUSCL) reach the same level of accuracy as the other one (referred to as Runge Kutta), at a lower computational cost. More interestingly, these two schemes are compatible with the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) framework. It has been implemented in the AMR code RAMSES. It offers a novel and efficient implementation of a second order scheme for the induction equation. We have tested it by solving two kinematic dynamo problems in the low diffusion limit. The construction of this scheme for the induction equation constitutes a step towards solving the full MHD set of equations using an extension of our current methodology.

  1. Gamma-Ray Burst Dynamics and Afterglow Radiation from Adaptive Mesh Refinement, Special Relativistic Hydrodynamic Simulations

    De Colle, Fabio; Lopez-Camara, Diego; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    We report on the development of Mezcal-SRHD, a new adaptive mesh refinement, special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) code, developed with the aim of studying the highly relativistic flows in Gamma-Ray Burst sources. The SRHD equations are solved using finite volume conservative solvers. The correct implementation of the algorithms is verified by one-dimensional (1D) shock tube and multidimensional tests. The code is then applied to study the propagation of 1D spherical impulsive blast waves expanding in a stratified medium with $\\rho \\propto r^{-k}$, bridging between the relativistic and Newtonian phases, as well as to a two-dimensional (2D) cylindrically symmetric impulsive jet propagating in a constant density medium. It is shown that the deceleration to non-relativistic speeds in one-dimension occurs on scales significantly larger than the Sedov length. This transition is further delayed with respect to the Sedov length as the degree of stratification of the ambient medium is increased. This result, toge...

  2. Multigroup radiation hydrodynamics with flux-limited diffusion and adaptive mesh refinement

    González, Matthias; Commerçon, Benoît; Masson, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Radiative transfer plays a key role in the star formation process. Due to a high computational cost, radiation-hydrodynamics simulations performed up to now have mainly been carried out in the grey approximation. In recent years, multi-frequency radiation-hydrodynamics models have started to emerge, in an attempt to better account for the large variations of opacities as a function of frequency. We wish to develop an efficient multigroup algorithm for the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES which is suited to heavy proto-stellar collapse calculations. Due to prohibitive timestep constraints of an explicit radiative transfer method, we constructed a time-implicit solver based on a stabilised bi-conjugate gradient algorithm, and implemented it in RAMSES under the flux-limited diffusion approximation. We present a series of tests which demonstrate the high performance of our scheme in dealing with frequency-dependent radiation-hydrodynamic flows. We also present a preliminary simulation of a three-dimensional p...

  3. Astrophysical hydrodynamics with a high-order discontinuous Galerkin scheme and adaptive mesh refinement

    Schaal, Kevin; Bauer, Andreas; Chandrashekar, Praveen; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Klingenberg, Christian; Springel, Volker

    2015-11-01

    Solving the Euler equations of ideal hydrodynamics as accurately and efficiently as possible is a key requirement in many astrophysical simulations. It is therefore important to continuously advance the numerical methods implemented in current astrophysical codes, especially also in light of evolving computer technology, which favours certain computational approaches over others. Here we introduce the new adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code TENET, which employs a high-order discontinuous Galerkin (DG) scheme for hydrodynamics. The Euler equations in this method are solved in a weak formulation with a polynomial basis by means of explicit Runge-Kutta time integration and Gauss-Legendre quadrature. This approach offers significant advantages over commonly employed second-order finite-volume (FV) solvers. In particular, the higher order capability renders it computationally more efficient, in the sense that the same precision can be obtained at significantly less computational cost. Also, the DG scheme inherently conserves angular momentum in regions where no limiting takes place, and it typically produces much smaller numerical diffusion and advection errors than an FV approach. A further advantage lies in a more natural handling of AMR refinement boundaries, where a fall-back to first order can be avoided. Finally, DG requires no wide stencils at high order, and offers an improved data locality and a focus on local computations, which is favourable for current and upcoming highly parallel supercomputers. We describe the formulation and implementation details of our new code, and demonstrate its performance and accuracy with a set of two- and three-dimensional test problems. The results confirm that DG schemes have a high potential for astrophysical applications.

  4. Adaptive mesh refinement and automatic remeshing in crystal plasticity finite element simulations

    In finite element simulations dedicated to the modelling of microstructure evolution, the mesh has to be fine enough to: (i) accurately describe the geometry of the constituents; (ii) capture local strain gradients stemming from the heterogeneity in material properties. In this paper, 3D polycrystalline aggregates are discretized into unstructured meshes and a level set framework is used to represent the grain boundaries. The crystal plasticity finite element method is used to simulate the plastic deformation of these aggregates. A mesh sensitivity analysis based on the deformation energy distribution shows that the predictions are, on average, more sensitive near grain boundaries. An anisotropic mesh refinement strategy based on the level set description is introduced and it is shown that it offers a good compromise between accuracy requirements on the one hand and computation time on the other hand. As the aggregates deform, mesh distortion inevitably occurs and ultimately causes the breakdown of the simulations. An automatic remeshing tool is used to periodically reconstruct the mesh and appropriate transfer of state variables is performed. It is shown that the diffusion related to data transfer is not significant. Finally, remeshing is performed repeatedly in a highly resolved 500 grains polycrystal subjected to about 90% thickness reduction in rolling. The predicted texture is compared with the experimental data and with the predictions of a standard Taylor model

  5. voFoam - A geometrical Volume of Fluid algorithm on arbitrary unstructured meshes with local dynamic adaptive mesh refinement using OpenFOAM

    Maric, Tomislav; Bothe, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    A new parallelized unsplit geometrical Volume of Fluid (VoF) algorithm with support for arbitrary unstructured meshes and dynamic local Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR), as well as for two and three dimensional computation is developed. The geometrical VoF algorithm supports arbitrary unstructured meshes in order to enable computations involving flow domains of arbitrary geometrical complexity. The implementation of the method is done within the framework of the OpenFOAM library for Computational Continuum Mechanics (CCM) using the C++ programming language with modern policy based design for high program code modularity. The development of the geometrical VoF algorithm significantly extends the method base of the OpenFOAM library by geometrical volumetric flux computation for two-phase flow simulations. For the volume fraction advection, a novel unsplit geometrical algorithm is developed, which inherently sustains volume conservation utilizing unique Lagrangian discrete trajectories located in the mesh points. ...

  6. Radiation diffusion for multi-fluid Eulerian hydrodynamics with adaptive mesh refinement

    Block-structured meshes provide the ability to concentrate grid points and computational effort in interesting regions of a flow field, without sacrificing the efficiency and low memory requirements of a regular grid. We describe an algorithm for simulating radiation diffusion on such a mesh, coupled to multi-fluid gasdynamics. Conservation laws are enforced by using locally conservative difference schemes along with explicit synchronization operations between different levels of refinement. In unsteady calculations each refinement level is advanced at its own optimal timestep. Particular attention is given to the appropriate coupling between the fluid energy and the radiation field, the behavior of the discretization at sharp interfaces, and the form of synchronization between levels required for energy conservation in the diffusion process. Two- and three-dimensional examples are presented, including parallel calculations performed on an IBM SP-2

  7. Investigation of instabilities affecting detonations: Improving the resolution using block-structured adaptive mesh refinement

    Ravindran, Prashaanth

    The unstable nature of detonation waves is a result of the critical relationship between the hydrodynamic shock and the chemical reactions sustaining the shock. A perturbative analysis of the critical point is quite challenging due to the multiple spatio-temporal scales involved along with the non-linear nature of the shock-reaction mechanism. The author's research attempts to provide detailed resolution of the instabilities at the shock front. Another key aspect of the present research is to develop an understanding of the causality between the non-linear dynamics of the front and the eventual breakdown of the sub-structures. An accurate numerical simulation of detonation waves requires a very efficient solution of the Euler equations in conservation form with detailed, non-equilibrium chemistry. The difference in the flow and reaction length scales results in very stiff source terms, requiring the problem to be solved with adaptive mesh refinement. For this purpose, Berger-Colella's block-structured adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) strategy has been developed and applied to time-explicit finite volume methods. The block-structured technique uses a hierarchy of parent-child sub-grids, integrated recursively over time. One novel approach to partition the problem within a large supercomputer was the use of modified Peano-Hilbert space filling curves. The AMR framework was merged with CLAWPACK, a package providing finite volume numerical methods tailored for wave-propagation problems. The stiffness problem is bypassed by using a 1st order Godunov or a 2nd order Strang splitting technique, where the flow variables and source terms are integrated independently. A linearly explicit fourth-order Runge-Kutta integrator is used for the flow, and an ODE solver was used to overcome the numerical stiffness. Second-order spatial resolution is obtained by using a second-order Roe-HLL scheme with the inclusion of numerical viscosity to stabilize the solution near the discontinuity

  8. Large Eddy simulation of compressible flows with a low-numerical dissipation patch-based adaptive mesh refinement method

    Pantano, Carlos

    2005-11-01

    We describe a hybrid finite difference method for large-eddy simulation (LES) of compressible flows with a low-numerical dissipation scheme and structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR). Numerical experiments and validation calculations are presented including a turbulent jet and the strongly shock-driven mixing of a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. The approach is a conservative flux-based SAMR formulation and as such, it utilizes refinement to computational advantage. The numerical method for the resolved scale terms encompasses the cases of scheme alternation and internal mesh interfaces resulting from SAMR. An explicit centered scheme that is consistent with a skew-symmetric finite difference formulation is used in turbulent flow regions while a weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme is employed to capture shocks. The subgrid stresses and transports are calculated by means of the streched-vortex model, Misra & Pullin (1997)

  9. High-Performance Reactive Fluid Flow Simulations Using Adaptive Mesh Refinement on Thousands of Processors

    Calder, A. C.; Curtis, B. C.; Dursi, L. J.; Fryxell, B.; Henry, G.; MacNeice, P.; Olson, K.; Ricker, P.; Rosner, R.; Timmes, F. X.; Tufo, H. M.; Truran, J. W.; Zingale, M.

    We present simulations and performance results of nuclear burning fronts in supernovae on the largest domain and at the finest spatial resolution studied to date. These simulations were performed on the Intel ASCI-Red machine at Sandia National Laboratories using FLASH, a code developed at the Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes at the University of Chicago. FLASH is a modular, adaptive mesh, parallel simulation code capable of handling compressible, reactive fluid flows in astrophysical environments. FLASH is written primarily in Fortran 90, uses the Message-Passing Interface library for inter-processor communication and portability, and employs the PARAMESH package to manage a block-structured adaptive mesh that places blocks only where the resolution is required and tracks rapidly changing flow features, such as detonation fronts, with ease. We describe the key algorithms and their implementation as well as the optimizations required to achieve sustained performance of 238 GLOPS on 6420 processors of ASCI-Red in 64-bit arithmetic.

  10. Adaptive Mesh Refinement and Adaptive Time Integration for Electrical Wave Propagation on the Purkinje System

    2015-01-01

    A both space and time adaptive algorithm is presented for simulating electrical wave propagation in the Purkinje system of the heart. The equations governing the distribution of electric potential over the system are solved in time with the method of lines. At each timestep, by an operator splitting technique, the space-dependent but linear diffusion part and the nonlinear but space-independent reactions part in the partial differential equations are integrated separately with implicit scheme...

  11. Adaptive Mesh Refinement Cosmological Simulations of Cosmic Rays in Galaxy Clusters

    Skillman, Samuel William

    2013-12-01

    Galaxy clusters are unique astrophysical laboratories that contain many thermal and non-thermal phenomena. In particular, they are hosts to cosmic shocks, which propagate through the intracluster medium as a by-product of structure formation. It is believed that at these shock fronts, magnetic field inhomogeneities in a compressing flow may lead to the acceleration of cosmic ray electrons and ions. These relativistic particles decay and radiate through a variety of mechanisms, and have observational signatures in radio, hard X-ray, and Gamma-ray wavelengths. We begin this dissertation by developing a method to find shocks in cosmological adaptive mesh refinement simulations of structure formation. After describing the evolution of shock properties through cosmic time, we make estimates for the amount of kinetic energy processed and the total number of cosmic ray protons that could be accelerated at these shocks. We then use this method of shock finding and a model for the acceleration of and radio synchrotron emission from cosmic ray electrons to estimate the radio emission properties in large scale structures. By examining the time-evolution of the radio emission with respect to the X-ray emission during a galaxy cluster merger, we find that the relative timing of the enhancements in each are important consequences of the shock dynamics. By calculating the radio emission expected from a given mass galaxy cluster, we make estimates for future large-area radio surveys. Next, we use a state-of-the-art magnetohydrodynamic simulation to follow the electron acceleration in a massive merging galaxy cluster. We use the magnetic field information to calculate not only the total radio emission, but also create radio polarization maps that are compared to recent observations. We find that we can naturally reproduce Mpc-scale radio emission that resemble many of the known double radio relic systems. Finally, motivated by our previous studies, we develop and introduce a

  12. Parallel adaptive mesh refinement method based on WENO finite difference scheme for the simulation of multi-dimensional detonation

    Wang, Cheng; Dong, XinZhuang; Shu, Chi-Wang

    2015-10-01

    For numerical simulation of detonation, computational cost using uniform meshes is large due to the vast separation in both time and space scales. Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is advantageous for problems with vastly different scales. This paper aims to propose an AMR method with high order accuracy for numerical investigation of multi-dimensional detonation. A well-designed AMR method based on finite difference weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme, named as AMR&WENO is proposed. A new cell-based data structure is used to organize the adaptive meshes. The new data structure makes it possible for cells to communicate with each other quickly and easily. In order to develop an AMR method with high order accuracy, high order prolongations in both space and time are utilized in the data prolongation procedure. Based on the message passing interface (MPI) platform, we have developed a workload balancing parallel AMR&WENO code using the Hilbert space-filling curve algorithm. Our numerical experiments with detonation simulations indicate that the AMR&WENO is accurate and has a high resolution. Moreover, we evaluate and compare the performance of the uniform mesh WENO scheme and the parallel AMR&WENO method. The comparison results provide us further insight into the high performance of the parallel AMR&WENO method.

  13. A low numerical dissipation patch-based adaptive mesh refinement method for large-eddy simulation of compressible flows

    Pantano, C.; Deiterding, R.; Hill, D. J.; Pullin, D. I.

    2007-01-01

    We present a methodology for the large-eddy simulation of compressible flows with a low-numerical dissipation scheme and structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR). A description of a conservative, flux-based hybrid numerical method that uses both centered finite-difference and a weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme is given, encompassing the cases of scheme alternation and internal mesh interfaces resulting from SAMR. In this method, the centered scheme is used in turbulent flow regions while WENO is employed to capture shocks. One-, two- and three-dimensional numerical experiments and example simulations are presented including homogeneous shock-free turbulence, a turbulent jet and the strongly shock-driven mixing of a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability.

  14. A Diffuse Interface Method with Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Simulation of Incompressible Multi-Phase Flows with Moving Contact Lines

    Sui, Yi; Spelt, Peter D. M.; Ding, Hang

    2010-11-01

    Diffuse Interface (DI) methods are employed widely for the numerical simulation of two-phase flows, even with moving contact lines. In a DI method, the interface thickness should be as thin as possible to simulate spreading phenomena under realistic flow conditions, so a fine grid is required, beyond the reach of current methods that employ a uniform grid. Here we have integrated a DI method based on a uniform mesh, to a block-based adaptive mesh refinement method, so that only the regions near the interface are resolved by a fine mesh. The performance of the present method is tested by simulations including drop deformation in shear flow, Rayleigh-Taylor instability and drop spreading on a flat surface, et al. The results show that the present method can give accurate results with much smaller computational cost, compared to the original DI method based on a uniform mesh. Based on the present method, simulation of drop spreading is carried out with Cahn number of 0.001 and the contact line region is well resolved. The flow field near the contact line, the contact line speed as well as the apparent contact angle are investigated in detail and compared with previous analytical work.

  15. The interaction of supernova blast waves with interstellar clouds using high-order adaptive mesh refinement methods

    The interaction of a supernova shock with an interstellar cloud can be idealized to the problem of the interaction of a strong planar shock with a dense spherical inhomogeneity surrounded by a less dense fluid: the intercloud medium (ICM). This deceptively simple problem actually represents an extremely complex set of nonlinear hydrodynamic flows encompassing a rich set of shock/shock interaction phenomena. The authors have, for the first time, implemented local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) techniques with second-order Godunov methods as developed recently by Berger and Colella to astrophysical gas dynamic scenarios to address this complex nonlinear problem. With AMR with a Godunov second-order method, they are able to evolve the hydrodynamics highly complex, multiply shock-distorted structures to a high degree of accuracy with a total of not more than 80,000 grid cells. A comparable calculation with a fixed grid would need >1,500,000 grid cells to achieve a similar accuracy. Clearly, adaptive mesh refinement techniques hold a major advantage in calculating complex compressible gas dynamic flows one to two orders of magnitude more rapidly than standard techniques

  16. Lyapunov exponents and adaptive mesh refinement for high-speed flows using a discontinuous Galerkin scheme

    Moura, R. C.; Silva, A. F. C.; Bigarella, E. D. V.; Fazenda, A. L.; Ortega, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes two important improvements to shock-capturing strategies using a discontinuous Galerkin scheme, namely, accurate shock identification via finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) operators and efficient shock treatment through a point-implicit discretization of a PDE-based artificial viscosity technique. The advocated approach is based on the FTLE operator, originally developed in the context of dynamical systems theory to identify certain types of coherent structures in a flow. We propose the application of FTLEs in the detection of shock waves and demonstrate the operator's ability to identify strong and weak shocks equally well. The detection algorithm is coupled with a mesh refinement procedure and applied to transonic and supersonic flows. While the proposed strategy can be used potentially with any numerical method, a high-order discontinuous Galerkin solver is used in this study. In this context, two artificial viscosity approaches are employed to regularize the solution near shocks: an element-wise constant viscosity technique and a PDE-based smooth viscosity model. As the latter approach is more sophisticated and preferable for complex problems, a point-implicit discretization in time is proposed to reduce the extra stiffness introduced by the PDE-based technique, making it more competitive in terms of computational cost.

  17. Simulating Magnetohydrodynamical Flow with Constrained Transport and Adaptive Mesh Refinement; Algorithms & Tests of the AstroBEAR Code

    Cunningham, Andrew J; Varniere, Peggy; Mitran, Sorin; Jones, Thomas W

    2007-01-01

    A description is given of the algorithms implemented in the AstroBEAR adaptive mesh refinement code for ideal magnetohydrodynamics. The code provides several high resolution, shock capturing schemes which are constructed to maintain conserved quantities of the flow in a finite volume sense. Divergence free magnetic field topologies are maintained to machine precision by collating the components of the magnetic field on a cell-interface staggered grid and utilizing the constrained transport approach for integrating the induction equations. The maintenance of such topologies on adaptive grids is achieved using prolongation and restriction operators which preserve the divergence and curl of the magnetic field across co-located grids of different resolution. The robustness and correctness of the code is demonstrated by comparing the numerical solution of various tests with analytical solutions or previously published numerical solutions obtained by other codes.

  18. Generic Mesh Refinement On GPU

    Boubekeur, Tamy; Schlick, Christophe

    2005-01-01

    International audience Many recent publications have shown that a large variety of computation involved in computer graphics can be moved from the CPU to the GPU, by a clever use of vertex or fragment shaders. Nonetheless there is still one kind of algorithms that is hard to translate from CPU to GPU: mesh refinement techniques. The main reason for this, is that vertex shaders available on current graphics hardware do not allow the generation of additional vertices on a mesh stored in grap...

  19. Lyman alpha Radiative Transfer in Cosmological Simulations using Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    Laursen, Peter; Sommer-Larsen, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    A numerical code for solving various Lyman alpha (Lya) radiative transfer (RT) problems is presented. The code is suitable for an arbitrary, three-dimensional distribution of Lya emissivity, gas temperature, density, and velocity field. Capable of handling Lya RT in an adaptively refined grid-based structure, it enables detailed investigation of the effects of clumpiness of the interstellar (or intergalactic) medium. The code is tested against various geometrically and physically idealized configurations for which analytical solutions exist, and subsequently applied to three "Lyman-break galaxies", extracted from high-resolution cosmological simulations at redshift z = 3.6. Proper treatment of the Lya scattering reveals a diversity of surface brightness (SB) and line profiles. Specifically, for a given galaxy the maximum observed SB can vary by an order of magnitude, and the total flux by a factor of 3 - 6, depending on the viewing angle. This may provide an explanation for differences in observed properties ...

  20. Adaptive mesh refinement for a finite volume method for flow and transport of radionuclides in heterogeneous porous media

    In this paper, we consider adaptive numerical simulation of miscible displacement problems in porous media, which are modeled by single phase flow equations. A vertex-centred finite volume method is employed to discretize the coupled system: the Darcy flow equation and the diffusion-convection concentration equation. The convection term is approximated with a Godunov scheme over the dual finite volume mesh, whereas the diffusion-dispersion term is discretized by piecewise linear conforming finite elements. We introduce two kinds of indicators, both of them of residual type. The first one is related to time discretization and is local with respect to the time discretization: thus, at each time, it provides an appropriate information for the choice of the next time step. The second is related to space discretization and is local with respect to both the time and space variable and the idea is that at each time it is an efficient tool for mesh adaptivity. An error estimation procedure evaluates where additional refinement is needed and grid generation procedures dynamically create or remove fine-grid patches as resolution requirements change. The method was implemented in the software MELODIE, developed by the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire). The algorithm is then used to simulate the evolution of radionuclide migration from the waste packages through a heterogeneous disposal, demonstrating its capability to capture complex behavior of the resulting flow. (authors)

  1. Adaptive Mesh Refinement for a Finite Volume Method for Flow and Transport of Radionuclides in Heterogeneous Porous Media

    Amaziane Brahim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider adaptive numerical simulation of miscible displacement problems in porous media, which are modeled by single phase flow equations. A vertex-centred finite volume method is employed to discretize the coupled system: the Darcy flow equation and the diffusion-convection concentration equation. The convection term is approximated with a Godunov scheme over the dual finite volume mesh, whereas the diffusion-dispersion term is discretized by piecewise linear conforming finite elements. We introduce two kinds of indicators, both of them of residual type. The first one is related to time discretization and is local with respect to the time discretization: thus, at each time, it provides an appropriate information for the choice of the next time step. The second is related to space discretization and is local with respect to both the time and space variable and the idea is that at each time it is an efficient tool for mesh adaptivity. An error estimation procedure evaluates where additional refinement is needed and grid generation procedures dynamically create or remove fine-grid patches as resolution requirements change. The method was implemented in the software MELODIE, developed by the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN, Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire. The algorithm is then used to simulate the evolution of radionuclide migration from the waste packages through a heterogeneous disposal, demonstrating its capability to capture complex behavior of the resulting flow.

  2. THREE-DIMENSIONAL ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT SIMULATIONS OF LONG-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURST JETS INSIDE MASSIVE PROGENITOR STARS

    Lopez-Camara, D.; Lazzati, Davide [Department of Physics, NC State University, 2401 Stinson Drive, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States); Morsony, Brian J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2535 Sterling Hall, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706-1582 (United States); Begelman, Mitchell C., E-mail: dlopezc@ncsu.edu [JILA, University of Colorado, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

    2013-04-10

    We present the results of special relativistic, adaptive mesh refinement, 3D simulations of gamma-ray burst jets expanding inside a realistic stellar progenitor. Our simulations confirm that relativistic jets can propagate and break out of the progenitor star while remaining relativistic. This result is independent of the resolution, even though the amount of turbulence and variability observed in the simulations is greater at higher resolutions. We find that the propagation of the jet head inside the progenitor star is slightly faster in 3D simulations compared to 2D ones at the same resolution. This behavior seems to be due to the fact that the jet head in 3D simulations can wobble around the jet axis, finding the spot of least resistance to proceed. Most of the average jet properties, such as density, pressure, and Lorentz factor, are only marginally affected by the dimensionality of the simulations and therefore results from 2D simulations can be considered reliable.

  3. Lyα RADIATIVE TRANSFER IN COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS USING ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT

    A numerical code for solving various Lyα radiative transfer (RT) problems is presented. The code is suitable for an arbitrary, three-dimensional distribution of Lyα emissivity, gas temperature, density, and velocity field. Capable of handling Lyα RT in an adaptively refined grid-based structure, it enables detailed investigation of the effects of clumpiness of the interstellar (or intergalactic) medium. The code is tested against various geometrically and physically idealized configurations for which analytical solutions exist, and subsequently applied to three different simulated high-resolution 'Lyman-break galaxies', extracted from high-resolution cosmological simulations at redshift z = 3.6. Proper treatment of the Lyα scattering reveals a diversity of surface brightness (SB) and line profiles. Specifically, for a given galaxy the maximum observed SB can vary by an order of magnitude, and the total flux by a factor of 3-6, depending on the viewing angle. This may provide an explanation for differences in observed properties of high-redshift galaxies, and in particular a possible physical link between Lyman-break galaxies and regular Lyα emitters.

  4. Moving Overlapping Grids with Adaptive Mesh Refinement for High-Speed Reactive and Non-reactive Flow

    Henshaw, W D; Schwendeman, D W

    2005-08-30

    We consider the solution of the reactive and non-reactive Euler equations on two-dimensional domains that evolve in time. The domains are discretized using moving overlapping grids. In a typical grid construction, boundary-fitted grids are used to represent moving boundaries, and these grids overlap with stationary background Cartesian grids. Block-structured adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is used to resolve fine-scale features in the flow such as shocks and detonations. Refinement grids are added to base-level grids according to an estimate of the error, and these refinement grids move with their corresponding base-level grids. The numerical approximation of the governing equations takes place in the parameter space of each component grid which is defined by a mapping from (fixed) parameter space to (moving) physical space. The mapped equations are solved numerically using a second-order extension of Godunov's method. The stiff source term in the reactive case is handled using a Runge-Kutta error-control scheme. We consider cases when the boundaries move according to a prescribed function of time and when the boundaries of embedded bodies move according to the surface stress exerted by the fluid. In the latter case, the Newton-Euler equations describe the motion of the center of mass of the each body and the rotation about it, and these equations are integrated numerically using a second-order predictor-corrector scheme. Numerical boundary conditions at slip walls are described, and numerical results are presented for both reactive and non-reactive flows in order to demonstrate the use and accuracy of the numerical approach.

  5. Mesh Adaptation and Shape Optimization on Unstructured Meshes Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this SBIR CRM proposes to implement the entropy adjoint method for solution adaptive mesh refinement into the Loci/CHEM unstructured flow solver. The scheme will...

  6. Parallelization of GeoClaw code for modeling geophysical flows with adaptive mesh refinement on many-core systems

    Zhang, S.; Yuen, D.A.; Zhu, A.; Song, S.; George, D.L.

    2011-01-01

    We parallelized the GeoClaw code on one-level grid using OpenMP in March, 2011 to meet the urgent need of simulating tsunami waves at near-shore from Tohoku 2011 and achieved over 75% of the potential speed-up on an eight core Dell Precision T7500 workstation [1]. After submitting that work to SC11 - the International Conference for High Performance Computing, we obtained an unreleased OpenMP version of GeoClaw from David George, who developed the GeoClaw code as part of his PH.D thesis. In this paper, we will show the complementary characteristics of the two approaches used in parallelizing GeoClaw and the speed-up obtained by combining the advantage of each of the two individual approaches with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), demonstrating the capabilities of running GeoClaw efficiently on many-core systems. We will also show a novel simulation of the Tohoku 2011 Tsunami waves inundating the Sendai airport and Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants, over which the finest grid distance of 20 meters is achieved through a 4-level AMR. This simulation yields quite good predictions about the wave-heights and travel time of the tsunami waves. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  7. Solving the relativistic magnetohydrodynamics equations with ADER discontinuous Galerkin methods, a posteriori subcell limiting and adaptive mesh refinement

    Zanotti, Olindo; Dumbser, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We present a new numerical tool for solving the special relativistic ideal MHD equations that is based on the combination of the following three key features: (i) a one-step ADER discontinuous Galerkin (DG) scheme that allows for an arbitrary order of accuracy in both space and time, (ii) an a posteriori subcell finite volume limiter that is activated to avoid spurious oscillations at discontinuities without destroying the natural subcell resolution capabilities of the DG finite element framework and finally (iii) a space-time adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) framework with time-accurate local time-stepping. The divergence-free character of the magnetic field is instead taken into account through the so-called 'divergence-cleaning' approach. The convergence of the new scheme is verified up to 5th order in space and time and the results for a sample of significant numerical tests including shock tube problems, the RMHD rotor problem and the Orszag-Tang vortex system are shown. We also consider a simple case of t...

  8. woptic: Optical conductivity with Wannier functions and adaptive k-mesh refinement

    Assmann, E.; Wissgott, P.; Kuneš, J.; Toschi, A.; Blaha, P.; Held, K.

    2016-05-01

    We present an algorithm for the adaptive tetrahedral integration over the Brillouin zone of crystalline materials, and apply it to compute the optical conductivity, dc conductivity, and thermopower. For these quantities, whose contributions are often localized in small portions of the Brillouin zone, adaptive integration is especially relevant. Our implementation, the woptic package, is tied into the WIEN2WANNIER framework and allows including a local many-body self energy, e.g. from dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). Wannier functions and dipole matrix elements are computed with the DFT package WIEN2k and Wannier90. For illustration, we show DFT results for fcc-Al and DMFT results for the correlated metal SrVO3.

  9. woptic: optical conductivity with Wannier functions and adaptive k-mesh refinement

    Assmann, E; Kuneš, J; Toschi, A; Blaha, P; Held, K

    2015-01-01

    We present an algorithm for the adaptive tetrahedral integration over the Brillouin zone of crystalline materials, and apply it to compute the optical conductivity, dc conductivity, and thermopower. For these quantities, whose contributions are often localized in small portions of the Brillouin zone, adaptive integration is especially relevant. Our implementation, the woptic package, is tied into the wien2wannier framework and allows including a many-body self energy, e.g. from dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). Wannier functions and dipole matrix elements are computed with the DFT package Wien2k and Wannier90. For illustration, we show DFT results for fcc-Al and DMFT results for the correlated metal SrVO$_3$.

  10. Autotuning of Adaptive Mesh Refinement PDE Solvers on Shared Memory Architectures

    Nogina, Svetlana

    2012-01-01

    Many multithreaded, grid-based, dynamically adaptive solvers for partial differential equations permanently have to traverse subgrids (patches) of different and changing sizes. The parallel efficiency of this traversal depends on the interplay of the patch size, the architecture used, the operations triggered throughout the traversal, and the grain size, i.e. the size of the subtasks the patch is broken into. We propose an oracle mechanism delivering grain sizes on-the-fly. It takes historical runtime measurements for different patch and grain sizes as well as the traverse\\'s operations into account, and it yields reasonable speedups. Neither magic configuration settings nor an expensive pre-tuning phase are necessary. It is an autotuning approach. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  11. A low-numerical dissipation, patch-based adaptive-mesh-refinement method for large-eddy simulation of compressible flows

    Pantano, C.; Deiterding, R.; Hill, D. J.; Pullin, D. I.

    2006-09-01

    This paper describes a hybrid finite-difference method for the large-eddy simulation of compressible flows with low-numerical dissipation and structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR). A conservative flux-based approach is described with an explicit centered scheme used in turbulent flow regions while a weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme is employed to capture shocks. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability are presented.

  12. An Adaptive Mesh Algorithm: Mesh Structure and Generation

    Scannapieco, Anthony J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-21

    The purpose of Adaptive Mesh Refinement is to minimize spatial errors over the computational space not to minimize the number of computational elements. The additional result of the technique is that it may reduce the number of computational elements needed to retain a given level of spatial accuracy. Adaptive mesh refinement is a computational technique used to dynamically select, over a region of space, a set of computational elements designed to minimize spatial error in the computational model of a physical process. The fundamental idea is to increase the mesh resolution in regions where the physical variables are represented by a broad spectrum of modes in k-space, hence increasing the effective global spectral coverage of those physical variables. In addition, the selection of the spatially distributed elements is done dynamically by cyclically adjusting the mesh to follow the spectral evolution of the system. Over the years three types of AMR schemes have evolved; block, patch and locally refined AMR. In block and patch AMR logical blocks of various grid sizes are overlaid to span the physical space of interest, whereas in locally refined AMR no logical blocks are employed but locally nested mesh levels are used to span the physical space. The distinction between block and patch AMR is that in block AMR the original blocks refine and coarsen entirely in time, whereas in patch AMR the patches change location and zone size with time.

  13. Controlling Reflections from Mesh Refinement Interfaces in Numerical Relativity

    Baker, John G.; Van Meter, James R.

    2005-01-01

    A leading approach to improving the accuracy on numerical relativity simulations of black hole systems is through fixed or adaptive mesh refinement techniques. We describe a generic numerical error which manifests as slowly converging, artificial reflections from refinement boundaries in a broad class of mesh-refinement implementations, potentially limiting the effectiveness of mesh- refinement techniques for some numerical relativity applications. We elucidate this numerical effect by presenting a model problem which exhibits the phenomenon, but which is simple enough that its numerical error can be understood analytically. Our analysis shows that the effect is caused by variations in finite differencing error generated across low and high resolution regions, and that its slow convergence is caused by the presence of dramatic speed differences among propagation modes typical of 3+1 relativity. Lastly, we resolve the problem, presenting a class of finite-differencing stencil modifications which eliminate this pathology in both our model problem and in numerical relativity examples.

  14. Cartesian anisotropic mesh adaptation for compressible flow

    Simulating transient compressible flows involving shock waves presents challenges to the CFD practitioner in terms of the mesh quality required to resolve discontinuities and prevent smearing. This paper discusses a novel two-dimensional Cartesian anisotropic mesh adaptation technique implemented for compressible flow. This technique, developed for laminar flow by Ham, Lien and Strong, is efficient because it refines and coarsens cells using criteria that consider the solution in each of the cardinal directions separately. In this paper the method will be applied to compressible flow. The procedure shows promise in its ability to deliver good quality solutions while achieving computational savings. The convection scheme used is the Advective Upstream Splitting Method (Plus), and the refinement/ coarsening criteria are based on work done by Ham et al. Transient shock wave diffraction over a backward step and shock reflection over a forward step are considered as test cases because they demonstrate that the quality of the solution can be maintained as the mesh is refined and coarsened in time. The data structure is explained in relation to the computational mesh, and the object-oriented design and implementation of the code is presented. Refinement and coarsening algorithms are outlined. Computational savings over uniform and isotropic mesh approaches are shown to be significant. (author)

  15. 3D adaptive mesh refinement simulations of the gas cloud G2 born within the disks of young stars in the Galactic Center

    Schartmann, M; Burkert, A; Gillessen, S; Genzel, R; Pfuhl, O; Eisenhauer, F; Plewa, P M; Ott, T; George, E M; Habibi, M

    2015-01-01

    The dusty, ionized gas cloud G2 is currently passing the massive black hole in the Galactic Center at a distance of roughly 2400 Schwarzschild radii. We explore the possibility of a starting point of the cloud within the disks of young stars. We make use of the large amount of new observations in order to put constraints on G2's origin. Interpreting the observations as a diffuse cloud of gas, we employ three-dimensional hydrodynamical adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) simulations with the PLUTO code and do a detailed comparison with observational data. The simulations presented in this work update our previously obtained results in multiple ways: (1) high resolution three-dimensional hydrodynamical AMR simulations are used, (2) the cloud follows the updated orbit based on the Brackett-$\\gamma$ data, (3) a detailed comparison to the observed high-quality position-velocity diagrams and the evolution of the total Brackett-$\\gamma$ luminosity is done. We concentrate on two unsolved problems of the diffuse cloud scen...

  16. Electrostatic PIC with adaptive Cartesian mesh

    Kolobov, Vladimir I

    2016-01-01

    We describe an initial implementation of an electrostatic Particle-in-Cell (ES-PIC) module with adaptive Cartesian mesh in our Unified Flow Solver framework. Challenges of PIC method with cell-based adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) are related to a decrease of the particle-per-cell number in the refined cells with a corresponding increase of the numerical noise. The developed ES-PIC solver is validated for capacitively coupled plasma, its AMR capabilities are demonstrated for simulations of streamer development during high-pressure gas breakdown. It is shown that cell-based AMR provides a convenient particle management algorithm for exponential multiplications of electrons and ions in the ionization events.

  17. Electrostatic PIC with adaptive Cartesian mesh

    Kolobov, Vladimir; Arslanbekov, Robert

    2016-05-01

    We describe an initial implementation of an electrostatic Particle-in-Cell (ES-PIC) module with adaptive Cartesian mesh in our Unified Flow Solver framework. Challenges of PIC method with cell-based adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) are related to a decrease of the particle-per-cell number in the refined cells with a corresponding increase of the numerical noise. The developed ES-PIC solver is validated for capacitively coupled plasma, its AMR capabilities are demonstrated for simulations of streamer development during high-pressure gas breakdown. It is shown that cell-based AMR provides a convenient particle management algorithm for exponential multiplications of electrons and ions in the ionization events.

  18. Details of tetrahedral anisotropic mesh adaptation

    Jensen, Kristian Ejlebjerg; Gorman, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    We have implemented tetrahedral anisotropic mesh adaptation using the local operations of coarsening, swapping, refinement and smoothing in MATLAB without the use of any for- N loops, i.e. the script is fully vectorised. In the process of doing so, we have made three observations related to details of the implementation: 1. restricting refinement to a single edge split per element not only simplifies the code, it also improves mesh quality, 2. face to edge swapping is unnecessary, and 3. optimising for the Vassilevski functional tends to give a little higher value for the mean condition number functional than optimising for the condition number functional directly. These observations have been made for a uniform and a radial shock metric field, both starting from a structured mesh in a cube. Finally, we compare two coarsening techniques and demonstrate the importance of applying smoothing in the mesh adaptation loop. The results pertain to a unit cube geometry, but we also show the effect of corners and edges by applying the implementation in a spherical geometry.

  19. Serial and parallel dynamic adaptation of general hybrid meshes

    Kavouklis, Christos

    The Navier-Stokes equations are a standard mathematical representation of viscous fluid flow. Their numerical solution in three dimensions remains a computationally intensive and challenging task, despite recent advances in computer speed and memory. A strategy to increase accuracy of Navier-Stokes simulations, while maintaining computing resources to a minimum, is local refinement of the associated computational mesh in regions of large solution gradients and coarsening in regions where the solution does not vary appreciably. In this work we consider adaptation of general hybrid meshes for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) applications. Hybrid meshes are composed of four types of elements; hexahedra, prisms, pyramids and tetrahedra, and have been proven a promising technology in accurately resolving fluid flow for complex geometries. The first part of this dissertation is concerned with the design and implementation of a serial scheme for the adaptation of general three dimensional hybrid meshes. We have defined 29 refinement types, for all four kinds of elements. The core of the present adaptation scheme is an iterative algorithm that flags mesh edges for refinement, so that the adapted mesh is conformal. Of primary importance is considered the design of a suitable dynamic data structure that facilitates refinement and coarsening operations and furthermore minimizes memory requirements. A special dynamic list is defined for mesh elements, in contrast with the usual tree structures. It contains only elements of the current adaptation step and minimal information that is utilized to reconstruct parent elements when the mesh is coarsened. In the second part of this work, a new parallel dynamic mesh adaptation and load balancing algorithm for general hybrid meshes is presented. Partitioning of a hybrid mesh reduces to partitioning of the corresponding dual graph. Communication among processors is based on the faces of the interpartition boundary. The distributed

  20. Numerical Simulation of Fluid Interfaces with the Adaptive Mesh Refinement Method, the Ghost Fluid Method and the Level Set Method%界面捕捉Level Set方法的(AMR)数值模拟

    宫翔飞; 张树道; 江松

    2006-01-01

    在流体力学方程的计算中采用高精度WENO格式,用AMR(adaptive mesh refinement)方法提高流场局部分辨率,在采用Level Set函数标定物质界面的计算中用GFM(ghostfluid method)方法进行界面处理,尝试将AMR技术与界面追踪技术相互融合并应用于数值模拟,对不同的模拟结果进行了比较.

  1. Adaptive mesh strategies for the spectral element method

    Mavriplis, Catherine

    1992-01-01

    An adaptive spectral method was developed for the efficient solution of time dependent partial differential equations. Adaptive mesh strategies that include resolution refinement and coarsening by three different methods are illustrated on solutions to the 1-D viscous Burger equation and the 2-D Navier-Stokes equations for driven flow in a cavity. Sharp gradients, singularities, and regions of poor resolution are resolved optimally as they develop in time using error estimators which indicate the choice of refinement to be used. The adaptive formulation presents significant increases in efficiency, flexibility, and general capabilities for high order spectral methods.

  2. Adaptive multilevel mesh refinement method for the solution of low Mach number reactive flows; Methode adaptative de raffinement local multi-niveaux pour le calcul d'ecoulements reactifs a faible nombre de Mach

    Core, X.

    2002-02-01

    The isobar approximation for the system of the balance equations of mass, momentum, energy and chemical species is a suitable approximation to represent low Mach number reactive flows. In this approximation, which neglects acoustics phenomena, the mixture is hydrodynamically incompressible and the thermodynamic effects lead to an uniform compression of the system. We present a novel numerical scheme for this approximation. An incremental projection method, which uses the original form of mass balance equation, discretizes in time the Navier-Stokes equations. Spatial discretization is achieved through a finite volume approach on MAC-type staggered mesh. A higher order de-centered scheme is used to compute the convective fluxes. We associate to this discretization a local mesh refinement method, based on Flux Interface Correction technique. A first application concerns a forced flow with variable density which mimics a combustion problem. The second application is natural convection with first small temperature variations and then beyond the limit of validity of the Boussinesq approximation. Finally, we treat a third application which is a laminar diffusion flame. For each of these test problems, we demonstrate the robustness of the proposed numerical scheme, notably for the density spatial variations. We analyze the gain in accuracy obtained with the local mesh refinement method. (author)

  3. Parallel adaptation of general three-dimensional hybrid meshes

    A new parallel dynamic mesh adaptation and load balancing algorithm for general hybrid grids has been developed. The meshes considered in this work are composed of four kinds of elements; tetrahedra, prisms, hexahedra and pyramids, which poses a challenge to parallel mesh adaptation. Additional complexity imposed by the presence of multiple types of elements affects especially data migration, updates of local data structures and interpartition data structures. Efficient partition of hybrid meshes has been accomplished by transforming them to suitable graphs and using serial graph partitioning algorithms. Communication among processors is based on the faces of the interpartition boundary and the termination detection algorithm of Dijkstra is employed to ensure proper flagging of edges for refinement. An inexpensive dynamic load balancing strategy is introduced to redistribute work load among processors after adaptation. In particular, only the initial coarse mesh, with proper weighting, is balanced which yields savings in computation time and relatively simple implementation of mesh quality preservation rules, while facilitating coarsening of refined elements. Special algorithms are employed for (i) data migration and dynamic updates of the local data structures, (ii) determination of the resulting interpartition boundary and (iii) identification of the communication pattern of processors. Several representative applications are included to evaluate the method.

  4. Parallel adaptation of general three-dimensional hybrid meshes

    Kavouklis, Christos; Kallinderis, Yannis

    2010-05-01

    A new parallel dynamic mesh adaptation and load balancing algorithm for general hybrid grids has been developed. The meshes considered in this work are composed of four kinds of elements; tetrahedra, prisms, hexahedra and pyramids, which poses a challenge to parallel mesh adaptation. Additional complexity imposed by the presence of multiple types of elements affects especially data migration, updates of local data structures and interpartition data structures. Efficient partition of hybrid meshes has been accomplished by transforming them to suitable graphs and using serial graph partitioning algorithms. Communication among processors is based on the faces of the interpartition boundary and the termination detection algorithm of Dijkstra is employed to ensure proper flagging of edges for refinement. An inexpensive dynamic load balancing strategy is introduced to redistribute work load among processors after adaptation. In particular, only the initial coarse mesh, with proper weighting, is balanced which yields savings in computation time and relatively simple implementation of mesh quality preservation rules, while facilitating coarsening of refined elements. Special algorithms are employed for (i) data migration and dynamic updates of the local data structures, (ii) determination of the resulting interpartition boundary and (iii) identification of the communication pattern of processors. Several representative applications are included to evaluate the method.

  5. Evolutions in 3D numerical relativity using fixed mesh refinement

    Schnetter, E; Hawke, I; Schnetter, Erik; Hawley, Scott H.; Hawke, Ian

    2004-01-01

    We present results of 3D numerical simulations using a finite difference code featuring fixed mesh refinement (FMR), in which a subset of the computational domain is refined in space and time. We apply this code to a series of test cases including a robust stability test, a nonlinear gauge wave and an excised Schwarzschild black hole in an evolving gauge. We find that the mesh refinement results are comparable in accuracy, stability and convergence to unigrid simulations with the same effective resolution. At the same time, the use of FMR reduces the computational resources needed to obtain a given accuracy. Particular care must be taken at the interfaces between coarse and fine grids to avoid a loss of convergence at high resolutions. This FMR system, "Carpet", is a driver module in the freely available Cactus computational infrastructure, and is able to endow existing Cactus simulation modules ("thorns") with FMR with little or no extra effort.

  6. Mesh refinement of simulation with the AID riser transmission gamma

    Type reactors Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFBR) vertical, in which the particulate and gaseous phases have flows upward (riser) have been widely used in gasification processes, combustion and fluid catalytic cracking (FCC). These biphasic reactors (gas-solid) efficiency depends largely on their hydrodynamic characteristics, and shows different behaviors in the axial and radial directions. The solids axial distribution is observed by the higher concentration in the base, getting more diluted toward the top. Radially, the solids concentration is characterized as core-annular, in which the central region is highly diluted, consisting of dispersed particles and fluid. In the present work developed a two-dimensional geometry (2D) techniques through simulations in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to predict the gas-solid flow in the riser type CFBR through transient modeling, based on the kinetic theory of granular flow . The refinement of computational meshes provide larger amounts of information on the parameters studied, but may increase the processing time of the simulations. A minimum number of cells applied to the mesh construction was obtained by testing five meshes. The validation of the hydrodynamic parameters was performed using a range of 241Am source and detector NaI (Tl). The numerical results were provided consistent with the experimental data, indicating that the refined computational mesh in a controlled manner, improve the approximation of the expected results. (author)

  7. Grid adaptation using chimera composite overlapping meshes

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform grid adaptation using composite overlapping meshes in regions of large gradient to accurately capture the salient features during computation. The chimera grid scheme, a multiple overset mesh technique, is used in combination with a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical solution is first converged to a steady state based on an initial coarse mesh. Solution-adaptive enhancement is then performed by using a secondary fine grid system which oversets on top of the base grid in the high-gradient region, but without requiring the mesh boundaries to join in any special way. Communications through boundary interfaces between those separated grids are carried out using trilinear interpolation. Application to the Euler equations for shock reflections and to shock wave/boundary layer interaction problem are tested. With the present method, the salient features are well-resolved.

  8. Grid adaption using Chimera composite overlapping meshes

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform grid adaptation using composite over-lapping meshes in regions of large gradient to capture the salient features accurately during computation. The Chimera grid scheme, a multiple overset mesh technique, is used in combination with a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical solution is first converged to a steady state based on an initial coarse mesh. Solution-adaptive enhancement is then performed by using a secondary fine grid system which oversets on top of the base grid in the high-gradient region, but without requiring the mesh boundaries to join in any special way. Communications through boundary interfaces between those separated grids are carried out using tri-linear interpolation. Applications to the Euler equations for shock reflections and to a shock wave/boundary layer interaction problem are tested. With the present method, the salient features are well resolved.

  9. Evolutions in 3D numerical relativity using fixed mesh refinement

    We present results of 3D numerical simulations using a finite difference code featuring fixed mesh refinement (FMR), in which a subset of the computational domain is refined in space and time. We apply this code to a series of test cases including a robust stability test, a nonlinear gauge wave and an excised Schwarzschild black hole in an evolving gauge. We find that the mesh refinement results are comparable in accuracy, stability and convergence to unigrid simulations with the same effective resolution. At the same time, the use of FMR reduces the computational resources needed to obtain a given accuracy. Particular care must be taken at the interfaces between coarse and fine grids to avoid a loss of convergence at higher resolutions, and we introduce the use of 'buffer zones' as one resolution of this issue. We also introduce a new method for initial data generation, which enables higher order interpolation in time even from the initial time slice. This FMR system, 'Carpet', is a driver module in the freely available Cactus computational infrastructure, and is able to endow generic existing Cactus simulation modules ('thorns') with FMR with little or no extra effort

  10. Finite-volume goal-oriented mesh adaptation for aerodynamics using functional derivative with respect to nodal coordinates

    Todarello, Giovanni; Vonck, Floris; Bourasseau, Sébastien; Peter, Jacques; Désidéri, Jean-Antoine

    2016-05-01

    A new goal-oriented mesh adaptation method for finite volume/finite difference schemes is extended from the structured mesh framework to a more suitable setting for adaptation of unstructured meshes. The method is based on the total derivative of the goal with respect to volume mesh nodes that is computable after the solution of the goal discrete adjoint equation. The asymptotic behaviour of this derivative is assessed on regularly refined unstructured meshes. A local refinement criterion is derived from the requirement of limiting the first order change in the goal that an admissible node displacement may cause. Mesh adaptations are then carried out for classical test cases of 2D Euler flows. Efficiency and local density of the adapted meshes are presented. They are compared with those obtained with a more classical mesh adaptation method in the framework of finite volume/finite difference schemes [46]. Results are very close although the present method only makes usage of the current grid.

  11. A multilevel adaptive mesh generation scheme using Kd-trees

    Alfonso Limon

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a mesh refinement strategy for PDE based simulations that benefits from a multilevel decomposition. Using Harten's MRA in terms of Schroder-Pander linear multiresolution analysis [20], we are able to bound discontinuities in $mathbb{R}$. This MRA is extended to $mathbb{R}^n$ in terms of n-orthogonal linear transforms and utilized to identify cells that contain a codimension-one discontinuity. These refinement cells become leaf nodes in a balanced Kd-tree such that a local dyadic MRA is produced in $mathbb{R}^n$, while maintaining a minimal computational footprint. The nodes in the tree form an adaptive mesh whose density increases in the vicinity of a discontinuity.

  12. A Discontinuous Galerkin Time-Domain Method with Dynamically Adaptive Cartesian Meshes for Computational Electromagnetics

    Yan, Su; Arslanbekov, Robert R; Kolobov, Vladimir I; Jin, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    A discontinuous Galerkin time-domain (DGTD) method based on dynamically adaptive Cartesian meshes (ACM) is developed for a full-wave analysis of electromagnetic fields in dispersive media. Hierarchical Cartesian grids offer simplicity close to that of structured grids and the flexibility of unstructured grids while being highly suited for adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The developed DGTD-ACM achieves a desired accuracy by refining non-conformal meshes near material interfaces to reduce stair-casing errors without sacrificing the high efficiency afforded with uniform Cartesian meshes. Moreover, DGTD-ACM can dynamically refine the mesh to resolve the local variation of the fields during propagation of electromagnetic pulses. A local time-stepping scheme is adopted to alleviate the constraint on the time-step size due to the stability condition of the explicit time integration. Simulations of electromagnetic wave diffraction over conducting and dielectric cylinders and spheres demonstrate that the proposed meth...

  13. Interpolation methods and the accuracy of lattice-Boltzmann mesh refinement

    Guzik, Stephen M. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Weisgraber, Todd H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Colella, Phillip [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Alder, Berni J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-12-10

    A lattice-Boltzmann model to solve the equivalent of the Navier-Stokes equations on adap- tively refined grids is presented. A method for transferring information across interfaces between different grid resolutions was developed following established techniques for finite- volume representations. This new approach relies on a space-time interpolation and solving constrained least-squares problems to ensure conservation. The effectiveness of this method at maintaining the second order accuracy of lattice-Boltzmann is demonstrated through a series of benchmark simulations and detailed mesh refinement studies. These results exhibit smaller solution errors and improved convergence when compared with similar approaches relying only on spatial interpolation. Examples highlighting the mesh adaptivity of this method are also provided.

  14. An Adaptive Mesh Algorithm: Mapping the Mesh Variables

    Scannapieco, Anthony J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-25

    Both thermodynamic and kinematic variables must be mapped. The kinematic variables are defined on a separate kinematic mesh; it is the duel mesh to the thermodynamic mesh. The map of the kinematic variables is done by calculating the contributions of kinematic variables on the old thermodynamic mesh, mapping the kinematic variable contributions onto the new thermodynamic mesh and then synthesizing the mapped kinematic variables on the new kinematic mesh. In this document the map of the thermodynamic variables will be described.

  15. Optimal additive Schwarz methods for the $hp$-BEM: the hypersingular integral operator in 3D on locally refined meshes

    Führer, Thomas; Melenk, Jens Markus; Praetorius, Dirk; Rieder, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We propose and analyze an overlapping Schwarz preconditioner for the $p$ and $hp$ boundary element method for the hypersingular integral equation in 3D. We consider surface triangulations consisting of triangles. The condition number is bounded uniformly in the mesh size $h$ and the polynomial order $p$. The preconditioner handles adaptively refined meshes and is based on a local multilevel preconditioner for the lowest order space. Numerical experiments on different geometries illustrate its...

  16. Multigrid solution strategies for adaptive meshing problems

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the issues which arise when combining multigrid strategies with adaptive meshing techniques for solving steady-state problems on unstructured meshes. A basic strategy is described, and demonstrated by solving several inviscid and viscous flow cases. Potential inefficiencies in this basic strategy are exposed, and various alternate approaches are discussed, some of which are demonstrated with an example. Although each particular approach exhibits certain advantages, all methods have particular drawbacks, and the formulation of a completely optimal strategy is considered to be an open problem.

  17. New high quality adaptive mesh generator utilized in modelling plasma streamer propagation at atmospheric pressures

    Papadakis, A. P.; Georghiou, G. E.; Metaxas, A. C.

    2008-12-01

    A new adaptive mesh generator has been developed and used in the analysis of high-pressure gas discharges, such as avalanches and streamers, reducing computational times and computer memory needs significantly. The new adaptive mesh generator developed, uses normalized error indicators, varying from 0 to 1, to guarantee optimal mesh resolution for all carriers involved in the analysis. Furthermore, it uses h- and r-refinement techniques such as mesh jiggling, edge swapping and node addition/removal to develop an element quality improvement algorithm that improves the mesh quality significantly and a fast and accurate algorithm for interpolation between meshes. Finally, the mesh generator is applied in the characterization of the transition from a single electron to the avalanche and streamer discharges in high-voltage, high-pressure gas discharges for dc 1 mm gaps, RF 1 cm point-plane gaps and parallel-plate 40 MHz configurations, in ambient atmospheric air.

  18. New high quality adaptive mesh generator utilized in modelling plasma streamer propagation at atmospheric pressures

    Papadakis, A P [Department of Electrical Engineering, Frederick University Cyprus, 7 Y Frederickou Street, Palouriotissa, Nicosia 1036 (Cyprus); Georghiou, G E [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Cyprus, 75 Kallipoleos, PO Box 20577, 1678, Nicosia (Cyprus); Metaxas, A C [St John' s College, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 1TP (United Kingdom)], E-mail: eng.ap@frederick.ac.cy, E-mail: geg@ucy.ac.cy, E-mail: acm33@cam.ac.uk

    2008-12-07

    A new adaptive mesh generator has been developed and used in the analysis of high-pressure gas discharges, such as avalanches and streamers, reducing computational times and computer memory needs significantly. The new adaptive mesh generator developed, uses normalized error indicators, varying from 0 to 1, to guarantee optimal mesh resolution for all carriers involved in the analysis. Furthermore, it uses h- and r-refinement techniques such as mesh jiggling, edge swapping and node addition/removal to develop an element quality improvement algorithm that improves the mesh quality significantly and a fast and accurate algorithm for interpolation between meshes. Finally, the mesh generator is applied in the characterization of the transition from a single electron to the avalanche and streamer discharges in high-voltage, high-pressure gas discharges for dc 1 mm gaps, RF 1 cm point-plane gaps and parallel-plate 40 MHz configurations, in ambient atmospheric air.

  19. Local mesh refinement for incompressible fluid flow with free surfaces

    Terasaka, H.; Kajiwara, H.; Ogura, K. [Tokyo Electric Power Company (Japan)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    A new local mesh refinement (LMR) technique has been developed and applied to incompressible fluid flows with free surface boundaries. The LMR method embeds patches of fine grid in arbitrary regions of interest. Hence, more accurate solutions can be obtained with a lower number of computational cells. This method is very suitable for the simulation of free surface movements because free surface flow problems generally require a finer computational grid to obtain adequate results. By using this technique, one can place finer grids only near the surfaces, and therefore greatly reduce the total number of cells and computational costs. This paper introduces LMR3D, a three-dimensional incompressible flow analysis code. Numerical examples calculated with the code demonstrate well the advantages of the LMR method.

  20. Development and verification of unstructured adaptive mesh technique with edge compatibility

    In the design study of the large-sized sodium-cooled fast reactor (JSFR), one key issue is suppression of gas entrainment (GE) phenomena at a gas-liquid interface. Therefore, the authors have been developed a high-precision CFD algorithm to evaluate the GE phenomena accurately. The CFD algorithm has been developed on unstructured meshes to establish an accurate modeling of JSFR system. For two-phase interfacial flow simulations, a high-precision volume-of-fluid algorithm is employed. It was confirmed that the developed CFD algorithm could reproduce the GE phenomena in a simple GE experiment. Recently, the authors have been developed an important technique for the simulation of the GE phenomena in JSFR. That is an unstructured adaptive mesh technique which can apply fine cells dynamically to the region where the GE occurs in JSFR. In this paper, as a part of the development, a two-dimensional unstructured adaptive mesh technique is discussed. In the two-dimensional adaptive mesh technique, each cell is refined isotropically to reduce distortions of the mesh. In addition, connection cells are formed to eliminate the edge incompatibility between refined and non-refined cells. The two-dimensional unstructured adaptive mesh technique is verified by solving well-known lid-driven cavity flow problem. As a result, the two-dimensional unstructured adaptive mesh technique succeeds in providing a high-precision solution, even though poor-quality distorted initial mesh is employed. In addition, the simulation error on the two-dimensional unstructured adaptive mesh is much less than the error on the structured mesh with a larger number of cells. (author)

  1. Strategies for hp-adaptive Refinement

    In the hp-adaptive version of the finite element method for solving partial differential equations, the grid is adaptively refined in both h, the size of the elements, and p, the degree of the piecewise polynomial approximation over the element. The selection of which elements to refine is determined by a local a posteriori error indicator, and is well established. But the determination of whether the element should be refined by h or p is still open. In this paper, we describe several strategies that have been proposed for making this determination. A numerical example to illustrate the effectiveness of these strategies will be presented.

  2. Stochastic domain decomposition for time dependent adaptive mesh generation

    Bihlo, Alexander; Walsh, Emily J

    2015-01-01

    The efficient generation of meshes is an important component in the numerical solution of problems in physics and engineering. Of interest are situations where global mesh quality and a tight coupling to the solution of the physical partial differential equation (PDE) is important. We consider parabolic PDE mesh generation and present a method for the construction of adaptive meshes in two spatial dimensions using stochastic domain decomposition that is suitable for an implementation in a multi- or many-core environment. Methods for mesh generation on periodic domains are also provided. The mesh generator is coupled to a time dependent physical PDE and the system is evolved using an alternating solution procedure. The method uses the stochastic representation of the exact solution of a parabolic linear mesh generator to find the location of an adaptive mesh along the (artificial) subdomain interfaces. The deterministic evaluation of the mesh over each subdomain can then be obtained completely independently us...

  3. Applications of automatic mesh generation and adaptive methods in computational medicine

    Schmidt, J.A.; Macleod, R.S. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Johnson, C.R.; Eason, J.C. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Important problems in Computational Medicine exist that can benefit from the implementation of adaptive mesh refinement techniques. Biological systems are so inherently complex that only efficient models running on state of the art hardware can begin to simulate reality. To tackle the complex geometries associated with medical applications we present a general purpose mesh generation scheme based upon the Delaunay tessellation algorithm and an iterative point generator. In addition, automatic, two- and three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement methods are presented that are derived from local and global estimates of the finite element error. Mesh generation and adaptive refinement techniques are utilized to obtain accurate approximations of bioelectric fields within anatomically correct models of the heart and human thorax. Specifically, we explore the simulation of cardiac defibrillation and the general forward and inverse problems in electrocardiography (ECG). Comparisons between uniform and adaptive refinement techniques are made to highlight the computational efficiency and accuracy of adaptive methods in the solution of field problems in computational medicine.

  4. An adaptive mesh finite volume method for the Euler equations of gas dynamics

    Mungkasi, Sudi

    2016-06-01

    The Euler equations have been used to model gas dynamics for decades. They consist of mathematical equations for the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy of the gas. For a large time value, the solution may contain discontinuities, even when the initial condition is smooth. A standard finite volume numerical method is not able to give accurate solutions to the Euler equations around discontinuities. Therefore we solve the Euler equations using an adaptive mesh finite volume method. In this paper, we present a new construction of the adaptive mesh finite volume method with an efficient computation of the refinement indicator. The adaptive method takes action automatically at around places having inaccurate solutions. Inaccurate solutions are reconstructed to reduce the error by refining the mesh locally up to a certain level. On the other hand, if the solution is already accurate, then the mesh is coarsened up to another certain level to minimize computational efforts. We implement the numerical entropy production as the mesh refinement indicator. As a test problem, we take the Sod shock tube problem. Numerical results show that the adaptive method is more promising than the standard one in solving the Euler equations of gas dynamics.

  5. Adaptive Mesh Redistibution Method Based on Godunov's Scheme

    Azarenok, Boris N.; Ivanenko, Sergey A.; Tang, Tao

    2003-01-01

    In this work, a detailed description for an efficent adaptive mesh redistribution algorithm based on the Godunov's scheme is presented. After each mesh iteration a second-order finite-volume flow solver is used to update the flow parameters at the new time level directly without using interpolation. Numerical experiments are perfomed to demonstrate the efficency and robustness of the proposed adaptive mesh algorithm in one and two dimensions.

  6. Parallel paving: An algorithm for generating distributed, adaptive, all-quadrilateral meshes on parallel computers

    Lober, R.R.; Tautges, T.J.; Vaughan, C.T.

    1997-03-01

    Paving is an automated mesh generation algorithm which produces all-quadrilateral elements. It can additionally generate these elements in varying sizes such that the resulting mesh adapts to a function distribution, such as an error function. While powerful, conventional paving is a very serial algorithm in its operation. Parallel paving is the extension of serial paving into parallel environments to perform the same meshing functions as conventional paving only on distributed, discretized models. This extension allows large, adaptive, parallel finite element simulations to take advantage of paving`s meshing capabilities for h-remap remeshing. A significantly modified version of the CUBIT mesh generation code has been developed to host the parallel paving algorithm and demonstrate its capabilities on both two dimensional and three dimensional surface geometries and compare the resulting parallel produced meshes to conventionally paved meshes for mesh quality and algorithm performance. Sandia`s {open_quotes}tiling{close_quotes} dynamic load balancing code has also been extended to work with the paving algorithm to retain parallel efficiency as subdomains undergo iterative mesh refinement.

  7. Development of unstructured adaptive mesh algorithm for high-precision gas-liquid two-phase flow simulation. 1st report. Formulation and verification of two-dimensional unstructured adaptive mesh algorithm

    A high-precision simulation method for gas-liquid two-phase flows on unstructured meshes has been developed as a part of numerical studies on a gas entrainment phenomenon in the sodium-cooled fast reactor (JSFR). In this study, a two-dimensional unstructured adaptive mesh algorithm is developed because an adaptive mesh technique is necessary to simulate the local gas entrainment phenomenon accurately in large size JSFR. In a proposed two-dimensional adaptive mesh algorithm, each cell is isotropically subdivided to reduce distortions of the mesh. In addition, a connection cell is formed to eliminate the edge incompatibility between a refined and a non-refined cells. When forming connection cells, patterns of each connection cell is determined by subdivision condisions of neighboring cells. After checking the developed two-dimensional unstructured adaptive mesh manipulations (subdivision and merging of cells and construction of connection cells), the present adaptive mesh algorithm is verified by solving well-kwon driven cavity problem. As the result, the present unstructed adaptive mesh algorithm succeeds in reproducing vortical flow field in the cavity using relatively small cell number. (author)

  8. Spatially adaptive hp refinement approach for PN neutron transport equation using spectral element method

    Highlights: • Powerful hp-SEM refinement approach for PN neutron transport equation has been presented. • The method provides great geometrical flexibility and lower computational cost. • There is a capability of using arbitrary high order and non uniform meshes. • Both posteriori and priori local error estimation approaches have been employed. • High accurate results are compared against other common adaptive and uniform grids. - Abstract: In this work we presented the adaptive hp-SEM approach which is obtained from the incorporation of Spectral Element Method (SEM) and adaptive hp refinement. The SEM nodal discretization and hp adaptive grid-refinement for even-parity Boltzmann neutron transport equation creates powerful grid refinement approach with high accuracy solutions. In this regard a computer code has been developed to solve multi-group neutron transport equation in one-dimensional geometry using even-parity transport theory. The spatial dependence of flux has been developed via SEM method with Lobatto orthogonal polynomial. Two commonly error estimation approaches, the posteriori and the priori has been implemented. The incorporation of SEM nodal discretization method and adaptive hp grid refinement leads to high accurate solutions. Coarser meshes efficiency and significant reduction of computer program runtime in comparison with other common refining methods and uniform meshing approaches is tested along several well-known transport benchmarks

  9. Adaptive mesh generation for non-steady state heat transport problems

    Full text: The paper deals with the problem of mesh generation for the two-dimensional finite element modeling. The general objective of the work is development of the mesh adaptation method and its application to non-steady state heat transport processes. The main feature of the method is generation of new triangular or quadrilateral mesh at each iteration of the adaptation procedure. This generation is performed on the basis of information obtained from the previous iteration. The adaptation is based on the evaluation of the solution curvature, which is approximated using second spatial derivatives. Discrete Hessian of the solution is applied to generate the relevant discrete metric, which is next interpolated in the whole domain. The metric is defined by three parameters: stretching of elements in two orthogonal directions and the angle of the directions with respect to the coordinate system. Thus, the mesh can be refined or stretched in the selected parts of the domain and in a selected direction. The general idea of the developed adaptation method applied to steady state problems is described. Application of the method to non-steady state heat transport processes is described in the present paper. Mesh adaptation in non-steady state processes presents several difficulties, among which decision when re-meshing should be done and transport of information from the old mesh to the new mesh are the most important. An example of application of the mesh adaptation method to the processes, which are characterized by fast changes of heat transfer coefficient in the third kind boundary conditions and by strong inhomogeneity of heat transport, is described. Refs. 1 (author)

  10. Kinetic Solvers with Adaptive Mesh in Phase Space

    Arslanbekov, Robert R; Kolobov, Vladimir I; Frolova, Anna A.

    2013-01-01

    An Adaptive Mesh in Phase Space (AMPS) methodology has been developed for solving multi-dimensional kinetic equations by the discrete velocity method. A Cartesian mesh for both configuration (r) and velocity (v) spaces is produced using a tree of trees data structure. The mesh in r-space is automatically generated around embedded boundaries and dynamically adapted to local solution properties. The mesh in v-space is created on-the-fly for each cell in r-space. Mappings between neighboring v-s...

  11. A thread-parallel algorithm for anisotropic mesh adaptation

    Rokos, Georgios; Gorman, Gerard J.; Southern, James; Kelly, Paul H. J.

    2013-01-01

    Anisotropic mesh adaptation is a powerful way to directly minimise the computational cost of mesh based simulation. It is particularly important for multi-scale problems where the required number of floating-point operations can be reduced by orders of magnitude relative to more traditional static mesh approaches. Increasingly, finite element and finite volume codes are being optimised for modern multi-core architectures. Typically, decomposition methods implemented through the Message Passin...

  12. Structures in Detonation Waves in Low-Pressure H2–O2–Ar Mixtures: A Summary of Results Obtained with the Adaptive Mesh Refinement Framework AMROC

    Ralf Deiterding

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation can be key to the understanding of the multidimensional nature of transient detonation waves. However, the accurate approximation of realistic detonations is demanding as a wide range of scales needs to be resolved. This paper describes a successful solution strategy that utilizes logically rectangular dynamically adaptive meshes. The hydrodynamic transport scheme and the treatment of the nonequilibrium reaction terms are sketched. A ghost fluid approach is integrated into the method to allow for embedded geometrically complex boundaries. Large-scale parallel simulations of unstable detonation structures of Chapman-Jouguet detonations in low-pressure hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures demonstrate the efficiency of the described techniques in practice. In particular, computations of regular cellular structures in two and three space dimensions and their development under transient conditions, that is, under diffraction and for propagation through bends are presented. Some of the observed patterns are classified by shock polar analysis, and a diagram of the transition boundaries between possible Mach reflection structures is constructed.

  13. Kinetic Solvers with Adaptive Mesh in Phase Space

    Arslanbekov, Robert R; Frolova, Anna A

    2013-01-01

    An Adaptive Mesh in Phase Space (AMPS) methodology has been developed for solving multi-dimensional kinetic equations by the discrete velocity method. A Cartesian mesh for both configuration (r) and velocity (v) spaces is produced using a tree of trees data structure. The mesh in r-space is automatically generated around embedded boundaries and dynamically adapted to local solution properties. The mesh in v-space is created on-the-fly for each cell in r-space. Mappings between neighboring v-space trees implemented for the advection operator in configuration space. We have developed new algorithms for solving the full Boltzmann and linear Boltzmann equations with AMPS. Several recent innovations were used to calculate the full Boltzmann collision integral with dynamically adaptive mesh in velocity space: importance sampling, multi-point projection method, and the variance reduction method. We have developed an efficient algorithm for calculating the linear Boltzmann collision integral for elastic and inelastic...

  14. Numerical modeling of seismic waves using frequency-adaptive meshes

    Hu, Jinyin; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2016-08-01

    An improved modeling algorithm using frequency-adaptive meshes is applied to meet the computational requirements of all seismic frequency components. It automatically adopts coarse meshes for low-frequency computations and fine meshes for high-frequency computations. The grid intervals are adaptively calculated based on a smooth inversely proportional function of grid size with respect to the frequency. In regular grid-based methods, the uniform mesh or non-uniform mesh is used for frequency-domain wave propagators and it is fixed for all frequencies. A too coarse mesh results in inaccurate high-frequency wavefields and unacceptable numerical dispersion; on the other hand, an overly fine mesh may cause storage and computational overburdens as well as invalid propagation angles of low-frequency wavefields. Experiments on the Padé generalized screen propagator indicate that the Adaptive mesh effectively solves these drawbacks of regular fixed-mesh methods, thus accurately computing the wavefield and its propagation angle in a wide frequency band. Several synthetic examples also demonstrate its feasibility for seismic modeling and migration.

  15. Adaptively-refined overlapping grids for the numerical solution of systems of hyperbolic conservation laws

    Brislawn, Kristi D.; Brown, David L.; Chesshire, Geoffrey S.; Saltzman, Jeffrey S.

    1995-01-01

    Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) in conjunction with higher-order upwind finite-difference methods have been used effectively on a variety of problems in two and three dimensions. In this paper we introduce an approach for resolving problems that involve complex geometries in which resolution of boundary geometry is important. The complex geometry is represented by using the method of overlapping grids, while local resolution is obtained by refining each component grid with the AMR algorithm, appropriately generalized for this situation. The CMPGRD algorithm introduced by Chesshire and Henshaw is used to automatically generate the overlapping grid structure for the underlying mesh.

  16. Dynamic mesh refinement for discrete models of jet electro-hydrodynamics

    Lauricella, Marco; Pisignano, Dario; Succi, Sauro

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, several models of unidimensional fluid jets exploit discrete element methods. In some cases, as for models aiming at describing the electrospinning nanofabrication process of polymer fibers, discrete element methods suffer a non constant resolution of the jet representation. We develop a dynamic mesh-refinement method for the numerical study of the electro-hydrodynamic behavior of charged jets using discrete element methods. To this purpose, we import ideas and techniques from the string method originally developed in the framework of free-energy landscape simulations. The mesh-refined discrete element method is demonstrated for the case of electrospinning applications.

  17. Some observations on mesh refinement schemes applied to shock wave phenomena

    Quirk, James J.

    1995-01-01

    This workshop's double-wedge test problem is taken from one of a sequence of experiments which were performed in order to classify the various canonical interactions between a planar shock wave and a double wedge. Therefore to build up a reasonably broad picture of the performance of our mesh refinement algorithm we have simulated three of these experiments and not just the workshop case. Here, using the results from these simulations together with their experimental counterparts, we make some general observations concerning the development of mesh refinement schemes for shock wave phenomena.

  18. Adaptive upscaling with the dual mesh method

    Guerillot, D.; Verdiere, S.

    1997-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate that upscaling should be calculated during the flow simulation instead of trying to enhance the a priori upscaling methods. Hence, counter-examples are given to motivate our approach, the so-called Dual Mesh Method. The main steps of this numerical algorithm are recalled. Applications illustrate the necessity to consider different average relative permeability values depending on the direction in space. Moreover, these values could be different for the same average saturation. This proves that an a priori upscaling cannot be the answer even in homogeneous cases because of the {open_quotes}dynamical heterogeneity{close_quotes} created by the saturation profile. Other examples show the efficiency of the Dual Mesh Method applied to heterogeneous medium and to an actual field case in South America.

  19. A Hybrid Advection Scheme for Conserving Angular Momentum on a Refined Cartesian Mesh

    Byerly, Zachary D; Tohline, Joel E; Marcello, Dominic C

    2014-01-01

    We test a new "hybrid" scheme for simulating dynamical fluid flows in which cylindrical components of the momentum are advected across a rotating Cartesian coordinate mesh. This hybrid scheme allows us to conserve angular momentum to machine precision while capitalizing on the advantages offered by a Cartesian mesh, such as a straightforward implementation of mesh refinement. Our test focuses on measuring the real and imaginary parts of the eigenfrequency of unstable axisymmetric modes that naturally arise in massless polytropic tori having a range of different aspect ratios, and quantifying the uncertainty in these measurements. Our measured eigenfrequencies show good agreement with the results obtained from the linear stability analysis of Kojima (1986) and from nonlinear hydrodynamic simulations performed on a cylindrical coordinate mesh by Woodward et al. (1994). When compared against results conducted with a traditional Cartesian advection scheme, the hybrid scheme achieves qualitative convergence at the...

  20. Dimensional reduction as a tool for mesh refinement and trackingsingularities of PDEs

    Stinis, Panagiotis

    2007-06-10

    We present a collection of algorithms which utilizedimensional reduction to perform mesh refinement and study possiblysingular solutions of time-dependent partial differential equations. Thealgorithms are inspired by constructions used in statistical mechanics toevaluate the properties of a system near a critical point. The firstalgorithm allows the accurate determination of the time of occurrence ofa possible singularity. The second algorithm is an adaptive meshrefinement scheme which can be used to approach efficiently the possiblesingularity. Finally, the third algorithm uses the second algorithm untilthe available resolution is exhausted (as we approach the possiblesingularity) and then switches to a dimensionally reduced model which,when accurate, can follow faithfully the solution beyond the time ofoccurrence of the purported singularity. An accurate dimensionallyreduced model should dissipate energy at the right rate. We construct twovariants of each algorithm. The first variant assumes that we have actualknowledge of the reduced model. The second variant assumes that we knowthe form of the reduced model, i.e., the terms appearing in the reducedmodel, but not necessarily their coefficients. In this case, we alsoprovide a way of determining the coefficients. We present numericalresults for the Burgers equation with zero and nonzero viscosity toillustrate the use of the algorithms.

  1. Tsunami modelling with adaptively refined finite volume methods

    LeVeque, R.J.; George, D.L.; Berger, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical modelling of transoceanic tsunami propagation, together with the detailed modelling of inundation of small-scale coastal regions, poses a number of algorithmic challenges. The depth-averaged shallow water equations can be used to reduce this to a time-dependent problem in two space dimensions, but even so it is crucial to use adaptive mesh refinement in order to efficiently handle the vast differences in spatial scales. This must be done in a 'wellbalanced' manner that accurately captures very small perturbations to the steady state of the ocean at rest. Inundation can be modelled by allowing cells to dynamically change from dry to wet, but this must also be done carefully near refinement boundaries. We discuss these issues in the context of Riemann-solver-based finite volume methods for tsunami modelling. Several examples are presented using the GeoClaw software, and sample codes are available to accompany the paper. The techniques discussed also apply to a variety of other geophysical flows. ?? 2011 Cambridge University Press.

  2. Automatic mesh adaptivity for CADIS and FW-CADIS neutronics modeling of difficult shielding problems

    The CADIS and FW-CADIS hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic techniques dramatically increase the efficiency of neutronics modeling, but their use in the accurate design analysis of very large and geometrically complex nuclear systems has been limited by the large number of processors and memory requirements for their preliminary deterministic calculations and final Monte Carlo calculation. Three mesh adaptivity algorithms were developed to reduce the memory requirements of CADIS and FW-CADIS without sacrificing their efficiency improvement. First, a macro-material approach enhances the fidelity of the deterministic models without changing the mesh. Second, a deterministic mesh refinement algorithm generates meshes that capture as much geometric detail as possible without exceeding a specified maximum number of mesh elements. Finally, a weight window coarsening algorithm de-couples the weight window mesh and energy bins from the mesh and energy group structure of the deterministic calculations in order to remove the memory constraint of the weight window map from the deterministic mesh resolution. The three algorithms were used to enhance an FW-CADIS calculation of the prompt dose rate throughout the ITER experimental facility. Using these algorithms resulted in a 23.3% increase in the number of mesh tally elements in which the dose rates were calculated in a 10-day Monte Carlo calculation and, additionally, increased the efficiency of the Monte Carlo simulation by a factor of at least 3.4. The three algorithms enabled this difficult calculation to be accurately solved using an FW-CADIS simulation on a regular computer cluster, obviating the need for a world-class super computer. (authors)

  3. Kinetic solvers with adaptive mesh in phase space.

    Arslanbekov, Robert R; Kolobov, Vladimir I; Frolova, Anna A

    2013-12-01

    An adaptive mesh in phase space (AMPS) methodology has been developed for solving multidimensional kinetic equations by the discrete velocity method. A Cartesian mesh for both configuration (r) and velocity (v) spaces is produced using a "tree of trees" (ToT) data structure. The r mesh is automatically generated around embedded boundaries, and is dynamically adapted to local solution properties. The v mesh is created on-the-fly in each r cell. Mappings between neighboring v-space trees is implemented for the advection operator in r space. We have developed algorithms for solving the full Boltzmann and linear Boltzmann equations with AMPS. Several recent innovations were used to calculate the discrete Boltzmann collision integral with dynamically adaptive v mesh: the importance sampling, multipoint projection, and variance reduction methods. We have developed an efficient algorithm for calculating the linear Boltzmann collision integral for elastic and inelastic collisions of hot light particles in a Lorentz gas. Our AMPS technique has been demonstrated for simulations of hypersonic rarefied gas flows, ion and electron kinetics in weakly ionized plasma, radiation and light-particle transport through thin films, and electron streaming in semiconductors. We have shown that AMPS allows minimizing the number of cells in phase space to reduce the computational cost and memory usage for solving challenging kinetic problems. PMID:24483578

  4. Kinetic solvers with adaptive mesh in phase space

    Arslanbekov, Robert R.; Kolobov, Vladimir I.; Frolova, Anna A.

    2013-12-01

    An adaptive mesh in phase space (AMPS) methodology has been developed for solving multidimensional kinetic equations by the discrete velocity method. A Cartesian mesh for both configuration (r) and velocity (v) spaces is produced using a “tree of trees” (ToT) data structure. The r mesh is automatically generated around embedded boundaries, and is dynamically adapted to local solution properties. The v mesh is created on-the-fly in each r cell. Mappings between neighboring v-space trees is implemented for the advection operator in r space. We have developed algorithms for solving the full Boltzmann and linear Boltzmann equations with AMPS. Several recent innovations were used to calculate the discrete Boltzmann collision integral with dynamically adaptive v mesh: the importance sampling, multipoint projection, and variance reduction methods. We have developed an efficient algorithm for calculating the linear Boltzmann collision integral for elastic and inelastic collisions of hot light particles in a Lorentz gas. Our AMPS technique has been demonstrated for simulations of hypersonic rarefied gas flows, ion and electron kinetics in weakly ionized plasma, radiation and light-particle transport through thin films, and electron streaming in semiconductors. We have shown that AMPS allows minimizing the number of cells in phase space to reduce the computational cost and memory usage for solving challenging kinetic problems.

  5. An adaptive p-refinement strategy applied to nodal expansion method in 3D Cartesian geometry

    Highlights: • An adaptive p-refinement approach is developed and implemented successfully in ACNEM. • The proposed strategy enhances the accuracy with regard to the uniform zeroth order solution. • Improvement of results is gained by less computation time relative to uniform high order solution. - Abstract: The aim of this work is to develop a coarse mesh treatment strategy using adaptive polynomial, p, refinement approach for average current nodal expansion method in order to solve the neutron diffusion equation. For performing the adaptive solution process, a posteriori error estimation scheme, i.e. flux gradient has been utilized for finding the probable numerical errors. The high net leakage in a node represents flux gradient existence between neighbor nodes and it may indicate the source of errors for the coarse mesh calculation. Therefore, the relative Cartesian directional net leakage of nodes is considered as an assessment criterion for mesh refinement in a sub-domain. In our proposed approach, the zeroth order nodal expansion solution is used along coarse meshes as large as fuel assemblies to treat neutron populations. Coarse nodes with high directional net leakage may be chosen for implementing higher order polynomial expansion in the corresponding direction, i.e. X and/or Y and/or Z Cartesian directions. Using this strategy, the computational cost and time are reduced relative to uniform high order polynomial solution. In order to demonstrate the efficiency of this approach, a computer program, APNEC, Adaptive P-refinement Nodal Expansion Code, has been developed for solving the neutron diffusion equation using various orders of average current nodal expansion method in 3D rectangular geometry. Some well-known benchmarks are investigated to compare the uniform and adaptive solutions. Results demonstrate the superiority of our proposed strategy in enhancing the accuracy of solution without using uniform high order solution throughout the domain and

  6. Optimality of multilevel preconditioners for local mesh refinement in three dimensions

    Aksoylu, Burak

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we establish optimality of the Bramble-Pasciak-Xu (BPX) norm equivalence and optimality of the wavelet modified (or stabilized) hierarchical basis (WHB) preconditioner in the setting of local 3D mesh refinement. In the analysis of WHB methods, a critical first step is to establish the optimality of BPX norm equivalence for the refinement procedures under consideration. While the available optimality results for the BPX norm have been constructed primarily in the setting of uniformly refined meshes, a notable exception is the local 2D red-green result due to Dahmen and Kunoth. The purpose of this article is to extend this original 2D optimality result to the local 3D red-green refinement procedure introduced by Bornemann-Erdmann-Kornhuber (BEK), and then to use this result to extend the WHB optimality results from the quasiuniform setting to local 2D and 3D red-green refinement scenarios. The BPX extension is reduced to establishing that locally enriched finite element subspaces allow for the ...

  7. Adaptive anisotropic meshing for steady convection-dominated problems

    Nguyen, Hoa [Tulane University; Gunzburger, Max [Florida State University; Ju, Lili [University of South Carolina; Burkardt, John [Florida State University

    2009-01-01

    Obtaining accurate solutions for convection–diffusion equations is challenging due to the presence of layers when convection dominates the diffusion. To solve this problem, we design an adaptive meshing algorithm which optimizes the alignment of anisotropic meshes with the numerical solution. Three main ingredients are used. First, the streamline upwind Petrov–Galerkin method is used to produce a stabilized solution. Second, an adapted metric tensor is computed from the approximate solution. Third, optimized anisotropic meshes are generated from the computed metric tensor by an anisotropic centroidal Voronoi tessellation algorithm. Our algorithm is tested on a variety of two-dimensional examples and the results shows that the algorithm is robust in detecting layers and efficient in avoiding non-physical oscillations in the numerical approximation.

  8. Dynamic mesh refinement for discrete models of jet electro-hydrodynamics

    Lauricella, Marco; Pontrelli, Giuseppe; Pisignano, Dario; Succi, Sauro

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, several models of unidimensional fluid jets exploit discrete element methods. In some cases, as for models aiming at describing the electrospinning nanofabrication process of polymer fibers, discrete element methods suffer a non constant resolution of the jet representation. We develop a dynamic mesh-refinement method for the numerical study of the electro-hydrodynamic behavior of charged jets using discrete element methods. To this purpose, we import ideas and techniques from the s...

  9. MECHANICAL DYNAMICS ANALYSIS OF PM GENERATOR USING H-ADAPTIVE REFINEMENT

    AJAY KUMAR; SANJAY MARWAHA; ANUPAMA MARWAHA

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the dynamic analysis of permanent magnet (PM) rotor generator using COMSOL Multiphysics, a Finite Element Analysis (FEA) based package and Simulink, a system simulation program. Model of PM rotor generator is developed for its mechanical dynamics and computational of torque resulting from magnetic force. For the model the mesh is constructed using first order Lagrange quadratic elements and h-adaptive refinement technique based upon bank bisection is used for improving ac...

  10. Mesh Refinement for Particle-In-Cell Plasma Simulations: Applications to - and benefits for - Heavy-Ion-Fusion

    The numerical simulation of the driving beams in a heavy ion fusion power plant is a challenging task, and simulation of the power plant as a whole, or even of the driver, is not yet possible. Despite the rapid progress in computer power, past and anticipated, one must consider the use of the most advanced numerical techniques, if we are to reach our goal expeditiously. One of the difficulties of these simulations resides in the disparity of scales, in time and in space, which must be resolved. When these disparities are in distinctive zones of the simulation region, a method which has proven to be effective in other areas (e.g., fluid dynamics simulations) is the mesh refinement technique. They discuss the challenges posed by the implementation of this technique into plasma simulations (due to the presence of particles and electromagnetic waves). They will present the prospects for and projected benefits of its application to heavy ion fusion. In particular to the simulation of the ion source and the final beam propagation in the chamber. A collaboration project is under way at LBNL between the Applied Numerical Algorithms Group (ANAG) and the HIF group to couple the Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) library (CHOMBO) developed by the ANAG group to the Particle-In-Cell accelerator code WARP developed by the HIF-VNL. They describe their progress and present their initial findings

  11. The Stratified Ocean Model with Adaptive Refinement (SOMAR)

    Santilli, Edward; Scotti, Alberto

    2015-06-01

    A computational framework for the evolution of non-hydrostatic, baroclinic flows encountered in regional and coastal ocean simulations is presented, which combines the flexibility of Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) with a suite of numerical tools specifically developed to deal with the high degree of anisotropy of oceanic flows and their attendant numerical challenges. This framework introduces a semi-implicit update of the terms that give rise to buoyancy oscillations, which permits a stable integration of the Navier-Stokes equations when a background density stratification is present. The lepticity of each grid in the AMR hierarchy, which serves as a useful metric for anisotropy, is used to select one of several different efficient Poisson-solving techniques. In this way, we compute the pressure over the entire set of AMR grids without resorting to the hydrostatic approximation, which can degrade the structure of internal waves whose dynamics may have large-scale significance. We apply the modeling framework to three test cases, for which numerical or analytical solutions are known that can be used to benchmark the results. In all the cases considered, the model achieves an excellent degree of congruence with the benchmark, while at the same time achieving a substantial reduction of the computational resources needed.

  12. Particle systems for adaptive, isotropic meshing of CAD models.

    Bronson, Jonathan R; Levine, Joshua A; Whitaker, Ross T

    2012-10-01

    We present a particle-based approach for generating adaptive triangular surface and tetrahedral volume meshes from computer-aided design models. Input shapes are treated as a collection of smooth, parametric surface patches that can meet non-smoothly on boundaries. Our approach uses a hierarchical sampling scheme that places particles on features in order of increasing dimensionality. These particles reach a good distribution by minimizing an energy computed in 3D world space, with movements occurring in the parametric space of each surface patch. Rather than using a pre-computed measure of feature size, our system automatically adapts to both curvature as well as a notion of topological separation. It also enforces a measure of smoothness on these constraints to construct a sizing field that acts as a proxy to piecewise-smooth feature size. We evaluate our technique with comparisons against other popular triangular meshing techniques for this domain. PMID:23162181

  13. Adaptive radial basis function mesh deformation using data reduction

    Gillebaart, T.; Blom, D. S.; van Zuijlen, A. H.; Bijl, H.

    2016-09-01

    Radial Basis Function (RBF) mesh deformation is one of the most robust mesh deformation methods available. Using the greedy (data reduction) method in combination with an explicit boundary correction, results in an efficient method as shown in literature. However, to ensure the method remains robust, two issues are addressed: 1) how to ensure that the set of control points remains an accurate representation of the geometry in time and 2) how to use/automate the explicit boundary correction, while ensuring a high mesh quality. In this paper, we propose an adaptive RBF mesh deformation method, which ensures the set of control points always represents the geometry/displacement up to a certain (user-specified) criteria, by keeping track of the boundary error throughout the simulation and re-selecting when needed. Opposed to the unit displacement and prescribed displacement selection methods, the adaptive method is more robust, user-independent and efficient, for the cases considered. Secondly, the analysis of a single high aspect ratio cell is used to formulate an equation for the correction radius needed, depending on the characteristics of the correction function used, maximum aspect ratio, minimum first cell height and boundary error. Based on the analysis two new radial basis correction functions are derived and proposed. This proposed automated procedure is verified while varying the correction function, Reynolds number (and thus first cell height and aspect ratio) and boundary error. Finally, the parallel efficiency is studied for the two adaptive methods, unit displacement and prescribed displacement for both the CPU as well as the memory formulation with a 2D oscillating and translating airfoil with oscillating flap, a 3D flexible locally deforming tube and deforming wind turbine blade. Generally, the memory formulation requires less work (due to the large amount of work required for evaluating RBF's), but the parallel efficiency reduces due to the limited

  14. White Dwarf Mergers on Adaptive Meshes I. Methodology and Code Verification

    Katz, Max P; Calder, Alan C; Swesty, F Douglas; Almgren, Ann S; Zhang, Weiqun

    2015-01-01

    The Type Ia supernova progenitor problem is one of the most perplexing and exciting problems in astrophysics, requiring detailed numerical modeling to complement observations of these explosions. One possible progenitor that has merited recent theoretical attention is the white dwarf merger scenario, which has the potential to naturally explain many of the observed characteristics of Type Ia supernovae. To date there have been relatively few self-consistent simulations of merging white dwarf systems using mesh-based hydrodynamics. This is the first paper in a series describing simulations of these systems using a hydrodynamics code with adaptive mesh refinement. In this paper we describe our numerical methodology and discuss our implementation in the compressible hydrodynamics code CASTRO, which solves the Euler equations, and the Poisson equation for self-gravity, and couples the gravitational and rotation forces to the hydrodynamics. Standard techniques for coupling gravitation and rotation forces to the hy...

  15. ROAMing terrain (Real-time Optimally Adapting Meshes)

    Duchaineau, M.; Wolinsky, M.; Sigeti, D.E.; Miller, M.C.; Aldrich, C.; Mineev, M.

    1997-07-01

    Terrain visualization is a difficult problem for applications requiring accurate images of large datasets at high frame rates, such as flight simulation and ground-based aircraft testing using synthetic sensor stimulation. On current graphics hardware, the problem is to maintain dynamic, view-dependent triangle meshes and texture maps that produce good images at the required frame rate. We present an algorithm for constructing triangle meshes that optimizes flexible view-dependent error metrics, produces guaranteed error bounds, achieves specified triangle counts directly, and uses frame-to-frame coherence to operate at high frame rates for thousands of triangles per frame. Our method, dubbed Real-time Optimally Adapting Meshes (ROAM), uses two priority queues to drive split and merge operations that maintain continuous triangulations built from pre-processed bintree triangles. We introduce two additional performance optimizations: incremental triangle stripping and priority-computation deferral lists. ROAM execution time is proportionate to the number of triangle changes per frame, which is typically a few percent of the output mesh size, hence ROAM performance is insensitive to the resolution and extent of the input terrain. Dynamic terrain and simple vertex morphing are supported.

  16. ADAPTIVE MODEL REFINEMENT FOR THE IONOSPHERE AND THERMOSPHERE

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ADAPTIVE MODEL REFINEMENT FOR THE IONOSPHERE AND THERMOSPHERE ANTHONY M. D’AMATO∗, AARON J. RIDLEY∗∗, AND DENNIS S. BERNSTEIN∗∗∗ Abstract. Mathematical models of...

  17. Adaptive mesh generation for image registration and segmentation

    Fogtmann, Mads; Larsen, Rasmus

    This paper deals with the problem of generating quality tetrahedral meshes for image registration. From an initial coarse mesh the approach matches the mesh to the image volume by combining red-green subdivision and mesh evolution through mesh-to-image matching regularized with a mesh quality...

  18. Comprehensive adaptive mesh refinement in wrinkling prediction analysis

    Selman, A.; Meinders, T.; Huetink, J.; Boogaard, van den, F.E.

    2002-01-01

    Discretisation errors indicator, contact free wrinkling and wrinkling with contact indicators are, in a challenging task, brought together and used in a comprehensive approach to wrinkling prediction analysis in thin sheet metal forming processes.

  19. Solution of linear systems in arterial fluid mechanics computations with boundary layer mesh refinement

    Manguoglu, Murat; Takizawa, Kenji; Sameh, Ahmed H.; Tezduyar, Tayfun E.

    2009-10-01

    Computation of incompressible flows in arterial fluid mechanics, especially because it involves fluid-structure interaction, poses significant numerical challenges. Iterative solution of the fluid mechanics part of the equation systems involved is one of those challenges, and we address that in this paper, with the added complication of having boundary layer mesh refinement with thin layers of elements near the arterial wall. As test case, we use matrix data from stabilized finite element computation of a bifurcating middle cerebral artery segment with aneurysm. It is well known that solving linear systems that arise in incompressible flow computations consume most of the time required by such simulations. For solving these large sparse nonsymmetric systems, we present effective preconditioning techniques appropriate for different stages of the computation over a cardiac cycle.

  20. Adjoint-based error estimation and mesh adaptation for the correction procedure via reconstruction method

    Shi, Lei; Wang, Z. J.

    2015-08-01

    Adjoint-based mesh adaptive methods are capable of distributing computational resources to areas which are important for predicting an engineering output. In this paper, we develop an adjoint-based h-adaptation approach based on the high-order correction procedure via reconstruction formulation (CPR) to minimize the output or functional error. A dual-consistent CPR formulation of hyperbolic conservation laws is developed and its dual consistency is analyzed. Super-convergent functional and error estimate for the output with the CPR method are obtained. Factors affecting the dual consistency, such as the solution point distribution, correction functions, boundary conditions and the discretization approach for the non-linear flux divergence term, are studied. The presented method is then used to perform simulations for the 2D Euler and Navier-Stokes equations with mesh adaptation driven by the adjoint-based error estimate. Several numerical examples demonstrate the ability of the presented method to dramatically reduce the computational cost comparing with uniform grid refinement.

  1. Polarizable Atomic Multipole X-Ray Refinement: Particle Mesh Ewald Electrostatics for Macromolecular Crystals.

    Schnieders, Michael J; Fenn, Timothy D; Pande, Vijay S

    2011-04-12

    Refinement of macromolecular models from X-ray crystallography experiments benefits from prior chemical knowledge at all resolutions. As the quality of the prior chemical knowledge from quantum or classical molecular physics improves, in principle so will resulting structural models. Due to limitations in computer performance and electrostatic algorithms, commonly used macromolecules X-ray crystallography refinement protocols have had limited support for rigorous molecular physics in the past. For example, electrostatics is often neglected in favor of nonbonded interactions based on a purely repulsive van der Waals potential. In this work we present advanced algorithms for desktop workstations that open the door to X-ray refinement of even the most challenging macromolecular data sets using state-of-the-art classical molecular physics. First we describe theory for particle mesh Ewald (PME) summation that consistently handles the symmetry of all 230 space groups, replicates of the unit cell such that the minimum image convention can be used with a real space cutoff of any size and the combination of space group symmetry with replicates. An implementation of symmetry accelerated PME for the polarizable atomic multipole optimized energetics for biomolecular applications (AMOEBA) force field is presented. Relative to a single CPU core performing calculations on a P1 unit cell, our AMOEBA engine called Force Field X (FFX) accelerates energy evaluations by more than a factor of 24 on an 8-core workstation with a Tesla GPU coprocessor for 30 structures that contain 240 000 atoms on average in the unit cell. The benefit of AMOEBA electrostatics evaluated with PME for macromolecular X-ray crystallography refinement is demonstrated via rerefinement of 10 crystallographic data sets that range in resolution from 1.7 to 4.5 Å. Beginning from structures obtained by local optimization without electrostatics, further optimization using AMOEBA with PME electrostatics improved

  2. Improving Tropical Cyclone Track and Intensity in a Global Model with Local Mesh Refinement

    Zarzycki, C. M.; Jablonowski, C.

    2014-12-01

    Even with recent improvements in general circulation model (GCM) resolution, tropical cyclones (TCs) are typically underresolved, resulting in fewer or weaker storms than observed. In an effort to alleviate these issues, the use of limited area models (LAMs) allowing for higher resolutions has become popular. However, LAMs require lateral boundary conditions and typically lack two-way communication with the exterior domain. Variable-resolution GCMs can serve as the bridge between traditional global models and high-resolution LAMs. These models can reach 10 km or finer resolution in low-latitude ocean basins where TCs are prevalent. They do so while maintaining global continuity, therefore eliminating the need for externally-forced and possibly numerically and physically inconsistent boundary conditions required by LAMs. Recent developments allow the Community Atmosphere Model's (CAM) Spectral Element (SE) dynamical core to be run on unstructured, statically-nested, variable-resolution grids. We present deterministic CAM-SE model simulations of TCs during recent summers and compare the model's prediction of storm track and intensity to other global and regional models as well as observations. The simulations are run on a 55 km global cubed-sphere grid with additional refinement to 13 km over the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific Oceans. Forecasts are integrated for eight days and the period of analysis spans three months (August, September, and October) during 2012 and 2013. We compare these simulations to identically initialized model runs without mesh refinement to demonstrate the impact of high resolution on TC behavior in CAM. We also investigate cyclone genesis and whether locally high resolution in a global model leads to improved forecast skill at longer lead times. In addition, the impact of the localized refined patch on the remainder of the coarser global solution during the simulation period is discussed.

  3. THE PLUTO CODE FOR ADAPTIVE MESH COMPUTATIONS IN ASTROPHYSICAL FLUID DYNAMICS

    We present a description of the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) implementation of the PLUTO code for solving the equations of classical and special relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD and RMHD). The current release exploits, in addition to the static grid version of the code, the distributed infrastructure of the CHOMBO library for multidimensional parallel computations over block-structured, adaptively refined grids. We employ a conservative finite-volume approach where primary flow quantities are discretized at the cell center in a dimensionally unsplit fashion using the Corner Transport Upwind method. Time stepping relies on a characteristic tracing step where piecewise parabolic method, weighted essentially non-oscillatory, or slope-limited linear interpolation schemes can be handily adopted. A characteristic decomposition-free version of the scheme is also illustrated. The solenoidal condition of the magnetic field is enforced by augmenting the equations with a generalized Lagrange multiplier providing propagation and damping of divergence errors through a mixed hyperbolic/parabolic explicit cleaning step. Among the novel features, we describe an extension of the scheme to include non-ideal dissipative processes, such as viscosity, resistivity, and anisotropic thermal conduction without operator splitting. Finally, we illustrate an efficient treatment of point-local, potentially stiff source terms over hierarchical nested grids by taking advantage of the adaptivity in time. Several multidimensional benchmarks and applications to problems of astrophysical relevance assess the potentiality of the AMR version of PLUTO in resolving flow features separated by large spatial and temporal disparities.

  4. The Geometry of r-adaptive meshes generated using Optimal Transport Methods

    C. J. Budd; Russell, R. D.; Walsh, E.

    2014-01-01

    The principles of mesh equidistribution and alignment play a fundamental role in the design of adaptive methods, and a metric tensor M and mesh metric are useful theoretical tools for understanding a methods level of mesh alignment, or anisotropy. We consider a mesh redistribution method based on the Monge-Ampere equation, which combines equidistribution of a given scalar density function with optimal transport. It does not involve explicit use of a metric tensor M, although such a tensor mus...

  5. LOAD AWARE ADAPTIVE BACKBONE SYNTHESIS IN WIRELESS MESH NETWORKS

    Yuan Yuan; Zheng Baoyu

    2009-01-01

    Wireless Mesh Networks (WMNs) are envisioned to support the wired backbone with a wireless Backbone Networks (BNet) for providing internet connectivity to large-scale areas.With a wide range of internet-oriented applications with different Quality of Service (QoS) requirement,the large-scale WMNs should have good scalability and large bandwidth.In this paper,a Load Aware Adaptive Backbone Synthesis (LAABS) algorithm is proposed to automatically balance the traffic flow in the WMNs.The BNet will dynamically split into smaller size or merge into bigger one according to statistic load information of Backbone Nodes (BNs).Simulation results show LAABS generates moderate BNet size and converges quickly,thus providing scalable and stable BNet to facilitate traffic flow.

  6. Problem-adapted mesh generation with FEM-features

    Werner, Horst; Weber, Christian; Schilke, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Today automatic meshing of CAD geometry is the most common method of FEM mesh generation. However, to get results of acceptable accuracy with universal meshing algorithms it is necessary to use rather small-sized elements which leads to high memory and CPU time consumption. Furthermore, the irregularity of automatically generatated meshes makes it difficult to create well-defined local areas with different material properties. A solution for this problem is the application of predefined build...

  7. A trigonal nodal SP3 method with mesh refinement capabilities - Development and verification

    The neutronics model of the nodal reactor dynamics code DYN3D developed for 3D analyses of steady states and transients in Light-Water Reactors has been extended by a simplified P3 (SP3) neutron transport option - to overcome the limitations of the diffusion approach at regions with significant anisotropy effects. To provide a method being applicable to reactors with hexagonal fuel assemblies and to furthermore allow flexible mesh refinement, the nodal SP3 method has been developed on the basis of a flux expansion in triangular-z geometry. In this paper, the derivation of the trigonal SP3 method is presented in a condensed form and a verification of the methodology on quasi-pin level is performed by means of two single-assembly test examples. The corresponding pin-wise few-group cross sections were obtained by the deterministic lattice code HELIOS. The power distributions were calculated using both the trigonal DYN3D diffusion and SP3 solver and compared to the HELIOS reference solutions. Close to regions with non-negligible flux gradients, e.g., caused by the presence of a strong absorbing material, the power distribution calculated by DYN3D-SP3 shows a significant improvement in comparison to the diffusion method. (authors)

  8. Numerical relativity simulations of neutron star merger remnants using conservative mesh refinement

    Dietrich, Tim; Ujevic, Maximiliano; Bruegmann, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    We study equal and unequal-mass neutron star mergers by means of new numerical relativity simulations in which the general relativistic hydrodynamics solver employs an algorithm that guarantees mass conservation across the refinement levels of the computational mesh. We consider eight binary configurations with total mass $M=2.7\\,M_\\odot$, mass-ratios $q=1$ and $q=1.16$, and four different equation of states (EOSs), and one configuration with a stiff EOS, $M=2.5M_\\odot$ and $q=1.5$. We focus on the post-merger dynamics and study the merger remnant, dynamical ejecta and the postmerger gravitational wave spectrum. Although most of the merger remnants form a hypermassive neutron star collapsing to a black hole+disk system on dynamical timescales, stiff EOSs can eventually produce a stable massive neutron star. Ejecta are mostly emitted around the orbital plane; favored by large mass ratios and softer EOS. The postmerger wave spectrum is mainly characterized by non-axisymmetric oscillations of the remnant. The st...

  9. Goal based mesh adaptivity for fixed source radiation transport calculations

    Highlights: ► Derives an anisotropic goal based error measure for shielding problems. ► Reduces the error in the detector response by optimizing the finite element mesh. ► Anisotropic adaptivity captures material interfaces using fewer elements than AMR. ► A new residual based on the numerical scheme chosen forms the error measure. ► The error measure also combines the forward and adjoint metrics in a novel way. - Abstract: In this paper, the application of goal based error measures for anisotropic adaptivity applied to shielding problems in which a detector is present is explored. Goal based adaptivity is important when the response of a detector is required to ensure that dose limits are adhered to. To achieve this, a dual (adjoint) problem is solved which solves the neutron transport equation in terms of the response variables, in this case the detector response. The methods presented can be applied to general finite element solvers, however, the derivation of the residuals are dependent on the underlying finite element scheme which is also discussed in this paper. Once error metrics for the forward and adjoint solutions have been formed they are combined using a novel approach. The two metrics are combined by forming the minimum ellipsoid that covers both the error metrics rather than taking the maximum ellipsoid that is contained within the metrics. Another novel approach used within this paper is the construction of the residual. The residual, used to form the goal based error metrics, is calculated from the subgrid scale correction which is inherent in the underlying spatial discretisation employed

  10. Three-dimensional modeling and highly refined mesh generation of the aorta artery and its tunics

    This paper describes strategies and techniques to perform modeling and automatic mesh generation of the aorta artery and its tunics (adventitia, media and intima walls), using open source codes. The models were constructed in the Blender package and Python scripts were used to export the data necessary for the mesh generation in TetGen. The strategies proposed are able to provide meshes of complicated and irregular volumes, with a large number of mesh elements involved (12,000,000 tetrahedrons approximately). These meshes can be used to perform computational simulations by Finite Element Method (FEM).

  11. Algebraic turbulence modeling for unstructured and adaptive meshes

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1990-01-01

    An algebraic turbulence model based on the Baldwin-Lomax model, has been implemented for use on unstructured grids. The implementation is based on the use of local background structured turbulence meshes. At each time-step, flow variables are interpolated from the unstructured mesh onto the background structured meshes, the turbulence model is executed on these meshes, and the resulting eddy viscosity values are interpolated back to the unstructured mesh. Modifications to the algebraic model were required to enable the treatment of more complicated flows, such as confluent boundary layers and wakes. The model is used in conjuction with an efficient unstructured multigrid finite-element Navier-Stokes solver in order to compute compressible turbulent flows on fully unstructured meshes. Solutions about single and multiple element airfoils are obtained and compared with experimental data.

  12. h-Adaptive Mesh Generation using Electric Field Intensity Value as a Criterion (in Japanese)

    Toyonaga, Kiyomi; Cingoski, Vlatko; Kaneda, Kazufumi; Yamashita, Hideo

    1994-01-01

    Finite mesh divisions are essential to obtain accurate solution of two dimensional electric field analysis. It requires the technical knowledge to generate a suitable fine mesh divisions. In electric field problem, analysts are usually interested in the electric field intensity and its distribution. In order to obtain electric field intensity with high-accuracy, we have developed and adaptive mesh generator using electric field intensity value as a criterion.

  13. Optimal panel-clustering in the presence of anisotropic mesh refinement

    Graham, I.G.; Grasedyck, L; Hackbusch, W.; Sauter, S.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we consider the numerical solution of discrete boundary integral equations on polyhedral surfaces in three dimensions. When the solution contains typical edge singularities, highly stretched meshes are preferred to uniform meshes, since they reduce the number of degrees of freedom needed to obtain a fixed accuracy. The classical panel-clustering method can still be applied in the presence of such highly stretched meshes. However, we will show that the savings in computation time...

  14. A spatially adaptive grid-refinement approach for the finite element solution of the even-parity Boltzmann transport equation

    A spatially adaptive grid-refinement approach has been investigated to solve the even-parity Boltzmann transport equation. A residual based a posteriori error estimation scheme has been utilized for checking the approximate solutions for various finite element grids. The local particle balance has been considered as an error assessment criterion. To implement the adaptive approach, a computer program ADAFENT (adaptive finite elements for neutron transport) has been developed to solve the second order even-parity Boltzmann transport equation using K+ variational principle for slab geometry. The program has a core K+ module which employs Lagrange polynomials as spatial basis functions for the finite element formulation and Legendre polynomials for the directional dependence of the solution. The core module is called in by the adaptive grid generator to determine local gradients and residuals to explore the possibility of grid refinements in appropriate regions of the problem. The a posteriori error estimation scheme has been implemented in the outer grid refining iteration module. Numerical experiments indicate that local errors are large in regions where the flux gradients are large. A comparison of the spatially adaptive grid-refinement approach with that of uniform meshing approach for various benchmark cases confirms its superiority in greatly enhancing the accuracy of the solution without increasing the number of unknown coefficients. A reduction in the local errors of the order of 102 has been achieved using the new approach in some cases

  15. MECHANICAL DYNAMICS ANALYSIS OF PM GENERATOR USING H-ADAPTIVE REFINEMENT

    AJAY KUMAR

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the dynamic analysis of permanent magnet (PM rotor generator using COMSOL Multiphysics, a Finite Element Analysis (FEA based package and Simulink, a system simulation program. Model of PM rotor generator is developed for its mechanical dynamics and computational of torque resulting from magnetic force. For the model the mesh is constructed using first order Lagrange quadratic elements and h-adaptive refinement technique based upon bank bisection is used for improving accuracy of the model. Effect of rotor moment of inertia (MI on the winding resistance and winding inductance has been studied by using Simulink. It is shown that the system MI has a significant effect on optimal winding resistance and inductance to achieve steady state operation in shortest period of time.

  16. The GeoClaw software for depth-averaged flows with adaptive refinement

    Berger, Marsha J.; George, David L.; LeVeque, Randall J.; Mandli, Kyle T.

    2011-09-01

    Many geophysical flow or wave propagation problems can be modeled with two-dimensional depth-averaged equations, of which the shallow water equations are the simplest example. We describe the GeoClaw software that has been designed to solve problems of this nature, consisting of open source Fortran programs together with Python tools for the user interface and flow visualization. This software uses high-resolution shock-capturing finite volume methods on logically rectangular grids, including latitude-longitude grids on the sphere. Dry states are handled automatically to model inundation. The code incorporates adaptive mesh refinement to allow the efficient solution of large-scale geophysical problems. Examples are given illustrating its use for modeling tsunamis and dam-break flooding problems. Documentation and download information is available at www.clawpack.org/geoclaw.

  17. The GeoClaw software for depth-averaged flows with adaptive refinement

    Berger, Marsha J; LeVeque, Randall J; Mandli, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    Many geophysical flow or wave propagation problems can be modeled with two-dimensional depth-averaged equations, of which the shallow water equations are the simplest example. We describe the GeoClaw software that has been designed to solve problems of this nature, consisting of open source Fortran programs together with Python tools for the user interface and flow visualization. This software uses high-resolution shock-capturing finite volume methods on logically rectangular grids, including latitude--longitude grids on the sphere. Dry states are handled automatically to model inundation. The code incorporates adaptive mesh refinement to allow the efficient solution of large-scale geophysical problems. Examples are given illustrating its use for modeling tsunamis, dam break problems, and storm surge. Documentation and download information is available at www.clawpack.org/geoclaw

  18. A zoomable and adaptable hidden fine-mesh approach to solving advection-dispersion equations

    A zoomable and adaptable hidden fine-mesh approach (ZAHFMA), that can be used with either finite element or finite difference methods, is proposed to solve the advection-dispersion equation. The approach is based on automatic adaptation of zooming a hidden fine-mesh in the place where the sharp front locates. Preliminary results indicate that ZAHFMA used with finite element methods can handle the advection-dispersion problems with Peclet number ranging from 0 to ∞. 5 refs., 2 figs

  19. Dynamic Mesh Adaptation for Front Evolution Using Discontinuous Galerkin Based Weighted Condition Number Mesh Relaxation

    Greene, Patrick T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schofield, Samuel P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nourgaliev, Robert [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-06-21

    A new mesh smoothing method designed to cluster mesh cells near a dynamically evolving interface is presented. The method is based on weighted condition number mesh relaxation with the weight function being computed from a level set representation of the interface. The weight function is expressed as a Taylor series based discontinuous Galerkin projection, which makes the computation of the derivatives of the weight function needed during the condition number optimization process a trivial matter. For cases when a level set is not available, a fast method for generating a low-order level set from discrete cell-centered elds, such as a volume fraction or index function, is provided. Results show that the low-order level set works equally well for the weight function as the actual level set. Meshes generated for a number of interface geometries are presented, including cases with multiple level sets. Dynamic cases for moving interfaces are presented to demonstrate the method's potential usefulness to arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) methods.

  20. Geometrically Consistent Mesh Modification

    Bonito, A.

    2010-01-01

    A new paradigm of adaptivity is to execute refinement, coarsening, and smoothing of meshes on manifolds with incomplete information about their geometry and yet preserve position and curvature accuracy. We refer to this collectively as geometrically consistent (GC) mesh modification. We discuss the concept of discrete GC, show the failure of naive approaches, and propose and analyze a simple algorithm that is GC and accuracy preserving. © 2010 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  1. A new multiscale air quality transport model (Fluidity, 4.1.9) using fully unstructured anisotropic adaptive mesh technology

    Zheng, J.; Zhu, J.; Wang, Z.; Fang, F.; Pain, C. C.; Xiang, J.

    2015-06-01

    A new anisotropic hr-adaptive mesh technique has been applied to modelling of multiscale transport phenomena, which is based on a discontinuous Galerkin/control volume discretization on unstructured meshes. Over existing air quality models typically based on static-structured grids using a locally nesting technique, the advantage of the anisotropic hr-adaptive model has the ability to adapt the mesh according to the evolving pollutant distribution and flow features. That is, the mesh resolution can be adjusted dynamically to simulate the pollutant transport process accurately and effectively. To illustrate the capability of the anisotropic adaptive unstructured mesh model, three benchmark numerical experiments have been setup for two-dimensional (2-D) transport phenomena. Comparisons have been made between the results obtained using uniform resolution meshes and anisotropic adaptive resolution meshes.

  2. Geostrophic balance preserving interpolation in mesh adaptive shallow-water ocean modelling

    Maddison, James R; Farrell, Patrick E

    2010-01-01

    The accurate representation of geostrophic balance is an essential requirement for numerical modelling of geophysical flows. Significant effort is often put into the selection of accurate or optimal balance representation by the discretisation of the fundamental equations. The issue of accurate balance representation is particularly challenging when applying dynamic mesh adaptivity, where there is potential for additional imbalance injection when interpolating to new, optimised meshes. In the context of shallow-water modelling, we present a new method for preservation of geostrophic balance when applying dynamic mesh adaptivity. This approach is based upon interpolation of the Helmholtz decomposition of the Coriolis acceleration. We apply this in combination with a discretisation for which states in geostrophic balance are exactly steady solutions of the linearised equations on an f-plane; this method guarantees that a balanced and steady flow on a donor mesh remains balanced and steady after interpolation on...

  3. Computations of Aerodynamic Performance Databases Using Output-Based Refinement

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Handle complex geometry problems; Control discretization errors via solution-adaptive mesh refinement; Focus on aerodynamic databases of parametric and optimization studies: 1. Accuracy: satisfy prescribed error bounds 2. Robustness and speed: may require over 105 mesh generations 3. Automation: avoid user supervision Obtain "expert meshes" independent of user skill; and Run every case adaptively in production settings.

  4. METHOD FOR ADAPTIVE MESH GENERATION BASED ON GEOMETRICAL FEATURES OF 3D SOLID

    HUANG Xiaodong; DU Qungui; YE Bangyan

    2006-01-01

    In order to provide a guidance to specify the element size dynamically during adaptive finite element mesh generation, adaptive criteria are firstly defined according to the relationships between the geometrical features and the elements of 3D solid. Various modes based on different datum geometrical elements, such as vertex, curve, surface, and so on, are then designed for generating local refmed mesh. With the guidance of the defined criteria, different modes are automatically selected to apply on the appropriate datum objects to program the element size in the local special areas. As a result, the control information of element size is successfully programmed coveting the entire domain based on the geometrical features of 3D solid. A new algorithm based on Delaunay triangulation is then developed for generating 3D adaptive fmite element mesh, in which the element size is dynamically specified to catch the geometrical features and suitable tetrahedron facets are selected to locate interior nodes continuously. As a result, adaptive mesh with good-quality elements is generated. Examples show that the proposed method can be successfully applied to adaptive finite element mesh automatic generation based on the geometrical features of 3D solid.

  5. Performance Evaluation of Various STL File Mesh Refining Algorithms Applied for FDM-RP Process

    Ledalla, Siva Rama Krishna; Tirupathi, Balaji; Sriram, Venkatesh

    2016-06-01

    Layered manufacturing machines use the stereolithography (STL) file to build parts. When a curved surface is converted from a computer aided design (CAD) file to STL, it results in a geometrical distortion and chordal error. Parts manufactured with this file, might not satisfy geometric dimensioning and tolerance requirements due to approximated geometry. Current algorithms built in CAD packages have export options to globally reduce this distortion, which leads to an increase in the file size and pre-processing time. In this work, different mesh subdivision algorithms are applied on STL file of a complex geometric features using MeshLab software. The mesh subdivision algorithms considered in this work are modified butterfly subdivision technique, loops sub division technique and general triangular midpoint sub division technique. A comparative study is made with respect to volume and the build time using the above techniques. It is found that triangular midpoint sub division algorithm is more suitable for the geometry under consideration. Only the wheel cap part is then manufactured on Stratasys MOJO FDM machine. The surface roughness of the part is measured on Talysurf surface roughness tester.

  6. Adaptive scheduling in cellular access, wireless mesh and IP networks

    Nieminen, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    Networking scenarios in the future will be complex and will include fixed networks and hybrid Fourth Generation (4G) networks, consisting of both infrastructure-based and infrastructureless, wireless parts. In such scenarios, adaptive provisioning and management of network resources becomes of critical importance. Adaptive mechanisms are desirable since they enable a self-configurable network that is able to adjust itself to varying traffic and channel conditions. The operation of adaptive me...

  7. Using Multi-threading for the Automatic Load Balancing of 2D Adaptive Finite Element Meshes

    Heber, Gerd; Biswas, Rupak; Thulasiraman, Parimala; Gao, Guang R.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we present a multi-threaded approach for the automatic load balancing of adaptive finite element (FE) meshes The platform of our choice is the EARTH multi-threaded system which offers sufficient capabilities to tackle this problem. We implement the adaption phase of FE applications oil triangular meshes and exploit the EARTH token mechanism to automatically balance the resulting irregular and highly nonuniform workload. We discuss the results of our experiments oil EARTH-SP2, on implementation of EARTH on the IBM SP2 with different load balancing strategies that are built into the runtime system.

  8. On a Bisection Algorithm that Produces Conforming Locally Refined Simplicial Meshes

    Hannukainen, A.; Korotov, S.; Křížek, Michal

    Berlin : Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, 2008 - (Lirkov, I.; Margenov, S.; Waśniewski, J.), s. 571-579 ISBN 978-3-540-78825-6. ISSN 0302-9743. [LSSC 2007. International Conference on Large-Scale Scientific Computations /6./. Sozopol (BG), 05.06.2007-09.06.2007] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA100190803 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : finite element method * mesh density function * convergence Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  9. Finite element model for linear-elastic mixed mode loading using adaptive mesh strategy

    2008-01-01

    An adaptive mesh finite element model has been developed to predict the crack propagation direction as well as to calculate the stress intensity factors (SIFs), under linear-elastic assumption for mixed mode loading application. The finite element mesh is generated using the advancing front method. In order to suit the requirements of the fracture analysis, the generation of the background mesh and the construction of singular elements have been added to the developed program. The adaptive remeshing process is carried out based on the posteriori stress error norm scheme to obtain an optimal mesh. Previous works of the authors have proposed techniques for adaptive mesh generation of 2D cracked models. Facilitated by the singular elements, the displacement extrapolation technique is employed to calculate the SIF. The fracture is modeled by the splitting node approach and the trajectory follows the successive linear extensions of each crack increment. The SIFs values for two different case studies were estimated and validated by direct comparisons with other researchers work.

  10. Adaptive local refinement and multi-level methods for simulating multiphasic flows

    This thesis describes some numerical and mathematical aspects of incompressible multiphase flows simulations with a diffuse interface Cahn-Hilliard / Navier-Stokes model (interfaces have a small but a positive thickness). The space discretization is performed thanks to a Galerkin formulation and the finite elements method. The presence of different scales in the system (interfaces have a very small thickness compared to the characteristic lengths of the domain) suggests the use of a local adaptive refinement method. The algorithm that is introduced allows to implicitly handle the non-conformities of the generated meshes to produce conformal finite elements approximation spaces. It consists in refining basis functions instead of cells. The refinement of a basis function is made possible by the conceptual existence of a nested sequence of uniformly refined grids from which 'parent-child' relationships are deduced, linking the basis functions of two consecutive refinement levels. Moreover, it is shown how this method can be exploited to build multigrid pre-conditioners. From a composite finite elements approximation space, it is indeed possible to rebuild, by 'coarsening', a sequence of auxiliary nested spaces which allows to enter in the abstract multigrid framework. Concerning the time discretization, it begins with the study of the Cahn-Hilliard system. A semi-implicit scheme is proposed to remedy to convergence failures of the Newton method used to solve this (non linear) system. It guarantees the decrease of the discrete free energy ensuring the stability of the scheme. The existence and convergence of discrete solutions towards the weak solution of the system are shown. The study continues with providing an unconditionally stable time discretization of the complete Cahn-Hilliard / Navier-Stokes model. An important point is that this discretization does not strongly couple the Cahn-Hilliard and Navier-Stokes systems allowing to independently solve the two systems

  11. Black hole head-on collisions and gravitational waves with fixed mesh-refinement and dynamic singularity excision

    We present long-term-stable and convergent evolutions of head-on black-hole collisions and extraction of gravitational waves generated during the merger and subsequent ring-down. The new ingredients in this work are the use of fixed mesh-refinement and dynamical singularity excision techniques. We are able to carry out head-on collisions with large initial separations and demonstrate that our excision infrastructure is capable of accommodating the motion of the individual black holes across the computational domain as well as their merger. We extract gravitational waves from these simulations using the Zerilli-Moncrief formalism and find the ring-down radiation to be, as expected, dominated by the l=2, m=0 quasinormal mode. The total radiated energy is about 0.1% of the total Arnowitt-Deser-Misner mass of the system

  12. A dynamic mesh refinement technique for Lattice Boltzmann simulations on octree-like grids

    Neumann, Philipp

    2012-04-27

    In this contribution, we present our new adaptive Lattice Boltzmann implementation within the Peano framework, with special focus on nanoscale particle transport problems. With the continuum hypothesis not holding anymore on these small scales, new physical effects - such as Brownian fluctuations - need to be incorporated. We explain the overall layout of the application, including memory layout and access, and shortly review the adaptive algorithm. The scheme is validated by different benchmark computations in two and three dimensions. An extension to dynamically changing grids and a spatially adaptive approach to fluctuating hydrodynamics, allowing for the thermalisation of the fluid in particular regions of interest, is proposed. Both dynamic adaptivity and adaptive fluctuating hydrodynamics are validated separately in simulations of particle transport problems. The application of this scheme to an oscillating particle in a nanopore illustrates the importance of Brownian fluctuations in such setups. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  13. STABILIZED FEM FOR CONVECTION-DIFFUSION PROBLEMS ON LAYER-ADAPTED MESHES

    Hans-G(o)rg Roos

    2009-01-01

    The application of a standard Galerkin finite element method for convection-diflusion problems leads to oscillations in the discrete solution,therefore stabilization seems to be necessary.We discuss several recent stabilization methods,especially its combination with a Galerkin method on layer-adapted meshes.Supercloseness results obtained allow an improvement of the discrete solution using recovery techniques.

  14. 3D Simulation of Flow with Free Surface Based on Adaptive Octree Mesh System

    Li Shaowu; Zhuang Qian; Huang Xiaoyun; Wang Dong

    2015-01-01

    The technique of adaptive tree mesh is an effective way to reduce computational cost through automatic adjustment of cell size according to necessity. In the present study, the 2D numerical N-S solver based on the adaptive quadtree mesh system was extended to a 3D one, in which a spatially adaptive octree mesh system and multiple parti-cle level set method were adopted for the convenience to deal with the air-water-structure multiple-medium coexisting domain. The stretching process of a dumbbell was simulated and the results indicate that the meshes are well adaptable to the free surface. The collapsing process of water column impinging a circle cylinder was simulated and from the results, it can be seen that the processes of fluid splitting and merging are properly simulated. The interaction of sec-ond-order Stokes waves with a square cylinder was simulated and the obtained drag force is consistent with the result by the Morison’s wave force formula with the coefficient values of the stable drag component and the inertial force component being set as 2.54.

  15. Towards a large-scale scalable adaptive heart model using shallow tree meshes

    Krause, Dorian; Dickopf, Thomas; Potse, Mark; Krause, Rolf

    2015-10-01

    Electrophysiological heart models are sophisticated computational tools that place high demands on the computing hardware due to the high spatial resolution required to capture the steep depolarization front. To address this challenge, we present a novel adaptive scheme for resolving the deporalization front accurately using adaptivity in space. Our adaptive scheme is based on locally structured meshes. These tensor meshes in space are organized in a parallel forest of trees, which allows us to resolve complicated geometries and to realize high variations in the local mesh sizes with a minimal memory footprint in the adaptive scheme. We discuss both a non-conforming mortar element approximation and a conforming finite element space and present an efficient technique for the assembly of the respective stiffness matrices using matrix representations of the inclusion operators into the product space on the so-called shallow tree meshes. We analyzed the parallel performance and scalability for a two-dimensional ventricle slice as well as for a full large-scale heart model. Our results demonstrate that the method has good performance and high accuracy.

  16. The geometry of r-adaptive meshes generated using optimal transport methods

    Budd, C. J.; Russell, R. D.; Walsh, E.

    2015-02-01

    The principles of mesh equidistribution and alignment play a fundamental role in the design of adaptive methods, and a metric tensor and mesh metric are useful theoretical tools for understanding a method's level of mesh alignment, or anisotropy. We consider a mesh redistribution method based on the Monge-Ampère equation which combines equidistribution of a given scalar density function with optimal transport. It does not involve explicit use of a metric tensor, although such a tensor must exist for the method, and an interesting question to ask is whether or not the alignment produced by the metric gives an anisotropic mesh. For model problems with a linear feature and with a radially symmetric feature, we derive the exact form of the metric, which involves expressions for its eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The eigenvectors are shown to be orthogonal and tangential to the feature, and the ratio of the eigenvalues (corresponding to the level of anisotropy) is shown to depend, both locally and globally, on the value of the density function and the amount of curvature. We thereby demonstrate how the optimal transport method produces an anisotropic mesh along a given feature while equidistributing a suitably chosen scalar density function. Numerical results are given to verify these results and to demonstrate how the analysis is useful for problems involving more complex features, including for a non-trivial time dependant nonlinear PDE which evolves narrow and curved reaction fronts.

  17. Multi-scale mesh saliency with local adaptive patches for viewpoint selection

    Nouri, Anass; Charrier, Christophe; Lézoray, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    International audience Our visual attention is attracted by specific areas into 3D objects (represented by meshes). This visual attention depends on the degree of saliency exposed by these areas. In this paper, we propose a novel multi-scale approach for detecting salient regions. To do so, we define a local surface descriptor based on patches of adaptive size and filled in with a local height field. The single-scale saliency of a vertex is defined as its degree measure in the mesh with ed...

  18. Essentials of finite element modeling and adaptive refinement

    Dow, John O

    2012-01-01

    Finite Element Analysis is a very popular, computer-based tool that uses a complex system of points called nodes to make a grid called a ""mesh. "" The mesh contains the material and structural properties that define how the structure will react to certain loading conditions, allowing virtual testing and analysis of stresses or changes applied to the material or component design. This groundbreaking text extends the usefulness of finite element analysis by helping both beginners and advanced users alike. It simplifies, improves, and extends both the finite element method while at the same t

  19. Influence of reaction kinetics and mesh refinement on the numerical modelling of concrete/clay interactions

    Marty, Nicolas C. M.; Tournassat, Christophe; Burnol, André; Giffaut, Eric; Gaucher, Eric C.

    2009-01-01

    SummaryLarge quantities of cements and concretes need to be incorporated in geological disposal facilities for long-lived radwaste. An alkaline plume diffusing from an aged concrete (pH ˜ 12.5) through argillite-type rocks has been modelled considering feedback of porosity value variations on transport properties using the reactive transport code TOUGHREACT. The mineralogical composition of the argillite is modified at the interface with the concrete. Diffusion of cementitious elements leads to rapid and strong porosity occlusion in the argillite. Numerical results show that both reaction rates and spatial refinement affect mineralogical transformation pathways. The variations in porosity and the extension of the zone affected by the alkaline perturbation are compared at different times. The major effects of mineral precipitation under kinetic constraints, rather than local equilibrium, are a delay in the porosity clogging and an increase in the extension of the alkaline perturbation in the clay formation. The same time-delay rise for the porosity occlusion also appears for the roughest spatial resolutions. A simulation as representative as possible of temporal and spatial scales of cementation processes must then be supported by more comparative data such as long term experimental investigations or natural analogues.

  20. A Simple Fault-Tolerant Adaptive and Minimal Routing Approach in 3-D Meshes

    WU Jie(吴杰)

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we propose a sufficient condition for minimal routing in 3-dimensional (3-D) meshes with faulty nodes. It is based on an early work of the author on minimal routing in 2-dimensional (2-D) meshes. Unlike many traditional models that assume all the nodes know global fault distribution or just adjacent fault information, our approach is based on the concept of limited global fault information. First, we propose a fault model called faulty cube in which all faulty nodes in the system are contained in a set of faulty cubes. Fault information is then distributed to limited number of nodes while it is still sufficient to support minimal routing. The limited fault information collected at each node is represented by a vector called extended safety level. The extended safety level associated with a node can be used to determine the existence of a minimal path from this node to a given destination. Specifically, we study the existence of minimal paths at a given source node, limited distribution of fault information, minimal routing, and deadlock-free and livelock-free routing. Our results show that any minimal routing that is partially adaptive can be applied in our model as long as the destination node meets a certain condition. We also propose a dynamic planar-adaptive routing scheme that offers better fault tolerance and adaptivity than the planar-adaptive routing scheme in 3-D meshes. Our approach is the first attempt to address adaptive and minimal routing in 3-D meshes with faulty nodes using limited fault information.

  1. DISCONTINUITY-CAPTURING FINITE ELEMENT COMPUTATION OF UNSTEADY FLOW WITH ADAPTIVE UNSTRUCTURED MESH

    DONG Genjin; LU Xiyun; ZHUANG Lixian

    2004-01-01

    A discontinuity-capturing scheme of finite element method (FEM) is proposed. The unstructured-grid technique combined with a new type of adaptive mesh approach is developed for both compressible and incompressible unsteady flows, which exhibits the capability of capturing the shock waves and/or thin shear layers accurately in an unsteady viscous flow at high Reynolds number.In particular, a new testing variable, i.e., the disturbed kinetic energy E, is suggested and used in the adaptive mesh computation, which is universally applicable to the capturing of both shock waves and shear layers in the inviscid flow and viscous flow at high Reynolds number. Based on several calculated examples, this approach has been proved to be effective and efficient for the calculations of compressible and incompressible flows.

  2. Upper and lower bounds in limit analysis: adaptive meshing strategies and discontinuous loading

    Muñoz Romero, José; Bonet Carbonell, Javier; Huerta, Antonio; Peraire Guitart, Jaume

    2008-01-01

    This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: Muñoz, José J. [et al.]. Upper and lower bounds in limit analysis: adaptive meshing strategies and discontinuous loading. "International journal for numerical methods in engineering", Agost 2008, vol. 77, núm. 4, p. 471-501., which has been published in final form at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121370765/abstract Peer Reviewed

  3. An adaptive hierarchical particle-mesh code with isolated boundary conditions

    Gelato, Sergio; Chernoff, David F.; Wasserman, Ira

    1996-01-01

    This article describes a new, fully adaptive Particle-Multiple-Mesh numerical simulation code developed primarily for simulations of small regions (such as a group of galaxies) in a cosmological context. It integrates the equations of motion of a set of particles subject to their mutual gravitational interaction and to an arbitrary external field. The interactions are computed using a hierarchy of nested grids constructed anew at each integration step to enhance the spatial resolution in high...

  4. TRIM: A finite-volume MHD algorithm for an unstructured adaptive mesh

    Schnack, D.D.; Lottati, I.; Mikic, Z. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    The authors describe TRIM, a MHD code which uses finite volume discretization of the MHD equations on an unstructured adaptive grid of triangles in the poloidal plane. They apply it to problems related to modeling tokamak toroidal plasmas. The toroidal direction is treated by a pseudospectral method. Care was taken to center variables appropriately on the mesh and to construct a self adjoint diffusion operator for cell centered variables.

  5. Application and Refinement of a Method to Achieve Uniform Convective Response on Variable-Resolution Meshes

    Walko, R. L.; Medvigy, D.; Avissar, R.

    2013-12-01

    regular model grid or (2) estimate the essential elements of the convective response from lookup table entries that were previously generated for similar environments using method (1). Obviously, method (2) is extremely efficient while method (1) is computationally intensive, so the key is to construct clever algorithms that enable method (2) to be used as often as possible. The method is self-learning in that as a model simulation progresses, the lookup table can grow and the search algorithm for selecting the best table entries can adapt to the growing table. We demonstrate applications of this method on the variable-resolution hexagonal grid of the Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Model (OLAM) for both idealized and realistic environments.

  6. Impact of space-time mesh adaptation on solute transport modeling in porous media

    Esfandiar, Bahman; Porta, Giovanni; Perotto, Simona; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2015-02-01

    We implement a space-time grid adaptation procedure to efficiently improve the accuracy of numerical simulations of solute transport in porous media in the context of model parameter estimation. We focus on the Advection Dispersion Equation (ADE) for the interpretation of nonreactive transport experiments in laboratory-scale heterogeneous porous media. When compared to a numerical approximation based on a fixed space-time discretization, our approach is grounded on a joint automatic selection of the spatial grid and the time step to capture the main (space-time) system dynamics. Spatial mesh adaptation is driven by an anisotropic recovery-based error estimator which enables us to properly select the size, shape, and orientation of the mesh elements. Adaptation of the time step is performed through an ad hoc local reconstruction of the temporal derivative of the solution via a recovery-based approach. The impact of the proposed adaptation strategy on the ability to provide reliable estimates of the key parameters of an ADE model is assessed on the basis of experimental solute breakthrough data measured following tracer injection in a nonuniform porous system. Model calibration is performed in a Maximum Likelihood (ML) framework upon relying on the representation of the ADE solution through a generalized Polynomial Chaos Expansion (gPCE). Our results show that the proposed anisotropic space-time grid adaptation leads to ML parameter estimates and to model results of markedly improved quality when compared to classical inversion approaches based on a uniform space-time discretization.

  7. Strategies for h-Adaptive Refinement for a Finite Element Treatment of Harmonic Oscillator Schroedinger Eigenproblem

    A Schroedinger eigenvalue problem is solved for the 2D quantum simple harmonic oscillator using a finite element discretization of real space within which elements are adaptively spatially refined. We compare two competing methods of adaptively discretizing the real-space grid on which computations are performed without modifying the standard polynomial basis-set traditionally used in finite element interpolations; namely, (i) an application of the Kelly error estimator, and (ii) a refinement based on the local potential level. When the performance of these methods are compared to standard uniform global refinement, we find that they significantly improve the total time spent in the eigensolver. (general)

  8. Adaptive resolution refinement for high-fidelity continuum parameterizations

    Anderson, J.W.; Khamayseh, A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Jean, B.A. [Mississippi State Univ., Starkville, MS (United States)

    1996-10-01

    This paper describes an algorithm the adaptively samples a parametric continuum so that a fidelity metric is satisfied. Using the divide-and-conquer strategy of adaptive sampling eliminates the guesswork of traditional uniform parameterization techniques. The space and time complexity of parameterization are increased in a controllable manner so that a desired fidelity is obtained.

  9. FINITE VOLUME METHODS AND ADAPTIVE REFINEMENT FOR GLOBAL TSUNAMI PROPAGATION AND LOCAL INUNDATION

    David L. George

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The shallow water equations are a commonly accepted approximation governing tsunami propagation. Numerically capturing certain features of local tsunami inundation requires solving these equations in their physically relevant conservative form, as integral con- servation laws for depth and momentum. This form of the equations presents challenges when trying to numerically model global tsunami propagation, so often the best numerical methods for the local inundation regime are not suitable for the global propagation regime. The different regimes of tsunami flow belong to different spatial scales as well, and re- quire correspondingly different grid resolutions. The long wavelength of deep ocean tsunamis requires a large global scale computing domain, yet near the shore the propa- gating energy is compressed and focused by bathymetry in unpredictable ways. This can lead to large variations in energy and run-up even over small localized regions.We have developed a finite volume method to deal with the diverse flow regimes of tsunamis. These methods are well suited for the inundation regime—they are robust in the presence of bores and steep gradients, or drying regions, and can capture the inundating shoreline and run-up features. Additionally, these methods are well-balanced, meaning that they can appropriately model global propagation.To deal with the disparate spatial scales, we have used adaptive refinement algorithms originally developed for gas dynamics, where often steep variation is highly localized at a given time, but moves throughout the domain. These algorithms allow evolving Cartesian sub-grids that can move with the propagating waves and highly resolve local inundation of impacted areas in a single global scale computation. Because the dry regions are part of the computing domain, simple rectangular cartesian grids eliminate the need for complex shoreline-fitted mesh generation.

  10. Domain adaptation using stock market prices to refine sentiment dictionaries

    Moore, Andrew; Rayson, Paul Edward; Young, Steven Eric

    2016-01-01

    As part of a larger project where we are examining the relationship and influence of news and social media on stock price, here we investigate the potential links between the sentiment of news articles about companies and stock price change of those companies. We describe a method to adapt sentiment word lists based on news articles about specific companies, in our case downloaded from the Guardian. Our novel approach here is to adapt word lists in sentiment classifiers for news articles base...

  11. A three-dimensional nodal method with Channel-wise Intrinsic Axial Mesh Adaptation

    Highlights: • CIAMA solves axial heterogeneity without iterative node re-homogenization. • CIAMA can easily resolve the control rod cusping problem. • CIAMA result shows great potential for 3-D pin-by-pin calculation. - Abstract: In a conventional coarse mesh nodal method the more accurate treatment of intra-nodal axial heterogeneity requires iterative axial node re-homogenization using axial flux profiles either reconstructed from core-wise coarse mesh solution or obtained from channel-wise axial fine mesh calculation. In this paper a new nodal method formulation, using Channel-wise Intrinsic Axial Mesh Adaptation (CIAMA), is proposed to solve this problem in a more fundamental way. For a given transverse (radial) leakage, along each axial channel a rigorous sub-node heterogeneous calculation is performed with the explicit axial heterogeneity within each coarse axial node. However, the transverse leakage between the axial channels is still calculated on the basis of coarse axial nodes, using the axially averaged radial current in each coarse axial node. Since the coupling between the axial channels is through the coarse axial nodes, it is not necessary to match the boundaries of the axial sub-nodes of neighboring axial channels in order to incorporate the axial sub-node calculation as an intrinsic part of the whole core global calculation. Therefore in the CIAMA nodal method, each axial channel is allowed to have its own sub-nodes adapting to its own axial heterogeneity variation. The CIAMA method has been implemented in the commercial code EGRET, which is used to qualify CIAMA. Excellent results of modeling fuel grid and control rod movement are presented. Application of CIAMA to three-dimensional pin-by-pin core calculation is also discussed and demonstrated to work well

  12. FUN3D Grid Refinement and Adaptation Studies for the Ares Launch Vehicle

    Bartels, Robert E.; Vasta, Veer; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Park, Mike; Mineck, Raymond E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents grid refinement and adaptation studies performed in conjunction with computational aeroelastic analyses of the Ares crew launch vehicle (CLV). The unstructured grids used in this analysis were created with GridTool and VGRID while the adaptation was performed using the Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) code FUN3D with a feature based adaptation software tool. GridTool was developed by ViGYAN, Inc. while the last three software suites were developed by NASA Langley Research Center. The feature based adaptation software used here operates by aligning control volumes with shock and Mach line structures and by refining/de-refining where necessary. It does not redistribute node points on the surface. This paper assesses the sensitivity of the complex flow field about a launch vehicle to grid refinement. It also assesses the potential of feature based grid adaptation to improve the accuracy of CFD analysis for a complex launch vehicle configuration. The feature based adaptation shows the potential to improve the resolution of shocks and shear layers. Further development of the capability to adapt the boundary layer and surface grids of a tetrahedral grid is required for significant improvements in modeling the flow field.

  13. A mesh adaptivity scheme on the Landau-de Gennes functional minimization case in 3D, and its driving efficiency

    Bajc, Iztok; Hecht, Frédéric; Žumer, Slobodan

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a 3D mesh adaptivity strategy on unstructured tetrahedral meshes by a posteriori error estimates based on metrics derived from the Hessian of a solution. The study is made on the case of a nonlinear finite element minimization scheme for the Landau-de Gennes free energy functional of nematic liquid crystals. Newton's iteration for tensor fields is employed with steepest descent method possibly stepping in. Aspects relating the driving of mesh adaptivity within the nonlinear scheme are considered. The algorithmic performance is found to depend on at least two factors: when to trigger each single mesh adaptation, and the precision of the correlated remeshing. Each factor is represented by a parameter, with its values possibly varying for every new mesh adaptation. We empirically show that the time of the overall algorithm convergence can vary considerably when different sequences of parameters are used, thus posing a question about optimality. The extensive testings and debugging done within this work on the simulation of systems of nematic colloids substantially contributed to the upgrade of an open source finite element-oriented programming language to its 3D meshing possibilities, as also to an outer 3D remeshing module.

  14. Polyhedral shape model for terrain correction of gravity and gravity gradient data based on an adaptive mesh

    Guo, Zhikui; Chen, Chao; Tao, Chunhui

    2016-04-01

    Since 2007, there are four China Da yang cruises (CDCs), which have been carried out to investigate polymetallic sulfides in the southwest Indian ridge (SWIR) and have acquired both gravity data and bathymetry data on the corresponding survey lines(Tao et al., 2014). Sandwell et al. (2014) published a new global marine gravity model including the free air gravity data and its first order vertical gradient (Vzz). Gravity data and its gradient can be used to extract unknown density structure information(e.g. crust thickness) under surface of the earth, but they contain all the mass effect under the observation point. Therefore, how to get accurate gravity and its gradient effect of the existing density structure (e.g. terrain) has been a key issue. Using the bathymetry data or ETOPO1 (http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/global/global.html) model at a full resolution to calculate the terrain effect could spend too much computation time. We expect to develop an effective method that takes less time but can still yield the desired accuracy. In this study, a constant-density polyhedral model is used to calculate the gravity field and its vertical gradient, which is based on the work of Tsoulis (2012). According to gravity field attenuation with distance and variance of bathymetry, we present an adaptive mesh refinement and coarsening strategies to merge both global topography data and multi-beam bathymetry data. The local coarsening or size of mesh depends on user-defined accuracy and terrain variation (Davis et al., 2011). To depict terrain better, triangular surface element and rectangular surface element are used in fine and coarse mesh respectively. This strategy can also be applied to spherical coordinate in large region and global scale. Finally, we applied this method to calculate Bouguer gravity anomaly (BGA), mantle Bouguer anomaly(MBA) and their vertical gradient in SWIR. Further, we compared the result with previous results in the literature. Both synthetic model

  15. Moving mesh generation with a sequential approach for solving PDEs

    physical and mesh equations suffers typically from long computation time due to highly nonlinear coupling between the two equations. Moreover, the extended system (physical and mesh equations) may be sensitive to the tuning parameters such as a temporal relaxation factor. It is therefore useful to design a......In moving mesh methods, physical PDEs and a mesh equation derived from equidistribution of an error metrics (so-called the monitor function) are simultaneously solved and meshes are dynamically concentrated on steep regions (Lim et al., 2001). However, the simultaneous solution procedure of...... adaptive grid method (local refinement by adding/deleting the meshes at a discrete time level) as well as of efficiency for the dynamic adaptive grid method (or moving mesh method) where the number of meshes is not changed. For illustration, a phase change problem is solved with the decomposition algorithm....

  16. Adaptive Fault-Tolerant Routing in 2D Mesh with Cracky Rectangular Model

    Yi Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper mainly focuses on routing in two-dimensional mesh networks. We propose a novel faulty block model, which is cracky rectangular block, for fault-tolerant adaptive routing. All the faulty nodes and faulty links are surrounded in this type of block, which is a convex structure, in order to avoid routing livelock. Additionally, the model constructs the interior spanning forest for each block in order to keep in touch with the nodes inside of each block. The procedure for block construction is dynamically and totally distributed. The construction algorithm is simple and ease of implementation. And this is a fully adaptive block which will dynamically adjust its scale in accordance with the situation of networks, either the fault emergence or the fault recovery, without shutdown of the system. Based on this model, we also develop a distributed fault-tolerant routing algorithm. Then we give the formal proof for this algorithm to guarantee that messages will always reach their destinations if and only if the destination nodes keep connecting with these mesh networks. So the new model and routing algorithm maximize the availability of the nodes in networks. This is a noticeable overall improvement of fault tolerability of the system.

  17. Solution adaptive triangular meshes with application to the simulation of plasma equilibrium

    A new discrete Laplace operator is constructed on a local mesh molecule, second order accurate on symmetric cell regions, based on local Taylor series expansions. This discrete Laplacian is then compared to the one commonly used in the literature. A truncation error analysis of gradient and Laplace operators calculated at triangle centroids reveals that the maximum bounds of their truncation errors are minimized on equilateral triangles, for a fixed triangle perimeter. A new adaptive strategy on arbitrary triangular grids is developed in which a uniform grid is defined with respect to the solution surface, as opposed to the x,y plane. Departures from mesh uniformity arises from a spacially dependent mean-curvature of the solution surface. The power of this new adaptive technique is applied to the problem of finding free-boundary plasma equilibria within the context of MHD. The geometry is toroidal, and axisymmetry in the toroidal direction is assumed. We are led to conclude that the grid should move, not towards regions of high curvature of magnetic flux, but rather towards regions of greater toroidal current density. This has a direct bearing on the accuracy with which the Grad-Shafranov equation is being approximated

  18. Multi-dimensional upwind fluctuation splitting scheme with mesh adaption for hypersonic viscous flow

    Wood, William Alfred, III

    production is shown relative to DMFDSFV. Remarkably the fluctuation splitting scheme shows grid converged skin friction coefficients with only five points in the boundary layer for this case. A viscous Mach 17.6 (perfect gas) cylinder case demonstrates solution monotonicity and heat transfer capability with the fluctuation splitting scheme. While fluctuation splitting is recommended over DMFDSFV, the difference in performance between the schemes is not so great as to obsolete DMFDSFV. The second half of the dissertation develops a local, compact, anisotropic unstructured mesh adaption scheme in conjunction with the multi-dimensional upwind solver, exhibiting a characteristic alignment behavior for scalar problems. This alignment behavior stands in contrast to the curvature clustering nature of the local, anisotropic unstructured adaption strategy based upon a posteriori error estimation that is used for comparison. The characteristic alignment is most pronounced for linear advection, with reduced improvement seen for the more complex non-linear advection and advection-diffusion cases. The adaption strategy is extended to the two-dimensional and axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations of motion through the concept of fluctuation minimization. The system test case for the adaption strategy is a sting mounted capsule at Mach-10 wind tunnel conditions, considered in both two-dimensional and axisymmetric configurations. For this complex flowfield the adaption results are disappointing since feature alignment does not emerge from the local operations. Aggressive adaption is shown to result in a loss of robustness for the solver, particularly in the bow shock/stagnation point interaction region. Reducing the adaption strength maintains solution robustness but fails to produce significant improvement in the surface heat transfer predictions.

  19. Minimising the error in eigenvalue calculations involving the Boltzmann transport equation using goal-based adaptivity on unstructured meshes

    This article presents a method for goal-based anisotropic adaptive methods for the finite element method applied to the Boltzmann transport equation. The neutron multiplication factor, keff, is used as the goal of the adaptive procedure. The anisotropic adaptive algorithm requires error measures for keff with directional dependence. General error estimators are derived for any given functional of the flux and applied to keff to acquire the driving force for the adaptive procedure. The error estimators require the solution of an appropriately formed dual equation. Forward and dual error indicators are calculated by weighting the Hessian of each solution with the dual and forward residual respectively. The Hessian is used as an approximation of the interpolation error in the solution which gives rise to the directional dependence. The two indicators are combined to form a single error metric that is used to adapt the finite element mesh. The residual is approximated using a novel technique arising from the sub-grid scale finite element discretisation. Two adaptive routes are demonstrated: (i) a single mesh is used to solve all energy groups, and (ii) a different mesh is used to solve each energy group. The second method aims to capture the benefit from representing the flux from each energy group on a specifically optimised mesh. The keff goal-based adaptive method was applied to three examples which illustrate the superior accuracy in criticality problems that can be obtained

  20. Simulations of recoiling black holes: adaptive mesh refinement and radiative transfer

    Meliani, Zakaria; Olivares, Hector; Porth, Oliver; Rezzolla, Luciano; Younsi, Ziri

    2016-01-01

    (Abridged) We here continue our effort to model the behaviour of matter when orbiting or accreting onto a generic black hole by developing a new numerical code employing advanced techniques geared solve the equations of in general-relativistic hydrodynamics. The new code employs a number of high-resolution shock-capturing Riemann-solvers and reconstruction algorithms, exploiting the enhanced accuracy and the reduced computational cost of AMR techniques. In addition, the code makes use of sophisticated ray-tracing libraries that, coupled with general-relativistic radiation-transfer calculations, allow us to compute accurately the electromagnetic emissions from such accretion flows. We validate the new code by presenting an extensive series of stationary accretion flows either in spherical or axial symmetry and performed either in 2D or 3D. In addition, we consider the highly nonlinear scenario of a recoiling black hole produced in the merger of a supermassive black hole binary interacting with the surrounding ...

  1. Kinematic Dynamos using Constrained Transport with High Order Godunov Schemes and Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    Teyssier, R; Fromang, S

    2006-01-01

    We propose to extend the well-known MUSCL-Hancock scheme for Euler equations to the induction equation modeling the magnetic field evolution in kinematic dynamo problems. The scheme is based on an integral form of the underlying conservation law which, in our formulation, results in a ``finite-surface'' scheme for the induction equation. This naturally leads to the well-known ``constrained transport'' method, with additional continuity requirement on the magnetic field representation. The second ingredient in the MUSCL scheme is the predictor step that ensures second order accuracy both in space and time. We explore specific constraints that the mathematical properties of the induction equations place on this predictor step, showing that three possible variants can be considered. We show that the most aggressive formulations (referred to as C-MUSCL and U-MUSCL) reach the same level of accuracy as the other one (referred to as Runge-Kutta), at a lower computational cost. More interestingly, these two schemes a...

  2. Kinematic Dynamos using Constrained Transport with High Order Godunov Schemes and Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    Teyssier, R.; Fromang, S.; Dormy, E.

    2006-01-01

    We propose to extend the well-known MUSCL-Hancock scheme for Euler equations to the induction equation modeling the magnetic field evolution in kinematic dynamo problems. The scheme is based on an integral form of the underlying conservation law which, in our formulation, results in a ``finite-surface'' scheme for the induction equation. This naturally leads to the well-known ``constrained transport'' method, with additional continuity requirement on the magnetic field representation. The sec...

  3. Conservative multi-implicit integral deferred correction methods with adaptive mesh refinement

    Layton, A.T. [Univ. of North Carolina, Dept. of Mathematics, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)]. E-mail: layton@amath.unc.edu

    2004-07-01

    In most models of reacting gas dynamics, the characteristic time scales of chemical reactions are much shorter than the hydrodynamic and diffusive time scales, rendering the reaction part of the model equations stiff. Moreover, nonlinear forcings may introduce into the solutions sharp gradients or shocks, the robust behavior and correct propagation of which require the use of specialized spatial discretization procedures. This study presents high-order conservative methods for the temporal integration of model equations of reacting flows. By means of a method of lines discretization on the flux difference form of the equations, these methods compute approximations to the cell-averaged or finite-volume solution. The temporal discretization is based on a multi-implicit generalization of integral deferred correction methods. The advection term is integrated explicitly, and the diffusion and reaction terms are treated implicitly but independently, with the splitting errors present in traditional operator splitting methods reduced via the integral deferred correction procedure. To reduce computational cost, time steps used to integrate processes with widely-differing time scales may differ in size. (author)

  4. Conservative multi-implicit integral deferred correction methods with adaptive mesh refinement

    In most models of reacting gas dynamics, the characteristic time scales of chemical reactions are much shorter than the hydrodynamic and diffusive time scales, rendering the reaction part of the model equations stiff. Moreover, nonlinear forcings may introduce into the solutions sharp gradients or shocks, the robust behavior and correct propagation of which require the use of specialized spatial discretization procedures. This study presents high-order conservative methods for the temporal integration of model equations of reacting flows. By means of a method of lines discretization on the flux difference form of the equations, these methods compute approximations to the cell-averaged or finite-volume solution. The temporal discretization is based on a multi-implicit generalization of integral deferred correction methods. The advection term is integrated explicitly, and the diffusion and reaction terms are treated implicitly but independently, with the splitting errors present in traditional operator splitting methods reduced via the integral deferred correction procedure. To reduce computational cost, time steps used to integrate processes with widely-differing time scales may differ in size. (author)

  5. An adaptive grid refinement strategy for the simulation of negative streamers

    The evolution of negative streamers during electric breakdown of a non-attaching gas can be described by a two-fluid model for electrons and positive ions. It consists of continuity equations for the charged particles including drift, diffusion and reaction in the local electric field, coupled to the Poisson equation for the electric potential. The model generates field enhancement and steep propagating ionization fronts at the tip of growing ionized filaments. An adaptive grid refinement method for the simulation of these structures is presented. It uses finite volume spatial discretizations and explicit time stepping, which allows the decoupling of the grids for the continuity equations from those for the Poisson equation. Standard refinement methods in which the refinement criterion is based on local error monitors fail due to the pulled character of the streamer front that propagates into a linearly unstable state. We present a refinement method which deals with all these features. Tests on one-dimensional streamer fronts as well as on three-dimensional streamers with cylindrical symmetry (hence effectively 2D for numerical purposes) are carried out successfully. Results on fine grids are presented, they show that such an adaptive grid method is needed to capture the streamer characteristics well. This refinement strategy enables us to adequately compute negative streamers in pure gases in the parameter regime where a physical instability appears: branching streamers

  6. Goal functional evaluations for phase-field fracture using PU-based DWR mesh adaptivity

    Wick, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a posteriori error estimation and goal-oriented mesh adaptivity are developed for phase-field fracture propagation. Goal functionals are computed with the dual-weighted residual (DWR) method, which is realized by a recently introduced novel localization technique based on a partition-of-unity (PU). This technique is straightforward to apply since the weak residual is used. The influence of neighboring cells is gathered by the PU. Consequently, neither strong residuals nor jumps over element edges are required. Therefore, this approach facilitates the application of the DWR method to coupled (nonlinear) multiphysics problems such as fracture propagation. These developments then allow for a systematic investigation of the discretization error for certain quantities of interest. Specifically, our focus on the relationship between the phase-field regularization and the spatial discretization parameter in terms of goal functional evaluations is novel.

  7. Crash: A Block-Adaptive-Mesh Code for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics - Implementation and Verification

    van der Holst, B; Sokolov, I V; Powell, K G; Holloway, J P; Myra, E S; Stout, Q; Adams, M L; Morel, J E; Drake, R P

    2011-01-01

    We describe the CRASH (Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics) code, a block adaptive mesh code for multi-material radiation hydrodynamics. The implementation solves the radiation diffusion model with the gray or multigroup method and uses a flux limited diffusion approximation to recover the free-streaming limit. The electrons and ions are allowed to have different temperatures and we include a flux limited electron heat conduction. The radiation hydrodynamic equations are solved in the Eulerian frame by means of a conservative finite volume discretization in either one, two, or three-dimensional slab geometry or in two-dimensional cylindrical symmetry. An operator split method is used to solve these equations in three substeps: (1) solve the hydrodynamic equations with shock-capturing schemes, (2) a linear advection of the radiation in frequency-logarithm space, and (3) an implicit solve of the stiff radiation diffusion, heat conduction, and energy exchange. We present a suite of verification test problem...

  8. An adaptive hierarchical particle-mesh code with isolated boundary conditions

    Gelato, S; Wasserman, I M; Gelato, Sergio; Chernoff, David F.; Wasserman, Ira

    1996-01-01

    This article describes a new, fully adaptive Particle-Multiple-Mesh numerical simulation code developed primarily for simulations of small regions (such as a group of galaxies) in a cosmological context. It integrates the equations of motion of a set of particles subject to their mutual gravitational interaction and to an arbitrary external field. The interactions are computed using a hierarchy of nested grids constructed anew at each integration step to enhance the spatial resolution in high-density regions of interest. Significant effort has gone into supporting isolated boundary conditions at the top grid level. This makes our method also applicable to non-cosmological problems, at the cost of some complications which we discuss. We point out the implications of some differences between our approach and those of other authors of similar codes, in particular with respect to the handling of the interface between regions of different spatial resolution. We present a selection of tests performed to verify the ...

  9. 6th International Meshing Roundtable '97

    White, D.

    1997-09-01

    The goal of the 6th International Meshing Roundtable is to bring together researchers and developers from industry, academia, and government labs in a stimulating, open environment for the exchange of technical information related to the meshing process. In the pas~ the Roundtable has enjoyed significant participation born each of these groups from a wide variety of countries. The Roundtable will consist of technical presentations from contributed papers and abstracts, two invited speakers, and two invited panels of experts discussing topics related to the development and use of automatic mesh generation tools. In addition, this year we will feature a "Bring Your Best Mesh" competition and poster session to encourage discussion and participation from a wide variety of mesh generation tool users. The schedule and evening social events are designed to provide numerous opportunities for informal dialog. A proceedings will be published by Sandia National Laboratories and distributed at the Roundtable. In addition, papers of exceptionally high quaIity will be submitted to a special issue of the International Journal of Computational Geometry and Applications. Papers and one page abstracts were sought that present original results on the meshing process. Potential topics include but are got limited to: Unstructured triangular and tetrahedral mesh generation Unstructured quadrilateral and hexahedral mesh generation Automated blocking and structured mesh generation Mixed element meshing Surface mesh generation Geometry decomposition and clean-up techniques Geometry modification techniques related to meshing Adaptive mesh refinement and mesh quality control Mesh visualization Special purpose meshing algorithms for particular applications Theoretical or novel ideas with practical potential Technical presentations from industrial researchers.

  10. Two-dimensional adaptive mesh generation algorithm and its application with higher-order compressible flow solver

    A combined procedure for two-dimensional Delaunay mesh generation algorithm and an adaptive remeshing technique with higher-order compressible flow solver is presented. A pseudo-code procedure is described for the adaptive remeshing technique. The flux-difference splitting scheme with a modified multidimensional dissipation for high-speed compressible flow analysis on unstructured meshes is proposed. The scheme eliminates nonphysical flow solutions such as the spurious bump of the carbuncle phenomenon observed from the bow shock of the flow over a blunt body and the oscillation in the odd-even grid perturbation in a straight duct for the Quirk's odd-even decoupling test. The proposed scheme is further extended to achieve higher-order spatial and temporal solution accuracy. The performance of the combined procedure is evaluated on unstructured triangular meshes by solving several steady-state and transient high-speed compressible flow problems