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Sample records for adaptive hifu noise

  1. Adaptive HIFU noise cancellation for simultaneous therapy and imaging using an integrated HIFU/imaging transducer

    Jeong, Jong Seob; Cannata, Jonathan Matthew; Shung, K Kirk [Department of Biomedical Engineering, NIH Resource Center for Medical Ultrasonic Transducer Technology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)], E-mail: jongsjeo@usc.edu

    2010-04-07

    It was previously demonstrated that it is feasible to simultaneously perform ultrasound therapy and imaging of a coagulated lesion during treatment with an integrated transducer that is capable of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and B-mode ultrasound imaging. It was found that coded excitation and fixed notch filtering upon reception could significantly reduce interference caused by the therapeutic transducer. During HIFU sonication, the imaging signal generated with coded excitation and fixed notch filtering had a range side-lobe level of less than -40 dB, while traditional short-pulse excitation and fixed notch filtering produced a range side-lobe level of -20 dB. The shortcoming is, however, that relatively complicated electronics may be needed to utilize coded excitation in an array imaging system. It is for this reason that in this paper an adaptive noise canceling technique is proposed to improve image quality by minimizing not only the therapeutic interference, but also the remnant side-lobe 'ripples' when using the traditional short-pulse excitation. The performance of this technique was verified through simulation and experiments using a prototype integrated HIFU/imaging transducer. Although it is known that the remnant ripples are related to the notch attenuation value of the fixed notch filter, in reality, it is difficult to find the optimal notch attenuation value due to the change in targets or the media resulted from motion or different acoustic properties even during one sonication pulse. In contrast, the proposed adaptive noise canceling technique is capable of optimally minimizing both the therapeutic interference and residual ripples without such constraints. The prototype integrated HIFU/imaging transducer is composed of three rectangular elements. The 6 MHz center element is used for imaging and the outer two identical 4 MHz elements work together to transmit the HIFU beam. Two HIFU elements of 14.4 mm x 20.0 mm dimensions

  2. Adaptive HIFU noise cancellation for simultaneous therapy and imaging using an integrated HIFU/imaging transducer

    It was previously demonstrated that it is feasible to simultaneously perform ultrasound therapy and imaging of a coagulated lesion during treatment with an integrated transducer that is capable of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and B-mode ultrasound imaging. It was found that coded excitation and fixed notch filtering upon reception could significantly reduce interference caused by the therapeutic transducer. During HIFU sonication, the imaging signal generated with coded excitation and fixed notch filtering had a range side-lobe level of less than -40 dB, while traditional short-pulse excitation and fixed notch filtering produced a range side-lobe level of -20 dB. The shortcoming is, however, that relatively complicated electronics may be needed to utilize coded excitation in an array imaging system. It is for this reason that in this paper an adaptive noise canceling technique is proposed to improve image quality by minimizing not only the therapeutic interference, but also the remnant side-lobe 'ripples' when using the traditional short-pulse excitation. The performance of this technique was verified through simulation and experiments using a prototype integrated HIFU/imaging transducer. Although it is known that the remnant ripples are related to the notch attenuation value of the fixed notch filter, in reality, it is difficult to find the optimal notch attenuation value due to the change in targets or the media resulted from motion or different acoustic properties even during one sonication pulse. In contrast, the proposed adaptive noise canceling technique is capable of optimally minimizing both the therapeutic interference and residual ripples without such constraints. The prototype integrated HIFU/imaging transducer is composed of three rectangular elements. The 6 MHz center element is used for imaging and the outer two identical 4 MHz elements work together to transmit the HIFU beam. Two HIFU elements of 14.4 mm x 20.0 mm dimensions could

  3. Adaptive noise

    Viney, Mark; Reece, Sarah E.

    2013-01-01

    In biology, noise implies error and disorder and is therefore something which organisms may seek to minimize and mitigate against. We argue that such noise can be adaptive. Recent studies have shown that gene expression can be noisy, noise can be genetically controlled, genes and gene networks vary in how noisy they are and noise generates phenotypic differences among genetically identical cells. Such phenotypic differences can have fitness benefits, suggesting that evolution can shape noise ...

  4. Adaptive noise cancellation

    In this report we describe the concept of adaptive noise canceling, an alternative method of estimating signals corrupted by additive noise of interference. The method uses 'primary' input containing the corrupted signal and a 'reference' input containing noise correlated in some unknown way with the primary noise, the reference input is adaptively filtered and subtracted from the primary input to obtain the signal estimate. Adaptive filtering before subtraction allows the treatment of inputs that are deterministic or stochastic, stationary or time variable. When the reference input is free of signal and certain other conditions are met then noise in the primary input can be essentially eliminated without signal distortion. It is further shown that the adaptive filter also acts as notch filter. Simulated results illustrate the usefulness of the adaptive noise canceling technique. (author)

  5. Adaptive Noise Reduction System

    Ivana Ropuš

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise is an all-present environment pollutant, considered to be one of the greatest contemporary pollutants. World-wide, co-ordinated actions are conducted in order to develop systems which minimise the noise influence onto society.In this article we argue that novel approach to suppression of influence of noise is useful. Furthermore, we argue that the efficient approach is formulation of the efficient, broadly applicable, ubiquituous, adaptive noise-protection system. The approach combines the natural noise-protection form based on plants with the artificially formed coatings.Elements of the system are discussed, its formation and maintenance analysed and perspectives conjectured.

  6. Adaptive noise level estimation

    Yeh, Chunghsin; Roebel, Axel

    2006-01-01

    We describe a novel algorithm for the estimation of the colored noise level in audio signals with mixed noise and sinusoidal components. The noise envelope model is based on the assumptions that the envelope varies slowly with frequency and that the magnitudes of the noise peaks obey a Rayleigh distribution. Our method is an extension of a recently proposed approach of spectral peak classification of sinusoids and noise, which takes into account a noise envelope model to improve the detection...

  7. Adaptive feedback active noise control

    Kuo, Sen M.; Vijayan, Dipa

    Feedforward active noise control (ANC) systems use a reference sensor that senses a reference input to the controller. This signal is assumed to be unaffected by the secondary source and is a good measure of the undesired noise to be cancelled by the system. The reference sensor may be acoustic (e.g., microphone) or non-acoustic (e.g., tachometer, optical transducer). An obvious problem when using acoustic sensors is that the reference signal may be corrupted by the canceling signal generated by the secondary source. This problem is known as acoustic feedback. One way of avoiding this is by using a feedback active noise control (FANC) system which dispenses with the reference sensor. The FANC technique originally proposed by Olson and May employs a high gain negative feedback amplifier. This system suffered from the drawback that the error microphone had to be placed very close to the loudspeaker. The operation of the system was restricted to low frequency range and suffered from instability due to the possibility of positive feedback. Feedback systems employing adaptive filtering techniques for active noise control were developed. This paper presents the FANC system modeled as an adaptive prediction scheme.

  8. Adaptive Noise Suppression Using Digital Signal Processing

    Kozel, David; Nelson, Richard

    1996-01-01

    A signal to noise ratio dependent adaptive spectral subtraction algorithm is developed to eliminate noise from noise corrupted speech signals. The algorithm determines the signal to noise ratio and adjusts the spectral subtraction proportion appropriately. After spectra subtraction low amplitude signals are squelched. A single microphone is used to obtain both eh noise corrupted speech and the average noise estimate. This is done by determining if the frame of data being sampled is a voiced or unvoiced frame. During unvoice frames an estimate of the noise is obtained. A running average of the noise is used to approximate the expected value of the noise. Applications include the emergency egress vehicle and the crawler transporter.

  9. Adaptive Intelligent Ventilation Noise Control Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the NASA need for quiet on-orbit crew quarters (CQ), Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to develop a new Adaptive Intelligent Ventilation Noise...

  10. Adaptive Intelligent Ventilation Noise Control Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address NASA needs for quiet crew volumes in a space habitat, Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to develop a new Adaptive Intelligent Ventilation Noise...

  11. Adaptive avoidance of reef noise.

    Stephen D Simpson

    Full Text Available Auditory information is widely used throughout the animal kingdom in both terrestrial and aquatic environments. Some marine species are dependent on reefs for adult survival and reproduction, and are known to use reef noise to guide orientation towards suitable habitat. Many others that forage in food-rich inshore waters would, however, benefit from avoiding the high density of predators resident on reefs, but nothing is known about whether acoustic cues are used in this context. By analysing a sample of nearly 700,000 crustaceans, caught during experimental playbacks in light traps in the Great Barrier Reef lagoon, we demonstrate an auditory capability in a broad suite of previously neglected taxa, and provide the first evidence in any marine organisms that reef noise can act as a deterrent. In contrast to the larvae of species that require reef habitat for future success, which showed an attraction to broadcasted reef noise, taxa with a pelagic or nocturnally emergent lifestyle actively avoided it. Our results suggest that a far greater range of invertebrate taxa than previously thought can respond to acoustic cues, emphasising yet further the potential negative impact of globally increasing levels of underwater anthropogenic noise.

  12. Musical noise reduction using an adaptive filter

    Hanada, Takeshi; Murakami, Takahiro; Ishida, Yoshihisa; Hoya, Tetsuya

    2003-10-01

    This paper presents a method for reducing a particular noise (musical noise). The musical noise is artificially produced by Spectral Subtraction (SS), which is one of the most conventional methods for speech enhancement. The musical noise is the tin-like sound and annoying in human auditory. We know that the duration of the musical noise is considerably short in comparison with that of speech, and that the frequency components of the musical noise are random and isolated. In the ordinary SS-based methods, the musical noise is removed by the post-processing. However, the output of the ordinary post-processing is delayed since the post-processing uses the succeeding frames. In order to improve this problem, we propose a novel method using an adaptive filter. In the proposed system, the observed noisy signal is used as the input signal to the adaptive filter and the output of SS is used as the reference signal. In this paper we exploit the normalized LMS (Least Mean Square) algorithm for the adaptive filter. Simulation results show that the proposed method has improved the intelligibility of the enhanced speech in comparison with the conventional method.

  13. Producing Uniform Lesion Pattern in HIFU Ablation

    Zhou, Yufeng; Kargl, Steven G.; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2009-04-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is emerging as a modality for treatment of solid tumors. The temperature at the focus can reach over 65° C denaturing cellular proteins resulting in coagulative necrosis. Typically, HIFU parameters are the same for each treated spot in most HIFU control systems. Because of thermal diffusion from nearby spots, the size of lesions will gradually become larger as the HIFU therapy progresses, which may cause insufficient treatment of initial spots, and over-treatment of later ones. It is found that the produced lesion pattern also depends on the scanning pathway. From the viewpoint of the physician creating uniform lesions and minimizing energy exposure are preferred in tumor ablation. An algorithm has been developed to adaptively determine the treatment parameters for every spot in a theoretical model in order to maintain similar lesion size throughout the HIFU therapy. In addition, the exposure energy needed using the traditional raster scanning is compared with those of two other scanning pathways, spiral scanning from the center to the outside and from the outside to the center. The theoretical prediction and proposed algorithm were further evaluated using transparent gel phantoms as a target. Digital images of the lesions were obtained, quantified, and then compared with each other. Altogether, dynamically changing treatment parameters can improve the efficacy and safety of HIFU ablation.

  14. Adaptive noise Wiener filter for scanning electron microscope imaging system.

    Sim, K S; Teh, V; Nia, M E

    2016-03-01

    Noise on scanning electron microscope (SEM) images is studied. Gaussian noise is the most common type of noise in SEM image. We developed a new noise reduction filter based on the Wiener filter. We compared the performance of this new filter namely adaptive noise Wiener (ANW) filter, with four common existing filters as well as average filter, median filter, Gaussian smoothing filter and the Wiener filter. Based on the experiments results the proposed new filter has better performance on different noise variance comparing to the other existing noise removal filters in the experiments. SCANNING 38:148-163, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26235517

  15. A new adaptive filtering algorithm for systems with multiplicative noise

    WANG Hui-li; CHEN Xi-xin; LU Qian-hao

    2005-01-01

    Presented here is a new adaptive state filtering algorithm for systems with multiplicative noise. This algorithm estimates the vector state of the system and the statistics of noise when all the statistics of noise are unknown. This filtering algorithm is a simple recursive structure. A simulation example is presented which demonstrates the effectiveness of this filtering algorithm.

  16. Application of Adaptive Filters to Active Noise Control

    PEI Bingnan; LI Chuanguang

    2001-01-01

    A modified LMS algorithm for noise-control is suggested after a mathematical model ofsound-cancellation is established, on the basis of thesound wave interference principle and the physicalmodel of progressive waves in a duct. Its applicationin controlling noise with the frequency range from 100to 800 Hz can be implemented by using the adaptivedigital signal processing technique. The experimentson a pink noise, a broadband noise and a noise takenfrom a tank were made, which show that there existsan attenuation of 11 dB at the frequency of 500 Hzor so, and that the proposed adaptive noise controltechnique is very effective and valid.

  17. SIMULATION AND PERFORMANCE ANALYASIS OF ADAPTIVE FILTER IN NOISE CANCELLATION

    RAJ KUMAR THENUA,

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Noise problems in the environment have gained attention due to the tremendous growth of technology that has led to noisy engines, heavy machinery, high speed wind buffeting and other noise sources. The problem of controlling the noise level has become the focus of a tremendous amount of research over the years. In last few years various adaptive algorithms are developed for noise cancellation. In this paper we present an implementation of LMS (Least Mean Square, NLMS (Normalized Least Mean Square and RLS (Recursive Least Square algorithms on MATLAB platform with the intention to compare their performance in noise cancellation. We simulate the adaptive filter in MATLAB with a noisy tone signal and white noise signal and analyze the performance of algorithms in terms of MSE (Mean Squared Error, percentage noise removal, computational complexity and stability. The obtained results shows that RLS has the best performance but at thecost of large computational complexity and memory requirement.

  18. Adaptive Threshold Median Filter for Multiple-Impulse Noise

    JIANG Bo; HUANG Wei

    2007-01-01

    Attenuating the noises plays an essential role in the image processing. Almost all the traditional median filters concern the removal of impulse noise having a single layer, whose noise gray level value is constant. In this paper, a new adaptive median filter is proposed to handle those images corrupted not only by single layer noise. The adaptive threshold median filter(ATMF) has been developed by combining the adaptive median filter (AMF) and two dynamic thresholds. Because of the dynamic threshold being used, the ATMF is able to balance the removal of the multiple-impulse noise and the quality of image. Comparison of the proposed method with traditional median filters is provided. Some visual examples are given to demonstrate the performance of the proposed Filter.

  19. Performance Analysis of LMS Adaptive FIR Filter and RLS Adaptive FIR Filter for Noise Cancellation

    Jyotsna Yadav

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Interest in adaptive filters continues to grow as they begin to find practical real-time applications in areas such as channel equalization, echo cancellation, noise cancellation and many other adaptive signal processing applications. The key to successful adaptive signal processing understands the fundamental properties of adaptive algorithms such as LMS, RLS etc. Adaptive filter is used for the cancellation of the noise component which is overlap with undesired signal in the same frequency range. This paper presents design, implementation and performance comparison of adaptive FIR filter using LMS and RMS algorithms. MATLAB Simulink environment are used for simulations.

  20. Adaptive Liners for Broadband Noise Reduction Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will combine the advantages of adaptive materials with the simplistic passive design of state-of-the-art acoustic liners to provide the ability to tune...

  1. Adaptive noise reduction for fiber optic gyroscopes in borehole applications

    Yan, Tingyang; Zhang, Chunxi; Gao, Shuang; Ma, Zongfeng

    2006-11-01

    Fiber Optic Gyroscopes (FOGs) have been investigated and proposed as alternative sensors to magnetometers in borehole surveying applications due to their compactness, ruggedness, low cost and high environmental insensitivity. However, FOGs are subject to high measurement noise from various sources, which deteriorates the performance and quality of FOGs, thus the overall system accuracy is limited. To improve the accuracy of the surveying system, adaptive filtering techniques are utilized to reduce the noise level at the output of the FOG. A Forward Linear Prediction (FLP) filter based on Normalized Least-Mean-Square (NLMS) adaptive algorithm was designed and evaluated using kinematic data. Results show that the FLP filter can suppress the FOG noise to a certain degree and a satisfactory signal-to-noise ratio improvement can be achieved using this method.

  2. An adaptive chaotic secure communication scheme with channel noises

    In this Letter, an adaptive secure communication scheme with channel noises is proposed. Based on the idea of chaotic masking-modulation, the message is encrypted by a chaotic signal. By using adaptive feedback control techniques, the transmitter and the receiver are synchronized, so the masked signal can be perfectly recovered by the receiver in the presence of channel noises. In light of the Lyapunov stability theory for stochastic differential equations, several theoretical results are rigorously established. Finally, the famous Chua's circuits is used to illustrate the possible applications of the obtained theoretical results, and the computer simulations show that the proposed scheme is feasible and efficient

  3. Reduction of Radiographic Quantum Noise Using Adaptive Weighted Median Filter

    Images are easily corrupted by noise during the data transmission, data capture and data processing. A technical method of noise analyzing and adaptive filtering for reducing of quantum noise in radiography is presented. By adjusting the characteristics of the filter according to local statistics around each pixel of the image as moving windowing, it is possible to suppress noise sufficiently while preserve edge and other significant information required in reading. We have proposed adaptive weighted median(AWM) filters based on local statistics. We show two ways of realizing the AWM filters. One is a simple type of AWM filter, whose weights are given by a simple non-linear function of three local characteristics. The other is the AWM filter which is constructed by homogeneous factor(HF). Homogeneous factor(HF) from the quantum noise models that enables the filter to recognize the local structures of the image is introduced, and an algorithm for determining the HF fitted to the detection systems with various inner statistical properties is proposed. We show by the experimented that the performances of proposed method is superior to these of other filters and models in preserving small details and suppressing the noise at homogeneous region. The proposed algorithms were implemented by visual C++ language on a IBM-PC Pentium 550 for testing purposes, the effects and results of the noise filtering were proposed by comparing with images of the other existing filtering methods

  4. Reducing Background Noise Through a Stethoscope Cup Using Adaptive Filters

    Hill, Bryce E.; Christensen, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    An adaptive filtering algorithm was used to test the validity of adaptively filtering respiratory signals recorded at the trachea with an external reference microphone. Two different setups were tested. The first used a microphone in open air, the second used a microphone that was housed inside a second stethoscope cup. The primary microphone was affixed to a phantom material. External sounds and music were played via aloud speaker to record additive noise data from within the stethoscope cup...

  5. Performance Analysis of LMS Adaptive FIR Filter and RLS Adaptive FIR Filter for Noise Cancellation

    Jyotsna Yadav

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Interest in adaptive filters continues to grow as they begin to find practical real-time applications in areassuch as channel equalization, echo cancellation, noise cancellation and many other adaptive signalprocessing applications. The key to successful adaptive signal processing understands the fundamentalproperties of adaptive algorithms such as LMS, RLS etc. Adaptive filter is used for the cancellation of thenoise component which is overlap with undesired signal in the same frequency range. This paper presentsdesign, implementation and performance comparison of adaptive FIR filter using LMS and RMSalgorithms. MATLAB Simulink environment are used for simulations.

  6. Noise-exploitation and adaptation in neuromorphic sensors

    Hindo, Thamira; Chakrabartty, Shantanu

    2012-04-01

    Even though current micro-nano fabrication technology has reached integration levels where ultra-sensitive sensors can be fabricated, the sensing performance (resolution per joule) of synthetic systems are still orders of magnitude inferior to those observed in neurobiology. For example, the filiform hairs in crickets operate at fundamental limits of noise; auditory sensors in a parasitoid fly can overcome fundamental limitations to precisely localize ultra-faint acoustic signatures. Even though many of these biological marvels have served as inspiration for different types of neuromorphic sensors, the main focus these designs have been to faithfully replicate the biological functionalities, without considering the constructive role of "noise". In man-made sensors device and sensor noise are typically considered as a nuisance, where as in neurobiology "noise" has been shown to be a computational aid that enables biology to sense and operate at fundamental limits of energy efficiency and performance. In this paper, we describe some of the important noise-exploitation and adaptation principles observed in neurobiology and how they can be systematically used for designing neuromorphic sensors. Our focus will be on two types of noise-exploitation principles, namely, (a) stochastic resonance; and (b) noise-shaping, which are unified within our previously reported framework called Σ▵ learning. As a case-study, we describe the application of Σ▵ learning for the design of a miniature acoustic source localizer whose performance matches that of its biological counterpart(Ormia Ochracea).

  7. MR-guided transcranial brain HIFU in small animal models

    Larrat, B; Pernot, M; Aubry, J-F; Sinkus, R; Fink, M; Tanter, M [Institut Langevin, ESPCI ParisTech, CNRS UMR 7587, INSERM U979, Universite Paris VII, Laboratoire Ondes et Acoustique, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75 231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Dervishi, E; Boch, A-L [Hopital de la Pitie-Salpetriere-INSERM, U495, 47 Boulevard de l' Hopital, 75651 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Seilhean, D [Hopital de la Pitie-Salpetriere-Neuropathology Department, 47 Boulevard de l' Hopital, 75651 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Marie, Y [Hopital de la Pitie-Salpetriere-Neurosurgery Department, 47 Boulevard de l' Hopital, 75651 Paris Cedex 13 (France)], E-mail: benoit.larrat@espci.fr

    2010-01-21

    Recent studies have demonstrated the feasibility of transcranial high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy in the brain using adaptive focusing techniques. However, the complexity of the procedures imposes provision of accurate targeting, monitoring and control of this emerging therapeutic modality in order to ensure the safety of the treatment and avoid potential damaging effects of ultrasound on healthy tissues. For these purposes, a complete workflow and setup for HIFU treatment under magnetic resonance (MR) guidance is proposed and implemented in rats. For the first time, tissue displacements induced by the acoustic radiation force are detected in vivo in brain tissues and measured quantitatively using motion-sensitive MR sequences. Such a valuable target control prior to treatment assesses the quality of the focusing pattern in situ and enables us to estimate the acoustic intensity at focus. This MR-acoustic radiation force imaging is then correlated with conventional MR-thermometry sequences which are used to follow the temperature changes during the HIFU therapeutic session. Last, pre- and post-treatment magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) datasets are acquired and evaluated as a new potential way to non-invasively control the stiffness changes due to the presence of thermal necrosis. As a proof of concept, MR-guided HIFU is performed in vitro in turkey breast samples and in vivo in transcranial rat brain experiments. The experiments are conducted using a dedicated MR-compatible HIFU setup in a high-field MRI scanner (7 T). Results obtained on rats confirmed that both the MR localization of the US focal point and the pre- and post-HIFU measurement of the tissue stiffness, together with temperature control during HIFU are feasible and valuable techniques for efficient monitoring of HIFU in the brain. Brain elasticity appears to be more sensitive to the presence of oedema than to tissue necrosis.

  8. MR-guided transcranial brain HIFU in small animal models

    Recent studies have demonstrated the feasibility of transcranial high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy in the brain using adaptive focusing techniques. However, the complexity of the procedures imposes provision of accurate targeting, monitoring and control of this emerging therapeutic modality in order to ensure the safety of the treatment and avoid potential damaging effects of ultrasound on healthy tissues. For these purposes, a complete workflow and setup for HIFU treatment under magnetic resonance (MR) guidance is proposed and implemented in rats. For the first time, tissue displacements induced by the acoustic radiation force are detected in vivo in brain tissues and measured quantitatively using motion-sensitive MR sequences. Such a valuable target control prior to treatment assesses the quality of the focusing pattern in situ and enables us to estimate the acoustic intensity at focus. This MR-acoustic radiation force imaging is then correlated with conventional MR-thermometry sequences which are used to follow the temperature changes during the HIFU therapeutic session. Last, pre- and post-treatment magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) datasets are acquired and evaluated as a new potential way to non-invasively control the stiffness changes due to the presence of thermal necrosis. As a proof of concept, MR-guided HIFU is performed in vitro in turkey breast samples and in vivo in transcranial rat brain experiments. The experiments are conducted using a dedicated MR-compatible HIFU setup in a high-field MRI scanner (7 T). Results obtained on rats confirmed that both the MR localization of the US focal point and the pre- and post-HIFU measurement of the tissue stiffness, together with temperature control during HIFU are feasible and valuable techniques for efficient monitoring of HIFU in the brain. Brain elasticity appears to be more sensitive to the presence of oedema than to tissue necrosis.

  9. Applications of active adaptive noise control to jet engines

    Shoureshi, Rahmat; Brackney, Larry

    1993-01-01

    During phase 2 research on the application of active noise control to jet engines, the development of multiple-input/multiple-output (MIMO) active adaptive noise control algorithms and acoustic/controls models for turbofan engines were considered. Specific goals for this research phase included: (1) implementation of a MIMO adaptive minimum variance active noise controller; and (2) turbofan engine model development. A minimum variance control law for adaptive active noise control has been developed, simulated, and implemented for single-input/single-output (SISO) systems. Since acoustic systems tend to be distributed, multiple sensors, and actuators are more appropriate. As such, the SISO minimum variance controller was extended to the MIMO case. Simulation and experimental results are presented. A state-space model of a simplified gas turbine engine is developed using the bond graph technique. The model retains important system behavior, yet is of low enough order to be useful for controller design. Expansion of the model to include multiple stages and spools is also discussed.

  10. Egg White Phantoms for HIFU

    We used fresh egg white and polyacrylamide to create a transparent tissue mimicking phantom. Heating of phantoms by HIFU leads to egg white protein denaturation and creation of visible white lesions. We measured the acoustical and thermal properties and investigated the possibility to use such phantoms to study the lesion formation during the HIFU therapy

  11. Reduced rank adaptive filtering in impulsive noise environments

    Soury, Hamza

    2014-11-01

    An impulsive noise environment is considered in this paper. A new aspect of signal truncation is deployed to reduce the harmful effect of the impulsive noise to the signal. A full rank direct solution is derived followed by an iterative solution. The reduced rank adaptive filter is presented in this environment by using two methods for rank reduction, while the minimized objective function is defined using the Lp norm. The results are presented and the efficiency of each method is discussed. © 2014 IEEE.

  12. Background Noise Reduction in Wind Tunnels using Adaptive Noise Cancellation and Cepstral Echo Removal Techniques for Microphone Array Applications

    Spalt, Taylor B

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate Adaptive Noise Cancelling and Cepstrum echo removal post-processing techniques on acoustic data from a linear microphone array in an anechoic chamber. A point source speaker driven with white noise was used as the primary signal. The first experiment included a background speaker to provide interference noise at three different Signal-to-Noise Ratios to simulate noise propagating down a wind tunnel circuit. The second experiment contained only the...

  13. Noise Adaptive Stream Weighting in Audio-Visual Speech Recognition

    Martin Heckmann

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that integration of acoustic and visual information especially in noisy conditions yields improved speech recognition results. This raises the question of how to weight the two modalities in different noise conditions. Throughout this paper we develop a weighting process adaptive to various background noise situations. In the presented recognition system, audio and video data are combined following a Separate Integration (SI architecture. A hybrid Artificial Neural Network/Hidden Markov Model (ANN/HMM system is used for the experiments. The neural networks were in all cases trained on clean data. Firstly, we evaluate the performance of different weighting schemes in a manually controlled recognition task with different types of noise. Next, we compare different criteria to estimate the reliability of the audio stream. Based on this, a mapping between the measurements and the free parameter of the fusion process is derived and its applicability is demonstrated. Finally, the possibilities and limitations of adaptive weighting are compared and discussed.

  14. Nonlinear mode decomposition: A noise-robust, adaptive decomposition method

    Iatsenko, Dmytro; McClintock, Peter V. E.; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2015-09-01

    The signals emanating from complex systems are usually composed of a mixture of different oscillations which, for a reliable analysis, should be separated from each other and from the inevitable background of noise. Here we introduce an adaptive decomposition tool—nonlinear mode decomposition (NMD)—which decomposes a given signal into a set of physically meaningful oscillations for any wave form, simultaneously removing the noise. NMD is based on the powerful combination of time-frequency analysis techniques—which, together with the adaptive choice of their parameters, make it extremely noise robust—and surrogate data tests used to identify interdependent oscillations and to distinguish deterministic from random activity. We illustrate the application of NMD to both simulated and real signals and demonstrate its qualitative and quantitative superiority over other approaches, such as (ensemble) empirical mode decomposition, Karhunen-Loève expansion, and independent component analysis. We point out that NMD is likely to be applicable and useful in many different areas of research, such as geophysics, finance, and the life sciences. The necessary matlab codes for running NMD are freely available for download.

  15. An adaptive noise attenuation method for edge and amplitude preservation

    Cai Han-Peng; He Zhen-Hua; Li Ya-Lin; He Guang-Ming; Zou Wen; Zhang Dong-Jun; Liu Pu

    2014-01-01

    Noise intensity distributed in seismic data varies with different frequencies or frequency bands; thus, noise attenuation on the full-frequency band affects the dynamic properties of the seismic reflection signal and the subsequent seismic data interpretation, reservoir description, hydrocarbon detection, etc. Hence, we propose an adaptive noise attenuation method for edge and amplitude preservation, wherein the wavelet packet transform is used to decompose the full-band seismic signal into multiband data and then process these data using nonlinear anisotropic dip-oriented edge-preservingfi ltering. In the fi ltering, the calculated diffusion tensor from the structure tensor can be exploited to establish the direction of smoothing. In addition, the fault confidence measure and discontinuity operator can be used to preserve the structural and stratigraphic discontinuities and edges, and the decorrelation criteria can be used to establish the number of iterations. These parameters can minimize the intervention and subjectivity of the interpreter, and simplify the application of the proposed method. We applied the proposed method to synthetic and real 3D marine seismic data. We found that the proposed method could be used to attenuate noise in seismic data while preserving the effective discontinuity information and amplitude characteristics in seismic refl ection waves, providing high-quality data for interpretation and analysis such as high-resolution processing, attribute analysis, and inversion.

  16. Nonparametric estimation of the volatility under microstructure noise: wavelet adaptation

    Hoffmann, Marc; Schmidt-Hieber, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    We study nonparametric estimation of the volatility function of a diffusion process from discrete data, when the data are blurred by additional noise. This noise can be white or correlated, and serves as a model for microstructure effects in financial modeling, when the data are given on an intra-day scale. By developing pre-averaging techniques combined with wavelet thresholding, we construct adaptive estimators that achieve a nearly optimal rate within a large scale of smoothness constraints of Besov type. Since the underlying signal (the volatility) is genuinely random, we propose a new criterion to assess the quality of estimation; we retrieve the usual minimax theory when this approach is restricted to deterministic volatility.

  17. Simulation and Performance Analysis of Adaptive Filtering Algorithms in Noise Cancellation

    Ferdouse, Lilatul; Nipa, Tamanna Haque; Jaigirdar, Fariha Tasmin

    2011-01-01

    Noise problems in signals have gained huge attention due to the need of noise-free output signal in numerous communication systems. The principal of adaptive noise cancellation is to acquire an estimation of the unwanted interfering signal and subtract it from the corrupted signal. Noise cancellation operation is controlled adaptively with the target of achieving improved signal to noise ratio. This paper concentrates upon the analysis of adaptive noise canceller using Recursive Least Square (RLS), Fast Transversal Recursive Least Square (FTRLS) and Gradient Adaptive Lattice (GAL) algorithms. The performance analysis of the algorithms is done based on convergence behavior, convergence time, correlation coefficients and signal to noise ratio. After comparing all the simulated results we observed that GAL performs the best in noise cancellation in terms of Correlation Coefficient, SNR and Convergence Time. RLS, FTRLS and GAL were never evaluated and compared before on their performance in noise cancellation in ...

  18. Comparative study of adaptive-noise-cancellation algorithms for intrusion detection systems

    Some intrusion detection systems are susceptible to nonstationary noise resulting in frequent nuisance alarms and poor detection when the noise is present. Adaptive inverse filtering for single channel systems and adaptive noise cancellation for two channel systems have both demonstrated good potential in removing correlated noise components prior detection. For such noise susceptible systems the suitability of a noise reduction algorithm must be established in a trade-off study weighing algorithm complexity against performance. The performance characteristics of several distinct classes of algorithms are established through comparative computer studies using real signals. The relative merits of the different algorithms are discussed in the light of the nature of intruder and noise signals

  19. Noise robust automatic speech recognition with adaptive quantile based noise estimation and speech band emphasizing filter bank

    Bonde, Casper Stork; Graversen, Carina; Gregersen, Andreas Gregers;

    2005-01-01

    appearance of the speech signal which require noise robust voice activity detection and assumptions of stationary noise. However, both of these requirements are often not met and it is therefore of particular interest to investigate methods like the Quantile Based Noise Estimation (QBNE) mehtod which......An important topic in Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) is to reduce the effect of noise, in particular when mismatch exists between the training and application conditions. Many noise robutness schemes within the feature processing domain use as a prerequisite a noise estimate prior to the...... estimates the noise during speech and non-speech sections without the use of a voice activity detector. While the standard QBNE-method uses a fixed pre-defined quantile accross all frequency bands, this paper suggests adaptive QBNE (AQBNE) which adapts the quantile individually to each frequency band...

  20. Emergent Adaptive Noise Reduction from Communal Cooperation of Sensor Grid

    Jones, Kennie H.; Jones, Michael G.; Nark, Douglas M.; Lodding, Kenneth N.

    2010-01-01

    In the last decade, the realization of small, inexpensive, and powerful devices with sensors, computers, and wireless communication has promised the development of massive sized sensor networks with dense deployments over large areas capable of high fidelity situational assessments. However, most management models have been based on centralized control and research has concentrated on methods for passing data from sensor devices to the central controller. Most implementations have been small but, as it is not scalable, this methodology is insufficient for massive deployments. Here, a specific application of a large sensor network for adaptive noise reduction demonstrates a new paradigm where communities of sensor/computer devices assess local conditions and make local decisions from which emerges a global behaviour. This approach obviates many of the problems of centralized control as it is not prone to single point of failure and is more scalable, efficient, robust, and fault tolerant

  1. Adaptive de-noising method based on wavelet and adaptive learning algorithm in on-line PD monitoring

    王立欣; 诸定秋; 蔡惟铮

    2002-01-01

    It is an important step in the online monitoring of partial discharge (PD) to extract PD pulses from various background noises. An adaptive de-noising method is introduced for adaptive noise reduction during detection of PD pulses. This method is based on Wavelet Transform (WT) , and in the wavelet domain the noises decomposed at the levels are reduced by independent thresholds. Instead of the standard hard thresholding function, a new type of hard thresholding function with continuous derivative is employed by this method. For the selection of thresholds, an unsupervised learning algorithm based on gradient in a mean square error (MSE) is present to search for the optimal threshold for noise reduction, and the optimal threshold is selected when the minimum MSE is obtained. With the simulating signals and on-site experimental data processed by this method,it is shown that the background noises such as narrowband noises can be reduced efficiently. Furthermore, it is proved that in comparison with the conventional wavelet de-noising method the adaptive de-noising method has a better performance in keeping the pulses and is more adaptive when suppressing the background noises of PD signals.

  2. A Three-Microphone Adaptive Noise Canceller for Minimizing Reverberation and Signal Distortion

    Zayed M. Ramadan

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces an adaptive noise canceller (ANC) to improve the system performance in the presence of signal leakage components. The proposed ANC consists of two adaptive filters and three microphones. The first adaptive filter cancels the signal leakage and the second filter cancels the noise. For best results, a least mean squares adaptive algorithm was also introduced and used in the proposed ANC. In this algorithm the step size was based on both error vector and data normalization....

  3. A multi-stage noise adaptive switching filter for extremely corrupted images

    Dinh, Hai; Adhami, Reza; Wang, Yi

    2015-07-01

    A multi-stage noise adaptive switching filter (MSNASF) is proposed for the restoration of images extremely corrupted by impulse and impulse-like noise. The filter consists of two steps: noise detection and noise removal. The proposed extrema-based noise detection scheme utilizes the false contouring effect to get better over detection rate at low noise density. It is adaptive and will detect not only impulse but also impulse-like noise. In the noise removal step, a novel multi-stage filtering scheme is proposed. It replaces corrupted pixel with the nearest uncorrupted median to preserve details. When compared with other methods, MSNASF provides better peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) and structure similarity index (SSIM). A subjective evaluation carried out online also demonstrates that MSNASF yields higher fidelity.

  4. On-line adaptive line frequency noise cancellation from a nuclear power measuring channel

    Qadir Javed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available On-line software for adaptively canceling 50 Hz line frequency noise has been designed and tested at Pakistan Research Reactor 1. Line frequency noise causes much problem in weak signals acquisition. Sometimes this noise is so dominant that original signal is totally corrupted. Although notch filter can be used for eliminating this noise, but if signal of interest is in close vicinity of 50 Hz, then original signal is also attenuated and hence overall performance is degraded. Adaptive noise removal is a technique which could be employed for removing line frequency without degrading the desired signal. In this paper line frequency noise has been eliminated on-line from a nuclear power measuring channel. The adaptive LMS algorithm has been used to cancel 50 Hz noise. The algorithm has been implemented in labVIEW with NI 6024 data acquisition card. The quality of the acquired signal has been improved much as can be seen in experimental results.

  5. Adaptive Feed-Forward Control of Low Frequency Interior Noise

    Kletschkowski, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    This book presents a mechatronic approach to Active Noise Control (ANC). It describes the required elements of system theory, engineering acoustics, electroacoustics and adaptive signal processing in a comprehensive, consistent and systematic manner using a unified notation. Furthermore, it includes a design methodology for ANC-systems, explains its application and describes tools to be used for ANC-system design. From the research point of view, the book presents new approaches to sound source localization in weakly damped interiors. One is based on the inverse finite element method, the other is based on a sound intensity probe with an active free field. Furthermore, a prototype of an ANC-system able to reach the physical limits of local (feed-forward) ANC is described. This is one example for applied research in ANC-system design. Other examples are given for (i) local ANC in a semi-enclosed subspace of an aircraft cargo hold and (ii) for the combination of audio entertainment with ANC.

  6. Performance Evaluation of 2D Adaptive Bilateral Filter For Removal of Noise From Robust Images

    Sridhar, B.; Dr.K.V.V.S.Reddy

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present the performance analysis of adaptive bilateral filter by pixel to noise ratio and mean square errors. It was evaluate changing the parameters of the adaptive filter half width values and standard deviations. In adaptive bilateral filter, the edge slope is enhanced by transforming the histogram via a range filter with adaptive offset and width. The variance of range filter can also be adaptive. The filter is applied to improve the sharpens of a gray level and color im...

  7. Noise Estimation from Remote Sensing Images by Fractal Theory and Adaptive Image Block Division

    FU Peng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach for additive noise estimation from highly textured optical remote sensing images has been proposed, which is based on fractal theory and adaptive image block division. Different from the conventional regular block division based noise estimation methods, the divided adaptive image blocks with the proposed method are adhering to the local image information, which are most likely to be homogeneous blocks. Combining with the week textured image region detection using fractal theory and noise standard deviation calculation using statistical analysis, the proposed method can automatically estimate additive noise intensity from optical remote sensing images. Quantified analysis of experiments with ZY-3 satellite images demonstrates that the proposed method is applicable to optical remote sensing images with various complexities and different noise levels. Meanwhile, the notion of week textured image region detection and adaptive image block division can also be applied to multiplicative noise estimation from radar images after modification.

  8. Adaptive Noise Cancellation Method Used for Wheel Speed Signal of Integrate ABS/ASR System

    MA Yue-feng; LIU Zhao-du; QI Zhi-quan; CUI Hai-feng

    2006-01-01

    A novel adaptive noise cancellation method for wheel speed signal of the anti-lock braking system/anti-slip regulation(ABS/ASR) control system is proposed. Based on the spectrum distribution of vehicle's wheel speed signal got from fast Fourier transform under various conditions, the high-pass filter is used to deal with original wheel speed signals sampled to get reference noise signal and the original wheel speed signals are used as adaptive filter's desired outputs. The difference between original signals and reference noise signals is used as the error signal for the adaptive FIR filter and also used as the whole adaptive noise cancellation system's final output. This method can obtain the noise signal on-line and is easy to use for real control system,which is useful to improve the performance of integrate system ABS/ASR.

  9. HIFU for palliative treatment of pancreatic cancer

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D.; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2011-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a novel non-invasive modality for ablation of various solid tumors including uterine fibroids, prostate cancer, hepatic, renal, breast and pancreatic tumors. HIFU therapy utilizes mechanical energy in the form of a powerful ultrasound wave that is focused inside the body to induce thermal and/or mechanical effects in tissue. Multiple preclinical and non-randomized clinical trials have been performed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of HIFU for pa...

  10. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy methodology for noise assessment of wind turbine.

    Shahaboddin Shamshirband

    Full Text Available Wind turbine noise is one of the major obstacles for the widespread use of wind energy. Noise tone can greatly increase the annoyance factor and the negative impact on human health. Noise annoyance caused by wind turbines has become an emerging problem in recent years, due to the rapid increase in number of wind turbines, triggered by sustainable energy goals set forward at the national and international level. Up to now, not all aspects of the generation, propagation and perception of wind turbine noise are well understood. For a modern large wind turbine, aerodynamic noise from the blades is generally considered to be the dominant noise source, provided that mechanical noise is adequately eliminated. The sources of aerodynamic noise can be divided into tonal noise, inflow turbulence noise, and airfoil self-noise. Many analytical and experimental acoustical studies performed the wind turbines. Since the wind turbine noise level analyzing by numerical methods or computational fluid dynamics (CFD could be very challenging and time consuming, soft computing techniques are preferred. To estimate noise level of wind turbine, this paper constructed a process which simulates the wind turbine noise levels in regard to wind speed and sound frequency with adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS. This intelligent estimator is implemented using Matlab/Simulink and the performances are investigated. The simulation results presented in this paper show the effectiveness of the developed method.

  11. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy methodology for noise assessment of wind turbine.

    Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Petković, Dalibor; Hashim, Roslan; Motamedi, Shervin

    2014-01-01

    Wind turbine noise is one of the major obstacles for the widespread use of wind energy. Noise tone can greatly increase the annoyance factor and the negative impact on human health. Noise annoyance caused by wind turbines has become an emerging problem in recent years, due to the rapid increase in number of wind turbines, triggered by sustainable energy goals set forward at the national and international level. Up to now, not all aspects of the generation, propagation and perception of wind turbine noise are well understood. For a modern large wind turbine, aerodynamic noise from the blades is generally considered to be the dominant noise source, provided that mechanical noise is adequately eliminated. The sources of aerodynamic noise can be divided into tonal noise, inflow turbulence noise, and airfoil self-noise. Many analytical and experimental acoustical studies performed the wind turbines. Since the wind turbine noise level analyzing by numerical methods or computational fluid dynamics (CFD) could be very challenging and time consuming, soft computing techniques are preferred. To estimate noise level of wind turbine, this paper constructed a process which simulates the wind turbine noise levels in regard to wind speed and sound frequency with adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). This intelligent estimator is implemented using Matlab/Simulink and the performances are investigated. The simulation results presented in this paper show the effectiveness of the developed method. PMID:25075621

  12. A Three-Microphone Adaptive Noise Canceller for Minimizing Reverberation and Signal Distortion

    Zayed M. Ramadan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an adaptive noise canceller (ANC to improve the system performance in the presence of signal leakage components. The proposed ANC consists of two adaptive filters and three microphones. The first adaptive filter cancels the signal leakage and the second filter cancels the noise. For best results, a least mean squares adaptive algorithm was also introduced and used in the proposed ANC. In this algorithm the step size was based on both error vector and data normalization. Simulation results, carried out using a real speech, demonstrate significant improvements of the proposed ANC over the conventional one in minimizing signal distortion and reverberation.

  13. Shape anomaly detection under strong measurement noise: An analytical approach to adaptive thresholding

    Krasichkov, Alexander S.; Grigoriev, Eugene B.; Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Nifontov, Eugene M.

    2015-10-01

    We suggest an analytical approach to the adaptive thresholding in a shape anomaly detection problem. We find an analytical expression for the distribution of the cosine similarity score between a reference shape and an observational shape hindered by strong measurement noise that depends solely on the noise level and is independent of the particular shape analyzed. The analytical treatment is also confirmed by computer simulations and shows nearly perfect agreement. Using this analytical solution, we suggest an improved shape anomaly detection approach based on adaptive thresholding. We validate the noise robustness of our approach using typical shapes of normal and pathological electrocardiogram cycles hindered by additive white noise. We show explicitly that under high noise levels our approach considerably outperforms the conventional tactic that does not take into account variations in the noise level.

  14. Effects of directional microphone and adaptive multichannel noise reduction algorithm on cochlear implant performance

    Chung, K.; Zeng, F G; Acker, K N

    2006-01-01

    Although cochlear implant (CI) users have enjoyed good speech recognition in quiet, they still have difficulties understanding speech in noise. We conducted three experiments to determine whether a directional microphone and an adaptive multichannel noise reduction algorithm could enhance Cl performance in noise and whether Speech Transmission Index (STI) can be used to predict CI performance in various acoustic and signal processing conditions. In Experiment 1, CI users listened to speech in...

  15. Time-shared channel identification for adaptive noise cancellation in breath sound extraction

    Zheng HAN; Hong WANG; Leyi WANG; Gang George YIN

    2004-01-01

    Noise artifacts are one of the key obstacles in applying continuous monitoring and computer-assisted analysis of lung sounds.Traditional adaptive noise cancellation (ANC) methodologies work reasonably well when signal and noise are stationary and independent.Clinical lung sound auscultation encounters an acoustic environment in which breath sounds are not stationary and often correlate with noise.Consequently,capability of ANC becomes significantly compromised.This paper introduces a new methodology for extracting authentic lung sounds from noise-corrupted measurements.Unlike traditional noise cancellation methods that rely on either frequency band separation or signal/noise independence to achieve noise reduction,this methodology combines the traditional noise canceling methods with the unique feature of time-split stages in breathing sounds.By employing a multi-sensor system,the method first employs a high-pass filter to eliminate the off-band noise,and then performs time-shared blind identification and noise cancellation with recursion from breathing cycle to cycle.Since no frequency separation or signal/noise independence is required,this method potentially has a robust and reliable capability of noise reduction,complementing the traditional methods.

  16. Sequentially Adapted Parallel Feedforward Active Noise Control of Noisy Sinusoidal Signals

    Govind Kannan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A large class of acoustic noise sources has an underlying periodic process that generates a periodic noise component, and thus their acoustic noise can in general be modeled as the sum of a periodic signal and a randomly fluctuating signal (usually a broadband background noise. Active control of periodic noise (i.e., for a mixture of sinusoids is more effective than that of random noise. For mixtures of sinusoids in a background broadband random noise, conventional FXLMS-based single filter method does not reach the maximum achievable Noise Attenuation Level (NALmax⁡. In this paper, an alternative approach is taken and the idea of a parallel active noise control (ANC architecture for cancelling mixtures of periodic and random signals is presented. The proposed ANC system separates the noise into periodic and random components and generates corresponding antinoises via separate noise cancelling filters, and tends to reach NALmax⁡ consistently. The derivation of NALmax⁡ is presented. Both the separation and noise cancellation are based on adaptive filtering. Experimental results verify the analytical development by showing superior performance of the proposed method, over the single-filter approach, for several cases of sinusoids in white noise.

  17. Stabilization of the distribution of the product output in adaptive receivers noise signal

    Yu. L. Mazor

    1986-04-01

    Full Text Available The algorithm of adaptive receiving noise signals on the background noise interference with monotonically varying spectra, allowing through the introduction of a reference path to stabilize the distribution of the output product. With the help of computer modeling an estimate of the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  18. Adaptive Drainage Slots for Acoustic Noise Attenuation Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group, Inc. (CRG), proposes to demonstrate feasibility in the reduction of noise attributed to drainage slots in jet engine acoustic liners....

  19. Adaptive noise estimation and suppression for improving microseismic event detection

    Mousavi, S. Mostafa; Langston, Charles A.

    2016-09-01

    Microseismic data recorded by surface arrays are often strongly contaminated by unwanted noise. This background noise makes the detection of small magnitude events difficult. A noise level estimation and noise reduction algorithm is presented for microseismic data analysis based upon minimally controlled recursive averaging and neighborhood shrinkage estimators. The method might not be compared with more sophisticated and computationally expensive denoising algorithm in terms of preserving detailed features of seismic signal. However, it is fast and data-driven and can be applied in real-time processing of continuous data for event detection purposes. Results from application of this algorithm to synthetic and real seismic data show that it holds a great promise for improving microseismic event detection.

  20. Adaptive Drainage Slots for Acoustic Noise Attenuation Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group, Inc. (CRG) demonstrated feasibility in the reduction of noise attributed to drainage slots in jet engine acoustic liners. This was...

  1. Multi-channel differencing adaptive noise cancellation with multi-kernel method

    Wei Gao; Jianguo Huang; Jing Han

    2015-01-01

    Although a various of existing techniques are able to improve the performance of detection of the weak interesting sig-nal, how to adaptively and efficiently attenuate the intricate noises especial y in the case of no available reference noise signal is stil the bottleneck to be overcome. According to the characteristics of sonar arrays, a multi-channel differencing method is presented to provide the prerequisite reference noise. However, the ingre-dient of obtained reference noise is too complicated to be used to effectively reduce the interference noise only using the clas-sical linear cancel ation methods. Hence, a novel adaptive noise cancel ation method based on the multi-kernel normalized least-mean-square algorithm consisting of weighted linear and Gaussian kernel functions is proposed, which al ows to simultaneously con-sider the cancel ation of linear and nonlinear components in the reference noise. The simulation results demonstrate that the out-put signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the novel multi-kernel adaptive filtering method outperforms the conventional linear normalized least-mean-square method and the mono-kernel normalized least-mean-square method using the realistic noise data measured in the lake experiment.

  2. Solution for Vehicles Noise Cancellation With Modification of LMS Adaptive Algorithm

    Sri Arttini Dwi Prasetyowati

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The problems of noise cancelling systems are based on the specific characteristics of their sources. Therefore, the knowledge of each noise source should be represented prior to the excecution ofthe designed noise cancelling scheme. Since the noises emitted vary with the types of the passing vehicles, the scheme should be well adjusted automatically. The delay must be minimixed by managing the value of step size. Five representing types of noise producing vehicles (noise from: bus, truck, motocycle, car with diesel fuel, and car with gasoline were always changing following the passing vehicle. The robust LMS (Least Mean Square algorithm was applied first, then followed by modification LMS algorithm. The results show that LMS algorithm with two process, which is modification from adaptive LMS algorithm is the simplest and the best if it is applied in vehicle’s noise cancellation.

  3. PSO Algorithm based Adaptive Median Filter for Noise Removal in Image Processing Application

    Ruby Verma

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A adaptive Switching median filter for salt and pepper noise removal based on genetic algorithm is presented. Proposed filter consist of two stages, a noise detector stage and a noise filtering stage. Particle swarm optimization seems to be effective for single objective problem. Noise Dictation stage works on it. In contrast to the standard median filter, the proposed algorithm generates the noise map of corrupted Image. Noise map gives information about the corrupted and non-corrupted pixels of Image. In filtering, filter calculates the median of uncorrupted neighbouring pixels and replaces the corrupted pixels. Extensive simulations are performed to validate the proposed filter. Simulated results show refinement both in Peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR and Image Quality Index value (IQI. Experimental results shown that proposed method is more effective than existing methods.

  4. Adaptive nonlocal means filtering based on local noise level for CT denoising

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate an image-domain noise reduction method based on a modified nonlocal means (NLM) algorithm that is adaptive to local noise level of CT images and to implement this method in a time frame consistent with clinical workflow. Methods: A computationally efficient technique for local noise estimation directly from CT images was developed. A forward projection, based on a 2D fan-beam approximation, was used to generate the projection data, with a noise model incorporating the effects of the bowtie filter and automatic exposure control. The noise propagation from projection data to images was analytically derived. The analytical noise map was validated using repeated scans of a phantom. A 3D NLM denoising algorithm was modified to adapt its denoising strength locally based on this noise map. The performance of this adaptive NLM filter was evaluated in phantom studies in terms of in-plane and cross-plane high-contrast spatial resolution, noise power spectrum (NPS), subjective low-contrast spatial resolution using the American College of Radiology (ACR) accreditation phantom, and objective low-contrast spatial resolution using a channelized Hotelling model observer (CHO). Graphical processing units (GPU) implementation of this noise map calculation and the adaptive NLM filtering were developed to meet demands of clinical workflow. Adaptive NLM was piloted on lower dose scans in clinical practice. Results: The local noise level estimation matches the noise distribution determined from multiple repetitive scans of a phantom, demonstrated by small variations in the ratio map between the analytical noise map and the one calculated from repeated scans. The phantom studies demonstrated that the adaptive NLM filter can reduce noise substantially without degrading the high-contrast spatial resolution, as illustrated by modulation transfer function and slice sensitivity profile results. The NPS results show that adaptive NLM denoising preserves the

  5. Adaptive nonlocal means filtering based on local noise level for CT denoising

    Li, Zhoubo; Trzasko, Joshua D.; Lake, David S.; Blezek, Daniel J.; Manduca, Armando, E-mail: manduca.armando@mayo.edu [Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Yu, Lifeng; Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate an image-domain noise reduction method based on a modified nonlocal means (NLM) algorithm that is adaptive to local noise level of CT images and to implement this method in a time frame consistent with clinical workflow. Methods: A computationally efficient technique for local noise estimation directly from CT images was developed. A forward projection, based on a 2D fan-beam approximation, was used to generate the projection data, with a noise model incorporating the effects of the bowtie filter and automatic exposure control. The noise propagation from projection data to images was analytically derived. The analytical noise map was validated using repeated scans of a phantom. A 3D NLM denoising algorithm was modified to adapt its denoising strength locally based on this noise map. The performance of this adaptive NLM filter was evaluated in phantom studies in terms of in-plane and cross-plane high-contrast spatial resolution, noise power spectrum (NPS), subjective low-contrast spatial resolution using the American College of Radiology (ACR) accreditation phantom, and objective low-contrast spatial resolution using a channelized Hotelling model observer (CHO). Graphical processing units (GPU) implementation of this noise map calculation and the adaptive NLM filtering were developed to meet demands of clinical workflow. Adaptive NLM was piloted on lower dose scans in clinical practice. Results: The local noise level estimation matches the noise distribution determined from multiple repetitive scans of a phantom, demonstrated by small variations in the ratio map between the analytical noise map and the one calculated from repeated scans. The phantom studies demonstrated that the adaptive NLM filter can reduce noise substantially without degrading the high-contrast spatial resolution, as illustrated by modulation transfer function and slice sensitivity profile results. The NPS results show that adaptive NLM denoising preserves the

  6. Micro-bubble enhanced HIFU

    Kajiyama, K.; Yoshinaka, K.; Takagi, S.; Matsumoto, Y.

    2010-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment that employs microbubbles to provide enhanced heating has been investigated in order to develop a less invasive and more rapid tumor ablation therapy. It has been demonstrated that microbubbles have significant effects on heating enhancement in vitro and in vivo experiments, however ultrasound propagation could be disturbed when there are too many microbubbles between the transducer and the focus. In this study, we develop a method to make a clear pass way for obtaining enhanced heating by using microbubbles just at the focus, thus avoiding heating on the pass way from the transducer to the target region. In this method, microbubbles are destroyed in front of the HIFU focus (on the transducer side) by irradiating a intense burst wave of microsecond order, before irradiating the ultrasound waves for heating the target region. The experiment is conducted in a medium of a polyacrylamide gel containing microbubbles, and a temperature-sensing liquid crystal sheet is set in the focus to observe the temperature distribution. The ultrasound frequency was 2.2 MHz and the intensity was 5000 W/cm2, and 20 burst waves were irradiated at pulse repetition frequency of 1 kHz. The number of wave pulses was varied. The continuous-wave frequency, intensity and irradiation time are 2.2 MHz, 1000 W/cm2 and 60 sec, respectively. As the number of pulses increased, the heating region moves from the transducer side to the focus. This is because microbubbles in front of the focus are destroyed and the ultrasound propagates around the target position effectively. These results suggest that the microbubble distribution and the heating position in the developed HIFU system can be controlled.

  7. Periodic Noise Suppression from ECG Signal using Novel Adaptive Filtering Techniques

    Yogesh Sharma

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Electrocardiogram signal most commonly known recognized and used biomedical signal for medical examination of heart. The ECG signal is very sensitive in nature, and even if small noise mixed with original signal, the various characteristics of the signal changes, Data corrupted with noise must either filtered or discarded, filtering is important issue for design consideration of real time heart monitoring systems. Various filters used for removing the noise from ECG signals, most commonly used filters are Notch Filters, FIR filters, IIR filters, Wiener filter, Adaptive filters etc. Performance analysis shows that the best result is obtained by using Adaptive filter to remove various noises from ECG signal and get significant SNR andMSE results. In this paper a novel adaptive approach by using LMS algorithm and delay has shown whichcan be used for pre-processing of ECG signal and give appreciable result.

  8. Direction-Based Adaptive Switching Filter for Removing High-Density Impulse Noise

    刘会刚; 孙菁; 张福海; 任立儒

    2014-01-01

    A direction-based adaptive switching (DBAS) filter is presented for the removal of high-density impulse noise in images. The extrema detection and 28-directional detection are employed to discriminate the pixels as noisy or noise-free. If a pixel is classified as noisy, it will be replaced by a median or a mean value within an adaptive filter window with respect to different noise densities. Simulation results show that the miss-detection ratio and false-alarm ratio are both very low even at noise level as high as 90%. At the same time, better results are obtained in terms of the qualitative and quantitative measures. The peak signal-to-noise ratios increase by nearly 1 dB compared with other existing algorithms. In addition, the computation time is around 10 s for test images with resolutions of 512´512 since the proposed approach has low complexity.

  9. A NEW DE-NOISING METHOD BASED ON 3-BAND WAVELET AND NONPARAMETRIC ADAPTIVE ESTIMATION

    Li Li; Peng Yuhua; Yang Mingqiang; Xue Peijun

    2007-01-01

    Wavelet de-noising has been well known as an important method of signal de-noising.Recently,most of the research efforts about wavelet de-noising focus on how to select the threshold,where Donoho method is applied widely.Compared with traditional 2-band wavelet,3-band wavelet has advantages in many aspects.According to this theory,an adaptive signal de-noising method in 3-band wavelet domain based on nonparametric adaptive estimation is proposed.The experimental results show that in 3-band wavelet domain,the proposed method represents better characteristics than Donoho method in protecting detail and improving the signal-to-noise ratio of reconstruction signal.

  10. Construction and solution of an adaptive image-restoration model for removing blur and mixed noise

    Wang, Youquan; Cui, Lihong; Cen, Yigang; Sun, Jianjun

    2016-03-01

    We establish a practical regularized least-squares model with adaptive regularization for dealing with blur and mixed noise in images. This model has some advantages, such as good adaptability for edge restoration and noise suppression due to the application of a priori spatial information obtained from a polluted image. We further focus on finding an important feature of image restoration using an adaptive restoration model with different regularization parameters in polluted images. A more important observation is that the gradient of an image varies regularly from one regularization parameter to another under certain conditions. Then, a modified graduated nonconvexity approach combined with a median filter version of a spatial information indicator is proposed to seek the solution of our adaptive image-restoration model by applying variable splitting and weighted penalty techniques. Numerical experiments show that the method is robust and effective for dealing with various blur and mixed noise levels in images.

  11. Emerging HIFU applications in cancer therapy.

    Maloney, Ezekiel; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2015-05-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), is a promising, non-invasive modality for treatment of tumours in conjunction with magnetic resonance imaging or diagnostic ultrasound guidance. HIFU is being used increasingly for treatment of prostate cancer and uterine fibroids. Over the last 10 years a growing number of clinical trials have examined HIFU treatment of both benign and malignant tumours of the liver, breast, pancreas, bone, connective tissue, thyroid, parathyroid, kidney and brain. For some of these emerging indications, HIFU is poised to become a serious alternative or adjunct to current standard treatments--including surgery, radiation, gene therapy, immunotherapy, and chemotherapy. Current commercially available HIFU devices are marketed for their thermal ablation applications. In the future, lower energy treatments may play a significant role in mediating targeted drug and gene delivery for cancer treatment. In this article we introduce currently available HIFU systems, provide an overview of clinical trials in emerging oncological targets, and briefly discuss selected pre-clinical research that is relevant to future oncological HIFU applications. PMID:25367011

  12. Effects of MRTI sampling characteristics on estimation of HIFU SAR and tissue thermal diffusivity

    Dillon, C. R.; Todd, N.; Payne, A.; Parker, D. L.; Christensen, D. A.; Roemer, R. B.

    2013-10-01

    While the non-invasive and three-dimensional nature of magnetic-resonance temperature imaging (MRTI) makes it a valuable tool for high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatments, random and systematic errors in MRTI measurements may propagate into temperature-based parameter estimates used for pretreatment planning. This study assesses the MRTI effects of zero-mean Gaussian noise (SD = 0.0-2.0 °C), temporal sampling (tacq = 1.0-8.0 s), and spatial averaging (Res = 0.5-2.0 mm isotropic) on HIFU temperature measurements and temperature-based estimates of the amplitude and full width half maximum (FWHM) of the HIFU specific absorption rate and of tissue thermal diffusivity. The ultrasound beam used in simulations and ex vivo pork loin experiments has lateral and axial FWHM dimensions of 1.4 mm and 7.9 mm respectively. For spatial averaging simulations, beams with lateral FWHM varying from 1.2-2.2 mm are also assessed. Under noisy conditions, parameter estimates are improved by fitting to data from larger voxel regions. Varying the temporal sampling results in minimal changes in measured temperatures (HIFU beams studied, a spatial resolution of 1 × 1 × 3 mm3 or smaller is required to keep errors in temperature and all estimated parameters less than 10%. By quantifying the errors associated with these sampling characteristics, this work provides researchers with appropriate MRTI conditions for obtaining estimates of parameters essential to pretreatment modeling of HIFU thermal therapies.

  13. Object detection in ultrasound elastography for use in HIFU treatment of cancer

    Huang, Alex; Mankani, Soumya; Choo, Chang

    2014-03-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), has applications in treating various cancers, such as prostate, liver and breast cancer. In order for HIFU to be effective and efficient it needs to be guided by an imaging modality. While there are several options for guiding HIFU treatment, one of the most promising is ultrasound elastography. Current commercial devices use Brightness-Mode (B-mode) imaging or MRI, and are manual processes. Ultrasound elastography, allows complete automation of HIFU treatment due to the enhanced image, that elastography provides. The elastic image provides more information and less noise. To show that segmentation was possible on elastic images, nine algorithms were implemented in matlab and used on three distinct images for object detection. The three images used, have varying properties regarding object intensity and placement, as well as different noise patterns. Using PSNR, to gauge the effectiveness of each algorithm, it was shown that segmentation was possible on all images using different algorithms. The bilateral-shock-bilateral algorithm proved to be an overall effective algorithm in every situation with a PSNR of 83.87db on the phantom image. The segmentation results clearly highlight any object in the images. Future work includes fine tuning the algorithm with different phantom images and in-vivo images to distinguish between noise and desired object.

  14. Channel Impulse Response Length and Noise Variance Estimation for OFDM Systems with Adaptive Guard Interval

    Van Duc Nguyen

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available A new algorithm estimating channel impulse response (CIR length and noise variance for orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM systems with adaptive guard interval (GI length is proposed. To estimate the CIR length and the noise variance, the different statistical characteristics of the additive noise and the mobile radio channels are exploited. This difference is due to the fact that the variance of the channel coefficients depends on the position within the CIR, whereas the noise variance of each estimated channel tap is equal. Moreover, the channel can vary rapidly, but its length changes more slowly than its coefficients. An auxiliary function is established to distinguish these characteristics. The CIR length and the noise variance are estimated by varying the parameters of this function. The proposed method provides reliable information of the estimated CIR length and the noise variance even at signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of 0 dB. This information can be applied to an OFDM system with adaptive GI length, where the length of the GI is adapted to the current length of the CIR. The length of the GI can therefore be optimized. Consequently, the spectral efficiency of the system is increased.

  15. Channel Impulse Response Length and Noise Variance Estimation for OFDM Systems with Adaptive Guard Interval

    Gelle Guillaume

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A new algorithm estimating channel impulse response (CIR length and noise variance for orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM systems with adaptive guard interval (GI length is proposed. To estimate the CIR length and the noise variance, the different statistical characteristics of the additive noise and the mobile radio channels are exploited. This difference is due to the fact that the variance of the channel coefficients depends on the position within the CIR, whereas the noise variance of each estimated channel tap is equal. Moreover, the channel can vary rapidly, but its length changes more slowly than its coefficients. An auxiliary function is established to distinguish these characteristics. The CIR length and the noise variance are estimated by varying the parameters of this function. The proposed method provides reliable information of the estimated CIR length and the noise variance even at signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of 0 dB. This information can be applied to an OFDM system with adaptive GI length, where the length of the GI is adapted to the current length of the CIR. The length of the GI can therefore be optimized. Consequently, the spectral efficiency of the system is increased.

  16. A New Adaptive Square-Root Unscented Kalman Filter for Nonlinear Systems with Additive Noise

    Yong Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Kalman filter (KF, extended KF, and unscented KF all lack a self-adaptive capacity to deal with system noise. This paper describes a new adaptive filtering approach for nonlinear systems with additive noise. Based on the square-root unscented KF (SRUKF, traditional Maybeck’s estimator is modified and extended to nonlinear systems. The square root of the process noise covariance matrix Q or that of the measurement noise covariance matrix R is estimated straightforwardly. Because positive semidefiniteness of Q or R is guaranteed, several shortcomings of traditional Maybeck’s algorithm are overcome. Thus, the stability and accuracy of the filter are greatly improved. In addition, based on three different nonlinear systems, a new adaptive filtering technique is described in detail. Specifically, simulation results are presented, where the new filter was applied to a highly nonlinear model (i.e., the univariate nonstationary growth model (UNGM. The UNGM is compared with the standard SRUKF to demonstrate its superior filtering performance. The adaptive SRUKF (ASRUKF algorithm can complete direct recursion and calculate the square roots of the variance matrixes of the system state and noise, which ensures the symmetry and nonnegative definiteness of the matrixes and greatly improves the accuracy, stability, and self-adaptability of the filter.

  17. Development of a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Hydrophone System

    The growing clinical use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has driven a need for reliable, reproducible measurements of HIFU acoustic fields. We have previously presented data on a reflective scatterer approach, incorporating several novel features for improved bandwidth, reliability, and reproducibility [Proc. 2005 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium, 1739-1742]. We now report on several design improvements which have increase the signal to noise ratio of the system, and potentially reduced the cost of implementation. For the scattering element, we now use an artificial sapphire material to provide a more uniform radiating surface. The receiver is a segmented, truncated spherical structure with a 10 cm radius; the scattering element is positioned at the center of the sphere. The receiver is made from 25 micron thick, biaxially stretched PVDF, with a Pt-Au electrode on the front surface. In the new design, a specialized backing material provides the stiffness required to maintain structural stability, while at the same time providing both electrical shielding and ultrasonic absorption. Compared with the previous version, the new receiver design has improved the noise performance by 8-12 dB; the new scattering sphere has reduced the scattering loss by another 14 dB, producing an effective sensitivity of -298 dB re 1 microVolt/Pa. The design trade-off still involves receiver sensitivity with effective spot size, and signal distortion from the scatter structure. However, the reduced cost and improved repeatability of the new scatter approach makes the overall design more robust for routine waveform measurements of HIFU systems.

  18. Implementasi dan Perbandingan Metode Alpha-Trimmed Mean Filter dan Adaptive Media Filter untuk Reduksi Noise pada Citra Digital

    Nababan, Sunfirst Lady Jeanfera

    2015-01-01

    Basically, every image acquisition can cause to the presence of noise in the resulting image. Uniform Noise, Salt & Pepper Noise, and Speckle Noise are three of many model noises that are present in the image. Digital image that contained noise can cause problems in the form of an image that cannot be interpreted properly by human, however noise can be reduce through image restoration called filtering. Filter method that can be used to reduce the noises are Alpha-Trimmed Mean Filter and Adapt...

  19. Design of a Low-Power VLSI Macrocell for Nonlinear Adaptive Video Noise Reduction

    Fanucci Luca; Saponara Sergio; Terreni Pierangelo

    2004-01-01

    A VLSI macrocell for edge-preserving video noise reduction is proposed in the paper. It is based on a nonlinear rational filter enhanced by a noise estimator for blind and dynamic adaptation of the filtering parameters to the input signal statistics. The VLSI filter features a modular architecture allowing the extension of both mask size and filtering directions. Both spatial and spatiotemporal algorithms are supported. Simulation results with monochrome test videos prove its efficiency for ...

  20. Real-time adaptive filtering of dental drill noise using a digital signal processor

    Kaymak, E; Atherton, MA; Rotter, KRG; Millar, B.

    2006-01-01

    The application of noise reduction methods requires the integration of acoustics engineering and digital signal processing, which is well served by a mechatronic approach as described in this paper. The Normalised Least Mean Square (NLMS) algorithm is implemented on the Texas Instruments TMS320C6713 DSK Digital Signal Processor (DSP) as an adaptive digital filter for dental drill noise. Blocks within the Matlab/Simulink Signal Processing Blockset and the Embedded Target for TI C6000 DSP famil...

  1. HIFU for Palliative Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer.

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest malignancies, with only a 6 % 5-year survival rate and over 50 % of patients being diagnosed at the advanced stage. Current therapies are ineffective, and the treatment of patients with advanced disease is palliative. In the past decade, HIFU ablation has emerged as a modality for palliative treatment of pancreatic tumors. Multiple preclinical and non-randomized clinical trials have been performed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this procedure. Substantial tumor-related pain reduction was achieved in most cases after HIFU treatment and few significant side effects were observed. In addition, some studies indicate that combination of HIFU ablation with chemotherapy may provide a survival benefit. This chapter summarizes the pre-clinical and clinical experience obtained to date in HIFU treatment of pancreatic tumors and discusses the challenges, limitations and new approaches in this modality. PMID:26486333

  2. Determination of cytotoxic thermal dose during HIFU ablation

    Nandlall, Sacha D.; Bazán-Peregrino, Miriam; Mo, Steven; Coussios, Constantin-C.

    2012-10-01

    Thermal dose has been proposed for various hyperthermic cancer treatment modalities as a measure of heat-induced cell and tissue damage. However, many of the models that are currently used for calculating thermal dose have not been validated or suitably adapted for the elevated temperatures and rates of heating encountered during ablation by High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). This work quantifies the performance of the widely employed Cumulative Equivalent Minutes at 43°C (CEM43) thermal dose metric under HIFU-relevant heating. A total of 36 agar phantoms were embedded with different human cancer cell lines (PC3, 22RV1, or ZR75.1) as well as calcein AM and propidium iodide assays. The phantoms were cast in sterile molds with internal dimensions of 7 cm × 7 cm × 2 mm. Using a water bath, 12 of the phantoms were treated with mild hyperthermia (43-46°C for up to 60 minutes), while another 12 were subjected to HIFU-relevant temperature profiles (60-80°C peak temperature, 2-3°C/s peak heating rate). In each of the remaining 12 phantoms, 8 HIFU exposures were carried out in a 37°C water tank (1.067 MHz, 95% duty cycle, 3-6 MPa peak rarefaction pressure, 2-20 s exposure duration). Cavitation emissions were monitored passively with a detector transducer that was confocally and co-axially aligned with the HIFU source. Cell death was quantified by measuring the locally averaged fluorescence intensity of the assays relative to unheated and severely heat-shocked phantoms. The results show that the CEM43 dose required to achieve the same level of heat-induced cell death varies considerably across cell lines, and that inertial cavitation can cause significant mechanical damage at ablation-relevant intensities even when no significant thermal dose is delivered (CEM43 < 5 s). These findings demonstrate the need for improved models of cell death at ablation-relevant temperatures.

  3. Removal of noises from electromagnetic radiation of coal or rock with EEMD-adaptive morphological filter

    CHEN Shi-hai; WANG En-yuan

    2012-01-01

    The electromagnetic radiation (EMR) signal collected by monitoring system during coal or rock dynamic disaster may be interferred easily by electromagnetic noises in mines.The noises have a direct influence on the recognition and analysis of the EMR signal features during the disaster.With the aim of removing these noises,an ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) adaptive morphological filter was proposed.From the result of the simulation and the experiment,it is shown that the method can restrain the random noise and white Gaussian noise mixed with EMR signal effectively.The filter is highly useful for improving the robustness of the coal or rock dynamic disaster monitoring system.

  4. Adaptive Noise Cancellation System for Low Frequency Transmission of Sound in Open Fan Aircraft

    Steven Griffin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the use of a structural/acoustic model of a section of a large aircraft to help define the sensor/actuator architecture that was used in a hardware demonstration of adaptive noise cancellation. Disturbances considered were representative of propeller-induced disturbances from an open fan aircraft. Controller on and controller off results from a hardware demonstration on a portion of a large aircraft are also included. The use of the model has facilitated the development of a new testing technique, closely related to modal testing, that can be used to find good structural actuator locations for adaptive noise cancellation.

  5. Adaptive cancellation of light relative intensity noise for fiber optic gyroscope

    Zhong xiao Ji

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce the relative intensity noise (RIN in the interferometric signal of the fiber optic gyroscope (FOG, an adaptive noise subtraction method is presented, which aims to overcome to the drawbacks that the fixed delay time and gain of the digital noise subtraction method. The drawbacks will make the performance of FOG to be degraded greatly in the changing environment. In the paper the adaptive noise subtraction system based on the recursive least squares algorithm (RLS is formed in FPGA, in which the interferometric signal is regarded as the signal source, and RIN in the free end of the optical fiber coupler of FOG is looked as the noise reference signal. The two critical parameters that minimum delay time and its varying range result from measuring the minimum and maximum delay times of the interferometric signal in a certain temperature range. The off-line and on-line temperature experimental results verify the capability of adapting to the environmental temperature.

  6. Adaptive Cancellation of Light Relative Intensity Noise for Fiber Optic Gyroscope

    Zhongxiao Ji

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce the relative intensity noise (RIN in the interferometric signal of the fiber optic gyroscope (FOG, an adaptive noise subtraction method is presented, which aims to overcome to the drawbacks that the fixed delay time and gain of the digital noise subtraction method. The drawbacks will make the performance of FOG to be degraded greatly in the changing environment. In the paper the adaptive noise subtraction system based on the recursive least squares algorithm (RLS is formed in FPGA, in which the interferometric signal is regarded as the signal source, and RIN in the free end of the optical fiber coupler of FOG is looked as the noise reference signal. The two critical parameters that minimum delay time and its varying range result from measuring the minimum and maximum delay times of the interferometric signal in a certain temperature range. The off-line and on-line temperature experimental results verify the capability of adapting to the environmental temperature.      

  7. Adaptive V/UV Speech Detection Based on Characterization of Background Noise

    F. Beritelli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an adaptive system for Voiced/Unvoiced (V/UV speech detection in the presence of background noise. Genetic algorithms were used to select the features that offer the best V/UV detection according to the output of a background Noise Classifier (NC and a Signal-to-Noise Ratio Estimation (SNRE system. The system was implemented, and the tests performed using the TIMIT speech corpus and its phonetic classification. The results were compared with a nonadaptive classification system and the V/UV detectors adopted by two important speech coding standards: the V/UV detection system in the ETSI ES 202 212 v1.1.2 and the speech classification in the Selectable Mode Vocoder (SMV algorithm. In all cases the proposed adaptive V/UV classifier outperforms the traditional solutions giving an improvement of 25% in very noisy environments.

  8. Adaptive Threshold Clipper Combining Receiver for Fast Frequency Hopping Systems during Partial-Band Noise Jamming

    肖立民; 许希斌; 姚彦

    2001-01-01

    Diversity combining technologies are analyzed for fastfrequency-hopping spread spectrum systems during partial-band noise jamming to develop a novel combining receiver called an Adaptive Threshold Clipper Combining Receiver (ATCCR). The optimal clipping level for an ATCCR is analyzed, computed, and compared with several other diversity combining technologies. Since the ATCCR can estimate the power of the jamming and the number of jammed frequency cells to adaptively adjust the clipper's threshold, the system performance using the adaptive threshold clipper combining technique can be greatly improved.

  9. Transform Domain Robust Variable Step Size Griffiths' Adaptive Algorithm for Noise Cancellation in ECG

    Hegde, Veena; Deekshit, Ravishankar; Satyanarayana, P. S.

    2011-12-01

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) is widely used for diagnosis of heart diseases. Good quality of ECG is utilized by physicians for interpretation and identification of physiological and pathological phenomena. However, in real situations, ECG recordings are often corrupted by artifacts or noise. Noise severely limits the utility of the recorded ECG and thus needs to be removed, for better clinical evaluation. In the present paper a new noise cancellation technique is proposed for removal of random noise like muscle artifact from ECG signal. A transform domain robust variable step size Griffiths' LMS algorithm (TVGLMS) is proposed for noise cancellation. For the TVGLMS, the robust variable step size has been achieved by using the Griffiths' gradient which uses cross-correlation between the desired signal contaminated with observation or random noise and the input. The algorithm is discrete cosine transform (DCT) based and uses symmetric property of the signal to represent the signal in frequency domain with lesser number of frequency coefficients when compared to that of discrete Fourier transform (DFT). The algorithm is implemented for adaptive line enhancer (ALE) filter which extracts the ECG signal in a noisy environment using LMS filter adaptation. The proposed algorithm is found to have better convergence error/misadjustment when compared to that of ordinary transform domain LMS (TLMS) algorithm, both in the presence of white/colored observation noise. The reduction in convergence error achieved by the new algorithm with desired signal decomposition is found to be lower than that obtained without decomposition. The experimental results indicate that the proposed method is better than traditional adaptive filter using LMS algorithm in the aspects of retaining geometrical characteristics of ECG signal.

  10. Signal to noise ratio of free space homodyne coherent optical communication after adaptive optics compensation

    Huang, Jian; Mei, Haiping; Deng, Ke; Kang, Li; Zhu, Wenyue; Yao, Zhoushi

    2015-12-01

    Designing and evaluating the adaptive optics system for coherent optical communication link through atmosphere requires to distinguish the effects of the residual wavefront and disturbed amplitude to the signal to noise ratio. Based on the new definition of coherent efficiency, a formula of signal to noise ratio for describing the performance of coherent optical communication link after wavefront compensation is derived in the form of amplitude non-uniformity and wavefront error separated. A beam quality metric is deduced mathematically to evaluate the effect of disturbed amplitude to the signal to noise ratio. Experimental results show that the amplitude fluctuation on the receiver aperture may reduce the signal to noise ratio about 24% on average when Fried coherent length r0=16 cm.

  11. Time-scale and noise optimality in self-organized critical adaptive networks.

    Kuehn, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that adaptive networks driven by simple local rules can organize into "critical" global steady states, providing another framework for self-organized criticality (SOC). We focus on the important convergence to criticality and show that noise and time-scale optimality are reached at finite values. This is in sharp contrast to the previously believed optimal zero noise and infinite time-scale separation case. Furthermore, we discover a noise-induced phase transition for the breakdown of SOC. We also investigate each of these three effects separately by developing models that reveal three generically low-dimensional dynamical behaviors: time-scale resonance, a simplified version of stochastic resonance, which we call steady-state stochastic resonance, and noise-induced phase transitions. PMID:22463275

  12. Adaptive correction procedure for TVL1 image deblurring under impulse noise

    Bai, Minru; Zhang, Xiongjun; Shao, Qianqian

    2016-08-01

    For the problem of image restoration of observed images corrupted by blur and impulse noise, the widely used TVL1 model may deviate from both the data-acquisition model and the prior model, especially for high noise levels. In order to seek a solution of high recovery quality beyond the reach of the TVL1 model, we propose an adaptive correction procedure for TVL1 image deblurring under impulse noise. Then, a proximal alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) is presented to solve the corrected TVL1 model and its convergence is also established under very mild conditions. It is verified by numerical experiments that our proposed approach outperforms the TVL1 model in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) values and visual quality, especially for high noise levels: it can handle salt-and-pepper noise as high as 90% and random-valued noise as high as 70%. In addition, a comparison with a state-of-the-art method, the two-phase method, demonstrates the superiority of the proposed approach.

  13. HIFU-induced gene activation in vitro

    Liu, Yunbo; Zhong, Pei; Kon, Takashi; Li, Chuanyuan

    2001-05-01

    This work investigated the inducible gene activation in cancer cells that were sublethally injured during HIFU treatment. HeLa cells were transfected by an adenovirus vector that encodes GFP under the control of hsp70B promoter, leading to about 65% transfection efficiency. A volume of 10 μL transfected HeLa cells in suspension (5×107 cells/ml) were placed at the bottom of a PCR tube so that the cell suspension could be heated to a peak temperature of 50°C, 60°C, and 70°C for 120, 10, and 1 s, respectively, by a focused 1.1-MHz HIFU transducer operated at a peak negative pressure of -2.7 MPa at different duty cycles. One day after HIFU treatment, cell viability was determined to be 63%, 35%, and 18%, respectively, based on Trypan Blue exclusion test. Importantly, in all test groups, inducible GFP expression was detected in about 40%-50% of the surviving cells with GFP intensity increased by 25-fold based on flow cytometry analysis. These results demonstrate that even under the short exposure duration of HIFU treatment, inducible gene expression could be produced in sublethally injured cell population in vitro. Further studies are underway to explore the optimal HIFU condition for gene activation in vivo.

  14. Real-time monitoring of HIFU treatment using pulse inversion

    Song, Jae Hee; Yoo, Yangmo; Song, Tai-Kyong; Chang, Jin Ho

    2013-08-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging is widely used for the real-time guidance of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment at a relatively low cost. However, ultrasound image guided HIFU (USgHIFU) is limited in the real-time monitoring of HIFU treatment due to the large amplitude HIFU signals received by the US imaging transducer. The amplitude of the HIFU scattered signal is generally much higher than the amplitude of the pulse-echo signal received by the imaging transducer. This creates an interference pattern obscuring the image of the tissue. As such, it is difficult to monitor lesion location. This paper proposes a real-time monitoring method to be performed concurrently with the HIFU insonation, but without HIFU interference, which allows for the improvement of treatment accuracy and safety in USgHIFU. The proposed method utilizes the physical properties of pulse inversion which is capable of removing the fundamental and odd harmonic components of the HIFU interference. Therefore, it is possible to secure the desired spectral bandwidth used to construct US images for HIFU treatment monitoring. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated through experiments with both a bovine serum albumin phantom and a chicken breast. The results demonstrated that the proposed method is capable of providing interference-free US images, thus successfully allowing for US imaging during HIFU treatment.

  15. Real-time monitoring of HIFU treatment using pulse inversion

    Ultrasound (US) imaging is widely used for the real-time guidance of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment at a relatively low cost. However, ultrasound image guided HIFU (USgHIFU) is limited in the real-time monitoring of HIFU treatment due to the large amplitude HIFU signals received by the US imaging transducer. The amplitude of the HIFU scattered signal is generally much higher than the amplitude of the pulse-echo signal received by the imaging transducer. This creates an interference pattern obscuring the image of the tissue. As such, it is difficult to monitor lesion location. This paper proposes a real-time monitoring method to be performed concurrently with the HIFU insonation, but without HIFU interference, which allows for the improvement of treatment accuracy and safety in USgHIFU. The proposed method utilizes the physical properties of pulse inversion which is capable of removing the fundamental and odd harmonic components of the HIFU interference. Therefore, it is possible to secure the desired spectral bandwidth used to construct US images for HIFU treatment monitoring. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated through experiments with both a bovine serum albumin phantom and a chicken breast. The results demonstrated that the proposed method is capable of providing interference-free US images, thus successfully allowing for US imaging during HIFU treatment. (paper)

  16. Developing de-noising methods for ultrasonic NDT based on wavelet transform and adaptive filtering

    Digital signal processing methods based on the advanced wavelet transform and adaptive filtering were developed to deal with the problem of material's grain noise in ultrasonic Non Destructive Testing applications. The developed methods were implemented in lab View (Laboratory Virtual Instruments Engineering Workbench) programming environment. The experimental ultrasonic signals were obtained by inspecting stainless steel blocks with side-drilled holes, and carbon steel welded plates contain three types of welding flaws: root crack, centerline crack and slag inclusion. The simulations were carried out using CIVA Non Destructive Evaluation modeling software. Wavelet transform has introduced innovative changes in different fields of science and engineering. One of its important applications is in de-noising of signals and images. Wavelet packet is an efficient de-noising method, which has been used for ultrasonic Non Destructive Testing signals de-noising, wavelet packet is generalizations of the discrete wavelet transform. The first part of this research proposes the use of the un decimated wavelet transform in implementing wavelet packets to overcome the limitation of the shift variance encountered in discrete wavelet transform. Simulations and experiments were carried out on flaw's echo signals contaminated with material's grain noise, various wavelet transform processing parameters were investigated, including the number of decomposition levels, analyzing wavelets, and threshold setting. The results showed superior de-noising effect of the developed method over the conventional one. In the second part of the research, improvements are proposed to the multi-stage adaptive filter, which has been reported in a previous study as an advanced adaptive noise cancellation system for ultrasonic None Destructive Testing applications. The multi stage adaptive filter is limited by the slow convergence speed of the least-mean-squares algorithm as well as

  17. Cavitation damage in blood clots under HIFU

    Weiss, Hope; Ahadi, Golnaz; Hoelscher, Thilo; Szeri, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has been shown to accelerate thrombolysis, the dissolution of blood clots, in vitro and in vivo, for treatment of ischemic stroke. Cavitation in sonothrombolysis is thought to play an important role, although the mechanisms are not fully understood. The damage to a blood clot associated with bubble collapses in a HIFU field is studied. The region of damage caused by a bubble collapse on the fibrin network of the blood clot exposed to HIFU is estimated, and compared with experimental assessment of the damage. The mechanical damage to the network caused by a bubble is probed using two independent approaches, a strain based method and an energy based method. Immunoflourescent fibrin staining is used to assess the region of damage experimentally.

  18. Effects of MRTI sampling characteristics on estimation of HIFU SAR and tissue thermal diffusivity

    While the non-invasive and three-dimensional nature of magnetic-resonance temperature imaging (MRTI) makes it a valuable tool for high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatments, random and systematic errors in MRTI measurements may propagate into temperature-based parameter estimates used for pretreatment planning. This study assesses the MRTI effects of zero-mean Gaussian noise (SD = 0.0–2.0 °C), temporal sampling (tacq = 1.0–8.0 s), and spatial averaging (Res = 0.5–2.0 mm isotropic) on HIFU temperature measurements and temperature-based estimates of the amplitude and full width half maximum (FWHM) of the HIFU specific absorption rate and of tissue thermal diffusivity. The ultrasound beam used in simulations and ex vivo pork loin experiments has lateral and axial FWHM dimensions of 1.4 mm and 7.9 mm respectively. For spatial averaging simulations, beams with lateral FWHM varying from 1.2–2.2 mm are also assessed. Under noisy conditions, parameter estimates are improved by fitting to data from larger voxel regions. Varying the temporal sampling results in minimal changes in measured temperatures (3 or smaller is required to keep errors in temperature and all estimated parameters less than 10%. By quantifying the errors associated with these sampling characteristics, this work provides researchers with appropriate MRTI conditions for obtaining estimates of parameters essential to pretreatment modeling of HIFU thermal therapies. (paper)

  19. REMOVAL OF HIGH DENSITY IMPULSE NOISE USING MORPHOLOGICAL BASED ADAPTIVE UNSYMMETRICAL TRIMMED MID-POINT FILTER

    S. Saravanakumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A Morphological based Adaptive Unsymmetrical Trimmed Mid-Point Filter (MAUTMPF for the restoration of gray scale images corrupted by salt and pepper noise for varying noise densities is proposed in this study. Images corrupted by impulsive noise severely hinder subsequent image processing tasks, such as edge detection, image segmentation, object recognition, etc. Therefore, it is absolutely essential to restore the original image from the corrupted image. The proposed algorithm replaces the corrupted pixel by mid point value out of the retained pixels other than 0’s and 255’s in a 3×3 window. The essential condition for the validity of the window is that at least two pixels in the selected window should be uncorrupted; if not the window size is incremented by 2. The iteration stops when the window size reaches 7. In particular case, when the condition for validity doesn’t hold in 7×7 window then the original 3×3 window is chosen and midpoint of minimum and maximum values of already processed pixels is replaced with the centre pixel. experimental evaluation using MATLAB reveals that our MAUTMPF shows better performance compared to the previous de-noising algorithms in terms of Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR and Mean Square Error (MSE for noise densities up to 90%. The validity of the proposed algorithm is verified by testing it for different gray scale images.

  20. Background noise cancellation of manatee vocalizations using an adaptive line enhancer.

    Yan, Zheng; Niezrecki, Christopher; Cattafesta, Louis N; Beusse, Diedrich O

    2006-07-01

    The West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) has become an endangered species partly because of an increase in the number of collisions with boats. A device to alert boaters of the presence of manatees is desired. Previous research has shown that background noise limits the manatee vocalization detection range (which is critical for practical implementation). By improving the signal-to-noise ratio of the measured manatee vocalization signal, it is possible to extend the detection range. The finite impulse response (FIR) structure of the adaptive line enhancer (ALE) can detect and track narrow-band signals buried in broadband noise. In this paper, a constrained infinite impulse response (IIR) ALE, called a feedback ALE (FALE), is implemented to reduce the background noise. In addition, a bandpass filter is used as a baseline for comparison. A library consisting of 100 manatee calls spanning ten different signal categories is used to evaluate the performance of the bandpass filter, FIR-ALE, and FALE. The results show that the FALE is capable of reducing background noise by about 6.0 and 21.4 dB better than that of the FIR-ALE and bandpass filter, respectively, when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the original manatee call is -5 dB. PMID:16875212

  1. Intercostal HIFU Treatment: A Tissue Phantom

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) when used clinically to treat liver and kidney tumours is often directed between the ribs. This paper details the construction of a tissue phantom, incorporating ribs, and its use to assess the clinical safety of HIFU exposures. The prefocal, acoustic side-lobes of the ultrasonic beam were studied with and without rib interference, and thermocouples used to assess in-situ temperature changes. The results show that there are implications in regards to the safety of clinical treatment, should the operator be unaware of the characteristics of the transducer being used

  2. HIFU as a Neoadjuvant Therapy in Cancer Treatment

    Zhong, P.; Xing, F.; Huang, X.; Zhu, H.; Lo, H. W.; Zhong, X.; Pruitt, S.; Robertson, C.

    2011-09-01

    To broaden the application spectrum of HIFU in cancer therapy, we performed a pilot experiment to evaluate the potential of using HIFU as a neoadjuvant therapy prior to surgery. Mice bearing wild-type B16F10 melanoma inoculated subcutaneously were either untreated (control) or treated by HIFU, CPA-7 or HIFU+CPA-7 before surgical resection of the primary tumor two days after HIFU treatment. The animals were then followed for four weeks or up to the humane endpoint to determine local recurrence, distant metastasis, and survival rate. The results demonstrate that animals treated by HIFU+CPA-7 (which is a small molecule that suppresses STAT3 activity) had a significantly lower recurrence rate, and slower growth of the recurrent tumor, with concomitantly higher survival rate, followed by those treated with CPA-7 and HIFU, respectively. Immunological assays revealed that CPA-7 treatment could significantly lower STAT3, and subsequently, Treg activities. In particular, the combination of HIFU and CPA-7 can induce a much stronger anti-tumor immune response than HIFU or surgery alone, as assessed by CTL and IFN-γ secretion. Overall, our results suggest that HIFU in combination with immunotherapy strategies has the potential to be used as a neoadjuvant therapy to prime the host with a strong anti-tumor immune response before surgical resection of the primary tumor. This multimodality, combinational therapy has the potential to greatly broaden the range of HIFU applications in cancer therapy with lower tumor recurrence and improved survival rate.

  3. Noises Cancelling Adaptive Methods in Control Telemetry Systems of Oil Electrical Submersible Pumps

    Ustun, Ozgur; Yilmaz, Murat; Ali Zada, Parviz; Tuncay, R. Nejat

    2015-01-01

    The main ideas of this paper are that only some from more than 10 MATLAB Adaptive Methods library may be useful and can be recommended to filter out High-Noises in similar Control Telemetry Channels of Electric Power Components like ESP Systems: only four of applied have shown successfully good results in the early prediction of the ESP motor real insulation disruption (like Sign-error, Sign-data and Sign-sign filters). The best among the ten analyzed adaptive filter algorithms was recognized...

  4. AN ADAPTIVE OPTIMAL KALMAN FILTER FOR STOCHASTIC VIBRATION CONTROL SYSTEM WITH UNKNOWN NOISE VARIANCES

    Li Shu; Zhuo Jiashou; Ren Qingwen

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, an optimal criterion is presented for adaptive Kalman filter in a control sys tem with unknown variances of stochastic vibration by constructing a function of noise variances and minimizing the function. We solve the model and measure variances by using DFP optimal method to guarantee the results of Kalman filter to be optimized. Finally, the control of vibration can be implemented by LQG method.

  5. Marginalized adaptive particle filtering for nonlinear models with unknown time-varying noise parameters

    Ökzan, E.; Šmídl, Václav; Saha, S.; Lundquist, C.; Gustafsson, F.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 6 (2013), s. 1566-1575. ISSN 0005-1098 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP102/11/0437 Keywords : Unknown Noise Statistics * Adaptive Filtering * Marginalized Particle Filter * Bayesian Conjugate prior Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory Impact factor: 3.132, year: 2013 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/AS/smidl-0393047.pdf

  6. Dynamic Adaptive Median Filter (DAMF for Removal of High Density Impulse Noise

    Punyaban Patel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel adaptive filtering scheme to remove impulse noise from images. The scheme replaces the corrupted test pixel with the median value of non-corrupted neighboring pixels selected from a window dynamically. If the number of non-corrupted pixels in the selected window is not sufficient, a window of next higher size is chosen. Thus window size is automatically adapted based on the density of noise in the image as well as the density of corruption local to a window. As a result window size may vary pixel to pixel while filtering. The scheme is simple to implement and do not require multiple iterations. The efficacy of the proposed scheme is evaluated with respect to subjective as well as objective parameters on standard images on various noise densities. Comparative analysis reveals that the proposed scheme has improved performance over other schemes, preferably in high density impulse noise cases. Further, the computational overhead is also less as compared its competent scheme.

  7. Speech perception at positive signal-to-noise ratios using adaptive adjustment of time compression.

    Schlueter, Anne; Brand, Thomas; Lemke, Ulrike; Nitzschner, Stefan; Kollmeier, Birger; Holube, Inga

    2015-11-01

    Positive signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) characterize listening situations most relevant for hearing-impaired listeners in daily life and should therefore be considered when evaluating hearing aid algorithms. For this, a speech-in-noise test was developed and evaluated, in which the background noise is presented at fixed positive SNRs and the speech rate (i.e., the time compression of the speech material) is adaptively adjusted. In total, 29 younger and 12 older normal-hearing, as well as 24 older hearing-impaired listeners took part in repeated measurements. Younger normal-hearing and older hearing-impaired listeners conducted one of two adaptive methods which differed in adaptive procedure and step size. Analysis of the measurements with regard to list length and estimation strategy for thresholds resulted in a practical method measuring the time compression for 50% recognition. This method uses time-compression adjustment and step sizes according to Versfeld and Dreschler [(2002). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 111, 401-408], with sentence scoring, lists of 30 sentences, and a maximum likelihood method for threshold estimation. Evaluation of the procedure showed that older participants obtained higher test-retest reliability compared to younger participants. Depending on the group of listeners, one or two lists are required for training prior to data collection. PMID:26627804

  8. Adaptive cancellation of geomagnetic background noise for magnetic anomaly detection using coherence

    Magnetic anomaly detection (MAD) is an effective method for the detection of ferromagnetic targets against background magnetic fields. Currently, the performance of MAD systems is mainly limited by the background geomagnetic noise. Several techniques have been developed to detect target signatures, such as the synchronous reference subtraction (SRS) method. In this paper, we propose an adaptive coherent noise suppression (ACNS) method. The proposed method is capable of evaluating and detecting weak anomaly signals buried in background geomagnetic noise. Tests with real-world recorded magnetic signals show that the ACNS method can excellently remove the background geomagnetic noise by about 21 dB or more in high background geomagnetic field environments. Additionally, as a general form of the SRS method, the ACNS method offers appreciable advantages over the existing algorithms. Compared to the SRS method, the ACNS algorithm can eliminate the false target signals and represents a noise suppressing capability improvement of 6.4 dB. The positive outcomes in terms of intelligibility make this method a potential candidate for application in MAD systems. (paper)

  9. Noise

    Noise is all around you, from televisions and radios to lawn mowers and washing machines. Normally, you ... sensitive structures of the inner ear and cause noise-induced hearing loss. More than 30 million Americans ...

  10. A comparison of adaptive and notch filtering for removing electromagnetic noise from monopolar surface electromyographic signals

    The purpose of this study was to compare the monopolar electromyographic (EMG) amplitude versus isometric force relationships from three signal processing methods (raw versus notch filtering versus adaptive filtering). Seventeen healthy subjects (mean ± SD age = 24.6 ± 4.3 yr) performed incremental isometric muscle actions of the dominant leg extensors in 10% increments from 10% to 100% of the maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). During each muscle action, a monopolar surface EMG signal was recorded from the vastus lateralis and processed with the three signal processing methods. The linear slope coefficients for the EMG amplitude versus isometric force relationships were equivalent for the three signal processing methods and correlated (r = 0.997–0.999). However, the mean amplitude values for the notch-filtered signals were less than those for the raw and adaptive-filtered signals. Thus, adaptive filtering may be the best method for removing electromagnetic noise from monopolar surface EMG signals

  11. The effects of an adaptive directional BEAM microphone on the mismatch negativity responses of cochlear implant users in noise

    ERDOĞAN*, Asuman; Akdaş, Ferda

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effects of noise on mismatch negativity (MMN) responses and the possible benefits of an adaptive directional BEAM microphone in noise during MMN recordings, and to compare the cochlear implant-evoked potential results with normal hearing subjects. Materials and methods: /da/ and /di/ speech stimuli were used to elicit MMN responses in 11 Freedom cochlear implant users and in 11 normal hearing subjects. Speech noise was delivered at 80 dB sound pressure level (-10 dB signa...

  12. Three-dimensional anisotropic adaptive filtering of projection data for noise reduction in cone beam CT

    Purpose: The combination of quickly rotating C-arm gantry with digital flat panel has enabled the acquisition of three-dimensional data (3D) in the interventional suite. However, image quality is still somewhat limited since the hardware has not been optimized for CT imaging. Adaptive anisotropic filtering has the ability to improve image quality by reducing the noise level and therewith the radiation dose without introducing noticeable blurring. By applying the filtering prior to 3D reconstruction, noise-induced streak artifacts are reduced as compared to processing in the image domain. Methods: 3D anisotropic adaptive filtering was used to process an ensemble of 2D x-ray views acquired along a circular trajectory around an object. After arranging the input data into a 3D space (2D projections + angle), the orientation of structures was estimated using a set of differently oriented filters. The resulting tensor representation of local orientation was utilized to control the anisotropic filtering. Low-pass filtering is applied only along structures to maintain high spatial frequency components perpendicular to these. The evaluation of the proposed algorithm includes numerical simulations, phantom experiments, and in-vivo data which were acquired using an AXIOM Artis dTA C-arm system (Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim, Germany). Spatial resolution and noise levels were compared with and without adaptive filtering. A human observer study was carried out to evaluate low-contrast detectability. Results: The adaptive anisotropic filtering algorithm was found to significantly improve low-contrast detectability by reducing the noise level by half (reduction of the standard deviation in certain areas from 74 to 30 HU). Virtually no degradation of high contrast spatial resolution was observed in the modulation transfer function (MTF) analysis. Although the algorithm is computationally intensive, hardware acceleration using Nvidia's CUDA Interface provided an 8.9-fold

  13. An Innovations-Based Noise Cancelling Technique on Inverse Kepstrum Whitening Filter and Adaptive FIR Filter in Beamforming Structure

    Jinsoo Jeong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an acoustic noise cancelling technique using an inverse kepstrum system as an innovations-based whitening application for an adaptive finite impulse response (FIR filter in beamforming structure. The inverse kepstrum method uses an innovations-whitened form from one acoustic path transfer function between a reference microphone sensor and a noise source so that the rear-end reference signal will then be a whitened sequence to a cascaded adaptive FIR filter in the beamforming structure. By using an inverse kepstrum filter as a whitening filter with the use of a delay filter, the cascaded adaptive FIR filter estimates only the numerator of the polynomial part from the ratio of overall combined transfer functions. The test results have shown that the adaptive FIR filter is more effective in beamforming structure than an adaptive noise cancelling (ANC structure in terms of signal distortion in the desired signal and noise reduction in noise with nonminimum phase components. In addition, the inverse kepstrum method shows almost the same convergence level in estimate of noise statistics with the use of a smaller amount of adaptive FIR filter weights than the kepstrum method, hence it could provide better computational simplicity in processing. Furthermore, the rear-end inverse kepstrum method in beamforming structure has shown less signal distortion in the desired signal than the front-end kepstrum method and the front-end inverse kepstrum method in beamforming structure.

  14. Multi-microphone adaptive noise reduction strategies for coordinated stimulation in bilateral cochlear implant devices.

    Kokkinakis, Kostas; Loizou, Philipos C

    2010-05-01

    Bilateral cochlear implant (BI-CI) recipients achieve high word recognition scores in quiet listening conditions. Still, there is a substantial drop in speech recognition performance when there is reverberation and more than one interferers. BI-CI users utilize information from just two directional microphones placed on opposite sides of the head in a so-called independent stimulation mode. To enhance the ability of BI-CI users to communicate in noise, the use of two computationally inexpensive multi-microphone adaptive noise reduction strategies exploiting information simultaneously collected by the microphones associated with two behind-the-ear (BTE) processors (one per ear) is proposed. To this end, as many as four microphones are employed (two omni-directional and two directional) in each of the two BTE processors (one per ear). In the proposed two-microphone binaural strategies, all four microphones (two behind each ear) are being used in a coordinated stimulation mode. The hypothesis is that such strategies combine spatial information from all microphones to form a better representation of the target than that made available with only a single input. Speech intelligibility is assessed in BI-CI listeners using IEEE sentences corrupted by up to three steady speech-shaped noise sources. Results indicate that multi-microphone strategies improve speech understanding in single- and multi-noise source scenarios. PMID:21117762

  15. Adaptive ambient noise tomography and its application to the Garlock Fault, southern California

    Li, Peng; Lin, Guoqing

    2014-05-01

    Traditional ambient noise tomography methods using regular grid nodes are often ill posed because the inversion grids do not always represent the distribution of ray paths. Large grid spacing is usually used to reduce the number of inversion parameters, which may not be able to solve for small-scale velocity structure. We present a new adaptive tomography method with irregular grids that provides a few advantages over the traditional methods. First, irregular grids with different sizes and shapes can fit the ray distribution better and the traditionally ill-posed problem can become more stable owing to the different parametrizations. Secondly, the data in the area with dense ray sampling will be sufficiently utilized so that the model resolution can be greatly improved. Both synthetic and real data are used to test the newly developed tomography algorithm. In synthetic data tests, we compare the resolution and stability of the traditional and adaptive methods. The results show that adaptive tomography is more stable and performs better in improving the resolution in the area with dense ray sampling. For real data, we extract the ambient noise signals of the seismic data near the Garlock Fault region, obtained from the Southern California Earthquake Data Center. The resulting group velocity of Rayleigh wave is well correlated with the geological structures. High-velocity anomalies are shown in the cold southern Sierra Nevada, the Tehachapi Mountains and the Western San Gabriel Mountains. In contrast, low velocity values are prominent in the southern San Joaquin Valley and western Mojave.

  16. HIFU Tissue Ablation: Concept and Devices.

    Ter Haar, Gail

    2016-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is rapidly gaining clinical acceptance as a technique capable of providing non-invasive heating and ablation for a wide range of applications. Usually requiring only a single session, treatments are often conducted as day case procedures, with the patient either fully conscious, lightly sedated or under light general anesthesia. HIFU scores over other thermal ablation techniques because of the lack of necessity for the transcutaneous insertion of probes into the target tissue. Sources placed either outside the body (for treatment of tumors or abnormalities of the liver, kidney, breast, uterus, pancreas brain and bone), or in the rectum (for treatment of the prostate), provide rapid heating of a target tissue volume, the highly focused nature of the field leaving tissue in the ultrasound propagation path relatively unaffected. Numerous extra-corporeal, transrectal and interstitial devices have been designed to optimize application-specific treatment delivery for the wide-ranging areas of application that are now being explored with HIFU. Their principle of operation is described here, and an overview of their design principles is given. PMID:26486329

  17. Adaptive spatial filtering of daytime sky noise in a satellite quantum key distribution downlink receiver

    Gruneisen, Mark T.; Sickmiller, Brett A.; Flanagan, Michael B.; Black, James P.; Stoltenberg, Kurt E.; Duchane, Alexander W.

    2016-02-01

    Spatial filtering is an important technique for reducing sky background noise in a satellite quantum key distribution downlink receiver. Atmospheric turbulence limits the extent to which spatial filtering can reduce sky noise without introducing signal losses. Using atmospheric propagation and compensation simulations, the potential benefit of adaptive optics (AO) to secure key generation (SKG) is quantified. Simulations are performed assuming optical propagation from a low-Earth-orbit satellite to a terrestrial receiver that includes AO. Higher-order AO correction is modeled assuming a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and a continuous-face-sheet deformable mirror. The effects of atmospheric turbulence, tracking, and higher-order AO on the photon capture efficiency are simulated using statistical representations of turbulence and a time-domain wave-optics hardware emulator. SKG rates are calculated for a decoy-state protocol as a function of the receiver field of view for various strengths of turbulence, sky radiances, and pointing angles. The results show that at fields of view smaller than those discussed by others, AO technologies can enhance SKG rates in daylight and enable SKG where it would otherwise be prohibited as a consequence of background optical noise and signal loss due to propagation and turbulence effects.

  18. Adaptive noise cancelling and time-frequency techniques for rail surface defect detection

    Liang, B.; Iwnicki, S.; Ball, A.; Young, A. E.

    2015-03-01

    Adaptive noise cancelling (ANC) is a technique which is very effective to remove additive noises from the contaminated signals. It has been widely used in the fields of telecommunication, radar and sonar signal processing. However it was seldom used for the surveillance and diagnosis of mechanical systems before late of 1990s. As a promising technique it has gradually been exploited for the purpose of condition monitoring and fault diagnosis. Time-frequency analysis is another useful tool for condition monitoring and fault diagnosis purpose as time-frequency analysis can keep both time and frequency information simultaneously. This paper presents an ANC and time-frequency application for railway wheel flat and rail surface defect detection. The experimental results from a scaled roller test rig show that this approach can significantly reduce unwanted interferences and extract the weak signals from strong background noises. The combination of ANC and time-frequency analysis may provide us one of useful tools for condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of railway vehicles.

  19. Development of adaptive IIR filtered-e LMS algorithm for active noise control

    SUN Xu; MENG Guang; TENG Pengxiao; CHEN Duanshi

    2003-01-01

    Compared to finite impulse response (FIR) filters, infinite impulse response (IIR)filters can match the system better with much fewer coefficients, and hence the computationload is saved and the performance improves. Therefore, it is attractive to use IIR filters insteadof FIR filters in active noise control (ANC). However, filtered-U LMS (FULMS) algorithm, theIIR filter-based algorithm commonly used so far cannot ensure global convergence. A new IIRfilter based adaptive algorithm, which can ensure global convergence with computation loadonly slightly increasing, is proposed in this paper. The new algorithm is called as filtered-eLMS algorithm since the error signal of which need to be filtered. Simulation results show thatthe FELMS algorithm presents better performance than the FULMS algorithm.

  20. Noise correlation-based adaptive polarimetric image representation for contrast enhancement of a polarized beacon in fog

    Panigrahi, Swapnesh; Fade, Julien; Alouini, Mehdi

    2015-10-01

    We show the use of a simplified snapshot polarimetric camera along with an adaptive image processing for optimal detection of a polarized light beacon through fog. The adaptive representation is derived using theoretical noise analysis of the data at hand and is shown to be optimal in the Maximum likelihood sense. We report that the contrast enhancing optimal representation that depends on the background noise correlation differs in general from standard representations like polarimetric difference image or polarization filtered image. Lastly, we discuss a detection strategy to reduce the false positive counts.

  1. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in Localized Prostate Cancer Treatment

    Alkhorayef, Mohammed; Mahmoud, Mustafa Z.; Alzimami, Khalid S.; Sulieman, Abdelmoneim; Fagiri, Maram A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) applies high-intensity focused ultrasound energy to locally heat and destroy diseased or damaged tissue through ablation. This study intended to review HIFU to explain the fundamentals of HIFU, evaluate the evidence concerning the role of HIFU in the treatment of prostate cancer (PC), review the technologies used to perform HIFU and the published clinical literature regarding the procedure as a primary treatment for PC. Material/Meth...

  2. A Split-and-Merge-Based Uterine Fibroid Ultrasound Image Segmentation Method in HIFU Therapy.

    Menglong Xu

    Full Text Available High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU therapy has been used to treat uterine fibroids widely and successfully. Uterine fibroid segmentation plays an important role in positioning the target region for HIFU therapy. Presently, it is completed by physicians manually, reducing the efficiency of therapy. Thus, computer-aided segmentation of uterine fibroids benefits the improvement of therapy efficiency. Recently, most computer-aided ultrasound segmentation methods have been based on the framework of contour evolution, such as snakes and level sets. These methods can achieve good performance, although they need an initial contour that influences segmentation results. It is difficult to obtain the initial contour automatically; thus, the initial contour is always obtained manually in many segmentation methods. A split-and-merge-based uterine fibroid segmentation method, which needs no initial contour to ensure less manual intervention, is proposed in this paper. The method first splits the image into many small homogeneous regions called superpixels. A new feature representation method based on texture histogram is employed to characterize each superpixel. Next, the superpixels are merged according to their similarities, which are measured by integrating their Quadratic-Chi texture histogram distances with their space adjacency. Multi-way Ncut is used as the merging criterion, and an adaptive scheme is incorporated to decrease manual intervention further. The method is implemented using Matlab on a personal computer (PC platform with Intel Pentium Dual-Core CPU E5700. The method is validated on forty-two ultrasound images acquired from HIFU therapy. The average running time is 9.54 s. Statistical results showed that SI reaches a value as high as 87.58%, and normHD is 5.18% on average. It has been demonstrated that the proposed method is appropriate for segmentation of uterine fibroids in HIFU pre-treatment imaging and planning.

  3. Usefulness of noise adaptive non-linear Gaussian filter in FDG-PET study

    In positron emission tomography (PET) studies, shortening transmission (TR) scan time can improve patient comfort and increase scanner throughput. However, PET images from short TR scans may be degraded due to the statistical noise included in the TR image. The purpose of this study was to apply non-linear Gaussian (NLG) and noise adaptive NLG (ANLG) filters to TR images, and to evaluate the extent of noise reduction by the ANLG filter in comparison with that by the NLG filter using phantom and clinical studies. In phantom studies, pool phantoms of various diameters and injected doses of 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) were used and the coefficients of variation (CVs) of the counts in the TR images processed with the NLG and ANLG filters were compared. In clinical studies, two normal volunteers and 13 patients with tumors were studied. In volunteer studies, the CV values in the liver were compared. In patient studies, the standardized uptake values (SUVs) of tumors in the emission images were obtained after processing the TR images using the NLG and ANLG filters. In phantom studies, the CV values in the TR images processed with the ANLG filter were smaller than those in the images processed with the NLG filter. When using the ANLG filter, their dependency on the phantom size, injected dose of FDG and TR scan time was smaller than when using the NLG filter. In volunteer studies, the CV values in the images processed with the ANLG filter were smaller than those in the images processed with the NLG filter, and were almost constant regardless of the TR scan time. In patient studies, there was an excellent correlation between the SUVs obtained from the images with a TR scan time of 7 min processed with the NLG filter (x) and those obtained from the images with a TR scan time of 4 min processed with the ANLG filter (y) (r=0.995, y=1.034x-0.075). Our results suggest that the ANLG filter is effective and useful for noise reduction in TR images and shortening TR scan

  4. Practical Study and Solutions Adapted For The Road Noise In The Algiers City

    Iddir, R.; Boukhaloua, N.; Saadi, T.

    At the present hour where the city spreads on a big space, the road network devel- opment was a following logical of this movement. Generating a considerable impact thus on the environment. This last is a resulting open system of the interaction be- tween the man and the nature, it's affected all side by the different means of transport and by their increasing demand of mobility. The contemporary city development be- got problems bound to the environment and among it : The road noise. This last is a complex phenomenon, essentially by reason of its humans sensory effects, its impact on the environment is considerable, this one concerns the life quality directly, mainly in population zones to strong density. The resonant pollution reached its paroxysm; the road network of Algiers is not conceived to satisfy requirements in resonant pol- lution matter. For it arrangements soundproof should be adapted in order to face of it these new requirements in matter of the acoustic comfort. All these elements drove to the process aiming the attenuation of the hindrance caused by the road traffic and it by actions essentially aiming: vehicles, the structure of the road and the immediate envi- ronment of the system road - structure. From these results, we note that the situation in resonant nuisance matter in this zone with strong traffic is disturbing, and especially on the residents health.

  5. Rapid HIFU autofocusing using the entire MR-ARFI image

    Grissom, William A.; Kaye, Elena; Pauly, Kim Butts; Zur, Yuval; Yeo, Desmond; Medan, Yoav; Davis, Cynthia [Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); GE Healthcare, Haifa (Israel); GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Biomedical Engineering, Technion IIT, Haifa (Israel); GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States)

    2012-11-28

    Phase aberrations and attenuations caused by bone can defocus HIFU in the brain and organs behind the ribcage. To refocus the beam, MR-ARFI can be used to measure tissue displacements created by each element in the transducer, and optimize driving signal delays and amplitudes. We introduce a new MR-ARFI-based autofocusing method that requires many fewer image acquisitions than current methods. The method is validated in simulations of bone and brain HIFU transducers, and compared to a conventional method.

  6. Rapid HIFU autofocusing using the entire MR-ARFI image

    Phase aberrations and attenuations caused by bone can defocus HIFU in the brain and organs behind the ribcage. To refocus the beam, MR-ARFI can be used to measure tissue displacements created by each element in the transducer, and optimize driving signal delays and amplitudes. We introduce a new MR-ARFI-based autofocusing method that requires many fewer image acquisitions than current methods. The method is validated in simulations of bone and brain HIFU transducers, and compared to a conventional method.

  7. PREVENTION OF DYSURIA AFTER HIFU THERAPY FOR PROSTATE CANCER

    A. Yu. Shestaev; V. V. Protoshchak; L. M. Sinelnikov; V. A. Kardinalova; R. A. Yeloev

    2014-01-01

    Objective: to identify factors for the development of dysuria and its prevention in patients with prostate cancer (PC) after high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy.Subjects and methods. In September 2008 to June 2013, the Clinic of Urology, S.M. Kirov Military Medical Academy, treated 98 patients, by performing HIFU sessions on an Ablatherm apparatus (EDAP, France). All the patients underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) to reduce the volume of the ablated tissue. ...

  8. PREVENTION OF DYSURIA AFTER HIFU THERAPY FOR PROSTATE CANCER

    A. Yu. Shestaev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify factors for the development of dysuria and its prevention in patients with prostate cancer (PC after high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU therapy.Subjects and methods. In September 2008 to June 2013, the Clinic of Urology, S.M. Kirov Military Medical Academy, treated 98 patients, by performing HIFU sessions on an Ablatherm apparatus (EDAP, France. All the patients underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP to reduce the volume of the ablated tissue. The patients were divided into 2 groups: 1 29 patients underwent TURP 3 days before HIFU therapy; 2 69 did this 1 month before major surgery. Each group was divided into 2 subgroups: 1 after ultrasound ablation, a urethral catheter was inserted for 10 days; 2 epicystostoma was applied, followed by its overlapping on day 3 postablation and spontaneous urination. The postoperative incidence of dysuria was estimated from subjective (complaints, voiding diary, and Inter-national Prostate Symptom Score and objective (uroflowmetry, small pelvic ultrasonography with determination of residual urine volume criteria.Results. In the patients who had undergone TURP one month before HIFU therapy, grades I–II urinary incontinence and urethral pros-tatic stricture occurred much less infrequently than in those who had undergone this maneuver 3 days prior to major surgery. Urinary in-continence and urethral prostatic stricture occurred 2-fold more frequently after TURP being carried out 3 days before HIFU therapy than after the urethral catheter being inserted. TURP performed one month before HIFU therapy showed no great difference in the incidence complications regardless of the type of bladder drainage.Conclusion. The short interval between TURP and HIFU therapy for PC increases the risk of postoperative dysuric events. The optimal time to perform TURP prior to HIFU therapy is 1 month.

  9. PREVENTION OF DYSURIA AFTER HIFU THERAPY FOR PROSTATE CANCER

    A. Yu. Shestaev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify factors for the development of dysuria and its prevention in patients with prostate cancer (PC after high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU therapy.Subjects and methods. In September 2008 to June 2013, the Clinic of Urology, S.M. Kirov Military Medical Academy, treated 98 patients, by performing HIFU sessions on an Ablatherm apparatus (EDAP, France. All the patients underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP to reduce the volume of the ablated tissue. The patients were divided into 2 groups: 1 29 patients underwent TURP 3 days before HIFU therapy; 2 69 did this 1 month before major surgery. Each group was divided into 2 subgroups: 1 after ultrasound ablation, a urethral catheter was inserted for 10 days; 2 epicystostoma was applied, followed by its overlapping on day 3 postablation and spontaneous urination. The postoperative incidence of dysuria was estimated from subjective (complaints, voiding diary, and Inter-national Prostate Symptom Score and objective (uroflowmetry, small pelvic ultrasonography with determination of residual urine volume criteria.Results. In the patients who had undergone TURP one month before HIFU therapy, grades I–II urinary incontinence and urethral pros-tatic stricture occurred much less infrequently than in those who had undergone this maneuver 3 days prior to major surgery. Urinary in-continence and urethral prostatic stricture occurred 2-fold more frequently after TURP being carried out 3 days before HIFU therapy than after the urethral catheter being inserted. TURP performed one month before HIFU therapy showed no great difference in the incidence complications regardless of the type of bladder drainage.Conclusion. The short interval between TURP and HIFU therapy for PC increases the risk of postoperative dysuric events. The optimal time to perform TURP prior to HIFU therapy is 1 month.

  10. A de-noising algorithm based on wavelet threshold-exponential adaptive window width-fitting for ground electrical source airborne transient electromagnetic signal

    Ji, Yanju; Li, Dongsheng; Yu, Mingmei; Wang, Yuan; Wu, Qiong; Lin, Jun

    2016-05-01

    The ground electrical source airborne transient electromagnetic system (GREATEM) on an unmanned aircraft enjoys considerable prospecting depth, lateral resolution and detection efficiency, etc. In recent years it has become an important technical means of rapid resources exploration. However, GREATEM data are extremely vulnerable to stationary white noise and non-stationary electromagnetic noise (sferics noise, aircraft engine noise and other human electromagnetic noises). These noises will cause degradation of the imaging quality for data interpretation. Based on the characteristics of the GREATEM data and major noises, we propose a de-noising algorithm utilizing wavelet threshold method and exponential adaptive window width-fitting. Firstly, the white noise is filtered in the measured data using the wavelet threshold method. Then, the data are segmented using data window whose step length is even logarithmic intervals. The data polluted by electromagnetic noise are identified within each window based on the discriminating principle of energy detection, and the attenuation characteristics of the data slope are extracted. Eventually, an exponential fitting algorithm is adopted to fit the attenuation curve of each window, and the data polluted by non-stationary electromagnetic noise are replaced with their fitting results. Thus the non-stationary electromagnetic noise can be effectively removed. The proposed algorithm is verified by the synthetic and real GREATEM signals. The results show that in GREATEM signal, stationary white noise and non-stationary electromagnetic noise can be effectively filtered using the wavelet threshold-exponential adaptive window width-fitting algorithm, which enhances the imaging quality.

  11. Noise-driven switching between limit cycles and adaptability in a small-dimensional excitable network with balanced coupling

    We study the adaptability of coupled non-linear oscillators to external forcing by using a system of globally coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo equations. Each unit is either excitatory or inhibitory. If the numbers of units of both types are in a specific relation (balanced coupling), we observe the presence of multistable oscillatory states with different excitation or firing rates. In the presence of noise, there is noise-driven switching between these states. The selection between higher- and lower-frequency oscillitons depends on the input, which results in increasing coherence between the periodic input and the system's output

  12. Noise-driven switching between limit cycles and adaptability in a small-dimensional excitable network with balanced coupling

    We study a system of globally coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo equations. Each unit is either excitatory or inhibitory. If the numbers of units of both types are in a specific ratio, we observe the presence of multistable oscillatory states with different excitation or firing rates. In the presence of noise, there is noise-driven switching between these states and the resultant firing pattern is long-range correlated. The choice between higher and lower frequency oscillations depends on the input, which results in increasing adaptability of the system's output to the periodic input

  13. Blood coagulation using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)

    Nguyen, Phuc V.; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2014-03-01

    High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) technology provides a feasible method of achieving thermal coagulation during surgical procedures. One of the potential clinical benefits of HIFU can induce immediate hemostasis without suturing. The objective of this study was to investigate the efficiency of a HIFU system for blood coagulation on severe vascular injury. ngHIFU treatment was implemented immediately after bleeding in artery. The ultrasound probe was made of piezoelectric material, generating a central frequency of 2.0 MHz as well as an ellipsoidal focal spot of 2 mm in lateral dimension and 10 mm in axial dimension. Acoustic coagulation was employed on a perfused chicken artery model in vitro. A surgical incision (1 to 2 mm long) was made with a scapel on the arterial wall, and heparinized autologous blood was made to leak out from the incision with a syringe pump. A total of 5 femoral artery incisions was treated with the HIFU beam. The intensity of 4500 W/cm2 at the focus was applied for all treatments. Complete hemostasis was achieved in all treatments, along with the treatment times of 25 to 50 seconds. The estimated intraoperative blood loss was from 2 to 5 mL. The proposed HIFU system may provide an effective method for immediate blood coagulation for arteries and veins in clinical applications.

  14. CT urography in the urinary bladder: To compare excretory phase images using a low noise index and a high noise index with adaptive noise reduction filter

    Background: Although CT urography (CTU) is widely used for the evaluation of the entire urinary tract, the most important drawback is the radiation exposure. Purpose: To evaluate the effect of a noise reduction filter (NRF) using a phantom and to quantitatively and qualitatively compare excretory phase (EP) images using a low noise index (NI) with those using a high NI and postprocessing NRF (pNRF). Material and Methods: Each NI value was defined for a slice thickness of 5 mm, and reconstructed images with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm were assessed. Sixty patients who were at high risk of developing bladder tumors (BT) were divided into two groups according to whether their EP images were obtained using an NI of 9.88 (29 patients; group A) or an NI of 20 and pNRF (31 patients; group B). The CT dose index volume (CTDIvol) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the bladder with respect to the anterior pelvic fat were compared in both groups. Qualitative assessment of the urinary bladder for image noise, sharpness, streak artifacts, homogeneity, and the conspicuity of polypoid or sessile-shaped BTs with a short-axis diameter greater than 10 mm was performed using a 3-point scale. Results: The phantom study showed noise reduction of approximately 40% and 76% dose reduction between group A and group B. CTDIvol demonstrated a 73% reduction in group B (4.6 ± 1.1 mGy) compared with group A (16.9 ± 3.4 mGy). The CNR value was not significantly different (P = 0.60) between group A (16.1 ± 5.1) and group B (16.6 ± 7.6). Although group A was superior (P < 0.01) to group B with regard to image noise, other qualitative analyses did not show significant differences. Conclusion: EP images using a high NI and pNRF were quantitatively and qualitatively comparable to those using a low NI, except with regard to image noise

  15. Rician noise reduction in magnetic resonance images using adaptive non-local mean and guided image filtering

    Mahmood, Muhammad Tariq; Chu, Yeon-Ho; Choi, Young-Kyu

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a Rician noise reduction method for magnetic resonance (MR) images. The proposed method is based on adaptive non-local mean and guided image filtering techniques. In the first phase, a guidance image is obtained from the noisy image through an adaptive non-local mean filter. Sobel operators are applied to compute the strength of edges which is further used to control the spread of the kernel in non-local mean filtering. In the second phase, the noisy and the guidance images are provided to the guided image filter as input to restore the noise-free image. The improved performance of the proposed method is investigated using the simulated and real data sets of MR images. Its performance is also compared with the previously proposed state-of-the art methods. Comparative analysis demonstrates the superiority of the proposed scheme over the existing approaches.

  16. A multichannel nonlinear adaptive noise canceller based on generalized FLANN for fetal ECG extraction

    Ma, Yaping; Xiao, Yegui; Wei, Guo; Sun, Jinwei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a multichannel nonlinear adaptive noise canceller (ANC) based on the generalized functional link artificial neural network (FLANN, GFLANN) is proposed for fetal electrocardiogram (FECG) extraction. A FIR filter and a GFLANN are equipped in parallel in each reference channel to respectively approximate the linearity and nonlinearity between the maternal ECG (MECG) and the composite abdominal ECG (AECG). A fast scheme is also introduced to reduce the computational cost of the FLANN and the GFLANN. Two (2) sets of ECG time sequences, one synthetic and one real, are utilized to demonstrate the improved effectiveness of the proposed nonlinear ANC. The real dataset is derived from the Physionet non-invasive FECG database (PNIFECGDB) including 55 multichannel recordings taken from a pregnant woman. It contains two subdatasets that consist of 14 and 8 recordings, respectively, with each recording being 90 s long. Simulation results based on these two datasets reveal, on the whole, that the proposed ANC does enjoy higher capability to deal with nonlinearity between MECG and AECG as compared with previous ANCs in terms of fetal QRS (FQRS)-related statistics and morphology of the extracted FECG waveforms. In particular, for the second real subdataset, the F1-measure results produced by the PCA-based template subtraction (TSpca) technique and six (6) single-reference channel ANCs using LMS- and RLS-based FIR filters, Volterra filter, FLANN, GFLANN, and adaptive echo state neural network (ESN a ) are 92.47%, 93.70%, 94.07%, 94.22%, 94.90%, 94.90%, and 95.46%, respectively. The same F1-measure statistical results from five (5) multi-reference channel ANCs (LMS- and RLS-based FIR filters, Volterra filter, FLANN, and GFLANN) for the second real subdataset turn out to be 94.08%, 94.29%, 94.68%, 94.91%, and 94.96%, respectively. These results indicate that the ESN a and GFLANN perform best, with the ESN a being slightly better than the GFLANN but about four times more

  17. EEG/ERP adaptive noise canceller design with controlled search space (CSS) approach in cuckoo and other optimization algorithms.

    Ahirwal, M K; Kumar, Anil; Singh, G K

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the migration of adaptive filtering with swarm intelligence/evolutionary techniques employed in the field of electroencephalogram/event-related potential noise cancellation or extraction. A new approach is proposed in the form of controlled search space to stabilize the randomness of swarm intelligence techniques especially for the EEG signal. Swarm-based algorithms such as Particles Swarm Optimization, Artificial Bee Colony, and Cuckoo Optimization Algorithm with their variants are implemented to design optimized adaptive noise canceler. The proposed controlled search space technique is tested on each of the swarm intelligence techniques and is found to be more accurate and powerful. Adaptive noise canceler with traditional algorithms such as least-mean-square, normalized least-mean-square, and recursive least-mean-square algorithms are also implemented to compare the results. ERP signals such as simulated visual evoked potential, real visual evoked potential, and real sensorimotor evoked potential are used, due to their physiological importance in various EEG studies. Average computational time and shape measures of evolutionary techniques are observed 8.21E-01 sec and 1.73E-01, respectively. Though, traditional algorithms take negligible time consumption, but are unable to offer good shape preservation of ERP, noticed as average computational time and shape measure difference, 1.41E-02 sec and 2.60E+00, respectively. PMID:24407307

  18. Histopathological changes associated with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment for localised adenocarcinoma of the prostate

    van Leenders, G J L H; Beerlage, H; Ruijter, E.; de la Rosette, J J M C H; van de Kaa, C A

    2000-01-01

    Aims—Investigation of the histopathological changes in prostatectomy specimens of patients with prostate cancer after high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and identification of immunohistochemical markers for tissue damage after HIFU treatment.

  19. Elimination of therapeutic ultrasound noise from pre-beamformed RF data in ultrasound imaging for ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment

    Takagi, Ryo; Goto, Kota; Jimbo, Hayato; Matsuura, Keiko; Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Umemura, Shin-ichiro; Yoshizawa, Shin

    2015-07-01

    In conventional ultrasonic monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment, a significant interval between consecutive HIFU shots is set for monitoring target tissue to avoid the interference of HIFU noise with RF echo signals. Thus, it is difficult to detect changes in tissue on the order of milliseconds, which are required to dynamically control the HIFU exposure. In this study, a new filtering method to eliminate the HIFU noise in the RF signals before beamforming is proposed. The CW response was estimated from RF signals with no pulse response to the imaging exposure, and the estimated CW response was subtracted from the entire RF signal to selectively eliminate the HIFU noise for each channel of the array probe before dynamic focusing was applied. The HIFU noise was selectively eliminated by this method when it existed. The results imply that the proposed filtering method is useful for true real-time detection of changes in tissue due to thermal coagulation during HIFU exposure.

  20. Combination of the transurethral resection and prostate HIFU ablation at treatment of the localized cancer

    Popkov V.M.; Fomkin R.N.; Blyumberg B.l.; Shatylko T.V.; Sedova L.N.; Abramova E.P.

    2014-01-01

    Research objective: to estimate results of treatment of patients with the localized form of a cancer of a prostate at a combination of a transurethral resection (TURP) and HIFU of an ablation. Objects and research methods: From February, 2009 to February, 2014 of 100 patients with the localized form of a cancer of a prostate were selected for research: 26 patients were included into HIFU and 74 group in group of the combined treatment (TURP+HIFU). Selection criteria for HIFU ablation were ...

  1. Feasibility of monitoring HIFU prostate cancer therapy using elastography

    Souchon, Remi; Chapelon, Jean Y.; Bertrand, Michel J.; Kallel, Faouzi; Ophir, Jonathan

    2001-05-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility of elastographic monitoring of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) therapy of prostate cancer. Elastography is an imaging technique based on strain estimation in soft tissues under quasi-static compression. Since pathological tissues and HIFU-induced lesions exhibit different elastic properties than normal tissues, elastography is potentially able to achieve these goals. An ultrasound scanner was connected to a PC to acquire RF images. This setup is compatible with a HIFU device used for prostate cancer therapy by transrectal route. The therapy transducer and the biplane-imaging probe are covered with a balloon filled with a coupling liquid. Compression of the prostate is applied by inflating the balloon, while imaging sector scans of the prostate. In-vivo elastograms of the prostate were acquired before HIFU treatment. Problems inherent to in-vivo acquisitions are reported, such as undesired tangential displacements during the radial compression. This study shows the potential for in-vivo elastogram acquisition of HIFU-induced lesions in the human prostate.

  2. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in Localized Prostate Cancer Treatment

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) applies high-intensity focused ultrasound energy to locally heat and destroy diseased or damaged tissue through ablation. This study intended to review HIFU to explain the fundamentals of HIFU, evaluate the evidence concerning the role of HIFU in the treatment of prostate cancer (PC), review the technologies used to perform HIFU and the published clinical literature regarding the procedure as a primary treatment for PC. Studies addressing HIFU in localized PC were identified in a search of internet scientific databases. The analysis of outcomes was limited to journal articles written in English and published between 2000 and 2013. HIFU is a non-invasive approach that uses a precisely delivered ultrasound energy to achieve tumor cell necrosis without radiation or surgical excision. In current urological oncology, HIFU is used clinically in the treatment of PC. Clinical research on HIFU therapy for localized PC began in the 1990s, and the majority of PC patients were treated with the Ablatherm device. HIFU treatment for localized PC can be considered as an alternative minimally invasive therapeutic modality for patients who are not candidates for radical prostatectomy. Patients with lower pre-HIFU PSA level and favourable pathologic Gleason score seem to present better oncologic outcomes. Future advances in technology and safety will undoubtedly expand the HIFU role in this indication as more of patient series are published, with a longer follow-up period

  3. Implementation of Adaptive Filter Structures on a Fixed Point Signal Processor for Acoustical Noise Reduction

    Chunduri, Krishna Chaitanya; Gutti, Chalapathi

    2005-01-01

    The problem of controlling the noise level in the environment has been the focus of a tremendous amount of research over the years. Active Noise Cancellation (ANC) is one such approach that has been proposed for reduction of steady state noise. ANC refers to an electromechanical or electro acoustic technique of canceling an acoustic disturbance to yield a quieter environment. The basic principle of ANC is to introduce a canceling “anti-noise” signal that has the same amplitude but the exact o...

  4. An adaptive integrated algorithm for noninvasive fetal ECG separation and noise reduction based on ICA-EEMD-WS.

    Liu, Guangchen; Luan, Yihui

    2015-11-01

    High-resolution fetal electrocardiogram (FECG) plays an important role in assisting physicians to detect fetal changes in the womb and to make clinical decisions. However, in real situations, clear FECG is difficult to extract because it is usually overwhelmed by the dominant maternal ECG and other contaminated noise such as baseline wander, high-frequency noise. In this paper, we proposed a novel integrated adaptive algorithm based on independent component analysis (ICA), ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD), and wavelet shrinkage (WS) denoising, denoted as ICA-EEMD-WS, for FECG separation and noise reduction. First, ICA algorithm was used to separate the mixed abdominal ECG signal and to obtain the noisy FECG. Second, the noise in FECG was reduced by a three-step integrated algorithm comprised of EEMD, useful subcomponents statistical inference and WS processing, and partial reconstruction for baseline wander reduction. Finally, we evaluate the proposed algorithm using simulated data sets. The results indicated that the proposed ICA-EEMD-WS outperformed the conventional algorithms in signal denoising. PMID:26429348

  5. Adaptive Volterra filter with continuous lp-norm using a logarithmic cost for nonlinear active noise control

    Lu, Lu; Zhao, Haiquan

    2016-03-01

    The filtered-x least mean lp-norm (FxLMP) algorithm is proven to be useful for nonlinear active noise control (NANC) systems. However, its performance deteriorates when the impulsive noises are presented in NANC systems. To surmount this shortcoming, a new nonlinear adaptive algorithm based on Volterra expansion model (VFxlogLMP) is developed in this paper, which is derived by minimizing the lp-norm of logarithmic cost. It is found that the FxLMP and VFxlogLMP require to select an appropriate value of p according to the prior information on noise characteristics, which prohibit their practical applications. Based on VFxlogLMP algorithm, we proposed a continuous lp-norm algorithm with logarithmic cost (VFxlogCLMP), which does not need the parameter selection and thresholds estimation. Benefiting from the various error norms for 1≤p≤2, it remains the robustness of VFxlogLMP. Moreover, the convergence behavior of VFxlogCLMP for moving average secondary paths and stochastic input signals is performed. Compared to the existing algorithms, two versions of the proposed algorithms have much better convergence and stability in impulsive noise environments.

  6. Wireless rake-receiver using adaptive filter with a family of partial update algorithms in noise cancellation applications

    Fayadh, Rashid A.; Malek, F.; Fadhil, Hilal A.; Aldhaibani, Jaafar A.; Salman, M. K.; Abdullah, Farah Salwani

    2015-05-01

    For high data rate propagation in wireless ultra-wideband (UWB) communication systems, the inter-symbol interference (ISI), multiple-access interference (MAI), and multiple-users interference (MUI) are influencing the performance of the wireless systems. In this paper, the rake-receiver was presented with the spread signal by direct sequence spread spectrum (DS-SS) technique. The adaptive rake-receiver structure was shown with adjusting the receiver tap weights using least mean squares (LMS), normalized least mean squares (NLMS), and affine projection algorithms (APA) to support the weak signals by noise cancellation and mitigate the interferences. To minimize the data convergence speed and to reduce the computational complexity by the previous algorithms, a well-known approach of partial-updates (PU) adaptive filters were employed with algorithms, such as sequential-partial, periodic-partial, M-max-partial, and selective-partial updates (SPU) in the proposed system. The simulation results of bit error rate (BER) versus signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are illustrated to show the performance of partial-update algorithms that have nearly comparable performance with the full update adaptive filters. Furthermore, the SPU-partial has closed performance to the full-NLMS and full-APA while the M-max-partial has closed performance to the full-LMS updates algorithms.

  7. Noise Reduction and Gap Filling of fAPAR Time Series Using an Adapted Local Regression Filter

    Álvaro Moreno

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Time series of remotely sensed data are an important source of information for understanding land cover dynamics. In particular, the fraction of absorbed photosynthetic active radiation (fAPAR is a key variable in the assessment of vegetation primary production over time. However, the fAPAR series derived from polar orbit satellites are not continuous and consistent in space and time. Filtering methods are thus required to fill in gaps and produce high-quality time series. This study proposes an adapted (iteratively reweighted local regression filter (LOESS and performs a benchmarking intercomparison with four popular and generally applicable smoothing methods: Double Logistic (DLOG, smoothing spline (SSP, Interpolation for Data Reconstruction (IDR and adaptive Savitzky-Golay (ASG. This paper evaluates the main advantages and drawbacks of the considered techniques. The results have shown that ASG and the adapted LOESS perform better in recovering fAPAR time series over multiple controlled noisy scenarios. Both methods can robustly reconstruct the fAPAR trajectories, reducing the noise up to 80% in the worst simulation scenario, which might be attributed to the quality control (QC MODIS information incorporated into these filtering algorithms, their flexibility and adaptation to the upper envelope. The adapted LOESS is particularly resistant to outliers. This method clearly outperforms the other considered methods to deal with the high presence of gaps and noise in satellite data records. The low RMSE and biases obtained with the LOESS method (|rMBE| < 8%; rRMSE < 20% reveals an optimal reconstruction even in most extreme situations with long seasonal gaps. An example of application of the LOESS method to fill in invalid values in real MODIS images presenting persistent cloud and snow coverage is also shown. The LOESS approach is recommended in most remote sensing applications, such as gap-filling, cloud-replacement, and observing temporal

  8. Experimental ablation of the pancreas with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU in a porcine model

    Biao Xie, Yu-Yuan Li, Lin Jia, Yu-Qiang Nie, Hong Du, Shu-Man Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility and safety of high intensity focused ultrasound's (HIFU in pancreatic diseases. Twelve pigs were divided into three groups. The pancreases of pigs in Group A were ablated directly with HIFU, but those in Group B and C ablated by extracorporeal HIFU. The pigs in Group C were sacrificed at day 7 after HIFU. Serological parameters were determined pre-operation and post-operation. The entire pancreas was removed for histological examination. Each animal tolerate the HIFU ablation well. The complete necrosis was observed in targeted regions. The margins of the necrotic regions were clearly delineated from the surrounding normal tissues. Infiltration of inflammatory cells and phorocytosis on the boundary were found in group C. Blood and urine amylase levels were relatively steady after HIFU. No acute pancreatitis or severe complications occurred. In conclusion, HIFU ablation on the pancreas was safe and effective in experimental pigs.

  9. HIFU Monitoring and Control with Dual-Mode Ultrasound Arrays

    Casper, Andrew Jacob

    The biological effects of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) have been known and studied for decades. HIFU has been shown capable of treating a wide variety of diseases and disorders. However, despite its demonstrated potential, HIFU has been slow to gain clinical acceptance. This is due, in part, to the difficulty associated with robustly monitoring and controlling the delivery of the HIFU energy. The non-invasive nature of the surgery makes the assessment of treatment progression difficult, leading to long treatment times and a significant risk of under treatment. This thesis research develops new techniques and systems for robustly monitoring HIFU therapies for the safe and efficacious delivery of the intended treatment. Systems and algorithms were developed for the two most common modes of HIFU delivery systems: single-element and phased array applicators. Delivering HIFU with a single element transducer is a widely used technique in HIFU therapies. The simplicity of a single element offers many benefits in terms of cost and overall system complexity. Typical monitoring schemes rely on an external device (e.g. diagnostic ultrasound or MRI) to assess the progression of therapy. The research presented in this thesis explores using the same element to both deliver and monitor the HIFU therapy. The use of a dual-mode ultrasound transducer (DMUT) required the development of an FPGA based single-channel arbitrary waveform generator and high-speed data acquisition unit. Data collected from initial uncontrolled ablations led to the development of monitoring and control algorithms which were implemented directly on the FPGA. Close integration between the data acquisition and arbitrary waveform units allowed for fast, low latency control over the ablation process. Results are presented that demonstrate control of HIFU therapies over a broad range of intensities and in multiple in vitro tissues. The second area of investigation expands the DMUT research to an

  10. Spatiotemporal filtering of MR-temperature artifacts arising from bowel motion during transurethral MR-HIFU

    Purpose: Transurethral MR-HIFU is a minimally invasive image-guided treatment for localized prostate cancer that enables precise targeting of tissue within the gland. The treatment is performed within a clinical MRI to obtain real-time MR thermometry used as an active feedback to control the spatial heating pattern in the prostate and to monitor for potential damage to surrounding tissues. This requires that the MR thermometry measurements are an accurate representation of the true tissue temperature. The proton resonance frequency shift thermometry method used is sensitive to tissue motion and changes in the local magnetic susceptibility that can be caused by the motion of air bubbles in the rectum, which can impact the performance of transurethral MR-HIFU in these regions of the gland. Methods: A method is proposed for filtering of temperature artifacts based on the temporal variance of the temperature, using empirical and dynamic positional knowledge of the ultrasonic heating beam, and an estimation of the measurement noise. A two-step correction strategy is introduced which eliminates artifact-detected temperature variations while keeping the noise level low through spatial averaging. Results: The filter has been evaluated by postprocessing data from five human transurethral ultrasound treatments. The two-step correction process led to reduced final temperature standard deviation in the prostate and rectum areas where the artifact was located, without negatively affecting areas distal to the artifact. The performance of the filter was also found to be consistent across all six of the data sets evaluated. The evaluation of the detection criterion parameter M determined that a value of M = 3 achieves a conservative filter with minimal loss of spatial resolution during the process. Conclusions: The filter was able to remove most artifacts due to the presence of moving air bubbles in the rectum during transurethral MR-HIFU. A quantitative estimation of the filter

  11. Spatiotemporal filtering of MR-temperature artifacts arising from bowel motion during transurethral MR-HIFU

    Schmitt, Alain, E-mail: aschmitt@sri.utoronto.ca [Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Mougenot, Charles [Philips Healthcare, 281 Hillmount Road, Markham, Ontario L6C 2S3 (Canada); Chopra, Rajiv [Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canadaand Department of Radiology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75390-9061 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Transurethral MR-HIFU is a minimally invasive image-guided treatment for localized prostate cancer that enables precise targeting of tissue within the gland. The treatment is performed within a clinical MRI to obtain real-time MR thermometry used as an active feedback to control the spatial heating pattern in the prostate and to monitor for potential damage to surrounding tissues. This requires that the MR thermometry measurements are an accurate representation of the true tissue temperature. The proton resonance frequency shift thermometry method used is sensitive to tissue motion and changes in the local magnetic susceptibility that can be caused by the motion of air bubbles in the rectum, which can impact the performance of transurethral MR-HIFU in these regions of the gland. Methods: A method is proposed for filtering of temperature artifacts based on the temporal variance of the temperature, using empirical and dynamic positional knowledge of the ultrasonic heating beam, and an estimation of the measurement noise. A two-step correction strategy is introduced which eliminates artifact-detected temperature variations while keeping the noise level low through spatial averaging. Results: The filter has been evaluated by postprocessing data from five human transurethral ultrasound treatments. The two-step correction process led to reduced final temperature standard deviation in the prostate and rectum areas where the artifact was located, without negatively affecting areas distal to the artifact. The performance of the filter was also found to be consistent across all six of the data sets evaluated. The evaluation of the detection criterion parameter M determined that a value of M = 3 achieves a conservative filter with minimal loss of spatial resolution during the process. Conclusions: The filter was able to remove most artifacts due to the presence of moving air bubbles in the rectum during transurethral MR-HIFU. A quantitative estimation of the filter

  12. Feasibility of real-time treatment feedback using novel filter for eliminating therapeutic ultrasound noise with high-speed ultrasonic imaging in ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment

    Takagi, Ryo; Jimbo, Hayato; Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Tomiyasu, Kentaro; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    In the conventional ultrasonic monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment, a significant interval between HIFU shots is required when monitoring target tissue to avoid interference between HIFU noise and RF echo signals. In our previous study, a new filtering method to eliminate only HIFU noise while maintaining tissue signals intact was proposed, and it was shown that the thermal coagulation could be detected during simultaneous HIFU irradiation through off-line processing. In this study, the filtering method and a real-time coagulation detection algorithm were implemented in an ultrasound imaging system, whose use for sequential exposure with multiple foci was demonstrated similarly to a commercial HIFU ablation system. The coagulation was automatically detected by the proposed method during real-time simultaneous HIFU irradiation, and the HIFU exposure time was controlled according to the changes in the tissue. The results imply that ultrasonic monitoring with the filtering and detection methods is useful for true real-time detection of changes in the tissue due to thermal coagulation during HIFU exposure.

  13. dc SQUID electronics based on adaptive noise cancellation and a high open-loop gain controller

    A low-noise SQUID readout electronics with a high slew rate and an automatic gain control feature has been developed. Flux noise levels of 5x10-7Φ0/√Hz at 1 kHz and 2x10-6Φ0/√Hz at 1 Hz have been measured with this readout scheme. The system tolerates sinusoidal disturbances having amplitudes up to 140 Φ0 at 1 kHz without loosing lock. The electronics utilizes a cooled GaAs FET to control the cancellation of the voltage noise of the room temperature amplifier, a PI3/2 controller to provide a high open-loop gain at low frequencies, and a square-wave flux and offset voltage modulation to enable automatic control of the noise reduction. The cutoff frequency of the flux-locked-loop is 300 kHz and the feedback gain is more than 130 dB at 10 Hz. (orig.)

  14. An analytical solution for improved HIFU SAR estimation

    Accurate determination of the specific absorption rates (SARs) present during high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) experiments and treatments provides a solid physical basis for scientific comparison of results among HIFU studies and is necessary to validate and improve SAR predictive software, which will improve patient treatment planning, control and evaluation. This study develops and tests an analytical solution that significantly improves the accuracy of SAR values obtained from HIFU temperature data. SAR estimates are obtained by fitting the analytical temperature solution for a one-dimensional radial Gaussian heating pattern to the temperature versus time data following a step in applied power and evaluating the initial slope of the analytical solution. The analytical method is evaluated in multiple parametric simulations for which it consistently (except at high perfusions) yields maximum errors of less than 10% at the center of the focal zone compared with errors up to 90% and 55% for the commonly used linear method and an exponential method, respectively. For high perfusion, an extension of the analytical method estimates SAR with less than 10% error. The analytical method is validated experimentally by showing that the temperature elevations predicted using the analytical method's SAR values determined for the entire 3D focal region agree well with the experimental temperature elevations in a HIFU-heated tissue-mimicking phantom. (paper)

  15. Experimentelle Untersuchungen zur nichtinvasiven Gewebeablation durch hochenergetischen fokussierten Ultraschall (HIFU)

    Peters, Kristina

    2007-01-01

    Es wurden am neu bewerteten porcinen Nierenmodell mittels hochintensivem fokussierten Ultraschall mit verschiedenen HIFU Behandlungsgeräten Gewebeareale abladiert und die Effekte mittels histologischen Verfahren, Magnetresonanztherapie, Angiographie und einem Ultraschallphantom evaluiert. Es konnte gezeigt werden, dass es bei geeigneter Einstellung möglich ist klinisch relevante Gewebsvolumina zuverlässig, irreversibel zu zerstören.

  16. Real-time Monitoring of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Ablation of In Vitro Canine Livers Using Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU).

    Grondin, Julien; Payen, Thomas; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a technique that can perform and monitor high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. An oscillatory motion is generated at the focus of a 93-element and 4.5 MHz center frequency HIFU transducer by applying a 25 Hz amplitude-modulated signal using a function generator. A 64-element and 2.5 MHz imaging transducer with 68kPa peak pressure is confocally placed at the center of the HIFU transducer to acquire the radio-frequency (RF) channel data. In this protocol, real-time monitoring of thermal ablation using HIFU with an acoustic power of 7 W on canine livers in vitro is described. HIFU treatment is applied on the tissue during 2 min and the ablated region is imaged in real-time using diverging or plane wave imaging up to 1,000 frames/second. The matrix of RF channel data is multiplied by a sparse matrix for image reconstruction. The reconstructed field of view is of 90° for diverging wave and 20 mm for plane wave imaging and the data are sampled at 80 MHz. The reconstruction is performed on a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) in order to image in real-time at a 4.5 display frame rate. 1-D normalized cross-correlation of the reconstructed RF data is used to estimate axial displacements in the focal region. The magnitude of the peak-to-peak displacement at the focal depth decreases during the thermal ablation which denotes stiffening of the tissue due to the formation of a lesion. The displacement signal-to-noise ratio (SNRd) at the focal area for plane wave was 1.4 times higher than for diverging wave showing that plane wave imaging appears to produce better displacement maps quality for HMIFU than diverging wave imaging. PMID:26556647

  17. Wavelet domain adaptive filtering algorithm for removing the seamless pipe noise contained in the magnetic flux leakage data

    Han Wenhua; Que Peiwen

    2006-01-01

    With the widespread application and fast development of gas and oil pipeline network in China, the pipeline inspection technology has been used more extensively. The magnetic flux leakage (MFL) method has established itself as the most widely used in-line inspection technique for the evaluation of gas and oil pipelines. The MFL data obtained from seamless pipeline inspection is usually contaminated by the seamless pipe noise (SPN). SPN can in some cases completely mask MFL signals from certain type of defects,and therefore considerably reduces the detectability of the defect signals. In this paper, a new de-noising algorithm called wavelet domain adaptive filtering is proposed for removing the SPN contained in the MFL data. The new algorithm results from combining the wavelet transform with the adaptive filtering technique. Results from application of the proposed algorithm to the MFL data from field tests show that the proposed algorithm has good performance and considerably improves the detectability of the defect signals in the MFL data.

  18. Integrated WiFi/PDR/Smartphone Using an Adaptive System Noise Extended Kalman Filter Algorithm for Indoor Localization

    Xin Li

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Wireless signal strength is susceptible to the phenomena of interference, jumping, and instability, which often appear in the positioning results based on Wi-Fi field strength fingerprint database technology for indoor positioning. Therefore, a Wi-Fi and PDR (pedestrian dead reckoning real-time fusion scheme is proposed in this paper to perform fusing calculation by adaptively determining the dynamic noise of a filtering system according to pedestrian movement (straight or turning, which can effectively restrain the jumping or accumulation phenomena of wireless positioning and the PDR error accumulation problem. Wi-Fi fingerprint matching typically requires a quite high computational burden: To reduce the computational complexity of this step, the affinity propagation clustering algorithm is adopted to cluster the fingerprint database and integrate the information of the position domain and signal domain of respective points. An experiment performed in a fourth-floor corridor at the School of Environment and Spatial Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, shows that the traverse points of the clustered positioning system decrease by 65%–80%, which greatly improves the time efficiency. In terms of positioning accuracy, the average error is 4.09 m through the Wi-Fi positioning method. However, the positioning error can be reduced to 2.32 m after integration of the PDR algorithm with the adaptive noise extended Kalman filter (EKF.

  19. Variational Bayesian Adaptation of Noise Covariances in Non-Linear Kalman Filtering

    Hartikainen, Simo Särkkä Jouni

    2013-01-01

    This paper is considered with joint estimation of state and time-varying noise covariance matrices in non-linear stochastic state space models. We present a variational Bayes and Gaussian filtering based algorithm for efficient computation of the approximate filtering posterior distributions. The Gaussian filtering based formulation of the non-linear state space model computation allows usage of efficient Gaussian integration methods such as unscented transform, cubature integration and Gauss...

  20. Multi-microphone adaptive noise reduction strategies for coordinated stimulation in bilateral cochlear implant devices

    Kokkinakis, Kostas; Loizou, Philipos C.

    2010-01-01

    Bilateral cochlear implant (BI-CI) recipients achieve high word recognition scores in quiet listening conditions. Still, there is a substantial drop in speech recognition performance when there is reverberation and more than one interferers. BI-CI users utilize information from just two directional microphones placed on opposite sides of the head in a so-called independent stimulation mode. To enhance the ability of BI-CI users to communicate in noise, the use of two computationally inexpensi...

  1. HIFU and Chemotherapy Synergistic Inhibitory Effect on Dunning AT2 Tumour-Bearing Rats

    Curiel, Laura; Paparel, Philipe; Chesnais, Sabrina; Gelet, Albert; Chapelon, Jean-Yves

    2005-03-01

    Since there is no 100% satisfactory treatment for localized prostate cancer in patients presenting symptoms representing a poor prognosis (stage T3, high Gleason score, PSA level greater than 15 ng/ml, etc.), this study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic and synergistic inhibition effects of using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in combination with chemotherapy (Taxane + Estramustine). Forty-one Dunning AT2 tumour-bearing Copenhagen rats receiving HIFU and/or chemotherapy were divided into four groups: control group; chemotherapy group; HIFU group; and HIFU-chemotherapy combined group. Increase in the tumour volume was observed over 3 weeks and the tumour volume doubling time was evaluated. Growth curves for each group were then plotted and statistically evaluated. HIFU treatment combined with Taxane + Estramusine was found to have a significant synergistic effect; on day 30, the distribution of tumour volume relative to the treatment group was significantly different (p = 0.0007). The control group volumes were significantly greater than those of the chemotherapy-only (p = 0.006) or HIFU-only group (p = 0.006). The greatest difference was observed between the chemotherapy plus HIFU combined group and the control group. Additionally, tumour-doubling times were 7.7 days for the control group, 13.2 days for the HIFU-only group, and 31.2 days for the chemotherapy plus HIFU group. The differences in tumour growth rates between the chemotherapy plus HIFU combined group and a chemotherapy-only + HIFU-only grouping was 3.8% (p = 0.0020). Thus, the combined chemotherapy plus HIFU treatment was clearly more effective in reducing the tumour size than HIFU only or chemotherapy only, which indicates a synergy between the two types of treatment. Our results suggest that this combined therapy could be useful for the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer.

  2. Adaptive Echo Noise Elimination for Speech Enhancement of Tamil letter ‘Zha’

    A. Srinivasan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic echo depends on time delay between initial and reflected sound wave, strength of reflected sound. In the speech processing of letter ‘zha’ [11], echo of the recorded voice gives the spurious results. Such complexity can be avoided by suitable pyramidalmethod like adaptive filtering technique. Adaptive filtering tries to adjust these parameters with the aim of meeting some well-defined target, which depends upon the state of the system and surroundings. In speech recognition, the acoustic echo gives the faulty results.Objective of this paper is to analyze the performance of various adaptive filtering algorithms for acoustic echo cancellation in recorded speech enhancement of the letter ‘Zha’ in Tamil language. These algorithms are simulated in MATLAB and compared with theperformance of those algorithms based on parameters such us computational complexity, convergence rate and amount of echo attenuation.

  3. Dual adaptive statistical approach for quantitative noise reduction in photon-counting medical imaging: application to nuclear medicine images

    Noise reduction in photon-counting images remains challenging, especially at low count levels. We have developed an original procedure which associates two complementary filters using a Wiener-derived approach. This approach combines two statistically adaptive filters into a dual-weighted (DW) filter. The first one, a statistically weighted adaptive (SWA) filter, replaces the central pixel of a sliding window with a statistically weighted sum of its neighbors. The second one, a statistical and heuristic noise extraction (extended) (SHINE-Ext) filter, performs a discrete cosine transformation (DCT) using sliding blocks. Each block is reconstructed using its significant components which are selected using tests derived from multiple linear regression (MLR). The two filters are weighted according to Wiener theory. This approach has been validated using a numerical phantom and a real planar Jaszczak phantom. It has also been illustrated using planar bone scintigraphy and myocardial single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) data. Performances of filters have been tested using mean normalized absolute error (MNAE) between the filtered images and the reference noiseless or high-count images.Results show that the proposed filters quantitatively decrease the MNAE in the images and then increase the signal-to-noise Ratio (SNR). This allows one to work with lower count images. The SHINE-Ext filter is well suited to high-size images and low-variance areas. DW filtering is efficient for low-size images and in high-variance areas. The relative proportion of eliminated noise generally decreases when count level increases. In practice, SHINE filtering alone is recommended when pixel spacing is less than one-quarter of the effective resolution of the system and/or the size of the objects of interest. It can also be used when the practical interest of high frequencies is low. In any case, DW filtering will be preferable.The proposed filters have been applied to nuclear

  4. 多通道自适应噪声抵消系统%An adaptive multi-channel anti-noise system

    于新颖

    2015-01-01

    对多通道自适应噪声抵消系统的噪声抑制能力进行了MATLAB仿真分析,结果表明,多通道系统的抑噪能力高于单通道系统,信噪比增益提高了1.36 dB左右。%We study the noise checking ability of an adaptive multi‐channel anti‐noise system with MATLAB simulation .The results show that the noise checking ability of the adaptive multi‐channel system is better than that of single‐channel ,and the signal‐to‐noise ratio increases by about 1 .36 dB .

  5. Adaptive Signal Detection and Parameter Estimation in Unknown Colored Gaussian Noise

    Tang, Bo; Kay, Steven

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers the general signal detection and parameter estimation problem in the presence of colored Gaussian noise disturbance. By modeling the disturbance with an autoregressive process, we present three signal detectors with different unknown parameters under the general framework of binary hypothesis testing. The closed form of parameter estimates and the asymptotic distributions of these three tests are also given. Given two examples of frequency modulated signal detection problem and time series moving object detection problem, the simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of three presented detectors.

  6. HIFU Therapy Compared with Other Thermal Ablation Methods in a Perfused Organ Model

    Jenne, Jürgen W.; Risse, Frank; Häcker, Axel; Peters, Kristina; Siegler, Peter; Divkovic, Gabriela Wilzbach; Huber, Peter E.

    2007-05-01

    Therapy with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been shown to be both safe and clinically practical in a growing number of patient studies for a variety of different target organs. Especially in cancer therapy there are comparable ablation methods like radio frequency (RFA) or laser (LITT) ablation, which are clinically more accepted. In an ongoing study we compare HIFU with RF- and laser ablation under MRI guidance in a perfused organ model. All evaluated techniques were appropriate to induce defined and localized ablation necrosis in the renal cortex. Our HIFU system and the laser system were completely MRI compatible. The tested RF- system showed local needle artefacts and disturbed the MR images during operation. The ablation rate of HIFU using a spot scanning technique was clearly lower compared to the other ablation techniques. However, advanced HIFU scanning methods might overcome this limitation. In addition HIFU is the only complete non-invasive ablation technique.

  7. Weighted Robust Adaptive Filtering in Krein Space and Its Application in Active Noise Control

    Jayawardhana, Bayu; Yuan, Shuqing; Xie, Lihua

    2002-01-01

    Robust adaptive filtering ensures the minimization of the transfer function from the disturbance to the estimation error and thus, guarantees the robustness against the worst-case disturbance in the system. However, a more general approach will be given in this paper hy employing frequency weighting, which offers flexibility in determining robustness sensitivity in certain frequency of interest. Using the projection in Krein space, we developed a weighted recursive H∞ filtering that computes ...

  8. Seismic random noise elimination according to the adaptive fractal conservation law

    Meng, Fanlei; Li, Yue; Zeng, Qian

    2016-05-01

    The fractal conservation law (FCL) is based on the Cauchy problem of the partial differential equation (PDE), which is modified by an anti-diffusive term of lower order. The analysis indicates that it can eliminate the high frequencies and preserve or amplify the low/medium frequencies. The performance of FCL depends on the threshold selected for the PDE. This threshold corresponds to the cut-off frequency of FCL in the frequency domain. Generally, the threshold is fixed. Thus, the FCL cannot track the signal beyond the cut-off frequency, and it removes the higher-frequency components of the signal. To solve this problem, an adaptive FCL filtering method is presented. The main purpose of this method is to select the optimal FCL threshold in each sample index such that it can adaptively track the rapid changes in the signal. In the adaptive FCL, we select FCL estimations with different thresholds and construct a convex hull of these estimations of each sample index. Consequently, we introduce a quadratic functional with respect to FCL estimation to ensure that we select the optimal estimation from the convex hull of each sample index. This leads to a box-constrained convex problem, which can be solved by the Viterbi algorithm.

  9. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in Uterine Fibroid Treatment: Review Study

    MAHMOUD, MUSTAFA Z.; Alkhorayef, Mohammed; Alzimami, Khalid S.; Aljuhani, Manal Saud; Sulieman, Abdelmoneim

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a highly precise medical procedure used locally to heat and destroy diseased tissue through ablation. This study intended to review HIFU in uterine fibroid therapy, to evaluate the role of HIFU in the therapy of leiomyomas as well as to review the actual clinical activities in this field including efficacy and safety measures beside the published clinical literature. Material/Methods An inclusive literature review was carried out ...

  10. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) as the alternative method of treatment of oncourological diseases

    Blyumberg B.I.; Fomkin R.N.; Popkov V.M.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing interest devoted to technology of high intensity focused ultrasound (high-intensity focused ultrasound, HIFU), basically, is explained by a wide spectrum of potential fields of application at minimum invasiveness of the given method. In oncourology HIFU is applied in prostate and kidney cancer. In case of tumors of renal parenchyma the given technique is being clinically tested, while HIFU is currently used in the practice of European oncourologists in treatment of prostate cancer....

  11. Immune System Modulation with LOFU And HIFU Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    Guha, C.; Huagang, Z.; Chen, W.; Carlosn, R.; Sanghvi, N. T.

    2011-09-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) results in instantaneous coagulative tissue necrosis. In contrast, "low" energy focused ultrasound (LOFU) induces membrane perturbation while maintaining cell viability. This report explores the tumor immunomodulatory roles of LOFU and HIFU combination treatment. We hypothesized that administration of repeated cycles of LOFU, followed by HIFU would release tumor-derived peptide-heat shock protein complexes in the blood and induce systemic tumor-specific immune response that would enhance tumor control of both local and systemic disease.

  12. Linear adaptive noise-reduction filters for tomographic imaging: Optimizing for minimum mean square error

    Sun, W Y [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-04-01

    This thesis solves the problem of finding the optimal linear noise-reduction filter for linear tomographic image reconstruction. The optimization is data dependent and results in minimizing the mean-square error of the reconstructed image. The error is defined as the difference between the result and the best possible reconstruction. Applications for the optimal filter include reconstructions of positron emission tomographic (PET), X-ray computed tomographic, single-photon emission tomographic, and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Using high resolution PET as an example, the optimal filter is derived and presented for the convolution backprojection, Moore-Penrose pseudoinverse, and the natural-pixel basis set reconstruction methods. Simulations and experimental results are presented for the convolution backprojection method.

  13. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in Uterine Fibroid Treatment: Review Study

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a highly precise medical procedure used locally to heat and destroy diseased tissue through ablation. This study intended to review HIFU in uterine fibroid therapy, to evaluate the role of HIFU in the therapy of leiomyomas as well as to review the actual clinical activities in this field including efficacy and safety measures beside the published clinical literature. An inclusive literature review was carried out in order to review the scientific foundation, and how it resulted in the development of extracorporeal distinct devices. Studies addressing HIFU in leiomyomas were identified from a search of the Internet scientific databases. The analysis of literature was limited to journal articles written in English and published between 2000 and 2013. In current gynecologic oncology, HIFU is used clinically in the treatment of leiomyomas. Clinical research on HIFU therapy for leiomyomas began in the 1990s, and the majority of patients with leiomyomas were treated predominantly with HIFUNIT 9000 and prototype single focus ultrasound devices. HIFU is a non-invasive and highly effective standard treatment with a large indication range for all sizes of leiomyomas, associated with high efficacy, low operative morbidity and no systemic side effects. Uterine fibroid treatment using HIFU was effective and safe in treating symptomatic uterine fibroids. Few studies are available in the literature regarding uterine artery embolization (UAE). HIFU provides an excellent option to treat uterine fibroids

  14. Combination of the transurethral resection and prostate HIFU ablation at treatment of the localized cancer

    Popkov V.M.

    2014-09-01

    26 patients were included into HIFU and 74 group in group of the combined treatment (TURP+HIFU. Selection criteria for HIFU ablation were the localized cancer of a prostate concerning which earlier it wasn't carried out treatments, and level of a PSA at the time of statement of the diagnosis 15 ng/ml. All patients corresponding to these by criteria, were considered as candidates for treatment and inclusion in the analysis. The nadir and stability of PSA, the histologic conclusion, IPSS, quality of life and complication were estimated at time of postoperative supervision. Results: Statistically significant influence of a combination TURP+HIFU for the term of transurethral drainage of a bladder (a median of 40 days against 7 days, incontience frequency (15.4% against 6.9%, infections of urinary ways (47.9% against 11.4% and IPSS change during the postoperative period (on the average 8.91 against 3.37 is noted. During the short period of supervision it wasn't observed considerable changes in relation to efficiency: in HIFU group the frequency of repeated sessions made 25%, in TUR/HIFU group 4%. Conclusion: HIFU therapy is modern, minimum invasive method of a cancer therapy of a prostate. The combination of a transurethral resection and HIFU ablation significantly reduces the frequency of the complications connected with treatment. Maintaining the patient after combined TURP and HIFU ablation is comparable with maintaining the patient after usual TURP.

  15. The role of numerical simulation for the development of an advanced HIFU system

    Okita, Kohei; Narumi, Ryuta; Azuma, Takashi; Takagi, Shu; Matumoto, Yoichiro

    2014-10-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been used clinically and is under clinical trials to treat various diseases. An advanced HIFU system employs ultrasound techniques for guidance during HIFU treatment instead of magnetic resonance imaging in current HIFU systems. A HIFU beam imaging for monitoring the HIFU beam and a localized motion imaging for treatment validation of tissue are introduced briefly as the real-time ultrasound monitoring techniques. Numerical simulations have a great impact on the development of real-time ultrasound monitoring as well as the improvement of the safety and efficacy of treatment in advanced HIFU systems. A HIFU simulator was developed to reproduce ultrasound propagation through the body in consideration of the elasticity of tissue, and was validated by comparison with in vitro experiments in which the ultrasound emitted from the phased-array transducer propagates through the acrylic plate acting as a bone phantom. As the result, the defocus and distortion of the ultrasound propagating through the acrylic plate in the simulation quantitatively agree with that in the experimental results. Therefore, the HIFU simulator accurately reproduces the ultrasound propagation through the medium whose shape and physical properties are well known. In addition, it is experimentally confirmed that simulation-assisted focus control of the phased-array transducer enables efficient assignment of the focus to the target. Simulation-assisted focus control can contribute to design of transducers and treatment planning.

  16. Design, Fabrication, and Testing of SMA Enabled Adaptive Chevrons for Jet Noise Reduction

    Turner, Travis L.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Cano, Roberto J.; Fleming, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    This study presents the status and results from an effort to design, fabricate, and test an adaptive jet engine chevron concept based upon embedding shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators in a composite laminate, termed a SMA hybrid composite (SMAHC). The approach for fabricating the adaptive SMAHC chevrons involves embedding prestrained Nitinol actuators on one side of the mid-plane of the composite laminate such that thermal excitation generates a thermal moment and deflects the structure. A glass-epoxy pre-preg/Nitinol ribbon material system and a vacuum hot press consolidation approach are employed. A versatile test system for control and measurement of the chevron deflection performance is described. Projection moire interferometry (PMI) is used for global deformation measurement and infrared (IR) thermography is used for 2-D temperature measurement and feedback control. A recently commercialized constitutive model for SMA and SMAHC materials is used in the finite element code ABAQUS to perform nonlinear static analysis of the chevron prototypes. Excellent agreement is achieved between the predicted and measured chevron deflection performance, thereby validating the design tool. Although the performance results presented in this paper fall short of the requirement, the concept is proven and an approach for achieving the performance objectives is evident.

  17. Noise Estimation and Adaptive Encoding for Asymmetric Quantum Error Correcting Codes

    Florjanczyk, Jan; Brun, Todd; Center for Quantum Information Science; Technology Team

    We present a technique that improves the performance of asymmetric quantum error correcting codes in the presence of biased qubit noise channels. Our study is motivated by considering what useful information can be learned from the statistics of syndrome measurements in stabilizer quantum error correcting codes (QECC). We consider the case of a qubit dephasing channel where the dephasing axis is unknown and time-varying. We are able to estimate the dephasing angle from the statistics of the standard syndrome measurements used in stabilizer QECC's. We use this estimate to rotate the computational basis of the code in such a way that the most likely type of error is covered by the highest distance of the asymmetric code. In particular, we use the [ [ 15 , 1 , 3 ] ] shortened Reed-Muller code which can correct one phase-flip error but up to three bit-flip errors. In our simulations, we tune the computational basis to match the estimated dephasing axis which in turn leads to a decrease in the probability of a phase-flip error. With a sufficiently accurate estimate of the dephasing axis, our memory's effective error is dominated by the much lower probability of four bit-flips. Aro MURI Grant No. W911NF-11-1-0268.

  18. New parameters in adaptive testing of ferromagnetic materials utilizing magnetic Barkhausen noise

    Pal'a, Jozef; Ušák, Elemír

    2016-03-01

    A new method of magnetic Barkhausen noise (MBN) measurement and optimization of the measured data processing with respect to non-destructive evaluation of ferromagnetic materials was tested. Using this method we tried to found, if it is possible to enhance sensitivity and stability of measurement results by replacing the traditional MBN parameter (root mean square) with some new parameter. In the tested method, a complex set of the MBN from minor hysteresis loops is measured. Afterward, the MBN data are collected into suitably designed matrices and optimal parameters of MBN with respect to maximum sensitivity to the evaluated variable are searched. The method was verified on plastically deformed steel samples. It was shown that the proposed measuring method and measured data processing bring an improvement of the sensitivity to the evaluated variable when comparing with measuring traditional MBN parameter. Moreover, we found a parameter of MBN, which is highly resistant to the changes of applied field amplitude and at the same time it is noticeably more sensitive to the evaluated variable.

  19. CT and Ultrasound Guided Stereotactic High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)

    To demonstrate the feasibility of CT and B-mode Ultrasound (US) targeted HIFU, a prototype coaxial focused ultrasound transducer was registered and integrated to a CT scanner. CT and diagnostic ultrasound were used for HIFU targeting and monitoring, with the goals of both thermal ablation and non-thermal enhanced drug delivery. A 1 megahertz coaxial ultrasound transducer was custom fabricated and attached to a passive position-sensing arm and an active six degree-of-freedom robotic arm via a CT stereotactic frame. The outer therapeutic transducer with a 10 cm fixed focal zone was coaxially mounted to an inner diagnostic US transducer (2-4 megahertz, Philips Medical Systems). This coaxial US transducer was connected to a modified commercial focused ultrasound generator (Focus Surgery, Indianapolis, IN) with a maximum total acoustic power of 100 watts. This pre-clinical paradigm was tested for ability to heat tissue in phantoms with monitoring and navigation from CT and live US. The feasibility of navigation via image fusion of CT with other modalities such as PET and MRI was demonstrated. Heated water phantoms were tested for correlation between CT numbers and temperature (for ablation monitoring). The prototype transducer and integrated CT/US imaging system enabled simultaneous multimodality imaging and therapy. Pre-clinical phantom models validated the treatment paradigm and demonstrated integrated multimodality guidance and treatment monitoring. Temperature changes during phantom cooling corresponded to CT number changes. Contrast enhanced or non-enhanced CT numbers may potentially be used to monitor thermal ablation with HIFU. Integrated CT, diagnostic US, and therapeutic focused ultrasound bridges a gap between diagnosis and therapy. Preliminary results show that the multimodality system may represent a relatively inexpensive, accessible, and simple method of both targeting and monitoring HIFU effects. Small animal pre-clinical models may be translated to large

  20. Findings of multidetector row computed tomography of HCCs treated by HIFU ablation

    Purpose: We evaluated the efficacy of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and a long-term study by follow-up multidetector-row computed tomography (CT) was conducted to evaluate the changes occurring in the treatment area following the HIFU ablation. Materials and methods: HIFU ablation was carried out in 14 patients with small HCCs (≤3 lesions, ≤3 cm in diameter). The HIFU system (Chongqing Haifu Tech) was used under ultrasound guidance. The evaluations were performed by follow-up CT at 1 week, 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after the HIFU ablation. Results: HIFU ablation was carried out successfully in 11 of the 14 patients. At 1 week after the HIFU, a peripheral rim enhancement was found in all cases (100%). This finding was persistent in 6 of the 11 cases (54.5%) at 1 month, and in 1 of the 11 (9%) cases at 3 months after HIFU ablation. In all cases, the rim enhancement disappeared by 6 or 12 months after the HIFU ablation. At the 12 months follow-up, a decrease in the diameter of the ablated lesions was found. The enhancement around the treated area was found to be persistent at the 12 months follow-up in the one case of recurrence of the treated site in which the safety margin was not sufficiently wide. During the follow-up period, there were 2 cases with residual of HCC tumors. We performed radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for these residual tumors after the HIFU ablation. Conclusion: To ascertain the cause of the peripheral enhancement on follow-up CT images after the HIFU ablation, in particular, to determine whether it might be caused by residual tumor or recurrence at the treated site, careful follow-up is important, especially in cases where the safety margin of the ablated area was not sufficiently wide.

  1. [Framework design of MRI guided phased HIFU system and software development].

    Ma, Ruifeng; Shen, Guofeng; Qiao, Shan; Wei, Bo; Chen, Sheng; Chen, Yazhu

    2013-03-01

    This paper introduced a new structure of MRI guided P-HIFU therapy system and software implementation based on the current P-HIFU system and interface provided by MRI vendor. The tests showed that the system's software can achieve the appropriate form of treatment need. PMID:23777061

  2. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU as the alternative method of treatment of oncourological diseases

    Blyumberg B.I.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Increasing interest devoted to technology of high intensity focused ultrasound (high-intensity focused ultrasound, HIFU, basically, is explained by a wide spectrum of potential fields of application at minimum invasiveness of the given method. In oncourology HIFU is applied in prostate and kidney cancer. In case of tumors of renal parenchyma the given technique is being clinically tested, while HIFU is currently used in the practice of European oncourologists in treatment of prostate cancer. The majority of the references describing the results of HIFU application in prostate cancer is based on data of a number of clinical observations. It has been proved that HIFU is a possible method of treatment of highly — and moderate-differentiated tumors, and local relapses after remote radial therapy.

  3. A 3 to 5 GHz low-phase-noise fractional-N frequency synthesizer with adaptive frequency calibration for GSM/PCS/DCS/WCDMA transceivers

    A low-phase-noise Σ—Δ fractional-N frequency synthesizer for GSM/PCS/DCS/WCDMA transceivers is presented. The voltage controlled oscillator is designed with a modified digital controlled capacitor array to extend the tuning range and minimize phase noise. A high-resolution adaptive frequency calibration technique is introduced to automatically choose frequency bands and increase phase-noise immunity. A prototype is implemented in 0.13 μm CMOS technology. The experimental results show that the designed 1.2 V wideband frequency synthesizer is locked from 3.05 to 5.17 GHz within 30 μs, which covers all five required frequency bands. The measured in-band phase noise are −89, −95.5 and −101 dBc/Hz for 3.8 GHz, 2 GHz and 948 MHz carriers, respectively, and accordingly the out-of-band phase noise are −121, −123 and −132 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset, which meet the phase-noise-mask requirements of the above-mentioned standards. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  4. Investigation of HIFU-induced anti-tumor immunity in a murine tumor model

    Lyerly H Kim

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU is an emerging non-invasive treatment modality for localized treatment of cancers. While current clinical strategies employ HIFU exclusively for thermal ablation of the target sites, biological responses associated with both thermal and mechanical damage from focused ultrasound have not been thoroughly investigated. In particular, endogenous danger signals from HIFU-damaged tumor cells may trigger the activation of dendritic cells. This response may play a critical role in a HIFU-elicited anti-tumor immune response which can be harnessed for more effective treatment. Methods Mice bearing MC-38 colon adenocarcinoma tumors were treated with thermal and mechanical HIFU exposure settings in order to independently observe HIFU-induced effects on the host's immunological response. In vivo dendritic cell activity was assessed along with the host's response to challenge tumor growth. Results Thermal and mechanical HIFU were found to increase CD11c+ cells 3.1-fold and 4-fold, respectively, as compared to 1.5-fold observed for DC injection alone. In addition, thermal and mechanical HIFU increased CFSE+ DC accumulation in draining lymph nodes 5-fold and 10-fold, respectively. Moreover, focused ultrasound treatments not only caused a reduction in the growth of primary tumors, with tumor volume decreasing by 85% for thermal HIFU and 43% for mechanical HIFU, but they also provided protection against subcutaneous tumor re-challenge. Further immunological assays confirmed an enhanced CTL activity and increased tumor-specific IFN-γ-secreting cells in the mice treated by focused ultrasound, with cytotoxicity induced by mechanical HIFU reaching as high as 27% at a 10:1 effector:target ratio. Conclusion These studies present initial encouraging results confirming that focused ultrasound treatment can elicit a systemic anti-tumor immune response, and they suggest that this immunity is closely related to

  5. Evaluation of temperature rise in a tissue mimicking material during HIFU exposure

    Maruvada, S; Liu, Y; Herman, B A; Harris, G R, E-mail: subha.maruvada@fda.hhs.gov [Food and Drug Administration, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg., Silver Spring, MD 20993 (United States)

    2011-02-01

    In pre-clinical testing it is essential to characterize clinical high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) devices using tissue-mimicking materials (TMMs) with well known characteristics, including temperature rise and cavitation properties. The purpose of this study was to monitor cavitation behavior and correlate its effect with temperature rise in a HIFU TMM containing an embedded thermocouple. A 75-{mu}m fine wire thermocouple was embedded in a hydrogel-based TMM previously developed for HIFU. HIFU at 1.1 and 3.3 MHz was focused at the thermocouple junction. Focal pressures from 1-11 MPa were applied and the temperature profiles were recorded. Three hydrophones were used to monitor cavitation activity during sonication. A hydrophone confocal with the HIFU transducer and a cylindrical hydrophone lateral to the HIFU beam were used as passive cavitation detectors for spectral analysis of signals, and a needle hydrophone placed beyond the HIFU focus was used to record changes in the pressure amplitude due to blockage by bubbles at or near the focus. B-mode imaging scans were employed to visualize bubble presence during sonication. In a separate measurement, schlieren imaging was used to monitor the change in field distribution behind the TMM. All hydrophone methods correlated well with cavitation in the TMM.

  6. Evaluation of temperature rise in a tissue mimicking material during HIFU exposure

    In pre-clinical testing it is essential to characterize clinical high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) devices using tissue-mimicking materials (TMMs) with well known characteristics, including temperature rise and cavitation properties. The purpose of this study was to monitor cavitation behavior and correlate its effect with temperature rise in a HIFU TMM containing an embedded thermocouple. A 75-μm fine wire thermocouple was embedded in a hydrogel-based TMM previously developed for HIFU. HIFU at 1.1 and 3.3 MHz was focused at the thermocouple junction. Focal pressures from 1-11 MPa were applied and the temperature profiles were recorded. Three hydrophones were used to monitor cavitation activity during sonication. A hydrophone confocal with the HIFU transducer and a cylindrical hydrophone lateral to the HIFU beam were used as passive cavitation detectors for spectral analysis of signals, and a needle hydrophone placed beyond the HIFU focus was used to record changes in the pressure amplitude due to blockage by bubbles at or near the focus. B-mode imaging scans were employed to visualize bubble presence during sonication. In a separate measurement, schlieren imaging was used to monitor the change in field distribution behind the TMM. All hydrophone methods correlated well with cavitation in the TMM.

  7. Segmentation of uterine fibroid ultrasound images using a dynamic statistical shape model in HIFU therapy.

    Ni, Bo; He, Fazhi; Yuan, ZhiYong

    2015-12-01

    Segmenting the lesion areas from ultrasound (US) images is an important step in the intra-operative planning of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). However, accurate segmentation remains a challenge due to intensity inhomogeneity, blurry boundaries in HIFU US images and the deformation of uterine fibroids caused by patient's breathing or external force. This paper presents a novel dynamic statistical shape model (SSM)-based segmentation method to accurately and efficiently segment the target region in HIFU US images of uterine fibroids. For accurately learning the prior shape information of lesion boundary fluctuations in the training set, the dynamic properties of stochastic differential equation and Fokker-Planck equation are incorporated into SSM (referred to as SF-SSM). Then, a new observation model of lesion areas (named to RPFM) in HIFU US images is developed to describe the features of the lesion areas and provide a likelihood probability to the prior shape given by SF-SSM. SF-SSM and RPFM are integrated into active contour model to improve the accuracy and robustness of segmentation in HIFU US images. We compare the proposed method with four well-known US segmentation methods to demonstrate its superiority. The experimental results in clinical HIFU US images validate the high accuracy and robustness of our approach, even when the quality of the images is unsatisfactory, indicating its potential for practical application in HIFU therapy. PMID:26459767

  8. HIFU Ultrasound Power Measurements at INRiM

    In this work the new system for the ultrasound power measurement of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound transducers realized at INRIM ultrasounds laboratory is presented. The system is based on a submersible load cell that takes the place of the balance. This solution presents essentially two advantages. The first one, of mechanical nature, is relevant to the fact that the target is directly connected to the force transducer, eliminating unwanted target motion at high power. The second, of electric nature, concerns the possibility to reduce the insonation time (the ON period of the electric driving signal to the HIFU transducer) under of 2 s, and is allowed for by the faster response of the force transducer (700 Hz bandwidth). The main components of uncertainty and the overall budget of the measurement system are presented together with the results of measures of conductance, G, carried on a HIFU transducer, at the work frequencies 2.0 MHz and 6.38 MHz, for values of power ranging from 10 W to 100 W. The results of the ultrasonic conductance, G, obtained with the new system are compared with values obtained using the traditional measuring system for low powers (P ≤ 20W).

  9. HIFU Ultrasound Power Measurements at INRiM

    Durando, G.; Guglielmone, C.; Musacchio, C.

    2011-02-01

    In this work the new system for the ultrasound power measurement of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound transducers realized at INRIM ultrasounds laboratory is presented. The system is based on a submersible load cell that takes the place of the balance. This solution presents essentially two advantages. The first one, of mechanical nature, is relevant to the fact that the target is directly connected to the force transducer, eliminating unwanted target motion at high power. The second, of electric nature, concerns the possibility to reduce the insonation time (the ON period of the electric driving signal to the HIFU transducer) under of 2 s, and is allowed for by the faster response of the force transducer (700 Hz bandwidth). The main components of uncertainty and the overall budget of the measurement system are presented together with the results of measures of conductance, G, carried on a HIFU transducer, at the work frequencies 2.0 MHz and 6.38 MHz, for values of power ranging from 10 W to 100 W. The results of the ultrasonic conductance, G, obtained with the new system are compared with values obtained using the traditional measuring system for low powers (P <= 20W).

  10. Development of HIFU Therapy System for Lower Extremity Varicose Veins

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment utilizing microbubbles was investigated in the present study. It is known that microbubbles have the potential to enhance the heating effects of an ultrasound field. In this study, the heat accompanying microbubble oscillation was used to occlude varicose veins. Alteration of veins was observed after ultrasound irradiation. Veins were resected by stripping. In this study, two vein conditions were adopted during HIFU irradiation; non-compressed and compressed. Compressing the vein was expected to improve occlusion by rubbing the altered intima under compressed conditions. The frequency of the ultrasound was 1.7 MHz, the intensity at the focus was 2800 W/cm2, and the irradiation time was 20 s. In this study, the contrast agent Levovist registered was chosen as a microbubble source, and the void fraction (ratio of total gas volume to liquid) in the vein was fixed at 10-5. Under non-compressed conditions, changes were observed only at the adventitia of the vein anterior wall. In contrast, under compressed conditions, changes were observed from the intima to the adventitia of both the anterior and posterior walls, and they were partly stuck together. In addition, more experiments with hematoxylin-eosin staining suggested that the changes in the vein were more substantial under the latter conditions. From these results, it was confirmed that the vein was occluded more easily with vein compression.

  11. HIFU Ultrasound Power Measurements at INRiM

    Durando, G; Guglielmone, C; Musacchio, C, E-mail: g.durando@inrim.it [INRIM strada delle cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy)

    2011-02-01

    In this work the new system for the ultrasound power measurement of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound transducers realized at INRIM ultrasounds laboratory is presented. The system is based on a submersible load cell that takes the place of the balance. This solution presents essentially two advantages. The first one, of mechanical nature, is relevant to the fact that the target is directly connected to the force transducer, eliminating unwanted target motion at high power. The second, of electric nature, concerns the possibility to reduce the insonation time (the ON period of the electric driving signal to the HIFU transducer) under of 2 s, and is allowed for by the faster response of the force transducer (700 Hz bandwidth). The main components of uncertainty and the overall budget of the measurement system are presented together with the results of measures of conductance, G, carried on a HIFU transducer, at the work frequencies 2.0 MHz and 6.38 MHz, for values of power ranging from 10 W to 100 W. The results of the ultrasonic conductance, G, obtained with the new system are compared with values obtained using the traditional measuring system for low powers (P {<=} 20W).

  12. Approaches to overcome current limitations of HIFU treatment

    Umemura, Shin-Ichiro; Kawabata, Ken-Ichi; Sasaki, Kazuaki; Azuma, Takashi; Ishida, Kazunari; Kubota, Jun; Ichihara, Mitsuyoshi; Okai, Takashi

    2001-05-01

    Noninvasive therapy with HIFU has been successfully applied to transrectal treatment of prostate cancer as well as benign prostate hyperplasia. However, there are two major technical reasons why its clinical application to other organs is currently limited: (1) low throughput of treatment and (2) lack of penetration to deep tissues. To multiply the throughput, a split-focus technique, in which the focal spot is enlarged primarily in the lateral direction, was developed. An electronically variable focus array transducer was also developed to enhance the throughput. An approach to treat a large volume of uterus myoma by coagulating its feeding arteries has been studied. The tissue volume to be coagulated can be thereby reduced by orders of magnitude. The penetration and throughput can potentially be improved at the same time by delivering a microbubble agent to the target tissue. It was theoretically predicted that a microbubble agent could multiply the ultrasonic tissue absorption. The effectiveness of this approach was confirmed in animal experiments using Optison. Real-time monitoring of tissue coagulation during HIFU exposure also can enhance the throughput through preventing excess deposition of ultrasonic energy. Monitoring coagulation by imaging local displacement in tissue with ultrasound will be discussed as well.

  13. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focal spot localization using harmonic motion imaging (HMI).

    Han, Yang; Hou, Gary Yi; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa

    2015-08-01

    Several ultrasound-based imaging modalities have been proposed for image guidance and monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. However, accurate localization and characterization of the effective region of treatment (focal spot) remain important obstacles in the clinical implementation of HIFU ablation. Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) is a HIFU monitoring technique that utilizes radiation-force-induced localized oscillatory displacement. HMIFU has been shown to correctly identify the formation and extent of HIFU thermal ablation lesions. However a significant problem remains in identifying the location of the HIFU focus, which is necessary for treatment planning. In this study, the induced displacement was employed to localize the HIFU focal spot inside the tissue prior to treatment. Feasibility was shown with two separate systems. The 1D HMIFU system consisted of a HIFU transducer emitting an amplitude-modulated HIFU beam for mechanical excitation and a confocal single-element, pulse-echo transducer for simultaneous RF acquisition. The 2D HIFU system consists of a HIFU phased array, and a co-axial imaging phased array for simultaneous imaging. Initial feasibility was first performed on tissue-mimicking gelatin phantoms and the focal zone was defined as the region corresponding to the -3dB full width at half maximum of the HMI displacement. Using the same parameters, in vitro experiments were performed in canine liver specimens to compare the defined focal zone with the lesion. In vitro measurements showed good agreement between the HMI predicted focal zone and the induced HIFU lesion location. HMIFU was experimentally shown to be capable of predicting and tracking the focal region in both phantoms and in vitro tissues. The accuracy of focal spot localization was evaluated by comparing with the lesion location in post-ablative tissues, with a R(2) = 0.821 at p < 0.002 in the 2D HMI system. We demonstrated the

  14. Simulation of Transrib HIFU Propagation and the Strategy of Phased-array Activation

    Zhou, Yufeng; Wang, Mingjun

    Liver ablation is challenging in high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) because of the presence of ribs and great inhomogeneity in multi-layer tissue. In this study, angular spectrum approach (ASA) has been used in the wave propagation from phased-array HIFU transducer, and diffraction, attenuation and the nonlinearity are accounted for by means of second order operator splitting method. Bioheat equation is used to simulate the subsequent temperature elevation and lesion formation with the formation of shifted focus and multiple foci. In summary, our approach could simulate the performance of phased-array HIFU in the clinics and then develop an appropriate treatment plan.

  15. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focal spot localization using harmonic motion imaging (HMI)

    Han, Yang; Hou, Gary Yi; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa

    2015-08-01

    Several ultrasound-based imaging modalities have been proposed for image guidance and monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. However, accurate localization and characterization of the effective region of treatment (focal spot) remain important obstacles in the clinical implementation of HIFU ablation. Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) is a HIFU monitoring technique that utilizes radiation-force-induced localized oscillatory displacement. HMIFU has been shown to correctly identify the formation and extent of HIFU thermal ablation lesions. However a significant problem remains in identifying the location of the HIFU focus, which is necessary for treatment planning. In this study, the induced displacement was employed to localize the HIFU focal spot inside the tissue prior to treatment. Feasibility was shown with two separate systems. The 1D HMIFU system consisted of a HIFU transducer emitting an amplitude-modulated HIFU beam for mechanical excitation and a confocal single-element, pulse-echo transducer for simultaneous RF acquisition. The 2D HIFU system consists of a HIFU phased array, and a co-axial imaging phased array for simultaneous imaging. Initial feasibility was first performed on tissue-mimicking gelatin phantoms and the focal zone was defined as the region corresponding to the  -3dB full width at half maximum of the HMI displacement. Using the same parameters, in vitro experiments were performed in canine liver specimens to compare the defined focal zone with the lesion. In vitro measurements showed good agreement between the HMI predicted focal zone and the induced HIFU lesion location. HMIFU was experimentally shown to be capable of predicting and tracking the focal region in both phantoms and in vitro tissues. The accuracy of focal spot localization was evaluated by comparing with the lesion location in post-ablative tissues, with a R2 = 0.821 at p  HIFU focal spot without inducing thermal changes

  16. Progress in Development of HIFU CMUTs for use under MR-guidance

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) guided by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive treatment that potentially reduces patient morbidity, lowers costs, and increases treatment accessibility. Traditionally, piezoelectric transducers are used for HIFU, but capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) have many advantages, including fabrication flexibility, low loss, and efficient transmission. We designed, fabricated, and tested HIFU CMUTs for use under MRI guidance and have demonstrated continuous wave (CW) focusing. In this paper, we demonstrate that CMUTs can be designed for therapeutic ultrasound. First, we demonstrate successful unfocused heating of a HIFU phantom to 18.6 deg. C, which was successfully monitored under MR guidance. Second, we demonstrated a focused CMUT array whose beam profile matched with simulation. In the future, we will expand the array and system for upper abdominal cancer therapy.

  17. Novel Non-invasive Treatment With High-intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU).

    Marinova, M; Rauch, M; Schild, H H; Strunk, H M

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound is not only used for diagnostic purposes but it also can be applied therapeutically so far that nowadays high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) even represents a novel non-invasive treatment modality for various solid tumors. HIFU works by causing selectively deep tissue destruction of target lesions within the body without harming adjacent and overlying structures. In this article, we present an overview on both the mode of action and requirements for a HIFU treatment as well as on the safety and the current status of indications and possible applications with regard to benign and malignant gynecological diseases. Based on numerous studies and original articles, HIFU proved to be an effective and low-risk treatment option particularly for uterine fibroids and adenomyosis, but it also seems to be effective for breast fibroadenomas or even for breast cancer in special cases and other rare entities. PMID:26251996

  18. Class-DE Ultrasound Transducer Driver for HIFU Therapy.

    Christoffersen, Carlos; Wong, Wai; Pichardo, Samuel; Togtema, Greg; Curiel, Laura

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a practical implementation of an integrated MRI-compatible CMOS amplifier capable of directly driving a piezoelectric ultrasound transducer suitable for high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy. The amplifier operates in Class DE mode without the need for an output matching network. The integrated amplifier has been implemented with the AMS AG H35 CMOS process. A class DE amplifier design methodology for driving unmatched piezoelectric loads is presented along with simulation and experimental results. The proposed design achieves approximately 90% efficiency with over 800 mW of output power at 1010 kHz. The total die area including pads is 2 mm(2) . Compatibility with MRI was validated with B1 imaging of a phantom and the amplifier circuit. PMID:25955850

  19. HIFU Transducer Characterization Using a Robust Needle Hydrophone

    Howard, Samuel M.; Zanelli, Claudio I.

    2007-05-01

    A robust needle hydrophone has been developed for HIFU transducer characterization and reported on earlier. After a brief review of the hydrophone design and performance, we demonstrate its use to characterize a 1.5 MHz, 10 cm diameter, F-number 1.5 spherically focused source driven to exceed an intensity of 1400 W/cm2at its focus. Quantitative characterization of this source at high powers is assisted by deconvolving the hydrophone's calibrated frequency response in order to accurately reflect the contribution of harmonics generated by nonlinear propagation in the water testing environment. Results are compared to measurements with a membrane hydrophone at 0.3% duty cycle and to theoretical calculations, using measurements of the field at the source's radiating surface as input to a numerical solution of the KZK equation.

  20. Whole Body Bone Scan Findings after High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Treatment

    Seo, Ye Young; O, Joo Hyun; Sohn, Hyung Sun; Choi, Eun Kyoung; Yoo, Ik Dong; Oh, Jin Kyoung; Han, Eun Ji; Jung, Seung Eun; Kim, Sung Hoon [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    This study aims to examine the findings of {sup 99mT}c diphosphonate bone scans in cancer patients with a history of HIFU treatment. Bone scan images of patients with a history of HIFU treatment for primary of metastatic cancer from January 2006 to July 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Cases of primary bone tumor or HIFU treatment reaching only the superficial soft tissue layer were excluded. Bone scan images of 62 patients (26 female, 36 male; mean age 57{+-}9 years) were studied. HIFU treatment was performed in the liver (n=40), pancreas (n=40), pancreas (n=16), and breast (n=6). Mean interval time between HIFU treatment and bone scan was 106{+-}105 days (range: 1-572 days). Of 62 scans, 43 showed diffusely decreased uptake of bone within the path of HIFU treatment: antero axillary and/or posterior arcs of right 5th to 11th ribs in 34 cases after treatment of hepatic lesions; anterior arcs of 2nd to 5th ribs in 5 cases after treatment for breast tumors; and posterior arcs of left 9th to 11th ribs or thoraco lumbar vertebrae in 4 cases after treatment for pancreas tumor. Of 20 patients who had bone scans more than twice, five showed recovered uptake of the radiotracer in the involved ribs in the follow up bone scan. Of 62 bone scans in patients with a history of HIFU treatment for primary of metastatic cancer, 69% presented diffusely decreased uptake in the bone in the path of HIFU treatment.

  1. Whole Body Bone Scan Findings after High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Treatment

    This study aims to examine the findings of 99mTc diphosphonate bone scans in cancer patients with a history of HIFU treatment. Bone scan images of patients with a history of HIFU treatment for primary of metastatic cancer from January 2006 to July 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Cases of primary bone tumor or HIFU treatment reaching only the superficial soft tissue layer were excluded. Bone scan images of 62 patients (26 female, 36 male; mean age 57±9 years) were studied. HIFU treatment was performed in the liver (n=40), pancreas (n=40), pancreas (n=16), and breast (n=6). Mean interval time between HIFU treatment and bone scan was 106±105 days (range: 1-572 days). Of 62 scans, 43 showed diffusely decreased uptake of bone within the path of HIFU treatment: antero axillary and/or posterior arcs of right 5th to 11th ribs in 34 cases after treatment of hepatic lesions; anterior arcs of 2nd to 5th ribs in 5 cases after treatment for breast tumors; and posterior arcs of left 9th to 11th ribs or thoraco lumbar vertebrae in 4 cases after treatment for pancreas tumor. Of 20 patients who had bone scans more than twice, five showed recovered uptake of the radiotracer in the involved ribs in the follow up bone scan. Of 62 bone scans in patients with a history of HIFU treatment for primary of metastatic cancer, 69% presented diffusely decreased uptake in the bone in the path of HIFU treatment.

  2. First Experience Of Application Of High-Intensity Focused Ultrasonic Ablation (Hifu) In Prostate Cancer Treatment

    A.V. Stativko; B.I. Blumberg; A.N. Ponukalin; R.N. Fomkin; P.V. Glybochko

    2009-01-01

    The scientific article points out that 40 sessions of HIFU prostate ablation have been performed for estimation of clinical efficiency. Average frequency of influences presents 628±164 impulses; average volume of tissues subjected to influence during one procedure is 33,8±16,3 smi (132 %) of prostate volume; average operation time constitutes 150 minutes (from 90 to 200 minutes). During the operation no complications have been occurred. In the first days after the session of HIFU there was a ...

  3. Characterization of HIFU transducers designed for sonochemistry application: Acoustic streaming.

    Hallez, L; Touyeras, F; Hihn, J-Y; Bailly, Y

    2016-03-01

    Cavitation distribution in a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound sonoreactors (HIFU) has been extensively described in the recent literature, including quantification by an optical method (Sonochemiluminescence SCL). The present paper provides complementary measurements through the study of acoustic streaming generated by the same kind of HIFU transducers. To this end, results of mass transfer measurements (electrodiffusional method) were compared to optical method ones (Particle Image Velocimetry). This last one was used in various configurations: with or without an electrode in the acoustic field in order to have the same perturbation of the wave propagation. Results show that the maximum velocity is not located at the focal but shifted near the transducer, and that this shift is greater for high powers. The two cavitation modes (stationary and moving bubbles) are greatly affect the hydrodynamic behavior of our sonoreactors: acoustic streaming and the fluid generated by bubble motion. The results obtained by electrochemical measurements show the same low hydrodynamic activity in the transducer vicinity, the same shift of the active focal toward the transducer, and the same absence of activity in the post-focal axial zone. The comparison with theoretical Eckart's velocities (acoustic streaming in non-cavitating media) confirms a very high activity at the "sonochemical focal", accounted for by wave distortion, which induced greater absorption coefficients. Moreover, the equivalent liquid velocities are one order of magnitude larger than the ones measured by PIV, confirming the enhancement of mass transfer by bubbles oscillation and collapse close to the surface, rather than from a pure streaming effect. PMID:26585023

  4. High-intensity focused ultrasound treatment (HIFU) for the advanced pancreatic cancer

    Song, In Ho; Jung, Seung Eun; Hahn, Seong Tai; Jang, Jin Hee; Cho, Se Hyun; Han, Joon Yeol; Kim, Jin Il; Lee, Ji Young; Sung, Choon Ho [St. Mary' Hospital, the Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    We wanted to evaluate the levels of effect and safety of high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation (HIFU) for treating patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Nineteen sessions of HIFU, with the patients under general anesthesia, were performed in 18 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. The change of the gray-scale of the target lesion was analyzed during HIFU, and MRI was performed before and after HIFU. We assessed the extent of coagulative necorsis, the change of pain and the complications after HIFU. The change of tumor size and the survival of patients were also evaluated. The average size of tumor was 4 cm in diameter. Eighty nine percent of the target tumors showed increased echogenicity. On MRI, necrosis of the entire target tumor occurred in 79% of the patients. After treatment, effective pain relief was noted in 89% of the patients. There were no major complications. No size increase of the treated tumor was noted during 24 weeks of follow-up for 10 patients. Six patients among 12 patients who were available for follow-up are still alive and they are receiving chemotherapy. Six patients expired due to other disease or progression of metastasis. HIFU is a safe method without any major complications, and it is effective for inducing tumor necrosis and achieving pain control for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

  5. Segmentation of tumor ultrasound image in HIFU therapy based on texture and boundary encoding

    It is crucial in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy to detect the tumor precisely with less manual intervention for enhancing the therapy efficiency. Ultrasound image segmentation becomes a difficult task due to signal attenuation, speckle effect and shadows. This paper presents an unsupervised approach based on texture and boundary encoding customized for ultrasound image segmentation in HIFU therapy. The approach oversegments the ultrasound image into some small regions, which are merged by using the principle of minimum description length (MDL) afterwards. Small regions belonging to the same tumor are clustered as they preserve similar texture features. The mergence is completed by obtaining the shortest coding length from encoding textures and boundaries of these regions in the clustering process. The tumor region is finally selected from merged regions by a proposed algorithm without manual interaction. The performance of the method is tested on 50 uterine fibroid ultrasound images from HIFU guiding transducers. The segmentations are compared with manual delineations to verify its feasibility. The quantitative evaluation with HIFU images shows that the mean true positive of the approach is 93.53%, the mean false positive is 4.06%, the mean similarity is 89.92%, the mean norm Hausdorff distance is 3.62% and the mean norm maximum average distance is 0.57%. The experiments validate that the proposed method can achieve favorable segmentation without manual initialization and effectively handle the poor quality of the ultrasound guidance image in HIFU therapy, which indicates that the approach is applicable in HIFU therapy. (paper)

  6. High-intensity focused ultrasound treatment (HIFU) for the advanced pancreatic cancer

    We wanted to evaluate the levels of effect and safety of high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation (HIFU) for treating patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Nineteen sessions of HIFU, with the patients under general anesthesia, were performed in 18 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. The change of the gray-scale of the target lesion was analyzed during HIFU, and MRI was performed before and after HIFU. We assessed the extent of coagulative necorsis, the change of pain and the complications after HIFU. The change of tumor size and the survival of patients were also evaluated. The average size of tumor was 4 cm in diameter. Eighty nine percent of the target tumors showed increased echogenicity. On MRI, necrosis of the entire target tumor occurred in 79% of the patients. After treatment, effective pain relief was noted in 89% of the patients. There were no major complications. No size increase of the treated tumor was noted during 24 weeks of follow-up for 10 patients. Six patients among 12 patients who were available for follow-up are still alive and they are receiving chemotherapy. Six patients expired due to other disease or progression of metastasis. HIFU is a safe method without any major complications, and it is effective for inducing tumor necrosis and achieving pain control for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer

  7. Flat HIFU transducer with a sawtooth-shaped ultrasound radiation face

    Son, Keon-Ho; Cho, Young-Ki; Kim, Dae-Seung; Kim, Myung-Deok; Kang, Kook-Jin

    2013-10-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducers are spherically-curved in order to obtain a high intensity gain of the converged ultrasound energy at the geometrical focus. Ultrasound imaging devices monitor the procedure of HIFU treatment in ultrasound-guided HIFU systems where the image probe is positioned at the apex of the HIFU transducer, which has a spherical surface. However, the remote image probe's location yields a poor image quality compared to that obtained using conventional ultrasound imaging where the image probe is in direct contact with the surface. A phased array HIFU transducer with a new structure is suggested to overcome this limitation. The centers of the array elements are distributed over the flat surface of the transducer. However, the elements are tilted to form a geometrical focus, like a transducer with a spherically-curved surface, to obtain a high focal gain. The cross-section of the ultrasound radiation face of the transducer resembles the teeth of a saw. The acoustic field emitted from this transducer was simulated in order to design and produce the transducer. The simulation was compared with the measured sound field to verify that the transducer was correctly manufactured and designed; subsequently, the acoustic power was measured, and ultrasound images were obtained through the installation of an image probe on the transducer, which confirmed the application of this transducer to HIFU treatment.

  8. Segmentation of tumor ultrasound image in HIFU therapy based on texture and boundary encoding

    Zhang, Dong; Xu, Menglong; Quan, Long; Yang, Yan; Qin, Qianqing; Zhu, Wenbin

    2015-02-01

    It is crucial in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy to detect the tumor precisely with less manual intervention for enhancing the therapy efficiency. Ultrasound image segmentation becomes a difficult task due to signal attenuation, speckle effect and shadows. This paper presents an unsupervised approach based on texture and boundary encoding customized for ultrasound image segmentation in HIFU therapy. The approach oversegments the ultrasound image into some small regions, which are merged by using the principle of minimum description length (MDL) afterwards. Small regions belonging to the same tumor are clustered as they preserve similar texture features. The mergence is completed by obtaining the shortest coding length from encoding textures and boundaries of these regions in the clustering process. The tumor region is finally selected from merged regions by a proposed algorithm without manual interaction. The performance of the method is tested on 50 uterine fibroid ultrasound images from HIFU guiding transducers. The segmentations are compared with manual delineations to verify its feasibility. The quantitative evaluation with HIFU images shows that the mean true positive of the approach is 93.53%, the mean false positive is 4.06%, the mean similarity is 89.92%, the mean norm Hausdorff distance is 3.62% and the mean norm maximum average distance is 0.57%. The experiments validate that the proposed method can achieve favorable segmentation without manual initialization and effectively handle the poor quality of the ultrasound guidance image in HIFU therapy, which indicates that the approach is applicable in HIFU therapy.

  9. Design and evaluation of a transesophageal HIFU probe for ultrasound-guided cardiac ablation: simulation of a HIFU mini-maze procedure and preliminary ex vivo trials.

    Constanciel, Elodie; N'Djin, W Apoutou; Bessière, Francis; Chavrier, Françoise; Grinberg, Daniel; Vignot, Alexandre; Chevalier, Philippe; Chapelon, Jean Yves; Lafon, Cyril

    2013-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most frequent cardiac arrhythmia. Left atrial catheter ablation is currently performed to treat this disease. Several energy sources are used, such as radio-frequency or cryotherapy. The main target of this procedure is to isolate the pulmonary veins. However, significant complications caused by the invasive procedure are described, such as stroke, tamponade, and atrioesophageal fistula, and a second intervention is often needed to avoid atrial fibrillation recurrence. For these reasons, a minimally-invasive device allowing performance of more complex treatments is still needed. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can cause deep tissue lesions without damaging intervening tissues. Left atrial ultrasound-guided transesophageal HIFU ablation could have the potential to become a new ablation technique. The goal of this study was to design and test a minimally-invasive ultrasound-guided transesophageal HIFU probe under realistic treatment conditions. First, numerical simulations were conducted to determine the probe geometry, and to validate the feasibility of performing an AF treatment using a HIFU mini-maze (HIFUMM) procedure. Then, a prototype was manufactured and characterized. The 18-mm-diameter probe head housing contained a 3-MHz spherical truncated HIFU transducer divided into 8 rings, with a 5-MHz commercial transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) transducer integrated in the center. Finally, ex vivo experiments were performed to test the impact of the esophagus layer between the probe and the tissue to treat, and also the influence of the lungs and the vascularization on lesion formation. First results show that this prototype successfully created ex vivo transmural myocardial lesions under ultrasound guidance, while preserving intervening tissues (such as the esophagus). Ultrasound-guided transesophageal HIFU can be a good candidate for treatment of AF in the future. PMID:24658718

  10. Adapt

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  11. Report on research of calculus fragmentation by HIFU-induced cavitation in Tsinghua University: 2. Thermal effects

    Thermal effects in the research of breaking kidney stones using HIFU-induced cavitation were studied. Damages to the phantom could be observed after an acting period of HIFU. It was shown that temperature rise is much greater in phantom than in water. Greatest changes occur near the focal region of HIFU transducer. Distinct temperature changes can be observed with input of continuous signals, while modest changes appear with input of pulsed signals. The fact that pulsed signals generate less damage, indicate the favourable acting patterns of HIFU. More tests are being done at the moment.

  12. Nanoparticle-enhanced synergistic HIFU ablation and transarterial chemoembolization for efficient cancer therapy

    You, Yufeng; Wang, Zhigang; Ran, Haitao; Zheng, Yuanyi; Wang, Dong; Xu, Jinshun; Wang, Zhibiao; Chen, Yu; Li, Pan

    2016-02-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is being generally explored as a non-invasive therapeutic modality to treat solid tumors. However, the clinical use of HIFU for large and deep tumor-ablation applications such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is currently entangled with long treatment duration and high operating energy. This critical issue can be potentially resolved by the introduction of HIFU synergistic agents (SAs). Traditional SAs such as microbubbles and microparticles face the problem of large size, short cycle time, damage to mononuclear phagocytic system and unsatisfactory targeting efficiency. In this work, we have developed a facile and versatile nanoparticle-based HIFU synergistic cancer surgery enhanced by transarterial chemoembolization for high-efficiency HCC treatment based on elaborately designed Fe3O4-PFH/PLGA nanocapsules. Multifunctional Fe3O4-PFH/PLGA nanocapsules were administrated into tumor tissues via transarterial injection combined with Lipiodol to achieve high tumor accumulation because transarterial chemoembolization by Lipiodol could block the blood vessels. The high synergistic HIFU ablation effect was successfully achieved against HCC tumors based on the phase-transformation performance of the perfluorohexane (PFH) inner core in the composite nanocapsules, as systematically demonstrated in VX2 liver tumor xenograft in rabbits. Multifunctional Fe3O4-PFH/PLGA nanocapsules were also demonstrated as efficient contrast agents for ultrasound, magnetic resonance and photoacoustic tri-modality imagings, potentially applicable for imaging-guided HIFU synergistic surgery. Therefore, the elaborate integration of traditional transarterial chemoembolization with recently developed nanoparticle-enhanced HIFU cancer surgery could efficiently enhance the HCC cancer treatment outcome, initiating a new and efficient therapeutic protocol/modality for clinic cancer treatment.

  13. Robotic high-intensity focused ultrasound (rHIFU) for the prostate cancer treatment

    Solovov, Vyacheslav; Shaplygin, Leonid; Vozdvizhenskiy, Mikhail

    2012-11-01

    Introduction & Objectives: rHIFU shows a successful treatment for localized prostate cancer (PC). Here we explored the effectiveness of the rHIFU treatment for the prostate cancer, hormone-resistant prostate cancer (HRPC) and failure after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and radical prostatectomy (RPE). Materials & Methods: 748 patients were treated in our center between Sep 2007 - February 2012: 137 - hormone-resistance (median time before hormone-resistance 25 months), 286 - received neoadjuvant hormone therapy 6 months, 293 - no treatment before HIFU, 32 - after the EBRT failure. 667 patients underwent TURP+rHIFU, 81 only rHIFU (volume prostate prostate volume - 39 (5,5-108) cc. Results: Median PSA level 12 months after rHIFU treatment were 0,04 (0-2,24) ng/ml - low risk group, for high risk group - 0,5 (0-48,4) ng/ml, with failure after EBRT and RPE- 0,5 (0-3,2) ng/ml; 36 months after rHIFU treatment were 0,5 (0,02-3,6) ng/ml - low risk group, for high risk group - 3,2 (0-21,38) ng/ml, with failure after EBRT and RPE - 1,7 (0-9,8) ng/ml. Patients with low risk had 4,5% of progression, with high risk PC - 25%, with failure after EBRT and RPE - 19,6%. Kaplan-Meir analyses of the total group indicated that the risk of progression after 1 year follow-up was 10%, the risk of progression was 23% after 4 years of follow-up. Complications: incontinence I - 17,5%, incontinence II - 7,7%, stricture - 18,2%, fistula - 0,3 %. Conclusions: Our experience shows that rHIFU ablation is safe, minimally invasive, effective treatment with moderate side effects for the PC, hormone-resistant prostate cancer, rHIFU also may be used as a salvage therapy after EBRF. Further studies are required.

  14. Alternative Focal Spot Geometry for More Efficient HIFU Treatment Assessment

    Kaye, Elena; Chen, Jing; Medan, Yoav; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2010-03-01

    In this work a more time efficient approach for tissue assessment with MR-ARFI is proposed. During HIFU treatments gadolinium-free assessment of treated tissue is highly desirable. MR-ARFI allows measuring tissue displacement in the focal spot. Therefore raster-scanning the ultrasound focal spot through the tissue of interest can give information about tissue stiffness in the "probed" area. To enhance efficiency of such ultrasound "probing," we replaced a conventional point focus with a line focus that allows greater area coverage during MR-ARFI acquisitions. This approach was tested in a phantom and in ex vivo bovine muscle. The results of the study showed that the line focus produces a fairly uniform line shape focal spot in both temperature and displacement maps. Using one line focus position, the displacement maps obtained in the muscle tissue well depicted the difference in displacement in the area where lesion was created. This shows great potential for line focus geometry combined with MR-ARFI as an alternative treatment assessment technique.

  15. Interactions H.I.F.U. / polymer films

    Hallez, L.; Touyeras, F.; Hihn, J.-Y.; Bailly, Y.

    2010-01-01

    In order to obtain the modification of a defined volume of a polymer layer, preliminary tests of sonication (HIFU 0.75 and 3 MHz) were carried out to obtain an accurate characterization of the acoustic fields as well as convective flow velocities measured close to the surface by Particle Image Velocimetry and luminol mapping. Then, sonication of a delimited zone of an acrylic resin deposited upon a stainless steel thin substrate highlighted a strong dependence of the polymerization or reticulation degree, with different exposure times and different power thresholds for the same final modification. The point was to examine the ability of the thin polymer film to absorb ultrasonic energy or to act as a perfect reflector which induces asymmetric cavitation and therefore violent collapses to take place close to the surface. In the first case, the wave absorption by the film is converted into heat and then acts for the polymer alteration under the high convective flow velocities. For the highest acoustic intensities and for the hardest films, cavitation occurs and the produced microbubbles oscillated and grow close to the surface. Then, the shocks resulting of the bubble collapse eroded mechanically the film.

  16. The Reduced Cochlear Output and the Failure to Adapt the Central Auditory Response Causes Tinnitus in Noise Exposed Rats

    Rüttiger, Lukas; Singer, Wibke; Panford-Walsh, Rama; Matsumoto, Masahiro; Lee, Sze Chim; Zuccotti, Annalisa; Zimmermann, Ulrike; Jaumann, Mirko; Rohbock, Karin; Xiong, Hao; Knipper, Marlies

    2013-01-01

    Tinnitus is proposed to be caused by decreased central input from the cochlea, followed by increased spontaneous and evoked subcortical activity that is interpreted as compensation for increased responsiveness of central auditory circuits. We compared equally noise exposed rats separated into groups with and without tinnitus for differences in brain responsiveness relative to the degree of deafferentation in the periphery. We analyzed (1) the number of CtBP2/RIBEYE-positive particles in ribbo...

  17. Salvage HIFU for biopsy confirmed local prostate cancer recurrence after radical prostatectomy and radiation therapy: Case report and literature review.

    Rittberg, Rebekah; Kroczak, Tadeusz; Fleshner, Neil; Drachenberg, Darrel

    2015-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a treatment option for low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer and more recently has been used as salvage therapy after failed radiation therapy. We present a case of local recurrence with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy and salvage external beam radiation therapy with salvage HIFU without biochemical recurrence at 20 months. PMID:26425239

  18. Salvage HIFU for biopsy confirmed local prostate cancer recurrence after radical prostatectomy and radiation therapy: Case report and literature review

    Rittberg, Rebekah; Kroczak, Tadeusz; Fleshner, Neil; Drachenberg, Darrel

    2015-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a treatment option for low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer and more recently has been used as salvage therapy after failed radiation therapy. We present a case of local recurrence with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy and salvage external beam radiation therapy with salvage HIFU without biochemical recurrence at 20 months.

  19. Feasibility of laser-integrated high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment for bladder tumors: in vitro study (Conference Presentation)

    Nguyen, Van Phuc; Park, Suhyun; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that photothemal therapy combined with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can provide a promising method to achieve rapid thermal coagulation during surgical procedures. The current study investigated the feasibility of the laser-integrated high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) application to treat bladder tumors by enhancing thermal effects and therapeutic depth in vitro. To generate thermal coagulation, a single element HIFU transducer with a central frequency of 2.0 MHz was used to transmit acoustic energy to 15 fresh porcine bladders injected with an artificial tumor (100 µl gelatin and hemoglobin solution) in vitro. Simultaneously, an 80-W 532-nm laser system was also implemented to induce thermal necrosis in the targeted tissue. The intensity of 570 W/cm2 at the focus of HIFU and laser energy of 0.9 W were applied to all the samples for 40 s. The temperature rise increased up to about 1.6 or 3 folds (i.e., ΔT=32±3.8 K for laser-integrated HIFU, ΔT=20±6.5 K for HIFU only, and ΔT=11±5.6 K for laser only). The estimated lesion depth also increased by 1.3 and 2 folds during the dual-thermal treatment, in comparison with the treatment by either HIFU or laser. The results indicated that the laser-integrated HIFU treatment can be an efficient hyperthermic method for tumor coagulation.

  20. Image noise-based dose adaptation in dynamic volume CT of the heart: dose and image quality optimisation in comparison with BMI-based dose adaptation

    To compare the image quality and radiation dose using image-noise (IN)-based determination of X-ray tube settings compared with a body mass index (BMI)-based protocol during CT coronary angiography (CTCA). Two hundred consecutive patients referred for CTCA to our institution were divided into two groups: BMI-based, 100 patients had CTCA with the X-ray tube current adjusted to the patient's BMI while maintaining a fixed tube potential of 120 kV; IN-based, 100 patients underwent imaging with the X-ray tube current and voltage adjusted to the IN measured within the mid-left ventricle on a pre-acquisition trans-axial image. Two independent cardiac radiologists performed blinded image quality assessment with quantification of the IN and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) from the mid-LV and qualitative assessment using a three-point score. Radiation dose (CTDI and DLP) was recorded from the console. Results showed: IN (HU): BMI-based, 30.1 ± 9.9; IN-based, 33.1 ± 6.7; 32 % variation reduction (P = 0.001); SNR: BMI-based, 18.6 ± 7.1; IN-based, 15.4 ± 3.7; 48 % variation reduction (P < 0.0001). Visual scores: BMI-based, 2.3 ± 0.6; IN-based, 2.2 ± 0.5 (P = 0.54). Radiation dose: CTDI (mGy), BMI-based, 22.68 ± 8.9; IN-based, 17.16 ± 7.6; 24.3 % reduction (P < 0.001); DLP (mGy.cm), BMI-based, 309.3 ± 127.5; IN-based, 230.6 ± 105.5; 25.4 % reduction (P < 0.001). Image-noise-based stratification of X-ray tube parameters for CTCA results in 32 % improvement in image quality and 25 % reduction in radiation dose compared with a BMI-based protocol. (orig.)

  1. Contrast Agent Ultrasonography before and after HIFU Treatment of Parathyroid Glands

    Kovatcheva, Roussanka; Arnaud, Françoise; Lacoste, François

    2010-03-01

    OBJECTIVES: To observe changes in the parathyroid tissue treated by extracorporeal HIFU. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 5 patients were treated for primary hyperparathyroidism by thermally ablating enlarged parathyroid glands using an external HIFU applicator. The treated glands were visualized with B-Mode and contrast enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) before, 1 week and 4 weeks post HIFU. Serum iPTH, calcium, and phosphorus levels were monitored before and after the treatment. RESULTS: The initial results showed a correlation between contrast agent uptake of treated parathyroid tissue, the reduction of volume of the gland and the decrease of iPTH levels. CONCLUSIONS These results show it is possible to use CEUS to monitor the thermal ablation of parathyroid glands.

  2. Clinical applications for magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU): present and future

    It has been well known for decades that high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) generates heat in tissues resulting in coagulative necrosis. Implementation, however, has been slow, due to difficulties with finding an appropriate imaging modality that could not only guide treatment, but also provide real-time thermal feedback. These problems have been overcome with the newest magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound systems (MRgHIFU). With its superior spatial resolution enabling accurate image guidance coupled with its ability to provide real-time thermography during treatments, MRI is moving further into the realm of therapeutics for oncologic patient care. This article will discuss the implementation of an MR-guided HIFU system, current clinical indications and touch on future directions.

  3. The Efficacy of High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    Bo Xie; Jiajun Ling; Weiming Zhang; Xueqin Huang; Jihua Zhen; Yanzhe Huang

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To observe the efficacy of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)in the treatment of late-stage pancreatic cancer.METHODS Sixteen patients with advanced pancreatic cancer received HIFU therapy.Evaluation of efficacy was made on the basis of changes in clinical symptoms and variations in the tumor echo and size.RESULTS Clinical symptoms such as pain were significantly alleviated,echo of the tumor was enhanced with B-US and the quality of life such as eating,sleeping and mental status was markedly improved;no serious complications were observed.CONCLUSION The use of HIFU in the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer is feasible and safe.It is effective in killing the carcinoma cells and alleviaring pain.This technique may offer non-invasive therapy for the treatment of patients with late-stage pancreatic cancer.

  4. Noise suppression by noise

    Vilar, J. M. G.; Rubí Capaceti, José Miguel

    2001-01-01

    We have analyzed the interplay between an externally added noise and the intrinsic noise of systems that relax fast towards a stationary state, and found that increasing the intensity of the external noise can reduce the total noise of the system. We have established a general criterion for the appearance of this phenomenon and discussed two examples in detail.

  5. Noise reduction of dental drill noise

    Rotter, KRGR; Atherton, MA; Kaymak, E; Millar, BJ

    2008-01-01

    Dental drills produce a characteristic noise that is uncomfortable for patients and is also known to be harmful to dentists under prolonged exposure. It is therefore desirable to protect the patient and dentist whilst allowing two-way communication, which will require a headphone - type system. Re-establishing good communication between the dentist and patient will be achieved through a combination of three noise cancellation technologies, namely, Passive Noise Control (PNC), Adaptive Filteri...

  6. Sonoluminescence characterization of inertial cavitation inside a BSA phantom treated by pulsed HIFU.

    Yin, Hui; Chang, Nan; Xu, Shanshan; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inertial cavitation inside a phantom treated by pulsed HIFU (pHIFU). Basic bovine serum albumin (BSA) phantoms without any inherent ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) or phase-shift nano-emulsions (PSNEs) were used. During the treatment, sonoluminescence (SL) recordings were performed to characterize the spatial distribution of inertial cavitation adjacent to the focal region. High-speed photographs and thermal coagulations, comparing with the SL results, were also recorded and presented. A series of pulse parameters (pulse duration (PD) was between 1 and 23 cycles and pulse repetition frequency (PRF) was between 0.5kHz and 100kHz) were performed to make a systematic investigation under certain acoustic power (APW). Continuous HIFU (cHIFU) investigation was also performed to serve as control group. It was found that, when APW was 19.5W, pHIFU with short PD was much easier to form SL adjacent to the focal region inside the phantom, while it was difficult for cHIFU to generate cavitation bubbles. With appropriate PD and PRF, the residual bubbles of the previous pulses could be stimulated by the incident pulses to oscillate in a higher level and even violently collapse, resulting to enhanced physical thermogenesis. The experimental results showed that the most violent inertial cavitation occurs when PD was set to 6 cycles (5μs) and PRF to 10kHz, while the highest level of thermal coagulation was observed when PD was set to 10 cycles. The cavitational and thermal characteristics were in good correspondence, exhibiting significant potentiality regarding to inject-free cavitation bubble enhanced thermal ablation under lower APW, compared to the conventional thermotherapy. PMID:27150756

  7. A Pulsatile Flow Phantom for Image-Guided HIFU Hemostasis of Blood Vessels

    A pulsatile flow phantom for studying ultrasound image-guided acoustic hemostasis in a controlled environment has been developed. An ex vivo porcine carotid artery was attached to the phantom and embedded in a visually and ultrasonically transparent gel. Heparinized porcine blood was pumped through the phantom. Power-Doppler and B-mode ultrasound were used to remotely target the HIFU focus to the site of a needle puncture. In nine trials, complete hemostasis was achieved after an average HIFU application of 55 +/- 34 seconds. The vessels remained patent after treatment. With this phantom, it will be possible to do controlled studies of ultrasound image-guided acoustic hemostasis

  8. Transrectal Array Configurations Optimized For Prostate HIFU Ablation

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate and compare steering and ablation rates from several types of transrectal arrays operated at different frequencies for whole prostate ablation. Three-dimensional acoustic and thermal modeling (Rayleigh-Sommerfield and Penne's BHTE) were performed. Treatment volumes up to 70cc and anterior-posterior distances up to 6 cm were considered. The maximum transducer dimensions were constrained to 5 cm (along rectum) and 2.5 cm (elevation), and the channel count was limited to 256. Planar array configurations for truncated-annular, 1/1.5D, and 2D random arrays were evaluated at 1, 2, and 4 MHz for capability to treat the entire prostate. The acoustic intensity at the surface was fixed at 10 W/cm2. The maximum temperature was restricted to 80 deg. C. The volumetric ablation rate was computed to compare the treatment times amongst different configurations. The 1.5D Planar array at 1 MHz ablated the whole prostate in the shortest amount of time while maintaining adequate steering. The higher frequency arrays required smaller elevation apertures for a fixed channel count to maintain a single focal spot at the desired location. Consequently, these arrays resulted in slower heating rates with increased near-field heating. The 1 MHz 1.5D array would also be advantageous compared to single-element transducers since only one mechanical degree of motion is required. This study demonstrates the selection of an optimal array geometry and frequency for transrectal HIFU, resulting in faster ablation rates and reduced treatment times.

  9. A Bayesian approach to the inference of parametric configuration of the signal-to-noise ratio in an adaptive refinement of the measurements

    Marquez, Maria Jose

    2012-01-01

    Calibration is nowadays one of the most important processes involved in the extraction of valuable data from measurements. The current availability of an optimum data cube measured from a heterogeneous set of instruments and surveys relies on a systematic and robust approach in the corresponding measurement analysis. In that sense, the inference of configurable instrument parameters can considerably increase the quality of the data obtained. This paper proposes a solution based on Bayesian inference for the estimation of the configurable parameters relevant to the signal to noise ratio. The information obtained by the resolution of this problem can be handled in a very useful way if it is considered as part of an adaptive loop for the overall measurement strategy, in such a way that the outcome of this parametric inference leads to an increase in the knowledge of a model comparison problem in the context of the measurement interpretation. The context of this problem is the multi-wavelength measurements coming...

  10. 一种色噪声下的自适应Kalman跟踪滤波器%An Adaptive Kalman Tracking Filter with Colored Noises

    孙强; 惠晓滨; 黄鹤

    2011-01-01

    有色噪声干扰情况下非线性系统的状态估计是许多实际工程需要解决的问题.该文章针对传统Kalman滤波器噪声统计特性未知时,受色噪声的影响精度严重降低,甚至出现发散等现象,设计了一种基于神经模糊网络的自适应的Kalman滤波跟踪器.该滤波器通过利用神经模糊网络作为误差估计器,估计出Kalman滤波器的估计误差,从而对Kalman滤波跟踪器的预测结果进行修正,得到更优的预测值.计算机仿真结果表明,该算法可以克服传统算法的局限性,有效地防止滤波器发散,缩小实际的滤波误差,提高滤波精度,实现对跟踪结果的在线改进.%Estimation in nonlinear system with Colored Noises is problem in many projects. The traditional Kalman Filter is still deficient in tracking targets in the nonlinear systems with colored noises.An adaptive Kalman tracking algorithm based on neuro-fuzzy network is proposed in the paper. The estimation error is obtained online to modify the filtered result with neuro-fuzzy network as the estimator.The analysis of simulation results indicates preliminarily that our better tracking algorithm does restrain colored noise and improve that tracking accuracy. At same time it can reduce error of traditional algorithm and improve the tracking accuracy of the system online.

  11. Suppression Measured from Chinchilla Auditory-Nerve-Fiber Responses Following Noise-Induced Hearing Loss: Adaptive-Tracking and Systems-Identification Approaches.

    Sayles, Mark; Walls, Michael K; Heinz, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    The compressive nonlinearity of cochlear signal transduction, reflecting outer-hair-cell function, manifests as suppressive spectral interactions; e.g., two-tone suppression. Moreover, for broadband sounds, there are multiple interactions between frequency components. These frequency-dependent nonlinearities are important for neural coding of complex sounds, such as speech. Acoustic-trauma-induced outer-hair-cell damage is associated with loss of nonlinearity, which auditory prostheses attempt to restore with, e.g., "multi-channel dynamic compression" algorithms.Neurophysiological data on suppression in hearing-impaired (HI) mammals are limited. We present data on firing-rate suppression measured in auditory-nerve-fiber responses in a chinchilla model of noise-induced hearing loss, and in normal-hearing (NH) controls at equal sensation level. Hearing-impaired (HI) animals had elevated single-fiber excitatory thresholds (by ~ 20-40 dB), broadened frequency tuning, and reduced-magnitude distortion-product otoacoustic emissions; consistent with mixed inner- and outer-hair-cell pathology. We characterized suppression using two approaches: adaptive tracking of two-tone-suppression threshold (62 NH, and 35 HI fibers), and Wiener-kernel analyses of responses to broadband noise (91 NH, and 148 HI fibers). Suppression-threshold tuning curves showed sensitive low-side suppression for NH and HI animals. High-side suppression thresholds were elevated in HI animals, to the same extent as excitatory thresholds. We factored second-order Wiener-kernels into excitatory and suppressive sub-kernels to quantify the relative strength of suppression. We found a small decrease in suppression in HI fibers, which correlated with broadened tuning. These data will help guide novel amplification strategies, particularly for complex listening situations (e.g., speech in noise), in which current hearing aids struggle to restore intelligibility. PMID:27080669

  12. Significant skin burns may occur with the use of a water balloon in HIFU treatment

    Ritchie, Robert; Collin, Jamie; Wu, Feng; Coussios, Constantin; Leslie, Tom; Cranston, David

    2012-10-01

    HIFU is a minimally-invasive therapy suitable for treating selected intra-abdominal tumors. Treatment is safe although skin burns may occur due to pre-focal heating. HIFU treatment of a renal transplant tumor located in the left lower abdomen was undertaken in our centre. Treatment was performed prone, requiring displacement of the abdominal wall away from the treatment field using a water balloon, constructed of natural rubber latex and filled with degassed water. Intra-operatively, ultrasound imaging and physical examination of the skin directly over the focal region was normal. Immediately post-operative, a full-thickness skin burn was evident at the periphery of the balloon location, outside the expected HIFU path. Three possibilities may account for this complication. Firstly, the water balloon may have acted as a lens, focusing the HIFU to a neo-focus off axis. Secondly, air bubbles may have been entrapped between the balloon and the skin, causing heating at the interface. Finally, heating of the isolated water within the balloon may have been sufficient to cause burning. In this case, the placement of a water balloon caused a significant skin burn. Care should be taken in their use as burns, situated off axis, may occur even if the overlying skin appears normal.

  13. The nuclide imaging of primary malignant bone tumor before and after HIFU treatment

    Objective: To investigate the difference of bone nuclide imaging on primary malignant bone tumor before and after high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. Methods: 99Tcm-methylene-diphosphonate (MDP) bone imaging was applied before and after HIFU treatment and 99Tcm(V)-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) imaging was used when it was needed. Results: 1) There were areas of abnormal high uptake of 99Tcm-MDP in bone foci, while the lower uptake or no-uptake areas of 99Tcm-MDP outside the foci were found simultaneously. 2) The high uptake of 99Tcm(V)-DMSA in 5 cases after the HIFU treatment in the foci indicated the relapse of the former bone tumor. Conclusions: The location and extent of the tumor, and effectiveness of HIFU treatment can be estimated sensitively with 99Tcm-MDP bone imaging. The high uptake of 99Tcm(V)-DMSA in the focus indicates the relapse of the primary malignant bone tumor or new bone lesion in a certain degree

  14. Characterization of HIFU transducers designed for sonochemistry application: Cavitation distribution and quantification

    Hallez, L.; Touyeraz, F.; Hihn, J. Y.; Klíma, Jiří; Guey, J.-L.; Spajer, M.; Bailly, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 2 (2010), s. 310-317. ISSN 0041-624X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : HIFU * acoustic cavitation * MBSCL threshold * sonoreactors Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 1.599, year: 2010

  15. Identification of risk factors of prostate adenocarcinoma recurrence after HIFU therapy using immunohistochemical markers

    Popkov V.M.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for recurrence of prostate adenocarcinoma after HIFU therapy. Material and methods: Material for the study was obtained from patients diagnosed with adenocarcinoma before and after HIFU treatment. Morphological study was conducted using a standard staining, and immunohistochemical markers: PCNA, Amacr, E-cadherin, Bel2, Andr, Estr, VEGF, P53, PCNA. Results: After treatment in 89% of patients with initial prostate volume greater than 50 cc the signs of recurrence of adenocarcinoma were showed. At low risk for D'Amico after treatment the expression of proliferation markers, VEGF, Amacr significantly decreased. With a high degree of risk — increased expression of Bel2. After treatment the expression of the following markers: PCNA, Amacr, VEGF significantly increased in the group of patients with the presence of invasion. Conclusion: Patients with initial prostate volume less than 50 cc, low risk to D'Amico, the lack of perineural and perivascular invasion have a low risk of recurrence after HIFU therapy; patients at high risk for D'Amico, the presence of perineural and perivascular invasion initial and prostate volume greater than 50 cc, low-grade cribriform form of adenocarcinoma have a high risk of recurrence of adenocarcinoma. Recurrence of adenocarcinoma develops independently of the period after HIFU therapy.

  16. Initial Experience with the Extracorporeal HIFU Knife with 49 Patients: Japanese Experience

    Ganaha, F.; Okuno, T.; Lee, C. O.; Shimizu, T.; Osako, K.; Oka, S.; Lee, K. H.; Chen, W. Z.; Zhu, H.; Park, S. H.; Qi, Z.; Shi, D.; Song, H. S.

    2005-03-01

    Forty nine patients with 63 tumours were treated with the Chongqing Haifu knife, as an adjunct to intra-arterial chemoinfusion. Treatment targets included breast (20 lesions), liver (16), bone (8), lymph-node (6), soft tissue (4), lung and pleura (4), pancreas (2), kidney (2) and adrenal gland (1). Follow-up contrast MRI was performed at 3 weeks to assess the effects of HIFU ablation. All cases completed the planned treatment. Of 25 lesions treated with the intention of complete tumour ablation, complete necrosis was obtained in 19 lesions (76%) including 4 secondary success cases. Among 32 lesions having partial and palliative treatment, tumour size was decreased in 6 lesions (21%), and good pain control was obtained in 6 out of 7 patients (86%). Skin injury was the most common complication after HIFU (16%), and was mostly a superficial dermal burn that did not necessitate any treatment. However, there was one patient with deep skin injury at an operation scar which resulted in skin perforation. Other adverse events included soft tissue swelling, prolonged fever, anorexia, persistent pain, shortness of the breath, sacroiliac joint fracture and prolonged diarrhoea. In our limited experience, superficial lesions (e.g. breast cancer, bone, soft tissue, lymph-node and pleural metastasis) appear to be good candidates for HIFU treatment. There appears to be a role for the HIFU knife in pain control for patients with bone metastasis and pancreatic cancer.

  17. Effects of oxytocin on high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation of adenomysis: A prospective study

    Zhang, Xin [State Key Laboratory of Ultrasound Engineering in Medicine Co-founded by Chongqing and the Ministry of Science and Technology, Chongqing Key laboratory of Ultrasound in Medicine and Engineering, College of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Zou, Min; Zhang, Cai [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chongqing Haifu Hospital, Chongqing 401121 (China); He, Jia [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Suining Central Hospital, Sichuan 629000 (China); Mao, Shihua [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Three Gorges Central Hospital, Chongqing 404000 (China); Wu, Qingrong [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Fuling Central Hospital, Chongqing 408099 (China); He, Min [State Key Laboratory of Ultrasound Engineering in Medicine Co-founded by Chongqing and the Ministry of Science and Technology, Chongqing Key laboratory of Ultrasound in Medicine and Engineering, College of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Suining Central Hospital, Sichuan 629000 (China); Wang, Jian [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chongqing Haifu Hospital, Chongqing 401121 (China); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Three Gorges Central Hospital, Chongqing 404000 (China); Zhang, Ruitao [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chongqing Haifu Hospital, Chongqing 401121 (China); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Fuling Central Hospital, Chongqing 408099 (China); Zhang, Lian, E-mail: lianwzhang@yahoo.com [State Key Laboratory of Ultrasound Engineering in Medicine Co-founded by Chongqing and the Ministry of Science and Technology, Chongqing Key laboratory of Ultrasound in Medicine and Engineering, College of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chongqing Haifu Hospital, Chongqing 401121 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Objective: To investigate the effects of oxytocin on high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation for the treatment of adenomyosis. Materials and methods: Eighty-six patients with adenomyosis from three hospitals were randomly assigned to the oxytocin group or control group for HIFU treatment. During HIFU treatment, 80 units of oxytocin was added in 500 ml of 0.9% normal saline running at the rate of 2 ml/min (0.32 U/min) in the oxytocin group, while 0.9% normal saline was used in the control group. Both patients and HIFU operators were blinded to oxytocin or saline application. Treatment results, adverse effects were compared. Results: When using oxytocin, the non-perfused volume (NPV) ratio was 80.7 ± 11.6%, the energy-efficiency factor (EEF) was 8.1 ± 9.9 J/mm{sup 3}, and the sonication time required to ablate 1 cm{sup 3} was 30.0 ± 36.0 s/cm{sup 3}. When not using oxytocin, the non-perfused volume ratio was 70.8 ± 16.7%, the EEF was 15.8 ± 19.6 J/mm{sup 3}, and the sonication time required to ablate 1 cm{sup 3} was 58.2 ± 72.7 S/cm{sup 3}. Significant difference in the NPV ratio, EEF, and the sonication time required to ablate 1 cm{sup 3} between the two groups was observed. No oxytocin related adverse effects occurred. Conclusion: Oxytocin could significantly decrease the energy for ablating adenomyosis with HIFU, safely enhance the treatment efficiency.

  18. Effects of oxytocin on high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation of adenomysis: A prospective study

    Objective: To investigate the effects of oxytocin on high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation for the treatment of adenomyosis. Materials and methods: Eighty-six patients with adenomyosis from three hospitals were randomly assigned to the oxytocin group or control group for HIFU treatment. During HIFU treatment, 80 units of oxytocin was added in 500 ml of 0.9% normal saline running at the rate of 2 ml/min (0.32 U/min) in the oxytocin group, while 0.9% normal saline was used in the control group. Both patients and HIFU operators were blinded to oxytocin or saline application. Treatment results, adverse effects were compared. Results: When using oxytocin, the non-perfused volume (NPV) ratio was 80.7 ± 11.6%, the energy-efficiency factor (EEF) was 8.1 ± 9.9 J/mm3, and the sonication time required to ablate 1 cm3 was 30.0 ± 36.0 s/cm3. When not using oxytocin, the non-perfused volume ratio was 70.8 ± 16.7%, the EEF was 15.8 ± 19.6 J/mm3, and the sonication time required to ablate 1 cm3 was 58.2 ± 72.7 S/cm3. Significant difference in the NPV ratio, EEF, and the sonication time required to ablate 1 cm3 between the two groups was observed. No oxytocin related adverse effects occurred. Conclusion: Oxytocin could significantly decrease the energy for ablating adenomyosis with HIFU, safely enhance the treatment efficiency

  19. 自适应滤波器消除语音信号中混合噪声%Elimination of Mixed-noise in Speech Singal by Adaptive Filter

    高榕; 张仕凯; 李靖; 余昭杰; 丁传鹏; 李强

    2012-01-01

    The acquisition and transmission of speech signal are often mixed with a variety of noise or interference, such as sinusoidal narrow-band interference and Gaussian white noise. A simple adaptive filter is hard to filter out them simultaneously. In order to suppress mixed-noise to get a real voice signal,a two-stage adaptive filter program was proposed based on least mean square (LMS) adaptive algorithm and adaptive noise cancellation principle. By adding delay elements to a traditional adaptive noise cancellation, the first stage could eliminate the sinusoidal narrow-band interference, and the second stage was used to eliminate the Gaussian white noise. The two-stage adaptive filter was simulated by using Simulink block library. The simulation results show that the proposed filter can effectively filter out mixed-noise including sinusoidal narrow-band interference and Gaussian white noise,and improve the quality of speech signal.%语音信号在实际采集和传输的过程中,往往掺杂着多种噪声干扰,比较常见的是正弦窄带干扰和高斯白噪声,而一个简单的自适应滤波器往往很难同时滤除多种噪声.为了抑制混合噪声而得到真实的语音信号,在最小均方误差(LMS)自适应算法和自适应噪声抵消原理的基础上,提出了一种两级自适应滤波器方案,第1级在传统噪声抵消系统中加入延迟单元消除正弦窄带干扰,第Ⅱ级用LMS自适应噪声抵消器消除高斯白噪声,同时,利用Simulink模块库对所设计的两级自适应滤波器进行了建模仿真.仿真结果表明:该方案滤波器可以有效地滤除包含正弦窄带干扰和高斯白噪声的混合噪声,达到提高语音质量的目的.

  20. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) as a Salvage Treatment for Recurrent Prostate Cancer after Brachytherapy — a Feasibility Study

    Chapman, Alexander T.; Rivens, Ian H.; Thompson, Alan C.; ter Haar, Gail R.

    2007-05-01

    HIFU may be an effective salvage treatment for patients who develop local recurrence after permanent low-dose brachytherapy. It has been suggested that the presence of seeds in the prostate may obstruct the HIFU beam or alter the heating characteristics of the prostate tissue. Acoustic field measurements were made using a membrane hydrophone and lesioning experiments were carried out in ex vivo bovine liver. These revealed a significant effect of the seeds on the HIFU focal region as well as a reduction in lesion length when seeds were placed in a pre-focal position. Further work is needed to evaluate the full effects of implanted brachytherapy seeds on the clinical delivery of HIFU.

  1. Health-related quality of life after salvage high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment for locally radiorecurrent prostate cancer

    The objective of this study was to evaluate health-related quality of life (HRQOL) after salvage high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for locally radiorecurrent prostate cancer (PCa). Since June 2006 we have treated 61 patients consecutively by salvage HIFU. All patients were offered the University of California, Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Index (UCLA-PCI) questionnaire at baseline and at follow-up. Scores ranged from 0 (worst) to 100 (best). Clinically significant changes were defined as a minimum difference of 10 points between the baseline score and the score at follow-up. Fifty-seven patients (93%) had evaluable data at baseline, compared with 46 (75%) after treatment. The mean time lapse between HIFU treatment and questionnaire response was 17.5 months (range 6-29 months). The mean score for urinary function decreased from 79.7±12.1 prior to HIFU to 67.4±17.8 after HIFU (P<0.001). The mean score for sexual function decreased from 32.1±24.1 prior to HIFU to 17.2±17.0 after HIFU (P<0.001). There were no significant effects on bowel function. There was a significant reduction in the mean score for Physical HRQOL, but the mean score for Mental HRQOL was did not change significantly. Treatment of localized radiorecurrent PCa by salvage HIFU is associated with clinically significant reductions in urinary and sexual function domains after a mean follow-up of 17.5 months. (author)

  2. Annular and Cylindrical Phased Array Geometries for Transrectal High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) using PZT and Piezocomposite Materials

    Seip, Ralf; Chen, Wohsing; Carlson, Roy; Frizzell, Leon; Warren, Gary; Smith, Nadine; Saleh, Khaldon; Gerber, Gene; Shung, Kirk; Guo, Hongkai; Sanghvi, Narendra T.

    2005-03-01

    This paper presents engineering progress and the latest in-vitro and in-vivo results obtained with a 4.0 MHz, 20 element, PZT annular transrectal HIFU array and several 4.0 MHz, 211 element, PZT and piezocomposite cylindrical transrectal HIFU arrays for the treatment of prostate cancer. The geometries of both arrays were designed and analyzed to steer the HIFU beams to the desired sites in the prostate volume using multi-channel electronic drivers, with the intent to increase treatment efficiency and reliability for the next generation of HIFU systems. The annular array is able to focus in depth from 25 mm to 50 mm, generate total acoustic powers in excess of 60W, and has been integrated into a modified Sonablate®500 HIFU system capable of controlling such an applicator through custom treatment planning and execution software. Both PZT- and piezocomposite cylindrical arrays were constructed and their characteristics were compared for the transrectal applications. These arrays have been installed into appropriate transducer housings, and have undergone characterization tests to determine their total acoustic power output, focusing range (in depth and laterally), focus quality, efficiency, and comparison tests to determine the material and technology of choice (PZT or piezocomposite) for intra-cavity HIFU applications. Array descriptions, characterization results, in-vitro and in-vivo results, and an overview of their intended use through the application software is shown.

  3. Factors influencing the ablative efficiency of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment for adenomyosis: A retrospective study.

    Gong, Chunmei; Yang, Bin; Shi, Yarong; Liu, Zhongqiong; Wan, Lili; Zhang, Hong; Jiang, Denghua; Zhang, Lian

    2016-08-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate factors affecting ablative efficiency of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for adenomyosis. Materials and methods In all, 245 patients with adenomyosis who underwent ultrasound guided HIFU (USgHIFU) were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and after HIFU treatment. The non-perfused volume (NPV) ratio, energy efficiency factor (EEF) and greyscale change were set as dependent variables, while the factors possibly affecting ablation efficiency were set as independent variables. These variables were used to build multiple regression models. Results A total of 245 patients with adenomyosis successfully completed HIFU treatment. Enhancement type on T1 weighted image (WI), abdominal wall thickness, volume of adenomyotic lesion, the number of hyperintense points, location of the uterus, and location of adenomyosis all had a linear relationship with the NPV ratio. Distance from skin to the adenomyotic lesion's ventral side, enhancement type on T1WI, volume of adenomyotic lesion, abdominal wall thickness, and signal intensity on T2WI all had a linear relationship with EEF. Location of the uterus and abdominal wall thickness also both had a linear relationship with greyscale change. Conclusion The enhancement type on T1WI, signal intensity on T2WI, volume of adenomyosis, location of the uterus and adenomyosis, number of hyperintense points, abdominal wall thickness, and distance from the skin to the adenomyotic lesion's ventral side can all be used as predictors of HIFU for adenomyosis. PMID:27385316

  4. 11C Choline PET Guided Salvage Radiotherapy with Volumetric Modulation Arc Therapy and Hypofractionation for Recurrent Prostate Cancer after HIFU Failure

    Alongi, Filippo; Liardo, Rocco L. E.; Iftode, Cristina; Lopci, Egesta; Villa, Elisa; Comito, Tiziana; Tozzi, Angelo; Navarria, Pierina; Ascolese, Anna M.; Mancosu, Pietro; Tomatis, Stefano; Bellorofonte, Carlo; Arturo, Chiti; Scorsetti, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate tolerance, feasibility and acute toxicity in patients undergoing salvage radiotherapy after high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) failure. From 2005 to 2011 a total of 15 patients were treated with HIFU as primary radical treatment. Between July 2011 and February 2013, all 15 patients presented biochemical relapse after HIFU and 11C choline PET documenting intrapostatic-only failure. Salvage EBRT was performed with moderate hypofractionation schedul...

  5. Noise Pollution

    ... Overview » Title IV - Noise Pollution Title IV - Noise Pollution The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments added a ... abatement 7642 Authorization of appropriations What is Noise Pollution? The traditional definition of noise is “unwanted or ...

  6. Hydrophone spatial directivity and the induced difference in HIFU acoustic field test

    Hydrophone has been widely used in testing ultrasonic field distribution. But the hydrophone has a certain directivity, which may bring error in the actual acoustic field measurements. So it is necessary to meet some requirements about the directivity of hydrophone. In the measurement, the spatial directivities of needle hydrophone, membrane hydrophone and robust hydrophone is measured and a comparison about measured data of HIFU acoustic field with them is given. Experimental results indicate that the asymmetric special directivity of hydrophone is due to manufacturing processes and other reasons. As a result, it is not sufficient to test the directivity of hydrophone along one axis. It is necessary to adjust the direction of the hydrophone when characterizing the HIFU field.

  7. Ultrasound-Stimulated Acoustic Emission in Thermal Image-Guided HIFU Therapy: A Phantom Study

    Magnetic resonance image (MRI) is a promising monitoring tool for non-invasive real-time thermal guidance in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) during thermal ablation surgery. However, this approach has two main drawbacks: 1) majority of components need to be redesigned to be MR compatible in order to avoid effecting MR images, and 2) the cost of operating MRI facilities is high. Alternately, ultrasound-stimulated acoustic emission (USAE) method has been applied for detecting thermal variations in tissues. An optical transparent phantom, made from polyacrylamide, containing thermal sensitive indicator protein (Bovine Serum Albumin), was prepared for observing the HIFU-induced denaturalization. A thermal-couple was set up for validation of temperature distribution. Experimental results show that thermal image can be captured clearly under stationary conditions

  8. Hydrophone spatial directivity and the induced difference in HIFU acoustic field test

    Chen, T; Zhang, D [Institute of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Hu, J M; Huang, W; Zhang, W, E-mail: Chent_qxs@jsfda.gov.cn [Jiangsu Province Institute for Medical Equipment Testing, Nanjing 210012 (China)

    2011-02-01

    Hydrophone has been widely used in testing ultrasonic field distribution. But the hydrophone has a certain directivity, which may bring error in the actual acoustic field measurements. So it is necessary to meet some requirements about the directivity of hydrophone. In the measurement, the spatial directivities of needle hydrophone, membrane hydrophone and robust hydrophone is measured and a comparison about measured data of HIFU acoustic field with them is given. Experimental results indicate that the asymmetric special directivity of hydrophone is due to manufacturing processes and other reasons. As a result, it is not sufficient to test the directivity of hydrophone along one axis. It is necessary to adjust the direction of the hydrophone when characterizing the HIFU field.

  9. Seven-Year Outcomes Following HIFU in Patients with Localized Prostate Cancer

    Uchida, Toyoaki; Shoji, Sunao; Nagata, Yoshihiro; Terachi, Toshiro; Illing, Rowland O.; Emberton, Mark

    2007-05-01

    We evaluated 409 patients suffering from localized prostate cancer treated with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). All patients were followed for at least 12 months after treatment. Biochemical failure was defined according to the criteria recommended by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Consensus Panel. None of the patients received hormonal or other anticancer therapy before documentation of a biochemical failure. The biochemical disease-free rates at 5 years in patients with low, intermediate and high risk groups were 93%, 68% and 44%, respectively (pHIFU therapy appears to be a safe and efficacious minimally invasive therapy for patients with localized prostate cancer, especially those with a pretreatment PSA level less than 20 ng/ml or patients with low-risk group.

  10. Development and validation of a MRgHIFU non-invasive tissue acoustic property estimation technique.

    Johnson, Sara L; Dillon, Christopher; Odéen, Henrik; Parker, Dennis; Christensen, Douglas; Payne, Allison

    2016-11-01

    MR-guided high-intensity focussed ultrasound (MRgHIFU) non-invasive ablative surgeries have advanced into clinical trials for treating many pathologies and cancers. A remaining challenge of these surgeries is accurately planning and monitoring tissue heating in the face of patient-specific and dynamic acoustic properties of tissues. Currently, non-invasive measurements of acoustic properties have not been implemented in MRgHIFU treatment planning and monitoring procedures. This methods-driven study presents a technique using MR temperature imaging (MRTI) during low-temperature HIFU sonications to non-invasively estimate sample-specific acoustic absorption and speed of sound values in tissue-mimicking phantoms. Using measured thermal properties, specific absorption rate (SAR) patterns are calculated from the MRTI data and compared to simulated SAR patterns iteratively generated via the Hybrid Angular Spectrum (HAS) method. Once the error between the simulated and measured patterns is minimised, the estimated acoustic property values are compared to the true phantom values obtained via an independent technique. The estimated values are then used to simulate temperature profiles in the phantoms, and compared to experimental temperature profiles. This study demonstrates that trends in acoustic absorption and speed of sound can be non-invasively estimated with average errors of 21% and 1%, respectively. Additionally, temperature predictions using the estimated properties on average match within 1.2 °C of the experimental peak temperature rises in the phantoms. The positive results achieved in tissue-mimicking phantoms presented in this study indicate that this technique may be extended to in vivo applications, improving HIFU sonication temperature rise predictions and treatment assessment. PMID:27441427