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Sample records for adaptive fast walking

  1. Fast Scramblers, Democratic Walks and Information Fields

    Magan, Javier M

    2015-01-01

    We study a family of weighted random walks on complete graphs. These `democratic walks' turn out to be explicitly solvable, and we find the hierarchy window for which the characteristic time scale saturates the so-called fast scrambling conjecture. We show that these democratic walks describe well the properties of information spreading in systems in which every degree of freedom interacts with every other degree of freedom, such as Matrix or infinite range models. The argument is based on the analysis of suitably defined `Information fields' ($\\mathcal{I}$), which are shown to evolve stochastically towards stationarity due to unitarity of the microscopic model. The model implies that in democratic systems, stabilization of one subsystem is equivalent to global scrambling. We use these results to study scrambling of infalling perturbations in black hole backgrounds, and argue that the near horizon running coupling constants are connected to entanglement evolution of single particle perturbations in democratic...

  2. Adaptive Nonlinear Tracking for Robotic Walking

    Dolinský, Kamil; Čelikovský, Sergej

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2012), s. 28-35. ISSN 2223-7038 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Adaptive control * Kalman filter * walking robot s Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory http://lib.physcon.ru/doc?id=9e51935aa5bc

  3. Adaptive walks on correlated fitness landscapes with heterogeneous connectivities

    We propose a model for studying the statistical properties of adaptive walks on correlated fitness landscapes which are established in genotype spaces of complex structure. The fitness distribution on the genotype space follows either the bivariate Gaussian distribution or the bivariate exponential distribution. In both cases the degree of correlation of the fitness landscape can be tuned by using a single parameter. To perform the adaptive walks two distinct rules are applied: the random adaptation walk (RAW) and the gradient adaptation walk (GAW). While for the RAW the mean walk length, L-bar, is a monotonic increasing function of the connectivity of the genotype space, for the GAW L-bar is a one-humped function. The RAW produces longer adaptive walks compared to the GAW, though its performance is slightly poorer and thereby the local maxima reached by the GAW algorithm are usually closer to the global optimum of the fitness landscape

  4. Unique characteristics of motor adaptation during walking in young children

    Musselman, Kristin E.; Susan K Patrick; Vasudevan, Erin V. L.; Bastian, Amy J.; Yang, Jaynie F.

    2011-01-01

    Children show precocious ability in the learning of languages; is this the case with motor learning? We used split-belt walking to probe motor adaptation (a form of motor learning) in children. Data from 27 children (ages 8–36 mo) were compared with those from 10 adults. Children walked with the treadmill belts at the same speed (tied belt), followed by walking with the belts moving at different speeds (split belt) for 8–10 min, followed again by tied-belt walking (postsplit). Initial asymmet...

  5. Accurate estimate of the critical exponent nu for self-avoiding walks via a fast implementation of the pivot algorithm.

    Clisby, Nathan

    2010-02-01

    We introduce a fast implementation of the pivot algorithm for self-avoiding walks, which we use to obtain large samples of walks on the cubic lattice of up to 33x10{6} steps. Consequently the critical exponent nu for three-dimensional self-avoiding walks is determined to great accuracy; the final estimate is nu=0.587 597(7). The method can be adapted to other models of polymers with short-range interactions, on the lattice or in the continuum. PMID:20366773

  6. Adaptive importance sampling of random walks on continuous state spaces

    The authors consider adaptive importance sampling for a random walk with scoring in a general state space. Conditions under which exponential convergence occurs to the zero-variance solution are reviewed. These results generalize previous work for finite, discrete state spaces in Kollman (1993) and in Kollman, Baggerly, Cox, and Picard (1996). This paper is intended for nonstatisticians and includes considerable explanatory material

  7. Self-Avoiding Walks Over Adaptive Triangular Grids

    Heber, Gerd; Biswas, Rupak; Gao, Guang R.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Space-filling curves is a popular approach based on a geometric embedding for linearizing computational meshes. We present a new O(n log n) combinatorial algorithm for constructing a self avoiding walk through a two dimensional mesh containing n triangles. We show that for hierarchical adaptive meshes, the algorithm can be locally adapted and easily parallelized by taking advantage of the regularity of the refinement rules. The proposed approach should be very useful in the runtime partitioning and load balancing of adaptive unstructured grids.

  8. A Passive Dynamic Walking Model Based on Knee-Bend Behaviour: Stability and Adaptability for Walking Down Steep Slopes

    Kang An

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a passive dynamic walking model based on knee-bend behaviour, which is inspired by the way human beings walk. The length and mass parameters of human beings are used in the walking model. The knee-bend mechanism of the stance leg is designed in the phase between knee-strike and heel- strike. q* which is the angular difference of the stance leg between the two events, knee-strike and knee-bend, is adjusted in order to find a stable walking motion. The results show that the stable periodic walking motion on a slope of r <0.4 can be found by adjusting q*. Furthermore, with a particular q* in the range of 0.12walk down more steps before falling down on an arbitrary slope. The walking motion is more stable and adaptable than the conventional walking motion, especially for steep slopes.

  9. Linearly Bounded Liars, Adaptive Covering Codes, and Deterministic Random Walks

    Cooper, Joshua N

    2009-01-01

    We analyze a deterministic form of the random walk on the integer line called the {\\em liar machine}, similar to the rotor-router model, finding asymptotically tight pointwise and interval discrepancy bounds versus random walk. This provides an improvement in the best-known winning strategies in the binary symmetric pathological liar game with a linear fraction of responses allowed to be lies. Equivalently, this proves the existence of adaptive binary block covering codes with block length $n$, covering radius $\\leq fn$ for $f\\in(0,1/2)$, and cardinality $O(\\sqrt{\\log \\log n}/(1-2f))$ times the sphere bound $2^n/\\binom{n}{\\leq \\lfloor fn\\rfloor}$.

  10. Walking on an Oscillating Treadmill: Two Paths to Functional Adaptation

    Brady, Rachel A.; Peters, Brian T.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2010-01-01

    We mounted a treadmill on top of a six degree-of-freedom motion base platform to investigate and characterize locomotor responses produced by healthy adults when introduced to a novel walking condition. Subjects were classified into two groups according to how their stride times were affected by the perturbation. Our data suggest that a person's choice of adaptation strategy is influenced by the relationship between his unique, natural stride frequency and the external frequency imposed by the motion base. Our data suggest that a person's stride time response while walking on a laterally oscillating treadmill is influenced by the relationship between his unique, natural stride frequency and the imposed external frequency of the motion base. This relationship may be useful for checking the efficacy of gait training and rehabilitation programs. Preselecting and manipulating a person's EST could be one way to draw him out of his preferred "entrainment well" during therapy or training.

  11. Physiological adaptation of a mature adult walking the Alps.

    Ardigò, Luca P; Lippi, Giuseppe; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Schena, Federico

    2011-09-01

    Research on endurance locomotion has mainly focused on elite athletes rather than common middle-aged subjects. Our report describes the physiological and hematological adaptation of a healthy, active 62-year-old man who trekked alone along a 1300 km/3 month course of Alpine paths (Via Alpina). The following procedures were conducted: pre- and post-trekking and fortnightly field anthropometry (total and lean body mass), functional tests (isometric maximal voluntary force, spontaneous walking speed, relative metabolic cost, and peak oxygen consumption) and clinical chemistry/hematological measurements with laboratory instruments; daily self-administered effort measurements using portable devices along the route (walked distance, ascent, descent, time, metabolic consumption, and cost). Despite the tough trekking route, the subject completed the trek without any worsening of his performance, or any significant health or functional problems. In addition, his peak oxygen consumption increased by 13.2%. His successful adaptation may be attributed to his constant, repeated middle-intensity and extensive exercise and lengthy exposure to high altitude. The clinical chemistry/hematological measurements documented his physiological adaptation. In conclusion, we show how an active, middle-aged man can successfully face endurance trekking, not only without any harm to his health or functions but also with an increase in his capacity to support specific effort. PMID:21962049

  12. An Adaptive Guidance System for Robotic Walking Aids

    Graf, Birgit

    2009-01-01

    In the last years, several robotic walking aids to assist elderly users with mobility constraints and thus to react to the growing number of elderly persons in our society have been developed. In order to ensure good support for the user, the robotic walker should adapt to the motion of the user while at the same time not losing the target out of sight. Even though some of the existing active robotic walkers are able to guide their user to a target, during guidance, the input of the user is n...

  13. COMBINED EFFECTS OF FAST TREADMILL WALKING AND FUNCTIONAL ELECTRICAL STIMULATION ON POST-STROKE GAIT

    Kesar, Trisha M.; Reisman, Darcy S.; Perumal, Ramu; Jancosko, Angela M.; Higginson, Jill S.; Rudolph, Katherine S.; Binder-Macleod, Stuart A

    2010-01-01

    Gait dysfunctions are highly prevalent in individuals post-stroke and affect multiple lower extremity joints. Recent evidence suggests that treadmill walking at faster than self-selected speeds can help improve post-stroke gait impairments. Also, the combination of functional electrical stimulation (FES) and treadmill training has emerged as a promising post-stroke gait rehabilitation intervention. However, the differential effects of combining FES with treadmill walking at the fast versus a ...

  14. An Approach to Stable Walking over Uneven Terrain Using a Reflex-Based Adaptive Gait

    Umar Asif

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the implementation of an adaptive gait in a six-legged walking robot that is capable of generating reactive stepping actions with the same underlying control methodology as an insect for stable walking over uneven terrains. The proposed method of gait generation uses feedback data from onboard sensors to generate an adaptive gait in order to surmount obstacles, gaps and perform stable walking. The paper addresses its implementation through simulations in a visual dynamic simulation environment. Finally the paper draws conclusions about the significance and performance of the proposed gait in terms of tracking errors while navigating in difficult terrains.

  15. Motion Tracking with Fast Adaptive Background Subtraction

    Xiao De-gui; Yu Sheng-sheng; Zhou Jing-li

    2003-01-01

    To extract and track moving objects is usually one of the most important tasks of intelligent video surveillance systems. This paper presents a fast and adaptive background subtraction algorithm and the motion tracking process using this algorithm. The algorithm uses only luminance components of sampled image sequence pixels and models every pixel in a statistical model. The algorithm is characterized by its ability of real time detecting sudden lighting changes, and extracting and tracking motion objects faster. It is shown that our algorithm can be realized with lower time and space complexity and adjustable object detection error rate with comparison to other background subtraction algorithms. Making use of the algorithm, an indoor monitoring system is also worked out and the motion tracking process is presented in this paper. Experimental results testify the algorithm's good performances when used in an indoor monitoring system.

  16. Spatiotemporal synchronization of biped walking patterns with multiple external inputs by style-phase adaptation.

    Matsubara, Takamitsu; Uchikata, Akimasa; Morimoto, Jun

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a framework for generating coordinated periodic movements of robotic systems with multiple external inputs. We developed an adaptive pattern generator model that is composed of a two-factor observation model with a style parameter and phase dynamics with a phase variable. The style parameter controls the spatial patterns of the generated trajectories, and the phase variable manages its temporal profiles. By exploiting the style-phase separation in the pattern generation, we can independently design adaptation schemes for the spatial and temporal profiles of the pattern generator to multiple external inputs. To validate the effectiveness of our proposed method, we applied it to a user-exoskeleton model to achieve user-adaptive walking assistance for which the exoskeleton robot's movements need to be coordinated with the user walking patterns and environment. As a result, the exoskeleton robot successfully performed stable biped walking behaviors for walking assistance even when the style of the observed walking pattern and the period were suddenly changed. PMID:26459123

  17. Grapham: Graphical Models with Adaptive Random Walk Metropolis Algorithms

    Vihola, Matti

    2008-01-01

    Recently developed adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods have been applied successfully to many problems in Bayesian statistics. Grapham is a new open source implementation covering several such methods, with emphasis on graphical models for directed acyclic graphs. The implemented algorithms include the seminal Adaptive Metropolis algorithm adjusting the proposal covariance according to the history of the chain and a Metropolis algorithm adjusting the proposal scale based on the o...

  18. Extended Evolutionary Fast Learn-to-Walk Approach for Four-Legged Robots

    Muh.Anshar; Mary-Anne Williams

    2007-01-01

    Robot locomotion is an active research area. In this paper we focus on the locomotion of quadruped robots. An effective walking gait of quadruped robots is mainly concerned with two key aspects, namely speed and stability. The large search space of potential parameter settings for leg joints means that hand tuning is not feasible in general. As a result walking parameters are typically determined using machine learning techniques. A major shortcoming of using machine learning techniques is the significant wear and tear of robots since many parameter combinations need to be evaluated before an optimal solution is found.This paper proposes a direct walking gait learning approach, which is specifically designed to reduce wear and tear of robot motors, joints and other hardware. In essence we provide an effective learning mechanism that leads to a solution in a faster convergence time than previous algorithms. The results demonstrate that the new learning algorithm obtains a faster convergence to the best solutions in a short run. This approach is significant in obtaining faster walking gaits which will be useful for a wide range of applications where speed and stability are important. Future work will extend our methods so that the faster convergence algorithm can be applied to a two legged humanoid and lead to less wear and tear whilst still developing a fast and stable gait.

  19. Synaptic plasticity in a recurrent neural network for versatile and adaptive behaviors of a walking robot

    Eduard Grinke

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Walking animals, like insects, with little neural computing can effectively perform complex behaviors. They can walk around their environment, escape from corners/deadlocks, and avoid or climb over obstacles. While performing all these behaviors, they can also adapt their movements to deal with an unknown situation. As a consequence, they successfully navigate through their complex environment. The versatile and adaptive abilities are the result of an integration of several ingredients embedded in their sensorimotor loop. Biological studies reveal that the ingredients include neural dynamics, plasticity, sensory feedback, and biomechanics. Generating such versatile and adaptive behaviors for a walking robot is a challenging task. In this study, we present a bio-inspired approach to solve this task. Specifically, the approach combines neural mechanisms with plasticity, sensory feedback, and biomechanics. The neural mechanisms consist of adaptive neural sensory processing and modular neural locomotion control. The sensory processing is based on a small recurrent network consisting of two fully connected neurons. Online correlation-based learning with synaptic scaling is applied to adequately change the connections of the network. By doing so, we can effectively exploit neural dynamics (i.e., hysteresis effects and single attractors in the network to generate different turning angles with short-term memory for a biomechanical walking robot. The turning information is transmitted as descending steering signals to the locomotion control which translates the signals into motor actions. As a result, the robot can walk around and adapt its turning angle for avoiding obstacles in different situations as well as escaping from sharp corners or deadlocks. Using backbone joint control embedded in the locomotion control allows the robot to climb over small obstacles. Consequently, it can successfully explore and navigate in complex environments.

  20. Psychotherapy: Adaptation or Walking Together? (A Roadside Conversation)

    Nina Bychkova; Yana Larionova

    2011-01-01

    The article concerns psychotherapeutic work in the perspective of existential approach. Two trends are discerned in modern psychotherapy regardless of the known division into different schools – the adaptation therapy, and the one viewing a person in the context of his Personal being in the world. Therapy here is understood as the Way of mutual personal growth of both the therapist and the client. Distinction is singled out as one of the central points in forming the meanings, essential for b...

  1. Psychotherapy: Adaptation or Walking Together? (A Roadside Conversation

    Nina Bychkova

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The article concerns psychotherapeutic work in the perspective of existential approach. Two trends are discerned in modern psychotherapy regardless of the known division into different schools – the adaptation therapy, and the one viewing a person in the context of his Personal being in the world. Therapy here is understood as the Way of mutual personal growth of both the therapist and the client. Distinction is singled out as one of the central points in forming the meanings, essential for both the normal development of a child and in psychotherapy, and remaining significant for spiritual growth in adults. 

  2. What can we learn from slow self-avoiding adaptive walks by an infinite radius search algorithm?

    Khor, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Slow self-avoiding adaptive walks by an infinite radius search algorithm (Limax) are analyzed as themselves, and as the network they form. The study is conducted on several NK problems and two HIFF problems. We find that examination of such "slacker" walks and networks can indicate relative search difficulty within a family of problems, help identify potential local optima, and detect presence of structure in fitness landscapes. Hierarchical walks are used to differentiate rugged landscapes w...

  3. δ-exceedance records and random adaptive walks

    Park, Su-Chan; Krug, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    We study a modified record process where the kth record in a series of independent and identically distributed random variables is defined recursively through the condition {Y}k\\gt {Y}k-1-{δ }k-1 with a deterministic sequence {δ }k\\gt 0 called the handicap. For constant {δ }k\\equiv δ and exponentially distributed random variables it has been shown in previous work that the process displays a phase transition as a function of δ between a normal phase where the mean record value increases indefinitely and a stationary phase where the mean record value remains bounded and a finite fraction of all entries are records (Park et al 2015 Phys. Rev. E 91 042707). Here we explore the behavior for general probability distributions and decreasing and increasing sequences {δ }k, focusing in particular on the case when {δ }k matches the typical spacing between subsequent records in the underlying simple record process without handicap. We find that a continuous phase transition occurs only in the exponential case, but a novel kind of first order transition emerges when {δ }k is increasing. The problem is partly motivated by the dynamics of evolutionary adaptation in biological fitness landscapes, where {δ }k corresponds to the change of the deterministic fitness component after k mutational steps. The results for the record process are used to compute the mean number of steps that a population performs in such a landscape before being trapped at a local fitness maximum.

  4. Locomotor stability and adaptation during perturbed walking across the adult female lifespan.

    McCrum, Christopher; Epro, Gaspar; Meijer, Kenneth; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Karamanidis, Kiros

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work was to examine locomotor stability and adaptation across the adult female lifespan during perturbed walking on the treadmill. 11 young, 11 middle and 14 older-aged female adults (mean and SD: 25.5(2.1), 50.6(6.4) and 69.0(4.7) years old respectively) walked on a treadmill. We applied a sustained perturbation to the swing phase of the right leg for 18 consecutive gait cycles, followed by a step with the resistance unexpectedly removed, via an ankle strap connected to a break-and-release system. The margin of stability (MoS) at foot touchdown was calculated as the difference between the anterior boundary of the base of support (BoS) and extrapolated center of mass. Older participants showed lower MoS adaptation magnitude in the early adaptation phase (steps 1-3) compared to the young and middle-aged groups. However, in the late adaptation phase (steps 16-18) there were no significant differences in adaptation magnitude between the three age groups. After removing the resistance, all three age groups showed similar aftereffects (i.e. increased BoS). The current results suggest that in old age, the ability to recalibrate locomotion to control stability is preserved, but the rate of adaptive improvement in locomotor stability is diminished. PMID:26970886

  5. Adaptive walks in a gene network model of morphogenesis: insights into the Cambrian explosion

    Sole, Ricard V.; Fernandez, Pau; Kauffman, Stuart A.

    2003-01-01

    The emergence of complex patterns of organization close to the Cambrian boundary is known to have happened over a (geologically) short period of time. It involved the rapid diversification of body plans and stands as one of the major transitions in evolution. How it took place is a controversial issue. Here we explore this problem by considering a simple model of pattern formation in multicellular organisms. By modeling gene network-based morphogenesis and its evolution through adaptive walks...

  6. The adaptive dynamic community detection algorithm based on the non-homogeneous random walking

    Xin, Yu; Xie, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Jing

    2016-05-01

    With the changing of the habit and custom, people's social activity tends to be changeable. It is required to have a community evolution analyzing method to mine the dynamic information in social network. For that, we design the random walking possibility function and the topology gain function to calculate the global influence matrix of the nodes. By the analysis of the global influence matrix, the clustering directions of the nodes can be obtained, thus the NRW (Non-Homogeneous Random Walk) method for detecting the static overlapping communities can be established. We design the ANRW (Adaptive Non-Homogeneous Random Walk) method via adapting the nodes impacted by the dynamic events based on the NRW. The ANRW combines the local community detection with dynamic adaptive adjustment to decrease the computational cost for ANRW. Furthermore, the ANRW treats the node as the calculating unity, thus the running manner of the ANRW is suitable to the parallel computing, which could meet the requirement of large dataset mining. Finally, by the experiment analysis, the efficiency of ANRW on dynamic community detection is verified.

  7. Neural Control and Adaptive Neural Forward Models for Insect-like, Energy-Efficient, and Adaptable Locomotion of Walking Machines

    Poramate Manoonpong

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Living creatures, like walking animals, have found fascinating solutions for the problem of locomotion control. Their movements show the impression of elegance including versatile, energy-efficient, and adaptable locomotion. During the last few decades, roboticists have tried to imitate such natural properties with artificial legged locomotion systems by using different approaches including machine learning algorithms, classical engineering control techniques, and biologically-inspired control mechanisms. However, their levels of performance are still far from the natural ones. By contrast, animal locomotion mechanisms seem to largely depend not only on central mechanisms (central pattern generators, CPGs and sensory feedback (afferent-based control but also on internal forward models (efference copies. They are used to a different degree in different animals. Generally, CPGs organize basic rhythmic motions which are shaped by sensory feedback while internal models are used for sensory prediction and state estimations. According to this concept, we present here adaptive neural locomotion control consisting of a CPG mechanism with neuromodulation and local leg control mechanisms based on sensory feedback and adaptive neural forward models with efference copies. This neural closed-loop controller enables a walking machine to perform a multitude of different walking patterns including insect-like leg movements and gaits as well as energy-efficient locomotion. In addition, the forward models allow the machine to autonomously adapt its locomotion to deal with a change of terrain, losing of ground contact during stance phase, stepping on or hitting an obstacle during swing phase, leg damage, and even to promote cockroach-like climbing behavior. Thus, the results presented here show that the employed embodied neural closed-loop system can be a powerful way for developing robust and adaptable machines.

  8. Multiple Decoupled CPGs with Local Sensory Feedback for Adaptive Locomotion Behaviors of Bio-inspired Walking Robots

    Shaker Barikhan, Subhi; Wörgötter, Florentin; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2014-01-01

    Walking animals show versatile locomotion. They can also adapt their movement according to the changes of their morphology and the environmental conditions. These emergent properties are realized by biomechanics, distributed central pattern generators (CPGs), local sensory feedback, and their...

  9. The effect of age and microstructural white matter integrity on lap time variation and fast-paced walking speed.

    Tian, Qu; Ferrucci, Luigi; Resnick, Susan M; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Shardell, Michelle D; Landman, Bennett A; Venkatraman, Vijay K; Gonzalez, Christopher E; Studenski, Stephanie A

    2016-09-01

    Macrostructural white matter damage (WMD) is associated with less uniform and slower walking in older adults. The effect of age and subclinical microstructural WM degeneration (a potentially earlier phase of WM ischemic damage) on walking patterns and speed is less clear. This study examines the effect of age on the associations of regional microstructural WM integrity with walking variability and speed, independent of macrostructural WMD. This study involved 493 participants (n = 51 young; n = 209 young-old; n = 233 old-old) from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. All completed a 400-meter walk test and underwent a concurrent brain MRI with diffusion tensor imaging. Microstructural WM integrity was measured as fractional anisotropy (FA). Walking variability was measured as trend-adjusted variation in time over ten 40-meter laps (lap time variation, LTV). Fast-paced walking speed was assessed as mean lap time (MLT). Multiple linear regression models of FA predicting LTV and MLT were adjusted for age, sex, height, weight, and WM hyperintensities. Independent of WM hyperintensities, lower FA in the body of the corpus callosum was associated with higher LTV and longer MLT only in the young-old. Lower FA in superior longitudinal, inferior fronto-occipital, and uncinate fasciculi, the anterior limb of the internal capsule, and the anterior corona radiate was associated with longer MLT only in the young-old. While macrostructural WMD is known to predict more variable and slower walking in older adults, microstructural WM disruption is independently associated with more variable and slower fast-paced walking only in the young-old. Disrupted regional WM integrity may be a subclinical contributor to abnormal walking at an earlier phase of aging. PMID:26399234

  10. Fore-aft ground force adaptations to induced forelimb lameness in walking and trotting dogs.

    Abdelhadi, Jalal; Wefstaedt, Patrick; Nolte, Ingo; Schilling, Nadja

    2012-01-01

    Animals alter their locomotor mechanics to adapt to a loss of limb function. To better understand their compensatory mechanisms, this study evaluated the changes in the fore-aft ground forces to forelimb lameness and tested the hypothesis that dogs unload the affected limb by producing a nose-up pitching moment via the exertion of a net-propulsive force when the lame limb is on the ground. Seven healthy Beagles walked and trotted at steady speed on an instrumented treadmill while horizontal force data were collected before and after a moderate lameness was induced. Peak, mean and summed braking and propulsive forces as well as the duration each force was exerted and the time to reach maximum force were evaluated for both the sound and the lame condition. Compared with the sound condition, a net-propulsive force was produced by the lame diagonal limbs due to a reduced braking force in the affected forelimb and an increased propulsive force in the contralateral hindlimb when the dogs walked and trotted. To regain pitch stability and ensure steady speed for a given locomotor cycle, the dogs produced a net-braking force when the sound diagonal limbs were on the ground by exerting greater braking forces in both limbs during walking and additionally reducing the propulsive force in the hindlimb during trotting. Consistent with the proposed mechanism, dogs maximize their double support phases when walking. Likely associated with the fore-aft force adaptations to lameness are changes in muscle recruitment that potentially result in short- and long-term effects on the limb and trunk muscles. PMID:23300614

  11. Fast-start adaptation funding: keeping promises from Copenhagen

    Ciplet, David; Roberts, J. Timmons [Brown University (United States); Chandani, Achala; Huq, Saleemul

    2010-11-15

    The most concrete commitment to come out of the international climate negotiations in Copenhagen was US$30 billion dollars in 'fast-start climate finance' to developing countries, with balanced support for both mitigation and adaptation. Fast-start adaptation finance, in particular, is crusial for poor countries facing rapid climate change. But so far, pledges for adaptation from developed countries have been inadequate and unclear. This briefing outlines ways for the Cancun negotiations to address five crucial issues for adaptation finance: (1) the amount and type of funding being offered, (2) the definition of adaptation, (3) global oversight and accounting, (4) a clear baseline and transparent spending and (5) the channel for delivering funds.

  12. Sox17 regulates liver lipid metabolism and adaptation to fasting.

    Rommelaere, Samuel; Millet, Virginie; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Gensollen, Thomas; Andreoletti, Pierre; Cherkaoui-Malki, Mustapha; Bourges, Christophe; Escalière, Bertrand; Du, Xin; Xia, Yu; Imbert, Jean; Beutler, Bruce; Kanai, Yoshiakira; Malissen, Bernard; Malissen, Marie; Tailleux, Anne; Staels, Bart; Galland, Franck; Naquet, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Liver is a major regulator of lipid metabolism and adaptation to fasting, a process involving PPARalpha activation. We recently showed that the Vnn1 gene is a PPARalpha target gene in liver and that release of the Vanin-1 pantetheinase in serum is a biomarker of PPARalpha activation. Here we set up a screen to identify new regulators of adaptation to fasting using the serum Vanin-1 as a marker of PPARalpha activation. Mutagenized mice were screened for low serum Vanin-1 expression. Functional interactions with PPARalpha were investigated by combining transcriptomic, biochemical and metabolic approaches. We characterized a new mutant mouse in which hepatic and serum expression of Vanin-1 is depressed. This mouse carries a mutation in the HMG domain of the Sox17 transcription factor. Mutant mice display a metabolic phenotype featuring lipid abnormalities and inefficient adaptation to fasting. Upon fasting, a fraction of the PPARα-driven transcriptional program is no longer induced and associated with impaired fatty acid oxidation. The transcriptional phenotype is partially observed in heterozygous Sox17+/- mice. In mutant mice, the fasting phenotype but not all transcriptomic signature is rescued by the administration of the PPARalpha agonist fenofibrate. These results identify a novel role for Sox17 in adult liver as a modulator of the metabolic adaptation to fasting. PMID:25141153

  13. Fast Histograms using Adaptive CUDA Streams

    Koppaka, Sisir; Narasimhan, Srihari; Narayanan, Babu

    2010-01-01

    Histograms are widely used in medical imaging, network intrusion detection, packet analysis and other stream-based high throughput applications. However, while porting such software stacks to the GPU, the computation of the histogram is a typical bottleneck primarily due to the large impact on kernel speed by atomic operations. In this work, we propose a stream-based model implemented in CUDA, using a new adaptive kernel that can be optimized based on latency hidden CPU compute. We also explore the tradeoffs of using the new kernel vis-\\`a-vis the stock NVIDIA SDK kernel, and discuss an intelligent kernel switching method for the stream based on a degeneracy criterion that is adaptively computed from the input stream.

  14. Fore-Aft Ground Force Adaptations to Induced Forelimb Lameness in Walking and Trotting Dogs

    Abdelhadi, Jalal; Wefstaedt, Patrick; Nolte, Ingo; Schilling, Nadja

    2012-01-01

    Animals alter their locomotor mechanics to adapt to a loss of limb function. To better understand their compensatory mechanisms, this study evaluated the changes in the fore-aft ground forces to forelimb lameness and tested the hypothesis that dogs unload the affected limb by producing a nose-up pitching moment via the exertion of a net-propulsive force when the lame limb is on the ground. Seven healthy Beagles walked and trotted at steady speed on an instrumented treadmill while horizontal f...

  15. Information criterion based fast PCA adaptive algorithm

    Li Jiawen; Li Congxin

    2007-01-01

    The novel information criterion (NIC) algorithm can find the principal subspace quickly, but it is not an actual principal component analysis (PCA) algorithm and hence it cannot find the orthonormal eigen-space which corresponds to the principal component of input vector.This defect limits its application in practice.By weighting the neural network's output of NIC, a modified novel information criterion (MNIC) algorithm is presented.MNIC extractes the principal components and corresponding eigenvectors in a parallel online learning program, and overcomes the NIC's defect.It is proved to have a single global optimum and nonquadratic convergence rate, which is superior to the conventional PCA online algorithms such as Oja and LMSER.The relationship among Oja, LMSER and MNIC is exhibited.Simulations show that MNIC could converge to the optimum fast.The validity of MNIC is proved.

  16. Sox17 Regulates Liver Lipid Metabolism and Adaptation to Fasting

    Rommelaere, Samuel; Millet, Virginie; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Gensollen, Thomas; Andreoletti, Pierre; Cherkaoui-Malki, Mustapha; Bourges, Christophe; Escalière, Bertrand; Du, Xin; Xia, Yu; Imbert, Jean; Beutler, Bruce; Kanai, Yoshiakira; Malissen, Bernard; Malissen, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Liver is a major regulator of lipid metabolism and adaptation to fasting, a process involving PPARalpha activation. We recently showed that the Vnn1 gene is a PPARalpha target gene in liver and that release of the Vanin-1 pantetheinase in serum is a biomarker of PPARalpha activation. Here we set up a screen to identify new regulators of adaptation to fasting using the serum Vanin-1 as a marker of PPARalpha activation. Mutagenized mice were screened for low serum Vanin-1 expression. Functional...

  17. An Optimal Control Modification to Model-Reference Adaptive Control for Fast Adaptation

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Boskovic, Jovan

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a method that can achieve fast adaptation for a class of model-reference adaptive control. It is well-known that standard model-reference adaptive control exhibits high-gain control behaviors when a large adaptive gain is used to achieve fast adaptation in order to reduce tracking error rapidly. High gain control creates high-frequency oscillations that can excite unmodeled dynamics and can lead to instability. The fast adaptation approach is based on the minimization of the squares of the tracking error, which is formulated as an optimal control problem. The necessary condition of optimality is used to derive an adaptive law using the gradient method. This adaptive law is shown to result in uniform boundedness of the tracking error by means of the Lyapunov s direct method. Furthermore, this adaptive law allows a large adaptive gain to be used without causing undesired high-gain control effects. The method is shown to be more robust than standard model-reference adaptive control. Simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  18. Adaptability of stride-to-stride control of stepping movements in human walking.

    Bohnsack-McLagan, Nicole K; Cusumano, Joseph P; Dingwell, Jonathan B

    2016-01-25

    Humans continually adapt their movements as they walk on different surfaces, avoid obstacles, etc. External (environmental) and internal (physiological) noise-like disturbances, and the responses that correct for them, each contribute to locomotor variability. This variability may sometimes be detrimental (perhaps increasing fall risk), or sometimes beneficial (perhaps reflecting exploration of multiple task solutions). Here, we determined how humans regulated stride-to-stride fluctuations in walking when presented different task goals that allowed them to exploit inherent redundancies in different ways. Fourteen healthy adults walked on a treadmill under each of four conditions: constant speed only (SPD), constant speed and stride length (LEN), constant speed and stride time (TIM), or constant speed, stride length, and stride time (ALL). Multiple analyses tested competing hypotheses that participants might attempt to either equally satisfy all goals simultaneously, or instead adopt systematic intermediate strategies that only partly satisfied each individual goal. Participants exhibited similar average stepping behavior, but significant differences in variability and stride-to-stride serial correlations across conditions. Analyses of the structure of stride-to-stride fluctuation dynamics demonstrated humans resolved the competing goals presented not by minimizing errors equally with respect to all goals, but instead by trying to only partly satisfy each goal. Thus, humans exploit task redundancies even when they are explicitly removed from the task specifications. These findings may help identify when variability is predictive of, or protective against, fall risk. They may also help inform rehabilitation interventions to better exploit the positive contributions of variability, while minimizing the negative. PMID:26725217

  19. Brain source localization based on fast fully adaptive approach.

    Ravan, Maryam; Reilly, James P

    2012-01-01

    In the electroencephalogram (EEG) or magnetoencephalogram (MEG) context, brain source localization (beamforming) methods often fail when the number of observations is small. This is particularly true when measuring evoked potentials, especially when the number of electrodes is large. Due to the nonstationarity of the EEG/MEG, an adaptive capability is desirable. Previous work has addressed these issues by reducing the adaptive degrees of freedom (DoFs). This paper develops and tests a new multistage adaptive processing for brain source localization that has been previously used for radar statistical signal processing application with uniform linear antenna array. This processing, referred to as the fast fully adaptive (FFA) approach, could significantly reduce the required sample support and computational complexity, while still processing all available DoFs. The performance improvement offered by the FFA approach in comparison to the fully adaptive minimum variance beamforming (MVB) with limited data is demonstrated by bootstrapping simulated data to evaluate the variability of the source location. PMID:23367106

  20. What can we learn from slow self-avoiding adaptive walks by an infinite radius search algorithm?

    Khor, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Slow self-avoiding adaptive walks by an infinite radius search algorithm (Limax) are analyzed as themselves, and as the network they form. The study is conducted on several NK problems and two HIFF problems. We find that examination of such "slacker" walks and networks can indicate relative search difficulty within a family of problems, help identify potential local optima, and detect presence of structure in fitness landscapes. Hierarchical walks are used to differentiate rugged landscapes which are hierarchical (e.g. HIFF) from those which are anarchic (e.g. NK). The notion of node viscidity as a measure of local optimum potential is introduced and found quite successful although more work needs to be done to improve its accuracy on problems with larger K.

  1. A Fast Adaptive Receive Antenna Selection Method in MIMO System

    Chaowei Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Antenna selection has been regarded as an effective method to acquire the diversity benefits of multiple antennas while potentially reduce hardware costs. This paper focuses on receive antenna selection. According to the proportion between the numbers of total receive antennas and selected antennas and the influence of each antenna on system capacity, we propose a fast adaptive antenna selection algorithm for wireless multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO systems. Mathematical analysis and numerical results show that our algorithm significantly reduces the computational complexity and memory requirement and achieves considerable system capacity gain compared with the optimal selection technique in the same time.

  2. Kinematic Adaptations of Forward and Backward Walking on Land and in Water

    Cadenas-Sanchez Cristina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare sagittal plane lower limb kinematics during walking on land and submerged to the hip in water. Eight healthy adults (age 22.1 ± 1.1 years, body height 174.8 ± 7.1 cm, body mass 63.4 ± 6.2 kg were asked to cover a distance of 10 m at comfortable speed with controlled step frequency, walking forward or backward. Sagittal plane lower limb kinematics were obtained from three dimensional video analysis to compare spatiotemporal gait parameters and joint angles at selected events using two-way repeated measures ANOVA. Key findings were a reduced walking speed, stride length, step length and a support phase in water, and step length asymmetry was higher compared to the land condition (p<0.05. At initial contact, knees and hips were more flexed during walking forward in water, whilst, ankles were more dorsiflexed during walking backward in water. At final stance, knees and ankles were more flexed during forward walking, whilst the hip was more flexed during backward walking. These results show how walking in water differs from walking on land, and provide valuable insights into the development and prescription of rehabilitation and training programs.

  3. Fast and Adaptive Lossless Onboard Hyperspectral Data Compression System

    Aranki, Nazeeh I.; Keymeulen, Didier; Kimesh, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Modern hyperspectral imaging systems are able to acquire far more data than can be downlinked from a spacecraft. Onboard data compression helps to alleviate this problem, but requires a system capable of power efficiency and high throughput. Software solutions have limited throughput performance and are power-hungry. Dedicated hardware solutions can provide both high throughput and power efficiency, while taking the load off of the main processor. Thus a hardware compression system was developed. The implementation uses a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The implementation is based on the fast lossless (FL) compression algorithm reported in Fast Lossless Compression of Multispectral-Image Data (NPO-42517), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 8 (August 2006), page 26, which achieves excellent compression performance and has low complexity. This algorithm performs predictive compression using an adaptive filtering method, and uses adaptive Golomb coding. The implementation also packetizes the coded data. The FL algorithm is well suited for implementation in hardware. In the FPGA implementation, one sample is compressed every clock cycle, which makes for a fast and practical realtime solution for space applications. Benefits of this implementation are: 1) The underlying algorithm achieves a combination of low complexity and compression effectiveness that exceeds that of techniques currently in use. 2) The algorithm requires no training data or other specific information about the nature of the spectral bands for a fixed instrument dynamic range. 3) Hardware acceleration provides a throughput improvement of 10 to 100 times vs. the software implementation. A prototype of the compressor is available in software, but it runs at a speed that does not meet spacecraft requirements. The hardware implementation targets the Xilinx Virtex IV FPGAs, and makes the use of this compressor practical for Earth satellites as well as beyond-Earth missions with hyperspectral instruments.

  4. Waddling Random Walk: Fast and Accurate Sampling of Motif Statistics in Large Graphs

    Han, Guyue; Sethu, Harish

    2016-01-01

    The relative frequency of small subgraphs within a large graph, such as one representing an online social network, is of high interest to sociologists, computer scientists and marketeers alike. However, the computation of these network motif statistics via naive enumeration is infeasible for either its prohibitive computational costs or access restrictions on the full graph data. Methods to estimate the motif statistics based on random walks by sampling only a small fraction of the subgraphs ...

  5. Examining links between anxiety, reinvestment and walking when talking by older adults during adaptive gait

    Young, WR; Olonilua, M; Masters, RSW; Dimitriadis, S.; Williams, AM

    2015-01-01

    Falls by older adults often result in reduced quality of life and debilitating fear of further falls. Stopping walking when talking (SWWT) is a significant predictor of future falls by older adults and is thought to reflect age-related increases in attentional demands of walking. We examine whether SWWT is associated with use of explicit movement cues during locomotion, and evaluate if conscious control (i.e., movement specific reinvestment) is causally linked to falls-related anxiety during ...

  6. Holographic Adaptive Laser Optics System (HALOS): Fast, Autonomous Aberration Correction

    Andersen, G.; MacDonald, K.; Gelsinger-Austin, P.

    2013-09-01

    We present an adaptive optics system which uses a multiplexed hologram to deconvolve the phase aberrations in an input beam. This wavefront characterization is extremely fast as it is based on simple measurements of the intensity of focal spots and does not require any computations. Furthermore, the system does not require a computer in the loop and is thus much cheaper, less complex and more robust as well. A fully functional, closed-loop prototype incorporating a 32-element MEMS mirror has been constructed. The unit has a footprint no larger than a laptop but runs at a bandwidth of 100kHz over an order of magnitude faster than comparable, conventional systems occupying a significantly larger volume. Additionally, since the sensing is based on parallel, all-optical processing, the speed is independent of actuator number running at the same bandwidth for one actuator as for a million. We are developing the HALOS technology with a view towards next-generation surveillance systems for extreme adaptive optics applications. These include imaging, lidar and free-space optical communications for unmanned aerial vehicles and SSA. The small volume is ideal for UAVs, while the high speed and high resolution will be of great benefit to the ground-based observation of space-based objects.

  7. Fast, multiphase volume adaptation to hyperosmotic shock by Escherichia coli.

    Teuta Pilizota

    Full Text Available All living cells employ an array of different mechanisms to help them survive changes in extra cellular osmotic pressure. The difference in the concentration of chemicals in a bacterium's cytoplasm and the external environment generates an osmotic pressure that inflates the cell. It is thought that the bacterium Escherichia coli use a number of interconnected systems to adapt to changes in external pressure, allowing them to maintain turgor and live in surroundings that range more than two-hundred-fold in external osmolality. Here, we use fluorescence imaging to make the first measurements of cell volume changes over time during hyperosmotic shock and subsequent adaptation on a single cell level in vivo with a time resolution on the order of seconds. We directly observe two previously unseen phases of the cytoplasmic water efflux upon hyperosmotic shock. Furthermore, we monitor cell volume changes during the post-shock recovery and observe a two-phase response that depends on the shock magnitude. The initial phase of recovery is fast, on the order of 15-20 min and shows little cell-to-cell variation. For large sucrose shocks, a secondary phase that lasts several hours adds to the recovery. We find that cells are able to recover fully from shocks as high as 1 Osmol/kg using existing systems, but that for larger shocks, protein synthesis is required for full recovery.

  8. Effect of walking stress on growth, physiological adaptability and endocrine responses in Malpura ewes in a semi-arid tropical environment

    Sejian, Veerasamy; Maurya, Vijai P.; Naqvi, Syed M. K.

    2012-03-01

    Sheep in hot semi-arid environments are mostly reared using extensive systems. In addition to thermal stress and feed scarcity, the animals need to walk long distances for grazing in this ecological zone. A study was conducted to assess the effect of long-distance walking on adaptive capability in terms of physiological, biochemical and endocrine responses in Malpura ewes. Fourteen adult Malpura non-pregnant ewes weighing between 33 and 35 kg were used in the study. The ewes were randomly allocated into two groups of seven animals each: GI ( n = 7; Control), and GII ( n = 7; walking stress). The animals were stall-fed with a diet consisting of 70% roughage and 30% concentrate. Both GI and GII ewes had uniform access to feed and water. The walking stress group (GII) ewes were made to walk 14 km in two spans between 0900 and 1500 hours with 1 h 30 min for each span (7 km) of walking. The ewes subjected to walking stress (GII) were prevented from grazing by applying a face mask made of cotton thread. The study was conducted for a period of two estrous cycles (35 days) during the autumn season (October-November). Physiological responses were recorded twice daily at 0800 and 1400 hours at weekly intervals. Blood samples were collected from the jugular vein at weekly intervals to study the effects of walking stress on blood biochemical and endocrine parameters. The results indicate that walking stress had significant ( P hormone levels. The significant changes in RR, RT, plasma cortisol, T3 and T4 show that Malpura ewes have the capability to adapt to long-distance walking, and that adrenal and thyroid gland hormones play a significant role in such adaptation.

  9. Using Efference Copy and a Forward Internal Model for Adaptive Biped Walking

    Schröder-Schetelig, Johannes; Manoonpong, Poramate; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2010-01-01

    application of this for our dynamic walking robot RunBot. We use efference copies of the motor commands with a simple forward internal model to predict the expected self-generated acceleration during walking. The difference to the actually measured acceleration is then used to stabilize the walking on......To behave properly in an unknown environment, animals or robots must distinguish external from self-generated stimuli on their sensors. The biologically inspired concepts of efference copy and internal model have been successfully applied to a number of robot control problems. Here we present an...... track configurations. Furthermore we believe that the experimental studies pursued here will sharpen our understanding of how the efference copies influence dynamic locomotion control to the benefit of modern neural control strategies in robots....

  10. Kinematic Adaptations of Forward And Backward Walking on Land and in Water.

    Cadenas-Sanchez, Cristina; Arellano, Raúl; Vanrenterghem, Jos; López-Contreras, Gracia

    2015-12-22

    The aim of this study was to compare sagittal plane lower limb kinematics during walking on land and submerged to the hip in water. Eight healthy adults (age 22.1 ± 1.1 years, body height 174.8 ± 7.1 cm, body mass 63.4 ± 6.2 kg) were asked to cover a distance of 10 m at comfortable speed with controlled step frequency, walking forward or backward. Sagittal plane lower limb kinematics were obtained from three dimensional video analysis to compare spatiotemporal gait parameters and joint angles at selected events using two-way repeated measures ANOVA. Key findings were a reduced walking speed, stride length, step length and a support phase in water, and step length asymmetry was higher compared to the land condition (pland, and provide valuable insights into the development and prescription of rehabilitation and training programs. PMID:26839602

  11. [Adaptation of humans to walking in semi-hard and flexible space suits under terrestrial gravity].

    Panfilov, V E

    2011-01-01

    The spacesuit donning-on procedure can be viewed as the combining of two kinematic circuits into a single human-spacesuit functional system (HSS) for implementation of extravehicular operations. Optimal human-spacesuit interaction hinges on controllability and coordination of HSS mobile components, and also spacesuit slaving to the central nervous system (CNS) mediated through the human locomotion apparatus. Analysis of walking patterns in semi-hard and flexible spacesuits elucidated the direct and feedback relations between the external (spacesuit) and external (locomotion apparatus and CNS) circuits Lack of regularity in the style of spacesuit design creates difficulties for the direct CNS control of locomotion. Consequently, it is necessary to modify the locomotion command program in order to resolve these difficulties and to add flexibility to CNS control The analysis also helped trace algorithm of program modifications with the ultimate result of induced (forced) walk optimization. Learning how to walk in spacesuit Berkut requires no more than 2500 single steps, whereas about 300 steps must be made to master walk skills in spacesuit SKV. PMID:21675190

  12. Fast Adaptive Blind MMSE Equalizer for Multichannel FIR Systems

    Kacha, Ibrahim; Abed-Meraim, Karim; Belouchrani, Adel

    2006-12-01

    We propose a new blind minimum mean square error (MMSE) equalization algorithm of noisy multichannel finite impulse response (FIR) systems, that relies only on second-order statistics. The proposed algorithm offers two important advantages: a low computational complexity and a relative robustness against channel order overestimation errors. Exploiting the fact that the columns of the equalizer matrix filter belong both to the signal subspace and to the kernel of truncated data covariance matrix, the proposed algorithm achieves blindly a direct estimation of the zero-delay MMSE equalizer parameters. We develop a two-step procedure to further improve the performance gain and control the equalization delay. An efficient fast adaptive implementation of our equalizer, based on the projection approximation and the shift invariance property of temporal data covariance matrix, is proposed for reducing the computational complexity from[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] to[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.], where[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] is the number of emitted signals,[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] the data vector length, and[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] the dimension of the signal subspace. We then derive a statistical performance analysis to compare the equalization performance with that of the optimal MMSE equalizer. Finally, simulation results are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed blind equalization algorithm.

  13. Fast Adaptive Blind MMSE Equalizer for Multichannel FIR Systems

    Abed-Meraim Karim

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new blind minimum mean square error (MMSE equalization algorithm of noisy multichannel finite impulse response (FIR systems, that relies only on second-order statistics. The proposed algorithm offers two important advantages: a low computational complexity and a relative robustness against channel order overestimation errors. Exploiting the fact that the columns of the equalizer matrix filter belong both to the signal subspace and to the kernel of truncated data covariance matrix, the proposed algorithm achieves blindly a direct estimation of the zero-delay MMSE equalizer parameters. We develop a two-step procedure to further improve the performance gain and control the equalization delay. An efficient fast adaptive implementation of our equalizer, based on the projection approximation and the shift invariance property of temporal data covariance matrix, is proposed for reducing the computational complexity from to , where is the number of emitted signals, the data vector length, and the dimension of the signal subspace. We then derive a statistical performance analysis to compare the equalization performance with that of the optimal MMSE equalizer. Finally, simulation results are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed blind equalization algorithm.

  14. Adaptive and Energy Efficient Walking in a Hexapod Robot under Neuromechanical Control and Sensorimotor Learning

    Xiong, Xiaofeng; Wörgötter, Florentin; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2016-01-01

    force feedback and for online tuning the VAAMs' stiffness parameters. The control and learning mechanisms enable the hexapod robot advanced mobility sensor driven-walking device (AMOS) to achieve variable compliant walking that accommodates different gaits and surfaces. As a consequence, AMOS can......) to generate the proper leg stiffness (i.e., compliance); and 3) to determine joint angles that give rise to particular positions at the endpoints of the legs. To tackle this problem for a robotic application, here we present a neuromechanical controller coupled with sensorimotor learning. The...... controller consists of a modular neural network for coordinating 18 joints and several virtual agonist-antagonist muscle mechanisms (VAAMs) for variable compliant joint motions. In addition, sensorimotor learning, including forward models and dual-rate learning processes, is introduced for predicting foot...

  15. A fast inverse dynamics model of walking for use in optimisation studies.

    Salehi, Hadi; Ren, Lei; Howard, David

    2016-08-01

    Computer simulation of human gait, based on measured motion data, is a well-established technique in biomechanics. However, optimisation studies requiring many iterative gait cycle simulations have not yet found widespread application because of their high computational cost. Therefore, a computationally efficient inverse dynamics model of 3D human gait has been designed and compared with an equivalent model, created using a commercial multi-body dynamics package. The fast inverse dynamics model described in this paper led to an eight fold increase in execution speed. Sufficient detail is provided to allow readers to implement the model themselves. PMID:26745213

  16. Adaptive behaviour of the spinal cord in the transition from quiet stance to walking

    Serrao Mariano

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modulation of nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR excitability was evaluated during gait initiation in 10 healthy subjects to investigate how load- and movement-related joint inputs activate lower spinal centres in the transition from quiet stance to walking. A motion analysis system integrated with a surface EMG device was used to acquire kinematic, kinetic and EMG variables. Starting from a quiet stance, subjects were asked to walk forward, at their natural speed. The sural nerve was stimulated and EMG responses were recorded from major hip, knee and ankle muscles. Gait initiation was divided into four subphases based on centre of pressure and centre of mass behaviours, while joint displacements were used to categorise joint motion as flexion or extension. The reflex parameters were measured and compared between subphases and in relation to the joint kinematics. Results The NWR was found to be subphase-dependent. NWR excitability was increased in the hip and knee flexor muscles of the starting leg, just prior to the occurrence of any movement, and in the knee flexor muscles of the same leg as soon as it was unloaded. The NWR was hip joint kinematics-dependent in a crossed manner. The excitability of the reflex was enhanced in the extensor muscles of the standing leg during the hip flexion of the starting leg, and in the hip flexors of the standing leg during the hip extension of the starting leg. No notable reflex modulation was observed in the ankle muscles. Conclusions Our findings show that the NWR is modulated during the gait initiation phase. Leg unloading and hip joint motion are the main sources of the observed modulation and work in concert to prepare and assist the starting leg in the first step while supporting the contralateral leg, thereby possibly predisposing the lower limbs to the cyclical pattern of walking.

  17. Effect of walking stress on growth, physiological adaptability and endocrine responses in Malpura ewes in a semi-arid tropical environment

    Sejian, Veerasamy; Maurya, Vijai P.; Naqvi, Syed M. K.

    2012-03-01

    Sheep in hot semi-arid environments are mostly reared using extensive systems. In addition to thermal stress and feed scarcity, the animals need to walk long distances for grazing in this ecological zone. A study was conducted to assess the effect of long-distance walking on adaptive capability in terms of physiological, biochemical and endocrine responses in Malpura ewes. Fourteen adult Malpura non-pregnant ewes weighing between 33 and 35 kg were used in the study. The ewes were randomly allocated into two groups of seven animals each: GI ( n = 7; Control), and GII ( n = 7; walking stress). The animals were stall-fed with a diet consisting of 70% roughage and 30% concentrate. Both GI and GII ewes had uniform access to feed and water. The walking stress group (GII) ewes were made to walk 14 km in two spans between 0900 and 1500 hours with 1 h 30 min for each span (7 km) of walking. The ewes subjected to walking stress (GII) were prevented from grazing by applying a face mask made of cotton thread. The study was conducted for a period of two estrous cycles (35 days) during the autumn season (October-November). Physiological responses were recorded twice daily at 0800 and 1400 hours at weekly intervals. Blood samples were collected from the jugular vein at weekly intervals to study the effects of walking stress on blood biochemical and endocrine parameters. The results indicate that walking stress had significant ( P < 0.05) influence on body weight, average daily gain, respiration rate (RR), rectal temperature (RT), haemoglobin (Hb), packed cell volume (PCV), plasma glucose, calcium, phosphorus, aspartate amino transferase (AST), alanine amino transferase (ALT), tri-iodo-thyronine (T3), thyroxin (T4), and cortisol. However, walking stress did not influence the reproductive hormone levels. The significant changes in RR, RT, plasma cortisol, T3 and T4 show that Malpura ewes have the capability to adapt to long-distance walking, and that adrenal and thyroid gland

  18. The Walking Interventions Through Texting (WalkIT) Trial: Rationale, Design, and Protocol for a Factorial Randomized Controlled Trial of Adaptive Interventions for Overweight and Obese, Inactive Adults

    Hurley, Jane C; Hollingshead, Kevin E; Todd, Michael; Jarrett, Catherine L; Tucker, Wesley J; Angadi, Siddhartha S; Adams, Marc A

    2015-01-01

    Background Walking is a widely accepted and frequently targeted health promotion approach to increase physical activity (PA). Interventions to increase PA have produced only small improvements. Stronger and more potent behavioral intervention components are needed to increase time spent in PA, improve cardiometabolic risk markers, and optimize health. Objective Our aim is to present the rationale and methods from the WalkIT Trial, a 4-month factorial randomized controlled trial (RCT) in inact...

  19. FFA-CONTEXT AWARE ENERGY EFFICIENT ROUTING USING FAST REACTIVE AND ADAPTIVE ALGORITHM

    P. Kavitha Rani; E. Kannan

    2014-01-01

    A vital issue of routing is how to efficiently strengthen energy consumption of the whole network and to avoid the energy-hole which leads to node failure or node death; this scenario makes the network to work improperly and leads to network death, Here we proves our hypothesis with linearity between routing and linear principles. Our proposed work effectively utilizes the adaption of Optimized particle swarm algorithm (Fast Reactive and fast adaptive algorithm) in order to solve the routing ...

  20. Adaptation mechanism of interlimb coordination in human split-belt treadmill walking through learning of foot contact timing: a robotics study.

    Fujiki, Soichiro; Aoi, Shinya; Funato, Tetsuro; Tomita, Nozomi; Senda, Kei; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2015-09-01

    Human walking behaviour adaptation strategies have previously been examined using split-belt treadmills, which have two parallel independently controlled belts. In such human split-belt treadmill walking, two types of adaptations have been identified: early and late. Early-type adaptations appear as rapid changes in interlimb and intralimb coordination activities when the belt speeds of the treadmill change between tied (same speed for both belts) and split-belt (different speeds for each belt) configurations. By contrast, late-type adaptations occur after the early-type adaptations as a gradual change and only involve interlimb coordination. Furthermore, interlimb coordination shows after-effects that are related to these adaptations. It has been suggested that these adaptations are governed primarily by the spinal cord and cerebellum, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Because various physiological findings suggest that foot contact timing is crucial to adaptive locomotion, this paper reports on the development of a two-layered control model for walking composed of spinal and cerebellar models, and on its use as the focus of our control model. The spinal model generates rhythmic motor commands using an oscillator network based on a central pattern generator and modulates the commands formulated in immediate response to foot contact, while the cerebellar model modifies motor commands through learning based on error information related to differences between the predicted and actual foot contact timings of each leg. We investigated adaptive behaviour and its mechanism by split-belt treadmill walking experiments using both computer simulations and an experimental bipedal robot. Our results showed that the robot exhibited rapid changes in interlimb and intralimb coordination that were similar to the early-type adaptations observed in humans. In addition, despite the lack of direct interlimb coordination control, gradual changes and after-effects in the

  1. Synaptic plasticity in a recurrent neural network for versatile and adaptive behaviors of a walking robot

    Grinke, Eduard; Tetzlaff, Christian; Wörgötter, Florentin;

    2015-01-01

    mechanisms with plasticity, exteroceptive sensory feedback, and biomechanics. The neural mechanisms consist of adaptive neural sensory processing and modular neural locomotion control. The sensory processing is based on a small recurrent neural network consisting of two fully connected neurons. Online...

  2. [Research on Adaptive Balance Reaction for Gait Slippery Instability Events on Level Walk Based on Plantar Pressure and Gait Parameter Analysis].

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Junxia; Si, Ying

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, for gait instability phenomenon, many researches have been carried out at home and abroad. However, the relationship between plantar pressure and gait parameters in the process of balance adjustment is still unclear. This study describes the human body adaptive balance reaction during slip events on slippery level walk by plantar pressure and gait analysis. Ten healthy male subjects walked on a level path wearing shoes with two contrastive contaminants (dry, oil). The study collected and analyzed the change rule of spatiotemporal parameters, plantar pressure parameters, vertical ground reaction force (VGRF), etc. The results showed that the human body adaptive balance reaction during slip events on slippery level walk mainly included lighter touch at the heel strikes, tighter grip at the toe offs, a lower velocity, a shorter stride length and longer support time. These changes are used to maintain or recover body balance. These results would be able to explore new ideas and provide reference value for slip injury prevention, walking rehabilitation training design, research and development of walking assistive equipments, etc. PMID:27079090

  3. Slow walking on a treadmill desk does not negatively affect executive abilities: an examination of cognitive control, conflict adaptation, response inhibition, and post-error slowing.

    Larson, Michael J; LeCheminant, James D; Carbine, Kaylie; Hill, Kyle R; Christenson, Edward; Masterson, Travis; LeCheminant, Rick

    2015-01-01

    An increasing trend in the workplace is for employees to walk on treadmills while working to attain known health benefits; however, the effect of walking on a treadmill during cognitive control and executive function tasks is not well known. We compared the cognitive control processes of conflict adaptation (i.e., congruency sequence effects-improved performance following high-conflict relative to low-conflict trials), post-error slowing (i.e., Rabbitt effect), and response inhibition during treadmill walking (1.5 mph) relative to sitting. Understanding the influence of treadmill desks on these cognitive processes may have implications for worker health and productivity. Sixty-nine individuals were randomized to either a sitting (n = 35) or treadmill-walking condition (n = 34). Groups did not differ in age or body mass index. All participants completed a computerized Eriksen flanker task and a response-inhibition go/no-go task in random order while either walking on a treadmill or seated. Response times (RTs) and accuracy were analyzed separately for each task using mixed model analysis of variance. Separate ANOVAs for RTs and accuracy showed the expected conflict adaptation effects, post-error slowing, and response inhibition effects when collapsed across sitting and treadmill groups (all Fs > 78.77, Ps 0.38), suggesting no decrements or enhancements in conflict-related control and adjustment processes or response inhibition for those walking on a treadmill versus sitting. We conclude that cognitive control performance remains relatively unaffected during slow treadmill walking relative to sitting. PMID:26074861

  4. Adaptation of an artificial diet for Spodoptera cosmioides (Walk.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) laboratory rearing

    Bavaresco, Alvimar [EPAGRI, Estacao Experimetal de Canoinhas, SC (Brazil)]. E-mail: bavaresco@epagri.rct-sc.br; Garcia, Mauro S.; Gruetzmacher, Anderson D.; Ringenberg, Rudiney; Foresti, Josemar [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPel), RS (Brazil). Dept. de Fitossanidade

    2004-03-15

    The biology of Spodoptera cosmioides (Walk.) was studied on three artificial diets with different protein sources (d1 = white bean, yeast extract, soybean flour, powder milk and wheat germ; d2 = 'carioca' bean and yeast extract; d3 = corn flour, wheat germ and yeast extract). The objective of this research was to determine the most suitable diet for mass rearing S. cosmioides in laboratory. The species is highly polyphagous, and for this reason we hypothesized that diets that are suitable for other Lepidoptera can allow its development and fulfill the minimum requirements of biological quality, quantity and economy. Although S. cosmioides has completed the biological cycle on the three diets, the d1 was the most suitable for its rearing and produced the fastest development, higher total survival and pupae weight, as well as higher net reproduction rate (Ro), intrinsic rate of natural increase (rm) and finite rate of natural increase (l). The number of instars varied from six to seven, predominating six in d1 and d3; in d2, half the population presented six instars and half seven. Females presented pupae duration significantly lower that the males in all diets, thus emerging earlier. Adult longevity was not affected by the diets, while total fecundity was higher in d1 and d2. In conclusion, the diet 1 is recommended to mass rearing S. cosmioides in the laboratory. (author)

  5. Adaptation of an artificial diet for Spodoptera cosmioides (Walk.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) laboratory rearing

    The biology of Spodoptera cosmioides (Walk.) was studied on three artificial diets with different protein sources (d1 = white bean, yeast extract, soybean flour, powder milk and wheat germ; d2 = 'carioca' bean and yeast extract; d3 = corn flour, wheat germ and yeast extract). The objective of this research was to determine the most suitable diet for mass rearing S. cosmioides in laboratory. The species is highly polyphagous, and for this reason we hypothesized that diets that are suitable for other Lepidoptera can allow its development and fulfill the minimum requirements of biological quality, quantity and economy. Although S. cosmioides has completed the biological cycle on the three diets, the d1 was the most suitable for its rearing and produced the fastest development, higher total survival and pupae weight, as well as higher net reproduction rate (Ro), intrinsic rate of natural increase (rm) and finite rate of natural increase (l). The number of instars varied from six to seven, predominating six in d1 and d3; in d2, half the population presented six instars and half seven. Females presented pupae duration significantly lower that the males in all diets, thus emerging earlier. Adult longevity was not affected by the diets, while total fecundity was higher in d1 and d2. In conclusion, the diet 1 is recommended to mass rearing S. cosmioides in the laboratory. (author)

  6. Neural Control and Adaptive Neural Forward Models for Insect-like, Energy-Efficient, and Adaptable Locomotion of Walking Machines

    Manoonpong, Poramate; Parlitz, Ulrich; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2013-01-01

    natural properties with artificial legged locomotion systems by using different approaches including machine learning algorithms, classical engineering control techniques, and biologically-inspired control mechanisms. However, their levels of performance are still far from the natural ones. By contrast...... forward models allow the machine to autonomously adapt its locomotion to deal with a change of terrain, losing of ground contact during stance phase, stepping on or hitting an obstacle during swing phase, leg damage, and even to promote cockroach-like climbing behavior. Thus, the results presented here...

  7. Fast calibration of high-order adaptive optics systems

    Kasper, Markus; Fedrigo, Enrico; Looze, Douglas P.; Bonnet, Henri; Ivanescu, Liviu; Oberti, Sylvain

    2004-06-01

    We present a new method of calibrating adaptive optics systems that greatly reduces the required calibration time or, equivalently, improves the signal-to-noise ratio. The method uses an optimized actuation scheme with Hadamard patterns and does not scale with the number of actuators for a given noise level in the wave-front sensor channels. It is therefore highly desirable for high-order systems and/or adaptive secondary systems on a telescope without a Gregorian focal plane. In the latter case, the measurement noise is increased by the effects of the turbulent atmosphere when one is calibrating on a natural guide star.

  8. The time-walk of analog constant fraction discriminators using very fast scintillator detectors with linear and non-linear energy response

    The electronic γ–γ fast timing technique allows for direct nuclear lifetime determination down to the few picoseconds region by measuring the time difference between two coincident γ-ray transitions. Using high resolution ultra-fast LaBr3(Ce) scintillator detectors in combination with the recently developed mirror symmetric centroid difference method, nuclear lifetimes are measured with a time resolving power of around 5 ps. The essence of the method is to calibrate the energy dependent position (centroid) of the prompt response function of the setup which is obtained for simultaneously occurring events. This time-walk of the prompt response function induced by the analog constant fraction discriminator has been determined by systematic measurements using different photomultiplier tubes and timing adjustments of the constant fraction discriminator. We propose a universal calibration function which describes the time-walk or the combined γ–γ time-walk characteristics, respectively, for either a linear or a non-linear amplitude versus energy dependency of the scintillator detector output pulses.

  9. Centralized and Distributed Solutions for Fast Muting Adaptation in LTE-Advanced HetNets

    Soret, Beatriz; Pedersen, Klaus I.

    2015-01-01

    though the eICIC configuration (RE and ABS) ideally should be instantaneously adapted to follow the fluctuations of the traffic and the channel conditions over time, previous studies have focused on slow intercell coordination. In this paper, we investigate fast dynamic eICIC solutions for centralized...... and distributed Radio Resource Management (RRM) architectures. The centralized RRM architecture assumes macro and Remote Radio Heads (RRHs) inter-connected via high-speed fronthaul connections, while the distributed architecture is based on traditional macro and pico cells deployments with X2 backhaul...... interface. Two different fast muting adaptation algorithms are derived, and it is shown how those can be appplied to both the centralized and the distributed architecture. Performance results with bursty traffic show that the fast dynamic adaptation provides significant gains, both in 5%-ile and 50%-ile...

  10. Adaptation of fibers in fast-twitch muscles of rats to spaceflight and hindlimb suspension

    Jiang, Bian; Ohira, Yoshi; Roy, Roland R.; Nguyen, Quyet; Il'ina-Kakueva, E. I.; Oganov, V.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1992-01-01

    The adaptation of single fibers in medial gastrocnemius (MG), a fast-twitch extensor, and in tibialis anterior (TA), a fast-twitch flexor, was studied after 14 days of spaceflight onboard Cosmos 2044 or hindlimb suspension. Quantitative myosin ATPase activities of single fibers were measured in flight and suspended rats. Each of the enzyme and size measurements were directly correlated within each fiber with respect to its qualitative myosin ATPase staining properties and its expression of fast, slow, or both myosin heavy chains (MHC). The percentage of slow- and fast-twitch fibers of the MG and TA were found to be unchanged. Mean fiber size of all fibers was unaffected after flight or suspension. The ATPase activity in the MG was higher in flight than in control or suspended rats. In comparison to Cosmos 1887 spaceflight, the adaptations in the muscle fibers of the MG were more moderate.

  11. Improving GPU-accelerated Adaptive IDW Interpolation Algorithm Using Fast kNN Search

    Mei, Gang; Xu, Nengxiong; Xu, Liangliang

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an efficient parallel Adaptive Inverse Distance Weighting (AIDW) interpolation algorithm on modern Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). The presented algorithm is an improvement of our previous GPU-accelerated AIDW algorithm by adopting fast k-Nearest Neighbors (kNN) search. In AIDW, it needs to find several nearest neighboring data points for each interpolated point to adaptively determine the power parameter; and then the desired prediction value of the interpolated point is ...

  12. Identification of fast-changing signals by means of adaptive chaotic transformations

    Berezowski, Marek; Lawnik, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The adaptive approach of strongly non-linear fast-changing signals identification is discussed. The approach is devised by adaptive sampling based on chaotic mapping in yourself of a signal. Presented sampling way may be utilized online in the automatic control of chemical reactor (throughout identification of concentrations and temperature oscillations in real-time), in medicine (throughout identification of ECG and EEG signals in real-time), etc. In this paper, we presented it to identify t...

  13. Adaptive approach to global synchronization of directed networks with fast switching topologies

    Global synchronization of directed networks with switching topologies is investigated. It is found that if there exists at least one directed spanning tree in the network with the fixed time-average topology and the time-average topology is achieved sufficiently fast, the network will reach global synchronization for appreciate coupling strength. Furthermore, this appreciate coupling strength may be obtained by local adaptive approach. A sufficient condition about the global synchronization is given. Numerical simulations verify the effectiveness of the adaptive strategy.

  14. Novel Fast Adapting Interneurons Mediate Cholinergic-Induced Fast GABAA IPSCs In Striatal Spiny Neurons

    Faust, Thomas W.; Assous, Maxime; Shah, Fulva; Tepper, James M.; Koós, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Previous work suggests that neostriatal cholinergic interneurons control the activity of several classes of GABAergic interneurons through fast nicotinic receptor mediated synaptic inputs. Although indirect evidence has suggested the existence of several classes of interneurons controlled by this mechanism only one such cell type, the neuropeptide-Y expressing neurogliaform neuron, has been identified to date. Here we tested the hypothesis that in addition to the neurogliaform neurons that el...

  15. Fast Block-match Motion Estimation Based on Multilevel Adaptive Diamond Search

    Li, Shan; Yi, Qing-Ming; Shi, Min

    In this paper, a novel fast block-match algorithm called MADS based on multilevel adaptive diamond search is proposed. The algorithm adaptively estimates the frame-level motion complexity with the reference frame texture information and the macro-block residual value at first, and then estimates the block-level motion complexity according to the spatial-temporal correlation of the vector field. The threshold is applied to stop the stationary block from searching. The initial search point and different diamond search modes are adaptively selected based on motion type for non-stationary block. Experimental results show that MADS algorithm has better performance than other popular fast algorithms for a wide range of video sequences.

  16. Fast non-local means with size-adaptive search window

    Hancheng Yu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the authors present a fast non-local means (NLM image denoising algorithm with size-adaptive search window. On the basis of the edge gradient and direction of the noisy image, the proposed fast scheme divides all the pixels into significant edge, moderate edge or non-edge region, and the size of the search window for most pixels which belong to non-edge region can be reduced. The proposed fast scheme also adopts different strategies to pre-select similar patches in the search window for efficient NLM denoising. Experimental results show that compared with the standard NLM method, the proposed fast scheme achieves a substantial reduction in computational cost and improvement in the denoising performance, both in terms of visual quality and numerical results.

  17. Lack of on-going adaptations in the soleus muscle activity during walking in patients affected by large-fiber neuropathy

    Nazarena, Mazzaro; Grey, Michael James; Sinkjær, Thomas;

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of feedback from large-diameter sensory fibers to the adaptation of soleus muscle activity after small ankle trajectory modifications during human walking. Small-amplitude and slow-velocity ankle dorsiflexion enhancements and reductions were...... applied during the stance phase of the gait cycle to mimic the normal variability of the ankle trajectory during walking. Patients with demyelination of large sensory fibers (Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A and antibodies to myelin-associated glycoprotein neuropathy) and age-matched controls participated in...... this study. The patients had absent light-touch sense in the toes and feet and absent quadriceps and Achilles tendon reflexes, indicating functional loss of large sensory fibers. Moreover, their soleus stretch reflex response consisted of a single electromyographic (EMG) burst with delayed onset and...

  18. How to Explore a Fast-Changing World (Cover Time of a Simple Random Walk on Evolving Graphs)

    Avin, Ch.; Koucký, Michal; Lotker, Z.

    Berlin: Springer, 2008 - (Aceto, L.; Damgárd, I.; Goldberg, L.; Halldórsson, M.; Ingólfsdóttir, A.; Walukiewicz, I.), s. 121-132. (LNCS. 5125). ISBN 978-3-540-70574-1. [International Colloquium on Automata, Languages and Programming , ICALP 2008/35./. Reykjavik (IS), 07.07.2008-11.07.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR GP201/07/P276 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : random walks * cover time * evolving graphs Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  19. Dynamics of Human Walking

    Kokshenev, V B

    2004-01-01

    The problem of biped locomotion at steady speeds is discussed through the Lagrangian formulation developed for velocity-dependent, body driving forces. Human walking on a level surface is analyzed in terms of the data on the resultant ground-reaction force and the external work. It is shown that the trajectory of the human center of mass is due to a superposition of its rectilinear motion with a given speed V and a backward rotation along a shortened hypocycloid. A stiff-to-compliant crossover between walking gaits is established at mid speeds, which separate slow walking from fast walking, limited by V_{\\max}=3.4 m/s. Key words: locomotion, bipedalism, human, biomechanics, walking.

  20. Fast implementation of length-adaptive privacy amplification in quantum key distribution

    Post-processing is indispensable in quantum key distribution (QKD), which is aimed at sharing secret keys between two distant parties. It mainly consists of key reconciliation and privacy amplification, which is used for sharing the same keys and for distilling unconditional secret keys. In this paper, we focus on speeding up the privacy amplification process by choosing a simple multiplicative universal class of hash functions. By constructing an optimal multiplication algorithm based on four basic multiplication algorithms, we give a fast software implementation of length-adaptive privacy amplification. “Length-adaptive” indicates that the implementation of privacy amplification automatically adapts to different lengths of input blocks. When the lengths of the input blocks are 1 Mbit and 10 Mbit, the speed of privacy amplification can be as fast as 14.86 Mbps and 10.88 Mbps, respectively. Thus, it is practical for GHz or even higher repetition frequency QKD systems. (general)

  1. Validation of the new fast perimetric strategy GATE (German Adaptive Thresholding Estimation) for static perimetry

    Luithardt, Annette Franziska geb. Schmid

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To validate the commercially available “EyeSuite” version of the new fast thresholding algorithm GATE (German Adaptive Thresholding Estimation) for automated static perimetry. Methods Thirty patients suffering from visual pathway lesions of various origin (anterior ischemic optic neuropathy [n=3], glaucoma [n=15], (post-) chiasmal visual pathway lesion [n=6], retinitis pigmentosa (RP) [n=6]) were tested on three Octopus 900 perimeters (Haag-Streit AG, Köniz, Switzerland) wi...

  2. Fast Linear Adaptive Skipping Training Algorithm for Training Artificial Neural Network

    Manjula Devi, R.; R. C. Suganthe; S. KUPPUSWAMI

    2013-01-01

    Artificial neural network has been extensively consumed training model for solving pattern recognition tasks. However, training a very huge training data set using complex neural network necessitates excessively high training time. In this correspondence, a new fast Linear Adaptive Skipping Training (LAST) algorithm for training artificial neural network (ANN) is instituted. The core essence of this paper is to ameliorate the training speed of ANN by exhibiting only the input samples that do ...

  3. Adaptations to changing speed, load, and gradient in human walking: cost of transport, optimal speed, and pendulum.

    Gomeñuka, N A; Bona, R L; da Rosa, R G; Peyré-Tartaruga, L A

    2014-06-01

    It has been observed that the optimal speed (OPT) of human walking is independent of load on level surfaces because of the unaltered trajectory of the center of mass and consequent conservation of the pendular mechanism. However, the role of the inverted pendulum mechanism that combines speed, load, and gradient during walking remains unknown. In the present study, 10 subjects walked on a treadmill, with and without loading (25% of the body mass), at different speeds and slopes (0%, +7%, and +15%). The three-dimensional motion and VO2 were simultaneously registered. The mechanical external and internal work and the cost of transport (C) changed with the speed and gradient, but the load only affected C. OPT decreased with increasing gradient, and the pendular mechanics (R) was modified mainly as a result of changes in speed and gradient. OPT and R were independent of the load in these gradients. Remarkably, R increased with increasing speed and decreased (to 30%) with an increasing gradient; moreover, R was independent of load. Therefore, the energy-saving strategy by the pendular mechanism persists, although at a diminished level, in loaded walking on gradients and partially explains the OPT in this condition. PMID:24102934

  4. Improvement of the Simplified Fast Transversal Filter Type Algorithm for Adaptive Filtering

    Madjid Arezki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In this study, we proposed a new algorithm M-SMFTF for adaptive filtering with fast convergence and low complexity. Approach: It was the result of a simplified FTF type algorithm, where the adaptation gain was obtained only from the forward prediction variables and using a new recursive method to compute the likelihood variable. Results: The computational complexity was reduced from 7L-6L, where L is the finite impulse response filter length. Furthermore, this computational complexity can be significantly reduced to (2L+4P when used with a reduced P-size forward predictor. Conclusion: This algorithm presented a certain interest, for the adaptation of very long filters, like those used in the problems of echo acoustic cancellation, due to its reduced complexity, its numerical stability and its convergence in the presence of the speech signal.

  5. A non-traditional model of the metabolic syndrome: the adaptive significance of insulin resistance in fasting-adapted seals

    Dorian S Houser

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance in modern society is perceived as a pathological consequence of excess energy consumption and reduced physical activity. Its presence in relation to the development of cardiovascular risk factors has been termed the metabolic syndrome, which produces increased mortality and morbidity and which is rapidly increasing in human populations. Ironically, insulin resistance likely evolved to assist animals during food shortages by increasing the availability of endogenous lipid for catabolism while protecting protein from use in gluconeogenesis and eventual oxidation. Some species that incorporate fasting as a predictable component of their life history demonstrate physiological traits similar to the metabolic syndrome during prolonged fasts. One such species is the northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris, which fasts from food and water for periods of up to three months. During this time, ~90% of the seals metabolic demands are met through fat oxidation and circulating non-esterified fatty acids are high (0.7-3.2 mM. All life history stages of elephant seal studied to date demonstrate insulin resistance and fasting hyperglycemia as well as variations in hormones and adipocytokines that reflect the metabolic syndrome to some degree. Elephant seals demonstrate some intriguing adaptations with the potential for medical advancement; for example, ketosis is negligible despite significant and prolonged fatty acid oxidation and investigation of this feature might provide insight into the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. The parallels to the metabolic syndrome are likely reflected to varying degrees in other marine mammals, most of which evolved on diets high in lipid and protein content but essentially devoid of carbohydrate. Utilization of these natural models of insulin resistance may further our understanding of the pathophysiology of the metabolic syndrome in humans and better assist the development of preventative measures

  6. Adaptive Hybrid Visual Servo Regulation of Mobile Robots Based on Fast Homography Decomposition

    Chunfu Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For the monocular camera-based mobile robot system, an adaptive hybrid visual servo regulation algorithm which is based on a fast homography decomposition method is proposed to drive the mobile robot to its desired position and orientation, even when object’s imaging depth and camera’s position extrinsic parameters are unknown. Firstly, the homography’s particular properties caused by mobile robot’s 2-DOF motion are taken into account to induce a fast homography decomposition method. Secondly, the homography matrix and the extracted orientation error, incorporated with the desired view’s single feature point, are utilized to form an error vector and its open-loop error function. Finally, Lyapunov-based techniques are exploited to construct an adaptive regulation control law, followed by the experimental verification. The experimental results show that the proposed fast homography decomposition method is not only simple and efficient, but also highly precise. Meanwhile, the designed control law can well enable mobile robot position and orientation regulation despite the lack of depth information and camera’s position extrinsic parameters.

  7. Walking abnormalities

    ... safety reasons, especially on uneven ground. See a physical therapist for exercise therapy and walking retraining. For a ... the right position for standing and walking. A physical therapist can supply these and provide exercise therapy, if ...

  8. FFA-CONTEXT AWARE ENERGY EFFICIENT ROUTING USING FAST REACTIVE AND ADAPTIVE ALGORITHM

    P. Kavitha Rani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A vital issue of routing is how to efficiently strengthen energy consumption of the whole network and to avoid the energy-hole which leads to node failure or node death; this scenario makes the network to work improperly and leads to network death, Here we proves our hypothesis with linearity between routing and linear principles. Our proposed work effectively utilizes the adaption of Optimized particle swarm algorithm (Fast Reactive and fast adaptive algorithm in order to solve the routing problem in wireless sensor networks to avoid the energy hole. Our approach effectively defines the node leader based on energy level and path optimization for node traversing using particle swarm which effectively utilizes the solution for problem in linearity into routing problem. Our algorithm FFA redefines the particle swarm rules which are reliable in routing strategies and adapts to the working principle. The optimization in our algorithm is to balance energy level and to withstand for its context. This study proves the accuracy using our algorithm respectively by theoretical survey and analysis with simulated results.

  9. The use of the spectral method within the fast adaptive composite grid method

    McKay, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    The use of efficient algorithms for the solution of partial differential equations has been sought for many years. The fast adaptive composite grid (FAC) method combines an efficient algorithm with high accuracy to obtain low cost solutions to partial differential equations. The FAC method achieves fast solution by combining solutions on different grids with varying discretizations and using multigrid like techniques to find fast solution. Recently, the continuous FAC (CFAC) method has been developed which utilizes an analytic solution within a subdomain to iterate to a solution of the problem. This has been shown to achieve excellent results when the analytic solution can be found. The CFAC method will be extended to allow solvers which construct a function for the solution, e.g., spectral and finite element methods. In this discussion, the spectral methods will be used to provide a fast, accurate solution to the partial differential equation. As spectral methods are more accurate than finite difference methods, the ensuing accuracy from this hybrid method outside of the subdomain will be investigated.

  10. Adaptive control of piezoelectric fast steering mirror for high precision tracking application

    Wang, Geng; Rao, Changhui

    2015-03-01

    A piezoelectric fast steering mirror (PFSM) is a complex, strong coupling nonlinear system that integrates optics, mechanics, electrics, and control. Due to the existence of hysteresis nonlinearity, mechanical resonance, and all kinds of disturbances, precise tracking control of a PFSM is a challenging task. This paper presents a comprehensive study of modeling, controller design, and simulation evaluation for a PFSM system. First a general model of a PFSM system integrating mechanical dynamics, electrical dynamics, and hysteresis nonlinearity is proposed, and then a robust adaptive controller is developed under both unknown hysteresis nonlinearities and parameter uncertainties. The parameters needed directly in the formulation of the controller are adaptively estimated. The proposed control law ensures the uniform boundedness of all signals in the closed-loop system. Furthermore, a stability analysis of the control system is performed to guarantee that the output tracking error converges to zero asymptotically. Finally, simulation tests with different motion trajectories are conducted to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  11. Detection of trichothecene producing Fusarium spp. by PCR: adaptation, validation and application to fast food

    Antonella Agodi

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Background. Food contamination by trichothecene mycotoxins is considered to be an emerging public health problem. The aim of this study was to validate a rapid sonification protocol, previously set up for cereal Fusarium DNA extraction from fast food samples, produced by a centre for research and development in the food industry in Catania, Sicily, and to validate it for a diagnostic PCR assay targeted at tri5, the key gene of trichothecene biosynthesis.

    Methods. DNA from reference Fusarium spp. strains and from fast food samples was prepared, setting up an extraction protocol adapted using some modifications based on a method recently described. Validation experiments were performed: serial dilution of DNA extracted from fungal cultures were added to food samples and then DNA was extracted. Specific primer pairs were used to detect F. graminearum and F. culmorum DNA in species-specific assays as well as trichothecene-producing Fusarium spp. in a groupspecific system.

    Results. All genomic DNA extracted from trichothecene-producing Fusarium spp. as well as from DNA-spiked fast food samples and from food still in it’s original condition resulted in the correct amplification. The detection limit was 1 x 10-4 μg of DNA. All fungal and food samples tested gave highly consistent results in repeatability assays, thus demonstrating the within-lab and within/between-day precision of the method.

    Conclusions. Information on the epidemiology of trichothecene producing Fusarium through the food chain and the identification of the most frequently contaminated components of fast food are essential in order to develop effective public health strategies for minimising consumer exposure to trichothecenes. Key words: Fusarium, fast food, trichothecenes, PCR

  12. Adaptive AFM scan speed control for high aspect ratio fast structure tracking

    Ahmad, Ahmad; Schuh, Andreas; Rangelow, Ivo W. [Department of Microelectronic and Nanoelectronic Systems, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology Ilmenau University of Technology, Gustav-Kirchhoffstr. 1, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Improved imaging rates in Atomic Force Microscopes (AFM) are of high interest for disciplines such as life sciences and failure analysis of semiconductor wafers, where the sample topology shows high aspect ratios. Also, fast imaging is necessary to cover a large surface under investigation in reasonable times. Since AFMs are composed of mechanical components, they are associated with comparably low resonance frequencies that undermine the effort to increase the acquisition rates. In particular, high and steep structures are difficult to follow, which causes the cantilever to temporarily loose contact to or crash into the sample. Here, we report on a novel approach that does not affect the scanner dynamics, but adapts the lateral scanning speed of the scanner. The controller monitors the control error signal and, only when necessary, decreases the scan speed to allow the z-piezo more time to react to changes in the sample's topography. In this case, the overall imaging rate can be significantly increased, because a general scan speed trade-off decision is not needed and smooth areas are scanned fast. In contrast to methods trying to increase the z-piezo bandwidth, our method is a comparably simple approach that can be easily adapted to standard systems.

  13. Fast and Adaptive Lossless On-Board Hyperspectral Data Compression System for Space Applications

    Aranki, Nazeeh; Bakhshi, Alireza; Keymeulen, Didier; Klimesh, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Efficient on-board lossless hyperspectral data compression reduces the data volume necessary to meet NASA and DoD limited downlink capabilities. The techniques also improves signature extraction, object recognition and feature classification capabilities by providing exact reconstructed data on constrained downlink resources. At JPL a novel, adaptive and predictive technique for lossless compression of hyperspectral data was recently developed. This technique uses an adaptive filtering method and achieves a combination of low complexity and compression effectiveness that far exceeds state-of-the-art techniques currently in use. The JPL-developed 'Fast Lossless' algorithm requires no training data or other specific information about the nature of the spectral bands for a fixed instrument dynamic range. It is of low computational complexity and thus well-suited for implementation in hardware, which makes it practical for flight implementations of pushbroom instruments. A prototype of the compressor (and decompressor) of the algorithm is available in software, but this implementation may not meet speed and real-time requirements of some space applications. Hardware acceleration provides performance improvements of 10x-100x vs. the software implementation (about 1M samples/sec on a Pentium IV machine). This paper describes a hardware implementation of the JPL-developed 'Fast Lossless' compression algorithm on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The FPGA implementation targets the current state of the art FPGAs (Xilinx Virtex IV and V families) and compresses one sample every clock cycle to provide a fast and practical real-time solution for Space applications.

  14. Fast Adapting Ensemble: A New Algorithm for Mining Data Streams with Concept Drift

    Agustín Ortíz Díaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of large data streams in the presence of concept drifts is one of the main challenges in the field of data mining, particularly when the algorithms have to deal with concepts that disappear and then reappear. This paper presents a new algorithm, called Fast Adapting Ensemble (FAE, which adapts very quickly to both abrupt and gradual concept drifts, and has been specifically designed to deal with recurring concepts. FAE processes the learning examples in blocks of the same size, but it does not have to wait for the batch to be complete in order to adapt its base classification mechanism. FAE incorporates a drift detector to improve the handling of abrupt concept drifts and stores a set of inactive classifiers that represent old concepts, which are activated very quickly when these concepts reappear. We compare our new algorithm with various well-known learning algorithms, taking into account, common benchmark datasets. The experiments show promising results from the proposed algorithm (regarding accuracy and runtime, handling different types of concept drifts.

  15. A numerical adaptation of self-avoiding walk identities from the honeycomb to other 2D lattices

    Recently, Duminil-Copin and Smirnov proved a long-standing conjecture of Nienhuis that the connective constant of self-avoiding walks (SAWs) on the honeycomb lattice is √(2+√2). A key identity used in that proof depends on the existence of a parafermionic observable for SAWs on the honeycomb lattice. Despite the absence of a corresponding observable for SAWs on the square and triangular lattices, we show that in the limit of large lattices, some of the consequences observed on the honeycomb lattice persist on other lattices. This permits the accurate estimation, though not an exact evaluation, of certain critical amplitudes, as well as critical points, for these lattices. For the honeycomb lattice, an exact amplitude for loops is proved. (paper)

  16. A comparison of slow, uphill and fast, level walking on lower extremity biomechanics and tibiofemoral joint loading in obese and nonobese adults.

    Haight, Derek J; Lerner, Zachary F; Board, Wayne J; Browning, Raymond C

    2014-02-01

    We determined if slow, uphill walking (0.75 m/s, 6°) reduced tibiofemoral (TF) loading compared to faster, level walking (1.50 m/s) in obese and nonobese adults. We collected kinematic, kinetic, and electromyographic data as 9 moderately obese and 10 nonobese participants walked on a dual-belt instrumented treadmill. We used OpenSim to scale a musculoskeletal model and calculate joint kinematics, kinetics, muscle forces, and TF forces. Compressive TF forces were greater in the obese adults during both speed/grade combinations. During level walking, obese participants walked with a straighter leg than nonobese participants, resulting in early stance vasti muscle forces that were similar in the obese and nonobese participants. Early stance peak compressive TF forces were reduced by 23% in obese (2,352 to 1,811 N) and 35% in nonobese (1,994 to 1,303 N) individuals during slow, uphill walking compared to brisk level walking. Late stance peak TF forces were similar across speeds/grades, but were greater in obese (∼2,900 N) compared to nonobese (∼1,700 N) individuals. Smaller early stance TF loads and loading rates suggest that slow, uphill walking may be appropriate exercise for obese individuals at risk for musculoskeletal pathology or pain. PMID:24127395

  17. Fast binarized time-reversed adapted-perturbation (b-TRAP) optical focusing inside scattering media

    Ma, Cheng; Liu, Yan; Wang, Lihong V

    2015-01-01

    Light scattering inhibits high-resolution optical imaging, manipulation and therapy deep inside biological tissue by preventing focusing. To form deep foci, wavefront-shaping and time-reversal techniques that break the optical diffusion limit have been developed. For in vivo applications, such focusing must provide high gain, high speed, and a large number of spatial modes. However, none of the previous techniques meet these requirements simultaneously. Here, we overcome this challenge by rapidly measuring the perturbed optical field within a single camera exposure followed by adaptively time-reversing the phase-binarized perturbation. Consequently, a phase-conjugated wavefront is synthesized within a millisecond, two orders of magnitude shorter than the digitally achieved record. We demonstrated real-time focusing in dynamic scattering media, and extended laser speckle contrast imaging to new depths. The unprecedented combination of fast response, high gain, and large mode count makes this work a major strid...

  18. Fast-adaptive fiber-optic sensor for ultra-small vibration and deformation measurement

    Adaptive fiber-optic interferometer measuring system based on a dynamic hologram recorded in photorefractive CdTe crystal without applying an external electric field is developed. Vectorial mixing of two waves with different polarizations in the anisotropic diffraction geometry allows for the realization of linear regime of phase demodulation at the diffusion hologram. High sensitivity of the interferometer is achieved due to recording of the hologram in reflection geometry at high spatial frequencies in a crystal with sufficient concentration of photorefractive centers. The sensitivity obtained makes possible a broadband detection of ultra-small vibrations with amplitude of less then 0.1 nm. High cut-off frequency of the interferometer achieved using low-power light sources due to fast response of CdTe crystal allows one to eliminate temperature fluctuations and other industrial noises

  19. Fast simulation of transport and adaptive permeability estimation in porous media

    Berre, Inga

    2005-07-01

    The focus of the thesis is twofold: Both fast simulation of transport in porous media and adaptive estimation of permeability are considered. A short introduction that motivates the work on these topics is given in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2, the governing equations for one- and two-phase flow in porous media are presented. Overall numerical solution strategies for the two-phase flow model are also discussed briefly. The concepts of streamlines and time-of-flight are introduced in Chapter 3. Methods for computing streamlines and time-of-flight are also presented in this chapter. Subsequently, in Chapters 4 and 5, the focus is on simulation of transport in a time-of-flight perspective. In Chapter 4, transport of fluids along streamlines is considered. Chapter 5 introduces a different viewpoint based on the evolution of isocontours of the fluid saturation. While the first chapters focus on the forward problem, which consists in solving a mathematical model given the reservoir parameters, Chapters 6, 7 and 8 are devoted to the inverse problem of permeability estimation. An introduction to the problem of identifying spatial variability in reservoir permeability by inversion of dynamic production data is given in Chapter 6. In Chapter 7, adaptive multiscale strategies for permeability estimation are discussed. Subsequently, Chapter 8 presents a level-set approach for improving piecewise constant permeability representations. Finally, Chapter 9 summarizes the results obtained in the thesis; in addition, the chapter gives some recommendations and suggests directions for future work. Part II In Part II, the following papers are included in the order they were completed: Paper A: A Streamline Front Tracking Method for Two- and Three-Phase Flow Including Capillary Forces. I. Berre, H. K. Dahle, K. H. Karlsen, and H. F. Nordhaug. In Fluid flow and transport in porous media: mathematical and numerical treatment (South Hadley, MA, 2001), volume 295 of Contemp. Math., pages 49

  20. Fast Adaptive S-ALOHA Scheme for Event-driven Machine-to-Machine Communications

    Wu, Huasen; La, Richard J; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Youguang

    2012-01-01

    Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communication is now playing a market-changing role in a wide range of business world. However, in event-driven M2M communications, a large number of devices activate within a short period of time, which in turn causes high radio congestions and severe access delay. To solve this problem, we propose a Fast Adaptive S-ALOHA (FASA) scheme for M2M communication systems with bursty traffic. The statistics of consecutive idle and collision slots are used in FASA to accelerate the tracking process of network status, instead of observing in a single slot. Furthermore, the fast convergence property of FASA is guaranteed by using drift analysis. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed FASA scheme achieves near-optimal performance in reducing access delay, which outperforms that of traditional additive schemes such as PB-ALOHA. Moreover, compared to multiplicative schemes, FASA shows its robust performance even under heavy traffic load in addition to better delay performance.

  1. A service-oriented medical framework for fast and adaptive information delivery in mobile environment.

    Park, Eunjeong; Nam, Hyo Suk

    2009-11-01

    The need for fast treatment of patients in critical conditions motivates the use of mobile devices to provide prompt and consistent communication between hospitals and physicians. We propose a framework that supports ubiquitous access to medical systems using personalized mobile services and integrated medical systems. The proposed service-oriented medical framework provides dynamically composed services that are adapted to contextual variables such as the user's role, the network bandwidth, and resources available at mobile devices while supporting task allocation in distributed servers for massive resource-consuming services. It also manages accurate patient data by integrating local medical systems using medical information standards such as Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine and Health Level 7. We have demonstrated the effectiveness of our framework by building a prototype of context-based adaptation of computerized tomography image retrieval for acute stroke treatments, which allows images to be viewed on mobile devices with WiMax wireless network. The proposed medical framework reduces hospital delays of patients and facilitates treatments in the absence of medical specialists. PMID:19775976

  2. Fast Model Adaptation for Automated Section Classification in Electronic Medical Records.

    Ni, Jian; Delaney, Brian; Florian, Radu

    2015-01-01

    Medical information extraction is the automatic extraction of structured information from electronic medical records, where such information can be used for improving healthcare processes and medical decision making. In this paper, we study one important medical information extraction task called section classification. The objective of section classification is to automatically identify sections in a medical document and classify them into one of the pre-defined section types. Training section classification models typically requires large amounts of human labeled training data to achieve high accuracy. Annotating institution-specific data, however, can be both expensive and time-consuming; which poses a big hurdle for adapting a section classification model to new medical institutions. In this paper, we apply two advanced machine learning techniques, active learning and distant supervision, to reduce annotation cost and achieve fast model adaptation for automated section classification in electronic medical records. Our experiment results show that active learning reduces the annotation cost and time by more than 50%, and distant supervision can achieve good model accuracy using weakly labeled training data only. PMID:26262005

  3. GPU-based ultra-fast direct aperture optimization for online adaptive radiation therapy

    Online adaptive radiation therapy (ART) has great promise to significantly reduce normal tissue toxicity and/or improve tumor control through real-time treatment adaptations based on the current patient anatomy. However, the major technical obstacle for clinical realization of online ART, namely the inability to achieve real-time efficiency in treatment re-planning, has yet to be solved. To overcome this challenge, this paper presents our work on the implementation of an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) direct aperture optimization (DAO) algorithm on the graphics processing unit (GPU) based on our previous work on the CPU. We formulate the DAO problem as a large-scale convex programming problem, and use an exact method called the column generation approach to deal with its extremely large dimensionality on the GPU. Five 9-field prostate and five 5-field head-and-neck IMRT clinical cases with 5 x 5 mm2 beamlet size and 2.5 x 2.5 x 2.5 mm3 voxel size were tested to evaluate our algorithm on the GPU. It takes only 0.7-3.8 s for our implementation to generate high-quality treatment plans on an NVIDIA Tesla C1060 GPU card. Our work has therefore solved a major problem in developing ultra-fast (re-)planning technologies for online ART.

  4. Multi-atlas registration and adaptive hexahedral voxel discretization for fast bioluminescence tomography.

    Ren, Shenghan; Hu, Haihong; Li, Gen; Cao, Xu; Zhu, Shouping; Chen, Xueli; Liang, Jimin

    2016-04-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has been a valuable optical molecular imaging technique to non-invasively depict the cellular and molecular processes in living animals with high sensitivity and specificity. Due to the inherent ill-posedness of BLT, a priori information of anatomical structure is usually incorporated into the reconstruction. The structural information is usually provided by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In order to obtain better quantitative results, BLT reconstruction with heterogeneous tissues needs to segment the internal organs and discretize them into meshes with the finite element method (FEM). It is time-consuming and difficult to handle the segmentation and discretization problems. In this paper, we present a fast reconstruction method for BLT based on multi-atlas registration and adaptive voxel discretization to relieve the complicated data processing procedure involved in the hybrid BLT/CT system. A multi-atlas registration method is first adopted to estimate the internal organ distribution of the imaged animal. Then, the animal volume is adaptively discretized into hexahedral voxels, which are fed into FEM for the following BLT reconstruction. The proposed method is validated in both numerical simulation and an in vivo study. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can reconstruct the bioluminescence source efficiently with satisfactory accuracy. PMID:27446674

  5. Adaptive control of piezoelectric fast steering mirror for high precision tracking application

    A piezoelectric fast steering mirror (PFSM) is a complex, strong coupling nonlinear system that integrates optics, mechanics, electrics, and control. Due to the existence of hysteresis nonlinearity, mechanical resonance, and all kinds of disturbances, precise tracking control of a PFSM is a challenging task. This paper presents a comprehensive study of modeling, controller design, and simulation evaluation for a PFSM system. First a general model of a PFSM system integrating mechanical dynamics, electrical dynamics, and hysteresis nonlinearity is proposed, and then a robust adaptive controller is developed under both unknown hysteresis nonlinearities and parameter uncertainties. The parameters needed directly in the formulation of the controller are adaptively estimated. The proposed control law ensures the uniform boundedness of all signals in the closed-loop system. Furthermore, a stability analysis of the control system is performed to guarantee that the output tracking error converges to zero asymptotically. Finally, simulation tests with different motion trajectories are conducted to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. (paper)

  6. Multi-atlas registration and adaptive hexahedral voxel discretization for fast bioluminescence tomography

    Ren, Shenghan; Hu, Haihong; Li, Gen; Cao, Xu; Zhu, Shouping; Chen, Xueli; Liang, Jimin

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has been a valuable optical molecular imaging technique to non-invasively depict the cellular and molecular processes in living animals with high sensitivity and specificity. Due to the inherent ill-posedness of BLT, a priori information of anatomical structure is usually incorporated into the reconstruction. The structural information is usually provided by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In order to obtain better quantitative results, BLT reconstruction with heterogeneous tissues needs to segment the internal organs and discretize them into meshes with the finite element method (FEM). It is time-consuming and difficult to handle the segmentation and discretization problems. In this paper, we present a fast reconstruction method for BLT based on multi-atlas registration and adaptive voxel discretization to relieve the complicated data processing procedure involved in the hybrid BLT/CT system. A multi-atlas registration method is first adopted to estimate the internal organ distribution of the imaged animal. Then, the animal volume is adaptively discretized into hexahedral voxels, which are fed into FEM for the following BLT reconstruction. The proposed method is validated in both numerical simulation and an in vivo study. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can reconstruct the bioluminescence source efficiently with satisfactory accuracy.

  7. Reduced γ-γ time walk to below 50 ps using the multiplexed-start and multiplexed-stop fast-timing technique with LaBr3(Ce) detectors

    Régis, J.-M.; Saed-Samii, N.; Rudigier, M.; Ansari, S.; Dannhoff, M.; Esmaylzadeh, A.; Fransen, C.; Gerst, R.-B.; Jolie, J.; Karayonchev, V.; Müller-Gatermann, C.; Stegemann, S.

    2016-07-01

    The electronic γ-γ fast-timing technique using arrays consisting of many LaBr3(Ce) detectors is a powerful method to determine lifetimes of nuclear excited states with a lower limit of about 5 ps. This method requires the determination of the energy-dependent time walk of the zero time which is represented by the centroid of a prompt γ-γ time distribution. The full-energy peak versus full-energy peak prompt response difference which represents the linearly combined mean γ-γ time walk of a fast-timing array consisting of 8 LaBr3(Ce) detectors was measured using a standard 152Eu γ-ray source for the energy region of 40-1408 keV. The data were acquired using a "multiplexed-start and multiplexed-stop" analogue electronics circuitry and analysed by employing the generalized centroid difference method. Concerning the cylindrical 1.5 in.×1.5 in. LaBr3(Ce) crystals which are coupled to the Hamamatsu R9779 photomultiplier tubes, the best fast-timing array time resolution of 202(3) ps is obtained for the two prompt γ lines of 60Co by using the leading-edge timing principle. When using the zero-crossover timing principle the time resolution is degraded by up to 30%, dependent on the energy and the shaping delay time of the constant fraction discriminator model Ortec 935. The smallest γ-γ time walk to below 50 ps is obtained by using a shaping delay time of about 17 ns and an optimum "time-walk adjustment" needed for detector output pulses with amplitudes smaller than 400 mV.

  8. The adaptation of limb kinematics to increasing walking speeds in freely moving mice 129/Sv and C57BL/6.

    Serradj, Nadjet; Jamon, Marc

    2009-07-19

    The kinematics of locomotion was analyzed in two strains of great importance for the creation of mutated mice (C56BL/6 and 129/Sv). Different behavioral situations were used to trigger sequences of movement covering the whole range of velocities in the mice, and the variations of kinematic parameters were analyzed in relation with velocity. Both stride frequency and stride length contributed to the moving speed, but stride frequency was found to be the main contributor to the speed increase. A trot-gallop transition was detected at speed about 70 cm/s, in relation with a sharp shift in limb coordination. The results of this study were consistent with pieces of information previously published concerning the gait analyses of other strains, and provided an integrative view of the basic motor pattern of mice. On the other hand some qualitative differences were found in the movement characteristics of the two strains. The stride frequency showed a higher contribution to speed in 129/Sv than in C57BL/6. In addition, 129/Sv showed a phase shift in the forelimb and hindlimb, and a different position of the foot during the stance time that revealed a different gait and body position during walking. Overall, 129/Sv moved at a slower speed than C57BL/6 in any behavioral situation. This difference was related to a basal lower level of motor activity. The possibility that an alteration in the dopamine circuit was responsible for the different movement pattern in 129/Sv is discussed. PMID:19428617

  9. A Fast Adaptive Artificial Neural Network Controller for Flexible Link Manipulators

    Amin Riad Maouche

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a hybrid approach to the problem of controlling flexible link manipulators in the dynamic phase of the trajectory. A flexible beam/arm is an appealing option for civil and military applications, such as space-based robot manipulators. However, flexibility brings with it unwanted oscillations and severe chattering which may even lead to an unstable system. To tackle these challenges, a novel control architecture scheme is presented. First, a neural network controller based on the robot’s dynamic equation of motion is elaborated. Its aim is to produce a fast and stable control of the joint position and velocity and damp the vibration of each arm. Then, an adaptive Cerebellar Model Articulation Controller (CMAC is implemented to balance unmodeled dynamics, enhancing the precision of the control. Efficiency of the new controller obtained is tested on a two-link flexible manipulator. Simulation results on a dynamic trajectory with a sinusoidal form show the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy.

  10. Adaptation of fast responding power supply for radial position control in SST-1

    A high current, fast responding power supply was installed in 2005 for vertical stabilization of elongated plasmas in SST-1 tokamak. Presently, during initial experiments of SST-1 tokamak the need for radial control during current build-up was envisaged. For this purpose the existing power supply was suitable and the same was re-commissioned and control adaptations were carried as per experimental requirements. This paper highlights the capabilities of the power supply and details the modifications in the control interfaces and test programs for the radial control purpose. Details of the operation of the power supply along with control interfaces with performance measurements are provided. The re-commissioning provided an opportunity in the trouble shooting methods and sequential operation of the system. With the operational use on the actual coil the mutual effects are understood better and appropriate test programs are prepared. The power supply provided satisfactory performance for the intended use. In additional the system is suitable to simulate a plasma current loop to enable the testing and calibration of Rogowski coil used for plasma current measurement. (author)

  11. FAST

    Zuidmeer-Jongejan, Laurian; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Poulsen, Lars K.;

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The FAST project (Food Allergy Specific Immunotherapy) aims at the development of safe and effective treatment of food allergies, targeting prevalent, persistent and severe allergy to fish and peach. Classical allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), using subcutaneous injections with...... aqueous food extracts may be effective but has proven to be accompanied by too many anaphylactic side-effects. FAST aims to develop a safe alternative by replacing food extracts with hypoallergenic recombinant major allergens as the active ingredients of SIT. Both severe fish and peach allergy are caused...... lower their threshold for fish or peach intake, thereby decreasing their anxiety and dependence on rescue medication....

  12. Endocrine response to realimentation in young northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris): Indications for development of fasting adaptation.

    Dailey, Rachael E; Fontaine, Christine M; Avery, Julie P

    2016-09-01

    Most organisms undergo changes in their environment, both predictably and unpredictably, which require them to alter priorities in nutrient allocation with regards to food availability. Species that more predictably encounter extended periods of limited food resources or intake while mitigating the negative effects of starvation are considered to be fasting adapted. Northern elephant seals (NES) are one such species and routinely undergo extended periods of fasting for breeding, molting, as well as a post-weaning fast at 6-8weeks of age. However, during unusual times of nutritional deprivation, animals may enter stage III fasting. While fasting and foraging in this species has been extensively studied, realimentation following fasting beyond normal life history parameters has not been investigated. In this study, changes in ghrelin, growth hormone (GH), and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I were compared across 8weeks of realimentation following emaciation in three age classes: neonates, post-molt pups, and yearlings. Longitudinal changes in hormone profiles indicate that neonate and post-molt pups are slow to recover mass and positive energy balance despite an energy dense diet fed at 10% body mass. In addition, ghrelin and GH concentrations remained elevated in post-molt pups compared to other age classes. Changes in hormone concentrations early in realimentation indicate that yearling animals recover more rapidly from periods of nutritional deprivation than do younger animals. Overall, this suggests that the ability to regulate metabolic homeostasis with regards to nutrient allocation may develop over time, even in a species that is considered to be fasting adapted. PMID:27288636

  13. Adaptive Control of Active Balancing System for a Fast Speed-varying Jeffcott Rotor with Actuator Time Delay

    HU Bing; FANG Zhi-chu

    2008-01-01

    Due to actuator time delay existing in an adaptive control of the active balancing system for a fastspeed-varying Jeffcott rotor, if an unsynchronized control force (correction imbalance) is applied to the system,it may lead to degradation in control efficiency and instability of the control system. In order to avoid theseshortcomings, a simple adaptive controller was designed for a strictly positive real rotor system with actuatortime delay, then a Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional was constructed after an appropriate transform of this sys-tem model, the stability conditions of this adaptive control system with actuator time delay were derived. Afteradding a filter function, the active balancing system for the fast speed-varying Jeffcott rotor with actuator timedelay can easily be converted to a strictly positive real system, and thus it can use the above adaptive controllersatisfying the stability conditions. Finally, numerical simulations show that the adaptive controller proposedworks very well to perform the active balancing for the fast speed-varying Jeffcott rotor with actuator timedelay.

  14. Comparison of heart rate responses. Water walking versus treadmill walking.

    Whitley, J D; Schoene, L L

    1987-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare heart rate responses to water walking versus treadmill walking to determine whether the responses were of sufficient magnitude to elicit cardiorespiratory training effects. The heart rates of 12 healthy, female college students were measured immediately after walking in waist-deep water and on a treadmill at the same distance, durations, and speeds (2.55, 2.77, 3.02, and 3.31 km/hr). A significant increase in heart rate with increased speeds resulted from water walking (p less than .05); from rest to the fastest speed, it was 135% (96 bpm). For treadmill walking, the increase of 19% (13 bpm) was not significant. The heart rates for the water condition were significantly higher (p less than .05) at each speed. These findings indicate that water walking could serve as an effective exercise mode, for example, for cardiorespiratory fitness for individuals who are unable to perform such weight-bearing activities as jogging, fast walking, cycling, and dancing. PMID:3659133

  15. Tracking fast changing non-stationary distributions with a topologically adaptive neural network: Application to video tracking

    Drumea, Georges,; Frezza-Buet, Hervé

    2007-01-01

    International audience In this paper, an original method named GNG-T, extended from GNG-U algorithm by Fritzke is presented. The method performs continuously vector quantization over a distribution that changes over time. It deals with both sudden changes and continuous ones, and is thus suited for video tracking framework, where continuous tracking is required as well as fast adaptation to incoming and outgoing people. The central mechanism relies on the management of quantization resolut...

  16. Does gene flow constrain adaptive divergence or vice versa? A test using ecomorphology and sexual isolation in Timema cristinae walking-sticks.

    Nosil, P; Crespi, B J

    2004-01-01

    Population differentiation often reflects a balance between divergent natural selection and the opportunity for homogenizing gene flow to erode the effects of selection. However, during ecological speciation, trait divergence results in reproductive isolation and becomes a cause, rather than a consequence, of reductions in gene flow. To assess both the causes and the reproductive consequences of morphological differentiation, we examined morphological divergence and sexual isolation among 17 populations of Timema cristinae walking-sticks. Individuals from populations adapted to using Adenostoma as a host plant tended to exhibit smaller overall body size, wide heads, and short legs relative to individuals using Ceonothus as a host. However, there was also significant variation in morphology among populations within host-plant species. Mean trait values for each single population could be reliably predicted based upon host-plant used and the potential for homogenizing gene flow, inferred from the size of the neighboring population using the alternate host and mitochondrial DNA estimates of gene flow. Morphology did not influence the probability of copulation in between-population mating trials. Thus, morphological divergence is facilitated by reductions in gene flow, but does not cause reductions in gene flow via the evolution of sexual isolation. Combined with rearing data indicating that size and shape have a partial genetic basis, evidence for parallel origins of the host-associated forms, and inferences from functional morphology, these results indicate that morphological divergence in T. cristinae reflects a balance between the effects of host-specific natural selection and gene flow. Our findings illustrate how data on mating preferences can help determine the causal associations between trait divergence and levels of gene flow. PMID:15058723

  17. A Fast, Locally Adaptive, Interactive Retrieval Algorithm for the Analysis of DIAL Measurements

    Samarov, D. V.; Rogers, R.; Hair, J. W.; Douglass, K. O.; Plusquellic, D.

    2010-12-01

    Differential absorption light detection and ranging (DIAL) is a laser-based tool which is used for remote, range-resolved measurement of particular gases in the atmosphere, such as carbon-dioxide and methane. In many instances it is of interest to study how these gases are distributed over a region such as a landfill, factory, or farm. While a single DIAL measurement only tells us about the distribution of a gas along a single path, a sequence of consecutive measurements provides us with information on how that gas is distributed over a region, making DIAL a natural choice for such studies. DIAL measurements present a number of interesting challenges; first, in order to convert the raw data to concentration it is necessary to estimate the derivative along the path of the measurement. Second, as the distribution of gases across a region can be highly heterogeneous it is important that the spatial nature of the measurements be taken into account. Finally, since it is common for the set of collected measurements to be quite large it is important for the method to be computationally efficient. Existing work based on Local Polynomial Regression (LPR) has been developed which addresses the first two issues, but the issue of computational speed remains an open problem. In addition to the latter, another desirable property is to allow user input into the algorithm. In this talk we present a novel method based on LPR which utilizes a variant of the RODEO algorithm to provide a fast, locally adaptive and interactive approach to the analysis of DIAL measurements. This methodology is motivated by and applied to several simulated examples and a study out of NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) looking at the estimation of aerosol extinction in the atmosphere. A comparison study of our method against several other algorithms is also presented. References Chaudhuri, P., Marron, J.S., Scale-space view of curve estimation, Annals of Statistics 28 (2000) 408-428. Duong, T., Cowling

  18. Revision of FMM-Yukawa: An adaptive fast multipole method for screened Coulomb interactions

    Zhang, Bo; Huang, Jingfang; Pitsianis, Nikos P.; Sun, Xiaobai

    2010-12-01

    FMM-YUKAWA is a mathematical software package primarily for rapid evaluation of the screened Coulomb interactions of N particles in three dimensional space. Since its release, we have revised and re-organized the data structure, software architecture, and user interface, for the purpose of enabling more flexible, broader and easier use of the package. The package and its documentation are available at http://www.fastmultipole.org/, along with a few other closely related mathematical software packages. New version program summaryProgram title: FMM-Yukawa Catalogue identifier: AEEQ_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEEQ_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU GPL 2.0 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 78 704 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 854 265 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN 77, FORTRAN 90, and C. Requires gcc and gfortran version 4.4.3 or later Computer: All Operating system: Any Classification: 4.8, 4.12 Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEEQ_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 180 (2009) 2331 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: To evaluate the screened Coulomb potential and force field of N charged particles, and to evaluate a convolution type integral where the Green's function is the fundamental solution of the modified Helmholtz equation. Solution method: The new version of fast multipole method (FMM) that diagonalizes the multipole-to-local translation operator is applied with the tree structure adaptive to sample particle locations. Reasons for new version: To handle much larger particle ensembles, to enable the iterative use of the subroutines in a solver, and to remove potential contention in assignments for parallelization. Summary of revisions: The software package FMM-Yukawa has been

  19. A new adaptive fast motion estimation algorithm based on local motion similarity degree (LMSD)

    LIU Long; HAN Chongzhao; BAI Yan

    2005-01-01

    In the motion vector field adaptive search technique (MVFAST) and the predictive motion vector field adaptive search technique (PMVFAST), the size of the largest motion vector from the three adjacent blocks (left, top, top-right) is compared with the threshold to select different search scheme. But a suitable search center and search pattern will not be selected in the adaptive search technique when the adjacent motion vectors are not coherent in local region. This paper presents an efficient adaptive search algorithm. The motion vector variation degree (MVVD) is considered a reasonable factor for adaptive search selection. By the relationship between local motion similarity degree (LMSD) and the variation degree of motion vector (MVVD), the motion vectors are classified as three categories according to corresponding LMSD; then different proposed search schemes are adopted for motion estimation. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has a significant computational speedup compared with MVFAST and PMVFAST algorithms, and offers a similar, even better performance.

  20. 15 Gbit/s indoor optical wireless systems employing fast adaptation and imaging reception in a realistic environment

    Alsaadi, Fuad E.

    2016-03-01

    Optical wireless systems are promising candidates for next-generation indoor communication networks. Optical wireless technology offers freedom from spectrum regulations and, compared to current radio-frequency networks, higher data rates and increased security. This paper presents a fast adaptation method for multibeam angle and delay adaptation systems and a new spot-diffusing geometry, and also considers restrictions needed for complying with eye safety regulations. The fast adaptation algorithm reduces the computational load required to reconfigure the transmitter in the case of transmitter and/or receiver mobility. The beam clustering approach enables the transmitter to assign power to spots within the pixel's field of view (FOV) and increases the number of such spots. Thus, if the power per spot is restricted to comply with eye safety standards, the new approach, in which more spots are visible within the FOV of the pixel, leads to enhanced signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Simulation results demonstrate that the techniques proposed in this paper lead to SNR improvements that enable reliable operation at data rates as high as 15 Gbit/s. These results are based on simulation and not on actual measurements or experiments.

  1. Adaptive Threshold Clipper Combining Receiver for Fast Frequency Hopping Systems during Partial-Band Noise Jamming

    肖立民; 许希斌; 姚彦

    2001-01-01

    Diversity combining technologies are analyzed for fastfrequency-hopping spread spectrum systems during partial-band noise jamming to develop a novel combining receiver called an Adaptive Threshold Clipper Combining Receiver (ATCCR). The optimal clipping level for an ATCCR is analyzed, computed, and compared with several other diversity combining technologies. Since the ATCCR can estimate the power of the jamming and the number of jammed frequency cells to adaptively adjust the clipper's threshold, the system performance using the adaptive threshold clipper combining technique can be greatly improved.

  2. Fast and Flexible Tracking and Mitigating a Jamming Signal with an Adaptive Notch Filter

    BORIO DANIELE; O'DRISCOLL CILLIAN; Fortuny Guasch, Joaquim

    2014-01-01

    GNSS jammers are small portable devices able to broadcast disruptive interference and overpower the much weaker GNSS signals. The authors consider the use of an adaptive notch filter as an effective solution for mitigating jamming effects.

  3. Fast Spectral Velocity Estimation Using Adaptive Techniques: In-Vivo Results

    Gran, Fredrik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Udesen, Jesper; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    Adaptive spectral estimation techniques are known to provide good spectral resolution and contrast even when the observation window(OW) is very sbort. In this paper two adaptive techniques are tested and compared to the averaged perlodogram (Welch) for blood velocity estimation. The Blood Power...... spectral Capon (BPC) method is based on a standard minimum variance technique adapted to account for both averaging over slowtime and depth. The Blood Amplitude and Phase Estimation technique (BAPES) is based on finding a set of matched filters (one for each velocity component of interest) and filtering...... the blood process over slow-time and averaging over depth to find the power spectral density estimate. In this paper, the two adaptive methods are explained, and performance Is assessed in controlled steady How experiments and in-vivo measurements. The three methods were tested on a circulating How...

  4. Role of PGC-1{alpha} in exercise and fasting induced adaptations in mouse liver

    Haase, Tobias Nørresø; Jørgensen, Stine Ringholm; Leick, Lotte;

    2011-01-01

    The transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-¿ coactivator (PGC)-1a plays a role in regulation of several metabolic pathways. By use of whole body PGC-1a knockout (KO) mice we investigated the role of PGC-1a in fasting, acute exercise and exercise training...... induced regulation of key proteins in gluconeogenesis and metabolism in the liver. In both wild type (WT) and PGC-1a KO mice liver, the mRNA content of the gluconeogenic proteins glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) was upregulated during fasting. Pyruvate...... carboxylase (PC) remained unchanged after fasting in WT mice, but was upregulated in PGC-1a KO mice. In response to a single exercise bout G6Pase mRNA was upregulated in both genotypes, whereas no significant changes were detected in PEPCK or PC mRNA. While G6Pase and PC protein remained unchanged, liver...

  5. Physiological adaptive indicators in fasted neonate broiler chicks in response to calcium gluconate injection.

    Khosravinia, H

    2016-06-01

    Four hundred and eighty mixed-sex broiler chicks aged 3 h after hatching were allotted according to a completely random design in a 6 × 2 × 2 factorial schedule into two groups of 12 replications of 20 chicks each. The main experimental factors were fasting for 0, 6, 12, 24, 36 and 48 h after chick placement and calcium gluconate (Ca-glu) injection (0 and 0.6 ml). Live body weight (BW) of chicks decreased linearly (Y = 43.36-0.109BW0 h , r(2)  = 0.876) as neonatal fasting extended. Injection of 0.6 ml Ca-glu at 3 h post-hatching did not affect weight loss of chicks. Yolk residuals (YR) utilized linearly (Y = 5.75-0.062YR, r(2)  = 0.956) by 0.062 g/h in neonate fasted chicks up to 48 h, showing no effect of Ca-glu injection. Neonatal fasting periods longer than 12 h increased liver weight (p < 0.05). The mean absolute and proportional (% of BW0 h ) breast and leg weight were reduced linearly as neonatal fasting extended (p < 0.05). Serum glucose concentration increased up to 6 h and then reduced linearly to 150 mg/dl after 48-h fasting. The Ca-glu treatment influenced serum glucose level for a short period up to 6 h of fasting. Serum Ca concentration sharply increased up to threefolds in the birds received Ca-glu injection resulting in acute hypercalcemia, then decreased to the initial level after 24-h feed withdrawal (p < 0.05). The mean serum level for creatinine, uric acid, cholesterol, HDL, albumins and total proteins significantly increased during the fasting periods of 6 to 48 h and significantly elevated in the birds receiving 0.6-ml Ca-glu injection compared with the non-treated chicks (p < 0.05). It was concluded that subcutaneous administration of 0.6 ml Ca-glu in the chick's neck did not suitably support the increased metabolic demands for glucose and calcium in feed-deprived neonate chicks. PMID:26344414

  6. Fast Muting Adaptation for LTE-A HetNets with Remote Radio Heads

    Soret, Beatriz; Pedersen, Klaus I.; Kolding, Troels Emil; Kroener, Hans; Maniatis, Ioannis

    Management in macro-RRH cases is developed. Based on minimal information collection, we propose an algorithm that adjusts the ABS ratio on a fast basis, aiming at balancing the instantaneous load betweeen the macro and the RRH layer. Performance results with bursty traffic and low and high load conditions...

  7. Complexity reduction in the H.264/AVC using highly adaptive fast mode decision based on macroblock motion activity

    Abdellah, Skoudarli; Mokhtar, Nibouche; Amina, Serir

    2015-11-01

    The H.264/AVC video coding standard is used in a wide range of applications from video conferencing to high-definition television according to its high compression efficiency. This efficiency is mainly acquired from the newly allowed prediction schemes including variable block modes. However, these schemes require a high complexity to select the optimal mode. Consequently, complexity reduction in the H.264/AVC encoder has recently become a very challenging task in the video compression domain, especially when implementing the encoder in real-time applications. Fast mode decision algorithms play an important role in reducing the overall complexity of the encoder. In this paper, we propose an adaptive fast intermode algorithm based on motion activity, temporal stationarity, and spatial homogeneity. This algorithm predicts the motion activity of the current macroblock from its neighboring blocks and identifies temporal stationary regions and spatially homogeneous regions using adaptive threshold values based on content video features. Extensive experimental work has been done in high profile, and results show that the proposed source-coding algorithm effectively reduces the computational complexity by 53.18% on average compared with the reference software encoder, while maintaining the high-coding efficiency of H.264/AVC by incurring only 0.097 dB in total peak signal-to-noise ratio and 0.228% increment on the total bit rate.

  8. Different Transcriptional Responses from Slow and Fast Growth Rate Strains of Listeria monocytogenes Adapted to Low Temperature

    Cordero, Ninoska; Maza, Felipe; Navea-Perez, Helen; Aravena, Andrés; Marquez-Fontt, Bárbara; Navarrete, Paola; Figueroa, Guillermo; González, Mauricio; Latorre, Mauricio; Reyes-Jara, Angélica

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes has become one of the principal foodborne pathogens worldwide. The capacity of this bacterium to grow at low temperatures has opened an interesting field of study in terms of the identification and classification of new strains of L. monocytogenes with different growth capacities at low temperatures. We determined the growth rate at 8°C of 110 strains of L. monocytogenes isolated from different food matrices. We identified a group of slow and fast strains according to their growth rate at 8°C and performed a global transcriptomic assay in strains previously adapted to low temperature. We then identified shared and specific transcriptional mechanisms, metabolic and cellular processes of both groups; bacterial motility was the principal process capable of differentiating the adaptation capacity of L. monocytogenes strains with different ranges of tolerance to low temperatures. Strains belonging to the fast group were less motile, which may allow these strains to achieve a greater rate of proliferation at low temperature. PMID:26973610

  9. The Joys and Terrors of Fast Adaptation: New findings elucidate antibiotic resistance and natural selection

    Roth, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Experiments of Pränting and Andersson demonstrate how bacteria adapt to the growth limitation caused by antibiotic resistance mutations. The process of adaptation relies on gene copy number changes that arise at high rates, including duplications (10−4/cell/generation), amplifications (10−2/cell/generation) and mutant copy loss (10−2/cell/division). Reversible increases in copy number improve growth by small steps and provide more targets for rare sequence alterations (10−9/cell/division) tha...

  10. Fast heating and cooling in nanoimprint using a spring-loaded adapter in a preheated press

    Schift, Helmut; Bellini, Sandro; Gobrecht, Jens;

    2007-01-01

    By using a spring-loaded adapter, instant heating and cooling of wafer-type substrates was implemented in standard hot embossing equipment. This was possible by using the well-known concept of a clamped stack of stamp and substrate, pre-assembled in an alignment fixture. A number of thermoplastic...

  11. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C.; Markley, John L.

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-13C, U-15N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of 1H, 13C, and 15N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use.

  12. Detection of trichothecene producing Fusarium spp. by PCR: adaptation, validation and application to fast food

    Antonella Agodi; Martina Barchitta; Margherita Ferrante; Salvatore Sciacca; Ludwig Niessen

    2005-01-01

    Background. Food contamination by trichothecene mycotoxins is considered to be an emerging public health problem. The aim of this study was to validate a rapid sonification protocol, previously set up for cereal Fusarium DNA extraction from fast food samples, produced by a centre for research and development in the food industry in Catania, Sicily, and to validate it for a diagnostic PCR assay targeted at tri5, the key gene of trichothecene biosynthesis.&...

  13. Generation of fast neturon spectra using an adaptive Gauss-Kronrod Quadrature algorithm

    Triplett, Brian Scott

    A lattice physics calculation is often the first step in analyzing a nuclear reactor. This calculation condenses regions of the reactor into average parameters (i.e., group constants) that can be used in coarser full-core, time-dependent calculations. This work presents a high-fidelity deterministic method for calculating the neutron energy spectrum in an infinite medium. The spectrum resulting from this calculation can be used to generate accurate group constants. This method includes a numerical algorithm based on Gauss-Kronrod Quadrature to determine the neutron transfer source to a given energy while controlling numerical error. This algorithm was implemented in a pointwise transport solver program called Pointwise Fast Spectrum Generator (PWFSG). PWFSG was benchmarked against the Monte Carlo program MCNP and another pointwise spectrum generation program, CENTRM, for a set of fast reactor infinite medium example cases. PWFSG showed good agreement with MCNP, yielding coefficients of determination above 98% for all example cases. In addition, PWFSG had 6 to 8 times lower flux estimation error than CENTRM in the cases examined. With run-times comparable to CENTRM, PWFSG represents a robust set of methods for generation of fast neutron spectra with increased accuracy without increased computational cost.

  14. Research on fast real-time adaptive audio mixing in multimedia conference

    FAN Xing; GU Wei-kang; YE Xiu-qing

    2005-01-01

    In multimedia conference, the capability of audio processing is basic and requires more for real-time criteria. In this article, we categorize and analyze the schemes, and provide several multipoint speech audio mixing schemes using weighted algorithm, which meet the demand of practical needs for real-time multipoint speech mixing, for which the ASW and AEW schemes are especially recommended. Applying the adaptive algorithms, the high-performance schemes we provide do not use the saturation operation widely used in multimedia processing. Therefore, no additional noise will be added to the output. The above adaptive algorithms have relatively low computational complexity and good hearing perceptibility. The schemes are designed for parallel processing, and can be easily implemented with hardware, such as DSPs, and widely applied in multimedia conference systems.

  15. Adaptive prediction in digitally controlled buck converter with fast load transient response

    Lee, TLA; Chan, PCH

    2012-01-01

    An adaptive prediction scheme based on linear extrapolation for digitally controlled voltage-mode buck-type switching converter is presented. A major drawback of conventional digitally controlled switching converters is bandwidth limitation due to the additional phase lag in the digital feedback control loop. By predicting the future error voltage, the ADC sampling time delay is compensated in order to achieve a higher bandwidth even with a modest sampling rate. Both simulation and measuremen...

  16. Wavelet multiresolution analyses adapted for the fast solution of boundary value ordinary differential equations

    Jawerth, Bjoern; Sweldens, Wim

    1993-01-01

    We present ideas on how to use wavelets in the solution of boundary value ordinary differential equations. Rather than using classical wavelets, we adapt their construction so that they become (bi)orthogonal with respect to the inner product defined by the operator. The stiffness matrix in a Galerkin method then becomes diagonal and can thus be trivially inverted. We show how one can construct an O(N) algorithm for various constant and variable coefficient operators.

  17. Amplifying effect of a release mechanism for fast adaptation in the hair bundle.

    Sul, Bora; Iwasa, Kuni H

    2009-07-01

    A "release" mechanism, which has been experimentally observed as the fast component in the hair bundle's response to mechanical stimulation, appears similar to common mechanical relaxation with a damping effect. This observation is puzzling because such a response is expected to have an amplifying role in the mechanoelectrical transduction process in hair cells. Here it is shown that a release mechanism can indeed have a role in amplification, if it is associated with negative stiffness due to the gating of the mechonoelectric transducer channel. PMID:19603855

  18. Life in the Fast Lane: The Evolution of an Adaptive Vehicle Control System

    Jochem, Todd; Pomerleau, Dean

    1996-01-01

    Giving robots the ability to operate in the real world has been, and continues to be, one of the most difficult tasks in AI research. Since 1987, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have been investigating one such task. Their research has been focused on using adaptive, vision-based systems to increase the driving performance of the Navlab line of on-road mobile robots. This research has led to the development of a neural network system that can learn to drive on many road types simply...

  19. A Modified Fast Approximated Power Iteration Subspace Tracking Method for Space-Time Adaptive Processing

    Yang Zhiwei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a subspace-tracking-based space-time adaptive processing technique for airborne radar applications. By applying a modified approximated power iteration subspace tracing algorithm, the principal subspace in which the clutter-plus-interference reside is estimated. Therefore, the moving targets are detected by projecting the data on the minor subspace which is orthogonal to the principal subspace. The proposed approach overcomes the shortcomings of the existing methods and has satisfactory performance. Simulation results confirm that the performance improvement is achieved at very small secondary sample support, a feature that is particularly attractive for applications in heterogeneous environments.

  20. Fast Fourier and Wavelet Transforms for Wavefront Reconstruction in Adaptive Optics

    Dowla, F U; Brase, J M; Olivier, S S

    2000-07-28

    Wavefront reconstruction techniques using the least-squares estimators are computationally quite expensive. We compare wavelet and Fourier transforms techniques in addressing the computation issues of wavefront reconstruction in adaptive optics. It is shown that because the Fourier approach is not simply a numerical approximation technique unlike the wavelet method, the Fourier approach might have advantages in terms of numerical accuracy. However, strictly from a numerical computations viewpoint, the wavelet approximation method might have advantage in terms of speed. To optimize the wavelet method, a statistical study might be necessary to use the best basis functions or ''approximation tree.''

  1. Collaborative Software Development in Support of Fast Adaptive AeroSpace Tools (FAAST)

    Kleb, William L.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Park, Michael A.; Wood, William A.

    2003-01-01

    A collaborative software development approach is described. The software product is an adaptation of proven computational capabilities combined with new capabilities to form the Agency's next generation aerothermodynamic and aerodynamic analysis and design tools. To efficiently produce a cohesive, robust, and extensible software suite, the approach uses agile software development techniques; specifically, project retrospectives, the Scrum status meeting format, and a subset of Extreme Programming's coding practices are employed. Examples are provided which demonstrate the substantial benefits derived from employing these practices. Also included is a discussion of issues encountered when porting legacy Fortran 77 code to Fortran 95 and a Fortran 95 coding standard.

  2. Complementarity and quantum walks

    We show that quantum walks interpolate between a coherent 'wave walk' and a random walk depending on how strongly the walker's coin state is measured; i.e., the quantum walk exhibits the quintessentially quantum property of complementarity, which is manifested as a tradeoff between knowledge of which path the walker takes vs the sharpness of the interference pattern. A physical implementation of a quantum walk (the quantum quincunx) should thus have an identifiable walker and the capacity to demonstrate the interpolation between wave walk and random walk depending on the strength of measurement

  3. Target Localization by Resolving the Time Synchronization Problem in Bistatic Radar Systems Using Space Fast-Time Adaptive Processor

    D. Madurasinghe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The proposed technique allows the radar receiver to accurately estimate the range of a large number of targets using a transmitter of opportunity as long as the location of the transmitter is known. The technique does not depend on the use of communication satellites or GPS systems, instead it relies on the availability of the direct transmit copy of the signal from the transmitter and the reflected paths off the various targets. An array-based space-fast time adaptive processor is implemented in order to estimate the path difference between the direct signal and the delayed signal, which bounces off the target. This procedure allows us to estimate the target distance as well as bearing.

  4. GPU-based ultra-fast direct aperture optimization for online adaptive radiation therapy

    Men, Chunhua; Jiang, Steve B

    2010-01-01

    Online adaptive radiation therapy (ART) has great promise to significantly reduce normal tissue toxicity and/or improve tumor control through real-time treatment adaptations based on the current patient anatomy. However, the major technical obstacle for clinical realization of online ART, namely the inability to achieve real-time efficiency in treatment re-planning, has yet to be solved. To overcome this challenge, this paper presents our work on the implementation of an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) direct aperture optimization (DAO) algorithm on graphics processing unit (GPU) based on our previous work on CPU. We formulate the DAO problem as a large-scale convex programming problem, and use an exact method called column generation approach to deal with its extremely large dimensionality on GPU. Five 9-field prostate and five 5-field head-and-neck IMRT clinical cases with 5\\times5 mm2 beamlet size and 2.5\\times2.5\\times2.5 mm3 voxel size were used to evaluate our algorithm on GPU. It takes onl...

  5. SIRT1 Gain of Function Does Not Mimic or Enhance the Adaptations to Intermittent Fasting

    Marie Boutant

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Caloric restriction (CR has been shown to prevent the onset of insulin resistance and to delay age-related physiological decline in mammalian organisms. SIRT1, a NAD+-dependent deacetylase enzyme, has been suggested to mediate the adaptive responses to CR, leading to the speculation that SIRT1 activation could be therapeutically used as a CR-mimetic strategy. Here, we used a mouse model of moderate SIRT1 overexpression to test whether SIRT1 gain of function could mimic or boost the metabolic benefits induced by every-other-day feeding (EODF. Our results indicate that SIRT1 transgenesis does not affect the ability of EODF to decrease adiposity and improve insulin sensitivity. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that SIRT1 transgenesis and EODF promote very distinct adaptations in individual tissues, some of which can be even be metabolically opposite, as in brown adipose tissue. Therefore, whereas SIRT1 overexpression and CR both improve glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity, the etiologies of these benefits are largely different.

  6. SIRT1 Gain of Function Does Not Mimic or Enhance the Adaptations to Intermittent Fasting.

    Boutant, Marie; Kulkarni, Sameer S; Joffraud, Magali; Raymond, Frédéric; Métairon, Sylviane; Descombes, Patrick; Cantó, Carles

    2016-03-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to prevent the onset of insulin resistance and to delay age-related physiological decline in mammalian organisms. SIRT1, a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase enzyme, has been suggested to mediate the adaptive responses to CR, leading to the speculation that SIRT1 activation could be therapeutically used as a CR-mimetic strategy. Here, we used a mouse model of moderate SIRT1 overexpression to test whether SIRT1 gain of function could mimic or boost the metabolic benefits induced by every-other-day feeding (EODF). Our results indicate that SIRT1 transgenesis does not affect the ability of EODF to decrease adiposity and improve insulin sensitivity. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that SIRT1 transgenesis and EODF promote very distinct adaptations in individual tissues, some of which can be even be metabolically opposite, as in brown adipose tissue. Therefore, whereas SIRT1 overexpression and CR both improve glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity, the etiologies of these benefits are largely different. PMID:26923584

  7. Adaptation and performance of the Cartesian coordinates fast multipole method for nanomagnetic simulations

    An implementation of the fast multiple method (FMM) is performed for magnetic systems with long-ranged dipolar interactions. Expansion in spherical harmonics of the original FMM is replaced by expansion of polynomials in Cartesian coordinates, which is considerably simpler. Under open boundary conditions, an expression for multipole moments of point dipoles in a cell is derived. These make the program appropriate for nanomagnetic simulations, including magnetic nanoparticles and ferrofluids. The performance is optimized in terms of cell size and parameter set (expansion order and opening angle) and the trade off between computing time and accuracy is quantitatively studied. A rule of thumb is proposed to decide the appropriate average number of dipoles in the smallest cells, and an optimal choice of parameter set is suggested. Finally, the superiority of Cartesian coordinate FMM is demonstrated by comparison to spherical harmonics FMM and FFT.

  8. Adaptation and Performance of the Cartesian Coordinates Fast Multipole Method for Nanomagnetic Simulations

    Zhang, Wen

    2008-01-01

    An implementation of the fast multiple method (FMM) is performed for magnetic systems with long-ranged dipolar interactions. Expansion in spherical harmonics of the original FMM is replaced by expansion of polynomials in cartesian coordinates, which is considerably simpler. Under open boundary conditions, an expression for multipole moments of point dipoles in a cell is derived. These make the program appropriate for nanomagnetic simulations, including magnetic nanoparticles and ferrofluids. The performance is optimized in terms of cell size and parameter set (expansion order and opening angle) and trade off between computing time and accuracy is quantitatively studied. A rule of thumb is proposed to decide the average number of dipoles in the smallest cells, and an optimal choice of parameter set is suggested.

  9. Fire-Walking

    Willey, David

    2010-01-01

    This article gives a brief history of fire-walking and then deals with the physics behind fire-walking. The author has performed approximately 50 fire-walks, took the data for the world's hottest fire-walk and was, at one time, a world record holder for the longest fire-walk (www.dwilley.com/HDATLTW/Record_Making_Firewalks.html). He currently…

  10. Nordic walking and chronic low back pain

    Morsø, Lars; Hartvigsen, Jan; Puggaard, Lis;

    2006-01-01

    Low Back Pain is a major public health problem all over the western world. Active approaches including exercise in the treatment of low back pain results in better outcomes for patients, but it is not known exactly which types of back exercises are most beneficial or whether general physical...... activity provide similar benefits. Nordic Walking is a popular and fast growing type of exercise in Northern Europe. Initial studies have demonstrated that persons performing Nordic Walking are able to exercise longer and harder compared to normal walking thereby increasing their cardiovascular metabolism...

  11. Fast and intuitive programming of adaptive laser cutting of lace enabled by machine vision

    Vaamonde, Iago; Souto-López, Álvaro; García-Díaz, Antón

    2015-07-01

    A machine vision system has been developed, validated, and integrated in a commercial laser robot cell. It permits an offline graphical programming of laser cutting of lace. The user interface allows loading CAD designs and aligning them with images of lace pieces. Different thread widths are discriminated to generate proper cutting program templates. During online operation, the system aligns CAD models of pieces and lace images, pre-checks quality of lace cuts and adapts laser parameters to thread widths. For pieces detected with the required quality, the program template is adjusted by transforming the coordinates of every trajectory point. A low-cost lace feeding system was also developed for demonstration of full process automation.

  12. An adaptively fast ensemble empirical mode decomposition method and its applications to rolling element bearing fault diagnosis

    Xue, Xiaoming; Zhou, Jianzhong; Xu, Yanhe; Zhu, Wenlong; Li, Chaoshun

    2015-10-01

    Ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) represents a significant improvement over the original empirical mode decomposition (EMD) method for eliminating the mode mixing problem. However, the added white noises generate some tough problems including the high computational cost, the determination of the two critical parameters (the amplitude of the added white noise and the number of ensemble trials), and the contamination of the residue noise in the signal reconstruction. To solve these problems, an adaptively fast EEMD (AFEEMD) method combined with complementary EEMD (CEEMD) is proposed in this paper. In the proposed method, the two critical parameters are respectively fixed as 0.01 times standard deviation of the original signal and two ensemble trials. Instead, the upper frequency limit of the added white noise is the key parameter which needs to be prescribed beforehand. Unlike the original EEMD method, only two high-frequency white noises are added to the signal to be investigated with anti-phase in AFEEMD. Furthermore, an index termed relative root-mean-square error is employed for the adaptive selection of the proper upper frequency limit of the added white noises. Simulation test and vibration signals based fault diagnosis of rolling element bearing under different fault types are utilized to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method. The analysis results indicate that the AFEEMD method represents a sound improvement over the original EEMD method, and has strong practicability.

  13. Randomized random walk on a random walk

    This paper discusses generalizations of the model introduced by Kehr and Kunter of the random walk of a particle on a one-dimensional chain which in turn has been constructed by a random walk procedure. The superimposed random walk is randomised in time according to the occurrences of a stochastic point process. The probability of finding the particle in a particular position at a certain instant is obtained explicitly in the transform domain. It is found that the asymptotic behaviour for large time of the mean-square displacement of the particle depends critically on the assumed structure of the basic random walk, giving a diffusion-like term for an asymmetric walk or a square root law if the walk is symmetric. Many results are obtained in closed form for the Poisson process case, and these agree with those given previously by Kehr and Kunter. (author)

  14. Real-time fast inverse dose optimization for image guided adaptive radiation therapy-Enhancements to fast inverse dose optimization (FIDO)

    A fast, accurate and stable optimization algorithm is very important for inverse planning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and for implementing dose-adaptive radiotherapy in the future. Conventional numerical search algorithms with positive beam weight constraints generally require numerous iterations and may produce suboptimal dose results due to trapping in local minima regions of the objective function landscape. A direct solution of the inverse problem using conventional quadratic objective functions without positive beam constraints is more efficient but it will result in unrealistic negative beam weights. We review here a direct solution of the inverse problem that is efficient and does not yield unphysical negative beam weights. In fast inverse dose optimization (FIDO) method the objective function for the optimization of a large number of beamlets is reformulated such that the optimization problem is reducible to a linear set of equations. The optimal set of intensities is then found through a matrix inversion, and negative beamlet intensities are avoided without the need for externally imposed ad hoc conditions. In its original version [S. P. Goldman, J. Z. Chen, and J. J. Battista, in Proceedings of the XIVth International Conference on the Use of Computers in Radiation Therapy, 2004, pp. 112-115; S. P. Goldman, J. Z. Chen, and J. J. Battista, Med. Phys. 32, 3007 (2005)], FIDO was tested on single two-dimensional computed tomography (CT) slices with sharp KERMA beams without scatter, in order to establish a proof of concept which demonstrated that FIDO could be a viable method for the optimization of cancer treatment plans. In this paper we introduce the latest advancements in FIDO that now include not only its application to three-dimensional volumes irradiated by beams with full scatter but include as well a complete implementation of clinical dose-volume constraints including maximum and minimum dose as well as equivalent uniform dose

  15. Fast-adapting mechanoreceptors are important for force control in precision grip but not for sensorimotor memory.

    Park, Susanna B; Davare, Marco; Falla, Marika; Kennedy, William R; Selim, Mona M; Wendelschafer-Crabb, Gwen; Koltzenburg, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Sensory feedback from cutaneous mechanoreceptors in the fingertips is important in effective object manipulation, allowing appropriate scaling of grip and load forces during precision grip. However, the role of mechanoreceptor subtypes in these tasks remains incompletely understood. To address this issue, psychophysical tasks that may specifically assess function of type I fast-adapting (FAI) and slowly adapting (SAI) mechanoreceptors were used with object manipulation experiments to examine the regulation of grip force control in an experimental model of graded reduction in tactile sensitivity (healthy volunteers wearing 2 layers of latex gloves). With gloves, tactile sensitivity decreased significantly from 1.9 ± 0.4 to 12.3 ± 2.2 μm in the Bumps task assessing function of FAI afferents but not in a grating orientation task assessing SAI afferents (1.6 ± 0.1 to 1.8 ± 0.2 mm). Six axis force/torque sensors measured peak grip (PGF) and load (PLF) forces generated by the fingertips during a grip-lift task. With gloves there was a significant increase of PGF (14 ± 6%), PLF (17 ± 5%), and grip and load force rates (26 ± 8%, 20 ± 8%). A variable-weight series task was used to examine sensorimotor memory. There was a 20% increase in PGF when the lift of a light object was preceded by a heavy relative to a light object. This relationship was not significantly altered when lifting with gloves, suggesting that the addition of gloves did not change sensorimotor memory effects. We conclude that FAI fibers may be important for the online force scaling but not for the buildup of a sensorimotor memory. PMID:27052582

  16. Where to quantum walk

    Kendon, Viv

    2011-01-01

    Quantum versions of random walks have diverse applications that are motivating experimental implementations as well as theoretical studies. However, the main impetus behind this interest is their use in quantum algorithms, which have always employed the quantum walk in the form of a program running on a quantum computer. Recent results showing that quantum walks are "universal for quantum computation" relate entirely to algorithms, and do not imply that a physical quantum walk could provide a...

  17. Intra-limb coordination while walking is affected by cognitive load and walking speed.

    Ghanavati, Tabassom; Salavati, Mahyar; Karimi, Noureddin; Negahban, Hossein; Ebrahimi Takamjani, Ismail; Mehravar, Mohammad; Hessam, Masumeh

    2014-07-18

    Knowledge about intra-limb coordination (ILC) during challenging walking conditions provides insight into the adaptability of central nervous system (CNS) for controlling human gait. We assessed the effects of cognitive load and speed on the pattern and variability of the ILC in young people during walking. Thirty healthy young people (19 female and 11 male) participated in this study. They were asked to perform 9 walking trials on a treadmill, including walking at three paces (preferred, slower and faster) either without a cognitive task (single-task walking) or while subtracting 1׳s or 3׳s from a random three-digit number (simple and complex dual-task walking, respectively). Deviation phase (DP) and mean absolute relative phase (MARP) values-indicators of variability and phase dynamic of ILC, respectively-were calculated using the data collected by a motion capture system. We used a two-way repeated measure analysis of variance for statistical analysis. The results showed that cognitive load had a significant main effect on DP of right shank-foot and thigh-shank, left shank-foot and pelvis-thigh (peffect of walking speed was significant on DP of all segments in each side and MARP of both thigh-shank and pelvis-thigh segments (pcognitive load and walking speed was only significant for MARP values of left shank-foot and right pelvis-thigh (pcognitive load and speed could significantly affect the ILC and variability and phase dynamic during walking. PMID:24861632

  18. Adapt

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  19. Walk This Way

    Mason, Nick

    2007-01-01

    A generation ago, it was part of growing up for all kids when they biked or walked to school. But in the last 30 years, heavier traffic, wider roads and more dangerous intersections have made it riskier for students walking or pedaling. Today, fewer than 15 percent of kids bike or walk to school compared with more than 50 percent in 1969. In the…

  20. Quantum walk computation

    Kendon, Viv [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-04

    Quantum versions of random walks have diverse applications that are motivating experimental implementations as well as theoretical studies. Recent results showing quantum walks are “universal for quantum computation” relate to algorithms, to be run on quantum computers. We consider whether an experimental implementation of a quantum walk could provide useful computation before we have a universal quantum computer.

  1. HIFI-C: a robust and fast method for determining NMR couplings from adaptive 3D to 2D projections

    We describe a novel method for the robust, rapid, and reliable determination of J couplings in multi-dimensional NMR coupling data, including small couplings from larger proteins. The method, 'High-resolution Iterative Frequency Identification of Couplings' (HIFI-C) is an extension of the adaptive and intelligent data collection approach introduced earlier in HIFI-NMR. HIFI-C collects one or more optimally tilted two-dimensional (2D) planes of a 3D experiment, identifies peaks, and determines couplings with high resolution and precision. The HIFI-C approach, demonstrated here for the 3D quantitative J method, offers vital features that advance the goal of rapid and robust collection of NMR coupling data. (1) Tilted plane residual dipolar couplings (RDC) data are collected adaptively in order to offer an intelligent trade off between data collection time and accuracy. (2) Data from independent planes can provide a statistical measure of reliability for each measured coupling. (3) Fast data collection enables measurements in cases where sample stability is a limiting factor (for example in the presence of an orienting medium required for residual dipolar coupling measurements). (4) For samples that are stable, or in experiments involving relatively stronger couplings, robust data collection enables more reliable determinations of couplings in shorter time, particularly for larger biomolecules. As a proof of principle, we have applied the HIFI-C approach to the 3D quantitative J experiment to determine N-C' RDC values for three proteins ranging from 56 to 159 residues (including a homodimer with 111 residues in each subunit). A number of factors influence the robustness and speed of data collection. These factors include the size of the protein, the experimental set up, and the coupling being measured, among others. To exhibit a lower bound on robustness and the potential for time saving, the measurement of dipolar couplings for the N-C' vector represents a realistic

  2. SU-E-J-208: Fast and Accurate Auto-Segmentation of Abdominal Organs at Risk for Online Adaptive Radiotherapy

    Gupta, V; Wang, Y; Romero, A; Heijmen, B; Hoogeman, M [Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Myronenko, A; Jordan, P [Accuray Incorporated, Sunnyvale, United States. (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Various studies have demonstrated that online adaptive radiotherapy by real-time re-optimization of the treatment plan can improve organs-at-risk (OARs) sparing in the abdominal region. Its clinical implementation, however, requires fast and accurate auto-segmentation of OARs in CT scans acquired just before each treatment fraction. Autosegmentation is particularly challenging in the abdominal region due to the frequently observed large deformations. We present a clinical validation of a new auto-segmentation method that uses fully automated non-rigid registration for propagating abdominal OAR contours from planning to daily treatment CT scans. Methods: OARs were manually contoured by an expert panel to obtain ground truth contours for repeat CT scans (3 per patient) of 10 patients. For the non-rigid alignment, we used a new non-rigid registration method that estimates the deformation field by optimizing local normalized correlation coefficient with smoothness regularization. This field was used to propagate planning contours to repeat CTs. To quantify the performance of the auto-segmentation, we compared the propagated and ground truth contours using two widely used metrics- Dice coefficient (Dc) and Hausdorff distance (Hd). The proposed method was benchmarked against translation and rigid alignment based auto-segmentation. Results: For all organs, the auto-segmentation performed better than the baseline (translation) with an average processing time of 15 s per fraction CT. The overall improvements ranged from 2% (heart) to 32% (pancreas) in Dc, and 27% (heart) to 62% (spinal cord) in Hd. For liver, kidneys, gall bladder, stomach, spinal cord and heart, Dc above 0.85 was achieved. Duodenum and pancreas were the most challenging organs with both showing relatively larger spreads and medians of 0.79 and 2.1 mm for Dc and Hd, respectively. Conclusion: Based on the achieved accuracy and computational time we conclude that the investigated auto

  3. HIFI-C: a robust and fast method for determining NMR couplings from adaptive 3D to 2D projections

    Cornilescu, Gabriel, E-mail: gabrielc@nmrfam.wisc.edu; Bahrami, Arash; Tonelli, Marco; Markley, John L.; Eghbalnia, Hamid R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison (United States)], E-mail: eghbalni@nmrfam.wisc.edu

    2007-08-15

    We describe a novel method for the robust, rapid, and reliable determination of J couplings in multi-dimensional NMR coupling data, including small couplings from larger proteins. The method, 'High-resolution Iterative Frequency Identification of Couplings' (HIFI-C) is an extension of the adaptive and intelligent data collection approach introduced earlier in HIFI-NMR. HIFI-C collects one or more optimally tilted two-dimensional (2D) planes of a 3D experiment, identifies peaks, and determines couplings with high resolution and precision. The HIFI-C approach, demonstrated here for the 3D quantitative J method, offers vital features that advance the goal of rapid and robust collection of NMR coupling data. (1) Tilted plane residual dipolar couplings (RDC) data are collected adaptively in order to offer an intelligent trade off between data collection time and accuracy. (2) Data from independent planes can provide a statistical measure of reliability for each measured coupling. (3) Fast data collection enables measurements in cases where sample stability is a limiting factor (for example in the presence of an orienting medium required for residual dipolar coupling measurements). (4) For samples that are stable, or in experiments involving relatively stronger couplings, robust data collection enables more reliable determinations of couplings in shorter time, particularly for larger biomolecules. As a proof of principle, we have applied the HIFI-C approach to the 3D quantitative J experiment to determine N-C' RDC values for three proteins ranging from 56 to 159 residues (including a homodimer with 111 residues in each subunit). A number of factors influence the robustness and speed of data collection. These factors include the size of the protein, the experimental set up, and the coupling being measured, among others. To exhibit a lower bound on robustness and the potential for time saving, the measurement of dipolar couplings for the N-C' vector

  4. HIFI-C: a robust and fast method for determining NMR couplings from adaptive 3D to 2D projections.

    Cornilescu, Gabriel; Bahrami, Arash; Tonelli, Marco; Markley, John L; Eghbalnia, Hamid R

    2007-08-01

    We describe a novel method for the robust, rapid, and reliable determination of J couplings in multi-dimensional NMR coupling data, including small couplings from larger proteins. The method, "High-resolution Iterative Frequency Identification of Couplings" (HIFI-C) is an extension of the adaptive and intelligent data collection approach introduced earlier in HIFI-NMR. HIFI-C collects one or more optimally tilted two-dimensional (2D) planes of a 3D experiment, identifies peaks, and determines couplings with high resolution and precision. The HIFI-C approach, demonstrated here for the 3D quantitative J method, offers vital features that advance the goal of rapid and robust collection of NMR coupling data. (1) Tilted plane residual dipolar couplings (RDC) data are collected adaptively in order to offer an intelligent trade off between data collection time and accuracy. (2) Data from independent planes can provide a statistical measure of reliability for each measured coupling. (3) Fast data collection enables measurements in cases where sample stability is a limiting factor (for example in the presence of an orienting medium required for residual dipolar coupling measurements). (4) For samples that are stable, or in experiments involving relatively stronger couplings, robust data collection enables more reliable determinations of couplings in shorter time, particularly for larger biomolecules. As a proof of principle, we have applied the HIFI-C approach to the 3D quantitative J experiment to determine N-C' RDC values for three proteins ranging from 56 to 159 residues (including a homodimer with 111 residues in each subunit). A number of factors influence the robustness and speed of data collection. These factors include the size of the protein, the experimental set up, and the coupling being measured, among others. To exhibit a lower bound on robustness and the potential for time saving, the measurement of dipolar couplings for the N-C' vector represents a realistic

  5. SU-E-J-208: Fast and Accurate Auto-Segmentation of Abdominal Organs at Risk for Online Adaptive Radiotherapy

    Purpose: Various studies have demonstrated that online adaptive radiotherapy by real-time re-optimization of the treatment plan can improve organs-at-risk (OARs) sparing in the abdominal region. Its clinical implementation, however, requires fast and accurate auto-segmentation of OARs in CT scans acquired just before each treatment fraction. Autosegmentation is particularly challenging in the abdominal region due to the frequently observed large deformations. We present a clinical validation of a new auto-segmentation method that uses fully automated non-rigid registration for propagating abdominal OAR contours from planning to daily treatment CT scans. Methods: OARs were manually contoured by an expert panel to obtain ground truth contours for repeat CT scans (3 per patient) of 10 patients. For the non-rigid alignment, we used a new non-rigid registration method that estimates the deformation field by optimizing local normalized correlation coefficient with smoothness regularization. This field was used to propagate planning contours to repeat CTs. To quantify the performance of the auto-segmentation, we compared the propagated and ground truth contours using two widely used metrics- Dice coefficient (Dc) and Hausdorff distance (Hd). The proposed method was benchmarked against translation and rigid alignment based auto-segmentation. Results: For all organs, the auto-segmentation performed better than the baseline (translation) with an average processing time of 15 s per fraction CT. The overall improvements ranged from 2% (heart) to 32% (pancreas) in Dc, and 27% (heart) to 62% (spinal cord) in Hd. For liver, kidneys, gall bladder, stomach, spinal cord and heart, Dc above 0.85 was achieved. Duodenum and pancreas were the most challenging organs with both showing relatively larger spreads and medians of 0.79 and 2.1 mm for Dc and Hd, respectively. Conclusion: Based on the achieved accuracy and computational time we conclude that the investigated auto

  6. Talk the Walk: Does Socio-Cognitive Resource Reallocation Facilitate the Development of Walking?

    Geva, Ronny; Orr, Edna

    2016-01-01

    Walking is of interest to psychology, robotics, zoology, neuroscience and medicine. Human's ability to walk on two feet is considered to be one of the defining characteristics of hominoid evolution. Evolutionary science propses that it emerged in response to limited environmental resources; yet the processes supporting its emergence are not fully understood. Developmental psychology research suggests that walking elicits cognitive advancements. We postulate that the relationship between cognitive development and walking is a bi-directional one; and further suggest that the initiation of novel capacities, such as walking, is related to internal socio-cognitive resource reallocation. We shed light on these notions by exploring infants' cognitive and socio-communicative outputs prospectively from 6-18 months of age. Structured bi/tri weekly evaluations of symbolic and verbal development were employed in an urban cohort (N = 9) for 12 months, during the transition from crawling to walking. Results show links between preemptive cognitive changes in socio-communicative output, symbolic-cognitive tool-use processes, and the age of emergence of walking. Plots of use rates of lower symbolic play levels before and after emergence of new skills illustrate reductions in use of previously attained key behaviors prior to emergence of higher symbolic play, language and walking. Further, individual differences in age of walking initiation were strongly related to the degree of reductions in complexity of object-use (r = .832, p skills that serve recruitment of external resources [socio-communication bids before speech (r = -.696, p computational approach yielded an even stronger link, underscoring internal resource reallocation as a facilitator of walking initiation (r = .901, p<0.001). These preliminary data suggest that representational capacities, symbolic object use, language and social developments, form an integrated adaptable composite, which possibly enables proactive

  7. Comparison of two modes of ventilation after fast-track cardiac surgery: Adaptive support ventilation versus synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation

    Objective: There is substantial debate regarding the appropriate protocol for ventilatory management in fast-track cardiac anesthesia (FTCA). This study was carried out to assess and compare the risks and benefits of respiratory weaning based on adaptive support ventilation (ASV) and synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation (SIMV) after uncomplicated cardiac surgery. Methodology: In a randomized clinical trial, after receiving approval of the Department Research Committee and informed consent from study subjects, 100 patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) were enrolled during a 4-month period at a university-based hospital. After surgery and admission to the intensive care unit (ICU), patients were randomized to ASV and SIMV groups. Arterial blood gas (ABG) and hemodynamic variables, respiratory and ventilator characteristics including lung compliance, rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI), tidal volume (TV), respiratory rate (RR), peak inspiratory pressure (P peak), mean airway pressure (p mean), Pao2/FIo2, duration of mechanical ventilation and tracheal intubation, and length of ICU stay were recorded and compared between the two groups. The data were analyzed in 82 patients after considering the exclusion criteria. Results: There were no differences between ASV and SIMV groups in demographics and preoperative characteristics. The duration of tracheal intubation and the length of ICU stay were similar in both groups. There were no statistically and clinically relevant differences between the two groups in ABG, hemodynamic changes, and respiratory and ventilator characteristics during ICU stay. Conclusion: Although ASV may facilitate postoperative respiratory management in FTCA, both ASV and SIMV provide similarly safe and practicable respiratory weaning in the cardiac ICU. The evaluation of potential advantages in patient outcomes and resource utilization of respiratory weaning based on ASV

  8. Exergame and Balance Training Modulate Prefrontal Brain Activity during Walking and Enhance Executive Function in Older Adults

    Eggenberger, Patrick; Wolf, Martin; Schumann, Martina; de Bruin, Eling D.

    2016-01-01

    Different types of exercise training have the potential to induce structural and functional brain plasticity in the elderly. Thereby, functional brain adaptations were observed during cognitive tasks in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies that correlated with improved cognitive performance. This study aimed to investigate if exercise training induces functional brain plasticity during challenging treadmill walking and elicits associated changes in cognitive executive functions. Forty-two elderly participants were recruited and randomly assigned to either interactive cognitive-motor video game dancing (DANCE) or balance and stretching training (BALANCE). The 8-week intervention included three sessions of 30 min per week and was completed by 33 participants (mean age 74.9 ± 6.9 years). Prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity during preferred and fast walking speed on a treadmill was assessed applying functional near infrared spectroscopy pre- and post-intervention. Additionally, executive functions comprising shifting, inhibition, and working memory were assessed. The results showed that both interventions significantly reduced left and right hemispheric PFC oxygenation during the acceleration of walking (p attention on other processes while walking, which could be relevant to improve mobility and falls prevention in the elderly. This study provides a deeper understanding of the associations between exercise training, brain function during walking, and cognition in older adults. PMID:27148041

  9. Walks on Weighted Networks

    WU An-Cai; XU Xin-Jian; WU Zhi-Xi; WANG Ying-Hai

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of random walks on weighted networks. Assuming that the edge weight and the node strength are used as local information by a random walker. Two kinds of walks, weight-dependent walk and strength-dependent walk, are studied. Exact expressions for stationary distribution and average return time are derived and confirmed by computer simulations. The distribution of average return time and the mean-square that a weight-dependent walker can arrive at a new territory more easily than a strength-dependent one.

  10. Tempo and walking speed with music in the urban context.

    Franěk, Marek; van Noorden, Leon; Režný, Lukáš

    2014-01-01

    The study explored the effect of music on the temporal aspects of walking behavior in a real outdoor urban setting. First, spontaneous synchronization between the beat of the music and step tempo was explored. The effect of motivational and non-motivational music (Karageorghis et al., 1999) on the walking speed was also studied. Finally, we investigated whether music can mask the effects of visual aspects of the walking route environment, which involve fluctuation of walking speed as a response to particular environmental settings. In two experiments, we asked participants to walk around an urban route that was 1.8 km in length through various environments in the downtown area of Hradec Králové. In Experiment 1, the participants listened to a musical track consisting of world pop music with a clear beat. In Experiment 2, participants were walking either with motivational music, which had a fast tempo and a strong rhythm, or with non-motivational music, which was slower, nice music, but with no strong implication to movement. Musical beat, as well as the sonic character of the music listened to while walking, influenced walking speed but did not lead to precise synchronization. It was found that many subjects did not spontaneously synchronize with the beat of the music at all, and some subjects synchronized only part of the time. The fast, energetic music increases the speed of the walking tempo, while slower, relaxing music makes the walking tempo slower. Further, it was found that listening to music with headphones while walking can mask the influence of the surrounding environment to some extent. Both motivational music and non-motivational music had a larger effect than the world pop music from Experiment 1. Individual differences in responses to the music listened to while walking that were linked to extraversion and neuroticism were also observed. The findings described here could be useful in rhythmic stimulation for enhancing or recovering the features of

  11. Tempo and walking speed with music in the urban context

    Franěk, Marek; van Noorden, Leon; Režný, Lukáš

    2014-01-01

    The study explored the effect of music on the temporal aspects of walking behavior in a real outdoor urban setting. First, spontaneous synchronization between the beat of the music and step tempo was explored. The effect of motivational and non-motivational music (Karageorghis et al., 1999) on the walking speed was also studied. Finally, we investigated whether music can mask the effects of visual aspects of the walking route environment, which involve fluctuation of walking speed as a response to particular environmental settings. In two experiments, we asked participants to walk around an urban route that was 1.8 km in length through various environments in the downtown area of Hradec Králové. In Experiment 1, the participants listened to a musical track consisting of world pop music with a clear beat. In Experiment 2, participants were walking either with motivational music, which had a fast tempo and a strong rhythm, or with non-motivational music, which was slower, nice music, but with no strong implication to movement. Musical beat, as well as the sonic character of the music listened to while walking, influenced walking speed but did not lead to precise synchronization. It was found that many subjects did not spontaneously synchronize with the beat of the music at all, and some subjects synchronized only part of the time. The fast, energetic music increases the speed of the walking tempo, while slower, relaxing music makes the walking tempo slower. Further, it was found that listening to music with headphones while walking can mask the influence of the surrounding environment to some extent. Both motivational music and non-motivational music had a larger effect than the world pop music from Experiment 1. Individual differences in responses to the music listened to while walking that were linked to extraversion and neuroticism were also observed. The findings described here could be useful in rhythmic stimulation for enhancing or recovering the features of

  12. Tempo and walking speed with music in the urban context

    Marek eFranek

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study explored the effect of music on the temporal aspects of walking behavior in a real outdoor urban setting. First, spontaneous synchronization between the beat of the music and step tempo was explored. The effect of motivational and non-motivational music (Karageorghis et al. 1999 on the walking speed was also studied. Finally, we investigated whether music can mask the effects of visual aspects of the walking route environment, which involve fluctuation of walking speed as a response to particular environmental settings. In two experiments, we asked participants to walk around an urban route through various environments in the downtown area of Hradec Králové. In Experiment 1, the participants listened to a musical track consisting of world pop music with a clear beat. In Experiment 2, participants were walking either with motivational music, which had a fast tempo and a strong rhythm, or with non-motivational music, which was slower, nice music, but with no strong implication to movement. Musical beat, as well as the sonic character of the music listened to while walking, influenced walking speed but did not lead to precise synchronization. It was found that many subjects did not spontaneously synchronize with the beat of the music at all, and some subjects synchronized only part of the time. The fast, energetic music increases the speed of the walking tempo, while slower, relaxing music makes the walking tempo slower. Further, it was found that listening to music with headphones while walking can mask the influence of the surrounding environment to some extent. Both motivational music and non-motivational music had a larger effect than the music from Experiment 1. Individual differences in responses to the music listened to while walking that were linked to extraversion and neuroticism were also observed. The findings described here could be useful in rhythmic stimulation for enhancing or recovering the features of movement

  13. Effects of wintertime fasting and seasonal adaptation on AMPK and ACC in hypothalamus, adipose tissue and liver of the raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides).

    Kinnunen, Sanni; Mänttäri, Satu; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Nieminen, Petteri; Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Saarela, Seppo

    2016-02-01

    The raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) is a canid with autumnal fattening and passive wintering strategy. We examined the effects of wintertime fasting and seasonality on AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a regulator of metabolism, and its target, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) on the species. Twelve farmed raccoon dogs (eleven females/one male) were divided into two groups: half were fasted for ten weeks in December-March (winter fasted) and the others were fed ad libitum (winter fed). A third group (autumn fed, eight females) was fed ad libitum and sampled in December. Total AMPK, ACC and their phosphorylated forms (pAMPK, pACC) were measured from hypothalamus, liver, intra-abdominal (iWAT) and subcutaneous white adipose tissues (sWAT). The fasted animals lost 32% and the fed 20% of their body mass. Hypothalamic AMPK expression was lower and pACC levels higher in the winter groups compared to the autumn fed group. Liver pAMPK was lower in the winter fasted group, with consistently decreased ACC and pACC. AMPK and pAMPK were down-regulated in sWAT and iWAT of both winter groups, with a parallel decline in pACC in sWAT. The responses of AMPK and ACC to fasting were dissimilar to the effects observed previously in non-seasonal mammals and hibernators. Differences between the winter fed and autumn fed groups indicate that the functions of AMPK and ACC could be regulated in a season-dependent manner. Furthermore, the distinctive effects of prolonged fasting and seasonal adaptation on AMPK-ACC pathway could contribute to the wintering strategy of the raccoon dog. PMID:26603554

  14. More Adults Are Walking

    2012-07-31

    This podcast is based on the August 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. While more adults are walking, only half get the recommended amount of physical activity. Listen to learn how communities, employers, and individuals may help increase walking.  Created: 7/31/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/7/2012.

  15. Dynamic walking with Dribbel

    Dertien, Edwin

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the design and construction of Dribbel, a passivity-based walking robot. Dribbel has been designed and built at the Control Engineering group of the University of Twente. This paper focuses on the practical side: the design approach, construction, electronics, and software design. After a short introduction of dynamic walking, the design process, starting with simulation, is discussed.

  16. Self-avoiding quantum walks

    Camilleri, Elizabeth; Rohde, Peter P.; Twamley, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Quantum walks exhibit many unique characteristics compared to classical random walks. In the classical setting, self-avoiding random walks have been studied as a variation on the usual classical random walk. Classical self-avoiding random walks have found numerous applications, most notably in the modeling of protein folding. We consider the analogous problem in the quantum setting. We complement a quantum walk with a memory register that records where the walker has previously resided. The w...

  17. Walking on Mars

    Cavagna, G. A.; Willems, P. A.; Heglund, N. C.

    1998-06-01

    Sometime in the near future humans may walk in the reduced gravity of Mars. Gravity plays an essential role in walking. On Earth, the body uses gravity to `fall forwards' at each step and then the forward speed is used to restore the initial height in a pendulum-like mechanism. When gravity is reduced, as on the Moon or Mars, the mechanism of walking must change. Here we investigate the mechanics of walking on Mars onboard an aircraft undergoing gravity-reducing flight profiles. The optimal walking speed on Mars will be 3.4 km h-1 (down from 5.5 km h-1 on Earth) and the work done per unit distance to move the centre of mass will be half that on Earth.

  18. Quantum walks on simplicial complexes

    Matsue, Kaname; Ogurisu, Osamu; Segawa, Etsuo

    2016-05-01

    We construct a new type of quantum walks on simplicial complexes as a natural extension of the well-known Szegedy walk on graphs. One can numerically observe that our proposing quantum walks possess linear spreading and localization as in the case of the Grover walk on lattices. Moreover, our numerical simulation suggests that localization of our quantum walks reflects not only topological but also geometric structures. On the other hand, our proposing quantum walk contains an intrinsic problem concerning exhibition of non-trivial behavior, which is not seen in typical quantum walks such as Grover walks on graphs.

  19. Biomechanical analysis of rollator walking

    Alkjaer, T; Larsen, Peter K; Pedersen, Gitte;

    2006-01-01

    The rollator is a very popular walking aid. However, knowledge about how a rollator affects the walking patterns is limited. Thus, the purpose of the study was to investigate the biomechanical effects of walking with and without a rollator on the walking pattern in healthy subjects.......The rollator is a very popular walking aid. However, knowledge about how a rollator affects the walking patterns is limited. Thus, the purpose of the study was to investigate the biomechanical effects of walking with and without a rollator on the walking pattern in healthy subjects....

  20. Humanoid robot Lola: design and walking control.

    Buschmann, Thomas; Lohmeier, Sebastian; Ulbrich, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present the humanoid robot LOLA, its mechatronic hardware design, simulation and real-time walking control. The goal of the LOLA-project is to build a machine capable of stable, autonomous, fast and human-like walking. LOLA is characterized by a redundant kinematic configuration with 7-DoF legs, an extremely lightweight design, joint actuators with brushless motors and an electronics architecture using decentralized joint control. Special emphasis was put on an improved mass distribution of the legs to achieve good dynamic performance. Trajectory generation and control aim at faster, more flexible and robust walking. Center of mass trajectories are calculated in real-time from footstep locations using quadratic programming and spline collocation methods. Stabilizing control uses hybrid position/force control in task space with an inner joint position control loop. Inertial stabilization is achieved by modifying the contact force trajectories. PMID:19665558

  1. Synthetic Physiology: Strategies for Adapting Tools from Nature for Genetically-Targeted Control of Fast Biological Processes

    Chow, Brian Y.; Chuong, Amy S.; Klapoetke, Nathan C; Boyden, Edward S.

    2011-01-01

    The life and operation of cells involve many physiological processes that take place over fast timescales of milliseconds to minutes. Genetically-encoded technologies for driving or suppressing specific fast physiological processes in intact cells, perhaps embedded within intact tissues in living organisms, are critical for the ability to understand how these physiological processes contribute to emergent cellular and organismal functions and behaviors. Such “synthetic physiology” tools are o...

  2. Random walks on combs

    Durhuus, B; Wheater, J; Durhuus, Bergfinnur; Jonsson, Thordur; Wheater, John

    2006-01-01

    We develop techniques to obtain rigorous bounds on the behaviour of random walks on combs. Using these bounds we calculate exactly the spectral dimension of random combs with infinite teeth at random positions or teeth with random but finite length. We also calculate exactly the spectral dimension of some fixed non-translationally invariant combs. We relate the spectral dimension to the critical exponent of the mass of the two-point function for random walks on random combs, and compute mean displacements as a function of walk duration. We prove that the mean first passage time is generally infinite for combs with anomalous spectral dimension.

  3. Quantum graph walks I: mapping to quantum walks

    Higuchi, Yusuke; Konno, Norio; Sato, Iwao; Segawa, Etsuo

    2012-01-01

    We clarify that coined quantum walk is determined by only the choice of local quantum coins. To do so, we characterize coined quantum walks on graph by disjoint Euler circles with respect to symmetric arcs. In this paper, we introduce a new class of coined quantum walk by a special choice of quantum coins determined by corresponding quantum graph, called quantum graph walk. We show that a stationary state of quantum graph walk describes the eigenfunction of the quantum graph.

  4. Why not walk faster?

    Usherwood, James Richard

    2005-01-01

    Bipedal walking following inverted pendulum mechanics is constrained by two requirements: sufficient kinetic energy for the vault over midstance and sufficient gravity to provide the centripetal acceleration required for the arc of the body about the stance foot. While the acceleration condition identifies a maximum walking speed at a Froude number of 1, empirical observation indicates favoured walk–run transition speeds at a Froude number around 0.5 for birds, humans and humans under manipul...

  5. Exergame and Balance Training Modulate Prefrontal Brain Activity during Walking and Enhance Executive Function in Older Adults.

    Eggenberger, Patrick; Wolf, Martin; Schumann, Martina; de Bruin, Eling D

    2016-01-01

    Different types of exercise training have the potential to induce structural and functional brain plasticity in the elderly. Thereby, functional brain adaptations were observed during cognitive tasks in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies that correlated with improved cognitive performance. This study aimed to investigate if exercise training induces functional brain plasticity during challenging treadmill walking and elicits associated changes in cognitive executive functions. Forty-two elderly participants were recruited and randomly assigned to either interactive cognitive-motor video game dancing (DANCE) or balance and stretching training (BALANCE). The 8-week intervention included three sessions of 30 min per week and was completed by 33 participants (mean age 74.9 ± 6.9 years). Prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity during preferred and fast walking speed on a treadmill was assessed applying functional near infrared spectroscopy pre- and post-intervention. Additionally, executive functions comprising shifting, inhibition, and working memory were assessed. The results showed that both interventions significantly reduced left and right hemispheric PFC oxygenation during the acceleration of walking (p < 0.05 or trend, r = 0.25-0.36), while DANCE showed a larger reduction at the end of the 30-s walking task compared to BALANCE in the left PFC [F (1, 31) = 3.54, p = 0.035, r = 0.32]. These exercise training induced modulations in PFC oxygenation correlated with improved executive functions (p < 0.05 or trend, r = 0.31-0.50). The observed reductions in PFC activity may release cognitive resources to focus attention on other processes while walking, which could be relevant to improve mobility and falls prevention in the elderly. This study provides a deeper understanding of the associations between exercise training, brain function during walking, and cognition in older adults. PMID:27148041

  6. Exergame and Balance Training modulate Prefrontal Brain Activity during Walking and enhance Executive Function in Older Adults

    Patrick eEggenberger

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Different types of exercise training have the potential to induce structural and functional brain plasticity in the elderly. Thereby, functional brain adaptations were observed during cognitive tasks in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies that correlated with improved cognitive performance. This study aimed to investigate if exercise training induces functional brain plasticity during challenging treadmill walking and elicits associated changes in cognitive executive functions. Forty-two elderly participants were recruited and randomly assigned to either interactive cognitive-motor video game dancing (DANCE or balance and stretching training (BALANCE. The 8-week intervention included three sessions of 30 minutes per week and was completed by 33 participants (mean age 74.9±6.9 years. Prefrontal cortex (PFC activity during preferred and fast walking speed on a treadmill was assessed applying functional near infrared spectroscopy pre- and post-intervention. Additionally, executive functions comprising shifting, inhibition, and working memory were assessed. The results showed that both interventions significantly reduced left and right hemispheric PFC oxygenation during the acceleration of walking (p < .05 or trend, r = .25 to .36, while DANCE showed a larger reduction at the end of the 30-second walking task compared to BALANCE in the left PFC (F(1, 31 = 3.54, p = .035, r = .32. These exercise training induced modulations in PFC oxygenation correlated with improved executive functions (p < .05 or trend, r = .31 to .50. The observed reductions in PFC activity may release cognitive resources to focus attention on other processes while walking, which could be relevant to improve mobility and falls prevention in the elderly. This study provides a deeper understanding of the associations between exercise training, brain function during walking, and cognition in older adults.

  7. Talk the Walk: Does Socio-Cognitive Resource Reallocation Facilitate the Development of Walking?

    Orr, Edna

    2016-01-01

    preliminary data suggest that representational capacities, symbolic object use, language and social developments, form an integrated adaptable composite, which possibly enables proactive internal resource reallocation, designed to support the emergence of new developmental milestones, such as walking. PMID:27248834

  8. Environmental perceptions and objective walking trail audits inform a community-based participatory research walking intervention

    Zoellner Jamie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the documented physical activity disparities that exist among low-income minority communities and the increased focused on socio-ecological approaches to address physical inactivity, efforts aimed at understanding the built environment to support physical activity are needed. This community-based participatory research (CBPR project investigates walking trails perceptions in a high minority southern community and objectively examines walking trails. The primary aim is to explore if perceived and objective audit variables predict meeting recommendations for walking and physical activity, MET/minutes/week of physical activity, and frequency of trail use. Methods A proportional sampling plan was used to survey community residents in this cross-sectional study. Previously validated instruments were pilot tested and appropriately adapted and included the short version of the validated International Physical Activity Questionnaire, trail use, and perceptions of walking trails. Walking trails were assessed using the valid and reliable Path Environmental Audit Tool which assesses four content areas including: design features, amenities, maintenance, and pedestrian safety from traffic. Analyses included Chi-square, one-way ANOVA's, multiple linear regression, and multiple logistic models. Results Numerous (n = 21 high quality walking trails were available. Across trails, there were very few indicators of incivilities and safety features rated relatively high. Among the 372 respondents, trail use significantly predicted meeting recommendations for walking and physical activity, and MET/minutes/week. While controlling for other variables, significant predictors of trail use included proximity to trails, as well as perceptions of walking trail safety, trail amenities, and neighborhood pedestrian safety. Furthermore, while controlling for education, gender, and income; for every one time per week increase in using walking trails

  9. Tracking the origins of Yakutian horses and the genetic basis for their fast adaptation to subarctic environments

    Librado, Pablo; Der Sarkissian, Clio; Ermini, Luca;

    2015-01-01

    Yakutia, Sakha Republic, in the Siberian Far East, represents one of the coldest places on Earth, with winter record temperatures dropping below −70 °C. Nevertheless, Yakutian horses survive all year round in the open air due to striking phenotypic adaptations, including compact body conformations......, extremely hairy winter coats, and acute seasonal differences in metabolic activities. The evolutionary origins of Yakutian horses and the genetic basis of their adaptations remain, however, contentious. Here, we present the complete genomes of nine present-day Yakutian horses and two ancient specimens...

  10. Stilt walking: how do we learn those first steps?

    Akram, Sakineh B; Frank, James S

    2009-09-01

    This study examined how young healthy adults learn stilt walking. Ten healthy male university students attended two sessions of testing held on two consecutive days. In each session participants performed three blocks of 10 stilt-walking trials. Angular movements of head and trunk and the spatial and temporal gait parameters were recorded. When walking on stilts young adults improved their gait velocity through modifications of step parameters while maintaining trunk movements close to that observed during normal over-ground walking. Participants improved their performance by increasing their step frequency and step length and reducing the double support percentage of the gait cycle. Stilts are often used for drywall installation, painting over-the-head areas and raising workers above the ground without the burden of erecting scaffolding. This research examines the locomotor adaptation as young healthy adults learn the complex motor task of stilt walking; a task that is frequently used in the construction industry. PMID:19606365

  11. Online Joint Trajectory Generation of Human-like Biped Walking

    Jong-Wook Kim

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Biped walking has long been studied in the area of gait analysis and robotic locomotion. The goal of this paper is to establish a systematic methodology for human-like natural walking by fusing the measured human joint data and optimal pattern generation techniques based on a full-body humanoid model. To this end, this paper proposes an adaptive two-stage gait pattern by which the step length and walking velocity can be changed with two scaling factors. In addition, to cope with the situations involving passing over a small obstacle, the joint trajectories of the swing foot can be adjusted with a novel concept of differential angle trajectory using a reliable optimization method, viz. particle swarm optimization. The feasibility of the proposed walking scheme is validated by walking experiments with the robot platform DARwIn-OP.

  12. Unitary equivalence of quantum walks

    Highlights: • We have found unitary equivalent classes in coined quantum walks. • A single parameter family of coin operators is sufficient to realize all simple one-dimensional quantum walks. • Electric quantum walks are unitarily equivalent to time dependent quantum walks. - Abstract: A simple coined quantum walk in one dimension can be characterized by a SU(2) operator with three parameters which represents the coin toss. However, different such coin toss operators lead to equivalent dynamics of the quantum walker. In this manuscript we present the unitary equivalence classes of quantum walks and show that all the nonequivalent quantum walks can be distinguished by a single parameter. Moreover, we argue that the electric quantum walks are equivalent to quantum walks with time dependent coin toss operator

  13. A fast and efficient algorithm to compute BPX- and overlapping preconditioner for adaptive 3D-FEM

    Eibner, Tino

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we consider the well-known BPX-preconditioner in conjunction with adaptive FEM. We present an algorithm which enables us to compute the preconditioner with optimal complexity by a total of only O(DoF) additional memory. Furthermore, we show how to combine the BPX-preconditioner with an overlapping Additive-Schwarz-preconditioner to obtain a preconditioner for finite element spaces with arbitrary polynomial degree distributions. Numerical examples illustr...

  14. Mac-Phy Cross-Layer analysis and design of Mimo-Ofdm Wlans based on fast link adaptation

    Martorell Lliteras, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    The latestWLAN standard, known as IEEE 802.11n, has notably increased the network capacity with respect to its predecessors thanks to the incorporation of the multipleinput multiple-output (MIMO) technology. Nonetheless, the new amendment, as its previous ones, does not specify how crucial configuration mechanisms, most notably the adaptive modulation and coding (AMC) algorithm should be implemented. The AMC process has proved essential to fully exploit the system resources in ...

  15. Fast response and high sensitivity to microsaccades in a cascading-adaptation neural network with short-term synaptic depression

    Yuan, Wu-Jie; Zhou, Jian-Fang; Zhou, Changsong

    2016-04-01

    Microsaccades are very small eye movements during fixation. Experimentally, they have been found to play an important role in visual information processing. However, neural responses induced by microsaccades are not yet well understood and are rarely studied theoretically. Here we propose a network model with a cascading adaptation including both retinal adaptation and short-term depression (STD) at thalamocortical synapses. In the neural network model, we compare the microsaccade-induced neural responses in the presence of STD and those without STD. It is found that the cascading with STD can give rise to faster and sharper responses to microsaccades. Moreover, STD can enhance response effectiveness and sensitivity to microsaccadic spatiotemporal changes, suggesting improved detection of small eye movements (or moving visual objects). We also explore the mechanism of the response properties in the model. Our studies strongly indicate that STD plays an important role in neural responses to microsaccades. Our model considers simultaneously retinal adaptation and STD at thalamocortical synapses in the study of microsaccade-induced neural activity, and may be useful for further investigation of the functional roles of microsaccades in visual information processing.

  16. The lag-phase during diauxic growth is a trade-off between fast adaptation and high growth rate

    Chu, Dominique; Barnes, David J.

    2016-04-01

    Bi-phasic or diauxic growth is often observed when microbes are grown in a chemically defined medium containing two sugars (for example glucose and lactose). Typically, the two growth stages are separated by an often lengthy phase of arrested growth, the so-called lag-phase. Diauxic growth is usually interpreted as an adaptation to maximise population growth in multi-nutrient environments. However, the lag-phase implies a substantial loss of growth during the switch-over. It therefore remains unexplained why the lag-phase is adaptive. Here we show by means of a stochastic simulation model based on the bacterial PTS system that it is not possible to shorten the lag-phase without incurring a permanent growth-penalty. Mechanistically, this is due to the inherent and well established limitations of biological sensors to operate efficiently at a given resource cost. Hence, there is a trade-off between lost growth during the diauxic switch and the long-term growth potential of the cell. Using simulated evolution we predict that the lag-phase will evolve depending on the distribution of conditions experienced during adaptation. In environments where switching is less frequently required, the lag-phase will evolve to be longer whereas, in frequently changing environments, the lag-phase will evolve to be shorter.

  17. Fast Fuzzy C-Means Algorithm Incorporating Convex Combination of Bilateral Filter with Contrast Limited Adaptive Histogram Equalization

    K. Kadambavanam

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fast Generalized Fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm (FGFCM and its variants are effective methods for image clustering. Even though the incorporation of local spatial information to the objective function reduces their sensitivity to noise to some extent, they are still lack behind in suppressing the effect of noise and outliers on the edges and tiny areas of input image. This article proposes an algorithm to mitigate the disadvantage of FGFCM and its variants and enhances the performance of clustering. The experiments on the synthetic and real images are presented, to exhibit the improvements in the image clustering due to the proposed algorithm.

  18. Biomechanical conditions of walking

    Fan, Y F; Luo, L P; Li, Z Y; Han, S Y; Lv, C S; Zhang, B

    2015-01-01

    The development of rehabilitation training program for lower limb injury does not usually include gait pattern design. This paper introduced a gait pattern design by using equations (conditions of walking). Following the requirements of reducing force to the injured side to avoid further injury, we developed a lower limb gait pattern to shorten the stride length so as to reduce walking speed, to delay the stance phase of the uninjured side and to reduce step length of the uninjured side. This gait pattern was then verified by the practice of a rehabilitation training of an Achilles tendon rupture patient, whose two-year rehabilitation training (with 24 tests) has proven that this pattern worked as intended. This indicates that rehabilitation training program for lower limb injury can rest on biomechanical conditions of walking based on experimental evidence.

  19. The Act of Walking

    Vestergaard, Maria Quvang Harck; Olesen, Mette; Helmer, Pernille Falborg

    2014-01-01

    ’ of mobility (Jensen 2013:111) such as the urban environment, and the infrastructures. Walking has indeed also a ‘software dimension’ as an embodied performance that trigger the human senses (Jensen 2013) and which is closely related to the habitus and identity of the individual (Halprin 1963). The...... individual perception of ‘walkability’ is based upon a subjective judgement of different physical factors, such as sidewalk width, traffic volumes and building height (Ewing and Handy 2009:67). And iIn order to understand the act of walking it is therefore necessary to create a vocabulary to understand how...... and why the individuals evaluate, interpret and act (Bourdieu 1984), and how this affects their choice to walk. Therefore it could be questioned if whether an assessment of the physical environment is sufficient to identify all the factors that influence the individual perception of ‘walkability’, or...

  20. Can barley (Hordeum vulgare L. s.l.) adapt to fast climate changes? A controlled selection experiment

    Alemayehu, Fikadu Reta; Frenck, Georg; van der Linden, Leon;

    2013-01-01

    to environmental stress, we conducted a selection experiment over five plant generations (G0–G4) in three scenarios, where atmospheric [CO2] and temperature were increased as single factors and in combination. The treatments represented the expected environmental characteristics in Northern Europe around year 2075...... to environmental change needs to be explored in order to select the most productive genotypes. Presently, it is unknown whether cereal crops like spring barley can adapt to climate stressors over relatively few generations. To evaluate if strong selection pressures could change the performance of barley...

  1. Paradoxical regulation of human FGF21 by both fasting and feeding signals: is FGF21 a nutritional adaptation factor?

    Takashi Uebanso

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 has recently emerged as a metabolic hormone involved in regulating glucose and lipid metabolism in mouse, but the regulatory mechanisms and actions of FGF21 in humans remain unclear. Here we have investigated the regulatory mechanisms of the human FGF21 gene at the transcriptional level. A deletion study of the human FGF21 promoter (-1672 to +230 bp revealed two fasting signals, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα and glucagon signals, that independently induced human FGF21 gene transcription in mouse primary hepatocytes. In addition, two feeding signals, glucose and xylitol, also dose-dependently induced human FGF21 gene transcription and mRNA expression in both human HepG2 cells and mouse primary hepatocytes. FGF21 protein expression and secretion were also induced by high glucose stimulation. The human FGF21 promoter (-1672 to +230 bp was found to have a carbohydrate-responsive element at -380 to -366 bp, which is distinct from the PPAR response element (PPRE. Knock-down of the carbohydrate response element binding protein by RNAi diminished glucose-induced human FGF21 transcription. Moreover, we found that a region from -555 to -443 bp of the human FGF21 promoter region exerts an important role in the activation of basic transcription. In conclusion, human FGF21 gene expression is paradoxically and independently regulated by both fasting and feeding signals. These regulatory mechanisms suggest that human FGF21 is increased with nutritional crisis, including starvation and overfeeding.

  2. Walking and Sensing Mobile Lives

    Bødker, Mads; Meinhardt, Nina Dam

    In this position paper, we discuss how mindful walking with people allow us to explore sensory aspects of mobile lives that are typically absent from research. We present an app that aids researchers collect impressions from a walk.......In this position paper, we discuss how mindful walking with people allow us to explore sensory aspects of mobile lives that are typically absent from research. We present an app that aids researchers collect impressions from a walk....

  3. Endless self-avoiding walks

    Clisby, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a self-avoiding walk model for which end-effects are completely eliminated. We enumerate the number of these walks for various lattices in dimensions two and three, and use these enumerations to study the properties of this model. We find that endless self-avoiding walks have the same connective constant as self-avoiding walks, and the same Flory exponent $\

  4. Walking along water

    Rasmussen, Mattias Borg

    2014-01-01

    Steep slopes, white peaks and deep valleys make up the Andes. As phenomenologists of landscape have told us, different people have different landscapes. By moving across the terrain, walking along, we might get a sense of how this has been carved out by the movement of wind and water, tectonics...

  5. Walking - Sensing - Participation

    Bødker, Mads; Meinhardt, Nina Dam; Browning, David

    Building on ethnographic research and social theory in the field of ‘mobilities’, this workshop paper suggests that field work based on simply walking with people entails a form of embodied participation that informs technological interventions by creating a space within which to address a wider...

  6. Minimal Walking Technicolor

    Frandsen, Mads Toudal

    2007-01-01

    I report on our construction and analysis of the effective low energy Lagrangian for the Minimal Walking Technicolor (MWT) model. The parameters of the effective Lagrangian are constrained by imposing modified Weinberg sum rules and by imposing a value for the S parameter estimated from the...

  7. Walking for data

    Bødker, Mads; Browning, David; Meinhardt, Nina Dam

    We suggest that ‘walking’ in ethnographic work sensitizes researchers to a particular means of making sense of place. Following a brief conceptual exposition, we present our research tool iMaCam) that supports capturing and representing activities such as walking....

  8. Prudent Self-Avoiding Walks

    Anthony J. Guttmann

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We have produced extended series for prudent self-avoiding walks on the square lattice. These are subsets of self-avoiding walks. We conjecture the exact growth constant and critical exponent for the walks, and show that the (anisotropic generating function is almost certainly not differentiably-finite.

  9. Prudent Self-Avoiding Walks

    Guttmann, Anthony J.; Dethridge, John C.

    2008-01-01

    We have produced extended series for prudent self-avoiding walks on the square lattice. These are subsets of self-avoiding walks. We conjecture the exact growth constant and critical exponent for the walks, and show that the (anisotropic) generating function is almost certainly not differentiably-finite.

  10. Random Walks on Random Graphs

    Cooper, Colin; Frieze, Alan

    The aim of this article is to discuss some of the notions and applications of random walks on finite graphs, especially as they apply to random graphs. In this section we give some basic definitions, in Section 2 we review applications of random walks in computer science, and in Section 3 we focus on walks in random graphs.

  11. Linearized Alternating Direction Method with Adaptive Penalty and Warm Starts for Fast Solving Transform Invariant Low-Rank Textures

    Ren, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Transform Invariant Low-rank Textures (TILT) is a novel and powerful tool that can effectively rectify a rich class of low-rank textures in 3D scenes from 2D images despite significant deformation and corruption. The existing algorithm for solving TILT is based on the alternating direction method (ADM). It suffers from high computational cost and is not theoretically guaranteed to converge to a correct solution. In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm to speed up solving TILT, with guaranteed convergence. Our method is based on the recently proposed linearized alternating direction method with adaptive penalty (LADMAP). To further reduce computation, warm starts are also introduced to initialize the variables better and cut the cost on singular value decomposition. Extensive experimental results on both synthetic and real data demonstrate that this new algorithm works much more efficiently and robustly than the existing algorithm. It could be at least five times faster than the previous method.

  12. 基于自适应排列的快速图像加密算法%Fast Image Encryption Algorithm Based on Self-adaptive Permutation

    刘梅

    2009-01-01

    现有自适应图像加密算法可以抵抗已知明文攻击,其单轮加密速度很快,但安全性和整体加密速度较低.基于自适应排列提出一种新的快速图像加密算法,在确保加密操作简单高效的前提下,改变加密前后图像的像素分布.实验结果表明,该算法性能优于其他同类算法.%Existing self-adaptive image encryption algorithm is resistant to known plaintext attacks and with high speed of single round eneryption, but its security and speed of whole round encryption is low. This paper proposes a new fast image encryption algorithm based on self-adaptive permutation. This algorithm insures the simpleness and high efficiency of encryption operation, and changes the pixel distribution of encrypted image compared with that of original image. Experimental results show that this algorithm has better performance than other kindred algorithms.

  13. Fast and accurate solution for the SCUC problem in large-scale power systems using adapted binary programming and enhanced dual neural network

    Highlights: • A novel hybrid method based on decomposition of SCUC into QP and BP problems is proposed. • An adapted binary programming and an enhanced dual neural network model are applied. • The proposed EDNN is exactly convergent to the global optimal solution of QP. • An AC power flow procedure is developed for including contingency/security issues. • It is suited for large-scale systems, providing both accurate and fast solutions. - Abstract: This paper presents a novel hybrid method for solving the security constrained unit commitment (SCUC) problem. The proposed formulation requires much less computation time in comparison with other methods while assuring the accuracy of the results. Furthermore, the framework provided here allows including an accurate description of warmth-dependent startup costs, valve point effects, multiple fuel costs, forbidden zones of operation, and AC load flow bounds. To solve the nonconvex problem, an adapted binary programming method and enhanced dual neural network model are utilized as optimization tools, and a procedure for AC power flow modeling is developed for including contingency/security issues, as new contributions to earlier studies. Unlike classical SCUC methods, the proposed method allows to simultaneously solve the unit commitment problem and comply with the network limits. In addition to conventional test systems, a real-world large-scale power system with 493 units has been used to fully validate the effectiveness of the novel hybrid method proposed

  14. Group velocity of discrete-time quantum walks

    We show that certain types of quantum walks can be modeled as waves that propagate in a medium with phase and group velocities that are explicitly calculable. Since the group and phase velocities indicate how fast wave packets can propagate causally, we propose the use of these wave velocities in our definition for the hitting time of quantum walks. Our definition of hitting time has the advantage that it requires neither the specification of a walker's initial condition nor of an arrival probability threshold. We give full details for the case of quantum walks on the Cayley graphs of Abelian groups. This includes the special cases of quantum walks on the line and on hypercubes.

  15. Fast protocol for extraction of DNA from Prosopis spp leaves (plant adapted to arid environment) without liquid nitrogen.

    Michel-López, C Y; González-Mendoza, D; Grimaldo-Juarez, O

    2013-01-01

    The extraction of high-quality genomic DNA from Prosopis spp for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification is complicated, owing to the presence of a high percentage of secondary metabolites that bind to or co-precipitate with nucleic acids. In the present study, we report a modified sodium dodecyl sulfate/phenol protocol that eliminates the use of liquid nitrogen in the maceration process, β-mercaptoethanol in the buffer extraction, and the ethanol precipitation step. The A₂₆₀/A₂₈₀ absorbance ratios of the isolated DNA were approximately 2.0 to 1.9, suggesting that the DNA fraction was pure and can be used for further PCR analysis. The DNA isolated by this protocol is of sufficient quality for molecular applications; this technique could be applied to other organisms that have similar substances that hinder DNA extraction. Finally, this proposal represents an alternative fast, cheap, and effective method for the isolation of genomic DNA from fresh leaves of Prosopis spp, even in low-technology laboratories. PMID:24089098

  16. [Walking abnormalities in children].

    Segawa, Masaya

    2010-11-01

    Walking is a spontaneous movement termed locomotion that is promoted by activation of antigravity muscles by serotonergic (5HT) neurons. Development of antigravity activity follows 3 developmental epochs of the sleep-wake (S-W) cycle and is modulated by particular 5HT neurons in each epoch. Activation of antigravity activities occurs in the first epoch (around the age of 3 to 4 months) as restriction of atonia in rapid eye movement (REM) stage and development of circadian S-W cycle. These activities strengthen in the second epoch, with modulation of day-time sleep and induction of crawling around the age of 8 months and induction of walking by 1 year. Around the age of 1 year 6 months, absence of guarded walking and interlimb cordination is observed along with modulation of day-time sleep to once in the afternoon. Bipedal walking in upright position occurs in the third epoch, with development of a biphasic S-W cycle by the age of 4-5 years. Patients with infantile autism (IA), Rett syndrome (RTT), or Tourette syndrome (TS) show failure in the development of the first, second, or third epoch, respectively. Patients with IA fail to develop interlimb coordination; those with RTT, crawling and walking; and those with TS, walking in upright posture. Basic pathophysiology underlying these condition is failure in restricting atonia in REM stage; this induces dysfunction of the pedunculopontine nucleus and consequently dys- or hypofunction of the dopamine (DA) neurons. DA hypofunction in the developing brain, associated with compensatory upward regulation of the DA receptors causes psychobehavioral disorders in infancy (IA), failure in synaptogenesis in the frontal cortex and functional development of the motor and associate cortexes in late infancy through the basal ganglia (RTT), and failure in functional development of the prefrontal cortex through the basal ganglia (TS). Further, locomotion failure in early childhood causes failure in development of functional

  17. Walking behaviour of healthy elderly: attention should be paid

    Schmidt André

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have reported an association between executive function (EF and measures of gait, particularly among older adults. This study examined the relationship between specific components of executive functions and the relative dual task costs of gait (DTC in community-dwelling non-demented older adults, aged 65 years and older. Methods Temporal (stride time, stride velocity and spatial (stride length gait characteristics were measured using a GAITRite®-System among 62 healthy community dwelling older adults while walking with and without backward counting (BC at preferred and fast walking speeds. Specific executive functions divided attention, memory and inhibition were assessed using the Test for Attentional Performance (TAP. Other measures included Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, amount of daily medications taken, educational level and sociodemographic characteristics. Adjusted and unadjusted multivariable linear regression models were developed to assess the relations between variables. Results High relative DTC for stride time, stride velocity and stride length were associated with divided attention at fast walking speed. High relative DTC for stride time was associated with divided attention at preferred walking speed. The association between high DTC of stride length and memory was less robust and only observable at preferred walking speed. None of the gait measures was associated with inhibition. Conclusions Spatial and temporal dual task cost characteristics of gait are especially associated with divided attention in older adults. The results showed that the associated DTC differ by executive function and the nature of the task (preferred versus fast walking. Further research is warranted to determine whether improvement in divided attention translates to better performance on selected complex walking tasks.

  18. DELPHI - fast and adaptive computational laser point detection and visual footprint quantification for arbitrary underwater image collections

    Timm eSchoening

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Marine researchers continue to create large quantities of benthic images e.g. using AUVs (Autonomous Underwater Vehicles. In order to quantify the size of sessile objects in the images, a pixel-to-centimetre ratio is required for each image, often indirectly provided through a geometric laser point (LP pattern, projected onto the seafloor. Manual annotation of these LPs in all images is too time-consuming and thus infeasible for nowadays data volumes. Because of the technical evolution of camera rigs, the LP's geometrical layout and colour features vary for different expeditions and projects. This makes the application of one algorithm, tuned to a strictly defined LP pattern, also ineffective.Here we present the web-tool DELPHI, that efficiently learns the LP layout for one image transect / collection from just a small number of hand labelled LPs and applies this layout model to the rest of the data. The efficiency in adapting to new data allows to compute the LPs and the pixel-to-centimetre ratio fully automatic and with high accuracy. DELPHI is applied to two real-world examples and shows clear improvements regarding reduction of tuning effort for new LP patterns as well as increasing detection performance.

  19. Walking Algorithm of Humanoid Robot on Uneven Terrain with Terrain Estimation

    Jiang Yi; Qiuguo Zhu; Rong Xiong; Jun Wu

    2016-01-01

    Humanoid robots are expected to achieve stable walking on uneven terrains. In this paper, a control algorithm for humanoid robots walking on previously unknown terrains with terrain estimation is proposed, which requires only minimum modification to the original walking gait. The swing foot trajectory is redesigned to ensure that the foot lands at the desired horizontal positions under various terrain height. A compliant terrain adaptation method is applied to the landing foot to achieve a fi...

  20. Bionic ankle–foot prosthesis normalizes walking gait for persons with leg amputation

    Herr, Hugh M.; Grabowski, Alena M

    2011-01-01

    Over time, leg prostheses have improved in design, but have been incapable of actively adapting to different walking velocities in a manner comparable to a biological limb. People with a leg amputation using such commercially available passive-elastic prostheses require significantly more metabolic energy to walk at the same velocities, prefer to walk slower and have abnormal biomechanics compared with non-amputees. A bionic prosthesis has been developed that emulates the function of a biolog...

  1. Fractional random walk lattice dynamics

    Michelitsch, Thomas; Riascos, Alejandro Perez; Nowakowski, Andrzeij; Nicolleau, Franck

    2016-01-01

    We analyze time-discrete and continuous `fractional' random walks on undirected regular networks with special focus on cubic periodic lattices in $n=1,2,3,..$ dimensions.The fractional random walk dynamics is governed by a master equation involving {\\it fractional powers of Laplacian matrices $L^{\\frac{\\alpha}{2}}$}where $\\alpha=2$ recovers the normal walk.First we demonstrate thatthe interval $0\\textless{}\\alpha\\leq 2$ is admissible for the fractional random walk. We derive analytical expressions for fractional transition matrix and closely related the average return probabilities. We further obtain thefundamental matrix $Z^{(\\alpha)}$, and the mean relaxation time (Kemeny constant) for the fractional random walk.The representation for the fundamental matrix $Z^{(\\alpha)}$ relates fractional random walks with normal random walks.We show that the fractional transition matrix elements exihibit for large cubic $n$-dimensional lattices a power law decay of an $n$-dimensional infinite spaceRiesz fractional deriva...

  2. Simulation Studies of Bipedal Walking on the Moon and Mars

    Yamada, Shin; Ohshima, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Tomofumi; Narukawa, Terumasa; Takahashi, Masaki; Hase, Kimitaka; Liu, Meigen; Mukai, Chiaki

    In order to walk upright on the Moon or Mars without falling, a specific walking strategy to account for altered gravitational conditions must be verified. We have therefore been studying changes in the kinematics of walking at different gravitational loads using a body weight suspension system. Our simulation consisted of three gravitational conditions: 1 g (Earth); 1/3 g (Mars); and 1/6 g (the Moon). Surface EMG recordings were taken from the leg muscles of subjects walking on a treadmill. Cadence, stance phase duration, and step length were calculated from the walking velocity and steps. Subsequent experiments revealed that muscle activity and the duration of the double support phase decreased as simulated gravity was reduced. These changes are apparently caused not only by the direct effects of unloading but also by kinematic adaptations to the same. It can be said that humans walk slowly with a shortened stride and elongated stance phase in order to adjust to low gravitational conditions. One major limitation of our study that may have affected walking stability was the fact that the suspension system was fixed to an immovable frame. We have begun further studies using a newer movable body weight suspension system to achieve more realistic simulations.

  3. Implementation of a model reference adaptive control system using neural network to control a fast breeder reactor evaporator

    Artificial intelligence is foreseen as the base for new control systems aimed to replace traditional controllers and to assist and eventually advise plant operators. This paper discusses the development of an indirect model reference adaptive control (MRAC) system, using the artificial neural network (ANN) technique, and its implementation to control the outlet steam temperature of a sodium to water evaporator. The ANN technique is applied in the identification and in the control process of the indirect MRAC system. The emphasis is placed on demonstrating the efficacy of the indirect MRAC system in controlling the outlet steam temperature of the evaporator, and on showing the important function covered by the ANN technique. An important characteristic of this control system is that it relays only on some selected input variables and output variables of the evaporator model. These are the variables that can be actually measured or calculated in a real environment. The results obtained applying the indirect MRAC system to control the evaporator model are quite remarkable. The outlet temperature of the steam is almost perfectly kept close to its desired set point, when the evaporator is forced to depart from steady state conditions, either due to the variation of some input variables or due to the alteration of some of its internal parameters. The results also show the importance of the role played by the ANN technique in the overall control action. The connecting weights of the ANN nodes self adjust to follow the modifications which may occur in the characteristic of the evaporator model during a transient. The efficiency and the accuracy of the control action highly depends on the on-line identification process of the ANN, which is responsible for upgrading the connecting weights of the ANN nodes. (J.P.N.)

  4. Aging Random Walks

    Böttcher, S

    1997-01-01

    Aging refers to the property of two-time correlation functions to decay very slowly on (at least) two time scales. This phenomenon has gained recent attention due to experimental observations of the history dependent relaxation behavior in amorphous materials (``Glasses'') which pose a challenge to theorist. Aging signals the breaking of time-translational invariance and the violation of the fluctuation dissipation theorem during the relaxation process. But while the origin of aging in disordered media is profound, and the discussion is clad in the language of a well-developed theory, systems as simple as a random walk near a wall can exhibit aging. Such a simple walk serves well to illustrate the phenomenon and some of the physics behind it.

  5. Covering walks in graphs

    Fujie, Futaba

    2014-01-01

    Covering Walks  in Graphs is aimed at researchers and graduate students in the graph theory community and provides a comprehensive treatment on measures of two well studied graphical properties, namely Hamiltonicity and traversability in graphs. This text looks into the famous Kӧnigsberg Bridge Problem, the Chinese Postman Problem, the Icosian Game and the Traveling Salesman Problem as well as well-known mathematicians who were involved in these problems. The concepts of different spanning walks with examples and present classical results on Hamiltonian numbers and upper Hamiltonian numbers of graphs are described; in some cases, the authors provide proofs of these results to illustrate the beauty and complexity of this area of research. Two new concepts of traceable numbers of graphs and traceable numbers of vertices of a graph which were inspired by and closely related to Hamiltonian numbers are introduced. Results are illustrated on these two concepts and the relationship between traceable concepts and...

  6. Neuromechanical Control for Dynamic Bipedal Walking with Reduced Impact Forces

    Widenka, Johannes; Xiong, Xiaofeng; Matthias Braun, Jan;

    2016-01-01

    Human walking emerges from an intricate interaction of nervous and musculoskeletal systems. Inspired by this principle, we integrate neural control and muscle-like mechanisms to achieve neuromechanical control of the biped robot RunBot. As a result, the neuromechanical controller enables RunBot t......Bot to perform more human-like walking and reduce impact force during walking, compared to original neural control. Moreover, it also generates adaptive joint motions of RunBot; thereby allowing it to deal with different terrains......Human walking emerges from an intricate interaction of nervous and musculoskeletal systems. Inspired by this principle, we integrate neural control and muscle-like mechanisms to achieve neuromechanical control of the biped robot RunBot. As a result, the neuromechanical controller enables Run...

  7. Bounded Discrete Walks

    Banderier, Cyril; Nicodeme, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    This article tackles the enumeration and asymptotics of directed lattice paths (that are isomorphic to unidimensional paths) of bounded height (walks below one wall, or between two walls, for \\emphany finite set of jumps). Thus, for any lattice paths, we give the generating functions of bridges (``discrete'' Brownian bridges) and reflected bridges (``discrete'' reflected Brownian bridges) of a given height. It is a new success of the ``kernel method'' that the generating functions of such wal...

  8. Nordic Walking Classes

    Fitness Club

    2015-01-01

    Four classes of one hour each are held on Tuesdays. RDV barracks parking at Entrance A, 10 minutes before class time. Spring Course 2015: 05.05/12.05/19.05/26.05 Prices 40 CHF per session + 10 CHF club membership 5 CHF/hour pole rental Check out our schedule and enroll at: https://espace.cern.ch/club-fitness/Lists/Nordic%20Walking/NewForm.aspx? Hope to see you among us! fitness.club@cern.ch

  9. Physical activity effected by fast walking in elderly patients with type 2 diabetic disease%快速健步走运动对老年2型糖尿病患者身体活动能力的影响

    李艳玲; 张伟; 张金立; 冯娜; 许浩军

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of fast walking exercise on the physical activity in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in glucose metabolism and physical activity indicators. Methods 80 patients with T2DM were randomly divided into two groups:exercise group and the control group, 40 cases in each group. Exercise group performed on 16 weeks of fast walking, before the movement of glucose metabolism and physical activity indicators were compared. Results The experimental group iftness program VO2max before and after exercise, 30s arm lfexion and extension, 2min standing still, chair-reach, grab the back stretch, 6min walk, six test scores were signiifcantly increased (P0.05). 2h postprandial blood glucose (2hPG) decreased significantly (P0.05). Lower extremity muscle strength tests comparing exercise group had ankle flexion and extension muscle strength growth to varying. Conclusion Fast walking exercise training program will help to improve glucose metabolism and activity in patients with T2DM.%目的:探讨快速健步走运动对老年2型糖尿病(T2DM)患者糖代谢及身体活动能力各项指标的影响。方法将T2DM患者80例随机分为运动组及对照组,每组40例。对运动组患者进行为期16周的快速健步走运动训练,将运动前后糖代谢及身体活动能力各项指标进行对比。结果运动组运动前后体适能项目VO2max 、2 min原地踏步、6 min行走、30 s臂屈伸运动、抓背伸展运动、坐椅体前伸运动等6项测试指标比较差异有统计学意义(P0.05);运动组患者餐后2 h血糖下降明显(P0.05)。下肢肌力测试比较,运动组患者踝关节屈伸肌力量均有不同程度增长。结论快速健步走运动训练方案有利于改善T2DM患者糖代谢及活动能力。

  10. Random walks of a quantum particle on a circle

    When the quantum planar rotor is put on a lattice, its dynamics can be approximated by random walks on a circle. This allows for fast and accurate Monto Carlo simulations to determine the topological charge of different configurations of the system and thereby the Θ-dependency of the lowest energy levels

  11. Walking with springs

    Sugar, Thomas G.; Hollander, Kevin W.; Hitt, Joseph K.

    2011-04-01

    Developing bionic ankles poses great challenges due to the large moment, power, and energy that are required at the ankle. Researchers have added springs in series with a motor to reduce the peak power and energy requirements of a robotic ankle. We developed a "robotic tendon" that reduces the peak power by altering the required motor speed. By changing the required speed, the spring acts as a "load variable transmission." If a simple motor/gearbox solution is used, one walking step would require 38.8J and a peak motor power of 257 W. Using an optimized robotic tendon, the energy required is 21.2 J and the peak motor power is reduced to 96.6 W. We show that adding a passive spring in parallel with the robotic tendon reduces peak loads but the power and energy increase. Adding a passive spring in series with the robotic tendon reduces the energy requirements. We have built a prosthetic ankle SPARKy, Spring Ankle with Regenerative Kinetics, that allows a user to walk forwards, backwards, ascend and descend stairs, walk up and down slopes as well as jog.

  12. The quenched invariance principle for random walks in random environments admitting a bounded cycle representation

    Deuschel, Jean-Dominique; Kösters, Holger

    2008-01-01

    We derive a quenched invariance principle for random walks in random environments whose transition probabilities are defined in terms of weighted cycles of bounded length. To this end, we adapt the proof for random walks among random conductances by Sidoravicius and Sznitman (Probab. Theory Related Fields 129 (2004) 219--244) to the non-reversible setting.

  13. Adaptive fusion method of visible light and infrared images based on non-subsampled shearlet transform and fast non-negative matrix factorization

    Kong, Weiwei; Lei, Yang; Zhao, Huaixun

    2014-11-01

    The issue of visible light and infrared images fusion has been an active topic in both military and civilian areas, and a great many relevant algorithms and techniques have been developed accordingly. This paper addresses a novel adaptive approach to the above two patterns of images fusion problem, employing multi-scale geometry analysis (MGA) of non-subsampled shearlet transform (NSST) and fast non-negative matrix factorization (FNMF) together. Compared with other existing conventional MGA tools, NSST owns not only better feature-capturing capabilities, but also much lower computational complexities. As a modification version of the classic NMF model, FNMF overcomes the local optimum property inherent in NMF to a large extent. Furthermore, use of the FNMF with a less complex structure and much fewer iteration numbers required leads to the enhancement of the overall computational efficiency, which is undoubtedly meaningful and promising in so many real-time applications especially the military and medical technologies. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method is superior to other current popular ones in both aspects of subjective visual and objective performance.

  14. Persistence of random walk records

    We study records generated by Brownian particles in one dimension. Specifically, we investigate an ordinary random walk and define the record as the maximal position of the walk. We compare the record of an individual random walk with the mean record, obtained as an average over infinitely many realizations. We term the walk ‘superior’ if the record is always above average, and conversely, the walk is said to be ‘inferior’ if the record is always below average. We find that the fraction of superior walks, S, decays algebraically with time, S ∼ t−β, in the limit t → ∞, and that the persistence exponent is nontrivial, β = 0.382 258…. The fraction of inferior walks, I, also decays as a power law, I ∼ t−α, but the persistence exponent is smaller, α = 0.241 608…. Both exponents are roots of transcendental equations involving the parabolic cylinder function. To obtain these theoretical results, we analyze the joint density of superior walks with a given record and position, while for inferior walks it suffices to study the density as a function of position. (paper)

  15. Extendable self-avoiding walks

    Grimmett, Geoffrey R.; Holroyd, Alexander E; Peres, Yuval

    2013-01-01

    The connective constant mu of a graph is the exponential growth rate of the number of n-step self-avoiding walks starting at a given vertex. A self-avoiding walk is said to be forward (respectively, backward) extendable if it may be extended forwards (respectively, backwards) to a singly infinite self-avoiding walk. It is called doubly extendable if it may be extended in both directions simultaneously to a doubly infinite self-avoiding walk. We prove that the connective constants for forward,...

  16. Physical implementation of quantum walks

    Manouchehri, Kia

    2013-01-01

    Given the extensive application of random walks in virtually every science related discipline, we may be at the threshold of yet another problem solving paradigm with the advent of quantum walks. Over the past decade, quantum walks have been explored for their non-intuitive dynamics, which may hold the key to radically new quantum algorithms. This growing interest has been paralleled by a flurry of research into how one can implement quantum walks in laboratories. This book presents numerous proposals as well as actual experiments for such a physical realization, underpinned by a wide range of

  17. Walking. Sensing. Participation

    Bødker, Mads

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses three meditations to contemplate walking, sensing and participation as three ways with which we can extend the notion of ‘experiential computing’ proposed by Yoo (2010). By using the form of meditations, loosely associated concepts that are part introspective and part ‘causative’, i...... intended to also inform the design of technologies for the future. By emphasizing the senses and the body and their importance to an extended notion of sensory apprenticeship (Pink, 2009), the paper suggests alternative routes to knowing and representation in IS related fieldwork....

  18. Random walk loop soup

    Lawler, Gregory F.; Ferreras, José A. Trujillo

    2004-01-01

    The Brownian loop soup introduced in Lawler and Werner (2004) is a Poissonian realization from a sigma-finite measure on unrooted loops. This measure satisfies both conformal invariance and a restriction property. In this paper, we define a random walk loop soup and show that it converges to the Brownian loop soup. In fact, we give a strong approximation result making use of the strong approximation result of Koml\\'os, Major, and Tusn\\'ady. To make the paper self-contained, we include a proof...

  19. The quantum walk temperature

    Romanelli, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    A thermodynamic theory is developed to describe the behavior of the entanglement between the coin and position degrees of freedom of the quantum walk on the line. This theory shows that, in spite of the unitary evolution, a steady state is established after a Markovian transient stage. This study suggests that if a quantum dynamics is developed in a composite Hilbert space (i.e. the tensor product of several sub-spaces) then the behavior of an operator that only belongs to one of the sub-spaces may camouflage the unitary character of the global evolution.

  20. A slow walk back

    Woof, M.

    2002-09-01

    The article reports on the activity in the dragline sector which has been greater in the past 18 months than in previous years. One notable event is the recent order by BNI Coal in the USA of a large walking dragline, the Marion 8200 model from Bucyrus, for removal of overburden at the Center Mine in North Dakota. The Marison draglines have an oval rigid structure which provides an effective load and boom support. The article reports uses of other Bucyrus draglines in Canada and Australia. 2 figs.

  1. Quantum walk search on Johnson graphs

    Wong, Thomas G.

    2016-05-01

    The Johnson graph J(n,k) is defined by n symbols, where vertices are k-element subsets of the symbols, and vertices are adjacent if they differ in exactly one symbol. In particular, J(n,1) is the complete graph K n , and J(n,2) is the strongly regular triangular graph T n , both of which are known to support fast spatial search by continuous-time quantum walk. In this paper, we prove that J(n,3), which is the n-tetrahedral graph, also supports fast search. In the process, we show that a change of basis is needed for degenerate perturbation theory to accurately describe the dynamics. This method can also be applied to general Johnson graphs J(n,k) with fixed k.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF A FIELD TEST FOR EVALUATING AEROBIC FITNESS IN MIDDLE-AGED ADULTS: VALIDITY OF A 15-M INCREMENTAL SHUTTLE WALK AND RUN TEST

    Kotaro Mikawa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to develop a standardized and externally paced field test (15-m Incremental Shuttle Walk and Run Test [15mISWRT], incorporating an incremental and progressive structure, to assess aerobic fitness in middle-aged adults. 68 middle-aged men performed three tests in random order between one to two week intervals: 15-m ISWRT, cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPX, and 1500-m fast walk. Variables evaluated were 15-m ISWRT performance (distance completed, VO2max measured by CPX, 1500-m fast walk performance (walking time, and HR response in 15-m ISWRT and 1500-m fast walk. Validity of the 15-m ISWRT was tested by comparing the associations among the 15-m ISWRT performance, VO2max and the 1500-m fast walk performance. Changes in HR response during the 15-m ISWRT and the 1500-m fast walk were also compared. Correlations between each variable were as follows: the correlation between 15- m ISWRT performance and VO2max was very high, r = 0.86 (p < 0.01, the correlation between the 1500-m fast walk and VO2max was r = ?0.51 (p < 0.01. HR response during the 15-m ISWRT gently increased initially, whereas HR response during the 1500-m fast walk rapidly increased from the start. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the 15-m ISWRT is valid and safe for evaluating VO2max in middle-aged adults.

  3. Biped walking robot based on a 2-UPU+2-UU parallel mechanism

    Miao, Zhihuai; Yao, Yan'an; Kong, Xianwen

    2014-03-01

    Existing biped robots mainly fall into two categories: robots with left and right feet and robots with upper and lower feet. The load carrying capability of a biped robot is quite limited since the two feet of a walking robot supports the robot alternatively during walking. To improve the load carrying capability, a novel biped walking robot is proposed based on a 2-UPU+2-UU parallel mechanism. The biped walking robot is composed of two identical platforms(feet) and four limbs, including two UPU(universal-prismatic-universal serial chain) limbs and two UU limbs. To enhance its terrain adaptability like articulated vehicles, the two feet of the biped walking robot are designed as two vehicles in detail. The conditions that the geometric parameters of the feet must satisfy are discussed. The degrees-of-freedom of the mechanism is analyzed by using screw theory. Gait analysis, kinematic analysis and stability analysis of the mechanism are carried out to verify the structural design parameters. The simulation results validate the feasibility of walking on rugged terrain. Experiments with a physical prototype show that the novel biped walking robot can walk stably on smooth terrain. Due to its unique feet design and high stiffness, the biped walking robot may adapt to rugged terrain and is suitable for load-carrying.

  4. The effect of walking speed on muscle function and mechanical energetics

    Neptune, Richard R.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Kautz, Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    Modulating speed over a large range is important in walking, yet understanding how the neuromotor patterns adapt to the changing energetic demands of different speeds is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to identify functional and energetic adaptations in individual muscles in response to walking at faster steady-state speeds using muscle-actuated forward dynamics simulations. The simulation data were invariant with speed as to whether muscles contributed to trunk support, fo...

  5. Endless self-avoiding walks

    Clisby, Nathan

    2013-06-01

    We introduce a self-avoiding walk model for which end-effects are completely eliminated. We enumerate the number of these walks for various lattices in dimensions two and three, and use these enumerations to study the properties of this model. We find that endless self-avoiding walks have the same connective constant as self-avoiding walks, and the same Flory exponent ν. However, there is no power law correction to the exponential number growth for this new model, i.e. the critical exponent γ = 1 exactly in any dimension. In addition, the number growth has no analytic corrections to scaling, and we have convincing numerical evidence to support the conjecture that the amplitude for the number growth is a universal quantity. The technique by which end-effects are eliminated may be generalized to other models of polymers such as interacting self-avoiding walks.

  6. Endless self-avoiding walks

    We introduce a self-avoiding walk model for which end-effects are completely eliminated. We enumerate the number of these walks for various lattices in dimensions two and three, and use these enumerations to study the properties of this model. We find that endless self-avoiding walks have the same connective constant as self-avoiding walks, and the same Flory exponent ν. However, there is no power law correction to the exponential number growth for this new model, i.e. the critical exponent γ = 1 exactly in any dimension. In addition, the number growth has no analytic corrections to scaling, and we have convincing numerical evidence to support the conjecture that the amplitude for the number growth is a universal quantity. The technique by which end-effects are eliminated may be generalized to other models of polymers such as interacting self-avoiding walks. (paper)

  7. Quantum walks and search algorithms

    Portugal, Renato

    2013-01-01

    This book addresses an interesting area of quantum computation called quantum walks, which play an important role in building quantum algorithms, in particular search algorithms. Quantum walks are the quantum analogue of classical random walks. It is known that quantum computers have great power for searching unsorted databases. This power extends to many kinds of searches, particularly to the problem of finding a specific location in a spatial layout, which can be modeled by a graph. The goal is to find a specific node knowing that the particle uses the edges to jump from one node to the next. This book is self-contained with main topics that include: Grover's algorithm, describing its geometrical interpretation and evolution by means of the spectral decomposition of the evolution operater Analytical solutions of quantum walks on important graphs like line, cycles, two-dimensional lattices, and hypercubes using Fourier transforms Quantum walks on generic graphs, describing methods to calculate the limiting d...

  8. Walking for art's sake

    2005-01-01

      The man who compared himself to a proton ! On 20 May, Gianni Motti went down into the LHC tunnel and walked around the 27 kilometres of the underground ring at an average, unaccelerated pace of 5 kph. This was an artistic rather than an athletic performance, aimed at drawing a parallel between the fantastic speed of the beams produced by the future accelerator and the leisurely stroll of a human. The artist, who hails from Lombardy, was accompanied by cameraman Ivo Zanetti, who filmed the event from start to finish, and physicist Jean-Pierre Merlo. The first part of the film can be seen at the Villa Bernasconi, 8 route du Grand-Lancy, Grand Lancy, until 26 June.

  9. Walking for art's sake

    2005-01-01

    The man who compared himself to a proton ! On 20 May, Gianni Motti went down into the LHC tunnel and walked around the 27 kilometres of the underground ring at an average, unaccelerated pace of 5 kph. This was an artistic rather than an athletic performance, aimed at drawing a parallel between the fantastic speed of the beams produced by the future accelerator and the leisurely stroll of a human. The artist, who hails from Lombardy, was accompanied by cameraman Ivo Zanetti, who filmed the event from start to finish, and physicist Jean-Pierre Merlo. The first part of the film can be seen at the Villa Bernasconi, 8 route du Grand-Lancy, Grand Lancy, until 26 June.

  10. walk around Irkutsk

    Elena Grigoryeva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available It is noteworthy that this country develops through two types of events: either through a jubilee or through a catastrophe.It seems that Irkutsk Airport will be built only after the next crash. At least the interest to this problem returns regularly after sad events, and this occurs almost half a century (a jubilee, too! – the Council of Ministers decided to relocate the Airport away from the city as long ago as 1962. The Airport does not relate to the topic of this issue, but an attentive reader understands that it is our Carthage, and that the Airport should be relocated. The Romans coped with it faster and more effectively.Back to Irkutsk’s jubilee, we should say that we will do without blare of trumpets. We will just make an unpretentious walk around the city in its summer 350. Each our route covers new (some of them have been completed by the jubilee and old buildings, some of them real monuments. All these buildings are integrated into public spaces of different quality and age.We will also touch on the problems, for old houses, especially the wooden ones often provoke a greedy developer to demolish or to burn them down. Thus a primitive thrift estimates an output of additional square meters. Not to mention how attractive it is to seize public spaces without demolition or without reallocation of the dwellers. Or, rather, the one who is to preserve, to cherish and to improve such houses for the good of the citizens never speaks about this sensitive issue. So we have to do it.Walking is a no-hurry genre, unlike the preparation for the celebration. Walking around the city you like is a pleasant and cognitive process. It will acquaint the architects with the works of their predecessors and colleagues. We hope that such a walk may be interesting for Irkutsk citizens and visitors, too. Isn’t it interesting to learn “at first hand” the intimate details of the restoration of the Trubetskoys’ estate