WorldWideScience

Sample records for adaptation workshop summary

  1. Climate variability and climate change vulnerability and adaptation. Workshop summary

    Representatives from fifteen countries met in Prague, Czech Republic, on September 11-15, 1995, to share results from the analysis of vulnerability and adaptation to global climate change. The workshop focused on the issues of global climate change and its impacts on various sectors of a national economy. The U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC), which has been signed by more than 150 governments worldwide, calls on signatory parties to develop and communicate measures they are implementing to respond to global climate change. An analysis of a country's vulnerability to changes in the climate helps it identify suitable adaptation measures. These analyses are designed to determine the extent of the impacts of global climate change on sensitive sectors such as agricultural crops, forests, grasslands and livestock, water resources, and coastal areas. Once it is determined how vulnerable a country may be to climate change, it is possible to identify adaptation measures for ameliorating some or all of the effects.The objectives of the vulnerability and adaptation workshop were to: The objectives of the vulnerability and adaptation workshop were to: Provide an opportunity for countries to describe their study results; Encourage countries to learn from the experience of the more complete assessments and adjust their studies accordingly; Identify issues and analyses that require further investigation; and Summarize results and experiences for governmental and intergovernmental organizations

  2. SPLASH'13 workshops summary

    Balzer, S.; Schultz, U. P.

    Following its long-standing tradition, SPLASH 2013 will host 19 high-quality workshops, allowing their participants to meet and discuss research questions with peers, to mature new and exciting ideas, and to build up communities and start new collaborations. SPLASH workshops complement the main t...

  3. Summary of cosmology workshop

    Tarun Sandeep

    2004-10-01

    Cosmology is passing through a golden phase of rapid advance. The cosmology workshop at ICGC-2004 attracted a large number of research contributions to diverse topics of cosmology. I attempt to classify and summarize the research work and results of the oral and poster presentations made at the meeting.

  4. Experimental halls workshop summary

    On May 26 and 27, 1976, approximately 50 people met for an informal workshop on plans for experimental halls for ISABELLE. Plans as they exist in the May 1976 version of the ISABELLE proposal were presented. Discussions were held on the following four general topics by separate working groups: (1) pros and cons of open areas as compared with enclosed halls; (2) experimental hall needs of ep, anti pp, and other options; (3) hall for the lepton detector; and (4) hall for the hadron spectrometer. The planning for experimental halls at PEP, the hall for the lepton detector, the hadron spectrometer, and open areas are discussed

  5. Summary of the workshop

    The questions addressed through the Agenda of the Workshop ''The Safety of Nuclear Installations of the Next Generation and Beyond'' held in Chicago, Illinois, USA, on 28-31 August 1989 have been the following: what might be the type and extent of the future requirement for heightened use of nuclear energy, how must the matter of public concern over safety of nuclear energy be addressed if this technology is to be returned to its previous state of active growth, what lines of development of future types of nuclear plants are being pursued throughout the world that can affect the safety and acceptability of nuclear energy in the decades to come, what associated changes pertaining to safety will be needed in the nuclear field if the challenge is to be met positively

  6. Summary of longitudinal instabilities workshop

    Chasman, R.

    1976-01-01

    A five-day ISABELLE workshop on longitudinal instabilities was held at Brookhaven, August 9-13, 1976. About a dozen outside accelerator experts, both from Europe and the U.S.A., joined the local staff for discussions of longitudinal instabilities in ISABELLE. An agenda of talks was scheduled for the first day of the workshop. Later during the week, a presentation was given on the subject ''A more rigorous treatment of Landau damping in longitudinal beam instabilities''. A few progress meetings were held in which disagreements regarding calculations of coupling impedances were clarified. A summary session was held on the last day. Heavy emphasis was put on single bunched beam instabilities in the microwave region extending above the cut-off frequency of the ISABELLE vacuum chamber.

  7. National stakeholder workshop summary report

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This is a summary of the plenary sessions and small group discussion sessions from the fourth National Stakeholder Workshop sponsored by the DOE Office of Worker and Community Transition held in Atlanta, Georgia on March 13--15, 1996. Topics of the sessions included work force planning and restructuring, worker participation in health and safety, review of actions and commitments, lessons learned in collective bargaining agreements, work force restructuring guidance, work force planning, update on community transition activities. Also included are appendices listing the participants and DOE contacts.

  8. Nuclear Energy Innovation Workshops. Executive Summary

    Allen, Todd [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jackson, John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hildebrandt, Phil [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Baker, Suzy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The nuclear energy innovation workshops were organized and conducted by INL on March 2-4, 2015 at the five NUC universities and Boise State University. The output from these workshops is summarized with particular attention to final summaries that were provided by technical leads at each of the workshops. The current revision includes 3-4 punctuation corrections and a correction of the month of release from May to June.

  9. Summary of the PSI workshop

    The PSI workshop had been held at JAERI-Naka, from March 15th to 16th, 2002. This workshop is held twice a year as the skull practice session to report the recent progress on the plasma - surface interactions of the experimental reactors such as ITER, JT-60, LHD, etc. and the development of the plasma facing components. There were 34 participants from the university and 18 participants from JAERI and 26 papers were presented. This booklet was published for the purpose of saving a record of this workshop performed in oral lecture form. (author)

  10. Summary of the PSI workshop

    NONE

    2003-03-01

    The PSI workshop had been held at JAERI-Naka, from March 15th to 16th, 2002. This workshop is held twice a year as the skull practice session to report the recent progress on the plasma - surface interactions of the experimental reactors such as ITER, JT-60, LHD, etc. and the development of the plasma facing components. There were 34 participants from the university and 18 participants from JAERI and 26 papers were presented. This booklet was published for the purpose of saving a record of this workshop performed in oral lecture form. (author)

  11. Summary of the PST 2001 Workshop

    ''The Workshop on Polarized Sources and Targets (PST 2001) was held at the Brown County Inn in Nashville, Indiana from September 30th and October 4th, 2001. It was organized by the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility in Bloomington, Indiana. The Workshop is the most recent of a series held at about two year intervals, the last of which was held in Erlangen, Germany in 1999. About 80 scientists attended the Workshop. There were 12 invited talks, 30 contributed talks and 15 posters. E. Steffens (Erlangen) gave the summary talk at the conclusion of the Workshop. The subjects addressed in the Workshop included atomic beam polarized H and D targets, solid polarized targets, spin polarized HD, polarized electron sources, polarized ion sources, hadron polarimetry at intermediate to high energies, electron polarimetry, polarized neutrons and the use of polarized noble gases in medical imaging

  12. Midwest Transmission Workshop III Summary

    Kevin Bryan

    2003-03-12

    OAK-B135 On March 12-13, 2002, the National Wind Coordinating Committee (NWCC), in cooperation with regional stakeholders, held a two-day workshop: Planning for Electrical Transmission Needs in the Upper Midwest. The workshop was the outgrowth of an effort to develop a forum and process for consideration of transmission options that strives for equitable allocation of benefits and impacts among all affected parties. The goal of this workshop was to provide a catalyst for an enhanced, inclusive process for transmission planning with participation of and acceptance by all affected stakeholders. Participants in the meeting included representatives of state and regional regulatory agencies, utilities and power generators, the wind industry, environmental and landowner interests, and other interested parties (see Attachment A for a list of meeting participants).

  13. Workshop on momentum distributions: Summary

    This has been an extraordinary Workshop touching many branches of physics. The Workshop has treated momentum distributions in fluid and solid condensed matter, in nuclei, and in electronic systems. Both theoretical and experimental concepts and methods have been considered in all these branches. A variety of specific illustrations and applications in physical systems have been presented. One finds that some common unifying themes emerge. One finds, also, that some examples are available to illustrate where one branch is more mature than others and to contrast where expectations for future progress may be most encouraged. 6 refs., 2 figs

  14. Photosynthesis, environmental change, and plant adaptation: Research topics in plant molecular ecology. Summary report of a workshop

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    As we approach the 21st Century, it is becoming increasingly clear that human activities, primarily related to energy extraction and use, will lead to marked environmental changes at the local, regional, and global levels. The realized and the potential photosynthetic performance of plants is determined by a combination of intrinsic genetic information and extrinsic environmental factors, especially climate. It is essential that the effects of environmental changes on the photosynthetic competence of individual species, communities, and ecosystems be accurately assessed. From October 24 to 26, 1993, a group of scientists specializing in various aspects of plant science met to discuss how our predictive capabilities could be improved by developing a more rational, mechanistic approach to relating photosynthetic processes to environmental factors. A consensus emerged that achieving this goal requires multidisciplinary research efforts that combine tools and techniques of genetics, molecular biology, biophysics, biochemistry, and physiology to understand the principles, mechanisms, and limitations of evolutional adaptation and physiological acclimation of photosynthetic processes. Many of these basic tools and techniques, often developed in other fields of science, already are available but have not been applied in a coherent, coordinated fashion to ecological research. The efforts of this research program are related to the broader efforts to develop more realistic prognostic models to forecast climate change that include photosynthetic responses and feedbacks at the regional and ecosystem levels.

  15. Summary of longitudinal instabilities workshop

    A five-day ISABELLE workshop on longitudinal instabilities was held at BNL, August 9--13, 1976. Heavy emphasis was put on single bunched beam instabilities in the microwave region extending above the cut-off frequency of the ISABELLE vacuum chamber. A discussion is given of the mechanism governing the instability, and calculations as well as measurements of the longitudinal coupling impedances in the ISABELLE rings are described

  16. Summary of Kaon Factory Workshop

    Some highlights of the physics sessions of the Kaon Factory Workshop held in connection with the 8th International Conference on High-Energy Physics and Nuclear Structure in British Columbia in 1979 are presented. Particular emphasis is placed on the different investigations that can be carried out with kaons and antiprotons as opposed to pions and protons. Some data on K + 12C elastic scattering are shown. 3 figures

  17. Undergraduate Chemistry Education: A Workshop Summary

    Sawyer, Keegan; Alper, Joe

    2014-01-01

    "Undergraduate Chemistry Education" is the summary of a workshop convened in May 2013 by the Chemical Science Roundtable of the National Research Council to explore the current state of undergraduate chemistry education. Research and innovation in undergraduate chemistry education has been done for many years, and one goal of this…

  18. Summary and report on four national environmental workshops

    House, Peter W.

    1980-07-01

    Individual abstracts were prepared for the summaries of four workshops held during the last two years: (1) Integrated Assessment for Energy Related Environmental Standards Workshop - Berkeley, California, November 1978; (2) National Ecological Assessment Workshop - Savannah, Georgia, January 1979; (3) National/Regional Modelling Workshop - Reston, Virginia, May 1979; (4) Groundwater Workshop - Albuquerque, New Mexico, January 1980. (JGB)

  19. Midwest Transmission Workshop I Summary

    Kevin Bryan

    2001-05-01

    OAK-B135 The meeting was opened with a review of the purposes of the workshop: (1) Present and discuss key studies and assessments of transmission upgrades, additions and related issues for the upper Midwest, including work that addresses the full range of views on these topics; (2) Understand the various transmission issues in the upper Midwest and discuss options for addressing the issues; and (3) Identify the decision makers and entities that need to play an active role if transmission issues are to be resolved, and agree on next steps for engaging these individuals and organizations through education, outreach, and information dissemination.

  20. Draft Workshop Summary and Presentations

    In 2010, the International Energy Agency (IEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) released a Nuclear Energy Technology Road-map which outlined the steps needed to accelerate the development of nuclear power and its role in achieve deep greenhouse-gas emissions reduction. Both the global energy sector and the outlook for nuclear have changed significantly since then and an update of this Road-map is currently underway. The Paris meeting from January 23-24, 2014, brought together key stakeholders from industry, government, finance and other relevant organisations to help define and prioritise key items to be discussed in the IEA/NEA's Nuclear Road-map Update. One of the expected outcomes of this intensive brainstorming and Road-map development session was to discuss key targets, milestones, policy measures and other actions needed to support the development and deployment of nuclear power. The workshop was organized in 5 sessions dealing with: Session 1 - Technology development needs for nuclear: Reactor technology (Current state of the market, Gen II and Gen III reactors, Long Term Operation for existing fleet, Enhanced safety features, lessons from the Fukushima Daiichi accident, Small Modular Reactors, Gen IV technologies, Other innovations); Fuel cycle and decommissioning (Front and back end of the fuel cycle: development of new fuels such as accident tolerant fuels, reprocessing options storage and disposal of high level waste, extended storage issues, transport; Decommissioning); Session 2: Overcoming barriers to nuclear build (other than financing): Industrial issues (Supply chain bottlenecks (large heavy forgings), localisation, Codes and standards, Licensing - harmonisation, Building on time and on budget); Human resource issues (Training and capacity development needs, for new build and decommissioning and waste management activities, Identification of skills, mobility). Session 3: Economics and Financing of Nuclear (Industry Perspective; New nuclear and

  1. Scaling Climate Change Adaptation in the Northern Great Plains through Regional Climate Summaries and Local Qualitative-quantitative Scenario Planning Workshops

    Ray, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation will describe a project to between ecologists and climate scientists to inform National Park Service managers who are developing scenario planning for their parks and surrounding areas; this effort is advancing scenario methodologies and improving delivery mechanisms and applications to decision-making for National Parks. Climate change is expressed in both regional climatic shifts (e.g., temperature and precipitation changes) and local resource impacts. Resource management in a changing climate is challenging because future climate change and resource responses cannot be precisely predicted. Scenario planning is a tool to assess the range of plausible future conditions. However, selecting, acquiring, synthesizing, and scaling climate information for scenario planning requires significant time and skills. This project, which was recently selected for funding by the NC CSC, has three goals: 1) synthesize climate data into 3-5 distinctly different but plausible climate summaries for the northern Great Plains region; 2) craft summaries of these climate futures that are relevant to local land management units; and 3) apply these local summaries to further develop quantitative climate-resource-management scenarios through participatory workshops and simulation models. We will engage multiple stakeholders in two focal areas within the region: southwestern South Dakota in the vicinity of Badlands National Park, and central North Dakota in the vicinity of Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site. This effort will increase climate change planning efficiency in the region; promote collaborations across jurisdictions; and develop a prototype for a novel, efficient, and replicable form of scenario planning that could serve additional management units.

  2. Belgian Workshop (November 2003) - Executive Summary and International Perspective

    The fourth workshop of the OECD/NEA Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) was hosted by ONDRAF/NIRAS, the Belgian Agency for Radioactive Waste Management and enriched fissile materials. The central theme of the workshop was 'Dealing with interests, values and knowledge in managing risk' within the Belgian context of local partnerships for the long term management of low-level, short-lived radioactive waste. The four-day workshop started with a half-day session in Brussels giving a general introduction on the Belgian context and the local partnership methodology. This was followed by community visits to three local partnerships, PaLoFF in Fleurus-Farciennes, MONA in Mol, and STOLA in Dessel. After the visits, the workshop continued with two full-day sessions in Brussels. One hundred and nineteen registered participants, representing 13 countries, attended the workshop or participated in the community visits. About two thirds were Belgian stakeholders; the remainder came from FSC member organisations. The participants included representatives of municipal governments, civil society organisations, government agencies, industrial companies, the media, and international organisations as well as private citizens, consultants and academics. The four-day meeting was structured as follows: Day 1 morning was devoted to introductory presentations. Information was given on the general radioactive waste management context in Belgium. Regarding the management of LLW, and in particular the search for a disposal facility site, the workshop heard about the local partnership methodology developed by university researchers of the University of Antwerp and the Fondation Universitaire Luxembourgeoise (FUL). These partnerships between the potential host municipalities and the radwaste agency have the mission to develop an integrated facility proposal adapted to local conditions. Community visits took place on Day 1 afternoon and Day 2. Visits offered an opportunity for

  3. Sensors and Controls Workshop Summary Report; TOPICAL

    Higher operating efficiencies, emission reductions, improved reliability, and lower operating costs are benefits that the power industry can realize with the utilization of sensors and controls. However, for the power industry to derive the maximum benefit from sensors and controls, improvements in existing technologies and novel approaches to challenging measurements are needed. Recognizing the importance of sensors and controls, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) sponsored a sensors and controls workshop on April 17 to 18, 2001, in Washington, DC. The workshop focused on identifying technology needs in sensors and controls for existing fossil-energy power plants as well as future facilities conceived under the Vision 21 Program. Forty-six experts from 29 organizations, including private industry, research laboratories, academia, and government agencies, attended the workshop. The meeting opened with keynote speakers from NETL and the private sector. NETL officials spoke of the Vision 21 and advanced research programs. Speakers from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Delphi Automotive Systems Research Laboratory discussed the improvements realized with their respective operation through the use of sensors and controls. NETL keynote speakers Robert Romanosky and Carl Bauer emphasized that developing sensor and control systems plays a critical role in DOE Office of Fossil Energy Vision 21 Program, clean coal activities under the Power Plant Improvement Initiative, and the proposed Clean Coal Power Initiative. The Vision 21 Program is aimed at providing technologies for ultra-clean fossil-fuel-based energy production with 60- to 75-percent efficiencies and near zero emissions. The program also uses a modular approach to present opportunities to not only generate power, but also co-produce clean fuels, chemicals, steam, and other useful products. The ultra-high efficiency and environmental performance goals

  4. Summary session of the Gas Sampling Calorimetry Workshop

    The summary session of the Gas Sampling Calorimetry Workshop was a review and discussion session. A number of questions were raised and briefly discussed. More extensive discussions of energy resolution formed the heart of the final session

  5. The future of nuclear weapons in Europe workshop summary

    A summary is presented of a workshop that addressed the future of nuclear weapons in Europe. The workshop topics included the evolving European security environment; the Soviet Union, Eastern Europe, and nuclear weapons; the United States, NATO, and nuclear weapons; and Western Europe and nuclear weapons. The workshop, held at Los Alamos July 26, 1991, was sponsored by the Center for National Security Studies of the Los Alamos National Laboratory

  6. Kirwin National Wildlife Refuge : Vision & Goals Workshop summary report

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This summary report is on the Vision and Goals Workshop that took place February 12-13, 2003. The purpose for the workshop was to provide a forum for U.S. Fish and...

  7. National stakeholder workshops on climate change - 2002 : summary report

    This summary report is based on 14 reports prepared following a series of 1 day climate change workshops held in 14 cities across Canada during the period of June 7 to 24, 2002. The input has been grouped into important themes that were highlighted during the workshops. The key messages focused on analysis and modelling, an overall approach to the Kyoto Protocol, targeted measures, domestic emissions trading, purchases of international emissions permits, preferred approach to the Kyoto Protocol, risks, and impacts and adaptations. The workshops were designed to provide participants with a better understanding of ways to respond to climate change and the Kyoto Protocol. They were also designed to obtain the views of the participants and options contained in the Federal Discussion Paper on Canada's Contribution to Addressing Climate Change, as well as the National Climate Change Process, and the national analysis conducted by the Analysis and Modelling Group (AMG). While many participants agreed that climate change is a real problem requiring attention, there were widely divergent views regarding the ratification of the Kyoto Protocol. Industry participants suggested alternative approaches that include a longer time frame, less restrictive targets and greater harmonization with the United States approach. The Alberta Plan gained some interest because it contained some of these characteristics, however, some argued that the Alberta Action Plan must meet the Kyoto target. There was good support for Targeted Measures, a mix of support and some concerns for Domestic Emissions Trading (DET), and opposition to the international purchases under the Clean Development Mechanisms and Joint Implementation. There was little support for Canada's request for Clean Energy Export Credits. The western provinces and Quebec were in favour of negotiated covenants with a regulatory backstop as an alternative to DET. 1 tab

  8. Reactive multiphase flow simulation workshop summary

    VanderHeyden, W.B.

    1995-09-01

    A workshop on computer simulation of reactive multiphase flow was held on May 18 and 19, 1995 in the Computational Testbed for Industry at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico. Approximately 35 to 40 people attended the workshop. This included 21 participants from 12 companies representing the petroleum, chemical, environmental and consumer products industries, two representatives from the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies and several from Los Alamos. The dialog at the meeting suggested that reactive multiphase flow simulation represents an excellent candidate for government/industry/academia collaborative research. A white paper on a potential consortium for reactive multiphase flow with input from workshop participants will be issued separately.

  9. PHEV Market Introduction Workshop Summary Report

    Weber, Adrienne M [ORNL; Sikes, Karen R [ORNL

    2009-03-01

    The Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) Market Introduction Study Workshop was attended by approximately forty representatives from various stakeholder organizations. The event took place at the Hotel Helix in Washington, D.C. on December 1-2, 2008. The purpose of this workshop was to follow-up last year s PHEV Value Proposition Study, which showed that indeed, a viable and even thriving market for these vehicles can exist by the year 2030. This workshop aimed to identify immediate action items that need to be undertaken to achieve a successful market introduction and ensuing large market share of PHEVs in the U.S. automotive fleet.

  10. Demonstration and Deployment Strategy Workshop: Summary

    none,

    2014-05-01

    This report is based on the proceedings of the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Demonstration and Deployment Strategy Workshop, held on March 12–13, 2014, at Argonne National Laboratory.

  11. Workshop on entrepreneurial finance: a summary

    Timothy Dunne; Scott Shane; Thomson, James B.

    2009-01-01

    This Policy Discussion Paper summarizes papers that were presented at the Workshop on Entrepreneurial Finance, which was held March 12?13, 2009, at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. Researchers presented new empirical research that exploits data sets on entrepreneurial activity that are based on broad and representative data samples. Papers in the workshop focused primarily on analyses of the sources and structure of start-up finance, including the importance of bank lending, venture cap...

  12. NATO and a Nuclear Iran - Concept Paper, Workshop Summary

    On October 7, 2010, The Foundation for Strategic Research (Fondation pour la Recherche Strategique) convened a day-long workshop in Paris to discuss the consequences for NATO of a nuclear-armed Iran, with support from the German Marshall Fund of the United States. The workshop involved around twenty experts from Alliance and non-Alliance countries, NATO officials, and French officials. This paper is a brief summary of the debate, focusing on the main ideas developed by the participants

  13. Informal workshop on intense polarized ion sources: a summary

    An Informal Workshop on Intense Polarized Ion Sources was held on March 6, 1980, at the O'Hare Hilton Hotel, Chicago, Illinois. The purpose of the Workshop was to discuss problems in developing higher-intensity polarized proton sources, particularly the optically-pumped source recently proposed by L.W. Anderson of the University of Wisconsin. A summary of the discussions is reported

  14. STATE OF THE PRACTICE FOR BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS - SUMMARY OF USEPA WORKSHOP ON BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS: SUMMARY

    This is a summary of the Workshop on Landfill Bioreactors, held 9/6-7/2000 in Arlington, VA. The purpose of the workshop was to provide a forum to EPA, state and local governments, solid waste industry, and academic research representatives to exchange information and ideas on b...

  15. Executive Summary High-Yield Scenario Workshop Series Report

    Leslie Park Ovard; Thomas H. Ulrich; David J. Muth Jr.; J. Richard Hess; Steven Thomas; Bryce Stokes

    2009-12-01

    To get a collective sense of the impact of research and development (R&D) on biomass resource availability, and to determine the feasibility that yields higher than baseline assumptions used for past assessments could be achieved to support U.S. energy independence, an alternate “High-Yield Scenario” (HYS) concept was presented to industry experts at a series of workshops held in December 2009. The workshops explored future production of corn/agricultural crop residues, herbaceous energy crops (HECs), and woody energy crops (WECs). This executive summary reports the findings of that workshop.

  16. Photovoltaic Performance and Reliability Workshop summary

    Kroposki, Benjamin

    1997-02-01

    The objective of the Photovoltaic Performance and Reliability Workshop was to provide a forum where the entire photovoltaic (PV) community (manufacturers, researchers, system designers, and customers) could get together and discuss technical issues relating to PV. The workshop included presentations from twenty-five speakers and had more than one hundred attendees. This workshop also included several open sessions in which the audience and speakers could discuss technical subjects in depth. Several major topics were discussed including: PV characterization and measurements, service lifetimes for PV devices, degradation and failure mechanisms for PV devices, standardization of testing procedures, AC module performance and reliability testing, inverter performance and reliability testing, standardization of utility interconnect requirements, experience from field deployed systems, and system certification.

  17. Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Strategy Workshop Summary Report

    none,

    2014-07-01

    This report is based on the proceedings of the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Strategy Workshop. The workshop, held March 20–21, 2014, in Golden, Colorado, discussed and detailed the research and development needs for biomass indirect liquefaction. Discussions focused on pathways that convert biomass-based syngas (or any carbon monoxide, hydrogen gaseous stream) to liquid intermediates (alcohols or acids) and further synthesize those intermediates to liquid hydrocarbons that are compatible as either a refinery feed or neat fuel.

  18. Bioproducts to Enable Biofuels Workshop Summary Report

    Bailey, Andrea [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States); Leong, G. Jeremy [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States); Fitzgerald, Nichole [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This report summarizes the results of a public workshop sponsored by DOE/EERE in Westminster, Colorado, on July 16, 2015. The views and opinions of the workshop attendees, as summarized in this document, do not necessarily reflect those of the United States government or any agency thereof, nor do their employees make any warranty, expressed or implied, or assume any liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represent that its use would not infringe upon privately owned rights.

  19. A summary of the SOTANCP3 workshop

    This text summarizes the talks presented at the 3rd International Workshop on State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics (SOTANCP3) held in Yokohama (Japan) from 26 to 30 May 2014. Some personal opinions are also expressed on two much debated topics: the 12C spectrum in the continuum and conflicting interpretations of cluster wave functions

  20. Canada's energy future : 2008 workshop summary

    The National Energy Board hosted this Energy Futures Workshop as a follow-up to its report entitled Canada's Energy Future: Reference Case and Scenarios to 2030, which focused on emerging trends in energy supply and demand. Various energy futures that may be available to Canadians up to the year 2030 were examined. This workshop addressed issues regarding the growing demand for energy, the adequacy of future energy supplies, and related issues of greenhouse gas emissions, emerging technologies, energy infrastructure and energy exports. The workshop was attended by 18 experts who presented their diverse views on long-term energy issues. The sessions of the workshop focused on external and key geopolitical issues that will influence Canadian energy markets; the adoption of alternative and emerging sources of energy; outlook for Canadian oil supply, including oil sands development, reservoir quality, and financial, environmental and technological issues; issues in electricity generation and transmission; gas market dynamics; and carbon dioxide capture and storage and the associated benefits and challenges. There was general consensus that global and Canadian energy markets will remain in a state of flux. Crude oil prices are likely to remain high and volatile. The combination of maturing energy resource basins and geopolitical tensions has created uncertainty about future availability and access to global energy resources. 2 figs., 3 appendices

  1. Summary of ICGC04 Cosmology Workshop

    Souradeep, Tarun

    2005-01-01

    Cosmology is passing through a golden phase of rapid advance. The cosmology workshop at ICGC-2004 attracted a large number of research contributions from diverse topics of cosmology. I attempt to classify and summarize the research work and results of the oral and poster presentations made at the meeting.

  2. Fifth national stakeholder workshop summary report

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    On April 9--11, 1997, the Department of Energy`s Office of Worker and Community Transition convened its fifth National Stakeholder Workshop. The workshop addressed a wide range of work force restructuring and community transition issues critical to the future success of the Department. Two important elements of the meeting were: (1) reviewing progress made on the challenges identified during the March 1996f stakeholder`s meeting in Atlanta, Georgia; and (2) identifying areas that needed priority attention during the early months of the second Clinton Administration. The format of the Workshop included several plenary sessions and a number of small group discussion sessions. The small group sessions focused on topics related to labor issues, work force restructuring, work force planning, community transition, and employee concerns. The sessions provided a wide range of views on worker and community transition issues. The workshop included presentations on the following topics: Welcome and introductions; Opening remarks; Community reuse organizations: recent accomplishments; Privatization: policy, practice and potential pitfalls; Department of Energy`s integrated training initiatives; Congressional perspective on work force restructuring; and, Privatization and the Ten Year Plan.

  3. Science for Society Workshop Summary Report

    Wolfe, Amy K [ORNL; Bjornstad, David J [ORNL; Lenhardt, W Christopher [ORNL; Shumpert, Barry L [ORNL; Wang, Stephanie [ORNL

    2012-02-01

    Science for Society, a workshop held at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on September 27, 20111, explored ways to move Laboratory science toward use. It sought actionable recommendations. Thus the workshop focused on: (1) current practices that promote and inhibit the translation of science into use, (2) principles that could lead to improving ORNL's translational knowledge and technology transfer efforts, and (3) specific recommendations for making these principles operational. This highly interactive workshop struck a positive chord with participants, a group of 26 ORNL staff members from diverse arenas of science and technology (S and T), technology transfer, and external laboratory relations, who represented all levels of science, technology, and management. Recognizing that the transformation of fundamental principles into operational practices often follows a jagged path, the workshop sought to identify key choices that could lead to a smoother journey along this path, as well as choices that created roadblocks and bottlenecks. The workshop emphasized a portion of this pathway, largely excluding the marketplace. Participants noted that research translation includes linkages between fundamental and applied research and development (R and D), and is not restricted to uptake by manufacturers, consumers, or end users. Three crosscutting ideas encapsulate workshop participants observations: (1) ORNL should take more action to usher the translation of its S and T products toward use, so as to make a positive national and global impact and to enhance its own competitiveness in the future; (2) ORNL (and external entities such as DOE and Congress) conveys inconsistent messages with regard to the importance of research translation and application, which (a) creates confusion, (b) poses disincentives to pursue research translation, (c) imposes barriers that inhibit cross-fertilization and collaboration, and (d) diminishes the effectiveness of both the

  4. Linear magnetic fusion: summary of Seattle workshop

    None

    1977-12-01

    The linear-geometry magnetic confinement concept is among the oldest used in the study of high-temperature plasmas. However, it has generally been discounted as a suitable approach for demonstrating controlled thermonuclear fusion because rapid losses from the plasma column ends necessitate very long devices. Further, the losses and how to overcome them have not yet received parametric experimental study, nor do facilities exist with which such definitive experiments could be performed. Nonetheless, the important positive attribute, simplicity, together with the appearance of several ideas for reducing end losses have provided motivation for continued research on linear magnetic fusion (LMF). These motivations led to the LMF workshop, held in Seattle, March 9--11, 1977, which explored the potential of LMF as an alternate approach to fusion. A broad range of LMF aspects were addressed, including radial and axial losses, stability and equilibrium, heating, technology, and reactor considerations. The conclusions drawn at the workshop are summarized.

  5. Biopower Technical Strategy Workshop Summary Report

    none,

    2010-12-01

    Biopower is electricity produced from a wide range of biomass (organic materials found in wood, plants, agricultural waste and other materials). Biomass is a base load renewable energy source with high availability for electricity production. To explore opportunities for biopower in the United States, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Biomass Program conducted the Biopower Technical Strategy Workshop in Denver, Colorado, on December 2–3, 2009. This report summarizes the results of the workshop, which focused on challenges to the expanded use of biopower and the possible solutions, including technology research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) as well as policies and other market transformation mechanisms.

  6. Linear magnetic fusion: summary of Seattle workshop

    The linear-geometry magnetic confinement concept is among the oldest used in the study of high-temperature plasmas. However, it has generally been discounted as a suitable approach for demonstrating controlled thermonuclear fusion because rapid losses from the plasma column ends necessitate very long devices. Further, the losses and how to overcome them have not yet received parametric experimental study, nor do facilities exist with which such definitive experiments could be performed. Nonetheless, the important positive attribute, simplicity, together with the appearance of several ideas for reducing end losses have provided motivation for continued research on linear magnetic fusion (LMF). These motivations led to the LMF workshop, held in Seattle, March 9--11, 1977, which explored the potential of LMF as an alternate approach to fusion. A broad range of LMF aspects were addressed, including radial and axial losses, stability and equilibrium, heating, technology, and reactor considerations. The conclusions drawn at the workshop are summarized

  7. Sixth national stakeholder workshop summary report

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    On June 17--18, 1998, the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Worker and Community Transition convened its sixth National Stakeholder Workshop at the Ramada Plaza Hotel Old Town in Alexandria, Virginia. Approximately 325 stakeholders attended representing DOE headquarters and field offices, contractors, labor organizations, state and local government, education and community interest groups. The meeting addressed the progress made on the issues and challenges identified at the last stakeholder`s meeting in Oakland, California on April 9--11, 1997. Also discussed were the full range of the Department`s work force issues and creative solutions to the inherent challenges of simultaneously implementing the Department`s post Cold-War mission, work force restructuring guidance, contract reform objectives, asset disposition, performance-based management requirements, and business process improvement policies. The format of the Workshop included several plenary sessions and a number of small group discussion sessions. The small group sessions focused on topics related to labor issues, work force restructuring, work force planning, community transition, and employee concerns. The sessions provided a wide range of views on worker and community transition issues. The plenary sessions of the Workshop included presentations on the following topics: welcome and introductions; opening remarks; building a better labor-management relationship; keynote speech from Secretary of Energy Federico Pena; meeting tomorrow`s challenges (early site closures); harnessing the contracting process to encourage local growth; and, the British experience in economic conversion.

  8. SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] aperture workshop summary

    The SSC Aperture Workshop was held November 5-9, 1984 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The workshop focused on issues related to the selection of an optimum aperture for the SSC. Aperture is a critical issue at this early stage of design, because it strongly affects both the construction cost and the satisfactory commissioning and operation of the collider. The workshop had a double purpose: To design a course of action for determining the needed physical and dynamic aperture and commensurate magnetic field specifications of a high luminosity proton collider with a beam energy of 20 TeV, and to prepare a proposal for carrying out the recommended R ampersand D program in two steps -- a four-month intensive phase to provide knowledge essential for conceptual design and magnet selection, and a longer term effort to supply details and ultimately to support the construction, commissioning, and operation of the new collider. To accomplish these objectives, the participants met in the following working groups, each led by a coordinator, which are discussed in this paper: test lattices; aperture requirements; magnet errors; formats, data bases, networks and lattice codes; tracking codes; analytical screening; and experiments on existing machines

  9. PV performance modeling workshop summary report.

    Stein, Joshua S.; Tasca, Coryne Adelle (SRA International, Inc., Fairfax, VA); Cameron, Christopher P.

    2011-05-01

    During the development of a solar photovoltaic (PV) energy project, predicting expected energy production from a system is a key part of understanding system value. System energy production is a function of the system design and location, the mounting configuration, the power conversion system, and the module technology, as well as the solar resource. Even if all other variables are held constant, annual energy yield (kWh/kWp) will vary among module technologies because of differences in response to low-light levels and temperature. A number of PV system performance models have been developed and are in use, but little has been published on validation of these models or the accuracy and uncertainty of their output. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar Energy Technologies Program, Sandia National Laboratories organized a PV Performance Modeling Workshop in Albuquerque, New Mexico, September 22-23, 2010. The workshop was intended to address the current state of PV system models, develop a path forward for establishing best practices on PV system performance modeling, and set the stage for standardization of testing and validation procedures for models and input parameters. This report summarizes discussions and presentations from the workshop, as well as examines opportunities for collaborative efforts to develop objective comparisons between models and across sites and applications.

  10. From Neurons to Neighborhoods: An Update--Workshop Summary

    Olson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    "From Neurons to Neighborhoods: An Update: Workshop Summary" is based on the original study "From Neurons to Neighborhoods: Early Childhood Development," which was released in October of 2000. From the time of the original publication's release, much has occurred to cause a fundamental reexamination of the nation's…

  11. 5th LHC Crab Cavity Workshop, LHC-CC11 Workshop Summary Report

    G. Arduini; Calaga, R.; Ciapala, E.; Collier, P; Giovannozzi, M.; Jensen, E.; Koutchouk, J.P.; Mcintosh, P.; Metral, E.; Myers, S; Parma, V; Wenninger, J.; Zimmermann, F

    2012-01-01

    The 5th workshop on crab cavities for the LHC luminosity upgrade (LHC-CC11) was held from 14 to 15 November 2011 at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland. This report summarizes the contributions from the workshop and provides an overview of the present status of the crab crossing scheme considered for the LHC upgrade. The executive summary synthesizes the key conclusions from the advisory board session and lists the required next steps for R&D, testing and final implementation at the LHC.

  12. United States Civil Space Policy: Summary of a Workshop

    MacAuley, Molly K.; Alexander, Joseph K.; National Research Council

    In 2004, the NRC released a workshop report about the future direction of the U.S. civil space program. At the same time, the Administration announced the Vision for Space Exploration, and in June 2004, it issued a report that articulated a balanced space program for human and robotic exploration and science. Subsequent NRC reports, however, have noted that NASA has not been given the resources to carry out this broad-based program. This challenge, along with others faced by the U.S. civil space program, stimulated the NRC to form an ad hoc committee to organize a second workshop, held in November 2007, to address the space program's future directions. The workshop's goal was to air a range of views and perspectives so as to inform discussions of these questions by policymakers and the public. This book presents a summary of the workshop.

  13. Physical security workshop summary: entry control

    Entry control hardware has been used extensively in the past to assist security forces in separating the authorized from the unauthorized at the plant perimeter. As more attention is being focused on the insider threat, these entry control elements are being used to extend the security inspectors' presence into the plant by compartmentalizing access and monitoring vital components. This paper summarizes the experiences expressed by the participants at the March 16 to 19, 1982 INMM Physical Protection Workshop in utilizing access control and contraband detection hardware for plant wide entry control applications

  14. EPRI dam safety workshop summary: Proceedings

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has an extensive history of working with utilities, federal and state agencies, consultants, and other interests to conduct a number of workshops and studies to improve the safety of dams. Through these efforts, EPRI has developed a number of tools to assist dam owners, particularly EPRI members, in the evaluation and modification of dams. Although a considerable amount of progress has been made toward improving dam safety, there remain among the over 75,000 dams in the US a significant number of structures that require in-depth evaluation and possible modifications. At the same time, there are pressures from several directions to prioritize dam safety issues and find cost-effective solutions to problems because there seems to be an ever-decreasing amount of funds to address dam safety. In that regard, EPRI is sensitive to those cost considerations in a changing utility environment. Therefore, EPRI recently entered into discussions with utilities, regulatory agencies, federal agencies (dam owners), and others interested in dam safety issues. From those discussions, a number of research ideas were developed, which were distilled into three primary topics and several secondary topics of importance. The three primary areas of concern included: penstocks, tunnels, and gates; instrumentation and monitoring; and post-tensioned anchors. This report will provide a review of the workshop and insight on ideas for future dam safety R and D

  15. Summary of a workshop on severe accident management for BWRs

    Severe accident management can be defined as the use of existing and/or alternative resources, systems and actions to prevent or mitigate a core-melt accident. For each accident sequence and each combination of strategies there may be several options available to the operator; and each involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. Operational uncertainties include operator, system and instrument behavior during an accident. During the period September 26--28, 1990, a workshop was held at the University of California, Los Angeles, to address these uncertainties for Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). This report contains a summary of the workshop proceedings

  16. Summary of the Marbella TCF Workshop

    In this paper the author reviews the third workshop on the Tau-Charm Factory, held in Marbella, Spain, on 1-6 June 1993. The aim of the conference was: a thorough review of physics interest in light of recent theoretical and experimental progress; to update designs of accelerators and detectors for such a machine; and to discuss plans for the realization of such a device. The conclusions were that such a device would allow precision study of electroweak physics in tau systems. It would allow comprehensive study of tau and charm systems. It would be complementary to a B factory, providing in general better statistics with lesser systematic effects, and precision charm data for use in B factories. The device and its detector are feasible to design and construct

  17. Summary of the Nijmegen Workshop on Multiparticle Production

    Hwa, R C

    1996-01-01

    This is the summary talk of the Nijmegen Workshop. The topics are: 1. Introduction, 2. Phenomenology of mature topics, 2.1 Bose-Einstein correlations, 2.2 Fluctuations, 2.3 Phenomenology of QCD and other dynamics, 3. Experiments not driven by conventional theory, 3.1 Search for DCC, 3.2 Soft-photon production, 4. Theory not driven by conventional experiments, 4.1 Criticality, 4.2 Erraticity and chaos, 5. Other comments.

  18. Telemedicine in Space Flight - Summary of a NASA Workshop

    Barsten, K. N.; Watkins, S. D.; Otto, C.; Baumann, D. K.

    2011-01-01

    The Exploration Medical Capability Element of the Human Research Program at NASA Johnson Space Center hosted the Telemedicine Workshop in January 2011 to discuss the medical operational concept for a crewed mission to a near-Earth asteroid (NEA) and to identify areas for future work and collaboration. With the increased likelihood of a medical incident on a long duration exploration mission to a near-Earth asteroid, as well as the fact that there will likely be limited medical capabilities and resources available to diagnose and treat medical conditions, it is anticipated that a more structured use of telemedicine will become highly desirable. The workshop was convened to solicit expert opinion on current telemedicine practices and on medical care in remote environments. Workshop Objectives: The workshop brought together leaders in telemedicine and remote medicine from The University of Texas Medical Branch, Henry Ford Hospital, Ontario Telemedicine Network, U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research, University of Miami, American Telemedicine Association, Doctors Without Borders, and the Pan American Health Organization. The primary objectives of the workshop were to document the medical operations concept for a crewed mission to a NEA, to determine gaps between current capabilities and the capabilities outlined in the operations concept, to identify research required to close these gaps, and to discuss potential collaborations with external-to-NASA organizations with similar challenges. Summary of Discussions and Conclusions: The discussions held during the workshop and the conclusions reached by the workshop participants were grouped into seven categories: Crew Medical Officers, Patient Area in Spacecraft, Training, Electronic Medical Records, Intelligent Care Systems, Consultation Protocols, Prophylactic Surgical Procedures, and Data Prioritization. The key points discussed under each category will be presented.

  19. Canadian Site Visit and Workshop - Summary and International Perspective

    devoted to feedback from four thematic rapporteurs invited by the NEA. The thematic reports addressed the topics of radiological risk assessment, economics of local development, ethical inquiry, and stakeholder involvement. This document gives an executive summary of the presentations and discussions that took place at the workshop. It also provides the Secretariat's report of answers to audience questions and comments not found in speakers' official proceedings texts. The structure of the document follows the structure of the workshop itself (the workshop programme is provided in annex to the full proceedings). The NEA Secretariat also provides, in a separate section of the proceedings, a reflection placing the main lessons of the workshop in an international perspective

  20. National Approaches to Adaptation. Some Lessons Learnt from recent OECD and UNFCCC Workshops

    Adaptation to climate change is a challenge that all countries are currently facing. Most countries have already started to develop national or sectoral adaptation strategies. In parallel, an international process has also started to emerge to support these national adaptation efforts, whereby countries share their experiences with - and exchange views on - their national strategies. At the end of last year, two international meetings took place around adaptation issues, which brought together Annex I and non-Annex I Parties: the OECD Global Forum on Sustainable Development: Development and Climate Change, on 11-12 November 2004; and the In-Session Workshop on adaptation, as part of the SBSTA meetings, on 8 December 2004. Another international workshop on adaptation practices and strategies took place in Wellington, New Zealand, on 11-13 October, which was limited to OECD countries. This paper provides a brief summary of the national approaches presented at the OECD and UNFCCC workshops, as well as some preliminary insights on national adaptation strategies that emerge from these events. The intent is to facilitate further exchanges of views on adaptation, such as the one that took place within the Seminar of the Annex I Expert Group 'Working Together to Respond to Climate Change', on 21-22 March 2005

  1. Summary of the workshop: towards 4π physics

    This summary is not intended to give an extensive review of all what has been said during the three days about technics, experiments and theories. It will be rather a brief and simple overview of what I felt during the meeting while listening to the different talks, discussions and participating to the round tables which were also a very important part of the workshop and contributed a lot to its success. This summary will be organized as follows: in a first part I shall briefly describe the basic problems that one is faced with ''exclusive'' measurements. Finally, we shall briefly review some of the theoretical problems existing at intermediate bombarding energies since any experiment would initially rely heavily on theoretical considerations

  2. Summary of workshop on future physics with HERA data

    Recent highlights from the HERA experiments, Hermes, H1 and ZEUS, are reviewed and ideas for future analyses to fully exploit this unique data set are proposed. This document is a summary of a workshop on future physics with HERA data held at DESY, Hamburg at the end of 2014. All areas of HERA physics are covered and contributions from both experimentalists and theorists are included. The document outlines areas where HERA physics can still make a significant contribution, principally in a deeper understanding of QCD, and its relevance to other facilities. Within the framework of the Data Preservation in High Energy Physics, the HERA data have been preserved for analyses to take place over a timescale of 10 years and more. Therefore, although an extensive list of possibilities is presented here, safe storage of the data ensures that it can also be used in the far future should new ideas and analyses be proposed.

  3. International Workshop on the Future of Physics and Society, Debrecen, Hungary, 4-6 March 1999, Workshop Summary

    Mackintosh, Raymond S.

    1999-01-01

    The Debrecen workshop was one of a number held in preparation for the UNESCO-ICSU World Conference on Science, which will be held in Budapest, June 1999. A report representing the views of the workshop, prepared for that conference and containing a number of recommended actions, is included with this summary. The workshop affirmed the ongoing importance of physics for its own sake and as part of our culture, as a key element in our increasingly unified science and as an essential contributor ...

  4. Documenting Student Performance through Effective Performance Assessments: Workshop Summary. Horticulture.

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Agricultural Education Curriculum Materials Service.

    This document contains materials about and from a workshop that was conducted to help Ohio horticulture teachers learn to document student competence through effective performance assessments. The document begins with background information about the workshop and a list of workshop objectives. Presented next is a key to the 40 performance…

  5. Summary Report of the Workshop on the Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Database

    The Workshop on the Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Database (EXFOR) was held at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 6 to 10 October 2014. The workshop was organized to discuss various aspects of the EXFOR compilation process including compilation rules, different techniques for nuclear reaction data measurements, software developments, etc. A summary of the presentations and discussions that took place during the workshop is reported here. (author)

  6. Summary Report of the Workshop on The Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Database

    The Workshop on the Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Database (EXFOR) was held at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 6 to 10 October 2014. The workshop was organized to discuss various aspects of the EXFOR compilation process including compilation rules, different techniques for nuclear reaction data measurements, software developments, etc. A summary of the presentations and discussions that took place during the workshop is reported here.

  7. Summary Report of the Workshop on The Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Database

    Semkova, V. [IAEA Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria); Pritychenko, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-10-10

    The Workshop on the Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Database (EXFOR) was held at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 6 to 10 October 2014. The workshop was organized to discuss various aspects of the EXFOR compilation process including compilation rules, different techniques for nuclear reaction data measurements, software developments, etc. A summary of the presentations and discussions that took place during the workshop is reported here.

  8. Climate change adaptation in the Canadian energy sector : workshop report

    This workshop on climate change adaptation in the Canadian energy sector was conducted in order to develop a climate change work plan for the Council of Energy Ministers (CEM) as well as to develop awareness and dialogue within Canada's energy sector. Industry members and government officials identified findings from recent assessment reports on climate change adaptation and discussed ways in which the international oil and gas industry is currently adapting its operations and technologies to ensure continuing safety and risk mitigation. The use of hydrological models to forecast the potential impacts of climate change was discussed, and the drivers of climate change adaptation were reviewed. A total of 26 topics were identified, 13 of which were prioritized for group discussions based on their impact and urgency. The following 5 topics were finally identified as top priority topics: (1) climate change adaptation science, (2) co-ordinated local, provincial, national, and international policies, (3) information sharing and knowledge transfer, (4) aging infrastructure and increasing demand, and (5) market mechanisms for adaptation. Four presentations were given during the initial portion of the workshop. 4 tabs., 1 fig

  9. 75 FR 69662 - Workshop: Cumulative Mixtures Risk of Six Selected Phthalates in Support of Summary Information...

    2010-11-15

    ... AGENCY Workshop: Cumulative Mixtures Risk of Six Selected Phthalates in Support of Summary Information on...: Notice of Peer Consultation Workshop on the Cumulative Mixtures Risk of Six Selected Phthalates; Request... phthalates as set forth in the National Academies of Science (NAS) report ``Phthalates and Cumulative...

  10. Summary of the 2015 LHCb workshop on multi-body decays of D and B mesons

    Amato, Sandra; Baesso, Clarissa; Haim, Eli Ben; Bigi, Ikaros; Boito, Diogo; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Reis, Alberto Correa dos; Craik, Daniel Charles; Torres, Melissa Maria Cruz; Dalseno, Jeremy; Hickman, Ignacio de Bediaga; Vieira, Daniel Evangelho; Rodrigues, Fernando Luiz Ferreira; Gershon, Timothy; Göbel, Carla; Greenwald, Daniel; Harnew, Samuel Thomas; Henry, Louis; Hicheur, Adlene; Latham, Thomas Edward; Loiseau, Benoit; London, David; Lopes, Helder; Magalhães, Patricia; de Miranda, Jussara Marques; Tostes, Danielle Martins; Rodrigues, Andre Massafferri; Mathad, Abhijit; Meadows, Brian; Carreno, Diego Milanes; Rodriguez, Josue Danilo Molina; Moraes, Danielle; Nasteva, Irina; Nielsen, Marina; Nogueira, Jorge; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oset, Eulogio; Rodrigues, Bruno Osorio; Goicochea, Juan Martin Otalora; Paul, Stephan; Polycarpo, Erica; Prouvé, Claire; Quagliani, Renato; Rademacker, Jonas; Robilotta, Manoel; Rodriguez, Jairo Alexis; Coutinho, Rafael Silva; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Sun, Liang; Szczepaniak, Adam; Aoude, Rafael Tourinho; Wallace, Charlotte; Whitehead, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This document contains a summary of the LHCb workshop on multi-body decays of D and B mesons, held at CBPF, Rio de Janeiro, in July 2015. The workshop was focused on issues related to amplitude analysis of three- and four-body hadronic decays. In addition to selected LHCb results, contributions from guest theorists are included.

  11. The Souris River Loop National Wildlife Refuges : Vision & Goals Workshop summary report

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This summary report is on the Vision and Goals Workshop that took place January 14-15, 2003. The purpose for the workshop was to provide a forum for U.S. Fish and...

  12. Exploratory Workshop on the Social Impacts of Robotics. Summary and Issues. A Background Paper.

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This report contains a summary of the results of an exploratory workshop to discuss the future of industrial robotics and its likely impact on public policy. Background information is presented, and workshop goals are delineated. Under the general area of robot technology, these topics are covered: the roots of robotics technology, a definition of…

  13. Workshop summaries for the third US/USSR symposium on fusion-fission reactors

    Workshop summaries on topics related to the near-term development requirements for fusion-fission (hybrid) reactors are presented. The summary topics are as follows: (1) external factors, (2) plasma engineering, (3) ICF hybrid reactors, (4) blanket design, (5) materials and tritium, and (6) blanket engineering development requirements

  14. Workshop summaries for the third US/USSR symposium on fusion-fission reactors

    Jassby, D.L. (ed.)

    1979-07-01

    Workshop summaries on topics related to the near-term development requirements for fusion-fission (hybrid) reactors are presented. The summary topics are as follows: (1) external factors, (2) plasma engineering, (3) ICF hybrid reactors, (4) blanket design, (5) materials and tritium, and (6) blanket engineering development requirements. (MOW)

  15. IOC/WMO Workshop on Marine Pollution Monitoring (3rd, New Delhi, India, February 11-15, 1980). Summary Report. Workshop Report No. 22.

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission.

    Provided is a summary report of the third IOC/WMO (Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission/World Meteorological Organization) workshop of marine pollution monitoring. Summaries are presented in nine sections, including: (1) workshop opening; (2) welcoming addresses; (3) reports on the Marine Pollution (Petroleum) Monitoring Pilot Project…

  16. 1994 Building energy codes and standards workshops: Summary and documentation

    Sandahl, L.J.; Shankle, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    During the spring of 1994, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Codes and Standards, conducted five two-day Regional Building Energy Codes and Standards workshops across the United States. Workshops were held in Chicago, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Dallas, and Denver. The workshops were designed to benefit state-level officials including staff of building code commissions, energy offices, public utility commissions, and others involved with adopting/updating, implementing, and enforcing state building codes in their states. The workshops provided an opportunity for state and other officials to learn more about the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) requirements for residential and commercial building energy codes, the Climate Change Action Plan, the role of the U.S. Department of Energy and the Building Energy Standards Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, the commercial and residential codes and standards, the Home Energy Rating Systems (HERS), Energy Efficient Mortgages (EEM), training issues, and other topics related to the development, adoption, implementation, and enforcement of building energy codes. In addition to receiving information on the above topics, workshop participants were also encouraged to inform DOE of their needs, particularly with regard to implementing building energy codes, enhancing current implementation efforts, and building on training efforts already in place. This paper documents the workshop findings and workshop planning and follow-up processes.

  17. Workshop on advanced nuclear data online services. Summary report

    This report summarizes the Workshop on Advanced Nuclear Data Online Services held in Vienna, Austria, 29 November to 3 December 1999. It includes the main topics of the agenda, the list of participants, and general comments and recommendations. (author)

  18. Childhood Cancer Genomics Gaps and Opportunities - Workshop Summary

    NCI convened a workshop of representative research teams that have been leaders in defining the genomic landscape of childhood cancers to discuss the influence of genomic discoveries on the future of childhood cancer research.

  19. 1995 building energy codes and standards workshops: Summary and documentation

    Sandahl, L.J.; Shankle, D.L.

    1996-02-01

    During the spring of 1995, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted four two-day Regional Building Energy Codes and Standards workshops across the US. Workshops were held in Chicago, Denver, Rhode Island, and Atlanta. The workshops were designed to benefit state-level officials including staff of building code commissions, energy offices, public utility commissions, and others involved with adopting/updating, implementing, and enforcing building energy codes in their states. The workshops provided an opportunity for state and other officials to learn more about residential and commercial building energy codes and standards, the role of the US Department of Energy and the Building Standards and Guidelines Program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Home Energy Rating Systems (HERS), Energy Efficient Mortgages (EEM), training issues, and other topics related to the development, adoption, implementation, and enforcement of building energy codes. Participants heard success stories, got tips on enforcement training, and received technical support materials. In addition to receiving information on the above topics, workshop participants had an opportunity to provide input on code adoption issues, building industry training issues, building design issues, and exemplary programs across the US. This paper documents the workshop planning, findings, and follow-up processes.

  20. Acadia National Park Climate Change Scenario Planning Workshop summary

    Star, Jonathan; Fisichelli, Nicholas; Bryan, Alexander; Babson, Amanda; Cole-Will, Rebecca; Miller-Rushing, Abraham J.

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes outcomes from a two-day scenario planning workshop for Acadia National Park, Maine (ACAD). The primary objective of the workshop was to help ACAD senior leadership make management and planning decisions based on up-to-date climate science and assessments of future uncertainty. The workshop was also designed as a training program, helping build participants' capabilities to develop and use scenarios. The details of the workshop are given in later sections. The climate scenarios presented here are based on published global climate model output. The scenario implications for resources and management decisions are based on expert knowledge distilled through scientist-manager interaction during workgroup break-out sessions at the workshop. Thus, the descriptions below are from these small-group discussions in a workshop setting and should not be taken as vetted research statements of responses to the climate scenarios, but rather as insights and examinations of possible futures (Martin et al. 2011, McBride et al. 2012).

  1. International Workshop on the Future of Physics and Society, Debrecen, Hungary, 4-6 March 1999, Workshop Summary

    MacIntosh, R S

    1999-01-01

    The Debrecen workshop was one of a number held in preparation for the UNESCO-ICSU World Conference on Science, which will be held in Budapest, June 1999. A report representing the views of the workshop, prepared for that conference and containing a number of recommended actions, is included with this summary. The workshop affirmed the ongoing importance of physics for its own sake and as part of our culture, as a key element in our increasingly unified science and as an essential contributor to the solution of environmental and energy problems. The problems faced by physics as an activity and as an educational subject were discussed and actions for both society as a whole and the physics community itself were put forward.

  2. Working Group summary reports from the Advanced Photon Source reliability workshop

    A workshop was held at APS to address reliability goals for accelerator systems. Seventy-one individuals participated in the workshop, including 30 from other institutions. The goals of the workshop were to: (1) Give attendees an introduction to the basic concepts of reliability analysis. (2) Exchange information on operating experience at existing accelerator facilities and strategies for achieving reliability at facilities under design or in construction. (3) Discuss reliability goals for APS and the means of their achievement. This report contains the working group summary report an APS's following systems: RF Systems; Power Supplies; Magnet Systems; Interlock and Diagnostics; and Vacuum Systems

  3. Energy Conservation R and D Objectives Workshop. Volume 2. Summary

    Monetta, D J [ed.

    1977-01-01

    ERDA's Division of Conservation Research and Technology (CONRT) sponsored the first of a series of Energy Conservation R and D Objectives Workshops in San Diego, California, from March 6 to 8, 1977. This meeting had two primary objectives: to test a new method of gathering information for CONRT's planning process and, to the extent that the first objective was achieved, to actually gather information for CONRT's current planning process. For this experiment, CONRT and the Coast Community College District, the local host of the workshop, assembled representatives from ERDA, industry, the academic community, and the general public to discuss and critique CONRT's activities and planning process. Participants met in general sessions and in three smaller panels devoted to specific areas of interest to CONRT. The first workshop proceedings are described, the results are summarized, and major conclusions and recommendations are presented.

  4. SUMMARY OF THE 2006 HADRONIC SHOWER SIMULATION WORKSHOP

    WATERS, LAURIE S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-19

    The 2006 Hadronic Shower Simulation Workshop, held September 6-8, 2006 at Fermi National Laboratory brought together an international assembly of experts in the field of hadronic shower development. The overall goal was to present the current understanding of the physics of hadronic showers, and to study examples of how this is measured in particle-physics calorimetry. The modeling of such events is critical, and the major Monte Carlo codes, FLUKA, GEANT, MARS, MCNPX, and PHTS were represented at the workshop. A wide range of physics, much of which is used by the simulation codes was also discussed, ranging from the hadronic CEM, LAQGSM, and DTUJET models, down to low energy neutronics capabilities. Special purpose codes and methodologies used for specific applications such as muon and neutrino physics were also shown. The results of a code benchmarking exercises were presented and extensively discussed. This paper summarizes the key topics presented in the workshop.

  5. Summary from the epistemic uncertainty workshop: consensus amid diversity

    The 'Epistemic Uncertainty Workshop' sponsored by Sandia National Laboratories was held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, on 6-7 August 2002. The workshop was organized around a set of Challenge Problems involving both epistemic and aleatory uncertainty that the workshop participants were invited to solve and discuss. This concluding article in a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety based on the workshop discusses the intent of the Challenge Problems, summarizes some discussions from the workshop, and provides a technical comparison among the papers in this special issue. The Challenge Problems were computationally simple models that were intended as vehicles for the illustration and comparison of conceptual and numerical techniques for use in analyses that involve: (i) epistemic uncertainty, (ii) aggregation of multiple characterizations of epistemic uncertainty, (iii) combination of epistemic and aleatory uncertainty, and (iv) models with repeated parameters. There was considerable diversity of opinion at the workshop about both methods and fundamental issues, and yet substantial consensus about what the answers to the problems were, and even about how each of the four issues should be addressed. Among the technical approaches advanced were probability theory, Dempster-Shafer evidence theory, random sets, sets of probability measures, imprecise coherent probabilities, coherent lower previsions, probability boxes, possibility theory, fuzzy sets, joint distribution tableaux, polynomial chaos expansions, and info-gap models. Although some participants maintained that a purely probabilistic approach is fully capable of accounting for all forms of uncertainty, most agreed that the treatment of epistemic uncertainty introduces important considerations and that the issues underlying the Challenge Problems are legitimate and significant. Topics identified as meriting additional research include elicitation of uncertainty representations, aggregation of

  6. Nuclear rapprochement in Argentina and Brazil: Workshop summary

    James E. Doyle

    1999-10-01

    On October 21 and 22, 1998, the Center for International Security Affairs at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Center for Global Security and Cooperation at Science Applications International Corporation hosted the first of a series of work-shops on states that have chosen to roll back their pursuit of nuclear arms. The objective of the workshop series is to conduct a systematic evaluation of the roles played by U.S. nonproliferation policy in cases of nuclear rollback or restraint and to provide recommendations for future nonproliferation efforts based on lessons learned. Key attendees at the workshop included officials and former officials from the foreign ministries of Argentina and Brazil, and current and former officials from the U.S. Department of State, the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA), and the Department of Energy (DOE). Scholars and independent researchers who have examined nuclear policy in Argentina and Brazil also participated. This workshop report includes important background information that helps set the stage for assessing nuclear policies in Argentina and Brazil. It describes national perspectives and areas of consensus and debate among the participants, particularly on the questions of lessons learned and their salience to proliferation challenges in other states. It also summarizes key questions and propositions regarding the roles played in these cases by U.S. nonproliferation policy.

  7. Summary of the workshop: Classical general relativity and gravitational waves

    In the workshop, classical general relativity and gravitational waves at ICGC-2007, eleven lectures were presented on classical general relativity and nine on gravitational waves. Lectures covered diverse topics in these areas during the three days of parallel sessions. We classify and summarize here the research work and results of the oral presentations made.

  8. Houston design/build workshop for passive solar homes: summary

    None

    1981-10-01

    The workshop is briefly described and evaluated. Evaluation forms completed by 20 of the 50 attendees are given as well as the analysis of the data they provide. Conclusions are drawn regarding the program, speakers, site, communication materials, and professional identification of the attendees (as architects, builders, etc.). (LEW)

  9. Summary of workshop session F on electron-cloud instabilities

    Zimmermann, Frank; Wolski, Andrzej

    2004-01-01

    We summarize Session F of the ECLOUD 04 workshop. This session was dedicated to beam instabilities driven by electron cloud. Specifically, we discuss the principal observations of electron-cloud instabilities, analytical models, simulation codes and the next steps that need to be taken to arrive at a predictive theory.

  10. Workshop on Accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion: Summary Report of the Workshop

    Seidl, P.A.; Barnard, J.J.

    2011-04-29

    The Workshop on Accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion was held at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory May 23-26, 2011. The workshop began with plenary sessions to review the state of the art in HIF (heavy ion fusion), followed by parallel working groups, and concluded with a plenary session to review the results. There were five working groups: IFE (inertial fusion energy) targets, RF approach to HIF, induction accelerator approach to HIF, chamber and driver interface, ion sources and injectors.

  11. Summary of the proceedings of the workshop on the refinery of the future

    1994-06-01

    This report on the Workshop on the Refinery of the Future has been prepared for participants to provide them with a succinct summary of the presentations, deliberations, and discussions. In preparing the summary, we have striven to capture the key findings (conclusions) and highlight the issues and concerns raised during the plenary and breakout sessions. The presentation of the summary of the proceedings follows the final workshop agenda, which is given in Section I; each section is tabbed to facilitate access to specific workshop topics. The material presented relies heavily on the outline summaries prepared and presented by the Plenary Session Chairman and the Facilitators for each breakout group. These summaries are included essentially as presented. In addition, individuals were assigned to take notes during each session; these notes were used to reconstruct critical issues that were discussed in more detail. The key comments made by the participants, which tended to represent the range of views expressed relative to the issues, are presented immediately following the facilitator`s summary outline in order to convey the flavor of the discussions. The comments are not attributed to individuals, since in many instances they represent a composite of several similar views expressed during the discussion. The facilitators were asked to review the writeups describing the outcomes of their sessions for accuracy and content; their suggested changes were incorporated. Every effort has thus been made to reconstruct the views expressed as accurately as possible; however, errors and/or misinterpretations undoubtedly have occurred.

  12. Automated Vehicle Policy and Regulation: A State Perspective Workshop: Summary

    Young, Stanley E. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Levine, Aaron [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-06-01

    A workshop held on May 18, 2016, at the University of Maryland focused on key principles that should govern state policy decisions intended to ensure the safe operation of autonomous vehicles (AVs). The patchwork approach taken by early state adopters had primarily addressed only testing of these vehicles. As uncertainties in technology and business models play out, and in the absence of more suitable policies and regulations, states are relying on laws created for conventional vehicles to govern AV operations. The workshop addressed these challenges with three panel discussions that examined the underpinnings of policy development, factors affecting policy decisions, and the ultimate impact of AVs in a number of areas, including economic competitiveness; quality of mobility, particularly for disabled community; and energy use and emissions.

  13. Summary of CERN-GSI Workshop on Electron Cloud

    Rumolo, G; Boine-Frankenheim, O

    2011-01-01

    The bilateral CERN-GSI Electron Cloud Workshop was organized with the main goal to review the status of CERN and GSI electron cloud studies in order to find synergies between the two laboratories and to define a common strategy for future developments in terms of simulation tools, diagnostics and mitigation techniques. The workshop took place on 7–8 March 2011 at CERN (BE Auditorium) and welcomed 30 registered participants coming from CERN, GSI, INFN-LNF, KEK, CELLS, CINVESTAV, and several other institutes. It was supported by CERN and GSI, and sponsored by the European Commission under the FP7 “Research Infrastructures” project EuCARD (grant agreement no.227579), work package “Accelerator Science Networks” (AccNet)

  14. Summary of the 2014 Beam-Halo Monitoring Workshop

    Fisher, Alan

    2015-09-25

    Understanding and controlling beam halo is important for high-intensity hadron accelerators, for high-brightness electron linacs, and for low-emittance light sources. This can only be achieved by developing suitable diagnostics. The main challenge faced by such instrumentation is the high dynamic range needed to observe the halo in the presence of an intense core. In addition, measurements must often be made non-invasively. This talk summarizes the one-day workshop on Beam-Halo Monitoring that was held at SLAC on September 19 last year, immediately following IBIC 2014 in Monterey. Workshop presentations described invasive techniques using wires, screens, or crystal collimators, and non-invasive measurements with gas or scattered electrons. Talks on optical methods showed the close links between observing halo and astronomical problems like observing the solar corona or directly observing a planet orbiting another star.

  15. Workshop on large molten pool heat transfer summary and conclusions

    The CSNI Workshop on Large Molten Heat Transfer held at Grenoble (France) in March 1994 was organised by CSNI's Principal Working Group on the Confinement of Accidental Radioactive Releases (PWG4) with the cooperation of the Principal Working Group on Coolant System Behaviour (FWG2) and in collaboration with the Grenoble Nuclear Research Centre of the French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA). Conclusions and recommendations are given for each of the five sessions of the workshops: Feasibility of in-vessel core debris cooling through external cooling of the vessel; Experiments on molten pool heat transfer; Calculational efforts on molten pool convection; Heat transfer to the surrounding water - experimental techniques; Future experiments and ex-vessel studies (open forum discussion)

  16. Hydro operational restrictions forum: Licensee workshop summary. Final report

    In spite of producing no atmospheric pollutants, hydroelectric power plants often go unrecognized as a unique provider of clean, efficient, low-cost energy. A concerted effort is needed to ensure that these attributes are fully accounted for when considering the uses and benefits of available water resources. Relicensing reviews and other regulatory activities associated with continued operation of hydro generation projects have drawn increased attention to hydro resources. This attention has typically resulted in imposition of conditions having a substantial cost impact without, necessarily, reflecting a full appreciation of the resource's benefits and attributes. With the extensive countrywide effort in relicensing and regulation, there is an opportunity to collect and compile lessons learned. This is particularly true with respect to preferred practices, technologies, and techniques applicable to required studies and mitigation measures. Such compilation will enable the industry and related stakeholders to improve quality and effectiveness while reducing costs of relicensing and mitigation for continued hydro operations. As a technology leader for the industry, EPRI is in a unique position to identify and document these techniques and practices. This report comprises the proceedings of the hydro licensees workshop. Fifteen licensee representatives with recent or current involvement in the relicensing process gathered at this workshop and shared their experiences, both good and bad. Support was strong among attendees for EPRI's effort to collect and compile these, along with the experiences of others, into a guidebook of accepted practices. Initial workshop findings were used in the second workshop to solicit buy-in from agencies and NGOs to the need for--as well as proposed scope of--a compendium of preferred practices

  17. 10041 Executive Summary -- Perspectives Workshop: Digital Social Networks

    Bry, Francois; Cap, Clemens; Dahm, Ingo; Maintz, Julia; Schaffert, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    The Perspective Workshop on “Digital Social Networks” held in between January 25th and 29th, 2010 at the research centre Schloss Dagstuhl focused on technological, socio-economical, and political aspects of digital social networks, and, more generally, digital social media. Digital social media give rise to users and communities to collaboratively generate and exchange content and to interact. They enable social computation, i.e. computations that involve both software and groups of people. ...

  18. Summary report of the Solar Reflective Materials Technology Workshop

    Lind, M.A.; Ault, L.E.

    1978-10-01

    The Solar Reflective Materials Technology Workshop sponsored by the Department of Energy and organized by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the Solar Energy Research Institute was held on March 28--30, 1978, in Denver, Colorado. The two and one-half day seminar/workshop was attended by over 95 people representing some 60 private companies and government laboratories. The purpose of the workshop was to assess the ''state-of-the-art'' of solar reflector materials technology, define current mirror design requirements, and make recommendations to DOE for future research and development efforts. The reflector materials are defined for the purpose of this workshop as including all the materials which make up the reflector structure including the actual reflecting surface, the protective coatings, and the support substrate. The reflective surface includes metals, metallic films, metallic alloys, and dielectric or ceramic stacks. The protective coatings, which can be applied to both the front and back of the reflective surface, include such materials as polymer paints and films as well as inorganic coatings such as SiO, MgF/sub 2/ and thin glass. Mirror support structures which have been considered include polymer foams, cellular glass, aluminum honeycomb, wood and paper products, and fiberglass and epoxy composites. The authors of the invited papers were asked to emphasize one or more of four basic areas. These topics included: the requirements and properties for reflector materials, the testing procedures used to evaluate the materials, the results of environmental tests performed on some of the materials, and the actual field experience of solar concentrator structures. Acknowledging that the most severe applications for reflector materials result from high concentration ratio or central receiver concepts, the majority of the speakers addressed specific problems dealing with these concepts. (WHK)

  19. Summary of the CEC/USDOE workshop on uncertainty analysis

    There is uncertainty in all aspects of assessing the consequences of accidental releases of radioactive material, from understanding and describing the environmental and biological transfer processes to modeling emergency response. A wide range of scientific disciplines is involved in these assessments, and diverse approaches have been adopted to take account of uncertainties in the different areas. The need for an exchange of views and a comparison of approaches between the diverse disciplines led to the organization of a CEC/USDOE Workshop on Uncertainty Analysis held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, in November 1989. The workshop brought together specialists in a number of disciplines, including those expert in the mathematics and statistics of uncertainty analysis, in expert judgment elicitation and evaluation, and in all aspects of assessing the radiological and environmental consequences of accidental releases of radioactive material. In addition, there was participation from users of the output of accident consequences assessment in decision making and/or regulatory frameworks. The main conclusions that emerged from the workshop are summarized in this paper. These are discussed in the context of three different types of accident consequence assessment: probabilistic assessments of accident consequences undertaken as inputs to risk analyses of nuclear installations, assessments of accident consequences in real time to provide inputs to decisions on the introduction of countermeasures, and the reconstruction of doses and risks resulting from past releases of radioactive material

  20. Organic acid modeling and model validation: Workshop summary

    Sullivan, T.J.; Eilers, J.M.

    1992-08-14

    A workshop was held in Corvallis, Oregon on April 9--10, 1992 at the offices of E S Environmental Chemistry, Inc. The purpose of this workshop was to initiate research efforts on the entitled Incorporation of an organic acid representation into MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments) and testing of the revised model using Independent data sources.'' The workshop was attended by a team of internationally-recognized experts in the fields of surface water acid-bass chemistry, organic acids, and watershed modeling. The rationale for the proposed research is based on the recent comparison between MAGIC model hindcasts and paleolimnological inferences of historical acidification for a set of 33 statistically-selected Adirondack lakes. Agreement between diatom-inferred and MAGIC-hindcast lakewater chemistry in the earlier research had been less than satisfactory. Based on preliminary analyses, it was concluded that incorporation of a reasonable organic acid representation into the version of MAGIC used for hindcasting was the logical next step toward improving model agreement.

  1. Organic acid modeling and model validation: Workshop summary. Final report

    Sullivan, T.J.; Eilers, J.M.

    1992-08-14

    A workshop was held in Corvallis, Oregon on April 9--10, 1992 at the offices of E&S Environmental Chemistry, Inc. The purpose of this workshop was to initiate research efforts on the entitled ``Incorporation of an organic acid representation into MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments) and testing of the revised model using Independent data sources.`` The workshop was attended by a team of internationally-recognized experts in the fields of surface water acid-bass chemistry, organic acids, and watershed modeling. The rationale for the proposed research is based on the recent comparison between MAGIC model hindcasts and paleolimnological inferences of historical acidification for a set of 33 statistically-selected Adirondack lakes. Agreement between diatom-inferred and MAGIC-hindcast lakewater chemistry in the earlier research had been less than satisfactory. Based on preliminary analyses, it was concluded that incorporation of a reasonable organic acid representation into the version of MAGIC used for hindcasting was the logical next step toward improving model agreement.

  2. Carbon dioxide storage in unconventional reservoirs workshop: summary of recommendations

    Jones, Kevin B.; Blondes, Madalyn S.

    2015-01-01

    “Unconventional reservoirs” for carbon dioxide (CO2) storage—that is, geologic reservoirs in which changes to the rock trap CO2 and therefore contribute to CO2 storage—including coal, shale, basalt, and ultramafic rocks, were the focus of a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) workshop held March 28 and 29, 2012, at the National Conservation Training Center in Shepherdstown, West Virginia. The goals of the workshop were to determine whether a detailed assessment of CO2 storage capacity in unconventional reservoirs is warranted, and if so, to build a set of recommendations that could be used to develop a methodology to assess this storage capacity. Such an assessment would address only the technically available resource, independent of economic or policy factors. At the end of the workshop, participants agreed that sufficient knowledge exists to allow an assessment of the potential CO2 storage resource in coals, organic-rich shales, and basalts. More work remains to be done before the storage resource in ultramafic rocks can be meaningfully assessed.

  3. South Asia transboundary water quality monitoring workshop summary report.

    Betsill, Jeffrey David; Littlefield, Adriane C.; Luetters, Frederick O.; Rajen, Gaurav

    2003-04-01

    The Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) promotes collaborations among scientists and researchers in several regions as a means of achieving common regional security objectives. To promote cooperation in South Asia on environmental research, an international working group made up of participants from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and the United States convened in Kathmandu, Nepal, from February 17-23,2002. The workshop was held to further develop the South Asia Transboundary Water Quality Monitoring (SATWQM) project. The project is sponsored in part by the CMC located at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico through funding provided by the US. Department of State, Regional Environmental Affairs Office, American Embassy, Kathmandu, Nepal, and the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. This report summarizes the SATWQM project, the workshop objectives, process and results. The long-term interests of the participants are to develop systems for sharing regional environmental information as a means of building confidence and improving relations among South Asian countries. The more immediate interests of the group are focused on activities that foster regional sharing of water quality data in the Ganges and Indus River basins. Issues of concern to the SATWQM network participants include studying the impacts from untreated sewage and industrial effluents, agricultural run-off, salinity increases in fresh waters, the siltation and shifting of river channels, and the environmental degradation of critical habitats such as wetlands, protected forests, and endangered aquatic species conservation areas. The workshop focused on five objectives: (1) a deepened understanding of the partner organizations involved; (2) garnering the support of additional regional and national government and non-government organizations in South Asia involved in river water quality monitoring; (3) identification

  4. Current Understanding and Therapy of Asthma Workshop Summary

    Kuender D. Yang; Yu-Zhi Chen; Shau-Ku Huang

    2004-01-01

    The prevalence of asthma has increased globally in the past 2 decades. To address this critical issue, a workshop on "Current Understanding and Therapy of Asthma" was recently held in Beijing, as a part of the 10th International Conference of the Society of Chinese Bioscientists in America (SCBA). Several pertinent topics were addressed by leading experts from China, Taiwan, Japan and the US, which include epidemiology, the molecular genetic mechanism, pathogenesis, treatment and prevention of asthma. This article highlights the issues presented and discussed in this ground-breaking symposium emphasizing this important public health problem in the Chinese population. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(6):436-439.

  5. PROBABILISTIC SENSITIVITY AND UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS WORKSHOP SUMMARY REPORT

    Seitz, R

    2008-06-25

    Stochastic or probabilistic modeling approaches are being applied more frequently in the United States and globally to quantify uncertainty and enhance understanding of model response in performance assessments for disposal of radioactive waste. This increased use has resulted in global interest in sharing results of research and applied studies that have been completed to date. This technical report reflects the results of a workshop that was held to share results of research and applied work related to performance assessments conducted at United States Department of Energy sites. Key findings of this research and applied work are discussed and recommendations for future activities are provided.

  6. Summary of George Mason University SN1987A workshop

    The author summaries studies of SN 1987A. This discussion focuses on how theories of core collapse in supernovae have been confirmed by observations of neutrinos produced by SN1987A and observations of the exponential tail of the light curve of SN1987A give strong support to the prediction that this phase of supernova light curves is powered by 56Co decay

  7. KEK workshop on kaon, muon and neutrino physics: summary

    Bryman, D. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    1998-02-01

    A broad range of current work and future possibilities associated with the interactions and properties of kaons, muons and neutrinos was discussed at the workshop with particular emphasis on possibilities for the Japanese Hadron Facility. The recent evidence for the flavor changing neutral current reaction K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{nu}-bar was presented along with prospects for future work. New experiments at BNL, KEK and Fermilab are being developed to study the especially attractive CP-violating channel K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{nu}{nu}-bar. Very sensitive searches for lepton flavor violation in muon decays and muon capture, and measurements aiming at uncovering non-standard model T-violating effects in K{sub {mu}3} decay were also discussed. Several neutrino experiments continue to observe deficits in rates relative to expectations, possibly indicating evidence for oscillations, and promising new initiatives such at the K2K project at KEK are in the works to explore these matters further. Many of the issues raised at the workshop are relevant to the search for an understanding of the three generation spectrum of quarks and leptons i.e. the generation puzzle. (author)

  8. United States Civil Space Policy: Summary of a Workshop

    2008-01-01

    What are the principal purposes, goals, and priorities of the U.S. civil space program? This question was the focus of the workshop on civil space policy held November 29-30, 2007, by the Space Studies Board (SSB) and the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board (ASEB) of the National Research Council (NRC). In addressing this question, invited speakers and panelists and the general discussion from this public workshop explored a series of topics, including the following: (1) Key changes and developments in the U.S. civil space program since the new national Vision for Space Exploration2 (the Vision) was articulated by the executive branch in 2004; (2) The fit of space exploration within a broader national and international context; (3) Affordability, public interest, and political will to sustain the civil space program; (4) Definitions, metrics, and decision criteria for the mix and balance of activities within the program portfolio; (5) Roles of government in Earth observations from space; and (6) Gaps in capabilities and infrastructure to support the program.

  9. Summary of workshop on ceramic composite interface coatings

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    Commercialization of fiber-reinforced composites has been limited because of the stability of the interface coatings that control the mechanical properties of the composites. Typical materials are currently manufactured with pyrolytic carbon interface coatings that perform well in inert atmospheres or when stresses are kept very low (<70 MPa). Unfortunately, carbon coatings are not stable at high temperatures in air or oxidizing conditions which results in degradation of the mechanical properties of the composites. The problem of oxidation resistant interface coatings is not unique to the Fossil Program. Such coatings are also a concern to the United States Air Force, the Continuous Fiber-reinforced Ceramic Composites Program, the Fusion Energy Materials Program, and to the European Community. This workshop was organized to compare and discuss the need for and development of oxidation-resistant interface coatings in each of these programs.

  10. Summary review of rock mechanics workshop on radioactive waste disposal

    Presentations, critiques and recommendations for the disposal of commercial radioactive waste based upon an analysis of the information presented at the Rock Mechanics Review/Workshop, Denver, Colorado, December 16-17, 1976 are summarized. The workshop, comprised of both formal and informal sessions, with about 50 participants, was hosted by RE/SPEC Inc. and Dr. Paul F. Gnirk, President and was sponsored by the Office of Waste Isolation (OWI), led by Dr. William C. McClain. The panel of reviewers, responsible for this report, consisted of Neville L. Carter, Richard E. Goodman, and Robert H. Merrill. These panel members were selected not only on the basis of their experience in various aspects of Rock Mechanics and Mining Engineering but also because they have had no previous active participation in problems concerning disposal of radioactive waste. By way of a general comment, the review panel was very favorably impressed with the Rock Mechanics research efforts, supported by OWI, on this problem and with the level of technical competence of those carrying out the research. Despite the rather preliminary nature of the results presented and the youth of the program itself, it is clear that the essential ingredients for a successful program are at hand, especially as regards disposal in natural salt formations. These include laboratory studies of appropriate rock deformation, numerical analyses of thermal and mechanical stresses around openings, and in situ field tests. We shall comment on each of these three major areas in turn. We shall then offer recommendations for their improvement, and, finally, we shall make more general recommendations for future considerations of the OWI radioactive waste disposal program

  11. τ-charm factory workshop machine physics summary

    Designing a τ-charm Factory to meet the requirements of the experimentalists raises a number of challenging problems in accelerator physics. This was reflected in a set of particularly productive sessions in the Accelerator Physics Working Groups. The summary which follows is intended as a guide to help the reader find his way through the more detailed material reproduced in these proceedings. They have tried to list the participants after the headings summarizing the work of the accelerator physics subgroups but it should be borne in mind that the composition of the subgroups varied in time and there was a good deal of overlap among them

  12. Summary of the 3rd workshop on the reduced-moderation water reactor

    Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Nakatsuka, Tohru; Iwamura, Takamichi [eds.

    2000-06-01

    The research activities of a Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) are being performed for a development of the next generation water-cooled reactor. A workshop on the RMWR was held on March 3rd 2000 aiming to exchange information between JAERI and other organizations such as universities, laboratories, utilities and vendors. This report summarizes the contents of lectures and discussions on the workshop. The 1st workshop was held on March 1998 focusing on the review of the research activities and future research plan. The succeeding 2nd workshop was held on March 1999 focusing on the topics of the plutonium utilization in water-cooled reactors. The 3rd workshop was held on March 3rd 2000, which was attended by 77 participants. The workshop began with a lecture titled 'Recent Situation Related to Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR)', followed by 'Program on MOX Fuel Utilization in Light Water Reactors' which is the mainstream scenario of plutonium utilization by utilities, and 'Feasibility Studies on Commercialized Fast Breeder Reactor Cycle System' mainly conducted by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). Also, following lectures were given as the recent research activities in JAERI: 'Progress in Design Study on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors', 'Long-Term Scenarios of Power Reactors and Fuel Cycle Development and the Role of Reduced Moderation Water Reactors', 'Experimental and Analytical Study on Thermal Hydraulics' and Reactor Physics Experiment Plan using TCA'. At the end of the workshop, a general discussion was performed about the research and development of the RMWR. This report includes the original papers presented at the workshop and summaries of the questions and answers for each lecture and general discussion, as well as presentation viewgraphs, program and participant list as appendixes. The 7 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  13. Summary report of a workshop on phytoremediation research needs

    Soil contamination is a national and global problem. A major challenge is the remediation of large sites contaminated with radionuclides and toxic metals, often present in relatively small amounts but above regulatory action levels. Despite the function of phytoremediation processes in nature for millenia, the technology of phytoremediation is, for the most part, still a concept. There are many different pollutants, plant uptake mechanisms, soil matrices, and plant species that need to be investigated, without overlooking the microbial participation in this technology. Developing actual practical applications will require a significant and coordinated research and development effort, due to the complexity of both biological systems and the soil contamination problems. Research and development in this area must involve scientists and engineers in Federal and state agencies, foreign organizations and industry. The representation at the workshop of researchers from many disciplines, organizations and countries, augurs well for a cooperative and interdisciplinary research effort and the rapid application of this technology. The urgent needs for effective, low-cost technologies to clean-up contaminated soils, both in the US and around the world, suggests phytoremediation as a high national and international research priority. The availability of scientists trained in the interdisciplinary topics relating to phytoremediation will be a major factor in expediting development of this technology

  14. Summary report of a workshop on phytoremediation research needs

    1994-12-01

    Soil contamination is a national and global problem. A major challenge is the remediation of large sites contaminated with radionuclides and toxic metals, often present in relatively small amounts but above regulatory action levels. Despite the function of phytoremediation processes in nature for millenia, the technology of phytoremediation is, for the most part, still a concept. There are many different pollutants, plant uptake mechanisms, soil matrices, and plant species that need to be investigated, without overlooking the microbial participation in this technology. Developing actual practical applications will require a significant and coordinated research and development effort, due to the complexity of both biological systems and the soil contamination problems. Research and development in this area must involve scientists and engineers in Federal and state agencies, foreign organizations and industry. The representation at the workshop of researchers from many disciplines, organizations and countries, augurs well for a cooperative and interdisciplinary research effort and the rapid application of this technology. The urgent needs for effective, low-cost technologies to clean-up contaminated soils, both in the US and around the world, suggests phytoremediation as a high national and international research priority. The availability of scientists trained in the interdisciplinary topics relating to phytoremediation will be a major factor in expediting development of this technology.

  15. Summary of the Space Charge Workshop 2013 (SC-13)

    Franchetti, G

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the disucssions and conclusions from the "Space Charge 2013" (SC-13) workshop at CERN, 16-19 April 2013. SC-13 was jointly organized by EUCARD, ACCNET, ICFA, HIC4FAIR and LIU. Strong activities on space-charge related topics are ongoing at CERN (LIU), GSI (FAIR), and RAL (ISIS upgrade). Several studies include experimental work. The issue of code benchmarking is important with regard to long-term tracking. In particular, the noise created by PIC codes evoked intense discussions. Interesting from a theoretical stand point has been a discussion about equating PIC noise with intrabeam-scattering. A decision has been taken to use the GSI test suite for benchmarking of frozen space charge models also for the benchmarking of PIC codes. Firm plans have been made to benchmark Synergia and Orbit, plus perhaps also IMPACT and WARP. Other discussion focused on the role of GPU for high intensity beam dynamics. Corresponding efforts were reported from GSI, RAL, and FNAL. The final consensus is that ...

  16. URBAN ATMOSPHERIC OBSERVATORY (UAO) FIRST PLANNING WORKSHOP, JANUARY 27-28-2003. WORKSHOP SUMMARY.

    REYNOLDS,R.M.; LEE,H.N.

    2003-03-27

    The Urban Atmospheric Observatory (UAO) First Planning Workshop was held on 27-28 January 2003 at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) in downtown Manhattan, New York City. The meeting was well attended by local, state, and national administrators, as well as scientists and engineers from the national laboratories and academia. The real-time intensive UAO is a necessary step toward the development and validation of new technologies in support of the New York City emergency management and anti-terrorism effort. The real-time intensive UAO will be a dense array of meteorological instrumentation, remote sensing and satellite products and model output, as well as radiation detection, gamma spectrometer and aerosol measurements focused onto a small area in the heart of Manhattan. Such a test-bed, developed in a somewhat homogeneous urban area, and with a well-developed communication and data collection backbone, will be of immense utility for understanding how models of all scales can be improved and how they can best be integrated into the city's emergency program. The goal of the First Planning Workshop was to bring together a small group of experts in the fields of urban meteorology, modeling from mesoscale to fine-mesh computational fluid dynamics, instrumentation, communications and visualization, in order to (1) establish the importance of the observational program, (2) define the most efficient and cost-effective design for the program, (3) define needed intensive observational efforts and establish a schedule, and (4) define the importance of the UAO in emergency operations. The workshop achieved its goals with the enthusiastic participation of over forty persons. There was a synthesis of ideas towards a world-class facility that would benefit both immediate emergency management activities and, over an extended time, the entire field of urban meteorology and contaminant dispersion modeling.

  17. Summary of RPC 2007, the IX International Workshop

    Sharma, Archana

    2009-01-01

    This summary highlights the success stories and open issues for the widely employed Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC). Many experiments were represented, each having its own specific requirements for the operation of the detector. The general focus is on the understanding of operational characteristics, namely studies of electrode material, gas systems, aging and long term performance. Simulations of electric field and transport parameters are reported, along with performance at high rates, focused on timing and time-of-flight systems. There are important issues related to operation of large RPC systems and their commissioning, QA and QC procedures. Finally, RPCs are now being used in diverse applications such as Calorimetry with analogue readout and in Astrophysics

  18. Executive Summary of the Workshop “Nutritional Challenges in the High Risk Infant”

    Higgins, Rosemary D.; Devaskar, Sherin; Hay, William W.; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Frank R. Greer; Kennedy, Kathleen; Meier, Paula; Papile, LuAnn; Sherman, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) invited an expert panel to a workshop to address the current knowledge gaps and lack of evidence-based guidelines that preclude optimal nutritional care for infants in neonatal intensive care units. Since much research needs to be done in this complex area of science, the group was requested to propose new research to rectify current deficiencies in this field. This paper provides a summary of...

  19. Summary of an Informal Workshop on the Causes of Economic Growth

    Jonathan Temple

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of an OECD workshop on the causes of economic growth, held 6-7 July 2000. The topics covered include the recent growth resurgence in the United States, the potential importance of ICT and the Internet, and the part played by continual reallocation and restructuring. The paper also discusses the growth role of education, institutions, social capital, the financial sector, international trade and foreign direct investment, and indicates how research on these topics...

  20. 4th International Workshop on Adaptive Optics for Industry and Medicine

    Wittrock, Ulrich

    2005-01-01

    This book treats the development and application of adaptive optics for industry and medicine. The contributions describe recently developed components for adaptive-optics systems such as deformable mirrors, wavefront sensors, and mirror drivers as well as complete adaptive optical systems and their applications in industry and medicine. Applications range from laser-beam forming and adaptive aberration correction for high-power lasers to retinal imaging in ophthalmology. The contributions are based on presentations made at the 4th International Workshop on Adaptive Optics in Industry and Medicine which took place in Münster, Germany, in October 2003. This highly successful series of workshops on adaptive optics started in 1997 and continues with the 5th workshop in Beijing in 2005.

  1. A workshop on developing risk assessment methods for medical use of radioactive material. Volume 1: Summary

    Tortorelli, J.P. [ed.] [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-08-01

    A workshop was held at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, August 16--18, 1994 on the topic of risk assessment on medical devices that use radioactive isotopes. Its purpose was to review past efforts to develop a risk assessment methodology to evaluate these devices, and to develop a program plan and a scoping document for future methodology development. This report contains a summary of that workshop. Participants included experts in the fields of radiation oncology, medical physics, risk assessment, human-error analysis, and human factors. Staff from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) associated with the regulation of medical uses of radioactive materials and with research into risk-assessment methods participated in the workshop. The workshop participants concurred in NRC`s intended use of risk assessment as an important technology in the development of regulations for the medical use of radioactive material and encouraged the NRC to proceed rapidly with a pilot study. Specific recommendations are included in the executive summary and the body of this report. An appendix contains the 8 papers presented at the conference: NRC proposed policy statement on the use of probabilistic risk assessment methods in nuclear regulatory activities; NRC proposed agency-wide implementation plan for probabilistic risk assessment; Risk evaluation of high dose rate remote afterloading brachytherapy at a large research/teaching institution; The pros and cons of using human reliability analysis techniques to analyze misadministration events; Review of medical misadministration event summaries and comparison of human error modeling; Preliminary examples of the development of error influences and effects diagrams to analyze medical misadministration events; Brachytherapy risk assessment program plan; and Principles of brachytherapy quality assurance.

  2. A workshop on developing risk assessment methods for medical use of radioactive material. Volume 1: Summary

    A workshop was held at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, August 16--18, 1994 on the topic of risk assessment on medical devices that use radioactive isotopes. Its purpose was to review past efforts to develop a risk assessment methodology to evaluate these devices, and to develop a program plan and a scoping document for future methodology development. This report contains a summary of that workshop. Participants included experts in the fields of radiation oncology, medical physics, risk assessment, human-error analysis, and human factors. Staff from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) associated with the regulation of medical uses of radioactive materials and with research into risk-assessment methods participated in the workshop. The workshop participants concurred in NRC's intended use of risk assessment as an important technology in the development of regulations for the medical use of radioactive material and encouraged the NRC to proceed rapidly with a pilot study. Specific recommendations are included in the executive summary and the body of this report. An appendix contains the 8 papers presented at the conference: NRC proposed policy statement on the use of probabilistic risk assessment methods in nuclear regulatory activities; NRC proposed agency-wide implementation plan for probabilistic risk assessment; Risk evaluation of high dose rate remote afterloading brachytherapy at a large research/teaching institution; The pros and cons of using human reliability analysis techniques to analyze misadministration events; Review of medical misadministration event summaries and comparison of human error modeling; Preliminary examples of the development of error influences and effects diagrams to analyze medical misadministration events; Brachytherapy risk assessment program plan; and Principles of brachytherapy quality assurance

  3. Workshop on iodine aspects of severe accident management. Summary and conclusions

    Following a recommendation of the OECD Workshop on the Chemistry of Iodine in Reactor Safety held in Wuerenlingen (Switzerland) in June 1996 [Summary and Conclusions of the Workshop, Report NEA/CSNI/R(96)7], the CSNI decided to sponsor a Workshop on Iodine Aspects of Severe Accident Management, and their planned or effective implementation. The starting point for this conclusion was the realization that the consolidation of the accumulated iodine chemistry knowledge into accident management guidelines and procedures remained, to a large extent, to be done. The purpose of the meeting was therefore to help build a bridge between iodine research and the application of its results in nuclear power plants, with particular emphasis on severe accident management. Specifically, the Workshop was expected to answer the following questions: - what is the role of iodine in severe accident management? - what are the needs of the utilities? - how can research fulfill these needs? The Workshop was organized in Vantaa (Helsinki), Finland, from 18 to 20 May 1999, in collaboration with Fortum Engineering Ltd. It was attended by forty-six specialists representing fifteen Member countries and the European Commission. Twenty-eight papers were presented. These included four utility papers, representing the views of Electricite de France (EDF), Teollisuuden Voima Oy and Fortum Engineering Ltd (Finland), the Nuclear Energy Institute (USA), and Japanese utilities. The papers were presented in five sessions: - iodine speciation; - organic compound control; - iodine control; - modeling; - iodine management; A sixth session was devoted to a general discussion on iodine management under severe accident conditions. This report summarizes the content of the papers and the conclusions of the workshop

  4. Background to Canada-India workshop (CIW) and summary from the first CIW

    Papavinasam, S. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). CANMET Materials Technology Lab

    2008-07-01

    This presentation provided background information on the Canada-India workshop (CIW) on pipeline integrity that focused on five themes, including nanotechnology; information technology; biotechnology; energy; and earth sciences. The presentation outlined follow-up trips conducted in 2006 such as the India conference on the Society of Surface Protective Coatings, and a conference entitled advances in electrochemical techniques in Goa, India, organized by the Electrochemical Research Institute. Follow-up trips in 2007 and outcomes were also highlighted. These outcomes of these conferences included a memorandum of understanding between CANMET in Montreal and the Indian Institute of Technology in Bombay; a memorandum of understanding between CANMET Montreal and the Indian Institute of Technology in Kanpur, India; and a memorandum of understanding between CANMET Montreal and the Central Electrochemical Research Institute. The presentation concluded with a photograph and summary of the first Canada-India workshop on pipeline integrity in Mumbai, India in November 2007. 8 figs.

  5. Summary of the workshop on structural analysis needs for magnetic fusion energy superconducting magnets

    The technical portions of the meeting were divided into three major sessions as follows: (1) Review of methods being presently used by the MFE community for structural evaluation of current designs. (2) Future structural analysis needs. (3) Open discussions dealing with adequacy of present methods, the improvements needed for MFE magnet structural analysis, and the establishment of an MFE magnet structural advisory group. Summaries of the individual talks presented on Wednesday and Thursday (i.e., items 1 and 2 above) are included following the workshop schedule given later in this synopsis

  6. Workshop summary

    Remy Avila

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available En este resumen, se hace un compendio de los resultados m as signi cativos relacionados con el sitio de San Pedro M artir presentados en este taller. Para tener una visi on m as completa de las caracter sticas del sitio, recomendamos la lectura de todos los art culos incluidos en el presente volumen.

  7. The emerging roles of energy storage in a competitive power market: Summary of a DOE Workshop

    Gordon, S.P.; Falcone, P.K. [eds.

    1995-06-01

    This report contains a summary of the workshop, {open_quotes}The Emerging Roles of Energy Storage in a Competitive Power Market,{close_quotes} which was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and Sandia National Laboratories and was held in Pleasanton, California on December 6-7, 1994. More than 70 people attended, representing government agencies, national laboratories, equipment vendors, electric utilities and other energy providers, venture capital interests, and consultants. Many types of energy storage were discussed, including electrical (batteries and superconducting magnets), mechanical (flywheels and pumped hydro), hydrogen, compressed air, and thermal energy storage. The objectives of the workshop were to communicate within the energy storage community regarding the costs, benefits, and technical status of various technology options; to explore and elucidate the evolving roles of energy storage in a more dynamic and competitive power and energy marketplace; and to discuss the optimum federal role in this area. The goals of the workshop were fully realized through knowledgeable and insightful presentations and vigorous discussion, which are summarized.

  8. Human Genome Diversity Project. Summary of planning workshop 3(B): Ethical and human-rights implications

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    The third planning workshop of the Human Genome Diversity Project was held on the campus of the US National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, from February 16 through February 18, 1993. The second day of the workshop was devoted to an exploration of the ethical and human-rights implications of the Project. This open meeting centered on three roundtables, involving 12 invited participants, and the resulting discussions among all those present. Attendees and their affiliations are listed in the attached Appendix A. The discussion was guided by a schedule and list of possible issues, distributed to all present and attached as Appendix B. This is a relatively complete, and thus lengthy, summary of the comments at the meeting. The beginning of the summary sets out as conclusions some issues on which there appeared to be widespread agreement, but those conclusions are not intended to serve as a set of detailed recommendations. The meeting organizer is distributing his recommendations in a separate memorandum; recommendations from others who attended the meeting are welcome and will be distributed by the meeting organizer to the participants and to the Project committee.

  9. Summary of the 4th workshop on the reduced-moderation water reactor

    Nakatsuka, Toru; Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Iwamura, Takamichi (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-09-01

    The research on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors (RMWRs) has been performed in JAERI for the development of future innovative reactors. The workshop on the RMWRs has been held every year since fiscal 1997 aimed at information exchange between JAERI and other organizations such as universities, laboratories, utilities and vendors. The 4th workshop was held on March 2, 2001 under the joint auspices of JAERI and North Kanto branch of Atomic Energy Society of Japan. The workshop began with three lectures on recent research activities in JAERI entitled 'Recent Situation of Research on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor', 'Analysis on Electricity Generation Costs of Reduced Moderation Water Reactors' and 'Reprocessing Technology for Spent Mixed-Oxides Fuel from LWR'. Then five lectures followed: 'Micro Reactor Physics of MOX Fueled LWR' which shows the recent results of reactor physics, Fast Reactor Cooled by Supercritical Light Water' which is another type of reduced-moderation reactor, 'Phase 1 of Feasibility Studies on Commercialized Fast Breeder Reactor Cycle System' mainly conducted by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), 'Integral Type Small PWR with Stand-alone Safety' which is intended to suit for the future consumers' needs, and Utilization of Plutonium in Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors' which dictates benefits of plutonium utilization with RMWRs. This report includes the original papers presented at the workshop and summaries of the questions and answers for each lecture, as well as presentation handouts, program and participant list as appendixes. The 8 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  10. Innovations in the design of mechanical components for a beamline -- The SRl`95 Workshop 2 summary

    Kuzay, T.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Warwick, T. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation 1995 Conference (SRI`95) was hosted by the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Of the many workshops within the conference, the SRI`95 Workshop 2 was ``Innovations in the Design of Mechanical Components of a Beamline``. The workshop was attended well with over 140 registrants. The following topics were discussed. Industry`s perspective on the status and future was provided by Huber Diffrationtechnik, Oxford Instruments, and Kohzu Seiko Ltd. on goniometers/diffractometers, advanced manufacturing technique of high heat load components, such as the APS photon shutter, and the specialties of monochromators provided to the third-generation synchrotrons, respectively. This was followed by a description of the engineering of a dual function monochromator design for water-cooled diamond or cryogenically cooled silicon monochromators by CMC CAT/APS. Another category was the nagging problem of sensitivity of the photon beam position monitors (XBPM) to bending magnet radiation (``BM contamination``) and the undulator magnet gap changes. Problem descriptions and suggested solutions were provided by both the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and the APS. Other innovative ideas were the cooling schemes (enhanced cooling of beamline components using metallic porous meshes including cryo-cooled applications); Glidcop photon shutter design using microchannels at the ALS; and window/filter design, manufacture and operational experiences at CHESS and PETRA/HASYLAB. Additional discussions were held on designing for micromotions and precision in the optical support systems and smart user filter schemes. This is a summary of the presentations at the Workshop. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Summary of the 4th workshop on the reduced-moderation water reactor

    The research on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors (RMWRs) has been performed in JAERI for the development of future innovative reactors. The workshop on the RMWRs has been held every year since fiscal 1997 aimed at information exchange between JAERI and other organizations such as universities, laboratories, utilities and vendors. The 4th workshop was held on March 2, 2001 under the joint auspices of JAERI and North Kanto branch of Atomic Energy Society of Japan. The workshop began with three lectures on recent research activities in JAERI entitled 'Recent Situation of Research on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor', 'Analysis on Electricity Generation Costs of Reduced Moderation Water Reactors' and 'Reprocessing Technology for Spent Mixed-Oxides Fuel from LWR'. Then five lectures followed: 'Micro Reactor Physics of MOX Fueled LWR' which shows the recent results of reactor physics, Fast Reactor Cooled by Supercritical Light Water' which is another type of reduced-moderation reactor, 'Phase 1 of Feasibility Studies on Commercialized Fast Breeder Reactor Cycle System' mainly conducted by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), 'Integral Type Small PWR with Stand-alone Safety' which is intended to suit for the future consumers' needs, and Utilization of Plutonium in Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors' which dictates benefits of plutonium utilization with RMWRs. This report includes the original papers presented at the workshop and summaries of the questions and answers for each lecture, as well as presentation handouts, program and participant list as appendixes. The 8 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  12. ECAG 2008 Workshop: Facial and Bodily Expressions for Control and Adaptation of Games

    Nijholt, Anton; Poppe, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    In this workshop of the 8th IEEE International Conference on Automatic Face and Gesture Recognition (FG 2008), the emphasis is on research on facial and bodily expressions for the control and adaptation of games. We distinguish between two forms of expressions, depending on whether the user has the initiative and consciously uses his or her movements and expressions to control the interface, or whether the application takes the initiative to adapt itself to the affective state of the user as ...

  13. Implementation of the natural resource damage assessment rule. Workshop summary; interim notification policy: Environmental Restoration Program

    1991-11-01

    Regulations have been promulgated by the Department of Interior (DOI) which provide an administrative process whereby natural resource trustees may establish the type and extent of injury and evaluate the damages to natural resources. These regulations provide an optional mechanism for Natural Resource Damage Assessments (NRDAs), with four major components. A workshop was held to develop recommendations for DOE-OR regarding implementation of the DOI NRDA regulations at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The attendants were divided into three working groups to consider (1) administrative/legal requirements, (2) ecological assessments, and (3) the NRDA/economic evaluation process. This report supplies an overview of the DOI NRDA regulations as well as summaries of the consensus of each of the three working groups.

  14. Summary of the stakeholders workshop to develop a National Volcano Early Warning System (NVEWS)

    Guffanti, Marianne; Scott, William E.; Driedger, Carolyn L.; Ewert, John W.

    2006-01-01

    The importance of investing in monitoring, mitigation, and preparedness before natural hazards occur has been amply demonstrated by recent disasters such as the Indian Ocean Tsunami in December 2004 and Hurricane Katrina in August 2005. Playing catch-up with hazardous natural phenomena such as these limits our ability to work with public officials and the public to lessen adverse impacts. With respect to volcanic activity, the starting point of effective pre-event mitigation is monitoring capability sufficient to detect and diagnose precursory unrest so that communities at risk have reliable information and sufficient time to respond to hazards with which they may be confronted. Recognizing that many potentially dangerous U.S. volcanoes have inadequate or no ground-based monitoring, the U.S Geological Survey (USGS) Volcano Hazards Program (VHP) and partners recently evaluated U.S. volcano-monitoring capabilities and published 'An Assessment of Volcanic Threat and Monitoring Capabilities in the United States: Framework for a National Volcano Early Warning System (NVEWS).' Results of the NVEWS volcanic threat and monitoring assessment are being used to guide long-term improvements to the national volcano-monitoring infrastructure operated by the USGS and affiliated groups. The NVEWS report identified the need to convene a workshop of a broad group of stakeholders--such as representatives of emergency- and land-management agencies at the Federal, State, and local levels and the aviation sector--to solicit input about implementation of NVEWS and their specific information requirements. Accordingly, an NVEWS Stakeholders Workshop was held in Portland, Oregon, on 22-23 February 2006. A summary of the workshop is presented in this document.

  15. Summary report for the second TUV-workshop proceedings on living PSA application

    This workshop on living PSA Application was organized to support the OECD/NEA CSNI-Principal Working Group No.5 on Risk Assessment for an international exchange of experience on living PSA application. The first session was devoted to Living PSA Applications and the second session to Tools for Living PSA. Living PSA Applications: Reasons for performing PSA (regulatory requirement, targets; corporate requirement, targets; safety related activity prioritization; other); Logistic of Living PSA Management (Corporate management involvement, Decision making levels and guidance, Plant level involvement, Required personnel commitment, Frequency and extent of re-quantification of PSA, Types of safety/risk parameters to be monitored, Quality assurance on maintaining Living PSA); Examples of Application (Experiences of application, State of Living PSA/e.g. all accident sequences involved, Details of component level involvement). Tools for Living PSA: Data Collection Systems and Codes (Source and type of data collected, Probabilistic parameter quantification, Interface to basic event data, Data code systems). An executive summary of the workshop is given

  16. Summary of comments received from workshops on radiological criteria for decommissioning

    Caplin, J.; Page, G.; Smith, D.; Wiblin, C. [Advanced Systems Technology, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting an enhanced participatory rulemaking to establish radiological criteria for site cleanup and decommissioning of NRC-licensed facilities. Open public meetings were held during 1993 in Chicago, IL, San Francisco, CA, Boston, MA, Dallas, TX, Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, and Washington, DC. Interested parties were invited to provide input on the rulemaking issues before the NRC staff develops a draft proposed rule. This report summarizes 3,635 comments categorized from transcripts of the seven workshops and 1,677 comments from 100 NRC docketed letters from individuals and organizations. No analysis or response to the comments is included. The comments reflect a broad spectrum of viewpoints on the issues related to radiological criteria for site cleanup and decommissioning. The NRC also held public meetings on the scope of the Generic Environmental Impact Statement (GEIS) during July 1993. The GEIS meetings were held in Washington, DC., San Francisco, CA, Oklahoma City, OK, and Cleveland, OH. Related comments from these meetings were reviewed and comments which differed substantially from those from the workshops are also summarized in the body of the report. A summary of the comments from the GEIS scoping meetings is included as an Appendix.

  17. Summary of comments received from workshops on radiological criteria for decommissioning

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting an enhanced participatory rulemaking to establish radiological criteria for site cleanup and decommissioning of NRC-licensed facilities. Open public meetings were held during 1993 in Chicago, IL, San Francisco, CA, Boston, MA, Dallas, TX, Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, and Washington, DC. Interested parties were invited to provide input on the rulemaking issues before the NRC staff develops a draft proposed rule. This report summarizes 3,635 comments categorized from transcripts of the seven workshops and 1,677 comments from 100 NRC docketed letters from individuals and organizations. No analysis or response to the comments is included. The comments reflect a broad spectrum of viewpoints on the issues related to radiological criteria for site cleanup and decommissioning. The NRC also held public meetings on the scope of the Generic Environmental Impact Statement (GEIS) during July 1993. The GEIS meetings were held in Washington, DC., San Francisco, CA, Oklahoma City, OK, and Cleveland, OH. Related comments from these meetings were reviewed and comments which differed substantially from those from the workshops are also summarized in the body of the report. A summary of the comments from the GEIS scoping meetings is included as an Appendix

  18. Workshop

    Hess, Regitze; Lotz, Katrine

    2003-01-01

    Program for en arkitektur-workshop med focus på de danske havne. Præsentation af 57 yngre danske og internationale deltagende arkitekter.......Program for en arkitektur-workshop med focus på de danske havne. Præsentation af 57 yngre danske og internationale deltagende arkitekter....

  19. Workshop on adaptive grid methods for fusion plasmas

    Wiley, J.C. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-07-01

    The author describes a general `hp` finite element method with adaptive grids. The code was based on the work of Oden, et al. The term `hp` refers to the method of spatial refinement (h), in conjunction with the order of polynomials used as a part of the finite element discretization (p). This finite element code seems to handle well the different mesh grid sizes occuring between abuted grids with different resolutions.

  20. US/Japan workshop on mitigation and adaptation technologies related to global climate change

    Bernthal, F.M.

    1993-12-31

    It is a great pleasure for me to have the honor of delivering the keynote address for this important gathering, an honor enhanced further because of the many activities and historic relationships represented by this workshop. First of all, it represents the spirit of continuing cooperation and good relations between the United States and Japan. With the aid of the framework provided by the U.S./Japan Science and Technology Agreement, our two nations can come together to address a problem that has no national boundaries {hor_ellipsis} and we can think about solutions of potential benefit to all citizens of the global community. This workshop also symbolizes the spirit of cooperation so characteristic of the conduct of research in science and technology -- cooperation between us as individual scientists and engineers, between the various institutions we represent, and across our diverse disciplines. This workshop is only the second of its kind. The first US/Japan Workshop on global climate change was held last year in Japan. That workshop focused on cooperative scientific research in the United States and Japan. Out of it came a general agreement to continue collaborative work and to extend cooperation into the area of global change-related technologies, in particular those technologies that hold promise for mitigation and adaptation.

  1. Global Positioning System for the Geosciences: Summary and Proceedings of a Workshop on Improving the GPS Reference Station Infrastructure for Earth, Oceanic, and Atmospheric Science Applications

    1997-01-01

    This report, which represents the results of the workshop, is divided into two sections. Section I includes an executive summary, a chapter introducing the reader to GPS and its usefulness for Earth, oceanic, and atmospheric research, and four chapters summarizing the themes of the workshop presentations, poster papers, and working group discussions. Section II contains the proceedings of the workshop and is divided into five chapters corresponding to the five categories of invited papers written by workshop speakers and authors of poster papers. The appendices contain additional information about the workshop and the Steering Committee.

  2. Grid-Adapted FUN3D Computations for the Second High Lift Prediction Workshop

    Lee-Rausch, E. M.; Rumsey, C. L.; Park, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Contributions of the unstructured Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes code FUN3D to the 2nd AIAA CFD High Lift Prediction Workshop are described, and detailed comparisons are made with experimental data. Using workshop-supplied grids, results for the clean wing configuration are compared with results from the structured code CFL3D Using the same turbulence model, both codes compare reasonably well in terms of total forces and moments, and the maximum lift is similarly over-predicted for both codes compared to experiment. By including more representative geometry features such as slat and flap brackets and slat pressure tube bundles, FUN3D captures the general effects of the Reynolds number variation, but under-predicts maximum lift on workshop-supplied grids in comparison with the experimental data, due to excessive separation. However, when output-based, off-body grid adaptation in FUN3D is employed, results improve considerably. In particular, when the geometry includes both brackets and the pressure tube bundles, grid adaptation results in a more accurate prediction of lift near stall in comparison with the wind-tunnel data. Furthermore, a rotation-corrected turbulence model shows improved pressure predictions on the outboard span when using adapted grids.

  3. A summary of the 2nd workshop on Human Resources Development (HRD) in the nuclear field in Asia. FY2000

    NONE

    2001-06-01

    The Human Resources Development (HRD) Project was added in 1999 as a Cooperation Activity of 'the Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia (FNCA)' which is organized by Nuclear Committee. The HRD Project supports to solidify the foundation of nuclear development utilization in Asia by promoting human resources development in Asian countries. The principal activity of the HRD Project is to hold the Workshop on Human Resources Development in the Nuclear Field in Asia once a year. The objective of the Workshop is to clarify problems and needs of the human resources development of each country and to support it mutually by exchanging information etc. The report consists of a summary of the 2nd Workshop on Human Resources Development in the Nuclear Field in Asia held on November 27 and 28, 2000 at Tokai Research Establishment of JAERI. (author)

  4. A summary of the 2nd workshop on Human Resources Development (HRD) in the nuclear field in Asia. FY2000

    The Human Resources Development (HRD) Project was added in 1999 as a Cooperation Activity of 'the Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia (FNCA)' which is organized by Nuclear Committee. The HRD Project supports to solidify the foundation of nuclear development utilization in Asia by promoting human resources development in Asian countries. The principal activity of the HRD Project is to hold the Workshop on Human Resources Development in the Nuclear Field in Asia once a year. The objective of the Workshop is to clarify problems and needs of the human resources development of each country and to support it mutually by exchanging information etc. The report consists of a summary of the 2nd Workshop on Human Resources Development in the Nuclear Field in Asia held on November 27 and 28, 2000 at Tokai Research Establishment of JAERI. (author)

  5. Summary of the spent nuclear fuel transportation workshop for state officials, October 22, 1985, Springfield, Illinois. Final report

    On October 22, 1985, thirty-two state officials representing eighteen states attended a workshop on the transportation of spent nuclear fuel hosted by the Illinois Department of Nuclear Safety and co-sponsored by the US Department of Energy. The letter of invitation is attached to this report along with the agenda for the workshop. Also attached is the attendance list. The purposes of the workshop were to explain Illinois' inspection, escort and emergency preparedness program for spent nuclear fuel to officials from other states and to discuss the needs of the future national system when DOE begins shipping spent fuel to either a repository or a monitored retrievable storage facility. Summaries of the presentations and the reports from the discussion groups are presented

  6. Low dose effects and non-monotonic dose responses for endocrine active chemicals: Science to practice workshop: Workshop summary

    Beausoleil, Claire; Ormsby, Jean-Nicolas; Gies, Andreas;

    2013-01-01

    A workshop was held in Berlin September 12–14th 2012 to assess the state of the science of the data supporting low dose effects and non-monotonic dose responses (“low dose hypothesis”) for chemicals with endocrine activity (endocrine disrupting chemicals or EDCs). This workshop consisted of lectu...... consensus was reached the robust discussions were helpful to inform both basic scientists and risk assessors on all the issues. There were a number of important ideas developed to help continue the discussion and improve communication over the next few years....

  7. Summary of the 3rd LHC Crab Cavity Workshop (LHC-CC09)

    Calaga, R.; Zimmermann, Frank; Koutchouk, Jean-Pierre; Delayen, Jean; Pierini, Paolo; Ciapala, Edmond; McIntosh, Peter; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Brüning, Oliver; Collier, Paul; Funakoshi, Yoshihiro

    2010-01-01

    The 3rd workshop on crab compensation for the LHC luminosity upgrade (LHC-CC09) was held September 16-18, 2008 at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland. The workshop was organized by joint collaboration of CERN, EUCARD, KEK and US-LARP. Approximately 50 workshop participants from 3 continents and several institutions discussed the future strategy of implementing crab cavities in the LHC

  8. Summary of annual cycle energy system workshop I held October 29--30, 1975, at Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Fischer, H.C.; Moyers, J.C.; Hise, E.C.; Nephew, E.A. (eds.)

    1976-07-01

    The Annual Cycle Energy System (ACES) concept provides space heating, air conditioning, and water heating by means of a heat pump and an energy storage tank. Heat is removed in winter from the water in the tank and is added during the following summer. A workshop was held on October 29-30, 1975 in Oak Ridge, Tenn. to disseminate information on ACES. This report gives summaries of the presentations, which covered technical, economic, and institutional aspects of the concept.

  9. Managing the Environmental Impacts of Growth Under Climate Change: A Workshop for State and Local Decision-Makers--Workshop Summary

    From November 8/9, 2011, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) hosted a workshop titled "Managing the Environmental Impacts of Growth Under Climate Change." The Office of Research and Development (ORD) organized the meeting, which was held in Research Triangle Park, Nort...

  10. IAEA workshop on 'Atomic and molecular data for fusion energy research'. Summary report

    On September 8-12 a workshop on Atomic and Molecular (A+M) Data for Fusion Energy Research was hosted by the International Centre for Theoretical Physics in Trieste Italy. The workshop was attended by twelve students representing eleven Member States. A total of five lecturers, including four external to the Agency, made presentations to the workshop. All lecturers provided advance copies of the lecture materials and all provided written assignments for the students, to provide practical examples of applications of data issues to actual problems related to fusion energy research. All materials were collected on CDs, which were distributed to the students by the conclusion of the workshop. During the course of the workshop the students were given the opportunity to describe their backgrounds and research interests. The workshop did arouse interest in A+M processes related to fusion. The workshop was viewed as successful by the students. (author)

  11. Proceedings of the workshop on ion source issues relevant to a pulsed spallation neutron source: Part 1: Workshop summary

    The workshop reviewed the ion-source requirements for high-power accelerator-driven spallation neutron facilities, and the performance of existing ion sources. Proposals for new facilities in the 1- to 5-MW range call for a widely differing set of ion-source requirements. For example, the source peak current requirements vary from 40 mA to 150 mA, while the duty factor ranges from 1% to 9%. Much of the workshop discussion centered on the state-of-the-art of negative hydrogen ion source (H-) technology and the present experience with Penning and volume sources. In addition, other ion source technologies, for positive ions or CW applications were reviewed. Some of these sources have been operational at existing accelerator complexes and some are in the source-development stage on test stands

  12. Research needs to better understand Lake Ontario ecosystem function: A workshop summary

    Stewart, Thomas J.; Rudstam, Lars G.; Watkins, James M.; Johnson, Timothy B.; Weidel, Brian C.; Koops, Marten A.

    2016-01-01

    Lake Ontario investigators discussed and interpreted published and unpublished information during two workshops to assess our current understanding of Lake Ontario ecosystem function and to identify research needs to guide future research and monitoring activities. The purpose of this commentary is to summarize key investigative themes and hypotheses that emerged from the workshops. The outcomes of the workshop discussions are organized under four themes: spatial linkages and interactions, drivers of primary production, trophic transfer, and human interactions.

  13. CNRA/CSNI workshop on licensing and operating experience of computer-based I and C systems - Summary and conclusions

    The OECD Workshop on Licensing and Operating Experience of Computer-Based I and C Systems, was sponsored by both the Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) and the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). It was organised in collaboration with the Czech State Office for Nuclear Safety (SUJB), the Czech Power Board CEZ a.s., I and C Energo a.s. and the Nuclear Research Institute, Rez near Prague. The objectives of the Workshop were to exchange the experience gained by both the regulators and the industry in different countries in the licensing and operation of computer-based I and C systems, to discuss the existing differences in their licensing approaches in various countries, to consider the safety aspects of their practical use, and to discuss the ways of promoting future international co-operation in the given area. The scope of the Workshop included: - review of the progress made since the CNRA/CSNI workshop which was held in 1996 - current and future regulatory needs and/or requirements for the computer-based I and C systems - progress made in software life cycle activities, including verification and validation, and safety/hazards analysis - benefits of applying the computer-based I and C systems to improve plant performance and safety. The Technical Sessions and Discussion Sessions covered the following topics: Opening Session: Advances made in the use and planning of computer-based I and C systems; Topic 1: National and international standards and guides for computer-based safety systems; Topic 2: Regulatory aspects; Topic 3: Analysis and assessment of digital I and C systems; Topic 4: Software life cycle activities; Topic 4: Experience with applications, system aspects, potential limits and future trends and needs; Final Session: Workshop summary. The workshop provided a unique opportunity for people with experience in licensing, developing, manufacturing, implementing, maintaining or

  14. Environmental Virology Workshop Summary, Tucson, Arizona, Jan 7-12, 2013

    Sullivan, Matthew [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2015-02-17

    Full Text of the report: A total of 66 researchers participated in this workshop, including 44 attendees, 3 program officers from private and federal funding agencies, and 19 workshop teachers. The workshop was incredibly productive and focused on identifying knowledge-gaps critical for predictive modeling, and developing the framework (experimental, informatic, theoretical) needed to obtain the data. All attendees developed a strong foundation in cutting-edge methods and a network of researchers that are now aiding in advancing environmental virology research. To more broadly reach Environmental Virologists, a subset of the attendees since proposed and ran a viromics workshop at the American Society of Microbiology meeting in 2014 in Boston, MA where the workshop sold-out. The workshop proposal was accepted again by ASM and is scheduled to occur at the New Orleans meeting in May, 2015. Additionally, PI Sullivan is co-convening a ''Viromics: Tools and Concepts'' session at the FEMS meeting in the Netherlands in June 2015 to continue getting the word out about Environmental Virology. A second formal Environmental Virology Workshop is being planned to occur in Scotland in summer 2016, likely held jointly with the Aquatic Virology Workshop. I wish to thank DOE for their critical support for this workshop which has helped galvanize the field.

  15. Summary of a GAMBIT Club Workshop on Gas Migration in Bentonite. A Report produced for the GAMBIT Club

    Rodwell, W.R. [Serco Assurance, Risley (GB)] (ed.)

    2005-11-15

    In order to review the status of understanding of gas migration in bentonite, and particularly the experimental data that provides the basis for such understanding as exists, the GAMBIT Club organised a workshop of invited participants that was held in Madrid during 29-30 October 2003. (The GAMBIT Club is a consortium of radioactive waste management agencies: SKB, ANDRA, Enresa, JNC, Nagra, and Posiva.) The motivation for the workshop was the difficulty found in developing models of gas migration in bentonite because of lack of detailed characterisation of its mechanism and controlling parameters. This report provides a summary of the presentations made at the workshop and of the discussions that took place. Copies of the slides presented are provided in the appendix. The titles of the presentations are: Overview of Current Status of Experimental Knowledge and Understanding of Gas migration in Bentonite (William Rodwell); Summary of GAMBIT Club Modelling of Gas Migration in Compacted Bentonite (William Rodwell); A Capillarity/advection Model for Gas Break-through Pressures (Marolo Alfaro, Jim Graham); Recent Experiments by JNC on Gas Migration in Bentonite (Kenji Tanai, Mikihiko Yamamoto); Gas Flow in Clays: Experimental Data Leading to Two-phase and Preferential-path Modelling (Eduardo Alonso); Gas Movement in MX80 Bentonite under Constant Volume Conditions (Jon Harrington, Steve Horseman); Some Practical Observations on Gas Flow in Clays and Clay-rich Rocks (Steve Horseman, Jon Harrington); Early Large-scale Experiments on Gas Break-through Pressures in Clay based Materials (Harald Hoekmark)

  16. Summary of a GAMBIT Club Workshop on Gas Migration in Bentonite. A Report produced for the GAMBIT Club

    In order to review the status of understanding of gas migration in bentonite, and particularly the experimental data that provides the basis for such understanding as exists, the GAMBIT Club organised a workshop of invited participants that was held in Madrid during 29-30 October 2003. (The GAMBIT Club is a consortium of radioactive waste management agencies: SKB, ANDRA, Enresa, JNC, Nagra, and Posiva.) The motivation for the workshop was the difficulty found in developing models of gas migration in bentonite because of lack of detailed characterisation of its mechanism and controlling parameters. This report provides a summary of the presentations made at the workshop and of the discussions that took place. Copies of the slides presented are provided in the appendix. The titles of the presentations are: Overview of Current Status of Experimental Knowledge and Understanding of Gas migration in Bentonite (William Rodwell); Summary of GAMBIT Club Modelling of Gas Migration in Compacted Bentonite (William Rodwell); A Capillarity/advection Model for Gas Break-through Pressures (Marolo Alfaro, Jim Graham); Recent Experiments by JNC on Gas Migration in Bentonite (Kenji Tanai, Mikihiko Yamamoto); Gas Flow in Clays: Experimental Data Leading to Two-phase and Preferential-path Modelling (Eduardo Alonso); Gas Movement in MX80 Bentonite under Constant Volume Conditions (Jon Harrington, Steve Horseman); Some Practical Observations on Gas Flow in Clays and Clay-rich Rocks (Steve Horseman, Jon Harrington); Early Large-scale Experiments on Gas Break-through Pressures in Clay based Materials (Harald Hoekmark)

  17. Summary and main conclusions of the workshop on the use of expert judgment in decision-making

    CEA-Nuclear Energy Division and JRC-Institute for Energy had research activities on some common topics, particularly on the reliability and the performance assessment of technological systems and industrial facilities, and on the use of expert opinions in such applications. They performed in the past deep literature reviews in this last topic, which showed a large diversity of available methodologies. Three main conclusions could be obtained from that review: 1) The majority of available methodologies present restricted applicability, 2) there is a lack of exchanges between specialists in different application areas and 3) there is a scarcity of papers about the impact of the choice of an expert judgement method in the decision-making processes. In this context, the two organizations organized a 'workshop on the use of expert judgment in decision making' last June 2005; the first to our knowledge on this specific topic. The objectives of this workshop were to create an exchange forum around the three ideas previously mentioned and to gather a first state of the art, in order to identify the needs for R and D. This workshop brought together 55 participants, from different industry sectors (energy, both nuclear and non-nuclear, food, civil engineering and communication among others), universities, research organizations and technical support organizations. In this paper we provide a summary of this workshop, highlighting main contributions and providing information about identified main areas of interest. (authors)

  18. Summary of the 19th Joint EU-US Transport Task Force Workshop

    Angioni, C.; Mantica, P.; Naulin, Volker;

    2015-01-01

    This conference report summarizes the contributions to, and discussions at, the 19th Joint EU-US Transport Task Force workshop, held in Culham, UK, during 8-11 September 2014. The workshop was organized under six topics: momentum transport, energetic particles, challenges in modelling transport i...

  19. Materials Innovation for Next-Generation T&D Grid Components. Workshop Summary Report

    Taylor, Emmanuel [Energetics Incorporated, Columbia, MD (United States); Kramer, Caroline [Energetics Incorporated, Columbia, MD (United States); Marchionini, Brian [Energetics Incorporated, Columbia, MD (United States); Sabouni, Ridah [Energetics Incorporated, Columbia, MD (United States); Cheung, Kerry [U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Washington, DC (United States). Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE); Lee, Dominic F [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Materials Innovations for Next-Generation T&D Grid Components Workshop was co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and held on August 26 27, 2015, at the ORNL campus in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The workshop was planned and executed under the direction of workshop co-chair Dr. Kerry Cheung (DOE) and co-chair Dr. Dominic Lee (ORNL). The information contained herein is based on the results of the workshop, which was attended by nearly 50 experts from government, industry, and academia. The research needs and pathways described in this report reflect the expert opinions of workshop participants, but they are not intended to represent the views of the entire electric power community.

  20. RIACS Workshop on the Verification and Validation of Autonomous and Adaptive Systems

    Pecheur, Charles; Visser, Willem; Simmons, Reid

    2001-01-01

    The long-term future of space exploration at NASA is dependent on the full exploitation of autonomous and adaptive systems: careful monitoring of missions from earth, as is the norm now, will be infeasible due to the sheer number of proposed missions and the communication lag for deep-space missions. Mission managers are however worried about the reliability of these more intelligent systems. The main focus of the workshop was to address these worries and hence we invited NASA engineers working on autonomous and adaptive systems and researchers interested in the verification and validation (V&V) of software systems. The dual purpose of the meeting was to: (1) make NASA engineers aware of the V&V techniques they could be using; and (2) make the V&V community aware of the complexity of the systems NASA is developing.

  1. Small genomes: New initiatives in mapping and sequencing. Workshop summary report

    McKenney, K. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Biotechnology Div.; Robb, F. [Univ. of Maryland Biotechnology Inst., Baltimore, MD (United States). Center of Marine Biotechnology

    1993-12-31

    The workshop was held 5--7 July 1993 at the Center for Advanced Research in Biotechnology (CARB) and hosted by the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute (UMBI) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The objective of this workshop was to bring together individuals interested in DNA technologies and to determine the impact of these current and potential improvements of the speed and cost-effectiveness of mapping and sequencing on the planning of future small genome projects. A major goal of the workshop was to spur the collaboration of more diverse groups of scientists working on this topic, and to minimize competitiveness as an inhibitory factor to progress.

  2. Summary and Findings from the NREL/DOE Hydrogen Sensor Workshop (June 8, 2011)

    Buttner, W.; Burgess, R.; Post, M.; Rivkin, C.

    2012-07-01

    On June 8, 2011, DOE/NREL hosted a hydrogen sensor workshop attended by nearly forty participants from private organizations, government facilities, and academic institutions . The workshop participants represented a cross section of stakeholders in the hydrogen community, including sensor developers, end users, site safety officials, and code and standards developers. The goals of the workshop were to identify critical applications for the emerging hydrogen infrastructure that require or would benefit from hydrogen sensors, to assign performance specifications for sensor deployed in each application, and to identify shortcomings or deficiencies (i.e., technical gaps) in the ability of current sensor technology to meet the assigned performance requirements.

  3. Second ANS workshop on the safety of Soviet-designed nuclear power plants. Summary report

    The Second American Nuclear Society Workshop on the Safety of Soviet-Designed Nuclear Power Plants was held in Washington, DC, in November, 1994. The Workshop consisted of both plenary sessions and working sessions with three hundred participants overall. All countries with operating Soviet-Designed nuclear power plants were represented and representatives from several other countries also participated. In addition to the status and plans related to technical issues, the Workshop also included discussions of economic, political, legal, and social issues as they relate to the safety of these nuclear power plants

  4. Summary Report of a Specialized Workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluations

    Nichols, Alan L. [Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Dimitrious, P. [IAEA Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria); Kondev, F. G. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ricard-McCutchan, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-04-27

    A three-day specialised workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluations was organised and held at the headquarters of the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna, Austria, from 27 to 29 April 2015. This workshop covered a wide range of important topics and issues addressed when evaluating and maintaining the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). The primary aim was to improve evaluators’ abilities to identify and understand the most appropriate evaluation processes to adopt in the formulation of individual ENSDF data sets. Participants assessed and reviewed existing policies, procedures and codes, and round-table discussions included the debate and resolution of specific difficulties experienced by ENSDF evaluators (i.e., all workshop participants). The contents of this report constitute a record of this workshop, based on the presentations and subsequent discussions.

  5. Summary Report of a Specialized Workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluations

    A three-day specialised workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluations was organised and held at the headquarters of the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna, Austria, from 27 to 29 April 2015. This workshop covered a wide range of important topics and issues addressed when evaluating and maintaining the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). The primary aim was to improve evaluators' abilities to identify and understand the most appropriate evaluation processes to adopt in the formulation of individual ENSDF data sets. Participants assessed and reviewed existing policies, procedures and codes, and round-table discussions included the debate and resolution of specific difficulties experienced by ENSDF evaluators (i.e., all workshop participants). The contents of this report constitute a record of this workshop, based on the presentations and subsequent discussions.

  6. Small x Phenomenology summary of the 3rd Lund Small x Workshop in 2004

    Andersen, J R; Bartels, J; Barnafoldi, G G; Chachamis, G; Collins, J; Grindhammer, G; Gustafson, G; Hansson, M; Ingelman, G; Jung, H; Jönsson, L B; Knutsson, A; Kowalski, H; Kutak, K; Kyrieleis, A; Lévai, Peter; Lipatov, A; Loennblad, L; Lublinsky, M; Marchesini, G; Milcewicz, I; Risler, C; Sabio Vera, Agustin; Sjoedahl, M; Stasto, A M; Turnau, J; Watt, G; Zotov, N P; Andersen, Jeppe R; Baranov, Serguei; Bartels, Jochen; Barnafoldi, Gergely G.; Chachamis, Grigorios; Collins, John; Grindhammer, Guenter; Gustafson, Goesta; Hansson, Magnus; Ingelman, Gunnar; Jung, Hannes; Joensson, Leif; Knutsson, Albert; Kowalski, Henri; Kutak, Krzysztof; Kyrieleis, Albrecht; Levai, Peter; Lipatov, Artem; Loennblad, Leif; Lublinsky, Michael; Marchesini, Giuseppe; Milcewicz, Izabela; Risler, Christiane; Sabio-Vera, Agustin; Sjoedahl, Malin; Stasto, Anna; Turnau, Jacek; Watt, Graeme; Zotov, Nikolai

    2006-01-01

    A third workshop on small-x physics, within the Small-x Collaboration, was held in Hamburg in May 2004 with the aim of overviewing recent theoretical progress in this area and summarizing the experimental status.

  7. Small x phenomenology. Summary of the 3rd Lund small x workshop in 2004

    A third workshop on small-x physics, within the Small-x Collaboration, was held in Hamburg in May 2004 with the aim of overviewing recent theoretical progress in this area and summarizing the experimental status. (Orig.)

  8. Small-x phenomenology - Summary of the 3rd Lund small-x workshop in 2004

    A third workshop on small-x physics, within the Small-x Collaboration, was held in Hamburg in May 2004 with the aim of overviewing recent theoretical progress in this area and summarizing the experimental status. (orig.)

  9. Small x phenomenology. Summary of the 3rd Lund small x workshop in 2004

    Andersen, J.R. [Cavendish Lab., Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom); Baranov, S. [Lebedev Inst. of Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bartels, J. [Hamburg Univ. (DE). FRG] (and others)

    2006-04-15

    A third workshop on small-x physics, within the Small-x Collaboration, was held in Hamburg in May 2004 with the aim of overviewing recent theoretical progress in this area and summarizing the experimental status. (Orig.)

  10. A summary report of the workshop on the 'academic leadership training in the AIMST University, Malaysia'

    Premkumar, Rajagopal; Subhash J Bhore

    2013-01-01

    In Malaysia, there are 81 (as on February 15, 2013) higher education institutions including satellite branches of the foreign universities. In northern part of the Peninsular Malaysia, AIMST University is the first private not-for-profit university and aims to become a premier private university in the country and the region. The workshop described in this article was designed to develop and enhance the capacity of academic staff-in-leadership-role for the University. This type of workshops m...

  11. Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) Propulsion Technology Workshop. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Chojnacki, Kent T.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the Rocket-Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) Propulsion Technology Workshop was to assess the RBCC propulsion system's viability for Earth-to-Orbit (ETO) transportation systems. This was accomplished by creating a forum (workshop) in which past work in the field of RBCC propulsion systems was reviewed, current technology status was evaluated, and future technology programs in the field of RBCC propulsion systems were postulated, discussed, and recommended.

  12. OECD workshop on ex-vessel debris coolability - summary and recommendations

    The meeting organised in Karlsruhe was complementary to the OECD Workshop on In-Vessel Core Debris Retention and Coolability held in Garching, Germany in March 1998. The objectives of the Workshop were to: - exchange information on past, present and planned R and D activities in the area of ex-vessel debris coolability, and promote collaboration among the experts; - review the present situation and identify areas where knowledge is adequate for plant application; - address major uncertainties and identify remaining issues relevant to reactor safety; - discuss future orientations of work; - propose conclusions and recommendations to the CSNI. The Workshop had four main sessions, some of them divided into sub-sessions: Session A: Special Modes of Corium Discharge into the Containment; Session B: Phenomena to Achieve Coolability (B1: Natural Convection Heat Transfer with Bubbling, B2: Characteristics of Particle Beds, B3: Spreading, B4: Fragmentation and Quenching, B5: Flooding); Session C: Material Properties and Thermochemistry (C1: Properties, C2: Thermochemistry); Session D: Reactor Application. The Session Chairmen summaries are attached (Annex II). Each session and the meeting itself were concluded by a general discussion. Throughout the presentations of the papers and the discussions, the focus was on the application to the full size plant. This report presents the conclusions and recommendations after evaluation of the presentations and discussions. They are generally listed in the sequence of the meltdown process. (1) The conditions of melt release at vessel failure may vary according to the variations of core melt-down in the RPV. Relevant scenarios and bounding melt release conditions, such as melt dispersal into the containment as one extreme or jet impingement as another extreme release mode, should be quantified in order to plan and assess different management procedures or countermeasures for accident mitigation. (2) The phase diagrams and physical

  13. Summary and Outlook of the International Workshop on Aging Phenomena in Gaseous Detectors (DESY, Hamburg, October, 2001)

    Titov, M L; Padilla, C; Tesch, N

    2002-01-01

    High Energy Physics experiments are currently entering a new era which requires the operation of gaseous particle detectors at unprecedented high rates and integrated particle fluxes. Full functionality of such detectors over the lifetime of an experiment in a harsh radiation environment is of prime concern to the involved experimenters. New classes of gaseous detectors such as large-scale straw-type detectors, Micro-pattern Gas Detectors and related detector types with their own specific aging effects have evolved since the first workshop on wire chamber aging was held at LBL, Berkeley in 1986. In light of these developments and as detector aging is a notoriously complex field, the goal of the workshop was to provide a forum for interested experimentalists to review the progress in understanding of aging effects and to exchange recent experiences. A brief summary of the main results and experiences reported at the 2001 workshop is presented, with the goal of providing a systematic review of aging effects in ...

  14. Summary of SMIRT20 Preconference Topical Workshop - Identifying Structural Issues in Advanced Reactors

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL, USA) and IASMiRT sponsored an international forum Nov 5-6, 2008 in Porvoo, Finland for nuclear industry, academic, and regulatory representatives to identify structural issues in current and future advanced reactor design, especially for extreme conditions and external threats. The purpose of this Topical Workshop was to articulate research, engineering, and regulatory Code development needs. The topics addressed by the Workshop were selected to address critical industry needs specific to advanced reactor structures that have long lead times and can be the subject of future SMiRT technical sessions. The topics were; (1) structural/materials needs for extreme conditions and external threats in contemporary (Gen. III) and future (Gen. IV and NGNP) advanced reactors and (2) calibrating simulation software and methods that address topic 1. The workshop discussions and research needs identified are presented. The Workshop successfully produced interactive discussion on the two topics resulting in a list of research and technology needs. It is recommended that IASMiRT communicate the results of the discussion to industry and researchers to encourage new ideas and projects. In addition, opportunities exist to retrieve research reports and information that currently exists, and encourage more international cooperation and collaboration. It is recommended that IASMiRT continue with an off-year workshop series on select topics.

  15. Summary proceedings of a workshop on Bioremediation and its Societal Implications and Concerns (BASIC)

    Drell, D.W. [Department of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States). Office of Health and Environmental Research, Health Effects and Life Sciences Research Division; Metting, F.B. Jr. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Wuy, L.D. [ed.] [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-11-01

    This document summarizes the proceedings of a workshop on Bioremediation and Its Societal Implications and Concerns (BASIC) held July 18-19, 1996 at the Airlie Center near Warrenton, Virginia. The workshop was sponsored by the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), as part of its fundamental research program in Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR). The information summarized in these proceedings represents the general conclusions of the workshop participants, and not the opinions of workshop organizers or sponsors. Neither are they consensus opinions, as opinions differed among participants on a number of points. The general conclusions presented below were reached through a review, synthesis, and condensation of notes taken by NABIR Program Office staff and OHER program managers throughout the workshop. Specific contributions by participants during breakout sessions are recorded in bullet form in the appropriate sections, without attribution to the contributors. These contributions were transcribed as faithfully as possible from notes about the original discussions. They were edited only to make them grammatically correct, parallel in structure, and understandable to someone not familiar with the NABIR Program or BASIC element.

  16. Summary proceedings of a workshop on Bioremediation and its Societal Implications and Concerns (BASIC)

    This document summarizes the proceedings of a workshop on Bioremediation and Its Societal Implications and Concerns (BASIC) held July 18-19, 1996 at the Airlie Center near Warrenton, Virginia. The workshop was sponsored by the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), as part of its fundamental research program in Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR). The information summarized in these proceedings represents the general conclusions of the workshop participants, and not the opinions of workshop organizers or sponsors. Neither are they consensus opinions, as opinions differed among participants on a number of points. The general conclusions presented below were reached through a review, synthesis, and condensation of notes taken by NABIR Program Office staff and OHER program managers throughout the workshop. Specific contributions by participants during breakout sessions are recorded in bullet form in the appropriate sections, without attribution to the contributors. These contributions were transcribed as faithfully as possible from notes about the original discussions. They were edited only to make them grammatically correct, parallel in structure, and understandable to someone not familiar with the NABIR Program or BASIC element

  17. Innovations in the design of mechanical components for a beamline emdash The SRI close-quote 95 Workshop 2 Summary

    The Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation 1995 Conference (SRI close-quote 95) was hosted by the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Of the many workshops within the conference, the SRI close-quote 95 Workshop 2 was open-quote open-quote Innovations in the Design of Mechanical Components of a Beamline.close-quote close-quote The workshop was well attended with over 140 registrants. The following topics were discussed. Industry close-quote s perspective on the status and future was provided by Huber Diffraktionstechnik GMBH on goniometers/diffractometers, Oxford Instruments on advanced manufacturing technique of high heat load components, such as the APS photon shutter, and Kohzu Seiki Co. Ltd. on the specialties of monochromators provided to the third-generation synchrotrons. This was followed by a description of the engineering of a dual function monochromator design for water-cooled diamond or cryogenically cooled silicon monochromators by CMC CAT/APS. Another category was the nagging problem of sensitivity of the photon beam position monitors (XBPM) to bending magnet radiation (open-quote open-quote BM contamination close-quote close-quote) and the undulator magnet gap changes. Problem descriptions and suggested solutions were provided by both the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and the APS. Other innovative ideas were the cooling schemes (enhanced cooling of beamline components using metallic porous meshes including cryo-cooled applications); Glidcop photon shutter design using microchannels at the ALS; and window/filter design, manufacture and operational experiences at CHESS and PETRA/HASYLAB. Additional discussions were held on designing for micromotions and precision in the optical support systems and smart user filter schemes. This is a summary of the presentations at the Workshop. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  18. Innovations in the design of mechanical components for a beamline-The SRI'95 Workshop 2 Summary (invited)

    Kuzay, T. M.; Warwick, T.

    1996-09-01

    The Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation 1995 Conference (SRI'95) was hosted by the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Of the many workshops within the conference, the SRI'95 Workshop 2 was ``Innovations in the Design of Mechanical Components of a Beamline.'' The workshop was well attended with over 140 registrants. The following topics were discussed. Industry's perspective on the status and future was provided by Huber Diffraktionstechnik GMBH on goniometers/diffractometers, Oxford Instruments on advanced manufacturing technique of high heat load components, such as the APS photon shutter, and Kohzu Seiki Co. Ltd. on the specialties of monochromators provided to the third-generation synchrotrons. This was followed by a description of the engineering of a dual function monochromator design for water-cooled diamond or cryogenically cooled silicon monochromators by CMC CAT/APS. Another category was the nagging problem of sensitivity of the photon beam position monitors (XBPM) to bending magnet radiation (``BM contamination'') and the undulator magnet gap changes. Problem descriptions and suggested solutions were provided by both the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and the APS. Other innovative ideas were the cooling schemes (enhanced cooling of beamline components using metallic porous meshes including cryo-cooled applications); Glidcop photon shutter design using microchannels at the ALS; and window/filter design, manufacture and operational experiences at CHESS and PETRA/HASYLAB. Additional discussions were held on designing for micromotions and precision in the optical support systems and smart user filter schemes. This is a summary of the presentations at the Workshop.

  19. Knowledge management in Nordic NPPs. Summary report of the findings from the workshop

    Nilsen, S. [Inst. for Energy Technology, Halden (Norway)

    2005-04-01

    The title of the reported project is 'Nordic Nuclear Safety Research (NKS) Workshop on Knowledge Management in Nordic NPPs'. One important objective of this workshop was to explore if and how knowledge retention activities could be coordinated between the various Nordic utilities. The main conclusions of the workshop can be summed up as follows: Establishing good knowledge management routines is recognized by many utilities today. However, there seem to be no real consensus on what should be focused on in the present situation. Maybe the most pressing problem is to avoid undesirable consequences of the massive retirement soon to follow. Still, there is no consensus on what those consequences might be, and what should be done to avoid them. (au)

  20. Summary of the 2nd workshop on ion beam-applied biology

    Induction of novel plant resources by ion beam-irradiation has been investigated in JAERI. To share the knowledge of the present status of the field, and to find out future plants, 1st Workshop on ion beam-applied biology was held last year titled as ''Development of breeding technique for ion beams''. To further improve the research cooperation and to exchange useful information in the field, researchers inside JAERI and also with researchers outside, such as those from agricultural experiment stations, companies, and Universities met each other at the 2nd workshop on ion beam-applied biology titled as ''Future development of breeding technique for ion beams''. People from RIKEN, Institute of Radiation Breeding, Wakasa wan Energy Research Center, National Institute of Radiological Science also participated in this workshop. The 12 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  1. Knowledge management in Nordic NPPs. Summary report of the findings from the workshop

    The title of the reported project is 'Nordic Nuclear Safety Research (NKS) Workshop on Knowledge Management in Nordic NPPs'. One important objective of this workshop was to explore if and how knowledge retention activities could be coordinated between the various Nordic utilities. The main conclusions of the workshop can be summed up as follows: Establishing good knowledge management routines is recognized by many utilities today. However, there seem to be no real consensus on what should be focused on in the present situation. Maybe the most pressing problem is to avoid undesirable consequences of the massive retirement soon to follow. Still, there is no consensus on what those consequences might be, and what should be done to avoid them. (au)

  2. Utility-scale grid-tied PV inverter reliability workshop summary report.

    Granata, Jennifer E.; Quintana, Michael A.; Tasca, Coryne Adelle (SRA International, Inc., Fairfax, VA); Atcitty, Stanley

    2011-07-01

    A key to the long-term success of the photovoltaic (PV) industry is confidence in the reliability of PV systems. Inverters are the most commonly noted cause of PV system incidents triggered in the field. While not all of these incidents are reliability-related or even necessarily failures, they still result in a loss of generated power. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar Energy Technologies Program, Sandia National Laboratories organized a Utility-Scale Grid-Tied Inverter Reliability Workshop in Albuquerque, New Mexico, January 27-28, 2011. The workshop addressed the reliability of large (100-kilowatt+) grid-tied inverters and the implications when such inverters fail, evaluated inverter codes and standards, and provided discussion about opportunities to enhance inverter reliability. This report summarizes discussions and presentations from the workshop and identifies opportunities for future efforts.

  3. Summary of the Topical Workshop on Top Quark Differential Distributions 2014

    Czakon, Michal; Mitov, Alexander; Rojo, Juan

    2016-01-01

    We summarize the Topical Workshop on Top Quark Differential Distributions 2014, which took place in Cannes immediately before the annual Top2014 conference. The workshop was motivated by the availability of top quark differential distributions at next-to-next-to-leading order and the forthcoming Large Hadron Collider (LHC) 13 TeV data. The main goal of the workshop was to explore the impact of improved calculations of top quark production on precision LHC measurements, PDF determinations and searches for physics beyond the Standard Model, as well as finding ways in which the high precision data from ATLAS, CMS and LHCb can be used to further refine theoretical predictions for top production.

  4. Space Science and the International Traffic in Arms Regulations: Summary of a Workshop

    Finarelli, Margaret G.; Alexander, Joseph K.

    2008-01-01

    equipment and services be covered as defense articles under ITAR. Scientific satellites were explicitly included despite their use for decades in peaceful internationally conducted cooperative scientific research. It is widely recognized that the shift in regulatory regime from EAR to ITAR has had major deleterious effects on international scientific research activities that depend on satellites, spaceflight hardware, and other items that are now controlled by ITAR. Furthermore, contravening U.S. interests in attracting foreign students to U.S. universities, the capture of space technology by ITAR has caused serious problems in the teaching of university space science and engineering classes, virtually all of which include non-U.S. students. This report is a summary of a September 2007 workshop in which participants from the space research communities and the export-control administration and policy communities came together to discuss problems, effects, and potential solutions regarding the application of ITAR to space science. The principal themes and ideas that emerged from the discussions are summarized.

  5. A summary report of the workshop on the 'academic leadership training in the AIMST University, Malaysia'.

    Premkumar, Rajagopal; Bhore, Subhash J

    2013-06-01

    In Malaysia, there are 81 (as on February 15, 2013) higher education institutions including satellite branches of the foreign universities. In northern part of the Peninsular Malaysia, AIMST University is the first private not-for-profit university and aims to become a premier private university in the country and the region. The workshop described in this article was designed to develop and enhance the capacity of academic staff-in-leadership-role for the University. This type of workshops may be a good method to enhance the leadership qualities of the head of each unit, department, school and faculty in each university. PMID:24023458

  6. Advanced Power Electronics Interfaces for Distributed Energy Workshop Summary: August 24, 2006, Sacramento, California

    Treanton, B.; Palomo, J.; Kroposki, B.; Thomas, H.

    2006-10-01

    The Advanced Power Electronics Interfaces for Distributed Energy Workshop, sponsored by the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research program and organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, was held Aug. 24, 2006, in Sacramento, Calif. The workshop provided a forum for industry stakeholders to share their knowledge and experience about technologies, manufacturing approaches, markets, and issues in power electronics for a range of distributed energy resources. It focused on the development of advanced power electronic interfaces for distributed energy applications and included discussions of modular power electronics, component manufacturing, and power electronic applications.

  7. NNSA / IAEA VVER reactor safety workshops. May 2002 - April 2003. Executive summary

    Over the past year, the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has sponsored four workshops to compare the probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) of Soviet-designed VVER power plants. The ''International Workshop on Safety of First-Generation VVER-440 Nuclear Power Plants'' was held on May 20-25, 2002, in Piestany, Slovakia. A short follow-on workshop was held in Bratislava, Slovakia, on November 5-6, 2002, to complete the work begun in May. Piestany was the location also for the ''International Workshop on Safety of Second-Generation VVER-440 Nuclear Power Plants'' (September 9-14, 2002) and the ''International Workshop on Safety of VVER-1000 Nuclear Power Plants'' (April 7-12, 2003). The four workshops were held in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Slovakia (UJD), the Center for Nuclear Safety in Central and Eastern Europe (CENS), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objectives of the workshops were to identify the impact of the improvements on the core damage frequency; the contribution to the PRA results of different assumptions about events that can occur at the plants; and to understand, identify, and prioritize potential improvements in hardware and plant operation of VVER nuclear power plants. These objectives were achieved based on insights gained from recent PRAs completed by the plants and their technical support organizations. Nine first-generation VVER-440 plants (nominally of the VVER-440/230 design) are currently operating in Armenia, Bulgaria, Russia, and Slovakia. Sixteen VVER-440/213 plants are currently operating in the Czech Republic, Hungary, Russia, Slovakia, and Ukraine. Twenty-three VVER-1000 plants are currently operating in Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Russia, and Ukraine. Eleven addition plants are in the advanced stages of construction in various parts of the world. The workshops reviewed the current configuration and safety status of each plant

  8. A summary report on the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project Workshop on Transparent Conducting Polymers

    Kachare, R.; Moacanin, J.

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings and technical discussions of a workshop on Transparent Conducting Polymers (TCP) for solar cell applications are reported. This is in support of the Device Research Task of the Flat-Flate Solar Array Project. The workshop took place on January 11 and 12, 1985, in Santa Barbara, California. Participants included university and industry researchers. The discussions focused on the electronic and optical properties of TCP, and on experimental issues and problems that should be addressed for high-efficiency solar cell application.

  9. Summary Day 1: Second AirMonTech Workshop, Current and Future Air Quality Monitoring

    Querol, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Presentación resumen de las ponencias del primer día de las Second AirMonTech Workshop, Current and Future Air Quality Monitoring. Estas jornadas tuvieron lugar en Barcelona del 25 al 26 de abril de 2012.

  10. Summary of the 2008 Evidence-based Chinese Medicine(EBCM) Workshop

    吴大嵘; 赖世隆; 杨显荣

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 Evidence-based Chinese Medicine (EBCM) Workshop,jointly organized by the International Society for Chinese Medicine/Editorial Board of Chinese Medicine(Macao) and the Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine/ Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of

  11. A Workshop on Methods for Neutron Scattering Instrument Design. Introduction and Summary

    The future of neutron and x-ray scattering instrument development and international cooperation was the focus of the workshop on ''Methods for Neutron Scattering Instrument Design'' September 23-25 at the E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. These proceedings are a collection of a portion of the invited and contributed presentations

  12. SUMMARY OF WORKSHOP ON BIODEGRADATION OF MTBE FEBRUARY 1-3, 2000

    A workshop on biodegradation of methyl tert butyl ether (MTBE) contaminated soils and groundwater was held in Cincinnati, Ohio, February 1-2, 2000, and was sponsored by the USEPA's NRMRL and the American Petroleum Institute. Researchers in academia, industry, and government were ...

  13. Executive Summary of the "iMarine data Platform for collaborations" workshop

    Castelli, Donatella; Taconet, Marc; Garavelli, Sara; Parker, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    The iMarine workshop is presented as an aim at showcasing achievements and presenting the concept of a public-?? centred partnership to support sustainability. To this end, it explored added value for different participants (e.g. users, data providers, and partners) through interactive discussions and surveys.

  14. Summary of the proceedings of the workshop on future directions in nuclear physics research

    The workshop was intended to gather active researchers in nuclear physics to discuss the directions for research during the next 10 to 15 years. Topics discussed included: fundamental interactions; nuclear spectroscopy; electromagnetic nuclear physics; intermediate energy physics; heavy ion physics; and interrelationships among subfields of nuclear physics

  15. Summary Talk of the X Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics

    Opher, R

    2004-01-01

    Of the many important topics that were discussed at the workshop, I summarize and comment on 25 presentations, which I found to be particularly interesting. They fall into all of the areas covered in the conference: basic plasma phenomena, space and astrophysical plasmas, technological applications of plasma, and thermonuclear fusion.

  16. Soot Reference Materials for instrument calibration and intercomparisons: a workshop summary with recommendations

    D. Baumgardner

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Soot, which is produced from biomass burning and the incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass fuels, has been linked to regional and global climate change and to negative health problems. Scientists measure soot using a variety of methods in order to quantify source emissions and understand its atmospheric chemistry, reactivity under emission conditions, interaction with solar radiation, influence on clouds, and health impacts. A major obstacle currently limiting progress is the absence of established standards or reference materials for calibrating the many instruments used to measure the various properties of soot.

    The current state of availability and practicability of soot standard reference materials (SRMs was reviewed by a group of 50 international experts during a workshop in June of 2011. The workshop was convened to summarize the current knowledge on soot measurement techniques, identify the measurement uncertainties and limitations related to the lack of SRMs, and identify attributes of SRMs that, if developed, would reduce measurement uncertainties. The workshop established that suitable SRMs are available for calibrating some, but not all, measurement methods. The community of single-particle sootphotometer (SP2 users identified a suitable SRM, fullerene soot, but users of instruments that measure light absorption by soot collected on filters did not. Similarly, those who use thermal optical analysis (TOA to analyze the organic and elemental carbon components of soot were not satisfied with current SRMs. The workshop produced recommendations for the development of new SRMs that would be suitable for the different soot measurement methods.

  17. Summary of the Very Large Hadron Collider Physics and Detector Workshop

    G. Anderson; U. Baur; Berger, M.; Borcherding, F; Brandt, A; Denisov, D.; Eno, S.; Han, T.; Keller, S; Khazins, D.; LeCompte, T.(High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, USA); Lykken, J; Olness, F.; Paige, F.; R. Scalise

    1997-01-01

    One of the options for an accelerator beyond the LHC is a hadron collider with higher energy. Work is going on to explore accelerator technologies that would make such a machine feasible. This workshop concentrated on the physics and detector issues associated with a hadron collider with an energy in the center of mass of the order of 100 to 200 TeV.

  18. Annual Anastasia Arbovirus Surveillance and Mosquito Control Workshops: Summary of the Past 11 Years

    Realizing the needs of local mosquito control workers for advance training and education the Anastasia Mosquito Control District (AMCD) and the USDA-ARS Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary entomology (CMAVE) developed a regional workshop to address these needs. Since 2004 the AMCD and CM...

  19. The Science of Public Messages for Suicide Prevention: A Workshop Summary

    Chambers, David A.; Pearson, Jane L.; Lubell, Keri; Brandon, Susan; O'Brien, Kevin; Zinn, Janet

    2005-01-01

    There is minimal guidance for efforts to create effective public messages that increase awareness that suicide is preventable. To address this need, several agencies in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Annenberg Foundation convened a workshop consisting of suicide prevention advocates and persons with expertise in public…

  20. Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX): Overview and Summary of the Second and Third Workshop Results

    Duan, Q; Schaake, J; Andreassian, V; Franks, S; Gupta, H V; Gusev, Y M; Habets, F; Hall, A; Hay, L; Hogue, T; Huang, M; Leavesley, G; Liang, X; Nasonova, O N; Noilhan, J; Oudin, L; Sorooshian, S; Wagener, T; Wood, E F

    2005-02-10

    Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) is an international project aimed to develop enhanced techniques for the a priori estimation of parameters in hydrologic models and in land surface parameterization schemes of atmospheric models. MOPEX science strategy involves three major steps: data preparation, a priori parameter estimation methodology development, and demonstration of parameter transferability. A comprehensive MOPEX database has been developed that contains historical hydrometeorological data and land surface characteristics data for many hydrologic basins in the United States and in other countries. This database is continuing to be expanded to include more basins in all parts of the world. A number of international MOPEX workshops have been convened to bring together interested hydrologists and land surface modelers from all over world to exchange knowledge and experience in developing a priori parameter estimation techniques. This paper describes the results from the second and third MOPEX workshops. The specific objective of those workshops is to examine the state of a priori parameter estimation techniques and how they can be potentially improved with observations from well-monitored hydrologic basins. Participants of these MOPEX workshops were given data for 12 basins in the Southeastern United States and were asked to carry out a series of numerical experiments using a priori parameters as well as calibrated parameters developed for their respective hydrologic models. Eight different models have carried all out the required numerical experiments and the results from those models have been assembled for analysis in this paper. This paper presents an overview of the MOPEX experiment design. The experimental results are analyzed and the important lessons from the two workshops are discussed. Finally, a discussion of further work and future strategy is given.

  1. Executive summary of the workshop on polarisation and beam energy measurement at the ILC

    This note summarizes the results of the ''Workshop on Polarisation and Beam Energy Measurements at the ILC'', held at DESY (Zeuthen) April 9-11 2008. The topics for the workshop included (i) physics requirements, (ii) polarised sources and low energy polarimetry, (iii) BDS polarimeters, (iv) BDS energy spectrometers, and (v) physics-based measurements of beam polarisation and beam energy from collider data. Discussions focused on the current ILC baseline programme as described in the Reference Design Report (RDR), which includes physics runs at beam energies between 100 and 250 GeV, as well as calibration runs on the Z-pole. Electron polarisation of Pe- >or similar 80% and positron polarisation of Pe+ >or similar 30% are part of the baseline configuration of the machine. Energy and polarisation measurements for ILC options beyond the baseline, including Z-pole running and the 1 TeV energy upgrade, were also discussed. (orig.)

  2. The Implementation of hydrogen mitigation techniques: summary and conclusions: OECD Workshop

    The OECD Workshop on the Implementation of Hydrogen Mitigation Techniques was held in Winnipeg, Canada from 1996 May 13 to 15. Sixty-five experts from twelve OECD Member countries and the Russian Federation attended the meeting. Thirty-five papers were presented in six sessions: accident management and analyses, relevant aspects of hydrogen production, distribution and mixing, engineering, technology, possible side-effects and consequences, new designs. The objectives of the Workshop were to establish the state-of-the-art of hydrogen mitigation techniques, with emphasis on igniters and catalytic recombiners, to exchange information on Member countries' strategies in managing hydrogen mitigation and to establish dialogue as to differences in approach, to determine whether there is now an adequate technical basis for such strategies or whether more work - in which areas - is desirable, and to exchange information on future plans for implementation of hydrogen mitigation techniques

  3. Summary of EuCARD-AccNet CERN-GSI Workshop on Electron Cloud

    Rumolo, G; Boine-Frankenheim, O

    2011-01-01

    The bilateral CERN-GSI Electron Cloud Workshop was organized with the main goal to review the status of CERN and GSI electron cloud studies in order to find synergies between the two laboratories and to define a common strategy for future developments in terms of simulation tools, diagnostics and mitigation techniques. The workshop took place on 7–8 March 2011 at CERN (BE Auditorium) and welcomed 30 registered participants coming from CERN, GSI, INFN-LNF, KEK, CELLS, CINVESTAV, TUD, and several other institutes. It was supported by CERN and GSI, and sponsored by the European Commission under the FP7 “Research Infrastructures” project EuCARD (grant agreement no.227579), work package “Accelerator Science Networks” (AccNet).

  4. 77 FR 31371 - Public Workshop: Privacy Compliance Workshop

    2012-05-25

    ... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Public Workshop: Privacy Compliance Workshop AGENCY: Privacy Office, DHS. ACTION: Notice Announcing Public Workshop. SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security Privacy Office will host a public workshop, ``Privacy Compliance Workshop.'' DATES: The workshop will be held on...

  5. Summary of Data from the Fifth AIAA CFD Drag Prediction Workshop

    Levy, David W.; Laflin, Kelly R.; Tinoco, Edward N.; Vassberg, John C.; Mani, Mori; Rider, Ben; Rumsey, Chris; Wahls, Richard A.; Morrison, Joseph H.; Brodersen, Olaf P.; Crippa, Simone; Mavriplis, Dimitri J.; Murayama, Mitsuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Results from the Fifth AIAA CFD Drag Prediction Workshop (DPW-V) are presented. As with past workshops, numerical calculations are performed using industry-relevant geometry, methodology, and test cases. This workshop focused on force/moment predictions for the NASA Common Research Model wing-body configuration, including a grid refinement study and an optional buffet study. The grid refinement study used a common grid sequence derived from a multiblock topology structured grid. Six levels of refinement were created resulting in grids ranging from 0.64x10(exp 6) to 138x10(exp 6) hexahedra - a much larger range than is typically seen. The grids were then transformed into structured overset and hexahedral, prismatic, tetrahedral, and hybrid unstructured formats all using the same basic cloud of points. This unique collection of grids was designed to isolate the effects of grid type and solution algorithm by using identical point distributions. This study showed reduced scatter and standard deviation from previous workshops. The second test case studied buffet onset at M=0.85 using the Medium grid (5.1x106 nodes) from the above described sequence. The prescribed alpha sweep used finely spaced intervals through the zone where wing separation was expected to begin. Some solutions exhibited a large side of body separation bubble that was not observed in the wind tunnel results. An optional third case used three sets of geometry, grids, and conditions from the Turbulence Model Resource website prepared by the Turbulence Model Benchmarking Working Group. These simple cases were intended to help identify potential differences in turbulence model implementation. Although a few outliers and issues affecting consistency were identified, the majority of participants produced consistent results.

  6. Summary Report of the INL-JISEA Workshop on Nuclear Hybrud Energy Systems

    Hybrid energy systems utilize two or more energy resources as inputs to two or more physically coupled subsystems to produce one or more energy commodities as outputs. Nuclear hybrid energy systems can be used to provide load-following electrical power to match diurnal to seasonal-scale changes in power demand or to compensate for the variability of renewable wind or solar generation. To maintain economical, full rate operation of the nuclear reactor, its thermal energy available when power demand is low could be diverted into making synthetic vehicle fuels of various types. The Institute for Nuclear Energy Science and Technology (INEST) and the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) co-sponsored an international workshop to identify research topics important in advancing the potential use of hybrid systems with a specific focus on nuclear-renewable hybrid systems. The workshop included presentations ranging from energy challenges and research and development (R and D) directions being pursued by nations to multiple options for hybrid systems. Those options include one that is being commercialized to other opportunities and analysis results quantifying them. The workshop also involved two breakout sessions - one focused on thermal energy management issues especially at unit-operation scale and the second focused on system operations issues including system controls, regulatory issues, technical and economic analysis, and market challenges. A discussion involving the full group focused on more general issues such as societal involvement and participation. Key criteria for selecting hybrid energy system projects and metrics for comparing them were also identified by the full group. The workshop's findings are being used initially by INEST to define topics for a research preproposal solicitation.

  7. Climate Policy in the United States and Japan: Prospects in 2005 and Beyond, Workshop Summary

    Pizer, William; Tamura, Kentaro

    2005-01-01

    Resources for the Future and the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies convened a one and one-half day workshop on domestic and international climate policy May 11–12, 2005, in Tokyo, Japan. The first day included 49 participants hearing presentations from 13 speakers and discussing domestic activities, economics, and politics. The second day included a smaller group of participants listening to a panel of four experts and discussing opportunities for future international climate regi...

  8. Soot reference materials for instrument calibration and intercomparisons: a workshop summary with recommendations

    D. Baumgardner

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Soot, which is produced from biomass burning and the incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass fuels, has been linked to regional and global climate change and to negative health problems. Scientists measure the properties of soot using a variety of methods in order to quantify source emissions and understand its atmospheric chemistry, reactivity under emission conditions, interaction with solar radiation, influence on clouds, and health impacts. A major obstacle currently limiting progress is the absence of established standards or reference materials for calibrating the many instruments used to measure the various properties of soot.

    The current state of availability and practicability of soot standard reference materials (SRMs was reviewed by a group of 50 international experts during a workshop in June of 2011. The workshop was convened to summarize the current knowledge on soot measurement techniques, identify the measurement uncertainties and limitations related to the lack of soot SRMs, and identify attributes of SRMs that, if developed, would reduce measurement uncertainties. The workshop established that suitable SRMs are available for calibrating some, but not all, measurement methods. The community of users of the single-particle soot-photometer (SP2, an instrument using laser-induced incandescence, identified a suitable SRM, fullerene soot, but users of instruments that measure light absorption by soot collected on filters did not. Similarly, those who use thermal optical analysis (TOA to analyze the organic and elemental carbon components of soot were not satisfied with current SRMs. The workshop, and subsequent, interactive discussions, produced a number of recommendations for the development of new SRMs, and their implementation, that would be suitable for the different soot measurement methods.

  9. Managing Costs in a U.S. Greenhouse Gas Trading Program: A Workshop Summary

    Tatsutani, Marika; Pizer, William A.

    2008-01-01

    Cost containment has emerged as a major point of contention in the current congressional debate about designing a cap-and-trade program to limit future U.S. greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This paper reviews basic concepts and policy options for cost management, drawing on a March 2008 workshop sponsored by Resources for the Future (RFF), the National Commission on Energy Policy, and Duke University’s Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions. The different sources and temporal di...

  10. The Chemistry of iodine in reactor safety: summary and conclusions: OECD Workshop

    About seventy experts from fourteen OECD member countries attended this Fourth OECD Workshop on the chemistry of iodine in reactor safety, as well as experts from Latvia and the Commission of the European Communities. Thirty four papers were presented, in five sessions: national and international programmes (integral and intermediate-scale experiments), experimental homogeneous phase chemistry, surface processes, thermodynamic and kinetic studies, safety applications. A final session is devoted to a general discussion on remaining research studies relevant to reactor safety

  11. Summary Report of the INL-JISEA Workshop on Nuclear Hybrud Energy Systems

    Mark Antkowiak; Richard Boardman; Shannon Bragg-Sitton; Robert Cherry; Mark Ruth

    2012-07-01

    Hybrid energy systems utilize two or more energy resources as inputs to two or more physically coupled subsystems to produce one or more energy commodities as outputs. Nuclear hybrid energy systems can be used to provide load-following electrical power to match diurnal to seasonal-scale changes in power demand or to compensate for the variability of renewable wind or solar generation. To maintain economical, full rate operation of the nuclear reactor, its thermal energy available when power demand is low could be diverted into making synthetic vehicle fuels of various types. The Institute for Nuclear Energy Science and Technology (INEST) and the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) co-sponsored an international workshop to identify research topics important in advancing the potential use of hybrid systems with a specific focus on nuclear-renewable hybrid systems. The workshop included presentations ranging from energy challenges and research and development (R&D) directions being pursued by nations to multiple options for hybrid systems. Those options include one that is being commercialized to other opportunities and analysis results quantifying them. The workshop also involved two breakout sessions - one focused on thermal energy management issues especially at unit-operation scale and the second focused on system operations issues including system controls, regulatory issues, technical and economic analysis, and market challenges. A discussion involving the full group focused on more general issues such as societal involvement and participation. Key criteria for selecting hybrid energy system projects and metrics for comparing them were also identified by the full group. The workshop's findings are being used initially by INEST to define topics for a research preproposal solicitation.

  12. Climate Research Roadmap Workshop: Summary Report, May 13-14, 2010

    None

    2010-09-01

    In recognition of the ongoing advances and challenges of climate change research, DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) organized a workshop asking the scientific community to identify the current state of climate science. The goal of the workshop was to determine the research challenges important for developing a predictive understanding of global climate. Participants were asked to focus on interdisciplinary research that capitalized on BER's scientific strengths in Atmospheric System Research, Terrestrial Ecosystem Science, and Climate and Earth System Modeling. Approximately 50 scientists representing these three areas were asked to identify desired outcomes for the next 10 years. Goals were identified for the near (1--3 years), mid (4--7 years), and long term (8--10 years). Discussions were focused by discipline (atmospheric, terrestrial, and modeling) and by latitude (high, temperate, and tropical). In addition, opportunities and needs for integration across disciplines and latitudes were identified with a specific focus on crosscutting challenges and outcomes. BER will use this workshop output to update its strategic plan for climate research.

  13. Summary of workshop on high temperature materials based on Laves phases

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The Offices of Fossil Energy and Basic Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy jointly sponsored the Workshop on High Temperature Materials Based on Laves Phases in conjunction with the Tenth Annual Conference on Fossil Energy Materials held at the Radisson Summit Hill Hotel in Knoxville, Tennessee on May 14-16, 1996. The objective of this workshop was to review the current status and to address critical issues in the development of new-generation high-temperature structural materials based on Laves phases. The one-day workshop included two sessions of overview presentations and a session of discussion on critical scientific and technological issues. The Laves phases represent an abundant class of intermetallic alloys with possible high-temperature structural applications. Laves phases form at or near the AB{sub 2} composition, and there are over 360 binary Laves phases. The ability of these alloys to dissolve considerable amounts of ternary alloying additions provides over 900 combined binary and ternary Laves phases. Many Laves phases have unique properties which make them attractive for high-temperature structural use. At half their homologous temperature, they retain >0.85 of their ambient yield strength, which is higher than all other intermetallics. Many of the Laves phases also have high melting temperatures, excellent creep properties, reasonably low densities, and for alloys containing Cr, Al, Si or Be, good oxidation resistance. Despite these useful properties, the tendency for low-temperature brittleness has limited the potential application of this large class of alloys.

  14. Materials characterization center workshop on compositional and microstructural analysis of nuclear waste materials. Summary report

    The purpose of the Workshop on Compositional and Microstructural Analysis of Nuclear Waste Materials, conducted November 11 and 12, 1980, was to critically examine and evaluate the various methods currently used to study non-radioactive, simulated, nuclear waste-form performance. Workshop participants recognized that most of the Materials Characterization Center (MCC) test data for inclusion in the Nuclear Waste Materials Handbook will result from application of appropriate analytical procedures to waste-package materials or to the products of performance tests. Therefore, the analytical methods must be reliable and of known accuracy and precision, and results must be directly comparable with those from other laboratories and from other nuclear waste materials. The 41 participants representing 18 laboratories in the United States and Canada were organized into three working groups: Analysis of Liquids and Solutions, Quantitative Analysis of Solids, and Phase and Microstructure Analysis. Each group identified the analytical methods favored by their respective laboratories, discussed areas needing attention, listed standards and reference materials currently used, and recommended means of verifying interlaboratory comparability of data. The major conclusions from this workshop are presented

  15. Nuclear containment steel liner corrosion workshop : final summary and recommendation report.

    Erler, Bryan A. (Erler Engineering Ltd., Chicago, IL); Weyers, Richard E. (Virginia Tech University, Blacksburg, VA); Sagues, Alberto (University of South Florida, Tampa, FL); Petti, Jason P.; Berke, Neal Steven (Tourney Consulting Group, LLC, Kalamazoo, MI); Naus, Dan J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN)

    2011-07-01

    This report documents the proceedings of an expert panel workshop conducted to evaluate the mechanisms of corrosion for the steel liner in nuclear containment buildings. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored this work which was conducted by Sandia National Laboratories. A workshop was conducted at the NRC Headquarters in Rockville, Maryland on September 2 and 3, 2010. Due to the safety function performed by the liner, the expert panel was assembled in order to address the full range of issues that may contribute to liner corrosion. This report is focused on corrosion that initiates from the outer surface of the liner, the surface that is in contact with the concrete containment building wall. Liner corrosion initiating on the outer diameter (OD) surface has been identified at several nuclear power plants, always associated with foreign material left embedded in the concrete. The potential contributing factors to liner corrosion were broken into five areas for discussion during the workshop. Those include nuclear power plant design and operation, corrosion of steel in contact with concrete, concrete aging and degradation, concrete/steel non-destructive examination (NDE), and concrete repair and corrosion mitigation. This report also includes the expert panel member's recommendations for future research.

  16. Summary Report of the INL-JISEA Workshop on Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems

    Antkowiak, M.; Ruth, M.; Boardman, R.; Bragg-Sitton, S.; Cherry, R.; Shunn, L.

    2012-07-01

    The Institute for Nuclear Energy Science and Technology (INEST) and the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) co-sponsored an international workshop to identify research topics important in advancing the potential use of hybrid systems with a specific focus on nuclear-renewable hybrid systems. The workshop included presentations ranging from energy challenges and research and development directions being pursued by nations to multiple options for hybrid systems. Those options include one that is being commercialized to other opportunities and analysis results quantifying them. The workshop also involved two breakout sessions--one focused on thermal energy management issues especially at unit-operation scale and the second focused on system operations issues including system controls, regulatory issues, technical and economic analysis, and market challenges. A discussion involving the full group focused on more general issues such as societal involvement and participation. Key criteria for selecting hybrid energy system projects and metrics for comparing them were also identified by the full group.

  17. OECD/CSNI Workshop on In-Vessel Core Debris Retention and Coolability - Summary and Conclusions

    In the spring of 1994 an OECD Workshop on Large Pool Heat transfer was held in Grenoble. The scope of this workshop was the investigation of (1) molten pool heat transfer, (2) heat transfer to the surrounding water, and (3) the feasibility of in-vessel core debris cooling through external cooling of the vessel. Since this time, experimental test series have been completed (e.g., COPO, ULPU, CORVIS) and new experimental programs (e.g., BALI, SONATA, RASPLAV, debris and gap heat transfer) have been established to consolidate and expand the data base for further model development and to improve the understanding of in-vessel debris retention and coolability in a nuclear power plant. Discussions within the CSNI's PWG-2 and the Task Group on Degraded Core Cooling (TG-DCC) have led to the conclusion that the time was ripe for organizing a new international Workshop with the objectives: - to review the results of experimental research that has been conducted in this area; - to exchange information on the results of member countries experiments and model development on in-vessel core debris retention and coolability; - to discuss areas where additional experimental research is needed in order to provide an adequate data base for analytical model development for core debris retention and coolability. The scope of this workshop was limited to the phenomena connected to in-vessel core debris retention and coolability and did not include steam explosion and fission product issues. The workshop was structured into the following sessions: Key note papers; Experiments and model development; Debris bed heat transfer; Corium properties, molten pool convection and crust formation; Gap formation and gap cooling; Creep behaviour of reactor pressure vessel lower head; Ex-vessel boiling and critical heat flux phenomena; Scaling to reactor severe accident conditions and reactor applications. Compared to the previous workshop held in Grenoble in 1994, large progress has been made in the

  18. Summary of the workshop on the power of aggregated toxicity data

    In this workshop, ongoing federal agency (i.e., EPA, ATSDR, FDA, NIEHS and others) projects that employ toxicity data were discussed, as well as the possibility of innovative approaches for use of existing and new sources of information in risk assessment. Quantitative risk assessment relies upon having detailed exposure-response data, such as number of animals and incidence by exposure group in dichotomous measures and values by individual animal for continuous measures; this level of detail is often not reported in peer-reviewed studies. Additionally, biologically-based models (e.g., PBPK) are useful in risk assessment but require knowledge or collection of parameters as inputs (both chemical-specific and more general physiological parameters), and this information is not always readily available. Structure activity relationship information is also being called upon to help fill in knowledge gaps about specific chemicals where data from related chemicals may be available. Some existing data sources have been developed by various agencies for specific applications, such as those mentioned, and advantage should be taken of those existing resources; however, a great deal more is possible. The purpose of this workshop was to gather together many of the stakeholders using and developing shared toxicological information, determine the potential for greater collaboration, and determine the best course to facilitate the further development of joint information resources. A number of recommendations (development of a consensus toxicological review format, standardization of terminology and data sharing formats, and agreement on primary data elements) and topics for additional discussion were the major products of this workshop

  19. Diving into the analysis of time-depth recorder and behavioural data records: A workshop summary

    Womble, Jamie N.; Horning, Markus; Lea, Mary-Anne; Rehberg, Michael J.

    2013-04-01

    Directly observing the foraging behavior of animals in the marine environment can be extremely challenging, if not impossible, as such behavior often takes place beneath the surface of the ocean and in extremely remote areas. In lieu of directly observing foraging behavior, data from time-depth recorders and other types of behavioral data recording devices are commonly used to describe and quantify the behavior of fish, squid, seabirds, sea turtles, pinnipeds, and cetaceans. Often the definitions of actual behavioral units and analytical approaches may vary substantially which may influence results and limit our ability to compare behaviors of interest across taxonomic groups and geographic regions. A workshop was convened in association with the Fourth International Symposium on Bio-logging in Hobart, Tasmania on 8 March 2011, with the goal of providing a forum for the presentation, review, and discussion of various methods and approaches that are used to describe and analyze time-depth recorder and associated behavioral data records. The international meeting brought together 36 participants from 14 countries from a diversity of backgrounds including scientists from academia and government, graduate students, post-doctoral fellows, and developers of electronic tagging technology and analysis software. The specific objectives of the workshop were to host a series of invited presentations followed by discussion sessions focused on (1) identifying behavioral units and metrics that are suitable for empirical studies, (2) reviewing analytical approaches and techniques that can be used to objectively classify behavior, and (3) identifying cases when temporal autocorrelation structure is useful for identifying behaviors of interest. Outcomes of the workshop included highlighting the need to better define behavioral units and to devise more standardized processing and analytical techniques in order to ensure that results are comparable across studies and taxonomic groups.

  20. Summary of the First Workshop on Sustainable Software for Science: Practice and Experiences (WSSSPE1

    Daniel S Katz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Challenges related to development, deployment, and maintenance of reusable software for science are becoming a growing concern. Many scientists’ research increasingly depends on the quality and availability of software upon which their works are built. To highlight some of these issues and share experiences, the First Workshop on Sustainable Software for Science: Practice and Experiences (WSSSPE1 was held in November 2013 in conjunction with the SC13 Conference. The workshop featured keynote presentations and a large number (54 of solicited extended abstracts that were grouped into three themes and presented via panels. A set of collaborative notes of the presentations and discussion was taken during the workshop. Unique perspectives were captured about issues such as comprehensive documentation, development and deployment practices, software licenses and career paths for developers. Attribution systems that account for evidence of software contribution and impact were also discussed. These include mechanisms such as Digital Object Identifiers, publication of “software papers”, and the use of online systems, for example source code repositories like GitHub. This paper summarizes the issues and shared experiences that were discussed, including cross-cutting issues and use cases. It joins a nascent literature seeking to understand what drives software work in science, and how it is impacted by the reward systems of science. These incentives can determine the extent to which developers are motivated to build software for the long-term, for the use of others, and whether to work collaboratively or separately. It also explores community building, leadership, and dynamics in relation to successful scientific software.

  1. Wind Energy Industry Eagle Detection and Deterrents: Research Gaps and Solutions Workshop Summary Report

    Sinclair, Karin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); DeGeorge, Elise [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-04-13

    The Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act (BGEPA) prohibits the 'take' of these birds. The act defines take as to 'pursue, shoot, shoot at, poison, wound, kill, capture, trap, collect, destroy, molest or disturb.' The 2009 Eagle Permit Rule (74 FR 46836) authorizes the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to issue nonpurposeful (i.e., incidental) take permits, and the USFWS 2013 Eagle Conservation Plan Guidance provides a voluntary framework for issuing programmatic take permits to wind facilities that incorporate scientifically supportable advanced conservation practices (ACPs). Under these rules, the Service can issue permits that authorize individual instances of take of bald and golden eagles when the take is associated with, but not the purpose of, an otherwise lawful activity, and cannot practicably be avoided. To date, the USFWS has not approved any ACPs, citing the lack of evidence for 'scientifically supportable measures.' The Eagle Detection and Deterrents Research Gaps and Solutions Workshop was convened at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in December 2015 with a goal to comprehensively assess the current state of technologies to detect and deter eagles from wind energy sites and the key gaps concerning reducing eagle fatalities and facilitating permitting under the BGEPA. During the workshop, presentations and discussions focused primarily on existing knowledge (and limitations) about the biology of eagles as well as technologies and emerging or novel ideas, including innovative applications of tools developed for use in other sectors, such as the U.S. Department of Defense and aviation. The main activity of the workshop was the breakout sessions, which focused on the current state of detection and deterrent technologies and novel concepts/applications for detecting and minimizing eagle collisions with wind turbines. Following the breakout sessions, participants were asked about their individual impressions of the

  2. Summary: Addressing the Interactional Challenges of Moving Collaborative Adaptive Management From Theory to Practice

    Kathi K. Beratan

    2014-01-01

    Translating the attractive concept of collaborative adaptive management (CAM) into practice has proven very difficult. The papers included in this Special Feature explore why this is true and suggest how the challenges might be addressed. This summary highlights common themes, major challenges, and implications for research and practice. Many of the included papers emphasize the central importance of collaboration and stakeholder engagement as a response to complexity and uncertainty. Collect...

  3. Summary of the industry/NASA/FAA workshop on philosophy of automation: Promises and realities

    Norman, Susan D.

    1990-01-01

    Issues of flight deck automation are multi-faceted and complex. The rapid introduction of advanced computer based technology on to the flight deck of transport category aircraft has had considerable impact on both aircraft operations and the flight crew. As part of NASA's responsibility to facilitate an active exchange of ideas and information between members of the aviation community, an Industry/NASA/FAA workshop was conducted in August 1988. One of the most important conclusions to emerge from the workshop was that the introduction of automation has clearly benefited aviation and has substantially improved the operational safety and efficiency of our air transport system. For example, one carrier stated that they have been flying the Boeing 767 (one of the first aircraft to employ substantial automation) since 1982, and they have never had an accident or incident resulting in damage to the aircraft. Notwithstanding its benefits, many issues associated with the design, certification, and operation of automated aircraft were identified. For example two key conceptual issues were the need for the crew to have a thorough understanding of the system and the importance of defining the pilot's role. With respect to certification, a fundamental issue is the lack of comprehensive human factors requirements in the current regulations. Operational considerations, which have been a factor in incidents involving automation, were also cited. Viewgraphs used in the presentation are given.

  4. Summary of the 9th IEA workshop on radiation effects in ceramic insulators

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hodgson, E.R.; Shikama, T.

    1997-08-01

    Twenty one scientists attended an IEA workshop in Cincinnati, Ohio on May 8-9, 1997, which was mainly devoted to reviewing the current knowledge base on the phenonenon of radiation induced electrical degradation in ceramic insulators. Whereas convincing evidence for bulk RIED behavior has been observed by two research groups in sapphire after electron irradiation, definitive levels of bulk RIED have not been observed in high purity Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} by several research groups during energetic ion or fission neutron irradiation. Possible reasons for the conflicting RIED results obtained by different research groups were discussed. It was conducted that RIED does not appear to be of immediate concern for near-term fusion devices such as ITER. However, continued research on the RIED phenomenon with particular emphasis on electron irradiations of single crystal alumina was recommended in order to determine the underlying physical mechanisms. This will allow a better determination of whether RIED might occur under any of the widely varying experimental conditions in a fusion energy device. Several critical issues which are recommended for future study were outlined by the workshop attendees.

  5. Executive Summary of the Workshop on Polarization and Beam Energy Measurements at the ILC

    Aurand, B.; Bailey, I.; Bartels, C.; Blair, G.; Brachmann, A.; Clarke, J.; Deacon, L.; Duginov, V.; Ghalumyan, A.; Hartin, A.; Hauptman, J.; Helebrant, C.; Hesselbach, S.; Kafer, D.; List, J.; Lorenzon, W.; Lyapin, A.; Marchesini, I.; Melikian, R.; Monig, K.; Moeit, K.C.; /Bonn U. /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Royal Holloway, U. of London /SLAC /Daresbury /Dubna, JINR /Yerevan Phys. Inst /Oxford U., JAI /Iowa State U. /Durham U., IPPP /Michigan U. /University Coll. London /Novosibirsk, IYF /Minsk, Inst. Phys. /Oregon U.

    2008-07-25

    This note summarizes the results of the 'Workshop on Polarization and Beam Energy Measurements at the ILC', held at DESY (Zeuthen) April 9-11 2008. The topics for the workshop included (1) physics requirements, (2) polarized sources and low energy polarimetry, (3) BDS polarimeters, (4) BDS energy spectrometers, and (5) physics-based measurements of beam polarization and beam energy from collider data. Discussions focused on the current ILC baseline program as described in the Reference Design Report (RDR), which includes physics runs at beam energies between 100 and 250 GeV, as well as calibration runs on the Z-pole. Electron polarization of P{sub e{sup -}} {approx}> 80% and positron polarization of P{sub e{sup +}} {approx}> 30% are part of the baseline configuration of the machine. Energy and polarization measurements for ILC options beyond the baseline, including Z-pole running and the 1 TeV energy upgrade, were also discussed.

  6. Measuring hot flashes: summary of a National Institutes of Health workshop.

    Miller, Heather G; Li, Rose Maria

    2004-06-01

    The etiology and mechanism of hot flashes remain incompletely understood. Future studies of hormonal and neurologic systems may provide promising leads to improve our understanding of the basic phenomenon and perhaps also shed light on the placebo effect. However, this is likely a complex undertaking. Critical to this effort is the ability to reliably identify when a hot flash has occurred. The leading objective measure in use today--sternal skin conductance monitoring--has some limitations in ambulatory settings. However, a more severe limitation is the inability of sternal skin conductance to provide any information on duration, intensity, and interference with activities. Ultimately, researchers desire a convenient and cost-effective sensor for monitoring hot flashes without cumbersome electrodes that might become compromised if a subject experiences extensive sweating or takes a shower and one that can capture data continuously for relatively long periods of observation. However, researchers also need well-characterized methods for collecting self-reported data. If the primary concern is helping women with hot flashes find relief, then subjective measures collected through diaries or interviews cannot be dismissed. Given the importance of this information, it would make sense to undertake methodologic research to ensure that the best possible systems are used to collect valid and reliable information. The factors that we want to measure with respect to hot flashes are likely to change over time as more is learned about the underlying phenomenon. This will probably be an evolutionary process, one involving decisions about what biological factors will be most useful for the task at hand, what technologies might be available or easily adaptable, which measures should be bundled together to maximize the precision of data collected with the available technology, and the analysis of the data to generate new hypotheses and perhaps the need for new measurement tools

  7. Summary

    Basic aspects of a two-week Workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data: Theory and Evaluation are outlined in this short note for the record. The aims and contents of this 2008 workshop are summarized, along with the agenda, list of participants, comments and recommendations. Further consideration will be given to holding this specific workshop at various time intervals for training purposes on the advice of the International Nuclear Data Committee (INDC) and the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators. (author)

  8. White Paper Summary of 2nd ASTM International Workshop on Hydrides in Zirconium Alloy Cladding

    Sindelar, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Louthan, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); PNNL, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-05-29

    This white paper recommends that ASTM International develop standards to address the potential impact of hydrides on the long term performance of irradiated zirconium alloys. The need for such standards was apparent during the 2nd ASTM International Workshop on Hydrides in Zirconium Alloy Cladding and Assembly Components, sponsored by ASTM International Committee C26.13 and held on June 10-12, 2014, in Jackson, Wyoming. The potentially adverse impacts of hydrogen and hydrides on the long term performance of irradiated zirconium-alloy cladding on used fuel were shown to depend on multiple factors such as alloy chemistry and processing, irradiation and post irradiation history, residual and applied stresses and stress states, and the service environment. These factors determine the hydrogen content and hydride morphology in the alloy, which, in turn, influence the response of the alloy to the thermo-mechanical conditions imposed (and anticipated) during storage, transport and disposal of used nuclear fuel. Workshop presentations and discussions showed that although hydrogen/hydride induced degradation of zirconium alloys may be of concern, the potential for occurrence and the extent of anticipated degradation vary throughout the nuclear industry because of the variations in hydrogen content, hydride morphology, alloy chemistry and irradiation conditions. The tools and techniques used to characterize hydrides and hydride morphologies and their impacts on material performance also vary. Such variations make site-to-site comparisons of test results and observations difficult. There is no consensus that a single material or system characteristic (e.g., reactor type, burnup, hydrogen content, end-of life stress, alloy type, drying temperature, etc.) is an effective predictor of material response during long term storage or of performance after long term storage. Multi-variable correlations made for one alloy may not represent the behavior of another alloy exposed to

  9. Summary of the IEA workshop on radiation effects in ceramic insulators

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-04-01

    A brief summary is given of research on radiation effects in ceramic insulators for fusion energy application performed during the last two years in Europe, Canada, Japan, the Russian Federation, the Ukraine and the United States. The IEA round-robin radiation induced electrical degradation (RIED) experiment on Wesgo AL995 polycrystalline alumina has been completed by 5 research groups, with none of the groups observing clear indications of REID.

  10. Summary of the Workshop on Molten Salt Reactor Technologies Commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the Startup of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment

    Betzler, Benjamin R [ORNL; Mays, Gary T [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    A workshop on Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) technologies commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) was held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on October 15 16, 2015. The MSRE represented a pioneering experiment that demonstrated an advanced reactor technology: the molten salt eutectic-fueled reactor. A multinational group of more than 130 individuals representing a diverse set of stakeholders gathered to discuss the historical, current, and future technical challenges and paths to deployment of MSR technology. This paper provides a summary of the key messages from this workshop.

  11. Summary of the 3rd workshop on high power RF-systems for accelerators

    The aim of this workshop was to bring together experts from the field of CW and high average power RF systems. The focus was on operational and reliability issues of high-power amplifiers using klystrons and tubes, large power supplies; as well as cavity design and low-level RF and feedback control systems. All these devices are used in synchrotron radiation facilities, high power linacs and collider rings, and cyclotrons. Furthermore, new technologies and their applications were introduced, amongst other: high power solid state amplifiers, IOT amplifiers, and high voltage power supplies employing solid state controllers/crowbars. Numerical methods for complete rf-field modeling of complex RF structures like cyclotrons were presented, as well as integrated RF-cavity designs (electro-magnetic fields and mechanical structure), using numerical methods. (author)

  12. Thermal Properties Capability Development Workshop Summary to Support the Implementation Plan for PIE Thermal Conductivity Measurements

    Braase, Lori [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Papesch, Cynthia [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hurley, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE)-Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and associated nuclear fuels programs have invested heavily over the years in infrastructure and capability development. With the current domestic and international need to develop Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF), increasing importance is being placed on understanding fuel performance in irradiated conditions and on the need to model and validate that performance to reduce uncertainty and licensing timeframes. INL’s Thermal Properties Capability Development Workshop was organized to identify the capability needed by the various nuclear programs and list the opportunities to meet those needs. In addition, by the end of fiscal year 2015, the decision will be made on the initial thermal properties instruments to populate the shielded cell in the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL).

  13. Workshop summary, future prospects and FCC-ee impact on $\\alpha_s$

    d'Enterria, David

    2015-01-01

    The workshop on “High-precision α s measurements from LHC to FCC-ee” –organized in the con- text of the preparation of the Future Circular Collider (FCC) Conceptual Design Report, within the FCC-e + e − “QCD and photon-photon” physics working group activities– discussed the latest advances in the measurement of the strong interaction coupling α s . The meeting brought together leading experts in the field to explore in depth recent theoretical and experimental developments on the determination of α s , new ways to measure this coupling in lepton-lepton, lepton-hadron and hadron-hadron collisions, and in particular the improvements expected at the proposed Future Circular Collider e + e − (FCC-ee) facility.

  14. Summary of the 1st International Workshop on Networked Reality in Telecommunication

    Davis, T.

    1994-05-01

    s of workshop papers are presented. Networked reality refers to the array of technologies and services involved in collecting a representation of reality at one location and using it to reconstruct an artificial representation of that reality at a remote location. The term encompasses transmission of the required information between the sites, and also includes the psychological, cultural, and legal implications of introducing derived communication systems. Networked reality is clearly derived from the emerging virtual reality technology base but is intended to go beyond the latter to include its integration with the required telecommunication technologies. A noteworthy feature of the Networked Reality '94 technical program is the extent of emphasis on social (particularly medical) impacts of the technology.

  15. National Incident Management System (NIMS) Standards Review Panel Workshop Summary Report

    Stenner, Robert D.; Kirk, Jennifer L.; Stanton, James R.; Shebell, Peter; Schwartz, Deborah S.; Judd, Kathleen S.; Gelston, Gariann M.

    2006-02-07

    examining the challenge, the following general process appears to be a reasonable approach for identifying and establishing existing standards that would be applicable to NIMS compliance. The suggested generalized steps to establishing existing SDO generated standards for NIMS compliance are: (1) establish search criteria from the NIMS and its support documents, (2) search SDO databases to identify key existing nationally and/or internationally recognized standards that have potential application to NIMS compliance needs, (3) review the identified standards against the specific component needs of the NIMS, (4) identify the pertinent aspects/components of those identified standards that clearly address specific NIMS compliance needs, (5) establish a process to adopt the pertinent standards, which includes the generation of formalized FEMA Guidance that identifies the specific NIMS component compliance needs addressed in the respective standard, (6) develop performance criteria for which to measure compliance with the identified NIMS components addressed by the respective adopted standard, and (7) adopt the standard, publish the guidance and performance criteria, and incorporate it into routine FEMA/NIC NIMS management operations. This review process will also help identify real gaps in standards for which new NIMS specific standards should be developed. To jump start this process and hopefully identify some key ''low hanging fruit'' standards the NIC could use to begin such a process, a panel of first-responder experts (familiar with the current standards of common use in the first-responder community) from various response disciplines was formed and a workshop held. The workshop included a pre-workshop information gathering process. This report discusses the workshop and its findings in detail.

  16. Summary and viewgraphs from the Q-121 US/Japan advanced current drive concepts workshop

    With the emphasis placed on current drive by ITER, which requires steady state operation in its engineering phase, it is important to bring theory and experiment in agreement for each of the schemes that could be used in that design. Both neutral beam and lower hybrid (LH) schemes are in excellent shape in that regard. Since the projected efficiency of all schemes is marginal it is also important to continue our search for more efficient processes. This workshop featured experimental and theoretical work in each processes. This workshop featured experimental and theoretical work in each of these areas, that is, validation of theory and the search for better ideas. There were a number of notable results to report, the most striking again (as with last year) the long pulse operation of TRIAM-1M. A low current was sustained for over 1 hour with LH waves, using new hall-effect sensors in the equilibrium field circuit to maintain position control. In JT-60, by sharpening the wave spectrum the current drive efficiency was improved to 0.34 x 1020m-2A/W and 1.5 MA of current was driven entirely by the lower hybrid system. Also in that machine, using two different LH frequencies, the H-mode was entered. Finally, by using the LH system for startup they saved 2.5 resistive volt-sec of flux, which if extrapolated to ITER would save 40 volt-sec there. For the first time, and experiment on ECH current drive showed reasonable agreement with theory. Those experiments are reported here by James (LLNL) on the D3-D machine. Substantially lower ECH current drive than expected theoretically was observed on WT-3, but if differed by being in a low absorption regime. Nonetheless, excellent physics results were achieved in the WT-3 experiments, notably in having careful measurements of the parallel velocity distributions

  17. Assessing social and economic effects of perceived risk: Workshop summary: Draft: BWIP Repository Project

    The US Department of Energy sponsored a one-day workshop to discuss the complex dimensions of risk judgment formation and the assessment of social and economic effects of risk perceptions related to the permanent underground storage of highly radioactive waste from commercial nuclear power plants. Affected parties have publicly expressed concerns about potentially significant risk-related effects of this approach to waste management. A selective review of relevant literature in psychology, decision analysis, economics, sociology, and anthropology was completed, along with an examination of decision analysis techniques that might assist in developing suitable responses to public risk-related concerns. The workshop was organized as a forum in which a set of distinguished experts could exchange ideas and observations about the problems of characterizing the effects of risk judgments. Out of the exchange emerged the issues or themes of problems with probabilistic risk assessment techniques are evident; differences exist in the way experts and laypersons view risk, and this leads to higher levels of public concern than experts feel are justified; experts, risk managers, and decision-makers sometimes err in assessing risk and in dealing with the public; credibility and trust are important contributing factors in the formation of risk judgments; social and economic consequences of perceived risk should be properly anticipated; improvements can be made in informing the public about risk; the role of the public in risk assessment, risk management and decisions about risk should be reconsidered; and mitigation and compensation are central to resolving conflicts arising from divergent risk judgments. 1 tab

  18. Materials Characterization Center workshop on leaching of radioactive waste forms. Summary report

    At the first Materials Characterization Center (MCC) workshop, on the leaching of radioactive waste forms, there was general agreement that, after certain revisions, the proposed leach test plan set forth by the MCC can be expected to meet most of the nuclear waste community's waste form durability data requirements. The revisions give a clearer definition of the purposes of each test and the end uses of the data. As a result of the workshop, the format of the test program has been recast to clarify the purposes, limitations, and interrelationships of the individual tests. There was also a recognition that the leach test program must be based on an understanding of the mechanistic principles of leaching, and that further study is needed to ensure that the approved data from the MCC leach tests will be compatible with mechanistic research needs. It was agreed that another meeting of the participants in Working Groups 3 and 4, and perhaps some other experts, should be held as soon as possible to focus just on the definition of leach test requirements for mechanistic research. The MCC plans to hold this meeting in April 1980. Many of the tests that will lead to increased understanding of mechanisms will of necessity be long-term tests, sometimes lasting for several years. But the MCC also faces pressing needs to produce approved data that can be used for the comparison of waste forms in the relative near-term, i.e., in the next 1 to 3 yr. Therefore, it was decided to initiate a round-robin test of the MCC short-term static leach procedure as soon as practicable. The MCC has tentative plans for organization of the round robin in May 1980

  19. Materials Characterization Center. Second workshop on irradiation effects in nuclear waste forms. Summary report

    Weber, W.J.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this second workshop on irradiations effects was to continue the discussions initiated at the first workshop and to obtain guidance for the Materials Characterization Center in developing test methods. The following major conclusions were reached: Ion or neutron irradiations are not substitutes for the actinide-doping technique, as described by the MCC-6 Method for Preparation and Characterization of Actinide-Doped Waste Forms, in the final evaluation of any waste form with respect to the radiation effects from actinide decay. Ion or neutron irradiations may be useful for screening tests or more fundamental studies. The use of these simulation techniques as screening tests for actinide decay requires that a correlation between ion or neutron irradiations and actinide decay be established. Such a correlation has not yet been established and experimental programs in this area are highly recommended. There is a need for more fundamental studies on dose-rate effects, temperature dependence, and the nature and importance of alpha-particle effects relative to the recoil nucleus in actinide decay. There are insufficient data presently available to evaluate the potential for damage from ionizing radiation in nuclear waste forms. No additional test methods were recommended for using ion or neutron irradiations to simulate actinide decay or for testing ionization damage in nuclear waste forms. It was recognized that additional test methods may be required and developed as more data become available. An American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Task Group on the Simulation of Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Forms (E 10.08.03) was organized to act as a continuing vehicle for discussions and development of procedures, particularly with regard to ion irradiations.

  20. Summary of the 1. Asian Workshop on the Ethical Dimensions of the Radiological Protection System

    Kun-Woo Cho gave a panorama of the 1. Asian Workshop held in Daejeon on 27-28 August 2013 and he focused mainly on the results of the discussions carried out within the three Working Groups. In each group the discussion initially addressed on two questions: What issues of radiation protection refer to ethics? What are the ethical values (explicit and implicit), which underlie the system of radiological protection? WG 1 focused on the fact that the RP system includes judgments that refer to ethical values, but they are implicitly and un-clearly presented in the ICRP recommendations; on the dialogues about the foundation, objectives and rationality of RP system, which should be pushed to facilitate the understanding of the system for RP specialists and stakeholders; and on RP culture and wise behaviours vis-a-vis radiation, which should be promoted in the society. WG 2 discussed the need of ethical consideration in the system of radiological protection; the need to revisit whether individual rights to happiness or justice had been respected; the need to provide more rationales to support important judgments in the RP system, and the need to refine the term 'members of the public' to distinguish informed individuals with certain benefit in return. WG 3 noted that strong parallels between bio-ethics and RP ethics exist. It has also agreed that simplicity, education and communication efforts are required in the RP system to overcome public misunderstanding and to enhance acceptability. With respect to the values of RP ethics attention was given to tolerance of people's views, human dignity, justice, respect for persons, beneficence, prudence, understanding/simplicity and well-being. The presentation reported a view of the conclusions obtained from the 1. Asian Workshop focused on communication, well-being, tolerability and acceptability of risk as the main issues addressed

  1. Summary Report on CO{sub 2} Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop

    Varadharajan, C.; Birkholzer, J.; Kraemer, S.; Porse, S.; Carroll, S.; Wilkin, R.; Maxwell, R.; Bachu, S.; Havorka, S.; Daley, T.; Digiulio, D.; Carey, W.; Strasizar, B.; Huerta, N.; Gasda, S.; Crow, W.

    2012-02-15

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) jointly hosted a workshop on “CO{sub 2} Geologic Sequestration and Water Resources” in Berkeley, June 1–2, 2011. The focus of the workshop was to evaluate R&D needs related to geological storage of CO{sub 2} and potential impacts on water resources. The objectives were to assess the current status of R&D, to identify key knowledge gaps, and to define specific research areas with relevance to EPA’s mission. About 70 experts from EPA, the DOE National Laboratories, industry, and academia came to Berkeley for two days of intensive discussions. Participants were split into four breakout session groups organized around the following themes: Water Quality and Impact Assessment/Risk Prediction; Modeling and Mapping of Area of Potential Impact; Monitoring and Mitigation; Wells as Leakage Pathways. In each breakout group, participants identified and addressed several key science issues. All groups developed lists of specific research needs; some groups prioritized them, others developed short-term vs. long-term recommendations for research directions. Several crosscutting issues came up. Most participants agreed that the risk of CO{sub 2} leakage from sequestration sites that are properly selected and monitored is expected to be low. However, it also became clear that more work needs to be done to be able to predict and detect potential environmental impacts of CO{sub 2} storage in cases where the storage formation may not provide for perfect containment and leakage of CO{sub 2}–brine might occur.

  2. How do we convert the transport sector to renewable energy and improve the sector's interplay with the energy system? Main findings and recommendations from Workshop on Transport - renewable energy in the transport sector and planning

    Soenderberg Petersen, L.; Larsen, Hans (eds.)

    2009-07-15

    As part of the DTU Climate Change Technologies Programme, DTU arranged a series of workshops and conferences on climate change technology focusing on assessment of and adaptation to climate changes as well as on mitigation of greenhouse gasses (GHG). Each workshop targeted a specific technology problem area. The Workshop on Transport took place at DTU 17 - 18 March 2009. The workshop developed and discussed recommendations for future climate change technologies. This report presents summary and recommendations from the workshop. (au)

  3. Summary of workshop on alloys for very high-temperature applications

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    In current fossil energy systems, the maximum operating temperatures experienced by critical metal structures do not exceed approximately 732{degrees}C and the major limitation on the use of the alloys typically is corrosion resistance. In systems intended for higher performance and higher efficiency, increasingly higher working fluid temperatures will be employed, which will require materials with higher-temperature capabilities, in particular, higher creep strength and greater environmental resistance. There have been significant developments in alloys in recent years, from modifications of currently-used wrought ferritic and austenitic alloys with the intent of improving their high-temperature capabilities, to oxide dispersion-strengthened alloys targeted at extremely high-temperature applications. The aim of this workshop was to examine the temperature capability of these alloys compared to current alloys, and compared to the needs of advanced fossil fuel combustion or conversion systems, with the goals of identifying where modified/new alloys would be expected to find application, their limitations, and the information/actions required or that are being taken to qualify them for such use.

  4. Geothermal reservoir engineering, second workshop summaries, December 1-3, 1976

    Kruger, P.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

    1976-12-01

    Workshop proceedings included the following: (1) During the Overview Session some papers, among others, discussed 'Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Research' and 'Geothermal Reservoir Engineering in Industry'; (2) Session I, Reservoir Physics, included papers on 'Steam Zone Temperature Gradients at the Geysers' and 'Water Influx in a Steam Producing Well'; (3) Session II, Well Testing, included papers on 'Borehole Geophysics in Geothermal Wells--Problems and Progress' and 'Herber-Pressure Interference Study'; (4) Session III, Field Development, included papers on 'A Reservoir Engineering Study of the East Mesa KGRA' and 'Determining the Optimal Rate of Geothermal Energy Extraction'; (5) Session IV, Well Stimulation, included papers on 'Fluid Flow Through a Large Vertical Crack in the Earth's Crust' and 'Explosive Stimulation of Geothermal Wells'; and (6) Session V, Modeling, included papers on 'Steam Transport in Porous Media' and 'Large-Scale Geothermal Field Parameters and Convection Theory.'

  5. An Adaptive Association Test for Multiple Phenotypes with GWAS Summary Statistics.

    Kim, Junghi; Bai, Yun; Pan, Wei

    2015-12-01

    We study the problem of testing for single marker-multiple phenotype associations based on genome-wide association study (GWAS) summary statistics without access to individual-level genotype and phenotype data. For most published GWASs, because obtaining summary data is substantially easier than accessing individual-level phenotype and genotype data, while often multiple correlated traits have been collected, the problem studied here has become increasingly important. We propose a powerful adaptive test and compare its performance with some existing tests. We illustrate its applications to analyses of a meta-analyzed GWAS dataset with three blood lipid traits and another with sex-stratified anthropometric traits, and further demonstrate its potential power gain over some existing methods through realistic simulation studies. We start from the situation with only one set of (possibly meta-analyzed) genome-wide summary statistics, then extend the method to meta-analysis of multiple sets of genome-wide summary statistics, each from one GWAS. We expect the proposed test to be useful in practice as more powerful than or complementary to existing methods. PMID:26493956

  6. International Conference on Climate Change Adaptation Assessments: Conference summary and statement

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The International Conference on Climate Change Adaptation Assessments was held in St. Petersburg, Russian Federation, from May 22--25, 1995. Sponsored by the Russian Federal Service for Hydrometeorology and Environmental Monitoring, the US Country Studies Program, and the directorate General for International Cooperation of the Netherlands Government, it was the first international conference focusing exclusively on adaptation to climate change. More than 100 people from 29 countries on five continents participated. The conference primarily addressed measures to anticipate the potential effects of climate change to minimize negative effects and take advantage of any positive effects. The focus was on what governments, institutions, and individuals can do to prepare for climate change. The conference dealt with two major topics: What adaptation options are most effective and efficient in anticipating climate change and what methods should be used to assess the effectiveness and efficiency of adaptation options. Brief summaries are given from the following sessions on agriculture; Water resources; coastal resources; ecosystems and forests; fisheries; human settlements; water and agriculture; and the panel session on international adaptation in national communications and other development plans and needs for technical assistance.

  7. Safety related issues of spent nuclear fuel storage : summary of a NATO advanced research workshop

    Full text: A NATO Advanced Research Workshop was held in Almaty, Kazakhstan, in September 2005. The Workshop was co-sponsored by the IAEA and was concerned with the safety issues associated with spent fuel and waste from three types of reactor: research reactors with Al alloy-clad dispersion fuels, fast reactors with stainless steel-clad UO2, and commercial light-water reactors with Zr alloy-clad UO2. Fifteen presentations dealt with research reactors, five with the BN-350 fast reactor in Kazakhstan-shut down and in decommissioning, and two with commercial reactors in the U.S. and Ukraine. With 657 research reactors built and 274 still operational, corrosion of Al-clad research reactor spent fuel during wet storage was a major subject for discussion. Programs at the IAEA, in the U.S., and elsewhere, have actively studied corrosion of Al-clad fuel since the 1980s and the major mechanisms for aqueous corrosion of both spent fuel and of spent-fuel-pool structural components appear to be now well understood, as are the procedures required to limit corrosion. Nonetheless, avoiding corrosion requires vigilance in monitoring and controlling water quality. Measures to ensure water quality are now being taken at operating research reactors, but are difficult to impose at reactors that are shutdown, where there is less funding (or staff) for the task. It was noted there are about 62,000 spent research reactor fuel assemblies-most of them in wet storage-at many reactor sites around the world, three-quarters in industrialized nations, the remainder in developing countries. Dry storage of research reactor fuel is also being used or actively considered in France, Poland, Russia and the U.S. A variant of simple dry storage-the 'melt-and-dilute' option-casts the spent research reactor fuel with natural U into steel canisters to produce a corrosion-resistant low-enrichment fuel configuration which is suitable for safe long-term storage. The main safety issue of spent fast reactor

  8. Summary of the third control system cyber-security (CS)2/HEP workshop

    Over the last decade modern accelerator and experiment control systems have increasingly been based on commercial-off-the-shelf products (VME crates, programmable logic controllers (PLCs), supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems, etc.), on Windows or Linux PCs, and on communication infrastructures using Ethernet and TCP/IP. Despite the benefits coming with this (r)evolution, new vulnerabilities are inherited, too: Worms and viruses spread within seconds via the Ethernet cable, and attackers are becoming interested in control systems. The Stuxnet worm of 2010 against a particular Siemens PLC is a unique example for a sophisticated attack against control systems. Unfortunately, control PCs cannot be patched as fast as office PCs. Even worse, vulnerability scans at CERN using standard IT tools have shown that commercial automation systems lack fundamental security precautions: Some systems crashed during the scan, others could easily be stopped or their process data being altered. The third (CS)2/HEP workshop was intended to raise awareness; exchange good practices, ideas, and implementations; discuss what works and what not as well as their pros and cons; report on security events, lessons learned and successes; and update on progresses made at HEP laboratories around the world in order to secure control systems. It appears that deploying a 'Defense-in-depth approach is mandatory and corresponds to good practice while the full compliance to ISO-27000 standard is definitely both an ultimate goal and a very difficult challenge. There was a broad consensus to state that developing a 'security culture' among the players whatever they are: system experts, administrators, vendors or operators is the first step to do

  9. Creating Fantastic PI Workshops

    Biedermann, Laura B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Clark, Blythe G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Colbert, Rachel S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dagel, Amber Lynn [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gupta, Vipin P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hibbs, Michael R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Perkins, David Nikolaus [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); West, Roger Derek [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this SAND report is to provide guidance for other groups hosting workshops and peerto-peer learning events at Sandia. Thus this SAND report provides detail about our team structure, how we brainstormed workshop topics and developed the workshop structure. A Workshop “Nuts and Bolts” section provides our timeline and check-list for workshop activities. The survey section provides examples of the questions we asked and how we adapted the workshop in response to the feedback.

  10. Methodological issues in radiation dose-volume outcome analyses: Summary of a joint AAPM/NIH workshop

    This report represents a summary of presentations at a joint workshop of the National Institutes of Health and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). Current methodological issues in dose-volume modeling are addressed here from several different perspectives. Areas of emphasis include (a) basic modeling issues including the equivalent uniform dose framework and the bootstrap method, (b) issues in the valid use of statistics, including the need for meta-analysis, (c) issues in dealing with organ deformation and its effects on treatment response, (d) evidence for volume effects for rectal complications, (e) the use of volume effect data in liver and lung as a basis for dose escalation studies, and (f) implications of uncertainties in volume effect knowledge on optimized treatment planning. Taken together, these approaches to studying volume effects describe many implications for the development and use of this information in radiation oncology practice. Areas of significant interest for further research include the meta-analysis of clinical data; interinstitutional pooled data analyses of volume effects; analyses of the uncertainties in outcome prediction models, minimal parameter number outcome models for ranking treatment plans (e.g., equivalent uniform dose); incorporation of the effect of motion in the outcome prediction; dose-escalation/isorisk protocols based on outcome models; the use of functional imaging to study radio-response; and the need for further small animal tumor control probability/normal tissue complication probability studies

  11. Proceedings of a workshop on coastal impacts and adaptation related to climate change : the C-CIARN Coastal Node

    Coastal zones are sensitive to increases in air, sea and ground temperatures as well as to variations in sea level, precipitation, ice thickness, and storm intensity. In order to address concerns regarding climate change in coastal areas, the government of Canada established a Coastal Node as part of the Canadian Climate Impact and Adaptation Research Network (C-CIARN). The role of C-CIARN Coastal Node was recently outlined in a workshop aimed at providing guidelines and research priorities for stakeholders from all coastal regions of Canada. The workshop considered the integration of the node function with one or more of the regional nodes or with the fisheries node. Topics of discussion included both direct impacts on coastal infrastructure or human-use activities as well as indirect impacts resulting from changes in the ecosystem. refs., tabs

  12. Biofuels and certification. A workshop at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. Summary report

    Devereaux, Charan; Lee, Henry

    2009-06-01

    Liquid biofuels can provide a substitute for fossil fuels in the transportation sector. Many countries have mandated the use of biofuels, by creating targets for their use. If not implemented with care, however, actions that increase biofuel production can put upward pressure on food prices, increase greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and exacerbate degradation of land, forest, and water sources. A strong global biofuels industry will not emerge unless these environmental and social concerns are addressed. Interested parties around the world are actively debating the design and implementation of policies to meet the biofuel goals, particularly those established in the United States and Europe. In general, policy options for managing the potential risks and benefits of biofuel development should specify not only clear standards governing biofuel content and production processes, but also certification processes for verifying whether particular biofuels meet those standards, and specific metrics or indicators on which to base the certification. Historically, many standards in the energy and environment fields have ultimately been set or supported by governments. Many of the certification processes have been voluntary, carried out by independent third parties. The biofuels case is a young one, however, with questions of goals, standards, certification, and metrics still in interdependent flux. The workshop focused its discussions on certification issues, but found the discussions naturally reaching into ongoing debates regarding possible goals, standards, and metrics. Many countries are proposing that for a biofuel to qualify as contributing to government-mandated targets or goals, it must be certified to meet certain standards. These standards could be limited to the amount of GHG emitted in the production process or could include a number of other environmental sustainability concerns ranging from deforestation and biodiversity to water resources. While the threat to

  13. Summary of Training Workshop on the Use of NASA tools for Coastal Resource Management in the Gulf of Mexico

    Judd, Chaeli; Judd, Kathleen S.; Gulbransen, Thomas C.; Thom, Ronald M.

    2009-03-01

    A two-day training workshop was held in Xalapa, Mexico from March 10-11 2009 with the goal of training end users from the southern Gulf of Mexico states of Campeche and Veracruz in the use of tools to support coastal resource management decision-making. The workshop was held at the computer laboratory of the Institute de Ecologia, A.C. (INECOL). This report summarizes the results of that workshop and is a deliverable to our NASA client.

  14. Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report: Proceedings from the Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop, Golden, Colorado, June 11-13, 2012

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) held a Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop June 11-13, 2012, in Golden, Colorado, to discuss biogas and waste-to-energy technologies for fuel cell applications. The overall objective was to identify opportunities for coupling renewable biomethane with highly efficient fuel cells to produce electricity; heat; combined heat and power (CHP); or combined heat, hydrogen and power (CHHP) for stationary or motive applications. The workshop focused on biogas sourced from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), landfills, and industrial facilities that generate or process large amounts of organic waste, including large biofuel production facilities (biorefineries).

  15. Best practice in police social media adaptation

    S. Denef (Sebastian); N. Kaptein (Nico); P.S. Bayerl (Petra Saskia); L. Ramirez (Leonardo)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractSummary: Best Practice in Police Social Media Adaptation. This document describes best practice of European police forces in adapting social media. The description of these practices stems from a workshop series and other events where police ICT experts met with academics and industry ex

  16. Salt marsh restoration as a community adaptation to climate change and sea level rise in Maritime Canada : workshop report

    Singh, K. [Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, NS (Canada). Faculty of Management, School for Resource and Environmental Studies

    2007-01-17

    This workshop provided a multi-disciplinary perspective on salt marsh restoration as an adaptation strategy to climate change. It focused on the use of coastal salt marshes as an effective, low cost approach to coastal protection and adaptation to climate change and sea level rise. The purpose was to gain community feedback on many concerns such as land use conflicts regarding dykeland being used for transport infrastructure, agriculture production, and development; a lack of resources, education and money; community support; land ownership; and political barriers. The purpose of the workshop was to collect information and gain a better understanding of the viewpoints of different stakeholders, including all levels of government, First Nation groups, agricultural producers, non-governmental organizations and community groups. The vulnerability of Maritime Canada to climate change and sea-level rise was discussed along with the costs and benefits of restoring the salt marshes in the Maritimes which have been either significantly degraded or completely destroyed. 54 refs., 4 tabs., 6 figs., 4 appendices.

  17. Summary Report of PQRI Workshop on Nanomaterial in Drug Products: Current Experience and Management of Potential Risks

    Bartlett, Jeremy A.; Brewster, Marcus; Brown, Paul; Cabral-Lilly, Donna; Cruz, Celia N.; David, Raymond; Eickhoff, W. Mark; Haubenreisser, Sabine; Jacobs, Abigail; Malinoski, Frank; Morefield, Elaine; Nalubola, Ritu; Prud’homme, Robert K.; Sadrieh, Nakissa; Sayes, Christie M.

    2014-01-01

    At the Product Quality Research Institute (PQRI) Workshop held last January 14–15, 2014, participants from academia, industry, and governmental agencies involved in the development and regulation of nanomedicines discussed the current state of characterization, formulation development, manufacturing, and nonclinical safety evaluation of nanomaterial-containing drug products for human use. The workshop discussions identified areas where additional understanding of material attributes, absorpti...

  18. Adaptive harvest management for the Svalbard population of pink-footed geese: briefing summary

    Johnson, Fred A.

    2013-01-01

    The African-Eurasian Waterbird Agreement (AEWA; http://www.unep-aewa.org/) calls for means to manage populations which cause conflicts with certain human economic activities. The Svalbard population of the pink-footed goose has been selected as the first test case for such an international species management plan to be developed. This document describes progress to date on the development of an adaptive harvest management (AHM) strategy for maintaining pink-footed goose abundance near their target level by providing for sustainable harvasts in Norway and Denmark. This briefing supplements material provided in the Progress Summary distributed to the International Working Group on February 1, 2013. We emphasize that peer review is an essential aspect of the process of developing and implementing an AHM program for pink-footed geese, and we will continue to solicit reviews by the International Working Group and their staff, as well as scientists not engaged in this effort. We wish to make the Working Group aware the the following two manuscripts have been submitted recently to refereed journals and are available upon request from the senior authors: Jensen, G.H., J. Madsen, F.A. Johnson, and M. Tamstorf. Snow conditions as an estimator of the breeding output in high-Arctic pink-footed geese Anser brachyrhynchus. Polar Biology: In review. Johnson, F.A., G.H. Jensen, J. Madsen, and B.K. Williams. Uncertainity, robustness, and the value of information in managing an expanding Arctic goose population. Ecological Modeling: In review. In addition to these manuscripts, the Progress Summary (February 1, 2013), and this Briefing Summary (April 23, 2013) an annual report will be produced in August 2013 and every summer thereafter. Additional manuscripts for journal publication are also anticipated.

  19. Materials Characterization Center workshop on leaching mechanisms of nuclear waste forms, May 19-21, 1982, Gaithersburg, Maryland. Summary report

    Mendel, J.E. (comp.)

    1982-08-01

    This is a report of the second workshop on the leaching mechanism of nuclear waste forms, which was held at Geithersburg, Maryland, May 19-21, 1982. The first session of the workshop was devoted to progress reports by participants in the leaching mechanisms program. These progress reports, as prepared by the participants, are given in Section 3.0. The goal of the remainder of the workshop was to exchange information on the development of repository-relevant leach testing techniques, often called interactions testing. To this end, a wide spectrum of investigators, many of whose work is sponsored by DOE's Nuclear Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) project, made presentations at the workshop. These presentations were a significant and beneficial part of the workshop and are summarized in Sections 4.0, 5.0 and 6.0 according to the workshop agenda topics. In many cases, the presenters provided a written version of their presentation which has been included verbatim; in the other cases, the workshop chairman has supplied a brief synopsis. Twenty-one papers have been abstracted and indexed for inclusion in the data base.

  20. Materials Characterization Center workshop on leaching mechanisms of nuclear waste forms, May 19-21, 1982, Gaithersburg, Maryland. Summary report

    This is a report of the second workshop on the leaching mechanism of nuclear waste forms, which was held at Geithersburg, Maryland, May 19-21, 1982. The first session of the workshop was devoted to progress reports by participants in the leaching mechanisms program. These progress reports, as prepared by the participants, are given in Section 3.0. The goal of the remainder of the workshop was to exchange information on the development of repository-relevant leach testing techniques, often called interactions testing. To this end, a wide spectrum of investigators, many of whose work is sponsored by DOE's Nuclear Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) project, made presentations at the workshop. These presentations were a significant and beneficial part of the workshop and are summarized in Sections 4.0, 5.0 and 6.0 according to the workshop agenda topics. In many cases, the presenters provided a written version of their presentation which has been included verbatim; in the other cases, the workshop chairman has supplied a brief synopsis. Twenty-one papers have been abstracted and indexed for inclusion in the data base

  1. Summary of activities of the life cycle costing workshop conducted by the Environmental Restoration Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    A five-day life cycle workshop was conducted by the Environmental Restoration (FR) Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop appropriate remediation scenarios for each Waste Area Grouping (WAG) at ORNL and to identify associated data needs (e.g., remedial investigations, special studies, and technology demonstrations) and required interfaces. Workshop participants represented the Department of Energy, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Bechtel National, Radian Corporation, EBASCO Corporation, and M-K Ferguson. The workshop was used to establish a technical basis for remediation activities at each WAG. The workshop results are documented in this report and provide the baseline for estimating the technical scope for each WAG. The scope and associated budgets and schedules will be summarized in baseline reports for each WAG, which, in turn, will be compiled into an overall strategy document for ORNL ER

  2. Summary proceedings: Workshop on REDD+ and legal regimes of mangroves, peatlands and other wetlands: ASEAN and the world

    Lovleen Bhullar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This report summarises the proceedings of the workshop as interpreted by the assigned rapporteur and editors of the Asia-Pacific Centre for Environmental Law, which were reviewed and approved by the presenters.

  3. Proceedings of the workshop on program options in intermediate-energy physics. Volume 1. Summary and panel reports

    A Workshop on Program Options in Intermediate-Energy Physics sponsored by the US Department of Energy was held at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, August 20 to 31, 1979. The scope of the workshop included all laboratories in intermediate-energy physics, worldwide, and all of these sent representatives to the workshop. The workshop addressed itself to the critical questions on nuclear and particle physics and how they can best be investigated by intermediate-energy accelerators. Among the questions that the workshop members considered were: (1) what are the important physics topics which might be understood through research on these accelerators in the next 10 years. These topics include, but are not restricted to, fundamental interactions and symmetries in particle physics, and nuclear modes of motion, structure, and reaction mechanisms; (2) what experiments should be undertaken to carry out the program. What are the kinematical conditions, accuracies, resolutions, and other parameters required to obtain the desired knowledge; (3) which accelerators are best suited for each experiment. What work at other laboratories (low-, intermediate-, or high-energy) could be undertaken to complement and/or supplement the proposed LAMPF program; and (4) what new facility capabilities should be explored for the long-term future. The workshop was divided into small panels in order to promote effective interchange of ideas. After reports to other panels and plenary sessions, the panelists prepared reports stating the results of their deliberations. These reports comprise the principal part of Volume I

  4. Proceedings of the workshop on program options in intermediate-energy physics. Volume 1. Summary and panel reports

    Allred, J.C.; Talley, B. (comps.)

    1980-05-01

    A Workshop on Program Options in Intermediate-Energy Physics sponsored by the US Department of Energy was held at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, August 20 to 31, 1979. The scope of the workshop included all laboratories in intermediate-energy physics, worldwide, and all of these sent representatives to the workshop. The workshop addressed itself to the critical questions on nuclear and particle physics and how they can best be investigated by intermediate-energy accelerators. Among the questions that the workshop members considered were: (1) what are the important physics topics which might be understood through research on these accelerators in the next 10 years. These topics include, but are not restricted to, fundamental interactions and symmetries in particle physics, and nuclear modes of motion, structure, and reaction mechanisms; (2) what experiments should be undertaken to carry out the program. What are the kinematical conditions, accuracies, resolutions, and other parameters required to obtain the desired knowledge; (3) which accelerators are best suited for each experiment. What work at other laboratories (low-, intermediate-, or high-energy) could be undertaken to complement and/or supplement the proposed LAMPF program; and (4) what new facility capabilities should be explored for the long-term future. The workshop was divided into small panels in order to promote effective interchange of ideas. After reports to other panels and plenary sessions, the panelists prepared reports stating the results of their deliberations. These reports comprise the principal part of Volume I.

  5. Workshop in adaptation and mitigation strategies - approaching global warming: A review of the adaptation and mitigation perspectives

    The debate within the scientific, policy, and environmental communities on what, if anything, to do about global warming appears to be focused on whether to adapt to climate change in the future or to mitigate climate change in the present. As the issue has become increasingly politicized, the debate over these two approaches has become polarized. The two approaches, however, are not mutually exclusive; in fact, there is much common ground between them. But differences can be found in how proponents of each approach view the risks of global climate change and the values that underpin these perceptions of risk. In this paper, the author will briefly outline the progression of global warming from an obscure scientific concern into a leading international political issue. The author will also review some previous efforts by social scientists to assess attitudes and positions on global warming. He will then examine in detail the adaptation and mitigation perspectives and assess how they differ on the basis of different conceptions of uncertainty and risk, equity, and technology. Finally, he will examine the adaptation and mitigation approaches from the perspective of developing countries

  6. Emerging methods and tools for environmental risk assessment, decision-making, and policy for nanomaterials: summary of NATO Advanced Research Workshop

    Nanomaterials and their associated technologies hold promising opportunities for the development of new materials and applications in a wide variety of disciplines, including medicine, environmental remediation, waste treatment, and energy conservation. However, current information regarding the environmental effects and health risks associated with nanomaterials is limited and sometimes contradictory. This article summarizes the conclusions of a 2008 NATO workshop designed to evaluate the wide-scale implications (e.g., benefits, risks, and costs) of the use of nanomaterials on human health and the environment. A unique feature of this workshop was its interdisciplinary nature and focus on the practical needs of policy decision makers. Workshop presentations and discussion panels were structured along four main themes: technology and benefits, human health risk, environmental risk, and policy implications. Four corresponding working groups (WGs) were formed to develop detailed summaries of the state-of-the-science in their respective areas and to discuss emerging gaps and research needs. The WGs identified gaps between the rapid advances in the types and applications of nanomaterials and the slower pace of human health and environmental risk science, along with strategies to reduce the uncertainties associated with calculating these risks.

  7. 6th International Microbeam Workshop

    Dr Kevin M. Prise

    2004-01-01

    The extended abstracts which are submitted here present a summary of the proceedings of the 6th International Workshop/12th LH Gray Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at St. Catherine's College, University of Oxford, UK on March, 29th-31st, 2003. In 1993 the 4th LH Gray Workshop entitled ''Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response'' was held at the Gray Cancer Institute in Northwood. This was organized by Prof BD Michael, Dr M. Folkard and Dr KM Prise and brought together 40 participants interested in developing and applying new microbeam technology to problems in radiation biology (1). The workshop was an undoubted success and has spawned a series of subsequent workshops every two years. In the past, these workshops have been highly successful in bringing together groups interested in developing and applying micro-irradiation techniques to the study of cell and tissue damage by ionizing radiations. Following the first microbeam workshop, there has been a rapid growth in the number of centres developing radiobiology microbeams, or planning to do so and there are currently 15-20 worldwide. Much of the recent research using microbeams has used them to study low-dose effects and ''non-targeted'' responses such bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. The goal of the 6th workshop was to build on our knowledge of the development of microbeam approaches and the application to radiation biology in the future with the meeting stretching over a 3 day period. Over 80 participants reviewed the current state of radiobiology microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments both in the fields of physics and biology.

  8. Summary of Information Presented at an NRC-Sponsored Low-Power Shutdown Public Workshop, April 27, 1999, Rockville, Maryland

    Wheeler, Timothy A.; Whitehead, Donnie W.; Lois, Erasmia

    1999-07-01

    This report summarizes a public workshop that was held on April 27, 1999, in Rockville, Maryland. The workshop was conducted as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) efforts to further develop its understanding of the risks associated with low power and shutdown operations at US nuclear power plants. A sufficient understanding of such risks is required to support decision-making for risk-informed regulation, in particular Regulatory Guide 1.174, and the development of a consensus standard. During the workshop the NRC staff discussed and requested feedback from the public (including representatives of the nuclear industry, state governments, consultants, private industry, and the media) on the risk associated with low-power and shutdown operations.

  9. Summary of Information Presented at an NRC-Sponsored Low-Power Shutdown Public Workshop, April 27, 1999, Rockville, Maryland

    This report summarizes a public workshop that was held on April 27, 1999, in Rockville, Maryland. The workshop was conducted as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) efforts to further develop its understanding of the risks associated with low power and shutdown operations at US nuclear power plants. A sufficient understanding of such risks is required to support decision-making for risk-informed regulation, in particular Regulatory Guide 1.174, and the development of a consensus standard. During the workshop the NRC staff discussed and requested feedback from the public (including representatives of the nuclear industry, state governments, consultants, private industry, and the media) on the risk associated with low-power and shutdown operations

  10. Summary Report of Advanced Hydropower Innovations and Cost Reduction Workshop at Arlington, VA, November 5 & 6, 2015

    O' Connor, Patrick [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rugani, Kelsey [Kearns & West, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); West, Anna [Kearns & West, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    On behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind and Water Power Technology Office (WWPTO), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), hosted a day and half long workshop on November 5 and 6, 2015 in the Washington, D.C. metro area to discuss cost reduction opportunities in the development of hydropower projects. The workshop had a further targeted focus on the costs of small, low-head1 facilities at both non-powered dams (NPDs) and along undeveloped stream reaches (also known as New Stream-Reach Development or “NSD”). Workshop participants included a cross-section of seasoned experts, including project owners and developers, engineering and construction experts, conventional and next-generation equipment manufacturers, and others to identify the most promising ways to reduce costs and achieve improvements for hydropower projects.

  11. Summary of the second workshop on liquid argon time projection chamber research and development in the United States

    Acciarri, R.; Adamowski, M.; Artrip, D.; Baller, B.; Bromberg, C.; Cavanna, F.; Carls, B.; Chen, H.; Deptuch, G.; Epprecht, L.; Dharmapalan, R.; Foreman, W.; Hahn, A.; Johnson, M.; Jones, B. J. P.; Junk, T.; Lang, K.; Lockwitz, S.; Marchionni, A.; Mauger, C.; Montanari, C.; Mufson, S.; Nessi, M.; Olling Back, H.; Petrillo, G.; Pordes, S.; Raaf, J.; Rebel, B.; Sinins, G.; Soderberg, M.; Spooner, N. J. C.; Stancari, M.; Strauss, T.; Terao, K.; Thorn, C.; Tope, T.; Toups, M.; Urheim, J.; Van de Water, R.; Wang, H.; Wasserman, R.; Weber, M.; Whittington, D.; Yang, T.

    2015-07-01

    The second workshop to discuss the development of liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) in the United States was held at Fermilab on July 8-9, 2014. The workshop was organized under the auspices of the Coordinating Panel for Advanced Detectors, a body that was initiated by the American Physical Society Division of Particles and Fields. All presentations at the workshop were made in six topical plenary sessions: i) Argon Purity and Cryogenics, ii) TPC and High Voltage, iii) Electronics, Data Acquisition and Triggering, iv) Scintillation Light Detection, v) Calibration and Test Beams, and vi) Software. This document summarizes the current efforts in each of these areas. It primarily focuses on the work in the US, but also highlights work done elsewhere in the world.

  12. Summary of the second workshop on liquid argon time projection chamber research and development in the United States

    The second workshop to discuss the development of liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) in the United States was held at Fermilab on July 8-9, 2014. The workshop was organized under the auspices of the Coordinating Panel for Advanced Detectors, a body that was initiated by the American Physical Society Division of Particles and Fields. All presentations at the workshop were made in six topical plenary sessions: i) Argon Purity and Cryogenics, ii) TPC and High Voltage, iii) Electronics, Data Acquisition and Triggering, iv) Scintillation Light Detection, v) Calibration and Test Beams, and vi) Software. This document summarizes the current efforts in each of these areas. It primarily focuses on the work in the US, but also highlights work done elsewhere in the world

  13. Summary of the Second Workshop on Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Research and Development in the United States

    Acciarri, R; Artrip, D; Baller, B; Bromberg, C; Cavanna, F; Carls, B; Chen, H; Deptuch, G; Epprecht, L; Dharmapalan, R; Foreman, W; Hahn, A; Johnson, M; Jones, B J P; Junk, T; Lang, K; Lockwitz, S; Marchionni, A; Mauger, C; Montanari, C; Mufson, S; Nessi, M; Back, H Olling; Petrillo, G; Pordes, S; Raaf, J; Rebel, B; Sinins, G; Soderberg, M; Spooner, N J C; Stancari, M; Strauss, T; Terao, K; Thorn, C; Tope, T; Toups, M; Urheim, J; Van de Water, R; Wang, H; Wasserman, R; Weber, M; Whittington, D; Yang, T

    2015-01-01

    The second workshop to discuss the development of liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) in the United States was held at Fermilab on July 8-9, 2014. The workshop was organized under the auspices of the Coordinating Panel for Advanced Detectors, a body that was initiated by the American Physical Society Division of Particles and Fields. All presentations at the workshop were made in six topical plenary sessions: $i)$ Argon Purity and Cryogenics, $ii)$ TPC and High Voltage, $iii)$ Electronics, Data Acquisition and Triggering, $iv)$ Scintillation Light Detection, $v)$ Calibration and Test Beams, and $vi)$ Software. This document summarizes the current efforts in each of these areas. It primarily focuses on the work in the US, but also highlights work done elsewhere in the world.

  14. Summary of the Second Workshop on Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Research and Development in the United States

    Acciarri, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); et al.

    2015-04-21

    The second workshop to discuss the development of liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) in the United States was held at Fermilab on July 8-9, 2014. The workshop was organized under the auspices of the Coordinating Panel for Advanced Detectors, a body that was initiated by the American Physical Society Division of Particles and Fields. All presentations at the workshop were made in six topical plenary sessions: i) Argon Purity and Cryogenics, ii) TPC and High Voltage, iii) Electronics, Data Acquisition and Triggering, iv) Scintillation Light Detection, v) Calibration and Test Beams, and vi) Software. This document summarizes the current efforts in each of these areas. It primarily focuses on the work in the US, but also highlights work done elsewhere in the world.

  15. Summary

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text follows: During the five sessions of the workshop, much insight has been gained in a variety of issues and challenges that national programmes will encounter as they approach the construction phase of deep geologic repositories as well as their plans to address and resolve these issues. Due to the wide range of participating programmes and due to the different phases of repository development represented, the information presented at the workshop ranged from general and generic questions to specific technical, managerial, administrative, legal, regulatory and procedural issues. Although many issues still awaiting their resolutions, it can be observed that there were joint views amongst the participants with respect to the nature and specificities of these issues. These include: - the need for flexibility (within a so-called safety envelope) when projects evolve over time, - the need to address targets could be very difficult in nature and in some cases may compete with each other when developing and optimising repository systems, - the central role of management with regard to developing adequate professional attitudes and an appropriate safety culture, taking into account the various professional disciplines involved, - the need for integrating different legal and regulatory fields, often addressed by different authorities, and the question of a 'leading regulator'; - the technical challenge of conceptualising parallel processes such as excavation in parts of a repository and emplacement in others and the need to fulfil related safety requirements (mining and occupational, radiation protection etc.), - monitoring may have different roles in different phases of repository development, or - the outstanding role of the safety case prepared in advance to operation (waste emplacement) compared to the cases prepared at other stages of repository development, and the need to act accordingly in the regulatory

  16. Fusion Plasma Modelling Using Atomic and Molecular Data. Summary report of a Joint ICTP-IAEA Workshop

    The Joint ICTP-IAEA Workshop on Fusion Plasma Modelling using Atomic and Molecular Data was held from 23-27 January 2012 at Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics in Trieste, Italy. Ten lecturers presented tutorials and reviews on topics in fusion plasma modelling and atomic, molecular and plasma-material interaction processes. There were 20 participants, generally early-career researchers in the area of A+M+PMI processes and also plasma modellers. The participants presented their work in short talks and a poster session. The proceedings of the workshop are summarized here. (author)

  17. Developing common information elements for renewable energy systems: summary and proceedings of the SERI/AID workshop

    Ashworth, J.H.; Neuendorffer, J.W.

    1980-06-01

    This report describes the activities, conclusions, and recommendations of the Workshop on Evaluation Systems for Renewable Energy Systems sponsored by the Agency for International Development and SERI, held 20-22 February 1980 in Golden, Colorado. The primary objectives of the workshop was to explore whether it was possible to establish common information elements that would describe the operation and impact of renewable energy projects in developing countries. The workshop provided a forum for development program managers to discuss the information they would like to receive about renewable energy projects and to determine whether common data could be agreed on to facilitate information exchange among development organizations. Such information could be shared among institutions and used to make informed judyments on the economic, technical, and social feasibility of the technologies. Because developing countries and foreign assistance agencies will be financing an increasing number of renewable energy projects, these organizations need information on the field experience of renewable energy technologies. The report describes the substance of the workshop discussions and includes the papers presented on information systems and technology evaluation and provides lists of important information elements generated by both the plenary sessions and the small working groups.

  18. Nontechnical Strategies To Reduce Children's Exposure to Inappropriate Material on the Internet. Summary of a Workshop (December 13, 2000).

    Iannotta, Joah G., Ed.

    In response to a Congressional mandate in conjunction with the Protection of Children from Sexual Predators Act of 1998, a committee of experts was formed to explore both technical and nontechnical strategies for protecting children from pornography and other inappropriate Internet content. This book summarizes a workshop held in December 2000 to…

  19. Workshop on the leaching mechanisms of nuclear-waste forms, October 27-28, 1981. Summary report

    The purpose of this informal workshop was to initiate the program and achieve the following goals: (1) acquaint laboratory investigators (data generators) with the needs of the mathematical modelers (data users). Session I was devoted to a tutorial by D.D. Jackson, mathematical modeler for the leaching mechanisms program, on PROTOCOL, a general case waste form leaching model; (2) define important testing parameters, based on the present state of knowledge. To achieve this, a number of important testing parameters were identified for special discussion in Session II; (3) develop an understanding of the interrelationships between the activities of leaching mechanisms program participants, and begin definition of the specific role of each participant in the overall program; and (4) establish good communication between the leaching mechanisms program and related programs, particularly the waste form leaching program at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) and the various Nuclear Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) waste package programs. The agenda for the workshop is attached as Appendix A; a list of attendees is in Appendix B. Because this workshop was devoted to preliminary planning for the leaching mechanisms program, the presentations and discussions were purposely kept informal. This report represents a synopsis of the proceedings that has been prepared by the leaching mechanisms coordinator and reviewed by the workshop participants

  20. Summary record: Workshop on alternatives to chlorofluorocarbons as solvents. Held in Irvine, California on June 17-18, 1991

    The impetus for minimization or elimination of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) comes from the growing body of knowledge concerning depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer and formation of polar ozone 'holes'. The workshop concentrated on solvent usage, which constitutes some 12% of CFCs contribution to ozone depletion and is estimated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) at a sales dollar volume of $145 million per year for the United States alone. There is widespread solvent use in the electronics, automotive, defense, and spacecraft industries, as well as by a myriad of smaller fabricators and for consumer products. Seventeen major corporations in collaboration with the EPA, have formed the Industry Cooperative for Ozone Layer Protection (ICOLP). Two meetings were held prior to the workshop. The first included presentations by representatives from the ICOLP member companies on the pertinent activities of their respective organizations. The objective of this meeting was to brief the steering committee on the needs, limitations, problems, and successes in the development of alternatives to CFCs. Much of the background material presented in the workshop report was compiled during this first meeting. The objectives of the second meeting of the steering committee were to plan the agenda for the workshop and to identify the industry representatives to be invited

  1. Dynamic Processes in Biology, Chemistry, and Materials Science: Opportunities for UltraFast Transmission Electron Microscopy - Workshop Summary Report

    Kabius, Bernd C.; Browning, Nigel D.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Diehl, Barbara L.; Stach, Eric A.

    2012-07-25

    This report summarizes a 2011 workshop that addressed the potential role of rapid, time-resolved electron microscopy measurements in accelerating the solution of important scientific and technical problems. A series of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and National Academy of Science workshops have highlighted the critical role advanced research tools play in addressing scientific challenges relevant to biology, sustainable energy, and technologies that will fuel economic development without degrading our environment. Among the specific capability needs for advancing science and technology are tools that extract more detailed information in realistic environments (in situ or operando) at extreme conditions (pressure and temperature) and as a function of time (dynamic and time-dependent). One of the DOE workshops, Future Science Needs and Opportunities for Electron Scattering: Next Generation Instrumentation and Beyond, specifically addressed the importance of electron-based characterization methods for a wide range of energy-relevant Grand Scientific Challenges. Boosted by the electron optical advancement in the last decade, a diversity of in situ capabilities already is available in many laboratories. The obvious remaining major capability gap in electron microscopy is in the ability to make these direct in situ observations over a broad spectrum of fast (µs) to ultrafast (picosecond [ps] and faster) temporal regimes. In an effort to address current capability gaps, EMSL, the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, organized an Ultrafast Electron Microscopy Workshop, held June 14-15, 2011, with the primary goal to identify the scientific needs that could be met by creating a facility capable of a strongly improved time resolution with integrated in situ capabilities. The workshop brought together more than 40 leading scientists involved in applying and/or advancing electron microscopy to address important scientific problems of relevance to DOE’s research

  2. Joint IAEA/NEA workshop proceedings on regulatory review of plant safety analysis - Abstracts, Summary and Conclusions

    Based on the final discussion, the seminar was a valuable exchange of information and helpful in understanding the safety analysis and regulatory review issues. It gave a chance for some countries to see 'where they are' regulatory-wise with respect to other countries. There was a strong support for a follow-up workshop within the next two years. A general opinion expressed by most of the participants was that the suggested next seminar should be based more on an 'overall safety analysis' review rather than on very detailed presentations on specific issues. Also, there should be more discussions on Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs) and emergency planning. In addition, to establish a 'common language', the development of a glossary of terms would be most helpful. In general, all of the participating countries are adapting regulatory and licensing practices previously developed by other countries. Such an approach allows to utilise and rely on a broad experience of countries with a well established nuclear power industry, strong regulatory organisation and licensing practices. Since there are obvious differences in engineering traditions and in countries' legal/regulatory frameworks, questions arise about how to reconcile these differences in adapting and developing practices suitable for a given country. It was advised as a good practice to identify from the very beginning what needs to be done and the goals to be accomplished not only in the perspective of safety and technical requirements but also in the context of the economical, political, legal and regulatory situation in a given country. There has to be a consistency in any approach, but one can never follow 'blindly' the others. It became quite obvious that the needs of countries with a big nuclear program are very different from those of 'small' countries. Adaptation of other countries' rules is a big effort in itself (e.g., Romania applying Canadian regulations). In addition, the French-German co

  3. The Role of Federal Government for Climate Adaptation in the Urban Context: Results of a workshop (Invited)

    Buizer, J.; Chhetri, N.; Roy, M.

    2010-12-01

    Extreme weather events in urban areas such as torrential rainfall in Chicago and London, floods in Boston and Elbe and heat waves in Europe have shed stark light on cities’ vulnerability to the effects of climate change. At the same time, cities themselves are significant net contributors to GHG’s attributable to climatic changes through the built environment (e.g. housing, roads, and parking lots), transport, consumption and recreation. In the arid region of southwestern United States, issues associated with the adequacy of water resources, urban heat island, and air quality best exemplify these contributions. This duality - cities as impacted by, and contributors to extreme climatic patterns induced by climate change, and the specific climate information needed for decision-making by city planners - provided the impetus for a two-day workshop in January 2009. Organized by Arizona State University, the workshop included city managers, planners, private sector stakeholders, water managers, researchers, and Federal program managers. The aim was to identify information needs, and data and research gaps, as well as to design strategies to address climate uncertainty. Two key approaches discussed were: a) building multiple, flexible scenarios and modeling efforts that enable decision-makers to plan for a number of possible futures, and b) matching Federal climate assets to local, regional and sectoral needs through continuous collaboration that supports decision-making within the social, economic, and political context of the place. Federal leadership in facilitating, coordinating and informing efforts that nurture the creative intellectual capacity of cities to produce integrated solutions to mitigate the effects of and adapt to climate change will go a long way in addressing urban climate adaptation in the United States. Participants outlined a number of concerns and suggestions for Federal government leaders and services associated with a national climate

  4. Summary report of a workshop on research opportunities in plant biochemistry, December 11--13, 1992, Kona, Hawaii

    1992-12-31

    A DOE-sponsored workshop was held December 11--13, 1992 in Kona, Hawaii to discuss those aspects of fundamental research in plant biochemistry deemed essential to provide the basic information base necessary for exploiting plant biotechnology to meet future societal needs. Twenty nine scientists, with interests representing many of the various areas of plant biochemistry, participated. The workshop was intended to define in both broad and specific terms the current state of knowledge in the general area of metabolic biochemistry, and to identify those areas that afford unusual opportunity or that are relatively underdeveloped in comparison with other areas of plant biology. Participants provided critiques of the state of knowledge of the major areas of metabolic biochemistry in relation to a series of questions that are presented herein.

  5. Summary of workshop on materials issues in low emission boilers and high efficiency coal-fired cycles

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to review with experts in the field the materials issues associated with two of the primary coal power systems being developed by the DOE Office of Fossil Energy. The DOE-FE Advanced Power Systems Program includes natural gas-based and coal-based power systems. Major activities in the natural gas-based power systems area include the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program, the Fuel Cells Program, and Hybrid Cycles. The coal-based power systems projects include the Low Emissions Boiler Systems (LEBS) Program, the High-Performance Power Systems Program (HIPPS), the Integrated (Coal) Gasification Combined-Cycle Program, and the Fluidized-Bed Combustion Program. This workshop focused on the materials issues associated with the LEBS and HIPPS technologies.

  6. Japanese contributions to IAEA INTOR workshop, phase two A, part 2, chapter I: introduction, and chapter II: summary

    This report corresponds to Chapters I and II of Japanese contribution report to IAEA INTOR Workshop, Phase Two A, Part 2. The major objectives of the INTOR workshop, Phase Two A, Part 2 are to study critical technical issues, and to assess scientific and technical data bases, and to finally upgrade the INTOR design concept. To study critical technical issues that affect the feasibility or practicability of the INTOR design concept, the following five groups are organized; (A) Impurity control, (B) RF heating and current drive, (C) Transient electromagnetics, (D) Maintainability, (E) Technical benefit. In addition to those groups, the three disciplinary groups are organized to assess the worldiode scientific and technical data bases that exist now and that will exist 4-5 years to support the detailed design and construction of an INTOR-like machine, and to identify additional R D that is required; (F) Physics, (G) Engineering, (H) Nuclear. (author)

  7. Summary of a workshop on high heat load x-ray optics held at Argonne National Laboratory

    A workshop on High Heat Load X-Ray Optics was held at Argonne National Laboratory on August 3-5, 1989. The workshop was cosponsored by the Advanced Photon Source and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility and served as a satellite conference to SR189. The object of this workshop was to discuss recent advances in the art of cooling X-ray optics subject to high heat loads from synchrotron beams. The cooling of the first optical element in the intense photon beams that will be produced in the next generation of synchrotron sources is recognized as one of the major challenges that must be faced before one will be able to use these very intense beams. Considerable advances have been made in this art during the last few years, but much work remains to be done before the heating problem can be said to be completely solved. Special emphasis was placed on recent cooling experiments and detailed open-quote finite-elementclose quotes and open-quote finite-differenceclose quotes calculations comparing experiment with theory and extending theory to optimize performance

  8. Summary of the Mini BNL/LARP/CARE-HHH Workshop on Crab Cavities for the LHC (LHC-CC08)

    The first mini-workshop on crab compensation for the LHC luminosity upgrade (LHC-CC08) was held February 24-25, 2008 at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. A total of 35 participants from 3 continents and 15 institutions from around the world participated to discuss the exciting prospect of a crab scheme for the LHC. If realized it will be the first demonstration in hadron colliders. The workshop is organized by joint collaboration of BNL, US-LARP and CARE-HHH. The enormous interest in the subject of crab cavities for the international linear collider and future light sources has resulted in a large international collaboration to exchange aspects of synergy and expertise. A central repository for this exchange of information documenting the latest design effort for LHC crab cavities is consolidated in a wiki page: https://twiki.cern.ch/twiki/bin/view/Main/LHCCrabCavities. The main goal of this workshop was to define a road-map for a prototype crab cavity to be installed in the LHC and to discuss the associated R and D and beam dynamics challenges. The diverse subject of implementing the crab scheme resulted in a scientific program with a wide range of subtopics which were divided into 8 sessions. Each session was given a list of fundamental questions to be addressed and used as a guideline to steer the discussions

  9. Waterfowl identification workshops

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Summary of waterfowl identification workshops conducted by Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge and J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge. Objectives of the...

  10. Workshop summary: 'Integrating air quality and climate mitigation - is there a need for new metrics to support decision making?'

    von Schneidemesser, E.; Schmale, J.; Van Aardenne, J.

    2013-12-01

    Air pollution and climate change are often treated at national and international level as separate problems under different regulatory or thematic frameworks and different policy departments. With air pollution and climate change being strongly linked with regard to their causes, effects and mitigation options, the integration of policies that steer air pollutant and greenhouse gas emission reductions might result in cost-efficient, more effective and thus more sustainable tackling of the two problems. To support informed decision making and to work towards an integrated air quality and climate change mitigation policy requires the identification, quantification and communication of present-day and potential future co-benefits and trade-offs. The identification of co-benefits and trade-offs requires the application of appropriate metrics that are well rooted in science, easy to understand and reflect the needs of policy, industry and the public for informed decision making. For the purpose of this workshop, metrics were loosely defined as a quantified measure of effect or impact used to inform decision-making and to evaluate mitigation measures. The workshop held on October 9 and 10 and co-organized between the European Environment Agency and the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies brought together representatives from science, policy, NGOs, and industry to discuss whether current available metrics are 'fit for purpose' or whether there is a need to develop alternative metrics or reassess the way current metrics are used and communicated. Based on the workshop outcome the presentation will (a) summarize the informational needs and current application of metrics by the end-users, who, depending on their field and area of operation might require health, policy, and/or economically relevant parameters at different scales, (b) provide an overview of the state of the science of currently used and newly developed metrics, and the scientific validity of these

  11. Summary of the GNWT Dehcho regional workshop on the social impacts of the Mackenzie Valley gas project

    The proposed Mackenzie Gas Project will span at least 20 years and is expected to have significant social impacts. This workshop provided a forum for communities and government to evaluate the social impacts of the project, as well as a means for initiating collaborative planning to monitor and manage them over the next 20 years. Local plans for managing the impacts during the construction of the pipeline were discussed, as well as issues concerning future economic activity, demographic changes and long-lasting social impacts. Participants included government and community representatives from various areas in the Northwest Territories (NT). Impacts on employment and income were reviewed, as well as issues concerning housing, health and wellness. The role of the NT bureau of statistics in the monitoring of social trends was examined. Current government resources for managing impacts were evaluated as well as various social envelope departments. Community resources for managing social impacts were reviewed. Positive and negative impacts were discussed for each of the topics presented at the workshops, as well as current and future mitigation efforts. Participants developed concrete suggestions for monitoring impacts, assessing resource needs and collaborating. refs., tabs., figs.

  12. LER-LHC injector workshop summary and super-ferric fast cycling injector in the SPS tunnel

    Ambrosio, Giorgio; Hays, Steven; Huang, Yuenian; Johnstone, John; Kashikhin, Vadim; MacLachlan, James; Mokhov, Nikolai; Piekarz, Henryk; Sen, Tanaji; Shiltsev, Vladimir; /Fermilab; de Rijk, Gijsbert; /CERN

    2007-03-01

    A Workshop on Low Energy Ring (LER) in the LHC tunnel as main injector was convened at CERN on October 11-12, 2006. We present the outline of the LER based on the presentations, and respond to the raised questions and discussions including the post-workshop studies. We also outline the possibility of using the LER accelerator technologies for the fast cycling injector accelerator in the SPS tunnel (SF-SPS). A primary goal for the LER (Low Energy Ring) injector accelerator is to inject 1.5 TeV proton beams into the LHC, instead of the current injection scheme with 0.45 TeV beams from the SPS. At this new energy, the field harmonics [1] of the LHC magnets are sufficiently satisfactory to prevent the luminosity losses expected to appear when applying the transfer of the 0.45 TeV SPS beams. In addition, a feasibility study of batch slip stacking in the LER has been undertaken with a goal of increasing in this way the LHC luminosity by up to a factor of 4. A combined luminosity increase may, therefore, be in the range of an order of magnitude. In the long term, the LER injector accelerator would greatly facilitate the implementation of a machine, which doubles the LHC energy (DLHC).

  13. OECD/DOE/CEA VVER-1000 Coolant Transient Benchmark. Summary Record of the First Workshop (V1000-CT1)

    The first workshop for the VVER-1000 Coolant Transient Benchmark TT Benchmark was hosted by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Centre d'Etudes de Saclay, France. The V1000CT benchmark defines standard problems for validation of coupled three-dimensional (3-D) neutron-kinetics/system thermal-hydraulics codes for application to Soviet-designed VVER-1000 reactors using actual plant data without any scaling. The overall objective is to access computer codes used in the safety analysis of VVER power plants, specifically for their use in reactivity transient simulations in a VVER-1000. The V1000CT benchmark consists of two phases: V1000CT-1 - simulation of the switching on of one main coolant pump (MCP) while the other three MCP are in operation, and V1000CT- 2 - calculation of coolant mixing tests and Main Steam Line Break (MSLB) scenario. Further background information on this benchmark can be found at the OECD/NEA benchmark web site . The purpose of the first workshop was to review the benchmark activities after the Starter Meeting held last year in Dresden, Germany: to discuss the participants' feedback and modifications introduced in the Benchmark Specifications on Phase 1; to present and to discuss modelling issues and preliminary results from the three exercises of Phase 1; to discuss the modelling issues of Exercise 1 of Phase 2; and to define work plan and schedule in order to complete the two phases

  14. OECD/DOE/CEA VVER-1000 Coolant Transient Benchmark. Summary Record of the Third Workshop (V1000-CT3)

    The overall objective of the VVER-1000 coolant transient (V1000CT) benchmark is to assess computer codes used in the safety analysis of VVER power plants, specifically for their use in analysis of reactivity transients in a VVER-1000. The V1000CT benchmark consists of two phases: V1000CT-1 is a simulation of the switching on of one main coolant pump (MCP) when the other three MCPs are in operation, and V1000CT-2 concerns calculation of coolant mixing tests and main steam line break (MSLB) scenarios. Each of the two phases contains three exercises. The reference problem chosen for simulation in Phase 1 is a MCP switching on when the other three main coolant pumps are in operation in a VVER-1000. This event is characterized by rapid increase in the flow through the core resulting in a coolant temperature decrease, which is spatially dependent. This leads to insertion of spatially distributed positive reactivity due to the modelled feedback mechanisms and non-symmetric power distribution. Simulation of the transient requires evaluation of core response from a multi-dimensional perspective (coupled three-dimensional neutronics/core thermal-hydraulics) supplemented by a one-dimensional simulation of the remainder of the reactor coolant system. Three exercises are defined in the framework of Phase 1: a) Exercise 1 - Point kinetics plant simulation; b) Exercise 2 - Coupled 3-D neutronics/core thermal-hydraulics response evaluation; c) Exercise 3 - Best-estimate coupled 3-D core/plant system transient modelling. In addition to the measured (experiment) scenario, extreme calculation scenarios were defined in the frame of Exercise 3 for better testing 3-D neutronics/thermal-hydraulics techniques. The proposals concerned: rod ejection simulations with scram set points at two different power levels. The technical topics presented at this workshop were: Review of the benchmark activities after the 2. Workshop; - Discussion of participant's feedback and introduced modifications

  15. Summary of the Tandem Cylinder Solutions from the Benchmark Problems for Airframe Noise Computations-I Workshop

    Lockard, David P.

    2011-01-01

    Fifteen submissions in the tandem cylinders category of the First Workshop on Benchmark problems for Airframe Noise Computations are summarized. Although the geometry is relatively simple, the problem involves complex physics. Researchers employed various block-structured, overset, unstructured and embedded Cartesian grid techniques and considerable computational resources to simulate the flow. The solutions are compared against each other and experimental data from 2 facilities. Overall, the simulations captured the gross features of the flow, but resolving all the details which would be necessary to compute the noise remains challenging. In particular, how to best simulate the effects of the experimental transition strip, and the associated high Reynolds number effects, was unclear. Furthermore, capturing the spanwise variation proved difficult.

  16. Building the Human Vaccines Project: strategic management recommendations and summary report of the 15-16 July 2014 business workshop.

    Schenkelberg, Theodore; Kieny, Marie-Paule; Bianco, A E; Koff, Wayne C

    2015-05-01

    The Human Vaccines Project is a bold new initiative, with the goal of solving the principal scientific problem impeding vaccine development for infectious diseases and cancers: the generation of specific, broad, potent and durable immune responses in humans. In the July 2014 workshop, 20 leaders from the public and private sectors came together to give input on strategic business issues for the creation of the Human Vaccines Project. Participants recommended the Project to be established as a nonprofit public-private partnership, structured as a global R&D consortium closely engaged with industrial partners, and located/affiliated with one or more major academic centers conducting vaccine R&D. If successful, participants concluded that the Project could greatly accelerate the development of new and improved vaccines, with the potential to transform disease prevention in the 21st century. PMID:25673514

  17. National and regional climate change impact assessments in the forestry sector. Workshop summary and abstracts of oral and poster presentations

    Lindner, M. [ed.

    2000-07-01

    Climate change is likely to affect forests and the forest industry during the 21{sup st} century. Different processes in forest ecosystems and the forest sector are sensitive to climate and many different projects have been conducted, in which the scale of study varied from the individual leaf to the whole globe. Several attempts have been made to link impact models (e.g., ecological and socio-economic models), and to integrate them in national or regional climate impact assessment studies. However, integration of climate impact assessments for the forestry sector is still a relatively new issue on the research agenda. From November 10 to 13, 1999 the Postdam Institue for Climate Impact Research and the European Forest Institute organised a workshop in Wenddoche near Belzig (Germany) to bring together individuals and research groups from the currently developing research community, to provide a forum for the exchange of experience, and to stimulate further research collaboration. The workshop attracted 31 scientists from 12 countries, representing a wide range of disciplines covering ecophysiology, soils, forest ecology, growth and yield, silviculture, remote sensing, forest policy, and forest economics. Several presentations investigated possible impacts of climate change on forest growth and development. A second major topic was the carbon budget and the possible contribution of forestry to carbon dioxide mitigation. The third important focus was the application of economic models to estimate socio-economic consequences of changes in forest productivity and the linkage of ecological and economic models. Non-timber forest benefits were addressed in one regional impact assessment and in two national integrated assessments from the U.S. and Germany. The latter also included social components with the involvement of stakeholders and the decision making of forest owners under global change.

  18. Assessing social and economic effects of perceived risk: Workshop summary: Draft: BWIP Repository Project. [Basalt Waste Isolation Program

    Nealey, S.M.; Liebow, E.B. (eds.)

    1988-03-01

    The US Department of Energy sponsored a one-day workshop to discuss the complex dimensions of risk judgment formation and the assessment of social and economic effects of risk perceptions related to the permanent underground storage of highly radioactive waste from commercial nuclear power plants. Affected parties have publicly expressed concerns about potentially significant risk-related effects of this approach to waste management. A selective review of relevant literature in psychology, decision analysis, economics, sociology, and anthropology was completed, along with an examination of decision analysis techniques that might assist in developing suitable responses to public risk-related concerns. The workshop was organized as a forum in which a set of distinguished experts could exchange ideas and observations about the problems of characterizing the effects of risk judgments. Out of the exchange emerged the issues or themes of problems with probabilistic risk assessment techniques are evident; differences exist in the way experts and laypersons view risk, and this leads to higher levels of public concern than experts feel are justified; experts, risk managers, and decision-makers sometimes err in assessing risk and in dealing with the public; credibility and trust are important contributing factors in the formation of risk judgments; social and economic consequences of perceived risk should be properly anticipated; improvements can be made in informing the public about risk; the role of the public in risk assessment, risk management and decisions about risk should be reconsidered; and mitigation and compensation are central to resolving conflicts arising from divergent risk judgments. 1 tab.

  19. Placental origins of adverse pregnancy outcomes: potential molecular targets: an Executive Workshop Summary of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

    Ilekis, John V; Tsilou, Ekaterini; Fisher, Susan; Abrahams, Vikki M; Soares, Michael J; Cross, James C; Zamudio, Stacy; Illsley, Nicholas P; Myatt, Leslie; Colvis, Christine; Costantine, Maged M; Haas, David M; Sadovsky, Yoel; Weiner, Carl; Rytting, Erik; Bidwell, Gene

    2016-07-01

    Although much progress is being made in understanding the molecular pathways in the placenta that are involved in the pathophysiology of pregnancy-related disorders, a significant gap exists in the utilization of this information for the development of new drug therapies to improve pregnancy outcome. On March 5-6, 2015, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development of the National Institutes of Health sponsored a 2-day workshop titled Placental Origins of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes: Potential Molecular Targets to begin to address this gap. Particular emphasis was given to the identification of important molecular pathways that could serve as drug targets and the advantages and disadvantages of targeting these particular pathways. This article is a summary of the proceedings of that workshop. A broad number of topics were covered that ranged from basic placental biology to clinical trials. This included research in the basic biology of placentation, such as trophoblast migration and spiral artery remodeling, and trophoblast sensing and response to infectious and noninfectious agents. Research findings in these areas will be critical for the formulation of the development of future treatments and the development of therapies for the prevention of a number of pregnancy disorders of placental origin that include preeclampsia, fetal growth restriction, and uterine inflammation. Research was also presented that summarized ongoing clinical efforts in the United States and in Europe that has tested novel interventions for preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction, including agents such as oral arginine supplementation, sildenafil, pravastatin, gene therapy with virally delivered vascular endothelial growth factor, and oxygen supplementation therapy. Strategies were also proposed to improve fetal growth by the enhancement of nutrient transport to the fetus by modulation of their placental transporters and the targeting of placental

  20. Best practice in police social media adaptation

    Denef, Sebastian; Kaptein, Nico; Bayerl, Petra Saskia; Ramirez, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    textabstractSummary: Best Practice in Police Social Media Adaptation. This document describes best practice of European police forces in adapting social media. The description of these practices stems from a workshop series and other events where police ICT experts met with academics and industry experts; and from a study of the Twitter usage of British police forces during the 2011 riots. Grouped in nine categories, we describe different uses and implementation strategies of social media by ...

  1. Innovation for Vulnerable Farmers: Drought and Water Scarcity Adaptation Technologies.

    Clark, William C; Harley, Alicia Grace; Holbrook, Noel Michele

    2015-01-01

    This report is a summary of themes discussed during a two-day workshop on “Innovation for Vulnerable Farmers: Drought and Water Scarcity Adaptation Technologies.†The workshop was held at Harvard University on September 11–12, 2014. It brought together a diverse group of scholars to explore how actors in the agriculture innovation system can better promote the needs of small and marginal farmers.

  2. Summary of workshop on materials issues associated with low-NO{sub x} combustion conditions in fossil-fired boilers

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    It was anticipated by some members of the high-temperature corrosion community that the fitting of low-NO{sub x} burners to coal-fired power plants would lead to an increase in furnace wall corrosion, as a result of the relatively substoichiometric conditions created by the staged combustion process. These expectations were not borne out by initial experience. Recently, however, cases of severe furnace wall corrosion have been reported by some U.S. utility boilers retrofitted with modern low-NO{sub x} burners. There is extensive experience of furnace wall corrosion in utility boilers in the U.K., which indicates that excessive fireside corrosion rates (>200 nm/hr; 34 mil/yr) are experienced when tubes are exposed simultaneously to substoichiometric gaseous environments (CO>3.0 percent) and high radiant heat fluxes. Such conditions may be generated when flame impingement occurs. Where such conditions persist, increases in fuel chlorine content will exacerbate the rate of metal loss. In the absence of either circumstances, corrosion rates are much reduced and little influence of coal chlorine content is anticipated. Although the corrosion is essentially sulfidation caused by H{sub 2}S in the flue gas, the contribution of fuel sulfur in the corrosion experience by U.K. boilers is unresolved, partly because of the relatively small range in sulfur content of coals burned in U.K. utility boilers. The intent of this workshop was three-fold: to better define the problem in terms of the form and rate of attack; to examine what is known about its root causes; and to review the potential for using corrosion-resistant materials as part of the solution.

  3. Patient-centered cancer treatment planning: improving the quality of oncology care. Summary of an Institute of Medicine workshop.

    Balogh, Erin P; Ganz, Patricia A; Murphy, Sharon B; Nass, Sharyl J; Ferrell, Betty R; Stovall, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's National Cancer Policy Forum recently convened a workshop on patient-centered cancer treatment planning, with the aim of raising awareness about this important but often overlooked aspect of cancer treatment. A primary goal of patient-centered treatment planning is to engage patients and their families in meaningful, thorough interactions with their health care providers to develop an accurate, well-conceived treatment plan, using all available medical information appropriately while also considering the medical, social, and cultural needs and desires of the patient and family. A cancer treatment plan can be shared among the patient, family, and care team in order to facilitate care coordination and provide a roadmap to help patients navigate the path of cancer treatment. There are numerous obstacles to achieving patient-centered cancer treatment planning in practice. Some of these challenges stem from the patient and include patients' lack of assertiveness, health literacy, and numeracy, and their emotional state and concurrent illnesses. Others are a result of physician limitations, such as a lack of time to explain complex information and a lack of tools to facilitate treatment planning, as well as insensitivity to patients' informational, cultural, and emotional needs. Potential solutions to address these obstacles include better training of health care providers and patients in optimal communication and shared decision making, and greater use of support services and tools such as patient navigation and electronic health records. Other options include greater use of quality metrics and reimbursement for the time it takes to develop, discuss, and document a treatment plan. PMID:22128118

  4. OECD/DOE/CEA VVER-1000 Coolant Transient Benchmark. Summary Record of the Fourth Workshop (V100-CT4)

    a MSLB scenario are selected for simulation in Phase 2 of the benchmark. The introduction as an additional option of CFD modelling of the vessel with specific boundary conditions rather than core boundary conditions and CFD modelling of the mixing is also included as Exercise 1 of Phase 2. For this specific case additional data from Kozloduy NPP Unit 6 are made available. The selected mixing experiment was conducted at KNPP-6 as part of the plant commissioning phase. This asymmetric experiment includes single loop cooling and heating-up at 9 % of nominal power with all MCP in operation. It is being used to test and validate vessel-mixing models (CFD, coarse-mesh and mixing matrix). Vessel boundary conditions and core power distribution are part of this exercise specification. The transient to be analyzed in Phase 2 is initiated by a MSLB in the VVER-1000 NPP between the steam generator and the steam isolation valve, outside of the containment. This event is characterized by a large asymmetric cooling of the core, stuck rods and a large primary coolant flow variation. Two scenarios are defined: the first scenario is taken from the current licensing practice and the second one is derived from the original one using aggravating assumptions to enhance the code-to-code comparisons. The main objective is to clarify the local 3-D feedback effects depending on the vessel mixing. Special emphasis is put on testing 3-D vessel thermal-hydraulics models and coupling of 3-D neutronics/vessel thermal-hydraulics. The MSLB scenario simulation is divided into two exercises: Exercise 2 consists of coupled 3-D neutronics/vessel thermal-hydraulics simulation using specified vessel thermal-hydraulic boundary conditions, and Exercise 3 consists of best-estimate coupled 3-D core/3-D vessel/plant system modelling. The technical topics presented at this workshop were: - Review of the benchmark activities after the 3. Workshop; - Discussion of participant's feedback and introduced

  5. Advanced fuel cycles. Proceedings of the workshop

    Ospina, C.; Stanculescu, A. [eds.

    1995-12-31

    The proceedings enclose the papers presented at the workshop sessions on strategies concerning reactors and fuel cycles, on increased plutonium utilisation in LWRs, on advanced systems, complemented by the workshop summaries and recommendations. figs., tabs., refs.

  6. Advanced fuel cycles. Proceedings of the workshop

    The proceedings enclose the papers presented at the workshop sessions on strategies concerning reactors and fuel cycles, on increased plutonium utilisation in LWRs, on advanced systems, complemented by the workshop summaries and recommendations. figs., tabs., refs

  7. Summary of the NICHD-BPCA Pediatric Formulation Initiatives Workshop-Pediatric Biopharmaceutics Classification System (PBCS) Working Group

    Abdel-Rahman, Susan; Amidon, Gordon L.; Kaul, Ajay; Lukacova, Viera; Vinks, Alexander A.; Knipp, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    The Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) allows compounds to be classified based on their in vitro solubility and intestinal permeability. The BCS has found widespread use in the pharmaceutical community as an enabling guide for the rational selection of compounds, formulation for clinical advancement and generic biowaivers. The Pediatric Biopharmaceutics Classification System (PBCS) working group was convened to consider the possibility of developing an analogous pediatric based classification system. Since there are distinct developmental differences that can alter intestinal contents, volumes, permeability and potentially biorelevant solubilities at the different ages, the PBCS working group focused on identifying age specific issues that would need to be considered in establishing a flexible, yet rigorous PBCS. Objective To summarize the findings of the PBCS working group and provide insights into considerations required for the development of a pediatric based biopharmaceutics classification system. Methods Through several meetings conducted both at The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health, Human Development (NICHD)-US Pediatric Formulation Initiative (PFI) workshop (November 2011) and via teleconferences, the PBCS working group considered several high level questions that were raised to frame the classification system. In addition, the PBCS working group identified a number of knowledge gaps that would need to be addressed in order to develop a rigorous PBCS. Results It was determined that for a PBCS to be truly meaningful, it would need to be broken down into several different age groups that would account for developmental changes in intestinal permeability, luminal contents, and gastrointestinal transit. Several critical knowledge gaps where identified including: 1) a lack of fully understanding the ontogeny of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters along the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, in the liver and in the kidney; 2

  8. 09201 Executive Summary -- Self-Healing and Self-Adaptive Systems

    Andrzejak, Artur; Geihs, Kurt; Shehory, Onn; Wilkes, John

    2009-01-01

    From May 10th 2009 to May 15th 2009 the Dagstuhl Seminar 09201 ``Self-Healing and Self-Adaptive Systems'' was held in Schloss Dagstuhl~--~Leibniz Center for Informatics. During the seminar, several participants presented their current research, and ongoing work and open problems were discussed. The topics, goals, schedule and overview of group work is given in this paper.

  9. 77 FR 76051 - Public Workshop on Minimal Residual Disease; Public Workshop

    2012-12-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Public Workshop on Minimal Residual Disease; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug... workshop that will provide a forum for discussion of extending the qualification of minimal...

  10. 77 FR 76050 - Public Workshop on Minimal Residual Disease; Public Workshop

    2012-12-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Public Workshop on Minimal Residual Disease; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug... workshop that will provide a forum for discussion of extending the qualification of minimal...

  11. FLAGS: A Flexible and Adaptive Association Test for Gene Sets Using Summary Statistics.

    Huang, Jianfei; Wang, Kai; Wei, Peng; Liu, Xiangtao; Liu, Xiaoming; Tan, Kai; Boerwinkle, Eric; Potash, James B; Han, Shizhong

    2016-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been widely used for identifying common variants associated with complex diseases. Despite remarkable success in uncovering many risk variants and providing novel insights into disease biology, genetic variants identified to date fail to explain the vast majority of the heritability for most complex diseases. One explanation is that there are still a large number of common variants that remain to be discovered, but their effect sizes are generally too small to be detected individually. Accordingly, gene set analysis of GWAS, which examines a group of functionally related genes, has been proposed as a complementary approach to single-marker analysis. Here, we propose a FL: exible and A: daptive test for G: ene S: ets (FLAGS), using summary statistics. Extensive simulations showed that this method has an appropriate type I error rate and outperforms existing methods with increased power. As a proof of principle, through real data analyses of Crohn's disease GWAS data and bipolar disorder GWAS meta-analysis results, we demonstrated the superior performance of FLAGS over several state-of-the-art association tests for gene sets. Our method allows for the more powerful application of gene set analysis to complex diseases, which will have broad use given that GWAS summary results are increasingly publicly available. PMID:26773050

  12. TV THERAPY WITHOUT PSYCHOLOGY: ADAPTING THE SELF IN POST-SOVIET MEDIA. SUMMARY

    Lerner, Julia

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the constitution of a new therapeutic emotional cultural style in post-Soviet Russia. Its manifestations are particularly evident in the media, where off-the-shelf forms of Western late capitalist popular culture are imitated, seemingly in a one-to-one fashion. Engaging with the literature on emotional capitalism, the author points to the particular conditions in which therapeutic culture is being adapted in Russia. The alternative tradition of subjectivity in the Russia...

  13. User Profile-Driven Data Warehouse Summary for Adaptive OLAP Queries

    Rym Khemiri; Fadila Bentayeb

    2013-01-01

    Data warehousing is an essential element of decision support systems. It aims at enabling the user knowledge to make better and faster daily business decisions. To improve this decision support system and to give more and more relevant information to the user, the need to integrate user's profiles into the data warehouse process becomes crucial. In this paper, we propose to exploit users' preferences as a basis for adapting OLAP (On-Line Analytical Processing) queries to the user. For this, w...

  14. Proceedings of the International Workshop on: methods and tools for water-related adaptation to climate change and climate proofing

    Moerwanto, A.S.; Driel, van W.; Susandi, A.; Schrevel, A.; Meer, van der P.J.; Jacobs, C.

    2010-01-01

    The workshop fits in the National Water Plan of the Netherlands’ government of which the international chapter includes the strengthening of cooperation with other delta countries, including Indonesia, Vietnam and Bangladesh and is part of the work plan of the Cooperative Programme on Water and Clim

  15. Summary of the Geographic Information System workshop, held in Chicago, Illinois, May 29--30, 1991. Final report, December 1989--December 1991

    Thompson, P J; Sullivan, R G; Sundell, R C; Messersmith, J [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1991-12-01

    The Gas Research Institute, in conjunction with Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored a workshop on May 29--30, 1991, in Chicago, Illinois, to give gas utilities the opportunity to learn about the availability, applications, and benefits of Geographic Information Systems (GISs). This report is a synopsis of that workshop and contains brief discussions, followed by copies of the viewgraphs shown at the workshop, for the following GIS topics: (1) introduction to GIS, (2) data development, (3) analytical functions, (4) use for gas pipeline right-of-way applications, and (5)video imaging and simulation.

  16. 75 FR 71454 - NIJ Certification Programs Workshop

    2010-11-23

    ... of Justice Programs NIJ Certification Programs Workshop AGENCY: National Institute of Justice. ACTION: Notice of Meeting of the NIJ Certification Programs Workshop. SUMMARY: The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) is hosting a Certification Programs Workshop to introduce NIJ standards for law...

  17. Nuclear Propulsion Project Workshop summary

    Miller, Thomas J.; Clark, John S.; Barnett, John W.

    1991-01-01

    NASA-Lewis has undertaken the planning and coordination of a joint NASA/DOE/DOD Nuclear Propulsion Project which will investigate both nuclear electric and nuclear thermal concepts. The three-agency team has been tasked with the development of an Interagency Agreement and Memorandum of Understanding, as well as the drafting of a statement as to astronaut crew guidelines and values, the assessment of human-rating requirements, the development of an interagency safety and environmental assessment plan, and the development of test facility requirements. Attention is to be given to the role of SP-100 for nuclear-electric propulsion applications.

  18. Regulatory management systems: Adapting to changes in the environment [Session summary

    Full text: The presentations and the discussions identified a number of key challenges that regulatory bodies are facing. These include challenges in maintaining and improving competence, as well as establishing the necessary policies and approaches to deal with new situations, mainly resulting from ageing or the prolonged operation of NPPs, the construction of new NPPs, the decommissioning of nuclear installations and the establishment of the waste management infrastructure. Declining education and research infrastructure is also observed in many countries. There is, therefore, an increasing need to: (1) Create an attractive environment for students in the nuclear safety area, to implement more aggressive recruitment strategies, to ensure that sustainable education and training capabilities are in place in the Member States and that a comprehensive knowledge management system is implemented in the regulatory bodies; (2) Consider cooperative efforts for activities demanding high resources. Further discussion may be needed on cooperation efforts for activities, such as new reactor design certification. The globalization of the energy market and the resulting changes in the structure and the management of the operating organizations lead the regulatory bodies to adapt their strategies. Particular attention is requested for ensuring the qualification of the operating organizations, and reviewing and inspecting the organizational performance in achieving and maintaining a high level of safety for the short term and the long term. Globalization also calls for more harmonization of regulatory requirements where appropriate. Efforts in this direction are pursued at the regional levels, acknowledging that harmonization does not mean uniformity. The role of the IAEA safety standards in building an international nuclear safety regime has also increased. The regulatory community will benefit strongly from cross-fertilization between the regional and multinational efforts, and

  19. Summary Report for National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and Centro Para Prevencao da Poluicao (C3P) 2011 International Workshop on Environment and Alternative Energy

    Greene, Brian

    2011-01-01

    The C3P &. NASA International Workshop on Environment and Alternative Energy was held on November 15-18, 2011 at the European Space Agency (ESA)'s Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC) in Noordwijk, The Netherlands. The theme of the workshop was "Global Collaboration in Environmental and Alternative Energy Strategies". The workshop was held at ESTEC's conference center. More than 110 individuals from eleven countries attended the workshop. For the first time since the inception of NASA-C3P workshops, a full day was dedicated to a student session. Fifteen students from around the globe gave oral presentations along with poster displays relating to the latest technologies in environmental and alternative energy strategies. Judges from NASA, C3P and ESA awarded plaques to the top three students. In addition to the students, thirty eight U.S. and international subject matter experts presented on the following general environmental-related topics: (1) Hazardous materials management and substitution in support of space operations (2) Emerging renewable and alternative energy technologies (3) Sustainable development and redevelopment (4) Remediation technologies and strategies The workshop also included a panel discussion on the topic of the challenges of operating installations across borders. Throughout the workshop, attendees heard about the scope of environmental and energy challenges that industry and governments face. They heard about technologies for increasing energy efficiency and increasing use of renewable energy. They learned about ways companies and government agencies are using materials, processes, goods and services in a manner more respectful with the environment and in compliance with health and safety rules. The concept of partnerships and their inherent benefits was evidenced throughout the workshop. Partnering is a key aspect of sustainability because sustainable development is complicated. Through formal presentations and side discussions, attendees

  20. Experience and new developments in implementing ALARA in occupational, public and patient exposures. Summary and recommendations of the 10. european ALARA network workshop

    The 10. european ALARA network (E.A.N.) workshop took place in Prague (Czech Republic) in September 2006. This was the 10-year anniversary of the E.A.N., and unlike the previous workshops that addressed a particular ALARA topic, the aim of this workshop was to consider the implementation of the optimisation principle in all domains of activities (nuclear and conventional industry, medical sector, NORM industry). This principle is fundamental to radiation protection, and the workshop drew together key stakeholders to discuss its past, present and future status. The workshop was asked to consider the practical implementation of ALARA, and how this might be improved in the next 10 years. The objectives of the 10. E.A.N. workshop were to review the past evolution of the ALARA concept, internationally, within the Eu, and nationally, in terms of the practical impact on radiation protection; to examine the current status of the implementation of the ALARA principle; and to identify needs for future developments in the concept and implementation of optimisation. As with previous workshops, half the programme time was devoted to invited presentations, and half to working group discussions and report backs. After discussion, the output of these working groups was collated by the E.A.N. co-computers, to produce seven formal recommendations to international organizations (IAEA, International Labour Organisation, European Commission), to E.A.N. itself and to national authorities. These recommendations deal with justification of practices, holistic approach, ALARA culture, ALARA training, especially in the medical sector, ALARA focus through inspection and control, and stakeholder involvement. Individual presentations. (authors)

  1. Establishing Ozone Critical Levels II. UNECE Workshop Report

    Karlsson, Per Erik; Sellden, Gun; Pleijel, Haakan (eds.)

    2003-06-01

    This document is the final report from the workshop. It contains the overall summary of the conclusions from the workshop, the reports from the three working groups that were active during the workshop as well as all background papers presented at the workshop.

  2. Evaluating biological variation in non-transgenic crops: executive summary from the ILSI Health and Environmental Sciences Institute workshop, November 16-17, 2009, Paris, France

    Doerrer, Nancy; Ladics, Gregory; McClain, Scott;

    2010-01-01

    varieties that have the same breeding history and exposure to the same environmental conditions. Importantly, the biological relevance and safety significance of changes in "-omic" data are still unknown. Furthermore, the current compositional assessment for evaluating the substantial equivalence of GM......The International Life Sciences Institute Health and Environmental Sciences Institute Protein Allergenicity Technical Committee hosted an international workshop November 16-17, 2009, in Paris, France, with over 60 participants from academia, government, and industry to review and discuss the...... final session of the workshop. The workshop established some common, though not unique, challenges for all "-omics" techniques, and include (a) standardization of separation/extraction and analytical techniques; (b) difficulty in associating environmental impacts (e.g., planting, soil texture, location...

  3. Proceedings of 6th International Microbeam Workshop/12th L.H. Gray Workshop Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response

    The extended abstracts which are submitted here present a summary of the proceedings of the 6th International Workshop/12th LH Gray Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at St. Catherine's College, University of Oxford, UK on March, 29th-31st, 2003. In 1993 the 4th LH Gray Workshop entitled ''Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response'' was held at the Gray Cancer Institute in Northwood. This was organized by Prof BD Michael, Dr M. Folkard and Dr KM Prise and brought together 40 participants interested in developing and applying new microbeam technology to problems in radiation biology (1). The workshop was an undoubted success and has spawned a series of subsequent workshops every two years. In the past, these workshops have been highly successful in bringing together groups interested in developing and applying micro-irradiation techniques to the study of cell and tissue damage by ionizing radiations. Following the first microbeam workshop, there has been a rapid growth in the number of centres developing radiobiology microbeams, or planning to do so and there are currently 15-20 worldwide. Much of the recent research using microbeams has used them to study low-dose effects and ''non-targeted'' responses such bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. The goal of the 6th workshop was to build on our knowledge of the development of microbeam approaches and the application to radiation biology in the future with the meeting stretching over a 3 day period. Over 80 participants reviewed the current state of radiobiology microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments both in the fields of physics and biology

  4. [Souris River Loop Refuges : CCP planning workshops meeting

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a summary on an initial meeting to discuss 1 how the biological workshops will be conducted , 2 tentatively agree on the expected outcome of the workshops,...

  5. Summary report of the third combined workshop of the ITER confinement and transport and ITER confinement database and modeling expert groups

    In this last workshop of the current EDA phase, attention was paid to discussion of outstanding problems, completion of the ITER Physics Base Document, release of the latest version of the databases and the contents of forthcoming papers: two for the next EPS conference and two for the next IAEA conference. A separate publication in Nuclear Fusion is planned for the Profile Database

  6. Proceedings of the international conference on nuclear structure at high angular momentum and the workshop on large gamma-ray detector arrays. Conference summaries

    The proceedings of the conference/workshop is being published in two volumes. Abstracts of all contributed papers are contained in volume 1. The final proceedings will be published as volume 2 under the same report number (AECL--10613), and will contain expanded versions of abstracts submitted by registered participants together with the invited and contributed talks

  7. ALARA issues arising for safety and security of radiation sources and security screening devices - Summary and recommendations of the 12. European ALARA network workshop

    The 12. European ALARA Network (EAN) workshop on 'ALARA issues arising for safety and security of radiation sources and security screening devices' took place in Vienna (Austria) in October 2009. The aim of that workshop was to consider how the implementation of ALARA3, in terms of planned and emergency situations, involving worker and public doses, is affected by the introduction of security-related measures. In the case of new equipment and procedures, there was also the question of whether exposures arising from security screening devices can be justified and optimised. This workshop consisted of invited oral presentations, which highlighted the main issues, and half of the programme was devoted to discussions within working groups on specific topics. During their discussions, the working groups identified recommendations dealing with the following topics: the implementation of the Code of Conduct and HASS4 - ensuring ALARA; balancing security and safety - how to achieve an optimum solution; the management of an emergency exposure situation from an ALARA perspective; the justification and optimisation of the use of security devices. The objective of this paper is to present the main conclusions and recommendations produced during the workshop. Individual presentations (papers and slides) as well as the reports from the working groups are available to download on the EAN web site (http://www.eu-alara.net). (authors)

  8. Executive summary

    On 18 May 2001, the Finnish Parliament ratified the Decision in Principle on the final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel at Olkiluoto, within the municipality of Eurajoki. The Municipality Council and the government has made positive decisions earlier, at the end of 2000, and in compliance with the Nuclear Energy Act, Parliament's ratification was then required. The decision is valid for the spent fuel generated by the existing Finnish nuclear power plants and means that the construction of the final disposal facility is considered to be in line with the overall good of society. Earlier steps included, amongst others, the approval of the technical project by the Safety Authority. Future steps include construction of an underground rock characterisation facility, ONKALO (2003-2004), and application for separate construction and operating licences for the final disposal facility (from about 2010). How did this political and societal decision come about? The FSC Workshop provided the opportunity to present the history leading up to the Decision in Principle (DiP), and to examine future perspectives with an emphasis on stakeholder involvement. This Executive Summary gives an overview of the presentations and discussions that took place at the workshop. It presents, for the most part, a factual account of the individual presentations and of the discussions that took place. It relies importantly on the notes that were taken at the meeting. Most materials are elaborated upon in a fuller way in the texts that the various speakers and session moderators contributed for these proceedings. The structure of the Executive Summary follows the structure of the workshop itself. Complementary to this Summary and also provided with this document, is a NEA Secretariat's perspective aiming to place the results of all discussions, feedback and site visit into an international perspective. (authors)

  9. From high energy gamma sources to cosmic rays, one century after their discovery. Summary of the SciNeGHE2012 workshop

    The interplay between studies and measurements concerning high energy gamma ray sources and cosmic rays was the main focus of the 2012 edition of the Science with the New Generation of High Energy Gamma-ray Experiments (SciNeGHE) workshop. The workshop started with a special session devoted to the history of the cosmic radiation research in the centenary of its discovery, with a special attention also to the history of very high energy gamma-ray astronomy. The main results and the current status from space-borne and ground-based gamma and cosmic ray experiments were presented, together with the state of the art theoretical scenarios. The future of the field was studied through the presentation of many new experiment concepts, as well as through the analysis of new observational techniques and R and D programs

  10. Summary Report for Concentrating Solar Power Thermal Storage Workshop: New Concepts and Materials for Thermal Energy Storage and Heat-Transfer Fluids, May 20, 2011

    Glatzmaier, G.

    2011-08-01

    This document summarizes a workshop on thermal energy storage for concentrating solar power (CSP) that was held in Golden, Colorado, on May 20, 2011. The event was hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. The objective was to engage the university and laboratory research communities to identify and define research directions for developing new high-temperature materials and systems that advance thermal energy storage for CSP technologies. This workshop was motivated, in part, by the DOE SunShot Initiative, which sets a very aggressive cost goal for CSP technologies -- a levelized cost of energy of 6 cents per kilowatt-hour by 2020 with no incentives or credits.

  11. Nutritional characterisation of foods: Science-based approach to nutrient profiling - Summary report of an ILSI Europe workshop held in April 2006

    Tetens, Inge; Oberdörfer, R.; Madsen, C.;

    2007-01-01

    The background of the workshop was the proposed EU legislation to regulate nutrition and health claims for foods in Europe. This regulation will require the development of a science-based nutrient profiling system in order to determine which foods or categories of foods will be permitted to make...... reached a degree of agreement on several central points. Most participants favored a food category approach rather than an 'across the board' system for nutrient profiling. Most also felt that nutrient profiling schemes should focus on disqualifying nutrients, while taking into due account relevant...... qualifying nutrients. Levels of each nutrient should be clearly defined for all food categories to be profiled. Reference amounts selected for further considerations were: (1) per 100 g/100 ml, (2) legislated reference amounts, and (3) per 100 kcal. The majority of workshop participants agreed that nutrient...

  12. Short summary of International workshop on principles for disposal of radioactive and other hazardous wastes, Stockholm 7-10 june 1988

    The purpose of the workshop has been to discuss legal, scientific and practical aspects of disposal of low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LLW and ILW) and other types of hazardous wastes. During the autumn the National Institute of Radiation Protection will produce proceedings from the workshop. These proceedings will be published by the Department of Environment and Energy and will include opening addresses, invited paper, reports from discussions from plenary sessions as well as working groups and the recommendations agreed upon. In annexes will be found reports from the different working groups as well as the more interesting parts of the national presentations that served as discussion material for the different working groups

  13. Addressing practical challenges for biodiversity offsetting in the UK. Summary report for policy makers on the first 'Towards no net loss, and beyond' workshop, 22 June 2010

    Howard, B.M.; Margerison, C.

    2010-01-01

    This report summarises the views and ideas expressed during a workshop to identify practical challenges for the further implementation of biodiversity offsetting in the UK, and to work out how these may be resolved. The event involved 41 participants from a wide range of organisations. It was organised by the Natural Capital Initiative; an independent forum for discussion of policy and practice aligned with the ecosystem approach. ‘Biodiversity offsetting’ means the delivery of measurable...

  14. On the biology of fish gametes: summary and recommendations of the Third International Workshop, Budapest and Gödöllo, Hungary, 2011.

    Horváth, Áttila; Asturiano Nemesio, Juan Francisco; Rosenthal, H. (ed.)

    2012-01-01

    [EN] Workshop sessions were organized along three major topics: a) Gamete preservation including short- and long-term preservation as well as cryogenic storage of fish sperm, eggs, oocytes and primordial germ cells (PGCs); b) Gametogenesis, including development of PGCs, spermatogenesis and oogenesis in various species; c) Gamete quality which included a broad range of subjects from sperm morphology or motility to proteomics, regulation of fertilization processes and t...

  15. Summary of comments received at workshop on use of a Site Specific Advisory Board (SSAB) to facilitate public participation in decommissioning cases

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting an enhanced participatory rulemaking to establish radiological criteria for the decommissioning of NRC-licensed facilities. As part of this rulemaking, On August 20, 1994 the NRC published a proposed rule for public comment. Paragraph 20.1406(b) of the proposed rule would require that the licensee convene a Site Specific Advisory Board (SSAB) if the licensee proposed release of the site for restricted use after decommissioning. To encourage comment the NRC held a workshop on the subject of $SABs on December 6, 7, and 8, 1994. This report summarizes the 567 comments categorized from the transcript of the workshop. The commenters at the workshop generally supported public participation in decommissioning cases. Many participants favored promulgating requirements in the NRC's rules. Some industry participants favored relying on voluntary exchanges between the public and the licensees. Many participants indicated that a SSAB or something functionally equivalent is needed in controversial decommissioning cases, but that some lesser undertaking can achieve meaningful public participation in other cases. No analysis or response to the comments is included in this report

  16. Summary of the presentations at the international workshop on reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the developing world: Assessment of benefits, costs and barriers

    Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N. [eds.

    1991-06-01

    The ``International Workshop on Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Developing World: Assessment of Benefits, Costs and Barriers`` was the second workshop held as part of a project being conducted by the International Energy Studies Group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, in collaboration with experts from leading institutions across the developing world. The goal of the project is to analyze long-range energy consumption in developing countries and its potential contribution to global climate change. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is supporting this work, the results of which already have made a key contribution to the technical analysis being used as the basis for discussion by the Energy and Industry Sub-group of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The main purpose of this workshop was two-fold: (1) to discuss the feasibility of implementing the efficiency improvements and fuel switching measures incorporated into the long-term energy scenarios created for 17 developing countries and (2) to examine the costs and benefits of reducing energy-related carbon dioxide emissions generated by developing countries.

  17. Summary of the presentations at the international workshop on reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the developing world: Assessment of benefits, costs and barriers

    Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N. (eds.)

    1991-06-01

    The International Workshop on Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Developing World: Assessment of Benefits, Costs and Barriers'' was the second workshop held as part of a project being conducted by the International Energy Studies Group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, in collaboration with experts from leading institutions across the developing world. The goal of the project is to analyze long-range energy consumption in developing countries and its potential contribution to global climate change. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is supporting this work, the results of which already have made a key contribution to the technical analysis being used as the basis for discussion by the Energy and Industry Sub-group of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The main purpose of this workshop was two-fold: (1) to discuss the feasibility of implementing the efficiency improvements and fuel switching measures incorporated into the long-term energy scenarios created for 17 developing countries and (2) to examine the costs and benefits of reducing energy-related carbon dioxide emissions generated by developing countries.

  18. Summary of comments received at workshop on use of a Site Specific Advisory Board (SSAB) to facilitate public participation in decommissioning cases

    Caplin, J.; Padge, G.; Smith, D.; Wiblin, C. [Advanced Systems Technology, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting an enhanced participatory rulemaking to establish radiological criteria for the decommissioning of NRC-licensed facilities. As part of this rulemaking, On August 20, 1994 the NRC published a proposed rule for public comment. Paragraph 20.1406(b) of the proposed rule would require that the licensee convene a Site Specific Advisory Board (SSAB) if the licensee proposed release of the site for restricted use after decommissioning. To encourage comment the NRC held a workshop on the subject of $SABs on December 6, 7, and 8, 1994. This report summarizes the 567 comments categorized from the transcript of the workshop. The commenters at the workshop generally supported public participation in decommissioning cases. Many participants favored promulgating requirements in the NRC`s rules. Some industry participants favored relying on voluntary exchanges between the public and the licensees. Many participants indicated that a SSAB or something functionally equivalent is needed in controversial decommissioning cases, but that some lesser undertaking can achieve meaningful public participation in other cases. No analysis or response to the comments is included in this report.

  19. Summary of the presentations at the international workshop on reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the developing world: Assessment of benefits, costs and barriers

    The ''International Workshop on Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Developing World: Assessment of Benefits, Costs and Barriers'' was the second workshop held as part of a project being conducted by the International Energy Studies Group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, in collaboration with experts from leading institutions across the developing world. The goal of the project is to analyze long-range energy consumption in developing countries and its potential contribution to global climate change. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is supporting this work, the results of which already have made a key contribution to the technical analysis being used as the basis for discussion by the Energy and Industry Sub-group of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The main purpose of this workshop was two-fold: (1) to discuss the feasibility of implementing the efficiency improvements and fuel switching measures incorporated into the long-term energy scenarios created for 17 developing countries and (2) to examine the costs and benefits of reducing energy-related carbon dioxide emissions generated by developing countries

  20. Writing Workshop in Preschool

    King, Kelly A.

    2012-01-01

    Preschoolers may be novices in the area of writing but, as this article highlights, they are indeed writers. In a year-long ethnography of preschoolers during structured writing time the teacher/researcher explored how students adapted to a writing workshop format. Students participated in daily journal writing and sharing, and weekly conference…

  1. Adapt

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  2. IFPA meeting 2008 workshops report

    Lash, G.E.; Ansari, T.; Bischof, P.;

    2009-01-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting. At the IFPA meeting 2008 diverse topics were discussed in 12 themed workshops. Topics covered included: immunology of placentation; galectins and trophoblast invasion; signaling in implantation and invasion; markers to identify trophobla...... subpopulations; placental pathology; placental toxicology; sterology; placental transport of fatty acids; placental mesenchymal stem cells; comparative placentation; trophoblst and neoplasia; trophoblast differentiation. This report is a summary of the various topics covered....

  3. Accelerator technology working group summary

    A summary is presented of workshop deliberations on basic scaling, the economic viability of laser drive power for HEP accelerators, the availability of electron beam injectors for near-term experiments, and a few very general remarks on technology issues

  4. Highlights of the EPA innovative regulatory strategies workshop: Market-based incentives and other innovations for air pollution control. Summary of workshop discussion sessions. Held in Washington, DC on January 15-17, 1992

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 allow, and in some cases require, States to adopt market-based strategies or other innovative types of air pollution control. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) innovative regulatory strategies program seeks to encourage and facilitate, as appropriate, the development, demonstration, and implementation of a wide range of innovative regulatory air pollution programs, including market-based, informational, and pollution prevention approaches. The 3-day national workshop, attended by over two hundred people from Federal, State, and local agencies, industry, environmental and public interest groups, and the academic community highlighted issues associated with a variety of innovative, market-based strategies which are currently being developed or used by State and local authorities around the country

  5. Rapporteurs' report: Workshop on ethical issues in diagnostic radiology

    This paper presents the summary reports of the session rapporteurs at the Workshop on Ethical Issues in Diagnostic Radiology. The summaries reflect the extent to which the topics discussed are well reflected in the papers presented in this proceedings. (authors)

  6. Environmental Management Science Program Workshop

    None

    1998-07-01

    This program summary book is a compendium of project summaries submitted by principal investigators in the Environmental Management Science Program and Environmental Management/Energy Research Pilot Collaborative Research Program (Wolf-Broido Program). These summaries provide information about the most recent project activities and accomplishments. All projects will be represented at the workshop poster sessions, so you will have an opportunity to meet with the researchers. The projects will be presented in the same order at the poster session as they are presented in this summary book. Detailed questions about an individual project may be directed to the investigators involved.

  7. A Review of the Environmental Impacts for Marine and Hydrokinetic Projects to Inform Regulatory Permitting: Summary Findings from the 2015 Workshop on Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies, Washington, D.C.

    Baring-Gould, E. Ian [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Christol, Corrie [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); LiVecchi, Al [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kramer, Sharon [H.T. Harvey and Associates, Los Gatos, CA (United States); West, Anna [Kearns & West, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-07-01

    In 2014 and 2015, the U.S. Department of Energy initiated efforts to develop and implement technology- and application-focused marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) workshops to share the global experience and knowledge base on evolving MHK technologies, observed and not-observed impacts, monitoring and measurement methods, and regulatory needs. The resulting MHK Regulator Workshops engaged resource managers and other decision makers at key regulatory organizations, scientists, researchers, facilitators, and technical experts and provided an opportunity to examine the risks of single-device and small-scale deployments, explore what can be learned and observed from single devices and small-scale arrays, and consider requirements for projects at varying scales of deployment. Experts and stakeholders identified key remaining information gaps. Initial discussions focused on differentiating between monitoring required for single or small-scale deployments and MHK impact research that, although important, goes beyond what is feasible or should be needed to meet specific project regulatory requirements but is appropriate for broader research and development. Four areas of identified potential environmental impacts provided the focus for the workshop: acoustic output impacts, electromagnetic field (EMF) emissions, physical interactions, and environmental effects of MHK energy development on the physical environment. Discussions also focused on the regulatory process and experience, adaptive management, industry drivers, and lessons that can be learned from the wind energy industry. The discussion was set in the context of the types of MHK technologies that are currently proposed or planned in the United States. All presentations and the following discussions are summarized in this document.

  8. Summary Report of the First International Symposium on Strain Gauge Balances and Workshop on AoA/Model Deformation Measurement Techniques

    Tripp, John S.; Tcheng, Ping; Burner, Alpheus W.; Finley, Tom D.

    1999-01-01

    The first International Symposium on Strain Gauge Balances was sponsored under the auspices of the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), Hampton, Virginia during October 22-25, 1996. Held at the LaRC Reid Conference Center, the Symposium provided an open international forum for presentation, discussion, and exchange of technical information among wind tunnel test technique specialists and strain gauge balance designers. The Symposium also served to initiate organized professional activities among the participating and relevant international technical communities. The program included a panel discussion, technical paper sessions, tours of local facilities, and vendor exhibits. Over 130 delegates were in attendance from 15 countries. A steering committee was formed to plan a second international balance symposium tentatively scheduled to be hosted in the United Kingdom in 1998 or 1999. The Balance Symposium was followed by the half-day Workshop on Angle of Attack and Model Deformation on the afternoon of October 25. The thrust of the Workshop was to assess the state of the art in angle of attack (AoA) and model deformation measurement techniques and to discuss future developments.

  9. Summary of the workshop on open-quote open-quote X-ray Optics and Ray Tracing: Status and Needs close-quote close-quote

    A workshop on x-ray optics and ray tracing was held on October 18, 1995, at the Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation conference held at Argonne. The object of the workshop was to exchange experience in ray-tracing calculations between the largest synchrotron radiation facilities. The introduction was carried out by Franco Cerrina, who made a review presentation of SHADOW, the only ray-tracing code that can be used for almost all the synchrotron radiation applications and surely is the most wide-spread and complete one. Then a total of seven speakers presented in short talks (20 minutes) their experience in the use of SHADOW at their respective facilities, their developments, suggestions, wishes, and complaints about some points of the package. Some of the presentations are available as contributed papers to the SRI close-quote 95 proceedings. In general, the speakers (representing all the U.S. Department of Energy synchrotron radiation sources) felt that the program was an essential part of the facilities experimental development. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  10. Geothermal systems materials: a workshop/symposium

    1978-01-01

    Sixteen papers are included. A separate abstract was prepared for each. Summaries of workshops on the following topics are also included in the report: non-metallic materials, corrosion, materials selection, fluid chemistry, and failure analysis. (MHR)

  11. 75 FR 21007 - Food Labeling; Public Workshop

    2010-04-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food Labeling; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Office... University (OSU), Robert M. Kerr Food & Agricultural Products Center (FAPC), is announcing a public...

  12. DARPA Santa Cruz Workshop on Planning

    Swartout, William R.

    1988-01-01

    This is a summary of the Workshop on Planning that was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency and held in Santa Cruz, California, on October 21-23, 1987. The purpose of this workshop was to identify and explore new directions for research in planning.

  13. The 1988 AAAI Workshop on Explanation

    Wick, Michael R.

    1989-01-01

    This article is a summary of the Workshop on Explanation held during the 1988 National Conference on Artificial Intelligence in St. Paul, Minnesota. The purpose of the workshop was to identify key research issues in the rapidly emerging area of expert system explanation.

  14. Workshop on gravitational waves and relativistic astrophysics

    Patrick Das Gupta

    2004-10-01

    Discussions related to gravitational wave experiments viz. LIGO and LISA as well as to observations of supermassive black holes dominated the workshop sessions on gravitational waves and relativistic astrophysics in the ICGC-2004. A summary of seven papers that were presented in these workshop sessions has been provided in this article.

  15. Modeling the Oil Transition: A Summary of the Proceedings of the DOE/EPA Workshop on the Economic and Environmental Implications of Global Energy Transitions

    Greene, David L [ORNL

    2007-02-01

    The global energy system faces sweeping changes in the next few decades, with potentially critical implications for the global economy and the global environment. It is important that global institutions have the tools necessary to predict, analyze and plan for such massive change. This report summarizes the proceedings of an international workshop concerning methods of forecasting, analyzing, and planning for global energy transitions and their economic and environmental consequences. A specific case, it focused on the transition from conventional to unconventional oil and other energy sources likely to result from a peak in non-OPEC and/or global production of conventional oil. Leading energy models from around the world in government, academia and the private sector met, reviewed the state-of-the-art of global energy modeling and evaluated its ability to analyze and predict large-scale energy transitions.

  16. Evaluating biological variation in non-transgenic crops: executive summary from the ILSI Health and Environmental Sciences Institute workshop, November 16-17, 2009, Paris, France

    Doerrer, Nancy; Ladics, Gregory; McClain, Scott;

    2010-01-01

    allergenicity. Once established as a standardized assay, survey approaches such as the "-omics" techniques can be considered in a hypothesis-driven analysis of plants, such as determining unintended effects in genetically modified (GM) crops. However, the analysis should include both the GM and control......The International Life Sciences Institute Health and Environmental Sciences Institute Protein Allergenicity Technical Committee hosted an international workshop November 16-17, 2009, in Paris, France, with over 60 participants from academia, government, and industry to review and discuss the...... is critical in establishing the utility of new technologies due to the variability in specific analytes that may result from genetic differences (crop genotype), different crop management practices (conventional high input, low input, organic), interaction between genotype and environment, and the...

  17. Third Joint GIF–IAEA Workshop on Safety Design Criteria for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors, 26-27 February 2013, Vienna, Austria. Summary Report

    The main objectives of the meeting were to: • Present and share information on the work carried out by GIF, the IAEA and the Member States on the definition of safety design criteria for SFR, including safety approach and requirements on general plant design; • Present the document prepared by the GIF-SFR Task Force on Safety Design Criteria; • Present and discuss safety design concepts of SFRs under development in Member States, with particular emphasis on design measures against Design Basis Accidents and Design Extended Conditions, as well as the associated safety evaluations and supporting R&D; • Draft a room document which should be the basis of the discussion for the Panel on Safety Design Criteria of the FR13 Conference in Paris. • Discuss the results and agree on the future actions of the 3rd Joint GIF-IAEA Workshop on Safety of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors

  18. A summary of the joint GSICS - CEOS/IVOS lunar calibration workshop: moving towards intercalibration using the Moon as a transfer target

    Wagner, S. C.; Hewison, T.; Stone, T.; Lachérade, S.; Fougnie, B.; Xiong, X.

    2015-10-01

    In December 2014 experts from 14 different agencies and departments attended the joint GSICS - CEOS/IVOS Lunar Calibration Workshop meeting organised by EUMETSAT in collaboration with USGS, CNES and NASA. Altogether, this represents potentially more than 25 instruments capable of observing the Moon. The main objectives of the workshop were i) to work across agencies with the GSICS Implementation of the ROLO model (GIRO) - a common and validated implementation of the USGS lunar radiometric reference, ii) to share knowledge and expertise on lunar calibration and iii) to generate for the first time a reference dataset that could be used for validation and comparisons. This lunar calibration community endorsed the GIRO to be the established publicly available reference for lunar calibration, directly traceable to the USGS ROLO model. However, further effort is required to reach inter-calibration between instruments, in particular for each instrument team to accurately estimate the over-sampling factor for their images of the Moon. A way to develop a cross-calibration algorithm and GSICS inter-calibration products is proposed. This includes key issues of fixing the GIRO calibration to an absolute scale, addressing spectral differences between instruments, and improving the existing calibration reference, which translates into future updates of the GIRO. The availability of extensive Moon observation datasets will help to further improve this reference and is expected to grow with the availability of additional lunar observations from past, current and future missions. All participants agreed on EUMETSAT pursuing its efforts in developing and maintaining the GIRO in collaboration with USGS to ensure traceability to the reference ROLO model.

  19. Ten year's activity in the field of neutron scattering workshop

    'Neutron scattering' is in the frame of the 'Utilization of Research Reactor's of the FNCA (Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia) project, which held the workshops from FY 1992. This report is a summary of the results and activities of neutron scattering workshops and sub-workshops since the start in FY 1992. (author)

  20. 75 FR 16157 - Pharmaceutical Supply Chain; Public Workshop

    2010-03-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pharmaceutical Supply Chain; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public workshop entitled ``2010 PDA/FDA Pharmaceutical Supply Chain...

  1. Proceedings of the OECD/NEA workshop on seismic risk - Summary and conclusions - Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations PWG3 and PWG5

    The objectives of the Workshop were: - To provide a forum to review the recent advances in methodology and application of seismic probabilistic safety assessment and seismic margin analysis of nuclear installations, - To discuss the effective uses of the seismic PSA/margin analysis with consideration of merits and limitations of probabilistic methods, - To review the state of the art methodology to provide guidance for conducting seismic PSA, and - To discuss methodological issues and identify areas in which further research is needed for enhancing the usefulness of seismic PSA. The emphasis of the Workshop was placed on the exchange of ideas on effective ways of using seismic PSA rather than the numerical PSA results for specific plants such as core damage frequencies or seismic hazard. From the presentations and discussions in this workshop, it can be concluded that the seismic PSA/Margin methods have been and are being used world-wide, providing useful information for safety improvement or decision making, and great amount of experience has been accumulated, although the status of programs in member countries vary widely. The objectives of such studies include the following: - To examine whether there are cost effective ways to improve safety from ALARP point of view - To assist in decision making in backfitting by identifying cost effective improvements - To demonstrate the seismic margin of existing or future plants - To examine the vulnerabilities in protection against severe accident - To improve design of future reactors by identifying relatively weak points - To assist in selection of new sites for NPPs. Although numerical results from seismic PSA have not been directly used in seismic design as an alternate or supplement to current deterministic analysis methods, some countries have already adopted the use of probabilistic seismic hazard analysis for determining design basis earthquakes (SSE in USA) and some activities are ongoing to develop methods for

  2. Summary of Session III

    Furman, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    This is a summary of the talks presented in Session III "Simulations of Electron-Cloud Build Up" of the Mini-Workshop on Electron-Cloud Simulations for Proton and Positron Beams ECLOUD-02, held at CERN, 15-18 April 2002.

  3. Workshop on automated beam steering and shaping (ABS). Proceedings

    A workshop on Automated Beam Steering and Shaping (ABS) was held at CERN in December 1998. This was the first workshop dedicated to this subject. The workshop had two major goals: to review the present status of ABS algorithms and systems around the world and to create a worldwide ABS community. These proceedings contain summary reports from all sessions, contributions from several presentations held at the workshop, and a complete set of abstracts for all presentations. (orig.)

  4. Summary of the International Workshop on Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) Roadmapping in the ITER Era; 7–10 September 2011, Princeton, NJ, USA

    With the ITER project now well under way, the countries engaged in fusion research are planning, with renewed intensity, the research and major facilities needed to develop the science and technology for harnessing fusion energy. The Workshop on MFE Roadmapping in the ITER Era was organized to provide a timely forum for an international exchange of technical information and strategic perspectives on how best to tackle the remaining challenges leading to a magnetic fusion DEMO, a nuclear fusion device or devices with a level of physics and technology integration necessary to cover the essential elements of a commercial fusion power plant. Presentations addressed issues under four topics: (1) Perspectives on DEMO and the roadmap to DEMO; (2) Technology; (3) Physics-Technology integration and optimization; and (4) Major facilities on the path to DEMO. Participants identified a set of technical issues of high strategic importance, where the development strategy strongly influences the overall roadmap, and where there are divergent understandings in the world community, namely (1) the assumptions used in fusion design codes, (2) the strategy for fusion materials development, (3) the strategy for blanket development, (4) the strategy for plasma exhaust solution development and (5) the requirements and state of readiness for next-step facility options. It was concluded that there is a need to continue and to focus the international discussion concerning the scientific and technical issues that determine the fusion roadmap, and it was suggested that an international activity be organized under appropriate auspices to foster international cooperation on these issues. (conference report)

  5. Disposal of radioactive waste: the forming of a new approach in Germany. Summary and international perspective. FSC Community Visit and National Workshop, Hitzacker, Hamburg, 5-8 October 2004

    responsibilities and cooperation with emphasis on policy aspects' (Day 3 morning). Each of the sessions started with short plenary presentations by representatives of various stakeholders' interests and focusing on a pre-defined set of questions. Participants were then divided into roundtable discussion groups that examined similar questions. Outcomes of each roundtable discussion were reported in follow-up plenaries. The final two sessions (Day 3 afternoon) included two thematic reports, final feedback from participants and conclusions. Thematic reports addressed the topics 'Long-term robustness of the proposed decision making process' and 'Roles and responsibilities of the various institutional players: clarity and coherence'. This Executive Summary gives an overview of the presentations and discussions that took place at the community visit and the workshop. It is followed by the NEA Secretariat's reflection placing the main lessons of the workshop in a wider perspective

  6. Summary of Survey and Workshop Results on Areas of Research in Human Factors for the Design and Operation of New Nuclear Plant Technology - Final Report

    in Advanced Systems. 4. Management of Unplanned, Unanticipated Events. 5. Human System Interface (HSI) Design Principles for Supporting Operator Cognitive Functions. 6. Complexity Issues in Advanced Systems. 7. Organizational Factors - Safety Culture. 8. Human Factors Engineering (HFE) Methods and Tools. The WGHOF undertook two efforts to respond to recommendations in the TOP. The first was the development and implementation of a survey to identify the level of interest in performing research projects related to the eight research topic areas and to assess the level of interest in collaborating in such research. The second effort was implementation of a workshop to discuss how the use of new human-system technology in the operation of NPPs may affect reliable human performance and plant safety. (authors)

  7. Virtual Workshop

    Buus, Lillian; Bygholm, Ann

    In relation to the Tutor course in the Mediterranean Virtual University (MVU) project, a virtual workshop “Getting experiences with different synchronous communication media, collaboration, and group work” was held with all partner institutions in January 2006. More than 25 key-tutors within MVU...... participated from different institutions in the workshop. The result of the workshop was experiences with different communication tools and media. Facing the difficulties and possibilities in collaborateting virtually concerned around group work and development of a shared presentation. All based on getting...... experiences for the learning design of MVU courses. The workshop intented to give the participants the possibility to draw their own experiences with issues on computer supported collaboration, group work in a virtual environment, synchronous and asynchronous communication media, and different perspectives...

  8. Towards an adaptation action plan : climate change and health in the Toronto-Niagara region : summary for policy makers

    The current science regarding climate change and its potential health effects was assessed in an effort to provide information to decision-makers dealing with health infrastructure in the Toronto-Niagara region. This report also presents an assessment of how the health care system can adapt to handle the increased demand for services resulting from the projected negative human health effects of climate change. The first part of the report presents some background information on climate change and health issues and demonstrates how the current health care infrastructure cannot deal effectively with the full range of health effects that may occur in heavily populated areas such as the Toronto-Niagara region. The second part of the report summarizes the scientific knowledge about the expected impacts of climate change and associated health effects, such as heat stress, extreme weather events, poor air quality, vector-borne diseases, food and water-borne diseases, and increased exposure to ultra-violet radiation. It was noted that children and the elderly are most vulnerable. The final part of the report outlines an adaptation action plan to improve the health care infrastructure through public education and communication, surveillance and monitoring, ecosystem intervention, infrastructure development, technical engineering, and medical intervention. 100 refs., 1 fig

  9. 75 FR 53277 - Notice of Workshop on Polymers for Photovoltaic Systems

    2010-08-31

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Notice of Workshop on Polymers for Photovoltaic Systems.... SUMMARY: The National Institute of Standards and Technology announces a ] Workshop on Polymers for... polymeric materials used in photovoltaic systems; testing, performance, and reliability of polymers...

  10. N Reactor Lessons Learned workshop

    This report describes a workshop designed to introduce participants to a process, or model, for adapting LWR Safety Standards and Analysis Methods for use on rector designs significantly different than LWR. The focus of the workshop is on the ''Lessons Learned'' from the multi-year experience in the operation of N Reactor and the efforts to adapt the safety standards developed for commercial light water reactors to a graphite moderated, water cooled, channel type reactor. It must be recognized that the objective of the workshop is to introduce the participants to the operation of a non-LWR in a LWR regulatory world. The total scope of this topic would take weeks to provide a through overview. The objective of this workshop is to provide an introduction and hopefully establish a means to develop a longer term dialogue for technical exchange. This report provides outline of the workshop, a proposed schedule of the workshop, and a description of the tasks will be required to achieve successful completion of the project

  11. Workshop on the RHIC performance

    Khiari, F.; Milutinovic, J.; Ratti, A.; Rhoades-Brown, M.J. (eds.)

    1988-07-01

    The most recent conceptual design manual for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven was published in May 1986 (BNL 51932). The purpose of this workshop was to review the design specifications in this RHIC reference manual, and to discuss in detail possible improvements in machine performance by addressing four main areas. These areas are beam-beam interactions, stochastic cooling, rf and bunch instabilities. The contents of this proceedings are as follows. Following an overview of the workshop, in which the motivation and goals are discussed in detail, transcripts of the first day talks are given. Many of these transcripts are copies of the original transparencies presented at the meeting. The following four sections contain contributed papers, that resulted from discussions at the workshop within each of the four working groups. In addition, there is a group summary for each of the four working groups at the beginning of each section. Finally, a list of participants is given.

  12. Workshop on the RHIC performance

    The most recent conceptual design manual for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven was published in May 1986 (BNL 51932). The purpose of this workshop was to review the design specifications in this RHIC reference manual, and to discuss in detail possible improvements in machine performance by addressing four main areas. These areas are beam-beam interactions, stochastic cooling, rf and bunch instabilities. The contents of this proceedings are as follows. Following an overview of the workshop, in which the motivation and goals are discussed in detail, transcripts of the first day talks are given. Many of these transcripts are copies of the original transparencies presented at the meeting. The following four sections contain contributed papers, that resulted from discussions at the workshop within each of the four working groups. In addition, there is a group summary for each of the four working groups at the beginning of each section. Finally, a list of participants is given

  13. Alpha-emitters for medical therapy workshop

    Feinendegen, L.E.; McClure, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    A workshop on ``Alpha-Emitters for Medical Therapy`` was held May 30-31, 1996 in Denver Colorado to identify research goals and potential clinical needs for applying alpha-particle emitters and to provide DOE with sufficient information for future planning. The workshop was attended by 36 participants representing radiooncology, nuclear medicine, immunotherapy, radiobiology, molecular biology, biochemistry, radiopharmaceutical chemistry, dosimetry, and physics. This report provides a summary of the key points and recommendations arrived at during the conference.

  14. Alpha-emitters for medical therapy workshop

    A workshop on ''Alpha-Emitters for Medical Therapy'' was held May 30-31, 1996 in Denver Colorado to identify research goals and potential clinical needs for applying alpha-particle emitters and to provide DOE with sufficient information for future planning. The workshop was attended by 36 participants representing radiooncology, nuclear medicine, immunotherapy, radiobiology, molecular biology, biochemistry, radiopharmaceutical chemistry, dosimetry, and physics. This report provides a summary of the key points and recommendations arrived at during the conference

  15. Summary: Spin Physics

    Gehrmann, T.

    1999-01-01

    Comment: LaTeX, 13 pages, Summary talk presented at the Workshop ``Polarized Protons at High Energies - Accelerator Challenges and Physics Opportunities'', DESY Hamburg, 17-20 May, 1999; The complete paper, including figures, is also available via anonymous ftp at ftp://ttpux2.physik.uni-karlsruhe.de/ttp99/ttp99-36/ or via www at http://www-ttp.physik.uni-karlsruhe.de/Preprints/

  16. Blois V: Experimental summary

    The author gives a summary talk of the best experimental data given at the Vth Blois Workshop on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering. He addresses the following eight areas in his talk: total and elastic cross sections; single diffractive excitation; electron-proton scattering; di-jets and rapidity gaps; areas of future study; spins and asymmetries; high-transverse momentum and masses at the Tevatron; and disoriented chiral condensates and cosmic radiation

  17. Summer 1994 Computational Science Workshop. Final report

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report documents the work performed by the University of New Mexico Principal Investigators and Research Assistants while hosting the highly successful Summer 1994 Computational Sciences Workshop in Albuquerque on August 6--11, 1994. Included in this report is a final budget for the workshop, along with a summary of the participants` evaluation of the workshop. The workshop proceeding have been delivered under separate cover. In order to assist in the organization of future workshops, we have also included in this report detailed documentation of the pre- and post-workshop activities associated with this contract. Specifically, we have included a section that documents the advertising performed, along with the manner in which applications were handled. A complete list of the workshop participants in this section. Sample letters that were generated while dealing with various commercial entities and departments at the University are also included in a section dealing with workshop logistics. Finally, we have included a section in this report that deals with suggestions for future workshops.

  18. Algal Biology Toolbox Workshop Summary Report

    None

    2016-08-09

    BETO works to accelerate the development of a sustainable, cost-competitive, advanced biofuel industry that can strengthen U.S. energy security, environmental quality, and economic vitality, through research, development, and demonstration projects in partnership with industry, academia, and national laboratory partners. BETO’s Advanced Algal Systems Program (also called the Algae Program) has a long-term applied research and development (R&D) strategy to increase the yields and lower the costs of algal biofuels. The team works with partners to develop new technologies, to integrate technologies at commercially relevant scales, and to conduct crosscutting analyses to bet- ter understand the potential and challenges of the algal biofuels industry. Research has indicated that this industry is capable of producing billions of gallons of renewable diesel, gasoline, and jet fuels annually. R&D activities are integrated with BETO’s longstanding effort to accelerate the commercialization of lignocellulosic biofuels.

  19. Successful STEM Education: A Workshop Summary

    Beatty, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    What students learn about the science disciplines, technology, engineering, and mathematics during their K-12 schooling shapes their intellectual development, opportunities for future study and work, and choices of career, as well as their capacity to make informed decisions about political and civic issues and about their own lives. Most people…

  20. The lessons learned workshop : comprehensive conservation planning pilot projects

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Summary of the Lessons Learned Workshop, held i on January 22, 2003 in Lakewood, Colorado. Participants included U.S. Fish and Wildlife and U.S. Geological Survey....

  1. Reports of MC and A system design workshop subgroups

    A summary of subgroup reports from the workshop on design of a materials control and accounting system for a low-enrichment fuel fabrication facility is presented. Responses to a MC and A design system questionnaire are also summarized

  2. TFTR/JET INTOR workshop on plasma transport tokamaks

    This report summarizes the proceedings of a Workshop on transport models for prediction and analysis of tokamak plasma confinement. Summaries of papers on theory, predictive modeling, and data analysis are included

  3. Japanese contributions to IAEA INTOR Workshop, phase IIA

    Japanese contributions at INTOR Phase 2A are summarized as a first three chapters of the report, Japanese Contributions to INTOR Workshop, Phase 2A. This report contains Introduction, Summary of the total report and INTOR Concepts. (author)

  4. Workshop on Radio Transients

    Croft, Steve; Gaensler, Bryan

    2012-04-01

    abstract-type="normal">SummaryWe are entering a new era in the study of variable and transient radio sources. This workshop discussed the instruments and the strategies employed to study those sources, how they are identified and classified, how results from different surveys can be compared, and how radio observations tie in with those at other wavelengths. The emphasis was on learning what common ground there is between the plethora of on-going projects, how methods and code can be shared, and how best practices regarding survey strategy could be adopted. The workshop featured the four topics below. Each topic commenced with a fairly brief introductory talk, which then developed into discussion. By way of preparation, participants had been invited to upload and discuss one slide per topic to a wiki ahead of the workshop. 1. Telescopes, instrumentation and survey strategy. New radio facilities and on-going projects (including upgrades) are both studying the variability of the radio sky, and searching for transients. The discussion first centred on the status of those facilities, and on projects with a time-domain focus, both ongoing and planned, before turning to factors driving choices of instrumentation, such as phased array versus single pixel feeds, the field of view, spatial and time resolution, frequency and bandwidth, depth, area, and cadence of the surveys. 2. Detection, pipelines, and classification. The workshop debated (a) the factors that influence decisions to study variability in the (u,v) plane, in images, or in catalogues, (b) whether, and how much, pipeline code could potentially be shared between one project and another, and which software packages are best for different approaches, (c) how data are stored and later accessed, and (d) how transients and variables are defined and classified. 3. Statistics, interpretation, and synthesis. It then discussed how (i) the choice of facility and strategy and (ii) detection and classification schemes

  5. Ten year's activity in the field of neutron scattering workshop

    Hamaguchi, Yoshikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    'Neutron scattering' is in the frame of the 'Utilization of Research Reactor's of the FNCA (Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia) project, which held the workshops from FY 1992. This report is a summary of the results and activities of neutron scattering workshops and sub-workshops since the start in FY 1992. (author)

  6. 75 FR 11873 - Notice of Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop

    2010-03-12

    ... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Notice of Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop AGENCY... Workshop. SUMMARY: The Fuel Cell Technologies Program, under the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and...-cutting stack and balance of plant component technology. Input from workshop participants will be used...

  7. Proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Tritium Effects in Plasma Facing Components

    The 4th International Workshop on Tritium Effects in Plasma Facing Components was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 14-15, 1998. This workshop occurs every two years, and has previously been held in Livermore/California, Nagoya/Japan, and the JRC-Ispra Site in Italy. The purpose of the workshop is to gather researchers involved in the topic of tritium migration, retention, and recycling in materials used to line magnetic fusion reactor walls and provide a forum for presentation and discussions in this area. This document provides an overall summary of the workshop, the workshop agenda, a summary of the presentations, and a list of attendees

  8. Collaborative authoring workshop

    Klemke, Roland; Schmitz, Birgit

    2009-01-01

    Klemke, R., & Schmitz, B. (2009). Collaborative authoring workshop. Workshop presentation at the Joint Technology Enhanced Learning Summerschool (JTELSS 2009). May, 30-June, 6, 2009, Terchova, Slovakia.

  9. TPC Workshop

    The first workshop to focus on time projection chambers was held at TRIUMF (Canada) this summer. Some 75 participants came from groups in Europe and North America using TPCs in a variety of applications in experimental physics. Reports included several general descriptions of existing detectors as well as some proposals for new instruments. A time projection chamber (TPC) is the name given to a class of large volume drift chambers which operate generally with parallel electric and magnetic fields. Applications span energies from a few MeV in double beta decay searches, through intermediate energies in muon decay studies to large high energy arrays planned for LEP at CERN

  10. Workshop experience

    Georgina Holt

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The setting for the workshop was a heady mix of history, multiculturalism and picturesque riverscapes. Within the group there was, as in many food studies, a preponderance of female scientists (or ethnographers, but the group interacted on lively, non-gendered terms - focusing instead on an appreciation of locals food and enthusiasm for research shared by all, and points of theoretical variance within that.The food provided by our hosts was of the very highest eating and local food qualities...

  11. Network workshop

    Bruun, Jesper; Evans, Robert Harry

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the background for, realisation of and author reflections on a network workshop held at ESERA2013. As a new research area in science education, networks offer a unique opportunity to visualise and find patterns and relationships in complicated social or academic network data...... and analysed networks using the commonly used and freely available software Gephi (gephi.org). Reflecting upon why science education researchers might be hesitant to adopt network methodology we identify a key problem for networks in science education research: The cost in resources of learning how to include...

  12. Coordination of Decision Making in Spain. The 'COWAM Spain' Initiative and the Current Project Under Consideration for a National Interim Storage Facility for Spent Fuel and High Level Waste. The Sixth Workshop of the Forum on Stakeholder Confidence. Executive Summary and International Perspective

    speakers introduced the COWAM Spain initiative and expounded its three main themes: (i) democracy and participatory systems for the local level; (ii) the interplay between the national and local level; and (iii) long-term governance. Presentations provided a background to subsequent round table discussions that included both local stakeholders and international delegates. Day 3 afternoon was devoted to the feedback by two thematic rapporteurs. They evaluated the meeting from two distinct perspectives: that of the policy making approach, and of participatory decision making. The present Summary gives an overview of the presentations and discussions that took place at the workshop and the community visit. The structure of the Executive Summary follows the structure of the workshop itself. Complementary to this Executive Summary, and also provided with this document, is the NEA Secretariat's reflection highlighting from an international perspective some of the lessons to b

  13. Optical Network Testbeds Workshop

    Joe Mambretti

    2007-06-01

    This is the summary report of the third annual Optical Networking Testbed Workshop (ONT3), which brought together leading members of the international advanced research community to address major challenges in creating next generation communication services and technologies. Networking research and development (R&D) communities throughout the world continue to discover new methods and technologies that are enabling breakthroughs in advanced communications. These discoveries are keystones for building the foundation of the future economy, which requires the sophisticated management of extremely large qualities of digital information through high performance communications. This innovation is made possible by basic research and experiments within laboratories and on specialized testbeds. Initial network research and development initiatives are driven by diverse motives, including attempts to solve existing complex problems, the desire to create powerful new technologies that do not exist using traditional methods, and the need to create tools to address specific challenges, including those mandated by large scale science or government agency mission agendas. Many new discoveries related to communications technologies transition to wide-spread deployment through standards organizations and commercialization. These transition paths allow for new communications capabilities that drive many sectors of the digital economy. In the last few years, networking R&D has increasingly focused on advancing multiple new capabilities enabled by next generation optical networking. Both US Federal networking R&D and other national R&D initiatives, such as those organized by the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) of Japan are creating optical networking technologies that allow for new, powerful communication services. Among the most promising services are those based on new types of multi-service or hybrid networks, which use new optical networking

  14. Summary Record

    (II-3) - Uncertainty analysis of the steady state benchmark. It should be recognized that the purpose of this benchmark is not only to compare currently available macroscopic approaches but above-all to encourage the development of novel next-generation approaches that focus on more microscopic processes. Thus, the benchmark problem includes both macroscopic and microscopic measurement data. In this context, the sub-channel grade void fraction data are regarded as the macroscopic data and the digitized computer graphic images are the microscopic data. The technical topics to be addressed at the workshop include: - Review of the benchmark activities after the 4. Workshop; - Presentation and discussion of summary of comparisons of final submitted results for Exercise 1 of Phase I (I-1); for Exercise 0 of Phase II (II-0); and for Exercise 1 of Phase II (II-1); - Presentation and discussion of comparison of final submitted results for Exercise 2 of Phase I (I-2); - Presentation and discussion of comparison of final submitted results for Exercise 3 of Phase I (I-3); - Presentation and discussion of comparison of final submitted results for Exercise 2 of Phase II (II-2); - Presentation and discussion of preliminary uncertainty results for Exercise 4 of Phase I (I-4); - Presentation and discussion of preliminary uncertainty results for Exercise 3 of Phase II (II-3); - Preparing a special issue in a journal with participants' BFBT papers; - Defining a work plan and schedule outlining actions to advance the two phases of the benchmark activities

  15. Recent Workshops

    Wickens, F. J.

    Since the previous edition of ATLAS e-news, the NIKHEF Institute in Amsterdam has hosted not just one but two workshops related to ATLAS TDAQ activities. The first in October was dedicated to the Detector Control System (DCS). Just three institutes, CERN, NIKHEF and St Petersburg, provide the effort for the central DCS services, but each ATLAS sub-detector provides effort for their own controls. Some 30 people attended, including representatives for all of the ATLAS sub-detectors, representatives of the institutes working on the central services and the project leader of JCOP, which brings together common aspects of detector controls across the LHC experiments. During the three-day workshop the common components were discussed, and each sub-detector described their experiences and plans for their future systems. Whilst many of the components to be used are standard commercial components, a key custom item for ATLAS is the ELMB (Embedded Local Monitor Board). Prototypes for this have now been extensively test...

  16. Minutes of the third annual workshop on chromate replacements in light metal finishing

    Guilinger, T.R.; Buchheit, R.G.; Kelly, M.J. [and others

    1994-05-01

    Goal of the workshop was to bring together coating researchers, developers, and users from a variety of industries (defense, automotive, aerospace, packaging) to discuss new coating ideas from the perspective not only of end user, but also the coating supplier, developer, and researcher. The following are included in this document: workshop agenda, list of attendees, summary of feedback, workshop notes compiled by organizers, summaries of Sessions II and IV by session moderators, and vugraphs and abstracts.

  17. Regional Workshops on CETA/Educational Linkages.

    McGough, Robert; And Others

    This document presents a summary of the proceedings of five regional workshops in Virginia which focused on planning for future involvement and linkages, as well as giving an orientation to the capabilities and operational philosophies of both Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) programs and educational organizations. Following…

  18. MICCAI Workshops

    Nedjati-Gilani, Gemma; Venkataraman, Archana; O'Donnell, Lauren; Panagiotaki, Eleftheria

    2014-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings from two closely related workshops: Computational Diffusion MRI (CDMRI’13) and Mathematical Methods from Brain Connectivity (MMBC’13), held under the auspices of the 16th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention, which took place in Nagoya, Japan, September 2013. Inside, readers will find contributions ranging from mathematical foundations and novel methods for the validation of inferring large-scale connectivity from neuroimaging data to the statistical analysis of the data, accelerated methods for data acquisition, and the most recent developments on mathematical diffusion modeling. This volume offers a valuable starting point for anyone interested in learning computational diffusion MRI and mathematical methods for brain connectivity as well as offers new perspectives and insights on current research challenges for those currently in the field. It will be of interest to researchers and practitioners in computer science, ...

  19. Crisis Management: Research Summaries

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.; Dorman, Sally; Anderson, Luke; McNair, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This article presents summaries of three studies relevant to school crisis response. The first report, "A Framework for International Crisis Intervention" (Sally Dorman), is a review of how existing crisis intervention models (including the NASP PREPaRE model) have been adapted for international use. The second article, "Responding…

  20. Designing a system to offset for the residual impacts of terrestrial development on ecosystem service provision. Summary report for policy makers of the third 'Towards no net loss, and beyond' workshop, 7th December 2010

    Margerison, C.; Howard, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarises the views and ideas expressed during a workshop to design a system to offset for the residual impacts of terrestrial development on ecosystem service provision. The event involved 33 participants from a wide range of organisations. It was organised by the Natural Capital Initiative; an independent forum for discussion of policy and practice aligned with the ecosystem approach. ‘Biodiversity offsetting’ means the delivery of measurable conservation outcomes to compens...

  1. Addressing scientific knowledge and environmental information challenges for biodiversity offsetting in the UK. Summary report for policy makers on the second 'Towards no net loss, and beyond' workshop, 29 September 2010

    Howard, B.M.; Margerison, C.

    2010-01-01

    This report summarises the views and ideas expressed during a workshop to identify and assess the scientific knowledge and environmental information needed to underpin the possible large-scale implementation of biodiversity offsetting in the UK. The event involved 37 participants from a wide range of organisations. It was organised by the Natural Capital Initiative; an independent forum for discussion of policy and practice aligned with the ecosystem approach. ‘Biodiversity offsetting’ m...

  2. Combined PET/MRI: from Status Quo to Status Go. Summary Report of the Fifth International Workshop on PET/MR Imaging; February 15-19, 2016; Tübingen, Germany.

    Bailey, D L; Pichler, B J; Gückel, B; Barthel, H; Beer, A J; Botnar, R; Gillies, R; Goh, V; Gotthardt, M; Hicks, R J; Lanzenberger, R; la Fougere, C; Lentschig, M; Nekolla, S G; Niederdraenk, T; Nikolaou, K; Nuyts, J; Olego, D; Riklund, K Åhlström; Signore, A; Schäfers, M; Sossi, V; Suminski, M; Veit-Haibach, P; Umutlu, L; Wissmeyer, M; Beyer, T

    2016-10-01

    This article provides a collaborative perspective of the discussions and conclusions from the fifth international workshop of combined positron emission tomorgraphy (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that was held in Tübingen, Germany, from February 15 to 19, 2016. Specifically, we summarise the second part of the workshop made up of invited presentations from active researchers in the field of PET/MRI and associated fields augmented by round table discussions and dialogue boards with specific topics. This year, this included practical advice as to possible approaches to moving PET/MRI into clinical routine, the use of PET/MRI in brain receptor imaging, in assessing cardiovascular diseases, cancer, infection, and inflammatory diseases. To address perceived challenges still remaining to innovatively integrate PET and MRI system technologies, a dedicated round table session brought together key representatives from industry and academia who were engaged with either the conceptualisation or early adoption of hybrid PET/MRI systems. Discussions during the workshop highlighted that emerging unique applications of PET/MRI such as the ability to provide multi-parametric quantitative and visual information which will enable not only overall disease detection but also disease characterisation would eventually be regarded as compelling arguments for the adoption of PET/MR. However, as indicated by previous workshops, evidence in favour of this observation is only growing slowly, mainly due to the ongoing inability to pool data cohorts from independent trials as well as different systems and sites. The participants emphasised that moving from status quo to status go entails the need to adopt standardised imaging procedures and the readiness to act together prospectively across multiple PET/MRI sites and vendors. PMID:27534971

  3. Workshop on radiological aspects of SSC operations

    Toohig, T.E. [ed.

    1987-05-01

    Integral to the design of an accelerator facility is the provision of adequate shielding to contain any radiation arising from operation of the facility. Complementary to the questions of environmental shielding are a number of radiation questions related to operation of the completed facility. One obvious need is the specification of systems for monitoring environmental emissions to ensure consistency between the design criteria and the actual levels during operation. Another question is the effect on the components of the machine of the radiation within the environmental shield. These questions were examined at the workshop. This report is a summary of the materials presented at the workshop.

  4. Workshop on Precision Measurements of alphas

    Bethke, S; Kluth, S; Schieck, J; Stewart, I W; Aoki, S; Beneke, M; Blumlein, J; Brambilla, N; Brodsky, S; Descotes-Genon, S; Erler, J; Forte, S; Gehrmann, T; Golterman, M; Hashimoto, S; Kronfeld, A; Kuhn, J; Lepage, P; Martin, A; Mateu, V; Menke, S; Nomura, Y; Pahl, C; Petriello, F; Pich, A; Rabbertz, K; Salam, G; Schulz, H; Sommer, R; Steinhauser, M; Webber, B; Yuan, CP; Zanderighi, G

    2011-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the "Workshop on Precision Measurements of alphas" held at the Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich, February 9-11, 2011. The workshop explored in depth the determination of alphas(mZ) in the MS-bar scheme from the key categories where high precision measurements are currently being made, including DIS and global PDF fits, tau-decays, electroweak precision observables and Z-decays, event-shapes, and lattice QCD. These proceedings contain a short summary contribution from the speakers, as well as the lists of authors, conveners, participants, and talks.

  5. Workshop introduction

    The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration's Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) has three subprograms that directly reduce the nuclear/radiological threat; Convert (Highly Enriched Uranium), Protect (Facilities), and Remove (Materials). The primary mission of the Off-Site Source Recovery Project (OSRP) falls under the 'Remove' subset. The purpose of this workshop is to provide a venue for joint-technical collaboration between the OSRP and the Nuclear Radiation Safety Service (NRSS). Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace initiative and the Soviet equivalent both promoted the spread of the paradoxical (peaceful and harmful) properties of the atom. The focus of nonproliferation efforts has been rightly dedicated to fissile materials and the threat they pose. Continued emphasis on radioactive materials must also be encouraged. An unquantifiable threat still exists in the prolific quantity of sealed radioactive sources (sources) spread worldwide. It does not appear that the momentum of the evolution in the numerous beneficial applications of radioactive sources will subside in the near future. Numerous expert studies have demonstrated the potentially devastating economic and psychological impacts of terrorist use of a radiological dispersal or emitting device. The development of such a weapon, from the acquisition of the material to the technical knowledge needed to develop and use it, is straightforward. There are many documented accounts worldwide of accidental and purposeful diversions of radioactive materials from regulatory control. The burden of securing sealed sources often falls upon the source owner, who may not have a disposal pathway once the source reaches the end of its useful life. This disposal problem is exacerbated by some source owners not having the resources to safely and compliantly store them. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) data suggests that, in the US alone, there are tens of thousands of high-activity (IAEA

  6. IPHE Infrastructure Workshop Proceedings

    None

    2010-02-01

    This proceedings contains information from the IPHE Infrastructure Workshop, a two-day interactive workshop held on February 25-26, 2010, to explore the market implementation needs for hydrogen fueling station development.

  7. AAAI 2002 Workshops

    Blake, Brian; Haigh, Karen; Hexmoor, Henry; Falcone, Rino; Soh, Leen-Kiat; Baral, Chitta; McIlraith, Sheila; Gmytrasiewicz, Piotr; Parsons, Simon; Malaka, Rainer; Krueger, Antonio; Bouquet, Paolo; Smart, Bill; Kurumantani, Koichi; Pease, Adam

    2002-01-01

    The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) presented the AAAI-02 Workshop Program on Sunday and Monday, 28-29 July 2002 at the Shaw Convention Center in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. The AAAI-02 workshop program included 18 workshops covering a wide range of topics in AI. The workshops were Agent-Based Technologies for B2B Electronic-Commerce; Automation as a Caregiver: The Role of Intelligent Technology in Elder Care; Autonomy, Delegation, and Control: From Interagent...

  8. The Temporary City Workshop

    Moore, Niamh; McCarthy, Linda

    2014-01-01

    The Temporary City Workshop was hosted by Dr Niamh Moore-Cherry on Tuesday 21 October in Nova UCD. The workshop is part of the Greening as Spatial Politics project funded by the IRC New Foundations scheme 2013 and is a collaboration between geographers at University College Dublin and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. The goal of the workshop was to facilitate networking across a diversity of stakeholders and initiate discussion on temporary urban interventions in Dublin. The workshop wa...

  9. Astrobiology Workshop: Leadership in Astrobiology

    DeVincenzi, D. (Editor); Briggs, G.; Cohen, M.; Cuzzi, J.; DesMarais, D.; Harper, L.; Morrison, D.; Pohorille, A.

    1996-01-01

    Astrobiology is defined in the 1996 NASA Strategic Plan as 'The study of the living universe.' At NASA's Ames Research Center, this endeavor encompasses the use of space to understand life's origin, evolution, and destiny in the universe. Life's origin refers to understanding the origin of life in the context of the origin and diversity of planetary systems. Life's evolution refers to understanding how living systems have adapted to Earth's changing environment, to the all-pervasive force of gravity, and how they may adapt to environments beyond Earth. Life's destiny refers to making long-term human presence in space a reality, and laying the foundation for understanding and managing changes in Earth's environment. The first Astrobiology Workshop brought together a diverse group of researchers to discuss the following general questions: Where and how are other habitable worlds formed? How does life originate? How have the Earth and its biosphere influenced each other over time? Can terrestrial life be sustained beyond our planet? How can we expand the human presence to Mars? The objectives of the Workshop included: discussing the scope of astrobiology, strengthening existing efforts for the study of life in the universe, identifying new cross-disciplinary programs with the greatest potential for scientific return, and suggesting steps needed to bring this program to reality. Ames has been assigned the lead role for astrobiology by NASA in recognition of its strong history of leadership in multidisciplinary research in the space, Earth, and life sciences and its pioneering work in studies of the living universe. This initial science workshop was established to lay the foundation for what is to become a national effort in astrobiology, with anticipated participation by the university community, other NASA centers, and other agencies. This workshop (the first meeting of its kind ever held) involved life, Earth, and space scientists in a truly interdisciplinary sharing

  10. HTS Wire Development Workshop: Proceedings

    1994-07-01

    The 1994 High-Temperature Superconducting Wire Development Workshop was held on February 16--17 at the St. Petersburg Hilton and Towers in St. Petersburg, Florida. The meeting was hosted by Florida Power Corporation and sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems. The meeting focused on recent high-temperature superconducting wire development activities in the Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Systems program. The meeting opened with a general discussion on the needs and benefits of superconductivity from a utility perspective, the US global competitiveness position, and an outlook on the overall prospects of wire development. The meeting then focused on four important technology areas: Wire characterization: issues and needs; technology for overcoming barriers: weak links and flux pinning; manufacturing issues for long wire lengths; and physical properties of HTS coils. Following in-depth presentations, working groups were formed in each technology area to discuss the most important current research and development issues. The working groups identified research areas that have the potential for greatly enhancing the wire development effort. These areas are discussed in the summary reports from each of the working groups. This document is a compilation of the workshop proceedings including all general session presentations and summary reports from the working groups.

  11. ICP-MS Workshop

    Carman, April J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Eiden, Gregory C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-11-01

    This is a short document that explains the materials that will be transmitted to LLNL and DNN HQ regarding the ICP-MS Workshop held at PNNL June 17-19th. The goal of the information is to pass on to LLNL information regarding the planning and preparations for the Workshop at PNNL in preparation of the SIMS workshop at LLNL.

  12. The Reading Workshop: Creating Space for Readers.

    Serafini, Frank

    With so many different approaches to teaching reading, how can a teacher make sense of the best paths available? This book, by describing its author/educator's day-to-day schedule and giving an overview of how the workshop operates over time, provides a flexible framework a teacher can adapt and implement to suit his or her needs. And by bringing…

  13. Second IRIMA workshop Industrial Research and Innovation Monitoring and Analysis: Counting (and accounting) R&D and non-R&D intangibles, drivers of firm’s innovation and growth – Summary Report

    HERVAS SORIANO FERNANDO

    2014-01-01

    In this second IRIMA Workshop the aim was to discuss the policy implications of new evidence obtained by the project on the role that R&D and non-R&D intangible assets (e.g. training, design, branding and reputation) have for companies’ innovation and growth in Europe. In particular, it focused on what accounting data at company level can actually reveal on the role of intangibles assets - both at the micro and at the macro level - and on what they miss-reveal or simply are not able to disclo...

  14. Proceedings of the 1997 workshop on the utilization of research reactors

    The 1997 Workshop on the Utilization of Research Reactors, which is the sixth Workshop on the theme of research reactor utilization was held in Bandung, Indonesia from November 6 to 13. This Workshop was executed based on the agreement in the Eighth International conference for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia (ICNCA) held in Tokyo, March 1997. The whole Workshop consists of the preceding Sub-workshop carried out the demonstration experiment of Radioisotope Production, and the Workshop on the theme of three fields (Neutron Scattering, Radioisotope production, Safe Operation and Maintenance of Research Reactor). The total number of participants for the workshop was about 100 people from 8 countries, i.e. China, Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Philippine, Thailand, Vietnam and Japan. It consists of the papers for Sub-workshop, Neutron Scattering, Radioisotope Production, Safe Operation and Maintenance of research reactor, and summary reports. The 53 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  15. Proceedings of the 1997 workshop on the utilization of research reactors

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    The 1997 Workshop on the Utilization of Research Reactors, which is the sixth Workshop on the theme of research reactor utilization was held in Bandung, Indonesia from November 6 to 13. This Workshop was executed based on the agreement in the Eighth International conference for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia (ICNCA) held in Tokyo, March 1997. The whole Workshop consists of the preceding Sub-workshop carried out the demonstration experiment of Radioisotope Production, and the Workshop on the theme of three fields (Neutron Scattering, Radioisotope production, Safe Operation and Maintenance of Research Reactor). The total number of participants for the workshop was about 100 people from 8 countries, i.e. China, Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Philippine, Thailand, Vietnam and Japan. It consists of the papers for Sub-workshop, Neutron Scattering, Radioisotope Production, Safe Operation and Maintenance of research reactor, and summary reports. The 53 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  16. WORKSHOP: Radiofrequency superconductivity

    Full text: With superconducting radiofrequency playing a major role in the push for new machines to break fresh physics frontiers, it has become a tradition for experts and newcomers in this field from all over the world to meet every second year to hear progress reports from laboratories and to discuss common problems and possible solutions. The sixth such workshop was held from 4-8 October under the chairmanship of Ron Sundelin at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) under construction in Newport News, Virginia. With 170 participants from 14 countries including Eastern Europe and China, it reflected the growing interest in the field - looking back to 1984, when CERN was the host laboratory, the second workshop had less than 100 participants. The CEBAF meeting began with laboratory status reports, covering both high beam energy ('high beta') applications with 'spherical' cavities (as with CERN's LEP200), all using niobium as superconductor and working between 352 MHz and 3 GHz, and lower energy (low beta') applications with geometrically more complicated shapes such as quarter or half wave, split ring or spoke resonators, some using electrodeposited lead as superconductor and working around 100 MHz. During these talks it became clear that more and more laboratories have focused on routine problems, such as reliable series production and testing, running cavities with ancillaries in the machines, or building complete prototypes for projects to be approved by critical funding authorities. This contrasts with the heady days just a few years ago when - at least in the high beta community - the main objective was to explore new ideas. State-of-the-art summaries showed how at 1.3 and 3 GHz 25-30 MV/m have been reached by several laboratories using different preparation methods. Newer developments for common problems included r.f. windows, couplers, controls, and especially field emission, public enemy number one for

  17. Report of workshop on energy

    The Working Group on Energy (WG) was organized under International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP). The WG has been considering problems on future energy supply and role of physics to solve the subjects. As one of activities of the WG, a Workshop on Energy was held on May 13, 2004 at Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in Tokyo hosted by IUPAP and co-hosted by JAERI and High Energy Accelerator Research Organization. The objectives of this workshop are to suggest active contributions of pure and applied physics field to the solution of the energy problem and to advance research and development (R and D) of future energy through the discussions about present status, problem and prospect of different energy development in the world and in Japan. This report records the summary of the Workshop and, abstracts and materials of 12 presentations. After the invited presentations about overview of energy problems in the world, in China and in Japan, R and D activities on the following four fields were presented; 'Research and Development of New Energy', 'Research and Development of Fusion', 'Prospect of Accelerator Driven System (ADS)', and 'Hydrogen Production, Storage and Transportation'. At the end of the workshop, possible role of physics for the current and future energy problem was discussed. It was recognized that the energy problem was not as simple as to be solved by one country, and hence the international collaboration became essential. The importance of the coordination with other fields, such as chemistry and material, was also emphasized. (author)

  18. Proceedings of the atmospheric tracers and tracer application workshop

    In addition to presentations by participating members a general discussion was held in order to summarize and outline the goals and objectives of the workshop. A number of new low level background tracers such as heavy methanes, perfluorocarbons, multiply labeled isotopes such as 13C18O2, helium 3, in addition to sample collection techniques and analytical methods for various tracers were discussed. This report is a summary of discussions and papers presented at this workshop

  19. Proceedings of the atmospheric tracers and tracer application workshop

    Barr, S.; Gedayloo, T. (comps.)

    1979-12-01

    In addition to presentations by participating members a general discussion was held in order to summarize and outline the goals and objectives of the workshop. A number of new low level background tracers such as heavy methanes, perfluorocarbons, multiply labeled isotopes such as /sup 13/C/sup 18/O/sub 2/, helium 3, in addition to sample collection techniques and analytical methods for various tracers were discussed. This report is a summary of discussions and papers presented at this workshop.

  20. Design Summary of general layout and workshop layout Tianhong coal preparation plant%天宏选煤厂总平面与车间布置设计总结

    郭丽杰; 于凤芹

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces the design thought of general layout of tianhong coal preparation plant and workshop layout and the design of some details. The production practice indicated that, the coal preparation technology is advanced, high sorting precision, stable product quality, the indicators meet the expected design goal, total plane and workshop layout fully based on actual situation, such asdetails of the design of later period operation consumption contributed.%介绍了天宏选煤厂总平面布置及车间布置时的设计思路以及一些细节设计。生产实践表明,选煤工艺先进,分选精度高,产品质量稳定,各项指标达到预期设计目标,总平面及车间布置充分结合现场的实际情况,细节设计也为后期运营的节能降耗做出了贡献。

  1. The Workshop Program at the Nineteenth National Conference on Artificial Intelligence

    Muslea, Ion; Dignum, Virginia; Corkill, Daniel; Jonker, Catholijn; Dignum, Frank; Coradeschi, Silvia; Saffiotti, Alessandro; Fu, Dan; Orkin, Jeff; Cheetham, William E.; Goebel, Kai; Bonissone, Piero; Soh, Leen-Kiat; Jones, Randolph M.; Wray, Robert E.

    2005-01-01

    AAAI presented the AAAI-04 workshop program on July 25-26, 2004 in San Jose, California. This program included twelve workshops covering a wide range of topics in artificial intelligence. The titles of the workshops were as follows: (1) Adaptive Text Extraction and Mining; (2) Agent Organizations: Theory and Practice; (3) Anchoring Symbols to Sensor Data; (4) Challenges in Game AI; (5) Fielding Applications of Artificial Intelligence; (6) Forming and Maintaining Coalitions in Adaptive Multiag...

  2. HTTR workshop (workshop on hydrogen production technology)

    Various research and development efforts have been performed to solve the global energy and environmental problems caused by large consumption of fossil fuels. Research activities on advanced hydrogen production technology by the use of nuclear heat from high temperature gas cooled reactors, for example, have been flourished in universities, research institutes and companies in many countries. The Department of HTTR Project and the Department of Advanced Nuclear Heat Technology of JAERI held the HTTR Workshop (Workshop on Hydrogen Production Technology) on July 5 and 6, 2004 to grasp the present status of R and D about the technology of HTGR and the nuclear hydrogen production in the world and to discuss about necessity of the nuclear hydrogen production and technical problems for the future development of the technology. More than 110 participants attended the Workshop including foreign participants from USA, France, Korea, Germany, Canada and United Kingdom. In the Workshop, the presentations were made on such topics as R and D programs for nuclear energy and hydrogen production technologies by thermo-chemical or other processes. Also, the possibility of the nuclear hydrogen production in the future society was discussed. The workshop showed that the R and D for the hydrogen production by the thermo-chemical process has been performed in many countries. The workshop affirmed that nuclear hydrogen production could be one of the competitive supplier of hydrogen in the future. The second HTTR Workshop will be held in the autumn next year. (author)

  3. The New England Climate Adaptation Project: Enhancing Local Readiness to Adapt to Climate Change through Role-Play Simulations

    Rumore, D.; Kirshen, P. H.; Susskind, L.

    2014-12-01

    Despite scientific consensus that the climate is changing, local efforts to prepare for and manage climate change risks remain limited. How we can raise concern about climate change risks and enhance local readiness to adapt to climate change's effects? In this presentation, we will share the lessons learned from the New England Climate Adaptation Project (NECAP), a participatory action research project that tested science-based role-play simulations as a tool for educating the public about climate change risks and simulating collective risk management efforts. NECAP was a 2-year effort involving the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Consensus Building Institute, the National Estuarine Research Reserve System, and four coastal New England municipalities. During 2012-2013, the NECAP team produced downscaled climate change projections, a summary risk assessment, and a stakeholder assessment for each partner community. Working with local partners, we used these assessments to create a tailored, science-based role-play simulation for each site. Through a series of workshops in 2013, NECAP engaged between 115-170 diverse stakeholders and members of the public in each partner municipality in playing the simulation and a follow up conversation about local climate change risks and possible adaptation strategies. Data were collected through before-and-after surveys administered to all workshop participants, follow-up interviews with 25 percent of workshop participants, public opinion polls conducted before and after our intervention, and meetings with public officials. This presentation will report our research findings and explain how science-based role-play simulations can be used to help communicate local climate change risks and enhance local readiness to adapt.

  4. First Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Snow and Ice Workshop

    Hall, Dorothy K. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This document is a compilation of summaries of talks presented at a 2-day workshop on Moderate Resolution maging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow and ice products. The objectives of the workshop were to: inform the snow and ce community of potential MODIS products, seek advice from the participants regarding the utility of the products, and letermine the needs for future post-launch MODIS snow and ice products. Four working groups were formed to discuss at-launch snow products, at-launch ice products, post-launch snow and ice products and utility of MODIS snow and ice products, respectively. Each working group presented recommendations at the conclusion of the workshop.

  5. IPCC workshop on sea level rise and ice sheet instabilities. Workshop report

    Stocker, T.; Dahe, Q.; Plattner, G.-K.; Tignor, M.; Allen, S.; Midgley, P.

    2010-10-15

    This Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Workshop, organized by Working Group I (WGI), addressed a topic of key importance for the WGI contribution to the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). Sea level rise is one of the longest-term consequences of continued increase in anthropogenic greenhouse gases and threatens the livelihood of millions of people. While the physical processes that influence sea level changes are well known and established, the uncertainties in the projections of some of the components contributing to sea level rise are still unacceptably high. The largest uncertainty is associated with the response of the large ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica, and their sensitivity to atmospheric and oceanic warming and changes in precipitation. For these reasons, the IPCC Plenary approved the proposal of WGI to hold an IPCC Workshop very early in the AR5 cycle so that the scientific progress since the last IPCC assessment (IPCC AR4, 2007) could be highlighted for a wider audience and areas of emerging results or major remaining questions could be discussed. The experts attending the Workshop covered a wide range of specialties including in situ and remote sensing observations of ice sheet movement and mass balance, reconstructions and direct observations of past and present sea level changes on regional to global scales, changes in ocean properties and circulation, glacier mass balance and dynamics, simulation of ice sheets and short and long-term climate projections. As sea level change is a truly cross-cutting issue, this workshop offered the opportunity to bring together scientists from research communities that normally tend to interact comparatively little. This Workshop Report contains a concise summary of the overall discussions and conclusions of the Workshop as well as summaries of the discussions in the breakout groups. It further includes the extended abstracts of the keynote presentations and poster abstracts presented during

  6. Proceedings of Brookhaven National Laboratory's fusion/synfuel workshop

    The fusion synfuels workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on August 27-29, 1979 examined the current status of candidate synfuel processes and the R and D required to develop the capability for fusion synfuel production. Participants divided into five working groups, covering the following areas: (1) economics and applications; (2) high-temperature electrolysis; (3) thermochemical processes (including hybrid thermo-electrochemical); (4) blanket and materials; and (5) high-efficiency power cycles. Each working group presented a summary of their conclusions and recommendations to all participants during the third day of the Workshop. These summaries are given

  7. Summary of the {eta}-meson sessions

    Chrien, R.E.

    1993-06-01

    This summary describes the contents of the nineteen talks related to research on the {eta} meson and presented at the Workshop of Future Directions. The subjects of this area include threshold {eta} production, {eta}-nuclear spectroscopy, baryon spectroscopy, {eta} decays, facilities, and instrumentation.

  8. Summary of the [eta]-meson sessions

    Chrien, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    This summary describes the contents of the nineteen talks related to research on the [eta] meson and presented at the Workshop of Future Directions. The subjects of this area include threshold [eta] production, [eta]-nuclear spectroscopy, baryon spectroscopy, [eta] decays, facilities, and instrumentation.

  9. 77 FR 38772 - Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; Electronic Dealer Reporting System Workshop

    2012-06-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-BA75 Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; Electronic... Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public workshops. SUMMARY: On June 28,...

  10. Mergeable summaries

    Agarwal, Pankaj K.; Graham, Graham; Huang, Zengfeng;

    2013-01-01

    means that the summaries can be merged in a way akin to other algebraic operators such as sum and max, which is especially useful for computing summaries on massive distributed data. Several data summaries are trivially mergeable by construction, most notably all the sketches that are linear functions...... of the datasets. But some other fundamental ones, like those for heavy hitters and quantiles, are not (known to be) mergeable. In this article, we demonstrate that these summaries are indeed mergeable or can be made mergeable after appropriate modifications. Specifically, we show that for ϵ-approximate heavy...... to geometric summaries such as ϵ-approximations which permit approximate multidimensional range counting queries. While most of the results in this article are theoretical in nature, some of the algorithms are actually very simple and even perform better than the previously best known algorithms, which we...

  11. Proceedings of the Workshop on the Okhotsk Sea and Adjacent Areas [Vladivostok, June 1995

    1996-01-01

    I REPORT OF THE PICES WORKSHOP ON THE OKHOTSK SEA AND ADJACENT AREAS (pdf, 0.1 Mb) 1. Outline of the workshop 2. Summary reports from sessions 3. Recommendations of the workshop 4. Acknowledgments II SCIENTIFIC PAPERS SUBMITTED FROM SESSIONS 1. Physical Oceanography Sessions (pdf, 4 Mb) A. Circulation and water mass structure of the Okhotsk Sea and Northwestern Pacific Valentina D. Budaeva & Vyacheslav G. Makarov Seasonal variability of t...

  12. Commodity Market Development in Europe – Outlook. Proceedings of the November 2010 Workshop

    FELLMANN THOMAS; M'BAREK Robert; GAY Stephan

    2011-01-01

    This report contains a summary and the presentations of the expert workshop 'Commodity Market Development in Europe – Outlook', held in October 2010 in Brussels. The workshop was held in order to present and discuss the preliminary results of the European Commission's outlook on EU agricultural market developments. The workshop gathered high-level policy makers, modelling and market experts and provided a forum to present and discuss recent and projected developments on the EU agricultura...

  13. Commodity Market Development in Europe – Outlook Proceedings of the October 2011 Workshop

    Fellmann, Thomas; Helaine, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    This report contains a summary and the presentations of the expert workshop 'Commodity Market Development in Europe – Outlook', held in October 2011 in Brussels. The workshop was held in order to present and discuss the preliminary results of the European Commission's outlook on EU agricultural market developments. The workshop gathered high-level policy makers, modelling and market experts and provided a forum to present and discuss recent and projected developments on the EU agricultura...

  14. 7th International Workshop on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response

    Brenner, David J.

    2009-07-21

    The extended abstracts that follow present a summary of the Proceedings of the 7th International Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at Columbia University’s Kellogg Center in New York City on March 15–17, 2006. These International Workshops on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response have been held regularly since 1993 (1–5). Since the first workshop, there has been a rapid growth (see Fig. 1) in the number of centers developing microbeams for radiobiological research, and worldwide there are currently about 30 microbeams in operation or under development. Single-cell/single-particle microbeam systems can deliver beams of different ionizing radiations with a spatial resolution of a few micrometers down to a few tenths of a micrometer. Microbeams can be used to addressquestions relating to the effects of low doses of radiation (a single radiation track traversing a cell or group of cells), to probe subcellular targets (e.g. nucleus or cytoplasm), and to address questions regarding the propagation of information about DNA damage (for example, the radiation-induced bystander effect). Much of the recent research using microbeams has been to study low-dose effects and ‘‘non-targeted’’ responses such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. This Workshop provided a forum to assess the current state of microbeam technology and current biological applications and to discuss future directions for development, both technological and biological. Over 100 participants reviewed the current state of microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments in the fields of both physics and biology.

  15. Building Strong Geoscience Departments Through the Visiting Workshop Program

    Ormand, C. J.; Manduca, C. A.; Macdonald, H.; Bralower, T. J.; Clemens-Knott, D.; Doser, D. I.; Feiss, P. G.; Rhodes, D. D.; Richardson, R. M.; Savina, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Building Strong Geoscience Departments project focuses on helping geoscience departments adapt and prosper in a changing and challenging environment. From 2005-2009, the project offered workshop programs on topics such as student recruitment, program assessment, preparing students for the workforce, and strengthening geoscience programs. Participants shared their departments' challenges and successes. Building on best practices and most promising strategies from these workshops and on workshop leaders' experiences, from 2009-2011 the project ran a visiting workshop program, bringing workshops to 18 individual departments. Two major strengths of the visiting workshop format are that it engages the entire department in the program, fostering a sense of shared ownership and vision, and that it focuses on each department's unique situation. Departments applied to have a visiting workshop, and the process was highly competitive. Selected departments chose from a list of topics developed through the prior workshops: curriculum and program design, program elements beyond the curriculum, recruiting students, preparing students for the workforce, and program assessment. Two of our workshop leaders worked with each department to customize and deliver the 1-2 day programs on campus. Each workshop incorporated exercises to facilitate active departmental discussions, presentations incorporating concrete examples drawn from the leaders' experience and from the collective experiences of the geoscience community, and action planning to scaffold implementation. All workshops also incorporated information on building departmental consensus and assessing departmental efforts. The Building Strong Geoscience Departments website complements the workshops with extensive examples from the geoscience community. Of the 201 participants in the visiting workshop program, 140 completed an end of workshop evaluation survey with an overall satisfaction rating of 8.8 out of a possible 10

  16. Civil Engineering Technology Consultants' Workshop (Atlanta, Georgia, May 17-20, 1967).

    Dobrovolny, Jerry S.

    A consultants' workshop was conducted by the Occupational Education Project of the American Association of Junior Colleges to orient the consultants to recent developments in civil engineering technology and their responsibilities in program development. This document, a summary of workshop presentations and discussions, is intended as a guide to…

  17. 75 FR 33613 - Notice of the Carbon Sequestration-Geothermal Energy-Science Joint Workshop

    2010-06-14

    ... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Notice of the Carbon Sequestration--Geothermal Energy... the Carbon Sequestration--Geothermal Energy--Science Joint Workshop. SUMMARY: The DOE Geothermal....geothermal.energy.gov . DATES: The Carbon Sequestration--Geothermal Energy--Science Joint Workshop will...

  18. 77 FR 6579 - Vendor Outreach Workshop for Small Information Technology (IT) Businesses in the National Capitol...

    2012-02-08

    ... Office of the Secretary Vendor Outreach Workshop for Small Information Technology (IT) Businesses in the.... SUMMARY: The Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization of the Department of the Interior is... States that are interested in doing business with the Department. This outreach workshop will...

  19. Tandem mirror theory workshop

    The workshop was divided into three sections which were constituted according to subject matter: RF Heating, MHD Equilibrium and Stability, and Transport and Microstability. An overview from Livermore's point of view was given at the beginning of each session. Each session was assigned a secretary to take notes. These notes have been used in preparing this report on the workshop. The report includes the activities, conclusions, and recommendations of the workshop

  20. AAAI 2008 Workshop Reports

    Bunescu, Razvan C; Ohio University; Carvalho, Vitor R.; Microsoft Live Labs; Chomicki, Jan; University of Buffalo; Conitzer, Vincent; Duke University; Cox, Michael T.; BBN Technologies; Dignum, Virginia; Utrecht University; Dodds, Zachary; Harvey Mudd College; Dredze, Mark; University of Pennsylvania; Furcy, David; University of Wisconsin Oshkosh; Gabrilovich, Evgeniy; Yahoo! Research; Göker, Mehmet H.; PricewaterhouseCoopers; Guesgen, Hans Werner; Massey University; Hirsh, Haym; Rutgers University; Jannach, Dietmar; Dortmund University of Technology; Junker, Ulrich; ILOG

    2009-01-01

    AAAI was pleased to present the AAAI-08 Workshop Program, to be held Sunday and Monday, July 13–14, in Chicago, Illinois, USA. The program included the following fifteen workshops: Advancements in POMDP Solvers, AI Education Workshop, Coordination, Organization, Institutions and Norms in Agent Systems, Enhanced Messaging, Human Implications of Human-Robot Interaction, Intelligent Techniques for Web Personalization and Recommender Systems, Metareasoning: Thinking about Thinking, Multidisciplin...

  1. Advances in Biomedical Imaging, Bioengineering, and Related Technologies for the Development of Biomarkers of Pancreatic Disease: Summary of a National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Workshop.

    Kelly, Kimberly A; Hollingsworth, Michael A; Brand, Randall E; Liu, Christina H; Singh, Vikesh K; Srivastava, Sudhir; Wasan, Ajay D; Yadav, Dhiraj; Andersen, Dana K

    2015-11-01

    A workshop sponsored by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering focused on research gaps and opportunities in the development of new biomarkers of pancreatic disease. The session was held on July 22, 2015, and structured into 6 sessions: 1) Introduction and Overview; 2) Keynote Address; 3) New Approaches to the Diagnosis of Chronic Pancreatitis; 4) Biomarkers of Pain and Inflammation; 5) New Approaches to the Detection of Pancreatic Cancer; and 6) Shed Exosomes, Shed Cells, and Shed Proteins. Recent advances in the fields of pancreatic imaging, functional markers of pancreatic disease, proteomics, molecular and cellular imaging, and detection of circulating cancer cells and exosomes were reviewed. Knowledge gaps and research needs were highlighted. The development of new methods for the noninvasive determination of pancreatic pathology; the use of cellular markers of pancreatic function, inflammation, pain, and malignancy; and the refinement of methods to identify cells and cellular constituents of pancreatic cancer were discussed. The further refinement of sophisticated technical methods and the need for clinical studies to validate these new approaches in large-scale studies of patients at risk for the development of pancreatic disease were repeatedly emphasized. PMID:26465948

  2. Meteorological Summaries

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multi-year summaries of one or more meteorological elements at a station or in a state. Primarily includes Form 1078, a United States Weather Bureau form designed...

  3. Survey Summary

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Nursing home summary information for the Health and Fire Safety Inspections currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including dates of the three most recent...

  4. A Pleiotropy-Informed Bayesian False Discovery Rate Adapted to a Shared Control Design Finds New Disease Associations From GWAS Summary Statistics

    Liley, James; Wallace, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successful in identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with many traits and diseases. However, at existing sample sizes, these variants explain only part of the estimated heritability. Leverage of GWAS results from related phenotypes may improve detection without the need for larger datasets. The Bayesian conditional false discovery rate (cFDR) constitutes an upper bound on the expected false discovery rate (FDR) across a set of SNPs whose p values for two diseases are both less than two disease-specific thresholds. Calculation of the cFDR requires only summary statistics and have several advantages over traditional GWAS analysis. However, existing methods require distinct control samples between studies. Here, we extend the technique to allow for some or all controls to be shared, increasing applicability. Several different SNP sets can be defined with the same cFDR value, and we show that the expected FDR across the union of these sets may exceed expected FDR in any single set. We describe a procedure to establish an upper bound for the expected FDR among the union of such sets of SNPs. We apply our technique to pairwise analysis of p values from ten autoimmune diseases with variable sharing of controls, enabling discovery of 59 SNP-disease associations which do not reach GWAS significance after genomic control in individual datasets. Most of the SNPs we highlight have previously been confirmed using replication studies or larger GWAS, a useful validation of our technique; we report eight SNP-disease associations across five diseases not previously declared. Our technique extends and strengthens the previous algorithm, and establishes robust limits on the expected FDR. This approach can improve SNP detection in GWAS, and give insight into shared aetiology between phenotypically related conditions. PMID:25658688

  5. Youth Perspectives on Sexual Health Workshops: Informing Future Practice.

    Ashdown, Heather; Jalloh, Chelsea; Wylie, John L

    2015-11-01

    Newcomer and street-involved youth provided their perspective on the design and content of a sexual education workshop. Following the workshop, focus group discussions were held with 80 youth from four youth-serving agencies. Youth expressed increased levels of confidence and empowerment, consistent with recent criticism that a focus on specific behaviors as intervention outcome measures may miss important psychosocial changes in participants. Some youth views on cultural adaptation of workshops were not consistent with current views expressed by some adult educators, highlighting the need to ensure a youth perspective is captured during intervention development. Finally, the dichotomous views that youth expressed regarding workshop activities emphasizes a research gap related to how best to adapt interventions to different cognitive capacities, literacy levels, and learning styles. Information of this kind is relevant in terms of knowledge translation from youth to program planners and educators. PMID:25652195

  6. Workshop of medical physics

    This event was held in San Carlos de Bariloche, Argentine Republic from 14 th. through 18 th. November, 1988. A great part of the physicians in the area of medical physics participated in this workshop. This volume includes the papers presented at this Workshop of Medical Physics

  7. Workshop on SG Harvester

    QingPeng

    1994-01-01

    The Workshop on Stripper-Gatherer Harvester. co-sponsored by CNRRI and IRRI was held at CNRRI's experimental station from Jul 12-14, 1994. At the workshop, head of IRRI's Agricultural Engineering Dept, Dr Quick and his staff member, a consultant of Agricultural Engineering Division ,

  8. Petroleum Revenue Management Workshop

    World Bank

    2004-01-01

    The Oil, Gas, Mining and Chemicals Department, and the World Bank/UNDP Energy Sector Management Assistance Programme (ESMAP) hosted a workshop on Petroleum Revenue Management on October 23-24, 2002 in Washington, D.C. The workshop brought together petroleum industry, civil society, developmental agencies, academics and country representatives to discuss experiences, challenging operational...

  9. Warehouse Sanitation Workshop Handbook.

    Food and Drug Administration (DHHS/PHS), Washington, DC.

    This workshop handbook contains information and reference materials on proper food warehouse sanitation. The materials have been used at Food and Drug Administration (FDA) food warehouse sanitation workshops, and are selected by the FDA for use by food warehouse operators and for training warehouse sanitation employees. The handbook is divided…

  10. Workshops in Mecklenburg

    Nørgaard, Heide Wrobel

    In archeology, it has long been common to align typological groups with workshops and centres of production. Today, research shows that determination of a prehistoric workshop is only possible when an object gives an indication of its crafting process and that information can be matched between...

  11. Workshop on CEBAF at higher energies

    Isgur, N.; Stoler, P. [eds.

    1994-04-01

    Since the current parameters of CEBAF were defined almost a decade ago, there has been a remarkably fruitful evolution of our picture of the behavior of strongly interacting matter that apparently could be addressed by CEBAF at higher energies. Favorable technical developments coupled with foresight in initial laboratory planning have now made it feasible to consider approximately doubling CEBAF`s current design energy of 4 GeV to approach 10 GeV at rather modest cost. The purpose of the workshop, sponsored by the CEBAF User Group, was to begin to develop the next phase of CEBAF`s program by giving the entire community the opportunity to participate in defining the future of our field, and in particular the physics accessible with an upgraded CEBAF energy. It is intended that this report mark the first step toward an ultimate goal of defining a physics program that will form the basis for an upgrade of CEBAF. The report begins with a brief overview of the workshop`s conclusions. Its body consists of sections corresponding to the workshop`s Working Groups on Hadron Spectroscopy and Production, High Q{sup 2} Form Factors and Exclusive Reactions, Inclusive and Semi-Inclusive Processes, and Hadrons in the Nuclear Medium. Each section begins with the working group summaries and is followed by associated plenary talks summarizing the outstanding physics issues addressable by an upgrade, which are in turn followed by individual contributions presenting specific physics programs. An appendix describes capabilities of CEBAF`s current experimental equipment at higher energies; another appendix lists workshop participants. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  12. Above and beyond state-of-the-art approaches to investigate sequence data: summary of methods and results from the population-based association group at the Genetic Analysis Workshop 19.

    Lorenzo Bermejo, Justo

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarizes the contributions from the Population-Based Association group at the Genetic Analysis Workshop 19. It provides an overview of the new statistical approaches tried out by group members in order to take best advantage of population-based sequence data.Although contributions were highly heterogeneous regarding the applied quality control criteria and the number of investigated variants, several technical issues were identified, leading to practical recommendations. Preliminary analyses revealed that Hurdle-negative binomial regression is a promising approach to investigate the distribution of allele counts instead of called genotypes from sequence data. Convergence problems, however, limited the use of this approach, creating a technical challenge shared by environment-stratified models used to investigate rare variant-environment interactions, as well as by rare variant haplotype analyses using well-established public software. Estimates of relatedness and population structure strongly depended on the allele frequency of selected variants for inference. Another practical recommendation was that dissenting probability values from standard and small-sample tests of a particular hypothesis may reflect a lack of validity of large-sample approximations. Novel statistical approaches that integrate evolutionary information showed some advantage to detect weak genetic signals, and Bayesian adjustment for confounding was able to efficiently estimate causal genetic effects. Haplotype association methods may constitute a valuable complement of collapsing approaches for sequence data. This paper reports on the experience of members of the Population-Based Association group with several novel, promising approaches to preprocessing and analyzing sequence data, and to following up identified association signals. PMID:26866664

  13. Adaptation to Climate Variability and Change. Methodological Issues

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) convened a Workshop on Adaptation to Climate Variability and Change in Costa Rica in 1998 that involved more than 200 expects and incorporated views from many research communities. This paper summarizes the recommendations from the Workshop and profiles the contributions to the advancement of methodologies for adaptation science. 25 refs

  14. IPCC workshop on socio-economic scenarios. Workshop report

    Edenhofer, O.; Pichs-Madruga, R.; Sokona, Y. (and others)

    2012-07-01

    The goal of the IPCC Workshop on Socio-Economic Scenarios (WoSES) was to facilitate the development of socioeconomic narratives and pathways by the integrated assessment modelling, impacts, and adaptation communities. Describing these pathways and narratives is a core step to analyzing the interdependent issues of adaptation and mitigation in an integrated manner. The Workshop participants agreed that structured and consistent assessments of possible future impacts, vulnerabilities, adaptation, and mitigation would benefit from using shared qualitative narrative and quantitative descriptions of potential socioeconomic and ecosystem reference conditions that underlie challenges to mitigation and adaptation. These descriptions should be flexible enough to provide a framework for comparison within which regional or local studies of adaptation and vulnerability could build their own narratives. The defining socioeconomic conditions of these scenarios are designated Shared Socioeconomic reference Pathways (SSPs). The SSPs define the state of human and natural societies at a macro scale and have two elements: a narrative storyline and a set of quantified measures that define the high-level state of society as it evolves over the 21st century under the assumption of no significant climate change. This assumption defines the SSPs as a baseline independent of climate change projections. The set of SSPs was chosen to characterize the range of uncertainty in mitigation efforts required to achieve particular radiative forcing pathways, in adaptation efforts that could be undertaken to prepare for and respond to the climate change associated with those pathways, and in residual impacts. This will allow assessment of scenarios along two axes: socioeconomic challenges to mitigation, and socioeconomic challenges to adaptation. This conceptualization of SSPs allows them to be combined with different degrees of anthropogenic interference with the climate system (measured in terms of

  15. Proceedings of the workshop on crystalline ion beams

    The workshop consisted of mainly invited and some contributed papers. More informal discussions took place in three working groups on the following topics: beam cooling techniques; diagnostics of crystalline beams; storage rings for crystalline beams. The present volume collects all papers as well as the summaries of the working groups. See hints under the relevant topics. (orig./HSI)

  16. Proceedings of the tau-charm factory workshop

    This report contains papers on the following main topics: machine physics; tau physics; D and Ds physics; J/Ψ and charmonium physics; tau charm factories; workshop summary; accelerator physics; tau physics; charmed meson physics; J/Ψ and charmonium physics; and detector

  17. Proceedings of the biomagnetic effects workshop. [Lead abstract

    Tenforde, T.S. (ed.)

    1978-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for six of the eight chapters contained in these proceedings. The other two chapters contain introductory material (Chapter 1) dealing with the rationale for the work shop, and a summary (Chapter 8) of the major objectives that were accomplished at the workshop relative to the current status of awareness in the field of biomagnetic effects. (ERB)

  18. Proceedings of the 1982 summer workshop on proton decay experiments

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 18 of the 21 papers presented. Three papers were previously included in the data base. Also included in the proceedings are a workshop summary, working group reports, and a report of the Technical assessment Panel on Proton Decay

  19. 76 FR 60505 - Food Defense Workshop; Public Workshop

    2011-09-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food Defense Workshop; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Office of... M. Kerr Food & Agricultural Products Center (FAPC), is announcing a public workshop entitled...

  20. Adaptive harvest management for the Svalbard population of pink‐footed geese: 2016 progress summary: Technical Report from DCE – Danish Centre for Environment and Energy, No. 86

    Johnson, Fred A.; Madsen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    This document describes progress to date on the development of an adaptive harvest management strategy for maintaining the Svalbard population of pink‐footed geese (Anser brachyrhynchus) near their agreed target level (60,000) by providing for sustainable harvests in Norway and Denmark. This report provides an assessment of the most recent monitoring information (1991-2015) and its implications for the harvest management strategy. By combining varying hypotheses about survival and reproduction, a suite of nine models have been developed that represent a wide range of possibilities concerning the extent to which demographic rates are density dependent or independent. These results suggest that the pink‐footed goose population may have recently experienced a release from density‐dependent mechanisms, corresponding to the period of most rapid growth in population size. Beginning with the 2016 hunting season, harvest quotas will be prescribed on an annual basis rather than every three years because of the potential to better meet population management objectives. Based on updated model weights, the recent observations of population size (74,800), the proportion of the population comprised of one-year-old birds (0.138), and temperature days in Svalbard (20), the optimal harvest quota for the 2016 hunting season is 25,000. The large increase in quota compared to that during first three years of AHM reflects stakeholders’ desire to reduce population size to the goal of 60,000, recognizing that population size remains relatively high and above-average production is expected in 2016 due to a warm spring.

  1. Report on the PCaPAC 2000 Workshop

    Bacher, R

    2001-01-01

    In October 2000, the third PCaPAC (PCs and Particle Accelerator Controls) workshop took place at DESY. This paper presents a summary of the workshop. The workshop reviewed existing and new PC-based accelerator control systems, from small-scale to large-scale installations. It demonstrated convincingly the advantage of modern, commercial mass-market products used for accelerator controls. Disadvantages of these technologies were reported as well. Large-scale PC systems inherently bring administrative concerns into the picture. In this vein, special emphasis was given to system administration for distributed systems. A major topic of the workshop was the integration of different control system approaches as well as the integration of different platforms within the same control system. In particular, PC-based concepts offer the simple opportunity to interface to commercial SCADA systems. In addition, large emphasis was given to the presentation of future developments including the next network trends to data exc...

  2. Proceedings of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop

    Dykes, K.

    2014-12-01

    The second National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop was held in Broomfield, Colorado, from January 29 to February 1, 2013. The event included a day-and-a-half workshop exploring a wide variety of topics related to system modeling and design of wind turbines and plants. Following the workshop, 2 days of tutorials were held at NREL, showcasing software developed at Sandia National Laboratories, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Glenn Laboratories, and NREL. This document provides a brief summary of the various workshop activities and includes a review of the content and evaluation results from attendees.

  3. Nuclear Innovation Workshops Report

    Jackson, John Howard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Allen, Todd Randall [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hildebrandt, Philip Clay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Baker, Suzanne Hobbs [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Innovation Workshops were held at six locations across the United States on March 3-5, 2015. The data collected during these workshops has been analyzed and sorted to bring out consistent themes toward enhancing innovation in nuclear energy. These themes include development of a test bed and demonstration platform, improved regulatory processes, improved communications, and increased public-private partnerships. This report contains a discussion of the workshops and resulting themes. Actionable steps are suggested at the end of the report. This revision has a small amount of the data in Appendix C removed in order to avoid potential confusion.

  4. Nuclear Innovation Workshops Report

    The Nuclear Innovation Workshops were held at six locations across the United States on March 3-5, 2015. The data collected during these workshops has been analyzed and sorted to bring out consistent themes toward enhancing innovation in nuclear energy. These themes include development of a test bed and demonstration platform, improved regulatory processes, improved communications, and increased public-private partnerships. This report contains a discussion of the workshops and resulting themes. Actionable steps are suggested at the end of the report. This revision has a small amount of the data in Appendix C removed in order to avoid potential confusion.

  5. Workshop on Lie Algebras

    Osborn, J

    1989-01-01

    During the academic year 1987-1988 the University of Wisconsin in Madison hosted a Special Year of Lie Algebras. A Workshop on Lie Algebras, of which these are the proceedings, inaugurated the special year. The principal focus of the year and of the workshop was the long-standing problem of classifying the simple finite-dimensional Lie algebras over algebraically closed field of prime characteristic. However, other lectures at the workshop dealt with the related areas of algebraic groups, representation theory, and Kac-Moody Lie algebras. Fourteen papers were presented and nine of these (eight research articles and one expository article) make up this volume.

  6. 1993 CAT workshop on beamline optical designs

    An Advanced Photon Source (APS) Collaborative Access Team (CAT) Workshop on Beamline Optical Designs was held at Argonne National Laboratory on July 26--27, 1993. The goal of this workshop was to bring together experts from various synchrotron sources to provide status reports on crystal, reflecting, and polarizing optics as a baseline for discussions of issues facing optical designers for CAT beamlines at the APS. Speakers from the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), the University of Chicago, the National Synchrotron Light Source, and the University of Manchester (England) described single- and double-crystal monochromators, mirrors, glass capillaries, and polarizing optics. Following these presentations, the 90 participants divided into three working groups: Crystal Optics Design, Reflecting Optics, and Optics for Polarization Studies. This volume contains copies of the presentation materials from all speakers, summaries of the three working groups, and a ''catalog'' of various monochromator designs

  7. 1993 CAT workshop on beamline optical designs

    1993-11-01

    An Advanced Photon Source (APS) Collaborative Access Team (CAT) Workshop on Beamline Optical Designs was held at Argonne National Laboratory on July 26--27, 1993. The goal of this workshop was to bring together experts from various synchrotron sources to provide status reports on crystal, reflecting, and polarizing optics as a baseline for discussions of issues facing optical designers for CAT beamlines at the APS. Speakers from the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), the University of Chicago, the National Synchrotron Light Source, and the University of Manchester (England) described single- and double-crystal monochromators, mirrors, glass capillaries, and polarizing optics. Following these presentations, the 90 participants divided into three working groups: Crystal Optics Design, Reflecting Optics, and Optics for Polarization Studies. This volume contains copies of the presentation materials from all speakers, summaries of the three working groups, and a ``catalog`` of various monochromator designs.

  8. Workshop on beam cooling and related topics

    The sessions of the Workshop on Beam Cooling and Related Topics, held in Montreux from 4-8 October 1993, are reported in these Proceedings. This meeting brought together international experts in the field of accelerator beam cooling. Its purpose was to discuss the status of the different cooling techniques currently in use (stochastic, electron, ionization, heavy-ion, and laser) and their actual performances, technological implications, and future prospects. Certain theoretical principles (muon cooling, cyclotron maser cooling) were discussed and are reported on in these Proceedings. Also of interest in this Workshop was the possibility of beam crystallization in accelerators using ultimate cooling. In the first part of these Proceedings, overview talks on the various cooling techniques, their implications, present performance, and future prospects are presented. More detailed reports on all the topics are then given in the form of oral presentations or poster sessions. Finally, the chairmen and/or convenors then present summary talks. (orig.)

  9. Workshop on Preserving High Purity Uranium-233

    Krichinsky, Alan M [ORNL; Giaquinto, Joseph [ORNL; Canaan, R Douglas {Doug} [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    A workshop was held on at the MARC X conference to provide a forum for the scientific community to communicate needs for high-purity 233U and its by-products in order to preserve critical items otherwise slated for downblending and disposal. Currently, only a small portion of the U.S. holdings of separated 233U is being preserved. However, many additional kilograms of 233U (>97% pure) still are destined to be downblended which will permanently destroy their potential value for many other applications. It is not likely that this material will ever be replaced due to a lack of operating production capability. Summaries of information conveyed at the workshop and feedback obtained from the scientific community are presented herein.

  10. Research Summaries

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents summaries of four recent crisis management publications: (1) "Crisis Intervention for Children/Caregivers Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence," summarized by Donna DeVaughn Kreskey; (2) "Predictors of Trauma Reactions Following the 9/11 Terrorist Attacks," summarized by Kelly O'Connor; (3) "Cognitive Coping Styles and PTSD…

  11. Research Summaries

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    In this column, members of the NASP Crisis Management in the Schools Interest Group provide summaries of three studies relevant to school crisis response. The first study investigated the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among rescue workers. The second article explored the Child and Family Traumatic Stress Intervention, which is…

  12. Conference summaries

    This volume contains conference summaries of the international conference on radioactive waste management of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: storage and disposal; hydrogeology and geochemistry; transportation; buffers and backfill; public attitudes; tailings; site investigations and geomechanics; concrete; economics; licensing; matrix materials and container design; durability of fuel; biosphere modelling; radioactive waste processing; and, future options

  13. Research Summaries

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents summaries of three recent crisis management publications: (1) "The Impact of School Violence on School Personnel," summarized by Kimberly de Deaux; (2) "Children Exposed to War/Terrorism," summarized by Jennifer DeFago; and (3) "Suicide Survivors Seeking Mental Health Services," summarized by Kimberly de Deaux. The first…

  14. Report on the Eighteenth International Workshop on Principles of Diagnosis (DX-07)

    Biswas, Gautam; Vanderbilt University; Koutsoukos, Xenofon; Vanderbilt University

    2008-01-01

    The eighteenth annual International Workshop on Principles of Diagnosis was held in Nashville, Tennessee, May 29–31, 2007. Papers presented at the workshop covered a variety of theories, principles, and computational techniques for diagnosis, monitoring, testing, reconfiguration, fault-adaptive control, and repair of complex systems. This year’s workshop emphasized inter-actions and exchange of ideas and experiences between researchers and practitioners whose backgrounds included AI, control ...

  15. GammaWorkshops Proceedings

    Strålberg, Elisabeth; Klemola, Seppo; Nielsen, Sven Poul;

    were invited to the GammaWorkshops. The topics included efficiency transfer, true coincidence summing corrections, self-attenuation corrections, measurement of natural radionuclides (natural decay series), combined measurement uncertainty calculations, and detection limits. These topics covered both...

  16. Special parallel processing workshop

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    This report contains viewgraphs from the Special Parallel Processing Workshop. These viewgraphs deal with topics such as parallel processing performance, message passing, queue structure, and other basic concept detailing with parallel processing.

  17. Printed Spacecraft Workshop Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objectives of this workshop are to engage the engineering community at JPL that is knowledgeable in this technology in guiding/developing/critiquing  its...

  18. Cybernetics and Workshop Design.

    Eckstein, Daniel G.

    1979-01-01

    Cybernetic sessions allow for the investigation of several variables concurrently, resulting in a large volume of input compacted into a concise time frame. Three session questions are reproduced to illustrate the variety of ideas generated relative to workshop design. (Author)

  19. Highly Autonomous Systems Workshop

    Doyle, R.; Rasmussen, R.; Man, G.; Patel, K.

    1998-01-01

    It is our aim by launching a series of workshops on the topic of highly autonomous systems to reach out to the larger community interested in technology development for remotely deployed systems, particularly those for exploration.

  20. Gas busses : workshop; Gassbusseminar

    2008-07-01

    Main themes in the workshop were: Alternative automotive fuels for busses; Gas driven busses - a solution with multiple possibilities; Hydrogen as fuel; Why Rogaland chooses natural gas propellant for busses; experiences from managing gas busses. (AG). 7 presentations

  1. WORKSHOPS: Radiofrequency superconductivity

    In the continual push towards higher energy particle beams, superconducting radiofrequency techniques now play a vital role, highlighted in the fifth workshop on radiofrequency superconductivity, held at DESY from 19 - 24 August 1991

  2. GEOTHERMAL EFFLUENT SAMPLING WORKSHOP

    This report outlines the major recommendations resulting from a workshop to identify gaps in existing geothermal effluent sampling methodologies, define needed research to fill those gaps, and recommend strategies to lead to a standardized sampling methodology.

  3. Transportation Management Workshop: Proceedings

    This report is a compilation of discussions presented at the Transportation Management Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Topics include waste packaging, personnel training, robotics, transportation routing, certification, containers, and waste classification

  4. Transportation Management Workshop: Proceedings

    1993-10-01

    This report is a compilation of discussions presented at the Transportation Management Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Topics include waste packaging, personnel training, robotics, transportation routing, certification, containers, and waste classification.

  5. Complex Flow Workshop Report

    none,

    2012-05-01

    This report documents findings from a workshop on the impacts of complex wind flows in and out of wind turbine environments, the research needs, and the challenges of meteorological and engineering modeling at regional, wind plant, and wind turbine scales.

  6. Workshop I: Gender Studies

    Hennessey, Eden; Kurup, Anitha; Meza-Montes, Lilia; Shastri, Prajval; Ghose, Shohini

    2015-12-01

    Participants in the Gender Studies workshop of the 5th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics discussed the gender question in science practice from a policy perspective, informed by investigations from the social science disciplines. The workshop's three sessions—"Equity and Education: Examining Gender Stigma in Science," "A Comparative Study of Women Scientists and Engineers: Experiences in India and the US," and "Toward Gender Equity Through Policy: Characterizing the Social Impact of Interventions—are summarized, and the resulting recommendations presented.

  7. Stable Research Platform Workshop

    Fisher, F H; Bishop, C B

    1988-01-01

    A workshop on stable oceanographic research platforms was held at the Marine Physical Laboratory June 29-30, 1987. Research needs of several scientific disciplines, including physical oceanography, air-sea interaction, biological oceanography (especially bio-optics), and acoustics were discussed in detail with respect to the advantages of various stable platforms. This workshop was stimulated by recent requests involving the use of FLIP in weather conditions beyond its original capab...

  8. African Otter Workshop

    Jan Reed-Smith; Hughes Akpona; Grace Yoxon

    2016-01-01

    All concerned thought this was an excellent workshop with important progress made towards creating a viable beginning of an African Otter Network. There is a long road ahead but the 2015 African Otter Workshop is a start on developing range country partners, activists and researchers as well as collaborating on issue identification and resolution which will assist in preserving at least some refugia for Africa’s otters. A list of actions was agreed on, including the creation of an African Ott...

  9. Industrial Fuel Flexibility Workshop

    none,

    2006-09-01

    On September 28, 2006, in Washington, DC, ITP and Booz Allen Hamilton conducted a fuel flexibility workshop with attendance from various stakeholder groups. Workshop participants included representatives from the petrochemical, refining, food and beverage, steel and metals, pulp and paper, cement and glass manufacturing industries; as well as representatives from industrial boiler manufacturers, technology providers, energy and waste service providers, the federal government and national laboratories, and developers and financiers.

  10. A Workshop that Works

    Yunes, Nicolas; Key, Joey Shapiro

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of a scientific workshop is to bring together experts in a specific field or related fields to collaborate, to discuss, and to creatively make progress in a particular area. The organizational aspects of such a meeting play a critical role in achieving these goals. We here present suggestions from scientists to scientists that hopefully help in organizing a successful scientific workshop that maximizes collaboration and creativity.

  11. AAAI-07 Workshop Reports

    Anand, Sarabjot Singh; Bahls, Daniel; Burghart, Catherina R.; Burstein, Mark; Chen, Huajun; Collins, John; Dietterich, Tom; Doyle, Jon; Drummond, Chris; Elazmeh, William; Geib, Christopher; Goldsmith, Judy; Guesgen, Hans W.; Hendler, Jim; Jannach, Dietmar

    2007-01-01

    The AAAI-07 workshop program was held Sunday and Monday, July 22-23, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. The program included the following thirteen workshops: (1) Acquiring Planning Knowledge via Demonstration; (2) Configuration; (3) Evaluating Architectures for Intelligence; (4) Evaluation Methods for Machine Learning; (5) Explanation-Aware Computing; (6) Human Implications of Human-Robot Interaction; (7) Intelligent Techniques for Web Personalization; (8) Plan, Activity, and Intent Rec...

  12. Low-level waste workshops. Final report

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 specifies that each state is responsible for the disposal of the low-level waste which is generated within its boundaries. The Act states that such wastes can be most safely and efficiently managed on a regional basis through compacts. It also defines low-level waste as waste which is not classified as high-level radioactive waste, transuranic waste, spent nuclear fuel, or by-product material as defined in the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. The Policy Act also stipulates that regional agreements or compacts shall not be applicable to the transportation, management, or disposal of low-level radioactive waste from atomic energy defense activities or federal research and development activities. It also specifies that agreements or compacts shall take affect on January 1, 1986, upon Congressional approval. In February 1983, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant to the Council of State Governments' Midwestern Office. The grant was to be used to fund workshops for legislation on low-level radioactive waste issues. The purpose of the workshops was to provide discussion specifically on the Midwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste. Legislators from the states which were eligible to join the compact were invited: Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota and Wisconsin. Virginia, Kansas and Nebraska were also eligible but had joined other compacts. Consequently, they weren't invited to the workshops. The Governor's office of West Virginia expressed interest in the compact, and its legislators were invited to attend a workshop. Two workshops were held in March. This report is a summary of the proceedings which details the concerns of the compact and expresses the reasoning behind supporting or not supporting the compact

  13. Proceedings of solar energy storage options. Volume I. An intensive workshop on thermal energy storage for solar heating and cooling

    None

    1979-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 28 papers presented. Panel chairmen's summaries are included; the complete panel reports will be published in Volume II of the Solar Energy Storage Options Workshop proceedings. (WHK)

  14. 2. Workshop 'Isotopes in Nature'. 1

    The workshop was aimed at discussing in detail the following problems: (1) distribution of stable and radioactive isotopes in nature, (2) theoretical and experimental studies of isotopic effects in natural processes, (3) problems of sample preparation and sample measurement in determining the relative abundance of stable isotopes or radioactive isotopes in nature, (4) age estimations of samples from different areas of the geosphere, (5) contributions to the specification of global and regional substance cycles in nature with the aid of isotopic and geochemical studies. 75 summaries are included

  15. Third workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P. (eds.)

    1977-12-15

    The Third Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford University on December 14, 1977, with 104 attendees from six nations. In keeping with the recommendations expressed by the participants at the Second Workshop, the format of the Workshop was retained, with three days of technical sessions devoted to reservoir physics, well and reservoir testing, field development, and mathematical modeling of geothermal reservoirs. The program presented 33 technical papers, summaries of which are included in these Proceedings. Although the format of the Workshop has remained constant, it is clear from a perusal of the Table of Contents that considerable advances have occurred in all phases of geothermal reservoir engineering over the past three years. Greater understanding of reservoir physics and mathematical representations of vapor-dominated and liquid-dominated reservoirs are evident; new techniques for their analysis are being developed, and significant field data from a number of newer reservoirs are analyzed. The objectives of these workshops have been to bring together researchers active in the various physical and mathematical disciplines comprising the field of geothermal reservoir engineering, to give the participants a forum for review of progress and exchange of new ideas in this rapidly developing field, and to summarize the effective state of the art of geothermal reservoir engineering in a form readily useful to the many government and private agencies involved in the development of geothermal energy. To these objectives, the Third Workshop and these Proceedings have been successfully directed. Several important events in this field have occurred since the Second Workshop in December 1976. The first among these was the incorporation of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) into the newly formed Department of Energy (DOE) which continues as the leading Federal agency in geothermal reservoir engineering research. The Third

  16. Identification and summary characterization of materials potentially requiring vitrification: Background information

    This document contains background information for the Workshop in general and the presentation entitled 'Identification and Summary Characterization of Materials Potentially Requiring Vitrification' that was given during the first morning of the workshop. summary characteristics of 9 categories of US materials having some potential to be vitrified are given. This is followed by a 1-2 page elaborations for each of these 9 categories. References to more detailed information are included

  17. Conference summaries

    This volume contains summaries of 28 papers presented at the 27. conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association. These papers discuss the general situation of the Canadian nuclear industry and the CANDU reactor; dialogue with the public; the International Atomic Energy Agency; and economic goals and operating lessons. It also contains summaries of 70 papers presented at the 8. conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society, which discuss plant life extension; safety and the environment; reactor physics; thermalhydraulics; risk assessment; the CANDU spacer location and repositioning project; CANDU operations; safety research after Chernobyl; fuel channels; and nuclear technology developments. The individual papers are also available in INIS-mf--13673 (CNA), and INIS-mf--12909 (CNS). (L.L.)

  18. Conference summaries

    This volume contains conference summaries for the 31. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association and the 12. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: reactor physics; thermalhydraulics; industrial irradiation; computer applications; fuel channel analysis; small reactors; severe accidents; fuel behaviour under accident conditions; reactor components, safety related computer software; nuclear fuel management; fuel behaviour and performance; reactor safety; reactor engineering; nuclear waste management; and, uranium mining and processing

  19. Workshop on scientific applications of coherent x-rays

    This is a report on a workshop held at SLAC on February 12, 1994 to assess the science that would become possible using high peak power, short pulses of coherent radiation from a Free Electron Laser (FEL) operating in the hard x-ray region, at wavelengths down to about 1 angstrom. Sixty-three people participated in the workshop. The appendices to this report give a list of participants, the workshop agenda, and the charge to the workshop. Material describing the performance parameters of several possible sources was made available to the participants along with a graph showing the spectral distribution of the spontaneous as well as the coherent radiation and a note on peak power issues. This material is also included as an appendix to this report. This report consists of an Executive Summary, brief summaries by the speaker for each of the talks that were given, and copies of some of the viewgraphs that were shown. Also included are important points raised in the discussions that followed each talk. In addition, two contributions from scientists who could not attend the workshop are included, plus one contribution received from a participant after the workshop. A serious storm on the East coast made it impossible for three speakers and several intended participants to reach Stanford. The talk by Janos Kirz was presented by Malcolm Howells using viewgraphs sent by FAX. The talks by Keith Nelson and Brian Stephenson were not given. We include summaries by them of the talks they would have given, plus copies of some of their viewgraphs, in this report

  20. Far-field environment working group summary

    Pearcy, E.C. [Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX (United States); Cady, R.E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This article is a summary of the proceedings of a group discussion which took place at the Workshop on the Role of Natural Analogs in Geologic Disposal of High-Level Nuclear Waste in San Antonio, Texas on July 22-25, 1991. The working group concentrated on the subject of the potential impacts of underground disposal of high-level radioactive wastes on the far-field environment.