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Sample records for adams-stokes syndrome

  1. Beals Syndrome

    ... Boards & Staff Annual Report & Financials Contact Us Donate Marfan & Related Disorders What is Marfan Syndrome? What are ... the syndrome. How does Beals syndrome compare with Marfan syndrome? People with Beals syndrome have many of ...

  2. Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Antiphospholipid Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Hughes Syndrome Table of Contents ( ... research is being done? Clinical Trials What is Antiphospholipid Syndrome? Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder caused ...

  3. Joubert Syndrome

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Joubert Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... Organizations Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Joubert Syndrome? Joubert syndrome is a rare brain malformation ...

  4. Marfan Syndrome

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, ... fibrillin. A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, ...

  5. Kindler syndrome

    Kaviarasan P

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Kindler syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder associated with skin fragility. It is characterized by blistering in infancy, photosensitivity and progressive poikiloderma. The syndrome involves the skin and mucous membrane with radiological changes. The genetic defect has been identified on the short arm of chromosome 20. This report describes an 18-year-old patient with classical features like blistering and photosensitivity in childhood and the subsequent development of poikiloderma. The differential diagnosis of Kindler syndrome includes diseases like Bloom syndrome, Cockayne syndrome, dyskeratosis congenita, epidermolysis bullosa, Rothmund-Thomson syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum. Our patient had classical cutaneous features of Kindler syndrome with phimosis as a complication.

  6. Cushing's Syndrome

    ... Cushing's syndrome, also called hypercortisolism , is a rare endocrine disorder caused by chronic exposure of the body's tissues ... removing the tumor while minimizing the chance of endocrine deficiency or long-term ... for Cushing's Syndrome Clinical Trials ...

  7. Turner Syndrome

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  8. Metabolic Syndrome

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These ... doctors agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  9. Asperger syndrome

    Asperger syndrome is often considered a high functioning form of autism. It can lead to difficulty interacting socially, repeat behaviors, and clumsiness. Asperger syndrome is a part of the larger developmental disorder ...

  10. Pseudoaminopterin syndrome.

    Kraoua, Lilia; Capri, Yline; Perrin, Laurence; Benmansour, Abdelmajjid; Verloes, Alain

    2012-09-01

    Pseudoaminopterin syndrome or aminopterin syndrome-like sine aminopterin (ASSA syndrome--OMIM 600325] is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome defined by characteristic dysmorphic features, skeletal defects, limb anomalies, cryptorchidism, and growth retardation. The syndrome owes its name to the fact that patients resemble the children exposed to aminopterin or to methotrexate, two dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors used for chemotherapy, or as an abortificient in early pregnancy. Ten patients have been described with pseudoaminopterin syndrome. Their phenotype is variable, and differs from the phenotype resulting from folic acid deprivation, leading to the notion that the pathogenesis may be more complex than simple vitamin deficiency. We report on an Algerian patient with pseudoaminopterin syndrome, review the previously reported cases and confirm that pseudoaminopterin syndrome does not result from a detectable contiguous gene imbalance as high resolution CGH array was normal in this child. PMID:22811276

  11. Usher Syndrome

    Usher syndrome is an inherited disease that causes serious hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, an eye disorder ... hearing and vision. There are three types of Usher syndrome: People with type I are deaf from ...

  12. Turner Syndrome

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of ...

  13. Proteus Syndrome

    ... Gift Stock Gift Sunshine Society Contact Privacy Policy Proteus Syndrome Definition Common Signs Diagnostic Criteria (I have ... NIH to go with this criteria) Glossary Videos Proteus Syndrome is a condition which involves atypical growth ...

  14. Learning about Marfan Syndrome

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Marfan Syndrome What is Marfan syndrome? What are the ... Syndrome Additional Resources for Marfan Syndrome What is Marfan syndrome? Marfan syndrome is one of the most ...

  15. Alagille syndrome.

    Krantz, I D; Piccoli, D A; Spinner, N B

    1997-01-01

    Alagille syndrome (OMIM 118450) is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with abnormalities of the liver, heart, eye, skeleton, and a characteristic facial appearance. Also referred to as the Alagille-Watson syndrome, syndromic bile duct paucity, and arteriohepatic dysplasia, it is a significant cause of neonatal jaundice and cholestasis in older children. In the fully expressed syndrome, affected subjects have intrahepatic bile duct paucity and cholestasis, in conjunction with cardiac ma...

  16. Cushing Syndrome

    ... links Share this: Page Content What is Cushing’s syndrome? Cushing’s syndrome is a condition that occurs when the body’s ... medication or as a result of a tumor, Cushing’s syndrome can develop. Many factors influence whether this happens, ...

  17. Dumping Syndrome

    ... Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Dumping Syndrome Page Content On this page: What is ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is dumping syndrome? Dumping syndrome occurs when food, especially sugar, ...

  18. Urofacial syndrome

    Kamal F Akl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The urofacial syndrome is characterized by functional obstructive uropathy asso-ciated with an inverted smile. The importance of the subject is that it sheds light, not only on the muscles of facial expression, but also on the inheritance of voiding disorders and lower urinary tract malformations. We report a 10-year-old-male patient who had the urofacial syndrome. Early diagnosis of the urofacial syndrome is important to avoid upper urinary tract damage and renal failure.

  19. Waardenburg syndrome.

    Read, A P; Newton, V E

    1997-01-01

    Auditory-pigmentary syndromes are caused by physical absence of melanocytes from the skin, hair, eyes, or the stria vascularis of the cochlea. Dominantly inherited examples with patchy depigmentation are usually labelled Waardenburg syndrome (WS). Type I WS, characterised by dystopia canthorum, is caused by loss of function mutations in the PAX3 gene. Type III WS (Klein-Waardenburg syndrome, with abnormalities of the arms) is an extreme presentation of type I; some but not all patients are ho...

  20. Sweet Syndrome

    Kasapçopur, Özgür; Sever, Lale; Çalışkan, Salim; Kodakoğlu, Ramazan; Mat, Cem; Kaner, Gültekin; Arısoy, Nil

    1996-01-01

    Sweet syndrome is a vasculitis characterized with fever leucocytosis neutrophilia and dermal neutrophilic infiltration In children Sweet syndrome usually occurs with secondary to infection and in adults to malignancy We report a Sweet syndrome in a five years old girl with respiratory infections otitis dactylitis long lasting fever and cutaneous rash A neutrophilic dermal infiltration is noted in cutaneous biopsy These signs have disappeared with corticosteroid treatment In conclusion Sweet s...

  1. Revesz syndrome

    Dayane Cristine Issaho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Revesz syndrome is a rare variant of dyskeratosis congenita and is characterized by bilateral exudative retinopathy, alterations in the anterior ocular segment, intrauterine growth retardation, fine sparse hair, reticulate skin pigmentation, bone marrow failure, cerebral calcification, cerebellar hypoplasia and psychomotor retardation. Few patients with this syndrome have been reported, and significant clinical variations exist among patients. This report describes the first Brazilian case of Revesz syndrome and its ocular and clinical features.

  2. Metabolic syndrome

    Gogia Atul

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The Metabolic syndrome is a widely prevalent and multi-factorial disorder. The syndrome has been given several names, including- the metabolic syndrome, the insulin resistance syndrome, the plurimetabolic syndrome, and the deadly quartet. With the formulation of NCEP/ATP III guidelines, some uniformity and standardization has occurred in the definition of metabolic syndrome and has been very useful for epidemiological purposes. The mechanisms underlying the metabolic syndrome are not fully known; however resistance to insulin stimulated glucose uptake seems to modify biochemical responses in a way that predisposes to metabolic risk factors. The clinical relevance of the metabolic syndrome is related to its role in the development of cardiovascular disease. Management of the metabolic syndrome involves patient-education and intervention at various levels. Weight reduction is one of the main stays of treatment. In this article we comprehensively discuss this syndrome- the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical relevance and management. The need to do a comprehensive review of this particular syndrome has arisen in view of the ever increasing incidence of this entitiy. Soon, metabolic syndrome will overtake cigarette smoking as the number one risk factor for heart disease among the US population. Hardly any issue of any primary care medical journal can be opened without encountering an article on type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia or hypertension. It is rare to see type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity or hypertension in isolation. Insulin resistance and resulting hyperinsulinemia have been implicated in the development of glucose intolerance (and progression to type 2 diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia, hypertension, polycystic ovary yndrome, hypercoagulability and vascular inflammation, as well as the eventual development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease manifested as myocardial infarction, stroke and myriad end organ diseases. Conversely

  3. Brugada syndrome

    Bockeria O.L.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Brugada syndrome is characterized by sudden death associated with one of several ECG patterns including incomplete right bundle-branch block and ST-segment elevation in the anterior precordial leads. According to the ECG patterns there are three types of Brugada syndrome. Brugada syndrome is genetically determined and has an autosomal dominant pattern of transmission in about 50% of familial cases. Nowadays implantation of cardioverter-defibrillator is the only proven method of sudden cardiac death prevention.

  4. Velocardiofacial syndrome.

    Pike, A. C.; Super, M.

    1997-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome is a syndrome of multiple anomalies that include cleft palate, cardiac defects, learning difficulties, speech disorder and characteristic facial features. It has an estimated incidence of 1 in 5000. The majority of cases have a microdeletion of chromosome 22q11.2. The phenotype of this condition shows considerable variation, not all the principal features are present in each case. Identification of the syndrome can be difficult as many of the anomalies are minor and ...

  5. Sheehan syndrome

    Postpartum hypopituitarism; Postpartum pituitary insufficiency; Hypopituitarism Syndrome ... Malee MP. Pituitary and adrenal disorders in pregnancy. In: Gabbe ... Problem Pregnancies . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ...

  6. What Is Down Syndrome?

    ... NDSS Home » Down Syndrome » What Is Down Syndrome? What Is Down Syndrome? In every cell in the ... chromosome 21 causes the characteristics of Down syndrome. What Causes Down Syndrome? Regardless of the type of ...

  7. Marfan Syndrome (For Teens)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Marfan Syndrome KidsHealth > For Teens > Marfan Syndrome Print A ... a genetic disorder called Marfan syndrome. What Is Marfan Syndrome? Marfan syndrome is named after Antoine Marfan, ...

  8. Down Syndrome: Eye Problems

    ... En Español Read in Chinese What causes Down syndrome? Down syndrome is caused by a duplication of all ... in persons with Down syndrome. How common is Down syndrome? The frequency of Down syndrome is approximately 1 ...

  9. Proteus Syndrome Foundation

    ... Gift Stock Gift Sunshine Society Contact Privacy Policy Proteus Syndrome Foundation The Proteus Syndrome Foundation , a 501c3 ... 1 Trial with ARQ 092 in Proteus Syndrome Proteus Syndrome Patient Registry The Proteus Syndrome Foundation Contact ...

  10. Turner Syndrome

    Ravinder K. Gupta, Ritu Gupta, Sunil Dutt Sharma

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Turner Syndrome is one of the important chromosomal disorders characterised by loss (total or part ofsex chromosome. The manifestations being peripheral edema, short stature, extra skin fold, webbing ofneck, renal and cardiovascular anomalies, sexual infantilism, learning disability etc. We present here aone month female baby who had classical features of Turner Syndrome. The karyotape analysis wasconsistent with the diagnosis.

  11. Turner Syndrome

    Akcan AB.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is an important cause of short stature in girls and primer amenorrhea in young women that is usually caused by loss of part or all of an X chromosome. This topic will review the clinical manifestations, diagnosis and management of Turner syndrome.

  12. Tourette Syndrome.

    Look, Kathy

    Tourette Syndrome has a history of being misdiagnosed or undiagnosed due to its unusual and complex symptoms. This paper describes: the symptoms of Tourette Syndrome; its etiology; age of onset; therapeutic methods, such as drug therapy, psychotherapy, diet control, and hypnosis; educational implications; and employment prospects. Several…

  13. Antiphospholipid syndrome

    Cervera, Ricard; Piette, Jean-Charles; Font, Josep;

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression.......To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression....

  14. Proteus syndrome

    George Renu

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of proteus syndrome in a 20 year old male is repoted. Hemihypertrophy, asymmetric megalodactyly, linear epidermal naevus, naevus flammeus, angiokeratoma, lymphangioma circumscriptum, thickening of the palms and soles, scoliosis and varicose veins were present. There are only few reports of these cases in adults. The syndrome has not been reported from India.

  15. Burnout Syndrome

    Panova, Gordana; Panov, Nenad; Stojanov, H; Sumanov, Gorgi; Panova, Blagica; Stojanovski, Angel; Nikolovska, Lence; Jovevska, Svetlana; Trajanovski, D; Asanova, D

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Increasing work responsibilities, allocation of duties, loss of energy and motivation in everyday activities, emotional exhaustion, lack of time for themselves, insuffi cient time for rest and recreation, dissatisfaction in private life. All these symptoms can be cause of Burnout Syndrome. Aim: To see the importance of this syndrome, the consequences of job dissatisfaction, the environment, family and expression in drastic chan...

  16. Poland syndrome

    Chandra Madhur Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Poland′s syndrome is a rare congenital condition, characterized by the absence of the sternal or breastbone portion of the pectoralis major muscle, which may be associated with the absence of nearby musculoskeletal structures. We hereby report an 8-year-old boy with typical features of Poland syndrome, the first documented case from Uttar Pradesh, India.

  17. Noonan Syndrome

    Sanjeev K. Digra, Deep Aman Singh, Vikram Gupta, Ghanshyam Saini

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a 11 year old boy and his father both Noonan’s. Noonan syndrome occurs in 1 out of 2000live births. Short stature, webbing of neck, pectus carinatum or pectus excavatum, hypertelorismcubitus valgus, epicanthus, downward slanted palpebral fissures, ptosis, microganthia and earabnormalities are the common features of Noonan syndrome.

  18. Bloom's Syndrome

    ... Niemann-Pick Disease, Type A Spinal Muscular Atrophy Tay-Sachs Disease Usher Syndrome, Type 1F and Type III ... Niemann-Pick Disease, Type A Spinal Muscular Atrophy Tay-Sachs Disease Usher Syndrome, Type 1F and Type III ...

  19. Kounis syndrome.

    Ntuli, P M; Makambwa, E

    2015-10-01

    Kounis syndrome is characterised by a group of symptoms that manifest as unstable vasospastic or non-vasospastic angina secondary to a hypersensitivity reaction. It was first described by Kounis and Zavras in 1991 as the concurrence of an allergic response with an anaphylactoid or anaphylactic reaction and coronary artery spasm or even myocardial infarction. Since then, this condition has evolved to include a number of mast cell activation disorders associated with acute coronary syndrome. There are many triggering factors, including reactions to multiple medications, exposure to radiological contrast media, poison ivy, bee stings, shellfish and coronary stents. In addition to coronary arterial involvement, Kounis syndrome comprises other arterial systems with similar physiologies, such as mesenteric and cerebral circulation resulting in ischaemia/infarction of the vital organs. The incidence of this condition is difficult to establish owing to the number of potential instigating factors and its relatively infrequent documentation in the literature.We report the case of an HIV-negative 39-year-old man with no coronary risk factors or family history of premature coronary artery disease, who developed Kounis syndrome after the administration of fluoroquinolone for dysuria. However, to the best of our knowledge,no data on the incidence and prevalence of Kounis syndrome in South Africa have ever been reported in the literature. The recent understanding of Kounis syndrome has led to the condition being classified into three syndrome variants. PMID:26636160

  20. HYDROLETHALUS SYNDROME

    Aradhana

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Hydrolethalus Syndrome (HLS is a rare lethal genetic syndrome, recognized as a consequence of a study on Meckle syndrome in Finland .1 HLS is characterized by multiple developmental defects of fetus which include fetal hydrocephalus, agenesis of corpus callosum, absent midline structures of brain, Cleft lip and cleft palate, defective lobulation of lungs, micrognathia and very characteristic abnormality of polydactyly. About 80% of patients have polydactyly, in hands it is postaxial and preaxial in feet with duplicated big toe. A highly characteristic hallux duplex is seen in almost no other situation .2 Club feet is also common.

  1. Neuroacanthocytosis Syndromes

    Walker Ruth H

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuroacanthocytosis (NA syndromes are a group of genetically defined diseases characterized by the association of red blood cell acanthocytosis and progressive degeneration of the basal ganglia. NA syndromes are exceptionally rare with an estimated prevalence of less than 1 to 5 per 1'000'000 inhabitants for each disorder. The core NA syndromes include autosomal recessive chorea-acanthocytosis and X-linked McLeod syndrome which have a Huntington´s disease-like phenotype consisting of a choreatic movement disorder, psychiatric manifestations and cognitive decline, and additional multi-system features including myopathy and axonal neuropathy. In addition, cardiomyopathy may occur in McLeod syndrome. Acanthocytes are also found in a proportion of patients with autosomal dominant Huntington's disease-like 2, autosomal recessive pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and several inherited disorders of lipoprotein metabolism, namely abetalipoproteinemia (Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome and hypobetalipoproteinemia leading to vitamin E malabsorption. The latter disorders are characterized by a peripheral neuropathy and sensory ataxia due to dorsal column degeneration, but movement disorders and cognitive impairment are not present. NA syndromes are caused by disease-specific genetic mutations. The mechanism by which these mutations cause neurodegeneration is not known. The association of the acanthocytic membrane abnormality with selective degeneration of the basal ganglia, however, suggests a common pathogenetic pathway. Laboratory tests include blood smears to detect acanthocytosis and determination of serum creatine kinase. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging may demonstrate striatal atrophy. Kell and Kx blood group antigens are reduced or absent in McLeod syndrome. Western blot for chorein demonstrates absence of this protein in red blood cells of chorea-acanthocytosis patients. Specific genetic testing is possible in all NA syndromes

  2. Piriformis syndrome

    ... Wallet sciatica; Hip socket neuropathy; Pelvic outlet syndrome; Low back pain - piriformis ... medical help immediately if: You have sudden severe pain in your lower back or legs, along with muscle weakness or numbness ...

  3. Rett syndrome

    An infant with Rett syndrome usually has normal development for the first 6 to 18 months. Symptoms range from ... of social engagement Ongoing, severe constipation and gastroesophageal reflux (GERD ) Poor circulation that can lead to cold ...

  4. Gardner Syndrome

    ... syndromes. For more information, talk with an assisted reproduction specialist at a fertility clinic. How common is ... detected X-ray or computed tomography (CT or CAT) scan of the small bowel if adenomas are ...

  5. Piriformis Syndrome

    ... syndrome occurs when this muscle presses on your sciatic nerve (the nerve that goes from your spinal cord ... cause the piriformis muscle to press against the sciatic nerve, such as sitting, walking up stairs or running. ...

  6. Marfan Syndrome

    ... caved-in look. He also wore glasses for myopia (say: my-OH-pee-uh), or nearsightedness, which ... syndrome, this "glue" is weaker than normal. This causes changes in many systems of the body, but ...

  7. Aase syndrome

    ... a provider who has experience treating anemias. A bone marrow transplant may be necessary if other treatment fails. ... counseling is recommended if you have a family history of this syndrome and wish to become pregnant.

  8. Hunter syndrome

    ... to your health care provider for more information. Bone marrow transplant has been tried for the early-onset form, ... to have children and who have a family history of Hunter syndrome. Prenatal testing is available. Carrier ...

  9. Hurler syndrome

    ... to your health care provider for more information. Bone marrow transplant has been used in several people with this ... Call your provider if: You have a family history of Hurler syndrome and are considering having children ...

  10. [Heptopulmonary syndrome].

    Cuadrado, Antonio; Díaz, Ainhoa; Iruzubieta, Paula; Salcines, José Ramón; Crespo, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome is characterized by the presence of liver disease, pulmonary vascular dilatations, and arterial hypoxemia. It is usually associated with cirrhosis of any origin, but has been described in other liver diseases, both acute and chronic, and not always associated with portal hypertension. The gold standard method to detect pulmonary vascular dilations is contrast enhancement echocardiography with saline and is essential for the diagnosis of hepatopulmonary syndrome. These dilatations reflect changes in the pulmonary microvasculature (vasodilatation, intravascular monocyte accumulation, and angiogenesis) and induce a ventilation/perfusion mismatch, or even true intrapulmonary shunts, which eventually trigger hypoxemia. This syndrome worsens patients' prognosis and impairs their quality of life and may lead to the need for liver transplantation, which is the only effective and definitive treatment. In this article, we review the etiological, pathophysiological, clinical and therapeutic features of this syndrome. PMID:25840463

  11. Turcot Syndrome

    ... procedure done in conjunction with in-vitro fertilization (IVF). It allows people who carry a specific known ... screening? If you are concerned about your family history and think your family may have Turcot syndrome, ...

  12. Levator Syndrome

    ... 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease a Dangerous Combo Are 'Workaholics' Prone to OCD, Anxiety? ALL NEWS > Resources First ... are variations of levator syndrome. The muscle spasm causes pain that typically is not related to defecation. ...

  13. Pendred Syndrome

    ... Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health Search Search form Search A–Z Index Español Menu Home ... children, the thyroid is important for normal growth and development. Children with Pendred syndrome, however, rarely have problems ...

  14. Goodpasture syndrome

    ... glomerulonephritis with pulmonary hemorrhage; Pulmonary renal syndrome; Glomerulonephritis - pulmonary hemorrhage ... when urinating Nausea and vomiting Pale skin Swelling (edema) in any area of the body, especially in the legs

  15. Tourette Syndrome

    ... methylphenidate and clonidine in children with ADHD and tics. Developing New Treatments for Tourette Syndrome: Clinical and Basic Science Dialogue Publicaciones en Español Síndrome de Tourette Prepared ...

  16. Alport Syndrome

    ... syndrome diagnosed? Your healthcare provider will have to watch your signs, symptoms, and look at your family ... 05/2016 - 10:00am Philadelphia, PA Kidney Camp Sun, 07/17/2016 - 6:00pm Ingleside, IL Register ...

  17. Barth Syndrome

    Saric, Ana; Andreau, Karine; Armand, Anne-Sophie;

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme tafazzin, TAZ, cause Barth syndrome (BTHS). Individuals with this X-linked multisystem disorder present cardiomyopathy (CM) (often dilated), skeletal muscle weakness, neutropenia, growth retardation, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Biopsies of the heart...

  18. [DIDMOAD syndrome].

    Alicanoğlu, R; Canbakan, B; Yildiz, N; Arikan, E; Kundur, H; Bahtiyar, K; Sayali, E

    1994-01-01

    The DIDMOAD or so called Wolfram syndrome is a hereditary disease with autosomal-recessive transmission showing 4 main features: diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, nervus opticus atrophia and deafness. Beside this it shows multiple organ involvement. Our 38-year old male patient, showing all above mentioned features except deafness had urinary tract involvement and neurological symptoms. EEG, cerebral MRI, tests with evoked potentials and HLA-typing were performed to discuss the aetiopathogenetic background in our patient. Almost all symptoms of the Wolfram syndrome can be mixed up with complications of diabetes mellitus, which is usually the first symptom of the Wolfram syndrome. Because of this, wrong diagnosis is not rare. Hence in differential diagnosis in any diabetes mellitus type I patient, the possibility of the Wolfram syndrome should be discussed. PMID:8023526

  19. Heyde's syndrome

    Perišić Nenad

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Heyde's syndrome implies an association of calcified aortic stenosis with the high gradient of pressure and angiodysplasic bleeding from the digestive tract. It has been proven that in patients with this syndrome, acquired form of von Willebrand type II A develops. Replacing of aortic valves by artificial ones brings about the spontaneous retreat of coagulation disorder, and the stoppage of the digestive tract bleeding. Case report. We reported two patients with the Heyde's syndrome. In one of the patients the aortic valves were replaced by biologic valves, after which the digestive tract bleeding stopped, while the second patient was treated conservatively due to a high operation risk. Conclusion. Patients with Heyde's syndrome are a complex multidisciplinary problem, thus their adequate treatment requires a team work in order to provide the most rational type of therapy for each patient separately.

  20. Reifenstein syndrome

    ... male sex hormones (androgens). Testosterone is a male sex hormone. This disorder is a type of androgen insufficiency syndrome. ... Donohoue PA. Disorders of sex development. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton ... J, Schor N, Behrman RE, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . ...

  1. HELLP syndrome

    ... out of 1,000 pregnancies. In women with preeclampsia or eclampsia , the condition develops in 10 to ... have high blood pressure and are diagnosed with preeclampsia before they develop HELLP syndrome. In some cases, ...

  2. Kindler syndrome

    Kaviarasan P; Prasad P; Shradda; Viswanathan P

    2005-01-01

    Kindler syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder associated with skin fragility. It is characterized by blistering in infancy, photosensitivity and progressive poikiloderma. The syndrome involves the skin and mucous membrane with radiological changes. The genetic defect has been identified on the short arm of chromosome 20. This report describes an 18-year-old patient with classical features like blistering and photosensitivity in childhood and the subsequent development of poikiloderm...

  3. Turner Syndrome

    Ramachandran Sudarshan; G Sree Vijayabala; KS Prem Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects mostly females. Affected females have characteristic features such as short stature, premature ovarian failure, and several other features. Oral manifestations of this condition are not much discussed in the literature. But reported literature includes teeth, palate, periodontal and salivary changes. So the aim of this review is to illustrate the general manifestations, and especially the oral manifestations of Turner syndrome and evaluate th...

  4. Pendred's syndrome

    This report describes Pendred's syndrome in three siblings of a consanguineous marriage, belonging to Rahimyar Khan. The children presented with deafmutism and goiters. The investigations included scintigram, perchlorate discharge test and audiometery. The perchlorate discharge was positive in index case. Bilateral sensorineural hearing defect was detected on Pure Tone Average (PTA) audiometry. Meticulous clinical and laboratory evaluation is mandatory for the detection of rare disorders like Pendred's syndrome. (author)

  5. Turner Syndrome: Other FAQs

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Turner Syndrome: Other FAQs Skip sharing on social media links ... been diagnosed with Turner syndrome. Now what? Is Turner syndrome inherited? Turner syndrome is usually not inherited, but ...

  6. Learning about Down Syndrome

    ... for the genetic terms used on this page Learning About Down Syndrome What is Down syndrome? What ... Down syndrome? People who have Down syndrome have learning difficulties, mental retardation, a characteristic facial appearance, and ...

  7. Burning Mouth Syndrome

    ... OralHealth > Topics > Burning Mouth Syndrome > Burning Mouth Syndrome Burning Mouth Syndrome Main Content Key Points Symptoms Diagnosis Primary and Secondary BMS Treatment Helpful Tips Key Points Burning mouth syndrome is burning pain in the mouth that may ...

  8. Pfeiffer syndrome

    Fryns Jean-Pierre

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pfeiffer syndrome is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that associates craniosynostosis, broad and deviated thumbs and big toes, and partial syndactyly on hands and feet. Hydrocephaly may be found occasionally, along with severe ocular proptosis, ankylosed elbows, abnormal viscera, and slow development. Based on the severity of the phenotype, Pfeiffer syndrome is divided into three clinical subtypes. Type 1 "classic" Pfeiffer syndrome involves individuals with mild manifestations including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia and finger and toe abnormalities; it is associated with normal intelligence and generally good outcome. Type 2 consists of cloverleaf skull, extreme proptosis, finger and toe abnormalities, elbow ankylosis or synostosis, developmental delay and neurological complications. Type 3 is similar to type 2 but without a cloverleaf skull. Clinical overlap between the three types may occur. Pfeiffer syndrome affects about 1 in 100,000 individuals. The disorder can be caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor genes FGFR-1 or FGFR-2. Pfeiffer syndrome can be diagnosed prenatally by sonography showing craniosynostosis, hypertelorism with proptosis, and broad thumb, or molecularly if it concerns a recurrence and the causative mutation was found. Molecular genetic testing is important to confirm the diagnosis. Management includes multiple-staged surgery of craniosynostosis. Midfacial surgery is performed to reduce the exophthalmos and the midfacial hypoplasia.

  9. Antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Crowther, Mark; Branch, Ware; Khamashta, Munther A

    2010-10-30

    The antiphospholipid syndrome causes venous, arterial, and small-vessel thrombosis; pregnancy loss; and preterm delivery for patients with severe pre-eclampsia or placental insufficiency. Other clinical manifestations are cardiac valvular disease, renal thrombotic microangiopathy, thrombocytopenia, haemolytic anaemia, and cognitive impairment. Antiphospholipid antibodies promote activation of endothelial cells, monocytes, and platelets; and overproduction of tissue factor and thromboxane A2. Complement activation might have a central pathogenetic role. Of the different antiphospholipid antibodies, lupus anticoagulant is the strongest predictor of features related to antiphospholipid syndrome. Therapy of thrombosis is based on long-term oral anticoagulation and patients with arterial events should be treated aggressively. Primary thromboprophylaxis is recommended in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and probably in purely obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome. Obstetric care is based on combined medical-obstetric high-risk management and treatment with aspirin and heparin. Hydroxychloroquine is a potential additional treatment for this syndrome. Possible future therapies for non-pregnant patients with antiphospholipid syndrome are statins, rituximab, and new anticoagulant drugs. PMID:20822807

  10. Serotonin Syndrome

    Harold Muñoz Cortés

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The serotonin syndrome is a clinical condition associated with serotonin agonists, prescribed to treat some psychiatric and non psychiatric diseases like affective, anxiety and pain disorders. Is due to an excessive stimulation of central and peripheral serotonin receptors that leads to mental, autonomic and neuromuscular changes. Usually the disorder resolves within the first 24 hours after the medications are discontinued, however some patients progress to a multiple organ failure and die. This paper is a theoretical review of the fundamental aspects of the serotonin syndrome, beginning with a brief review of the anatomic and physiologic features of serotonin system, to continue to examine the most relevant historic, diagnosis, clinical and treatment aspects of the syndrome.

  11. Postconcussional Syndrome

    Necla Keskin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Postconcussional syndrome is characterized by somatic, cognitive and psychiatric (emotional, behavioral symptoms that occurs after mild traumatic brain injury. It has been known that these symptoms recover fully within 3-6 months almost in 90% of patients. Although its etiology is still controversial, biological, psychological and social factors may account for the development and continuation of the symptoms. Diagnosis is based on the subjective complaints. To find out an objective method for definite diagnosis, trials searching for both neuroimaging and specific serum biomarkers stil continue. The treatment of the syndrome is mainly of palliative nature. Information, education, reassurance and multifaceted rehabilitation programmes can be beneficial. There are promising trials reporting the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy in the treatment of postconcussional syndrome. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(1.000: 96-109

  12. Nutcracker syndrome

    Purpose: The purpose of this case study is to highlight the symptoms of the Nutcracker Syndrome (NCS), the methods of clinical investigations and the importance of differential diagnosis. Introduction: The NCS refers to left renal vein entrapment caused by abnormal branching patterns of the superior mesenteric artery from the aorta.1,2 Clinical case presentation: A 27 years old female presented to the emergency department with complaints of abdominal discomfort, bloating, loose bowel motions and irregular micro-haematuria. The radiologist's report indicated the findings from computed tomography examination to be consistent with anterior NCS. Discussion: In most of the NCS cases the clinical symptoms are non-specific.3 The syndrome is caused by a vascular disorder, but its clinical manifestation can relate to a wide range of abdominal, urological, endovascular or gynaecological pathologies.4 Conclusion: Nutcracker Syndrome is a relatively rare disease and underdiagnosed may lead to left renal vein thrombosis

  13. Refeeding syndrome

    Tripathy Swagata

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a fifty-year-old male who was admitted with a three month history of increasing weakness, prostration, decreasing appetite and inability to swallow. The patient was a chronic alcoholic, unemployed, and of very poor socioeconomic background. The patient was initially investigated for upper GI malignancy, Addisons disease, bulbar palsy and other endocrinopathies. Concurrent management was started for severe electrolyte abnormalities and enteral nutritional supplementation was begun. By the fourth day of feeding patient developed severe hypophosphatemia and other life-threatening features suggesting refeeding syndrome. The patient was managed for the manifestations of refeeding syndrome. A final diagnosis of chronic alcoholic malnutrition with refeeding syndrome was made. Refeeding of previously starving patients may lead to a variety of complications including sudden death.

  14. Eagle's Syndrome

    Pinheiro, Thaís Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is difficult, and it is generally confounded by other manifestations of cervicopharyngeal pain. Objective: To describe a case of Eagle's syndrome. Case Report: A 53-year-old man reported lateral pain in his neck that had been present for 30 years. Computed tomography (CT of the neck showed elongation and ossification of the styloid processes of the temporal bone, which was compatible with Eagle's syndrome. Surgery was performed for bilateral resection of the stylohyoid ligament by using a transoral and endoscopic access route. The patient continued to present pain laterally in the neck, predominantly on his left side. CT was performed again, which showed elongation of the styloid processes. The patient then underwent lateral cervicotomy with resection of the stylohyoid process, which partially resolved his painful condition. Final Comments: Patients with Eagle's syndrome generally have a history of chronic pain. Appropriate knowledge of this disease is necessary for adequate treatment to be provided. The importance of diagnosing this uncommon and often unsuspected disease should be emphasized, given that correct clinical-surgical treatment is frequently delayed. The diagnosis of Eagle's syndrome is clinical and radiographic, and the definitive treatment in cases of difficult-to-control pain is surgical.

  15. Waardenburg syndrome

    Tagra Sunita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome is a rare inherited and genetically heterogenous disorder of neural crest cell development. Four distinct subtypes showing marked interfamilial and intrafamilial variability have been described. We report a girl showing constellation of congenital hearing impairment with 110 dB and 105 dB loss in right and left ear respectively, hypoplastic blue iridis, white forelock, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal root. Other affected relatives of the family, with variable features of the syndrome, have been depicted in the pedigree.

  16. [Eisenmenger syndrome].

    Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Iversen, Kasper; Vejlstrup, Niels G; Hansen, Peter Bo; Søndergaard, Lars

    2009-04-01

    Congenital heart disease with left-to-right shunt can induce proliferation, vasoconstriction and thrombosis in the pulmonary vascular bed. Eventually, the patient may develop Eisenmenger syndrome defined as pulmonary arterial hypertension caused by high pulmonary vascular resistance with right-to-left shunt and cyanosis. Patients with Eisenmenger syndrome suffer a high risk of complications in connection with acute medical conditions, extra-cardiac surgery and pregnancy. This article describes the precautions that should be taken to reduce morbidity and mortality in these patients. PMID:19416617

  17. Rapunzel syndrome

    An 18-year-old single female patient, presented with non specific gastrointestinal symptoms of anorexia, abdominal pain, and change in bowel habit. Clinically she was anemic, cachectic, and depressed. Abdominal examination revealed mobile epigastric mass. The scalp alopecia and endoscopy coupled by computed tomography scan, confirmed the diagnoses of trichobezoar, but it was not diagnosed as Rapunzel syndrome except after laparotomy, gastrotomy, and enterotomy. There are less than 16 cases of Rapunzel syndrome described worldwide, and this is the first case to be described in the middle east. (author)

  18. Joubert syndrome

    Joubert syndrome is a rare malformation of the posterior fossa, mainly affecting the cerebellar vermis, which generally appears as a dysplastic lesion. Other structures of the cervico medullary junction may be involved, with accompanying brainstem hypoplasia according to neuroimaging studies. The diagnosis is usually reached during, childhood, based on a constellation of changes in the child's neurological development that are supported by the results of imaging studied. Respiratory problems are the most common signs in newborns,leading to the suspicion of the presence of this syndrome. (Author) 11 refs

  19. Turner Syndrome

    Ramachandran Sudarshan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects mostly females. Affected females have characteristic features such as short stature, premature ovarian failure, and several other features. Oral manifestations of this condition are not much discussed in the literature. But reported literature includes teeth, palate, periodontal and salivary changes. So the aim of this review is to illustrate the general manifestations, and especially the oral manifestations of Turner syndrome and evaluate their possible management. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(4.000: 246-252

  20. Eisenmengers syndrom

    Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Iversen, Kasper; Vejlstrup, Niels G;

    2009-01-01

    Congenital heart disease with left-to-right shunt can induce proliferation, vasoconstriction and thrombosis in the pulmonary vascular bed. Eventually, the patient may develop Eisenmenger syndrome defined as pulmonary arterial hypertension caused by high pulmonary vascular resistance with right......-to-left shunt and cyanosis. Patients with Eisenmenger syndrome suffer a high risk of complications in connection with acute medical conditions, extra-cardiac surgery and pregnancy. This article describes the precautions that should be taken to reduce morbidity and mortality in these patients. Udgivelsesdato...

  1. Olmsted syndrome

    Kumar Pramod

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Olmsted syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the combination of periorificial, keratotic plaques and bilateral palmoplantar keratoderma. New associated features are being reported. Olmsted syndrome is particularly rare in a female patient, and we report such a case in a six year-old Indian girl, who presented with keratoderma of her soles since birth and on her palms since the age of two years along with perioral and perinasal hyperkeratosis. She had sparse, light brown, thin hair. Although the psychomotor development of the child was normal until 18 months of age, the keratoderma plaques had restricted the child′s mobility after that stage.

  2. Eagle syndrome

    Eagle syndrome occurs due to elongation of the styloid process or calcification of the stylohyoid ligament, which then may produce a pain sensation due the pressure exerted on various structures in the head and neck. When suspected, imaging helps in identifying the abnormally elongated styloid process or the calcified ligament. In recent years, three-dimensional CT (3DCT) has proved to be valuable in these cases. We report the case of a 62-year-old man with this syndrome in whom imaging with 3DCT conclusively established the diagnosis

  3. Lemierre's syndrome.

    O'Dwyer, D N

    2012-02-01

    Lemierre\\'s syndrome is a rare disease that results in an oropharyngeal infection, which precipitates an internal jugular vein thrombosis and metastatic infection. Fusobacterium necrophorum is an anaerobic Gram-negative bacillus and has been identified as the causative agent. We describe the case of a young girl whose presentation and diagnosis were confounded by a history of valvular heart disease. Infection of heart valves can produce many of the signs and symptoms associated with Lemierre\\'s syndrome. We describe the diagnosis, investigation and optimal management of this rare disorder.

  4. Morbihan syndrome

    Stefano Veraldi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of severe Morbihan syndrome (chronic erythematous edema of the upper portion of the face in a 60-year-old man. The syndrome was characterized clinically by erythematous edema involving the forehead, glabella, and both eyelids, because of which the patient was not able to open completely his eyes. Furthermore, erythema and telangiectasiae were visible on the nose and cheeks. Laboratory and instrumental examinations were within normal ranges or negative. Histopathological examination showed dermal edema, perivascular and periadnexal lympho-histiocytic infiltrate, and sebaceous gland hyperplasia. Oral isotretinoin was ineffective despite the relatively long duration of the therapy (26 weeks.

  5. Burnout syndrome

    Bábská, Simona

    2014-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with the so-called burnout syndrome, which, as I believe, is getting to be a serious problem in today´s busy world. This issue deserves a full attention especially from those concerned – workers in assisting professions. What usually precedes the burnout syndrome is a big enthusiasm and motivation for work in which a potential patient can help other people and get them out of their troubles, sometimes he /she feels even like having a mission. However, without kno...

  6. Marfan syndrome masked by Down syndrome?

    J.C. Vis; K. van Engelen; J. Timmermans; B.C. Hamel; B.J.M. Mulder

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality. A simultaneous occurrence with Marfan syndrome is extremely rare. We present a case of a 28-year-old female with Down syndrome and a mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene. The patient showed strikingly few manifestations of Marfan syndrome. Althou

  7. Metabolic Syndrome

    ... If you already have metabolic syndrome, making these healthy lifestyle choices can help reduce your risk of heart disease and other health problems. If lifestyle changes alone can’t control your ... to help. Maintain a healthy weight Your doctor can measure your body mass ...

  8. Nephrotic Syndrome

    ... use of certain legal and illegal drugs, or morbid obesity can lead to nephrotic syndrome. Symptoms Some kids ... KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All ...

  9. Robinow Syndrome

    Gökhan Gökalp

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Robinow syndrome is characterized by dwarfism demonstrating short-limbed extremities, vertebral malsegmentation/malformation (hemivertebra, costal dysplasia, genital hypoplasia, and fetal facial appearance (wide and prominent forehead, hypertelorism, small and wide nose, molar hypoplasia, and retrognathia. It is a rare genetic disease which may present with either mild autosomal dominant form or severe recessive form. Vertebral and costal abnormalities are common diagnostic signs that may be severe. The disease presents with kyphoscoliosis and chest abnormalities along with thoracic vertebral fusion and hemivertebral appearance. Ribs may demonstrate fusion. Based on those involvements, the disease can be categorized as spondylothoracic, spondylocostal, ischiovertebral dysplasia, and cervicofaciothoracic syndrome.Diagnosis is established by the help of clinical characteristics. Radiography might contribute to the diagnosis by revealing changes in the skeletal system. Case Report: A three-year-old male patient presented with operated left undescendent testis and buried penis. On physical examination, he also had a dysmorphic face characterized by macrocephaly, hypertelorism, prominent eyes, a flattened nasal bridge, triangular-fish mouth, gingival hypertrophy and left hand clinodactyly. Radiographic examination documented mesomelic shortening of the radius-ulna, malsegmentation of the thoracal spine and the ribs fusion.Conclusion: Robinow syndrome is a rare syndrome which can be diagnosed by typical facial appearance and radiologic findings. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2010; 8: 44-7

  10. Rett Syndrome.

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.…

  11. Nodding Syndrome

    2013-12-19

    Dr. Scott Dowell, a CDC director, discusses the rare illness, nodding syndrome, in children in Africa.  Created: 12/19/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/27/2014.

  12. Usher Syndrome

    ... of their hearing within the first year of life. Progressive vision loss caused by retinitis pigmentosa becomes occurs in childhood. ... type III have progressive hearing loss and vision loss beginning in the first few decades of life. Unlike the other forms of Usher syndrome, infants ...

  13. [Refeeding syndrome].

    Ševela, Stanislav; Novák, František; Kazda, Antonín; Brodská, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Despite being known more than 60 years, refeeding syndrome (RS) still bears many uncertainties. For example, its definition is not clear and definite, and the attitude to it varies from the complete neglect to over-prevention.The term "refeeding syndrome" refers to electrolyte and metabolic changes occurring in malnourished patients after the readministration of nutrition. These changes concern especially to phosphates and ions. Potassium, magnesium, naturism and fluids balance are involved. The changes lead to cell energetic metabolism and electric potential disturbances, with related clinical symptoms.Fully developed refeeding syndrome is quite rare; nevertheless it can be fatal for the patient. However, even its development can lead to many complications increasing the patient's morbidity and the length of stay in the hospital. Yet the refeeding syndrome is more or less predictable and if kept in mind also preventable.The aim of this article is to get the reader to know more about this metabolic phenomenon and possible attitudes towards it. PMID:27088791

  14. Noonan syndrome.

    Burgt, I. van der

    2007-01-01

    Noonan Syndrome (NS) is characterised by short stature, typical facial dysmorphology and congenital heart defects. The incidence of NS is estimated to be between 1:1000 and 1:2500 live births. The main facial features of NS are hypertelorism with down-slanting palpebral fissures, ptosis and low-set

  15. Metabolic syndrome

    Charles Shaeffer

    2004-01-01

    @@ The emergence of cardiac disease as the number one world-wide cause of death justifies efforts to identify individuals at higher risk for preventive therapy. The metabolic syndrome, originally described by Reaven, 1 has been associated with higher cardiovascular disease risk. 2 Type Ⅱ diabetes is also a frequent sequela. 3

  16. Tourette Syndrome

    ... writing, painting, or making music help focus the mind on other things. There's speculation that the composer Mozart had TS. Find support. The Tourette Syndrome Association sponsors support groups with others who understand the challenges of TS. Take control. People with TS can feel more in control ...

  17. Lemierre's syndrome

    Johannesen, Katrine; Bødtger, Uffe; Heltberg, Ole

    2014-01-01

    a variety of infectious complications. Rapid diagnosis and treatment is necessary to avoid severe complications or death. Close collaboration with local microbiologist is pivotal. Treatment consists of longterm treatment with penicillin and metronidazole. This is a case report of Lemierre's syndrome....

  18. Marfan syndrome masked by Down syndrome?

    Mulder, B. J.; van Engelen, K.; Vis, J.C.; Timmermans, J.; Hamel, B C J

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality. A simultaneous occurrence with Marfan syndrome is extremely rare. We present a case of a 28-year-old female with Down syndrome and a mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene. The patient showed strikingly few manifestations of Marfan syndrome. Although variable expression is known to be present in Marfan syndrome, phenotypic expression of Marfan syndrome in our patient might be masked by the co-occurrence of Down syndrome. (Neth Heart J 2009;1...

  19. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms, or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Recognition of PNS is valuable for several reasons: the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor; they may allow assessment of premalignant states; they may aid in the search metastases; they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy; and, they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformation and oncogene expression. This review will concentrate on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of some of the common PNS encountered in veterinary medicine.

  20. Waardenburg syndrome

    Mehta, Manish; Kavadu, Paresh; Chougule, Sachin

    2004-01-01

    We report a case of Waardenburg syndrome in a female child aged 2yrs. Petrus Johannes Waardenburg(1) , a Dutch Ophthalmologist in 1951 described individuals with retinal pigmentary differences who had varying degrees of hearing loss and dystopia canthorum (i.e., latral displacement of inner canthi of eyes). The disease runs in families with a dominant inheritance pattern with varying degree of clinical presentation. Patient usually present with heterochromic iris, pigmentary abnormalities of ...

  1. Waardenburg syndrome

    Tagra Sunita; Talwar Amrita; Walia Rattan Lal; Sidhu Puneet

    2006-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a rare inherited and genetically heterogenous disorder of neural crest cell development. Four distinct subtypes showing marked interfamilial and intrafamilial variability have been described. We report a girl showing constellation of congenital hearing impairment with 110 dB and 105 dB loss in right and left ear respectively, hypoplastic blue iridis, white forelock, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal root. Other affected relatives of the family, with variable features ...

  2. HABERLAND SYNDROME

    Ratnakumari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Encephalo cranio cutaneous lipomatosis (ECCL is a rare neuro-cutaneous syndrome. It is characterized by unilateral lipomas of the cranium, face, and neck, ipsilateral lipodermoids of the eye, ipsilateral brain anomalies. There are 53 cases mentioned so far in the literature. To our knowledge, only 3 cases were reported from India. We report a case of a baby girl who presented in our institution for neuro-radiological evaluation based on which diagnosis of ECCL was made.

  3. Turner Syndrome

    Akcan AB.

    2007-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a neurogenetic disorder characterized by partial or complete monosomy-X. TS is associated with certain physical and medical features including estrogen deficiency, short stature and increased risk for several diseases with cardiac conditions being among the most serious. Girls with TS are typically treated with growth hormone and estrogen replacement therapies to address short stature and estrogen deficiency. The cognitive-behavioral phenotype associated with TS includ...

  4. Robinow Syndrome

    Gökhan Gökalp; Erdal Eren; Zeynep Yazıcı; Halil Sağlam

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Robinow syndrome is characterized by dwarfism demonstrating short-limbed extremities, vertebral malsegmentation/malformation (hemivertebra), costal dysplasia, genital hypoplasia, and fetal facial appearance (wide and prominent forehead, hypertelorism, small and wide nose, molar hypoplasia, and retrognathia). It is a rare genetic disease which may present with either mild autosomal dominant form or severe recessive form. Vertebral and costal abnormalities are common diagnostic si...

  5. Marfan syndrome.

    Jain, Eesha; Pandey, Ramesh Kumar

    1997-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of the connective tissue, with skeletal, ligamentous, orooculofacial, pulmonary, abdominal, neurological and the most fatal, cardiovascular manifestations. It has no cure but early diagnosis, regular monitoring and preventive lifestyle regimen ensure a good prognosis. However, the diagnosis can be difficult as it is essentially a clinical one, relying on family history, meticulous physical examination and investigation of involved organ sy...

  6. Mermaid syndrome

    Çelik, Yalçın; Turhan, Ali Haydar; Gülaşı, Selvi; Kara, Tuğba; Şenli, Hicran; Atıcı, Aytuğ

    2013-01-01

    Sirenomelia also known as the mermaid syndrome is a very rare congenital anomaly characterized by lower limb fusion and severe urogenital gastrointestinal cardiovasculer central nervous system malformations We report a case of sirenomelia who had a single umblical artery renal agenesis pulmoner hypoplasia esophageal atresia ventricular septal defect anal atresia intestinal atresia and who was lost at fifth hour of life Turk Arch Ped 2013; 48: 65 7

  7. Noonan Syndrome

    Bhambhani, Vikas; Muenke, Maximilian

    2014-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a common genetic disorder that causes multiple congenital abnormalities and a large number of potential health conditions. Most affected individuals have characteristic facial features that evolve with age; a broad, webbed neck; increased bleeding tendency; and a high incidence of congenital heart disease, failure to thrive, short stature, feeding difficulties, sternal deformity, renal malformation, pubertal delay, cryptorchidism, developmental or behavioral problems, visio...

  8. Apert's Syndrome

    Kumar, Gudipaneni Ravi; Jyothsna, Mandapati; Ahmed, Syed Basheer; Sree Lakshmi, Ketham Reddy

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Apert's syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by craniosynostosis, midfacial malforma­tion and symmetrical syndactyly of hands and feet. Craniofacial deformities include cone-shaped calvarium, fat forehead, prop-tosis, hypertelorism and short nose with a bulbous tip. Intraoral findings include high arched palate with pseudocleft, maxillary transverse and sagittal hypoplasia with concomitant dental crowding, skeletal and dental anterior open bite...

  9. Hepatorenal syndrome

    Sharon Turban; Paul J Thuluvath; Mohamed G Atta

    2007-01-01

    Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is a "functional" and reversible form of renal failure that occurs in patients with advanced chronic liver disease. The distinctive hallmark feature of HRS is the intense renal vasoconstriction caused by interactions between systemic and portal hemodynamics. This results in activation of vasoconstrictors and suppression of vasodilators in the renal circulation. Epidemiology, pathophysiology, as well as current and emerging therapies of HRS are discussed in this review.

  10. Brachycephalic Syndrome.

    Dupré, Gilles; Heidenreich, Dorothee

    2016-07-01

    Animals presenting with brachycephalic syndrome suffer from multilevel obstruction of the airways as well as secondary structural collapse. Stenotic nares, aberrant turbinates, nasopharyngeal collapse, soft palate elongation and hyperplasia, laryngeal collapse, and left bronchus collapse are being described as the most common associated anomalies. Rhinoplasty and palatoplasty as well as newer surgical techniques and postoperative care strategies have resulted in significant improvement of the prognosis even in middle-aged dogs. PMID:27012936

  11. Caroli's syndrome

    In 1958 Caroli described the syndrome of congenital, either segmental or involving the entire bile duct system, saccular extensions of the intrahepatic bile ducts. He differentiated between two types of this disease pattern. The first form concerns pure cystic dilatations of the intrahepatic bile ducts, whereas the second one is combined with hepatic fibrosis and portal hypertension. Both types are characterised by cystic dilatations in the kidneys and in the extrahepatic bile ducts, pancreas and spleen. (orig.)

  12. Griscelli syndrome

    Kumar T

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial albinism with immunodeficiency is a rare and fatal immunologic disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution and variable cellular immunodeficiency. It was initially described in 1978. Primary abnormalities included silvery grayish sheen to the hair, large pigment agglomerations in hair shafts and an abundance of mature melanosomes in melanocytes, with reduced pigmentation of adjacent keratinocytes. We describe a child with Griscelli syndrome who presented with hepatitis, pancytopenia and silvery hair. The diagnosis was confirmed by microscopic skin and hair examination.

  13. Asperger syndrome

    Woodbury-Smith, Marc R.; Volkmar, Fred R.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Asperger syndrome (AS) is a chronic neurodevelopmental disorder of social interaction, communication, and a restricted range of behaviors or interests. Although not generally associated with intellectual disability, the severe social disability and, in many cases, associated mental health and other medical problems, result in disability throughout life. The diagnosis is often delayed, sometimes into adulthood, which is unfortunate because there are now a range...

  14. Brugada syndrome

    Rachel Bastiaenen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Brugada syndrome demonstrates characteristic electrocardiogram features and is a significant cause of sudden death in young adults with overtly normal cardiac structure and function. The genetic basis has not yet been fully elucidated but our understanding of the causative mutations and modifiers of arrhythmic events is advancing rapidly alongside sequencing technologies. We expect that the future will include risk stratification according to genotype and management tailored to the genetic diagnosis.

  15. Burnout syndrome

    Kebza, V.; Šolcová, Iva

    Praha: EFPA/UPA, 2007 - (Polišenská, V.; Šolc, M.; Kotrlová, J.). s. 31 ISBN 978-80-7064-017-3. [European Conress of Psychology /10./. 03.07.2007-06.07.2007, Praha] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA406/06/0747 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70250504 Keywords : burnout syndrome * type D personality * physiological indicators Subject RIV: AN - Psychology

  16. CREST Syndrome

    Tuğçe Köksüz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of CREST syndrome (calsinosis cutis, Raynaud’s phenomenon, oesophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia with all of the five major symptoms. A 46-year-old woman was admitted to our clinic with the complaint of erythema, rigidity and pain on the plantar surface of the feet. She had had Raynaud’s phenomenon for 20 years and oesophageal reflux for five years. Her face had become masklike and there was prominent telangiectasies on her face and hands. Sclerosis were confined to the fingers (sclerodactyly. Direct X-ray graphy demonstrated calcinosis cutis on the left hand and suprapatellar region. She was treated with nifedipine 30 mg/day, acetylsalicylic acid 100 mg/day for Raynaud’s phenomenon and famotidine 40 mg/day, metoclopramide HCL 30 mg/day for oesophageal dysmotility. Her complaints were partially relieved after the treatment. This case had all of the five major symptoms of CREST syndrome, and we aimed to emphasize the major symptoms and complications of CREST syndrome. (Turk J Dermatol 2012; 6: 48-50

  17. Noonan syndrome.

    Bhambhani, Vikas; Muenke, Maximilian

    2014-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a common genetic disorder that causes multiple congenital abnormalities and a large number of potential health conditions. Most affected individuals have characteristic facial features that evolve with age; a broad, webbed neck; increased bleeding tendency; and a high incidence of congenital heart disease, failure to thrive, short stature, feeding difficulties, sternal deformity, renal malformation, pubertal delay, cryptorchidism, developmental or behavioral problems, vision problems, hearing loss, and lymphedema. Familial recurrence is consistent with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance, but most cases are due to de novo mutations. Diagnosis can be made on the basis of clinical features, but may be missed in mildly affected patients. Molecular genetic testing can confirm diagnosis in 70% of cases and has important implications for genetic counseling and management. Most patients with Noonan syndrome are intellectually normal as adults, but some may require multidisciplinary evaluation and regular follow-up care. Age-based Noonan syndrome-specific growth charts and treatment guidelines are available. PMID:24444506

  18. Antiphospholipid syndrome

    Pavlović Dragan M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is an autoimmune disease with recurrent thromboses and pregnancy complications (90% are female patients that can be primary and secondary (with concomitant autoimmune disease. Antiphospholipid antibodies are prothrombotic but also act directly with brain tissue. One clinical and one laboratory criterion is necessary for the diagnosis of APS. Positive serological tests have to be confirmed after at least 12 weeks. Clinical picture consists of thromboses in many organs and spontaneous miscarriages, sometimes thrombocytopaenia and haemolytic anaemia, but neurological cases are the most frequent: headaches, stroke, encephalopathy, seizures, visual disturbances, Sneddon syndrome, dementia, vertigo, chorea, balism, transitory global amnesia, psychosis, transversal myelopathy and Guillain-Barre syndrome. About 50% of strokes below 50 years of age are caused by APS. The first line of therapy in stroke is anticoagulation: intravenous heparin or low-weight heparins. In chronic treatment, oral anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy are used, warfarin and aspirin, mostly for life. In resistant cases, corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis are necessary. Prognosis is good in most patients but some are treatment-resistant with recurrent thrombotic events and eventually death.

  19. National Down Syndrome Society

    ... with Down Syndrome Since 1979 National Down Syndrome Society 8 E 41st Street, 8th Floor New York ... Program! The mission of the National Down Syndrome Society is to be the national advocate for the ...

  20. Central Pain Syndrome

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Central Pain Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Central Pain Syndrome? Central pain syndrome is a neurological condition ...

  1. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    ... Condiciones Chinese Conditions Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Read in Chinese What is Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS)? Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) describes changes in a baby born to a mother whose pregnancy was complicated by alcohol consumption. A broader term ...

  2. Tourette Syndrome (For Parents)

    ... their child cope with the condition. About Tourette Syndrome Tourette syndrome (TS) is named for French doctor Georges ... people with TS. previous continue Diagnosing and Treating Tourette Syndrome Pediatricians and family doctors may refer a child ...

  3. Barth Syndrome (BTHS)

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Barth Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... is being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Barth Syndrome? Barth syndrome (BTHS) is a rare, genetic disorder ...

  4. Sexuality and Down Syndrome

    ... NDSS Home » Resources » Wellness » Sexuality » Sexuality & Down Syndrome Sexuality & Down Syndrome Human sexuality encompasses an individual's self- ... community standards for adult behavior. How Can Healthy Sexuality be Encouraged for Individuals with Down Syndrome? Creating ...

  5. Narcotic Bowel Syndrome

    ... Intolerance Malabsorption Narcotic Bowel Syndrome Radiation Therapy Injury Short Bowel Syndrome Symptoms & Causes Treatments Nutrition and Diet Managing Secondary Effects Medications Surgery Daily Living with SBS Resources SMA Syndrome Volvulus ...

  6. Hepatorenal syndrome

    Jan Lata

    2012-01-01

    Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is defined as a functional renal failure in patients with liver disease with portal hypertension and it constitutes the climax of systemic circulatory changes associated with portal hypertension.This term refers to a precisely specified syndrome featuring in particular morphologically intact kidneys,where regulatory mechanisms have minimised glomerular filtration and maximised tubular resorption and urine concentration,which ultimately results in uraemia.The syndrome occurs almost exclusively in patients with ascites.Type 1 HRS develops as a consequence of a severe reduction of effective circulating volume due to both an extreme splanchnic arterial vasodilatation and a reduction of cardiac output.Type 2 HRS is characterised by a stable or slowly progressive renal failure so that its main clinical consequence is not acute renal failure,but refractory ascites,and its impact on prognosis is less negative.Liver transplantation is the most appropriate therapeutic method,nevertheless,only a few patients can receive it.The most suitable "bridge treatments" or treatment for patients ineligible for a liver transplant include terlipressin plus albumin.Terlipressin is at an initial dose of 0.5-1 mg every 4 h by intravenous bolus to 3 mg every 4 h in cases when there is no response.Renal function recovery can be achieved in less than 50% of patients and a considerable decrease in renal function may reoccur even in patients who have been responding to therapy over the short term.Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt plays only a marginal role in the treatment of HRS.

  7. Morvan Syndrome

    Maskery, Mark; Chhetri, Suresh K.; Dayanandan, Rejith; Gall, Claire

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old gentleman was admitted to the regional neurosciences center with encephalopathy, myokymia, and dysautonomia. Chest imaging had previously identified an incidental mass in the anterior mediastinum, consistent with a primary thymic tumor. Antivoltage-gated potassium channel (anti-VGKC) antibodies were positive (titer 1273 pmol/L) and he was hypokalemic. Electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were in keeping with peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndrome, and an electroencephalogram was consistent with encephalopathy. A diagnosis of Morvan syndrome was made, for which he was initially treated with high-dose steroids, followed by a 5-day course of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. He also underwent thymectomy, followed by a postexcision flare of his symptoms requiring intensive care management. Further steroids, plasmapheresis, and IVIG achieved stabilization of his clinical condition, enabling transfer for inpatient neurorehabilitation. He was commenced on azathioprine and a prolonged oral steroid taper. A subsequent presumed incipient relapse responded well to further IVIG treatment. This case report documents a thymoma-associated presentation of anti-VGKC-positive Morvan syndrome supplemented by patient and carer narrative and video, both of which provide valuable further insights into this rare disorder. There are a limited number of publications surrounding this rare condition available in the English literature. This, combined with the heterogenous presentation, association with underlying malignancy, response to treatment, and prognosis, provides a diagnostic challenge. However, the association with anti-VGKC antibody-associated complexes and 2 recent case series have provided some scope for both accurate diagnosis and management. PMID:26740856

  8. Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome

    Tuzovic, S.; Fiebach, B.J.O.; Magnus, L.; Sauerbrei, H.U.

    1982-11-01

    This article reports on 14 cases of a trichorhinophalangeal syndrome in five successive generations. Besides the well-known characteristics of the TRPS the following symptoms observed in this family are new: Teething was considerably delayed, intelligence was reduced, and there were skin manifestations resembling eczema. Besides, struma colli and colitis ulcerosa were also observed. Subsequent observations have to clarify whether these symptoms are a facultative part of the TRPS pattern. The constant appearance of carriers of these characteristics during five generation points to dominant heredity.

  9. Olmsted Syndrome

    Sirka C

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A 20-year-old Sikh man had palmoplantar keratoderma, flexion deformity of digits, universal alopecia, keratotic plaques at the angles of mouth, gluteal cleft, knees and dorsal aspects of the metacarpophalangeal joints of the hand; features of Olmsted syndrome. He had normal nails, teeth, oral mucosa and normal joint movements. Treatment with acitretin, 25mg/day for three and a half months, followed by 25mg once daily alternating with 50mg once daily for 3 months resulted in significant improvement.

  10. [Piriformis syndrome].

    Erauso, Thomas; Pégorie, Anne; Gaveau, Yves-Marie; Tardy, Dominique

    2010-09-20

    Sciatic pain is often misleading and establishing the link with a local muscular cause can be difficult and lead to errors, especially when faced with a young sportsman, with typical discogenic pain. Simple, specific and reproducible tests enable a better identification and treatment of a muscular cause or canal syndrome. Physiotherapy, or local infiltrations are generally very efficient, and sufficient. Surgery may be considered only in a very limited number of cases, lack of response to the first line treatment and then only if it is the absolute diagnosis, diagnosis which must remain a diagnosis of exception, more so of exclusion. PMID:21033479

  11. CREST Syndrome

    Tuğçe Köksüz; Zeynep Nurhan Saraçoğlu; Ayşe Esra Koku-Aksu; İlham Sabuncu; Cengiz Korkmaz

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of CREST syndrome (calsinosis cutis, Raynaud’s phenomenon, oesophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia) with all of the five major symptoms. A 46-year-old woman was admitted to our clinic with the complaint of erythema, rigidity and pain on the plantar surface of the feet. She had had Raynaud’s phenomenon for 20 years and oesophageal reflux for five years. Her face had become masklike and there was prominent telangiectasies on her face and hands. Sclerosis were ...

  12. Rett Syndrome

    Sitholey, Prabhat; Agarwal, Vivek; Srivastava, Rohit

    2012-01-01

    Rett syndrome is one of the most common causes of complex disability in girls. It is characterized by early neurological regression that severely affects motor, cognitive and communication skills, by autonomic dysfunction and often a seizure disorder. It is a monogenic X-linked dominant neurodevelopmental disorder related to mutation in MECP2, which encodes the methyl-CpG-binding protein MeCP2. There are several mouse models either based on conditional knocking out of the Mecp2 gene or on a t...

  13. [Ascher's syndrome].

    Halling, F; Sandrock, D; Merten, H A; Hönig, J F

    1991-01-01

    Ascher's syndrome is composed of the triad blepharochalasis, double lip and goitre. In many of the cases reported in the literature this typical constellation of symptoms is not complete; particularly the struma is not mandatorily involved. A 58-year-old patient with this rare disease who exhibited blepharochalasis and double upper and lower lip is presented. Additionally, subclinical hypothyroidism and alopecia areata totalis were found. In differential diagnosis other causes of double lips or enlargement of the lips must be considered. PMID:1817784

  14. Mazabraud syndrome

    John, Anulekha Mary; Behera, Kishore Kumar; Mathai, Thomas; Parmar, Harshad; Paul, Thomas V.

    2013-01-01

    A 25 year old lady presented with pain and swelling of left thigh. On examination she was found to have tenderness of left femur with a separate soft tissue swelling within the thigh muscle. Further evaluation revealed expansile bony lesion on X-ray of left tibia and multiple hot spots on bone scan suggestive of fibrous dysplasia. The soft tissue swelling on excision and histopathological examination was found to be intramuscular myxoma. The combination of the above two, called Mazabraud syndrome is being reported. PMID:23961498

  15. Mazabraud syndrome

    Anulekha Mary John

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 25 year old lady presented with pain and swelling of left thigh. On examination she was found to have tenderness of left femur with a separate soft tissue swelling within the thigh muscle. Further evaluation revealed expansile bony lesion on X-ray of left tibia and multiple hot spots on bone scan suggestive of fibrous dysplasia. The soft tissue swelling on excision and histopathological examination was found to be intramuscular myxoma. The combination of the above two, called Mazabraud syndrome is being reported.

  16. Griscelli syndrome.

    Ariffin, H; Geikowski, A; Chin, T F; Chau, D; Arshad, A; Abu Bakar, K; Krishnan, S

    2014-08-01

    We report a case of Griscelli Syndrome (GS). Our patient initially presented with a diagnosis of haemophagocytic lymphistiocytosis (HLH). Subsequent microscopic analysis of the patient's hair follicle revealed abnormal distribution of melanosomes in the shaft, which is a hallmark for GS. Analysis of RAB27A gene in this patient revealed a homozygous mutation in exon 6, c.550C>T, p.R184X . This nonsense mutation causes premature truncation of the protein resulting in a dysfunctional RAB27A. Recognition of GS allows appropriate institution of therapy namely chemotherapy for HLH and curative haemotopoeitic stem cell transplantation. PMID:25500851

  17. HELLP syndrome

    Dilek Acar

    2014-08-01

    Suggested treatment modality consists, stabilization of blood pressure and magnesium sulfate infusion. Then evaluation of fetal status and planning delivery method and time if maternal status remains unstable. If prognosis seems favorable without urgent delivery and fetus can benefit from it, a course of betamethasone can be given to fetuses between 24 and 34 weeks of gestational age. The only and definite treatment of HELLP syndrome is delivering the baby. Suggested benefits of steroid therapy and other experimental treatments are still to be proven effective by large randomized controlled trials. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(4.000: 735-760

  18. OCULO-CEREBRO-RENAL SYNDROME (LOWE'S SYNDROME)

    1991-01-01

    Oculo-cerebro-renal syndrome (Lowe's syndrome) is characterized by mental and motor retardation, cataract, glaucoma and renal abnormalities. It is an X-linked recessive metabolic disease. Two brothers suffering from Lowe's syndrome are reported. Their mother with lenticular opacities and peculiar facial appearance is in concordance with the obligate carrier. The ocular changes and heridity are discussed.

  19. KBG syndrome

    Brancati Francesco

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract KBG syndrome is a rare condition characterised by a typical facial dysmorphism, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, skeletal (mainly costovertebral anomalies and developmental delay. To date, KBG syndrome has been reported in 45 patients. Clinical features observed in more than half of patients that may support the diagnosis are short stature, electroencephalogram (EEG anomalies (with or without seizures and abnormal hair implantation. Cutaneous syndactyly, webbed short neck, cryptorchidism, hearing loss, palatal defects, strabismus and congenital heart defects are less common findings. Autosomal dominant transmission has been observed in some families, and it is predominantly the mother, often showing a milder clinical picture, that transmits the disease. The diagnosis is currently based solely on clinical findings as the aetiology is unknown. The final diagnosis is generally achieved after the eruption of upper permanent central incisors at 7–8 years of age when the management of possible congenital anomalies should have been already planned. A full developmental assessment should be done at diagnosis and, if delays are noted, an infant stimulation program should be initiated. Subsequent management and follow-up should include an EEG, complete orthodontic evaluation, skeletal investigation with particular regard to spine curvatures and limb asymmetry, hearing testing and ophthalmologic assessment.

  20. Myasthenic syndromes.

    Farrugia, M E

    2011-03-01

    The neuromuscular junction is vulnerable to autoimmune attack both at the pre-synaptic nerve terminal and at the post-synaptic muscle membrane. Antibodies directed to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the muscle surface are the cause of myasthenia gravis in the majority of cases. Myasthenia gravis is an acquired condition, characterised by weakness and fatigability of the skeletal muscles. The ocular muscles are commonly affected first, but the disease often generalises. Treatment includes symptom control and immunosuppression. The thymus gland plays an important role in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis and thymectomy is indicated in certain subgroups. Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome is associated with antibodies directed to the voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies at the pre-synaptic nerve terminal. It is an acquired condition and, in some cases, may be paraneoplastic, often secondary to underlying small cell lung carcinoma. Clinical presentation is distinct from myasthenia gravis, with patients often first presenting with lower limb muscle fatigability and autonomic symptoms. Congenital myasthenic syndromes are inherited neuromuscular disorders due to mutations in proteins at the neuromuscular junction. Various phenotypes exist depending on the protein mutation. Treatment is directed towards symptom control and immunosuppression is not indicated. PMID:21365067

  1. Marfan Syndrome (For Parents)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth Marfan Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Marfan Syndrome Print A ... the Doctor en español Síndrome de Marfan About Marfan Syndrome Marfan syndrome is a progressive genetic disorder ...

  2. Facts about Down Syndrome

    ... Us Information For... Media Policy Makers Facts about Down Syndrome Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... with Down syndrome. View charts » What is Down Syndrome? Down syndrome is a condition in which a ...

  3. Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    Jelsig, Anne Marie; Qvist, Niels; Brusgaard, Klaus;

    2014-01-01

    -intestinal symptoms and types of cancers differs.Clinical awareness and early diagnosis of HPS is important, as affected patients and at-risk family members should be offered genetic counselling and surveillance. Surveillance in children with HPS might prevent or detect intestinal or extra-intestinal complications......Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes such as......-intestinal cancer. The syndromes are rare and inherited in an autosomal dominant manner.The diagnosis of HPS has traditionally been based on clinical criteria, but can sometimes be difficult as the severity of symptoms range considerably from only a few symptoms to very severe cases - even within the same family...

  4. Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome or Wilkie Syndrome

    We described three cases of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome, also known as Wilkie's syndrome, chronic duodenal ileus, or cast syndrome. This syndrome occurs when the third portion of the duodenum is compressed between the SMA and the aorta. The major risk factors for development of SMA syndrome are rapid weight loss and surgical correction of spinal deformities. The clinical presentation of SMA syndrome is variable and nonspecific, including nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and weight loss. The diagnosis is based on endoscopic, radiographic and tomographic findings of duodenal compression by the SMA. The treatment of SMA syndrome is aimed at the precipitating factor, which usually is related to weight loss. Therefore, conservative therapy with nutritional supplementation is the initial approach, and surgery is reserved for those who do not respond to nutritional therapy.

  5. Leopard syndrome

    Dallapiccola Bruno

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract LEOPARD syndrome (LS, OMIM 151100 is a rare multiple congenital anomalies condition, mainly characterized by skin, facial and cardiac anomalies. LEOPARD is an acronym for the major features of this disorder, including multiple Lentigines, ECG conduction abnormalities, Ocular hypertelorism, Pulmonic stenosis, Abnormal genitalia, Retardation of growth, and sensorineural Deafness. About 200 patients have been reported worldwide but the real incidence of LS has not been assessed. Facial dysmorphism includes ocular hypertelorism, palpebral ptosis and low-set ears. Stature is usually below the 25th centile. Cardiac defects, in particular hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mostly involving the left ventricle, and ECG anomalies are common. The lentigines may be congenital, although more frequently manifest by the age of 4–5 years and increase throughout puberty. Additional common features are café-au-lait spots (CLS, chest anomalies, cryptorchidism, delayed puberty, hypotonia, mild developmental delay, sensorineural deafness and learning difficulties. In about 85% of the cases, a heterozygous missense mutation is detected in exons 7, 12 or 13 of the PTPN11 gene. Recently, missense mutations in the RAF1 gene have been found in two out of six PTPN11-negative LS patients. Mutation analysis can be carried out on blood, chorionic villi and amniotic fluid samples. LS is largely overlapping Noonan syndrome and, during childhood, Neurofibromatosis type 1-Noonan syndrome. Diagnostic clues of LS are multiple lentigines and CLS, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and deafness. Mutation-based differential diagnosis in patients with borderline clinical manifestations is warranted. LS is an autosomal dominant condition, with full penetrance and variable expressivity. If one parent is affected, a 50% recurrence risk is appropriate. LS should be suspected in foetuses with severe cardiac hypertrophy and prenatal DNA test may be performed. Clinical management should

  6. Metabolic Syndrome: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Mortada, Rami; Williams, Tracy

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous condition characterized by androgen excess, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. It is the most common endocrinopathy among women of reproductive age, affecting between 6.5% and 8% of women, and is the most common cause of infertility. Insulin resistance is almost always present in women with PCOS, regardless of weight, and they often develop diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The Rotterdam criteria are widely used for diagnosis. These criteria require that patients have at least two of the following conditions: hyperandrogenism, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. The diagnosis of PCOS also requires exclusion of other potential etiologies of hyperandrogenism and ovulatory dysfunction. The approach to PCOS management differs according to the presenting symptoms and treatment goals, particularly the patient's desire for pregnancy. Weight loss through dietary modifications and exercise is recommended for patients with PCOS who are overweight. Oral contraceptives are the first-line treatment for regulating menstrual cycles and reducing manifestations of hyperandrogenism, such as acne and hirsutism. Clomiphene is the first-line drug for management of anovulatory infertility. Metformin is recommended for metabolic abnormalities such as prediabetes, and a statin should be prescribed for cardioprotection if the patient meets standard criteria for statin therapy. PMID:26280343

  7. [Hepatopulmonary syndrome].

    Thévenot, Thierry; Weil, Delphine; Garioud, Armand; Lison, Hortensia; Cadranel, Jean-François; Degano, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is defined by the association of portal hypertension, increased alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient and intrapulmonary vascular dilations. Pathophysiological mechanisms of hypoxemia are characterized by ventilation-perfusion mismatch, oxygen diffusion limitation between alveolus and the centre of the dilated capillary, and right-to-left shunting. An excess of vasodilator molecules (like nitric monoxide) and proangiogenic factors (like VEGF) play an important role in the occurrence of HPS. Symptoms of HPS are not specific and dominated by a progressive dyspnea in upright position. Pulse oximetry is a simple non-invasive screening test but only detect the most severe forms of HPS. Medical treatment is disappointing and only liver transplantation may lead to resolution of HPS. Survival following liver transplantation is promising when hypoxemia is not severely decreased. PMID:27021476

  8. Antiphospholipid syndrome.

    George, Diane; Erkan, Doruk

    2009-01-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune systemic disease that is diagnosed when there is vascular thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity occurring with persistently positive antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) (lupus anticoagulant test, anticardiolipin antibodies, and/or anti-beta(2)-glycoprotein I antibodies). Although International APS Classification Criteria have been formulated to provide a uniform approach to APS research, aPL may cause a spectrum of clinical manifestations, some of which are not included in these criteria. The main aPL-related cardiac manifestations include valve abnormalities (vegetations and/or thickening), myocardial infarction (MI), intracardiac thrombi, and myocardial microthrombosis. In this article, we will review the definition, etiopathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of aPL-related clinical events with emphasis on cardiac manifestations. PMID:19732604

  9. Noonan syndrome

    van der Burgt Ineke

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Noonan Syndrome (NS is characterised by short stature, typical facial dysmorphology and congenital heart defects. The incidence of NS is estimated to be between 1:1000 and 1:2500 live births. The main facial features of NS are hypertelorism with down-slanting palpebral fissures, ptosis and low-set posteriorly rotated ears with a thickened helix. The cardiovascular defects most commonly associated with this condition are pulmonary stenosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Other associated features are webbed neck, chest deformity, mild intellectual deficit, cryptorchidism, poor feeding in infancy, bleeding tendency and lymphatic dysplasias. The syndrome is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. In approximately 50% of cases, the disease is caused by missense mutations in the PTPN11 gene on chromosome 12, resulting in a gain of function of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 protein. Recently, mutations in the KRAS gene have been identified in a small proportion of patients with NS. A DNA test for mutation analysis can be carried out on blood, chorionic villi and amniotic fluid samples. NS should be considered in all foetuses with polyhydramnion, pleural effusions, oedema and increased nuchal fluid with a normal karyotype. With special care and counselling, the majority of children with NS will grow up and function normally in the adult world. Management should address feeding problems in early childhood, evaluation of cardiac function and assessment of growth and motor development. Physiotherapy and/or speech therapy should be offered if indicated. A complete eye examination and hearing evaluation should be performed during the first few years of schooling. Preoperative coagulation studies are indicated. Signs and symptoms lessen with age and most adults with NS do not require special medical care.

  10. Prenatal Tests for Down Syndrome

    PRENATAL TESTS FOR DOWN SYNDROME S HARE W ITH W OMEN PRENATAL TESTS FOR DOWN SYNDROME What Is Down Syndrome? ... suggests that you consult your health care provider. PRENATAL TESTS FOR DOWN SYNDROME 256 Volume 50, No. ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Rett syndrome

    ... Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Rett syndrome Rett syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... autism-dementia-ataxia-loss of purposeful hand use syndrome Rett disorder Rett's disorder Rett's syndrome RTS RTT Related ...

  12. Gilles de la Tourette syndrome

    ... cannot control. The condition is commonly called Tourette syndrome. ... Tourette syndrome ... fewer people have more severe forms of Tourette syndrome. Tourette syndrome is four times as likely to occur ...

  13. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome

    ... Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome Request Permissions Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 04/2016 What is Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome? Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS) is ...

  14. Burning Mouth Syndrome and "Burning Mouth Syndrome".

    Rifkind, Jacob Bernard

    2016-03-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is distressing to both the patient and practitioner unable to determine the cause of the patient's symptoms. Burning mouth syndrome is a diagnosis of exclusion, which is used only after nutritional deficiencies, mucosal disease, fungal infections, hormonal disturbances and contact stomatitis have been ruled out. This article will explore the many causes and treatment of patients who present with a chief complaint of "my mouth burns," including symptomatic treatment for those with burning mouth syndrome. PMID:27209717

  15. Mobbing syndrome

    Sakoula Z.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The term mobbing comes from the English word mob, meaning attack, Compass bother. Today is the systematic psychological attack and a strategic marginalization accepted at the workplace from their superiors or colleagues unwanted, for various reasons, employees. The term was used in 1800 by British biology, description of aggressive behavior in flight, certain species of migratory birds. In 1900, ethologist Konrad Lorenz uses it to interpret the hostility of the majority of the herd, compared to lean animals of the same breed. The German psychologist Heinz Leyman, is the first, which is in the 80s, attributes the condition in human society, describing all the negative health effects of mobbing in the workplace as a "syndrome mobbing». Purpose: To work is to illustrate the phenomenon mobbing, which can appear as a problem in the relationship of the perpetrator to the victim, but also implies the presence of such conditions to occur and flourish. Literature Review: searched the literature, internet, Keyword: Work or Employee Abuse, Mistreatment, Emotional Abuse, Bossing, Victimization, Intimidation, Psychological terrorization, Psychological violence. The mobbing syndrome is defined as "repeated abusive behavior, manifested through actions, words, intimidation, acts, gestures, ways of organizing work and have the character or purpose to offend the personality, dignity or physical or mental integrity of the worker in the performance of his work, to jeopardize the employment status or to create a hostile, intimidating, degrading, humiliating or offensive working environment. According to the French psychiatrist Marie France Hirigoyen, the "offender" is a personality that satisfied 'hurting' his fellows and develops self-esteem, conveying to others the "pain" that cannot feel, but also the internal contradictions that refuses edited. Conclusions: the mobbing is the reason for the development of mental and physical diseases as an

  16. Hepatorenal Syndrome

    Pınar Zeyneloğlu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Renal failure is a common major complication in patients with advanced cirrhosis and generally indicates a poor prognosis when combined with liver failure. Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS is characterised by a combination of disturbances in circulatory and kidney function. Arterial pressure is decreased in the systemic circulation due to reduced total systemic vascular resistance. Kidney dysfunction is caused by reduction in renal blood flow. The diagnosis of HRS is based on exclusion of other disorders that cause acute kidney injury in cirrhosis as there are no specific tests. There are two types of HRS with different characteristics and prognostics. Liver transplantation is the treatment of choice for all patients without contraindication. The best approach to the pharmacologic management is the administration vasoconstrictor drugs based on the pathogenesis. Many vasoconstrictors including vasopressin analogues (terlipressin, ornipressin and vasopressin, somatostatin analogues (octreotide and alpha-adrenergic analogues (midodrine and norepinephrine have been studied. In most of the studies intravenous albumin therapy was coadministered with vasoconstrictor drugs and suggested that albumin should be considered as the component of pharmacologic intervention in patients with HRS. Renal replacement therapy in the form of hemodialysis or continuous venovenous hemofiltration has been used in the management of HRS patients awaiting transplantation or in those with acute potentially reversible conditions. The artificial hepatic support systems require further investigation. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2012; 10: 37-44

  17. Tourette syndrome.

    Cavanna, Andrea E; Termine, Cristiano

    2012-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder consisting of multiple motor and one or more vocal/phonic tics. TS is increasingly recognized as a common neuropsychiatric disorder usually diagnosed in early childhood and comorbid neuropsychiatric disorders occur in approximately 90% of patients, with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) being the most common ones. Moreover, a high prevalence of depression and personality disorders has been reported. Although the mainstream of tic management is represented by pharmacotherapy, different kinds of psychotherapy, along with neurosurgical interventions (especially deep brain stimulation, DBS) play a major role in the treatment of TS. The current diagnostic systems have dictated that TS is a unitary condition. However, recent studies have demonstrated that there may be more than one TS phenotype. In conclusion, it appears that TS probably should no longer be considered merely a motor disorder and, most importantly, that TS is no longer a unitary condition, as it was previously thought. PMID:22411257

  18. Leigh syndrome

    A male infant developed hypotonia at 5 months, vomiting, diarrhea, fever, generalized clonic convulsion, tonic spasm and periodical opisthotonus at 8 months, swallowing difficulty at 10 months, pes equinovarus and optic atrophy at 11 months, and then tachypnea, and died at 14 months of age. Parents were consanguinous. Laboratory studies revealed elevated serum LDH, CPK, lactate and Pyruvate. TPP-ATP phosphoryl transferase inhibitor was negative in urine. EEG showed irregular and diffuse slow waves and periodic diffuse spike and waves. CT scan at 9 months of age showed slightly low attenuation areas in the putamen bilaterally. At 11 months, a diffuse cerebral atrophy was found, and the low attenuation of the basal ganglia became more definite. No enhanced lesion was seen at 13 months of age. Thiamine tetra-hydrofurfuryl disulfide and lipoic acid were tried without success. The pathological findings of the brain were astrogliosis and proliferation of capillaries in putamen, thalamus, caudate neucleus, substantia nigra, pontine brachium and cerebral cortex, which were symmetrically involved. The symmetrical cavitation was found in putamen. Optic nerve and mamillary body were spared. CT scan findings corresponded well with the pathology of the necrotic lesions of the brain. It was concluded that these CT scan pictures described above may be diagnostic of Leigh syndrome. (author)

  19. Milk-alkali syndrome

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000332.htm Milk-alkali syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Milk-alkali syndrome is a condition in which there ...

  20. Androgen insensitivity syndrome

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001180.htm Androgen insensitivity syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is when a person who ...

  1. Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome

    Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome (HHS) is a complication of type 2 diabetes . It involves extremely high blood ... Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome is a condition of: Extremely high blood sugar (glucose) level Extreme lack of ...

  2. Chinese restaurant syndrome

    Chinese restaurant syndrome is a set of symptoms that some people have after eating Chinese food. A food additive ... Chinese restaurant syndrome is most often diagnosed based on the symptoms. The health care provider may ask the following ...

  3. International Rett Syndrome Foundation

    ... Website What’s in Your State? For Families: Find Rett syndrome related resources in your state! State Resources Rettsyndrome.org is the world's leading Rett syndrome research funding organization We have invested $38 million ...

  4. What Causes Rett Syndrome?

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications What causes Rett syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... as bad for development as too little. Is Rett syndrome passed from one generation to the next? In ...

  5. What Is Marfan Syndrome?

    ... 11:11 Size: 10.5 MB November 2014 What Is Marfan Syndrome? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Being Done on Marfan Syndrome? For More Information What Is Connective Tissue? Connective tissue supports many parts ...

  6. Moebius Syndrome Foundation

    ... FRAME video on Moebius syndrome The Moebius Syndrome Foundation is excited to announce the premiere of the FRAME video, produced by Rick Guidotti and his non-profit organization, Positive Exposure! FRAME is a web-based ...

  7. Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000304.htm Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome (HHS) is a complication of ...

  8. Green Nail Syndrome

    ... Favorite Name: Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Green Nail Syndrome Share | Green nail syndrome (GNS) is an infection of the ... discoloration of nails, also known as chloronychia. The green discoloration varies from blue-green to dark green ...

  9. Sick sinus syndrome

    ... chambers is a common cause of sick sinus syndrome. Coronary artery disease , high blood pressure, and aortic and ... pressure may be normal or low. Sick sinus syndrome may cause symptoms of heart failure to start or get worse. Sick sinus ...

  10. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    Median nerve dysfunction; Median nerve entrapment ... Calandruccio JH. Carpal tunnel syndrome, ulnar tunnel syndrome, and stenosing tenosynovitis. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2013: ...

  11. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000085.htm Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) is a condition in some ...

  12. Abdominal Pain Syndrome

    ... inspection of a drop of urine), and urine culture for bacterial infection. Stools can be analyzed for ... Hepatitis C Inflammatory Bowel Disease Irritable Bowel Syndrome Obesity Digestive Health Topics Abdominal Pain Syndrome Belching, Bloating, ...

  13. Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome

    Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) is a problem that is sometimes seen in women who take fertility medicines ... the belly and chest area. This is called ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). OHSS occurs only after the ...

  14. What is Down Syndrome?

    ... Syndrome/Down-Syndrome-Facts/ [top] What are common symptoms? » ​​ Last Reviewed: 01/17/2014 Related A-Z Topics Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Early Learning Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDDs) All related ...

  15. Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome

    Rubinstein syndrome, RTS ... Rubinstein-Taybi Parents Group USA: www.rubinstein-taybi.org ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 14. Stevens CA. Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. Gene Reviews. 2014;8. PMID: 20301699 ...

  16. Munchausen syndrome by proxy

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001555.htm Munchausen syndrome by proxy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Munchausen syndrome by proxy is a mental illness and a form of ...

  17. Learning about Klinefelter Syndrome

    ... for the genetic terms used on this page Learning About Klinefelter Syndrome What is Klinefelter syndrome? What ... they are referred to a doctor to evaluate learning disabilities. The diagnosis may also be considered in ...

  18. Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome? Antiphospholipid (AN-te-fos-fo-LIP-id) antibody ... weeks or months. This condition is called catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS). People who have APS also are at ...

  19. Down Syndrome (For Kids)

    ... Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Movie: Digestive System Winter Sports: Sledding, ... people who have it. What's Life Like for Kids With Down Syndrome? Many kids with Down syndrome ...

  20. Down Syndrome: Education

    ... Kit Financials Newsroom Shop NDSS Home » Resources » Education Education This section includes information about inclusion, elementary and ... and postsecondary options for students with Down syndrome. Education & Down Syndrome This section provides an overview and ...

  1. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS)

    ... this page: About CDC.gov . Hantavirus Share Compartir Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Severe HPS. Image courtesy D. ... the workers showed evidence of infection or illness. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Topics Transmission Where HPS is ...

  2. Turner Syndrome (For Parents)

    ... special blood test that looks at chromosomes — a karyotype — is used to diagnose Turner syndrome. Several physical ... and prompt him or her to order a karyotype. Results that indicate Turner syndrome show 45 chromosomes ...

  3. Metabolic Syndrome and Migraine

    Sachdev, Amit; Marmura, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Migraine and metabolic syndrome are highly prevalent and costly conditions. The two conditions coexist, but it is unclear what relationship may exist between the two processes. Metabolic syndrome involves a number of findings, including insulin resistance, systemic hypertension, obesity, a proinflammatory state, and a prothrombotic state. Only one study addresses migraine in metabolic syndrome, finding significant differences in the presentation of metabolic syndrome in migraineurs. However, ...

  4. The wellness syndrome

    Mik-Meyer, Nanna

    2015-01-01

    Klumme. Wellness er blevet et syndrom, og dets symptomer er angst, selvbebrejdelser og skyldfølelse. Kommentar med udgangspunkt i: Carl Cederström & Andre Spicer, "The Wellness Syndrome" (Polity Books, 2015. 200 p.).......Klumme. Wellness er blevet et syndrom, og dets symptomer er angst, selvbebrejdelser og skyldfølelse. Kommentar med udgangspunkt i: Carl Cederström & Andre Spicer, "The Wellness Syndrome" (Polity Books, 2015. 200 p.)....

  5. PRES syndrome

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiological entity characterized by headache, confusion, visual disturbances, seizures and posterior transient changes on neuroimaging. PRES has been described in several conditions including hypertensive encephalopathy, preeclampsia, eclampsia, infections, electrolyte imbalance, hypercalcaemia and use of several drugs. It occurs due to elevated blood pressure which exceeds the autoregulatory capacity of brain vasculature. The posterior circulation supplied by vertibro-basilar system has poor sympathetic innervation and, therefore, is frequently involved. The role of neuroimaging is to establish the initial diagnosis and to exclude other causes of neurological symptoms and signs. NCCT is sufficient to make the diagnosis in a proper clinical setting. MRI features are characteristic and has diagnostic and prognostic value. Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) can differentiate this condition from ischemia/cytotoxic edema. Differential diagnosis of PRES includes PCA territory infarcts, venous thrombosis, demyelinating disorders, vasculitis and encephalitis. The diagnosis has important implications because the reversibility of the clinico-radiological abnormalities is contingent on the prompt control of blood pressure and/or withdrawing of the offending drug. We describe here a case of PRES in a 12 years old girl with acute lymphoblasts leukaemia, treated with cytostatics-vincristine, pharmorubycin and methotrexate. After 39 days from the beginning of the treatment there are good results in the myelogram and the flowcytometric examination, but the patient made two tonic-clonic seizures. CT and MRI were made and signs of leucoencephalopathy were diagnosed. Several control MRI examinations after cessation of the therapy and disappearance of the neurologic symptoms were made. The normal findings and the clinical course were the reasons for the PRES diagnosis

  6. Brugada syndrome

    Priori Silvia G

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A novel clinical entity characterized by ST segment elevation in right precordial leads (V1 to V3, incomplete or complete right bundle branch block, and susceptibility to ventricular tachyarrhythmia and sudden cardiac death has been described by Brugada et al. in 1992. This disease is now frequently called "Brugada syndrome" (BrS. The prevalence of BrS in the general population is unknown. The suggested prevalence ranges from 5/1,000 (Caucasians to 14/1,000 (Japanese. Syncope, typically occurring at rest or during sleep (in individuals in their third or fourth decades of life is a common presentation of BrS. In some cases, tachycardia does not terminate spontaneously and it may degenerate into ventricular fibrillation and lead to sudden death. Both sporadic and familial cases have been reported and pedigree analysis suggests an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. In approximately 20% of the cases BrS is caused by mutations in the SCN5A gene on chromosome 3p21-23, encoding the cardiac sodium channel, a protein involved in the control of myocardial excitability. Since the use of the implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD is the only therapeutic option of proven efficacy for primary and secondary prophylaxis of cardiac arrest, the identification of high-risk subjects is one of the major goals in the clinical decision-making process. Quinidine may be regarded as an adjunctive therapy for patients at higher risk and may reduce the number of cases of ICD shock in patients with multiple recurrences.

  7. The acute radiation syndrome

    Symptoms and signs from medical aspects resulting from whole body exposure, or in the main part, to ionizing radiation are described. The dose-response relationship is studied and the exposure is divided in three parts: central nervous system syndrome, gastrointestinal syndrome and hematopoietic syndrome. Brief comments about the treatment are reported. (M.A.C.)

  8. CONSTIPATION IN RETT SYNDROME

    Gastrointestinal problems occur frequently in girls with Rett syndrome. Constipation is a common problem in girls with Rett syndrome because of their neurological abnormalities. Research studies to better understand the abnormalities of large bowel function in our girls with Rett syndrome have not b...

  9. What Is Usher Syndrome?

    ... into electrical impulses that transfer messages to the brain. How is Usher syndrome inherited? Usher syndrome is ... required for the child to be affected. A person with only one copy of the gene is a ... in deafness and deaf-blindness, but are not related to Usher syndrome. ...

  10. Stiff skin syndrome.

    Geng, S; Lei, X; Toyohara, J P; Zhan, P; Wang, J; Tan, S

    2006-07-01

    Stiff skin syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by pronounced skin induration, mild hypertrichosis and limited joint mobility, predominantly on the buttocks and thighs. Many heterogeneous cases have been reported under the name of stiff skin syndrome. We present a case of stiff skin syndrome from China, the diagnosis based on the patient's typical clinical and histopathological features. PMID:16836505

  11. Munchausen syndrome by proxy

    Munchausen syndrome by proxy is a mental illness and a form of child abuse . The caretaker of ... No one is sure what causes Munchausen syndrome by proxy. Sometimes, the person was abused as a child or has Munchausen syndrome (fake illness for themselves).

  12. Fragile X Syndrome Overview

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Fragile X Syndrome: Overview Skip sharing on social media links Share ... menu on the left. ​ Common Name Fragile X syndrome or Fragile X Medical or Scientific Names Martin-Bell syndrome Last ...

  13. CANDLE syndrome: a recently described autoinflammatory syndrome.

    Tüfekçi, Özlem; Bengoa, ŞebnemYilmaz; Karapinar, Tuba Hilkay; Ataseven, Eda Büke; İrken, Gülersu; Ören, Hale

    2015-05-01

    CANDLE syndrome (chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature) is a recently described autoinflammatory syndrome characterized by early onset, recurrent fever, skin lesions, and multisystemic inflammatory manifestations. Most of the patients have been shown to have mutation in PSMB8 gene. Herein, we report a 2-year-old patient with young onset recurrent fever, atypical facies, widespread skin lesions, generalized lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, joint contractures, hypertrglyceridemia, lipodystrophy, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Clinical features together with the skin biopsy findings were consistent with the CANDLE syndrome. The pathogenesis and treatment of this syndrome have not been fully understood. Increased awareness of this recently described syndrome may lead to recognition of new cases and better understanding of its pathogenesis which in turn may help for development of an effective treatment. PMID:25036278

  14. Barth syndrome

    Clarke Sarah LN

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract First described in 1983, Barth syndrome (BTHS is widely regarded as a rare X-linked genetic disease characterised by cardiomyopathy (CM, skeletal myopathy, growth delay, neutropenia and increased urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid (3-MGCA. Fewer than 200 living males are known worldwide, but evidence is accumulating that the disorder is substantially under-diagnosed. Clinical features include variable combinations of the following wide spectrum: dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM, endocardial fibroelastosis (EFE, left ventricular non-compaction (LVNC, ventricular arrhythmia, sudden cardiac death, prolonged QTc interval, delayed motor milestones, proximal myopathy, lethargy and fatigue, neutropenia (absent to severe; persistent, intermittent or perfectly cyclical, compensatory monocytosis, recurrent bacterial infection, hypoglycaemia, lactic acidosis, growth and pubertal delay, feeding problems, failure to thrive, episodic diarrhoea, characteristic facies, and X-linked family history. Historically regarded as a cardiac disease, BTHS is now considered a multi-system disorder which may be first seen by many different specialists or generalists. Phenotypic breadth and variability present a major challenge to the diagnostician: some children with BTHS have never been neutropenic, whereas others lack increased 3-MGCA and a minority has occult or absent CM. Furthermore, BTHS was first described in 2010 as an unrecognised cause of fetal death. Disabling mutations or deletions of the tafazzin (TAZ gene, located at Xq28, cause the disorder by reducing remodeling of cardiolipin, a principal phospholipid of the inner mitochondrial membrane. A definitive biochemical test, based on detecting abnormal ratios of different cardiolipin species, was first described in 2008. Key areas of differential diagnosis include metabolic and viral cardiomyopathies, mitochondrial diseases, and many causes of neutropenia and

  15. Hypereosinophilic syndromes

    Goldman Michel

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypereosinophilic syndromes (HES constitute a rare and heterogeneous group of disorders, defined as persistent and marked blood eosinophilia (> 1.5 × 109/L for more than six consecutive months associated with evidence of eosinophil-induced organ damage, where other causes of hypereosinophilia such as allergic, parasitic, and malignant disorders have been excluded. Prevalence is unknown. HES occur most frequently in young to middle-aged patients, but may concern any age group. Male predominance (4–9:1 ratio has been reported in historic series but this is likely to reflect the quasi-exclusive male distribution of a sporadic hematopoietic stem cell mutation found in a recently characterized disease variant. Target-organ damage mediated by eosinophils is highly variable among patients, with involvement of skin, heart, lungs, and central and peripheral nervous systems in more than 50% of cases. Other frequently observed complications include hepato- and/or splenomegaly, eosinophilic gastroenteritis, and coagulation disorders. Recent advances in underlying pathogenesis have established that hypereosinophilia may be due either to primitive involvement of myeloid cells, essentially due to occurrence of an interstitial chromosomal deletion on 4q12 leading to creation of the FIP1L1-PDGFRA fusion gene (F/P+ variant, or to increased interleukin (IL-5 production by a clonally expanded T cell population (lymphocytic variant, most frequently characterized by a CD3-CD4+ phenotype. Diagnosis of HES relies on observation of persistent and marked hypereosinophilia responsible for target-organ damage, and exclusion of underlying causes of hypereosinophilia, including allergic and parasitic disorders, solid and hematological malignancies, Churg-Strauss disease, and HTLV infection. Once these criteria are fulfilled, further testing for eventual pathogenic classification is warranted using appropriate cytogenetic and functional approaches. Therapeutic

  16. Poland-Möbius syndrome.

    Parker, D. L.; Mitchell, P. R.; Holmes, G. L.

    1981-01-01

    A patient with stigmata of both the Möbius syndrome and the Poland syndrome is presented. This is now the twelfth well-documented patient with a combination of the two syndromes. The association of the Poland syndrome and the Möbius syndrome occurs with sufficient frequency that the combination probably represents a formal genesis malformation syndrome of unknown aetiology that should be designated the Poland-Möbius syndrome.

  17. [Tic syndrome].

    Czapliński, Adam; Steck, Andreas J; Fuhr, Peter

    2002-01-01

    A tic is an involuntary, sudden, rapid, recurrent, nonrrhythmic, stereotyped, motor movement or vocalization. This paper reviews clinical, pathophysiological, epidemiological and treatment issues of tic disorders. The clinical presentation of tic disorders with simple and complex motor or vocal tics is reviewed in detail. The most common psychiatric comorbid conditions, such as personality disorder (PD), Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), Self-Destructive Behavior (SDB) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are presented too. All forms of tics may be exacerbated by anger or stress, but they are usually markedly diminished during sleep. Premonitory feelings or "sensory experiences", which are distinct from the actual motor or phonic tics and precede the tics, occur in over 80% of tic-patients and in 95% of patients with Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (GTS). The American Psychiatric Association recognizes three types of tic disorders on the basis of clinical criteria: Transient Tic Disorder, Chronic Motor or Vocal Tic Disorder and GTS. The diagnostic criteria for these types are described. According to epidemiological data, up to 10% of children have at least somewhere a transient tic disorder. The onset of tics, whether simple or multiple, occurs at approximately 7 years of age. The accepted prevalence figure for GTS is 0.05-3%. Although tics can appear as the result of brain injury, Huntington chorea or encephalitis, they are most commonly idiopathic. Genetic factors appear to be present in many but not in all cases of tic disorders. Autosomal dominant, sex-linked models or semirecessive-semidominant-oligogenic models have been considered. Based on the review of the literature we believe that tic disorders are related to altered neurotransmitter function within the CNS, especially that the functional abnormality is somehow related to dopaminergic mechanism. Several authors have recently investigated the possible role of autoimmune response to

  18. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome)

    Lo Muzio Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. The estimated prevalence varies from 1/57,000 to 1/256,000, with a male-to-female ratio of 1:1. Main clinical manifestations include multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), odontogenic keratocysts of the jaws, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, skeletal abnormalities, intracranial ectopic ...

  19. Metabolic syndrome and migraine

    Amit eSachdev

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Migraine and metabolic syndrome are highly prevaleirnt and costly conditions.The two conditions coexist, but it is unclear what relationship may exist between the two processes. Metabolic syndrome involves a number of findings, including insulin resistance, systemic hypertension, obesity, a proinflammatory state, and a prothrombotic state. Only one study addresses migraine in metabolic syndrome, finding significant differences in the presentation of metabolic syndrome in migraineurs. However, controversy exists regarding the contribution of each individual risk factor to migraine pathogensis and prevalence. It is unclear what treatment implications, if any, exist as a result of the concomitant diagnosis of migraine and metabolic syndrome. The cornerstone of migraine and metabolic syndrome treatments is prevention, relying heavily on diet modification, sleep hygiene, medication use, and exercise.

  20. Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome

    Harris, C. P.; Townsend, J J

    2012-01-01

    The dialysis disequilibrium syndrome is a rare but serious complication of hemodialysis. Despite the fact that maintenance hemodialysis has been a routine procedure for over 50 years, this syndrome remains poorly understood. The signs and symptoms vary widely from restlessness and headache to coma and death. While cerebral edema and increased intracranial pressure are the primary contributing factors to this syndrome and are the target of therapy, the precise mechanisms for their development ...

  1. Gambaran Radiografi Crouzon Syndrome

    Chairani

    2010-01-01

    Crouzon’s syndrome merupakan penyakit autosomal dominan yang disebabkan oleh mutasi gen pertumbuhan FGFR 2 (Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 2) kromosom 10, kepala tidak berkembang dengan sempurna. Insiden crouzon syndrome berkisar antara 1: 25000 sampai 1: 60000 kelahiran. Secara klinis mempunyai kepala yang pendek dan lebar, atau sekitar 30% penderita crouzon’s syndrome mengalami hydrocephalus. Manifestasi penyakit ini di rongga mulut antara lain: protrusi mandibula, gigi berjejal pad...

  2. Rubinsten Taybi Syndrome

    J. Jannati

    2008-01-01

    Rubinstein Taybi syndrome or Broad Thumb and Hallux syndrome is a genetic multisystem disorder with unknown mode of inheritance. "nThis syndrome characterized by Broad terminal phalange of the thumbs and /or hallucess broad terminal phalanges of other fingers, characteristic facies (small head, beaked nose, hypertelorism, antimongoloid slant of the palpebral fissures, strabismus, high arch palate, abnormalities of ears, mental and motor retardation."nRadiologic manifestations are sh...

  3. [Paraneoplastic syndromes: a review].

    Berardi, R; Grilli, G; Romagnoli, E; Saladino, T; Freddari, F; Tamburrano, T; Galizia, E; Carbonari, G; Mariani, C; Braconi, C; Pierantoni, C; Battelli, N; Scartozzi, M; Cascinu, S

    2005-01-01

    Modern oncology often obtains good results against earlier neoplasms, whilst it's still in difficulties against the advanced ones. The knowledge of paraneoplastic syndromes is crucial both to cure patients and to do an earlier diagnosis. When we recognize a paraneoplastic syndrome that comes before the clinic beginning of a neoplasm, perhaps we save a life. This review discusses all the main paraneoplastic syndromes, focusing mainly on their clinical aspect and reminding the most commonly associated cancers. PMID:16463565

  4. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome

    Galli, Jonathan A.; Sawaya, Ronald Andari; Friedenberg, Frank K.

    2011-01-01

    Coinciding with the increasing rates of cannabis abuse has been the recognition of a new clinical condition known as Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is characterized by chronic cannabis use, cyclic episodes of nausea and vomiting, and frequent hot bathing. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome occurs by an unknown mechanism. Despite the well-established anti-emetic properties of marijuana, there is increasing evidence of its paradoxical effects on the gastrointes...

  5. Introduction: Williams Syndrome

    Morris, Colleen A.

    2010-01-01

    In the nearly 50 years since the description of Williams syndrome by Williams et al. in 1961, the focus of scientific inquiry has shifted from identification, definition, and description of the syndrome in small series to genotype-phenotype correlation, pathophysiologic investigation in both humans and in animal models, and therapeutic outcomes in large cohorts. Study of this rare syndrome has provided insight into the structure and function of the extracellular matrix, has contributed to und...

  6. Understanding Brugada syndrome.

    Gehshan, Janine Mary; Rizzolo, Denise

    2015-06-01

    Brugada syndrome is an established cause of sudden cardiac arrest in patients without structural cardiac abnormalities. Recognition and diagnosis of this syndrome has been slowly increasing. Syncope, ventricular dysrhythmia, or sudden cardiac arrest may be the presenting symptom, although detection of the characteristic right precordial ST-segment elevation on ECG can be a potentially lifesaving intervention. This article reviews the clinical presentation, pathophysiology, genetics, and current management of Brugada syndrome. PMID:25932713

  7. Coeliac artery compression syndrome

    OKTAY, Özgür; MEMİŞ, Ahmet; Parildar, Mustafa; Oran, İsmail

    2003-01-01

    Celiac artery compression syndrome, also called median arcuate ligament compression syndrome, causes gastrointestinal ischemia secondary to compression of the proximal portion of the celiac artery just beyond its origin by the median arcuate ligament of the diaphragm. This syndrome is frequently demonstrated on aortography performed in patients without complaints of intestinal angina. Isolated stenosis or even occlusion of the celiac artery is always compensated for by collateral circul...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Waardenburg syndrome

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Waardenburg syndrome Waardenburg syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Waardenburg syndrome is a group of genetic conditions that can ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Rotor syndrome

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Rotor syndrome Rotor syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Rotor syndrome is a relatively mild condition characterized by ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Joubert syndrome

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Joubert syndrome Joubert syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Joubert syndrome is a disorder that affects many parts ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Turner syndrome

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Turner syndrome Turner syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Turner syndrome is a chromosomal condition that affects development in ...

  12. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in Children

    ... KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in Children Page Content On this page: What is hemolytic ... spine. [ Top ] What causes hemolytic uremic syndrome in children? The most common cause of hemolytic uremic syndrome ...

  13. First Trimester Down Syndrome Screen

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? First Trimester Down Syndrome Screen Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... is carrying has a chromosomal abnormality such as Down syndrome (trisomy 21) or Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18) . The ...

  14. Features of Fragile X Syndrome

    ... Figuring Out CGG Repeats! Donate | Print Fragile X Syndrome Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a genetic condition that causes ... health concerns associated with the condition. Features of Fragile X Syndrome in Males Read our Story The majority of ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Arts syndrome

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Arts syndrome Arts syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Arts syndrome is a disorder that causes serious neurological ...

  16. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-01-01

    Investigators at Children's Hospital of Montefiore, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, NY, determined the incidence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) in a pediatric critical care unit.

  17. Neonatal abstinence syndrome

    ... JR, Isemann B, Ward LP, et al. Current management of neonatal abstinence syndrome secondary to ... MD, MSc, IBCLC, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Medical University of ...

  18. Short Bowel Syndrome

    ... may include nutritional support medications surgery intestinal transplant Nutritional Support The main treatment for short bowel syndrome is nutritional support, which may include the following: Oral rehydration. Adults ...

  19. Organic brain syndrome

    OBS; Organic mental disorder (OMS); Chronic organic brain syndrome ... Listed below are disorders associated with OBS. Brain injury caused by ... the brain ( subarachnoid hemorrhage ) Blood clot inside the ...

  20. Do you know this syndrome? *

    Rosmaninho, A.; Pinto-Almeida, T.; Fernandes, I; Machado, S; Selores, M.

    2013-01-01

    Noonan Syndrome is one of the most common genetic syndromes and also an important differential diagnosis in children presenting with syndromic facies similar to Turner's syndrome phenotype. This syndrome is characterized by facial dysmorphism, congenital heart defects, short stature and also a wide phenotypic variation. This article discusses the case of a 10 year-old patient with Noonan syndrome that presented typical facies, cardiac defects (pulmonary dilatation and mitral regurgitation), d...

  1. Metabolic syndrome in acute coronary syndrome

    Objective: To determine the frequency of metabolic syndrome in male patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome Study design: A Descriptive study Place and duration of study: Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology and National Institute of Heart Diseases, Rawalpindi, from October 2007 to September 2008 Patients and Methods: Male patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) were included. Patients having angioplasty (PCI), coronary artery bypass surgery in the past and other co-morbid diseases were excluded. All patients were assessed for the presence of five components of metabolic syndrome including hypertension, HDL-Cholesterol and triglycerides, glucose intolerance and abdominal obesity. Systolic, diastolic blood pressures, waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI) were measured. ECG, cardiac enzymes, fasting glucose and lipid profile were also done. Results: A total of 135 male patients of ACS were studied with a mean age of 54.26 +- 11 years. Metabolic syndrome (MS) was present in 55 (40.7%) patients. MS with all five components was documented in 4 (7.27%) while MS with four and three components was seen in 23 (41.81%) and 28 (50.90%) patients respectively. Only 24 (43.63%) patients with MS had diabetes mellitus, remaining 31(56.36%) were non diabetic. Frequencies of diabetes, hypertension and family history of CAD were significantly higher (p<0.05) in patients with metabolic syndrome as compared to patients with normal metabolic status. Conclusion: Metabolic syndrome is fairly common and important risk factor in patients of IHD. Other risk factors like smoking, dyslipidemia, hypertension and diabetes were also frequently found. Public awareness to control the risk factors can reduce the prevalence of CAD in our country. (author)

  2. Syndrome in question*

    Peruzzo, Juliano; Nazar, Fernanda Luca; Tubone, Mariana Quirino; Escobar, Gabriela Fortes; Cestari, Tania Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an inherited disease characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentation changes and minor facial malformations. It has four clinical variants. We report the case of a girl who, like her mother, was affected by this syndrome. The diagnosis was made after detection and treatment of deafness. PMID:26375234

  3. Syndrome in Question.

    Peruzzo, Juliano; Nazar, Fernanda Luca; Tubone, Mariana Quirino; Escobar, Gabriela Fortes; Cestari, Tania Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an inherited disease characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentation changes and minor facial malformations. It has four clinical variants. We report the case of a girl who, like her mother, was affected by this syndrome. The diagnosis was made after detection and treatment of deafness. PMID:26375234

  4. Syndrome in question*

    Peruzzo, Juliano; Nazar, Fernanda Luca; Tubone, Mariana Quirino; Escobar, Gabriela Fortes; Cestari, Tania Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an inherited disease characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentation changes and minor facial malformations. It has four clinical variants. We report the case of a girl who, like her mother, was affected by this syndrome. The diagnosis was made after detection and treatment of deafness.

  5. Chediak-Higashi syndrome.

    Kumar, P; Rao, K S; Shashikala, P; Chandrashekar, H R; Banapurmath, C R

    2000-08-01

    A case of Chediak-Higashi syndrome is reported in a four-year-old boy who presented with recurrent chest infection, partial albinism, hyperpigmentation of the extremities and presence of giant granules in leucocytes and melanocytes in the skin. Parental consanguinity was present. Though uncommon, hyperpigmentation of sun exposed areas may be the initial symptom in Chediak-Higashi syndrome. PMID:10985003

  6. Kleine Levin Syndrome

    Abdul Wahid Khan, Zia Ud Din, Abdul Salam

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available A case of Kleine Levin Syndrome is presented. Episodic course with spontaneous remission of eachepisode and characteristic features of hypersomnia, hyperphagia, disinhibited behavior. affective featureslike ilTitability and cognitive disturbance made the diagnosis of Kleine Levin syndrome 111 ourpatient.

  7. Poland's syndrome: radiologic findings

    Poland's syndrome is a rare non-inherited congenital anomaly. The authors describe the classic radiologic findings of Poland's syndrome by reporting the case of a male four-year old patient with asymmetry of hands and chest, illustrating the fundamental imaging criteria for a conclusive diagnosis. (author)

  8. Polycystic ovarian syndrome

    Nina Madnani; Kaleem Khan; Phulrenu Chauhan; Girish Parmar

    2013-01-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a "multispeciality" disorder suspected in patients with irregular menses and clinical signs of hyperandrogenism such as acne, seborrhoea, hirsutism, irregular menses, infertility, and alopecia. Recently, PCOS has been associated with the metabolic syndrome. Patients may develop obesity, insulin resistance, acanthosis nigricans, Type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemias, hypertension, non-alcoholic liver disease, and obstructive sleep apnoea. Good clinical examinatio...

  9. Klippel-Feil Syndrome

    ... such as Klippel-Feil Syndrome and open promising new avenues for treatment. NIH Patient Recruitment for Klippel-Feil Syndrome Clinical Trials At NIH Clinical Center Throughout the U.S. and Worldwide NINDS Clinical Trials Organizations Column1 Column2 March of Dimes 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue ...

  10. Apert Syndrome. Case Report

    Ninecta Pérez Breña

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The case of a white female aged 7 is evaluated in the Primary Care Service of the Barrio Adentro medical mission in Nueva Esparta state, Republic of Venezuela. After a clinical and radiological evaluation she is diagnosed with a genetic syndrome known as Apert Syndrome.

  11. MECP2 Duplication Syndrome

    Signorini, Cinzia; De Felice, Claudio; Leoncini, Silvia;

    2016-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) and MECP2 duplication syndrome (MDS) are neurodevelopmental disorders caused by alterations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene expression. A relationship between MECP2 loss-of-function mutations and oxidative stress has been previously documented in RTT patients...

  12. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome

    2014-07-07

    This podcast discusses Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, a viral respiratory illness caused by Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus—MERS-CoV.  Created: 7/7/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 7/7/2014.

  13. Trigeminalt trofisk syndrom--

    Kjaerskov, Mette Wanscher; Bygum, Anette

    2009-01-01

    Trigeminal trophic syndrome (TTS) is a rare but well-described syndrome consisting of the triad: paraesthesia, anaesthesia and crescent-shaped ulceration of the ala nasi. We report a case of a 62-year-old woman presenting with TTS after operative excision of an acusticus neurinoma. She attended s...

  14. Yellow nail syndrome

    Dixit Ramakant

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of yellow nail syndrome is described in a forty year old male patient who presented with classical triad of this syndrome i.e. deformed yellow nails, lymph-edema and chronic recurrent pleural effusion. The practical problems in the di-agnosis are also briefly discussed with emphasis on awareness of this rare clinical entity.

  15. Bronchiectasis and Marfan's syndrome.

    Foster, M E; Foster, D R

    1980-01-01

    Marfan's syndrome is a rare hereditary disorder characterized by skeletal, cardiovascular and ocular abnormalities. Pulmonary abnormalities occur in approximately 10% of patients the commonest being spontaneous pneumothorax and emphysema. A patient is described who had Marfan's syndrome and bronchiectasis, an association only described on 2 previous occasions in the literature.

  16. Restless Legs Syndrome

    ... Us FAQs Home » Health Information for the Public » Health Topics » Restless Legs Syndrome Explore Restless Legs Syndrome What Is... Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Insomnia Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency Sleep Studies Send a ...

  17. Metabolic syndrome and menopause

    Jouyandeh Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolic syndrome is defined as an assemblage of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, and menopause is associated with an increase in metabolic syndrome prevalence. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components among postmenopausal women in Tehran, Iran. Methods In this cross-sectional study in menopause clinic in Tehran, 118 postmenopausal women were investigated. We used the adult treatment panel 3 (ATP3 criteria to classify subjects as having metabolic syndrome. Results Total prevalence of metabolic syndrome among our subjects was 30.1%. Waist circumference, HDL-cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, diastolic blood pressure ,Systolic blood pressure, and triglyceride were significantly higher among women with metabolic syndrome (P-value Conclusions Our study shows that postmenopausal status is associated with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome. Therefore, to prevent cardiovascular disease there is a need to evaluate metabolic syndrome and its components from the time of the menopause.

  18. Rothmund - Thomson Syndrome

    Sharma N. L

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Rothmund-Thomson syndrome is a rare geno-photodermatosis of children. Poikilodermatous cutaneous changes, growth retardation, juvenile cataract and high incidence of malignancy are its classical features. A Thomson type of Rothmund-Thomson syndrome with characteristic poikiloderma congenitale, growth retardation, absence of juvenile cataract and parental non-consanguinity is described in an 8 year old Indian girl.

  19. [Frey syndrome in childhood].

    Clarós, P; González-Enseñat, M A; Arimany, J; Vincente, M A; Clarós, A

    1993-01-01

    Frey's syndrome is distinguished by the appearing of erythema, sensation of hotness, sometimes pain, and transpiration discharge in the preauricular and temporal area when ingestion stars. We present an eleven month old child with this pathology and we review the etiology and clinic manifestations of this syndrome. PMID:8129975

  20. Adult onset Leigh syndrome

    Pandit Lekha

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Leigh syndrome is a rare progressive mitochondrial disorder of oxidative metabolism. Though it has been reported in infancy and childhood, it is rarely described in adults. The authors describe a patient who had clinical and magnetic resonance imaging features diagnostic of Leigh syndrome, with supportive biochemical and muscle histochemistry evidence.

  1. Kleine-Levin Syndrome

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A systematic review of all published cases of Kleine-Levin syndrome (KLS described in 195 articles since 1962 is presented from Stanford University Center for Narcolepsy, Palo Alto, CA; the Kleine-Levin Syndrome Foundation, Boston, MA; and Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris, France.

  2. Fragile X syndrome.

    Wiebe, E.; A. Wiebe

    1994-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common form of inherited mental retardation. Only recently has it been possible to detect all carriers and transmitters. We review the syndrome and discuss the pedigree of a large fragile X family. Family doctors should identify cases in their practices so genetic counseling can be offered to the families.

  3. Lemierre's Syndrome Mimicking Leptospirosis

    Lin, Dagmar; Suwantarat, Nuntra; Young, Royden S.

    2010-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is a suppurative thrombophlebitis involving the internal jugular vein, most commonly associated with Fusobacterium necrophorum, usually a complication of oropharyngeal infections. This syndrome is rare and is often overlooked. We present a case of sepsis mimicking initially severe leptospirosis (Weil's disease) due to acute febrile illness with multiorgan failure and hyperbilirubinemia. Finally, blood cultures revealed Fusobacterium necrophorum and computed tomography (CT)...

  4. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome in PAGOD syndrome.

    Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Miyake, Akira; Nakayashiro, Mami

    2014-06-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities as well as non-cardiac anomalies have been identified as independent risk factors for surgical morbidity and mortality in Fontan palliation. The combination of malformations consisting of pulmonary hypoplasia, agonadism (sex reversal), omphalocele, and diaphragmatic defect is compatible with pulmonary artery and lung hypoplasia, agonadism, omphalocele, and diaphragmatic defect (PAGOD). Most cases have been associated with cardiac disease, particularly hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) that is potentially destined for Fontan palliation. Reported herein is the case of a Japanese female infant diagnosed with PAGOD syndrome along with HLHS (mitral atresia and aortic atresia), in whom intractable respiratory failure manifested as bilateral eventration of the diaphragm and presumed right lung hypoplasia. These characteristic pulmonary lesions associated with the syndrome precluded use of the Fontan pathway. PMID:24894929

  5. Hyperacute cognitive stroke syndromes.

    Ferro, J M

    2001-10-01

    Cognitive syndromes are common clinical manifestations of hyperacute stroke and may be the single or dominant presenting features. They are related to acute dysfunction of complex integrated distributed functional networks serving different cognitive domains. The most common cortical syndromes include nonfluent or fluent aphasia, neglect, collor agnosia, pure alexia and Balint's syndrome. Disturbances of declarative memory are common following posterior cerebral artery and thalamic strokes. Abulia can follow thalamic, caudate and capsular lesions. Intraventricular and subarachnoid haemorrhages can cause preeminent neuropsychological changes. Disorientation is present in about 40% of acute stroke patients and delirium complicates the course of 25% of acute strokes. Some hyperacute cognitive stroke syndromes are useful indicators of later disability. Cognitive syndromes may pose special difficulties to neurology residents, unless formal teaching in neuropsychology and psychiatry is included in their training programs. PMID:11697519

  6. Neonatal bartter syndrome

    A pre-term baby girl was born following a pregnancy complicated by severe polyhydramnios at a gestational age of 36 weeks. She was initially suffering from respiratory distress consistent with idiopathic respiratory distress syndrome, and altered electrolyte imbalance with hyponatremia, hypokalemia and hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis. However, during the third week of life when she had dehydration along with significant electrolyte imbalance, Bartter's syndrome was considered which was supported by findings of high renin and aldosterone levels. Treatment was done by correction of electrolytes and dehydration along with indomethacin. The drug was well tolerated. The infant showed correction of electrolyte imbalance. The features of this case suggest an extreme form of Bartter's syndrome presenting from the early days of life. The syndrome is reported because of it's rarity and alerts pediatricians to the antenatal and neonatal variant of Bartter's syndrome. (author)

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Majeed syndrome

    ... the skin, most often a condition known as Sweet syndrome. The symptoms of Sweet syndrome include fever and the development of painful bumps ... NORD): Osteomyelitis National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD): Sweet Syndrome GeneReviews (1 link) Majeed Syndrome Genetic Testing Registry ( ...

  8. Sweet's syndrome with idiopathic thrombocythemia

    Kaszewski, Sebastian; Czajkowski, Rafał; Protas-Drozd, Franciszka; Placek, Waldemar; Jakubowski, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of paraneoplastic skin syndromes associating neoplastic processes is assumed as the crucial aspect of dermatological practice. Knowledge of clinical findings of dermatoses suggesting coincidence of malignant proliferative processes facilitates diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. We would like to present a case of Sweet's syndrome, qualified for comparative paraneoplastic skin syndromes. Sweet's syndrome, acute, febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, was first described by Robert Dougla...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Gorlin syndrome

    ... Syndrome Life Support Network Gorlin Syndrome Group National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) GeneReviews (1 link) Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Gorlin syndrome Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (1 link) ...

  10. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome

    Gvozdenović Ljiljana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is now recognized as a toxin-mediated, multisystem illness. It is characterized by an early onset of shock with multiorgan failure and continues to be associated with high morbidity and mortality, caused by group A Streptococcus pyogenes. The symptoms for staphylococcal and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome are similar. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was not well described until 1993, when children who had suffered from varicella presented roughly 2-4 weeks later with a clinical syndrome highly suggestive of toxic shock syndrome. Characteristics, complications and therapy. It is characterized by a sudden onset of fever, chills, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle aches and rash. It can rapidly progress to severe and intractable hypotension and multisystem dysfunction. Almost every organ system can be involved. Complications of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome may include kidney failure, liver failure and even death. Crystalloids and inotropic agents are used to treat the hypovolemic shock aggressively, with close monitoring of the patient’s mean arterial pressure and central venous pressure. An immediate and aggressive management of hypovolemic shock is essential in streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Targeted antibiotics are indicated; penicillin or a betalactam antibiotic is used for treating group A streptococci, and clindamycin has emerged as a key portion of the standard treatment.

  11. Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome.

    Galli, Jonathan A; Sawaya, Ronald Andari; Friedenberg, Frank K

    2011-12-01

    Coinciding with the increasing rates of cannabis abuse has been the recognition of a new clinical condition known as Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is characterized by chronic cannabis use, cyclic episodes of nausea and vomiting, and frequent hot bathing. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome occurs by an unknown mechanism. Despite the well-established anti-emetic properties of marijuana, there is increasing evidence of its paradoxical effects on the gastrointestinal tract and CNS. Tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, and cannabigerol are three cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant with opposing effects on the emesis response. The clinical course of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome may be divided into three phases: prodromal, hyperemetic, and recovery phase. The hyperemetic phase usually ceases within 48 hours, and treatment involves supportive therapy with fluid resuscitation and anti-emetic medications. Patients often demonstrate the learned behavior of frequent hot bathing, which produces temporary cessation of nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. The broad differential diagnosis of nausea and vomiting often leads to delay in the diagnosis of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome shares several similarities with CHS and the two conditions are often confused. Knowledge of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and natural course of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is limited and requires further investigation. PMID:22150623

  12. Mosaicism in Stickler syndrome

    Stevenson, David A.; Vanzo, Rena; Damjanovich, Kristy; Hanson, Heather; Muntz, Harlan; Hoffman, Robert O.; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar

    2012-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is a heterogeneous condition due to mutations in COL2A1, COL11A1, COL11A2, and COL9A1. To our knowledge, neither non-penetrance nor mosaicism for COL2A1 mutations has been reported for Stickler syndrome. We report on a family with two clinically affected sibs with Stickler syndrome who have clinically unaffected parents. Both sibs have a novel heterozygous mutation in exon 26 of COL2A1 (c.1525delT); this results in a premature termination codon downstream of the mutation sit...

  13. Treatment in Postconcussional Syndrome

    Necla Keskin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Postconcussional syndrome is characterized by somatic, cognitive and psychiatric (emotional, behavioral symptoms that occur after mild traumatic brain injury. These symptoms usually recover fully within 3-6 months almost in 90% of patients. Persistent post-concussion symptoms could occur in 10% of patients. Diagnosis is based on the subjective complaints and the treatment of the syndrome is mainly of palliative nature. The patient should be educated about the nature and outcome of the syndrome and reassured that almost all symptoms recover fully within 3-6 months. Multifaceted rehabilitation programs and cognitive behavioral therapy could be beneficial. Pharmacotherapy and somatic therapy are other options for persistent symptoms.

  14. Testicular Feminization Syndrome

    Vaneet Kour, Ajay Abrol

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Testicular feminization syndrome or androgen insensitivity syndrome is a rare disorder with anincidence of 1:20,000-64,000 male births. The individual with complete form of this syndrome (CIAShave female external genitalia while those with partial form (PIAS have variable ambiguity ofgenitalia and often need extensive reconsructive surgery. The diagonosis should be suspected infemale child with inguinal hernia or presenting with primary ammenorrohea and on examinationthere is no vagina with absent axillary or pubic hair. Awareness of this entity is important as withearly diagonosis such disorder can be managed appropriately and accurate information can begiven to parents regarding long term issues of harmone replacement therapy and fertility.

  15. Radiology of syndromes

    In the course of 20 years, the author has investigated the radiological aspects of many different syndromes. 541 of them are listed in this book, together with their typical X-ray pictures. Congenital deformities, genetic diseases, and acquired diseases with typical combinations of sigs and symptoms are presented with information on how to identify them. Clinical manifestations are briefly characterized, and hereditary aspects are mentioned. Pathological characteristics and names of the syndromes are presented. A bibliography is given for every syndrome for those who intend to deepen their knowledge. (orig./MG)

  16. Recurrent Miller Fisher syndrome.

    Madhavan, S; Geetha; Bhargavan, P V

    2004-07-01

    Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) is a variant of Guillan Barre syndrome characterized by the triad of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and areflexia. Recurrences are exceptional with Miller Fisher syndrome. We are reporting a case with two episodes of MFS within two years. Initially he presented with partial ophthalmoplegia, ataxia. Second episode was characterized by full-blown presentation characterized by ataxia, areflexia and ophthalmoplegia. CSF analysis was typical during both episodes. Nerve conduction velocity study was fairly within normal limits. MRI of brain was within normal limits. He responded to symptomatic measures initially, then to steroids in the second episode. We are reporting the case due to its rarity. PMID:15645989

  17. Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

    ... and nerves. One of these structures is the posterior tibial nerve, which is the focus of tarsal tunnel ... syndrome is a compression, or squeezing, on the posterior tibial nerve that produces symptoms anywhere along the path ...

  18. Guillain-Barre Syndrome

    Guillain-Barre syndrome is a rare disorder that causes your immune system to attack your peripheral nervous system ( ... over a period of weeks and then stabilize. Guillain-Barre can be hard to diagnose. Possible tests include ...

  19. ADHD & Down Syndrome

    ... at an accredited sleep center. What Types of Communication Difficulties Can Look Like ADHD? People with Down ... Down syndrome have a wide range of learning styles. A child's educational team may need to try ...

  20. Joubert Syndrome, A Ciliopathy

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at Neurogenetics Unit, Mendel Laboratory, Rome, and University of Salerno, Italy, review the clinical features and genetic basis of Joubert syndrome, overlap with other ciliopathies, and the multifaceted roles of primary cilia in CNS development.

  1. Toxic shock syndrome

    ... a toxin produced by some types of Staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock-like syndrome (TSLS), can be caused by Streptococcal bacteria. Not all staph or strep infections cause toxic ...

  2. Children with Usher syndrome

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2012-01-01

    , 1 with mild mental retardation, and 2 with conduct disorder). Another 3 children had had a mental or behavioral disorder previously in their childhood. Conclusion: Even though vision impairment first manifests in late childhood, some children with Usher syndrome seem to develop mental and behavioral...... disorders among 26 children, 3-17 years of age, with Usher syndrome. Results: Six of the 26 children were diagnosed with a mental or behavioral disorder (1 with schizophrenia and mild mental retardation, 1 with atypical autism and severe mental retardation, 1 with atypical autism and mild mental retardation......Background: Mental and behavioral disorders among adults with Usher syndrome have been discussed and reported in some case studies but no research has been reported on children with Usher syndrome. Methods: This article investigates the prevalence and characteristics of mental and behavioral...

  3. Cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome

    DongFuhui

    2004-01-01

    The cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome is named that, the cutaneous nerve's functional disorder caused by some chronic entrapment, moreover appears a series of nerve's feeling obstacle,vegetative nerve function obstacle, nutrition obstacle, even motor function obstacle in various degree.

  4. Dumping syndrome (image)

    Dumping syndrome occurs when the contents of the stomach empty too quickly into the small intestine. The ... causing nausea, cramping, diarrhea, sweating, faintness, and palpitations. Dumping usually occurs after the consumption of too much ...

  5. Aging male syndrome

    Valer Donca

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Aging Male Syndrome is a medical condition through which men could pass between the ages of 35 and 65, when testosterone levelsin their body decline considerably. Androgen deficiency in the aging male has become a topic of increasing interest and debate throughout theworld. In contrast to female menopause, the process of aging in the male genital system is slow and highly variable between individuals. Thecharacteristic symptoms of Aging Male Syndrome include weakness, depression, fatigue and changes in body hair and skin, decreased sexualdesire, decreased lean body mass accompanied by increased visceral fat, decreased bone mineral density. Aging Male Syndrome is usually diagnosedby testing the blood for testosterone levels. The usual treatment method for Aging Male Syndrome includes testosterone injections,testosterone patches, testosterone gels and oral preparations.

  6. Facts about Tourette Syndrome

    ... Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Info For Families Bullying Info for Health Professionals Info for Education Professionals ... 6): 497-501. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Prevalence of diagnosed Tourette Syndrome in persons aged ...

  7. Blueberries and Metabolic Syndrome

    Metabolic Syndrome is a cluster of metabolic disorders that increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Type 2 diabetes, elevated blood pressure, and atherogenic dyslipidemia are among the metabolic alterations that predispose the individual to several adverse cardiovascular complications. The hea...

  8. What is Metabolic Syndrome?

    ... becoming more common due to a rise in obesity rates among adults. In the future, metabolic syndrome may overtake smoking as the leading risk factor for heart disease. It is possible to prevent or delay ...

  9. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS)

    Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) is a condition in some obese people in which poor breathing leads to ... Maintain a healthy weight and avoid obesity. Use your CPAP or BiPAP treatment as your provider prescribed.

  10. Ellis Von Creveld Syndrome

    Afshar H

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available One patient with Ellis Von Creveld syndrome contains: dwarfism, congenital heart"ndisease, ectodermal dysplasia, polyductyly, an abnormally wide labial frenum and maxillary"nmolars with single root.

  11. Nephrotic Syndrome in Adults

    ... glomeruli. Nephrotic syndrome can also be caused by systemic diseases, which are diseases that affect many parts of the body, such as diabetes or lupus. Systemic diseases that affect the kidneys are called secondary causes ...

  12. Cardio Renal Syndrome

    KV Sahasranam

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available For a long time, physicians have recognized that the kidney and the heart are related especially when there is severe dysfunction of either of them. Dysfunction of one of these organs seldom occurs in isolation. Of late the cardio renal syndrome is assuming significance because of its increasing incidence, awareness and complications. There is no definite definition of the cardio renal syndrome. However, an attempted definition states that it is a "decline in renal function in the setting of advanced heart failure". This definition does not cover the whole gamut of the cardio renal syndrome. Cardiac diseases are associated independently with a decrease in renal function and progression of existing renal disease. Chronic Kidney disease (CKD is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events and outcome. This bidirectional nature of cardiac and renal interaction is called Cardio Renal Syndrome (CRS.

  13. Ehlers-Danlos' Syndrom

    Leganger, Julie; Søborg, Marie-Louise Kulas; Farholt, Stense;

    2016-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) comprises a group of diseases characterized by connective tissue fragility. The clinical symptoms primarily involve the skin, joints, blood vessels and internal organs. Diagnosing EDS is complicated because of the clinical variability, imprecise diagnostic criteria...

  14. Distal arthrogryposis syndrome

    Kulkarni K

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A 5-month-old male infant presented with weak cry, decreased body movements, tightness of whole body since birth, and one episode of generalized seizure on day 4 of life. He was born at term by elective caesarian section performed for breech presentation. The child had failure to thrive, contractures at elbow and knee joints, hypertonia, microcephaly, small mouth, retrognathia, and camptodactyly. There was global developmental delay. Abdominal examination revealed umbilical and bilateral inguinal hernia. Visual evoked response and brainstem evoked response audiometry were abnormal. Nerve conduction velocity was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain revealed paucity of white matter in bilateral cerebral hemispheres with cerebellar and brain stem atrophy. The differential diagnoses considered in the index patient were distal arthrogryposis (DA syndrome, cerebroculofacioskeletal syndrome, and Pena Shokier syndrome. The index patient most likely represents a variant of DA: Sheldon Hall syndrome.

  15. Multiple Mucosal Neuroma Syndrome

    Thami Gurvinder P

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of multiple mucosal neuroma syndrome recently classified as Multiple Endocrinal Neoplasia (MEN, type 2b, is reported for its rarity and importance of diagnosis at an early age.

  16. Painful Bruising Syndrome

    Kalla G

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Painful bruising syndrome (PBS is a distinctive but rare clinical entity. We are reporting a case of PBS in a 26 year old hysterical woman who responded excellently to oral cyproheptadine and psychotherapy.

  17. Catastrophic Antiphospholipid Syndrome.

    El-Shereef, Rawhya R; El-Abedin, Zein; Abdel Aziz, Rashad; Talat, Ibrahim; Saleh, Mohammed; Abdel-Samia, Hanna; Sameh, Amro; Sharha, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports one case of successfully treated patients suffering from a rare entity, the catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS). Management of this patient is discussed in detail. PMID:27375916

  18. Cri du chat syndrome

    ... slow growth Low-set or abnormally shaped ears Intellectual disability Partial webbing or fusing of fingers or toes ... Intellectual disability is common. Half of children with this syndrome learn enough verbal skills to communicate. The cat- ...

  19. Rubinsten Taybi Syndrome

    J. Jannati

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Rubinstein Taybi syndrome or Broad Thumb and Hallux syndrome is a genetic multisystem disorder with unknown mode of inheritance. "nThis syndrome characterized by Broad terminal phalange of the thumbs and /or hallucess broad terminal phalanges of other fingers, characteristic facies (small head, beaked nose, hypertelorism, antimongoloid slant of the palpebral fissures, strabismus, high arch palate, abnormalities of ears, mental and motor retardation."nRadiologic manifestations are short and wide terminal phalanx of thumbs and great toes, flaring of iliac (small iliac index, and skeletal maturation retardation."nLarge foramen magnum, congenital heart disease, urinary tract anomalies, prominent forehead, vertebral anomalies, sternal anomalies, dislocation of patella, syndactyly, polydactyly, absence of corpus callosum are other reported anomalies."nThe radiologic manifestations of this syndrome are discussed in this case report.

  20. Anesthesia & Down Syndrome

    ... has been more aggressive early cardiac intervention. Other congenital (present at birth) issues requiring early surgical intervention in Down syndrome populations include esophageal, gastrointestinal and urinary tract problems. Correction of these problems and early, aggressive ...

  1. Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome? Obesity hypoventilation (HI-po-ven-tih- ... NHLBI Research Featured in HBO Documentary Series on Obesity Hear people talk about their challenges and successes ...

  2. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    ... syndrome (RDS) is a problem often seen in premature babies. The condition makes it hard for the ... a slippery substance in the lungs called surfactant. This substance helps the lungs fill with air ...

  3. Prader-Willi syndrome

    ... signs of morbid obesity, such as: Abnormal glucose tolerance High insulin level in the blood Low oxygen ... PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Prader-Willi Syndrome Browse ...

  4. Vogt koyanagi harada syndrome

    Amin S

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of Vogt Koyanagi Harada syndrome is reported. The depigmented macules appeared initially over eyebrows and around both eyes after an episode of fever and then rapidly involved almost the entire body within 6 months.

  5. Klinefelter Syndrome (For Teens)

    ... role in who we are — including deciding our gender, how we look, and how we grow. Doctors ... with Klinefelter syndrome may also have problems with attention, speech development, and learning word skills like spelling, ...

  6. RESTLESS LEGS SYNDROME

    Dmitriy Valer'evich Artem'ev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, clinical picture, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and treatment of restless legs syndrome. Recommendations are given how to choose therapeutic modalities and drugs in relation to different factors.

  7. Down Syndrome (For Parents)

    ... DS based on the infant's physical characteristics, a karyotype — a blood or tissue sample stained to ... the parent of a child diagnosed with Down syndrome, you may at first feel overwhelmed by feelings ...

  8. 47,XXY Klinefelter syndrome

    Aksglaede, Lise; Link, Katarina; Giwercman, Aleksander; Jørgensen, Niels; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Juul, Anders

    2013-01-01

    47,XXY (Klinefelter syndrome) is the most frequent sex chromosomal disorder and affects approximately one in 660 newborn boys. The syndrome is characterized by varying degrees of cognitive, social, behavioral, and learning difficulties and in adulthood additionally primary testicular failure with...... clinical finding in KS is small testes, that are most often not identified until after puberty. Decreased awareness of this syndrome among health professionals and a general perception that all patients with 47,XXY exhibit the classic textbook phenotype results in a highly under-diagnosed condition with up...... the appropriate ages and stages of development for the purpose of preventing osteopenia/osteoporosis, metabolic syndrome, and other medical conditions related to hypogonadism and to the XXY as well as minimizing potential learning and psychosocial problems. The aim of this review is to present the...

  9. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the sudden, unexplained death of an infant younger than one year old. Some people call ... boys, African Americans, and American Indian/Alaska Native infants have a higher risk of SIDS. Although health ...

  10. Impingement syndrome (image)

    ... arch of the shoulder blade, it can cause shoulder pain called impingement syndrome. The tendons become compressed, damaged, and inflamed leading to rotator cuff tendonitis. This can occur ... use of the shoulder like baseball pitching, or from an injury.

  11. PIRIFORMIS SYNDROME: A REVIEW

    Subhasis Ranjan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Piriformis syndrome is a painful musculoskeletal condition resembling sciatica, secondary to sciatic nerve entrapment in piriformis muscle at the greater sciatic notch and responsible for 6%cases of low back pain, also called back pocket sciatica or wallet sciatica, first described in 1928 by Yeoman. It usually occurs due to abnormalities in piriformis muscle such as hypertrophy, inflammation and anatomic variations resulting in irritation and entrapment of sciatic nerve. The diagnosis of piriformis syndrome is made by clinical features, electromyography and nerve conduction velocity, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and bone scan. Management of piriformis syndrome includes nonsurgical and surgical interventions. Non-surgical management includes- nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physical therapy, ultrasound, correction of biomechanical abnormality, lifestyle modifications, local anesthetic and/or steroid injection into the piriformis muscle. Surgical management includes-surgical release of piriformis muscle and decompression of the sciatic nerve. Piriformis Syndrome- a review.

  12. Parental Alienation Syndrome

    Fuat Torun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Children who have been programmed by one parent to be alienated from the other parent are commonly seen in the context of child-custody disputes. Its primary manifestation is the child’s campaign of denigration against a parent, a campaign that has no justification. It is said to result from a combination of a programming (brainwashing parent’s indoctrinations and the child’s own contributions to the vilification of the targeted parent. Many evaluators use the term parental alienation syndrome to refer to the disorder engendered in such children. However, there is significant controversy going on about the validity of parental alienation syndrome. The purpose of this article has been to describe and help to differentiate parental alienation syndrome and abuse for mental health professionals working in the field, and discuss the arguments about the validity of this syndrome.

  13. Congenital nephrotic syndrome

    The disorder often leads to infection, malnutrition, and kidney failure. It can lead to death by age 5, and many children die within the first year. Congenital nephrotic syndrome may be controlled in some cases with early ...

  14. Treacher Collins Syndrome

    ... cleft palate is a frequently associated conditions this syndrome. Cleft palate itself sometimes can cause feeding problems and increase the risk of middle ear problems. Your child’s primary care provider or cleft palate or craniofacial ...

  15. National Reye's Syndrome Foundation

    ... we need your help... Learn More Share: View National Reye's Syndrome Foundation's LinkedIn profile Spread Awareness with the Kids & Aspirin Don't Mix car magnet ribbon. Get News & Updates: SignUp to get ...

  16. Catastrophic Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Rawhya R. El-Shereef

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports one case of successfully treated patients suffering from a rare entity, the catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS. Management of this patient is discussed in detail.

  17. Narcolepsy and ROHHAD Syndrome

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at Ghent University Hospital, Belgium; Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, and Sleep Medicine Centre, Heeze, Netherlands, report a 7-year-old girl with rapid-onset obesity, hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation, and autonomic dysregulation (ROHHAD syndrome.

  18. Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome

    An eye exam may reveal signs of dry eye syndrome . A physical exam may also show: Curving of the spine ( kyphoscoliosis ) Osteomyelitis Repeat sinus infections A chest x-ray may reveal lung abscesses. ...

  19. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    Possible complications of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome include: Chronic joint pain Early-onset arthritis Failure of surgical wounds to close (or stitches tear out) Premature rupture of membranes during pregnancy ...

  20. Chediak-Higashi syndrome

    ... condition may have: Silver hair, light-colored eyes (albinism) Increased infections in the lungs, skin, and mucous ... There is no specific treatment for Chediak-Higashi syndrome. Bone ... the disease appear to have been successful in several patients. ...

  1. Alport Syndrome Diagnosis

    ... with X-linked Alport Syndrome will show abnormal staining for COL4A5 in the skin biopsy. This approach ... and enzyme tests are performed on cultured tissue cells and/or white blood cells. During amniocentesis, a ...

  2. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disorder that causes extreme fatigue. This fatigue is not the kind of tired feeling that ... activities. The main symptom of CFS is severe fatigue that lasts for 6 months or more. You ...

  3. Harnsteinbildung und metabolisches Syndrom

    Graeff, Dorothee

    2013-01-01

    Die Urolithiasis kann heute als Volkskrankheit gelten. Sie hat damit den gleichen Stellenwert wie die arterielle Hypertonie, die Adipositas und der Diabetes mellitus, alle drei Symptome des metabolischen Syndroms. Anhand einer retrospektiven Datenanalyse wurde untersucht, ob im zugrundeliegenden Patientenkollektiv mit 472 Harnsteinbildnern eines oder mehrere Symptome des metabolischen Syndroms das Risiko für eine Harnsteinbildung erhöhen. Von 327 Männern und 145 Frauen waren 154 Personen adip...

  4. Shah-Waardenburg Syndrome

    Mahmoudi, Abdelhalim; Rami, Mohamed; Khattala, Khalid; Elmadi, Aziz; Afifi, My Abderrahmane; Youssef, Bouabdallah

    2013-01-01

    Shah-Waardenburg syndrome (SWS) is a neurocristopathy and is characterized by Hirschsprung's disease (HD), deafness, and depigmentation of hairs, skin, and iris. Is a very rare congenital disorder with variable clinical expression. This report describes a 4-day-old male newborn with Waardenburg's syndrome associated with aganglionosis of the colon and terminal ileum, and review the relevant literature for draws attention to the causal relationship between these two entities.

  5. Shah-Waardenburg syndrome.

    Mahmoudi, Abdelhalim; Rami, Mohamed; Khattala, Khalid; Elmadi, Aziz; Afifi, My Abderrahmane; Youssef, Bouabdallah

    2013-01-01

    Shah-Waardenburg syndrome (SWS) is a neurocristopathy and is characterized by Hirschsprung's disease (HD), deafness, and depigmentation of hairs, skin, and iris. Is a very rare congenital disorder with variable clinical expression. This report describes a 4-day-old male newborn with Waardenburg's syndrome associated with aganglionosis of the colon and terminal ileum, and review the relevant literature for draws attention to the causal relationship between these two entities. PMID:23565307

  6. Ketonuria and HELLP syndrome

    Gubbala, Phanendra Kumar; Karoshi, Mahantesh; Zakaria, Faris

    2009-01-01

    We recently managed a patient with the HELLP syndrome (Haemolysis, Elevated Liver enzymes and Low Platelet count) where there was a delay in diagnosis due to gastroenteritis. This case also reiterates the varied or lack of symptomatology in patients developing HELLP and obscuring the initial diagnosis. Patients with HELLP syndrome have significant maternal morbidity and mortality, hence clinical vigilance and high suspicion play a key role in the diagnosis and subsequent management.

  7. Ketonuria and HELLP syndrome.

    Gubbala, Phanendra Kumar; Karoshi, Mahantesh; Zakaria, Faris

    2009-01-01

    We recently managed a patient with the HELLP syndrome (Haemolysis, Elevated Liver enzymes and Low Platelet count) where there was a delay in diagnosis due to gastroenteritis. This case also reiterates the varied or lack of symptomatology in patients developing HELLP and obscuring the initial diagnosis. Patients with HELLP syndrome have significant maternal morbidity and mortality, hence clinical vigilance and high suspicion play a key role in the diagnosis and subsequent management. PMID:21686464

  8. Celiac Artery Compression Syndrome

    Mohammed Muqeetadnan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac artery compression syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by episodic abdominal pain and weight loss. It is the result of external compression of celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament. We present a case of celiac artery compression syndrome in a 57-year-old male with severe postprandial abdominal pain and 30-pound weight loss. The patient eventually responded well to surgical division of the median arcuate ligament by laparoscopy.

  9. Sweet Syndrome in childhood.

    Santos, Talita Batalha Pires dos; Sales, Barbara Cristina Gouveia; Sigres, Marianne; Rosman, Fernando; Cerqueira, Ana Maria Mosca de

    2015-01-01

    Sweet syndrome or acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis is a recurrent and rare skin disease caused by the release of cytokines, with diverse possible etiologic causes. It presents clinically with polymorphic skin lesions, fever, arthralgia, and peripheral leukocytosis. In general, it is associated with infections, malignancy and drugs. It usually regresses spontaneously and treatment is primarily to control the basic disease. The authors report the case of a child of 1 year and 11 months who developed Sweet syndrome. PMID:26375229

  10. Parsonage-Turner Syndrome

    Feinberg, Joseph H.; Radecki, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Parsonage-Turner Syndrome (PTS), also referred to as idiopathic brachial plexopathy or neuralgic amyotrophy, is a rare disorder consisting of a complex constellation of symptoms with abrupt onset of shoulder pain, usually unilaterally, followed by progressive neurologic deficits of motor weakness, dysesthesias, and numbness. Although the etiology of the syndrome is unclear, it is reported in various clinical situations, including postoperatively, postinfectious, posttraumatic, and postvaccina...

  11. SYNDROME IN QUESTION*

    Chiacchio, Nilton Di; Jasso-Olivares, Julio Cesar; Chiacchio, Nilton Gioia Di; Jacinto, José Antonio; Restrepo, Maria Victoria Suárez

    2015-01-01

    The Iso-Kikuchi Syndrome is a rare condition characterized by nail dysplasia involving the index fingers, including micronychia, polyonychia, anonychia, irregular lunula, malalignment and hemionychogryphosis. On the antero-posterior image, radiologic examination reveals a narrowing of the distal phalanx. The lateral image shows a Y-shaped bifurcation of the distal phalanx. We report a case of a patient with typical clinical and radiologic signs of Iso-Kikuchi Syndrome. PMID:26131880

  12. POLYCYSTIC OVARY SYNDROME

    Akula Annapurna

    2013-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is a condition in which a woman has an imbalance of female sex hormones. This may lead to menstrual cycle changes, cysts in the ovaries, trouble getting pregnant, and other health changes. In PCOS, mature eggs are not released from the ovaries. Instead, they can form very small cysts in the ovary. These changes can contribute to infertility. Common symptoms of PCOS include Menstrual disorders, Infertility, High levels of testosterone and Metabolic syndrome. Obesity, ...

  13. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    Jawa Deepti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by the presence of multiple odontogenic keratocysts along with various cutaneous, dental, osseous, ophthalmic, neurological, and sex organ abnormalities. Early diagnosis is essential as it may progress to aggressive basal cell carcinomas and neoplasias. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome has rarely been reported from India. We report here one such patient, diagnosed at a rural hospital.

  14. Tobacco and metabolic syndrome

    Yatan Pal Singh Balhara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco is a leading contributor to morbidity and mortality globally. Metabolic syndrome is a constellation of abdominal obesity, atherogenic dyslipidemia, raised blood pressure, insulin resistance (with and without glucose intolerance, pro-inflammatory state, and pro-thrombotic state. Tobacco use is associated with various core components of metabolic syndrome. It has been found to play a causal role in various pathways leading on to development this condition, the current article discusses various facets of this association.

  15. Neurocutaneous syndromes; Neurokutane Erkrankungen

    Niederstadt, T. [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Kurlemann, G. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Fakultaet

    2007-09-15

    Neurocutaneous Syndromes or phakomatoses are a heterogenous group of congenital diseases. They are characterized by dysplasias of tissues derived from the neuroektoderm. Skin alterations may be helpful in the interpretation of cerebral lesions. Recently, the genetic and pathophysiologic alterations of many phakomatoses have been elucidated. In this paper the radiologic findings and clinical signs of the most common neurocutaneous diseases (Neurofibromatosis 1 and 2, Tuberous Sclerosis Complex and Sturge Weber Syndrome) will be discussed. (orig.)

  16. Spontaneous ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

    Kasum, Miro; Orešković, Slavko; Ježek, Davor

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous forms of the ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (sOHSS) are nearly always reported between 8 and 14 weeks of pregnancy and also with follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) producing pituitary adenoma. The syndrome has been previously reported in rare instances of increased production of human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) such as multiple pregnancies, hydatiforme mole, polycystic ovary disease and elevated concentrations of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in hypothyreoidism. High lev...

  17. quadriparesis in sjogren syndrome.

    nikhil srivastva; vijay parashar; praveen chaturvedi; nilesh kumar

    2015-01-01

    Hypokalemic paralysis is a well recognised clinical presentation of Primary sjogren syndrome that occurs due to renal potassium loss caused by interstitial nephritis. However we report a case where a hypokalemic paralysis in a suspected case of sjogren syndrome was associated with high anion gap metabolic acidosis in the presence of a near normal Glomerular filtration rate (RTA) and a failure to acidify urine pH< 5.5 .Such cases represent a minority of distal RTA patients as they characterist...

  18. Unmasking diogenes syndrome

    Kashinath Nayak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diogenes syndrome is characterized by extreme self-neglect, social withdrawal, and poor personal and domestic hygiene. We report a case of Diogenes syndrome presenting with dermatitis passivata. An unusual "mask" of dirt resembling a carapace, onset of neglect after awareness of a breast lump and resumption of personal grooming and social activities after removal of the lump and counseling were seen.

  19. Approach to Brugada Syndrome

    Johnson Francis

    2016-01-01

    Brugada Syndrome was initially described by Brugada brothers in their seminal paper published in the Journal of American College of Cardiology in 1992. The syndrome was characterized by syncopal episodes and/or sudden cardiac death in association with right bundle branch block pattern with ST segment elevation in right precordial leads. Genetic basis involving mutations in sodium channel (SCN5A) was first described in 1998. But SCN5A mutations account for only about a fifth of the clinical c...

  20. Postthrombotic Syndrome: Surgical Possibilities

    Khanna, Ajay K; Shivanshu Singh

    2011-01-01

    Postthrombotic syndrome (PTS) is a late outcome of deep vein thrombosis characterized by cramping pain, swelling, hyperpigmentation, eczema, lipodermatosclerosis, and ulceration in the leg due to increased venous outflow resistance and reflux venous flow. Newer surgical and endovascular interventions have a promising result in the management of postthrombotic syndrome. Early surgical or endovascular interventions in appropriately selected patients may decrease the incidence of recurrent ulcer...

  1. The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome

    Biesecker Leslie G

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS) is a pleiotropic, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome. It is rare, but precise estimates of incidence are difficult to determine, as ascertainment is erratic (estimated range 1–9/1,000,000). The primary findings include hypertelorism, macrocephaly with frontal bossing, and polysyndactyly. The polydactyly is most commonly preaxial of the feet and postaxial in the hands, with variable cutaneous syndactyly, but the limb findings vary sign...

  2. Johanson-Blizzard syndrome

    2011-01-01

    Johanson-Blizzard syndrome (JBS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, hypoplastic or aplastic nasal alae, cutis aplasia on the scalp, and other features including developmental delay, failure to thrive, hearing loss, mental retardation, hypothyroidism, dental abnormalities, and anomalies in cardiac and genitourinary systems. More than 60 cases of this syndrome have been reported to date. We describe the case of a male infant with typical sy...

  3. Irritable bowel syndrome.

    Beck, E.; Hurwitz, B

    1992-01-01

    1. Irritable bowel syndrome is a functional disorder of the lower intestinal tract affecting approximately 10% of the population and causing a wide range of symptoms. 2. Most cases of irritable bowel syndrome can be diagnosed in general practice on the basis of the presenting history and clinical examination but some patients may need to be referred to a gastro-enterologist for further assessment including sigmoidoscopy and barium enema. 3. The clinical picture may include symptoms of abdomin...

  4. Iliotibial band friction syndrome

    Lavine, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Published articles on iliotibial band friction syndrome have been reviewed. These articles cover the epidemiology, etiology, anatomy, pathology, prevention, and treatment of the condition. This article describes (1) the various etiological models that have been proposed to explain iliotibial band friction syndrome; (2) some of the imaging methods, research studies, and clinical experiences that support or call into question these various models; (3) commonly proposed treatment methods for ili...

  5. Complications of nephrotic syndrome

    Se Jin Park; Jae Il Shin

    2011-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is one of the most common glomerular diseases that affect children. Renal histology reveals the presence of minimal change nephrotic syndrome (MCNS) in more than 80% of these patients. Most patients with MCNS have favorable outcomes without complications. However, a few of these children have lesions of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, suffer from severe and prolonged proteinuria, and are at high risk for complications. Complications of NS are divided into two c...

  6. Trisomy 13 (Patau Syndrome)

    Masoud Poureisa

    2009-01-01

    "nDescription and Definition: Synonym: patau syndrome with an incidence of 1 in 5000 births, this syndrome is characterized by multiple congenital abnormalities involving virtually every organ system. "nAbnormalities Detectable by Ultrasound "nHoloprosencephaly "nVentriculomegaly "nEnlarged cisterna magna "nMicrocephaly "nAgenesis of the corpus callosum "nCleft lip and palate "nMidface hypoplasia "nCyclopia "nMicrophthalmia "nHypotel...

  7. Ketonuria and HELLP syndrome

    Gubbala, Phanendra Kumar; Karoshi, Mahantesh; Zakaria, Faris

    2009-01-01

    We recently managed a patient with the HELLP syndrome (Haemolysis, Elevated Liver enzymes and Low Platelet count) where there was a delay in diagnosis due to gastroenteritis. This case also reiterates the varied or lack of symptomatology in patients developing HELLP and obscuring the initial diagnosis. Patients with HELLP syndrome have significant maternal morbidity and mortality, hence clinical vigilance and high suspicion play a key role in the diagnosis and subsequent management. PMID:21686464

  8. Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome.

    O'Leary, D P

    2010-01-01

    Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome is a rare abnormality of the anatomical relationship between the popliteal artery and adjacent muscles or fibrous bands in the popliteal fossa. The following is a case report of a 19 year old female, in whom popliteal artery entrapment syndrome was diagnosed, and successfully treated surgically. A review of literature is also presented and provides details on how PAES is classified, diagnosed both clinically and radiologically, and treated surgically.

  9. Asperger Syndrome in children

    Ioannis Koutelekos; Chrysoula Valamoutopoulou

    2009-01-01

    The Asperger’s Syndrome is reported in the pervasive developmental disorders and was categorized as a separate disorder, initially in the ICD -10 (World Health Organization, 1992) and afterwards in the DSM-IV (American Psychiatric Organization, 1994). The Asperger’s Syndrome is distinguished by a team of symptoms that concern the low output in the social interaction and the communication dexterities, as well as the increased stereotypical behavior in various activities and interests.The aim o...

  10. Asperger Syndrome in children

    Ioannis Koutelekos

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The Asperger’s Syndrome is reported in the pervasive developmental disorders and was categorized as a separate disorder, initially in the ICD -10 (World Health Organization, 1992 and afterwards in the DSM-IV (American Psychiatric Organization, 1994. The Asperger’s Syndrome is distinguished by a team of symptoms that concern the low output in the social interaction and the communication dexterities, as well as the increased stereotypical behavior in various activities and interests.The aim of this particular article that constitutes a case study is the descriptive approach of the Asperger’s Syndrome, through the study of the child behavior.The methodology that was followed in the present case-study was based on inquiring studies and reviews that were drawn from international data bases that correspond to this particular case study of syndrome Asperger in children.Results: The individuals with Asperger’ s syndrome, as well as the case study, tend to experience really big difficulties in elementary social behaviors, as failure in the development and creation of friendly relations or in the search of entertainment activities with others. Moreover, they face difficulties in the comprehension of non verbal communication (body language and the other’s expressions, the body gestures or even the eye contact.Conclusions: The precocious recognition of Asperger’s syndrome is imperative, with final objective the continuous briefing and sensitization of all health professionals, as well as the wider public, toward this syndrome. The earlier a parent foreruns for the diagnosis, the bigger probabilities they stand for a potential functional re-establishment of the syndrome.

  11. The stress ulcer syndrome

    Essen, H.A.

    1986-01-01

    textabstractThe stress ulcer syndrome is described in this thesis. This syndrome is seen in patients admitted to intensive care departments or being treated in field hospitals, in disaster areas, or battle fields. Acute mucosal lesions associated with burns (Curling's ulcers) and central nervous system disorders (Cushing's ulcers) appear to have a different pathophysiology and a different pathology to the real stress ulcers. Peptic ulcers and gastric lesions following use of non-steroidal ant...

  12. Syndrome in question*

    Dalapicola, Monique Coelho; Veasey, John Verrinder; Lellis, Rute Facchini

    2016-01-01

    Ross syndrome is a rare disease characterized by peripheral nervous system dysautonomia with selective degeneration of cholinergic fibers. It is composed by the triad of unilateral or bilateral segmental anhidrosis, deep hyporeflexia and Holmes-Adie's tonic pupil. The presence of compensatory sweating is frequent, usually the symptom that most afflicts patients. The aspects of the syndrome are put to discussion due to the case of a male patient, caucasian, 47 years old, with clinical onset of 25 years. PMID:26982793

  13. Syndrome in question*

    Dalapicola, Monique Coelho; Veasey, John Verrinder; Lellis, Rute Facchini

    2016-01-01

    Ross syndrome is a rare disease characterized by peripheral nervous system dysautonomia with selective degeneration of cholinergic fibers. It is composed by the triad of unilateral or bilateral segmental anhidrosis, deep hyporeflexia and Holmes-Adie's tonic pupil. The presence of compensatory sweating is frequent, usually the symptom that most afflicts patients. The aspects of the syndrome are put to discussion due to the case of a male patient, caucasian, 47 years old, with clinical onset of...

  14. Syndrome in question.

    Dalapicola, Monique Coelho; Veasey, John Verrinder; Lellis, Rute Facchini

    2016-02-01

    Ross syndrome is a rare disease characterized by peripheral nervous system dysautonomia with selective degeneration of cholinergic fibers. It is composed by the triad of unilateral or bilateral segmental anhidrosis, deep hyporeflexia and Holmes-Adie's tonic pupil. The presence of compensatory sweating is frequent, usually the symptom that most afflicts patients. The aspects of the syndrome are put to discussion due to the case of a male patient, caucasian, 47 years old, with clinical onset of 25 years. PMID:26982793

  15. What Are the Treatments for Rett Syndrome?

    ... Resources and Publications What are the treatments for Rett syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... 2012, from http://www.rettsyndrome.org/understanding-rett-syndrome/about-rett-syndrome [top] PubMed Health. (2010). Rett syndrome . Retrieved ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome

    ... result, Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome is classified as an autoinflammatory disorder. Abnormal inflammation likely underlies many of the ... Condition ALDD autoinflammation, lipodystrophy, and dermatosis syndrome Japanese autoinflammatory syndrome with lipodystrophy JASL Nakajo syndrome NKJO Related ...

  17. The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome

    Biesecker Leslie G

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS is a pleiotropic, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome. It is rare, but precise estimates of incidence are difficult to determine, as ascertainment is erratic (estimated range 1–9/1,000,000. The primary findings include hypertelorism, macrocephaly with frontal bossing, and polysyndactyly. The polydactyly is most commonly preaxial of the feet and postaxial in the hands, with variable cutaneous syndactyly, but the limb findings vary significantly. Other low frequency findings include central nervous system (CNS anomalies, hernias, and cognitive impairment. GCPS is caused by loss of function mutations in the GLI3 transcription factor gene and is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. The disorder is allelic to the Pallister-Hall syndrome and one form of the acrocallosal syndrome. Clinical diagnosis is challenging because the findings of GCPS are relatively non-specific, and no specific and sensitive clinical have been delineated. For this reason, we have proposed a combined clinical-molecular definition for the syndrome. A presumptive diagnosis of GCPS can be made if the patient has the classic triad of preaxial polydactyly with cutaneous syndactyly of at least one limb, hypertelorism, and macrocephaly. Patients with a phenotype consistent with GCPS (but which may not manifest all three attributes listed above and a GLI3 mutation may be diagnosed definitively with GCPS. In addition, persons with a GCPS-consistent phenotype who are related to a definitively diagnosed family member in a pattern consistent with autosomal dominant inheritance may be diagnosed definitively as well. Antenatal molecular diagnosis is technically straightforward to perform. Differential diagnoses include preaxial polydactyly type 4, the GCPS contiguous gene syndrome, acrocallosal syndrome, Gorlin syndrome, Carpenter syndrome, and Teebi syndrome. Treatment of the disorder is symptomatic, with plastic or

  18. Tolosa Hunt syndrome: a rare syndrome

    Spandan Patel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tolosa Hunt Syndrome (THS is rare syndrome with an estimated annual incidence of 1 case per million per year. THS is painful ophthalmoplegia caused by nonspecific inflammation of cavernous sinus or superior orbital fissure. It is often unilateral with severe headache and ophthalmoplegia involving third, fourth, fifth and sixth cranial nerves. We present a case admitted in our hospital that came with complaint of severe unilateral headache with loss of vision of left eye. He did not have any other significant history except that he was complaining of partial sensory loss over left upper part of face. Ophthalmologist reference was taken to rule out any other cause involving optic disc and funduscopy which was normal. Further investigations were done which ruled out all possible causes. Patient was started on steroids and on MRI scan and clinical presentation, patient was diagnosed as Tolosa- Hunt Syndrome. Thus we report a rare case of THS which showed gradual recovery with corticosteroids. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(12.000: 3914-3916

  19. Marfan syndrome: An eyesight of syndrome

    Ashok Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome (MFS, a relatively common autosomal dominant hereditary disorder of connective tissue with prominent manifestations in the skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular systems, is caused by mutations in the glycoprotein gene fibrillin-1 (FBN1. Aortic root dilation and mitral valve prolapse are the main presentations among the cardiovascular malformations of MFS. The revised Ghent diagnostics nosology of Marfan syndrome is established in accordance with a combination of major and minor clinical manifestations in various organ systems and the family history. The pathogenesis of Marfan syndrome has not been fully elucidated. However, fibrillin-1 gene mutations are believed to exert a dominant negative effect. The treatment includes prophylactic β-blockers and angiotensin II-receptor blockers in order to slow down the dilation of the ascending aorta and prophylactic aortic surgery. Importantly, β-blocker therapy may reduce TGF-β activation, which has been recognized as a contributory factor in MFS. The identification of a mutation allows for early diagnosis, prognosis, genetic counseling, preventive management of carriers and reassurance for unaffected relatives. The importance of knowing in advance the location of the putative family mutation is highlighted by its straightforward application to prenatal and postnatal screening. The present article aims to provide an overview of this rare hereditary disorder.

  20. Autoimmune Basis for Postural Tachycardia Syndrome

    2016-03-30

    Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome; Postural Tachycardia Syndrome; Tachycardia; Arrhythmias, Cardiac; Autonomic Nervous System Diseases; Orthostatic Intolerance; Cardiovascular Diseases; Primary Dysautonomias

  1. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome

    Lo Muzio Lorenzo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. The estimated prevalence varies from 1/57,000 to 1/256,000, with a male-to-female ratio of 1:1. Main clinical manifestations include multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs, odontogenic keratocysts of the jaws, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, skeletal abnormalities, intracranial ectopic calcifications, and facial dysmorphism (macrocephaly, cleft lip/palate and severe eye anomalies. Intellectual deficit is present in up to 5% of cases. BCCs (varying clinically from flesh-colored papules to ulcerating plaques and in diameter from 1 to 10 mm are most commonly located on the face, back and chest. The number of BBCs varies from a few to several thousand. Recurrent jaw cysts occur in 90% of patients. Skeletal abnormalities (affecting the shape of the ribs, vertebral column bones, and the skull are frequent. Ocular, genitourinary and cardiovascular disorders may occur. About 5–10% of NBCCS patients develop the brain malignancy medulloblastoma, which may be a potential cause of early death. NBCCS is caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. Clinical diagnosis relies on specific criteria. Gene mutation analysis confirms the diagnosis. Genetic counseling is mandatory. Antenatal diagnosis is feasible by means of ultrasound scans and analysis of DNA extracted from fetal cells (obtained by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling. Main differential diagnoses include Bazex syndrome, trichoepithelioma papulosum multiplex and Torre's syndrome (Muir-Torre's syndrome. Management requires a multidisciplinary approach. Keratocysts are treated by surgical removal. Surgery for BBCs is indicated when the number of lesions is limited; other treatments include laser

  2. Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia clefting syndrome (EEC syndrome)

    Koul, Monika; Dwivedi, Rahul; Upadhyay, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia- clefting syndrome (also k/a. split hand- split foot malformation /split hand-split foot ectodermal dysplasia- cleft syndrome/ectodermal dysplasia cleft lip/cleft palate syndrome) a rare form of ectodermal dysplasia, is an autosomal dominant disorder inherited as a genetic trait and characterized by a triad of (i) ectrodactyly, (ii) ectodermal dysplasia and, (iii) & facial clefts.

  3. HERLYN - WERNER - WUNDERLICH SYNDROME (HWW SYNDROME): A CASE REPORT

    Pallavi S.; Ganpat; Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the mullerian duct system can result in various urogenital anomalies and, Herlyn Werner Wunderlich syndrome (HWW syndrome) is one such rare anomaly . This syndrome is characterized by uterus didelphys with blind hemi vagina and ipsilateral renal agenesis . 1 it is also known as OHVIRA (Obstructed Hemi vagina with ...

  4. Pre-Menstrual Syndrome in Women with Down Syndrome

    Mason, Linda; Cunningham, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    Background: Prevalence of pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS) may be higher in women with Down syndrome due to syndrome specific characteristics in biochemistry, psychopathology and lifestyle. Recognition of PMS may be difficult for women with intellectual disabilities and their carers. Method: A daily diary, used to diagnose PMS with typical women, was…

  5. Hypothyroidism in metabolic syndrome

    Sunil Kumar Kota

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Metabolic syndrome (MetS and hypothyroidism are well established forerunners of atherogenic cardiovascular disease. Considerable overlap occurs in the pathogenic mechanisms of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease by metabolic syndrome and hypothyroidism. Insulin resistance has been studied as the basic pathogenic mechanism in metabolic syndrome. [1] This cross sectional study intended to assess thyroid function in patients with metabolic syndrome and to investigate the association between hypothyroidism and metabolic syndrome. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients with metabolic syndrome who fulfilled the National Cholesterol Education Program- Adult Treatment Panel (NCEP-ATP III criteria [ 3 out of 5 criteria positive namely blood pressure ≥ 130/85 mm hg or on antihypertensive medications, fasting plasma glucose > 100 mg/dl or on anti-diabetic medications, fasting triglycerides > 150 mg/dl, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C 102 cms in men and 88 cms in women] were included in the study group. [2] Fifty patients who had no features of metabolic syndrome (0 out of 5 criteria for metabolic syndrome were included in the control group. Patients with liver disorders, renal disorders, congestive cardiac failure, pregnant women, patients on oral contraceptive pills, statins and other medications that alter thyroid functions and lipid levels and those who are under treatment for any thyroid related disorder were excluded from the study. Acutely ill patients were excluded taking into account sick euthyroid syndrome. Patients were subjected to anthropometry, evaluation of vital parameters, lipid and thyroid profile along with other routine laboratory parameters. Students t-test, Chi square test and linear regression, multiple logistic regression models were used for statistical analysis. P value < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Of the 100 patients in study group, 55 were females (55% and 45 were males (45%. Of the 50

  6. Behavioral features of CHARGE syndrome (Hall-Hittner syndrome) comparison with Down syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, and Williams syndrome.

    Graham, John M; Rosner, Beth; Dykens, Elisabeth; Visootsak, Jeannie

    2005-03-15

    CHARGE syndrome, or Hall-Hitner syndrome (HHS), has been delineated as a common syndrome that includes coloboma, choanal atresia, cranial nerve dysfunction (particularly asymmetric facial palsy and neurogenic swallowing problems), characteristic ear abnormalities, deafness with hypoplasia of the cochlea and semicircular canals, genital hypoplasia, and variable heart defects, orofacial clefting, tracheo-esophageal fistula, renal anomalies, thymic/parathyroid hypoplasia, spine anomalies, short broad neck with sloping shoulders, and characteristic facial features. We conducted behavioral and personality assessments in 14 boys with HHS syndrome aged 6-21 years, and compared their characteristics with similar data from 20 age-matched boys with Down syndrome (DS), 17 boys with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), and 16 boys with Williams syndrome (WS). We used the Reiss Profile of Fundamental Goals and Motivation Sensitivities, the Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), and the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC). All 14 boys with HHS were legally deaf, and 10 of the 14 were also legally blind. In comparison these other syndromes, boys with HHS had behavior that resembled autistic spectrum disorder. They were socially withdrawn, lacked interest in social contact, and manifested reduced seeking of attention from others, with hyperactivity and a need to maintain order. Though the boys with HHS showed decreased social interaction, they were not as socially impaired as in classic autism. Their language was delayed due to dual sensory impairment, cranial nerve deficits, and chronic medical problems, but their language style was not abnormal (no echolalia or jargon, no scripted phrases, and no pronoun reversal). Boys with HSS appeared frustrated, but they were not aggressive, or at risk for delinquency, manifesting few stereotypic behaviors or unusual preoccupations. They did not have a restricted repertoire of activities and interests. Their behavioral features appeared to be due

  7. Complex regional pain syndrome.

    Bruehl, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome is a chronic pain condition characterized by autonomic and inflammatory features. It occurs acutely in about 7% of patients who have limb fractures, limb surgery, or other injuries. Many cases resolve within the first year, with a smaller subset progressing to the chronic form. This transition is often paralleled by a change from "warm complex regional pain syndrome," with inflammatory characteristics dominant, to "cold complex regional pain syndrome" in which autonomic features dominate. Multiple peripheral and central mechanisms seem to be involved, the relative contributions of which may differ between individuals and over time. Possible contributors include peripheral and central sensitization, autonomic changes and sympatho-afferent coupling, inflammatory and immune alterations, brain changes, and genetic and psychological factors. The syndrome is diagnosed purely on the basis of clinical signs and symptoms. Effective management of the chronic form of the syndrome is often challenging. Few high quality randomized controlled trials are available to support the efficacy of the most commonly used interventions. Reviews of available randomized trials suggest that physical and occupational therapy (including graded motor imagery and mirror therapy), bisphosphonates, calcitonin, subanesthetic intravenous ketamine, free radical scavengers, oral corticosteroids, and spinal cord stimulation may be effective treatments. Multidisciplinary clinical care, which centers around functionally focused therapies is recommended. Other interventions are used to facilitate engagement in functional therapies and to improve quality of life. PMID:26224572

  8. Progestogens and Cushing's syndrome.

    Harte, C

    2012-02-03

    We report 3 patients where Medroxyprogesterone Acetate (MPA = Provera) and Megestrol Acetate (Megace) in doses used for therapy of breast cancer, caused clinical hypercortisolism and Cushing\\'s syndrome. Studies of the toxicity of Medroxyprogesterone Acetate list the commonest adverse events at 500 mg\\/day as weight gain, water retention, increased blood pressure, tremor, moon face, sweating, muscle cramps, vaginal bleeding and increased appetite. Glucocorticoid-like effects are seen in up to 30% of patients treated for longer than 6 weeks with mostly large doses of the order of 1500 mg\\/day but Cushing\\'s syndrome has been reported in patients taking 400 mg\\/day. Neither the glucocorticoid-like effects or Cushing\\'s syndrome have been previously observed with Megestrol Acetate. In the elderly female population receiving progestogens for neoplastic disease the progestogen itself could be an appreciable cause of morbidity both by causing glucocorticoid-like effects and Cushing\\'s syndrome but also by lack of awareness of the danger of sudden withdrawal of these compounds when the hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is suppressed. The signs and symptoms could be easily overlooked unless appropriate testing for Cushing\\'s syndrome is carried out. While the progestogen may have to be continued indefinitely a dose decrease may be feasible with reduction of morbidity.

  9. Capsule contraction syndrome

    Mesut COŞKUN

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Capsule contraction syndrome occurs after fibrous metaplasia of lens proteins that leads to capsular bag contraction. Excessive front capsular wrinkling is seen in capsule contraction syndrome and there is an imbalance between powers supplying capsular integrity. This situation leads to zonular weakness. Capsule contraction syndrome is associated with pseudoexfoliation, older age, uveitis, pars planitis and myotonic muscular dystrophy. In order to decrease the risk of capsule contraction syndrome, front capsulerhexis area should be open as 5.5-6 mm diameter and a curysoft intraocular lens should be used. In order to prevent lens epithelial proliferation and metaplasia, lens epithelial cells at inferior surface of front capsule should be aspirated carefully. If postoperative capsular contraction detected, front capsulotomy should be performed by Nd-YAG laser at postoperative 2 to 3 weeks. In patients that Nd-YAG laser is unsuccessful, capsular tension should be decreased by surgical microincisions. In present study, we evaluated etiology, prevention and management of capsule contraction syndrome in the light of actual literature knowledge.

  10. Congenital nephrotic syndrome

    Claudia Fanni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available CNS (Congenital nephrotic syndrome is a disorder characterized by the presence of a nephrotic syndrome in the first three months of life. Different pathologies can cause this syndrome. In general, we can distinguish primary forms (sporadic and hereditary and secondary forms (acquired and associated with other syndromes. The most common form is the Finnish CNS (CNF, congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type, a hereditary form whose name derives from the fact that the highest incidence is described in that country (1.2:10,000. The pathogenesis, the clinical picture, the diagnostic criteria, the therapy and the outcome are described in details.  Proceedings of the International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · Cagliari (Italy · October 25th, 2014 · The role of the clinical pathological dialogue in problem solving Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Peter Van Eyken

  11. Prognosis of Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, evaluated the clinical features, prognosis, and prophylaxis of cyclic vomiting syndrome and the relationship between the syndrome and levels of adrenocorticotropic/antidiuretic hormones (ACTH/ADH.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Barth syndrome

    ... becomes increasingly weakened and is less able to pump blood. Individuals with Barth syndrome may have elastic fibers ... of the muscle and impairs its ability to pump blood. In people with Barth syndrome , the heart problems ...

  13. How Is Metabolic Syndrome Treated?

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Metabolic Syndrome Treated? Heart-healthy lifestyle changes are the first line of treatment for metabolic syndrome. If heart-healthy lifestyle changes aren’t enough, ...

  14. Aplastic Anemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ... Organizations (PDF, 270 KB). Alternate Language URL Aplastic Anemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes Page Content On this page: ... References For More Information Acknowledgments What are aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)? Aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic ...

  15. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a condition in which there is an extra electrical pathway of the heart. The ... to periods of rapid heart rate ( tachycardia ). Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is one of the most common ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Sotos syndrome

    ... gene are the primary cause of Sotos syndrome , accounting for up to 90 percent of cases. Other ... Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Sotos' syndrome Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (1 link) ...

  17. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CPRS)

    ... a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Complex Regional Pain Syndrome - CRPS Email to a friend * ... DESCRIPTION Formerly Known as Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD) Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a pain condition ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Moebius syndrome

    ... may also be risk factors for Moebius syndrome . Many of the signs and symptoms of Moebius syndrome result from the absence or underdevelopment of cranial nerves VI and VII . These nerves, which emerge from ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Lujan syndrome

    ... Description Lujan syndrome is a condition characterized by intellectual disability, behavioral problems, and certain physical features. It occurs almost exclusively in males. The intellectual disability associated with Lujan syndrome is usually mild to ...

  20. Irregular sleep-wake syndrome

    Sleep-wake syndrome - irregular ... routine during the day. The amount of total sleep time is normal, but the body clock loses ... have a different condition, such as shift work sleep disorder or jet lag syndrome.

  1. Tics, Tourette Syndrome, and OCD

    ... Size Email Print Share Tics, Tourette Syndrome, and OCD Page Content Article Body Tics are rapid, repetitive ... shown that chronic tic disorders, Tourette syndrome, and OCD may stem from some common factors, and a ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Partington syndrome

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Partington syndrome Partington syndrome Enable ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: MEGDEL syndrome

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions MEGDEL syndrome MEGDEL syndrome Enable ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Leigh syndrome

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Leigh syndrome Leigh syndrome Enable ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome Enable ...

  6. Fragile X Syndrome: Other FAQs

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Fragile X Syndrome: Other FAQs Skip sharing on social media links ... Are there specific disorders or conditions associated with Fragile X syndrome? Among the other conditions associated with Fragile X ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Crouzonodermoskeletal syndrome

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Crouzonodermoskeletal syndrome Crouzonodermoskeletal syndrome Enable ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Ochoa syndrome

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Ochoa syndrome Ochoa syndrome Enable ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Maffucci syndrome

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Maffucci syndrome Maffucci syndrome Enable ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Miller syndrome

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Miller syndrome Miller syndrome Enable ...

  11. Learning about Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS)

    ... and links from the National Institutes of Health. Learning About Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS) What is antiphospholipid syndrome ( ... with APS include : Systemic Vascular Thrombosis While the deep veins of the legs are the most frequent ...

  12. Biliary hypoplasia in Williams syndrome

    O'Reilly, K; Ahmed, S F; Murday, V.; McGrogan, P

    2006-01-01

    Neonatal hepatitis and biliary hypoplasia are not recognised features of Williams syndrome. A case of Williams syndrome, presenting with neonatal conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia leading to an initial misdiagnosis is reported.

  13. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): Symptoms

    ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) Share Compartir Symptoms On this Page ... Symptoms What's the Clinical Course of CFS? Chronic fatigue syndrome can be misdiagnosed or overlooked because its ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Stickler syndrome

    ... people with Stickler syndrome have severe nearsightedness (high myopia ). In some cases, the clear gel that fills ... Criteria Stickler Involved People: Stickler Syndrome Recognition, Diagnosis, Treatment These resources from MedlinePlus offer information about the ...

  15. Waardenburg Syndrome: A Case Report

    Hayrullah Alp; Esma Alp

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Auditory-pigmentary syndromes are a group of diseases that effect the skin, hair, eyes and the cochlea. Waardenburg syndrome is one of the members of these autosomal dominantly inherited diseases. Waardenburg syndrome is characterized by white forelock, congenital sensorineural hearing loss, hypopigmented skin and anomalies of the intraocular tissues. How ever all these diagnostic features may not be seen in all patient. In addition, there are four subtypes of the syndrome in ea...

  16. Hypertension og det metaboliske syndrom

    Olsen, Michael Hecht; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Larsen, Mogens Lytken

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a relatively prevalent condition characterized by co-existence of several metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension. Patients with hypertension have an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome which, in turn, increases the cardiovascular...... syndrome is of clinical importance as it makes the treating physician test for other elements of the syndrome in patients with one of the elements, e.g. hypertension. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Jun...

  17. Sleep problems in Rett syndrome

    YOUNG, Deidra; Nagarajan, Lakshmi; de Klerk, Nick; Jacoby, Peter; Ellaway, Carolyn; Leonard, Helen

    2007-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurological disorder, affecting mainly females. It is generally caused by mutations in the MECP2 gene. Sleep problems are thought to occur commonly in Rett syndrome, but there has been little research on prevalence or natural history. An Australian population-based registry of cases born since 1976 has been operating since 1993, with current ascertainment at 300. The Australian Rett Syndrome Database (ARSD) consists of information about Rett syndrome cases inc...

  18. Marfan Syndrome: A Case Report

    Rajendran Ganesh; Rajendran Vijayakumar; Haridoss Selvakumar

    2012-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant systemic disorder of the connective tissue. Children affected by the Marfan syndrome carry a mutation in one of their two copies of the gene that encodes the connective tissue protein fibrillin-1. Marfan syndrome affects most organs and tissues, especially the skeleton, lungs, eyes, heart, and the large blood vessel that distributes blood from the heart to the rest of the body. A case report of Marfan syndrome has been reported with oral features. The ...

  19. Unusual presentation of Lynch Syndrome

    Yu Veronica PCC

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lynch Syndrome/HNPCC is a syndrome of cancer predisposition linked to inherited mutations of genes participating in post-replicative DNA mismatch repair (MMR. The spectrum of cancer associated with Lynch Syndrome includes tumours of the colorectum, endometrium, ovary, upper gastrointestinal tract and the urothelium although other cancers are rarely described. We describe a family of Lynch Syndrome with an hMLH1 mutation, that harbours an unusual tumour spectrum and its diagnostic and management challenges.

  20. Unusual presentation of Lynch Syndrome

    Yu Veronica PCC; Novelli Marco; Payne Stewart J; Fisher Sam; Barnetson Rebecca A; Frayling Ian M; Barrett Ann; Goudie David; Ardern-Jones Audrey; Eeles Ros; Shanley Susan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Lynch Syndrome/HNPCC is a syndrome of cancer predisposition linked to inherited mutations of genes participating in post-replicative DNA mismatch repair (MMR). The spectrum of cancer associated with Lynch Syndrome includes tumours of the colorectum, endometrium, ovary, upper gastrointestinal tract and the urothelium although other cancers are rarely described. We describe a family of Lynch Syndrome with an hMLH1 mutation, that harbours an unusual tumour spectrum and its diagnostic an...

  1. Mortal postpartum neuroleptic malignant syndrome

    Üstündağ, Mehmet; Orak, Murat; Güloğlu, Cahfer; Doğan, Halil; Uysal, Emin

    2006-01-01

    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome is a serious side effect caused by antipsychotic medications. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome is believed to be triggered by neuroleptic blockade of dopaminergic receptors located in the hypothalamus and basal ganglia. The incidence of neuroleptic malignant syndrome with conventional antipsychotic agents has been reported to vary from 0.02-2.44%. Manifestations of this syndrome include severe muscle rigidity and high temperature with any of the following symptoms...

  2. Skin Findings in Williams Syndrome

    Kozel, Beth A; Bayliss, Susan J.; Berk, David R; Waxler, Jessica L.; Knutsen, Russell H.; Danback, Joshua R.; Pober, Barbara R.

    2014-01-01

    Previous examination in a small number of individuals with Williams syndrome (also referred to as Williams-Beuren syndrome) has shown subtly softer skin and reduced deposition of elastin, an elastic matrix protein important in tissue recoil. No quantitative information about skin elasticity in individuals with Williams syndrome is available; nor has there been a complete report of dermatologic findings in this population. To fill this knowledge gap, 94 patients with Williams syndrome aged 7-5...

  3. [DRESS syndrome induced by ciprofloxacine].

    Sahnoun, Rym; El Aïdli, Sihem; Zaïem, Ahmed; Lakhoua, Ghozlane; Kastalli, Sarrah; Daghfous, Riadh

    2015-04-01

    The Drug rash with hypereosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome, or hypersensitivity syndrome, is a severe drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome. It has been exceptionally described with ciprofloxacin. We report a 47-year-old-woman who developed DRESS syndrome, 2 days after taking ciprofloxacin for a urinary infection. She had a generalized maculopapular rash, severe rhabdomyolysis, liver involvement, renal failure and hypereosinophilia. Clinical symptoms had completely resolved after ciprofloxacin withdrawal. Renal failure has decrease after short corticosteroid treatment. PMID:25680964

  4. Ankle impingement syndromes

    Soft-tissue and osseous impingement syndromes can be an important cause of chronic ankle pain, particularly in the professional athlete. The classification of ankle impingement syndromes is based to their anatomical location around the tibiotalar joint. The most important impingement syndromes are anterolateral, anterior and posterior impingement with more recent studies describing posteromedial and anteromedial impingement. Usually conventional radiography is the first imaging technique to be performed as it allows assessment of potential bone abnormalities, particularly in anterior and posterior joint compartments. Computed tomography (CT) only plays a role in the assessment of the posterior impingement. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is regarded as the modality of choice as it is able to demonstrate both osseous and soft tissue changes, such as bone marrow edema, capsular and ligametous thickening, and localized synovitis. (orig.)

  5. Femoroacetabular impingement syndrome

    Tolga Ege

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI syndrome is a recently understood hip condition that describes the pathologic contact between the femoral neck and the acetabular rim. Previously, it was also called and ldquo;acetabular rim syndrome and rdquo; or and ldquo;cervicoacetabular impingement syndrome and rdquo;. It is characterized by a developmental disorder affecting the femoral neck, acetabular rim and labrum. The chronic irritation on the hip joint causes chondral damage and mechanical changes, and these degenerative changes eventually lead to osteoarthritis. Two types of FAI have been described: Cam type and pincer type. Treatment options for FAI are conservative, open, mini open and arthroscopic surgery. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2016; 5(1.000: 42-47

  6. Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Esteve-Valverde, E; Ferrer-Oliveras, R; Alijotas-Reig, J

    2016-04-01

    Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome is an acquired autoimmune disorder that is associated with various obstetric complications and, in the absence of prior history of thrombosis, with the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies directed against other phospholipids, proteins called cofactors or PL-cofactor complexes. Although the obstetric complications have been related to the procoagulant properties of antiphospholipid antibodies, pathological studies of human placenta have shown the proinflammatory capacity of antiphospholipid antibodies via the complement system and proinflammatory cytokines. There is no general agreement on which antiphospholipid antibodies profile (laboratory) confers the greatest obstetric risk, but the best candidates are categories I and IIa. Combined treatment with low doses of aspirin and heparin achieves good obstetric and maternal outcomes. In this study, we also review the therapeutic possibilities in refractory cases, although the likelihood of progressing to other autoimmune diseases is low. We briefly comment on incomplete obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome, also known as antiphospholipid antibody-mediated pregnancy morbidity syndrome. PMID:26603476

  7. Joint hypermobility syndrome pain.

    Grahame, Rodney

    2009-12-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) was initially defined as the occurrence of musculoskeletal symptoms in the presence of joint laxity and hypermobility in otherwise healthy individuals. It is now perceived as a commonly overlooked, underdiagnosed, multifaceted, and multisystemic heritable disorder of connective tissue (HDCT), which shares many of the phenotypic features of other HDCTs such as Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Whereas the additional flexibility can confer benefits in terms of mobility and agility, adverse effects of tissue laxity and fragility can give rise to clinical consequences that resonate far beyond the confines of the musculoskeletal system. There is hardly a clinical specialty to be found that is not touched in one way or another by JHS. Over the past decade, it has become evident that of all the complications that may arise in JHS, chronic pain is arguably the most menacing and difficult to treat. PMID:19889283

  8. Stroke and restricted sensory syndromes

    There have been sporadic case reports of a restricted sensory syndrome caused by stroke, most often as a cheiro-oral syndrome. We describe 14 patients with stroke who showed various restricted sensory syndromes and correlated their symptoms with the radiological findings. (orig./MG)

  9. Intestinal haemorrhage in Turner's syndrome.

    Burge, D M; A. W. Middleton; Kamath, R; Fasher, B J

    1981-01-01

    A 13-year-old girl with Turner's syndrome and bleeding from intestinal venous ectasia is reported. The various types of vascular anomaly of the bowel associated with Turner's syndrome are discussed. Awareness of these anomalies may help prevent unnecessary laparotomy in children with this syndrome.

  10. Down syndrome: a cardiovascular perspective

    J.C. Vis; M.G.J. Duffels; M.M. Winter; M.E. Weijerman; J.M. Cobben; S.A. Huisman; B.J.M. Mulder

    2009-01-01

    This review focuses on the heart and vascular system in patients with Down syndrome. A clear knowledge on the wide spectrum of various abnormalities associated with this syndrome is essential for skilful management of cardiac problems in patients with Down syndrome. Epidemiology of congenital heart

  11. Urinary Peptides in Rett Syndrome.

    Solaas, K. M.; Skjeldal, O.; Gardner, M. L. G.; Kase, B. F.; Reichelt, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    A study found a significantly higher level of peptides in the urine of 53 girls with Rett syndrome compared with controls. The elevation was similar to that in 35 girls with infantile autism. Levels of peptides were lower in girls with classic Rett syndrome than those with congenital Rett syndrome. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  12. Down Syndrome: A Cardiovascular Perspective

    Vis, J. C.; Duffels, M. G. J.; Winter, M. M.; Weijerman, M. E.; Cobben, J. M.; Huisman, S. A.; Mulder, B. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    This review focuses on the heart and vascular system in patients with Down syndrome. A clear knowledge on the wide spectrum of various abnormalities associated with this syndrome is essential for skillful management of cardiac problems in patients with Down syndrome. Epidemiology of congenital heart defects, cardiovascular aspects and…

  13. Hypoparathyroidism-retardation-dysmorphism syndrome

    Kalenahalli Jagadish Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital hypoparathyroidism, growth retardation and facial dysmorphism is a rare autosomal recessive disorder seen among children born to consanguineous couple of Arab ethnicity. This syndrome is commonly known as Sanjad-Sakati or hypoparathyroidism-retardation-dysmorphism syndrome (HRD. We report 13-year-old Hindu boy with hypoparathyroidism, tetany, facial dysmorphism and developmental delay, compatible with HRD syndrome.

  14. Marfan syndrome: current perspectives

    Pepe, Guglielmina; Giusti, Betti; Sticchi, Elena; Abbate, Rosanna; Gensini, Gian Franco; Nistri, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a pleiotropic connective tissue disease inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, due to mutations in the FBN1 gene encoding fibrillin 1. It is an important protein of the extracellular matrix that contributes to the final structure of a microfibril. Few cases displaying an autosomal recessive transmission are reported in the world. The FBN1 gene, which is made of 66 exons, is located on chromosome 15q21.1. This review, after an introduction on the clinical manifestations that leads to the diagnosis of MFS, focuses on cardiovascular manifestations, pharmacological and surgical therapies of thoracic aortic aneurysm and/or dissection (TAAD), mechanisms underlying the progression of aneurysm or of acute dissection, and biomarkers associated with progression of TAADs. A Dutch group compared treatment with losartan, an angiotensin II receptor-1 blocker, vs no other additional treatment (COMPARE clinical trial). They observed that losartan reduces the aortic dilatation rate in patients with Marfan syndrome. Later on, they also reported that losartan exerts a beneficial effect on patients with Marfan syndrome carrying an FBN1 mutation that causes haploinsufficiency (quantitative mutation), while it has no significant effect on patients displaying dominant negative (qualitative) mutations. Moreover, a French group in a 3-year trial compared the administration of losartan vs placebo in patients with Marfan syndrome under treatment with beta-receptor blockers. They observed that losartan decreases blood pressure but has no effect on aortic diameter progression. Thus, beta-receptor blockers remain the gold standard therapy in patients with Marfan syndrome. Three potential biochemical markers are mentioned in this review: total homocysteine, serum transforming growth factor beta, and lysyl oxidase. Moreover, markers of oxidative stress measured in plasma, previously correlated with clinical features of Marfan syndrome, may be explored as potential

  15. 46,XX Male Syndrome

    Bekir Uçan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available 46, XX male syndrome – testicular disorder of sexual differentiation (DSD is a rare condition characterized by a spectrum of clinical presentations, ranging from ambiguous to normal male genitalia. These cases are diagnosed more easily in childhood. In adults, the diagnosis can be difficult due to the current normal gender development. Here, we report hormonal, molecular and cytogenetic results in an adult male patient with primary hypogonadism who was diagnosed with 46, XX male syndrome in our clinic. Turk Jem 2013; 17: 46-8

  16. Wolcott-Rallison Syndrome

    A Juneja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia with early-onset diabetes mellitus (also known as Wolcott-Rallison syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that manifests itself in early infancy with symptoms of diabetes mellitus. Short stature and walking difficulties become evident in the 2 nd year of life when the child starts to walk. These skeletal changes are progressive with age. There is usually a short trunk, excessive lordosis, a short and broad chest, and genu valgum. This report presents a case of Wolcott-Rallison syndrome in a 10 year old child.

  17. Sturge-Weber syndrome

    Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) is a rare neurocutaneous syndrome characterized by intracranial leptomeningeal angioma, facial port-wine nevi, and glaucoma. Diagnosis is relatively easy because of the facial angioma and MRI findings, but evaluating severity is difficult. Predictors of SWS's prognosis are epilepsy and brain dysfunction under the leptomeningeal angioma. Therefore, active research has been intensely conducted with electrophysiological, neuroimaging, and neuropsychological methods. Final goals of this research are to define the therapeutic strategy. In this review, we focus on recent advances in neuroimaging and electroencephalogram (EEG) analysis to discover the epileptogenesis, the most adequate therapy, and prospective topics of investigation in SWS. (author)

  18. [Neuroleptic induced deficit syndrome].

    Szafrański, T

    1995-01-01

    Increasing interest in subjective aspects of therapy and rehabilitation focused the attention of psychiatrists, psychologists and psychopharmacologists on the mental side effects of neuroleptics. For the drug-related impairment of affective, cognitive and social function the name of neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome (NIDS) is proposed. Patients with NIDS appear to be indifferent to the environmental stimuli, retarded and apathetic. They complain of feeling drugged and drowsy, weird, they suffer from lack of motivation, feel like "zombies". The paper presents description of NIDS and its differentiation from negative and depressive symptoms in schizophrenia and subjective perceiving of extrapyramidal syndromes. PMID:7652089

  19. Juvenile Reiter's syndrome.

    Conaglen, J; Grennan, D M; Signal, T; McArthur, J E; Lucas, R; Palmer, D G

    1979-04-01

    A case of Reiter's syndrome occurring in an 11-year-old, pre-pubertal boy is described. The boy was a heterozygote for the histocompatibility antigen B27 and other arthritic members of his family included his mother with colitic arthritis and an aunt with ankylosing spondylitis. His HLA-B27 negative sibs have remained well. Shigella Salmonella and Yersinia organisms have been previously incriminated as precipitating factors in some patients with Reiter's syndrome but no evidence of recent infection with any of these agents was found in this patient. The case is reported because of the rarity of the condition at this age. PMID:287465

  20. The alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

    McKeon, A

    2008-08-01

    The alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) is a common management problem in hospital practice for neurologists, psychiatrists and general physicians alike. Although some patients have mild symptoms and may even be managed in the outpatient setting, others have more severe symptoms or a history of adverse outcomes that requires close inpatient supervision and benzodiazepine therapy. Many patients with AWS have multiple management issues (withdrawal symptoms, delirium tremens, the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, seizures, depression, polysubstance abuse, electrolyte disturbances and liver disease), which requires a coordinated, multidisciplinary approach. Although AWS may be complex, careful evaluation and available treatments should ensure safe detoxification for most patients.

  1. Marfan syndrome: current perspectives

    Pepe G

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Guglielmina Pepe,1,2 Betti Giusti,1,2 Elena Sticchi,1,2 Rosanna Abbate,1,2 Gian Franco Gensini,1–3 Stefano Nistri2,4 1Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Section of Critical Medical Care and Medical Specialities, DENOTHE Center, University of Florence, 2Cardiothoracovascular Department, Marfan Syndrome and Related Disorders Regional Referral Center, Careggi Hospital, 3Santa Maria agli Ulivi, Fondazione Don Carlo Gnocchi, Onlus, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Florence, 4Cardiology Service, CMSR Veneto Medica, Altavilla Vicentina, Italy Abstract: Marfan syndrome (MFS is a pleiotropic connective tissue disease inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, due to mutations in the FBN1 gene encoding fibrillin 1. It is an important protein of the extracellular matrix that contributes to the final structure of a microfibril. Few cases displaying an autosomal recessive transmission are reported in the world. The FBN1 gene, which is made of 66 exons, is located on chromosome 15q21.1. This review, after an introduction on the clinical manifestations that leads to the diagnosis of MFS, focuses on cardiovascular manifestations, pharmacological and surgical therapies of thoracic aortic aneurysm and/or dissection (TAAD, mechanisms underlying the progression of aneurysm or of acute dissection, and biomarkers associated with progression of TAADs. A Dutch group compared treatment with losartan, an angiotensin II receptor-1 blocker, vs no other additional treatment (COMPARE clinical trial. They observed that losartan reduces the aortic dilatation rate in patients with Marfan syndrome. Later on, they also reported that losartan exerts a beneficial effect on patients with Marfan syndrome carrying an FBN1 mutation that causes haploinsufficiency (quantitative mutation, while it has no significant effect on patients displaying dominant negative (qualitative mutations. Moreover, a French group in a 3-year trial compared the administration of

  2. quadriparesis in sjogren syndrome.

    nikhil srivastva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hypokalemic paralysis is a well recognised clinical presentation of Primary sjogren syndrome that occurs due to renal potassium loss caused by interstitial nephritis. However we report a case where a hypokalemic paralysis in a suspected case of sjogren syndrome was associated with high anion gap metabolic acidosis in the presence of a near normal Glomerular filtration rate (RTA and a failure to acidify urine pH 5.5 in the presence of systemic acidosis. [Natl J Med Res 2015; 5(2.000: 161-162

  3. Noonan syndrome and chylothorax

    Chylothorax during childhood usually develops as a result of posto-perative complications following cardiothoracic surgery. It is rarely due to the malformations of the lymphatic system associated with dysmorphic syndrome. We report two cases of Noonan syndrome involving neonatal development of chylothorax. In children with the Noonan phenotype who develop pleural effusion during the neonatal period in the absence of obstetric trauma, it is advisable to rule out the presence of congenital lymphatic malformation and study the pleural effusion, initially introducing conservative treatment with dietary therapy. Chest radiography, ultrasound and computed tomography reveal the presence of the pleural effusion and parenchymal pattern compatible with chloroethoxy and lymphangiectasis. (Author) 15 refs

  4. [Alport's syndrome (author's transl)].

    Huismans, H

    1978-05-01

    A case report is given of a 22-years old student (whose brother had Alport's syndrome) with recurrent central corneal swelling and paracentral erosions of the cornea of both eyes. Further signs of beginning Alport's syndrome in this case are disturbance of re-adaptation after dazzling (Mesoptometer) and paracentral scotomata in the visual fields. Remarkable was the small diameter of the disc in both eyes (1.37 mm). Local therapy was Scopolamin-eye-drops, Actihaemyl- and especially Cystein-Gel (2.4%). PMID:672101

  5. Lemierre's Syndrome Complicating Pregnancy

    M. Thompson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Lemierre's syndrome is an anaerobic suppurative thrombophlebitis involving the internal jugular vein secondary to oropharyngeal infection. There is only one previous case report in pregnancy which was complicated by premature delivery of an infant that suffered significant neurological damage. We present an atypical case diagnosed in the second trimester with a live birth at term. By reporting this case, we hope to increase the awareness of obstetricians to the possibility of Lemierre's syndrome when patients present with signs of unabating oropharyngeal infection and pulmonary symptoms.

  6. [The Patau syndrome].

    Misanović, Verica; Jonuzi, Fedat; Biscević, Emir; Uzicanin, Sajra; Vegar, Sandra

    2002-01-01

    Known as D trisomy, Patau syndrome is the third chromosomopathy according to frequency. One of the 5000 newborn carries the trisomy 13. In over 80% cases there is fresh mutation with non separation in myeosis of older mother. The mosaic or translocation forms are not rare. The mail newborn with Patau syndrome is shown in this article. We notice: microcephalia, dolihocephalia, microphthalmia, cheilognatopalatoshisis, polydactilia, and found ultrasound changes at the brain, hearth and genitourinary system. Cytogenetic finding show: mail cariotype with aberrations 47, XY + 13, Sy Patau. PMID:12762245

  7. CDH3-Related Syndromes

    Basel-Vanagaite, L; Pasmanik-Chor, M; Lurie, R;

    2010-01-01

    Hypotrichosis with juvenile macular dystrophy (HJMD) and ectodermal dysplasia, ectrodactyly and macular dystrophy (EEM) are both caused by mutations in the CDH3 gene. In this report, we describe a family with EEM syndrome caused by a novel CDH3 gene mutation and review the mutation spectrum and...

  8. Waardenburg syndrome 2

    Uma Garg; Ritesh Surana

    2012-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare disease characterised by sensorineural deafness in association with oculocutaneous pigmentary anomalies and dystopia canthorum. In this article, we report a 6-year-old boy with WS2, one of four clinical types of WS, for its rarity and relative paucity of reports in the otological literature. We also review the relevant literature of this rare disorder.

  9. Nevus comedonicus syndrome

    Pravesh Yadav; Vibhu Mendiratta; Shiwangi Rana; Ram Chander

    2015-01-01

    A case of nevus comedonicus syndrome with atypical cutaneous presentation (widespread involvement without any particular pattern, midline lesions involving lower abdomen and involvement of bilateral pinna), and some unusual skeletal (adduction deformity involving bilateral metatarsal along with medial deviation at the level of tarsometatarsal joint), central nervous system (agenesis of corpus callosum with a interhemispheric cyst), visceral (pancreatic cyst) and neurological manifestations ha...

  10. [Dejerine-Roussy syndrome].

    Cambier, J

    1982-01-01

    The description of the thalamic syndrome by J. Dejerine and G. Roussy in 1906 was a consecration of the clinicopathologic method, announcing the end of discussions relative to the role of the thalamus as a sensorial relay center, discussions opposing B. Luys to Türk and to Charcot and which animated the end of the 19th century. Since then, the thalamic syndrome has not ceased to arouse the attention of neurologists, who have developed four major themes: the specificity of the thalamic hemianesthesia; the mechanism of the central pain; the semiologic value and physiopathology of the abnormal movements; and finally the pupillary and vasomotor disorders. Exploration of each of these topics led to a definition of neurologic semiology and to the development of neurophysiology during the second half of the XXth century. By reviewing this the confrontation between different men and schools appears behind the opposition of ideas. The revision of the thalamic syndrome ceased when the discovery of the non-specific functions of the thalamus opened the way to new concepts. Dejerine-Roussy's syndrome expresses the semiology of the relay nuclei. For the last thirty years, experience has accumulated on the semiology of lesions affecting the nuclei of convergence. Neuropsychology of thalamic lesions has demonstrated the regulatory role performed by the thalamus within each hemisphere and in the relative activation of each hemisphere. But this is another story. PMID:6763299

  11. Sweet′s syndrome

    Bharija Subhash

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of 10 cases of Sweet′s syndrome observed during a period of 3 years in Eastern parts of Libya is reported. All the patients were females. Fever and peripheral neutrophilia were not found in all these cases. Dapsone was found to be very effective in the cases in which it was tried.

  12. Classical Sweet's syndrome

    Saurabh R Jindal; Kura, Mahendra M.

    2014-01-01

    A 38-year - old female came to us with sudden eruptions of painful edematous lesions which appeared pseudovesicular on cutaneous examination. Histopathology supported the diagnosis of sweet′s syndrome and she responded to a combination of dapsone and oral steroids, after having relapsed on self-discontinuation of monotherapy with dapsone.

  13. Holmes-Adie Syndrome

    ... pupil. Thoracic sympathectomy, which severs the involved sympathetic nerve, is the definitive treatment for excessive sweating. What is the prognosis? Holmes-Adie syndrome is not life-threatening or disabling. The loss of deep tendon reflexes is permanent. Some symptoms of the disorder may ...

  14. Chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Prins, J.B.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Bleijenberg, G.

    2006-01-01

    During the past two decades, there has been heated debate about chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) among researchers, practitioners, and patients. Few illnesses have been discussed so extensively. The existence of the disorder has been questioned, its underlying pathophysiology debated, and an effective

  15. Skin peeling syndrome

    Sharma Rajeev; Kumar Ashok

    1994-01-01

    We are reporting a case of skin peeling syndrome, a rare disorder in which sudden generalized exfoliation of the stratum corneum occurs. Histopathologically, there was well formed subcorneal pustule filled with polymorphs and nuclear dust, considering this to be a varient of subcorneal pustular dermatosis, we have put the patient on Dapsone.

  16. Metabolic cutis laxa syndromes

    Mohamed, M.; Kouwenberg, D.; Gardeitchik, T.; Kornak, U.; Wevers, R.A.; Morava, E.

    2011-01-01

    Cutis laxa is a rare skin disorder characterized by wrinkled, redundant, inelastic and sagging skin due to defective synthesis of elastic fibers and other proteins of the extracellular matrix. Wrinkled, inelastic skin occurs in many cases as an acquired condition. Syndromic forms of cutis laxa, howe

  17. Ectopic Cushing syndrome

    ... tumors of the pancreas Medullary carcinoma of the thyroid Small cell tumors of the lung Tumors of the thymus gland ... syndrome Pancreatic islet cell tumor Pheochromocytoma Rheumatoid arthritis Thyroid cancer - medullary carcinoma Tumor Update Date 10/28/2015 Updated by: Brent ...

  18. What Causes Cushing's Syndrome?

    ... in the lungs, pancreas (pronounced PAN-kree-uhs ), thyroid, or thymus How Tumors Can Cause Cushing’s Syndrome Normally, the pituitary gland ... cancerous, are mostly found in the lungs, pancreas, thyroid, and thymus. ... are more vulnerable to tumors in one or more glands that influence cortisol ...

  19. Hair tourniquet syndrome

    Bangroo A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A frequently unrecognized and potentially devastating form of penile strangulation is that caused by human hair. Hair tourniquet syndrome frequently occurs during the time period when post partum mothers are experiencing increased hair loss. The majority of cases are thought to be accidental, however possibility of child abuse should be considered in every case.

  20. Sheldon-Hall syndrome

    Bamshad Michael J

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sheldon-Hall syndrome (SHS is a rare multiple congenital contracture syndrome characterized by contractures of the distal joints of the limbs, triangular face, downslanting palpebral fissures, small mouth, and high arched palate. Epidemiological data for the prevalence of SHS are not available, but less than 100 cases have been reported in the literature. Other common clinical features of SHS include prominent nasolabial folds, high arched palate, attached earlobes, mild cervical webbing, short stature, severe camptodactyly, ulnar deviation, and vertical talus and/or talipes equinovarus. Typically, the contractures are most severe at birth and non-progressive. SHS is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern but about half the cases are sporadic. Mutations in either MYH3, TNNI2, or TNNT3 have been found in about 50% of cases. These genes encode proteins of the contractile apparatus of fast twitch skeletal muscle fibers. The diagnosis of SHS is based on clinical criteria. Mutation analysis is useful to distinguish SHS from arthrogryposis syndromes with similar features (e.g. distal arthrogryposis 1 and Freeman-Sheldon syndrome. Prenatal diagnosis by ultrasonography is feasible at 18–24 weeks of gestation. If the family history is positive and the mutation is known in the family, prenatal molecular genetic diagnosis is possible. There is no specific therapy for SHS. However, patients benefit from early intervention with occupational and physical therapy, serial casting, and/or surgery. Life expectancy and cognitive abilities are normal.

  1. Drug hypersensitivity syndrome

    Rashmi Kumari; Dependra K Timshina; Devinder Mohan Thappa

    2011-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity syndrome (DHS) is an adverse drug reaction commonly associated with the aromatic antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), viz., phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), phenobarbital (PB), lamotrigine, primidone, etc. It can also be caused by other drugs, such as sulfonamides, dapsone, minocycline, gold derivatives, cyclosporine, captopril, diltiazem, terbinafine, azathioprine and allopurinol. Diagnosis of DHS may be difficult because of the variety of clinical and laboratory abnormalit...

  2. Amniotic Band Syndrome

    Shetty, Prathvi; Menezes, Leo Theobald; Tauro, Leo Francis; Diddigi, Kumar Arun

    2012-01-01

    Amniotic band syndrome is an uncommon congenital disorder without any genetic or hereditary disposition. It involves fetal entrapment in strands of amniotic tissue and causes an array of deletions and deformations. Primary treatment is plastic and reconstructive surgery after birth with in utero fetal surgery also coming in vogue.

  3. Papillon-lefevre syndrome

    Prasad PVS; Padmavathy L; Anandaraj A

    1993-01-01

    Seven cases of Papillon-Lefevre syndrome from 6 families were studied. Their ages ranged from 3 to 25 years. Falling of deciduous teeth was noticed between 2½ to 7 years. Five patients developed palmoplanatar keratoderma at 3 months of age. Two patients showed punctate lesions also. Only 1 patient was born to consanguinous parents.

  4. Papillon-lefevre syndrome

    Prasad PVS

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Seven cases of Papillon-Lefevre syndrome from 6 families were studied. Their ages ranged from 3 to 25 years. Falling of deciduous teeth was noticed between 2½ to 7 years. Five patients developed palmoplanatar keratoderma at 3 months of age. Two patients showed punctate lesions also. Only 1 patient was born to consanguinous parents.

  5. The Tie retraction syndrome.

    Geerling, Gerd; Neppert, Birte; Hemmant, Bridget

    2012-12-01

    Tissue retraction is implicated in the pathogenesis of various ophthalmic disorders. Here we describe the clinical characteristics, epidemiology and pathophysiology of a form of retraction syndrome which - to the best of our knowledge - has not been reported in the ophthalmic literature so far. We have termed this condition - consisting of a slowly progressive pseudovertical shortening of tie length due to a horizontal extension of girth length - the "Tie retraction syndrome" (TRS). Other pathognomonic features include an increased tie tip to belt buckle distance and a prolapse of the subumbilical fat pad (SUFP). The syndrome has a clear male to female preponderance and shows an increasing incidence with age and income before tax. Based on a newly proposed grading scheme we discuss and illustrate the diagnosis as well as the medical and surgical management options of this abundant, but often undiagnosed condition. The authors have no explanation for the apparent lack of awareness for this widely preponderant syndrome and its severe cosmetically disfiguring potential. We thus would like to invite all fellow colleagues with expertise in the field to comment or present their views. PMID:23088329

  6. Bladder pain syndrome

    Hanno, Philip; Nordling, Jørgen; Fall, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome is a deceptively intricate symptom complex that is diagnosed on the basis of chronic pelvic pain, pressure, or discomfort perceived to be related to the urinary bladder, accompanied by at least one other urinary symptom. It is a diagnosis of exclusion in a patient who has...

  7. Pharmacotherapy for Dravet Syndrome.

    Wallace, Adam; Wirrell, Elaine; Kenney-Jung, Daniel L

    2016-06-01

    Dravet syndrome (DS) is an intractable pediatric epilepsy syndrome, starting in early childhood. This disorder typically manifests with febrile status epilepticus, and progresses to a multifocal epilepsy with febrile and non-febrile seizures with encephalopathy. Most cases are due to a mutation in the SCN1A gene. This article reviews treatments for DS, with an emphasis on pharmacotherapy. While many medications are used in treating the seizures associated with DS, these patients typically have medically refractory epilepsy, and polytherapy is often required. First-line agents include valproate and clobazam, although there are supportive data for topiramate, levetiracetam, stiripentol and the ketogenic diet. Other agents such as fenfluramine are promising therapies for Dravet syndrome. Sodium channel-blocking anticonvulsants such as carbamazepine and lamotrigine are generally contraindicated in this syndrome. Nonpharmacologic therapies (such as neurostimulation or surgery) are understudied in DS. Because DS is a global encephalopathy, pharmacologic treatment of non-epileptic manifestations of the disease is often necessary. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder is often encountered in patients with DS, and psychostimulants can be helpful for this indication. Other psychoactive drugs are less studied in this context. Extrapyramidal and gait disorders are often encountered in DS as well. While DS is a severe epileptic encephalopathy with a high (up to 15 %) mortality rate in childhood, careful pharmacologic management can improve these patients' clinical picture and quality of life. PMID:26966048

  8. Chronic Mononucleosis Syndrome

    Shortt, S. E. D.; Haynes, E. R.

    1986-01-01

    Debilitating illness in patients with only vague symptoms and minimal findings from physical examination and routine laboratory tests is frustrating for both patient and physician. A case of chronic mononucleosis is presented, and the literature describing the clinical and laboratory features of the syndrome is reviewed, with reference to four recent studies. Guidelines for diagnosis are suggested.

  9. Tourette Syndrome: Classroom Implications

    Chaturvedi, Amrita; Gartin, Barbara C.; Murdick, Nikki L.

    2011-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurobiological disorder characterized by various involuntary motor movements and vocal tics. Symptoms of TS emerge between the ages of 3 to 8 years old, are most severe when an individual reaches puberty, and decrease by the time a person is 20 years old. Additionally, persons with TS may have secondary disabilities of…

  10. Kleine-Levin Syndrome.

    Miglis, Mitchell G; Guilleminault, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Kleine-Levin syndrome is a rare recurrent hypersomnia associated with symptoms of behavioral and cognitive impairment. This article reviews common presenting symptoms, differential diagnosis, diagnostic workup, and potential treatment options. Current updates on functional imaging studies and long-term neuropsychological studies are reviewed. PMID:27137943

  11. Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    Boyle, Martine Isabel; Jespersgaard, Cathrine; Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen; Bisgaard, Anne-Marie; Tümer, Zeynep

    2015-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS; MIM #122470, 300590, 610759, 614701, 300882) is a rare and clinically variable disorder that affects multiple organs. It is characterized by intellectual disability (mild to severe), distinctive facial features, pre- and postnatal growth retardation, and hirsutism...

  12. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome

    Saini Monica

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes (RCVS are a group of disorders that have in common an acute presentation with headache, reversible vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries, with or without neurological signs and symptoms. In contrast to primary central nervous system vasculitis, they have a relatively benign course. We describe here a patient who was diagnosed with RCVS.

  13. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

    Zerrer, Peggy

    The paper reviews Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), a series of effects seen in children whose mothers drink alcohol to excess during pregnancy. The identification of FAS and its recognition as a major health problem in need of prevention are traced. Characteristics of children with FAS are described and resultant growth retardation, abnormal physical…

  14. ADHD & Tourette Syndrome

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of methylphenidate (MPH and clonidine (CLON, alone and in combination, in 136 children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and chronic tic disorder, was evaluated in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind clinical trial, and reported by the Tourette Syndrome Study Group from the University of Rochester, NY.

  15. Bladder pain syndrome

    Hanno, Philip; Nordling, Jørgen; Fall, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome is a deceptively intricate symptom complex that is diagnosed on the basis of chronic pelvic pain, pressure, or discomfort perceived to be related to the urinary bladder, accompanied by at least one other urinary symptom. It is a diagnosis of exclusion in a patient who has ex...

  16. The neuroleptic malignant syndrome

    YAZMAN, Yılmaz Niyazi; İYİGÜN, İbrahim

    1998-01-01

    Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS) may occur at any time during the course of therapy in as many as 1 percent of persons who take neuroleptics, particulary haloperidol. In this paper, one case with fever (as high as 39 °C), marked rigidity, tachycardia and consciousness is presented, and clinical presentation, treatment and prognosis of NMS is discussed.

  17. Syndrome in question.

    Wu, Yinhua; Qiao, Jianjun; Fang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Vulvovaginal-gingival syndrome is characterized by erosions and desquamation of the vulva, vagina, and gingiva. We reported a case of a 32-year-old woman presenting with an 8-year history of damage to the vulval and perianal anatomy and limitation of mouth opening. The patient's symptoms were relieved after treatment with topical tacrolimus cream. PMID:25184936

  18. The Schnitzler syndrome

    Lipsker Dan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Schnitzler syndrome is a rare and underdiagnosed entity which is considered today as being a paradigm of an acquired/late onset auto-inflammatory disease. It associates a chronic urticarial skin rash, corresponding from the clinico-pathological viewpoint to a neutrophilic urticarial dermatosis, a monoclonal IgM component and at least 2 of the following signs: fever, joint and/or bone pain, enlarged lymph nodes, spleen and/or liver, increased ESR, increased neutrophil count, abnormal bone imaging findings. It is a chronic disease with only one known case of spontaneous remission. Except of the severe alteration of quality of life related mainly to the rash, fever and pain, complications include severe inflammatory anemia and AA amyloidosis. About 20% of patients will develop a lymphoproliferative disorder, mainly Waldenström disease and lymphoma, a percentage close to other patients with IgM MGUS. It was exceedingly difficult to treat patients with this syndrome until the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra became available. Anakinra allows a complete control of all signs within hours after the first injection, but patients need continuous treatment with daily injections. In many aspects, the Schnitzler syndrome resembles the genetically determined auto-inflammatory syndromes involving activating mutations of the NLRP3 inflammasome. This latter point and its consequences will be addressed.

  19. Modelling Down Syndrome

    Buckley, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Animal models are extensively used in genetics, neuroscience and biomedical research. Recent studies illustrate the usefulness and the challenges of research utilising genetically engineered mice to explore the developmental biology of Down syndrome. These studies highlight many of the issues at the centre of what we understand about Down…

  20. Subacromial impingement syndrome

    Umer, M.; Qadir, I.; Azam, M.

    2012-01-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS) represents a spectrum of pathology ranging from subacromial bursitis to rotator cuff tendinopathy and full-thickness rotator cuff tears. The relationship between subacromial impingement and rotator cuff disease in the etiology of rotator cuff injury is a matte

  1. Anton's syndrome and eugenics

    Kondziella, Daniel; Frahm-Falkenberg, Siska

    2011-01-01

    to the clinical neurosciences, including pioneering work in neurosurgery, neuropsychology, and child psychiatry. However, it has not been recognized in the English literature that Anton was also a dedicated advocate of eugenics and racial hygiene. This paper provides a case of Anton's syndrome and...

  2. Fatal phenytoin hypersensitivity syndrome

    Mahadeva, U; Al-Mrayat, M; Steer, K; Leen, E

    1999-01-01

    The phenytoin (hydantoin) hypersensitivity syndrome is rare but potentially fatal. Often, as in this case, it presents with non-specific symptoms and signs, requiring a high degree of clinical suspicion for diagnosis.


Keywords: phenytoin; hydantoin; hypersensitivity.

  3. Glucagonoma and Pseudoglucagonoma Syndrome

    Ibánez Aguirre J

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Glucagonoma syndrome may present either associated with a pancreatic neoplasm which secretes glucagon or as a pseudo-glucagonoma associated with other diseases. It is extremely infrequent but well-known with a current prevalence estimated at 1/20,000,000. DESIGN: A retrospective review of glucagonoma and pseudoglucagonoma cases observed between January 1998 and December 2003 in three hospitals. PATIENTS: Five cases: 3 with a demonstrable glucagon-secreting tumor and 2 cases without an associated neoplasm. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Age, sex, initial diagnosis, associated symptoms, and pathology were analyzed as were procedures employed in diagnosis, imaging studies, laboratory data, surgery and follow-up. RESULTS: Hyperglycemia and elevated plasma glucagon levels were found in all cases. In 3 cases, hypo-aminoacidemia and a descrease in fatty acids were found . No changes of zinc levels were observed. Abdominal ultrasound studies were of no value except in evaluating pancreatitis. A CT-scan was conclusive when a pancreatic neoplasm existed and 3 patients were operated on a curative basis. DISCUSSION: Necrolytic migratory erythema was the key diagnosis in all cases. Surgery was intended to be curative. The follow-up was of 8, 37 and 57 months in the cases of true glucagonoma syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: A real prevalence of glucagonoma syndrome could be greater than currently estimated. In our series, it was 13.5/20,000,000. Pseudoglucagonoma syndrome remains a rarity.

  4. Catastrophic antiphospholipid Syndrome

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is characterized by venous, arterial thrombosis and miscarriages along with lupic anticoagulant and antibodies against anticardiolipin. The catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS) has been described since 1992 like a multiple organic dysfunction caused by multiple vascular thrombosis in three or more organs. The patients who suffer from this syndrome may have or not history of APS. There are two or three mechanisms that may cause the CAPS, alone or in combination: These are: 1. The multisystemic thrombotic disease with emphasis in microvasculature occlusion of the organs and occlusion of big arterial or veins 2. The disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) superimpose in 15% to 50% of the patients that, of course, conducted to an occlusive disease of arterioles, veins or capillaries. 3. A systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) induced by citoquines. In this review it is described clinical and laboratory features, pathogenesis and treatment of CAPS. For this purpose, it was searched for Medline from 1993 to 2000 and revised the most significant issues obtained by this medium

  5. Dry eye syndrome

    ... second-hand smoke exposure Cold or allergy medicines Dry eye can also be caused by: Heat or chemical burns Previous eye surgery A rare autoimmune disorder in which the glands that produce tears are destroyed ( Sjögren's syndrome )

  6. The Syndrome of Catatonia

    James Allen Wilcox

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Catatonia is a psychomotor syndrome which has historically been associated with schizophrenia. Many clinicians have thought that the prevalence of this condition has been decreasing over the past few decades. This review reminds clinicians that catatonia is not exclusively associated with schizophrenia, and is still common in clinical practice. Many cases are related to affective disorders or are of an idiopathic nature. The illusion of reduced prevalence has been due to evolving diagnostic systems that failed to capture catatonic syndromes. This systemic error has remained unchallenged, and potentiated by the failure to perform adequate neurological evaluations and catatonia screening exams on psychiatric patients. We find that current data supports catatonic syndromes are still common, often severe and of modern clinical importance. Effective treatment is relatively easy and can greatly reduce organ failure associated with prolonged psychomotor symptoms. Prompt identification and treatment can produce a robust improvement in most cases. The ongoing prevalence of this syndrome requires that psychiatrists recognize catatonia and its presentations, the range of associated etiologies, and the import of timely treatment.

  7. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome

    2011-07-14

    Dr. Adam MacNeil, epidemiologist with Viral Special Pathogens Branch at CDC, discusses hantavirus pulmonary syndrome.  Created: 7/14/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 7/18/2011.

  8. Nutrition and metabolic syndrome.

    Albornoz López, Raúl

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome comprises a cluster of metabolic abnormalities that increase the risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The exact etiology is unclear, although it is known thatthere is a complex interaction between genetic, metabolic and environmental factors. Among the environmental factors, dietary habits play an important role in the treatment and prevention of this condition. General classic recommendations include control of obesity, increased physical activity, decreased intake of saturated fat and cholesterol, reduced intake of simple sugars and increased intake of fruits and vegetables. It has been studied the influence of diets low in carbohydrates, diets rich in polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, fiber intake, the Mediterranean diet and the glycemic index in relation to metabolic syndrome.Other nutrients recently studied are the micronutrients (magnesium and calcium, soy and other phytochemicals. Evidence suggests that a healthy diet like the Mediterranean protects against metabolic syndrome,caracterized for a low content in saturated and trans fat, high in monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids, balanced intake of carbohydrates and high in fiber, fruits and vegetables. There is more controversy about the type of diet of choice for the control ofmetabolic syndrome (low-carbohydrate diets or lowfat, needing more studies on the role of soy and other phytochemicals.

  9. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    ... you are concerned about your risk or are planning to start a family. Call for an appointment with your health care ... a family history of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Those planning to start a family should be aware of the type of EDS ...

  10. Annotation: The Savant Syndrome

    Heaton, Pamela; Wallace, Gregory L.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Whilst interest has focused on the origin and nature of the savant syndrome for over a century, it is only within the past two decades that empirical group studies have been carried out. Methods: The following annotation briefly reviews relevant research and also attempts to address outstanding issues in this research area.…

  11. Trisomy 18 (Edwards Syndrome

    Masoud Poureisa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Description and Definition "n"n Synonym: Edward syndrome Characterized by malformations of multiple organ systems, trisomy 18 has an incidence of 3 in 10000 live births. Abnormalities detectable by ultrasound Common findings Agenesis of the corpus callosum Choroid plexus cysts Posterior fossa abnormalities Micrognathia Low-set ears Microphthalmous Hypertelorism Short radial ray Clenched hand with overlapping index finger Clubbed foot Rocker-bottom foot Renal anomalies hydronephrosis Omphalocele Diaphragmatic hernia Cryptorchidism Heart defects Single umbilical artery Intrauterine growth restriction Polyhydramnios Nuchal lucency Occasional findings Meningomyelocele Ventriculomegaly Cleft lip and plate Major differential diagnoses Freeman-Sheldon syndrome (clenched hands and intrauterine growth restriction Pena Shokeir syndrome (pseudo-trisomy 18 Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (clenched hands and intrauterine grown restriction Triploidy (intrauterine growth restriction Trisomy 9 Other multiple malformation syndromes associated with intrauterine growth retardation, limb anomalies and/ or heart defects. Ultrasound diagnosis Prenatal; ultrasound diagnosis has been established in the first trimester, based on the finding of a nuchal lucency. Detectable features on the early second trimester include abnormal forearms, clenched hands, clubbed feet, omphalocele and a major heart defect. The features of trisomy 18 are detectable in 80% of affected fetuses in the second trimester. Sonography is often used to evaluate fetuses for the prsence of trisomy 18 when choroid plexus cysts are present, or when the triple screen results in a low level of maternal serum alpha- fetoprotein, estriol and human chorionic  gonadotropin combination. Although trisomy 18 occurs in 1 in 100 fetuses with choroid plexus cysts, if it is an isolated finding, the risk for trisomy 18 falls below 1 in 400. Documenting an open hand is very helpful as most fetuses with trisomy 18 are

  12. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome

    Thiagarajan Ravi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypoplastic left heart syndrome(HLHS refers to the abnormal development of the left-sided cardiac structures, resulting in obstruction to blood flow from the left ventricular outflow tract. In addition, the syndrome includes underdevelopment of the left ventricle, aorta, and aortic arch, as well as mitral atresia or stenosis. HLHS has been reported to occur in approximately 0.016 to 0.036% of all live births. Newborn infants with the condition generally are born at full term and initially appear healthy. As the arterial duct closes, the systemic perfusion becomes decreased, resulting in hypoxemia, acidosis, and shock. Usually, no heart murmur, or a non-specific heart murmur, may be detected. The second heart sound is loud and single because of aortic atresia. Often the liver is enlarged secondary to congestive heart failure. The embryologic cause of the disease, as in the case of most congenital cardiac defects, is not fully known. The most useful diagnostic modality is the echocardiogram. The syndrome can be diagnosed by fetal echocardiography between 18 and 22 weeks of gestation. Differential diagnosis includes other left-sided obstructive lesions where the systemic circulation is dependent on ductal flow (critical aortic stenosis, coarctation of the aorta, interrupted aortic arch. Children with the syndrome require surgery as neonates, as they have duct-dependent systemic circulation. Currently, there are two major modalities, primary cardiac transplantation or a series of staged functionally univentricular palliations. The treatment chosen is dependent on the preference of the institution, its experience, and also preference. Although survival following initial surgical intervention has improved significantly over the last 20 years, significant mortality and morbidity are present for both surgical strategies. As a result pediatric cardiologists continue to be challenged by discussions with families regarding initial decision

  13. Syndromic diarrhea/Tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome

    Fabre Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Syndromic diarrhea/Tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome (SD/THE is a rare and severe bowel disorder caused by mutation in SKIV2L or in TTC37, 2 genes encoding subunits of the putative human SKI complex. The estimated prevalence is 1/1,000,000 births and the transmission is autosomal recessive. The classical form is characterized by 5 clinical signs: intractable diarrhea of infancy beginning in the first month of life, usually leading to failure to thrive and requiring parenteral nutrition; facial dysmorphism characterised by prominent forehead and cheeks, broad nasal root and hypertelorism; hair abnormalities described as woolly and easily removable; immune disorders resulting from defective antibody production; intrauterine growth restriction. The aetiology is a defect in TTC37, a TPR containing protein, or in the RNA helicase SKIV2L, both constituting the putative human ski complex. The ski complex is a heterotetrameric cofactor of the cytoplasmic RNA exosome which ensures aberrants mRNAs decay. The diagnosis SD/THE is initially based on clinical findings and confirmed by direct sequencing of TTC37 and SKIV2L. Differential diagnosis with the other causes of intractable diarrhea is easily performed by pathologic investigations. During their clinical course, most of the children require parenteral nutrition and often immunoglobulin supplementation. With time, some of them can be weaned off parenteral nutrition and immunoglobulin supplementation. The prognosis depends on the management and is largely related to the occurrence of parenteral nutrition complications or infections. Even with optimal management, most of the children seem to experience failure to thrive and final short stature. Mild mental retardation is observed in half of the cases. Abstract in French Les diarrhées syndromiques ou syndrome tricho-hepato-enterique (SD/THE sont un syndrome rare et sévère dont l’incidence est estimée à 1 cas pour 1 million de naissances et la

  14. Syndromic diarrhea/Tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Syndromic diarrhea/Tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome (SD/THE) is a rare and severe bowel disorder caused by mutation in SKIV2L or in TTC37, 2 genes encoding subunits of the putative human SKI complex. The estimated prevalence is 1/1,000,000 births and the transmission is autosomal recessive. The classical form is characterized by 5 clinical signs: intractable diarrhea of infancy beginning in the first month of life, usually leading to failure to thrive and requiring parenteral nutrition; facial dysmorphism characterised by prominent forehead and cheeks, broad nasal root and hypertelorism; hair abnormalities described as woolly and easily removable; immune disorders resulting from defective antibody production; intrauterine growth restriction. The aetiology is a defect in TTC37, a TPR containing protein, or in the RNA helicase SKIV2L, both constituting the putative human ski complex. The ski complex is a heterotetrameric cofactor of the cytoplasmic RNA exosome which ensures aberrants mRNAs decay. The diagnosis SD/THE is initially based on clinical findings and confirmed by direct sequencing of TTC37 and SKIV2L. Differential diagnosis with the other causes of intractable diarrhea is easily performed by pathologic investigations. During their clinical course, most of the children require parenteral nutrition and often immunoglobulin supplementation. With time, some of them can be weaned off parenteral nutrition and immunoglobulin supplementation. The prognosis depends on the management and is largely related to the occurrence of parenteral nutrition complications or infections. Even with optimal management, most of the children seem to experience failure to thrive and final short stature. Mild mental retardation is observed in half of the cases. Abstract in French Les diarrhées syndromiques ou syndrome tricho-hepato-enterique (SD/THE) sont un syndrome rare et sévère dont l’incidence est estimée à 1 cas pour 1 million de naissances et la transmission

  15. Targeted therapy for genetic cancer syndromes: Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome.

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2015-02-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome are cancer syndromes which affect multiple organs and lead to significant decline in quality of life in affected patients. These syndromes are rare and typically affect the adolescent and young adult population, resulting in greater cumulative years of life lost. Improved understanding of the underpinnings of the genetic pathways underlying these syndromes and the rapid evolution of targeted therapies in general have made it possible to develop therapeutic options for these patients and other genetic cancer syndromes. Targeted therapies especially antiangiogenics and inhibitors of the PIK3CA/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway have shown activity in selected group of patients affected by these syndromes or in patients harboring specific sporadic mutations which are otherwise characteristic of these syndromes. Unfortunately due to the rare nature, patients with these syndromes are not the focus of clinical trials and unique results seen in these patients can easily go unnoticed. Most of the data suggesting benefits of targeted therapies are either case reports or small case series. Thus, a literature review was indicated. In this review we explore the use of molecularly targeted therapy options in Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome. PMID:25725225

  16. LEOPARD syndrome is not linked to the Marfan syndrome and the Watson syndrome loci

    Rass-Rothchild, A.: Abeliovitch, D.; Kornstein, A. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)]|[Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel)

    1994-09-01

    The acronym LEOPARD stands for a syndromic association of Lentigines, Eletrocardiographic changes, Ocular hypertelorism, Pulmonic stenosis, Abnormal genitalia, Retardation of growth and sensorineural Deafness. Inheritance is autosomal dominant with high penetrance and variable expressivity. In 1990 Torok et al. reported on the association of LEOPARD and Marfan syndrome. In addition a clinical similarity (cardiac and cutaneous involvement) exists with the Watson syndrome (neurofibromatosis and pulmonic stenosis) which is linked to the marker D17S33 on chromosome 17. We studied possible linkage of LEOPARD syndrome to the Marfan syndrome locus on chromosome 15 (D15S1, MF13, and (TAAAA)n repeats) and to the NF-1 locus on chromosome 17 in a family with 9 cases of LEOPARD syndrome. Close linkage between LEOPARD syndrome and both the Marfan locus on chromosome 15 and the NF-1 locus on chromosome 17 was excluded (lod score <-2.0 through {theta} = 0.1).

  17. Ectopic corticotroph syndrome

    Penezić Zorana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Endogenous Cushing's syndrome is a clinical state resulting from prolonged, inappropriate exposure to excessive endogenous secretion of Cortisol and hence excess circulating free cortisol, characterized by loss of the normal feedback mechanisms of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and the normal circadian rhythm of cortisol secretion [2]. The etiology of Cushing's syndrome may be excessive ACTH secretion from the pituitary gland, ectopic ACTH secretion by nonpituitary tumor, or excessive autonomous secretion of cortisol from a hyperfunctioning adrenal adenoma or carcinoma. Other than this broad ACTH-dependent and ACTH-independent categories, the syndrome may be caused by ectopic CRH secretion, PPNAD, MAH, ectopic action of GIP or catecholamines, and other adrenel-dependent processes associated with adrenocortical hyperfunction. CASE REPORT A 31 year-old men with b-month history of hyperpigmentation, weight gain and proximal myopathy was refereed to Institute of Endocrinology for evaluation of hypercortisolism. At admission, patient had classic cushingoid habit with plethoric face, dermal and muscle atrophy, abdominal strie rubrae and centripetal obesity. The standard laboratory data showed hyperglycaemia and hypokaliemia with high potassium excretion level. The circadian rhythm of cortisol secretion was blunted, with moderately elevated ACTH level, and without cortisol suppression after low-dose and high-dose dexamethason suppression test. Urinary 5HIAA was elevated. Abdominal and sellar region magnetic resonance imaging was negative. CRH stimulation resulted in ACTH increase of 87% of basal, but without significant increase of cortisol level, only 7%. Thoracal CT scan revealed 14 mm mass in right apical pulmonary segment. A wedge resection of anterior segment of right upper lobe was performed. Microscopic evaluation showed tumor tissue consisting of solid areas of uniform, oval cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm and centrally

  18. Genetics Home Reference: restless legs syndrome

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions restless legs syndrome restless legs syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Other Names for This Condition Ekbom syndrome Ekbom's syndrome restless leg syndrome RLS WED Willis-Ekbom disease Related Information ...

  19. The developmental trajectory of disruptive behavior in Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome and Williams syndrome.

    Rice, Lauren J; Gray, Kylie M; Howlin, Patricia; Taffe, John; Tonge, Bruce J; Einfeld, Stewart L

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the developmental trajectories of verbal aggression, physical aggression, and temper tantrums in four genetic syndrome groups. Participants were part of the Australian Child to Adult Development Study (ACAD), which collected information from a cohort of individuals with an intellectual disability at five time points over 18 years. Data were examined from a total of 248 people with one of the four following syndromes: Down syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, or Williams syndrome. Changes in behaviors were measured using validated items from the Developmental Behavior Checklist (DBC). The results indicate that, while verbal aggression shows no evidence of diminishing with age, physical aggression, and temper tantrums decline with age before 19 years for people with Down syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, and William syndrome; and after 19 years for people with Prader-Willi syndrome. These findings offer a somewhat more optimistic outlook for people with an intellectual disability than has previously been suggested. Research is needed to investigate the mechanisms predisposing people with PWS to persistence of temper tantrums and physical aggression into adulthood. PMID:25983069

  20. Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia clefting syndrome (EEC syndrome).

    Koul, Monika; Dwivedi, Rahul; Upadhyay, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia- clefting syndrome (also k/a. split hand- split foot malformation /split hand-split foot ectodermal dysplasia- cleft syndrome/ectodermal dysplasia cleft lip/cleft palate syndrome) a rare form of ectodermal dysplasia, is an autosomal dominant disorder inherited as a genetic trait and characterized by a triad of (i) ectrodactyly, (ii) ectodermal dysplasia and, (iii) & facial clefts. PMID:25737931

  1. Circulatory Syndrome: An Evolution of the Metabolic Syndrome Concept!

    Khoshdel, Ali Reza; Carney, Shane L; Gillies, Alastair

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome has been a useful, though controversial construct in clinical practice as well as a valuable model in order to understand the interactions of diverse cardiovascular risk factors. However the increasing importance of the circulatory system in particular the endothelium , in both connecting and controlling organ function has underlined the limitations of the metabolic syndrome definition. The proposed “Circulatory Syndrome” is an attempt to refine the metabolic syndrome c...

  2. [Recovery of Cushing syndrome revealing McCune-Albright syndrome].

    Halioui-Louhaichi, S; Dridi, Y; Azzabi, O; Selmi, I; Fetni, I; Siala, N; Maherzi, A

    2016-01-01

    Cushing syndrome (CS) is a rare feature of McCune-Albright syndrome. Treatments consist of bilateral adrenalectomy followed by lifelong glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid treatment. However, cases of spontaneous remission of CS have been reported in the literature. We report a case of McCune-Albright syndrome with CS treated with metyrapone for 30 months with prolonged remission after a 12-year follow-up. Adrenalectomy may be avoided in some cases of CS caused by McCune-Albright syndrome. Metyrapone could be a good alternative to surgical treatment. PMID:26552628

  3. Dangerous triplet: Polycystic ovary syndrome, oral contraceptives and Kounis syndrome

    Nurdan; Erol; Aysu; Turkmen; Karaagac; Nicholas; G; Kounis

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is characterized by ovulatory dysfunction, androgen excess and polycystic ovaries and is associated with hypertension, diabetes, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular events. Oral contraceptives constitute first-line treatment, particularly when symptomatic hyperandrogenism is present. However, these drugs are associated with cardiovascular events and hypersensitivity reactions that pose problem in differential diagnosis and therapy. We present a 14 year-old female with polycystic ovary syndrome taking oral contraceptive and suffering from recurrent coronary ischemic attacks with increased eosinophils, and troponin levels suggesting Kounis syndrome.

  4. Short bowel syndrome

    This thesis describes some aspects of short bowel syndrome. When approximately 1 m or less small bowel is retained after extensive resection, a condition called short bowel syndrome is present. Since the advent of parenteral nutrition, the prognosis of patients with a very short bowel has dramatically improved. Patients with 40 to 100 cm remaining jejunum and/or ileum can generally be maintained with oral nutrition due to increased absorption of the small bowel remnant as result of intestinal adaptation. This study reports clinical, biochemical and nutritional aspects of short bowel patients on oral or parenteral nutrition, emphasizing data on absorption of various nutrients and on bone metabolism. Furthermore, some technical apsects concerning long-term parenteral nutrition are discussed. (Auth.)

  5. Elejalde syndrome (ES).

    Mohammadzadeh Shanehsaz, Siavash; Rezazadeh, Azadeh; Dandashli, Anwar

    2015-03-01

    Silvery hair and severe dysfunction of the central nervous system (Neuroectodermal melanolysosomal disease or Elejalde Syndrome) characterize this rare autosomal recessive syndrome. The main clinical features include silver-leaden hair, bronze skin after sun exposure, and neurologic involvement. Large granules of melanin unevenly distributed in the hair shaft are observed. Abnormal melanocytes and melanosomes and abnormal inclusion bodies in fibroblasts may be present. We report a 10-year-old girl with silver-leaden (silvery) hair, bronze skin color on sun-exposed areas, generalized hypopigmentation of covered body parts, and congenital seizures. The child was the elder of two children born of a consanguineous marriage. The younger sibling, a female neonate, had the same clinical presentation. PMID:25780981

  6. Deep gluteal syndrome

    Martin, Hal David; Reddy, Manoj; Gómez-Hoyos, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Deep gluteal syndrome describes the presence of pain in the buttock caused from non-discogenic and extrapelvic entrapment of the sciatic nerve. Several structures can be involved in sciatic nerve entrapment within the gluteal space. A comprehensive history and physical examination can orientate the specific site where the sciatic nerve is entrapped, as well as several radiological signs that support the suspected diagnosis. Failure to identify the cause of pain in a timely manner can increase pain perception, and affect mental control, patient hope and consequently quality of life. This review presents a comprehensive approach to the patient with deep gluteal syndrome in order to improve the understanding of posterior hip anatomy, nerve kinematics, clinical manifestations, imaging findings, differential diagnosis and treatment considerations. PMID:27011826

  7. Johanson-Blizzard syndrome.

    Almashraki, Nabeel; Abdulnabee, Mukarram Zainuddin; Sukalo, Maja; Alrajoudi, Abdullah; Sharafadeen, Iman; Zenker, Martin

    2011-10-01

    Johanson-Blizzard syndrome (JBS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, hypoplastic or aplastic nasal alae, cutis aplasia on the scalp, and other features including developmental delay, failure to thrive, hearing loss, mental retardation, hypothyroidism, dental abnormalities, and anomalies in cardiac and genitourinary systems. More than 60 cases of this syndrome have been reported to date. We describe the case of a male infant with typical symptoms of JBS. In addition, a new clinical feature which has not previously been documented, that is anemia requiring frequent blood transfusions and mild to moderate thrombocytopenia was observed. A molecular study was performed which revealed a novel homozygous UBR1 mutation. Possible explanations for this new association are discussed. PMID:22072859

  8. Stewart Treves Syndrome*

    Pereira, Elisangela Samartin Pegas; de Moraes, Elisa Trino; Siqueira, Daniela Melo; dos Santos, Marcel Alex Soares

    2015-01-01

    Stewart-Treves Syndrome is characterized by the presence of lymphangiosarcoma on limb extremities. Rare, it occurs in 0.5% of patients who have undergone radical mastectomy with axillary node dissection. The main cause is chronic lymphedema with endothelial and lymphatic differentiation, with no direct relationship to breast cancer. Seven years after a radical right-side mastectomy with lymph node dissection and adjuvant therapy, the patient developed a lesion on her right arm. The dermatological examination revealed an erythematous nodule with bleeding surface on chronic right forearm lymphedema. After the biopsy, a lymphangiosarcoma on chronic lymphedema was diagnosed. Infrequent, this syndrome is relevant because of its associated mortality. Early diagnosis is important to improve survival and reduce complications. PMID:26312725

  9. Senior Loken Syndrome

    F Najafi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of ESRD under the age of 20 almost is the inherited kidney disease or congenital disorders of urinary tract. NPHP/ medullary cystic disease includes a group of tubulo- genetic kidney disorders. NPHP is the cause of 15-20% ESRD in children and adolescents. The extra renal manifestations include: oculomotor Apraxia(Cogan syndrome, mental retardation, retinitis pigmentosa, (Senior- Loken syndrome liver fibrosis and skeletal disorders. Recently, on the basis of genetics and type of the protein product of these mutations, NPHP is divided to 6 types. The presented case is a 17 year old boy with end stage renal disease that he has been managed with hemodialysis. As the patient has polyuria and disturbance in vision from childhood and on physical examination he had retinitis pigmentosa and horizontal nystagmus with a history of chronic kidney disease in his 12 years old sister, and familial marriage between his parents, we suggest NPHP4 for the patient.

  10. Central Neuropathic Pain Syndromes.

    Watson, James C; Sandroni, Paola

    2016-03-01

    Chronic pain is common in patients with neurologic complications of a central nervous system insult such as stroke. The pain is most commonly musculoskeletal or related to obligatory overuse of neurologically unaffected limbs. However, neuropathic pain can result directly from the central nervous system injury. Impaired sensory discrimination can make it challenging to differentiate central neuropathic pain from other pain types or spasticity. Central neuropathic pain may also begin months to years after the injury, further obscuring recognition of its association with a past neurologic injury. This review focuses on unique clinical features that help distinguish central neuropathic pain. The most common clinical central pain syndromes-central poststroke pain, multiple sclerosis-related pain, and spinal cord injury-related pain-are reviewed in detail. Recent progress in understanding of the pathogenesis of central neuropathic pain is reviewed, and pharmacological, surgical, and neuromodulatory treatments of this notoriously difficult to treat pain syndrome are discussed. PMID:26944242

  11. Hadju-cheney syndrome

    The case of a 24-year-old man with Hadju-Cheney syndrome is reported. No similar disease occured in his family. Inverted and bulbous tips of fingers were noted at age 9 and protruded occipital bone at age 10. He complained of left facial spasm and facial tics for 1 year. Examination revealed a man of short stature, with a brachycephalic skull and hypertelorism. Radiologically there was an extreme degree of basilar impression with the basal angle of 180 degrees, demineralized spinal vertebrae, and acro-osteolysis. Both bone and CT scans demonstrated the abnormalities of the skull clearly. The basilar artery ran almost horizontally on angiography. He gradually deteriorated neurologically with bulbar, pyramidal and cerebellar signs and symptoms. Review of the literature revealed at least then non-familial and nine familial cases of this disorder. It is considered that this syndrome is a genetically determined generalized dysplastic bone disorder. (orig.)

  12. Hadju-Cheney syndrome

    Kawamura, J.; Matsubayashi, K.; Ogawa, M.

    1981-08-01

    The case of a 24-year-old man with Hadju-Cheney syndrome is reported. No similar disease occured in his family. Inverted and bulbous tips of fingers were noted at age 9 and protruded occipital bone at age 10. He complained of left facial spasm and facial tics for 1 year. Examination revealed a man of short stature, with a brachycephalic skull and hypertelorism. Radiologically there was an extreme degree of basilar impression with the basal angle of 180 degrees, demineralized spinal vertebrae, and acro-osteolysis. Both bone and CT scans demonstrated the abnormalities of the skull clearly. The basilar artery ran almost horizontally on angiography. He gradually deteriorated neurologically with bulbar, pyramidal and cerebellar signs and symptoms. Review of the literature revealed at least then non-familial and nine familial cases of this disorder. It is considered that this syndrome is a genetically determined generalized dysplastic bone disorder.

  13. Dementia in Down's syndrome.

    Ballard, Clive; Mobley, William; Hardy, John; Williams, Gareth; Corbett, Anne

    2016-05-01

    Down's syndrome is the most common genetic cause of learning difficulties, and individuals with this condition represent the largest group of people with dementia under the age of 50 years. Genetic drivers result in a high frequency of Alzheimer's pathology in these individuals, evident from neuroimaging, biomarker, and neuropathological findings, and a high incidence of cognitive decline and dementia. However, cognitive assessment is challenging, and diagnostic methods have not been fully validated for use in these patients; hence, early diagnosis remains difficult. Evidence regarding the benefits of cholinesterase inhibitors and other therapeutic options to treat or delay progressive cognitive decline or dementia is very scarce. Despite close similarities with late-onset Alzheimer's disease, individuals with Down's syndrome respond differently to treatment, and a targeted approach to drug development is thus necessary. Genetic and preclinical studies offer opportunities for treatment development, and potential therapies have been identified using these approaches. PMID:27302127

  14. Delleman Oorthuys syndrome

    Syed Wajahat A Rizvi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oculocerebrocutaneous or Delleman syndrome is a rare congenital syndrome characterized by microphthalmia/anophthalmia with or without orbital cysts, focal skin defects, intracranial cysts and skin appendages. We here report a case of 1-year-old male child with periocular skin tags, lid colobomas, and dermal hypoplasia. The patient had delayed developmental milestones and history of tonic-clonic seizures. Magnetic resonance imaging of the head revealed a large arachnoid cyst, aplastic cerebellar vermis and polymicrographic pattern of the cerebral cortex. A complex cyst of spleen was also noted on abdominal ultrasonography. Orbital cysts depending on the size can be excised or left alone. Neuroimaging evaluation of patients with congenital orbital cysts and skin appendages is emphasized for early and appropriate management.

  15. Polycystic ovarian syndrome

    Nina Madnani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS is a "multispeciality" disorder suspected in patients with irregular menses and clinical signs of hyperandrogenism such as acne, seborrhoea, hirsutism, irregular menses, infertility, and alopecia. Recently, PCOS has been associated with the metabolic syndrome. Patients may develop obesity, insulin resistance, acanthosis nigricans, Type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemias, hypertension, non-alcoholic liver disease, and obstructive sleep apnoea. Good clinical examination with hematological and radiological investigations is required for clinical evaluation. Management is a combined effort involving a dermatologist, endocrinologist, gynecologist, and nutritionist. Morbidity in addition includes a low "self image" and poor quality of life. Long term medications and lifestyle changes are essential for a successful outcome. This article focuses on understanding the normal and abnormal endocrine functions involved in the pathogenesis of PCOS. Proper diagnosis and management of the patient is discussed.

  16. Inpatient alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

    Monte-Secades, R; Rabuñal-Rey, R; Guerrero-Sande, H

    2015-03-01

    A 55-year-old man was admitted for a femur fracture; an alcohol fetor was noted on admission. The following day, the patient began to experience tremors and nervousness. Intravenous haloperidol was administered. Shortly afterwards, the patient experienced two generalized seizures and then began to experience delirium and uncontrollable agitation. The patient was diagnosed with alcohol withdrawal syndrome; high doses of intravenous midazolam were prescribed and infused. A few hours later, the patient presented signs of respiratory depression, requiring a transfer to the intensive care unit. After a review of the medical history, it was determined that the patient had been admitted on 3 previous occasions due to alcohol withdrawal and had progressed to delirium tremens after experiencing seizures. Can the risk of alcohol withdrawal syndrome and the need for prophylactic treatment be assessed on admission? Were appropriate monitoring and treatment measures employed? Would it have been possible to change his outcome? PMID:25559647

  17. Catastrophic primary antiphospholipid syndrome

    Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPLS) was diagnosed in a 64-year-old male who was admitted to our hospital with dyspnea. The clinical and radiological examinations showed pulmonary thromboembolism, and so thromboembolectomy was performed. Abdominal distension rapidly developed several days later, and the abdominal computed tomography (CT) abdominal scan revealed thrombus within the superior mesenteric artery with small bowel and gall bladder distension. Cholecystectomy and jejunoileostomy were performed, and gall bladder necrosis and small bowel infarction were confirmed. The anticardiolipin antibody was positive. Anticoagulant agents and steroids were administered, but the patient expired 4 weeks after surgery due to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We report here on a case of catastrophic APLS with manifestations of pulmonary thromboembolism, rapidly progressing GB necrosis and bowel infarction

  18. Catastrophic primary antiphospholipid syndrome

    Kim, Dong Hun; Byun, Joo Nam [Chosun University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Sang Wan [Miraero21 Medical Center, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-15

    Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPLS) was diagnosed in a 64-year-old male who was admitted to our hospital with dyspnea. The clinical and radiological examinations showed pulmonary thromboembolism, and so thromboembolectomy was performed. Abdominal distension rapidly developed several days later, and the abdominal computed tomography (CT) abdominal scan revealed thrombus within the superior mesenteric artery with small bowel and gall bladder distension. Cholecystectomy and jejunoileostomy were performed, and gall bladder necrosis and small bowel infarction were confirmed. The anticardiolipin antibody was positive. Anticoagulant agents and steroids were administered, but the patient expired 4 weeks after surgery due to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We report here on a case of catastrophic APLS with manifestations of pulmonary thromboembolism, rapidly progressing GB necrosis and bowel infarction.

  19. Waardenburg Syndrome: A Case Report

    Hayrullah Alp

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Auditory-pigmentary syndromes are a group of diseases that effect the skin, hair, eyes and the cochlea. Waardenburg syndrome is one of the members of these autosomal dominantly inherited diseases. Waardenburg syndrome is characterized by white forelock, congenital sensorineural hearing loss, hypopigmented skin and anomalies of the intraocular tissues. How ever all these diagnostic features may not be seen in all patient. In addition, there are four subtypes of the syndrome in each of which the genetic and clinical findings are different. Case Report: In this article, a-3-year old boy with Waardenburg syndrome Type 1 was described. Also, in some of the family members the same disease was diagnosed. Conclusion: Waardenburg syndrome should be evaluated in the patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss accompanied with the clinical findings. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2010; 8: 123-6

  20. DRESS syndrome in ophthalmic patients.

    Sousa, Jacqueline Martins de; Nascimento, Heloisa; Belfort, Rubens

    2016-01-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is a rare and potentially fatal adverse drug reaction associated with skin rash, fever, eosinophilia, and multiple organ injury. A number of pharmacological agents are known to cause DRESS syndrome such as allopurinol, anticonvulsants, vancomycin, trimethoprime-sulfamethoxazole, and pyrimethamine-sulfadiazine. Here, we describe two patients who developed DRESS syndrome during ocular treatment. The first case was being treated for late postoperative endophthalmitis with topical antibiotics, intravenous cephalothin, meropenem, and intravitreal injection of vancomycin and ceftazidime before symptoms developed. We were unable to identify the causal drug owing to the large number of medications concurrently administered. The second case presented with DRESS syndrome symptoms during ocular toxoplasmosis treatment. In this case, a clearer association with pyrimethamine-sulfadiazine was observed. As a result of the regular prescription of pharmacological agents associated with DRESS syndrome, ophthalmologists should be aware of the potentially serious complications of DRESS syndrome. PMID:27463633

  1. Das Burnout-Syndrom

    Froehlich, Annette

    2010-01-01

    The burnout-syndrome was first described in great detail by H. Freudenberger 1974.There are a lot of different definitions. The most often cited is from Maslach and Jackson (1986) characterizing burnout by three core dimensions: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and reduced personal accomplishment. Although burnout can be related to psychological, somatic and psychosomatic health-problems, it is not listed as an “occupational disease” but as a “job-related injurious to health”. In the I...

  2. Asperger syndrome: an update

    Klin Ami

    2003-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the history and clinical features of Asperger syndrome, and considers guidelines for clinical assessment and treatment. A review of issues related to external validity is provided, which points out the limitations of current research, and lists several potentially beneficial areas of investigation into the nosologic status of the condition. It concludes with a discussion of the unequivocal need of individuals with severe social disabilities for comprehensi...

  3. Waardenburg′s syndrome

    Amladi Sangeeta

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A 2 ½ year old female child presented with heterochromia irides and a depigmented macule on the hand with central hyperpigmentation. There was presence of medial eyebrow hyperplasia, broad nasal root and dystopia canthorum. The fundus on the affected side was albinotic. There was no white forelock or deafness. Biopsy from the depigmented area showed an absence of melancocytes. A diagnosis of Waardenburg′s syndrome type 1 was made.

  4. Waardenburg syndrome 2

    Uma Garg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome (WS is a rare disease characterised by sensorineural deafness in association with oculocutaneous pigmentary anomalies and dystopia canthorum. In this article, we report a 6-year-old boy with WS2, one of four clinical types of WS, for its rarity and relative paucity of reports in the otological literature. We also review the relevant literature of this rare disorder.

  5. Waardenburg′s syndrome

    Yesudian Devakar; Jayaraman M; Janaki V; Yesudian Patrick

    1993-01-01

    A 2 ½ year old female child presented with heterochromia irides and a depigmented macule on the hand with central hyperpigmentation. There was presence of medial eyebrow hyperplasia, broad nasal root and dystopia canthorum. The fundus on the affected side was albinotic. There was no white forelock or deafness. Biopsy from the depigmented area showed an absence of melancocytes. A diagnosis of Waardenburg′s syndrome type 1 was made.

  6. Waardenburg′s syndrome

    Yesudian Devakar

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Three children in a family of five presented with heterochromia iridis, lateral displacement of inner canthi and varying degrees of sensorineural deafness. All the 3 showed iris atrophy. The father of the children had only heterochromia iridis. A diagnosis of Waardenburg′s syndrome Type I was made in the children with the father probably representing a forme fruste of the condition

  7. Klinefelter's syndrome in adolescence.

    Ratcliffe, S G; Bancroft, J.; Axworthy, D; McLaren, W.

    1982-01-01

    Twelve boys with Klinefelter's syndrome (47,XXY) identified by sex chromatin screening at birth were examined at between ages 16 and 18 years, together with 12 controls matched for social class and birth order from the same newborn population. Physical examination, psychometric assessment, personality, and degree of psychosexual development were assessed without knowledge of the karyotype. Anthropometry showed increased leg length and decreased head circumference in the XXY boys. Gynaecomasti...

  8. Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome.

    Klooster, N J; Kitslaar, P; Janevski, B K

    1988-06-01

    Two patients with unilateral popliteal artery entrapment syndrome (PAES) are reported. The importance of diligence in angiographic diagnosis and recognition of the so-called "functional" PAES group as a separate entity are stressed. It is inferred from our material that a surgical approach for PAES is to be advocated since surgical release of the entrapment can lead to complete resolution of symptoms regardless of aetiology. PMID:2837797

  9. Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome

    Klooster, N.J.J.; Janevski, B.K.; Kitslaar, P.

    1988-06-01

    Two patients with unilateral popliteal artery entrapment syndrome (PAES) are reported. The importance of diligence in angiographic diagnosis and recognition of the so-called 'functional' PAES group as a separate entity are stressed. It is inferred from our material that a surgical approach for PAES is to be advocated since surgical release of the entrapment can lead to complete resolution of symptoms regardless of aetiology.

  10. Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome

    Two patients with unilateral popliteal artery entrapment syndrome (PAES) are reported. The importance of diligence in angiographic diagnosis and recognition of the so-called 'functional' PAES group as a separate entity are stressed. It is inferred from our material that a surgical approach for PAES is to be advocated since surgical release of the entrapment can lead to complete resolution of symptoms regardless of aetiology. (orig.)

  11. Nevus comedonicus syndrome

    Pravesh Yadav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of nevus comedonicus syndrome with atypical cutaneous presentation (widespread involvement without any particular pattern, midline lesions involving lower abdomen and involvement of bilateral pinna, and some unusual skeletal (adduction deformity involving bilateral metatarsal along with medial deviation at the level of tarsometatarsal joint, central nervous system (agenesis of corpus callosum with a interhemispheric cyst, visceral (pancreatic cyst and neurological manifestations have been illustrated.

  12. Lesson Eight Preexcitation syndrome

    鲁端; 吴文烈

    2003-01-01

    @@ The most frequently encountered type of ventricular preexcitation is that1 associated with AV bypass tracts.These connections are composed of2 strands of atrial-like muscle which may occur almost anywhere around the AV ring s.T he term Wolff-Parkinson-White(WPW) syndrome is applied to patients with both preexcitation on the ECG and paroxysmal tachycardias. AV bypass tracts can be associated with certain congenital abnormalities,the most important of which3 is Ebstein's anomaly.

  13. Sweet Syndrome in childhood*

    dos Santos, Talita Batalha Pires; Sales, Barbara Cristina Gouveia; Sigres, Marianne; Rosman, Fernando; de Cerqueira, Ana Maria Mosca

    2015-01-01

    Sweet syndrome or acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis is a recurrent and rare skin disease caused by the release of cytokines, with diverse possible etiologic causes. It presents clinically with polymorphic skin lesions, fever, arthralgia, and peripheral leukocytosis. In general, it is associated with infections, malignancy and drugs. It usually regresses spontaneously and treatment is primarily to control the basic disease. The authors report the case of a child of 1 year and 11 months who...

  14. Metabolic syndrome in children

    Melinda Morea; Nicolae Miu

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MS) in children. Material and methods: We performed a cross sectional, retrospective study. A total of 395 children aged between 2-19 years old were examined.. The children have undergone physical examination; weight, height, waist circumference, blood pressure (BP) were measured. The nutritional status of the children was assessed by body mass index (BMI) and laboratory tests needed to diagnose MS were performed. IDF ...

  15. Fetal varicella syndrome

    Ramachandra S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fetal varicella syndrome is a rare condition of the newborn, presenting with cutaneous scars, limb defects and ocular and central nervous system abnormalities. It is due to varicella or zoster developing in the fetus following maternal varicella infection during early pregnancy. We are reporting one such patient who presented with a linear, depressed, erythematous scar over the left forearm and axillary fold, with a history of maternal chicken pox during the first trimester of pregnancy.

  16. Fetal varicella syndrome

    Ramachandra S; Metta Arun; Haneef Nayeem; Kodali Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    Fetal varicella syndrome is a rare condition of the newborn, presenting with cutaneous scars, limb defects and ocular and central nervous system abnormalities. It is due to varicella or zoster developing in the fetus following maternal varicella infection during early pregnancy. We are reporting one such patient who presented with a linear, depressed, erythematous scar over the left forearm and axillary fold, with a history of maternal chicken pox during the first trimester of pregnancy.

  17. Alagille Syndrome: A Review

    Callea, Michele; Bahsi, Emrullah; Montanari, Marco; Ince, Bayram; Mancini, Giovanni E.; YAVUZ, Yasemin; Radovich, Franco; Gunay, Ayse; Piana, Gabriela; Unal, Mehmet; D’Alessandro, Giovanni; Caselli, Mauro; Clarich, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Alagille Syndrome (AGS) is a genetically determined multisystem disorder affecting liver, hearth, eyes, skeleton and facies, less commonly kidney and CNS. The prognosis depends on the severity of the associated anomalies. The liver pathology plays a central role in that most clinical complications are due to long standing cholestasis as a consequence of lack of bile excretion secondary to paucity/absence of interlobular bile ducts. That results in hyperbilirubinemia, hypercholesterolemia, hyp...

  18. Treatment of Tourette Syndrome

    Kurlan, Roger M.

    2013-01-01

    Tourette’s syndrome (TS) consists of chronic motor and phonic tics and characteristically begins in childhood. The tics can be disabling and commonly associated behavioral comorbities such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), can also cause problems in daily functioning. The underlying etiology and neurobiology of TS remain unknown although genetic factors appear to be important, cortical control of basal ganglia motor function appears to...

  19. Spontaneous ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

    Kasum, Miro; Oresković, Slavko; Jezek, Davor

    2013-06-01

    Spontaneous forms of the ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (sOHSS) are nearly always reported between 8 and 14 weeks of pregnancy and also with follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) producing pituitary adenoma. The syndrome has been previously reported in rare instances of increased production of human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) such as multiple pregnancies, hydatiforme mole, polycystic ovary disease and elevated concentrations of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in hypothyreoidism. High levels of these hormones are able to stimulate by natural promiscuous activation the wild-type FSHr, resulting in sporadic presentations of the syndrome. Since 2003, only six different activating FSHr gene mutations have been reported in cases of familial or habitual sOHSS. In addition to five mutations which have been found in the transmembrane helices (Asp567Asn, Asp567Gly, Thr449Ile, Thr449Ala, Ile545Thr), the first germline mutation (c.383C > A, p. Ser 128 Tyr) in the extracelullar domain was identified. All five mutants were abnormally activated by TSH and normal levels of hCG while displaying constitutive activity. In contrast to these mutations, the p.Ser128Tyr mutant displayed an increase in sensitivity only toward hCG. Accordingly, the mutated FSHrs, may be hyperstimulated by the pregnancy-derived hCG or TSH, inducing the occurrence of the syndrome. In the differential diagnosis, malignancy, pregnancy luteoma and hyperreactio luteinalis would have to be excluded. In almost all of the cases the disease regresses spontaneously and could be managed expectantly or conservatively, but with termination of pregnancy or surgery in cases of complications. PMID:23941020

  20. Brachycephalic airway syndrome.

    Meola, Stacy D

    2013-08-01

    Brachycephalic airway syndrome is a common finding in brachycephalic breeds. A combination of primary and secondary changes can progress to life-threatening laryngeal collapse. Early recognition of primary anatomic abnormalities that include stenotic nares, elongated soft palate, and hypoplastic trachea would allow the clinician to make early recommendations for medical and surgical management, which can improve the quality of life in affected animals. PMID:24182996