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Sample records for acutely acl injured

  1. The acutely ACL injured knee assessed by MRI

    Frobell, R B; Roos, H P; Roos, E M;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To map by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and quantitative MRI (qMRI) concomitant fractures and meniscal injuries, and location and volume of traumatic bone marrow lesions (BMLs) in the acutely anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injured knee. To relate BML location and volume to cortical...... depression fractures, meniscal injuries and patient characteristics. METHODS: One hundred and twenty-one subjects (26% women, mean age 26 years) with an ACL rupture to a previously un-injured knee were studied using a 1.5T MR imager within 3 weeks from trauma. Meniscal injuries and fractures were classified...... by type, size and location. BML location and volume were quantified using a multi-spectral image data set analyzed by computer software, edited by an expert radiologist. RESULTS: Fractures were found in 73 (60%) knees. In 67 (92%) of these knees at least one cortical depression fracture was found...

  2. The acutely ACL injured knee assessed by MRI: changes in joint fluid, bone marrow lesions, and cartilage during the first year

    Frobell, R B; Le Graverand, M-P; Buck, R;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate changes in the knee during the first year after acute rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of volumes of joint fluid (JF), bone marrow lesions (BMLs), and cartilage volume (VC), and cartilage thickness (ThCcAB) and cartilage surface area (AC). To identify...

  3. Measurement of Knee Morphometrics Using MRI: A Comparative Study between ACL-Injured and Non-Injured Knees

    Park, Jin Sung; Nam, Dae Chul; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Hyung Kan; Hwang, Sun Chul

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to find out the differences of distal femur morphology between the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-injured and the non-ACL injured on an magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the difference of bone structure by gender. Materials and Methods MRI Measurements of notch width (NW), bicondylar width (BCW), medial condyle width (MCW), lateral condyle width (LCW), medial-to-lateral condyle ratio (M:L ratio), and notch entrance width (NE) were taken from 120 subj...

  4. A Case-Control Study Of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Volume, Tibial Plateau Slopes and Intercondylar Notch Dimensions In ACL-Injured Knees

    Simon, RA; Everhart, J; Nagaraja, HN; Chaudhari, AM

    2010-01-01

    The role played by anatomic factors in ACL injury remains elusive. In this study, objective methods were used to characterize ACL volume, tibial slopes, and notch geometry from ACL-injured and matched control subjects. The study tested four hypotheses: 1) the medial tibial plateau slope is steeper posteriorly in the injured group compared to the non-injured group, 2) the lateral tibial plateau slope is steeper posteriorly in the injured group compared to the non-injured group, 3) the femoral ...

  5. Do ACL-injured copers exhibit differences in knee kinematics?: An MRI study.

    Barrance, Peter J; Williams, Glenn N; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Buchanan, Thomas S

    2007-01-01

    Kinematic changes after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury may play a role in the long-term development of osteoarthritis (OA). Some ACL-injured patients (copers) successfully return to demanding activities without the reconstructive surgery usually recommended for functionally unstable patients (noncopers). We determined whether copers exhibit less disruption to kinematics than noncopers, perhaps because of lower impairment of muscular control as observed in earlier studies. We used dynamic magnetic resonance imaging and model-based tracking to investigate anteroposterior (AP) and internal-external tibial positioning in copers, presurgical noncopers, and uninjured control subjects during dynamic nonloaded knee extension. Copers and control subjects showed similar levels of side-to-side differences in AP tibial positioning (1.1 +/- 4.9 mm and 1.4 +/- 2.7 mm, respectively), whereas noncopers exhibited anterior tibial positioning in their injured knees (2.6 +/- 3 mm) that differed from control subjects. Copers were the most variable of the three groups, and contrary to our hypothesis, tibial positioning in copers was not different from that of noncopers. Differences in tibial positioning did not correlate with side-to-side differences in AP laxity in any of the groups, and we identified no changes to tibial axial rotation patterns associated with ACL deficiency. PMID:17091013

  6. Incidence of Hyperpronation in the ACL Injured Knee: A Clinical Perspective

    Beckett, Mark E.; Massie, Denise L.; Bowers, K. Douglas; Stoll, David A.

    1992-01-01

    Assessing abnormal biomechanics when treating various lower extremity pathologies provides the athlete with comprehensive management and promotes injury prevention. However, there have been few previous investigations of abnormal biomechanical forces on ligamentous pathologies of the knee. During this clinical study we investigated the incidence of hyperpronation in subjects who have had an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Fifty subjects with a past medical history of ACL rupture and ...

  7. Knee kinematic and kinetic characteristics of landing after hop : ACL injured subjects before and after rehabilitation

    Storevold, Annika

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dynamic knee stability strategies of anterior cruciate ligament deficient (ACL) subjects have previously been reported in gait analysis studies. Few studies have investigated these strategies during a more strenuous sport related activity such as a single leg hop. Joint stiffness may be an important functional performance parameter, to our knowledge no one have looked into knee joint stiffness after an ACL injury. Furthermore, too few studies have examined changes i...

  8. Principal component modeling of isokinetic moment curves for discriminating between the injured and healthy knees of unilateral ACL deficient patients.

    Almosnino, Sivan; Brandon, Scott C E; Day, Andrew G; Stevenson, Joan M; Dvir, Zeevi; Bardana, Davide D

    2014-02-01

    Bilateral knee strength evaluations of unilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficient patients using isokinetic dynamometry are commonly performed in rehabilitation settings. The most frequently-used outcome measure is the peak moment value attained by the knee extensor and flexor muscle groups. However, other strength curve features may also be of clinical interest and utility. The purpose of this investigation was to identify, using Principal Component Analysis (PCA), strength curve features that explain the majority of variation between the injured and uninjured knee, and to assess the capabilities of these features to detect the presence of injury. A mixed gender cohort of 43 unilateral ACL deficient patients performed 6 continuous concentric knee extension and flexion repetitions bilaterally at 60°s(-1) and 180°s(-1) within a 90° range of motion. Moment waveforms were analyzed using PCA, and binary logistic regression was used to develop a discriminatory decision rule. For all directions and speeds, a statistically significant overall reduction in strength was noted for the involved knee in comparison to the uninvolved knee. The discriminatory decision rule yielded a specificity and sensitivity of 60.5% and 60.5%, respectively, corresponding to an accuracy of ∼62%. As such, the curve features extracted using PCA enabled only limited clinical usefulness in discerning between the ACL deficient and contra lateral, healthy knee. Improvement in discrimination capabilities may perhaps be achieved by consideration of different testing speeds and contraction modes, as well as utilization of other data analysis techniques. PMID:24280243

  9. Radiography of the acutely injured shoulder

    Routine radiological examination of the acute shoulder has been unchanged in radiology departments for many years. At UCLH (University College London Hospitals, UK) this examination consists of two projections, an AP (antero-posterior) and an LS (lateral scapula). Following a review of the related literature and the possible advantages of an axial style projection, a study was performed to evaluate whether a new projection named modified trauma axial (MTA) shoulder projection could replace the existing LS projection in the routine examination of the acute shoulder. A retrospective analysis of 244 acute shoulder examinations over a 5-month period was performed. AP, LS and MTA projections were taken with paired AP and LS, and AP and MTA radiographs were reported separately. 97 traumatic abnormalities were reported using AP and MTA whilst only 64 abnormalities were reported using AP and LS views. The MTA projection demonstrated it was significant for evaluating articular surfaces of the humeral head and glenoid, defects in the humeral head, greater tuberosity fractures, glenoid fractures and fractures of the acromion. It was established that if the LS projection was replaced with the MTA view no traumatic pathologies would have been overlooked and in fact there was a 52% increase in traumatic abnormalities detected. Use of a chi-squared test demonstrated a highly significant difference in the number of traumatic abnormalities detected between the two pairs of projection combinations (p = 0.0004). Based on this study and the examined literature the routine examination of the acutely injured shoulder is recommended to include the AP and MTA projections only.

  10. Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcome Network Early Anti-inflammatory Treatment in Patients with Acute ACL Tear” (MOON-AAA) Clinical Trial

    Lattermann, Christian; Proffitt, Mary; Huston, Laura J.; Gammon, Lee; Johnson, Darren L.; Kraus, Virginia B.; Spindler, Kurt P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: We present the early results from the “Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcome Network Early Anti-inflammatory Treatment in Patients with Acute ACL Tear and Painful Effusions” (MOON-AAA) clinical trial (figure 1). This trial allows for a well controlled prospective cohort of patients with isolated ACL injury at risk for OA. We compared the effect of a single versus a repeated dosage of Kenalog within the first two weeks after ACL injury and its effect on chondral degradation in the first 4 weeks prior to surgical reconstruction of the ACL. Methods: 49 patients with isolated ACL tears were enrolled. Knee joints were aspirated and patients received an injection with 40 mg Kenalog either within 4 days, 10 days, both time points or not at all (saline injection control). Serum, synovial fluid and urine were collected at 3 time points. Permutated block randomization, triple blinding, independent monitoring and standardized x-ray was performed to comply with GCP standards. Patient reported outcomes were collected at 6 time points up to 6 months post-ACL reconstruction(IKDC, KOOS and Marx activity level). A standardized synovial fluid biomarker panel was analyzed according to OARSI guidelines. Statistical analysis were performed using SAS mixed models analysis. Results: Serum analysis shows significant change after injury. Chondrodegradatory markers such as CTX-II, MMP-1 and MMP-3 as well as COMP indicate a progressive destruction of chondral matrix and collagen breakdown . There is a dramatic (250%) increase of CTX-II in the first 4 weeks. Matrix proteins such as MMP-1 and 3 as well as COMP show an initial increase and then a steep decline (see figure 1). Inflammatory markers (IL-1 alpha, IL-1beta, IRAP) show a decline from the time of injury. IL-1 alpha, however shows a dramatic uptake after week 2. This longitudinal data confirms a dramatic onset of early osteoarthritic biomarker profiles immediately after ACL injury as measured in synovial fluid

  11. Clinical measurements of proprioception, muscle strength and laxity in relation to function in the ACL-injured knee.

    Roberts, David; Ageberg, Eva; Andersson, Gert; Fridén, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    A knee injury with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture may cause deficits in proprioception, increased laxity and decreased muscle strength. Although it may be common knowledge that these factors affect knee function, only a few studies have been performed where this has been investigated in the clinical situation, and the results are not conclusive. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate how and to what extent proprioception, laxity and strength affect knee joint functio...

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of bone bruising in the acutely injured knee--short-term outcome

    AIM: To investigate the short-term outcome and associated injuries of bone bruising in the acutely injured knee. METHOD AND MATERIALS: Thirty patients (age range 17-39 years, mean 28 years) with bone bruising identified on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after an acute knee injury were rescanned 12-14 weeks post-injury. The volume of bone bruising was measured on coronal STIR (short TI inversion recovery) images and correlation made with the presence and type of ligamentous and osteochondral injuries. RESULTS: All bone bruises were present on repeat MRI. Twenty of the 30 patients (67%) had associated anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, seven of the 30 (23%) had collateral ligament injuries and three of the 30 (10%) had no associated ligamentous injuries. Greater than 50% reduction in bone bruise volume was demonstrated at repeat scanning in 24 of the 30 patients (80%) and less than 50% in five of the 30 patients (17%). One patient showed an increase in volume of bone bruising at follow-up. There was no correlation between initial size or size reduction of bone bruising and the presence/absence or type of associated injuries. In 21 patients the bone bruises resolved from the periphery, whilst eight patients showed bone bruises that resolved towards the joint margin, all of whom had associated osteochondral injuries. Of the 30 patients, 17 showed bone bruising that extended to the joint margin, 10 of whom had associated osteochondral injuries on MRI. On clinical review some degree of knee pain was still present in all but one of the patients reviewed. The single patient who reported complete resolution of symptoms was one of the three patients with isolated bone bruising CONCLUSION: Bone bruises persist for at least 12-14 weeks, which is longer than previously quoted. Two discrete patterns of bone bruise resolution have been demonstrated. The size and persistence of bone bruising is not related to the presence or absence or type of associated ligamentous

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of bone bruising in the acutely injured knee--short-term outcome

    Davies, N.H.; Niall, D.; King, L.J.; Lavelle, J.; Healy, J.C. E-mail: j.healy@ic.ac.uk

    2004-05-01

    AIM: To investigate the short-term outcome and associated injuries of bone bruising in the acutely injured knee. METHOD AND MATERIALS: Thirty patients (age range 17-39 years, mean 28 years) with bone bruising identified on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after an acute knee injury were rescanned 12-14 weeks post-injury. The volume of bone bruising was measured on coronal STIR (short TI inversion recovery) images and correlation made with the presence and type of ligamentous and osteochondral injuries. RESULTS: All bone bruises were present on repeat MRI. Twenty of the 30 patients (67%) had associated anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, seven of the 30 (23%) had collateral ligament injuries and three of the 30 (10%) had no associated ligamentous injuries. Greater than 50% reduction in bone bruise volume was demonstrated at repeat scanning in 24 of the 30 patients (80%) and less than 50% in five of the 30 patients (17%). One patient showed an increase in volume of bone bruising at follow-up. There was no correlation between initial size or size reduction of bone bruising and the presence/absence or type of associated injuries. In 21 patients the bone bruises resolved from the periphery, whilst eight patients showed bone bruises that resolved towards the joint margin, all of whom had associated osteochondral injuries. Of the 30 patients, 17 showed bone bruising that extended to the joint margin, 10 of whom had associated osteochondral injuries on MRI. On clinical review some degree of knee pain was still present in all but one of the patients reviewed. The single patient who reported complete resolution of symptoms was one of the three patients with isolated bone bruising CONCLUSION: Bone bruises persist for at least 12-14 weeks, which is longer than previously quoted. Two discrete patterns of bone bruise resolution have been demonstrated. The size and persistence of bone bruising is not related to the presence or absence or type of associated ligamentous

  14. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injured (TRALI): Current Concepts

    Álvarez, P; Carrasco, R; Romero-Dapueto, C; Castillo, R.L

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a life-threatening intervention that develops within 6 hours of transfusion of one or more units of blood, and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality resulting from transfusion. It is necessary to dismiss other causes of acute lung injury (ALI), like sepsis, acute cardiogenic edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or bacterial infection. There are two mechanisms that lead to the development of this syndrome: immune-mediated...

  15. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injured (TRALI): Current Concepts.

    Álvarez, P; Carrasco, R; Romero-Dapueto, C; Castillo, R L

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a life-threatening intervention that develops within 6 hours of transfusion of one or more units of blood, and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality resulting from transfusion. It is necessary to dismiss other causes of acute lung injury (ALI), like sepsis, acute cardiogenic edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or bacterial infection. There are two mechanisms that lead to the development of this syndrome: immune-mediated and no immune- mediated TRALI. A common theme among the experimental TRALI models is the central importance of neutrophils in mediating the early immune response, and lung vascular injury. Central clinical symptoms are dyspnea, tachypnea, tachycardia, cyanosis and pulmonary secretions, altogether with other hemodynamic alterations, such as hypotension and fever. Complementary to these clinical findings, long-term validated animal models for TRALI should allow the determination of the cellular targets for TRALI-inducing alloantibodies as well as delineation of the underlying pathogenic molecular mechanisms, and key molecular mediators of the pathology. Diagnostic criteria have been established and preventive measures have been implemented. These actions have contributed to the reduction in the overallnumber of fatalities. However, TRALI still remains a clinical problem. Any complication suspected of TRALI should immediately be reported. PMID:26312100

  16. Protective effects of parmelia tinctorum preparations on acute radiation-injured mice

    Objective: To investigate the radiation protection effect of Parmelia tinctorum preparations in dosage, drug administration time, administration methods and different preparation methods on acute radiation-injured mice, and find out the best therapeutic project. Methods: Kunming mice were injected (ip) with 10 mg/kg, 20 mg/kg, 40 mg/kg, 80 mg/kg of Parmelia tinctorum preparations before irradiation respectively, then irradiated by 9 Gy 60Co γ-ray. The 30-day survival rates and the protection factors were observed. By the same method, another group of mice were injected (ip) with Parmelia tinctorum preparations at 15 min, 30 min, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h before irradiation respectively, the 30-day survival rates and the protection factors were observed. The protective effect of Parmelia tinctorum preparations from intramuscular and oral routes were compared with the same method. The protective effect of Parmelia tinctorum water extract preparations and alcohol extract preparations were compared. Results: A certain dosage (20-80 mg/kg) of Parmelia tinctorum preparations could greatly improve the 30-day survival rates and the protection factors of radiation-injured mice. Parmelia tinctorum preparations had significant therapeutic effect on 60Co γ-ray radiation-injured mice at 15 min-1 h before irradiation. Administration of Parmelia tinctorum preparations by intramuscular injection showed a little lower efficacy than by intraperitoneal injection, but administration the same dose orally had no significant radiation protective effect. Parmelia tinctorum preparations extracted by water injected (ip) before irradiation had the same radiation protective effect with those extracted by 50% alcohol. Conclusion: Parmelia tinctorum preparations have a certain protective effect on acute radiation-injured mice. The best therapeutic project is injected (ip) with 40 mg/kg of Parmelia tinctorum preparations at 30 min before irradiation. (authors)

  17. Management of Acute Combined ACL-Medial and Posteromedial Instability of the Knee.

    Medvecky, Michael J; Tomaszewski, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Medial collateral ligament (MCL) injuries are the most common ligamentous injury of the knee. The extent of injury can range from a minor first-degree (1-degree) sprain to an extensive third-degree (3-degree) sprain that can propagate across the knee, rupturing one or both cruciate ligaments, and result in a knee subluxation or dislocation. A common pattern involves the combined anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and MCL injury that is the focus of this chapter. The vast majority of these combined medial-sided injuries are treated nonoperatively with delayed reconstruction of the ACL injury in athletically active individuals. The MCL and associated medial structures are carefully assessed on physical examination, and classification of injury is based upon abnormal limits of joint motion. In vitro cadaveric biomechanical testing has given us a better understanding of ligament deficiency and altered joint motion. Consistency in terminology is necessary for proper classification of injury and reproducible categorization of injury patterns to be able to compare both nonoperative and operative treatment of various injury patterns. PMID:25932883

  18. Clearance of aerosolized Tc-99m DTPA from normal vs. acutely smoke-injured dog lungs

    Acute cigarette smoke exposure is known to reversibly increase the clearance rate of aerosolized DTPA from human lungs. The authors studied DTPA clearance after acute severe plywood smoke exposure, on the order of that experienced by burn victims, since current diagnostic methods (Xe-133 and radiographs) for major inhalation injury are insensitive and/or non-specific. Smoke generated from burning plywood sawdust and kerosene was delivered via endotracheal tube at 370C. Skin burns were not inflicted (so the pulmonary consequences of thermal injury were not factors). Chest radiographs and Xe-133 studies were obtained before and after smoke injury but before DTPA aerosol delivery. Six normal and 7 smoke-exposed anesthetized mongrel dogs were studied with 3 mCi of Tc-99m DTPA delivered by aerosol for 5 minutes. Pulmonary Tc-99m DTPA activity was quantitated by computer. Data were acquired over the lungs at 1 frame per 10 secs. for 16 minutes, and the t/sub 1/2/ of DTPA washout from the lungs was calculated. The mean t/sub 1/2/ of 6 normal dogs was 36.52 min. (S.D. 17.73), while the t/sub 1/2/ of 7 smoke-injured dogs was 6.08 min. (S.D. 1.99). The longest t/sub 1/2/ of an injured lung (9.68 min.) was slightly more than half of the shortest t/sub 1/2/ of a normal lung (15.36 min). Thus, acutely smoke-injured dog lungs clear Tc-99m DTPA much faster than normal lungs, consistent with an increase in lung epithelial permeability. This technique may be promising clinically, since early diagnosis of inhalation injury is important for optimal therapy

  19. Repair of acutely injured spinal cord through constructing tissue-engineered neural complex in adult rats

    PU Yu; GUO Qing-shan; WANG Ai-min; WU Si-yu; XING Shu-xing; ZHANG Zhong-rong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To construct tissue-engineered neural complex in vitro and study its effect in repairing acutely injured spinal cord in adult rats. Methods: Neural stem cells were harvested from the spinal cord of embryo rats and propagated in vitro. Then the neural stem cells were seeded into polyglycolic acid scaffolds and co-cultured with extract of embryonic spinal cord in vitro. Immunofluorescence histochemistry and scanning electron microscope were used to observe the microstructure of this complex. Animal model of spine semi-transection was made and tissue-engineered neural complex was implanted by surgical intervention. Six weeks after transplantation, functional evaluation and histochemistry were applied to evaluate the functional recovery and anatomic reconstruction. Results: The tissue-engineered neural complex had a distinct structure, which contained neonatal neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. After tissue-engineered neural complex was implanted into the injured spinal cord, the cell components such as neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, could survive and keep on developing. The adult rats suffering from spinal cord injury got an obvious neurological recovery in motor skills. Conclusions: The tissue-engineered neural complex appears to have therapeutic effects on the functional recovery and anatomic reconstruction of the adult rats with spinal cord injury.

  20. Mitochondrial fission is an acute and adaptive response in injured motor neurons.

    Kiryu-Seo, Sumiko; Tamada, Hiromi; Kato, Yukina; Yasuda, Katsura; Ishihara, Naotada; Nomura, Masatoshi; Mihara, Katsuyoshi; Kiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Successful recovery from neuronal damage requires a huge energy supply, which is provided by mitochondria. However, the physiological relevance of mitochondrial dynamics in damaged neurons in vivo is poorly understood. To address this issue, we established unique bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic (BAC Tg) mice, which develop and function normally, but in which neuronal injury induces labelling of mitochondria with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and expression of cre recombinase. GFP-labelled mitochondria in BAC Tg mice appear shorter in regenerating motor axons soon after nerve injury compared with mitochondria in non-injured axons, suggesting the importance of increased mitochondrial fission during the early phase of nerve regeneration. Crossing the BAC Tg mice with mice carrying a floxed dynamin-related protein 1 gene (Drp1), which is necessary for mitochondrial fission, ablates mitochondrial fission specifically in injured neurons. Injury-induced Drp1-deficient motor neurons show elongated or abnormally gigantic mitochondria, which have impaired membrane potential and axonal transport velocity during the early phase after injury, and eventually promote neuronal death. Our in vivo data suggest that acute and prominent mitochondrial fission during the early stage after nerve injury is an adaptive response and is involved in the maintenance of mitochondrial and neuronal integrity to prevent neurodegeneration. PMID:27319806

  1. Mitochondrial fission is an acute and adaptive response in injured motor neurons

    Kiryu-Seo, Sumiko; Tamada, Hiromi; Kato, Yukina; Yasuda, Katsura; Ishihara, Naotada; Nomura, Masatoshi; Mihara, Katsuyoshi; Kiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Successful recovery from neuronal damage requires a huge energy supply, which is provided by mitochondria. However, the physiological relevance of mitochondrial dynamics in damaged neurons in vivo is poorly understood. To address this issue, we established unique bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic (BAC Tg) mice, which develop and function normally, but in which neuronal injury induces labelling of mitochondria with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and expression of cre recombinase. GFP-labelled mitochondria in BAC Tg mice appear shorter in regenerating motor axons soon after nerve injury compared with mitochondria in non-injured axons, suggesting the importance of increased mitochondrial fission during the early phase of nerve regeneration. Crossing the BAC Tg mice with mice carrying a floxed dynamin-related protein 1 gene (Drp1), which is necessary for mitochondrial fission, ablates mitochondrial fission specifically in injured neurons. Injury-induced Drp1-deficient motor neurons show elongated or abnormally gigantic mitochondria, which have impaired membrane potential and axonal transport velocity during the early phase after injury, and eventually promote neuronal death. Our in vivo data suggest that acute and prominent mitochondrial fission during the early stage after nerve injury is an adaptive response and is involved in the maintenance of mitochondrial and neuronal integrity to prevent neurodegeneration. PMID:27319806

  2. Cultured mycelium Cordyceps sinensis protects liver sinusoidal endothelial cells in acute liver injured mice.

    Peng, Yuan; Chen, Qian; Yang, Tao; Tao, Yanyan; Lu, Xiong; Liu, Chenghai

    2014-03-01

    control. Compared with the model group, CMCS and 1,10-phenanthroline significantly improved serum ALT/AST, attenuated hepatic inflammation and improved peroxidative injury in liver, decreased MMP-2/9 activities in liver tissue, improved integration of scaffold structure, and decreased protein expression of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. CMCS could protect LSECs from injury and maintain the microvasculature integration in acute injured liver of mice induced by LPS/D-GalN. Its action mechanism was associated with the down-regulation of MMP-2/9 activities and inhibition of peroxidation in injured liver. PMID:24442316

  3. Multiple-ligament injured knee

    SUN Lei; NING Zhi-jie; ZHANG Hui; TIAN Min; NING Tin-min

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical characteristic of the multiple-ligament injured knee and evaluate the protocol,technique and outcome of treatment for the multipleligament injured knee.Methods: From October 2001 to March 2005, 9 knees with combined anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tears in 9 patients were identified with clinical and arthroscopic examinations. Of them, 5 knees were combined with ruptures of posteromedial corner (PMC) and medial collateral ligament (MCL), 4 with disruptions of posterolateral corner ( PLC), 2 with popliteal vascular injuries and 1 with peroneal nerve injuries. Six patients were hospitalized in acute phase of trauma, 2 received repairs of popliteal artery and 4 had repairs of PMC and MCL. Reconstructions of ACL and PCL with autografts under arthroscope were performed in all patients at 4 to 10 weeks after trauma,including reconstruction of PLC with the posterior half of biceps femoris tendon tenodesis in 4 patients and reconstructions of PMC and MCL with femoral fascia in 1 patient.Results: No severe complications occurred at early stage after operation in the 9 patients. All of them were followed up for 10-39 months with an average of 23. 00 months ± 9.46 months. Lysholm score was 70-95 with an average of 85.00 ± 8.29. International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score was from severely abnormal (Grade D) in 9 knees at initial examination to normal (Grade A) in 2 knees, nearly normal (Grade B ) in 6 knees and abnormal in 1 knee at the last follow-up. Of the 9 patients, 7 returned to the same activity level before injury and 2 were under the level.Conclusions: The multiple-ligament injured knee with severe instability is usually combined with other important structure damages. Therefore, careful assessment and treatment of the combined injuries are essential. Reconstructions of ACL and PCL under arthroscope, combined with repairs or reconstructions of the extraarticular ligaments

  4. ACL reconstruction - discharge

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction - discharge; ACL reconstruction - discharge ... had surgery to reconstruct your anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The surgeon drilled holes in the bones of ...

  5. Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries KidsHealth > For Teens > Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) ... and Recovery Coping With an ACL Injury About ACL Injuries A torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is ...

  6. Does the lateral intercondylar ridge disappear in ACL deficient patients?

    van Eck, Carola F.; Morse, Kenneth R.; Lesniak, Bryson P.; Kropf, Eric J.; Tranovich, Michael J.; van Dijk, C. Niek; Fu, Freddie H

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a difference in the presence of the lateral intercondylar ridge and the lateral bifurcate ridge between patients with sub-acute and chronic ACL injuries. We hypothesized that the ridges would be present less often with chronic ACL deficiency. Twenty-five patients with a chronic ACL injury were matched for age and gender to 25 patients with a sub-acute ACL injury. The lateral intercondylar ridge and lateral bifurcate ridge were scored as ...

  7. Failure to visualize acutely injured kidneys with technetium-99m DMSA does not preclude recoverable function

    A 35-yr-old patient developed severe acute tubular necrosis requiring hemodialysis. A [99mTc]dimercaptosuccinic acid scan of the kidneys showed no renal uptake at 4 or 24 hr, but the patient subsequently recovered normal renal function as judged by a normal serum creatinine. Based on this case report and a review of the literature, one cannot assume irreversible loss of function in patients with acute renal failure, based on the absence of radiopharmaceutical uptake by the kidneys

  8. Greater fear of re-injury and increased tibial translation in patients who later sustain an ACL graft rupture or a contralateral ACL rupture: a pilot study.

    Tagesson, Sofi; Kvist, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to compare fear of re-injury, patient reported function, static and dynamic tibial translation and muscle strength assessed before and 5 weeks after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction between individuals who sustained a subsequent ACL graft rupture or a contralateral ACL injury within 5 years after the reconstruction, and individuals with no subsequent injury. Nineteen patients were investigated before, and 5 weeks after an ACL reconstruction with a quadruple hamstring tendon graft. At 5 years follow up, 3 patients had sustained an ACL graft rupture and 2 patients had sustained a contralateral ACL rupture. Fear of re-injury, confidence with the knee, patient reported function, activity level, static and dynamic tibial translation and muscle strength were assessed. The re-injured group reported greater fear of re-injury and had greater static tibial translation in both knees before the ACL reconstruction compared to those who did not sustain another ACL injury. There were no other differences between groups. In conclusion, fear of re-injury and static tibial translation before the index ACL reconstruction were greater in patients who later on suffered an ACL graft rupture or a contralateral ACL rupture. These factors may predict a subsequent ACL injury. PMID:25894209

  9. Differences among mechanoreceptors in healthy and injured anterior cruciate ligaments and their clinical importance

    Dhillon, Mandeep Sing; Bali, Kamal; Prabhakar, Sharad

    2012-01-01

    Mechanoreceptors in an intact Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) contribute towards functional stability of the knee joint. Injury to the ACL not only causes mechanical instability, but also leads to a disturbance in the neuromuscular control of the injured knee due to loss or damage to mechanoreceptors. ACL reconstruction restores proprioceptive potential of the knee to some extent, but the results vary. Although the remnant ACL contains residual mechanoreceptors, the number and functionality ...

  10. MR diffusion tensor imaging in the evaluation of neural progenitor cells transplantation to acute injured canine spinal cord

    Objective: To observe the effect of transplantation of telomerase immortalized human neural progenitor cells to acute injured canine spinal cord by using MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Methods: Telomerase immortalized human neural progenitor cells with expression of green fluorescent protein were prepared for transplantation. Eight adult canines with left spinal cord hemisection at the level of T13 were examined by MR diffusion tensor imaging four times sequentially: prior to injury, one week after injury, one week after transplantation (two weeks after injury), and four weeks after transplantation. Results: The ADC values of the injured spinal cord were (1.00 ± 0.15) x 10-3 mm2/s, (1.65 ± 0.45) x 10-3 mm2/s, (1.44 ± 0.48) xl0-3 mm2/s, and (1.43 ± 0.26) x 10-3 mm2/s, respectively. There was statistically significant difference between the data obtained at different times (F= 6.038, P=0.005). The FA values of the injured spinal cord were 0.59±0.11, 0.30±0.17, 0.36±0.25, and 0.34±0.11, respectively. There was also statistically significant difference between the data obtained at different times (F=5.221, P=0.009). The ADC values of the intact spinal cord were (1.01±0.17) x 10-3 mm2/s, (1.32±0.06) x 10-3 mm2/s, (1.10±0.24) x 10-3 mm2/s, and (1.14±0.22) x 10-3 mm2/s, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the data obtained at different times (F=1.303, P=0.306). The FA values of the intact spinal cord were 0.60 ± 0.09, 0.38 ± 0.25, 0.46 ± 0.15, and 0.50 ± 0.21, respectively. There was also no statistically significant difference between the data obtained at different times (F=2.797, P=0.072). Conclusion: DTI can provide useful information for spinal cord injury and regeneration in experimental spinal cord injury. (authors)

  11. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury

    Cruciate ligament injury - anterior; ACL injury; Knee injury - anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ... confirm the diagnosis. It may also show other knee injuries. First aid for an ACL injury may include: ...

  12. Cultured mycelium Cordyceps sinensis protects liver sinusoidal endothelial cells in acute liver injured mice

    Peng, Yuan; Chen, Qian; Yang, Tao; Tao, Yanyan; Lu, Xiong; Liu, Chenghai

    2014-01-01

    Cultured mycelium Cordyceps sinensis (CMCS) was widely used for a variety of diseases including liver injury, the current study aims to investigate the protective effects of CMCS on liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) in acute injury liver and related action mechanisms. The mice were injected intraperitoneally with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and d-galactosamine (D-GalN). 39 male BABL/c mice were randomly divided into four groups: normal control, model control, CMCS treatment and 1,10-phe...

  13. Effects of osteoblasts on recovery of hematopoiesis and angiogenesis in acute irradiation injured mice

    Objective: To explore the effects of osteoblasts on the recovery of hematopoiesis and angiogenesis in acute irradiation injury mice. Methods: The femurs of 18 male BALB/c mice were used to prepare the bone marrow osteoblasts, and the rest mice were divided into 3 groups as normal group, saline group and osteoblast group. The mice in normal group received no treatment, and the other two groups were received 6.0 Gy 60Co γ-ray irradiation. After irradiation each mouse of osteoblast group was administered with 2 × 106 osteoblasts through tail vein injection, and equal volume saline was given to each mouse of saline group by the same way. The following factors were measured at 7, 14, 21 d after irradiation, they were the counts of peripheral blood cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNC), the percentage of CD34 + cells in BMMNC, the histology changes and micro vascular density (MVD) of bone marrow tissue. Results: The counts of peripheral blood cells, BMMNC and hematopoietic tissue area in osteoblast group were higher than those in saline group.The percentage of CD34 + cells in BMMNC and the MVD of bone marrow in osteoblast group were also higher than those in saline group at 7, 14, 21 d after irradiation (t=2.46-64.51, P<0.05). Conclusions: Osteoblasts could significantly promote the recovery of hematopoiesis and angiogenesis in mice after acute irradiation injury. (authors)

  14. ACL2(ml): Machine-Learning for ACL2

    Heras, Jónathan; Komendantskaya, Ekaterina

    2014-01-01

    ACL2(ml) is an extension for the Emacs interface of ACL2. This tool uses machine-learning to help the ACL2 user during the proof-development. Namely, ACL2(ml) gives hints to the user in the form of families of similar theorems, and generates auxiliary lemmas automatically. In this paper, we present the two most recent extensions for ACL2(ml). First, ACL2(ml) can suggest now families of similar function definitions, in addition to the families of similar theorems. Second, the lemma generation ...

  15. Update on rehabilitation following ACL reconstruction

    John Nyland

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available John Nyland, Emily Brand, Brent FisherDepartment of Orthopaedic Surgery, Division of Sports Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USAAbstract: As anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction has evolved to less invasive, more anatomical approaches, rehabilitation of the injured athlete has likewise become more progressive and innovative, with a sound understanding of graft and fixation strength and biologic healing-remodeling constraints. This review discusses these innovations including specific considerations before surgery, when planning rehabilitation timetables, and the importance of reestablishing nonimpaired active and passive knee range of motion and biarticular musculotendinous extensibility in positions of function. Concepts of self-efficacy or confidence and reestablishing the “athlete role” are also addressed. Since ACL injury and reinjury are largely related to the influence of structure-form-function on dynamic knee joint stability, the interrelationships between sensorimotor, neuromuscular, and conventional resistance training are also discussed. Although pivot shift “giving way” relates to function loss following ACL injury, anterior translational laxity often does not. Although there is growing evidence that progressive eccentric training may benefit the patient following ACL reconstruction, there is less evidence supporting the use of functional ACL knee braces. Of considerable importance is selecting and achieving a criteria-based progression to sports-specific training, reestablishing osseous homeostasis and improved bone density, blending open and closed kinetic chain exercises at the appropriate time period, and appreciating the influence of the trunk, upper extremities, and sports equipment use on knee loads. We believe that knee dysfunction and functional recovery should be considered from a local, regional, and global perspective. These concepts are consolidated into our approach to prepare

  16. Body Mass Index, Modulated by Lateral Posterior Tibial Slope, Predicts ACL Injury Risk

    Bojicic, Katherine M.; Beaulieu, Melanie L.; Krieger, Daniel Imaizumi; Ashton-Miller, James A.; Wojtys, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Intervention strategies to prevent ACL injury rely on increasing knowledge of risk factors. While several modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors for ACL rupture have been identified, the interaction between them remains unknown. The aim of this study was to quantify the relationship between BMI and several knee geometries as potential risk factors for ACL injury. We hypothesized that an increased BMI in the presence of an increased posterior tibial slope or middle cartilage slope would increase risk of ACL injury. We also hypothesized that an increased BMI in the presence of a decreased posterior meniscal height or meniscal bone angle would result in an increased risk of ACL injury. Methods: Sagittal knee MRI files from 76 ACL-injured and 42 non-injured subjects were gathered from the institution’s archive. The PTS, MCS, PMH, and MBA were measured using the circle method and compared with BMI from the subject demographic. Data were analyzed using univariate and multivariate logistical regression. Figure 1 details measurements made for each knee geometry. Results: Univariate analysis of PTS showed increases in PTS significantly increase the odds of ACL tear (p = 0.043, OR =1.12). Univariate analysis of MCS showed increases of MCS significantly increase the odds of ACL tear (p = 0.037, OR = 1.12). Multivariate analysis of PTS and BMI centered around the mean (PTS*cBMI) showed increases of PTS in combination with increases in cBMI significantly increases the odds of ACL rupture (p value = .050, OR = 1.03). Table 1 shows predicted increases in ACL injury risk for combinations of increases in PTS and BMI. Conclusion: An increase in BMI will increase the risk of ACL tear when an increase in lateral posterior tibial slope is present. An increase in lateral posterior tibial slope or lateral middle cartilage slope increases the risk of an ACL tear.

  17. Current Concepts in ACL Reconstruction

    Fu, Freddie H; Cohen, Steven B.

    2008-01-01

    Current Concepts in ACL Reconstruction is a complete reference text composed of the most thorough collection of topics on the ACL and its surgical reconstruction compiled, with contributions from some of the world's experts and most experienced ACL surgeons. Various procedures mentioned throughout the text are also demonstrated in an accompanying video CD-ROM. PURPOSE Composing a single, comprehensive and complete information source on ACL including basic sciences, clinical issues, latest con...

  18. Derivation of injury-responsive dendritic cells for acute brain targeting and therapeutic protein delivery in the stroke-injured rat.

    Nathan C Manley

    Full Text Available Research with experimental stroke models has identified a wide range of therapeutic proteins that can prevent the brain damage caused by this form of acute neurological injury. Despite this, we do not yet have safe and effective ways to deliver therapeutic proteins to the injured brain, and this remains a major obstacle for clinical translation. Current targeted strategies typically involve invasive neurosurgery, whereas systemic approaches produce the undesirable outcome of non-specific protein delivery to the entire brain, rather than solely to the injury site. As a potential way to address this, we developed a protein delivery system modeled after the endogenous immune cell response to brain injury. Using ex-vivo-engineered dendritic cells (DCs, we find that these cells can transiently home to brain injury in a rat model of stroke with both temporal and spatial selectivity. We present a standardized method to derive injury-responsive DCs from bone marrow and show that injury targeting is dependent on culture conditions that maintain an immature DC phenotype. Further, we find evidence that when loaded with therapeutic cargo, cultured DCs can suppress initial neuron death caused by an ischemic injury. These results demonstrate a non-invasive method to target ischemic brain injury and may ultimately provide a way to selectively deliver therapeutic compounds to the injured brain.

  19. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN ACL RECONSTRUCTION

    Freddie H. Fu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Current Concepts in ACL Reconstruction is a complete reference text composed of the most thorough collection of topics on the ACL and its surgical reconstruction compiled, with contributions from some of the world's experts and most experienced ACL surgeons. Various procedures mentioned throughout the text are also demonstrated in an accompanying video CD-ROM. PURPOSE Composing a single, comprehensive and complete information source on ACL including basic sciences, clinical issues, latest concepts and surgical techniques, from evaluation to outcome, from history to future, editors and contributors have targeted to keep the audience pace with the latest concepts and techniques for the evaluation and the treatment of ACL injuries. FEATURES The text is composed of 27 chapters in 6 sections. The first section is mostly about basic sciences, also history of the ACL, imaging, clinical approach to adolescent and pediatric patients are subjected. In the second section, Graft Choices and Arthroscopy Portals for ACL Reconstruction are mentioned. The third section is about the technique and the outcome of the single-bundle ACL reconstruction. The fourth chapter includes the techniques and outcome of the double-bundle ACL reconstruction. In the fifth chapter revision, navigation technology, rehabilitation and the evaluation of the outcome of ACL reconstruction is subjected. The sixth/the last chapter is about the future advances to reach: What We Have Learned and the Future of ACL Reconstruction. AUDIENCE Orthopedic residents, sports traumatology and knee surgery fellows, orthopedic surgeons, also scientists in basic sciences or clinicians who are studying or planning a research on ACL forms the audience group of this book. ASSESSMENT This is the latest, the most complete and comprehensive textbook of ACL reconstruction produced by the editorial work up of two pioneer and masters "Freddie H. Fu MD and Steven B. Cohen MD" with the contribution of world

  20. Two-dimensional electrophoretogram of acute brain injury-associated proteins Comparison between Injured and normal cerebral cortex

    Xuejun Li; Xianrui Yuan; Cui Li; Zefeng Peng; Dun Yuan

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:To this date,specific molecular markers for early diagnosis and prognosis monitoring ofcraniocerebral injury in clinical medicine do not exist.Therefore,differential detection of specific proteinsmight play an important role in diagnosis and treatment of this type of brain injury.OBJECTIVE:To compare differential cerebral cortical protein expression of craniocerebral injury patientsand normal subjects through the use of proteomics.DESIGN:Contrast observation.SETTING:Department of Neurosurgery,Xiangya Hospital of Central South University.PARTICIPANTS:Ten patients(6 males and 4 females,20-58 years old),with severe craniocerebral injury,were selected at the Department of Neurosurgery,Xiangya Hospital of Central South University,from June2004 to December 2006.All patients were diagnosed with CT test and Glasgow test(scores <8).Surgery was performed 4-12 hours after craniocerebral injury,and injured cortical tissues of the frontal and temporal lobes were resected for sampling.At the same time,control cortical tissues were collected from frontal and temporal lobes of 2 epileptic patients who underwent hippocampus-nucleus amygdala resection,and 2 lateral ventricular tumor patients who underwent tumor resection.The participants and their relatives provided confirmed consent,and this study received confirmed consent from the local ethics committee. METHODS:Ten samples from injured patients and 4 normal samples were compared through the use of proteomics.Total protein was separated by using two-dimensional electrophoresis with immobilized pH gradients,and the differential protein expressions were compared using image analysis after blue-sliver staining. Differential protein spot expressions were analyzed with a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOF MS) and electrospray ionization-quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry(ESI-Qq TOF MS).MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ①Two-dimensional electrophoresis of protein from

  1. Blockade of peroxynitrite-induced neural stem cell death in the acutely injured spinal cord by drug-releasing polymer

    YU, DOU; Neeley, William L.; Pritchard, Christopher D.; Slotkin, Jonathan R.; Woodard, Eric J.; Langer, Robert; Teng, Yang D.

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic impact of neural stem cells (NSCs) for acute spinal cord injury (SCI) has been limited by the rapid loss of donor cells. Neuroinflammation is likely the cause. Since there are close temporal-spatial correlations between the inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase expression and the donor NSC death after neurotrauma, we reasoned that NO-associated radical species might be the inflammatory effectors which eliminate NSC grafts and kill host neurons. To test this hypothesis, human NSCs (...

  2. Rehabilitation of severely injured children.

    Gans, B. M.; di Scala, C.

    1991-01-01

    Injury is the leading cause of death and disability in childhood. Ideal systems of care integrate comprehensive management of acutely injured children with rehabilitation. We review the nature of childhood injury, its disabling consequences, and the best ways to manage the care of children with serious injuries.

  3. Extending ACL2 with SMT Solvers

    Peng, Yan; Greenstreet, Mark

    2015-01-01

    We present our extension of ACL2 with Satisfiability Modulo Theories (SMT) solvers using ACL2's trusted clause processor mechanism. We are particularly interested in the verification of physical systems including Analog and Mixed-Signal (AMS) designs. ACL2 offers strong induction abilities for reasoning about sequences and SMT complements deduction methods like ACL2 with fast nonlinear arithmetic solving procedures. While SAT solvers have been integrated into ACL2 in previous work, SMT method...

  4. Interaction of dependent and non-dependent regions of the acutely injured lung during a stepwise recruitment manoeuvre

    The benefit of treating acute lung injury with recruitment manoeuvres is controversial. An impediment to settling this debate is the difficulty in visualizing how distinct lung regions respond to the manoeuvre. Here, regional lung mechanics were studied by electrical impedance tomography (EIT) during a stepwise recruitment manoeuvre in a porcine model with acute lung injury. The following interaction between dependent and non-dependent regions consistently occurred: atelectasis in the most dependent region was reversed only after the non-dependent region became overdistended. EIT estimates of overdistension and atelectasis were validated by histological examination of lung tissue, confirming that the dependent region was primarily atelectatic and the non-dependent region was primarily overdistended. The pulmonary pressure–volume equation, originally designed for modelling measurements at the airway opening, was adapted for EIT-based regional estimates of overdistension and atelectasis. The adaptation accurately modelled the regional EIT data from dependent and non-dependent regions (R2 > 0.93, P < 0.0001) and predicted their interaction during recruitment. In conclusion, EIT imaging of regional lung mechanics reveals that overdistension in the non-dependent region precedes atelectasis reversal in the dependent region during a stepwise recruitment manoeuvre. (paper)

  5. Hydrogen-rich saline injection into the subarachnoid cavity within 2 weeks promotes recovery after acute spinal cord injur y

    Jian-long Wang; Qing-shan Zhang; Kai-di Zhu; Jian-feng Sun; Ze-peng Zhang; Jian-wen Sun; Ke-xiang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen can relieve tissue-damaging oxidative stress, inlfammation and apoptosis. Injection of hydrogen-rich saline is an effective method for transporting molecular hydrogen. We hypothe-sized that hydrogen-rich saline would promote the repair of spinal cord injury induced by Allen’s method in rats. At 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 hours after injury, then once daily for 2 weeks, 0.25 mL/kg hydrogen-rich saline was infused into the subarachnoid space through a catheter. Results at 24 hours, 48 hours, 1 week and 2 weeks after injury showed that hydrogen-rich saline marked-ly reduced cell death, inlfammatory cell inifltration, serum malondialdehyde content, and caspa se-3 immunoreactivity, elevated serum superoxide dismutase activity and calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactivity, and improved motor function in the hindlimb. The present study conifrms that hydrogen-rich saline injected within 2 weeks of injury effectively contributes to the repair of spinal cord injury in the acute stage.

  6. Biomechanical risk factors of non-contact ACL injuries:A stochastic biomechanical modeling study

    Cheng-Feng; Lin; Hui; Liu; Michael; T.Gros; Paul; Weinhold; William; E.Garrett; Bing; Yu

    2012-01-01

    <正>Background:Significant efforts have been made to identify modifiable risk factors of non-contact anterior cruciate ligament(ACL) injuries in male and female athletes.However,current literature on the risk factors for ACL injury are purely descriptive.An understanding of biomechanical relationship between risk and risk factors of the non-contact ACL injury is necessary to develop effective prevention programs. Purpose:To compare lower extremity kinematics and kinetics between trials with and without non-contact ACL injuries and to determine if any difference exists between male and female trials with non-contact ACL injuries regarding the lower extremity motion patterns. Methods:In this computer simulation study,a stochastic biomechanical model was used to estimate the ACL loading at the time of peak posterior ground reaction force(GRF) during landing of the stop-jump task.Monte Carlo simulations were performed to simulate the ACL injuries with repeated random samples of independent variables.The distributions of independent variables were determined from in vivo laboratory data of 40 male and 40 female recreational athletes. Results:In the simulated injured trials,both male and female athletes had significantly smaller knee flexion angles,greater normalized peak posterior and vertical GRF.greater knee valgus moment,greater patella tendon force,greater quadriceps force,greater knee extension moment. and greater proximal tibia anterior shear force in comparison to the simulated uninjured trials.No significant difference was found between genders in any of the selected biomechanical variables in the trials with simulated non-contact ACL injuries. Conclusion:Small knee flexion angle,large posterior GRF.and large knee valgus moment are risk factors of non-contact ACL injury determined by a stochastic biomechanical model with a cause-and-effect relationship.

  7. Experimental Strategies to Bridge Large Tissue Gaps in the Injured Spinal Cord after Acute and Chronic Lesion.

    Brazda, Nicole; Estrada, Veronica; Voss, Christian; Seide, Klaus; Trieu, Hoc Khiem; Müller, Hans Werner

    2016-01-01

    After a spinal cord injury (SCI) a scar forms in the lesion core which hinders axonal regeneration. Bridging the site of injury after an insult to the spinal cord, tumor resections, or tissue defects resulting from traumatic accidents can aid in facilitating general tissue repair as well as regenerative growth of nerve fibers into and beyond the affected area. Two experimental treatment strategies are presented: (1) implantation of a novel microconnector device into an acutely and completely transected thoracic rat spinal cord to readapt severed spinal cord tissue stumps, and (2) polyethylene glycol filling of the SCI site in chronically lesioned rats after scar resection. The chronic spinal cord lesion in this model is a complete spinal cord transection which was inflicted 5 weeks before treatment. Both methods have recently achieved very promising outcomes and promoted axonal regrowth, beneficial cellular invasion and functional improvements in rodent models of spinal cord injury. The mechanical microconnector system (mMS) is a multi-channel system composed of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) with an outlet tubing system to apply negative pressure to the mMS lumen thus pulling the spinal cord stumps into the honeycomb-structured holes. After its implantation into the 1 mm tissue gap the tissue is sucked into the device. Furthermore, the inner walls of the mMS are microstructured for better tissue adhesion. In the case of the chronic spinal cord injury approach, spinal cord tissue - including the scar-filled lesion area - is resected over an area of 4 mm in length. After the microsurgical scar resection the resulting cavity is filled with polyethylene glycol (PEG 600) which was found to provide an excellent substratum for cellular invasion, revascularization, axonal regeneration and even compact remyelination in vivo. PMID:27077921

  8. Activation of TLR-4 and liver injur y via NF-kappa B in rat with acute cholangitis

    Hong Yu; Shuo-Dong Wu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a family of type 1 transmembrane receptors, which can recognize different pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Among them, TLR-4 is speciifc to lipopolysaccharide. It transfers the infection signal into the cell and promotes the translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) to the nucleus and the subsequent transcriptional activation of genes encoding pro-and anti-inlfammatory cytokines and chemokines. Acute cholangitis (AC) is a common biliary tract infection in oriental countries, and often leads to liver injury. The activation of TLR-4 and its signiifcance in liver injury in rats with AC remain unclear. METHODS:Rat models of AC (biliary tract obstruction+E. coli injection, n=36) and control models (biliary tract obstruction+saline, n=18) were made. Liver tissue injury was investigated by pathological examination. The levels of serum TNF-α and IL-10 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the expressions of TLR-4, NF-κB mRNAs and proteins in the liver were detected by RT-PCR, immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting, respectively. RESULTS: Severe liver tissue injury in rats with AC was evident as shown by pathological examination. TLR-4 and NF-κB were strongly expressed in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes in the AC group. They were negative or slightly positive in the control group. TLR-4 mRNA and protein in the liver of rats with AC increased 1 hour after biliary tract ligation and E. coli injection, and peaked at 6 hours after surgery. Twenty-four hours later, they began to decrease. The expression of TLR-4 was paralleled by that of NF-κB in the liver and TNF-αin serum. CONCLUSION:The higher expression of TLR-4 in the liver of rats with AC may be involved in liver injury through the activation of NF-κB and release of cytokines such as TNF-α.

  9. Partial ACL rupture: an MR diagnosis?

    Yao, L. [Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA Center for the Health Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Gentili, A. [Dept. of Radiology, UCLA-Wadsworth Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Petrus, L. [Dept. of Radiology, UCLA-Olive View Medical Center, Sylmar, CA (United States); Lee, J.K. [Dept. of Radiology, Samaritan Hospital, Troy, NY (United States)

    1995-05-01

    We sought to clarify the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MR) to show partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures and to allow distinction of partial from complete ACL ruptures. Eighty-eight patients were studied by arthroscopy and MR (36 with normal ACLs, 21 with partial ACL ruptures, and 31 with complete ACL ruptures). MR studies were interpreted by an experienced, blinded reader. MR examinations were also independently scored with respect to four primary and seven secondary signs, and these data were analyzed using discriminant analysis. The sensitivity of MR is lower for partial than for complete ACL ruptures. Most detected partial ACL ruptures resemble complete ruptures on MR. Secondary signs do not significantly improve detection of partial ACL ruptures, but they do help to distinguish partial from complete ACL ruptures. Displacement of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus and popliteus muscle injury are indicative of complete ACL rupture. The majority of partial ACL ruptures are shown by MR, but MR is less sensitive for partial than for complete ACL rupture. The distinction of partial from complete ACL rupture on MR examination, while problematic, is slightly improved by assessment of secondary signs. (orig.)

  10. Partial ACL rupture: an MR diagnosis?

    We sought to clarify the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MR) to show partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures and to allow distinction of partial from complete ACL ruptures. Eighty-eight patients were studied by arthroscopy and MR (36 with normal ACLs, 21 with partial ACL ruptures, and 31 with complete ACL ruptures). MR studies were interpreted by an experienced, blinded reader. MR examinations were also independently scored with respect to four primary and seven secondary signs, and these data were analyzed using discriminant analysis. The sensitivity of MR is lower for partial than for complete ACL ruptures. Most detected partial ACL ruptures resemble complete ruptures on MR. Secondary signs do not significantly improve detection of partial ACL ruptures, but they do help to distinguish partial from complete ACL ruptures. Displacement of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus and popliteus muscle injury are indicative of complete ACL rupture. The majority of partial ACL ruptures are shown by MR, but MR is less sensitive for partial than for complete ACL rupture. The distinction of partial from complete ACL rupture on MR examination, while problematic, is slightly improved by assessment of secondary signs. (orig.)

  11. Biomechanical Evaluation of Knee Kinematics after ACL Reconstructions in Anatomic SB and DB - Technique with Additional Medial Meniscus Suture

    Lorbach, Olaf; Herbort, Mirco; Engelhardt, Martin; Kieb, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Biomechanical evaluation of knee laxity after single- and double-bundle ACL reconstruction with additional medial meniscus suture. Methods: Kinematics of the intact knee were determined in 12 human cadaver specimens in response to a 134-N anterior tibial load (aTT) and a combined rotatory load of 10 Nm valgus and 4 Nm internal tibial rotation using a robotic/universal force moment sensor testing system. Subsequently, the ACL was resected following the creation of a bucket-handle tear of the medial meniscus. A standard repair of the medial meniscus was performed using 3 inside-out horizontal sutures. Finally, The ACL was reconstructed using an anatomic single-bundle (6) or double-bundle technique (6). Knee kinematics were determined following every sub-step. Results: Significant increase of aTT in the ACL-deficient knee was found with significant increase in the ACL-deficient knee with additional medial meniscal injury (p=.003; p=.009). ACL reconstructions significantly decreased aTT compared to the ACL-deficient knee. No significant differences were found between the intact knee and the ACL reconstructed knee with additional meniscal repair. In response to a simulated pivot shift, aTT in the intact knee significantly increased in the ACL-deficient knee as well as in the meniscus injured/meniscus-sutured knee (p=.003;p=.007). No significant differences were found between the ACL-deficient and ACL reconstructed knee with additional meniscal repair. SB as well as DB ACL reconstruction with additional medial meniscal repair restored knee kinematics compared to the intact knee. Comparison of SB versus DB ACL reconstruction did not reveal any significant differences neither in a simulated Lachman test nor in response to a simulated pivot shift (p=.05). Conclusion: aTT as well as aTT in response to a combined rotatory load significantly increased with ACL deficiency compared to the intact knee, additional medial meniscal injury further increased aTT. Anatomic

  12. An Athlete's Nightmare: Tearing the ACL

    ... Issue Past Issues An Athlete's Nightmare : Tearing the ACL Past Issues / Summer 2008 Table of Contents For ... years after successful surgery to repair a torn ACL, Michelle Backus of Gaithersburg, Md., is once again ...

  13. Pediatric ACL injuries: evaluation and management

    Mall, Nathan A.; Paletta, George A.

    2013-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a stabilizing structure to both anterior translation of the tibia with respect to the femur as well as rotation of the knee joint. Children and adolescents are susceptible to these injuries, and there are some who believe the incidence of ACL injuries in this population is increasing due to year round single sport participation. Pediatric ACL injuries are typically seen in several forms: tibial avulsion fractures, partial ACL tears, and full thickness l...

  14. Mechanisms of non‐contact ACL injuries

    Yu, Bing; Garrett, William E.

    2007-01-01

    In soccer one of the most common knee injuries is the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear, which usually occurs through non‐contact mechanisms. Female soccer players are at higher risk of sustaining non‐contact ACL injuries than male soccer players. A good understanding of ACL loading mechanisms is the basis for a good understanding of the mechanisms of non‐contact ACL injuries, which in turn is essential for identifying risk factors and developing prevention strategies. Current literature ...

  15. Motor learning in ACL injury prevention

    Benjaminse, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Motor learning in ACL injury prevention
Anne Benjaminse

The physical and psychosocial consequences of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury are large, for example limitations in daily life, reduction of sports participation, development of osteoarthritis in the knee and increased risk for re-rupture. The importance of prevention is clear, however we have not been able yet to reduce the ACL injury incidence. The aim of this dissertation was therefore to examine how current ACL injury pre...

  16. Evidence-Based ACL Reconstruction

    E. Carlos RODRIGUEZ-MERCHAN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is controversy in the literature regarding a number of topics related to anterior cruciate ligament (ACLreconstruction. The purpose of this article is to answer the following questions: 1 Bone patellar tendon bone (BPTB reconstruction or hamstring reconstruction (HR; 2 Double bundle or single bundle; 3 Allograft or authograft; 4 Early or late reconstruction; 5 Rate of return to sports after ACL reconstruction; 6 Rate of osteoarthritis after ACL reconstruction. A Cochrane Library and PubMed (MEDLINE search of systematic reviews and meta-analysis related to ACL reconstruction was performed. The key words were: ACL reconstruction, systematic reviews and meta-analysis. The main criteria for selection were that the articles were systematic reviews and meta-analysesfocused on the aforementioned questions. Sixty-nine articles were found, but only 26 were selected and reviewed because they had a high grade (I-II of evidence. BPTB-R was associated with better postoperative knee stability but with a higher rate of morbidity. However, the results of both procedures in terms of functional outcome in the long-term were similar. The double-bundle ACL reconstruction technique showed better outcomes in rotational laxity, although functional recovery was similar between single-bundle and double-bundle. Autograft yielded better results than allograft. There was no difference between early and delayed reconstruction. 82% of patients were able to return to some kind of sport participation. 28% of patients presented radiological signs of osteoarthritis with a follow-up of minimum 10 years.

  17. Imaging biopsy composition at ACL reconstruction

    Pedersen DR

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Douglas R Pedersen,1,2 James A Martin,1,2 Daniel R Thedens,3 Noelle F Klocke,1,2 Nathaniel H Roberts,1 Jessica E Goetz,1 Annunziato Amendola1 1Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, 3Department of Radiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA Purpose: Early-stage osteoarthritis (OA includes glycosaminoglycan (GAG loss and collagen disruption that cannot be seen on morphological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. T1ρ MRI is a measurement that probes the low-frequency rate of exchange between protons of free water and those from water associated with macromolecules in the cartilage's extracellular matrix. While it has been hypothesized that increased water mobility resulting from early osteoarthritic changes cause elevated T1ρ MRI values, there remain several unknown mechanisms influencing T1ρ measurements in cartilage. The purpose of this work was to relate histological and biochemical metrics directly measured from osteochondral biopsies and fluid specimens with quantitative MRI-detected changes of in vivo cartilage composition. Patients and methods: Six young patients were enrolled an average of 41 days after acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL rupture. Femoral trochlear groove osteochondral biopsies, serum, and synovial fluid were harvested during ACL reconstruction to complement a presurgery quantitative MRI study (T1ρ, T2, delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage [dGEMRIC] relaxation times. A high-resolution MRI scan of the excised osteochondral biopsy was also collected. Analyses of in vivo T1ρ images were compared with ex vivo T1ρ imaging, GAG assays and histological GAG distribution in the osteochondral biopsies, and direct measures of bone and cartilage turnover markers and "OA marker" 3B3 in serum and synovial fluid samples. Conclusion: T1ρ relaxation times in patients with a torn ACL were elevated from normal, indicating changes consistent with general fluid effusion after

  18. The effect of protein and carbohydrate supplementation on strength training outcome of rehabilitation in ACL patients

    Holm, Lars; Esmarck, B.; Mizuno, M.;

    2006-01-01

    therefore to investigate if nutrient supplementation during 12 weeks of conservative rehabilitation strength training could enhance hypertrophy and strength of the quadriceps muscle in ACL-injured patients. Twenty-six ACL-injured men and women were included and randomly distributed into three...... supplementation groups: Protein+Carbohydrate (PC), Isocaloric-Carbohydrate (IC), or Placebo (PL), ingesting the supplementation immediately after each of 36 training sessions. Determined from images of thigh cross-sections (magnetic resonance imaging) the hypertrophy of the quadriceps muscle differed...... significantly between groups at the distal part, with the PC group demonstrating the largest hypertrophy. Peak torque of the quadriceps muscle at constant velocity 60 degrees.s-1 was significantly elevated in the PC group only, and the time to reach peak torque tended to decrease as well only in the PC group...

  19. Differential properties of human ACL and MCL stem cells may be responsible for their differential healing capacity

    Fu Freddie H

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human anterior cruciate ligament (hACL and medial collateral ligament (hMCL of the knee joint are frequently injured, especially in athletic settings. It has been known that, while injuries to the MCL typically heal with conservative treatment, ACL injuries usually do not heal. As adult stem cells repair injured tissues through proliferation and differentiation, we hypothesized that the hACL and hMCL contain stem cells exhibiting unique properties that could be responsible for the differential healing capacity of the two ligaments. Methods To test the above hypothesis, we derived ligament stem cells from normal hACL and hMCL samples from the same adult donors using tissue culture techniques and characterized their properties using immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR, and flow cytometry. Results We found that both hACL stem cells (hACL-SCs and hMCL stem cells (hMCL-SCs formed colonies in culture and expressed stem cell markers nucleostemin and stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 (SSEA-4. Moreover, both hACL-SCs and hMCL-SCs expressed CD surface markers for mesenchymal stem cells, including CD44 and CD90, but not those markers for vascular cells, CD31, CD34, CD45, and CD146. However, hACL-SCs differed from hMCL-SCs in that the size and number of hACL-SC colonies in culture were much smaller and grew more slowly than hMCL-SC colonies. Moreover, fewer hACL-SCs in cell colonies expressed stem cell markers STRO-1 and octamer-binding transcription factor-4 (Oct-4 than hMCL-SCs. Finally, hACL-SCs had less multi-differentiation potential than hMCL-SCs, evidenced by differing extents of adipogenesis, chondrogenesis, and osteogenesis in the respective induction media. Conclusions This study shows for the first time that hACL-SCs are intrinsically different from hMCL-SCs. We suggest that the differences in their properties contribute to the known disparity in healing capabilities between the two ligaments.

  20. LYCAT, a homologue of C. elegans acl-8, acl-9, and acl-10, determines the fatty acid composition of phosphatidylinositol in mice[S

    Imae, Rieko; Inoue, Takao; Nakasaki, Yasuko; Uchida, Yasunori; Ohba, Yohsuke; Kono, Nozomu; Nakanishi, Hiroki; Sasaki, Takehiko; Mitani, Shohei; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian phosphatidylinositol (PI) has a unique fatty acid composition in that 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl species is predominant. This fatty acid composition is formed through fatty acid remodeling by sequential deacylation and reacylation. We recently identified three Caenorhabditis elegans acyltransferases (ACL-8, ACL-9, and ACL-10) that incorporate stearic acid into the sn-1 position of PI. Mammalian LYCAT, which is the closest homolog of ACL-8, ACL-9, and ACL-10, was originally identified...

  1. Treatment for acute anterior cruciate ligament tear

    Frobell, Richard B; Roos, Harald P; Roos, Ewa M; Roemer, Frank W; Ranstam, Jonas; Lohmander, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    To compare, in young active adults with an acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear, the mid-term (five year) patient reported and radiographic outcomes between those treated with rehabilitation plus early ACL reconstruction and those treated with rehabilitation and optional delayed ACL...

  2. Data Definitions in the ACL2 Sedan

    Chamarthi, Harsh Raju; Dillinger, Peter C.; Manolios, Panagiotis

    2014-01-01

    We present a data definition framework that enables the convenient specification of data types in ACL2s, the ACL2 Sedan. Our primary motivation for developing the data definition framework was pedagogical. We were teaching undergraduate students how to reason about programs using ACL2s and wanted to provide them with an effective method for defining, testing, and reasoning about data types in the context of an untyped theorem prover. Our framework is now routinely used not only for pedagogica...

  3. Anatomic Double-Bundle Reinsertion After Acute Proximal Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Using Knotless PushLock Anchors

    Weninger, Patrick; Wepner, Florian; Kissler, Florian; Enenkel, Michael; Wurnig, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Direct anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repair has been described with different suture techniques after acute ACL injury, but these procedures showed high failure rates. Recent studies, however, led to a better understanding of the biology of primary ACL healing. This article describes a novel technique combining the “healing response technique” with primary anatomic double-bundle ACL reinsertion after an acute proximal ACL tear using nonabsorbable No. 2 FiberWire (Arthrex, Naples, FL) and P...

  4. ACL RECONSTRUCTION ‐ IT'S ALL ABOUT TIMING

    Evans, Stephanie; Shaginaw, Justin; Bartolozzi, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the most common ligamentous injury, ranging from up to 200,000 injuries per year in the United States. Sports such as soccer, football, and skiing have been reported to be high‐risk sports that can cause injury to the ACL when compared to other sport activities. Due to the high incidence of ACL injuries, approximately 100,000 ACL reconstructions are performed each year. Although conservative treatment can potentially be successful in the appro...

  5. Rehabilitation after ACL Injury: A Fluoroscopic Study on the Effects of Type of Exercise on the Knee Sagittal Plane Arthrokinematics

    Sadegh Norouzi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A safe rehabilitation exercise for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injuries needs to be compatible with the normal knee arthrokinematics to avoid abnormal loading on the joint structures. The objective of this study was to measure the amount of the anterior tibial translation (ATT of the ACL-deficient knees during selective open and closed kinetic chain exercises. The intact and injured knees of fourteen male subjects with unilateral ACL injury were imaged using uniplanar fluoroscopy, while the subjects performed forward lunge and unloaded/loaded open kinetic knee extension exercises. The ATTs were measured from fluoroscopic images, as the distance between the tibial and femoral reference points, at seven knee flexion angles, from 0° to 90°. No significant differences were found between the ATTs of the ACL-deficient and intact knees at all flexion angles during forward lunge and unloaded open kinetic knee extension (. During loaded open kinetic knee extension, however, the ATTs of the ACL deficient knees were significantly larger than those of the intact knees at 0° (. It was suggested that the forward lunge, as a weight-bearing closed kinetic chain exercise, provides a safer approach for developing muscle strength and functional stability in rehabilitation program of ACL-deficient knees, in comparison with open kinetic knee extension exercise.

  6. Transplantation of the meniscus and the ACL

    Binnet, Mehmet S.

    2004-01-01

    As the last step in the preservation of the menisci, transplantation of this organ is developing. After the pioneering work of Fu, ACL transplantation of these organs have come info routine practice. In this paper we presented a case in which we had performed an allograft meniskus and ACL transplantation with a short review of contemporary literature.

  7. MR imaging of bone bruise associated with ACL tear

    The authors reviewed 56 MR studies of the knee performed for suspected cruciate ligament tear at the Tokyo Metropolitan Hiroo Hospital from April 1990 to March 1991. There were 10 patients with abnormal signal in the subcortical bone marrow. Eight of these patients had concomitant anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear with no evidence of fracture on plain radiographs of the knee. The abnormal signals were all seen in the lateral compartment, almost invariably in the middle third of the lateral femoral condyle and posterolateral aspect of the tibial plateau, and were of low intensity on T1-weighted and proton density images and of high intensity on T2-weighted images. It was speculated that these abnormalities resulted from impaction of the lateral femoral condyle into the posterior lip of the tibial plateau due to rotary subluxation of the tibia. One patient had a follow-up study three months later, which revealed complete resolution of bone bruise. It was concluded that bone bruise associated with ACL tear is seen specific locations, which may be a useful secondary sign of acute ACL tear. (author)

  8. Effects of ACL Reconstructive Surgery on Temporal Variations of Cytokine Levels in Synovial Fluid

    Bigoni, Marco; Gandolla, Marta; Sacerdote, Paola; Piatti, Massimiliano; Castelnuovo, Alberto; Franchi, Silvia; Gorla, Massimo; Munegato, Daniele; Gaddi, Diego; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Omeljaniuk, Robert J.; Locatelli, Vittorio; Torsello, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction restores knee stability but does not reduce the incidence of posttraumatic osteoarthritis induced by inflammatory cytokines. The aim of this research was to longitudinally measure IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α levels in patients subjected to ACL reconstruction using bone-patellar tendon-bone graft. Synovial fluid was collected within 24–72 hours of ACL rupture (acute), 1 month after injury immediately prior to surgery (presurgery), and 1 month thereafter (postsurgery). For comparison, a “control” group consisted of individuals presenting chronic ACL tears. Our results indicate that levels of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 vary significantly over time in reconstruction patients. In the acute phase, the levels of these cytokines in reconstruction patients were significantly greater than those in controls. In the presurgery phase, cytokine levels in reconstruction patients were reduced and comparable with those in controls. Finally, cytokine levels increased again with respect to control group in the postsurgery phase. The levels of IL-1β and TNF-α showed no temporal variation. Our data show that the history of an ACL injury, including trauma and reconstruction, has a significant impact on levels of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 in synovial fluid but does not affect levels of TNF-α and IL-1β. PMID:27313403

  9. ACL command with forward converter

    Morard, Julien; Biner, Hans-Peter

    2009-01-01

    Objectif: Les ACL sont des lampes 28V/250W utilisées dans le domaine de l’éclairage scénique. Jusqu’à présent 8 lampes sont branchées en série sur le réseau ce qui interdit toute commande individuelle. L’appareil conçu dans ce projet contient un « Power Factor Corrector PFC » pour pouvoir créer un bus de tension à 400V et un convertisseur de type « Forward » pour chaque lampe qui réduit la tension à 28 Volts efficace. Le convertisseur Forward a été conçu lors du travail de semestre. L’objecti...

  10. Proprioceptive deficits after ACL injury : are they clinically relevant?

    Gokeler, Alli; Benjaminse, Anne; Hewett, Timothy E.; Lephart, Scott M.; Engebretsen, Lars; Ageberg, Eva; Engelhardt, Martin; Arnold, Markus P.; Postema, Klaas; Otten, Egbert; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To establish the clinical relevance of proprioceptive deficits reported after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Material and methods A literature search was done in electronic databases from January 1990 to June 2009. Inclusion criteria for studies were ACL deficient (ACL-D) and ACL

  11. MRI Study of the ACL in Children and Adolescents

    Cvjetko, Ivan; Dovžak, Ivana; Banić, Tihomir; Bakota, Bore; Borić, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Reconstruction of the ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) requires precise anatomical placement of the tendon graft. Anatomic variations may increase/decrease risk of the ACL rupture. Twenty-eight children with clinical, MRI and arthroscopic verified ACL ruptures were compared with match case control group. MRI was done one to 12 months after trauma. The thresholds values for identifying the ACL rupture were set; ACL angle 0°, and the PCL angle

  12. Proprioceptive deficits after ACL injury: are they clinically relevant?

    Gokeler, Alli; Benjaminse, Anne; Hewett, Timothy E.; Lephart, Scott M.; Engebretsen, Lars; Ageberg, Eva; Engelhardt, Martin; Arnold, Markus P; Postema, Klaas; Otten, Egbert; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To establish the clinical relevance of proprioceptive deficits reported after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Material and methods A literature search was done in electronic databases from January 1990 to June 2009. Inclusion criteria for studies were ACL deficient (ACL-D) and ACL reconstruction (ACL-R) articles written in English, Dutch or German and calculation of correlation(s) between proprioception tests and clinical outcome measures. Clinical outcome measures were mus...

  13. ACL TRAUMATIC INJURIES AND POST OPERATIVE CHANGES

    Leila Aghaghazvini

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The objective of this exhibit is to explain imaging of ACL traumatic injuries and post operative changes.Content: Cruciate ligaments have an extra-synovial and intra-capsular location between which fatty tissue lies. The ACL is best seen on sagittal oblique images with slices oriented parallel to the cortex of the lateral femoral condyle so with extension during examination the ligament should therefore appear taut with an approximate 60 degree angle to the tibial plateau. Following injury, there are primary and secondary signs of ACL tearing which will discussed.Summary: In this exhibit, we present imaging findings of ACL injuries. Information about these findings may permit the radiologist to play a significant role in the diagnosis of the problem and prevention of any additional procedures.

  14. Anterior cruciate ligament- specialized post-operative return-to-sports (ACL-SPORTS) training: a randomized control trial

    White, Kathleen; Di Stasi, Stephanie L.; Smith, Angela H; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Background Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is standard practice for athletes that wish to return to high-level activities; however functional outcomes after ACLR are poor. Quadriceps strength weakness, abnormal movement patterns and below normal knee function is reported in the months and years after ACLR. Second ACL injuries are common with even worse outcomes than primary ACLR. Modifiable limb-to-limb asymmetries have been identified in individuals who re-injure after prima...

  15. Strategies to avoid a missed diagnosis of co-occurring concussion in post-acute patients having a spinal cord injur y

    David S. Kushner

    2015-01-01

    Research scientists and clinicians should be aware that missed diagnoses of mild-moderate trau-matic brain injuries in post-acute patients having spinal cord injuries may approach 60–74%with certain risk factors, potentially causing clinical consequences for patients, and confounding the results of clinical research studies. Factors leading to a missed diagnosis may include acute trau-ma-related life-threatening issues, sedation/intubation, subtle neuropathology on neuroimaging, failure to collect Glasgow Coma Scale scores or duration of posttraumatic amnesia, or lack of va-lidity of this information, and overlap in neuro-cognitive symptoms with emotional responses to spinal cord injuries. Strategies for avoiding a missed diagnosis of mild-moderate traumatic brain injuries in patients having a spinal cord injuries are highlighted in this perspective.

  16. The risk assessment score in acute whiplash injury predicts outcome and reflects biopsychosocial factors

    Kasch, Helge; Qerama, Erisela; Kongsted, Alice;

    2011-01-01

    One-year prospective study of 141 acute whiplash patients (WLP) and 40 acute ankle-injured controls.......One-year prospective study of 141 acute whiplash patients (WLP) and 40 acute ankle-injured controls....

  17. How Can I Do That with ACL2? Recent Enhancements to ACL2

    Matt Kaufmann; J Strother Moore

    2011-01-01

    The last several years have seen major enhancements to ACL2 functionality, largely driven by requests from its user community, including utilities now in common use such as 'make-event', 'mbe', and trust tags. In this paper we provide user-level summaries of some ACL2 enhancements introduced after the release of Version 3.5 (in May, 2009, at about the time of the 2009 ACL2 workshop) up through the release of Version 4.3 in July, 2011, roughly a couple of years later. Many of these features ar...

  18. Dynamic intraligamentary stabilization: novel technique for preserving the ruptured ACL

    Eggli, S; Kohlhof, H.; Zumstein, M.; Henle, P; Hartel, M; Evangelopoulos, D. S.; Bonel, H; Kohl, S.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Replacement of the torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) with a transplant is today`s gold standard. A new technique for preserving and healing the torn ACL is presented. HYPOTHESIS a dynamic intraligamentary stabilization (DIS) that provides continuous postinjury stability of the knee and ACL in combination with biological improvement of the healing environment [leucocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF) and microfracturing] should enable biomechanically stable ACL self-...

  19. Dynamic intraligamentary stabilization: novel technique for preserving the ruptured ACL

    Eggli, S; Kohlhof, H.; Zumstein, M.; Henle, P; Hartel, M; Evangelopoulos, D. S.; Bonel, H; Kohl, S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Replacement of the torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) with a transplant is today`s gold standard. A new technique for preserving and healing the torn ACL is presented. Hypothesis: a dynamic intraligamentary stabilization (DIS) that provides continuous postinjury stability of the knee and ACL in combination with biological improvement of the healing environment [leucocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF) and microfracturing] should enable biomechanically stable ACL self-healing. Me...

  20. The potential for primary repair of the ACL

    Vavken, Patrick; Murray, Martha M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to assess the feasibility of successfully repairing the torn ACL. Two major motivators for developing a new treatment for ACL injuries are the recently reported high rates of osteoarthritis after conventional ACL reconstruction as well as the problem of how to safely treat skeletally immature patients. A key factor in developing such a technique was the identification of the main inhibitor of intrinsic ACL healing – the lack of clot formation between the two torn...

  1. Reducing the Risk of ACL Injury in Female Athletes

    McDaniel, Larry W.; Rasche, Adrienna; Gaudet, Laura; Jackson, Allen

    2010-01-01

    The Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) is located behind the kneecap (patella) and connects the thigh bone (femur) to the shin bone (tibia). Stabilizing the knee joint is the primary responsibility of the ACL. Injuries that affect the ACL are three to five times more common in females than males. This is a result of anatomical, biomechanical,…

  2. 急性颅脑损伤病人免感染营养支持的分析%The acute brain injured the patient to exempt the infection nutrition support to analyze

    李道佩; 零达尚

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Understood the domestic and foreign acute skulls damage patient's nutrition support, and how on achieves avoids or reduce infection illness complication occurrence makes the suitable analysis. MATERIAL AND METHOD Draws support specialized database: Medline、wanfang data digitization periodical, Qinghuatongfang CHKD periodical entire library. In the comparison, in the induction related content foundation carries on the analysis. RESULTS Altogether searches to is discussing 6,Special study 5,Special course 8,Related report 13. The acute brain injures patient's nutrition support way mainly for to pass through outside the stomach and intestines the nutrition (PN), outside the entire intestines the nutrition (TPN) and in the stomach and intestines the nutrition (EN). Carries on the nutrition support in the acute brain injure early time to achieve the mutual recognition, how but arranges outside the intestines in the nutrition and the intestines the nutrition use, always has the different position. CONCLUSION In the intestines the nutrition support compares outside the intestines the nutrition support to be possible to avoid, to reduce this kind of patient because the nutrition support to cause the infection illness complication the occurrence; carries on the nutrition support regarding this kind of patient to be possible to divide into two stages: outside the first stage intestines in the nutrition support and the intestines also the nutrition support carries on, after waits the brain damage condition to be stable transits to the second stage entire stomach and intestines in the nutrition support.%目的了解国内外急性颅脑损伤病人的营养支持,并就如何做到避免、减少感染并发症的发生作适当分析.资料与方法所借助的专业数据库:Medline、万方数据库数字化期刊、清华同方CHKD期刊全文库.在比较、归纳有关内容的基础上进行分析.结果共搜索到论著6篇,专题研究5篇,专题讲座8

  3. How Can I Do That with ACL2? Recent Enhancements to ACL2

    Kaufmann, Matt; 10.4204/EPTCS.70.4

    2011-01-01

    The last several years have seen major enhancements to ACL2 functionality, largely driven by requests from its user community, including utilities now in common use such as 'make-event', 'mbe', and trust tags. In this paper we provide user-level summaries of some ACL2 enhancements introduced after the release of Version 3.5 (in May, 2009, at about the time of the 2009 ACL2 workshop) up through the release of Version 4.3 in July, 2011, roughly a couple of years later. Many of these features are not particularly well known yet, but most ACL2 users could take advantage of at least some of them. Some of the changes could affect existing proof efforts, such as a change that treats pairs of functions such as 'member' and 'member-equal' as the same function.

  4. Psychopathological responses of physically injured persons

    Lešić Aleksandar

    2003-01-01

    seriousness of injuries but also to the circumstances of their occurrence. The proneness to develop PTSD symptoms was not in correlation with the preparedness for accident, it being much poorer in peacetime injuries, as opposed to wartime patients, who had been prepared to the possibility of injury occurrence. The highest value of family homogeneity (FHI was established in the wartime injured, which led us to conclude that the injury contributed to the cohesion of the family from which the patient came. By extracting some questions related to psychopathological entities such as insomnia, depression, somatization, anxiety, and cognitive disorders, the following results were obtained. Depression was the most frequent in both groups of injuries. Anxiety was also present in the control group; and insomnia and somatization, that is, conversion symptoms, were present in both groups of the injured. By examining narrower psychological characteristics of the wartime injured revealed dissociation problems derangement to be the most frequent. Then follow the symptoms of depression which occur significantly more frequently in the wartime injured in comparison to the peacetime injured. The phenomenological symptoms of derangement and depression proved to be reliable parameters of physical trauma. It is also significant that the three characteristics showed correlation to psychopathological responses: severity of surgery, paralysis and acute injury.

  5. A Comparison of Dynamic Postural Stability Between Asymptomatic Controls and Male Patients One Year After ACL Reconstruction (Pilot Study)

    Ataoglu, Muhammed Baybars; Hazar, Zeynep; Kafa, Nihan; Özer, Mustafa; Citaker, Seyit

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine if dynamic postural stability gained one year after ACL reconstruction in patients who received rehabilitation. Methods: Seven male patients (mean age=32,66 ±6,47) who had previously undergone ACL reconstruction (ACL-R) and 7 sex-and general physical activity matched uninjured controls included to study. Mean time since original injury was 13±3,31 months. Dynamic postural control was assessed with 20° knee flexion with Star Excursion Balance test. Each participant performed 3 trials of the anterior, posterior-medial, and posterior-lateral directional components of the SEBT. Reach distances for each directional component were compared with non-injured leg and healthy controls’. Results: There was no significant difference in all directions of Star Excursion Balance test between neither the operated and uninjured knees of patients nor between patients and healthy controls (p>0,05). Conclusion: No deficits in dynamic postural stability were present average one year after ACL reconstruction in patients who received rehabilitation. It can be said that rehabilitation is effective in the recovery of dynamic postural stability.

  6. Functional and muscle morphometric effects of ACL reconstruction. A prospective CT study with 1 year follow-up.

    Lindström, M; Strandberg, S; Wredmark, T; Felländer-Tsai, L; Henriksson, M

    2013-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was used to explore if changes in muscle cross-sectional area and quality after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and reconstruction would be related to knee function. Fourteen females and 23 males (16-54 years) underwent clinical tests, subjective questionnaires, and CT 1 week before and 1 year after ACL surgery with semitendinosus-gracilis (STG) graft and rehabilitation. Postoperatively, knee laxity was decreased and functional knee measures and subjective patient scores improved. The most obvious remaining deficit was the quadriceps atrophy, which was significantly larger if the right leg was injured. Right-leg injury also tended to cause larger compensatory hypertrophy of the combined knee flexor and tibial internal rotator muscles (preoperatively). The quadriceps atrophy was significantly correlated with the scores and functional tests, the latter also being related to the remaining size of the gracilis muscle. Biceps femoris hypertrophy and, in males only, semimembranosus hypertrophy was observed following the ACL reconstruction. The lack of semimembranosus hypertrophy in the women could, via tibial internal rotation torque deficit, contribute to the less favorable functional and subjective outcome recorded for the women. The results indicate that the quadriceps, the combined knee flexor/tibial internal rotator muscles, side of ACL injury, and sex are important to consider in rehabilitation after STG graft. PMID:22107159

  7. The Risk Assessment Score in acute whiplash injury predicts outcome and reflects bio-psycho-social factors

    Kasch, Helge; Qerama, Erisela; Kongsted, Alice;

    2011-01-01

    One-year prospective study of 141 acute whiplash patients (WLP) and 40 acute ankle-injured controls.......One-year prospective study of 141 acute whiplash patients (WLP) and 40 acute ankle-injured controls....

  8. Schwann cells generated from neonatal skin-derived precursors or neonatal peripheral nerve improve functional recovery after acute transplantation into the partially injured cervical spinal cord of the rat.

    Sparling, Joseph S; Bretzner, Frederic; Biernaskie, Jeff; Assinck, Peggy; Jiang, Yuan; Arisato, Hiroki; Plunet, Ward T; Borisoff, Jaimie; Liu, Jie; Miller, Freda D; Tetzlaff, Wolfram

    2015-04-29

    The transplantation of Schwann cells (SCs) holds considerable promise as a therapy for spinal cord injury, but the optimal source of these cells and the best timing for intervention remains debatable. Previously, we demonstrated that delayed transplantation of SCs generated from neonatal mouse skin-derived precursors (SKP-SCs) promoted repair and functional recovery in rats with thoracic contusions. Here, we conducted two experiments using neonatal rat cells and an incomplete cervical injury model to examine the efficacy of acute SKP-SC transplantation versus media control (Experiment 1) and versus nerve-derived SC or dermal fibroblast (Fibro) transplantation (Experiment 2). Despite limited graft survival, by 10 weeks after injury, rats that received SCs from either source showed improved functional recovery compared with media- or fibroblast-treated animals. Compared with media treatment, SKP-SC-transplanted rats showed enhanced rubrospinal tract (RST) sparing/plasticity in the gray matter (GM) rostral to injury, particularly in the absence of immunosuppression. The functional benefits of SC transplantations over fibroblast treatment correlated with the enhanced preservation of host tissue, reduced RST atrophy, and/or increased RST sparing/plasticity in the GM. In summary, our results indicate that: (1) early transplantation of neonatal SCs generated from skin or nerve promotes repair and functional recovery after incomplete cervical crush injury; (2) either of these cell types is preferable to Fibros for these purposes; and (3) age-matched SCs from these two sources do not differ in terms of their reparative effects or functional efficacy after transplantation into the injured cervical spinal cord. PMID:25926450

  9. Reliability and validity of videotaped functional performance tests in ACL-injured subjects

    von Porat, Anette; Holmström, Eva; Roos, Ewa

    2008-01-01

    , crossover hop on one leg and one-leg hop. The videos were observed by four physiotherapists, and the knee movement pattern quality, a feature of the loading strategy of the lower extremity, was scored on an 11-point rating scale. To assess the criterion validity, the observational rating was correlated...... with the maximum knee flexion angle in landing during the crossover hop determined by a three-dimensional motion analysis system (VICON). RESULTS: Inter-observer agreement between the four physiotherapists was moderate to good, ICC(1,2) 0.57-0.76 for the four test situations. Fair to good correlations were...

  10. In vitro comparison of human fibroblasts from intact and ruptured ACL for use in tissue engineering

    Brune, T.; Borel, A.; Gilbert, T. W.; J P Franceschi; Badylak, S.F.; Sommer, P.

    2007-01-01

    The present study compares fibroblasts extracted from intact and ruptured human anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) for creation of a tissue engineered ACL-construct, made of porcine small intestinal submucosal extracellular matrix (SIS-ECM) seeded with these ACL cells. The comparison is based on histological, immunohistochemical and RT-PCR analyses. Differences were observed between cells in a ruptured ACL (rACL) and cells in an intact ACL (iACL), particularly with regard to the expression of ...

  11. Persistent Biomechanical Alterations After ACL Reconstruction Are Associated With Early Cartilage Matrix Changes Detected by Quantitative MR

    Amano, Keiko; Pedoia, Valentina; Su, Favian; Souza, Richard B.; Li, Xiaojuan; Ma, C. Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Background: The effectiveness of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in preventing early osteoarthritis is debated. Restoring the original biomechanics may potentially prevent degeneration, but apparent pathomechanisms have yet to be described. Newer quantitative magnetic resonance (qMR) imaging techniques, specifically T1ρ and T2, offer novel, noninvasive methods of visualizing and quantifying early cartilage degeneration. Purpose: To determine the tibiofemoral biomechanical alterations before and after ACL reconstruction using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to evaluate the association between biomechanics and cartilage degeneration using T1ρ and T2. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: Knee MRIs of 51 individuals (mean age, 29.5 ± 8.4 years) with unilateral ACL injuries were obtained prior to surgery; 19 control subjects (mean age, 30.7 ± 5.3 years) were also scanned. Follow-up MRIs were obtained at 6 months and 1 year. Tibial position (TP), internal tibial rotation (ITR), and T1ρ and T2 were calculated using an in-house Matlab program. Student t tests, repeated measures, and regression models were used to compare differences between injured and uninjured sides, observe longitudinal changes, and evaluate correlations between TP, ITR, and T1ρ and T2. Results: TP was significantly more anterior on the injured side at all time points (P < .001). ITR was significantly increased on the injured side prior to surgery (P = .033). At 1 year, a more anterior TP was associated with elevated T1ρ (P = .002) and T2 (P = .026) in the posterolateral tibia and with decreased T2 in the central lateral femur (P = .048); ITR was associated with increased T1ρ in the posteromedial femur (P = .009). ITR at 6 months was associated with increased T1ρ at 1 year in the posteromedial tibia (P = .029). Conclusion: Persistent biomechanical alterations after ACL reconstruction are related to significant changes in cartilage T1ρ and T2 at 1 year

  12. CURRENT STATUS AND POTENTIAL FOR PRIMARY ACL REPAIR

    Murray, Martha M.

    2009-01-01

    ACL rupture occurs in hundreds of thousands active adolescents and young adults each year. Despite current treatment, post-traumatic osteoarthritis following these injuries is commonplace within a decade of injury in these young patients. Thus, there is widespread clinical and scientific interest in improving patient outcomes and preventing osteoarthritis. The current emphasis on the removal of the torn ACL and subsequent replacement with a tendon graft (ACL reconstruction) stems from adheren...

  13. PROPRIOCEPTION, BODY BALANCE AND FUNCTIONALITY IN INDIVIDUALS WITH ACL RECONSTRUCTION

    Furlanetto, Tássia Silveira; Peyré-Tartaruga, Leonardo Alexandre; do Pinho, Alexandre Severo; Bernardes, Emanuele da Silva; Zaro, Milton Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Objective : To evaluate and compare proprioception, body balance and knee functionality of individuals with or without unilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Methods : Forty individuals were divided in two groups: Experimental group, 20 individuals with ACL reconstruction at six months postoperative, and control group, 20 individuals with no history of lower limb pathologies. In the experimental group, we assessed lower limbs with reconstructed ACL and contralateral limb;...

  14. The iliotibial band in acute knee trauma: patterns of injury on MR imaging

    Mansour, Ramy; Yoong, Philip; McKean, David; Teh, James L. [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15

    To delineate the spectrum of knee injuries associated with sprains and tears of the distal iliotibial band (ITB). A retrospective review of 200 random MRI scans undertaken for acute knee trauma was performed. Scans were excluded if there was a history of injury over 4 weeks from the time of the scan, septic arthritis, inflammatory arthropathy, previous knee surgery, or significant artefact. In each scan, the ITB was scored as normal, minor sprain (grade 1), severe sprain (grade 2), and torn (grade 3). The menisci, ligaments, and tendons of each knee were also assessed. The mean age was 27.4 years (range, 9-69 years) and 71.5 % (n = 143) of the patients were male. The ITB was injured in 115 cases (57.5 %). The next most common soft tissue structure injured was the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in 53.5 % of cases (n = 107). Grade 1 ITB injury was seen in 90 of these 115 cases (45 %), grade 2 injury in 20 cases, and grade 3 injury in only five cases. There is a significant association between ITB injury and ACL rupture (p < 0.05), as well as acute patellar dislocation (p < 0.05). There were ten cases of significant posterolateral corner injury, and all were associated with ITB injury, including four ITB tears. Only two cases of isolated ITB injury were seen (1 %). ITB injury is common in acute knee trauma and is associated with significant internal derangement of the knee, especially cruciate ligament rupture, posterolateral corner injury, and patellar dislocation. (orig.)

  15. The iliotibial band in acute knee trauma: patterns of injury on MR imaging

    To delineate the spectrum of knee injuries associated with sprains and tears of the distal iliotibial band (ITB). A retrospective review of 200 random MRI scans undertaken for acute knee trauma was performed. Scans were excluded if there was a history of injury over 4 weeks from the time of the scan, septic arthritis, inflammatory arthropathy, previous knee surgery, or significant artefact. In each scan, the ITB was scored as normal, minor sprain (grade 1), severe sprain (grade 2), and torn (grade 3). The menisci, ligaments, and tendons of each knee were also assessed. The mean age was 27.4 years (range, 9-69 years) and 71.5 % (n = 143) of the patients were male. The ITB was injured in 115 cases (57.5 %). The next most common soft tissue structure injured was the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in 53.5 % of cases (n = 107). Grade 1 ITB injury was seen in 90 of these 115 cases (45 %), grade 2 injury in 20 cases, and grade 3 injury in only five cases. There is a significant association between ITB injury and ACL rupture (p < 0.05), as well as acute patellar dislocation (p < 0.05). There were ten cases of significant posterolateral corner injury, and all were associated with ITB injury, including four ITB tears. Only two cases of isolated ITB injury were seen (1 %). ITB injury is common in acute knee trauma and is associated with significant internal derangement of the knee, especially cruciate ligament rupture, posterolateral corner injury, and patellar dislocation. (orig.)

  16. Proof Pad: A New Development Environment for ACL2

    Caleb Eggensperger

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Most software development projects rely on Integrated Development Environments (IDEs based on the desktop paradigm, with an interactive, mouse-driven user interface. The standard installation of ACL2, on the other hand, is designed to work closely with Emacs. ACL2 experts, on the whole, like this mode of operation, but students and other new programmers who have learned to program with desktop IDEs often react negatively to the process of adapting to an unfamiliar form of interaction. This paper discusses Proof Pad, a new IDE for ACL2. Proof Pad is not the only attempt to provide ACL2 IDEs catering to students and beginning programmers. The ACL2 Sedan and DrACuLa systems arose from similar motivations. Proof Pad builds on the work of those systems, while also taking into account the unique workflow of the ACL2 theorem proving system. The design of Proof Pad incorporated user feedback from the outset, and that process continued through all stages of development. Feedback took the form of direct observation of users interacting with the IDE as well as questionnaires completed by users of Proof Pad and other ACL2 IDEs. The result is a streamlined interface and fast, responsive system that supports using ACL2 as a programming language and a theorem proving system. Proof Pad also provides a property-based testing environment with random data generation and automated interpretation of properties as ACL2 theorem definitions.

  17. ACL Injury prevention in female athletes: review of the literature and practical considerations in implementing an ACL prevention program

    Voskanian, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    Female athletes are at 3.5 times risk of sustaining a non-contact ACL injury compared with males. Research has shown that this gender discrepancy results from differences in neuromuscular adaptations and biomechanics related to landing techniques. Studies have examined the preventative effect of ACL prevention programs, which have been designed to address these risky neuromuscular and biomechanical patterns. We review the key studies on ACL prevention in female athletes and summarize the crit...

  18. Incidence of Second Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injury 2 Years after Primary ACL Reconstruction and Return to Sport

    Paterno, Mark V.; Rauh, Mitchell; SCHMITT, LAURA C.; Ford, Kevin R.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The incidence of second anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in the first 12 months after ACL reconstruction (ACLR) and return to sport in a young, active population has been reported to be 15 times greater than a previously uninjured cohort. It is unknown if this high relative rate of injury continues beyond the first year after return to sport following ACLR. The tested hypothesis was that the incidence rate of a subsequent ACL injury in the 2 years following ACLR and return ...

  19. Medial portal technique for single-bundle anatomical Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction

    Brown, Charles H.; Spalding, Tim; Robb, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to describe the medial portal technique for anatomical single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Placement of an ACL graft within the anatomical femoral and tibial attachment sites is critical to the success and clinical outcome of ACL reconstruction. Non-anatomical ACL graft placement is the most common technical error leading to recurrent instability following ACL reconstruction. ACL reconstruction has commonly been performed using a transtibial ...

  20. Bit-Blasting ACL2 Theorems

    Sol Swords

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Interactive theorem proving requires a lot of human guidance. Proving a property involves (1 figuring out why it holds, then (2 coaxing the theorem prover into believing it. Both steps can take a long time. We explain how to use GL, a framework for proving finite ACL2 theorems with BDD- or SAT-based reasoning. This approach makes it unnecessary to deeply understand why a property is true, and automates the process of admitting it as a theorem. We use GL at Centaur Technology to verify execution units for x86 integer, MMX, SSE, and floating-point arithmetic.

  1. Histological Predictors of Maximum Failure Loads Differ Between the Healing ACL and ACL Grafts After 6 and 12 Months In Vivo

    Proffen, B. L.; Proffen, Benedikt L.; Fleming, Braden C.; Fleming, B C; Murray, M. M.; Murray, Martha M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Bioenhanced anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repair, where the suture repair is supplemented with a biological scaffold, is a promising novel technique to stimulate healing after ACL rupture. However, the histological properties of a successfully healing ACL and how they relate to the mechanical properties have not been fully described. Purpose: To determine which histological features best correlate with the mechanical properties of the healing ACL repairs and ACL grafts in a por...

  2. Effect of culture complex of BMSCs and sodium hydroxide- and GRGDSPC-treated PET on the reconstruction of injured anterior cruciate ligament in a rabbit model.

    Huang, Jianming; Chen, Fengrong; Jian, Guojian; Ye, Zhiyang; Wang, Zimin; Liu, Haoyuan; Kang, Yifan

    2015-01-01

    Ligament reconstruction is an effective therapy for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligaments have recently gained popularity in clinical ACL reconstruction for its advantage in the improvement of keen function. However, the application of PET in clinical treatment is limited by its poor bioactivity and biocompatibility. Recently, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have been widely studied in regenerative medical therapy due to their multi-lineage differentiation. Previous study also indicated that BMSCs may promote the healing of tendon-bone interface of injured ligament. We speculate that BMSCs may enhance the curative effect of PET artificial ligament on the tendon-bone-healing in ligament reconstruction. In this study, the PET materials were first modified with sodium hydroxide hydrolysis and GRGDSPC peptide which was able to improve its bioactivity and biocompatibility. Then, the effects of modified PET materials on the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs were examined. The in vitro co-culture of BMSCs and modified PET showed the modified PET promoted the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs. Further, the effect of culture complex of BMSCs and modified PET artificial ligament co-culture system on the injured ligament reconstruction was investigated in vivo. Results showed not only better growth and differentiation of BMSCs but also satisfactory healing of the injured ligament was observed after implantation of this culture complex into the injured ligament of rabbits. Our study provides a brand-new solution for ACL reconstruction. PMID:26221227

  3. ACL-RSI and KOOS Measures Predict Normal Knee Function after ACL-SPORTS Training

    White, Kathleen; Zeni, Joseph; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: After anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) athletes commonly report increased fear of re-injury and below normal knee function. Implementing a post-operative training protocol (ACL-SPORTS Training) to improve patient perceived knee function, may improve short term outcomes after surgery. Identifying pre-training measures that predict normal knee function after training may allow us to determine who may respond to the treatment intervention. The purpose of this study wa...

  4. Knee instability scores for ACL reconstruction.

    Rahnemai-Azar, Ata A; Naendrup, Jan-Hendrik; Soni, Ashish; Olsen, Adam; Zlotnicki, Jason; Musahl, Volker

    2016-06-01

    Despite abundant biological, biomechanical, and clinical research, return to sport after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury remains a significant challenge. Residual rotatory knee laxity has been identified as one of the factors responsible for poor functional outcome. To improve and standardize the assessment of knee instability, a variety of instability scoring systems is available. Recently, devices to objectively quantify static and dynamic clinical exams have been developed to complement traditional subjective grading systems. These devices enable an improved evaluation of knee instability and possible associated injuries. This additional information may promote the development of new treatment algorithms and allow for individualized treatment. In this review, the different subjective laxity scores as well as complementary objective measuring systems are discussed, along with an introduction of injury to an individualized treatment algorithm. PMID:26980119

  5. A randomized trial of treatment for acute anterior cruciate ligament tears

    Frobell, Richard B; Roos, Ewa M; Roos, Harald P; Ranstam, Jonas; Lohmander, L Stefan

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal management of a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee is unknown. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, controlled trial involving 121 young, active adults with acute ACL injury in which we compared two strategies: structured rehabilitation plus early ACL...... reconstruction and structured rehabilitation with the option of later ACL reconstruction if needed. The primary outcome was the change from baseline to 2 years in the average score on four subscales of the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) - pain, symptoms, function in sports and recreation...... rehabilitation plus early ACL reconstruction, 1 did not undergo surgery. Of 59 assigned to rehabilitation plus optional delayed ACL reconstruction, 23 underwent delayed ACL reconstruction; the other 36 underwent rehabilitation alone. The absolute change in the mean KOOS(4) score from baseline to 2 years was 39...

  6. ACL-rupturer hos fotbollstjejer – riskfaktorer och prevention

    Ågren, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries is a serius and traumatic injury to the knee that is common in female soccer players and often force the player to quit or lower the level of activity because of lost stability in the knee or from fear to suffer  a new injury. Female soccerplayers have a higher risk than their male counterparts to get an ACL rupture and especially adolescent females have a high risk. The most common causes to a non-contact ACL rupture is side-cutting manuv...

  7. The Effects of a Valgus Collapse Knee Position on In Vivo ACL Elongation

    Utturkar, G. M.; Irribarra, L.A.; Taylor, K A; Spritzer, C.E.; Taylor, D. C.; Garrett, W E; DeFrate, Louis E.

    2012-01-01

    There are conflicting data regarding what motions increase ACL injury risk. More specifically, the mechanical role of valgus collapse positions during ACL injury remains controversial. Our objective was to evaluate ACL elongation in a model that mimics knee movements thought to occur during ACL injury. Eight healthy male subjects were imaged using MR and biplanar fluoroscopy to measure the in vivo elongation of the ACL and its functional bundles during three static knee positions: full extens...

  8. Healing Cocktail Therapy for Non-healing Tissue-ACL

    Paul; Kuo-Li; SUNG

    2005-01-01

    1IntroductionThe incidence of the injury in the anterior cruciateligament (ACL) ,a majorligament contributingtothe sta-bility andfunctionality of the knee joint ,has beensteadi-lyincreasing as a result of increased participation in thesports activity. Currently, ACL injuries are recognizedwith greaterfrequencyinchildrenand adolescents .Tradi-tional methods for young patients are bracing, muscle re-habilitation,and activity modification.However ,as a re-sult of the poor outcome of non-operative treatment ,op...

  9. Case Series: Cyclops lesion - extension loss after ACL reconstruction

    Localized anterior arthrofibrosis (cyclops lesion) is the second most common cause of extension loss after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. We present and discuss two patients with prior ACL reconstructions, who presented with pain and loss of extension following surgery. MRI and arthroscopy of the knee revealed typical features of a cyclops lesion. The patients showed significant symptomatic improvement following arthroscopic resection of these lesions

  10. Fetal ACL Fibroblasts Exhibit Enhanced Cellular Properties Compared with Adults

    Stalling, Simone S.; Nicoll, Steven B.

    2008-01-01

    Fetal tendons and skin heal regeneratively without scar formation. Cells isolated from these fetal tissues exhibit enhanced cellular migration and collagen production in comparison to cells from adult tissue. We determined whether fetal and adult fibroblasts isolated from the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), a tissue that does not heal regeneratively, exhibit differences in cell migration rates and collagen elaboration. An in vitro migration assay showed fetal ACL fibroblasts migrated twice ...

  11. Proof Pad: A New Development Environment for ACL2

    Caleb Eggensperger

    2013-01-01

    Most software development projects rely on Integrated Development Environments (IDEs) based on the desktop paradigm, with an interactive, mouse-driven user interface. The standard installation of ACL2, on the other hand, is designed to work closely with Emacs. ACL2 experts, on the whole, like this mode of operation, but students and other new programmers who have learned to program with desktop IDEs often react negatively to the process of adapting to an unfamiliar form of interaction. This p...

  12. Non-contact ACL Injuries: Mechanisms and Risk Factors

    Boden, Barry P.; Sheehan, Frances T.; Torg, Joseph S.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2010-01-01

    Significant advances have recently been made in understanding the mechanisms involved in noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Most ACL injuries involve minimal to no contact. Female athletes sustain a two- to eightfold greater rate of injury than do their male counterparts. Recent videotape analyses demonstrate significant differences in average leg and trunk positions during injury compared with control subjects. These findings as well as those of cadaveric and MRI studies ind...

  13. Greater fear of re-injury and increased tibial translation in patients who later sustain an ACL graft rupture or a contralateral ACL rupture : a pilot study

    Tagesson (Sonesson), Sofi; Kvist, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to compare fear of re-injury, patient reported function, static and dynamic tibial translation and muscle strength assessed before and 5 weeks after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction between individuals who sustained a subsequent ACL graft rupture or a contralateral ACL injury within 5 years after the reconstruction, and individuals with no subsequent injury. Nineteen patients were investigated before, and 5 weeks after an ACL reconstruction with a quadruple hamst...

  14. Outcome of ACL Reconstruction and Concomitant Articular Injury Treatment

    Seyed Mohammad Tahami

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Articular cartilage injuries are a common clinical problem at the time of ACL reconstruction with an incidence rate of 16-46%. Good results of ACL reconstruction combined with the treatment of chondral lesions have been published in some studies. Method: After statistical analysis 30 patients were selected and divided in 2 groups. TheFfirst group consisted of 15 patients wite isolated ACL tear without any other concomitant injuries and the second group consisted of 15 patients with ACL tear and concomitant high grade (grade 3 or 4 of outerbridge classification contained articular cartilage injuries during arthroscopy. Group 1 underwent ACL reconstruction and group 2 underwent ACL reconstruction combined with chondroplasty via the drilling and microfracture technique. For each patient the Lysholm knee score questionnaire was completed before surgery, 6 months and 1 year after surgery. Results: The mean Lysholm knee score in both groups improves: 9.6 points after 6 months and 16.06 points after 1 year in group 1 and 23.26 points after 6 months and 30.66 after 1 year in group 2, whict was statistically significant (Pvalue

  15. The Dutch language anterior cruciate ligament return to sport after injury scale (ACL-RSI) - validity and reliability

    Slagers, Anton J; Reininga, Inge H F; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge

    2016-01-01

    The ACL-Return to Sport after Injury scale (ACL-RSI) measures athletes' emotions, confidence in performance, and risk appraisal in relation to return to sport after ACL reconstruction. Aim of this study was to study the validity and reliability of the Dutch version of the ACL-RSI (ACL-RSI (NL)). Tot

  16. A Novel First Aid Stretcher for Immobilization and Transportation of Spine Injured Patients

    Yan-Sheng Liu; Ya-Ping Feng; Jia-Xin Xie; Zhuo-Jing Luo; Cai-Hong Shen; Fang Niu; Jian Zou; Shao-Feng Tang; Jiang Hao; Jia-Xiang Xu; Li-Ping Xiao; Xiao-Ming Xu; Hui Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Effective immobilization and transportation are vital to the life-saving acute medical care needed when treating critically injured people. However, the most common types of stretchers used today are wrought with problems that can lead to further medical complications, difficulty in employment and rescue, and ineffective transitions to hospital treatment. Here we report a novel first aid stretcher called the "emergency carpet", which solves these problems with a unique design for spine injure...

  17. Long-Term Data Reveal Rate and Risk Factors for Subsequent Surgeries Following Initial ACL Reconstruction

    ... and Risk Factors for Subsequent Surgeries Following Initial ACL Reconstruction Nearly one-fifth of patients who undergo ... surgery to reconstruct a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) eventually need to have additional surgery on the ...

  18. Reconstruction of ACL Ligament rupture: results of 96 operation

    Tahmasebi MN

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL is one of the main knee stabilizing ligaments. Because of high incidence of ACL tearing especially in young athletes its reconstruction is very important. The aim of this study was to evaluate short-term results of anterior cruciate ligament ruptures using four strand hamstring auto graft and Bone patellar tendon autograph. "nMethods: The study group included 96 patients (3 female and 93 male with ACL teared who had been referred to our center in 5 years period (2002-2007. The subject which were Accessed in this study included meniscal injury concomitant chondral injury, determine the most common cause of ACL tearing, comparision of IKDC and lysholm score in all patients before and after surgery, and limitation of rang of motion of knee post operation. "nResults: Involvement was in the right knee in 38 patients and in the left knee in 58 patients. Mean age of patients was 27.6 years (19-48. Mean surgical delay was 18 month (1-77. The most common cause of tear was playing soccer. Meniscal injury was in 78 patients. (Medial meniscus in 63 patients, lateral meniscus in 29 patients Concommitent chondral injury was in 54 patients (56.25%. 68% of patients returned to preoperative functions sport activity. There was no limitation in extension and there was 6 patients limitation in flexion about 20º. In last visit of patients IKDS in class A and B was 96. "nConclusion: It is seem that arthroscopic reconstruction of ACL is a safe and good method in treatment of Knee stability. Use of IKDC and lysholm score for comparision of patients before and after surgery is helpful. The operation should be done early after injury. Reconstruction of ACL in older patients in the abscense of DJD is effective.

  19. Efficacy of a metalloproteinase inhibitor in spinal cord injured dogs.

    Jonathan M Levine

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinase-9 is elevated within the acutely injured murine spinal cord and blockade of this early proteolytic activity with GM6001, a broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, results in improved recovery after spinal cord injury. As matrix metalloproteinase-9 is likewise acutely elevated in dogs with naturally occurring spinal cord injuries, we evaluated efficacy of GM6001 solubilized in dimethyl sulfoxide in this second species. Safety and pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in naïve dogs. After confirming safety, subsequent pharmacokinetic analyses demonstrated that a 100 mg/kg subcutaneous dose of GM6001 resulted in plasma concentrations that peaked shortly after administration and were sustained for at least 4 days at levels that produced robust in vitro inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-9. A randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled study was then conducted to assess efficacy of GM6001 given within 48 hours of spinal cord injury. Dogs were enrolled in 3 groups: GM6001 dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (n = 35, dimethyl sulfoxide (n = 37, or saline (n = 41. Matrix metalloproteinase activity was increased in the serum of injured dogs and GM6001 reduced this serum protease activity compared to the other two groups. To assess recovery, dogs were a priori stratified into a severely injured group and a mild-to-moderate injured group, using a Modified Frankel Scale. The Texas Spinal Cord Injury Score was then used to assess long-term motor/sensory function. In dogs with severe spinal cord injuries, those treated with saline had a mean motor score of 2 (95% CI 0-4.0 that was significantly (P<0.05; generalized linear model less than the estimated mean motor score for dogs receiving dimethyl sulfoxide (mean, 5; 95% CI 2.0-8.0 or GM6001 (mean, 5; 95% CI 2.0-8.0. As there was no independent effect of GM6001, we attribute improved neurological outcomes to dimethyl sulfoxide, a pleotropic agent that may target diverse

  20. In vivo measurement of ACL length and relative strain during walking

    Taylor, K A; Cutcliffe, H C; Queen, R.M.; Utturkar, G. M.; Spritzer, C.E.; Garrett, W E; DeFrate, L.E.

    2012-01-01

    Although numerous studies have addressed the effects of ACL injury and reconstruction on knee joint motion, there is currently little data available describing in vivo ACL strain during activities of daily living. Data describing in vivo ACL strain during activities such as gait is critical to understanding the biomechanical function of the ligament, and ultimately, to improving the surgical treatment of patients with ACL rupture. Thus, our objective was to characterize the relative strain in...

  1. Knee rotational laxity and proprioceptive function 2 years after partial ACL reconstruction

    Chouteau, Julien; Testa, Rodolphe; Viste, Anthony; MOYEN, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate knee rotational laxity and proprioceptive function 2 years after partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. According to our hypothesis, partial ACL reconstruction could restore knee laxity and function to the intact level. Methods : We conducted a study in fifteen consecutive patients undergoing partial ACL reconstruction. Fifteen anteromedial bundle tears were identified intra-operatively. Partial ACL reconstructions were performed by the s...

  2. Sagittal Plane Knee Biomechanics and Vertical Ground Reaction Forces Are Modified Following ACL Injury Prevention Programs

    Padua, Darin A.; DiStefano, Lindsay J.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) occur because of excessive loading on the knee. ACL injury prevention programs can influence sagittal plane ACL loading factors and vertical ground reaction force (VGRF). Objective: To determine the influence of ACL injury prevention programs on sagittal plane knee biomechanics (anterior tibial shear force, knee flexion angle/moments) and VGRF. Data Sources: The PubMed database was searched for studies published between January 1988 an...

  3. Non-contact ACL injuries in female athletes: an International Olympic Committee current concepts statement

    Renstrom, P; Ljungqvist, A; Arendt, E;

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury remains high in young athletes. Because female athletes have a much higher incidence of ACL injuries in sports such as basketball and team handball than male athletes, the IOC Medical Commission invited a multidisciplinary group of ACL expert...

  4. Preventing ACL Injuries in Females: What Physical Educators Need to Know

    Toscano, Lisa; Carroll, Brianne

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries happen at a frequent rate, especially in girls and women. While there are many factors that contribute to ACL tears, teaching proper landing techniques and strengthening certain muscles can decrease the incidence of ACL tears, especially in women. This article reviews some of the high-risk factors that…

  5. Enhancements to ACL2 in Versions 5.0, 6.0, and 6.1

    Matt Kaufmann; J Strother Moore

    2013-01-01

    We report on highlights of the ACL2 enhancements introduced in ACL2 releases since the 2011 ACL2 Workshop. Although many enhancements are critical for soundness or robustness, we focus in this paper on those improvements that could benefit users who are aware of them, but that might not be discovered in everyday practice.

  6. The role of the anterolateral ligament in ACL insufficient and reconstructed knees on rotary stability

    Tavlo, Mette; Eljaja, S; Tranum-Jensen, Jørgen;

    2016-01-01

    -posterior stability in ACL-insufficient knees. Reconstruction of ACL and ALL reestablished knee stability. The appearance of the ALL was not uniform. The ALL was an internal rotational stabilizer. Anatomical ALL reconstruction in combination with ACL reconstruction could reestablish stability. ALL reconstruction...

  7. ACL2 Meets the GPU: Formalizing a CUDA-based Parallelizable All-Pairs Shortest Path Algorithm in ACL2

    David S. Hardin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available As Graphics Processing Units (GPUs have gained in capability and GPU development environments have matured, developers are increasingly turning to the GPU to off-load the main host CPU of numerically-intensive, parallelizable computations. Modern GPUs feature hundreds of cores, and offer programming niceties such as double-precision floating point, and even limited recursion. This shift from CPU to GPU, however, raises the question: how do we know that these new GPU-based algorithms are correct? In order to explore this new verification frontier, we formalized a parallelizable all-pairs shortest path (APSP algorithm for weighted graphs, originally coded in NVIDIA's CUDA language, in ACL2. The ACL2 specification is written using a single-threaded object (stobj and tail recursion, as the stobj/tail recursion combination yields the most straightforward translation from imperative programming languages, as well as efficient, scalable executable specifications within ACL2 itself. The ACL2 version of the APSP algorithm can process millions of vertices and edges with little to no garbage generation, and executes at one-sixth the speed of a host-based version of APSP coded in C – a very respectable result for a theorem prover. In addition to formalizing the APSP algorithm (which uses Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm at its core, we have also provided capability that the original APSP code lacked, namely shortest path recovery. Path recovery is accomplished using a secondary ACL2 stobj implementing a LIFO stack, which is proven correct. To conclude the experiment, we ported the ACL2 version of the APSP kernels back to C, resulting in a less than 5% slowdown, and also performed a partial back-port to CUDA, which, surprisingly, yielded a slight performance increase.

  8. Wounded, Ill, and Injured Challenges.

    Jones, Stephen L

    2016-01-01

    The Washington Post articles of February 2007 led to a close examination of the care provided Wounded Warriors at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Subsequent reports by the President's Commission, Independent Review Group, and Defense Health Board all recommended ways to improve care. Joint Task Force National Capital Region Medical was established to implement the recommended improvements in Warrior care, and the recommendations of the Base Realignment and Closure Commission to close Walter Reed and realign the staff into a new Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and Fort Belvoir Community Hospital. It accomplished these tasks, maintained existing wounded, ill, and injured care, and safely transferred patients during the height of the fighting season in Afghanistan. It successfully accomplished its mission through engaged leadership, establishing an appropriate environment for Warrior care, careful management of casualty flow, and robust communication with all parties affected by the changes. The lessons learned in Warrior care should be considered when planning future military medical operations. PMID:27215871

  9. A Review of metabolic staging in severely injured patients

    Alonso-Poza Alfredo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An interpretation of the metabolic response to injury in patients with severe accidental or surgical trauma is made. In the last century, various authors attributed a meaning to the post-traumatic inflammatory response by using teleological arguments. Their interpretations of this response, not only facilitates integrating the knowledge, but also the flow from the bench to the bedside, which is the main objective of modern translational research. The goal of the current review is to correlate the metabolic changes with the three phenotypes -ischemia-reperfusion, leukocytic and angiogenic- that the patients express during the evolution of the systemic inflammatory response. The sequence in the expression of multiple metabolic systems that becomes progressively more elaborate and complex in severe injured patients urges for more detailed knowledge in order to establish the most adequate metabolic support according to the evolutive phase. Thus, clinicians must employ different treatment strategies based on the different metabolic phases when caring for this challenging patient population. Perhaps, the best therapeutic option would be to favor early hypometabolism during the ischemia-reperfusion phase, to boost the antienzymatic metabolism and to reduce hypermetabolism during the leukocytic phase through the early administration of enteral nutrition and the modulation of the acute phase response. Lastly, the early epithelial regeneration of the injured organs and tissues by means of an oxidative metabolism would reduce the fibrotic sequelae in these severely injured patients.

  10. Aircast Award for Basic Science - The Effect of Dynamic Changes in ACL Graft Force on Soft Tissue ACL Graft-Tunnel Incorporation

    Ma, Richard; Schaer, Michael; Chen, Tina; Sisto, Marco; Voigt, Clifford; Nguyen, Joseph; Ying, Lilly; Deng, Xiang-hua; Rodeo, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Anterior cruciate ligament grafts that are placed for reconstruction are subject to complex forces with joint motion. Current “anatomic” ACL reconstructions result in greater in situ graft forces. The biologic effect of changing magnitudes of ACL graft force on graft-tunnel osseointegration is not completely understood. The objective of the present study is to determine the effects of dynamic mechanical ACL graft tension or load on graft-tunnel incorporation. Methods: One hundred ...

  11. Preferential Loading of the ACL Compared to the MCL during Landing: A Novel In Sim Approach Yields the Multi-Planar Mechanism of Dynamic Valgus during ACL Injury

    Quatman, Carmen E.; Kiapour, Ata; Demetropoulos, Constantine K.; Kiapour, Ali; Wordeman, Samuel Clayton; Levine, Jason W.; Goel, Vijay K.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Strong biomechanical and epidemiologic evidence associates knee valgus collapse with isolated non-contact ACL injury. However, the predominance of isolated non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries is challenging for clinicians and researchers to explain, as the medial collateral ligament (MCL) has been reported to be the primary restraint against knee valgus. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative ACL to MCL strain patterns during physiologic simula...

  12. Proceedings 10th International Workshop on the ACL2 Theorem Prover and its Applications

    Hardin, David; Schmaltz, Julien

    2011-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of ACL2 2011, the International Workshop on the ACL2 Theorem Prover and its Applications. The workshop was held in Austin, Texas, USA, on November 3-4 2011. ACL2 2011 is the tenth in a series of workshops on the ACL2 Theorem Prover and its Applications. The workshop was co-located with the eleventh Conference on Formal Methods in Computer Aided Design (FMCAD'11). The ACL2 Workshop series provide a major technical forum for researchers to present and discus...

  13. Decreased femoral head–neck offset: a possible risk factor for ACL injury

    Philippon, Marc; Dewing, Christopher; Briggs, Karen; Steadman, J. Richard

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Reduction in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in young, active individuals continues to be a major goal in sports medicine. The purpose of this study was to determine the head–neck offset, as measured by AP pelvis alpha angles, in patients presenting to a single surgeon with isolated ACL and non-ACL knee injuries. Methods In a group of 48 patients with complete, primary ACL rupture and 42 controls with non-ACL injury (i.e., meniscus tear, cartilage defect), a single surgeon, ...

  14. Rehabilitation of Patients Following Autogenic Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone ACL Reconstruction: A 20-Year Perspective

    De Carlo, Mark S.; McDivitt, Ryan

    2006-01-01

    Rehabilitation of patients following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has undergone remarkable improvements over the past two decades. During this time, ACL research has been at the forefront of many orthopaedic and sports physical therapy clinics. With over 20 years of ACL rehabilitation experience (senior author) and prior collaboration with accelerated ACL rehabilitation pioneer K. Donald Shelbourne, the authors wish to present a unique perspective on the evolution of ACL re...

  15. ACL reconstruction and the implication of its tibial attachment for stability of the joint: anthropometric and biomechanical study

    Papachristou, George; Sourlas, John; Magnissalis, Evangelos; Plessas, Spyros; Papachristou, Konstantinos

    2006-01-01

    The planar topography of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insertion was investigated and correlated to the use of the double-bundle/double tibial tunnel ACL reconstruction technique within the ACL tibial insertion area. The anteroposterior and mediolateral length of the tibial ACL attachment and the distances of the tibial insertion area from the anterior and posterior tibial borders were measured and the stability of the joint was tested using the double-bundle/double tibial tunnel ACL r...

  16. MRI of normal anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and reconstructed ACL: comparison of when the knee is extended with when the knee is flexed

    Nakanishi, K. [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Medical School, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita-City, Osaka 565 (Japan); Horibe, S. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Osaka University Medical School, Osaka (Japan); Shiozaki, Y. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Osaka University Medical School, Osaka (Japan); Ishida, T. [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Medical School, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita-City, Osaka 565 (Japan); Narumi, Y. [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Medical School, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita-City, Osaka 565 (Japan); Ikezoe, J. [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Medical School, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita-City, Osaka 565 (Japan); Nakamura, H. [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Medical School, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita-City, Osaka 565 (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate, using MRI, the morphology of normal anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and ACL grafts when the knee was extended compared with when the knee was flexed. Eighteen normal controls and 22 ACL graft patients were studied. Spin-echo (SE) T1-weighted images (TR 330 ms/TE 15 ms, NEX 1) were obtained with a slice thickness of 3 mm. Oblique sagittal images parallel to the ACL were obtained at various flexed angles of the knee joint. In 12 of the 18 normal controls the ACL appeared convex toward the posterior side when the knee was extended and gradually became straight when the knee was flexed. In 15 of the 22 ACL graft patients the grafts appeared straight when the knee was extended and became convex toward the anterior side when the knee was flexed. It is concluded that the morphological changes seen on MR images of ACL grafts from when the knee is extended to when the knee is flexed are different from those in the normal ACL. (orig.). With 7 figs., 1 tab.

  17. MRI of normal anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and reconstructed ACL: comparison of when the knee is extended with when the knee is flexed

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate, using MRI, the morphology of normal anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and ACL grafts when the knee was extended compared with when the knee was flexed. Eighteen normal controls and 22 ACL graft patients were studied. Spin-echo (SE) T1-weighted images (TR 330 ms/TE 15 ms, NEX 1) were obtained with a slice thickness of 3 mm. Oblique sagittal images parallel to the ACL were obtained at various flexed angles of the knee joint. In 12 of the 18 normal controls the ACL appeared convex toward the posterior side when the knee was extended and gradually became straight when the knee was flexed. In 15 of the 22 ACL graft patients the grafts appeared straight when the knee was extended and became convex toward the anterior side when the knee was flexed. It is concluded that the morphological changes seen on MR images of ACL grafts from when the knee is extended to when the knee is flexed are different from those in the normal ACL. (orig.). With 7 figs., 1 tab

  18. Rapid Hamstrings/Quadriceps strength in ACL-reconstructed elite alpine ski racers

    Jordan, Matthew J; Aagaard, Per; Herzog, Walter

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Due to the importance of hamstrings (HAM) and quadriceps (QUAD) strength for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention, and the high incidence of ACL injury in ski racing, HAM and QUAD maximal and explosive strength was assessed in ski racers with and without ACL reconstruction ...... QUAD strength assessments in the physical evaluation of uninjured skiers. Further, HAM and QUAD strength should be assessed over a long-term period following surgery to identify chronic strength deficits in ACL-R ski racers.......PURPOSE: Due to the importance of hamstrings (HAM) and quadriceps (QUAD) strength for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention, and the high incidence of ACL injury in ski racing, HAM and QUAD maximal and explosive strength was assessed in ski racers with and without ACL reconstruction...... and RTD (per kg body mass) were calculated for the uninjured group to compare between sexes, and to compare the control group with the ACL-R limb and unaffected limb of the ACL-R skiers. H/Q MVC and RTD strength ratios were also compared RESULTS: The ACL-R limb demonstrated significant HAM and QUAD...

  19. Electrospinning polymer blends for biomimetic scaffolds for ACL tissue engineering

    Garcia, Vanessa Lizeth

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is one of the most common knee injuries. Current ACL reconstructive strategies consist of using an autograft or an allograft to replace the ligament. However, limitations have led researchers to create tissue engineered grafts, known as scaffolds, through electrospinning. Scaffolds made of natural and synthetic polymer blends have the potential to promote cell adhesion while having strong mechanical properties. However, enzymes found in the knee are known to degrade tissues and affect the healing of intra-articular injuries. Results suggest that the natural polymers used in this study modify the thermal properties and tensile strength of the synthetic polymers when blended. Scanning electron microscopy display bead-free and enzyme biodegradability of the fibers. Raman spectroscopy confirms the presence of the natural and synthetic polymers in the scaffolds while, amino acid analysis present the types of amino acids and their concentrations found in the natural polymers.

  20. Knee kinematics and kinetics in former soccer players with a 16-year-old ACL injury – the effects of twelve weeks of knee-specific training

    Holmström Eva

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Training of neuromuscular control has become increasingly important and plays a major role in rehabilitation of subjects with an injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL. Little is known, however, of the influence of this training on knee stiffness during loading. Increased knee stiffness occurs as a loading strategy of ACL-injured subjects and is associated with increased joint contact forces. Increased or altered joint loads contribute to the development of osteoarthritis. The aim of the study was to determine if knee stiffness, defined by changes in knee kinetics and kinematics of gait, step activity and cross-over hop could be reduced through a knee-specific 12-week training programme. Methods A 3-dimensional motion analysis system (VICON and a force plate (AMTI were used to calculate knee kinetics and kinematics before and after 12 weeks of knee-specific training in 12 males recruited from a cohort with ACL injury 16 years earlier. Twelve uninjured males matched for age, sex, BMI and activity level served as a reference group. Self-reported patient-relevant data were obtained by the KOOS questionnaire. Results There were no significant changes in knee stiffness during gait and step activity after training. For the cross-over hop, increased peak knee flexion during landing (from 44 to 48 degrees, p = 0.031 and increased internal knee extensor moment (1.28 to 1.55 Nm/kg, p = 0.017 were seen after training, indicating reduced knee stiffness. The KOOS sport and recreation score improved from 70 to 77 (p = 0.005 and was significantly correlated with the changes in knee flexion during landing for the cross-over hop (r = 0.6, p = 0.039. Conclusion Knee-specific training improved lower extremity kinetics and kinematics, indicating reduced knee stiffness during demanding hop activity. Self-reported sport and recreational function correlated positively with the biomechanical changes supporting a clinical importance of the

  1. ACL mismatch reconstructions: influence of different tunnel placement strategies in single-bundle ACL reconstructions on the knee kinematics.

    Herbort, Mirco; Lenschow, Simon; Fu, Freddie H; Petersen, Wolf; Zantop, Thore

    2010-11-01

    To evaluate the influence of tibial and femoral tunnel position in ACL reconstruction on knee kinematics, we compared ACL reconstruction with a tibial and femoral tunnel in anteromedial (AM-AM reconstruction) and in posterolateral footprint (PL-PL reconstruction) with a reconstruction technique with tibial posterolateral and femoral anteromedial tunnel placement (PL-AM reconstruction). In 9 fresh-frozen human cadaveric knees, the knee kinematics under simulated Lachman (134 N anterior tibial load) and a simulated pivot shift test (10 N/m valgus and 4 N/m internal tibial torque) were determined at 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of flexion. Kinematics were recorded for intact, ACL-deficient, and single-bundle ACL reconstructed knees using three different reconstruction strategies in randomized order: (1) PL-AM, (2) AM-AM and (3) PL-PL reconstructions. Under simulated Lachman test, single-bundle PL-AM reconstruction and PL-PL reconstructions both showed significantly increased anterior tibial translation (ATT) at 60° and 90° when compared to the intact knee. At all flexion angles, AM-AM reconstruction did not show any statistical significant differences in ATT compared to the intact knee. Under simulated pivot shift, PL-AM reconstruction resulted in significantly higher ATT at 0°, 30°, and 60° knee flexion and AM-AM reconstructions showed significantly higher ATT at 30° compared to the intact knee. PL-PL reconstructions did not show any significant differences to the intact knee. AM-AM reconstructions restore the intact knee kinematics more closely when compared to a PL-AM technique resembling a transtibial approach. PL-PL reconstructions showed increased ATT at higher flexion angles, however, secured the rotational stability at all flexion angles. Due to the independent tibial and femoral tunnel location, a medial portal technique may be superior to a transtibial approach. PMID:20461359

  2. Spectrum of injuries associated with paediatric ACL tears: an MRI pictorial review

    Jacob L Jaremko; Ghuenter, Zachary D; Jans, Lennart; MacMahon, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Objective Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury are well known, but most published reviews show obvious examples of associated injuries and give little focus to paediatric patients. Here, we demonstrate the spectrum of MRI appearances at common sites of associated injury in adolescents with ACL tears, emphasising age-specific issues. Methods Pictorial review using images from children with surgically confirmed ACL tears after athletic injury. Res...

  3. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear in an Athlete: Does Increased Heel Loading Contribute to ACL Rupture?

    Burkhart, Bradd; Ford, Kevin R.; Myer, Gregory D; Heidt, Robert S.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2008-01-01

    Rupture to the anterior cruciate ligament is a common athletic injury in American football. The lower extremity biomechanics related to increased ACL injury risk are not completely understood. However, foot landing has been purported to be a significant contributing factor to the ACL injury mechanism. In this case report, information is presented on an athlete previously tested for in-shoe loading patterns on artificial turf and subsequently went on to non-contact ACL rupture on the same surf...

  4. The evolution of ACL reconstruction over the last fifty years

    Chambat, Pierre; Guier, Christian; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Fayard, Jean-Marie; Thaunat, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has evolved considerably over the past 30 years. This has largely been due to a better understanding of ACL anatomy and in particular a precise description of the femoral and tibial insertions of its two bundles. In the 1980s, the gold standard was anteromedial bundle reconstruction using the middle third of the patellar ligament. Insufficient control of rotational laxity led to the development of double bundle ACL reconstruction. This concept, ...

  5. A tale of 10 European centres – 2010 APOSSM travelling fellowship review in ACL surgery

    Lee Yee Han; Kuroda Ryosuke; Zhao Jinzhong; Chan Kai

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of ESSKA- APOSSM Travelling fellowship is to better understand the epidemiology, management and surgical techniques for sports across continents. There has been a progressive evolution in ACL reconstruction and there is variation in technique in ACL reconstruction amongst the most experienced surgeons in different continents. During this one month fellowship, we saw various ACL reconstruction techniques using different graft sources, with a variety of graft fixation metho...

  6. Injury Risk Estimation Expertise: Interdisciplinary Differences in Performance on the ACL Injury Risk Estimation Quiz

    Petushek, Erich J.; Ward, Paul; Cokely, Edward T.; Myer, Gregory D

    2015-01-01

    Background: Simple observational assessment of movement is a potentially low-cost method for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury screening and prevention. Although many individuals utilize some form of observational assessment of movement, there are currently no substantial data on group skill differences in observational screening of ACL injury risk. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to compare various groups’ abilities to visually assess ACL injury risk as well as the as...

  7. Visual estimation of ACL injury risk: Efficient assessment method, group differences, and expertise mechanisms

    Petushek, Erich J.; Cokely, Edward T.; Ward, Paul; Durocher, John; Wallace, Sean; Myer, Gregory D

    2015-01-01

    Simple observational assessment of movement quality (e.g., drop vertical jump biomechanics) is an efficient and low cost method for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury screening and prevention. A recently developed test (see www.ACL-IQ.org) has revealed substantial cross-professional/group differences in visual ACL injury risk estimation skill. Specifically, parents, sport coaches, and to some degree sports medicine physicians, would likely benefit from training or the use of decision sup...

  8. Comparison of Two Methods to Measure Return to Sports after Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Reconstruction

    Yabroudi, Mohammad A.; Muller, Bart; Lai, Chung-Liang; Andrew, Lynch; Oostdyk, Alicia; Fu, Freddie H; Harner, Christopher D.; Irrgang, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Return to sports (RTS) is a primary goal for ACL reconstruction. Recent studies indicate that return to prior level of sports participation is poor with only 45% of patients having returned to sport.1 The purpose of this study was to evaluate return to pre-injury level of sports participation after ACL reconstruction using a strict comprehensive definition for RTS. Methods: Participants who were 1 to 5 years after ACL reconstruction completed a survey to determine their pre-and po...

  9. The popliteal fibular ligament in acute knee trauma: patterns of injury on MR imaging

    McKean, D.; Thomee, E.; Grant, D.; Teh, J.L.; Mansour, R. [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom); Yoong, P. [Royal Berkshire NHS Foundation Trust, Royal Berkshire Hospital, Reading (United Kingdom); Yanny, S. [Buckinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust, Stoke Mandeville Hospital, Aylesbury (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    To describe the patterns of injury associated with injury to the popliteofibular ligament injury. A retrospective review was performed of 180 MRI scans undertaken for acute knee trauma. Scans were excluded if the time of injury was over 4 weeks from the time of the scan, or if there was a history of septic arthritis, inflammatory arthropathy, previous knee surgery, or significant artefact. An agreed criterion for assessing the structures of the posterolateral ligamentous complex was defined and in each scan, the popliteofibular ligament (PFL) was scored as normal or injured. The menisci, ligaments, and tendons of each knee were also assessed. The mean age was 25.7 years (range, 9-65 years) and 72.2 % (n = 130) patients were male. The PFL was injured in 36 cases (20 %). There is a significant association between PFL injury and ACL rupture (p = 0.0001), ITB injury (p = 0.0001), PCL injury (p = 0.0373), in addition to associations with injury to other posterolateral corner structures including the lateral collateral ligament (p = 0.0001), biceps femoris tendon (p = 0.0014), and popliteus tendon (p = 0.0014). Of our series of PFL injuries, nine cases (25 %) were associated with further injuries of posterolateral corner structures and in 27 cases (75 %) the PFL was the only posterolateral corner structure torn. PFL injury is not uncommon in acute knee trauma and is associated with significant internal derangement of the knee, especially anterior cruciate ligament rupture, ITB sprain, and injury to other structures within the posterolateral corner. (orig.)

  10. The popliteal fibular ligament in acute knee trauma: patterns of injury on MR imaging

    To describe the patterns of injury associated with injury to the popliteofibular ligament injury. A retrospective review was performed of 180 MRI scans undertaken for acute knee trauma. Scans were excluded if the time of injury was over 4 weeks from the time of the scan, or if there was a history of septic arthritis, inflammatory arthropathy, previous knee surgery, or significant artefact. An agreed criterion for assessing the structures of the posterolateral ligamentous complex was defined and in each scan, the popliteofibular ligament (PFL) was scored as normal or injured. The menisci, ligaments, and tendons of each knee were also assessed. The mean age was 25.7 years (range, 9-65 years) and 72.2 % (n = 130) patients were male. The PFL was injured in 36 cases (20 %). There is a significant association between PFL injury and ACL rupture (p = 0.0001), ITB injury (p = 0.0001), PCL injury (p = 0.0373), in addition to associations with injury to other posterolateral corner structures including the lateral collateral ligament (p = 0.0001), biceps femoris tendon (p = 0.0014), and popliteus tendon (p = 0.0014). Of our series of PFL injuries, nine cases (25 %) were associated with further injuries of posterolateral corner structures and in 27 cases (75 %) the PFL was the only posterolateral corner structure torn. PFL injury is not uncommon in acute knee trauma and is associated with significant internal derangement of the knee, especially anterior cruciate ligament rupture, ITB sprain, and injury to other structures within the posterolateral corner. (orig.)

  11. Full-thickness cartilage lesion do not affect knee function in patients with ACL injury

    2011-01-01

    Full-thickness cartilage lesion do not affect knee function in patients with ACL injury Abstract There is debate in the literature regarding the impact of full-thickness cartilage lesion on knee function in patients with ACL injury. The hypothesis of this study is that a full-thickness cartilage lesion at the time of ACL reconstruction does not influence knee function as measured by the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) in patients with ACL injury. Of the 4,849 prim...

  12. In vitro comparison of human fibroblasts from intact and ruptured ACL for use in tissue engineering

    T Brune

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study compares fibroblasts extracted from intact and ruptured human anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL for creation of a tissue engineered ACL-construct, made of porcine small intestinal submucosal extracellular matrix (SIS-ECM seeded with these ACL cells. The comparison is based on histological, immunohistochemical and RT-PCR analyses. Differences were observed between cells in a ruptured ACL (rACL and cells in an intact ACL (iACL, particularly with regard to the expression of integrin subunits and smooth muscle actin (SMA. Despite these differences in the cell source, both cell populations behaved similarly when seeded on an SIS-ECM scaffold, with similar cell morphology, connective tissue organization and composition, SMA and integrin expression. This study shows the usefulness of naturally occurring scaffolds such as SIS-ECM for the study of cell behaviour in vitro, and illustrates the possibility to use autologous cells extracted from ruptured ACL biopsies as a source for tissue engineered ACL constructs.

  13. Pain analgesia among adolescent self-injurers.

    Glenn, Jeffrey J; Michel, Bethany D; Franklin, Joseph C; Hooley, Jill M; Nock, Matthew K

    2014-12-30

    Although non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) involves self-inflicted physical harm, many self-injurers report feeling little or no pain during the act. Here we test: (1) whether the pain analgesia effects observed among adult self-injurers are also present among adolescents, and (2) three potential explanatory models proposing that habituation, dissociation, and/or self-criticism help explain the association between NSSI and pain analgesia among adolescents. Participants were 79 adolescents (12-19 years) recruited from the community who took part in a laboratory-based pain study. Results revealed that adolescent self-injurers have a higher pain threshold and greater pain endurance than non-injurers. Statistical mediation models revealed that the habituation and dissociation models were not supported; however, a self-critical style does mediate the association between NSSI and pain analgesia. The present findings extend earlier work by highlighting that a self-critical style may help to explain why self-injurers exhibit pain analgesia. Specifically, the tendency to experience self-critical thoughts in response to stressful events may represent a third variable that increases the likelihood of both NSSI and pain analgesia. Prospective experimental studies are needed to replicate and tease apart the direction of these associations, and may provide valuable leads in the development of effective treatments for this dangerous behavior problem. PMID:25172611

  14. Computerized tomography examination of injured spleen

    In blunt abdominal injury, the spleen is most frequently injured. A rapid and accurate diagnosis of the injured spleen is therefore of great importance for early and correct therapeutic management. A group is discussed of 56 patients who were examined in the years 1981-1987 after blunt injury of the abdomen by computerized tomography. Computerized tomography is a very useful method which allows rapid and accurate noninvasive diagnosis of different degrees of spleen injury and its possible complications. In comparison with other methods, computerized tomography is the most effective method providing comprehensive information on other organs in the abdominal cavity. It also allows noninvasive examination of severely injured patients and of non-cooperating patients. (author). 6 figs., 1 tab., 15 refs

  15. ATP released by injured neurons activates Schwann cells

    Samuele eNegro

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Injured nerve terminals of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs can regenerate. This remarkable and complex response is governed by molecular signals that are exchanged among the cellular components of this synapse: motor axon nerve terminal (MAT, perisynaptic Schwann cells (PSCs, and muscle fibre. The nature of signals that govern MAT regeneration is ill-known. In the present study the spider toxin α-Latrotoxin has been used as tool to investigate the mechanisms underlying peripheral neuroregeneration. Indeed this neurotoxin induces an acute, specific, localized and fully reversible damage of the presynaptic nerve terminal, and its action mimics the cascade of events that leads to nerve terminal degeneration in injured patients and in many neurodegenerative conditions. Here we provide evidence of an early release by degenerating neurons of ATP as alarm messenger, that contributes to the activation of a series of intracellular pathways within SCs that are crucial for nerve regeneration: Ca2+, cAMP, ERK1/2, and CREB. These results contribute to define the cross-talk taking place among degenerating nerve terminals and PSCs, involved in the functional recovery of the NMJ.

  16. Quality of Movement for Athletes Six Months Post ACL Reconstruction

    deMille, Polly; Nguyen, Joseph; Brown, Allison; Do, Huong; Selvaggio, Elizabeth; Chiaia, Theresa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention programs evaluate quality of movement (QM) to identify and correct high-risk movement patterns. However, return to play (RTP) decisions post-ACL reconstruction (ACLR) are often based on non-sport relatedquantitative measures such as isokinetic tests and/or time from surgery, with six months post-ACLR being a common expectation for RTP. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether athletes are ready to RTP 6 months post ACLR using a QM assessment (QMA). Methods: A QMA including nine dynamic tasks (squat, single leg [SL] stance, step down, SL squat, jump in place, side to side jump, broad jump, hop to opposite, SL hop) progressing from double- to single-limb vertical and horizontal movements was administered to 136 athletes at five to seven months post-ACLR. Tasks were viewed from the frontal and sagittal planes by a physical therapist and performance specialist. Movements were evaluated live for risk factors associated with ACL injury (strategy, depth, control, symmetry, and alignment). The proportion of patients exhibiting risky movement patterns for each task was calculated. Fisher’s Exact test was used to determine if there were differences in movement patterns between males and females. Results: The proportion of patients demonstrating risky movement patterns for a task ranged from 48% to 100%. All 136 patients exhibited risky movement patterns for at least one task and 60% of patients displayed risky movement patterns in five or more of the nine tasks. Rates of risky movement patterns were not different between males and females for all tasks (P>0.1 for all tasks). Conclusion: Six months has been cited as a probable time for RTP post-ACLR; thus this is the expectation of the athlete. Our data show that athletes demonstrate multiple QM patterns associated with initial ACL injury, as well as 2nd injury at five to seven months post-operatively. Altered movement patterns evident in tasks as

  17. Dual ACL Ganglion Cysts: Significance of Detailed Arthroscopy

    Samarth Mittal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intra-articular ganglion cysts of the knee joint are rare and most frequently are an incidental finding on MRI and arthroscopy. Most of the previous studies have reported a single ganglion cyst in the knee. There have been previous reports of more than one cyst in the same knee but not in the same structure within the knee. We are reporting a case of dual ACL (anterior cruciate ligament ganglion cysts one of which was missed on radiological examination but later detected during arthroscopy. To the best of our knowledge, no such case has been reported in the indexed English literature till date.

  18. Dual ACL Ganglion Cysts: Significance of Detailed Arthroscopy

    Samarth Mittal; Amit Singla; Nag, H. L.; Sanjay Meena; Ramprakash Lohiya; Abhinav Agarwal

    2014-01-01

    Intra-articular ganglion cysts of the knee joint are rare and most frequently are an incidental finding on MRI and arthroscopy. Most of the previous studies have reported a single ganglion cyst in the knee. There have been previous reports of more than one cyst in the same knee but not in the same structure within the knee. We are reporting a case of dual ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) ganglion cysts one of which was missed on radiological examination but later detected during arthroscopy. ...

  19. MRI diagnosis of ACL bundle tears: value of oblique axial imaging

    Ng, Alex W.H.; Griffith, James F.; Hung, Esther H.Y. [Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong SAR (China); Law, Kan Yip; Yung, Patrick S.H. [Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2013-02-15

    To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of oblique axial intermediate weighting MR imaging in detecting partial thickness anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) bundle tears. The study protocol was approved by the institutional ethics committee. Sixty-one subjects (43 male, 18 female; mean age 27.4 years; range 9 to 57 years) with clinically suspected ACL tear or meniscal tear between September 2009 and January 2011 were studied with MRI and arthroscopy. Detection of partial tear for the ACL as a whole and for each ACL bundle by protocol A (standard orthogonal sequences) and protocol B (standard orthogonal sequences plus oblique axial intermediate weighted imaging) was compared in a blinded fashion. Performance characteristics for protocol A and protocol B were compared using sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and ROC curves. A two-tailed p value of <0.05 indicated statistical significance. Fifteen (24.6%) normal, 15 (24.6%) partial and 31 complete tears were diagnosed by arthroscopy. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of protocol A for the diagnosis of partial tear of the ACL was 33%, 87% and 74%, while for protocol B the values were 87%, 87% and 87% respectively. The area under the curve (AUC) for the diagnosis of partial ACL tear and individual bundle tear was higher for protocol B, although this difference did not reach statistical significance (p > 0.05). The addition of oblique axial imaging to standard MR imaging improves diagnostic accuracy for detecting partial tears of the ACL as well as individual bundle tears of the ACL. (orig.)

  20. Proceedings 10th International Workshop on the ACL2 Theorem Prover and its Applications

    Hardin, David; 10.4204/EPTCS.70

    2011-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of ACL2 2011, the International Workshop on the ACL2 Theorem Prover and its Applications. The workshop was held in Austin, Texas, USA, on November 3-4 2011. ACL2 2011 is the tenth in a series of workshops on the ACL2 Theorem Prover and its Applications. The workshop was co-located with the eleventh Conference on Formal Methods in Computer Aided Design (FMCAD'11). The ACL2 Workshop series provide a major technical forum for researchers to present and discuss improvements and extensions to the theorem prover, comparisons of ACL2 with other systems, and applications of ACL2 in formal verification or formalized mathematics. Workshops have been held at approxiamately 18 month intervals since 1999. ACL2 is the most recent incarnation of the Boyer-Moore family of theorem provers, for which, Robert Boyer, Matt Kaufmann and J Strother Moore received the 2005 ACM Software System Award. It is state-of-the-art automated reasoning system that has been successfully used in academia, gov...

  1. Evaluating ACLS Algorithms for the International Space Station (ISS) - A Paradigm Revisited

    Alexander, Dave; Brandt, Keith; Locke, James; Hurst, Victor, IV; Mack, Michael D.; Pettys, Marianne; Smart, Kieran

    2007-01-01

    The ISS may have communication gaps of up to 45 minutes during each orbit and therefore it is imperative to have medical protocols, including an effective ACLS algorithm, that can be reliably autonomously executed during flight. The aim of this project was to compare the effectiveness of the current ACLS algorithm with an improved algorithm having a new navigation format.

  2. Lower extremity performance following ACL rehabilitation in the KANON-trial

    Ericsson, Ylva B; Roos, Ewa M.; Frobell, Richard B

    2013-01-01

    The additional effect of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction on muscle strength and physical performance after a structured exercise programme is not well understood.......The additional effect of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction on muscle strength and physical performance after a structured exercise programme is not well understood....

  3. Initial Experiments with TPTP-style Automated Theorem Provers on ACL2 Problems

    Joosten, SJC Sebastiaan; Kaliszyk, C.; Urban, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports our initial experiments with using external ATP on some corpora built with the ACL2 system. This is intended to provide the first estimate about the usefulness of such external reasoning and AI systems for solving ACL2 problems.

  4. The role of oblique axial MR imaging in the diagnosis of ACL bundle lesions

    Heba Ahmed Kamal

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Compared with standard MR imaging, the addition of oblique axial imaging improves the diagnostic accuracy for detecting lesions of the ACL, including both bundles’ delineation. This imaging plane seems to provide a useful adjunct to standard MR imaging when ACL lesion is suspected.

  5. THE EFFECTS OF MODIFIED POSTERIOR TIBIAL SLOPE ON ACL STRAIN AND KNEE KINEMATICS: A HUMAN CADAVERIC STUDY

    Fening, Stephen D.; Kovacic, Jeffrey; Kambic, Helen; McLean, Scott; Scott, Jacob; Miniaci, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Increases to the posterior tibial slope can lead to an anterior shift in tibial resting position. However, the effect of this shift on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) strain has not been investigated sufficiently. This study examined the relationship between increased tibial slope and ACL strain, as well as the subsequent kinematics of the tibiofemoral joint. We hypothesized increases in slope would shift the tibia anterior relative to the femur and increase ACL strain. ACL strain measuremen...

  6. Stress During ACLS Courses: Is it Important for Learning Skills?

    Emilton Lima Júnior

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the influence of stress on teaching medical emergencies in an Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS course and to verify this influence on learning, and the efficiency of emergency care training. METHODS: Seventeen physicians signed up for an ACLS course. Their pulses were taken and blood pressure (BP verified on the first day, before the beginning of the course, and on the second day, during the theoretical and practical test (TPT. Variations in pulse rates and BP were compared with students' test grades. Then, students answered a questionnaire of variables (QV about the amount of sleep they had during the course, the quantity of study material and the time spent studying for the course, and a stress scale graphic. RESULTS: Seven students had a pulse variation less than 10% between the 2 periods and 10 had a 10% or more variation. Grades on TPT were, respectively, 91.4±2.4 and 87.3±5.2 (p<0.05. Six students had a BP variation less than 20 mmHg, and in 11 it varied more than 21 mmHg. Grades on the TPT were 92.3±3.3 and 86.2± 8.1, respectively (p<0.05. The QV dates did not significantly influence grades. CONCLUSION: Stress, as an isolated variable, had a negative influence on the learning process and on the efficiency of emergency training in this situation.

  7. 76 FR 61061 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...

    2011-10-03

    ... is 38,146 mt and 0 mt of the sub-ACL is set aside for research (75 FR 48874, August 12, 2010). The... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch Limit) Harvested for Management... day until January 1, 2012, when the 2012 sub-ACL (annual catch limit) for Area 3 becomes...

  8. 76 FR 66654 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...

    2011-10-27

    ... 1A is 26,546 mt, and 0 mt of the sub-ACL is set aside for research (75 FR 48874, August 12, 2010... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch Limit) Harvested for Management... specification of the overfishing limit, acceptable biological catch, annual catch limit (ACL), optimum...

  9. 78 FR 21071 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...

    2013-04-09

    ...-ACL is set aside for research (75 FR 48874, August 12, 2010). The regulations at Sec. 648.201 require... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch Limit) Harvested for Management..., acceptable biological catch, annual catch limit (ACL), optimum yield, domestic harvest and processing,...

  10. 77 FR 10668 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...

    2012-02-23

    ... 22,146 mt, and 0 mt of the sub-ACL is set aside for research (75 FR 48874, August 12, 2010). Section... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch Limit) Harvested for Management... the overfishing limit, acceptable biological catch, annual catch limit (ACL), optimum yield,...

  11. 76 FR 61059 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...

    2011-10-03

    ...,362 mt and 0 mt of the sub-ACL is set aside for research (75 FR 48874, August 12, 2010). The... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch Limit) Harvested for Management... calendar day until January 1, 2012, when the 2012 sub-ACL for Area 1B becomes available, except...

  12. Lymph is not a Plasma Ultrafiltrate: A Proteomic Analysis of Injured Patients

    Dzieciatkowska, Monika; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Moore, Ernest E; Wohlauer, Max; Banerjee, Anirban; Silliman, Christopher C.; Hansen, Kirk C.

    2014-01-01

    Studies on animal models have documented a role for the water soluble protein fraction of mesenteric lymph as a conduit from hemorrhagic shock to acute lung injury and post-injury multiple organ failure. We hypothesize that mesenteric lymph is not an ultrafiltrate of plasma and contains specific protein mediators that may predispose patients to ALI/MOF. Mesenteric lymph and plasma were collected from critically ill or injured patients and from nine patients with lymphatic injuries, during sem...

  13. Accuracy of nonorthogonal MR imaging in acute disruption of the anterior cruciate ligament

    This paper reports on a prospective study of 120 patients with suspected acute internal derangement of the knee undertaken to compare orthogonal, sagittal, T1-weighted MR imaging with nonorthogonal (oblique), sagittal, T2-weighted MR imaging in the evaluation of injuries of the anterior cruciated ligament (ACL). When an unidentified ACL (13%) was regarded as presenting a complete ACL disruption, orthogonal and nonorthogonal MR imaging had sensitivities of 70.5% and 100% specificities of 94.2% and 100%, accuracies of 87.1% and 100% positive predictive values of 80% and 100% and negative predictive values of 81.5% and 100%, respectively

  14. Knee functional recovery and limb-to-limb symmetry restoration after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture and ACL reconstruction

    Nawasreh, Zakariya Hussein

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common sport injury of young athletes who participate in jumping, cutting, and pivoting activities. Although ACL reconstruction (ACLR) surgery has the goal of enabling athletes to return to preinjury activity levels, treatment results often fall short of this goal. The outcomes after ACLR are variable and less than optimal with low rate of return to preinjury activity level and high risk for second ACL injury. Factors related to the knee functional limitations, strength deficits, and limb-to-limb movement asymmetry may be associated with poor outcomes after ACLR. Additionally, the criteria that are used to determine a patient's readiness to return to the preinjury activity level are undefined which may also be associated with poor outcomes after ACLR. The clinical decision-making to clear patients' for safe and successful return to high physical activities should be based on a universal comprehensive set of objective criteria that ensure normal knee function and limb-to-limb symmetry. A battery of return to activity criteria (RTAC) that emphases normal knee function and limb-to-limb movement symmetry has been constituted to better ensure safe and successful return to preinjury activity level. Yet, only variables related to patients' demographics, concomitant injuries, and treatment measures have been used to predict return to preinjury activity levels after ACLR. However, the ability of RTAC variables that ensure normal knee function and limb movement symmetry to predict the return to participate in the same preinjury activity level after ACLR has not been investigated. In light of this background, the first aim of the present study was to compare functional knee performance-based and patient-reported measures of those who PASS and who FAIL on RTAC at 6 months (6-M) following ACLR with those at 12 months (12-M) and 24 months (24-M) following ACLR and to determine how performance-based and patient-reported measures

  15. A Note on Optimal Care by Wealth-Constrained Injurers

    Thomas J. Miceli; Kathleen Segerson

    2001-01-01

    This paper clarifies the relationship between an injurer's wealth level and his care choice by highlighting the distinction between monetary and non-monetary care. When care is non-monetary, wealth-constrained injurers generally take less than optimal care, and care is increasing in their wealth level under both strict liability and negligence. In contrast, when care is monetary, injurers may take too much or too little care under strict liability, and care is not strictly increasing in injur...

  16. Translation and measurement properties of the Swedish version of ACL-Return to Sports after Injury questionnaire

    Kvist, Joanna; Österberg, Annika; Gauffin, Håkan; Tagesson (Sonesson), Sofi; Webster, K.; Ardern, C.

    2013-01-01

    Psychological factors may be a hindrance for returning to sport after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The ACL-Return to Sport after Injury scale (ACL-RSI) measures athletes emotions, confidence in performance, and risk appraisal in relation to return to sport. The aim of this study was to translate the ACL-RSI scale from English to Swedish and to examine some of the measurement properties of the Swedish version. The ACL-RSI was translated and culturally adapted. A professi...

  17. A-B Hourglass Technique in Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Reconstruction

    Within a period of 2 years starting from April 2000 to November 2002, fifty (50) cases of torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) were treated and followed up using our simple modified technique in a retrospective non-randomized study conducted in Saudi-German Hospital, Saudi Arabia. All of which had torn ACL either isolated or associated with meniscal tear. Some of our study group was subjected arthroscopic interference in the same knee before either in the form of ACL reconstruction using P-T-B graft or for menisectomy. During this study per-operative evaluation, intra-operative technique and post-operative follow-up were standardized, with maximum follow-up period of 19 months and minimum follow-up period of 9 month. The final outcome was graded according to Lyshom knee score (1982). The mean age at surgery was 26.5 (from 17 to 36 years). The study group included 11 isolated torn ACL, 29 torn ACL with tear in the medial meniscus, 4 torn ACL with lateral meniscus tear and 6 cases with torn ACL associated with tear in both menisci. All of the cases were treated using the same technique. (author)

  18. Prognosis and predictors of ACL reconstructions using the MOON cohort: a model for comparative effectiveness studies.

    Spindler, Kurt P; Parker, Richard D; Andrish, Jack T; Kaeding, Christopher C; Wright, Rick W; Marx, Robert G; McCarty, Eric C; Amendola, Annunziato; Dunn, Warren R; Huston, Laura J; Harrell, Frank E

    2013-01-01

    Injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) threatens an active lifestyle and exposes the patient to risk of early osteoarthritis (OA). ACL reconstruction is typically chosen by individuals to allow a return to their previous work and sports activities. Primary ACL reconstruction (ACLR) has in general been effective at restoring functional stability, but patients' modifiable predictors of both short- and long-term validated outcomes and OA are largely unknown. The Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) consortium was established in 2002 to enroll and longitudinally follow a population cohort of ACL reconstructed patients. The objective was to establish patient-specific predictive models of clinically important outcomes. Over the past 10 years, the overarching aims of this NIAMS-funded prospective multicenter cohort of ACL reconstructions has been threefold: (1) to identify both short- and long-term prognosis and predictors of sports function, activity level, and general health through validated patient-reported outcomes, (2) to identify the symptoms and signs of OA, and (3) to quantify the incidence of ACL reconstruction graft and/or contralateral ACL failures and additional surgical procedures. This manuscript summarizes the Kappa Delta Ann Doner Vaughan Award paper and presentation at the 2012 ORS/AAOS Annual Meeting. PMID:22912340

  19. Exciting innovations for the spinally injured

    Hunt, K.J.; McLean, A.N.

    2002-01-01

    Spinal injury can be devastating, resulting, as it often does, in some paralysis and loss of sensation. Engineering plays an important role in spinal cord injury rehabilitation. Here, the authors survey current research into the uses of functional electrical stimulation to improve the quality of life of spinally injured people. Touching on the area of spinal cord repair and nerve regeneration, they also consider the question of whether technology can help paraplegics to take steps again.

  20. Psychopathological responses of physically injured persons

    Lešić Aleksandar; Opalić Petar D.

    2003-01-01

    The idea to monitor and research psychopathological responses of physically injured persons in a more systematic manner has come from our observation of huge differences in patient behavior, whose psychological responses were noticeably changed and often inappropriate. The behavior aberrations were all the more striking because we treated wartime injuries in addition to peacetime ones. Our sample had 175 patient subjects, of both sexes different ages, marital status and professions. A group o...

  1. Transportation of the Critically Ill and Injured

    Ailsby, R L

    1987-01-01

    The introduction of cookbook-style protocols to emergency treatment of critically ill and injured patients has significantly improved the quality of pre-hospital care and the organization of transportation of these patients. The systematic implementation of pre-planned protocols by physicians, nursing staff, and ambulance personnel, combined with regular post-incident performance evaluations, will enhance the level of medical care both in large and small community settings.

  2. Narrating the self-injured body

    Chandler, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Illness narratives have traditionally been used as a conceptual tool for exploring experiences of chronic illness or disease. In this paper, I suggest that Frank's typology of illness narratives (chaos, restitution and quest) also offers an illuminating approach to analysing accounts of self-injury, demonstrating the diverse ways in which self-injury is practiced, experienced and narrated. Drawing on 24 narrative interviews with 12 people who had self-injured, I focus on participants’ account...

  3. Comparison of ACL strain estimated via a data-driven model with in vitro measurements.

    Weinhandl, Joshua T; Hoch, Matthew C; Bawab, Sebastian Y; Ringleb, Stacie I

    2016-11-01

    Computer modeling and simulation techniques have been increasingly used to investigate anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) loading during dynamic activities in an attempt to improve our understanding of injury mechanisms and development of injury prevention programs. However, the accuracy of many of these models remains unknown and thus the purpose of this study was to compare estimates of ACL strain from a previously developed three-dimensional, data-driven model with those obtained via in vitro measurements. ACL strain was measured as the knee was cycled from approximately 10° to 120° of flexion at 20 deg s(-1) with static loads of 100, 50, and 50 N applied to the quadriceps, biceps femoris and medial hamstrings (semimembranosus and semitendinosus) tendons, respectively. A two segment, five-degree-of-freedom musculoskeletal knee model was then scaled to match the cadaver's anthropometry and in silico ACL strains were then determined based on the knee joint kinematics and moments of force. Maximum and minimum ACL strains estimated in silico were within 0.2 and 0.42% of that measured in vitro, respectively. Additionally, the model estimated ACL strain with a bias (mean difference) of -0.03% and dynamic accuracy (rms error) of 0.36% across the flexion-extension cycle. These preliminary results suggest that the proposed model was capable of estimating ACL strains during a simple flexion-extension cycle. Future studies should validate the model under more dynamic conditions with variable muscle loading. This model could then be used to estimate ACL strains during dynamic sporting activities where ACL injuries are more common. PMID:27030937

  4. Developing a 6-DOF robot to investigate multi-axis ACL injuries under valgus loading coupled with tibia internal rotation.

    Ren, Yupeng; Jacobs, Benjamin J; Nuber, Gordon W; Koh, Jason L; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2010-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries have become more common in recent years as more young people participate in risky sporting activities [1]. Most ACL injuries occur as a result of noncontact mechanisms. Previous in vitro studies of ACL strain have found significant increases in ACL strain primarily with anterior directed force on the tibia relative to the femur and with internal rotation and often with valgus torque [2,3]. However, there remains significant controversy over the mechanisms of ACL failure and the forces on the knee that lead to injury. Some studies have also shown that isolated valgus loading may not load the ACL strongly. The goal of this study was to investigate the mechanism underlying valgus-related ACL injuries. An improved understanding of ACL failure may lead to improved ACL injury prevention programs. A novel 6 degrees of freedom (DOF) knee driving robot was developed in this study with a unique multi-axis simultaneous torque/position control. It was found that pure valgus torque caused a torque that internally rotated the tibia and thus increased ACL strain markedly, which may be an important mechanism underlying the rather common seemingly valgus-related ACL injuries. PMID:21097089

  5. Prevalens av kneartrose hos fotballspillere, og relasjonen til ACL-skade

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Football is the world biggest sport (7), and the estimates for ACL(Anterior Cruciate Ligament)-injuries varies; 0,06-3,7 for each 1000 playing-hours. (5,44) In Scandinavia football is the most common activity that leads to ACL-injury. (35) The objectives for this article are to investigate the radiological prevalence of osteoarthritis among former footballplayers, and the relation to ACL-injury. Methods: The data and material are mainly from unsystematic searches in PubMed and...

  6. Traumatically injured astrocytes release a proteomic signature modulated by STAT3-dependent cell survival.

    Levine, Jaclynn; Kwon, Eunice; Paez, Pablo; Yan, Weihong; Czerwieniec, Gregg; Loo, Joseph A; Sofroniew, Michael V; Wanner, Ina-Beate

    2016-05-01

    Molecular markers associated with CNS injury are of diagnostic interest. Mechanical trauma generates cellular deformation associated with membrane permeability with unknown molecular consequences. We used an in vitro model of stretch-injury and proteomic analyses to determine protein changes in murine astrocytes and their surrounding fluids. Abrupt pressure-pulse stretching resulted in the rapid release of 59 astrocytic proteins with profiles reflecting cell injury and cell death, i.e., mechanoporation and cell lysis. This acute trauma-release proteome was overrepresented with metabolic proteins compared with the uninjured cellular proteome, bearing relevance for post-traumatic metabolic depression. Astrocyte-specific deletion of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3-CKO) resulted in reduced stretch-injury tolerance, elevated necrosis and increased protein release. Consistent with more lysed cells, more protein complexes, nuclear and transport proteins were released from STAT3-CKO versus nontransgenic astrocytes. STAT3-CKO astrocytes had reduced basal expression of GFAP, lactate dehydrogenase B (LDHB), aldolase C (ALDOC), and astrocytic phosphoprotein 15 (PEA15), and elevated levels of tropomyosin (TPM4) and α actinin 4 (ACTN4). Stretching caused STAT3-dependent cellular depletion of PEA15 and GFAP, and its filament disassembly in subpopulations of injured astrocytes. PEA15 and ALDOC signals were low in injured astrocytes acutely after mouse spinal cord crush injury and were robustly expressed in reactive astrocytes 1 day postinjury. In contrast, α crystallin (CRYAB) was present in acutely injured astrocytes, and absent from uninjured and reactive astrocytes, demonstrating novel marker differences among postinjury astrocytes. These findings reveal a proteomic signature of traumatically-injured astrocytes reflecting STAT3-dependent cellular survival with potential diagnostic value. GLIA 2016;64:668-694. PMID:26683444

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the normal and chronically injured adult rat spinal cord in vivo

    We assessed the capacity of MRI to show and characterise the spinal cord (SC) in vivo in normal and chronically injured adult rats. In the chronically injured animals the SC was studied by MRI and histological examination. MRI was performed at 1.5 T, using gradient-echo and spin-echo (SE) sequences, the latter with and without gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA). Several positions were tried for good alignment and to diminish interference by respiratory movements. Images of the SC were obtained in sagittal, coronal, and axial planes. Normal SC was observed as a continuous intensity in both sequences, although contrast resolution was better using SE; it was not possible to differentiate the grey and white matter. Low signal was seen in the damaged area in chronically injured rats, which corresponded to cysts, trabeculae, mononuclear infiltrate, and fibroglial wall on histological examination. Gd-DTPA failed to enhance the SC in normal or chronically injured rats. It did, however, cause enhancement of the lesion after acute SC injury. (orig.)

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of the normal and chronically injured adult rat spinal cord in vivo

    Guizar-Sahagun, G. (Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico) Dept. of Clinical Research in Neurology and Neurosurgery, Hospital de Especialidades, Centro Medico Nacional Siglo XXI, Inst. Mexicano del Seguro Social, Mexico City (Mexico)); Rivera, F. (Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico)); Babinski, E. (Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico)); Berlanga, E. (Dept. of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Hospital Angeles del Pedregal, Mexico City (Mexico)); Madrazo, M. (Dept. of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Hospital Angeles del Pedregal, Mexico City (Mexico)); Franco-Bourland, R. (Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico) Dept. of Biochemistry, Inst. Nacional de la Nutricion, Mexico City (Mexico)); Grijalva, I. (Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico) Dept. of Clinical Research in Neurology and Neurosurgery, Hospital de Especialidades, Centro Medico Nacional Siglo

    1994-08-01

    We assessed the capacity of MRI to show and characterise the spinal cord (SC) in vivo in normal and chronically injured adult rats. In the chronically injured animals the SC was studied by MRI and histological examination. MRI was performed at 1.5 T, using gradient-echo and spin-echo (SE) sequences, the latter with and without gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA). Several positions were tried for good alignment and to diminish interference by respiratory movements. Images of the SC were obtained in sagittal, coronal, and axial planes. Normal SC was observed as a continuous intensity in both sequences, although contrast resolution was better using SE; it was not possible to differentiate the grey and white matter. Low signal was seen in the damaged area in chronically injured rats, which corresponded to cysts, trabeculae, mononuclear infiltrate, and fibroglial wall on histological examination. Gd-DTPA failed to enhance the SC in normal or chronically injured rats. It did, however, cause enhancement of the lesion after acute SC injury. (orig.)

  9. Can MRI distinguish between acute partial and complete anterior cruciate ligament tear?

    A study to elucidate the title problem was done. Subjects were 8 patients with partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear diagnosed by both MRI and arthroscopy within 6 weeks after trauma, 14 patients with complete ACL tear diagnosed similarly and 10 control patients with arthroscopically intact ACL. Proton density-and T2-weighted MRI imaging of the sagittal section of the knee was performed with 1.5 T magnets (Siemens Magnetom H15, Shimadzu SMT150GUX) by using a dedicated knee coil, with slice thickness of 4-5 mm and 14-16 cm field of view. The examination was done on the primary (discontinuity of low signal band, abnormal axis of the ligament and focal or diffuse increased signal intensity) and secondary (bone bruise, anterior translocation of the tibia and PCL curvature value) signs of ACL tear. In proton density-weighted sagittal images, it was found easy to distinguish acute partial ACL tear from normal ligament but not from complete ACL tear. In T2-weighted images, partial ACL tear was suggested to keep continuity of the ligament. (H.O.)

  10. An Unusual Case of Acl Cyst with Multiple Melon Seed Bodies of the Knee

    Vaish, Abhishek; Sancheti, Parag; Vaishya, Raju

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The cyst of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a known clinical entity, but its association with knee synovitis and melon or rice bodies is not documented. Case Report: We report a rare case of ganglionic cyst of of the knee in association with diffuse synovitis and multiple melon or rice bodies in a 36 year old male. The case was treated arthroscopically with removal ofthe cyst of ACL and multiple melon seed bodies. Conclusion: Information regarding incidence, treatment, and o...

  11. KNEE SYNERGISM DURING GAIT REMAIN ALTERED ONE YEAR AFTER ACL RECONSTRUCTION

    LEPORACE, GUSTAVO; METSAVAHT, LEONARDO; PEREIRA, GLAUBER RIBEIRO; OLIVEIRA, LISZT PALMEIRA DE; Crespo, Bernardo; BATISTA, LUIZ ALBERTO

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To compare the activation of the vastus lateralis (VL) and biceps femoris (BF) muscles during gait, as well VL/BF muscular co-contraction (MCC) between healthy (CG) and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed (ACL-R) subjects. Methods: Nineteen subjects, ten controls and nine ACL-R patients had a VL and BF electromyogram (EMG) captured to calculate the MCC ratio. A Principal Component (PC) Analysis was applied to reduce the dimensionality effect of each of the MCC, VL and...

  12. Different knee joint loading patterns in ACL deficient copers and non-copers during walking

    Alkjaer, Tine; Henriksen, Marius; Simonsen, Erik B

    2011-01-01

    Rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) causes changes in the walking pattern. ACL deficient subjects classified as copers and non-copers have been observed to adopt different post-injury walking patterns. How these different patterns affect the knee compression and shear forces is...... unresolved. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate how different walking patterns observed between copers, non-copers, and controls affect the knee compression and shear forces during walking....

  13. Increased Posterior Tibial Slope and its Association with ACL Rupture in the Pediatric Population

    O'Malley, Michael P.; Milewski, Matthew David; Solomito, Matthew; Erwteman, Andrew; Nissen, Carl W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Particular interest has been placed in identifying risk factors for sports related injuries in younger populations. In regards to the relationship between posterior sagittal slope of the tibia as a potential risk factor for ACL injury in the pediatric population, studies at this time remain limited.The purpose of our study is to investigate this relationship between posterior tibial slope and ACL rupture in the pediatric population. Our null hypothesis states that an increased pos...

  14. Diagnostic Value of Knee Arthrometry in the Prediction of ACL Strain During Landing

    Kiapour, Ata; Wordeman, Samuel Clayton; Paterno, Mark V.; Quatman, Carmen E.; Levine, Jason W.; Goel, Vijay K.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Excessive knee joint laxity may decrease overall joint stability and increase the risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury during high risk activities. Despite the frequent clinical use of knee arthrometry, as an accurate and valid method for evaluation of knee laxity, no data exists to correlate instrumented laxity measures and ACL strain during dynamic high-risk activities. The purpose of this study was to evaluate relationships between instrumented anterior knee laxity m...

  15. Cross-professional differences in real-time assessment of ACL injury risk

    Petushek, Erich J.; Ward, Paul; Cokely, Edward T.; Myer, Gregory D

    2015-01-01

    Simple visual inspection of movement is a potentially low cost method for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury screening and prevention. Although many professionals, athletes, and coaches utilize some form of visual inspection of movement/injury risk, there is currently no substantial data on group skill differences. Sports medicine professionals, exercise science students/academics, and strength and conditioning coaches exhibited consistently superior ACL injury risk estima...

  16. Intra-articular bupivacaine or bupivacaine and morphine after ACL reconstruction

    Danieli, Marcus Vinicius; Cavazzani Neto, Antonio; Herrera, Paulo Adilson

    2012-01-01

    Objective Reconstructive surgery of the ACL is one of the most commonly performed surgeries today and the control of postoperative pain is part of the priorities of the surgeon. Within the arsenal of analgesia we have the intra-articular application of drugs, and the most studied one is bupivacaine with or without morphine. This study compared the application of bupivacaine with or without morphine with a control group after ACL reconstruction with flexor tendon graft. Methods Forty-five pati...

  17. Incidence and Outcome of Early Acute Kidney Injury in Critically-Ill Trauma Patients

    Amber S Podoll; Kozar, Rosemary; Holcomb, John B; Kevin W Finkel

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the incidence and effect on mortality of early acute kidney injury in severely injured trauma patients using the Acute Kidney Injury Network creatinine criteria. Design A retrospective cohort study of severely injured trauma patients admitted to the shock trauma intensive care unit. Setting Texas Trauma Institute, a state designated level I trauma unit certified by the American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma. Patients 901 severely injured trauma patients admitt...

  18. MRI diagnosis of ACL bundle tears: value of oblique axial imaging

    To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of oblique axial intermediate weighting MR imaging in detecting partial thickness anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) bundle tears. The study protocol was approved by the institutional ethics committee. Sixty-one subjects (43 male, 18 female; mean age 27.4 years; range 9 to 57 years) with clinically suspected ACL tear or meniscal tear between September 2009 and January 2011 were studied with MRI and arthroscopy. Detection of partial tear for the ACL as a whole and for each ACL bundle by protocol A (standard orthogonal sequences) and protocol B (standard orthogonal sequences plus oblique axial intermediate weighted imaging) was compared in a blinded fashion. Performance characteristics for protocol A and protocol B were compared using sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and ROC curves. A two-tailed p value of 0.05). The addition of oblique axial imaging to standard MR imaging improves diagnostic accuracy for detecting partial tears of the ACL as well as individual bundle tears of the ACL. (orig.)

  19. A novel first aid stretcher for immobilization and transportation of spine injured patients.

    Liu, Yan-Sheng; Feng, Ya-Ping; Xie, Jia-Xin; Luo, Zhuo-Jing; Shen, Cai-Hong; Niu, Fang; Zou, Jian; Tang, Shao-Feng; Hao, Jiang; Xu, Jia-Xiang; Xiao, Li-Ping; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Zhu, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Effective immobilization and transportation are vital to the life-saving acute medical care needed when treating critically injured people. However, the most common types of stretchers used today are wrought with problems that can lead to further medical complications, difficulty in employment and rescue, and ineffective transitions to hospital treatment. Here we report a novel first aid stretcher called the "emergency carpet", which solves these problems with a unique design for spine injured patients. Polyurethane composite material, obtained by a novel process of manually mixing isocyanate and additives, can be poured into a specially designed fabric bag and allowed to harden to form a rigid human-shaped stretcher. The effectiveness of the emergency carpet was examined in the pre-hospital management of victims with spinal fractures. Additionally, it was tested on flat ground and complex terrain as well as in the sea and air. We demonstrated that the emergency carpet can be assembled and solidified on the scene in 5 minutes, providing effective immobilization to the entire injured body. With the protection of the emergency carpet, none of the 20 patients, who were finally confirmed to have spinal column fracture or dislocation, had any neurological deterioration during transportation. Furthermore, the carpet can be handled and transported by multiple means under differing conditions, without compromising immobilization. Finally, the emergency carpet allows the critically injured patient to receive multiple examinations such as X-ray, CT, and MRI without being removed from the carpet. Our results demonstrate that the emergency carpet has ideal capabilities for immobilization, extrication, and transportation of the spine injured patients. Compared with other stretchers, it allows for better mobility, effective immobilization, remarkable conformity to the body, and various means for transportation. The emergency carpet is promising for its intrinsic advantages in

  20. A Novel First Aid Stretcher for Immobilization and Transportation of Spine Injured Patients

    Liu, Yan-Sheng; Feng, Ya-Ping; Xie, Jia-Xin; Luo, Zhuo-Jing; Shen, Cai-Hong; Niu, Fang; Zou, Jian; Tang, Shao-Feng; Hao, Jiang; Xu, Jia-Xiang; Xiao, Li-Ping; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Zhu, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Effective immobilization and transportation are vital to the life-saving acute medical care needed when treating critically injured people. However, the most common types of stretchers used today are wrought with problems that can lead to further medical complications, difficulty in employment and rescue, and ineffective transitions to hospital treatment. Here we report a novel first aid stretcher called the “emergency carpet”, which solves these problems with a unique design for spine injured patients. Polyurethane composite material, obtained by a novel process of manually mixing isocyanate and additives, can be poured into a specially designed fabric bag and allowed to harden to form a rigid human-shaped stretcher. The effectiveness of the emergency carpet was examined in the pre-hospital management of victims with spinal fractures. Additionally, it was tested on flat ground and complex terrain as well as in the sea and air. We demonstrated that the emergency carpet can be assembled and solidified on the scene in 5 minutes, providing effective immobilization to the entire injured body. With the protection of the emergency carpet, none of the 20 patients, who were finally confirmed to have spinal column fracture or dislocation, had any neurological deterioration during transportation. Furthermore, the carpet can be handled and transported by multiple means under differing conditions, without compromising immobilization. Finally, the emergency carpet allows the critically injured patient to receive multiple examinations such as X-ray, CT, and MRI without being removed from the carpet. Our results demonstrate that the emergency carpet has ideal capabilities for immobilization, extrication, and transportation of the spine injured patients. Compared with other stretchers, it allows for better mobility, effective immobilization, remarkable conformity to the body, and various means for transportation. The emergency carpet is promising for its intrinsic advantages

  1. A novel first aid stretcher for immobilization and transportation of spine injured patients.

    Yan-Sheng Liu

    Full Text Available Effective immobilization and transportation are vital to the life-saving acute medical care needed when treating critically injured people. However, the most common types of stretchers used today are wrought with problems that can lead to further medical complications, difficulty in employment and rescue, and ineffective transitions to hospital treatment. Here we report a novel first aid stretcher called the "emergency carpet", which solves these problems with a unique design for spine injured patients. Polyurethane composite material, obtained by a novel process of manually mixing isocyanate and additives, can be poured into a specially designed fabric bag and allowed to harden to form a rigid human-shaped stretcher. The effectiveness of the emergency carpet was examined in the pre-hospital management of victims with spinal fractures. Additionally, it was tested on flat ground and complex terrain as well as in the sea and air. We demonstrated that the emergency carpet can be assembled and solidified on the scene in 5 minutes, providing effective immobilization to the entire injured body. With the protection of the emergency carpet, none of the 20 patients, who were finally confirmed to have spinal column fracture or dislocation, had any neurological deterioration during transportation. Furthermore, the carpet can be handled and transported by multiple means under differing conditions, without compromising immobilization. Finally, the emergency carpet allows the critically injured patient to receive multiple examinations such as X-ray, CT, and MRI without being removed from the carpet. Our results demonstrate that the emergency carpet has ideal capabilities for immobilization, extrication, and transportation of the spine injured patients. Compared with other stretchers, it allows for better mobility, effective immobilization, remarkable conformity to the body, and various means for transportation. The emergency carpet is promising for its

  2. Blood pressure in head‐injured patients

    Mitchell, Patrick; Gregson, Barbara A; Piper, Ian; Citerio, Giuseppe; Mendelow, A David; Chambers, Iain R

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine the statistical characteristics of blood pressure (BP) readings from a large number of head‐injured patients. Methods The BrainIT group has collected high time‐resolution physiological and clinical data from head‐injured patients who require intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring. The statistical features of this dataset of BP measurements with time resolution of 1 min from 200 patients is examined. The distributions of BP measurements and their relationship with simultaneous ICP measurements are described. Results The distributions of mean, systolic and diastolic readings are close to normal with modest skewing towards higher values. There is a trend towards an increase in blood pressure with advancing age, but this is not significant. Simultaneous blood pressure and ICP values suggest a triphasic relationship with a BP rising at 0.28 mm Hg/mm Hg of ICP, for ICP up to 32 mm Hg, and 0.9 mm Hg/mm Hg of ICP for ICP from 33 to 55 mm Hg, and falling sharply with rising ICP for ICP >55 mm Hg. Conclusions Patients with head injury appear to have a near normal distribution of blood pressure readings that are skewed towards higher values. The relationship between BP and ICP may be triphasic. PMID:17138594

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage Contact and Bound Water in ACL-Deficient and ACL Reconstructed Knees

    Baer, Geoffrey Scott; Kaiser, Jarred; Vignos, Michael; Liu, Fang; Smith, Colin Robert; Kijowski, Richard; Thelen, Darryl

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Osteoarthritis (OA) is common following ACL-reconstructive (ACLR) surgery (6). The cause of early OA is not understood, but theories have focused on osteochondral damage at the time of injury (2) and abnormal joint mechanics following surgical repair (7). In this study, we investigate the inter-relationship of cartilage mechanics and biomarkers of OA in both ACL-deficient (ACLD) and ACLR knees. Our approach employs a novel dynamic MR sequence to measure joint mechanics (3) and the recently developed mcDESPOT to assess regional variations in water bound to proteoglycan (PG) (5). We hypothesize that bound water will be diminished in the cartilage of ACLD knees and, after surgery, will continue to adapt in a manner that reflects altered cartilage loading. This abstract presents initial observations on a cross-section of healthy, ACLD and ACLR knees. Methods: The dominant knees of 8 healthy controls, ACLD knees of 5 patients and ACLR knees of 8 patients were imaged in a 3 T MRI scanner (Table). Controls had no history of pain, injury, or surgery to their knee. Patients had no additional ligament injury and no meniscal damage. ACLD subjects were imaged prior to reconstructive surgery. Femoral and tibial cartilage were segmented from MR images and cartilage thickness was calculated. The mcDESPOT sequence provided a fraction map of water bound to PG (Fpg). Subjects flexed their knee against an inertial load at 0.5 Hz, while a SPGR-VIPR sequence continuously acquired volumetric data. Kinematics were obtained using model tracking of the dynamic images (3). Cartilage was registered to the bone segments for all frames, and contact patterns were characterized by the proximity between surfaces. Spatial representations of tibial cartilage contact, thickness and Fpg were co-registered for each subject. Results: Our initial images suggest lower Fpg values in ACLD knees, primarily on the posterior-lateral tibia. This is also observed in ACLR knees, with additional

  4. T2* MR Relaxometry and Ligament Volume are Associated with the Structural Properties of the Healing ACL

    Biercevicz, Alison M.; Murray, Martha M.; Walsh, Edward G; Miranda, Danny L.; Machan, Jason T.; Fleming, Braden C.

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to develop a non-invasive magnetic resonance (MR) method to predict the structural properties of a healing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using volume and T2* relaxation time. We also compared our T2*-based structural property prediction model to a previous model utilizing signal intensity, an acquisition-dependent variable. Surgical ACL transection followed by no treatment (i.e., natural healing) or bio-enhanced ACL repair was performed in a porcine model. After 52 weeks ...

  5. The concept of double bundle ACL simulation with a single bundle patellar tendon graft. A cadaveric feasibility study

    Jacobi Matthias; Magnussen Robert A; Villa Vincent; Demey Guillaume; Neyret Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background There is significant interest in the restoration of the double-bundle anatomy of the native ACL when performing ACL reconstruction. Possible techniques include those utilizing two separate grafts with independent tunnels and those that attempt to mimic this anatomy with a single graft and fewer tunnels. Many of the latter techniques require specific instrumentation and are technically challenging. We demonstrate that the double-bundle anatomy of the native ACL can theoreti...

  6. ACL graft re-rupture after double-bundle reconstruction: factors that influence the intra-articular pattern of injury

    van Eck, Carola F.; Kropf, Eric J.; Romanowski, James R.; Lesniak, Bryson P.; Tranovich, Michael J.; van Dijk, C. Niek; Fu, Freddie H

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine the most common rupture patterns of previously reconstructed DB-ACL cases, seen at the time of revision surgery, and to determine the influence of age, gender, time between the initial ACL reconstruction and re-injury, tunnel angle and etiology of failure. Methods Forty patients who presented for revision surgery after previous double-bundle ACL reconstruction were enrolled. Three orthopedic surgeons independently reviewed the arthroscopic videos and determined the ruptur...

  7. Normalized motor function but impaired sensory function after unilateral non-reconstructed ACL injury: patients compared with uninjured controls.

    Ageberg, Eva; Fridén, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Improvement in motor function after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is achieved by appropriate rehabilitation. However, it has been questioned whether training after injury can lead to sensory improvement. We hypothesized that motor function can be restored after unilateral non-reconstructed ACL injury, whereas the sensory function cannot, i.e., there would be no difference in functional performance or knee muscle strength between subjects with ACL injury and uninjured controls, but t...

  8. The effect of isolated valgus moments on ACL strain during single-leg landing: A simulation study

    Shin, Choongsoo S.; Chaudhari, Ajit M.; Andriacchi, Thomas P.

    2008-01-01

    Valgus moments on the knee joint during single-leg landing have been suggested as a risk factor for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The purpose of this study was to test the influence of isolated valgus moment on ACL strain during single-leg landing. Physiologic levels of valgus moments from an in vivo study of single-leg landing were applied to a three-dimensional dynamic knee model, previously developed and tested for ACL strain measurement during simulated landing. The ACL strain,...

  9. Case study: Muscle atrophy and hypertrophy in a premier league soccer player during rehabilitation from ACL injury.

    Milsom, Jordan; Barreira, Paulo; Burgess, Darren J; Iqbal, Zafar; Morton, James P

    2014-10-01

    The onset of injury and subsequent period of immobilization and disuse present major challenges to maintenance of skeletal muscle mass and function. Although the characteristics of immobilization-induced muscle atrophy are well documented in laboratory studies, comparable data from elite athletes in free-living conditions are not readily available. We present a 6-month case-study account from a professional soccer player of the English Premier League characterizing rates of muscle atrophy and hypertrophy (as assessed by DXA) during immobilization and rehabilitation after ACL injury. During 8 weeks of inactivity and immobilization, where the athlete adhered to a low carbohydrate-high protein diet, total body mass decreased by 5 kg attributable to 5.8 kg loss and 0.8 kg gain in lean and fat mass, respectively. Changes in whole-body lean mass was attributable to comparable relative decreases in the trunk (12%, 3.8 kg) and immobilized limb (13%, 1.4 kg) whereas the nonimmobilized limb exhibited smaller declines (7%, 0.8 kg). In Weeks 8 to 24, the athlete adhered to a moderate carbohydrate-high protein diet combined with structured resistance and field based training for both the lower and upper-body that resulted in whole-body muscle hypertrophy (varying from 0.5 to 1 kg per week). Regional hypertrophy was particularly pronounced in the trunk and nonimmobilized limb during weeks 8 to 12 (2.6 kg) and 13 to 16 (1.3 kg), respectively, whereas the previously immobilized limb exhibited slower but progressive increases in lean mass from Week 12 to 24 (1.2 kg). The athlete presented after the totality of the injured period with an improved anthropometrical and physical profile. PMID:24458224

  10. Displaced Medial and Lateral Bucket Handle Meniscal Tears With Intact ACL and PCL.

    Boody, Barrett S; Omar, Imran M; Hill, James A

    2015-08-01

    Bucket handle lesions are vertical longitudinal tears in the meniscus that may displace centrally into the respective medial or lateral compartment, frequently causing mechanical symptoms, including pain, perceived instability, and mechanical locking. Bucket handle meniscal tears are most commonly from a traumatic etiology and are frequently found with concomitant anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Multiple imaging signs and associations have been described for the diagnosis of bucket handle meniscus tears, including coronal truncation, absent bow tie sign, double posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), double ACL, displacement of the bucket handle fragment, and disproportionate posterior horn signs. Among meniscal pathology encountered on magnetic resonance imaging or during arthroscopy, bucket handle meniscal tears are infrequent occurrences. Furthermore, the occurrence of displaced medial and lateral bucket handle tears found on imaging and during arthroscopy is very uncommon and is only sparsely reported in the literature. When displaced medial and lateral bucket handle meniscal segments are visualized within the intercondylar notch along with the ACL and PCL, the radiologic findings are referred to as the "quadruple cruciate" sign or the "Jack and Jill lesion." Of the few case reports described in the literature, only one noted displaced medial and lateral bucket handle meniscus tears with an intact ACL and PCL. The current case report outlines a similar rare case of the quadruple cruciate sign: displaced medial and lateral bucket handle meniscal tears located within the intercondylar notch and an intact ACL and PCL. PMID:26270763

  11. KNEE SYNERGISM DURING GAIT REMAIN ALTERED ONE YEAR AFTER ACL RECONSTRUCTION

    LEPORACE, GUSTAVO; METSAVAHT, LEONARDO; PEREIRA, GLAUBER RIBEIRO; OLIVEIRA, LISZT PALMEIRA DE; CRESPO, BERNARDO; BATISTA, LUIZ ALBERTO

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To compare the activation of the vastus lateralis (VL) and biceps femoris (BF) muscles during gait, as well VL/BF muscular co-contraction (MCC) between healthy (CG) and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed (ACL-R) subjects. Methods: Nineteen subjects, ten controls and nine ACL-R patients had a VL and BF electromyogram (EMG) captured to calculate the MCC ratio. A Principal Component (PC) Analysis was applied to reduce the dimensionality effect of each of the MCC, VL and BF curves for both healthy and ACL reconstructed groups. The PC scores were used to calculate the standard distance (SD). SD values were employed in order to compare each dependent variable (MCC, VL and BF) between the two groups using unpaired t-test. Results: ACL-R group presented a lower VL activation at the beginning and at the end of the gait cycle, as compared to the control group. However, no difference was found for BF or VL/BF MCC. Conclusion: The gait analysis of ACL reconstructed patients demonstrated a persistent deficit in VL activation when compared to the control group, even one year after surgery. Level of Evidence III. Case Control Study PMID:27217814

  12. The experience of being a partner to a spinal cord injured person

    Angel, Sanne; Buus, Niels

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative focuses on the personal experiences of partners to a spinal cord injured person. Using a Ricoeurian phenomenological-hermeneutic approach, we analysed seven partners' narratives 1 and 2 years after their partner's injury. The study revealed how the injury was experienced from the...... partners' perspective through the aftermath. In the acute phase after the injury, partners also felt harmed, and support was needed in relation to their own daily activities, eating, resting, and managing distress. During the institutionalized rehabilitation, partners felt torn between supporting the...

  13. Psychoactive substances in seriously injured drivers in Denmark

    Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese; Steentoft, Anni; Bernhoft, Inger Marie;

    2013-01-01

    found to be above the Danish legal limit in 4.9% of injured drivers. Young men (median age 31 years) were over-represented among injured drivers who violated Danish law for alcohol and drugs. Diazepam (4.4%), tramadol (3.2%), and clonazepam (3.0%) were the medicinal drugs most frequently detected at...

  14. Preventive effect of phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis on alloxan-injured mice.

    Ou, Yu; Lin, Lin; Pan, Qin; Yang, Xuegan; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2012-11-01

    The preventive effect of phycocyanin (obtained from Spirulina platensis) on alloxan-injured mice is investigated. Oral administration of phycocyanin was started two weeks before an alloxan injury and continued until four weeks later. Tests resulted in the following positive results of oral phycocyanin administration on alloxan-injured mice: decrease fasting blood glucose and glycosylated serum protein (GSP); maintain total antioxidative capability (T-AOC); avert malondialdehyde (MDA) formation in the liver, kidney, and pancreas; decrease total cholesterol (TC) level and triglycerides (TG) level in serum and liver; increase the levels of hepatic glycogen level; maintain glucokinase (GK) expression in the liver and decrease p53 expression in the pancreas at mRNA level. The histological observations also supported the above results. Acute toxicity study further shows that phycocyanin is relatively safe. These results led to the conclusion that phycocyanin has significant preventive effect on alloxan-injured mice. The inhibition of p53 pathway could be one of the mechanisms that led to the protection of pancreatic islets from alloxan injury. We also proposed that GK expression that functions to promote liver glycogen synthesis could be the reason for reduced blood glucose level. The encouraging results are the first step in studying the potential of phycocyanin as a clinical measure in preventing diabetes. PMID:23121873

  15. Internet-based prevention of posttraumatic stress symptoms in injured trauma patients: design of a randomized controlled trial

    Joanne Mouthaan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Injured trauma victims are at risk of developing Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD and other post-trauma psychopathology. So far, interventions using cognitive behavioral techniques (CBT have proven most efficacious in treating early PTSD in highly symptomatic individuals. No early intervention for the prevention of PTSD for all victims has yet proven effective. In the acute psychosocial care for trauma victims, there is a clear need for easily applicable, accessible, cost-efficient early interventions. Objective: To describe the design of a randomized controlled trial (RCT evaluating the effectiveness of a brief Internet-based early intervention that incorporates CBT techniques with the aim of reducing acute psychological distress and preventing long-term PTSD symptoms in injured trauma victims. Method: In a two armed RCT, 300 injured trauma victims from two Level-1 trauma centers in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, will be assigned to an intervention or a control group. Inclusion criteria are: being 18 years of age or older, having experienced a traumatic event according to the diagnostic criteria of the DSM-IV and understanding the Dutch language. The intervention group will be given access to the intervention's website (www.traumatips.nl, and are specifically requested to login within the first month postinjury. The primary clinical study outcome is PTSD symptom severity. Secondary outcomes include symptoms of depression and anxiety, quality of life, and social support. In addition, a cost-effectiveness analysis of the intervention will be performed. Data are collected at one week post-injury, prior to first login (baseline, and at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months. Analyses will be on an intention-to-treat basis. Discussion: The results will provide more insight into the effects of preventive interventions in general, and Internet-based early interventions specifically, on acute stress reactions and PTSD, in an injured population, during the

  16. Antagonist muscle moment is increased in ACL deficient subjects during maximal dynamic knee extension

    Alkjær, Tine; Simonsen, Erik B; Magnusson, S Peter; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Aagaard, Per

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Coactivation of the hamstring muscles during dynamic knee extension may compensate for increased knee joint laxity in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficient subjects. This study examined if antagonist muscle coactivation during maximal dynamic knee extension was elevated in...... subjects with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency compared to age-matched healthy controls. METHODS: Electromyography (EMG) and net knee joint moments were recorded during maximal concentric quadriceps and eccentric hamstring contractions, performed in an isokinetic dynamometer (ROM: 90......-10°, angular speed: 30°/s). Hamstring antagonist EMG recorded during concentric quadriceps contraction was converted into antagonist moment based on the EMG-moment relationship observed during eccentric agonist contractions. RESULTS: The magnitude of antagonist hamstring EMG was 65.5% higher in ACL deficient...

  17. Fluoroscopic Analysis of Tibial Translation in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injured Knees With and Without Bracing During Forward Lunge

    Jalali

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Despite several studies with different methods, the effect of functional knee braces on knee joint kinematics is not clear. Direct visualization of joint components through medical imaging modalities may provide the clinicians with more useful information. Objectives In this study, for the first time in the literature, video fluoroscopy was used to investigate the effect of knee bracing on the sagittal plane kinematics of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injured patients. Patients and Methods For twelve male unilateral ACL deficient subjects, the anterior tibial translation was measured during lunge exercise in non-braced and braced conditions. Fluoroscopic images were acquired from the subjects using a digital fluoroscopy system with a rate of 10 fps. The image of each frame was scaled using a calibration coin and analyzed in AutoCAD environment. The angle between the two lines, tangent to the posterior cortexes of the femoral and tibial shafts was measured as the flexion angle. For the fluoroscopic images associated with 0°, 15°, 30°, 45° and 60° knee flexion angles, the relative anterior-posterior configuration of the tibiofemoral joint was assessed by measuring the position of landmarks on the tibia and femur. Results Results indicated that the overall anterior translations of the tibia during the eccentric (down and concentric (up phases of lunge exercise were 10.4 ± 1.7 mm and 9.0 ± 2.2 mm for non-braced, and 10.1 ± 3.4 mm and 7.4 ± 2.5 mm, for braced conditions, respectively. The difference of the tibial anterior-posterior translation behaviors of the braced and non-braced knees was not statistically significant. Conclusion Fluoroscopic imaging provides an effective tool to measure the dynamic behavior of the knee joint in the sagittal plane and within the limitations of this study, the pure mechanical stabilizing effect of functional knee bracing is not sufficient to control the anterior tibial translation of the ACL

  18. 77 FR 61299 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...

    2012-10-09

    ... research in the 2010-2012 specifications (75 FR 48874, August 12, 2010). Section 648.201 requires the... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch Limit) Harvested for Management... specification of the overfishing ] limit, acceptable biological catch, annual catch limit (ACL), optimum...

  19. 77 FR 66746 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...

    2012-11-07

    ... research in the 2010-2012 specifications (75 FR 48874, August 12, 2010). However, due to an over-harvest in Area 1A in 2010, the FY 2012 sub-ACL in Area 1A was revised to 24,668 mt on February 24, 2012 (77 FR... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch Limit) Harvested for...

  20. Musculoskeletal Modeling of a Forward Lunge Movement:Implications for ACL Loading

    Alkjaer, T; Wieland, MR; Andersen, MS;

    2010-01-01

    Body Modeling System. The model and the pelvis. The hips were modeled as spherical joints, the knees as hinge joints, and the ankles as universal joints. Each according to a minimum fatigue criterion. Main Outcome Measures: Muscle and joint reaction forces that pulled the tibia in anterior or posterior...... never required any stabilization by the ACL. The forward lunge explored the muscle and reaction forces, which can be used for further examination of ACL injury mechanisms and prevention strategies by applying parameter and optimization studies to the model....

  1. Comparison of the Insall-Salvati ratio of the patella in patients with and without an ACL tear.

    Lin, Chien-Fu Jeff; Wu, Jiunn-Jer; Chen, Teng-Shung; Huang, Tung-Fu

    2005-01-01

    The object of this prospective study is to compare the Insall-Salvati ratio between the patients who have an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear and receive arthroscopic-assistant ACL reconstruction and the patients who have no ACL tear but do have an internal disorder of the knee and receive arthroscopic surgery. We prospectively and consecutively collected into two groups a total of 217 patients who had sport injuries and received arthroscopic surgery. The study group included 115 patients who had an ACL tear and received arthroscopic-assistant ACL reconstruction with middle-third bone-patella tendon-bone graft. The control group included 102 patients with internal disorders of the knee joint, including meniscus tear, plicae, or other chondral lesion, but without an ACL tear. We measured the patellar Insall-Salvati ratio [12] on the pre-operative X-ray films for all patients. The Insall-Salvati ratio in the ACL-tear study group is significantly smaller than the control group of internal disorders of the knee (0.99+/-0.11 vs 1.05+/-0.12, p=0.001). There is no significant difference in age, gender, the side of the involved knee, duration of symptoms, patella length and patella tendon length between the two groups. In conclusion, our study shows that patella infra has an association with ACL tears, and patella infra may be a risk factor for ACL tears. In patients with an ACL tear who had patella baja, the middle-third patellar tendon may not be an ideal graft for reconstruction. PMID:15654645

  2. Olfactory impairment and traumatic brain injury in blast-injured combat troops

    Mulligan, Lisa P.; Smith, Alice B.; Olsen, Cara H.; Lyon, Dina M.; Belluscio, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether a structured and quantitative assessment of differential olfactory performance—recognized between a blast-injured traumatic brain injury (TBI) group and a demographically comparable blast-injured control group—can serve as a reliable antecedent marker for preclinical detection of intracranial neurotrauma. Methods: We prospectively and consecutively enrolled 231 polytrauma inpatients, acutely injured from explosions during combat operations in either Afghanistan or Iraq and requiring immediate stateside evacuation and sequential admission to our tertiary care medical center over a 2½-year period. This study correlates olfactometric scores with both contemporaneous neuroimaging findings as well as the clinical diagnosis of TBI, tabulates population-specific incidence data, and investigates return of olfactory function. Results: Olfactometric score predicted abnormal neuroimaging significantly better than chance alone (area under the curve = 0.78, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.70–0.87). Normosmia was present in all troops with mild TBI (i.e., concussion) and all control subjects. Troops with radiographic evidence of frontal lobe injuries were 3 times more likely to have olfactory impairment than troops with injuries to other brain regions (relative risk 3.0, 95% CI 0.98–9.14). Normalization of scores occurred in all anosmic troops available for follow-up testing. Conclusion: Quantitative identification olfactometry has limited sensitivity but high specificity as a marker for detecting acute structural neuropathology from trauma. When considering whether to order advanced neuroimaging, a functional disturbance with central olfactory impairment should be regarded as an important tool to inform the decision process. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that central olfactory dysfunction identifies patients with TBI who have intracranial radiographic abnormalities with a sensitivity of 35% (95% CI 20

  3. Acute Concomitant Anterior Cruciate Ligament and Patellar Tendon Tears in a Non-dislocated Knee

    Robert D Wissman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tears are common and may occur in isolation or with other internal derangements of the joint. Tears of the patellar tendon (PT occur less frequently and are rarely associated with intra-articular pathology. Acute combined tears of both the ACL and PT are known complications of high-energy traumatic knee dislocations. We present a case of an acute concomitant ACL and PT tears in a low-energy non-dislocated knee. To our knowledge, this injury has only been described in a limited number of case reports in the orthopedic literature. We present the imaging findings of this combined injury and discuss the importance of magnetic resonance (MR in diagnosis.

  4. Purinergic signaling on leukocytes infiltrating the LPS-injured lung.

    Daniela Friebe

    Full Text Available Extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides have been implicated as important signaling molecules in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI. While adenosine is known to inhibit T cell activation, little information is available as to ATP and NAD degrading enzymes, the expression of ATP and adenosine receptors/transporters in different T cell subsets. ALI was induced by challenging mice with intra-tracheal instillation of 60 µl (3 µg/g LPS. After 3 d and 7 d blood, lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage was collected and immune cells were analyzed using flow cytometry. The transcriptional phenotype of T helper cells, cytotoxic and regulatory T cells sorted by FACS was assessed by measuring the expression profile of 28 genes related to purinergic signaling using TaqMan Array Micro Fluidic Cards. Catabolism of ATP, NAD and cAMP by activated CD4+ T cells was evaluated by HPLC. CD73 was found to be highly abundant on lymphoid cells with little abundance on myeloid cells, while the opposite was true for CD39. After ALI, the abundance of CD39 and CD73 significantly increased on all T cell subsets derived from lung tissue and bronchoalveolar space. Expression analysis in T cell subsets of the lung revealed ATP (Cd39, Cd73 and NAD (Cd38, Cd157, Cd296, Pc-1 degrading enzymes. However, only transcription of Cd38, Cd39, Cd73, Ent1 and A2a receptor was significantly upregulated after ALI in T helper cells. CD4+ T cells from injured lung rapidly metabolized extracellular ATP to AMP and adenosine but not NAD or cAMP. These findings show that lung T cells--the dominant cell fraction in the later phase of ALI--exhibit a unique expression pattern of purinergic signaling molecules. Adenosine is formed by T cells at an enhanced rate from ATP but not from NAD and together with upregulated A2a receptor is likely to modulate the healing process after acute lung injury.

  5. Electromyographic evaluation of functional electrical stimulation to injured oculomotor nerve

    Min Yang; Shiting Li; Youqiang Meng; Ningxi Zhu; Xuhui Wang; Liang Wan; Wenchuan Zhang; Jun Zhong; Shugan Zhu; Massimiliano Visocchi

    2011-01-01

    Functional electrical stimulation delivered early after injury to the proximal nerve stump has been proposed as a therapeutic approach for enhancing the speed and specificity of axonal regeneration following nerve injury. In this study, the injured oculomotor nerve was stimulated functionally by an implantable electrode. Electromyographic monitoring of the motor unit potential of the inferior oblique muscle was conducted for 12 weeks in two injury groups, one with and one without electric stimulation. The results revealed that, at 2, 4, 6, 8 weeks after functional electric stimulation of the injured oculomotor nerve, motor unit potentials significantly increased, such that amplitude was longer and spike duration gradually shortened. These findings indicate that the injured oculomotor nerve has the potential for regeneration and repair, but this ability is not sufficient for full functional recovery to occur. Importantly, the current results indicated that recovery and regeneration of the injured oculomotor nerve can be promoted with functional electrical stimulation.

  6. Multi-ligand nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to the injured vascular wall

    Kona, Soujanya

    Pathological conditions like coronary artery disease, acute myocardial infarction, stroke, and peripheral artery diseases as well as cardiovascular interventions used in the treatment of coronary artery diseases such as angioplasty and stenting damage/injure the blood vessel wall, leading to inflamed or activated endothelial cells that have been implicated in events leading to thrombosis, inflammation, and restenosis. Oral administration of anti-coagulant and anti-inflammatory drugs causes systemic toxicity, bleeding, patient incompliance, and inadequate amounts of drugs at the injured area. Though drug-eluting stents have shown therapeutic benefits, complications such as in-stent restenosis and late thrombosis still remain and are a cause for concern. Rapid growth in the field of nanotechnology and nanoscience in recent years has paved the way for new targeted and controlled drug delivery strategies. In this perspective, the development of biodegradable nanoparticles for targeted intracellular drug delivery to the inflamed endothelial cells may offer an improved avenue for treatment of cardiovascular diseases. The major objective of this research was to develop "novel multi-ligand nanoparticles," as drug carriers that can efficiently target and deliver therapeutic agents to the injured/inflamed vascular cells under dynamic flow conditions. Our approach mimics the natural binding ability of platelets to injured/activated endothelial cells through glycoprotein Ib (GPIb) bound to P-selectin expressed on inflamed endothelial cells and to the subendothelium through GPIb binding to von Willebrand factor (vWF) deposited onto the injured vascular wall. Our design also exploits the natural cell membrane translocation ability of the internalizing cell peptide - trans-activating transcriptor (TAT) to enhance the nanoparticle uptake by the targeted cells. Our hypothesis is that these multi-ligand nanoparticles would show an increased accumulation at the injury site since GPIb

  7. Pseudocyclops: two cases of ACL graft partial tears mimicking cyclops lesions on MRI.

    Simpfendorfer, Claus; Miniaci, Anthony; Subhas, Naveen; Winalski, Carl S; Ilaslan, Hakan

    2015-08-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using autografts or allografts is a common surgical procedure, particularly in young athletes. Although the procedure has excellent success rates, complications such as mechanical impingement, graft rupture, and arthrofibrosis can occur, often necessitating additional surgery. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has become a valuable tool in evaluating complications after ACL reconstruction. We report two cases of ACL reconstruction complicated by arthroscopically proven partial graft tears. In both cases the torn anterior graft fibers were flipped into the intercondylar notch, mimicking anterior arthrofibrosis, i.e., a "cyclops lesion," on MR imaging. Careful review of the direction of graft fibers on MR imaging in the "pseudocyclops" lesions can help differentiate these partial tears from the fibrosis of a true cyclops. The "pseudocyclops" lesion is a previously undescribed MR imaging sign of partial ACL graft tear. Larger studies are required to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the sign, as well as the clinical importance of these partial graft tears. PMID:25620690

  8. Pseudocyclops: two cases of ACL graft partial tears mimicking cyclops lesions on MRI

    Simpfendorfer, Claus; Subhas, Naveen; Winalski, Carl S.; Ilaslan, Hakan [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Miniaci, Anthony [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Orthopedics, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using autografts or allografts is a common surgical procedure, particularly in young athletes. Although the procedure has excellent success rates, complications such as mechanical impingement, graft rupture, and arthrofibrosis can occur, often necessitating additional surgery. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has become a valuable tool in evaluating complications after ACL reconstruction. We report two cases of ACL reconstruction complicated by arthroscopically proven partial graft tears. In both cases the torn anterior graft fibers were flipped into the intercondylar notch, mimicking anterior arthrofibrosis, i.e., a ''cyclops lesion,'' on MR imaging. Careful review of the direction of graft fibers on MR imaging in the ''pseudocyclops'' lesions can help differentiate these partial tears from the fibrosis of a true cyclops. The ''pseudocyclops'' lesion is a previously undescribed MR imaging sign of partial ACL graft tear. Larger studies are required to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the sign, as well as the clinical importance of these partial graft tears. (orig.)

  9. Dimensionality of the Knee Numeric-Entity Evaluation Score (KNEES-ACL)

    Comins, J D; Krogsgaard, M R; Kreiner, Svend;

    2013-01-01

    The benefit of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has been questioned based on patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). Valid interpretation of such results requires confirmation of the psychometric properties of the PROM. Rasch analysis is the gold standard for validation of PROMs...

  10. ACL Report. A Report of the Activities of the American Classical League 1977-1978.

    Lawall, Gilbert

    Five topics of interest to persons involved in classical studies are discussed in this report: (1) "A Survey of the Classical Scene" focusses on the future of classical studies in elementary and secondary schools with some mention of the situation in colleges and universities. (2) "ACL: The State of the League" includes officers, agenda and…

  11. Iliotibial band autograft versus bone-patella-tendon-bone autograft, a possible alternative for ACL reconstruction

    Stensbirk, Frederik; Thorborg, Kristian; Konradsen, Lars; Jørgensen, Uffe; Hölmich, Per

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The long-term results after using the iliotibial band autograft (ITB) in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are not fully known. If equal in quality to conventional methods, the ITB graft could be a useful alternative as a primary graft, in revision surgery or multi-ligament......PURPOSE: The long-term results after using the iliotibial band autograft (ITB) in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are not fully known. If equal in quality to conventional methods, the ITB graft could be a useful alternative as a primary graft, in revision surgery or multi......-ligament reconstruction. The purpose is to assess whether the ITB autograft is a long-term reliable alternative to the bone-patella-tendon-bone (BPTB) autograft, using a prospective randomized controlled trial design. METHODS: From 1995 to 1996, sixty patients scheduled for primary ACL reconstruction were included in a...... prospective randomized controlled trial. Three senior knee surgeons, experienced in both types of ACL surgery, performed all the operations. A standardized and supervised rehabilitation programme was used for both groups for 6 months. Thirty patients received the ITB reconstruction, and 30 received the BPTB...

  12. Forward lunge as a functional performance test in ACL deficient subjects: test-retest reliability

    Alkjaer, Tine; Henriksen, Marius; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Simonsen, Erik B

    2009-01-01

    The forward lunge movement may be used as a functional performance test of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficient and reconstructed subjects. The purposes were 1) to determine the test-retest reliability of a forward lunge in healthy subjects and 2) to determine the required numbers of...

  13. Pseudocyclops: two cases of ACL graft partial tears mimicking cyclops lesions on MRI

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using autografts or allografts is a common surgical procedure, particularly in young athletes. Although the procedure has excellent success rates, complications such as mechanical impingement, graft rupture, and arthrofibrosis can occur, often necessitating additional surgery. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has become a valuable tool in evaluating complications after ACL reconstruction. We report two cases of ACL reconstruction complicated by arthroscopically proven partial graft tears. In both cases the torn anterior graft fibers were flipped into the intercondylar notch, mimicking anterior arthrofibrosis, i.e., a ''cyclops lesion,'' on MR imaging. Careful review of the direction of graft fibers on MR imaging in the ''pseudocyclops'' lesions can help differentiate these partial tears from the fibrosis of a true cyclops. The ''pseudocyclops'' lesion is a previously undescribed MR imaging sign of partial ACL graft tear. Larger studies are required to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the sign, as well as the clinical importance of these partial graft tears. (orig.)

  14. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction using Bone Patellar Tendon Bone autograft in ACL deficient Knee

    Navin Kumar Karn

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Injury to Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL reconstruction has increased because of increased interest in sports. There are various grafts used for reconstruction of ACL, for example, Bone Patellar Tendon Bone, Hamstring etc. The study was conducted to evaluate the results of Bone Patellar Tendon Bone graft used for reconstruction of Anterior Cruciate Ligament.Materials & Methods: 40 patients with chronic ACL deficient knee presenting to Neuro Hospital from July 2011 to June 2013 were included in the study. The patients with intraarticular fracture of knee, severe OA knee, local active or suspected infection and systemic disease that might influence the study results were excluded from the study. Bone patellar tendon bone graft was harvested from ipsilateral knee in all the cases. The patient was followed till 2 year with specified programme of rehabilitation. The pain was assessed using VAS and the function of the knee was assessed using Modified WOMAC knee index.Results: The long term satisfactory results in terms of functional stability, symptom relief and return to preinjury level of activity was seen in 32 cases (80%. Two knees got infected out of which one required arthroscopic debridement. Mean visual analogue scale was 8 and modified WOMAC knee score was 3 at 2 year follow up.Conclusion: Bone patellar tendon bone graft is useful in high demand patients and cost effective option with high patient satisfaction rate for reconstruction of ACL.JCMS Nepal. 2015;11(3:12-15.

  15. Nurses' experience of caring for burn injured children in pain.

    Olsson, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: Aim: To illuminate how nurses working with burn injured children describe their care for burn injured children in pain during dressing procedures and which conditions and obstacles nurses express they are working under in order to proceed with giving care. Method: Semi-structured qualitative interviews with eight nurses at a pediatric burn ward in Dar es Salaam. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and processed by manifest content analysis. Result: Three themes were derived and i...

  16. Multiple sites of vasopressin synthesis in the injured brain

    Szmydynger-Chodobska, Joanna; Zink, Brian J.; Chodobski, Adam

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the primary targets for vasopressin actions on the injured brain are the cerebrovascular endothelium and astrocytes, and that vasopressin amplifies the posttraumatic production of proinflammatory mediators. Here, the controlled cortical impact model of traumatic brain injury in rats was used to identify the sources of vasopressin in the injured brain. Injury increased vasopressin synthesis in the hypothalamus and cerebral cortex adjacent to the posttraumat...

  17. Visual-Spatial Therapeutic Rehabilitation for the Brain Injured Patient

    Karen Love, OD

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic vision rehabilitation is a significantly underutilized component of the multidisciplinary rehabilitation program for the brain injured patient population. The purpose of this paper is to present the impact of visual dysfunction in brain injury, to demonstrate the benefit of therapeutic vision rehabilitation on the activities of daily life for the brain injured patient, and to give practical activity instructions for the vision therapist. This paper discusses the importanc...

  18. Risks of intracranial haematoma in head injured adults.

    Mendelow, A D; Teasdale, G; Jennett, B; Bryden, J; Hessett, C; Murray, G.

    1983-01-01

    A study was conducted to estimate the risk that an adult (age 15 or over) will develop a surgically significant intracranial haematoma after a head injury. Two simple features were used that can be recognised by clinicians with minimal training: a skull fracture and the conscious level. The risks were calculated from samples of 545 patients with haematomas, 2773 head injured patients in accident and emergency departments, and 2783 head injured patients in primary surgical wards. With radiolog...

  19. Comparison between clinical grading and navigation data of knee laxity in ACL-deficient knees

    Yamamoto Yuji

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The latest version of the navigation system for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction has the supplementary ability to assess knee stability before and after ACL reconstruction. In this study, we compared navigation data between clinical grades in ACL-deficient knees and also analyzed correlation between clinical grading and navigation data. Methods 150 ACL deficient knees that received primary ACL reconstruction using an image-free navigation system were included. For clinical evaluation, the Lachman, anterior drawer, and pivot shift tests were performed under general anesthesia and were graded by an examiner. For the assessment of knee stability using the navigation system, manual tests were performed again before ACL reconstruction. Navigation data were recorded as anteroposterior (AP displacement of the tibia for the Lachman and anterior drawer tests, and both AP displacement and tibial rotation for the pivot shift test. Results Navigation data of each clinical grade were as follows; Lachman test grade 1+: 10.0 mm, grade 2+: 13.2 ± 3.1 mm, grade 3+: 14.5 ± 3.3 mm, anterior drawer test grade 1+: 6.8 ± 1.4 mm, grade 2+: 7.4 ± 1.8 mm, grade 3+: 9.1 ± 2.3 mm, pivot shift test grade 1+: 3.9 ± 1.8 mm/21.5° ± 7.8°, grade 2+: 4.8 ± 2.1 mm/21.8° ± 7.1°, and grade 3+: 6.0 ± 3.2 mm/21.1° ± 7.1°. There were positive correlations between clinical grading and AP displacement in the Lachman, and anterior drawer tests. Although positive correlations between clinical grading and AP displacement in pivot shift test were found, there were no correlations between clinical grading and tibial rotation in pivot shift test. Conclusions In response to AP force, the navigation system can provide the surgeon with correct objective data for knee laxity in ACL deficient knees. During the pivot shift test, physicians may grade according to the displacement of the tibia, rather than rotation.

  20. Health significance and occurrence of injured bacteria in drinking water

    McFeters, G. A.; LeChevallier, M. W.; Singh, A.; Kippin, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    Enteropathogenic and indicator bacteria become injured in drinking water with exposure to sublethal levels of various biological, chemical and physical factors. One manifestation of this injury is the inability to grow and form colonies on selective media containing surfactants. The resulting underestimation of indicator bacteria can lead to a false estimation of water potability. m-T7 medium was developed specifically for the recovery of injured coliforms (both "total" and fecal) in drinking water. The m-T7 method was used to survey operating drinking water treatment and distribution systems for the presence of injured coliforms that were undetected with currently used media. The mean recovery with m-Endo LES medium was less than 1/100 ml while it ranged between 6 and 68/100ml with m-T7 agar. The majority of samples giving positive results with m-T7 medium yielded no detectable coliforms with m-Endo LES agar. Over 95% of the coliform bacteria in these samples were injured. Laboratory experiments were also done to ascribe the virulence of injured waterborne pathogens. Enteropathogens including Salmonella typhimurium, Yersinia enterocolitica and Shigella spp. required up to 20 times the chlorine levels to produce the same injury in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and nonpathogenic coliforms. Similar results were seen with Y. enterocolitica exposed to copper. The recovery of ETEC was followed by delayed enterotoxin production, both in vitro and in the gut of experimental animals. This indicates that injured waterborne enteropathogenic bacteria can be virulent.

  1. Use of ultra-high molecular weight polycaprolactone scaffolds for ACL reconstruction.

    Leong, Natalie L; Kabir, Nima; Arshi, Armin; Nazemi, Azadeh; Jiang, Jie; Wu, Ben M; Petrigliano, Frank A; McAllister, David R

    2016-05-01

    Previously, we reported on the implantation of electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) grafts for use in ACL tissue engineering in a small animal model. In the present study, we hypothesized that grafts fabricated from ultra-high molecular weight polycaprolactone (UHMWPCL) would have similarly favorable biologic properties but superior mechanical properties as compared to grafts fabricated from PCL. Two forms of polycaprolactone were obtained (UHMWPCL, MW = 500 kD, and PCL, MW = 80 kD) and electrospun into scaffolds that were used to perform ACL reconstruction in 7-8 week old male Lewis rats. The following groups were examined: UHMWPCL, PCL, flexor digitorum longus (FDL) allograft, native ACL, as well as sham surgery in which the ACL was transsected. At 16 weeks post-operatively, biomechanical testing, histology, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were performed. Analysis of cellularity indicated that there was no significant difference among the UHMWPCL, PCL, and FDL allograft groups. Quantification of birefringence from picrosirius red staining demonstrated significantly more aligned collagen fibers in the allograft than the PCL group, but no difference between the UHMWPCL and allograft groups. The peak load to failure of the UHMWPCL grafts was significantly higher than PCL, and not significantly different from FDL allograft. This in vivo study establishes the superiority of the higher molecular weight version of polycaprolactone over PCL as a scaffold material for ACL reconstruction. By 16 weeks after implantation, the UHMWPCL grafts were not significantly different from the FDL allografts in terms of cellularity, peak load to failure, stiffness, and collagen fiber alignment. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:828-835, 2016. PMID:26497133

  2. Fifteen Year Prospective Comparison of Patellar & Hamstring Tendon Grafts for ACL Reconstruction

    Roe, Justin; Salmon, Lucy; Kok, Alison; Linklater, James; Pinczewski, Leo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This prospective longitudinal study compares isolated endoscopic ACL reconstruction utilizing 4-strand hamstring tendon (HT) or patellar tendon (PT) autograft over a 15-year period with respect to clinical outcomes and the development of osteoarthritis. Method: 90 consecutive patients with isolated ACL rupture were reconstructed with a PT autograft and 90 patients received HT autograft, with an identical surgical technique. Patients were assessed at 2, 5, 7, 10 and 15 years. Assessment included the IKDC Knee Ligament Evaluation including radiographic evaluation, KT1000, kneeling pain, and clinical outcomes. Results: Subjects who received the PT graft had significantly worse outcomes at 15 years for the variables of radiologically detectable osteoarthritis (p=0.001), motion loss (p=0.02), single leg hop test (p=0.002), participation in strenuous activity (p=0.03), knee related decrease in activity level (p=0.002) and kneeling pain (p=0.03). There was no significant difference between the HT and PT groups in overall IKDC grade (p=0.28). ACL graft rupture occurred in 16% of HT group and 8% of the PT group (p=0.10). Contralateral ACL rupture occurred in significantly more PT patients (24%) than HT patients (12%) (p=0.03). Conclusion: Significant differences have developed at 15 years after surgery which were not seen at earlier reviews. Compared to the HT Group, the PT group had significantly worse outcomes with respect to radiological osteoarthritis, range of motion and functional tests but no significant difference in laxity was identified. There was a high incidence of ACL injury after reconstruction, to both the reconstructed and the contralateral knee.

  3. Evaluation of the ability of primary selective enrichment to resuscitate heat-injured and freeze-injured Listeria monocytogenes cells.

    Budu-Amoako, E; Toora, S; Ablett, R F; J. Smith

    1992-01-01

    Resuscitation rates of injured Listeria monocytogenes on conventional selective Listeria enrichment broth and nonselective Trypticase soy broth containing 0.6% yeast extract were compared. Cells were heated to 60 degrees C for 5 min or frozen at -20 degrees C for 7 days. Inoculation of Trypticase soy broth-yeast extract with the stressed cells resulted in growth that was superior to that in Listeria enrichment broth. Injured cells were fully recovered at 6 to 8 h.

  4. A Comparison of Dynamic Postural Stability Between Asymptomatic Controls and Male Patients One Year After ACL Reconstruction (Pilot Study)

    Ataoglu, Muhammed Baybars; Hazar, Zeynep; Kafa, Nihan; ÖZER, Mustafa; Citaker, Seyit

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine if dynamic postural stability gained one year after ACL reconstruction in patients who received rehabilitation. Methods: Seven male patients (mean age=32,66 ±6,47) who had previously undergone ACL reconstruction (ACL-R) and 7 sex-and general physical activity matched uninjured controls included to study. Mean time since original injury was 13±3,31 months. Dynamic postural control was assessed with 20° knee flexion with Star Excursion Bala...

  5. Ways of experiencing participation and factors affecting the current activity level after non-reconstructed ACL injury

    Österberg, Annika; Kvist, Joanna; Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine

    2011-01-01

    Current assessment methods after an ACL injury do not consider how the individuals themselves experience their participation in activities or what factors they think have affected their current activity level.

  6. Acute care management of spinal cord injuries.

    Mitcho, K; Yanko, J R

    1999-08-01

    Meeting the health care needs of the spinal cord-injured patient is an immense challenge for the acute care multidisciplinary team. The critical care nurse clinician, as well as other members of the team, needs to maintain a comprehensive knowledge base to provide the care management that is essential to the care of the spinal cord-injured patient. With the active participation of the patient and family in care delivery decisions, the health care professionals can help to meet the psychosocial and physical needs of the patient/family unit. This article provides an evidence-based, comprehensive review of the needs of the spinal cord-injured patient in the acute care setting including optimal patient outcomes, methods to prevent complications, and a plan that provides an expeditious transition to rehabilitation. PMID:10646444

  7. Simultaneous reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) with autologous graft and of medial collateral ligament (MCL) with allograft

    Aparicio, José Luis; Nardin, Lisandro; Savá, Matías S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Over the last years, the incidence of multiple ligament injuries has increased significantly due to the rising number of traffic accidents in relation to their kinetics and due to higher sports demands. Among their various combinations, one of them is the lesion of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) which is associated to medial collateral ligament responsible for them in a 13 %. Nowadays several techniques to the reconstruction of Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) and Medial Colla...

  8. Biomechanical Evaluation of Knee Kinematics after ACL Reconstructions in Anatomic SB and DB - Technique with Additional Medial Meniscus Suture

    Lorbach, Olaf; Herbort, Mirco; Engelhardt, Martin; Kieb, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Biomechanical evaluation of knee laxity after single- and double-bundle ACL reconstruction with additional medial meniscus suture. Methods: Kinematics of the intact knee were determined in 12 human cadaver specimens in response to a 134-N anterior tibial load (aTT) and a combined rotatory load of 10 Nm valgus and 4 Nm internal tibial rotation using a robotic/universal force moment sensor testing system. Subsequently, the ACL was resected following the creation of a bucket-handle t...

  9. An Integrated Approach To Change the Outcome Part I: Neuromuscular Screening Methods To Identify High Acl Injury Risk Athletes

    Myer, Gregory D; Ford, Kevin R.; Brent, Jensen L.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2012-01-01

    An important step for treatment of a particular injury etiology is the appropriate application of a treatment targeted to the population at risk. An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk algorithm has been defined that employs field-based techniques in lieu of laboratory-based motion analysis systems to identify athletes with high ACL injury risk landing strategies. The resultant field-based assessment techniques, in combination with the developed prediction algorithm, allow for low-co...

  10. Acute acalculous cholecystitis.

    Barie, Philip S; Eachempati, Soumitra R

    2003-08-01

    Acute cholecystitis can develop without gallstones in critically ill or injured patients. However, the development of acute acalculous cholecystitis is not limited to surgical or injured patients, or even to the intensive care unit. Diabetes, malignant disease, abdominal vasculitis, congestive heart failure, cholesterol embolization, and shock or cardiac arrest have been associated with acute acalculous cholecystitis. Children may also be affected, especially after a viral illness. The pathogenesis of acute acalculous cholecystitis is a paradigm of complexity. Ischemia and reperfusion injury, or the effects of eicosanoid proinflammatory mediators, appear to be the central mechanisms, but bile stasis, opioid therapy, positive-pressure ventilation, and total parenteral nutrition have all been implicated. Ultrasound of the gallbladder is the most accurate diagnostic modality in the critically ill patient, with gallbladder wall thickness of 3.5 mm or greater and pericholecystic fluid being the two most reliable criteria. The historical treatment of choice for acute acalculous cholecystitis has been cholecystectomy, but percutaneous cholecystostomy is now the mainstay of therapy, controlling the disease in about 85% of patients. Rapid improvement can be expected when the procedure is performed properly. The mortality rates (historically about 30%) for percutaneous and open cholecystostomy appear to be similar, reflecting the severity of illness, but improved resuscitation and critical care may portend a decreased risk of death. Interval cholecystectomy is usually not indicated after acute acalculous cholecystitis in survivors; if the absence of gallstones is confirmed and the precipitating disorder has been controlled, the cholecystostomy tube can be pulled out after the patient has recovered. PMID:12864960