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Sample records for acute wild-type canine

  1. Lymphotropism and host responses during acute wild-type canine distemper virus infections in a highly susceptible natural host

    Nielsen, Line; Søgaard, Mette; Jensen, Trine Hammer;

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms behind the in vivo virulence of immunosuppressive wild-type Morbillivirus infections are still not fully understood. To investigate lymphotropism and host responses we have selected the natural host model of canine distemper virus (CDV) infection in mink. This model displays...

  2. A multiplex reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction for detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus

    Cui Shang-jin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A multiplex reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nPCR method was developed for the detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus (CDV. A pair of primers (P1 and P4 specific for CDV corresponding to the highly conserved region of the CDV genome were used as a common primer pair in the first-round PCR of the nested PCR. Primers P2 specific for CDV wild-type strains, were used as the forward primer together with the common reverse primer P4 in the second round of nested PCR. Primers P3, P5 specific for CDV wild-type strain or vaccine strain, were used as the forward primer together with the common reverse primer P4+P6 in the second round of nested PCR. A fragment of 177 bp was amplified from vaccine strain genomic RNA, and a fragment of 247 bp from wild-type strain genomic RNA in the RT-nPCR, and two fragments of 247 bp and 177 bp were amplified from the mixed samples of vaccine and wild-type strains. No amplification was achieved for uninfected cells, or cells infected with Newcastle disease virus (NDV, canine parvovirus (CPV, canine coronavirus (CCV, rabies virus (RV, or canine adenovirus (CAV. The RT-nPCR method was used to detect 30 field samples suspected of canine distemper from Heilongjiang and Jilin Provinces, and 51 samples in Shandong province. As a result of 30 samples, were found to be wild-type-like, and 5 to be vaccine-strain-like. The RT-nPCR method can be used to effectively detect and differentiate wild-type CDV-infected dogs from dogs vaccinated with CDV vaccine, and thus can be used in clinical detection and epidemiological surveillance.

  3. Detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus by a duplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

    Dong, X Y; Li, W H; Zhu, J L; Liu, W J; Zhao, M Q; Luo, Y W; Chen, J D

    2015-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is the cause of canine distemper (CD) which is a severe and highly contagious disease in dogs. In the present study, a duplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method was developed for the detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of CDV. Four primers were designed to detect and discriminate the two viruses by generating 638- and 781-bp cDNA products, respectively. Furthermore, the duplex RT-PCR method was used to detect 67 field samples suspected of CD from Guangdong province in China. Results showed that, 33 samples were to be wild-type-like. The duplex RT-PCR method exhibited high specificity and sensitivity which could be used to effectively detect and differentiate wild-type and vaccine CDV, indicating its use for clinical detection and epidemiological surveillance. PMID:27175171

  4. Experimental adaptation of wild-type canine distemper virus (CDV to the human entry receptor CD150.

    Maria Bieringer

    Full Text Available Canine distemper virus (CDV, a close relative of measles virus (MV, is widespread and well known for its broad host range. When the goal of measles eradication may be achieved, and when measles vaccination will be stopped, CDV might eventually cross the species barrier to humans and emerge as a new human pathogen. In order to get an impression how fast such alterations may occur, we characterized required adaptive mutations to the human entry receptors CD150 (SLAM and nectin-4 as first step to infect human target cells. Recombinant wild-type CDV-A75/17(red adapted quickly to growth in human H358 epithelial cells expressing human nectin-4. Sequencing of the viral attachment proteins (hemagglutinin, H, and fusion protein, F genes revealed that no adaptive alteration was required to utilize human nectin-4. In contrast, the virus replicated only to low titres (10(2 pfu/ml in Vero cells expressing human CD150 (Vero-hSLAM. After three passages using these cells virus was adapted to human CD150 and replicated to high titres (10(5 pfu/ml. Sequence analyses revealed that only one amino acid exchange in the H-protein at position 540 Asp→Gly (D540G was required for functional adaptation to human CD150. Structural modelling suggests that the adaptive mutation D540G in H reflects the sequence alteration from canine to human CD150 at position 70 and 71 from Pro to Leu (P70L and Gly to Glu (G71E, and compensates for the gain of a negative charge in the human CD150 molecule. Using this model system our data indicate that only a minimal alteration, in this case one adaptive mutation, is required for adaptation of CDV to the human entry receptors, and help to understand the molecular basis why this adaptive mutation occurs.

  5. MDM4 Overexpressed in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients with Complex Karyotype and Wild-Type TP53

    Li Li; Yanhong Tan; Xiuhua Chen; Zhifang Xu; Siyao Yang; Fanggang Ren; Haixiu Guo; Xiaojuan Wang; Yi Chen; Guoxia Li; Hongwei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia patients with complex karyotype (CK-AML) account for approximately 10-15% of adult AML cases, and are often associated with a poor prognosis. Except for about 70% of CK-AML patients with biallelic inactivation of TP53, the leukemogenic mechanism in the nearly 30% of CK-AML patients with wild-type TP53 has remained elusive. In this study, 15 cases with complex karyotype and wild-type TP53 were screened out of 140 de novo AML patients and the expression levels of MDM4, a ...

  6. Molecular detection and phylogenetic relationship of wild-type strains of canine distemper virus in symptomatic dogs from Uberlândia, Minas Gerais

    S.A. Headley

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the occurrence of canine distemper virus (CDV by evaluating the presence of viral RNA within urine samples of dogs from Uberlândia, MG, with clinical manifestations suggestive of infection by CDV by targeting the CDV N gene. Of the clinical samples collected ( n =33, CDV viruria was detected in 45.5%. Five dogs died spontaneously; all had characteristic CDV-associated histopathological alterations and demonstrated CDV viruria. Statistical analyses revealed that the age, gender, breed, or the organ system of the dog affected had no influence on the occurrence of canine distemper. Myoclonus and motor incoordination were the most significant neurological manifestations observed. A direct association was observed between keratoconjunctivitis and dogs with CDV viruria. These findings suggest that CDV viruria in symptomatic dogs might not be age related, and that symptomatic dogs can demonstrate clinical manifestations attributed to CDV without viruria identified by RT-PCR. Additionally, the results of the sequence identities analysed have suggested that all Brazilian wild-type strains of CDV currently identified are closely related and probably originated from the same lineage of CDV. Nevertheless, phylogenetic analyses suggest that there are different clusters of wild-type strains of CDV circulating within urban canine populations in Brazil.

  7. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in DNA immunized mink challenged with wild-type canine distemper virus

    Nielsen, Line; Søgaard, Mette; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter;

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the different phases of the immune response after DNA immunization with the hemagglutinin and nucleoprotein genes from canine distemper virus (CDV). Although attenuated live CDV vaccines have effectively reduced the incidence of disease, canine distemper is...

  8. CD7 in acute myeloid leukemia: correlation with loss of wild-type CEBPA, consequence of epigenetic regulation

    Drexler Hans G

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD7 is a negative prognostic marker in myeloid malignancies. In acute myeloid leukemia (AML, an inverse correlation exists between expression of wild-type CEBPA and CD7. Aim of this study was to find out whether C/EBPα is a negative regulator of CD7 and which other regulatory mechanisms might be involved. Results As already described for primary AML cells, the majority of AML cell lines tested were either C/EBPα+/CD7- or C/EBPα-/CD7+. However, the existence of isolated CD7+ cell lines expressing wild-type C/EBPα challenges the notion that C/EBPα acts as a unique repressor of CD7. Furthermore, ectopic expression of CEBPA did not reduce CD7 in CD7+ cells and knock-down of C/EBPα failed to induce CD7 in CD7- cells. In contrast, the DNA demethylating agent Aza-2'deoxycytidine triggered CD7 expression in CD7- AML and in T-cell lines suggesting epigenetic regulation of CD7. Bisulfite sequencing data confirmed that CpGs in the CD7 exon1 region are methylated in CD7- cell lines, and unmethylated in CD7+ cell lines. Conclusion We confirmed an inverse correlation between the expression of wild-type CEBPA and of CD7 in AML cells. Our results contradict the hypothesis that C/EBPα acts as repressor for CD7, and instead show that epigenetic mechanisms are responsible for CD7 regulation, in AML cells as well as in T-cells, the typical CD7 expressing cell type.

  9. CEBPA single mutation can be a possible favorable prognostic indicator in NPM1 and FLT3-ITD wild-type acute myeloid leukemia patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk.

    Park, Sang Hyuk; Chi, Hyun-Sook; Cho, Young-Uk; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, Chan-Jeoung

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic impact of CEBPA single mutation in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk. CEBPA single and double mutations were detected in 11 (9.7%) and 17 (15.1%) of 113 NPM1 wild-type patients, but no CEBPA mutations were detected in a group of 44 NPM1 mutated patients. Among patients with NPM1/FLT3-ITD wild-type, those with CEBPA double mutations (P=0.013 and 0.007 for overall survival and relapse-free survival, respectively) or a single mutation (P=0.039 and 0.020 for overall survival and relapse-free survival, respectively) demonstrated a favorable prognosis compared with CEBPA wild-type patients. Subsequent multivariate analysis confirmed the favorable prognostic impact of CEBPA single and double mutations. Despite the low statistical power of this study due to the small number of patients, our preliminary data suggest that CEBPA single mutation may be associated with favorable clinical outcomes in NPM1/FLT3-ITD wild-type AML patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk. PMID:24054719

  10. Double CEBPA mutations are prognostically favorable in non-M3 acute myeloid leukemia patients with wild-type NPM1 and FLT3-ITD.

    Wen, Xiang-Mei; Lin, Jiang; Yang, Jing; Yao, Dong-Ming; Deng, Zhao-Qun; Tang, Chun-Yan; Xiao, Gao-Fei; Yang, Lei; Ma, Ji-Chun; Hu, Jia-Bo; Qian, Wei; Qian, Jun

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed to investigate the pattern of CEBPA mutations and its clinical significance in Chinese non-M3 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. The entire coding region of CEBPA gene was amplified by PCR and then sequenced in samples from 233 non-M3 AML patients. Fifty mutations were identified in 37 (15.8%) patients with eleven (4.7%) double mutated CEBPA (dmCEBPA) and twenty-six (11.1%) single mutated CEBPA (smCEBPA). dmCEBPA was exclusively observed in M1 and M2 subtypes of FAB classification (P = 0.008), whereas smCEBPA occurred in almost all subtypes (P = 0.401). Patients with dmCEBPA had significantly younger age and higher WBC counts than those with wtCEBPA (P = 0.016 and 0.043, respectively). Both dmCEBPA and smCEBPA were mainly present in cytogenetically normal patients. Patients with dmCEBPA achieved higher rate of complete (CR) than wtCEBPA patients (88% vs. 51%, P = 0.037), whereas smCEBPA and wtCEBPA groups are similar (47% vs. 51%, P = 0.810). Patients with dmCEBPA had a superior overall survival (OS) compared with patients with wtCEBPA (P = 0.033), whereas patients with smCEBPA had a similar OS as patients with wtCEBPA (P = 0.976). dmCEBPA but not smCEBPA was also associated with favorable outcome in patients with wild-type NPM1 and FLT3-ITD (NPM1(wt)FLT3-ITD(wt) ). Our data confirm that dmCEBPA but not smCEBPA is prognostically favorable in NPM1(wt)FLT3-ITD(wt) AML, and suggest that the entity AML with mutated CEBPA should be definitely designated as AML with dmCEBPA in WHO classification and smCEBPA should be excluded from the favorable risk of molecular abnormalities. PMID:25400766

  11. Acute pancreatitis : a newly recognised potential complication of canine babesiosis

    A.J. Möhr; Lobetti, R. G.; J.J. Van der Lugt

    2000-01-01

    This retrospective study describes 4 cases of canine babesiosis with histologically confirmed acute pancreatitis. In addition, 16 dogs with babesiosis are reported with serum amylase (>3500 U/l ) and/or lipase (>650 U/l ) activity elevations of a magnitude that would support a diagnosis of probable acute pancreatitis, although extra-pancreatic sources of the enzymes could not be excluded in these cases. Median time of pancreatitis diagnosis was 2.5 days post-admission, with primarily yo...

  12. FLT3 mutations in canine acute lymphocytic leukemia

    FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) is a commonly mutated protein in a variety of human acute leukemias. Mutations leading to constitutively active FLT3, including internal tandem duplications of the juxtamembrane domain (ITD), result in continuous cellular proliferation, resistance to apoptotic cell death, and a poorer prognosis. A better understanding of the molecular consequences of FLT3 activation would allow improved therapeutic strategies in these patients. Canine lymphoproliferative diseases, including lymphoma and acute leukemias, share evolutionarily conserved chromosomal aberrations and exhibit conserved mutations within key oncogenes when compared to their human counterparts. A small percentage of canine acute lymphocytic leukemias (ALL) also exhibit FLT3 ITD mutations. We molecularly characterized FLT3 mutations in two dogs and one cell line, by DNA sequencing, gene expression analysis via quantitative real-time PCR, and sensitivity to the FLT3 inhibitor lestaurtinib via in vitro proliferation assays. FLT 3 and downstream mediators of FLT3 activation were assessed by Western blotting. The canine B-cell leukemia cell line, GL-1, and neoplastic cells from 2/7 dogs diagnosed cytologically with ALL were found to have FLT3 ITD mutations and FLT3 mRNA up-regulation. Lestaurtinib, a small molecule FLT3 inhibitor, significantly inhibited the growth of GL-1 cells, while not affecting the growth of two other canine lymphoid cell lines without the FLT3 mutation. Finally, western blots were used to confirm the conserved downstream mediators of FLT3 activating mutations. These results show that ALL and FLT3 biology is conserved between canine and human patients, supporting the notion that canine ALL, in conjunction with the GL-1 cell line, will be useful in the development of a relevant large animal model to aid in the study of human FLT3 mutant leukemias

  13. Acute pancreatitis : a newly recognised potential complication of canine babesiosis

    A.J. Möhr

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective study describes 4 cases of canine babesiosis with histologically confirmed acute pancreatitis. In addition, 16 dogs with babesiosis are reported with serum amylase (>3500 U/l and/or lipase (>650 U/l activity elevations of a magnitude that would support a diagnosis of probable acute pancreatitis, although extra-pancreatic sources of the enzymes could not be excluded in these cases. Median time of pancreatitis diagnosis was 2.5 days post-admission, with primarily young (median age 3 years, sexually intact dogs affected. The development of pancreatitis was unrelated to the degree of anaemia at time of admission. In addition to pancreatitis, 80 % of cases suffered from other babesial complications, namely icterus (13, acute respiratory distress syndrome (6, immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia (6, renal failure (3, haemoconcentration (2 and cerebral syndrome (2. Acute respiratory distress syndrome, renal failure and cerebral syndrome were associated with a poor prognosis, with 4 of the 5 dogs included in the overall 26 % mortality rate having at least 1 of these complications. Haemolytic anaemia with ischaemia-reperfusion injury to the pancreas is proposed as a possible primary pathophysiological mechanism in babesial pancreatitis. Hypotensive shock, immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia, haemoconcentration and possibly altered lipid metabolism in babesiosis may also be involved. The previously postulated pro-inflammatory cytokine milieu of complicated babesiosis may underlie the progression, if not the primary initiation, of pancreatic pathology. Acute pancreatitis may represent the previously reported 'gut' form of babesiosis.

  14. Double CEBPA mutations are prognostically favorable in non-M3 acute myeloid leukemia patients with wild-type NPM1 and FLT3-ITD

    Wen, Xiang-Mei; Lin, Jiang; YANG Jing; Yao, Dong-Ming; Deng, Zhao-Qun; Tang, Chun-Yan; Xiao, Gao-fei; Lei YANG; Ma, Ji-chun; Hu, Jia-Bo; Qian, Wei; Qian, Jun

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed to investigate the pattern of CEBPA mutations and its clinical significance in Chinese non-M3 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. The entire coding region of CEBPA gene was amplified by PCR and then sequenced in samples from 233 non-M3 AML patients. Fifty mutations were identified in 37 (15.8%) patients with eleven (4.7%) double mutated CEBPA (dmCEBPA) and twenty-six (11.1%) single mutated CEBPA (smCEBPA). dmCEBPA was exclusively observed in M1 and M2 subtypes of FAB cl...

  15. Effects of ascorbic acid on carcinogenicity and acute toxicity of nickel subsulfide, and on tumor transplants growth in gulonolactone oxidase knock-out mice and wild-type C57BL mice

    Kasprzak, Kazimierz S. [Laboratory of Comparative Carcinogenesis, National Cancer Institute at Frederick, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Diwan, Bhalchandra A. [Basic Research Program, Science Applications International Corporation-Frederick, Inc., National Cancer Institute at Frederick, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Kaczmarek, Monika Z. [Laboratory of Comparative Carcinogenesis, National Cancer Institute at Frederick, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Logsdon, Daniel L. [Laboratory Animal Sciences Program, Science Applications International Corporation-Frederick, Inc., National Cancer Institute at Frederick, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Fivash, Mathew J. [Data Management Services, National Cancer Institute at Frederick, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Salnikow, Konstantin, E-mail: salnikok@mail.nih.gov [Laboratory of Comparative Carcinogenesis, National Cancer Institute at Frederick, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    The aim of this study was to test a hypothesis that ascorbate depletion could enhance carcinogenicity and acute toxicity of nickel. Homozygous L-gulono- < gamma > -lactone oxidase gene knock-out mice (Gulo-/- mice) unable to produce ascorbate and wild-type C57BL mice (WT mice) were injected intramuscularly with carcinogenic nickel subsulfide (Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2}), and observed for the development of injection site tumors for 57 weeks. Small pieces of one of the induced tumors were transplanted subcutaneously into separate groups of Gulo-/- and WT mice and the growth of these tumors was measured for up to 3 months. The two strains of mice differed significantly with regard to (1) Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} carcinogenesis: Gulo-/- mice were 40% more susceptible than WT mice; and (2) transplanted tumors development: Gulo-/- mice were more receptive to tumor growth than WT mice, but only in terms of a much shorter tumor latency; later in the exponential phase of growth, the growth rates were the same. And, with adequate ascorbate supplementation, the two strains were equally susceptible to acute toxicity of Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2}. Statistically significant effects of dietary ascorbate dosing levels were the following: (1) reduction in ascorbate supplementation increased acute toxicity of Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} in Gulo-/- mice; (2) ascorbate supplementation extended the latency of transplanted tumors in WT mice. In conclusion, the lack of endogenous ascorbate synthesis makes Gulo-/- mice more susceptible to Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} carcinogenesis. Dietary ascorbate tends to attenuate acute toxicity of Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} and to extend the latency of transplanted tumors. The latter effects may be of practical importance to humans and thus deserve further studies. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ascorbate depletion enhances carcinogenicity and acute toxicity of nickel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gulo-/- mice unable to synthesize ascorbate were used in this study. Black

  16. Perfil de restrição de um fragmento do gene da hemaglutinina amplificado pela RT-PCR a partir de estirpes vacinais e selvagens do vírus da cinomose canina Restriction pattern of a hemagglutinin gene amplified by RT-PCR from vaccine strains and wild-type canine distemper virus

    F.J. Negrão

    2006-12-01

    , Onderstepoort and Rockborn CDV strains were analyzed. All RT-PCR amplified product from CDV wild-type and vaccine-strains had the same RFLP pattern with Hinf I enzyme showing the amplicon specificity. The RFLP pattern for CDV vaccine-strains generated with Rsa I enzyme was the expected by in silico analysis. All 27 wild-type CDV strains present the same Rsa I enzyme RFLP pattern that was different from vaccine-strains pattern, suggesting molecular differences between vaccine-strains and wild-type of CDV from dogs population in North region of Paraná State/Brazil. These results open the perspectives of the accomplishment of comparative molecular analysis, such as sequencing of the whole gene H, of CDV wild-type strains identified in different Brazilian regions.

  17. Uncommon acute neurologic presentation of canine distemper in 4 adult dogs.

    Galán, Alba; Gamito, Araceli; Carletti, Beatrice E; Guisado, Alicia; de las Mulas, Juana Martín; Pérez, José; Martín, Eva M

    2014-04-01

    Four uncommon cases of canine distemper (CD) were diagnosed in vaccinated adult dogs. All dogs had acute onset of neurologic signs, including seizures, abnormal mentation, ataxia, and proprioceptive deficits. Polymerase chain reaction for CD virus was positive on cerebrospinal fluid in 2 cases. Due to rapid deterioration the dogs were euthanized and CD was confirmed by postmortem examination. PMID:24688139

  18. Uncommon acute neurologic presentation of canine distemper in 4 adult dogs

    Galán, Alba; Gamito, Araceli; Carletti, Beatrice E.; Guisado, Alicia; de las Mulas, Juana Martín; Pérez, José; Martín, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    Four uncommon cases of canine distemper (CD) were diagnosed in vaccinated adult dogs. All dogs had acute onset of neurologic signs, including seizures, abnormal mentation, ataxia, and proprioceptive deficits. Polymerase chain reaction for CD virus was positive on cerebrospinal fluid in 2 cases. Due to rapid deterioration the dogs were euthanized and CD was confirmed by postmortem examination.

  19. Urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL as a biomarker for acute canine kidney injury

    Lee Ya-Jane

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biomarkers for the early prediction of canine acute kidney injury (AKI are clinically important. Recently, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL was found to be a sensitive biomarker for the prediction of human AKI at a very early stage and the development of AKI after surgery. However, NGAL has not yet been studied with respect to dog kidney diseases. The application of NGAL canine AKI was investigated in this study. Results The canine NGAL gene was successfully cloned and expressed. Polyclonal antibodies against canine NGAL were generated and used to develop an ELISA for measuring NGAL protein in serum and urine samples that were collected from 39 dogs at different time points after surgery. AKI was defined by the standard method, namely a serum creatinine increase of greater than or equal to 26.5 μmol/L from baseline within 48 h. At 12 h after surgery, compared to the group without AKI (12 dogs, the NGAL level in the urine of seven dogs with AKI was significantly increased (median 178.4 pg/mL vs. 88.0 pg/mL, and this difference was sustained to 72 h. Conclusion As the increase in NGAL occurred much earlier than the increase in serum creatinine, urine NGAL seems to be able to serve as a sensitive and specific biomarker for the prediction of AKI in dogs.

  20. Controversial results of therapy with mesenchymal stem cells in the acute phase of canine distemper disease.

    Pinheiro, A O; Cardoso, M T; Vidane, A S; Casals, J B; Passarelli, D; Alencar, A L F; Sousa, R L M; Fantinato-Neto, P; Oliveira, V C; Lara, V M; Ambrósio, C E

    2016-01-01

    Distemper disease is an infectious disease reported in several species of domestic and wild carnivores. The high mortality rate of animals infected with canine distemper virus (CDV) treated with currently available therapies has driven the study of new efficacious treatments. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapy is a promising therapeutic option for many degenerative, hereditary, and inflammatory diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize stem cells derived from the canine fetal olfactory epithelium and to assess the systemic response of animals infected with CDV to symptomatic therapy and treatment with MSCs. Eight domestic mongrel dogs (N = 8) were divided into two groups: support group (SG) (N = 5) and support group + cell therapy (SGCT) (N = 3), which were monitored over 15 days. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 6, 9, 12, and 15 to assess blood count and serum biochemistry (urea, creatinine, alanine transferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, total protein, albumin, and globulin), and urine samples were obtained on days 0 and 15 for urinary evaluation (urine I). The results showed a high mortality rate (SG = 4 and SGCT = 2), providing inadequate data on the clinical course of CDV infection. MSC therapy resulted in no significant improvement when administered during the acute phase of canine distemper disease, and a prevalence of animals with high mortality rate was found in both groups due to the severity of symptoms. PMID:27323085

  1. A comparative study on administration routes of recombinant staphylokinase in canine model with acute cerebral infarction

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and complications in the treatment of dogs with acute cerebral infarction using recombinant staphylokinase (r-Sak) via different administration routes. Methods: The model of left internal cerebral embolism was established with interventional technique in 24 beagle adult dogs which were randomly divided into control group, intraarterial group and intravenous group. Postembolization 5 hours (or 3 hrs in intravenous group), a cerebral angiography was performed, a dosage of 10 000 u/kg r-sak was infused through left internal carotid artery or left femoral vein within 30 mins, and only 10 ml of saline was infused in control group. Angiography was repeated to observe the effects on recanalization and blood samples were collected to determine activated partial thromboplastin time, etc. at 30, 60 and 120 mins respectively after thrombolysis. The behavior of these canines was observed and all of the dogs were sacrificed after 24 hours for pathologic study. Results: 2 hour's after thrombolysis, recanalization rates of embolized cerebral vessels were 0%, 93.3% and 37.5% in control group, intraarterial group and intravenous group respectively, and the complete recanalization rates were 0%, 60% and 6.7%, respectively. There were significant differences between the two r-Sak groups and the control group (P<0.05), and the complete recanalization rate of intraarterial group was obviously higher than that of intravenous group (P<0.05). Influence on blood coagulation and fibrillolysis in two r-Sak groups showed no significant difference, and no serious complication occurred in 24 hours. Conclusion: Thrombolysis using r-Sak is an effective treatment for canine models with acute cerebral infarction, and the thrombolysis effect of intraarterial method is much more than that of intravenous method. (authors)

  2. Amyloid polyneuropathy caused by wild-type transthyretin

    Lam, L.; Margeta, M; Layzer, R

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Introduction: Amyloidosis derived from transthyretin (TTR) molecules is typically caused by mutations of the TTR gene. Methods: We describe an elderly patient with a severe length-dependent polyneuropathy that unexpectedly proved to be caused by wild-type transthyretin amyloidosis. Results: The diagnosis was made by muscle biopsy, because no amyloid deposits were found in the biopsied nerve segment. Most cases of wild-type transthyretin amyloidosis occur in elde...

  3. Dose-effective investigation of intraarterial r-Sak in canine model with acute cerebral infarctions

    Objective: To compare the effect and complications of intraarterial thrombolysis with different doses of recombinant-staphylokinase (r-Sak) in canine model with acute cerebral infarction, and then to find out the most properly appropriate effective dose. Methods: The model with left cerebral embolism was established with interventional technique in 24 beagle adult dogs. They were randomly divided into 4 groups including control group(saline, 10 ml), group of low dose(r-Sak, 5 000 u/kg), middle dose(r-Sak, 10 000 u/kg) and high dose(r-Sak, 20 000 u/kg). Angiography and intraarterial thrombolysis were performed within 30 minutes after the embolization. Microcatheter was superselectively inserted into left carotid artery. Five hour's later with a repeated angiography at half, 1 and 2 hours after thrombolysis to observe the recanalization. Blood samples were collected at a series of time pre-and post-thrombolysis to test the plasma levels of PT, APTT and D-dimer. These canines were sacrificed, and their cerebri were taken out for pathologic study by the end of 24 hours. Results: The rates of efficacy within 2 hours after thrombolysis were 10.0% (1/10) in control group, 40.0% (4/10) in low dose group, 90.9% (10/11) in middle dose group and 100% (9/9) in high dose group. The rates of complete recanalization were 0, 10% (1/10), 36.4% (4/11) and 66.7% (6/9), correspondingly and respectively. There were statistically obvious differences between the 3 groups (P0.05). Death occurred in 1 canine(high dose group) within 24 hours after thrombolysis with hemorrhagic lesion in parietal lobe of brain. No other severe complications ocurred. Conclusions: (1) Intraarterial thrombolysis with r-Sak within 5 hours after onset of thrombosis is effective and feasible. Intraarterial r-Sak shows strong thrombolytic effect for white thrombus including a few platelets. There is relative high rate of recanalization with no less than 10 000U/kg of r-Sak but accompanied with high risk of

  4. Effect of nifekalant on acute electrical remodelling in rapid atrial pacing canine model

    TANG Min; ZHANG Shu; SUN Qi; HUA Wei; HUANG Cong-xin

    2006-01-01

    Background Nifekalant may prevent atrial fibrillation (AF) and possibly be useful in treatment of atrial tachyarrhythmia in patients with severe heart failure. This study investigated the electophysiologic effect of nifekalant on the acute atrial remodeling in rapid atrial pacing (RAP) model of canine.Methods Twelve mongrel dogs subjected to rapid stimulation (400 beats/min) at left atrial appendage (LAA)for 24 hours, were randomized into the control group (rapid pacing only, n=6) and the nifekalant group (intravenous nifekalant therapy immediately after RAP, n=6). Atrial electrophysiological parameters were measured in right atrium, coronary sinus, LAA, posterior wall of left atrium (PWLA) and left superior pulmonary vein (LSPV), before and after the RAP.Results In the control group, the effective refractory periods (ERP) were shortened greatly at all sites, paced dogs had substantially shorter ERPs in the high right atrium, LAA, and LSPV, but fewer changes in the PWLA,the coefficient variation of ERP (COV ERP) was increased significantly. After rapid atrial stimulation, the inducibility of AF increased significantly [induction number: pre-RAP vs post-RAP, 1.00± 0.89 vs 8.17 ± 2.79,P<0.01; duration of AF: pre-RAP vs post-RAP, (450.34± 362.59) ms vs (9975.77 ±4376.99) ms, P<0.01]. In the nifekalant group, although the ERPs were prolonged at all sites compared with those in pre-RAP state, only the value at LSPV differed significantly from that in pre-RAP state [pre-RAP vs post-RAP, (102.50±5.24) ms vs (132.51 ±5.20) ms, P<0.01]; the COV ERP did not change statistically in this group. The inducibility of AF slightly increased but insignificantly after pacing [induction number: pre-RAP vs post-RAP, 0.83 ±0.75 vs 1.67±0.82, P=0.19; duration of AF: pre-RAP vs post-RAP, (378.67±317.88) ms vs (1124.08±1109.77) ms,P=0.06]. Conduction time values did not alter significantly in either of the two groups after RAP.Conclusions In canine RAP model, nifekalant

  5. Transcutaneous Intraluminal Impedance Measurement for Minimally Invasive Monitoring of Gastric Motility: Validation in Acute Canine Models

    Michael D. Poscente

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcutaneous intraluminal impedance measurement (TIIM is a new method to cutaneously measure gastric contractions by assessing the attenuation dynamics of a small oscillating voltage emitted by a battery-powered ingestible capsule retained in the stomach. In the present study, we investigated whether TIIM can reliably assess gastric motility in acute canine models. Methods. Eight mongrel dogs were randomly divided into 2 groups: half received an active TIIM pill and half received an identically sized sham capsule. After 24-hour fasting and transoral administration of the pill (active or sham, two force transducers (FT were sutured onto the antral serosa at laparotomy. After closure, three standard cutaneous electrodes were placed on the abdomen, registering the transluminally emitted voltage. Thirty-minute baseline recordings were followed by pharmacological induction of gastric contractions using neostigmine IV and another 30-minute recording. Normalized one-minute baseline and post-neostigmine gastric motility indices (GMIs were calculated and Pearson correlation coefficients (PCCs between cutaneous and FT GMIs were obtained. Statistically significant GMI PCCs were seen in both baseline and post-neostigmine states. There were no significant GMI PCCs in the sham capsule test. Further chronic animal studies of this novel long-term gastric motility measurement technique are needed before testing it on humans.

  6. Molecular dynamics studies on the structural stability of wild-type dog prion protein.

    Zhang, Jiapu; Liu, David D W

    2011-06-01

    Prion diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob diseases, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, Fatal Familial Insomnia, Kuru in humans, scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (or 'mad-cow' disease) and chronic wasting disease in cattle are invariably fatal and highly infectious neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans and animals. However, by now there have not been some effective therapeutic approaches to treat all these prion diseases. In 2008, canine mammals including dogs (canis familials) were the first time academically reported to be resistant to prion diseases (Vaccine 26: 2601-2614 (2008)). Thus, it is very worth studying the molecular structures of dog prion protein to obtain insights into the immunity of dogs to prion diseases. This paper studies the molecular structural dynamics of wild-type dog prion protein. The comparison analyses with rabbit prion protein show that the dog prion protein has stable molecular structures whether under neutral or low pH environments. We also find that the salt bridges such as D177-R163 contribute to the structural stability of wild-type rabbit prion protein under neutral pH environment. PMID:21469747

  7. Focal mesangial-sclerosing glomerulonephritis and acute-spontaneous infectious canine hepatitis: structural, immunohistochemical and subcellular studies.

    Hervás, J; Gómez-Villamandos, J C; Pérez, J; Carrasco, L; Sierra, M A

    1997-06-01

    The glomerular alterations observed in a dog with acute spontaneous infectious canine hepatitis (ICH) are described. Histologic changes of the glomeruli were enlargement of the mesangium with presence of intranuclear inclusion bodies and without proliferation of mesangial cells. Electron microscopy revealed adenovirus replication sites in glomerular mesangial cells and in endothelial cells of glomerular capillaries, as well as a focal mesangial-sclerosing glomerulonephritis associated with electron dense deposits which were closely related with extracellular ICH viral particles and immunohistochemically reactive for immunoglobulin (Ig) G, IgA, IgM and C3c complement components. PMID:9239835

  8. Comparative effects of chlorpyrifos in wild type and cannabinoid Cb1 receptor knockout mice

    Baireddy, Praveena; Liu, Jing; Hinsdale, Myron; Pope, Carey, E-mail: carey.pope@okstate.edu

    2011-11-15

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) modulate neurotransmission by inhibiting the release of a variety of neurotransmitters. The cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55.212-2 (WIN) can modulate organophosphorus (OP) anticholinesterase toxicity in rats, presumably by inhibiting acetylcholine (ACh) release. Some OP anticholinesterases also inhibit eCB-degrading enzymes. We studied the effects of the OP insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) on cholinergic signs of toxicity, cholinesterase activity and ACh release in tissues from wild type (+/+) and cannabinoid CB1 receptor knockout (-/-) mice. Mice of both genotypes (n = 5-6/treatment group) were challenged with CPF (300 mg/kg, 2 ml/kg in peanut oil, sc) and evaluated for functional and neurochemical changes. Both genotypes exhibited similar cholinergic signs and cholinesterase inhibition (82-95% at 48 h after dosing) in cortex, cerebellum and heart. WIN reduced depolarization-induced ACh release in vitro in hippocampal slices from wild type mice, but had no effect in hippocampal slices from knockouts or in striatal slices from either genotype. Chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO, 100 {mu}M) reduced release in hippocampal slices from both genotypes in vitro, but with a greater reduction in tissues from wild types (21% vs 12%). CPO had no significant in vitro effect on ACh release in striatum. CPF reduced ACh release in hippocampus from both genotypes ex vivo, but reduction was again significantly greater in tissues from wild types (52% vs 36%). In striatum, CPF led to a similar reduction (20-23%) in tissues from both genotypes. Thus, while CB1 deletion in mice had little influence on the expression of acute toxicity following CPF, CPF- or CPO-induced changes in ACh release appeared sensitive to modulation by CB1-mediated eCB signaling in a brain-regional manner. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C57Bl/6 mice showed dose-related cholinergic toxicity following subcutaneous chlorpyrifos exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wild type and

  9. Structural determination of wild-type lactose permease

    Guan, Lan; Mirza, Osman; Verner, Gillian; Iwata, So; Kaback, H. Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Here we describe an x-ray structure of wild-type lactose permease (LacY) from Escherichia coli determined by manipulating phospholipid content during crystallization. The structure exhibits the same global fold as the previous x-ray structures of a mutant that binds sugar but cannot catalyze translocation across the membrane. LacY is organized into two six-helix bundles with twofold pseudosymmetry separated by a large interior hydrophilic cavity open only to the cytoplasmic side and containin...

  10. Comparative study of intraarterial and intravenous thrombolysis with urokinase in canine models of acute pulmonary arterial embolism

    Objective: To evaluate the efficiency and safety of intraarterial thrombolysis with urokinase (UK)in canine models of acute pulmonary arterial embolism. Methods: 24 Canine models of selective acute pulmonary artery embolism with autologous blood clot were divided randomly into 3 groups(each with 8 dogs): intraarterial thrombolytic group (10 000 u/kg of UK infused in 30 rain), intravenous thrombolytic group (20 000 u/kg of UK infused in 2 h) and control group (100 ml of saline infused in 2 h). The value of pulmonary arterial mean pressure (PAMP), blood gas analysis (PaO2 and PaCO2), coagulation index(PT and APTT)and D-dimer were tested at 2 h, 4 h after the thrombolytic procedure and pulmonary arterial angiography was repeated. Results: Comparing the levels of PAMP, PaO2 and D-dimer, showed significant difference in the 3 groups (P2 and blood supply restores more rapidly than the intravenous one. (authors)

  11. Full Genome Sequence-Based Comparative Study of Wild-Type and Vaccine Strains of Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus from Italy

    Piccirillo, Alessandra; Lavezzo, Enrico; Niero, Giulia; Moreno, Ana; Massi, Paola; Franchin, Elisa; Toppo, Stefano; Salata, Cristiano; Palù, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an acute and highly contagious respiratory disease of chickens caused by an alphaherpesvirus, infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV). Recently, full genome sequences of wild-type and vaccine strains have been determined worldwide, but none was from Europe. The aim of this study was to determine and analyse the complete genome sequences of five ILTV strains. Sequences were also compared to reveal the similarity of strains across time and to discriminate...

  12. Canine-Origin G3P[3] Rotavirus Strain in Child with Acute Gastroenteritis

    De Grazia, Simona; Martella, Vito; Giammanco, Giovanni M; Gòmara, Miren Iturriza; Ramirez, Stefania; Cascio, Antonio; Colomba, Claudia; Arista, Serenella

    2007-01-01

    Infection by an animal-like strain of rotavirus (PA260/97) was diagnosed in a child with gastroenteritis in Palermo, Italy, in 1997. Sequence analysis of VP7, VP4, VP6, and NSP4 genes showed resemblance to a G3P[3] canine strain identified in Italy in 1996. Dogs are a potential source of human viral pathogens.

  13. Automatic Detection of Wild-type Mouse Cranial Sutures

    Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Darvann, Tron Andre; Hermann, Nuno V.;

    , automatic detection of the cranial sutures becomes important. We have previously built a craniofacial, wild-type mouse atlas from a set of 10 Micro CT scans using a B-spline-based nonrigid registration method by Rueckert et al. Subsequently, all volumes were registered nonrigidly to the atlas. Using these...... observer traced the sutures on each of the mouse volumes as well. The observer outperforms the automatic approach by approximately 0.1 mm. All mice have similar errors while the suture error plots reveal that suture 1 and 2 are cumbersome, both for the observer and the automatic approach. These sutures can...

  14. Analysis of Doppler flow spectra of the superior vena cava in a canine model of acute thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    Sun, Dan Dan; Chen, Hong Mao; Duan, Yun You; Yuan, Li Jun; Shang, Fu Jun; Liang, Ning Nan; Cao, Wei

    2011-10-01

    We aimed to establish a canine model of acute thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (ATEPH) and to explore the feasibility of diagnosing pulmonary hypertension (PH) through the Doppler flow spectra of the superior vena cava (SVC). A canine model of ATEPH was developed by infusing thrombus into the right femoral vein. The pulmonary arterial pressure was simultaneously measured via a right heart catheter with the guidance of ultrasound. The maximum systolic peak flow velocity (SPV), ventricular reverse peak flow velocity (VRPV), diastolic peak flow velocity (DPV), and atrial reverse peak flow velocity (ARPV) of the SVC were measured by transthoracic echocardiography. ATEPH was successfully established in 24 dogs (88.9%) with the pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PASP) greater than 30 mmHg. ARPV increased significantly with the increase of PASP, and was positively correlated with PASP (PSPV larger than 0.8 could be better adopted to identify all the subjects with PH in this study. The Doppler flow spectra of the SVC could be employed to assess the severity of ATEPH.  PMID:21916968

  15. "Wild type" GIST: Clinicopathological features and clinical practice.

    Wada, Ryuichi; Arai, Hiroki; Kure, Shoko; Peng, Wei-Xia; Naito, Zenya

    2016-08-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a mesenchymal tumor of the gastrointestinal tract. Mutation of KIT and PDGFRA genes is implicated in the tumorigenesis. Approximately 10% of GISTs do not harbor mutation of these genes, and they are designated as "wild type" GIST. They are classified into succinate dehydrogenase (SDH)-deficient and non-SDH-deficient groups. SDH-deficient group includes Carney triad and Carney Stratakis syndrome. The patients are young women. Tumors occur in the antrum of the stomach, and tumor cells are epithelioid. Lymph node metastasis is frequent. The non-SDH-deficient group includes neurofibromatosis (NF) type 1 and GISTs with mutations of BRAF, KRAS, and PIK3CA and with the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion gene. GIST in NF occurs in the small intestine, and tumor cells are spindle shaped. GIST with BRAF mutation arises in the small intestine. Attention to the age, gender, family history and other neoplasms may raise the prediction of syndromic disease. Location of the tumor, morphology, and pleomorphism of the tumor cells are further informative. Lymphovascular invasion should be carefully evaluated. The determination of KIT expression is essential for the diagnosis. When wild type GIST is suspected, intensive genetic analysis is required. Further, a careful and long-time observation is recommended. PMID:27427238

  16. A negative search of acute canine distemper virus infection in DogSLAM transgenic C57BL/6 mice

    Somporn Techangamsuwan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Canine distemper is a highly contagious and immunosuppressive viral disease caused by canine distemper virus(CDV, an enveloped RNA virus of the family Paramyxoviridae. The susceptible host spectrum of CDV is broad andincludes all families of the order Carnivora. To accomplish the infection, CDV requires an expression of signaling lymphocyteactivation molecule (SLAM functioning as a cellular receptor which generally presents in a variety of different lymphoid cellsubpopulations, including immature thymocytes, primary B cells, activated T cells, memory T cells, macrophages and maturedendritic cells. The distribution of SLAM-presenting cells is in accordance with the lymphotropism and immunosuppressionfollowing morbillivirus infection. In the present study, the C57BL/6 mice engrafted with dog-specific SLAM sequence(DogSLAM were used. The weanling (3-week-old transgenic offspring C57BL/6 mice were infected with CDV Snyder Hill(CDV-SH strain via the intranasal (n=6, intracerebral (n=6 and intraperitoneal (n=5 routes. Clinical signs, hematology,histopathology, immunohistochemistry, virus isolation and RT-PCR were observed for two weeks post infection. Resultsshowed that CDV-SH-inoculated transgenic mice displayed mild-to-moderate congestion of various organs (brain, lung,spleen, kidney, lymph node, and adrenal gland. By means of immunohistochemistry, virus isolation and RT-PCR, CDV couldnot be detected. The evidence of CDV infection in this study could not be demonstrated in acute phase. Even though thetransgenic mouse is not a suitable animal model for CDV, or a longer incubation period is prerequisite, it needs to be clarifiedin a future study.

  17. Prion-Specific Antibodies Produced in Wild-Type Mice.

    Heegaard, Peter M H; Bergström, Ann-Louise; Andersen, Heidi Gertz; Cordes, Henriette

    2015-01-01

    Peptide-specific antibodies produced against synthetic peptides are of high value in probing protein structure and function, especially when working with challenging proteins, including not readily available, non-immunogenic, toxic, and/or pathogenic proteins. Here, we present a straightforward method for production of mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against peptides representing two sites of interest in the bovine prion protein (boPrP), the causative agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy ("mad cow disease") and new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob's disease (CJD) in humans, as well as a thorough characterization of their reactivity with a range of normal and pathogenic (misfolded) prion proteins. It is demonstrated that immunization of wild-type mice with ovalbumin-conjugated peptides formulated with Freund's adjuvant induces a good immune response, including high levels of specific anti-peptide antibodies, even against peptides very homologous to murine protein sequences. In general, using the strategies described here for selecting, synthesizing, and conjugating peptides and immunizing 4-5 mice with 2-3 different peptides, high-titered antibodies reacting with the target protein are routinely obtained with at least one of the peptides after three to four immunizations with incomplete Freund's adjuvant. PMID:26424281

  18. Wild type measles virus attenuation independent of type I IFN

    Horvat Branka

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Measles virus attenuation has been historically performed by adaptation to cell culture. The current dogma is that attenuated virus strains induce more type I IFN and are more resistant to IFN-induced protection than wild type (wt. Results The adaptation of a measles virus isolate (G954-PBL by 13 passages in Vero cells induced a strong attenuation of this strain in vivo. The adapted virus (G954-V13 differs from its parental strain by only 5 amino acids (4 in P/V/C and 1 in the M gene. While a vaccine strain, Edmonston Zagreb, could replicate equally well in various primate cells, both G954 strains exhibited restriction to the specific cell type used initially for their propagation. Surprisingly, we observed that both G954 strains induced type I IFN, the wt strain inducing even more than the attenuated ones, particularly in human plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells. Type I IFN-induced protection from the infection of both G954 strains depended on the cell type analyzed, being less efficient in the cells used to grow the viral strain. Conclusion Thus, mutations in M and P/V/C proteins can critically affect MV pathogenicity, cellular tropism and lead to virus attenuation without interfering with the α/β IFN system.

  19. Full Genome Sequence-Based Comparative Study of Wild-Type and Vaccine Strains of Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus from Italy.

    Alessandra Piccirillo

    Full Text Available Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT is an acute and highly contagious respiratory disease of chickens caused by an alphaherpesvirus, infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV. Recently, full genome sequences of wild-type and vaccine strains have been determined worldwide, but none was from Europe. The aim of this study was to determine and analyse the complete genome sequences of five ILTV strains. Sequences were also compared to reveal the similarity of strains across time and to discriminate between wild-type and vaccine strains. Genomes of three ILTV field isolates from outbreaks occurred in Italy in 1980, 2007 and 2011, and two commercial chicken embryo origin (CEO vaccines were sequenced using the 454 Life Sciences technology. The comparison with the Serva genome showed that 35 open reading frames (ORFs differed across the five genomes. Overall, 54 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and 27 amino acid differences in 19 ORFs and two insertions in the UL52 and ORFC genes were identified. Similarity among the field strains and between the field and the vaccine strains ranged from 99.96% to 99.99%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship among them, as well. This study generated data on genomic variation among Italian ILTV strains revealing that, even though the genetic variability of the genome is well conserved across time and between wild-type and vaccine strains, some mutations may help in differentiating among them and may be involved in ILTV virulence/attenuation. The results of this study can contribute to the understanding of the molecular bases of ILTV pathogenicity and provide genetic markers to differentiate between wild-type and vaccine strains.

  20. Full Genome Sequence-Based Comparative Study of Wild-Type and Vaccine Strains of Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus from Italy.

    Piccirillo, Alessandra; Lavezzo, Enrico; Niero, Giulia; Moreno, Ana; Massi, Paola; Franchin, Elisa; Toppo, Stefano; Salata, Cristiano; Palù, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an acute and highly contagious respiratory disease of chickens caused by an alphaherpesvirus, infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV). Recently, full genome sequences of wild-type and vaccine strains have been determined worldwide, but none was from Europe. The aim of this study was to determine and analyse the complete genome sequences of five ILTV strains. Sequences were also compared to reveal the similarity of strains across time and to discriminate between wild-type and vaccine strains. Genomes of three ILTV field isolates from outbreaks occurred in Italy in 1980, 2007 and 2011, and two commercial chicken embryo origin (CEO) vaccines were sequenced using the 454 Life Sciences technology. The comparison with the Serva genome showed that 35 open reading frames (ORFs) differed across the five genomes. Overall, 54 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 27 amino acid differences in 19 ORFs and two insertions in the UL52 and ORFC genes were identified. Similarity among the field strains and between the field and the vaccine strains ranged from 99.96% to 99.99%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship among them, as well. This study generated data on genomic variation among Italian ILTV strains revealing that, even though the genetic variability of the genome is well conserved across time and between wild-type and vaccine strains, some mutations may help in differentiating among them and may be involved in ILTV virulence/attenuation. The results of this study can contribute to the understanding of the molecular bases of ILTV pathogenicity and provide genetic markers to differentiate between wild-type and vaccine strains. PMID:26890525

  1. Biosafety of recombinant and wild type nucleopolyhedroviruses as bioinsecticides.

    Ashour, Mohamed-Bassem; Ragheb, Didair A; El-Sheikh, El-Sayed A; Gomaa, El-Adarosy A; Kamita, Shizuo G; Hammock, Bruce D

    2007-06-01

    The entomopathogenic Autographa californica (Speyer) nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) has been genetically modified to increase its speed of kill. The potential adverse effects of a recombinant AcMNPV (AcAaIT) as well as wild type AcMNPV and wild type Spodoptera littoralis NPV (SlNPV) were studied. Cotton plants were treated with these viruses at concentrations that were adjusted to resemble the recommended field application rate (4 x 10(12) PIBs/feddan, feddan = 4,200 m2) and 3rd instar larvae of S. littoralis were allowed to feed on the contaminated plants. SDS-PAGE, ELISA, and DNA analyses were used to confirm that larvae that fed on these plants were virus-infected. Polyhedra that were purified from the infected larvae were subjected to structural protein analysis. A 32 KDa protein was found in polyhedra that were isolated from all of the viruses. Subtle differences were found in the size and abundance of ODV proteins. Antisera against polyhedral proteins isolated from AcAaIT polyhedra were raised in rabbits. The terminal bleeds from rabbits were screened against four coating antigens (i.e., polyhedral proteins from AcAaIT, AcAaIT from field-infected larvae (AcAaIT-field), AcMNPV, and SlNPV) using a two-dimensional titration method with the coated antigen format. Competitive inhibition experiments were conducted in parallel to optimize antibody and coating antigen concentrations for ELISA. The IC50 values for each combination ranged from 1.42 to 163 microg/ml. AcAaIT-derived polyhedrin gave the lowest IC50 value, followed by those of SlNPV, AcAaIT-field, and AcMNPV. The optimized ELISA system showed low cross reactivity for AcMNPV (0.87%), AcAaIT-field (1.2%), and SlNPV (4.0%). Genomic DNAs isolated from AcAaIT that were passaged in larvae of S. littoralis that were reared in the laboratory or field did not show any detectable differences. Albino rats (male and female) that were treated with AcAaIT, AcMNPV or SlNPV (either orally or by intraperitoneal injection at

  2. Biosafety of Recombinant and Wild Type Nucleopolyhedroviruses as Bioinsecticides

    Bruce D. Hammock

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The entomopathogenic Autographa californica (Speyer nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV has been genetically modified to increase its speed of kill. The potential adverse effects of a recombinant AcMNPV (AcAaIT as well as wild type AcMNPV and wild type Spodoptera littoralis NPV (SlNPV were studied. Cotton plants were treated with these viruses at concentrations that were adjusted to resemble the recommended field application rate (4 x 1012 PIBs/feddan, feddan = 4,200 m2 and 3rd instar larvae of S. littoralis were allowed to feed on the contaminated plants. SDS-PAGE, ELISA, and DNA analyses were used to confirm that larvae that fed on these plants were virus-infected. Polyhedra that were purified from the infected larvae were subjected to structural protein analysis. A 32 KDa protein was found in polyhedra that were isolated from all of the viruses. Subtle differences were found in the size and abundance of ODV proteins. Antisera against polyhedral proteins isolated from AcAaIT polyhedra were raised in rabbits. The terminal bleeds from rabbits were screened against four coating antigens (i.e., polyhedral proteins from AcAaIT, AcAaIT from field-infected larvae (AcAaIT-field, AcMNPV, and SlNPV using a two-dimensional titration method with the coated antigen format. Competitive inhibition experiments were conducted in parallel to optimize antibody and coating antigen concentrations for ELISA. The IC50 values for each combination ranged from 1.42 to 163 μg/ml. AcAaIT-derived polyhedrin gave the lowest IC50 value, followed by those of SlNPV, AcAaIT-field, and AcMNPV. The optimized ELISA system showed low cross reactivity for AcMNPV (0.87%, AcAaIT-field (1.2%, and SlNPV (4.0%. Genomic DNAs isolated from AcAaIT that were passaged in larvae of S. littoralis that were reared in the laboratory or field did not show any detectable differences. Albino rats (male and female that were treated with AcAaIT, AcMNPV or SlNPV (either orally or by intraperitoneal

  3. Wild-type measles virus is intrinsically dual-tropic

    MakotoTakeda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Measles is a highly contagious disease that causes temporary and severe immunosuppression in patients. Signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM expressed on cells of the immune system functions as a receptor for measles virus (MV. In addition to SLAM, vaccine strains of MV also use a ubiquitously expressed complement regulatory protein, CD46, as a receptor, whereas wild-type (wt MV strains do not use this receptor. However, recent studies have indicated that SLAM is not the sole receptor for wt MV strains. These strains have an intrinsic ability to enter both immune and epithelial cells using distinct receptor binding sites in their hemagglutinin (H protein. Recently, a clear answer was obtained through the identification of an epithelial MV receptor, nectin4, expressed at adherens junctions, thereby greatly improving our knowledge of MV receptors. It is now clear that MV specifically targets two cell types, immune cells and epithelial cells, using SLAM and nectin4, respectively. MV loses the ability to use either SLAM or nectin4 when it possesses specific mutations in the H protein. However, nectin4-blind MV still infects SLAM-positive immune cells efficiently (SLAM-tropic, and conversely, SLAM-blind MV infects nectin4-positive epithelial cells efficiently (nectin4-tropic. In this regard, MV is intrinsically dual-tropic to immune cells and epithelial cells. Although many aspects and molecular mechanisms underlying immunosuppressive effects and a highly contagious nature of MV still remain to be elucidated, analyses of physiological functions of these two receptors would provide deep insights into MV pathogenesis.

  4. MR diffusion tensor imaging in the evaluation of neural progenitor cells transplantation to acute injured canine spinal cord

    Objective: To observe the effect of transplantation of telomerase immortalized human neural progenitor cells to acute injured canine spinal cord by using MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Methods: Telomerase immortalized human neural progenitor cells with expression of green fluorescent protein were prepared for transplantation. Eight adult canines with left spinal cord hemisection at the level of T13 were examined by MR diffusion tensor imaging four times sequentially: prior to injury, one week after injury, one week after transplantation (two weeks after injury), and four weeks after transplantation. Results: The ADC values of the injured spinal cord were (1.00 ± 0.15) x 10-3 mm2/s, (1.65 ± 0.45) x 10-3 mm2/s, (1.44 ± 0.48) xl0-3 mm2/s, and (1.43 ± 0.26) x 10-3 mm2/s, respectively. There was statistically significant difference between the data obtained at different times (F= 6.038, P=0.005). The FA values of the injured spinal cord were 0.59±0.11, 0.30±0.17, 0.36±0.25, and 0.34±0.11, respectively. There was also statistically significant difference between the data obtained at different times (F=5.221, P=0.009). The ADC values of the intact spinal cord were (1.01±0.17) x 10-3 mm2/s, (1.32±0.06) x 10-3 mm2/s, (1.10±0.24) x 10-3 mm2/s, and (1.14±0.22) x 10-3 mm2/s, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the data obtained at different times (F=1.303, P=0.306). The FA values of the intact spinal cord were 0.60 ± 0.09, 0.38 ± 0.25, 0.46 ± 0.15, and 0.50 ± 0.21, respectively. There was also no statistically significant difference between the data obtained at different times (F=2.797, P=0.072). Conclusion: DTI can provide useful information for spinal cord injury and regeneration in experimental spinal cord injury. (authors)

  5. Activation Of Wild-Type Hras Suppresses The Earliest Stages Of Pancreatic Cancer

    Jamie Weyandt

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: Loss of wild-type Hras promotes the earliest stages of pancreatic tumorigenesis, and moreover results in more rapid progression of the disease. As such, mechanisms leading to activation of wild-type Ras proteins, including but not limited to redox-dependent reactions, may influence the development of pancreatic cancer.

  6. Biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa wild type, flagella and type IV pili mutants

    Klausen, M.; Heydorn, Arne; Ragas, Paula Cornelia; Lambertsen, Lotte Munch; Aaes-Jorgensen, A.; Molin, Søren; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2003-01-01

    for P. aeruginosa initial attachment or biofilm formation, but the cell appendages had roles in biofilm development, as wild type, flagella and type IV pili mutants formed biofilms with different structures. Dynamics and selection during biofilm formation were investigated by tagging the wild type and...... flagella/type IV mutants with Yfp and Cfp and performing time-lapse confocal laser scanning microscopy in mixed colour biofilms. The initial microcolony formation occurred by clonal growth, after which wild-type P. aeruginosa bacteria spread over the substratum by means of twitching motility. The wild......-type biofilms were dynamic compositions with extensive motility, competition and selection occurring during development. Bacterial migration prevented the formation of larger microcolonial structures in the wild-type biofilms. The results are discussed in relation to the current model for P. aeruginosa biofilm...

  7. IGF-1,bFGF EXPRESSION AND VASCULAR REGENERATION IN ACUTE INFARCTED CANINE MYOCARDIUM AFTER AUTOLOGUS SKELETAL MUSCLE SATELLITE CELL IMPLANTATION

    朱洪生; 钟竑; 张臻

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the cell growth factor secretion and vascular regeneration in acute infarcted myocardium after autologous skeletal muscle satellite cell implantation.MethodsAutologous skeletal muscle satellite cells from adult mongrel canine were implanted into the acute myocardial infarct site via the ligated left anterior descending (LAD) artery. Specimens were harvested at 2, 4, 8 weeks after implantation for the expression of insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), basic fibroblast growth factor (Bfgf) and the vascular density.ResultsThe expression of IGF-1, Bfgf and the vascular density in skeletal muscle satellite cell implant group were higher than that in the control group.ConclusionThe skeletal muscle satellite cells, after being implanted into the acute myocardial infarction, not only showed myocardial regeneration, but also showed the ability to secrete the cell factors, hence representing a positive effect on the regeneration of the infarcted myocardium.

  8. TREATMENT OF CANINE ACUTE LIVER FAILURE WITH MODIFIED EXTRACORPOREAL PIGLIVER PERFUSION

    王博; 吕毅; 刘昌; 仵正; 潘承恩

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the theraputic effect of extracorporeal liver perfusion on the treatment of acute liver failure. Methods Mongrel dogs weighing 12-14*!kg were selected. Hepatic failure was induced by an end-to-side portacaval shunt. The common hepatic and gastroduodenal arteries were occluded for 2 hours. To the control group (n=7), the dogs received standard medical therapy . To the treating group (n=10), the dogs received extracorporeal kidney and liver perfusion at the onset of the occlusion of the hepatic artery. During the liver support, the animals were frequently monitored regarding their clinical state, liver function, biochemical and hematological parameters. Results After the occlusion of the liver blood flow, all dogs died within 3-7.5 hours. The average survival time was (5.7±1.2) hours. Serum levels of ALT, AST, LDH and ammonia increased significantly. In the treating group, the dogs died within 7-10.5 hours. The average survival time was 8.6±1.1 hours. There were no significant diferences in serum levels of ALT, AST, LDH between the two groups(P>0.05). There were dramatic diferences in blood Ammonia level, PT, FIB between the two groups(P<0.05). The survival time was longer in treating group. The animals' blood pressure were more stable in the treating group than that in the control group. Conclusion The modified xenogenic liver perfusion can provide necessary hepatic function for the acute liver failure dogs.

  9. Pharmacologic activation of wild-type p53 by nutlin therapy in childhood cancer.

    Van Maerken, Tom; Rihani, Ali; Van Goethem, Alan; De Paepe, Anne; Speleman, Frank; Vandesompele, Jo

    2014-03-28

    A peculiar feature of several types of childhood cancer is that loss-of-function mutations of the TP53 (p53) tumor suppressor gene are uncommon, in contrast to many adult tumors. As p53 needs to be inactivated in order for tumor cells to survive and thrive, pediatric tumors typically make use of other mechanisms to keep p53 in check. One of the critical negative regulators of p53 is the MDM2 oncoprotein. Many anticancer drug development efforts in the past decade have therefore been devoted to the discovery and optimization of small molecules that selectively disrupt the interaction between MDM2 and p53, which could provide, in principle, a potent means to restore p53 function in tumor cells with wild-type p53. The nutlins are the class of selective inhibitors of the p53-MDM2 interaction that are currently most advanced in their clinical development. We review here the preclinical data that support the potential therapeutic use of nutlin drugs in the treatment of various pediatric tumors, including neuroblastoma, retinoblastoma, osteosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, medulloblastoma, and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:24262662

  10. Wild-Type and Non-Wild-Type Mycobacterium tuberculosis MIC Distributions for the Novel Fluoroquinolone Antofloxacin Compared with Those for Ofloxacin, Levofloxacin, and Moxifloxacin.

    Yu, Xia; Wang, Guirong; Chen, Suting; Wei, Guomei; Shang, Yuanyuan; Dong, Lingling; Schön, Thomas; Moradigaravand, Danesh; Parkhill, Julian; Peacock, Sharon J; Köser, Claudio U; Huang, Hairong

    2016-09-01

    Antofloxacin (AFX) is a novel fluoroquinolone that has been approved in China for the treatment of infections caused by a variety of bacterial species. We investigated whether it could be repurposed for the treatment of tuberculosis by studying its in vitro activity. We determined the wild-type and non-wild-type MIC ranges for AFX as well as ofloxacin (OFX), levofloxacin (LFX), and moxifloxacin (MFX), using the microplate alamarBlue assay, of 126 clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains from Beijing, China, of which 48 were OFX resistant on the basis of drug susceptibility testing on Löwenstein-Jensen medium. The MIC distributions were correlated with mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of gyrA (Rv0006) and gyrB (Rv0005). Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) data for AFX were retrieved from the literature. AFX showed lower MIC levels than OFX but higher MIC levels than LFX and MFX on the basis of the tentative epidemiological cutoff values (ECOFFs) determined in this study. All strains with non-wild-type MICs for AFX harbored known resistance mutations that also resulted in non-wild-type MICs for LFX and MFX. Moreover, our data suggested that the current critical concentration of OFX for Löwenstein-Jensen medium that was recently revised by the World Health Organization might be too high, resulting in the misclassification of phenotypically non-wild-type strains with known resistance mutations as wild type. On the basis of our exploratory PK/PD calculations, the current dose of AFX is unlikely to be optimal for the treatment of tuberculosis, but higher doses could be effective. PMID:27324769

  11. Tumor suppressor p53: analysis of wild-type and mutant p53 complexes.

    Milner, J; Medcalf, E A; Cook, A. C.

    1991-01-01

    It has been suggested that the dominant effect of mutant p53 on tumor progression may reflect the mutant protein binding to wild-type p53, with inactivation of suppressor function. To date, evidence for wild-type/mutant p53 complexes involves p53 from different species. To investigate wild-type/mutant p53 complexes in relation to natural tumor progression, we sought to identify intraspecific complexes, using murine p53. The mutant phenotype p53-246(0) was used because this phenotype is immuno...

  12. Adhesion of Conidia of Drechmeria coniospora to Caenorhabditis elegans Wild Type and Mutants

    Jansson, Hans-Börje

    1994-01-01

    Adhesion of conidia of the endoparasitic fungus Drechmeria coniospora to the cuticles of the wild type and four different head defective mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans, and subsequent infection, was studied. The conidia adhered around the sensory structures in the head region, vulva, and occasionally to other parts of the cuticle in both mutant and wild type hosts. Infection took place after adhesion to the head region by penetration through the cuticle, and, following adhesion around the ...

  13. Adenovirus-mediated wild-type PTEN promoting glioma stem/progenitor cells autophagy activity

    ZHAO Yao-dong; Zi-long WEI; Zhang, Quan-Bin; LOU Mei-qing; HUANG, QIANG

    2013-01-01

    Background PTEN is an anti-oncogene frequently inactivating in glioma. The previous study found that PTEN was closely related to cellular autophagy activity. The purpose of this paper is to study whether the inactivation of PTEN in glioma stem/progenitor cells (GSPCs) is correlative with the low autophagic activity in GSPCs. Methods Wild-type PTEN genes were transferred into GSPCs mediated by adenovirus. The autophagic activity in GSPCs before or after the introduction of wild-type PTEN was...

  14. Genetic variation of the transthyretin gene in wild-type transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTRwt)

    Sikora, Jacquelyn L.; Logue, Mark W.; Chan, Gloria G.; Spencer, Brian H.; Prokaeva, Tatiana B.; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Seldin, David C.; Connors, Lawreen H.

    2014-01-01

    Wild-type transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTRwt), typically diagnosed as congestive heart failure in elderly Caucasian men, features myocardial amyloid deposits of wild-type plasma protein transthyretin (TTR). ATTRwt is sporadic, its pathogenesis is poorly understood, and currently there are no biomarkers for diagnosis or prognosis. Genetic studies of variant-associated transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTRm) have suggested that non-coding TTR gene variants modulate disease. We hypothesized that cis-ac...

  15. Canine Distemper

    Although this brochure provides basic information about canine distemper, your veterinarian is always your best source of ... Consult your veterinarian for more information about canine distemper and its prevention. And Now A Note On ...

  16. Variable stress-responsiveness in wild type and domesticated fighting fish.

    Verbeek, Peter; Iwamoto, Toshitaka; Murakami, Noboru

    2008-01-28

    We combined behavioral and physiological measures to compare coping style in wild-type Betta splendens and a domesticated strain selectively bred for sports fighting. We showed previously that the fighter strain is more aggressive than the wild type during experimental conditions that most closely resemble an actual fight. We predicted that compared to the wild type, the fighter strain would show a more proactive coping style, characterized by lesser cortisol and greater sympathetic responses to non-social challenges. We introduced males to an unfamiliar environment and spatial confinement as challenges that may resemble some of those that B. splendens may encounter in its natural habitat. We developed a non-invasive stress assay that enables repeated individual measures of water-borne cortisol. We estimated sympathetic activation through opercular beat rate and recorded the duration of behavioral immobility. We found that exposure to an unfamiliar environment raised cortisol levels in the wild type but not in the fighter strain and that confinement raised cortisol levels in both. In both strains opercular beat rates were significantly reduced during the latter stages of confinement compared to during the early stages. The fighter strain, but not the wild type, adopted a behavioral strategy of immobility from the very beginning of confinement. PMID:17884114

  17. Discrimination of oligonucleotides of different lengths with a wild-type aerolysin nanopore.

    Cao, Chan; Ying, Yi-Lun; Hu, Zheng-Li; Liao, Dong-Fang; Tian, He; Long, Yi-Tao

    2016-08-01

    Protein nanopores offer an inexpensive, label-free method of analysing single oligonucleotides. The sensitivity of the approach is largely determined by the characteristics of the pore-forming protein employed, and typically relies on nanopores that have been chemically modified or incorporate molecular motors. Effective, high-resolution discrimination of oligonucleotides using wild-type biological nanopores remains difficult to achieve. Here, we show that a wild-type aerolysin nanopore can resolve individual short oligonucleotides that are 2 to 10 bases long. The sensing capabilities are attributed to the geometry of aerolysin and the electrostatic interactions between the nanopore and the oligonucleotides. We also show that the wild-type aerolysin nanopores can distinguish individual oligonucleotides from mixtures and can monitor the stepwise cleavage of oligonucleotides by exonuclease I. PMID:27111839

  18. The effect of UVB on flavonoid biosynthesis in wild type and mutant petunia and arabidopsis

    Full text: Flavonoids may protect plants against damage by UVB radiation. Flavonoid composition and mRNA expression were determined following growth of plants under natural light, and under natural light with low UVB and with enhanced UVB. In wild-type Arabidopsis and Petunia, UVB induced an increase in total levels of flavonols and this was due to an up-regulation of, several genes coding for key enzymes in the phenylpropanoid pathway. In addition, UVB induced a higher rate of production of the di-hydroxylated si flavonol, quercetin glycoside than of the mono-hydroxylated equivalent, of kaempferol glycoside. Thus the ratio of quercetin to kaempferol increased with UVB treatment in wild type plants, and this suggests that the flavonoid r 3'hydroxylase (F3'H) enzyme, which converts dihydrokaempferol to dihydroquercetin, may play a key role in plant protection from UVB. Mutant plants of both species lacking this F3'H gene were grown under similar UV conditions. Leaves of the mutant Arabidopsis plant (tt7) did not contain quercetin, even under the enhanced UVB treatment. Under the low UVB treatment the total amount of flavonol was similar to the wild-type (Ler), but with increasing UVB, total flavonol (i.e. kaempferol) levels were significantly higher than in similarly treated wild type plants. In the Petunia F3'H mutant, low levels of quercetin were found even in the low UVB treatment, which indicates this variety may be producing some quercetin via an alternative pathway. Under UVB radiation, total flavonoids increased to levels significantly higher than in similarly treated wild type plants, and most of this material was kaempferol. These observations suggest that quercetin is the preferred protective flavonol in wild type plants, due perhaps to enhanced antioxidant or free radical scavenging activity. In mutant plants lacking the F3'H enzyme, the response is to produce a larger amount of a less effective photoprotectant

  19. Structure and Composition of Protein Bodies from Wild-Type and High-Lysine Barley Endosperm

    Ingversen, J.

    1975-01-01

    granular component. Particles with the same structure were present in the protein body preparation from the mutant, where, however, the granular component was the most prominent. Amino-acid composition and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the proteins from the protein body preparation revealed......-polyacrylamidegel electrophoresis. Sections through pellets of isolated protein bodies from both the mutant and the wild type revealed protein body structures corresponding with those observed in sections through the intact starchy endosperms. The majority of the wild-type protein bodies was homogeneous spheres accompanied with a...

  20. Establishment of reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification for rapid detection and differentiation of canine distemper virus infected and vaccinated animals.

    Liu, Da-Fei; Liu, Chun-Guo; Tian, Jin; Jiang, Yi-Tong; Zhang, Xiao-Zhan; Chai, Hong-Liang; Yang, Tian-Kuo; Yin, Xiu-Chen; Zhang, Hong-Ying; Liu, Ming; Hua, Yu-Ping; Qu, Lian-Dong

    2015-06-01

    Although widespread vaccination against canine distemper virus (CDV) has been conducted for many decades, several canine distemper outbreaks in vaccinated animals have been reported frequently. In order to detect and differentiate the wild-type and vaccine strains of the CDV from the vaccinated animals, a novel reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) method was developed. A set of four primers-two internal and two external-were designed to target the H gene for the specific detection of wild-type CDV variants. The CDV-H RT-LAMP assay rapidly amplified the target gene, within 60 min, using a water bath held at a constant temperature of 65°C. The assay was 100-fold more sensitive than conventional RT-PCR, with a detection limit of 10(-1)TCID50ml(-1). The system showed a preference for wild-type CDV, and exhibited less sensitivity to canine parvovirus, canine adenovirus type 1 and type 2, canine coronavirus, and canine parainfluenza virus. The assay was validated using 102 clinical samples obtained from vaccinated dog farms, and the results were comparable to a multiplex nested RT-PCR assay. The specific CDV-H RT-LAMP assay provides a simple, rapid, and sensitive tool for the detection of canines infected with wild-type CDV from canines vaccinated with attenuated vaccine. PMID:25769803

  1. Acute Changes in Central Corneal Thickness According to Experimental Adjustment of Intraocular Pressure in Normal Canine Eyes

    Park, Young-Woo; JEONG, Man-Bok; Lee, Eui Ri; Lee, Yesran; Ahn, Jae-Sang; Kim, Soo-Hyun; SEO, Kangmoon

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Central corneal thickness (CCT) can be a promising source of glaucoma monitoring and diagnosis. This study evaluated changes in CCT according to experimental adjustment of intraocular pressure (IOP) in canine eyes. To adjust and measure IOP, each eye was cannulated with two 26-gauge needles under inhalant anesthesia. One needle was connected to a pressure transducer, and the other was connected to an adjustable bag of physiologic saline. IOP was stepwise increased from 10 mmHg to 70 ...

  2. Adenovirus-mediated wild-type PTEN promoting glioma stem/progenitor cells autophagy activity

    ZHAO Yao-dong

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background PTEN is an anti-oncogene frequently inactivating in glioma. The previous study found that PTEN was closely related to cellular autophagy activity. The purpose of this paper is to study whether the inactivation of PTEN in glioma stem/progenitor cells (GSPCs is correlative with the low autophagic activity in GSPCs. Methods Wild-type PTEN genes were transferred into GSPCs mediated by adenovirus. The autophagic activity in GSPCs before or after the introduction of wild-type PTEN was detected by immunocytochemistry, electron microscopy, and Western blotting assay. Results After transfection of wild-type PTEN, a large number of microtuble-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (MAP1LC3-positive granules could be found in the cytoplasm of GSPCs under a confocal microscopy, and these granules were demonstrated to be autophagosomes under an electron microscope. Moreover, the expression of autophagy-related gene Beclin-1 significantly increased after the transfection of wild-type PTEN gene. Conclusion The inactivation of PTEN in GSPCs is one reason of the low autophagic activity of GSPCs.

  3. Biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa wild type, flagella and type IV pili mutants

    Klausen, M.; Heydorn, Arne; Ragas, Paula Cornelia;

    2003-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Gfp-tagged Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 wild type, flagella and type IV pili mutants in flow chambers irrigated with citrate minimal medium was characterized by the use of confocal laser scanning microscopy and comstat image analysis. Flagella and type IV pili were not necessary...

  4. Conformational Diversity of Wild-type Tau Fibrils Specified by Templated Conformation Change*S⃞

    Frost, Bess; Ollesch, Julian; Wille, Holger; Marc I. Diamond

    2009-01-01

    Tauopathies are sporadic and genetic neurodegenerative diseases characterized by aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein Tau. Tau pathology occurs in over 20 phenotypically distinct neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer disease and frontotemporal dementia. The molecular basis of this diversity among sporadic tauopathies is unknown, but distinct fibrillar wild-type (WT) Tau conformations could play a role. Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscop...

  5. Measuring cell surface elasticity on enteroaggregative Escherichia coli wild type and dispersin mutant by AFM

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is pathogenic and produces severe diarrhea in humans. A mutant of EAEC that does not produce dispersin, a cell surface protein, is not pathogenic. It has been proposed that dispersin imparts a positive charge to the bacterial cell surface allowing the bacteria to colonize on the negatively charged intestinal mucosa. However, physical properties of the bacterial cell surface, such as rigidity, may be influenced by the presence of dispersin and may contribute to pathogenicity. Using the system developed in our laboratory for mounting and imaging bacterial cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM), in liquid, on gelatin coated mica surfaces, studies were initiated to measure cell surface elasticity. This was carried out in both wild type EAEC, that produces dispersin, and the mutant that does not produce dispersin. This was accomplished using AFM force-distance (FD) spectroscopy on the wild type and mutant grown in liquid or on solid medium. Images in liquid and in air of both the wild-type and mutant grown in liquid and on solid media are presented. This work represents an initial step in efforts to understand the pathogenic role of the dispersin protein in the wild-type bacteria

  6. Genetic characterization of wild-type measles viruses isolated in China, 2006-2007

    Nan Lijuan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Molecular characterization of wild-type measles viruses in China during 1995-2004 demonstrated that genotype H1 was endemic and widely distributed throughout the country. H1-associated cases and outbreaks caused a resurgence of measles beginning in 2005. A total of 210,094 measles cases and 101 deaths were reported by National Notifiable Diseases Reporting System (NNDRS and Chinese Measles Laboratory Network (LabNet from 2006 to 2007, and the incidences of measles were 6.8/100,000 population and 7.2/100,000 population in 2006 and 2007, respectively. Five hundred and sixty-five wild-type measles viruses were isolated from 24 of 31 provinces in mainland China during 2006 and 2007, and all of the wild type virus isolates belonged to cluster 1 of genotype H1. These results indicated that H1-cluster 1 viruses were the predominant viruses circulating in China from 2006 to 2007. This study contributes to previous efforts to generate critical baseline data about circulating wild-type measles viruses in China that will allow molecular epidemiologic studies to help measure the progress made toward China's goal of measles elimination by 2012.

  7. Pathological Roles of Wild-Type Cu, Zn-Superoxide Dismutase in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Yoshiaki Furukawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dominant mutations in a Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1 gene cause a familial form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. While it remains controversial how SOD1 mutations lead to onset and progression of the disease, many in vitro and in vivo studies have supported a gain-of-toxicity mechanism where pathogenic mutations contribute to destabilizing a native structure of SOD1 and thus facilitate misfolding and aggregation. Indeed, abnormal accumulation of SOD1-positive inclusions in spinal motor neurons is a pathological hallmark in SOD1-related familial ALS. Furthermore, similarities in clinical phenotypes and neuropathology of ALS cases with and without mutations in sod1 gene have implied a disease mechanism involving SOD1 common to all ALS cases. Although pathogenic roles of wild-type SOD1 in sporadic ALS remain controversial, recent developments of novel SOD1 antibodies have made it possible to characterize wild-type SOD1 under pathological conditions of ALS. Here, I have briefly reviewed recent progress on biochemical and immunohistochemical characterization of wild-type SOD1 in sporadic ALS cases and discussed possible involvement of wild-type SOD1 in a pathomechanism of ALS.

  8. Organophosphonate utilization by the wild-type strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Zboińska, E; Lejczak, B; Kafarski, P

    1992-01-01

    The wild-type strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens was found to utilize a range of structurally diverse organophosphonates as its sole carbon or nitrogen sources. Representative compounds included aminoalkylphosphonates, hydroxyalkylphosphonates, oxoalkylphosphonates, and phosphono dipeptides. Among them, amino(phenyl)methylphosphonate,2-aminoethylphosphonate, aminomethylphosphonate, diisopropyl 9-aminofluoren-9-ylphosphonate, and 2-oxoalkylphosphonates were used by P. fluorescens as its sole so...

  9. Craniofacial Statistical Deformation Models of Wild-type mice and Crouzon mice

    Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Darvann, Tron Andre; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Hermann, Nuno V.; Oubel, Estanislao; Larsen, Rasmus; Frangi, Alejandro F.; Larsen, Per; Perlyn, Chad A.; Morriss-Kay, Gillian M.; Kreiborg, Sven

    2007-01-01

    of Micro CT scannings of the heads of wild-type (normal) mice and Crouzon mice were investigated. Statistical deformation models were built to assess the anatomical differences between the groups, as well as the within-group anatomical variation. Following the approach by Rueckert et al. we built an...

  10. Structure and Composition of Protein Bodies from Wild-Type and High-Lysine Barley Endosperm

    Ingversen, J.

    1975-01-01

    Protein bodies were isolated from 13 and 28 day old endosperms of barley mutant 1508 and its wild type, Bomi barley. The fine structure of the isolated protein bodies was determined by electron microscopy, and the proteins present in the preparations characterized by amino-acid analysis and SDS-p...

  11. Calorimetric and spectroscopic investigations of the thermal denaturation of wild type nitrite reductase

    Stirpe, A; Guzzi, R; Wijma, H; Verbeet, MP; Canters, GW; Sportelli, L

    2005-01-01

    Nitrite reductase (NiR) is a multicopper protein, with a trimeric structure containing two types of copper site: type I is present in each subunit whereas type 2 is localized at the subunits interface. The paper reports on the thermal behaviour of wild type NiR from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6. The tem

  12. Nutlin-3a: A Potential Therapeutic Opportunity for TP53 Wild-Type Ovarian Carcinomas.

    Erin K Crane

    Full Text Available Epithelial ovarian cancer is a diverse molecular and clinical disease, yet standard treatment is the same for all subtypes. TP53 mutations represent a node of divergence in epithelial ovarian cancer histologic subtypes and may represent a therapeutic opportunity in subtypes expressing wild type, including most low-grade ovarian serous carcinomas, ovarian clear cell carcinomas and ovarian endometrioid carcinomas, which represent approximately 25% of all epithelial ovarian cancer. We therefore sought to investigate Nutlin-3a--a therapeutic which inhibits MDM2, activates wild-type p53, and induces apoptosis--as a therapeutic compound for TP53 wild-type ovarian carcinomas. Fifteen epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines of varying histologic subtypes were treated with Nutlin-3a with determination of IC50 values. Western Blot (WB and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR analyses quantified MDM2, p53, and p21 expression after Nutlin-3a treatment. DNA from 15 cell lines was then sequenced for TP53 mutations in exons 2-11 including intron-exon boundaries. Responses to Nutlin-3a were dependent upon TP53 mutation status. By qRT-PCR and WB, levels of MDM2 and p21 were upregulated in wild-type TP53 sensitive cell lines, and p21 induction was reduced or absent in mutant cell lines. Annexin V assays demonstrated apoptosis in sensitive cell lines treated with Nutlin-3a. Thus, Nutlin-3a could be a potential therapeutic agent for ovarian carcinomas expressing wild-type TP53 and warrants further investigation.

  13. Nutlin-3a: A Potential Therapeutic Opportunity for TP53 Wild-Type Ovarian Carcinomas.

    Crane, Erin K; Kwan, Suet-Yan; Izaguirre, Daisy I; Tsang, Yvonne T M; Mullany, Lisa K; Zu, Zhifei; Richards, JoAnne S; Gershenson, David M; Wong, Kwong-Kwok

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is a diverse molecular and clinical disease, yet standard treatment is the same for all subtypes. TP53 mutations represent a node of divergence in epithelial ovarian cancer histologic subtypes and may represent a therapeutic opportunity in subtypes expressing wild type, including most low-grade ovarian serous carcinomas, ovarian clear cell carcinomas and ovarian endometrioid carcinomas, which represent approximately 25% of all epithelial ovarian cancer. We therefore sought to investigate Nutlin-3a--a therapeutic which inhibits MDM2, activates wild-type p53, and induces apoptosis--as a therapeutic compound for TP53 wild-type ovarian carcinomas. Fifteen epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines of varying histologic subtypes were treated with Nutlin-3a with determination of IC50 values. Western Blot (WB) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analyses quantified MDM2, p53, and p21 expression after Nutlin-3a treatment. DNA from 15 cell lines was then sequenced for TP53 mutations in exons 2-11 including intron-exon boundaries. Responses to Nutlin-3a were dependent upon TP53 mutation status. By qRT-PCR and WB, levels of MDM2 and p21 were upregulated in wild-type TP53 sensitive cell lines, and p21 induction was reduced or absent in mutant cell lines. Annexin V assays demonstrated apoptosis in sensitive cell lines treated with Nutlin-3a. Thus, Nutlin-3a could be a potential therapeutic agent for ovarian carcinomas expressing wild-type TP53 and warrants further investigation. PMID:26248031

  14. Inhibition of HIV type 1 infectivity by coexpression of a wild-type and a defective glycoprotein 120

    Lund, O S; Losman, B; Schønning, Kristian; Bolmstedt, A; Olofsson, S; Hansen, J E

    1998-01-01

    processed and incorporated into virus particles, but that D373K virions have no detectable infectivity (below 0.1% relative to wild type). When D373K and the wild-type envelope gene were cotransfected in 293 cells at a 4:1 ratio, the resultant infectivity of the HIV-1 supernatant was reduced more than 100...... model: when virion formation is saturated with envelope protein, expression and incorporation of a defective envelope protein imply a corresponding dilution of wild-type protein on the surface of virions. The cooperative function of wild-type envelope proteins is subsequently compromised, and a trans...

  15. Vitamin C reduces spatial learning deficits in middle-aged and very old APP/PSEN1 transgenic and wild-type mice

    Harrison, F.E.; Hosseini, A. H.; McDonald, M. P.; May, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by a build up of amyloid β (Aβ) deposits, elevated oxidative stress, and deterioration of the cholinergic system. The present study investigated short-term cognitive-enhancing effects of acute intraperitoneal (i.p.) Vitamin C (ascorbate) treatment in APP/PSEN1 mice, a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. Middle-aged (12 months) and Very old (24 months) APP/PSEN1 bigenic and wild-type mice were treated with a...

  16. Role of Apoptosis in Rabies Viral Encephalitis: A Comparative Study in Mice, Canine, and Human Brain with a Review of Literature

    Suja, M. S.; Anita Mahadevan; Madhusudana, S.N.; Shankar, S. K.

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the role of apoptosis in rabies encephalitis in humans and canines infected with wild-type street virus, in comparison with rodent model infected with street and laboratory passaged CVS strain, we studied postmortem brain tissue from nine humans, six canines infected with street rabies virus, and Swiss albino mice inoculated intramuscularly (IM) and intracerebrally (IC) with street and CVS strains. Encephalitis and high rabies antigen load were prominent in canine and human brains...

  17. Acute changes in canine small bowel muscle prostaglandin synthesis and function after x-irradiation with 9.38 Gy

    Abdominal radiotherapy is often limited by radiation-induced enteritis. Prostaglandin (PG) synthesis may play a role in the altered function of small bowel (SB) muscle and mucosa. Therefore, the authors have investigated the effects of X-radiation on PG synthesis, and other aspects of canine SB smooth muscle function. Canine SB received 9.38 Gy of 250 kVp X-radiation in situ. Electrodes were used to monitor spike burst and propagation of electrical activity in the SB muscle pre- and post-exposure. Animals were sacrificed prior to irradiation and at 1 and 4 days post-irradiation. Serum PG levels were assayed from mesenteric artery and vein samples, and SB muscle was removed for analysis of PG synthesis. SB muscle myoelectric activity decreased after irradiation until sacrifice (day 4). The PG synthesis in irradiated SB muscle at days 1 and 4 increased in PGE/sub 2/ and PGF/sub 2/α and in thromboxane A/sub 2/ metabolite, while the PGI/sub 2/ metabolite decreased. PG levels in venous blood indicate similar changes after passage through the intestine. Although causality is not established, radiation does induce changes in PG synthesis which correlate with changes in myoelectric activity (motility)

  18. The effect of nitric oxide synthase inhibitors nitro-L-arginine and 7-nitroindazole on spatial learning and motor functions in Lurcher mutant and wild type mice.

    Markvartová, V; Vozeh, F

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an intercellular messenger that, among other things, plays an important role in the nervous system as a gaseous neurotransmitter, modulating long-term potentiation (LTP) induction of synaptic transmission. LTP has been suggested to be the basis of memory formation. On the other hand NO also participates in excitotoxic processes which play an important role in many neuropathological states. The aim of this work was to observe the effect of two NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors (N omega-Nitro-L-arginine, NA; 7-nitroindazole, NI) on spontaneous behaviour, spatial learning and motor functions in Lurcher (+/Lc) and wild type (+/+) mice, derived from the B6CBA strain. Heterozygous Lurcher mutant mice represent a natural model of the olivocerebellar degeneration. They suffer from postnatal, practically total, extinction of cerebellar Purkinje cells (due to the excitotoxic apoptosis) and a partial decrease of granule cells and inferior olive neurons (ION) because of the lost target of their axons. +/+ animals are healthy littermates of +/Lc. NA is a nonselective NOS inhibitor which influences, except neuronal (n), also endothelial (e) NOS with an impact on blood pressure, NI is a selective nNOS inhibitor without any circulatory effect. The adult animals of both types (+/Lc; +/+) were influenced by acute administration of both inhibitors (25 mg/kg i.p. 30 min. before experiments) and newborns only by both acute and long-term administration of NI (1 month, starting from postnatal day 2, P2). Control solutions - saline or solvents of both NA and NI inhibitors--diluted 1M HCl and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) respectively, were given at a relevant volume in the same way. The effect of both inhibitors and control solutions on motor functions was tested using four standard procedures (horizontal wire, slanting ladder, rotating cylinder, foot-bridge); in newborns at the age of 14 days. Spatial learning ability was examined in five-day long procedure in the Morris

  19. Isolation and Translation of Hordein Messenger RNA from Wild Type and Mutant Endosperms in Barley

    Brandt, Anders Bøving; Ingwersen, J.

    1978-01-01

    0.30 megadaltons. The 11S messenger RNA was translated in vitro into hordein precursor polypeptides which are 2–4 kilodaltons larger than the native hordein polypeptides. The endosperm cell of mutant No. 1508 contained twice as much RNA as the wild type endosperm cell but the same amount of...... polyadenylated 11S RNA. The template activity of the latter was 10% of that found for the 11S hordein messenger RNA from the wild type and was limited to translation into one hordein precursor polypeptide....... different B1 hordein polypeptide, which is revealed by 21 nucleotide substitutions resulting in 9 amino acid changes. Messenger RNA has been isolated from developing barley endosperms by sucrose gradient sedimentation, Sepharose 4B gel filtration and preparative gel electrophoresis. Hordein messenger RNA...

  20. Structural Characterization of Lignin in Wild-type versus COMT Down-regulated Switchgrass

    ArthurRagauskas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the chemical structural characteristics of cellulolytic enzyme lignin isolated from switchgrass focusing on comparisons between wild-type control and caffeic acid 3-O-methyltransferase (COMT down-regulated transgenic line. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR techniques including 13C, 31P, and two-dimensional 13C-1H heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC as well as gel permeation chromatography (GPC were employed. Compared to the wild-type, the COMT down-regulated transgenic switchgrass lignin demonstrated a decrease in syringyl (S: guaiacyl (G ratio and p-coumarate:ferulate ratio, an increase in relative abundance of phenylcoumaran unit, and a comparable content of total free phenolic OH groups along with formation of benzodioxane unit. In addition, COMT down-regulation had no significant effects on the lignin molecular weights during its biosynthesis process.

  1. Phylogenetic evidence of canine distemper virus in Serengeti's lions.

    Harder, Timm; Kenter, Marcel; Appel, Max; Roelke-Parker, Melody; Barrett, Thomas,; Osterhaus, Albert

    1995-01-01

    textabstractRecently an epizootic, reported to be due to a morbillivirus infection, affected the lion population of the Tanzanian Serengeti National Park. A morbillivirus phosphoprotein (P) gene fragment was amplified by PCR from tissue samples of several affected lions. Sequencing of the amplificates and subsequent phylogenetic analyses revealed that a wild-type strain of canine distemper morbillivirus (CDV) was involved. Vaccination of the local domestic dog population with proven safe CDV ...

  2. Production, purification and biochemical characterization of lactate oxidase wild type and double mutant

    García Grillasca, Gustavo

    2010-01-01

    Mutations N212S and S178N of Lactate Oxidase (LOX) from Aeorcoccus viridanswere prepared by site directed mutagenesis and confirmed by sequencing. Once these two mutations were created, the mutated protein was expressed, purified and characterized along with the Wild Type (WT). A protocol was established for purifying the Double Mutant (DM) and the WT, consisting ofan ammonium sulfide precipitation before two subsequent FPLC steps,the former one with a hydrophobic interactio...

  3. Wild-type Measles Virus in Brain Tissue of Children with Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis, Argentina

    Barrero, Paola Roxana; Grippo, Jorge; Viegas, Mariana; Mistchenko, Alicia Susana

    2003-01-01

    We studied eight children who had measles at 6 to 10 months of age during the 1998 Argentine measles outbreak and in whom subacute sclerosing panencephalitis developed 4 years later. We report the genetic characterization of brain tissue–associated measles virus samples from three patients. Phylogenetic relationships clustered these viruses with the wild-type D6 genotype isolated during the 1998 outbreak. The children received measles vaccine; however, vaccinal strains were not found.

  4. Bevacizumab-containing regimens after cetuximab failure in Kras wild-type metastatic colorectal carcinoma

    LAM, KA ON; LEE, VICTOR HO FUN; LIU, RICO KIN YIN; Leung, To Wai; Kwong, Dora Lai Wan

    2012-01-01

    Bevacizumab and cetuximab both improve treatment efficacy when administered with chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal carcinoma (mCRC). Cetuximab has enhanced efficacy in Kras wild-type tumors. However, inferior outcomes have been demonstrated concerning the concurrent use of bevacizumab and cetuximab with chemotherapy. There is an urgent need to define the optimal sequence of use of these two agents. With regard to the pre-clinical data that increased VEGF expression is associated with acq...

  5. Stability of Iowa mutant and wild type Aβ-peptide aggregates

    Alred, Erik J.; Scheele, Emily G.; Berhanu, Workalemahu M.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E., E-mail: uhansmann@ou.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

    2014-11-07

    Recent experiments indicate a connection between the structure of amyloid aggregates and their cytotoxicity as related to neurodegenerative diseases. Of particular interest is the Iowa Mutant, which causes early-onset of Alzheimer's disease. While wild-type Amyloid β-peptides form only parallel beta-sheet aggregates, the mutant also forms meta-stable antiparallel beta sheets. Since these structural variations may cause the difference in the pathological effects of the two Aβ-peptides, we have studied in silico the relative stability of the wild type and Iowa mutant in both parallel and antiparallel forms. We compare regular molecular dynamics simulations with such where the viscosity of the samples is reduced, which, we show, leads to higher sampling efficiency. By analyzing and comparing these four sets of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we probe the role of the various factors that could lead to the structural differences. Our analysis indicates that the parallel forms of both wild type and Iowa mutant aggregates are stable, while the antiparallel aggregates are meta-stable for the Iowa mutant and not stable for the wild type. The differences result from the direct alignment of hydrophobic interactions in the in-register parallel oligomers, making them more stable than the antiparallel aggregates. The slightly higher thermodynamic stability of the Iowa mutant fibril-like oligomers in its parallel organization over that in antiparallel form is supported by previous experimental measurements showing slow inter-conversion of antiparallel aggregates into parallel ones. Knowledge of the mechanism that selects between parallel and antiparallel conformations and determines their relative stability may open new avenues for the development of therapies targeting familial forms of early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Nucleoprotein gene analysis of the wild-type measles viruses circulated in Beijing in 2001

    谢正德; 申昆玲; 许文波; 照日格图; 朱贞

    2004-01-01

    @@ The hemagglutinin (H) and nucleoprotein (N) genes are the most variable regions on the genome of the measles virus. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the H and/or N genes has been used to describe different genetic groups of wild-type measles virus.1-3 This genetic information has been used in molecular epidemiological studies to identify the transmission pathways of measles virus. The present study was conducted to reveal the genotype of measles viruses which circulated in Beijing in 2001.

  7. Proteomic analysis of metacyclogenesis in Leishmania infantum wild-type and PTR1 null mutant

    Wilfried Moreira; Danielle Légaré; Gina Racine; Gaétan Roy; Marc Ouellette

    2014-01-01

    The parasite Leishmania exhibits a dimorphic life cycle with promastigotes found in the insect vector and amastigotes residing within mammalian macrophages. In the insect, promastigotes undergo metacyclogenesis with two main stages, the procyclic and metacyclic stages. Reduced pterins, provided by the pteridine reductase PTR1, are important factors controlling metacyclogenesis. We applied here the liquid-based free-flow electrophoresis technique for the analysis of L. infantum wild-type and P...

  8. An emerging role for misfolded wild-type SOD1 in sporadic ALS pathogenesis

    Daryl A Bosco

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder that targets motor neurons, leading to paralysis and death within a few years of disease onset. While several genes have been linked to the inheritable, or familial, form of ALS, much less is known about the cause(s of sporadic ALS, which accounts for approximately 90% of ALS cases. Due to the clinical similarities between familial and sporadic ALS, it is plausible that both forms of the disease converge on a common pathway and, therefore, involve common factors. Recent evidence suggests the Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1 protein to be one such factor that is common to both sporadic and familial ALS. In 1993, mutations were uncovered in SOD1 that represent the first known genetic cause of familial ALS. While the exact mechanism of mutant-SOD1 toxicity is still not known today, most evidence points to a gain of toxic function that stems, at least in part, from the propensity of this protein to misfold. In the wild-type SOD1 protein, non-genetic perturbations such as metal depletion, disruption of the quaternary structure, and oxidation, can also induce SOD1 to misfold. In fact, these aforementioned post-translational modifications cause wild-type SOD1 to adopt a “toxic conformation” that is similar to familial ALS-linked SOD1 variants. These observations, together with the detection of misfolded wild-type SOD1 within human post-mortem sporadic ALS samples, have been used to support the controversial hypothesis that misfolded forms of wild-type SOD1 contribute to sporadic ALS pathogenesis. In this review, we present data from the literature that both support and contradict this hypothesis. We also discuss SOD1 as a potential therapeutic target for both familial and sporadic ALS.

  9. Blastocyst Injection of Wild Type Embryonic Stem Cells Induces Global Corrections in Mdx Mice

    Stillwell, Elizabeth; Vitale, Joseph; Zhao, Qingshi; Beck, Amanda; Schneider, Joel; Khadim, Farah; Elson, Genie; Altaf, Aneela; Yehia, Ghassan; Dong, Jia-hui; Liu, Jing; Mark, Willie; Bhaumik, Mantu; Grange, Robert; Fraidenraich, Diego

    2009-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an incurable neuromuscular degenerative disease, caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene. Mdx mice recapitulate DMD features. Here we show that injection of wild-type (WT) embryonic stem cells (ESCs) into mdx blastocysts produces mice with improved pathology and function. A small fraction of WT ESCs incorporates into the mdx mouse nonuniformly to upregulate protein levels of dystrophin in the skeletal muscle. The chimeric muscle shows reduced regenerat...

  10. Nutlin-3a: A Potential Therapeutic Opportunity for TP53 Wild-Type Ovarian Carcinomas

    Crane, Erin K; Kwan, Suet-Yan; Daisy I Izaguirre; Tsang, Yvonne T. M.; Mullany, Lisa K.; Zu, Zhifei; Richards, JoAnne S.; Gershenson, David M.; Wong, Kwong-Kwok

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is a diverse molecular and clinical disease, yet standard treatment is the same for all subtypes. TP53 mutations represent a node of divergence in epithelial ovarian cancer histologic subtypes and may represent a therapeutic opportunity in subtypes expressing wild type, including most low-grade ovarian serous carcinomas, ovarian clear cell carcinomas and ovarian endometrioid carcinomas, which represent approximately 25% of all epithelial ovarian cancer. We therefore ...

  11. Stability of Iowa mutant and wild type Aβ-peptide aggregates

    Recent experiments indicate a connection between the structure of amyloid aggregates and their cytotoxicity as related to neurodegenerative diseases. Of particular interest is the Iowa Mutant, which causes early-onset of Alzheimer's disease. While wild-type Amyloid β-peptides form only parallel beta-sheet aggregates, the mutant also forms meta-stable antiparallel beta sheets. Since these structural variations may cause the difference in the pathological effects of the two Aβ-peptides, we have studied in silico the relative stability of the wild type and Iowa mutant in both parallel and antiparallel forms. We compare regular molecular dynamics simulations with such where the viscosity of the samples is reduced, which, we show, leads to higher sampling efficiency. By analyzing and comparing these four sets of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we probe the role of the various factors that could lead to the structural differences. Our analysis indicates that the parallel forms of both wild type and Iowa mutant aggregates are stable, while the antiparallel aggregates are meta-stable for the Iowa mutant and not stable for the wild type. The differences result from the direct alignment of hydrophobic interactions in the in-register parallel oligomers, making them more stable than the antiparallel aggregates. The slightly higher thermodynamic stability of the Iowa mutant fibril-like oligomers in its parallel organization over that in antiparallel form is supported by previous experimental measurements showing slow inter-conversion of antiparallel aggregates into parallel ones. Knowledge of the mechanism that selects between parallel and antiparallel conformations and determines their relative stability may open new avenues for the development of therapies targeting familial forms of early-onset Alzheimer's disease

  12. A Snapshot of Histone Modifications within Transposable Elements in Drosophila Wild Type Strains

    Rebollo, Rita; Horard, Béatrice; Begeot, Flora; Delattre, Marion; Gilson, Eric; Vieira, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are a major source of genetic variability in genomes, creating genetic novelty and driving genome evolution. Analysis of sequenced genomes has revealed considerable diversity in TE families, copy number, and localization between different, closely related species. For instance, although the twin species Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans share the same TE families, they display different amounts of TEs. Furthermore, previous analyses of wild type derived strains of D. simulans have revealed high polymorphism regarding TE copy number within this species. Several factors may influence the diversity and abundance of TEs in a genome, including molecular mechanisms such as epigenetic factors, which could be a source of variation in TE success. In this paper, we present the first analysis of the epigenetic status of four TE families (roo, tirant, 412 and F) in seven wild type strains of D. melanogaster and D. simulans. Our data shows intra- and inter-specific variations in the histone marks that adorn TE copies. Our results demonstrate that the chromatin state of common TEs varies among TE families, between closely related species and also between wild type strains. PMID:22962605

  13. Stark effect in wild-type and heterodimer-containing reaction centers from Rhodobacter capsulatus

    The effect of an external electric field on the optical absorption spectra of wild-type Rhodobacter capsulatus and two Rb. capsulatus reaction centers that have been genetically modified through site-directed mutagenesis was measured at 77 K. The two genetically modified reaction centers replace histidine M200, the axial ligand to the M-side bacteriochlorophyll of the special pair, with either leucine or phenylalanine. These substitutions results in the replacement of the M-side bacteriochlorophyll with bacteriopheophytin, forming a bacteriochlorophyll-bacteriopheophytin heterodimer. The magnitude of the change in dipole moment from the ground to excited state (Δμapp) and the angle δ between the Qy transition moment and the direction of Δμapp were measured for the special pair absorption band for all three reaction centers. The differences in the magnitude of Δμapp and the angle δ between wild-type and heterodimer reaction centers are consistent with increased charge transfer in the heterodimer special pair. These results support calculations that place the special pair charge-transfer state higher in energy than the excited singlet state in wild-type Rb. capsulatus RCs

  14. In vitro Intestinal Mucosal Epithelial Responses to Wild-Type Salmonella Typhi and Attenuated Typhoid Vaccines.

    Fiorentino, Maria; Lammers, Karen M; Levine, Myron M; Sztein, Marcelo B; Fasano, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    Typhoid fever, caused by S. Typhi, is responsible for approximately 200,000 deaths per year worldwide. Little information is available regarding epithelium-bacterial interactions in S. Typhi infection. We have evaluated in vitro the effects of wild-type S. Typhi, the licensed Ty21a typhoid vaccine and the leading strains CVD 908-htrA and CVD 909 vaccine candidates on intestinal barrier function and immune response. Caco2 monolayers infected with wild-type S. Typhi exhibited alterations in the organization of tight junctions, increased paracellular permeability, and a rapid decrease in Trans-Epithelial Electrical Resistance as early as 4 h post-exposure. S. Typhi triggered the secretion of interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-6. Caco2 cells infected with the attenuated strains exhibited a milder pro-inflammatory response with minimal disruption of the barrier integrity. We conclude that wild-type S. Typhi causes marked transient alterations of the intestinal mucosa that are more pronounced than those observed with Ty21a or new generation attenuated typhoid vaccine candidates. PMID:23408152

  15. Clavulanic acid production by the MMS 150 mutant obtained from wild type Streptomyces clavuligerus ATCC 27064

    Eliton da Silva Vasconcelos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Clavulanic acid (CA is a powerful inhibitor of the beta-lactamases, enzymes produced by bacteria resistants to penicillin and cefalosporin. This molecule is produced industrially by strains of Streptomyces clavuligerus in complex media which carbon and nitrogen resources are supplied by inexpensive compounds still providing high productivity. The genetic production improvement using physical and chemical mutagenic agents is an important strategy in programs of industrial production development of bioactive metabolites. However, parental strains are susceptible to loss of their original productivity due genetic instability phenomenona. In this work, some S. clavuligerus mutant strains obtained by treatment with UV light and with MMS are compared with the wild type (Streptomyces clavuligerus ATCC 27064. The results indicated that the random mutations originated some strains with different phenotypes, most divergent demonstrated by the mutants strains named AC116, MMS 150 and MMS 54, that exhibited lack of pigmentation in their mature spores. Also, the strain MMS 150 presented a larger production of CA when cultivated in semi-synthetics media. Using other media, the wild type strain obtained a larger CA production. Besides, using the modifed complex media the MMS 150 strain showed changes in its lipolitic activity and a larger production of CA. The studies also allowed finding the best conditions for a lipase activity exhibited by wild type S. clavuligerus and the MMS150 mutant.

  16. Voltage-Jump Relaxation Kinetics for Wild-type and Chimeric β Subunits of Neuronal Nicotinic Receptors

    Figl, Antonio; Labarca, Cesar; Davidson, Norman; Lester, Henry A.; Cohen, Bruce N.

    1996-01-01

    We have studied the voltage-jump relaxation currents for a series of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors resulting from the coexpression of wild-type and chimeric β4/β2 subunits with α3 subunits in Xenopus oocytes. With acetylcholine as the agonist, the wild-type α3β4 receptors displayed five- to eightfold slower voltage-jump relaxations than did the wild-type α3β2 receptors. In both cases, the relaxations could best be described by two exponential components of approximately equal amp...

  17. Stimulus control by 5methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine in wild-type and CYP2D6-humanized mice

    Winter, J. C.; Amorosi, D.J.; Rice, Kenner C.; Cheng, Kejun; Yu, Ai-Ming

    2011-01-01

    In previous studies we have observed that, in comparison with wild type mice, Tg-CYP2D6 mice have increased serum levels of bufotenine [5-hydroxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine] following the administration of 5-MeO-DMT. Furthermore, following the injection of 5-MeO-DMT, harmaline was observed to increase serum levels of bufotenine and 5-MeO-DMT in both wild-type and Tg-CYP2D6 mice. In the present investigation, 5-MeO-DMT-induced stimulus control was established in wild-type and Tg-CYP2D6 mice. The t...

  18. Growth, seed development and genetic analysis in wild type and Def mutant of Pisum sativum L

    Ayeh Kwadwo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The def mutant pea (Pisum sativum L showed non-abscission of seeds from the funicule. Here we present data on seed development and growth pattern and their relationship in predicting this particular trait in wild type and mutant lines as well as the inheritance pattern of the def allele in F2 and F3 populations. Findings Pod length and seed fresh weight increase with fruit maturity and this may affect the abscission event in pea seeds. However, the seed position in either the distal and proximal ends of the pod did not show any difference. The growth factors of seed fresh weight (FW, width of funicles (WFN, seed width (SW and seed height (SH were highly correlated and their relationships were determined in both wild type and def mutant peas. The coefficient of determination R2 values for the relationship between WFN and FW, SW and SH and their various interactions were higher for the def dwarf type. Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that variation of WFN was associated with SH and SW. Pearson's chi square analysis revealed that the inheritance and segregation of the Def locus in 3:1 ratio was significant in two F2 populations. Structural analysis of the F3 population was used to confirm the inheritance status of the Def locus in F2 heterozygote plants. Conclusions This study investigated the inheritance of the presence or absence of the Def allele, controlling the presence of an abscission zone (AZ or an abscission-less zone (ALZ forming in wild type and mutant lines respectively. The single major gene (Def controlling this phenotype was monogenic and def mutants were characterized and controlled by the homozygous recessive def allele that showed no palisade layers in the hilum region of the seed coat.

  19. HPLC ANALYSIS OF BIOACTIVE COMPOUNDS IN TEN DIFFERENT WILD TYPE UNDER-UTILIZED LEGUME GRAINS

    Vellingiri Vadivel and Hans Konrad Biesalski

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, many food industries have been initiated the formulation of nutraceutical/functional foods by incorporating the bioactive ingredients for the prevention/treatment of certain chronic diseases. In this connection, certain promising wild type under-utilized legume grains received more attention, since they are naturally a rich source of L-Dopa (precursor of dopamine and certain bioactive compounds including phenolics, tannins and phytic acid. In the present study, seed materials of certain promising wild type under-utilized food legume grains such as Abrus precatorius L., Acacia leucopholea Willd, Bauhinia varigata L., Canavalia gladiata (Jacq. DC., Cassia floribunda Cav., Entada scandens Benth., Indigofera linifolia (L.f. Retz., Mucuna monosperma DC. Ex Wight., Sesbania bispinosa (Jacq. Wight. and Tamarindus indica L., collected from Eastern and Western Ghats of South India, were investigated for certain bioactive compounds through HPLC technique. All the analysed samples were found to constitute a viable source of total free phenolics (4.23 – 8.75 g/100 g DM, tannins (1.04 – 5.41 g /100 g DM, L-Dopa (1.17 – 5.34 g/100 g DM and phytic acid (0.96 – 2.74 g/100 g DM and also the newly developed HPLC procedures were proven to be sensitive enough to detect these bioactive compounds even at tracer level. Further, such wild type legume grains could be recommended as a natural source of bioactive compounds in the dietary management of certain chronic diseases such as Parkinsonism, diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular diseases, cancer etc.

  20. Structural and Morphometric Comparison of Lower Incisors in PACAP-Deficient and Wild-Type Mice.

    Sandor, B; Fintor, K; Reglodi, D; Fulop, D B; Helyes, Z; Szanto, I; Nagy, P; Hashimoto, H; Tamas, A

    2016-06-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a neuropeptide with widespread distribution. PACAP plays an important role in the development of the nervous system, it has a trophic and protective effect, and it is also implicated in the regulation of various physiological functions. Teeth are originated from the mesenchyme of the neural crest and the ectoderm of the first branchial arch, suggesting similarities with the development of the nervous system. Earlier PACAP-immunoreactive fibers have been found in the odontoblastic and subodontoblastic layers of the dental pulp. Our previous examinations have shown that PACAP deficiency causes alterations in the morphology and structure of the developing molars of 7-day-old mice. In our present study, morphometric and structural comparison was performed on the incisors of 1-year-old wild-type and PACAP-deficient mice. Hard tissue density measurements and morphometric comparison were carried out on the mandibles and the lower incisors with micro-CT. For structural examination, Raman microscopy was applied on frontal thin sections of the mandible. With micro-CT morphometrical measurements, the size of the incisors and the relative volume of the pulp to dentin were significantly smaller in the PACAP-deficient group compared to the wild-type animals. The density of calcium hydroxyapatite in the dentin was reduced in the PACAP-deficient mice. No structural differences could be observed in the enamel with Raman microscopy. Significant differences were found in the dentin of PACAP-deficient mice with Raman microscopy, where increased carbonate/phosphate ratio indicates higher intracrystalline disordering. The evaluation of amide III bands in the dentin revealed higher structural diversity in wild-type mice. Based upon our present and previous results, it is obvious that PACAP plays an important role in tooth development with the regulation of morphogenesis, dentin, and enamel mineralization. Further studies are

  1. Genetic variation of the transthyretin gene in wild-type transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTRwt).

    Sikora, Jacquelyn L; Logue, Mark W; Chan, Gloria G; Spencer, Brian H; Prokaeva, Tatiana B; Baldwin, Clinton T; Seldin, David C; Connors, Lawreen H

    2015-01-01

    Wild-type transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTRwt), typically diagnosed as congestive heart failure in elderly Caucasian men, features myocardial amyloid deposits of wild-type plasma protein transthyretin (TTR). ATTRwt is sporadic, its pathogenesis is poorly understood, and currently there are no biomarkers for diagnosis or prognosis. Genetic studies of variant-associated transthyretin amyloidosis have suggested that non-coding TTR gene variants modulate disease. We hypothesized that cis-acting regulatory elements in the TTR gene non-coding regions may modify expression, affecting ATTRwt onset and progression. We studied an ATTRwt cohort consisting of 108 Caucasian males ranging in age from 59 to 87 years with cardiomyopathy due to wild-type TTR deposition; results were compared to 118 anonymous controls matched by age, sex, and race. Four predicted non-coding regulatory regions and all exons in the TTR gene were sequenced using the Sanger method. Eleven common variants were identified; three variants were significantly associated with ATTRwt (p < 0.05), though only one, rs72922940, remained near significance (p corrected = 0.083) after multiple testing correction. Exon analyses demonstrated the occurrence of the p.G26S (G6S) polymorphism in 7 % of ATTRwt subjects and 12 % of controls; this variant was predicted to be a protective factor (p = 0.051). Four variants were significantly associated with age at onset and survival. In this first genetic study of a large, well-characterized cohort of ATTRwt, non-coding and coding variants associated with disease, age at onset, and survival were identified. Further investigation is warranted to determine the prevalence of these variants in ATTRwt, their regulatory function, and potential role in assessing disease risk. PMID:25367359

  2. Temperature sensitivity for conformation is an intrinsic property of wild-type p53.

    Hainaut, P; Butcher, S.; Milner, J.

    1995-01-01

    The tumour-suppressor protein p53 is a metal-binding transcription factor with sequence-specific DNA-binding capacity. In cancer, mutation of p53 disrupts protein conformation with consequent loss of DNA binding and associated tumour-suppressor function. In vitro, the conformation and DNA-binding activity of wild-type p53 are subject to redox modulation and are abrogated by exposure to metal chelators. In the present study, we have used the chelator 1, 10-phenanthroline (OP) to probe the effe...

  3. Electrochemical analysis of wild type and mutant p53 core domains

    Ostatná, Veronika; Paleček, Emil

    Brno, 2008. s. 18. [1st joint meeting on the role of p53 , MDM2, AGR2/3 and ubiquitin/chaperone system in tumour biology. 21.04.2008-22.04.2008, Brno] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035; GA ČR(CZ) GP202/07/P497 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : tumor supressor p53 * wild type and mutant p53 * electrochemical analysis Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  4. Amelioration of epidermolysis bullosa by transfer of wild-type bone marrow cells

    Tolar, Jakub; Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi; Riddle, Megan; McElmurry, Ron T; Osborn, Mark; Xia, Lily; Lund, Troy; Slattery, Catherine; Uitto, Jouni; Christiano, Angela M.; Wagner, John E.; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2009-01-01

    The recessive dystrophic form of epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is a disorder of incurable skin fragility and blistering caused by mutations in the type VII collagen gene (Col7a1). The absence of type VII collagen production leads to the loss of adhesion at the basement membrane zone due to the absence of anchoring fibrils, which are composed of type VII collagen. We report that wild-type, congenic bone marrow cells homed to damaged skin, produced type VII collagen protein and anchoring fibrils...

  5. A conditionally replicating HIV-1 vector interferes with wild-type HIV-1 replication and spread.

    Dropulić, B; Hĕrmánková, M; Pitha, P M

    1996-01-01

    Defective-interfering viruses are known to modulate virus pathogenicity. We describe conditionally replicating HIV-1 (crHIV) vectors that interfere with wild-type HIV-1 (wt-HIV) replication and spread. crHIV vectors are defective-interfering HIV genomes that do not encode viral proteins and replicate only in the presence of wt-HIV helper virus. In cells that contain both wt-HIV and crHIV genomes, the latter are shown to have a selective advantage for packaging into progeny virions because the...

  6. Growth, seed development and genetic analysis in wild type and Def mutant of Pisum sativum L

    Ayeh Kwadwo; Lee YeonKyeong; Ambrose Mike J; Hvoslef-Eide Anne

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The def mutant pea (Pisum sativum L) showed non-abscission of seeds from the funicule. Here we present data on seed development and growth pattern and their relationship in predicting this particular trait in wild type and mutant lines as well as the inheritance pattern of the def allele in F2 and F3 populations. Findings Pod length and seed fresh weight increase with fruit maturity and this may affect the abscission event in pea seeds. However, the seed position in either...

  7. Evidence for allosteric variants of wild-type p53, a tumour suppressor protein.

    Cook, A; Milner, J

    1990-01-01

    A tumour suppressor function for p53 is indicated in human lung cancer and in carcinoma of the colorectum. Loss of suppressor function, by mutation of the p53 gene, is associated with activation of p53 as an oncogene. The suppressor (wild type) and oncogenic (mutant) forms of the murine p53 protein are distinguishable at the molecular level by reactivity with anti-p53 monoclonal antibodies. For example, activated mutant p53 fails to react with PAb246 (p53-246 degrees). We now demonstrate that...

  8. STUDY DATA OF KRAS- AND RAS-UNMUTATED (WILD TYPE OF COLORECTAL CANCER

    V. A. Gorbunova

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available  Analysis of latest trials, comparing treatment schemes including chemotherapy with anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies or bevacizumab is presented in this article. The data in these trials is inconsistent, but detailed analysis of FIRE-3 trial allows to distinguish a wild-type RAS patient group that benefits most from chemotherapy with cetuximab or panitumumab as 1st line metastatic colorectal cancer treatment. A final analysis of this patient group in CALGB/SWOG 80 405 trial is pending. The RAS analysis is pivotal for choice of 1st line chemotherapy.

  9. Molecular cloning of the wild-type phoM operon in Escherichia coli K-12.

    Wanner, B L; Wilmes, M R; Hunter, E

    1988-01-01

    A metastable bacterial alkaline phosphatase (Bap) phenotype is seen in phoR mutants, which alternately express a Bap-constitutive or -negative phenotype. The alteration is affected by mutations in the phoM region near 0 min. By molecular cloning of the wild-type phoM operon onto a multicopy plasmid and recombining onto the plasmid the pho-510 mutation that abolishes variation, the phoM operon, rather than some nearby gene, was shown to control variation. Complementation tests indicated that t...

  10. Rearing in seawater mesocosms improves the spawning performance of growth hormone transgenic and wild-type coho salmon.

    Rosalind A Leggatt

    Full Text Available Growth hormone (GH transgenes can significantly accelerate growth rates in fish and cause associated alterations to their physiology and behaviour. Concern exists regarding potential environmental risks of GH transgenic fish, should they enter natural ecosystems. In particular, whether they can reproduce and generate viable offspring under natural conditions is poorly understood. In previous studies, GH transgenic salmon grown under contained culture conditions had lower spawning behaviour and reproductive success relative to wild-type fish reared in nature. However, wild-type salmon cultured in equal conditions also had limited reproductive success. As such, whether decreased reproductive success of GH transgenic salmon is due to the action of the transgene or to secondary effects of culture (or a combination has not been fully ascertained. Hence, salmon were reared in large (350,000 L, semi-natural, seawater tanks (termed mesocosms designed to minimize effects of standard laboratory culture conditions, and the reproductive success of wild-type and GH transgenic coho salmon from mesocosms were compared with that of wild-type fish from nature. Mesocosm rearing partially restored spawning behaviour and success of wild-type fish relative to culture rearing, but remained lower overall than those reared in nature. GH transgenic salmon reared in the mesocosm had similar spawning behaviour and success as wild-type fish reared in the mesocosm when in full competition and without competition, but had lower success in male-only competition experiments. There was evidence of genotype×environmental interactions on spawning success, so that spawning success of transgenic fish, should they escape to natural systems in early life, cannot be predicted with low uncertainty. Under the present conditions, we found no evidence to support enhanced mating capabilities of GH transgenic coho salmon compared to wild-type salmon. However, it is clear that GH transgenic

  11. Mathematical model of the SOS response regulation in wild-type Escherichia coli

    Regulation of the SOS response in Escherichia coli, which is a set of inducible cellular reactions introduced after DNA damage, is due to specific interaction of LexA and RecA proteins. LexA protein is a common repressor of the genes of the SOS system, and RecA protein, once transiently activated by the so-called SOS-inducing signal, promotes LexA protein destruction. We have described the SOS regulation by means of differential equations with regard to LexA and RecA concentrations elsewhere. The 'input' function for model equations is the level of the SOS-inducing signal against time. Here we present a means for calculating the concentration of single-stranded DNA (SOS-inducing signal) as a function of time in wild-type cells after ultraviolet irradiation. With model equations one can simulate kinetic curves of SOS regulatory proteins after DNA damage to survey the SOS response kinetics. Simulation of LexA protein kinetics agrees with experimental data. We compare simulated LexA kinetic curves in wild-type and uνr- mutant bacteria, which is useful in investigating the way uνrABC-dependent excision repair modulates the SOS response kinetics. Possible applications of the model to investigating various aspects of the SOS induction are discussed

  12. Detergent effects on primary charge separation in wild-type and mutant Rhodobacter capsulatus reaction centers

    The primary electron-transfer processes in reaction centers (RCs) from wild-type and several mutants of Rhodobacter capsulatus have been investigated as a function of the detergent used to extract the RC protein from the membrane. Wild-type and L(M212)H mutant RCs that have been isolated using the detergent Deriphat 160-C both display somewhat slower initial charge separation (longer P* lifetimes) than the same RCs isolated using the detergent LDAO. For the F(L181)Y/Y(M208)F/L(M212)H triple mutant, the differences in the initial charge separation events for Deriphat-versus LDAO-isolated RCs are more significant. In all cases, use of Deriphat 160-C to extract the protein from the membrane yields RCs in which the QY band of P is retained at its native position near 865 nm, whereas LDAO extraction yields RCs that have the P band near 850 nm. Origins of the differences in both the ground state spectrum and the photochemistry, including possible RC-lipid associations, are considered

  13. Postnatal characterization of cells in the accessory olfactory bulb of wild type and reeler mice

    Eduardo eMartín-López

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Olfaction is the most relevant chemosensory sense of the rodents. General odors are primarily detected by the main olfactory system while most pheromonal signals are received by the accessory olfactory system. The first relay in the brain occurs in the olfactory bulb, which is subdivided in the main and accessory olfactory bulb (MOB/AOB. Given that the cell generation time is different between AOB and MOB, and the cell characterization of AOB remains limited, the goal of this work was first, the definition of the layering of AOB/MOB and second, the establishment of cellular phenotypes in the AOB in a time window corresponding to the early postnatal development. Moreover, since reelin deficiency has been related to layering and olfactory learning deficits, those data were compared with reeler mice. Firstly, we compared the layering between AOB and MOB at early embryonic stages. Then, cell phenotypes were established using specific neuronal and glial markers as well as the reelin adaptor protein Dab1 to analyze differences in both genetic backgrounds. There was no apparent difference in the cell phenotypes among AOB and MOB or between wild type and reeler animals. However, it was outstanding a disruption in the granular cell layer of reeler with respect to wild type mice. In conclusion, the AOB in reelin deficient mice showed similar neuronal and glial cell types being only affected the layering of granular cells.

  14. ALS mutant FUS disrupts nuclear localization and sequesters wild-type FUS within cytoplasmic stress granules.

    Vance, Caroline; Scotter, Emma L; Nishimura, Agnes L; Troakes, Claire; Mitchell, Jacqueline C; Kathe, Claudia; Urwin, Hazel; Manser, Catherine; Miller, Christopher C; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Dragunow, Mike; Rogelj, Boris; Shaw, Christopher E

    2013-07-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding Fused in Sarcoma (FUS) cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disorder. FUS is a predominantly nuclear DNA- and RNA-binding protein that is involved in RNA processing. Large FUS-immunoreactive inclusions fill the perikaryon of surviving motor neurons of ALS patients carrying mutations at post-mortem. This sequestration of FUS is predicted to disrupt RNA processing and initiate neurodegeneration. Here, we demonstrate that C-terminal ALS mutations disrupt the nuclear localizing signal (NLS) of FUS resulting in cytoplasmic accumulation in transfected cells and patient fibroblasts. FUS mislocalization is rescued by the addition of the wild-type FUS NLS to mutant proteins. We also show that oxidative stress recruits mutant FUS to cytoplasmic stress granules where it is able to bind and sequester wild-type FUS. While FUS interacts with itself directly by protein-protein interaction, the recruitment of FUS to stress granules and interaction with PABP are RNA dependent. These findings support a two-hit hypothesis, whereby cytoplasmic mislocalization of FUS protein, followed by cellular stress, contributes to the formation of cytoplasmic aggregates that may sequester FUS, disrupt RNA processing and initiate motor neuron degeneration. PMID:23474818

  15. Plastid sedimentation kinetics in roots of wild-type and starch-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis

    MacCleery, S. A.; Kiss, J. Z.

    1999-01-01

    Sedimentation and movement of plastids in columella cells of the root cap were measured in seedlings of wild-type, a reduced starch mutant, and a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis. To assay for sedimentation, we used both linear measurements and the change of angle from the cell center as indices in vertical and reoriented plants with the aid of computer-assisted image analysis. Seedlings were fixed at short periods after reorientation, and plastid sedimentation correlated with starch content in the three strains of Arabidopsis. Amyloplasts of wild-type seedlings showed the greatest sedimentation, whereas plastids of the starchless mutant showed no significant sedimentation in the vertically grown and reoriented seedlings. Because previous research has shown that a full complement of starch is needed for full gravitropic sensitivity, this study correlates increased sensitivity with plastid sedimentation. However, although plastid sedimentation contributed to gravisensitivity, it was not required, because the gravitropic starchless mutant had plastids that did not sediment. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to measure plastid sedimentation in Arabidopsis roots after reorientation of seedlings. Taken together, the results of this study are consistent with the classic plastid-based and protoplast-based models of graviperception and suggest that multiple systems of perception exist in plant cells.

  16. Spatial encoding in spinal sensorimotor circuits differs in different wild type mice strains

    Schouenborg Jens

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies in the rat have shown that the spatial organisation of the receptive fields of nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR system are functionally adapted through experience dependent mechanisms, termed somatosensory imprinting, during postnatal development. Here we wanted to clarify 1 if mice exhibit a similar spatial encoding of sensory input to NWR as previously found in the rat and 2 if mice strains with a poor learning capacity in various behavioural tests, associated with deficient long term potention, also exhibit poor adaptation of NWR. The organisation of the NWR system in two adult wild type mouse strains with normal long term potentiation (LTP in hippocampus and two adult wild type mouse strains exhibiting deficiencies in corresponding LTP were used and compared to previous results in the rat. Receptive fields of reflexes in single hindlimb muscles were mapped with CO2 laser heat pulses. Results While the spatial organisation of the nociceptive receptive fields in mice with normal LTP were very similar to those in rats, the LTP impaired strains exhibited receptive fields of NWRs with aberrant sensitivity distributions. However, no difference was found in NWR thresholds or onset C-fibre latencies suggesting that the mechanisms determining general reflex sensitivity and somatosensory imprinting are different. Conclusion Our results thus confirm that sensory encoding in mice and rat NWR is similar, provided that mice strains with a good learning capability are studied and raise the possibility that LTP like mechanisms are involved in somatosensory imprinting.

  17. Phylogenetic Analysis of Citrus tristeza virus Isolates of Wild Type Citrus in China

    YI Long; ZHOU Chang-yong

    2014-01-01

    The genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates collected from Chinese wild type citrus were analyzed by comparing the sequences of nine genomic regions (p23, p20, p13, p18, p25, p27, POL, HEL and k17) with the CTV isolates of cultivated citrus from different countries. The results showed that the divergence pattern of genomic RNA of the CTV isolates from wild type citrus was similar to that of other isolates from cultivated citrus, the 3´ proximal region was relatively conserved, and the 5´ proximal region had greater variability. The nine genomic regions of CTV isolates analyzed were found to have been under purifying selection in the evolution process. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the eleven Chinese wild CTV isolates were located at different clades and did not relfect their geographical origins, suggesting genetic diversity among the Chinese wild CTV populations. These results will aid in the understanding of molecular evolution of the Chinese CTV populations.

  18. Wild-type macrophages reverse disease in heme oxygenase 1-deficient mice.

    Kovtunovych, Gennadiy; Ghosh, Manik C; Ollivierre, Wade; Weitzel, R Patrick; Eckhaus, Michael A; Tisdale, John F; Yachie, Akihiro; Rouault, Tracey A

    2014-08-28

    Loss-of-function mutation in the heme oxygenase 1 (Hmox1) gene causes a rare and lethal disease in children, characterized by severe anemia and intravascular hemolysis, with damage to endothelia and kidneys. Previously, we found that macrophages engaged in recycling of red cells were depleted from the tissues of Hmox1(-/-) mice, which resulted in intravascular hemolysis and severe damage to the endothelial system, kidneys, and other organs. Here, we report that subablative bone marrow transplantation (BMT) has a curative effect for disease in Hmox1(-/-) animals as a result of restoration of heme recycling by repopulation of the tissues with wild-type macrophages. Although engraftment was transient, BMT reversed anemia, normalized blood chemistries and iron metabolism parameters, and prevented renal damage. The largest proportion of donor-derived cells was observed in the livers of transplanted animals. These cells, identified as Kupffer cells with high levels of Hmox1 expression, persisted months after transient engraftment of the donor bone marrow and were responsible for the full restoration of heme-recycling ability in Hmox1(-/-) mice and reversing Hmox1-deficient phenotype. Our findings suggest that BMT or the development of specific cell therapies to repopulate patients' tissues with wild-type or reengineered macrophages represent promising approaches for HMOX1 deficiency treatment in humans. PMID:24963040

  19. Prolactin inhibits a major tumor-suppressive function of wild type BRCA1.

    Chen, Kuan-Hui Ethan; Walker, Ameae M

    2016-06-01

    Even though mutations in the tumor suppressor, BRCA1, markedly increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancer, most breast and ovarian cancers express wild type BRCA1. An important question is therefore how the tumor-suppressive function of normal BRCA1 is overcome during development of most cancers. Because prolactin promotes these and other cancers, we investigated the hypothesis that prolactin interferes with the ability of BRCA1 to inhibit the cell cycle. Examining six different cancer cell lines with wild type BRCA1, and making use of both prolactin and the growth-inhibiting selective prolactin receptor modulator, S179D PRL, we demonstrate that prolactin activation of Stat5 results in the formation of a complex between phospho-Stat5 and BRCA1. Formation of this complex does not interfere with nuclear translocation or binding of BRCA1 to the p21 promoter, but does interfere with the ability of BRCA1 to transactivate the p21 promoter. Overexpression of a dominant-negative Stat5 in prolactin-stimulated cells resulted in increased p21 expression. We conclude that prolactin inhibits a major tumor-suppressive function of BRCA1 by interfering with BRCA1's upregulation of expression of the cell cycle inhibitor, p21. PMID:26970274

  20. Differential gene expression between wild-type and Gulo-deficient mice supplied with vitamin C

    Yan Jiao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that hepatic vitamin C (VC levels in VC deficient mice rescued with high doses of VC supplements still do not reach the optimal levels present in wild-type mice. For this, we used a mouse scurvy model (sfx in which the L-gulonolactone oxidase gene (Gulo is deleted. Six age- (6 weeks old and gender- (female matched wild-type (WT and sfx mice (rescued by administering 500 mg of VC/L were used as the control (WT and treatment (MT groups (n = 3 for each group, respectively. Total hepatic RNA was used in triplicate microarray assays for each group. EDGE software was used to identify differentially expressed genes and transcriptomic analysis was used to assess the potential genetic regulation of Gulo gene expression. Hepatic VC concentrations in MT mice were significantly lower than in WT mice, even though there were no morphological differences between the two groups. In MT mice, 269 differentially expressed transcripts were detected (> twice the difference between MT and WT mice, including 107 up-regulated and 162 down-regulated genes. These differentially expressed genes included stress-related and exclusively/predominantly hepatocyte genes. Transcriptomic analysis identified a major locus on chromosome 18 that regulates Gulo expression. Since three relevant oxidative genes are located within the critical region of this locus we suspect that they are involved in the down-regulation of oxidative activity in sfx mice.

  1. Transcript profiling reveals expression differences in wild-type and glabrous soybean lines

    Stromvik Martina

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trichome hairs affect diverse agronomic characters such as seed weight and yield, prevent insect damage and reduce loss of water but their molecular control has not been extensively studied in soybean. Several detailed models for trichome development have been proposed for Arabidopsis thaliana, but their applicability to important crops such as cotton and soybean is not fully known. Results Two high throughput transcript sequencing methods, Digital Gene Expression (DGE Tag Profiling and RNA-Seq, were used to compare the transcriptional profiles in wild-type (cv. Clark standard, CS and a mutant (cv. Clark glabrous, i.e., trichomeless or hairless, CG soybean isoline that carries the dominant P1 allele. DGE data and RNA-Seq data were mapped to the cDNAs (Glyma models predicted from the reference soybean genome, Williams 82. Extending the model length by 250 bp at both ends resulted in significantly more matches of authentic DGE tags indicating that many of the predicted gene models are prematurely truncated at the 5' and 3' UTRs. The genome-wide comparative study of the transcript profiles of the wild-type versus mutant line revealed a number of differentially expressed genes. One highly-expressed gene, Glyma04g35130, in wild-type soybean was of interest as it has high homology to the cotton gene GhRDL1 gene that has been identified as being involved in cotton fiber initiation and is a member of the BURP protein family. Sequence comparison of Glyma04g35130 among Williams 82 with our sequences derived from CS and CG isolines revealed various SNPs and indels including addition of one nucleotide C in the CG and insertion of ~60 bp in the third exon of CS that causes a frameshift mutation and premature truncation of peptides in both lines as compared to Williams 82. Conclusion Although not a candidate for the P1 locus, a BURP family member (Glyma04g35130 from soybean has been shown to be abundantly expressed in the CS line and very

  2. Detailed conformation dynamics and activation process of wild type c-Abl and T315I mutant

    Yang, Li-Jun; Zhao, Wen-Hua; Liu, Qian

    2014-10-01

    Bcr-Abl is an important target for therapy against chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). The synergistic effect between myristyl pocket and the ATP pocket has been found. But its detailed information based on molecular level still has not been achieved. In this study, conventional molecular dynamics (CMD) and target molecular dynamics (TMD) simulations were performed to explore the effect of T315I mutation on dynamics and activation process of Abl containing the N-terminal cap (Ncap). The CMD simulation results reveal the increasing flexibility of ATP pocket in kinase domain (KD) after T315I mutation which confirms the disability of ATP-pocket inhibitors to the Abl-T315I mutant. On the contrary, the T315I mutation decreased the flexibility of remote helix αI which suggests the synergistic effect between them. The mobility of farther regions containing Ncap, SH3, SH2 and SH2-KD linker were not affected by T315I mutation. The TMD simulation results show that the activation process of wild type Abl and Abl-T315I mutant experienced global conformation change. Their differences were elucidated by the activation motion of subsegments including A-loop, P-loop and Ncap. Besides, the T315I mutation caused decreasing energy barrier and increasing intermediate number in activation process, which results easier activation process. The TMD and CMD results indicate that a drug targeting only the ATP pocket is not enough to inhibit the Abl-T315I mutant. An effective way to inhibit the abnormal activity of Abl-T315I mutant is to combine the ATP-pocket inhibitors with inhibitors binding at non-ATP pockets mainly related to Ncap, SH2-KD linker and myristyl pocket.

  3. Isolation and phylogenetic characterization of Canine distemper virus from India.

    Swati; Deka, Dipak; Uppal, Sanjeev Kumar; Verma, Ramneek

    2015-09-01

    Canine distemper (CD), caused by canine distemper virus (CDV) is a highly contagious disease that infects a variety of carnivores. Sequence analysis of CDVs from different geographical areas has shown a lot of variation in the genome of the virus especially in haemagglutinin gene which might be one of the causes of vaccine failure. In this study, we isolated the virus (place: Ludhiana, Punjab; year: 2014) and further cloned, sequenced and analyzed partial haemagglutinin (H) gene and full length genes for fusion protein (F), phosphoprotein (P) and matrix protein (M) from an Indian wild-type CDV. Higher sequence homology was observed with the strains from Switzerland, Hungary, Germany; and lower with the vaccine strains like Ondersteport, CDV3, Convac for all the genes. The multiple sequence alignment showed more variation in partial H (45 nucleotide and 5 amino acid substitutions) and complete F (79 nucleotide and 30 amino acid substitutions) than in complete P (44 nucleotide and 22 amino acid substitutions) and complete M (22 nucleotide and 4 amino acid substitutions) gene/protein. Predicted potential N-linked glycosylation sites in H, F, M and P proteins were similar to the previously known wild-type CDVs but different from the vaccine strains. The Indian CDV formed a distinct clade in the phylogenetic tree clearly separated from the previously known wild-type and vaccine strains. PMID:26396979

  4. Genome sequence of SG33 strain and recombination between wild-type and vaccine myxoma viruses.

    Camus-Bouclainville, Christelle; Gretillat, Magalie; Py, Robert; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Guérin, Jean Luc; Bertagnoli, Stéphane

    2011-04-01

    Myxomatosis in Europe is the result of the release of a South America strain of myxoma virus in 1952. Several attenuated strains with origins in South America or California have since been used as vaccines in the rabbit industry. We sequenced the genome of the SG33 myxoma virus vaccine strain and compared it with those of other myxoma virus strains. We show that SG33 genome carries a large deletion in its right end. Furthermore, our data strongly suggest that the virus isolate from which SG33 is derived results from an in vivo recombination between a wild-type South America (Lausanne) strain and a California MSD-derived strain. These findings raise questions about the use of insufficiently attenuated virus in vaccination. PMID:21470452

  5. Proteomic characterization of a wild-type wine strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Trabalzini, Lorenza; Paffetti, Alessandro; Ferro, Elisa; Scaloni, Andrea; Talamo, Fabio; Millucci, Lia; Martelli, Paola; Santucci, Annalisa

    2003-12-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the optimal eukaryotic model system to study mammalian biological responses. At the same time Saccharomyces cerevisiae is also widely utilized as a biotechnological tool in the food industry. Enological Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains have been so far routinely analyzed for their microbiological aspects. Nevertheless, wine yeasts are gaining an increasing interest in the last years since they strongly affect both the vinification process and the organoleptic properties of the final product wine. The protein repertoire is responsible of such features and, consequently, 2D-PAGE can be an useful tool to evaluate and select optimal wine yeast strains. We present here the first proteomic map of a wild-type wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain selected for the guided fermentation of very high quality wines. PMID:15141481

  6. Blastocyst injection of wild type embryonic stem cells induces global corrections in mdx mice.

    Elizabeth Stillwell

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is an incurable neuromuscular degenerative disease, caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene. Mdx mice recapitulate DMD features. Here we show that injection of wild-type (WT embryonic stem cells (ESCs into mdx blastocysts produces mice with improved pathology and function. A small fraction of WT ESCs incorporates into the mdx mouse nonuniformly to upregulate protein levels of dystrophin in the skeletal muscle. The chimeric muscle shows reduced regeneration and restores dystrobrevin, a dystrophin-related protein, in areas with high and with low dystrophin content. WT ESC injection increases the amount of fat in the chimeras to reach WT levels. ESC injection without dystrophin does not prevent the appearance of phenotypes in the skeletal muscle or in the fat. Thus, dystrophin supplied by the ESCs reverses disease in mdx mice globally in a dose-dependent manner.

  7. Invitro Synthesis of Barley Endosperm Proteins on Wild Type and Mutant Templates

    Brandt, A.; Ingversen, J.

    1976-01-01

    an increased content of some hordein polypeptides catalyzed a preferential synthesis of these polypeptides in vitro. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the in vitro template activities of the free polyribosomes from the wild type and mutant endosperms were very similar. The......Membrane bound and free polyribosomes were isolated from 20 day old barley endosperms. Sucrose gradient analysis revealed distinct polysomal peaks up to heptamers. The isolated polysomes were active in a cell-free protein synthesizing system employing wheat germ extract. SDS-polyacrylamide gel......-migration with native hordein on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Membrane bound endosperm polysomes from a barley mutant defective in hordein synthesis produced in the cell-free protein synthesizing system only a small amount of hordein. Conversely membrane bound polysomes from the endosperm of a mutant giving rise to...

  8. Characterization of melanin produced by a wild-type strain of Bacillus cereus

    ZHANG Jianping; CAI Jun; DENG Yinyue; CHEN Yuehua; REN Gaixin

    2007-01-01

    Bacillus cereus 58 (Bc58)is a UV-resistant wild type strain that has an ability to produce a sorrel pigment induced by L-tyrosine.The Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR)spectra and chemical tests of its pigment are similar to that of the standard melanin (Sigma).A bioassay shows that the LC50 of a Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt)formulation added with the melanin of Bc58 and exposed to UV for 5 h is 16.1 μg/ml,which is similar to that of the Bt formulation without UV treatment,however,it is almost double that of the Bt formulation exposed to UV without the melanin of Bc58.The result of SDS-PAGE indicates that the melanin of Bc58 can protect the insecticidal crystal proteins from degradation.This suggests that it is an excellent UV protective agent for the insecticidal crystal proteins of the Bt formulation.

  9. Impaired olfactory bulb neurogenesis depends on the presence of human wild-type alpha-synuclein.

    May, V E L; Nuber, S; Marxreiter, F; Riess, O; Winner, B; Winkler, J

    2012-10-11

    Synucleinopathies including Parkinson's disease (PD) are characterized by the accumulation of alpha-synuclein (α-syn) within neural cell bodies and their processes. Transgenic mice overexpressing human wild-type or mutant forms of α-syn under the control of different promoters were developed to analyse the underlying neuropathology of PD. One of the earliest clinical symptoms associated with PD is olfactory impairment. The generation of new neurons persists up to adulthood in mammals, in particular the olfactory bulb (OB). In order to assess this process in relation to α-syn accumulation, we used mice overexpressing human wild-type α-syn under the regulatable control (tet-off) of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα-promoter (CaMKII). We observed a decrease in OB neurogenesis in transgenic animals compared to controls using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label newly generated cells (neuron-specific nuclear protein; NeuN). After cessation of transgene expression we detected an increase in newly generated cells both in granular (GCL) and glomerular (GLOM) layers of the OB. This led to a rescue of newly generated neurons (BrdU(+)/NeuN(+)) within the GLOM with a distinct specificity for the dopaminergic subpopulation. In contrast, we did not detect a cell-specific rescue of neuronal cells in the GCL suggesting diverse effects of alpha-synucleinopathy in both interneuronal layers of the OB. Colabelling of BrdU with glial markers showed that a differentiation into neither astroglia nor microglia attributed to the observed phenotype in the GCL. In particular, BrdU(+) particles located within microglial cells were predominantly associated close to the membrane therefore the resembling phagocytosed nuclear fragments of BrdU(+) cells. Thus, our study further contributes insights into α-syn accumulation as a causative player in the impairment of adult neurogenesis and emphasizes its diverse role in cell renewal of distinct OB cell layers. PMID:22814000

  10. An Ultra-Violet Tolerant Wild-Type Strain of Melanin-Producing Bacillus thuringiensis

    Sansinenea

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Bacillus thuringiensis is the most successful biological control agent used in agriculture, forestry and mosquito control. However, the insecticidal activity of the B. thuringiensis formulation is not very stable and rapidly loses its biological activity under field conditions, due to the ultraviolet radiation in sunlight. Melanin is known to absorb radiation therefore photo protection of B. thuringiensis based on melanin has been extensively studied. Objectives The aim of this study was to find a wild type strain of naturally melanin-producing B. thuringiensis to avoid any mutation or manipulation that can affect the Cry protein content. Materials and Methods Bacillus thuringiensis strains were isolated from soils of different States of Mexico and pigment extraction was followed by lowering the pH to 2 using 1N HCl. Pigment was characterized by some chemical tests based on its solubility, bleaching by H2O2 and flocculation with FeCl3, and using an Infrared (IR spectrum. Ultraviolet (UV irradiation experiment was performed to probe the melanin efficacy. Results ELI52 strain of B. thuringiensis was confirmed to naturally produce melanin. The Cry protein analysis suggested that ELI52 is probably a B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strain with toxic activity against the Diptera order of insects. Ultra Violet protection efficacy of melanin was probed counting total viable colonies after UV radiation and comparing the results with the non-producing melanin strain L-DOPA (L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine was also detected in the culture. ELI52 strain showed an antagonistic effect over some common bacteria from the environment. Conclusions ELI52 wild-type strain of B. thuringiensis is a good bio-insecticide that produces melanin with UV-resistance that is probably toxic against the Diptera order of insects and can inhibit the growth of other environmental bacteria.

  11. Wild-Type KRAS and BRAF Could Predict Response to Cetuximab in Chinese Colorectal Cancer Patients

    Jing Gao; Ting-ting Wang; Jing-wei Yu; Yan-yan Li; Lin Shen

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the relationship between KRAS,BRAF mutations and the response to Cetuximab in Chinese colorectal cancer patients.Methods:A total of 273 Chinese colorectal cancer patients were evaluated for KRAS and BRAF mutations by 5anger sequencing.Among them,59 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) were treated with Cetuximab in combination with chemotherapy from August 2005 to July 2009.Statistical analysis was conducted to assess the relationship between KRAS,BRAF mutations and the response or survival of 59 mCRC patients.Results:KRAS and BRAF mutation rates were 38.5% (105/273) and 5.1% (14/273),respectively,and KRAS/BRAF mutations were mutually exclusive.Among 59 patients treated with Cetuximab plus chemotherapy,KRAS and BRAF mutations were identified in 11 and 5 patients,respectively.The response rates and median progression-free survivals (PFS) in KRAS wild-type and mutant patients were 35.4% (17/48) vs.9.1% (1/11) (P=0.054) and 153 days vs.99 days (P=0.01),respectively.Also,the response rates and median PFS in BRAF wild-type and mutant patients were 37.2% (16/43) vs.20% (1/5) (P=0.016) and 138 days vs.90 days (P=0.036),respectively.Conclusion:Besides KRAS,assessing BRAF mutation should also be required to select patients eligible for Cetuximab.Further prospective evaluation in large samples should be performed to confirm these preliminary findings.

  12. Efficient Reassignment of a Frequent Serine Codon in Wild-Type Escherichia coli.

    Ho, Joanne M; Reynolds, Noah M; Rivera, Keith; Connolly, Morgan; Guo, Li-Tao; Ling, Jiqiang; Pappin, Darryl J; Church, George M; Söll, Dieter

    2016-02-19

    Expansion of the genetic code through engineering the translation machinery has greatly increased the chemical repertoire of the proteome. This has been accomplished mainly by read-through of UAG or UGA stop codons by the noncanonical aminoacyl-tRNA of choice. While stop codon read-through involves competition with the translation release factors, sense codon reassignment entails competition with a large pool of endogenous tRNAs. We used an engineered pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase to incorporate 3-iodo-l-phenylalanine (3-I-Phe) at a number of different serine and leucine codons in wild-type Escherichia coli. Quantitative LC-MS/MS measurements of amino acid incorporation yields carried out in a selected reaction monitoring experiment revealed that the 3-I-Phe abundance at the Ser208AGU codon in superfolder GFP was 65 ± 17%. This method also allowed quantification of other amino acids (serine, 33 ± 17%; phenylalanine, 1 ± 1%; threonine, 1 ± 1%) that compete with 3-I-Phe at both the aminoacylation and decoding steps of translation for incorporation at the same codon position. Reassignments of different serine (AGU, AGC, UCG) and leucine (CUG) codons with the matching tRNA(Pyl) anticodon variants were met with varying success, and our findings provide a guideline for the choice of sense codons to be reassigned. Our results indicate that the 3-iodo-l-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)/tRNA(Pyl) pair can efficiently outcompete the cellular machinery to reassign select sense codons in wild-type E. coli. PMID:26544153

  13. Molecular Dynamics Approach in the Comparison of Wild-Type and Mutant Paraoxonase-1 Apoenzyme Form

    Amine, Khadija; Miri, Lamia; Naimi, Adil; Saile, Rachid; El Kharrim, Abderrahmane; Mikou, Afaf; Kettani, Anass

    2015-01-01

    There is some evidence linking the mammalian paraoxonase-1 (PON1) loops (L1 and L2) to an increased flexibility and reactivity of its active site with potential substrates. The aim of this work is to study the structural, dynamical, and functional effects of the most flexible regions close to the active site and to determine the impact of mutations on the protein. For both models, wild-type (PON1wild) and PON1 mutant (PON1mut) models, the L1 loop and Q/R and L/M mutations were constructed using MODELLER software. Molecular dynamics simulations of 20 ns at 300 K on fully modeled PON1wild and PON1mut apoenzyme have been done. Detailed analyses of the root-mean-square deviation and fluctuations, H-bonding pattern, and torsion angles have been performed. The PON1wild results were then compared with those obtained for the PON1mut. Our results show that the active site in the wild-type structure is characterized by two distinct movements of opened and closed conformations of the L1 and L2 loops. The alternating and repetitive movement of loops at specific times is consistent with the presence of 11 defined hydrogen bonds. In the PON1mut, these open-closed movements are therefore totally influenced and repressed by the Q/R and L/M mutations. In fact, these mutations seem to impact the PON1mut active site by directly reducing the catalytic core flexibility, while maintaining a significant mobility of the switch regions delineated by the loops surrounding the active site. The impact of the studied mutations on structure and dynamics proprieties of the protein may subsequently contribute to the loss of both flexibility and activity of the PON1 enzyme. PMID:26417201

  14. Canine mastocytosis

    Paiva, D.; Mendonça, A; Vala, Helena

    2013-01-01

    Mastocytosis is a mast cell disorder in which its exaggerated proliferation can occur in two forms: systemic and cutaneous (Davis et al., 1992). Because canine mastocytosis is a rare situation of controversial and difficult diagnosis, the goal of this study consists in a current revision of this subject, in order to sensitize the veterinary staff to its severity, with particular focus on the information the veterinary nurse must hold to better apply a specialized nursing care with the hig...

  15. Differential proteomic and behavioral effects of long-term voluntary exercise in wild-type and APP-overexpressing transgenics.

    Rao, Shailaja Kishan; Ross, Jordan M; Harrison, Fiona E; Bernardo, Alexandra; Reiserer, Randall S; Reiserer, Ronald S; Mobley, James A; McDonald, Michael P

    2015-06-01

    Physical exercise may provide protection against the cognitive decline and neuropathology associated with Alzheimer's disease, although the mechanisms are not clear. In the present study, APP/PSEN1 double-transgenic and wild-type mice were allowed unlimited voluntary exercise for 7months. Consistent with previous reports, wheel-running improved cognition in the double-transgenic mice. Interestingly, the average daily distance run was strongly correlated with spatial memory in the water maze in wild-type mice (r(2)=.959), but uncorrelated in transgenics (r(2)=.013). Proteomics analysis showed that sedentary transgenic mice differed significantly from sedentary wild-types with respect to proteins involved in synaptic transmission, cytoskeletal regulation, and neurogenesis. When given an opportunity to exercise, the transgenics' deficiencies in cytoskeletal regulation and neurogenesis largely normalized, but abnormal synaptic proteins did not change. In contrast, exercise enhanced proteins associated with cytoskeletal regulation, oxidative phosphorylation, and synaptic transmission in wild-type mice. Soluble and insoluble Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels were significantly decreased in both cortex and hippocampus of active transgenics, suggesting that this may have played a role in the cognitive improvement in APP/PSEN1 mice. β-secretase was significantly reduced in active APP/PSEN1 mice compared to sedentary controls, suggesting a mechanism for reduced Aβ. Taken together, these data illustrate that exercise improves memory in wild-type and APP-overexpressing mice in fundamentally different ways. PMID:25818006

  16. Detection and differentiation of wild-type and a vaccine strain of Streptococcus equi ssp. equi using pyrosequencing.

    Livengood, Julia L; Lanka, Saraswathi; Maddox, Carol; Tewari, Deepanker

    2016-07-25

    Streptococcus equi subspecies equi (S. equi), the causative agent of strangles, is an important equine pathogen. Strangles is a highly contagious disease and a commercial modified live vaccine (MLV) is used for protection, which although effective, may also result in clinical signs of the disease. A rapid means to differentiate between the MLV and wild-type infection is crucial for quarantine release and limiting the disease spread. This study describes the use of a pyrosequencing assay targeting a single nucleotide deletion upstream of the SzPSe gene to distinguish between the wild-type and vaccine strains. A set of 96 characterized clinical specimens and isolates were tested using the assay. The assay was successful in differentiating between wild-type S. equi and the vaccine strains and in discriminating S. equi from other Streptococci. The vaccine strain was identified in 61.7% (29/47) of the strangles cases in horses with a history of MLV vaccination. PMID:27317457

  17. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence of wild-type hepatitis - A virus and its attenuated candidate vaccine derivative

    Development of attenuated mutants for use as vaccines is in progress for other viruses, including influenza, rotavirus, varicella-zoster, cytomegalovirus, and hepatitis-A virus (HAV). Attenuated viruses may be derived from naturally occurring mutants that infect human or nonhuman hosts. Alternatively, attenuated mutants may be generated by passage of wild-type virus in cell culture. Production of attenuated viruses in cell culture is a laborious and empiric process. Despite previous empiric successes, understanding the molecular basis for attenuation of vaccine viruses could facilitate future development and use of live-virus vaccines. Comparison of the complete nucleotide sequences of wild-type (virulent) and vaccine (attenuated) viruses has been reported for polioviruses and yellow fever virus. Here, the authors compare the nucleotide sequence of wild-type HAV HM-175 with that of a candidate vaccine derivative

  18. Effects of salt stress on wild type and vte4 mutant Arabidopsis thaliana: Model plant to engineer tolerance towards salinity

    Khalatbari Amir Ali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major environmental constraints impairing plant distribution and yield is believed to be salt stress. Additionally, engineered abiotic stress resistance or/and tolerance is considered as an indispensable target in order to enhance plant productivity. In this study, the effects of salinity on physiological and morphological of wild type (Columbia-0 and vte4 mutant Arabidopsis thaliana were investigated under different NaCl concentrations. These salt treatments, including control condition, 50mM and 100mM NaCl were imposed on the plants. Each salt treatment was replicated three times in a complete randomized design with factorial arrangement. Wild type and mutant A.thaliana plants were subjected to the abiotic stress (salinity for up to 11 days to evaluate the parameters of growth, development and water relations. As a result, the performance of wild type plants was stronger than vte4 mutant under different salt treatments. Under control condition, rosette dry weight, maximum quantum efficiency (PSII and specific leaf area obtained the highest values of 13.85 mg, considered, wild type A.thaliana recorded higher value of 0.82 gW/gFW for relative water content (RWC under 50mM NaCl whereas mutant plants gained the value of 0.78 gW/gFW under the same condition. However, root mass fraction indicated an increase for both wild type and vte4 mutant plants after 11 days of salt stress onset. The reduction of water potential was observed for wild type and mutant A.thaliana where it scored -1.3 MPa and -1.4, respectively. As a conclusion, these findings implied that under different salt treatments morphological and physiological responses of wild type and vte4 mutant were affected in which wild type plants showed more tolerance. Lack of γ-tocopherol methyltransferase (γ -TMT gene in vte4 seemed to impair defence mechanism of this mutant against salinity.

  19. The mechanism of dehydration in chromophore maturation of wild-type green fluorescent protein: A theoretical study

    Ma, Yingying; Yu, Jian-Guo; Sun, Qiao; Li, Zhen; Smith, Sean C.

    2015-07-01

    An interesting aspect of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) is its autocatalytic chromophore maturation. Numerous experimental studies have indicated that dehydration is the last step in the chromophore maturation process of wild-type GFP. Based on the crystal structure of wild-type GFP, the mechanism of the reverse reaction of dehydration was investigated by using density functional theory (DFT) in this study. Our results proposed that the dehydration is exothermic. Moreover, the rate-limiting step of the mechanism is the proton on guanidinium of Arg96 transferring to the β-carbon anion of Tyr66, which is consistent with the experimental observation.

  20. Transcriptional Activation by Wild-Type But Not Transforming Mutants of the p53 Anti-Oncogene

    Raycroft, Loretta; Wu, Hongyun; Lozano, Guillermina

    1990-01-01

    The protein encoded by the wild-type p53 proto-oncogene has been shown to suppress transformation, whereas certain mutations that alter p53 become transformation competent. Fusion proteins between p53 and the GAL4 DNA binding domain were made to anchor p53 to a DNA target sequence and to allow measurement of transcriptional activation of a reporter plasmid. The wild-type p53 stimulated transcription in this assay, but two transforming mutations in p53 were unable to act as transcriptional act...

  1. Differential angiogenic gene expression in TP53 wild-type and mutant ovarian cancer cell lines

    BrittanyAnneDavidson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Underlying mechanisms regulating angiogenesis in ovarian cancer have not been completely elucidated. Evidence suggests that the TP53 tumor suppressor pathway and tumor microenvironment play integral roles. We utilized microarray technology to study the interaction between TP53 mutational status & hypoxia on angiogenic gene expression. Methods: Affymetrix U133A arrays were analyzed for angiogenic gene expression in 19 ovarian cancer cell lines stratified both by TP53 mutation status and A2780 wild-type (wt TP53 vs. mutated (m TP53 cell lines after treatment under hypoxic conditions or with ionizing radiation. Results: Twenty-eight differentially expressed angiogenic genes were identified in the mTP53 cell lines compared to wtTP53 lines. Five genes were upregulated in mTP53 cells: 40% involved in extracellular matrix (ECM degradation (MMP10/15 and 60% in angiogenesis (FGFR3/VEGFA/EPHB4. Twenty-three genes were upregulated in wtTP53: nearly 22% were ECM constituents or involved in ECM degradation; over 40% were growth factors or mediators of angiogenesis. Five genes were upregulated in the A2780mTP53 cells: 40% involved in ECM remodeling (MMP10, ADAMTS1, 40% with pro-angiogenic activity (EFNB2, F2R, and 20% with anti-angiogenic properties (ADAMTS1. Three genes were upregulated in hypoxia treated cells compared to controls: 1 with anti-angiogenic activity (ANGPTL4 and 2 with pro-angiogenic activity (VEGFA, EFNA3. No significant gene fold changes were noted after exposure to radiation. Four genes continued to demonstrate significant differential expression (p≤0.05 after adjusting for multiple comparisons. These genes included ENG upregulation in wild-type lines and upregulation of FGF-20, ADAMTS1 & MMP10 in mTP53 lines. Conclusions: Our exploratory findings indicate that non-overlapping angiogenic pathways may be altered by TP53 mutations and hypoxic conditions in ththe tumor microenvironment. Further evaluation is needed for

  2. Study on the mating compatibility of part pear varieties and wild types of Pyrus ussuriensis

    2008-01-01

    To understand the mating compatibility of Pyrus ussuriensis Maxim.,we studied the fertility of pollen and conducted a hand-pollination trial in the field on some pear varieties and wild types.The results showed that about 53% of varieties among 32 tested genotypes were male sterile.Not only did the pollen vitalities in normal varieties show distinct differences,but pollen vitalities from flower forcing in a glasshouse were found to be lower than those from natural flowering in the field,which had no apparent effect on fruit setting of tested varieties.Most of the tested genotypes such as Nanguoli,Pingxiangli,and Hanxiangli showed selfincompatibility (SI).Honghuagaili could bear fruit after hand pollination,but there were abnormal seeds in its fruits.So we suggested it was a recessive SI that happened during embryo development.Longxiangli has the capacity of self-compatibility (SC) to some extent,its fruit setting rate of inflorescence could reach 23.3%.Manual self-pollination during bud flowering could improve the fruit setting rate of part tested genotypes with SI,but had no effect on the fruit setting rate 3 days after flowering.Mating between female parents with the variety selected from F1 generation showed that the majority of their combinations were compatible.There was one-way SC when Nanguoli was crossed with Hanhongli,while no fruits could be found after Hanhongli was crossed with Nanguoli.It may be related to the S-genotype or haplotype of Nanguoli.In addition,mating between the varieties derived from bud mutation with the female parent appeared incompatible.We concluded that P.ussuriensis Maxim.is similar to other grown pear systems with the characteristics of SI,the fruit setting rate of self pollination in some varieties and wild types can be improved by artificial self-pollination during bud flowering,and fruit cannot be developed through pollination between the varieties from bud mutation and the female parent.

  3. A retrospective investigation of canine adenovirus (CAV) infection in adult dogs in Turkey : article

    Gur, S; A. Acar

    2009-01-01

    Canine adenovirus (CAV) type 1 and 2, respectively, cause infectious canine hepatitis and infectious canine laryngotracheitis in members of the families Canidae and Ursidae worldwide. Both of these infections are acute diseases, especially in young dogs. The aim of this study was to conduct a serological investigation of canine adenovirus infection. For this purpose, serumsamples were collected from native pure-bred Kangal (n = 11), and Akbash dogs (n = 17) and Turkish Greyhounds (n=15) in Es...

  4. Auto-Assembling Detoxified Staphylococcus aureus Alpha-Hemolysin Mimicking the Wild-Type Cytolytic Toxin.

    Fiaschi, Luigi; Di Palo, Benedetta; Scarselli, Maria; Pozzi, Clarissa; Tomaszewski, Kelly; Galletti, Bruno; Nardi-Dei, Vincenzo; Arcidiacono, Letizia; Mishra, Ravi P N; Mori, Elena; Pallaoro, Michele; Falugi, Fabiana; Torre, Antonina; Fontana, Maria Rita; Soriani, Marco; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane; Grandi, Guido; Rappuoli, Rino; Ferlenghi, Ilaria; Bagnoli, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus alpha-hemolysin (Hla) assembles into heptameric pores on the host cell membrane, causing lysis, apoptosis, and junction disruption. Herein, we present the design of a newly engineered S. aureus alpha-toxin, HlaPSGS, which lacks the predicted membrane-spanning stem domain. This protein is able to form heptamers in aqueous solution in the absence of lipophilic substrata, and its structure, obtained by transmission electron microscopy and single-particle reconstruction analysis, resembles the cap of the wild-type cytolytic Hla pore. HlaPSGS was found to be impaired in binding to host cells and to its receptor ADAM10 and to lack hemolytic and cytotoxic activity. Immunological studies using human sera as well as sera from mice convalescent from S. aureus infection suggested that the heptameric conformation of HlaPSGS mimics epitopes exposed by the cytolytic Hla pore during infection. Finally, immunization with this newly engineered Hla generated high protective immunity against staphylococcal infection in mice. Overall, this study provides unprecedented data on the natural immune response against Hla and suggests that the heptameric HlaPSGS is a highly valuable vaccine candidate against S. aureus. PMID:27030589

  5. Comparative metabolomic analysis of wild type and mads3 mutant rice anthers

    Guorun Qu; Sheng Quan; Palash Mondol; Jie Xu; Dabing Zhang; Jianxin Shi

    2014-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) MADS3 transcription factor regulates the homeostasis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during late anther development, and one MADS3 mutant, mads3-4, has defective anther wal s, aborted microspores and complete male sterility. Here, we report the untargeted metabolomic analysis of both wild type and mads3-4 mature anthers. Mutation of MADS3 led to an unbalanced redox status and caused oxidative stress that damages lipid, protein, and DNA. To cope with oxidative stress in mads3-4 anthers, soluble sugars were mobilized and carbohydrate metabolism was shifted to amino acid and nucleic acid metabolism to provide substrates for the biosynthesis of antioxidant proteins and the repair of DNA. Mutation of MADS3 also affected other aspects of rice anther development such as secondary metabolites associated with cuticle, cellwal , and auxin metabolism. Many of the discovered metabolic changes in mads3-4 anthers were corroborated with changes of expression levels of correspond-ing metabolic pathway genes. Altogether, this comparative metabolomic analysis indicated that MADS3 gene affects rice anther development far beyond the ROS homeostasis regulation.

  6. Wild-Type Transthyretin Cardiac Amyloidosis: Novel Insights From Advanced Imaging.

    Narotsky, David L; Castano, Adam; Weinsaft, Jonathan W; Bokhari, Sabahat; Maurer, Mathew S

    2016-09-01

    Amyloidosis is caused by extracellular deposition of abnormal protein fibrils, resulting in destruction of tissue architecture and impairment of organ function. The most common forms of systemic amyloidosis are light-chain and transthyretin-related (ATTR). ATTR can result from an autosomal dominant hereditary transmission of mutated genes in the transthyretin or from a wild-type form of disease (ATTRwt), previously known as senile cardiac amyloidosis. With the aging of the worldwide population, ATTRwt will emerge as the most common type of cardiac amyloidosis that clinicians encounter. Diagnosis of systemic amyloidosis is often delayed, either because of the false assumption that it is a rare disease, or because of misdiagnosis as a result of mistaking it with other conditions. Clinicians must integrate clinical clues from history, physical examination, and common diagnostic tests to raise suspicion for ATTRwt. The historical gold standard for diagnosis of cardiac amyloid is endomyocardial biopsy analysis with pathological distinction of precursor protein type, but this method often results in delayed diagnosis because of the limited availability of expertise to perform and interpret the endomyocardial biopsy specimen. Emerging noninvasive imaging modalities provide easier, accurate screening for ATTRwt. These modalities include advanced echocardiography, using strain imaging and the myocardial contraction fraction; nuclear scintigraphy, which can differentiate between ATTR and light-chain cardiac amyloid; and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, using extracellular volume measurement, late gadolinium enhancement, and distinct T1 mapping. These novel approaches reveal insights into the prevalence, clinical course, morphological effects, and prognosis of ATTRwt. PMID:27568874

  7. Wild-type p53 gene expression sensitizes radioresistant esophageal cancer cell lines

    Objective: To define the radiosensitizing effect of wild-type p3 (Wt-p53) on human radioresistant esophageal cancer cell lines and the application of p53 gene therapy combined with radiotherapy. Methods: The human esophageal cancer cell lines TE-13 and its radioresistant variant TE-13R50 derived from repeated irradiation were initially transfected with Ad5CMV-p53, a recombined adenovirus vector containing human Wt-p53 cDNA and cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. The impact of Ad5CMV-p53 expression on radiation sensitivity was observed and analyzed both after transfected cell lines (in vitro) and their transplanted tumors (in vivo) had been irradiated. Results: Significant difference in radiosensitivity between the TE-13 (D0= 1.38 Gy) and TE-13R50 (D0 = 2.48 Gy) cell lines was confirmed. When Ad5CMV-p53 had been transfected and expressed in there cells, their sensitivity to irradiation was enhanced obviously, with declined D0 values of 0.97 Gy and 1.14 Gy, respectively. On the other hand, the growth rate of transplanted tumors in nude mice was more suppressed by combined radiation and injection of Ad5CMV-p53, as compared with irradiation alone, especially for TE-13R50. Conclusion: The potentiation of adenovirus-mediated wt-p53 gene expression has a significant impact on improving the radiosensitivity of esophageal cancer cell lines

  8. Nickel adsorption by wild type and nickel resistant isolate of chlorella sp

    Use of unicellular green microalgae has several advantages over conventional methods for removing heavy metals from contaminated sites. Here, a comparative study was made to investigate nickel detoxification mechanisms between a wild type(WT) Chlorella sp. and a nickel resistant, EMS-5 cell line isolated from the same species by EMS (Ethyl Methane Sulphonate) mutagenesis. Results showed that the growth rate of the tested algal cells was inhibited with increasing nickel concentrations in the liquid growth medium. Higher ID/sub 50/ value of EMS-5 compared to the WT revealed some degree of resistance to nickel. Removal and adsorption of Ni/sub 2+/ were found rapid during the first few hours in both the algal cultures when exposed to 50 microM Ni/sub 2+/. However, kinetic experiments showed significantly higher removal and adsorption of Ni by EMS-5 compared to the WT throughout the treatment hours. Besides, the total nickel accumulation, surface bound and intracellular nickel in EMS-5 was significantly higher to that of the WT. Hence the EMS-5 appeared more resistant to nickel. (author)

  9. Taste responses to sweet stimuli in alpha-gustducin knockout and wild-type mice.

    Danilova, Vicktoria; Damak, Sami; Margolskee, Robert F; Hellekant, Göran

    2006-07-01

    The importance of alpha-gustducin in sweet taste transduction is based on data obtained with sucrose and the artificial sweetener SC45647. Here we studied the role of alpha-gustducin in sweet taste. We compared the behavioral and electrophysiological responses of alpha-gustducin knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice to 11 different sweeteners, representing carbohydrates, artificial sweeteners, and sweet amino acids. In behavioral experiments, over 48-h preference ratios were measured in two-bottle preference tests. In electrophysiological experiments, integrated responses of chorda tympani (CT) and glossopharyngeal (NG) nerves were recorded. We found that preference ratios of the KO mice were significantly lower than those of WT for acesulfame-K, dulcin, fructose, NC00174, D-phenylalanine, L-proline, D-tryptophan, saccharin, SC45647, sucrose, but not neotame. The nerve responses to all sweeteners, except neotame, were smaller in the KO mice than in the WT mice. The differences between the responses in WT and KO mice were more pronounced in the CT than in the NG. These data indicate that alpha-gustducin participates in the transduction of the sweet taste in general. PMID:16740645

  10. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy discriminates the response to microglial stimulation of wild type and Alzheimer's disease models.

    Pardon, Marie-Christine; Yanez Lopez, Maria; Yuchun, Ding; Marjańska, Małgorzata; Prior, Malcolm; Brignell, Christopher; Parhizkar, Samira; Agostini, Alessandra; Bai, Li; Auer, Dorothee P; Faas, Henryk M

    2016-01-01

    Microglia activation has emerged as a potential key factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Metabolite levels assessed by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) are used as markers of neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative diseases, but how they relate to microglial activation in health and chronic disease is incompletely understood. Using MRS, we monitored the brain metabolic response to lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced microglia activation in vivo in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (APP/PS1) and healthy controls (wild-type (WT) littermates) over 4 hours. We assessed reactive gliosis by immunohistochemistry and correlated metabolic and histological measures. In WT mice, LPS induced a microglial phenotype consistent with activation, associated with a sustained increase in macromolecule and lipid levels (ML9). This effect was not seen in APP/PS1 mice, where LPS did not lead to a microglial response measured by histology, but induced a late increase in the putative inflammation marker myoinositol (mI) and metabolic changes in total creatine and taurine previously reported to be associated with amyloid load. We argue that ML9 and mI distinguish the response of WT and APP/PS1 mice to immune mediators. Lipid and macromolecule levels may represent a biomarker of activation of healthy microglia, while mI may not be a glial marker. PMID:26813748

  11. Intraperitoneal Infection of Wild-Type Mice with Synthetically Generated Mammalian Prion.

    Xinhe Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The prion hypothesis postulates that the infectious agent in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs is an unorthodox protein conformation based agent. Recent successes in generating mammalian prions in vitro with bacterially expressed recombinant prion protein provide strong support for the hypothesis. However, whether the pathogenic properties of synthetically generated prion (rec-Prion recapitulate those of naturally occurring prions remains unresolved. Using end-point titration assay, we showed that the in vitro prepared rec-Prions have infectious titers of around 104 LD50/μg. In addition, intraperitoneal (i.p. inoculation of wild-type mice with rec-Prion caused prion disease with an average survival time of 210-220 days post inoculation. Detailed pathological analyses revealed that the nature of rec-Prion induced lesions, including spongiform change, disease specific prion protein accumulation (PrP-d and the PrP-d dissemination amongst lymphoid and peripheral nervous system tissues, the route and mechanisms of neuroinvasion were all typical of classical rodent prions. Our results revealed that, similar to naturally occurring prions, the rec-Prion has a titratable infectivity and is capable of causing prion disease via routes other than direct intra-cerebral challenge. More importantly, our results established that the rec-Prion caused disease is pathogenically and pathologically identical to naturally occurring contagious TSEs, supporting the concept that a conformationally altered protein agent is responsible for the infectivity in TSEs.

  12. Profile of Cytokines and Chemokines Triggered by Wild-Type Strains of Rabies Virus in Mice.

    Appolinário, Camila Michele; Allendorf, Susan Dora; Peres, Marina Gea; Ribeiro, Bruna Devidé; Fonseca, Clóvis R; Vicente, Acácia Ferreira; Antunes, João Marcelo A de Paula; Megid, Jane

    2016-02-01

    Rabies is a lethal infectious disease that causes 55,000 human deaths per year and is transmitted by various mammalian species, such as dogs and bats. The host immune response is essential for avoiding viral progression and promoting viral clearance. Cytokines and chemokines are crucial in the development of an immediate antiviral response; the rabies virus (RABV) attempts to evade this immune response. The virus's capacity for evasion is correlated with its pathogenicity and the host's inflammatory response, with highly pathogenic strains being the most efficient at hijacking the host's defense mechanisms and thereby decreasing inflammation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of a set of cytokine and chemokine genes that are related to the immune response in the brains of mice inoculated intramuscularly or intracerebrally with two wild-type strains of RABV, one from dog and the other from vampire bat. The results demonstrated that the gene expression profile is intrinsic to the specific rabies variant. The prompt production of cytokines and chemokines seems to be more important than their levels of expression for surviving a rabies infection. PMID:26711511

  13. Evaluation of short-interfering RNAs treatment in experimental rabies due to wild-type virus

    Camila Michele Appolinario

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTWe have evaluated the efficacy of short-interfering RNAs targeting the nucleoprotein gene and also the brain immune response in treated and non-treated infected mice. Mice were inoculated with wild-type virus, classified as dog (hv2 or vampire bat (hv3 variants and both groups were treated or leaved as controls. No difference was observed in the lethality rate between treated and non-treated groups, although clinical evaluation of hv2 infected mice showed differences in the severity of clinical disease (p = 0.0006. Evaluation of brain immune response 5 days post-inoculation in treated hv2 group showed no difference among the analyzed genes, whereas after 10 days post-inoculation there was increased expression of 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 12, interferon gamma, and C-X-C motif chemokine 10 associated with higher expression of Ngene in the same period (p < 0.0001. In hv2 non-treated group only higher interferon beta expression was found at day 5. The observed differences in results of the immune response genes between treated and non-treated groups is not promising as they had neither impact on mortality nor even a reduction in the expression of N gene in siRNA treated animals. This finding suggests that the use of pre-designed siRNA alone may not be useful in rabies treatment.

  14. Experimentally derived structural constraints for amyloid fibrils of wild-type transthyretin.

    Bateman, David A; Tycko, Robert; Wickner, Reed B

    2011-11-16

    Transthyretin (TTR) is a largely β-sheet serum protein responsible for transporting thyroxine and vitamin A. TTR is found in amyloid deposits of patients with senile systemic amyloidosis. TTR mutants lead to familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy and familial amyloid cardiomyopathy, with an earlier age of onset. Studies of amyloid fibrils of familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy mutant TTR suggest a structure similar to the native state with only a simple opening of a β-strand-loop-strand region exposing the two main β-sheets of the protein for fibril elongation. However, we find that the wild-type TTR sequence forms amyloid fibrils that are considerably different from the previously suggested amyloid structure. Using protease digestion with mass spectrometry, we observe the amyloid core to be primarily composed of the C-terminal region, starting around residue 50. Solid-state NMR measurements prove that TTR differs from other pathological amyloids in not having an in-register parallel β-sheet architecture. We also find that the TTR amyloid is incapable of binding thyroxine as monitored by either isothermal calorimetry or 1,8-anilinonaphthalene sulfonate competition. Taken together, our experiments are consistent with a significantly different configuration of the β-sheets compared to the previously suggested structure. PMID:22098747

  15. Rapid and reliable extraction of genomic DNA from various wild-type and transgenic plants

    Yang Moon-Sik

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA extraction methods for PCR-quality DNA from calluses and plants are not time efficient, since they require that the tissues be ground in liquid nitrogen, followed by precipitation of the DNA pellet in ethanol, washing and drying the pellet, etc. The need for a rapid and simple procedure is urgent, especially when hundreds of samples need to be analyzed. Here, we describe a simple and efficient method of isolating high-quality genomic DNA for PCR amplification and enzyme digestion from calluses, various wild-type and transgenic plants. Results We developed new rapid and reliable genomic DNA extraction method. With our developed method, plant genomic DNA extraction could be performed within 30 min. The method was as follows. Plant tissue was homogenized with salt DNA extraction buffer using hand-operated homogenizer and extracted by phenol:chloroform:isoamyl alcohol (25:24:1. After centrifugation, the supernatant was directly used for DNA template for PCR, resulting in successful amplification for RAPD from various sources of plants and specific foreign genes from transgenic plants. After precipitating the supernatant, the DNA was completely digested by restriction enzymes. Conclusion This DNA extraction procedure promises simplicity, speed, and efficiency, both in terms of time and the amount of plant sample required. In addition, this method does not require expensive facilities for plant genomic DNA extraction.

  16. Sphingopeptides: dihydrosphingosine-based fusion inhibitors against wild-type and enfuvirtide-resistant HIV-1.

    Ashkenazi, Avraham; Viard, Mathias; Unger, Linor; Blumenthal, Robert; Shai, Yechiel

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the structural organization of lipids in the cell and viral membranes is essential for elucidating mechanisms of viral fusion that lead to entry of enveloped viruses into their host cells. The HIV lipidome shows a remarkable enrichment in dihydrosphingomyelin, an unusual sphingolipid formed by a dihydrosphingosine backbone. Here we investigated the ability of dihydrosphingosine to incorporate into the site of membrane fusion mediated by the HIV envelope (Env) protein. Dihydrosphingosine as well as cholesterol, fatty acid, and tocopherol was conjugated to highly conserved, short HIV-1 Env-derived peptides with no antiviral activity otherwise. We showed that dihydrosphingosine exclusively endowed nanomolar antiviral activity to the peptides (IC(50) as low as 120 nM) in HIV-1 infection on TZM-bl cells and on Jurkat T cells, as well as in the cell-cell fusion assay. These sphingopeptides were active against enfuvirtide-resistant and wild-type CXCR4 and CCR5 tropic HIV strains. The anti-HIV activity was determined by both the peptides and their dihydrosphingosine conjugate. Moreover, their mode of action involved accumulation in the cells and viruses and binding to membranes enriched in sphingomyelin and cholesterol. The data suggest that sphingopeptides are recruited to the HIV membrane fusion site and provide a general concept in developing inhibitors of sphingolipid-mediated biological systems. PMID:22872679

  17. Differential transcription patterns in wild-type and glycoprotein G-deleted infectious laryngotracheitis viruses.

    Mahmoudian, Alireza; Markham, Philip F; Noormohammadi, Amir H; Devlin, Joanne M; Browning, Glenn F

    2013-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) causes severe respiratory disease in poultry throughout the world. Recently the role of glycoprotein G (gG) in ILTV pathogenesis has been investigated and it has been shown to have chemokine-binding activity. An ILTV vaccine candidate deficient in gG has been developed and the deletion has been shown to alter the host's immune response to the virus. To understand the effect of the gG gene on transcription of other viral genes, the global expression profile of 72 ILTV genes in gG-deleted and wild-type ILTVs were investigated both in vivo and in vitro using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Several genes were differentially expressed in the different viruses in LMH cell cultures or in the tracheas of infected birds, and the expression of a number of genes, including ICP27, gC, gJ, Ul7 and UL40, differed significantly both in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that they had direct or indirect roles in virulence. This study has provided insights into the interactions between gG and other ILTV genes that may have a role in virulence. PMID:23611157

  18. Comparative whole genome sequence analysis of wild-type and cidofovir-resistant monkeypoxvirus

    Huggins John

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We performed whole genome sequencing of a cidofovir {[(S-1-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxy-propyl cytosine] [HPMPC]}-resistant (CDV-R strain of Monkeypoxvirus (MPV. Whole-genome comparison with the wild-type (WT strain revealed 55 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and one tandem-repeat contraction. Over one-third of all identified SNPs were located within genes comprising the poxvirus replication complex, including the DNA polymerase, RNA polymerase, mRNA capping methyltransferase, DNA processivity factor, and poly-A polymerase. Four polymorphic sites were found within the DNA polymerase gene. DNA polymerase mutations observed at positions 314 and 684 in MPV were consistent with CDV-R loci previously identified in Vaccinia virus (VACV. These data suggest the mechanism of CDV resistance may be highly conserved across Orthopoxvirus (OPV species. SNPs were also identified within virulence genes such as the A-type inclusion protein, serine protease inhibitor-like protein SPI-3, Schlafen ATPase and thymidylate kinase, among others. Aberrant chain extension induced by CDV may lead to diverse alterations in gene expression and viral replication that may result in both adaptive and attenuating mutations. Defining the potential contribution of substitutions in the replication complex and RNA processing machinery reported here may yield further insight into CDV resistance and may augment current therapeutic development strategies.

  19. Comparative Temporal Proteomics of a Response Regulator (SO2426)-Deficient Strain and Wild-Type Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 During Chromate Transformation

    Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Thompson, Melissa R [ORNL; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Zhang, Bing [ORNL; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Thompson, Dorothea K. [Purdue University; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Predicted orphan response regulators encoded in the Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 genome are poorly understood from a cellular function perspective. Our previous transcriptomic and proteomic analyses demonstrated that an annotated DNA-binding response regulator, SO2426, was significantly up-regulated in wild-type S. oneidensis cells at both themRNAand protein levels in response to acute chromate [Cr(VI)] challenge, suggesting a potential regulatory role for this protein in metal stress pathways. To investigate the impact of SO2426 activity on chromate stress response at a genome-wide scale, we describe here comparative and temporal proteome characterizations using multidimensional HPLC-MS/MS and statistical analysis to identify differentially expressed proteins in biological replicates of wild-type S. oneidensis MR-1 and a so2426 deletion ( so2426) strain, which exhibited an impaired Cr(VI) transformation rate compared to that of the parental strain. Global protein profiles were examined at different time intervals (0, 1, 3, 4 h) following exogenous chromate challenge. Results indicated that deletion of the so2426 gene negatively affected expression of a small protein subset (27 proteins) including those with annotated functions in siderophore biosynthesis (SO3032), Fe uptake (SO4743), intracellular Fe storage (Bfr1), and other transport processes. Cr(VI) exposure and subsequent ransformation dramatically increased the number of differentially expressed proteins detected,with up-regulated bundance patterns observed largely for proteins involved in general stress protection and detoxification trategies, cell motility, and protein fate. In addition, the proteome data sets were mined for amino acids with otential post-translational modifications (PTMs) indicative of a level of gene expression regulation extending eyond the transcriptional control imposed by SO2426.

  20. Effects of antiandrogens on transformation and transcription activation of wild-type and mutated (LNCaP) androgen receptors

    C.A. Berrevoets (Cor); J. Veldscholte (Jos); E. Mulder (Eppo)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractLNCaP cells contain androgen receptors with a mutation in the steroid binding domain (Thr 868 changed to Ala) resulting in a changed hormone specificity. Both the wild-type and mutated androgen receptors were transfected into COS cells. Transcription activation was studied in cells co-tr

  1. Nectin4 Is an Epithelial Cell Receptor for Canine Distemper Virus and Involved in Neurovirulence

    Pratakpiriya, Watanyoo; Seki, Fumio; Otsuki, Noriyuki; Sakai, Kouji; FUKUHARA, HIDEO; Katamoto, Hiromu; HIRAI, Takuya; Maenaka, Katsumi; Techangamsuwan, Somporn; LAN, Nguyen Thi; Takeda, Makoto; Yamaguchi, Ryoji

    2012-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) uses signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM), expressed on immune cells, as a receptor. However, epithelial and neural cells are also affected by CDV in vivo. Wild-type CDV strains showed efficient replication with syncytia in Vero cells expressing dog nectin4, and the infection was blocked by an anti-nectin4 antibody. In dogs with distemper, CDV antigen was preferentially detected in nectin4-positive neurons and epithelial cells, suggesting that nectin4 i...

  2. Stimulus control by 5methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine in wild-type and CYP2D6-humanized mice

    Winter, J. C.; Amorosi, D. J.; Rice, Kenner C.; Cheng, Kejun; Yu, Ai-Ming

    2011-01-01

    In previous studies we have observed that, in comparison with wild type mice, Tg-CYP2D6 mice have increased serum levels of bufotenine [5-hydroxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine] following the administration of 5-MeO-DMT. Furthermore, following the injection of 5-MeO-DMT, harmaline was observed to increase serum levels of bufotenine and 5-MeO-DMT in both wild-type and Tg-CYP2D6 mice. In the present investigation, 5-MeO-DMT-induced stimulus control was established in wild-type and Tg-CYP2D6 mice. The two groups did not differ in their rate of acquisition of stimulus control. When tested with bufotenine, no 5-MeO-DMT-appropriate responding was observed. In contrast, the more lipid soluble analog of bufotenine, acetylbufotenine, was followed by an intermediate level of responding. The combination of harmaline with 5-MeO-DMT yielded a statistically significant increase in 5-MeO-DMT-appropriate responding in Tg-CYP2D6 mice; a comparable increase occurred in wild-type mice. In addition, it was noted that harmaline alone was followed by a significant degree of 5-MeO-DMT-appropriate responding in Tg-CYP2D6 mice. It is concluded that wild-type and Tg-CYPD2D6 mice do not differ in terms of acquisition of stimulus control by 5-MeO-DMT or in their response to bufotenine and acetylbufotenine. In both groups of mice, harmaline was found to enhance the stimulus effects of 5-MeO-DMT. PMID:21624387

  3. Stimulus control by 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine in wild-type and CYP2D6-humanized mice.

    Winter, J C; Amorosi, D J; Rice, Kenner C; Cheng, Kejun; Yu, Ai-Ming

    2011-09-01

    In previous studies we have observed that, in comparison with wild type mice, Tg-CYP2D6 mice have increased serum levels of bufotenine [5-hydroxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine] following the administration of 5-MeO-DMT. Furthermore, following the injection of 5-MeO-DMT, harmaline was observed to increase serum levels of bufotenine and 5-MeO-DMT in both wild-type and Tg-CYP2D6 mice. In the present investigation, 5-MeO-DMT-induced stimulus control was established in wild-type and Tg-CYP2D6 mice. The two groups did not differ in their rate of acquisition of stimulus control. When tested with bufotenine, no 5-MeO-DMT-appropriate responding was observed. In contrast, the more lipid soluble analog of bufotenine, acetylbufotenine, was followed by an intermediate level of responding. The combination of harmaline with 5-MeO-DMT yielded a statistically significant increase in 5-MeO-DMT-appropriate responding in Tg-CYP2D6 mice; a comparable increase occurred in wild-type mice. In addition, it was noted that harmaline alone was followed by a significant degree of 5-MeO-DMT-appropriate responding in Tg-CYP2D6 mice. It is concluded that wild-type and Tg-CYPD2D6 mice do not differ in terms of acquisition of stimulus control by 5-MeO-DMT or in their response to bufotenine and acetylbufotenine. In both groups of mice, harmaline was found to enhance the stimulus effects of 5-MeO-DMT. PMID:21624387

  4. Spaceflight influences both mucosal and peripheral cytokine production in PTN-Tg and wild type mice.

    Justin L McCarville

    Full Text Available Spaceflight is associated with several health issues including diminished immune efficiency. Effects of long-term spaceflight on selected immune parameters of wild type (Wt and transgenic mice over-expressing pleiotrophin under the human bone-specific osteocalcin promoter (PTN-Tg were examined using the novel Mouse Drawer System (MDS aboard the International Space Station (ISS over a 91 day period. Effects of this long duration flight on PTN-Tg and Wt mice were determined in comparison to ground controls and vivarium-housed PTN-Tg and Wt mice. Levels of interleukin-2 (IL-2 and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1 were measured in mucosal and systemic tissues of Wt and PTN-Tg mice. Colonic contents were also analyzed to assess potential effects on the gut microbiota, although no firm conclusions could be made due to constraints imposed by the MDS payload and the time of sampling. Spaceflight-associated differences were observed in colonic tissue and systemic lymph node levels of IL-2 and TGF-β1 relative to ground controls. Total colonic TGF-β1 levels were lower in Wt and PTN-Tg flight mice in comparison to ground controls. The Wt flight mouse had lower levels of IL-2 and TGF-β1 compared to the Wt ground control in both the inguinal and brachial lymph nodes, however this pattern was not consistently observed in PTN-Tg mice. Vivarium-housed Wt controls had higher levels of active TGF-β1 and IL-2 in inguinal lymph nodes relative to PTN-Tg mice. The results of this study suggest compartmentalized effects of spaceflight and on immune parameters in mice.

  5. Noncanonical DNA motifs as transactivation targets by wild type and mutant p53.

    Jennifer J Jordan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Sequence-specific binding by the human p53 master regulator is critical to its tumor suppressor activity in response to environmental stresses. p53 binds as a tetramer to two decameric half-sites separated by 0-13 nucleotides (nt, originally defined by the consensus RRRCWWGYYY (n = 0-13 RRRCWWGYYY. To better understand the role of sequence, organization, and level of p53 on transactivation at target response elements (REs by wild type (WT and mutant p53, we deconstructed the functional p53 canonical consensus sequence using budding yeast and human cell systems. Contrary to early reports on binding in vitro, small increases in distance between decamer half-sites greatly reduces p53 transactivation, as demonstrated for the natural TIGER RE. This was confirmed with human cell extracts using a newly developed, semi-in vitro microsphere binding assay. These results contrast with the synergistic increase in transactivation from a pair of weak, full-site REs in the MDM2 promoter that are separated by an evolutionary conserved 17 bp spacer. Surprisingly, there can be substantial transactivation at noncanonical (1/2-(a single decamer and (3/4-sites, some of which were originally classified as biologically relevant canonical consensus sequences including PIDD and Apaf-1. p53 family members p63 and p73 yielded similar results. Efficient transactivation from noncanonical elements requires tetrameric p53, and the presence of the carboxy terminal, non-specific DNA binding domain enhanced transactivation from noncanonical sequences. Our findings demonstrate that RE sequence, organization, and level of p53 can strongly impact p53-mediated transactivation, thereby changing the view of what constitutes a functional p53 target. Importantly, inclusion of (1/2- and (3/4-site REs greatly expands the p53 master regulatory network.

  6. Internal binding sites for MSH: Analyses in wild-type and variant Cloudman melanoma cells

    Cloudman S91 mouse melanoma cells express both external (plasma membrane) and internal binding sites for MSH. Using 125I-beta melanotropin (beta-MSH) as a probe, we report here an extensive series of studies on the biological relevance of these internal sites. Cells were swollen in a hypotonic buffer and lysed, and a particulate fraction was prepared by high-speed centrifugation. This fraction was incubated with 125I-beta-MSH with or without excess nonradioactive beta-MSH in the cold for 2 hours. The material was then layered onto a step-wise sucrose gradient and centrifuged; fractions were collected and counted in a gamma counter or assayed for various enzymatic activities. The following points were established: (1) Specific binding sites for MSH were observed sedimenting at an average density of 50% sucrose in amelanotic cells and at higher densities in melanotic cells. (2) These sites were similar in density to those observed when intact cells were labeled externally with 125I-beta-MSH and then warmed to promote internalization of the hormone. (3) Most of the internal binding sites were not as dense as fully melanized melanosomes. (4) In control experiments, the MSH binding sites were not found in cultured hepatoma cells. (5) Variant melanoma cells, which differed from the wild-type in their responses to MSH, had reduced expression of internal binding sites even though their ability to bind MSH to the outer cell surface appeared normal. (MSH-induced responses included changes in tyrosinase, dopa oxidase, and dopachrome conversion factor activities, melanization, proliferation, and morphology.) (6) Isobutylmethylxanthine, which enhanced cellular responsiveness to MSH, also enhanced expression of internal binding sites. The results indicate that expression of internal binding sites for MSH is an important criterion for cellular responsiveness to the hormone

  7. Effects of chronic variable stress on cognition and Bace1 expression among wild-type mice.

    Cordner, Z A; Tamashiro, K L K

    2016-01-01

    Stressful life events, activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and glucocorticoids are now thought to have a role in the development of several neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD) through mechanisms that may include exacerbation of cognitive impairment, neuronal loss, and beta-amyloid (Aβ) and tau neuropathology. In the current study, we use a wild-type mouse model to demonstrate that chronic variable stress impairs cognitive function and that aged mice are particularly susceptible. We also find that stress exposure is associated with a 1.5- to 2-fold increase in the expression of Bace1 in the hippocampus of young adult mice and the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex and amygdala of aged mice. Further, the increased expression of Bace1 was associated with decreased methylation of several CpGs in the Bace1 promoter region. In a second series of experiments, exposure to environmental enrichment (EE) prevented the stress-related changes in cognition, gene expression and DNA methylation. Together, these findings re-affirm the adverse effects of stress on cognition and further suggest that aged individuals are especially susceptible. In addition, demonstrating that chronic stress results in decreased DNA methylation and increased expression of Bace1 in the brain may provide a novel link between stress, Aβ pathology and AD. Finally, understanding the mechanisms by which EE prevented the effects of stress on cognition and Bace1 expression will be an important area of future study that may provide insights into novel approaches to the treatment of AD. PMID:27404286

  8. Time course and progression of wild type α-Synuclein accumulation in a transgenic mouse model

    Amschl David

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progressive accumulation of α-synuclein (α-Syn protein in different brain regions is a hallmark of synucleinopathic diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies and multiple system atrophy. α-Syn transgenic mouse models have been developed to investigate the effects of α-Syn accumulation on behavioral deficits and neuropathology. However, the onset and progression of pathology in α-Syn transgenic mice have not been fully characterized. For this purpose we investigated the time course of behavioral deficits and neuropathology in PDGF-β human wild type α-Syn transgenic mice (D-Line between 3 and 12 months of age. Results These mice showed progressive impairment of motor coordination of the limbs that resulted in significant differences compared to non-transgenic littermates at 9 and 12 months of age. Biochemical and immunohistological analyses revealed constantly increasing levels of human α-Syn in different brain areas. Human α-Syn was expressed particularly in somata and neurites of a subset of neocortical and limbic system neurons. Most of these neurons showed immunoreactivity for phosphorylated human α-Syn confined to nuclei and perinuclear cytoplasm. Analyses of the phenotype of α-Syn expressing cells revealed strong expression in dopaminergic olfactory bulb neurons, subsets of GABAergic interneurons and glutamatergic principal cells throughout the telencephalon. We also found human α-Syn expression in immature neurons of both the ventricular zone and the rostral migratory stream, but not in the dentate gyrus. Conclusion The present study demonstrates that the PDGF-β α-Syn transgenic mouse model presents with early and progressive accumulation of human α-Syn that is accompanied by motor deficits. This information is essential for the design of therapeutical studies of synucleinopathies.

  9. Wild-type p53 and p73 negatively regulate expression of proliferation related genes.

    Scian, M J; Carchman, E H; Mohanraj, L; Stagliano, K E R; Anderson, M A E; Deb, D; Crane, B M; Kiyono, T; Windle, B; Deb, S P; Deb, S

    2008-04-17

    When normal cells come under stress, the wild-type (WT) p53 level increases resulting in the regulation of gene expression responsible for growth arrest or apoptosis. Here we show that elevated levels of WT p53 or its homologue, p73, inhibit expression of a number of cell cycle regulatory and growth promoting genes. Our analysis also identified a group of genes whose expression is differentially regulated by WT p53 and p73. We have infected p53-null H1299 human lung carcinoma cells with recombinant adenoviruses expressing WT p53, p73 or beta-galactosidase, and have undertaken microarray hybridization analyses to identify genes whose expression profile is altered by p53 or p73. Quantitative real-time PCR verified the repression of E2F-5, centromere protein A and E, minichromosome maintenance proteins (MCM)-2, -3, -5, -6 and -7 and human CDC25B after p53 expression. 5-Fluorouracil treatment of colon carcinoma HCT116 cells expressing WT p53 results in a reduction of the cyclin B2 protein level suggesting that DNA damage may indeed cause repression of these genes. Transient transcriptional assays verified that WT p53 repressed promoters of a number of these genes. Interestingly, a gain-of-function p53 mutant instead upregulated a number of these promoters in transient transfection. Using promoter deletion mutants of MCM-7 we have found that WT p53-mediated repression needs a minimal promoter that contains a single E2F site and surrounding sequences. However, a single E2F site cannot be significantly repressed by WT p53. Many of the genes identified are also repressed by p21. Thus, our work shows that WT p53 and p73 repress a number of growth-related genes and that in many instances this repression may be through the induction of p21. PMID:17982488

  10. Direct conversion of xylan to butanol by a wild-type Clostridium species strain G117.

    Yan, Yu; Basu, Anindya; Li, Tinggang; He, Jianzhong

    2016-08-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass has great potential for use as a carbon source for the production of second-generation biofuels by solventogenic bacteria. Here we describe the production of butanol by a newly discovered wild-type Clostridium species strain G117 with xylan as the sole carbon source for fermentation. Strain G117 produced 0.86 ± 0.07 g/L butanol and 53.4 ± 0.05 mL hydrogen directly from 60 g/L xylan provided that had undergone no prior enzymatic hydrolysis. After process optimization, the amount of butanol produced from xylan was increased to 1.24 ± 0.37 g/L. In contrast to traditional acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) solventogenic fermentation, xylan supported fermentation in strain G117 and negligible amount of acetone was produced. The expression of genes normally associated with acetone production (adc and ctfB2) were down-regulated compared to xylose fed cultures. This lack of acetone production may greatly simplify downstream separation process. Moreover, higher amount of butanol (2.94 g/L) was produced from 16.99 g/L xylo-oligosaccharides, suggesting a major role for strain G117 in butanol production from xylan and its oligosaccharides. The unique ability of strain G117 to produce a considerable amount of butanol directly from xylan without producing undesirable fermentation byproducts opens the door to the possibility of cost-effective biofuels production in a single step. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1702-1710. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26803924

  11. Primary charge separation within P870* in wild type and heterodimer mutants in femtosecond time domain.

    Khatypov, R A; Khmelnitskiy, A Yu; Khristin, A M; Fufina, T Yu; Vasilieva, L G; Shuvalov, V A

    2012-08-01

    Primary charge separation dynamics in the reaction center (RC) of purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides and its P870 heterodimer mutants have been studied using femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy with 20 and 40fs excitation at 870nm at 293K. Absorbance increase in the 1060-1130nm region that is presumably attributed to P(A)(δ+) cation radical molecule as a part of mixed state with a charge transfer character P*(P(A)(δ+)P(B)(δ-)) was found. This state appears at 120-180fs time delay in the wild type RC and even faster in H(L173)L and H(M202)L heterodimer mutants and precedes electron transfer (ET) to B(A) bacteriochlorophyll with absorption band at 1020nm in WT. The formation of the P(A)(δ+)B(A)(δ-) state is a result of the electron transfer from P*(P(A)(δ+)P(B)(δ-)) to the primary electron acceptor B(A) (still mixed with P*) with the apparent time delay of ~1.1ps. Next step of ET is accompanied by the 3-ps appearance of bacteriopheophytin a(-) (H(A)(-)) band at 960nm. The study of the wave packet formation upon 20-fs illumination has shown that the vibration energy of the wave packet promotes reversible overcoming of an energy barrier between two potential energy surfaces P* and P*(P(A)(δ+)B(A)(δ-)) at ~500fs. For longer excitation pulses (40fs) this promotion is absent and tunneling through an energy barrier takes about 3ps. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability: from Natural to Artificial. PMID:22209778

  12. DELINEATING TOXIC AREAS BY CANINE OLFACTION

    A research project was undertaken to learn how the highly acute olfactory sensitivity of the canine could be applied with advantage to environmental problems. The objectives were to determine how dogs could be trained to detect hazardous and toxic pollutants in the environment an...

  13. Wild type p53 transcriptionally represses the SALL2 transcription factor under genotoxic stress.

    Carlos Farkas

    Full Text Available SALL2- a member of the Spalt gene family- is a poorly characterized transcription factor found deregulated in various cancers, which suggests it plays a role in the disease. We previously identified SALL2 as a novel interacting protein of neurotrophin receptors and showed that it plays a role in neuronal function, which does not necessarily explain why or how SALL2 is deregulated in cancer. Previous evidences indicate that SALL2 gene is regulated by the WT1 and AP4 transcription factors. Here, we identified SALL2 as a novel downstream target of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Bioinformatic analysis of the SALL2 gene revealed several putative p53 half sites along the promoter region. Either overexpression of wild-type p53 or induction of the endogenous p53 by the genotoxic agent doxorubicin repressed SALL2 promoter activity in various cell lines. However R175H, R249S, and R248W p53 mutants, frequently found in the tumors of cancer patients, were unable to repress SALL2 promoter activity, suggesting that p53 specific binding to DNA is important for the regulation of SALL2. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated binding of p53 to one of the identified p53 half sites in the Sall2 promoter, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed in vivo interaction of p53 with the promoter region of Sall2 containing this half site. Importantly, by using a p53ER (TAM knockin model expressing a variant of p53 that is completely dependent on 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen for its activity, we show that p53 activation diminished SALL2 RNA and protein levels during genotoxic cellular stress in primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs and radiosensitive tissues in vivo. Thus, our finding indicates that p53 represses SALL2 expression in a context-specific manner, adding knowledge to the understanding of SALL2 gene regulation, and to a potential mechanism for its deregulation in cancer.

  14. Wild-type phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthase (PRS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a bacterial class II PRS?

    Ardala Breda

    Full Text Available The 5-phospho-α-D-ribose 1-diphosphate (PRPP metabolite plays essential roles in several biosynthetic pathways, including histidine, tryptophan, nucleotides, and, in mycobacteria, cell wall precursors. PRPP is synthesized from α-D-ribose 5-phosphate (R5P and ATP by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis prsA gene product, phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthase (MtPRS. Here, we report amplification, cloning, expression and purification of wild-type MtPRS. Glutaraldehyde cross-linking results suggest that MtPRS predominates as a hexamer, presenting varied oligomeric states due to distinct ligand binding. MtPRS activity measurements were carried out by a novel coupled continuous spectrophotometric assay. MtPRS enzyme activity could be detected in the absence of P(i. ADP, GDP and UMP inhibit MtPRS activity. Steady-state kinetics results indicate that MtPRS has broad substrate specificity, being able to accept ATP, GTP, CTP, and UTP as diphosphoryl group donors. Fluorescence spectroscopy data suggest that the enzyme mechanism for purine diphosphoryl donors follows a random order of substrate addition, and for pyrimidine diphosphoryl donors follows an ordered mechanism of substrate addition in which R5P binds first to free enzyme. An ordered mechanism for product dissociation is followed by MtPRS, in which PRPP is the first product to be released followed by the nucleoside monophosphate products to yield free enzyme for the next round of catalysis. The broad specificity for diphosphoryl group donors and detection of enzyme activity in the absence of P(i would suggest that MtPRS belongs to Class II PRS proteins. On the other hand, the hexameric quaternary structure and allosteric ADP inhibition would place MtPRS in Class I PRSs. Further data are needed to classify MtPRS as belonging to a particular family of PRS proteins. The data here presented should help augment our understanding of MtPRS mode of action. Current efforts are toward experimental structure

  15. Canine Leishmaniasis, Italy

    Ferroglio, Ezio; Maroli, Michele; Gastaldo, Silvia; Mignone, Walter; Rossi, Luca

    2005-01-01

    We report the results of a survey to determine the prevalence of canine leishmaniasis and the presence of sand flies in northwestern Italy, where autochthonous foci of canine leishmaniasis have not been reported. Active foci of canine leishmaniasis were identified, which suggests that the disease is now also endemic in continental climate areas.

  16. Panitumumab and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin in platinum-resistant epithelial ovarian cancer with KRAS wild-type

    Steffensen, Karina Dahl; Waldstrøm, Marianne; Pallisgård, Niels;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The increasing number of negative trials for ovarian cancer treatment has prompted an evaluation of new biologic agents, which in combination with chemotherapy may improve survival. The aim of this study was to investigate the response rate in platinum-resistant, KRAS wild-type ovarian...... cancer patients treated with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) supplemented with panitumumab. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Major eligibility criteria were relapsed ovarian/fallopian/peritoneal cancer patients with platinum-resistant disease, measurable disease by GCIG CA125 criteria and KRAS wild-type......-free and overall survival in the intention-to-treat population was 2.7 months (2.5-3.2 months, 95% confidence interval) and 8.1 months (5.6-11.7 months, 95% confidence interval), respectively. The most common treatment-related grade 3 toxicities included skin toxicity (42%), fatigue (19%), and vomiting (12...

  17. Transcriptional regulatory program in wild-type and retinoblastoma gene-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts during adipocyte differentiation

    Hakim-Weber, Robab; Krogsdam, Anne-M; Jørgensen, Claus;

    2011-01-01

    Although many molecular regulators of adipogenesis have been identified a comprehensive catalogue of components is still missing. Recent studies showed that the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) was expressed in the cell cycle and late cellular differentiation phase during adipogenesis. To investigate...... this dual role of pRb in the early and late stages of adipogenesis we used microarrays to perform a comprehensive systems-level analysis of the common transcriptional program of the classic 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cell line, wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), and retinoblastoma gene...... experimental data and computational analyses pinpointed a feedback-loop between Pparg and Foxo1.To analyze the effects of the retinoblastoma protein at the transcriptional level we chose a perturbated system (Rb-/- MEFs) for comparison to the transcriptional program of wild-type MEFs. Gene ontology analysis of...

  18. Uptake and egress of cadmium in cultures of cadmium-resistant and the corresponding ''wild-type'' cells

    Development of resistance against the highly toxic Cd++ ion has been described earlier both in animals, cell cultures and in bacteria. In this paper we have tested if decreased intracellular concentration of Cd plays a role in resistance to Cd in three mammalian cell cultures. The cells originated from different tissue and from two different species, Cd-resistant and corresponding ''wild-type'' strains were used. The results from all three lines show essentially the same, namely that there is no significant difference in Cd content between the Cd-resistant and the non-resistant cells. The resistant cells from all three lines grow continuously with a cellular Cd-content which is several times higher than that killing all cells of the non-resistant ''wild-type''. (author)

  19. Human Bcl-2 Reverses Survival Defects in Yeast Lacking Superoxide Dismutase and Delays Death of Wild-Type Yeast

    Longo, Valter D.; Ellerby, Lisa M.; Bredesen, Dale E.; Valentine, Joan S.; Gralla, Edith B.

    1997-01-01

    We expressed the human anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-2, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to investigate its effects on antioxidant protection and stationary phase survival. Yeast lacking copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (sod1Δ) show a profound defect in entry into and survival during stationary phase even under conditions optimal for survival of wild-type strains (incubation in water after stationary phase is reached). Expression of Bcl-2 in the sod1Δ strain caused a large improvement in viability a...

  20. A histological study of the development of the penis of wild-type and androgen-insensitive mice.

    Murakami, R

    1987-01-01

    Development of the penis of wild-type and androgen-insensitive (Tfm) mice was compared histologically to demonstrate possible androgen-dependent histogenesis in this organ. The os penis of the normal males consists of a hyaline cartilage and a membrane bone in the proximal segment and a fibrocartilage in the distal segment. Only the membrane bone of the proximal segment developed in the Tfm mice. The corpus cavernosum penis, corpus cavernosum glandis, and corpus cavernosum urethrae developed ...

  1. Characterization of Two Second-Site Mutations Preventing Wild Type Protein Aggregation Caused by a Dominant Negative PMA1 Mutant

    Pilar Eraso; Francisco Portillo; Mazón, María J.

    2013-01-01

    The correct biogenesis and localization of Pma1 at the plasma membrane is essential for yeast growth. A subset of PMA1 mutations behave as dominant negative because they produce aberrantly folded proteins that form protein aggregates, which in turn provoke the aggregation of the wild type protein. One approach to understand this dominant negative effect is to identify second-site mutations able to suppress the dominant lethal phenotype caused by those mutant alleles. We isolated and character...

  2. Induction of wild-type p53 activity in human cancer cells by ribozymes that repair mutant p53 transcripts

    Watanabe, Takashi; Sullenger, Bruce A

    2000-01-01

    Several groups have attempted to develop gene therapy strategies to treat cancer via introduction of the wild-type (wt) p53 cDNA into cancer cells. Unfortunately, these approaches do not result in regulated expression of the p53 gene and do not reduce expression of the mutant p53 that is overexpressed in cancerous cells. These shortcomings may greatly limit the utility of this gene replacement approach. We describe an alternative strategy with trans-splicing ribozymes that can simultaneously ...

  3. Tracing the movement of adiponectin in a parabiosis model of wild-type and adiponectin-knockout mice

    Hideaki Nakatsuji; Ken Kishida; Ryohei Sekimoto; Tohru Funahashi; Iichiro Shimomura

    2014-01-01

    Adiponectin is exclusively synthesized by adipocytes and exhibits anti-diabetic, anti-atherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory properties. Hypoadiponectinemia is associated in obese individuals with insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. However, the mechanisms responsible for hypoadiponectinemia remain unclear. Here, we investigated adiponectin movement using hetero parabiosis model of wild type (WT) and adiponectin-deficient (KO) mice. WT mice were parabiosed with WT mice (WT–WT) or KO mice (...

  4. High-Throughput Functional Screening of Steroid Substrates with Wild-Type and Chimeric P450 Enzymes

    Urban, Philippe; Truan, Gilles; Pompon, Denis

    2014-01-01

    The promiscuity of a collection of enzymes consisting of 31 wild-type and synthetic variants of CYP1A enzymes was evaluated using a series of 14 steroids and 2 steroid-like chemicals, namely, nootkatone, a terpenoid, and mifepristone, a drug. For each enzyme-substrate couple, the initial steady-state velocity of metabolite formation was determined at a substrate saturating concentration. For that, a high-throughput approach was designed involving automatized incubations in 96-well microplate ...

  5. Group B streptococcal Ibc protein antigen: distribution of two determinants in wild-type strains of common serotypes.

    Johnson, D R; Ferrieri, P

    1984-01-01

    Studies were carried out on the distribution of the Ibc protein antigenic marker in wild-type strains of group B streptococci of diverse serotypes isolated from epidemiological studies. Rabbits were immunized with group B streptococcal strain H36B, a prototype Ib strain, to produce antibody to the Ibc protein antigens. One antiserum (no. 970) contained antibody only against the trypsin-sensitive (TS) portion of the Ibc antigen. A second antiserum (no. 973), however, contained antibody to both...

  6. Green tea extract as a treatment for patients with wild-type transthyretin amyloidosis: an observational study

    aus dem Siepen F; Bauer R; Aurich M; Buss SJ; Steen H.; Altl; De, K.; Katus HA; Kristen AV

    2015-01-01

    Fabian aus dem Siepen,1 Ralf Bauer,1 Matthias Aurich,1 Sebastian J Buss,1 Henning Steen,1 Klaus Altland,2 Hugo A Katus,1 Arnt V Kristen1 1Department of Cardiology, Angiology, and Respiratory Medicine, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; 2Institute of Human Genetics, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen, Germany Background: Causative treatment of patients with wild-type transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathy (wtATTR-CM) is lacking. Recent reports indicate the potential use of epi...

  7. Variation in amount of wild-type transthyretin in different fibril and tissue types in ATTR amyloidosis

    Ihse, Elisabet; Suhr, Ole B.; Hellman, Ulf; Westermark, Per

    2010-01-01

    Familial transthyretin (TTR) amyloidosis is caused by a mutation in the TTR gene, although wild-type (wt) TTR is also incorporated into the amyloid fibrils. Liver transplantation (LT) is the prevailing treatment of the disease and is performed in order to eliminate the mutant TTR from plasma. The outcome of the procedure is varied; especially problematic is a progressive cardiomyopathy seen in some patients, presumably caused by continued incorporation of wtTTR. What determines the discrepanc...

  8. Characterization of two second-site mutations preventing wild type protein aggregation caused by a dominant negative PMA1 mutant.

    Pilar Eraso

    Full Text Available The correct biogenesis and localization of Pma1 at the plasma membrane is essential for yeast growth. A subset of PMA1 mutations behave as dominant negative because they produce aberrantly folded proteins that form protein aggregates, which in turn provoke the aggregation of the wild type protein. One approach to understand this dominant negative effect is to identify second-site mutations able to suppress the dominant lethal phenotype caused by those mutant alleles. We isolated and characterized two intragenic second-site suppressors of the PMA1-D378T dominant negative mutation. We present here the analysis of these new mutations that are located along the amino-terminal half of the protein and include a missense mutation, L151F, and an in-frame 12bp deletion that eliminates four residues from Cys409 to Ala412. The results show that the suppressor mutations disrupt the interaction between the mutant and wild type enzymes, and this enables the wild type Pma1 to reach the plasma membrane.

  9. Effects of introducing wild-type p53 gene on the radiosensitivity of SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells

    Objective: To study the effect of wild-type p53 gene on the radiosensitivity of SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells. Methods: Recombinant eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3 containing full-length human wild-type p53 cDNA was introduced by lipofectamine-mediated gene transfection into cultured SKOV-3 cells which had been irradiated with 2 and 4 Gy X-rays, respectively. The radiosensitivities of the tumor cells with different p53 status were studied. Results: The number of colonies in the SKOV-3, SKOV-3-vect, and SKOV-3-p53 groups decreased by 18.6%, 22.9% and 44.5%, respectively with 2 Gy irradiation, and decreased by 63.6%, 64.9% and 88.9%, respectively with 4 Gy irradiation. After introduction of p53 cDNA, the cell number in S phase and the ratio of G2/M phase of tumor cells decreased and the ratio of G1/G0 phase increased. The introduction of p53 gene into cells led to cell cycle arrest in G1 phase. Conclusion: Exogenous introduction of wild-type p53 cDNA into SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells can increase their radiosensitivity

  10. Podocyte-specific overexpression of wild type or mutant trpc6 in mice is sufficient to cause glomerular disease.

    Paola Krall

    Full Text Available Mutations in the TRPC6 calcium channel (Transient receptor potential channel 6 gene have been associated with familiar forms of Focal and Segmental Glomerulosclerosis (FSGS affecting children and adults. In addition, acquired glomerular diseases are associated with increased expression levels of TRPC6. However, the exact role of TRPC6 in the pathogenesis of FSGS remains to be elucidated. In this work we describe the generation and phenotypic characterization of three different transgenic mouse lines with podocyte-specific overexpression of the wild type or any of two mutant forms of Trpc6 (P111Q and E896K previously related to FSGS. Consistent with the human phenotype a non-nephrotic range of albuminuria was detectable in almost all transgenic lines. The histological analysis demonstrated that the transgenic mice developed a kidney disease similar to human FSGS. Differences of 2-3 folds in the presence of glomerular lesions were found between the non transgenic and transgenic mice expressing Trpc6 in its wild type or mutant forms specifically in podocytes. Electron microscopy of glomerulus from transgenic mice showed extensive podocyte foot process effacement. We conclude that overexpression of Trpc6 (wild type or mutated in podocytes is sufficient to cause a kidney disease consistent with FSGS. Our results contribute to reinforce the central role of podocytes in the etiology of FSGS. These mice constitute an important new model in which to study future therapies and outcomes of this complex disease.

  11. Uptake,Subcellular Distribution,and Chemical Forms of Cadmium in Wild-Type and Mutant Rice

    HE Jun-Yu; ZHU Cheng; REN Yan-Fang; YAN Yu-Ping; CHENG Chang; JIANG De-An; SUN Zong-Xiu

    2008-01-01

    Wild-type (Zhonghua 11) and mutant rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants were used to investigate the effect of cadmium (Cd) application on biomass production,to characterize the influx of Cd from roots to shoots,and to determine the form,content,and subcellular distribution of Cd in the roots,leaf sheaths,and leaves of the rice plants.Seedlings were cultivated in a nutrient solution and were treated with 0.5 mmol L-1 of Cd2+ for 14 d.The sensitivity of rice plants to Cd toxicity was tested by studying the changes in biomass production and by observing the onset of toxicity symptoms in the plants.Both the wild-type and mutant rice plants developed symptoms of Cd stress.In addition,Cd application significantly (P ≤ 0.01) decreased dry matter production of roots,leaf sheaths,and leaves of both types,especially the mutant.The Cd content in roots of the mutant was significantly (P≤0.05) higher than that of the wild-type rice.However,there was no significant difference in the Cd content of roots,leaf sheaths,and leaves between the wild-type and mutant rice.Most of the Cd was bound to the cell wall of the roots,leaf sheaths,and leaves,and the mutant had greater Cd content in cell organelles than the wild type.The uneven subcellular distribution could be responsible for the Cd sensitivity of the mutant rice.Furthermore,different chemical forms of Cd were found to occur in the roots,leaf sheaths,and leaves of both types of rice plants.Ethanol-,water-,and NaCl-extractable Cd had greater toxicity than the other forms of Cd and induced stunted growth and chlorosls in the plants.The high Cd content of the toxic forms of Cd in the cell organelles could seriously damage the cells and the metabolic processes in mutant rice plants.

  12. Innate immune responses to obesity in cloned and wild-type domestic pig

    Højbøge, Tina Rødgaard; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Stagsted, Jan;

    , mRNA expression profiles of certain acute phase proteins were significantly affected by cloning, being expressed at higher levels in the liver of both cloned groups compared to both WT groups but at lower levels in adipose tissues of cloned lean pigs as opposed to WT lean pigs. Also there were...... three months of age. mRNA expression levels were determined for 39 innate immune factors on a high-throughput qPCR system in samples from liver, abdominal fat, mesenteric fat and subcutaneous fat. Previous findings have suggested that cloning may affect certain phenotypic traits of pigs including basic...

  13. Brain activation by short-term nicotine exposure in anesthetized wild-type and beta2-nicotinic receptors knockout mice: a BOLD fMRI study

    Suarez, S.V.; Changeux, J.P.; Granon, S. [Unite de Neurobiologie Integrative du Systeme Cholinergique, URA CNRS 2182, Institut Pasteur, Departement de Neuroscience, 25 rue du Dr Roux, 75015 Paris (France); Amadon, A.; Giacomini, E.; Le Bihan, D. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, 4 place du general Leclerc, 91400 Orsay (France); Wiklund, A. [Section of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-07-01

    Rationale: The behavioral effects of nicotine and the role of the beta2-containing nicotinic receptors in these behaviors are well documented. However, the behaviors altered by nicotine rely on the functioning on multiple brain circuits where the high-affinity {beta}2-containing nicotinic receptors ({beta}2*nAChRs) are located. Objectives We intend to see which brain circuits are activated when nicotine is given in animals naive for nicotine and whether the {beta}2*nAChRs are needed for its activation of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal in all brain areas. Materials and methods: We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure the brain activation evoked by nicotine (1 mg/kg delivered at a slow rate for 45 min) in anesthetized C57BL/6J mice and {beta}2 knockout (KO) mice. Results: Acute nicotine injection results in a significant increased activation in anterior frontal, motor, and somatosensory cortices and in the ventral tegmental area and the substantia nigra. Anesthetized mice receiving no nicotine injection exhibited a major decreased activation in all cortical and subcortical structures, likely due to prolonged anesthesia. At a global level, {beta}2 KO mice were not rescued from the globally declining BOLD signal. However, nicotine still activated regions of a meso-cortico-limbic circuit likely via {alpha}7 nicotinic receptors. Conclusions: Acute nicotine exposure compensates for the drop in brain activation due to anesthesia through the meso-cortico-limbic network via the action of nicotine on {beta}2*nAChRs. The developed fMRI method is suitable for comparing responses in wild-type and mutant mice. (authors)

  14. Brain activation by short-term nicotine exposure in anesthetized wild-type and beta2-nicotinic receptors knockout mice: a BOLD fMRI study

    Rationale: The behavioral effects of nicotine and the role of the beta2-containing nicotinic receptors in these behaviors are well documented. However, the behaviors altered by nicotine rely on the functioning on multiple brain circuits where the high-affinity β2-containing nicotinic receptors (β2*nAChRs) are located. Objectives We intend to see which brain circuits are activated when nicotine is given in animals naive for nicotine and whether the β2*nAChRs are needed for its activation of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal in all brain areas. Materials and methods: We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure the brain activation evoked by nicotine (1 mg/kg delivered at a slow rate for 45 min) in anesthetized C57BL/6J mice and β2 knockout (KO) mice. Results: Acute nicotine injection results in a significant increased activation in anterior frontal, motor, and somatosensory cortices and in the ventral tegmental area and the substantia nigra. Anesthetized mice receiving no nicotine injection exhibited a major decreased activation in all cortical and subcortical structures, likely due to prolonged anesthesia. At a global level, β2 KO mice were not rescued from the globally declining BOLD signal. However, nicotine still activated regions of a meso-cortico-limbic circuit likely via α7 nicotinic receptors. Conclusions: Acute nicotine exposure compensates for the drop in brain activation due to anesthesia through the meso-cortico-limbic network via the action of nicotine on β2*nAChRs. The developed fMRI method is suitable for comparing responses in wild-type and mutant mice. (authors)

  15. Extracellular enzyme activities during lignocellulose degradation by Streptomyces spp.: a comparative study of wild-type and genetically manipulated strains

    The wild-type ligninolytic actinomycete Streptomyces viridosporus T7A and two genetically manipulated strains with enhanced abilities to produce a water-soluble lignin degradation intermediate, an acid-precipitable polymeric lignin (APPL), were grown on lignocellulose in solid-state fermentation cultures. Culture filtrates were periodically collected, analyzed for APPL, and assayed for extracellular lignocellulose-catabolizing enzyme activities. Two APPL-overproducing strains, UV irradiation mutant T7A-81 and protoplast fusion recombinant SR-10, had higher and longer persisting peroxidase, esterase, and endoglucanase activities than did the wild-type strain T7A. Results implicated one or more of these enzymes in lignin solubilization. Only mutant T7A-81 had higher xylanase activity than the wild type. The peroxidase was induced by both lignocellulose and APPL. This extracellular enzyme has some similarities to previously described ligninases in fungi. This is the first report of such an enzyme in Streptomyces spp. Four peroxidase isozymes were present, and all catalyzed the oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, while one also catalyzed hydrogen peroxide-dependent oxidation of homoprotocatechuic acid and caffeic acid. Three constitutive esterase isozymes were produced which differed in substrate specificity toward α-naphthyl acetate and α-naphthyl butyrate. Three endoglucanase bands, which also exhibited a low level of xylanase activity, were identified on polyacrylamide gels as was one xylanase-specific band. There were no major differences in the isoenzymes produced by the different strains. The probable role of each enzyme in lignocellulose degradation is discussed

  16. Pharmacological activation of wild-type p53 in the therapy of leukemia.

    Kojima, Kensuke; Ishizawa, Jo; Andreeff, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is inactivated by mutations in the majority of human solid tumors. Conversely, p53 mutations are rare in leukemias and are only observed in a small fraction of the patient population, predominately in patients with complex karyotype acute myeloid leukemia or hypodiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, the loss of p53 function in leukemic cells is often caused by abnormalities in p53-regulatory proteins, including overexpression of MDM2/MDMX, deletion of CDKN2A/ARF, and alterations in ATM. For example, MDM2 inhibits p53-mediated transcription, promotes its nuclear export, and induces proteasome-dependent degradation. The MDM2 homolog MDMX is another direct regulator of p53 that inhibits p53-mediated transcription. Several small-molecule inhibitors and stapled peptides targeting MDM2 and MDMX have been developed and have recently entered clinical trials. The clinical trial results of the first clinically used MDM2 inhibitor, RG7112, illustrated promising p53 activation and apoptosis induction in leukemia cells as proof of concept. Side effects of RG7112 were most prominent in suppression of thrombopoiesis and gastrointestinal symptoms in leukemia patients. Predictive biomarkers for response to MDM2 inhibitors have been proposed, but they require further validation both in vitro and in vivo so that the accumulated knowledge concerning pathological p53 dysregulation in leukemia and novel molecular-targeted strategies to overcome this dysregulation can be translated safely and efficiently into novel clinical therapeutics. PMID:27327543

  17. Use of SLAM and PVRL4 and identification of pro-HB-EGF as cell entry receptors for wild type phocine distemper virus.

    Mary M Melia

    Full Text Available Signalling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM has been identified as an immune cell receptor for the morbilliviruses, measles (MV, canine distemper (CDV, rinderpest and peste des petits ruminants (PPRV viruses, while CD46 is a receptor for vaccine strains of MV. More recently poliovirus like receptor 4 (PVRL4, also known as nectin 4, has been identified as a receptor for MV, CDV and PPRV on the basolateral surface of polarised epithelial cells. PVRL4 is also up-regulated by MV in human brain endothelial cells. Utilisation of PVRL4 as a receptor by phocine distemper virus (PDV remains to be demonstrated as well as confirmation of use of SLAM. We have observed that unlike wild type (wt MV or wtCDV, wtPDV strains replicate in African green monkey kidney Vero cells without prior adaptation, suggesting the use of a further receptor. We therefore examined candidate molecules, glycosaminoglycans (GAG and the tetraspan proteins, integrin β and the membrane bound form of heparin binding epithelial growth factor (proHB-EGF,for receptor usage by wtPDV in Vero cells. We show that wtPDV replicates in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells expressing SLAM and PVRL4. Similar wtPDV titres are produced in Vero and VeroSLAM cells but more limited fusion occurs in the latter. Infection of Vero cells was not inhibited by anti-CD46 antibody. Removal/disruption of GAG decreased fusion but not the titre of virus. Treatment with anti-integrin β antibody increased rather than decreased infection of Vero cells by wtPDV. However, infection was inhibited by antibody to HB-EGF and the virus replicated in CHO-proHB-EGF cells, indicating use of this molecule as a receptor. Common use of SLAM and PVRL4 by morbilliviruses increases the possibility of cross-species infection. Lack of a requirement for wtPDV adaptation to Vero cells raises the possibility of usage of proHB-EGF as a receptor in vivo but requires further investigation.

  18. A study of the stability of wild type and mutant p53 complexes with different DNA substrates

    Šebest, Peter; Pivoňková, Hana; Němcová, Kateřina; Fojta, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 276, č. 1 (2009), s. 62. ISSN 1742-464X. [34th FEBS Congress. 04.07.2009-09.07.2009, Prague] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500040701; GA ČR(CZ) GP204/07/P476; GA ČR(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : wild type and mutant p53 * sequence-specific binding * immunoprecipitation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  19. A study of the stability of wild type and mutant p53 complexes with different DNA substrates

    Šebest, P.; Pivoňková, Hana; Němcová, Kateřina; Fojta, Miroslav

    Prague, 2009. s. 62. ISSN 1742-464X. [34th FEBS Congress: Life's Molecular Interactions. 04.07.2009-09.07.2009, Prague] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500040701; GA ČR(CZ) GP204/07/P476; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : wild type and mutant p53 * sequence-specific binding * immunoprecipitation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  20. The progressive nature of Wallerian degeneration in wild-type and slow Wallerian degeneration (WldS nerves

    Grumme Daniela S

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The progressive nature of Wallerian degeneration has long been controversial. Conflicting reports that distal stumps of injured axons degenerate anterogradely, retrogradely, or simultaneously are based on statistical observations at discontinuous locations within the nerve, without observing any single axon at two distant points. As axon degeneration is asynchronous, there are clear advantages to longitudinal studies of individual degenerating axons. We recently validated the study of Wallerian degeneration using yellow fluorescent protein (YFP in a small, representative population of axons, which greatly improves longitudinal imaging. Here, we apply this method to study the progressive nature of Wallerian degeneration in both wild-type and slow Wallerian degeneration (WldS mutant mice. Results In wild-type nerves, we directly observed partially fragmented axons (average 5.3% among a majority of fully intact or degenerated axons 37–42 h after transection and 40–44 h after crush injury. Axons exist in this state only transiently, probably for less than one hour. Surprisingly, axons degenerated anterogradely after transection but retrogradely after a crush, but in both cases a sharp boundary separated intact and fragmented regions of individual axons, indicating that Wallerian degeneration progresses as a wave sequentially affecting adjacent regions of the axon. In contrast, most or all WldS axons were partially fragmented 15–25 days after nerve lesion, WldS axons degenerated anterogradely independent of lesion type, and signs of degeneration increased gradually along the nerve instead of abruptly. Furthermore, the first signs of degeneration were short constrictions, not complete breaks. Conclusions We conclude that Wallerian degeneration progresses rapidly along individual wild-type axons after a heterogeneous latent phase. The speed of progression and its ability to travel in either direction challenges earlier models

  1. Increased hydrogen production by Escherichia coli strain HD701 in comparison with the wild-type parent strain MC4100

    Penfold, DW; Forster, CF; Macaskie, LE

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogen production by Escherichia coli is mediated by the formate hydrogenlyase (FHL) complex. E. coli strain HD701 cannot synthesize the FHL complex repressor, Hyc A. Consequently, it has an up-regulated FHL system and can, therefore, evolve hydrogen at a greater rate than its parental wild type, E. coli MC4100. Resting cells of E. coli strain HD701 and MC4100 were set up in batch mode in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) to decouple growth from hydrogen production at the expense of sugar ...

  2. Differential Host Immune Responses after Infection with Wild-Type or Lab-Attenuated Rabies Viruses in Dogs

    Gnanadurai, Clement W.; Yang, Yang; Huang, Ying; Li, Zhenguang; Leyson, Christina M.; Cooper, Tanya L.; Platt, Simon R.; Harvey, Stephen B.; Hooper, Douglas C.; Faber, Milosz; Fu, Zhen F.

    2015-01-01

    Rabies virus (RABV) induces encephalomyelitis in humans and animals. One of the major problems with rabies is that the infected individuals most often do not develop virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA). In this study we have investigated the host immune response to RABV infection in dogs, using a live-attenuated (TriGAS) or a wild-type (wt) (DRV-NG11) RABV isolated from a rabid dog. Methodology/Principal Findings The experimental infection of dogs with TriGAS induced high levels of VNA in the...

  3. Wild-Type p53 Enhances Efficiency of Simian Virus 40 Large-T-Antigen-Induced Cellular Transformation▿

    Hermannstädter, Andrea; Ziegler, Christine; Kühl, Marion; Deppert, Wolfgang; Tolstonog, Genrich V.

    2009-01-01

    Abortive infection of BALB/c mouse embryo fibroblasts differing in p53 gene status (p53+/+ versus p53−/−) with simian virus 40 (SV40) revealed a quantitatively and qualitatively decreased transformation efficiency in p53−/− cells compared to p53+/+ cells, suggesting a supportive effect of wild-type (wt) p53 in the SV40 transformation process. SV40 transformation efficiency also was low in immortalized p53−/− BALB/c 10-1 cells but could be restored to approximately the level in immortalized p5...

  4. Sleep-Waking Discharge of Ventral Tuberomammillary Neurons in Wild-Type and Histidine Decarboxylase Knock-Out Mice

    Sakai, Kazuya; Takahashi, Kazumi; Anaclet, Christelle; Lin, Jian-Sheng

    2010-01-01

    Using extracellular single-unit recordings, we have determined the characteristics of neurons in the ventral tuberomammillary nucleus (VTM) of wild-type (WT) and histidine decarboxylase knock-out (HDC-KO) mice during the sleep-waking cycle. The VTM neurons of HDC-KO mice showed no histamine immunoreactivity, but were immunoreactive for the histaminergic (HA) neuron markers adenosine deaminase and glutamic acid decarboxylase 67. In the VTM of WT mice, we found waking (W)-specific, non-W-specif...

  5. Negative growth regulation in a glioblastoma tumor cell line that conditionally expresses human wild-type p53.

    Mercer, W E; Shields, M T; Amin, M; Sauve, G J; Appella, E; Romano, J W; Ullrich, S J

    1990-01-01

    To investigate the effect that human wild-type p53 (wt-p53) expression has on cell proliferation we constructed a recombinant plasmid, pM47, in which wt-p53 cDNA is under transcriptional control of the hormone-inducible mouse mammary tumor virus promoter linked to the dominant biochemical selection marker gene Eco gpt. The pM47 plasmid was introduced into T98G cells derived from a human glioblastoma multiforme tumor, and a stable clonal cell line, GM47.23, was derived that conditionally expre...

  6. Proteomic profiling of phosphoproteins and glycoproteins responsive to wild-type alpha-synuclein accumulation and aggregation

    Kulathingal, Jayanarayan; Ko, Li-wen; Cusack, Bernadette; Yen, Shu-Hui

    2008-01-01

    A tetracycline inducible transfectant cell line (3D5) capable of producing soluble and sarkosyl-insoluble assemblies of wild-type human alpha-synuclein (α-Syn) upon differentiation with retinoic acid was used to study the impact of α-Syn accumulation on protein phosphorylation and glycosylation. Soluble proteins from 3D5 cells, with or without the induced α-Syn expression were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and staining of gels with dyes that bind to proteins (Sypro ruby), ph...

  7. Expression profile and subcellular location of the plasmid-encoded virulence (Spv) proteins in wild-type Salmonella dublin.

    El-Gedaily, A; Paesold, G; Krause, M.

    1997-01-01

    The plasmid-encoded virulence genes (spvABCD) in nontyphoid Salmonella strains mediate lethal infections in a variety of animals. Previous studies have shown that these genes are transcriptionally regulated by stationary-phase growth. We studied the expression profile and the subcellular locations of the SpvABCD proteins in wild-type S. dublin by using polyclonal antibodies against SpvA, SpvB, SpvC, and SpvD. The cellular levels of the individual proteins were determined during growth by quan...

  8. Transient Transfection of a Wild-Type p53 Gene Triggers Resveratrol-Induced Apoptosis in Cancer Cells

    Ferraz da Costa, Danielly Cristiny; Casanova, Fabiana Alves; Quarti, Julia; Malheiros, Maitê Santos; Sanches, Daniel; dos Santos, Patricia Souza; Fialho, Eliane; Silva, Jerson L.

    2012-01-01

    Resveratrol is a promising chemopreventive agent that mediates many cellular targets involved in cancer signaling pathways. p53 has been suggested to play a role in the anticancer properties of resveratrol. We investigated resveratrol-induced cytotoxicity in H1299 cells, which are non-small lung cancer cells that have a partial deletion of the gene that encodes the p53 protein. The results for H1299 cells were compared with those for three cell lines that constitutively express wild-type p53:...

  9. Comparative studies on production of Glutamic acid using wild type, mutants, immobilized cells and immobilized mutants of Corynebacterium glutamicum

    Hajera Tabassum,

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study comparative studies were carried out on glutamic acid production with wild type cells, mutants, immobilized cells and immobilized mutants of Corynebacerium glutamicum. Immobilization was carried out by sodium alginate method; physical mutagenesis was performed by U.V irradiation and chemical mutagenesis with nitrosoguanidine. Five physical mutants and five chemical mutants were selected for study. Fermentation was carried out for a period of six days at 300C at 200 rpm. Highest amount of glutamic acid was produced with immobilized chemical mutants.

  10. The Small Colony Variant Of Listeria Monocytogenes Is More Tolerant To Antibiotics And Grows Better Within Caco-2 Epithelial Cells Than The Wild Type

    Curtis, Thomas; Gram, Lone; Knudsen, Gitte Maegaard

    2015-01-01

    tolerant of 20mM H2O2 as compared to the wild type, with 6.3 log10 CFU/ml and 3.7 log10 CFU/ml, respectively. The SCV E18 had lower survival rate in unactivated macrophages, however, it was able to survive and multiply to almost 100-fold higher CFU/ml than the wild type in CaCo-2 epithelial cells...

  11. Resuscitation of wild-type p53 expression by disrupting ceramide glycosylation: a novel approach to target mutant p53 tumors

    Liu, Yong-Yu

    2011-01-01

    Mutant p53 is frequently detected in cancers lose of its ability in tumor suppression and gain of function in promoting tumor progression. Restoration of p53 functions by replacement of wild-type p53 and inhibition of its degradation or increment of its transcriptional activity has been applied in prevention and treatment of cancers. Recent evidence indicates that disrupting ceramide glycosylation can resuscitate wild-type p53 expression and p53-dependent apoptosis in mutant p53 tumors. Actin...

  12. Analysis of the wild-type and mutant genes encoding the enzyme kynurenine monooxygenase of the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti

    Han, Q; Calvo, E.; Marinotti, O.; Fang, J; Rizzi, M; James, A A; Li, J.

    2003-01-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) catalyses the hydroxylation of kynurenine to 3-hydroxykynurenine. KMO has a key role in tryptophan catabolism and synthesis of ommochrome pigments in mosquitoes. The gene encoding this enzyme in the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, is called kynurenine hydroxylase (kh) and a mutant allele that produces white eyes has been designated khw. A number of cDNA clones representative of wild-type and mutant genes were isolated. Sequence analyses of the wild-type ...

  13. No Genetic Bottleneck in Plasmodium falciparum Wild-Type Pfcrt Alleles Reemerging in Hainan Island, China, following High-Level Chloroquine Resistance▿

    Chen, Nanhua; Gao, Qi; Wang, Shanqing; Wang, Guangze; Gatton, Michelle; Cheng, Qin

    2007-01-01

    Chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum was highly prevalent in Hainan, China, in the 1970s. Twenty-five years after cessation of chloroquine therapy, the prevalence of P. falciparum wild-type Pfcrt alleles has risen to 36% (95% confidence interval, 22.1 to 52.4%). The diverse origins of wild-type alleles indicate that there was no genetic bottleneck caused by high chloroquine resistance.

  14. Inhibition of HIV type 1 infectivity by coexpression of a wild-type and a defective glycoprotein 120

    Lund, O S; Losman, B; Schønning, Kristian; Bolmstedt, A; Olofsson, S; Hansen, J E

    1998-01-01

    An amino acid substitution (D --> K) in the C3 region of HIV-1 gp120 has previously been shown to inhibit binding of virions to CD4+ cells. We have introduced the same mutation into the HIV-1 isolate LAV-I(BRU), in which the mutation is denoted D373K. Here we show that the D373K envelope protein is...... processed and incorporated into virus particles, but that D373K virions have no detectable infectivity (below 0.1% relative to wild type). When D373K and the wild-type envelope gene were cotransfected in 293 cells at a 4:1 ratio, the resultant infectivity of the HIV-1 supernatant was reduced more than 100......-fold. When the same ratio of plasmids was tested in COS-1 cells the inhibition of HIV-1 was an order of magnitude less than observed in 293 cells. COS-1 and 293 cells differed in that only 293 cells displayed saturation of virus production with respect to the envelope protein. Our data fit a simple...

  15. Protection of p53 wild type cells from taxol by nutlin-3 in the combined lung cancer treatment

    Mutations within the tumor suppressor TP53 gene are one of the most common genetic alterations present at high frequency in human tumors and have been shown to be associated with resistance to radio-chemotherapy. The lack of the wild type TP53 gene in cancer cells could be exploited for therapeutic advantage using a sequence of two antagonistic drugs. The aim of this study was to selectively kill p53 deficient cells (FaDu and H1299) by taxol and to protect p53 wild type cells (A549) by the prior administration of nutlin-3 in comparison to certain known anticancer drugs (5-fluorouracil, camptothecin, roscovitine). Cytotoxic and cytostatic properties of 5-fluorouracil, camptothecin, roscovitine and nutlin-3 administrating alone or in combination with taxol were investigated in vitro by flow cytometry. It was found that nutlin-3 induced growth arrest and protected A549 cells from taxol. FaDu and H1299 cells responded to the same treatments with mitotic arrest and massive apoptosis. Other compounds (5-fluorouracil, camptothecin and roscovitine) revealed weaker selectivity and elevated toxicity in comparison to nutlin-3. We propose a therapeutic strategy protecting normal cells from taxol while increasing apoptosis selectively in p53-deficient cells using nutlin-3

  16. Fructose 6-phosphate phosphoketolase activity in wild-type strains of Lactobacillus, isolated from the intestinal tract of pigs.

    Bolado-Martínez, E; Acedo-Félix, E; Peregrino-Uriarte, A B; Yepiz-Plascencia, G

    2012-01-01

    Phosphoketolases are key enzymes of the phosphoketolase pathway of heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria, which include lactobacilli. In heterofermentative lactobacilli xylulose 5-phosphate phosphoketolase (X5PPK) is the main enzyme of the phosphoketolase pathway. However, activity of fructose 6-phosphate phosphoketolase (F6PPK) has always been considered absent in lactic acid bacteria. In this study, the F6PPK activity was detected in 24 porcine wild-type strains of Lactobacillus reuteri and Lactobacillus mucosae, but not in the Lactobacillus salivarius or in L. reuteri ATCC strains. The activity of F6PPK increased after treatment of the culture at low-pH and diminished after porcine bile-salts stress conditions in wild-type strains of L. reuteri. Colorimetric quantification at 505 nm allowed to differentiate between microbial strains with low activity and without the activity of F6PPK. Additionally, activity of F6PPK and the X5PPK gene expression levels were evaluated by real time PCR, under stress and nonstress conditions, in 3 L. reuteri strains. Although an exact correlation, between enzyme activity and gene expression was not obtained, it remains possible that the xpk gene codes for a phosphoketolase with dual substrate, at least in the analyzed strains of L. reuteri. PMID:23101386

  17. Molecular dynamics studies on the NMR structures of rabbit prion protein wild-type and mutants: surface electrostatic charge distributions

    Zhang, Jiapu

    2014-01-01

    Prion is a misfolded protein found in mammals that causes infectious diseases of the nervous system in humans and animals. Prion diseases are invariably fatal and highly infectious neurodegenerative diseases that affect a wide variety of mammalian species such as sheep and goats, cattle, deer, elk and humans etc. Recent studies have shown that rabbits have a low susceptibility to be infected by prion diseases with respect to other animals including humans. The present study employs molecular dynamics (MD) means to unravel the mechanism of rabbit prion proteins (RaPrPC) based on the recently available rabbit NMR structures (of the wild-type and its two mutants of two surface residues). The electrostatic charge distributions on the protein surface are the focus when analysing the MD trajectories. It is found that we can conclude that surface electrostatic charge distributions indeed contribute to the structural stability of wild-type RaPrPC; this may be useful for the medicinal treatment of prion diseases.

  18. Accelerated telomere shortening and replicative senescence in human fibroblasts overexpressing mutant and wild-type lamin A

    LMNA mutations are responsible for a variety of genetic disorders, including muscular dystrophy, lipodystrophy, and certain progeroid syndromes, notably Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria. Although a number of clinical features of these disorders are suggestive of accelerated aging, it is not known whether cells derived from these patients exhibit cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated aging. We examined a series of isogenic skin fibroblast lines transfected with LMNA constructs bearing known pathogenic point mutations or deletion mutations found in progeroid syndromes. Fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A exhibited accelerated rates of loss of telomeres and shortened replicative lifespans, in addition to abnormal nuclear morphology. To our surprise, these abnormalities were also observed in lines overexpressing wild-type lamin A. Copy number variants are common in human populations; those involving LMNA, whether arising meiotically or mitotically, might lead to progeroid phenotypes. In an initial pilot study of 23 progeroid cases without detectable WRN or LMNA mutations, however, no cases of altered LMNA copy number were detected. Nevertheless, our findings raise a hypothesis that changes in lamina organization may cause accelerated telomere attrition, with different kinetics for overexpession of wild-type and mutant lamin A, which leads to rapid replicative senescence and progroid phenotypes

  19. Cellular toxicity of yeast prion protein Rnq1 can be modulated by N-terminal wild type huntingtin.

    Sethi, Ratnika; Patel, Vishal; Saleh, Aliabbas A; Roy, Ipsita

    2016-01-15

    Aggregation of the N-terminal human mutant huntingtin and the consequent toxicity in the yeast model of Huntington's disease (HD) requires the presence of Rnq1 protein (Rnq1p) in its prion conformation [RNQ1(+)]. The understanding of interaction of wild-type huntingtin (wt-Htt) with the amyloidogenic prion has some gaps. In this work, we show that N-terminal fragment of wt-Htt (N-wt-Htt) ameliorated the toxic effect of [RNQ1(+)] depending on expression levels of both proteins. When the expression of N-wt-Htt was high, it increased the expression and delayed the aggregation of [RNQ1(+)]. As the expression of N-wt-Htt was reduced, it formed high molecular weight aggregates along with the prion. Even when sequestered by [RNQ1(+)], the beneficial effect of N-wt-Htt on expression of Rnq1p and on cell survival was evident. Huntingtin protein ameliorated toxicity due to the prion protein [RNQ1(+)] in yeast cells in a dose-dependent manner, resulting in increase in cell survival, hinting at its probable role as a component of the proteostasis network of the cell. Taking into account the earlier reports of the beneficial effect of expression of N-wt-Htt on the aggregation of mutant huntingtin, the function of wild-type huntingtin as an inhibitor of protein aggregation in the cell needs to be explored. PMID:26628321

  20. Resistance to cadmium ions and formation of a cadmium-binding complex in various wild-type yeasts.

    Inouhe, M; Sumiyoshi, M; Tohoyama, H; Joho, M

    1996-04-01

    The resistance to cadmium ions (Cd-resistance) and possible formation of cadmium-binding complexes were examined in eight different wild-type yeasts. Saccharomyces exiguus, Pichia farinosa, Torulaspora delbrueckii and Schizosaccharomyces octosporus exhibited partial Cd-resistance, as compared to the Cd-resistant strain 301N and the Cu-resistant but Cd-sensitive strain X2180-1B of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Saccharomyces carlsbergensis, Pichia mogii, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Kluyveromyces lactis were all Cd-sensitive. The partially Cd-sensitive species, with the exception of S. exiguus, accumulated Cd2+ ions in the cytoplasmic fraction to varying extents. This fraction from S. octosporus included a Cd-binding complex that contained (gamma EC)nG peptides known as cadystins or phytochelatins, while P. farinosa and T. delbrueckii synthesized Cd-binding proteins that were similar to the Cd-metallothionein produced by S. cerevisiae 301N in terms of molecular weight and amino acid composition. These results suggest that such cytoplasmic molecules play a role in the Cd-tolerance of the above three species of yeast. S. exiguus retained most cadmium in the cell wall fraction and no Cd-binding complex was found in the cytoplasm, an indication of the important role of the cell wall in its Cd-tolerance. Different modes of binding of Cd2+ ions appear to be involved in the Cd-resistance of wild-type yeasts and fungi. PMID:8673342

  1. 18F-Labeled wild-type annexin V: comparison of random and site-selective radiolabeling methods.

    Perreault, Amanda; Knight, James C; Wang, Monica; Way, Jenilee; Wuest, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Early stage apoptosis is characterized by the externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) from the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane to the outer periphery. Consequently, PS represents an excellent target for non-invasive imaging of apoptosis by positron emission tomography. Annexin V is a 36 kDa protein which binds with high affinity to PS. Radiolabeling of wild-type annexin V with fluorine-18 ((18)F) can be accomplished via random acylation of 23 amine groups (22 lysine residues and one N-terminal amine) with [(18)F]SFB or site-specific alkylation reaction on cysteine residue at position 315 with maleimide-containing prosthetic groups like [(18)F]FBEM. The effect upon random and site-directed (18)F labeling of annexin V was studied with EL4 mouse lymphoma cells. Both, randomly and site-selectively radiolabeled annexin V demonstrated comparable binding to apoptotic EL4 cells. This finding suggests that the (18)F radiolabeling method has no significant effect on the ability of (18)F-labeled wild-type annexin V to bind PS in apoptotic cells. PMID:26255286

  2. Characteristics of alpha/beta interferon induction after infection of murine fibroblasts with wild-type and mutant alphaviruses

    We examined the characteristics of interferon alpha/beta (IFN-α/β) induction after alphavirus or control Sendai virus (SeV) infection of murine fibroblasts (MEFs). As expected, SeV infection of wild-type (wt) MEFs resulted in strong dimerization of IRF3 and the production of high levels of IFN-α/β. In contrast, infection of MEFs with multiple alphaviruses failed to elicit detectable IFN-α/β. In more detailed studies, Sindbis virus (SINV) infection caused dimerization and nuclear migration of IRF3, but minimal IFN-β promoter activity, although surprisingly, the infected cells were competent for IFN production by other stimuli early after infection. A SINV mutant defective in host macromolecular synthesis shutoff induced IFN-α/β in the MEF cultures dependent upon the activities of the TBK1 IRF3 activating kinase and host pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) PKR and MDA5 but not RIG-I. These results suggest that wild-type alphaviruses antagonize IFN induction after IRF3 activation but also may avoid detection by host PRRs early after infection.

  3. Transfection of p53-knockout mouse fibroblasts with wild-type p53 increases the thermo sensitivity and stimulates apoptosis induced by heat stress

    Purpose: The relationship between p53 functions and cellular thermo sensitivity was evaluated using murine fibroblasts transfected with either wild-type p53 or mutated p53, or those with a null p53 genotype. Methods and Materials: Cellular thermo sensitivity was determined using the clonogenic assay. Cell cycle distribution was assayed by determining DNA content using flow cytometry. Apoptosis was analyzed by detection of both apoptotic bodies and DNA fragmentation. Results: Stable transfectant with either wild-type p53 or mutated p53 was established. The transfectants with wild-type p53 were more thermo sensitive than either those with a null p53 or with mutated p53. Although heat-induced G1 cell cycle arrest was substantially observed in all transfectants, wild-type p53 enhanced and prolonged the G1 arrest; furthermore, wild-type p53 stimulated the induction of apoptosis by heat stress, whereas mutated p53 delayed it extremely. Conclusion: The p53 gene is a factor for determining cellular thermo sensitivity and wild-type p53 contributes to thermo sensitization resulting in enhancement of heat-induced apoptosis

  4. Transfection of p53-knockout mouse fibroblasts with wild-type p53 increases the thermo sensitivity and stimulates apoptosis induced by heat stress

    Purpose: The relationship between the p53 functions and cellular thermo sensitivity was evaluated using murine fibroblasts transfected with either wild-type p53 or mutated p53, or those with a null p53 genotype. Methods and Materials: Cellular thermo sensitivity was determined using the clonogenic assay. Cell cycle distribution was assayed by determining DNA content using flow cytometer. Apoptosis was analyzed by detection of both apoptotic bodies and DNA fragmentation. Results: Stable transfectant with either wild-type p53 or mutated p53 was established. The transfectants with wild-type p53 were more thermo sensitive than either those with a null p53 or with mutated p53. Although heat-induced G1 cell cycle arrest was substantially observed in all transfectants, wild-type p53 enhanced and prolonged the G1 arrest. Furthermore, wild-type p53 stimulated the induction of apoptosis by heat stress, whereas mutated p53 delayed it extremely. Conclusion: The p53 gene is at least a factor for determining cellular thermo sensitivity and wild-type p53 contributes to thermo sensitization resulting in enhancement of heat-induced apoptosis

  5. Maintenance erlotinib in advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer: cost-effectiveness in EGFR wild-type across Europe

    Walleser S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Silke Walleser,1 Joshua Ray,2 Helge Bischoff,3 Alain Vergnenègre,4 Hubertus Rosery,5 Christos Chouaid,6 David Heigener,7 Javier de Castro Carpeño,8 Marcello Tiseo,9 Stefan Walzer21Health Economic Consultancy, Renens, Switzerland; 2F Hoffmann-La Roche Pharmaceuticals AG, Basel, Switzerland; 3Thoracic Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; 4Limoges University Hospital, Limoges, France; 5Assessment-in-Medicine GmbH, Loerrach, Germany; 6Hospital Saint Antoine, Paris, France; 7Hospital Grosshansdorf, Grosshansdorf, Germany; 8University Hospital La Paz, Madrid, Spain; 9University Hospital of Parma, Parma, ItalyBackground: First-line maintenance erlotinib in patients with locally advanced or metastatic nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC has demonstrated significant overall survival and progression-free survival benefits compared with best supportive care plus placebo, irrespective of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR status (SATURN trial. The cost-effectiveness of first-line maintenance erlotinib in the overall SATURN population has been assessed and published recently, but analyses according to EGFR mutation status have not been performed yet, which was the rationale for assessing the cost-effectiveness of first-line maintenance erlotinib specifically in EGFR wild-type metastatic NSCLC.Methods: The incremental cost per life-year gained of first-line maintenance erlotinib compared with best supportive care in patients with EGFR wild-type stable metastatic NSCLC was assessed for five European countries (the United Kingdom, Germany, France, Spain, and Italy with an area-under-the-curve model consisting of three health states (progression-free survival, progressive disease, death. Log-logistic survival functions were fitted to Phase III patient-level data (SATURN to model progression-free survival and overall survival. The first-line maintenance erlotinib therapy cost (modeled for time to treatment cessation, medication cost in later lines, and

  6. Tau oligomers impair memory and induce synaptic and mitochondrial dysfunction in wild-type mice

    Jackson George R

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The correlation between neurofibrillary tangles of tau and disease progression in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD patients remains an area of contention. Innovative data are emerging from biochemical, cell-based and transgenic mouse studies that suggest that tau oligomers, a pre-filament form of tau, may be the most toxic and pathologically significant tau aggregate. Results Here we report that oligomers of recombinant full-length human tau protein are neurotoxic in vivo after subcortical stereotaxic injection into mice. Tau oligomers impaired memory consolidation, whereas tau fibrils and monomers did not. Additionally, tau oligomers induced synaptic dysfunction by reducing the levels of synaptic vesicle-associated proteins synaptophysin and septin-11. Tau oligomers produced mitochondrial dysfunction by decreasing the levels of NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (electron transport chain complex I, and activated caspase-9, which is related to the apoptotic mitochondrial pathway. Conclusions This study identifies tau oligomers as an acutely toxic tau species in vivo, and suggests that tau oligomers induce neurodegeneration by affecting mitochondrial and synaptic function, both of which are early hallmarks in AD and other tauopathies. These results open new avenues for neuroprotective intervention strategies of tauopathies by targeting tau oligomers.

  7. Establishment of a sensitized canine model for kidney transplantation

    XIE Sen; XIA Sui-sheng; TANG Li-gong; CHENG Jun; CHEN Zhi-shui; ZHENG Shan-gen

    2005-01-01

    Objective:To establish a sensitized canine model for kidney transplantation. Methods:12 male dogs were averagely grouped as donors and recipients. A small number of donor canine lymphocytes was infused into different anatomic locations of a paired canine recipient for each time and which was repeated weekly. Specific immune sensitization was monitored by means of Complement Dependent Cytotoxicity (CDC) and Mixed Lymphocyte Culture (MLC) test. When CDC test conversed to be positive and MLC test showed a significant proliferation of reactive lymphocytes of canine recipients, the right kidneys of the paired dogs were excised and transplanted to each other concurrently. Injury of renal allograft function was scheduled determined by ECT dynamic kidney photography and pathologic investigation. Results :CDC test usually conversed to be positive and reactive lymphocytes of canine recipients were also observed to be proliferated significantly in MLC test after 3 to 4 times of canine donor lymphocyte infusions. Renal allograft function deterioration occurred 4 d post-operatively in 4 of 6 canine recipients, in contrast to none in control dogs. Pathologic changes suggested antibody-mediated rejection (delayed) or acute rejection in 3 excised renal allograft of sensitized dogs. Seven days after operation, all sensitized dogs had lost graft function, pathologic changes of which showed that the renal allografts were seriously rejected. 2 of 3 dogs in control group were also acutely rejected. Conclusion:A convenient method by means of repeated stimulation of canine lymphocyte may induce specific immune sensitization in canine recipients. Renal allografts in sensitized dogs will be earlier rejected and result in a more deteriorated graft function.

  8. Transcriptional regulatory program in wild-type and retinoblastoma gene-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts during adipocyte differentiation

    Hansen Jacob B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although many molecular regulators of adipogenesis have been identified a comprehensive catalogue of components is still missing. Recent studies showed that the retinoblastoma protein (pRb was expressed in the cell cycle and late cellular differentiation phase during adipogenesis. To investigate this dual role of pRb in the early and late stages of adipogenesis we used microarrays to perform a comprehensive systems-level analysis of the common transcriptional program of the classic 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cell line, wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs, and retinoblastoma gene-deficient MEFs (Rb-/- MEFs. Findings Comparative analysis of the expression profiles of 3T3-L1 cells and wild-type MEFs revealed genes involved specifically in early regulation of the adipocyte differentiation as well as secreted factors and signaling molecules regulating the later phase of differentiation. In an attempt to identify transcription factors regulating adipogenesis, bioinformatics analysis of the promoters of coordinately and highly expressed genes was performed. We were able to identify a number of high-confidence target genes for follow-up experimental studies. Additionally, combination of experimental data and computational analyses pinpointed a feedback-loop between Pparg and Foxo1. To analyze the effects of the retinoblastoma protein at the transcriptional level we chose a perturbated system (Rb-/- MEFs for comparison to the transcriptional program of wild-type MEFs. Gene ontology analysis of 64 deregulated genes showed that the Rb-/- MEF model exhibits a brown(-like adipocyte phenotype. Additionally, the analysis results indicate a different or additional role for pRb family member involvement in the lineage commitment. Conclusion In this study a number of commonly modulated genes during adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells and MEFs, potential transcriptional regulation mechanisms, and differentially regulated targets during adipocyte

  9. Genetic Characterization of the Hemagglutinin Genes of Wild-Type Measles Virus Circulating in China, 1993–2009

    Zhu, Zhen; Liu, Chunyu; Mao, Naiying; Ji, Yixin; Wang, Huiling; Jiang, Xiaohong; Li, Chongshan; Tang, Wei; Feng, Daxing; Wang, Changyin; Zheng, Lei; Lei, Yue; Ling, Hua; Zhao, Chunfang; Ma, Yan; He, Jilan; Wang, Yan; Li, Ping; Guan, Ronghui; Zhou, Shujie; Zhou, Jianhui; Wang, Shuang; Zhang, Hong; Zheng, Huanying; Liu, Leng; Ma, Hemuti; Guan, Jing; Lu, Peishan; Feng, Yan; Zhang, Yanjun; Zhou, Shunde; Xiong, Ying; Ba, Zhuoma; Chen, Hui; Yang, Xiuhui; Bo, Fang; Ma, Yujie; Liang, Yong; Lei, Yake; Gu, Suyi; Liu, Wei; Chen, Meng; Featherstone, David; Jee, Youngmee; Bellini, William J.; Rota, Paul A.; Xu, Wenbo

    2013-01-01

    Background China experienced several large measles outbreaks in the past two decades, and a series of enhanced control measures were implemented to achieve the goal of measles elimination. Molecular epidemiologic surveillance of wild-type measles viruses (MeV) provides valuable information about the viral transmission patterns. Since 1993, virologic surveillnace has confirmed that a single endemic genotype H1 viruses have been predominantly circulating in China. A component of molecular surveillance is to monitor the genetic characteristics of the hemagglutinin (H) gene of MeV, the major target for virus neutralizing antibodies. Principal Findings Analysis of the sequences of the complete H gene from 56 representative wild-type MeV strains circulating in China during 1993–2009 showed that the H gene sequences were clustered into 2 groups, cluster 1 and cluster 2. Cluster1 strains were the most frequently detected cluster and had a widespread distribution in China after 2000. The predicted amino acid sequences of the H protein were relatively conserved at most of the functionally significant amino acid positions. However, most of the genotype H1 cluster1 viruses had an amino acid substitution (Ser240Asn), which removed a predicted N-linked glycosylation site. In addition, the substitution of Pro397Leu in the hemagglutinin noose epitope (HNE) was identified in 23 of 56 strains. The evolutionary rate of the H gene of the genotype H1 viruses was estimated to be approximately 0.76×10−3 substitutions per site per year, and the ratio of dN to dS (dN/dS) was <1 indicating the absence of selective pressure. Conclusions Although H genes of the genotype H1 strains were conserved and not subjected to selective pressure, several amino acid substitutions were observed in functionally important positions. Therefore the antigenic and genetic properties of H genes of wild-type MeVs should be monitored as part of routine molecular surveillance for measles in China. PMID

  10. Structure and age-dependent development of the turkey liver: a comparative study of a highly selected meat-type and a wild-type turkey line.

    Hünigen, Hana; Mainzer, Kathleen; Hirschberg, Ruth M; Custodis, Pia; Gemeinhardt, Ole; Al Masri, Salah; Richardson, Kenneth C; Hafez, Hafez Mohamed; Plendl, Johanna

    2016-04-01

    In this study the macroscopic and microscopic structure of the liver of a fast growing, meat-type turkey line (British United turkeys BUT Big 6, n=25) and a wild-type turkey line (Wild Canadian turkey, n=48) were compared at the age of 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 wk. Because the growth plates of long bones were still detectable in the 20-week-old wild-type turkeys, indicating immaturity, a group of 8 wild-type turkeys at the age of 24 wk was included in the original scope of the study. Over the term of the study, the body and liver weights of birds from the meat-type turkey line increased at a faster rate than those of the wild-type turkey line. However, the relative liver weight of the meat-type turkeys declined (from 2.7 to 0.9%) to a greater extent than that of the wild-type turkeys (from 2.8 to 1.9%), suggesting a mismatch in development between muscle weights and liver weights of the meat-type turkeys. Signs of high levels of fat storage in the liver were detected in both lines but were greater in the wild-type turkey line, suggesting a better feed conversion by the extreme-genotype birds i.e., meat-type birds. For the first time, this study presents morphologic data on the structure and arrangement of the lymphatic tissue within the healthy turkey liver, describing two different types of lymphatic aggregations within the liver parenchyma, i.e., aggregations with and without fibrous capsules. Despite differences during development, both adult meat-type and adult wild-type turkeys had similar numbers of lymphatic aggregations. PMID:26908884

  11. Investigations on 131I-hippurate-clearance in ostructive-uropathy extraction of para-aminohippuric acid and 131I-hippurate in the acutely obstructed canine kidney

    The results of more recent clinical and experimental investigations have thrown doubt on the usefulness of determining the individual 131I-hippurate clearance for evaluation of the function of acutely obstructed kidneys. In the clearance studies carried out in the conventional way it was difficult to determine quantitatively the urine produced during urinary obstruction. The renal extraction of p-aminohippuric acid and 131I-hippurate was determined in simultaneous measurement in six dogs before and after acute urinary obstruction with a constant plasma level of the test substances. The results obtained with this very elaborate method which is, however, independent of urine collection show that an acute urinary obstruction leads to a decrease of renal extraction both of PAH and of 131I-hippurate. The results of the extraction investigations hence confirm the results of the clearance studies mentioned. In addition, they show that the 'increase' of renal performance immediately after an experimentally induced urinary obstruction repeatedly found with catheterless determination of 131I-hippurate-clearance cannot be explained by a different kinetic behavior of PAH and 131I-hippurate in the acutely obstructed kidney. (orig./MG)

  12. Quantitative inner membrane proteome datasets of the wild-type and the Δmin mutant of Escherichia coli.

    Liang, Suh-Yuen; Lin, Shu-Yu; Chiang, I-Chen; Shih, Yu-Ling

    2016-09-01

    This article presents data that were obtained through measuring the impact of the Min oscillation on membrane proteins in Escherichia coli by quantitative protemoics analysis. We isolated inner membranes from the wild-type and mutant strains to generate proteomics datasets based on NanoLC-nanoESI-MS/MS mass spectrometry using the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) method. The datasets included the raw spectral files from four sample replicates and the processed files using Proteome Discoverer that contained a total of 40,072 MS/MS spectra with confident peptide identifier (FDRmembrane proteome of unique proteins with quantitation. Proteins of interest, that show significant difference in protein abundance of the mutant membrane, were isolated through statistical filtering. The data is related to "Quantitative proteomics analysis reveals the Min system of Escherichia coli modulates reversible protein association with the inner membrane" (Lee et al., 2016 [1]). PMID:27331106

  13. High-throughput functional screening of steroid substrates with wild-type and chimeric P450 enzymes.

    Urban, Philippe; Truan, Gilles; Pompon, Denis

    2014-01-01

    The promiscuity of a collection of enzymes consisting of 31 wild-type and synthetic variants of CYP1A enzymes was evaluated using a series of 14 steroids and 2 steroid-like chemicals, namely, nootkatone, a terpenoid, and mifepristone, a drug. For each enzyme-substrate couple, the initial steady-state velocity of metabolite formation was determined at a substrate saturating concentration. For that, a high-throughput approach was designed involving automatized incubations in 96-well microplate with sixteen 6-point kinetics per microplate and data acquisition using LC/MS system accepting 96-well microplate for injections. The resulting dataset was used for multivariate statistics aimed at sorting out the correlations existing between tested enzyme variants and ability to metabolize steroid substrates. Functional classifications of both CYP1A enzyme variants and steroid substrate structures were obtained allowing the delineation of global structural features for both substrate recognition and regioselectivity of oxidation. PMID:25243177

  14. High-Throughput Functional Screening of Steroid Substrates with Wild-Type and Chimeric P450 Enzymes

    Philippe Urban

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The promiscuity of a collection of enzymes consisting of 31 wild-type and synthetic variants of CYP1A enzymes was evaluated using a series of 14 steroids and 2 steroid-like chemicals, namely, nootkatone, a terpenoid, and mifepristone, a drug. For each enzyme-substrate couple, the initial steady-state velocity of metabolite formation was determined at a substrate saturating concentration. For that, a high-throughput approach was designed involving automatized incubations in 96-well microplate with sixteen 6-point kinetics per microplate and data acquisition using LC/MS system accepting 96-well microplate for injections. The resulting dataset was used for multivariate statistics aimed at sorting out the correlations existing between tested enzyme variants and ability to metabolize steroid substrates. Functional classifications of both CYP1A enzyme variants and steroid substrate structures were obtained allowing the delineation of global structural features for both substrate recognition and regioselectivity of oxidation.

  15. Effects of wild type tau and disease-linked tau mutations on microtubule organization and intracellular trafficking.

    Yu, Dezhi; Feinstein, Stuart C; Valentine, Megan T

    2016-05-24

    We investigate the effects of transient expression of wild type (WT) and disease-linked mutations of tau (R406W, P301L, ΔN296) on cytoskeletal organization and cargo transport in COS-7 cells, which are natively tau-free. The introduction of tau proteins (either WT or mutant forms) leads to a dramatic restructuring of the microtubule cytoskeleton, as observed using immunofluorescence microscopy. Yet, this microtubule bundling and aggregation has a modest effect on the speed and travel distance of motor-driven cargo transport, as measured by the motions of fluorescently-labeled lysosomes. This suggests that localized transport events are insensitive to the global structure of the microtubule cytoskeleton. Importantly, we also found no evidence that the disease-linked tau mutants were particularly toxic; in fact we found that expression of mutant and WT tau had similar effects on overall microtubule structure and transport phenotypes. PMID:26674472

  16. IFN-{gamma} enhances neurogenesis in wild-type mice and in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Baron, Rona; Nemirovsky, Anna; Harpaz, Idan; Cohen, Hagit; Owens, Trevor; Monsonego, Alon

    2008-01-01

    mechanisms can generate immunity to such deficits in neuronal repair. We demonstrate that in contrast to primarily innate immunity cytokines, such as interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, the adaptive immunity cytokine IFN-gamma enhances neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of adult mice and improves...... mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. We demonstrate that limited amounts of IFN-gamma in the brain shape the neuropoietic milieu to enhance neurogenesis, possibly representing the normal function of the immune system in controlling brain inflammation and repair.-Baron, R., Nemirovsky, A., Harpaz, I......., Cohen, H., Owens, T., Monsonego, A. IFN-gamma enhances neurogenesis in wild-type mice and in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease....

  17. Comparison of the activities of wild type and mutant enhancing factor/mouse secretory phospholipase A2 proteins

    Bhakti M Kirtane; Rita Mulherkar

    2002-09-01

    Enhancing factor (EF) protein, an isoform of secretory phospholipase A2 (PLA2), was purified as a modulator of epidermal growth factor from the small intestine of the Balb/c mouse. It was for the first time that a growth modulatory property of sPLA2 was demonstrated. Deletion mutation analysis of EF cDNA carried out in our laboratory showed that enhancing activity and phospholipase activity are two separate activities that reside in the same molecule. In order to study the specific amino acids involved in each of these activities, two site-directed mutants of EF were made and expressed in vitro. Comparison of enhancing activity as well as phospholipase A2 activity of these mutant proteins with that of wild type protein helped in identification of some of the residues important for both the activities.

  18. THE HIGH ACTIVITY OF VECTIBIX IN PATIENTS WITH METASTATIC COLORECTAL CANCER WITH THE RAS WILD-TYPE GENE

    N. N. Semenov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available High-efficiency inhibitors of EGFR (panitumumab and cetuximab in combination with chemotherapy in patients with advanced colorectal cancer is the result of the targeting special group of the patients based on studies of genes. Previously it was shown that the presence of mutation in exon 2 of KRAS gene (40 % of patients determines the effectivity of this group of drugs. However, the search for additional indicators was continued. The result is that the presence of mutations in exons 3 and 4 of KRAS gene and in exons 2, 3 and 4 of NRAS gene also predict EGFR inhibitors efficacy. These mutations are defined in 10 % of patients. Analysis showed that the efficiency of panitumumab and cetuximab in combination with chemotherapy significantly increased in patients with wild-type KRAS and NRAS.

  19. Wild-type and molten globular chorismate mutase achieve comparable catalytic rates using very different enthalpy/entropy compensations

    HU Hao

    2014-01-01

    The origin of the catalytic power of enzymes with a meta-stable native state,e.g.molten globular state,is an unsolved challenging issue in biochemistry.To help understand the possible differences between this special class of enzymes and the typical ones,we report here computer simulations of the catalysis of both the well-folded wild-type and the molten globular mutant of chorismate mutase.Using the ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical minimum free-energy path method,we determined the height of reaction barriers that are in good agreement with experimental measurements.Enzyme-substrate interactions were analyzed in detail to identify factors contributing to catalysis.Computed angular order parameters of backbone N–H bonds and side-chain methyl groups suggested site-specific,non-uniform rigidity changes of the enzymes during catalysis.The change of conformational entropy from the ground state to the transition state revealed distinctly contrasting entropy/enthalpy compensations in the dimeric wild-type enzyme and its molten globular monomeric variant.A unique catalytic strategy was suggested for enzymes that are natively molten globules:some may possess large conformational flexibility to provide strong electrostatic interactions to stabilize the transition state of the substrate and compensate for the entropy loss in the transition state.The equilibrium conformational dynamics in the reactant state were analyzed to quantify their contributions to the structural transitions enzymes needed to reach the transition states.The results suggest that large-scale conformational dynamics make important catalytic contributions to sampling conformational regions in favor of binding the transition state of substrate.

  20. Differential gene expression in wild-type and X-ray-sensitive mutants of Chinese hamster ovary cell lines

    Complementary DNA cloning, differential screening and Northern hybridization techniques were used to study differential gene expression in wild-type Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) K1 cell line and its two X-ray sensitive mutants, xrs-5 and xrs-6. Eleven species of mRNAs were found under-expressed in two independently isolated mutants. The steady-state levels of those mRNAs are 3-26-fold less in the 2 mutants, depending on the particular species. Of underexpressed mRNAs, 6 have been identified by comparing sequences of cloned cDNAs to the known sequences in GenBank 4 of them code for the structural proteins of ferritin heavy chain, non- muscle myosin light chain 3nm, ribosomal protein S17 and L7, resp. The other 2 have strong homology with mouse B2 or retroviral sequences. The remaining 5 mRNAs did not show significant homology with any of the known sequences and apparently represent newly isolated species. Effects of 137Cs γ-rays on the expression of the 11 mRNAs has been studied. Radiation inhibited expression of the B2-like gene in mutants but not in the wild type CHO cells. Levels of the other 10 mRNAs were not affected by radiation. The underexpression of this group of genes in both xrs-5 and xrs-6 mutants seems to be related to their radiation- sensitive phenotype, although the specific gene responsible has not been identified. Two models are proposed to explain the mechanism of under- expression. It is suggested that a cellular factor or/and chromosome structural changes are involved. (author). 33 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  1. Identification of proteins that regulate radiation-induced apoptosis in murine tumors with wild type p53

    In this study, we investigated the molecular factors determining the induction of apoptosis by radiation. Two murine tumors syngeneic to C3H/HeJ mice were used: an ovarian carcinoma OCa-I, and a hepatocarcinoma HCa-I. Both have wild type p53, but display distinctly different radiosensitivity in terms of specific growth delay (12.7 d in OCa-I and 0.3 d in HCa-I) and tumor cure dose 50% (52.6 Gy in OCa-I and >80 Gy in HCa-I). Eight-mm tumors on the thighs of mice were irradiated with 25 Gy and tumor samples were collected at regular time intervals after irradiation. The peak levels of apoptosis were 16.1±0.6% in OCa-I and 0.2±0.0% in HCa-I at 4 h after radiation, and this time point was used for subsequent proteomics analysis. Protein spots were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting with a focus on those related to apoptosis. In OCa-I tumors, radiation increased the expression of cytochrome c oxidase and Bcl2/adenovirus E1B-interacting 2 (Nip 2) protein higher than 3-fold. However in HCa-I, these two proteins showed no significant change. The results suggest that radiosensitivity in tumors with wild type p53 is regulated by a complex mechanism. Furthermore, these proteins could be molecular targets for a novel therapeutic strategy involving the regulation of radiosensitivity. (author)

  2. On the mechanistic differences of benzene-induced leukemogenesis between wild type and p53 knockout mice

    Leukemia induction by benzene inhalation was first reported by Le Noire in 1887, described multiple cases of leukemia among Parisian cobblers. However, experimental induction of leukemia by benzene exposure was not succeeded for a hundred years, until Snyder et al. and our group reported it nearly 20 years ago. Nevertheless, the mechanistic background of benzene-induced leukemia was still an enigma until recently a benzene-induced peculiar cell kinetics of the stem/progenitor cells has been elucidated by our study, demonstrated a marked repeated oscillatory decrease in peripheral blood and bone marrow (BM) cellularity during and after benzene exposure, which epigenetically preceded and developed the leukemia more than a year later. We utilized the BUUV (bromodeoxyuridine + UV exposure) method to study stem/progenitor cell kinetics during and/or after benzene exposure. Using these methods, we were able to measure the labeling rate, cycling fraction of clonogenic progenitor cells, and other cell cycle parameters. The cycling fraction of stem/progenitor cells was found not to turn into an active hematopoiesis but to remain low during benzene inhalation and further we found evidence that the cycling fraction depression may be mediated in part by a slowing of stem/progenitor cell cycling perse by up-regulation of p21. The benzene induced leukemogenicity between mice carrying wild-type p53 and mice lacking p53 seem to differ from one another. In the case of p53 knockout mouse, DNA damage such as weak mutagenicity and or chromosomal damages are retained, and those damages participated in the induction of a consequent activation of proto-oncogenes and the like, which led cells to further neoplastic changes. In contrast, in the case of wild type mice, a dramatic oscillational change in the cell cycle of the stem cell compartment seems to be an important factor for mice carrying the p53 gene. (author)

  3. Green tea extract as a treatment for patients with wild-type transthyretin amyloidosis: an observational study

    aus dem Siepen F

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fabian aus dem Siepen,1 Ralf Bauer,1 Matthias Aurich,1 Sebastian J Buss,1 Henning Steen,1 Klaus Altland,2 Hugo A Katus,1 Arnt V Kristen1 1Department of Cardiology, Angiology, and Respiratory Medicine, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; 2Institute of Human Genetics, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen, Germany Background: Causative treatment of patients with wild-type transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathy (wtATTR-CM is lacking. Recent reports indicate the potential use of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, the most abundant catechin in green tea, to inhibit amyloid fibril formation. We sought to investigate changes of cardiac function and morphology in patients with wtATTR-CM after consumption of green tea extract (GTE. Methods: Twenty-five male patients (71 [64; 80] years with wtATTR-CM were submitted to clinical examination, echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI (n=14, and laboratory testing before and after daily consumption of GTE capsules containing 600 mg epigallocatechin-3-gallate for at least 12 months. Results: A significant decrease of left ventricular (LV myocardial mass by 6% (196 [100; 247] vs 180 [85; 237] g; P=0.03 by cMRI and total cholesterol by 8.4% (191 [118; 267] vs 173 [106; 287] mg/dL; P=0.006 was observed after a 1-year period of GTE consumption. LV ejection fraction by cMRI (53% [33%; 69%] vs 54% [28%; 71%]; P=0.75, LV wall thickness (17 [13; 21] vs 18 [14; 25] mm; P=0.1, and mitral annular plane systolic excursion (10 [5; 23] vs 8 [4; 13] mm; P=0.3 by echocardiography remained unchanged. Conclusion: This study supports LV mass stabilization in patients with wtATTR-CM consuming GTE potentially indicating amyloid fibril reduction. Keywords: wild-type ATTR, cardiomyopathy, polyphenol, EGCG

  4. Canine pulmonary angiostrongylosis

    Koch, Jørgen; Willesen, Jakob Lundgren

    2009-01-01

    Canine pulmonary angiostrongylosis is an emerging snail-borne disease causing verminous pnemonia and coagulopathy in dogs. The parasite is fund in Europe, North and South America and Africa, covering tropical, subtropical and temperate regions. Its distribution has been characterised by isolated...... larvae may not reflect what happens under field conditions. There is insufficient understanding of the spread of infection and the dynamic consequences of this parasite in the canine population. This review discusses the biology, epidemiology, clinical aspects and management of canine pulmonary...

  5. Cell killing and mutagenesis by alkylating agents and UV irradiation in wild-type and deoxycytidine-kinase-deficient Friend murine leukaemia cells

    Wild-type (clone 707) Friend murine leukaemia cells were compared with two ara-C-resistant subclones in terms of sensitivity to cell killing and mutagenesis to 6-thioguanine resistance following treatment with ethyl methane sulphonate, methyl methane sulphonate and UV irradiation. The ara-C-resistant subclones, 707DKE and 707DK48, had respective deoxycytidine kinase activities of 6.7 and 5.4% the values found in wild-type cells. No clear pattern of altered sensitivity to cell killing or mutagenesis emerged between the wild-type cells and the ara-C-resistant subclones. These results do not provide evidence for a role of deoxycytidine kinase in determining sensitivity to mutagenic agents in the Friend cell line. (author)

  6. Effects of Bio-Au Nanoparticles on Electrochemical Activity of Shewanella oneidensis Wild Type and ΔomcA/mtrC Mutant

    Wu, Ranran; Cui, Li; Chen, Lixiang; Wang, Chao; Cao, Changli; Sheng, Guoping; Yu, Hanqing; Zhao, Feng

    2013-11-01

    Both Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 wild type and its mutant ΔomcA/mtrC are capable of transforming AuIII into Au nanoparticles (AuNPs). Cyclic voltammetry reveals a decrease in redox current after the wild type is exposed to AuIII but an increase in oxidation current for the mutant. The peak current of the wild type is much higher than that of the mutant before the exposure of AuIII, but lower than that of the mutant after the formation of AuNPs. This suggests that damage to the electron transfer chain in the mutant could be repaired by AuNPs to a certain extent. Spectroscopy and SDS-PAGE analysis indicate a decrease in cell protein content after the formation of AuNPs, which provides a convenient way to detect intracellular information on cells.

  7. Perturbation of auxin homeostasis by overexpression of wild-type IAA15 results in impaired stem cell differentiation and gravitropism in roots.

    Da-Wei Yan

    Full Text Available Aux/IAAs interact with auxin response factors (ARFs to repress their transcriptional activity in the auxin signaling pathway. Previous studies have focused on gain-of-function mutations of domain II and little is known about whether the expression level of wild-type Aux/IAAs can modulate auxin homeostasis. Here we examined the perturbation of auxin homeostasis by ectopic expression of wild-type IAA15. Root gravitropism and stem cell differentiation were also analyzed. The transgenic lines were less sensitive to exogenous auxin and exhibited low-auxin phenotypes including failures in gravity response and defects in stem cell differentiation. Overexpression lines also showed an increase in auxin concentration and reduced polar auxin transport. These results demonstrate that an alteration in the expression of wild-type IAA15 can disrupt auxin homeostasis.

  8. Analysis of all subunits, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, of the succinate dehydrogenase complex in KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST.

    Pantaleo, Maria A; Astolfi, Annalisa; Urbini, Milena; Nannini, Margherita; Paterini, Paola; Indio, Valentina; Saponara, Maristella; Formica, Serena; Ceccarelli, Claudio; Casadio, Rita; Rossi, Giulio; Bertolini, Federica; Santini, Donatella; Pirini, Maria G; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Basso, Umberto; Biasco, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of genes encoding the subunits of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex were described in KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST separately in different reports. In this study, we simultaneously sequenced the genome of all subunits, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, and SDHD in a larger series of KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST in order to evaluate the frequency of the mutations and explore their biological role. SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, and SDHD were sequenced on the available samples obtained from 34 KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GISTs. Of these, in 10 cases, both tumor and peripheral blood (PB) were available, in 19 cases only tumor, and in 5 cases only PB. Overall, 9 of the 34 patients with KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST carried mutations in one of the four subunits of the SDH complex (six patients in SDHA, two in SDHB, one in SDHC). WB and immunohistochemistry analysis showed that patients with KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST who harbored SDHA mutations exhibited a significant downregulation of both SDHA and SDHB protein expression, with respect to the other GIST lacking SDH mutations and to KIT/PDGFRA-mutated GIST. Clinically, four out of six patients with SDHA mutations presented with metastatic disease at diagnosis with a very slow, indolent course. Patients with KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST may harbor germline and/or de novo mutations of SDH complex with prevalence for mutations within SDHA, which is associated with a downregulation of SDHA and SDHB protein expression. The presence of germline mutations may suggest that these patients should be followed up for the risk of development of other cancers. PMID:23612575

  9. Characterization and structural analysis of wild type and a non-abscission mutant at the development funiculus (Def locus in Pisum sativum L

    Ambrose Mike J

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In pea seeds (Pisum sativum L., the Def locus defines an abscission event where the seed separates from the funicle through the intervening hilum region at maturity. A spontaneous mutation at this locus results in the seed failing to abscise from the funicle as occurs in wild type peas. In this work, structural differences between wild type peas that developed a distinct abscission zone (AZ between the funicle and the seed coat and non-abscission def mutant were characterized. Results A clear abscission event was observed in wild type pea seeds that were associated with a distinct double palisade layers at the junction between the seed coat and funicle. Generally, mature seeds fully developed an AZ, which was not present in young wild type seeds. The AZ was formed exactly below the counter palisade layer. In contrast, the palisade layers at the junction of the seed coat and funicle were completely absent in the def mutant pea seeds and the cells in this region were seen to be extensions of surrounding parenchymatous cells. Conclusion The Def wild type developed a distinct AZ associated with palisade layer and counterpalisade layer at the junction of the seed coat and funicle while the def mutant pea seed showed non-abscission and an absence of the double palisade layers in the same region. We conclude that the presence of the double palisade layer in the hilum of the wild type pea seeds plays an important structural role in AZ formation by delimiting the specific region between the seed coat and the funicle and may play a structural role in the AZ formation and subsequent detachment of the seed from the funicle.

  10. The Canine Oral Microbiome

    Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Klein, Erin A.; Thompson, Emily C.; Blanton, Jessica M.; Chen, Tsute; Milella, Lisa; Buckley, Catherine M. F.; Davis, Ian J.; Bennett, Marie-Lousie; Marshall-Jones, Zoe V.

    2012-01-01

    Determining the bacterial composition of the canine oral microbiome is of interest for two primary reasons. First, while the human oral microbiome has been well studied using molecular techniques, the oral microbiomes of other mammals have not been studied in equal depth using culture independent methods. This study allows a comparison of the number of bacterial taxa, based on 16S rRNA-gene sequence comparison, shared between humans and dogs, two divergent mammalian species. Second, canine or...