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Sample records for acute venous thromboembolism

  1. A Rare Occurrence of Simultaneous Venous and Arterial Thromboembolic Events – Lower Limb Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Thromboembolism as Initial Presentation in Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    Kutiyal, Aditya S.; Dharmshaktu, Pramila; Kataria, Babita; Garg, Abhilasha

    2016-01-01

    The development of acute myeloid leukemia has been attributed to various factors, including hereditary, radiation, drugs, and certain occupational exposures. The association between malignancy and venous thromboembolism events is well established. Here, we present a case of a 70-year-old Indian man who had presented with arterial and venous thrombosis, and the patient was later diagnosed with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). In our case, the patient presented with right lower limb deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism four months prior to the diagnosis of APL. Although thromboembolic event subsequent to the diagnosis of malignancy, and especially during the chemotherapy has been widely reported, this prior presentation with simultaneous occurrence of both venous and arterial thromboembolism has rarely been reported. We take this opportunity to state the significance of a complete medical evaluation in cases of recurrent or unusual thrombotic events. PMID:26949347

  2. Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis

    Laryea, Jonathan; Champagne, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) can occur after major general surgery. Pulmonary embolism is recognized as the most common identifiable cause of death in hospitalized patients in the United States. The risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) is higher in colorectal surgical procedures compared with general surgical procedures. The incidence of venous thromboembolism in this population is estimated to be 0.2 to 0.3%. Prevention of VTE is considered a patient-safety measur...

  3. Peripheral and Central Venous Blood Glucose Concentrations in Dogs and Cats with Acute Arterial Thromboembolism

    S. Klainbart; Kelmer, E.; Vidmayer, B.; Bdolah‐Abram, T.; Segev, G.; Aroch, I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute limb paralysis because of arterial thromboembolism (ATE) occurs in cats and less commonly in dogs. ATE is diagnosed based on physical examination findings and, occasionally, advanced imaging. Hypothesis/Objectives Peripheral, affected limb venous glucose concentration is decreased in ATE, whereas its systemic concentration is within or above reference interval. Animals Client‐owned cats and dogs were divided into 3 respective groups: acute limb paralysis because of ATE (22 ca...

  4. Venous Thromboembolic Disease

    Jaff, Michael R

    2002-01-01

    Physicians understand the importance of prompt diagnosis and therapy of venous thromboembolism. This is a common and potentially deadly disease. Many patients may have no symptoms of this disorder, yet face a significant risk of serious complications if undiagnosed and untreated. Venous duplex ultrasonography has become the diagnostic test of choice for deep venous thrombosis. Quantitative d-dimer levels may be very helpful in establishing the diagnosis of venous thrombosis. Helical (spiral) ...

  5. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk assessment and prophylaxis in acute orthopaedic admissions: improving compliance with national guidelines

    Watts, Laura; Grant, David

    2013-01-01

    “Each year over 25,000 people die from Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) contracted in hospital. This is more than the combined total of deaths from breast cancer, AIDS and traffic accidents”. (1) Orthopaedic patients are at particular risk of VTE. In 2011, the project team carried out an audit into compliance with national VTE assessment guidelines on all acute trauma and orthopaedic admissions during a two week period at a District General Hospital. The study demonstrated that compliance was ini...

  6. Idiopathic venous thromboembolism and thrombophilia

    Sinescu, C; Hostiuc, M; Bartos, D.

    2011-01-01

    During the past decade idiopathic venous thromboembolism has become a separate entity, a chronic illness which has required prolonged anticoagulation and other prevention strategies to avoid recurrences. This article reviews recent developments regarding unprovoked venous thromboembolism and its relation with thrombophilia. In the beginning, the latest definition of idiopathic venous thromboembolism is presented. The article continues with statistics about thrombophilia, related venous thromb...

  7. Hormonal contraception and venous thromboembolism

    Lidegaard, Øjvind; Milsom, Ian; Geirsson, Reynir Tomas;

    2012-01-01

    New studies about the influence of hormonal contraception on the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) have been published.......New studies about the influence of hormonal contraception on the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) have been published....

  8. Venous thromboses and thromboembolism in acute stroke: risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention

    Andrei Viktorovich Fonyakin; L A Geraskina

    2013-01-01

    Stroke patients among all patients with somatic diseases are at one of the highest risks for venous thromboembolism (VTE). The proven risk factors for venous thrombosis in stroke are prolonged immobilization, elderly age, obesity, diabetes mellitus, and inherited coagulopathies. If no drug prevention is done, the course of stroke is complicated by deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in 75% of the immobilized patients and pulmonary thromboembolism develops in 20%. At present there are mechanical, pharm...

  9. Direct Oral Anticoagulants and Their Use in Treatment and Secondary Prevention of Acute Symptomatic Venous Thromboembolism.

    Granziera, Serena; Hasan, Arjumand; Cohen, Alexander Ander T

    2016-04-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have been compared with standard therapy in large phase III studies to assess their safety and efficacy in the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolism and in the secondary prevention of recurrent venous thromboembolism. Although the mean population age and the gross inclusion and exclusion criteria were similar across these studies, they differed in other aspects such as overall study design and acute treatment strategies. The 4 DOACs examined in phase III trials (apixaban, edoxaban, rivaroxaban, and dabigatran) showed noninferiority compared with standard therapy for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolism and for the prevention of recurrent venous thromboembolism. Furthermore, these DOACs exhibited a similar safety profile to standard therapy, with the risk of major bleeding significantly reduced in some of these studies. Rivaroxaban and apixaban were tested as a single-drug approach, whereas in the dabigatran and edoxaban studies, initial bridging with parenteral agents was employed. The purpose of this review is to compare the phase III studies of DOACs in this indication, to highlight the differences, and to discuss a series of clinically relevant issues, including the management of key patient subgroups (eg, fragile patients, those with cancer or renal impairment), extended treatment, use of comedications, heparin pretreatment versus a single-drug approach, and the bleeding profiles of the DOACs. PMID:26329910

  10. Venous thromboembolism: The intricacies

    Dutta T

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE has been a subject of great interest of late. Since Rudolph Virchow described the famous Virchow′s triad in 1856, there have been rapid strides in the understanding of the pathogenesis and factors responsible for it. Discovery of various thrombophilic factors, both primary and acquired, in the last 40 years has revolutionized prognostication and management of this potentially life-threatening condition due to its associated complication of pulmonary thromboembolism. Detailed genetic mapping and linkage analyses have been underlining the fact that VTE is a multifactorial disorder and a complex one. There are many gene-gene and gene-environment interactions that alter and magnify the clinical picture in this disorder. Point in case is pregnancy, where the risk of VTE is 100-150 times increased in the presence of Factor V Leiden, prothrombin mutation (Prothrombin 20210A and antithrombin deficiency. Risk of VTE associated with long-haul air flight has now been well recognized. Thrombotic events associated with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS are 70% venous and 30% arterial. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism are the most common venous events, though unusual cases of catastrophes due to central vein thrombosis like renal vein thrombosis and Budd-Chiari syndrome (catastrophic APS may occur.

  11. Venous Thromboembolism. Diagnostic Guide

    The paper defines to the deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and the development of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) as manifestations of oneself pathology. Most of the pistons of the PTE (90%), they originate in the deep veins of the inferior members, proximal to the veins popliteas. In strange occasions, they make it in the veins of the superior members. The diagnosis, localization and extension of the DVT and of the PTE they are necessary to treat appropriately this given illness their high morbid mortality. The great majority of the PTE is symptomatic but it is necessary to know the risk of subsequent PTE examining the permeability of the deep veined system in the patient with suspicion of recent or old PTE to prevent its recurrence

  12. Venous thromboembolism in women

    Group, ESHRE Capri Workshop; Skouby, Sven Olaf

    2013-01-01

    conception occur together. In pregnancy, the risk of VTE is increased ~5-fold, while the use of combined hormonal contraception (CHC) doubles the risk and this relative risk is higher with the more recent pills containing desogestrel, gestodene and drospirenone when compared with those with levonorgestrel....... Similarly, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) increases the VTE risk 2- to 4-fold. There is a synergistic effect between thrombophilia and the various reproductive risks. Prevention of VTE during pregnancy should be offered to women with specific risk factors. In women who are at high risk, CHC and HRT......BACKGROUND Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a specific reproductive health risk for women. METHODS Searches were performed in Medline and other databases. The selection criteria were high-quality studies and studies relevant to clinical reproductive medicine. Summaries were presented and discussed...

  13. Venous thromboembolism risk and prophylaxis in the acute hospital care setting: the Irish results of the ENDORSE study.

    Murphy, O

    2012-05-01

    ENDORSE (Epidemiologic International Day for the Evaluation of Patients at Risk for Venous Thromboembolism in the Acute Hospital Care Setting), is a multinational, cross-sectional survey of venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk prevalence and effective prophylaxis in the acute hospital care setting. Three Irish hospitals enrolled in the study. The American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) guidelines were employed to evaluate VTE risk and prophylaxis. Of 552 patients, 297 (53.8%) and 255 (46.2%) were categorised as surgical or medical, respectively, with 175 (59%) surgical and 109 (43%) medical patients deemed to be at risk for VTE. Of these, only 112 (64%) and 51 (47%) received recommended VTE prophylaxis, respectively. The results are consistent with those observed in other countries and demonstrate a high prevalence of risk for VTE and a low rate of prophylaxis use, particularly in medical patients. Awareness of VTE guidelines should be an integral component of health policy.

  14. Graduated compression stockings to prevent venous thromboembolism in hospital: evidence from patients with acute stroke.

    Kearon, Clive; O'Donnell, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is the most common preventable cause of death in hospital patients and prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is cost-saving in high-risk patients. Low-dose anticoagulation is very effective at preventing VTE but increases bleeding. Graduated compression stockings and intermittent pneumatic compression devices are also used to prevent VTE and do not increase bleeding, which makes their use appealing in patients who cannot tolerate bleeding, such as patients with acute stroke. Studies that evaluated mechanical methods of preventing VTE were small and mainly used asymptomatic deep vein thrombosis (DVT), detected using screening tests, as the study outcome. The recently published CLOTS Trial 1 (Clots in Legs Or sTockings after Stroke) compared thigh-level compression stockings with no stockings in about 2500 patients with stroke and immobility, and found that thigh-level stockings were not effective. Indirectly, the findings of this study question the ability of stockings to prevent VTE in other patient groups, including those after surgery. CLOTS 1 compared thigh-level and below-knee stockings in about 3000 patients with acute stroke. Given that thigh-level stockings were ineffective in CLOTS 1, it is surprising that they were more effective than below-knee stockings in CLOTS Trial 2. A possible explanation is that below-knee stockings increase DVT, although this seems unlikely. CLOTS 1 and CLOTS 2 question whether graduated compression stockings prevent VTE and suggest the need for further trials evaluating their efficacy in medical and surgical patients. PMID:21346697

  15. Anticoagulation Management Practices and Outcomes in Elderly Patients with Acute Venous Thromboembolism: A Clinical Research Study.

    Charlène Insam

    Full Text Available Whether anticoagulation management practices are associated with improved outcomes in elderly patients with acute venous thromboembolism (VTE is uncertain. Thus, we aimed to examine whether practices recommended by the American College of Chest Physicians guidelines are associated with outcomes in elderly patients with VTE. We studied 991 patients aged ≥65 years with acute VTE in a Swiss prospective multicenter cohort study and assessed the adherence to four management practices: parenteral anticoagulation ≥5 days, INR ≥2.0 for ≥24 hours before stopping parenteral anticoagulation, early start with vitamin K antagonists (VKA ≤24 hours of VTE diagnosis, and the use of low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH or fondaparinux. The outcomes were all-cause mortality, VTE recurrence, and major bleeding at 6 months, and the length of hospital stay (LOS. We used Cox regression and lognormal survival models, adjusting for patient characteristics. Overall, 9% of patients died, 3% had VTE recurrence, and 7% major bleeding. Early start with VKA was associated with a lower risk of major bleeding (adjusted hazard ratio 0.37, 95% CI 0.20-0.71. Early start with VKA (adjusted time ratio [TR] 0.77, 95% CI 0.69-0.86 and use of LMWH/fondaparinux (adjusted TR 0.87, 95% CI 0.78-0.97 were associated with a shorter LOS. An INR ≥2.0 for ≥24 hours before stopping parenteral anticoagulants was associated with a longer LOS (adjusted TR 1.2, 95% CI 1.08-1.33. In elderly patients with VTE, the adherence to recommended anticoagulation management practices showed mixed results. In conclusion, only early start with VKA and use of parenteral LMWH/fondaparinux were associated with better outcomes.

  16. The adherence to initial processes of care in elderly patients with acute venous thromboembolism.

    Anna K Stuck

    Full Text Available We aimed to assess whether elderly patients with acute venous thromboembolism (VTE receive recommended initial processes of care and to identify predictors of process adherence.We prospectively studied in- and outpatients aged ≥65 years with acute symptomatic VTE in a multicenter cohort study from nine Swiss university- and non-university hospitals between September 2009 and March 2011. We systematically assessed whether initial processes of care, which are recommended by the 2008 American College of Chest Physicians guidelines, were performed in each patient. We used multivariable logistic models to identify patient factors independently associated with process adherence.Our cohort comprised 950 patients (mean age 76 years. Of these, 86% (645/750 received parenteral anticoagulation for ≥5 days, 54% (405/750 had oral anticoagulation started on the first treatment day, and 37% (274/750 had an international normalized ratio (INR ≥2 for ≥24 hours before parenteral anticoagulation was discontinued. Overall, 35% (53/153 of patients with cancer received low-molecular-weight heparin monotherapy and 72% (304/423 of patients with symptomatic deep vein thrombosis were prescribed compression stockings. In multivariate analyses, symptomatic pulmonary embolism, hospital-acquired VTE, and concomitant antiplatelet therapy were associated with a significantly lower anticoagulation-related process adherence.Adherence to several recommended processes of care was suboptimal in elderly patients with VTE. Quality of care interventions should particularly focus on processes with low adherence, such as the prescription of continued low-molecular-weight heparin therapy in patients with cancer and the achievement of an INR ≥2 for ≥24 hours before parenteral anticoagulants are stopped.

  17. Air travel and venous thromboembolism.

    2002-01-01

    There has recently been increased publicity on the risk of venous thrombosis after long-haul flights. This paper reviews the evidence base related to the association between air travel and venous thromboembolism. The evidence consists only of case reports, clinical case-control studies and observational studies involving the use of intermediate end-points, or expert opinion. Some studies have suggested that there is no clear association, whereas others have indicated a strong relationship. On...

  18. Venous thromboembolism deserves your attention

    Marc Samama, Charles

    2001-01-01

    The survey of how Canadian intensive care units (ICUs) prevent and diagnose venous thromboembolism (VTE) presented in this issue of Critical Care illustrates considerable variability. Lack of optimal patient care reflects how VTE is rated in ICUs. The discussion should no longer focus on the incidence of thrombosis, but rather on its prevention. Unfractionated heparin remains the most commonly used agent to prevent VTE, despite the recognized efficacy and safety of low-molecular-weight hepari...

  19. Fibrin-related markers for diagnosing acute-, subclinical-, and pre-venous thromboembolism in patients with major orthopedic surgery.

    Yamaguchi, Toshio; Wada, Hideo; Miyazaki, Shinichi; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Wakabayashi, Hiroki; Asanuma, Kunihiro; Fujimoto, Naoki; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Ohishi, Kohshi; Sakaguchi, Akane; Yamada, Norikazu; Ito, Masaaki; Yamashita, Yoshiki; Katayama, Naoyuki; Sudo, Akihiro

    2016-05-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common complication in patients who have undergone major orthopedic surgery, but there are few predictors of VTE after major orthopedic surgery treated with an anticoagulant. We measured levels of fibrin-related markers (FRMs), such as D-dimer, soluble fibrin (SF), and fibrinogen and fibrin degradation products (FDPs) in 66 patients with acute-phase VTE, and 367 patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery. Plasma FDP, D-dimer, and SF levels were significantly higher in patients with acute VTE, but only FDP and D-dimer levels were significantly higher in subclinical VTE. Adequate cut-off levels of D-dimer were 2.2 μg/ml for diagnosing acute VTE and 1.5 μg/ml for diagnosing subclinical VTE. D-dimer of less than 1.9 or 0.7 μg/ml ruled out acute VTE or subclinical VTE. D-dimer of more than 1.3 μg/ml preoperatively showed a moderate risk for postoperative VTE. Measurement of FRMs is useful for evaluating the risk of subclinical or postoperative VTE in patients with major orthopedic surgery. In particular, FDP is the most valuable marker for diagnosing acute VTE, whereas D-dimer is the most valuable for diagnosing subclinical VTE or predicting VTE. PMID:26872909

  20. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in hospitalized acutely ill medical patients: focus on the clinical utility of (low-dose fondaparinux

    Di Nisio M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Marcello Di Nisio,1,2 Ettore Porreca3 1Department of Medical, Oral and Biotechnological Sciences, University G D'Annunzio of Chieti-Pescara, Chieti, Italy; 2Department of Vascular Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; 3Department of Medicine and Aging, Centre for Aging Sciences, Internal Medicine Unit, University G D'Annunzio Foundation, Chieti, Italy Abstract: Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a frequent complication among acutely ill medical patients hospitalized for congestive heart failure, acute respiratory insufficiency, rheumatologic disorders, and acute infectious and/or inflammatory diseases. Based on robust data from randomized controlled studies and meta-analyses showing a reduced incidence of VTE by 40% to about 60% with pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis, prevention of VTE with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH, unfractionated heparin (UFH, or fondaparinux is currently recommended in all at-risk hospitalized acutely ill medical patients. In patients who are bleeding or are at high risk for major bleeding, mechanical prophylaxis with graduated compression stockings or intermittent pneumatic compression may be suggested. Thromboprophylaxis is generally continued for 6 to 14 days or for the duration of hospitalization. Selected cases could benefit from extended thromboprophylaxis beyond this period, although the risk of major bleeding remains a concern, and additional studies are needed to identify patients who may benefit from prolonged prophylaxis. For hospitalized acutely ill medical patients with renal insufficiency, a low dose (1.5 mg once daily of fondaparinux or prophylactic LMWH subcutaneously appears to have a safe profile, although proper evaluation in randomized studies is lacking. The evidence on the use of prophylaxis for VTE in this latter group of patients, as well as in those at higher risk of bleeding complications, such as patients with thrombocytopenia, remains scarce. For critically ill patients

  1. Risk factors for venous thromboembolism during pregnancy

    Jensen, Thomas Bo; Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Grøn, Randi; Bretler, Ditte-Marie; Schmiegelow, Michelle Dalgas; Andersson, Charlotte; Azimi, Aziza; Gislason, Gunnar; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring

    2013-01-01

    Pregnant women are at an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Risk factors for VTE among pregnant women are not sufficiently investigated.......Pregnant women are at an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Risk factors for VTE among pregnant women are not sufficiently investigated....

  2. Predicting the Risk of Venous Thromboembolism Recurrence

    Heit, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a chronic disease with a 30% ten-year recurrence rate. The highest incidence of recurrence is in the first 6 months. Active cancer significantly increases the hazard of early recurrence, and the proportions of time on standard heparin (APTT≥0.2 anti-Xa U/mL) and warfarin (INR≥2.0) treatment, significantly reduce the hazard. The acute treatment duration does not affect recurrence risk after treatment is stopped. Independent predictors of late recurrence include ...

  3. Venous thromboembolism in cancer patients

    Mehmet Fuat Eren

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a major complication of cancer and represents an important cause of morbidity and mortality. The incidence of VTE is 0.6-7.8% in patients with cancer more than double the incidence of VTE in patients without cancer. The risk of VTE which includes deep venous thrombosis (DVT and pulmonary embolism (PE is increased two to seven fold in patients with cancer. VTE risk is especially high among certain groups such as hospitalized patients with cancer and those receiving active antineoplastic therapy. Also cancer patients, who undergoing major surgery, are increased risk of VTE. Trauma, long-haul travel, increased age, obesity, previous VTE and genetic component are also predisposing factors for VTE. Patients with cancer who develop VTE should be managed multidisciplinary treatment guidelines. The primary goal of thromboprophylaxis in patients with cancer is to prevent VTE. The large majority of cancer patients should be treated with therapeutic doses of unfractioned heparin (UFH or low molecular weight heparin (LMWH. Prophylaxis should include cancer patients who underwent major surgery for cancer and patients with a history of VTE.

  4. Familial risk of venous thromboembolism: a nationwide cohort study

    Sørensen, H T; Riis, A H; Diaz, L J;

    2011-01-01

    Background: Venous thromboembolism has genetic determinants, but population-based data on familial risks are limited. Objectives: To examine the familial risk of venous thromboembolism. Methods: We undertook a nationwide study of a cohort of patients with deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary...... expected number of venous thromboembolism cases among siblings, using population-specific, gender-specific and age-specific incidence rates. Results: We identified 30 179 siblings of 19 599 cases of venous thromboembolism. The incidence among siblings was 2.2 cases per 1000 person-years, representing a...... with pulmonary embolism. Conclusion: Venous thromboembolism has a strong familial component....

  5. PROPHYLAXIS OF VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM IN ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY

    Leme, Luiz Eugênio Garcez; Sguizzatto, Guilherme Turolla

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism and its complications in orthopedic surgery is increasingly significant. This review discusses the pathophysiology of thrombus formation in general and orthopedic surgery, its incidence, predisposing factors and complications. It also presents an updated presentation and critique of prophylaxis currently available in our environment.

  6. Low-molecular-weight heparins in the treatment of venous thromboembolism

    Huisman Menno V; Ageno Walter

    2000-01-01

    Abstract Venous thromboembolism is a common disease that is associated with considerable morbidity if left untreated. Recently, low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs) have been evaluated for use in acute treatment of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Randomized studies have shown that LMWHs are as effective as unfractionated heparin in the prevention of recurrent venous thromboembolism, and are as safe with respect to the occurrence of major bleeding. A pooled analysis did not sho...

  7. Enoxaparin Treatment Followed by Rivaroxaban for the Treatment of Acute Lower Limb Venous Thromboembolism: Initial Experience in a Single Center.

    Wolosker, Nelson; Varella, Andrea Y M; Fukuda, Juliana M; Teivelis, Marcelo; Kuzniec, Sergio; Krutman, Mariana; Guerra, João C de C; Ramacciotti, Eduardo

    2016-05-01

    Rivaroxaban is a target-specific oral anticoagulant approved for the treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE). On its major clinical trials, treatment was initiated directly with a 3-week dose of oral 15 mg twice daily followed by 20 mg every day for at least 3 months. We retrospectively evaluated an initial therapy for confirmed VTE with 1 to 18 days of enoxaparin (1 mg/kg twice daily parenteral) followed by oral rivaroxaban 20 mg every day. Of 49 patients, we found no symptomatic recurrence, no major bleeding, and only 1 clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding. We concluded in this pilot study that it is safe and effective to treat patients with enoxaparin course followed directly by a dose of 20 mg of rivaroxaban. PMID:26739543

  8. Review of the cost of venous thromboembolism

    Fernandez MM; Hogue S; Preblick R; Kwong WJ

    2015-01-01

    Maria M Fernandez,1 Susan Hogue,1 Ronald Preblick,2 Winghan Jacqueline Kwong2 1RTI-Health Solutions, Market Access and Outcomes Strategy, Research Triangle Park, NC, 2Daiichi Sankyo, Inc., Health Economics & Outcomes Research, Parsippany, NJ, USA Background: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the second most common medical complication and a cause of excess length of hospital stay. Its incidence and economic burden are expected to increase as the population ages. We reviewed the recent l...

  9. Venous thromboembolism in cancer patients: risk assessment, prevention and management.

    Tukaye, Deepali N; Brink, Heidi; Baliga, Ragavendra

    2016-03-01

    Thrombosis and thromboembolic events contribute to significant morbidity in cancer patients. Venous thrombosis embolism (which includes deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism) accounts for a large percentage of thromboembolic events. Appropriate identification of cancer patients at high risk for venous thromboembolism and management of thromboembolic event is crucial in improving the quality of care for cancer patients. However, thromboembolism in cancer patients is a complex problem and the management has to be tailored to each individual. The focus of this review is to understand the complex pathology, physiology and risk factors that drive the process of venous thrombosis and embolism in cancer patients and the current guidelines in management. PMID:26919091

  10. 77 FR 10748 - Scientific Information Request on Mechanical Prophylaxis of Venous Thromboembolism (VTE)

    2012-02-23

    ... Prophylaxis of Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS... Pharmacologic and Mechanical Prophylaxis of Venous Thromboembolism Among Special Populations Review, which is... review of the evidence for pharmacologic and mechanical prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism (VTE)...

  11. The Role of Platelets in Venous Thromboembolism

    Montoro-García, Silvia; Schindewolf, Marc; Stanford, Sophia; Larsen, Ole Halfdan; Thiele, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    thrombosis are evaluated to assess the role of platelets in VTE. The clinical significance of platelets for VTE risk assessment in specific patient cohorts and their role as a suitable therapeutic target for VTE prevention is acknowledged. The role of platelets in VTE is a promising field for future research.......Multiple factors contribute to the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Platelets have attracted much interest in arterial cardiovascular disease, whereas their role in VTE has received much less attention. Recent evidence suggests that platelets may play a more important role in VTE than...... previously anticipated. This review discusses the mechanisms that link platelets with venous thrombotic disease and their potential applications as novel risk factors for VTE. In addition, animal studies and randomized clinical trials that highlight the potential effect of antiplatelet therapy in venous...

  12. The Role of Platelets in Venous Thromboembolism.

    Montoro-García, Silvia; Schindewolf, Marc; Stanford, Sophia; Larsen, Ole Halfdan; Thiele, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Multiple factors contribute to the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Platelets have attracted much interest in arterial cardiovascular disease, whereas their role in VTE has received much less attention. Recent evidence suggests that platelets may play a more important role in VTE than previously anticipated. This review discusses the mechanisms that link platelets with venous thrombotic disease and their potential applications as novel risk factors for VTE. In addition, animal studies and randomized clinical trials that highlight the potential effect of antiplatelet therapy in venous thrombosis are evaluated to assess the role of platelets in VTE. The clinical significance of platelets for VTE risk assessment in specific patient cohorts and their role as a suitable therapeutic target for VTE prevention is acknowledged. The role of platelets in VTE is a promising field for future research. PMID:26926584

  13. Management of venous thromboembolism during pregnancy.

    Ginsberg, J S; Bates, S M

    2003-07-01

    The incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) probably increases 2-4-fold in pregnancy and is higher after a caesarean section than after vaginal delivery. Management of VTE in pregnancy is challenging. Many diagnostic tests are less accurate in pregnant than in non-pregnant patients and some radiologic procedures expose the fetus to ionizing radiation, although this can be reduced by taking appropriate precautions. Compression ultrasonography (CUS) is the test of choice for deep vein thrombosis (DVT), whereas for PE, V/Q lung scan is the first-line test, followed by CUS if the results are non-diagnostic. Anticoagulants that have been evaluated for the prevention and treatment of VTE in pregnancy include heparin and heparin compounds, and coumarin derivatives. When determining the optimal treatment regimens, it is important to consider: (i) the safety of the drug for the fetus and mother; (ii) the efficacy of the regimen; and (iii) the dose regimens for acute and secondary treatment, and during delivery and postpartum. Heparins are safer than coumarins for the fetus, as they do not cross the placental barrier. Heparins, particularly unfractionated heparin (UFH) and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) tend also to be safer for the mother than other compounds. Of the two, LMWHs, although more expensive, are associated with lower rates of bleeding complications, and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and osteoporosis, than UFH, and should therefore be the treatment of choice in VTE during pregnancy. Patients with prior VTE or a hypercoagulable state have an increased risk of VTE during pregnancy. Depending on the presence of one or both of these factors, clinical surveillance, with anticoagulant treatment where necessary, is recommended. PMID:12871278

  14. New anticoagulants for the treatment of venous thromboembolism

    Caio Julio Cesar dos Santos Fernandes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, venous thromboembolism (VTE is among the leading causes of death from cardiovascular disease, surpassed only by acute myocardial infarction and stroke. The spectrum of VTE presentations ranges, by degree of severity, from deep vein thrombosis to acute pulmonary thromboembolism. Treatment is based on full anticoagulation of the patients. For many decades, it has been known that anticoagulation directly affects the mortality associated with VTE. Until the beginning of this century, anticoagulant therapy was based on the use of unfractionated or low-molecular-weight heparin and vitamin K antagonists, warfarin in particular. Over the past decades, new classes of anticoagulants have been developed, such as factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors, which significantly changed the therapeutic arsenal against VTE, due to their efficacy and safety when compared with the conventional treatment. The focus of this review was on evaluating the role of these new anticoagulants in this clinical context.

  15. Antithrombotic Agents in the Prevention and Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism

    包承鑫

    2004-01-01

    @@ Venous thromboembolism is a major health problem,carrying significant morbidity and mortality, with an incidence that exceeds I per 1 000. Independent risk factors for venous thromboembolism include increasing age, male gender, surgery, trauma, hospital or nursing home confinement, neurologic disease with extremity paresis, central venous catheter/transvenous pacemaker, prior superficial vein thrombosis, and varicose, among women, the risk factors include pregnancy, oral contraceptives, and hormone replacement therapy.

  16. Venous Thromboembolism in the Cancer Population: Pathology, Risk, and Prevention

    Hawbaker, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Patients with cancer have an increased risk of developing venous thromboembolism (VTE) and the incidence of these events has been increasing over the past decade. Venous thromboembolic events include both deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. These events contribute to higher morbidity and mortality rates. Understanding the complex pathogenesis of and risk factors for cancer-associated VTE will help guide advanced practitioners to improve outcomes with prophylaxis. The American Socie...

  17. Statins and prevention of venous thromboembolism: Myth or reality?

    Gaertner, Sébastien; Cordeanu, Eléna-Mihaela; Nouri, Salah; Mirea, Corina; Stephan, Dominique

    2016-03-01

    The pleiotropic effects of statins, beyond their cholesterol-lowering properties, are much debated. In primary prevention, several observational cohort and case-control studies appear to show that statins reduce the incidence of venous thromboembolism by about 30%. In a single randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial (JUPITER), which included 17,000 patients, rosuvastatin 20mg/day reduced the risk of venous thromboembolism by 43%. However, these patients were at low risk of venous thromboembolism, and the frequency of the event was, in principle, low. In secondary prevention, several observational studies and post-hoc analyses of randomized clinical trials have suggested that statins may prevent recurrence of venous thromboembolism. However, none of these studies had enough scientific weight to form the basis of a recommendation to use statins for secondary prevention. The putative preventive effect of statins appears to be independent of plasma cholesterol concentration and could be a pharmacological property of the statin class, although a dose-effect relationship has not been demonstrated. The mechanism through which statins might prevent venous thrombosis is thought to involve their anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects or perhaps a more specific action, by blocking the degradation of antithrombotic proteins. A mechanism involving the action of statins on interactions between risk factors for atherosclerosis and venous thromboembolism is supported by some studies, but not all. In the absence of firm evidence, statins cannot currently be recommended for primary or secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism. PMID:26778087

  18. The management of acute venous thromboembolism in clinical practice – study rationale and protocol of the European PREFER in VTE Registry

    Agnelli, Giancarlo; Gitt, Anselm K; Bauersachs, Rupert; Fronk, Eva-Maria; Laeis, Petra; Mismetti, Patrick; Monreal, Manuel; Willich, Stefan N.; Wolf, Wolf-Peter; Cohen, Alexander T.; ,

    2015-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major health problem, with over one million events every year in Europe. However, there is a paucity of data on the current management in real life, including factors influencing treatment pathways, patient satisfaction, quality of life (QoL), and utilization of health care resources and the corresponding costs. The PREFER in VTE registry has been designed to address this and to understand medical care and needs as well as potential gaps for improv...

  19. Prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism in orthopedic surgery

    LIU Lin-tao; MA Bao-tong

    2006-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism ( VTE), which is manifested as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), represents a significant cause of death, disability,and discomfort. They are frequent complications of various surgical procedures. The aging population and the survival of more severely injured patients may suggest an increasing risk of thromboembolism in the trauma patients. Expanded understanding of the population at risk challenges physicians to carefully examine risk factors for VTE to identify high-risk patients who can benefit from prophylaxis. An accurate knowledge of evidence-based risk factors is important in predicting and preventing postoperative DVT, and can be incorporated into a decision support system for appropriate thromboprophylaxis use.Standard use of DVT prophylaxis in a high-risk trauma population leads to a low incidence of DVT. The incidence of VTE is common in Asia. The evaluation includes laboratory tests, Doppler test and phlebography. Screening Doppler sonography should be performed for surveillance on all critically injured patients to identify DVT. D-Dimer is a useful marker to monitor prophylaxis in trauma surgery patients. The optimal time to start prophylaxis is between 2 hours before and 10 hours after surgery, but the risk of PE continues for several weeks. Thromboprophylaxis includes graduated compression stockings and anticoagulants for prophylaxis. Anticoagulants include Warfarin, which belongs to Vitamin K antagonists, unfractionated heparin,low molecular weight heparins, factor Xa indirect inhibitor Fondaparinux, and the oral Ⅱa inhibitor Melagatran and ximelagatran. Recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin is a new and highly effective antithrombotic agent. Prophylactic placement of vena caval filters in selected trauma patients may decrease the incidence of PE. The indications for prophylactic inferior vena cava filter insertion include prolonged immobilization with multiple injuries, closed head injury, pelvic

  20. Feasibility and safety of rehabilitation after venous thromboembolism

    Noack F

    2015-07-01

    one. Four patients (0.9% had to be transferred to a primary care hospital for non-PE-associated reasons (acute coronary syndrome, pharyngeal abscess, and acute abdominal problems. No influence of any of the physical activity interventions on the incidence of any AE was found. Conclusion: Since PE is a life-threatening disease, it seems reasonable to recommend rehabilitation at least in PE patients with an intermediate or high risk. It is shown for the first time in this study that a standard rehabilitation program after PE is safe. However, efficacy and safety in the long term need to be studied prospectively. Keywords: venous thromboembolism, pulmonary embolism, rehabilitation

  1. The treatment of venous thromboembolism with new oral anticoagulants

    Davide Imberti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditional anticoagulants, such as low molecular weight heparin, unfractionated heparin, fondaparinux and vitamin K antagonists, have been the mainstay of treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE in the clinical hospital setting and after discharge. These anticoagulants are effective, but are associated with some limitations that may lead to their underuse in many settings. Based on the results of large, randomized clinical trials, new oral anticoagulants have been validated for the treatment of acute deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, and for the prevention of recurrent VTE. These drugs represent a landmark shift in anticoagulation care and may overcome some of the limitations of traditional agents, with the potential of improving adherence to anticoagulation therapy.

  2. CATCH: a randomised clinical trial comparing long-term tinzaparin versus warfarin for treatment of acute venous thromboembolism in cancer patients

    Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) is recommended and commonly used for extended treatment of cancer-associated thrombosis (CAT), but its superiority over warfarin has been demonstrated in only one randomised study. We report here the rationale, design and a priori analysis plans of Comparison of Acute Treatments in Cancer Haemostasis (CATCH; NCT01130025), a multinational, Phase III, open-label, randomised controlled trial comparing tinzaparin with warfarin for extended treatment of CAT. The primary objective is to assess the efficacy of tinzaparin in preventing recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with active cancer and acute, symptomatic proximal deep vein thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolism. The secondary objectives are to determine: safety of tinzaparin given over 6 months; clinical and laboratory markers for recurrent VTE and/or major bleeding; 6-month overall mortality; incidence and severity of post-thrombotic syndrome; patient-reported quality of life; and healthcare resource utilisation. Nine hundred patients are randomised to receive tinzaparin 175 IU/kg once daily for 6 months or initial tinzaparin 175 IU/kg once daily for 5–10 days and dose-adjusted warfarin (target INR 2.0–3.0) for 6 months. The primary composite outcome is time to recurrent VTE, including incidental VTE and fatal pulmonary embolism. All patients are followed up to 6 months or death, whichever comes sooner. Blinded adjudication will be performed for all reported VTE, bleeding events and causes of death. Efficacy will be analysed using centrally adjudicated results of all patients according to intention-to-treat analysis. An independent Data Safety Monitoring Board is reviewing data at regular intervals and an interim analysis is planned after 450 patients have completed the study. The results will add significantly to the knowledge of the efficacy, safety and cost effectiveness of tinzaparin in the prevention of recurrent VTE in patients with cancer and thrombosis

  3. SP-05VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM AND GLIOBLASTOMA

    Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Mandel, Jacob; Ying, Yuan; Wu, Jimin; Courtney, C.; Ladha, Harshad; Pawar, Tushar; Gilbert, Mark; Armstrong, Terri

    2014-01-01

    The risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is very high for patients with brain tumors; Glioblastoma (GB) specifically is one of the most at risk cancers. The aim of this study is to estimate the frequency and identify potential risk factors of GB patients developing VTE during adjuvant chemotherapy and to test if the Khorana scale accurately predicts the risk of VTE among this patient population. We retrospectively reviewed patients with GB treated at MD Anderson during the years 2005-2011. The target population of our study was patients who developed VTE after starting adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients were excluded if they did not start treatment with the established standard of care, had less than 6 months follow up or if they developed VTE before starting adjuvant treatment. The study sample included 440 patients. 64 (14.5%) of them developed VTE. The median time to develop VTE was 6.5 months. On multivariate analysis male sex, BMI≥ 35, KPS ≤80, history of VTE and steroid therapy were significantly associated with the development of VTE. We also found that in this patient sample, the Khorana scale was not a valid predictive model in GB patients due to very poor specificity. Of the 64 patients who developed a VTE, 36 were treated with anticoagulation, 2 with an IVC filter, and 21 with both. Complications secondary to anticoagulation were reported in 16% (n = 10) of patients. The complications included intracranial hemorrhage, bleeding to other organs and thrombocytopenia. VTE is very common in patients with GB. Currently, we are lacking a scale that accurately predicts the risk of VTE among GB patients. Predictive scales used for other cancers do not seem valid for GB due to the unique nature of the disease. Future studies are needed to create an accurate predictive model for VTE in GB patients.

  4. Treatment of pregnancy related venous thromboembolism

    Mitić Gorana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism during pregnancy are complicated since the use of antithrombotic drugs carries a certain risk to the mother, the fetus or both. Coumarins cross the placental barrier and may be responsible for bleeding, teratogenicity and central nervous system abnormalities. The risk of embriopathy is particularly high between 6 and 12 weeks of gestation. Treatement. Heparin is the treatment of choice for thrombosis during pregnancy because it is entirely safe for the fetus, unlike oral anticoagulants. The frequency of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and osteoporosis is significantly lower if LMWH is applied, so this heparin type is preferable to UFH during pregnancy. Treatment of women with VTE during pregnancy, especially those with thrombophilia, requires individualized dosing and duration of antithrombotic thrapy. Peripartal management. In order to avoid the peripartum anticoagulant heparin effect and possible bleeding, heparin should be discontinued prior to the delivery and reintroduced after the parturition. PROPHYLACTIC REGIMEn. Prophylactic antithrombotic regimen during subsequent pregnancies should also be individualized. The use of low molecular weight heparins is becoming more widespread. They have reliable pharmacokinetics, require less frequent injections than unfractionated heparin and carry a lower risk of treatment complications. LMW heparins are safe and effective and they are replacing UFH as the anticoagulant of choice during pregnancy. Both UFH and LMWH are not secreted into breast milk and can be safely given to nursing mothers. Warfarin does not induce an anticoagulant effect in the breast-fed infant, so it can be safely used in women who require postpartum anticoagulant therapy.

  5. Clinical experience with the new oral anticoagulants for treatment of venous thromboembolism.

    Bacchus, Farzana; Schulman, Sam

    2015-03-01

    Four non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants, apixaban, dabigatran, edoxaban, and rivaroxaban, have been evaluated in phase III clinical trials for the treatment of acute venous thromboembolism, and all except edoxaban have also been studied for extended secondary prophylaxis after venous thromboembolism. Rivaroxaban, and recently also dabigatran, has been approved for this indication, and it is therefore timely to review the characteristics, efficacy, and safety of these drugs with emphasis on patients with venous thromboembolism. This review focuses on the clinical results from the phase III trials, separately for each of the drugs as compared with vitamin K antagonists. We also address the results from meta-analyses that were published recently. Finally, the results in some special groups of interest-renal impairment, elderly patients, and patients with cancer-are reviewed, although they only comprised small minorities of the study populations. All 4 drugs demonstrated noninferiority against vitamin K antagonists in the acute treatment and clear superiority against placebo in the extended treatment (not performed with edoxaban). The risk of bleeding was generally lower with non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants, and the reduction of risk of intracranial hemorrhage seems to mirror the experience from atrial fibrillation trials. In conclusion, during the past 30 years we have moved from a week of hospitalization and intravenous heparin therapy, via low-molecular-weight heparin injections subcutaneously and early discharge from the hospital, to the possibility of only oral outpatient therapy without coagulation monitoring, yet safe for patients with acute venous thromboembolism. PMID:25717178

  6. Oral contraceptives and venous thromboembolism: a five-year national case-control study

    Lidegaard, Øjvind; Edström, Birgitte; Kreiner, Svend

    2002-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism; Oral contraceptives; Pulmonary embolism; Third-generation; Second-generation; Pill Scare......Venous thromboembolism; Oral contraceptives; Pulmonary embolism; Third-generation; Second-generation; Pill Scare...

  7. Edoxaban in venous thromboembolism and stroke prevention: an appraisal

    Proietti M; Lip GYH

    2016-01-01

    Marco Proietti,1,2 Gregory YH Lip1,3 1University of Birmingham Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, City Hospital, Birmingham, UK; 2Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, Sapienza-University of Rome, Rome, Italy; 3Aalborg Thrombosis Research Unit, Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark Abstract: Oral anticoagulation is the therapeutic cornerstone in preventing thromboembolic risk in both atrial fibrillation (AF) and venous thromboembolism (VT...

  8. Differentiation of parenteral anticoagulants in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism

    Adiguzel Cafer

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevention of venous thromboembolism has been identified as a leading priority in hospital safety. Recommended parenteral anticoagulant agents with different indications for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism include unfractionated heparin, low-molecular-weight heparins and fondaparinux. Prescribing decisions in venous thromboembolism management may seem complex due to the large range of clinical indications and patient types, and the range of anticoagulants available. Methods MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched to identify relevant original articles. Results Low-molecular-weight heparins have nearly replaced unfractionated heparin as the gold standard antithrombotic agent. Low-molecular-weight heparins currently available in the US are enoxaparin, dalteparin, and tinzaparin. Each low-molecular-weight heparin is a distinct pharmacological entity with different licensed indications and available clinical evidence. Enoxaparin is the only low-molecular-weight heparin that is licensed for both venous thromboembolism prophylaxis and treatment. Enoxaparin also has the largest body of clinical evidence supporting its use across the spectrum of venous thromboembolism management and has been used as the reference standard comparator anticoagulant in trials of new anticoagulants. As well as novel oral anticoagulant agents, biosimilar and/or generic low-molecular-weight heparins are now commercially available. Despite similar anticoagulant properties, studies report differences between the branded and biosimilar and/or generic agents and further clinical studies are required to support the use of biosimilar low-molecular-weight heparins. The newer parenteral anticoagulant, fondaparinux, is now also licensed for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in surgical patients and the treatment of acute deep-vein thrombosis; clinical experience with this anticoagulant is expanding. Conclusions Parenteral

  9. Drug Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism in the Elderly.

    Boey, Jir Ping; Gallus, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Half of all patients with acute venous thromboembolism are aged over 70 years; they then face the added hazard of an age-related increase in the incidence of major bleeding. This makes it even more important to weigh the balance of benefit and risk when considering anticoagulant treatment and treatment duration. Traditional treatment with a heparin (usually low molecular weight) followed by a vitamin K antagonist such as warfarin is effective but is often complicated, especially in the elderly. The direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs), i.e. the thrombin inhibitor dabigatran and the factor Xa inhibitors rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban, are given in fixed doses, do not need laboratory monitoring, have fewer drug-drug interactions and are therefore much easier to take. Randomised trials, their meta-analyses and 'real-world' data indicate the DOACs are no less effective than warfarin (are non-inferior) and probably cause less major bleeding (especially intracranial). It seems the relative safety of DOACs extends to age above 65 or 70 years, although bleeding becomes more likely regardless of the chosen anticoagulant. Renal impairment, comorbidities (especially cancer) and interventions are special hazards. Ways to minimise bleeding include patient selection and follow-up, education about venous thromboembolism, anticoagulants, drug interactions, regular checks on adherence and avoiding needlessly prolonged treatment. The relatively short circulating half-lives of DOACs mean that time, local measures and supportive care are the main response to major bleeding. They also simplify the management of invasive interventions. An antidote for dabigatran, idarucizumab, was recently approved by regulators, and a general antidote for factor Xa inhibitors is in advanced development. PMID:27255713

  10. Chemoprophylaxis for Venous Thromboembolism Prevention: Concerns Regarding Efficacy and Ethics

    Eric Swanson, MD

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Chemoprophylaxis has been recommended for plastic surgery patients judged to be at increased risk for venous thromboembolism. Several investigators have encountered this complication in patients despite anticoagulation therapy. An increased rate of complications related to postoperative bleeding has been reported. This article examines the efficacy and safety of this intervention, along with ethical considerations, in an attempt to determine whether any benefits of chemoprophylaxis justify the additional risks. The statistical methods and conclusion of the Venous Thromboembolism Prevention Study are challenged. Other preventative measures that do not cause negative side effects are discussed as safer alternatives.

  11. Physicians' practice for prevention of venous thromboembolism in medical patients

    Objective: To audit physicians' practice of providing prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients admitted to acute- care medical wards and to determine the consequences of lack of prophylaxis. Patients and Methods: Demographic data as well as risk factors for VTE were identified for all patients who were divide in two groups. Patients who received prophylaxis (group-A) and those who did not (group-B) were both followed up. Type of prophylaxis and any complications were documented. Duplex ultrasound of the lower limbs was done in all patients in both groups and the outcome for all patients were documented. Results: Two hundred and forty-nine (249) patients were studied. Ninety-eight (39.35%) patients (group-A) received prophylaxis for VTE, while 151 (60.65%) patients (group-B) did not receive prophylaxis. Twenty-five point eight percent (25.8%),37.5%, and 50% of patients with 3, 4 and 5 risk factors respectively did not receive thromboprophylaxis. Duplex sonography did not reveal deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in any patient of the two groups in hospital and up to one month after discharge. There was no statistical difference in mortality between the two groups. Conclusion: Physicians' practice showed low threshold for providing VTE prophylaxis for medical patients. This was not translated to higher incidence of VTE or higher hospital mortality. (author)

  12. Risk factors for venous thromboembolism in 1.3 million pregnancies: a nationwide prospective cohort.

    Rie Adser Virkus

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To quantify risk factors for venous thromboembolism during pregnancy and the puerperal period. DESIGN: In a nationwide prospective cohort study we followed pregnant and puerperal women in Denmark from 1995 to 2009 for venous thromboembolism. Information on risk factors and confounders was retrieved from national registries. The diagnosis of venous thromboembolism was confirmed through medical charts. We calculated adjusted incidence rates per 10,000 women years and used Poisson regression to estimate effects during pregnancy and the puerperal period. RESULTS: We studied 1,297,037 pregnancies and related puerperal periods, during which there were 748 venous thromboembolisms. The incidence rate for venous thromboembolism during a pregnancy with and without hospitalization for hyperemesis was 15.2/10,000 yr and 6.3/10,000 yr, respectively, (adjusted rate ratio: 2.5 (95%-confidence interval; 1.4-4.5. The incidence rate among women with multiple pregnancies was 18.2/10,000 yr and 6.3/10,000 yr in singletons (adjusted rate ratio: 2.8 (1.9-4.2. Increased risk was found with hospitalization during pregnancy or the puerperal period with incidence rates of 42.1/10.000 and 54.7/10.000, respectively, (rate ratios: 12.2 (8.7-17 and 5.9 (4.0-8.8. Women hospitalized with infections during pregnancy had incidence rates of 25.9/10,000 yr and 29.3/10,000 yr during pregnancy and the puerperal period, respectively, and of 62.7/10,000 yr if hospitalized with infection in the puerperal period. Puerperal venous thromboembolism was associated with hospitalization for preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction/fetal death with incidence rates of 45.8/10,000 yr and 18.3/10,000 yr, respectively (rate ratio: 5.0 (3.1-7.8 and 1.9 (0.9-4.4. Additionally puerperal venous thromboembolism was associated with obesity, elective and acute caesarean sections and major postpartum bleeding with incidence rates of 25.5/10,000 yr, 23.2/10,000 yr, 34.0/10,000 yr and 20

  13. Diet as prophylaxis and treatment for venous thromboembolism?

    Cundiff David K; Agutter Paul S; Malone P; Pezzullo John C

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Both prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE: deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary emboli (PE)) with anticoagulants are associated with significant risks of major and fatal hemorrhage. Anticoagulation treatment of VTE has been the standard of care in the USA since before 1962 when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration began requiring randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) showing efficacy, so efficacy trials were never required for FDA approval...

  14. Cardiovascular risk factors and risk of venous thromboembolism

    Brækkan, Sigrid Kufaas

    2010-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), including deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a common disease, with serious short- and long-term complications and a potential fatal outcome. Despite the knowledge of several inherited and acquired risk factors for VTE, still 30-50 % of the VTE events occur in the absence of obvious predisposing factors. Traditionally, arterial and venous thrombosis has been considered as separate disease entities with different pathology, epidemiology and treatments...

  15. Fish Intake and Venous Thromboembolism: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Mattiuzzi, Camilla; Cervellin, Gianfranco; Franchini, Massimo; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    Diet plays an important role in modulating the risk of arterial and venous thrombosis. Several lines of evidence attest that consumption of fish and its compounds, especially omega-3 fatty acids, may be effective to decrease the cardiovascular risk. Since the pathogenesis of arterial and venous thrombosis share some common aspects, we performed a systematic review of published clinical studies that investigated the association between fish intake and venous thrombosis. An electronic search was carried out in Medline, Scopus, and ISI Web of Science using the key words "fish" OR "seafood" AND "venous thromboembolism" OR "deep vein thrombosis" OR "pulmonary embolism", with no language or date restriction. Overall, 6 studies (5 prospective and 1 case-control) were finally identified. In only 1 small case-control study, a larger intake of total fish was found to be negatively associated with the risk of venous thromboembolism. No association was found in 4 large prospective studies, whereas a positive association was observed in the remaining. No substantial difference was also noticed between intake of fatty or lean fish. Taken together, the current epidemiological evidence does not support the existence of a significant effect of total fish consumption on the risk of venous thromboembolism. PMID:25962392

  16. Statin treatment and risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism

    Nguyen, Cu Dinh; Andersson, Charlotte; Jensen, Thomas Bo;

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Statins may decrease the risk of primary venous thromboembolism (VTE), that is, deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) but the effect of statins in preventing recurrent VTE is less clear. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the association between statin ...

  17. Venous thromboembolism in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators

    Pedersen, Susanne Bendesgaard; Hjortshøj, Søren Pihlkjær; Bøtker, Hans Erik;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: To examine the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and its risk factors among patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs). METHODS AND RESULTS: All first-time ICD recipients in Denmark during 2000-12 were identified from medical databases. Incident VTEs were ascertained...

  18. The role of dyslipidemia and statins in venous thromboembolism

    Rosendaal Frits R

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent studies have proposed an association between hyperlipidemia and venous thromboembolism (VTE. We review the epidemiological evidence linking dyslipidemia with VTE and examine several possible underlying mechanisms. We discuss the possible role of HMG CoA reductase inhibitors (statins in the prevention and treatment of VTE and suggest future directions for research.

  19. Low-molecular-weight heparins in the treatment of venous thromboembolism

    Huisman Menno V

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Venous thromboembolism is a common disease that is associated with considerable morbidity if left untreated. Recently, low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs have been evaluated for use in acute treatment of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Randomized studies have shown that LMWHs are as effective as unfractionated heparin in the prevention of recurrent venous thromboembolism, and are as safe with respect to the occurrence of major bleeding. A pooled analysis did not show substantial differences among different LMWH compounds used, but no direct comparison of the different LMWHs is currently available. Finally, in patients with pulmonary embolism, there is a relative lack of large studies of daily practice. It could be argued that large prospective studies, in patients who were treated with LMWHs from the moment of diagnosis, are needed.

  20. Low-molecular-weight heparins in the treatment of venous thromboembolism

    Ageno , Walter; Huisman, Menno V

    2000-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism is a common disease that is associated with considerable morbidity if left untreated. Recently, low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs) have been evaluated for use in acute treatment of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Randomized studies have shown that LMWHs are as effective as unfractionated heparin in the prevention of recurrent venous thromboembolism, and are as safe with respect to the occurrence of major bleeding. A pooled analysis did not show substantial differences among different LMWH compounds used, but no direct comparison of the different LMWHs is currently available. Finally, in patients with pulmonary embolism, there is a relative lack of large studies of daily practice. It could be argued that large prospective studies, in patients who were treated with LMWHs from the moment of diagnosis, are needed. PMID:11714421

  1. Effective management of venous thromboembolism in the community: non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    Patel R

    2016-01-01

    Raj Patel Department of Haematological Medicine, King's Thrombosis Centre, King's College Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Anticoagulation therapy is essential for the effective treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE). For many years, anticoagulation for acute VTE was limited to the use of initial parenteral heparin, overlapping with and followed by a vitamin K antagonist. Although highly effective, this regimen has several limitations and is particularly cha...

  2. Effective management of venous thromboembolism in the community: non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    Patel, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Raj Patel Department of Haematological Medicine, King's Thrombosis Centre, King's College Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Anticoagulation therapy is essential for the effective treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE). For many years, anticoagulation for acute VTE was limited to the use of initial parenteral heparin, overlapping with and followed by a vitamin K antagonist. Although highly effective, this regimen has several limitations and is particul...

  3. Efficacy and safety of new oral anticoagulants in prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism

    Luca Masotti; Cecilia Becattini; Roberto Cappelli; Giancarlo Landini; Alessandro Pampana; Domenico Prisco; Giancarlo Agnelli

    2011-01-01

    One of the main innovation emerged in recent years in the field of venous thromboembolism (VTE) has been represented by the clinical development and marketing of new oral anticoagulant agents used for prophylaxis and acute treatment. These drugs are represented by direct thrombin inhibitors (anti-factor IIa) and the direct inhibitors of activated factor X (anti-Xa). The main achievement of these new agents is represented by their ease of use without laboratory monitoring or dose adjustment. D...

  4. Venous thromboembolism and occult cancer: impact on clinical practice.

    Gheshmy, Afshan; Carrier, Marc

    2016-04-01

    Unprovoked venous thromboembolism (VTE) can be the first manifestation of cancer. Given this relationship between unprovoked VTE and cancer, it is appealing for clinicians to screen their patients with a first episode of acute unprovoked VTE for a potential occult malignancy. Five different studies have compared a limited (thorough history and physical exam, basic bloodwork) to a more extensive occult cancer screening strategy (e.g. computed tomography, fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, etc.). Most of these studies have failed to show that an extensive occult cancer screening strategy diagnoses more occult cancer (including early cancers), misses fewer cancers during follow-up or improves overall and/or cancer-related mortality suggesting that extensive occult cancer screening should not be performed routinely. Therefore, patients with a first unprovoked VTE should undergo a limited cancer screening only and clinicians should ensure that their patients are up to date regarding age- and gender- specific cancer screening (colon, breast, cervix and prostate) as per their national recommendations. Current evidence does not support a net clinical benefit to perform an extensive occult cancer screening on all patients, and a decision to do additional testing should be made on a case by case basis. PMID:27067984

  5. [New anticoagulants in the treatment of venous thromboembolism].

    Bura-Rivière, Alessandra

    2013-09-01

    Anticoagulant therapy is the cornerstone of treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE). The treatment needs rapid initial anticoagulaton to minimize the risk of thrombus extension and fata pulmonary embolism, followed by an extended anticoagulation, aimed at preventing recurrent VTE. Till very recently, immediate anticoagulation can only be achieved with parenteral agents, such as heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, or fondaparinux. Extended treatment usually involves the administration of vitamin K antagonists, such as warfarin. Emerging direct oral anticoagulants have the potential to streamline VTE treatment. These agents include oral anticoagulants that target thrombin or factor Xa. This article reviews the characteristics of these agents, describes the results of clinical trials in venous thromboembolic disease and outlines their strengths and weakness. PMID:24167902

  6. Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Plastic Surgery: A Literature Review.

    Hernandez, Sergio; Valdes, Jorge; Salama, Moises

    2016-06-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major health concern because it increases morbidity and mortality after a surgical procedure. A number of well-defined, evidence-based guidelines are available delineating suitable use of prophylaxis to prevent deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Despite the available literature, there are clear gaps between recommendations and clinical practice, affecting the incidence of VTE. Plastic surgeons underuse the substantiated literature and risk stratification tools that are available to decrease the incidence of VTE in the office-based surgical setting because of fear of bleeding or hematoma complications postoperatively. Venous thromboembolism creates an economic burden on both the patient and the healthcare system. The intent of this literature review is to determine existing VTE risk using assessment models available to aid in the implementation of protocols for VTE prevention, specifically for high-risk cosmetic surgical patients in office-based settings. PMID:27501651

  7. Epidemiological study of venous thromboembolism in a big Danish cohort

    Severinsen, Marianne Tang; Kristensen, Søren Risom; Overvad, Kim;

    Introduction: Epidemiological data on venous thromboembolism (VT), i.e. pulmonary emboli (PE) and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) are sparse. We have examined VT-diagnoses registered in a big Danish Cohort study.  Methods: All first-time VT diagnoses in The Danish National Patient Register were...... identified among participants in the Danish cohort study "Diet, Cancer and Health" in which 57,053 50-64 years old persons were included 1993-7. Medical records were retrieved and reviewed by an experienced physician using a detailed standardized form, and information on the diagnostic work-up and presence...

  8. Recent advances in the management of venous thromboembolism

    Ageno, Walter

    2010-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a spectrum of diseases that includes deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). Anticoagulant treatment is the mainstay of therapy for VTE. Unfractionated heparin (UFH) or low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) followed by vitamin K antagonists have been the treatment of choice for most patients with VTE, with the aim to prevent thrombus extension or embolization and recurrent VTE. Fondaparinux, a selective, indirect, parenteral factor Xa inhibitor, i...

  9. Does thromboprophylaxis prevent venous thromboembolism after major orthopedic surgery?*,**

    Akpinar, Evrim Eylem; Hosgün, Derya; Akan, Burak; Ates, Can; Gülhan, Meral

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Pulmonary embolism (PE) is an important complication of major orthopedic surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and factors influencing the development of VTE in patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery in a university hospital. METHODS: Patients who underwent major orthopedic surgery (hip arthroplasty, knee arthroplasty, or femur fracture repair) between February of 2006 and June of 2012 were retrospectively included in the...

  10. Does thromboprophylaxis prevent venous thromboembolism after major orthopedic surgery?

    Evrim Eylem Akpinar; Derya Hosgun; Burak Akan; Can Ates; Meral Gulhan

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Pulmonary embolism (PE) is an important complication of major orthopedic surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and factors influencing the development of VTE in patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery in a university hospital. METHODS: Patients who underwent major orthopedic surgery (hip arthroplasty, knee arthroplasty, or femur fracture repair) between February of 2006 and June of 2012 were retrospectively included i...

  11. Chemoprophylaxis for Venous Thromboembolism Prevention: Concerns Regarding Efficacy and Ethics

    Eric Swanson, MD

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Chemoprophylaxis has been recommended for plastic surgery patients judged to be at increased risk for venous thromboembolism. Several investigators have encountered this complication in patients despite anticoagulation therapy. An increased rate of complications related to postoperative bleeding has been reported. This article examines the efficacy and safety of this intervention, along with ethical considerations, in an attempt to determine whether any benefits of chemoprophylaxis j...

  12. Medical rota changes and venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in orthopaedic patients

    Bohler, Iain; George Mackenzie Jardine, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Efficacy of clinical guidelines to improve patient care is highly dependent on the ability of hospital teams to interpret and implement advised standards of care. Trimester and bi-annual rotation changes often see transference and loss of acquired experience and knowledge from wards with ensuing shortfalls in patient safety and care quality. Such shortfalls were noticed in the ability of our unit to adhere to national venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis measures. A prospective quality im...

  13. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing bariatric surgery

    Bartlett MA; Mauck KF; Daniels PR

    2015-01-01

    Matthew A Bartlett, Karen F Mauck, Paul R Daniels Division of General Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic Thrombophilia Center, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: Bariatric surgical procedures are now a common method of obesity treatment with established effectiveness. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) events, which include deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, are an important source of postoperative morbidity and mortality among bariatric surgery patients. Due t...

  14. Strategies for Diagnosis and Prevention of Venous Thromboembolism during Pregnancy

    Shalini Jain Bagaria; V. B. Bagaria

    2011-01-01

    Pregnancy and the postpartum period have an increased incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE). The condition is unique during this period for several reasons. Primarily, because there is complexity in diagnosing this condition in view of altered physiology and preexisting edema in pregnancy and also because there are restrictions on the use of certain drugs and a need for vigilant monitoring of anticoagulant activities of drugs during the period. The problem is compounded and assumes the hi...

  15. VENOUS INSUFFICIENCY AND THROMBOEMBOLIC DISEASE IN BARIATRIC SURGERY PATIENTS

    Bonno van BELLEN

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Morbid obesity is associated with various co-morbidities, including chronic venous insufficiency. Bariatric surgery is the only effective treatment for morbid obesity, but with potential risks and possible complications, including venous thromboembolism. Objective To determine the prevalence of clinical and ultrasonographic signs of chronic venous insufficiency in morbid obese patients in preparation for bariatric surgery and the incidence of post-operative venous thromboembolic disease. Methods Patients on work-up for bariatric surgery of Centro Terapêutico Especializado em Fígado (CETEFI and Pro-Gastro surgical teams of the Hospital Beneficência Portuguesa de São Paulo were included. The analysed data were pre-operative findings for venous insufficiency (CEAP - clinical, etiological, anatomical, physiopathologic - classification and venous ultrassonographic findings, type of surgery (open or laparoscopic, abdominal circumference, body mass index (BMI and post-operative ultrassonography search for venous insufficiency and deep venous thrombosis. Results Between March 2007 and December 2009, 95 patients candidates for bariatric surgery had clinical and duplex scan evaluation of the lower limbs venous system. Of the 95 patients, 53 were submitted to the surgical procedure. There was a predominance of women (77.9%, the average age was 38.5 years, average preoperative weight 124.6 kg and average BMI of 45.5 kg/m2. Regarding obesity, 16.8% were obese, and 83.1% were morbidly obese. In relation to the venous findings, 86.3% of the patients did fit CEAP classification less than 3 and 13.7% greater than or equal to 3. Among the post-operative complications, there were four cases of wound infection. Three patients developed post-operative distal venous thrombosis (7.5%, but no one had clinically manifested pulmonary embolism. Conclusion No relation between BMI, CEAP classification and venous ultrassonographic findings were found. Although

  16. Risk Factors for Venous Thromboembolism in 1.3 Million Pregnancies

    Virkus, Rie Adser; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Lidegaard, Øjvind;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify risk factors for venous thromboembolism during pregnancy and the puerperal period. DESIGN: In a nationwide prospective cohort study we followed pregnant and puerperal women in Denmark from 1995 to 2009 for venous thromboembolism. Information on risk factors and confounders ...... for venous thromboembolism during pregnancy or the puerperal period were hospitalization, infection, hyperemesis, multiple pregnancies, preeclampsia, obesity, caesarean section, major postpartum bleeding, and intrauterine growth restriction or fetal death.......OBJECTIVE: To quantify risk factors for venous thromboembolism during pregnancy and the puerperal period. DESIGN: In a nationwide prospective cohort study we followed pregnant and puerperal women in Denmark from 1995 to 2009 for venous thromboembolism. Information on risk factors and confounders...... was retrieved from national registries. The diagnosis of venous thromboembolism was confirmed through medical charts. We calculated adjusted incidence rates per 10,000 women years and used Poisson regression to estimate effects during pregnancy and the puerperal period. RESULTS: We studied 1...

  17. Venous Thromboembolism in Cancer Patients Undergoing Major Abdominal Surgery: Prevention and Management

    Bhavana Bhagya Rao; Kalayarasan, R.; Vikram Kate; Ananthakrishnan, N

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is an important risk factor for venous thrombosis. Venous thromboembolism is one of the most common complications of cancer and the second leading cause of death in these patients. Recent research has given insight into mechanism and various risk factors in cancer patients which predispose to thromboembolism. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on the prophylaxis, diagnosis, and management of venous thromboembolism in these patients.

  18. Differentiation of parenteral anticoagulants in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism

    Adiguzel Cafer; Fareed Jawed; Thethi Indermohan

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The prevention of venous thromboembolism has been identified as a leading priority in hospital safety. Recommended parenteral anticoagulant agents with different indications for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism include unfractionated heparin, low-molecular-weight heparins and fondaparinux. Prescribing decisions in venous thromboembolism management may seem complex due to the large range of clinical indications and patient types, and the range of antic...

  19. The risk of venous thromboembolism in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Peeters, P J H L; Bazelier, M T; Uitdehaag, B M J;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), disability and autoinflammatory processes may result in an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the risk of VTE associated with MS. METHODS: We conducted an observational-cohort study within the Clinical Practice...... Research Datalink (1987-2009) linked to the National Registry of Hospitalizations (1997-2008). At the time of MS diagnosis, a comparison cohort (N = 33 370) without a recorded MS diagnosis during the study period was matched (6:1) to the MS cohort (n = 5566) by birth year, sex, and practice. Subjects were...

  20. Retrievable Inferior Vena Cava Filters for Venous Thromboembolism

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are used as an alternative to anticoagulants for prevention of fatal pulmonary embolism (PE) in venous thromboembolic disorders. Retrievable IVC filters have become an increasingly attractive option due to the long-term risks of permanent filter placement. These devices are shown to be technically feasible in insertion and retrieval percutaneously while providing protection from PE. Nevertheless, there are complications and failed retrievals with these retrievable filters. The aim of the paper is to review the retrievable filters and their efficacy, safety, and retrievability

  1. Prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism during HRT: current perspectives.

    Rott, Hannelore

    2014-01-01

    Many large trials in the past 15 years have proven an increased risk of vascular complications in women using oral, mostly non-bioidentical, hormone therapy. The risk of vascular complications depends on the route of administration (oral versus transdermal), age, duration of administration, and type of hormones (bioidentical versus non-bioidentical). Acquired and/or hereditary thrombophilias (eg, factor V Leiden, prothrombin mutation G20210A, and others) lead to a further increase of risk for venous thromboembolism, stroke, or myocardial infarction. Therefore, bioidentical hormone therapy via the transdermal route seems to be the safest opportunity for hormone replacement therapy, although large trials for bioidentical hormone therapy are needed. PMID:25210472

  2. C-reactive protein and risk of venous thromboembolism in the general population

    Zacho, Jeppe; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2010-01-01

    To examine the robustness of the association between C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and to examine whether genetically elevated CRP levels cause VTE.......To examine the robustness of the association between C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and to examine whether genetically elevated CRP levels cause VTE....

  3. Venous thromboembolism in HIV-positive women during puerperium : a case series

    Jansen, J.M.; Lijfering, W.M.; Sprenger, H.G.; van der Meer, J.; van Pampus, M.G.

    2008-01-01

    Several studies in the past few years suggested that HIV-infection is associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism. No data have been reported, however, on pregnancy and the postpartum period as possible additional risk factors for venous thromboembolism in HIV-infected women. We pres

  4. Venous thromboembolism in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    Chaturvedi, S; Neff, A; Nagler, A; Savani, U; Mohty, M; Savani, B N

    2016-04-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is an increasingly recognized problem in the post-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) setting, with a lack of high-quality evidence-based data to recommend best practices. Few patients with hematologic malignancies and even fewer post-HSCT patients were included in randomized trials of VTE prophylaxis and treatment. Prior VTE, GVHD, infections and indwelling venous catheters are risk factors for thrombosis. The increasing use of post-transplant maintenance therapy with lenalidomide in patients with multiple myeloma adds to this risk after autologous HSCT. These patients are also at high risk of bleeding complications because of prolonged thrombocytopenia and managing the competing risks of bleeding and thrombosis can be challenging. This review aims to provide a practical, clinician-focused approach to the prevention and treatment of VTE in the post-HSCT setting. PMID:26691425

  5. New anticoagulants for the prevention of venous thromboembolism

    Cecilia Becattini

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Cecilia Becattini, Alessandra Lignani, Giancarlo AgnelliInternal and Cardiovascular Medicine and Stroke Unit, University of Perugia, ItalyAbstract: Anticoagulant drugs have an essential role in the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic diseases. Currently available anticoagulants substantially reduce the incidence of thromboembolic events in a number of clinical conditions. However, these agents have limitations that strengthen the case for the development of new anticoagulants. An ideal anticoagulant should be at least as effective as those currently in use, as well as safe, simple to use, and widely applicable. The majority of new anticoagulants currently under investigation are small molecules with a selective and direct anti-Xa or antithrombin action, allowing oral administration in fixed doses. These new agents are in different phases of clinical development. The anti-Xa agent rivaroxaban and the antithrombin agent dabigatran are already available for the prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism in some countries. Apixaban is in an advanced phase of clinical development and several anti-Xa agents are currently approaching phase III clinical trials. Promising results in terms of efficacy and safety profiles have been obtained with these agents in different clinical conditions. Differences in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics could offer the potential for individualized anticoagulant therapies in the near future.Keywords: anticoagulant therapy, antithrombotic therapy, anticoagulants, direct thrombin inhibitors, factor Xa inhibitors

  6. New anticoagulants for the prevention of venous thromboembolism

    Becattini, Cecilia; Lignani, Alessandra; Agnelli, Giancarlo

    2010-01-01

    Anticoagulant drugs have an essential role in the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic diseases. Currently available anticoagulants substantially reduce the incidence of thromboembolic events in a number of clinical conditions. However, these agents have limitations that strengthen the case for the development of new anticoagulants. An ideal anticoagulant should be at least as effective as those currently in use, as well as safe, simple to use, and widely applicable. The majority of new anticoagulants currently under investigation are small molecules with a selective and direct anti-Xa or antithrombin action, allowing oral administration in fixed doses. These new agents are in different phases of clinical development. The anti-Xa agent rivaroxaban and the antithrombin agent dabigatran are already available for the prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism in some countries. Apixaban is in an advanced phase of clinical development and several anti-Xa agents are currently approaching phase III clinical trials. Promising results in terms of efficacy and safety profiles have been obtained with these agents in different clinical conditions. Differences in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics could offer the potential for individualized anticoagulant therapies in the near future. PMID:20531960

  7. Risk impact of edoxaban in the management of stroke and venous thromboembolism

    Hurst KV

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Katherine V Hurst, John Matthew O’Callaghan, Ashok Handa Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK Abstract: The new generation of target-specific oral anticoagulants is being prescribed for increasing numbers of patients at risk of stroke or venous thromboembolism (VTE. These drugs offer valuable benefits due to fast onset anticoagulation, a fixed anticoagulation effect (allowing administration of specified doses, and no requirement for routine monitoring. Edoxaban is a fast-acting oral anticoagulant, approved for use in the prevention of stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF and in the treatment of acute VTE. Like many of the new oral anticoagulants, it selectively inhibits factor Xa, in a concentration-dependent manner. Multiple Phase II clinical trials have shown edoxaban to be noninferior to vitamin K antagonists in the prevention of stroke and VTE, with a good safety profile. To date, the pivotal studies to endorse edoxaban’s clinical use have been ENGAGE AF-TIMI and Hokusai-VTE, both of which have compared its efficacy to standard warfarin treatment. This paper aims at reviewing the use of edoxaban in the management of stroke and thromboembolic disease, highlighting the key study results that have led to its current license. Keywords: edoxaban, stroke management, venous thromboembolism, atrial fibrillation, randomized controlled trials, new oral anticoagulants

  8. Pulmonary Thromboembolism Complicating Acute Pancreatitis With Pancreatic Ascites: A Series of 4 cases

    Ruchir Patel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease often associated with local and systemic complications. Portosplenic and splanchnic vascular complications of acute pancreatitis are common, but extrasplanchnic vessel thrombosis is less commonly seen. Among them, pulmonary thromboembolism is a very rare complication to be encountered with. We report four cases of acute pulmonary thromboembolism in patients with acute pancreatitis superimposed on chronic pancreatitis. All the patients had abdominal pain on presentation and distention of abdomen during the course. Dyspnea was present in all the patients. All patients were found to have pancreatic ascites, whose association with pulmonary thromboembolism is reported only in two patients till date upto our knowledge. Two of them had deep vein thrombosis and rest two had no venous thrombosis. All of them were managed conservatively using subcutaneous heparin, intravenous fluids and analgesics. We provide the causative mechanism for occurrence of pulmonary thromboembolism in acute on chronic pancreatitis. We have also hypothesized pancreatic ascites as the possible cause for pulmonary thromboembolism and provide explanation for it. We conclude that pulmonary thromboembolism in acute pancreatitis has good prognosis if diagnosed timely. Whenever patient with pancreatic ascites presents with dyspnea, pulmonary thromboembolism must be ruled out.

  9. Diagnostic Indication for Venous Echo-Doppler of the Lower Limbs in the Diagnosis of Thromboembolic

    To study the effectiveness of Doppler echography in the deep venous system of the lower limbs for deep venous thrombosis detection in patients suspected of having pulmonary thromboembolism. There were received 341 consecutive suspected pulmonary thromboembolism patients, all of whom were emergency room attended. All were submitted to CT pulmonary angiography in order to evaluate thrombus presence in the pulmonary tree. Without knowing the results of the previous exploration, we studied 301 of the patients using Doppler echography in deep venous system of the lower limbs in order to evaluate thrombus presence. In the group of CT-detected pulmonary thromboembolism patients, the percentage of Doppler echography-detected deep venous thrombosis was 46.3%, while in the group of non-detected patients this percentage decreased to 4.7%. Additional deep venous system exploration in clinically suspected pulmonary thiolcarbamate patients is useful, since it can increase the detection rate of venous thromboembolic disease, thereby leading to early treatment and prevention of the disease's manifestation in the lungs. Realization of Doppler echography is especially beneficial in those patients who exhibit no factors which predispose them to thromboembolic disease, as well as in patients who have previously had venous thrombosis. This exploration account for 4.7% of non-detected pulmonary embolism patients being added to the ranks of those with thromboembolic disease, an important percentage when taking into consideration the high pulmonary thromboembolism morbimortality rate. (Author) 30 refs

  10. Venous Thromboembolism and Risk of Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonia A Nationwide Study

    Sode, Birgitte Margareta; Dahl, Morten; Nielsen, Sune Fallgaard; Nordestgaard, B.G.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Idiopathic interstitial pneumonia is characterized by pulmonary fibrosis and high mortality. Objectives: We examined the association between ever-diagnosed venous thromboembolism and risk of incident idiopathic interstitial pneumonia. Venous thromboembolism was taken as a proxy for a...... Danish registries. Measurements and Main Results: Age-standardized incidence rates per 10,000 person-years for idiopathic interstitial pneumonia were higher among those ever diagnosed with venous thromboembolism (1.8; n = 158,676), pulmonary embolism (2.8; n = 70,586), and deep venous thrombosis only (1.......2; n = 88,090), than among control subjects (0.8; n = 7,260,278). Multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios for idiopathic interstitial pneumonia were 1.8 (95% confidence interval [Cl], 1.7-1.9) in those ever diagnosed with venous thromboembolism, 2.4 (95% CI, 2.3-2.6) in those ever diagnosed with pulmonary...

  11. Predictors of recurrent venous thromboembolism and bleeding on anticoagulation.

    Menapace, Laurel A; McCrae, Keith R; Khorana, Alok A

    2016-04-01

    The impact of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in the cancer population remains substantial despite significant advances in detecting and treating thrombotic events. While there is extensive literature regarding predictors of first VTE event in cancer patients as well as a validated predictive score, less data exist regarding recurrent VTE in cancer cohorts and associated predictive variables. A similar paucity of data in regard to bleeding events in cancer patients receiving anticoagulation has been observed. This review article will highlight clinical risk factors as well as predictive biomarkers associated with recurrent VTE and bleeding in cancer patients receiving therapeutic anticoagulation. Predictive risk assessment models for cancer-associated recurrent VTE and bleeding are also discussed. PMID:27067987

  12. Prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism during HRT: current perspectives

    Rott H

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hannelore Rott Coagulation Center Rhine-Ruhr, Duisburg, Germany Abstract: Many large trials in the past 15 years have proven an increased risk of vascular complications in women using oral, mostly non-bioidentical, hormone therapy. The risk of vascular complications depends on the route of administration (oral versus transdermal, age, duration of administration, and type of hormones (bioidentical versus non-bioidentical. Acquired and/or hereditary thrombophilias (eg, factor V Leiden, prothrombin mutation G20210A, and others lead to a further increase of risk for venous thromboembolism, stroke, or myocardial infarction. Therefore, bioidentical hormone therapy via the transdermal route seems to be the safest opportunity for hormone replacement therapy, although large trials for bioidentical hormone therapy are needed. Keywords: hormone replacement therapy, stroke, myocardial infarction, thrombophilia, bioidentical hormone therapy

  13. [Duration of anticoagulant therapy in venous thromboembolic complications].

    Kuznetsov, M R; Leontyev, S G; Neskhodimov, L A; Tolstikhin, V Yu; Khotinskiy, A A

    2016-01-01

    Adequate anticoagulant therapy is a general approach to treatment of deep vein thrombosis. However, the duration of anticoagulant therapy is not strictly specified in everyday clinical practice. The present article deals with various approaches to selecting the duration of therapy with anticoagulants based on the findings of studies, national and foreign clinical guidelines. The minimal duration of therapy for deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism amounts to 3 months in accordance with the national and American recommendations. For some cohorts of patients, continuation of therapy above 3 months is considered: patients with idiopathic thrombosis (the recommended duration of therapy of not less than 6 months), patients having persisting risk factor for relapse of thrombosis on termination of the main therapeutic course, oncological patients (6 month therapy followed by assessing the risk and benefit of continuing therapy with anticoagulants). Prolonged therapy of venous thromboembolism using unfractionated heparin or low-molecular-weight heparin followed by changing over to vitamin K antagonists is associated with decreased risk for thrombosis relapse approximately by 90%, however increasing the risk of haemorrhage. Currently, as an alternative, it is possible to consider administration of novel oral anticoagulants (rivaroxaban, dabigatran, apixaban) which beside high efficacy are associated with less risk of bleeding. The route of administration, no necessity to control the INR, and the minimal number of drug and food interactions make administration of new oral anticoagulants an attractive alternative to therapy with heparins and vitamin K antagonists. PMID:27100556

  14. Venous thromboembolism as an adverse effect of antipsychotic treatment

    Bałkowiec-Iskra, Ewa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Many studies suggest an association between the use of antipsychotics (APs and occurrence of venous thromboembolism (VTE. Thromboembolism is often related to a significant risk of disability or death. Despite many years of investigating the interrelations between use of APs and VTE, they have not been specified yet. This paper aims to summarize reports on the VTE risk factors in patients using APs. Based on the analyzed clinical studies, meta-analyses and data published by European Medicines Agency, it has been determined, that the main risk factors for VTE are duration of treatment and patient-related factors, such as gender, age, body mass, and physical activity. Current data do not allow to identify the prothrombotic potential for individual APs or indicate a higher risk for developing VTE in patients treated with newer atypical APs. Due to the complex pathogenesis of VTE it would be necessary to perform large, comparative studies, allowing to identify precisely differences in prothrombotic potential of individual APs. It is necessary to specify products with the lowest VTE risk, what would be useful in the treatment of high-risk patients. All patients treated with APs should be assessed with the risk of VTE and, if needed, appropriate prevention methods (including most of all the elimination of modifiable risk factors should be implemented. Moreover, patients should be educated in scope of VTE prodromal symptoms. All patients with the higher VTE risk should be diagnosed as soon as possible and adequate treatment should be implemented.

  15. Different Finite Durations of Anticoagulation and Outcomes following Idiopathic Venous Thromboembolism: A Meta-Analysis

    Aaron B. Holley

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Controversy remains over the optimal length of anticoagulation following idiopathic venous thromboembolism. We sought to determine if a longer, finite course of anticoagulation offered additional benefit over a short course in the initial treatment of the first episode of idiopathic venous thromboembolism. Data Extraction. Rates of deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, combined venous thromboembolism, major bleeding, and mortality were extracted from prospective trials enrolling patients with first time, idiopathic venous thromboembolism. Data was pooled using random effects meta-regression. Results. Ten trials, with a total of 3225 patients, met inclusion criteria. For each additional month of initial anticoagulation, once therapy was stopped, recurrent venous thromboembolism (0.03 (95% CI: −0.28 to 0.35; =.24, mortality (−0.10 (95% CI: −0.24 to 0.04; =.15, and major bleeding (−0.01 (95% CI: −0.05 to 0.02; =.44 rates measured in percent per patient years, did not significantly change. Conclusions: Patients with an initial idiopathic venous thromboembolism should be treated with 3 to 6 months of secondary prophylaxis with vitamin K antagonists. At that time, a decision between continuing with indefinite therapy can be made, but there is no benefit to a longer (but finite course of therapy.

  16. Increased risk of venous thromboembolism and arterial cardiovascular events in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    Kristensen, Søren Lund; Ahlehoff, Ole; Lindhardsen, Jesper;

    2012-01-01

    This focused review describes the current knowledge of the association between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and cardiovascular disease. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease, and as well as venous thromboembolism this disease shares inflammatory mechanisms with IBD. Patients...

  17. Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism With New Anticoagulant Agents.

    Becattini, Cecilia; Agnelli, Giancarlo

    2016-04-26

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common disease associated with high risk for recurrences, death, and late sequelae, accounting for substantial health care costs. Anticoagulant agents are the mainstay of treatment for deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. The recent availability of oral anticoagulant agents that can be administered in fixed doses, without laboratory monitoring and dose adjustment, is a landmark change in the treatment of VTE. In Phase III trials, rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban (antifactor Xa agents), and dabigatran (an antithrombin agent) were noninferior and probably safer than conventional anticoagulation therapy (low-molecular-weight heparin followed by vitamin K antagonists). These favorable results were confirmed in specific patient subgroups, such as the elderly and fragile. However, some patients, such as those with cancer or with intermediate- to high-risk pulmonary embolism, were underrepresented in the Phase III trials. Further clinical research is required before new oral anticoagulant agents can be considered standard of care for the full spectrum of patients with VTE. PMID:27102510

  18. Prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer.

    Lee, Agnes Y Y

    2014-12-01

    Robust evidence remains scarce in guiding best practice in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism in patients living with cancer. Recommendations from major consensus guidelines are largely based on extrapolated data from trials performed mostly in noncancer patients, observational studies and registries, studies using surrogate outcomes, and underpowered randomized controlled trials. Nonetheless, a personalized approach based on individual risk assessment is uniformly recommended for inpatient and outpatient thromboprophylaxis and there is consensus that anticoagulant prophylaxis is warranted in selected patients with a high risk of thrombosis. Prediction tools for estimating the risk of thrombosis in the hospital setting have not been validated, but the use of prophylaxis in the ambulatory setting in those with a high Khorana score is under active investigation. Symptomatic and incidental thrombosis should be treated with anticoagulant therapy, but little is known about the optimal duration. Pharmacologic options for prophylaxis and treatment are still restricted to unfractionated heparin, low molecular weight heparin, and vitamin K antagonists because there is currently insufficient evidence to support the use of target-specific, non-vitamin K-antagonist oral anticoagulants. Although these agents offer practical advantages over traditional anticoagulants, potential drug interaction with chemotherapeutic agents, gastrointestinal problems, hepatic and renal impairment, and the lack of rapid reversal agents are important limitations that may reduce the efficacy and safety of these drugs in patients with active cancer. Clinicians and patients are encouraged to participate in clinical trials to advance the care of patients with cancer-associated thrombosis. PMID:25696871

  19. Do medical patients need to receive pharmacologic prophylaxis for the prevention of venous thromboembolism?

    Ageno, Walter

    2012-10-01

    Acutely ill medical patients with reduced mobility are at increased risk of venous thromboembolism, which can occur during hospitalization or after discharge. A number of clinical trials and meta-analyses have shown that pharmacologic prophylaxis with anticoagulant drugs in these patients significantly reduces the risk of fatal pulmonary embolism as compared to placebo or no treatment, without significant increase in the risk of major bleeding. Thus, the use of anticoagulant prophylaxis is recommended for all high risk medical patients during hospitalization. To identify these high risk patients, clinicians may use the inclusion criteria applied in the trials, with a selection that is mostly qualitative, or risk assessment models, with a selection that is both qualitative and quantitative. With both approaches, about 40 % of medical patients would be at increased risk of venous thrombosis. Because in the real world medical patients tend to be much older and with more comorbidities than in clinical trials, patient selection needs to also take into account risk factors for bleeding. Among others, estimation of creatinine clearance appears to be particularly important to prevent excessive exposure to anticoagulant drugs. Finally, although the risk of venous thrombosis may persist in some patients after hospital discharge, clinical trials assessing extended prophylaxis in this setting have failed to show a convincing clinical benefit with this approach. PMID:23073856

  20. Effective management of venous thromboembolism in the community: non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    Patel R

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Raj Patel Department of Haematological Medicine, King's Thrombosis Centre, King's College Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Anticoagulation therapy is essential for the effective treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE. For many years, anticoagulation for acute VTE was limited to the use of initial parenteral heparin, overlapping with and followed by a vitamin K antagonist. Although highly effective, this regimen has several limitations and is particularly challenging when given in an ambulatory setting. Current treatment pathways for most patients with deep-vein thrombosis typically involve initial hospital or community-based ambulatory care with subsequent follow-up in a secondary care setting. With the introduction of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs into routine clinical practice, it is now possible for the initial acute management of patients with deep-vein thrombosis to be undertaken by primary care. As hospital admissions associated with VTE become shorter, primary care will play an increasingly important role in the long-term management of these patients. Although the NOACs can potentially simplify patient management and improve clinical outcomes, primary care physicians may be less familiar with these new treatments compared with traditional therapy. To assist primary care physicians in further understanding the role of the NOACs, this article outlines the main differences between NOACs and traditional anticoagulation therapy and discusses the benefit–risk profile of the different NOACs in the treatment and secondary prevention of recurrent VTE. Key considerations for the use of NOACs in the primary care setting are highlighted, including dose transition, risk assessment and follow-up, duration of anticoagulant therapy, how to minimize bleeding risks, and the importance of patient education and counseling. Keywords: venous thromboembolism, oral anticoagulant, prevention, treatment, primary

  1. Diet as prophylaxis and treatment for venous thromboembolism?

    Cundiff David K

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE: deep venous thrombosis (DVT and pulmonary emboli (PE with anticoagulants are associated with significant risks of major and fatal hemorrhage. Anticoagulation treatment of VTE has been the standard of care in the USA since before 1962 when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration began requiring randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs showing efficacy, so efficacy trials were never required for FDA approval. In clinical trials of 'high VTE risk' surgical patients before the 1980s, anticoagulant prophylaxis was clearly beneficial (fatal pulmonary emboli (FPE without anticoagulants = 0.99%, FPE with anticoagulants = 0.31%. However, observational studies and RCTs of 'high VTE risk' surgical patients from the 1980s until 2010 show that FPE deaths without anticoagulants are about one-fourth the rate that occurs during prophylaxis with anticoagulants (FPE without anticoagulants = 0.023%, FPE while receiving anticoagulant prophylaxis = 0.10%. Additionally, an FPE rate of about 0.012% (35/28,400 in patients receiving prophylactic anticoagulants can be attributed to 'rebound hypercoagulation' in the two months after stopping anticoagulants. Alternatives to anticoagulant prophylaxis should be explored. Methods and Findings The literature concerning dietary influences on VTE incidence was reviewed. Hypotheses concerning the etiology of VTE were critiqued in relationship to the rationale for dietary versus anticoagulant approaches to prophylaxis and treatment. Epidemiological evidence suggests that a diet with ample fruits and vegetables and little meat may substantially reduce the risk of VTE; vegetarian, vegan, or Mediterranean diets favorably affect serum markers of hemostasis and inflammation. The valve cusp hypoxia hypothesis of DVT/VTE etiology is consistent with the development of VTE being affected directly or indirectly by diet. However, it is less consistent with

  2. Venous Thromboembolism (VTE): Risk Assessment in Hospitalized Patients

    Objective: To determine the number of hospitalized patients at risk for developing venous thromboembolism (VTE) / deep vein thrombosis (DVT), identifying the most common risk factor and to document the use of thromboprophylaxis. Study Design: Observational and cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Chandka Medical College Hospital, Larkana, from October to December 2011. Methodology: A total of 170 patients underwent this study and these included 51 (30%) from general medical, and 119 (70%) from surgical units. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined and data was collected on printed format. VTE risk assessment was done according to Caprini Model and criteria defined by the American College of Chest Physicians- ACCP. Results: Out of 170 patients, 91 were male and 79 female with mean age of 39 +- 16 years. According to ACCP criteria for VTE risk assessment, 20% (n=34) patients were identified to be at low risk, 20% (n=34) at moderate risk, 47.65% (n=81) at high risk and 12.35% (n=21) at very high risk of developing VTE. The commonest risk factor significantly identified was immobility (54.7%, p < 0.005), followed by advancing age (41.17%, p < 0.005) and obesity (18.23%). The most common risk factor in all types of surgical patients was anaesthesia for more than 45 minutes 82.35% (n=98/119) and in medical patients advancing age 45% (n=23/51). Only 6 (3.5%) patients received thromboprophylaxis, all were surgical patients of very high-risk category. Conclusion: Majority of studied hospitalized patients were at high risk of developing VTE. Immobility was the commonest risk factor for developing VTE, followed by advancing age and obesity. Very few hospitalized patients actually received thromboprophylaxis. (author)

  3. Predicting perioperative venous thromboembolism in Japanese gynecological patients.

    Masae Ikeda

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To develop a convenient screening method that can predict perioperative venous thromboembolism (VTE and identify patients at risk of fatal perioperative pulmonary embolism (PE. METHODS: Patients hospitalized for gynecological abdominal surgery (n = 183 underwent hematology tests and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT to detect VTE. All statistical analyses were carried out using the SPSS software program (PASWV19.0J. RESULTS: The following risk factors for VTE were identified by univariate analysis: plasmin-alpha2-plasmin inhibitor complex (PIC, thrombin-antithrombin III complex (TAT, and prolonged immobility (all p<0.001; age, neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC, malignancy, hypertension, past history of VTE, and hormone therapy (all p<0.01; and hemoglobin, transverse tumor diameter, ovarian disease, and menopause (all p<0.05. Multivariate analysis using these factors revealed that PIC, age, and transverse tumor diameter were significant independent determinants of the risk of VTE. We then calculated the incidence rate of perioperative VTE using PIC and transverse tumor diameter in patient groups stratified by age. In patients aged ≤40 years, PIC ≥1.3 µg/mL and a transverse tumor diameter ≥10 cm identified the high-risk group for VTE with an accuracy of 93.6%. For patients in their 50 s, PIC ≥1.3 µg/mL identified a high risk of VTE with an accuracy of 78.2%. In patients aged ≥60 years, a transverse tumor diameter ≥15 cm (irrespective of PIC or PIC ≥1.3 µg/mL identified the high-risk group with an accuracy of 82.4%. CONCLUSIONS: We propose new screening criteria for VTE risk that are based on PIC, transverse tumor diameter, and age. Our findings suggest the usefulness of these criteria for predicting the risk of perioperative VTE and for identifying patients with a high risk of fatal perioperative PE.

  4. HIV infection is a risk factor for venous thromboembolism.

    Copur, A Sinan; Smith, Peter R; Gomez, Victor; Bergman, Michael; Homel, Peter

    2002-05-01

    The reported incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has ranged from 0.25 to 0.96% in clinical studies, but up to 17% at autopsy. A preliminary analysis at our hospital suggested that the frequency of VTE among HIV-positive individuals might be higher than previously reported. To further evaluate this issue, we performed a retrospective study of patients with a diagnosis of VTE and/or HIV infection discharged from our hospital between July 1, 1998 and June 30, 1999. A total of 13,496 patients were discharged during the year of the study. There were 244 patients with VTE and 362 who were HIV-positive. Ten of the 244 patients with VTE were HIV-positive (4.1%). The frequency of VTE among HIV-positive individuals was 10/362 (2.8%) compared to 234/13134 (1.8%) in the non-HIV-positive group, but the difference is not statistically significant. However, in patients under age 50, the frequencies were significantly different: 10/302 (3.31%) versus 35/6594 (0.53%), respectively (p < 0.0001). The frequency of VTE in HIV-positive patients less than 50 years old (3.31%) was greater than in HIV-positive patients over 50 years of age (0/60), but the difference did not reach statistical significance. In contrast, in the non-HIV-positive group, VTE was significantly more frequent in those 50 and older compared to younger patients (3.04% versus 0.53%, p = 0.0001). Statistical analysis indicated that the direction of association between age and diagnosis of VTE differed for HIV-positive patients versus non-HIV-positive patients. Our results suggest that HIV-positive patients under age 50 are at increased risk for VTE compared with non-HIV-positive individuals. PMID:12055028

  5. Occurrence and Prognosis of Symptomatic Venous Thromboembolism in Colorectal Cancer Surgery Patients

    Kim, Dae Sik; Park, Keun-Myoung; Won, Yong Sung; Kim, Jang Yong; Lee, Jin Kwon; Kim, Jun Gi; Oh, Seong Taek; Jung, Sang Seol; Kang, Won Kyung

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Colorectal cancer (CRC) has a high risk for postoperative thromboembolic complications such as venous thromboembolism (VTE) compared to other surgical diseases, but the relationship between VTE and CRC in Asian patients remains poorly understood. The present study examined the incidence of symptomatic VTE in Korean patients who underwent surgery for CRC. We also identified risk factors, incidence and survival rate for VTE in these patients Materials and Methods: The patients were ide...

  6. The thrombophilic pattern of different clinical manifestations of venous thromboembolism: a survey of 443 cases of venous thromboembolism.

    Grifoni, Elisa; Marcucci, Rossella; Ciuti, Gabriele; Cenci, Caterina; Poli, Daniela; Mannini, Lucia; Liotta, Agatina Alessandrello; Miniati, Massimo; Abbate, Rosanna; Prisco, Domenico

    2012-03-01

    Although pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) share many risk factors, it is uncertain whether thrombophilic abnormalities may impact differently on the development of these two clinical manifestations of venous thromboembolism (VTE). To give further insight into this issue, we estimated the association of PE with different types of thrombophilia and evaluated whether these abnormalities have a different prevalence in patients presenting with PE, alone or associated with DVT, as compared with those with isolated DVT. In this study 443 consecutive patients with a first episode of VTE and 304 matched healthy controls underwent laboratory screening for thrombophilia, including natural anticoagulants, factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A polymorphisms, antiphospholipid antibodies, homocysteine, factor VIII, and lipoprotein(a). Of the 443 patients, 224 patients had isolated DVT, 144 had combined DVT/PE, and 75 had isolated PE. At least one thrombophilic abnormality was detected in 72.8% of DVT, 66% of DVT/EP, and 60% of isolated PE patients. A high prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia and elevated lipoprotein(a) levels was found in all patients with no significant differences among the three groups. The prevalence of prothrombin G20210A polymorphism and of elevated factor VIII levels was significantly higher in patients with DVT and DVT/PE than in controls, but not in those with isolated PE, whereas factor V Leiden polymorphism was associated with isolated DVT but not with DVT/PE or isolated PE. In conclusion, the thrombophilic burden seems different in isolated PE versus DVT with or without PE, suggesting that PE may encompass a different pathophysiological process of thrombosis to DVT. PMID:22422337

  7. The Case against Chemoprophylaxis for Venous Thromboembolism Prevention and the Rationale for SAFE Anesthesia

    Eric Swanson, MD

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The Venous Thromboembolism Prevention study concludes that anticoagulation is effective in reducing the risk of thromboembolism in patients who are identified as higher risk by Caprini scores. This report critically assesses the statistics used in the Venous Thromboembolism Prevention study, its method of data presentation, and its conclusions. The usefulness of risk stratification and the value of anticoagulation—both prevailing concepts in risk reduction today—are challenged. Actual data show that chemoprophylaxis has no proven benefit in plastic surgery. Complications of anticoagulation predictably include excessive bleeding and hematomas, which may be serious and life-threatening. Several large published series of patients undergoing elective plastic surgery under total intravenous anesthesia have shown a much reduced risk of thromboembolism. A SAFE (Spontaneous breathing, Avoid gas, Face up, Extremities mobile anesthesia method is discussed as a safer and more effective alternative to traditional general endotracheal anesthesia and anticoagulation. The choice for plastic surgeons is not between a venous thromboembolism and a hematoma. The choice is between a thromboembolism and adjusting our anesthesia and surgery habits to reduce the risk to a baseline level.

  8. The incidence of venous thromboembolism and practice of deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis in hospitalized cirrhotic patients

    Alqahtani Saad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cirrhotic patients are characterized by a decreased synthesis of coagulation and anticoagulation factors. The coagulopathy of cirrhotic patients is considered to be auto-anticoagulation. Our aim was to determine the incidence and predictors of venous thromboembolism (VTE and examine the practice of deep venous thrombosis (DVT prophylaxis among hospitalized cirrhotic patients. Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed in a tertiary teaching hospital. We included all adult patients admitted to the hospital with a diagnosis of liver cirrhosis from January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2009. We grouped our cohort patients in two groups, cirrhotic patients without VTE and cirrhotic with VTE. Results Over one year, we included 226 cirrhotic patients, and the characteristics of both groups were similar regarding their clinical and laboratory parameters and their outcomes. Six patients (2.7% developed VTE, and all of the VTEs were DVT. Hepatitis C was the most common (51% underlying cause of liver cirrhosis, followed by hepatitis B (22%; 76% of the cirrhotic patients received neither pharmacological nor mechanical DVT prophylaxis. Conclusion Cirrhotic patients are at risk for developing VTE. The utilization of DVT prophylaxis was suboptimal.

  9. Bleeding events with dabigatran or warfarin in patients with venous thromboembolism.

    Majeed, Ammar; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Kakkar, Ajay; Kearon, Clive; Eriksson, Henry; Kreuzer, Jörg; Feuring, Martin; Hantel, Stephan; Friedman, Jeffrey; Schellong, Sebastian; Schulman, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Dabigatran was as effective as warfarin for the acute treatment of venous thromboembolism in the RE-COVER and RE-COVER II trials. We compared the incidence of bleeding with dabigatran versus warfarin in pooled data from these studies. The localisation, bleeding severity, and the impact of key factors on the incidence of bleeding, were compared between the dabigatran and warfarin treatment group. Altogether, 2553 patients received dabigatran and 2554 warfarin, each for a mean of 164 days. The incidence of any bleeding event was significantly lower with dabigatran (hazard ratio [HR] 0.70; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.61-0.79), as was the incidence of the composite of MBEs and clinically relevant non-major bleeding events (HR 0.62; 95% CI, 0.50-0.76). The incidence of major bleeding events (MBEs) was also significantly lower with dabigatran in the double-dummy phase (HR, 0.60; 95%CI, 0.36-0.99) but not statistically different between the two treatment arms when the entire treatment period is considered (HR 0.73 95% CI, 0.48-1.11). Increasing age, reduced renal function, Asian ethnicity, and concomitant antiplatelet therapy were associated with higher bleeding rates in both treatment groups. The reduction in bleeding with dabigatran compared to warfarin was consistent among the subgroups and with a similar pattern for intracranial, and urogenital major bleeding. In conclusion, treatment of venous thromboembolism with dabigatran is associated with a lower risk of bleeding compared to warfarin. This reduction did not differ with respect to the location of bleeding or among predefined subgroups. PMID:26403199

  10. [Venous thromboembolism's risk assessment: rationale, objectives, and methodology--the ARTE study].

    França, Ana; De Sousa, Joaquim Abreu; Felicíssimo, Paulo; Ferreira, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    Venous thromboembolism is a frequent clinical condition with high impact on both morbidity and mortality. Venous thromboembolism risk is particularly high in hospitalized patients as well as in oncologic patients, being a factor of poor prognosis for the oncologic disease. Several clinical studies have shown the need to develop effective hospital strategies using a systematic and individualized assessment of venous thromboembolism risk, and additionally to optimize the institution of prophylaxis treatment and its proper use in the context of in-hospital and outpatient management. The ARTE national study is a non-interventional, multicentre, prospective study which is divided in two phases. In the first phase patients are followed in the hospital; in the second phase patients are followed in ambulatory context for a period of 6 months after discharge. Four thousand patients will be included, equally distributed over medical, surgical, oncologic and orthopaedic patients. Data will be collected from the patient's clinical files and through direct clinical evaluation of risk factors for venous thromboembolism, in the departments of medicine, oncology, surgery, and orthopaedics of the participating centres. The main objectives of the study are to assess the risk profile of venous thromboembolism of the study population using a risk assessment model adapted from the Caprini and Khorana et al models, and the validation of the score for the Portuguese population. Simultaneously, the secondary objectives are as follows: to determine the proportion of patients with venous thromboembolism risk, according to the risk assessment model, that are doing prophylaxis; to determine the duration of prophylaxis during the hospitalization; to determine the proportion of patients doing long-term prophylaxis, at the moment of the discharge; to determine the incidence of thromboembolic events (deep venous thrombosis; stroke; pulmonary thromboembolism; transient ischemic attack

  11. Epidemiology and pathophysiology of venous thromboembolism: similarities with atherothrombosis and the role of inflammation.

    Riva, Nicoletta; Donadini, Marco P; Ageno, Walter

    2015-06-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a multifactorial disease. Major provoking factors (e. g. surgery, cancer, major trauma, and immobilisation) are identified in 50-60 % of patients, while the remaining cases are classified as unprovoked. However, minor predisposing conditions may be detectable in these patients, possibly concurring to the pathophysiology of the disease, especially when co-existing. In recent years, the role of chronic inflammatory disorders, infectious diseases and traditional cardiovascular risk factors has been extensively investigated. Inflammation, with its underlying prothrombotic state, could be the potential link between these risk factors, as well as the explanation for the reported association between arterial and venous thromboembolic events. PMID:25472800

  12. New anticoagulants for the prevention of venous thromboembolism

    Becattini, Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    Cecilia Becattini, Alessandra Lignani, Giancarlo AgnelliInternal and Cardiovascular Medicine and Stroke Unit, University of Perugia, ItalyAbstract: Anticoagulant drugs have an essential role in the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic diseases. Currently available anticoagulants substantially reduce the incidence of thromboembolic events in a number of clinical conditions. However, these agents have limitations that strengthen the case for the development of new anticoagulants. An ideal...

  13. Prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism with low-molecular-weight heparins: Clinical implications of the recent European guidelines

    Prandoni Paolo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Venous thromboembolism (VTE is an important cause of avoidable morbidity and mortality. However, routine prophylaxis for at-risk patients is underused. Recent guidelines issued by an international consensus group, including the International Union of Angiology (IUA, recommend use of low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs for the treatment of acute VTE and prevention of recurrence, and for prophylaxis in surgical and medical patients. This review highlights current inadequacies in the provision of thromboprophylaxis, and considers the clinical implications of the European guidelines on the prevention and treatment of VTE.

  14. Venous thromboembolism in ovarian cancer: incidence, risk factors and impact on survival.

    Abu Saadeh, Feras

    2013-09-01

    Ovarian cancer has a higher incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) than other cancers. Clear cell cancers carry the highest risk at 11-27%. The aim of this study was to identify the predisposing factors for VTE in a population of ovarian cancer patients and to determine the influence of VTE on overall survival.

  15. The risk of venous thromboembolism in patients with multiple sclerosis : the Clinical Practice Research Datalink

    Peeters, P J H L; Bazelier, M T; Uitdehaag, B M J; Leufkens, H G M; De Bruin, M L; de Vries, F

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), disability and autoinflammatory processes may result in an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the risk of VTE associated with MS. METHODS: We conducted an observational-cohort study within the Clinical Practice

  16. Use of bisphosphonates and raloxifene and risk of deep venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism

    Vestergaard, P; Schwartz, K; Pinholt, E M; Rejnmark, Lars; Mosekilde, Leif

    2010-01-01

    Prior studies have associated raloxifene and strontium ranelate with deep venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism. In a cohort study, we observed an increased risk also with the bisphosphonates. However, the increase was present already before the start of bisphosphonates pointing at an...

  17. Microparticle tissue factor activity is increased in cancer patients prior to the development of venous thromboembolism

    Kleinjan, A.; Van Doormaal, F.F.; Berckmans, R.J.; MacKman, N.; Manly, D.A.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Richel, D.J.; Buller, H.R.; Sturk, A.; Nieuwland, R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Cancer greatly increases the risk of venous thromboem-bolism (VTE). Here, we investigated the contribution of microparti-cle-dependent procoagulant activity to the prothrombotic state in these patients. Methods: In 43 cancer patients without VTE at entry and 22 healthy volunteers, mark

  18. Insulin resistance and risk of venous thromboembolism : results of a population-based cohort study

    Van Schouwenburg, I. M.; Mahmoodi, B. K.; Veeger, N. J. G. M.; Bakker, S. J. L.; Kluin-Nelemans, H. C.; Meijer, K.; Gansevoort, R. T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Obesity is an established risk factor for venous thromboembolism (VTE), but it is uncertain how this is mediated. Insulin resistance has a central role in the pathophysiology of the metabolic effects of obesity. Objective: We aimed to investigate whether insulin resistance is a risk fact

  19. Pulmonary thromboembolic disease. Clinical management of acute and chronic disease.

    Torbicki, Adam

    2010-07-01

    Pulmonary thromboembolism falls between the areas of pulmonology and cardiology, internal medicine and intensive care, radiology and nuclear medicine, and hematology and cardiothoracic surgery. Depending on their clinical background, physicians faced with a patient with a pulmonary thromboembolism may speak different languages and adopt different treatment approaches. Now, however, there is an opportunity to end the Tower of Babel surrounding pulmonary thromboembolism. There is a growing acknowledgement that the key clinical problems in both acute pulmonary embolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension are linked to right ventricular pressure overload and right ventricular failure. As a result, cardiologists and cardiac intensive care specialists are taking an increasing interest in understanding and combating these conditions. The European Society of Cardiology was the first to elaborate comprehensive clinical practice guidelines for pulmonary thromboembolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. The task forces involved in producing these guidelines included radiologists, pulmonologists, hematologists, intensive care physicians and surgeons, which ensured that the final document was universally acceptable. The aim of this article was to provide an overview of the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and prevention of acute pulmonary thromboembolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, while taking into account European Society of Cardiology guidelines and incorporating new evidence where necessary. PMID:20609317

  20. The value of blood D-dimer test in the diagnosis of walk-in patients with venous thromboembolism

    Shozo Yasuoka

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Shozo Yasuoka, Shunichiro KubotaYasuoka Clinic, Musashino City, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Venous thromboembolism (VTE and related pulmonary thromboembolism are life-threatening diseases that require efficient diagnosis and clinical management. While the diagnosis and treatment of VTE in hospitalized patients has been extensively studied, less has been reported on walk-in patients with VTE. Here we report on four outpatients with VTE that were efficiently diagnosed using the blood D-dimer test and successfully treated.Keywords: venous thromboembolism, pulmonary thromboembolism, blood D-dimer test

  1. Edoxaban for prevention of venous thromboembolism after major orthopedic surgery

    Kawaji H; Ishii M; Tamaki Y; Sasaki K; Takagi M

    2012-01-01

    Hiroyuki Kawaji,1 Masaji Ishii,1 Yasunobu Tamaki,1 Kan Sasaki,2 Michiaki Takagi,21Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Saiseikai Yamagata Saisei Hospital, 2Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Yamagata University Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata, JapanAbstract: Fatal pulmonary thromboembolism is the most serious complication following surgery. Patients undergoing major orthopedic surgeries, including total hip replacement, total knee replacement, and hip fracture surgery, represent a group at partic...

  2. Improving venous thromboembolic disease prophylaxis in medical inpatients: a role for education and audit.

    Kent, B D

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Venous thromboembolic disease (VTED) prophylaxis is a key strategy in reducing preventable deaths in medical inpatients. We assessed compliance with internationally published guidelines for VTED prophylaxis in at-risk medical patients before and 1 month after an educational intervention to enhance compliance with such guidelines. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty patients were assessed on each occasion. Pre-intervention, VTED prophylaxis was prescribed in only 48% of at-risk cases. Compliance was best among patients under stroke services and worst for those under acute medical teams. Patients within specialist units were more likely to be prescribed prophylaxis than those in general wards (75 vs. 53%; p = 0.0019). Post-intervention, overall compliance improved to 63% (p = 0.041 for comparison). There was a significant improvement among general medical teams (48 vs. 75%; p = 0.001), and in general wards (52 vs. 74%; p = 0.003). CONCLUSIONS: Thromboprophylaxis is under-prescribed in medical inpatients, but compliance with international guidelines can be significantly enhanced with targeted educational intervention.

  3. Primary prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolic events in patients with gastrointestinal cancers - Review.

    Riess, Hanno; Habbel, Piet; Jühling, Anja; Sinn, Marianne; Pelzer, Uwe

    2016-03-15

    Venous thromboembolism event (VTE) is a common and morbid complication in cancer patients. Patients with gastrointestinal cancers often suffer from symptomatic or incidental splanchnic vein thrombosis, impaired liver function and/or thrombocytopenia. These characteristics require a thorough risk/benefit evaluation for individual patients. Considering the risk factors for the development of VTE and bleeding events in addition to recent study results may be helpful for correct initiation of primary pharmacological prevention and treatment of cancer-associated thrombosis (CAT), preferably with low molecular weight heparins (LMWH). Whereas thromboprophylaxis is most often recommended in hospitalized surgical and non-surgical patients with malignancy, there is less agreement as to its duration. With regard to ambulatory cancer patients, the lack of robust data results in low grade recommendations against routine use of anticoagulant drugs. Anticoagulation with LMWH for the first months is the evidence-based treatment for acute CAT, but duration of secondary prevention and the drug of choice are unclear. Based on published guidelines and literature, this review will focus on prevention and treatment strategies of VTE in patients with gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:26989461

  4. Combined hormonal contraception and risk of venous thromboembolism within the first year following pregnancy

    Petersen, Jesper Friis; Bergholt, T; Nielsen, Anne Kathrine;

    2014-01-01

    pregnancies aged 15-49 during the period of 1995-2009 were included. The main outcomes were relative and absolute risks of first time venous thromboembolism in users as well as non-users of combined hormonal contraceptives. In 985,569 person-years, 598 venous thromboembolisms were recorded. After early...... terminated pregnancies and births, respectively, 113 and 485 events occurred in 212,552 and 773,017 person-years. After early terminated pregnancies, the crude VTE incidence ratios were similar, and the numbers needed to harm were equal between groups that did or did not use combined hormonal contraceptives...... throughout the follow-up year. After childbirth, individuals that used combined hormonal contraceptives were more likely than non-users to experience VTE depicted by crude incidence ratios; however, the difference was only significant after 14 weeks. This implied that the numbers needed to harm were lower...

  5. Comparative risk impact of edoxaban in the management of stroke and venous thromboembolism

    Tellor, Katie B; Van Tuyl, Joseph S; Armbruster, Anastasia L

    2016-01-01

    Edoxaban, a factor Xa inhibitor, was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration in 2015 for stroke prevention in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and treatment of venous thromboembolism. It is the fourth target-specific oral anticoagulant to be approved. Edoxaban is noninferior for efficacy compared to warfarin for both approved indications. Edoxaban is superior to warfarin for the first major or clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding event in venous thromboembolism and major bleeding in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Edoxaban is dosed once daily for both indications and requires dose adjustment for renal function. In patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, use is not recommended in patients with a creatinine clearance greater than 95 mL/min due to reduced efficacy. Edoxaban offers a new therapeutic alternative to the currently available options in the market. PMID:27217759

  6. Association of MTHFR genetic polymorphisms with venous thromboembolism in Uyghur population in Xinjiang, China

    Li, Zhao; Yadav, Umesh; MAHEMUTI, AILIMAN; Tang, Bao-Peng; Upur, Halmurat

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to reveal the association between Methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene mutations (C677T, A1298C and C1317T) and risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in Han and Uyghur population in Xinjiang. Material and method: We conducted a case control study composed of 246 cases, including 86 Uyghur and 160 Han ethnic diagnosed VTE were admitted in the First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University between January 2008 to December 2012, and 292...

  7. Rivaroxaban versus enoxaparin/vitamin K antagonist therapy in patients with venous thromboembolism and renal impairment

    Bauersachs, Rupert M.; Lensing, Anthonie WA; Prins, Martin H.; Kubitza, Dagmar; Pap, Ákos F; Decousus, Hervé; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; Prandoni, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with renal impairment receiving classical anticoagulation for venous thromboembolism (VTE) are at increased risk of bleeding and possibly pulmonary embolism. We examined the efficacy and safety of oral rivaroxaban in patients with VTE with and without renal impairment. Methods Prespecified subgroup analysis of the EINSTEIN DVT and EINSTEIN PE studies comparing fixed-dose rivaroxaban with enoxaparin/a vitamin K antagonist (VKA), performed in 8246 patients enrolled from 2007...

  8. The geko™ Electro-Stimulation Device for Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis: A NICE Medical Technology Guidance

    Summers, Jennifer A; Clinch, James; Radhakrishnan, Muralikrishnan; Healy, Andy; McMillan, Viktoria; Morris, Elizabeth; Rua, Tiago; Ofuya, Mercy; Wang, Yanzhong; Dimmock, Paul W; Lewis, Cornelius; Peacock, Janet L; Keevil, Stephen F.

    2014-01-01

    The geko™ device is a single-use, battery-powered, neuromuscular electrostimulation device that aims to reduce the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) selected the geko™ device for evaluation, and invited the manufacturer, Firstkind Ltd, to submit clinical and economic evidence. King’s Technology Evaluation Centre, an External Assessment Centre (EAC) commissioned by the NICE, independently assessed the evidence submitted. The spon...

  9. Risk factors for venous thromboembolism following prolonged air travel. Coach class thrombosis.

    Arfvidsson, B; Eklof, B; Kistner, R L; Masuda, E M; Sato, D T

    2000-04-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) in legs and lungs is a potentially life-threatening condition. The incidence of VTE associated with air travel is still unknown, but it may have increased. Most travelers who develop symptoms do so within 24 hours after their flight takes off. Predisposing risk factors may be divided into patient-related and cabin-related factors, both of which are described. It is emphasized that better information and better inflight precautions can minimize these risk factors. PMID:10806562

  10. Computer Surveillance of Patients at High Risk for and with Venous Thromboembolism

    Evans, R. Scott; Lloyd, James F.; Aston, Valerie T.; Woller, Scott C.; Tripp, Jacob S.; Elliott, C. Greg; Stevens, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), may be the number one preventable cause of death associated with hospitalization. Numerous evidence-based guidelines for effective VTE prophylaxis therapy exist. However, underuse is common due to the difficulty in integrating VTE risk assessment into routine patient care. Previous studies utilizing computer decision support to identify high-risk patients report improved use of prophylaxis therapy ...

  11. Introduction of a Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis Protocol for Older Adult Psychiatric Patients.

    Croxford, Anna; Clare, Adam; McCurdy, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Hospital-Acquired venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in older adults. In psychiatric patients these risks are increased due to multiple factors including poor mobility, restraint, catatonia, sedation, and conventional antipsychotic use. Diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric patients presenting with signs and symptoms of a VTE can be delayed due to a patient's communication difficulties, non-compliance, or attribution of symptoms to a psychosomatic cause...

  12. Deficiency of the natural anticoagulant proteins in women with pregnancy related venous thromboembolism

    Mitić Gorana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Inherited thrombophilia can be defined as a predisposition to thrombosis caused by heritable defects, such as mutations in genes encoding the natural anticoagulants or clotting factors. Pregnancy related risk of VTE is sixfold increased comparing to non pregnant age matched women. Pregnancy is an independent risk factor for the development of venous thromboembolism and this risk is further increased by the presence of thrombophilia. Aim of the study: The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between deficiency of natural anticoagulants: antithrombin, protein C and protein S and pregnancy related thromboembolism. We have determined the activities of antithrombin, proten C and protein S in 74 women with pregnancy related thrombosis and in 45 healthy women who had at least two uncomplicated pregnancies. Among the women with the history of venous thromboembolism antithrombin deficiency was found in 4 (5.4%, protein C deficiency in 2 (2.7% and protein S deficiency in 5 (6.76%. The total of 11 (14.6% women was found to be deficient. Not a single woman in the control group was found to be deficient in natural anticoagulants. Deficiencies of coagulation inhibitors are associated with an increased risk of venous thrombosis during pregnancy and puerperium (p= 0.006. Antithrombin, protein C and protein S deficient women are at higher risk of developing venous thromboembolism during antepartal period (p= 0.0097. Prophylactic treatment with heparin should be recommended from the very beginning of the following pregnancy in women with antithrombin, protein C or protein S deficiency.

  13. Venous Thromboembolism following Elective Aesthetic Plastic Surgery: A Longitudinal Prospective Study in 1254 Patients

    Denis Souto Valente; Lauro Aita Carvalho; Rafaela Koehler Zanella; Sibelie Valente

    2014-01-01

    Background. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a disorder with short-term mortality and long-term morbidity. Healthy patients submitted to elective aesthetic plastic surgeries (EAPS) have risk factors to develop VTE not well established yet. The objective of this study was to examine the incidence and risk factors for VTE in these patients. Methods. Longitudinal, prospective (minimum follow-up of 3 months), observational study. Comprehensive information on patient characteristics and surgeries p...

  14. Do pregnant women have a higher risk for venous thromboembolism following air travel?

    Morteza Izadi; Mohammad Javad Alemzadeh-Ansari; Davood Kazemisaleh; Maryam Moshkani-Farahani; Akbar Shafiee

    2015-01-01

    International travel has become increasingly common and accessible, and it is part of everyday life in pregnant women. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a serious public health disorder that occurs following long-haul travel, especially after air travel. The normal pregnancy is accompanied by a state of hypercoagulability and hypofibrinolysis. Thus, it seems that pregnant women are at a higher risk of VTE following air travel, and, if they have preexisting risk factors, this risk would increase...

  15. Simple measures can improve care in our hospitals : an audit of venous thromboembolism practice

    LoFaro, Thomas; Azzopardi, Stephanie; Busuttil, Sarah; Cordina, John

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a serious but preventable complication of hospitalisation. Doctors still sometimes fail to adhere to them, thus putting patients at risk and incurring considerable expense for the national health service. We chose to audit the practice of doctors in our geriatric facility, and assessed the effect of a memoire to increase compliance. We also explore how our hospitals can learn from the experience of other centres, where the risk of litigation has broug...

  16. Psoriasis complicated with venous thromboembolism: report of two cases and a literature review

    ZHAO Yun-xia; CHEN Gang; ZHAO Rui-zhen; ZHANG Xiao-guang

    2011-01-01

    Cases of psoriasis complicated with venous thromboembolism are rarely reported. Here, we report two cases and review the current literature on the subject. Two patients with long-standing severe psoriasis presented with chest pain,shortness of breath and breathing difficulties. The patients were diagnosed using lung ventilation-perfusion scans or computed tomographic pulmonary angiography. Anticoagulation or thrombolytic therapy was initiated, and long-term continuous anticoagulation with warfarin prevented any recurrences.

  17. Primary prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolic events in patients with gastrointestinal cancers - Review

    Riess, Hanno; Habbel, Piet; Jühling, Anja; Sinn, Marianne; Pelzer, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism event (VTE) is a common and morbid complication in cancer patients. Patients with gastrointestinal cancers often suffer from symptomatic or incidental splanchnic vein thrombosis, impaired liver function and/or thrombocytopenia. These characteristics require a thorough risk/benefit evaluation for individual patients. Considering the risk factors for the development of VTE and bleeding events in addition to recent study results may be helpful for correct initiation of pri...

  18. Profile of betrixaban and its potential in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism

    Eikelboom, John

    2015-01-01

    Noel C Chan,1,2 Vinai Bhagirath,1,3 John W Eikelboom1,3,41Population Health Research Institute, Hamilton, ON, Canada; 2Department of Haematology, Monash Medical Center, Clayton, VIC, Australia; 3Thrombosis and Atherosclerosis Research Institute, 4Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, CanadaAbstract: Venous thromboembolism (VTE), which includes deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a common and potentially preventable cause of morbidity and mortality. Unfractiona...

  19. OPTIMAL PREVENTION OF HOSPITAL VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM WITH THE HELP OF MEDICAL INFORMATION SYSTEM

    G. I. Nazarenko; S. A. Payushk; V. A. Otdelenov; E. B. Kleymenova; L. P. Yashina; D. A. Sychev

    2015-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism are an important medical and social problem, contributing to the structure of morbidity and mortality in the developed countries. Despite the availability of clinical guidelines for the prevention of venous thromboembolic complications there is a gap between scientific knowledge and clinical practice. Clinical decision support systems (CDSS) are confirmed to be effective tool for the implementation of clinical guidelines in daily practice. CDSS shou...

  20. Clinical utility of apixaban in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism: current evidence

    Zalpour A; Oo TH

    2014-01-01

    Ali Zalpour,1 Thein Hlaing Oo21Division of Pharmacy – Clinical Programs, 2Section of Thrombosis and Benign Hematology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Anticoagulation with heparin and vitamin K antagonist has been the mainstay of prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) for many years. In recent years, novel oral anticoagulants such as dabigatran etexilate (a direct thrombin inhibitor) and rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban (...

  1. Clinical utility of apixaban in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism: current evidence

    Oo, Thein Hlaing

    2014-01-01

    Ali Zalpour,1 Thein Hlaing Oo21Division of Pharmacy – Clinical Programs, 2Section of Thrombosis and Benign Hematology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Anticoagulation with heparin and vitamin K antagonist has been the mainstay of prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) for many years. In recent years, novel oral anticoagulants such as dabigatran etexilate (a direct thrombin inhibitor) and rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxab...

  2. Guidance for the treatment and prevention of obstetric-associated venous thromboembolism

    Bates, Shannon M.; Middeldorp, Saskia; Rodger, Marc; James, Andra H; Greer, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), which may manifest as pulmonary embolism (PE) or deep vein thrombosis (DVT), is a serious and potentially fatal condition. Treatment and prevention of obstetric-related VTE is complicated by the need to consider fetal, as well as maternal, wellbeing when making management decisions. Although absolute VTE rates in this population are low, obstetric-associated VTE is an important cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. This manuscript, initiated by the Anticoagu...

  3. Symptomatic and Incidental Venous Thromboembolic Disease Are Both Associated with Mortality in Patients with Prostate Cancer

    Shruti Chaturvedi; Surbhi Sidana; Paul Elson; Khorana, Alok A.; McCrae, Keith R

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The association between malignancy and venous thromboembolic disease (VTE) is well established. The independent impact of VTE, both symptomatic and incidental, on survival in patients with prostate cancer is not known. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the effect of VTE of survival in prostate cancer. Methods Data regarding clinical characteristics, treatment and outcomes of 453 consecutive prostate cancer patients were collected. Fisher exact (categorical var...

  4. Statin treatment and risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism: a nationwide cohort study

    Nguyen, Cu Dinh; Andersson, Charlotte; Jensen, Thomas Bo; Gjesing, Anne; Schjerning Olsen, Anne-Marie; Malta Hansen, Carolina; Büller, Harry; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Gislason, Gunnar H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Statins may decrease the risk of primary venous thromboembolism (VTE), that is, deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) but the effect of statins in preventing recurrent VTE is less clear. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the association between statin therapy and risk of recurrent VTE. Design A prospective cohort study. Setting All hospitals in Denmark. Participants All patients with a hospital diagnosis of VTE in Denmark during 1997–2009 associate...

  5. A randomized trial of rosuvastatin in the prevention of venous thromboembolism

    Glynn, Robert J; Danielson, Eleanor; Fonseca, Francisco A H;

    2009-01-01

    therapy on the risk of venous thromboembolism, and evidence from randomized trials is lacking. METHODS: We randomly assigned 17,802 apparently healthy men and women with both low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels of less than 130 mg per deciliter (3.4 mmol per liter) and high-sensitivity C...... ratio with rosuvastatin, 0.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.37 to 0.86; P=0.007); the corresponding rates for unprovoked venous thromboembolism (i.e., occurring in the absence of a known malignant condition, trauma, hospitalization, or surgery) were 0.10 and 0.17 (hazard ratio, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.35 to...... 1.09; P=0.09) and for provoked venous thromboembolism (i.e., occurring in patients with cancer or during or shortly after trauma, hospitalization, or surgery), 0.08 and 0.16 (hazard ratio, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.28 to 0.96; P=0.03). The rates of pulmonary embolism were 0.09 in the rosuvastatin group and 0...

  6. Clinical characteristics of italian patients with venous thromboembolism enrolled in the RIETE Registry

    Pierpaolo Di Micco

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The clinical characteristics, treatment strategies and outcome of patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE may vary from country to country. Materials and methods: The RIETE (Registro Informatizado su la Enfermedad TromboEmbolica is an ongoing, prospective registry of consecutive patients with acute, objectively confirmed, symptomatic VTE. Our aim was to assess the influence of surgery and immobility for non-surgical reasons on 3-month outcomes of all Italian patients registered in the RIETE. Results: Through July 2008, 21,397 patients with acute VTE were registered in the RIETE. Of these, 896 (4.2% were Italian, and 360 (40% presented with pulmonary embolism (PE. Overall, 137 (15% developed VTE after surgery; 156 (17% developed VTE after >4 days of immobility, and 603 (67% developed VTE in the absence of surgery or immobility. Most patients (83% received initial therapy with low-molecular-weight heparin; 15% received unfractionated heparin. For long-term therapy, 63% of patients received vitamin K antagonists. The incidence of fatal PE during the first 3 months of therapy was 1.5% for patients with postoperative VTE, 7.7% for who developed VTE after immobility, and 1.2% for the remaining patients. The incidence of fatal bleeding among these patients was 1.5%, 1.9% and 0.3%, respectively. Of the 137 patients with postoperative VTE, 61% had received VTE prophylaxis. Of the 156 patients with recent immobility, 24% had received VTE prophylaxis. Conclusions: VTE arising after a period of immobility was associated with the highest rates of fatal PE and fatal bleeding during the first 3 months of therapy. The use of thromboprophylaxis in this population should be improved.

  7. Effective management of venous thromboembolism in the community: non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    Patel, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulation therapy is essential for the effective treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE). For many years, anticoagulation for acute VTE was limited to the use of initial parenteral heparin, overlapping with and followed by a vitamin K antagonist. Although highly effective, this regimen has several limitations and is particularly challenging when given in an ambulatory setting. Current treatment pathways for most patients with deep-vein thrombosis typically involve initial hospital or community-based ambulatory care with subsequent follow-up in a secondary care setting. With the introduction of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) into routine clinical practice, it is now possible for the initial acute management of patients with deep-vein thrombosis to be undertaken by primary care. As hospital admissions associated with VTE become shorter, primary care will play an increasingly important role in the long-term management of these patients. Although the NOACs can potentially simplify patient management and improve clinical outcomes, primary care physicians may be less familiar with these new treatments compared with traditional therapy. To assist primary care physicians in further understanding the role of the NOACs, this article outlines the main differences between NOACs and traditional anticoagulation therapy and discusses the benefit–risk profile of the different NOACs in the treatment and secondary prevention of recurrent VTE. Key considerations for the use of NOACs in the primary care setting are highlighted, including dose transition, risk assessment and follow-up, duration of anticoagulant therapy, how to minimize bleeding risks, and the importance of patient education and counseling. PMID:27217793

  8. Symptomatic venous thromboembolism following fractures distal to the knee

    Wahlsten, L. R.; Eckardt, H.; Lyngbæk, S.;

    2015-01-01

    the knee. METHODS: Using individual linkage of nationwide registries, we included all Danish patients who had undergone surgery for a fracture distal to the knee between 1999 and 2011. Patients were followed for 180 days from discharge. Event rates of DVT/PE were calculated, and significant risk...... of DVT/PE was low following surgery for fractures distal to the knee; however, the risk was increased in the presence of a number of risk factors. This study suggests that specific groups of patients undergoing surgery for a fracture distal to the knee might benefit from postdischarge antithrombotic......BACKGROUND: Our aims were to determine the incidence of symptomatic deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) that required inpatient or outpatient treatment, and to identify specific risk factors associated with DVT/PE in patients who had undergone surgery for a fracture distal to...

  9. Preoperative screening for venous thromboembolism in total knee arthroplasty

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the availability of the D-dimer as a screening marker, the factors affecting on the value of the D-dimer, and the patient's background with the deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) before total knee arthroplasty (TKA) prospective trial. The total of 85 patients scheduled for TKA from March 2004 to Aril 2007 were enrolled under the criteria excluding the revison surgery and the medication of anticoagulant. There were 20 men and 65 women with a mean age of 73 years-old (range, 52-89). All patients were measured the D-dimer preoperatively. If the value was more than 1.0 μg/ml, the multidetector-CT (MD-CT) examination was followed to determined the diagnosis for DVT and/or pulmonary embolism (PE). In addition, six clinical factors including the age, sex, body mass index (BMI), disease, heart function, and walking ability were examined in order to analyze their influences on the value of D-dimer and the formation of DVT/PE. The mean value of D-dimer was 2.5±2.7 μg/ml and 71 patients (83.5%) had the value more than 1.0 μg/ml. The incidence of DVT/PE was 9.4% (1.2-15.0 μg/ml). There were no symptomatic cases. No clinical factors had significant differences in the occurrence of DVT/PE. Our findings demonstrated that the preoperative screening for DVT/PE using the MD-CT selectively in patients with a high value of D-dimer was not always available. Additional anticoagulant treatment, therefore, may be necessary for the prevention of DVT/PE after TKA. (author)

  10. Efficacy and safety of new oral anticoagulants in prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism

    Luca Masotti

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the main innovation emerged in recent years in the field of venous thromboembolism (VTE has been represented by the clinical development and marketing of new oral anticoagulant agents used for prophylaxis and acute treatment. These drugs are represented by direct thrombin inhibitors (anti-factor IIa and the direct inhibitors of activated factor X (anti-Xa. The main achievement of these new agents is represented by their ease of use without laboratory monitoring or dose adjustment. Dabigatran (anti-factor IIa, rivaroxaban, and apixaban (anti-Xa are in advanced phase of clinical development with concluded phase III trials. Up to now the results of efficacy and safety of phase III clinical trials are available, while phase IV studies are currently ongoing. Overall, the phase III clinical trials showed the non inferiority of new oral anticoagulants in VTE prophylaxis of patients undergone to major orthopedic surgery, such as hip and knee arthroplasty, compared to conventional prophylaxis represented by subcutaneous low molecular weight heparin with similar safety. Moreover dabigatran has shown to be not inferior when compared to warfarin for the prevention of six months VTE recurrences, with a significative lower incidence of bleedings. Awaiting the results of many other ongoing phase III trials, since now it is possible to think that, in the next future, new oral anticoagulants will be widely diffused in clinical practice for their ease of use and feasibility. In this review the Authors analyse the available results of phase III clinical trials for dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban, focusing on the antithrombotic endpoints for prevention and treatment of VTE and the bleeding risk. Moreover synthesis of ongoing trials will be displayed.

  11. Controversies in venous thromboembolism: the unique case of isolated distal deep vein thrombosis.

    Porfidia, Angelo; Carnicelli, Annamaria; Bonadia, Nicola; Pola, Roberto; Landolfi, Raffaele

    2016-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) represents the third leading cause of cardiovascular mortality, and it is the main cause of preventable mortality in hospitalized patients. Among VTE, there is the unique case of isolated distal deep vein thrombosis (IDDVT), which still lacks an agreement in terms of optimal therapeutic strategy. Although most IDDVTs are self-limiting and associated with a very low risk of embolic complications, still not all IDDVTs can be safely identified as stable. Lack of strong scientific evidence, fear of thromboembolic complications, and risk of bleeding upon initiation of anticoagulant treatment result in very heterogeneous therapeutic strategies among physicians. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the literature, highlight the many controversial issues regarding IDDVTs, and call for a consensus of experts aimed to shed new light on the gray areas of IDDVT management and therapy. PMID:27126683

  12. Impact of venous thromboembolism on clinical management and therapy after hip and knee arthroplasty.

    Fisher, William D

    2011-10-01

    Postoperative deep vein thrombosis (DVT) occurs most often in the large veins of the legs in patients undergoing major joint arthroplasty and major surgical procedures. These patients remain at high risk for venous thromboembolic events. In patients undergoing total hip or total knee arthroplasty (THA or TKA, respectively), different patterns of altered venous hemodynamics and hypercoagulability have been found, thus the rate of distal DVT is higher than that of proximal DVT after TKA. In addition, symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) occurs earlier after TKA than THA; however, most of those events occur after hospital discharge. Consequently, extended thromboprophylaxis after discharge should be considered and is particularly important after THA owing to the prolonged risk period for VTE. Evidence-based guideline recommendations for the prevention of VTE in these patients have not been fully implemented. This is partly owing to the limitations of traditional anticoagulants, such as the parenteral route of administration or frequent coagulation monitoring and dose adjustment, as well as concerns about bleeding risks. The introduction of new oral agents (e.g., dabigatran etexilate and rivaroxaban) may facilitate guideline adherence, particularly in the outpatient setting, owing to their oral administration without the need for routine coagulation monitoring. Furthermore, the direct Factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban has been shown to be more effective than enoxaparin in preventing VTE. PMID:21774881

  13. Decisions to withhold diagnostic investigations in nursing home patients with a clinical suspicion of venous thromboembolism.

    Henrike J Schouten

    Full Text Available This study aimed to gather insights in physicians' considerations for decisions to either refer for- or to withhold additional diagnostic investigations in nursing home patients with a suspicion of venous thromboembolism.Our study was nested in an observational study on diagnostic strategies for suspected venous thromboembolism in nursing home patients. Patient characteristics, bleeding-complications and mortality were related to the decision to withhold investigations. For a better understanding of the physicians' decisions, 21 individual face-to-face in-depth interviews were performed and analysed using the grounded theory approach.Referal for additional diagnostic investigations was forgone in 126/322 (39.1% patients with an indication for diagnostic work-up. 'Blind' anticoagulant treatment was initiated in 95 (75.4% of these patients. The 3 month mortality rates were higher for patients in whom investigations were withheld than in the referred patients, irrespective of anticoagulant treatment (odds ratio 2.45; 95% confidence interval 1.40 to 4.29 but when adjusted for the probability of being referred (i.e. the propensity score, there was no relation of non-diagnosis decisions to mortality (odds ratio 1.75; 0.98 to 3.11. In their decisions to forgo diagnostic investigations, physicians incorporated the estimated relative impact of the potential disease; the potential net-benefits of diagnostic investigations and whether performing investigations agreed with established management goals in advance care planning.Referral for additional diagnostic investigations is withheld in almost 40% of Dutch nursing home patients with suspected venous thromboembolism and an indication for diagnostic work-up. We propose that, given the complexity of these decisions and the uncertainty regarding their indirect effects on patient outcome, more attention should be focused on the decision to either use or withhold additional diagnostic tests.

  14. Incidence of recurrent venous thromboembolism and of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension in patients after a first episode of pulmonary embolism.

    Poli, Daniela; Grifoni, Elisa; Antonucci, Emilia; Arcangeli, Chiara; Prisco, Domenico; Abbate, Rosanna; Miniati, Massimo

    2010-10-01

    After a first episode of pulmonary embolism (PE), two major problems need to be considered: risk of recurrence when anticoagulation is stopped, and risk of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTPH). We followed prospectively consecutive patients who survived a first episode of PE, with or without deep vein thrombosis, to assess the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) recurrences and of symptomatic and asymptomatic CTPH. After 3-6 months of oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) patients underwent transthoracic echocardiography for measuring transtricuspid (rV-rA) gradient. When rV-rA gradient was >35 mmHg further evaluations were performed to rule in or out CTPH. During follow-up patients who developed persistent dyspnea were re-evaluated. In patients who underwent OAT withdrawal D-dimer (DD), prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 (F1 + 2), and thrombophilia were evaluated one month after warfarin discontinuation. Overall, 239 patients, 118 males, median age 59(16-89) years, were followed up for a median time of 36(9-192) months. Nine patients had rV-rA gradient >30 mmHg and ≤35 mmHg, and one of 37 mmHg. Among patients with normal rV-rA gradient, one developed persistent dyspnea 55 months after the first event and CPTH was confirmed. Among 206 patients who stopped OAT, 23(11.2%) had VTE recurrence, 11 PE(48%). Elevated DD and F1 + 2 levels after stopping OAT were significantly associated with recurrence. None of patients with recurrent VTE had elevated rV-rA gradient. In our series the incidence of CTPH after a first episode of PE was 0.4%. VTE recurrence and elevated DD and F1 + 2 levels seemed not to be related to the development of CTPH. PMID:20157841

  15. OPTIMAL PREVENTION OF HOSPITAL VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM WITH THE HELP OF MEDICAL INFORMATION SYSTEM

    G. I. Nazarenko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism are an important medical and social problem, contributing to the structure of morbidity and mortality in the developed countries. Despite the availability of clinical guidelines for the prevention of venous thromboembolic complications there is a gap between scientific knowledge and clinical practice. Clinical decision support systems (CDSS are confirmed to be effective tool for the implementation of clinical guidelines in daily practice. CDSS should be based on national and international clinical guidelines; their effectiveness depends upon successful integration with other health information systems and care flow processes.

  16. Risk of venous thromboembolism from use of oral contraceptives containing different progestogens and oestrogen doses: Danish cohort study, 2001-9

    Lidegaard, Øjvind; Nielsen, Lars Hougaard; Skovlund, Charlotte Wessel;

    2011-01-01

    To assess the risk of venous thromboembolism from use of combined oral contraceptives according to progestogen type and oestrogen dose.......To assess the risk of venous thromboembolism from use of combined oral contraceptives according to progestogen type and oestrogen dose....

  17. Risk factors predictive of occult cancer detection in patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism

    Ihaddadene, Ryma; Corsi, Daniel J.; Lazo-Langner, Alejandro; Shivakumar, Sudeep; Zarychanski, Ryan; Tagalakis, Vicky; Solymoss, Susan; Routhier, Nathalie; Douketis, James; Le Gal, Gregoire

    2016-01-01

    Risk factors predictive of occult cancer detection in patients with a first unprovoked symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) are unknown. Cox proportional hazard models and multivariate analyses were performed to assess the effect of specific risk factors on occult cancer detection within 1 year of a diagnosis of unprovoked VTE in patients randomized in the Screening for Occult Malignancy in Patients with Idiopathic Venous Thromboembolism (SOME) trial. A total of 33 (3.9%; 95% CI, 2.8%-5.4%) out of the 854 included patients received a new diagnosis of cancer at 1-year follow-up. Age ≥ 60 years (hazard ratio [HR], 3.11; 95% CI, 1.41-6.89; P = .005), previous provoked VTE (HR, 3.20; 95% CI, 1.19-8.62; P = .022), and current smoker status (HR, 2.80; 95% CI, 1.24-6.33; P = .014) were associated with occult cancer detection. Age, prior provoked VTE, and smoking status may be important predictors of occult cancer detection in patients with first unprovoked VTE. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00773448. PMID:26817957

  18. Efficacy and safety of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis with apixaban in major orthopedic surgery

    Werth S

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Sebastian Werth, Kai Halbritter, Jan Beyer-WestendorfCenter for Vascular Medicine and Department of Medicine III, Division of Angiology, University Hospital “Carl Gustav Carus” Dresden, Dresden, GermanyAbstract: Over the last 15 years, low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs have been accepted as the “gold standard” for pharmaceutical thromboprophylaxis in patients at high risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE in most countries around the world. Patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery (MOS represent a population with high risk of VTE, which may remain asymptomatic or become symptomatic as deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. Numerous trials have investigated LMWH thromboprophylaxis in this population and demonstrated high efficacy and safety of these substances. However, LMWHs have a number of disadvantages, which limit the acceptance of patients and physicians, especially in prolonged prophylaxis up to 35 days after MOS. Consequently, new oral anticoagulants (NOACs were developed that are of synthetic origin and act as direct and very specific inhibitors of different factors in the coagulation cascade. The most developed NOACs are dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban, all of which are approved for thromboprophylaxis in MOS in a number of countries around the world. This review is focused on the pharmacological characteristics of apixaban in comparison with other NOACs, on the impact of NOAC on VTE prophylaxis in daily care, and on the management of specific situations such as bleeding complications during NOAC therapy.Keywords: major orthopedic surgery, apixaban, dabigatran, edoxaban, rivaroxaban, deep vein thrombosis, venous thromboembolism, VTE prophylaxis

  19. Preventing venous thromboembolic events after total hip arthroplasty: new developments in clinical practice.

    Deitelzweig, Steven

    2012-04-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is a frequently performed orthopedic surgical procedure, and the number of these surgeries is expected to increase significantly over the coming years. Patients undergoing joint arthroplasty are at a particularly high risk for developing venous thromboembolic events (eg, deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism). Prevention of postoperative complications is an important responsibility not only for orthopedic surgeons, but also for other clinicians involved in patients' care. Effective thromboprophylaxis is crucial to reduce the risk of developing venous thromboembolism following total hip arthroplasty and is an important goal of therapy. In response to some of the practical limitations of traditional anticoagulants, a new generation of oral anticoagulants has been developed. These agents include the selective factor Xa inhibitors, rivaroxaban and apixaban, and the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran etexilate. The objective of this review article is to update hospitalists on the trial data and clinical considerations surrounding the new anticoagulants. Hospitalists play a key role in caring for surgical patients either in a consultative role or in conjunction with surgical teams. Thus, a practical knowledge of recent developments in thromboprophylaxis is essential for providing high-quality, evidence-based care. PMID:22615082

  20. Incidence of venous thromboembolism among patients who underwent major surgery in a public hospital in Singapore

    Anindya P. Susanto

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a fatal yet potentially preventable complication of surgery. Routine thromboprophylaxis is still unequivocal prescription is problematic due to perception of low VTE incidence among Asian population. This study aims to investigate the incidence of VTE and thromboprophylaxis prescription among patients undergoing major surgery in a Singapore hospital.Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. Data were obtained from medical record of 1,103 patients who had underwent major orthopaedic or abdominal surgery in 2011-2012 at Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Singapore. Incidence of VTE events either in the same admission or re-admission in less than one month time were noted as study parameters.Results: Incidence of VTE was 2.1% (95% CI: 1.67 - 2.53 of which 1.3% and 0.8% were DVT and PE cases respectively. Age, gender, history of VTE, ischemic heart disease, and mechanical prophylaxis were associated with VTE incidence based on bivariate analysis. The prescription of pharmacological thromboprophylaxis was associated with prior anticoagulant medication, type of surgery, and incidence of new bleeding. Conclusion: Subsequent to major surgeries, VTE is as common in Asian patients as published data in other populations. Pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis should be considered as recommended in non-Asian guidelines.Keywords: thromboprophylaxis, venous thromboembolism

  1. Comparative risk impact of edoxaban in the management of stroke and venous thromboembolism

    Tellor KB

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Katie B Tellor, Joseph S Van Tuyl, Anastasia L Armbruster Department of Pharmacy Practice, St Louis College of Pharmacy, St Louis, MO, USA Abstract: Edoxaban, a factor Xa inhibitor, was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration in 2015 for stroke prevention in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and treatment of venous thromboembolism. It is the fourth target-specific oral anticoagulant to be approved. Edoxaban is noninferior for efficacy compared to warfarin for both approved indications. Edoxaban is superior to warfarin for the first major or clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding event in venous thromboembolism and major bleeding in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Edoxaban is dosed once daily for both indications and requires dose adjustment for renal function. In patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, use is not recommended in patients with a creatinine clearance greater than 95 mL/min due to reduced efficacy. Edoxaban offers a new therapeutic alternative to the currently available options in the market. Keywords: anticoagulation, stroke, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, atrial fibrillation, Savaysa™

  2. Clinical utility of apixaban in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism: current evidence

    Zalpour A

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ali Zalpour,1 Thein Hlaing Oo21Division of Pharmacy – Clinical Programs, 2Section of Thrombosis and Benign Hematology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Anticoagulation with heparin and vitamin K antagonist has been the mainstay of prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE for many years. In recent years, novel oral anticoagulants such as dabigatran etexilate (a direct thrombin inhibitor and rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban (a direct factor Xa inhibitor have emerged for the prevention and treatment of VTE. Novel oral anticoagulants have been shown to be noninferior to vitamin K antagonist or heparin in the prevention and treatment of VTE. This review specifically examines the role of apixaban in the prevention and treatment of VTE based on the available literature. The management of apixaban in the perioperative setting is also explored because some patients on apixaban may require surgical intervention. Finally, we discuss the management of apixaban-induced major bleeding complications, the relevance of drug–drug interactions, and patient education.Keywords: new oral anticoagulants, apixaban, venous thromboembolism, thromboprophylaxis

  3. Rationale and design of XAMOS: noninterventional study of rivaroxaban for prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism after major hip and knee surgery

    Turpie AG

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Alexander GG Turpie,1 André C Schmidt,2 Reinhold Kreutz,3 Michael R Lassen,4 Waheed Jama,1,2 Lorenzo Mantovani,5 Sylvia Haas61Department of Medicine, Hamilton Health Sciences, General Division, Ontario, Canada; 2Bayer Healthcare Pharmaceuticals, Global Development, Berlin, Germany; 3Institut für Klinische Pharmakologie und Toxikologie, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Mitte, Berlin, Germany; 4Department of Orthopaedics, Spine Clinic, Clinical Trial Unit, Hørsholm Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Hørsholm, Denmark; 5Faculty of Pharmacy, Federico II University of Naples, Naples, Italy; 6Institut für Experimentelle Onkologie und Therapieforschung, TU München, GermanyAbstract: Venous thromboembolism is a frequent and potentially life-threatening complication of orthopedic surgery. Rivaroxaban is an oral direct factor Xa inhibitor, which was shown to be effective for the prevention of venous thromboembolism after elective hip and knee arthroplasty in the RECORD study program. Rivaroxaban has the potential to overcome the limitations of the current standards of care in the prevention of venous thromboembolism. XAMOS (Xarelto® in the prophylaxis of post-surgical venous thromboembolism after elective major orthopedic surgery of hip or knee is an international, noninterventional, parallel-group study to gain insight into the safety (major bleeding, side effects and effectiveness (prevention of symptomatic thromboembolic events of rivaroxaban in daily clinical practice. XAMOS will follow 15,000 patients after major orthopedic surgery in approximately 200 centers worldwide, with about 7500 patients receiving rivaroxaban and about 7500 standard of care. XAMOS will supplement the clinical data obtained in the Phase III RECORD 1, 2, 3, and 4 trials in which rivaroxaban was shown to be superior for the primary efficacy endpoints, and with a safety profile similar to that of enoxaparin after hip or knee replacement surgery. XAMOS was

  4. Cost-effectiveness of new oral anticoagulants in the treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism

    A. V. Rudakova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the cost-effectiveness of apixaban in the treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE compared with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH/warfarin and other new oral anticoagulants (NOACs. Material and methods. Cost-effectiveness analysis was performed using a Markov model, developed on the basis of the results of AMPLIFY AMPLIFY-Ext trials, and network meta-analyzes on the use of antithrombotic drugs in acute VTE and long-term administration after VTE. Markov cycle duration was 3 months. The duration of therapy in the simulation was 6 and 12 months. The time horizon of the study was 5 years. Life expectancy and costs were discounted by 3.5% per year. The costs on drugs were estimated based on the registered marginal cost price. Besides, the analysis was performed to the weighted average auctions prices for NOACs. The costs of monitoring and treatment of complications were calculated on the basis of the collective agreement of compulsory health insurance system (St. Petersburg, 2015. Results. Apixaban provided significant cost savings compared with other modes of anticoagulant therapy for hospital treatment. Apixaban provided cost savings compared with other NOACs with a minimal increase in life expectancy with regard to quality in long-term analysis. Apixaban provided an increase in life expectancy compared with the appointment of LMWH/warfarin, but required some increase in costs. At therapy duration of 6 months, the costs per one additional year of life with regard to quality and to one additional calendar year of life were 309.8-403.7 and 481.6-627.4 thousand rubles, respectively; at therapy duration of 12 months – 1254.4-1476.9 and 649.0-764.1 thousand rubles, respectively. Conclusion. Apixaban provided a reduction in the incidence of bleeding compared with other NOACs and LMWH/warfarin with comparable efficacy in treatment and secondary prevention of VTE. Apixaban therapy costs were lower than these

  5. Differences in urinary prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 levels after total hip replacement in relation to venous thromboembolism and bleeding events

    Borris, L C; Breindahl, M; Lassen, M R;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 is excreted in urine (uF1 + 2) as a result of thrombin generation and, therefore, may be a useful marker of coagulation status. OBJECTIVES: To assess uF1 + 2 levels after total hip replacement (THR) in patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) and bleeding ...

  6. Combined arterial and venous whole-body MR angiography with cardiac MR imaging in patients with thromboembolic disease - initial experience

    The objective was to assess the feasibility of a combined arterial and venous whole-body three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MR) angiography, together with a cardiac MR examination, in patients with arterial thromboembolism. Ten patients with arterial thromboembolism underwent a contrast-enhanced whole-body MR examination of the arterial and venous vessels, followed by a cardiac MR examination on a separate occasion within 24 h. All examinations were performed on a 1.5-T MR scanner. For both arterial and venous MR angiography only one injection of contrast agent was necessary. The cardiac imaging protocol included dark-blood-prepared half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo-spin-echo sequences, fast steady-state free precession cine sequences, T2-weighted turbo-spin-echo sequences and inversion recovery gradient-echo fast low-angle-shot sequences after injection of contrast agent. MR imaging revealed additional clinically unknown arterial thromboembolisms in four patients. The thoracic aorta was depicted as embolic source in four patients, while deep vein thrombosis (DVT) was found in one patient as the underlying disease. Unsuspected infarction of parenchymal organs was detected by MRI in two patients. An unknown additional DVT was found in one patient. Four patients were considered to have arterial emboli of cardiac origin. In conclusion, acquisition of arterial and venous MR angiograms of the entire vascular system combined with cardiac MR imaging is a most comprehensive and valuable strategy in patients with arterial thromboembolism. (orig.)

  7. Rivaroxaban for the prevention of venous thromboembolism after hip or knee arthroplasty. Pooled analysis of four studies

    Turpie, A G G; Lassen, M R; Eriksson, Birgit; Gent, M; Berkowitz, S D; Misselwitz, F; Bandel, T J; Homering, M; Westermeier, T; Kakkar, A K

    2011-01-01

    Four phase III studies compared oral rivaroxaban with subcutaneous enoxaparin for the prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) after total hip or knee arthroplasty (THA or TKA). A pooled analysis of these studies compared the effect of rivaroxaban with enoxaparin on symptomatic VTE plus all...

  8. Combined arterial and venous whole-body MR angiography with cardiac MR imaging in patients with thromboembolic disease - initial experience

    Vogt, Florian M.; Hunold, Peter; Barkhausen, Joerg [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Herborn, Christoph U. [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Medical Prevention Center Hamburg (MPCH) at University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Ruehm, Stefan G. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kroger, Knut [University Hospital Essen, Department of Angiology, Essen (Germany)

    2008-05-15

    The objective was to assess the feasibility of a combined arterial and venous whole-body three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MR) angiography, together with a cardiac MR examination, in patients with arterial thromboembolism. Ten patients with arterial thromboembolism underwent a contrast-enhanced whole-body MR examination of the arterial and venous vessels, followed by a cardiac MR examination on a separate occasion within 24 h. All examinations were performed on a 1.5-T MR scanner. For both arterial and venous MR angiography only one injection of contrast agent was necessary. The cardiac imaging protocol included dark-blood-prepared half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo-spin-echo sequences, fast steady-state free precession cine sequences, T2-weighted turbo-spin-echo sequences and inversion recovery gradient-echo fast low-angle-shot sequences after injection of contrast agent. MR imaging revealed additional clinically unknown arterial thromboembolisms in four patients. The thoracic aorta was depicted as embolic source in four patients, while deep vein thrombosis (DVT) was found in one patient as the underlying disease. Unsuspected infarction of parenchymal organs was detected by MRI in two patients. An unknown additional DVT was found in one patient. Four patients were considered to have arterial emboli of cardiac origin. In conclusion, acquisition of arterial and venous MR angiograms of the entire vascular system combined with cardiac MR imaging is a most comprehensive and valuable strategy in patients with arterial thromboembolism. (orig.)

  9. Management of acute portomesenteric venous thrombosis induced by protein S deficiency: report of a case.

    Lin, Hao-Yu; Ho, Cheng-Maw; Lai, Hong-Shiee; Lee, Po-Huang

    2012-10-01

    Hereditary protein S deficiency is a risk factor which may predispose patients to venous thrombosis. Deep venous thrombosis of the lower extremities can result in painful congestion, while the presence of mesenteric venous thrombosis (MVT) can cause abdominal emergencies. We herein report a protein S-deficient patient presenting with acute portomesenteric venous thrombosis. Early management using anticoagulant therapy was initially successful. However, the subsequent bowel stricture resulting from the ischemic insult was further managed with a surgical bypass. The patient was kept on long-term thrombophylaxis. The treatment strategy for MVT with bowel ischemia has evolved from aggressive portomesenteric thrombectomy with resection of the involved bowel, to conservative anticoagulation to recanalize thrombotic mesenteric veins with bowel preservation. Surgical intervention is reserved for transmural necrosis or bowel perforation. The perioperative thrombophylaxis of inherited thrombophilic patients is also important for preventing further thromboembolic events. PMID:22484987

  10. Red meat, processed meat and the risk of venous thromboembolism: friend or foe?

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Cervellin, Gianfranco; Mattiuzzi, Camilla

    2015-08-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a highly prevalent condition worldwide, which can be triggered by a combination of inherited and acquired risk factors, including diet. Several lines of evidence suggest that consumption of red and processed meat is associated with a significant risk of colorectal cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Therefore, an electronic search was conducted to identify clinical studies investigating the potential association between the risk of venous thrombosis and consumption of red or processed meat. Seven articles were finally included in this review, 6 prospective studies and 1 case-control investigation. Taken together, the evidence of the current scientific literature suggests that whether or not a pathophysiological link may exist between red or processed meat consumption and venous thrombosis, the association is definitely weak, since it was found to be non-statistically significant in four prospective cohort studies, marginally significant in one prospective cohort study and highly significant in the remaining prospective cohort study. In the single case-control study, the risk was also found to be non-statistically significant. Although further studies will be needed to definitely establish the existence of a thrombotic risk associated with different subtypes of red or processed meat, it seems premature to conclude that a reduced consumption of red and processed meat lowers the risk of VTE. PMID:25962721

  11. Pregnancy-associated venous thromboembolism: Part I- Deep vein thrombus diagnosis and treatment

    Venous thromboembolic (VTE) complications are leading causes of mortality in the developed world. Over the past 20 years, there has been an increase of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in the pregnant women, and this increase may be explained by the risk factors including older age, cesarean section, history of VTE and presence of thrombophilia. To reduce the incidence of VTE in pregnancy and improve the outcomes, a wider understanding of the risk factors and a better identification of women at a risk of the thrombosis, with objective diagnosis and provide the optimal effective and safe treatment. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, considered manifestations of the same disease, are often preventable and usually treatable. Nevertheless, VTE remains a substantial problem despite the dramatic decline in pregnancy-related mortality in industrialized countries over the past century. While diagnosis and management of VTE in pregnancy are challenging, and many diagnosis tests are less accurate in pregnant than non-pregnant patients and the available options are suboptimal. This is a review in 2 parts, in part I, we address the following questions. In pregnant women, who developed DVT; how to diagnose and the treatment once the diagnosis is confirmed. For each of these problems, the relevant background is briefly summarized, approaches recommended and the suggested practical and relatively safe diagnostic management approaches. Part II, we address pregnant women with pulmonary embolism, how to diagnose and treat. (author)

  12. Imaging diagnosis of acute pulmonary thromboembolism

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a frequent disease which requires an accurate diagnosis in order to establish an effective treatment considering that anticoagulant therapy may lead to complications. Lung ventilation / perfusion scintigraphy (LS V/Q) has been employed as the imaging meted of choice in patients with suspicion of PE. Pulmonary angiography is considered invasive, hence its utilization is usually reserved for otherwise unresolved cases. Other methods like venous Doppler ultrasound and echocardiography have a complementary role or are not widely indicated. The introduction of spiral CT (SCT), specially with multislice capabilities has made available a fast, relatively economic and efficient method for non-invasive diagnosis of PE. Availability of the technique is increasing and it has been included in some diagnostic algorithms for PE as the initial method of evaluation (and sometimes the only one). However, most research has been performed comparing this state-of-the-art technology with classical radionuclide protocols instead of using updated techniques such as SPECT and ultrafine radio aerosols. Moreover, SCT delivers much higher dose rates to the patient which must be taken into account specially in young individuals. In general, available evidence shows superior sensitivity of LS V/Q with higher specificity of SCT, within a context of similar overall accuracy provided optimized protocols are employed. Interpretation criteria for LS V/Q should be revised in an attempt to minimize indeterminate results, and together with the routine utilization of SPECT and novel ventilation systems should improve the performance of LS V/Q. The choice of the initial diagnostic modality should be guided by a correct determination of pre-test probability, clinical characteristics of the patient potentially influencing the efficacy and safety of the method, availability of the different techniques, relative costs and operator's experience. Such a selective and pragmatic

  13. Venous thromboembolism prevention post neck of femur fractures – does it make a difference?

    Hussain Fazleenah

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neck of femur fractures predispose patients to venous thromboembolism (VTE. NICE has issued guideline 46 to reduce this risk through the use of antithrombic agents. We audited our department's VTE practise by reviewing the clinical notes of 123 consecutive patients with no exclusions. We found our compliance to be a low 6%. We also found that patients were likely to be given low molecular heparin (LMWH only during their hospital stay. Reasons for the low adherence were probably secondary to confusion caused by the multiple thromboprophylaxis protocols used in our department. The correlation between duration of heparin administration and length of hospital stay was due to logistical difficulty in administering VTE prophylaxis out of hospital setting.

  14. The prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism with LMWHs and new anticoagulants

    Andrew D Blann

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Andrew D Blann, Chee W KhooUniversity Department of Medicine, City Hospital, Birmingham, UKAbstract: As the risk factors for thrombosis are becoming better understood, so is the need for anticoagulation. The inherent difficulties with warfarin are such that a low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH is often the key therapeutic. However, there are several different species of LMWH available to the practitioner, which leads to the need for an objective guide. New agents are coming onto the marketplace, and these may supersede both warfarin and the heparins. The current report will review the biochemistry and pharmacology of different LWMHs and identify which are more suitable for the different presentations of venous thromboembolism. It will conclude with a brief synopsis of new agents which may supersede warfarin and heparin.Keywords: thrombosis, warfarin, heparin, anticoagulation

  15. Symptomatic and incidental venous thromboembolic disease are both associated with mortality in patients with prostate cancer.

    Shruti Chaturvedi

    Full Text Available The association between malignancy and venous thromboembolic disease (VTE is well established. The independent impact of VTE, both symptomatic and incidental, on survival in patients with prostate cancer is not known. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the effect of VTE of survival in prostate cancer.Data regarding clinical characteristics, treatment and outcomes of 453 consecutive prostate cancer patients were collected. Fisher exact (categorical variables and t-test (continuous variables were utilized to test associations with VTE and mortality. Survival was estimated using the Kaplan Meier method. A Cox regression model was used to model the mortality hazard ratio (HR.At diagnosis, 358 (83% patients had early stage disease, 43 (10% had locally advanced disease and 32 (7% had metastatic disease. During the follow up period, 122 (27% patients died and 41 (9% developed VTE (33 deep vein thrombosis, 5 pulmonary embolism, and 3 patients with both DVT and PE. Twenty-five VTE events were symptomatic and 16 were incidentally diagnosed on CT scans obtained for other reasons. VTE was associated with increased mortality [HR 6.89 (4.29-11.08, p<0.001] in a multivariable analysis adjusted for cancer stage, performance status, treatments and co-morbidities. There was no difference in survival between patients who had symptomatic and incidental VTE.Venous thromboembolic disease, both symptomatic and incidental, is a predictor of poor survival in patients with prostate cancer, especially those with advanced disease. Further studies are needed to evaluate the benefit of prophylactic and therapeutic anticoagulation in this population.

  16. Establishment of selected acute pulmonary thromboembolism model in experimental sheep

    Objective: To establish a selected acute pulmonary thromboembolism model in experimental sheep suitable for animal experiment. Methods: By using Seldinger's technique the catheter sheath was placed in both the femoral vein and femoral artery in ten sheep. Under C-arm DSA guidance the catheter was inserted through the catheter sheath into the pulmonary artery. Via the catheter appropriate amount of sheep autologous blood clots was injected into the selected pulmonary arteries. The selected acute pulmonary thromboembolism model was thus established. Pulmonary angiography was performed to check the results. The pulmonary arterial pressure, femoral artery pressure,heart rates and partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood (PaO2) were determined both before and after the treatment. The above parameters obtained after the procedure were compared with the recorded parameters measured before the procedure, and the sheep model quality was evaluated. Results: The baseline of pulmonary arterial pressure was (27.30 ± 9.58) mmHg,femoral artery pressure was (126.4 ± 13.72) mmHg, heart rate was (103 ± 15) bpm and PaO2 was (87.7 ± 12.04) mmHg. Sixty minutes after the injection of (30 ± 5) ml thrombotic agglomerates, the pulmonary arterial pressures rose to (52 ± 49) mmHg, femoral artery pressures dropped to (100 ± 21) mmHg. The heart rates went up to (150 ± 26) bpm. The PaO2 fell to (25.3 ± 11.2) mmHg. After the procedure the above parameters were significantly different from that measured before the procedure in all ten animals (P < 0.01). The pulmonary arteriography clearly demonstrated that the selected pulmonary arteries were successfully embolized. Conclusion: The anatomy of sheep's femoral veins,vena cava system, pulmonary artery and right heart system are suitable for the establishment of the catheter passage, for this reason, selected acute pulmonary thromboembolism model can be easily created in experimental sheep. The technique is feasible and the model has

  17. Efficacy and Safety of Low Molecular Weight Heparin Prophylaxis for Venous Thromboembolism Following Lumbar Decompression Surgery

    Zhi-jian Sun; Xiang Li; Yu Zhao; Giu-xing Qiu; Yi-peng Wang; Xi-sheng Weng; Hong Zhao; Jian-xiong Shen; Yu Jiang; Ye Li

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) prophylaris for venous thromboembolism (VTE) after lumbar decompression surgery.Methods Patients at high or the highest risk of VTE who underwent lumbar spine surgery in Peking Union Medical College Hospital from January 2004 to April 2011 were included in the present study.All the patients received a half dose of LMWH 6 hours after surgery followed by a full dose LMWH once per day until discharge.We recorded incidences of deep venous thrombosis (DVT),pulmonary embolism (PE),bleeding complications,and medication side effects.Results Seventy-eight consecutive patients were eligible and enrolled in this study.The mean hospital stat was 8.5+4.5 days.No symptomatic DVT,PE,or major bleeding events were observed.One patient developed wound ecchymosis,another developed wound bleeding,four had mild hepatic aminotransferase level elevation,and one developed a suspicious allergic reaction.Conclusion LMWH may be applied as an effective and safe prophylaxis for VTE in high-risk patients undergoing lumbar decompression surgery.

  18. Association between particulate air pollution and venous thromboembolism: A systematic literature review.

    Franchini, Massimo; Mengoli, Carlo; Cruciani, Mario; Bonfanti, Carlo; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution is a leading global problem for public health. A number of ambient pollutants have been involved, including carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), ozone (O3) and particulate matter (PM). Although exposure to PM has been linked to a wide array of cardiovascular and respiratory disorders, its effect on venous thrombotic disorders is still uncertain. To elucidate this issue, we have performed a systematic review on the existing literature on the association between PM and venous thromboembolism (VTE), using MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane electronic databases. Of the 158 reviewed studies, 11 of them (3 case-crossover studies, 2 time-series studies, 2 case-control studies, 2 prospective cohort studies, 2 retrospective studies) involving more than 500,000 events fulfilled the inclusion criteria and results are presented here. Because there was substantial heterogeneity in study design, duration of follow-up, statistical measure of effects, clinical outcomes and threshold, we refrained to perform a quantitative analysis of the available data and carried out only a systematic review. Overall, the literature data suggest a link between PM and VTE, but further trials on larger populations of patients with homogeneous study designs and outcomes are warranted. PMID:26639051

  19. Potential role of new anticoagulants for prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism in cancer patients

    Gómez-Outes A

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Antonio Gómez-Outes,1 M Luisa Suárez-Gea,1 Ramón Lecumberri,2 Ana Isabel Terleira-Fernández,3,4 Emilio Vargas-Castrillón,3,4 Eduardo Rocha51Division of Pharmacology and Clinical Evaluation, Medicines for Human Use, Spanish Agency for Medicines and Medical Devices, Madrid, 2Department of Hematology, University Clinic of Navarra, Pamplona, 3Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Hospital Clínico, Madrid, 4Department of Pharmacology, Universidad Complutense, Madrid, 5Department of Hematology, School of Medicine, University of Navarra, Pamplona, SpainAbstract: Venous thromboembolism (VTE, encompassing deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cancer. Low molecular weight heparins are the preferred option for anticoagulation in cancer patients according to current clinical practice guidelines. Fondaparinux may also have a place in prevention of VTE in hospitalized cancer patients with additional risk factors and for initial treatment of VTE. Although low molecular weight heparins and fondaparinux are effective and safe, they require daily subcutaneous administration, which may be problematic for many patients, particularly if long-term treatment is needed. Studying anticoagulant therapy in oncology patients is challenging because this patient group has an increased risk of VTE and bleeding during anticoagulant therapy compared with the population without cancer. Risk factors for increased VTE and bleeding risk in these patients include concomitant treatments (surgery, chemotherapy, placement of central venous catheters, radiotherapy, hormonal therapy, angiogenesis inhibitors, antiplatelet drugs, supportive therapies (ie, steroids, blood transfusion, white blood cell growth factors, and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, and tumor-related factors (local vessel damage and invasion, abnormalities in platelet function, and number. New anticoagulants in development for prophylaxis

  20. Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in meningioma surgery - a population based comparative effectiveness study of routine mechanical prophylaxis with or without preoperative low molecular weight heparin

    Sjåvik, Kristin; Bartek, Jiri; Solheim, Ole;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECT: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a serious complication after intracranial meningioma surgery. To what extent systemic prophylaxis with pharmacotherapy is beneficial with respect to VTE risk, or associated with increased risk of bleeding and postoperative hemorrhage, remains debated. The c...

  1. Pros and cons of new oral anticoagulants in the treatment of venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer.

    Verso, Melina; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Prandoni, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Patients with cancer account for 20 % of cases of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Cancer patients are at increased risk for VTE during the entire course of their disease, also in absence of traditional VTE risk factors. Furthermore, patients with VTE and cancer have an estimated risk of bleeding of 15-20 % per year while on anticoagulant treatment. For these reasons, treatment of acute VTE in patients with cancer remains a clinical challenge. In clinical studies, which included about 27,000 patients, new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been shown to be as effective and safe as conventional anticoagulation (heparin given with and followed by vitamin K antagonists) for the treatment of VTE. In these studies, 1227 patients with active cancer were enrolled. Preliminary results of subgroup analyses and meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials suggest that NOACs could represent an alternative to conventional anticoagulation in patients with active cancer. Further "ad hoc" studies evaluating the clinical benefit of treatment with NOACs in patients with VTE and cancer are needed. PMID:25840679

  2. The recent clinical trials on use of the novel direct oral anticoagulants in patients with venous thromboembolism: a review

    Gualtiero Palareti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE, encompassing deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, requires an immediate anticoagulation, that has been carried out so far by administering a parenteral anticoagulant drug (heparin or derivatives overlapped with an oral vitamin K antagonist (VKA, more often warfarin. Several new direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs, with a mechanism of action completely different than VKA, have been developed in recent years. Recent clinical trials have investigated their use in VTE patients showing results at least equal for efficacy and safety, and sometime even better, as the standard anticoagulant treatment. There are differences in the design of the trials. In two cases the involved DOAC was administered immediately after VTE diagnosis as a single drug treatment (rivaroxaban and apixaban, whereas in the other trials (involving dabigatran and edoxaban the DOAC was administered after an initial course of approximately 7 days with heparin or derivatives. Some clinical trials have also investigated the use of DOACs for extended anticoagulant treatment after the acute phase. Aim of this article is to review the results of the currently available clinical trials that have compared the use of DOACs versus the standard of care in patients with VTE.

  3. Tromboprofilaxis en pacientes no quirúrgicos internados en un hospital general Venous thromboembolism prevention in non-surgical adult patients admitted in a general hospital

    Marcelo J. Melero

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Los pacientes adultos internados por una enfermedad no quirúrgica tienen un riesgo alto de padecer una tromboembolia venosa y pueden desarrollar alguna forma de esta enfermedad cuando no reciben un tratamiento preventivo adecuado. Los objetivos de este estudio prospectivo, analítico, observacional y transversal, fueron: 1 determinar cuál es el porcentaje de pacientes adultos internados por una enfermedad aguda no quirúrgica en el Hospital de Clínicas José de San Martín, Universidad de Buenos Aires, que tienen indicación de tromboprofilaxis, 2 establecer cuántos de ellos reciben un tratamiento preventivo para la tromboembolia venosa, y 3 comprobar cuántos estaban medicados con alguna forma de tromboprofilaxis sin tener causas que justificaran este tratamiento. Se estudiaron 93 pacientes durante un lapso de 72 horas consecutivas. Se encontró que el 90.3% de ellos necesitaba un tratamiento preventivo para la tromboembolia venosa y el 76.2% de estos enfermos recibían tromboprofilaxis farmacológica. Un 33.3% de los pacientes internados tenía indicado un tratamiento farmacológico preventivo sin tener una causa que justificara esta prescripción. El porcentaje encontrado de pacientes tratados con tromboprofilaxis es más alto que el comunicado en otros estudios observacionales.Adult patients hospitalized for a non-surgical condition, usually have a high risk of venous thromboembolism and may develop some form of this disease when they do not receive appropriate preventive treatment. The objectives of this prospective, analytical, observational and cross-sectional study were: 1 to determine what percentage of adult patients hospitalized for a non-surgical acute condition at the Hospital de Clínicas José de San Martín, Universidad de Buenos Aires, had indication for preventive thromboprophylaxis, 2 to establish how many of them had been prescribed a preventive treatment of venous thromboembolism, 3 to establish how many of them had been

  4. High absolute risks and predictors of venous and arterial thromboembolic events in patients with nephrotic syndrome: results from a large retrospective cohort study.

    Mahmoodi, B.K.; Kate, M.K. ten; Waanders, F.; Veeger, N.J.; Brouwer, J.L.; Vogt, L.; Navis, G.; Meer, J.W.M. van der

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: No data are available on the absolute risk of either venous thromboembolism (VTE) or arterial thromboembolism (ATE) in patients with nephrotic syndrome. Reported risks are based on multiple case reports and small studies with mostly short-term follow-up. We assessed the absolute risk of

  5. 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations and risk of venous thromboembolism in the general population with 18,791 participants

    Brøndum-Jacobsen, Peter; Benn, Marianne; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vitamin D has potential antithrombotic effects suggesting that vitamin D analogs could be used as adjunctive antithrombotic agents. However, epidemiological evidence of an association between reduced 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations and risk of venous thromboembolism is lacking...... adjusted plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D(log-rank trend:p= 4×10(-4) ). Comparing participants in the lowest versus the highest tertile of plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, the crude risk estimates in an age and sex adjusted model was a 37%(95% confidence interval: 15%-64%) increased risk of venous...... thromboembolism. Corresponding risk increases in an age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and cancer adjusted model was 26%(5%-51%), and in a multivariable adjusted model further including physical activity, hormone replacement therapy, menopausal status, oral contraception use, and lipid lowering therapy 28...

  6. Risk of venous thromboembolism in people with lung cancer: a cohort study using linked UK healthcare data

    Walker, Alex J.; Baldwin, David R; Card, Tim R; Powell, Helen A; Hubbard, Richard B.; Grainge, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    Background: Venous thromboembolism is a potentially preventable cause of death in people with lung cancer. Identification of those most at risk and high risk periods may provide the opportunity for better targeted intervention. Methods: We conducted a cohort study using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink linked to Hospital Episode Statistics and Cancer Registry data. Our cohort comprised 10,598 people with lung cancer diagnosed between 1997 and 2006 with follow-up continuing to the ...

  7. Variation in the risk of venous thromboembolism in people with colorectal cancer: a population-based cohort study from England

    Walker, A J; West, J.; Card, T R; Humes, D J; Grainge, M J

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with colorectal cancer are at high risk of developing venous thromboembolism (VTE), and recent international guidelines have advised extended prophylaxis for some of these patients following surgery or during chemotherapy. However, our understanding of which patients are at increased risk, and to what extent, is limited. Objectives To determine absolute and relative rates of VTE among patients with colorectal cancer according to Dukes stage, surgical intervention, and chem...

  8. Prevention of venous thromboembolism after total knee replacement by high-dose aspirin or intermittent calf and thigh compression.

    McKenna, R; Galante, J; Bachmann, F.; Wallace, D.L.; Kaushal, P S; Meredith, P.

    1980-01-01

    A prospective study of patients undergoing total knee replacement was carried out by using a combination of 125I-fibrinogen scanning and phlebography, and showed a high incidence of venous thromboembolic disease (TE). Ventilation-perfusion lung scanning was performed to detect pulmonary emboli in most patients. High doses of aspirin and an intermittent low-pressure pneumatic compression device (IPCD) were effective, even in women, in preventing TE. Low doses of aspirin and placebo were equall...

  9. Risk factors for venous thromboembolism and prophylaxis in medical inpatients: data from the FADOI ‘‘GEMINI’’ study

    Mauro Campanini; Gualberto Gussoni; Mauro Silingardi; Gianluigi Scannapieco; Carlo Buniolo; Antonella Valerio; Walter Ageno; Ido Iori; Antonino Mazzone; on behalf of the FADOI ‘‘GEMINI’’ study

    2013-01-01

    Background: Though venous thromboembolism (VTE) frequently occurs in non-surgical setting, epidemiology and risk factors for VTE in unselected medical inpatients have not been extensively studied, and uncertainties remain about the prophylactic strategy in these patients. Materials and methods: In a prospective, observational, multicenter study we aimed to contemporarily assess the epidemiology of symptomatic VTE in consecutive patients hospitalized in Internal Medicine, to evaluate the impac...

  10. Coagulation factors IX through XIII and the risk of future venous thrombosis: the Longitudinal Investigation of Thromboembolism Etiology

    Cushman, Mary; O'Meara, Ellen S.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Heckbert, Susan R

    2009-01-01

    Higher levels of procoagulant factors and factor XII deficiency may be risk factors for first venous thromboembolism (VTE). We studied associations of coagulation factors IX through XIII with risk of future VTE in 2 general population samples. Using a nested case-control study combining the 21 860 participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study and the Cardiovascular Health Study, we determined antigenic levels of these coagulation factors in primarily pre-event blood samples fr...

  11. Clustering Patterns of Comorbidities Associated with In-Hospital Death in Hospitalizations of US Adults with Venous Thromboembolism

    Tsai, James; Grant, Althea M.; Soucie, J. Michael; Helwig, Amy; Yusuf, Hussain R.; Boulet, Sheree L.; Reyes, Nimia L.; Atrash, Hani K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a significant source of mortality, morbidity, disability, and impaired health-related quality of life in the world. Objective: We aimed to evaluate the clustering patterns and associations of 29 comorbidities with in-hospital death among adult hospitalizations with a diagnosis of VTE in the United States by analyzing data from the 2009 Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 153,124 adult hospitalizations with a dia...

  12. Antipsychotics and risk of venous thromboembolism: A population-based case-control study

    Anna K Jönsson

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Anna K Jönsson1, Erzsebet Horváth-Puhó2, Staffan Hägg3, Lars Pedersen4, Henrik Toft Sørensen41Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden; 2Centre for Registry Research, Aarhus C, Denmark; 3Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 4Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus C, DenmarkAbstract: During the last decade, the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE has been reported in users of antipsychotic drugs. However, the reports have been inconclusive. This study aimed to determine the relative risk of VTE in antipsychotic drug users. Using data from medical databases in North Jutland and Aarhus Counties, Denmark, and the Danish Civil Registration System, we identified 5,999 cases with a first-time diagnosis of VTE and, based on risk set sampling, 59,990 sex- and age-matched population controls during 1997–2005. Users of antipsychotic drugs were identified from population-based prescription databases and categorized based on filled prescriptions prior to admission date for VTE or index date for controls as current (at least one prescription within 90 days, recent (at least one prescription within 91–180 days, former (at least one prescription within 181–365 days or nonusers (no recorded prescription within 365 days. Compared with nonusers, current users of any antipsychotic drugs had an increased risk of VTE (adjusted relative risk [ARR]: 1.99, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.69–2.34. Former users of any antipsychotic drugs had a nonsignificant elevated risk of VTE compared with nonusers (ARR: 1.54, 95% CI: 0.99–2.40, p-value: 0.056. In conclusion, users of antipsychotic drugs have an increased risk of VTE, compared with nonusers, which might be due to the treatment itself, to lifestyle factors, to the underlying disease, or to residual confounding. Keywords: antipsychotic agents, venous thromboembolism, adverse effects, case-control study

  13. Prospective study of diet and venous thromboembolism in US women and men.

    Varraso, Raphaëlle; Kabrhel, Christopher; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Rimm, Eric B; Camargo, Carlos A

    2012-01-15

    The authors investigated diet as a risk factor for the development of venous thromboembolism (VTE) among 129,430 US women and men in the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study. There were 2,892 cases of VTE from 1984 through 2008. Information on participants' dietary intakes was collected every 2-4 years using a food frequency questionnaire. Dietary patterns (prudent vs. Western), food intakes (fruit, vegetables, fish, red and processed meats, and alcohol), and nutrient intakes (omega-3 fatty acids, trans fatty acids, total fiber, and vitamins K(1), B(6), B(12), and E) were categorized into quintiles, and the risk of VTE was compared among quintiles with the use of Cox proportional hazard models. After adjusting the results for 17 potential confounders, the authors found that adherence to the Western dietary pattern was associated with an increased risk of VTE in men (for the highest quintile vs. the lowest, relative risk = 1.43, 95% confidence interval: 1.16, 1.78; P for trend red and processed meat and trans fatty acids, no association was found in women, whereas a significant positive association was found in men. These results suggest a weak association between diet and the risk of VTE. PMID:22180874

  14. Incidence of venous thromboembolism in the setting of hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    O'Hara, V J Daphne; Miller, Trent; Mehta, Rakesh; Swartzendruber, Evonne; Kiel, Patrick J

    2014-01-01

    The underlying risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is unclear in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). As such, these patients should still be considered at risk for development of VTE due to factors such as their underlying malignancy and the marked inflammatory state that develops from treatment. The purpose of this study was to characterize the incidence of VTE in patients undergoing HCT. Retrospective chart review of patients from the Indiana University Stem Cell Transplant Unit treated between January 1, 2008, and May 24, 2011. Patients were older than 18 years and had undergone HCT. The primary objective was to analyze the incidence of VTE in patients undergoing autologous HCT versus allogeneic HCT. Secondary objectives included documentation of VTE treatment strategies and time to occurrence of VTE. Of the 567 patients who underwent autologous HCT, 14 developed VTE (2.5%), whereas 5 of the 180 patients who underwent allogeneic HCT developed VTE (2.8%; P = 1.000). The median time to development of VTE from admission for HCT was 12 days in the autologous HCT arm versus 19 days in the allogeneic HCT arm (P = 0.610). The most commonly used VTE treatment strategy was enoxaparin (12 out of 19 VTEs). This study illustrates that VTE does occur rarely in patients who have undergone HCT. The optimal treatment regimen in this population requires further evaluation. Until a reliable protocol for treatment and evidence for risk factors are established, providers should be vigilant for occurrence of VTE in these patients. PMID:24061558

  15. Enoxaparin venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in bariatric surgery: A best evidence topic.

    Parker, S G; McGlone, E R; Knight, W R; Sufi, P; Khan, O A

    2015-11-01

    A best evidence topic in surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: which is the best regimen of enoxaparin thromboprophylaxis for patients undergoing bariatric surgery? One hundred and twenty-five papers were identified using the reported literature search, of which four represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, country and date of publication, patient groups, relevant outcomes and results of these papers were tabulated. All four studies are non-randomized cohort studies examining venous thromboembolism rates and major postoperative bleeding following varying regimens of Enoxaparin thromboprophylaxis. There is no level 1 evidence which significantly favors any particular thromboprophylaxis regimen. There is some evidence that extended duration of treatment of ten days after discharge significantly reduces the incidence of VTE compared to in-hospital treatment only, and that a higher incidence of post-operative bleeding occurs with a regimen that includes a pre-operative dose of Enoxaparin. With regard to dosage, for in-hospital treatment the higher dosage of 40 mg twice daily as opposed to 30 mg seems to significantly reduce the incidence of VTE without significantly affecting bleeding rate. PMID:26394187

  16. Clinical and economic analysis of the use of apixaban for the treatment of venous thromboembolic events

    O. V. Shatalova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Pharmacoeconomic analysis of apixaban use compared to conventional therapy in patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE.Material and methods. Economic evaluation was performed from a position of the health care system. The cost analysis, "cost-effectiveness" analysis, "impact on the budget” analysis, and sensitivity analysis were fulfilled.Results. In real clinical practice in hospitals direct medical costs of apixaban treatment of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism make up 2331.67 and 3142.98 rubles, respectively, while the costs of the standard therapy - 6192.15 and 6225.75 rubles. Potential resource savings will reduce 2.65 times the cost of the health system. The share of the costs of treatment of adverse effects (bleeding in the conventional therapy group was 4.8 times higher than the costs in apixaban group. The results of analysis of the effect on the budget show a decrease in the load on the budget when apixaban was included in the treatment regimen of VTE. Potential resource savings of the health system in the treatment of 1,000 patients with apixaban will account 3,911,860 rubles in comparison with conventional therapy.Conclusion. The inclusion of apixaban in the therapy of VTE can significantly reduce the burden on the budget of the health care system.

  17. Comparison of sodium and calcium heparin in prevention of venous thromboembolism.

    Cade, J F; Andrews, J T; Stubbs, A E

    1982-10-01

    The relative efficacy of sodium and calcium heparin in preventing venous thromboembolism and their relative side-effects were studied in 234 high-risk patients in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The two heparin preparations were from the same batch and in the same concentration, and were given in a dose of 5000 U 12 hourly. Positive leg scans were found in 19% after placebo, 12% after sodium heparin and 8% after calcium heparin. Bruising at the injection site was more common after calcium heparin (66%) than after sodium heparin (53%) or placebo (38%). Pain at the injection site was also more common after calcium heparin (26%) than after sodium heparin (8%) or placebo (6%). Changes in the activated partial thromboplastin time were small and did not correlate with leg scan results or bruising. While there was a tendency for calcium heparin to be possibly more effective, it was followed by significantly more local haematoma and pain. PMID:6758747

  18. Socioeconomic and occupational risk factors for venous thromboembolism in Sweden: a nationwide epidemiological study.

    Zöller, Bengt; Li, Xinjun; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2012-05-01

    Our aims were to investigate possible associations between hospitalisation for venous thromboembolism (VTE) and socioeconomic and occupational factors. A nationwide database was constructed by linking Swedish census data to the Hospital Discharge Register (1990-2007). Hospital diagnoses of VTE were based on the International Classification of Diseases. Standardised incidence ratios were calculated for different socioeconomic and occupational groups. A total of 43063 individuals aged >20 years were hospitalised for VTE. Individuals with >12 years of education were at lower risk for VTE. Blue-collar workers, farmers, and non-employed individuals had higher risks for VTE, and white collar workers and professionals lower risks. In males and/or females, risks for VTE were increased for assistant nurses; farmers; miners and quarry workers; mechanics, iron and metalware workers; wood workers; food manufacture workers; packers; loaders and warehouse workers; public safety and protection workers; cooks and stewards; home helpers; building caretakers; and cleaners. Decreased risks were observed for technical, chemical, physical, and biological workers; physicians; dentists; nurses; other health and medical workers; teachers, religious, juridical, and other social science-related workers; artistic workers; clerical workers; sale agents; and fishermen, whalers and sealers. High educational level and several occupations requiring high levels of education were protective against VTE, while the risks for VTE were increased for farmers, blue-collar workers and non-employed individuals. The mechanisms are unknown but it might involve persistent psychosocial stress related to low socioeconomic and occupational status. PMID:21868069

  19. COPD and risk of venous thromboembolism and mortality in a general population.

    Børvik, Trond; Brækkan, Sigrid K; Enga, Kristin; Schirmer, Henrik; Brodin, Ellen E; Melbye, Hasse; Hansen, John-Bjarne

    2016-02-01

    The relationship between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) has been scarcely studied in the general population. We aimed to investigate the association between COPD and risk of VTE and mortality in a population-based cohort.Spirometry was conducted in 8646 males and females, participating in the fifth (2001-02) and sixth (2007-08) surveys of the Tromsø Study. Incident VTE events during follow-up were registered from the date of inclusion to December 31, 2011. Cox-regression models with COPD stages and confounders as time varying covariates were used to calculate hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals for VTE and all-cause mortality.During a median follow-up of 6.2 years, 215 subjects developed VTE. Subjects with COPD stage III/IV had a two-fold higher risk of secondary VTE compared to subjects with normal airflow (HR 2.05, 95% CI 1.02-4.10). COPD patients, particularly those with stage III/IV disease, with VTE had a higher mortality rate than COPD patients without VTE (50.2% versus 5.6% per year).Our findings suggest that patients with severe COPD may have increased risk of secondary VTE, and that COPD patients with VTE have a higher mortality rate than COPD patients without VTE. PMID:26585434

  20. Progressive Mobility Protocol Reduces Venous Thromboembolism Rate in Trauma Intensive Care Patients: A Quality Improvement Project.

    Booth, Kathryn; Rivet, Josh; Flici, Richelle; Harvey, Ellen; Hamill, Mark; Hundley, Douglas; Holland, Katelyn; Hubbard, Sandra; Trivedi, Apurva; Collier, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    The intensive care unit (ICU) trauma population is at high risk for complications associated with immobility. The purpose of this project was to compare ICU trauma patient outcomes before and after implementation of a structured progressive mobility (PM) protocol. Outcomes included hospital and ICU stays, ventilator days, falls, respiratory failure, pneumonia, or venous thromboembolism (VTE). In the preintervention cohort, physical therapy (PT) consults were placed 53% of the time. This rose to more than 90% during the postintervention period. PT consults seen within 24 hr rose from a baseline 23% pre- to 74%-94% in the 2 highest compliance postintervention months. On average, 40% of patients were daily determined to be too unstable for mobility per protocol guidelines-most often owing to elevated intracranial pressure. During PM sessions, there were no adverse events (i.e., extubation, hypoxia, fall). There were no significant differences in clinical outcomes between the 2 cohorts regarding hospital and ICU stays, average ventilator days, mortality, falls, respiratory failure, or pneumonia overall or within ventilated patients specifically. There was, however, a difference in the incidence of VTE between the preintervention cohort (21%) and postintervention cohort (7.5%) (p = .0004). A PM protocol for ICU trauma patients is safe and may reduce patient deconditioning and VTE complications in this high-risk population. Multidisciplinary commitment, daily protocol reinforcement, and active engagement of patients/families are the cornerstones to success in this ICU PM program. PMID:27618376

  1. Prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism: a great global divide between expert guidelines and clinical practice?

    Bikdeli, Behnood; Sharif-Kashani, Babak

    2012-03-01

    Our understanding of development and prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) has improved dramatically since Virchow described the triad of stasis, hypercoagulability, and endothelial dysfunction during the mid-1800s. A full arsenal of effective pharmacological and mechanical methods can help prevent VTE and many professional organizations have provided extensive evidence-based statements for VTE prophylaxis. Disappointingly, however, VTE has remained the major preventable cause of hospital death. Adherence rate to clinical guidelines is undesirably low. Many real-world patients have also been excluded from VTE prevention trials and hence practice guidelines recommendations. The comprehensive and repetitious formats of many available guidelines also limit their readability and applicability by nonthrombosis specialists. Moreover, some patients suffer from VTE despite complying with the contemporary prophylaxis regimens. Besides, significant heterogeneity exists in thromboprophylaxis practice and pitfalls between different countries. Last but not the least; although many at-risk patients are underprophylaxed, there is evidence to suggest that overprophylaxis (i.e., prescription of thromboprophylaxis in low-risk patients) comprises another important problem. We review the thromboprophylaxis practice and pitfalls around the world and provide recommendations on how the major obstacles can be overcome. PMID:22422329

  2. Exploring sub-optimal use of an electronic risk assessment tool for venous thromboembolism.

    Baysari, Melissa T; Jackson, Nicola; Ramasamy, Sheena; Santiago, Priscila; Xiong, Juan; Westbrook, Johanna; Omari, Abdullah; Day, Richard O

    2016-07-01

    International guidelines and consensus groups recommend using a risk assessment tool (RAT) to assess Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) risk prior to the prescription of prophylaxis. We set out to examine how an electronic RAT was being used (i.e. if by the right clinician, at the right time, for the right purpose) and to identify factors influencing utilization of the RAT. A sample of 112 risk assessments was audited and 12 prescribers were interviewed. The RAT was used as intended in only 40 (35.7%) cases (i.e. completed by a doctor within 24 h of admission, prior to the prescription of prophylaxis). We identified several reasons for sub-optimal use of the RAT, including beliefs about the need for a RAT, poor awareness of the tool, and poor RAT design. If a user-centred approach had been adopted, it is likely that a RAT would not have been implemented or that problematic design issues would have been identified. PMID:26995037

  3. Venous Thromboembolism following Elective Aesthetic Plastic Surgery: A Longitudinal Prospective Study in 1254 Patients

    Denis Souto Valente

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a disorder with short-term mortality and long-term morbidity. Healthy patients submitted to elective aesthetic plastic surgeries (EAPS have risk factors to develop VTE not well established yet. The objective of this study was to examine the incidence and risk factors for VTE in these patients. Methods. Longitudinal, prospective (minimum follow-up of 3 months, observational study. Comprehensive information on patient characteristics and surgeries performed was obtained. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative risk factors were analyzed for their association with VTE. Results. A total of 1254 patients were included in the study. Postoperative VTE occurred in 17 (1,35% of patients. VTE was more frequent in patients more than 40 years old (82.3%. Smoking, patients with 2 or 3 pregnancies, and hormone replacement therapy, and oral contraceptives use presents higher levels of VTE. In this study we have not found any correlation between liposuction, augmentation mammoplasty, mastopexy, and rhinoplasty as an isolated risk factor for VTE. Conclusions. The incidence of VTE in patients undergoing EAPS was 1.35%. Patients with more than 40 years of age, tobacco users, patients with 2 or more pregnancies, and hormone replacement therapy or oral contraceptives use presents higher levels of VTE.

  4. The incidence of venous thromboembolism in cervical cancer: a nationwide population-based study

    Tsai Shiang-Jiun

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a life-threatening condition that occurs as a complication of cervical cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of VTE in cervical cancer patients during a 5-year follow-up. Methods The study analyzed data deposited between 2003 and 2008 in the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD, provided by the National Health Research Institutes in Taiwan. Totally, 1013 cervical cancer patients after treatment and 2026 appendectomy patients were eligible. The Kaplan-Meier method and the Cox proportional hazards model were used to assess the VTE risk. Results The 5-year cumulative risk for VTE was significantly higher in the cervical cancer group than in the control group (3.3% vs 0.3%, p vs 30.3%, p  Conclusions The cumulative risk of VTE was significantly higher in cervical cancer patients, and these patients also had lower survival rates. Strategies to reduce these risks need to be examined.

  5. Sirolimus use and incidence of venous thromboembolism in cardiac transplant recipients.

    Thibodeau, Jennifer T; Mishkin, Joseph D; Patel, Parag C; Kaiser, Patricia A; Ayers, Colby R; Mammen, Pradeep P A; Markham, David W; Ring, W Steves; Peltz, Matthias; Drazner, Mark H

    2012-01-01

    Sirolimus is an immunosuppressive agent increasingly used in cardiac transplant recipients in the setting of allograft vasculopathy or worsening renal function. Recently, sirolimus has been associated with increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in lung transplant recipients. To investigate whether this association is also present in cardiac transplant recipients, we retrospectively reviewed the charts of 67 cardiac transplant recipients whose immunosuppressive regimen included sirolimus and 134 matched cardiac transplant recipients whose regimen did not include sirolimus. Rates of VTE were compared. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models tested the association of sirolimus use with VTE. A higher incidence of VTE was seen in patients treated with vs. without sirolimus (8/67 [12%] vs. 9/134 [7%], log-rank statistic: 4.66, p=0.03). Lower body mass index (BMI) and total cholesterol levels were also associated with VTE (p<0.05). The association of sirolimus with VTE persisted when adjusting for BMI (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval]: 2.96 [1.13, 7.75], p=0.03) but not when adjusting for total cholesterol (p=0.08). These data suggest that sirolimus is associated with an increased risk of VTE in cardiac transplant recipients, a risk possibly mediated through comorbid conditions. Larger, more conclusive studies are needed. Until such studies are completed, a heightened level of awareness for VTE in cardiac transplant recipients treated with sirolimus appears warranted. PMID:22775970

  6. Venous thromboembolism and subsequent risk of cancer in patients with liver disease

    Montomoli, Jonathan; Erichsen, Rune; Søgaard, Kirstine Kobberøe;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) may be a marker of occult cancer in the general population. While liver disease is known to increase the risk of VTE and cancer, it is unclear whether VTE in patients with liver disease is also a marker of occult cancer. DESIGN: A population-based cohort...... and patients with liver cirrhosis were followed as two separate cohorts from the date of their VTE. MEASURES: For each cohort, we computed the absolute and relative risk (standardised incidence ratio; SIR) of cancer after VTE. RESULTS: During the study period, 1867 patients with non-cirrhotic liver disease...... and 888 with liver cirrhosis were diagnosed with incident VTE. In the first year following VTE, the absolute risk of cancer was 2.7% among patients with non-cirrhotic liver disease and 4.3% among those with liver cirrhosis. The SIR for the first 90 days of follow-up was 9.96 (95% CI 6.85 to 13.99) among...

  7. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants for the prevention of recurrent venous thromboembolism.

    Bauersachs, Rupert

    2016-08-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is associated with a risk of recurrence that depends on factors specific to index event and patient. A first unprovoked VTE increases the risk of a recurrent event, particularly during the first year after anticoagulation cessation. Determining a strategy for the long-term prevention of recurrent VTE poses challenges that stem from a lack of agreement on recommended therapy duration and varying treatment burden for the patient. Oral anticoagulants, including vitamin K antagonists and non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs), are the main treatment options for the long-term prevention of recurrent VTE. However, the risk of VTE recurrence must be balanced against the risk of bleeding in each patient. Phase III clinical trials have evaluated rivaroxaban, apixaban and dabigatran for extended treatment and prevention of VTE versus placebo, and versus warfarin in the case of dabigatran. Compared with placebo treatment, each NOAC showed superior efficacy together with an acceptable safety profile during extended treatment periods of 6-18months. Patients receiving long-term NOAC therapy will still require regular risk factor assessment, but these agents may permit longer treatment duration with an improved benefit-risk profile. PMID:27263046

  8. Do pregnant women have a higher risk for venous thromboembolism following air travel?

    Morteza Izadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available International travel has become increasingly common and accessible, and it is part of everyday life in pregnant women. Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a serious public health disorder that occurs following long-haul travel, especially after air travel. The normal pregnancy is accompanied by a state of hypercoagulability and hypofibrinolysis. Thus, it seems that pregnant women are at a higher risk of VTE following air travel, and, if they have preexisting risk factors, this risk would increase. There is limited data about travel-related VTE in pregnant women; therefore, in the present study, we tried to evaluate the pathogenesis of thrombosis, association of thrombosis and air travel, risk factors and prevention of VTE in pregnant women based on available evidences. Pregnancy is associated with a five- to 10-fold increased risk of VTE compared with nonpregnant women; however, during the postpartum period, this risk would increase to 20-80-fold. Furthermore, the risk of thrombosis is higher in individuals with preexisting risk factors, and the most common risk factor for VTE during pregnancy is a previous history of VTE. Pregnant women are at a higher risk for thrombosis compared with other women. Thus, the prevention of VTE and additional risk factors should be considered for all pregnant women who travel by plane.

  9. The Risk of Venous Thromboembolism with Different Generation of Oral Contraceptives; a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Alireza Baratloo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral contraceptives (OCs are considered as one of the most common risk factor of venous thromboembolism (VTE in child bearing age. Some of the recent researches indicate that the odds of VTE may be even higher with newer generations of OCs. The present meta-analysis was designed to evaluate the effect of different generation of OCs on the occurrence of VTE. Methods: Two researchers independently ran a thorough search in Pubmed, ISI Web of Science, EMBASE, CINAHL and Scopus databases regarding study keywords including thromboembolic event, thromboembolism, embolism, thromboembolic, thrombotic and thrombosis, combined with oral contraceptive. The outcomes were the incidence of diagnosed thromboembolism, such as deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and cerebral venous thrombosis. Based on the heterogeneity of the studies, random effect model was used and pooled odds ratio was reported. Results: Three cohort and 17 case-control studies with 13,265,228 subjects were entered into meta-analysis. Analysis showed that the odds of VTE in women taking OCs are more than three-fold (OR=3.13; 95% CI: 2.61-3.65. The risk of VTE in women taking first-, second- and third-generation OCs are 3.5 fold (OR=3.48; 95% CI: 2.01-4.94, 3 fold (OR=3.08; 95% CI: 2.43-3.74 and 4.3 fold (OR=4.35; CI: 3.69‒5.01, respectively. Conclusion: It seems that the risk of VTE is not same between different generations of OCs, so that third-generation has highest risk. Taking second and third-generation OCs increases the risk of VTE up to 3 and 4.3 fold, respectively. The researchers of the present study suggest that more clinical trials be designed in relation to the effect of newer generations of OCs in different communities. 

  10. Vein thromboembolism prevention in stroke patients

    Savić Dejan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Having in mind the rate of occurrence and clinical importance, venous thromboembolism implies venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism as a result of embolisation of the thrombotic particles from deep veins or pelvic veins. Venous thrombosis of the deep veins may result in chronic vein insufficiency, but the primary medical problem is the possibility of development of pulmonary embolism which may cause permanent respiratory function damage or even fatal outcome. Venous thromboembolism prevention in stroke The high incidence of deep vein thrombosis (30% clinically and up to 50% subclinically in acute stroke hemiparetic and bed ridden patients within two weeks from the onset and 1-2% pulmonary embolism with the fatal outcome in the first month clinically and 17% of all fatal outcomes in postmortem investigations present a necessity for the early venous thromboembolism prevention. On the other hand, the most powerful prevention strategy - anticoagulation has important limitations in acute stroke patients: almost impossible to be used in cerebral haemorrhage and a great risk for the development of hemorrhagic transformation in cerebral infarction. The fact that other prevention strategies have limited value requires an estimation of efectivity-risk ratio in venous thromboembolism prevention in stroke. Conclusion Venous thromboembolism prevention in stroke patients is necessary because of a greater risk for venous thromboembolism in these patients according to the nature of illness and functional disability, but also a problem because of limited possibility to recommend the proper medicament according to the risk of serious complications. The necessity of preventing venous thromboembolism and estimation of efficiency-risk ratio in stroke patients, beside plenty of studies and consensus conferences, remain individual and often very difficult.

  11. Septic Mesenteric Venous Thrombophlebitis: A Rare Complication of Acute Appendicitis

    Stylianos Kykalos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenteric venous thrombophlebitis represents a very rare complication of acute appendicitis. Based on the findings of a 45-year-old patient with mesenteric venous thrombophlebitis due to acute appendicitis, we herein describe the diagnostic difficulties and therapeutic options in this uncommon disease. The treatment in our case consisted of simple appendectomy and perioperative anticoagulation therapy.

  12. Prevention of venous thromboembolism with an oral factor Xa inhibitor, YM150, after total hip arthroplasty. A dose finding study (ONYX-2)

    Eriksson, B I; Turpie, A G G; Lassen, M R; Prins, M H; Agnelli, G; Kälebo, P; Wetherill, G; Wilpshaar, J W; Meems, L

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anticoagulant prophylaxis substantially reduces the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) after major orthopedic surgery. The direct factor Xa inhibitor YM150 is currently under investigation for the prevention of VTE, stroke and ischemic vascular events in patients after orthopedic...... surgery, with atrial fibrillation and with acute coronary syndrome, respectively. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the efficacy and safety of YM150 for the prevention of VTE following elective total hip arthroplasty. PATIENTS/METHODS: Patients were randomized to postoperative, once-daily, oral YM150 (5, 10, 30......, 60 or 120 mg) (double-blind) or preoperative subcutaneous (open label) enoxaparin (40 mg) for 5 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint comprised VTE diagnosed by mandatory bilateral venography or verified symptomatic deep vein thrombosis (DVT) plus all deaths up to 9 days after surgery. The primary...

  13. Contemporary approach to primary prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism regarding the impact of risk factors on anticoagulation therapy duration

    Antonijević Nebojša M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adequate thromboprophylaxis primarily requires timely detection of reversible and irreversible risk factors of venous thromboembolism (VTE and their categorization. It is important to note that the highest percentage of VTE episodes occur in non-surgical (medical patients and that VTE develops in a large number of surgical patients upon hospital discharge; this emphasizes the need for adequate VTE prevention in inflammatory diseases, acute medical illness and other medical diseases as well as for prolonging and optimizing the anticoagulant regimen after surgical intervention in the primary VTE prophylaxis. As almost completely unrecognized and neglected major risk factors of VTE in clinical practice, we particularly point out the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and heart failure, especially in NYHA functional class III and IV patients with significantly reduced left heart ventricle. It is necessary to raise clinicians’ awareness of a potential danger from wrongly and one-sidedly interpreted dyspnea and coughing signs in patients with COPD as typical symptoms of basic respiratory disease as well as from ascribing the signs of disease aggravation in heart failure patients exclusively to cardial status worsening, neglecting the possibility of having unrecognized and untreated pulmonary embolism at issue. Contemporary way of life enhances the development of new VTE risk factors such as traveler’s thrombosis, in particular during long-haul flights as well as in individuals sitting at a computer for prolonged periods (e-thrombosis. Determining and recognizing VTE risk factors, especially those formerly neglected nonsurgical ones and simultaneous presence of multiple risk factors within a given period is required for defining an adequate anticoagulant regimen in primary VTE prophylaxis for surgical and non-surgical (medical patients.

  14. Acute Arterial Thromboembolism In The Extremities: A Case Series In Sina General Hospital,1991-97

    Zafarghandy MRt Nasiri Sheikhani N

    2002-01-01

    "Arterial Thromboembolism" is the most common cause of "Acute Arterial Ischemia" of extremities. In this study, It is attempted to collect retrospectively some documentary information of all "acute arterial thromboembolic occlusions of the limbs"."nMaterials and Methods: In descriptive retrograde study in Sina General hospital, all related records in this regard were collected from March 1991 to March 1997. To reveal the statistical o...

  15. Correlates of syncope in patients with acute pulmonary thromboembolism.

    Jenab, Yaser; Lotfi-Tokaldany, Masoumeh; Alemzadeh-Ansari, Mohammad-Javad; Seyyedi, Seyyed Reza; Shirani, Shapoor; Soudaee, Mehdi; Ghaffari-Marandi, Neda

    2015-11-01

    Identification of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE), as a cause of syncope, is important and may be life saving. We prospectively analyzed data on 335 patients with acute PTE. Relationships between syncope secondary to acute PTE and clinical findings, risk factors, and imaging modalities were analyzed. Of the 335 patients, 36 (10.7%) had syncope at presentation. Compared to patients without syncope, those with syncope had a higher frequency of right ventricular (RV) dysfunction (94.3% vs 72.1%, respectively; P value = .004) and saddle embolism (24.2% vs 10.9%, respectively; P value = .044). Frequency of RV dysfunction was similar between patients with and without saddle embolism. Although not significant, more patients with syncope had a history of previous PTE (P value = .086). By multivariable analysis, RV dysfunction and saddle embolism were independent correlates of syncope in patients with PTE. In-hospital mortality was not significantly different between the groups. In conclusion, among patients with PTE, RV dysfunction and saddle embolism were the independent correlates of syncope. PMID:24989710

  16. Breast cancer-associated venous thromboembolism: A case-control study.

    Rebouças, Danilo; Costa, Maria; Thuler, Luiz; Garces, Alvaro; Aquino, Luciana; Bines, José

    2016-08-01

    Breast cancer is frequently associated with venous thromboembolism (VTE). VTE may result in significant morbidity, a substantial economic burden and even leads to patients' death. Risk factor identification and management of VTE in breast cancer patients remains poorly studied. We evaluated breast cancer patients' baseline and treatment characteristics in predicting VTE occurrence as well as its prognosis. We conducted a case-control study of all breast cancer patients with a VTE diagnosed between January 2007 and December 2011 at the Instituto Nacional de Câncer (INCA) in Brazil. Two hundred and twenty five patients developed VTE and were compared with 225 controls, in the 5-year study period. The bulk of the thrombotic events were unilateral (94.2%) VTEs of the lower extremity (78.7%), largely proximally located (78%). VTE occurred more often within the first 3 years after the diagnosis of cancer (66.2%), being more common in the first 6 months (21.8%). Significant predictors of developing VTE were age 50 years and over (OR 1.85, 95% CI: 1.16-2.95), PS equal to or above 3 (OR 2.01, 95% CI: 1.24-3.26), and the presence of a CVC (OR 2.56, 95% CI: 1.42-4.62). This large retrospective analysis of VTE in breast cancer patients confirms that most events occur early in the treatment course. The incidence of VTE was associated with patients' age, PS, and the presence of CVC. Prospective studies are needed to evaluate outpatient thromboprophylaxis for selected groups of patients. PMID:27253153

  17. Menstrual Cycle Control in Female Astronauts and the Associated Risk of Venous Thromboembolism

    Jain, Varsha; Wotring, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common and serious condition affecting approximately 1-2 per 1000 people in the USA every year. There have been no documented case reports of VTE in female astronauts during spaceflight in the published literature. Some female astronauts use hormonal contraception to control their menstrual cycles and it is currently unknown how this affects their risk of VTE. Current terrestrial risk prediction models do not account for the spaceflight environment and the physiological changes associated with it. We therefore aim to estimate a specific risk score for female astronauts who are taking hormonal contraception for menstrual cycle control, to deduce whether they are at an elevated risk of VTE. A systematic review of the literature was conducted in order to identify and quantify known terrestrial risk factors for VTE. Studies involving analogues for the female astronaut population were also reviewed, for example, military personnel who use the oral contraceptive pill for menstrual suppression. Well known terrestrial risk factors, for example, obesity or smoking would not be applicable to our study population as these candidates would have been excluded during astronaut selection processes. Other risk factors for VTE include hormonal therapy, lower limb paralysis, physical inactivity, hyperhomocysteinemia, low methylfolate levels and minor injuries, all of which potentially apply to crew members LSAH data will be assessed to identify which of these risk factors are applicable to our astronaut population. Using known terrestrial risk data, an overall estimated risk of VTE for female astronauts using menstrual cycle control methods will therefore be calculated. We predict this will be higher than the general population but not significantly higher requiring thromboprophylaxis. This study attempts to delineate what is assumed to be true of our astronaut population, for example, they are known to be a healthy fit cohort of individuals, and

  18. Emotional states and future risk of venous thromboembolism: the Tromsø Study.

    Enga, Kristin F; Brækkan, Sigrid K; Hansen-Krone, Ida J; Hansen, John-Bjarne

    2012-03-01

    Emotional states of depression and loneliness are reported to be associated with higher risk and optimism with lower risk of arterial cardiovascular disease (CVD) and death. The relation between emotional states and risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) has not been explored previously. We aimed to investigate the associations between self-reported emotional states and risk of incident VTE in a population-based, prospective study. The frequency of feeling depressed, lonely and happy/optimistic were registered by self-administered questionnaires, along with major co-morbidities and lifestyle habits, in 25,964 subjects aged 25-96 years, enrolled in the Tromsø Study in 1994-1995. Incident VTE-events were registered from the date of inclusion until September 1, 2007. There were 440 incident VTE-events during a median of 12.4 years of follow-up. Subjects who often felt depressed had 1.6-fold (95% CI:1.02-2.50) higher risk of VTE compared to those not depressed in analyses adjusted for other risk factors (age, sex , body mass index, oestrogens), lifestyle (smoking, alcohol consumption, educational level) and co-morbidities (diabetes, CVD, and cancer). Often feeling lonely was not associated with VTE. However, the incidence rate of VTE in subjects who concurrently felt often lonely and depressed was higher than for depression alone (age-and sex-adjusted incidence rate: 3.27 vs. 2.21). Oppositely, subjects who often felt happy/optimistic had 40% reduced risk of VTE (HR 0.60, 95% CI: 0.41-0.87). Our findings suggest that self-reported emotional states are associated with risk of VTE. Depressive feelings were associated with increased risk, while happiness/optimism was associated with reduced risk of VTE. PMID:22318455

  19. Feasibility of intermittent pneumatic compression for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis during magnetic resonance imaging-guided interventions

    Highlights: •The controller of a standard SCD is labeled as an “MR-unsafe”. •No commercially available “MR-safe” SCDs. •Standard SCDs can be used in iMRI by placing the device outside the MRI scanner room. •Using serial extension tubing did not cause device failure. -- Abstract: Purpose: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized and surgical patients. To reduce risk, perioperative VTE prophylaxis is recommended for cancer patients undergoing surgical or interventional procedures. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used in interventional oncology when alternative imaging modalities do not adequately delineate malignancies. Extended periods of immobilization during MRI-guided interventions necessitate an MR compatible sequential compression device (SCD) for intra-procedural mechanical VTE prophylaxis. Such devices are not commercially available. Materials and methods: A standard SCD routinely used at our institution for VTE prophylaxis during interventional procedures was used. To satisfy MR safety requirements, the SCD controller was placed in the MR control room and connected to the compression sleeves in the magnet room through the wave guide using tubing extensions. The controller pressure sensor was used to monitor adequate pressure delivery and detect ineffective low or abnormal high pressure delivery. VTE prophylaxis was provided using the above mentioned device for 38 patients undergoing MR-guided ablations. Results: There was no evidence of device failure due to loss of pressure in the extension tubing assembly. No interference with the anesthesia or interventional procedures was documented. Conclusion: Although the controller of a standard SCD is labeled as “MR-unsafe”, the SCD can be used in interventional MR settings by placing the device outside the MR scanner room. Using serial tubing extensions did not cause device failure. The described method can be used to provide

  20. PHARMACOECONOMIC ASPECTS OF THE PREVENTION OF VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLIC EVENTS AFTER LARGE JOINTS REPLACEMENT

    A. V. Rudakova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolic (VTE events are a major concern in large joints replacement leading to patients’ death. The prevention of VTE events suggests the prescription of low molecular weight heparin or oral anticoagulants that differ significantly in their efficacy, safety and cost of the therapy.Aim. To assess the cost-effectiveness of different options for the prevention of VTE events in hip and knee joints replacement.Material and methods. The model, which allows evaluation of the VTE complications incidence in patients aged 60-65years, was developed based on the results of such clinical trials as ADVANCE-2, ADVANCE-3, RE-MODEL, RE-NOVATE. Analysis was performed on survival period of patients. Weighted average prices of public bidding for the purchase of drugs (enoxaparin, dabigatran and apixaban during the first quarter of 2015 were the source of the data on the expenses on VTE events prevention. The cost of treatment of VTE events matched for the rate of compulsory health insurance in St. Petersburg for 2015. The costs and life expectancy of patients were discounted at 3.5% per year.Results. The best results for the prevention of VTE events are observed at the treatment regimen with apixsaban. Treatment regimens with dabigatran and enoxaparin were less effective and comparable with each other. At that, the prevalence of major bleedings was similar for all treatment regiments. Apixaban reduced the cost of treatment and prevention of VTE events 1.8-2.0 times as compared with enoxaparin and 1.2-1.4 times in comparison with dabigatran.Conclusion. The new oral anticoagulants are effective and safe alternative to low molecular weight heparins used for the prevention of VTE events in large joints replacement and provide budgetary savings as compared with enoxaparin. Apixaban has a maximum capacity for the reduction of VTE events, lowering the cost of treatment and prevention of VTE events.

  1. Venous thromboembolic risk and protein S deficiency: ethnic difference and remaining issues

    Tong Yin; Toshiyuki Miyata

    2009-01-01

    Protein S deficiency is an autosomal dominant disorder that results from mutations in the protein S gene (PROS1). Inherited deficiency of protein S constitutes a risk factor for venous thromboembolism. Protein S functions as a nonenzymatic cofactor for activated protein C in the proteolytic degradation of coagulation factors V a and Villa. The frequency of protein S deficiency seems to differ between populations. More than 200 rare mutations in PROS1 have been identified in patients with protein S deficiency. Among the prevalent mutations within PROS1, the S460P substitution (known as Heerlen polymorphism) detected in Caucasians and the K196E substitution (known as protein S Tokushima) found in Japanese have been intensively studied for their structures and potential functions in the disorder of protein S deficiency. Until now, causative mutations in PROS1 have been found in only approximately 50% of cases with protein S deficiency. Co-segregation analysis of microsatellite haplotypes with protein S deficiency in families with protein S deficiency suggests that the causative defects in the PROS1 mutation-negative patients are located in or close to the PROS 1 gene. Large PROS 1 gene deletions have been identified in 3 out of 9 PROS 1 mutation-negative Swedish VTE families with protein S deficiency and 1 out of 6 PROS1 mutation-negative Japanese patients with protein S deficiency. Intensive sequencing of the entire PROS 1 gene, including introns, may be needed to identify the cryptic mutations in those patients, and these efforts might uncover the pathogenesis of protein S deficiency.

  2. Absence of venous thromboembolism risk following quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination, Vaccine Safety Datalink, 2008–2011

    Naleway, Allison L.; Crane, Brad; Smith, Ning; Daley, Matthew F.; Donahue, James; Gee, Julianne; Greene, Sharon K.; Harrington, Theresa; Jackson, Lisa A.; Klein, Nicola P.; Tseng, Hung Fu; Vellozzi, Claudia; Weintraub, Eric S.

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate concerns about a potential association between quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination (HPV4) and venous thromboembolism (VTE), we conducted a self-controlled case series study in adolescents and young adults 9–26 years of age in the Vaccine Safety Datalink. Methods We identified potential VTE cases diagnosed in 2008 through 2011 who had also received at least one HPV4 dose during that period. We confirmed each presumptive diagnosis by medical record review. We calculated incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) to estimate the risk in the 1–60 day period following HPV4 exposure and in subsets of that period. IRRs were stratified by age, gender, hormonal contraceptive use, and recent surgery or trauma. Results We identified 313 potential cases of VTE among HPV4 vaccinees, and 291 (93%) had sufficient medical records for review. Of these, we confirmed 156 (54%) cases. VTE was uncommon among males (n = 3) and 9–12 year olds (n = 4). Nearly all confirmed cases (97%) had at least one known risk factor for VTE, including hormonal contraceptive use, obesity, and hypercoagulability. Sixteen (10%) confirmed cases occurred in the 1–60 days following HPV4 exposure. The risk of VTE varied from 1.47 (95% CI: 0.47–4.64) in the 1–7 days following HPV4 exposure to 0.92 (95% CI: 0.54–1.57) in the 1–60 days following vaccination. It was not possible to calculate a stratified IRR for males due to small sample size; the other risk factors evaluated did not significantly affect the risk of VTE after HPV4 exposure. Conclusion The risk of developing VTE among 9- to 26-year-olds was not elevated following HPV4 exposure. Sample size limited our ability to rigorously evaluate potential effect modifiers, such as gender, through stratified analysis. PMID:26549361

  3. A prospective study on survival in cancer patients with and without venous thromboembolism.

    Agnelli, Giancarlo; Verso, Melina; Mandalà, Mario; Gallus, Silvano; Cimminiello, Claudio; Apolone, Giovanni; Di Minno, Giovanni; Maiello, Evaristo; Prandoni, Paolo; Santoro, Armando; Crinò, Lucio; Labianca, Roberto

    2014-08-01

    Retrospective population-based studies showed that in cancer patients venous thromboembolism (VTE) is associated with reduced survival. Master Oncology is a multicenter study in patients with solid advanced cancer aimed at assessing (1) risk factors for VTE using a case-control design, and (2) survival in cases (patients with VTE) and controls (patients without VTE). Survival data were prospectively collected for at least 10 months. Overall, 237 cases and 339 controls were included in the analysis. The following factors were found to be associated with an increased risk of VTE: body mass index (BMI; OR 2.02; 95% CI 1.31-3.12 for ≥26 vs. <23 kg/m(2)), ECOG score (OR 2.14; 95% CI 1.47-3.11 for grade 1, and 3.32; 95% CI 1.64-6.00 for grade 2-3, compared to grade 0) and recent diagnosis of cancer (OR 1.90; 95% CI 1.33-2.71 for <12 vs. ≥12 months). After an average prospective observation of 8.3 months, 136 cases (57.4%) and 127 controls (37.5%) died with a median survival of 8.7 (95% CI 7.5-10.9) and 14.3 months (95% CI 12.2-18.7), respectively, (Wilcoxon = 27.72, p < 0.001; multivariate hazard ratio 1.55; 95% CI 1.21-2.00). Median survival time was reduced for both patients with symptomatic (Wilcoxon = 35.22, p < 0.001) and asymptomatic VTE (Wilcoxon = 4.63, p = 0.031). Patients with advanced solid cancer, high BMI, high ECOG score, and recent diagnosis of cancer are associated with an increased risk for VTE. Patients with both symptomatic and asymptomatic VTE have a reduced survival compared to those without VTE. PMID:23943559

  4. Thrombomodulin gene c.1418C>T polymorphism and risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism.

    Ahmad, Abrar; Sundquist, Kristina; Zöller, Bengt; Svensson, Peter J; Sundquist, Jan; Memon, Ashfaque A

    2016-07-01

    Thrombomodulin gene (THBD) is a critical cofactor in protein C anticoagulant system. THBD c.1418C>T polymorphism is reported to be associated with higher risk of primary venous thromboembolism (VTE) but its role in VTE recurrence is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of THBD polymorphism in VTE recurrence. THBD c.1418C>T polymorphism was genotyped by using Taqman polymerase chain reaction in a prospective population based study of 1465 consecutive objectively verified VTE patients. Uni- and multivariate Cox regression were performed for the risk assessment of VTE recurrence. Patients who had VTE before inclusion or had recurrence or died during anticoagulant treatment were excluded. Among the remaining (N = 1046) patients, 126 (12.05 %) had VTE recurrence during the follow up period (from 1998 to 2008). THBD polymorphism was not significantly associated with risk of VTE recurrence in the univariate [Hazard ratio (HR) 1.11, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.78-1.59, p = 0.55] as well as the multivariate analysis adjusted for age, sex and thrombophilia (HR 1.11, 95 % CI 0.78-1.59, p = 0.54). Similarly, in unprovoked first VTE (n = 614), no association was observed between THBD polymorphism and risk of VTE recurrence (HR 1.22 and 95 % CI 0.78-1.89, p = 0.38). In this prospective study, our results do not suggest a predictive role for THBD c.1418C>T polymorphism in VTE recurrence. PMID:26743062

  5. Feasibility of intermittent pneumatic compression for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis during magnetic resonance imaging-guided interventions

    Maybody, Majid, E-mail: maybodym@mskcc.org [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Taslakian, Bedros, E-mail: bt05@aub.edu.lb [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Riad El-Solh, 1107 2020 Beirut (Lebanon); Durack, Jeremy C., E-mail: durackj@mskcc.org [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Kaye, Elena A., E-mail: kayee@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Erinjeri, Joseph P., E-mail: erinjerj@mskcc.org [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan, E-mail: srimaths@mskcc.org [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Solomon, Stephen B., E-mail: solomons@mskcc.org [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •The controller of a standard SCD is labeled as an “MR-unsafe”. •No commercially available “MR-safe” SCDs. •Standard SCDs can be used in iMRI by placing the device outside the MRI scanner room. •Using serial extension tubing did not cause device failure. -- Abstract: Purpose: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized and surgical patients. To reduce risk, perioperative VTE prophylaxis is recommended for cancer patients undergoing surgical or interventional procedures. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used in interventional oncology when alternative imaging modalities do not adequately delineate malignancies. Extended periods of immobilization during MRI-guided interventions necessitate an MR compatible sequential compression device (SCD) for intra-procedural mechanical VTE prophylaxis. Such devices are not commercially available. Materials and methods: A standard SCD routinely used at our institution for VTE prophylaxis during interventional procedures was used. To satisfy MR safety requirements, the SCD controller was placed in the MR control room and connected to the compression sleeves in the magnet room through the wave guide using tubing extensions. The controller pressure sensor was used to monitor adequate pressure delivery and detect ineffective low or abnormal high pressure delivery. VTE prophylaxis was provided using the above mentioned device for 38 patients undergoing MR-guided ablations. Results: There was no evidence of device failure due to loss of pressure in the extension tubing assembly. No interference with the anesthesia or interventional procedures was documented. Conclusion: Although the controller of a standard SCD is labeled as “MR-unsafe”, the SCD can be used in interventional MR settings by placing the device outside the MR scanner room. Using serial tubing extensions did not cause device failure. The described method can be used to provide

  6. The geko™ electro-stimulation device for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis: a NICE medical technology guidance.

    Summers, Jennifer A; Clinch, James; Radhakrishnan, Muralikrishnan; Healy, Andy; McMillan, Viktoria; Morris, Elizabeth; Rua, Tiago; Ofuya, Mercy; Wang, Yanzhong; Dimmock, Paul W; Lewis, Cornelius; Peacock, Janet L; Keevil, Stephen F

    2015-04-01

    The geko™ device is a single-use, battery-powered, neuromuscular electrostimulation device that aims to reduce the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) selected the geko™ device for evaluation, and invited the manufacturer, Firstkind Ltd, to submit clinical and economic evidence. King's Technology Evaluation Centre, an External Assessment Centre (EAC) commissioned by the NICE, independently assessed the evidence submitted. The sponsor submitted evidence related to the geko™ device and, in addition, included studies of other related devices as further clinical evidence to support a link between increased blood flow and VTE prophylaxis. The EAC assessed this evidence, conducted its own systematic review and concluded that there is currently limited direct evidence that geko™ prevents VTE. The sponsor's cost model is based on the assumption that patients with an underlying VTE risk and subsequently treated with geko™ will experience a reduction in their baseline risk. The EAC assessed this cost model but questioned the validity of some model assumptions. Using the EACs revised cost model, the cost savings for geko™ prophylaxis against a 'no prophylaxis' strategy were estimated as £197 per patient. Following a second public consultation, taking into account a change in the original draft recommendations, the NICE medical technologies guidance MTG19 was issued in June 2014. This recommended the adoption of the geko™ for use in people with a high risk of VTE and when other mechanical/pharmacological methods of prophylaxis are impractical or contraindicated in selected patients within the National Health Service in England. PMID:25403719

  7. Prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism in pregnancy in patients with hereditary antithrombin deficiency

    James AH

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Andra H James,1 Barbara A Konkle,2,3 Kenneth A Bauer4 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, 2Puget Sound Blood Center, Seattle, Washington, 3Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, 4Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and VA Boston Healthcare System, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA Objective: The aims of the study reported here were to provide data from six pregnant subjects who were enrolled in a clinical trial of antithrombin (AT concentrate, discuss other published case series and case reports, and provide general guidance for the use of AT concentrate for inherited AT deficiency in pregnancy. Methods: In the late 1980s, 31 AT-deficient subjects were enrolled in a prospective treatment trial of the plasma-derived AT concentrate Thrombate III®. Herein, newly available treatment data about the six pregnant subjects in the trial is tabulated and summarized. Results: All six experienced venous thromboembolism (VTE during pregnancy, were dosed according to a weight-based protocol, and were treated concomitantly with anticoagulation. Loading doses of AT concentrate of 54–62 units/kg were followed by maintenance doses of 50%–100% of the loading dose for 3–10 days. At the time of labor, loading doses of 46–50 units/kg were followed by maintenance doses of 50%–75% of the loading dose for 5–7 days. None of the six experienced recurrent thrombosis while receiving treatment with AT concentrate. Conclusion: Currently we suggest that women with AT deficiency who are pregnant or postpartum and have a personal history of VTE or current VTE receive AT concentrates. Keywords: thrombophilia, thrombosis, plasma-derived concentrate, labor, delivery, heparin.

  8. Inferior vena cava filters in the management of cancer-associated venous thromboembolism: a systematic review

    Rachna Raman

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study systematically reviews outcomes after inferior vena cava (IVC filtration in cancer-associated venous thromboembolism (VTE. A comprehensive review of the English language literature was performed using MEDLINE, COCHRANE library, Embase and CINAHL on outcomes (i.e., pulmonary embolism, recurrent DVT, postphlebitic syndrome and survival following IVC filtration in cancer-associated VTE. Fourteen studies with 2,154 cancer patients receiving IVC filters post-VTE were included. All were observational studies. The mean duration of followup was 0.7–38 months and mean patient age was 56.8– 68 years. Among study participants, 47–87% had stage 3 or 4 cancers. Of the 47–93% of filters inserted for contraindications to anticoagulation (AC, 10–33% were placed for relative contraindications. Recurrent PE was seen in 0–6%, fatal PE in 0–4.5%, recurrent DVT in 0–18.2%, postphlebitic syndrome (PPS in 0–2.7%, and IVC thrombosis (ICVT in 3% of cancer patients. Median survival post-filter insertion was 2–10 months. Evidence supporting the utility of IVC filter insertion in cancer-associated VTE is limited to observational studies only. Preliminary data demonstrate similar safety and efficacy of filters in cancer and noncancer populations. The combination of filters and anticoagulation is no more effective than either modality alone. Retrievable filters are an attractive option for prevention of VTE in the presence of temporary risk factors or temporary contraindications to anticoagulation in patients who have a reasonable life expectancy, but there is no evidence to support their preferential use in patients with advanced malignancy.

  9. Patient Preferences for Receiving Education on Venous Thromboembolism Prevention – A Survey of Stakeholder Organizations

    Shihab, Hasan M.; Farrow, Norma E.; Shaffer, Dauryne L.; Hobson, Deborah B.; Kulik, Susan V.; Zaruba, Paul D.; Shermock, Kenneth M.; Kraus, Peggy S.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Streiff, Michael B.; Haut, Elliott R.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among hospitalized patients and is largely preventable. Strategies to decrease the burden of VTE have focused on improving clinicians’ prescribing of prophylaxis with relatively less emphasis on patient education. Objective To develop a patient-centered approach to education of patients and their families on VTE: including importance, risk factors, and benefit/harm of VTE prophylaxis in hospital settings. Design, Setting and Participants The objective of this study was to develop a patient-centered approach to education of patients and their families on VTE: including importance, risk factors, and benefit/harm of VTE prophylaxis in hospital settings. We implemented a three-phase, web-based survey (SurveyMonkey) between March 2014 and September 2014 and analyzed survey data using descriptive statistics. Four hundred twenty one members of several national stakeholder organizations and a single local patient and family advisory board were invited to participate via email. We assessed participants’ preferences for VTE education topics and methods of delivery. Participants wanted to learn about VTE symptoms, risk factors, prevention, and complications in a context that emphasized harm. Although participants were willing to learn using a variety of methods, most preferred to receive education in the context of a doctor-patient encounter. The next most common preferences were for video and paper educational materials. Conclusions Patients want to learn about the harm associated with VTE through a variety of methods. Efforts to improve VTE prophylaxis and decrease preventable harm from VTE should target the entire continuum of care and a variety of stakeholders including patients and their families. PMID:27031330

  10. A Current Review of Mechanical Compression and Its Role in Venous Thromboembolic Prophylaxis in Total Knee and Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    Pierce, Todd P; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Jauregui, Julio J; Elmallah, Randa K; Lieberman, Jay R; Mont, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Interest in mechanical compression for venous thromboembolic disease prophylaxis has increased over the last several years because of concerns related to bleeding complications associated with chemoprophylaxis. However, the research evaluating compression is clearly not definitive. Therefore, this review aims to: (1) summarize methods of compression; (2) compare AAOS, ACCP, and SCIP guidelines; and (3) make recommendations regarding usage. Below-the-knee devices have demonstrated the most efficacy with multiple guidelines recommending usage. Efficacy and compliance may be improved with the use of mobile devices. PMID:26048728

  11. Thyroid function, as assessed by TSH, and future risk of venous thromboembolism: The Tromsø study

    Lerstad, Gunhild; Enga, Kristin Fjeldstad; Jorde, Rolf; Brodin, Ellen Elisabeth; Svartberg, Johan; Brækkan, Sigrid Kufaas; Hansen, John-Bjarne

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The relationship between thyroid function and the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) has not been addressed in population-based cohorts. We investigated the association between TSH levels and the risk of VTE in a general adult population. Design: Population-based cohort study. Methods: TSH was measured in 11 962 subjects aged 25–89 years who participated in Tromsø 4–6 starting in 1994–1995. Incident VTE events were recorded through 31st December 2010. Cox's regression mod...

  12. New oral antithrombotics: focus on dabigatran, an oral, reversible direct thrombin inhibitor for the prevention and treatment of venous and arterial thromboembolic disorders

    Dahl OE

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ola E Dahl1,21Department of Orthopaedics, Innlandet Hospital Trust, Elverum Central Hospital, Elverum, Norway; 2Thrombosis Research Institute, London, UKAbstract: Venous thromboembolism, presenting as deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, is a major challenge for health care systems. It is the third most common vascular disease after coronary heart disease and stroke, and many hospitalized patients have at least one risk factor. In particular, patients undergoing hip or knee replacement are at risk, with an incidence of asymptomatic deep vein thrombosis of 40%–60% without thromboprophylaxis. Venous thromboembolism is associated with significant mortality and morbidity, with patients being at risk of recurrence, post-thrombotic syndrome, and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Arterial thromboembolism is even more frequent, and atrial fibrillation, the most common embolic source (cardiac arrhythmia, is associated with a five-fold increase in the risk of stroke. Strokes due to atrial fibrillation tend to be more severe and disabling and are more often fatal than strokes due to other causes. Currently, recommended management of both venous and arterial thromboembolism involves the use of anticoagulants such as coumarin and heparin derivatives. These agents are effective, although have characteristics that prevent them from providing optimal anticoagulation and convenience. Hence, new improved oral anticoagulants are being investigated. Dabigatran is a reversible, direct thrombin inhibitor, which is administered as dabigatran etexilate, the oral prodrug. Because it is the first new oral anticoagulant that has been licensed in many countries worldwide for thromboprophylaxis following orthopedic surgery and for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation, this compound will be the main focus of this review. Dabigatran has been investigated for the treatment of established venous thromboembolism and prevention of

  13. Intermittent sequential pneumatic compression of the legs and thromboembolism-deterrent stockings in the prevention of postoperative deep venous thrombosis

    One hundred fifty patients over the age of 30 who had undergone major abdominal operations were stratified according to the risk of deep venous thrombosis and randomized into three groups to receive different prophylactic regimens: group A, electrical calf stimulation; group B, low-dose subcutaneous heparin; group C, intermittent sequential compression and thromboembolism-deterrent (TED) stockings. All the patients were scanned with the 125I-fibrinogen test for the whole stay in hospital. The incidence of 125I-fibrinogen detected deep venous thrombi was 18% in group A, 9% in group B, and 4% in group C. The results indicate that the regimen of intermittent sequential compression and TED stockings is as effective as low-dose subcutaneous heparin. Electrical calf stimulation is less effective

  14. Nontraumatic vascular emergencies: imaging and intervention in acute venous occlusion

    Risk factors for acute venous occlusion range from prolonged immobilization to hypercoagulability syndromes, trauma, and malignancy. The aim of this review article is to illustrate the different imaging options for the diagnosis of acute venous occlusion and to assess the value of interventional strategies for venous thrombosis treatment in an emergency setting. First, diagnosis and treatment of the most common form of venous occlusion, at the level of the lower extremities, is presented, followed by pelvic vein and inferior vena cava occlusion, mesenteric venous thrombosis, upper extremity occlusion, acute cerebral vein thrombosis, and finally acute venous occlusion of hemodialysis access. In acute venous occlusion of the lower extremity phlebography is still the reference gold standard. Presently, duplex ultrasound with manual compression is the most sensitive and specific noninvasive test. Limitations of ultrasonography include isolated distal calf vein occlusion, obesity, and patients with lower extremity edema. If sonography is nondiagnostic, venography should be considered. Magnetic resonance venography can differentiate an acute occlusion from chronic thrombus, but because of its high cost and limited availability, it is not yet used for the routine diagnosis of lower extremity venous occlusion only. Regarding interventional treatment, catheter-directed thrombolysis can be applied to dissolve thrombus in charily selected patients with symptomatic occlusion and no contraindications to therapy. Acute occlusion of the pelvic veins and the inferior vena cava, often due to extension from the femoropopliteal system, represents a major risk for pulmonary embolism. Color flow Doppler imaging is often limited owing to obesity and bowel gas. Venography has long been considered the gold standard for identifying proximal venous occlusion. Both CT scanning and MR imaging, however, can even more accurately diagnose acute pelvis vein or inferior vena cava occlusion. MRI is

  15. Profilaxia para tromboembolia venosa em um hospital geral Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in a general hospital

    Fernanda Fuzinatto

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a prática de profilaxia para tromboembolia venosa (TEV em pacientes em um hospital geral. MÉTODOS: Estudo de coorte transversal conduzido no Hospital Nossa Senhora da Conceição, localizado na cidade de Porto Alegre (RS, com uma amostra constituída de pacientes internados selecionados randomicamente entre outubro de 2008 e fevereiro de 2009. Foram incluídos pacientes maiores de 18 anos e internados por mais de 48 h. Os critérios de exclusão foram pacientes em uso de anticoagulantes, história de doença tromboembólica, gestação e puerpério. A adequação da profilaxia foi avaliada seguindo as recomendações de um protocolo criado pela instituição e tendo como base principal a diretriz da American College of Chest Physician, oitava edição. RESULTADOS: Foram incluídos 262 pacientes com média de idade de 59,1 ± 16,6 anos. Os fatores de risco mais comuns foram imobilização (70,6%, infecção (44,3%, câncer (27,5%, obesidade (23,3% e cirurgia maior (14,1%. Na avaliação do nível de risco para TEV, 143 (54,6% e 117 pacientes (44,7%, respectivamente, foram classificados como de risco alto e moderado. No geral, 46,2% dos pacientes tiveram profilaxia adequada, assim como 25% dos pacientes com três ou mais fatores de risco e 18% dos pacientes com câncer, e houve diferenças estatisticamente significativas entre esses grupos quando comparados àqueles com menos de três fatores de risco e sem câncer (p OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the use of venous thromboembolism (VTE prophylaxis in a general hospital. METHODS: A cross-sectional cohort study at the Hospital Nossa Senhora da Conceição, located in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil, involving a random sample of patients admitted between October of 2008 and February of 2009. We included patients over 18 years of age and hospitalized for more than 48 h. The exclusion criteria were anticoagulant use, pregnancy, puerperium, and a history of thromboembolic disease. The

  16. Calcified pulmonary thromboembolism in a child with sickle cell disease: value of multidetector CT in patients with acute chest syndrome

    The incidence of pulmonary embolism in children is not clearly known, but is believed to be low. Risk factors for pulmonary thromboembolism include central venous catheter, malignancy, surgery, infection, trauma, and congenital hypercoagulable disorders. Children with sickle cell disease are prothrombotic and are at an increased risk of thromboembolism. The incidence of this event is unknown because these children are often not thoroughly imaged. We report here a case of a calcified pulmonary thromboembolism in a child with sickle cell disease and emphasize the use of multidetector CT in detection of pulmonary thromboembolism in children with sickle cell disease. (orig.)

  17. Calcified pulmonary thromboembolism in a child with sickle cell disease: value of multidetector CT in patients with acute chest syndrome

    Staser, Jonathan A. [Indiana University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Alam, Tariq [Medical College of Ohio, Department of Radiology, Toledo, OH (United States); Applegate, Kimberly [Indiana University Medical Center, Sections of Pediatric Radiology and Health Services Research, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Indiana University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Riley Hospital for Children, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2006-06-15

    The incidence of pulmonary embolism in children is not clearly known, but is believed to be low. Risk factors for pulmonary thromboembolism include central venous catheter, malignancy, surgery, infection, trauma, and congenital hypercoagulable disorders. Children with sickle cell disease are prothrombotic and are at an increased risk of thromboembolism. The incidence of this event is unknown because these children are often not thoroughly imaged. We report here a case of a calcified pulmonary thromboembolism in a child with sickle cell disease and emphasize the use of multidetector CT in detection of pulmonary thromboembolism in children with sickle cell disease. (orig.)

  18. Evaluation of the risk of venous thromboembolism after quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination among US females.

    Yih, W Katherine; Greene, Sharon K; Zichittella, Lauren; Kulldorff, Martin; Baker, Meghan A; de Jong, Jill L O; Gil-Prieto, Ruth; Griffin, Marie R; Jin, Robert; Lin, Nancy D; McMahill-Walraven, Cheryl N; Reidy, Megan; Selvam, Nandini; Selvan, Mano S; Nguyen, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    After the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) licensed quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4) in 2006, reports suggesting a possible association with venous thromboembolism (VTE) emerged from the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System and the Vaccine Safety Datalink. Our objective was to determine whether HPV4 increased VTE risk. The subjects were 9-26-year-old female members of five data partners in the FDA's Mini-Sentinel pilot project receiving HPV4 during 2006-2013. The outcome was radiologically confirmed first-ever VTE among potential cases identified by diagnosis codes in administrative data during Days 1-77 after HPV4 vaccination. With a self-controlled risk interval design, we compared counts of first-ever VTE in risk intervals (Days 1-28 and Days 1-7 post-vaccination) and control intervals (Days 36-56 for Dose 1 and Days 36-63 for Doses 2 and 3). Combined hormonal contraceptive use was treated as a potential confounder. The main analyses were: (1) unadjusted for time-varying VTE risk from contraceptive use, (2) unadjusted but restricted to cases without such time-varying risk, and (3) adjusted by incorporating the modeled risk of VTE by week of contraceptive use in the analysis. Of 279 potential VTE cases identified following 1,423,399 HPV4 doses administered, 225 had obtainable charts, and 53 were confirmed first-ever VTE. All 30 with onsets in risk or control intervals had known risk factors for VTE. VTE risk was not elevated in the first 7 or 28 days following any dose of HPV in any analysis (e.g. relative risk estimate (95% CI) from both unrestricted analyses, for all-doses, 28-day risk interval: 0.7 (0.3-1.4)). Temporal scan statistics found no clustering of VTE onsets after any dose. Thus, we found no evidence of an increased risk of VTE associated with HPV4 among 9-26-year-old females. A particular strength of this evaluation was its control for both time-invariant and contraceptive-related time-varying potential confounding. PMID:26549364

  19. Risk factors for perioperative venous thromboembolism: A retrospective study in Japanese women with gynecologic diseases

    Yoshimatsu Misako

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with gynecologic cancer have a high risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE like patients with other cancers. However, there is little information on risk factors for VTE during gynecologic surgery and no uniform preventive strategy. Our objectives were to identify risk factors for perioperative VTE in gynecologic patients and establish methods for prevention. Methods We analyzed 1,232 patients who underwent surgery at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of St. Marianna University School of Medicine between January 2005 and June 2008. We investigated (1 risk factors for preoperative VTE, (2 use of an inferior vena cava (IVC filter, and (3 risk factors for postoperative VTE. Results There were 39 confirmed cases of perioperative VTE (3.17%, including 25 patients with preoperative VTE and 14 with postoperative VTE. Thirty-two patients had cancer and seven patients had benign diseases. Twenty-two of the 32 cancer patients (68.7% had preoperative VTE, while postoperative VTE occurred in 10 cancer patients. Multivariate analysis indicated that ovarian cancer, tumor diameter ≥10 cm, and previous of VTE were independent risk factors for preoperative VTE. Among ovarian cancer patients, multivariate analysis showed that an age ≥50 years, the presence of heart disease, clear cell adenocarcinoma, and tumor diameter ≥20 cm were independent risk factors for preoperative VTE. The factors significantly related to preoperative VTE in patients with benign disease included previous VTE, age ≥55 years, tumor diameter ≥20 cm, and a history of allergic-immunologic disease. Thirteen of the 25 patients (52% with preoperative VTE had an IVC filter inserted preoperatively. Postoperative screening (interview and D-dimer measurement revealed VTE in 14/1,232 patients (1.14%. Multivariate analysis indicated that cancer surgery, a history of allergic-immunologic disease, and blood transfusion ≥2,000 ml were independent risk

  20. A Clinical Outcome-Based Prospective Study on Venous Thromboembolism After Cancer Surgery

    Agnelli, Giancarlo; Bolis, Giorgio; Capussotti, Lorenzo; Scarpa, Roberto Mario; Tonelli, Francesco; Bonizzoni, Erminio; Moia, Marco; Parazzini, Fabio; Rossi, Romina; Sonaglia, Francesco; Valarani, Bettina; Bianchini, Carlo; Gussoni, Gualberto

    2006-01-01

    Summary Background Data: The epidemiology of venous thromboembolism (VTE) after cancer surgery is based on clinical trials on VTE prophylaxis that used venography to screen deep vein thrombosis (DVT). However, the clinical relevance of asymptomatic venography-detected DVT is unclear, and the population of these clinical trials is not necessarily representative of the overall cancer surgery population. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of clinically overt VTE in a wide spectrum of consecutive patients undergoing surgery for cancer and to identify risk factors for VTE. Methods: @RISTOS was a prospective observational study in patients undergoing general, urologic, or gynecologic surgery. Patients were assessed for clinically overt VTE occurring up to 30 ± 5 days after surgery or more if the hospital stay was longer than 35 days. All outcome events were evaluated by an independent Adjudication Committee. Results: A total of 2373 patients were included in the study: 1238 (52%) undergoing general, 685 (29%) urologic, and 450 (19%) gynecologic surgery. In-hospital prophylaxis was given in 81.6% and postdischarge prophylaxis in 30.7% of the patients. Fifty patients (2.1%) were adjudicated as affected by clinically overt VTE (DVT, 0.42%; nonfatal pulmonary embolism, 0.88%; death 0.80%). The incidence of VTE was 2.83% in general surgery, 2.0% in gynecologic surgery, and 0.87% in urologic surgery. Forty percent of the events occurred later than 21 days from surgery. The overall death rate was 1.72%; in 46.3% of the cases, death was caused by VTE. In a multivariable analysis, 5 risk factors were identified: age above 60 years (2.63, 95% confidence interval, 1.21–5.71), previous VTE (5.98, 2.13–16.80), advanced cancer (2.68, 1.37–5.24), anesthesia lasting more than 2 hours (4.50, 1.06–19.04), and bed rest longer than 3 days (4.37, 2.45–7.78). Conclusions: VTE remains a common complication of cancer surgery, with a remarkable proportion

  1. European Union-28: An annualised cost-of-illness model for venous thromboembolism.

    Barco, Stefano; Woersching, Alex L; Spyropoulos, Alex C; Piovella, Franco; Mahan, Charles E

    2016-04-01

    Annual costs for venous thromboembolism (VTE) have been defined within the United States (US) demonstrating a large opportunity for cost savings. Costs for the European Union-28 (EU-28) have never been defined. A literature search was conducted to evaluate EU-28 cost sources. Median costs were defined for each cost input and costs were inflated to 2014 Euros (€) in the study country and adjusted for Purchasing Power Parity between EU countries. Adjusted costs were used to populate previously published cost-models based on adult incidence-based events. In the base model, annual expenditures for total, hospital-associated, preventable, and indirect costs were €1.5-2.2 billion, €1.0-1.5 billion, €0.5-1.1 billion and €0.2-0.3 billion, respectively (indirect costs: 12 % of expenditures). In the long-term attack rate model, total, hospital-associated, preventable, and indirect costs were €1.8-3.3 billion, €1.2-2.4 billion, €0.6-1.8 billion and €0.2-0.7 billion (indirect costs: 13 % of expenditures). In the multiway sensitivity analysis, annual expenditures for total, hospital-associated, preventable, and indirect costs were €3.0-8.5 billion, €2.2-6.2 billion, €1.1-4.6 billion and €0.5-1.4 billion (indirect costs: 22 % of expenditures). When the value of a premature life-lost increased slightly, aggregate costs rose considerably since these costs are higher than the direct medical costs. When evaluating the models aggregately for costs, the results suggests total, hospital-associated, preventable, and indirect costs ranging from €1.5-13.2 billion, €1.0-9.7 billion, €0.5-7.3 billion and €0.2-6.1 billion, respectively. Our study demonstrates that VTE costs have a large financial impact upon the EU-28's healthcare systems and that significant savings could be realised if better preventive measures are applied. PMID:26607486

  2. Dabigatran in the prevention of venous thromboembolism after major orthopedic surgery

    Orietta Zaniolo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a very frequent surgical complication, especially in major orthopedic procedures. Prophylaxis with pharmacological agents, including warfarin and subcutaneous injection of either low-molecular weight heparin (LMWH or low-dose unfractionated heparin, and/or with mechanical methods has been shown to be effective and safe. Despite recommendations on the routine implementation of these prophylaxis methods, some surveys demonstrate that many patients currently don’t receive any prophylaxis. The recent introduction of dabigatran etexilate, a novel oral direct thrombin inhibitor approved for VTE prophylaxis in total knee and hip substitution, represents a major advance in the provision of efficient anticoagulation therapy. Two pivotal randomized controlled multicenter trials assessed non-inferiority of dabigatran 150/220 mg/day versus enoxaparin 40 mg/day in the prevention of VTE after hip and knee replacement. From an economical point of view, an English modeling study on dabigatran cost/effectiveness showed it to be associated with lower cost and slightly higher gain in Quality Adjusted Life Years, thus dominating enoxaparin. Other analyses obtained results consistent with these, estimating inferior costs related to the use of dabigatran with respect to low weight heparin; this difference was mainly due to health personnel work for heparins subcutaneous administration. In Italy, acquisition costs for a 28-35 days therapeutic cycle of main antithrombotic drugs vary between 70 and 170 €, according to different distribution policy. Dabigatran, with a cost of 117 €, holds a medial position. Cost savings related to oral administration may partially offset the price difference between dabigatran and the less expensive options among LMWHs or, compared with the more expensive ones, add to pharmaceutical cost savings. In order to increase the effectiveness of VTE prophylaxis, the improvement of patient adherence to the

  3. Venous thromboembolism: patient awareness and education in the pre-operative assessment clinic.

    Haymes, Adam

    2016-04-01

    Each year venous thromboembolism (VTE) causes up to 60,000 deaths in the UK, many resulting from hospital-acquired thromboses following elective surgery. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines state that all elective surgical patients should receive verbal and written information pre-operatively regarding the risks of developing VTE. This audit assessed elective surgical patient's prior awareness of VTE and examined how effective targeted patient education during the pre-operative assessment is in increasing this awareness. A 13 point questionnaire designed to assess a pre-operative patient's understanding of topics relating to VTE was provided to consecutive patients identified as being at risk of developing VTE at the end of their pre-operative assessment over a two-week period. A total of 68 questionnaires were completed. Provision of verbal and written information was poor (47 %, n = 32 and 47 %, n = 32 respectively). Despite this, 71 % (n = 48) of patients were aware of the consequences of developing VTE. Many patients correctly identified surgery (71 %, n = 48), immobility (71 %, n = 48) and being overweight (68 %, n = 46) as risk factors, but not dehydration (47 %, n = 32). Lack of awareness regarding personal methods to reduce the risk of developing a VTE post-operatively (24 %, n = 16) and potential side-effects of medical prophylaxis (32 %, n = 22) were also identified. Many patients already possess an awareness of VTE, however, specific knowledge regarding its risk factors and methods of prevention is lacking. Provision of targeted written and verbal educational information during the pre-operative assessment is an effective method of increasing a patient's awareness of these topics. Increased patient awareness may empower patients in their post-operative recovery and enable them to make more informed decisions regarding VTE prophylaxis options. PMID:25991380

  4. ELISA-Based Detection System for Protein S K196E Mutation, a Genetic Risk Factor for Venous Thromboembolism.

    Keiko Maruyama

    Full Text Available Protein S (PS acts as a cofactor for activated protein C in the plasma anticoagulant system. PS Lys196-to-Glu (K196E mutation is a genetic risk factor for venous thromboembolism in Japanese individuals. Because of the substantial overlap in PS anticoagulant activity between KK (wild-type and KE (heterozygous genotypes, it is difficult to identify PS K196E carriers by measuring PS activity. Here, we generated monoclonal antibodies specific to the PS K196E mutant and developed a simple and reliable method for the identification of PS K196E carriers. We immunized mice with a keyhole limpet hemocyanin-conjugated synthetic peptide with Glu196. The hybridoma cells were screened for the binding ability of the produced antibodies to recombinant mutant EGF-like domains of PS (Ile117-Glu283. We obtained three hybridoma cell lines producing PS K196E mutation-specific antibodies. We established a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA system in which the PS K196E mutation-specific monoclonal antibody was used as a detection antibody. We measured human plasma samples by using this system and successfully discriminated 11 individuals with the KE genotype from 122 individuals with the KK genotype. The ELISA system using the PS K196E mutation-specific antibody is a useful tool for the rapid identification of PS K196E carriers, who are at a higher risk for venous thromboembolism.

  5. Effectiveness of self-managed oral anticoagulant therapy in patients with recurrent venous thromboembolism. A propensity-matched cohort study

    Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard; Skjøth, Flemming; Grove, Erik Lerkevang;

    2016-01-01

    Patient-self-management (PSM) of oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) with vitamin K antagonists for venous thromboembolism (VTE) has demonstrated efficacy in randomised, controlled trials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of PSM of OAT in everyday clinical practice. Prospectiv......Patient-self-management (PSM) of oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) with vitamin K antagonists for venous thromboembolism (VTE) has demonstrated efficacy in randomised, controlled trials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of PSM of OAT in everyday clinical practice...... control group with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.63; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.42-0.95, whereas no difference was seen with bleeding (HR: 0.95; 95 % CI 0.44-2.02). The risk of all-cause death was lower for PSM patients (HR: 0.41; 95 % CI 0.21-0.81). A net clinical benefit analysis sums the effect on...... recurrent VTE and bleeding up to a weighted rate difference of 0.86 (95 % CI 0.00-1.72) in favour of PSM. In conclusion, PSM of anticoagulant treatment was associated with a statistically significant lower rate of recurrent VTE and all-cause death compared to patients on conventionally managed anticoagulant...

  6. Edoxaban: A Novel Factor Xa Inhibitor for the Management of Non-valvular Atrial Fibrillation and Venous Thromboembolism.

    Kubli, Kara A; Snead, Jessica A; Cheng-Lai, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Warfarin has been a highly prevalent agent for over 70 years; however, its use has been limited by drug-drug interactions, adverse events, and the need for frequent monitoring. To minimize these complications, several non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants have been approved, including the latest agent, edoxaban. Edoxaban is a factor Xa inhibitor approved for the prevention of stroke/systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. Edoxaban was largely studied in the Edoxaban versus Warfarin in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation (ENGAGE AF-TIMI 48) and Edoxaban versus Warfarin for the Treatment of Symptomatic Venous Thromboembolism (Hokusai-VTE) trials, both showing noninferiority when compared with warfarin. Similar to other oral anticoagulants, the most serious adverse effects of edoxaban are related to bleeding. However, there are currently no approved reversal agents. Andexanet alfa and ciraparantag are the latest agents being studied for reversal. This article provides an overview of the safety and efficacy along with the advantages and disadvantages of edoxaban. PMID:26991962

  7. Incident venous thromboembolic events in the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER

    Ford Ian

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Venous thromboembolic events (VTE, including deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, are common in older age. It has been suggested that statins might reduce the risk of VTE however positive results from studies of middle aged subjects may not be generalisable to elderly people. We aimed to determine the effect of pravastatin on incident VTE in older people; we also studied the impact of clinical and plasma risk variables. Methods This study was an analysis of incident VTE using data from the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of pravastatin in men and women aged 70-82. Mean follow-up was 3.2 years. Risk for VTE was examined in non-warfarin treated pravastatin (n = 2834 and placebo (n = 2865 patients using a Cox's proportional hazard model, and the impact of other risk factors assessed in a multivariate forward stepwise regression analysis. Baseline clinical characteristics, blood biochemistry and hematology variables, plasma levels of lipids and lipoproteins, and plasma markers of inflammation and adiposity were compared. Plasma markers of thrombosis and hemostasis were assessed in a nested case (n = 48 control (n = 93 study where the cohort was those participants, not on warfarin, for whom data were available. Results There were 28 definite cases (1.0% of incident VTE in the pravastatin group recipients and 20 cases (0.70% in placebo recipients. Pravastatin did not reduce VTE in PROSPER compared to placebo [unadjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval 1.42 (0.80, 2.52 p = 0.23]. Higher body mass index (BMI [1.09 (1.02, 1.15 p = 0.0075], country [Scotland vs Netherlands 4.26 (1.00, 18.21 p = 0.050 and Ireland vs Netherlands 6.16 (1.46, 26.00 p = 0.013], lower systolic blood pressure [1.35 (1.03, 1.75 p = 0.027] and lower baseline Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE score [1.19 (1.01, 1.41 p = 0.034] were associated with an

  8. Influence of preceding length of anticoagulant treatment and initial presentation of venous thromboembolism on risk of recurrence after stopping treatment: analysis of individual participants’ data from seven trials

    Boutitie, Florent; Pinede, Laurent; Schulman, Sam; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Raskob, Gary; Julian, Jim; Hirsh, Jack; Kearon, Clive

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine how length of anticoagulation and clinical presentation of venous thromboembolism influence the risk of recurrence after anticoagulant treatment is stopped and to identify the shortest length of anticoagulation that reduces the risk of recurrence to its lowest level. Design Pooled analysis of individual participants’ data from seven randomised trials. Setting Outpatient anticoagulant clinics in academic centres. Population 2925 men or women with a first venous thromboem...

  9. Perioperative venous thromboembolic disease and the emerging role of the novel oral anticoagulants: An analysis of the implications for perioperative management

    Martina Mookadam; Fadi E Shamoun; Harish Ramakrishna; Hiba Obeid; Renee L Rife; Farouk Mookadam

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism includes 2 inter-related conditions: Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Heparin and low-molecular-weight heparin followed by oral anticoagulation with vitamin K agonists is the first line and current accepted standard therapy with good efficacy. However, this therapeutic strategy has many limitations including the significant risk of bleeding and drug, food and disease interactions that require frequent monitoring. Dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edox...

  10. Urinary Prothrombin Fragment 1+2 in relation to Development of Non-Symptomatic and Symptomatic Venous Thromboembolic Events following Total Knee Replacement

    Borris, Lars Carl; Breindahl, Morten; Rud-Lassen, Michael;

    2011-01-01

    Prothrombin fragment 1+2 is excreted in urine (uF1+2) as a result of in vivo thrombin generation and can be a marker of coagulation status after an operative procedure. This study compared uF1+2 levels in patients with symptomatic and non-symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) after total knee ...